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Sample records for tumor collagenase stimulating

  1. Role of Tumor Collagenase Stimulating Factor in Breast Cancer Invasion and Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    involving hazardous organisms, theZinvestigator(s) adhered to the CDC-NIH Guide for Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories. ’Z...sequencing and characterization of the tumor cell-derived collagenase stimulatory factor. Arch. Biochem. Biophys., 285: 90-96, 1991. 15. Prescott , J

  2. Digesting a Path Forward: The Utility of Collagenase Tumor Treatment for Improved Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolor, Aaron; Szoka, Francis C

    2018-06-04

    Collagen and hyaluronan are the most abundant components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and their overexpression in tumors is linked to increased tumor growth and metastasis. These ECM components contribute to a protective tumor microenvironment by supporting a high interstitial fluid pressure and creating a tortuous setting for the convection and diffusion of chemotherapeutic small molecules, antibodies, and nanoparticles in the tumor interstitial space. This review focuses on the research efforts to deplete extracellular collagen with collagenases to normalize the tumor microenvironment. Although collagen synthesis inhibitors are in clinical development, the use of collagenases is contentious and clinically untested in cancer patients. Pretreatment of murine tumors with collagenases increased drug uptake and diffusion 2-10-fold. This modest improvement resulted in decreased tumor growth, but the benefits of collagenase treatment are confounded by risks of toxicity from collagen breakdown in healthy tissues. In this review, we evaluate the published in vitro and in vivo benefits and limitations of collagenase treatment to improve drug delivery.

  3. Role of Tumor Collagenase Stimulating Factor in Breast Cancer Invasion and Metastasis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zucker, Stanley

    1997-01-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor (EMMPRIN), a plasma membrane glycoprotein identified originally in carcinoma cells, is responsible for inducing peritumoral fibroblasts to produce matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs...

  4. Role of Tumor Collagenase Stimulating Factor in Breast Cancer Invasion and Metastasis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zucker, Stanley

    1996-01-01

    EMMPRIN (TCSF) is a plasma membrane glycoprotein that is present on the surface of breast cancer cells, and is responsible, in part, for the elevated levels of MMPs in peritumoral fibroblasts and endothelial cells...

  5. Role of Tumor Collagenase Stimulating Factor in Breast Cancer Invasion and Metastasis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zucker, Stanley

    1999-01-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor (EMMPRIN), a plasma membrane glycoprotein identified originally in carcinoma cells, is responsible for inducing Ireritumoral fibroblasts to produce matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs...

  6. Role of Tumor Collagenase Stimulating Factor in Breast Cancer Invasion and Metastasis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zucker, Stanley

    1998-01-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor (EMMPRIN), a plasma membrane glycoprotein identified originally in carcinoma cells, is responsible for inducing peritumoral fibroblasts to produce matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs...

  7. Role of Tumor Collagenase Stimulating Factor in Breast Cancer Invasion and Metastasis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zucker, Stanley

    1997-01-01

    .... Using in situ hybridization, we have identified EMMPRIN in breast cancer cells. New monoclonal antibodies to EMMPRlN and MTl-MMP are being employed to further define their immunohistochemical localization in breast cancer...

  8. Regulation of collagenase inhibitor production in chondrosarcoma chondrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, J.; Harper, E.

    1987-01-01

    Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocytes produce an inhibitor of collagenase. This inhibitor is similar to those isolated from normal cartilage tissues. These cells will synthesize proteins in the absence of serum. Since serum contains inhibitors of collagenase, it is necessary to culture cells without serum in order to obtain accurate measurements of enzyme and inhibitor levels. They examined the effect of insulin on inhibitor secretion by cultures of Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocytes. They observed a 2.5 to 3.5 fold stimulation of inhibitory activity in the presence of as little as 10 ng/ml insulin as compared to controls in serum free Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium supplemented with 4.5 g/l glucose. The units of inhibitor were determined over a 7 day culture period. Medium was harvested daily and assayed for collagenase activity and for inhibition of a known collagenase from rabbit skin or human skin, using the 14 C-glycine peptide release assay. The amount of inhibitor obtained from days 2 through 7 were: 1.4 unit (control), 3.8 units (10 ng/ml insulin), 5.2 units (1 μg/ml insulin). The addition of 1 mM dibutyryl cyclic AMP to these chondrocytes in the presence of 1 μg/ml insulin caused a decrease in the level of inhibitor, suggesting that a dephosphorylation event may be necessary for this stimulation by insulin to occur

  9. Regulation and inhibition of collagenase expression by long-wavelength ultraviolet radiation in cultured human skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, Marta; Hamilton, Tiffani; Haili Li

    1995-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms responsible for the connective tissue changes produced by chronic exposure to UV light are poorly understood. collagenase, a metalloproteinase, initiates degradation of types I and III collagen and thus plays a key role in the remodeling of dermal collagen. Collagenase synthesis by fibroblasts and keratinocytes involves the protein kinase C (PKC) second messenger system, and corticosteroids have been shown to suppress its synthesis at the level of gene transcription. Long-wavelength UV light (UVA, 320-400 nm) stimulates the synthesis of interstitial collagenase, as well as increasing PKC activity, in human skin fibroblasts in vitro. This study explores the regulation of collagenase expression by UVA in cultured human skin fibroblasts. Specifically, the time course, the effect of actinomycin D, an inhibitor of RNA synthesis, as well as the effect of PKC inhibitors and dexamethansone on expression of collagenase following UVA irradiation were examined. (Author)

  10. Composite implants coated with biodegradable polymers prevent stimulating tumor progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litviakov, N. V.; Tsyganov, M. M.; Cherdyntseva, N. V.; Tverdokhlebov, S. I.; Bolbasov, E. N.; Perelmuter, V. M.; Kulbakin, D. E.; Zheravin, A. A.; Svetlichnyi, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    In this experiment we studied oncologic safety of model implants created using the solution blow spinning method with the use of the PURASORB PL-38 polylactic acid polymer and organic mineral filler which was obtained via laser ablation of a solid target made of dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate. For this purpose the implant was introduced into the area of Wistar rats’ iliums, and on day 17 after the surgery the Walker sarcoma was transplanted into the area of the implant. We evaluated the implant’s influence on the primary tumor growth, hematogenous and lymphogenous metastasis of the Walker sarcoma. In comparison with sham operated animals the implant group demonstrated significant inhibition of hematogenous metastasis on day 34 after the surgery. The metastasis inhibition index (MII) equaled 94% and the metastases growth inhibition index (MGII) equaled 83%. The metastasis frequency of the Walker sarcoma in para aortic lymph nodes in the implant group was not statistically different from the control frequency; there was also no influence of the implant on the primary tumor growth noted. In case of the Walker sarcoma transplantation into the calf and the palmar pad of the ipsilateral limb to the one with the implant in the ilium, we could not note any attraction of tumor cells to the implant area, i.e. stimulation of the Walker sarcoma relapse by the implant. Thus, the research concluded that the studied implant meets the requirements of oncologic safety.

  11. Composite implants coated with biodegradable polymers prevent stimulating tumor progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litviakov, N. V., E-mail: nvlitv72@yandex.ru; Tsyganov, M. M., E-mail: TsyganovMM@yandex.ru; Cherdyntseva, N. V., E-mail: nvch@oncology.tomsk.ru [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tverdokhlebov, S. I., E-mail: tverd@tpu.ru; Bolbasov, E. N., E-mail: ebolbasov@gmail.com [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Perelmuter, V. M., E-mail: pvm@ngs.ru; Kulbakin, D. E., E-mail: kulbakin2012@gmail.com [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Zheravin, A. A., E-mail: zheravin2010@yandex.ru [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Academician E.N. Meshalkin Novosibirsk State Research Institute of Circulation Pathology, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Svetlichnyi, V. A., E-mail: v-svetlichnyi@bk.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-02

    In this experiment we studied oncologic safety of model implants created using the solution blow spinning method with the use of the PURASORB PL-38 polylactic acid polymer and organic mineral filler which was obtained via laser ablation of a solid target made of dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate. For this purpose the implant was introduced into the area of Wistar rats’ iliums, and on day 17 after the surgery the Walker sarcoma was transplanted into the area of the implant. We evaluated the implant’s influence on the primary tumor growth, hematogenous and lymphogenous metastasis of the Walker sarcoma. In comparison with sham operated animals the implant group demonstrated significant inhibition of hematogenous metastasis on day 34 after the surgery. The metastasis inhibition index (MII) equaled 94% and the metastases growth inhibition index (MGII) equaled 83%. The metastasis frequency of the Walker sarcoma in para aortic lymph nodes in the implant group was not statistically different from the control frequency; there was also no influence of the implant on the primary tumor growth noted. In case of the Walker sarcoma transplantation into the calf and the palmar pad of the ipsilateral limb to the one with the implant in the ilium, we could not note any attraction of tumor cells to the implant area, i.e. stimulation of the Walker sarcoma relapse by the implant. Thus, the research concluded that the studied implant meets the requirements of oncologic safety.

  12. Cell proliferation in vitro modulates fibroblast collagenase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindblad, W.J.; Flood, L.

    1986-01-01

    Collagenase enzyme activity is regulated by numerous control mechanisms which prevent excessive release and activation of this protease. A primary mechanism for regulating enzyme extracellular activity may be linked to cell division, therefore they have examined the release of collagenase by fibroblasts in vitro in response to cellular proliferation. Studies were performed using fibroblasts derived from adult rat dermis maintained in DMEM containing 10% newborn calf serum, 25 mM tricine buffer, and antibiotics. Cells between subculture 10 and 19 were used with enzyme activity determined with a 14 C-labelled soluble Type I collagen substrate with and without trypsin activation. Fibroblasts, trypsinized and plated at low density secreted 8.5 fold more enzyme than those cells at confluence (975 vs. 115 dpm/μg DNA). This diminution occurred gradually as the cells went from logrithmic growth towards confluence. Confluent fibroblast monolayers were scraped in a grid arrangement, stimulating the remaining cells to divide, without exposure to trypsin. Within 24-48 hr postscraping enzyme levels had increased 260-400%, accompanied by enhanced incorporation of 3 H-thymidine and 3 H-uridine into cell macromolecules. The burst of enzyme release began to subside 12 hr later. These results support a close relationship between fibroblast proliferation and collagenase secretion

  13. Stimulation of cytolytic T lymphocytes by azaguanine-resistant mouse tumor cells in selective hat medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snick, J. van; Uyttenhove, C.; Pel, A. van; Boon, T.

    1981-01-01

    Primed syngeneic or umprimed allogeneic mouse spleen cells were stimulated with azaguanine-resistant P815 tumor cells that were killed by the addition of aminopterin to the stimulation medium. The recovery of lymphocytes and their cytolytic activity and specificity were similar to those obtained after stimulation with irradiated cells. This method conveniently replaces the inactivation of stimulatory cells by irradiation or mitomycin treatment. Moreover, it has the advantage of inactivating not only the stimulatory cells but also the tumor cells that often contaminate the spleens of tumor-bearing animals, provided these animals have been inoculated with azaguanine-resistant tumor cell mutants. (Auth.)

  14. Coordinate regulation of stromelysin and collagenase genes determined with cDNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, S.M.; Clark, E.J.; Werb, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Secreted proteinases are required for tumor metastasis, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling during wound healing and embryonic growth. Thus, the regulation of the genes of secreted proteinases may serve as an interesting model for growth-controlled genes in general. The authors studied the genes of the secreted proteinases stromelysin and collagenase by using molecularly cloned cDNAs from each proteinase. Stromelysin cDNA was cloned by differential screening of a total cDNA library from rabbit synovial cells treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, which yielded a clone of 1.2 kilobase pairs; collagenase cDNA was obtained by cloning reverse transcripts of anti-collagenase-immunoadsorbed polysomal mRNA, which yielded a clone of 0.8 kilobase pairs. Stromelysin and collagenase mRNA species of 2.2 and 2.4 kilobases, respectively, were detected on hybridization blots of RNA from phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-treated but not untreated rabbit synovial cells. Expression of stromelysin mRNA was also induced in rabbit alveolar macrophages and rabbit brain capillary endothelial cells treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Stromelysin and collagenase mRNA were both induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and cytochalasin B at a constant ratio of the two gene products; this suggest coordinate regulation. The fact that induction was blocked after inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide implicates an indirect signal transduction pathway that requires new protein synthesis

  15. Validating computationally predicted TMS stimulation areas using direct electrical stimulation in patients with brain tumors near precentral regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opitz, Alexander; Zafar, Noman; Bockermann, Volker; Rohde, Veit; Paulus, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The spatial extent of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is of paramount interest for all studies employing this method. It is generally assumed that the induced electric field is the crucial parameter to determine which cortical regions are excited. While it is difficult to directly measure the electric field, one usually relies on computational models to estimate the electric field distribution. Direct electrical stimulation (DES) is a local brain stimulation method generally considered the gold standard to map structure-function relationships in the brain. Its application is typically limited to patients undergoing brain surgery. In this study we compare the computationally predicted stimulation area in TMS with the DES area in six patients with tumors near precentral regions. We combine a motor evoked potential (MEP) mapping experiment for both TMS and DES with realistic individual finite element method (FEM) simulations of the electric field distribution during TMS and DES. On average, stimulation areas in TMS and DES show an overlap of up to 80%, thus validating our computational physiology approach to estimate TMS excitation volumes. Our results can help in understanding the spatial spread of TMS effects and in optimizing stimulation protocols to more specifically target certain cortical regions based on computational modeling.

  16. Effects of pulsed magnetic stimulation on tumor development and immune functions in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Sachiko; Ogiue-Ikeda, Mari; Sekino, Masaki; Ueno, Shoogo

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effects of pulsed magnetic stimulation on tumor development processes and immune functions in mice. A circular coil (inner diameter = 15 mm, outer diameter = 75 mm) was used in the experiments. Stimulus conditions were pulse width = 238 micros, peak magnetic field = 0.25 T (at the center of the coil), frequency = 25 pulses/s, 1,000 pulses/sample/day and magnetically induced eddy currents in mice = 0.79-1.54 A/m(2). In an animal study, B16-BL6 melanoma model mice were exposed to the pulsed magnetic stimulation for 16 days from the day of injection of cancer cells. A tumor growth study revealed a significant tumor weight decrease in the stimulated group (54% of the sham group). In a cellular study, B16-BL6 cells were also exposed to the magnetic field (1,000 pulses/sample, and eddy currents at the bottom of the dish = 2.36-2.90 A/m(2)); however, the magnetically induced eddy currents had no effect on cell viabilities. Cytokine production in mouse spleens was measured to analyze the immunomodulatory effect after the pulsed magnetic stimulation. tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) production in mouse spleens was significantly activated after the exposure of the stimulus condition described above. These results showed the first evidence of the anti-tumor effect and immunomodulatory effects brought about by the application of repetitive magnetic stimulation and also suggested the possible relationship between anti-tumor effects and the increase of TNF-alpha levels caused by pulsed magnetic stimulation.

  17. FOXL2-induced follistatin attenuates activin A-stimulated cell proliferation in human granulosa cell tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Jung-Chien; Chang, Hsun-Ming; Qiu, Xin; Fang, Lanlan; Leung, Peter C.K., E-mail: peter.leung@ubc.ca

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •Activin A stimulates cell proliferation in KGN human granulosa cell tumor-derived cell line. •Cyclin D2 mediates activin A-induced KGN cell proliferation. •FOXL2 induces follistatin expression in KGN cells. •FOXL2-induced follistatin attenuates activin A-stimulated KGN cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Human granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) are rare, and their etiology remains largely unknown. Recently, the FOXL2 402C > G (C134W) mutation was found to be specifically expressed in human adult-type GCTs; however, its function in the development of human GCTs is not fully understood. Activins are members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily, which has been shown to stimulate normal granulosa cell proliferation; however, little is known regarding the function of activins in human GCTs. In this study, we examined the effect of activin A on cell proliferation in the human GCT-derived cell line KGN. We show that activin A treatment stimulates KGN cell proliferation. Treatment with the activin type I receptor inhibitor SB431542 blocks activin A-stimulated cell proliferation. In addition, our results show that cyclin D2 is induced by treatment with activin A and is involved in activin A-stimulated cell proliferation. Moreover, the activation of Smad signaling is required for activin A-induced cyclin D2 expression. Finally, we show that the overexpression of the wild-type FOXL2 but not the C134W mutant FOXL2 induced follistatin production. Treatment with exogenous follistatin blocks activin A-stimulated cell proliferation, and the overexpression of wild-type FOXL2 attenuates activin A-stimulated cell proliferation. These results suggest that FOXL2 may act as a tumor suppressor in human adult-type GCTs by inducing follistatin expression, which subsequently inhibits activin-stimulated cell proliferation.

  18. The History of Collagenase Clostridium Histolyticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kevin K; Bennett, Nelson

    2015-10-01

    After its U.S. FDA approval in 2013, Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCh) has seen increasing use as a nonoperative treatment for Peyronie's disease (PD). We review the history of CCh and trials that led to its adoption. To provide a historical and contemporary context for the evolution of Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum as a treatment modality for Peyronie's disease. A comprehensive search of peer-reviewed literature was performed pertaining to CCh and its biochemical and clinical significance. The main outcome studied was the efficacy and safety profile of CCh in PD. CCh use in other diseases processes and its associated outcomes are also described. CCh injection yields objective improvement in penile curvature across multiple trials in PD patients. Recently, level 1 strength of evidence has emerged supporting its widespread use. As such, CCh stands as the only FDA-approved injectable therapy for PD. Adverse events were namely limited to local reactions. Serious systemic complications and need for intervention were rare. CCh is a safe and effective treatment for PD patients with deformities and plaque configuration amenable to injectable therapy. Multiple trials have demonstrated improvements in objective and subjective metrics such as penile curvature and bother scores. However, multiyear follow-up is needed to assess durability and its sustained clinical significance. Currently, refinement in dosing and technique has established a niche for CCh in PD patients who are affected by their symptoms but are not yet committed to surgical intervention. Yang KK and Bennett N. The history of collagenase clostridium histolyticum. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Reduction of the radiogenic tumor incidence by stimulation with lyophilized fetal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bause, R.; Gros, C.J.; Landsberger, A.; Renner, H.; Klinikum Nuernberg

    1983-01-01

    The effect of an immunization treatment with lyophilized xenogenic fetal cells was studied in 7 months old, female albino rats (strain Wistar). The tumor incidence was measured after a sublethal whole-body irradiation with 600 cGy. Furthermore, the spleen of the individual animals was histologically examined. 3,5 to 6 months after a whole-body irradiation with 600 cGy, the tumor incidence was 55%. The tumors found were tubular adenocarcinomas of the thyroid gland. A significant reduction of the tumor incidence can be achieved by an immunostimulation with xenogenic, lyophilized, fetal cells (connective tissue and bone marrow, respectively) administered twice, namely eight days before and four days after the whole-body irradiation. The tumor incidence measured after 3,5 months was 10% and 15%, respectively, and after 6 months 15% and 25%, respectively. No significant tumor protection is achieved, however, by a single stimulation before whole-body irradiation and by a stimulation performed one or two times after whole-body irradiation. Histologic examinations of the spleen show in the immunostimulized animals a strong regeneration of the immune system with a significantly increased number of follicles and a significant increase of lumphocytes in the red pulp. The authors stress the possible clinical importance for radio-oncology of an immunostimulation with lyophilized, xenogenic, fetal cells. (orig.) [de

  20. Alternating current electrical stimulation enhanced chemotherapy: a novel strategy to bypass multidrug resistance in tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janigro, Damir; Perju, Catalin; Fazio, Vincent; Hallene, Kerri; Dini, Gabriele; Agarwal, Mukesh K; Cucullo, Luca

    2006-01-01

    Tumor burden can be pharmacologically controlled by inhibiting cell division and by direct, specific toxicity to the cancerous tissue. Unfortunately, tumors often develop intrinsic pharmacoresistance mediated by specialized drug extrusion mechanisms such as P-glycoprotein. As a consequence, malignant cells may become insensitive to various anti-cancer drugs. Recent studies have shown that low intensity very low frequency electrical stimulation by alternating current (AC) reduces the proliferation of different tumor cell lines by a mechanism affecting potassium channels while at intermediate frequencies interfere with cytoskeletal mechanisms of cell division. The aim of the present study is to test the hypothesis that permeability of several MDR1 over-expressing tumor cell lines to the chemotherapic agent doxorubicin is enhanced by low frequency, low intensity AC stimulation. We grew human and rodent cells (C6, HT-1080, H-1299, SKOV-3 and PC-3) which over-expressed MDR1 in 24-well Petri dishes equipped with an array of stainless steel electrodes connected to a computer via a programmable I/O board. We used a dedicated program to generate and monitor the electrical stimulation protocol. Parallel cultures were exposed for 3 hours to increasing concentrations (1, 2, 4, and 8 μM) of doxorubicin following stimulation to 50 Hz AC (7.5 μA) or MDR1 inhibitor XR9576. Cell viability was assessed by determination of adenylate kinase (AK) release. The relationship between MDR1 expression and the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin as well as the cellular distribution of MDR1 was investigated by computerized image analysis immunohistochemistry and Western blot techniques. By the use of a variety of tumor cell lines, we show that low frequency, low intensity AC stimulation enhances chemotherapeutic efficacy. This effect was due to an altered expression of intrinsic cellular drug resistance mechanisms. Immunohistochemical, Western blot and fluorescence analysis revealed

  1. Lysyl Oxidase Plays a Critical Role in Endothelial Cell Stimulation to Drive Tumor Angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Ann-Marie; Bird, Demelza; Welti, Jonathan C

    2013-01-01

    Identification of key molecules that drive angiogenesis is critical for the development of new modalities for the prevention of solid tumor progression. Using multiple models of colorectal cancer, we show that activity of the extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme lysyl oxidase (LOX) is essential...... for stimulating endothelial cells in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. We show that LOX activates Akt through platelet-derived growth factor receptor ß (PDGFRß) stimulation, resulting in increased VEGF expression. LOX-driven angiogenesis can be abrogated through targeting LOX directly or using inhibitors of PDGFRß...

  2. Predicting the Probability of Abnormal Stimulated Growth Hormone Response in Children After Radiotherapy for Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Chiaho; Wu Shengjie; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Lukose, Renin C.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a mathematical model utilizing more readily available measures than stimulation tests that identifies brain tumor survivors with high likelihood of abnormal growth hormone secretion after radiotherapy (RT), to avoid late recognition and a consequent delay in growth hormone replacement therapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 191 prospectively collected post-RT evaluations of peak growth hormone level (arginine tolerance/levodopa stimulation test), serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein 3, height, weight, growth velocity, and body mass index in 106 children and adolescents treated for ependymoma (n = 72), low-grade glioma (n = 28) or craniopharyngioma (n = 6), who had normal growth hormone levels before RT. Normal level in this study was defined as the peak growth hormone response to the stimulation test ≥7 ng/mL. Results: Independent predictor variables identified by multivariate logistic regression with high statistical significance (p < 0.0001) included IGF-1 z score, weight z score, and hypothalamic dose. The developed predictive model demonstrated a strong discriminatory power with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.883. At a potential cutoff point of probability of 0.3 the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 78%. Conclusions: Without unpleasant and expensive frequent stimulation tests, our model provides a quantitative approach to closely follow the growth hormone secretory capacity of brain tumor survivors. It allows identification of high-risk children for subsequent confirmatory tests and in-depth workup for diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency.

  3. Predicting the Probability of Abnormal Stimulated Growth Hormone Response in Children After Radiotherapy for Brain Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua Chiaho, E-mail: Chia-Ho.Hua@stjude.org [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu Shengjie [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Chemaitilly, Wassim [Division of Endocrinology, Department of Pediatric Medicine, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Lukose, Renin C.; Merchant, Thomas E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a mathematical model utilizing more readily available measures than stimulation tests that identifies brain tumor survivors with high likelihood of abnormal growth hormone secretion after radiotherapy (RT), to avoid late recognition and a consequent delay in growth hormone replacement therapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 191 prospectively collected post-RT evaluations of peak growth hormone level (arginine tolerance/levodopa stimulation test), serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein 3, height, weight, growth velocity, and body mass index in 106 children and adolescents treated for ependymoma (n = 72), low-grade glioma (n = 28) or craniopharyngioma (n = 6), who had normal growth hormone levels before RT. Normal level in this study was defined as the peak growth hormone response to the stimulation test {>=}7 ng/mL. Results: Independent predictor variables identified by multivariate logistic regression with high statistical significance (p < 0.0001) included IGF-1 z score, weight z score, and hypothalamic dose. The developed predictive model demonstrated a strong discriminatory power with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.883. At a potential cutoff point of probability of 0.3 the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 78%. Conclusions: Without unpleasant and expensive frequent stimulation tests, our model provides a quantitative approach to closely follow the growth hormone secretory capacity of brain tumor survivors. It allows identification of high-risk children for subsequent confirmatory tests and in-depth workup for diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency.

  4. Expression of follicle-stimulating hormone receptor by the vascular endothelium in tumor metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siraj, Ahsan; Gonin, Julie; Radu, Aurelian; Ghinea, Nicolae; Desestret, Virginie; Antoine, Martine; Fromont, Gaëlle; Huerre, Michel; Sanson, Marc; Camparo, Philippe; Pichon, Christophe; Planeix, François

    2013-01-01

    The Follicle Stimulating Hormone receptor (FSHR) is expressed by the vascular endothelium in a wide range of human tumors. It was not determined however if FSHR is present in metastases which are responsible for the terminal illness. We used immunohistochemistry based on a highly FSHR-specific monoclonal antibody to detect FSHR in cancer metastases from 6 major tumor types (lung, breast, prostate, colon, kidney, and leiomyosarcoma) to 6 frequent locations (bone, liver, lymph node, brain, lung, and pleura) of 209 patients. In 166 patients examined (79%), FSHR was expressed by blood vessels associated with metastatic tissue. FSHR-positive vessels were present in the interior of the tumors and some few millimeters outside, in the normally appearing tissue. In the interior of the metastases, the density of the FSHR-positive vessels was constant up to 7 mm, the maximum depth available in the analyzed sections. No significant differences were noticed between the density of FSHR-positive vessels inside vs. outside tumors for metastases from lung, breast, colon, and kidney cancers. In contrast, for prostate cancer metastases, the density of FSHR-positive vessels was about 3-fold higher at the exterior of the tumor compared to the interior. Among brain metastases, the density of FSHR-positive vessels was highest in lung and kidney cancer, and lowest in prostate and colon cancer. In metastases of breast cancer to the lung pleura, the percentage of blood vessels expressing FSHR was positively correlated with the progesterone receptor level, but not with either HER-2 or estrogen receptors. In normal tissues corresponding to the host organs for the analyzed metastases, obtained from patients not known to have cancer, FSHR staining was absent, with the exception of approx. 1% of the vessels in non tumoral temporal lobe epilepsy samples. FSHR is expressed by the endothelium of blood vessels in the majority of metastatic tumors

  5. MRI in flexor tendon rupture after collagenase injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khurana, Shruti; Wadhwa, Vibhor; Chhabra, Avneesh; Amirlak, Bardia

    2017-01-01

    Flexor tendon rupture is an unusual complication following collagenase injection to relieve contractures. These patients require a close follow-up and in the event of tendon rupture, a decision has to be made whether to repair the tendon or manage the complication conservatively. The authors report the utility of MRI in the prognostication and management of a patient with Dupuytren's contracture, who underwent collagenase injection and subsequently developed flexor digitorum profundus tendon rupture. (orig.)

  6. MRI in flexor tendon rupture after collagenase injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khurana, Shruti [Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi (India); Wadhwa, Vibhor [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Chhabra, Avneesh [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Amirlak, Bardia [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Flexor tendon rupture is an unusual complication following collagenase injection to relieve contractures. These patients require a close follow-up and in the event of tendon rupture, a decision has to be made whether to repair the tendon or manage the complication conservatively. The authors report the utility of MRI in the prognostication and management of a patient with Dupuytren's contracture, who underwent collagenase injection and subsequently developed flexor digitorum profundus tendon rupture. (orig.)

  7. Collagenase-3 expression in periapical lesions: an immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, G; Astekar, M S; Ramesh, G; Kaur, P; Sowmya, G V

    2014-08-01

    Collagenase-3 (matrix metalloproteinase-13) is a metalloproteinase (MMP) that is associated with bone lesions and exhibits variable expression patterns in odontogenic cysts; it may play a role in regulating focal proliferation and maturation of jaw cyst epithelium. We studied the localization, staining intensity and distribution of collagenase-3 in 13 periapical granulomas with epithelium, 16 periapical granulomas without epithelium and 10 radicular cysts using archived formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissues. A monoclonal antibody against human collagenase-3 was used to evaluate its expression. Immunohistochemical staining intensities of collagenase-3 in all periapical lesions were (-), 4 (10%); (+), 1 (3%); (++), 22 (56%) and (+++), 12 (31%); differences were not statistically significant. Immunohistochemical distribution of collagenase-3 in epithelial cells was (-), 17 (44%); (+), 17 (44%); (++), 5 (13%); in fibroblasts it was (-), 8 (20%); (+), 23 (59%); (++), 8 (21%); in plasma cells it was (-), 7 (18%); (+), 22 (56%); (++), 10 (26%); in macrophages it was (-), 7 (18%); (+), and 15 (38%); and (++), 17 (44%). Statistically significant differences were found in epithelial cells (p = 0.00) and fibroblasts (p = 0.02), whereas differences were not statistically significant for plasma cells and macrophages. Collagenase-3 may play a role in the conversion of a periapical granuloma with epithelium to radicular cyst. MMP's influence not only epithelial rest cell migration, but also invasion of various stromal cells into granulomatous tissue.

  8. Amplified QCM biosensor for type IV collagenase based on collagenase-cleavage of gold nanoparticles functionalized peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zong-Mu; Jin, Xin; Zhao, Guang-Chao

    2018-05-30

    The present study develops a rapid, simple and efficient method for the determination of type IV collagenase by using a specific peptide-modified quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). A small peptide (P1), contains a specific sequence (Pro-Gly) and a terminal cysteine, was synthetized and immobilized to the surface of QCM electrode via the reaction between Au and thiol of the cysteine. The peptide bond between proline and glycine can be specific hydrolyzed cleavage by type IV collagenase, which enabled the modified electrode with a high selectivity toward type IV collagenase. The cleaving process caused a frequency change of QCM to give a signal related to the concentration of type IV collagenase. The morphologies of the modified electrodes were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the specific hydrolyzed cleavage process was monitored by QCM. When P1 was modified with gold nanoparticles (P1-Au NPs), the signal could be amplified to further enhance the sensitivity of the designed sensor due to the high-mass of the modified Au NPs. Compared the direct unamplified assay, the values obtained for the limit of detection for type IV collagenase was 0.96 ng mL -1 , yielding about 6.5 times of magnitude improvement in sensitivity. This signal enhanced peptide based QCM biosensor for type IV collagenase also showed good selectivity and sensitivity in complex matrix. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The role of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in radiation-induced tumor cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilalta, Marta; Brune, Jourdan; Rafat, Marjan; Soto, Luis; Graves, Edward E

    2018-03-13

    Recently it has been observed in preclinical models that that radiation enhances the recruitment of circulating tumor cells to primary tumors, and results in tumor regrowth after treatment. This process may have implications for clinical radiotherapy, which improves control of a number of tumor types but which, despite continued dose escalation and aggressive fractionation, is unable to fully prevent local recurrences. By irradiating a single tumor within an animal bearing multiple lesions, we observed an increase in tumor cell migration to irradiated and unirradiated sites, suggesting a systemic component to this process. Previous work has identified the cytokine GM-CSF, produced by tumor cells following irradiation, as a key effector of this process. We evaluated the ability of systemic injections of a PEGylated form of GM-CSF to stimulate tumor cell migration. While increases in invasion and migration were observed for tumor cells in a transwell assay, we found that daily injections of PEG-GM-CSF to tumor-bearing animals did not increase migration of cells to tumors, despite the anticipated changes in circulating levels of granulocytes and monocytes produced by this treatment. Combination of PEG-GM-CSF treatment with radiation also did not increase tumor cell migration. These findings suggest that clinical use of GM-CSF to treat neutropenia in cancer patients will not have negative effects on the aggressiveness of residual cancer cells. However, further work is needed to characterize the mechanism by which GM-CSF facilitates systemic recruitment of trafficking tumor cells to tumors.

  10. Multiple collagenase injections are safe for treatment of Dupuytren's contractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajendran, Varun K; Hentz, Vincent; Kenney, Deborah; Curtin, Catherine M

    2014-07-01

    The authors report the case of a 65-year-old, right-hand-dominant man who had severe Dupuytren's disease with multiple cords and flexion contractures of the metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints of both hands and underwent repeated collagenase injections for treatment. Collagenase has been shown to be safe and effective in the treatment of Dupuytren's contractures when administered as a single dose, but the results of multiple injections over a prolonged period are unknown. Antibodies to collagenase develop in all patients after several treatments, raising concerns about safety and efficacy as a result of sensitization from repeated exposures. The antibodies generated as a result of repeated exposure to collagenase could theoretically render it less effective with time and could also lead to immune reactions as severe as anaphylaxis. The authors present the case of a single patient who experienced continued correction of his contractures with only minor and self-limited adverse reactions after administration of 12 collagenase doses through 15 injections during a 4-year period. Over time, the injections continued to be effective at correcting metacarpophalangeal joint contractures, but less effective at correcting proximal interphalangeal joint contractures. The patient did eventually require a fasciectomy, but the safety and modest success of the repeated collagenase injections shows promise for a less invasive treatment with a better risk profile than open fasciectomy. Although further studies are needed, repeated administration of collagenase appears to be safe and modestly effective for severe Dupuytren's contractures, although a fasciectomy may ultimately be required in the most severe cases. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Quantitative ultrasound characterization of tumor cell death: ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles for radiation enhancement.

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    Hyunjung Christina Kim

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of quantitative ultrasound imaging in characterizing cancer cell death caused by enhanced radiation treatments. This investigation focused on developing this ultrasound modality as an imaging-based non-invasive method that can be used to monitor therapeutic ultrasound and radiation effects. High-frequency (25 MHz ultrasound was used to image tumor responses caused by ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles in combination with radiation. Human prostate xenografts grown in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice were treated using 8, 80, or 1000 µL/kg of microbubbles stimulated with ultrasound at 250, 570, or 750 kPa, and exposed to 0, 2, or 8 Gy of radiation. Tumors were imaged prior to treatment and 24 hours after treatment. Spectral analysis of images acquired from treated tumors revealed overall increases in ultrasound backscatter intensity and the spectral intercept parameter. The increase in backscatter intensity compared to the control ranged from 1.9±1.6 dB for the clinical imaging dose of microbubbles (8 µL/kg, 250 kPa, 2 Gy to 7.0±4.1 dB for the most extreme treatment condition (1000 µL/kg, 750 kPa, 8 Gy. In parallel, in situ end-labelling (ISEL staining, ceramide, and cyclophilin A staining demonstrated increases in cell death due to DNA fragmentation, ceramide-mediated apoptosis, and release of cyclophilin A as a result of cell membrane permeabilization, respectively. Quantitative ultrasound results indicated changes that paralleled increases in cell death observed from histology analyses supporting its use for non-invasive monitoring of cancer treatment outcomes.

  12. Tumor Suppressor p53 Stimulates the Expression of Epstein-Barr Virus Latent Membrane Protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qianli; Lingel, Amy; Geiser, Vicki; Kwapnoski, Zachary; Zhang, Luwen

    2017-10-15

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with multiple human malignancies. EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is required for the efficient transformation of primary B lymphocytes in vitro and possibly in vivo The tumor suppressor p53 plays a seminal role in cancer development. In some EBV-associated cancers, p53 tends to be wild type and overly expressed; however, the effects of p53 on LMP1 expression is not clear. We find LMP1 expression to be associated with p53 expression in EBV-transformed cells under physiological and DNA damaging conditions. DNA damage stimulates LMP1 expression, and p53 is required for the stimulation. Ectopic p53 stimulates endogenous LMP1 expression. Moreover, endogenous LMP1 blocks DNA damage-mediated apoptosis. Regarding the mechanism of p53-mediated LMP1 expression, we find that interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5), a direct target of p53, is associated with both p53 and LMP1. IRF5 binds to and activates a LMP1 promoter reporter construct. Ectopic IRF5 increases the expression of LMP1, while knockdown of IRF5 leads to reduction of LMP1. Furthermore, LMP1 blocks IRF5-mediated apoptosis in EBV-infected cells. All of the data suggest that cellular p53 stimulates viral LMP1 expression, and IRF5 may be one of the factors for p53-mediated LMP1 stimulation. LMP1 may subsequently block DNA damage- and IRF5-mediated apoptosis for the benefits of EBV. The mutual regulation between p53 and LMP1 may play an important role in EBV infection and latency and its related cancers. IMPORTANCE The tumor suppressor p53 is a critical cellular protein in response to various stresses and dictates cells for various responses, including apoptosis. This work suggests that an Epstein-Bar virus (EBV) principal viral oncogene is activated by cellular p53. The viral oncogene blocks p53-mediated adverse effects during viral infection and transformation. Therefore, the induction of the viral oncogene by p53 provides a means for the virus to cope with infection and

  13. Nano-Pulse Stimulation induces immunogenic cell death in human papillomavirus-transformed tumors and initiates an adaptive immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph G Skeate

    Full Text Available Nano-Pulse Stimulation (NPS is a non-thermal pulsed electric field modality that has been shown to have cancer therapeutic effects. Here we applied NPS treatment to the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16-transformed C3.43 mouse tumor cell model and showed that it is effective at eliminating primary tumors through the induction of immunogenic cell death while subsequently increasing the number of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes within the tumor microenvironment. In vitro NPS treatment of C3.43 cells resulted in a doubling of activated caspase 3/7 along with the translocation of phosphatidylserine (PS to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane, indicating programmed cell death activity. Tumor-bearing mice receiving standard NPS treatment showed an initial decrease in tumor volume followed by clearing of tumors in most mice, and a significant increase in overall survival. Intra-tumor analysis of mice that were unable to clear tumors showed an inverse correlation between the number of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and the size of the tumor. Approximately half of the mice that cleared established tumors were protected against tumor re-challenge on the opposite flank. Selective depletion of CD8+ T cells eliminated this protection, suggesting that NPS treatment induces an adaptive immune response generating CD8+ T cells that recognize tumor antigen(s associated with the C3.43 tumor model. This method may be utilized in the future to not only ablate primary tumors, but also to induce an anti-tumor response driven by effector CD8+ T cells capable of protecting individuals from disease recurrence.

  14. Nano-Pulse Stimulation induces immunogenic cell death in human papillomavirus-transformed tumors and initiates an adaptive immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeate, Joseph G; Da Silva, Diane M; Chavez-Juan, Elena; Anand, Snjezana; Nuccitelli, Richard; Kast, W Martin

    2018-01-01

    Nano-Pulse Stimulation (NPS) is a non-thermal pulsed electric field modality that has been shown to have cancer therapeutic effects. Here we applied NPS treatment to the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16)-transformed C3.43 mouse tumor cell model and showed that it is effective at eliminating primary tumors through the induction of immunogenic cell death while subsequently increasing the number of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes within the tumor microenvironment. In vitro NPS treatment of C3.43 cells resulted in a doubling of activated caspase 3/7 along with the translocation of phosphatidylserine (PS) to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane, indicating programmed cell death activity. Tumor-bearing mice receiving standard NPS treatment showed an initial decrease in tumor volume followed by clearing of tumors in most mice, and a significant increase in overall survival. Intra-tumor analysis of mice that were unable to clear tumors showed an inverse correlation between the number of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and the size of the tumor. Approximately half of the mice that cleared established tumors were protected against tumor re-challenge on the opposite flank. Selective depletion of CD8+ T cells eliminated this protection, suggesting that NPS treatment induces an adaptive immune response generating CD8+ T cells that recognize tumor antigen(s) associated with the C3.43 tumor model. This method may be utilized in the future to not only ablate primary tumors, but also to induce an anti-tumor response driven by effector CD8+ T cells capable of protecting individuals from disease recurrence.

  15. Collagenase Santyl ointment: a selective agent for wound debridement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Carson, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Enzymatic debridement is a frequently used technique for removal of necrotic tissue from wounds. Proteases with specificity to break down the collagenous materials in necrotic tissues can achieve selective debridement, digesting denatured collagen in eschar while sparing nonnecrotic tissues. This article provides information about the selectivity of a collagenase-based debriding agent, including evidence of its safe and efficacious uses. Recent research has been conducted, investigating the chemical and biological properties of collagenase ointment, including healing in animal models, digestion power on different collagen types, cell migration activity from collagen degradation products, and compatibility with various wound dressings and metal ions. Evidence presented demonstrates that collagenase ointment is an effective, selective, and safe wound debriding agent.

  16. A highly sensitive and specific assay for vertebrate collagenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodek, J.; Hurum, S.; Feng, J.

    1981-01-01

    A highly sensitive and specific assay for vertebrate collagenase has been developed using a [ 14 C]-labeled collagen substrate and a combination of SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) and fluorography to identify and quantitate the digestion products. The assay was sufficiently sensitive to permit the detection and quantitation of collagenase activity in 0.1 μl of gingival sulcal fluid, and in samples of cell culture medium without prior concentration. The assay has also been used to detect the presence of inhibitors of collagenolytic enzymes in various cell culture fluids. (author)

  17. Ethanol stimulates tumor progression and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in chick embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jian-Wei; Bailey, Amelia Purser; Sartin, Amanda; Makey, Ian; Brady, Ann L

    2005-01-15

    The mechanisms by which alcohol consumption causes cancer have not been established due to a lack of experimental studies. A chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model that bore human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) was used to determine whether the administration of physiologically relevant doses of ethanol could stimulate tumor growth, angiogenesis, metastasis, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in tumors. HT1080 cells were inoculated onto the "upper CAM" on Day 8, saline or ethanol was administrated at a dose of 0.25 g/kg per day on the CAM, and the tumors were harvested on Day 17. VEGF mRNA and protein were determined by Northern blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Intratumoral vascular volume density (IVVD) was determined by point counting on periodic acid-Schiff-stained sections. Intravasation of HT1080 cells was determined using human-Alu polymerase chain reaction analysis. The effects of ethanol on VEGF expression and cell proliferation were examined in cultured HT1080 cells. Ethanol treatment for 9 days caused a 2.2-fold increase in tumor volume (867 +/- 138 mm(3) vs. 402 +/- 28 mm(3)), a 2.1-fold increase in IVVD (0.021 +/- 0.004 mm(3)/mm(3) vs. 0.010 mm(3)/mm(3) +/- 0.002 mm(3)/mm(3)), and a significant increase in VEGF mRNA or protein expression in tumors compared with a group of control embryos (n = 6 embryos; P 8-fold in the intravasated HT1080 cells in the CAM group compared with the control group (n = 6 embryos; P < 0.01). Physiologically relevant levels of ethanol (10 mM and 20 mM) caused a dose-related increase in VEGF mRNA and protein expression in cultured HT1080 cells. The ethanol-HT1080-conditioned media increased the proliferation of endothelial cells, but not of HT1080 cells. The findings suggest that the induction of angiogenesis and VEGF expression by ethanol represents an important mechanism of cancer progression associated with alcoholic beverage consumption. (c) 2004 American Cancer Society.

  18. Rapid and transient stimulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species by melatonin in normal and tumor leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radogna, Flavia; Paternoster, Laura; De Nicola, Milena; Cerella, Claudia; Ammendola, Sergio; Bedini, Annalida; Tarzia, Giorgio; Aquilano, Katia; Ciriolo, Maria; Ghibelli, Lina

    2009-01-01

    Melatonin is a modified tryptophan with potent biological activity, exerted by stimulation of specific plasma membrane (MT1/MT2) receptors, by lower affinity intracellular enzymatic targets (quinone reductase, calmodulin), or through its strong anti-oxidant ability. Scattered studies also report a perplexing pro-oxidant activity, showing that melatonin is able to stimulate production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we show that on U937 human monocytes melatonin promotes intracellular ROS in a fast (< 1 min) and transient (up to 5-6 h) way. Melatonin equally elicits its pro-radical effect on a set of normal or tumor leukocytes; intriguingly, ROS production does not lead to oxidative stress, as shown by absence of protein carbonylation, maintenance of free thiols, preservation of viability and regular proliferation rate. ROS production is independent from MT1/MT2 receptor interaction, since a) requires micromolar (as opposed to nanomolar) doses of melatonin; b) is not contrasted by the specific MT1/MT2 antagonist luzindole; c) is not mimicked by a set of MT1/MT2 high affinity melatonin analogues. Instead, chlorpromazine, the calmodulin inhibitor shown to prevent melatonin-calmodulin interaction, also prevents melatonin pro-radical effect, suggesting that the low affinity binding to calmodulin (in the micromolar range) may promote ROS production.

  19. The effect of diet on tumor necrosis factor stimulation of hepatic lipogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feingold, K.R.; Soued, M.; Serio, M.K.; Adi, S.; Moser, A.H.; Grunfeld, C. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

    1990-06-01

    In this study, we determined the effects of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) on serum lipid levels and hepatic lipid synthesis in animals whose diets and feeding conditions were varied to induce changes in baseline serum lipid levels and/or rates of hepatic lipid synthesis. In animals studied at both the nadir and peak of the diurnal cycle of hepatic lipid synthesis, TNF acutely increases serum triglyceride levels, stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis, and increases the quantity of newly synthesized fatty acids found in the serum. Similarly, in animals ingesting either high-sucrose or cholesterol-enriched diets, TNF induces the characteristic rapid increase in serum triglyceride levels, hepatic fatty acid synthesis, and quantity of labeled fatty acids in the serum. In animals fed a diet high in triglycerides, using either corn oil or lard, TNF stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis and increases the quantity of newly synthesized fatty acids in the serum, but serum triglyceride levels do not change. However, TNF inhibits gastric emptying, which results in a marked decrease in fat absorption in TNF-treated animals. It is likely that a decrease in the dietary contribution to serum triglyceride levels during high-triglyceride feeding counterbalances the increased hepatic contribution induced by TNF treatment. In animals fasted before TNF administration there was no acute change in either serum lipid levels, hepatic fatty acid synthesis, or the quantity of labeled fatty acids in the serum. Thus, TNF stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis and increases serum triglyceride levels under many diverse dietary conditions, suggesting that there is a strong linkage between the immune system and lipid metabolism that is independent of most dietary manipulations and may be of fundamental importance in the body's response to infection.

  20. The effect of diet on tumor necrosis factor stimulation of hepatic lipogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feingold, K.R.; Soued, M.; Serio, M.K.; Adi, S.; Moser, A.H.; Grunfeld, C.

    1990-01-01

    In this study, we determined the effects of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) on serum lipid levels and hepatic lipid synthesis in animals whose diets and feeding conditions were varied to induce changes in baseline serum lipid levels and/or rates of hepatic lipid synthesis. In animals studied at both the nadir and peak of the diurnal cycle of hepatic lipid synthesis, TNF acutely increases serum triglyceride levels, stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis, and increases the quantity of newly synthesized fatty acids found in the serum. Similarly, in animals ingesting either high-sucrose or cholesterol-enriched diets, TNF induces the characteristic rapid increase in serum triglyceride levels, hepatic fatty acid synthesis, and quantity of labeled fatty acids in the serum. In animals fed a diet high in triglycerides, using either corn oil or lard, TNF stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis and increases the quantity of newly synthesized fatty acids in the serum, but serum triglyceride levels do not change. However, TNF inhibits gastric emptying, which results in a marked decrease in fat absorption in TNF-treated animals. It is likely that a decrease in the dietary contribution to serum triglyceride levels during high-triglyceride feeding counterbalances the increased hepatic contribution induced by TNF treatment. In animals fasted before TNF administration there was no acute change in either serum lipid levels, hepatic fatty acid synthesis, or the quantity of labeled fatty acids in the serum. Thus, TNF stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis and increases serum triglyceride levels under many diverse dietary conditions, suggesting that there is a strong linkage between the immune system and lipid metabolism that is independent of most dietary manipulations and may be of fundamental importance in the body's response to infection

  1. Hepatic Radiofrequency Ablation–induced Stimulation of Distant Tumor Growth Is Suppressed by c-Met Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gaurav; Moussa, Marwan; Wang, Yuanguo; Rozenblum, Nir; Galun, Eithan; Goldberg, S. Nahum

    2016-01-01

    VEGF levels. Compared with RF ablation alone, RF ablation combined with adjuvant PHA-665752 or semaxanib reduced distant tumor growth, proliferation, and microvascular density. For c-Met–negative tumors, hepatic RF ablation did not increase distant tumor growth, proliferation, or microvascular density compared with sham treatment. Conclusion RF ablation of normal liver can stimulate distant subcutaneous tumor growth mediated by HGF/c-Met pathway and VEGF activation. This effect was not observed in c-Met–negative tumors and can be blocked with adjuvant c-Met and VEGF inhibitors. © RSNA, 2015 PMID:26418615

  2. Possible stimulation of anti-tumor immunity using repeated cold stress: a hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoja Sasa

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phenomenon of hormesis, whereby small amounts of seemingly harmful or stressful agents can be beneficial for the health and lifespan of laboratory animals has been reported in literature. In particular, there is accumulating evidence that daily brief cold stress can increase both numbers and activity of peripheral cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells, the major effectors of adaptive and innate tumor immunity, respectively. This type of regimen (for 8 days has been shown to improve survival of mice infected with intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii, which would also be consistent with enhanced cell-mediated immunity. Presentation of the hypothesis This paper hypothesizes that brief cold-water stress repeated daily over many months could enhance anti-tumor immunity and improve survival rate of a non-lymphoid cancer. The possible mechanism of the non-specific stimulation of cellular immunity by repeated cold stress appears to involve transient activation of the sympathetic nervous system, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axes, as described in more detail in the text. Daily moderate cold hydrotherapy is known to reduce pain and does not appear to have noticeable adverse effects on normal test subjects, although some studies have shown that it can cause transient arrhythmias in patients with heart problems and can also inhibit humoral immunity. Sudden immersion in ice-cold water can cause transient pulmonary edema and increase permeability of the blood-brain barrier, thereby increasing mortality of neurovirulent infections. Testing the hypothesis The proposed procedure is an adapted cold swim (5–7 minutes at 20 degrees Celsius, includes gradual adaptation to be tested on a mouse tumor model. Mortality, tumor size, and measurements of cellular immunity (numbers and activity of peripheral CD8+ T lymphocytes and natural killer cells of the cold-exposed group would be compared to

  3. Fractional laser exposure induces neutrophil infiltration (N1 phenotype into the tumor and stimulates systemic anti-tumor immune response.

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    Masayoshi Kawakubo

    Full Text Available Ablative fractional photothermolysis (aFP using a CO2 laser generates multiple small diameter tissue lesions within the irradiation field. aFP is commonly used for a wide variety of dermatological indications, including treatment of photodamaged skin and dyschromia, drug delivery and modification of scars due to acne, surgical procedures and burns. In this study we explore the utility of aFP for treating oncological indications, including induction of local tumor regression and inducing anti-tumor immunity, which is in marked contrast to current indications of aFP.We used a fractional CO2 laser to treat a tumor established by BALB/c colon carcinoma cell line (CT26.CL25, which expressed a tumor antigen, beta-galactosidase (beta-gal. aFP treated tumors grew significantly slower as compared to untreated controls. Complete remission after a single aFP treatment was observed in 47% of the mice. All survival mice from the tumor inoculation rejected re-inoculation of the CT26.CL25 colon carcinoma cells and moreover 80% of the survival mice rejected CT26 wild type colon carcinoma cells, which are parental cells of CT26.CL25 cells. Histologic section of the FP-treated tumors showed infiltrating neutrophil in the tumor early after aFP treatment. Flow cytometric analysis of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes showed aFP treatment abrogated the increase in regulatory T lymphocyte (Treg, which suppresses anti-tumor immunity and elicited the expansion of epitope-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes, which were required to mediate the tumor-suppressing effect of aFP.We have demonstrated that aFP is able to induce a systemic anti-tumor adaptive immunity preventing tumor recurrence in a murine colon carcinoma in a mouse model. This study demonstrates a potential role of aFP treatments in oncology and further studies should be performed.

  4. A flagellin-derived toll-like receptor 5 agonist stimulates cytotoxic lymphocyte-mediated tumor immunity.

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    Nicholas D Leigh

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor (TLR mediated recognition of pathogen associated molecular patterns allows the immune system to rapidly respond to a pathogenic insult. The "danger context" elicited by TLR agonists allows an initially non-immunogenic antigen to become immunogenic. This ability to alter environment is highly relevant in tumor immunity, since it is inherently difficult for the immune system to recognize host-derived tumors as immunogenic. However, immune cells may have encountered certain TLR ligands associated with tumor development, yet the endogenous stimulation is typically not sufficient to induce spontaneous tumor rejection. Of special interest are TLR5 agonists, because there are no endogenous ligands that bind TLR5. CBLB502 is a pharmacologically optimized TLR5 agonist derived from Salmonella enterica flagellin. We examined the effect of CBLB502 on tumor immunity using two syngeneic lymphoma models, both of which do not express TLR5, and thus do not directly respond to CBLB502. Upon challenge with the T-cell lymphoma RMAS, CBLB502 treatment after tumor inoculation protects C57BL/6 mice from death caused by tumor growth. This protective effect is both natural killer (NK cell- and perforin-dependent. In addition, CBLB502 stimulates clearance of the B-cell lymphoma A20 in BALB/c mice in a CD8(+ T cell-dependent fashion. Analysis on the cellular level via ImageStream flow cytometry reveals that CD11b(+ and CD11c(+ cells, but neither NK nor T cells, directly respond to CBLB502 as determined by NFκB nuclear translocation. Our findings demonstrate that CBLB502 stimulates a robust antitumor response by directly activating TLR5-expressing accessory immune cells, which in turn activate cytotoxic lymphocytes.

  5. The effect of collagenase on nerve conduction velocity of dorsal root ganglion in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Wenquan; Li Heping; Yang Jianyong; Chen Wei; Huang Yonghui; Guo Wenbo

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the functional effects of collagenase on dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in rats by evoked potential conduction velocity measurement. Methods: A total of 57 male healthy Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into 7 groups: normal group, acute collagenase group, subacute collagenase group, chronic collagenase group, acute pseudo-operation group, subacute pseudo-operation group, chronic pseudo-operation group. 1200 units of collagenase was reconstituted in 4 ml isotonic saline prior for the experimental application. The left fifth lumbar DRG was exposed in each rat and followed by 1 ml collagenase solution (300 units) dropping on the exposed DRG in collagenase groups; and similarly 1 ml isotonic saline was applied to each of the exposed DRG in pseudo-operation groups. the effects of collagenase on nerve conduction velocity (NCV) were analyzed 1 hour, 1 week or 1 month after the procedure. The statistical analysis was carried out by software SPSS11.0. Results: The differences of NCV measured by evoked potential method between all groups including the normal group, collagenase groups, and pseudo-operation groups were not significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: The Neuroelectricity physiologic function of dorsal root ganglion and nerve would not be damaged by collagenase used in therapeutic concentration. (authors)

  6. Type I interferons as stimulators of DC-mediated cross-priming: impact on anti-tumor response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna eSchiavoni

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Induction of potent tumor-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses is a fundamental objective in anticancer therapeutic strategies. This event requires that antigen-presenting cells (APC present tumor-associated antigens (Ag on their MHC class-I molecule, in a process termed cross-presentation. Dendritic cells (DC are particularly keen on this task and can induce the cross-priming of CD8+ T cells, when exposed to danger or inflammatory signals that stimulate their activation. Type I interferons (IFN-I, a family of long-known immunostimulatory cytokines, have been proven to produce optimal activation signal for DC-induced cross-priming. Recent in vitro and in vivo evidences have suggested that IFN-I -stimulated cross-priming by DC against tumor-associated Ag is a key mechanism for cancer immunosurveillance and may be usefully exploited to boost anti-tumor CD8+ T-cell responses. Here, we will review the cross-presentation properties of different DC subsets, with special focus on cell-associated and tumor Ag, and discuss how IFN-I can modify this function, with the aim of identifying more specific and effective strategies for improving anticancer responses.

  7. Sources of variation influencing concordance between functional MRI and direct cortical stimulation in brain tumor surgery

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    Melanie A Morrison

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Object: Preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI remains a promising method to aid in the surgical management of patients diagnosed with brain tumors. For patients that are candidates for awake craniotomies, surgical decisions can potentially be improved by fMRI but this depends on the level of concordance between preoperative brain maps and the maps provided by the gold standard intraoperative method, direct cortical stimulation (DCS. There have been numerous studies of the concordance between fMRI and DCS using sensitivity and specificity measures, however the results are variable across studies and the key factors influencing variability are not well understood. Thus, the present work addresses the influence of technical factors on fMRI and DCS concordance. Methods: Motor and language mapping data were collected for a group of glioma patients (n = 14 who underwent both preoperative fMRI and intraoperative DCS in an awake craniotomy procedure for tumor removal. Normative fMRI data were also acquired in a healthy control group (n = 12. The fMRI and DCS mapping data were co-registered; true positive (TP, true negative (TN, false positive (FP and false negative (FN occurrences were tabulated over the exposed brain surface. Sensitivity and specificity were measured for the total group, and the motor and language sub-groups. The influence of grid placement, fMRI statistical thresholding, and task standardization were assessed. Correlations between proportions of agreement and error were carefully scrutinized to evaluate concordance more in-depth. Results: Concordance was significantly better for motor versus language mapping. There was an inverse relationship between TP and TN with increasing statistical threshold, and FP dominated the total error. Sensitivity and specificity were reduced when tasks were not standardized across fMRI and DCS. Conclusions: Although the agreement between fMRI and DCS is good, variability is introduced

  8. Role of Mesenchymal Derived Stem Cells in Stimulating Dormant Tumor Cells to Proliferate and Form Clinical Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Clinical Metastases PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jeffrey Green CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The Geneva Foundation Tacoma, WA 98402 REPORT DATE: July 2017 TYPE...2016 - 14 June 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Role of Mesenchymal-Derived Stem Cells in Stimulating Dormant Tumor Cells to Proliferate and Form Clinical ...and/or select agents. Nothing to report. 6. PRODUCTS: • publications, conference papers, and presentations ; Jennifer Zhu submitted an abstract and will

  9. Role of Mesenchymal-Derived Stem Cells in Stimulating Dormant Tumor Cells to Proliferate and Form Clinical Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Clinical Metastases PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Rosandra Kaplan CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The Geneva Foundation Tacoma, WA 98402 REPORT DATE: July 2017...2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Role of Mesenchymal-Derived Stem Cells in Stimulating Dormant Tumor Cells to Proliferate and Form Clinical Metastases 5a...PRODUCTS:  publications, conference papers, and presentations ; Jennifer Zhu submitted an abstract and will present this work at the Annual

  10. Glioma-secreted soluble factors stimulate microglial activation: The role of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ji-Sun; Jung, Eun-Hye; Kwon, Mi-Youn; Han, Inn-Oc

    2016-09-15

    We aimed to elucidate the effect of soluble factors secreted by glioma on microglial activation. Conditioned medium (CM) from glioma cells, CRT-MG and C6, significantly induced nitric oxide (NO) production and stimulated the mRNA expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in BV2 cells. Glioma CM stimulated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, and a p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, suppressed CM-induced NO production in BV2 cells. In addition, CM stimulated nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) DNA binding and transcriptional activity, which was repressed by SB203580. Gliomas displayed higher mRNA expression and release of TNF-α and IL-1β than primary astrocyte cells. Neutralization of TNF-α and IL-1β in C6-CM using a neutralizing antibody inhibited NO/iNOS expression in BV-2 cells. These results indicate potential contribution of diffusible tumor-derived factors to regulate microglial activation and subsequent tumor microenvironment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Curcumin attenuates lipolysis stimulated by tumor necrosis factor-α or isoproterenol in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiao-yun; Kong, Po-Ren; Wu, Jin-feng; Li, Ying; Li, Yan-xiang

    2012-12-15

    Curcumin, an active component derived from dietary spice turmeric (Curcuma longa), has been demonstrated antihyperglycemic, antiinflammatory and hypocholesterolemic activities in obesity and diabetes. These effects are associated with decreased level of circulating free fatty acids (FFA), however the mechanism has not yet been elucidated. The flux of FFA and glycerol from adipose tissue to the blood stream primarily depends on the lipolysis of triacylglycerols in the adipocytes. Adipocyte lipolysis is physiologically stimulated by catecholamine hormones. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) stimulates chronic lipolysis in obesity and type 2 diabetes. In this study, we examined the role of curcumin in inhibiting lipolytic action upon various stimulations in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Glycerol release from TNFα or isoproterenol-stimulated 3T3-L1 adipocytes in the absence or presence of curcumin was determined using a colorimetric assay (GPO-Trinder). Western blotting was used to investigate the TNFα-induced phosphorylation of MAPK and perilipin expression. Fatcake and cytosolic fractions were prepared to examine the isoproterenol-stimulated hormone-sensitive lipase translocation. Treatment with curcumin attenuated TNFα-mediated lipolysis by suppressing phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and reversing the downregulation of perilipin protein in TNFα-stimulated adipocytes (p<0.05). The acute lipolytic response to adrenergic stimulation of isoproterenol was also restricted by curcumin (10-20 μM, p<0.05), which was compatible with reduced perilipin phosphorylation(29%, p<0.05) and hormone-sensitive lipase translocation(20%, p<0.05). This study provides evidence that curcumin acts on adipocytes to suppress the lipolysis response to TNFα and catecholamines. The antilipolytic effect could be a cellular basis for curcumin decreasing plasma FFA levels and improving insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Collagenase chemonucleolysis: a long term radiographic study in normal dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atilola, M.A.O.; Cockshutt, J.R.; Mclaughlin, R.; Cochrane, S.M.; Pennock, P.W.

    1993-01-01

    Five clinically normal five year old dogs were used in this study. From a randomized table intervertebral discs were each injected with either collagenase or calcium chloride diluent. The surgically exposed cervical discs were injected with 50 units whereas thoracic and lumbar discs were injected under fluoroscopic guidance with 100 units of the enzyme. Postinjection radiographs revealed significant (p ltoreq .05) disc space narrowing in enzyme injected discs. The cervical discs had the highest frequency of radiographic narrowing (87%) followed by the thoracic (70%) and lumbar (53%) discs. Spondylosis deformans developed at the sites of cervical enzyme injections. None of the dogs had neurologic abnormalities one year postinjection

  13. The production of collagenase by adherent mononuclear cells cultured from human peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, J S; Weiss, J; Ryhänen, L; Nies, K M; Rantala-Ryhänen, S; Uitto, J

    1984-12-01

    Mononuclear cells were isolated from human peripheral blood by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation, and the cells adherent to plastic substrata were cultured in serum-free media supplemented with lactalbumin hydrolysate. These cell cultures, which consisted predominantly of monocyte-macrophages as judged by nonspecific esterase staining, accumulated collagenase in the medium. This collagenase resembled other vertebrate collagenases in that it cleaved native triple-helical type I collagen at a locus 3/4-length away from the amino-terminal end of the molecule. The collagenase activity was inhibited by Na2EDTA, dithiothreitol, and fetal calf serum, while the addition of Ca++ or N-ethylmaleimide enhanced the enzyme activity. The accumulation of collagenase in the culture media was markedly enhanced by the incubation of cells with concanavalin A or phorbol myristic acetate. In the presence of cycloheximide, the levels of collagenase activity were markedly reduced, suggesting that active protein synthesis was required to express the enzyme activity. In additional experiments, monocytes were further purified by counterflow centrifugation-elutriation. The collagenase production was markedly increased in cultures enriched in monocyte-macrophages and devoid of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The accumulation of collagenase in monocyte cultures incubated for 48 hours in the presence of concanavalin A or phorbol myristic acetate was of the same order of magnitude as in parallel cultures containing the same number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes purified by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation and Plasmagel sedimentation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Collagen degradation in the abdominal aneurysm: A conspiracy of matrix metalloproteinase and cysteine collagenases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdul-Hussien, H.; Soekhoe, R.G.V.; Weber, E.; Thüsen, J.H. von der; Kleemann, R.; Mulder, A.; Hajo Van Bockel, J.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Lindeman, J.H.N.

    2007-01-01

    Growth and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) result from increased collagen turnover. Collagen turnover critically depends on specific collagenases that cleave the triple helical region of fibrillar collagen. As yet, the collagenases responsible for collagen degradation in AAAs have not

  15. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibits insulin's stimulating effect on glucose uptake and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask-Madsen, Christian; Domínguez, Helena; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory mechanisms could be involved in the pathogenesis of both insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. Therefore, we aimed at examining whether the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha inhibits insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and insulin....../or TNF-alpha were coinfused. During infusion of insulin alone for 20 minutes, forearm glucose uptake increased by 220+/-44%. This increase was completely inhibited during coinfusion of TNF-alpha (started 10 min before insulin) with a more pronounced inhibition of glucose extraction than of blood flow....... Furthermore, TNF-alpha inhibited the ACh forearm blood flow response (Palpha...

  16. Collagenase clostridium histolyticum for the treatment of Dupuytren's contracture: systematic review and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazzelli, Miriam; Cruickshank, Moira; Tassie, Emma; McNamee, Paul; Robertson, Clare; Elders, Andrew; Fraser, Cynthia; Hernandez, Rodolfo; Lawrie, David; Ramsay, Craig

    2015-10-01

    Dupuytren's disease is a slowly progressive condition of the hand, characterised by the formation of nodules in the palm that gradually develop into fibrotic cords. Contracture of the cords produces deformities of the fingers. Surgery is recommended for moderate and severe contractures, but complications and/or recurrences are frequent. Collagenase clostridium histolyticum (CCH) has been developed as a minimally invasive alternative to surgery for some patients. To assess the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of collagenase as an alternative to surgery for adults with Dupuytren's contracture with a palpable cord. We searched all major electronic databases from 1990 to February 2014. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), non-randomised comparative studies and observational studies involving collagenase and/or surgical interventions were considered. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias of included studies. A de novo Markov model was developed to assess cost-effectiveness of collagenase, percutaneous needle fasciotomy (PNF) and limited fasciectomy (LF). Results were reported as incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were undertaken to investigate model and parameter uncertainty. Five RCTs comparing collagenase with placebo (493 participants), three RCTs comparing surgical techniques (334 participants), two non-randomised studies comparing collagenase and surgery (105 participants), five non-randomised comparative studies assessing various surgical procedures (3571 participants) and 15 collagenase case series (3154 participants) were included. Meta-analyses of RCTs assessing CCH versus placebo were performed. Joints randomised to collagenase were more likely to achieve clinical success. Collagenase-treated participants experienced significant reduction in contracture and an increased range of motion compared with placebo-treated participants

  17. The impact of preoperative language mapping by repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation on the clinical course of brain tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollmann, Nico; Ille, Sebastian; Hauck, Theresa; Maurer, Stefanie; Negwer, Chiara; Zimmer, Claus; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2015-04-11

    Language mapping by repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is used for resection planning in patients suffering from brain lesions within regions known to be involved in language function. Yet we also need data that show whether patients benefit clinically from preoperative rTMS for language mapping. We enrolled 25 patients with language eloquently located brain lesions undergoing preoperative rTMS language mapping (GROUP 1, 2011-2013), with the mapping results not being available for the surgeon, and we matched these patients with 25 subjects who also underwent preoperative rTMS (GROUP 2, 2013-2014), but the mapping results were taken into account during tumor resection. Additionally, cortical language maps were generated by analyzing preoperative rTMS and intraoperative direct cortical stimulation (DCS) data. Mean anterior-posterior (ap) craniotomy extents and overall craniotomy sizes were significantly smaller for the patients in GROUP 2 (Ap: p = 0.0117; overall size: p = 0.0373), and postoperative language deficits were found significantly more frequently for the patients in GROUP 1 (p = 0.0153), although the preoperative language status did not differ between groups (p = 0.7576). Additionally, there was a trend towards fewer unexpected tumor residuals, shorter surgery duration, less peri- or postoperative complications, shorter inpatient stay, and higher postoperative Karnofsky performance status scale (KPS) for the patients in GROUP 2. The present study provides a first hint that the clinical course of patients suffering from brain tumors might be improved by preoperative rTMS language mapping. However, a significant difference between both groups was only found for craniotomy extents and postoperative deficits, but not for other clinical parameters, which only showed a trend toward better results in GROUP 2. Therefore, multicenter trials with higher sample sizes are needed to further investigate the distinct impact of r

  18. Role of collagenase clostridium histolyticum in Peyronie's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peak TC

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Taylor C Peak,1 Gregory C Mitchell,2 Faysal A Yafi,2 Wayne J Hellstrom2 1Department of Urology, Tulane University School of Medicine, 2Section of Andrology, Department of Urology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA Abstract: Peyronie's disease is a localized connective tissue disease characterized by an active, inflammatory phase and a stable, quiescent phase, with the eventual development of collagenous plaques within the tunica albuginea of the penis. Risk factors primarily associated with Peyronie's disease include Dupuytren's contracture, penile trauma, and family history. A variety of treatment strategies have been utilized, including oral and topical agents, electromotive drug administration, intralesional injections, extracorporeal shockwave therapy, penile traction, and surgery. However, most of these strategies are ineffective, with surgery being the only definitive treatment. Collagenase clostridium histolyticum is a newly US Food and Drug Administration-approved agent for intralesional injection. It is thought to downregulate many of the disease-related genes, cytokines, and growth factors and degrade collagen fibers. It also suppresses cell attachment, spreading, and proliferation. Collagenase clostridium histolyticum has been clinically proven to be a safe and effective therapeutic option, demonstrating decreases in penile curvature and plaque consistency, as well as increases in patient satisfaction. During clinical evaluation, the Peyronie's Disease Questionnaire was validated as an effective tool for assessing treatment outcomes. Keywords: connective tissue disease, CCH, Xiaflex, Peyronie's Disease Questionnaire

  19. In vivo gene expression and immunoreactivity of Leptospira collagenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janwitthayanan, Weena; Keelawat, Somboon; Payungporn, Sunchai; Lowanitchapat, Alisa; Suwancharoen, Duangjai; Poovorawan, Yong; Chirathaworn, Chintana

    2013-06-12

    Pulmonary hemorrhage is an increasing cause of death of leptospirosis patients. Bacterial collagenase has been shown to be involved in lung hemorrhage induced by various infectious agents. According to Leptospira whole genome study, colA, a gene suggested to code for bacterial collagenase has been identified. We investigated colA gene expression in lung tissues of Leptospira infected hamsters. Golden Syrian Hamsters were injected intraperitoneally with Leptospira interrogans serovar Pyrogenes. The hamsters were sacrificed on days 3, 5 and 7 post-infection and lung tissues were collected for histological examination and RNA extraction. Lung pathologies including atelectasis and hemorrhage were observed. Expression of colA gene in lung tissues was demonstrated by both RT-PCR and real time PCR. In addition, ColA protein was cloned and the purified protein could react with sera from leptospirosis patients. Leptospira ColA protein may play a role in Leptospira survival or pathogenesis in vivo. Its reaction with leptospirosis sera suggests that this protein is immunogenic and could be another candidate for vaccine development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterizing the collagen stabilizing effect of crosslinked chitosan nanoparticles against collagenase degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishen, Anil; Shrestha, Suja; Shrestha, Annie; Cheng, Calvin; Goh, Cynthia

    2016-08-01

    Antibacterial and chelating properties of chitosan has been widely studied for various dental applications. To characterize the interaction between chitosan-nanoparticles (CSnp) and collagen, and understand their stabilizing effect against collagenase degradation for dentin matrix stabilization. Phase-1: a single Type I collagen-fibril model was used to study the interaction with CSnp along with carbodiimides crosslinking treatment. Degradation of the crosslinked fibrils was studied with bacterial collagenase enzyme and monitored using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, turbidity measurement (400nm), ninhydrin assay and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Interaction of CSnp with collagenase and Type I collagen, were evaluated using SDS-PAGE, and proteolytic cleavage potential of a synthetic peptide. Phase-2: degradation of dentin collagen crosslinked with/without CSnp was evaluated using FTIR, ninhydrin assay and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Glutaraldehyde crosslinking was used as a positive control. Both native collagen-fibrils and dentin collagen after crosslinking showed higher resistance to collagenase degradation, as observed in turbidity measurements and FTIR spectra. AFM images showed the interaction of CSnp with single collagen-fibril and crosslinked collagen resisted collagenase degradation up to 54h. The collagen and collagenase both formed complexes with CSnp resulting in thickening of bands and reduction in collagen degradation. CSnp treated collagenase showed significantly reduced cleavage of the fluorescent peptides. Dentin collagen was coated with CSnp following crosslinking with significant increase in resistance to collagenase degradation. Crosslinked CSnp on collagen stabilized and enhanced the resistance of dentin matrix against bacterial collagenase degradation due to non-specific interaction with both collagen and collagenase. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Transcutaneous cervical vagal nerve stimulation modulates cardiac vagal tone and tumor necrosis factor-alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock, C; Brock, B; Aziz, Q

    2017-01-01

    -VNS, there was an increase in cardiac vagal tone and a reduction in tumor necrosis factor-α in comparison to baseline. No change was seen in blood pressure, cardiac sympathetic index or other cytokines. These preliminary data suggest that t-VNS exerts an autonomic and a subtle antitumor necrosis factor-α effect, which...

  2. Tumor cell plasticity in Ewing sarcoma, an alternative circulatory system stimulated by hypoxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaft, van der D.W.J.; Hillen, F.; Pauwels, P.; Kirschmann, D.A.; Castermans, Karolien; Oude Egbrink, M.G.A.; Tran, M.G.; Sciot, R.; Hauben, E.; Hogendoorn, P.C.W.; Delattre, O.; Maxwell, P.H.; Hendrix, M.J.C.; Griffioen, A.W.

    2005-01-01

    A striking feature of Ewing sarcoma is the presence of blood lakes lined by tumor cells. The significance of these structures, if any, is unknown. Here, we report that the extent of blood lakes correlates with poor clinical outcomes, whereas variables of angiogenesis do not. We also show that Ewing

  3. Complement 5a stimulates macrophage polarization and contributes to tumor metastases of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Chunmei; Zhang, Wen-Mei; Li, Tao-Tao; Zhang, Cong-Cong; Qiu, Shulan; Liu, Yan; Liu, Sa; Jin, Ming; Jia, Li-Xin; Song, Wen-Chao; Du, Jie

    2018-05-15

    Inflammatory cells such as macrophages can play a pro-tumorigenic role in the tumor stroma. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) generally display an M2 phenotype with tumor-promoting activity; however, the mechanisms regulating the TAM phenotype remain unclear. Complement 5a (C5a) is a cytokine-like polypeptide that is generated during complement system activation and is known to promote tumor growth. Herein, we investigated the role of C5a on macrophage polarization in colon cancer metastasis in mice. We found that deficiency of the C5a receptor (C5aR) severely impairs the metastatic ability of implanted colon cancer cells. C5aR was expressed on TAMs, which exhibited an M2-like functional profile in colon cancer liver metastatic lesions. Furthermore, C5a mediated macrophage polarization and this process relied substantially on activation of the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway. Finally, analysis of human colon carcinoma indicated that C5aR expression is negatively associated with tumor differentiation grade. Our results demonstrate that C5aR has a central role in regulating the M2 phenotype of TAMs, which in turn, contributes to hepatic metastasis of colon cancer through NF-κB signaling. C5a is a potential novel marker for cancer prognosis and drugs targeting complement system activation, specifically the C5aR pathway, may offer new therapeutic opportunities for colon cancer management. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ubiquitin-Like Protein from Human Placental Extract Exhibits Collagenase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Debashree; Datta Chakraborty, Piyali; Mitra, Jyotirmoy; Sharma, Kanika; Mandal, Somnath; Das, Aneesha; Chakrabarti, Saikat; Bhattacharyya, Debasish

    2013-01-01

    An aqueous extract of human placenta exhibits strong gelatinase/collagenase activity in zymography. 2-D gel electrophoresis of the extract with gelatin zymography in the second dimension displayed a single spot, identified as ubiquitin-like component upon MALDI/TOF MS/MS analysis. Immunoblot indicated presence of ubiquitin and absence of collagenase in the extract. Collagenase activity of the ubiquitin-like component was confirmed from the change in solubility of collagen in aqueous buffer, degradation of collagen by size-exclusion HPLC and atomic force microscopy. Quantification with DQ-gelatin showed that the extract contains 0.04 U/ml of collagenase activity that was inhibited up to 95% by ubiquitin antibody. Ubiquitin from bovine erythrocytes demonstrated mild collagenase activity. Bioinformatics studies suggest that placental ubiquitin and collagenase follow structurally divergent evolution. This thermostable intrinsic collagenase activity of placental extract might have wide physiological relevance in degrading and remodeling collagen as it is used as a drug for wound healing and pelvic inflammatory diseases. PMID:23555718

  5. An improved collagen zymography approach for evaluating the collagenases MMP-1, MMP-8, and MMP-13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inanc, Seniz; Keles, Didem; Oktay, Gulgun

    2017-10-01

    Collagen zymography is an SDS-PAGE-based method for detecting both the proenzyme and active forms of collagenases. Although collagen zymography is used for assessment of the matrix metalloproteinases MMP-1 and MMP-13, it can be difficult to detect these collagenases due to technical issues. Moreover, it remains unclear whether the collagenase activity of MMP-8 can be detected by this method. Here, we present an improved collagen zymography method that allows quantification of the activities of MMP-1, MMP-8, and MMP-13. Activities of recombinant collagenases could be detected in collagen zymogram gels copolymerized with 0.3 mg/mL type I collagen extracted from rat tail tendon. This improved method is sensitive enough to detect the activity of as little as 1 ng of collagenase. We generated standard curves for the three collagenases to quantify the collagenolytic activity levels of unknown samples. To validate our improved method, we investigated MMP-1 activity levels in human thyroid cancer (8505C) and normal thyroid (Nthy-ori-3-1) cell lines, finding that the proenzyme and active MMP-1 levels were greater in 8505C cells than in Nthy-ori-3-1 cells. Taken together, our data show that collagen zymography can be used in both molecular and clinical investigations to evaluate collagenase activities in various pathological conditions.

  6. Therapeutic T cells induce tumor-directed chemotaxis of innate immune cells through tumor-specific secretion of chemokines and stimulation of B16BL6 melanoma to secrete chemokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fox Bernard A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms by which tumor-specific T cells induce regression of established metastases are not fully characterized. In using the poorly immunogenic B16BL6-D5 (D5 melanoma model we reported that T cell-mediated tumor regression can occur independently of perforin, IFN-γ or the combination of both. Characterization of regressing pulmonary metastases identified macrophages as a major component of the cells infiltrating the tumor after adoptive transfer of effector T cells. This led us to hypothesize that macrophages played a central role in tumor regression following T-cell transfer. Here, we sought to determine the factors responsible for the infiltration of macrophages at the tumor site. Methods These studies used the poorly immunogenic D5 melanoma model. Tumor-specific effector T cells, generated from tumor vaccine-draining lymph nodes (TVDLN, were used for adoptive immunotherapy and in vitro analysis of chemokine expression. Cellular infiltrates into pulmonary metastases were determined by immunohistochemistry. Chemokine expression by the D5 melanoma following co-culture with T cells, IFN-γ or TNF-α was determined by RT-PCR and ELISA. Functional activity of chemokines was confirmed using a macrophage migration assay. T cell activation of macrophages to release nitric oxide (NO was determined using GRIES reagent. Results We observed that tumor-specific T cells with a type 1 cytokine profile also expressed message for and secreted RANTES, MIP-1α and MIP-1β following stimulation with specific tumor. Unexpectedly, D5 melanoma cells cultured with IFN-γ or TNF-α, two type 1 cytokines expressed by therapeutic T cells, secreted Keratinocyte Chemoattractant (KC, MCP-1, IP-10 and RANTES and expressed mRNA for MIG. The chemokines released by T cells and cytokine-stimulated tumor cells were functional and induced migration of the DJ2PM macrophage cell line. Additionally, tumor-specific stimulation of wt or perforin

  7. Technical advantage of recombinant collagenase for isolation of muscle stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kana Ishii

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: Our results provide an efficient method of satellite cell preparation using recombinant collagenases with a high cell yield, viability of cells, and regeneration potency to fit the biological raw material criteria.

  8. Garlic (Allium sativum) stimulates lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha production from J774A.1 murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jessica; Harfouche, Youssef; De La Cruz, Melissa; Zamora, Martha P; Liu, Yan; Rego, James A; Buckley, Nancy E

    2015-02-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum) is known to have many beneficial attributes such as antimicrobial, antiatherosclerotic, antitumorigenetic, and immunomodulatory properties. In the present study, we investigated the effects of an aqueous garlic extract on macrophage cytokine production by challenging the macrophage J774A.1 cell line with the garlic extract in the absence or presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) under different conditions. The effect of allicin, the major component of crushed garlic, was also investigated. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, it was found that garlic and synthetic allicin greatly stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) production in macrophages treated with LPS. The TNF-α secretion levels peaked earlier and were sustained for a longer time in cells treated with garlic and LPS compared with cells treated with LPS alone. Garlic acted in a time-dependent manner. We suggest that garlic, at least partially via its allicin component, acts downstream from LPS to stimulate macrophage TNF-α secretion. © 2014 The Authors. Phytotherapy Research published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. A Sensitive, Rapid, and Specific Technique for the Detection of Collagenase Using Zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Shivcharan; Roy, Ipsita

    2017-01-01

    In-gel zymography is a commonly employed tool to identify active enzymes in a quantitative and qualitative manner. In this work, apart from the incorporation of substrate which is traditionally employed in zymography, the identification of collagenase by incubation of the enzyme resolved on a polyacrylamide gel with substrate solution is described. The two methods are quite fast and result in specific detection of bacterial collagenase.

  10. Tumor Necrosis Factor α Stimulates Osteoclast Differentiation by a Mechanism Independent of the Odf/Rankl–Rank Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kanichiro; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Jimi, Eijiro; Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Takami, Masamichi; Kotake, Shigeru; Nakagawa, Nobuaki; Kinosaki, Masahiko; Yamaguchi, Kyoji; Shima, Nobuyuki; Yasuda, Hisataka; Morinaga, Tomonori; Higashio, Kanji; Martin, T. John; Suda, Tatsuo

    2000-01-01

    Osteoclast differentiation factor (ODF, also called RANKL/TRANCE/OPGL) stimulates the differentiation of osteoclast progenitors of the monocyte/macrophage lineage into osteoclasts in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, also called CSF-1). When mouse bone marrow cells were cultured with M-CSF, M-CSF–dependent bone marrow macrophages (M-BMMφ) appeared within 3 d. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase–positive osteoclasts were also formed when M-BMMφ were further cultured for 3 d with mouse tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in the presence of M-CSF. Osteoclast formation induced by TNF-α was inhibited by the addition of respective antibodies against TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) or TNFR2, but not by osteoclastogenesis inhibitory factor (OCIF, also called OPG, a decoy receptor of ODF/RANKL), nor the Fab fragment of anti–RANK (ODF/RANKL receptor) antibody. Experiments using M-BMMφ prepared from TNFR1- or TNFR2-deficient mice showed that both TNFR1- and TNFR2-induced signals were important for osteoclast formation induced by TNF-α. Osteoclasts induced by TNF-α formed resorption pits on dentine slices only in the presence of IL-1α. These results demonstrate that TNF-α stimulates osteoclast differentiation in the presence of M-CSF through a mechanism independent of the ODF/RANKL–RANK system. TNF-α together with IL-1α may play an important role in bone resorption of inflammatory bone diseases. PMID:10637272

  11. Nanopulse Stimulation (NPS Induces Tumor Ablation and Immunity in Orthotopic 4T1 Mouse Breast Cancer: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Beebe

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanopulse Stimulation (NPS eliminates mouse and rat tumor types in several different animal models. NPS induces protective, vaccine-like effects after ablation of orthotopic rat N1-S1 hepatocellular carcinoma. Here we review some general concepts of NPS in the context of studies with mouse metastatic 4T1 mammary cancer showing that the postablation, vaccine-like effect is initiated by dynamic, multilayered immune mechanisms. NPS eliminates primary 4T1 tumors by inducing immunogenic, caspase-independent programmed cell death (PCD. With lower electric fields, like those peripheral to the primary treatment zone, NPS can activate dendritic cells (DCs. The activation of DCs by dead/dying cells leads to increases in memory effector and central memory T-lymphocytes in the blood and spleen. NPS also eliminates immunosuppressive cells in the tumor microenvironment and blood. Finally, NPS treatment of 4T1 breast cancer exhibits an abscopal effect and largely prevents spontaneous metastases to distant organs. NPS with fast rise–fall times and pulse durations near the plasma membrane charging time constant, which exhibits transient, high-frequency components (1/time = Hz, induce responses from mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and nucleus. Such effects may be responsible for release of danger-associated molecular patterns, including ATP, calreticulin, and high mobility group box 1 (HMBG1 from 4T1-Luc cells to induce immunogenic cell death (ICD. This likely leads to immunity and the vaccine-like response. In this way, NPS acts as a unique onco-immunotherapy providing distinct therapeutic advantages showing possible clinical utility for breast cancers as well as for other malignancies.

  12. Effect of hypolipidemic drugs on basal and stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bershtein, L.M.; Kovaleva, I.G.; Rozenberg, O.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper studies adenylate cyclase acticvity in Ehrlich's ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells during administration of drugs with a hypolipidemic action. Seven to eight days before they were killed, male mice ingested the antidiabetic biguanide phenformin, and the phospholipid-containing preparation Essentiale in drinking water. The cAMP formed was isolated by chromatography on Silufol plates after incubation of the enzyme preparation with tritium-ATP, or was determined by the competitive binding method with protein. It is shown that despite the possible differences in the concrete mechanism of action of the hypolipidemic agents chosen for study on the cyclase system, the use of such agents, offers definite prospects for oriented modification of the hormone sensitivity of tumor cells

  13. Hemispheric language dominance measured by repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation and postoperative course of language function in brain tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ille, Sebastian; Kulchytska, Nataliia; Sollmann, Nico; Wittig, Regina; Beurskens, Eva; Butenschoen, Vicki M; Ringel, Florian; Vajkoczy, Peter; Meyer, Bernhard; Picht, Thomas; Krieg, Sandro M

    2016-10-01

    The resection of left-sided perisylvian brain lesions harbors the risk of postoperative aphasia. Because it is known that language function can shift between hemispheres in brain tumor patients, the preoperative knowledge of the patient's language dominance could be helpful. We therefore investigated the hemispheric language dominance by repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and surgery-related deficits of language function. We pooled the bicentric language mapping data of 80 patients undergoing the resection of left-sided perisylvian brain lesions in our two university neurosurgical departments. We calculated error rates (ERs; ER = errors per stimulations) for both hemispheres and defined the hemispheric dominance ratio (HDR) as the quotient of the left- and right-sided ER (HDR >1= left dominant; HDR right dominant). The course of the patient's language function was evaluated and correlated with the preoperative HDR. Only three of 80 patients (4%) presented with permanent surgery-related aphasia and 24 patients (30%) with transient surgery-related aphasia. The mean HDR (± standard deviation) of patients with new aphasia after five days was significantly higher (1.68±1.07) than the HDR of patients with no new language deficit (1.37±1.08) (p=0.0482). With a predefined cut-off value of 0.5 for HDR, we achieved a sensitivity for predicting new aphasia of 100%. A higher preoperative HDR significantly correlates with an increased risk for transient aphasia. Moreover, the intensive preoperative workup in this study led to a considerably low rate of permanent aphasia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Emerging Roles of Tumor Necrosis Factor-Stimulated Gene-6 in the Pathophysiology and Treatment of Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rena Watanabe

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6 is a 35-kDa glycoprotein that has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects in experimental models of arthritis, acute myocardial infarction, and acute cerebral infarction. Several lines of evidence have shed light on the pathophysiological roles of TSG-6 in atherosclerosis. TSG-6 suppresses inflammatory responses of endothelial cells, neutrophils, and macrophages as well as macrophage foam cell formation and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC migration and proliferation. Exogenous TSG-6 infusion and endogenous TSG-6 attenuation with a neutralizing antibody for four weeks retards and accelerates, respectively, the development of aortic atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE-deficient mice. TSG-6 also decreases the macrophage/VSMC ratio (a marker of plaque instability and promotes collagen fibers in atheromatous plaques. In patients with coronary artery disease (CAD, plasma TSG-6 levels are increased and TSG-6 is abundantly expressed in the fibrous cap within coronary atheromatous plaques, indicating that TSG-6 increases to counteract the progression of atherosclerosis and stabilize the plaque. These findings indicate that endogenous TSG-6 enhancement and exogenous TSG-6 replacement treatments are expected to emerge as new lines of therapy against atherosclerosis and related CAD. Therefore, this review provides support for the clinical utility of TSG-6 in the diagnosis and treatment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases.

  15. Optimizing Wound Bed Preparation With Collagenase Enzymatic Debridement

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallon, Stanley K.; Weir, Dorothy; Lantis, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Difficult-to-heal and chronic wounds affect tens of millions of people worldwide. In the U.S. alone, the direct cost for their treatment exceeds $25 billion. Yet despite advances in wound research and treatment that have markedly improved patient care, wound healing is often delayed for weeks or months. For venous and diabetic ulcers, complete wound closure is achieved in as few as 25%–50% of chronic or hard-to-heal wounds. Wound bed preparation and the consistent application of appropriate and effective debridement techniques are recommended for the optimized treatment of chronic wounds. The TIME paradigm (Tissue, Inflammation/infection, Moisture balance and Edge of wound) provides a model to remove barriers to healing and optimize the healing process. While we often think of debridement as an episodic event that occurs in specific care giver/patient interface. There is the possibility of a maintenance debridement in which the chronic application of a medication can assist in both the macroscopic and microscopic debridement of a wound. We review the various debridement therapies available to clinicians in the United States, and explore the characteristics and capabilities of clostridial collagenase ointment (CCO), a type of enzymatic debridement, that potentially allows for epithelialization while debriding. It appears that in the case of CCO it may exert this influences by removal of the necrotic plug while promoting granulation and sustaining epithelialization. It is also easily combined with other methods of debridement, is selective to necrotic tissue, and has been safely used in various populations. We review the body of evidence has indicated that this concept of maintenance debridement, especially when combined episodic debridement may add a cost an efficacious, safe and cost-effective choice for debridement of cutaneous ulcers and burn wounds and it will likely play an expanding role in all phases of wound bed preparation. PMID:26442207

  16. Characterization of collagenase-3 binding and internalization by rabbit chondrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raggatt, L.J.; Choundhury, I.; Williams, S.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Collagenase-3 (MMP-13) is an extracellular matrix metalloproteinase that cleaves type II collagen, the major protein component of cartilage, with high specificity. Several studies have identified increased levels of MMP-13 in arthritic synovial fluid where it may contribute to matrix destruction in this disease. Our laboratory has previously documented a process where by osteoblastic cells remove MMP-13 from the surrounding milieu by binding the enzyme to a specific receptor. The enzyme is then internalized and degraded through the actions of the endocytotic receptor, the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP). Such a mechanism provides for a controlled elimination of a potentially destructive enzyme from the extracellular environment. This process of MMP-13 internalization also occurs in chondrocytes and is significantly reduced in OA chondrocytes. We are currently characterizing the internalization of MMP-13 in normal rabbit chondrocytes. Primary rabbit chondrocytes were harvested and cultured in monolayers for three passages. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to asses the cell phenotype during the culture period and the rabbit chondrocytes were found to express the cartilage specific genes aggrecan and type II collagen throughout this time. 125I-MMP-13 was used to assess the ability of the rabbit chondrocytes to bind MMP-13. Appreciable specific cell-association of MMP-13 was detected after 10 mm of exposure to the ligand and equilibrium was obtained after 2 h. After identifying the time to equilibrium we determined whether binding was saturable by incubating the chondrocytes with increasing concentrations of 125I-MMP-13 ranging from 0 to 100 nM at 4 deg C for 2h. The amount of specifically associated MMP-13 approached saturation at 75 nM, allowing assessment of the receptor kinetics. Finally, we have assessed the ability of rabbit chondrocytes to internalize a single cohort of 125I-MMP-13 over time at

  17. [Study on a collagenase protocol to extract DNA from remnant feathers in edible bird's nest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling-Li; Chen, Nian; Zhang, Wei-Wei; Wu, Guo-Hong; Lai, Xiao-Ping

    2013-08-01

    To establish a method for extracting genomic DNA from rudimental bird feather from the precious edible bird's nest (EBN) harvested from the swiftlet cave. Observed the EBN using endoscopic and studied the influence of adding collagenase on the extracting yield of DNA. PCR amplification and sequencing for the extraction was also conducted. Collagenase was used in addition to protease K which could substantively increase the DNA yield. The DNA extracted by this method could be used for PCR and other molecular biology analyses. This method can be applied to identify the species types in biological products, especially for animal tissue materials that rich in collagen.

  18. A low concentration of ethanol reduces the chemiluminescence of human granulocytes and monocytes but not the tumor necrosis factor alpha production by monocytes after endotoxin stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Diedrich, J. P.; Schäfer, Christian

    1998-01-01

    necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) from Mphi. Further, the efficiency of ethanol to inactivate chemically generated ROS was tested. Significant stimulation of ROS release occurred at endotoxin concentrations of 1 ng/ml or higher in both PMNs and Mphi. Ethanol significantly suppressed the formation of ROS...... immunogens and to increase the susceptibility of alcohol abusers to infectious diseases. As endotoxemia is common in alcohol abusers, we investigated the effect of ethanol (21.7 mmol/liter) on the luminol-amplified chemiluminescence of PMNs and Mphi after endotoxin stimulation and the release of tumor...... identical (6 to 8 ng/ml) in both PMNs and Mphi, independent of the presence of ethanol. In contrast to ROS formation, ethanol had no effect on the amount of TNF-alpha produced by endotoxin-stimulated Mphi. Ethanol was shown to be unable to decrease the levels of chemically generated ROS under physiological...

  19.  The role of metalloproteinases in modification of extracellular matrix in invasive tumor growth, metastasis and angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Fink

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are a family of endopeptydases which recquire a zinc ion at their active site, for proteolityc activity. There are six members of the MMP family: matrilysins, collagenases, stromelysins, gelatinases, membrane MMPs and other MMPs. Activity of MMPs is regulated at the level of gene transcription, mRNA stability, zymogene proteolitic activation, inhibition of an active enzyme and MMP degradation. Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs are main intracellular inhibitors of MMPs. Host cells can be stimulated by tumor cells to produce MMPs by secreted interleukins, interferons, growth factors and an extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN. MMPs are produced by tumor cells, fibroblasts, macrophages, mast cells, polimorphonuclear neutrophiles (PMNs and endothelial cells (ECs. MMPs affect many stages of tumor development, facilitating its growth through promoting tumor cells proliferation, invasion and migration, new blood vessels formation and blocking tumor cells apoptosis. MMPs can promote tumor development in several ways. ECM degradation results in release of peptide growth factors. Growth factors linked with cell surface or binding proteins can also be liberated by MMPs. MMPs can indirectly regulate integrin signalling or cleave E-cadherins, facilitating cell migration. MMPs support metastasis inducing an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT. MMP also support transendothelial migration. MMPs support angiogenesis by releasing pro-angiogenic factors and degrading ECM to support ECs migration. Cell surface growth factor receptors are also cleaved by MMPs, which results in inhibition of tumor development, so is release of anti-angiogenic factors from ECM. 

  20. Intake of high-fat diet stimulates the risk of ultraviolet radiation-induced skin tumors and malignant progression of papillomas to carcinoma in SKH-1 hairless mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaid, Mudit; Singh, Tripti; Prasad, Ram [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Katiyar, Santosh K., E-mail: skatiyar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we showed that administration of a high-fat diet (HF-diet) to C57BL/6 mice exacerbates their response to short-term UVB radiation-induced inflammation in the skin. To explore the effects of an HF-diet on UVB-induced tumorigenesis, we have used the SKH-1 hairless mouse model in which the mice are exposed to UVB radiation (180 mJ/cm{sup 2}) three times a week for 24 weeks. The development of UVB-induced skin tumors was rapid and the tumor multiplicity and tumor size were significantly higher (P < 0.01–0.005) in the mice fed an HF-diet than the mice fed a control-diet (C-diet). Moreover, the malignant progression of UVB-induced papillomas to carcinomas was higher in HF-diet-fed mice. On analysis of tumors and tumor-uninvolved skin samples from the tumor-bearing mice, we found that administration of an HF-diet significantly enhanced the levels of UVB-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), prostaglandin E{sub 2} (P < 0.01), and PGE{sub 2} receptors, and activation of NF-κB in the UVB-exposed skin as well as in tumors. In addition the HF-diet enhanced the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (P < 0.01), interleukin (IL)-1β (P < 0.01) and IL-6 (P < 0.05) in the UVB-exposed skin as well as in tumors. Western blot analysis revealed that HF-diet enhanced the levels of epidermal cell proliferation, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and phosphorylation of Akt at Ser{sup 473} in UVB-exposed skin and skin tumors. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the regular consumption of an HF-diet increases the risk of photocarcinogenesis in mice and that this is associated with enhanced expression of inflammatory mediators in the UVB-exposed skin and tumors. - Highlights: • Consumption of high-fat diet increases UVB-induced skin tumor development in mice. • Intake of high-fat diet stimulates progression of UV-induced papilloma to carcinoma. • Intake of high-fat diet enhances inflammation in UV-exposed skin • Regular

  1. Loci controlling lymphocyte production of interferon gamma after alloantigen stimulation in vitro and their co-localization with genes controlling lymphocyte infiltration of tumors and tumor susceptibility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lipoldová, Marie; Havelková, Helena; Badalová, Jana; Vojtíšková, Jarmila; Quan, L.; Krulová, Magdalena; Sohrabi, Yahya; Stassen, A. P. M.; Demant, P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 2 (2010), s. 203-213 ISSN 0340-7004 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009; GA AV ČR IAA500520606; GA ČR GD310/08/H077 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Tumor susceptibility * Genetic control of interferon gamma production * Lymphocyte infiltration of tumors Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.293, year: 2010

  2. Collagenase Treatment for Dupuytren Disease of the Thumb and First Web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreise, Marieke M.; Stenekes, Martin W.; Werker, Paul M. N.

    Purpose To evaluate the short-term effectiveness of collagenase Clostridium histolyticum to treat thumb and first web contractures in Dupuytren disease. Methods We prospectively included 14 thumbs in 12 patients with a contracture at the metacarpophalangeal or interphalangeal joint of at least 20

  3. Biochemical characterisation of the tissue degrading enzyme, collagenase, in the spined soldier bug, Podisus maculiventris (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghamari Mahboob

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Podisus maculiventris (Say is a generalist predator attacking many insect species from different orders. The bug injects saliva into its prey's body. The ingested hemolymph and liquefied internal tissues pass through the bug's alimentary tract. Collagenase working on peptide bonds of collagen and basement membrane proteins, leads to the disintegration of the prey's internal organs. As yet, there is an almost complete lack of knowledge on the collagenase activity in P. maculiventris. The collagenase activity of the salivary glands and midgut was optimum at pH 8.0 which was congruent with the optimal pH of the total proteolytic activity of the salivary glands. More collagenolytic activity was determined in the posterior lobe of the salivary glands and anterior midgut. Significant inhibition of collagenolytic activity by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA revealed the enzyme is a metalloproteinase. The collagenase activity notably decreased when the bug went hungry. The salivary gland collagenase is a vital enzyme in extra-oral digestion and facilitates the action of other digestive enzymes. The midgut collagenase may be involved in the digestion of the ingested muscle fibers. The collagenase probably acts as an intoxicating agent in the saliva (venom of P. maculiventris. Paralysing toxins are present in the salivary gland secretion.

  4. Survey for collagenase gene prtC in Porphyromonas gingivalis and Porphyromonas endodontalis isolated from endodontic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odell, L J; Baumgartner, J C; Xia, T; David, L L

    1999-08-01

    Collagenase is a potential virulence factor shown to be expressed by Porphyromonas gingivalis associated with periodontal disease. The purpose of this study was to use the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect the presence of the collagenase gene (prtC) in 21 strains of Porphyromonas species isolated from endodontic infections. Type strains for P. gingivalis (ATCC 33277), P. endodontalis (ATCC 35406), Prevotella intermedia (ATCC 25611), and Prevotella nigrescens (ATCC 33563) were used as controls. When PCR primers specific for the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of P. gingivalis or P. endodontalis were used, 16 of the strains were identified as P. gingivalis, and five strains were identified as P. endodontalis. The presence of the prtC gene for collagenase was detected using PCR. Amplicons were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis, with an 815 bp amplicon representing the presence of the collagenase gene. Type strain ATCC 33277 and all 16 clinical isolates of P. gingivalis produced the collagenase gene amplicon. Neither type strain ATCC 35406 nor the five strains from clinical isolates of P. endodontalis produced the collagenase gene amplicon. These results indicate that P. gingivalis from endodontic infections possesses the prtC gene. P. endodontalis does not seem to exhibit prtC. The virulence of P. gingivalis may be related to its production of collagenase.

  5. Efficacy and safety of collagenase Clostridium histolyticum injection for Dupuytren contracture: report of 40 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberton, F; Corain, M; Garofano, A; Pangallo, L; Valore, A; Zanella, V; Adani, R

    2014-12-01

    Dupuytren's disease (DD) is a fibroproliferative pathology that affects the palmar aponeurosis causing the development of nodules and collagen cords and the progressive flexion of the fingers. The standard procedure is surgical fasciectomy, followed by high recurrence rates. Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCH) injection represents an innovative noninvasive approach to the treatment of DD. This prospective study was designed to examine the efficacy and safety of CCH injection performed in the outpatient, using local anesthesia. Forty patients [32 metacarpophalangeal (MP), 8 proximal interphalangeal (PIP)] with Dupuytren's contracture of at least 20° for MP joint and any degree for PIP joint were included. The mean age was 66. All joints were treated with a single vial of collagenase injection and manual breaking of the cord 24 h after. All adverse effects (AEs) were monitored. Patients were checked 7, 30, 90, and 180 days after the injection. Primary endpoint was a reduction in digit contracture within 0°-5° of normal extension. Secondary endpoints were the improvement of range of motion, the evaluation of AEs incidence, and cost-effectiveness of collagenase treatment. About 67.5 % of patients obtained a clinical success. At 6 months, a further 7.5% attained the same result. The mean contracture of treated joints was 5.3º for MP and 6.8° for PIP joints. Twenty-three patients had one or more mild-to-moderate side effects. The use of collagenase appears to be an effective and safe method for the treatment of Dupuytren's contracture. Therapeutic success was achieved in a significant percentage of patients. The incidence of side effects was higher, but they were local reactions of short duration. The use of a single collagenase vial in patients treated in day surgery appears more cost-effective than surgery.

  6. Aloe vera: an in vitro study of effects on corneal wound closure and collagenase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curto, Elizabeth M; Labelle, Amber; Chandler, Heather L

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the in vitro effects of an aloe vera solution on (i) the viability and wound healing response of corneal cells and (ii) the ability to alter collagenase and gelatinase activities. Primary cultures of corneal epithelial cells and fibroblasts were prepared from grossly normal enucleated canine globes and treated with an aloe solution (doses ranging from 0.0-2 mg/mL). Cellular viability was evaluated using a colorimetric assay. A corneal wound healing model was used to quantify cellular ingrowth across a defect made on the confluent surface. Anticollagenase and antigelatinase activities were evaluated by incubating a bacterial collagenase/gelatinase with aloe solution (doses ranging from 0.0-500 μg/mL) and comparing outcome measures to a general metalloproteinase inhibitor, 1, 10-phenanthroline, and canine serum (doses ranging from 0.0-100%). None of the concentrations of aloe solution tested significantly affected the viability of corneal epithelial cells or fibroblasts. Concentrations ≤175 μg/mL slightly accelerated corneal epithelial cell wound closure; this change was not significant. Concentrations ≥175 μg/mL significantly (P ≤ 0.001) slowed the rate of corneal fibroblast wound closure, while aloe concentrations Aloe solution did not alter the ability for collagenase to degrade gelatin or collagen Type I but increased the ability for collagenase to degrade Type IV collagen. Although additional experiments are required, lower concentrations of aloe solution may be beneficial in healing of superficial corneal wounds to help decrease fibrosis and speed epithelialization. An increase in collagenase activity with aloe vera warrants further testing before considering in vivo studies. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  7. The anti-tumor effect of bee honey in Ehrlich ascite tumor model of mice is coincided with stimulation of the immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, W Y; Gabry, M S; El-Shaikh, K A; Othman, G A

    2008-01-01

    Honey is thought to exhibit a broad spectrum of therapeutic properties including antibacterial, antifungal, cytostatic and anti-inflammatory activity and has been used for the treatment of gastric ulcers, burns, and for storage of skin grafts. The present study investigated the antitumor effect of bee honey against Ehrlich ascites tumor in mice and the possible mode of antitumor action. Peroral administration of mice with honey (10, 100 or 1000 mg/ 100 g BW) every other day for 4 weeks before intraperitoneal inoculation with Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT, 1 x 10(6) cells) increased the number bone marrow cells as well as peritoneal macrophages, but not peripheral blood leukocytes nor splenocytes. The phagocytic function of macrophages as well as the T- and B-cell functions were also increased. Honey pre-treatment also recovered the total lipids, total proteins, as well as liver and kidney enzyme activities in EAT-bearing mice. In vitro studies on EAT cells demonstrated inhibitory effect of honey on tumor cell proliferation, viability % of tumor cells as well as the size of solid tumor. The present results indicate that the preventive treatment with honey is considerably effective against EAT in mice both in vivo and in vitro. The antitumor activity of honey may occur through the activation of macrophages, T-cells and B-cells.

  8. The subacute damage of the dorsal root ganglion induced by collagenase in rats: a study on the ultrastructure of neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Heping; Zhuang Wenquan; Yang Jianyong; Chen Wei

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of collagenase on the ultrastructure of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in rats. The safety of collagenase on nerve tissue was investigated. Additionally, the safety of percutaneous collagenase chemonucleolysis (PCCN) on nerve tissue was evaluated. Methods: In total 27 male, healthy SD rats were enrolled. All rats were randomized into 3 groups: normal group (9 rats), subacute damage of collagenase group (9 rats), subacute intervention-analogue group (9 rats). The left L5 DRG was exposed in each rat. One milliliter of the collagenase solution (300 units) was carefully applied to the exposed DRG in collagenase group, and one milliliter of the isotonic saline was applied to the exposed DRG in intervention-analogue group. The morphology of the DRG under electron microscope were analyzed 7-9 days after the procedures. Results: The types, number, and morphology of cells; the membrane of neutrons; the nerve fibers and blood vessels in DRG had not been changed in all groups observed under optic microscope. The difference of the ultrastructure of neutrons in DRG among the normal groups, intervention-analogue group and collagenase group was significant: 1) The eccentric nucleolus were revealed; 2) Swelling mitochondria and absence of mitochondria crests and vesicles. Cytoclasis and apoptosis of neutrons had not been observed under electron microscope. Conclusion: The collagenase used in PCCN dose have a certain damage to the neutreons in DRG. In the procedure of PCCN, the volume and dosage of collagenase should be carefully selected and the intervention should be precisely performed by experienced hands. (authors)

  9. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Amplification of Interleukin-1β and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Production in THP-1 Human Monocytic Cells Stimulated with Lipopolysaccharide of Oral Microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Baqui, A. A. M. A.; Meiller, Timothy F.; Chon, Jennifer J.; Turng, Been-Foo; Falkler, William A.

    1998-01-01

    Cytokines, including granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), are used to assist in bone marrow recovery during cancer chemotherapy. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) play important roles in inflammatory processes, including exacerbation of periodontal diseases, one of the most common complications in patients who undergo this therapy. A human monocyte cell line (THP-1) was utilized to investigate IL-1β and TNF-α production following GM-CSF suppl...

  10. Mapping of arithmetic processing by navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with parietal brain tumors and correlation with postoperative outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ille, Sebastian; Drummer, Katharina; Giglhuber, Katrin; Conway, Neal; Maurer, Stefanie; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2018-03-26

    Preserving functionality is of significant importance during neurosurgical resection of brain tumors. Specialized centers also map further brain functions apart from motor and language functions, such as arithmetic processing (AP). The mapping of AP by navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (nrTMS) in healthy volunteers has been demonstrated. The present study aimed to correlate the results of mapping AP with functional patient outcomes. We included 26 patients with parietal brain tumors. Due to preoperative impairment of AP, mapping was not possible in 8 patients (31%). We stimulated 52 cortical sites by nrTMS while patients performed a calculation task. Pre- and postoperatively, patients underwent a standardized number-processing and calculation test (NPCT). Tumor resection was blinded to nrTMS results, and the change in NPCT performance was correlated to resected AP-positive spots as identified by nrTMS. The resection of AP-positive sites correlated with a worsening of the postoperative NPCT result in 12 cases. In 3 cases, no AP-positive sites were resected and the postoperative NPCT result was similar to or better than preoperatively. Also, in 3 cases, the postoperative NPCT result was better than preoperatively, although AP-positive sites were resected. Despite only presenting a low number of cases, nrTMS might be a useful tool for preoperative mapping of AP. However, the reliability of the present results has to be evaluated in a larger series and by intraoperative mapping data. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hypoxia upregulates Bcl-2 expression and suppresses interferon-gamma induced antiangiogenic activity in human tumor derived endothelial cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wang, Jiang Huai

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hypoxia in solid tumors potentially stimulates angiogenesis by promoting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production and upregulating VEGF receptor expression. However, it is unknown whether hypoxia can modulate the effect of anti-angiogenic treatment on tumor-derived endothelium. METHODS: Human tumor-derived endothelial cells (HTDEC) were freshly isolated from surgically removed human colorectal tumors by collagenase\\/DNase digestion and Percol gradient sedimentation. Cell proliferation was assessed by measuring BrdU incorporation, and capillary tube formation was measured using Matrigel. Cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry and ELISA, and Bcl-2 expression was detected by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Under aerobic culture conditions (5% CO2 plus 21% O2) HTDEC expressed less Bcl-2 and were more susceptible to IFN-gamma-induced apoptosis with significant reductions in both cell proliferation and capillary tube formation, when compared with normal human macrovascular and microvascular EC. Following exposure of HTDEC to hypoxia (5% CO2 plus 2% O2), IFN-gamma-induced cell apoptosis, and antiangiogenic activity (i.e. an inhibition in cell proliferation and capillary tube formation) in HTDEC were markedly attenuated. This finding correlated with hypoxia-induced upregulation of Bcl-2 expression in HTDEC. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that hypoxia can protect HTDEC against IFN-gamma-mediated cell death and antiangiogenic activity, and suggest that improvement of tumor oxygenation may potentiate the efficacy of anti-cancer therapies specifically targeting the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis.

  12. Expression of most matrix metalloproteinase family members in breast cancer represents a tumor-induced host response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppner, K. J.; Matrisian, L. M.; Jensen, R. A.; Rodgers, W. H.

    1996-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family members have been associated with advanced-stage cancer and contribute to tumor progression, invasion, and metastasis as determined by inhibitor studies. In situ hybridization was performed to analyze the expression and localization of all known MMPs in a series of human breast cancer biopsy specimens. Most MMPs were localized to tumor stroma, and all MMPs had very distinct expression patterns. Matrilysin was expressed by morphologically normal epithelial ducts within tumors and in tissue from reduction mammoplasties, and by epithelial-derived tumor cells. Many family members, including stromelysin-3, gelatinase A, MT-MMP, interstitial collagenase, and stromelysin-1 were localized to fibroblasts of tumor stroma of invasive cancers but in quite distinct, and generally widespread, patterns. Gelatinase B, collagenase-3, and metalloelastase expression were more focal; gelatinase B was primarily localized to endothelial cells, collagenase-3 to isolated tumor cells, and metalloelastase to cytokeratin-negative, macrophage-like cells. The MMP inhibitor, TIMP-1, was expressed in both stromal and tumor components in most tumors, and neither stromelysin-2 nor neutrophil collagenase were detected in any of the tumors. These results indicate that there is very tight and complex regulation in the expression of MMP family members in breast cancer that generally represents a host response to the tumor and emphasize the need to further evaluate differential functions for MMP family members in breast tumor progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8686751

  13. Low dose decitabine treatment induces CD80 expression in cancer cells and stimulates tumor specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Xin Wang

    Full Text Available Lack of immunogenicity of cancer cells has been considered a major reason for their failure in induction of a tumor specific T cell response. In this paper, we present evidence that decitabine (DAC, a DNA methylation inhibitor that is currently used for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, acute myeloid leukemia (AML and other malignant neoplasms, is capable of eliciting an anti-tumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL response in mouse EL4 tumor model. C57BL/6 mice with established EL4 tumors were treated with DAC (1.0 mg/kg body weight once daily for 5 days. We found that DAC treatment resulted in infiltration of IFN-γ producing T lymphocytes into tumors and caused tumor rejection. Depletion of CD8(+, but not CD4(+ T cells resumed tumor growth. DAC-induced CTL response appeared to be elicited by the induction of CD80 expression on tumor cells. Epigenetic evidence suggests that DAC induces CD80 expression in EL4 cells via demethylation of CpG dinucleotide sites in the promoter of CD80 gene. In addition, we also showed that a transient, low-dose DAC treatment can induce CD80 gene expression in a variety of human cancer cells. This study provides the first evidence that epigenetic modulation can induce the expression of a major T cell co-stimulatory molecule on cancer cells, which can overcome immune tolerance, and induce an efficient anti-tumor CTL response. The results have important implications in designing DAC-based cancer immunotherapy.

  14. Low Dose Decitabine Treatment Induces CD80 Expression in Cancer Cells and Stimulates Tumor Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji-Hao; Yao, Yu-Shi; Li, Yong-Hui; Xu, Yi-Han; Li, Jing-Xin; Gao, Xiao-Ning; Zhou, Min-Hang; Jiang, Meng-Meng; Gao, Li; Ding, Yi; Lu, Xue-Chun; Shi, Jin-Long; Luo, Xu-Feng; Wang, Jia; Wang, Li-Li; Qu, Chunfeng; Bai, Xue-Feng; Yu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Lack of immunogenicity of cancer cells has been considered a major reason for their failure in induction of a tumor specific T cell response. In this paper, we present evidence that decitabine (DAC), a DNA methylation inhibitor that is currently used for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and other malignant neoplasms, is capable of eliciting an anti-tumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response in mouse EL4 tumor model. C57BL/6 mice with established EL4 tumors were treated with DAC (1.0 mg/kg body weight) once daily for 5 days. We found that DAC treatment resulted in infiltration of IFN-γ producing T lymphocytes into tumors and caused tumor rejection. Depletion of CD8+, but not CD4+ T cells resumed tumor growth. DAC-induced CTL response appeared to be elicited by the induction of CD80 expression on tumor cells. Epigenetic evidence suggests that DAC induces CD80 expression in EL4 cells via demethylation of CpG dinucleotide sites in the promoter of CD80 gene. In addition, we also showed that a transient, low-dose DAC treatment can induce CD80 gene expression in a variety of human cancer cells. This study provides the first evidence that epigenetic modulation can induce the expression of a major T cell co-stimulatory molecule on cancer cells, which can overcome immune tolerance, and induce an efficient anti-tumor CTL response. The results have important implications in designing DAC-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:23671644

  15. Low dose decitabine treatment induces CD80 expression in cancer cells and stimulates tumor specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Xin; Mei, Zhen-Yang; Zhou, Ji-Hao; Yao, Yu-Shi; Li, Yong-Hui; Xu, Yi-Han; Li, Jing-Xin; Gao, Xiao-Ning; Zhou, Min-Hang; Jiang, Meng-Meng; Gao, Li; Ding, Yi; Lu, Xue-Chun; Shi, Jin-Long; Luo, Xu-Feng; Wang, Jia; Wang, Li-Li; Qu, Chunfeng; Bai, Xue-Feng; Yu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Lack of immunogenicity of cancer cells has been considered a major reason for their failure in induction of a tumor specific T cell response. In this paper, we present evidence that decitabine (DAC), a DNA methylation inhibitor that is currently used for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and other malignant neoplasms, is capable of eliciting an anti-tumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response in mouse EL4 tumor model. C57BL/6 mice with established EL4 tumors were treated with DAC (1.0 mg/kg body weight) once daily for 5 days. We found that DAC treatment resulted in infiltration of IFN-γ producing T lymphocytes into tumors and caused tumor rejection. Depletion of CD8(+), but not CD4(+) T cells resumed tumor growth. DAC-induced CTL response appeared to be elicited by the induction of CD80 expression on tumor cells. Epigenetic evidence suggests that DAC induces CD80 expression in EL4 cells via demethylation of CpG dinucleotide sites in the promoter of CD80 gene. In addition, we also showed that a transient, low-dose DAC treatment can induce CD80 gene expression in a variety of human cancer cells. This study provides the first evidence that epigenetic modulation can induce the expression of a major T cell co-stimulatory molecule on cancer cells, which can overcome immune tolerance, and induce an efficient anti-tumor CTL response. The results have important implications in designing DAC-based cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Tumors initiated by constitutive Cdk2 activation exhibit transforming growth factor beta resistance and acquire paracrine mitogenic stimulation during progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corsino, P.; Davis, B.; Law, M.

    2007-01-01

    ) promoter results in mammary gland hyperplasia and fibrosis, and mammary tumors. Cell lines isolated from MMTV-cyclin D1-Cdk2 (MMTV-D1K2) tumors exhibit Rb and p130 hyperphosphorylation and up-regulation of the protein products of E2F-dependent genes. These results suggest that cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes may...... sites. Together, these results suggest that deregulation of the Cdk/Rb/E2F axis reprograms mammary epithelial cells to initiate a paracrine loop with tumor-associated fibroblasts involving TGF beta and HGF, resulting in desmoplasia. The MMTV-DIK2 mice should provide a useful model system...

  17. Tumor cell-released TLR4 ligands stimulate Gr-1+CD11b+F4/80+ cells to induce apoptosis of activated T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Yan; Sun, Ling-Cong; Wei, Jing-Jing; Li, Dong; Yuan, Ye; Yan, Bin; Liang, Zhi-Hui; Zhu, Hui-Fen; Xu, Yong; Li, Bo; Song, Chuan-Wang; Liao, Sheng-Jun; Lei, Zhang; Zhang, Gui-Mei; Feng, Zuo-Hua

    2010-09-01

    Gr-1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cells play important roles in tumor development and have a negative effect on tumor immunotherapy. So far, the mechanisms underlying the regulation of their immunosuppressive phenotype by classical and alternative macrophage activation stimuli are not well elucidated. In this study, we found that molecules from necrotic tumor cells (NTC-Ms) stimulated Gr-1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cells to induce apoptosis of activated T cells but not nonstimulated T cells. The apoptosis-inducing capacity was determined by higher expression levels of arginase I and IL-10 relative to those of NO synthase 2 and IL-12 in Gr-1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cells, which were induced by NTC-Ms through TLR4 signaling. The apoptosis-inducing capacity of NTC-Ms-stimulated Gr-1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cells could be enhanced by IL-10. IFN-gamma may reduce the apoptosis-inducing capacity of Gr-1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cells only if their response to IFN-gamma was not attenuated. However, the potential of Gr-1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cells to express IL-12 in response to IFN-gamma could be attenuated by tumor, partially due to the existence of active STAT3 in Gr-1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cells and NTC-Ms from tumor. In this situation, IFN-gamma could not effectively reduce the apoptosis-inducing capacity of Gr-1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cells. Tumor immunotherapy with 4-1BBL/soluble programmed death-1 may significantly reduce, but not abolish the apoptosis-inducing capacity of Gr-1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cells in local microenvironment. Blockade of TLR4 signaling could further reduce the apoptosis-inducing capacity of Gr-1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cells and enhance the suppressive effect of 4-1BBL/soluble form of programmed death-1 on tumor growth. These findings indicate the relationship of distinct signaling pathways with apoptosis-inducing capacity of Gr-1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cells and emphasize the importance of blocking TLR4 signaling to prevent the induction of T cell apoptosis by Gr-1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cells.

  18. Bombesin-stimulated serum immunoreactive trypsin in the different diagnosis between endocrine and exocrine tumors of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonora, G.; De Giorgio, R.; Toni, R.; Fanti, M.P.; Cariani, G.; Vezzadini, P.

    1987-01-01

    Bombesin administration was recently found to induce a marked increase in circulating immunoreactive trypsin (IRT), whose magnitude seems to reflect the functional capacity of pancreatic acinar cell mass. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of bombesin infusion on serum IRT concentration in patients with endocrine or exocrine tumors of the pancreas. Fifteen patients with pancreatic endocrine tumor, 17 patients with pancreatic exocrine carcinoma and 15 healty subjects were investigated. Serum IRT was measured by radioimmunoassay before and for 120 minutes after the start of bombesin infusion (9 ng/kg/min over 30 min). The integrated serum IRT response to bombesin administration in patients with endocrine tumor of the pancreas did not differ significantly from controls, but were significantly higher than in patients with exocrine carcinoma. In the latter the integrated IRT responses to bombesin infusion in patients with endocrine tumor can probably be explained by small tumor size and/or little invasion of the glandular parenchyma, resulting in an undetectable impairment of exocrine pancreatic function. The very low IRT responses in patients with exocrine carcinoma could reflect the presence of severe pancreatic damage. The results suggest that this newly proposed bombesin test may be useful in the preoperative differential diagnosis between endocrine and exocrine tumors of the pancreas

  19. X-ray targeting puncture collagenase chemonucleolysis combined with injection of medical ozone for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Lin; Zhu Genfa

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of X-ray target puncture collagenase chemonucleolysis combined with injection of medical ozone for lumbar disc herniation. Methods: One thousand and sixty-two cases of lumbar disc herniation accepted collagenase chemonucleolysis combined with injection of medical ozone targeted by X-ray. The therapeutic effects after operation were analyzed. Results: Of all the 1062 cases, the effective rate of X-ray target puncture collagenase chemonucleolysis combined with injection of medical ozone was 95.3% at 3 months, 92.3% at 12 months, and 91.2% at 24 months after operation. Conclusion: X-ray target puncture collagenase chemonucleolysis combined with injection of medical ozone is a simple and safe method for the lumbar disc herniation. It also had fewer adverse reactions and better therapeutic effects. (authors)

  20. Collagenases and gelatinases in bone healing. The focus on mandibular fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurzepa Jacek

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to high amount of collagen fibres in the structure of bone, the enzymes capable of collagen digestion play a key role in bone remodelling. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, prevailing extracellular endopeptideses, can digest extracellularly located proteins, e.g. collagen, proteoglycans, elastin or fibronectin. Among MMPs, collagenases (MMP-1, MMP-8 and MMP-13 and gelatinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9 can cleave collagen particles to forms that are able to undergo further steps of catabolism intracellularly. In addition, activity of the gelatinases (as an activation of proinflammatory cytokines facilitates spreading inflammation that is necessary during the first stage of bone healing. Further studies related to the role of various MMPs in mandibular fractures should precisely explain their function in the bone healing and evaluate the influence of MMPs inhibitors on that process. This review provides the basic information about two groups among MMPs family, collagenases and gelatinases, and their role in repairing processes after mandibular fractures.

  1. Lactoferrin release and interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor production by human polymorphonuclear cells stimulated by various lipopolysaccharides: relationship to growth inhibition of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, C; Cassone, A; Serbousek, D; Pearson, C A; Djeu, J Y

    1992-11-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, and Salmonella typhimurium, at doses from 1 to 100 ng/ml, strongly enhanced growth inhibition of Candida albicans by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in vitro. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that LPS markedly augmented phagocytosis of Candida cells by increasing the number of yeasts ingested per neutrophil as well as the number of neutrophils capable of ingesting fungal cells. LPS activation caused augmented release of lactoferrin, an iron-binding protein which itself could inhibit the growth of C. albicans in vitro. Antibodies against lactoferrin effectively and specifically reduced the anti-C. albicans activity of both LPS-stimulated and unstimulated PMN. Northern (RNA blot) analysis showed enhanced production of mRNAs for interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-6 and in neutrophils within 1 h of stimulation with LPS. The cytokines were also detected in the supernatant of the activated PMN, and their synthesis was prevented by pretreatment of LPS-stimulated PMN with protein synthesis inhibitors, such as emetine and cycloheximide. These inhibitors, however, did not block either lactoferrin release or the anti-Candida activity of LPS-stimulated PMN. These results demonstrate the ability of various bacterial LPSs to augment neutrophil function against C. albicans and suggest that the release of a candidastatic, iron-binding protein, lactoferrin, may contribute to the antifungal effect of PMN. Moreover, the ability to produce cytokines upon stimulation by ubiquitous microbial products such as the endotoxins points to an extraphagocytic, immunomodulatory role of PMN during infection.

  2. Ligand stimulation of ErbB4 and a constitutively-active ErbB4 mutant result in different biological responses in human pancreatic tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mill, Christopher P.; Gettinger, Kathleen L.; Riese, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Indeed, it has been estimated that 37,000 Americans will die from this disease in 2010. Late diagnosis, chemoresistance, and radioresistance of these tumors are major reasons for poor patient outcome, spurring the search for pancreatic cancer early diagnostic and therapeutic targets. ErbB4 (HER4) is a member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), a family that also includes the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR/ErbB1/HER1), Neu/ErbB2/HER2, and ErbB3/HER3. These RTKs play central roles in many human malignancies by regulating cell proliferation, survival, differentiation, invasiveness, motility, and apoptosis. In this report we demonstrate that human pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibit minimal ErbB4 expression; in contrast, these cell lines exhibit varied and in some cases abundant expression and basal tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR, ErbB2, and ErbB3. Expression of a constitutively-dimerized and -active ErbB4 mutant inhibits clonogenic proliferation of CaPan-1, HPAC, MIA PaCa-2, and PANC-1 pancreatic tumor cell lines. In contrast, expression of wild-type ErbB4 in pancreatic tumor cell lines potentiates stimulation of anchorage-independent colony formation by the ErbB4 ligand Neuregulin 1β. These results illustrate the multiple roles that ErbB4 may be playing in pancreatic tumorigenesis and tumor progression.

  3. Localized hypothermia aggravates bleeding in the collagenase model of intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Roseleen F; Williamson, Michael R; Dietrich, Kristen; Colbourne, Frederick

    2015-03-01

    Animal studies testing whether therapeutic hypothermia is neuroprotective after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) have been inconclusive. In rodents, ICH is often produced in the striatum by infusing collagenase, which causes prolonged hemorrhaging from multiple vessels. Our previous data shows that this bleeding (hematoma) is worsened by systemic hypothermia given soon after collagenase infusion. In this study we hypothesized that localized brain hypothermia would also aggravate bleeding in this model (0.2 U of collagenase in 1.2 μL of saline). We also evaluated cooling after intrastriatal thrombin infusion (1 U in 30 μL of saline)-a simplified model of ICH thought to cause bleeding. Focal hypothermia was achieved by flushing cold water through an implanted cooling device attached to the skull underneath the temporalis muscle of adult rats. Previous work and data at this time shows this method cools the striatum to ∼33°C, whereas the body remains normothermic. In comparison to normothermic groups, cooling significantly worsened bleeding when instituted at 6 hours (∼94 vs. 42 μL, p=0.018) and 12 hours (79 vs. 61 μL, p=0.042) post-ICH (24-hour survival), but not after a 24-hour delay (36-hour survival). Rats were cooled until euthanasia when hematoma size was determined by a hemoglobin-based spectrophotometry assay. Cooling did not influence cerebral blood volume after just saline or thrombin infusion. The latter is explained by the fact that thrombin did not cause bleeding beyond that caused by saline infusion. In summary, local hypothermia significantly aggravates bleeding many hours after collagenase infusion suggesting that bleeding may have confounded earlier studies with hypothermia. Furthermore, these findings serve as a cautionary note on using cooling even many hours after cerebral bleeding.

  4. Gabapentin reverses central pain sensitization following a collagenase-induced intrathalamic hemorrhage in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castel A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aude Castel, Pascal VachonFaculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Veterinary Biomedicine, University of Montreal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, CanadaPurpose: The treatment of central neuropathic pain remains amongst the biggest challenges for pain specialists. The main objective of this study was to assess gabapentin (GBP, amitriptyline (AMI, and carbamazepine (CARBA for the treatment of a rodent central neuropathic pain model.Methods: Male Sprague Dawley rats were trained on the rotarod, Hargreaves, Von Frey and acetone behavioral tests, and baseline values were obtained prior to surgery. A stereotaxic injection of either a collagenase solution or saline was made in the right ventral posterolateral thalamic nucleus. The rats were tested on days 2, 4, 8, and 11 postsurgery. They were retested at regular intervals from day 15 to day 25 postsurgery, after oral administration of either the vehicle (n=7 and n=8 rats with intracerebral injections of collagenase and saline, respectively or the different drugs (GBP [60 mg/kg], AMI [10 mg/kg], CARBA [100 mg/kg]; n=8 rats/drug.Results: A significant decrease in the mechanical thresholds and no change in heat threshold were observed in both hind limbs in the collagenase group, as we had previously shown elsewhere. Reversal of the mechanical hypersensitivity was achieved only with GBP (P<0.05. AMI and CARBA, at the dosages used, failed to show any effect on mechanical thresholds. Transient cold allodynia was observed in some collagenase-injected rats but failed to be statistically significant.Conclusion: Intrathalamic hemorrhaging in the ventrolateral thalamic nucleus induced a bilateral mechanical allodynia, which was reversed by GBP but not AMI or CARBA.Keywords: central pain, thalamus, amitriptyline, carbamazepine

  5. Inhibition of Collagenase by Mycosporine-like Amino Acids from Marine Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Anja; Gostner, Johanna; Fuchs, Julian E.; Chaita, Eliza; Aligiannis, Nektarios; Skaltsounis, Leandros; Ganzera, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) play an important role in extracellular matrix remodeling. Excessive activity of these enzymes can be induced by UV light and leads to skin damage, a process known as photoaging. In this study we investigated the collagenase inhibition potential of mycosporine-like amino acids (MAA), compounds that have been isolated from marine organisms and are known photoprotectants against UV-A and UV-B. For this purpose the commonly used collagenase assay was optimized and for the first time validated in terms of relationships between enzyme-substrate concentrations, temperature, incubation time and enzyme stability. Three compounds were isolated from the marine red algae Porphyra sp. and Palmaria palmata, and evaluated for their inhibitory properties against Chlostridium histolyticum collagenase (Chc). A dose-dependent, but very moderate inhibition was observed for all substances and IC50 values of 104.0 μM for shinorine, 105.9 μM for porphyra and 158.9 μM for palythine were determined. Additionally, computer-aided docking models suggested that the MAA binding to the active site of the enzyme is a competitive inhibition. PMID:26039265

  6. Tumors initiated by constitutive Cdk2 activation exhibit transforming growth factor beta resistance and acquire paracrine mitogenic stimulation during progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corsino, P.; Davis, B.; Law, M.

    2007-01-01

    Cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) complexes are present at high frequency in human breast cancer cell lines, but the significance of this observation is unknown. This report shows that expression of a cyclin D1-Cdk2 fusion protein under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMITV...

  7. Tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 stimulate bone resorption in vivo as measured by urinary [3H]tetracycline excretion from prelabeled mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, A.M.; Muehlbauer, R.C.F.; Fleisch, H.

    1988-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) have been shown to stimulate bone resorption in vitro. We have now investigated whether these cytokines also cause a similar action when administered in vivo. This was made possible by the adaptation of a newly developed technique that enables the continual assessment of bone resorption in vivo in mice by measuring urinary excretion of 3 H from [ 3 H]tetracycline-prelabeled animals. Experiments using maneuvers known to influence bone resorption, such as a change in dietary calcium or administration of parathyroid hormone or dichloromethylenebisphosphonate, indicate that the technique is reliable and sensitive in mice. Daily intravenous administration of either recombinant human or recombinant murine TNF-alpha, as well as subcutaneous administration of recombinant human IL-1 alpha, were found to stimulate bone resorption in a dose-dependent manner. The effect was maximal within 2 days. Thus, exogenous TNF-alpha and IL-1 alpha can stimulate bone resorption in vivo, suggesting that these cytokines may also exert a systemic effect on bone

  8. Tumor regression induced by intratumor therapy with a disabled infectious single cycle (DISC) herpes simplex virus (HSV) vector, DISC/HSV/murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, correlates with antigen-specific adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Selman A; Lynam, June; McLean, Cornelia S; Entwisle, Claire; Loudon, Peter; Rojas, José M; McArdle, Stephanie E B; Li, Geng; Mian, Shahid; Rees, Robert C

    2002-04-01

    Direct intratumor injection of a disabled infectious single cycle HSV-2 virus encoding the murine GM-CSF gene (DISC/mGM-CSF) into established murine colon carcinoma CT26 tumors induced a significant delay in tumor growth and complete tumor regression in up to 70% of animals. Pre-existing immunity to HSV did not reduce the therapeutic efficacy of DISC/mGM-CSF, and, when administered in combination with syngeneic dendritic cells, further decreased tumor growth and increased the incidence of complete tumor regression. Direct intratumor injection of DISC/mGM-CSF also inhibited the growth of CT26 tumor cells implanted on the contralateral flank or seeded into the lungs following i.v. injection of tumor cells (experimental lung metastasis). Proliferation of splenocytes in response to Con A was impaired in progressor and tumor-bearer, but not regressor, mice. A potent tumor-specific CTL response was generated from splenocytes of all mice with regressing, but not progressing tumors following in vitro peptide stimulation; this response was specific for the gp70 AH-1 peptide SPSYVYHQF and correlated with IFN-gamma, but not IL-4 cytokine production. Depletion of CD8(+) T cells from regressor splenocytes before in vitro stimulation with the relevant peptide abolished their cytolytic activity, while depletion of CD4(+) T cells only partially inhibited CTL generation. Tumor regression induced by DISC/mGM-CSF virus immunotherapy provides a unique model for evaluating the immune mechanism(s) involved in tumor rejection, upon which tumor immunotherapy regimes may be based.

  9. Gastrodin stimulates anticancer immune response and represses transplanted H22 hepatic ascitic tumor cell growth: Involvement of NF-κB signaling activation in CD4 + T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Guangwen; Yang, Tianming [College of Pharmacy, South-Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan (China); Wang, Chaoyuan [College of Life Science, South-Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan (China); Su, Hanwen, E-mail: suhanwen-1@163.com [Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Xiang, Meixian, E-mail: xiangmeixian99@163.com [College of Pharmacy, South-Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan (China)

    2013-06-15

    Gastrodia elata Blume (G. elata) is a famous restorative food in East Asia. It can be used as an auxiliary reagent in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment. Previous studies unveiled that G. elata exhibited immunomodulatory activities. To explore the active ingredients contributing to its immunomodulatory activities, gastrodin, vanillin, and parishin B were purified from G. elata and their anti-HCC effects were assessed in vivo. Among these compounds, only gastrodin was capable of repressing transplanted H22 ascitic hepatic tumor cell growth in vivo with low toxicity. Further investigations were designed to explore the effects of gastrodin on the immune system of tumor-bearing mice and potential molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. Our data showed that gastrodin ameliorated tumor cell transplantation-induced activation of endogenous pro-apoptotic pathway in CD4 + T cells and abnormalities in serum cytokine profiles in host animals. These events enhanced cytotoxic activities of natural killer and CD8 + T cells against H22 hepatic cancer cells. Gastrodin administration specifically upregulated mRNA levels of several nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) responsive genes in CD4 + T cells but not in CD8 + T cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that gastrodin increased the association of NF-κB p65 subunit to the promoter regions of IL-2 and Bcl-2 encoding genes in CD4 + T cells. Our investigations demonstrated that gastrodin is the main active ingredient contributing to the anticancer immunomodulatory properties of G. elata. Promoting NF-κB-mediated gene transcription in CD4 + T cells is implicated in its immunomodulatory activity. - Highlights: • Gastrodin stimulates anticancer immune response. • Gastrodin represses tumor transplantation-induced CD4 + T cell apoptosis. • Gastrodin activates NF-κB activity in CD4 + T cells.

  10. Gastrodin stimulates anticancer immune response and represses transplanted H22 hepatic ascitic tumor cell growth: Involvement of NF-κB signaling activation in CD4 + T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, Guangwen; Yang, Tianming; Wang, Chaoyuan; Su, Hanwen; Xiang, Meixian

    2013-01-01

    Gastrodia elata Blume (G. elata) is a famous restorative food in East Asia. It can be used as an auxiliary reagent in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment. Previous studies unveiled that G. elata exhibited immunomodulatory activities. To explore the active ingredients contributing to its immunomodulatory activities, gastrodin, vanillin, and parishin B were purified from G. elata and their anti-HCC effects were assessed in vivo. Among these compounds, only gastrodin was capable of repressing transplanted H22 ascitic hepatic tumor cell growth in vivo with low toxicity. Further investigations were designed to explore the effects of gastrodin on the immune system of tumor-bearing mice and potential molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. Our data showed that gastrodin ameliorated tumor cell transplantation-induced activation of endogenous pro-apoptotic pathway in CD4 + T cells and abnormalities in serum cytokine profiles in host animals. These events enhanced cytotoxic activities of natural killer and CD8 + T cells against H22 hepatic cancer cells. Gastrodin administration specifically upregulated mRNA levels of several nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) responsive genes in CD4 + T cells but not in CD8 + T cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that gastrodin increased the association of NF-κB p65 subunit to the promoter regions of IL-2 and Bcl-2 encoding genes in CD4 + T cells. Our investigations demonstrated that gastrodin is the main active ingredient contributing to the anticancer immunomodulatory properties of G. elata. Promoting NF-κB-mediated gene transcription in CD4 + T cells is implicated in its immunomodulatory activity. - Highlights: • Gastrodin stimulates anticancer immune response. • Gastrodin represses tumor transplantation-induced CD4 + T cell apoptosis. • Gastrodin activates NF-κB activity in CD4 + T cells

  11. Augmentation of antitumor immunity by fusions of ethanol-treated tumor cells and dendritic cells stimulated via dual TLRs through TGF-β1 blockade and IL-12p70 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koido, Shigeo; Homma, Sadamu; Okamoto, Masato; Namiki, Yoshihisa; Takakura, Kazuki; Takahara, Akitaka; Odahara, Shunichi; Tsukinaga, Shintaro; Yukawa, Toyokazu; Mitobe, Jimi; Matsudaira, Hiroshi; Nagatsuma, Keisuke; Kajihara, Mikio; Uchiyama, Kan; Arihiro, Seiji; Imazu, Hiroo; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Kan, Shin; Hayashi, Kazumi; Komita, Hideo; Kamata, Yuko; Ito, Masaki; Hara, Eiichi; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Gong, Jianlin; Tajiri, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of fusion cell (FC)-based cancer vaccine generated with whole tumor cells and dendritic cells (DCs) requires the improved immunogenicity of both cells. Treatment of whole tumor cells with ethanol resulted in blockade of immune-suppressive soluble factors such as transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, vascular endothelial growth factor, and IL-10 without decreased expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and the MUC1 tumor-associated antigen. Moreover, the ethanol-treated tumor cells expressed "eat-me" signals such as calreticulin (CRT) on the cell surface and released immunostimulatory factors such as heat shock protein (HSP)90α and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). A dual stimulation of protein-bound polysaccharides isolated from Coriolus versicolor (TLR2 agonist) and penicillin-inactivated Streptococcus pyogenes (TLR4 agonist) led human monocyte-derived DCs to produce HSP90α and multiple cytokines such as IL-12p70 and IL-10. Interestingly, incorporating ethanol-treated tumor cells and TLRs-stimulated DCs during the fusion process promoted fusion efficiency and up-regulated MHC class II molecules on a per fusion basis. Moreover, fusions of ethanol-treated tumor cells and dual TLRs-stimulated DCs (E-tumor/FCs) inhibited the production of multiple immune-suppressive soluble factors including TGF-β1 and up-regulated the production of IL-12p70 and HSP90α. Most importantly, E-tumor/FCs activated T cells capable of producing high levels of IFN-γ, resulting in augmented MUC1-specific CTL induction. Collectively, our results illustrate the synergy between ethanol-treated whole tumor cells and dual TLRs-stimulated DCs in inducing augmented CTL responses in vitro by FC preparations. The alternative system is simple and may provide a platform for adoptive immunotherapy.

  12. Augmentation of antitumor immunity by fusions of ethanol-treated tumor cells and dendritic cells stimulated via dual TLRs through TGF-β1 blockade and IL-12p70 production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeo Koido

    Full Text Available The therapeutic efficacy of fusion cell (FC-based cancer vaccine generated with whole tumor cells and dendritic cells (DCs requires the improved immunogenicity of both cells. Treatment of whole tumor cells with ethanol resulted in blockade of immune-suppressive soluble factors such as transforming growth factor (TGF-β1, vascular endothelial growth factor, and IL-10 without decreased expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I and the MUC1 tumor-associated antigen. Moreover, the ethanol-treated tumor cells expressed "eat-me" signals such as calreticulin (CRT on the cell surface and released immunostimulatory factors such as heat shock protein (HSP90α and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1. A dual stimulation of protein-bound polysaccharides isolated from Coriolus versicolor (TLR2 agonist and penicillin-inactivated Streptococcus pyogenes (TLR4 agonist led human monocyte-derived DCs to produce HSP90α and multiple cytokines such as IL-12p70 and IL-10. Interestingly, incorporating ethanol-treated tumor cells and TLRs-stimulated DCs during the fusion process promoted fusion efficiency and up-regulated MHC class II molecules on a per fusion basis. Moreover, fusions of ethanol-treated tumor cells and dual TLRs-stimulated DCs (E-tumor/FCs inhibited the production of multiple immune-suppressive soluble factors including TGF-β1 and up-regulated the production of IL-12p70 and HSP90α. Most importantly, E-tumor/FCs activated T cells capable of producing high levels of IFN-γ, resulting in augmented MUC1-specific CTL induction. Collectively, our results illustrate the synergy between ethanol-treated whole tumor cells and dual TLRs-stimulated DCs in inducing augmented CTL responses in vitro by FC preparations. The alternative system is simple and may provide a platform for adoptive immunotherapy.

  13. Melanoma targeting with alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone analogs labeled with fac-[99mTc(CO)3]+: effect of cyclization on tumor-seeking properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposinho, Paula D; Xavier, Catarina; Correia, João D G; Falcão, Soraia; Gomes, Paula; Santos, Isabel

    2008-03-01

    Early detection of primary melanoma tumors is essential because there is no effective treatment for metastatic melanoma. Several linear and cyclic radiolabeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) analogs have been proposed to target the melanocortin type 1 receptor (MC1R) overexpressed in melanoma. The compact structure of a rhenium-cyclized alpha-MSH analog (Re-CCMSH) significantly enhanced its in vivo tumor uptake and retention. Melanotan II (MT-II), a cyclic lactam analog of alpha-MSH (Ac-Nle-cyclo[Asp-His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-Lys]-NH2]), is a very potent and stable agonist peptide largely used in the characterization of melanocortin receptors. Taking advantage of the superior biological features associated with the MT-II cyclic peptide, we assessed the effect of lactam-based cyclization on the tumor-seeking properties of alpha-MSH analogs by comparing the pharmacokinetics profile of the 99mTc-labeled cyclic peptide betaAla-Nle-cyclo[Asp-His-D-Phe-Arg-Trp-Lys]-NH2 with that of the linear analog betaAla-Nle-Asp-His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-Lys-NH2 in melanoma-bearing mice. We have synthesized and coupled the linear and cyclic peptides to a bifunctional chelator containing a pyrazolyl-diamine backbone (pz) through the amino group of betaAla, and the resulting pz-peptide conjugates were reacted with the fac-[99mTc(CO)3]+ moiety. The 99mTc(CO)3-labeled conjugates were obtained in high yield, high specific activity, and high radiochemical purity. The cyclic 99mTc(CO)3-labeled conjugate presents a remarkable internalization (87.1% of receptor-bound tracer and 50.5% of total applied activity, after 6 h at 37 degrees C) and cellular retention (only 24.7% released from the cells after 5 h) in murine melanoma B16F1 cells. A significant tumor uptake and retention was obtained in melanoma-bearing C57BL6 mice for the cyclic radioconjugate [9.26 +/- 0.83 and 11.31 +/- 1.83% ID/g at 1 and 4 h after injection, respectively]. The linear 99mTc(CO)3-pz-peptide presented lower values for

  14. Human keratinocytes are a source for tumor necrosis factor alpha: Evidence for synthesis and release upon stimulation with endotoxin or ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeck, A.S.; Schwarz, T.; Kirnbauer, R.; Urbanski, A.; Perry, P.; Ansel, J.C.; Luger, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), in addition to being cytotoxic for certain tumor cells, has turned out as a multifunctional cytokine that is involved in the regulation of immunity and inflammation. Since human keratinocytes have been demonstrated to be a potent source of various cytokines, it was investigated whether epidermal cells synthesize and release TNF-alpha. Supernatants derived from normal human keratinocytes (HNK) and human epidermoid carcinoma cell lines (KB, A431) were tested both in a TNF-alpha-specific ELISA and a bioassay. In supernatants of untreated epidermal cells, no or minimal TNF-alpha activity was found, while after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or ultraviolet (UV) light, significant amounts were detected. Western blot analysis using an antibody directed against human TNF-alpha revealed a molecular mass of 17 kD for keratinocyte-derived TNF-alpha. These biological and biochemical data were also confirmed by Northern blot analysis revealing mRNA specific for TNF-alpha in LPS- or ultraviolet B (UVB)-treated HNK and KB cells. In addition, increased TNF-alpha levels were detected in the serum obtained from human volunteers 12 and 24 h after a single total body UVB exposure, which caused a severe sunburn reaction. These findings indicate that keratinocytes upon stimulation are able to synthesize and release TNF-alpha, which may gain access to the circulation. Thus, TNF-alpha in concert with other epidermal cell-derived cytokines may mediate local and systemic inflammatory reactions during host defense against injurious events caused by microbial agents or UV irradiation

  15. Andrographolide inhibits nuclear factor-κB activation through JNK-Akt-p65 signaling cascade in tumor necrosis factor-α-stimulated vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Ying; Hsu, Ming-Jen; Hsieh, Cheng-Ying; Lee, Lin-Wen; Chen, Zhih-Cherng; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Critical vascular inflammation leads to vascular dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases, including abdominal aortic aneurysms, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. Andrographolide is the most active and critical constituent isolated from the leaves of Andrographis paniculata, a herbal medicine widely used for treating anti-inflammation in Asia. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of the inhibitory effects of andrographolide in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) exposed to a proinflammatory stimulus, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Treating TNF-α-stimulated VSMCs with andrographolide suppressed the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in a concentration-dependent manner. A reduction in TNF-α-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), Akt, and p65 phosphorylation was observed in andrographolide-treated VSMCs. However, andrographolide affected neither IκBα degradation nor p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation under these conditions. Both treatment with LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt inhibitor, and treatment with SP600125, a JNK inhibitor, markedly reversed the andrographolide-mediated inhibition of p65 phosphorylation. In addition, LY294002 and SP600125 both diminished Akt phosphorylation, whereas LY294002 had no effects on JNK phosphorylation. These results collectively suggest that therapeutic interventions using andrographolide can benefit the treatment of vascular inflammatory diseases, and andrographolide-mediated inhibition of NF-κB activity in TNF-α-stimulated VSMCs occurs through the JNK-Akt-p65 signaling cascade, an IκBα-independent mechanism.

  16. Combined Stimulation with the Tumor Necrosis Factor α and the Epidermal Growth Factor Promotes the Proliferation of Hepatocytes in Rat Liver Cultured Slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Finot

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The culture liver slices are mainly used to investigate drug metabolism and xenobiotic-mediated liver injuries while apoptosis and proliferation remain unexplored in this culture model. Here, we show a transient increase in LDH release and caspase activities indicating an ischemic injury during the slicing procedure. Then, caspase activities decrease and remain low in cultured slices demonstrating a low level of apoptosis. The slicing procedure is also associated with the G0/G1 transition of hepatocytes demonstrated by the activation of stress and proliferation signalling pathways including the ERK1/2 and JNK1/2/3 MAPKinases and the transient upregulation of c-fos. The cells further progress up to mid-G1 phase as indicated by the sequential induction of c-myc and p53 mRNA levels after the slicing procedure and at 24 h of culture, respectively. The stimulation by epidermal growth factor induces the ERK1/2 phosphorylation but fails to activate expression of late G1 and S phase markers such as cyclin D1 and Cdk1 indicating that hepatocytes are arrested in mid-G1 phase of the cell cycle. However, we found that combined stimulation by the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α and the epidermal growth factor promotes the commitment to DNA replication as observed in vivo during the liver regeneration.

  17. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor amplification of interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha production in THP-1 human monocytic cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide of oral microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baqui, A A; Meiller, T F; Chon, J J; Turng, B F; Falkler, W A

    1998-05-01

    Cytokines, including granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), are used to assist in bone marrow recovery during cancer chemotherapy. Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) play important roles in inflammatory processes, including exacerbation of periodontal diseases, one of the most common complications in patients who undergo this therapy. A human monocyte cell line (THP-1) was utilized to investigate IL-1beta and TNF-alpha production following GM-CSF supplementation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from two oral microorganisms, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum. LPS of P. gingivalis or F. nucleatum was prepared by a phenol-water extraction method and characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and determination of total protein and endotoxin contents. Resting THP-1 cells were treated with LPS of P. gingivalis or F. nucleatum and/or GM-CSF (50 IU/ml) by using different concentrations for various time periods. Production of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha in THP-1 cells was measured by solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was used to evaluate the gene expression of resting and treated THP-1 cells. IL-1beta was not detected in untreated THP-1 cells. IL-1beta production was, however, stimulated sharply at 4 h. GM-CSF amplified IL-1beta production in THP-1 cells treated with LPS from both oral anaerobes. No IL-1beta-specific mRNA transcript was detected in untreated THP-1 cells. However, IL-1beta mRNA was detected by RT-PCR 2 h after stimulation of THP-1 cells with LPS from both organisms. GM-CSF did not shorten the IL-1beta transcriptional activation time. GM-CSF plus F. nucleatum or P. gingivalis LPS activated THP-1 cells to produce a 1.6-fold increase in TNF-alpha production at 4 h over LPS stimulation alone. These investigations with the in vitro THP-1 model indicate that there may be an increase in the cellular immune response to oral

  18. Rationale for combination of therapeutic antibodies targeting tumor cells and immune checkpoint receptors: Harnessing innate and adaptive immunity through IgG1 isotype immune effector stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Robert L; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Trotta, Anna Maria; García-Foncillas, Jesús; Schulten, Jeltje; Audhuy, François; Merlano, Marco; Milano, Gerard

    2018-02-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) G1 antibodies stimulate antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Cetuximab, an IgG1 isotype monoclonal antibody, is a standard-of-care treatment for locally advanced and recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) and metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). Here we review evidence regarding the clinical relevance of cetuximab-mediated ADCC and other immune functions and provide a biological rationale concerning why this property positions cetuximab as an ideal partner for immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) and other emerging immunotherapies. We performed a nonsystematic review of available preclinical and clinical data involving cetuximab-mediated immune activity and combination approaches of cetuximab with other immunotherapies, including ICIs, in SCCHN and CRC. Indeed, cetuximab mediates ADCC activity in the intratumoral space and primes adaptive and innate cellular immunity. However, counterregulatory mechanisms may lead to immunosuppressive feedback loops. Accordingly, there is a strong rationale for combining ICIs with cetuximab for the treatment of advanced tumors, as targeting CTLA-4, PD-1, and PD-L1 can ostensibly overcome these immunosuppressive counter-mechanisms in the tumor microenvironment. Moreover, combining ICIs (or other immunotherapies) with cetuximab is a promising strategy for boosting immune response and enhancing response rates and durability of response. Cetuximab immune activity-including, but not limited to, ADCC-provides a strong rationale for its combination with ICIs or other immunotherapies to synergistically and fully mobilize the adaptive and innate immunity against tumor cells. Ongoing prospective studies will evaluate the clinical effect of these combination regimens and their immune effect in CRC and SCCHN and in other indications. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Cytokine and immunoglobulin production by PWM-stimulated peripheral and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes of undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouzouita Kamel

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Undifferentiated Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (NPC patients show a characteristic pattern of antibody responses to the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV which is regularly associated with this tumor. However, no EBV-specific cytotoxic activity is detectable by the standard chromium-release assay at both peripheral and intratumoral levels. The mechanisms underlying this discrepancy between the humoral and cellular immune responses in NPC are still unknown, but might be related to an imbalance in immunoregulatory interleukin production. In this report, we investigated the ability of peripheral (PBL and tumor- infiltrating (TIL lymphocytes of undifferentiated NPC patients to produce in vitro three interleukins (IL-2, IL-6, IL-10 and three immunoglobulin isotypes (IgM, IgG, IgA. Methods Lymphocytes from 17 patients and 17 controls were cultured in the presence of Pokeweed mitogen (PWM for 12 days and their culture supernatants were tested for interleukins and immunoglobulins by specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA. Data were analysed using Student's t-test and probability values below 5% were considered significant. Results The data obtained indicated that TIL of NPC patients produced significantly more IL-2 (p = 0,0002, IL-10 (p = 0,020, IgM (p= 0,0003 and IgG (p Conclusion Taken together, our data reinforce the possibility of an imbalance in immunoregulatory interleukin production in NPC patients. An increased ability to produce cytokines such as IL-10 may underlie the discrepancy between humoral and cellular immune responses characteristic of NPC.

  20. Cytokine and immunoglobulin production by PWM-stimulated peripheral and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes of undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliss-Jaber, Lilia; Houissa-Kastally, Radhia; Bouzouita, Kamel; Khediri, Naceur; Khelifa, Ridha

    2004-01-01

    Undifferentiated Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (NPC) patients show a characteristic pattern of antibody responses to the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) which is regularly associated with this tumor. However, no EBV-specific cytotoxic activity is detectable by the standard chromium-release assay at both peripheral and intratumoral levels. The mechanisms underlying this discrepancy between the humoral and cellular immune responses in NPC are still unknown, but might be related to an imbalance in immunoregulatory interleukin production. In this report, we investigated the ability of peripheral (PBL) and tumor- infiltrating (TIL) lymphocytes of undifferentiated NPC patients to produce in vitro three interleukins (IL-2, IL-6, IL-10) and three immunoglobulin isotypes (IgM, IgG, IgA). Lymphocytes from 17 patients and 17 controls were cultured in the presence of Pokeweed mitogen (PWM) for 12 days and their culture supernatants were tested for interleukins and immunoglobulins by specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Data were analysed using Student's t-test and probability values below 5% were considered significant. The data obtained indicated that TIL of NPC patients produced significantly more IL-2 (p = 0,0002), IL-10 (p = 0,020), IgM (p= 0,0003) and IgG (p < 0,0001) than their PBL. On the other hand, patients PBL produced significantly higher levels of IL-2 (p = 0,022), IL-10 (p = 0,016) and IgM (p = 0,004) than those of controls. No significant differences for IL-6 and IgA were observed. Taken together, our data reinforce the possibility of an imbalance in immunoregulatory interleukin production in NPC patients. An increased ability to produce cytokines such as IL-10 may underlie the discrepancy between humoral and cellular immune responses characteristic of NPC

  1. Comparison of two cooling protocols for llama semen: with and without collagenase and seminal plasma in the medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretero, M I; Giuliano, S M; Arraztoa, C C; Santa Cruz, R C; Fumuso, F G; Neild, D M

    2017-08-01

    Seminal plasma (SP) of South American Camelids could interfere with the interaction of spermatozoa with the extenders; therefore it becomes necessary to improve semen management using enzymatic treatment. Our objective was to compare two cooling protocols for llama semen. Twelve ejaculates were incubated in 0.1% collagenase and then were divided into two aliquots. One was extended in lactose and egg yolk (LEY) (Protocol A: collagenase and SP present). The other aliquot was centrifuged, and the pellet was resuspended in LEY (Protocol B: collagenase and SP absent). Both samples were maintained at 5°C during 24 hr. Routine and DNA evaluations were carried out in raw and cooled semen. Both cooling protocols maintained sperm viability, membrane function and DNA fragmentation, with Protocol A showing a significantly lowered total and progressive motility (p semen samples prior to either cooling or freeze-thawing. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Surgery of language-eloquent tumors in patients not eligible for awake surgery: the impact of a protocol based on navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation on presurgical planning and language outcome, with evidence of tumor-induced intra-hemispheric plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, Giovanni; Quattropani, Maria C; Scibilia, Antonino; Conti, Alfredo; Angileri, Filippo Flavio; Esposito, Felice; Sindorio, Carmela; Cardali, Salvatore Massimiliano; Germanò, Antonino; Tomasello, Francesco

    2018-05-01

    Awake surgery and intraoperative monitoring represent the gold standard for surgery of brain tumors located in the perisylvian region of the dominant hemisphere due to their ability to map and preserve the language network during surgery. Nevertheless, in some cases awake surgery is not feasible. This could increase the risk of postoperative language deficit. Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) and nTMS-based DTI fiber tracking (DTI-FT) provide a preoperative mapping and reconstruction of the cortico-subcortical language network. This can be used to plan and guide the surgical strategy to preserve the language function. The objective if this study is to describe the impact of a non-invasive preoperative protocol for mapping the language network through the nTMS and nTMS-based DTI-FT in patients not eligible for awake surgery and thereby operated under general anesthesia for suspected language-eloquent brain tumors. We reviewed clinical data of patients not eligible for awake surgery and operated under general anaesthesia between 2015 and 2016. All patients underwent nTMS language cortical mapping and nTMS-based DTI-FT of subcortical language fascicles. The nTMS findings were used to plan and guide the maximal safe resection of the tumor. The impact on postoperative language outcome and the accuracy of the nTMS-based mapping in predicting language deficits were evaluated. Twenty patients were enrolled in the study. The nTMS-based reconstruction of the language network was successful in all patients. Interestingly, we observed a significant association between tumor localization and the cortical distribution of the nTMS errors (p = 0.004), thereby suggesting an intra-hemispheric plasticity of language cortical areas, probably induced by the tumor itself. The nTMS mapping disclosed the true-eloquence of lesions in 12 (60%) of all suspected cases. In the remaining 8 cases (40%) the suspected eloquence of the lesion was disproved. The n

  3. Correlating subcortical interhemispheric connectivity and cortical hemispheric dominance in brain tumor patients: A repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollmann, Nico; Ille, Sebastian; Tussis, Lorena; Maurer, Stefanie; Hauck, Theresa; Negwer, Chiara; Bauer, Jan S; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2016-02-01

    The present study aims to investigate the relationship between transcallosal interhemispheric connectivity (IC) and hemispheric language lateralization by using a novel approach including repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), hemispheric dominance ratio (HDR) calculation, and rTMS-based diffusion tensor imaging fiber tracking (DTI FT). 31 patients with left-sided perisylvian brain lesions underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and rTMS language mapping. Cortical language-positive rTMS spots were used to calculate HDRs (HDR: quotient of the left-sided divided by right-sided naming error rates for corresponding left- and right-sided cortical regions) and to create regions of interest (ROIs) for DTI FT. Then, fibers connecting the rTMS-based ROIs of both hemispheres were tracked, and the correlation of IC to HDRs was calculated via Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). Fibers connecting rTMS-based ROIs of both hemispheres were detected in 12 patients (38.7%). Within the patients in which IC was detected, the mean number of subcortical IC fibers ± standard deviation (SD) was 138.0 ± 346.5 (median: 7.5; range: 1-1,217 fibers). Regarding rs for the correlation of HDRs and fiber numbers of patients that showed IC, only moderate correlation was revealed. Our approach might be beneficial and technically feasible for further investigation of the relationship between IC and language lateralization. However, only moderate correlation was revealed in the present study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Stereotactic Administration of Edaravone Ameliorates Collagenase-Induced Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Guang-Zhu; Gao, Mou; Ge, Guang-Zhi; Wang, Qin-Qin; Ji, Xin-Chao; Sun, Yi-Lin; Zhang, Hong-Tian; Xu, Ru-Xiang

    2016-10-01

    Edaravone is widely used for treating ischemic stroke, but it is not still confirmed in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) as an ideal medication targeting the brain parenchyma. We aimed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of stereotactic administration of edaravone (SI) into the brain parenchyma. Intracerebral hemorrhage rat models were established by infusion of collagenase into the caudate nucleus. Neural functional recovery was assessed using modified neurological severity scores (mNSS). A comparative study of therapeutic effects between SI and intraperitoneal injection of edaravone (IP) involved in cerebral edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, hematoma absorption, inflammatory response and neuronal apoptosis. Compared with IP, the mNSS was significantly (P < 0.05) improved by SI; cerebral edema and BBB permeability were dramatically ameliorated (P < 0.05); IL-4 and IL-10 levels increased, but IL-1β and TNF-α levels significantly decreased; neuron apoptosis decreased markedly (P < 0.05); and caspase-3 and Bax expression significantly dropped, but Bcl-2 increased in SI group (P < 0.05). SI markedly improved neurological deficits in ICH rat models via antiinflammatory and antiapoptosis mechanisms and promoted M2-type microglia differentiation. SI was effective in rats with collagenase-induced ICH. © 2016 The Authors. CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Isolation, purification and characterization of collagenase from hepatopancreas of the land snail Achatina fulica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indra, D; Ramalingam, K; Babu, Mary

    2005-09-01

    Collagenase (matrix metalloproteinase-1, EC:3.4.24.7) was isolated from the hepatopancreas of Achatina fulica and characterized for its enzymatic activity and immunological properties. Procollagenase was isolated using ammonium sulphate precipitation and gel filtration, followed by purification by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography in the presence of trifluoroacetic acid and by dialysis in neutral buffer. In the presence of SDS and beta-mercaptoethanol, the procollagenase resolved into two subunits with molecular masses of 63 and 28 kDa, respectively. The 63 kDa fragment retained its ability to bind and degrade gelatin, but the 28 kDa was inactive. Analysis by 2D gel electrophoresis revealed that the 63 kDa fragment was basic (pIs 7.6, 7.8 and 8.15), while the 28 kDa fragment was acidic (pI 4.7 and 5.1). Western blot analysis confirmed the identity of collagenase, as only matrix metalloproteinase-1 rabbit antibodies against human matrix metalloproteinase-1 (N-terminal region) recognized both the isolated procollagenase and the 63 kDa fragment.

  6. Enrichment of tumor cells for cell kinetic analysis in human tumor biopsies using cytokeratin gating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haustermans, K.; Hofland, I.; Ramaekers, M.; Ivanyi, D.; Balm, A.J.M.; Geboes, K.; Lerut, T.; Schueren, E. van der; Begg, A.C.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of using cytokeratin antibodies to distinguish normal and malignant cells in human tumors using flow cytometry. The goal was ultimately to increase the accuracy of cell kinetic measurements on human tumor biopsies. Material and methods: A panel of four antibodies was screened on a series of 48 tumors from two centres; 22 head and neck tumors (Amsterdam) and 26 esophagus carcinomas (Leuven). First, screening was carried out by immunohistochemistry on frozen sections to test intensity of staining and the fraction of cytokeratin-positive tumor cells. The antibody showing the most positive staining was then used for flow cytometry on the same tumor. Results: The two broadest spectrum antibodies (AE1/AE3, E3/C4) showed overall the best results with immunohistochemical staining, being positive in over 95% of tumors. Good cell suspensions for DNA flow cytometry could be made from frozen material by a mechanical method, whereas enzymatic methods with trypsin or collagenase were judged failures in almost all cases. >From fresh material, both collagenase and trypsin produced good suspensions for flow cytometry, although the fraction of tumor cells, judged by proportion aneuploid cells, was markedly higher for trypsin. Using the best cytokeratin antibody for each tumor, two parameter flow cytometry was done (cytokeratin versus DNA content). Enrichment of tumor cells was then tested by measuring the fraction of aneuploid cells (the presumed malignant population) of cytokeratin-positive cells versus all cells. An enrichment factor ranging between 0 (no enrichment) and 1 (perfect enrichment, tumor cells only) was then calculated. The average enrichment was 0.60 for head and neck tumors and 0.59 for esophagus tumors. Conclusions: We conclude that this method can substantially enrich the proportion of tumor cells in biopsies from carcinomas. Application of this method could significantly enhance accuracy of tumor cell kinetic measurements

  7. Andrographolide Inhibits Nuclear Factor-κB Activation through JNK-Akt-p65 Signaling Cascade in Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Stimulated Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ying Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical vascular inflammation leads to vascular dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases, including abdominal aortic aneurysms, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. Andrographolide is the most active and critical constituent isolated from the leaves of Andrographis paniculata, a herbal medicine widely used for treating anti-inflammation in Asia. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of the inhibitory effects of andrographolide in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs exposed to a proinflammatory stimulus, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α. Treating TNF-α-stimulated VSMCs with andrographolide suppressed the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in a concentration-dependent manner. A reduction in TNF-α-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, Akt, and p65 phosphorylation was observed in andrographolide-treated VSMCs. However, andrographolide affected neither IκBα degradation nor p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation under these conditions. Both treatment with LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt inhibitor, and treatment with SP600125, a JNK inhibitor, markedly reversed the andrographolide-mediated inhibition of p65 phosphorylation. In addition, LY294002 and SP600125 both diminished Akt phosphorylation, whereas LY294002 had no effects on JNK phosphorylation. These results collectively suggest that therapeutic interventions using andrographolide can benefit the treatment of vascular inflammatory diseases, and andrographolide-mediated inhibition of NF-κB activity in TNF-α-stimulated VSMCs occurs through the JNK-Akt-p65 signaling cascade, an IκBα-independent mechanism.

  8. Studies on collagen-tannic acid-collagenase ternary system: Inhibition of collagenase against collagenolytic degradation of extracellular matrix component of collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Ganesan; Sehgal, Praveen Kumar; Mandal, Asit Baran; Sadulla, Sayeed

    2012-06-01

    We report the detailed studies on the inhibitory effect of tannic acid (TA) on Clostridium histolyticum collagenase (ChC) activity against degradation of extracellular matrix component of collagen. The TA treated collagen exhibited 64% resistance against collagenolytic hydrolysis by ChC, whereas direct interaction of TA with ChC exhibited 99% inhibition against degradation of collagen and the inhibition was found to be concentration dependant. The kinetic inhibition of ChC has been deduced from the extent of hydrolysis of N-[3-(2-furyl) acryloyl]-Leu-Gly-Pro-Ala (FALGPA). This data provides a selective competitive mode of inhibition on ChC activity seems to be influenced strongly by the nature and structure of TA. TA showed inhibitor activity against the ChC by molecular docking method. This result demonstrated that TA containing digalloyl radical possess the ability to inhibit the ChC. The inhibition of ChC in gaining new insight into the mechanism of stabilization of collagen by TA is discussed.

  9. Identifying Effective Enzyme Activity Targets for Recombinant Class I and Class II Collagenase for Successful Human Islet Isolation

    OpenAIRE

    Balamurugan, Appakalai N.; Green, Michael L.; Breite, Andrew G.; Loganathan, Gopalakrishnan; Wilhelm, Joshua J.; Tweed, Benjamin; Vargova, Lenka; Lockridge, Amber; Kuriti, Manikya; Hughes, Michael G.; Williams, Stuart K.; Hering, Bernhard J.; Dwulet, Francis E.; McCarthy, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Isolation following a good manufacturing practice-compliant, human islet product requires development of a robust islet isolation procedure where effective limits of key reagents are known. The enzymes used for islet isolation are critical but little is known about the doses of class I and class II collagenase required for successful islet isolation.

  10. The experimental study of the effect of dexamethasone, lidocaine and contrast medium on the activity of collagenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zhiqun; Liu Weimin; Li Zhonghua; Yang Peng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of hormone, anesthetic and contrast medium on the activities of collagenase lysis. Methods: Nuclear tissues were divided into equal amount for different groups and same units of collagenase were used for the lysis. The only difference in the control group from experimental groups was that there were no dexamethasone, lidocaine or omnipaque but existing in experimental groups. Twenty four hours later, the concentrations of the hydroxyproline were determined in different groups and the data were analyzed by statistical software with computer. Results: 1. The concentrations of hydroxyproline in the dexamethasone group, lidocaine group and omnipaque group were significantly lower than that of control group, especially that of lidocaine group, P value was <0.05 or 0.01. 2. The concentrations of hydroxyproline in the dexamethasone + lidocaine group, dexamethasone + omnipaque group, lidocaine+omnipaque group and dexamethasone + lidocaine + omnipaque group were significantly lower than that of control group; and simultaneously lower in dexamethasone group, lidocaine group, omnipaque group respectively; P value was also <0.05 or 0.01. Conclusion: Dexamethasone, lidocaine and omnipaque can individually inhibit the activity of collagenase at different degrees, so they shouldn't be used together with collagenase in treating the lumber disc herniation. (authors)

  11. Different Roles Of Class-I And Class-II Clostridium-histolyticum Collagenase In Rat Pancreatic-islet Isolation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, G. H. J.; Vos-Scheperkeuter, Greetje; Lin, Hun-Chi; van Schilfaarde, R

    Crude Clostridium histolyticum collagenase was purified by gel filtration and fractionated by anion exchange chromatography into class I with high collagen digestion activity (CDA) and low FALGPA (2-furanacryloyl-L-leucylglycyl-L-prolyI-L-alanine )hydrolysis activity (FHA), class II with low CDA and

  12. Effect of enzymatic debridement with two different collagenases versus mechanical debridement on chronic hard-to-heal wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onesti, Maria Giuseppina; Fioramonti, Paolo; Fino, Pasquale; Sorvillo, Valentina; Carella, Sara; Scuderi, Nicolò

    2016-12-01

    A chronic ulcer is usually defined as an injury that does not spontaneously evolve towards healing and does not progress through normal healing stages such as inflammation, proliferation and remodelling. This study was designed in order to compare two types of collagenases with mechanical debridement alone. It was thus possible to evaluate their differences in terms of pain and debridement efficacy. Patients were divided into three groups: 30 patients were daily dressed using an ointment based on collagenase produced by Vibrio alginolyticus (B group), 30 patients were daily dressed using an ointment based on a collagenase preparation derived from Clostridium histolyticum (N group) and 30 patients underwent classical mechanical debridement (M group). Complete wound healing over a period of 8 weeks occurred in 24 patients (27%) out of 90;10 patients belonging to the B group, 8 patients to the N group and 6 patients to the M group. This study was performed in order to highlight the differences between two commercially available collagenase-based ointments in comparison with mechanical debridement alone. At the final time point of week, the difference in the percentage of debridement was not statistically significant in all groups, but at 4 weeks, the debrided area in the B group was larger with respect to the N and M groups, suggesting a more rapid wound bed cleansing process. On the basis of our experience, collagenase derived from V. alginolyticus with hyaluronic acid showed chemical and physical properties that make it a product of great manageability and ensure the protection of peri-wound skin. Moreover, less pain was experienced by the patients. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum in the treatment of Peyronie’s disease: patient selection and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuhlmann PK

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Paige K Kuhlmann,1 Kenneth J DeLay,2 James Anaissie,2 Wayne JG Hellstrom,2 Faysal A Yafi3 1University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO, 2Department of Urology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, 3Department of Urology, University of California Irvine, Orange, CA, USA Abstract: The safety and efficacy of the use of collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCH for the treatment of Peyronie’s disease has been confirmed over the past several years. However, identification of the ideal patient population for use of this treatment is not well established. Multiple studies have attempted to delineate various patient-specific factors that may predict response to treatment with CCH, with the intent of enhancing patient selection. To date, these include baseline curvature severity, duration of disease, disease phase at presentation, plaque calcification, baseline erectile function, plaque size, age, comorbid diabetes, previous penile trauma, responsiveness to first treatment cycle, baseline penile shortening or pain, prior treatment with intralesional injection, compliance with plaque modeling, and atypical curvature. In addition, other studies have sought to explore various aspects of treatment with CCH that may affect patient perspective of treatment. They have focused on patient-reported outcomes, female partner considerations, cost of treatment, and potential confounders of patient satisfaction. This review provides a summary and analysis of currently available literature on topics of patient selection and perspectives in regard to treatment of Peyronie’s disease with CCH. Keywords: Peyronie’s disease, collagenase Clostridium histolyticum, Peyronie’s disease questionnaire, curvature deformity, intralesional injection, erectile function

  14. Novel animal model for Achilles tendinopathy: Controlled experimental study of serial injections of collagenase in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cesar Netto, Cesar; Godoy-Santos, Alexandre Leme; Augusto Pontin, Pedro; Natalino, Renato Jose Mendonça; Pereira, Cesar Augusto Martins; Lima, Francisco Diego de Oliveira; da Fonseca, Lucas Furtado; Staggers, Jackson Rucker; Cavinatto, Leonardo Muntada; Schon, Lew Charles; de Camargo, Olavo Pires; Fernandes, Túlio Diniz

    2018-01-01

    Our goal was to develop a novel technique for inducing Achilles tendinopathy in animal models which more accurately represents the progressive histological and biomechanical characteristic of chronic Achilles tendinopathy in humans. In this animal research study, forty-five rabbits were randomly assigned to three groups and given bilateral Achilles injections. Low dose (LD group) (n = 18) underwent a novel technique with three low-dose (0.1mg) injections of collagenase that were separated by two weeks, the high dose group (HD) (n = 18) underwent traditional single high-dose (0.3mg) injections, and the third group were controls (n = 9). Six rabbits were sacrificed from each experimental group (LD and HD) at 10, 12 and 16 weeks. Control animals were sacrificed after 16 weeks. Histological and biomechanical properties were then compared in all three groups. At 10 weeks, Bonar score and tendon cross sectional area was highest in HD group, with impaired biomechanical properties compared to LD group. At 12 weeks, Bonar score was higher in LD group, with similar biomechanical findings when compared to HD group. After 16 weeks, Bonar score was significantly increased for both LD group (11,8±2,28) and HD group (5,6±2,51), when compared to controls (2±0,76). LD group showed more pronounced histological and biomechanical findings, including cross sectional area of the tendon, Young's modulus, yield stress and ultimate tensile strength. In conclusion, Achilles tendinopathy in animal models that were induced by serial injections of low-dose collagenase showed more pronounced histological and biomechanical findings after 16 weeks than traditional techniques, mimicking better the progressive and chronic characteristic of the tendinopathy in humans.

  15. Intralesional Injection of Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum May Increase the Risk of Late-Onset Penile Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilan, Jonathan A; Wallen, Jared J; Baumgarten, Adam S; Morgan, Kevin N; Parker, Justin L; Carrion, Rafael E

    2018-04-01

    The use of intralesional injection of collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCH) has become a valid treatment option in the management of Peyronie's disease (PD). Multiple studies have shown the drug's safety and efficacy. However, sparse literature exists on the utility of the injection protocol's 14-day "observation period," in which patients are instructed to abstain from all sexual activity. To summarize the contemporary literature and report on our series of patients treated with CCH in an effort to explore the effectiveness of the postinjection observation period. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical course of men treated with at least one CCH injection at our institution from April 2014 through February 2017. The main outcome measure for our cohort was complication rate (hematoma, fracture). Secondary outcomes included progression to corrective surgery. Of the 102 patients treated, 5 (4.9%) developed a corporal fracture. Four of these occurred outside the 14-day observation period. One fracture was managed conservatively and the rest underwent surgical exploration and repair. Twelve penile hematomas were reported; one of these patients was surgically explored because of suspicious magnetic resonance imaging findings. Seven patients (6.9%) progressed to corrective surgery. Penile hematoma and corporal fracture are serious complications that must be discussed with patients before initiation of intralesional CCH treatment. Little evidence exists to direct physicians on the proper management of post-CCH penile fractures; many caregivers and patients elect to treat these injuries conservatively and avoid surgical exploration. Further studies are warranted to generate discussion and reassessment regarding the safety and effectiveness of this 14-day observation period. Beilan JA, Wallen JJ, Baumgarten AS, Morgan KN, Parker JL, Carrion RE. Intralesional Injection of Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum May Increase the Risk of Late-Onset Penile Fracture. Sex

  16. Stimulation of nuclear receptor REV-ERBs regulates tumor necrosis factor-induced expression of proinflammatory molecules in C6 astroglial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morioka, Norimitsu, E-mail: mnori@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Tomori, Mizuki; Zhang, Fang Fang; Saeki, Munenori; Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Nakata, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-08

    Under physiological conditions, astrocytes maintain homeostasis in the CNS. Following inflammation and injury to the CNS, however, activated astrocytes produce neurotoxic molecules such as cytokines and chemokines, amplifying the initial molecular-cellular events evoked by inflammation and injury. Nuclear receptors REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ (REV-ERBs) are crucial in the regulation of inflammation- and metabolism-related gene transcription. The current study sought to elucidate a role of REV-ERBs in rat C6 astroglial cells on the expression of inflammatory molecules following stimulation with the neuroinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Stimulation of C6 cells with TNF (10 ng/ml) significantly increased the mRNA expression of CCL2, interleukin-6 (IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9, but not fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and MMP-2. Treatment with either REV-ERB agonists GSK4112 or SR9009 significantly blocked TNF-induced upregulation of CCL2 mRNA and MMP-9 mRNA, but not IL-6 mRNA and iNOS mRNA expression. Furthermore, treatment with RGFP966, a selective histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) inhibitor, potently reversed the inhibitory effects of GSK4112 on TNF-induced expression of MMP-9 mRNA, but not CCL2 mRNA. Expression of Rev-erbs mRNA in C6 astroglial cells, primary cultured rat cortical and spinal astrocytes was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Together, the findings demonstrate an anti-inflammatory effect, downregulating of MMP-9 and CCL2 transcription, of astroglial REV-ERBs activation through HDAC3-dependent and HDAC3-independent mechanisms. - Highlights: • Rev-erbα mRNA and Rev-erbβ mRNA are expressed in C6 astroglial cells. • TNF increases the expression of CCL2, IL-6, MMP-9 and iNOS mRNA. • REV-ERB activation inhibits CCL2 mRNA and MMP-9 mRNA expression. • HDAC3 activity is involved in the inhibitory effect of REV-ERB on MMP-9 induction.

  17. Stimulation of nuclear receptor REV-ERBs regulates tumor necrosis factor-induced expression of proinflammatory molecules in C6 astroglial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morioka, Norimitsu; Tomori, Mizuki; Zhang, Fang Fang; Saeki, Munenori; Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Nakata, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, astrocytes maintain homeostasis in the CNS. Following inflammation and injury to the CNS, however, activated astrocytes produce neurotoxic molecules such as cytokines and chemokines, amplifying the initial molecular-cellular events evoked by inflammation and injury. Nuclear receptors REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ (REV-ERBs) are crucial in the regulation of inflammation- and metabolism-related gene transcription. The current study sought to elucidate a role of REV-ERBs in rat C6 astroglial cells on the expression of inflammatory molecules following stimulation with the neuroinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Stimulation of C6 cells with TNF (10 ng/ml) significantly increased the mRNA expression of CCL2, interleukin-6 (IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9, but not fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and MMP-2. Treatment with either REV-ERB agonists GSK4112 or SR9009 significantly blocked TNF-induced upregulation of CCL2 mRNA and MMP-9 mRNA, but not IL-6 mRNA and iNOS mRNA expression. Furthermore, treatment with RGFP966, a selective histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) inhibitor, potently reversed the inhibitory effects of GSK4112 on TNF-induced expression of MMP-9 mRNA, but not CCL2 mRNA. Expression of Rev-erbs mRNA in C6 astroglial cells, primary cultured rat cortical and spinal astrocytes was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Together, the findings demonstrate an anti-inflammatory effect, downregulating of MMP-9 and CCL2 transcription, of astroglial REV-ERBs activation through HDAC3-dependent and HDAC3-independent mechanisms. - Highlights: • Rev-erbα mRNA and Rev-erbβ mRNA are expressed in C6 astroglial cells. • TNF increases the expression of CCL2, IL-6, MMP-9 and iNOS mRNA. • REV-ERB activation inhibits CCL2 mRNA and MMP-9 mRNA expression. • HDAC3 activity is involved in the inhibitory effect of REV-ERB on MMP-9 induction.

  18. Targeting Autophagy in the Tumor Stroma to Eradicate Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    initiated. One potential caveat that has arisen is that fibroblast specific protein (FSP) may be expressed at low levels in late stage PyMT tumor...digestion solution per 5g of tumor tissue) 1.5 mg/ml Collagenase (from 100X stock solution) 125 U/ml Hyaluronidase (from 100X stock solution) MMF media...g. Determine the latency period to the onset of primary tumor formation and metastasis for recipient mice generated in subtask 1f. At selected

  19. Identifying Effective Enzyme Activity Targets for Recombinant Class I and Class II Collagenase for Successful Human Islet Isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, Appakalai N; Green, Michael L; Breite, Andrew G; Loganathan, Gopalakrishnan; Wilhelm, Joshua J; Tweed, Benjamin; Vargova, Lenka; Lockridge, Amber; Kuriti, Manikya; Hughes, Michael G; Williams, Stuart K; Hering, Bernhard J; Dwulet, Francis E; McCarthy, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Isolation following a good manufacturing practice-compliant, human islet product requires development of a robust islet isolation procedure where effective limits of key reagents are known. The enzymes used for islet isolation are critical but little is known about the doses of class I and class II collagenase required for successful islet isolation. We used a factorial approach to evaluate the effect of high and low target activities of recombinant class I (rC1) and class II (rC2) collagenase on human islet yield. Consequently, 4 different enzyme formulations with divergent C1:C2 collagenase mass ratios were assessed, each supplemented with the same dose of neutral protease. Both split pancreas and whole pancreas models were used to test enzyme targets (n = 20). Islet yield/g pancreas was compared with historical enzymes (n = 42). Varying the Wunsch (rC2) and collagen degradation activity (CDA, rC1) target dose, and consequently the C1:C2 mass ratio, had no significant effect on tissue digestion. Digestions using higher doses of Wunsch and CDA resulted in comparable islet yields to those obtained with 60% and 50% of those activities, respectively. Factorial analysis revealed no significant main effect of Wunsch activity or CDA for any parameter measured. Aggregate results from 4 different collagenase formulations gave 44% higher islet yield (>5000 islet equivalents/g) in the body/tail of the pancreas (n = 12) when compared with those from the same segment using a standard natural collagenase/protease mixture (n = 6). Additionally, islet yields greater than 5000 islet equivalents/g pancreas were also obtained in whole human pancreas. A broader C1:C2 ratio can be used for human islet isolation than has been used in the past. Recombinant collagenase is an effective replacement for the natural enzyme and we have determined that high islet yield can be obtained even with low doses of rC1:rC2, which is beneficial for the survival of islets.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the catalytic domain of collagenase G from Clostridium histolyticum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckhard, Ulrich; Nüss, Dorota; Ducka, Paulina; Schönauer, Esther; Brandstetter, Hans

    2008-01-01

    The catalytic domain of collagenase G from C. histolyticum was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) and purified using affinity and size-exclusion column-chromatographic methods. Crystals were obtained at 290 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffraction data have been collected to 2.75 Å resolution. The catalytic domain of collagenase G from Clostridium histolyticum has been cloned, recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using affinity and size-exclusion column-chromatographic methods. Crystals of the catalytic domain were obtained from 0.12 M sodium citrate and 23%(v/v) PEG 3350 at 293 K. The crystals diffracted to 2.75 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to an orthorhombic space group, with unit-cell parameters a = 57, b = 109, c = 181 Å. This unit cell is consistent with the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit and a solvent content of approximately 53%

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the catalytic domain of collagenase G from Clostridium histolyticum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckhard, Ulrich, E-mail: ulrich.eckhard@sbg.ac.at; Nüss, Dorota; Ducka, Paulina; Schönauer, Esther; Brandstetter, Hans [Structural Biology Group, Department of Molecular Biology, University of Salzburg, 5020 Salzburg (Austria)

    2008-05-01

    The catalytic domain of collagenase G from C. histolyticum was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) and purified using affinity and size-exclusion column-chromatographic methods. Crystals were obtained at 290 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffraction data have been collected to 2.75 Å resolution. The catalytic domain of collagenase G from Clostridium histolyticum has been cloned, recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using affinity and size-exclusion column-chromatographic methods. Crystals of the catalytic domain were obtained from 0.12 M sodium citrate and 23%(v/v) PEG 3350 at 293 K. The crystals diffracted to 2.75 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to an orthorhombic space group, with unit-cell parameters a = 57, b = 109, c = 181 Å. This unit cell is consistent with the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit and a solvent content of approximately 53%.

  2. Evaluation of the effect of cooling and of the addition of collagenase on llama sperm DNA using toluidine blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretero, M I; Giuliano, S M; Casaretto, C I; Gambarotta, M C; Neild, D M

    2012-05-01

    The effect cryopreservation has on sperm chromatin condensation has been studied in many species but not in South American camelids. The objectives of this study were to evaluate with toluidine blue (TB) the effects of cooling and of adding collagenase on llama sperm DNA condensation. The optimum incubation time (30 s, 1.5 and 3 min) with a reducing agent (dithiothreitol) was also determined. When comparing cooled samples with the raw ejaculate, a significant increase in sperm showing a high degree of decondensation (TB positive) was observed (P = 0.005). A positive correlation was observed, both in raw and cooled semen, between sperm head morphological abnormalities observed in TB-stained cells and TB-positive sperm (highly decondensed DNA), but not with TB-intermediate spermatozoa (moderately decondensed DNA). No significant differences (P > 0.05) were observed in samples incubated with or without 0.1% collagenase. In cooled semen, but not in raw, a significant increase (P = 0.000) in reacted sperm (TB positive) was observed using 3-min incubation with 1% dithiothreitol (DTT). To conclude, cooling would seem to produce an increase in llama sperm chromatin decondensation. Also, 0.1% collagenase in H-TALP-BSA could be added to raw semen to aid its manipulation as it would not seem to increase DNA decondensation. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Topical silver sulfadiazine vs collagenase ointment for the treatment of partial thickness burns in children: a prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostlie, Daniel J; Juang, David; Aguayo, Pablo; Pettiford-Cunningham, Janine P; Erkmann, Erin A; Rash, Diane E; Sharp, Susan W; Sharp, Ronald J; St Peter, Shawn D

    2012-06-01

    The 2 most commonly used topical agents for partial thickness burns are silver sulfadiazine (SSD) and collagenase ointment (CO). Silver sulfadiazine holds antibacterial properties, and eschar separation occurs naturally. Collagenase ointment is an enzyme that cleaves denatured collagen facilitating separation but has no antibacterial properties. Currently, there are no prospective comparative data in children for these 2 agents. Therefore, we conducted a prospective randomized trial. After institutional review board approval, patients were randomized to daily debridement with SSD or CO. Primary outcome was the need for skin grafting. Patients were treated for 2 days with SSD with subsequent randomization. Polymyxin was mixed with CO for antibacterial coverage. Debridements were performed daily for 10 days or until the burn healed. Grafting was performed after 10 days if not healed. From January 2008 to January 2011, 100 patients were enrolled, with no differences in patient characteristics. There were no differences in clinical course, outcome, or need for skin grafting. Wound infections occurred in 7 patients treated with CO and 1 patient treated with SSD (P = .06). Collagenase ointment was more expensive than SSD (P burns results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Adenoviral vaccination combined with CD40 stimulation and CTLA-4 blockage can lead to complete tumor regression in a murine melanoma model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Maria Rathmann; Holst, Peter J; Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard

    2010-01-01

    that the delay in tumor growth can be converted to complete regression and long-term survival in 30-40% of the mice by a booster vaccination plus combinational treatment with agonistic anti-CD40 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) and anti-CTLA-4 mAb. Regarding the mechanism underlying the improved clinical effect......, analysis of the tumor-specific response revealed a significantly prolonged tumor-specific CD8 T cell response in spleens of the mice receiving the combinational treatment compared with mice receiving either treatment individually. Matching this, CD8 T cell depletion completely prevented tumor control...

  5. Late complications of clinical clostridium histolyticum collagenase use in Dupuytren's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren M Rozen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: While Dupuytren's disease can cause disabling contractures requiring open surgery, a less-invasive option using Clostridium Histolyticum collagenase (CHC via percutaneous injection was recently reported. A recent prospective, randomized trial demonstrated few complications during 90 days follow-up, however did not assess any longer term follow-up for these patients. Long-term outcomes in this setting have not been adequately reported, and the current manuscript aims to identify late complications from the clinical use of percutaneous CHC. METHODS: The current manuscript reports an extended 12-month follow-up for a cohort of twelve of patients enrolled in the original prospective, randomized trial, treated at a single institution. An analysis of complications requiring surgical intervention was undertaken. RESULTS: Two of twelve patients reported debilitating pain and triggering requiring surgical intervention. Extensive deep-tissue scarring and adhesions were identified, providing the first visual and qualitative analysis of the pathologic effects of CHC. CONCLUSION: Late complications from CHC use can and have occurred, outside the follow-up period of the initial phase III trials. Longer term follow-up of such patients is thus essential, and further investigation and characterization of the late effects of CHC use is warranted.

  6. Direct Radiofrequency Application Improves Pain and Gait in Collagenase-Induced Acute Achilles Tendon Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Pu Tsai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency (RF is often used as a supplementary and alternative method to alleviate pain for chronic tendinopathy. Whether or how it would work for acute tendon injury is not addressed in the literatures. Through detailed pain and gait monitoring, we hypothesized that collagenase-induce acute tendinopathy model may be able to answer these questions. Gait parameters, including time, distance, and range of motion, were recorded and analyzed using a walking track equipped with a video-based system. Expression of substance P (SP, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP, and galanin were used as pain markers. Beta-III tubulin and Masson trichrome staining were used as to evaluate nerve sprouting, matrix tension, and degeneration in the tendon. Of fourteen analyzed parameters, RF significantly improved stance phase, step length, preswing, and intermediary toe-spread of gait. Improved gait related to the expression of substance P, CGRP, and reduced nerve fiber sprouting and matrix tension, but not galanin. The study indicates that direct RF application may be a valuable approach to improve gait and pain in acute tendon injury. Altered gait parameters may be used as references to evaluate therapeutic outcomes of RF or other treatment plan for tendinopathy.

  7. Data on isolating mesenchymal stromal cells from human adipose tissue using a collagenase-free method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wassim Shebaby

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present dataset describes a detailed protocol to isolate mesenchymal cells from human fat without the use of collagenase. Human fat specimen, surgically cleaned from non-fat tissues (e.g., blood vessels and reduced into smaller fat pieces of around 1–3 mm size, is incubated in complete culture media for five to seven days. Then, cells started to spread out from the fat explants and to grow in cultures according to an exponential pattern. Our data showed that primary mesenchymal cells presenting heterogeneous morphology start to acquire more homogenous fibroblastic-like shape when cultured for longer duration or when subcultured into new flasks. Cell isolation efficiency as well as cell doubling time were also calculated throughout the culturing experimentations and illustrated in a separate figure thereafter. This paper contains data previously considered as an alternative protocol to isolate adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell published in “Proliferation and differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs into osteoblastic lineage are passage dependent” [1]. Keywords: Adipose tissue, mesenchymal stromal cell, cell culture, doubling time

  8. Survey of patient and partner satisfaction following collagenase Clostridium histolyticum treatment for Peyronie's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaissie, J; Yafi, F A; Traore, E J; Sikka, S C; Hellstrom, W J G

    2017-03-01

    Intralesional injection of collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCH) is a minimally invasive, Food and Drug Administration-approved, effective treatment for Peyronie's disease (PD). To assess the satisfaction of patients and their female sexual partners (FSP) following CCH therapy for PD, we conducted a retrospective review of the records of all patients treated with CCH for PD between 04/2014 and 03/2016. Collected variables included demographics, pre- and post-treatment sexual function, penile curvature, penile vascular findings, and treatment outcomes. Patients and their FSPs were subsequently contacted by telephone and queried regarding their ability to have intercourse and their satisfaction with treatment. A total of 24 couples responded to our questionnaire and constitute the subjects of this analysis. Patient and FSP satisfaction with treatment were 67% and 71%, respectively. Significant predictors of FSP satisfaction with treatment included recall of penile trauma during prior sexual intercourse, improved ability to have sexual intercourse following treatment, and absence of post-procedural glans hypoesthesia. In conclusion, CCH imparts a significant benefit on a couple's sexual health. Partner satisfaction with treatment is correlated with improved ability to have sexual intercourse and absence of patient glans hypoesthesia. © 2017 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  9. Efficacy and Safety of the Collagenase of the Bacterium Clostridium Histolyticum for the Treatment of Capsular Contracture after Silicone Implants: Ex-Vivo Study on Human Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Fischer

    Full Text Available The fibrotic capsule that surrounds silicone implants consists mainly of collagen. The FDA-approved collagenase of the bacterium clostridium histolyticum provides a reasonable treatment option. Safety and efficacy at the female breast site must be evaluated before clinical utilization.We incubated 20 samples of fibrotic capsule as well as 12 full thickness skin grafts harvested from the female breast site for 24 hours with different doses of collagenase. Outcome measures involved histological assessment of thickness and density of the capsule tissue as well as the skin grafts. Furthermore, we performed a collagen assay and immunohistochemistry staining for collagen subtypes.Collagenase treatment was able to degrade human capsule contracture tissue ex-vivo. The remaining collagen subtype after degradation was type 4 only. 0.3 mg/ml of collagenase was most effective in reducing capsule thickness when compared with higher concentrations. Of note, effectiveness was inversely related to capsule density, such that there was less reduction in thickness with higher capsule densities and vice versa. Furthermore, the application of 0.3mg/ml collagenase did not lead to thinning or perforation of full thickness skin grafts.Adjustment of collagenase dose will depend on thickness and density of the contracted capsule. A concentration of 0.3mg/ml seems to be safe and effective in an ex-vivo setting. The remaining collagen subtype 4 is suitable to serve as a neo-capsule/acellular tissue matrix. Collagenase treatment for capsular contracture may soon become a clinical reality.

  10. Ewing's sarcoma of bone tumor cells produces MCSF that stimulates monocyte proliferation in a novel mouse model of Ewing's sarcoma of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulies, B S; DeBoyace, S D; Damron, T A; Allen, M J

    2015-10-01

    Ewing's sarcoma of bone is a primary childhood malignancy of bone that is treated with X-radiation therapy in combination with surgical excision and chemotherapy. To better study Ewing's sarcoma of bone we developed a novel model of primary Ewing's sarcoma of bone and then treated animals with X-radiation therapy. We identified that uncontrolled tumor resulted in lytic bone destruction while X-radiation therapy decreased lytic bone destruction and increased limb-length asymmetry, a common, crippling complication of X-radiation therapy. Osteoclasts were indentified adjacent to the tumor, however, we were unable to detect RANK-ligand in the Ewing's tumor cells in vitro, which lead us to investigate alternate mechanisms for osteoclast formation. Ewing's sarcoma tumor cells and archival Ewing's sarcoma of bone tumor biopsy samples were shown to express MCSF, which could promote osteoclast formation. Increased monocyte numbers were detected in peripheral blood and spleen in animals with untreated Ewing's sarcoma tumor while monocyte number in animals treated with x-radiation had normal numbers of monocytes. Our data suggest that our Ewing's sarcoma of bone model will be useful in the study Ewing's sarcoma tumor progression in parallel with the effects of chemotherapy and X-radiation therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ewing's Sarcoma of Bone Tumor Cells Produce MCSF that Stimulates Monocyte Proliferation in a Novel Mouse Model of Ewing's Sarcoma of Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulies, BS; DeBoyace, SD; Damron, TA; Allen, MJ

    2015-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma of bone is a primary childhood malignancy of bone that is treated with X-radiation therapy in combination with surgical excision and chemotherapy. To better study Ewing's sarcoma of bone we developed a novel model of primary Ewing's sarcoma of bone and then treated animals with X-radiation therapy. We identified that uncontrolled tumor resulted in lytic bone destruction while X-radiation therapy decreased lytic bone destruction and increased limb-length asymmetry, a common, crippling complication of X-radiation therapy. Osteoclasts were indentified adjacent to the tumor, however, we were unable to detect RANK-ligand in the Ewing's tumor cells in vitro, which lead us to investigate alternate mechanisms for osteoclast formation. Ewing's sarcoma tumor cells and archival Ewing's sarcoma of bone tumor biopsy samples were shown to express MCSF, which could promote osteoclast formation. Increased monocyte numbers were detected in peripheral blood and spleen in animals with untreated Ewing's sarcoma tumor while monocyte number in animals treated with x-radiation had normal numbers of monocytes. Our data suggest that our Ewing's sarcoma of bone model will be useful in the study Ewing's sarcoma tumor progression in parallel with the effects of chemotherapy and X-radiation therapy. PMID:26051470

  12. Ex-vivo in-vitro inhibition of lipopolysaccharide stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 beta secretion in human whole blood by extractum urticae dioicae foliorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obertreis, B; Ruttkowski, T; Teucher, T; Behnke, B; Schmitz, H

    1996-04-01

    An extract of Urtica dioica folium (IDS 23, Rheuma-Hek), monographed positively for adjuvant therapy of rheumatic diseases and with known effects in partial inhibition of prostaglandin and leukotriene synthesis in vitro, was investigated with respect to effects of the extract on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in human whole blood of healthy volunteers. In the assay system used, LPS stimulated human whole blood showed a straight increase of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) secretion reaching maximum concentrations within 24 h following a plateau and slight decrease up to 65 h, respectively. The concentrations of these cytokines was strongly positively correlated with the number of monocytes/macrophages of each volunteer. TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta concentration after LPS stimulation was significantly reduced by simultaneously given IDS 23 in a strictly dose dependent manner. At time 24 h these cytokine concentrations were reduced by 50.8% and 99.7%, respectively, using the highest test IDS 23 assay concentration of 5 mg/ml (p flavonoides such as caffeic malic acid, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, quercetin and rutin did not influence LPS stimulated TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6 secretion in tested concentrations up to 5 x 10(-5) mol/l. These further findings on the pharmacological mechanism of action of Urticae dioica folia may explain the positive effects of this extract in the treatment of rheumatic diseases.

  13. Budget impact analysis in Spanish patients with Dupuytren's contracture: fasciectomy vs. collagenase Clostridium histolyticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Salas-Cansado, M; Cuadros, M; Del Cerro, M; Arandes, J M

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the budget impact of collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCH) vs. fasciectomy (FSC) surgery for the treatment of Dupuytren's disease (DD) in Spain. A cost minimization analysis was adopted (effectiveness was assumed to be equivalent for both techniques). DD related costs were considered. CCH costs (including drug, administration and visits) were obtained from clinical trials and a real-life study. FSC costs (including type of admission, visits, operating room, re-admissions, tests, drugs and rehabilitation costs) were collected through a retrospective, observational, local study. Unit costs were obtained from local database systems (e-SALUD and BOT). Results were presented from the NHS perspective for the next 3 years. We assumed that there were 5100 fasciectomies per year (with a 5% annual increase) and that 20%, 30% and 40% of them will annually utilize CCH. In addition, a 10%, 15% and 20% of untreated diagnosed patients were expected to receive CCH. All the data were validated through an expert panel. A sensitivity analysis was performed with the main variables. The average FSC cost was €2250 (72% inpatients), €1703 for outpatients and €2467 for inpatients. The average CCH cost was €1220 (1.5 vial/injection and four visits) and could drop to €898 (1.1 vial/injections and three visits). The accumulated 3years budget impact analysis (BIA) was 45,971€ (K€-2993(1); 3870). According to this study, the inclusion of the CCH should produce a 3-year cumulative budgetary impact of €45,971 (K€-2993; 3870) for the NHS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Serial superficial digital flexor tendon biopsies for diagnosing and monitoring collagenase-induced tendonitis in horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José C. de Lacerda Neto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this investigation was to demonstrate the feasibility of a biopsy technique by performing serial evaluations of tissue samples of the forelimb superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT in healthy horses and in horses subjected to superficial digital flexor tendonitis induction. Eight adult horses were evaluated in two different phases (P, control (P1 and tendonitis-induced (P2. At P1, the horses were subjected to five SDFT biopsies of the left forelimb, with 24 hours (h of interval. Clinical and ultrasonographic (US examinations were performed immediately before the tendonitis induction, 24 and 48 h after the procedure. The biopsied tendon tissues were analyzed through histology. P2 evaluations were carried out three months later, when the same horses were subjected to tendonitis induction by injection of bacterial collagenase into the right forelimb SDFT. P2 clinical and US evaluations, and SDFT biopsies were performed before, and after injury induction at the following time intervals: after 24, 48, 72 and 96 h, and after 15, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 days. The biopsy technique has proven to be easy and quick to perform and yielded good tendon samples for histological evaluation. At P1 the horses did not show signs of localised inflammation, pain or lameness, neither SDFT US alterations after biopsies, showing that the biopsy procedure per se did not risk tendon integrity. Therefore, this procedure is feasible for routine tendon histological evaluations. The P2 findings demonstrate a relation between the US and histology evaluations concerning induced tendonitis evolution. However, the clinical signs of tendonitis poorly reflected the microscopic tissue condition, indicating that clinical presentation is not a reliable parameter for monitoring injury development. The presented method of biopsying SDFT tissue in horses enables the serial collection of material for histological analysis causing no clinical signs and tendon damage seen

  15. Disease-modifying effect of anthraquinone prodrug with boswellic acid on collagenase-induced osteoarthritis in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaneshwar, Suneela; Dipmala, Patil; Abhay, Harsulkar; Prashant, Bhondave

    2013-08-01

    Diacerein and its active metabolite rhein are promising disease modifying agents for osteoarthritis (OA). Boswellic acid is an active ingredient of Gugglu; a herbal medicine commonly administered in osteoarthritis. Both of them possess excellent anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activities. It was thought interesting to conjugate rhein and boswellic acid into a mutual prodrug (DSRB) and evaluate its efficacy on collagenase-induced osteoarthritis in rats wherein the conjugate, rhein, boswellic acid and their physical mixture, were tested based on various parameters. Oral administration of 3.85 mg of rhein, 12.36 mg of boswellic acid and 15.73 mg of DSRB which would release equimolar amounts of rhein and boswellic acid, exhibited significant restoration in rat body weight as compared to the untreated arthritic control group. Increase in knee diameter (mm), due to edema was observed in group injected with collagenase, which reduced significantly with the treatment of conjugate. The hematological parameters (Hb, RBC, WBC and ESR) and biochemical parameters (CRP, SALP, SGOT and SGPT) in the osteoarthritic rats were significantly brought back to normal values on treatment with conjugate. It also showed better anti-ulcer activity than rhein. Further the histopathological studies revealed significant anti-arthritic activity of conjugate when compared with the arthritic control group. In conclusion, the conjugate at the specified dose level of 15.73 mg/kg, p. o. (BID) showed reduction in knee diameter and it could significantly normalize the hematological and biochemical abnormalities in collagenase-induced osteoarthritis in rats. Further the histopathological studies confirmed the additive anti-arthritic effect of DSRB as compared to plain rhein.

  16. Economic and clinical benefit of collagenase ointment compared to a hydrogel dressing for pressure ulcer debridement in a long-term care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waycaster, Curtis; Milne, Catherine

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the cost-effectiveness of collagenase ointment relative to autolysis with a hydrogel dressing when debriding necrotic pressure ulcers in a long-term care setting. A Markov decision process model with 2 states (necrotic nonviable wound bed transitioning to a granulated viable wound bed) was developed using data derived from a prospective, randomized, 6-week, single-center trial of 27 institutionalized subjects with pressure ulcers that were ≥ 85% necrotic nonviable tissue. Direct medical costs from the payer perspective included study treatments, wound treatment supplies, and nursing time. Clinical benefit was measured as "granulation days" and was derived from the time-dependent debridement rates of the alternative products. The average cost per patient for 42 days of pressure ulcer care was $1,817 in 2012 for the collagenase group and $1,611 for the hydrogel group. Days spent with a granulated wound were 3.6 times higher for collagenase (23.4 vs 6.5) than with the hydrogel. The estimated cost per granulation day was > 3.2 times higher for hydrogel ($249) vs collagenase ($78). In this economic analysis based on a randomized, controlled clinical trial, collagenase ointment resulted in a faster time to complete debridement and was more cost-effective than hydrogel autolysis for pressure ulcers in a long-term care setting. Even though collagenase ointment has a higher acquisition cost than hydrogel, the clinical benefit offsets the initial cost difference, resulting in lower cost per granulation day to the nursing home over the course of the 42-day analysis.

  17. Study of HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibition Activity of the Hydrolyzed Product of Snakehead Fish (Channa striata) Skin Collagen with 50 kDa Collagenase from Bacillus licheniformis F11.4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia, Agnes; Rachmawati, Heni; Riani, Catur; Retnoningrum, Debbie S

    2016-01-01

    Bioactive peptides produced from enzymatic hydrolysis fibrous protein have been proven to have several biological activities. Previous study showed that the hydrolysis product of snakehead fish skin collagen with 26 kDa collagenase from Bacillus licheniformis F11.4 showed HMG-CoA (HMGR) inhibition activity. The aim of this research was to determine the ability of the hydrolysis product produced from snakehead fish skin collagen hydrolysed by 50 kDa collagenase from B. licheniformis F11.4 in inhibiting HMGR activity. Snakehead fish skin collagen was extracted using an acid method and collagenase was produced from B. licheniformis F11.4 using half-strength Luria Bertani (LB) medium containing 5% collagen. Crude collagenase was concentrated and fractionated using the DEAE Sephadex A-25 column eluted with increasing gradient concentrations of NaCl. Collagen, collagenase, and fractions were analyzed using SDS-PAGE and collagenolytic activity was analyzed by the zymography method. Collagenase with 50 kDa molecular weight presented in fraction one was used to hydrolyze the collagen. The reaction was done in 18 hours at 50°C. The hydrolysis product using 3.51 μg collagen and 9 ng collagenase showed 25.8% inhibition activity against pravastatin. This work shows for the first time that the hydrolysis product of snakehead fish skin collagen and 50 kDa collagenase from B. licheniformis F11.4 has potential as an anticholesterol agent.

  18. The effects of TYB-2285 and its metabolites on eosinophil adhesion to tumor necrosis factor α-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells

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    Takanari Tominaga

    1996-01-01

    The results of the present study demonstrate that TYB-2285 and its metabolites selectively inhibit the adhesion of eosinophils to HUVECs stimulated with TNF-α and also suggest that TYB-2285, TC-286 and TC-326 might block the VLA-4/VCAM-1 pathway selectively.

  19. Ketamine inhibits tumor necrosis factor secretion by RAW264.7 murine macrophages stimulated with antibiotic-exposed strains of community-associated, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

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    Aguirre Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infections caused by community-associated strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA are associated with a marked and prolonged host inflammatory response. In a sepsis simulation model, we tested whether the anesthetic ketamine inhibits the macrophage TNF response to antibiotic-exposed CA-MRSA bacteria via its antagonism of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors. RAW264.7 cells were stimulated for 18 hrs with 105 to 107 CFU/mL inocula of either of two prototypical CA-MRSA isolates, USA300 strain LAC and USA400 strain MW2, in the presence of either vancomycin or daptomycin. One hour before bacterial stimulation, ketamine was added with or without MK-801 (dizocilpine, a chemically unrelated non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, APV (D-2-amino-5-phosphono-valerate, a competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, NMDA, or combinations of these agents. Supernatants were collected and assayed for TNF concentration by ELISA. Results RAW264.7 cells exposed to either LAC or MW2 in the presence of daptomycin secreted less TNF than in the presence of vancomycin. The addition of ketamine inhibited macrophage TNF secretion after stimulation with either of the CA-MRSA isolates (LAC, MW2 in the presence of either antibiotic. The NMDA inhibitors, MK-801 and APV, also suppressed macrophage TNF secretion after stimulation with either of the antibiotic-exposed CA-MRSA isolates, and the effect was not additive or synergistic with ketamine. The addition of NMDA substrate augmented TNF secretion in response to the CA-MRSA bacteria, and the addition of APV suppressed the effect of NMDA in a dose-dependent fashion. Conclusions Ketamine inhibits TNF secretion by MRSA-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages and the mechanism likely involves NMDA receptor antagonism. These findings may have therapeutic significance in MRSA sepsis.

  20. Tumor-targeting properties of 90Y- and 177Lu-labeled α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide analogues in a murine melanoma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Yubin; Hoffman, Timothy J.; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the tumor-targeting properties of 90 Y-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH and 177 Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH in a murine melanoma mouse model. Methods: The in vitro properties of cellular internalization and retention of 90 Y-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH and 177 Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH were studied in B16/F1 murine melanoma cells. The pharmacokinetics of 90 Y-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH and 177 Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH were determined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. Results: 90 Y-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH and 177 Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH exhibited fast cellular internalization and extended cellular retention in B16/F1 cells. High receptor-mediated tumor uptake and retention coupled with fast whole-body clearance of 90 Y-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH and 177 Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH were demonstrated in B16/F1 tumor-bearing C57 mice. The tumor uptakes of 90 Y-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH and 177 Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH were 25.70±4.64 and 14.48±0.85 %ID/g at 2 h, and 14.09±2.73 and 17.68±3.32 %ID/g at 4 h postinjection. There was little activity accumulated in normal organs except for kidney. Conclusions: High tumor-targeting properties of 90 Y-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH and 177 Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH highlighted their potential as radiopharmaceuticals for targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma in further investigations

  1. Clostridial collagenase ointment and medicinal honey utilization for pressure ulcers in US hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfus, Jill; Delhougne, Gary; James, Roberta; Gayle, Julie; Waycaster, Curtis

    2018-04-01

    To describe the utilization of clostridial collagenase ointment (CCO) and medicinal honey debridement methods in real-world inpatient and outpatient hospital settings among pressure ulcer (PU) patients and compare the frequency of healthcare re-encounters between CCO- and medicinal honey-treated patients. De-identified hospital discharge records for patients receiving CCO or medicinal honey methods of debridement and having an ICD-9 code for PU were extracted from the US Premier Healthcare Database. Multivariable analysis was used to compare the frequency of inpatient and outpatient revisits up to 6 months after an index encounter for CCO- vs medicinal honey-treated PUs. The study identified 48,267 inpatients and 2,599 outpatients with PUs treated with CCO or medicinal honeys. Among study inpatients, n = 44,725 (93%) were treated with CCO, and n = 3,542 (7%) with medicinal honeys. CCO and medicinal honeys accounted for 1,826 (70%) and 773 (30%), respectively, of study outpatients. In adjusted models, those treated with CCO had lower odds for inpatient readmissions (OR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.80-0.94) after inpatient index visits, and outpatient re-encounters both after inpatient (OR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.67-0.79) and outpatient (OR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.64-0.95) index visits in 6 months of follow-up. The study was observational in nature, and did not adjust for reasons why patients were hospitalized initially, or why they returned to the facility. Although the study adjusted for differences in a variety of demographic, clinical, and hospital characteristics between the treatments, we are not able to rule out selection bias. Patients with CCO-treated PUs returned to inpatient and outpatient hospital settings less often compared with medicinal honey-treated PUs. These results from real-world administrative data help to gain a better understanding of the clinical characteristics of patients with PUs treated with these two debridement methods and

  2. Engineering D-Amino Acid Containing Collagen Like Peptide at the Cleavage Site of Clostridium histolyticum Collagenase for Its Inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punitha Velmurugan

    Full Text Available Collagenase is an important enzyme which plays an important role in degradation of collagen in wound healing, cancer metastasis and even in embryonic development. However, the mechanism of this degradation has not yet been completely understood. In the field of biomedical and protein engineering, the design and development of new peptide based materials is of main concern. In the present work an attempt has been made to study the effect of DAla in collagen like peptide (imino-poor region of type I collagen on the structure and stability of peptide against enzyme hydrolysis. Effect of replacement of DAla in the collagen like peptide has been studied using circular dichroic spectroscopy (CD. Our findings suggest that, DAla substitution leads to conformational changes in the secondary structure and favours the formation of polyproline II conformation than its L-counterpart in the imino-poor region of collagen like peptides. Change in the chirality of alanine at the cleavage site of collagenase in the imino-poor region inhibits collagenolytic activity. This may find application in design of peptides and peptidomimics for enzyme-substrate interaction, specifically with reference to collagen and other extra cellular matrix proteins.

  3. Utility of NucleoCounter for the chondrocyte count in the collagenase digest of human native cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonenaga, Kazumichi; Nishizawa, Satoru; Akizawa, Miki; Asawa, Yukiyo; Fujihara, Yuko; Takato, Tsuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    In cartilage tissue engineering, viable cell numbers should be correctly counted in the collagenase digest of the biopsied cartilage. However, this is a difficult task due to the presence of matrix debris, cell ghosts and their aggregates. To search for the correct cell counting method in this situation, we evaluated the utility of an automatic cell counting device, the NucleoCounter, and compared it with conventional staining using the LIVE/DEAD® kit. We first measured the cell numbers of a standard chondrocyte sample by the NucleoCounter, which showed a high accuracy (R2 = 0.9999) and reproducibility (%CV: 2.00–8.66). We then calculated the cell numbers and viability in some collagenase digests of native cartilage using either the NucleoCounter or LIVE/DEAD® kit, revealing that the total cell numbers, viable ones and viability were highly correlated between them (R2 = 0.9601, 0.9638 and 0.917, respectively). However, both the intrapersonal and interpersonal variabilities in the NucleoCounter was significantly decreased to about 1/20–1/5, compared to that of the LIVE/DEAD® kit. The NucleoCounter was regarded as a useful tool for simple, rapid, and highly reproducible cell counts, which may not only provide constant experimental data in a certain laboratory, but also contribute to the high reproducibility of the clinical results of cartilage tissue engineering among multiple institutions. PMID:20845070

  4. Stimulation of anti-tumor effect by low-dose irradiation. Pt. 2. The prolongation of life span in AKR mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Keiichiro; Misonoh, Jun; Hosoi, Yoshio; Ono, Tetsuya; Sakamoto, Kiyohiko.

    1994-01-01

    To elucidate the antileukemic effect of low-dose X-irradiation, we studied the influence of periodical low-dose X-irradiation on survival and tumor incidence of thymus using AKR mice. The findings of the experiments were as follows; (1) The median survival time of control AKR mice was 283±3 days. It of irradiation group of 15 cGy/week and 30cGy was 309±14 days and 316±10 days respectively. The life span was significantly prolonged (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01 respectively by Wilcoxon test) by periodical low-dose X-irradiation in term of breeding. (2) The incidence of thymus tumor which is observed remarkably in control AKR mice was 48.8%. It of irradiation group of 15 cGy/week and 30 cGy/week was 40% and 20% respectively. Inversely, the non-tumor incidence of tymus in control AKR mice was 19.5%. It of irradiation group of 15 cGy/week and 30 cGy/week was 32.5% and 51.4% respectively. The thymic tumor incidence was significantly decreased (p < 0.01 by chi-square test) in irradiation group of 30 cGy/week. (3) The incidence of thymic lymphoma as a death cause in control AKR mice was 80.4%. It of irradiation group of 15 cGy/week and 30cGy/week was 67.5% and 48.6% respectively. The incidence of thymic lymphoma was significantly decreased (p < 0.05 by chi-square test) in irradiation group of 30 cGy/week. (author)

  5. Ewing's Sarcoma of Bone Tumor Cells Produce MCSF that Stimulates Monocyte Proliferation in a Novel Mouse Model of Ewing's Sarcoma of Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Margulies, BS; DeBoyace, SD; Damron, TA; Allen, MJ

    2015-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma of bone is a primary childhood malignancy of bone that is treated with X-radiation therapy in combination with surgical excision and chemotherapy. To better study Ewing's sarcoma of bone we developed a novel model of primary Ewing's sarcoma of bone and then treated animals with X-radiation therapy. We identified that uncontrolled tumor resulted in lytic bone destruction while X-radiation therapy decreased lytic bone destruction and increased limb-length asymmetry, a common, cr...

  6. Inhibition of GLO1 in Glioblastoma Multiforme Increases DNA-AGEs, Stimulates RAGE Expression, and Inhibits Brain Tumor Growth in Orthotopic Mouse Models

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    Rahul Jandial

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancers that exhibit the Warburg effect may elevate expression of glyoxylase 1 (GLO1 to detoxify the toxic glycolytic byproduct methylglyoxal (MG and inhibit the formation of pro-apoptotic advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs. Inhibition of GLO1 in cancers that up-regulate glycolysis has been proposed as a therapeutic targeting strategy, but this approach has not been evaluated for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most aggressive and difficult to treat malignancy of the brain. Elevated GLO1 expression in GBM was established in patient tumors and cell lines using bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches. GLO1 inhibition in GBM cell lines and in an orthotopic xenograft GBM mouse model was examined using both small molecule and short hairpin RNA (shRNA approaches. Inhibition of GLO1 with S-(p-bromobenzyl glutathione dicyclopentyl ester (p-BrBzGSH(Cp2 increased levels of the DNA-AGE N2-1-(carboxyethyl-2′-deoxyguanosine (CEdG, a surrogate biomarker for nuclear MG exposure; substantially elevated expression of the immunoglobulin-like receptor for AGEs (RAGE; and induced apoptosis in GBM cell lines. Targeting GLO1 with shRNA similarly increased CEdG levels and RAGE expression, and was cytotoxic to glioma cells. Mice bearing orthotopic GBM xenografts treated systemically with p-BrBzGSH(Cp2 exhibited tumor regression without significant off-target effects suggesting that GLO1 inhibition may have value in the therapeutic management of these drug-resistant tumors.

  7. Inhibition of GLO1 in Glioblastoma Multiforme Increases DNA-AGEs, Stimulates RAGE Expression, and Inhibits Brain Tumor Growth in Orthotopic Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandial, Rahul; Neman, Josh; Lim, Punnajit P; Tamae, Daniel; Kowolik, Claudia M; Wuenschell, Gerald E; Shuck, Sarah C; Ciminera, Alexandra K; De Jesus, Luis R; Ouyang, Ching; Chen, Mike Y; Termini, John

    2018-01-30

    Cancers that exhibit the Warburg effect may elevate expression of glyoxylase 1 (GLO1) to detoxify the toxic glycolytic byproduct methylglyoxal (MG) and inhibit the formation of pro-apoptotic advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). Inhibition of GLO1 in cancers that up-regulate glycolysis has been proposed as a therapeutic targeting strategy, but this approach has not been evaluated for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive and difficult to treat malignancy of the brain. Elevated GLO1 expression in GBM was established in patient tumors and cell lines using bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches. GLO1 inhibition in GBM cell lines and in an orthotopic xenograft GBM mouse model was examined using both small molecule and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) approaches. Inhibition of GLO1 with S -( p -bromobenzyl) glutathione dicyclopentyl ester ( p- BrBzGSH(Cp)₂) increased levels of the DNA-AGE N ²-1-(carboxyethyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (CEdG), a surrogate biomarker for nuclear MG exposure; substantially elevated expression of the immunoglobulin-like receptor for AGEs (RAGE); and induced apoptosis in GBM cell lines. Targeting GLO1 with shRNA similarly increased CEdG levels and RAGE expression, and was cytotoxic to glioma cells. Mice bearing orthotopic GBM xenografts treated systemically with p -BrBzGSH(Cp)₂ exhibited tumor regression without significant off-target effects suggesting that GLO1 inhibition may have value in the therapeutic management of these drug-resistant tumors.

  8. Vasodilator-Stimulated Phosphoprotein (VASP) depletion from breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells inhibits tumor spheroid invasion through downregulation of Migfilin, β-catenin and urokinase-plasminogen activator (uPA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gkretsi, Vasiliki; Stylianou, Andreas; Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos, E-mail: tstylian@ucy.ac.cy

    2017-03-15

    A hallmark of cancer cells is their ability to invade surrounding tissues and form metastases. Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM)-adhesion proteins are crucial in metastasis, connecting tumor ECM with actin cytoskeleton thus enabling cells to respond to mechanical cues. Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) is an actin-polymerization regulator which interacts with cell-ECM adhesion protein Migfilin, and regulates cell migration. We compared VASP expression in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer (BC) cells and found that more invasive MDA-MB-231 cells overexpress VASP. We then utilized a 3-dimensional (3D) approach to study metastasis in MDA-MB-231 cells using a system that considers mechanical forces exerted by the ECM. We prepared 3D collagen I gels of increasing concentration, imaged them by atomic force microscopy, and used them to either embed cells or tumor spheroids, in the presence or absence of VASP. We show, for the first time, that VASP silencing downregulated Migfilin, β-catenin and urokinase plasminogen activator both in 2D and 3D, suggesting a matrix-independent mechanism. Tumor spheroids lacking VASP demonstrated impaired invasion, indicating VASP’s involvement in metastasis, which was corroborated by Kaplan-Meier plotter showing high VASP expression to be associated with poor remission-free survival in lymph node-positive BC patients. Hence, VASP may be a novel BC metastasis biomarker. - Highlights: • More invasive MDA-MB-231 overexpress VASP compared to MCF-7 breast cancer cells. • We prepared 3D collagen I gels of increasing concentration and characterized them. • VASP silencing downregulated Migfilin, β-catenin and uPA both in 2D and 3D culture. • Tumor spheroids lacking VASP demonstrated impaired invasion. • Kaplan-Meier plotter shows association of high VASP expression with poor survival.

  9. Co-stimulation through 4-1BB/CD137 improves the expansion and function of CD8(+ melanoma tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes for adoptive T-cell therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Ann Chacon

    Full Text Available Adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL can induce tumor regression in up to 50% or more of patients with unresectable metastatic melanoma. However, current methods to expand melanoma TIL, especially the "rapid expansion protocol" (REP were not designed to enhance the generation of optimal effector-memory CD8(+ T cells for infusion. One approach to this problem is to manipulate specific co-stimulatory signaling pathways to enhance CD8(+ effector-memory T-cell expansion. In this study, we determined the effects of activating the TNF-R family member 4-1BB/CD137, specifically induced in activated CD8(+ T cells, on the yield, phenotype, and functional activity of expanded CD8(+ T cells during the REP. We found that CD8(+ TIL up-regulate 4-1BB expression early during the REP after initial TCR stimulation, but neither the PBMC feeder cells in the REP or the activated TIL expressed 4-1BB ligand. However, addition of an exogenous agonistic anti-4-1BB IgG4 (BMS 663513 to the REP significantly enhanced the frequency and total yield of CD8(+ T cells as well as their maintenance of CD28 and increased their anti-tumor CTL activity. Gene expression analysis found an increase in bcl-2 and survivin expression induced by 4-1BB that was associated with an enhanced survival capability of CD8(+ post-REP TIL when re-cultured in the absence or presence of cytokines. Our findings suggest that adding an agonistic anti-4-1BB antibody during the time of TIL REP initiation produces a CD8(+ T cell population capable of improved effector function and survival. This may greatly improve TIL persistence and anti-tumor activity in vivo after adoptive transfer into patients.

  10. Inhibitory effects of tocopherols on expression of the cyclooxygenase-2 gene in RAW264.7 cells stimulated by lipopolysaccharide, tumor necrosis factor-α or Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yukio; Kawata, Akifumi; Koh, Teho; Seki, Yuya; Tamura, Seiko; Katayama, Tadashi; Fujisawa, Seiichiro

    2013-01-01

    Tocopherols, which include α-, β-, γ-, and δ-tocopherol, protect cells against harmful free radicals and play an important role in preventing many human diseases such as cancer, inflammatory disorders, and ageing itself. However, the causal relationships between periodontal or oral chronic diseases and tocopherols have not been sufficiently studied. The present study investigated the inhibitory effects of these compounds on the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) mRNA in RAW264.7 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) or fimbriae of Poryphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), an oral anaerobe. The cytotoxicity (EC₅₀) of tocopherols toward RAW cells was determined using a cell counting kit (CCK-8). The regulatory effect of these compounds on the expression of COX2 mRNA stimulated with LPS, TNFα or Pg fimbriae was investigated using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Each tocopherol had similarly low cytotoxicity. COX2 gene expression in RAW cells after exposure to the three different macrophage activators was inhibited by the tocopherols (ptocopherol, β-, γ- and δ-tocopherol exhibited greater inhibitory effects (pTocopherols exhibit anti-inflammatory activity, and β-, γ- and δ-tocopherol have particularly more potent anti-inflammatory activity than α-tocopherol. Tocopherols may have potential utility for prevention of periodontal and chronic oral diseases.

  11. Skin sample preparation by collagenase digestion for diclofenac quantification using LC-MS/MS after topical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Padala, Naga Surya Prakash; Boggavarapu, Rajesh Kumar; Kalaikadhiban, Ilayaraja; Ajjala, Devender Reddy; Bhyrapuneni, Gopinadh; Muddana, Nageswara Rao

    2016-06-01

    Skin is the target site to evaluate the pharmacokinetic parameters of topical applications. Sample preparation is one of the influential steps in the bioanalysis of drugs in the skin. Evaluation of dermatopharmacokinetics at preclinical stage is challenging due to lack of proper sample preparation method. There is a need for an efficient sample preparation procedure for quantification of drugs in the skin using LC-MS/MS. The skin samples treated with collagenase followed by homogenization using a bead beater represents a best-fit method resulting in uniform homogenate for reproducible results. A new approach involving enzymatic treatment and mechanical homogenization techniques were evaluated for efficient sample preparation of skin samples in the bioanalysis.

  12. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  13. 11-Hydroxy-β-steroid dehydrogenase gene expression in canine adipose tissue and adipocytes: stimulation by lipopolysaccharide and tumor necrosis factor α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, V H; Trayhurn, P; Hunter, L; Morris, P J; German, A J

    2011-10-01

    The enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSD-1) is expressed in a number of tissues in rodents and humans and is responsible for the reactivation of inert cortisone into cortisol. Its gene expression and activity are increased in white adipose tissue (WAT) from obese humans and may contribute to the adverse metabolic consequences of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. The extent to which 11β-HSD-1 contributes to adipose tissue function in dogs is unknown; the aim of the present study was to examine 11β-HSD-1 gene expression and its regulation by proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory agents in canine adipocytes. Real-time PCR was used to examine the expression of 11β-HSD-1 in canine adipose tissue and canine adipocytes differentiated in culture. The mRNA encoding 11β-HSD-1 was identified in all the major WAT depots in dogs and also in liver, kidney, and spleen. Quantification by real-time PCR showed that 11β-HSD-1 mRNA was least in perirenal and falciform depots and greatest in subcutaneous, omental, and gonadal depots. Greater expression was seen in the omental depot in female than in male dogs (P=0.05). Gene expression for 11β-HSD-1 was also seen in adipocytes, from both subcutaneous and visceral depots, differentiated in culture; expression was evident throughout differentiation but was generally greatest in preadipocytes and during early differentiation, declining as cells progressed to maturity. The inflammatory mediators lipopolysaccharide and tumor necrosis factor α had a main stimulatory effect on 11β-HSD-1 gene expression in canine subcutaneous adipocytes, but IL-6 had no significant effect. Treatment with dexamethasone resulted in a significant time- and dose-dependent increase in 11β-HSD-1 gene expression, with greatest effects seen at 24 h (2 nM: approximately 4-fold; 20 nM: approximately 14-fold; P=0.010 for both). When subcutaneous adipocytes were treated with the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ agonist rosiglitazone

  14. Concise Review: Mesenchymal Stem Cells Ameliorate Tissue Injury via Secretion of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Stimulated Protein/Gene 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous reports have described therapeutic benefits in various disease models after administration of the adult stem/progenitor cells from bone marrow or other tissues referred to as mesenchymal stem cells/multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs. They all showed that one of the important effects of MSCs is to act against excessive inflammatory responses and repair the damaged tissues. The therapeutic benefits of MSCs were initially interpreted by their migration, engraftment, and differentiation into target tissues. However, remarkable anatomical structural repairs and functional improvements were increasingly observed with a small number of or even no MSCs in the injured tissues. This suggests that most beneficial effects are largely due to paracrine secretions or cell-to-cell contacts that have multiple effects involving modulation of inflammatory and immune responses. Currently, the therapeutic benefits of MSCs are in part explained by the cells being activated by signals from injured tissues to express an anti-inflammatory protein, tumor-necrosis-factor-α-induced protein 6. This important mechanism of action has attracted increasing attention, and therefore we conducted this review to summarize the latest research.

  15. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulates fresh human monocytes to lyse actinomycin D-treated WEHI-164 target cells via increased secretion of a monokine similar to tumor necrosis factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, A.R.; McKinnon, K.P.; Koren, H.S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on tumoricidal activity of human monocytes freshly isolated from peripheral blood were studied. Actinomycin D-treated WEHI-164 cells were used as targets because they are NK insensitive and are lysed rapidly by monocytes in 6-hr 51 Cr-release assays. Monocytes exhibited significant spontaneous activity without endotoxin. Monocytes either pretreated for 1 hr with LPS or assayed in the presence of LPS exhibited 100- to 1000-fold increased cytolytic activity. Cytolytic activity was heat labile and trypsin sensitive, and was recovered from Sepharose S-200 columns in a single peak with an apparent m.w. between 25,000 and 40,000. Actinomycin D or cycloheximide treatment of monocytes before the addition of LPS inhibited cytolytic monokine production. Cytolytic monokine activity was practically neutralized by specific rabbit antisera to human tumor necrosis factor (TNF). It was concluded that, although fresh human monocytes exhibit spontaneous tumoricidal activity, LPS is a potent activating agent. Its stimulatory effects depend on new transcription and translation and are mediated by enhanced secretion of a cytolytic monokine similar to TNF

  16. Natural inhibitors of tumor-associated proteases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magdolen, U.; Krol, J.; Sato, S.; Schmitt, M.; Magdolen, V.; Krueger, A.; Mueller, M.M.; Sperl, S.

    2002-01-01

    The turnover and remodelling of extracellular matrix (ECM) is an essential part of many normal biological processes including development, morphogenesis, and wound healing. ECM turnover also occurs in severe pathological situations like artherosclerosis, fibrosis, tumor invasion and metastasis. The major proteases involved in this turnover are serine proteases (especially the urokinase-type plasminogen activator/plasmin system), matrix metalloproteases (a family of about 20 zinc-dependent endopeptidases including collagenases, gelatinases, stromelysins, and membrane-type metalloproteases), and cysteine proteases. In vivo, the activity of these proteases is tightly regulated in the extracellular space by zymogen activation and/or controlled inhibition. In the present review, we give an overview on the structure and biochemical properties of important tumor-associated protease inhibitors such as plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and type 2 (PAI-1, PAI-2), tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP-1, -2, -3, and -4), and the cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin C. Interestingly, some of these inhibitors of tumor-associated proteases display multiple functions which rather promote than inhibit tumor progression, when the presence of inhibitors in the tumor tissue is not balanced. (author)

  17. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Tuncel

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR plays a pivotal role in thyroid hormone metabolism. It is a major controller of thyroid cell function and growth. Mutations in TSHR may lead to several thyroid diseases, most commonly hyperthyroidism. Although its genetic and epigenetic alterations do not directly lead to carcinogenesis, it has a crucial role in tumor growth, which is initiated by several oncogenes. This article will provide a brief review of TSHR and related diseases.

  18. Bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unni, K.K.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on bone tumors. Topics covered include: Bone tumor imaging: Contribution of CT and MRI, staging of bone tumors, perind cell tumors of bone, and metastatic bone disease

  19. Increased susceptibility of skin from HERDA (Hereditary Equine Regional Dermal Asthenia)-affected horses to bacterial collagenase degradation: a potential contributing factor to the clinical signs of HERDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashmir-Raven, Ann; Lavagnino, Michael; Sedlak, Aleksa; Gardner, Keri; Arnoczky, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia (HERDA) is a genetic disorder of collagen resulting in fragile, hyper-extensible skin and ulcerative lesions. The predominance of skin lesions have been shown to occur on the dorsum of HERDA-affected horses. While this has been postulated to be due to increased exposure to sunlight of these areas, the precise pathological mechanism which causes this to occur is unclear. We hypothesized that an increase in collagenase activity, that has been associated with the exposure of dermal fibroblasts to sunlight, will significantly degrade the material properties of skin from HERDA-affected horses when compared to unaffected controls. Six unaffected and seven HERDA-affected horses, all euthanized for other reasons. Full-thickness skin samples from similar locations on each horse were collected and cut into uniform strips and their material properties (tensile modulus) determined by mechanical testing before (n = 12 samples/horse) or after (n = 12 samples/horse) incubation in bacterial collagenase at 37°C for 6 h. The change in modulus following treatment was then compared between HERDA-affected and unaffected horses using a Student's t-test. The modulus of skin from HERDA-affected horses decreased significantly more than that from unaffected horses following collagenase treatment (54 ± 7% versus 30 ± 16%, P = 0.004). The significant decrease in the modulus of skin from HERDA-affected horses following collagenase exposure suggests that their altered collagen microarchitecture is more susceptible to enzymatic degradation and may explain the localization of skin lesions in HERDA-affected horses to those areas of the body most exposed to sunlight. These findings appear to support the previously reported benefits of sunlight restriction in HERDA-affected horses. © 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

  20. Purification and characterization of a collagenase from Penicillium sp. UCP 1286 by polyethylene glycol-phosphate aqueous two-phase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Albuquerque Wanderley, Maria Carolina; Wanderley Duarte Neto, José Manoel; Campos Albuquerque, Wendell Wagner; de Araújo Viana Marques, Daniela; de Albuquerque Lima, Carolina; da Cruz Silvério, Sara Isabel; de Lima Filho, José Luiz; Couto Teixeira, José António; Porto, Ana Lúcia Figueiredo

    2017-05-01

    Collagenases are proteolytic enzymes capable of degrading both native and denatured collagen, reported to be applied in industrial, medical and biotechnological sectors. Liquid-liquid extraction using aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) is one of the most promising bioseparation techniques, which can substitute difficult solid-liquid separation processes, offering many advantages over conventional methods including low-processing time, low-cost material and low-energy consumption. The collagenase produced by Penicillium sp. UCP 1286 showed a stronger affinity for the bottom salt-rich phase, where the highest levels of collagenolytic activity were observed at the center point runs, using 15.0% (w/w) PEG 3350 g/mol and 12.5% (w/w) phosphate salt at pH 7.0 and concentration. The enzyme was characterized by thermal stability, pH tolerance and effect of inhibitors, showing optimal collagenolytic activity at 37 °C and pH 9.0 and proved to be a serine protease. ATPS showed high efficiency in the collagenase purification, confirmed by a single band in SDS/PAGE, and can in fact be applied as a quick and inexpensive alternative method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin enhances production and secretion of type IV collagenases in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Y; Kawakami, S; Fujii, Y; Kihara, K; Oshima, H

    1997-03-01

    Intravesical administration of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is an effective and widely accepted treatment for superficial bladder cancer. Rapid progression of the disease after BCG therapy, however, has been reported in some cases refractory to the treatment. We examined whether BCG treatment and coexistence of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) alter the invasive potential of bladder cancer cells. Production and secretion of two type IV collagenases, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2 and MMP 9, by PBMCs from five healthy donors or bladder cancer cells (T24, JTC 30, and JTC 32) were evaluated by gelatin zymography, western blot analysis, and northern blot analysis. Invasion of bladder cancer cells was also examined using reconstituted basement membrane (Matrigel). BCG (5, 50, and 500 micrograms/ml) had no effect on secretion of MMP 2 and MMP 9 by bladder cancer cells, but increased the production and secretion of MMP 9 by PBMCs in a dose-dependent manner. The coexistence of PBMCs increased invasion of T24 cells and BCG further enhanced the invasion. Thus, BCG promotes invasion of bladder cancer cells under certain conditions. An increase in the secretion of MMP 9 by PBMCs may account in part for the effect.

  2. Autologous leukocyte-reduced platelet-rich plasma therapy for Achilles tendinopathy induced by collagenase in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Juan C; López, Catalina; Álvarez, María E; Pérez, Jorge E; Carmona, Jorge U

    2016-01-19

    Leukocyte-reduced platelet-rich plasma (LR-PRP) is a therapy for tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon (TAT); however, there is scarce information regarding LR-PRP effects in rabbit models of TAT. We compared, at 4 and 12 weeks (w), the LR-PRP and placebo (PBS) effects on ultrasonography, histology and relative gene expression of collagen types I (COL1A1) and III (COL3A1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in 24 rabbits with TAT induced by collagenase. The rabbits (treated with both treatments) were euthanatised after either 4 or 12 w. A healthy group (HG (n = 6)) was included. At 4 and 12 w, the LR-PRP group had a no statistically different histology score to the HG. At w 4, the COL1A1 expression was significantly higher in the LR-PRP group when compared to HG, and the expression of COL3A1 from both LR-PRP and PBS-treated tendons was significantly higher when compared to the HG. At w 12, the expression of COL3A1 remained significantly higher in the PBS group in comparison to the LR-PRP group and the HG. At w 4, the LR-PRP group presented a significantly higher expression of VEGF when compared to the PBS group and the HG. In conclusion, LR-PRP treatment showed regenerative properties in rabbits with TAT.

  3. Collagenase mRNA Overexpression and Decreased Extracellular Matrix Components Are Early Events in the Pathogenesis of Emphysema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabíola S Z Robertoni

    Full Text Available To describe the progression of parenchymal remodeling and metalloproteinases gene expression in earlier stages of emphysema, mice received porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE instillation and Control groups received saline solution. After PPE instillation (1, 3, 6 hours, 3 and 21 days we measured the mean linear intercept, the volume proportion of types I and III collagen, elastin, fibrillin and the MMP-1, -8, -12 and -13 gene expression. We observed an initial decrease in type I (at the 3rd day and type III collagen (from the 6th hour until the 3rd day, in posterior time points in which we detected increased gene expression for MMP-8 and -13 in PPE groups. After 21 days, the type III collagen fibers increased and the type I collagen values returned to similar values compared to control groups. The MMP-12 gene expression was increased in earlier times (3 and 6 hours to which we detected a reduced proportion of elastin (3 days in PPE groups, reinforcing the already established importance of MMP-12 in the breakdown of ECM. Such findings will be useful to better elucidate the alterations in ECM components and the importance of not only metalloelastase but also collagenases in earlier emphysema stages, providing new clues to novel therapeutic targets.

  4. Safety and effectiveness of collagenase clostridium histolyticum in the treatment of Peyronie's disease using a new modified shortened protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Raheem, Amr; Capece, Marco; Kalejaiye, Odunayo; Abdel-Raheem, Tarek; Falcone, Marco; Johnson, Mark; Ralph, Oliver G; Garaffa, Giulio; Christopher, Andrew N; Ralph, David J

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of collagenase clostridium histolyticum (CCH; Xiapex ® , Xiaflex ® ) in the treatment of Peyronie's disease (PD) using a new modified treatment protocol that aims at reducing the number of injections needed and reducing patient visits, thus reducing the duration and cost of treatment. A prospective study of 53 patients with PD who had treatment with CCH at a single centre using a new modified protocol. The angle of curvature assessment after an intracavernosal injection of prostaglandin E1, the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) and Peyronie's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ) were completed at baseline and at week 12 (4 weeks after the last injection). The Global Assessment of Peyronie's disease (GAPD) questionnaire was completed at week 12. Under a penile block of 10 mL plain lignocaine 1%, a total of three intralesional injections of CCH (0.9 mg) were given at 4-weekly intervals using a new modified injection technique. In between injections patients used a combination of home modelling, stretching and a vacuum device on a daily basis to mechanically stretch the plaque. Investigator modelling was not performed. The mean (range) penile curvature at baseline was 54 (30-90)°. Of the 53 patients in the study, 51 patients (96.2%) had an improvement in the angel of curvature by a mean (range) of 17.36 (0-40)° or 31.4 (0-57)% from baseline after three CCH injections. The final mean (range) curvature was 36.9 (12-75)° (P effective, and cost efficient. The results of using only three CCH injections according to this modified protocol are comparable to those of the clinical trials that used eight CCH injections. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Cost effectiveness of adding clostridial collagenase ointment to selective debridement in individuals with stage IV pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Marissa J; Gilligan, Adrienne M; Waycaster, Curtis R; Schaum, Kathleen; Fife, Caroline E

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cost effectiveness (from a payer's perspective) of adding clostridial collagenase ointment (CCO) to selective debridement compared with selective debridement alone (non-CCO) in the treatment of stage IV pressure ulcers among patients identified from the US Wound Registry. A 3-state Markov model was developed to determine costs and outcomes between the CCO and non-CCO groups over a 2-year time horizon. Outcome data were derived from a retrospective clinical study and included the proportion of pressure ulcers that were closed (epithelialized) over 2 years and the time to wound closure. Transition probabilities for the Markov states were estimated from the clinical study. In the Markov model, the clinical outcome is presented as ulcer-free weeks, which represents the time the wound is in the epithelialized state. Costs for each 4-week cycle were based on frequencies of clinic visits, debridement, and CCO application rates from the clinical study. The final model outputs were cumulative costs (in US dollars), clinical outcome (ulcer-free weeks), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) at 2 years. Compared with the non-CCO group, the CCO group incurred lower costs ($11,151 vs $17,596) and greater benefits (33.9 vs 16.8 ulcer-free weeks), resulting in an economically dominant ICER of -$375 per ulcer. Thus, for each additional ulcer-free week that can be gained, there is a concurrent cost savings of $375 if CCO treatment is selected. Over a 2-year period, an additional 17.2 ulcer-free weeks can be gained with concurrent cost savings of $6,445 for each patient. In this Markov model based on real-world data from the US Wound Registry, the addition of CCO to selective debridement in the treatment of pressure ulcers was economically dominant over selective debridement alone, resulting in greater benefit to the patient at lower cost.

  6. growth stimulant

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of timing and duration of supplementation of LIVFIT VET ® (growth stimulant) as substitute for fish meal on the growth performance, haematology and clinical enzymes concentration of growing pigs.

  7. Extracellular S100A4(mts1) stimulates invasive growth of mouse endothelial cells and modulates MMP-13 matrix metalloproteinase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt-Hansen, Birgitte; Ornås, Dorte; Grigorian, Mariam

    2004-01-01

    with the transcriptional modulation of genes involved in the proteolytic degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM). Treatment of SVEC 4-10 with the S100A4 protein leads to the transcriptional activation of collagenase 3 (MMP-13) mRNA followed by subsequent release of the protein from the cells. Beta-casein zymography...... demonstrates enhancement of proteolytic activity associated with MMP-13. This observation indicates that extracellular S100A4 stimulates the production of ECM degrading enzymes from endothelial cells, thereby stimulating the remodeling of ECM. This could explain the angiogenic and metastasis...

  8. ADAM12 produced by tumor cells rather than stromal cells accelerates breast tumor progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frohlich, Camilla; Nehammer, Camilla; Albrechtsen, Reidar

    2011-01-01

    that ADAM12 deficiency reduces breast tumor progression in the PyMT model. However, the catalytic activity of ADAM12 appears to be dispensable for its tumor-promoting effect. Interestingly, we demonstrate that ADAM12 endogenously expressed in tumor-associated stroma in the PyMT model does not influence......Expression of ADAM12 is low in most normal tissues, but is markedly increased in numerous human cancers, including breast carcinomas. We have previously shown that overexpression of ADAM12 accelerates tumor progression in a mouse model of breast cancer (PyMT). In the present study, we found...... hypothesized, however, that the tumor-associated stroma may stimulate ADAM12 expression in tumor cells, based on the fact that TGF-ß1 stimulates ADAM12 expression and is a well-known growth factor released from tumor-associated stroma. TGF-ß1 stimulation of ADAM12-negative Lewis lung tumor cells induced ADAM12...

  9. Cartilage Protective and Chondrogenic Capacity of WIN-34B, a New Herbal Agent, in the Collagenase-Induced Osteoarthritis Rabbit Model and in Progenitor Cells from Subchondral Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Eun Huh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We sought to determine the cartilage repair capacity of WIN-34B in the collagenase-induced osteoarthritis rabbit model and in progenitor cells from subchondral bone. The cartilage protective effect of WIN-34B was measured by clinical and histological scores, cartilage area, and proteoglycan and collagen contents in the collagenase-induced osteoarthritis rabbit model. The efficacy of chondrogenic differentiation of WIN-34B was assessed by expression of CD105, CD73, type II collagen, and aggrecan in vivo and was analyzed by the surface markers of progenitor cells, the mRNA levels of chondrogenic marker genes, and the level of proteoglycan, GAG, and type II collagen in vitro. Oral administration of WIN-34B significantly increased cartilage area, and this was associated with the recovery of proteoglycan and collagen content. Moreover, WIN-34B at 200 mg/kg significantly increased the expression of CD105, CD73, type II collagen, and aggrecan compared to the vehicle group. WIN-34B markedly enhanced the chondrogenic differentiation of CD105 and type II collagen in the progenitor cells from subchondral bone. Also, we confirmed that treatment with WIN-34B strongly increased the number of SH-2(CD105 cells and expression type II collagen in subchondral progenitor cells. Moreover, WIN-34B significantly increased proteoglycan, as measured by alcian blue staining; the mRNA level of type II α1 collagen, cartilage link protein, and aggrecan; and the inhibition of cartilage matrix molecules, such as GAG and type II collagen, in IL-1β-treated progenitor cells. These findings suggest that WIN-34B could be a potential candidate for effective anti-osteoarthritic therapy with cartilage repair as well as cartilage protection via enhancement of chondrogenic differentiation in the collagenase-induced osteoarthritis rabbit model and progenitor cells from subchondral bone.

  10. The treatment of lumbar disc herniation: a comparison between percutaneous lumbar diskectomy combined with ozone and percutaneous lumbar diskectomy combined with collagenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Liming; Wei Xin; Hu Hong; You Jian; Zhao Xiaowei; Hu Kongqiong

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the short-term curative effect and the incidence of postoperative adverse events of percutaneous lumbar diskectomy (PLD) combined with ozone or PLD combined with collagenase in treating lumbar disk herniation. Methods: A total of 223 patients with lumbar disk herniation were enrolled in this study. Patients in the study group (n=108) were treated with PLD combined with ozone, while patients in the control group (n=115) were treated with PLD combined with collagenase. The short-term effectiveness and the incidence of postoperative adverse events were documented. The results were analyzed and compared between the two groups. Results: In the study group, the excellent and good therapeutic results were achieved in 85.18% of the patients (n=92) and the occurrence of adverse events was 5.56%, while in the control group, the excellent and good therapeutic results were achieved in 80.00% of the patients (n=92) and the occurrence of adverse events was 13.04%. No significant difference in the short-term effectiveness existed between the two groups (Pearson Chi-Square =1.038, P=0.308). And the difference in the occurrence of postoperative adverse events was not significant between the two groups (Pearson Chi-Square =3.661, P=0.056). No disc infection occurred in the study group. Conclusion: The short-term curative effect of PLD combined with ozone is not significantly different from that of PLD combined with collagenase. In order to maintain decompression within the disc for a long period and to reduce the incidence of postoperative adverse events PLD combined with ozone ablation is an effective complementary treatment. (authors)

  11. Use of collagenase ointment in conjunction with negative pressure wound therapy in the care of diabetic wounds: a case series of six patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Miller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic wounds with additional comorbidities are costly, time intensive, and difficult to heal. Often, multiple modalities may be necessary to achieve wound resolution, relying on the synergistic advantage of each therapy to affect wound healing. The selectivity of Clostridium collagenase is physiologically effective at degrading non-viable collagen fibers while preserving living collagen tissue. Additionally, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT has long been used to aid wound healing while concurrently depreciating biological wound burden time. Methods: Six patients were selected from those appearing to our university based limb salvage service. Inclusion criteria included patients with a recurrent mixed fibrotic and granular wound base, in which NPWT was indicated, without exclusion criteria. Patients enrolled were administered clostridial collagenase ointment at each regularly scheduled NPWT dressing change. Patients were followed until healing, with visual representations of wound progression and time to full healing recorded. Results: Tandem application of these therapies appeared to expedite wound healing by clearing degenerative fibrous tissue and expediting wound granulation without additional complication. Unfortunately, not all patients were able to reach full healing; with two patients experiencing ulcer recurrence, likely a result of their significant comorbid nature. Conclusion: In our experience, we have noticed a specific subgroup of patients who benefit greatly when collagenase enzymatic debridement therapy is combined with NPWT. It is our belief that this combination therapy combines the molecular clearing of non-viable collagen with the wound granulation necessary to advance complex wounds to the next step in healing despite the current paucity in literature discussing this specific pairing.

  12. Running exercise enhances motor functional recovery with inhibition of dendritic regression in the motor cortex after collagenase-induced intracerebral hemorrhage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, Yasuyuki; Tamakoshi, Keigo; Waseda, Yuya; Ishida, Kazuto

    2016-03-01

    Rehabilitative approaches benefit motor functional recovery after stroke and relate to neuronal plasticity. We investigated the effects of a treadmill running exercise on the motor functional recovery and neuronal plasticity after collagenase-induced striatal intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in rats. Male Wistar rats were injected with type IV collagenase into the left striatum to induce ICH. Sham-operated animals were injected with saline instead of collagenase. The animals were randomly assigned to the sham control (SC), the sham exercise (SE), the ICH control (IC), or the ICH exercise (IE) group. The exercise groups were forced to run on a treadmill at a speed of 9 m/min for 30 min/day between days 4 and 14 after surgery. Behavioral tests were performed using a motor deficit score, a beam-walking test and a cylinder test. At fifteen days after surgery, the animals were sacrificed, and their brains were removed. The motor function of the IE group significantly improved compared with the motor function of the IC group. No significant differences in cortical thickness were found between the groups. The IC group had fewer branches and shorter dendrite lengths compared with the sham groups. However, dendritic branches and lengths were not significantly different between the IE and the other groups. Tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) expression levels increased in the IE compared with IC group, but no significant differences in other protein (brain-derived neurotrophic factor, BDNF; Nogo-A; Rho-A/Rho-associated protein kinase 2, ROCK2) expression levels were found between the groups. These results suggest that improved motor function after a treadmill running exercise after ICH may be related to the prevention of dendritic regression due to TrkB upregulation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Ketamine inhibits tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 gene expressions in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages through suppression of toll-like receptor 4-mediated c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation and activator protein-1 activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, G.-J.; Chen, T.-L.; Ueng, Y.-F.; Chen, R.-M.

    2008-01-01

    Our previous study showed that ketamine, an intravenous anesthetic agent, has anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we further evaluated the effects of ketamine on the regulation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interlukin-6 (IL-6) gene expressions and its possible signal-transducing mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages. Exposure of macrophages to 1, 10, and 100 μM ketamine, 100 ng/ml LPS, or a combination of ketamine and LPS for 1, 6, and 24 h was not cytotoxic to macrophages. A concentration of 1000 μM of ketamine alone or in combined treatment with LPS caused significant cell death. Administration of LPS increased cellular TNF-α and IL-6 protein levels in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Meanwhile, treatment with ketamine concentration- and time-dependently alleviated the enhanced effects. LPS induced TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA syntheses. Administration of ketamine at a therapeutic concentration (100 μM) significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA expressions. Application of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) small interfering (si)RNA into macrophages decreased cellular TLR4 levels. Co-treatment of macrophages with ketamine and TLR4 siRNA decreased the LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 productions more than alone administration of TLR4 siRNA. LPS stimulated phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and translocation of c-Jun and c-Fos from the cytoplasm to nuclei. However, administration of ketamine significantly decreased LPS-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and translocation of c-Jun and c-Fos. LPS increased the binding of nuclear extracts to activator protein-1 consensus DNA oligonucleotides. Administration of ketamine significantly ameliorated LPS-induced DNA binding activity of activator protein-1. Therefore, a clinically relevant concentration of ketamine can inhibit TNF-α and IL-6 gene expressions in LPS-activated macrophages. The suppressive mechanisms occur through suppression of TLR4-mediated

  14. Combination Immunotherapy of B16 Melanoma Using Anti–Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte–Associated Antigen 4 (Ctla-4) and Granulocyte/Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (Gm-Csf)-Producing Vaccines Induces Rejection of Subcutaneous and Metastatic Tumors Accompanied by Autoimmune Depigmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Elsas, Andrea; Hurwitz, Arthur A.; Allison, James P.

    1999-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) blockade, alone or in combination with a granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)–expressing tumor cell vaccine, on rejection of the highly tumorigenic, poorly immunogenic murine melanoma B16-BL6. Recently established tumors could be eradicated in 80% (68/85) of the cases using combination treatment, whereas each treatment by itself showed little or no effect. Tumor rejection was dependent on CD8+ and NK1.1+ cells but occurred irrespective of the presence of CD4+ T cells. Mice surviving a primary challenge rejected a secondary challenge with B16-BL6 or the parental B16-F0 line. The same treatment regimen was found to be therapeutically effective against outgrowth of preestablished B16-F10 lung metastases, inducing long-term survival. Of all mice surviving B16-BL6 or B16-F10 tumors after combination treatment, 56% (38/68) developed depigmentation, starting at the site of vaccination or challenge and in most cases progressing to distant locations. Depigmentation was found to occur in CD4-depleted mice, strongly suggesting that the effect was mediated by CTLs. This study shows that CTLA-4 blockade provides a powerful tool to enhance T cell activation and memory against a poorly immunogenic spontaneous murine tumor and that this may involve recruitment of autoreactive T cells. PMID:10430624

  15. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  16. Sinus Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RESOURCES Medical Societies Patient Education About this Website Font Size + - Home > CONDITIONS > Sinus Tumors Adult Sinusitis Pediatric ... and they vary greatly in location, size and type. Care for these tumors is individualized to each ...

  17. Tumors markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi-Mizumoto, N.H.

    1989-01-01

    In order to study blood and cell components alterations (named tumor markers) that may indicate the presence of a tumor, several methods are presented. Aspects as diagnostic, prognostic, therapeutic value and clinical evaluation are discussed. (M.A.C.)

  18. Wilms tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... suggested. Alternative Names Nephroblastoma; Kidney tumor - Wilms Images Kidney anatomy Wilms tumor References Babaian KN, Delacroix SE, Wood CG, Jonasch E. Kidney cancer. In: Skorecki K, Chertow GM, Marsden PA, ...

  19. Comparison of the effects of stimulators and inhibitors of resorption on the release of lysosomal enzymes and radioactive calcium from fetal bone in organ culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eilon, G.; Raisz, L.G.

    1978-01-01

    The release of lysosomal enzymes, collagenase, and previously incorporated 45 Ca from fetal rat long bones cultured in a chemically defined medium is compared. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and prostaglandin E 2 increased the release of β-glucuronidase, acetylglucosaminidase, and cathepsin D, but showed little effect on collagenase activity in the medium at 48 h. The dose-response relations for β-glucuronidase and 45 Ca release were similar. However, the increase in lysosomal enzyme release was proportionally greater and occurred earlier than the increase in 45 Ca release. PTH also caused a significant increase in total β-glucuronidase activity in bone plus medium. Several agents which stimulate 45 Ca release at an optimal concentration, but not at a higher concentration, including dibutyryl cAMP, isobutylmethylxanthine, and the calcium ionophore, A23187, all increased lysosomal enzyme release at the concentration which increased 45 Ca release. Three inhibitors of bone resorption (calcitonin, cortisol, and colchicine) blocked lysosomal enzyme release at the same time that 45 Ca release decreased. When the bones escaped from calcitonin inhibition, both 45 Ca and lysosomalenzyme release increased. While colchicine blocked both lysosomal enzymes and 45 CA release, it actually increased the release of bone collagenase, and together with PTH or prostaglandin E 2 caused a large increase in free collagenase activity in the medium. These data indicate that lysosomal enzyme release is closely linked to bone resorption and suggest that lysosomal enzymes may have a primary role in initiating resorption, perhaps by acting on noncollagenous matrix or tissue components before mineral removal and collagen degradation

  20. Tumor cell invasion of collagen matrices requires coordinate lipid agonist-induced G-protein and membrane-type matrix metalloproteinase-1-dependent signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthis Nicholas J

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P are bioactive lipid signaling molecules implicated in tumor dissemination. Membrane-type matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MT1-MMP is a membrane-tethered collagenase thought to be involved in tumor invasion via extracellular matrix degradation. In this study, we investigated the molecular requirements for LPA- and S1P-regulated tumor cell migration in two dimensions (2D and invasion of three-dimensional (3D collagen matrices and, in particular, evaluated the role of MT1-MMP in this process. Results LPA stimulated while S1P inhibited migration of most tumor lines in Boyden chamber assays. Conversely, HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells migrated in response to both lipids. HT1080 cells also markedly invaded 3D collagen matrices (~700 μm over 48 hours in response to either lipid. siRNA targeting of LPA1 and Rac1, or S1P1, Rac1, and Cdc42 specifically inhibited LPA- or S1P-induced HT1080 invasion, respectively. Analysis of LPA-induced HT1080 motility on 2D substrates vs. 3D matrices revealed that synthetic MMP inhibitors markedly reduced the distance (~125 μm vs. ~45 μm and velocity of invasion (~0.09 μm/min vs. ~0.03 μm/min only when cells navigated 3D matrices signifying a role for MMPs exclusively in invasion. Additionally, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs-2, -3, and -4, but not TIMP-1, blocked lipid agonist-induced invasion indicating a role for membrane-type (MT-MMPs. Furthermore, MT1-MMP expression in several tumor lines directly correlated with LPA-induced invasion. HEK293s, which neither express MT1-MMP nor invade in the presence of LPA, were transfected with MT1-MMP cDNA, and subsequently invaded in response to LPA. When HT1080 cells were seeded on top of or within collagen matrices, siRNA targeting of MT1-MMP, but not other MMPs, inhibited lipid agonist-induced invasion establishing a requisite role for MT1-MMP in this process. Conclusion LPA is a

  1. Spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Oezsarlak, Oe.; Schepper, A.M.A. de; Parizel, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal tumors are uncommon lesions but may cause significant morbidity in terms of limb dysfunction. In establishing the differential diagnosis for a spinal lesion, location is the most important feature, but the clinical presentation and the patient's age and gender are also important. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays a central role in the imaging of spinal tumors, easily allowing tumors to be classified as extradural, intradural-extramedullary or intramedullary, which is very useful in tumor characterization. In the evaluation of lesions of the osseous spine both computed tomography (CT) and MR are important. We describe the most common spinal tumors in detail. In general, extradural lesions are the most common with metastasis being the most frequent. Intradural tumors are rare, and the majority is extramedullary, with meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors being the most frequent. Intramedullary tumors are uncommon spinal tumors. Astrocytomas and ependymomas comprise the majority of the intramedullary tumors. The most important tumors are documented with appropriate high quality CT or MR images and the characteristics of these tumors are also summarized in a comprehensive table. Finally we illustrate the use of the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of neoplasms affecting the central nervous system

  2. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  3. Urogenital tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    An overview is provided for veterinary care of urogenital tumors in companion animals, especially the dog. Neoplasms discussed include tumors of the kidney, urinary bladder, prostate, testis, ovary, vagina, vulva and the canine transmissible venereal tumor. Topics addressed include description, diagnosis and treatment.

  4. Mechanism of brain tumor headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lynne P

    2014-04-01

    Headaches occur commonly in all patients, including those who have brain tumors. Using the search terms "headache and brain tumors," "intracranial neoplasms and headache," "facial pain and brain tumors," "brain neoplasms/pathology," and "headache/etiology," we reviewed the literature from the past 78 years on the proposed mechanisms of brain tumor headache, beginning with the work of Penfield. Most of what we know about the mechanisms of brain tumor associated headache come from neurosurgical observations from intra-operative dural and blood vessel stimulation as well as intra-operative observations and anecdotal information about resolution of headache symptoms with various tumor-directed therapies. There is an increasing overlap between the primary and secondary headaches and they may actually share a similar biological mechanism. While there can be some criticism that the experimental work with dural and arterial stimulation produced head pain and not actual headache, when considered with the clinical observations about headache type, coupled with improvement after treatment of the primary tumor, we believe that traction on these structures, coupled with increased intracranial pressure, is clearly part of the genesis of brain tumor headache and may also involve peripheral sensitization with neurogenic inflammation as well as a component of central sensitization through trigeminovascular afferents on the meninges and cranial vessels. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  5. Tumor immunology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otter, W. den

    1987-01-01

    Tumor immunology, the use of immunological techniques for tumor diagnosis and approaches to immunotherapy of cancer are topics covered in this multi-author volume. Part A, 'Tumor Immunology', deals with present views on tumor-associated antigens, the initiation of immune reactions of tumor cells, effector cell killing, tumor cells and suppression of antitumor immunity, and one chapter dealing with the application of mathematical models in tumor immunology. Part B, 'Tumor Diagnosis and Imaging', concerns the use of markers to locate the tumor in vivo, for the histological diagnosis, and for the monitoring of tumor growth. In Part C, 'Immunotherapy', various experimental approaches to immunotherapy are described, such as the use of monoclonal antibodies to target drugs, the use of interleukin-2 and the use of drugs inhibiting suppression. In the final section, the evaluation, a pathologist and a clinician evaluate the possibilities and limitations of tumor immunology and the extent to which it is useful for diagnosis and therapy. refs.; figs.; tabs

  6. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Fused with Tandem Collagen-Binding Domains from Clostridium histolyticum Collagenase ColG Increases Bone Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Sekiguchi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic fibroblast growth factor 2 (bFGF accelerates bone formation during fracture healing. Because the efficacy of bFGF decreases rapidly following its diffusion from fracture sites, however, repeated dosing is required to ensure a sustained therapeutic effect. We previously developed a fusion protein comprising bFGF, a polycystic kidney disease domain (PKD; s2b, and collagen-binding domain (CBD; s3 sourced from the Clostridium histolyticum class II collagenase, ColH, and reported that the combination of this fusion protein with a collagen-like peptide, poly(Pro-Hyp-Gly10, induced mesenchymal cell proliferation and callus formation at fracture sites. In addition, C. histolyticum produces class I collagenase (ColG with tandem CBDs (s3a and s3b at the C-terminus. We therefore hypothesized that a bFGF fusion protein containing ColG-derived tandem CBDs (s3a and s3b would show enhanced collagen-binding activity, leading to improved bone formation. Here, we examined the binding affinity of four collagen anchors derived from the two clostridial collagenases to H-Gly-Pro-Arg-Gly-(Pro-Hyp-Gly12-NH2, a collagenous peptide, by surface plasmon resonance and found that tandem CBDs (s3a-s3b have the highest affinity for the collagenous peptide. We also constructed four fusion proteins consisting of bFGF and s3 (bFGF-s3, s2b-s3b (bFGF-s2b-s3, s3b (bFGF-s3b, and s3a-s3b (bFGF-s3a-s3b and compared their biological activities to those of a previous fusion construct (bFGF-s2b-s3 using a cell proliferation assay in vitro and a mouse femoral fracture model in vivo. Among these CB-bFGFs, bFGF-s3a-s3b showed the highest capacity to induce mesenchymal cell proliferation and callus formation in the mice fracture model. The poly(Pro-Hyp-Gly10/bFGF-s3a-s3b construct may therefore have the potential to promote bone formation in clinical settings.

  7. Autocrine Effects of Tumor-Derived Complement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Soon Cho

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a role for the complement system in enhancing cancer growth. Cancer cells secrete complement proteins that stimulate tumor growth upon activation. Complement promotes tumor growth via a direct autocrine effect that is partially independent of tumor-infiltrating cytotoxic T cells. Activated C5aR and C3aR signal through the PI3K/AKT pathway in cancer cells, and silencing the PI3K or AKT gene in cancer cells eliminates the progrowth effects of C5aR and C3aR stimulation. In patients with ovarian or lung cancer, higher tumoral C3 or C5aR mRNA levels were associated with decreased overall survival. These data identify a role for tumor-derived complement proteins in promoting tumor growth, and they therefore have substantial clinical and therapeutic implications.

  8. Tumoral tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, E.E.

    1979-01-01

    Direct tumor tracers are subdivided in the following categories:metabolite tracers, antitumoral tracers, radioactive proteins and cations. Use of 67 Ga-citrate as a clinically important tumoral tracer is emphasized and gallium-67 whole-body scintigraphy is discussed in detail. (M.A.) [pt

  9. Animal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    There are few trained veterinary radiation oncologists and the expense of facilities has limited the extent to which this modality is used. In recent years, a few cobalt teletherapy units and megavoltage x-ray units have been employed in larger veterinary institutions. In addition, some radiation oncologists of human medical institutions are interested and willing to cooperate with veterinarians in the treatment of animal tumors. Carefully designed studies of the response of animal tumors to new modalities serve two valuable purposes. First, these studies may lead to improved tumor control in companion animals. Second, these studies may have important implications to the improvement of therapy of human tumors. Much remains to be learned of animal tumor biology so that appropriate model systems can be described for such studies. Many of the latter studies can be sponsored by agencies interested in the improvement of cancer management

  10. Pituitary Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Association (ABTA) International RadioSurgery Association National Brain Tumor Society National Institute of Child Health and Human Development ... Definition The pituitary is a small, bean-sized gland ...

  11. Hypothalamic tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the brain to reduce spinal fluid pressure. Risks of radiation therapy include damage to healthy brain cells when tumor cells are destroyed. Common side effects from chemotherapy include loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting, and fatigue.

  12. Macrophage content of murine tumors: Associations with TD50 and tumor radiocurability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wike, J.; Hunter, N.; Volpe, J.; Milas, L.

    1987-01-01

    The experiments were designed to investigate whether the tumor-associated macrophage (TAM) content of murine solid tumors correlates with tumor response to ionizing radiation and with the clonogenic ability of tumor cells to establish s.c. tumors. Of 13 tumors studied, 6 were sarcomas and 7 were carcinomas; all tumors were of spontaneous origin in C/sub 3/Hf/Kam mice, with the exception of one sarcoma that was induced by 3-methylcholanthrene. Tumors were growing in the hind thighs of syngeneic mice, and their TAM content was determined when they were 8 mm in diameter. Their macrophage content varied greatly, ranging from 9 to 83%. Radiocurability of 8 mm tumors, determined by TCD50, ranged from 42 Gy (fibrosarcoma FSA) to > 80 Gy (hepatocarcinoma HCA-I). There was an obvious trend toward positive correlation (r = 0.43) between TAM content and reduced local tumor radiocurability. However, there was a significant negative correlation between TAM content and TD50 values, implying that cells from tumors with higher macrophage content were more clonogenic. TAM from the NFSA sarcoma, a tumor with a low TD50 value and poorly responsive to radiation, stimulated the in vitro growth of NFSA tumor cells. These observations suggest that high TAM content could be conducive to tumor cell proliferation and could be a factor in poor tumor radioresponse

  13. Partition Efficiency of High-Pitch Locular Multilayer Coil for Countercurrent Chromatographic Separation of Proteins Using Small-Scale Cross-Axis Coil Planet Centrifuge and Application to Purification of Various Collagenases with Aqueous-Aqueous Polymer Phase Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinomiya, Kazufusa; Kobayashi, Hiroko; Inokuchi, Norio; Nakagomi, Kazuya; Ito, Yoichiro

    2010-01-01

    Partition efficiency of the high-pitch locular multilayer coil was evaluated in countercurrent chromatographic (CCC) separation of proteins with an aqueous-aqueous polymer phase system using the small-scale cross-axis coil planet centrifuge (X-axis CPC) fabricated in our laboratory. The separation column was specially made by high-pitch (ca 5 cm) winding of 1.0 mm I.D., 2.0 mm O.D. locular tubing compressed at 2 cm intervals with a total capacity of 29.5 mL. The protein separation was performed using a set of stable proteins including cytochrome C, myoglobin, and lysozyme with the 12.5% (w/w) polyethylene glycol (PEG) 1000 and 12.5% (w/w) dibasic potassium phosphate system (pH 9.2) under 1000 rpm of column revolution. This high-pitch locular tubing yielded substantially increased stationary phase retention than the normal locular tubing for both lower and upper mobile phases. In order to demonstrate the capability of the high-pitch locular tubing, the purification of collagenase from the crude commercial sample was carried out using an aqueous-aqueous polymer phase system. Using the 16.0% (w/w) PEG 1000 – 6.3% (w/w) dibasic potassium phosphate – 6.3% (w/w) monobasic potassium phosphate system (pH 6.6), collagenase I, II, V and X derived from Clostridium hystolyticum were separated from other proteins and colored small molecular weight compounds present in the crude commercial sample, while collagenase N-2 and S-1 from Streptomyces parvulus subsp. citrinus were eluted with impurities at the solvent front with the upper phase. The collagenase from C. hystolyticum retained its enzymatic activity in the purified fractions. The overall results demonstrated that the high-pitch locular multilayer coil is effectively used for the CCC purification of bioactive compounds without loss of their enzymatic activities. PMID:21869859

  14. Partition Efficiency of High-Pitch Locular Multilayer Coil for Countercurrent Chromatographic Separation of Proteins Using Small-Scale Cross-Axis Coil Planet Centrifuge and Application to Purification of Various Collagenases with Aqueous-Aqueous Polymer Phase Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinomiya, Kazufusa; Kobayashi, Hiroko; Inokuchi, Norio; Nakagomi, Kazuya; Ito, Yoichiro

    2011-01-01

    Partition efficiency of the high-pitch locular multilayer coil was evaluated in countercurrent chromatographic (CCC) separation of proteins with an aqueous-aqueous polymer phase system using the small-scale cross-axis coil planet centrifuge (X-axis CPC) fabricated in our laboratory. The separation column was specially made by high-pitch (ca 5 cm) winding of 1.0 mm I.D., 2.0 mm O.D. locular tubing compressed at 2 cm intervals with a total capacity of 29.5 mL. The protein separation was performed using a set of stable proteins including cytochrome C, myoglobin, and lysozyme with the 12.5% (w/w) polyethylene glycol (PEG) 1000 and 12.5% (w/w) dibasic potassium phosphate system (pH 9.2) under 1000 rpm of column revolution. This high-pitch locular tubing yielded substantially increased stationary phase retention than the normal locular tubing for both lower and upper mobile phases. In order to demonstrate the capability of the high-pitch locular tubing, the purification of collagenase from the crude commercial sample was carried out using an aqueous-aqueous polymer phase system. Using the 16.0% (w/w) PEG 1000 - 6.3% (w/w) dibasic potassium phosphate - 6.3% (w/w) monobasic potassium phosphate system (pH 6.6), collagenase I, II, V and X derived from Clostridium hystolyticum were separated from other proteins and colored small molecular weight compounds present in the crude commercial sample, while collagenase N-2 and S-1 from Streptomyces parvulus subsp. citrinus were eluted with impurities at the solvent front with the upper phase. The collagenase from C. hystolyticum retained its enzymatic activity in the purified fractions. The overall results demonstrated that the high-pitch locular multilayer coil is effectively used for the CCC purification of bioactive compounds without loss of their enzymatic activities.

  15. Economic analysis and budget impact of clostridial collagenase ointment compared with medicinal honey for treatment of pressure ulcers in the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mearns ES

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth S Mearns,1 Michael Liang,1 Brendan L Limone,1 Adrienne M Gilligan,1 Jeffrey D Miller,1 Kathleen D Schaum,2 Curtis R Waycaster2 1Truven Health Analytics, an IBM Company, Cambridge, MA, USA; 2Smith & Nephew, Inc., Fort Worth, TX, USA Objectives: Pressure ulcer (PU treatment poses significant clinical and economic challenges to health-care systems. The aim of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness and budget impact of enzymatic debridement with clostridial collagenase ointment (CCO compared with autolytic debridement with medicinal honey (MH for PU treatment from a US payer/Medicare perspective in the hospital outpatient department setting.Methods: A cost-effectiveness analysis using a Markov model was developed using a 1-week cycle length across a 1-year time horizon. The three health states were inflammation/senescence, granulation/proliferation (ie, patients achieving 100% granulation, and epithelialization. Data sources included the US Wound Registry, Medicare fee schedules, and other published clinical and cost studies about PU treatment.Results: In the base case analysis over a 1-year time horizon, CCO was the economically dominant strategy (ie, simultaneously conferring greater benefit at less cost. Patients treated with CCO experienced 22.7 quality-adjusted life weeks (QALWs at a cost of $6,161 over 1 year, whereas MH patients experienced 21.9 QALWs at a cost of $7,149. Patients treated with CCO achieved 11.5 granulation weeks and 6.0 epithelization weeks compared with 10.6 and 4.4 weeks for MH, respectively. The number of clinic visits was 40.1 for CCO vs 43.4 for MH, and the number of debridements was 12.3 for CCO compared with 17.6 for MH. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses determined CCO dominant in 72% of 10,000 iterations and cost-effective in 91%, assuming a benchmark willingness-to-pay threshold of $50,000/quality-adjusted life year ($962/QALW. The budget impact analysis showed that for every 1% of patients

  16. Tumor Types: Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... May cause excessive secretion of hormones Common among men and women in their 50s-80s Accounts for about 13 percent of all brain tumors Symptoms Headache Depression Vision loss Nausea or vomiting Behavioral and cognitive ...

  17. Tumor immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; Lise, Mario; Nitti, Donato

    2007-01-01

    Advances in tumor immunology are supporting the clinical implementation of several immunological approaches to cancer in the clinical setting. However, the alternate success of current immunotherapeutic regimens underscores the fact that the molecular mechanisms underlying immune-mediated tumor rejection are still poorly understood. Given the complexity of the immune system network and the multidimensionality of tumor/host interactions, the comprehension of tumor immunology might greatly benefit from high-throughput microarray analysis, which can portrait the molecular kinetics of immune response on a genome-wide scale, thus accelerating the discovery pace and ultimately catalyzing the development of new hypotheses in cell biology. Although in its infancy, the implementation of microarray technology in tumor immunology studies has already provided investigators with novel data and intriguing new hypotheses on the molecular cascade leading to an effective immune response against cancer. Although the general principles of microarray-based gene profiling have rapidly spread in the scientific community, the need for mastering this technique to produce meaningful data and correctly interpret the enormous output of information generated by this technology is critical and represents a tremendous challenge for investigators, as outlined in the first section of this book. In the present Chapter, we report on some of the most significant results obtained with the application of DNA microarray in this oncology field.

  18. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell tumors; Islet of Langerhans tumor; Neuroendocrine tumors; Peptic ulcer - islet cell tumor; Hypoglycemia - islet cell tumor ... stomach acid. Symptoms may include: Abdominal pain Diarrhea ... and small bowel Vomiting blood (occasionally) Glucagonomas make ...

  19. Imaging of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaensler, E.H.L.

    1995-01-01

    The contents are diagnostic approaches, general features of tumors -hydrocephalus, edema, attenuation and/or intensity value, hemorrhage, fat, contrast enhancement, intra-axial supratentorial tumors - tumors of glial origin, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, subependymomas, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, choroid plexus papilloma; midline tumors - colloid cysts, craniopharyngiomas; pineal region tumors and miscellaneous tumors i.e. primary intracerebral lymphoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, hemangioblastomas; extraaxial tumors - meningiomas; nerve sheath tumors -schwannomas, epidermoids, dermoids, lipomas, arachnoid cysts; metastatic tumors (8 refs.)

  20. Imaging of brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaensler, E H.L. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-12-31

    The contents are diagnostic approaches, general features of tumors -hydrocephalus, edema, attenuation and/or intensity value, hemorrhage, fat, contrast enhancement, intra-axial supratentorial tumors - tumors of glial origin, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, subependymomas, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, choroid plexus papilloma; midline tumors - colloid cysts, craniopharyngiomas; pineal region tumors and miscellaneous tumors i.e. primary intracerebral lymphoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, hemangioblastomas; extraaxial tumors - meningiomas; nerve sheath tumors -schwannomas, epidermoids, dermoids, lipomas, arachnoid cysts; metastatic tumors (8 refs.).

  1. The use of Collagenase Clostridium Histolyticum in the management of Dupuytren's contracture-outcomes of a pilot study in a District General Hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Lynn E; Murphy, Karen M; Kilpatrick, Shauneen M; Thompson, Neville W

    2017-05-01

    Collagenase Clostridium Histolyticum (CCH) is a recognised treatment option for adult patients presenting with Dupuytren's contracture (DC). Twenty male patients with established DC were treated using CCH. The average metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint and proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP) contractures pre-treatment were 52 0 (range, 0 - 75 0 ) and 35 0 (range, 0 - 84 0 ) respectively. The average DASH score pre-treatment was 24.2 points (range, 0 - 68.2 points). Patients were reviewed at lmonth, 3months and at an average of 23 months (17 to 27 months). MCP joint contractures significantly improved compared to pre-treatment and the improvement was maintained at latest follow up. PIP joint contractures did significantly improve but to a lesser degree and there was no significant improvement compared to pre-treatment beyond 3months. A trend for MCP and PIP joint contracture recurrence was observed at latest follow up but did not reach statistical significance. DASH scores significantly improved from pre-treatment and the improvement was maintained at latest follow up. At 3months, the average patient satisfaction score was 9.5 (range, 6 - 10), which decreased to 8.6 (range, 6 - 10) at latest follow up. We estimated a potential cost saving of approximately £70,000 by treating 20 patients using CCH compared to inpatient operative fasciectomy. CCH is a useful option in the management of DC in appropriately selected patients. Cost-effectiveness in the treatment of DC should be carefully considered.

  2. [Comparative Cost Effectiveness of Clostridium Histolyticum Collagenase (Xiapex®) and Partial Fasciectomy for the Treatment of Dupuytren's Contracture in Austria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuwirth, M; Binter, A; Pipam, W; Rab, M

    2016-08-01

    Since Dupuytren's contracture is a common disorder, the costs for its surgical treatment impose a considerable burden on the healthcare system. For the first time in the German-speaking area, this study aimed to provide a comparative cost-effectiveness analysis for partial fasciectomy vs. treatment with Clostridium histolyticum collagenase (CCH). A retrospective monocentric study of the period from 2012 to 2014 comprised 40 patients with previously untreated Dupuytren's contracture of one finger. 20 outpatients received one CCH treatment (Group 1), while 20 inpatients underwent partial fasciectomy (Group 2). The direct pre-interventional treatment and post-interventional costs were compared. The direct post-interventional and postoperative results were comparable. Group 1 (CCH) showed a mean reduction in contracture of 96.4%; in Group 2 (partial fasciectomy), this was 97.7%. There were fewer complications in Group 1 than in Group 2. Mean treatment costs in Group 1 were € 1 458.60 and in Group 2, € 5 315.20. Treatment with CCH is more cost effective than with partial fasciectomy. This is due to greater costs for personnel, time and surgical material, as well as the treatment of the more frequent complications in Group 2. Despite the limited comparability, our findings are consistent with the present international literature. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moylan, D.J.; Yelovich, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    Primary bone malignancies are relatively rare with less than 4,000 new cases per year. Multiple myeloma (more correctly a hematologic malignancy) accounts for 40%; osteosarcomas, 28%; chondrosarcomas, 13%; fibrosarcomas arising in bone, 4%; and Ewing's sarcoma, 7%. The authors discuss various treatments for bone tumors, including radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery

  4. Wilms Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a child's general health and to detect any adverse side effects (such as low red or white blood cell ... medicine needed, which helps reduce long-term side effects. The most common ... can be completely removed by surgery. About 41% of all Wilms tumors are stage ...

  5. Nephrogenic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesbauer, P.

    2008-01-01

    Nephroblastomas are the most common malignant renal tumors in childhood. According to the guidelines of the SIOP (Societe Internationale d'Oncologie Pediatrique) and GPOH (Gesellschaft fuer Paediatrische Onkologie und Haematologie) pre-operative chemotherapy can be started without histological confirmation and thus initial imaging studies, in particular ultrasound, play an outstanding role for diagnostic purposes

  6. Local and systemic tumor immune dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enderling, Heiko

    Tumor-associated antigens, stress proteins, and danger-associated molecular patterns are endogenous immune adjuvants that can both initiate and continually stimulate an immune response against a tumor. In retaliation, tumors can hijack intrinsic immune regulatory programs that are intended to prevent autoimmune disease, thereby facilitating continued growth despite the activated antitumor immune response. In metastatic disease, this ongoing tumor-immune battle occurs at each site. Adding an additional layer of complexity, T cells activated at one tumor site can cycle through the blood circulation system and extravasate in a different anatomic location to surveil a distant metastasis. We propose a mathematical modeling framework that incorporates the trafficking of activated T cells between metastatic sites. We extend an ordinary differential equation model of tumor-immune system interactions to multiple metastatic sites. Immune cells are activated in response to tumor burden and tumor cell death, and are recruited from tumor sites elsewhere in the body. A model of T cell trafficking throughout the circulatory system can inform the tumor-immune interaction model about the systemic distribution and arrival of T cells at specific tumor sites. Model simulations suggest that metastases not only contribute to immune surveillance, but also that this contribution varies between metastatic sites. Such information may ultimately help harness the synergy of focal therapy with the immune system to control metastatic disease.

  7. β-Glucan from Lentinus edodes inhibits nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α production and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaojuan; Yasuda, Michiko; Nakamura-Tsuruta, Sachiko; Mizuno, Masashi; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2012-01-06

    Lentinan (LNT), a β-glucan from the fruiting bodies of Lentinus edodes, is well known to have immunomodulatory activity. NO and TNF-α are associated with many inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of LNT extracted by sonication (LNT-S) on the NO and TNF-α production in LPS-stimulated murine RAW 264.7 macrophages. The results suggested that treatment with LNT-S not only resulted in the striking inhibition of TNF-α and NO production in LPS-activated macrophage RAW 264.7 cells, but also the protein expression of inducible NOS (iNOS) and the gene expression of iNOS mRNA and TNF-α mRNA. It is surprising that LNT-S enhanced LPS-induced NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation and NF-κB luciferase activity, but severely inhibited the phosphorylation of JNK1/2 and ERK1/2. The neutralizing antibodies of anti-Dectin-1 and anti-TLR2 hardly affected the inhibition of NO production. All of these results suggested that the suppression of LPS-induced NO and TNF-α production was at least partially attributable to the inhibition of JNK1/2 and ERK1/2 activation. This work discovered a promising molecule to control the diseases associated with overproduction of NO and TNF-α.

  8. Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Oncolytic Virotherapy: Friend or Foe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas L. Denton

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cancer therapy remains a challenge due to toxicity limitations of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Oncolytic viruses that selectively replicate and destroy cancer cells are of increasing interest. In addition to direct cell lysis, these vectors stimulate an anti-tumor immune response. A key regulator of tumor immunity is the tumor-associated macrophage population. Macrophages can either support oncolytic virus therapy through pro-inflammatory stimulation of the anti-tumor response at the cost of hindering direct oncolysis or through immunosuppressive protection of virus replication at the cost of hindering the anti-tumor immune response. Despite similarities in macrophage interaction between adult and pediatric tumors and the abundance of research supporting macrophage modulation in adult tumors, there are few studies investigating macrophage modulation in pediatric cancers or modulation of immunotherapy. We review the current state of knowledge regarding macrophages in cancers and their influence on oncolytic virotherapy.

  9. "Cancer tumor".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronshtehn, V. A.

    The title is a phrase borrowed from a speech by a Leningrad pressman, V. E. Lvov, who called upon those attending a theoretical conference on ideological issues in astronomy held by the Leningrad Branch of the All-Union Astronomic and Geodetic Society (13 - 4 December 1948), "to make a more radical emphasis on the negative role of relativistic cosmology which is a cancer tumor disintegrating the contemporary astronomy theory, and a major ideological enemy of a materialist astronomy".

  10. Predictive Factors of Patients' and Their Partners' Sexual Function Improvement After Collagenase Clostridium Histolyticum Injection for Peyronie's Disease: Results From a Multi-Center Single-Arm Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocci, Andrea; Russo, Giorgio Ivan; Salonia, Andrea; Cito, Gianmartin; Regis, Federica; Polloni, Gaia; Giubilei, Gianluca; Cacciamani, Giovanni; Capece, Marco; Falcone, Marco; Greco, Isabella; Timpano, Massimiliano; Minervini, Andrea; Gacci, Mauro; Cai, Tommaso; Garaffa, Giulio; Giammusso, Bruno; Arcaniolo, Davide; Mirone, Vincenzo; Mondaini, Nicola

    2018-05-01

    Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCH; Xiapex) injections represent the only licensed medical treatment for Peyronie's disease (PD). To evaluate the efficacy and safety of CCH injections in men with stable PD, using a modified treatment protocol and to assess partners' bother improvement in a large cohort of White-European sexually active heterosexual men treated in a single tertiary-referral center. All the 135 patients enrolled underwent a thorough assessment, which included history taking, physical examination, and pharmacologically induced artificial erection test (intra-cavernous injection) to assess the degree of penile curvature (PC) at baseline and after the completion of the treatment. Patients with calcified plaque and/or ventral curvature were excluded. All patients underwent a modified treatment protocol, which consisted of 3 intra-lesional injections of 0.9 mg of CCH performed at 4-week intervals at the point of maximum curvature. After each injection, patients were instructed to follow a strict routine involving daily penile stretching in the intervals between injections. International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF)-15, Global Assessment of PD, PD questionnaires (PDQ), and Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) questionnaire were performed at baseline and at the end of treatment. Overall, 135 patients completed the study protocol. Before treatment, 18 (13.33%) partners showed a degree of sexual dysfunction. Baseline median IIEF-15, FSFI, and PDQ scores were, respectively, 59.0, 35.0, and 23.0. Overall, both IIEF-total and all domains significantly improved after treatment (all P < .01). A PC mean change of 19.07 (P = .00) was measured. At the univariate linear regression analysis, IIEF-15, IIEF-erectile function, IIEF-sexual desire, and IIEF-intercourse satisfaction were positively associated with FSFI (all P ≤ .03); conversely, PDQ-penile pain, PDQ-symptom bother, and post-treament penile curvature (P ≤ .04) were associated with a decreased

  11. Collagenase injections for the treatment of single cords in cases of Dupuytren’s contracture – a prospective intervention study of long-term experience with Xiapex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer, Lisa Maria

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The gold standard in the treatment of Dupuytren’s contracture is surgical therapy. Alternatives are percutaneous needle fasciotomy and radiation in exceptional cases. Injection treatments with Xiapex (Pfizer are a new therapy option. This collagenase, extracted from clostridium histolyticum, is used to break down the affected tissue cords. The objective of this study is to examine the effect and long-term success of treatment with Xiapex.Methods: In this study, Xiapex treatment was conducted on a sample group of 19 patients with Dupuytren’s contracture. The injection was placed either on the cord at the level of the metacarpophalangeal (MCP joint (n=17 or of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP joint (n=7. Break-up of the cord occurred 24 hours after the injection. The neutral zero method was used to assess the extent of movement. The Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (MHQ was selected for evaluation of the general hand function in 16 patients. The WHO-5 and the EQ-5D VAS Score were used as a measure of the patients’ satisfaction and their state of health. All values were collected both pre-injection as well as 1 year post-injection.Results: Out of 19 patients in our sample group, 16 patients (≈84% benefitted in terms of improvement in mobility. Overall, the range of movement increased by Ø 26° in the affected finger. A separate assessment demonstrated that:The range of movement increased by 77% in the MCP joint. The extent of movement pre-injection was Ø (0-28-78 and post-injection it was Ø (0-9-81 with an improvement of Ø 22°. In the PIP joint, only slight improvement was observed (Ø pre (0-27-93; post (0-24-95.The MHQ increased from Ø 76% (R: 32–97% to 81% (R: 39–100%.The painfulness decreased from Ø 19% (R: 0–55% to Ø11% (R: 0–55%, corresponding to Ø 43%. Satisfaction increased in 72% of patients by Ø 21%.According to WHO-5, patient satisfaction pre-injection was Ø 20 (R: 11–25, and 1 year after

  12. Human mesenchymal stromal cells transiently increase cytokine production by activated T cells before suppressing T-cell proliferation: effect of interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuerquis, Jessica; Romieu-Mourez, Raphaëlle; François, Moïra; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Young, Yoon Kow; Zhao, Jing; Eliopoulos, Nicoletta

    2014-02-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) suppress T-cell proliferation, especially after activation with inflammatory cytokines. We compared the dynamic action of unprimed and interferon (IFN)-γ plus tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-pretreated human bone marrow-derived MSCs on resting or activated T cells. MSCs were co-cultured with allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) at high MSC-to-PBMC ratios in the absence or presence of concomitant CD3/CD28-induced T-cell activation. The kinetic effects of MSCs on cytokine production and T-cell proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis were assessed. Unprimed MSCs increased the early production of IFN-γ and interleukin (IL)-2 by CD3/CD28-activated PBMCs before suppressing T-cell proliferation. In non-activated PBMC co-cultures, low levels of IL-2 and IL-10 synthesis were observed with MSCs in addition to low levels of CD69 expression by T cells and no T-cell proliferation. MSCs also decreased apoptosis in resting and activated T cells and inhibited the transition of these cells into the sub-G0/G1 and the S phases. With inhibition of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase, MSCs increased CD3/CD28-induced T-cell proliferation. After priming with IFN-γ plus TNF-α, MSCs were less potent at increasing cytokine production by CD3/CD28-activated PBMCs and more effective at inhibiting T-cell proliferation but had preserved anti-apoptotic functions. Unprimed MSCs induce a transient increase in IFN-γ and IL-2 synthesis by activated T cells. Pre-treatment of MSCs with IFN-γ plus TNF-α may increase their effectiveness and safety in vivo. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Probing the 3-D Structure, Dynamics, and Stability of Bacterial Collagenase Collagen Binding Domain (apo- versus holo-) by Limited Proteolysis MALDI-TOF MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sides, Cynthia R.; Liyanage, Rohana; Lay, Jackson O.; Philominathan, Sagaya Theresa Leena; Matsushita, Osamu; Sakon, Joshua

    2012-03-01

    Pairing limited proteolysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to probe clostridial collagenase collagen binding domain (CBD) reveals the solution dynamics and stability of the protein, as these factors are crucial to CBD effectiveness as a drug-delivery vehicle. MS analysis of proteolytic digests indicates initial cleavage sites, thereby specifying the less stable and highly accessible regions of CBD. Modulation of protein structure and stability upon metal binding is shown through MS analysis of calcium-bound and cobalt-bound CBD proteolytic digests. Previously determined X-ray crystal structures illustrate that calcium binding induces secondary structure transformation in the highly mobile N-terminal arm and increases protein stability. MS-based detection of exposed residues confirms protein flexibility, accentuates N-terminal dynamics, and demonstrates increased global protein stability exported by calcium binding. Additionally, apo- and calcium-bound CBD proteolysis sites correlate well with crystallographic B-factors, accessibility, and enzyme specificity. MS-observed cleavage sites with no clear correlations are explained either by crystal contacts of the X-ray crystal structures or by observed differences between Molecules A and B in the X-ray crystal structures. The study newly reveals the absence of the βA strand and thus the very dynamic N-terminal linker, as corroborated by the solution X-ray scattering results. Cobalt binding has a regional effect on the solution phase stability of CBD, as limited proteolysis data implies the capture of an intermediate-CBD solution structure when cobalt is bound.

  14. Tumor-altered dendritic cell function: implications for anti-tumor immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Michael Hargadon

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are key regulators of both innate and adaptive immunity, and the array of immunoregulatory functions exhibited by these cells is dictated by their differentiation, maturation, and activation status. Although a major role for these cells in the induction of immunity to pathogens has long been appreciated, data accumulated over the last several years has demonstrated that DC are also critical regulators of anti-tumor immune responses. However, despite the potential for stimulation of robust anti-tumor immunity by DC, tumor-altered DC function has been observed in many cancer patients and tumor-bearing animals and is often associated with tumor immune escape. Such dysfunction has significant implications for both the induction of natural anti-tumor immune responses as well as the efficacy of immunotherapeutic strategies that target endogenous DC in situ or that employ exogenous DC as part of anti-cancer immunization maneuvers. In this review, the major types of tumor-altered DC function will be described, with emphasis on recent insights into the mechanistic bases for the inhibition of DC differentiation from hematopoietic precursors, the altered programming of DC precursors to differentiate into myeloid-derived suppressor cells or tumor-associated macrophages, the suppression of DC maturation and activation, and the induction of immunoregulatory DC by tumors, tumor-derived factors, and tumor-associated cells within the milieu of the tumor microenvironment. The impact of these tumor-altered cells on the quality of the overall anti-tumor immune response will also be discussed. Finally, this review will also highlight questions concerning tumor-altered DC function that remain unanswered, and it will address factors that have limited advances in the study of this phenomenon in order to focus future research efforts in the field on identifying strategies for interfering with tumor-associated DC dysfunction and improving DC-mediated anti-tumor

  15. Radiation-induced nitric oxide mitigates tumor hypoxia and radioresistance in a murine SCCVII tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Yamamori, Tohru; Zhao, Songji; Kuge, Yuji; Tamaki, Nagara; Kameya, Hiromi; Nakamura, Hideo; Fujii, Hirotada; Inanami, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •IR-induced NO increased tissue perfusion and pO 2 . •IR increased NO production in tumors without changes in the mRNA and protein levels of NOS isoforms. •NOS activity assay showed that IR upregulated eNOS activity in tumors. •IR-induced NO decreased tumor hypoxia and altered tumor radiosensitivity. -- Abstract: Tumor hypoxia, which occurs mainly as a result of inadequate tissue perfusion in solid tumors, is a well-known challenge for successful radiotherapy. Recent evidence suggests that ionizing radiation (IR) upregulates nitric oxide (NO) production and that IR-induced NO has the potential to increase intratumoral circulation. However, the kinetics of NO production and the responsible isoforms for NO synthase in tumors exposed to IR remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism by which IR stimulates NO production in tumors and the effect of IR-induced NO on tumor radiosensitivity. Hoechst33342 perfusion assay and electron spin resonance oxymetry showed that IR increased tissue perfusion and pO 2 in tumor tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis using two different hypoxic probes showed that IR decreased hypoxic regions in tumors; treatment with a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, L-NAME, abrogated the effects of IR. Moreover, IR increased endothelial NOS (eNOS) activity without affecting its mRNA or protein expression levels in SCCVII-transplanted tumors. Tumor growth delay assay showed that L-NAME decreased the anti-tumor effect of fractionated radiation (10 Gy × 2). These results suggested that IR increased eNOS activity and subsequent tissue perfusion in tumors. Increases in intratumoral circulation simultaneously decreased tumor hypoxia. As a result, IR-induced NO increased tumor radiosensitivity. Our study provides a new insight into the NO-dependent mechanism for efficient fractionated radiotherapy

  16. Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  17. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  18. Brain tumor - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children) ... The cause of primary brain tumors is unknown. Primary brain tumors may ... (spread to nearby areas) Cancerous (malignant) Brain tumors ...

  19. Adrenal Gland Tumors: Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gland Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Adrenal Gland Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 03/ ... primary adrenal gland tumor is very uncommon. Exact statistics are not available for this type of tumor ...

  20. Pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poussaint, Tina Y. [Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Panigrahy, Ashok [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Huisman, Thierry A.G.M. [Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children' s Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology and Pediatric Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Among all causes of death in children from solid tumors, pediatric brain tumors are the most common. This article includes an overview of a subset of infratentorial and supratentorial tumors with a focus on tumor imaging features and molecular advances and treatments of these tumors. Key to understanding the imaging features of brain tumors is a firm grasp of other disease processes that can mimic tumor on imaging. We also review imaging features of a common subset of tumor mimics. (orig.)

  1. Spinal cord stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007560.htm Spinal cord stimulation To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Spinal cord stimulation is a treatment for pain that uses ...

  2. Feldspar, Infrared Stimulated Luminescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank

    2014-01-01

    This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars.......This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars....

  3. Growth hormone stimulation test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003377.htm Growth hormone stimulation test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone (GH) stimulation test measures the ability of ...

  4. Electron microscopical study of non-specific cholinesterase activity in simple lamellar corpuscles of glabrous skin from cat rhinarium: a histochemical evidence for the presence of collagenase-sensitive molecular forms and their secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubový, P

    1989-01-01

    The distribution of nCHE activity was studied histochemically in simple lamellar corpuscles (SLCs) of glabrous skin from cat rhinarium. The Schwann cells forming myelin sheaths in preterminal part of SCLs exhibited no positive reaction for nCHE activity. Prevalent reaction product was localized extracellularly in the inne core enveloping terminal portion of unmyelinated sensory axon. A dot-like shaped reaction product was deposited in the basal lamina of the inner core cells and their cytoplasmic lamellae or was scattered in enlarged interlamellar spaces. Only small amount of fine end product was found to be associated with the plasma membrane of inner core lamellae. Fine reaction product for nCHE activity was consistently localized in perinuclear and rER cisternae and saccules of the Golgi apparatus of inner core cells. Some vesicles around rER and the Golgi apparatus, ones beneath the plasma membrane, and tubular-like cisternal profiles oriented towards the surface contained nCHE end product, as well. The intracellular and extracellular localization of nCHE reaction product suggests that this enzyme behaves in cat SLCs as a secreted rather than as an integral membrane protein. A large amount of dot-like reaction product in the interlamellar spaces disappeared if the skin sections were treated with collagenase before incubation in the medium for histochemical detection of nCHE activity. The decrease of nCHE end product in SLCs of the skin sections after collagenase digestion was corroborated by means of light microdensitometer and electrometrical measurement. The histochemical detection and electrometrical measurement revealed that the majority of the reaction product in the interlamellar spaces of inner core corresponds with the nCHE molecules sensitive to collagenase treatment and they are probably counted among asymmetrical molecular forms.

  5. Testis tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.L.; Maier, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    Clinical trials are evaluating new combinations of drugs with the goal of diminishing the toxicity associated with the current regimens while not compromising the chance for cure. The evolution of information and staging studies such as tumor markers, CT scanning and MR scanning has made possible the detection of residual metastatic disease while obviating the need for surgical staging procedures. This has made less treatment possible for a large number of patients. The regularity of follow-up studies has made early detection of recurrences a possibility, so that effective and curative treatment is generally possible

  6. Stimulation of epithelial cell matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2, -9, -13) and interleukin-8 secretion by fusobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursoy, U K; Könönen, E; Uitto, V-J

    2008-10-01

    Bacterial pathogens involved in periodontal diseases exert their destructive effects primarily by stimulating the host cells to increase their secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). This study aimed to determine the epithelial cell matrix metalloproteinase and interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion upon exposure to fusobacteria. Eight different oral and non-oral Fusobacterium strains were incubated with HaCaT epithelial cells. Gelatin zymography and Western blot analysis were performed to detect collagenase 3 (MMP-13), gelatinase A (MMP-2), gelatinase B (MMP-9), and IL-8 secretion by epithelial cells. All Fusobacterium strains, especially Fusobacterium necrophorum ATCC 25286, Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586, and Fusobacterium varium ATCC 51644, increased MMP-9 and MMP-13 secretion. Fusobacterium simiae ATCC 33568, and to a lesser extent F. nucleatum and F. necrophorum, increased epithelial MMP-2 secretion. F. nucleatum and F. necrophorum also increased IL-8 secretion. F. varium ATCC 27725, a strain that only weakly stimulated MMP production, strongly increased the IL-8 production, suggesting that their expression is differently regulated. We conclude that the pathogenic potential of fusobacteria may partly result from their ability to stimulate secretion of MMP-9, MMP-13, and IL-8 from epithelial cells.

  7. Cytogenetic and dosimetric effects of 131I in lymphocyte of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer with and without r-hTSH stimulation. Study in thyroid tumor cells (WRO) treated with 131I and 60Co in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valgode, Flavia Gomes Silva

    2015-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) represents about 90% of thyroid malignancies with increasing incidence in the recent decades. Treatment modalities include thyroidectomy, 131 I therapy (with or without r-hTSH), radio and chemotherapy. Little is known about the effects of these treatments at the cellular level. This work was proposed in order to assess to what extent radioiodine therapy can cause damage in peripheral lymphocytes of patients with DTC, preceded or not by r-hTSH, taking into account acute, slow and dosimetric effects of 131 I (in vivo study). An in vitro study was also carried out on thyroid tumor target cells (WRO) by cytotoxicity and genotoxicity analysis and radioiodine uptake. For this, blood samples from patients divided into two groups (group A, r-hTSH + 131 I and group B, 131 I only) were collected before, 24 hours, 1 week, 1 month and 1 year after 131 I administration for aberration chromosome analysis (CA). A dose-response curve for 131 I in vitro was developed for estimating the absorbed dose in patients, comparing the dicentric frequencies obtained in vitro with in vivo data by Monte Carlo program. Radioiodine therapy induced an increase in the number of CA in lymphocytes of patients peaking 24 hours after treatment, with gradual decline over time and with more chromosomal damage in group B than in group A, reaching baseline levels one year after radioiodine administration. The frequency of dicentric found inpatient lymphocytes, 24h after treatment, was equivalent to that induced in vitro (0.354 ± 0.153 MBq / mL for group A and 0.309 ± 0.154 MBq / mL for group B), which corresponds to absorbed doses of 0.8 ± 0.3 Gy and 0.7 ± 0.3 Gy for groups A and B, respectively, with no significant difference between the groups. WRO cells showed a cell cycle relatively slow: 96,3h with an unstable karyotype. The genotoxic test showed a relatively high radioresistance (0.07 to 3.70 MBq/mL), with no statistical significance, with or without r

  8. Novel de novo synthesized phosphate carrier compound ABA-PEG20k-Pi20 suppresses collagenase production in Enterococcus faecalis and prevents colonic anastomotic leak in an experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegerinck, M; Hyoju, S K; Mao, J; Zaborin, A; Adriaansens, C; Salzman, E; Hyman, N H; Zaborina, O; van Goor, H; Alverdy, J C

    2018-04-16

    Previous work has demonstrated that anastomotic leak can be caused by collagenolytic bacteria such as Enterococcus faecalis via an effect on wound collagen. In humans, E. faecalis is the organism cultured most commonly from a leaking anastomosis, and is not routinely eliminated by standard oral or intravenous antibiotics. Novel strategies are needed to contain the virulence of this pathogen when present on anastomotic tissues. Polyphosphorylated polymer ABA-PEG20k-Pi20 was tested in mice for its ability to prevent anastomotic leak caused by collagenolytic E. faecalis. The study design included a distal colonic resection and anastomosis followed by introduction of E. faecalis to anastomotic tissues via enema. Mice were assigned randomly to receive either ABA-PEG20-Pi20 or its unphosphorylated precursor ABA-PEG20k in their drinking water. The development of anastomotic leak was determined after the animals had been killed. Overnight incubation of two different E. faecalis collagenolytic strains with 2 mmol/l of ABA-PEG20k-Pi20 led to near complete inhibition of collagenase production (from 21 000 to 1000 and from 68 000 to 5000 units; P leak rates decreased from eight of 15 to three of 15 animals (P leak caused by this organism. Clinical relevance Progress in understanding the pathogenesis of anastomotic leak continues to point to intestinal bacteria as key causative agents. The presence of pathogens such as Enterococcus faecalis that predominate on anastomotic tissues despite antibiotic use, coupled with their ability to produce collagenase, appears to alter the process of healing that leads to leakage. Further antibiotic administration may seem logical, but carries the unwanted risk of eliminating the normal microbiome, which functions competitively to exclude and suppress the virulence of pathogens such as E. faecalis. Therefore, non-antibiotic strategies that can suppress the production of collagenase by E. faecalis without affecting its growth, or potentially

  9. Teratoid Wilms′ tumor - A rare renal tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswanath Mukhopadhyay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Teratoid Wilms′ tumor is an extremely rare renal tumor. We report a case of unilateral teratoid Wilms′ tumor in a 4-year-old girl. The patient was admitted with a right-sided abdominal mass. The mass was arising from the right kidney. Radical nephrectomy was done and the patient had an uneventful recovery. Histopathology report showed teratoid Wilms′ tumor.

  10. Tumor-Derived Exosomes and Their Role in Tumor-Induced Immune Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa L. Whiteside

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-derived exosomes (TEX are emerging as critical components of an intercellular information network between the tumor and the host. The tumor escapes from the host immune system by using a variety of mechanisms designed to impair or eliminate anti-tumor immunity. TEX carrying a cargo of immunoinhibitory molecules and factors represent one such mechanism. TEX, which are present in all body fluids of cancer patients, deliver negative molecular or genetic signals to immune cells re-programming their functions. Although TEX can also stimulate immune activity, in the microenvironments dominated by the tumor, TEX tend to mediate immune suppression thus promoting tumor progression. The TEX content, in part resembling that of the parent cell, may serve as a source of cancer biomarkers. TEX also interfere with immune therapies. A better understanding of TEX and their contribution to cancer progression and cancer patients’ response to immune therapies represents a challenging new field of investigation.

  11. Tumor Macroenvironment and Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Zhoughbi, Wael; Huang, Jianfeng; Paramasivan, Ganapathy S.; Till, Holger; Pichler, Martin; Guertl-Lackner, Barbara; Hoefler, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    In this review we introduce the concept of the tumor macroenvironment and explore it in the context of metabolism. Tumor cells interact with the tumor microenvironment including immune cells. Blood and lymph vessels are the critical components that deliver nutrients to the tumor and also connect the tumor to the macroenvironment. Several factors are then released from the tumor itself but potentially also from the tumor microenvironment, influencing the metabolism of distant tissues and organ...

  12. Overexpression of the duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) by NSCLC tumor cells results in increased tumor necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addison, Christina L; Belperio, John A; Burdick, Marie D; Strieter, Robert M

    2004-01-01

    The Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) is known to be a promiscuous chemokine receptor that binds a variety of CXC and CC chemokines in the absence of any detectable signal transduction events. Within the CXC group of chemokines, DARC binds the angiogenic CXC chemokines including IL-8 (CXCL8), GROα (CXCL1) and ENA-78 (CXCL5), all of which have previously been shown to be important in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) tumor growth. We hypothesized that overexpression of DARC by a NSCLC tumor cell line would result in the binding of the angiogenic ELR+ CXC chemokines by the tumor cells themselves, and thus interfere with the stimulation of endothelial cells and induction of angiogenesis by the tumor cell-derived angiogenic chemokines. NSCLC tumor cells that constitutively expressed DARC were generated and their growth characteristics were compared to control transfected cells in vitro and in vivo in SCID animals. We found that tumors derived from DARC-expressing cells were significantly larger in size than tumors derived from control-transfected cells. However, upon histological examination we found that DARC-expressing tumors had significantly more necrosis and decreased tumor cellularity, as compared to control tumors. Expression of DARC by NSCLC cells was also associated with a decrease in tumor-associated vasculature and a reduction in metastatic potential. The expression of DARC in the context of NSCLC tumors may act as a chemokine decoy receptor and interferes with normal tumor growth and chemokine-induced tumor neovascularization

  13. Tumor-extrinsic discoidin domain receptor 1 promotes mammary tumor growth by regulating adipose stromal interleukin 6 production in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiujie; Gupta, Kshama; Wu, Bogang; Zhang, Deyi; Yuan, Bin; Zhang, Xiaowen; Chiang, Huai-Chin; Zhang, Chi; Curiel, Tyler J; Bendeck, Michelle P; Hursting, Stephen; Hu, Yanfen; Li, Rong

    2018-02-23

    Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) is a collagen receptor that mediates cell communication with the extracellular matrix (ECM). Aberrant expression and activity of DDR1 in tumor cells are known to promote tumor growth. Although elevated DDR1 levels in the stroma of breast tumors are associated with poor patient outcome, a causal role for tumor-extrinsic DDR1 in cancer promotion remains unclear. Here we report that murine mammary tumor cells transplanted to syngeneic recipient mice in which Ddr1 has been knocked out (KO) grow less robustly than in WT mice. We also found that the tumor-associated stroma in Ddr1- KO mice exhibits reduced collagen deposition compared with the WT controls, supporting a role for stromal DDR1 in ECM remodeling of the tumor microenvironment. Furthermore, the stromal-vascular fraction (SVF) of Ddr1 knockout adipose tissue, which contains committed adipose stem/progenitor cells and preadipocytes, was impaired in its ability to stimulate tumor cell migration and invasion. Cytokine array-based screening identified interleukin 6 (IL-6) as a cytokine secreted by the SVF in a DDR1-dependent manner. SVF-produced IL-6 is important for SVF-stimulated tumor cell invasion in vitro , and, using antibody-based neutralization, we show that tumor promotion by IL-6 in vivo requires DDR1. In conclusion, our work demonstrates a previously unrecognized function of DDR1 in promoting tumor growth. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... navigate their brain tumor diagnosis. WATCH AND SHARE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Central Nervous System Cancers Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  15. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Brain Tumors KidsHealth / For Parents / Brain Tumors What's in ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  16. Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  17. Malignant bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zedgenidze, G.A.; Kishkovskij, A.N.; Elashov, Yu.G.

    1984-01-01

    Clinicoroentgenologic semiotics of malignant bone tumors as well as metastatic bone tumors are presented. Diagnosis of malignant and metastatic bone tumors should be always complex, representing a result of cooperation of a physician, roentgenologist, pathoanatomist

  18. Tumors and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumors during pregnancy are rare, but they can happen. Tumors can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. The most common cancers in pregnancy are breast cancer, cervical cancer, lymphoma, and melanoma. ...

  19. Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumor > Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 01/ ... the body. It is important to remember that statistics on the survival rates for people with a ...

  20. Peripheral epithelial odontogenic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carzoglio, J.; Tancredi, N.; Capurro, S.; Ravecca, T.; Scarrone, P.

    2006-01-01

    A new case of peripheral epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor) is reported. It is localized in the superior right gingival region, a less frequent site, and has the histopathological features previously reported. Immunochemical studies were performed, revealing a differential positive stain to cytokeratins in tumor cells deeply seated in the tumor mass, probably related to tumoral cell heterogeneity.Interestingly, in this particular case S-100 protein positive reactivity was also detected in arborescent cells intermingled with tumoral cells, resembling Langerhans cells. Even though referred in the literature in central Pindborg tumors, no references were found about their presence in peripheral tumors, like the one that is presented here

  1. L-leucine methyl ester stimulates insulin secretion and islet glutamate dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, P; Kofod, Hans; Lernmark, A

    1983-01-01

    Column perifusion of collagenase-isolated mouse pancreatic islets was used to study the dynamics of insulin release in experiments lasting for several hours. The methyl esters of L-leucine and L-arginine were synthesized. Whereas L-arginine methyl ester (L-arginine OMe) had no effect, L-leucine OMe...... stimulated the release of insulin. The effect of L-leucine OMe was maximal at 5 mmol/liter. Whereas the Km for glucose-stimulated insulin release was unaffected by 1 mmol/liter L-leucine OMe, the maximal release of D-glucose was increased by the amino acid derivative that appeared more effective than L......-leucine. L-Leucine OMe was also a potent stimulus of insulin release from the perfused mouse pancreas. In the presence of 10 mmol/liter L-glutamine, 1 mmol/liter L-leucine OMe induced a 50- to 75-fold increase in insulin release. A similar stimulatory effect was also observed in column-perifused RIN 5F cells...

  2. [Transcranial magnetic stimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormos, J M; Catalá, M D; Pascual-Leone, A

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) permits stimulation of the cerebral cortex in humans without requiring open access to the brain and is one of the newest tools available in neuroscience. There are two main types of application: single-pulse TMS and repetitive TMS. The magnetic stimulator is composed of a series of capacitors that store the voltage necessary to generate a stimulus of the sufficient intensity of generate an electric field in the stimulation coil. The safety of TMS is supported by the considerable experience derived from studies involving electrical stimulation of the cortex in animals and humans, and also specific studies on the safety of TMS in humans. In this article we review historical and technical aspects of TMS, describe its adverse effects and how to avoid them, summarize the applications of TMS in the investigation of different cerebral functions, and discuss the possibility of using TMS for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  3. Radiological diagnostics of skeletal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhl, M.; Herget, G.W.

    2008-01-01

    The book contains contributions concerning the following topics: 1. introduction and fundamentals: WHO classification of bone tumors, imaging diagnostics and their function; localization, typical clinical and radiological criteria, TNM classification and status classification, invasive tumor diagnostics; 2. specific tumor diagnostics: chondrogenic bone tumors, osseous tumors, connective tissue bony tumors, osteoclastoma, osteomyelogenic bone tumors, vascular bone tumors, neurogenic bone tumors, chordoma; adamantinoma of the long tubular bone; tumor-like lesions, bony metastases, bone granulomas, differential diagnostics: tumor-like lesions

  4. Stimulation of dendritic cells enhances immune response after photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Pawel; Castano, Ana P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the administration of photosensitizers followed by illumination of the primary tumor with red light producing reactive oxygen species that cause vascular shutdown and tumor cell necrosis and apoptosis. Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT due to the acute inflammatory response, priming of the immune system to recognize tumor-associated antigens (TAA). The induction of specific CD8+ Tlymphocyte cells that recognize major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) restricted epitopes of TAAs is a highly desirable goal in cancer therapy. The PDT killed tumor cells may be phagocytosed by dendritic cells (DC) that then migrate to draining lymph nodes and prime naÃve T-cells that recognize TAA epitopes. This process is however, often sub-optimal, in part due to tumor-induced DC dysfunction. Instead of DC that can become mature and activated and have a potent antigen-presenting and immune stimulating phenotype, immature dendritic cells (iDC) are often found in tumors and are part of an immunosuppressive milieu including regulatory T-cells and immunosuppressive cytokines such as TGF-beta and IL10. We here report on the use of a potent DC activating agent, an oligonucleotide (ODN) that contains a non-methylated CpG motif and acts as an agonist of toll like receptor (TLR) 9. TLR activation is a danger signal to notify the immune system of the presence of invading pathogens. CpG-ODN (but not scrambled non-CpG ODN) increased bone-marrow DC activation after exposure to PDT-killed tumor cells, and significantly increased tumor response to PDT and mouse survival after peri-tumoral administration. CpG may be a valuable immunoadjuvant to PDT especially for tumors that produce DC dysfunction.

  5. Proinflammatory mediators stimulate neutrophil-directed angiogenesis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCourt, M

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF; vascular permeability factor) is one of the most potent proangiogenic cytokines, and it plays a central role in mediating the process of angiogenesis or new blood vessel formation. Neutrophils (PMNs) recently have been shown to produce VEGF. HYPOTHESIS: The acute inflammatory response is a potent stimulus for PMN-directed angiogenesis. METHODS: Neutrophils were isolated from healthy volunteers and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and anti-human Fas monoclonal antibody. Culture supernatants were assayed for VEGF using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Culture supernatants from LPS- and TNF-alpha-stimulated PMNs were then added to human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human microvessel endothelial cells and assessed for endothelial cell proliferation using 5-bromodeoxyuridine labeling. Tubule formation was also assessed on MATRIGEL basement membrane matrix. Neutrophils were lysed to measure total VEGF release, and VEGF expression was detected using Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Lipopolysaccharide and TNF-alpha stimulation resulted in significantly increased release of PMN VEGF (532+\\/-49 and 484+\\/-80 pg\\/mL, respectively; for all, presented as mean +\\/- SEM) compared with control experiments (32+\\/-4 pg\\/mL). Interleukin 6 and Fas had no effect. Culture supernatants from LPS- and TNF-alpha-stimulated PMNs also resulted in significant increases (P<.005) in macrovascular and microvascular endothelial cell proliferation and tubule formation. Adding anti-human VEGF-neutralizing polyclonal antibody to stimulated PMN supernatant inhibited these effects. Total VEGF release following cell lysis and Western blot analysis suggests that the VEGF is released from an intracellular store. CONCLUSION: Activated human PMNs are directly angiogenic by releasing VEGF, and this has important implications for inflammation, capillary leak syndrome

  6. Music acupuncture stimulation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brătilă, F; Moldovan, C

    2007-01-01

    Harmonic Medicine is the model using the theory that the body rhythms synchronize to an outer rhythm applied for therapeutic purpose, can restores the energy balance in acupuncture channels and organs and the condition of well-being. The purpose of this scientific work was to demonstrate the role played by harmonic sounds in the stimulation of the Lung (LU) Meridian (Shoutaiyin Feijing) and of the Kidney (KI) Meridian (Zushaoyin Shenjing). It was used an original method that included: measurement and electronic sound stimulation of the Meridian Entry Point, measurement of Meridian Exit Point, computer data processing, bio feed-back adjustment of the music stimulation parameters. After data processing, it was found that the sound stimulation of the Lung Meridian Frequency is optimal between 122 Hz and 128 Hz, with an average of 124 Hz (87% of the subjects) and for Kidney Meridian from 118 Hz to 121 Hz, with an average of 120 Hz (67% of the subjects). The acupuncture stimulation was more intense for female subjects (> 7%) than for the male ones. We preliminarily consider that an informational resonance phenomenon can be developed between the acupuncture music stimulation frequency and the cellular dipole frequency, being a really "resonant frequency signature" of an acupoint. The harmonic generation and the electronic excitation or low-excitation status of an acupuncture point may be considered as a resonance mechanism. By this kind of acupunctural stimulation, a symphony may act and play a healer role.

  7. Liver Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Liver Tumors KidsHealth / For Parents / Liver Tumors What's in this article? Types of Tumors ... Cancerous) Tumors Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Coping Print The liver is the body's largest solid organ. Lying next ...

  8. Endocrine tumors other than thyroid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeichi, Norio; Dohi, Kiyohiko

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the tendency for the occurrence of tumors in the endocrine glands, other than the thyroid gland, in A-bomb survivors using both autopsy and clinical data. ABCC-RERF sample data using 4136 autopsy cases (1961-1977) revealed parathyroid tumors in 13 A-bomb survivors, including 3 with the associated hyperparathyroidism, with the suggestion of dose-dependent increase in the occurrence of tumors. Based on clinical data from Hiroshima University, 7 (46.7%) of 15 parathyroid tumors cases were A-bomb survivors. Data (1974-1987) from the Tumor Registry Committee (TRC) in Hiroshima Prefecture revealed that a relative risk of parathyroid tumors was 5.6 times higher in the entire group of A-bomb survivors and 16.2 times higher in the group of heavily exposed A-bomb survivors, suggesting the dose-dependent increase in their occurrence. Adrenal tumors were detected in 47 of 123 cases from the TRC data, and 15 (31.5%) of these 47 were A-bomb survivors. Particularly, 11 cases of adrenal tumors associated with Cushing syndrome included 6 A-bomb survivors (54.5%). The incidence of multiple endocrine gonadial tumors (MEGT) tended to be higher with increasing exposure doses; and the 1-9 rad group, the 10-99 rad group, and the 100 or more rad group had a risk of developing MEGT of 4.1, 5.7, and 7.1, respectively, relative to both the not-in the city group and the 0 rad group. These findings suggested that there is a correlation between A-bomb radiation and the occurrence of parathyroid tumors (including hyperparathyroidism), adrenal tumors associated with Cushing syndrome and MEGT (especially, the combined thyroid and ovarian tumors and the combined thyroid and parathyroid tumors). (N.K.)

  9. Nicotine inhibits collagen synthesis and alkaline phosphatase activity, but stimulates DNA synthesis in osteoblast-like cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramp, W.K.; Lenz, L.G.; Galvin, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Use of smokeless tobacco is associated with various oral lesions including periodontal damage and alveolar bone loss. This study was performed to test the effects of nicotine on bone-forming cells at concentrations that occur in the saliva of smokeless tobacco users. Confluent cultures of osteoblast-like cells isolated from chick embryo calvariae were incubated for 2 days with nicotine added to the culture medium (25-600 micrograms/ml). Nicotine inhibited alkaline phosphatase in the cell layer and released to the medium, whereas glycolysis (as indexed by lactate production) was unaffected or slightly elevated. The effects on medium and cell layer alkaline phosphatase were concentration dependent with maximal inhibition occurring at 600 micrograms nicotine/ml. Nicotine essentially did not affect the noncollagenous protein content of the cell layer, but did inhibit collagen synthesis (hydroxylation of [ 3 H]proline and collagenase-digestible protein) at 100, 300, and 600 micrograms/ml. Release of [ 3 H]hydroxyproline to the medium was also decreased in a dose-dependent manner, as was the collagenase-digestible protein for both the medium and cell layer. In contrast, DNA synthesis (incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine) was more than doubled by the alkaloid, whereas total DNA content was slightly inhibited at 600 micrograms/ml, suggesting stimulated cell turnover. Morphologic changes occurred in nicotine-treated cells including rounding up, detachment, and the occurrence of numerous large vacuoles. These results suggest that steps to reduce the salivary concentration of nicotine in smokeless tobacco users might diminish damaging effects of this product on alveolar bone

  10. [Tissue collagenase MMP-14 and endogenous regulators of its activity in the corpus uteri in squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timoshenko, O S; Gureeva, T A; Kugaevskaya, E V; Zavalishina, L E; Andreeva, Yu Yu; Solovyeva, N I

    to investigate the expression of the membrane-bound matrix metalloproteinase MT1-MMP (MMP-14), its tissue inhibitor TIMP-2, and the proMMP-14 activator furin in the corpus uteri from the vaginal wall to the bottom of the uterine cavity in squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (SCCC). Hysterectomy material was examined in patients with SCCC. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and enzyme assays were used. In SCCC, higher levels of MMP-14 expression were established in tumor cells, as evidenced by IHC (+3) and RT-PCR. IHC showed that the expression of MMP-14 was absent or insignificant in the normal uterine endometrial and myometrial tissues. However, that of MMP-14 mRNA was also found in the normal tissues to the bottom of the uterine cavity. Furin activity in the tumor was much higher than that in normal tissues. IHC indicated that TIMP-2 expression was low or absent in both the tumor and normal tissues. The expression of TIMP-2 mRNA was sufficiently obvious in both the tumor and normal tissues to the bottom of the uterine cavity. In SCCC, MMP-14 expression was substantially increased in tumors. The expression of MMP-14 and regulators of its activity is aimed at enhancing the tumor destructive (invasive) potential in the pericellular space and can occur (be induced) in the morphologically normal uterine tissue apparently with involvement of signaling through the epithelial-mesenchymal interaction. Data are important for understanding the role of MMP-14 in the development of a multistage process of carcinogenesis and may have prognostic value and an impact on therapeutic strategy for the patient.

  11. Thyroid-stimulating hormone pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Michelle J; Erickson, Dana; Castro, M Regina; Atkinson, John L D

    2008-07-01

    Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-secreting pituitary adenomas are rare, representing secreting or clinically silent TSH-immunostaining pituitary tumors among all pituitary adenomas followed at their institution between 1987 and 2003. Patient records, including clinical, imaging, and pathological and surgical characteristics were reviewed. Twenty-one patients (6 women and 15 men; mean age 46 years, range 26-73 years) were identified. Of these, 10 patients had a history of clinical hyperthyroidism, of whom 7 had undergone ablative thyroid procedures (thyroid surgery/(131)I ablation) prior to the diagnosis of pituitary adenoma. Ten patients had elevated TSH preoperatively. Seven patients presented with headache, and 8 presented with visual field defects. All patients underwent imaging, of which 19 were available for imaging review. Sixteen patients had macroadenomas. Of the 21 patients, 18 underwent transsphenoidal surgery at the authors' institution, 2 patients underwent transsphenoidal surgery at another facility, and 1 was treated medically. Patients with TSH-secreting tumors were defined as in remission after surgery if they had no residual adenoma on imaging and had biochemical evidence of hypo-or euthyroidism. Patients with TSH-immunostaining tumors were considered in remission if they had no residual tumor. Of these 18 patients, 9 (50%) were in remission following surgery. Seven patients had residual tumor; 2 of these patients underwent further transsphenoidal resection, 1 underwent a craniotomy, and 4 underwent postoperative radiation therapy (2 conventional radiation therapy, 1 Gamma Knife surgery, and 1 had both types of radiation treatment). Two patients had persistently elevated TSH levels despite the lack of evidence of residual tumor. On pathological analysis and immunostaining of the surgical specimen, 17 patients had samples that stained positively for TSH, 8 for alpha-subunit, 10 for growth hormone, 7 for prolactin, 2 for adrenocorticotrophic hormone

  12. Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells Increase Tumor Growth Rates and Modify Tumor Physiology: Relevance for Therapeutic Targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagan, Jonathan, E-mail: jdpagan@uams.edu; Przybyla, Beata; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Gupta, Kalpna [Vascular Biology Center and Division of Hematology-Oncology Transplantation, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School, MN 72223 (United States); Griffin, Robert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2013-02-18

    oxygenation and subsequent radiation response of tumors. We surmise that these cells are preferentially stimulated to divide in the tumor microenvironment, thereby inducing the significant increase in tumor growth observed and that the use of injected BOECs could be a viable approach to modulate the tumor microenvironment for therapeutic gain. Conversely, agents or approaches to block their recruitment and integration of BOECs into primary or metastatic lesions may be an effective way to restrain cancer progression before or after other treatments are applied.

  13. Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells Increase Tumor Growth Rates and Modify Tumor Physiology: Relevance for Therapeutic Targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagan, Jonathan; Przybyla, Beata; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat; Gupta, Kalpna; Griffin, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    oxygenation and subsequent radiation response of tumors. We surmise that these cells are preferentially stimulated to divide in the tumor microenvironment, thereby inducing the significant increase in tumor growth observed and that the use of injected BOECs could be a viable approach to modulate the tumor microenvironment for therapeutic gain. Conversely, agents or approaches to block their recruitment and integration of BOECs into primary or metastatic lesions may be an effective way to restrain cancer progression before or after other treatments are applied

  14. CT of abdominal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Satoshi; Yamada, Kenji; Ito, Masatoshi; Ito, Hisao; Yamaura, Harutsugu

    1981-01-01

    CT findings in 33 patients who had an abdominal tumor were evaluated. CT revealed a tumor in 31 cases. The organ from which the tumor originated was correctly diagnosed in 18 patients. Whether the tumor was solid or cystic was correctly predicted in 28 patients. The diagnosis malignant or benign nature of tumor was correct, incorrect and impossible, in 23, 3, and five patiens, respectively. (Kondo, M.)

  15. SHP-1, a novel peptide isolated from seahorse inhibits collagen release through the suppression of collagenases 1 and 3, nitric oxide products regulated by NF-kappaB/p38 kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, BoMi; Qian, Zhong-Ji; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Considerable efforts have been taken to identify natural peptides as potential bioactive substances. In this study, novel peptide (SHP-1) derived from seahorse (Hippocampus, Syngnathidae) hydrolysate was explored for its inhibitory effects on collagen release in arthritis with the investigation of its underlying mechanism of action. The efficacy of SHP-1 was determined on cartilage protective effects such as inhibition of collagen and GAG release. SHP-1 was able to suppress not only the expression of collagenases 1 and 3, but also the production of NO via down-regulation of iNOS. However, it presented an irrelevant effect on the level of GAG release in chondrocytic and osteoblastic cells. Inhibition of collagen release by SHP-1 is associated with restraining the phosphorylation of NF-kappaB and p38 kinase cascade. Therefore, it could be suggested that SHP-1 has a potential to be used in arthritis treatment.

  16. Tumor macroenvironment and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zoughbi, Wael; Al-Zhoughbi, Wael; Huang, Jianfeng; Paramasivan, Ganapathy S; Till, Holger; Pichler, Martin; Guertl-Lackner, Barbara; Hoefler, Gerald

    2014-04-01

    In this review we introduce the concept of the tumor macroenvironment and explore it in the context of metabolism. Tumor cells interact with the tumor microenvironment including immune cells. Blood and lymph vessels are the critical components that deliver nutrients to the tumor and also connect the tumor to the macroenvironment. Several factors are then released from the tumor itself but potentially also from the tumor microenvironment, influencing the metabolism of distant tissues and organs. Amino acids, and distinct lipid and lipoprotein species can be essential for further tumor growth. The role of glucose in tumor metabolism has been studied extensively. Cancer-associated cachexia is the most important tumor-associated systemic syndrome and not only affects the quality of life of patients with various malignancies but is estimated to be the cause of death in 15%-20% of all cancer patients. On the other hand, systemic metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes are known to influence tumor development. Furthermore, the clinical implications of the tumor macroenvironment are explored in the context of the patient's outcome with special consideration for pediatric tumors. Finally, ways to target the tumor macroenvironment that will provide new approaches for therapeutic concepts are described. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Theranostic GO-based nanohybrid for tumor induced imaging and potential combinational tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Si-Yong; Feng, Jun; Rong, Lei; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Chen, Si; Liu, Xiang-Ji; Luo, Guo-Feng; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2014-02-12

    Graphene oxide (GO)-based theranostic nanohybrid is designed for tumor induced imaging and potential combinational tumor therapy. The anti-tumor drug, Doxorubicin (DOX) is chemically conjugated to the poly(ethylenimine)-co-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEI-PEG) grafted GO via a MMP2-cleavable PLGLAG peptide linkage. The therapeutic efficacy of DOX is chemically locked and its intrinsic fluorescence is quenched by GO under normal physiological condition. Once stimulated by the MMP2 enzyme over-expressed in tumor tissues, the resulting peptide cleavage permits the unloading of DOX for tumor therapy and concurrent fluorescence recovery of DOX for in situ tumor cell imaging. Attractively, this PEI-bearing nanohybrid can mediate efficient DNA transfection and shows great potential for combinational drug/gene therapy. This tumor induced imaging and potential combinational therapy will open a window for tumor treatment by offering a unique theranostic approach through merging the diagnostic capability and pathology-responsive therapeutic function. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Retinol as a micronutrients related to cervical local immunity: The expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha specifically stimulated with E6 epitope of human papillomavirus type-16 and ratio of CD4+/CD8+ T cell in natural history of cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utami, T. W.; Aziz, M. F.; Ibrahim, F.; Andrijono

    2017-08-01

    Retinol is one of the antioxidant micronutrients that plays essential roles in the immune system, by preventing the persistence of modulating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and cytokines production. Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha (TNF-α) is an acute pro-inflammatory cytokine which has many crucial roles in controlling HPV. In contrast, when persistent infection occurs, TNF-α induces carcinogenesis. The ratio of CD4+ cells to CD8+ T cells and adequate TNF-α production in acute HPV infection are key points for clearance. The aim of this research is to analyze the sufficiency level of retinol deposit, the expression of TNF-α, and the ratio of CD4+: CD8+ T cells in a normal cervix, clearance and persistent HPV subclinical infection, and cervical cancer group. The sufficiency level of retinol deposit was analyzed from peripheral blood using the ELISA method. The cervico-vaginal secretions, which were incubated for 24 hours, were stimulated specifically by E6 epitope HPV type-16, measuring TNF-α expression semi-quantitatively by the ELISpot method and CD4+/CD8+ T cells quantitatively by flowcytometry method. The sufficient level of retinol deposit in a normal cervix, clearance HPV subclinical infection, persistent, and cervical cancer group was 85%, 75% (OR 1.89), 33.3% (OR 11.33), and 75% (OR 1.89), respectively. The expression of TNF-α in normal cervix group was 10%, while for cervical cancer it was 75% (OR 27.00; p CD4+: CD8+ T cells in the normal cervix and cervical cancer group was 10% and 25% (OR 0.33). There was no high ratio of CD4+: CD8+ T cells in clearance (OR 1.22) and persistent (OR 0.95) HPV subclinical infection groups. This study was able to prove that the normal cervix group has the highest retinol deposit sufficiency level and the cervical cancer group has the highest TNF-α expression (OR 27; p < 0.001). The lowest of retinol deposit sufficiency level was not in cervical cancer, but in the persistent HPV subclinical infection group (OR 11.33). There was

  19. DNA repair in PHA stimulated human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catena, C.; Mattoni, A.

    1984-01-01

    Damage an repair of radiation induced DNA strand breaks were measured by alkaline lysis and hydroxyapatite chromatography. PHA stimulated human lymphocytes show that the rejoining process is complete within the first 50 min., afterwords secondary DNA damage and chromatid aberration. DNA repair, in synchronized culture, allows to evaluate individual repair capacity and this in turn can contribute to the discovery of individual who, although they do not demonstrate apparent clinical signs, are carriers of DNA repair deficiency. Being evident that a correlation exists between DNA repair capacity and carcinogenesis, the possibility of evaluating the existent relationship between DNA repair and survival in tumor cells comes therefore into discussion

  20. Bronchial carcinoid tumors: A rare malignant tumor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-02-03

    Feb 3, 2015 ... Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice • Sep-Oct 2015 • Vol 18 • Issue 5. Abstract. Bronchial carcinoid tumors (BCTs) are an uncommon group of lung tumors. They commonly affect the young adults and the middle aged, the same age group affected by other more common chronic lung conditions such as ...

  1. Mast cells: potential positive and negative roles in tumor biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marichal, Thomas; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J

    2013-11-01

    Mast cells are immune cells that reside in virtually all vascularized tissues. Upon activation by diverse mechanisms, mast cells can secrete a broad array of biologically active products that either are stored in the cytoplasmic granules of the cells (e.g., histamine, heparin, various proteases) or are produced de novo upon cell stimulation (e.g., prostaglandins, leukotrienes, cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors). Mast cells are best known for their effector functions during anaphylaxis and acute IgE-associated allergic reactions, but they also have been implicated in a wide variety of processes that maintain health or contribute to disease. There has been particular interest in the possible roles of mast cells in tumor biology. In vitro studies have shown that mast cells have the potential to influence many aspects of tumor biology, including tumor development, tumor-induced angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling, and the shaping of adaptive immune responses to tumors. Yet, the actual contributions of mast cells to tumor biology in vivo remain controversial. Here, we review some basic features of mast cell biology with a special emphasis on those relevant to their potential roles in tumors. We discuss how using in vivo tumor models in combination with models in which mast cell function can be modulated has implicated mast cells in the regulation of host responses to tumors. Finally, we summarize data from studies of human tumors that suggest either beneficial or detrimental roles for mast cells in tumors. ©2013 AACR.

  2. Kinase fusions are frequent in Spitz tumors and spitzoid melanomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Puig, Rosaura; Botton, Thomas; Yeh, Iwei; Lipson, Doron; Otto, Geoff; Brennan, Kristina; Murali, Rajmohan; Garrido, Maria; Miller, Vincent A.; Ross, Jeffrey S; Berger, Michael F.; Sparatta, Alyssa; Palmedo, Gabriele; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Busam, Klaus J.; Kutzner, Heinz; Cronin, Maureen T; Stephens, Philip J; Bastian, Boris C.

    2014-01-01

    Spitzoid neoplasms are a group of melanocytic tumors with distinctive histopathologic features. They include benign tumors (Spitz nevi), malignant tumors (spitzoid melanomas), and tumors with borderline histopathologic features and uncertain clinical outcome (atypical Spitz tumors). Their genetic underpinnings are poorly understood, and alterations in common melanoma-associated oncogenes are typically absent. Here we show that spitzoid neoplasms harbor kinase fusions of ROS1 (17%), NTRK1 (16%), ALK (10%), BRAF (5%), and RET (3%) in a mutually exclusive pattern. The chimeric proteins are constitutively active, stimulate oncogenic signaling pathways, are tumorigenic, and are found in the entire biologic spectrum of spitzoid neoplasms, including 55% of Spitz nevi, 56% of atypical Spitz tumors, and 39% of spitzoid melanomas. Kinase inhibitors suppress the oncogenic signaling of the fusion proteins in vitro. In summary, kinase fusions account for the majority of oncogenic aberrations in spitzoid neoplasms, and may serve as therapeutic targets for metastatic spitzoid melanomas. PMID:24445538

  3. Extracellular collagenases and the endocytic receptor, urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein/Endo180, cooperate in fibroblast-mediated collagen degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel H; Engelholm, Lars H; Ingvarsen, Signe

    2007-01-01

    in these events. A recently discovered turnover route with importance for tumor growth involves intracellular collagen degradation and is governed by the collagen receptor, urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP or Endo180). The interplay between this mechanism and extracellular...... collagenolysis is not known. In this report, we demonstrate the existence of a new, composite collagen breakdown pathway. Thus, fibroblast-mediated collagen degradation proceeds preferentially as a sequential mechanism in which extracellular collagenolysis is followed by uPARAP/Endo180-mediated endocytosis......The collagens of the extracellular matrix are the most abundant structural proteins in the mammalian body. In tissue remodeling and in the invasive growth of malignant tumors, collagens constitute an important barrier, and consequently, the turnover of collagen is a rate-limiting process...

  4. Supernatants from culture of type I collagen-stimulated PBMC from patients with cutaneous systemic sclerosis versus localized scleroderma demonstrate suppression of MMP-1 by fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Monica; Postlethwaite, Arnold E; Myers, Linda K; Hasty, Karen A

    2012-06-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic fibrosing disease characterized by vasculopathy, autoimmunity, and an accumulation of collagen in tissues. Numerous studies have shown that compared to healthy or diseased controls, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with SSc produce a variety of cytokines or proliferate when cultured with solubilized type I collagen (CI) or constituent α1(II) and α2(I) polypeptide chains. The purpose of this study was to determine whether PBMC isolated from patients with SSc and cultured in vitro with soluble CI elaborated soluble mediators that inhibit the production of collagenase (i.e., matrix metalloproteinase, MMP-1) by fibroblasts. Supernatants of CI-stimulated PBMC from juvenile and adult diffuse cutaneous (dc)SSc patients significantly reduced MMP-1 production by SSc dermal fibroblasts, while supernatants of CI-stimulated PBMC from patients with localized scleroderma (LS) did not. CI-stimulated PBMC culture supernatants from patients with dcSSc in contrast to patients with LS exhibited increased levels of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA, PDGF-BB, TNF-α, IL-13, and EGF. Prolonged culture of SSc dermal fibroblasts with recombinant PDGF-BB or IL-13 inhibited the induction of MMP-1 in response to subsequent TNF-α stimulation. These data suggest that therapies aimed at reducing these cytokines may decrease collagen accumulation in SSc, preventing the development of chronic fibrosis.

  5. Children's Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 Family Donate Volunteer Justin's Hope Fund Children’s Brain Tumor Foundation, A non-profit organization, was founded ... and the long term outlook for children with brain and spinal cord tumors through research, support, education, ...

  6. Metaphyseal giant cell tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, L.F.; Hemais, P.M.P.G.; Aymore, I.L.; Carmo, M.C.R. do; Cunha, M.E.P.R. da; Resende, C.M.C.

    1986-01-01

    Three cases of metaphyseal giant cell tumor are presented. A review of the literature is done, demostrating the lesion is rare and that there are few articles about it. Age incidence and characteristics of the tumor are discussed. (Author) [pt

  7. Testicular germinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fresco, R.

    2010-01-01

    This work is about diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of testicular germinal tumors. The presumed diagnosis is based in the anamnesis, clinical examination, testicular ultrasound and tumor markers. The definitive diagnosis is obtained through the inguinal radical orchidectomy

  8. Macrophages support splenic erythropoiesis in 4T1 tumor-bearing mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Liu

    Full Text Available Anemia is a common complication of cancer; a role of spleen in tumor-stress erythropoiesis has been suggested. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the splenic erythropoiesis following tumor maintenance remain poorly understood. Here we show that tumor development blocks medullar erythropoiesis by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF and then causes anemia in murine 4T1 breast tumor-bearing mice. Meanwhile, tumor-stress promotes splenic erythropoiesis. Splenectomy worsened tumor-induced anemia, and reduced tumor volume and tumor weight, indicating the essential role of spleen in tumor-stress erythropoiesis and tumor growth. Tumor progression of these mice led to increased amounts of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4 in spleen. The in vivo role of macrophages in splenic erythropoiesis under tumor-stress conditions was investigated. Macrophage depletion by injecting liposomal clodronate decreased the expression of BMP4, inhibited splenic erythropoiesis, aggravated the tumor-induced anemia and suppressed tumor growth. Our results provide insight that macrophages and BMP4 are positive regulators of splenic erythropoiesis in tumor pathological situations. These findings reveal that during the tumor-stress period, the microenvironment of the spleen is undergoing changes, which contributes to adopt a stress erythropoietic fate and supports the expansion and differentiation of stress erythroid progenitors, thereby replenishing red blood cells and promoting tumor growth.

  9. Retinoid inhibition of in vitro invasion of human amnion basement membrane by human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazely, F.

    1988-01-01

    The effects measured were the inhibition of tumor cell migration through the basement membrane (BM) and tumor cell degradative enzyme activity on 3 H-proline labeled collagenous and non collagenous components of the BM. The human lung carcinoma A549 or the human Ewing's sarcoma TC-106 cell lines treated with retinoids for two days were incubated on the BM in the absence of retinoids. A dose-dependent inhibition of cell invasion was produced by retinoids. Among the retinoids tested the most powerful was retinol acetate which inhibited invasion by 50% of A549 cells at a concentration of 0.09 μg/ml, and TC-106 cells at 0.08 μg/ml. Retinol acetate inhibited A549 and TC-106 cell growth by approximately 50% at levels almost 100-fold higher than those needed for antiinvasive activity. Retinol acetate was about 20 times more potent than retinoic acid and 30 times more than retinol palmitate. Furthermore, A549 cells treated with retinol acetate, under conditions whereby an anti-invasive state was induced,showed an increase in the number of cellular retinoic acid binding proteins (CRABP), a decrease in the activity of type IV collagenase and ectosialyltransferase, and no change in the activity of transglutaminase

  10. Tissue engineered tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M; Techy, G B; Ward, B R; Imam, S A; Atkinson, R; Ho, H; Taylor, C R

    2010-08-01

    Many research programs use well-characterized tumor cell lines as tumor models for in vitro studies. Because tumor cells grown as three-dimensional (3-D) structures have been shown to behave more like tumors in vivo than do cells growing in monolayer culture, a growing number of investigators now use tumor cell spheroids as models. Single cell type spheroids, however, do not model the stromal-epithelial interactions that have an important role in controlling tumor growth and development in vivo. We describe here a method for generating, reproducibly, more realistic 3-D tumor models that contain both stromal and malignant epithelial cells with an architecture that closely resembles that of tumor microlesions in vivo. Because they are so tissue-like we refer to them as tumor histoids. They can be generated reproducibly in substantial quantities. The bioreactor developed to generate histoid constructs is described and illustrated. It accommodates disposable culture chambers that have filled volumes of either 10 or 64 ml, each culture yielding on the order of 100 or 600 histoid particles, respectively. Each particle is a few tenths of a millimeter in diameter. Examples of histological sections of tumor histoids representing cancers of breast, prostate, colon, pancreas and urinary bladder are presented. Potential applications of tumor histoids include, but are not limited to, use as surrogate tumors for pre-screening anti-solid tumor pharmaceutical agents, as reference specimens for immunostaining in the surgical pathology laboratory and use in studies of invasive properties of cells or other aspects of tumor development and progression. Histoids containing nonmalignant cells also may have potential as "seeds" in tissue engineering. For drug testing, histoids probably will have to meet certain criteria of size and tumor cell content. Using a COPAS Plus flow cytometer, histoids containing fluorescent tumor cells were analyzed successfully and sorted using such criteria.

  11. New York Canyon Stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raemy, Bernard

    2012-06-21

    The New York Canyon Stimulation Project was to demonstrate the commercial application of Enhanced Geothermal System techniques in Buena Vista Valley area of Pershing County, Nevada. From October 2009 to early 2012, TGP Development Company aggressively implemented Phase I of Pre-Stimulation and Site/Wellbore readiness. This included: geological studies; water studies and analyses and procurement of initial permits for drilling. Oversubscription of water rights and lack of water needed for implementation of EGS were identified and remained primary obstacles. Despite extended efforts to find alternative solutions, the water supply circumstances could not be overcome and led TGP to determine a "No Go" decision and initiate project termination in April 2012.

  12. Morphogenesis and Complexity of the Tumor Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    A mechanism to describe the apoptosis process at mesoscopic level through p53 is proposed in this paper. A deterministic model given by three differential equations is deduced from the mesoscopic approach, which exhibits sustained oscillations caused by a supercritical Andronov-Hopf bifurcation. Taking as hypothesis that the p53 sustained oscillation is the fundamental mechanism for apoptosis regulation; the model predicts that it is necessary a strict control of p53 to stimulated it, which is an important consideration to established new therapy strategy to fight cancer. The mathematical modeling of tumor growth allows us to describe the most important regularities of these systems. A stochastic model, based on the most important processes that take place at the level of individual cells, is proposed to predict the dynamical behavior of the expected radius of the tumor and its fractal dimension. It was found that the tumor has a characteristic fractal dimension, which contains the necessary information to predict the tumor growth until it reaches a stationary state. The mathematical modeling of tumor growth is an approach to explain the complex nature of these systems. A model that describes tumor growth was obtained by using a mesoscopic formalism and fractal dimension. This model theoretically predicts the relation between the morphology of the cell pattern and the mitosis/apoptosis quotient that helps to predict tumor growth from tumoral cells fractal dimension. The relation between the tumor macroscopic morphology and the cell pattern morphology is also determined. This could explain why the interface fractal dimension decreases with the increase of the cell pattern fractal dimension and consequently with the increase of the mitosis/apoptosis relation. Indexes to characterize tumoral cell proliferation and invasion capacities are proposed and used to predict the growth of different types of tumors. These indexes also show that the proliferation capacity is

  13. Fertility preservation in women with CNS tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosoni, Alicia; Balestrini, Damiano; Brandes, Alba A

    2017-05-01

    Fertility impairment due to treatments is a major concern for adolescents and young adult patients who survived cancer. Areas covered: Chemotherapy may determine a detrimental effect on ovary function, leading to infertility, and premature ovarian failure. Embryo and oocyte cryopreservation is a standard strategy for fertility preservation; other strategies, such as gonadal tissue cryopreservation and the use of gonadotropin - releasing hormone agonist, are still considered experimental. There are few data available regarding the effect of pregnancy on glioma, which indicates tumor progression during pregnancy in 33-45% of patients. Expert commentary: Glioma patients need to be advised about the risk of tumor progression during pregnancy, and about the possible, even if not proven, interaction between hormone stimulation and tumor growth.

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of Mouse Skin Tumor Promotion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rundhaug, Joyce E.; Fischer, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple molecular mechanisms are involved in the promotion of skin carcinogenesis. Induction of sustained proliferation and epidermal hyperplasia by direct activation of mitotic signaling pathways or indirectly in response to chronic wounding and/or inflammation, or due to a block in terminal differentiation or resistance to apoptosis is necessary to allow clonal expansion of initiated cells with DNA mutations to form skin tumors. The mitotic pathways include activation of epidermal growth factor receptor and Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. Chronic inflammation results in inflammatory cell secretion of growth factors and cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukins, as well as production of reactive oxygen species, all of which can stimulate proliferation. Persistent activation of these pathways leads to tumor promotion

  15. Tumor interstitial fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina; Olsen, Charlotta J.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) is a proximal fluid that, in addition to the set of blood soluble phase-borne proteins, holds a subset of aberrantly externalized components, mainly proteins, released by tumor cells and tumor microenvironment through various mechanisms, which include classical...

  16. PLGA-based microcarriers induce mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenesis and stimulate cartilage repair in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morille, Marie; Toupet, Karine; Montero-Menei, Claudia N; Jorgensen, Christian; Noël, Danièle

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we aimed at evaluating the ability of novel PLGA-P188-PLGA-based microspheres to induce the differentiation of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) into chondrocytes. To this aim, we tested microspheres releasing TGFβ3 (PAM-T) in vitro and in situ, in a pathological osteoarthritic (OA) environment. We first evaluated the chondrogenic differentiation of human MSCs seeded onto PAM-T in vitro and confirmed the up-regulation of chondrogenic markers while the secretome of the cells was not changed by the 3D environment. We then injected human MSC seeded onto PAM-T in the knee joints of mice with collagenase-induced OA. After 6 weeks, histological analysis revealed that formation of a cartilage-like tissue occurred at the vicinity of PAM-T that was not observed when MSCs were seeded onto PAM. We also noticed that the endogenous articular cartilage was less degraded. The extent of cartilage protection was further analysed by confocal laser microscopy. When MSCs seeded onto PAM-T were injected early after OA induction, protection of cartilage against degradation was evidenced and this effect was associated to a higher survival of MSCs in presence of TGFβ3. This study points to the interest of using MSCs seeded onto PAM for cartilage repair and stimulation of endogenous cartilage regeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. IDEA: Stimulating Oral Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easley, Jacob J.

    1995-01-01

    Presents daily activities that facilitate complete sentence response, promote oral production, and aid the learning of vocabulary in foreign-language classes. Because speech is the primary form of communication in the foreign-language classroom, it is important to stimulate students to converse as soon as possible. (Author/CK)

  18. stimulated BV2 Microglial

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-03-26

    Mar 26, 2012 ... 2), in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglial cells. The level of NO production was analyzed using Griess reaction. The release of PGE2 was determined using sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay ...

  19. Brain stimulation in migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighina, Filippo; Cosentino, Giuseppe; Fierro, Brigida

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is a very prevalent disease with great individual disability and socioeconomic burden. Despite intensive research effort in recent years, the etiopathogenesis of the disease remains to be elucidated. Recently, much importance has been given to mechanisms underlying the cortical excitability that has been suggested to be dysfunctional in migraine. In recent years, noninvasive brain stimulation techniques based on magnetic fields (transcranial magnetic stimulation, TMS) and on direct electrical currents (transcranial direct current stimulation, tDCS) have been shown to be safe and effective tools to explore the issue of cortical excitability, activation, and plasticity in migraine. Moreover, TMS, repetitive TMS (rTMS), and tDCS, thanks to their ability to interfere with and/or modulate cortical activity inducing plastic, persistent effects, have been also explored as potential therapeutic approaches, opening an interesting perspective for noninvasive neurostimulation for both symptomatic and preventive treatment of migraine and other types of headache. In this chapter we critically review evidence regarding the role of noninvasive brain stimulation in the pathophysiology and treatment of migraine, delineating the advantages and limits of these techniques together with potential development and future application. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. PET and endocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigo, P.; Belhocine, T.; Hustinx, R.; Foidart-Willems, J.

    2000-01-01

    The authors review the main indications of PET examination, and specifically of 18 FDG, in the assessment of endocrine tumors: of the thyroid, of the parathyroid, of the adrenal and of the pituitary glands. Neuroendocrine tumors, gastro-entero-pancreatic or carcinoid tumors are also under the scope. Usually, the most differentiated tumors show only poor uptake of the FDG as they have a weak metabolic and proliferative activity. In the assessment of endocrine tumors, FDG-PET should be used only after most specific nuclear examinations been performed. (author)

  1. Tumor penetrating peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambet eTeesalu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC, contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular zip code of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is

  2. Platelets Promote Metastasis via Binding Tumor CD97 Leading to Bidirectional Signaling that Coordinates Transendothelial Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvona Ward

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Tumor cells initiate platelet activation leading to the secretion of bioactive molecules, which promote metastasis. Platelet receptors on tumors have not been well-characterized, resulting in a critical gap in knowledge concerning platelet-promoted metastasis. We identify a direct interaction between platelets and tumor CD97 that stimulates rapid bidirectional signaling. CD97, an adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR, is an overexpressed tumor antigen in several cancer types. Purified CD97 extracellular domain or tumor cell-associated CD97 stimulated platelet activation. CD97-initiated platelet activation led to granule secretion, including the release of ATP, a mediator of endothelial junction disruption. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA derived from platelets induced tumor invasiveness via proximal CD97-LPAR heterodimer signaling, coupling coincident tumor cell migration and vascular permeability to promote transendothelial migration. Consistent with this, CD97 was necessary for tumor cell-induced vascular permeability in vivo and metastasis formation in preclinical models. These findings support targeted blockade of tumor CD97 as an approach to ameliorate metastatic spread. : Tumor-initiated platelet activation promotes tissue invasion of cancer cells and metastasis. Ward et al. demonstrate that a common tumor-associated antigen, CD97, accounts for platelet activation and participates directly in LPA-mediated signal transduction leading to tumor cell invasion. CD97 promotes vascular extravasation and metastasis in pre-clinical models. Keywords: platelets, metastasis, transendothelial migration, circulating tumor cells, CD97, adhesion GPCR, LPA

  3. How Does Ionizing Irradiation Contribute to the Induction of Anti-Tumor Immunity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubner, Yvonne; Wunderlich, Roland; Rühle, Paul-Friedrich; Kulzer, Lorenz; Werthmöller, Nina; Frey, Benjamin; Weiss, Eva-Maria; Keilholz, Ludwig; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S.

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) with ionizing irradiation is commonly used to locally attack tumors. It induces a stop of cancer cell proliferation and finally leads to tumor cell death. During the last years it has become more and more evident that besides a timely and locally restricted radiation-induced immune suppression, a specific immune activation against the tumor and its metastases is achievable by rendering the tumor cells visible for immune attack. The immune system is involved in tumor control and we here outline how RT induces anti-inflammation when applied in low doses and contributes in higher doses to the induction of anti-tumor immunity. We especially focus on how local irradiation induces abscopal effects. The latter are partly mediated by a systemic activation of the immune system against the individual tumor cells. Dendritic cells are the key players in the initiation and regulation of adaptive anti-tumor immune responses. They have to take up tumor antigens and consecutively present tumor peptides in the presence of appropriate co-stimulation. We review how combinations of RT with further immune stimulators such as AnnexinA5 and hyperthermia foster the dendritic cell-mediated induction of anti-tumor immune responses and present reasonable combination schemes of standard tumor therapies with immune therapies. It can be concluded that RT leads to targeted killing of the tumor cells and additionally induces non-targeted systemic immune effects. Multimodal tumor treatments should therefore tend to induce immunogenic tumor cell death forms within a tumor microenvironment that stimulates immune cells.

  4. How does ionizing irradiation contribute to the induction of anti-tumor immunity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne eRubner

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy (RT with ionizing irradiation is commonly used to locally attack tumors. It induces a stop of cancer cell proliferation and finally leads to tumor cell death. During the last years it has become more and more evident that besides a timely and locally restricted radiation-induced immune suppression, a specific immune activation against the tumor and its metastases is achievable by rendering the tumor cells visible for immune attack. The immune system is involved in tumor control and we here outline how RT induces anti-inflammation when applied in low doses and contributes in higher doses to the induction of anti-tumor immunity. We especially focus on how local irradiation induces abscopal effects. The latter are partly mediated by a systemic activation of the immune system against the individual tumor cells. Dendritic cells are the key players in the initiation and regulation of adaptive anti-tumor immune responses. They have to take up tumor antigens and consecutively present tumor peptides in the presence of appropriate co-stimulation. We review how combinations of RT with further immune stimulators such as AnnexinA5 and hyperthermia foster the dendritic cell-mediated induction of anti-tumor immune responses and present reasonable combination schemes of standard tumor therapies with immune therapies. It can be concluded that RT leads to targeted killing of the tumor cells and additionally induces non-targeted systemic immune effects. Multimodal tumor treatments should therefore tend to induce immunogenic tumor cell death forms within a tumor microenvironment that stimulates immune cells.

  5. Plasmids encoding PKI(1-31), a specific inhibitor of cAMP-stimulated gene expression, inhibit the basal transcriptional activity of some but not all cAMP-regulated DNA response elements in JEG-3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, J R; Deutsch, P J; Price, D J; Habener, J F; Avruch, J

    1989-11-25

    Plasmids that encode a bioactive amino-terminal fragment of the heat-stable inhibitor of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, PKI(1-31), were employed to characterize the role of this protein kinase in the control of transcriptional activity mediated by three DNA regulatory elements in the JEG-3 human placental cell line. The 5'-flanking sequence of the human collagenase gene contains the heptameric sequence, 5'-TGAGTCA-3', previously identified as a "phorbol ester" response element. Reporter genes containing either the intact 1.2-kilobase 5'-flanking sequence from the human collagenase gene or just the 7-base pair (bp) response element, when coupled to an enhancerless promoter, each exhibit both cAMP and phorbol ester-stimulated expression in JEG-3 cells. Cotransfection of either construct with plasmids encoding PKI(1-31) inhibits cAMP-stimulated but not basal- or phorbol ester-stimulated expression. Pretreatment of cells with phorbol ester for 1 or 2 days abrogates completely the response to rechallenge with phorbol ester but does not alter the basal expression of either construct; cAMP-stimulated expression, while modestly inhibited, remains vigorous. The 5'-flanking sequence of the human chorionic gonadotropin-alpha subunit (HCG alpha) gene has two copies of the sequence, 5'-TGACGTCA-3', contained in directly adjacent identical 18-bp segments, previously identified as a cAMP-response element. Reporter genes containing either the intact 1.5 kilobase of 5'-flanking sequence from the HCG alpha gene, or just the 36-bp tandem repeat cAMP response element, when coupled to an enhancerless promoter, both exhibit a vigorous cAMP stimulation of expression but no response to phorbol ester in JEG-3 cells. Cotransfection with plasmids encoding PKI(1-31) inhibits both basal and cAMP-stimulated expression in a parallel fashion. The 5'-flanking sequence of the human enkephalin gene mediates cAMP-stimulated expression of reporter genes in both JEG-3 and CV-1 cells. Plasmids

  6. The Advantages of Multi-Epitope Tumor Antigens as an Approach to Treating Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kiertscher, Sylvia

    1999-01-01

    .... We hypothesized that the processing and presentation of multiple tumor antigen epitopes by DC is a more efficient and effective way of stimulating T cell responses than current HLA-restricted peptide-based methods...

  7. Epilepsy and Brain Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-yi Sha

    2009-01-01

    @@ Epidemiology It is estimated 61,414 new cases of primary brain tumors are expected to be diagnosed in 2009 in the U.S. The incidence statistic of 61,414 persons diagnosed per year includes both malignant (22,738) and non-malignant (38,677) brain tumors. (Data from American Brain Tumor Association). During the years 2004-2005, approximately 359,000 people in the United States were living with the diagnosis of a primary brain or central nervous system tumor. Specifically, more than 81,000 persons were living with a malignant tumor, more than 267,000 persons with a benign tumor. For every 100,000 people in the United States, approximately 131 are living following the diagnosis of a brain tumor. This represents a prevalence rate of 130.8 per 100,000 person years[1].

  8. Tumor associated osteoclast-like giant cells promote tumor growth and lymphangiogenesis by secreting vascular endothelial growth factor-C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Yu; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Morita, Ikuo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • M-CSF and RANKL expressing HeLa cells induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. • We established OGC-containing tumor model in vivo. • OGC-containing tumor became larger independent of M-CSF or RANKL effect. • VEGF-C secreted from OGCs was a one of candidates for OGC-containing tumor growth. - Abstract: Tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells (OGCs) have been reported in a variety of organs and exert an invasive and prometastatic phenotype, but the functional role of OGCs in the tumor environment has not been fully clarified. We established tumors containing OGCs to clarify the role of OGCs in tumor phenotype. A mixture of HeLa cells expressing macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, HeLa-M) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL, HeLa-R) effectively supported the differentiation of osteoclast-like cells from bone marrow macrophages in vitro. Moreover, a xenograft study showed OGC formation in a tumor composed of HeLa-M and HeLa-R. Surprisingly, the tumors containing OGCs were significantly larger than the tumors without OGCs, although the growth rates were not different in vitro. Histological analysis showed that lymphangiogenesis and macrophage infiltration in the tumor containing OGCs, but not in other tumors were accelerated. According to quantitative PCR analysis, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C mRNA expression increased with differentiation of osteoclast-like cells. To investigate whether VEGF-C expression is responsible for tumor growth and macrophage infiltration, HeLa cells overexpressing VEGF-C (HeLa-VC) were established and transplanted into mice. Tumors composed of HeLa-VC mimicked the phenotype of the tumors containing OGCs. Furthermore, the vascular permeability of tumor microvessels also increased in tumors containing OGCs and to some extent in VEGF-C-expressing tumors. These results suggest that macrophage infiltration and vascular permeability are possible mediators in these tumors. These

  9. Use of resources and costs associated with the treatment of Dupuytren’s contracture at an orthopedics and traumatology surgery department in Denia (Spain): collagenase clostridium hystolyticum versus subtotal fasciectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Our purpose was to analyze and compare the use of direct health resources and costs generated in the treatment of Dupuytren's contracture using two different techniques: subtotal fasciectomy and infiltration with Collagenase Clostridium Histolyticum (CCH) in regular clinical practice at the Orthopedic and Traumatology Surgery (OTS) Department at the Hospital de Denia (Spain). Methods Observational, retrospective study based on data from the computerized clinical histories of two groups of patients- those treated surgically using a one or two digit subtotal fasciectomy technique (FSC) and those treated with CCH infiltration, monitored in regular clinical practice from February, 2009 to May, 2012. Demographic (age, sex), clinical (number of digits affected and which ones) and use of resources (hospitalizations, medical visits, tests and drugs) data were collected. Resource use and associated costs, according to the hospital’s accounting department, were compared based on the type of treatment from Spain’s National Health Service. Results 91 patients (48 (52.8%) in the FSC group) were identified. The average age and number of digits affected was 65.9 (9.2) years and 1.33 (0.48) digits affected in the FSC group, and 65.1 (9.7) years and 1.16 (0.4) digits in the CCH group. Overall, the costs of treating Dupuytren's disease with subtotal FSC amount to €1,814 for major ambulatory surgery and €1,961 with hospital stay including admission, surgical intervention (€904), examinations, dressings and physiotherapy. As to collagenase infiltration, costs amount to €952 (including minor surgery admission, vial with product, office examination and dressings). Finally, comparing total costs for treatments, a savings of €388 is estimated in favor of CCH treatment in the best-case scenario (patient under MAS system with no need for physiotherapy) and €1,008 in the worst-case scenario (patient admitted to hospital needing subsequent physiotherapy), implying a

  10. [Transcranial magnetic stimulation and motor cortex stimulation in neuropathic pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylius, V; Ayache, S S; Teepker, M; Kappus, C; Kolodziej, M; Rosenow, F; Nimsky, C; Oertel, W H; Lefaucheur, J P

    2012-12-01

    Non-invasive and invasive cortical stimulation allows the modulation of therapy-refractory neuropathic pain. High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the contralateral motor cortex yields therapeutic effects at short-term and predicts the benefits of epidural motor cortex stimulation (MCS). The present article summarizes the findings on application, mechanisms and therapeutic effects of cortical stimulation in neuropathic pain.

  11. Tumor Suppression and Promotion by Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yenniffer Ávalos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic process that involves lysosomal degradation of proteins and organelles, mostly mitochondria, for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and reduction of metabolic stress. Problems in the execution of this process are linked to different pathological conditions, such as neurodegeneration, aging, and cancer. Many of the proteins that regulate autophagy are either oncogenes or tumor suppressor proteins. Specifically, tumor suppressor genes that negatively regulate mTOR, such as PTEN, AMPK, LKB1, and TSC1/2 stimulate autophagy while, conversely, oncogenes that activate mTOR, such as class I PI3K, Ras, Rheb, and AKT, inhibit autophagy, suggesting that autophagy is a tumor suppressor mechanism. Consistent with this hypothesis, the inhibition of autophagy promotes oxidative stress, genomic instability, and tumorigenesis. Nevertheless, autophagy also functions as a cytoprotective mechanism under stress conditions, including hypoxia and nutrient starvation, that promotes tumor growth and resistance to chemotherapy in established tumors. Here, in this brief review, we will focus the discussion on this ambiguous role of autophagy in the development and progression of cancer.

  12. Tumor suppression and promotion by autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávalos, Yenniffer; Canales, Jimena; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Criollo, Alfredo; Lavandero, Sergio; Quest, Andrew F G

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic process that involves lysosomal degradation of proteins and organelles, mostly mitochondria, for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and reduction of metabolic stress. Problems in the execution of this process are linked to different pathological conditions, such as neurodegeneration, aging, and cancer. Many of the proteins that regulate autophagy are either oncogenes or tumor suppressor proteins. Specifically, tumor suppressor genes that negatively regulate mTOR, such as PTEN, AMPK, LKB1, and TSC1/2 stimulate autophagy while, conversely, oncogenes that activate mTOR, such as class I PI3K, Ras, Rheb, and AKT, inhibit autophagy, suggesting that autophagy is a tumor suppressor mechanism. Consistent with this hypothesis, the inhibition of autophagy promotes oxidative stress, genomic instability, and tumorigenesis. Nevertheless, autophagy also functions as a cytoprotective mechanism under stress conditions, including hypoxia and nutrient starvation, that promotes tumor growth and resistance to chemotherapy in established tumors. Here, in this brief review, we will focus the discussion on this ambiguous role of autophagy in the development and progression of cancer.

  13. Grating stimulated echo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubetsky, B.; Berman, P.R.; Sleator, T.

    1992-01-01

    A theory of a grating simulated echo (GTE) is developed. The GSE involves the sequential excitation of atoms by two counterpropagating traveling waves, a standing wave, and a third traveling wave. It is shown that the echo signal is very sensitive to small changes in atomic velocity, much more sensitive than the normal stimulated echo. Use of the GSE as a collisional probe or accelerometer is discussed

  14. Extraosseous Ewing′s tumor of larynx: A rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Shinde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs are a group of highly malignant tumors composed of small round cells of neuroectodermal origin that affect soft tissue and bone. PNET of the larynx is extremely rare. We report a case of a 41-year-old male who presented with the complaints of progressively increasing stridor of 3 months duration, which was diagnosed as a case of neuroectodermal tumor in the subglottis. Patient was subjected to microlaryngeal surgery and the tumor was excised. Postoperatively, patient was given three cycles of chemotherapy comprising of ifosfamide, etoposide, and mesna, along with granulocyte colony stimulating factor, with 21 days interval. After chemotherapy repeat computed tomography scan showed no evidence of the tumor and no lymphadenopathy. Patient is symptom free for 18 months following completion of treatment. He is under regular follow-up and is undergoing monthly serial endoscopic evaluation.

  15. [Immune system and tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terme, Magali; Tanchot, Corinne

    2017-02-01

    Despite having been much debated, it is now well established that the immune system plays an essential role in the fight against cancer. In this article, we will highlight the implication of the immune system in the control of tumor growth and describe the major components of the immune system involved in the antitumoral immune response. The immune system, while exerting pressure on tumor cells, also will play a pro-tumoral role by sculpting the immunogenicity of tumors cells as they develop. Finally, we will illustrate the numerous mechanisms of immune suppression that take place within the tumoral microenvironment which allow tumor cells to escape control from the immune system. The increasingly precise knowledge of the brakes to an effective antitumor immune response allows the development of immunotherapy strategies more and more innovating and promising of hope. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Imaging of pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Juchems, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma is the most frequent solid tumor of the pancreas. This tumor has distinct features including early obstruction of the pancreatic duct, diminished enhancement after administration of contrast material due to desmoplastic growth, high propensity to infiltrate adjacent structures and to metastasize into the liver and the peritoneum. Hormone active endocrine tumors cause specific clinical symptoms. Imaging is aimed at localization of these hypervascular tumors. Non hormone active tumors are most frequently malignant and demonstrate very varying features. Cystic pancreatic tumors are increasingly detected by means of cross sectional imaging. Exact classification can be achieved with knowledge of the macropathology and considering clinical presentation as well as age and gender of the patients. (orig.)

  17. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte activity is enhanced in tumors with low IL-10 production in HBV-induced hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yang; Song, Qingwei; Hu, Dianhe; Zhuang, Xiaohu; Yu, Shengcai

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers and can be induced by chronic HBV infection. The role of HBV-specific immune responses in mediating tumorigenesis and HCC prognosis is debated. The effect of intratumoral microenvironment on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) is also unclear. Here, we examined resected tumor tissue from 36 patients with HBV-induced HCC. We categorized study cohort based on ex vivo IL-10 secretion by tumor cells into high IL-10-secreting (Hi10) and low IL-10-secreting (Lo10) groups, and found that the Lo10 group was less sensitive to TLR ligand stimulation. TILs from the Lo10 group contained higher frequencies of HBV-specific IFN-g-producing cells and total IFN-g-producing cells, and possessed higher proliferative capacity. Moreover, the proliferative capacity of TILs from the Hi10 group was negatively correlated with IL-10 secretion from tumor cells. Together, our data demonstrated that low IL-10-producing capacity in HBV-induced HCC tumors is associated with enhanced TIL activity. - Highlights: • We examined intratumoral IL-10 production in HBV-induced HCC. • We grouped HCC tumors into Hi10 and Lo10 groups based on their IL-10 production. • Lo10 groups had better IFN-g response by TILs. • Lo10 groups had better TIL proliferative capacity. • Lo10 group tumor cells were refractory to TLR ligand stimulation

  18. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte activity is enhanced in tumors with low IL-10 production in HBV-induced hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yang, E-mail: yangshi_xz@126.com; Song, Qingwei; Hu, Dianhe; Zhuang, Xiaohu; Yu, Shengcai

    2015-05-22

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers and can be induced by chronic HBV infection. The role of HBV-specific immune responses in mediating tumorigenesis and HCC prognosis is debated. The effect of intratumoral microenvironment on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) is also unclear. Here, we examined resected tumor tissue from 36 patients with HBV-induced HCC. We categorized study cohort based on ex vivo IL-10 secretion by tumor cells into high IL-10-secreting (Hi10) and low IL-10-secreting (Lo10) groups, and found that the Lo10 group was less sensitive to TLR ligand stimulation. TILs from the Lo10 group contained higher frequencies of HBV-specific IFN-g-producing cells and total IFN-g-producing cells, and possessed higher proliferative capacity. Moreover, the proliferative capacity of TILs from the Hi10 group was negatively correlated with IL-10 secretion from tumor cells. Together, our data demonstrated that low IL-10-producing capacity in HBV-induced HCC tumors is associated with enhanced TIL activity. - Highlights: • We examined intratumoral IL-10 production in HBV-induced HCC. • We grouped HCC tumors into Hi10 and Lo10 groups based on their IL-10 production. • Lo10 groups had better IFN-g response by TILs. • Lo10 groups had better TIL proliferative capacity. • Lo10 group tumor cells were refractory to TLR ligand stimulation.

  19. Central nervous system tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curran, W.J. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Intrinsic tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) pose a particularly challenging problem to practicing oncologists. These tumors rarely metastasize outside the CNS, yet even histologically benign tumors can be life-threatening due to their local invasiveness and strategic location. The surrounding normal tissues of the nervous system is often incapable of full functional regeneration, therefore prohibiting aggressive attempts to use either complete surgical resection or high doses of irradiation. Despite these limitations, notable achievements have recently been recorded in the management of these tumors

  20. Management of CNS tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griem, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    The treatment of tumors of the CNS has undergone a number of changes based on the impact of CT. The use of intraoperative US for the establishment of tumor location and tumor histology is demonstrated. MR imaging also is beginning to make an impact on the diagnosis and treatment of tumors of the CNS. Examples of MR images are shown. The authors then discuss the important aspects of tumor histology as it affects management and newer concepts in surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy on tumor treatment. The role of intraoperative placement of radioactive sources, the utilization of heavy particle radiation therapy, and the potential role of other experimental radiation therapy techniques are discussed. The role of hyperfractionated radiation and of neutrons and x-ray in a mixed-beam treatment are discussed in perspective with standard radiation therapy. Current chemotherapy techniques, including intraarterial chemotherapy, are discussed. The complications of radiation therapy alone and in combination with chemotherapy in the management of primary brain tumors, brain metastases, and leukemia are reviewed. A summary of the current management of pituitary tumors, including secreting pituitary adenomas and chromophobe adenomas, are discussed. The treatment with heavy particle radiation, transsphenoidal microsurgical removal, and combined radiotherapeutic and surgical management are considered. Tumor metastasis management of lesions of the brain and spinal cord are considered

  1. Low intensity transcranial electric stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antal, Andrea; Alekseichuk, I; Bikson, M

    2017-01-01

    Low intensity transcranial electrical stimulation (TES) in humans, encompassing transcranial direct current (tDCS), transcutaneous spinal Direct Current Stimulation (tsDCS), transcranial alternating current (tACS), and transcranial random noise (tRNS) stimulation or their combinations, appears...

  2. Tyrosine isomers mediate the classical phenomenon of concomitant tumor resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Raúl A; Bruzzo, Juan; Chiarella, Paula; di Gianni, Pedro; Isturiz, Martín A; Linskens, Susana; Speziale, Norma; Meiss, Roberto P; Bustuoabad, Oscar D; Pasqualini, Christiane D

    2011-11-15

    Concomitant tumor resistance (CR) is a phenomenon originally described in 1906 in which a tumor-bearing host is resistant to the growth of secondary tumor implants and metastasis. Although recent studies have indicated that T-cell-dependent processes mediate CR in hosts bearing immunogenic small tumors, manifestations of CR induced by immunogenic and nonimmunogenic large tumors have been associated with an elusive serum factor. In this study, we identify this serum factor as tyrosine in its meta and ortho isoforms. In three different murine models of cancer that generate CR, both meta-tyrosine and ortho-tyrosine inhibited tumor growth. In addition, we showed that both isoforms of tyrosine blocked metastasis in a fourth model that does not generate CR but is sensitive to CR induced by other tumors. Mechanistic studies showed that the antitumor effects of the tyrosine isoforms were mediated, in part, by early inhibition of mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway and inactivation of STAT3, potentially driving tumor cells into a state of dormancy. By revealing a molecular basis for the classical phenomenon of CR, our findings may stimulate new generalized approaches to limit the development of metastases that arise after resection of primary tumors, an issue of pivotal importance to oncologists and their patients. ©2011 AACR

  3. Effect of γ-radiation on the incidence of plant tumors (to the problem of carcinogenesis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzin, A.M.; Yurov, S.S.; Vagabova, M.Eh.; Shchelkaeva, N.V.

    1986-01-01

    In experiments on two plant species: of Kalanchoe diagremontiana and potato (Solanum tuberosum) it was shown that γ-irradiation of the plant tissues, before infecting with Ti-plasmide Agrobacterium tumefaciens C-58, with doses stimulating the development of the plants markedly increases the incidence of tumors, promotes their growth, and increases the probability of inverse differentiation of tumor cells

  4. Tumor cell-derived microparticles: a new form of cancer vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huafeng; Huang, Bo

    2015-08-01

    For cancer vaccines, tumor antigen availability is currently not an issue due to technical advances. However, the generation of optimal immune stimulation during vaccination is challenging. We have recently demonstrated that tumor cell-derived microparticles (MP) can function as a new form of potent cancer vaccine by efficiently activating type I interferon pathway in a cGAS/STING dependent manner.

  5. Tumor carcinoide apendicular Appendiceal carcinoid tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Vázquez Palanco

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue dar a conocer un interesante caso de tumor carcinoide que se presentó con cuadro clínico de apendicitis aguda. El paciente fue un varón de 8 años de edad, al cual se realizó apendicectomía a causa de una apendicitis aguda. El resultado anatomopatológico confirmó un tumor de células endocrinas (argentafinoma, tumor carcinoide en el tercio distal del órgano, que infiltraba hasta la serosa, y apendicitis aguda supurada. El paciente fue enviado a un servicio de oncohematología para tratamiento oncoespecífico. Por lo inusual de estos tumores en edades tempranas y por lo que puede representar para el niño una conducta no consecuente, decidimos presentar este caso a la comunidad científica nacional e internacional. Es extremadamente importante el seguimiento de los pacientes con apendicitis aguda y de las conclusiones del examen histológico, por lo que puede representar para el niño una conducta inadecuada en una situación como esta.The objective of this paper was to make known an interesting case of carcinoid tumor that presented a clinical picture of acute appendicitis.The patient was an eight-year-old boy that underwent appendectomy due to an acute appendicitis. The anatomopathological report confirmed an endocrine cell tumor (argentaffinoma, carcinoid tumor in the distal third of the organ that infiltrated up to the serosa, and acute suppurative appendicitis. The patient was referred to an oncohematology service for oncospecific treatment. As it is a rare tumor at early ages, and taking into account what a inconsequent behavior may represent for the child, it was decided to present this case to the national and international scientific community. The follow-up of the patients with acute appendicitis and of the conclusions of the histological examination is extremely important considering what an inadequate conduct may represent for the child in a situation like this.

  6. An exceptional collision tumor: gastric calcified stromal tumor and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The authors report an exceptional case of collision tumor comprised of a gastric calcified stromal tumor and a pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The pancreatic tumor was detected fortuitously on the histological exam of resection specimen. Key words: Collision tumor, stromal tumor, adenocarcinoma ...

  7. Pituitary gland tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesser, J.; Schlamp, K.; Bendszus, M.

    2014-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the most common tumors of the pituitary gland and the differential diagnostics with special emphasis on radiological diagnostic criteria. A selective search of the literature in PubMed was carried out. Pituitary adenomas constitute 10-15 % of all intracranial tumors and are the most common tumors of the sellar region. Tumors smaller than 1 cm in diameter are called microadenomas while those larger than 1 cm in diameter are called macroadenomas. Approximately 65 % of pituitary gland adenomas secrete hormones whereby approximately 50 % secrete prolactin, 10 % secrete growth hormone (somatotropin) and 6 % secrete corticotropin. Other tumors located in the sella turcica can also cause endocrinological symptoms, such as an oversecretion of pituitary hormone or pituitary insufficiency by impinging on the pituitary gland or its stalk. When tumors spread into the space cranial to the sella turcica, they can impinge on the optic chiasm and cause visual disorders. A common differential diagnosis of a sellar tumor is a craniopharyngeoma. In children up to 10 % of all intracranial tumors are craniopharyngeomas. Other differential diagnoses for sellar tumors are metastases, meningiomas, epidermoids and in rare cases astrocytomas, germinomas or Rathke cleft cysts As these tumors are located in an anatomically complex region of the skull base and are often very small, a highly focused imaging protocol is required. The currently favored modality is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the administration of a contrast agent. The sellar region should be mapped in thin slices. In cases of suspected microadenoma the imaging protocol should also contain a sequence with dynamic contrast administration in order to assess the specific enhancement characteristics of the tumor and the pituitary gland. (orig.) [de

  8. [Pituitary gland tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesser, J; Schlamp, K; Bendszus, M

    2014-10-01

    This article gives an overview of the most common tumors of the pituitary gland and the differential diagnostics with special emphasis on radiological diagnostic criteria. A selective search of the literature in PubMed was carried out. Pituitary adenomas constitute 10-15% of all intracranial tumors and are the most common tumors of the sellar region. Tumors smaller than 1 cm in diameter are called microadenomas while those larger than 1 cm in diameter are called macroadenomas. Approximately 65% of pituitary gland adenomas secrete hormones whereby approximately 50% secrete prolactin, 10% secrete growth hormone (somatotropin) and 6% secrete corticotropin. Other tumors located in the sella turcica can also cause endocrinological symptoms, such as an oversecretion of pituitary hormone or pituitary insufficiency by impinging on the pituitary gland or its stalk. When tumors spread into the space cranial to the sella turcica, they can impinge on the optic chiasm and cause visual disorders. A common differential diagnosis of a sellar tumor is a craniopharyngeoma. In children up to 10% of all intracranial tumors are craniopharyngeomas. Other differential diagnoses for sellar tumors are metastases, meningiomas, epidermoids and in rare cases astrocytomas, germinomas or Rathke cleft cysts As these tumors are located in an anatomically complex region of the skull base and are often very small, a highly focused imaging protocol is required. The currently favored modality is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the administration of a contrast agent. The sellar region should be mapped in thin slices. In cases of suspected microadenoma the imaging protocol should also contain a sequence with dynamic contrast administration in order to assess the specific enhancement characteristics of the tumor and the pituitary gland.

  9. Spinal Cord Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a surgical treatment for chronic neuropathic pain that is refractory to other treatment. Originally described by Shealy et al. in 1967(1), it is used to treat a range of conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS I)(2), angina pectoris(3), radicular...... pain after failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)(4), pain due to peripheral nerve injury, stump pain(5), peripheral vascular disease(6) and diabetic neuropathy(7,8); whereas phantom pain(9), postherpetic neuralgia(10), chronic visceral pain(11), and pain after partial spinal cord injury(12) remain more...

  10. Ewing tumors in infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Henk; Dirksen, Uta; Ranft, Andreas; Jürgens, Heribert

    2008-01-01

    Malignancies in infancy are extremely rare. Ewing tumors are hardly ever noted in these children. Since it is generally assumed that malignancies in infancy have an extremely poor outcome, we wanted to investigate whether this was also the case in Ewing tumors. We identified in the Munster data

  11. GASTROENTEROPANCREATIC NEUROENDOCRINE TUMORS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pavel M.E., Baum U., Hahn E.G., Hensen J. Doxorubucin and streptozocin after failed biotherapy of Neuroendocrine tumors. Int J. Gastrointest Cancer 2005; 35 179-185. 33. Yao J.C., Phan A., Hoff P.M., et al. Targeting vas- cular endothelial growth factor in advanced carci- noid tumors: a random assignment phase II study.

  12. Atypically localized glomus tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meric Ugurlar

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: When a painful mass is found in the body, glomus tumors should be kept in mind. The consideration of symptoms, including pain, temperature sensitivity, point tenderness, and discoloration, common characteristics of glomus tumors, may aid diagnosis. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(3.000: 112-117

  13. Renal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heerwagen, S T; Jensen, C; Bagi, P

    2007-01-01

    Renal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare soft-tissue tumor of controversial etiology with a potential for local recurrence after incomplete surgical resection. The radiological findings in renal IMT are not well described. We report two cases in adults with a renal mass treated...

  14. Pseudoanaplastic tumors of bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Won-Jong [Uijongbu St. Mary Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Gyunggido, 480-821 (Korea); Mirra, Joseph M. [Orthopaedic Hospital, Orthopedic Oncology, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2004-11-01

    To discuss the concept of pseudoanaplastic tumors of bone, which pathologically show hyperchromatism and marked pleomorphism with quite enlarged, pleomorphic nuclei, but with no to extremely rare, typical mitoses, and to propose guidelines for their diagnosis. From a database of 4,262 bone tumors covering from 1971 to 2001, 15 cases of pseudoanaplastic bone tumors (0.35% of total) were retrieved for clinical, radiographic and pathologic review. Postoperative follow-up after surgical treatment was at least 3 years and a maximum of 7 years. There were eight male and seven female patients. Their ages ranged from 10 to 64 years with average of 29.7 years. Pathologic diagnoses of pseudoanaplastic variants of benign bone tumors included: osteoblastoma (4 cases), giant cell tumor (4 cases), chondromyxoid fibroma (3 cases), fibrous dysplasia (2 cases), fibrous cortical defect (1 case) and aneurysmal bone cyst (1 case). Radiography of all cases showed features of a benign bone lesion. Six cases, one case each of osteoblastoma, fibrous dysplasia, aneurysmal bone cyst, chondromyxoid fibroma, giant cell tumor and osteoblastoma, were initially misdiagnosed as osteosarcoma. The remaining cases were referred for a second opinion to rule out sarcoma. Despite the presence of significant cytologic aberrations, none of our cases showed malignant behavior following simple curettage or removal of bony lesions. Our observation justifies the concept of pseudoanaplasia in some benign bone tumors as in benign soft tissue tumors, especially in their late evolutionary stage when bizarre cytologic alterations strongly mimic a sarcoma. (orig.)

  15. Vanishing tumor in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M V Vimal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient with microprolactinoma, who had two successful pregnancies, is described for management issues. First pregnancy was uneventful. During the second pregnancy, the tumor enlarged to macroprolactinoma with headache and blurring of vision which was managed successfully with bromocriptine. Post delivery, complete disappearance of the tumor was documented.

  16. Vanishing tumor in pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimal, M. V.; Budyal, Sweta; Kasliwal, Rajeev; Jagtap, Varsha S.; Lila, Anurag R.; Bandgar, Tushar; Menon, Padmavathy; Shah, Nalini S.

    2012-01-01

    A patient with microprolactinoma, who had two successful pregnancies, is described for management issues. First pregnancy was uneventful. During the second pregnancy, the tumor enlarged to macroprolactinoma with headache and blurring of vision which was managed successfully with bromocriptine. Post delivery, complete disappearance of the tumor was documented. PMID:23226664

  17. Glial tumors with neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chul-Kee; Phi, Ji Hoon; Park, Sung-Hye

    2015-01-01

    Immunohistochemical studies for neuronal differentiation in glial tumors revealed subsets of tumors having both characteristics of glial and neuronal lineages. Glial tumors with neuronal differentiation can be observed with diverse phenotypes and histologic grades. The rosette-forming glioneuronal tumor of the fourth ventricle and papillary glioneuronal tumor have been newly classified as distinct disease entities. There are other candidates for classification, such as the glioneuronal tumor without pseudopapillary architecture, glioneuronal tumor with neuropil-like islands, and the malignant glioneuronal tumor. The clinical significance of these previously unclassified tumors should be confirmed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tumorous interstitial lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinkel, E.; Meyer, E.; Mundinger, A.; Helwig, A.; Blum, U.; Wuertemberger, G.

    1990-01-01

    The radiological findings in pulmonary lymphangitic carcinomatosis and in leukemic pulmonary infiltrates mirror the tumor-dependent monomorphic interstitial pathology of lung parenchyma. It is a proven fact that pulmonary lymphangitic carcinomatosis is caused by hematogenous tumor embolization to the lungs; pathogenesis by contiguous lymphangitic spread is the exception. High-resolution CT performed as a supplement to the radiological work-up improves the sensitivity for pulmonary infiltrates in general and thus makes the differential diagnosis decided easier. Radiological criteria cannot discriminate the different forms of leukemia. Plain chest X-ray allows the diagnosis of pulmonary involvement in leukemia due to tumorous infiltrates and of tumor- or therapy-induced complications. It is essential that the radiological findings be interpreted with reference to the stage of tumor disease and the clinical parameters to make the radiological differential diagnosis of opportunistic infections more reliable. (orig.) [de

  19. Tumors of peripheral nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Michael; Lutz, Amelie M.

    2017-01-01

    Differentiation between malignant and benign tumors of peripheral nerves in the early stages is challenging; however, due to the unfavorable prognosis of malignant tumors early identification is required. To show the possibilities for detection, differential diagnosis and clinical management of peripheral nerve tumors by imaging appearance in magnetic resonance (MR) neurography. Review of current literature available in PubMed and MEDLINE, supplemented by the authors' own observations in clinical practice. Although not pathognomonic, several imaging features have been reported for a differentiation between distinct peripheral nerve tumors. The use of MR neurography enables detection and initial differential diagnosis in tumors of peripheral nerves. Furthermore, it plays an important role in clinical follow-up, targeted biopsy and surgical planning. (orig.) [de

  20. Wilm's tumor in adulthood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveev, B.P.; Bukharkin, B.V.; Gotsadze, D.T.

    1984-01-01

    Wilms' tumor occurs extremely rarely in adults. There is no consensus in the literature on the problems of clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of the diseasa. Ten adult patients (aged 16-29) with Wilms' tumor formed the study group. They made up 0.9 per cent of the total number of kidney tumor patients. The peculiarities of the clinical course that distinguish adult nephroblastoma from renal cancer and Wilms' tumor of the infancy were analysed. The latent period appeared to be long. Problems of diagnosis are discussed. Angiography proved to be of the highest diagnostic value. Complex treatment including transperitoneal nephrectory, radiation and chemotherapy was carried out in 7 cases, palliative radiation treatmenchemotherapy andn 3. Unlike pediatric nephroblastomt - i Wilms' tumor in adults was resistant to radiation. Treatment results still remained unsatisfactory: 6 patients died 7-19 months after the beginning of treatment

  1. Radiotherapy of pineal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danoff, B.; Sheline, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    Radiotherapy has universally been used in the treatment of pineal tumors and suprasellar germinomas. Recently however, major technical advances related to the use of the operating microscope and development of microsurgical techniques have prompted a renewed interest in the direct surgical approach for biopsy and/or excision. This interest has resulted in a controversy regarding the role of surgery prior to radiotherapy. Because of the heterogeneity of tumors occurring in the pineal region (i.e., germ cell tumors, pineal parenchymal tumors, glial tumors, and cysts) and their differing biological behavior, controversy also surrounds aspects of radiotherapy such as: the optimal radiation dose, the volume to be irradiated, and indications for prophylactic spinal irradiation. A review of the available data is presented in an attempt to answer these questions

  2. Parallel evolution of tumor subclones mimics diversity between tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Pierre; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Gerlinger, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) may foster tumor adaptation and compromise the efficacy of personalized medicines approaches. The scale of heterogeneity within a tumor (intratumor heterogeneity) relative to genetic differences between tumors (intertumor heterogeneity) is unknown. To address this, ...

  3. Clinical impact of anatomo-functional evaluation of brain function during brain tumor surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Atsushi; Yokoyama, Yohei; Takahashi, Jun; Hashimoto, Nobuo

    2009-01-01

    To attempt to improve surgical outcome of brain surgery, clinical significance of anatomo-functional evaluation of brain function during resection of brain tumors was assessed. Seventy four patients with glioma located near eloquent areas underwent surgery while awake. Intraoperative tractography-integrated functional neuronavigation and cortical/subcortical electrical stimulation were correlated with clinical symptoms during and after resection of tumors. Cortical functional areas were safely removed with negative electric stimulation and eloquent cortices could be removed in some circumstances. Subcortical functional mapping was difficult except for motor function. Studying cortical functional compensation allows more extensive removal of brain tumors located in the eloquent areas. (author)

  4. Growth hormone and prolactin radioimmunoassay in early diagnosis of pituitary tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gembicki, M.; Kosowicz, J.

    1978-01-01

    Results of prolactin and HGH determination in basal conditions and following stimulation tests in the group of 68 patients with pituitary or suprasellar tumors are presented. In acromegaly elevated level of HGH in fasting state, lack of supression after glucose loading and parodoxical drop of HGH after L-dopa administration were observed. In pituitary tumors without acromegaly determinations of HGH during insulin induced hypoglycemia revealed lack of HGH response to such stimulation in 25 cases which indicated hypopituitarism. In 10 cases elevated prolactin levels (48 - 1000 ng/ml) were observed, this indicates that some of so-called inactive tumors are in fact hormonally active. (author)

  5. A distributed current stimulator ASIC for high density neural stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong Hoan Park; Chaebin Kim; Seung-Hee Ahn; Tae Mok Gwon; Joonsoo Jeong; Sang Beom Jun; Sung June Kim

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a novel distributed neural stimulator scheme. Instead of a single stimulator ASIC in the package, multiple ASICs are embedded at each electrode site for stimulation with a high density electrode array. This distributed architecture enables the simplification of wiring between electrodes and stimulator ASIC that otherwise could become too complex as the number of electrode increases. The individual ASIC chip is designed to have a shared data bus that independently controls multiple stimulating channels. Therefore, the number of metal lines is determined by the distributed ASICs, not by the channel number. The function of current steering is also implemented within each ASIC in order to increase the effective number of channels via pseudo channel stimulation. Therefore, the chip area can be used more efficiently. The designed chip was fabricated with area of 0.3 mm2 using 0.18 μm BCDMOS process, and the bench-top test was also conducted to validate chip performance.

  6. Computationally Developed Sham Stimulation Protocol for Multichannel Desynchronizing Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magteld Zeitler

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A characteristic pattern of abnormal brain activity is abnormally strong neuronal synchronization, as found in several brain disorders, such as tinnitus, Parkinson's disease, and epilepsy. As observed in several diseases, different therapeutic interventions may induce a placebo effect that may be strong and hinder reliable clinical evaluations. Hence, to distinguish between specific, neuromodulation-induced effects and unspecific, placebo effects, it is important to mimic the therapeutic procedure as precisely as possibly, thereby providing controls that actually lack specific effects. Coordinated Reset (CR stimulation has been developed to specifically counteract abnormally strong synchronization by desynchronization. CR is a spatio-temporally patterned multichannel stimulation which reduces the extent of coincident neuronal activity and aims at an anti-kindling, i.e., an unlearning of both synaptic connectivity and neuronal synchrony. Apart from acute desynchronizing effects, CR may cause sustained, long-lasting desynchronizing effects, as already demonstrated in pre-clinical and clinical proof of concept studies. In this computational study, we set out to computationally develop a sham stimulation protocol for multichannel desynchronizing stimulation. To this end, we compare acute effects and long-lasting effects of six different spatio-temporally patterned stimulation protocols, including three variants of CR, using a no-stimulation condition as additional control. This is to provide an inventory of different stimulation algorithms with similar fundamental stimulation parameters (e.g., mean stimulation rates but qualitatively different acute and/or long-lasting effects. Stimulation protocols sharing basic parameters, but inducing nevertheless completely different or even no acute effects and/or after-effects, might serve as controls to validate the specific effects of particular desynchronizing protocols such as CR. In particular, based on

  7. Tumor control probability after a radiation of animal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urano, Muneyasu; Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko; Nesumi, Naofumi

    1975-01-01

    Tumor control and regrowth probability of animal tumors irradiated with a single x-ray dose were determined, using a spontaneous C3H mouse mammary carcinoma. Cellular radiation sensitivity of tumor cells and tumor control probability of the tumor were examined by the TD 50 and TCD 50 assays respectively. Tumor growth kinetics were measured by counting the percentage of labelled mitosis and by measuring the growth curve. A mathematical analysis of tumor control probability was made from these results. A formula proposed, accounted for cell population kinetics or division probability model, cell sensitivity to radiation and number of tumor cells. (auth.)

  8. The Tumor Macroenvironment: Cancer-Promoting Networks Beyond Tumor Beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, Melanie R; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R

    2015-01-01

    During tumor progression, alterations within the systemic tumor environment, or macroenvironment, result in the promotion of tumor growth, tumor invasion to distal organs, and eventual metastatic disease. Distally produced hormones, commensal microbiota residing within mucosal surfaces, myeloid cells and even the bone marrow impact the systemic immune system, tumor growth, and metastatic spread. Understanding the reciprocal interactions between the cells and soluble factors within the macroenvironment and the primary tumor will enable the design of specific therapies that have the potential to prevent dissemination and metastatic spread. This chapter will summarize recent findings detailing how the primary tumor and systemic tumor macroenvironment coordinate malignant progression. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Advances in Cancer Immunotherapy in Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smitha Menon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy is heralded as one of the most important advances in oncology. Until recently, only limited immunotherapeutic options were available in selected immunogenic cancers like melanoma and renal cell carcinomas. Nowadays, there is an improved understanding that anti-tumor immunity is controlled by a delicate balance in the tumor microenvironment between immune stimulatory and immune inhibitory pathways. Either by blocking the inhibitory pathways or stimulating the activating pathways that regulate cytotoxic lymphocytes, anti-tumor immunity can be enhanced leading to durable anti-tumor responses. Drugs which block the immune regulatory checkpoints namely the PD-1/PDL1 and CTLA 4 pathway have shown tremendous promise in a wide spectrum of solid and hematological malignancies, significantly improving overall survival in newly diagnosed and heavily pretreated patients alike. Hence there is renewed enthusiasm in the field of immune oncology with current research focused on augmenting responses to checkpoint inhibitors by combination therapy as well as studies looking at other immune modulators and adoptive T cell therapy. In this article, we highlight the key clinical advances and concepts in immunotherapy with particular emphasis on checkpoint inhibition as well as the future direction in this field.

  10. Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) / Microwave Ablation (MWA) of Lung Tumors ... and Microwave Ablation of Lung Tumors? What are Radiofrequency and Microwave Ablation of Lung Tumors? Radiofrequency ablation, ...

  11. The PCa Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sottnik, Joseph L; Zhang, Jian; Macoska, Jill A; Keller, Evan T

    2011-12-01

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) is a very complex niche that consists of multiple cell types, supportive matrix and soluble factors. Cells in the TME consist of both host cells that are present at tumor site at the onset of tumor growth and cells that are recruited in either response to tumor- or host-derived factors. PCa (PCa) thrives on crosstalk between tumor cells and the TME. Crosstalk results in an orchestrated evolution of both the tumor and microenvironment as the tumor progresses. The TME reacts to PCa-produced soluble factors as well as direct interaction with PCa cells. In return, the TME produces soluble factors, structural support and direct contact interactions that influence the establishment and progression of PCa. In this review, we focus on the host side of the equation to provide a foundation for understanding how different aspects of the TME contribute to PCa progression. We discuss immune effector cells, specialized niches, such as the vascular and bone marrow, and several key protein factors that mediate host effects on PCa. This discussion highlights the concept that the TME offers a potentially very fertile target for PCa therapy.

  12. Epilepsy and brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ENGLOT, DARIO J.; CHANG, EDWARD F.; VECHT, CHARLES J.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common in patients with brain tumors, and epilepsy can significantly impact patient quality of life. Therefore, a thorough understanding of rates and predictors of seizures, and the likelihood of seizure freedom after resection, is critical in the treatment of brain tumors. Among all tumor types, seizures are most common with glioneuronal tumors (70–80%), particularly in patients with frontotemporal or insular lesions. Seizures are also common in individuals with glioma, with the highest rates of epilepsy (60–75%) observed in patients with low-grade gliomas located in superficial cortical or insular regions. Approximately 20–50% of patients with meningioma and 20–35% of those with brain metastases also suffer from seizures. After tumor resection, approximately 60–90% are rendered seizure-free, with most favorable seizure outcomes seen in individuals with glioneuronal tumors. Gross total resection, earlier surgical therapy, and a lack of generalized seizures are common predictors of a favorable seizure outcome. With regard to anticonvulsant medication selection, evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of focal epilepsy should be followed, and individual patient factors should also be considered, including patient age, sex, organ dysfunction, comorbidity, or cotherapy. As concomitant chemotherapy commonly forms an essential part of glioma treatment, enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants should be avoided when possible. Seizure freedom is the ultimate goal in the treatment of brain tumor patients with epilepsy, given the adverse effects of seizures on quality of life. PMID:26948360

  13. CNS tumors: postoperative evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayanir, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Imaging assessment of brain tumors following surgery is complex and depends upon several factors, including the location of the tumor, the surgical procedure and the disease process for which it was performed. Depending upon these factors, one or a combination of complementary imaging modalities may be required to demonstrate any clinically relevant situation, to assist the surgeon in deciding if repeat surgery is necessary. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can show the shape, size, signal intensity, and enhancement of a brain tumor. It has been widely used to diagnose and differentiate brain tumors and to assess the surgery outcomes. Longitudinal MRI scans have also been applied for the assessment of treatment and response to surgery. The newly developed MRI techniques, including diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), have the potential to provide the molecular, functional and metabolic information of preoperative and postoperative brain tumors. Postoperative diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging are especially useful in predicting early functional recovery from new deficits after brain tumor surgery.This lecture will stress the principles, applications, and pitfalls of conventional as well as newly developing functional imaging techniques following operation of brain tumors

  14. Tumor cell surface proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, S.J.; Braslawsky, G.R.; Flynn, K.; Foote, L.J.; Friedman, E.; Hotchkiss, J.A.; Huang, A.H.L.; Lankford, P.K.

    1982-01-01

    Cell surface proteins mediate interaction between cells and their environment. Unique tumor cell surface proteins are being identified and quantified in several tumor systems to address the following questions: (i) how do tumor-specific proteins arise during cell transformation; (ii) can these proteins be used as markers of tumor cell distribution in vivo; (iii) can cytotoxic drugs be targeted specifically to tumor cells using antibody; and (iv) can solid state radioimmunoassay of these proteins provide a means to quantify transformation frequencies. A tumor surface protein of 180,000 M/sub r/ (TSP-180) has been identified on cells of several lung carcinomas of BALB/c mice. TSP-180 was not detected on normal lung tissue, embryonic tissue, or other epithelial or sarcoma tumors, but it was found on lung carcinomas of other strains of mice. Considerable amino acid sequence homology exists among TSP-180's from several cell sources, indicating that TSP-180 synthesis is directed by normal cellular genes although it is not expressed in normal cells. The regulation of synthesis of TSP-180 and its relationship to normal cell surface proteins are being studied. Monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to TSP-180 have been developed. The antibodies have been used in immunoaffinity chromatography to isolate TSP-180 from tumor cell sources. This purified tumor antigen was used to immunize rats. Antibody produced by these animals reacted at different sites (epitopes) on the TSP-180 molecule than did the original MoAb. These sera and MoAb from these animals are being used to identify normal cell components related to the TSP-180 molecule

  15. Central nervous system tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavin, P.R.; Fike, J.R.; Hoopes, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) tumors are relatively common in veterinary medicine, with most diagnoses occurring in the canine and feline species. Numerous tumor types from various cells or origins have been identified with the most common tumors being meningiomas and glial cell tumors. Radiation therapy is often used as an aid to control the clinical signs associated with these neoplasms. In general, these tumors have a very low metastatic potential, such that local control offers substantial benefit. Experience in veterinary radiation oncology would indicate that many patients benefit from radiation treatment. Current practice indicates the need for computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging studies. These highly beneficial studies are used for diagnosis, treatment planning, and to monitor treatment response. Improvements in treatment planning and radiation delivered to the tumor, while sparing the normal tissues, should improve local control and decrease potential radiation related problems to the CNS. When possible, multiple fractions of 3 Gy or less should be used. The tolerance dose to the normal tissue with this fractionation schedule is 50 to 55 Gy. The most common and serious complications of radiation for CNS tumors is delayed radiation myelopathy and necrosis. Medical management of the patient during radiation therapy requires careful attention to anesthetic protocols, and medications to reduce intracranial pressure that is often elevated in these patients. Canine brain tumors have served as an experimental model to test numerous new treatments. Increased availability of advanced imaging modalities has spawned increased detection of these neoplasms. Early detection of these tumors with appropriate aggressive therapy should prove beneficial to many patients

  16. Constitutive Signaling from an Engineered IL7 Receptor Promotes Durable Tumor Elimination by Tumor-Redirected T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, Thomas; Omer, Bilal; Tashiro, Haruko; Kruse, Robert L; Wagner, Dimitrios L; Parikh, Kathan; Yi, Zhongzhen; Sauer, Tim; Liu, Daofeng; Parihar, Robin; Castillo, Paul; Liu, Hao; Brenner, Malcolm K; Metelitsa, Leonid S; Gottschalk, Stephen; Rooney, Cliona M

    2017-11-01

    Successful adoptive T-cell immunotherapy of solid tumors will require improved expansion and cytotoxicity of tumor-directed T cells within tumors. Providing recombinant or transgenic cytokines may produce the desired benefits but is associated with significant toxicities, constraining clinical use. To circumvent this limitation, we constructed a constitutively signaling cytokine receptor, C7R, which potently triggers the IL7 signaling axis but is unresponsive to extracellular cytokine. This strategy augments modified T-cell function following antigen exposure, but avoids stimulating bystander lymphocytes. Coexpressing the C7R with a tumor-directed chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) increased T-cell proliferation, survival, and antitumor activity during repeated exposure to tumor cells, without T-cell dysfunction or autonomous T-cell growth. Furthermore, C7R-coexpressing CAR T cells were active against metastatic neuroblastoma and orthotopic glioblastoma xenograft models even at cell doses that had been ineffective without C7R support. C7R may thus be able to enhance antigen-specific T-cell therapies against cancer. Significance: The constitutively signaling C7R system developed here delivers potent IL7 stimulation to CAR T cells, increasing their persistence and antitumor activity against multiple preclinical tumor models, supporting its clinical development. Cancer Discov; 7(11); 1238-47. ©2017 AACR. This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 1201 . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Stimulated Thomson scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, R.L.

    1979-03-01

    The theory of stimulated Thomson scattering is investigated both quantum mechanically and classically. Two monochromatic electromagnetic waves of like polarization travelling in opposite directions are allowed to interact for a time tau with the electrons in a collisionless plasma. The electromagnetic waves have frequencies well above the plasma frequency, and their difference frequency is allowed to range upward from the plasma frequency. With the difference frequency well above the plasma frequency, the rate at which energy is transferred from one wave to the other is calculated quantum mechanically, classically from a fluid theory, and classically from an independent electron theory. The rate is calculated in both the homogeneously broadened limit, and in the inhomogeneously broadened limit

  18. Engagement sensitive visual stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Early detection during golden hour and treatment of individual neurological dysfunction in stroke using easy-to-access biomarkers based on a simple-to-use, cost-effective, clinically-valid screening tool can bring a paradigm shift in healthcare, both urban and rural. In our research we have designed a quantitative automatic home-based oculomotor assessment tool that can play an important complementary role in prognosis of neurological disorders like stroke for the neurologist. Once the patient has been screened for stroke, the next step is to design proper rehabilitation platform to alleviate the disability. In addition to the screening platform, in our research, we work in designing virtual reality based rehabilitation exercise platform that has the potential to deliver visual stimulation and in turn contribute to improving one’s performance.

  19. Stochastic models for tumoral growth

    OpenAIRE

    Escudero, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    Strong experimental evidence has indicated that tumor growth belongs to the molecular beam epitaxy universality class. This type of growth is characterized by the constraint of cell proliferation to the tumor border, and surface diffusion of cells at the growing edge. Tumor growth is thus conceived as a competition for space between the tumor and the host, and cell diffusion at the tumor border is an optimal strategy adopted for minimizing the pressure and helping tumor development. Two stoch...

  20. Stimulated coherent transition radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung-chi Lihn.

    1996-03-01

    Coherent radiation emitted from a relativistic electron bunch consists of wavelengths longer than or comparable to the bunch length. The intensity of this radiation out-numbers that of its incoherent counterpart, which extends to wavelengths shorter than the bunch length, by a factor equal to the number of electrons in the bunch. In typical accelerators, this factor is about 8 to 11 orders of magnitude. The spectrum of the coherent radiation is determined by the Fourier transform of the electron bunch distribution and, therefore, contains information of the bunch distribution. Coherent transition radiation emitted from subpicosecond electron bunches at the Stanford SUNSHINE facility is observed in the far-infrared regime through a room-temperature pyroelectric bolometer and characterized through the electron bunch-length study. To measure the bunch length, a new frequency-resolved subpicosecond bunch-length measuring system is developed. This system uses a far-infrared Michelson interferometer to measure the spectrum of coherent transition radiation through optical autocorrelation with resolution far better than existing time-resolved methods. Hence, the radiation spectrum and the bunch length are deduced from the autocorrelation measurement. To study the stimulation of coherent transition radiation, a special cavity named BRAICER is invented. Far-infrared light pulses of coherent transition radiation emitted from electron bunches are delayed and circulated in the cavity to coincide with subsequent incoming electron bunches. This coincidence of light pulses with electron bunches enables the light to do work on electrons, and thus stimulates more radiated energy. The possibilities of extending the bunch-length measuring system to measure the three-dimensional bunch distribution and making the BRAICER cavity a broadband, high-intensity, coherent, far-infrared light source are also discussed

  1. Uterine mesenchymal tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil A Sangle

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Uterine mesenchymal tumors are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that can frequently be diagnostically challenging. Differentiation between the benign and malignant counterparts of mesenchymal tumors is significant due to differences in clinical outcome, and the role of the surgical pathologist in making this distinction (especially in the difficult cases cannot be underestimated. Although immunohistochemical stains are supportive toward establishing a final diagnosis, the morphologic features trump all the other ancillary techniques for this group of neoplasms. This review therefore emphasizes the key morphologic features required to diagnose and distinguish uterine mesenchymal tumors from their mimics, with a brief description of the relevant immunohistochemical features.

  2. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenny, P.A.; Lee, G.Y.; Bissell, M.J.

    2006-11-07

    Despite some notable successes cancer remains, for the most part, a seemingly intractable problem. There is, however, a growing appreciation that targeting the tumor epithelium in isolation is not sufficient as there is an intricate mutually sustaining synergy between the tumor epithelial cells and their surrounding stroma. As the details of this dialogue emerge, new therapeutic targets have been proposed. The FDA has already approved drugs targeting microenvironmental components such as VEGF and aromatase and many more agents are in the pipeline. In this article, we describe some of the 'druggable' targets and processes within the tumor microenvironment and review the approaches being taken to disrupt these interactions.

  3. Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Neutrophils in Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehong Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Distinct tumor microenvironment forms in each progression step of cancer and has diverse capacities to induce both adverse and beneficial consequences for tumorigenesis. It is now known that immune cells can be activated to favor tumor growth and progression, most probably influenced by the tumor microenvironment. Tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils can exert protumoral functions, enhancing tumor cell invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, and extracellular matrix remodeling, while inhibiting the antitumoral immune surveillance. Considering that neutrophils in inflammatory environments recruit macrophages and that recruited macrophages affect neutrophil functions, there may be various degrees of interaction between tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. Platelets also play an important role in the recruitment and regulation of monocytic and granulocytic cells in the tumor tissues, suggesting that platelet function may be essential for generation of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. In this review, we will explore the biology of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils and their possible interactions in the tumor microenvironment. Special attention will be given to the recruitment and activation of these tumor-associated cells and to the roles they play in maintenance of the tumor microenvironment and progression of tumors.

  4. Improvement of Antitumor Therapies Based on Vaccines and Immune-Checkpoint Inhibitors by Counteracting Tumor-Immunostimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Chiarella

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune-checkpoint inhibitors and antitumor vaccines may produce both tumor-inhibitory and tumor-stimulatory effects on growing tumors depending on the stage of tumor growth at which treatment is initiated. These paradoxical results are not necessarily incompatible with current tumor immunology but they might better be explained assuming the involvement of the phenomenon of tumor immunostimulation. This phenomenon was originally postulated on the basis that the immune response (IR evoked in Winn tests by strong chemical murine tumors was not linear but biphasic, with strong IR producing inhibition and weak IR inducing stimulation of tumor growth. Herein, we extended those former observations to weak spontaneous murine tumors growing in pre-immunized, immune-competent and immune-depressed mice. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the interaction of specifical T cells and target tumor cells at low stimulatory ratios enhanced the production of chemokines aimed to recruit macrophages at the tumor site, which, upon activation of toll-like receptor 4 and p38 signaling pathways, would recruit and activate more macrophages and other inflammatory cells which would produce growth-stimulating signals leading to an accelerated tumor growth. On this basis, the paradoxical effects achieved by immunological therapies on growing tumors could be explained depending upon where the therapy-induced IR stands on the biphasic IR curve at each stage of tumor growth. At stages where tumor growth was enhanced (medium and large-sized tumors, counteraction of the tumor-immunostimulatory effect with anti-inflammatory strategies or, more efficiently, with selective inhibitors of p38 signaling pathways enabled the otherwise tumor-promoting immunological strategies to produce significant inhibition of tumor growth.

  5. An Effective Approach for Immunotherapy Using Irradiated Tumor Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafa, D.M.B.

    2011-01-01

    This study has been aimed to investigate the effect of injection of Irradiated Ehrlich tumor cells alone or concurrent with immunomodulator in mice before and after challenge with viable Ehrlich tumor cells for enhancement of immune system. This study includes the estimation of survival, tumor size, lymphocyte count, LDH, MTT, granzyme B, and DNA fragmentation. In order to fulfill the target of this study, a total of 120 female swiss albino mice were used. They were divided into two classes vaccinated (injection of vaccine before challenge) and therapeutic class (injection of vaccine after challenge). Each class was divided into four groups, group (1) mice injected with viable Ehrlich tumor cells (G1), group (2) mice injected with irradiated tumor cells (G2), group (3) mice injected with immunomodulator (G3), and group (4) mice injected with irradiated tumor cells + immunomodulator (G4). Results obtained from this study demonstrated that, the lymphocyte count and granzyme B activity were increased in both the vaccinated and therapeutic classes compared with control group. LDH activity was decreased in all groups of vaccinated class and also in G2 and G4 groups of therapeutic class compared with control group. There was a significant increase in percent apoptosis of tumor cells cultured with spleenocytes of the groups of vaccinated class as compared with control group. Cellular DNA from Ehrlich tumor cell line cultured with spleenocytes of immunized groups was fragmented into discrete bands of approximate multiples of 200 bp. Revealing significant apoptosis in tumor cells due to vaccination. It is concluded that, vaccination with irradiated tumor cells is an effective approach in stimulation of immune system against viable tumor cells.

  6. Benign Liver Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now Benign Liver Tumors Back ...

  7. Overview of Heart Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors By Siddique A. Abbasi, MD, MSc, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University; Attending Cardiologist, Director of Heart Failure, and Director of Cardiac MRI, Providence VA Medical ...

  8. Renal tumors in infancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucaya, J.; Garcia, P.

    1997-01-01

    The classification of childhood renal masses in updated, including the clinical signs and imaging techniques currently employed to confirm their presence and type them. Several bening and malignant childhood tumors are described in substantial detail. (Author) 24 refs

  9. Radioimmunoassays for tumor diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dressler, J.

    1983-01-01

    Aside from imaging techniques several (radio-)immunological analyses are used for tumor diagnosis. Oncofetal antigens, for instance the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), have become the most important substances for many malignancies. However, nearly all of the so-called tumor markers are not suitable for early diagnosis or screening either because of low sensitivity or low tumor specifity. On the other hand follow-up measurements give a very sensitive index of the success of treatment and may indicate tumor progression when other signs are still not present. In some carcinomas and under some clinical circumstances tumorspecific markers are available and mandatory for detection and/or staging: AFP in hepatoma, acid phosphatase in metastasizing carcinoma of the prostate and serum thyreoglobulin in differentiated thyroid cancer. (orig.) [de

  10. GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMOR (GIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi eTornillo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are the most frequent mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The discovery that these tumors, formerly thought of smooth muscle origin, are indeed better characterized by specific activating mutation in genes coding for the receptor tyrosine kinases CKIT and PDGFRA and that these mutations are strongly predictive for the response to targeted therapy with receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors has made GISTs the typical example of the integration of basic molecular knowledge in the daily clinical activity. The information on the mutational status of these tumors is essential to predict (and subsequently to plan the therapy. As resistant cases are frequently wild-type, other possible oncogenic events, defining other entities, have been discovered (e.g. succinil dehydrogenase mutation/dysregulation, insuline growth factor expression, mutations in the RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway. The classification of disease must nowadays rely on the integration of the clinico-morphological characteristics with the molecular data.

  11. Allogeneic tumor cell vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivatsan, Sanjay; Patel, Jaina M; Bozeman, Erica N; Imasuen, Imade E; He, Sara; Daniels, Danielle; Selvaraj, Periasamy

    2014-01-01

    The high mortality rate associated with cancer and its resistance to conventional treatments such as radiation and chemotherapy has led to the investigation of a variety of anti-cancer immunotherapies. The development of novel immunotherapies has been bolstered by the discovery of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), through gene sequencing and proteomics. One such immunotherapy employs established allogeneic human cancer cell lines to induce antitumor immunity in patients through TAA presentation. Allogeneic cancer immunotherapies are desirable in a clinical setting due to their ease of production and availability. This review aims to summarize clinical trials of allogeneic tumor immunotherapies in various cancer types. To date, clinical trials have shown limited success due potentially to extensive degrees of inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity found among cancer patients. However, these clinical results provide guidance for the rational design and creation of more effective allogeneic tumor immunotherapies for use as monotherapies or in combination with other therapies. PMID:24064957

  12. Multiple Primary Tumors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-05

    Dec 5, 2017 ... Multiple primary tumors occur in clinical practice causing diagnostic dilemma. It is not very .... was estrogen receptor negative, progesterone receptor negative, and ... cervical, ovarian, and urinary bladder cancers. Multiple.

  13. Pituitary Tumors: Condition Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones. They can press on or damage the pituitary gland and prevent it from secreting adequate levels of hormones. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. (2010). NINDS pituitary tumors information page . ...

  14. Specifically activated memory T cell subsets from cancer patients recognize and reject xenotransplanted autologous tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckhove, Philipp; Feuerer, Markus; Dolenc, Mathias; Schuetz, Florian; Choi, Carmen; Sommerfeldt, Nora; Schwendemann, Jochen; Ehlert, Katrin; Altevogt, Peter; Bastert, Gunther; Schirrmacher, Volker; Umansky, Viktor

    2004-01-01

    Bone marrow of breast cancer patients was found to contain CD8+ T cells specific for peptides derived from breast cancer–associated proteins MUC1 and Her-2/neu. Most of these cells had a central or effector memory phenotype (CD45RA–CD62L+ or CD45RA–CD62L–, respectively). To test their in vivo function, we separated bone marrow–derived CD45RA+ naive or CD45RA–CD45RO+ memory T cells, stimulated them with autologous dendritic cells pulsed with tumor lysate, and transferred them into NOD/SCID mice bearing autologous breast tumors and normal skin transplants. CD45RA– memory but not CD45RA+ naive T cells infiltrated autologous tumor but not skin tissues after the transfer. These tumor-infiltrating cells had a central or effector memory phenotype and produced perforin. Many of them expressed the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 and were found around P-selectin+ tumor endothelium. Tumor infiltration included cluster formation in tumor tissue by memory T cells with cotransferred dendritic cells. It was associated with the induction of tumor cell apoptosis and significant tumor reduction. We thus demonstrate selective homing of memory T cells to human tumors and suggest that tumor rejection is based on the recognition of tumor-associated antigens on tumor cells and dendritic cells by autologous specifically activated central and effector memory T cells. PMID:15232613

  15. Ultrasound stimulation on bone healing. The optimization of stimulation time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosim, R.C.; Paulin, J.B.P.; Goncalves, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    Previous works in ultrasonic simulation of bone healing dealt with parameters optimization. Albertin (1983) studied the stimulation time and found forty minutes as ideal. However, this stimulation time was the largest one employed and remained some doubt about the most appropriated value. 30, 40, 50 and 60 minutes of stimulation time were selected, while others parameters were held constant with: pulse width in 200 μs, repetition rate in 1000 pulses per second and amplitude in 30 V. Partial incomplete transverse osteotomies were done in the middle third of radio in the right forearm of rabbits. Twenty four animals divided in four subgroups, with 6 animals each were stimulated. The daily stimulation time for each subgroup was 30, 40, 50 and minutes respectively, during 15 consecutive days. The stimulation procedure started 24 hours after surgery. After the stimulation period, radiological, histological and morphometric evaluations were done and greater bone healing was found for the 50 minutes stimulation subgroup, in them new bone was also prominent. (author)

  16. Cancer drug troglitazone stimulates the growth and response of renal cells to hypoxia inducible factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taub, Mary, E-mail: biochtau@buffalo.edu

    2016-03-11

    Troglitazone has been used to suppress the growth of a number of tumors through apoptosis and autophagy. However, previous in vitro studies have employed very high concentrations of troglitazone (≥10{sup −5} M) in order to elicit growth inhibitory effects. In this report, when employing lower concentrations of troglitazone in defined medium, troglitazone was observed to stimulate the growth of primary renal proximal tubule (RPT) cells. Rosiglitazone, like troglitazone, is a thiazolidinedione (TZD) that is known to activate Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Υ (PPARΥ). Notably, rosiglitazone also stimulates RPT cell growth, as does Υ-linolenic acids, another PPARΥ agonist. The PPARΥ antagonist GW9662 inhibited the growth stimulatory effect of troglitazone. In addition, troglitazone stimulated transcription by a PPAR Response Element/Luciferase construct. These results are consistent with the involvement of PPARΥ as a mediator of the growth stimulatory effect of troglitazone. In a number of tumor cells, the expression of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) is increased, promoting the expression of HIF inducible genes, and vascularization. Troglitazone was observed to stimulate transcription by a HIF/luciferase construct. These observations indicate that troglitazone not only promotes growth, also the survival of RPT cells under conditions of hypoxia. - Highlights: • Troglitazone and rosiglitazone stimulate renal proximal tubule cell growth. • Troglitazone and linolenic acid stimulate growth via PPARϒ. • Linolenic acid stimulates growth in the presence of fatty acid free serum albumin. • Rosiglitazone stimulates transcription by a HRE luciferase construct.

  17. Cancer drug troglitazone stimulates the growth and response of renal cells to hypoxia inducible factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taub, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Troglitazone has been used to suppress the growth of a number of tumors through apoptosis and autophagy. However, previous in vitro studies have employed very high concentrations of troglitazone (≥10"−"5 M) in order to elicit growth inhibitory effects. In this report, when employing lower concentrations of troglitazone in defined medium, troglitazone was observed to stimulate the growth of primary renal proximal tubule (RPT) cells. Rosiglitazone, like troglitazone, is a thiazolidinedione (TZD) that is known to activate Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Υ (PPARΥ). Notably, rosiglitazone also stimulates RPT cell growth, as does Υ-linolenic acids, another PPARΥ agonist. The PPARΥ antagonist GW9662 inhibited the growth stimulatory effect of troglitazone. In addition, troglitazone stimulated transcription by a PPAR Response Element/Luciferase construct. These results are consistent with the involvement of PPARΥ as a mediator of the growth stimulatory effect of troglitazone. In a number of tumor cells, the expression of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) is increased, promoting the expression of HIF inducible genes, and vascularization. Troglitazone was observed to stimulate transcription by a HIF/luciferase construct. These observations indicate that troglitazone not only promotes growth, also the survival of RPT cells under conditions of hypoxia. - Highlights: • Troglitazone and rosiglitazone stimulate renal proximal tubule cell growth. • Troglitazone and linolenic acid stimulate growth via PPARϒ. • Linolenic acid stimulates growth in the presence of fatty acid free serum albumin. • Rosiglitazone stimulates transcription by a HRE luciferase construct.

  18. Antibody tumor penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have proven to be effective agents in cancer imaging and therapy. One of the major challenges still facing the field is the heterogeneous distribution of these agents in tumors when administered systemically. Large regions of untargeted cells can therefore escape therapy and potentially select for more resistant cells. We present here a summary of theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze and improve antibody penetration in tumor tissue. PMID:18541331

  19. Pituitary tumors containing cholecystokinin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, J F; Lindholm, J; Andersen, B N

    1987-01-01

    We found small amounts of cholecystokinin in the normal human adenohypophysis and therefore examined pituitary tumors from 87 patients with acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome, prolactinoma, or inactive pituitary adenomas. Five adenomas associated with Nelson's syndrome contained......'s disease and 7 acromegaly with adenomas containing ACTH. The cholecystokinin peptides from the tumors were smaller and less sulfated than cholecystokinin from normal pituitary glands. We conclude that ACTH-producing pituitary cells may also produce an altered form of cholecystokinin....

  20. Perlecan and tumor angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Xinnong; Couchman, John R

    2003-01-01

    Perlecan is a major heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) of basement membranes (BMs) and connective tissues. The core protein of perlecan is divided into five domains based on sequence homology to other known proteins. Commonly, the N-terminal domain I of mammalian perlecan is substituted with thr...... have unwanted promoting effects on tumor cell proliferation and tumor angiogenesis. Understanding of these attributes at the molecular level may offer opportunities for therapeutic intervention....

  1. Adrenocortical tumors in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C. Ribeiro

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Childhood adrenocortical tumors (ACT are rare. In the USA, only about 25 new cases occur each year. In Southern Brazil, however, approximately 10 times that many cases are diagnosed each year. Most cases occur in the contiguous states of São Paulo and Paraná. The cause of this higher rate has not been identified. Familial genetic predisposition to cancer (p53 mutations and selected genetic syndromes (Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome have been associated with childhood ACT in general but not with the Brazilian counterpart. Most of the affected children are young girls with classic endocrine syndromes (virilizing and/or Cushing. Levels of urinary 17-ketosteroids and plasma dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S, which are abnormal in approximately 90% of the cases, provide the pivotal clue to a diagnosis of ACT. Typical imaging findings of pediatric ACT consist of a large, well-defined suprarenal tumor containing calcifications with a thin capsule and central necrosis or hemorrhage. The pathologic classification of pediatric ACT is troublesome. Even an experienced pathologist can find it difficult to differentiate carcinoma from adenoma. Surgery is the single most important procedure in the successful treatment of ACT. The role of chemotherapy in the management of childhood ACT has not been established although occasional tumors are responsive to mitotane or cisplatin-containing regimens. Because of the heterogeneity and rarity of the disease, prognostic factors have been difficult to establish in pediatric ACT. Patients with incomplete tumor resection or with metastatic disease at diagnosis have a dismal prognosis. In patients with localized and completely resected tumors, the size of the tumor has predictive value. Patients with large tumors have a much higher relapse rate than those with small tumors.

  2. A study for radiation-related tumor microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Young Sook; Hong, Seok Il; Kim, Young Soon; Jin Yong Jae; Lee, Tae Hee; Chung, Eun Kyung; Yi, Jae Yeun; Park, Myung Jin; Kim, Yun Young; Kang, Sin Keun

    1999-04-01

    In this study, we attempted to elucidate the mechanism involved in radiation-induced modification and changes of biological factors and physicochemical factors of tumor microenvironment and develop techniques and agents for the modification of tumor microenvironment which is favorable for efficient radio-cancer therapy based on our basic study. We established in vitro tumor invasion and angiogenesis model, elucidated the importance of MMPs activation and the MMPs/TIMPs complex in the invasive transition of tumor. Furthermore we showed the signaling pathway for MMPs induction through EGF receptor and TGF beta 1 stimulated E-M transition. We also established primary culture of human endothelial cells and tubule forming condition which is utilized for the detection of novel angiogenic factors. We also identified hypoxia induced signaling pathway and showed that GBE improved blood perfusion which may increase the effectiveness of radio-cancer therapy

  3. A study for radiation-related tumor microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Young Sook; Hong, Seok Il; Kim, Young Soon; Jin Yong Jae; Lee, Tae Hee; Chung, Eun Kyung; Yi, Jae Yeun; Park, Myung Jin; Kim, Yun Young; Kang, Sin Keun

    1999-04-01

    In this study, we attempted to elucidate the mechanism involved in radiation-induced modification and changes of biological factors and physicochemical factors of tumor microenvironment and develop techniques and agents for the modification of tumor microenvironment which is favorable for efficient radio-cancer therapy based on our basic study. We established in vitro tumor invasion and angiogenesis model, elucidated the importance of MMPs activation and the MMPs/TIMPs complex in the invasive transition of tumor. Furthermore we showed the signaling pathway for MMPs induction through EGF receptor and TGF beta 1 stimulated E-M transition. We also established primary culture of human endothelial cells and tubule forming condition which is utilized for the detection of novel angiogenic factors. We also identified hypoxia induced signaling pathway and showed that GBE improved blood perfusion which may increase the effectiveness of radio-cancer therapy.

  4. Neuroendocrine tumors and smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Miličević

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine cells are dispersed around the body and can be found within the gastrointestinal system, lungs, larynx, thymus, thyroid, adrenal, gonads, skin and other tissues. These cells form the so-called ''diffuse neuroendocrine system'' and tumors arising from them are defined as neuroendocrine tumors (NETs. The traditional classification of NETs based on their embryonic origin includes foregut tumors (lung, thymus, stomach, pancreas and duodenum, midgut tumors (beyond the ligament of Treitz of the duodenum to the proximal transverse colon and hindgut tumors (distal colon and rectum. NETs at each site are biologically and clinically distinct from their counterparts at other sites. Symptoms in patients with early disease are often insidious in onset, leading to a delay in diagnosis. The majority of these tumors are thus diagnosed at a stage at which the only curative treatment, radical surgical intervention, is no longer an option. Due to the increasing incidence and mortality, many studies have been conducted in order to identify risk factors for the development of NETs. Still, little is known especially when it comes to preventable risk factors such as smoking. This review will focus on smoking and its contribution to the development of different subtypes of NETs.

  5. Transcranial brain stimulation: closing the loop between brain and stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karabanov, Anke; Thielscher, Axel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2016-01-01

    -related and state-related variability. Fluctuations in brain-states can be traced online with functional brain imaging and inform the timing or other settings of transcranial brain stimulation. State-informed open-loop stimulation is aligned to the expression of a predefined brain state, according to prespecified......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To discuss recent strategies for boosting the efficacy of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation to improve human brain function. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent research exposed substantial intra- and inter-individual variability in response to plasticity-inducing transcranial brain...... stimulation. Trait-related and state-related determinants contribute to this variability, challenging the standard approach to apply stimulation in a rigid, one-size-fits-all fashion. Several strategies have been identified to reduce variability and maximize the plasticity-inducing effects of noninvasive...

  6. Cish actively silences TCR signaling in CD8+ T cells to maintain tumor tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Douglas C; Guittard, Geoffrey C; Franco, Zulmarie; Crompton, Joseph G; Eil, Robert L; Patel, Shashank J; Ji, Yun; Van Panhuys, Nicholas; Klebanoff, Christopher A; Sukumar, Madhusudhanan; Clever, David; Chichura, Anna; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Varma, Rajat; Wang, Ena; Gattinoni, Luca; Marincola, Francesco M; Balagopalan, Lakshmi; Samelson, Lawrence E; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2015-11-16

    Improving the functional avidity of effector T cells is critical in overcoming inhibitory factors within the tumor microenvironment and eliciting tumor regression. We have found that Cish, a member of the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family, is induced by TCR stimulation in CD8(+) T cells and inhibits their functional avidity against tumors. Genetic deletion of Cish in CD8(+) T cells enhances their expansion, functional avidity, and cytokine polyfunctionality, resulting in pronounced and durable regression of established tumors. Although Cish is commonly thought to block STAT5 activation, we found that the primary molecular basis of Cish suppression is through inhibition of TCR signaling. Cish physically interacts with the TCR intermediate PLC-γ1, targeting it for proteasomal degradation after TCR stimulation. These findings establish a novel targetable interaction that regulates the functional avidity of tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells and can be manipulated to improve adoptive cancer immunotherapy.

  7. Silent pituitary macroadenoma co-secreting growth hormone and thyroid stimulating hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Orhan; Ertorer, M Eda; Aydin, M Volkan; Erdogan, Bulent; Altinors, Nur; Zorludemir, Suzan; Guvener, Nilgun

    2005-04-01

    Silent pituitary adenomas are a group of tumors showing heterogenous morphological features with no hormonal function observed clinically. To date no explanation has been provided as to why these tumors remain "silent". We report a case of a silent macroadenoma with both growth hormone (GH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) staining and secretion but with no clinical manifestations, in particular, the absence of features of acromegaly or hyperthyroidism. The relevant literature is reviewed.

  8. Highly Expressed Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) and Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Receptor (G-CSFR) in Human Gastric Cancer Leads to Poor Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhisong; Li, Yong; Zhao, Qun; Fan, Liqiao; Tan, Bibo; Zuo, Jing; Hua, Kelei; Ji, Qiang

    2018-03-23

    BACKGROUND Chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer (GC) patients has been the mainstay of therapy for many years. Although adding anti-angiogenic drugs to chemotherapy improves patient survival slightly, identifying anti-angiogenic therapy-sensitive patients remains challenging for oncologists. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis, which can be minimized with the anti-G-CSF antibody. Thus, G-CSF might be a potential tumor marker. However, the effects of G-CSF and G-CSFR expression on GC patient survival remain unclear. MATERIAL AND METHODS Seventy GC tissue samples were collected for G-CSF and G-CSFR detection by immunohistochemistry. A total of 40 paired GC tissues and matched adjacent mucosa were used to measure the G-CSF and G-CSFR levels by ELISA. Correlations between G-CSF/G-CSFR and clinical characteristics, VEGF-A levels and overall survival were analyzed. Biological function and underlying mechanistic investigations were carried out using SGC7901 cell lines, and the effects of G-CSF on tumor proliferation, migration, and tube formation were examined. RESULTS The levels of G-CSFR were upregulated in GC tissues compared to normal mucosa tissues. Higher G-CSF expression was associated with later tumor stages and higher tumor VEGF-A and serum CA724 levels, whereas higher G-CSFR expression was associated with lymph node metastasis. Patients with higher G-CSF expression had shorter overall survival times. In vitro, G-CSF stimulated SGC7901 proliferation and migration through the JAK2/STAT3 pathway and accelerated HUVEC tube formation. CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that increased G-CSF and G-CSFR in tumors leads to unfavorable outcomes for GC patients by stimulating tumor proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis, indicating that these factors are potential tumor targets for cancer treatment.

  9. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates tumor angiogenesis of human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunamura, Makoto; Duda, Dan G; Ghattas, Maivel H; Lozonschi, Lucian; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Yamauchi, Jun-Ichiro; Matsuno, Seiki; Shibahara, Shigeki; Abraham, Nader G

    2003-01-01

    Angiogenesis is necessary for the continued growth of solid tumors, invasion and metastasis. Several studies clearly showed that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in angiogenesis. In this study, we used the vital microscope system, transparent skinfold model, lung colonization model and transduced pancreatic cancer cell line (Panc-1)/human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) cells, to precisely analyze, for the first time, the effect of hHO-1 gene on tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Our results revealed that HO-1 stimulates angiogenesis of pancreatic carcinoma in severe combined immune deficient mice. Overexpression of human hHO-1 after its retroviral transfer into Panc-1 cells did not interfere with tumor growth in vitro. While in vivo the development of tumors was accelerated upon transfection with hHO-1. On the other hand, inhibition of heme oxygenase (HO) activity by stannous mesoporphyrin was able transiently to delay tumor growth in a dose dependent manner. Tumor angiogenesis was markedly increased in Panc-1/hHO-1 compared to mock transfected and wild type. Lectin staining and Ki-67 proliferation index confirmed these results. In addition hHO-1 stimulated in vitro tumor angiogenesis and increased endothelial cell survival. In a lung colonization model, overexpression of hHO-1 increased the occurrence of metastasis, while inhibition of HO activity by stannous mesoporphyrin completely inhibited the occurrence of metastasis. In conclusion, overexpression of HO-1 genes potentiates pancreatic cancer aggressiveness, by increasing tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis and that the inhibition of the HO system may be of useful benefit for the future treatment of the disease.

  10. EOR by stimulated microflora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svarovskaya, L.I.; Altunina, L.K.; Rozhenkova, Z.A.; Bulavin, V.D. [Institute of Petroleum Chemistry, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    A combined microbiological and physico-chemical method for EOR has been developed for flooded West Siberia oil fields with formation temperature of 45{degrees}-95{degrees}C (318-365K). Formation water includes rich and various biocenoses numbering up to 2 x 10{sup 7} cells per ml. Representatives of genera, i.e, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Actinomyces, Micrococcus, Mycobacterium, Sarcina, etc. were found to be the most widely distributed microorganisms. The method is based on injection of systems exhibiting high oil displacing capacity and at the same time being an additional nitrous nutrient for endemic populations of microorganisms. Their injection into formation water favors biomass growth by 4-6 orders and promotes syntheses of biosurfactants, biopolymers, acids, etc., and gaseous products. The features of residual oil displacement have been studied on laboratory models using a combined microbiological and physico-chemical method. A curve for the yield of residual oil is presented by two peaks. The first peak is stipulated by the washing action of oil displacement system, and the second one by the effect of metabolites produced at stimulation of biogenic processes. Oil displacement index increases by 15%-30%.

  11. Pediatric awake craniotomy and intra-operative stimulation mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogun, James A; Khan, Osaama H; Taylor, Michael; Dirks, Peter; Der, Tara; Carter Snead Iii, O; Weiss, Shelly; Ochi, Ayako; Drake, James; Rutka, James T

    2014-11-01

    The indications for operating on lesions in or near areas of cortical eloquence balance the benefit of resection with the risk of permanent neurological deficit. In adults, awake craniotomy has become a versatile tool in tumor, epilepsy and functional neurosurgery, permitting intra-operative stimulation mapping particularly for language, sensory and motor cortical pathways. This allows for maximal tumor resection with considerable reduction in the risk of post-operative speech and motor deficits. We report our experience of awake craniotomy and cortical stimulation for epilepsy and supratentorial tumors located in and around eloquent areas in a pediatric population (n=10, five females). The presenting symptom was mainly seizures and all children had normal neurological examinations. Neuroimaging showed lesions in the left opercular (n=4) and precentral or peri-sylvian regions (n=6). Three right-sided and seven left-sided awake craniotomies were performed. Two patients had a history of prior craniotomy. All patients had intra-operative mapping for either speech or motor or both using cortical stimulation. The surgical goal for tumor patients was gross total resection, while for all epilepsy procedures, focal cortical resections were completed without any difficulty. None of the patients had permanent post-operative neurologic deficits. The patient with an epileptic focus over the speech area in the left frontal lobe had a mild word finding difficulty post-operatively but this improved progressively. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 27 months. Pediatric awake craniotomy with intra-operative mapping is a precise, safe and reliable method allowing for resection of lesions in eloquent areas. Further validations on larger number of patients will be needed to verify the utility of this technique in the pediatric population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. THE TUMOR MACROENVIRONMENT: CANCER-PROMOTING NETWORKS BEYOND TUMOR BEDS

    OpenAIRE

    Rutkowski, Melanie R.; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Puchalt, Alfredo Perales; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2015-01-01

    During tumor progression, alterations within the systemic tumor environment, or macroenvironment, result in the promotion of tumor growth, tumor invasion to distal organs, and eventual metastatic disease. Distally produced hormones, commensal microbiota residing within mucosal surfaces, and myeloid cells and even the bone marrow impact the systemic immune system, tumor growth, and metastatic spread. Understanding the reciprocal interactions between the cells and soluble factors within the mac...

  13. Subliminal Stimulation: Hoax or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trank, Douglas M.

    Subliminal stimulation is defined as that which is perceived by an individual below the threshold of awareness or cognizance. This article traces the history of research in subliminal stimulation to illustrate that under certain circumstances and conditions, this behavioral phenomenon does occur. Although subliminal stimuli do affect human…

  14. Stimulating Language: Insights from TMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Joseph T.; Watkins, Kate E.

    2007-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, Pascual-Leone and colleagues used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate speech production in pre-surgical epilepsy patients and in doing so, introduced a novel tool into language research. TMS can be used to non-invasively stimulate a specific cortical region and transiently disrupt information processing. These…

  15. Tumor detection using feature extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankar, A.S.; Amudhavalli, N.; Sivakolundu, M.K.

    2008-01-01

    The assistance system for brain tumor detection helps the doctor to analyse the brain tumor in MRI image and help to make decision. The manual detection system takes 3 -5 hours time to analyse the tumor. Doctors are in a position to analyze the tumor faster and make a correct decision with an assistance system

  16. Wilms tumors: genotypes and phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Segers (Heidi)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWilms tumor, or nephroblastoma, represents about 90% of all pediatric renal tumors and about 7% of all pediatric malignancies. Most Wilms tumors are unilateral, although in 5-10 % of the patients both kidneys are infected. Wilms tumor typically occurs between the age of 2 and 4 years,

  17. Stimulation of granulocytic cell iodination by pine cone antitumor substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unten, S.; Sakagami, H.; Konno, K.

    1989-01-01

    Antitumor substances (Fractions VI and VII) prepared from the NaOH extract of pine cone significantly stimulated the iodination (incorporation of radioactive iodine into an acid-insoluble fraction) of human peripheral blood adherent mononuclear cells, polymorphonuclear cells (PMN), and human promyelocytic leukemic HL-60 cells. In contrast, these fractions did not significantly increase the iodination of nonadherent mononuclear cells, red blood cells, other human leukemic cell lines (U-937, THP-1, K-562), human diploid fibroblast (UT20Lu), or mouse cell lines (L-929, J774.1). Iodination of HL-60 cells, which were induced to differentiate by treatment with either retinoic acid or tumor necrosis factor, were stimulated less than untreated cells. The stimulation of iodination of both PMN and HL-60 cells required the continuous presence of these fractions and was almost completely abolished by the presence of myeloperoxidase inhibitors. The stimulation activity of these fractions was generally higher than that of various other immunopotentiators. Possible mechanisms of extract stimulation of myeloperoxidase-containing cell iodination are discussed

  18. NKT cells as an ideal anti-tumor immunotherapeutic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Shimizu, Kanako; Okamoto, Yoshitaka; Kunii, Naoki; Nakayama, Toshinori; Motohashi, Shinichiro; Taniguchi, Masaru

    2013-12-02

    Human natural killer T (NKT) cells are characterized by their expression of an invariant T cell antigen receptor α chain variable region encoded by a Vα24Jα18 rearrangement. These NKT cells recognize α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) in conjunction with the MHC class I-like CD1d molecule and bridge the innate and acquired immune systems to mediate efficient and augmented immune responses. A prime example of one such function is adjuvant activity: NKT cells augment anti-tumor responses because they can rapidly produce large amounts of IFN-γ, which acts on NK cells to eliminate MHC negative tumors and also on CD8 cytotoxic T cells to kill MHC positive tumors. Thus, upon administration of α-GalCer-pulsed DCs, both MHC negative and positive tumor cells can be effectively eliminated, resulting in complete tumor eradication without tumor recurrence. Clinical trials have been completed in a cohort of 17 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancers and 10 cases of head and neck tumors. Sixty percent of advanced lung cancer patients with high IFN-γ production had significantly prolonged median survival times of 29.3 months with only the primary treatment. In the case of head and neck tumors, 10 patients who completed the trial all had stable disease or partial responses 5 weeks after the combination therapy of α-GalCer-DCs and activated NKT cells. We now focus on two potential powerful treatment options for the future. One is to establish artificial adjuvant vector cells containing tumor mRNA and α-GalCer/CD1d. This stimulates host NKT cells followed by DC maturation and NK cell activation but also induces tumor-specific long-term memory CD8 killer T cell responses, suppressing tumor metastasis even 1 year after the initial single injection. The other approach is to establish induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells that can generate unlimited numbers of NKT cells with adjuvant activity. Such iPS-derived NKT cells produce IFN-γ in vitro and in vivo upon

  19. Human embryo immune escape mechanisms rediscovered by the tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, Laura; Petrini, Massimiliano; Fiammenghi, Laura; Riccobon, Angela; Ridolfi, Ruggero

    2009-01-01

    Towards the end of the 1990s, the two opposing theories on immunosurveillance and immunostimulation were extensively studied by researchers in an attempt to understand the complex mechanisms that regulate the relation between tumors and the host's immune system. Both theories probably have elements that would help us to comprehend how the host can induce anti-tumor clinical responses through stimulation of the immune system and which could also give us a deeper insight into the mechanisms of tumor immunosuppression. The model that most resembles the behavior of tumor cells in terms of growth, infiltration and suppression of the immune system of the environment in which they live is undoubtedly that of the embryonic cell. The fetus behaves like an allogenic transplant within the mother's body, using every means it has to escape from and defend itself against the mother's immune system. The majority of these mechanisms are the same as those found in tumor cells: antigenic loss, lack of expression of classic HLA-I molecules, production of immunosuppressive cytokines, induction of lack of expression of co-stimulatory molecules in antigen presenting cells, and induction of apoptosis in infiltrating lymphocytes, with activation of a type Th2 regulatory lymphocyte response. A careful and comparative study of key mechanisms capable of triggering tolerance or cytotoxicity in both embryonic and tumor cells could prove immensely valuable in designing new strategies for anti-tumor immunotherapy.

  20. ONCOLYTIC VIRUS-MEDIATED REVERSAL OF IMPAIRED TUMOR ANTIGEN PRESENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Ashok Gujar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anti-tumor immunity can eliminate existing cancer cells and also maintain a constant surveillance against possible relapse. Such an antigen-specific adaptive response begins when tumor-specific T cells become activated. T cell activation requires two signals on antigen presenting cells (APCs: antigen presentation through MHC molecules and co-stimulation. In the absence of one or both of these signals, T cells remain inactivated or can even become tolerized. Cancer cells and their associated microenvironment strategically hinder the processing and presentation of tumor antigens and consequently prevent the development of anti-tumor immunity. Many studies, however, demonstrate that interventions that overturn tumor-associated immune evasion mechanisms can establish anti-tumor immune responses of therapeutic potential. One such intervention is oncolytic virus (OV-based anti-cancer therapy. Here we discuss how OV-induced immunological events override tumor-associated antigen presentation impairment and promote appropriate T cell:APC interaction. Detailed understanding of this phenomenon is pivotal for devising the strategies that will enhance the efficacy of OV-based anti-cancer therapy by complementing its inherent oncolytic

  1. Pituitary gland tumors; Hypophysentumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesser, J.; Schlamp, K.; Bendszus, M. [Radiologische Klinik, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    This article gives an overview of the most common tumors of the pituitary gland and the differential diagnostics with special emphasis on radiological diagnostic criteria. A selective search of the literature in PubMed was carried out. Pituitary adenomas constitute 10-15 % of all intracranial tumors and are the most common tumors of the sellar region. Tumors smaller than 1 cm in diameter are called microadenomas while those larger than 1 cm in diameter are called macroadenomas. Approximately 65 % of pituitary gland adenomas secrete hormones whereby approximately 50 % secrete prolactin, 10 % secrete growth hormone (somatotropin) and 6 % secrete corticotropin. Other tumors located in the sella turcica can also cause endocrinological symptoms, such as an oversecretion of pituitary hormone or pituitary insufficiency by impinging on the pituitary gland or its stalk. When tumors spread into the space cranial to the sella turcica, they can impinge on the optic chiasm and cause visual disorders. A common differential diagnosis of a sellar tumor is a craniopharyngeoma. In children up to 10 % of all intracranial tumors are craniopharyngeomas. Other differential diagnoses for sellar tumors are metastases, meningiomas, epidermoids and in rare cases astrocytomas, germinomas or Rathke cleft cysts As these tumors are located in an anatomically complex region of the skull base and are often very small, a highly focused imaging protocol is required. The currently favored modality is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the administration of a contrast agent. The sellar region should be mapped in thin slices. In cases of suspected microadenoma the imaging protocol should also contain a sequence with dynamic contrast administration in order to assess the specific enhancement characteristics of the tumor and the pituitary gland. (orig.) [German] Diese Arbeit ist eine Uebersicht ueber die haeufigsten Hypophysentumoren und deren Differenzialdiagnosen mit Augenmerk auf die

  2. Tumor scintigram, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Shunichi; Hasegawa, Yoshihisa; Shimura, Kazuo; Ifuka, Keijiro

    1975-01-01

    In various cases of malignant tumors, especially those of lung cancer and liver cancer, scans were made with 57 Co-bleomycin(BLM), and its diagnostic significance was evaluated. Tumors were visualized with 57 Co-BLM in 22 of the 26 cases of lung cancer (84.6%). Concentrations of the RI were noted in all of the cases of squamous epithelium cancer, adenoid cancer and cellule-type undifferentiated cancer. The smallest tumor that could be detected was a 2 x 2 cm adenoid cancer. Tumors were imaged in 19 of the 27 cases of liver cancer (70.4%). This detection rate was increased by a combination of 57 Co-BLM and 198 Au-colloid scanning. The authors believe that 57 Co-BLM will help to establish the diagnosis of lung cancer or liver cancer. Tumors were also imaged in 6 of the 15 cases of breast cancer, but no distinct concentration was noted in the 7 cases of thyroid cancer. (Ueda, J.)

  3. Parotid hybrid tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bravo C, Gustavo; Seymour M, Camila; Fernandez R, Lara; Villanueva I, Maria Elena; Scott C, Carlos; Celedon L, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Tumors of the salivary glands represent 33%-10% of head and neck neoplasms. The most common location is the parotid gland, accounting for 50%-85% of the cases, with 20%-30% of them being malignant. The following are known to be indicative of a malignant tumor: fast growing, painless mass, associated facial paralysis and lymphadenopathy. Most parotid neoplasm derive from a single histological type but eventually the development of more than one type on the same gland can occur. This paper presents a case of a parotid neoplasm with two different histological tumors, with uncharacteristic clinical presentation. The patient presented initially with ear pain and otorrhoea, in the clinical examination highlighted an external auditory canal tumor. The complementary study revealed a parotid neoplasm and a total resection of the gland was performed. The biopsy revealed an adenoid-cystic carcinoma with differentiated basaloid areas. Adjuvant radio-chemotherapy was administered, and the imaging control with PET-CT showed no evidence of recurrence or dissemination of the tumor

  4. Influences of tumor stroma on the malignant phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Dau; Moeslund, Mette; Wandall, Hans H

    2008-01-01

    and laminin 5 was investigated. RESULTS: We found that expression of glycosylated oncofetal fibronectin was increased in the invasive phenotype of oral carcinoma cell lines. Furthermore we demonstrated that certain concentrations of collagen in the connective tissue equivalent, appears to stimulate......, fibronectin and laminin 5 are all characteristics of the tumor stroma. Less is, however, known of the significance of the biophysical properties of the tumor stroma. The purpose of the present study was to investigate how cellular and mechanical properties of the three-dimensional collagen matrix may...

  5. Endothelial Dll4 overexpression reduces vascular response and inhibits tumor growth and metastasization in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Alexandre; Djokovic, Dusan; Gigante, Joana; Mendonça, Liliana; Duarte, António

    2017-03-14

    The inhibition of Delta-like 4 (Dll4)/Notch signaling has been shown to result in excessive, nonfunctional vessel proliferation and significant tumor growth suppression. However, safety concerns emerged with the identification of side effects resulting from chronic Dll4/Notch blockade. Alternatively, we explored the endothelial Dll4 overexpression using different mouse tumor models. We used a transgenic mouse model of endothelial-specific Dll4 overexpression, previously produced. Growth kinetics and vascular histopathology of several types of solid tumors was evaluated, namely Lewis Lung Carcinoma xenografts, chemically-induced skin papillomas and RIP1-Tag2 insulinomas. We found that increased Dll4/Notch signaling reduces tumor growth by reducing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced endothelial proliferation, tumor vessel density and overall tumor blood supply. In addition, Dll4 overexpression consistently improved tumor vascular maturation and functionality, as indicated by increased vessel calibers, enhanced mural cell recruitment and increased network perfusion. Importantly, the tumor vessel normalization is not more effective than restricted vessel proliferation, but was found to prevent metastasis formation and allow for increased delivery to the tumor of concomitant chemotherapy, improving its efficacy. By reducing endothelial sensitivity to VEGF, these results imply that Dll4/Notch stimulation in tumor microenvironment could be beneficial to solid cancer patient treatment by reducing primary tumor size, improving tumor drug delivery and reducing metastization. Endothelial specific Dll4 overexpression thus appears as a promising anti-angiogenic modality that might improve cancer control.

  6. Poxviral protein A52 stimulates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation by causing tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) self-association leading to transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, Julianne; Hurst, Tara P; Flannery, Sinead M; Brennan, Kiva; Rupp, Sebastian; Oda, Shun-ichiro; Khan, Amir R; Bowie, Andrew G

    2013-11-22

    Vaccinia virus encodes a number of proteins that inhibit and manipulate innate immune signaling pathways that also have a role in virulence. These include A52, a protein shown to inhibit IL-1- and Toll-like receptor-stimulated NFκB activation, via interaction with interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 2 (IRAK2). Interestingly, A52 was also found to activate p38 MAPK and thus enhance Toll-like receptor-dependent IL-10 induction, which was TRAF6-dependent, but the manner in which A52 manipulates TRAF6 to stimulate p38 activation was unclear. Here, we show that A52 has a non-canonical TRAF6-binding motif that is essential for TRAF6 binding and p38 activation but dispensable for NFκB inhibition and IRAK2 interaction. Wild-type A52, but not a mutant defective in p38 activation and TRAF6 binding (F154A), caused TRAF6 oligomerization and subsequent TRAF6-TAK1 association. The crystal structure of A52 shows that it adopts a Bcl2-like fold and exists as a dimer in solution. Residue Met-65 was identified as being located in the A52 dimer interface, and consistent with that, A52-M65E was impaired in its ability to dimerize. A52-M65E although capable of interacting with TRAF6, was unable to cause either TRAF6 self-association, induce the TRAF6-TAK1 association, or activate p38 MAPK. The results suggest that an A52 dimer causes TRAF6 self-association, leading to TAK1 recruitment and p38 activation. This reveals a molecular mechanism whereby poxviruses manipulate TRAF6 to activate MAPKs (which can be proviral) without stimulating antiviral NFκB activation.

  7. Angiopoietin 2 stimulates TIE2-expressing monocytes to suppress T cell activation and to promote regulatory T cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffelt, Seth B; Chen, Yung-Yi; Muthana, Munitta; Welford, Abigail F; Tal, Andrea O; Scholz, Alexander; Plate, Karl H; Reiss, Yvonne; Murdoch, Craig; De Palma, Michele; Lewis, Claire E

    2011-04-01

    Angiopoietin 2 (ANGPT2) is a proangiogenic cytokine whose expression is often upregulated by endothelial cells in tumors. Expression of its receptor, TIE2, defines a highly proangiogenic subpopulation of myeloid cells in circulation and tumors called TIE2-expressing monocytes/macrophages (TEMs). Genetic depletion of TEMs markedly reduces tumor angiogenesis in various tumor models, emphasizing their essential role in driving tumor progression. Previously, we demonstrated that ANGPT2 augments the expression of various proangiogenic genes, the potent immunosuppressive cytokine, IL-10, and a chemokine for regulatory T cells (Tregs), CCL17 by TEMs in vitro. We now show that TEMs also express higher levels of IL-10 than TIE2(-) macrophages in tumors and that ANGPT2-stimulated release of IL-10 by TEMs suppresses T cell proliferation, increases the ratio of CD4(+) T cells to CD8(+) T cells, and promotes the expansion of CD4(+)CD25(high)FOXP3(+) Tregs. Furthermore, syngeneic murine tumors expressing high levels of ANGPT2 contained not only high numbers of TEMs but also increased numbers of Tregs, whereas genetic depletion of tumor TEMs resulted in a marked reduction in the frequency of Tregs in tumors. Taken together, our data suggest that ANGPT2-stimulated TEMs represent a novel, potent immunosuppressive force in tumors.

  8. Tumor radiation responses and tumor oxygenation in aging mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockwell, S.

    1989-01-01

    EMT6 mouse mammary tumors transplanted into aging mice are less sensitive to radiation than tumors growing in young adult animals. The experiments reported here compare the radiation dose-response curves defining the survivals of tumor cells in aging mice and in young adult mice. Cell survival curves were assessed in normal air-breathing mice and in mice asphyxiated with N 2 to produce uniform hypoxia throughout the tumors. Analyses of survival curves revealed that 41% of viable malignant cells were severely hypoxic in tumors in aging mice, while only 19% of the tumor cells in young adult animals were radiobiologically hypoxic. This did not appear to reflect anaemia in the old animals. Treatment of aging animals with a perfluorochemical emulsion plus carbogen (95% O 2 /5% CO 2 ) increased radiation response of the tumors, apparently by improving tumor oxygenation and decreasing the number of severely hypoxic, radiation resistant cells in the tumors. (author)

  9. CS2164, a novel multi-target inhibitor against tumor angiogenesis, mitosis and chronic inflammation with anti-tumor potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, You; Shan, Song; Li, Zhi-Bin; Xin, Li-Jun; Pan, De-Si; Yang, Qian-Jiao; Liu, Ying-Ping; Yue, Xu-Peng; Liu, Xiao-Rong; Gao, Ji-Zhou; Zhang, Jin-Wen; Ning, Zhi-Qiang; Lu, Xian-Ping

    2017-03-01

    Although inhibitors targeting tumor angiogenic pathway have provided improvement for clinical treatment in patients with various solid tumors, the still very limited anti-cancer efficacy and acquired drug resistance demand new agents that may offer better clinical benefits. In the effort to find a small molecule potentially targeting several key pathways for tumor development, we designed, discovered and evaluated a novel multi-kinase inhibitor, CS2164. CS2164 inhibited the angiogenesis-related kinases (VEGFR2, VEGFR1, VEGFR3, PDGFRα and c-Kit), mitosis-related kinase Aurora B and chronic inflammation-related kinase CSF-1R in a high potency manner with the IC 50 at a single-digit nanomolar range. Consequently, CS2164 displayed anti-angiogenic activities through suppression of VEGFR/PDGFR phosphorylation, inhibition of ligand-dependent cell proliferation and capillary tube formation, and prevention of vasculature formation in tumor tissues. CS2164 also showed induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest and suppression of cell proliferation in tumor tissues through the inhibition of Aurora B-mediated H3 phosphorylation. Furthermore, CS2164 demonstrated the inhibitory effect on CSF-1R phosphorylation that led to the suppression of ligand-stimulated monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation and reduced CSF-1R + cells in tumor tissues. The in vivo animal efficacy studies revealed that CS2164 induced remarkable regression or complete inhibition of tumor growth at well-tolerated oral doses in several human tumor xenograft models. Collectively, these results indicate that CS2164 is a highly selective multi-kinase inhibitor with potent anti-tumor activities against tumor angiogenesis, mitosis and chronic inflammation, which may provide the rationale for further clinical assessment of CS2164 as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of cancer. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  10. Radiology of neuroendocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hako, R.; Hakova, H.; Gulova, I.

    2011-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors arise in the bronchopulmonary or gastrointestinal tract, but they can arise in almost any organ. The tumors have varied malignant potential depending on the site of their origin. Metastases may be present at the time of diagnosis, which often occurs at a late stage of the disease. Most NETs have nonspecific imaging characteristics. Imaging plays a pivotal role in the localization and staging of neuroendocrine tumors and in monitoring the treatment response. Imaging should involve multi-phase computed tomography, contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, contrast-enhanced ultrasonography and other one. Hepatic metastatic disease in particular lends itself to a wide range of interventional treatment options. Transcatheter arterial embolization may be used alone or in combination with chemo embolization. Ablative techniques, hepatic cryotherapy and percutaneous ethanol injection may then be undertaken. A multidisciplinary approach to treatment and follow-up is important. (author)

  11. Bilateral Wilms' tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malcolm, A.W.; Jaffe, N.; Folkman, M.J.; Cassady, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty children with bilateral Wilms' tumor were presented to the Children's Hospital Medical Center and Children's Cancer Research Foundation, Sidney Farber Cancer Institute, and Joint Center for Radiation Therapy (CHMC-CCRF, SFCI, JCRT) from January 1, 1956 to December 31, 1976. Of these 20, 16 had simultaneous and 4 had metachronous disease on presentation. All patients were treated with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Of the 16 patients with simultaneous disease, 10 (63%) are alive and free of disease 12+ to 175+ months post diagnosis and treatment, with median follow-up of 121 months. There were no long-term survivors in the metachronous group; all were dead of disease within 21 months from initial presentation of original tumor. With these data we relate prognosis to extent of disease and discuss a general approach to the management of bilateral Wilms' tumor

  12. Upper urinary tract tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gandrup, Karen L; Nordling, Jørgen; Balslev, Ingegerd

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Computed tomography urography (CTU) is used widely in the work-up of patients with symptoms of urinary tract lesions. Preoperative knowledge of whether a tumor is invasive or non-invasive is important for the choice of surgery. So far there are no studies about the distinction...... of invasive and non-invasive tumors in ureter and renal pelvis based on the enhancement measured with Hounsfield Units. PURPOSE: To examine the value of CTU using split-bolus technique to distinguish non-invasive from invasive urothelial carcinomas in the upper urinary tract. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients...... obtained at CTU could distinguish between invasive and non-invasive lesions. No patients had a CTU within the last year before the examination that resulted in surgery. CONCLUSION: A split-bolus CTU cannot distinguish between invasive and non-invasive urothelial tumors in the upper urinary tract...

  13. Dysembryoplastic Neuroepithelial Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon-Lim Suh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNT is a benign glioneuronal neoplasm that most commonly occurs in children and young adults and may present with medically intractable, chronic seizures. Radiologically, this tumor is characterized by a cortical topography and lack of mass effect or perilesional edema. Partial complex seizures are the most common presentation. Three histologic subtypes of DNTs have been described. Histologically, the recognition of a unique, specific glioneuronal element in brain tumor samples from patients with medically intractable, chronic epilepsy serves as a diagnostic feature for complex or simple DNT types. However, nonspecific DNT has diagnostic difficulty because its histology is indistinguishable from conventional gliomas and because a specific glioneuronal element and/or multinodularity are absent. This review will focus on the clinical, radiographic, histopathological, and immunohistochemical features as well as the molecular genetics of all three variants of DNTs. The histological and cytological differential diagnoses for this lesion, especially the nonspecific variant, will be discussed.

  14. Mediastinal tumors. Update 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.E.; Thomas, C.R. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    This volume represents the premier work devoted solely to the complex myriad of mediastinal tumors. The contributors to the state-of-the-art text are clinical investigators of international renown. The diagnosis, natural history, and therapeutic strategies in respect of all mediastinal tumors are thoroughly addressed in a concise and logical manner. An emphasis on the multidisciplinary nature of mediastinal tumors is thematic throughout the text. Moreover, the combined-modality treatment schemes that have been increasingly developed worldwide are analyzed. This textbook will prove of value to all general surgeons, thoracic surgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, pulmonologists, and endocrinologists, as well as to nursing and medical students, residents and fellows-in training. (orig.). 55 figs., 21 tabs

  15. Leydig Cell Tumor Associated with Testicular Adrenal Rest Tumors in a Patient with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia due to 11β-Hydroxylase Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Charfi, Nadia; Kamoun, Mahdi; Feki Mnif, Mouna; Mseddi, Neila; Mnif, Fatma; Kallel, Nozha; Ben Naceur, Basma; Rekik, Nabila; Fourati, Hela; Daoud, Emna; Mnif, Zainab; Hadj Sliman, Mourad; Sellami-Boudawara, Tahia; Abid, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) describes a group of inherited autosomal recessive disorders characterized by enzyme defects in the steroidogenic pathways that lead to the biosynthesis of cortisol, aldosterone, and androgens. Chronic excessive adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation may result in hyperplasia of ACTH-sensitive tissues in adrenal glands and other sites such as the testes, causing testicular masses known as testicular adrenal rest tumors (TARTs). Leydig cell tumors (...

  16. Vagal nerve stimulation therapy: what is being stimulated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kember, Guy; Ardell, Jeffrey L; Armour, John A; Zamir, Mair

    2014-01-01

    Vagal nerve stimulation in cardiac therapy involves delivering electrical current to the vagal sympathetic complex in patients experiencing heart failure. The therapy has shown promise but the mechanisms by which any benefit accrues is not understood. In this paper we model the response to increased levels of stimulation of individual components of the vagal sympathetic complex as a differential activation of each component in the control of heart rate. The model provides insight beyond what is available in the animal experiment in as much as allowing the simultaneous assessment of neuronal activity throughout the cardiac neural axis. The results indicate that there is sensitivity of the neural network to low level subthreshold stimulation. This leads us to propose that the chronic effects of vagal nerve stimulation therapy lie within the indirect pathways that target intrinsic cardiac local circuit neurons because they have the capacity for plasticity.

  17. Vagal nerve stimulation therapy: what is being stimulated?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Kember

    Full Text Available Vagal nerve stimulation in cardiac therapy involves delivering electrical current to the vagal sympathetic complex in patients experiencing heart failure. The therapy has shown promise but the mechanisms by which any benefit accrues is not understood. In this paper we model the response to increased levels of stimulation of individual components of the vagal sympathetic complex as a differential activation of each component in the control of heart rate. The model provides insight beyond what is available in the animal experiment in as much as allowing the simultaneous assessment of neuronal activity throughout the cardiac neural axis. The results indicate that there is sensitivity of the neural network to low level subthreshold stimulation. This leads us to propose that the chronic effects of vagal nerve stimulation therapy lie within the indirect pathways that target intrinsic cardiac local circuit neurons because they have the capacity for plasticity.

  18. Tumor-induced osteomalacia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Florenzano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome clinically characterized by bone pain, fractures and muscle weakness. It is caused by tumoral overproduction of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23 that acts primarily at the proximal renal tubule, decreasing phosphate reabsorption and 1α-hydroxylation of 25 hydroxyvitamin D, thus producing hypophosphatemia and osteomalacia. Lesions are typically small, benign mesenchymal tumors that may be found in bone or soft tissue, anywhere in the body. In up to 60% of these tumors, a fibronectin-1(FN1 and fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1 fusion gene has been identified that may serve as a tumoral driver. The diagnosis is established by the finding of acquired chronic hypophosphatemia due to isolated renal phosphate wasting with concomitant elevated or inappropriately normal blood levels of FGF23 and decreased or inappropriately normal 1,25-OH2-Vitamin D (1,25(OH2D. Locating the tumor is critical, as complete removal is curative. For this purpose, a step-wise approach is recommended, starting with a thorough medical history and physical examination, followed by functional imaging. Suspicious lesions should be confirmed by anatomical imaging, and if needed, selective venous sampling with measurement of FGF23. If the tumor is not localized, or surgical resection is not possible, medical therapy with phosphate and active vitamin D is usually successful in healing the osteomalacia and reducing symptoms. However, compliance is often poor due to the frequent dosing regimen and side effects. Furthermore, careful monitoring is needed to avoid complications such us secondary/tertiary hyperparathyroidism, hypercalciuria, and nephrocalcinosis. Novel therapeutical approaches are being developed for TIO patients, such as image-guided tumor ablation and medical treatment with the anti-FGF23 monoclonal antibody KRN23 or anti FGFR medications. The case of a patient with TIO is presented to

  19. Tumors of germinal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plazas, Ricardo; Avila, Andres

    2002-01-01

    The tumors of germinal cells (TGC) are derived neoplasia of the primordial germinal cells that in the life embryonic migrant from the primitive central nervous system until being located in the gonads. Their cause is even unknown and they represent 95% of the testicular tumors. In them, the intention of the treatment is always healing and the diagnostic has improved thanks to the results of the handling multidisciplinary. The paper includes topics like their incidence and prevalence, epidemiology and pathology, clinic and diagnoses among other topics

  20. Electrical stimulation in exercise training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Walter

    1994-01-01

    Electrical stimulation has a long history of use in medicine dating back to 46 A.D. when the Roman physician Largus found the electrical discharge of torpedo fishes useful in the treatment of pain produced by headache and gout. A rival Greek physician, Dioscorides, discounted the value of the torpedo fish for headache relief but did recommend its use in the treatment of hemorrhoids. In 1745, the Leyden jar and various sized electrostatic generators were used to treat angina pectoris, epilepsy, hemiplegia, kidney stones, and sciatica. Benjamin Franklin used an electrical device to treat successfully a young woman suffering from convulsive fits. In the late 1800's battery powered hydroelectric baths were used to treat chronic inflammation of the uterus while electrified athletic supporters were advertised for the treatment of male problems. Fortunately, such an amusing early history of the simple beginnings of electrical stimulation did not prevent eventual development of a variety of useful therapeutic and rehabilitative applications of electrical stimulation. Over the centuries electrical stimulation has survived as a modality in the treatment of various medical disorders with its primary application being in the rehabilitation area. Recently, a surge of new interest in electrical stimulation has been kindled by the work of a Russian sport scientist who reported remarkable muscle strength and endurance improvements in elite athletes. Yakov Kots reported his research on electric stimulation and strength improvements in 1977 at a Canadian-Soviet Exchange Symposium held at Concordia University in Montreal. Since then an explosion of new studies has been seen in both sport science and in medicine. Based upon the reported works of Kots and the present surge of new investigations, one could be misled as to the origin of electrical stimulation as a technique to increase muscle strength. As a matter of fact, electric stimulation has been used as a technique to improve

  1. Ionizing radiation in tumor promotion and progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, R.E.J.

    1990-08-01

    Chronic exposure to beta radiation has been tested as a tumor promoting or progressing agent. The dorsal skins of groups of 25 female SENCAR mice were chemically initiated with a single exposure to DMBA, and chronic exposure to strontium-90/yttrium-90 beta radiation was tested as a stage 1, stage 2 or complete skin tumor promoter. Exposure of initiated mice to 0.5 gray twice a week for 13 weeks produced no papillomas, indicating no action as a complete promoter. Another similar group of animals was chemically promoted through stage 1 (with TPA) followed by 0.5 gray of beta radiation twice a week for 13 weeks. Again no papillomas developed indicating no action of chronic radiation as a stage 2 tumor promoter. The same radiation exposure protocol in another DMBA initiated group receiving both stage 1 and 2 chemical promotion resulted in a decrease in papilloma frequency, compared to the control group receiving no beta irradiation, indicating a tumor preventing effect of radiation at stage 2 promotion, probably by killing initiated cells. Chronic beta radiation was tested three different ways as a stage 1 tumor promoter. When compared to the appropriate control, beta radiation given after initiation as a stage 1 promoter (0.5 gray twice a week for 13 weeks), after initiation and along with a known stage 1 chemical promoter (1.0 gray twice a week for 2 weeks), or prior to initiation as a stage 1 promoter (0.5 gray twice a week for 4 weeks), each time showed a weak (∼ 15% stimulation) but statistically significant (p<0.01) ability to act as a stage 1 promoter. When tested as a tumor progressing agent delivered to pre-existing papillomas, beta radiation (0.5 gray twice a week for 13 weeks) increased carcinoma frequency from 0.52 to 0.68 carcinoma/animal, but this increase was not statistically significant at the 95% confidence level. We conclude that in the addition to the known initiating, progressing and complete carcinogenic action of acute exposures to ionizing

  2. Enhancing photodynamic therapy of a metastatic mouse breast cancer by immune stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castano, Ana P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2006-02-01

    One in 8 women in the United States will develop breast cancer during her lifetime and 40,000 die each year. Deaths are due to tumors that have metastasized despite local control. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising cancer treatment in which a photosensitizer (PS) accumulates in tumors and is subsequently activated by visible light of an appropriate wavelength. The energy of the light is transferred to molecular oxygen to produce reactive oxygen species that produce cell death and tumor ablation. Mechanisms include cytotoxicity to tumor cells, shutting down of the tumor vasculature, and the induction of a host immune response. The precise mechanisms involved in the PDT-mediated induction of anti-tumor immunity are not yet understood. Potential contributing factors are alterations in the tumor microenvironment via stimulation of proinflammatory cytokines and direct effects of PDT on the tumor that increase immunogenicity. We have studied PDT of 410.4 variant 4T1 tumors growing in the mammary fat pad (orthotopic) in Balb/c mice and which produce metastasis. We have shown that a PDT regimen that produces vascular shutdown and tumor necrosis leads to initial tumor ablation but the tumors recur at the periphery. We studied the combination of PDT with immunostimulating therapies. Low dose cyclophosphamide (CY) is a specific mechanism to deplete the regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+), these cells play an important role in the immunosuppression activity of tumors. In combination with PDT that produces release of tumor specific antigens, this immunostimulation may lead to generation of cytotoxic CD8 T-lymphocytes that recognize and destroy the tumor. The second alternative therapy is the use of a novel combination of the immunostimulant CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN) and PDT. CpG-ODN is recognized by Toll-like receptor 9 and directly or indirectly triggers B cells, NK cells, monocyte-macrophages and dendritic cells to proliferate, mature and secrete cytokines

  3. Cell kinetics of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma transplanted in mice with different degrees of tumor resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, K.L.B.

    1974-01-01

    Cell proliferation kinetics of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma grown in two strains of mice with different degrees of resistance to this tumor were examined. In the first portion of the study, growth of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma in nonresistant Swiss (Iowa) and slightly resistant CF1 mice was examined by measuring animal weight gain and host survival time after intraperitoneal injection of tumor cells. Since it appeared that CF1 mice were inherently more resistant than Swiss mice to the Ehrlich carcinoma, the second part of this investigation involved attempts to immunize CF1 mice against the tumor. Subcutaneous injections of Ehrlich cells previously exposed in vitro to 5000 R of 250 kVp x rays were utilized. One immunizing inoculation of lethally irradiated tumor cells afforded protection against an intraperitoneal challenge of 40 thousand Ehrlich cells. By varying the number and timing of immunizing inoculations it was possible to induce different degrees of tumor resistance in these mice. The most effective immunizing procedure utilized multiple inoculations of lethally irradiated tumor cells (LITC), followed by challenges with viable tumor cells (less than 1 million) which were rejected. These mice could then resist challenge inocula of 4 million viable tumor cells. In a few animals the immunizing procedures were ineffective; these animals, when challenged, developed even larger tumors than control mice. Tumor cell proliferation kinetics in these animals as well as in mice that were rejecting the tumor were examined in the third phase of the project. A shortening of the cell cycle was observed in almost all LITC-treated mice, whether tumor growth was eventually inhibited or stimulated. Decreased duration of the DNA-synthesis phase (S) of the tumor cell cycle was also a consistent finding. The role of the immune response in stimulating mitosis as well as in killing foreign cells was discussed. (U.S.)

  4. Augmented macrophage differentiation and polarization of tumor-associated macrophages towards M1 subtype in listeria-administered tumor-bearing host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Rakesh K; Vishvakarma, Naveen K; Mohapatra, Tribhuban M; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2012-09-01

    This study investigates the effect of Listeria administration on differentiation of macrophages from precursor bone marrow cells and functional status of tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). Listeria administration not only resulted in an augmented infiltration of tumor by F4/80 macrophages but also repolarized the functional status of TAM displaying features of some M1 macrophage subtype with upregulated phagocytosis and tumoricidal activity accompanied by altered expression of monocarboxylate transporter-1, toll-like receptor-2, surface markers: CD11c, interleukin-2 receptor, CD62L, and secreted molecules: nitric oxide, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and vascular endothelial growth factor. Declined tumor cell survival and modulated repertoire of cytokines: interferon-γ, IL-6, IL-10, and transforming growth factor-β in tumor microenvironment indicated their role in polarization of TAM towards proinflammatory state. Bone marrow cell of Listeria-administered tumor-bearing mice showed augmented survival, declined expression of p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis with an upregulated differentiation into activation responsive bone marrow-derived macrophages along with altered expression of macrophage-colony stimulating factor, macrophage-colony stimulating factor receptor, and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor receptor. These findings indicate that Listeria infection is associated with an augmented differentiation of macrophages accompanied by tumoricidal activation of TAM.

  5. Tumor Heterogeneity and Drug Resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucerova, L.; Skolekova, S.; Kozovska, Z.

    2015-01-01

    New generation of sequencing methodologies revealed unexpected complexity and genomic alterations linked with the tumor subtypes. This diversity exists across the tumor types, histologic tumor subtypes and subsets of the tumor cells within the same tumor. This phenomenon is termed tumor heterogeneity. Regardless of its origin and mechanisms of development it has a major impact in the clinical setting. Genetic, phenotypic and expression pattern diversity of tumors plays critical role in the selection of suitable treatment and also in the prognosis prediction. Intratumoral heterogeneity plays a key role in the intrinsic and acquired chemoresistance to cytotoxic and targeted therapies. In this review we focus on the mechanisms of intratumoral and inter tumoral heterogeneity and their relationship to the drug resistance. Understanding of the mechanisms and spatiotemporal dynamics of tumor heterogeneity development before and during the therapy is important for the ability to design individual treatment protocols suitable in the given molecular context. (author)

  6. Stochastic models for tumoral growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Carlos

    2006-02-01

    Strong experimental evidence has indicated that tumor growth belongs to the molecular beam epitaxy universality class. This type of growth is characterized by the constraint of cell proliferation to the tumor border and the surface diffusion of cells at the growing edge. Tumor growth is thus conceived as a competition for space between the tumor and the host, and cell diffusion at the tumor border is an optimal strategy adopted for minimizing the pressure and helping tumor development. Two stochastic partial differential equations are reported in this paper in order to correctly model the physical properties of tumoral growth in (1+1) and (2+1) dimensions. The advantage of these models is that they reproduce the correct geometry of the tumor and are defined in terms of polar variables. An analysis of these models allows us to quantitatively estimate the response of the tumor to an unfavorable perturbation during growth.

  7. Matrix metalloproteinase-10 promotes tumor progression through regulation of angiogenic and apoptotic pathways in cervical tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ge; Miyake, Makito; Lawton, Adrienne; Goodison, Steve; Rosser, Charles J

    2014-01-01

    Cancer invasion and metastasis develops through a series of steps that involve the loss of cell to cell and cell to matrix adhesion, degradation of extracellular matrix and induction of angiogenesis. Different protease systems (e.g., matrix metalloproteinases, MMPs) are involved in these steps. MMP-10, one of the lesser studied MMPs, is limited to epithelial cells and can facilitate tumor cell invasion by targeting collagen, elastin and laminin. Enhanced MMP-10 expression has been linked to poor clinical prognosis in some cancers, however, mechanisms underlying a role for MMP-10 in tumorigenesis and progression remain largely unknown. Here, we report that MMP-10 expression is positively correlated with the invasiveness of human cervical and bladder cancers. Using commercial tissue microarray (TMA) of cervical and bladder tissues, MMP-10 immunohistochemical staining was performed. Furthermore using a panel of human cells (HeLa and UROtsa), in vitro and in vivo experiments were performed in which MMP-10 was overexpressed or silenced and we noted phenotypic and genotypic changes. Experimentally, we showed that MMP-10 can regulate tumor cell migration and invasion, and endothelial cell tube formation, and that MMP-10 effects are associated with a resistance to apoptosis. Further investigation revealed that increasing MMP-10 expression stimulates the expression of HIF-1α and MMP-2 (pro-angiogenic factors) and PAI-1 and CXCR2 (pro-metastatic factors), and accordingly, targeting MMP-10 with siRNA in vivo resulted in diminution of xenograft tumor growth with a concomitant reduction of angiogenesis and a stimulation of apoptosis. Taken together, our findings show that MMP-10 can play a significant role in tumor growth and progression, and that MMP-10 perturbation may represent a rational strategy for cancer treatment

  8. Imatinib mesylate inhibits Leydig cell tumor growth: evidence for in vitro and in vivo activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basciani, Sabrina; Brama, Marina; Mariani, Stefania; De Luca, Gabriele; Arizzi, Mario; Vesci, Loredana; Pisano, Claudio; Dolci, Susanna; Spera, Giovanni; Gnessi, Lucio

    2005-03-01

    Leydig cell tumors are usually benign tumors of the male gonad. However, if the tumor is malignant, no effective treatments are currently available. Leydig cell tumors express platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), kit ligand and their respective receptors, PDGFR and c-kit. We therefore evaluated the effects of imatinib mesylate (imatinib), a selective inhibitor of the c-kit and PDGFR tyrosine kinases, on the growth of rodent Leydig tumor cell lines in vivo and in vitro, and examined, in human Leydig cell tumor samples, the expression of activated PDGFR and c-kit and the mutations in exons of the c-kit gene commonly associated with solid tumors. Imatinib caused concentration-dependent decreases in the viability of Leydig tumor cell lines, which coincided with apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation and ligand-stimulated phosphorylation of c-kit and PDGFRs. Mice bearing s.c. allografts of a Leydig tumor cell line treated with imatinib p.o., had an almost complete inhibition of tumor growth, less tumor cell proliferation, increased apoptosis, and a lesser amount of tumor-associated mean vessel density compared with controls. No drug-resistant tumors appeared during imatinib treatment but tumors regrew after drug withdrawal. Human Leydig cell tumors showed an intense expression of the phosphorylated form of c-kit and a less intense expression of phosphorylated PDGFRs. No activating mutations in common regions of mutation of the c-kit gene were found. Our studies suggest that Leydig cell tumors might be a potential target for imatinib therapy.

  9. Multielectrode intrafascicular and extraneural stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltink, Petrus H.; van Alste, Jan A.; Boom, H.B.K.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between nerve stimulation, pulse amplitude and isometric muscle force was measured to investigate recruitment of motor units. Force addition experiments were performed to obtain insight in the intersection of motor unit groups recruited by different electrodes. Intrafascicular and

  10. Immunoregulation of antitumor response; differential secretion of arachidonic acid metabolites by macrophages during stimulation ''in vitro'' with BCG and ''Corynebacterium parvum''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomecki, Jaroslaw; Sukiennik, Jadwiga; Kordowiak, Anna

    1993-01-01

    The level of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites in the supernatants of cultures peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) were studied under various conditions using BCG and ''Corynebacterium parvum'' as stimulators. The metabolite levels were analyzed by thin layer chromatography (TLC). The degree of macrophage cytotoxic/cytostatic activity was dependent on the dose and character of stimulators used and the source of macrophages. The application of micro cytotoxicity assay for the evaluation of tumor cell lysis (lung sarcoma SaL-1) ''in vitro'' revealed that peritoneal macrophages from healthy and tumor bearing BALB/c mice may affect the degree of antitumor response. In the supernatants of cultured PEC from tumor bearing mice AA level increased (by 10-fold) in comparison with PEC from healthy mice. Stimulation with BCG induced over a double level of AA in PEC isolated from tumor bearing mice non-stimulated or stimulated with ''C.parvum''. A lower level of prostaglandins (PGs) was found in the supernatants of cultured PEC isolated from healthy mice (stimulated and non-stimulated), but the highest level of PGs was observed in the supernatants of cultured PEC isolated from tumor bearing mice stimulated with BCG. The unique metabolite of AA was found only in the supernatants form non-stimulated PEC from tumor bearing mice. PEC from tumor bearing mice produced metabolites of AA which were not detected in control group. These results suggest that macrophages also play a regulatory role by secretion of AA. This process can be modified by bacterial antigens. (author). 21 refs, 7 figs

  11. Noninvasive Stimulation of the Human Brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Rothwell, John; Capogna, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Noninvasive brain stimulation methods, such as transcranial electric stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation are widely used tools for both basic research and clinical applications. However, the cortical circuits underlying their effects are poorly defined. Here we review the current...

  12. Multiple Primary Tumors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... breast and ascending colon. KEYWORDS: Carcinoid, colorectal cancer, metachronous, synchronous. Multiple Primary Tumors. MA Adeyanju, AA Ilori. Address for correspondence: Dr. MA Adeyanju,. Department of Surgery, Federal Medical Centre, Ebute Metta,. Lagos, Nigeria. E-mail: mbadeyanju@yahoo.

  13. Surgery for adrenal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamah, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the presentation, localization, pathology, surgical management and outcome of surgery for adrenal gland tumors. Design: Prospective clinico epidemiological study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at the Department of General Surgery, University Unit, Riyadh medical Complex Kingdom of Saudi Rabia from June, 1991 to may, 2001. Subjects and Methods: A total of 21 cases with adrenal tumors were studied for demographic data, clinical presentation, diagnostic workup, localization, surgical management, pathology and outcome. The outcome of these patients was followed prospectively. Results: The study included 12 female and 9 male patients. The mean age at surgery was 36.7 years. Hypertension (69.%) was the commonest presentation in hypersecretory functional tumors. The localization accuracy for ultrasonography, computerized tomography, MRI and MIBG scan was 95.2%, 98.3% 87.8% and 83.6% respectively. Pheochromocytoma was the most common adrenal pathology observed in 14 (66.6%) cases. The overall morbidity was 19% with no hospital mortality. Complete follow-up of available 19 patients (90.5 %) revealed no tumor recurrence and persistent hypertension in 14.3% cases. Conclusion: surgery on adrenal glands is safe in experienced hands and is recommended in institutes with all backup facilities. (author)

  14. Study of wilms' tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.H.; Yaqub, N.

    2001-01-01

    This study is an effort to bring into light data related to children with Wilms' tumor managed at Islamabad as local literature on this topic is lacking. It was retrospective study. The study was conducted at Children Hospital, Pakistan Institute of Medical Science, Islamabad between January, 1987 and December 1995. All patients managed during the study period were included in the study. In all the patients complete blood count (CBC), urine analysis (D/R),X-ray abdomen and chest, ultrasound abdomen and in selected cases CT scan were performed. National Wilms' Tumor Study Group (NWTS 3) protocol was followed for further management. Fifty patients including 28 males and 22 females with the age range from 9 months to 8 years were managed in 9 years period. Left kidney was involved in 31 patients. Most of the tumors were solid on ultrasound, 76% patients were in stage III and IV. In one case bilateral involvement of kidney was found. Forty patients underwent primary surgery. Only 14 patients received complete course of chemotherapy while 31 radiotherapy. Nineteen patients died and 15 lost to follow-up. The survival and mortality rates are comparable to NWTS-3 results, although, most of the patients were presented in advance stage of Wilms tumor. The survival of these patients can be improved by increasing awareness of society through electronic and print media. (author)

  15. Tumor-induced osteomalacia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, William H; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Chen, Clara C; Collins, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare and fascinating paraneoplastic syndrome in which patients present with bone pain, fractures, and muscle weakness. The cause is high blood levels of the recently identified phosphate and vitamin D-regulating hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). In TIO, FGF23 is secreted by mesenchymal tumors that are usually benign, but are typically very small and difficult to locate. FGF23 acts primarily at the renal tubule and impairs phosphate reabsorption and 1α-hydroxylation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, leading to hypophosphatemia and low levels of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D. A step-wise approach utilizing functional imaging (F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and octreotide scintigraphy) followed by anatomical imaging (computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging), and, if needed, selective venous sampling with measurement of FGF23 is usually successful in locating the tumors. For tumors that cannot be located, medical treatment with phosphate supplements and active vitamin D (calcitriol or alphacalcidiol) is usually successful; however, the medical regimen can be cumbersome and associated with complications. This review summarizes the current understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and provides guidance in evaluating and treating these patients. Novel imaging modalities and medical treatments, which hold promise for the future, are also reviewed. PMID:21490240

  16. Imaging findings of sacral tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Hong, Sung Hwan; Choi, Ja Young; Koh, Sung Hye; Chung, Hye Won; Choi, Jung Ah; Kang, Heung Sik

    2003-01-01

    The various pathologic conditions detected at CT and MRI and subsumed by the term 'sacral tumor' include primary bone tumors, sacral canal tumors and metastases. Among these, metastases are much more common than primary bone tumors, of which chordoma is the most common. Although the imaging findings of sacral tumors are nonspecific, a patient's age and sex, and specific findings such as calcification or fluid-fluid levels, can help radiologists in their differential diagnosis. We describe the imaging findings of primary sacral tumors, emphasizing the MRI findings

  17. Promotion of cancer cell invasiveness and metastasis emergence caused by olfactory receptor stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guenhaël Sanz

    Full Text Available Olfactory receptors (ORs are expressed in the olfactory epithelium, where they detect odorants, but also in other tissues with additional functions. Some ORs are even overexpressed in tumor cells. In this study, we identified ORs expressed in enterochromaffin tumor cells by RT-PCR, showing that single cells can co-express several ORs. Some of the receptors identified were already reported in other tumors, but they are orphan (without known ligand, as it is the case for most of the hundreds of human ORs. Thus, genes coding for human ORs with known ligands were transfected into these cells, expressing functional heterologous ORs. The in vitro stimulation of these cells by the corresponding OR odorant agonists promoted cell invasion of collagen gels. Using LNCaP prostate cancer cells, the stimulation of the PSGR (Prostate Specific G protein-coupled Receptor, an endogenously overexpressed OR, by β-ionone, its odorant agonist, resulted in the same phenotypic change. We also showed the involvement of a PI3 kinase γ dependent signaling pathway in this promotion of tumor cell invasiveness triggered by OR stimulation. Finally, after subcutaneous inoculation of LNCaP cells into NSG immunodeficient mice, the in vivo stimulation of these cells by the PSGR agonist β-ionone significantly enhanced metastasis emergence and spreading.

  18. Vagus nerve stimulation inhibits activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis during endotoxemia in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Westerloo, D. J.; Giebelen, I. A. J.; Meijers, J. C. M.; Daalhuisen, J.; de Vos, A. F.; Levi, M. [=Marcel M.; van der Poll, T.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sepsis and endotoxemia are associated with concurrent activation of inflammation and the hemostatic mechanism, which both contribute to organ dysfunction and death. Electrical vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has been found to inhibit tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha release during

  19. Economics of nuclear gas stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, G W [Austral Oil Company Incorporated, Houston, TX (United States); Coffer, H F; Luetkehans, G R [CER Geonuclear Corporation, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1970-05-01

    Nuclear stimulation of the Mesaverde Formation in the Piceance Basin appears to be the only available method that can release the contained gas economically. In the Rulison Field alone estimates show six to eight trillion cubic feet of gas may be made available by nuclear means, and possibly one hundred trillion cubic feet could be released in the Piceance Basin. Several problems remain to be solved before this tremendous gas reserve can be tapped. Among these are (1) rates of production following nuclear stimulation; (2) costs of nuclear stimulation; (3) radioactivity of the chimney gas; and (4) development of the ideal type of device to carry out the stimulations. Each of these problems is discussed in detail with possible solutions suggested. First and foremost is the rate at which gas can be delivered following nuclear stimulation. Calculations have been made for expected production behavior following a 5-kiloton device and a 40-kiloton device with different permeabilities. These are shown, along with conventional production history. The calculations show that rates of production will be sufficient if costs can be controlled. Costs of nuclear stimulation must be drastically reduced for a commercial process. Project Rulison will cost approximately $3.7 million, excluding lease costs, preliminary tests, and well costs. At such prices, nothing can possibly be commercial; however, these costs can come down in a logical step-wise fashion. Radiation contamination of the gas remains a problem. Three possible solutions to this problem are included. (author)

  20. Economics of nuclear gas stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, G.W.; Coffer, H.F.; Luetkehans, G.R.

    1970-01-01

    Nuclear stimulation of the Mesaverde Formation in the Piceance Basin appears to be the only available method that can release the contained gas economically. In the Rulison Field alone estimates show six to eight trillion cubic feet of gas may be made available by nuclear means, and possibly one hundred trillion cubic feet could be released in the Piceance Basin. Several problems remain to be solved before this tremendous gas reserve can be tapped. Among these are (1) rates of production following nuclear stimulation; (2) costs of nuclear stimulation; (3) radioactivity of the chimney gas; and (4) development of the ideal type of device to carry out the stimulations. Each of these problems is discussed in detail with possible solutions suggested. First and foremost is the rate at which gas can be delivered following nuclear stimulation. Calculations have been made for expected production behavior following a 5-kiloton device and a 40-kiloton device with different permeabilities. These are shown, along with conventional production history. The calculations show that rates of production will be sufficient if costs can be controlled. Costs of nuclear stimulation must be drastically reduced for a commercial process. Project Rulison will cost approximately $3.7 million, excluding lease costs, preliminary tests, and well costs. At such prices, nothing can possibly be commercial; however, these costs can come down in a logical step-wise fashion. Radiation contamination of the gas remains a problem. Three possible solutions to this problem are included. (author)

  1. IL-33 activates tumor stroma to promote intestinal polyposis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maywald, Rebecca L; Doerner, Stephanie K; Pastorelli, Luca; De Salvo, Carlo; Benton, Susan M; Dawson, Emily P; Lanza, Denise G; Berger, Nathan A; Markowitz, Sanford D; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Nadeau, Joseph H; Pizarro, Theresa T; Heaney, Jason D

    2015-05-12

    Tumor epithelial cells develop within a microenvironment consisting of extracellular matrix, growth factors, and cytokines produced by nonepithelial stromal cells. In response to paracrine signals from tumor epithelia, stromal cells modify the microenvironment to promote tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we identify interleukin 33 (IL-33) as a regulator of tumor stromal cell activation and mediator of intestinal polyposis. In human colorectal cancer, IL-33 expression was induced in the tumor epithelium of adenomas and carcinomas, and expression of the IL-33 receptor, IL1RL1 (also referred to as IL1-R4 or ST2), localized predominantly to the stroma of adenoma and both the stroma and epithelium of carcinoma. Genetic and antibody abrogation of responsiveness to IL-33 in the Apc(Min/+) mouse model of intestinal tumorigenesis inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, and suppressed angiogenesis in adenomatous polyps, which reduced both tumor number and size. Similar to human adenomas, IL-33 expression localized to tumor epithelial cells and expression of IL1RL1 associated with two stromal cell types, subepithelial myofibroblasts and mast cells, in Apc(Min/+) polyps. In vitro, IL-33 stimulation of human subepithelial myofibroblasts induced the expression of extracellular matrix components and growth factors associated with intestinal tumor progression. IL-33 deficiency reduced mast cell accumulation in Apc(Min/+) polyps and suppressed the expression of mast cell-derived proteases and cytokines known to promote polyposis. Based on these findings, we propose that IL-33 derived from the tumor epithelium promotes polyposis through the coordinated activation of stromal cells and the formation of a protumorigenic microenvironment.

  2. Biomarkers and Stimulation Algorithms for Adaptive Brain Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly B. Hoang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this review is to describe in what ways feedback or adaptive stimulation may be delivered and adjusted based on relevant biomarkers. Specific treatment mechanisms underlying therapeutic brain stimulation remain unclear, in spite of the demonstrated efficacy in a number of nervous system diseases. Brain stimulation appears to exert widespread influence over specific neural networks that are relevant to specific disease entities. In awake patients, activation or suppression of these neural networks can be assessed by either symptom alleviation (i.e., tremor, rigidity, seizures or physiological criteria, which may be predictive of expected symptomatic treatment. Secondary verification of network activation through specific biomarkers that are linked to symptomatic disease improvement may be useful for several reasons. For example, these biomarkers could aid optimal intraoperative localization, possibly improve efficacy or efficiency (i.e., reduced power needs, and provide long-term adaptive automatic adjustment of stimulation parameters. Possible biomarkers for use in portable or implanted devices span from ongoing physiological brain activity, evoked local field potentials (LFPs, and intermittent pathological activity, to wearable devices, biochemical, blood flow, optical, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI changes, temperature changes, or optogenetic signals. First, however, potential biomarkers must be correlated directly with symptom or disease treatment and network activation. Although numerous biomarkers are under consideration for a variety of stimulation indications the feasibility of these approaches has yet to be fully determined. Particularly, there are critical questions whether the use of adaptive systems can improve efficacy over continuous stimulation, facilitate adjustment of stimulation interventions and improve our understanding of the role of abnormal network function in disease mechanisms.

  3. Tumor Blood Vessel Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Lance

    2009-11-01

    ``Normalization'' of tumor blood vessels has shown promise to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutics. In theory, anti-angiogenic drugs targeting endothelial VEGF signaling can improve vessel network structure and function, enhancing the transport of subsequent cytotoxic drugs to cancer cells. In practice, the effects are unpredictable, with varying levels of success. The predominant effects of anti-VEGF therapies are decreased vessel leakiness (hydraulic conductivity), decreased vessel diameters and pruning of the immature vessel network. It is thought that each of these can influence perfusion of the vessel network, inducing flow in regions that were previously sluggish or stagnant. Unfortunately, when anti-VEGF therapies affect vessel structure and function, the changes are dynamic and overlapping in time, and it has been difficult to identify a consistent and predictable normalization ``window'' during which perfusion and subsequent drug delivery is optimal. This is largely due to the non-linearity in the system, and the inability to distinguish the effects of decreased vessel leakiness from those due to network structural changes in clinical trials or animal studies. We have developed a mathematical model to calculate blood flow in complex tumor networks imaged by two-photon microscopy. The model incorporates the necessary and sufficient components for addressing the problem of normalization of tumor vasculature: i) lattice-Boltzmann calculations of the full flow field within the vasculature and within the tissue, ii) diffusion and convection of soluble species such as oxygen or drugs within vessels and the tissue domain, iii) distinct and spatially-resolved vessel hydraulic conductivities and permeabilities for each species, iv) erythrocyte particles advecting in the flow and delivering oxygen with real oxygen release kinetics, v) shear stress-mediated vascular remodeling. This model, guided by multi-parameter intravital imaging of tumor vessel structure

  4. Epidemiological features of brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Nenad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumors account for 1.4% of all cancers and 2.4% of all cancer-related deaths. The incidence of brain tumors varies and it is higher in developed countries of Western Europe, North America, Australia and New Zealand. In Serbia, according to data from 2009, malignant brain tumors account for 2. 2 of all tumors, and from all cancer­related deaths, 3.2% is caused by malignant brain tumors. According to recent statistical reports, an overall incidence of brain tumors for benign and malignant tumors combined is 18.71 per 100,000 persons/year. The most common benign brain tumor in adults is meningioma, which is most present in women, and the most common malignant tumor is glioblastoma, which is most present in adult men. Due to high mortality, especially in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma and significant brain tumor morbidity, there is a constant interest in understanding its etiology in order to possibly prevent tumor occurrence in future and enable more efficient treatment strategies for this fatal brain disease. Despite the continuously growing number of epidemiological studies on possible factors of tumor incidence, the etiology remains unclear. The only established environmental risk factor of gliomas is ionizing radiation exposure. Exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields via cell phone use has gained a lot of attention as a potential risk factor of brain tumor development. However, studies have been inconsistent and inconclusive, so more definite results are still expected.

  5. Maxillary brown tumor as initial presentation of parathyroid adenoma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hon-Ke Sia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Brown tumor is a rare late-stage skeletal change caused by long-term stimulation of excess parathyroid hormone. It is not neoplastic, but a reparative cellular process. Common sites of brown tumor are the ribs, clavicle, long bones and pelvic girdle. Solitary maxillary brown tumor as initial presentation of primary hyperparathyroidism is rare; it is often accompanied by brown tumors of the other facial bones. Here, we present the first case of solitary maxillary brown tumor in a 29-year-old ethnic Chinese woman with initial presentation of a large tumor filling the left maxillary sinus. Underlying long-standing primary hyperparathyroidism caused by a large parathyroid adenoma was finally diagnosed. Brown tumor tends to be misdiagnosed as malignancy, and delayed diagnosis of the underlying hyperparathyroidism is common. Our case validates the suggestion that young women have a higher probability of brown tumor. Biopsy of the suspicious bone tumor and blood tests for calcium and parathyroid hormone level are crucial and essential to reach the correct diagnosis. Most brown tumors show spontaneous regression after parathyroidectomy. However, direct excision of the brown tumor may be indicated to avoid the risk of facial deformity and orbital compression at a special anatomical site, as in our case.

  6. Paradoxical action of fulvestrant in estradiol-induced regression of tamoxifen-stimulated breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipo, Clodia; Gajdos, Csaba; Liu, Hong; Chen, Bin; Jordan, V Craig

    2003-11-05

    Long-term tamoxifen treatment of breast cancer can result in tamoxifen-stimulated breast cancer, in which estrogen inhibits tumor growth after tamoxifen withdrawal. We investigated the molecular mechanism(s) of estradiol-induced tumor regression by using an in vivo model of tamoxifen-stimulated human breast cancer. Growth of parental estradiol-stimulated MCF-7E2 and long-term tamoxifen-stimulated MCF-7TAMLT xenografts in athymic mice was measured during treatment with vehicle, estradiol, estradiol plus tamoxifen, tamoxifen alone, estradiol plus fulvestrant, or fulvestrant alone. Apoptosis was detected by the terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Protein expression was assessed by western blot analysis. mRNA expression was assessed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. All statistical tests were two-sided. MCF-7E2 tumor growth was stimulated by estradiol (cross-sectional area at week 13 = 1.06 cm2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.82 to 1.30 cm2; Pestradiol-induced regression to 0.18 cm2 (95% CI = 0.15 to 0.21 cm2; P<.001), and tamoxifen or estradiol plus fulvestrant enhanced tumor growth to 1.00 cm2 (95% CI = 0.88 to 1.22 cm2). Estradiol increased the number of apoptotic cells in tumors by 23% (95% CI = 20% to 26%; P<.001) compared with all other treatments, decreased estrogen receptor alpha(ERalpha) protein expression, increased the expression of Fas mRNA and protein, decreased the expression of HER2/neu mRNA and protein and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) protein but did not affect Fas ligand protein expression compared with control. Paradoxically, fulvestrant reversed this effect and stimulated MCF-7TAMLT tumor growth apparently through ERalpha-mediated regulation of Fas, HER2/neu, and NF-kappaB. Physiologic levels of estradiol induced regression of tamoxifen-stimulated breast cancer tumors, apparently by inducing the death receptor Fas and suppressing the antiapoptotic

  7. Innate immune cell-derived microparticles facilitate hepatocarcinoma metastasis by transferring integrin α(M)β₂ to tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jingwei; Cai, Wenqian; Zhang, Yi; Huang, Chunmei; Zhang, Huafeng; Liu, Jing; Tang, Ke; Xu, Pingwei; Katirai, Foad; Zhang, Jianmin; He, Wei; Ye, Duyun; Shen, Guan-Xin; Huang, Bo

    2013-09-15

    Mechanisms by which tumor cells metastasize to distant organs still remain enigmatic. Immune cells have been assumed to be the root of metastasis by their fusing with tumor cells. This fusion theory, although interpreting tumor metastasis analogically and intriguingly, is arguable to date. We show in this study an alternative explanation by immune cell-derived microparticles (MPs). Upon stimulation by PMA or tumor cell-derived supernatants, immune cells released membrane-based MPs, which were taken up by H22 tumor cells, leading to tumor cell migration in vitro and metastasis in vivo. The underlying molecular basis was involved in integrin α(M)β₂ (CD11b/CD18), which could be effectively relayed from stimulated innate immune cells to MPs, then to tumor cells. Blocking either CD11b or CD18 led to significant decreases in MP-mediated tumor cell metastasis. This MP-mediated transfer of immune phenotype to tumor cells might also occur in vivo. These findings suggest that tumor cells may usurp innate immune cell phenotypes via MP pathway for their metastasis, providing new insight into tumor metastatic mechanism.

  8. Do hormonal contraceptives stimulate growth of neurofibromas? A survey on 59 NF1 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammert, Marge; Mautner, Victor-Felix; Kluwe, Lan

    2005-01-01

    Neurofibromas are benign tumors of the peripheral nerves and hallmark of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a tumor suppressor gene syndrome. Neurofibromas mostly start developing at puberty and can increase in size and number during pregnancy. Expression of progesterone receptors has been found in 75% of the tumors. Many female NF1 patients are thus concerned about the possibility that hormonal contraceptives may stimulate the growth of their neurofibromas. A survey was carried out on 59 female NF1 patients who are practicing or have practiced hormonal contraception to examine the effect of the various contraceptives on the growth of neurofibromas. Majority (53 out of 58) of patients who received oral estrogen-progestogen or pure progestogen preparations reported no associated tumor growth. In contrast, significant tumor growth was reported by two patients who received depot contraceptive containing high dose of synthetic progesterone. Oral contraceptives do not seem to stimulate the growth of neurofibromas in NF1 patients. High doses of progesterone might stimulate the growth of neurofibromas and deserve more caution

  9. Ubiquitinated Proteins Isolated From Tumor Cells Are Efficient Substrates for Antigen Cross-Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guangjie; Moudgil, Tarsem; Cui, Zhihua; Mou, Yongbin; Wang, Lixin; Fox, Bernard A; Hu, Hong-Ming

    2017-06-01

    We have previously shown that inhibition of the proteasome causes defective ribosomal products to be shunted into autophagosomes and subsequently released from tumor cells as defective ribosomal products in Blebs (DRibbles). These DRibbles serve as an excellent source of antigens for cross-priming of tumor-specific T cells. Here, we examine the role of ubiquitinated proteins (Ub-proteins) in this pathway. Using purified Ub-proteins from tumor cells that express endogenous tumor-associated antigen or exogenous viral antigen, we tested the ability of these proteins to stimulate antigen-specific T-cell responses, by activation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells generated from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Compared with total cell lysates, we found that purified Ub-proteins from both a gp100-specific melanoma cell line and from a lung cancer cell line expressing cytomegalovirus pp65 antigen produced a significantly higher level of IFN-γ in gp100- or pp65-specific T cells, respectively. In addition, Ub-proteins from an allogeneic tumor cell line could be used to stimulate tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes isolated and expanded from non-small cell lung cancer patients. These results establish that Ub-proteins provide a relevant source of antigens for cross-priming of antitumor immune responses in a variety of settings, including endogenous melanoma and exogenous viral antigen presentation, as well as antigen-specific tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. Thus, ubiquitin can be used as an affinity tag to enrich for unknown tumor-specific antigens from tumor cell lysates to stimulate tumor-specific T cells ex vivo or to be used as vaccines to target short-lived proteins.

  10. Biopsy in Musculoskeletal Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Gharehdaghi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of bone tumors is based on careful evaluation of clinical, imaging and a pathologic findings. So the biopsy of bone and soft tissue sarcomas is the final step in evaluation and a fundamental step in the diagnosis of the lesion. It should not be performed as a shortcut to diagnosis (1. The biopsy should be performed in order to confirm the diagnosis and differentiate among few diagnoses after careful staged studies. Real and artificial changes in imaging studies will be superimposed after performing biopsy, which may alter the interpretation if done after biopsy is taken (1. The correct management of a sarcoma depends on the accurate diagnosis. Inadequate, inapprppriate, or inaccurate non-representative biopsy leads to poorer outcome in terms of survivorship and limb salvage. An incorrect, unplanned incision and biopsy may unnecessarily contaminate uninvolved compartments which may convert a salvageable limb to amputation. Anatomic approach along with the proper biopsy techniques may lead to success or catastrophe. It is clear that in patients with inappropriate biopsy, the chance of the need to change the treatment to more radical than would originally be expected is significantly higher. Also it is more probable to need to  convert curative to palliative treatment and to require adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with inappropriate biopsies. Patients with sarcoma are best served by early referral to a specialized center where staged investigations and biopsy can be performed with minimal morbidity (3. Open biopsy is still considered the gold standard; however, recent studies suggest comparable results with percutaneous core needle biopsy. Our study on 103 consecutive CNB and open biopsy showed comparable results as well. Surgeons need to answer to two questions prior to performing a biopsy: 1-          Where is the best part of the lesion to be biopsied? 2-          What is the safest route without contaminating

  11. Neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davies, Karen

    2009-04-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors are rare neoplasms accounting for less than 5% of pancreatic malignancies. They are broadly classified into either functioning tumors (insulinomas, gastrinomas, glucagonomas, VIPomas, and somatostatinomas) or nonfunctioning tumors. The diagnosis of these tumors is difficult and requires a careful history and examination combined with laboratory tests and radiologic imaging. Signs and symptoms are usually related to hormone hypersecretion in the case of functioning tumors and to tumor size or metastases with nonfunctioning tumors. Surgical resection remains the treatment of choice even in the face of metastatic disease. Further development of novel diagnostic and treatment modalities offers potential to greatly improve quality of life and prolong disease-free survival for patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors.

  12. Neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davies, Karen

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors are rare neoplasms accounting for less than 5% of pancreatic malignancies. They are broadly classified into either functioning tumors (insulinomas, gastrinomas, glucagonomas, VIPomas, and somatostatinomas) or nonfunctioning tumors. The diagnosis of these tumors is difficult and requires a careful history and examination combined with laboratory tests and radiologic imaging. Signs and symptoms are usually related to hormone hypersecretion in the case of functioning tumors and to tumor size or metastases with nonfunctioning tumors. Surgical resection remains the treatment of choice even in the face of metastatic disease. Further development of novel diagnostic and treatment modalities offers potential to greatly improve quality of life and prolong disease-free survival for patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors.

  13. Tumor Biology and Microenvironment Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Part of NCI's Division of Cancer Biology's research portfolio, research in this area seeks to understand the role of tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment (TME) in driving cancer initiation, progression, maintenance and recurrence.

  14. Mitogenic activity of pine cone extracts against cultured splenocytes from normal and tumor-bearing animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurakata, Y; Sakagami, H; Takeda, M; Konno, K; Kitajima, K; Ichikawa, S; Hata, N; Sato, T

    1989-01-01

    An acidic pine cone extract, Fr. V. of Pinus parviflora Sieb. et Zucc. significantly stimulated DNA synthesis of isolated splenocytes from both mice and rats, but only marginally affected the DNA synthesis of leukemic cell lines. The maximum stimulation level attained by Fr. V slightly exceeded that of plant lectins, whereas much weaker stimulating activity was found in natural and chemically modified antitumor polysaccharides, sialic acid-rich glycoproteins, and polyphenolic compounds such as lignin and tannic acid. In mice with subcutaneously transplanted sarcoma-180, responses of splenocytes against Con A declines in the terminal stage of tumor development, whereas responses against Fr. V remained relatively constant throughout all periods of tumor progression. The suppression of Fr. V activity by acetylation or methylation suggests the importance of the hydroxyl group in the expression of its stimulation activity.

  15. Integrated genomics of ovarian xenograft tumor progression and chemotherapy response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuckey, Ashley; Brodsky, Alexander S; Fischer, Andrew; Miller, Daniel H; Hillenmeyer, Sara; Kim, Kyu K; Ritz, Anna; Singh, Rakesh K; Raphael, Benjamin J; Brard, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most deadly gynecological cancer with a very poor prognosis. Xenograft mouse models have proven to be one very useful tool in testing candidate therapeutic agents and gene function in vivo. In this study we identify genes and gene networks important for the efficacy of a pre-clinical anti-tumor therapeutic, MT19c. In order to understand how ovarian xenograft tumors may be growing and responding to anti-tumor therapeutics, we used genome-wide mRNA expression and DNA copy number measurements to identify key genes and pathways that may be critical for SKOV-3 xenograft tumor progression. We compared SKOV-3 xenografts treated with the ergocalciferol derived, MT19c, to untreated tumors collected at multiple time points. Cell viability assays were used to test the function of the PPARγ agonist, Rosiglitazone, on SKOV-3 cell growth. These data indicate that a number of known survival and growth pathways including Notch signaling and general apoptosis factors are differentially expressed in treated vs. untreated xenografts. As tumors grow, cell cycle and DNA replication genes show increased expression, consistent with faster growth. The steroid nuclear receptor, PPARγ, was significantly up-regulated in MT19c treated xenografts. Surprisingly, stimulation of PPARγ with Rosiglitazone reduced the efficacy of MT19c and cisplatin suggesting that PPARγ is regulating a survival pathway in SKOV-3 cells. To identify which genes may be important for tumor growth and treatment response, we observed that MT19c down-regulates some high copy number genes and stimulates expression of some low copy number genes suggesting that these genes are particularly important for SKOV-3 xenograft growth and survival. We have characterized the time dependent responses of ovarian xenograft tumors to the vitamin D analog, MT19c. Our results suggest that PPARγ promotes survival for some ovarian tumor cells. We propose that a combination of regulated expression and copy number

  16. Electrical stimulation and motor recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Wise

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several investigators have successfully regenerated axons in animal spinal cords without locomotor recovery. One explanation is that the animals were not trained to use the regenerated connections. Intensive locomotor training improves walking recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) in people, and >90% of people with incomplete SCI recover walking with training. Although the optimal timing, duration, intensity, and type of locomotor training are still controversial, many investigators have reported beneficial effects of training on locomotor function. The mechanisms by which training improves recovery are not clear, but an attractive theory is available. In 1949, Donald Hebb proposed a famous rule that has been paraphrased as "neurons that fire together, wire together." This rule provided a theoretical basis for a widely accepted theory that homosynaptic and heterosynaptic activity facilitate synaptic formation and consolidation. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord has a locomotor center, called the central pattern generator (CPG), which can be activated nonspecifically with electrical stimulation or neurotransmitters to produce walking. The CPG is an obvious target to reconnect after SCI. Stimulating motor cortex, spinal cord, or peripheral nerves can modulate lumbar spinal cord excitability. Motor cortex stimulation causes long-term changes in spinal reflexes and synapses, increases sprouting of the corticospinal tract, and restores skilled forelimb function in rats. Long used to treat chronic pain, motor cortex stimuli modify lumbar spinal network excitability and improve lower extremity motor scores in humans. Similarly, epidural spinal cord stimulation has long been used to treat pain and spasticity. Subthreshold epidural stimulation reduces the threshold for locomotor activity. In 2011, Harkema et al. reported lumbosacral epidural stimulation restores motor control in chronic motor complete patients. Peripheral nerve or functional electrical

  17. Direct Electrical Stimulation in the Human Brain Disrupts Melody Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcea, Frank E; Chernoff, Benjamin L; Diamond, Bram; Lewis, Wesley; Sims, Maxwell H; Tomlinson, Samuel B; Teghipco, Alexander; Belkhir, Raouf; Gannon, Sarah B; Erickson, Steve; Smith, Susan O; Stone, Jonathan; Liu, Lynn; Tollefson, Trenton; Langfitt, John; Marvin, Elizabeth; Pilcher, Webster H; Mahon, Bradford Z

    2017-09-11

    Prior research using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) [1-4] and behavioral studies of patients with acquired or congenital amusia [5-8] suggest that the right posterior superior temporal gyrus (STG) in the human brain is specialized for aspects of music processing (for review, see [9-12]). Intracranial electrical brain stimulation in awake neurosurgery patients is a powerful means to determine the computations supported by specific brain regions and networks [13-21] because it provides reversible causal evidence with high spatial resolution (for review, see [22, 23]). Prior intracranial stimulation or cortical cooling studies have investigated musical abilities related to reading music scores [13, 14] and singing familiar songs [24, 25]. However, individuals with amusia (congenitally, or from a brain injury) have difficulty humming melodies but can be spared for singing familiar songs with familiar lyrics [26]. Here we report a detailed study of a musician with a low-grade tumor in the right temporal lobe. Functional MRI was used pre-operatively to localize music processing to the right STG, and the patient subsequently underwent awake intraoperative mapping using direct electrical stimulation during a melody repetition task. Stimulation of the right STG induced "music arrest" and errors in pitch but did not affect language processing. These findings provide causal evidence for the functional segregation of music and language processing in the human brain and confirm a specific role of the right STG in melody processing. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Metastasis-inducing S100A4 and RANTES cooperate in promoting tumor progression in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitte Forst

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The tumor microenvironment has been described as a critical milieu determining tumor growth and metastases. A pivotal role of metastasis-inducing S100A4 in the development of tumor stroma has been proven in animal models and verified in human breast cancer biopsies. Expression and release of S100A4 has been shown in various types of stroma composing cells, including fibroblasts and immune cells. However, the events implicated in upstream and downstream pathways regulating the activity of the extracellular S100A4 protein in the tumor milieu remain unsolved.We studied the interplay between the tumor cell-derived cytokine regulated-upon-activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES; CCL5 and S100A4 which were shown to be critical factors in tumor progression. We found that RANTES stimulates the externalization of S100A4 via microparticle shedding from the plasma membrane of tumor and stroma cells. Conversely, the released S100A4 protein induces the upregulation of fibronectin (FN in fibroblasts and a number of cytokines, including RANTES in tumor cells as well as stimulates cell motility in a wound healing assay. Importantly, using wild type and S100A4-deficient mouse models, we demonstrated a substantial influence of tumor cell-derived RANTES on S100A4 release into blood circulation which ultimately increases the metastatic burden in mice.Altogether, the data presented strongly validate the pro-metastatic function of S100A4 in the tumor microenvironment and define how the tumor cell-derived cytokine RANTES acts as a critical regulator of S100A4-dependent tumor cell dissemination. Additionally, for the first time we demonstrated the mechanism of S100A4 release associated with plasma membrane microparticle shedding from various cells types.

  19. Bednar Tumor: An Uncommon Entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amonkar, Gayathri P; Rupani, Asha; Shah, Ajay; Deshpande, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Bednar tumor is an uncommon variant of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans. Also known as pigmented dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, this tumor is of intermediate grade. It is seen in adults and has a predisposition to affect the shoulder region. We report a rare case of Bednar tumor in a 40-year-old female patient. The diagnosis of Bednar tumor must be considered while reporting pigmented subcutaneous spindle cell lesions.

  20. Natural Killer Dendritic Cells Enhance Immune Responses Elicited by α-Galactosylceramide-Stimulated Natural Killer T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Won Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer dendritic cells (NKDCs possess potent anti-tumor activity, but the cellular effect of NKDC interactions with other innate immune cells is unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that the interaction of NKDCs and natural killer T (NKT cells is required for the anti-tumor immune responses that are elicited by α-galactosylceramide (α-GC in mice. The rapid and strong expression of interferon-γ by NKDCs after α-GC stimulation was dependent on NKT cells. Various NK and DC molecular markers and cytotoxic molecules were up-regulated following α-GC administration. This up-regulation could improve NKDC presentation of tumor antigens and increase cytotoxicity against tumor cells. NKDCs were required for the stimulation of DCs, NK cells, and NKT cells. The strong anti-tumor immune responses elicited by α-GC may be due to the down-regulation of regulatory T cells. Furthermore, the depletion of NKDCs dampened the tumor clearance mediated by α-GC-stimulated NKT cells in vivo. Taken together, these results indicate that complex interactions of innate immune cells might be required to achieve optimal anti-tumor immune responses during the early stages of tumorigenesis.

  1. Factor XIIIa is expressed by fibroblasts in fibrovascular tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, A J; Penneys, N S

    1989-10-01

    Factor XIIIa (FXIIIa), a blood and intracellularly produced coagulation factor, has been found in a variety of cell types including fibroblast-like mesenchymal cells, and has been shown to stimulate the proliferation of fibroblasts and some neoplastic cells in vitro. We have already shown that the dendritic fibroblasts composing the fibrous papule contain this factor. We hypothesized that histopathologically similar fibrovascular tumors may also express FXIIIa and, in this report, show that the large stellate fibroblasts found in acquired digital fibrokeratomas, angiofibromas (adenoma sebaceum of Pringle), and oral fibroma (oral fibrous hyperplasia) also express FXIIIa. We postulate that FXIIIa, possibly acting as a growth factor, may be a common denominator in the pathogenesis of these tumors. Another possibility is that these tumors may be the consequence of a local overproduction of FXIIIa in response to an, as yet, unidentified stimulus.

  2. Determinates of tumor response to radiation: Tumor cells, tumor stroma and permanent local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wende; Huang, Peigen; Chen, David J.; Gerweck, Leo E.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: The causes of tumor response variation to radiation remain obscure, thus hampering the development of predictive assays and strategies to decrease resistance. The present study evaluates the impact of host tumor stromal elements and the in vivo environment on tumor cell kill, and relationship between tumor cell radiosensitivity and the tumor control dose. Material and methods: Five endpoints were evaluated and compared in a radiosensitive DNA double-strand break repair-defective (DNA-PKcs −/− ) tumor line, and its DNA-PKcs repair competent transfected counterpart. In vitro colony formation assays were performed on in vitro cultured cells, on cells obtained directly from tumors, and on cells irradiated in situ. Permanent local control was assessed by the TCD 50 assay. Vascular effects were evaluated by functional vascular density assays. Results: The fraction of repair competent and repair deficient tumor cells surviving radiation did not substantially differ whether irradiated in vitro, i.e., in the absence of host stromal elements and factors, from the fraction of cells killed following in vivo irradiation. Additionally, the altered tumor cell sensitivity resulted in a proportional change in the dose required to achieve permanent local control. The estimated number of tumor cells per tumor, their cloning efficiency and radiosensitivity, all assessed by in vitro assays, were used to predict successfully, the measured tumor control doses. Conclusion: The number of clonogens per tumor and their radiosensitivity govern the permanent local control dose

  3. Hypoxia stimulates migration of breast cancer cells via the PERK/ATF4/LAMP3-arm of the unfolded protein response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagelkerke, A.; Bussink, J.; Mujcic, H.; Wouters, B.G.; Lehmann, S.A.; Sweep, F.C.; Span, P.N.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 pathway can stimulate tumor cell migration and metastasis. Furthermore, hypoxic tumors are associated with a poor prognosis. Besides the HIF-1 pathway, the unfolded protein response (UPR) is also induced by hypoxic conditions. The PKR-like

  4. Tumor uptake of radioruthenium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Richards, P.; Meinken, G.E.; Larson, S.M.; Grunbaum, Z.

    1980-01-01

    The use of ruthenium-97 as a scintigraphic agent, particularly for tumor localization, is investigated. The tumor uptake of ruthenium chloride and ruthenium-labelled transferrin is evaluated and their application as tumor-imagine agents is compared to gallium-67 citrate

  5. Intravascular bronchio-alveolar tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mata, J.M.; Caceres, J.; Prat, J.; Lopez, J.I.; Velilla, O.

    1991-01-01

    In 1975 Dail and Liebow described the clinical and pathological characteristics of a pulmonary tumor which they dominated intravascular bronchio-alveolar tumor (IVBAT). Our aim is to acquaint radiologists with the existence of this tumor by describing the radiologic findings in 2 patients with IVBAT, 1 with hepatic involvement ant the other with pulmonary osteoarthropathy. (author). 7 refs.; 2 figs

  6. Neonatal umbilical inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    antenatal scan. The preferred treatment option is resection of the tumor. Spontaneous regression has been described. Ann Pediatr Surg 13:160–162 c 2017 Annals of Pediatric. Surgery. ... Keywords: inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, neonatal tumor, surgical resection ... Other anatomical regions were the brain, the.

  7. Notch Signaling and Brain Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie; Kristoffersen, Karina; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2011-01-01

    Human brain tumors are a heterogenous group of neoplasms occurring inside the cranium and the central spinal cord. In adults and children, astrocytic glioma and medulloblastoma are the most common subtypes of primary brain tumors. These tumor types are thought to arise from cells in which Notch...

  8. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Hyung Kyu

    1983-01-01

    A 18-year-old man had a painless swelling in the right anterior portion of maxilla for 2 years. On radiographic examination, a radiolucent region that was not associated with an unerupted tooth was seen. Small scattered radiopaque foci were seen in the cystic lumen. At second case, a 16-year-old girl had a painless swelling in the anterior portion of maxilla for 3 years. On radio graphic examination, a radiolucent region that associated with an unerupted tooth was seen. Multiple scattered radiopaque foci were seen in the radiolucent cystic lumen. With the patient under local anesthesia, well encapsulated tumors were enucleated. The diagnosis made in the pathologist's report was Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor, benign lesion often having distinct clinical and radiographic features.

  9. Tumor targeted gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Joo Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of molecular mechanisms governing malignant transformation brings new opportunities for therapeutic intervention against cancer using novel approaches. One of them is gene therapy based on the transfer of genetic material to an organism with the aim of correcting a disease. The application of gene therapy to the cancer treatment had led to the development of new experimental approaches such as suicidal gene therapy, inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. Suicidal gene therapy is based on the expression in tumor cells of a gene encoding an enzyme that converts a prodrug into a toxic product. Representative suicidal genes are Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and cytosine deaminase (CD). Especially, physicians and scientists of nuclear medicine field take an interest in suicidal gene therapy because they can monitor the location and magnitude, and duration of expression of HSV1-tk and CD by PET scanner

  10. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Palaskar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is an uncommon lesion of unknown cause. It encompasses a spectrum of myofibroblastic proliferation along with varying amount of inflammatory infiltrate. A number of terms have been applied to the lesion, namely, inflammatory pseudotumor, fibrous xanthoma, plasma cell granuloma, pseudosarcoma, lymphoid hamartoma, myxoid hamartoma, inflammatory myofibrohistiocytic proliferation, benign myofibroblatoma, and most recently, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. The diverse nomenclature is mostly descriptive and reflects the uncertainty regarding true biologic nature of these lesions. Recently, the concept of this lesion being reactive has been challenged based on the clinical demonstration of recurrences and metastasis and cytogenetic evidence of acquired clonal chromosomal abnormalities. We hereby report a case of inflammatory pseudotumor and review its inflammatory versus neoplastic behavior.

  11. Tumor of small bowel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz Lobo, Elmer Jair; Rubio Vargas, Romulo; Cecilia Hani, Albis

    2009-01-01

    Young woman who is having episodes of overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding that requires transfusions. The endoscopic study consists of 2 endoscopies of the upper digestive system and two colonoscopies. The tests do not find the cause of the digestive hemorrhage. A double-balloon enteroscopy is performed and it is found that the Ileum has an ulcerate subepithelial lesion with neoplasia appearance which is marked with Chinese ink and biopsies are taken from the tissue which are not diagnosed. Studies of staging are performed ant the result is negative. A laparotomy is performed for diagnosis and treatment which includes the intestinal resection of ileum where the tumor is placed. The result of the test shows to be a neuroendocrine carcinoma of high degree of large cells undifferentiated. One appears in addition a revision to overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and neuroendocrine tumor of small

  12. CT findings of parotid gland tumors: benign versus malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Moon Ok; Han, Chun Hwan; Kim, Mie Young; Yi, Jeong Geun; Park, Kyung Joo; Lee, Joo Hyuk; Bae, Sang Hoon; Kim, Jeung Sook

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the characteristics of parotid gland tumors to help in the differentiation between benign and malignant lesions. The CT findings of 22 patients with surgically proven parotid gland tumors were reviewed. Analysis was focused on the density and margin characteristics of the tumors, and the relationship between the tumor and surrounding structures. Those tumors were pleomorphic adenoma (n = 8), Warthin's tumor (n = 5), basal cell adenoma (n = 1), lipoma (n = 1), dermoid cyst (n = 1), adenoid cystic carcinoma (n = 2), mucoepidermoid carcinoma (n 1), epidermoid carcinoma (n = 1), and carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma (n 1). Most of benign and malignant tumors were heterogeneous in density on contrast enhanced CT scans. In 5 of 6 malignant cases, the tumors had irregular or ill-defined margin and a tendancy to involve or cross the superficial layer of deep cervical fascia with obliteration of subcutaneous fat. Two malignant tumors invaded surrounding structures. Although the heterogeneous density of tumor is not a specific finding for malignancy at CT, following findings, such as, irregular or blurred margin of the lesion, the involvement of fascial plane, and the infiltration of surrounding structures may suggest the possibility of malignant parotid tumor

  13. Precision cancer immunotherapy: optimizing dendritic cell-based strategies to induce tumor antigen-specific T-cell responses against individual patient tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takuya; Nagaoka, Koji; Takahara, Masashi; Yang, Xiao Yi; Liu, Cong-Xiao; Guo, Hongtao; Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Hobeika, Amy; Hartman, Zachary; Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2015-05-01

    Most dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines have loaded the DC with defined antigens, but loading with autologos tumor-derived antigens would generate DCs that activate personalized tumor-specific T-cell responses. We hypothesized that DC matured with an optimized combination of reagents and loaded with tumor-derived antigens using a clinically feasible electroporation strategy would induce potent antitumor immunity. We first studied the effects on DC maturation and antigen presentation of the addition of picibanil (OK432) to a combination of zoledronic acid, tumor necrosis factor-α, and prostaglandin E2. Using DC matured with the optimized combination, we tested 2 clinically feasible sources of autologous antigen for electroloading, total tumor mRNA or total tumor lysate, to determine which stimulated more potent antigen-specific T cells in vitro and activated more potent antitumor immunity in vivo. The combination of tumor necrosis factor-α/prostaglandin E2/zoledronic acid/OK432 generated DC with high expression of maturation markers and antigen-specific T-cell stimulatory function in vitro. Mature DC electroloaded with tumor-derived mRNA [mRNA electroporated dendritic cell (EPDC)] induced greater expansion of antigen-specific T cells in vitro than DC electroloaded with tumor lysate (lysate EPDC). In a therapeutic model of MC38-carcinoembryonic antigen colon cancer-bearing mice, vaccination with mRNA EPDC induced the most efficient anti-carcinoembryonic antigen cellular immune response, which significantly suppressed tumor growth. In conclusion, mature DC electroloaded with tumor-derived mRNA are a potent cancer vaccine, especially useful when specific tumor antigens for vaccination have not been identified, allowing autologous tumor, and if unavailable, allogeneic cell lines to be used as an unbiased source of antigen. Our data support clinical testing of this strategy.

  14. Evoked Electromyographically Controlled Electrical Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Hayashibe

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Time-variant muscle responses under electrical stimulation (ES are often problematic for all the applications of neuroprosthetic muscle control. This situation limits the range of ES usage in relevant areas, mainly due to muscle fatigue and also to changes in stimulation electrode contact conditions, especially in transcutaneous ES. Surface electrodes are still the most widely used in noninvasive applications.Electrical field variations caused by changes in the stimulation contact condition markedly affect the resulting total muscle activation levels. Fatigue phenomena under functional electrical stimulation (FES are also well known source of time-varying characteristics coming from muscle response under ES. Therefore it is essential to monitor the actual muscle state and assess the expected muscle response by ES so as to improve the current ES system in favour of adaptive muscle-response-aware FES control. To deal with this issue, we have been studying a novel control technique using evoked electromyography (eEMG signals to compensate for these muscle time-variances under ES for stable neuroprosthetic muscle control. In this perspective article, I overview the background of this topic and highlight important points to be aware of when using ES to induce the desired muscle activation regardless of the time-variance. I also demonstrate how to deal with the common critical problem of ES to move toward robust neuroprosthetic muscle control with the Evoked Electromyographically Controlled Electrical Stimulation paradigm.

  15. Bone tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLeod, R.A.; Berquist, T.H.

    1988-01-01

    The emphasis of this chapter is on the contribution of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the care of patients with bone neoplasms. These modalities are emphasized because of their relative newness and not because they are considered more significant than the other more established examinations. Routine radiographs remain the most informative and essential imaging procedures for the diagnosis of bone tumors

  16. Stereotactic irradiation of tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinbacher, L.

    1989-01-01

    In the Federal German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg, a specific brain tumor localization system has been developed. The system offers precise and easy manipulation, and pin-pointed application for diagnostic evaluation and therapy. The radiation source for radiotherapy are 125 J-seeds. The method so far is applied primarily for treatment of astrocytomas in children. The article reviews applications and results. (MG) [de

  17. Stromal gastrointestinal tumors (GIST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balev, B.; Boykova, K.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: GIST are a heterogeneous group of mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract with varying tumor grade and frequency of 1: 100 000 per year. Mazur and Clark introduced the term for the first time in 1983. GIST constitute approximately 2% of the tumors in the gastrointestinal tract. The average age is 60 years. The most common locations are the stomach (60%), small intestine (30%), esophagus (1%), and rectum (5%). Learning objective: to demonstrate the imaging characteristics of the disease according to the current ESMO guidelines and to present the diagnostic accuracy of different imaging modalitiesnbased on review of literature and on own observations. GIST originate from interstitial cells (of Cajal) in the GIT wall, belonging to the autonomic nervous system, which is responsible for motility. 90% of GIST show overexpression of the KIT receptor, also known as CD117 or stem cell factor receptor. those that do not express c-KIT mutations, activate mutations in PDGFRA gene. Tumor’s macromorphology determines the imaging features on different modalities. Most of these tumors are exophytic, subepithelial, reach large size and enhance inhomogeneous due to necrosis. They usually do not cause obstruction. Ultrasound as the initiation method shows low sensitivity and specificity in GIST detection, CT with intravenous contrast is the gold standard. MRI contributes with assessing the vascularisation, cellularity and pH. FDG-PET/CT registers the metabolism of intratumoral acidosis. CT is the method of choice in the early diagnosis and determination of resectability of GIST. MRI is an additional method. PET FDG-CT is useful for the monitoring of patients treated with Imatinib

  18. Combined tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrba, H.

    1990-01-01

    This comprehensive survey of current methods and achievements first takes a look at the two basic therapies, devoting a chapter each to the surgery and radiotherapy of tumors. The principal subjects of the book, however, are the systemic, adjuvant therapy, biological therapies, hyperthermia and various other therapies (as e.g. treatment with ozone, oxygen, or homeopathic means), and psychotherapy. (MG) With 54 figs., 86 tabs [de

  19. Neuroendocrine Tumor, diagnostic difficulties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Oliveira

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH secretion is a rare disease. A 51 years old woman, with a Cushing syndrome secondary to ectopic ACTH secretion, diagnosed in 2009, with mediastinal lymphadenopathy, whose biopsy was compatible with lung small cell carcinoma, staged as IIIB using TNM classification. No other lesions were found in patient study. The patient was submitted to chemotherapy, associated to ketoconazole 200 mg twice daily, with partial remission of both conditions. Three years later was admitted with an aggravation of Cushing syndrome. There was no evidence of progression of pulmonary disease. A cystic lesion in the pancreatic uncinated process was found by abdominal CT scan and with avid uptake by DOTANOC PET discreet in anterior mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Biopsy of pancreatic mass revealed a neuroendocrine tumor. Pulmonary masses were biopsied again and was in favor of neuroendocrine tumor. It was assumed the diagnosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with mediastinal metastasis. The patient initiated lanreotid (120 mg, monthly, subcutaneous in association with ketoconazole. After 5 months of therapy, patient died with sepsis secondary to pneumonia. Neuroendocrine tumours are rare, difficult to diagnose and with poor prognosis when associated with ectopic ACTH secreting Cushing syndrome.

  20. MR findings of ovarian tumors with hormonal activity, with emphasis on tumors other than sex cord-stromal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Yumiko Oishi [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan)]. E-mail: ytanaka@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Saida, Tsukasa Sasaki [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tsukuba University Hospital (Japan); Minami, Rie [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Yagi, Takako [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tsukuba University Hospital (Japan); Tsunoda, Hajime [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kanto Medical Center, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone East Corporation (Japan); Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Minami, Manabu [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    Sex cord-stromal tumors including granulosa cell tumor, thecoma, Sertoli stromal cell tumor and steroid cell tumor are noted for their hormonal activity. However, there are many kinds of ovarian tumors other than sex cord-stromal tumors and tumor-like conditions with endocrine manifestations. Cross-sectional imaging, especially MR, can provide precise features of ovarian tumors and uterine morphological change even in a clinically latent excess of estrogen. In this article, we demonstrate typical imaging findings of ovarian tumors with hormonal activity. We also shortly explain the mechanism of the virilization and hyperestrogenism caused by ovarian tumors and tumor-like conditions.

  1. MR findings of ovarian tumors with hormonal activity, with emphasis on tumors other than sex cord-stromal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yumiko Oishi; Saida, Tsukasa Sasaki; Minami, Rie; Yagi, Takako; Tsunoda, Hajime; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Minami, Manabu

    2007-01-01

    Sex cord-stromal tumors including granulosa cell tumor, thecoma, Sertoli stromal cell tumor and steroid cell tumor are noted for their hormonal activity. However, there are many kinds of ovarian tumors other than sex cord-stromal tumors and tumor-like conditions with endocrine manifestations. Cross-sectional imaging, especially MR, can provide precise features of ovarian tumors and uterine morphological change even in a clinically latent excess of estrogen. In this article, we demonstrate typical imaging findings of ovarian tumors with hormonal activity. We also shortly explain the mechanism of the virilization and hyperestrogenism caused by ovarian tumors and tumor-like conditions

  2. Sulfonated polyaniline-based organic electrodes for controlled electrical stimulation of human osteosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yong; Yang, Yanyin; Poojari, Yadagiri; Liu, Yidong; Wu, Jen-Chieh; Hansford, Derek J; Epstein, Arthur J

    2013-06-10

    Electrically conducting polymers (CPs) were found to stimulate various cell types such as neurons, osteoblasts, and fibroblasts in both in vitro and in vivo studies. However, to our knowledge, no studies have been reported on the utility of CPs in stimulation of cancer or tumor cells in the literature. Here we report a facile fabrication method of self-doped sulfonated polyaniline (SPAN)-based interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) for controlled electrical stimulation of human osteosarcoma (HOS) cells. Increased degree of sulfonation was found to increase the SPAN conductivity, which in turn improved the cell attachment and cell growth without electrical stimulation. However, an enhanced cell growth was observed under controlled electrical (AC) stimulation at low applied voltage and frequency (≤800 mV and ≤1 kHz). The cell growth reached a maximum threshold at an applied voltage or frequency and beyond which pronounced cell death was observed. We believe that these organic electrodes may find utility in electrical stimulation of cancer or tumor cells for therapy and research and may also provide an alternative to the conventional metal-based electrodes.

  3. Tumor regression patterns in retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, S.N.; Siddique, S.N.; Zaheer, N.

    2016-01-01

    To observe the types of tumor regression after treatment, and identify the common pattern of regression in our patients. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, Al-Shifa Trust Eye Hospital, Rawalpindi, Pakistan, from October 2011 to October 2014. Methodology: Children with unilateral and bilateral retinoblastoma were included in the study. Patients were referred to Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad, for chemotherapy. After every cycle of chemotherapy, dilated funds examination under anesthesia was performed to record response of the treatment. Regression patterns were recorded on RetCam II. Results: Seventy-four tumors were included in the study. Out of 74 tumors, 3 were ICRB group A tumors, 43 were ICRB group B tumors, 14 tumors belonged to ICRB group C, and remaining 14 were ICRB group D tumors. Type IV regression was seen in 39.1% (n=29) tumors, type II in 29.7% (n=22), type III in 25.6% (n=19), and type I in 5.4% (n=4). All group A tumors (100%) showed type IV regression. Seventeen (39.5%) group B tumors showed type IV regression. In group C, 5 tumors (35.7%) showed type II regression and 5 tumors (35.7%) showed type IV regression. In group D, 6 tumors (42.9%) regressed to type II non-calcified remnants. Conclusion: The response and success of the focal and systemic treatment, as judged by the appearance of different patterns of tumor regression, varies with the ICRB grouping of the tumor. (author)

  4. Intrapontine malignant nerve sheath tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozić, Dusko; Nagulić, Mirjana; Samardzić, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    . On pathological examination, the neoplasm appeared to be an intrapontine nerve sheath tumor originating most likely from the intrapontine segment of one of the cranial nerve fibres. The tumor showed exophytic growth, with consequent spread to adjacent subaracnoid space. MR spectroscopy revealed the presence......The primary source of malignant intracerebral nerve sheath tumors is still unclear We report the imaging and MR spectroscopic findings in a 39-year-old man with a very rare brain stem tumor MR examination revealed the presence of intraaxial brain stem tumor with a partial exophytic growth...

  5. Epidemiological features of brain tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Živković Nenad; Mihailović Goran; Marković Marko; Berisavac Iva; Spaić Milan

    2013-01-01

    Brain tumors account for 1.4% of all cancers and 2.4% of all cancer-related deaths. The incidence of brain tumors varies and it is higher in developed countries of Western Europe, North America, Australia and New Zealand. In Serbia, according to data from 2009, malignant brain tumors account for 2. 2 of all tumors, and from all cancer­related deaths, 3.2% is caused by malignant brain tumors. According to recent statistical reports, an overall incidence of b...

  6. Seizure prognosis of patients with low-grade tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlenberg, Cynthia A; Fadul, Camilo E; Roberts, David W; Thadani, Vijay M; Bujarski, Krzysztof A; Scott, Rod C; Jobst, Barbara C

    2012-09-01

    Seizures frequently impact the quality of life of patients with low grade tumors. Management is often based on best clinical judgment. We examined factors that correlate with seizure outcome to optimize seizure management. Patients with supratentorial low-grade tumors evaluated at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. Using multiple regression analysis the patient characteristics and treatments were correlated with seizure outcome using Engel's classification. Of the 73 patients with low grade tumors and median follow up of 3.8 years (range 1-20 years), 54 (74%) patients had a seizure ever and 46 (63%) had at least one seizure before tumor surgery. The only factor significantly associated with pre-surgical seizures was tumor histology. Of the 54 patients with seizures ever, 25 (46.3%) had a class I outcome at last follow up. There was no difference in seizure outcome between grade II gliomas (astrocytoma grade II, oligodendroglioma grade II, mixed oligo-astrocytoma grade II) and other pathologies (pilocytic astrocytoma, ependymomas, DNET, gangliocytoma and ganglioglioma). Once seizures were established seizure prognosis was similar between different pathologies. Chemotherapy (p=0.03) and radiation therapy (p=0.02) had a positive effect on seizure outcome. No other parameter including significant tumor growth during the follow up period predicted seizure outcome. Only three patients developed new-onset seizures after tumor surgery that were non-perioperative. Anticonvulsant medication was tapered in 14 patients with seizures and 10 had no further seizures. Five patients underwent additional epilepsy surgery with a class I outcome in four. Two patients received a vagal nerve stimulator with >50% seizure reduction. Seizures at presentation are the most important factor associated with continued seizures after tumor surgery. Pathology does not influence seizure outcome. Use of long term prophylactic anticonvulsants is unwarranted. Chemotherapy and

  7. Activation of antitumor immune responses by Ganoderma formosanum polysaccharides in tumor-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Li; Lu, Chiu-Ying; Hsueh, Ying-Chao; Liu, Wen-Hsiung; Chen, Chun-Jen

    2014-11-01

    Fungi of the genus Ganoderma are basidiomycetes that have been used as traditional medicine in Asia and have been shown to exhibit various pharmacological activities. We recently found that PS-F2, a polysaccharide fraction purified from the submerged culture broth of Ganoderma formosanum, stimulates the maturation of dendritic cells and primes a T helper 1 (Th1)-polarized adaptive immune response in vivo. In this study, we investigated whether the immune adjuvant function of PS-F2 can stimulate antitumor immune responses in tumor-bearing mice. Continuous intraperitoneal or oral administration of PS-F2 effectively suppressed the growth of colon 26 (C26) adenocarcinoma, B16 melanoma, and sarcoma 180 (S180) tumor cells in mice without adverse effects on the animals' health. PS-F2 did not cause direct cytotoxicity on tumor cells, and it lost the antitumor effect in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells, and serum from PS-F2-treated tumor-bearing mice all exhibited antitumor activities when adoptively transferred to naïve animals, indicating that PS-F2 treatment stimulates tumor-specific cellular and humoral immune responses. These data demonstrate that continuous administration of G. formosanum polysaccharide PS-F2 can activate host immune responses against ongoing tumor growth, suggesting that PS-F2 can potentially be developed into a preventive/therapeutic agent for cancer immunotherapy.

  8. Brain tumor and CT, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Nobuyuki; Katada, Kazuhiro; Shinomiya, Youichi; Sano, Hirotoshi; Kanno, Tetsuo

    1981-01-01

    It is very important for a neurosurgeon to know the consistency of a brain tumor preoperatively, since the information which is of much use in indicating the likely difficulty of the operation, which operative tools should be selected, the amount of bleeding to be expected from the tumor, and so on. The authors, therefore, tried to evaluate the consistency of brain tumors preoperatively 27 cases in which the margin of the tumor was made clear with a homogeneous stain were studied concerning the relationship between the tumor consistency and the CT findings. The results are as follows: 1) A higher CT number on a plain CT indicated a harder consistency of the tumor. 2) A lesser contrast index (CT number on enhancement CT/CT number on plain CT) showed a harder consistency of the tumor. (author)

  9. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    A variety of lesions may involve the optic nerve. Mainly, these lesions are inflammatory or vascular lesions that rarely necessitate surgery but may induce significant visual morbidity. Orbital tumors may induce proptosis, visual loss, relative afferent pupillary defect, disc edema and optic...... atrophy, but less than one-tenth of these tumors are confined to the optic nerve or its sheaths. No signs or symptoms are pathognomonic for tumors of the optic nerve. The tumors of the optic nerve may originate from the optic nerve itself (primary tumors) as a proliferation of cells normally present...... in the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  10. Specific inhibition of cytotoxic memory cells produced against uv-induced tumors in uv-irradiation mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorn, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    Cytotoxic responses of uv-irradiated mice against syngeneic uv-induced tumors were measured by using a 51 Cr-release assay to determine if uv treatment induced a specific reduction of cytotoxic activity. The in vivo and in vitro primary responses against syngeneic tumors and allogeneic cells were unaffected, as was the ''memory'' response (in vivo stimulation, in vitro restimulation) against alloantigens. In contrast, the memory response of uv-treated mice against syngeneic, uv-induced tumors was consistently and significantly depressed. The cytotoxicity generated by tumor cell stimulation in vivo or in vitro was tumor-specific and T cell-dependent. Since the primary response against syngeneic uv-induced tumors produces apparently normal amounts of tumor-specific cytotoxic activity, uv-treated mice may not reject transplanted syngeneic tumors because of too few T effector memory cells. These results imply that, at least in this system, tumor rejection depends mostly on the secondary responses against tumor antigens and that at least one carcinogen can, indirectly, specifically regulate immune responses

  11. Experimental rat lung tumor model with intrabronchial tumor cell implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Neto, Antero; Simão, Antônio Felipe Leite; Miranda, Samuel de Paula; Mourão, Lívia Talita Cajaseiras; Bezerra, Nilfácio Prado; Almeida, Paulo Roberto Carvalho de; Ribeiro, Ronaldo de Albuquerque

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rat lung tumor model for anticancer drug testing. Sixty-two female Wistar rats weighing 208 +/- 20 g were anesthetized intraperitoneally with 2.5% tribromoethanol (1 ml/100 g live weight), tracheotomized and intubated with an ultrafine catheter for inoculation with Walker's tumor cells. In the first step of the experiment, a technique was established for intrabronchial implantation of 10(5) to 5 x 10(5) tumor cells, and the tumor take rate was determined. The second stage consisted of determining tumor volume, correlating findings from high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with findings from necropsia and determining time of survival. The tumor take rate was 94.7% for implants with 4 x 10(5) tumor cells, HRCT and necropsia findings matched closely (r=0.953; p<0.0001), the median time of survival was 11 days, and surgical mortality was 4.8%. The present rat lung tumor model was shown to be feasible: the take rate was high, surgical mortality was negligible and the procedure was simple to perform and easily reproduced. HRCT was found to be a highly accurate tool for tumor diagnosis, localization and measurement and may be recommended for monitoring tumor growth in this model.

  12. Modulating the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Tumor Nanomedicine Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanomedicines including liposomes, micelles, and nanoparticles based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR effect have become the mainstream for tumor treatment owing to their superiority over conventional anticancer agents. Advanced design of nanomedicine including active targeting nanomedicine, tumor-responsive nanomedicine, and optimization of physicochemical properties to enable highly effective delivery of nanomedicine to tumors has further improved their therapeutic benefits. However, these strategies still could not conquer the delivery barriers of a tumor microenvironment such as heterogeneous blood flow, dense extracellular matrix, abundant stroma cells, and high interstitial fluid pressure, which severely impaired vascular transport of nanomedicines, hindered their effective extravasation, and impeded their interstitial transport to realize uniform distribution inside tumors. Therefore, modulation of tumor microenvironment has now emerged as an important strategy to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumors. Here, we review the existing strategies and approaches for tumor microenvironment modulation to improve tumor perfusion for helping more nanomedicines to reach the tumor site, to facilitate nanomedicine extravasation for enhancing transvascular transport, and to improve interstitial transport for optimizing the distribution of nanomedicines. These strategies may provide an avenue for the development of new combination chemotherapeutic regimens and reassessment of previously suboptimal agents.

  13. Modulating the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Tumor Nanomedicine Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing

    2017-01-01

    Nanomedicines including liposomes, micelles, and nanoparticles based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect have become the mainstream for tumor treatment owing to their superiority over conventional anticancer agents. Advanced design of nanomedicine including active targeting nanomedicine, tumor-responsive nanomedicine, and optimization of physicochemical properties to enable highly effective delivery of nanomedicine to tumors has further improved their therapeutic benefits. However, these strategies still could not conquer the delivery barriers of a tumor microenvironment such as heterogeneous blood flow, dense extracellular matrix, abundant stroma cells, and high interstitial fluid pressure, which severely impaired vascular transport of nanomedicines, hindered their effective extravasation, and impeded their interstitial transport to realize uniform distribution inside tumors. Therefore, modulation of tumor microenvironment has now emerged as an important strategy to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumors. Here, we review the existing strategies and approaches for tumor microenvironment modulation to improve tumor perfusion for helping more nanomedicines to reach the tumor site, to facilitate nanomedicine extravasation for enhancing transvascular transport, and to improve interstitial transport for optimizing the distribution of nanomedicines. These strategies may provide an avenue for the development of new combination chemotherapeutic regimens and reassessment of previously suboptimal agents. PMID:29311946

  14. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve protects against cerebral ischemic injury through an anti-infammatory mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-xian Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vagus nerve stimulation exerts protective effects against ischemic brain injury; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia was established using the occlusion method, and the right vagus nerve was given electrical stimulation (constant current of 0.5 mA; pulse width, 0.5 ms; frequency, 20 Hz; duration, 30 seconds; every 5 minutes for a total of 60 minutes 30 minutes, 12 hours, and 1, 2, 3, 7 and 14 days after surgery. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve substantially reduced i