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Sample records for tumor cells stained

  1. Detection of alkaline phosphatase in canine cells previously stained with Wright-Giemsa and its utility in differentiating osteosarcoma from other mesenchymal tumors.

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    Ryseff, Julia K; Bohn, Andrea A

    2012-09-01

    Osteosarcoma (OSA) is a common primary bone tumor in dogs. Demonstration of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) reactivity by tumor cells on unstained slides is useful in differentiating osteosarcoma from other types of sarcoma. However, unstained slides are not always available. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the diagnostic utility of detecting ALP expression in differentiating osteosarcoma from other sarcomas in dogs using cytologic material previously stained with Wright-Giemsa stain and to assess the sensitivity and specificity of ALP expression for diagnosing osteosarcoma using a specific protocol. Archived aspirates of histologically confirmed sarcomas in dogs that had been previously stained with Wright-Giemsa stain were treated with 5-bromo, 4-chloro, 3-indolyl phosphate/nitroblue tetrazolium (BCIP/NBT) as a substrate for ALP. Cells were evaluated for expression of ALP after incubation with BCIP/NBT for 1 hour. Sensitivity and specificity of ALP expression for diagnosis of OSA were calculated. In samples from 83 dogs, cells from 15/17 OSAs and from 4/66 tumors other than OSA (amelanotic melanoma, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, collision tumor, and anaplastic sarcoma) expressed ALP. Sensitivity and specificity of ALP expression detected using BCIP/NBT substrate applied to cells previously stained with Wright-Giemsa stain for OSA were 88 and 94%, respectively. ALP expression detected using BCIP/NBT substrate applied to previously stained cells is useful in differentiating canine OSA from other mesenchymal neoplasms. © 2012 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  2. Enrichment of tumor cells for cell kinetic analysis in human tumor biopsies using cytokeratin gating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haustermans, K.; Hofland, I.; Ramaekers, M.; Ivanyi, D.; Balm, A.J.M.; Geboes, K.; Lerut, T.; Schueren, E. van der; Begg, A.C.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of using cytokeratin antibodies to distinguish normal and malignant cells in human tumors using flow cytometry. The goal was ultimately to increase the accuracy of cell kinetic measurements on human tumor biopsies. Material and methods: A panel of four antibodies was screened on a series of 48 tumors from two centres; 22 head and neck tumors (Amsterdam) and 26 esophagus carcinomas (Leuven). First, screening was carried out by immunohistochemistry on frozen sections to test intensity of staining and the fraction of cytokeratin-positive tumor cells. The antibody showing the most positive staining was then used for flow cytometry on the same tumor. Results: The two broadest spectrum antibodies (AE1/AE3, E3/C4) showed overall the best results with immunohistochemical staining, being positive in over 95% of tumors. Good cell suspensions for DNA flow cytometry could be made from frozen material by a mechanical method, whereas enzymatic methods with trypsin or collagenase were judged failures in almost all cases. >From fresh material, both collagenase and trypsin produced good suspensions for flow cytometry, although the fraction of tumor cells, judged by proportion aneuploid cells, was markedly higher for trypsin. Using the best cytokeratin antibody for each tumor, two parameter flow cytometry was done (cytokeratin versus DNA content). Enrichment of tumor cells was then tested by measuring the fraction of aneuploid cells (the presumed malignant population) of cytokeratin-positive cells versus all cells. An enrichment factor ranging between 0 (no enrichment) and 1 (perfect enrichment, tumor cells only) was then calculated. The average enrichment was 0.60 for head and neck tumors and 0.59 for esophagus tumors. Conclusions: We conclude that this method can substantially enrich the proportion of tumor cells in biopsies from carcinomas. Application of this method could significantly enhance accuracy of tumor cell kinetic measurements

  3. Staining of E-selectin ligands on paraffin-embedded sections of tumor tissue.

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    Carrascal, Mylène A; Talina, Catarina; Borralho, Paula; Gonçalo Mineiro, A; Henriques, Ana Raquel; Pen, Cláudia; Martins, Manuela; Braga, Sofia; Sackstein, Robert; Videira, Paula A

    2018-05-02

    The E-selectin ligands expressed by cancer cells mediate adhesion of circulating cancer cells to endothelial cells, as well as within tissue microenvironments important for tumor progression and metastasis. The identification of E-selectin ligands within cancer tissue could yield new biomarkers for patient stratification and aid in identifying novel therapeutic targets. The determinants of selectin ligands consist of sialylated tetrasaccharides, the sialyl Lewis X and A (sLe X and sLe A ), displayed on protein or lipid scaffolds. Standardized procedures for immunohistochemistry make use of the antibodies against sLe X and/or sLe A . However, antibody binding does not define E-selectin binding activity. In this study, we developed an immunohistochemical staining technique, using E-selectin-human Ig Fc chimera (E-Ig) to characterize the expression and localization of E-selectin binding sites on paraffin-embedded sections of different cancer tissue. E-Ig successfully stained cancer cells with high specificity. The E-Ig staining show high reactivity scores in colon and lung adenocarcinoma and moderate reactivity in triple negative breast cancer. Compared with reactivity of antibody against sLe X/A , the E-Ig staining presented higher specificity to cancer tissue with better defined borders and less background. The E-Ig staining technique allows the qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis of E-selectin binding activity on cancer cells. The development of accurate techniques for detection of selectin ligands may contribute to better diagnostic and better understanding of the molecular basis of tumor progression and metastasis.

  4. Pleural and Pulmonary Staining at Inferior Phrenic Arteriography Mimicking a Tumor Staining of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Deok Hee; Hwang, Jae Cheol; Lim, Soo Mee; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Sung, Kyu-Bo; Song, Ho-Young

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the findings of pleural and pulmonary staining of the inferior phrenic artery, which can be confused with tumor staining during transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) of hepatoma.Methods: Fifteen patients who showed pleural and pulmonary staining without relationship to hepatic masses at inferior phrenic arteriography were enrolled. The staining was noted at initial TACE (n = 8), at successive TACE (n = 5), and after hepatic surgery (n = 2). The angiographic pattern, the presence of pleural change on computed tomography (CT), and clinical history were evaluated.Results: Draining pulmonary veins were seen in all cases. The lower margin of the staining corresponded to the lower margin of the pleura in 10 patients. CT showed pleural and/or pulmonary abnormalities in all cases. After embolization of the inferior phrenic artery, the accumulation of iodized oil in the lung was noted.Conclusion: Understanding the CT and angiographic findings of pleural and pulmonary staining during TACE may help differentiate benign staining from tumor staining

  5. Antibody-supervised deep learning for quantification of tumor-infiltrating immune cells in hematoxylin and eosin stained breast cancer samples.

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    Turkki, Riku; Linder, Nina; Kovanen, Panu E; Pellinen, Teijo; Lundin, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Immune cell infiltration in tumor is an emerging prognostic biomarker in breast cancer. The gold standard for quantification of immune cells in tissue sections is visual assessment through a microscope, which is subjective and semi-quantitative. In this study, we propose and evaluate an approach based on antibody-guided annotation and deep learning to quantify immune cell-rich areas in hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained samples. Consecutive sections of formalin-fixed parafin-embedded samples obtained from the primary tumor of twenty breast cancer patients were cut and stained with H&E and the pan-leukocyte CD45 antibody. The stained slides were digitally scanned, and a training set of immune cell-rich and cell-poor tissue regions was annotated in H&E whole-slide images using the CD45-expression as a guide. In analysis, the images were divided into small homogenous regions, superpixels, from which features were extracted using a pretrained convolutional neural network (CNN) and classified with a support of vector machine. The CNN approach was compared to texture-based classification and to visual assessments performed by two pathologists. In a set of 123,442 labeled superpixels, the CNN approach achieved an F-score of 0.94 (range: 0.92-0.94) in discrimination of immune cell-rich and cell-poor regions, as compared to an F-score of 0.88 (range: 0.87-0.89) obtained with the texture-based classification. When compared to visual assessment of 200 images, an agreement of 90% (κ = 0.79) to quantify immune infiltration with the CNN approach was achieved while the inter-observer agreement between pathologists was 90% (κ = 0.78). Our findings indicate that deep learning can be applied to quantify immune cell infiltration in breast cancer samples using a basic morphology staining only. A good discrimination of immune cell-rich areas was achieved, well in concordance with both leukocyte antigen expression and pathologists' visual assessment.

  6. Antibody-supervised deep learning for quantification of tumor-infiltrating immune cells in hematoxylin and eosin stained breast cancer samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riku Turkki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Immune cell infiltration in tumor is an emerging prognostic biomarker in breast cancer. The gold standard for quantification of immune cells in tissue sections is visual assessment through a microscope, which is subjective and semi-quantitative. In this study, we propose and evaluate an approach based on antibody-guided annotation and deep learning to quantify immune cell-rich areas in hematoxylin and eosin (H&E stained samples. Methods: Consecutive sections of formalin-fixed parafin-embedded samples obtained from the primary tumor of twenty breast cancer patients were cut and stained with H&E and the pan-leukocyte CD45 antibody. The stained slides were digitally scanned, and a training set of immune cell-rich and cell-poor tissue regions was annotated in H&E whole-slide images using the CD45-expression as a guide. In analysis, the images were divided into small homogenous regions, superpixels, from which features were extracted using a pretrained convolutional neural network (CNN and classified with a support of vector machine. The CNN approach was compared to texture-based classification and to visual assessments performed by two pathologists. Results: In a set of 123,442 labeled superpixels, the CNN approach achieved an F-score of 0.94 (range: 0.92-0.94 in discrimination of immune cell-rich and cell-poor regions, as compared to an F-score of 0.88 (range: 0.87-0.89 obtained with the texture-based classification. When compared to visual assessment of 200 images, an agreement of 90% (k = 0.79 to quantify immune infiltration with the CNN approach was achieved while the inter-observer agreement between pathologists was 90% (k = 0.78. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that deep learning can be applied to quantify immune cell infiltration in breast cancer samples using a basic morphology staining only. A good discrimination of immune cell-rich areas was achieved, well in concordance with both leukocyte antigen expression and

  7. Utilization of Cell-Transfer Technique for Molecular Testing on Hematoxylin-Eosin-Stained Sections: A Viable Option for Small Biopsies That Lack Tumor Tissues in Paraffin Block.

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    Wu, Howard H; Jovonovich, Stephen M; Randolph, Melissa; Post, Kristin M; Sen, Joyashree D; Curless, Kendra; Cheng, Liang

    2016-12-01

    - In some instances the standard method of doing molecular testing from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded block is not possible because of limited tissue. Tumor cell-enriched cell-transfer technique has been proven useful for performing immunocytochemistry and molecular testing on cytologic smears. - To establish the cell-transfer technique as a viable option for isolating tumor cells from hematoxylin-eosin (H&E)-stained slides. - Molecular testing was performed by using the cell-transfer technique on 97 archived H&E-stained slides from a variety of different tumors. Results were compared to the conventional method of molecular testing. - Polymerase chain reaction-based molecular testing via the cell-transfer technique was successfully performed on 82 of 97 samples (85%). This included 39 of 47 cases for EGFR, 10 of 11 cases for BRAF, and 33 of 39 cases for KRAS mutations. Eighty-one of 82 cell-transfer technique samples (99%) showed agreement with previous standard method results, including 4 mutations and 35 wild-type alleles for EGFR, 4 mutations and 6 wild-type alleles for BRAF, and 11 mutations and 21 wild-type alleles for KRAS. There was only 1 discrepancy: a cell-transfer technique with a false-negative >KRAS result (wild type versus G12C). - Molecular testing performed on H&E-stained sections via cell-transfer technique is useful when tissue from cell blocks and small surgical biopsy samples is exhausted and the only available material for testing is on H&E-stained slides.

  8. HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) triggers autophagic tumor cell death.

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    Aits, Sonja; Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Mattias; Trulsson, Maria; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Mograbi, Baharia; Svanborg, Catharina

    2009-03-01

    HAMLET, a complex of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, kills a wide range of tumor cells. Here we propose that HAMLET causes macroautophagy in tumor cells and that this contributes to their death. Cell death was accompanied by mitochondrial damage and a reduction in the level of active mTOR and HAMLET triggered extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and the formation of double-membrane-enclosed vesicles typical of macroautophagy. In addition, HAMLET caused a change from uniform (LC3-I) to granular (LC3-II) staining in LC3-GFP-transfected cells reflecting LC3 translocation during macroautophagy, and this was blocked by the macroautophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. HAMLET also caused accumulation of LC3-II detected by Western blot when lysosomal degradation was inhibited suggesting that HAMLET caused an increase in autophagic flux. To determine if macroautophagy contributed to cell death, we used RNA interference against Beclin-1 and Atg5. Suppression of Beclin-1 and Atg5 improved the survival of HAMLET-treated tumor cells and inhibited the increase in granular LC3-GFP staining. The results show that HAMLET triggers macroautophagy in tumor cells and suggest that macroautophagy contributes to HAMLET-induced tumor cell death.

  9. Analysis of silver stained nucleolar organizing regions in odontogenic cysts and tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna, Md; Charan, Cr; Reddy Ealla, Kranti Kiran; Surekha, V; Kulkarni, Ganesh; Gokavarapu, Sandhya

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the probable differences in cell proliferation index of odontogenic cysts and tumors by means of a comparative silver stained nucleolar organizing region (AgNOR) quantification. This descriptive cross-sectional study was done on archival paraffin blocks (n = 62), consisting of 10 odontogenic keratocysts, 10 dentigerous cysts, 10 radicular cysts, 10 conventional ameloblastomas, 10 adenomatoid odontogenic tumors, 10 calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors and 2 ameloblasic carcinomas. The mean AgNOR count of odontogenic cysts was 1.709 and the benign odontogenic tumors was 1.862. Highest AgNOR count was recorded in odontogenic keratocyst and lowest was seen in radicular cyst. Statistically significant difference in AgNOR counts of ameloblastoma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, amelobalastoma and calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, benign odontogenic tumors and ameloblastic carcinoma were seen. AgNORs in ameloblastic carcinoma were more in number and more widely spread. AgNOR technique may be considered a good indicator of cell proliferation in odontogenic cysts and tumors.

  10. Discrimination of p53 immunohistochemistry-positive tumors by its staining pattern in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Koji; Oki, Eiji; Saeki, Hiroshi; Yan, Zhao; Tsuda, Yasuo; Hidaka, Gen; Kasagi, Yuta; Otsu, Hajime; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Kitao, Hiroyuki; Morita, Masaru; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry staining of p53 is a cheap and simple method to detect aberrant function of p53. However, there are some discrepancies between the result of immunohistochemistry staining and mutation analysis. This study attempted to find a new definition of p53 staining by its staining pattern. Immunohistochemistry staining of p53 and TP53 gene mutation analysis were performed in 148 gastric cancer patients. Also SNP-CGH array analysis was conducted to four cases. Positive staining of p53 was observed in 88 (59.5%) tumors. Tumors with positive p53 staining showed malignant features compared to negative tumors. Mutation of TP53 gene was observed in 29 (19.6%) tumors with higher age and differentiated type. In positive p53 tumors, two types could be distinguished; aberrant type and scattered type. With comparison to TP53 gene mutation analysis, all the scattered type had wild-type TP53 gene (P = 0.0003). SNP-CGH array showed that scattered-type tumors had no change in the structure of chromosome 17. P53-scattered-type staining tumors may reflect a functionally active nonmutated TP53 gene. In interpretation of p53 immunohistochemistry staining, distinguishing p53-positive tumors by their staining pattern may be important in gastric cancer

  11. Human CD34+ cells engineered to express membrane-bound tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand target both tumor cells and tumor vasculature.

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    Lavazza, Cristiana; Carlo-Stella, Carmelo; Giacomini, Arianna; Cleris, Loredana; Righi, Marco; Sia, Daniela; Di Nicola, Massimo; Magni, Michele; Longoni, Paolo; Milanesi, Marco; Francolini, Maura; Gloghini, Annunziata; Carbone, Antonino; Formelli, Franca; Gianni, Alessandro M

    2010-03-18

    Adenovirus-transduced CD34+ cells expressing membrane-bound tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (CD34-TRAIL+ cells) exert potent antitumor activity. To further investigate the mechanism(s) of action of CD34-TRAIL+ cells, we analyzed their homing properties as well as antitumor and antivascular effects using a subcutaneous myeloma model in immunodeficient mice. After intravenous injection, transduced cells homed in the tumor peaking at 48 hours when 188 plus or minus 25 CD45+ cells per 10(5) tumor cells were detected. Inhibition experiments showed that tumor homing of CD34-TRAIL+ cells was largely mediated by vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and stromal cell-derived factor-1. Both CD34-TRAIL+ cells and soluble (s)TRAIL significantly reduced tumor volume by 40% and 29%, respectively. Computer-aided analysis of TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling-stained tumor sections demonstrated significantly greater effectiveness for CD34-TRAIL+ cells in increasing tumor cell apoptosis and necrosis over sTRAIL. Proteome array analysis indicated that CD34-TRAIL+ cells and sTRAIL activate similar apoptotic machinery. In vivo staining of tumor vasculature with sulfosuccinimidyl-6-(biotinamido) hexanoate-biotin revealed that CD34-TRAIL+ cells but not sTRAIL significantly damaged tumor vasculature, as shown by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling+ endothelial cells, appearance of hemorrhagic areas, and marked reduction of endothelial area. These results demonstrate that tumor homing of CD34-TRAIL+ cells induces early vascular disruption, resulting in hemorrhagic necrosis and tumor destruction.

  12. Tumor Budding Detection by Immunohistochemical Staining is Not Superior to Hematoxylin and Eosin Staining for Predicting Lymph Node Metastasis in pT1 Colorectal Cancer.

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    Okamura, Takuma; Shimada, Yoshifumi; Nogami, Hitoshi; Kameyama, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Takashi; Kosugi, Shin-ichi; Wakai, Toshifumi; Ajioka, Yoichi

    2016-05-01

    Tumor budding is recognized as an important risk factor for lymph node metastasis in pT1 colorectal cancer. Immunohistochemical staining for cytokeratin has the potential to improve the objective diagnosis of tumor budding over detection based on hematoxylin and eosin staining. However, it remains unclear whether tumor budding detected by immunohistochemical staining is a significant predictor of lymph node metastasis in pT1 colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to clarify the clinical significance of tumor budding detected by immunohistochemical staining in comparison with that detected by hematoxylin and eosin staining. This was a retrospective study. The study was conducted at Niigata University Medical & Dental Hospital. We enrolled 265 patients with pT1 colorectal cancer who underwent surgery with lymph node dissection. Tumor budding was evaluated by both hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical staining with the use of CAM5.2 antibody. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were conducted to determine the optimal cutoff values for tumor budding detected by hematoxylin and eosin and CAM5.2 staining. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the significant factors for predicting lymph node metastasis. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses revealed that the cutoff values for tumor budding detected by hematoxylin and eosin and CAM5.2 staining for predicting lymph node metastases were 5 and 8. On multivariate analysis, histopathological differentiation (OR, 6.21; 95% CI, 1.16-33.33; p = 0.03) and tumor budding detected by hematoxylin and eosin staining (OR, 4.91; 95% CI, 1.64-14.66; p = 0.004) were significant predictors for lymph node metastasis; however, tumor budding detected by CAM5.2 staining was not a significant predictor. This study was limited by potential selection bias because surgically resected specimens were collected instead of endoscopically resected specimens. Tumor budding detected by

  13. Diagnostic value of the digital subtraction angiography of brain tumors. With special reference to the significance of tumor stains

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    Hirata, Yoshifumi; Matsukado, Yasuhiko; Takahashi, Mutsumasa

    1986-10-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in 110 cases of brain tumors were studied in comparison with conventional angiography (CA). The dural sinuses and tumor stains of meningiomas, particularly tuberculum sellae meningioma, were better shown by intravenous DSA (IV-DSA) than by CA. IV-DSA clearly demonstrated bilateral carotid arteries and was able to rule out the coexistence of the intracranial aneurysm in 88 % of 32 cases with pituitary adenomas. Combination of IV-DSA and high resolution computed tomography has replaced CA to determine surgical indication of patients with pituitary adenomas. Intra-arterial DSA (IA-DSA) was diagnostic and well comparable to CA in identifying main cerebral vasculature over 1 mm in diameter. As to the small arteries under 1 mm and fine tumor vessels, IA-DSA provided less information or none at all. However, IA-DSA was superior to CA for visualization of tumor stains. Not only in most of meningiomas and hemangioblastomas, but in some astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas, marked tumor stains were well demonstrated on DSA, and DSA provided surgical anatomy for neurosurgeons because of high contrast resolutions. Careful attention should be paid because tumor stains may overestimate tumor vascularity.

  14. Dissemination in athymic nude mice of lacZ transfected small cell lung cancer cells identified by X-gal staining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rømer, M U; Christiansen, J; Brünner, N

    1995-01-01

    The small cell lung cancer cell lines GLC-2 and DMS 456 were genetically labeled with the lacZ gene and examined for invasive and metastatic potential in META/Bom nude mice. The lacZ gene encodes the enzyme beta-D- galactosidase, and cells expressing this enzyme were identified by staining...... with the chromogenic substrate X-gal. lacZ expressing cells were investigated after subcutaneous (s.c.) inoculation and intravenous (i.v.) injection. The X-gal detection of beta-D-galactosidase activity proved to be a rapid and easy means for specific and highly sensitive identification of metastases. All primary s.......c. tumors stained by X-gal. The primary tumors of GLC-2 regularly demonstrated local invasive growth and produced multiple metastases in several organs. In contrast, primary DMS 456 tumors only occasionally demonstrated local invasion and very rarely generated secondary foci. No experimental metastases were...

  15. C5b-9 Staining Correlates With Clinical and Tumor Stage in Gastric Adenocarcinoma.

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    Chen, Jian; Yang, Wei-Jun; Sun, Hai-Jian; Yang, Xia; Wu, Yu-Zhang

    2016-08-01

    The complement system is a critical part of the immune response, acting in defense against viral infections, clearance of immune complexes, and maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Upregulated expression of the terminal complement complex, C5b-9, has been observed on various tumor cells, such as stomach carcinoma cells, and on cells in the necrotic regions of these tumors as well; however, whether and how C5b-9 is related to gastric cancer progression and severity remains unknown. In this study, human gastric adenocarcinoma (HGAC) tissues (n=47 cases) and patient-matched adjacent nontumoral parenchyma (n=20 cases) were evaluated by tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry. The HGAC tissues showed upregulated C5b-9 expression. Multinomial logistic regression and likelihood ratio testing showed that overexpression of C5b-9 in HGAC tissue was significantly correlated with clinical stage (P=0.007) and tumor stage (P=0.005), but not with tumor distant organ metastasis, lymphoid nodal status, sex, or age. Patients with late-stage gastric adenocarcinoma had a higher amount of tumor cells showing positive staining for C5b-9 than patients with early-stage disease. These results may help in diagnosis and assessment of disease severity of human gastric carcinoma.

  16. PD-L1 Expression of Tumor Cells, Macrophages, and Immune Cells in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients with Malignant Pleural Effusion.

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    Tseng, Yen-Han; Ho, Hsiang-Ling; Lai, Chiung-Ru; Luo, Yung-Hung; Tseng, Yen-Chiang; Whang-Peng, Jacqueline; Lin, Yi-Hsuan; Chou, Teh-Ying; Chen, Yuh-Min

    2018-03-01

    Whether immunohistochemical staining of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) on cells of pleural effusion could be used to predict response to immunotherapy treatment has not been reported. We retrospectively enrolled patients who had undergone malignant pleural effusion drainage and had effusion cell block specimens from 2014 to 2016. Immunohistochemical staining for PD-L1 was performed with tumor cells, immune cells, and macrophages of all cell block specimens. Immunoactivity was scored as 0 for absence of staining and 1+ for faint, 2+ for moderate, and 3+ for intense membranous staining. Patients' clinicopathological characteristics were also collected. PD-L1 expression of pleural effusion tumor cells was associated with the PD-L1 expression of macrophages (p = 0.003) and immune cells (p pleural effusion tumor cells and macrophages. The low intensity of PD-L1 expression in immune cells is associated with the poor survival of patients with lung cancer with malignant pleural effusion. Copyright © 2017 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The pattern of distribution of laminin in neurogenic tumors, granular cell tumors, and nevi of the oral mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reibel, J; Wewer, U; Albrechtsen, R

    1985-01-01

    . Accentuated staining was seen in Verocay bodies. In granular cell myoblastomas (GCM), small groups of tumor cells were encircled by laminin-positive material, whereas individual tumor cells were unstained. In nevi, diffusely spread nevus cells were surrounded by a rim of laminin, whereas when arranged...

  18. Occurrence of thymosin ß4 in human breast cancer cells and in other cell types of the tumor microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Lars-Inge; Holck, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    that there is a considerable heterogeneity in the cellular distribution of thymosin ß4 in breast cancer. In most tumors examined, cancer cells showed low or intermediate reactivity for thymosin ß4, whereas leukocytes and macrophages showed intense reactivity. In addition, endothelial cells showed variable reactivity...... to thymosin ß4, whereas myofibroblasts were negative. There was no correlation between the intensity of tumor cell staining and histological grade, whereas there was a tendency toward a correlation between endothelial cell staining and grade. These results demonstrate that multiple cell types within the tumor...

  19. An Evaluation on the Importance of Phosphotungstic Acid Haematoxyiin (PTAH Staining in Differential Diagnosis of Salivary Gland Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Yazdi

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available The differential diagnosis between pleomorphic adenoma, the most common salivary gland neoplasm, microscopically, and two other common salivary gland neoplasms, meaning adenoid cystic carcinoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma, is difficut.The purpose of this study was to determine the differences between pleomorphic adenoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma regarding the staining intensity with PTAH and H&E and also to investigate the relationship between staining intensity with PTAH and malignancy grade in mucoepidermoid carcinoma. 72 paraffin embeded samples including 24 pleomorphic adenoma, 24 adenoid cystic carcinoma and 24 mucoepidermoid carcinoma were selected and stained with PTAH. The staining intensity in total, in nucleus and cytoplasm of tumoral cells were evaluated and compared with H&E staining, statistically. The results were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis, and Wilcoxon signed ranks tests (P<0.05.The logistic model was presented to predict the degree of malignancies through the assessment of nucleus and cytoplasm staining intensity in tumoral cells, and the patient's age. In this study, a statistically significant relationship was observed between staining intensity by PTAH and H& E in nucleus of tumoral cells in pleomorphic adenoma. Moreover, statistically significant relation between staining intensity by PTAH and H & E in cytoplasm of tumoral cells in adenoid cystic carcinoma was found. But there was no relation in other cases. On the other hand, a statistically significant relation between intensity of staining in total, in nucleus and cytoplasm of tumoral cells and the type of tumor was found. No relation was obtained between malignancy grade of mucoepidermoid carcinoma and staining intensity in total, in nucleus and cytoplasm of tumoral cells. The presented logistic model indicated a direct relation between tumor malignancy with patient's age and staining intensity in nucleus of tumoral cells, but a

  20. Two-photon excited fluorescence imaging of the pancreatic solid pseudopapillary tumor without hematoxylin and eosin stains.

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    Xu, Yahao; Liao, Chenxi; Chen, Jing; Chen, Youting; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-05-01

    Solid pseudopapillary tumor (SPT) of the pancreas is an epithelial tumor with low-grade malignant potential and present more common in females. At present, the gold standard for accurate diagnosis of pancreatic tumor was mostly depending on the pathological and/or cytological evaluation. In this work, TPEF microscopy was applied to obtain the images of human normal pancreas and SPT of the pancreas without hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, for the purpose of identifying the organization structural, cell morphological, and cytoplasm changing, which were then compared to their corresponding H&E stained histopathological results. Our results showed that high-resolution TPEF imaging of the pancreatic SPT can clearly distinguish the pathological features from normal pancreas in unstained histological sections, and the results are consistent with the histological results. Moreover, we measured the nuclear-cytoplasmic ratios of the pancreatic SPT and normal pancreas to characterize their difference in the cytomorphological feature. It indicated that this technique can achieve the consistent information of pathological diagnosis, and has the potential to substantially improve the optical diagnosis and treatment of the pancreatic SPT without H&E staining in the future. SCANNING 38:245-250, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Cell proliferation markers in the transplanted canine transmissible venereal tumor

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    F.G.A. Santos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Adult male mongrel dogs were subcutaneously transplanted with the canine transmissible venereal tumor (TVT on the hypogastric region. Twelve specimens of tumors were collected, half during the proliferative phase and the other half during the regressive phase. Fragments of the tumor were fixed in 10% buffered formalin and routinely processed for light microscopy. Sections of 4µm were stained by Schorr or AgNOR or either immunostained for MIB1 (Ki67. Schorr stain, AgNOR and MIB1 showed an increased proliferative activity through mitotic index, nuclear argyrophilic protein stain and cycling tumoral cells in the growing tumors, respectively. All of the three cell proliferation markers were able to distinguish the TVT in both evolution phases. MIB1 monoclonal antibody was the best in the morphologic evaluation of growth and regression of TVT. This resulted in higher values than AgNORs counting and mitotic index. MIB1 immunostaining was the most effective parameter of the proliferative activity of TVT. However, a significant correlation has been detected only between mitosis counting and AgNORs.

  2. Immunohistochemical positive stained p53 protein in bladder transitional cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halimi Monireh

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Molecular genetics and immunopathologic analysis of bladder cancer have shown some abnormalities in a number of genes and proteins that have been implicated in the development and progression of such tumors, mainly in the p53 pathway. Aims: To investigate the rate of positively stained p53 protein in patients with urothelial papillary carcinoma of the bladder (UCB by immunohistochemistry and its relationship with tumor grade, gender and age of the patients. Settings and Design: During the present cross-sectional study, 100 paraffin-embedded specimens of UCB, which were provided from biopsies of the bladder by transurethral access, were immunohistochemically stained and studied for p53 protein from May 2006 to May 2007 in our referral center pathology laboratory. Materials and Methods: First, 4 µm slices of paraffin sections were provided and then stained by the avidin-biotin peroxidase method. The rate of positively stained p53 protein (defined as positive nuclear staining in over 10% of the cells was assessed. This rate was also estimated and compared between grades, genders and age-related groups (< 70 years, ≥70 years. Statistical Analysis: The χ2 , Fisher′s exact test and Mann-Whitney U test were used for comparing. Results: The overall rate of positively stained specimens was 11% for nuclear p53 protein. This rate was significantly higher in females (10/29 vs. 1/71; P < 0.001; odds ratio [OR]: 0.23; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.43-306.08, patients with 70 or older than 70 years (8/42 vs. 3/58; P = 0.04; OR: 0.55; 95% CI: 1.07-17.39 and in high-grade tumors (10/58 vs. 1/42; P = 0.02; OR: 0.59; 95% CI: 0.01-0.95. Conclusions: The rate of positively stained p53 protein for UCB was lower in our population. This rate was also higher in females, patients with 70 or older than 70 years and high grade of UCB.

  3. Identification of immune cell infiltration in hematoxylin-eosin stained breast cancer samples: texture-based classification of tissue morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkki, Riku; Linder, Nina; Kovanen, Panu E.; Pellinen, Teijo; Lundin, Johan

    2016-03-01

    The characteristics of immune cells in the tumor microenvironment of breast cancer capture clinically important information. Despite the heterogeneity of tumor-infiltrating immune cells, it has been shown that the degree of infiltration assessed by visual evaluation of hematoxylin-eosin (H and E) stained samples has prognostic and possibly predictive value. However, quantification of the infiltration in H and E-stained tissue samples is currently dependent on visual scoring by an expert. Computer vision enables automated characterization of the components of the tumor microenvironment, and texture-based methods have successfully been used to discriminate between different tissue morphologies and cell phenotypes. In this study, we evaluate whether local binary pattern texture features with superpixel segmentation and classification with support vector machine can be utilized to identify immune cell infiltration in H and E-stained breast cancer samples. Guided with the pan-leukocyte CD45 marker, we annotated training and test sets from 20 primary breast cancer samples. In the training set of arbitrary sized image regions (n=1,116) a 3-fold cross-validation resulted in 98% accuracy and an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.98 to discriminate between immune cell -rich and - poor areas. In the test set (n=204), we achieved an accuracy of 96% and AUC of 0.99 to label cropped tissue regions correctly into immune cell -rich and -poor categories. The obtained results demonstrate strong discrimination between immune cell -rich and -poor tissue morphologies. The proposed method can provide a quantitative measurement of the degree of immune cell infiltration and applied to digitally scanned H and E-stained breast cancer samples for diagnostic purposes.

  4. Occurrence of thymosin beta4 in human breast cancer cells and in other cell types of the tumor microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, L.-I.; Holck, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    that there is a considerable heterogeneity in the cellular distribution of thymosin beta4 in breast cancer. In most tumors examined, cancer cells showed low or intermediate reactivity for thymosin beta4, whereas leukocytes and macrophages showed intense reactivity. In addition, endothelial cells showed variable reactivity...... to thymosin beta4, whereas myofibroblasts were negative. There was no correlation between the intensity of tumor cell staining and histological grade, whereas there was a tendency toward a correlation between endothelial cell staining and grade. These results demonstrate that multiple cell types within...

  5. High-recovery visual identification and single-cell retrieval of circulating tumor cells for genomic analysis using a dual-technology platform integrated with automated immunofluorescence staining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campton, Daniel E; Ramirez, Arturo B; Nordberg, Joshua J; Drovetto, Nick; Clein, Alisa C; Varshavskaya, Paulina; Friemel, Barry H; Quarre, Steve; Breman, Amy; Dorschner, Michael; Blau, Sibel; Blau, C Anthony; Sabath, Daniel E; Stilwell, Jackie L; Kaldjian, Eric P

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are malignant cells that have migrated from solid cancers into the blood, where they are typically present in rare numbers. There is great interest in using CTCs to monitor response to therapies, to identify clinically actionable biomarkers, and to provide a non-invasive window on the molecular state of a tumor. Here we characterize the performance of the AccuCyte® – CyteFinder® system, a comprehensive, reproducible and highly sensitive platform for collecting, identifying and retrieving individual CTCs from microscopic slides for molecular analysis after automated immunofluorescence staining for epithelial markers. All experiments employed a density-based cell separation apparatus (AccuCyte) to separate nucleated cells from the blood and transfer them to microscopic slides. After staining, the slides were imaged using a digital scanning microscope (CyteFinder). Precisely counted model CTCs (mCTCs) from four cancer cell lines were spiked into whole blood to determine recovery rates. Individual mCTCs were removed from slides using a single-cell retrieval device (CytePicker™) for whole genome amplification and subsequent analysis by PCR and Sanger sequencing, whole exome sequencing, or array-based comparative genomic hybridization. Clinical CTCs were evaluated in blood samples from patients with different cancers in comparison with the CellSearch® system. AccuCyte – CyteFinder presented high-resolution images that allowed identification of mCTCs by morphologic and phenotypic features. Spike-in mCTC recoveries were between 90 and 91%. More than 80% of single-digit spike-in mCTCs were identified and even a single cell in 7.5 mL could be found. Analysis of single SKBR3 mCTCs identified presence of a known TP53 mutation by both PCR and whole exome sequencing, and confirmed the reported karyotype of this cell line. Patient sample CTC counts matched or exceeded CellSearch CTC counts in a small feasibility cohort. The AccuCyte

  6. Correlation of FMISO simulations with pimonidazole-stained tumor xenografts: A question of O{sub 2} consumption?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wack, L. J., E-mail: linda-jacqueline.wack@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Thorwarth, D. [Section for Biomedical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen 72076 (Germany); Mönnich, D. [Section for Biomedical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen 72076 (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Tübingen 72076 (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69121 (Germany); Yaromina, A. [OncoRay—National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden 01309, Germany and Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW—School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht 6229 ET (Netherlands); Zips, D. [German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Tübingen 72076 (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69121 (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen 72076 (Germany); and others

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To compare a dedicated simulation model for hypoxia PET against tumor microsections stained for different parameters of the tumor microenvironment. The model can readily be adapted to a variety of conditions, such as different human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) xenograft tumors. Methods: Nine different HNSCC tumor models were transplanted subcutaneously into nude mice. Tumors were excised and immunoflourescently labeled with pimonidazole, Hoechst 33342, and CD31, providing information on hypoxia, perfusion, and vessel distribution, respectively. Hoechst and CD31 images were used to generate maps of perfused blood vessels on which tissue oxygenation and the accumulation of the hypoxia tracer FMISO were mathematically simulated. The model includes a Michaelis–Menten relation to describe the oxygen consumption inside tissue. The maximum oxygen consumption rate M{sub 0} was chosen as the parameter for a tumor-specific optimization as it strongly influences tracer distribution. M{sub 0} was optimized on each tumor slice to reach optimum correlations between FMISO concentration 4 h postinjection and pimonidazole staining intensity. Results: After optimization, high pixel-based correlations up to R{sup 2} = 0.85 were found for individual tissue sections. Experimental pimonidazole images and FMISO simulations showed good visual agreement, confirming the validity of the approach. Median correlations per tumor model varied significantly (p < 0.05), with R{sup 2} ranging from 0.20 to 0.54. The optimum maximum oxygen consumption rate M{sub 0} differed significantly (p < 0.05) between tumor models, ranging from 2.4 to 5.2 mm Hg/s. Conclusions: It is feasible to simulate FMISO distributions that match the pimonidazole retention patterns observed in vivo. Good agreement was obtained for multiple tumor models by optimizing the oxygen consumption rate, M{sub 0}, whose optimum value differed significantly between tumor models.

  7. Basal cell carcinoma: CD56 and cytokeratin 5/6 staining patterns in the differential diagnosis with Merkel cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panse, Gauri; McNiff, Jennifer M; Ko, Christine J

    2017-06-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) can resemble Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) on histopathological examination and while CK20 is a useful marker in this differential, it is occasionally negative in MCC. CD56, a sensitive marker of neuroendocrine differentiation, is sometimes used to identify MCC, but has been reportedly variably positive in BCC as well. In contrast, CK5/6 consistently labels BCC but is not expressed in neuroendocrine tumors. We evaluated 20 cases of BCC for the pattern of CD56 and cytokeratin 5/6 (CK5/6) staining, hypothesizing that these 2 stains could differentiate BCC from MCC in difficult cases. Seventeen cases of MCC previously stained with CD56 were also examined. All BCCs showed patchy expression of CD56 except for 2 cases, which showed staining of greater than 70% of tumor. CK5/6 was diffusely positive in all cases of BCC. Fifteen of 17 MCCs were diffusely positive for CD56. The difference in the pattern of CD56 expression between MCC and BCC (diffuse vs patchy, respectively) was statistically significant (P < .05). BCC typically shows patchy CD56 expression and diffuse CK5/6 positivity. These 2 markers can be used to distinguish between BCC and MCC in challenging cases. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Toluidine Blue and Hematoxylin and Eosin Stains are Comparable in Evaluating Squamous Cell Carcinoma During Mohs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styperek, Andrew R; Goldberg, Leonard H; Goldschmidt, Laura E; Kimyai-Asadi, Arash

    2016-11-01

    Histologic examination of tissue is the foundation of Mohs micrographic surgery because determination of surgical margins influences whether additional tissue will be taken. Currently, there is no large focused study comparing toluidine blue (TB) and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stains in the evaluation of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). This study evaluates whether TB and H&E are comparable in assessing the presence of tumor in frozen sections of SCC. One hundred eighty-six randomized slides representing 93 tissue pieces from 36 tumors were examined by 3 Mohs surgeons (1 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education fellow and 2 fellowship-trained surgeons) and compared using a template that documented the presence and location of tumor on the slides. The evaluation of SCC with H&E and TB stains was highly concordant, with concordant identification of SCC in 96%, 96%, and 94% of tissue layers among the 3 Mohs surgeons ARS, LHG, and AK-A, respectively. Toluidine blue and H&E stains are statistically similar in their ability to detect SCC and guide Mohs surgical decision-making.

  9. NDRG2 is a candidate tumor-suppressor for oral squamous-cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, Hiroshi; Kondo, Yuudai [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Medicine of Sensory and Motor Organs, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki-gun, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Division of Tumor and Cellular Biochemistry, Department of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki-gun, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Nakahata, Shingo; Hamasaki, Makoto [Division of Tumor and Cellular Biochemistry, Department of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki-gun, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Sakoda, Sumio [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Medicine of Sensory and Motor Organs, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki-gun, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Morishita, Kazuhiro, E-mail: kmorishi@med.miyazaki-u.ac.jp [Division of Tumor and Cellular Biochemistry, Department of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki-gun, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan)

    2010-01-22

    Oral cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, and squamous-cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common phenotype of oral cancer. Although patients with OSCC have poor survival rates and a high incidence of metastasis, the molecular mechanisms of OSCC development have not yet been elucidated. This study investigated whether N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) contributes to the carcinogenesis of OSCC, as NDRG2 is reported to be a candidate tumor-suppressor gene in a wide variety of cancers. The down-regulation of NDRG2 mRNA, which was dependent on promoter methylation, was seen in the majority of OSCC cases and in several cases of precancerous leukoplakia with dysplasia. Induction of NDRG2 expression in an HSC-3/OSCC cell line significantly inhibited cell proliferation and decreased colony formation ability on soft agar. The majority of OSCC cell lines showed an activation of PI3K/Akt signaling, and enforced expression of NDRG2 in HSC-3 cells decreased the level of phosphorylated Akt at Serine 473 (p-Akt). Immunohistochemical p-Akt staining was detected in 56.5% of the OSCC tumors, and 80.4% of the tumors were negative for NDRG2 staining. Moreover, positive p-Akt staining was inversely correlated with decreased NDRG2 expression in OSCC tumors with moderate to poor differentiation (p < 0.005). Therefore, NDRG2 is a candidate tumor-suppressor gene for OSCC development and probably contributes to the tumorigenesis of OSCC partly via the modulation of Akt signaling.

  10. LANTHANUM STAINING OF THE SURFACE COAT OF CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Stephen M.

    1971-01-01

    Among the techniques which have been reported to stain the surface coat of cells, for electron microscopy, is lanthanum staining en bloc. Similarly, the presence of the cationic dye, Alcian blue 8GX, in a primary glutaraldehyde fixative has been reported to improve the preservation of the surface coat of cells of many types; however, the preserved coat is not very electron opaque unless thin sections are counterstained. The present paper shows that for several rat tissues lanthanum staining en bloc is an effective electron stain for the cell surface, giving excellent contrast, if combined sequentially with prefixation in an aldehyde fixative containing Alcian blue. The cationic substance cetylpyridinium chloride was found to have a similar effect to that of Alcian blue in enhancing the lanthanum staining of the surface coat material of the brush border of intestinal epithelial cells. The patterns of lanthanum staining obtained for the tissues studied strikingly resemble those reported in the literature where tissues are stained by several standard methods for demonstrating mucosubstances at the ultrastructural level. This fact and the reproduction of the effect of Alcian blue by cetylpyridinium chloride constitute a persuasive empirical argument that the material visualized is a mucopolysaccharide or mucopolysaccharide-protein complex. PMID:4108476

  11. Phagocytosis (cannibalism) of apoptotic neutrophils by tumor cells in gastric micropapillary carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barresi, Valeria; Branca, Giovanni; Ieni, Antonio; Rigoli, Luciana; Tuccari, Giovanni; Caruso, Rosario Alberto

    2015-05-14

    To identify those with a micropapillary pattern, ascertain relative frequency and document clinicopathological characteristics by reviewing gastric carcinomas. One hundred and fifty-one patients diagnosed with gastric cancer who underwent gastrectomy were retrospectively studied and the presence of a regional invasive micropapillary component was evaluated by light microscopy. All available hematoxylin-eosin (HE)-stained slides were histologically reviewed and 5 tumors were selected as putative micropapillary carcinoma when cancer cell clusters without a vascular core within empty lymphatic-like space comprised at least 5% of the tumor. Tumor tissues from these 5 invasive gastric carcinomas were immunostained using an anti-mucin 1 (MUC1) antibody (clone MA695) to detect the characteristic inside-out pattern and with D2-40 antibody to determine the presence of intratumoral lymph vessels. Detection of intraepithelial neutrophil apoptosis was evaluated in consecutive histological tissue sections by three independent methods, namely light microscopy with HE staining, the conventional terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) method and immunohistochemistry for activated caspase-3 (clone C92-605). Among 151 gastric cancers resected for cure, 5 (3.3%) were adenocarcinomas with a micropapillary component. Four of the patients died of disease from 6 to 23 mo and one patient was alive with metastases at 9 mo. All patients had advanced-stage cancer (≥ pT2) and lymph node metastasis. Positive MUC1 immunostaining on the stroma-facing surface (inside-out pattern) of the carcinomatous cluster cells, together with negative immunostaining for D2-40 in the cells limiting lymphatic-like spaces, confirmed the true micropapillary pattern in these gastric neoplasms. In all five cases, several micropapillae were infiltrated by neutrophils. HE staining, TUNEL assay and immunostaining for caspase-3 demonstrated apoptotic neutrophils within

  12. Ulex Europaeus lectin and anti-CD31 staining in squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix: potential prognostic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, B; Goldberg, I; Gotlieb, W H; Lerner-Geva, L; Ben-Baruch, G; Kopolovic, J

    1998-07-01

    Seventy-five squamous cell carcinomas of the uterine cervix and 10 controls were stained for Ulex Europaeus lectin 1 (UEA-1) and anti-CD31, and the results were analyzed with respect to patient age, clinical stage, tumor grade, and survival during a follow-up period of 1 to 13 years. The patients' mean age at the time of diagnosis was 47.8 years (range, 27 to 83). Seventeen patients died of disease, 2 had disease recurrence, and 51 patients remained free of disease; 5 patients were lost to follow-up. Twenty-eight cases (37.3%) showed focal membranous staining for UEA-1 and 9 cases (12%) showed a diffuse pattern; 38 cases (50.7%) were UEA-1 negative. Poor survival was related to diffuse membranous UEA-1 immunoreactivity (p = 0.02), age (p = 0.014), grade (p = 0.02), and stage (p = 0.0002). CD31-positive neoplastic cells displayed a cytoplasmic pattern. Fifteen cases (20%) had diffuse staining and another 15 (20%) stained focally; 45 cases (60%) were CD31-negative. The adjacent nonneoplastic epithelium and all 10 controls were uniformly negative for CD31. Variable staining of the endocervical epithelium and weak or negative staining of ectocervical epithelium for UEA-1 were observed. However, the epithelium in all controls was negative for UEA-1. Poor survival was related to both focal and diffuse staining for CD31 (p = 0.01 and p = 0.03, respectively). Staining by both UEA-1 and anti-CD31 retained its correlation with survival after exclusion of stage la tumors.

  13. TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis as a novel approach to eliminate tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, Susann; Kalthoff, Holger; Adam, Dieter; Philipp, Stephan; Davarnia, Parvin; Winoto-Morbach, Supandi; Röder, Christian; Arenz, Christoph; Trauzold, Anna; Kabelitz, Dieter; Schütze, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The cytokine TRAIL represents one of the most promising candidates for the apoptotic elimination of tumor cells, either alone or in combination therapies. However, its efficacy is often limited by intrinsic or acquired resistance of tumor cells to apoptosis. Programmed necrosis is an alternative, molecularly distinct mode of programmed cell death that is elicited by TRAIL under conditions when the classical apoptosis machinery fails or is actively inhibited. The potential of TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis in tumor therapy is, however, almost completely uncharacterized. We therefore investigated its impact on a panel of tumor cell lines of wide-ranging origin. Cell death/viability was measured by flow cytometry/determination of intracellular ATP levels/crystal violet staining. Cell surface expression of TRAIL receptors was detected by flow cytometry, expression of proteins by Western blot. Ceramide levels were quantified by high-performance thin layer chromatography and densitometric analysis, clonogenic survival of cells was determined by crystal violet staining or by soft agarose cloning. TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis killed eight out of 14 tumor cell lines. Clonogenic survival was reduced in all sensitive and even one resistant cell lines tested. TRAIL synergized with chemotherapeutics in killing tumor cell lines by programmed necrosis, enhancing their effect in eight out of 10 tested tumor cell lines and in 41 out of 80 chemotherapeutic/TRAIL combinations. Susceptibility/resistance of the investigated tumor cell lines to programmed necrosis seems to primarily depend on expression of the pro-necrotic kinase RIPK3 rather than the related kinase RIPK1 or cell surface expression of TRAIL receptors. Furthermore, interference with production of the lipid ceramide protected all tested tumor cell lines. Our study provides evidence that TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis represents a feasible approach for the elimination of tumor cells, and that this treatment may

  14. The role of tumor cell-derived connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) in pancreatic tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennewith, Kevin L; Huang, Xin; Ham, Christine M; Graves, Edward E; Erler, Janine T; Kambham, Neeraja; Feazell, Jonathan; Yang, George P; Koong, Albert; Giaccia, Amato J

    2009-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly aggressive and refractory to existing therapies. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is a fibrosis-related gene that is thought to play a role in pancreatic tumor progression. However, CCN2 can be expressed in a variety of cell types, and the contribution of CCN2 derived from either tumor cells or stromal cells as it affects the growth of pancreatic tumors is unknown. Using genetic inhibition of CCN2, we have discovered that CCN2 derived from tumor cells is a critical regulator of pancreatic tumor growth. Pancreatic tumor cells derived from CCN2 shRNA-expressing clones showed dramatically reduced growth in soft agar and when implanted s.c. We also observed a role for CCN2 in the growth of pancreatic tumors implanted orthotopically, with tumor volume measurements obtained by positron emission tomography imaging. Mechanistically, CCN2 protects cells from hypoxia-mediated apoptosis, providing an in vivo selection for tumor cells that express high levels of CCN2. We found that CCN2 expression and secretion was increased in hypoxic pancreatic tumor cells in vitro, and we observed colocalization of CCN2 and hypoxia in pancreatic tumor xenografts and clinical pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Furthermore, we found increased CCN2 staining in clinical pancreatic tumor tissue relative to stromal cells surrounding the tumor, supporting our assertion that tumor cell-derived CCN2 is important for pancreatic tumor growth. Taken together, these data improve our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for pancreatic tumor growth and progression, and also indicate that CCN2 produced by tumor cells represents a viable therapeutic target for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  15. Ocular melanoma metastatic to skin: the value of HMB-45 staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Robert A; Kist, Joseph M; Thomas, Isabelle; Fernández, Geover; Cruz, Manuel A; Koziorynska, Ewa I; Lambert, W Clark

    2004-06-01

    Cutaneous metastatic disease is an important finding that may represent the first sign of systemic cancer, or, if already known, that may change tumor staging and thus dramatically altered therapeutic plans. Although cutaneous metastases are relatively frequent in patients with cutaneous melanoma, they are less so from ocular melanoma. To demonstrate the value of HMB-45, staining in the detection of ocular melanoma metastatic to skin. The immunohistochemical stain HMB-45 a monoclonal antibody directed against intact human melanoma cells, was employed on a skin biopsy specimen from a cutaneous tumor. HMB-45 staining was positive in the atypical hyperchromatic cells of the deep dermis. HMB-45 may be of value in the detection of ocular melanoma metastatic to skin. Cutaneous metastatic disease is a somewhat common and extremely important diagnosis. Although cutaneous metastases from cutaneous melanoma are relatively frequent, those from ocular melanomas are less so. Use of histochemical staining, especially the HMB-45 stain, allows confirmation of the diagnosis.

  16. Merkel cell polyomavirus detection in Merkel cell cancer tumors in Northern Germany using PCR and protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitz, Miriam; Stieler, Kristin; Grundhoff, Adam; Moll, Ingrid; Brandner, Johanna M; Fischer, Nicole

    2014-10-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a highly malignant skin cancer which predominantly occurs in elderly and immunocompromised persons. The identification of the Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) has inaugurated a new understanding of Merkel cell carcinoma pathogenesis. The frequent detection of the virus in Merkel cell carcinoma tissue (70-90%), its monoclonal integration in the tumor cells and the expression of viral oncogenes highly suggest that MCPyV is causally linked to the pathogenesis of the majority of Merkel cell cancer (MCC) cases. Using qualitative and quantitative PCR together with immunohistochemical staining this study aimed at characterizing the presence of MCPyV sequences and viral early gene expression in a cohort of MCC cases (n = 32) selected in Northern Germany. 40-57% of the cases were identified as MCPyV positive with 40.6% of the cases positive by immunohistochemical staining and 51.6-57.6% positive by PCR. Interestingly, in the majority (64%) of LT-Antigen positive tumors only 25-50% of tumor cells express LT-Antigen. These data are in accord with published studies describing heterogeneity in MCPyV viral loads and suggest that detection of MCPyV in Merkel cell carcinoma by PCR should be undertaken using multiple primer pairs. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Combination therapy of radiation and immunomodulators in the treatment of MM46 tumor transplanted in C3H/He mice. Histological and histoenzymatic studies using alpha-naphtyl acetate esterase staining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyaji, Chihiro; Imanaka, Kazufumi; Gose, Kyuhei; Ichiyanagi, Akihiro; Imajo, Yoshinari (Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1983-12-01

    Female C3H/He mice aged 13 weeks with transplanted MM 46 tumor were used in histological and enzymohistochemical studies on the timing of administration of immunomodulators, PSK (a protein bound polysaccharide prepared from Coriolus versicolor), or OK-432 (Streptococcal preparation) combined with two fractionated local irradiation with the total dose of 3,000 rad. The daily dose of 250 mg/kg of PSK, or 1 KE/mouse of OK-432 was respectively injected intraperitoneally for four consecutive days before or after irradiation. Mice were sacrificed before irradiation and 7, 14 and 21 days after irradiation. Resected tumor tissues were examined using H-E staining and ..cap alpha..-naphtyl acetate esterase (ANAE) staining to observe the stromal reactions such as the infiltration of mononuclear cells and fibroblasts around tumor tissues. When PSK or OK-432 was administered after irradiation, remarkable lymphocytic infiltration was observed compared with the control group and the group to which PSK or OK-432 was administered before irradiation. ANAE staining revealed most of infiltrating lymphocytes were T-cells. These results suggested that PSK and OK-432 which were received after radiotherapy enhanced the immunological responses against tumors which were represented by remarkable lymphocytic infiltration.

  18. Evaluation of mast cells in periapical cysts, dentigerous cysts, and keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Noronha Santos Netto, Juliana; Pires, Fábio Ramôa; da Fonseca, Eliene Carvalho; Silva, Licínio Esmeraldo; de Queiroz Chaves Lourenço, Simone

    2012-09-01

    Several cell types are associated with the development of cystic and tumoral odontogenic lesions. Among inflammatory cells, mast cells can be associated with their pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to analyze mast cells in periapical cysts, dentigerous cysts, and keratocystic odontogenic tumors. Tissue sections were submitted to toluidine blue staining and immunohistochemistry with antibody anti-tryptase (clone G3). Mast cells were quantitated using Image-Pro Plus software to obtain the mean number of mast cells in three regions: epithelial, superficial portion of the fibrous wall and deep portion of the fibrous wall from 20 periapical cysts, 20 dentigerous cysts (six non-inflamed and 14 inflamed) and 20 keratocystic odontogenic tumors (four non-inflamed and 16 inflamed). The mean number of mast cells detected per lesion by immunohistochemistry (4.1) was higher than by histochemistry (1.5) (Pcysts and keratocystic odontogenic tumors showed a higher mean number of mast cells than non-inflamed lesions in all regions. The deep region from all cysts showed the highest mean number of degranulated mast cells, except for non-inflamed keratocystic odontogenic tumors analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemical staining detected higher number of mast cells than histochemistry. The higher number of mast cells observed in inflamed lesions could indicate the participation of these cells in the inflammatory response in odontogenic lesions. The prevalence of degranulated mast cells in the deep region suggests intense activity of these cells, possibly related to growth of cystic lesions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Method for semi-automated microscopy of filtration-enriched circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pailler, Emma; Oulhen, Marianne; Billiot, Fanny; Galland, Alexandre; Auger, Nathalie; Faugeroux, Vincent; Laplace-Builhé, Corinne; Besse, Benjamin; Loriot, Yohann; Ngo-Camus, Maud; Hemanda, Merouan; Lindsay, Colin R; Soria, Jean-Charles; Vielh, Philippe; Farace, Françoise

    2016-07-14

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC)-filtration methods capture high numbers of CTCs in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and metastatic prostate cancer (mPCa) patients, and hold promise as a non-invasive technique for treatment selection and disease monitoring. However filters have drawbacks that make the automation of microscopy challenging. We report the semi-automated microscopy method we developed to analyze filtration-enriched CTCs from NSCLC and mPCa patients. Spiked cell lines in normal blood and CTCs were enriched by ISET (isolation by size of epithelial tumor cells). Fluorescent staining was carried out using epithelial (pan-cytokeratins, EpCAM), mesenchymal (vimentin, N-cadherin), leukocyte (CD45) markers and DAPI. Cytomorphological staining was carried out with Mayer-Hemalun or Diff-Quik. ALK-, ROS1-, ERG-rearrangement were detected by filter-adapted-FISH (FA-FISH). Microscopy was carried out using an Ariol scanner. Two combined assays were developed. The first assay sequentially combined four-color fluorescent staining, scanning, automated selection of CD45(-) cells, cytomorphological staining, then scanning and analysis of CD45(-) cell phenotypical and cytomorphological characteristics. CD45(-) cell selection was based on DAPI and CD45 intensity, and a nuclear area >55 μm(2). The second assay sequentially combined fluorescent staining, automated selection of CD45(-) cells, FISH scanning on CD45(-) cells, then analysis of CD45(-) cell FISH signals. Specific scanning parameters were developed to deal with the uneven surface of filters and CTC characteristics. Thirty z-stacks spaced 0.6 μm apart were defined as the optimal setting, scanning 82 %, 91 %, and 95 % of CTCs in ALK-, ROS1-, and ERG-rearranged patients respectively. A multi-exposure protocol consisting of three separate exposure times for green and red fluorochromes was optimized to analyze the intensity, size and thickness of FISH signals. The semi-automated microscopy method reported here

  20. Circulating tumor cells in melanoma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary A Clawson

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are of recognized importance for diagnosis and prognosis of cancer patients. With melanoma, most studies do not show any clear relationship between CTC levels and stage of disease. Here, CTCs were enriched (∼400X from blood of melanoma patients using a simple centrifugation device (OncoQuick, and 4 melanocyte target RNAs (TYR, MLANA, MITF, and MIF were quantified using QPCR. Approximately one-third of melanoma patients had elevated MIF and MLANA transcripts (p<0.0001 and p<0.001, respectively compared with healthy controls. In contrast, healthy controls had uniformly higher levels of TYR and MITF than melanoma patients (p<0.0001. There was a marked shift of leukocytes into the CTC-enriched fractions (a 430% increase in RNA recovery, p<0.001, and no relationship between CTC levels and stage of disease was found. CTCs were captured on microfabricated filters and cultured. Captured melanoma CTCs were large cells, and consisted of 2 subpopulations, based on immunoreactivity. One subpopulation (∼50% stained for both pan-cytokeratin (KRT markers and the common leukocyte marker CD-45, whereas the second subpopulation stained for only KRT. Since similar cells are described in many cancers, we also examined blood from colorectal and pancreatic cancer patients. We observed analogous results, with most captured CTCs staining for both CD-45/KRT markers (and for the monocyte differentiation marker CD-14. Our results suggest that immature melanocyte-related cells (expressing TYR and MITF RNA may circulate in healthy controls, although they are not readily detectable without considerable enrichment. Further, as early-stage melanomas develop, immature melanocyte migration into the blood is somehow curtailed, whereas a significant proportion of patients develop elevated CTC levels (based on MIF and MLANA RNAs. The nature of the captured CTCs is consistent with literature describing leukocyte/macrophage-tumor cell fusion hybrids

  1. Expression of FK506 binding protein 65 (FKBP65) is decreased in epithelial ovarian cancer cells compared to benign tumor cells and to ovarian epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Rudi; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Orntoft, Torben Falck

    2011-01-01

    to be followed by a strongly increased risk of ovarian cysts. We performed the present study to reveal how FKBP65 is expressed in the ovary and in ovarian tumors and to see if this expression might be related to ovarian tumor development, a relationship we have found in colorectal cancer. Biopsies from...... prospectively collected samples from ovaries and benign, borderline, and invasive ovarian tumors were analyzed for expression of FKBP65 by immunohistochemistry. The expression was compared to survival and several clinicopathological parameters. FKBP65 is strongly expressed in ovarian epithelium and in benign...... ovarian tumor cells. In the ovary, a positive staining was also found in endothelial cells of blood vessels. In non-invasive and in invasive malignant tumor cells, a decreased staining was observed, which was not correlated to stage, histology, or survival. A significant inversed correlation to expression...

  2. Infiltration of M2 Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Correlates with Tumor Malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Kazumasa; Hiroi, Miki; Shimada, Jun; Ohmori, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are a major cellular component in the tumor microenvironment of many solid tumors. The functional competence of TAMs varies depending on the type of tumors and their respective microenvironments. The classically activated M1 macrophages exhibit antitumor functions, whereas the alternatively activated M2 macrophages exhibit protumor functions that contribute to tumor development and progression. Although TAMs have been detected in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), little is known about their phenotype. In the present study, we performed an immunohistochemical analysis to identify TAMs in surgically resected specimens from 50 patients with OSCC and evaluated the relationship between infiltrated TAMs and the pathological grade of OSCC. Positive staining for CD163, which has been used as a marker for M2 macrophages, was observed in OSCC specimens, and the percentages of CD163 + cells were significantly increased based on the pathological grade. CD163 + cells were detected in the tumor stroma in grade I tumors, whereas an increase in the CD163 + cells in the tumor nest was observed in higher grades of tumors. Although infiltrated CD4 + and CD8 + T cells were detected in all pathological grades of OSCC, no correlation between the infiltrated T cells and the CD163 + TAMs was observed. These results indicate that the infiltrated TAMs in OSCC have an M2 phenotype and that the M2 macrophages may participate in the development of OSCC

  3. Infiltration of M2 Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Correlates with Tumor Malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Kazumasa [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Diagnosis and Therapeutics, Meikai University of School of Dentistry, 1-1 Keyakidai, Sakado, Saitama 350-0283 (Japan); Hiroi, Miki [Division of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Oral Biology and Tissue Engineering, Meikai University School of Dentistry, 1-1 Keyakidai, Sakado, Saitama 350-0283 (Japan); Shimada, Jun [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Diagnosis and Therapeutics, Meikai University of School of Dentistry, 1-1 Keyakidai, Sakado, Saitama 350-0283 (Japan); Ohmori, Yoshihiro, E-mail: ohmori@dent.meikai.ac.jp [Division of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Oral Biology and Tissue Engineering, Meikai University School of Dentistry, 1-1 Keyakidai, Sakado, Saitama 350-0283 (Japan)

    2011-09-28

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are a major cellular component in the tumor microenvironment of many solid tumors. The functional competence of TAMs varies depending on the type of tumors and their respective microenvironments. The classically activated M1 macrophages exhibit antitumor functions, whereas the alternatively activated M2 macrophages exhibit protumor functions that contribute to tumor development and progression. Although TAMs have been detected in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), little is known about their phenotype. In the present study, we performed an immunohistochemical analysis to identify TAMs in surgically resected specimens from 50 patients with OSCC and evaluated the relationship between infiltrated TAMs and the pathological grade of OSCC. Positive staining for CD163, which has been used as a marker for M2 macrophages, was observed in OSCC specimens, and the percentages of CD163{sup +} cells were significantly increased based on the pathological grade. CD163{sup +} cells were detected in the tumor stroma in grade I tumors, whereas an increase in the CD163{sup +} cells in the tumor nest was observed in higher grades of tumors. Although infiltrated CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells were detected in all pathological grades of OSCC, no correlation between the infiltrated T cells and the CD163{sup +} TAMs was observed. These results indicate that the infiltrated TAMs in OSCC have an M2 phenotype and that the M2 macrophages may participate in the development of OSCC.

  4. Heterogeneity of estrogen receptor expression in circulating tumor cells from metastatic breast cancer patients.

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    Anna Babayan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endocrine treatment is the most preferable systemic treatment in metastatic breast cancer patients that have had an estrogen receptor (ER positive primary tumor or metastatic lesions, however, approximately 20% of these patients do not benefit from the therapy and demonstrate further metastatic progress. One reason for failure of endocrine therapy might be the heterogeneity of ER expression in tumor cells spreading from the primary tumor to distant sites which is reflected in detectable circulating tumor cells (CTCs. METHODS: A sensitive and specific staining protocol for ER, keratin 8/18/19, CD45 was established. Peripheral blood from 35 metastatic breast cancer patients with ER-positive primary tumors was tested for the presence of CTCs. Keratin 8/18/19 and DAPI positive but CD45 negative cells were classified as CTCs and evaluated for ER staining. Subsequently, eight individual CTCs from four index patients (2 CTCs per patient were isolated and underwent whole genome amplification and ESR1 gene mutation analysis. RESULTS: CTCs were detected in blood of 16 from 35 analyzed patients (46%, with a median of 3 CTCs/7.5 ml. In total, ER-negative CTCs were detected in 11/16 (69% of the CTC positive cases, including blood samples with only ER-negative CTCs (19% and samples with both ER-positive and ER-negative CTCs (50%. No correlation was found between the intensity and/or percentage of ER staining in the primary tumor with the number and ER status of CTCs of the same patient. ESR1 gene mutations were not found. CONCLUSION: CTCs frequently lack ER expression in metastatic breast cancer patients with ER-positive primary tumors and show a considerable intra-patient heterogeneity, which may reflect a mechanism to escape endocrine therapy. Provided single cell analysis did not support a role of ESR1 mutations in this process.

  5. Heterogeneity of Estrogen Receptor Expression in Circulating Tumor Cells from Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babayan, Anna; Hannemann, Juliane; Spötter, Julia; Müller, Volkmar

    2013-01-01

    Background Endocrine treatment is the most preferable systemic treatment in metastatic breast cancer patients that have had an estrogen receptor (ER) positive primary tumor or metastatic lesions, however, approximately 20% of these patients do not benefit from the therapy and demonstrate further metastatic progress. One reason for failure of endocrine therapy might be the heterogeneity of ER expression in tumor cells spreading from the primary tumor to distant sites which is reflected in detectable circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Methods A sensitive and specific staining protocol for ER, keratin 8/18/19, CD45 was established. Peripheral blood from 35 metastatic breast cancer patients with ER-positive primary tumors was tested for the presence of CTCs. Keratin 8/18/19 and DAPI positive but CD45 negative cells were classified as CTCs and evaluated for ER staining. Subsequently, eight individual CTCs from four index patients (2 CTCs per patient) were isolated and underwent whole genome amplification and ESR1 gene mutation analysis. Results CTCs were detected in blood of 16 from 35 analyzed patients (46%), with a median of 3 CTCs/7.5 ml. In total, ER-negative CTCs were detected in 11/16 (69%) of the CTC positive cases, including blood samples with only ER-negative CTCs (19%) and samples with both ER-positive and ER-negative CTCs (50%). No correlation was found between the intensity and/or percentage of ER staining in the primary tumor with the number and ER status of CTCs of the same patient. ESR1 gene mutations were not found. Conclusion CTCs frequently lack ER expression in metastatic breast cancer patients with ER-positive primary tumors and show a considerable intra-patient heterogeneity, which may reflect a mechanism to escape endocrine therapy. Provided single cell analysis did not support a role of ESR1 mutations in this process. PMID:24058649

  6. Breast cancer instructs dendritic cells to prime interleukin 13–secreting CD4+ T cells that facilitate tumor development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspord, Caroline; Pedroza-Gonzalez, Alexander; Gallegos, Mike; Tindle, Sasha; Burton, Elizabeth C.; Su, Dan; Marches, Florentina; Banchereau, Jacques; Palucka, A. Karolina

    2007-01-01

    We previously reported (Bell, D., P. Chomarat, D. Broyles, G. Netto, G.M. Harb, S. Lebecque, J. Valladeau, J. Davoust, K.A. Palucka, and J. Banchereau. 1999. J. Exp. Med. 190: 1417–1426) that breast cancer tumors are infiltrated with mature dendritic cells (DCs), which cluster with CD4+ T cells. We now show that CD4+ T cells infiltrating breast cancer tumors secrete type 1 (interferon γ) as well as high levels of type 2 (interleukin [IL] 4 and IL-13) cytokines. Immunofluorescence staining of tissue sections revealed intense IL-13 staining on breast cancer cells. The expression of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 in breast cancer cells suggests that IL-13 actually delivers signals to cancer cells. To determine the link between breast cancer, DCs, and CD4+ T cells, we implanted human breast cancer cell lines in nonobese diabetic/LtSz-scid/scid β2 microglobulin–deficient mice engrafted with human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells and autologous T cells. There, CD4+ T cells promote early tumor development. This is dependent on DCs and can be partially prevented by administration of IL-13 antagonists. Thus, breast cancer targets DCs to facilitate its development. PMID:17438063

  7. Cell wall staining with Trypan blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Marek, Magdalena; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    staining with fluorescent dyes is a valuable tool. Furthermore, cell wall staining is used to facilitate sub-cellular localization experiments with fluorescently-labeled proteins and the detection of yeast cells in non-fungal host tissues. Here, we report staining of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall......Yeast cells are protected by a cell wall that plays an important role in the exchange of substances with the environment. The cell wall structure is dynamic and can adapt to different physiological states or environmental conditions. For the investigation of morphological changes, selective...... with Trypan Blue, which emits strong red fluorescence upon binding to chitin and yeast glucan; thereby, it facilitates cell wall analysis by confocal and super-resolution microscopy. The staining pattern of Trypan Blue was similar to that of the widely used UV-excitable, blue fluorescent cell wall stain...

  8. AgNOR Count in Resting Cells (Resting NOR Is a New Prognostic Marker in Invasive Bladder Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuro Tomobe

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We have previously demonstrated that the AgNOR count in proliferating cells is a predictor of tumor recurrence in superficial bladder tumor (J. Urol. 162 (1999, 63–68. In the present study, we evaluate the type of AgNOR associated with cell cycles as a prognostic factor in invasive bladder tumor using a double staining technique employing both AgNOR and MIB-1 labelling. Materials and methods: Forty-four paraffin sections of invasive bladder tumors were stained simultaneously with AgNOR and MIB-1. The number of AgNORs in proliferating (MIB-1 positive or resting (MIB-1 negative cells were counted from a total of 100 nuclei. Correlations between MIB-1 associated AgNOR count and clinicopathological parameters were statistically analyzed. Results: The AgNOR count in proliferating cells (proliferating NOR was significantly higher than that in resting cells (resting NOR (p < 0.01. The resting NOR in tumors with distant metastases was significantly higher than that in tumors without metastases (p < 0.05. Patients with a low resting NOR tumor had a better prognosis than those with a high resting NOR tumor, whereas the proliferating NOR was not associated with survival. Survival analysis revealed that the resting NOR was the most powerful prognostic marker in patients with invasive bladder tumor (p < 0.05. Conclusions: Resting NOR had a predictive value in the prognosis of patients with invasive bladder tumor. Keywords: Transitional cell carcinoma, invasive, resting cell, AgNORs, MIB-1

  9. Essential contribution of tumor-derived perlecan to epidermal tumor growth and angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Xinnong; Multhaupt, Hinke; Chan, En

    2004-01-01

    As a major heparan sulfate proteoglycan (PG) in basement membranes, perlecan has been linked to tumor invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Here we produced epidermal tumors in immunocompromised rats by injection of mouse RT101 tumor cells. Tumor sections stained with species-specific perlecan...... factor. In vivo, antisense perlecan-transfected cells generated no tumors, whereas untransfected and vector-transfected cells formed tumors with obvious neovascularization, suggesting that tumor perlecan rather than host perlecan controls tumor growth and angiogenesis....

  10. Cell wall staining with Trypan blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesche, Johannes; Marek, Magdalena; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Yeast cells are protected by a cell wall that plays an important role in the exchange of substances with the environment. The cell wall structure is dynamic and can adapt to different physiological states or environmental conditions. For the investigation of morphological changes, selective staining with fluorescent dyes is a valuable tool. Furthermore, cell wall staining is used to facilitate sub-cellular localization experiments with fluorescently-labeled proteins and the detection of yeast cells in non-fungal host tissues. Here, we report staining of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall with Trypan Blue, which emits strong red fluorescence upon binding to chitin and yeast glucan; thereby, it facilitates cell wall analysis by confocal and super-resolution microscopy. The staining pattern of Trypan Blue was similar to that of the widely used UV-excitable, blue fluorescent cell wall stain Calcofluor White. Trypan Blue staining facilitated quantification of cell size and cell wall volume when utilizing the optical sectioning capacity of a confocal microscope. This enabled the quantification of morphological changes during growth under anaerobic conditions and in the presence of chemicals, demonstrating the potential of this approach for morphological investigations or screening assays.

  11. Cell wall staining with Trypan Blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes eLiesche

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Yeast cells are protected by a cell wall that plays an important role in the exchange of substances with the environment. The cell wall structure is dynamic and can adapt to different physiological states or environmental conditions. For the investigation of morphological changes, selective staining with fluorescent dyes is a valuable tool. Furthermore, cell wall staining is used to facilitate sub-cellular localization experiments with fluorescently-labeled proteins and the detection of yeast cells in non-fungal host tissues. Here, we report staining of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall with Trypan Blue, which emits strong red fluorescence upon binding to chitin and yeast glucan; thereby, it facilitates cell wall analysis by confocal and super-resolution microscopy. The staining pattern of Trypan Blue was similar to that of the widely used UV-excitable, blue fluorescent cell wall stain Calcofluor White. Trypan Blue staining facilitated quantification of cell size and cell wall volume when utilizing the optical sectioning capacity of a confocal microscope. This enabled the quantification of morphological changes during growth under anaerobic conditions and in the presence of chemicals, demonstrating the potential of this approach for morphological investigations or screening assays.

  12. Wortmannin efficiently suppresses the recovery from radiation-induced damage in pimonidazole-unlabeled quiescent tumor cell population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Suzuki, Minoru; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Ono, Koji; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Maruhashi, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Labeling of proliferating (P) cells in mice bearing EL4 tumors was achieved by continuous administration of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Tumors were irradiated with γ-rays at 1 h after pimonidazole administration followed by caffeine or wortmannin treatment. Twenty-four hours later, assessment of the responses of quiescent (Q) and total (=P+Q) cell populations were based on the frequencies of micronucleation and apoptosis using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The response of the pimonidazole-unlabeled tumor cell fractions was assessed by means of apoptosis frequency using immunofluorescence staining for pimonidazole. The pimonidazole-unlabeled cell fraction showed significantly enhanced radio-sensitivity compared with the whole cell fraction more remarkably in Q cells than total cells. However, a significantly greater decrease in radio-sensitivity in the pimonidazole-unlabeled than the whole cell fraction, evaluated using an assay performed 24 hours after irradiation, was more clearly observed in Q cells than total cells. In both the pimonidazole-unlabeled and the whole cell fractions, wortmannin efficiently suppressed the reduction in sensitivity due to delayed assay. Wortmannin combined with γ-ray irradiation is useful for suppressing the recovery from radiation-induced damage especially in the pimonidazole-unlabeled cell fraction within the total and Q tumor cell populations. (author)

  13. Studies of the endothelial origin of cells in systemic angioendotheliomatosis and other vascular lesions of the brain and meninges using ulex europaeus lectin stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelper, R L; Olson, S P; Carroll, T J; Hart, M N; Witters, E

    1986-01-01

    Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I) is a plant lectin which binds specifically to alpha-L-fucose moieties on the surface glycoproteins of human endothelial cells. The binding is completely inhibited by preincubation of the lectin with fucose. UEA-I can be conjugated directly to fluorescein or peroxidase and can be used to stain endothelium of paraffin embedded tissues. UEA-I staining was evaluated on normal and infarcted brain, systemic angioendotheliomatosis, metastatic epidural angiosarcoma, hemangioendothelioma, hemangioblastoma, angioblastic meningioma of both the hemangioblastic and hemangiopericytic types, and vascular meningioma. The endothelium, but not neuropil of normal and infarcted brain was positive for UEA-I. The tumor cells of hemangioendothelioma and angiosarcoma also stained. However, no staining was seen in malignant intravascular cells of angioendotheliomatosis, the stromal cells of hemangioblastoma, or pericytes of angioblastic meningioma. It is concluded that the malignant cells in angioendotheliomatosis, the stromal cells of hemangioblastoma and the pericytes of angioblastic meningioma do not produce surface glycoproteins characteristic of endothelial cells.

  14. A rare occurrence of a steroid cell tumor of the pelvic mesentery: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Louis Robert; Murhekar Kanchan; Majhi Urmila

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Steroid cell tumors are microscopically characterized by abundant eosinophilic or vacuolated cytoplasm that is often positive for fat stains. These tumors could be of ovarian or ectopic adrenal origin. We present a rare case of a steroid cell tumor arising from the pelvic mesentery. Case presentation A 31-year-old Asian woman was undergoing treatment for infertility and virilizing symptoms. She underwent laparoscopy followed by laprotomy for a suspected ovarian cyst/pelv...

  15. Radiobiologic significance of apoptosis and micronucleation in quiescent cells within solid tumors following γ-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Ono, Koji; Suzuki, Minoru; Kinashi, Yuko; Takagaki, Masao

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the frequency of apoptosis in quiescent (Q) cells within solid tumors following γ-ray irradiation, using four different tumor cell lines. In addition, to assess the significance of detecting apoptosis in these cell lines. Methods and Materials: C3H/He mice bearing SCC VII or FM3A tumors, Balb/c mice bearing EMT6/KU tumors, and C57BL mice bearing EL4 tumors received 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) continuously for 5 days via implanted mini-osmotic pumps to label all proliferating (P) cells. The mice then received γ-ray irradiation at a dose of 4-25 Gy while alive or after tumor clamping. Immediately after irradiation, the tumors were excised, minced, and trypsinized. The tumor cell suspensions thus obtained were incubated with cytochalasin-B (a cytokinesis blocker), and the micronucleus (MN) frequency in cells without BrdU labeling (=Q cells) was determined using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. Meanwhile, 6 hours after irradiation, tumor cell suspensions obtained in the same manner were fixed. The apoptosis frequency in Q cells was also determined with immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The MN and apoptosis frequency in total (P+Q) tumor cells were determined from the tumors that were not pretreated with BrdU. Results: In total cells, SCC VII, FM3A, and EMT6/KU cells showed reasonable relationships between MN frequency and surviving fraction (SF). However, fewer micronuclei were induced in EL4 cells than the other cell lines. In contrast, a comparatively close relationship between apoptosis frequency and SF was found in total cells of EL4 cell line. Less apoptosis was observed in the other cell lines. Quiescent tumor cells exhibited significantly lower values of MN and apoptosis frequency probably due to their large hypoxic fraction, similar to total tumor cells on clamped irradiation. Conclusion: γ-ray irradiation induced MN formation in SCC VII, FM3A, and EMT6/KU tumor cells, and the apoptosis was marked in EL4 cells compared with

  16. Hypoxic cell turnover in different solid tumor lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungkvist, Anna S.E.; Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.; Rijken, Paulus F.J.W.; Begg, Adrian C.; Raleigh, James A.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Most solid tumors contain hypoxic cells, and the amount of tumor hypoxia has been shown to have a negative impact on the outcome of radiotherapy. The efficacy of combined modality treatments depends both on the sequence and timing of the treatments. Hypoxic cell turnover in tumors may be important for optimal scheduling of combined modality treatments, especially when hypoxic cell targeting is involved. Methods and Materials: Previously we have shown that a double bioreductive hypoxic marker assay could be used to detect changes of tumor hypoxia in relation to the tumor vasculature after carbogen and hydralazine treatments. This assay was used in the current study to establish the turnover rate of hypoxic cells in three different tumor models. The first hypoxic marker, pimonidazole, was administered at variable times before tumor harvest, and the second hypoxic marker, CCI-103F, was injected at a fixed time before harvest. Hypoxic cell turnover was defined as loss of pimonidazole (first marker) relative to CCI-103F (second marker). Results: The half-life of hypoxic cell turnover was 17 h in the murine C38 colon carcinoma line, 23 h and 49 h in the human xenograft lines MEC82 and SCCNij3, respectively. Within 24 h, loss of pimonidazole-stained areas in C38 and MEC82 occurred concurrent with the appearance of pimonidazole positive cell debris in necrotic regions. In C38 and MEC82, most of the hypoxic cells had disappeared after 48 h, whereas in SCCNij3, viable cells that had been labeled with pimonidazole were still observed after 5 days. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates that the double hypoxia marker assay can be used to study changes in both the proportion of hypoxic tumor cells and their lifespan at the same time. The present study shows that large differences in hypoxic cell turnover rates may exist among tumor lines, with half-lives ranging from 17-49 h

  17. An improved method for staining cell colonies in clonogenic assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guda, Kishore; Natale, Leanna; Markowitz, Sanford D

    2007-06-01

    Clonogenic assay is a widely used experimental approach to test for the effects of drugs/genes on the growth and proliferative characteristics of cells in vitro. Accurate quantitation of treatment effects in clonogeneic assays depends on the ability to visualize and count cell colonies precisely. We report a novel method (referred as ETeB) for staining cell colonies grown on plastic and specially coated substrates like collagen. Using colon cancer cell lines grown on plastic and collagen, we compared the colony staining efficiencies of the widely used methylene blue, and Ethidium bromide (ETeB) stains. Results show that the ETeB protocol works well on plastic and is extremely effective for staining colonies on collagen when compared to methylene blue. The key features and advantages of ETeB technique are; (a) reduction in background for colonies grown on collagen and possibly other substrates, (b) the whole procedure takes less than a minute, (c) no post-stain washing step is required which eliminates colony losses for cell lines that are loosely adherent, (d) colony visualization and counting can be done immediately following the staining procedure using a standard UV illuminator and software, and (e) the method works across a wide variety of cell lines. The simplicity and robustness of this procedure should warrant its usage in both small and large-scale clonogenic experiments.

  18. Tumor microvessel density–associated mast cells in canine nodal lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Elizabeth; Whittington, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Mast cells are associated in angiogenesis in various human and animal neoplasms. However, association of mast cells with tumor microvessel density in canine lymphoma was not previously documented. The objective of the study is to determine if mast cells are increased in canine nodal lymphomas and to evaluate their correlation with tumor microvessel density and grading of lymphomas. Methods: Nodal lymphomas from 33 dogs were studied and compared with nonneoplastic lymph nodes from 6 dogs as control. Mast cell count was made on Toluidine blue stained sections. Immunohistochemistry using antibody against Factor VIII was employed to visualize and determine microvessel density. Results: The mast cell count in lymphoma (2.95 ± 2.4) was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that in the control (0.83 ± 0.3) and was positively correlated with tumor microvessel density (r = 0.44, p = 0.009). Significant difference was not observed in mast cell count and tumor microvessel density among different gradings of lymphomas. Conclusions: Mast cells are associated with tumor microvessel density in canine nodal lymphoma with no significant difference among gradings of lymphomas. Mast cells may play an important role in development of canine nodal lymphomas. Further detailed investigation on the role of mast cells as important part of tumor microenvironment in canine nodal lymphomas is recommended. PMID:26770752

  19. Tumor microvessel density–associated mast cells in canine nodal lymphoma

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    Moges Woldemeskel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Mast cells are associated in angiogenesis in various human and animal neoplasms. However, association of mast cells with tumor microvessel density in canine lymphoma was not previously documented. The objective of the study is to determine if mast cells are increased in canine nodal lymphomas and to evaluate their correlation with tumor microvessel density and grading of lymphomas. Methods: Nodal lymphomas from 33 dogs were studied and compared with nonneoplastic lymph nodes from 6 dogs as control. Mast cell count was made on Toluidine blue stained sections. Immunohistochemistry using antibody against Factor VIII was employed to visualize and determine microvessel density. Results: The mast cell count in lymphoma (2.95 ± 2.4 was significantly higher (p < 0.05 than that in the control (0.83 ± 0.3 and was positively correlated with tumor microvessel density (r = 0.44, p = 0.009. Significant difference was not observed in mast cell count and tumor microvessel density among different gradings of lymphomas. Conclusions: Mast cells are associated with tumor microvessel density in canine nodal lymphoma with no significant difference among gradings of lymphomas. Mast cells may play an important role in development of canine nodal lymphomas. Further detailed investigation on the role of mast cells as important part of tumor microenvironment in canine nodal lymphomas is recommended.

  20. Method for semi-automated microscopy of filtration-enriched circulating tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pailler, Emma; Oulhen, Marianne; Billiot, Fanny; Galland, Alexandre; Auger, Nathalie; Faugeroux, Vincent; Laplace-Builhé, Corinne; Besse, Benjamin; Loriot, Yohann; Ngo-Camus, Maud; Hemanda, Merouan; Lindsay, Colin R.; Soria, Jean-Charles; Vielh, Philippe; Farace, Françoise

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC)-filtration methods capture high numbers of CTCs in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and metastatic prostate cancer (mPCa) patients, and hold promise as a non-invasive technique for treatment selection and disease monitoring. However filters have drawbacks that make the automation of microscopy challenging. We report the semi-automated microscopy method we developed to analyze filtration-enriched CTCs from NSCLC and mPCa patients. Spiked cell lines in normal blood and CTCs were enriched by ISET (isolation by size of epithelial tumor cells). Fluorescent staining was carried out using epithelial (pan-cytokeratins, EpCAM), mesenchymal (vimentin, N-cadherin), leukocyte (CD45) markers and DAPI. Cytomorphological staining was carried out with Mayer-Hemalun or Diff-Quik. ALK-, ROS1-, ERG-rearrangement were detected by filter-adapted-FISH (FA-FISH). Microscopy was carried out using an Ariol scanner. Two combined assays were developed. The first assay sequentially combined four-color fluorescent staining, scanning, automated selection of CD45 − cells, cytomorphological staining, then scanning and analysis of CD45 − cell phenotypical and cytomorphological characteristics. CD45 − cell selection was based on DAPI and CD45 intensity, and a nuclear area >55 μm 2 . The second assay sequentially combined fluorescent staining, automated selection of CD45 − cells, FISH scanning on CD45 − cells, then analysis of CD45 − cell FISH signals. Specific scanning parameters were developed to deal with the uneven surface of filters and CTC characteristics. Thirty z-stacks spaced 0.6 μm apart were defined as the optimal setting, scanning 82 %, 91 %, and 95 % of CTCs in ALK-, ROS1-, and ERG-rearranged patients respectively. A multi-exposure protocol consisting of three separate exposure times for green and red fluorochromes was optimized to analyze the intensity, size and thickness of FISH signals. The semi-automated microscopy method reported here

  1. Comparison of staining of mitotic figures by haematoxylin and eosin-and crystal violet stains, in oral epithelial dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankle Madhuri

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitosis of cells gives rise to tissue integrity. Defects during mitosis bring about abnormalities. Excessive proliferation of cells due to increased mitosis is one such outcome, which is the hallmark in precancer and cancer. The localization of proliferating cells or their precursors may not be obvious and easy. Establishing an easy way to distinguish these mitotic cells will help in grading and understanding their biological potential. Although immunohistochemistry is an advanced method in use, the cost and time factor makes it less feasible for many laboratories. Selective histochemical stains like toluidine blue, giemsa and crystal violet have been used in tissues including the developing brain, neural tissue and skin. Aim of the study: 1To compare the staining of mitotic cells in haematoxylin and eosin with that in crystal violet. 2To compare the number of mitotic figures present in normal oral mucosa, epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma in crystal violet-stained sections with that in H and E-stained sections. Materials and Methods: Ten tissues of normal oral mucosa and 15 tissues each of oral epithelial dysplasia seen in tobacco-associated leukoplakia and squamous cell carcinoma were studied to evaluate the selectivity of 1% crystal violet for mitotic figures. The staining was compared with standard H and E staining. Statistical analysis was done using Man-Whitney U test. Results: A statistically significant increase in the mean mitotic count was observed in crystal violet-stained sections of epithelial dysplasia as compared to the H and E-stained sections ( p = 0.0327. A similar increase in the mitotic counts was noted in crystal violet-stained sections of oral squamous cell carcinoma as compared to the H and E-stained sections.( p = 0.0443. No significant difference was found in the mitotic counts determined in dysplasia or carcinoma by either the crystal violet ( p = 0.4429 or the H and E-staining techniques ( p = 0

  2. Assessment of γ-H2AX levels in circulating tumor cells from patients receiving chemotherapy

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    Garcia-Villa, Alejandra; Balasubramanian, Priya; Miller, Brandon L. [William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Lustberg, Maryam B.; Ramaswamy, Bhuvaneswari [Department of Internal Medicine, Breast Medical Oncology, James Cancer Hospital and Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, OH (United States); Chalmers, Jeffrey J., E-mail: chalmers.1@osu.edu [William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2012-10-25

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are prognostic markers in a variety of solid tumor malignancies. The potential of CTCs to be used as a “liquid biopsy” to monitor a patient’s condition and predict drug response and resistance is currently under investigation. Using a negative depletion, enrichment methodology, CTCs isolated from the peripheral blood of breast cancer patients with stage IV breast cancer undergoing DNA damaging therapy with platinum-based therapy were enriched. The enriched cell suspensions were stained with an optimized labeling protocol targeting: nuclei, cytokeratins 8, 18, and 19, the surface marker CD45, and the presence of the protein γ-H2AX. As a direct or indirect result of platinum therapy, double-strand break of DNA initiates phosphorylation of the histone H2AX, at serine 139; this phosphorylated form is referred to as γ-H2AX. In addition to γ-H2AX staining in specific locations with the cell nuclei, consistent with previous reports and referred to as foci, more general staining in the cell cytoplasm was also observed in some cells suggesting the potential of cell apoptosis. Our study underscores the utility and the complexity of investigating CTCs as predictive markers of response to various therapies. Additional studies are ongoing to evaluate the diverse γ-H2AX staining patterns we report here which needs to be further correlated with patient outcomes.

  3. Notch signaling and ghost cell fate in the calcifying cystig odontogenic tumor

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    Siar CH

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Notch signaling is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that enables adjacent cells to adopt different fates. Ghost cells (GCs are anucleate cells with homogeneous pale eosinophilic cytoplasm and very pale to clear central areas (previous nucleus sites. Although GCs are present in a variety of odontogenic lesions notably the calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (GCOT, their nature and process of formation remains elusive. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Notch signaling in the cell fate specification of GCs in CCOT. Immunohistochemical staining for four Notch receptors (Notch1, Notch2, Notch3 and Notch4 and three ligands (Jagged1, Jagged2 and Delta1 was performed on archival tissues of five CCOT cases. Level of positivity was quantified as negative (0, mild (+, moderate (2+ and strong (3+. Results revealed that GCs demonstrated overexpression for Notch1 and Jagged1 suggesting that Notch1Jagged1 signaling might serve as the main transduction mechanism in cell fate decision for GCs in CCOT. Protein localizations were largely membranous and/or cytoplasmic. Mineralized GCs also stained positive implicating that the calcification process might be associated with upregulation of these molecules. The other Notch receptors and ligands were weak to absent in GCs and tumoral epithelium. Stromal endothelium and fibroblasts were stained variably positive.

  4. Human tumor cell proliferation evaluated using manganese-enhanced MRI.

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    Rod D Braun

    Full Text Available Tumor cell proliferation can depend on calcium entry across the cell membrane. As a first step toward the development of a non-invasive test of the extent of tumor cell proliferation in vivo, we tested the hypothesis that tumor cell uptake of a calcium surrogate, Mn(2+ [measured with manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI], is linked to proliferation rate in vitro.Proliferation rates were determined in vitro in three different human tumor cell lines: C918 and OCM-1 human uveal melanomas and PC-3 prostate carcinoma. Cells growing at different average proliferation rates were exposed to 1 mM MnCl(2 for one hour and then thoroughly washed. MEMRI R(1 values (longitudinal relaxation rates, which have a positive linear relationship with Mn(2+ concentration, were then determined from cell pellets. Cell cycle distributions were determined using propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. All three lines showed Mn(2+-induced increases in R(1 compared to cells not exposed to Mn(2+. C918 and PC-3 cells each showed a significant, positive correlation between MEMRI R(1 values and proliferation rate (p≤0.005, while OCM-1 cells showed no significant correlation. Preliminary, general modeling of these positive relationships suggested that pellet R(1 for the PC-3 cells, but not for the C918 cells, could be adequately described by simply accounting for changes in the distribution of the cell cycle-dependent subpopulations in the pellet.These data clearly demonstrate the tumor-cell dependent nature of the relationship between proliferation and calcium influx, and underscore the usefulness of MEMRI as a non-invasive method for investigating this link. MEMRI is applicable to study tumors in vivo, and the present results raise the possibility of evaluating proliferation parameters of some tumor types in vivo using MEMRI.

  5. Comparison of special stains for keratin with routine hematoxylin and eosin stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Roopa S; Patil, Shankargouda; Majumdar, Barnali; Oswal, Rakesh G

    2015-03-01

    Keratins are the most abundant proteins and are characteristic findings in many epithelial pathologies, making it a diagnostically important marker, both histopathologically and immunohistochemically. Since, immunohistochemistry is an expensive diagnostic tool, special stains to detect the degree of keratinization could serve as a faster and economic option. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of special stains for keratin with standard hematoxylin and eosin stain (H and E). Objectives include: (i) To subject the diagnosed cases of keratin disorders to the selected special stains: Ayoub-shklar method, Dane-Herman method, Alcian blue -periodic acid Schiff 's (PAS), rapid papanicolaou (PAP) and Gram's stain. (ii) To compare the staining specificity and staining intensity of special stains with respect to routine hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) stain. (iii) To compare the efficacy of special stains to routine H and E stain in identification of the type of keratin present in the selected cases. A total of 80 cases of known pathology for keratin were retrieved from the department archive, which included 10 each of normal gingiva, hyperkeratosis, squamous papilloma, verrucous hyperplasia, verrucous carcinoma, well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst and keratocystic odontogenic tumors. Six sections of 4 µ each from the paraffin blocks were made, stained with H and E and the special stains and these were evaluated by 2 pathologists based on the modified scoring criteria from Rahma Al-Maaini and Philip Bryant 2008. The results were tabulated using Chi square and kappa statistics. The statistical values for identification of the type of keratinization was insignificant showing that ortho and parakeratinized epithelia could be correctly identified by both H and E as well as all the special stains. Furthermore, all the special stains showed a positive result and statistical significance (P < 0.001) with respect to

  6. Differential staining of bacteria: gram stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyes, Rita B; Reynolds, Jackie; Breakwell, Donald P

    2009-11-01

    In 1884, Hans Christian Gram, a Danish doctor, developed a differential staining technique that is still the cornerstone of bacterial identification and taxonomic division. This multistep, sequential staining protocol separates bacteria into four groups based on cell morphology and cell wall structure: Gram-positive cocci, Gram-negative cocci, Gram-positive rods, and Gram-negative rods. The Gram stain is useful for assessing bacterial contamination of tissue culture samples or for examining the Gram stain status and morphological features of bacteria isolated from mixed or isolated bacterial cultures. (c) 2009 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  7. AKT-mediated enhanced aerobic glycolysis causes acquired radioresistance by human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Noma, Naoto; Sano, Yui; Ochiai, Yasushi; Oikawa, Toshiyuki; Fukumoto, Manabu; Kunugita, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Cellular radioresistance is a major impediment to effective radiotherapy. Here, we demonstrated that long-term exposure to fractionated radiation conferred acquired radioresistance to tumor cells due to AKT-mediated enhanced aerobic glycolysis. Material and methods: Two human tumor cell lines with acquired radioresistance were established by long-term exposure to fractionated radiation with 0.5 Gy of X-rays. Glucose uptake was inhibited using 2-deoxy-D-glucose, a non-metabolizable glucose analog. Aerobic glycolysis was assessed by measuring lactate concentrations. Cells were then used for assays of ROS generation, survival, and cell death as assessed by annexin V staining. Results: Enhanced aerobic glycolysis was shown by increased glucose transporter Glut1 expression and a high lactate production rate in acquired radioresistant cells compared with parental cells. Inhibiting the AKT pathway using the AKT inhibitor API-2 abrogated these phenomena. Moreover, we found that inhibiting glycolysis with 2-deoxy-D-glucose suppressed acquired tumor cell radioresistance. Conclusions: Long-term fractionated radiation confers acquired radioresistance to tumor cells by AKT-mediated alterations in their glucose metabolic pathway. Thus, tumor cell metabolic pathway is an attractive target to eliminate radioresistant cells and improve radiotherapy efficacy

  8. Metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma to the skin staining positive with HMB-45.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Joshua A; Perniciaro, Charles; Gross, David J; Barksdale, Sarah K

    2012-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is uncommonly observed as a cutaneous metastasis. We report a 76-year-old man with metastatic HCC to the skin of the nasal ala, diagnosed antecedent to the primary tumor. HCC was confirmed by positive immunostaining with Hep Par 1 in tissue from the metastasis and from a needle biopsy of the primary lesion. In addition, tumor cells from both the metastasis and liver stained positive with HMB-45. To our knowledge, HMB-45 positive staining has not been reported in either primary or metastatic HCC.

  9. Adult type granulosa cell tumor in adult testis: report of a case and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanyong Bing

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Granulosa cell tumors can be classified into juvenile and adult types and more commonly occur in ovaries. Adult testicular granulosa cell tumors are extremely rare and only 29 cases of adult type have previously been reported. We report here a 28-year-old Caucasian man with a left testicular adult type granulosa cell tumor. The tumor measured 2.6 x 2.6 x 2.5 cm and was mitotically active (10/10 HPF. Immunohistochemical stains showed the tumor diffusely positive for inhibin and vimentin, and negative for epithelial membrane antigen, cytokeratins, synaptophysin, HMB-45, OCT-4, placental-like alkaline phosphatase and lymphoid markers . The reported granulosa cell tumors in adult testis were briefly reviewed.

  10. Malignant mast cell tumor of the thymus in an Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terayama, Yui; Matsuura, Tetsuro; Ozaki, Kiyokazu

    2017-01-01

    A 152-week-old male Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat kept as a non-treated animal in a long-term animal study presented with a soft mass in the anterior mediastinum, which adhered to the pleura of the lung. Histopathologically, the mass mainly consisted of round to short spindle-shaped tumor cells that had infiltrated through the hyperplastic thymic tissue. The tumor cells were arranged in loose to dense sheets. Nuclei were moderate in size and round to spindle-shaped, with small nucleoli. Almost all tumor cells exhibited abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm, including eosinophilic granules of a range of sizes. The granules of tumor cells exhibited metachromasia with toluidine blue stain and were positive for c-kit and mast cell protease II. These findings indicate that the tumor described here represents a rare case of spontaneous malignant mast cell tumor with thymic epithelial hyperplasia.

  11. Evaluation of Papanicolaou stain for studying micronuclei in buccal cells under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyad, Sohair B A; Israel, Ebenezer; El-Setouhy, Maged; Nasr, Ghada Radwan; Mohamed, Mostafa K; Loffredo, Christopher A

    2006-01-01

    To compare Papanicolaou (Pap) and May-Grünwald Giemsa (MGG) stain as 2 techniques for staining for buccal mucosal cells to detect micronuclei (MN) infield studies. Eighty cytologic smears (2 per individual) were taken from the buccal mucosa of 40 cigarette smokers recruited at a rural village in Egypt. Forty smears were stained with Pap stain and 40 with MGG stain. All were assessed for cellularity and scored for MN. Pap stain was faster and easier to process and transport in the field study than was MGG stain. Regarding MGG smears, bacteria and cell debris masked the MN as compared to Pap smears, in which the fixative destroyed the bacteria and made the cell boundaries clearly demarcated. Using Pap stain, MN were seen easily in transparent cytoplasm. Pap stain is the preferred method infield studies for scoring and detecting MN in cells of buccal mucosa.

  12. Induction of cancer cell death by proton beam in tumor hypoxic region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. M.; Hur, T. R.; Lee, K. B.; Jeong, M. H.; Park, J. W.

    2007-04-01

    Proton beam induced apoptosis significantly in Lewis lung carcinoma cells and hepatoma HepG2 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, but slightly in leukemia Molt-4 cells. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for death rate relative to gamma ray were ranged from 1.3 to 2.1 in LLC or HepG2 but 0.7 in Molt-4 cells at 72h after irradiation. The typical apoptosis was observed by nuclear DNA staining with DAPI. By FACS analysis after stained with PI, sub-G1 cell fraction was significantly increased but G2/M phase was not altered by proton beam irradiation measured at 24 h after irradiation. Proton beam-irradiated tumor cells induced cleavage of PARP-1 and procaspases (-3 and -9) and increased the level of p53 and p21. decreased pro-lamin B. Acitivity of caspases was significantly increased after proton beam irradiation. Furthermore, ROS were significantly increased and N-acetyl cystein (NAC) pretreatment restored the apoptotic cell death induced in proton beam-irradiated cells. In conclusion, single treatment of low energy proton beam with SOBP induced apoptosis of solid tumor cells via increased ROS, active caspase -3,-9 and p53, p2

  13. Induction of cancer cell death by proton beam in tumor hypoxic region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. M.; Hur, T. R.; Lee, K. B.; Jeong, M. H.; Park, J. W. [Kyungbook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Proton beam induced apoptosis significantly in Lewis lung carcinoma cells and hepatoma HepG2 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, but slightly in leukemia Molt-4 cells. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for death rate relative to gamma ray were ranged from 1.3 to 2.1 in LLC or HepG2 but 0.7 in Molt-4 cells at 72h after irradiation. The typical apoptosis was observed by nuclear DNA staining with DAPI. By FACS analysis after stained with PI, sub-G1 cell fraction was significantly increased but G2/M phase was not altered by proton beam irradiation measured at 24 h after irradiation. Proton beam-irradiated tumor cells induced cleavage of PARP-1 and procaspases (-3 and -9) and increased the level of p53 and p21. decreased pro-lamin B. Acitivity of caspases was significantly increased after proton beam irradiation. Furthermore, ROS were significantly increased and N-acetyl cystein (NAC) pretreatment restored the apoptotic cell death induced in proton beam-irradiated cells. In conclusion, single treatment of low energy proton beam with SOBP induced apoptosis of solid tumor cells via increased ROS, active caspase -3,-9 and p53, p2.

  14. Ultrastructure and pathology of desmoplastic small round cell tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Bin; Wang Bo; Gu Junlian; Li Xin; Li Yang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To observe the change of ultrastructure and pathology of desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) and recognize the characteristics of DSRCT and improve the standard of diagnosis. Methods: One case of primary DSRCT in right leg was observed by light microscope, immunohistochemical method and electron microscope and analyzed with review of the literatures. Results: The size of tumor was 3.2 cm x 2.4 cm x 1.3 cm with gray-yellow on cross-section. Foci of hemorrhage and necrosis were noted. Under light microscope, the tumor was composed of sharply demarcated nests of small rounded or oval cells. The cellular aggregates were surrounded and separated by abundant fibrous connective tissue. The tumor cells were uniform in size and shape, and showed small to moderate amounts of pale cytoplasm with indistinct cell borders. The nuclei were round to oval, with clumped chromatin and marked hyperchromasia. Some cells had one or two indistinct nucleoli. Numerous mitotic figures and areas of necrosis were dentified. The immunohistochemical results showed that the tumor cells were strongly positive for CK, EMA and NSE. There was focal positive staining for desmin with a perinuclear dot-like pattern. However, the tumor cells were negative for CgA, Myogenin, Syn, LCA, SMA, S-100, NF, GFAP, HMB45, HHF-35, CD3, CD10, Actin, CD99, and CD20. Under electron microscope, the tumor cells showed paranuclear cytoplasmic intermediate filaments arranging in globular or whorl array. Conclusion: DSRCT occurs both in the abdomen and at other sites. The patients with DSRCT range widely in age. DSRCT has distinctive histopathologic and ultrastructural features. This tumor shows immunohistochemical feature of epithelial, mesenchymal as well as neural multidirectional differentiation. RT-PCR may be served as an important diagnostic adjunct for DSRAT. The prognosis of the patients with DSRCT is very poor. (authors)

  15. Peripheral epithelial odontogenic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carzoglio, J.; Tancredi, N.; Capurro, S.; Ravecca, T.; Scarrone, P.

    2006-01-01

    A new case of peripheral epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor) is reported. It is localized in the superior right gingival region, a less frequent site, and has the histopathological features previously reported. Immunochemical studies were performed, revealing a differential positive stain to cytokeratins in tumor cells deeply seated in the tumor mass, probably related to tumoral cell heterogeneity.Interestingly, in this particular case S-100 protein positive reactivity was also detected in arborescent cells intermingled with tumoral cells, resembling Langerhans cells. Even though referred in the literature in central Pindborg tumors, no references were found about their presence in peripheral tumors, like the one that is presented here

  16. Effects of low dose radiation on tumor apoptosis, cell cycle progression and changes of apoptosis-related protein bcl-2 in tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hongsheng; Fei Conghe; Shen Fangzhen; Liang Jun

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of low dose radiation (LDR) on tumor apoptosis, cell cycle progression and changes of apoptosis-related protein bcl-2 in tumor-bearing mice. Methods: Kunming stain male mice were implanted with S180 sarcoma cells in the left inguen subcutaneously as an in situ experimental animal model. Seven days after implantation, the mice were given 75 mGy whole-body γ-irradiation. At 24 and 48 h after irradiation, all mice were sacrificed to measure the tumor volume, and tumor cell apoptosis, cell cycle progression were analyzed by flow cytometry. The expression of apoptosis-related protein bcl-2 and the apoptotic rate of tumor cells were observed by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Results: Tumor growth was significantly slowed down after LDR (P 1 phase and the expression of bcl-2 protein decreased at 24 h. Apoptotic rate of tumor cells increased significantly at 48 h after LDR. Conclusion: LDR could cause a G 1 -phase arrest and increase the apoptosis of tumor cells through the low level of apoptosis-related protein bcl-2 in the tumor-bearing mice. The organized immune function and anti-tumor ability are markedly increased after LDR. The study provides practical evidence of clinical application to cancer treatment

  17. Elevated expression of MMP-13 and TIMP-1 in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas may reflect increased tumor invasiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culhaci, Nil; Metin, Kubilay; Copcu, Eray; Dikicioglu, Emel

    2004-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases [MMPs], which degrade the extracellular matrix, play an important role in the invasion and metastasis of squamous cell carcinomas. One MMP, MMP-13, is thought to play a central role in MMP activation. The purpose of this study was to investigate MMP-13 and TIMP-1 expression in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck and to relate these levels of expression to histologic patterns of invasion. This study included T1 lesions obtained via biopsy from the larynx, tongue, and skin/mucosa of 78 patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. The relationship between expression of MMP-13 and TIMP-1 and the mode of tumor invasion [MI] was evaluated immunohistochemically, using breast carcinoma tissue as a positive control. Increased expression was observed in highly invasive tumors, as reflected by the significant correlation between the degree of staining for MMP-13 or TIMP-1 and MI grade [p < 0.05]. There was no significant relationship between the degree of staining for MMP-13 or TIMP-1 and patient age, sex, tumor site, or tumor histologic grade. In addition, levels of staining for MMP-13 did not correlate with levels of staining for TIMP-1. The expression of MMP-13 and TIMP-1 appears to play an important role in determining the invasive capacity of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck. Whereas additional studies are needed to confirm these findings, evaluating expression of these MMPs in small biopsy samples may be useful in determining the invasive capacity of these tumors at an earlier stage

  18. [Construction of 2-dimensional tumor microvascular architecture phenotype in non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-kang; Wang, Xiao-yi; Xiong, Zeng; Zhou, Hui; Zhou, Jian-hua; Fu, Chun-yan; Li, Bo

    2008-08-01

    To construct a technological platform of 2-dimensional tumor microvascular architecture phenotype (2D-TAMP) expression. Thirty samples of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were collected after surgery. The corresponding sections of tumor tissue specimens to the slice of CT perfusion imaging were selected. Immunohistochemical staining,Gomori methenamine silver stain, and electron microscope observation were performed to build a technological platform of 2D-TMAP expression by detecting the morphology and the integrity of basement membrane of microvasculature, microvascular density, various microvascular subtype, the degree of the maturity and lumenization of microvasculature, and the characteristics of immunogenetics of microvasculature. The technological platform of 2D-TMAP expression was constructed successfully. There was heterogeneity in 2D-TMAP expression of non-small cell lung cancer. The microvascular of NSCLC had certain characteristics. 2D-TMAP is a key technology that can be used to observe the overall state of micro-environment in tumor growth.

  19. Quantitative analysis of topoisomerase IIα to rapidly evaluate cell proliferation in brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Masashi; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Kano, Hideyuki; Kawabata, Yasuhiro; Katsuki, Takahisa; Shirahata, Mitsuaki; Ono, Makoto; Yamana, Norikazu; Hashimoto, Nobuo; Takahashi, Jun A.

    2005-01-01

    Immunohistochemical cell proliferation analyses have come into wide use for evaluation of tumor malignancy. Topoisomerase IIα (topo IIα), an essential nuclear enzyme, has been known to have cell cycle coupled expression. We here show the usefulness of quantitative analysis of topo IIα mRNA to rapidly evaluate cell proliferation in brain tumors. A protocol to quantify topo IIα mRNA was developed with a real-time RT-PCR. It took only 3 h to quantify from a specimen. A total of 28 brain tumors were analyzed, and the level of topo IIα mRNA was significantly correlated with its immuno-staining index (p < 0.0001, r = 0.9077). Furthermore, it sharply detected that topo IIα mRNA decreased in growth-inhibited glioma cell. These results support that topo IIα mRNA may be a good and rapid indicator to evaluate cell proliferate potential in brain tumors

  20. Salinomycin nanoparticles interfere with tumor cell growth and the tumor microenvironment in an orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daman, Zahra; Faghihi, Homa; Montazeri, Hamed

    2018-05-02

    Recently, salinomycin (SAL) has been reported to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in various tumors. The aim of this study was to deliver SAL to orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer by the aid of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs). The NPs were physico-chemically characterized and evaluated for cytotoxicity on luciferase-transduced AsPC-1 cells in vitro as well as implanted orthotopically into the pancreas of nude mice. SAL (3.5 mg/kg every other day) blocked tumor growth by 52% compared to the control group after 3 weeks of therapy. Western blotting of tumor protein extracts indicated that SAL treatment leads to up-regulation of E-cadherin, β-catenin, and transforming growth factor beta receptor (TGFβR) expressions in AsPC-1 orthotopic tumor. Noteworthy, immunofluorescence staining of adjacent tumor sections showed that treatment with SAL NPs cause significant apoptosis in the tumor cells rather than the stroma. Further investigations also revealed that TGFβR2 over-expression was induced in stroma cells after treatment with SAL NPs. These results highlight SAL-loaded PLGA NPs as a promising system for pancreatic cancer treatment, while the mechanistic questions need to be subsequently tested.

  1. Giant cell tumor of soft tissues of low malignant potential: A rare diagnosis on fine needle aspiration cytology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maithili M Kulkarni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary giant cell tumors of soft tissues (GCT-ST are extremely rare soft tissue tumors, located in both superficial and deep soft tissues. They resemble osseous giant cell tumors morphologically and immunohistochemically. The tumor exhibits strong positive immunoreactivity for cluster of differentiation 68 (CD68 within multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells and focal staining of mononuclear cells. Case reports describing the cytohistological features of this entity are very few. We report a case of GCT-ST of low malignant potential diagnosed on fine needle aspiration (FNA and confirmed on histological and immunohistochemical studies.

  2. Benign nerve sheath tumor of stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudry, N.U.; Zafar, S.; Haque, I.U.

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors are a group of tumors, which originate from the mesenchymal stem cells of the gastrointestinal tract. Gastric schwannoma is a very rare gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumor, which represents only 0.2% of all gastric tumors and 4% of all benign gastric neoplasms. We report a 55 years old lady who suffered from pain epigastrium, vomiting, occasionally with blood, loss of appetite and weight loss. Endoscopic examination showed a round submucosal tumor with a central ulceration along the greater curvature of the stomach. The pathological examination revealed a picture of spindle cell tumor. Immunohistochemical stain was strongly positive for S-100 protein stain, and non-reactive for CD34, CD117, consistent with benign nerve sheath tumor of stomach i.e. gastric schwannoma. (author)

  3. Microscopic analysis of MTT stained boar sperm cells

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tulyasys

    2015-06-08

    2H-tetrazolium bromide is widely used for assessment of cytotoxicity, cell viability, and proliferation studies in cell biology (van Meerloo et al., 2011;. Stockert et al., 2012). The stain is abbreviated as MTT.

  4. Early Alterations in Ovarian Surface Epithelial Cells and Induction of Ovarian Epithelial Tumors Triggered by Loss of FSH Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinlei Chen

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the behavior of the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE, which plays a central role in ovarian cancer etiology. It has been suggested that incessant ovulation causes OSE changes leading to transformation and that high gonadotropin levels during postmenopause activate OSE receptors, inducing proliferation. We examined the chronology of OSE changes, including tumor appearance, in a mouse model where ovulation never occurs due to deletion of follitropin receptor. Changes in epithelial cells were marked by pan-cytokeratin (CK staining. Histologic changes and CK staining in the OSE increased from postnatal day 2. CK staining was observed inside the ovary by 24 days and increased thereafter in tumor-bearing animals. Ovaries from a third of aged (1 year mutant mice showed CK deep inside, indicating cell migration. These tumors resembled serous papillary adenoma of human ovaries. Weak expression of GATA-4 and elevation of PCNA, cyclooxygenase-1, cyclooxygenase-2, and plateletderived growth factor receptors α and β in mutants indicated differences in cell proliferation, differentiation, and inflammation. Thus, we report that OSE changes occur long before epithelial tumors appear in FORKO mice. Our results suggest that neither incessant ovulation nor follicle-stimulating hormone receptor presence in the OSE is required for inducing ovarian tumors; thus, other mechanisms must contribute to ovarian tumorigenesis.

  5. Multifocal Abrikossoff's granular cell tumor of the oesophagus: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranđelović Tomislav D.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Granular cell tumors, relatively uncommon soft tissue tumors, have been a matter of debate among pathologists regarding histogenesis for a long time. Less common locations are in the aerodigestive tract including the oesophagus. CASE OUTLINE We have recently treated a rare case, a 37-year old male, who was admitted due to dysphagia and a painful swallow with occasional pharyngo-nasal regurgitation followed with a mild loss of weight. Standard clinical examination including X-ray chest, ECG and laboratory tests did not show pathological findings. Barium contrast oesophagography demonstrated multiple ovoid defects in the wall of the oesophagus. CT scan of the chest confirmed luminal narrowing owing to the tumor of the upper oesophagus. Upper endoscopy showed unusual multifocal nodular lesions alongside the oesophageal axis covered by smooth mucosa. A primary biopsy specimen taken from the largest nodules confirmed an unusual pathological finding of the granular cell tumor. Subtotal, transpleural oesophagectomy was performed and reconstruction was derived by long colon segment interposition through the posterior mediastinum. The postoperative course was uneventful. The operative specimen consisted of four ovoid tumors alongside the oesophagus (the greatest diameter 0.5-1.8, average 1.25. All verified tumors histologicaly consisted of a spindle-shaped or polygonal cells containing small and large eosinophilic granules and central nuclei. Most tumor cells showed strongly positive immunohistochemical staining for S-100 protein. These tumor cells were partially positive for p-53 and Ki-67. No lymph node metastases were detected histologically. CONCLUSION Multifocal granular cell tumor of the oesophagus is an unusual finding with low incidence, and rarely caused symptoms. Pathological features and multiplicity of such tumors emphasized malignant predisposition requiring surgical resection of the oesophagus.

  6. Development of a cell microarray chip for detection of circulating tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, S.; Yatsushiro, S.; Abe, K.; Baba, Y.; Kataoka, M.

    2012-03-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the peripheral blood of metastatic cancer patients has clinical significance in earlier diagnosis of metastases. In this study, a novel cell microarray chip for accurate and rapid detection of tumor cells from human leukocytes was developed. The chip with 20,944 microchambers (105 μm diameter and 50 μm depth) was made from polystyrene, and the surface was rendered to hydrophilic by means of reactive-ion etching, which led to the formation of mono-layers of leukocytes on the microchambers. As the model of CTCs detection, we spiked human bronchioalveolar carcinoma (H1650) cells into human T lymphoblastoid leukemia (CEM) cells suspension and detected H1650 cells using the chip. A CEM suspension contained with H1650 cells was dispersed on the chip surface, followed by 10 min standing to allow the cells to settle down into the microchambers. About 30 CEM cells were accommodated in each microchamber, over 600,000 CEM cells in total being on a chip. We could detect 1 H1650 cell per 106 CEM cells on the microarray by staining with fluorescence-conjugated antibody (Anti-Cytokeratin) and cell membrane marker (DiD). Thus, this cell microarray chip has highly potential to be a novel tool of accurate and rapid detection of CTCs.

  7. HAMLET binding to α-actinin facilitates tumor cell detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trulsson, Maria; Yu, Hao; Gisselsson, Lennart; Chao, Yinxia; Urbano, Alexander; Aits, Sonja; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Svanborg, Catharina

    2011-03-08

    Cell adhesion is tightly regulated by specific molecular interactions and detachment from the extracellular matrix modifies proliferation and survival. HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) is a protein-lipid complex with tumoricidal activity that also triggers tumor cell detachment in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that molecular interactions defining detachment are perturbed in cancer cells. To identify such interactions, cell membrane extracts were used in Far-western blots and HAMLET was shown to bind α-actinins; major F-actin cross-linking proteins and focal adhesion constituents. Synthetic peptide mapping revealed that HAMLET binds to the N-terminal actin-binding domain as well as the integrin-binding domain of α-actinin-4. By co-immunoprecipitation of extracts from HAMLET-treated cancer cells, an interaction with α-actinin-1 and -4 was observed. Inhibition of α-actinin-1 and α-actinin-4 expression by siRNA transfection increased detachment, while α-actinin-4-GFP over-expression significantly delayed rounding up and detachment of tumor cells in response to HAMLET. In response to HAMLET, adherent tumor cells rounded up and detached, suggesting a loss of the actin cytoskeletal organization. These changes were accompanied by a reduction in β1 integrin staining and a decrease in FAK and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, consistent with a disruption of integrin-dependent cell adhesion signaling. Detachment per se did not increase cell death during the 22 hour experimental period, regardless of α-actinin-4 and α-actinin-1 expression levels but adherent cells with low α-actinin levels showed increased death in response to HAMLET. The results suggest that the interaction between HAMLET and α-actinins promotes tumor cell detachment. As α-actinins also associate with signaling molecules, cytoplasmic domains of transmembrane receptors and ion channels, additional α-actinin-dependent mechanisms are discussed.

  8. HMB-45 and Melan-A are useful in the differential diagnosis between granular cell tumor and malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Briana C; Nascimento, Alessandra F

    2007-02-01

    Granular cell tumors (GCTs), especially if atypical or malignant, may share cytomorphologic and architectural features with malignant melanoma, when the latter shows granular cell change. In many cases, these neoplasms can be differentiated from each other on histologic grounds, but distinction may sometimes be challenging. By immunohistochemistry, both tumors are strongly positive for S-100 protein and frequently express other nonspecific markers such as CD68, NSE, and NKIC3. In the current study, we reviewed 60 cases of conventional cutaneous, mucosal, and visceral GCT and studied the use of immunoperoxidase staining for the differential diagnosis between malignant melanoma and GCT. Immunohistochemical stains for S-100 protein, A, HMB-45, and microphthalmia transcription factor (MITF) were performed in all cases. All of the tumors were positive for S-100 protein. MITF immunostaining was diffusely positive in 53 (88%) cases, focally positive in three (5%) cases, and negative in four (7%). Fifty-seven (95%) tumors were negative for Melan-A, one case was focally positive, and two cases showed rare positive tumor cells. None of the tumors expressed HMB-45. In conclusion, GCT and malignant melanoma can be reliably differentiated on the basis of immunohistochemical stains in the majority of cases. Although not always positive in malignant melanoma, in this context, HMB-45 expression seems to be 100% specific for the diagnosis of melanoma. Melan-A is slightly less specific, with rare cases of GCT showing focal positivity. MITF is not useful in this differential-93% of the GCTs in our series showed nuclear reactivity for this marker. The latter finding highlights the limited specificity of this antibody in the diagnosis of melanocytic tumors.

  9. Improving immunological tumor microenvironment using electro-hyperthermia followed by dendritic cell immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Yuk-Wah; Huang, Cheng-Chung; Yang, Kai-Lin; Chi, Mau-Shin; Chiang, Hsin-Chien; Wang, Yu-Shan; Andocs, Gabor; Szasz, Andras; Li, Wen-Tyng; Chi, Kwan-Hwa

    2015-10-15

    The treatment of intratumoral dentritic cells (DCs) commonly fails because it cannot evoke immunity in a poor tumor microenvironment (TME). Modulated electro-hyperthermia (mEHT, trade-name: oncothermia) represents a significant technological advancement in the hyperthermia field, allowing the autofocusing of electromagnetic power on a cell membrane to generate massive apoptosis. This approach turns local immunogenic cancer cell death (apoptosis) into a systemic anti-tumor immune response and may be implemented by treatment with intratumoral DCs. The CT26 murine colorectal cancer model was used in this investigation. The inhibition of growth of the tumor and the systemic anti-tumor immune response were measured. The tumor was heated to a core temperature of 42 °C for 30 min. The matured synergetic DCs were intratumorally injected 24 h following mEHT was applied. mEHT induced significant apoptosis and enhanced the release of heat shock protein70 (Hsp70) in CT26 tumors. Treatment with mEHT-DCs significantly inhibited CT26 tumor growth, relative to DCs alone or mEHT alone. The secondary tumor protection effect upon rechallenging was observed in mice that were treated with mEHT-DCs. Immunohistochemical staining of CD45 and F4/80 revealed that mEHT-DC treatment increased the number of leukocytes and macrophages. Most interestingly, mEHT also induced infiltrations of eosinophil, which has recently been reported to be an orchestrator of a specific T cell response. Cytotoxic T cell assay and ELISpot assay revealed a tumor-specific T cell activity. This study demonstrated that mEHT induces tumor cell apoptosis and enhances the release of Hsp70 from heated tumor cells, unlike conventional hyperthermia. mEHT can create a favorable tumor microenvironment for an immunological chain reaction that improves the success rate of intratumoral DC immunotherapy.

  10. Evaluation of Amelotin Expression in Benign Odontogenic Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiana Paula Stolf

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Amelotin (AMTN is highly and selectively expressed by odontogenic epithelium-derived ameloblasts throughout the maturation stage of enamel formation. The protein is secreted and concentrated at the basal lamina interface between ameloblasts and the mineralized enamel matrix. Odontogenic tumors (OT are characterized by morphological resemblance to the developing tooth germ. OT vary from slowly expanding, encapsulated tumors to locally aggressive and destructive lesions. The purpose of this study was to determine the expression profile of AMTN in benign odontogenic tumors and to correlate it with specific features of the lesions. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining for AMTN was performed on human ameloblastoma, ameloblastic fibroma (AF, ameloblastic fibro-odontoma (AFO, odontoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT and calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT. Results: Generally, ameloblastoma and AF did not stain for AMTN. A strong signal was detected in ameloblast-like layers of AFO and odontoma. Epithelial cells in AOT did not stain for AMTN, while calcifying areas of extracellular eosinophilic matrix were intensely stained. Interestingly, ghost cells present in odontomas and CCOT revealed variable staining, again in association with calcification foci. Conclusions: Amelotin expression was consistently detected in tumors presenting differentiated ameloblasts and obvious matrix deposition. Additionally, the presence of the protein in the eosinophilic matrix and small mineralized foci of AOT and calcification areas of ghost cells may suggest a role for AMTN in the control of mineralization events. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2013; 1(5.000: 236-245

  11. Localization of thymosin ß-4 in tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Lars-Inge; Holck, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    carcinomas. The degree of staining of breast cancer cells for thymosin ß-4 correlated neither to histological grade nor to endothelial cell staining. However, therewas a tendency toward correlation (P = 0.07) between staining of endothelial cells and histological grade. Treatment of cultured breast cancer......Overexpression of thymosin ß-4 has been linked to malignant progression but the localization of this polypeptide within tumor is incompletely known. We therefore examined breast cancers for thymosin ß-4 using immunofluorescence. Reactive cells were identified with monoclonal cell marker antibodies...... cells (SK-BR-3) with 1-4 µg thymosin ß-4/mL significantly increased cell numbers, as determined by MTT-assays. These data reveal an unexpected cellular heterogeneity of thymosin ß-4 expression in breast and colonic carcinomas and suggest that local release of this polypeptide in the tumor...

  12. Lectins stain cells differentially in the coral, Montipora capitata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Farah, Yael

    2014-01-01

    A limitation in our understanding of coral disease pathology and cellular pathogenesis is a lack of reagents to characterize coral cells. We evaluated the utility of plant lectins to stain tissues of a dominant coral, Montipora capitata, from Hawaii. Of 22 lectins evaluated, nine of these stained structures in the upper or basal body wall of corals. Specific structures revealed by lectins that were not considered distinct or evident on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections of coral tissues included apical and basal granules in gastrodermis and epidermis, cnidoglandular tract and actinopharynx cell surface membranes, capsules of mature holotrichous isorhizas, and perivitelline and periseminal cells. Plant lectins could prove useful to further our understanding of coral physiology, anatomy, cell biology, and disease pathogenesis.

  13. Staining human lymphocytes and onion root cell nuclei with madder root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cücer, N; Guler, N; Demirtas, H; Imamoğlu, N

    2005-01-01

    We performed staining experiments on cells using natural dyes and different mordants using techniques that are used for wool and silk dyeing. The natural dye sources were madder root, daisy, corn cockle and yellow weed. Ferrous sulfate, copper sulfate, potassium tartrate, urea, potassium aluminum sulfate and potassium dichromate were used as mordants. Distilled water, distilled water plus ethanol, heptane, and distilled water plus methanol were used as solvents. All dye-mordant-solvent combinations were studied at pH 2.4, 3.2 and 4.2. The generic staining procedure was to boil 5-10 onion roots or stimulated human lymphocyte (SHL) preparations in a dye bath on a hot plate. Cells were examined at every half hour. For multicolor staining, madder-dyed lymphocytes were decolorized, then stained with Giemsa. The AgNOR technique was performed following the decolorization of Giemsa stained lymphocytes. Good results were obtained for both onion root cells and lymphocytes that were boiled for 3 h in a dye bath that included 4 g madder root, 4 g ferrous sulfate as mordant in 50 ml of 1:1 (v/v) methanol:distilled water. The pH was adjusted to 4.2 with 6 ml acetic acid. We conclude that madder root has potential as an alternative dye for staining biological materials.

  14. Epidemiological Aspects and Differential Diagnosis of the Cutaneous Round Cell Tumors in Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana CORA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Round cell neoplasms (RCNs are frequent cutaneous lesions in dogs, with high percentages among skin tumors. In this category are included histiocytoma, mast cell tumor, plasmacytoma, lymphoma and transmissible venereal tumor. The aim of the study was to perform an epidemiological study with reference to the cutaneous round cell tumors in a period of 10 years in the Department of Pathology (Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. Additionally, in the recorded cases with round cell tumors (mast cell tumor, histiocytoma and lymphoma we described the main histological and cytological features. The epidemiological data were collected from the records of Pathology Department between 2005-2014. The investigation included dogs diagnosed with cutaneous round cell neoplasms, following necropsy analysis or assessment of biopsies or cytological samples. All collected specimens were analyzed by histopathological and/or cytological techniques. The staining used for histological investigation were Hematoxylin-eosin, Masson’s trichrome and Toluidine blue, whereas Diff Quik and Wright methods were utilized in cytological specimens. The distribution of the cutaneous round cell tumors in relation to age, breed and sex was also assessed. The most frequent round cell tumor type was the mast cell tumor (19.54% followed by histiocytoma (11.33% and lymphoma (1.98%. The round cell tumors recorded were equally distributed in both males and females. Concerning the distribution of cutaneous RCNs by age (average age, histiocytoma occurred in 5 years old subjects, mast cell tumor in 11.9 years old subjects, and lymphoma in 6 years old subjects. Mast cell tumor was more frequent in stray dogs and Boxer breed, while histiocytoma occurred more commonly in stray dogs. Histological and cytological analysis was mandatory to perform the differential diagnosis between RCNs. Microscopic details concerning cytoplasm and nucleus of tumoral cells, together with the

  15. Oxygen microenvironment affects the uptake of nanoparticles in head and neck tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Eunice Y.; Hodge, Sasson; Tai, Katherine; Hou, Huagang; Khan, Nadeem; Hoopes, P. Jack; Samkoe, Kimberley S.

    2013-02-01

    Survival of head and neck cancer patients has not improved in several decades despite advances in diagnostic and therapeutic techniques. Tumor hypoxia in head and neck cancers is a critical factor that leads to poor prognosis, resistance to radiation and chemotherapies, and increased metastatic potential. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (mNPHT) is a promising therapy for hypoxic tumors because nanoparticles (NP) can be directly injected into, or targeted to, hypoxic tumor cells and exposed to alternating magnetic fields (AMF) to induce hyperthermia. Magnetic NPHT can improve therapeutic effectiveness by two modes of action: 1) direct killing of hypoxic tumor cells; and 2) increase in tumor oxygenation, which has the potential to make the tumor more susceptible to adjuvant therapies such as radiation and chemotherapy. Prior studies in breast cancer cells demonstrated that a hypoxic microenvironment diminished NP uptake in vitro; however, mNPHT with intratumoral NP injection in hypoxic tumors increased tumor oxygenation and delayed tumor growth. In this study, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines were incubated in normoxic, hypoxic, and hyperoxic conditions with iron oxide NP for 4-72 hours. After incubation, the cells were analyzed for iron uptake by mass spectrometry, Prussian blue staining, and electron microscopy. In contrast to breast cancer cells, uptake of NPs was increased in hypoxic microenvironments as compared to normoxic conditions in HNSCC cells. In future studies, we will confirm the effect of the oxygen microenvironment on NP uptake and efficacy of mNPHT both in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Tumor-reactive immune cells protect against metastatic tumor and induce immunoediting of indolent but not quiescent tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Kyle K; Keim, Rebecca C; Graham, Laura; Idowu, Michael O; Wan, Wen; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Toor, Amir A; Bear, Harry D; Manjili, Masoud H

    2016-09-01

    Two major barriers to cancer immunotherapy include tumor-induced immune suppression mediated by myeloid-derived suppressor cells and poor immunogenicity of the tumor-expressing self-antigens. To overcome these barriers, we reprogrammed tumor-immune cell cross-talk by combined use of decitabine and adoptive immunotherapy, containing tumor-sensitized T cells and CD25(+) NKT cells. Decitabine functioned to induce the expression of highly immunogenic cancer testis antigens in the tumor, while also reducing the frequency of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and the presence of CD25(+) NKT cells rendered T cells, resistant to remaining myeloid-derived suppressor cells. This combinatorial therapy significantly prolonged survival of animals bearing metastatic tumor cells. Adoptive immunotherapy also induced tumor immunoediting, resulting in tumor escape and associated disease-related mortality. To identify a tumor target that is incapable of escape from the immune response, we used dormant tumor cells. We used Adriamycin chemotherapy or radiation therapy, which simultaneously induce tumor cell death and tumor dormancy. Resultant dormant cells became refractory to additional doses of Adriamycin or radiation therapy, but they remained sensitive to tumor-reactive immune cells. Importantly, we discovered that dormant tumor cells contained indolent cells that expressed low levels of Ki67 and quiescent cells that were Ki67 negative. Whereas the former were prone to tumor immunoediting and escape, the latter did not demonstrate immunoediting. Our results suggest that immunotherapy could be highly effective against quiescent dormant tumor cells. The challenge is to develop combinatorial therapies that could establish a quiescent type of tumor dormancy, which would be the best target for immunotherapy. © The Author(s).

  17. Arctigenin anti-tumor activity in bladder cancer T24 cell line through induction of cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shucai; Ma, Jing; Xiao, Jianbing; Lv, Xiaohong; Li, Xinlei; Yang, Huike; Liu, Ying; Feng, Sijia; Zhang, Yafang

    2012-08-01

    Bladder cancer is the most common neoplasm in the urinary system. This study assesses arctigenin anti-tumor activity in human bladder cancer T24 cells in vitro and the underlying molecular events. The flow cytometry analysis was used to detect cell-cycle distribution and apoptosis. Western blotting was used to detect changes in protein expression. The data showed that arctigenin treatment reduced viability of bladder cancer T24 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner after treatment with arctigenin (10, 20, 40, 80, and 100 μmol/L) for 24 hr and 48 hr. Arctigenin treatment clearly arrested tumor cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Apoptosis was detected by hoechst stain and flow cytometry after Annexin-V-FITC/PI double staining. Early and late apoptotic cells were accounted for 2.32-7.01% and 3.07-7.35%, respectively. At the molecular level, arctigenin treatment decreased cyclin D1 expression, whereas CDK4 and CDK6 expression levels were unaffected. Moreover, arctigenin selectively altered the phosphorylation of members of the MAPK superfamily, decreasing phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and activated phosphorylation of p38 significantly in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that arctigenin may inhibit cell viability and induce apoptosis by direct activation of the mitochondrial pathway, and the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway may play an important role in the anti-tumor effect of arctigenin. The data from the current study demonstrate the usefulness of arctigenin in bladder cancer T24 cells, which should further be evaluated in vivo before translation into clinical trials for the chemoprevention of bladder cancer. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. In vitro assays for predicting tumor cell response to radiation by apoptotic pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algan, Oe.; Hanks, G.E.; Biade, S.; Chapman, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: We had previously shown that the rate of spontaneous and radiation-induced apoptosis was significantly greater in well-differentiated compared to anaplastic Dunning prostate carcinomas. The goal of this study was to define the most useful assay for quantifying radiation-induced apoptotic cell death and to determine if measured rates of radiation-induced apoptosis in tumor cell populations can predict treatment outcome. Materials and Methods: The time course and extent of radiation-induced apoptosis after single doses of Cesium-137 gamma-rays were measured by five different assays. These included gross DNA degradation, nucleosome ladder formation, labeling of 3'-OH ends in DNA with an immunofluorescence probe, immunofluorescence vital stains (LIVE/DEAD[reg] EUKOLIGHT TM ) and trypan blue. The majority of these studies were performed with DU-145 human prostate cells. Data was analyzed to determine the component of cell inactivation resulting from apoptosis with the modified linear quadratic equation, -1n (SF) = (α a + α p ) D + β p D 2 , were α a represents cell inactivation by radiation-induced apoptosis, α p and β p represent cell death by proliferative mechanisms and D represents radiation dose. Results: These studies indicated that DU-145 cell death after radiation occurs over two distinct time periods. The first phase of death begins shortly after irradiation and plateaus within 16-24 hr. This process of cell death has properties consistent with apoptosis as determined by 3'-OH DNA end-labeling and nucleosome ladder assays. The second phase of cell death (determined by viability staining) begins approximately 48 hr after irradiation and continues until the remainder of inactivated cells express their death. This longer phase of cell inactivation probably represents proliferative cell death and other non-apoptotic mechanisms. The five different assays were performed on DU-145 cells 24 hr after irradiation with 10 Gy. Significant nucleosome ladders

  19. Cellient™ automated cell block versus traditional cell block preparation: a comparison of morphologic features and immunohistochemical staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, David G; Russell, Donna K; Benson, Jenna M; Schneider, Ashley E; Hoda, Rana S; Bonfiglio, Thomas A

    2011-10-01

    Traditional cell block (TCB) sections serve as an important diagnostic adjunct to cytologic smears but are also used today as a reliable preparation for immunohistochemical (IHC) studies. There are many ways to prepare a cell block and the methods continue to be revised. In this study, we compare the TCB with the Cellient™ automated cell block system. Thirty-five cell blocks were obtained from 16 benign and 19 malignant nongynecologic cytology specimens at a large university teaching hospital and prepared according to TCB and Cellient protocols. Cell block sections from both methods were compared for possible differences in various morphologic features and immunohistochemical staining patterns. In the 16 benign cases, no significant morphologic differences were found between the TCB and Cellient cell block sections. For the 19 malignant cases, some noticeable differences in the nuclear chromatin and cellularity were identified, although statistical significance was not attained. Immunohistochemical or special stains were performed on 89% of the malignant cases (17/19). Inadequate cellularity precluded full evaluation in 23% of Cellient cell block IHC preparations (4/17). Of the malignant cases with adequate cellularity (13/17), the immunohistochemical staining patterns from the different methods were identical in 53% of cases. The traditional and Cellient cell block sections showed similar morphologic and immunohistochemical staining patterns. The only significant difference between the two methods concerned the lower overall cell block cellularity identified during immunohistochemical staining in the Cellient cell block sections. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. An automated cell-counting algorithm for fluorescently-stained cells in migration assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novielli Nicole M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A cell-counting algorithm, developed in Matlab®, was created to efficiently count migrated fluorescently-stained cells on membranes from migration assays. At each concentration of cells used (10,000, and 100,000 cells, images were acquired at 2.5 ×, 5 ×, and 10 × objective magnifications. Automated cell counts strongly correlated to manual counts (r2 = 0.99, P

  1. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell tumors; Islet of Langerhans tumor; Neuroendocrine tumors; Peptic ulcer - islet cell tumor; Hypoglycemia - islet cell tumor ... stomach acid. Symptoms may include: Abdominal pain Diarrhea ... and small bowel Vomiting blood (occasionally) Glucagonomas make ...

  2. Normal and tumor-derived myoepithelial cells differ in their ability to interact with luminal breast epithelial cells for polarity and basement membrane deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Villadsen, Rene; Rank, Fritz; Bissell, Mina J.; Petersen, Ole William

    2001-10-04

    The signals that determine the correct polarity of breast epithelial structures in vivo are not understood. We have shown previously that luminal epithelial cells can be polarized when cultured within a reconstituted basement membrane gel. We reasoned that such cues in vivo may be given by myoepithelial cells. Accordingly, we used an assay where luminal epithelial cells are incorrectly polarized to test this hypothesis. We show that culturing human primary luminal epithelial cells within collagen-I gels leads to formation of structures with no lumina and with reverse polarity as judged by dual stainings for sialomucin, epithelial specific antigen or occludin. No basement membrane is deposited, and {beta}4-integrin staining is negative. Addition of purified human myoepithelial cells isolated from normal glands corrects the inverse polarity, and leads to formation of double-layered acini with central lumina. Among the laminins present in the human breast basement membrane (laminin-1, -5 and -10/11), laminin-1 was unique in its ability to substitute for myoepithelial cells in polarity reversal. Myoepithelial cells were purified also from four different breast cancer sources including a biphasic cell line. Three out of four samples either totally lacked the ability to interact with luminal epithelial cells, or conveyed only correction of polarity in a fraction of acini. This behavior was directly related to the ability of the tumor myoepithelial cells to produce {alpha}-1 chain of laminin. In vivo, breast carcinomas were either negative for laminin-1 (7/12 biopsies) or showed a focal, fragmented deposition of a less intensely stained basement membrane (5/12 biopsies). Dual staining with myoepithelial markers revealed that tumorassociated myoepithelial cells were either negative or weakly positive for expression of laminin-1, establishing a strong correlation between loss of laminin-1 and breast cancer. We conclude that the double-layered breast acinus may be

  3. In vivo measurement of cell proliferation in canine brain tumor using C-11-labeled FMAU and PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, Peter S.; Bading, James R.; Mouton, Peter P.; Links, Jonathan M.; Alauddin, Mian M.; Fissekis, John D.; Ravert, Hayden T.; Hilton, John; Wong, Dean F.; Anderson, James H.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Noncatabolized thymidine analogs are being developed for use in imaging DNA synthesis. We sought to relate a labeling index measured by immunohistochemical staining bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) technique to the uptake of 11 C 2'-fluoro-5-methyl-1-β-D-arabinofuranosyluracil (FMAU) measured with positron emission tomography (PET) in a brain tumor model. Methods: Adult beagles (n=8) with implanted brain tumors received [ 11 C]FMAU and dynamic imaging with arterial sampling. Six dogs were then infused with BUdR (200 mg/m 2 ) and sacrificed. Tumor time-activity curves (TACs) obtained from computed-tomography-defined regions of interest were corrected for partial volume effects and crosstalk from brain tissue. Tissue was analyzed for the percentage of tumor volume occupied by viable cells and by viable cells in S-phase as identified by BUdR staining. PET/[ 11 C]FMAU and BUdR were compared by linear regression analysis and analysis of variance, as well as by a nonparametric rank correlation test. Results: Tumor standardized uptake values (SUVs) and tumor-to-contralateral-brain uptake ratios at 50 min were 1.6±0.4 and 5.5±1.2 (n=8; mean±S.E.M.), respectively. No 11 C-labeled metabolites were observed in the blood through 60 min. Tumor TACs were well described with a three-compartment/four-parameter model (k 4 =0) and by Patlak analysis. Parametric statistical analysis showed that FMAU clearance from plasma into tumor Compartment 3 (K FMAU ) was significantly correlated with S-phase percent volume (P=.03), while tumor SUV was significantly correlated with both S-phase percent volume and cell percent volume (P=.02 and .03, respectively). Patlak slope, K FMAU and tumor SUV were equivalent with regard to rank correlation analysis, which showed that tumor uptake and trapping of FMAU were correlated with the volume density of dividing cells (P=.0003) rather than nondividing cells (P=.3). Conclusions: Trapping of [ 11 C]FMAU correlated with tumor growth rate, as

  4. Improving immunological tumor microenvironment using electro-hyperthermia followed by dendritic cell immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, Yuk-Wah; Huang, Cheng-Chung; Yang, Kai-Lin; Chi, Mau-Shin; Chiang, Hsin-Chien; Wang, Yu-Shan; Andocs, Gabor; Szasz, Andras; Li, Wen-Tyng; Chi, Kwan-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of intratumoral dentritic cells (DCs) commonly fails because it cannot evoke immunity in a poor tumor microenvironment (TME). Modulated electro-hyperthermia (mEHT, trade-name: oncothermia) represents a significant technological advancement in the hyperthermia field, allowing the autofocusing of electromagnetic power on a cell membrane to generate massive apoptosis. This approach turns local immunogenic cancer cell death (apoptosis) into a systemic anti-tumor immune response and may be implemented by treatment with intratumoral DCs. The CT26 murine colorectal cancer model was used in this investigation. The inhibition of growth of the tumor and the systemic anti-tumor immune response were measured. The tumor was heated to a core temperature of 42 °C for 30 min. The matured synergetic DCs were intratumorally injected 24 h following mEHT was applied. mEHT induced significant apoptosis and enhanced the release of heat shock protein70 (Hsp70) in CT26 tumors. Treatment with mEHT-DCs significantly inhibited CT26 tumor growth, relative to DCs alone or mEHT alone. The secondary tumor protection effect upon rechallenging was observed in mice that were treated with mEHT-DCs. Immunohistochemical staining of CD45 and F4/80 revealed that mEHT-DC treatment increased the number of leukocytes and macrophages. Most interestingly, mEHT also induced infiltrations of eosinophil, which has recently been reported to be an orchestrator of a specific T cell response. Cytotoxic T cell assay and ELISpot assay revealed a tumor-specific T cell activity. This study demonstrated that mEHT induces tumor cell apoptosis and enhances the release of Hsp70 from heated tumor cells, unlike conventional hyperthermia. mEHT can create a favorable tumor microenvironment for an immunological chain reaction that improves the success rate of intratumoral DC immunotherapy. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1690-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to

  5. Pattern multiplicity and fumarate hydratase (FH)/S-(2-succino)-cysteine (2SC) staining but not eosinophilic nucleoli with perinucleolar halos differentiate hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma-associated renal cell carcinomas from kidney tumors without FH gene alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Marie; Guillaud-Bataille, Marine; Salleron, Julia; Genestie, Catherine; Deveaux, Sophie; Slama, Abdelhamid; de Paillerets, Brigitte Bressac; Richard, Stéphane; Benusiglio, Patrick R; Ferlicot, Sophie

    2018-02-06

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma syndrome is characterized by an increased risk of agressive renal cell carcinoma, often of type 2 papillary histology, and is caused by FH germline mutations. A prominent eosinophilic macronucleolus with a perinucleolar clear halo is distinctive of hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma syndrome-associated renal cell carcinoma according to the 2012 ISUP and 2016 WHO kidney tumor classification. From an immunohistochemistry perspective, tumors are often FH-negative and S-(2-succino)-cysteine (2SC) positive. We performed a pathology review of 24 renal tumors in 23 FH mutation carriers, and compared them to 12 type 2 papillary renal cell carcinomas from FH wild-type patients. Prominent eosinophilic nucleoli with perinucleolar halos were present in almost all FH-deficient renal cell carcinomas (23/24). Unexpectedly, they were also present in 58% of type 2 papillary renal cell carcinomas from wild-type patients. Renal cell carcinoma in mutation carriers displayed a complex architecture with multiple patterns, typically papillary, tubulopapillary, and tubulocystic, but also sarcomatoid and rhabdoid. Such pattern diversity was not seen in non-carriers. FH/2SC immunohistochemistry was informative as all hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma-associated renal cell carcinomas were either FH- or 2SC+. For FH and 2SC immunohistochemistries taken separately, sensitivity of negative anti-FH immunohistochemistry was 87.5% and specificity was 100%. For positive anti-2SC immunohistochemistry, sensitivity, and specificity were 91.7% and 91.7%, respectively. All FH wild-type renal cell carcinoma were FH-positive, and all but one were 2SC-negative. In conclusion, multiplicity of architectural patterns, rhabdoid/sarcomatoid components and combined FH/2SC staining, but not prominent eosinophilic nucleoli with perinucleolar halos, differentiate hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma-associated renal

  6. [A morphometric analysis of the nuclei and nucleoli in tumor cells in lymphogranulomatosis, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and anaplastic large cell lymphoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgidze, L A; Vorob'ev, I A

    2009-01-01

    To make a comparative morphometric analysis of the nuclei and nucleoli of tumor cells in lymphogranulomatosis (LGM), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) for differential diagnosis of these lymphomas. Biopsy material (lymph node biopsies) was frozen in hexane, fixed and stained, then microscopic pictures were made. Mean area of tumor cell nuclei in LGM was 97.25 +/- 68.77 mcm2, in DLBCL and ALCL--55.89 +/- 20.13 mcm2 and 70.31 +/- 34.64 mcm2, respectively. The area differences were significant (p nucleoli of the former are larger than those of the latter. Mean area of the nucleoli in DLBCL was 3.05 +/- 1.58, in ALCL--5.53 +/- 4.94 mcm2. The differences are significant (p Nucleoli in Hodgkin 's cells are significantly larger than those in the tumor cells in ALCL and DLBCL and the nucleoli with the area more than 12 mcm2 can be used in differential diagnosis between LGM and DLBCL but not between LGM and ALCL.

  7. Pathway-specific differences between tumor cell lines and normal and tumor tissue cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tozeren Aydin

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell lines are used in experimental investigation of cancer but their capacity to represent tumor cells has yet to be quantified. The aim of the study was to identify significant alterations in pathway usage in cell lines in comparison with normal and tumor tissue. Methods This study utilized a pathway-specific enrichment analysis of publicly accessible microarray data and quantified the gene expression differences between cell lines, tumor, and normal tissue cells for six different tissue types. KEGG pathways that are significantly different between cell lines and tumors, cell lines and normal tissues and tumor and normal tissue were identified through enrichment tests on gene lists obtained using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM. Results Cellular pathways that were significantly upregulated in cell lines compared to tumor cells and normal cells of the same tissue type included ATP synthesis, cell communication, cell cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, purine, pyrimidine and pyruvate metabolism, and proteasome. Results on metabolic pathways suggested an increase in the velocity nucleotide metabolism and RNA production. Pathways that were downregulated in cell lines compared to tumor and normal tissue included cell communication, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs, and ECM-receptor interaction. Only a fraction of the significantly altered genes in tumor-to-normal comparison had similar expressions in cancer cell lines and tumor cells. These genes were tissue-specific and were distributed sparsely among multiple pathways. Conclusion Significantly altered genes in tumors compared to normal tissue were largely tissue specific. Among these genes downregulation was a major trend. In contrast, cell lines contained large sets of significantly upregulated genes that were common to multiple tissue types. Pathway upregulation in cell lines was most pronounced over metabolic pathways including cell nucleotide metabolism and oxidative

  8. Cell-based quantification of biomarkers from an ultra-fast microfluidic immunofluorescent staining: application to human breast cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliozzi, D.; Nguyen, H. T.; Gijs, M. A. M.

    2018-02-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is one of the main techniques currently used in the clinics for biomarker characterization. It consists in colorimetric labeling with specific antibodies followed by microscopy analysis. The results are then used for diagnosis and therapeutic targeting. Well-known drawbacks of such protocols are their limited accuracy and precision, which prevent the clinicians from having quantitative and robust IHC results. With our work, we combined rapid microfluidic immunofluorescent staining with efficient image-based cell segmentation and signal quantification to increase the robustness of both experimental and analytical protocols. The experimental protocol is very simple and based on fast-fluidic-exchange in a microfluidic chamber created on top of the formalin-fixed-paraffin-embedded (FFPE) slide by clamping it a silicon chip with a polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) sealing ring. The image-processing protocol is based on enhancement and subsequent thresholding of the local contrast of the obtained fluorescence image. As a case study, given that the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) protein is often used as a biomarker for breast cancer, we applied our method to HER2+ and HER2- cell lines. We report very fast (5 minutes) immunofluorescence staining of both HER2 and cytokeratin (a marker used to define the tumor region) on FFPE slides. The image-processing program can segment cells correctly and give a cell-based quantitative immunofluorescent signal. With this method, we found a reproducible well-defined separation for the HER2-to-cytokeratin ratio for positive and negative control samples.

  9. Decreased tumor cell proliferation as an indicator of the effect of preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adell, Gunnar; Zhang Hong; Jansson, Agneta; Sun Xiaofeng; Staal, Olle; Nordenskjoeld, Bo

    2001-01-01

    Background: Rectal cancer is a common malignancy, with significant local recurrence and death rates. Preoperative radiotherapy and refined surgical technique can improve local control rates and disease-free survival. Purpose: To investigate the relationship between the tumor growth fraction in rectal cancer measured with Ki-67 and the outcome, with and without short-term preoperative radiotherapy. Method: Ki-67 (MIB-1) immunohistochemistry was used to measure tumor cell proliferation in the preoperative biopsy and the surgical specimen. Materials: Specimens from 152 patients from the Southeast Swedish Health Care region were included in the Swedish rectal cancer trial 1987-1990. Results: Tumors with low proliferation treated with preoperative radiotherapy had a significantly reduced recurrence rate. The influence on death from rectal cancer was shown only in the univariate analysis. Preoperative radiotherapy of tumors with high proliferation did not significantly improve local control and disease-free survival. The interaction between Ki-67 status and the benefit of radiotherapy was significant for the reduced recurrence rate (p=0.03), with a trend toward improved disease-free survival (p=0.08). In the surgery-alone group, Ki-67 staining did not significantly correlate with local recurrence or survival rates. Conclusion: Many Ki-67 stained tumor cells in the preoperative biopsy predicts an increased treatment failure rate after preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer

  10. Multiparametric classification links tumor microenvironments with tumor cell phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojana Gligorijevic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available While it has been established that a number of microenvironment components can affect the likelihood of metastasis, the link between microenvironment and tumor cell phenotypes is poorly understood. Here we have examined microenvironment control over two different tumor cell motility phenotypes required for metastasis. By high-resolution multiphoton microscopy of mammary carcinoma in mice, we detected two phenotypes of motile tumor cells, different in locomotion speed. Only slower tumor cells exhibited protrusions with molecular, morphological, and functional characteristics associated with invadopodia. Each region in the primary tumor exhibited either fast- or slow-locomotion. To understand how the tumor microenvironment controls invadopodium formation and tumor cell locomotion, we systematically analyzed components of the microenvironment previously associated with cell invasion and migration. No single microenvironmental property was able to predict the locations of tumor cell phenotypes in the tumor if used in isolation or combined linearly. To solve this, we utilized the support vector machine (SVM algorithm to classify phenotypes in a nonlinear fashion. This approach identified conditions that promoted either motility phenotype. We then demonstrated that varying one of the conditions may change tumor cell behavior only in a context-dependent manner. In addition, to establish the link between phenotypes and cell fates, we photoconverted and monitored the fate of tumor cells in different microenvironments, finding that only tumor cells in the invadopodium-rich microenvironments degraded extracellular matrix (ECM and disseminated. The number of invadopodia positively correlated with degradation, while the inhibiting metalloproteases eliminated degradation and lung metastasis, consistent with a direct link among invadopodia, ECM degradation, and metastasis. We have detected and characterized two phenotypes of motile tumor cells in vivo, which

  11. Dichloroacetate induces tumor-specific radiosensitivity in vitro but attenuates radiation-induced tumor growth delay in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwicker, F.; Roeder, F.; Debus, J.; Huber, P.E. [University Hospital Center Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Clinical Cooperation Unit Molecular Radiation Oncology; Kirsner, A.; Weber, K.J. [University Hospital Center Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Peschke, P. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Clinical Cooperation Unit Molecular Radiation Oncology

    2013-08-15

    Background: Inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) by dichloroacetate (DCA) can shift tumor cell metabolism from anaerobic glycolysis to glucose oxidation, with activation of mitochondrial activity and chemotherapy-dependent apoptosis. In radiotherapy, DCA could thus potentially enhance the frequently moderate apoptotic response of cancer cells that results from their mitochondrial dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate tumor-specific radiosensitization by DCA in vitro and in a human tumor xenograft mouse model in vivo. Materials and methods: The interaction of DCA with photon beam radiation was investigated in the human tumor cell lines WIDR (colorectal) and LN18 (glioma), as well as in the human normal tissue cell lines HUVEC (endothelial), MRC5 (lung fibroblasts) and TK6 (lymphoblastoid). Apoptosis induction in vitro was assessed by DAPI staining and sub-G1 flow cytometry; cell survival was quantified by clonogenic assay. The effect of DCA in vivo was investigated in WIDR xenograft tumors growing subcutaneously on BALB/c-nu/nu mice, with and without fractionated irradiation. Histological examination included TUNEL and Ki67 staining for apoptosis and proliferation, respectively, as well as pinomidazole labeling for hypoxia. Results: DCA treatment led to decreased clonogenic survival and increased specific apoptosis rates in tumor cell lines (LN18, WIDR) but not in normal tissue cells (HUVEC, MRC5, TK6). However, this significant tumor-specific radiosensitization by DCA in vitro was not reflected by the situation in vivo: The growth suppression of WIDR xenograft tumors after irradiation was reduced upon additional DCA treatment (reflected by Ki67 expression levels), although early tumor cell apoptosis rates were significantly increased by DCA. This apparently paradoxical effect was accompanied by a marked DCA-dependent induction of hypoxia in tumor-tissue. Conclusion: DCA induced tumor-specific radiosensitization in vitro but not in vivo

  12. Reemergence of apoptotic cells between fractionated doses in irradiated murine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyn, R.E.; Hunter, N.R.; Milas, L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to follow up our previous studies on the development of apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors by testing whether an apoptotic subpopulation of cells reemerges between fractionated exposures. Mice bearing a murine ovarian carcinoma, OCa-I, were treated in vivo with two fractionation protocols: two doses of 12.5 Gy separated by various times out to 5 days and multiple daily fractions of 2.5 Gy. Animals were killed 4 h after the last dose in each protocol, and the percent apoptosis was scored from stained histological sections made from the irradiated tumors according to the specific features characteristic of this mode of cell death. The 12.5+12.5 Gy protocol yielded a net total percent apoptosis of about 45% when the two doses were separated by 5 days (total dose = 25 Gy), whereas the 2.5 Gy per day protocol yielded about 50% net apoptotic cells when given for 5 days (total dose = 12.5 Gy). These values are to be compared to the value of 36% apoptotic cells that is yielded by large single doses (> 25 Gy). Thus, these results indicate that an apoptotic subpopulation of cells reemerged between the fractions in both protocols, but the kinetics appeared to be delayed in the 12.5+12.5 Gy vs. the multiple 2.5 Gy protocol. This reemergence of cells with the propensity for radiation-induced apoptosis between fractionated exposures is consistent with a role for this mode of cell death in the response of tumors to radiotherapy and may represent the priming of a new subpopulation of tumor cells for apoptosis as part of normal tumor homeostasis to counterbalance cell division. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  13. Cell surface fucosylation does not affect development of colon tumors in mice with germline Smad3 mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, Steven E.; Karnak, David M.; Hurd, Elizabeth A.

    2006-01-01

    Background/Aims: Neoplasia-related alterations in cell surface α(1,2)fucosylated glycans have been reported in multiple tumors including colon, pancreas, endometrium, cervix, bladder, lung, and choriocarcinoma. Spontaneous colorectal tumors from mice with a germline null mutation of transforming growth factor-β signaling gene Smad3 (Madh3) were tested for α(1,2)fucosylated glycan expression. Methods: Ulex Europaeus Agglutinin-I lectin staining, fucosyltransferase gene northern blot analysis, and a cross of mutant mice with Fut2 and Smad3 germline mutations were performed. Results: Spontaneous colorectal tumors from Smad3 (-/-) homozygous null mice were found to express α(1,2)fucosylated glycans in an abnormal pattern compared to adjacent nonneoplastic colon. Northern blot analysis of α(1,2)fucosyltransferase genes Fut1 and Fut2 revealed that Fut2, but not Fut1, steady-state mRNA levels were significantly increased in tumors relative to adjacent normal colonic mucosa. Mutant mice with a Fut2-inactivating germline mutation were crossed with Smad3 targeted mice. In Smad3 (-/-)/Fut2 (-/-) double knock-out mice, UEA-I lectin staining was eliminated from colon and colon tumors, however, the number and size of tumors present by 24 weeks of age did not vary regardless of the Fut2 genotype. Conclusions: In this model of colorectal cancer, cell surface α(1,2)fucosylation does not affect development of colon tumors. PMID:17264540

  14. Facile method to stain the bacterial cell surface for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunsolus, Ian L.; Hu, Dehong; Mihai, Cosmin; Lohse, Samuel E.; Lee, Chang-Soo; Torelli, Marco; Hamers, Robert J.; Murphy, Catherine; Orr, Galya; Haynes, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    A method to fluorescently stain the surfaces of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial cells compatible with super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is presented. This method utilizes a commercially-available fluorescent probe to label primary amines at the surface of the cell. We demonstrate efficient staining of two bacterial strains, the Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis 168. Using structured illumination microscopy and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, which require high quantum yield or specialized dyes, we show that this staining method may be used to resolve the bacterial cell surface with sub-diffraction-limited resolution. We further use this method to identify localization patterns of nanomaterials, specifically cadmium selenide quantum dots, following interaction with bacterial cells.

  15. Apoptosis and Tumor Progressionin Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tenniswood, Martin P

    2005-01-01

    ... (as measured by BrdU incorporation) and apoptosis as measured by TUNEL staining. We have standardized an efficient methodologies for isolating cells from primary tumors expressing REP by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS...

  16. Distinguishing benign notochordal cell tumors from vertebral chordoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Takehiko; Iwata, Jun; Sugihara, Shinsuke; McCarthy, Edward F.; Karita, Michiaki; Murakami, Hideki; Kawahara, Norio; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Tomita, Katsuro

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to characterize imaging findings of benign notochordal cell tumors (BNCTs). Clinical and imaging data for 9 benign notochordal cell tumors in 7 patients were reviewed retrospectively. Conventional radiographs (n = 9), bone scintigrams (n = 2), computed tomographic images (n = 7), and magnetic resonance images (n = 8) were reviewed. Eight of the 9 lesions were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and microscopically examined. There were 3 male and 4 female patients with an age range of 22 to 55 years (average age, 44 years). Two patients had two lesions at different sites. The lesions involved the cervical spine in 4 patients, the lumbar spine in 2, the sacrum in 2, and the coccyx in 1. The most common symptom was mild pain. The lesions of 2 patients were found incidentally during imaging studies for unrelated conditions. Five patients underwent surgical procedures. One patient died of surgical complications. All other patients have been well without recurrent or progressive disease for 13 to 84 months. Radiographs usually did not reveal significant abnormality. Five lesions exhibited subtle sclerosis and 1 showed intense sclerosis. Technetium bone scan did not reveal any abnormal uptake. Computed tomography images had increased density within the vertebral bodies. The lesions had a homogeneous low signal intensity on T1-weighted magnetic resonance images and a high intensity on T2-weighted images without soft-tissue mass. Microscopically, lesions contained sheets of adipocyte-like vacuolated chordoid cells without a myxoid matrix. Benign notochordal cell tumors may be found during routine clinical examinations and do not require surgical management unless they show extraosseous disease. These tumors should be recognized by radiologists, pathologists, and orthopedic surgeons to prevent operations, which usually are extensive. (orig.)

  17. Cyclophilin A enhances cell proliferation and tumor growth of liver fluke-associated cholangiocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawanyawisuth Kanlayanee

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclophilin A (CypA expression is associated with malignant phenotypes in many cancers. However, the role and mechanisms of CypA in liver fluke-associated cholangiocarcinoma (CCA are not presently known. In this study, we investigated the expression of CypA in CCA tumor tissues and CCA cell lines as well as regulation mechanisms of CypA in tumor growth using CCA cell lines. Methods CypA expression was determined by real time RT-PCR, Western blot or immunohistochemistry. CypA silence or overexpression in CCA cells was achieved using gene delivery techniques. Cell proliferation was assessed using MTS assay or Ki-67 staining. The effect of silencing CypA on CCA tumor growth was determined in nude mice. The effect of CypA knockdown on ERK1/2 activation was assessed by Western blot. Results CypA was upregulated in 68% of CCA tumor tissues. Silencing CypA significantly suppressed cell proliferation in several CCA cell lines. Likewise, inhibition of CypA peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase activity using cyclosporin A (CsA decreased cell proliferation. In contrast, overexpression of CypA resulted in 30% to 35% increases in proliferation of CCA cell lines. Interestingly, neither silence nor overexpression of CypA affected cell proliferation of a non-tumor human cholangiocyte cell line, MMNK1. Suppression of CypA expression attenuated ERK1/2 activity in CCA M139 cells by using both transient and stable knockdown methods. In the in vivo study, there was a 43% reduction in weight of tumors derived from CypA-silenced CCA cell lines compared with control vector CCA tumors in mice; these tumors with stable CypA silencing showed a reduced cell proliferation. Conclusions CypA is upregulated in majority of CCA patients' tissues and confers a significant growth advantage in CCA cells. Suppression of CypA expression decreases proliferation of CCA cell lines in vitro and reduces tumor growth in the nude mouse model. Inhibition of Cyp

  18. Tumor cell proliferation kinetics and tumor growth rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tubiana, M

    1989-01-01

    The present knowledge on the growth rate and the proliferation kinetics of human tumor is based on the measurement of the tumor doubling times (DT) in several hundred patients and on the determination of the proportion of proliferating cells with radioactive thymidine or by flow cytometry in large numbers of patients. The results show that the DT of human tumor varies widely, from less than one week to over one year with a median value of approximately 2 months. The DTs are significantly correlated with the histological type. They depend upon (1) the duration of the cell cycle whose mean duration is 2 days with small variations from tumor to tumor, (2) the proportion of proliferating cells and consequently the cell birth rate which varies widely among tumors and which is significantly correlated to the DT, (3) the cell loss factors which also vary widely and which are the greatest when proliferation is most intensive. These studies have several clinical implications: (a) they have further increased our understanding of the natural history of human tumor, (b) they have therapeutic implications since tumor responsiveness and curability by radiation and drugs are strongly influenced by the cell kinetic parameters of the tumor, (c) the proportion of proliferating cells is of great prognostic value in several types of human cancers. The investigation of the molecular defects, which are correlated with the perturbation of control of cell proliferation, should lead to significant fundamental and therapeutic advances. (orig.).

  19. Quantitative ultrasound characterization of tumor cell death: ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles for radiation enhancement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunjung Christina Kim

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of quantitative ultrasound imaging in characterizing cancer cell death caused by enhanced radiation treatments. This investigation focused on developing this ultrasound modality as an imaging-based non-invasive method that can be used to monitor therapeutic ultrasound and radiation effects. High-frequency (25 MHz ultrasound was used to image tumor responses caused by ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles in combination with radiation. Human prostate xenografts grown in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice were treated using 8, 80, or 1000 µL/kg of microbubbles stimulated with ultrasound at 250, 570, or 750 kPa, and exposed to 0, 2, or 8 Gy of radiation. Tumors were imaged prior to treatment and 24 hours after treatment. Spectral analysis of images acquired from treated tumors revealed overall increases in ultrasound backscatter intensity and the spectral intercept parameter. The increase in backscatter intensity compared to the control ranged from 1.9±1.6 dB for the clinical imaging dose of microbubbles (8 µL/kg, 250 kPa, 2 Gy to 7.0±4.1 dB for the most extreme treatment condition (1000 µL/kg, 750 kPa, 8 Gy. In parallel, in situ end-labelling (ISEL staining, ceramide, and cyclophilin A staining demonstrated increases in cell death due to DNA fragmentation, ceramide-mediated apoptosis, and release of cyclophilin A as a result of cell membrane permeabilization, respectively. Quantitative ultrasound results indicated changes that paralleled increases in cell death observed from histology analyses supporting its use for non-invasive monitoring of cancer treatment outcomes.

  20. The number and microlocalization of tumor-associated immune cells are associated with patient's survival time in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Fuqiang; Liu, Lunxu; Che, Guowei; Yu, Nanbin; Pu, Qiang; Zhang, Shangfu; Ma, Junliang; Ma, Lin; You, Zongbing

    2010-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment is composed of tumor cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and infiltrating immune cells. Tumor-associated immune cells may inhibit or promote tumor growth and progression. This study was conducted to determine whether the number and microlocalization of macrophages, mature dendritic cells and cytotoxic T cells in non-small cell lung cancer are associated with patient's survival time. Ninety-nine patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were included in this retrospective study. Paraffin-embedded NSCLC specimens and their clinicopathological data including up to 8-year follow-up information were used. Immunohistochemical staining for CD68 (marker for macrophages), CD83 (marker for mature dendritic cells), and CD8 (marker for cytotoxic T cells) was performed and evaluated in a blinded fashion. The numbers of immune cells in tumor islets and stroma, tumor islets, or tumor stroma were counted under a microscope. Correlation of the cell numbers and patient's survival time was analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (version 13.0). The numbers of macrophages, mature dendritic cells and cytotoxic T cells were significantly more in the tumor stroma than in the tumor islets. The number of macrophages in the tumor islets was positively associated with patient's survival time, whereas the number of macrophages in the tumor stroma was negatively associated with patient's survival time in both univariate and multivariate analyses. The number of mature dendritic cells in the tumor islets and stroma, tumor islets only, or tumor stroma only was positively associated with patient's survival time in a univariate analysis but not in a multivariate analysis. The number of cytotoxic T cells in the tumor islets and stroma was positively associated with patient's survival time in a univariate analysis but not in a multivariate analysis. The number of cytotoxic T cells in the tumor islets only or stroma

  1. Tumor cell surface proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, S.J.; Braslawsky, G.R.; Flynn, K.; Foote, L.J.; Friedman, E.; Hotchkiss, J.A.; Huang, A.H.L.; Lankford, P.K.

    1982-01-01

    Cell surface proteins mediate interaction between cells and their environment. Unique tumor cell surface proteins are being identified and quantified in several tumor systems to address the following questions: (i) how do tumor-specific proteins arise during cell transformation; (ii) can these proteins be used as markers of tumor cell distribution in vivo; (iii) can cytotoxic drugs be targeted specifically to tumor cells using antibody; and (iv) can solid state radioimmunoassay of these proteins provide a means to quantify transformation frequencies. A tumor surface protein of 180,000 M/sub r/ (TSP-180) has been identified on cells of several lung carcinomas of BALB/c mice. TSP-180 was not detected on normal lung tissue, embryonic tissue, or other epithelial or sarcoma tumors, but it was found on lung carcinomas of other strains of mice. Considerable amino acid sequence homology exists among TSP-180's from several cell sources, indicating that TSP-180 synthesis is directed by normal cellular genes although it is not expressed in normal cells. The regulation of synthesis of TSP-180 and its relationship to normal cell surface proteins are being studied. Monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to TSP-180 have been developed. The antibodies have been used in immunoaffinity chromatography to isolate TSP-180 from tumor cell sources. This purified tumor antigen was used to immunize rats. Antibody produced by these animals reacted at different sites (epitopes) on the TSP-180 molecule than did the original MoAb. These sera and MoAb from these animals are being used to identify normal cell components related to the TSP-180 molecule

  2. Diagnostic utility of NCOA2 fluorescence in situ hybridization and Stat6 immunohistochemistry staining for soft tissue angiofibroma and morphologically similar fibrovascular tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Shintaro; Aoyama, Tomoyuki; Kondo, Kei; Keira, Yoshiko; Ogino, Jiro; Nakanishi, Katsuya; Kaya, Mitsunori; Emori, Makoto; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Nakajima, Hisaya; Takagi, Masayuki; Hasegawa, Tadashi

    2014-08-01

    Soft tissue angiofibroma (STA), a recently suggested new histologic entity, is a benign fibrovascular soft tissue tumor composed of bland spindle-shaped tumor cells with abundant collagenous to myxoid stroma and branching small vessels. The lesion has a characteristic AHRR-NCOA2 fusion gene derived from chromosomal translocation of t(5;8)(p15;q13). However, morphologically similar tumors containing abundant fibrovascular and myxoid stroma can complicate diagnosis. We designed an original DNA probe for detecting NCOA2 split signals on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and estimated its utility with 20 fibrovascular tumors: 4 each of STAs, solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs), and cellular angiofibromas and 3 each of low-grade myxofibrosarcomas, myxoid liposarcomas, and low-grade fibromyxoid sarcomas. We also performed FISH for 13q14 deletion and immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, retinoblastoma protein, and MUC-4 expression. Furthermore, IHC for Stat6 was conducted in the 20 cases analyzed by FISH and in an additional 26 SFTs. We found moderate to strong nuclear Stat6 expression in all SFTs but no expression in the other tumors. Both estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor expressions were observed in STAs, SFTs, and cellular angiofibromas. Expression of retinoblastoma protein was found in less than 10% of cells in all tumor types except myxoid liposarcoma. The low-grade fibromyxoid sarcomas were strongly positive for MUC-4. All STAs showed NCOA2 split signals on FISH. All tumors, regardless of histologic type, had 13q14 deletion. The NCOA2 FISH technique is a practical method for confirming STA diagnosis. The combination of NCOA2 FISH and Stat6 IHC proved effective for the differential diagnosis of STA, even when using small biopsy specimens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Discriminative staining methods for the nervous system: luxol fast blue--periodic acid-Schiff--hematoxylin triple stain and subsidiary staining methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, N

    1987-09-01

    This paper describes a new series of staining methods which can discriminatively demonstrate every structure of the nervous system, including axons and capillaries, in animal and human materials. Methods described in this paper consist of one primary stain, luxol fast blue-periodic acid Schiff-hematoxylin (LPH) and six different subsidiary staining methods. The LPH triple stain can precisely differentiate the following structures: neurons (Nissl bodies, cytoplasm, nuclear membrane and nucleolus), various kinds of nuclei (glia, ependyma, endothelium, leucocyte, connective tissue, etc.), myelin sheaths, neuronal processes (axons and dendrites), reacted glial cell bodies (protoplasmic astrocytes, foamy cells, etc.), blood vessels (arteries, veins and capillaries), meninges, intervening connective tissue, erythrocytes, lipofuscin granules, amyloid bodies, and others. Subsidiary staining methods are also described briefly. Applications are discussed in the context of staining technology and neuromorphological research.

  4. Defective repair of UV-damaged DNA in human tumor and SV40-transformed human cells but not in adenovirus-transformed human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rainbow, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    The DNA repair capacities of five human tumor cell lines, one SV40-transformed human cell line and one adenovirus-transformed human cell line were compared with that of normal human fibroblasts using a sensitive host cell reactivation (HCR) technique. Unirradiated and UV-irradiated suspensions of adenovirus type 2 (Ad 2) were assayed for their ability to form viral structural antigens (Vag) in the various cell types using immunofluorescent staining. The survival of Vag formation for UV-irradiated Ad 2 was significantly reduced in all the human tumor cell lines and the SV40-transformed human line compared to the normal human fibroblasts, but was apparently normal in the adenovirus-transformed human cells. D 0 values for the UV survival of Ad 2 Vag synthesis in the tumor and virally transformed lines expressed as a percentage of that obtained on normal fibroblast strains were used as a measure of DNA repair capacity. Percent HCR values ranged from 26 to 53% in the tumor cells. These results indicate a deficiency in the repair of UV-induced DNA damage associated with human tumorigenesis and the transformation of human cells by SV40 but not the transformation of human cells by adenovirus. (author)

  5. Thick tissue diffusion model with binding to optimize topical staining in fluorescence breast cancer margin imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaochun; Kang, Soyoung; Navarro-Comes, Eric; Wang, Yu; Liu, Jonathan T. C.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2018-03-01

    Intraoperative tumor/surgical margin assessment is required to achieve higher tumor resection rate in breast-conserving surgery. Though current histology provides incomparable accuracy in margin assessment, thin tissue sectioning and the limited field of view of microscopy makes histology too time-consuming for intraoperative applications. If thick tissue, wide-field imaging can provide an acceptable assessment of tumor cells at the surface of resected tissues, an intraoperative protocol can be developed to guide the surgery and provide immediate feedback for surgeons. Topical staining of margins with cancer-targeted molecular imaging agents has the potential to provide the sensitivity needed to see microscopic cancer on a wide-field image; however, diffusion and nonspecific retention of imaging agents in thick tissue can significantly diminish tumor contrast with conventional methods. Here, we present a mathematical model to accurately simulate nonspecific retention, binding, and diffusion of imaging agents in thick tissue topical staining to guide and optimize future thick tissue staining and imaging protocol. In order to verify the accuracy and applicability of the model, diffusion profiles of cancer targeted and untargeted (control) nanoparticles at different staining times in A431 tumor xenografts were acquired for model comparison and tuning. The initial findings suggest the existence of nonspecific retention in the tissue, especially at the tissue surface. The simulator can be used to compare the effect of nonspecific retention, receptor binding and diffusion under various conditions (tissue type, imaging agent) and provides optimal staining and imaging protocols for targeted and control imaging agent.

  6. Colorectal cancer prognosis depends on T-cell infiltration and molecular characteristics of the tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Anna M; Henriksson, Maria L; Van Guelpen, Bethany; Stenling, Roger; Oberg, Ake; Rutegård, Jörgen; Palmqvist, Richard

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to relate the density of tumor infiltrating T cells to cancer-specific survival in colorectal cancer, taking into consideration the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) and microsatellite instability (MSI) screening status. The T-cell marker CD3 was stained by immunohistochemistry in 484 archival tumor tissue samples. T-cell density was semiquantitatively estimated and scored 1-4 in the tumor front and center (T cells in stroma), and intraepithelially (T cells infiltrating tumor cell nests). Total CD3 score was calculated as the sum of the three CD3 scores (range 3-12). MSI screening status was assessed by immunohistochemistry. CIMP status was determined by quantitative real-time PCR (MethyLight) using an eight-gene panel. We found that patients whose tumors were highly infiltrated by T cells (total CD3 score ≥7) had longer survival compared with patients with poorly infiltrated tumors (total CD3 score ≤4). This finding was statistically significant in multivariate analyses (multivariate hazard ratio, 0.57; 95% confidence interval, 0.31-1.00). Importantly, the finding was consistent in rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative radiotherapy. Although microsatellite unstable tumor patients are generally considered to have better prognosis, we found no difference in survival between microsatellite unstable and microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients with similar total CD3 scores. Patients with MSS tumors highly infiltrated by T cells had better prognosis compared with intermediately or poorly infiltrated microsatellite unstable tumors (log rank P=0.013). Regarding CIMP status, CIMP-low was associated with particularly poor prognosis in patients with poorly infiltrated tumors (multivariate hazard ratio for CIMP-low versus CIMP-negative, 3.07; 95% confidence interval, 1.53-6.15). However, some subset analyses suffered from low power and are in need of confirmation by independent studies. In conclusion, patients whose

  7. Three-dimensional telomere architecture of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: comparison of tumor and normal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunpaweravong, S; Sunpaweravong, P; Sathitruangsak, C; Mai, S

    2016-05-01

    Telomeres are repetitive nucleotide sequences (TTAGGG)n located at the ends of chromosomes that function to preserve chromosomal integrity and prevent terminal end-to-end fusions. Telomere loss or dysfunction results in breakage-bridge-fusion cycles, aneuploidy, gene amplification and chromosomal rearrangements, which can lead to genomic instability and promote carcinogenesis. Evaluating the hypothesis that changes in telomeres contribute to the development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and to determine whether there are differences between young and old patients, we compared the three-dimensional (3D) nuclear telomere architecture in ESCC tumor cells with that of normal epithelial cells obtained from the same patient. Patients were equally divided by age into two groups, one comprising those less than 45 years of age and the other consisting of those over 80 years of age. Tumor and normal epithelial cells located at least 10 cm from the border of the tumor were biopsied in ESCC patients. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed for each sample to confirm and identify the cancer and normal epithelial cells. This study was based on quantitative 3D fluorescence in situ hybridization (Q-FISH), 3D imaging and 3D analysis of paraffin-embedded slides. The 3D telomere architecture data were computer analyzed using 100 nuclei per slide. The following were the main parameters compared: the number of signals (number of telomeres), signal intensity (telomere length), number of telomere aggregates, and nuclear volume. Tumor and normal epithelial samples from 16 patients were compared. The normal epithelial cells had more telomere signals and higher intensities than the tumor cells, with P-values of P architecture and found no statistically significant differences in any parameter tested between the young and old patients in either the tumor or epithelial cells. The 3D nuclear telomeric signature was able to detect differences in telomere architecture

  8. Histological staining methods preparatory to laser capture microdissection significantly affect the integrity of the cellular RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyang; Owens, James D; Shih, Joanna H; Li, Ming-Chung; Bonner, Robert F; Mushinski, J Frederic

    2006-04-27

    Gene expression profiling by microarray analysis of cells enriched by laser capture microdissection (LCM) faces several technical challenges. Frozen sections yield higher quality RNA than paraffin-imbedded sections, but even with frozen sections, the staining methods used for histological identification of cells of interest could still damage the mRNA in the cells. To study the contribution of staining methods to degradation of results from gene expression profiling of LCM samples, we subjected pellets of the mouse plasma cell tumor cell line TEPC 1165 to direct RNA extraction and to parallel frozen sectioning for LCM and subsequent RNA extraction. We used microarray hybridization analysis to compare gene expression profiles of RNA from cell pellets with gene expression profiles of RNA from frozen sections that had been stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), Nissl Stain (NS), and for immunofluorescence (IF) as well as with the plasma cell-revealing methyl green pyronin (MGP) stain. All RNAs were amplified with two rounds of T7-based in vitro transcription and analyzed by two-color expression analysis on 10-K cDNA microarrays. The MGP-stained samples showed the least introduction of mRNA loss, followed by H&E and immunofluorescence. Nissl staining was significantly more detrimental to gene expression profiles, presumably owing to an aqueous step in which RNA may have been damaged by endogenous or exogenous RNAases. RNA damage can occur during the staining steps preparatory to laser capture microdissection, with the consequence of loss of representation of certain genes in microarray hybridization analysis. Inclusion of RNAase inhibitor in aqueous staining solutions appears to be important in protecting RNA from loss of gene transcripts.

  9. Exosome-Based Cell-Cell Communication in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Maia

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumors are not isolated entities, but complex systemic networks involving cell-cell communication between transformed and non-transformed cells. The milieu created by tumor-associated cells may either support or halt tumor progression. In addition to cell-cell contact, cells communicate through secreted factors via a highly complex system involving characteristics such as ligand concentration, receptor expression and integration of diverse signaling pathways. Of these, extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes, are emerging as novel cell-cell communication mediators in physiological and pathological scenarios. Exosomes, membrane vesicles of endocytic origin released by all cells (both healthy and diseased, ranging in size from 30 to 150 nm, transport all the main biomolecules, including lipids, proteins, DNAs, messenger RNAs and microRNA, and perform intercellular transfer of components, locally and systemically. By acting not only in tumor cells, but also in tumor-associated cells such as fibroblasts, endothelium, leukocytes and progenitor cells, tumor- and non-tumor cells-derived exosomes have emerged as new players in tumor growth and invasion, tumor-associated angiogenesis, tissue inflammation and immunologic remodeling. In addition, due to their property of carrying molecules from their cell of origin to the peripheral circulation, exosomes have been increasingly studied as sources of tumor biomarkers in liquid biopsies. Here we review the current literature on the participation of exosomes in the communication between tumor and tumor-associated cells, highlighting the role of this process in the setup of tumor microenvironments that modulate tumor initiation and metastasis.

  10. A gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST masquerading as an ovarian mass

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    Beneduce Pasquale

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST are rare mesenchymal tumors originating in the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. Myogenic gastrointestinal stromal tumor, a distinctive morphologic variant is characterized by an unusually prominent myxoid stromal background. Case presentation We report a case of myxoid variant of GIST in a 42 years old woman presenting as an epigastric mass associated to an ovarian cyst and elevated CA-125. Histologically, the lesions was composed of a proliferation of spindle cells in an abundant myxoid stroma, without evidence of atypia or anaplasia. Immunohistochemical stains showed strong positive staining with muscle actin, positive staining with CD34 and weak positive staining with CD117, while showed negative for S-100. Conclusion At surgery every effort should be made to identify the origin of the tumor. A complete surgical removal of the tumor should be obtained, as this is the only established treatment that offers long term survival.

  11. Pericytes limit tumor cell metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xian, Xiaojie; Håkansson, Joakim; Ståhlberg, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Previously we observed that neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) deficiency in beta tumor cells facilitates metastasis into distant organs and local lymph nodes. Here, we show that NCAM-deficient beta cell tumors grew leaky blood vessels with perturbed pericyte-endothelial cell-cell interactions...... the microvessel wall. To directly address whether pericyte dysfunction increases the metastatic potential of solid tumors, we studied beta cell tumorigenesis in primary pericyte-deficient Pdgfb(ret/ret) mice. This resulted in beta tumor cell metastases in distant organs and local lymph nodes, demonstrating a role...... and deficient perivascular deposition of ECM components. Conversely, tumor cell expression of NCAM in a fibrosarcoma model (T241) improved pericyte recruitment and increased perivascular deposition of ECM molecules. Together, these findings suggest that NCAM may limit tumor cell metastasis by stabilizing...

  12. A Simple and Efficient Method for Preparing Cell Slides and Staining without Using Cytocentrifuge and Cytoclips

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    Xiaotang Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell staining is a necessary and useful technique for visualizing cell morphology and structure under a microscope. This technique has been used in many areas such as cytology, hematology, oncology, histology, virology, serology, microbiology, cell biology, and immunochemistry. One of the key pieces of equipment for preparing a slide for cell staining is cytology centrifuge (cytocentrifuge such as cytospin. However, many small labs do not have this expensive equipment and its accessory, cytoclips (also expensive relatively, which makes them difficult to study cell cytology. Here we present an alternative method for preparing a slide and cell staining in the absence of a cytocentrifuge (and cytoclips. This method is based on the principle that a regular cell centrifuge can be used to concentrate cells harvested from cell culture and then deposit the concentrated cell suspension to a slide evenly by using a cell spreader, followed by cell staining. The method presented is simple, rapid, economic, and efficient. This method may also avoid a possible change in cell morphology induced by cytocentrifuge.

  13. Bladder cancers respond to intravesical instillation of HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Wullt, Björn; Gustafsson, Lotta; Månsson, Wiking; Ljunggren, Eva; Svanborg, Catharina

    2007-09-15

    We studied if bladder cancers respond to HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) to establish if intravesical HAMLET application might be used to selectively remove cancer cells in vivo. Patients with nonmuscle invasive transitional cell carcinomas were included. Nine patients received 5 daily intravesical instillations of HAMLET (25 mg/ml) during the week before scheduled surgery. HAMLET stimulated a rapid increase in the shedding of tumor cells into the urine, daily, during the 5 days of instillation. The effect was specific for HAMLET, as intravesical instillation of NaCl, PBS or native alpha-lactalbumin did not increase cell shedding. Most of the shed cells were dead and an apoptotic response was detected in 6 of 9 patients, using the TUNEL assay. At surgery, morphological changes in the exophytic tumors were documented by endoscopic photography and a reduction in tumor size or change in tumor character was detected in 8 of 9 patients. TUNEL staining was positive in biopsies from the remaining tumor in 4 patients but adjacent healthy tissue showed no evidence of apoptosis and no toxic response. The results suggest that HAMLET exerts a direct and selective effect on bladder cancer tissue in vivo and that local HAMLET administration might be of value in the future treatment of bladder cancers. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Tumor-Infiltrating Immune Cells Promoting Tumor Invasion and Metastasis: Existing Theories

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    Yan-gao Man, Alexander Stojadinovic, Jeffrey Mason, Itzhak Avital, Anton Bilchik, Bjoern Bruecher, Mladjan Protic, Aviram Nissan, Mina Izadjoo, Xichen Zhang, Anahid Jewett

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a commonly held belief that infiltration of immune cells into tumor tissues and direct physical contact between tumor cells and infiltrated immune cells is associated with physical destructions of the tumor cells, reduction of the tumor burden, and improved clinical prognosis. An increasing number of studies, however, have suggested that aberrant infiltration of immune cells into tumor or normal tissues may promote tumor progression, invasion, and metastasis. Neither the primary reason for these contradictory observations, nor the mechanism for the reported diverse impact of tumor-infiltrating immune cells has been elucidated, making it difficult to judge the clinical implications of infiltration of immune cells within tumor tissues. This mini-review presents several existing hypotheses and models that favor the promoting impact of tumor-infiltrating immune cells on tumor invasion and metastasis, and also analyzes their strength and weakness.

  15. The apoptosis linked gene ALG-2 is dysregulated in tumors of various origin and contributes to cancer cell viability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Jonas; Høj, Berit Rahbek; Mollerup, Jens

    2008-01-01

    microarrays we analysed the expression of ALG-2 in 7371 tumor tissue samples of various origin as well as in 749 normal tissue samples. Most notably, ALG-2 was upregulated in mesenchymal tumors. No correlation was found between ALG-2 staining intensity and survival of patients with lung, breast or colon...... cancer. siRNA mediated ALG-2 downregulation led to a significant reduction in viability of HeLa cells indicating that ALG-2 may contribute to tumor development and expansion....

  16. Determinates of tumor response to radiation: Tumor cells, tumor stroma and permanent local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wende; Huang, Peigen; Chen, David J.; Gerweck, Leo E.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: The causes of tumor response variation to radiation remain obscure, thus hampering the development of predictive assays and strategies to decrease resistance. The present study evaluates the impact of host tumor stromal elements and the in vivo environment on tumor cell kill, and relationship between tumor cell radiosensitivity and the tumor control dose. Material and methods: Five endpoints were evaluated and compared in a radiosensitive DNA double-strand break repair-defective (DNA-PKcs −/− ) tumor line, and its DNA-PKcs repair competent transfected counterpart. In vitro colony formation assays were performed on in vitro cultured cells, on cells obtained directly from tumors, and on cells irradiated in situ. Permanent local control was assessed by the TCD 50 assay. Vascular effects were evaluated by functional vascular density assays. Results: The fraction of repair competent and repair deficient tumor cells surviving radiation did not substantially differ whether irradiated in vitro, i.e., in the absence of host stromal elements and factors, from the fraction of cells killed following in vivo irradiation. Additionally, the altered tumor cell sensitivity resulted in a proportional change in the dose required to achieve permanent local control. The estimated number of tumor cells per tumor, their cloning efficiency and radiosensitivity, all assessed by in vitro assays, were used to predict successfully, the measured tumor control doses. Conclusion: The number of clonogens per tumor and their radiosensitivity govern the permanent local control dose

  17. A new method for evaluating tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in colorectal cancer using hematoxylin and eosin (H-E)-stained tumor sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseki, Yasuhito; Shibutani, Masatsune; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Nagahara, Hisashi; Fukuoka, Tatsunari; Matsutani, Shinji; Kashiwagi, Shinichiro; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Hirakawa, Kosei; Ohira, Masaichi

    2018-01-01

    Numerous reports indicate that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) are a prognostic factor in various cancers and that they must be good biomarkers. However, the methods of evaluating TILs differ in each study; thus, there is not yet a standardized methodology for evaluating TILs. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prognostic significance of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) using the new method proposed by the International TILs Working Group in breast cancer and to standardize the method of evaluating TILs in CRC. We retrospectively reviewed a database of 160 patients with Stage II or III CRC. The density of TILs was assessed by measuring the area occupied by mononuclear cells over the stromal area on hematoxylin and eosin (H-E)-stained sections. We set 42% as the cut-off percentage of the area occupied by TILs according to the receiver operating characteristic curve, and we classified patients into the high-TILs and the low-TILs groups. The rates of relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) in the high-TILs group were significantly higher than those in the low-TILs group. A multivariate analysis showed that the density of TILs was independently associated with RFS and OS. Moreover, the density of TILs assessed by an observer was significantly associated with the density of TILs assessed by the automated imaging software program. The new method for evaluating TILs, which was recommended by the International TILs Working Group in breast cancer, might be a useful predictive factor in colorectal cancer patients.

  18. CD8+ Tumor-Infiltrating T Cells Are Trapped in the Tumor-Dendritic Cell Network

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    Alexandre Boissonnas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy enhances the antitumor adaptive immune T cell response, but the immunosuppressive tumor environment often dominates, resulting in cancer relapse. Antigen-presenting cells such as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs and tumor dendritic cells (TuDCs are the main protagonists of tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL immuno-suppression. TAMs have been widely investigated and are associated with poor prognosis, but the immuno-suppressive activity of TuDCs is less well understood. We performed two-photon imaging of the tumor tissue to examine the spatiotemporal interactions between TILs and TuDCs after chemotherapy. In a strongly immuno-suppressive murine tumor model, cyclophosphamide-mediated chemotherapy transiently enhanced the antitumor activity of adoptively transferred ovalbumin-specific CD8+ T cell receptor transgenic T cells (OTI but barely affected TuDC compartment within the tumor. Time lapse imaging of living tumor tissue showed that TuDCs are organized as a mesh with dynamic interconnections. Once infiltrated into the tumor parenchyma, OTI T cells make antigen-specific and long-lasting contacts with TuDCs. Extensive analysis of TIL infiltration on histologic section revealed that after chemotherapy the majority of OTI T cells interact with TuDCs and that infiltration is restricted to TuDC-rich areas. We propose that the TuDC network exerts antigen-dependent unproductive retention that trap T cells and limit their antitumor effectiveness.

  19. Multiphoton microscopy as a diagnostic imaging modality for pancreatic neoplasms without hematoxylin and eosin stains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Youting; Chen, Jing; Chen, Hong; Hong, Zhipeng; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Yanling; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of tissue samples is the standard approach in histopathology for imaging and diagnosing cancer. Recent reports have shown that multiphoton microscopy (MPM) provides better sample interface with single-cell resolution, which enhances traditional H&E staining and offers a powerful diagnostic tool with potential applications in oncology. The purpose of this study was to further expand the versatility of MPM by establishing the optical parameters required for imaging unstained histological sections of pancreatic neoplasms, thereby providing an efficient and environmentally sustainable alternative to H&E staining while improving the accuracy of pancreatic cancer diagnoses. We found that the high-resolution MPM images clearly distinguish between the structure of normal pancreatic tissues compared with pancreatic neoplasms in unstained histological sections, and discernable differences in tissue architecture and cell morphology between normal versus tumorigenic cells led to enhanced optical diagnosis of cancerous tissue. Moreover, quantitative assessment of the cytomorphological features visualized from MPM images showed significant differences in the nuclear-cytoplasmic ratios of pancreatic neoplasms compared with normal pancreas, as well as further distinguished pancreatic malignant tumors from benign tumors. These results indicate that the MPM could potentially serve as an optical tool for the diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasms in unstained histological sections.

  20. Tumor Cells Express FcγRl Which Contributes to Tumor Cell Growth and a Metastatic Phenotype

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    M. Bud Nelson

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available High levels of circulating immune complexes containing tumor-associated antigens are associated with a poor prognosis for individuals with cancer. The ability of B cells, previously exposed to tumor-associated antigens, to promote both in vitro and in vivo tumor growth formed the rationale to evaluate the mechanism by which immune complexes may promote tumor growth. In elucidating this mechanism, FcγRl expression by tumor cells was characterized by flow cytometry, polymerase chain reaction, and sequence analysis. Immune complexes containing shed tumor antigen and anti-shed tumor antigen Ab cross-linked FcγRl-expressing tumor cells, which resulted in an induction of tumor cell proliferation and of shed tumor antigen production. Use of selective tyrosine kinase inhibitors demonstrated that tumor cell proliferation induced by immune complex cross-linking of FcγRl is dependent on the tyrosine kinase signal transduction pathway. A selective inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase also inhibited this induction of tumor cell proliferation. These findings support a role for immune complexes and FcγRl expression by tumor cells in augmentation of tumor growth and a metastatic phenotype.

  1. Tumor stem cells: A new approach for tumor therapy (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    MENG, MIN; ZHAO, XIN-HAN; NING, QIAN; HOU, LEI; XIN, GUO-HONG; LIU, LI-FENG

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the existence of a minority of tumor cells possessing the stem cell properties of self-renewal and differentiation in leukemia and several solid tumors. However, these cells do not possess the normal regulatory mechanisms of stem cells. Following transplantation, they are capable of initiating tumorigenesis and are therefore known as ‘tumor stem cells’. Cellular origin analysis of tumor stem cells has resulted in three hypotheses: Embryonal rest hypothesis, anaplasia and maturation arrest. Several signaling pathways which are involved in carcinogenesis, including Wnt/β-catenin, Notch and Oct-4 signaling pathways are crucial in normal stem cell self-renewal decisions, suggesting that breakdown in the regulation of self-renewal may be a key event in the development of tumors. Thus, tumors can be regarded as an abnormal organ in which stem cells have escaped from the normal constraints on self-renewal, thus, leading to abnormally differentiated tumor cells that lose the ability to form tumors. This new model for maligancies has significance for clinical research and treatment. PMID:22844351

  2. Hemangiomas versus arterio-venous malformations: Role of elastic stains and mast cell density

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    Pravin Pawane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Vascular anomalies present diagnostic challenges to histopathologists. Mulliken and Glowacki′s classification categorizes vascular lesions into hemangiomas and vascular malformations. Aim: This study explored diagnostic clues in the histomorphology of hemangiomas and vascular malformations. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 cases of benign vascular lesions were retrieved from 12 years period. A total of 94 cases, where complete clinical details and representative paraffin sections were available, were included in this study. Hematoxylin and eosin (H and E stain and Verhoeff′s stain for elastic tissue were done on all cases and lesions were classified into hemangiomas or arterio-venous malformations (AVM. Mast cell density in all lesions was calculated from toluidine blue stained sections. Results: Ten cases of hemangiomas were reclassified as AVM on the basis of presence and absence of arteriovenous structures. Intra-lesional nerves were seen in significantly higher number of AVMs compared to hemangiomas. Medium and thick sized nerve bundles were seen in 56% of AVMs, while they were not seen in any of the hemangiomas. Mean mast cell density was significantly higher in proliferating hemangiomas (53.12 ± 27.83 cells/mm 2 compared to involuting hemangiomas (11.43 ± 7.9 cells/mm 2 . Conclusions: Use of elastic tissue stains are useful ancillary tools to distinguish between AVMs and hemangiomas. The presence of arteries and arterioles are an integral part of AVMs. The presence of the intra-lesional nerves can be useful to distinguish between AVMs and hemangiomas even on H and E stained sections. The significantly higher mast cell density seen in proliferating hemangiomas compared with involuting ones, seem to suggest that mast cells play an important role in the natural history of these lesions.

  3. Whole tumor antigen vaccination using dendritic cells: Comparison of RNA electroporation and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benencia Fabian

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Because of the lack of full characterization of tumor associated antigens for solid tumors, whole antigen use is a convenient approach to tumor vaccination. Tumor RNA and apoptotic tumor cells have been used as a source of whole tumor antigen to prepare dendritic cell (DC based tumor vaccines, but their efficacy has not been directly compared. Here we compare directly RNA electroporation and pulsing of DCs with whole tumor cells killed by ultraviolet (UV B radiation using a convenient tumor model expressing human papilloma virus (HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes. Although both approaches led to DCs presenting tumor antigen, electroporation with tumor cell total RNA induced a significantly higher frequency of tumor-reactive IFN-gamma secreting T cells, and E7-specific CD8+ lymphocytes compared to pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells. DCs electroporated with tumor cell RNA induced a larger tumor infiltration by T cells and produced a significantly stronger delay in tumor growth compared to DCs pulsed with UV-irradiated tumor cells. We conclude that electroporation with whole tumor cell RNA and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells are both effective in eliciting antitumor immune response, but RNA electroporation results in more potent tumor vaccination under the examined experimental conditions.

  4. Sertoli cell tumor arising in a cryptorchid testis presenting as a content of inguinal hernial sac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusuma Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sertoli cell tumors (SCTs are rare tumors accounting for <1% of all testicular tumors. Here, we report a rare case of SCT in a 60-year-old man presenting as a painless swelling in the right groin since childhood. Clinically, he presented with right-sided inguinal hernia with absence of the right testis. He had normal left testis and had no gynecomastia or infertility. The specimen of hernial sac showed testis with a 1.6 cm × 1.5 cm nodular mass having gray tan-cut surface. Histopathologically, the testis showed atrophy and the nodular portion showed tumor cells arranged in tubular and microcystic pattern, with no solid pattern or necrosis. The diagnosis of SCT was confirmed with immunohistochemical staining for inhibin which showed fine granular cytoplasmic positivity. Cryptorchid testis having SCT and presenting as a content of inguinal hernia is a rare occurrence.

  5. Histological staining methods preparatory to laser capture microdissection significantly affect the integrity of the cellular RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ming-Chung

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression profiling by microarray analysis of cells enriched by laser capture microdissection (LCM faces several technical challenges. Frozen sections yield higher quality RNA than paraffin-imbedded sections, but even with frozen sections, the staining methods used for histological identification of cells of interest could still damage the mRNA in the cells. To study the contribution of staining methods to degradation of results from gene expression profiling of LCM samples, we subjected pellets of the mouse plasma cell tumor cell line TEPC 1165 to direct RNA extraction and to parallel frozen sectioning for LCM and subsequent RNA extraction. We used microarray hybridization analysis to compare gene expression profiles of RNA from cell pellets with gene expression profiles of RNA from frozen sections that had been stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E, Nissl Stain (NS, and for immunofluorescence (IF as well as with the plasma cell-revealing methyl green pyronin (MGP stain. All RNAs were amplified with two rounds of T7-based in vitro transcription and analyzed by two-color expression analysis on 10-K cDNA microarrays. Results The MGP-stained samples showed the least introduction of mRNA loss, followed by H&E and immunofluorescence. Nissl staining was significantly more detrimental to gene expression profiles, presumably owing to an aqueous step in which RNA may have been damaged by endogenous or exogenous RNAases. Conclusion RNA damage can occur during the staining steps preparatory to laser capture microdissection, with the consequence of loss of representation of certain genes in microarray hybridization analysis. Inclusion of RNAase inhibitor in aqueous staining solutions appears to be important in protecting RNA from loss of gene transcripts.

  6. Autophagy contributes to resistance of tumor cells to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaachouay, Hassan; Ohneseit, Petra; Toulany, Mahmoud; Kehlbach, Rainer; Multhoff, Gabriele; Rodemann, H Peter

    2011-06-01

    Autophagy signaling is a novel important target to improve anticancer therapy. To study the role of autophagy on resistance of tumor cells to ionizing radiation (IR), breast cancer cell lines differing in their intrinsic radiosensitivity were used. Breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and HBL-100 were examined with respect to clonogenic cell survival and induction of autophagy after radiation exposure and pharmacological interference of the autophagic process. As marker for autophagy the appearance of LC3-I and LC3-II proteins was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. Formation of autophagic vacuoles was monitored by immunofluorescence staining of LC3. LC3-I and LC3-II formation differs markedly in radioresistant MDA-MB-231 versus radiosensitive HBL-100 cells. Western blot analyses of LC3-II/LC3-I ratio indicated marked induction of autophagy by IR in radioresistant MDA-MB-231 cells, but not in radiosensitive HBL-100 cells. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis of LC3-II positive vacuoles confirmed this differential effect. Pre-treatment with 3-methyladenine (3-MA) antagonized IR-induced autophagy. Likewise, pretreatment of radioresistant MDA-231 cells with autophagy inhibitors 3-MA or chloroquine (CQ) significantly reduced clonogenic survival of irradiated cells. Our data clearly indicate that radioresistant breast tumor cells show a strong post-irradiation induction of autophagy, which thus serves as a protective and pro-survival mechanism in radioresistance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. An improved method for staining cell colonies in clonogenic assays

    OpenAIRE

    Guda, Kishore; Natale, Leanna; Markowitz, Sanford D.

    2007-01-01

    Clonogenic assay is a widely used experimental approach to test for the effects of drugs/genes on the growth and proliferative characteristics of cells in vitro. Accurate quantitation of treatment effects in clonogeneic assays depends on the ability to visualize and count cell colonies precisely. We report a novel method (referred as ETeB) for staining cell colonies grown on plastic and specially coated substrates like collagen. Using colon cancer cell lines grown on plastic and collagen, we ...

  8. Dermal Squamomelanocytic Tumor: Neoplasm of Uncertain Biological Potential

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    Mirsad Dorić

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of exceedingly rare cutaneous neoplasm with histological features of malignancy and uncertain biological potential. The nodular, darkly pigmented facial tumor with central exulceration, size 12x10x7 mm, of the skin 61-year-old man preauricular left was completely exised.Histologically tumor consists of atypical squamous cells, which express signs of moderate to significant pleomorphism, mitotically active, with foci forming of parakeratotic horn cysts (“pearls”. Characteristically tumor also consists of large number of atypical melanocytes with multifocal pattern, inserted between atypical squamous cells, and which contain large amount of dark brown pigment melanin. Immunohistochemically, squamous cells stain positively with keratin (CK116, melanocytes were stained with S -100 protein, HMB 45, and vimentin, but failed to stain with CK 116.To our knowledge this is the sixth reported case in world literature. The follow-up time of four years no evidence of recurrence or metastasis, similar all reported cases, but it is too short period in estimation to guarantee a benign course. However, it appears that this group of neoplasm may have different prognosis from pure squamous carcinoma or malignant melanoma.

  9. The human complement inhibitor Sushi Domain-Containing Protein 4 (SUSD4) expression in tumor cells and infiltrating T cells is associated with better prognosis of breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englund, Emelie; Reitsma, Bart; King, Ben C.; Escudero-Esparza, Astrid; Owen, Sioned; Orimo, Akira; Okroj, Marcin; Anagnostaki, Lola; Jiang, Wen G.; Jirström, Karin; Blom, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    The human Sushi Domain-Containing Protein 4 (SUSD4) was recently shown to function as a novel inhibitor of the complement system, but its role in tumor progression is unknown. Using immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR, we investigated SUSD4 expression in breast cancer tissue samples from two cohorts. The effect of SUSD4 expression on cell migration and invasion was studied in vitro using two human breast cancer cell lines overexpressing SUSD4. Tissue stainings revealed that both tumor cells and tumor-infiltrating cells expressed SUSD4. The highest SUSD4 expression was detected in differentiated tumors with decreased rate of metastasis, and SUSD4 expression was associated with improved survival of the patients. Moreover, forced SUSD4 expression in human breast cancer cells attenuated their migratory and invasive traits in culture. SUSD4 expression also inhibited colony formation of human breast cancer cells cultured on carcinoma-associated fibroblasts. Furthermore, large numbers of SUSD4-expressing T cells in the tumor stroma associated with better overall survival of the breast cancer patients. Our findings indicate that SUSD4 expression in both breast cancer cells and T cells infiltrating the tumor-associated stroma is useful to predict better prognosis of breast cancer patients

  10. The human complement inhibitor Sushi Domain-Containing Protein 4 (SUSD4) expression in tumor cells and infiltrating T cells is associated with better prognosis of breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, Emelie; Reitsma, Bart; King, Ben C; Escudero-Esparza, Astrid; Owen, Sioned; Orimo, Akira; Okroj, Marcin; Anagnostaki, Lola; Jiang, Wen G; Jirström, Karin; Blom, Anna M

    2015-10-19

    The human Sushi Domain-Containing Protein 4 (SUSD4) was recently shown to function as a novel inhibitor of the complement system, but its role in tumor progression is unknown. Using immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR, we investigated SUSD4 expression in breast cancer tissue samples from two cohorts. The effect of SUSD4 expression on cell migration and invasion was studied in vitro using two human breast cancer cell lines overexpressing SUSD4. Tissue stainings revealed that both tumor cells and tumor-infiltrating cells expressed SUSD4. The highest SUSD4 expression was detected in differentiated tumors with decreased rate of metastasis, and SUSD4 expression was associated with improved survival of the patients. Moreover, forced SUSD4 expression in human breast cancer cells attenuated their migratory and invasive traits in culture. SUSD4 expression also inhibited colony formation of human breast cancer cells cultured on carcinoma-associated fibroblasts. Furthermore, large numbers of SUSD4-expressing T cells in the tumor stroma associated with better overall survival of the breast cancer patients. Our findings indicate that SUSD4 expression in both breast cancer cells and T cells infiltrating the tumor-associated stroma is useful to predict better prognosis of breast cancer patients.

  11. Proliferation assessment in breast carcinomas using digital image analysis based on virtual Ki67/cytokeratin double staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røge, Rasmus; Riber-Hansen, Rikke; Nielsen, Søren; Vyberg, Mogens

    2016-07-01

    Manual estimation of Ki67 Proliferation Index (PI) in breast carcinoma classification is labor intensive and prone to intra- and interobserver variation. Standard Digital Image Analysis (DIA) has limitations due to issues with tumor cell identification. Recently, a computer algorithm, DIA based on Virtual Double Staining (VDS), segmenting Ki67-positive and -negative tumor cells using digitally fused parallel cytokeratin (CK) and Ki67-stained slides has been introduced. In this study, we compare VDS with manual stereological counting of Ki67-positive and -negative cells and examine the impact of the physical distance of the parallel slides on the alignment of slides. TMAs, containing 140 cores of consecutively obtained breast carcinomas, were stained for CK and Ki67 using optimized staining protocols. By means of stereological principles, Ki67-positive and -negative cell profiles were counted in sampled areas and used for the estimation of PIs of the whole tissue core. The VDS principle was applied to both the same sampled areas and the whole tissue core. Additionally, five neighboring slides were stained for CK in order to examine the alignment algorithm. Correlation between manual counting and VDS in both sampled areas and whole core was almost perfect (correlation coefficients above 0.97). Bland-Altman plots did not reveal any skewness in any data ranges. There was a good agreement in alignment (>85 %) in neighboring slides, whereas agreement decreased in non-neighboring slides. VDS gave similar results compared with manual counting using stereological principles. Introduction of this method in clinical and research practice may improve accuracy and reproducibility of Ki67 PI.

  12. Effect of image compression and scaling on automated scoring of immunohistochemical stainings and segmentation of tumor epithelium

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    Konsti Juho

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Digital whole-slide scanning of tissue specimens produces large images demanding increasing storing capacity. To reduce the need of extensive data storage systems image files can be compressed and scaled down. The aim of this article is to study the effect of different levels of image compression and scaling on automated image analysis of immunohistochemical (IHC stainings and automated tumor segmentation. Methods Two tissue microarray (TMA slides containing 800 samples of breast cancer tissue immunostained against Ki-67 protein and two TMA slides containing 144 samples of colorectal cancer immunostained against EGFR were digitized with a whole-slide scanner. The TMA images were JPEG2000 wavelet compressed with four compression ratios: lossless, and 1:12, 1:25 and 1:50 lossy compression. Each of the compressed breast cancer images was furthermore scaled down either to 1:1, 1:2, 1:4, 1:8, 1:16, 1:32, 1:64 or 1:128. Breast cancer images were analyzed using an algorithm that quantitates the extent of staining in Ki-67 immunostained images, and EGFR immunostained colorectal cancer images were analyzed with an automated tumor segmentation algorithm. The automated tools were validated by comparing the results from losslessly compressed and non-scaled images with results from conventional visual assessments. Percentage agreement and kappa statistics were calculated between results from compressed and scaled images and results from lossless and non-scaled images. Results Both of the studied image analysis methods showed good agreement between visual and automated results. In the automated IHC quantification, an agreement of over 98% and a kappa value of over 0.96 was observed between losslessly compressed and non-scaled images and combined compression ratios up to 1:50 and scaling down to 1:8. In automated tumor segmentation, an agreement of over 97% and a kappa value of over 0.93 was observed between losslessly compressed images and

  13. Androgen receptor expression on circulating tumor cells in metastatic breast cancer.

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    Takeo Fujii

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor (AR is frequently detected in breast cancers, and AR-targeted therapies are showing activity in AR-positive (AR+ breast cancer. However, the role of AR in breast cancers is still not fully elucidated and the biology of AR in breast cancer remains incompletely understood. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs can serve as prognostic and diagnostic tools, prompting us to measure AR protein expression and conduct genomic analyses on CTCs in patients with metastatic breast cancer.Blood samples from patients with metastatic breast cancer were deposited on glass slides, subjected to nuclear staining with DAPI, and reacted with fluorescent-labeled antibodies to detect CD45, cytokeratin (CK, and biomarkers of interest (AR, estrogen receptor [ER], and HER2 on all nucleated cells. The stained slides were scanned and enumerated by non-enrichment-based non-biased approach independent of cell surface epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM using the Epic Sciences CTC platform. Data were analyzed using established digital pathology algorithms.Of 68 patients, 51 (75% had at least 1 CTC, and 49 of these 51 (96% had hormone-receptor-positive (HR+/HER2-negative primary tumors. AR was expressed in CK+ CTCs in 10 patients. Of these 10 patients, 3 also had ER expression in CK+ CTCs. Single cell genomic analysis of 78 CTCs from 1 of these 3 patients identified three distinct copy number patterns. AR+ cells had a lower frequency of chromosomal changes than ER+ and HER2+ cells.CTC enumeration and analysis using no enrichment or selection provides a non-biased approach to detect AR expression and chromosomal aberrations in CTCs in patients with metastatic breast cancer. The heterogeneity of intrapatient AR expression in CTCs leads to the new hypothesis that patients with AR+ CTCs have heterogeneous disease with multiple drivers. Further studies are warranted to investigate the clinical applicability of AR+ CTCs and their heterogeneity.

  14. Up-Regulation of the Lymphatic Marker Podoplanin, a Mucin-Type Transmembrane Glycoprotein, in Human Squamous Cell Carcinomas and Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schacht, Vivien; Dadras, Soheil S.; Johnson, Louise A.; Jackson, David G.; Hong, Young-Kwon; Detmar, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The mucin-type glycoprotein podoplanin is specifically expressed by lymphatic but not blood vascular endothelial cells in culture and in tumor-associated lymphangiogenesis, and podoplanin deficiency results in congenital lymphedema and impaired lymphatic vascular patterning. However, research into the biological importance of podoplanin has been hampered by the lack of a generally available antibody against the human protein, and its expression in normal tissues and in human malignancies has remained unclear. We generated a human podoplanin-Fc fusion protein and found that the commercially available mouse monoclonal antibody D2-40 specifically recognized human podoplanin, as assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot analyses. We found that, in addition to lymphatic endothelium, podoplanin was also expressed by peritoneal mesothelial cells, osteocytes, glandular myoepithelial cells, ependymal cells, and by stromal reticular cells and follicular dendritic cells of lymphoid organs. These findings were confirmed in normal mouse tissues with anti-podoplanin antibody 8.1.1. Podoplanin was also strongly expressed by granulosa cells in normal ovarian follicles, and by ovarian dysgerminomas and granulosa cell tumors. Although podoplanin was primarily absent from normal human epidermis, its expression was strongly induced in 22 of 28 squamous cell carcinomas studied. These findings suggest a potential role of podoplanin in tumor progression, and they also identify the first commercially available antibody for the specific staining of a defined lymphatic marker in archival human tissue sections, thereby enabling more widespread studies of tumor lymphangiogenesis in human cancers. PMID:15743802

  15. A combined Bodian-Nissl stain for improved network analysis in neuronal cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightower, M; Gross, G W

    1985-11-01

    Bodian and Nissl procedures were combined to stain dissociated mouse spinal cord cells cultured on coverslips. The Bodian technique stains fine neuronal processes in great detail as well as an intracellular fibrillar network concentrated around the nucleus and in proximal neurites. The Nissl stain clearly delimits neuronal cytoplasm in somata and in large dendrites. A combination of these techniques allows the simultaneous depiction of neuronal perikarya and all afferent and efferent processes. Costaining with little background staining by either procedure suggests high specificity for neurons. This procedure could be exploited for routine network analysis of cultured neurons.

  16. Establishment of 9L/F344 rat intracerebral glioma model of brain tumor stem cells

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    Zong-yu XIAO

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To establish the 9L/F344 rat intracerebral glioma model of brain tumor stem cells.  Methods Rat 9L gliosarcoma stem-like cells were cultured in serum-free suspension. The expression of CD133 and nestin were tested by immunohistochemistry. A total of 48 inbredline male F344 rats were randomly divided into 2 groups, and 9L tumor sphere cells and 9L monolayer cells were respectively implanted into the right caudate nucleus of F344 rats in 2 groups. Survival time was observed and determined using the method of Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Fourteen days after implantation or when the rats were dying, their brains were perfused and sectioned for HE staining, and CD133 and nestin were detected by immunohistochemistry.  Results Rat 9L tumor spheres were formed with suspension culture in serum-free medium. The gliomas formed in both groups were invasive without obvious capsule. More new vessels, bleeding and necrosis could be detected in 9L tumor spheres group. The tumor cells in both groups were positive for CD133 and nestin. There was no significant difference in the expression of CD133 and nestin between 2 groups (P > 0.05, for all. According to the expression of nestin, the tumors formed by 9L tumor sphere cells were more invasive. The median survival time of the rats bearing 9L tumor sphere cells was 15 d (95%CI: 15.219-15.781, and the median survival time of the rats bearing 9L monolayer cells was 21 d (95%CI: 20.395-21.605. There was significant difference between 2 groups (χ2 = 12.800, P = 0.000.  Conclusions 9L/F344 rat intracerebral glioma model of brain tumor stem cells is successfully established, which provides a glioma model for the future research. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.04.012

  17. Granular cell tumor on perianal region: a case report.

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    Kesici Ugur

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Granular cell tumor (GCT was first described by Abrikossoff in 1926. GCT is a rarely seen soft tissue tumor and is generally benign. While the tumor can be seen in all parts of the body it is generally located on the head and neck region, and especially on the tongue. GCT is rarely seen in the anal-perianal region. In accordance with literature this case was reported because it was thought to be the 27th anal-perianal located GCT case. In this case report, approximately 0,5-1 cm pedunculated polypoid lesion was determined in the perianal region during the physical examination of a 23 year old female patient who applied with palpable mass complaint in the perianal region. Lesion in the patient was totally excited with healthy skin-subcutaneous tissue under local anesthesia. A benign granular cell tumor was detected in the histopathological examination. Positive staining was monitored immunohistochemically with S-100 and neuron specific enolase (NSE. GCT is a rarely seen tumor in the anal-perianal region and its malign transformation rate is very low. Even lesions seen in the perianal region have clinically a benign appearance, a histopathological examination should be conducted and also GCT should be kept in mind during diagnosis. Malign-benign separation of these lesions is difficult so histopathological examination should be conducted with great care. Large local excision in the treatment provides curative treatment. But for those presenting malign transformation further examination must be performed for metastasis. After the treatment local recurrence and metastasis should be considered carefully. Prognosis of metastatic disease is very bad.

  18. Tumor-altered dendritic cell function: implications for anti-tumor immunity

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    Kristian Michael Hargadon

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are key regulators of both innate and adaptive immunity, and the array of immunoregulatory functions exhibited by these cells is dictated by their differentiation, maturation, and activation status. Although a major role for these cells in the induction of immunity to pathogens has long been appreciated, data accumulated over the last several years has demonstrated that DC are also critical regulators of anti-tumor immune responses. However, despite the potential for stimulation of robust anti-tumor immunity by DC, tumor-altered DC function has been observed in many cancer patients and tumor-bearing animals and is often associated with tumor immune escape. Such dysfunction has significant implications for both the induction of natural anti-tumor immune responses as well as the efficacy of immunotherapeutic strategies that target endogenous DC in situ or that employ exogenous DC as part of anti-cancer immunization maneuvers. In this review, the major types of tumor-altered DC function will be described, with emphasis on recent insights into the mechanistic bases for the inhibition of DC differentiation from hematopoietic precursors, the altered programming of DC precursors to differentiate into myeloid-derived suppressor cells or tumor-associated macrophages, the suppression of DC maturation and activation, and the induction of immunoregulatory DC by tumors, tumor-derived factors, and tumor-associated cells within the milieu of the tumor microenvironment. The impact of these tumor-altered cells on the quality of the overall anti-tumor immune response will also be discussed. Finally, this review will also highlight questions concerning tumor-altered DC function that remain unanswered, and it will address factors that have limited advances in the study of this phenomenon in order to focus future research efforts in the field on identifying strategies for interfering with tumor-associated DC dysfunction and improving DC-mediated anti-tumor

  19. Canine transmissible venereal tumor and seminoma: a cytohistopathology and chemotherapy study of tumors in the growth phase and during regression after chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanbakht, J; Pedram, B; Taheriyan, M R; Khadivar, F; Hosseini, S H; Abdi, F S; Hosseini, E; Moloudizargari, M; Aghajanshakeri, S H; Javaherypour, S; Shafiee, R; Emrani Bidi, R

    2014-06-01

    In this study, 12 dogs affected by canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) and testicular seminoma tumor were studied retrospectively. The cytological sample was smeared onto a glass slide and either air-dried for May-Grünwald-stain, and masses were surgically removed. The tumors were grossly examined, and sections of 4-μm thick were obtained from each sample and stained with H&E. For chemotherapy, vincristine sulfate was administered weekly as an infusion over 3 min via the cephalic vein at a dose of 0.025 mg/kg after diluting with physiological saline to a total amount of 10 ml. If no remission was observed after 8 weeks, chemotherapy was continued with weekly doxorubicin infusion at a dose of 1 mg/kg. All the tumor samples were divided into four cytohistopathologic groups, namely: multilobular (six cases), papillary (two cases), pedunculated (two cases), and tubular (two cases of seminoma). The most frequently represented tumor type was multilobular (6/10, 60 %) followed by pedunculated (2/10, 20 %), papillary (2/10, 20 %), and tubular (two cases of seminoma, 100 %). Cytological smears from eight tumors in regression after chemotherapy were poorly cellular, and many cells were fragmented. In two progressive tumors, there was an average of 1,406 ± 972 CTVT 200 cells/μl or 96.71 % of total cells counted. Thus, tumor cells represented 96.71 % of total cells within the biopsy specimens and the leukocytes 4.29 % (leukocyte, tumor cell ratio=0.062 ± 0.031). In eight regressive tumors, there was an average of 1,245 ± 1,032 CTVT 200 cells/μl or 97.31 % of total cells counted. Thus, tumor cells represented 97.31 % of total cells and leukocytes 2.69 % (leukocyte, tumor cell ratio=0.071 ± 0.174). Our data suggested that combination treatment with vincristine and doxorubicin in the future could be an excellent therapeutic alternative for the treatment of TVT for probably reducing the resistance to vincristine, and also, treatment success could easily be followed

  20. Dynamics of tumor oxygenation, CD31 staining and transforming growth factor-β levels after treatment with radiation or cyclophosphamide in the rat 13762 mammary carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Ikebe, Masahiko; Teicher, Beverly A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Tumors are dynamic tissues that undergo marked molecular, biochemical, and physiologic changes in response to cytotoxic anticancer therapies. Understanding the changes in tumor oxygenation and transforming growth factor-β expression may allow improved treatment regimens to be developed. Methods and Materials: The effects of a single dose of radiation therapy (20 Gy) or a single dose of chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, 250 mg/kg) on several molecular and physiologic parameters of the rat 13762 mammary carcinoma growing subcutaneously in female Fischer 344 rats were explored. Results: Treatment of the tumor-bearing animals with 20 Gy of radiation killed about two logs (99%) of the 13762 tumor cells, and treatment with cyclophosphamide (250 mg/kg) killed about 1.5 logs (95%) of the 13762 tumor cells. Hypoxia, as determined by a pO 2 electrode, initially decreased in the tumors of treated animals until 6 h. posttreatment and then increased, so that 24 h. after administration of the radiation therapy or the chemotherapy the number of intratumoral vessels as determined by CD31 staining increased until about 24 h after cytotoxic therapy. Transforming growth factor-β1, measured by radioimmunoassay, peaked in the serum between 6 h and 18 h and again between 72 h and 96 h after radiation therapy and peaked in the tumor at 24 h and again at 72 h after radiation therapy. The first serum peak after cyclophosphamide was 3 h after drug injection, with second peaks at 36 h and 48 h after drug administration. In the tumor, transforming growth factor-β1 peaked between 6 h and 8 h after drug administration and again 36 h and 72 h after drug. Apoptosis was maximal 6 h after 20 Gy and 24 h after cyclophosphamide. Vascular endothelial growth factor was also increased in tumors after cytotoxic therapy. Conclusions: These changes in the tumor physiologic status are sufficient to protect the tumor from a second cytotoxic insult administered days afterwards and to result in a

  1. Metastatic Granulosa Cell Tumor of the Testis: Clinical Presentation and Management

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    Anand Mohapatra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Granulosa cell tumors (GCTs of the testis are rare sex cord-stromal tumors that are present in both juvenile and adult subtypes. While most adult GCTs are benign, those that present with distant metastases manifest a grave prognosis. Treatments for aggressive GCTs are not well established. Options that have been employed in previous cases include retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND, radiation, chemotherapy, or a combination thereof. We describe the case of a 57-year-old man who presented with a painless left testicular mass and painful gynecomastia. Serum tumor markers (alpha fetoprotein, human chorionic gonadotropin, and lactate dehydrogenase and computed tomography of the chest and abdomen were negative. The patient underwent left radical orchiectomy. Immunohistochemical staining was consistent with a testicular GCT. He underwent a left-template laparoscopic RPLND which revealed 2/19 positive lymph nodes. Final pathological stage was IIA. He remains free of disease 32 months after surgery.

  2. Cell fusion in tumor progression: the isolation of cell fusion products by physical methods

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    Vincitorio Massimo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell fusion induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG is an efficient but poorly controlled procedure for obtaining somatic cell hybrids used in gene mapping, monoclonal antibody production, and tumour immunotherapy. Genetic selection techniques and fluorescent cell sorting are usually employed to isolate cell fusion products, but both procedures have several drawbacks. Results Here we describe a simple improvement in PEG-mediated cell fusion that was obtained by modifying the standard single-step procedure. We found that the use of two PEG undertreatments obtains a better yield of cell fusion products than the standard method, and most of these products are bi- or trinucleated polykaryocytes. Fusion rate was quantified using fluorescent cell staining microscopy. We used this improved cell fusion and cell isolation method to compare giant cells obtained in vitro and giant cells obtained in vivo from patients with Hodgkin's disease and erythroleukemia. Conclusions In the present study we show how to improve PEG-mediated cell fusion and that cell separation by velocity sedimentation offers a simple alternative for the efficient purification of cell fusion products and to investigate giant cell formation in tumor development.

  3. Emergent Stratification in Solid Tumors Selects for Reduced Cohesion of Tumor Cells: A Multi-Cell, Virtual-Tissue Model of Tumor Evolution Using CompuCell3D.

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    Maciej H Swat

    Full Text Available Tumor cells and structure both evolve due to heritable variation of cell behaviors and selection over periods of weeks to years (somatic evolution. Micro-environmental factors exert selection pressures on tumor-cell behaviors, which influence both the rate and direction of evolution of specific behaviors, especially the development of tumor-cell aggression and resistance to chemotherapies. In this paper, we present, step-by-step, the development of a multi-cell, virtual-tissue model of tumor somatic evolution, simulated using the open-source CompuCell3D modeling environment. Our model includes essential cell behaviors, microenvironmental components and their interactions. Our model provides a platform for exploring selection pressures leading to the evolution of tumor-cell aggression, showing that emergent stratification into regions with different cell survival rates drives the evolution of less cohesive cells with lower levels of cadherins and higher levels of integrins. Such reduced cohesivity is a key hallmark in the progression of many types of solid tumors.

  4. Localization of thymosin beta-4 in tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, L. -I.; Holck, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    in colorectal carcinomas. The degree of staining of breast cancer cells for thymosin beta-4 correlated neither to histological grade nor to endothelial cell staining. However, there was a tendency toward correlation (P = 0.07) between staining of endothelial cells and histological grade. Treatment of cultured......Overexpression of thymosin beta-4 has been linked to malignant progression but the localization of this polypeptide within tumors is incompletely known. We therefore examined breast cancers for thymosin beta-4 using immunofluorescence. Reactive cells were identified with monoclonal cell marker...... breast cancer cells (SK-BR-3) with 1-4 microg thymosin beta-4/mL significantly increased cell numbers, as determined by MTT-assays. These data reveal an unexpected cellular heterogeneity of thymosin beta-4 expression in breast and colonic carcinomas and suggest that local release of this polypeptide...

  5. Filter-Adapted Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FA-FISH) for Filtration-Enriched Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulhen, Marianne; Pailler, Emma; Faugeroux, Vincent; Farace, Françoise

    2017-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) may represent an easily accessible source of tumor material to assess genetic aberrations such as gene-rearrangements or gene-amplifications and screen cancer patients eligible for targeted therapies. As the number of CTCs is a critical parameter to identify such biomarkers, we developed fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for CTCs enriched on filters (filter-adapted-FISH, FA-FISH). Here, we describe the FA-FISH protocol, the combination of immunofluorescent staining (DAPI/CD45) and FA-FISH techniques, as well as the semi-automated microscopy method that we developed to improve the feasibility and reliability of FISH analyses in filtration-enriched CTC.

  6. Trefoil factor 3 is required for differentiation of thyroid follicular cells and acts as a context-dependent tumor suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abols, A; Ducena, K; Andrejeva, D; Sadovska, L; Zandberga, E; Vilmanis, J; Narbuts, Z; Tars, J; Eglitis, J; Pirags, V; Line, A

    2015-01-01

    Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) is overexpressed in a variety of solid epithelial cancers, where it has been shown to promote migration, invasion, proliferation, survival and angiogenesis. On the contrary, in the majority of thyroid tumors, it is downregulated, yet its role in the development of thyroid cancer remains unknown. Here we show that TFF3 exhibits strong cytoplasmic staining of normal thyroid follicular cells and colloid and the staining is increased in hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules, while it is decreased in all thyroid cancers of follicular cell origin. By meta-analysis of gene expression datasets, we found that in the thyroid cancer, conversely to the breast cancer, the expression of TFF3 mRNA was downregulated by estrogen signaling and confirmed this by treating thyroid cancer cells with estradiol. Forced expression of TFF3 in anaplastic thyroid cancer cells resulted in decreased cell proliferation, clonal spheroid formation and entry into the S phase. Furthermore, it induced acquisition of epithelial-like cell morphology and expression of the differentiation markers of thyroid follicular cells and transcription factors implicated in the thyroid morphogenesis and function. Taken together, this study provides the first evidence that TFF3 may act as a tumor suppressor or an oncogene depending on the cellular context.

  7. Evaluation of apoptosis and micronucleation induced by reactor neutron beams with two different cadmium ratios in total and quiescent cell populations within solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Ono, Koji; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Takagaki, Masao; Kobayashi, Tooru; Kinashi, Yuko; Suzuki, Minoru

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Response of quiescent (Q) and total tumor cells in solid tumors to reactor neutron beam irradiation with two different cadmium (Cd) ratios was examined in terms of micronucleus (MN) frequency and apoptosis frequency, using four different tumor cell lines. Methods and Materials: C57BL mice bearing EL4 tumors, C3H/He mice bearing SCC VII or FM3A tumors, and Balb/c mice bearing EMT6/KU tumors received 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) continuously for 5 days via implanted mini-osmotic pumps to label all proliferating (P) cells. Thirty min after i.p. injection of sodium borocaptate- 10 B (BSH), or 3 h after oral administration of p-boronophenylalanine- 10 B (BPA), the tumors were irradiated with neutron beams. The tumors without 10 B-compound administration were irradiated with neutron beams or γ-rays. This neutron beam irradiation was performed using neutrons with two different Cd ratios. The tumors were then excised, minced, and trypsinized. The tumor cell suspensions thus obtained were incubated with cytochalasin-B (a cytokinesis blocker), and the MN frequency in cells without BrdU labeling (=Q cells) was determined using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. Meanwhile, for apoptosis assay, 6 h after irradiation, tumor cell suspensions obtained in the same manner were fixed, and the apoptosis frequency in Q cells was also determined with immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The MN and apoptosis frequencies in total (P+Q) tumor cells were determined from the tumors that were not pretreated with BrdU. Results: Without 10 B-compounds, the sensitivity difference between total and Q cells was reduced by neutron beam irradiation. Under our particular neutron beam irradiation condition, relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons was larger in Q cells than in total cells, and the RBE values were larger for low Cd-ratio than high Cd-ratio neutrons. With 10 B-compounds, both frequencies were increased for each cell population, especially for total cells. BPA

  8. Prognostic significance of tumor budding and single cell invasion in gastric adenocarcinoma

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    Che K

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Keying Che,1,* Yang Zhao,2,3,* Xiao Qu,1 Zhaofei Pang,1 Yang Ni,4 Tiehong Zhang,4 Jiajun Du,1,5 Hongchang Shen4 1Institute of Oncology, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, 2Department of Breast Surgery, Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer in Shanghai, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, 3Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, 4Department of Oncology, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, 5Department of Thoracic Surgery, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Gastric carcinoma (GC is a highly aggressive cancer and one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Histopathological evaluation pertaining to invasiveness is likely to provide additional information in relation to patient outcome. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of tumor budding and single cell invasion in gastric adenocarcinoma.Materials and methods: Hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides generated from 296 gastric adenocarcinoma patients with full clinical and pathological and follow-up information were systematically reviewed. The patients were grouped on the basis of tumor budding, single cell invasion, large cell invasion, mitotic count, and fibrosis. The association between histopathological parameters, different classification systems, and overall survival (OS was statistically analyzed.Results: Among the 296 cases that were analyzed, high-grade tumor budding was observed in 49.0% (145 of them. Single cell invasion and large cell invasion were observed in 62.8% (186 and 16.9% (50 of the cases, respectively. Following univariate analysis, patients with high-grade tumor budding had shorter OS than those with low-grade tumor budding (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.260, P<0

  9. Gram staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coico, Richard

    2005-10-01

    Named after Hans Christian Gram who developed the method in 1884, the Gram stain allows one to distinguish between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria on the basis of differential staining with a crystal violet-iodine complex and a safranin counterstain. The cell walls of Gram-positive organisms retain this complex after treatment with alcohol and appear purple, whereas gram-negative organisms decolorize following such treatment and appear pink. The method described here is useful for assessing bacterial contamination of tissue culture samples or for examining the Gram stain status and morphological features of bacteria isolated from mixed or isolated bacterial cultures.

  10. Tumor-specific CD4+ T cells develop cytotoxic activity and eliminate virus-induced tumor cells in the absence of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmetzyanova, Ilseyar; Zelinskyy, Gennadiy; Schimmer, Simone; Brandau, Sven; Altenhoff, Petra; Sparwasser, Tim; Dittmer, Ulf

    2013-02-01

    The important role of tumor-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells is well defined in the immune control of the tumors, but the role of effector CD4(+) T cells is poorly understood. In the current research, we have used a murine retrovirus-induced tumor cell line of C57BL/6 mouse origin, namely FBL-3 cells, as a model to study basic mechanisms of immunological control and escape during tumor formation. This study shows that tumor-specific CD4(+) T cells are able to protect against virus-induced tumor cells. We show here that there is an expansion of tumor-specific CD4(+) T cells producing cytokines and cytotoxic molecule granzyme B (GzmB) in the early phase of tumor growth. Importantly, we demonstrate that in vivo depletion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and CD8(+) T cells in FBL-3-bearing DEREG transgenic mice augments IL-2 and GzmB production by CD4(+) T cells and increases FV-specific CD4(+) T-cell effector and cytotoxic responses leading to the complete tumor regression. Therefore, the capacity to reject tumor acquired by tumor-reactive CD4(+) T cells largely depends on the direct suppressive activity of Tregs. We suggest that a cytotoxic CD4(+) T-cell immune response may be induced to enhance resistance against oncovirus-associated tumors.

  11. Alpinia pricei Rhizome Extracts Induce Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Squamous Carcinoma KB Cells and Suppress Tumor Growth in Nude Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Cheng Hseu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpinia pricei has been shown to induce apoptosis in human squamous carcinoma (KB cells. In this study, we report the effectiveness of the ethanol (70% extracts of A. pricei rhizome (AP extracts in terms of tumor regression as determined using both in vitro cell culture and in vivo athymic nude mice models of KB cells. We found that the AP extract (25–200 μg/mL treatment decreased the proliferation of KB cells by arresting progression through the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. This cell cycle blockade was associated with reductions in cyclin A and B1, Cdc2, and Cdc25C, and increased p21/WAF1, Wee1, p53 and phospho-p53 (p-p53 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, we found that AP extract treatment decreased metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 and urokinase plasminogen activator (u-PA expression, while expression of their endogenous inhibitors, tissue inhibitor of MMP-1 (TIMP-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, were increased in KB cells. Furthermore, AP extract treatment effectively delayed tumor incidence in nude mice inoculated with KB cells and reduced the tumor burden. AP extract treatment also induced apoptotic DNA fragmentation, as detected by in situ TUNEL staining. Thus, A. pricei may possess antitumor activity in human squamous carcinoma (KB cells.

  12. Nonviral gene therapy in vivo with PAM-RG4/apoptin as a potential brain tumor therapeutic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Songhie; Nam, Kihoon; Choi, Sunghyun; Bai, Cheng Z; Lee, Yan; Park, Jong-Sang

    2013-01-01

    Glioma is still one of the most complicated forms of brain tumor to remove completely due to its location and the lack of an efficient means to specifically eliminate tumor cells. For these reasons, this study has examined the effectiveness of a nonviral gene therapy approach utilizing a tumor-selective killer gene on a brain tumor xenograft model. The therapeutic apoptin gene was recombined into the JDK plasmid and delivered into human brain tumor cells (U87MG) by using a polyamidoamine dendrimer with an arginine surface (PAM-RG4). Studies in vitro showed that the PAM-RG4/apoptin plasmid polyplex exhibited a particularly high transfection activity of .40%. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, 4',6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) TUNEL assay, DAPI staining, and caspase-3 activity assay verified that the tumor cells had undergone apoptosis induced by apoptin. For in vivo studies, the polyplex was injected into tumors, which were induced by injecting U87MG cells intradermally into nude mice. Based on hematoxylin and eosin staining, epidermal growth factor receptor immunohistochemistry results and tumor volume measurement results, tumor growth was effectively inhibited and no specific edema, irritation, or other harm to the skin was observed after polyplex injection. The in vivo expression of apoptin and the induction of apoptosis were verified by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis, TUNEL assay, and DAPI staining. The PAM-RG4/apoptin gene polyplex is a strong candidate for brain tumor therapeutics because of the synergistic effect of the carrier's high transfection efficiency (35%-40%) in glioma cells and the selective apoptosis-inducing activity of apoptin in tumor cells.

  13. Drug and radiation sensitivity measurements of successful primary monolayer culturing of human tumor cells using cell-adhesive matrix and supplemented medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, F.L.; Spitzer, G.; Ajani, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The limitations of the agar suspension culture method for primary culturing of human tumor cells prompted development of a monolayer system optimized for cell adhesion and growth. This method grew 83% of fresh human tumor cell biopsy specimens, cultured and not contaminated, from a heterogeneous group of 396 tumors including lung cancer (93 of 114, 82%); melanoma (54 of 72, 75%); sarcoma (46 of 59, 78%); breast cancer (35 of 39, 90%); ovarian cancer (16 of 21, 76%); and a miscellaneous group consisting of gastrointestinal, genitourinary, mesothelioma, and unknown primaries (78 of 91, 86%). Cell growth was characterized morphologically with Papanicolaoustained coverslip cultures and cytogenetically with Giemsastained metaphase spreads. Morphological features such as nuclear pleomorphism, chromatin condensation, basophilic cytoplasm, and melanin pigmentation were routinely seen. Aneuploid metaphases were seen in 90% of evaluable cultures, with 15 of 28 showing 70% or more aneuploid metaphases. Colony-forming efficiency ranged between 0.01 and 1% of viable tumor cells, with a median efficiency of 0.2%. This culture system uses a low inoculum of 25,000 viable cells per well which permitted chemosensitivity testing of nine drugs at four doses in duplicate from 2.2 X 10(6) viable tumor cells and radiation sensitivity testing at five doses in quadruplicate from 0.6 X 10(6) cells. Cultures were analyzed for survival by computerized image analysis of crystal violet-stained cells. Drug sensitivity studies showed variability in sensitivity and in survival curve shape with exponential cell killing for cisplatin, Adriamycin, and etoposide, and shouldered survival curves for 5-fluorouracil frequently seen. Radiation sensitivity studies also showed variability in both sensitivity and survival curve shape. Many cultures showed exponential cell killing, although others had shouldered survival curves

  14. Flow Cytometric DNA Analysis Using Cytokeratin Labeling for Identification of Tumor Cells in Carcinomas of the Breast and the Female Genital Tract

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    Rainer Kimmig

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometric assessment of DNA‐ploidy and S‐phase fraction in malignant tumors is compromised by the heterogeneity of cell subpopulations derived from the malignant and surrounding connective tissue, e.g., tumor, stromal and inflammatory cells. To evaluate the effect on quality of DNA cell cycle analysis and determination of DNA ploidy, cytokeratin labeling of epithelial cells was used for tumor cell enrichment in breast, ovarian, cervical and endometrial cancer prior to DNA analysis. In a prospective study, tumor cell subpopulations of 620 malignant tumors were labeled by a FITC‐conjugated cytokeratin antibody (CK 5, 6, CK18 and CK 5, 6, 8 and CK 17, respectively prior to flow cytometric cell cycle analysis. Compared to total cell analysis, detection rate of DNA‐aneuploid tumors following cytokeratin labeling was increased from 62% to 76.5% in breast cancer, from 68% to 77% in ovarian cancer, from 60% to 80% in cervical cancer and from 30% to 53% in endometrial cancer. Predominantly in DNA‐diploid tumors, a significantly improved detection of S‐phase fraction of the tumor cells was shown due to the elimination of contaminating nonproliferating “normal cells”. S‐phase fraction following tumor cell enrichment was increased by 10% (mean following cytokeratin staining in ovarian and endometrial cancer, by 30% in breast cancer and even by 70% in cervical cancer compared to total cell analysis. Thus, diagnostic accuracy of DNA‐analysis was enhanced by cytokeratin labeling of tumor cells for all tumor entities investigated.

  15. Propidium iodide (PI) stains Nissl bodies and may serve as a quick marker for total neuronal cell count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Junfei; Li, Chunman; Wu, Haihui; Feng, Xianling; Su, Qingning; Li, Shihe; Zhang, Lihong; Yew, David Tai Wai; Cho, Eric Yu Pang; Sha, Ou

    2015-03-01

    Propidium iodide (PI) reacts with both DNA and RNA and is a commonly used fluorescent reagent for nucleic acid staining. The aim of the study was to compare the cellular staining patterns of PI with that of Nissl staining in rat nervous tissues and to report a modified staining method that selectively labels Nissl bodies in neurons. Cryosections and paraffin sections of different tissues of normal Sprague-Dawley rats, including trigeminal ganglia, dorsal root ganglia, spinal cord, liver, and small intestine, were stained by either PI or the hematoxylin and eosin method. Some sections were treated with RNase or DNase before the above staining, and some were double stained with PI and a Nissl stain. The sections were observed by light, fluorescence or confocal microscopy. Results showed strong PI signals detected as patterns of granules in the neuronal cytoplasm of all nervous tissues, whereas the staining of neuronal nuclei was weaker. In contrast, nuclei of neuroglial cells were strongly stained by PI, while the cytoplasm was not obviously stained. Pretreatment of the neural tissue with RNase abolished the PI signals. Furthermore, the PI positive granules in neuronal cytoplasm co-localized with Nissl bodies stained by the fluorescent Nissl stain. When the tissue was pretreated with DNase, PI only stained the cytoplasmic granules of neurons, but not that of glial cells. Our results show that PI stains Nissl bodies and may serve as an economical and convenient neuron marker for neuronal cell counting when specific neural markers such as antibodies are not readily available. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  16. Human neutrophils facilitate tumor cell transendothelial migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    Tumor cell extravasation plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms by which tumor cells migrate through normal vascular endothelium remain unclear. In this study, using an in vitro transendothelial migration model, we show that human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) assist the human breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 to cross the endothelial barrier. We found that tumor-conditioned medium (TCM) downregulated PMN cytocidal function, delayed PMN apoptosis, and concomitantly upregulated PMN adhesion molecule expression. These PMN treated with TCM attached to tumor cells and facilitated tumor cell migration through different endothelial monolayers. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 cells alone did not transmigrate. FACScan analysis revealed that these tumor cells expressed high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) but did not express CD11a, CD11b, or CD18. Blockage of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and of ICAM-1 on MDA-MB-231 cells significantly attenuated TCM-treated, PMN-mediated tumor cell migration. These tumor cells still possessed the ability to proliferate after PMN-assisted transmigration. These results indicate that TCM-treated PMN may serve as a carrier to assist tumor cell transendothelial migration and suggest that tumor cells can exploit PMN and alter their function to facilitate their extravasation.

  17. Peculiarities in the CT findings of germ cell tumors in various tumor localizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazoe, Makoto; Miyagami, Mitsusuke; Tsubokawa, Takashi

    1991-01-01

    The CT findings of 17 germ cell tumors were studied in relation to the locations of the tumor, the pathological diagnoses, and the tumor markers (AFP and HCG). Generally, the CT findings of germ cell tumors depended on the pathological diagnoses more strongly than on the location of the tumors. On plain CT of 7 germ cell tumors in the pineal region, all of them demonstrated heterogeneous findings. Hydrocephalus was seen in 6 cases (86%) and calcification in 6 cases (86%) of the germ cell tumors in the pineal region. Calcification and hydrocephalus that appeared more often than in other regions were characteristic of germ cell tumors of the pineal region. The germ cell tumors in the basal ganglia had a slightly homogenous high density, with small cysts and calcification in most of them on plain CT. On enhanced CT, the tumors were moderately enhanced in all cases located in the basal ganglia. Four cases of germ cell tumors located in the basal ganglia revealed the dilatation of lateral ventricle due to hemispheric atrophy in the tumor side. The germ cell tumors showing an increase in the tumor markers such as AFP and HCG, which were usually malignant germ cell tumors, were strongly enhanced on enhanced CT. (author)

  18. Targeting Mitochondrial Function to Treat Quiescent Tumor Cells in Solid Tumors

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    Xiaonan Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The disorganized nature of tumor vasculature results in the generation of microenvironments characterized by nutrient starvation, hypoxia and accumulation of acidic metabolites. Tumor cell populations in such areas are often slowly proliferating and thus refractory to chemotherapeutical drugs that are dependent on an active cell cycle. There is an urgent need for alternative therapeutic interventions that circumvent growth dependency. The screening of drug libraries using multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS or glucose-starved tumor cells has led to the identification of several compounds with promising therapeutic potential and that display activity on quiescent tumor cells. Interestingly, a common theme of these drug screens is the recurrent identification of agents that affect mitochondrial function. Such data suggest that, contrary to the classical Warburg view, tumor cells in nutritionally-compromised microenvironments are dependent on mitochondrial function for energy metabolism and survival. These findings suggest that mitochondria may represent an “Achilles heel” for the survival of slowly-proliferating tumor cells and suggest strategies for the development of therapy to target these cell populations.

  19. Suprasellar germ cell tumor in a dog Tumor supra-selar de células germinativas em um cão

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    Raquel Rubia Rech

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A case of suprasellar germ cell tumor is described in a 6-year -old Airedale Terrier bitch that presented behavioral changes and abrupt onset of blindness. The neoplasm compressed the ventral surface of the cerebrum from the level of basal ganglia to the mesencephalon. Histologically the neoplasm consisted of nests and trabeculae of round to polygonal cells that occasionally surround tubules and cysts formed by columnar cells. Neoplastic cells are immunopositive for cytokeratin and alpha-fetoprotein. The diagnosis was based on location, histological appearance and on the immunohistochemical staining.É descrito um caso de tumor de células germinativas supra-selar em numa cadela Airedale Terrier de seis anos de idade, que apresentou transtornos do comportamento e aparecimento abrupto de cegueira. O neoplasma comprimia a superfície ventral do cérebro desde a altura dos núcleos basais até o mesencéfalo. Histologicamente, o neoplasma consistia de ninhos e trabéculas de células redondas ou poligonais que ocasionalmente arranjavam-se ao redor de túbulos e cistos formados por células colunares. As células neoplásicas foram positivas na imunoistoquímica para citoqueratina e a-fetoproteína. O diagnóstico foi feito com base na localização do tumor, no seu aspecto histológico e nos resultados da marcação imunoistoquímica.

  20. Cooperation of Indian Hedgehog and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Tumor Angiogenesis and Growth in Human Hepatocellular Carcinomas, an Immunohistochemical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Liu, Yang; Wang, Guangxi; Wang, Yuxiang; Guo, Limei

    2018-04-07

    The Hedgehog pathway was recently shown to be involved in vascular development and neovascularization in human embryogenesis and disease. However, the role of Hedgehog pathway in modulating tumor angiogenesis is still unexplored. In the current study, we investigated the expression of Indian Hedgehog (Ihh) and vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) in human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) with immunohistochemical staining and compared the immunoreaction data with various clinicopathologic characteristics. Immunoreactivity of Ihh and VEGF proteins was observed in 61.5% (56/91) and 64.5% (59/91) cases of HCC tumor tissues, respectively, which was considerably higher than the adjacent nonmalignant tissues. Ihh protein was observed predominantly in the cytoplasm of the tumor cells with a staining pattern of which was sparse and dot-like, or circular around the cell membrane. VEGF protein was expressed heterogenously in the cytoplasm in tumor cells and was negative in peritumoral areas in all cases. CD34 showed diffuse staining in the tumor parenchyma in most HCC specimens. The association of expression of Ihh and VEGF with tumor size was statistically significant (PIhh and VEGF proteins in HCC (r=0.6, PIhh and CD34 staining (r=0.261, P=0.012). Our findings suggest that Ihh is involved in the development of HCC. These findings are also consistent with the concept that cooperation of Ihh and VEGF modulate HCC tumor angiogenesis and growth.

  1. Matched rabbit monoclonal antibodies against αv-series integrins reveal a novel αvβ3-LIBS epitope, and permit routine staining of archival paraffin samples of human tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Simon L.; Grote, Hans Juergen; Wilm, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Summary The relationship between integrin expression and function in pathologies is often contentious as comparisons between human pathological expression and expression in cell lines is difficult. In addition, the expression of even integrins αvβ6 and αvβ8 in tumor cell lines is not comprehensively documented. Here, we describe rabbit monoclonal antibodies (RabMabs) against the extracellular domains of αv integrins that react with both native integrins and formalin fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) human tissues. These RabMabs, against αvβ3 (EM22703), αvβ5 (EM09902), αvβ6 (EM05201), αvβ8 (EM13309), and pan-αv (EM01309), recognize individual integrin chains in Western blots and in flow cytometry. EM22703 detected a ligand-induced binding site (LIBS), reporting an epitope enhanced by the binding of an RGD-peptide to αvβ3. αvβ8 was rarely expressed in human tumor specimens, and weakly expressed in non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). However, ovarian carcinoma cell lines expressed αvβ8, as did some melanoma cells, whereas U87MG glioma lacked αvβ8 expression. We observed an unexpected strong expression of αvβ6 in tumor samples of invasive ductal breast adenoma, colorectal carcinoma (CRC), and NSCLC. αvβ3 was strongly expressed in some invasive NSCLC cohorts. Interestingly, PC3 prostate cell and human prostate tumors did not express αvβ3. The RabMabs stained plasma membranes in FFPE-immunohistochemistry (IHC) samples of tumor cell lines from lung, ovary, colon, prostate, squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN), breast, and pancreas carcinomas. The RabMabs are unique tools for probing αv integrin biology, and suggest that especially αvβ6 and αvβ8 biologies still have much to reveal. PMID:23213423

  2. TIP-1 translocation onto the cell plasma membrane is a molecular biomarker of tumor response to ionizing radiation.

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    Hailun Wang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor response to treatment has been generally assessed with anatomic and functional imaging. Recent development of in vivo molecular and cellular imaging showed promise in time-efficient assessment of the therapeutic efficacy of a prescribed regimen. Currently, the in vivo molecular imaging is limited with shortage of biomarkers and probes with sound biological relevance. We have previously shown in tumor-bearing mice that a hexapeptide (HVGGSSV demonstrated potentials as a molecular imaging probe to distinguish the tumors responding to ionizing radiation (IR and/or tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment from those of non-responding tumors.In this study we have studied biological basis of the HVGGSSV peptide binding within the irradiated tumors by use of tumor-bearing mice and cultured cancer cells. The results indicated that Tax interacting protein 1 (TIP-1, also known as Tax1BP3 is a molecular target that enables the selective binding of the HVGGSSV peptide within irradiated xenograft tumors. Optical imaging and immunohistochemical staining indicated that a TIP-1 specific antibody demonstrated similar biodistribution as the peptide in tumor-bearing mice. The TIP-1 antibody blocked the peptide from binding within irradiated tumors. Studies on both of human and mouse lung cancer cells showed that the intracellular TIP-1 relocated to the plasma membrane surface within the first few hours after exposure to IR and before the onset of treatment associated apoptosis and cell death. TIP-1 relocation onto the cell surface is associated with the reduced proliferation and the enhanced susceptibility to the subsequent IR treatment.This study by use of tumor-bearing mice and cultured cancer cells suggested that imaging of the radiation-inducible TIP-1 translocation onto the cancer cell surface may predict the tumor responsiveness to radiation in a time-efficient manner and thus tailor radiotherapy of cancer.

  3. Induction of cancer cell death by proton beam in tumor hypoxic region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. M.; Heo, T. R.; Lee, K. B.; Jang, K. H.; Kim, H. N.; Lee, S. H.; Jeong, M. H.

    2008-04-01

    Proton beam has been applied to treat various tumor patients in clinical studies. However, it is still undefined whether proton radiation can inhibit the blood vessel formation and induce the cell death in vascular endothelial cells in growing organs. The aim of this study are first, to develop an optimal animal model for the observation of blood vessel development with low dose of proton beam and second, to investigate the effect of low dose proton beam on the inhibition of blood vessel formation induced by hypoxic conditions. In this study, flk1-GFP transgenic zebrafish embryos were used to directly visualize and determine the inhibition of blood vessels by low dose (1, 2, 5 Gy) of proton beam with spread out Bragg peak (SOBP). And we observed cell death by acridine orange staining at 96 hours post fertilization (hpf) stage of embryos after proton irradiation. We also compared the effects of proton beam with those of gamma-ray. An antioxidant, N-acetyl cystein (NAC) was used to investigate whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) were involved in the cell deaths induced by proton irradiation. Irradiated flk-1-GFP transgenic embryos with proton beam irradiation (35 MeV, spread out Bragg peak, SOBP) demonstrated a marked inhibition of embryonic growth and an altered fluorescent blood vessel development in the trunk region. When the cells with DNA damage in the irradiated zebrafish were stained with acridine orange, green fluorescent cell death spots were increased in trunk regions compared to non-irradiated control embryos. Proton beam also significantly increased the cell death rate in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), but pretreatment of N-acetyl cystein (NAC), an antioxidant, recovered the proton-induced cell death rate (p<0.01). Moreover, pretreatment of NAC abrogated the effect of proton beam on the inhibition of trunk vessel development and malformation of trunk truncation. From this study, we found that proton radiation therapy can inhibit the

  4. Differential expression of Mediator complex subunit MED15 in testicular germ cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klümper, Niklas; Syring, Isabella; Offermann, Anne; Shaikhibrahim, Zaki; Vogel, Wenzel; Müller, Stefan C; Ellinger, Jörg; Strauß, Arne; Radzun, Heinz Joachim; Ströbel, Philipp; Brägelmann, Johannes; Perner, Sven; Bremmer, Felix

    2015-09-17

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) are the most common cancer entities in young men with increasing incidence observed in the last decades. For therapeutic management it is important, that TGCT are divided into several histological subtypes. MED15 is part of the multiprotein Mediator complex which presents an integrative hub for transcriptional regulation and is known to be deregulated in several malignancies, such as prostate cancer and bladder cancer role, whereas the role of the Mediator complex in TGCT has not been investigated so far. Aim of the study was to investigate the implication of MED15 in TGCT development and its stratification into histological subtypes. Immunohistochemical staining (IHC) against Mediator complex subunit MED15 was conducted on a TGCT cohort containing tumor-free testis (n = 35), intratubular germ cell neoplasia unclassified (IGCNU, n = 14), seminomas (SEM, n = 107) and non-seminomatous germ cell tumors (NSGCT, n = 42), further subdivided into embryonic carcinomas (EC, n = 30), yolk sac tumors (YST, n = 5), chorionic carcinomas (CC, n = 5) and teratomas (TER, n = 2). Quantification of MED15 protein expression was performed through IHC followed by semi-quantitative image analysis using the Definiens software. In tumor-free seminiferous tubules, MED15 protein expression was absent or only low expressed in spermatogonia. Interestingly, the precursor lesions IGCNU exhibited heterogeneous but partly very strong MED15 expression. SEM weakly express the Mediator complex subunit MED15, whereas NSGCT and especially EC show significantly enhanced expression compared to tumor-free testis. In conclusion, MED15 is differentially expressed in tumor-free testis and TGCT. While MED15 is absent or low in tumor-free testis and SEM, NSGCT highly express MED15, hinting at the diagnostic potential of this marker to distinguish between SEM and NSGCT. Further, the precursor lesion IGCNU showed increased nuclear MED15

  5. Can p63 serve as a biomarker for giant cell tumor of bone? A Moroccan experience

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    Hammas Nawal

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multinucleated giant cell-containing tumors and pseudotumors of bone represent a heterogeneous group of benign and malignant lesions. Differential diagnosis can be challenging, particularly in instances of limited sampling. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the contribution of the P63 in the positive and differential diagnosis of giant cell tumor of bone. Methods This study includes 48 giant cell-containing tumors and pseudotumors of bone. P63 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Data analysis was performed using Epi-info software and SPSS software package (version 17. Results Immunohistochemical analysis showed a P63 nuclear expression in all giant cell tumors of bone, in 50% of osteoid osteomas, 40% of aneurysmal bone cysts, 37.5% of osteoblastomas, 33.3% of chondromyxoide fibromas, 25% of non ossifiant fibromas and 8.3% of osteosarcomas. Only one case of chondroblastoma was included in this series and expressed p63. No P63 immunoreactivity was detected in any of the cases of central giant cell granulomas or langerhans cells histiocytosis. The sensitivity and negative predictive value (NPV of P63 immunohistochemistry for the diagnosis of giant cell tumor of bone were 100%. The specificity and positive predictive value (PPV were 74.42% and 59.26% respectively. Conclusions This study found not only that GCTOB expresses the P63 but it also shows that this protein may serve as a biomarker for the differential diagnosis between two morphologically similar lesions particularly in instances of limited sampling. Indeed, P63 expression seems to differentiate between giant cell tumor of bone and central giant cell granuloma since the latter does not express P63. Other benign and malignant giant cell-containing lesions express P63, decreasing its specificity as a diagnostic marker, but a strong staining was seen, except a case of chondroblastoma, only in giant cell tumor of bone. Clinical and radiological

  6. Effectiveness of Vascular Markers (Immunohistochemical Stains) in Soft Tissue Sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Namra; Mushtaq, Sajid; Akhter, Noreen; Hussain, Mudassar; Hassan, Usman

    2018-05-01

    To ascertain the effectiveness of IHC markers of vascular origin like CD31, CD34, FLI1 and ERG in vascular soft tissue sarcomas including angiosarcomas, Kaposi sarcomas, epithelioid hemangioendothelioma and a non-vascular soft tissue sarcoma (Epithelioid sarcoma). Descriptive study. Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Lahore, from 2011 to 2017. Diagnosed cases of angiosarcomas (n=48), epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (n=9), Kaposi sarcoma (n=9) and epithelioid sarcoma (n=20) were selected. Immunohistochemical staining as performed on formalin fixed paraffin embedded sections. The sections were stained for the following markers: CD34 (VENTANA clone Q Bend 10), CD31 (Leica clone 1 A 10), FLI1 (CELL MARQUE clone MRQ-1) and ERG (CELL MARQUE clone EP111). A complete panel of CD34, CD31 and ERG was applied on 8/48 cases of angiosarcomas with triple positivity in 6 cases. Eight cases showed positivity for only CD31 and ERG and 2 cases showed positivity for only ERG. A complete panel of CD34, CD31 and ERG was applied on 3/9 cases of epithelioid hemangioendothelioma with positivity for all markers in 2 cases. Combined positivity for ERG and CD34 was seen in 2 cases and on 4 cases only CD31 immunohistochemical was solely applied with 100% positivity. FLI1 was not applied on any case. Among 9 cases of Kaposi sarcoma, ERG, CD34 and CD31 in combination were applied on only 1 case with triple positivity. Remaining cases show positivity for either CD34, CD31 or FLI1. Majority of cases of epithelioid sarcomas were diagnosed on the basis of cytokeratin and CD34 positivity with loss of INI1. The other vascular markers showed negativity in all cases. Among these four markers, ERG immunohistochemical stain is highly effective for endothelial differentiation due to its specific nuclear staining pattern in normal blood vessel endothelial cells (internal control) as well as neoplastic cells of vascular tumors and lack of background staining.

  7. Pulmonary emphysema and tumor microenvironment in primary lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Junichi; Ueda, Kazuhiro; Sano, Fumiho; Hayashi, Masataro; Nishimoto, Arata; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2016-02-01

    To clarify the relationship between the presence of pulmonary emphysema and tumor microenvironment and their significance for the clinicopathologic aggressiveness of non-small cell lung cancer. The subjects included 48 patients with completely resected and pathologically confirmed stage I non-small cell lung cancer. Quantitative computed tomography was used to diagnose pulmonary emphysema, and immunohistochemical staining was performed to evaluate the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression status in the intratumoral stromal cells as well as the microvessel density (MVD). Positive MMP-9 staining in the intratumoral stromal cells was confirmed in 17 (35%) of the 48 tumors. These 17 tumors were associated with a high MVD, frequent lymphovascular invasion, a high proliferative activity, and high postoperative recurrence rate (all, P pulmonary emphysema (P = 0.02). Lung cancers arising from pulmonary emphysema were also associated with a high MVD, proliferative activity, and postoperative recurrence rate (all, P < 0.05). The MMP-9 expression in intratumoral stromal cells is associated with the clinicopathologic aggressiveness of lung cancer and is predominantly identified in tumors arising in emphysematous lungs. Further studies regarding the biological links between the intratumoral and extratumoral microenvironment will help to explain why lung cancers originating in emphysematous lung tissues are associated with a poor prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mena, a new available marker in tumors of salivary glands?

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    S. Gurzu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Mena (mammalian Ena is an actin regulatory protein involved in cell motility and adhesion. Based on its potential role in malignant transformation revealed in other organs, we analyzed the Mena expression in normal salivary glands (SG and salivary tumors. Mena expression was determined in normal SG (n=10 and also benign (n=20 and malignant (n=35 lesions of SG. For the immunohistochemical staining we used the anti-Mena antibody. All normal SG and the benign lesions (10 pleomorphic adenomas, 10 Warthin’s tumors were Mena negative. Salivary duct carcinomas (n=5, carcinomas in pleomorphic adenoma (n=5, acinic cell carcinomas (n=5, squamous cell carcinomas (n=10 and high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinomas (n=2 were positive. The lymphomas (n=5 and low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinomas (n=1 were Mena negative. In one case the lymphoblastic cells stained positive for Mena. Some of the endothelial cells, in the peritumoral vessels, were Mena positive. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study in the literature about Mena expression in salivary tumors. Our study suggests that Mena protein seems to play a role in malignant transformation and its intensity is correlated with the type and grade of tumor and also with vascular invasion. Its positivity in endothelial cells may suggest its potential role in tumor angiogenesis.

  9. Mena, a new available marker in tumors of salivary glands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurzu, S; Krause, M; Ember, I; Azamfirei, L; Gobel, G; Feher, K; Jung, I

    2012-02-07

    Mena (mammalian Ena) is an actin regulatory protein involved in cell motility and adhesion. Based on its potential role in malignant transformation revealed in other organs, we analyzed the Mena expression in normal salivary glands (SG) and salivary tumors. Mena expression was determined in normal SG (n=10) and also benign (n=20) and malignant (n=35) lesions of SG. For the immunohistochemical staining we used the anti-Mena antibody. All normal SG and the benign lesions (10 pleomorphic adenomas, 10 Warthin's tumors) were Mena negative. Salivary duct carcinomas (n=5), carcinomas in pleomorphic adenoma (n=5), acinic cell carcinomas (n=5), squamous cell carcinomas (n=10) and high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinomas (n=2) were positive. The lymphomas (n=5) and low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinomas (n=1) were Mena negative. In one case the lymphoblastic cells stained positive for Mena. Some of the endothelial cells, in the peritumoral vessels, were Mena positive. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study in the literature about Mena expression in salivary tumors. Our study suggests that Mena protein seems to play a role in malignant transformation and its intensity is correlated with the type and grade of tumor and also with vascular invasion. Its positivity in endothelial cells may suggest its potential role in tumor angiogenesis.

  10. RCC2 over-expression in tumor cells alters apoptosis and drug sensitivity by regulating Rac1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nan; Ren, Dong; Li, Su; Ma, Wenli; Hu, Shaoyan; Jin, Yan; Xiao, Sheng

    2018-01-10

    Small GTP binding protein Rac1 is a component of NADPH oxidases and is essential for superoxide-induced cell death. Rac1 is activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), and this activation can be blocked by regulator of chromosome condensation 2 (RCC2), which binds the switch regions of Rac1 to prevent access from GEFs. Three cancer cell lines with up- or down-regulation of RCC2 were used to evaluate cell proliferation, apoptosis, Rac1 signaling and sensitivity to a group of nine chemotherapeutic drugs. RCC2 expression in lung cancer and ovarian cancer were studied using immunochemistry stain of tumor tissue arrays. Forced RCC2 expression in tumor cells blocked spontaneous- or Staurosporine (STS)-induced apoptosis. In contrast, RCC2 knock down in these cells resulted in increased apoptosis to STS treatment. The protective activity of RCC2 on apoptosis was revoked by a constitutively activated Rac1, confirming a role of RCC2 in apoptosis by regulating Rac1. In an immunohistochemistry evaluation of tissue microarray, RCC2 was over-expressed in 88.3% of primary lung cancer and 65.2% of ovarian cancer as compared to non-neoplastic lung and ovarian tissues, respectively. Because chemotherapeutic drugs can kill tumor cells by activating Rac1/JNK pathway, we suspect that tumors with RCC2 overexpression would be more resistant to these drugs. Tumor cells with forced RCC2 expression indeed had significant difference in drug sensitivity compared to parental cells using a panel of common chemotherapeutic drugs. RCC2 regulates apoptosis by blocking Rac1 signaling. RCC2 expression in tumor can be a useful marker for predicting chemotherapeutic response.

  11. Cancer stem cells and the tumor microenvironment: interplay in tumor heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albini, Adriana; Bruno, Antonino; Gallo, Cristina; Pajardi, Giorgio; Noonan, Douglas M; Dallaglio, Katiuscia

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells able to recapitulate tumor heterogeneity have been tracked, isolated and characterized in different tumor types, and are commonly named Cancer Stem Cells or Cancer Initiating Cells (CSC/CIC). CSC/CIC are disseminated in the tumor mass and are resistant to anti-cancer therapies and adverse conditions. They are able to divide into another stem cell and a "proliferating" cancer cell. They appear to be responsible for disease recurrence and metastatic dissemination even after apparent eradication of the primary tumor. The modulation of CSC/CIC activities by the tumor microenvironment (TUMIC) is still poorly known. CSC/CIC may mutually interact with the TUMIC in a special and unique manner depending on the TUMIC cells or proteins encountered. The TUMIC consists of extracellular matrix components as well as cellular players among which endothelial, stromal and immune cells, providing and responding to signals to/from the CSC/CIC. This interplay can contribute to the mechanisms through which CSC/CIC may reside in a dormant state in a tissue for years, later giving rise to tumor recurrence or metastasis in patients. Different TUMIC components, including the connective tissue, can differentially activate CIC/CSC in different areas of a tumor and contribute to the generation of cancer heterogeneity. Here, we review possible networking activities between the different components of the tumor microenvironment and CSC/CIC, with a focus on its role in tumor heterogeneity and progression. We also summarize novel therapeutic options that could target both CSC/CIC and the microenvironment to elude resistance mechanisms activated by CSC/CIC, responsible for disease recurrence and metastases.

  12. Combined histochemical staining, RNA amplification, regional, and single cell cDNA analysis within the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Stephen D; Che, Shaoli

    2004-08-01

    The use of five histochemical stains (cresyl violet, thionin, hematoxylin & eosin, silver stain, and acridine orange) was evaluated in combination with an expression profiling paradigm that included regional and single cell analyses within the hippocampus of post-mortem human brains and adult mice. Adjacent serial sections of human and mouse hippocampus were labeled by histochemistry or neurofilament immunocytochemistry. These tissue sections were used as starting material for regional and single cell microdissection followed by a newly developed RNA amplification procedure (terminal continuation (TC) RNA amplification) and subsequent hybridization to custom-designed cDNA arrays. Results indicated equivalent levels of global hybridization signal intensity and relative expression levels for individual genes for hippocampi stained by cresyl violet, thionin, and hematoxylin & eosin, and neurofilament immunocytochemistry. Moreover, no significant differences existed between the Nissl stains and neurofilament immunocytochemistry for individual CA1 neurons obtained via laser capture microdissection. In contrast, a marked decrement was observed in adjacent hippocampal sections stained for silver stain and acridine orange, both at the level of the regional dissection and at the CA1 neuron population level. Observations made on the cDNA array platform were validated by real-time qPCR using primers directed against beta-actin and glyceraldehyde-3 phosphate dehydrogenase. Thus, this report demonstrated the utility of using specific Nissl stains, but not stains that bind RNA species directly, in both human and mouse brain tissues at the regional and cellular level for state-of-the-art molecular fingerprinting studies.

  13. Intraoperative immunohistochemistry staining of sentinel nodes in breast cancer: Clinical and economical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, M.; Paaschburg, B.; Balslev, E.

    2008-01-01

    .0001) for isolated tumor cell metastasis, from 56 to 36.4% (p analysis showed an overall...... of the surgical procedures before (n = 706) and after (n = 503) introducing intraoperatice IHC on frozen section. We also did a cost analysis. Intraoperative IHC staining led to a lowering of the late positive SNB rate. Introducing IHC gave a decrease in the late positive rate from 93 to 52% (p

  14. Antitumor action of 3-bromopyruvate implicates reorganized tumor growth regulatory components of tumor milieu, cell cycle arrest and induction of mitochondria-dependent tumor cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Saveg; Kujur, Praveen Kumar; Pandey, Shrish Kumar; Goel, Yugal; Maurya, Babu Nandan; Verma, Ashish; Kumar, Ajay; Singh, Rana Pratap; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2018-01-15

    Evidences demonstrate that metabolic inhibitor 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) exerts a potent antitumor action against a wide range of malignancies. However, the effect of 3-BP on progression of the tumors of thymic origin remains unexplored. Although, constituents of tumor microenvironment (TME) plays a pivotal role in regulation of tumor progression, it remains unclear if 3-BP can alter the composition of the crucial tumor growth regulatory components of the external surrounding of tumor cells. Thus, the present investigation attempts to understand the effect of 3-BP administration to a host bearing a progressively growing tumor of thymic origin on tumor growth regulatory soluble, cellular and biophysical components of tumor milieu vis-à-vis understanding its association with tumor progression, accompanying cell cycle events and mode of cell death. Further, the expression of cell survival regulatory molecules and hemodynamic characteristics of the tumor milieu were analysed to decipher mechanisms underlying the antitumor action of 3-BP. Administration of 3-BP to tumor-bearing hosts retarded tumor progression accompanied by induction of tumor cell death, cell cycle arrest, declined metabolism, inhibited mitochondrial membrane potential, elevated release of cytochrome c and altered hemodynamics. Moreover, 3-BP reconstituted the external milieu, in concurrence with deregulated glucose and pH homeostasis and increased tumor infiltration by NK cells, macrophages, and T lymphocytes. Further, 3-BP administration altered the expression of key regulatory molecules involved in glucose uptake, intracellular pH and tumor cell survival. The outcomes of this study will help in optimizing the therapeutic application of 3-BP by targeting crucial tumor growth regulatory components of tumor milieu. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Novel synergistic antitumor effects of rapamycin with bortezomib on hepatocellular carcinoma cells and orthotopic tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Cun

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite recent advances in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, the chemotherapy efficacy against HCC is still unsatisfactory. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR has been emerged as an important cancer therapeutic target. However, HCC cells often resistant to rapamycin because of the paradoxical activation of Akt by rapamycin. In this study, we investigated whether bortezomib could enhance the antitumor effects of rapamycin. Methods The effects of rapamycin and bortezomib on HCC proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasiveness in vitro were assessed by CCK-8 analysis, flow cytometry, Hoechst 33342 staining and transwell assays, respectively. Total and phosphorylated protein levels of Akt were detected by Western blotting. The effects of rapamycin and/or bortezomib on the mRNA expression levels of p53, p27, p21 and Bcl-2 family in HCCLM3 cells were evaluated by RT-PCR. The roles of rapamycin and bortezomib on HCC growth and metastasis in xenograft models were evaluated by tumor volumes and fluorescent signals. The effects of rapamycin and bortezomib on cell proliferation and apoptosis in vivo were test by PCNA and TUNEL staining. Results Bortezomib synergized with rapamycin to reduce cell growth, induce apoptosis, and inhibit cell mobility in vitro. Further mechanistic studies showed that bortezomib inhibited rapamycin-induced phosphorylated Akt, which in turn enhanced apoptosis of HCC cell lines. The alteration of the mRNA expression of cell cycle inhibitors p53, p27, p21 and apoptosis associated genes Bcl-2, Bax were also involved in the synergistic antitumor effects of rapamycin and bortezomib. P53 inhibitor PFT-α significantly attenuate the effect of rapamycin and bortezomib on cell apoptosis, which indicated that the pro-apoptotic effect of rapamycin and bortezomib may be p53-dependent. Treatment of HCCLM3-R bearing nude mice with rapamycin and bortezomib significantly enhanced tumor growth

  16. Using cell nuclei features to detect colon cancer tissue in hematoxylin and eosin stained slides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Alex Skovsbo; Rasmussen, Anders Munk; Andersen, Niels Kristian Mäkinen; Andersen, Simon Kragh; Emborg, Jonas; Røge, Rasmus; Østergaard, Lasse Riis

    2017-08-01

    Currently, diagnosis of colon cancer is based on manual examination of histopathological images by a pathologist. This can be time consuming and interpretation of the images is subject to inter- and intra-observer variability. This may be improved by introducing a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for automatic detection of cancer tissue within whole slide hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stains. Cancer disrupts the normal control mechanisms of cell proliferation and differentiation, affecting the structure and appearance of the cells. Therefore, extracting features from segmented cell nuclei structures may provide useful information to detect cancer tissue. A framework for automatic classification of regions of interest (ROI) containing either benign or cancerous colon tissue extracted from whole slide H&E stained images using cell nuclei features was proposed. A total of 1,596 ROI's were extracted from 87 whole slide H&E stains (44 benign and 43 cancer). A cell nuclei segmentation algorithm consisting of color deconvolution, k-means clustering, local adaptive thresholding, and cell separation was performed within the ROI's to extract cell nuclei features. From the segmented cell nuclei structures a total of 750 texture and intensity-based features were extracted for classification of the ROI's. The nine most discriminative cell nuclei features were used in a random forest classifier to determine if the ROI's contained benign or cancer tissue. The ROI classification obtained an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.96, sensitivity of 0.88, specificity of 0.92, and accuracy of 0.91 using an optimized threshold. The developed framework showed promising results in using cell nuclei features to classify ROIs into containing benign or cancer tissue in H&E stained tissue samples. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  17. Tumor cell-derived microparticles polarize M2 tumor-associated macrophages for tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ruihua; Ji, Tiantian; Chen, Degao; Dong, Wenqian; Zhang, Huafeng; Yin, Xiaonan; Ma, Jingwei; Liang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Yi; Shen, Guanxin; Qin, Xiaofeng; Huang, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Despite identification of macrophages in tumors (tumor-associated macrophages, TAM) as potential targets for cancer therapy, the origin and function of TAM in the context of malignancy remain poorly characterized. Here, we show that microparticles (MPs), as a by-product, released by tumor cells act as a general mechanism to mediate M2 polarization of TAM. Taking up tumor MPs by macrophages is a very efficient process, which in turn results in the polarization of macrophages into M2 type, not only leading to promoting tumor growth and metastasis but also facilitating cancer stem cell development. Moreover, we demonstrate that the underlying mechanism involves the activation of the cGAS/STING/TBK1/STAT6 pathway by tumor MPs. Finally, in addition to murine tumor MPs, we show that human counterparts also possess consistent effect on human M2 polarization. These findings provide new insights into a critical role of tumor MPs in remodeling of tumor microenvironment and better understanding of the communications between tumors and macrophages.

  18. Prognostic significance of interleukin-8 and CD163-positive cell-infiltration in tumor tissues in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Fujita

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We investigated whether serum interleukin (IL-8 reflects the tumor microenvironment and has prognostic value in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Fifty OSCC patients who received radical resection of their tumor(s were enrolled. Preoperative sera were measured for IL-8 by ELISA. Expression of IL-8 and the infiltration of immune cells in tumor tissues were analyzed by an immunohistochemical staining of surgical specimens. RESULTS: We found that disease-free survival (DFS was significantly longer in the Stage I/II OSCC patients with low serum IL-8 levels compared to those with high levels (p = 0.001. The tumor expression of IL-8, i.e., IL-8(T and the density of CD163-positive cells in the tumor invasive front, i.e., CD163(IF were correlated with the serum IL-8 level (p = 0.033 and p = 0.038, respectively, and they were associated with poor clinical outcome (p = 0.007 and p = 0.002, respectively, in DFS in all patients. A multivariate analysis revealed that N status, IL-8(T and CD163(IF significantly affected the DFS of the patients. Further analysis suggested that combination of N status with serum IL-8, IL-8(T or CD163(IF may be a new criterion for discriminating between OSCC patients at high and low risk for tumor relapse. Interestingly, the in vitro experiments demonstrated that IL-8 enhanced generation of CD163-positive M2 macrophages from peripheral blood monocytes, and that the cells produced IL-10. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that IL-8 may be involved in poor clinical outcomes via generation of CD163-positive M2 macrophages, and that these factors in addition to N status may have prognostic value in patients with resectable OSCSS.

  19. Migration of iron-labeled KHYG-1 natural killer cells to subcutaneous tumors in nude mice, as detected by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallett, Christiane L; McFadden, Catherine; Chen, Yuhua; Foster, Paula J

    2012-07-01

    A novel cell line of cytotoxic natural killer (NK) cells, KHYG-1, was examined in vivo for immunotherapy against prostate cancer. The feasibility of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tracking to monitor the fate of injected NK cells following intravenous (i.v.), intraperitoneal (i.p.) and subcutaneous (s.c.) administration was assessed. PC-3M human prostate cancer cells were injected s.c. into the flank of nude mice (day 0). KHYG-1 NK cells were labeled with an iron oxide contrast agent and injected s.c., i.v. or i.p. on day 8. Mice were imaged by MRI on days 7, 9 and 12. Tumor sections were examined with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistologic staining for NK cells. NK cells were detected in the tumors by histology after all three administration routes. NK cells and fluorescence from the iron label were co-localized. Signal loss was seen in the areas around the tumors and between the tumor lobes in the s.c. group. We are the first to label this cell line of NK cells with an iron oxide contrast agent. Accumulation of NK cells was visualized by MRI after s.c. injection but not after i.v. and i.p. injection.

  20. Laser scanning cytometry (LCS) allows detailed analysis of the cell cycle in PI stained human fibroblasts (TIG-7).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, M; Sasaki, K; Satoh, T; Kurose, A; Kamada, T; Furuya, T; Murakami, T; Todoroki, T

    1997-01-01

    We have demonstrated a method for the in situ determination of the cell cycle phases of TIG-7 fibroblasts using a laser scanning cytometer (LSC) which has not only a function equivalent to flow cytometry (FCM) but also has a capability unique in itself. LSC allows a more detailed analysis of the cell cycle in cells stained with propidium iodide (PI) than FCM. With LSC it is possible to discriminate between mitotic cells and G2 cells, between post-mitotic cells and G1 cells, and between quiescent cells and cycling cells in a PI fluorescence peak (chromatin condensation) vs. fluorescence value (DNA content) cytogram for cells stained with PI. These were amply confirmed by experiments using colcemid and adriamycin. We were able to identify at least six cell subpopulations for PI stained cells using LSC; namely G1, S, G2, M, postmitotic and quiescent cell populations. LSC analysis facilitates the monitoring of effects of drugs on the cell cycle.

  1. ADAM12 produced by tumor cells rather than stromal cells accelerates breast tumor progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frohlich, Camilla; Nehammer, Camilla; Albrechtsen, Reidar

    2011-01-01

    that ADAM12 deficiency reduces breast tumor progression in the PyMT model. However, the catalytic activity of ADAM12 appears to be dispensable for its tumor-promoting effect. Interestingly, we demonstrate that ADAM12 endogenously expressed in tumor-associated stroma in the PyMT model does not influence......Expression of ADAM12 is low in most normal tissues, but is markedly increased in numerous human cancers, including breast carcinomas. We have previously shown that overexpression of ADAM12 accelerates tumor progression in a mouse model of breast cancer (PyMT). In the present study, we found...... hypothesized, however, that the tumor-associated stroma may stimulate ADAM12 expression in tumor cells, based on the fact that TGF-ß1 stimulates ADAM12 expression and is a well-known growth factor released from tumor-associated stroma. TGF-ß1 stimulation of ADAM12-negative Lewis lung tumor cells induced ADAM12...

  2. Classification of phytoplankton cells as live or dead using the vital stains fluorescein diacetate and 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntyre, Hugh L; Cullen, John J

    2016-08-01

    Regulations for ballast water treatment specify limits on the concentrations of living cells in discharge water. The vital stains fluorescein diacetate (FDA) and 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate (CMFDA) in combination have been recommended for use in verification of ballast water treatment technology. We tested the effectiveness of FDA and CMFDA, singly and in combination, in discriminating between living and heat-killed populations of 24 species of phytoplankton from seven divisions, verifying with quantitative growth assays that uniformly live and dead populations were compared. The diagnostic signal, per-cell fluorescence intensity, was measured by flow cytometry and alternate discriminatory thresholds were defined statistically from the frequency distributions of the dead or living cells. Species were clustered by staining patterns: for four species, the staining of live versus dead cells was distinct, and live-dead classification was essentially error free. But overlap between the frequency distributions of living and heat-killed cells in the other taxa led to unavoidable errors, well in excess of 20% in many. In 4 very weakly staining taxa, the mean fluorescence intensity in the heat-killed cells was higher than that of the living cells, which is inconsistent with the assumptions of the method. Applying the criteria of ≤5% false negative plus ≤5% false positive errors, and no significant loss of cells due to staining, FDA and FDA+CMFDA gave acceptably accurate results for only 8-10 of 24 species (i.e., 33%-42%). CMFDA was the least effective stain and its addition to FDA did not improve the performance of FDA alone. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Phycology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Phycological Society of America.

  3. Non-cell autonomous or secretory tumor suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Christelle En Lin; Chan, Shu Ning; Tang, Bor Luen

    2014-10-01

    Many malignancies result from deletions or loss-of-function mutations in one or more tumor suppressor genes, the products of which curb unrestrained growth or induce cell death in those with dysregulated proliferative capacities. Most tumor suppressors act in a cell autonomous manner, and only very few proteins are shown to exert a non-cell autonomous tumor suppressor function on other cells. Examples of these include members of the secreted frizzled-related protein (SFRP) family and the secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC)-related proteins. Very recent findings have, however, considerably expanded our appreciation of non-cell autonomous tumor suppressor functions. Broadly, this may occur in two ways. Intracellular tumor suppressor proteins within cells could in principle inhibit aberrant growth of neighboring cells by conditioning an antitumor microenvironment through secreted factors. This is demonstrated by an apparent non-cell autonomous tumor suppressing property of p53. On the other hand, a tumor suppressor produced by a cell may be secreted extracellularly, and taken up by another cell with its activity intact. Intriguingly, this has been recently shown to occur for the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) by both conventional and unconventional modes of secretion. These recent findings would aid the development of therapeutic strategies that seek to reinstate tumor suppression activity in therapeutically recalcitrant tumor cells, which have lost it in the first place. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Apoptosis and tumor cell death in response to HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Oskar; Aits, Sonja; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2008-01-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a molecular complex derived from human milk that kills tumor cells by a process resembling programmed cell death. The complex consists of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, and both the protein and the fatty acid are required for cell death. HAMLET has broad antitumor activity in vitro, and its therapeutic effect has been confirmed in vivo in a human glioblastoma rat xenograft model, in patients with skin papillomas and in patients with bladder cancer. The mechanisms of tumor cell death remain unclear, however. Immediately after the encounter with tumor cells, HAMLET invades the cells and causes mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c release, phosphatidyl serine exposure, and a low caspase response. A fraction of the cells undergoes morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis, but caspase inhibition does not rescue the cells and Bcl-2 overexpression or altered p53 status does not influence the sensitivity of tumor cells to HAMLET. HAMLET also creates a state of unfolded protein overload and activates 20S proteasomes, which contributes to cell death. In parallel, HAMLET translocates to tumor cell nuclei, where high-affinity interactions with histones cause chromatin disruption, loss of transcription, and nuclear condensation. The dying cells also show morphological changes compatible with macroautophagy, and recent studies indicate that macroautophagy is involved in the cell death response to HAMLET. The results suggest that HAMLET, like a hydra with many heads, may interact with several crucial cellular organelles, thereby activating several forms of cell death, in parallel. This complexity might underlie the rapid death response of tumor cells and the broad antitumor activity of HAMLET.

  5. Expressão dos filamentos intermediários no diagnóstico dos tumores mamários de cadelas Expression of intermediate filaments in canine mammary tumors diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A.P.C. Zuccari

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Foram utilizados anticorpos monoclonais para marcação imunoistoquímica dos tecidos tumorais e obtenção de informações sobre a histogênese dos tumores mamários utilizando-se anti-citoqueratinas para marcação de células epiteliais, e anti-actina e anti-vimentina para células mioepiteliais. O procedimento imunoistoquímico mostrou-se esclarecedor com relação à histogênese dos tumores mamários, confirmando a marcação de células epiteliais com as citoqueratinas que perdem sua expressão na transformação celular maligna. A alfa-actina e a vimentina mostraram-se eficientes na marcação de células mioepiteliais. A alfa-actina diminuiu a marcação na metaplasia óssea ou cartilaginosa contrariamente à vimentina cuja marcação foi aumentada. Os resultados permitem melhor entendimento da classificação dos tumores mamários de cadelas com a utilização de anticorpos monoclonais como marcadores do citoesqueleto, que se mostraram eficientes nessa caracterização.Immunohistochemical evaluation was performed to study the histogenesis of canine mammary tumors and to contribute to a better understanding of their classification. Monoclonal antibodies specific for different types of intermediate filaments (cytokeratins, vimentin, alpha-actin were used. Epithelial cells stained positively for cytokeratins and their expression was lost as the malignant transformation occurs. Myoepithelial cells stained positively for vimentin and alpha-actin. In contrast to vimentin, alpha-actin lost the expression as the cartilaginous or osseous metaplasia occurs. Immunohistochemical evaluation with monoclonal antibodies proved to be efficient for identification of tumor histogenesis. alpha-actin were used. Epithelial cells stained positively for cytokeratins and their expression was lost as the malignant transformation occurs. Myoepithelial cells stained positively for vimentin and alpha-actin. In contrast to vimentin, alpha-actin lost the expression

  6. Characterization of the loss of SUMO pathway function on cancer cells and tumor proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingyue He

    Full Text Available SUMOylation is a post-translational ubiquitin-like protein modification pathway that regulates important cellular processes including chromosome structure, kinetochore function, chromosome segregation, nuclear and sub-nuclear organization, transcription and DNA damage repair. There is increasing evidence that the SUMO pathway is dysregulated in cancer, raising the possibility that modulation of this pathway may have therapeutic potential. To investigate the importance of the SUMO pathway in the context of cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth, we applied lentivirus-based short hairpin RNAs (shRNA to knockdown SUMO pathway genes in human cancer cells. shRNAs for SAE2 and UBC9 reduced SUMO conjugation activity and inhibited proliferation of human cancer cells. To expand upon these observations, we generated doxycycline inducible conditional shRNA cell lines for SAE2 to achieve acute and reversible SAE2 knockdown. Conditional SAE2 knockdown in U2OS and HCT116 cells slowed cell growth in vitro, and SAE2 knockdown induced multiple terminal outcomes including apoptosis, endoreduplication and senescence. Multinucleated cells became senescent and stained positive for the senescence marker, SA-β Gal, and displayed elevated levels of p53 and p21. In an attempt to explain these phenotypes, we confirmed that loss of SUMO pathway activity leads to a loss of SUMOylated Topoisomerase IIα and the appearance of chromatin bridges which can impair proper cytokinesis and lead to multinucleation. Furthermore, knockdown of SAE2 induces disruption of PML nuclear bodies which may further promote apoptosis or senescence. In an in vivo HCT116 xenograft tumor model, conditional SAE2 knockdown strongly impaired tumor growth. These data demonstrate that the SUMO pathway is required for cancer cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, implicating the SUMO pathway as a potential cancer therapeutic target.

  7. Recombinant human endostatin improves tumor vasculature and alleviates hypoxia in Lewis lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Fang; Wang Jin; Zou Yi; Bao Yong; Huang Wenlin; Chen Guangming; Luo Xianrong; Chen Ming

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether recombinant human endostatin can create a time window of vascular normalization prior to vascular pruning to alleviate hypoxia in Lewis lung carcinoma in mice. Methods: Kinetic changes in morphology of tumor vasculature in response to recombinant human endostatin were detected under a confocal microscope with immunofluorescent staining in Lewis lung carcinomas in mice. The hypoxic cell fraction of different time was assessed with immunohistochemical staining . Effects on tumor growth were monitored as indicated in the growth curve of tumors . Results: Compared with the control group vascularity of the tumors was reduced over time by recombinant human endostatin treatment and significantly regressed for 9 days. During the treatment, pericyte coverage increased at day 3, increased markedly at day 5, and fell again at day 7. The vascular basement membrane was thin and closely associated with endothelial cells after recombinant human endostatin treatment, but appeared thickened, loosely associated with endothelial cells in control tumors. The decrease in hypoxic cell fraction at day 5 after treatment was also found. Tumor growth was not accelerated 5 days after recombinant human endostatin treatment. Conclusions: Recombinant human endostatin can normalize tumor vasculature within day 3 to 7, leading to improved tumor oxygenation. The results provide important experimental basis for combining recombinant human endostatin with radiation therapy in human tumors. (authors)

  8. NF-κB functions as a molecular link between tumor cells and Th1/Tc1 T cells in the tumor microenvironment to exert radiation-mediated tumor suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Priscilla S.; Bardhan, Kankana; Chen, May R.; Paschall, Amy V.; Lu, Chunwan; Bollag, Roni J.; Kong, Feng-Chong; Jin, JianYue; Kong, Feng-Ming; Waller, Jennifer L.; Pollock, Raphael E.; Liu, Kebin

    2016-01-01

    Radiation modulates both tumor cells and immune cells in the tumor microenvironment to exert its anti-tumor activity; however, the molecular connection between tumor cells and immune cells that mediates radiation-exerted tumor suppression activity in the tumor microenvironment is largely unknown. We report here that radiation induces rapid activation of the p65/p50 and p50/p50 NF-κB complexes in human soft tissue sarcoma (STS) cells. Radiation-activated p65/p50 and p50/p50 bind to the TNFα promoter to activate its transcription in STS cells. Radiation-induced TNFα induces tumor cell death in an autocrine manner. A sublethal dose of Smac mimetic BV6 induces cIAP1 and cIAP2 degradation to increase tumor cell sensitivity to radiation-induced cell death in vitro and to enhance radiation-mediated suppression of STS xenografts in vivo. Inhibition of caspases, RIP1, or RIP3 blocks radiation/TNFα-induced cell death, whereas inhibition of RIP1 blocks TNFα-induced caspase activation, suggesting that caspases and RIP1 act sequentially to mediate the non-compensatory cell death pathways. Furthermore, we determined in a syngeneic sarcoma mouse model that radiation up-regulates IRF3, IFNβ, and the T cell chemokines CCL2 and CCL5 in the tumor microenvironment, which are associated with activation and increased infiltration of Th1/Tc1 T cells in the tumor microenvironment. Moreover, tumor-infiltrating T cells are in their active form since both the perforin and FasL pathways are activated in irradiated tumor tissues. Consequently, combined BV6 and radiation completely suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Therefore, radiation-induced NF-κB functions as a molecular link between tumor cells and immune cells in the tumor microenvironment for radiation-mediated tumor suppression. PMID:27014915

  9. Experimental rat lung tumor model with intrabronchial tumor cell implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Neto, Antero; Simão, Antônio Felipe Leite; Miranda, Samuel de Paula; Mourão, Lívia Talita Cajaseiras; Bezerra, Nilfácio Prado; Almeida, Paulo Roberto Carvalho de; Ribeiro, Ronaldo de Albuquerque

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rat lung tumor model for anticancer drug testing. Sixty-two female Wistar rats weighing 208 +/- 20 g were anesthetized intraperitoneally with 2.5% tribromoethanol (1 ml/100 g live weight), tracheotomized and intubated with an ultrafine catheter for inoculation with Walker's tumor cells. In the first step of the experiment, a technique was established for intrabronchial implantation of 10(5) to 5 x 10(5) tumor cells, and the tumor take rate was determined. The second stage consisted of determining tumor volume, correlating findings from high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with findings from necropsia and determining time of survival. The tumor take rate was 94.7% for implants with 4 x 10(5) tumor cells, HRCT and necropsia findings matched closely (r=0.953; p<0.0001), the median time of survival was 11 days, and surgical mortality was 4.8%. The present rat lung tumor model was shown to be feasible: the take rate was high, surgical mortality was negligible and the procedure was simple to perform and easily reproduced. HRCT was found to be a highly accurate tool for tumor diagnosis, localization and measurement and may be recommended for monitoring tumor growth in this model.

  10. Phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of tumor tissue and circulating tumor cells in patients with metastatic castrationresistant prostate cancer: a report from the PETRUS prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massard, Christophe; Oulhen, Marianne; Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Auger, Nathalie; Foulon, Stéphanie; Abou-Lovergne, Aurélie; Billiot, Fanny; Valent, Alexander; Marty, Virginie; Loriot, Yohann; Fizazi, Karim; Vielh, Philippe; Farace, Francoise

    2016-01-01

    Molecular characterization of cancer samples is hampered by tumor tissue availability in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients. We reported the results of prospective PETRUS study of biomarker assessment in paired primary prostatic tumors, metastatic biopsies and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Among 54 mCRPC patients enrolled, 38 (70%) had biopsies containing more than 50% tumour cells. 28 (52%) patients were analyzed for both tissue samples and CTCs. FISH for AR-amplification and TMPRSS2-ERG translocation were successful in 54% and 32% in metastatic biopsies and primary tumors, respectively. By comparing CellSearch and filtration (ISET)-enrichment combined to four color immunofluorescent staining, we showed that CellSearch and ISET isolated distinct subpopulations of CTCs: CTCs undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, CTC clusters and large CTCs with cytomorphological characteristics but no detectable markers were isolated using ISET. Epithelial CTCs detected by the CellSearch were mostly lost during the ISET-filtration. AR-amplification was detected in CellSearch-captured CTCs, but not in ISET-enriched CTCs which harbor exclusively AR gain of copies. Eighty-eight percent concordance for ERG-rearrangement was observed between metastatic biopsies and CTCs even if additional ERG-alteration patterns were detected in ISET-enriched CTCs indicating a higher heterogeneity in CTCs. Molecular screening of metastatic biopsies is achievable in a multicenter context. Our data indicate that CTCs detected by the CellSearch and the ISET-filtration systems are not only phenotypically but also genetically different. Close attention must be paid to CTC characterization since neither approach tested here fully reflects the tremendous phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity present in CTCs from mCRPC patients. PMID:27391263

  11. Tumor-Induced Generation of Splenic Erythroblast-like Ter-Cells Promotes Tumor Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yanmei; Liu, Qiuyan; Hou, Jin; Gu, Yan; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Zhubo; Fan, Jia; Zhou, Weiping; Qiu, Shuangjian; Zhang, Yonghong; Dong, Tao; Li, Ning; Jiang, Zhengping; Zhu, Ha; Zhang, Qian; Ma, Yuanwu; Zhang, Lianfeng; Wang, Qingqing; Yu, Yizhi; Li, Nan; Cao, Xuetao

    2018-04-19

    Identifying tumor-induced leukocyte subsets and their derived circulating factors has been instrumental in understanding cancer as a systemic disease. Nevertheless, how primary tumor-induced non-leukocyte populations in distal organs contribute to systemic spread remains poorly defined. Here, we report one population of tumor-inducible, erythroblast-like cells (Ter-cells) deriving from megakaryocyte-erythroid progenitor cells with a unique Ter-119 + CD45 - CD71 + phenotype. Ter-cells are enriched in the enlarged spleen of hosts bearing advanced tumors and facilitate tumor progression by secreting neurotrophic factor artemin into the blood. Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and Smad3 activation are important in Ter-cell generation. In vivo blockade of Ter-cell-derived artemin inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) growth, and artemin deficiency abolishes Ter-cells' tumor-promoting ability. We confirm the presence of splenic artemin-positive Ter-cells in human HCC patients and show that significantly elevated serum artemin correlates with poor prognosis. We propose that Ter-cells and the secreted artemin play important roles in cancer progression with prognostic and therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Curcumin targets fibroblast–tumor cell interactions in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudás, József; Fullár, Alexandra; Romani, Angela; Pritz, Christian; Kovalszky, Ilona; Hans Schartinger, Volker; Mathias Sprinzl, Georg; Riechelmann, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of OSCC tumor cells. We hypothesized that Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells. Normal and 2 μM Curcumin-treated co-culture were performed for 4 days, followed by analysis of tumor cell invasivity, mRNA/protein expression of EMT-markers and mediators, activity measure of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), and western blot analysis of signal transduction in tumor cells and fibroblasts. In Curcumin-treated co-culture, in tumor cells, the levels of nuclear factor κB (NFκBα) and early response kinase (ERK)—decreased, in fibroblasts, integrin αv protein synthesis decreased compared to corresponding cells in normal co-culture. The signal modulatory changes induced by Curcumin caused decreased release of EMT-mediators in CAFs and reversal of EMT in tumor cells, which was associated with decreased invasion. These data confirm the palliative potential of Curcumin in clinical application. - Graphical abstract: Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells. Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells by inhibiting the production of EMT mediators in CAFs and by modification of intracellular signaling in tumor cells. This causes less invasivity and reversal of EMT in tumor cells. Highlights: ► Curcumin targets tumor–fibroblast interaction in head and neck cancer. ► Curcumin suppresses mediators of epithelial–mesenchymal transition. ► Curcumin decreases the invasivity of tumor cells

  13. Curcumin targets fibroblast–tumor cell interactions in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudás, József, E-mail: jozsef.dudas@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Fullár, Alexandra, E-mail: fullarsz@gmail.com [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); 1st Department of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University, Üllői út 26, 1085 Budapest (Hungary); Romani, Angela, E-mail: angela.romani@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Pritz, Christian, E-mail: christian.pritz@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kovalszky, Ilona, E-mail: koval@korb1.sote.hu [1st Department of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University, Üllői út 26, 1085 Budapest (Hungary); Hans Schartinger, Volker, E-mail: volker.schartinger@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Mathias Sprinzl, Georg, E-mail: georg.sprinzl@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Riechelmann, Herbert, E-mail: herbert.riechelmann@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2013-04-01

    Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of OSCC tumor cells. We hypothesized that Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells. Normal and 2 μM Curcumin-treated co-culture were performed for 4 days, followed by analysis of tumor cell invasivity, mRNA/protein expression of EMT-markers and mediators, activity measure of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), and western blot analysis of signal transduction in tumor cells and fibroblasts. In Curcumin-treated co-culture, in tumor cells, the levels of nuclear factor κB (NFκBα) and early response kinase (ERK)—decreased, in fibroblasts, integrin αv protein synthesis decreased compared to corresponding cells in normal co-culture. The signal modulatory changes induced by Curcumin caused decreased release of EMT-mediators in CAFs and reversal of EMT in tumor cells, which was associated with decreased invasion. These data confirm the palliative potential of Curcumin in clinical application. - Graphical abstract: Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells. Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells by inhibiting the production of EMT mediators in CAFs and by modification of intracellular signaling in tumor cells. This causes less invasivity and reversal of EMT in tumor cells. Highlights: ► Curcumin targets tumor–fibroblast interaction in head and neck cancer. ► Curcumin suppresses mediators of epithelial–mesenchymal transition. ► Curcumin decreases the invasivity of tumor cells.

  14. Galectin-1 Inhibitor OTX008 Induces Tumor Vessel Normalization and Tumor Growth Inhibition in Human Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonce, Nathan A; Griffin, Robert J; Dings, Ruud P M

    2017-12-09

    Galectin-1 is a hypoxia-regulated protein and a prognostic marker in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). Here we assessed the ability of non-peptidic galectin-1 inhibitor OTX008 to improve tumor oxygenation levels via tumor vessel normalization as well as tumor growth inhibition in two human HNSCC tumor models, the human laryngeal squamous carcinoma SQ20B and the human epithelial type 2 HEp-2. Tumor-bearing mice were treated with OTX008, Anginex, or Avastin and oxygen levels were determined by fiber-optics and molecular marker pimonidazole binding. Immuno-fluorescence was used to determine vessel normalization status. Continued OTX008 treatment caused a transient reoxygenation in SQ20B tumors peaking on day 14, while a steady increase in tumor oxygenation was observed over 21 days in the HEp-2 model. A >50% decrease in immunohistochemical staining for tumor hypoxia verified the oxygenation data measured using a partial pressure of oxygen (pO₂) probe. Additionally, OTX008 induced tumor vessel normalization as tumor pericyte coverage increased by approximately 40% without inducing any toxicity. Moreover, OTX008 inhibited tumor growth as effectively as Anginex and Avastin, except in the HEp-2 model where Avastin was found to suspend tumor growth. Galectin-1 inhibitor OTX008 transiently increased overall tumor oxygenation via vessel normalization to various degrees in both HNSCC models. These findings suggest that targeting galectin-1-e.g., by OTX008-may be an effective approach to treat cancer patients as stand-alone therapy or in combination with other standards of care.

  15. Tracking in vivo migration and distribution of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes by 5,6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester staining during cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei-li; Li, Suo-lin; Wen, Ming; Wen, Jun-ye; Han, Jie; Zhang, Hong-zhen; Gao, Fei; Cai, Jian-hui

    2013-08-01

    Killing of targeted tumors during adoptive cell transfer therapy is associated with cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) numbers, immunophenotype, tumor-specificity, and in vivo residence time, migration, and distribution. Therefore, tracing in vivo persistence, migration, and distribution of CTLs is important for cancer immunotherapy. Optimal staining concentration for CTL proliferation was determined by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and killing efficiencies of CTLs or carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE)-labeled melanoma antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CFSE-CTLs) for malignant melanoma cells in vitro were compared. Additionally, CFSE-CTLs were intravenously transfused to mice receiving B16 melanoma, and their residence time, migration, and distribution in vivo were observed by measuring fluorescence intensities of CFSE-CTLs per gram of tissue (%FI/g) in various tissues and analyzing tumor/non-tumor (T/NT) values. Anti-tumor effects of transferred CTLs and correlation between %FI/g and D-value of tumor size were analyzed. Five-micromolar CFSE was optimal for labeling CTLs with minimal cytotoxicity. No significant difference occurred between CTLs and CFSE-CTLs for tumor cell killing (P = 0.849) or interleukin-2 (P = 0.318) and interferon-γ (P = 0.201) levels. Distribution of CTLs in vivo varied with time. A negative correlation between %FI/g in tumors and D-value of tumor sizes by Spearman correlation analysis was observed. CTLs were recruited to and killed tumors from 6 hours to 3 days after cell infusion. CTLs were observed up to three weeks later in the tumor, liver, kidneys, and spleen; this was related to the abundant blood supply or the nature of immune organs. CCK-8 assay is a novel method to select optimal CFSE staining concentrations. Fluorescence intensity of transferred CTLs reflects their killing efficiency of tumors. CFSE fluorescent markers can trace in vivo CTL persistence, migration, and distribution because of its stability

  16. In vivo imaging of cell nuclei by photoacoustic microscopy without staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Da-Kang; Chen, Ruimin; Maslov, Konstantin; Zhou, Qifa; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    Ultraviolet photoacoustic microscopy (UVPAM) can image cell nuclei in vivo with high contrast and resolution noninvasively without staining. Here, we used UV light at wavelengths of 210-310 nm for excitation of DNA and RNA to produce photoacoustic waves. We applied the UVPAM to in vivo imaging of cell nuclei in mouse skin, and obtained UVPAM images of the unstained cell nuclei at wavelengths of 245-282 nm as ultrasound gel was used for acoustic coupling. The largest ratio of contrast to noise was found for the images of cell nuclei at a 250 nm wavelength.

  17. Antitumor Cell-Complex Vaccines Employing Genetically Modified Tumor Cells and Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Miguel

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluates the immune response mediated by vaccination with cell complexes composed of irradiated B16 tumor cells and mouse fibroblasts genetically modified to produce GM-CSF. The animals were vaccinated with free B16 cells or cell complexes. We employed two gene plasmid constructions: one high producer (pMok and a low producer (p2F. Tumor transplant was performed by injection of B16 tumor cells. Plasma levels of total IgG and its subtypes were measured by ELISA. Tumor volumes were measured and survival curves were obtained. The study resulted in a cell complex vaccine able to stimulate the immune system to produce specific anti-tumor membrane proteins (TMP IgG. In the groups vaccinated with cells transfected with the low producer plasmid, IgG production was higher when we used free B16 cell rather than cell complexes. Nonspecific autoimmune response caused by cell complex was not greater than that induced by the tumor cells alone. Groups vaccinated with B16 transfected with low producer plasmid reached a tumor growth delay of 92% (p ≤ 0.01. When vaccinated with cell complex, the best group was that transfected with high producer plasmid, reaching a tumor growth inhibition of 56% (p ≤ 0.05. Significant survival (40% was only observed in the groups vaccinated with free transfected B16 cells.

  18. Identification of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper as a key regulator of tumor cell proliferation in epithelial ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez Hervé

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the molecules that contribute to tumor progression of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC, currently a leading cause of mortality from gynecological malignancies. Glucocorticoid-Induced Leucine Zipper (GILZ, an intracellular protein widely expressed in immune tissues, has been reported in epithelial tissues and controls some of key signaling pathways involved in tumorigenesis. However, there has been no report on GILZ in EOC up to now. The objectives of the current study were to examine the expression of GILZ in EOC and its effect on tumor cell proliferation. Results GILZ expression was measured by immunohistochemical staining in tissue sections from 3 normal ovaries, 7 benign EOC and 50 invasive EOC. GILZ was not detected on the surface epithelium of normal ovaries and benign tumors. In contrast, it was expressed in the cytoplasm of tumor cells in 80% EOC specimens. GILZ immunostaining scores correlated positively to the proliferation marker Ki-67 (Spearman test in univariate analysis, P P Conclusion The present study is the first to identify GILZ as a molecule produced by ovarian cancer cells that promotes cell cycle progression and proliferation. Our findings clearly indicate that GILZ activates AKT, a crucial signaling molecule in tumorigenesis. GILZ thus appears as a potential key molecule in EOC.

  19. Interference with PSMB4 Expression Exerts an Anti-Tumor Effect by Decreasing the Invasion and Proliferation of Human Glioblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen Cheng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Glioblastoma (GBM is a malignant brain tumor with a poor prognosis. Proteasome subunit beta type-4 (PSMB4 is an essential subunit that contributes to the assembly of the 20S proteasome complex. However, the role of PSMB4 in glioblastomas remains to be clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of PSMB4 in GBM tumor progression. Methods: We first analyzed the PSMB4 protein and mRNA expression in 80 clinical brain specimens and 77 datasets from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database. Next, we inhibited the PSMB4 expression by siRNA in cellular and animal models to explore PSMB4’s underlying mechanisms. The cell survival after siPSMB4 transfection was assayed by MTT assay. Annexin V and propidium iodide staining was used to monitor the apoptosis by flow cytometric analysis. Moreover, the migration and invasion were evaluated by wound healing and Transwell assays. The expression of migration-related and invasion-related proteins after PSMB4 inhibition was detected by Western blotting. In addition, an orthotropic xenograft mouse model was used to assay the effect of PSMB4 knockdown in the in vivo study. Results: Basis on the results of bioinformatics study, glioma patients with higher PSMB4 expression had a shorter survival time than those with lower PSMB4 expression. The staining of clinical brain tissues showed elevated PSMB4 expression in GBM tissues compared with normal brain tissues. The PSMB4 inhibition decreased proliferation, migration and invasion abilities in human GBM cells. Downregulated PSMB4 resulted in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vitro. In an orthotropic xenograft mouse model, the glioma tumors progression was reduced when PSMB4 was down-regulated. The decreased PSMB4 enhanced the anti-tumor effect of temozolomide (TMZ on tumor growth. In addition, the absence of PSMB4 decreased the expression of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase and

  20. Studies on cross-immunity among syngeneic tumors by immunization with gamma-irradiated tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Izumi

    1977-01-01

    In order to clarify whether cross-immunity among 3-methyl-cholanthrene (MCA)-induced sarcomas in C3H/He mice can be established or not, transplantations of syngeneic tumors were carried out in mice immunized with gamma-irradiated (13,000 rad 60 Co) tumor cells and in those immunized with living tumor cells thereafter. The following results were obtained. By using immunizing procedure with only gamma-irradiated tumor cells, a pair of tumors originating from one and the same mouse showed cross-resistance to each other. However, no such evidence was seen among tumors originating from different mice. Cross-immunity among syngeneic tumors originating from different mice could be clearly observed, when immunizing procedure using living tumor cells was added after the treatment with gamma-irradiated tumor cells. It was considered that common antigenicity among MCA-induced sarcoma cells was decreased by gamma-irradiation and that individual differences of tumor antigenecity were shown distinctly under such conditions. (auth.)

  1. Gross Morphology and Localization of Adenohypophyseal Cells in Camel (Camelus dromedarius Using A New Combination of Stains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. S. Jaspal, Z. U. Rahman* and A. M. Cheema

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty normal camels (Camelus dromedarius were selected for gross morphological and modified staining of anterior pituitary. Camels were divided in three age groups viz 2-4, 5-10 and above 10 years. Pituitary weight, length, width and circumference were recorded before preservation and at midsegittal cutting. Pituitary weight increased significantly as these animals grew older. Male had heavier pituitary as compared to female. Higher pituitary weight was observed in old as compared to young camel. Sections (4m of camel pituitary gland were stained with “Phosphotungstic acid haematoxylin-Orange G-Acid fuchsin-Light green” combination of dyes. This combination of acidic and basic dyes showed affinity to their respective adenohypophyseal cells and proved a suitable combination for differentiation of adenohypophyseal cells and architectural pattern of pituitary gland. Use of Lugol’s Iodine and sodium thiosulphate solution caused mercury fixation which ultimately enhanced the staining of camel adenohypophysis. The whole pituitary presented a brilliant appearance of clarity, enabling cell counts to be performed easily, purely with reference to the colors of adenohypophyseal cell types. This method can be applied for differential staining of adenohypophysis and with good cytology results to the hypophysis of many mammals. The method also provides a sharp contrast between cellular and connective tissue components. With this staining technique, the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of different adenohypophyseal cell types at various functional and hormonal stages, under certain physiological and pathological conditions can also be studied.

  2. Development of one control and one tumor-specific induced pluripotent stem cell line from laryngeal carcinoma patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamin Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Skin fibroblasts and tumor fibroblasts were extracted from a 64-year old male patient clinically diagnosed with laryngeal carcinoma. Control and tumor specific induced pluripotent stem cells were reprogrammed with 5 reprogramming factors, Klf-4, c-Myc, Oct-4, Sox-2, and Lin-28, using the messenger RNA reprogramming system. The transgene-free iPSC lines showed pluripotency, confirmed by immunofluorescence staining. The iPSC lines also showed normal karyotype, and could form embryoid bodies in vitro and differentiate into the 3 germ layers in vivo. This in vitro cellular model can be used to study the oncogenesis and pathogenesis of laryngeal carcinoma.

  3. Gold namoprtices enhance anti-tumor effect of radiotherapy to hypoxic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sun; Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Jae Won; Keum, Ki Chang; Koom, Woong Sub [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Ui Seok; Koh, Won Gun [Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Hypoxia can impair the therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapy (RT). Therefore, a new strategy is necessary for enhancing the response to RT. In this study, we investigated whether the combination of nanoparticles and RT is effective in eliminating the radioresistance of hypoxic tumors. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) consisting of a silica core with a gold shell were used. CT26 colon cancer mouse model was developed to study whether the combination of RT and GNPs reduced hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) was used as a hypoxia marker. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining were conducted to evaluate cell death. Hypoxic tumor cells had an impaired response to RT. GNPs combined with RT enhanced anti-tumor effect in hypoxic tumor compared with RT alone. The combination of GNPs and RT decreased tumor cell viability compare to RT alone in vitro. Under hypoxia, tumors treated with GNPs + RT showed a higher response than that shown by tumors treated with RT alone. When a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger was added, the enhanced antitumor effect of GNPs + RT was diminished. In the present study, hypoxic tumors treated with GNPs + RT showed favorable responses, which might be attributable to the ROS production induced by GNPs + RT. Taken together, GNPs combined with RT seems to be potential modality for enhancing the response to RT in hypoxic tumors.

  4. Gold namoprtices enhance anti-tumor effect of radiotherapy to hypoxic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Sun; Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Jae Won; Keum, Ki Chang; Koom, Woong Sub; Chung, Ui Seok; Koh, Won Gun

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia can impair the therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapy (RT). Therefore, a new strategy is necessary for enhancing the response to RT. In this study, we investigated whether the combination of nanoparticles and RT is effective in eliminating the radioresistance of hypoxic tumors. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) consisting of a silica core with a gold shell were used. CT26 colon cancer mouse model was developed to study whether the combination of RT and GNPs reduced hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) was used as a hypoxia marker. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining were conducted to evaluate cell death. Hypoxic tumor cells had an impaired response to RT. GNPs combined with RT enhanced anti-tumor effect in hypoxic tumor compared with RT alone. The combination of GNPs and RT decreased tumor cell viability compare to RT alone in vitro. Under hypoxia, tumors treated with GNPs + RT showed a higher response than that shown by tumors treated with RT alone. When a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger was added, the enhanced antitumor effect of GNPs + RT was diminished. In the present study, hypoxic tumors treated with GNPs + RT showed favorable responses, which might be attributable to the ROS production induced by GNPs + RT. Taken together, GNPs combined with RT seems to be potential modality for enhancing the response to RT in hypoxic tumors

  5. Role of Axumin PET Scan in Germ Cell Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-01

    Testis Cancer; Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Cancer; Germ Cell Tumor of Testis; Germ Cell Tumor, Testicular, Childhood; Testicular Neoplasms; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Choriocarcinoma; Testicular Diseases; Germ Cell Cancer Metastatic; Germ Cell Neoplasm of Retroperitoneum; Germ Cell Cancer, Nos

  6. Nonviral gene therapy in vivo with PAM-RG4/apoptin as a potential brain tumor therapeutic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An S

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Songhie An,* Kihoon Nam,* Sunghyun Choi, Cheng Z Bai, Yan Lee, Jong-Sang ParkDepartment of Chemistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Glioma is still one of the most complicated forms of brain tumor to remove completely due to its location and the lack of an efficient means to specifically eliminate tumor cells. For these reasons, this study has examined the effectiveness of a nonviral gene therapy approach utilizing a tumor-selective killer gene on a brain tumor xenograft model.Methods and results: The therapeutic apoptin gene was recombined into the JDK plasmid and delivered into human brain tumor cells (U87MG by using a polyamidoamine dendrimer with an arginine surface (PAM-RG4. Studies in vitro showed that the PAM-RG4/apoptin plasmid polyplex exhibited a particularly high transfection activity of >40%. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay, 4´,6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI TUNEL assay, DAPI staining, and caspase-3 activity assay verified that the tumor cells had undergone apoptosis induced by apoptin. For in vivo studies, the polyplex was injected into tumors, which were induced by injecting U87MG cells intradermally into nude mice. Based on hematoxylin and eosin staining, epidermal growth factor receptor immunohistochemistry results and tumor volume measurement results, tumor growth was effectively inhibited and no specific edema, irritation, or other harm to the skin was observed after polyplex injection. The in vivo expression of apoptin and the induction of apoptosis were verified by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis, TUNEL assay, and DAPI staining.Conclusion: The PAM-RG4/apoptin gene polyplex is a strong candidate for brain tumor therapeutics because of the synergistic effect of the carrier's high transfection efficiency (35%–40% in glioma cells and the selective apoptosis-inducing activity of

  7. Optimizing Staining Protocols for Laser Microdissection of Specific Cell Types from the Testis Including Carcinoma In Situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Si Brask; Dalgaard, Marlene D; Nielsen, John Erik

    2009-01-01

    Microarray and RT-PCR based methods are important tools for analysis of gene expression; however, in tissues containing many different cells types, such as the testis, characterization of gene expression in specific cell types can be severely hampered by noise from other cells. The laser microdis......Microarray and RT-PCR based methods are important tools for analysis of gene expression; however, in tissues containing many different cells types, such as the testis, characterization of gene expression in specific cell types can be severely hampered by noise from other cells. The laser...... protocols, and present two staining protocols for frozen sections, one for fast and specific staining of fetal germ cells, testicular carcinoma in situ cells, and other cells with embryonic stem cell-like properties that express the alkaline phosphatase, and one for specific staining of lipid droplet...

  8. Utility of Fite-Faraco stain for both mast cell count and bacillary index in skin biopsies of leprosy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatura, K R; Sangeetha, S

    2012-01-01

    To assess the utility of a single stain for both mast cell count and bacillary index (BI), 50 skin-biopsie patients were stained with Fite-Faraco (FF) stain, viewed under oil immersion and BI calculated using the Ridley's logarithmic scale, and mast cells counted as the number of cells per mm2. Mean mast cell count per mm2 at the tuberculoid pole was lowest in TT 7.9 and highest in BT 14.23. At the lepromatous end, it was highest in BL 9.21, while in LL it was 8.23. Highest counts were seen in the borderline types overall. The correlation coefficient between histopathological diagnosis and BI is 0.822 which is a positive correlation to a significant degree. The correlation coefficient between histopathological diagnosis and mast cell count was found to be -0.17, which is a negative correlation but not to a significant degree. FF stain was utilised to visualise both bacilli for estimation of BI and mast cells for mast cell count, a seldom attempted feature in literature.

  9. Porcine intestinal mast cells. Evaluation of different fixatives for histochemical staining techniques considering tissue shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rieger

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Staining of mast cells (MCs, including porcine ones, is critically dependent upon the fixation and staining technique. In the pig, mucosal and submucosal MCs do not stain or stain only faintly after formalin fixation. Some fixation methods are particularly recommended for MC staining, for example the fixation with Carnoy or lead salts. Zinc salt fixation (ZSF has been reported to work excellently for the preservation of fixation-sensitive antigens. The aim of this study was to establish a reliable histological method for counting of MCs in the porcine intestinum. For this purpose, different tissue fixation and staining methods that also allow potential subsequent immunohistochemical investigations were evaluated in the porcine mucosa, as well as submucosa of small and large intestine. Tissues were fixed in Carnoy, lead acetate, lead nitrate, Zamboni and ZSF and stained subsequently with either polychromatic methylene blue, alcian blue or toluidine blue. For the first time our study reveals that ZSF, a heavy metal fixative, preserves metachromatic staining of porcine MCs. Zamboni fixation was not suitable for histochemical visualization of MCs in the pig intestine. All other tested fixatives were suitable. Alcian blue and toluidine blue co-stained intestinal goblet cells which made a prima facie identification of MCs difficult. The polychromatic methylene blue proved to be the optimal staining. In order to compare MC counting results of the different fixation methods, tissue shrinkage was taken into account. As even the same fixation caused shrinkage-differences between tissue from small and large intestine, different factors for each single fixation and intestinal localization had to be calculated. Tissue shrinkage varied between 19% and 57%, the highest tissue shrinkage was found after fixation with ZSF in the large intestine, the lowest one in the small intestine after lead acetate fixation. Our study emphasizes that MC counting results from

  10. Nile Red Staining for Oil Determination in Microalgal Cells: A New Insight through Statistical Modelling

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    Ronald Halim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the wake of global warming and rapid fossil fuel depletion, microalgae emerge as promising feedstocks for sustainable biofuel production. Nile red staining acts as a rapid diagnostic tool to measure the amount of biodiesel-convertible lipid that the cells accumulate. There is a need for the development of a more uniform staining procedure. In its first phase, this study examined the dependence of microalgal Nile red fluorescence (Tetraselmis suecica in terms of its most pertinent staining variables. A quadratic surface model that successfully described the Nile red fluorescence intensity as a composite function of its variables was generated (r2=0.86. Cell concentration was shown to have a significant effect on the fluorescence intensity. Up to a certain threshold, fluorescence intensity was shown to increase with Nile red dye concentration. In its second phase, the study reviewed findings from previous Nile red studies to elucidate some of the fundamental mechanism underlying the diffusion of Nile red dye molecules into the microalgal cells and their subsequent interaction with intracellular lipids. Through the review process, we were able to develop a simple framework that provided a set of guidelines for the standardization of the Nile red staining procedure across different microalgal species.

  11. Phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of tumor tissue and circulating tumor cells in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: A report from the PETRUS prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massard, Christophe; Oulhen, Marianne; Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Auger, Nathalie; Foulon, Stéphanie; Abou-Lovergne, Aurélie; Billiot, Fanny; Valent, Alexander; Marty, Virginie; Loriot, Yohann; Fizazi, Karim; Vielh, Philippe; Farace, Francoise

    2016-08-23

    Molecular characterization of cancer samples is hampered by tumor tissue availability in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients. We reported the results of prospective PETRUS study of biomarker assessment in paired primary prostatic tumors, metastatic biopsies and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Among 54 mCRPC patients enrolled, 38 (70%) had biopsies containing more than 50% tumour cells. 28 (52%) patients were analyzed for both tissue samples and CTCs. FISH for AR-amplification and TMPRSS2-ERG translocation were successful in 54% and 32% in metastatic biopsies and primary tumors, respectively. By comparing CellSearch and filtration (ISET)-enrichment combined to four color immunofluorescent staining, we showed that CellSearch and ISET isolated distinct subpopulations of CTCs: CTCs undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, CTC clusters and large CTCs with cytomorphological characteristics but no detectable markers were isolated using ISET. Epithelial CTCs detected by the CellSearch were mostly lost during the ISET-filtration. AR-amplification was detected in CellSearch-captured CTCs, but not in ISET-enriched CTCs which harbor exclusively AR gain of copies. Eighty-eight percent concordance for ERG-rearrangement was observed between metastatic biopsies and CTCs even if additional ERG-alteration patterns were detected in ISET-enriched CTCs indicating a higher heterogeneity in CTCs.Molecular screening of metastatic biopsies is achievable in a multicenter context. Our data indicate that CTCs detected by the CellSearch and the ISET-filtration systems are not only phenotypically but also genetically different. Close attention must be paid to CTC characterization since neither approach tested here fully reflects the tremendous phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity present in CTCs from mCRPC patients.

  12. Associations of Tumor PD-1 Ligands, Immunohistochemical Studies, and Textural Features in 18F-FDG PET in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck.

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    Chen, Rui-Yun; Lin, Ying-Chun; Shen, Wei-Chih; Hsieh, Te-Chun; Yen, Kuo-Yang; Chen, Shang-Wen; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2018-01-08

    To know tumor PD-L1 expression through IHC or the FDG-PET related radiomics, we investigated the association between programmed cell death protein 1 ligand (PD-L1) expression and immunohistochemical (IHC) biomarkers or textural features of 18F-fluoro-2-deoxdeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET) in 53 oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer patients who were ready to undergo radiotherapy-based treatment. Differences in textural features or biomarkers between tumors with and without PD-L1 expression were tested using a Mann-Whitney U test. The predicted values for PD-L1 expression were examined using logistic regression analysis. The mean percentages of tumor PD-L1 expression were 6.2 ± 13.5. Eighteen tumors had PD-L1 expression ≥5%, whereas 30 tumors ≥1%. Using a 5% cutoff, the p16 staining percentage and the textural index of correlation were two factors associated with PD-L1 expression. The odds ratios (ORs) were 17.00 (p = 0.028) and 0.009 (p = 0.015), respectively. When dichotomizing PD-L1 at 1%, the p16 and Ki-67 staining percentages were two predictors for PD-L1 expression with ORs of 11.41 (p = 0.035) and 757.77 (p = 0.045). p16 and Ki-67 staining percentages and several PET/CT-derived textural features can provide supplemental information to determine tumor PD-L1 expression in HNCs.

  13. Fibroblast spheroids as a model to study sustained fibroblast quiescence and their crosstalk with tumor cells

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    Salmenperä, Pertteli, E-mail: pertteli.salmenpera@helsinki.fi [Department of Virology, Medicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 21, FIN-00014 (Finland); Karhemo, Piia-Riitta [Research Programs Unit, Translational Cancer Biology, and Institute of Biomedicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 63, FIN-00014 (Finland); Räsänen, Kati [Department of Virology, Medicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 21, FIN-00014 (Finland); Laakkonen, Pirjo [Research Programs Unit, Translational Cancer Biology, and Institute of Biomedicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 63, FIN-00014 (Finland); Vaheri, Antti [Department of Virology, Medicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 21, FIN-00014 (Finland)

    2016-07-01

    Stromal fibroblasts have an important role in regulating tumor progression. Normal and quiescent fibroblasts have been shown to restrict and control cancer cell growth, while cancer-associated, i. e. activated fibroblasts have been shown to enhance proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. In this study we describe generation of quiescent fibroblasts in multicellular spheroids and their effects on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) growth in soft-agarose and xenograft models. Quiescent phenotype of fibroblasts was determined by global down-regulation of expression of genes related to cell cycle and increased expression of p27. Interestingly, microarray analysis showed that fibroblast quiescence was associated with similar secretory phenotype as seen in senescence and they expressed senescence-associated-β-galactosidase. Quiescent fibroblasts spheroids also restricted the growth of RT3 SCC cells both in soft-agarose and xenograft models unlike proliferating fibroblasts. Restricted tumor growth was associated with marginally increased tumor cell senescence and cellular differentiation, showed with senescence-associated-β-galactosidase and cytokeratin 7 staining. Our results show that the fibroblasts spheroids can be used as a model to study cellular quiescence and their effects on cancer cell progression. - Highlights: • Fibroblasts acquire a sustained quiescence when grown as multicellular spheroids. • This quiescence is associated with drastic change in gene expression. • Fibroblasts spheroids secrete various inflammation-linked cytokines and chemokines. • Fibroblasts spheroids reduced growth of RT3 SCC cells in xenograft model.

  14. Caffeine decreases phospho-Chk1 (Ser317) and increases mitotic cells with cyclin B1 and caspase 3 in tumors from UVB-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yao-Ping; Lou, You-Rong; Peng, Qing-Yun; Nghiem, Paul; Conney, Allan H

    2011-07-01

    Oral administration of caffeine to mice inhibits UVB-induced carcinogenesis, and these results are paralleled by epidemiology studies indicating that caffeinated coffee and tea intake (but not decaffeinated beverage intake) is associated with decreased incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancer. Topical applications of caffeine to the skin of SKH-1 mice that had previously been treated with UVB inhibited subsequent skin tumor development and stimulated apoptosis in tumors but not in nontumor areas of the epidermis. This study sought to determine the basis of these differential effects on tumor versus nontumor sites that can be induced by caffeine, long after all UVB treatment has ceased. The activation status of the ATR/Chk1 pathway in UVB-induced tumors and uninvolved skin was determined by quantitating phospho-Chk1 (Ser317) and induction of lethal mitosis in vivo in the presence and absence of topical caffeine treatment. In the absence of caffeine, we found that UVB-induced tumors often had islands of phospho-Chk1 (Ser317) staining cells that were not present in nontumor areas of the epidermis. Treatment of mice with topical caffeine significantly diminished phospho-Chk1 (Ser317) staining and increased the number of mitotic cells that expressed cyclin B1 and caspase 3 in tumors, consistent with caffeine-induced lethal mitosis selectively in tumors. We hypothesize that compared with adjacent uninvolved skin, UVB-induced skin tumors have elevated activation of, and dependence on, the ATR/Chk1 pathway long after UVB exposure has ceased and that caffeine can induce apoptosis selectively in tumors by inhibiting this pathway and promoting lethal mitosis.

  15. Tumor-associated macrophages in glioblastoma multiforme-a suitable target for somatostatin receptor-based imaging and therapy?

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    Constantin Lapa

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM have been shown to promote malignant growth and to correlate with poor prognosis. [1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-NN',N″,N'″-tetraacetic acid]-d-Phe1,Tyr3-octreotate (DOTATATE labeled with Gallium-68 selectively binds to somatostatin receptor 2A (SSTR2A which is specifically expressed and up-regulated in activated macrophages. On the other hand, the role of SSTR2A expression on the cell surface of glioma cells has not been fully elucidated yet. The aim of this study was to non-invasively assess SSTR2A expression of both glioma cells as well as macrophages in GBM.15 samples of patient-derived GBM were stained immunohistochemically for macrophage infiltration (CD68, proliferative activity (Ki67 as well as expression of SSTR2A. Anti-CD45 staining was performed to distinguish between resident microglia and tumor-infiltrating macrophages. In a subcohort, positron emission tomography (PET imaging using 68Ga-DOTATATE was performed and the semiquantitatively evaluated tracer uptake was compared to the results of immunohistochemistry.The amount of microglia/macrophages ranged from 50% in the tumor samples with the vast majority being resident microglial cells. A strong SSTR2A immunostaining was observed in endothelial cells of proliferating vessels, in neurons and neuropile. Only faint immunostaining was identified on isolated microglial and tumor cells. Somatostatin receptor imaging revealed areas of increased tracer accumulation in every patient. However, retention of the tracer did not correlate with immunohistochemical staining patterns.SSTR2A seems not to be overexpressed in GBM samples tested, neither on the cell surface of resident microglia or infiltrating macrophages, nor on the surface of tumor cells. These data suggest that somatostatin receptor directed imaging and treatment strategies are less promising in GBM.

  16. Tumor cell culture on collagen–chitosan scaffolds as three-dimensional tumor model: A suitable model for tumor studies

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    Aziz Mahmoudzadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cells naturally live in three-dimensional (3D microenvironments, while common laboratory tests and evaluations are done in two-dimensional (2D plates. This study examined the impact of cultured 4T1 cancer cells in a 3D collagen–chitosan scaffold compared with 2D plate cultures. Collagen–chitosan scaffolds were provided and passed confirmatory tests. 4T1 tumor cells were cultured on scaffolds and then tumor cells growth rate, resistance to X-ray radiation, and cyclophosphamide as a chemotherapy drug were analyzed. Furthermore, 4T1 cells were extracted from the scaffold model and were injected into the mice. Tumor growth rate, survival rate, and systemic immune responses were evaluated. Our results showed that 4T1 cells infiltrated the scaffolds pores and constructed a 3D microenvironment. Furthermore, 3D cultured tumor cells showed a slower proliferation rate, increased levels of survival to the X-ray irradiation, and enhanced resistance to chemotherapy drugs in comparison with 2D plate cultures. Transfer of extracted cells to the mice caused enhanced tumor volume and decreased life span. This study indicated that collagen–chitosan nanoscaffolds provide a suitable model of tumor that would be appropriate for tumor studies.

  17. Tumor cell culture on collagen-chitosan scaffolds as three-dimensional tumor model: A suitable model for tumor studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudzadeh, Aziz; Mohammadpour, Hemn

    2016-07-01

    Tumor cells naturally live in three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments, while common laboratory tests and evaluations are done in two-dimensional (2D) plates. This study examined the impact of cultured 4T1 cancer cells in a 3D collagen-chitosan scaffold compared with 2D plate cultures. Collagen-chitosan scaffolds were provided and passed confirmatory tests. 4T1 tumor cells were cultured on scaffolds and then tumor cells growth rate, resistance to X-ray radiation, and cyclophosphamide as a chemotherapy drug were analyzed. Furthermore, 4T1 cells were extracted from the scaffold model and were injected into the mice. Tumor growth rate, survival rate, and systemic immune responses were evaluated. Our results showed that 4T1 cells infiltrated the scaffolds pores and constructed a 3D microenvironment. Furthermore, 3D cultured tumor cells showed a slower proliferation rate, increased levels of survival to the X-ray irradiation, and enhanced resistance to chemotherapy drugs in comparison with 2D plate cultures. Transfer of extracted cells to the mice caused enhanced tumor volume and decreased life span. This study indicated that collagen-chitosan nanoscaffolds provide a suitable model of tumor that would be appropriate for tumor studies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Nestin expression in neuroepithelial tumors.

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    Schiffer, Davide; Manazza, Andrea; Tamagno, Ilaria

    2006-05-29

    Nestin is a marker of early stages of neurocytogenesis. It has been studied in 50 neuroepithelial tumors, mostly gliomas of different malignancy grades, by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, immunoblotting, and confocal microscopy and compared with GFAP and Vimentin. As an early marker of differentiation, Nestin is almost not expressed in diffuse astrocytomas, variably expressed in anaplastic astrocytomas and strongly and irregularly expressed in glioblastomas. Negative in oligodendrogliomas, it stains ependymomas and shows a gradient of expression in pilocytic astrocytomas. In glioblastomas, Nestin distribution does not completely correspond to that of GFAP and Vimentin with which its expression varies in tumor cells in a complementary way, as confirmed by confocal microscopy. Tumor cells can thus either derive from or differentiate toward the neurocytogenetic stages. Hypothetically, they could be put in relation with radial glia where during embriogenesis the three antigens are successively expressed. Completely negative cells of invasive or recurrent glioblastomas may represent malignant selected clones after accumulation of mutations or early stem cells not expressing antigens.

  19. Abalone visceral extract inhibit tumor growth and metastasis by modulating Cox-2 levels and CD8+ T cell activity

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    II Kim Jae

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abalone has long been used as a valuable food source in East Asian countries. Although the nutritional importance of abalone has been reported through in vitro and in vivo studies, there is little evidence about the potential anti-tumor effects of abalone visceral extract. The aim of the present study is to examine anti-tumor efficacy of abalone visceral extract and to elucidate its working mechanism. Methods In the present study, we used breast cancer model using BALB/c mouse-derived 4T1 mammary carcinoma and investigated the effect of abalone visceral extract on tumor development. Inhibitory effect against tumor metastasis was assessed by histopathology of lungs. Cox-2 productions by primary and secondary tumor were measured by real-time RT-PCR and immunoblotting (IB. Proliferation assay based on [3H]-thymidine incorporation and measurement of cytokines and effector molecules by RT-PCR were used to confirm tumor suppression efficacy of abalone visceral extract by modulating cytolytic CD8+ T cells. The cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cell was compared by JAM test. Results Oral administration of abalone visceral extract reduced tumor growth (tumor volume and weight and showed reduced metastasis as confirmed by decreased level of splenomegaly (spleen size and weight and histological analysis of the lung metastasis (gross analysis and histological staining. Reduced expression of Cox-2 (mRNA and protein from primary tumor and metastasized lung was also detected. In addition, treatment of abalone visceral extract increased anti-tumor activities of CD8+ T cells by increasing the proliferation capacity and their cytolytic activity. Conclusions Our results suggest that abalone visceral extract has anti-tumor effects by suppressing tumor growth and lung metastasis through decreasing Cox-2 expression level as well as promoting proliferation and cytolytic function of CD8+ T cells.

  20. Abalone visceral extract inhibit tumor growth and metastasis by modulating Cox-2 levels and CD8+ T cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choong-Gu; Kwon, Ho-Keun; Ryu, Jae Ha; Kang, Sung Jin; Im, Chang-Rok; Ii Kim, Jae; Im, Sin-Hyeog

    2010-10-20

    Abalone has long been used as a valuable food source in East Asian countries. Although the nutritional importance of abalone has been reported through in vitro and in vivo studies, there is little evidence about the potential anti-tumor effects of abalone visceral extract. The aim of the present study is to examine anti-tumor efficacy of abalone visceral extract and to elucidate its working mechanism. In the present study, we used breast cancer model using BALB/c mouse-derived 4T1 mammary carcinoma and investigated the effect of abalone visceral extract on tumor development. Inhibitory effect against tumor metastasis was assessed by histopathology of lungs. Cox-2 productions by primary and secondary tumor were measured by real-time RT-PCR and immunoblotting (IB). Proliferation assay based on [3H]-thymidine incorporation and measurement of cytokines and effector molecules by RT-PCR were used to confirm tumor suppression efficacy of abalone visceral extract by modulating cytolytic CD8+ T cells. The cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cell was compared by JAM test. Oral administration of abalone visceral extract reduced tumor growth (tumor volume and weight) and showed reduced metastasis as confirmed by decreased level of splenomegaly (spleen size and weight) and histological analysis of the lung metastasis (gross analysis and histological staining). Reduced expression of Cox-2 (mRNA and protein) from primary tumor and metastasized lung was also detected. In addition, treatment of abalone visceral extract increased anti-tumor activities of CD8+ T cells by increasing the proliferation capacity and their cytolytic activity. Our results suggest that abalone visceral extract has anti-tumor effects by suppressing tumor growth and lung metastasis through decreasing Cox-2 expression level as well as promoting proliferation and cytolytic function of CD8+ T cells.

  1. Interaction of tumor cells with the microenvironment

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    Lehnert Hendrik

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent advances in tumor biology have revealed that a detailed analysis of the complex interactions of tumor cells with their adjacent microenvironment (tumor stroma is mandatory in order to understand the various mechanisms involved in tumor growth and the development of metastasis. The mutual interactions between tumor cells and cellular and non-cellular components (extracellular matrix = ECM of the tumor microenvironment will eventually lead to a loss of tissue homeostasis and promote tumor development and progression. Thus, interactions of genetically altered tumor cells and the ECM on the one hand and reactive non-neoplastic cells on the other hand essentially control most aspects of tumorigenesis such as epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT, migration, invasion (i.e. migration through connective tissue, metastasis formation, neovascularisation, apoptosis and chemotherapeutic drug resistance. In this mini-review we will focus on these issues that were recently raised by two review articles in CCS.

  2. Multiple Primary Merkel Cell Carcinomas Presenting as Pruritic, Painful Lower Leg Tumors

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    Blumenthal, Laura; VandenBoom, Timothy; Melian, Edward; Peterson, Anthony; Hutchens, Kelli A.

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and highly aggressive neuroendocrine tumor of the skin which almost exclusively presents as a solitary tumor. It is most often seen on sun-exposed regions, historically almost exclusively on the head and neck, with only rare case reports on the extremities. Although recent studies have shown increased incidence with up to 20% on the extremities, here we present one of these rare emerging presentations, with the addition of a unique treatment option. Our patient is an 80-year-old male with a 3-month history of multiple raised, rapidly enlarging tumors on the right ankle. Two separate biopsies were performed and demonstrated sheets and clusters of small blue cells filling the dermis with scant cytoplasm, dusty chromatin, and nuclear molding. Subsequent immunohistochemical stains confirmed the diagnosis of multiple primary MCC. Despite the characteristic immunohistochemical profile of primary MCC, the possibility of a metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma from an alternate primary site was entertained, given his unusual clinical presentation. A complete clinical workup including CT scans of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed no evidence of disease elsewhere. Instead of amputation, the patient opted for nonsurgical treatment with radiation therapy alone, resulting in a rapid and complete response. This case represents an unusual presentation of primary MCC and demonstrates further evidence that radiation as monotherapy is an effective local treatment option for inoperable MCC. PMID:26594171

  3. Vulnerability of cultured canine lung tumor cells to NK cell-mediated cytolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haley, P.J.; Kohr, J.M.; Kelly, G.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Guilmette, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Five cell lines, designated as canine lung epithelial cell (CLEP), derived from radiation induced canine lung tumors and canine thyroid adeno-carcinoma (CTAC) cells were compared for their susceptibility to NK cell-mediated cytolysis using peripheral blood lymphocytes from normal, healthy Beagle dogs as effector cells. Effector cells and chromium 51 radiolabeled target cells were incubated for 16 h at ratios of 12.5:1, 25:1, 50:1, and 100:1. Increasing cytolysis was observed for all cell lines as the effector-to-target-cell ratios increased from 12.5:1 to 100:1. The percent cytotoxicity was significantly less for all lung tumor cell lines as compared to CTAC at the 100:1 ratio. One lung tumor cell line, CLEP-9, had 85% of the lytic vulnerability of the CTAC cell line and significantly greater susceptibility to NK cell-mediated lysis than all of the other lung tumor cell lines. Susceptibility to NK cell cytolysis did not correlate with in vivo malignant behavior of the original tumor. These data suggest that cultured canine lung tumor cells are susceptible to NK cell cytolytic activity in vitro and that at least one of these cell lines (CLEP-9) is a candidate for substitution of the standard canine NK cell target, CTAC, in NK cell assays. The use of lung tumor cells in NK cell assays may provide greater insight into the control of lung tumors by immune mechanisms. (author)

  4. The lifetime of hypoxic human tumor cells

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    Durand, Ralph E.; Sham, Edward

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: For hypoxic and anoxic cells in solid tumors to be a therapeutic problem, they must live long enough to be therapeutically relevant, or else be rapidly recruited into the proliferating compartment during therapy. We have, therefore, estimated lifetime and recruitment rate of hypoxic human tumor cells in multicell spheroids in vitro, or in xenografted tumors in SCID mice. Materials and Methods: Cell turnover was followed by flow cytometry techniques, using antibodies directed at incorporated halogenated pyrimidines. The disappearance of labeled cells was quantified, and verified to be cell loss rather than label dilution. Repopulation was studied in SiHa tumor xenografts during twice-daily 2.5-Gy radiation exposures. Results: The longevity of hypoxic human tumor cells in spheroids or xenografts exceeded that of rodent cell lines, and cell turnover was slower in xenografts than under static growth as spheroids. Human tumor cells remained viable in the hypoxic regions of xenografts for 4-10 days, compared to 3-5 days in spheroids, and 1-3 days for most rodent cells in spheroids. Repopulation was observed within the first few radiation treatments for the SiHa xenografts and, with accumulated doses of more than 10 Gy, virtually all recovered cells had progressed through at least one S-phase. Conclusion: Our results suggest an important difference in the ability of human vs. rodent tumor cells to withstand hypoxia, and raise questions concerning the increased longevity seen in vivo relative to the steady-state spheroid system

  5. Assessment of intratumor hypoxia by integrated 18F-FDG PET / perfusion CT in a liver tumor model.

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    Yong Wang

    Full Text Available Hypoxia in solid tumors occurs when metabolic demands in tumor cells surpass the delivery of oxygenated blood. We hypothesize that the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG metabolism and tumor blood flow mismatch would correlate with tumor hypoxia.Liver perfusion computed tomography (CT and 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET imaging were performed in twelve rabbit livers implanted with VX2 carcinoma. Under CT guidance, a fiber optic probe was inserted into the tumor to measure the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2. Tumor blood flow (BF and standardized uptake value (SUV were measured to calculate flow-metabolism ratio (FMR. Tumor hypoxia was further identified using pimonidazole immunohistochemical staining. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to determine the correlation between the imaging parameters and pO2 and pimonidazole staining.Weak correlations were found between blood volume (BV and pO2 level (r = 0.425, P = 0.004, SUV and pO2 (r = -0.394, P = 0.007, FMR and pimonidazole staining score (r = -0.388, P = 0.031. However, there was stronger correlation between tumor FMR and pO2 level (r = 0.557, P < 0.001.FMR correlated with tumor oxygenation and pimonidazole staining suggesting it may be a potential hypoxic imaging marker in liver tumor.

  6. EpCAM-Independent Enrichment of Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneck, Helen; Gierke, Berthold; Uppenkamp, Frauke; Behrens, Bianca; Niederacher, Dieter; Stoecklein, Nikolas H.; Templin, Markus F.; Pawlak, Michael; Fehm, Tanja; Neubauer, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are the potential precursors of metastatic disease. Most assays established for the enumeration of CTCs so far–including the gold standard CellSearch—rely on the expression of the cell surface marker epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM). But, these approaches may not detect CTCs that express no/low levels of EpCAM, e.g. by undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here we present an enrichment strategy combining different antibodies specific for surface proteins and extracellular matrix (ECM) components to capture an EpCAMlow/neg cell line and EpCAMneg CTCs from blood samples of breast cancer patients depleted for EpCAM-positive cells. The expression of respective proteins (Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8, CD44, ADAM8, CD146, TEM8, CD47) was verified by immunofluorescence on EpCAMpos (e.g. MCF7, SKBR3) and EpCAMlow/neg (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines. To test antibodies and ECM proteins (e.g. hyaluronic acid (HA), collagen I, laminin) for capturing EpCAMneg cells, the capture molecules were first spotted in a single- and multi-array format onto aldehyde-coated glass slides. Tumor cell adhesion of EpCAMpos/neg cell lines was then determined and visualized by Coomassie/MitoTracker staining. In consequence, marginal binding of EpCAMlow/neg MDA-MB-231 cells to EpCAM-antibodies could be observed. However, efficient adhesion/capturing of EpCAMlow/neg cells could be achieved via HA and immobilized antibodies against CD49f and Trop2. Optimal capture conditions were then applied to immunomagnetic beads to detect EpCAMneg CTCs from clinical samples. Captured CTCs were verified/quantified by immunofluorescence staining for anti-pan-Cytokeratin (CK)-FITC/anti-CD45 AF647/DAPI. In total, in 20 out of 29 EpCAM-depleted fractions (69%) from 25 metastatic breast cancer patients additional EpCAMneg CTCs could be identified [range of 1–24 CTCs per sample] applying Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8 and/or HA magnetic enrichment. Ep

  7. Utility of Iron Staining in Identifying the Cause of Renal Allograft Dysfunction in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

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    Yingchun Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell nephropathy (SCN is associated with iron/heme deposition in proximal renal tubules and related acute tubular injury (ATI. Here we report the utility of iron staining in differentiating causes of renal allograft dysfunction in patients with a history of sickle cell disease. Case 1: the patient developed acute allograft dysfunction two years after renal transplant. Her renal biopsy showed ATI, supported by patchy loss of brush border and positive staining of kidney injury molecule-1 in proximal tubular epithelial cells, where diffuse increase in iron staining (2+ was present. This indicated that ATI likely resulted from iron/heme toxicity to proximal tubules. Electron microscope confirmed aggregated sickle RBCs in glomeruli, indicating a recurrent SCN. Case 2: four years after renal transplant, the patient developed acute allograft dysfunction and became positive for serum donor-specific antibody. His renal biopsy revealed thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA and diffuse positive C4d stain in peritubular capillaries. Iron staining was negative in the renal tubules, implying that TMA was likely associated with acute antibody-mediated rejection (AAMR, type 2 rather than recurrent SCN. These case reports imply that iron staining is an inexpensive but effective method in distinguishing SCN-associated renal injury in allograft kidney from other etiologies.

  8. [Isolation and identification of brain tumor stem cells from human brain neuroepithelial tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jia-sheng; Deng, Yong-wen; Li, Ming-chu; Chen, Feng-Hua; Wang, Yan-jin; Lu, Ming; Fang, Fang; Wu, Jun; Yang, Zhuan-yi; Zhou, Xang-yang; Wang, Fei; Chen, Cheng

    2007-01-30

    To establish a simplified culture system for the isolation of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) from the tumors of human neuroepithelial tissue, to observe the growth and differentiation pattern of BTSCs, and to investigate their expression of the specific markers. Twenty-six patients with brain neuroepithelial tumors underwent tumor resection. Two pieces of tumor tissues were taken from each tumor to be dissociated, triturated into single cells in sterile DMEM-F12 medium, and then filtered. The tumor cells were seeded at a concentration of 200,000 viable cells per mL into serum-free DMEM-F12 medium simply supplemented with B27, human basic fibroblast growth factor (20 microg/L), human epidermal growth factor (20 microg /L), insulin (4 U/L), L-glutamine, penicillin and streptomycin. After the primary brain tumor spheres (BTSs) were generated, they were triturated again and passed in fresh medium. Limiting dilution assay was performed to observe the monoclone formation. 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation test was performed to observe the proliferation of the BTS. The BTSCs were cultured in mitogen-free DMEM-F12 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum to observe their differentiation. Immunocytochemistry was used to examine the expression of CD133 and nestin, specific markers of BTSC, and the rate of CD133 positive cells. Only a minority of subsets of cells from the tumors of neuroepithelial tissue had the capacity to survive, proliferate, and generate free-floating neurosphere-like BTSs in the simplified serum-free medium. These cells attached to the poly-L-lysine coated coverslips in the serum-supplemented medium and differentiated. The BTSCs were CD133 and nestin positive. The rate of CD133 positive cells in the tumor specimens was (21 +/- 6.2)% - (38 +/- 7.0)%. A new simplified culture system for the isolation of BTSCs is established. The tumors of human neuroepithelial tissue contain CD133 and nestin positive tumor stem cells which can be isolated

  9. CXCL17 expression by tumor cells recruits CD11b+Gr1 high F4/80- cells and promotes tumor progression.

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    Aya Matsui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chemokines are involved in multiple aspects of pathogenesis and cellular trafficking in tumorigenesis. In this study, we report that the latest member of the C-X-C-type chemokines, CXCL17 (DMC/VCC-1, recruits immature myeloid-derived cells and enhances early tumor progression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CXCL17 was preferentially expressed in some aggressive types of gastrointestinal, breast, and lung cancer cells. CXCL17 expression did not impart NIH3T3 cells with oncogenic potential in vitro, but CXCL17-expressing NIH3T3 cells could form vasculature-rich tumors in immunodeficient mice. Our data showed that CXCL17-expressing tumor cells increased immature CD11b(+Gr1(+ myeloid-derived cells at tumor sites in mice and promoted CD31(+ tumor angiogenesis. Extensive chemotactic assays proved that CXCL17-responding cells were CD11b(+Gr1(highF4/80(- cells (≈ 90% with a neutrophil-like morphology in vitro. Although CXCL17 expression could not increase the number of CD11b(+Gr1(+ cells in tumor-burdened SCID mice or promote metastases of low metastatic colon cancer cells, the existence of CXCL17-responding myeloid-derived cells caused a striking enhancement of xenograft tumor formation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that aberrant expression of CXCL17 in tumor cells recruits immature myeloid-derived cells and promotes tumor progression through angiogenesis.

  10. Enhanced anti-tumor activity of a new curcumin-related compound against melanoma and neuroblastoma cells

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    Pastorino Fabio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sharing the common neuroectodermal origin, melanoma and neuroblastoma are tumors widely diffused among adult and children, respectively. Clinical prognosis of aggressive neuroectodermal cancers remains dismal, therefore the search for novel therapies against such tumors is warranted. Curcumin is a phytochemical compound widely studied for its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. Recently, we have synthesized and tested in vitro various curcumin-related compounds in order to select new anti-tumor agents displaying stronger and selective growth inhibition activity on neuroectodermal tumors. Results In this work, we have demonstrated that the new α,β-unsaturated ketone D6 was more effective in inhibiting tumor cells growth when compared to curcumin. Normal fibroblasts proliferation was not affected by this treatment. Clonogenic assay showed a significant dose-dependent reduction in both melanoma and neuroblastoma colony formation only after D6 treatment. TUNEL assay, Annexin-V staining, caspases activation and PARP cleavage unveiled the ability of D6 to cause tumor cell death by triggering apoptosis, similarly to curcumin, but with a stronger and quicker extent. These apoptotic features appear to be associated with loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c release. In vivo anti-tumor activity of curcumin and D6 was surveyed using sub-cutaneous melanoma and orthotopic neuroblastoma xenograft models. D6 treated mice exhibited significantly reduced tumor growth compared to both control and curcumin treated ones (Melanoma: D6 vs control: P and D6 vs curcumin P Neuroblastoma: D6 vs both control and curcumin: P . Conclusions Our data indicate D6 as a good candidate to develop new therapies against neural crest-derived tumors.

  11. Thrombomodulin as a marker for vascular tumors. Comparative study with factor VIII and Ulex europaeus I lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonezawa, S; Maruyama, I; Sakae, K; Igata, A; Majerus, P W; Sato, E

    1987-10-01

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is a newly described endothelial cell-associated protein that functions as a potent natural anticoagulant by converting thrombin from a procoagulant protease to an anticoagulant. Various vascular tumors were characterized with immunoperoxidase staining with the use of a polyclonal anti-TM serum. The staining patterns of TM were compared with those of Factor VIII-related antigen (FVIII-RAG) and Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I), which have been used as markers for endothelial cells. The results showed that TM is a specific and a highly sensitive marker for angiosarcomas in comparison with FVIII-RAG or UEA-I. In contrast, UEA-I is more sensitive for benign vascular tumors than TM or FVIII-RAG. The other mesenchymal tumors of nonvascular origin showed negative staining for three endothelial markers. These results indicate that TM is a new specific and sensitive tool for the diagnosis of angiosarcomas.

  12. Immunohistochemical analysis and prognostic significance of PD-L1, PD-1, and CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Isidro; López-Guerrero, Jose Antonio; Scotlandi, Katia; Picci, Piero; Llombart-Bosch, Antonio

    2018-05-01

    Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT) are aggressive neoplasms with scant tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. We analyzed the immunohistochemical (IHC) expression of PD-L1 and PD-1 and their prognostic significance in clinically localized neoplasms in a cohort of 370 ESFT. Slides prepared from tissue microarrays were stained for PD-L1, PD-1, and CD8. Membranous/cytoplasmic staining over 5% of tumor cells was regarded as positive for PD-L1 and PD-1. Prognostic analysis was done considering only clinically localized tumors (n = 217). PD-L1 expression was present in 19% of ESFT, while PD-1 was expressed in 26%. Forty-eight percent of tumors were negative and 12% were positive for both PD-L1 and PD-1. Metastatic tumors displayed higher expression of PD-L1 (p < 0.0001). Histological subtypes were not correlated with PD-L1 or PD-1 positivity. ESFT with elevated proliferation index (Ki-67) were associated with higher PD-L1 expression (p = 0.049). Regarding prognosis, no significant association was found between PD-L1 expression and progression-free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS), whereas lack of PD-1 expression in tumor cells was correlated with both poor PFS (p = 0.02) and poor OS (p = 0.004). Tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T lymphocytes were observed in 15.4% of ESFT with informative results (347 tumors). No correlation was found between tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T lymphocytes and ESFT histological subtypes, tumor location, or PD-1 and PD-L1 expression, nor with PFS (p = 0.473) or OS (p = 0.087). PD-L1 expression was not significantly related to prognosis. PD-1 was expressed in 26% of ESFT tumor cells and may have prognostic and therapeutic implications. CD8 expression in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes was not related to prognosis.

  13. Metaphyseal giant cell tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, L.F.; Hemais, P.M.P.G.; Aymore, I.L.; Carmo, M.C.R. do; Cunha, M.E.P.R. da; Resende, C.M.C.

    1986-01-01

    Three cases of metaphyseal giant cell tumor are presented. A review of the literature is done, demostrating the lesion is rare and that there are few articles about it. Age incidence and characteristics of the tumor are discussed. (Author) [pt

  14. Reduced H3K27me3 expression in Merkel cell polyoma virus-positive tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busam, Klaus J; Pulitzer, Melissa P; Coit, Daniel C; Arcila, Maria; Leng, Danielle; Jungbluth, Achim A; Wiesner, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a primary cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma, which once metastatic is difficult to treat. Recent mutation analyses of Merkel cell carcinoma revealed a low number of mutations in Merkel cell polyomavirus-associated tumors, and a high number of mutations in virus-negative combined squamous cell and neuroendocrine carcinomas of chronically sun-damaged skin. We speculated that the paucity of mutations in virus-positive Merkel cell carcinoma may reflect a pathomechanism that depends on derangements of chromatin without alterations in the DNA sequence (epigenetic dysregulation). One central epigenetic regulator is the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), which silences genomic regions by trimethylating (me3) lysine (K) 27 of histone H3, and thereby establishes the histone mark H3K27me3. Recent experimental research data demonstrated that PRC2 loss in mice skin results in the formation of Merkel cells. Prompted by these findings, we explored a possible contribution of PRC2 loss in human Merkel cell carcinoma. We examined the immunohistochemical expression of H3K27me3 in 35 Merkel cell carcinomas with pure histological features (22 primary and 13 metastatic lesions) and in 5 combined squamous and neuroendocrine carcinomas of the skin. We found a strong reduction of H3K27me3 staining in tumors with pure histologic features and virus-positive Merkel cell carcinomas. Combined neuroendocrine carcinomas had no or only minimal loss of H3K27me3 labeling. Our findings suggest that a PRC2-mediated epigenetic deregulation may play a role in the pathogenesis of virus-positive Merkel cell carcinomas and in tumors with pure histologic features.

  15. Treatment Combining X-Irradiation and a Ribonucleoside Anticancer Drug, TAS106, Effectively Suppresses the Growth of Tumor Cells Transplanted in Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasui, Hironobu; Inanami, Osamu; Asanuma, Taketoshi; Iizuka, Daisuke; Nakajima, Takayuki; Kon, Yasuhiro; Matsuda, Akira; Kuwabara, Mikinori

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the in vivo antitumor efficacy of X-irradiation combined with administration of a ribonucleoside anticancer drug, 1-(3-C-ethynyl-β-D-ribo-pentofuranosyl)cytosine (TAS106, ECyd), to tumor cell-transplanted mice. Methods and Materials: Colon26 murine rectum adenocarcinoma cells and MKN45 human gastric adenocarcinoma cells were inoculated into the footpad in BALB/c mice and severe combined immunodeficient mice, respectively. They were treated with a relatively low dose of X-irradiation (2 Gy) and low amounts of TAS106 (0.1 mg/kg and 0.5 mg/kg). The tumor growth was monitored by measuring the tumor volume from Day 5 to Day 16 for Colon26 and from Day 7 to Day 20 for MKN45. Histologic analyses for proliferative and apoptotic cells in the tumors were performed using Ki-67 immunohistochemical and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling staining. The expression of survivin, a key molecule related to tumor survival, was assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical analysis. Results: When X-irradiation and TAS106 treatment were combined, significant inhibition of tumor growth was observed in both types of tumors compared with mice treated with X-irradiation or TAS106 alone. Marked inhibition of tumor growth was observed in half of the mice that received the combined treatment three times at 2-day intervals. Parallel to these phenomena, the suppression of survivin expression and appearance of Ki-67-negative and apoptotic cells were observed. Conclusions: X-irradiation and TAS106 effectively suppress tumor growth in mice. The inhibition of survivin expression by TAS106 is thought to mainly contribute to the suppression of the tumor growth

  16. Antigen localization controls T cell-mediated tumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeelenberg, Ingrid S; van Maren, Wendy W C; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Van Hout-Kuijer, Maaike A; Den Brok, Martijn H M G M; Wagenaars, Jori A L; van der Schaaf, Alie; Jansen, Eric J R; Amigorena, Sebastian; Théry, Clotilde; Figdor, Carl G; Adema, Gosse J

    2011-08-01

    Effective antitumor immunotherapy requires the identification of suitable target Ags. Interestingly, many of the tumor Ags used in clinical trials are present in preparations of secreted tumor vesicles (exosomes). In this study, we compared T cell responses elicited by murine MCA101 fibrosarcoma tumors expressing a model Ag at different localizations within the tumor cell in association with secreted vesicles (exosomes), as a nonsecreted cell-associated protein, or as secreted soluble protein. Remarkably, we demonstrated that only the tumor-secreting vesicle-bound Ag elicited a strong Ag-specific CD8(+) T cell response, CD4(+) T cell help, Ag-specific Abs, and a decrease in the percentage of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells in the tumor. Moreover, in a therapeutic tumor model of cryoablation, only in tumors secreting vesicle-bound Ag could Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells still be detected up to 16 d after therapy. We concluded that the localization of an Ag within the tumor codetermines whether a robust immunostimulatory response is elicited. In vivo, vesicle-bound Ag clearly skews toward a more immunogenic phenotype, whereas soluble or cell-associated Ag expression cannot prevent or even delay outgrowth and results in tumor tolerance. This may explain why particular immunotherapies based on these vesicle-bound tumor Ags are potentially successful. Therefore, we conclude that this study may have significant implications in the discovery of new tumor Ags suitable for immunotherapy and that their location should be taken into account to ensure a strong antitumor immune response.

  17. The clinicopathological features of intermediate trophoblastic tumor in the pineal region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Yun-xiang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the clinicopathological features of intermediate trophoblastic tumor (ITT in the pineal region. Methods A retrospective study was performed to analyse the diagnostic and therapeutic process of 1 case with ITT in the pineal region. The specimen obtained from the surgery was dealt with common tissue processing mode and cut into slices. HE staining was performed to observe histophathological features. Immunohistochemical staining (SP two-step method was performed to analyse the expression of tumor markers. Related literatures were reviewed. Results A 6-year old boy with clinical manifestations of penis enlargement and rapid growth for more than one year, presented a mass in his pineal region through MRI. The tumor was surgically excised after it is refractory to 10 times experimental radiotherapy as germinoma. The level of β-human chorionic gonadotropin ( β-hCG in his postoperative blood was decreased to normal, but gradually increased, once again followed to normal after three times chemotherapy. Patient was normal almost postoperative 6 months later by follow -up. Pathological examination showed sheets necrosis with multiple calcification and scattered fresh blood cells, epithelioid tumor cells with solid growth pattern. The tumor cells were atypical mononuclear cells with relative uniform (between heterotypic cells and partially surrounding and invasing the vascular walls. The cytoplasm of tumor cells was eosinophilic or clear, the nucleus was round or irregular in shape and some with intranuclear pseudoinclusions, and its mitotic figures were rarely seen under light microscopy. The tumor cells showed strong positive for AE1/AE3, cell adhesion molecules 5.2 (CAM5.2, human placental lactogen (hPL, octamer-binding transcription factor 3/4 (Oct3/4, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and E-cadherin. P53 was also expressed. The positive rate of Ki-67 was about 10%, and β-hCG was expressed in the extremely tumor cells. The

  18. Radiation induction of drug resistance in RIF-1 tumors and tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopwood, L.E.; Moulder, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    The RIF-1 tumor cell line contains a small number of cells (1-20 per 10(6) cells) that are resistant to various single antineoplastic drugs, including 5-fluorouracil (5FU), methotrexate (MTX), and adriamycin (ADR). For 5FU the frequency of drug resistance is lower for tumor-derived cells than for cells from cell culture; for MTX the reverse is true, and for ADR there is no difference. In vitro irradiation at 5 Gy significantly increased the frequency of drug-resistant cells for 5FU, MTX, and ADR. In vivo irradiation at 3 Gy significantly increased the frequency of drug-resistant cells for 5FU and MTX, but not for ADR. The absolute risk for in vitro induction of MTX, 5FU, and ADR resistance, and for in vivo induction of 5FU resistance, was 1-3 per 10(6) cells per Gy; but the absolute risk for in vivo induction of MTX resistance was 54 per 10(6) cells per Gy. The frequency of drug-resistant cells among individual untreated tumors was highly variable; among individual irradiated tumors the frequency of drug-resistant cells was significantly less variable. These studies provide supporting data for models of the development of tumor drug resistance, and imply that some of the drug resistance seen when chemotherapy follows radiotherapy may be due to radiation-induced drug resistance

  19. Hirschsprung's disease diagnosis: Comparison of immunohistochemical, hematoxilin and eosin staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarzadeh, Mehrdad; Talebi, Ardeshir; Edalaty, Masod; Hosseinpour, Mehrdad; Vahidi, Nasrin

    2009-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease (HD) is based on the absence of ganglion cells. In hemotoxilin and eosin (H and E) as well as acetylcholine esterase staining there are limitations in the diagnosis of immature ganglion cells in neonates. Methods: In this prospective study, 54 biopsies taken from suspected HD patients (five mucosal specimens and 49 full thickness specimens) were studied. In the laboratory, after preparing sections of paraffin embedded tissues, H and E staining slides were compared with immunohistochemical (IHC) staining including: S100, NSE, CD117, CD56, Cathepsin D, Vimentin, BCL2, GFAP, Synaptophysin and chromogranin. Results: The study revealed 30 negative (absence of ganglion cells) cases (55.5%), 17 positive cases (31.04%) and seven suspected cases (12.9%) of ganglion cells on the H and E staining. On IHC staining with CD56 and Cathepsin D, all of the 17 positive cases detected through H and E, were confirmed for having ganglion cells and out of 30 cases reported negative on H and E staining, 28(93.3%) were reported negative and two (6.7%) positive by IHC staining. Of the seven suspected cases H and E staining), IHC staining detectedganglion cells only in five slides; two remained negative. Conclusions: IHC staining using CD56 and Cathepsin D improved the accuracy of diagnosis in HD when used in addition to H and E staining technique, especially for negative or suspicious slides. PMID:20671847

  20. Homogeneous pancreatic cancer spheroids mimic growth pattern of circulating tumor cell clusters and macrometastases: displaying heterogeneity and crater-like structure on inner layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hao; Ou, Bao-Chi; Zhao, Jing-Kun; Yin, Shuai; Lu, Ai-Guo; Oechsle, Eva; Thasler, Wolfgang E

    2017-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer 3D in vitro models including multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), single cell-derived tumor spheroid (SCTS), tissue-derived tumor spheroid, and organotypic models provided powerful platforms to mimic in vivo tumor. Recent work supports that circulating tumor cell (CTC) clusters are more efficient in metastasis seeding than single CTCs. The purpose of this study is to establish 3D culture models which can mimic single CTC, monoclonal CTC clusters, and the expansion of macrometastases. Seven pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell lines were used to establish MCTS and SCTS using hanging drop and ultra-low attachment plates. Spheroid immunofluorescence staining, spheroid formation assay, immunoblotting, and literature review were performed to investigate molecular biomarkers and the morphological characteristics of pancreatic tumor spheroids. Single cells experienced different growth patterns to form SCTS, like signet ring-like cells, blastula-like structures, and solid core spheroids. However, golf ball-like hollow spheroids could also be detected, especially when DanG and Capan-1 cells were cultivated with fibroblast-conditioned medium (p cell lines could also establish tumor spheroid with hanging drop plates by adding methylated cellulose. Tumor spheroids derived from pancreatic cancer cell line DanG possessed asymmetrically distributed proliferation center, immune-checkpoint properties. ß-catenin, Ki-67, and F-actin were active surrounding the crater-like structure distributing on the inner layer of viable rim cover of the spheroids, which was relevant to well-differentiated tumor cells. It is possible to establish 3D CTC cluster models from homogenous PDA cell lines using hanging drop and ultra-low attachment plates. PDA cell line displays its own intrinsic properties or heterogeneity. The mechanism of formation of the crater-like structure as well as golf ball-like structure needs further exploration.

  1. Metabolic flux ratio analysis and cell staining suggest the existence of C4 photosynthesis in Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, A; Liu, L; Zhao, P; Yang, C; Wang, G C

    2016-03-01

    Mechanisms for carbon fixation via photosynthesis in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin were studied recently but there remains a long-standing debate concerning the occurrence of C4 photosynthesis in this species. A thorough investigation of carbon metabolism and the evidence for C4 photosynthesis based on organelle partitioning was needed. In this study, we identified the flux ratios between C3 and C4 compounds in P. tricornutum using (13)C-labelling metabolic flux ratio analysis, and stained cells with various cell-permeant fluorescent probes to investigate the likely organelle partitioning required for single-cell C4 photosynthesis. Metabolic flux ratio analysis indicated the C3/C4 exchange ratios were high. Cell staining indicated organelle partitioning required for single-cell C4 photosynthesis might exist in P. tricornutum. The results of (13)C-labelling metabolic flux ratio analysis and cell staining suggest single-cell C4 photosynthesis exists in P. tricornutum. This study provides insights into photosynthesis patterns of P. tricornutum and the evidence for C4 photosynthesis based on (13)C-labelling metabolic flux ratio analysis and organelle partitioning. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Preliminary Study on the Effect of Adipocytes on the Biological Behaviors of
Lung Adenocarcinoma A549 Cells in Tumor Microenvironment

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    Hang ZHANG

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Adipocytes in the tumor microenvironment may provide the metabolic fuel or signal transduction through media and other means to promote a variety of malignant proliferation and invasion, of tumor cells, but their role in lung cancer progression is still unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of adipocytes on lung cancer cell biology. Methods 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes were induced into mature adipocytes. The cell morphology was observed by microscopy and Oil Red O staining. MTT assay, colony formation assay, wound-healing and Transwell methods were used to detect lung cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion ability. The content of triglyceride in cells was determined by colorimetry. Results The morphology of lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells became more slender after co-culture with mature adipocytes, and the proliferation and cloning ability were significantly enhanced (P<0.05. In addition, mature adipocytes can also promote the migration ability (P<0.05, invasion ability (P<0.01 and accumulation of intracellular lipid (P<0.05 of A549 cells. Conclusion These findings suggested that adipocytes in tumor microenvironment can promote the proliferation, migration and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells, which may be related to lipid metabolism.

  3. Harnessing Dendritic Cells for Tumor Antigen Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nierkens, Stefan [Department of Tumor Immunology, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 28, Nijmegen 6525 GA (Netherlands); Janssen, Edith M., E-mail: edith.janssen@cchmc.org [Division of Molecular Immunology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Research Foundation, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2011-04-26

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that are crucial for the induction of anti-tumor T cell responses. As a consequence, research has focused on the harnessing of DCs for therapeutic interventions. Although current strategies employing ex vivo-generated and tumor-antigen loaded DCs have been proven feasible, there are still many obstacles to overcome in order to improve clinical trial successes and offset the cost and complexity of customized cell therapy. This review focuses on one of these obstacles and a pivotal step for the priming of tumor-specific CD8{sup +} and CD4{sup +} T cells; the in vitro loading of DCs with tumor antigens.

  4. Reprogramming of the Ovarian Tumor Stroma by Activation of a Biomechanical ECM Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    cells into natural killer (NK)-like cells called ITNK cells that express high levels of perforin, granzyme B, and INF-gamma, which collectively...ovarian tumors and benign granulomas for expression of the HU177 cryptic collagen epitope. Serial sections from frozen tissues were stained by

  5. Expression of TMPRSS4 in non-small cell lung cancer and its modulation by hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    NGUYEN, TRI-HUNG; WEBER, WILLIAM; HAVARI, EVIS; CONNORS, TIMOTHY; BAGLEY, REBECCA G.; McLAREN, RAJASHREE; NAMBIAR, PRASHANT R.; MADDEN, STEPHEN L.; TEICHER, BEVERLY A.; ROBERTS, BRUCE; KAPLAN, JOHANNE; SHANKARA, SRINIVAS

    2012-01-01

    Overexpression of TMPRSS4, a cell surface-associated transmembrane serine protease, has been reported in pancreatic, colorectal and thyroid cancers, and has been implicated in tumor cell migration and metastasis. Few reports have investigated both TMPRSS4 gene expression levels and the protein products. In this study, quantitative RT-PCR and protein staining were used to assess TMPRSS4 expression in primary non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) tissues and in lung tumor cell lines. At the transcriptional level, TMPRSS4 message was significantly elevated in the majority of human squamous cell and adenocarcinomas compared with normal lung tissues. Staining of over 100 NSCLC primary tumor and normal specimens with rabbit polyclonal anti-TMPRSS4 antibodies confirmed expression at the protein level in both squamous cell and adenocarcinomas with little or no staining in normal lung tissues. Human lung tumor cell lines expressed varying levels of TMPRSS4 mRNA in vitro. Interestingly, tumor cell lines with high levels of TMPRSS4 mRNA failed to show detectable TMPRSS4 protein by either immunoblotting or flow cytometry. However, protein levels were increased under hypoxic culture conditions suggesting that hypoxia within the tumor microenvironment may upregulate TMPRSS4 protein expression in vivo. This was supported by the observation of TMPRSS4 protein in xenograft tumors derived from the cell lines. In addition, staining of human squamous cell carcinoma samples for carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), a hypoxia marker, showed TMPRSS4 positive cells adjacent to CAIX positive cells. Overall, these results indicate that the cancer-associated TMPRSS4 protein is overexpressed in NSCLC and may represent a potential therapeutic target. PMID:22692880

  6. Assessment of programmed death-ligand 1 expression and tumor-associated immune cells in pediatric cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majzner, Robbie G; Simon, Jason S; Grosso, Joseph F; Martinez, Daniel; Pawel, Bruce R; Santi, Mariarita; Merchant, Melinda S; Geoerger, Birgit; Hezam, Imene; Marty, Virginie; Vielh, Phillippe; Daugaard, Mads; Sorensen, Poul H; Mackall, Crystal L; Maris, John M

    2017-10-01

    Programmed death 1 (PD-1) signaling in the tumor microenvironment dampens immune responses to cancer, and blocking this axis induces antitumor effects in several malignancies. Clinical studies of PD-1 blockade are only now being initiated in pediatric patients, and little is known regarding programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in common childhood cancers. The authors characterized PD-L1 expression and tumor-associated immune cells (TAICs) (lymphocytes and macrophages) in common pediatric cancers. Whole slide sections and tissue microarrays were evaluated by immunohistochemistry for PD-L1 expression and for the presence of TAICs. TAICs were also screened for PD-L1 expression. Thirty-nine of 451 evaluable tumors (9%) expressed PD-L1 in at least 1% of tumor cells. The highest frequency histotypes comprised Burkitt lymphoma (80%; 8 of 10 tumors), glioblastoma multiforme (36%; 5 of 14 tumors), and neuroblastoma (14%; 17 of 118 tumors). PD-L1 staining was associated with inferior survival among patients with neuroblastoma (P = .004). Seventy-four percent of tumors contained lymphocytes and/or macrophages. Macrophages were significantly more likely to be identified in PD-L1-positive versus PD-L1-negative tumors (P cancers exhibit PD-L1 expression, whereas a much larger fraction demonstrates infiltration with tumor-associated lymphocytes. PD-L1 expression may be a biomarker for poor outcome in neuroblastoma. Further preclinical and clinical investigation will define the predictive nature of PD-L1 expression in childhood cancers both at diagnosis and after exposure to chemoradiotherapy. Cancer 2017;123:3807-3815. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  7. A Historical Perspective on the Identification of Cell Types in Pancreatic Islets of Langerhans by Staining and Histochemical Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin, Denis G

    2015-08-01

    Before the middle of the previous century, cell types of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans were identified primarily on the basis of their color reactions with histological dyes. At that time, the chemical basis for the staining properties of islet cells in relation to the identity, chemistry and structure of their hormones was not fully understood. Nevertheless, the definitive islet cell types that secrete glucagon, insulin, and somatostatin (A, B, and D cells, respectively) could reliably be differentiated from each other with staining protocols that involved variations of one or more tinctorial techniques, such as the Mallory-Heidenhain azan trichrome, chromium hematoxylin and phloxine, aldehyde fuchsin, and silver impregnation methods, which were popularly used until supplanted by immunohistochemical techniques. Before antibody-based staining methods, the most bona fide histochemical techniques for the identification of islet B cells were based on the detection of sulfhydryl and disulfide groups of insulin. The application of the classical islet tinctorial staining methods for pathophysiological studies and physiological experiments was fundamental to our understanding of islet architecture and the physiological roles of A and B cells in glucose regulation and diabetes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. NKT cells as an ideal anti-tumor immunotherapeutic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Shimizu, Kanako; Okamoto, Yoshitaka; Kunii, Naoki; Nakayama, Toshinori; Motohashi, Shinichiro; Taniguchi, Masaru

    2013-12-02

    Human natural killer T (NKT) cells are characterized by their expression of an invariant T cell antigen receptor α chain variable region encoded by a Vα24Jα18 rearrangement. These NKT cells recognize α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) in conjunction with the MHC class I-like CD1d molecule and bridge the innate and acquired immune systems to mediate efficient and augmented immune responses. A prime example of one such function is adjuvant activity: NKT cells augment anti-tumor responses because they can rapidly produce large amounts of IFN-γ, which acts on NK cells to eliminate MHC negative tumors and also on CD8 cytotoxic T cells to kill MHC positive tumors. Thus, upon administration of α-GalCer-pulsed DCs, both MHC negative and positive tumor cells can be effectively eliminated, resulting in complete tumor eradication without tumor recurrence. Clinical trials have been completed in a cohort of 17 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancers and 10 cases of head and neck tumors. Sixty percent of advanced lung cancer patients with high IFN-γ production had significantly prolonged median survival times of 29.3 months with only the primary treatment. In the case of head and neck tumors, 10 patients who completed the trial all had stable disease or partial responses 5 weeks after the combination therapy of α-GalCer-DCs and activated NKT cells. We now focus on two potential powerful treatment options for the future. One is to establish artificial adjuvant vector cells containing tumor mRNA and α-GalCer/CD1d. This stimulates host NKT cells followed by DC maturation and NK cell activation but also induces tumor-specific long-term memory CD8 killer T cell responses, suppressing tumor metastasis even 1 year after the initial single injection. The other approach is to establish induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells that can generate unlimited numbers of NKT cells with adjuvant activity. Such iPS-derived NKT cells produce IFN-γ in vitro and in vivo upon

  9. Biological behavior of oral and perioral mast cell tumors in dogs: 44 cases (1996-2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Lorin A; Garrett, Laura D; de Lorimier, Louis-Philippe; Charney, Sarah C; Borst, Luke B; Fan, Timothy M

    2010-10-15

    To describe clinical outcome of dogs with mast cell tumors (MCTs) arising from the oral mucosa, oral mucocutaneous junction, or perioral region of the muzzle and evaluate the potential role of the chemokine receptor type 7 (CCR7) in the biological behavior of these tumors. Retrospective case series. 44 dogs with MCTs of the oral mucosa (n=14), oral mucocutaneous junction (19), or perioral region of the muzzle (11). Medical records were reviewed for information on signalment, regional metastasis, treatments, cause of death, and survival time. Twenty of the 44 cases had stored histologic samples available for immunohistochemical staining for CCR7 For all dogs, median survival time was 52 months. Twenty-six (59%) dogs had regional lymph node metastasis on admission. Median survival time for dogs with lymph node metastasis was 14 months, whereas median survival time was not reached for dogs without lymph node metastasis. Intensity of staining for CCR7 was not significantly associated with the presence of regional lymph node metastasis or survival time. Results suggested that in dogs with MCTs arising from the oral mucosa, oral mucocutaneous junction, or perioral region of the muzzle, the presence of regional lymph node metastasis at the time of diagnosis was a negative prognostic factor. However, prolonged survival times could be achieved with treatment. In addition, CCR7 expression in the primary tumor was not significantly associated with the presence of regional lymph node metastasis or survival time.

  10. In Vitro Efficient Expansion of Tumor Cells Deriving from Different Types of Human Tumor Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Turin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining human tumor cell lines from fresh tumors is essential to advance our understanding of antitumor immune surveillance mechanisms and to develop new ex vivo strategies to generate an efficient anti-tumor response. The present study delineates a simple and rapid method for efficiently establishing primary cultures starting from tumor samples of different types, while maintaining the immuno-histochemical characteristics of the original tumor. We compared two different strategies to disaggregate tumor specimens. After short or long term in vitro expansion, cells analyzed for the presence of malignant cells demonstrated their neoplastic origin. Considering that tumor cells may be isolated in a closed system with high efficiency, we propose this methodology for the ex vivo expansion of tumor cells to be used to evaluate suitable new drugs or to generate tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes or vaccines.

  11. The Role of Tumor Associated Macrophage in Recurrent Growth of Tumor Stem Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    recent cancer stem cell (CSC) theory, recurrent tumor must arise from a dormant tumor stem cell whose re-growth is triggered by shifting of...microenvironment. This project aims at clarifying the roles of TAM in recurrent growth of dormant stem cell in breast cancer. We hypothesize that the balance of...dormancy and recurrence is determined by the ability of the tumor stem cells to recruit TAM which in turn promotes self-renewal of the stem cell . We

  12. Uterine Tumor Resembling Ovarian Sex Cord Tumor (UTROSCT) Commonly Exhibits Positivity With Sex Cord Markers FOXL2 and SF-1 but Lacks FOXL2 and DICER1 Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croce, Sabrina; de Kock, Leanne; Boshari, Talia; Hostein, Isabelle; Velasco, Valerie; Foulkes, William D; McCluggage, W Glenn

    2016-07-01

    Uterine tumor resembling ovarian sex cord tumor (UTROSCT) is a rare neoplasm which morphologically and immunohistochemically exhibits overlap with an ovarian sex cord tumor. Although many of these neoplasms are positive with markers of ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors, staining is often limited and the pathogenesis of UTROSCT is unknown. To further explore the sex cord lineage of UTROSCT, we studied 19 of these neoplasms and examined the expression of 2 recently described markers of ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors, FOXL2, and steroidogenic factor-1. We also undertook FOXL2 and DICER1 mutation analysis in these cases; a somatic missense mutation in codon C134W (402C→G) of FOXL2 gene has been demonstrated in the vast majority (>95%) of ovarian adult granulosa cell tumors and somatic DICER1 mutations are found in approximately 60% of ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors. Ten of 19 cases (53%) exhibited nuclear immunoreactivity with FOXL2 and 11 of 19 (58%) exhibited nuclear staining with steroidogenic factor-1. Neither FOXL2 nor DICER1 mutations were identified in any case where there was sufficient tumor tissue for analysis (18 and 9 cases, respectively). Despite exhibiting an immunophenotype characteristic of a sex cord-stromal tumor, mutations in FOXL2 and DICER1, the 2 most common mutations hitherto reported in ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors, are not a feature of UTROSCT.

  13. Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor (SLCT) is a rare cancer of the ovaries. The cancer cells produce and release a male sex hormone ... lead to cancer. SLCT starts in the female ovaries. The cancer cells release a male sex hormone. As a ...

  14. Immune response to UV-induced tumors: mediation of progressor tumor rejection by natural killer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streeter, P.R.; Fortner, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    Skin tumors induced in mice by chronic ultraviolet (UV) irradiation are highly antigenic and can induce a state of transplantation immunity in syngeneic animals. In the present study, the authors compared the in vitro cytolytic activity of splenic lymphocytes from mice immunized with either regressor or progressor UV-tumors. The results of this comparison implicated tumor-specific cytolytic T (Tc) lymphocytes in rejection of regressor UV-tumors, and revealed that immunization with the progressor UV-tumor 2237 failed to elicit detectable levels of progressor tumor-specific Tc cells even as the tumors rejected. Following in vitro resensitization of spleen cells from either regressor or progressor tumor immune animals, the authors found NK-like lymphocytes with anti-tumor activity. As the authors had not detected cells with this activity in splenic lymphocyte preparations prior to in vitro resensitization, the authors examined lymphocytes from the local tumor environment during the course of progressor tumor rejection for this activity. This analysis revealed NK lymphocytes exhibiting significant levels of cytolytic activity against UV-tumors. These results implicate NK cells as potential effector cells in the rejection of progressor UV-tumors by immune animals, and suggests that these cells may be regulated by T lymphocytes

  15. Isolation of intact RNA from murine CD4+ T cells after intracellular cytokine staining and fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Porcelli, Steven A

    2018-05-01

    Intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) is a powerful method for identifying functionally distinct lymphocyte subsets, and for isolating these by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Although transcriptomic analysis of cells sorted on the basis of ICS has many potential applications, this is rarely performed because of the difficulty in isolating intact RNA from cells processed using standard fixation and permeabilization buffers for ICS. To address this issue, we compared three buffers shown previously to preserve RNA in nonhematopoietic cells subjected to intracellular staining for their effects on RNA isolated from T lymphocytes processed for ICS. Our results showed that buffers containing the recombinant ribonuclease inhibitor RNasin or high molar concentrations of salt yielded intact RNA from fixed and permeabilized T cells. As proof of principle, we successfully used the buffer containing RNasin to isolate intact RNA from CD4 + T cells that were sorted by FACS on the basis of specific cytokine production, thus demonstrating the potential of this approach for coupling ICS with transcriptomic analysis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. In vitro validation of an ultra-sensitive scanning fluorescence microscope for analysis of Circulating Tumor Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillig, Thore; Nygaard, Ann-Britt; Nekiunaite, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTC) holds promise of providing liquid biopsies from patients with cancer. However, current methods include enrichment procedures. We present a method (CytoTrack), where CTC from 7.5 mL of blood is stained, analyzed and counted by a scanning fluorescence...... microscope. The method was validated by breast cancer cells (MCF-7) spiked in blood from healthy donors. The number of cells spiked in each blood sample was exactly determined by cell sorter and performed in three series of three samples spiked with 10, 33 or 100 cells in addition with three control samples...... detect breast cancer cells in spiking experiments and should be tested on blood samples from breast cancer patients. The method could benefit from automation that could reduce the CV%, and further optimization of the procedure to increase the recovery....

  17. Angiographic diagnosis of a pancreatic islet tumor in a patient with the WDHA syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inamoto, K.; Yoshino, F.; Nakao, N.; Kawanaka, M.

    1980-01-01

    A patient with an islet cell tumor of the pancreas that produced the watery diarrhea, hypokalemia, achlorhydria syndrome is presented. On celiac angiography an extremely vascular mass was seen in the body of pancreas with hypertrophied arteries and persistent, dense tumor staining. (orig.) [de

  18. Precision cancer immunotherapy: optimizing dendritic cell-based strategies to induce tumor antigen-specific T-cell responses against individual patient tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takuya; Nagaoka, Koji; Takahara, Masashi; Yang, Xiao Yi; Liu, Cong-Xiao; Guo, Hongtao; Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Hobeika, Amy; Hartman, Zachary; Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2015-05-01

    Most dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines have loaded the DC with defined antigens, but loading with autologos tumor-derived antigens would generate DCs that activate personalized tumor-specific T-cell responses. We hypothesized that DC matured with an optimized combination of reagents and loaded with tumor-derived antigens using a clinically feasible electroporation strategy would induce potent antitumor immunity. We first studied the effects on DC maturation and antigen presentation of the addition of picibanil (OK432) to a combination of zoledronic acid, tumor necrosis factor-α, and prostaglandin E2. Using DC matured with the optimized combination, we tested 2 clinically feasible sources of autologous antigen for electroloading, total tumor mRNA or total tumor lysate, to determine which stimulated more potent antigen-specific T cells in vitro and activated more potent antitumor immunity in vivo. The combination of tumor necrosis factor-α/prostaglandin E2/zoledronic acid/OK432 generated DC with high expression of maturation markers and antigen-specific T-cell stimulatory function in vitro. Mature DC electroloaded with tumor-derived mRNA [mRNA electroporated dendritic cell (EPDC)] induced greater expansion of antigen-specific T cells in vitro than DC electroloaded with tumor lysate (lysate EPDC). In a therapeutic model of MC38-carcinoembryonic antigen colon cancer-bearing mice, vaccination with mRNA EPDC induced the most efficient anti-carcinoembryonic antigen cellular immune response, which significantly suppressed tumor growth. In conclusion, mature DC electroloaded with tumor-derived mRNA are a potent cancer vaccine, especially useful when specific tumor antigens for vaccination have not been identified, allowing autologous tumor, and if unavailable, allogeneic cell lines to be used as an unbiased source of antigen. Our data support clinical testing of this strategy.

  19. Granular cell tumor: An uncommon benign neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirthankar Gayen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Granular cell tumor is a distinctly rare neoplasm of neural sheath origin. It mainly presents as a solitary asymptomatic swelling in the oral cavity, skin, and rarely internal organs in the middle age. Histopathology is characteristic, showing polyhedral cells containing numerous fine eosinophilic granules with indistinct cell margins. We present a case of granular cell tumor on the back of a 48-year-old woman which was painful, mimicking an adnexal tumor.

  20. Effect of radiation on the expression of tumor-associated antigens of human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hareyama, Masato

    1988-01-01

    We studied the effects of irradiation on the expression of a tumor-associated antigen (YH206 antigen) of cultured human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and flow cytometry. YH206 antigen is preferentially expressed on adenocarcinoma cells. Irradiation of A549 cells remarkably increased the expression of YH206 antigen on the cell surface and the level of the antigen in the culture supernatant as well as in the cell lysate, whereas it significantly affected the expression of HLA (MHC-class I) antigen on the same cells. The expression of HLA antigen on the cell was also increased after treatment of the cells with interferon-γ. In an additional experiment, cells were stained simultaneously for surface antigens (fluorescein coupled antibodies) and for DNA content (propidium iodide), and then dual parameter measurements were performed by flow cytometry to analyse the relationship between antigen levels and the cell cycle. YH206 antigen and HLA antigen increased more in the S and G 2 /M phases of the cell cycle than in G 0 /G 1 . The expression of YH206 antigen was enhanced in the S and G 2 /M phases by irradiation, whereas the expression of HLA antigen was enhanced in each phase of the cell cycle with irradiation or IFN. These results suggest that irradiation plays a key role in the change of the expression of certain tumor-associated antigens. (author)

  1. The development of fluorescence turn-on probe for Al(III) sensing and live cell nucleus-nucleoli staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Anoop Kumar; Sharma, Vinay; Mathur, Pradeep; Shaikh, Mobin M.

    2016-10-01

    The morphology of nucleus and nucleolus is powerful indicator of physiological and pathological conditions. The specific staining of nucleolus recently gained much attention due to the limited and expensive availability of the only existing stain “SYTO RNA-Select”. Here, a new multifunctional salen type ligand (L1) and its Al3+ complex (1) are designed and synthesized. L1 acts as a chemosensor for Al3+ whereas 1 demonstrates specific staining of nucleus as well as nucleoli. The binding of 1 with nucleic acid is probed by DNase and RNase digestion in stained cells. 1 shows an excellent photostability, which is a limitation for existing nucleus stains during long term observations. 1 is assumed to be a potential candidate as an alternative to expensive commercial dyes for nucleus and nucleoli staining.

  2. Solid and Cystic Tumor (SCT of the Pancreas in an Adult Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ohiwa

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid and cystic tumor (SCT of the pancreas predominantly Occurs in women, and the occurrence in men is extremely rare. We experienced a male case of SCT. A 38-year-old man was admitted with the complaint of upper abdominal pain. CT scan showed the presence of a mass in the head of the pancreas. The mass was composed of high density areas and low density areas. Ultrasonograms revealed the mass being composed of high echoic areas and low echoic areas. The mass .was hypovascular on angiography. SCT was suspected and pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. The cut surface of the tumor showed mainly cystic degenerative areas containing dark red hemorrhagic materials. Microscopically, there were solid areas in the periphery and pseudopapillary areas in the center. No metastasis was found in the removed lymph nodes. The tumor cells were not stained by Grimelius' silver stain. The tumor cells were positive for alpha-l-antitrypsin (AAT and neuron-specific enolase (NSE. Pancreatic hormones such as insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin were all negative. Electron micrograph showed that tumor cells were rich in mitochondria. Zymogen granules and neurosecretory granules were not detected. Estrogen receptor (ER and progesterone receptor (PR were both negative.

  3. The incidence of IgG4-positive plasma cells staining TIN in patients with biopsy-proven tubulointerstitial nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac, Kathy; Wu, Xiao Juan; Mai, Jun; Howlin, Kenneth; Suranyi, Michael; Yong, Jim; Makris, Angela

    2017-06-01

    IgG4 disease is rare. However, IgG4 tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) is the most common renal manifestation. IgG4 disease is usually associated with elevated serum IgG4 levels and other organ involvement, low-density renal lesions on enhanced CT imaging and immune activation. The incidence of IgG4-TIN may be underestimated, as staining for IgG4 is not routine. This study sought to describe the prevalence of previously undiagnosed IgG4-TIN. Due to the complexity of the diagnosis, we only attempt to look at IgG4-positive plasma cell TIN as a potential indication for IgG4 renal disease. A retrospective review of native renal biopsies performed between 2002 and 2012 with a primary diagnosis of TIN was selected. Samples for which interstitial nephritis was secondary to a glomerular disease were excluded. The tissues were stained for IgG4 and scored by two blinded observers. Demographic and follow-up details were collected. This study was approved by the local ethics committee. 82 cases of interstitial nephritis from a total of 1238 renal biopsies (2002-2012) were available after staining for further assessment. 12 samples demonstrated staining consistent with the criteria for IgG4-positive plasma cell TIN, of which 3 had mildly positive staining, 7 moderately positive staining and 2 had markedly positive staining. There were no statistically significant differences in the baseline characteristics between the positive and negative staining groups. A number of cases of IgG4-positive plasma cell TIN were observed histologically that had been previously diagnosed as non-specific chronic TIN. IgG4-positive plasma cell TIN made up 1% of all renal biopsies performed over 10 years and 13% of all biopsies demonstrating TIN not related to glomerular disease. IgG4 staining should be considered routinely in biopsies demonstrating primary TIN. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Quantitative imaging of magnesium distribution at single-cell resolution in brain tumors and infiltrating tumor cells with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Subhash; Parker, Dylan J.; Barth, Rolf F.; Pannullo, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the deadliest forms of human brain tumors. The infiltrative pattern of growth of these tumors includes the spread of individual and/or clusters of tumor cells at some distance from the main tumor mass in parts of the brain protected by an intact blood-brain-barrier. Pathophysiological studies of GBM could be greatly enhanced by analytical techniques capable of in situ single-cell resolution measurements of infiltrating tumor cells. Magnesium homeostasis is an area of active investigation in high grade gliomas. In the present study, we have used the F98 rat glioma as a model of human GBM and an elemental/isotopic imaging technique of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), a CAMECA IMS-3f ion microscope, for studying Mg distributions with single-cell resolution in freeze-dried brain tissue cryosections. Quantitative observations were made on tumor cells in the main tumor mass, contiguous brain tissue, and infiltrating tumor cells in adjacent normal brain. The brain tissue contained a significantly lower total Mg concentration of 4.70 ± 0.93 mmol/Kg wet weight (mean ± SD) in comparison to 11.64 ± 1.96 mmol/Kg wet weight in tumor cells of the main tumor mass and 10.72 ± 1.76 mmol/Kg wet weight in infiltrating tumor cells (p<0.05). The nucleus of individual tumor cells contained elevated levels of bound Mg. These observations demonstrate enhanced Mg-influx and increased binding of Mg in tumor cells and provide strong support for further investigation of GBMs for altered Mg homeostasis and activation of Mg-transporting channels as possible therapeutic targets. PMID:26703785

  5. Tumors of germinal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plazas, Ricardo; Avila, Andres

    2002-01-01

    The tumors of germinal cells (TGC) are derived neoplasia of the primordial germinal cells that in the life embryonic migrant from the primitive central nervous system until being located in the gonads. Their cause is even unknown and they represent 95% of the testicular tumors. In them, the intention of the treatment is always healing and the diagnostic has improved thanks to the results of the handling multidisciplinary. The paper includes topics like their incidence and prevalence, epidemiology and pathology, clinic and diagnoses among other topics

  6. Association of preoperative radiation effect with tumor angiogenesis and vascular endothelial growth factor in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shintani, Satoru; Kiyota, Akihisa; Mihara, Mariko; Nakahara, Yuuji; Terakado, Nagaaki; Ueyama, Yoshiya; Matsumura, Tomohiro

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between tumor angiogenesis and the radiation-induced response, evaluated based on pathological changes, in oral squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with preoperative radiation therapy. Forty-one cases of squamous cell carcinoma treated with preoperative radiation therapy were investigated. Tumor angiogenesis was assessed by scoring the intratumor microvessel density (IMVD). Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was also evaluated before and after preoperative radiotherapy. There was no correlation between IMVD in the specimens before therapy and the pathological response to radiation therapy. However, radiation therapy decreased IMVD in the specimens after therapy. A significant association was observed between VEGF expression and resistance to radiation therapy: only 4 of the 21 patients whose tumors exhibited a high level (2+ or 3+) of VEGF staining experienced a major (3+ or 4+) pathological response to radiation therapy. Furthermore, an increasing level of VEGF expression after radiation therapy was observed in non-effective (0 to 2+) response cases. These results suggest that VEGF expression and the induction of this protein are related to radiosensitivity and could be used to predict the effects of preoperative radiation therapy on oral squamous cell carcinoma. (author)

  7. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  8. Cancer Stem Cells in Moderately Differentiated Buccal Mucosal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Express Components of the Renin-Angiotensin System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Therese Featherston

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim We have recently identified and characterized cancer stem cell (CSC subpopulations within moderately differentiated buccal mucosal squamous cell carcinoma (MDBMSCC. We hypothesized that these CSCs express components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS.Methods 3,3-Diaminobenzidine (DAB immunohistochemical (IHC staining was performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded MDBMSCC samples to investigate the expression of the components of the RAS: pro(renin receptor (PRR, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE, angiotensin II receptor 1 (ATIIR1 and angiotensin II receptor 2 (ATIIR2. NanoString mRNA gene expression analysis and Western Blotting (WB were performed on snap-frozen MDBMSCC samples to confirm gene expression and translation of these transcripts, respectively. Double immunofluorescent (IF IHC staining of these components of the RAS with the embryonic stem cell markers OCT4 or SALL4 was performed to demonstrate their localization in relation to the CSC subpopulations within MDBMSCC.Results DAB IHC staining demonstrated expression of PRR, ACE, ATIIR1 and ATIIR2 in MDBMSCC. IF IHC staining showed that PRR was expressed by the CSC subpopulations within the tumor nests, the peri-tumoral stroma and the endothelium of the microvessels within the peri-tumoral stroma. ATIIR1 and ATIIR2 were localized to the CSC subpopulations within the tumor nests and the peri-tumoral stroma, while ACE was localized to the endothelium of the microvessels within the peri-tumoral stroma. WB and NanoString analyses confirmed protein expression and transcription activation of PRR, ACE and ATIIR1 but not of ATIIR2, respectively.

  9. Malignant Solitary Fibrous Tumor Metastatic to Widely Invasive Hurthle Cell Thyroid Carcinoma: A Distinct Tumor-to-Tumor Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolson Kokohaare, Eva; Riva, Francesco M G; Bernstein, Jonathan M; Miah, Aisha B; Thway, Khin

    2018-04-01

    We illustrate a case of synchronous malignant solitary fibrous tumor of the thoracic cavity, and widely invasive thyroid Hurthle cell carcinoma. The Hurthle cell carcinoma was found to harbor distinct areas of malignant solitary fibrous tumor. This is a unique case of tumor-to-tumor metastasis that, to the best of our knowledge, has not been previously reported.

  10. The anti-fibrotic agent pirfenidone synergizes with cisplatin in killing tumor cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mediavilla-Varela, Melanie; Boateng, Kingsley; Noyes, David; Antonia, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-fibrotic drugs such as pirfenidone have been developed for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Because activated fibroblasts in inflammatory conditions have similar characteristics as cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and CAFs contribute actively to the malignant phenotype, we believe that anti-fibrotic drugs have the potential to be repurposed as anti-cancer drugs. The effects of pirfenidone alone and in combination with cisplatin on human patient-derived CAF cell lines and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines were examined. The impact on cell death in vitro as well as tumor growth in a mouse model was determined. Annexin V/PI staining and Western blot analysis were used to characterize cell death. Synergy was assessed with the combination index method using Calcusyn software. Pirfenidone alone induced apoptotic cell death in lung CAFs at a high concentration (1.5 mg/mL). However, co-culture in vitro experiments and co-implantation in vivo experiments showed that the combination of low doses of cisplatin (10 μM) and low doses of pirfenidone (0.5 mg/mL), in both CAFs and tumors, lead to increased cell death and decreased tumor progression, respectively. Furthermore, the combination of cisplatin and pirfenidone in NSCLC cells (A549 and H157 cells) leads to increased apoptosis and synergistic cell death. Our studies reveal for the first time that the combination of cisplatin and pirfenidone is active in preclinical models of NSCLC and therefore may be a new therapeutic approach in this disease. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2162-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  11. CT and MRI of germ-cell tumors with metastasis or multi-located tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyagami, Mitsusuke; Tazoe, Makoto; Tsubokawa, Takashi

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-seven cases of germ-cell tumors were examined with a CT scan in our clinic. In the 11 cases of metastasis or multi-localized tumors, the CT findings were studied in connection with the MRI findings. There were 6 cases of germ-cell tumors which had broad infiltrating tumors with multiple lesions on first admission. Their tumor sites were different from that in cases of malignant glioma, being frequently localized in the pineal and/or the suprasellar region, on the wall of the third and/or lateral ventricle, and in the region of the basal ganglia. Five of the cases of germ-cell tumors had metastasis with various patterns connected to a remote area - that is, to spinal cords, to the ventricular wall and basal cistern of the brain stem by CSF dissemination, to a lung by hematogeneous metastasis, and to the peritoneal wall or organs by a V-P shunt. The CT findings of germ-cell tumors were correlated mainly with the results of the histological diagnosis; they were found not to differ with the tumor site. The germinoma in the suprasellar region had less calcification than in the pineal region. Cysts, calcification, and an enlargement of the lateral ventricle on the tumor side were frequently seen in the germinoma of the basal ganglia. On the MRI of 5 cases of germinoma, the T 1 -weighted image revealed a slightly low or iso signal intensity, while the T 2 -weighted image showed a high signal intensity. In the case of multiple tumor lesions, some cases demonstrated different CT findings and radiosensitivities for each tumor. The possibility of a multicentric origin for the tumors is thus suggested in some cases of germ-cell tumors. (author)

  12. Multiple Primary Merkel Cell Carcinomas Presenting as Pruritic, Painful Lower Leg Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Blumenthal

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC is a rare and highly aggressive neuroendocrine tumor of the skin which almost exclusively presents as a solitary tumor. It is most often seen on sun-exposed regions, historically almost exclusively on the head and neck, with only rare case reports on the extremities. Although recent studies have shown increased incidence with up to 20% on the extremities, here we present one of these rare emerging presentations, with the addition of a unique treatment option. Our patient is an 80-year-old male with a 3-month history of multiple raised, rapidly enlarging tumors on the right ankle. Two separate biopsies were performed and demonstrated sheets and clusters of small blue cells filling the dermis with scant cytoplasm, dusty chromatin, and nuclear molding. Subsequent immunohistochemical stains confirmed the diagnosis of multiple primary MCC. Despite the characteristic immunohistochemical profile of primary MCC, the possibility of a metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma from an alternate primary site was entertained, given his unusual clinical presentation. A complete clinical workup including CT scans of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed no evidence of disease elsewhere. Instead of amputation, the patient opted for nonsurgical treatment with radiation therapy alone, resulting in a rapid and complete response. This case represents an unusual presentation of primary MCC and demonstrates further evidence that radiation as monotherapy is an effective local treatment option for inoperable MCC.

  13. Intracellular pH imaging in cancer cells in vitro and tumors in vivo using the new genetically encoded sensor SypHer2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirmanova, Marina V; Druzhkova, Irina N; Lukina, Maria M; Matlashov, Mikhail E; Belousov, Vsevolod V; Snopova, Ludmila B; Prodanetz, Natalia N; Dudenkova, Varvara V; Lukyanov, Sergey A; Zagaynova, Elena V

    2015-09-01

    Measuring intracellular pH (pHi) in tumors is essential for the monitoring of cancer progression and the response of cancer cells to various treatments. The purpose of the study was to develop a method for pHi mapping in living cancer cells in vitro and in tumors in vivo, using the novel genetically encoded indicator, SypHer2. A HeLa Kyoto cell line stably expressing SypHer2 in the cytoplasm was used, to perform ratiometric (dual excitation) imaging of the probe in cell culture, in 3D tumor spheroids and in tumor xenografts in living mice. Using SypHer2, pHi was demonstrated to be 7.34±0.11 in monolayer HeLa cells in vitro under standard cultivation conditions. An increasing pHi gradient from the center to the periphery of the spheroids was displayed. We obtained fluorescence ratio maps for HeLa tumors in vivo and ex vivo. Comparison of the map with the pathomorphology and with hypoxia staining of the tumors revealed a correspondence of the zones with higher pHi to the necrotic and hypoxic areas. Our results demonstrate that pHi imaging with the genetically encoded pHi indicator, SypHer2, can be a valuable tool for evaluating tumor progression in xenograft models. We have demonstrated, for the first time, the possibility of using the genetically encoded sensor SypHer2 for ratiometric pH imaging in cancer cells in vitro and in tumors in vivo. SypHer2 shows great promise as an instrument for pHi monitoring able to provide high accuracy and spatiotemporal resolution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Anti-tumor therapy with macroencapsulated endostatin producer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balduino Keli N

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Theracyte is a polytetrafluoroethylene membrane macroencapsulation system designed to induce neovascularization at the tissue interface, protecting the cells from host's immune rejection, thereby circumventing the problem of limited half-life and variation in circulating levels. Endostatin is a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis and tumor growth. Continuous delivery of endostatin improves the efficacy and potency of the antitumoral therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine whether recombinant fibroblasts expressing endostatin encapsulated in Theracyte immunoisolation devices can be used for delivery of this therapeutic protein for treatment of mice bearing B16F10 melanoma and Ehrlich tumors. Results Mice were inoculated subcutaneously with melanoma (B16F10 cells or Ehrlich tumor cells at the foot pads. Treatment began when tumor thickness had reached 0.5 mm, by subcutaneous implantation of 107 recombinant encapsulated or non-encapsulated endostatin producer cells. Similar melanoma growth inhibition was obtained for mice treated with encapsulated or non-encapsulated endostatin-expressing cells. The treatment of mice bearing melanoma tumor with encapsulated endostatin-expressing cells was decreased by 50.0%, whereas a decrease of 56.7% in tumor thickness was obtained for mice treated with non-encapsulated cells. Treatment of Ehrlich tumor-bearing mice with non-encapsulated endostatin-expressing cells reduced tumor thickness by 52.4%, whereas lower tumor growth inhibition was obtained for mice treated with encapsulated endostatin-expressing cells: 24.2%. Encapsulated endostatin-secreting fibroblasts failed to survive until the end of the treatment. However, endostatin release from the devices to the surrounding tissues was confirmed by immunostaining. Decrease in vascular structures, functional vessels and extension of the vascular area were observed in melanoma microenvironments. Conclusions This study indicates that

  15. Anti-tumor therapy with macroencapsulated endostatin producer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Danielle B; Chammas, Roger; Malavasi, Natália V; da Costa, Patrícia L N; Chura-Chambi, Rosa M; Balduino, Keli N; Morganti, Ligia

    2010-03-02

    Theracyte is a polytetrafluoroethylene membrane macroencapsulation system designed to induce neovascularization at the tissue interface, protecting the cells from host's immune rejection, thereby circumventing the problem of limited half-life and variation in circulating levels. Endostatin is a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis and tumor growth. Continuous delivery of endostatin improves the efficacy and potency of the antitumoral therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine whether recombinant fibroblasts expressing endostatin encapsulated in Theracyte immunoisolation devices can be used for delivery of this therapeutic protein for treatment of mice bearing B16F10 melanoma and Ehrlich tumors. Mice were inoculated subcutaneously with melanoma (B16F10 cells) or Ehrlich tumor cells at the foot pads. Treatment began when tumor thickness had reached 0.5 mm, by subcutaneous implantation of 107 recombinant encapsulated or non-encapsulated endostatin producer cells. Similar melanoma growth inhibition was obtained for mice treated with encapsulated or non-encapsulated endostatin-expressing cells. The treatment of mice bearing melanoma tumor with encapsulated endostatin-expressing cells was decreased by 50.0%, whereas a decrease of 56.7% in tumor thickness was obtained for mice treated with non-encapsulated cells. Treatment of Ehrlich tumor-bearing mice with non-encapsulated endostatin-expressing cells reduced tumor thickness by 52.4%, whereas lower tumor growth inhibition was obtained for mice treated with encapsulated endostatin-expressing cells: 24.2%. Encapsulated endostatin-secreting fibroblasts failed to survive until the end of the treatment. However, endostatin release from the devices to the surrounding tissues was confirmed by immunostaining. Decrease in vascular structures, functional vessels and extension of the vascular area were observed in melanoma microenvironments. This study indicates that immunoisolation devices containing endostatin

  16. In vitro cytotoxicity of human recombinant tumor necrosis factor alpha in association with radiotherapy in a human ovarian carcinoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manetta, A.; Lucci, J.; Soopikian, J.; Granger, G.; Berman, M.L.; DiSaia, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    It has been speculated that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) may decrease the cytotoxicity of radiotherapy by increasing the scavenging of toxic superoxide radicals. Because of the possible clinical implications, the cytotoxicity of TNF-alpha in combination with radiotherapy (RT) was compared with that of RT alone in a human ovarian cancer cell line. NIH:OVCAR-3 cells were incubated with TNF-alpha at 10.0, 1.0, 0.1, and 0.01 microgram/ml. Plates were divided into two groups; one received 150 cGy of radiotherapy and the other received no further therapy. Seventy-two hours later, supernatants were aspirated and viable cells were stained with a 1% solution of crystal violet. Survival of cells treated with RT plus TNF-alpha was expressed as a percentage of surviving irradiated controls. Analysis of results revealed minimal additive cell killing effect between TNF-alpha and radiotherapy at all concentrations of tumor necrosis factor, with the greatest difference noted in the group treated with 10 micrograms/ml TNF-alpha. A continued radiotherapy dose-response study with TNF-alpha showed a similar additive, not radioprotective, effect. This may have implication as a potentiator of RT in some human tumors

  17. Immunofluorescent staining of nuclear antigen in lymphoid cells transformed by Herpesvirus papio (HVP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, H

    1981-01-01

    An improved fixation method for antigen detection in lymphoblastoid cells is described. Herpesvirus papio nuclear antigen (HUPNA) could be stained in several transformed lymphoid cell lines by anti-complement immunofluorescence (ACIF). Antibody to HUPNA was detected in many human sera containing antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus capsid and nuclear antigen (EBNA). Rheumatoid arthritis sera showed a high incidence of both anti-EBNA and anti-HUPNA antibodies.

  18. Treatment Resistance Mechanisms of Malignant Glioma Tumor Stem Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmalz, Philip G.R.; Shen, Michael J.; Park, John K.

    2011-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are highly lethal because of their resistance to conventional treatments. Recent evidence suggests that a minor subpopulation of cells with stem cell properties reside within these tumors. These tumor stem cells are more resistant to radiation and chemotherapies than their counterpart differentiated tumor cells and may underlie the persistence and recurrence of tumors following treatment. The various mechanisms by which tumor stem cells avoid or repair the damaging effects of cancer therapies are discussed

  19. The Luna stain, an improved selective stain for detection of microsporidian spores in histologic sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Tracy S.; Spitsbergen, Jan M.; Feist, Stephen W.; Kent, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Microsporidia in histologic sections are most often diagnosed by observing spores in host tissues. Spores are easy to identify if they occur in large aggregates or xenomas when sections are stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). However, individual spores are not frequently detected in host tissues with conventional H&E staining, particularly if spores are scattered within the tissues, areas of inflammation or small spores in nuclei (i.e., Nucleospora salmonis). Hence, a variety of selective stains that enhance visualization of spores are recommended. We discovered that the Luna stain, used to highlight eosinophils, red blood cells and chitin in arthropods and other invertebrates, also stains spores of Pseudoloma neurophilia. We compared this stain to the Gram, Fite’s acid fast, Giemsa, and H&E stains on eight aquatic microsporidian organisms that were readily available in our two laboratories: Loma salmonae, Glugea anomala, Pseudoloma neurophilia, Pleistophora hyphessobryconis, Pleistophora vermiformis, Glugea sp., Steinhausia mytilovum and an unidentified microsporidian from E. sinensis, UK. Based on tinctorial properties and background staining, the Luna stain performed better for detection of 6 of the 8 microsporidia. Gram stain was superior for the two microsporidia from invertebrates, Steinhausia mytilovum and the unidentified microsporidian from E. sinensis. PMID:21848126

  20. Expression of adrenomedullin in human colorectal tumors and its role in cell growth and invasion in vitro and in xenograft growth in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouguerède, Emilie; Berenguer, Caroline; Garcia, Stéphane; Bennani, Bahia; Delfino, Christine; Nanni, Isabelle; Dahan, Laetitia; Gasmi, Mohamed; Seitz, Jean-François; Martin, Pierre-Marie; Ouafik, L'Houcine

    2013-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a multifunctional peptide vasodilator that transduces its effects through calcitonin receptor-like receptor/receptor activity-modifying protein-2 and -3 (CLR/RAMP2 and CLR/RAMP3). In this study, real-time quantitative reverse transcription demonstrated a significant expression of AM mRNA in tumor samples from colorectal cancer (CRC) patients in clinical stage II, III, and IV when compared with normal colorectal tissue. AM, CLR, RAMP2, and RAMP3 proteins were immunohistochemically localized in the carcinomatous epithelial compartment of CRC tissue. Tissue microarray analysis revealed a clear increase of AM, CLR, RAMP2, and RAMP3 staining in lymph node and distant metastasis when compared with primary tumors. The human colon carcinoma cells HT-29 expressed and secreted AM into the culture medium with a significant increase under hypoxia. Treatment of HT-29 cells with synthetic AM stimulated cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. Incubation with anti-AM antibody (αAM), anti-AM receptors antibodies (αAMR), or AM antagonist AM 22–52 inhibited significantly basal levels of proliferation of HT-29 cells, suggesting that AM may function as an autocrine growth factor for CRC cells. Treatment with αAM significantly suppressed the growth of HT-29 tumor xenografts in vivo. Histological examination of αAM-treated tumors showed evidence of disruption of tumor vascularity with decreased microvessel density, depletion of endothelial cells and pericytes, and increased tumor cell apoptosis. These findings highlight the potential importance of AM and its receptors in the progression of CRC and support the conclusion that αAM treatment inhibits tumor growth by suppression of angiogenesis and tumor growth, suggesting that AM may be a useful therapeutic target

  1. Tumor-induced loss of mural Connexin 43 gap junction activity promotes endothelial proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, Mayur; Naczki, Christine; Chen, Wenhong; Barlow, Keith D.; Case, L. Douglas; Metheny-Barlow, Linda J.

    2015-01-01

    Proper functional association between mural cells and endothelial cells (EC) causes EC of blood vessels to become quiescent. Mural cells on tumor vessels exhibit decreased attachment to EC, which allows vessels to be unstable and proliferative. The mechanisms by which tumors prevent proper association between mural cells and EC are not well understood. Since gap junctions (GJ) play an important role in cell-cell contact and communication, we investigated whether loss of GJ plays a role in tumor-induced mural cell dissociation. Mural cell regulation of endothelial proliferation was assessed by direct co-culture assays of fluorescently labeled cells quantified by flow cytometry or plate reader. Gap junction function was assessed by parachute assay. Connexin 43 (Cx43) protein in mural cells exposed to conditioned media from cancer cells was assessed by Western and confocal microscopy; mRNA levels were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR. Expression vectors or siRNA were utilized to overexpress or knock down Cx43. Tumor growth and angiogenesis was assessed in mouse hosts deficient for Cx43. Using parachute dye transfer assay, we demonstrate that media conditioned by MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells diminishes GJ communication between mural cells (vascular smooth muscle cells, vSMC) and EC. Both protein and mRNA of the GJ component Connexin 43 (Cx43) are downregulated in mural cells by tumor-conditioned media; media from non-tumorigenic MCF10A cells had no effect. Loss of GJ communication by Cx43 siRNA knockdown, treatment with blocking peptide, or exposure to tumor-conditioned media diminishes the ability of mural cells to inhibit EC proliferation in co-culture assays, while overexpression of Cx43 in vSMC restores GJ and endothelial inhibition. Breast tumor cells implanted into mice heterozygous for Cx43 show no changes in tumor growth, but exhibit significantly increased tumor vascularization determined by CD31 staining, along with decreased mural cell support

  2. Kaempferol suppresses bladder cancer tumor growth by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Qiang; Song, Wenbin; Xu, Defeng; Ma, Yanmin; Li, Feng; Zeng, Jin; Zhu, Guodong; Wang, Xinyang; Chang, Luke S; He, Dalin; Li, Lei

    2015-09-01

    The effects of the flavonoid compound, kaempferol, which is an inhibitor of cancer cell proliferation and an inducer of cell apoptosis have been shown in various cancers, including lung, pancreatic, and ovarian, but its effect has never been studied in bladder cancer. Here, we investigated the effects of kaempferol on bladder cancer using multiple in vitro cell lines and in vivo mice studies. The MTT assay results on various bladder cancer cell lines showed that kaempferol enhanced bladder cancer cell cytotoxicity. In contrast, when analyzed by the flow cytometric analysis, DNA ladder experiment, and TUNEL assay, kaempferol significantly was shown to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. These in vitro results were confirmed in in vivo mice studies using subcutaneous xenografted mouse models. Consistent with the in vitro results, we found that treating mice with kaempferol significant suppression in tumor growth compared to the control group mice. Tumor tissue staining results showed decreased expressions of the growth related markers, yet increased expressions in apoptosis markers in the kaempferol treated group mice tissues compared to the control group mice. In addition, our in vitro and in vivo data showed kaempferol can also inhibit bladder cancer invasion and metastasis. Further mechanism dissection studies showed that significant down-regulation of the c-Met/p38 signaling pathway is responsible for the kaempferol mediated cell proliferation inhibition. All these findings suggest kaempferol might be an effective and novel chemotherapeutic drug to apply for the future therapeutic agent to combat bladder cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A novel staining protocol for multiparameter assessment of cell heterogeneity in Phormidium populations (cyanobacteria employing fluorescent dyes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Tashyreva

    Full Text Available Bacterial populations display high heterogeneity in viability and physiological activity at the single-cell level, especially under stressful conditions. We demonstrate a novel staining protocol for multiparameter assessment of individual cells in physiologically heterogeneous populations of cyanobacteria. The protocol employs fluorescent probes, i.e., redox dye 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride, 'dead cell' nucleic acid stain SYTOX Green, and DNA-specific fluorochrome 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, combined with microscopy image analysis. Our method allows simultaneous estimates of cellular respiration activity, membrane and nucleoid integrity, and allows the detection of photosynthetic pigments fluorescence along with morphological observations. The staining protocol has been adjusted for, both, laboratory and natural populations of the genus Phormidium (Oscillatoriales, and tested on 4 field-collected samples and 12 laboratory strains of cyanobacteria. Based on the mentioned cellular functions we suggest classification of cells in cyanobacterial populations into four categories: (i active and intact; (ii injured but active; (iii metabolically inactive but intact; (iv inactive and injured, or dead.

  4. Immunohistochemical Ki-67/KL1 double stains increase accuracy of Ki-67 indices in breast cancer and simplify automated image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Patricia S; Bentzer, Nina K; Jensen, Vibeke

    2014-01-01

    observers and automated image analysis. RESULTS: Indices were predominantly higher for single stains than double stains (P≤0.002), yet the difference between observers was statistically significant (PPearson correlation coefficient for manual and automated indices ranged from 0.......69 to 0.85 (Pcorrelating automated indices with tumor characteristics, for example, tumor size (P... stains, Ki-67 should be quantified on double stains to reach a higher accuracy. Automated indices correlated well with manual estimates and tumor characteristics, and they are thus possibly valuable tools in future exploration of Ki-67 in breast cancer....

  5. Development of a stained cell nuclei counting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timilsina, Niranjan; Moffatt, Christopher; Okada, Kazunori

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a novel cell counting system which exploits the Fast Radial Symmetry Transformation (FRST) algorithm [1]. The driving force behind our system is a research on neurogenesis in the intact nervous system of Manduca Sexta or the Tobacco Hornworm, which was being studied to assess the impact of age, food and environment on neurogenesis. The varying thickness of the intact nervous system in this species often yields images with inhomogeneous background and inconsistencies such as varying illumination, variable contrast, and irregular cell size. For automated counting, such inhomogeneity and inconsistencies must be addressed, which no existing work has done successfully. Thus, our goal is to devise a new cell counting algorithm for the images with non-uniform background. Our solution adapts FRST: a computer vision algorithm which is designed to detect points of interest on circular regions such as human eyes. This algorithm enhances the occurrences of the stained-cell nuclei in 2D digital images and negates the problems caused by their inhomogeneity. Besides FRST, our algorithm employs standard image processing methods, such as mathematical morphology and connected component analysis. We have evaluated the developed cell counting system with fourteen digital images of Tobacco Hornworm's nervous system collected for this study with ground-truth cell counts by biology experts. Experimental results show that our system has a minimum error of 1.41% and mean error of 16.68% which is at least forty-four percent better than the algorithm without FRST.

  6. Hirschsprung′s disease diagnosis: Comparison of immunohistochemical, hematoxilin and eosin staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Memarzadeh Mehrdad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The diagnosis of Hirschsprung′s disease (HD is based on the absence of ganglion cells. In hemotoxilin and eosin (H and E as well as acetylcholine esterase staining there are limitations in the diagnosis of immature ganglion cells in neonates. Methods : In this prospective study, 54 biopsies taken from suspected HD patients (five mucosal specimens and 49 full thickness specimens were studied. In the laboratory, after preparing sections of paraffin embedded tissues, H and E staining slides were compared with immunohistochemical (IHC staining including: S100, NSE, CD117, CD56, Cathepsin D, Vimentin, BCL2, GFAP, Synaptophysin and chromogranin. Results : The study revealed 30 negative (absence of ganglion cells cases (55.5%, 17 positive cases (31.04% and seven suspected cases (12.9% of ganglion cells on the H and E staining. On IHC staining with CD56 and Cathepsin D, all of the 17 positive cases detected through H and E, were confirmed for having ganglion cells and out of 30 cases reported negative on H and E staining, 28(93.3% were reported negative and two (6.7% positive by IHC staining. Of the seven suspected cases H and E staining, IHC staining detectedganglion cells only in five slides; two remained negative. Conclusions : IHC staining using CD56 and Cathepsin D improved the accuracy of diagnosis in HD when used in addition to H and E staining technique, especially for negative or suspicious slides.

  7. Characterization of cell suspensions from solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallavicini, M.

    1985-01-01

    The desirable features of cells in suspension will necessarily be dependent upon the use for which the cells were prepared. Adequate cell yield or recovery is defined by the measurement to be performed. Retention of cellular morphology is important for microscopic identification of cell types in a heterogenous cell suspension, and may be used to determine whether the cells in suspension are representative of those in the tumor in situ. Different dispersal protocols may yield cells with different degrees of clonogenicity, as well as altered biochemical features, such as loss of cellular proteins, surface antigens, nucleotide pools, etc. The quality of the cell suspension can be judged by the degree of cell clumping and level of cellular debris, both of which impact on flow cytometric measurements and studies in which the number of cells be known accurately. Finally, if the data measured on the cells in suspension are to be extrapolated to phenomena occurring in the tumor in situ, it is desirable that the cells in suspension are representative of those in the solid tumor in vivo. This report compares characteristics of tumor cell suspensions obtained by different types of selected disaggregation methods. 33 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Periurethral granular cell tumor: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong Kon; Choi, Hyo Gyeong; Cho, Kyoung Sik

    1998-01-01

    Granular cell tumors are uncommon soft tissue tumors which arise as solitary or multiple masses. Lesions commonly arise in the head, neck, and chest wall, but can occur in any part of the body. To our knowledge, periurethral granular cell tumor has not been previously reported. We report one such case

  9. [Circulating tumor cells: cornerstone of personalized medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, A; Vidal, F; Rathat, G; Alix-Panabières, C

    2014-11-01

    Cancer treatment has evolved toward personalized medicine. It is mandatory for clinicians to ascertain tumor biological features in order to optimize patients' treatment. Identification and characterization of circulating tumor cells demonstrated a prognostic value in many solid tumors. Here, we describe the main technologies for identification and characterization of circulating tumor cells and their clinical application in gynecologic and breast cancers. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. Tumor-Associated Macrophages Recruit CCR6+ Regulatory T Cells and Promote the Development of Colorectal Cancer via Enhancing CCL20 Production in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qun; Zhang, Weiwei; Ke, Fang; Leng, Qibin; Wang, Hong; Chen, Jinfei; Wang, Honglin

    2011-01-01

    Background Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) remodel the colorectal cancer (CRC) microenvironment. Yet, findings on the role of TAMs in CRC seem to be contradictory compared with other cancers. FoxP3+ regulatory T (Treg)-cells dominantly infiltrate CRC. However, the underlying molecular mechanism in which TAMs may contribute to the trafficking of Treg-cells to the tumor mass remains unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings CRC was either induced by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and H. pylori or established by subcutaneous injection of mouse colorectal tumor cell line (CMT93) in mice. CMT93 cells were co-cultured with primary macrophages in a transwell apparatus. Recruitment of FoxP3 green fluorescence protein positive (FoxP3GFP+) Treg-cells was assessed using the IVIS Imaging System or immunofluorescence staining. A role for macrophages in trafficking of Treg-cells and in the development of CRC was investigated in CD11b diphtheria toxin receptor (CD11b-DTR) transgenic C57BL/6J mice in which macrophages can be selectively depleted. Treg-cells remarkably infiltrated solid tumor, and predominantly expressed the homing chemokine receptor (CCR) 6 in the induced CRC model. Both CMT93 cancer cells and macrophages produced a large amount of CCL20, the sole ligand of CCR6 in vitro and in vivo. Injection of recombinant mouse CCL20 into tumor sites promoted its development with a marked recruitment of Treg-cells in the graft CRC model. Conditional macrophage ablation decreased CCL20 levels, blocked Treg-cell recruitment and inhibited tumor growth in CD11b-DTR mice grafted with CMT93. Conclusions/Significance TAMs recruit CCR6+ Treg-cells to tumor mass and promote its development via enhancing the production of CCL20 in a CRC mouse model. PMID:21559338

  11. Tumor Immunology meets…Immunology: Modified cancer cells as professional APC for priming naïve tumor-specific CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou Nasser Eddine, Farah; Ramia, Elise; Tosi, Giovanna; Forlani, Greta; Accolla, Roberto S

    2017-01-01

    Although recent therapeutic approaches have revitalized the enthusiasm of the immunological way to combat cancer, still the comprehension of immunity against tumors is largely incomplete. Due to their specific function, CD8+ T cells with cytolytic activity (CTL) have attracted the attention of most investigators because CTL are considered the main effectors against tumor cells. Nevertheless, CTL activity and persistence is largely dependent on the action of CD4+ T helper cells (TH). Thus establishment of tumor-specific TH cell response is key to the optimal response against cancer. Here we describe emerging new strategies to increase the TH cell recognition of tumor antigens. In particular, we review recent data indicating that tumor cells themselves can act as surrogate antigen presenting cells for triggering TH response and how these findings can help in constructing immunotherapeutic protocols for anti-cancer vaccine development.

  12. Development of a Prognostic Marker for Lung Cancer Using Analysis of Tumor Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Bambanker cell freezing medium (Lymphotec Inc., Tokyo, Japan ). Prior to FACS, isolated tumor cells were stained with mouse anti-human CD45RA PE/Cy7... clone L48, BD Biosciences, San Jose, CA) and Aqua Vital Dye (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA). CD45 is a blood cell marker used to separate blood cells from

  13. Optimization of dendritic cell loading with tumor cell lysates for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Paul; Merrick, Alison E; West, Emma; O'Donnell, Dearbhaile; Selby, Peter; Vile, Richard; Melcher, Alan A

    2008-09-01

    The immune response to cancer is critically determined by the way in which tumor cells die. As necrotic, stress-associated death can be associated with activation of antitumor immunity, whole tumor cell antigen loading strategies for dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccination have commonly used freeze-thaw "necrotic" lysates as an immunogenic source of tumor-associated antigens. In this study, the effect of such lysates on the ability of DCs to mature in response to well-established maturation stimuli was examined, and methods to enhance lysate-induced DC activation explored. Freeze-thaw lysates were prepared from murine tumor cell lines and their effects on bone marrow-derived DC maturation and function examined. Unmodified freeze-thaw tumor cell lysates inhibited the toll-like receptor-induced maturation and function of bone marrow-derived DCs, preventing up-regulation of CD40, CD86, and major histocompatibility complex class II, and reducing secretion of inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-12 p70, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and IL-6]. Although IL-10 secretion was increased by lysate-pulsed DCs, this was not responsible for the observed suppression of IL-12. Although activation of the nuclear factor-kappaB pathway remained intact, the kinase activity of phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase was inhibited in lysate-pulsed DCs. Lysate-induced DC suppression was partially reversed in vitro by induction of tumor cell stress before lysis, and only DCs loaded with stressed lysates afforded protection against tumor challenge in vivo. These data suggest that ex vivo freeze-thaw of tumor cells does not effectively mimic in vivo immunogenic necrosis, and advocates careful characterization and optimization of tumor cell-derived vaccine sources for cancer immunotherapy.

  14. Energy and Redox Homeostasis in Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Fernandes de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells display abnormal morphology, chromosomes, and metabolism. This review will focus on the metabolism of tumor cells integrating the available data by way of a functional approach. The first part contains a comprehensive introduction to bioenergetics, mitochondria, and the mechanisms of production and degradation of reactive oxygen species. This will be followed by a discussion on the oxidative metabolism of tumor cells including the morphology, biogenesis, and networking of mitochondria. Tumor cells overexpress proteins that favor fission, such as GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1. The interplay between proapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family that promotes Drp 1-dependent mitochondrial fragmentation and fusogenic antiapoptotic proteins such as Opa-1 will be presented. It will be argued that contrary to the widespread belief that in cancer cells, aerobic glycolysis completely replaces oxidative metabolism, a misrepresentation of Warburg’s original results, mitochondria of tumor cells are fully viable and functional. Cancer cells also carry out oxidative metabolism and generally conform to the orthodox model of ATP production maintaining as well an intact electron transport system. Finally, data will be presented indicating that the key to tumor cell survival in an ROS rich environment depends on the overexpression of antioxidant enzymes and high levels of the nonenzymatic antioxidant scavengers.

  15. Cancer stem cells in solid tumors: elusive or illusive?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehrach Hans R

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the past years in vivo transplantation experiments and in vitro colony-forming assays indicated that tumors arise only from rare cells. These cells were shown to bear self-renewal capacities and the ability to recapitulate all cell types within an individual tumor. Due to their phenotypic resemblance to normal stem cells, the term "cancer stem cells" is used. However, some pieces of the puzzle are missing: (a a stringent definition of cancer stem cells in solid tumors (b specific markers that only target cells that meet the criteria for a cancer stem cell in a certain type of tumor. These missing parts started an ongoing debate about which is the best method to identify and characterize cancer stem cells, or even if their mere existence is just an artifact caused by the experimental procedures. Recent findings query the cancer stem cell hypothesis for solid tumors itself since it was shown in xenograft transplantation experiments that under appropriate conditions tumor-initiating cells are not rare. In this review we critically discuss the challenges and prospects of the currently used major methods to identify cancer stem cells. Further on, we reflect the present discussion about the existence of cancer stem cells in solid tumors as well as the amount and characteristics of tumor-initiating cells and finally provide new perspectives like the correlation of cancer stem cells and induced pluripotent cells.

  16. Amplification of tumor inducing putative cancer stem cells (CSCs) by vitamin A/retinol from mammary tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Rohit B. [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Wang, Qingde [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Khillan, Jaspal S., E-mail: khillan@pitt.edu [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Vitamin A supports self renewal of putative CSCs from mammary tumors. •These cells exhibit impaired retinol metabolism into retinoic acid. •CSCs from mammary tumors differentiate into mammary specific cell lineages. •The cells express mammary stem cell specific CD29 and CD49f markers. •Putative CSCs form highly metastatic tumors in NOD SCID mouse. -- Abstract: Solid tumors contain a rare population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that are responsible for relapse and metastasis. The existence of CSC however, remains highly controversial issue. Here we present the evidence for putative CSCs from mammary tumors amplified by vitamin A/retinol signaling. The cells exhibit mammary stem cell specific CD29{sup hi}/CD49f{sup hi}/CD24{sup hi} markers, resistance to radiation and chemo therapeutic agents and form highly metastatic tumors in NOD/SCID mice. The cells exhibit indefinite self renewal as cell lines. Furthermore, the cells exhibit impaired retinol metabolism and do not express enzymes that metabolize retinol into retinoic acid. Vitamin A/retinol also amplified putative CSCs from breast cancer cell lines that form highly aggressive tumors in NOD SCID mice. The studies suggest that high purity putative CSCs can be isolated from solid tumors to establish patient specific cell lines for personalized therapeutics for pre-clinical translational applications. Characterization of CSCs will allow understanding of basic cellular and molecular pathways that are deregulated, mechanisms of tumor metastasis and evasion of therapies that has direct clinical relevance.

  17. The Relationship Between Human Papillomavirus Status and Other Molecular Prognostic Markers in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Christina S.; Narasimhan, Balasubramanian; Cao Hongbin; Kwok, Shirley; Erickson, Julianna P.; Koong, Albert; Pourmand, Nader; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) status and known prognostic makers for head and neck cancers including tumor hypoxia, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression and intratumoral T-cell levels and to determine the prognostic impact of these markers by HPV status. Methods and Materials: HPV status in 82 evaluable head and neck squamous cell carcinomas patients was determined by pyrosequencing and related to p16 INK4a staining and treatment outcomes. It was correlated with tumor hypoxia (tumor pO 2 and carbonic anhydrase [CAIX] staining), EGFR status, and intratumoral lymphocyte expression (CD3 staining). Results: Forty-four percent of evaluable tumors had strong HPV signal by pyrosequencing. There was a significant relationship between strong HPV signal and p16 INK4a staining as well as oropharynx location. The strong HPV signal group fared significantly better than others, both in time to progression (TTP, p = 0.008) and overall survival (OS, p = 0.004) for all patients and for the oropharyngeal subset. Positive p16 INK4a staining was associated with better TTP (p = 0.014) and OS (p = 0.00002). There was no relationship between HPV status and tumor pO 2 or CAIX staining. However, HPV status correlated inversely with EGFR reactivity (p = 0.0006) and directly with CD3(+) T-lymphocyte level (p = 0.03). Whereas CAIX and EGFR overexpression were negative prognostic factors regardless of HPV status, CD3(+) T-cell levels was prognostic only in HPV(-) tumors. Conclusion: HPV status was a prognostic factor for progression and survival. It correlated inversely with EGFR expression and directly with T-cell infiltration. The prognostic effect of CAIX and EGFR expression was not influenced by HPV status, whereas intratumoral T-cell levels was significant only for HPV(-) tumors.

  18. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hilar Bile Duct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ippei Yamana

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We herein report a rare case of squamous cell carcinoma of the hilar bile duct. A 66-year-old Japanese male patient was admitted to our hospital because of appetite loss and jaundice. Abdominal computed tomography revealed an enhanced mass measuring 10 × 30 mm in the hilar bile duct region. After undergoing biliary drainage, the patient underwent extended right hepatic lobectomy with regional lymph nodes dissection. The tumor had invaded the right portal vein. Therefore, we also performed resection and reconstruction of the portal vein. Histopathologically, the carcinoma cells exhibited a solid structure with differentiation to squamous cell carcinoma with keratinization and intercellular bridges. Immunohistochemical staining of the tumor cells revealed positive cytokeratin staining and negative CAM 5.2 staining. Based on these findings, a definitive diagnosis of well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma of the hilar bile duct was made.

  19. Glioma Cells in the Tumor Periphery Have a Stem Cell Phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munthe, Sune; Petterson, Stine Asferg; Dahlrot, Rikke Hedegaard

    2016-01-01

    and a panel of markers was used. The panel comprised of six stem cell-related markers (CD133, Musashi-1, Bmi-1, Sox-2, Nestin and Glut-3), a proliferation marker (Ki-67) as well as a chemo-resistance marker (MGMT). Computer-based automated classifiers were designed to measure the mIDH1 positive nucleus area......-fraction of the chosen markers. Moreover, orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts from five different patient-derived spheroid cultures were obtained and the tumor cells identified by human specific immunohistochemical markers. The results showed that tumor cells in the periphery of patient gliomas expressed stem cell...... in the periphery of patient gliomas have a stem cell phenotype, although it is less pronounced than in the tumor core. Novel therapies aiming at preventing recurrence should therefore take tumor stemness into account. Migrating cells in orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts preserve expression and stem cell markers...

  20. Background staining of visualization systems in immunohistochemistry: comparison of the Avidin-Biotin Complex system and the EnVision+ system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosse, Bettine A H; Seelentag, Walter; Bachmann, Astrid; Bosman, Fred T; Yan, Pu

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate specific immunostaining and background staining in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human tissues with the 2 most frequently used immunohistochemical detection systems, Avidin-Biotin-Peroxidase (ABC) and EnVision+. A series of fixed tissues, including breast, colon, kidney, larynx, liver, lung, ovary, pancreas, prostate, stomach, and tonsil, was used in the study. Three monoclonal antibodies, 1 against a nuclear antigen (Ki-67), 1 against a cytoplasmic antigen (cytokeratin), and 1 against a cytoplasmic and membrane-associated antigen and a polyclonal antibody against a nuclear and cytoplasmic antigen (S-100) were selected for these studies. When the ABC system was applied, immunostaining was performed with and without blocking of endogenous avidin-binding activity. The intensity of specific immunostaining and the percentage of stained cells were comparable for the 2 detection systems. The use of ABC caused widespread cytoplasmic and rare nuclear background staining in a variety of normal and tumor cells. A very strong background staining was observed in colon, gastric mucosa, liver, and kidney. Blocking avidin-binding capacity reduced background staining, but complete blocking was difficult to attain. With the EnVision+ system no background staining occurred. Given the efficiency of the detection, equal for both systems or higher with EnVision+, and the significant background problem with ABC, we advocate the routine use of the EnVision+ system.

  1. Tumor associated macrophages protect colon cancer cells from TRAIL-induced apoptosis through IL-1beta-dependent stabilization of Snail in tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Kaler

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported that colon tumor cells stimulate macrophages to release IL-1beta, which in turn inactivates GSK3beta and enhances Wnt signaling in colon cancer cells, generating a self-amplifying loop that promotes the growth of tumor cells.Here we describe that macrophages protect HCT116 and Hke-3 colon cancer cells from TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Inactivation of IL-1beta by neutralizing IL-1beta antibody, or silencing of IL-1beta in macrophages inhibited their ability to counter TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Accordingly, IL-1beta was sufficient to inhibit TRAIL-induced apoptosis. TRAIL-induced collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential (Delta psi and activation of caspases were prevented by macrophages or by recombinant IL-1beta. Pharmacological inhibition of IL-1beta release from macrophages by vitamin D(3, a potent chemopreventive agent for colorectal cancer, restored the ability of TRAIL to induce apoptosis of tumor cells cultured with macrophages. Macrophages and IL-1beta failed to inhibit TRAIL-induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells expressing dnIkappaB, dnAKT or dnTCF4, confirming that they oppose TRAIL-induced cell death through induction of Wnt signaling in tumor cells. We showed that macrophages and IL-1beta stabilized Snail in tumor cells in an NF-kappaB/Wnt dependent manner and that Snail deficient tumor cells were not protected from TRAIL-induced apoptosis by macrophages or by IL-1beta, demonstrating a crucial role of Snail in the resistance of tumor cells to TRAIL.We have identified a positive feedback loop between tumor cells and macrophages that propagates the growth and promotes the survival of colon cancer cells: tumor cells stimulate macrophages to secrete IL-1beta, which in turn, promotes Wnt signaling and stabilizes Snail in tumor cells, conferring resistance to TRAIL. Vitamin D(3 halts this amplifying loop by interfering with the release of IL-1beta from macrophages. Accordingly, vitamin D(3 sensitizes tumor cells to TRAIL

  2. Tumor Cells and Tumor-Associated Macrophages: Secreted Proteins as Potential Targets for Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Baay, Marc; Brouwer, Anja; Pauwels, Patrick; Peeters, Marc; Lardon, Filip

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory pathways, meant to defend the organism against infection and injury, as a byproduct, can promote an environment which favors tumor growth and metastasis. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), which constitute a significant part of the tumor-infiltrating immune cells, have been linked to the growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis of a variety of cancers, most likely through polarization of TAMs to the M2 (alternative) phenotype. The interaction between tumor cells and macrophages pro...

  3. Monoclonal TCR-redirected tumor cell killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddy, Nathaniel; Bossi, Giovanna; Adams, Katherine J; Lissina, Anna; Mahon, Tara M; Hassan, Namir J; Gavarret, Jessie; Bianchi, Frayne C; Pumphrey, Nicholas J; Ladell, Kristin; Gostick, Emma; Sewell, Andrew K; Lissin, Nikolai M; Harwood, Naomi E; Molloy, Peter E; Li, Yi; Cameron, Brian J; Sami, Malkit; Baston, Emma E; Todorov, Penio T; Paston, Samantha J; Dennis, Rebecca E; Harper, Jane V; Dunn, Steve M; Ashfield, Rebecca; Johnson, Andy; McGrath, Yvonne; Plesa, Gabriela; June, Carl H; Kalos, Michael; Price, David A; Vuidepot, Annelise; Williams, Daniel D; Sutton, Deborah H; Jakobsen, Bent K

    2012-06-01

    T cell immunity can potentially eradicate malignant cells and lead to clinical remission in a minority of patients with cancer. In the majority of these individuals, however, there is a failure of the specific T cell receptor (TCR)–mediated immune recognition and activation process. Here we describe the engineering and characterization of new reagents termed immune-mobilizing monoclonal TCRs against cancer (ImmTACs). Four such ImmTACs, each comprising a distinct tumor-associated epitope-specific monoclonal TCR with picomolar affinity fused to a humanized cluster of differentiation 3 (CD3)-specific single-chain antibody fragment (scFv), effectively redirected T cells to kill cancer cells expressing extremely low surface epitope densities. Furthermore, these reagents potently suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Thus, ImmTACs overcome immune tolerance to cancer and represent a new approach to tumor immunotherapy.

  4. Mesothelioma tumor cells modulate dendritic cell lipid content, phenotype and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne K Gardner

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play an important role in the generation of anti-cancer immune responses, however there is evidence that DCs in cancer patients are dysfunctional. Lipid accumulation driven by tumor-derived factors has recently been shown to contribute to DC dysfunction in several human cancers, but has not yet been examined in mesothelioma. This study investigated if mesothelioma tumor cells and/or their secreted factors promote increases in DC lipid content and modulate DC function. Human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs were exposed to human mesothelioma tumor cells and tumor-derived factors in the presence or absence of lipoproteins. The data showed that immature MoDCs exposed to mesothelioma cells or factors contained increased lipid levels relative to control DCs. Lipid accumulation was associated with reduced antigen processing ability (measured using a DQ OVA assay, upregulation of the co-stimulatory molecule, CD86, and production of the tolerogenic cytokine, IL-10. Increases in DC lipid content were further enhanced by co-exposure to mesothelioma-derived factors and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, but not low-density lipoproteins. In vivo studies using a murine mesothelioma model showed that the lipid content of tumor-infiltrating CD4+ CD8α- DCs, CD4- CD8α- DCs DCs and plasmacytoid DCs increased with tumor progression. Moreover, increasing tumor burden was associated with reduced proliferation of tumor-antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in tumor-draining lymph nodes. This study shows that mesothelioma promotes DC lipid acquisition, which is associated with altered activation status and reduced capacity to process and present antigens, which may impair the ability of DCs to generate effective anti mesothelioma T cell responses.

  5. Microscopic endometrial perivascular epithelioid cell nodules: a case report with the earliest presentation of a uterine perivascular epithelioid cell tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Chia-Lang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Perivascular epithelioid cell (PEC tumors (PEComas are a family of related mesenchymal tumors composed of PECs which co-express melanocytic and smooth muscle markers. Although their distinctive histologic, immunohistochemical, ultrastructural, and genetic features have been clearly demonstrated, their histogenesis and normal counterpart remain largely unknown. Precursor lesions of PEComas have rarely been reported. We herein describe a tuberous sclerosis patient with microscopic PEC nodules in the endometrium of adenomyosis, pelvic endometriosis, an ovarian endometriotic cyst, and the endometrium of the uterine cavity. The nodules showed a mixture of spindle-shaped and epithelioid cells concentrically arranged around small arteries. The cells exhibited uniform nuclei, light eosinophilic cytoplasm, and immunoreactivity with HMB-45 and CD10. Some nodules revealed continuity with a PEComa in the myometrium. These findings support microscopic endometrial PEC nodules possibly being precursor lesions of uterine PEComas. The wide distribution of the nodules in the pelvis may be related to the multicentricity of PEComas in tuberous sclerosis patients. Owing to the immunoreactivity with CD10, microscopic endometrial PEC nodules may be misinterpreted as endothelial stromal cells unless melanocytic markers are stained. To the best of our knowledge, this is a case with the earliest manifestation of PEC lesions occurring in the endometrium. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/9658280017862643

  6. Lymphomas or leukemia presenting as ovarian tumors. An analysis of 42 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, B M; Robboy, S J

    1983-11-15

    Forty cases of ovarian lymphoma and two of extramedullary leukemia were examined with emphasis on histologic types correlated with age, modes of presentation, operative findings, including frequency of bilaterality and omental spread, clinical course following therapy, and problems in differential diagnosis. Although most cases were referred with diagnoses other than lymphoma (granulosa cell tumor or dysgerminoma, occasionally anaplastic tumor, Krukenberg tumor, or metastatic breast carcinoma), utilization of sections cut at 4 mu and stained with hematoxylin and eosin, or sections stained by the methyl green pyronine (MGP), naphthol-ASD esterase (NASD) or periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) methods helped bring out the lymphoid or hematopoietic nature of the cells. Sixteen patients were under 20 years of age. They had small noncleaved cell lymphoma (undifferentiated Burkitt's and non-Burkitt's, 10 cases), diffuse immunoblastic large cell lymphoma (4 cases), or acute granulocytic leukemia (2 cases). Twenty-six patients were 29 to 74 years of age and had diffuse large cell lymphoma (10 cases), diffuse immunoblastic large cell lymphoma (9 cases), follicular (nodular) lymphoma (6 cases) or small noncleaved cell lymphoma (1 case). Pain with an abdominal or pelvic mass was the most common presentation. Nine tumors were discovered during investigation of other gynecologic complaints. At laparotomy, the tumors in 55% of cases involved both ovaries, and in 64% also involved extragonadal sites (usually omentum, fallopian tubes, or lymph nodes). Seventeen patients had tumor affecting one ovary, seven of these without any evidence of extragonadal spread. Forty-two percent (15) of 37 patients with follow-up were alive after 2 years. Only nine patients survived more than 5 years; two subsequently died of lymphoma. Favorable prognostic features included: (1) FIGO stage IA; (2) unilateral ovarian involvement; (3) focal involvement of one ovary; and (4) follicular (nodular) lymphoma.

  7. Blood vessel endothelium-directed tumor cell streaming in breast tumors requires the HGF/C-Met signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, E; Xue, A; Wang, Y; Rougerie, P; Sharma, V P; Eddy, R; Cox, D; Condeelis, J

    2017-05-11

    During metastasis to distant sites, tumor cells migrate to blood vessels. In vivo, breast tumor cells utilize a specialized mode of migration known as streaming, where a linear assembly of tumor cells migrate directionally towards blood vessels on fibronectin-collagen I-containing extracellular matrix (ECM) fibers in response to chemotactic signals. We have successfully reconstructed tumor cell streaming in vitro by co-plating tumors cells, macrophages and endothelial cells on 2.5 μm thick ECM-coated micro-patterned substrates. We found that tumor cells and macrophages, when plated together on the micro-patterned substrates, do not demonstrate sustained directional migration in only one direction (sustained directionality) but show random bi-directional walking. Sustained directionality of tumor cells as seen in vivo was established in vitro when beads coated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells were placed at one end of the micro-patterned 'ECM fibers' within the assay. We demonstrated that these endothelial cells supply the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) required for the chemotactic gradient responsible for sustained directionality. Using this in vitro reconstituted streaming system, we found that directional streaming is dependent on, and most effectively blocked, by inhibiting the HGF/C-Met signaling pathway between endothelial cells and tumor cells. Key observations made with the in vitro reconstituted system implicating C-Met signaling were confirmed in vivo in mammary tumors using the in vivo invasion assay and intravital multiphoton imaging of tumor cell streaming. These results establish HGF/C-Met as a central organizing signal in blood vessel-directed tumor cell migration in vivo and highlight a promising role for C-Met inhibitors in blocking tumor cell streaming and metastasis in vivo, and for use in human trials.

  8. Inhibition of Tumor Growth of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma HepG2 Cells in a Nude Mouse Xenograft Model by the Total Flavonoids from Arachniodes exilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huimin Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A tumor growth model of human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells in nude mice was employed to investigate the antitumor activity of the total flavonoids extracted from Arachniodes exilis (TFAE in vivo. Several biochemical assays including hematoxylin-eosin (HE staining, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot were performed to elucidate the mechanism of action of total flavonoids extracted from Arachniodes exilis (TFAE. The results showed that TFAE effectively inhibited the tumor growth of hepatocellular carcinoma in nude mice and had no significant effect on body weight, blood system, and functions of liver and kidney. Expression levels of proapoptotic proteins Bax and cleaved caspase-3 remarkably increased while the expressions of Bcl-2, HIF-1α, and VEGF were suppressed by TFAE. These results suggested that the antitumor potential of TFEA was implied by the apoptosis of tumor cells and the inhibition of angiogenesis in tumor tissue.

  9. An Effective Approach for Immunotherapy Using Irradiated Tumor Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafa, D.M.B.

    2011-01-01

    This study has been aimed to investigate the effect of injection of Irradiated Ehrlich tumor cells alone or concurrent with immunomodulator in mice before and after challenge with viable Ehrlich tumor cells for enhancement of immune system. This study includes the estimation of survival, tumor size, lymphocyte count, LDH, MTT, granzyme B, and DNA fragmentation. In order to fulfill the target of this study, a total of 120 female swiss albino mice were used. They were divided into two classes vaccinated (injection of vaccine before challenge) and therapeutic class (injection of vaccine after challenge). Each class was divided into four groups, group (1) mice injected with viable Ehrlich tumor cells (G1), group (2) mice injected with irradiated tumor cells (G2), group (3) mice injected with immunomodulator (G3), and group (4) mice injected with irradiated tumor cells + immunomodulator (G4). Results obtained from this study demonstrated that, the lymphocyte count and granzyme B activity were increased in both the vaccinated and therapeutic classes compared with control group. LDH activity was decreased in all groups of vaccinated class and also in G2 and G4 groups of therapeutic class compared with control group. There was a significant increase in percent apoptosis of tumor cells cultured with spleenocytes of the groups of vaccinated class as compared with control group. Cellular DNA from Ehrlich tumor cell line cultured with spleenocytes of immunized groups was fragmented into discrete bands of approximate multiples of 200 bp. Revealing significant apoptosis in tumor cells due to vaccination. It is concluded that, vaccination with irradiated tumor cells is an effective approach in stimulation of immune system against viable tumor cells.

  10. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas; Westbrook, Carol

    2013-04-09

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  11. Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make hormones. Yolk sac tumors make the hormone alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Mixed germ cell tumors are made of ... used to diagnose some CNS germ cell tumors: Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG). Blood ...

  12. Transfer of allogeneic CD4+ T cells rescues CD8+ T cells in anti-PD-L1–resistant tumors leading to tumor eradication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arina, Ainhoa; Karrison, Theodore; Galka, Eva; Schreiber, Karin; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Schreiber, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Adoptively transferred CD8+ T cells can stabilize the size of solid tumors over long periods of time by exclusively recognizing antigen cross-presented on tumor stroma. However, these tumors eventually escape T cell–mediated growth control. The aim of this study was to eradicate such persistent cancers. In our model, the SIYRYYGL antigen is expressed by cancer cells that lack the MHC-I molecule Kb needed for direct presentation, but the antigen is picked up and cross-presented by tumor stroma. A single injection of antigen-specific 2C CD8+ T cells caused long-term inhibition of tumor growth, but without further intervention, tumors started to progress after approximately 3 months. Escape was associated with reduced numbers of circulating 2C cells. Tumor-infiltrating 2C cells produced significantly less TNFα and expressed more of the “exhaustion” markers PD-1 and Tim-3 than T cells from lymphoid organs. High-dose local ionizing radiation, depletion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, infusions of additional 2C cells, and antibodies blocking PD-L1 did not prevent tumor escape. In contrast, adoptive transfer of allogeneic CD4+ T cells restored the numbers of circulating Ag-specific CD8+ T cells and their intratumoral function, resulting in tumor eradication. These CD4+ T cells had no antitumor effects in the absence of CD8+ T cells and recognized the alloantigen cross-presented on tumor stroma. CD4+ T cells might also be effective in cancer patients when PD1/PD-L1 blockade does not rescue intratumoral CD8+ T-cell function and tumors persist. PMID:28077434

  13. Novel Approach of Differential Staining to Detect Necrotic Cells in Preimplantation Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Nasr Esfahani

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This novel approach describes a rapid and simple method for identification of necrotic vs. viable cells within a mammalian blastocyst.Materials and Methods: Hatched bovine blastocysts produced in vitro were first incubated for 30 min in pre-equilibrated culture medium containing propidium iodide (PI; 300μg/ml and bisbenzimide (Hoechst: H33342; 5μg/ml fluorescent dyes. Embryos were then freed from residual dyes by thoroughly washing in warm phosphate buffer saline free of calcium and magnesium (PBS-, fixed in 2.5% glutharaldehyde and washed again in PBS- . Stained embryos afterwards were mounted in a drop of glycerol over a microscopic slide. Prepared samples were examined under an epifluorescent microscope using the same excitation wavelength (330-385nm and barrier filter (400nm to distinguish necrosed vs. viable blastomers as being appeared in red and blue, respectively.Results: Obtained results showed that in cells with altered cell membrane such as late apoptotic or necrotic cells, PI and H33342 readily enter through the cytoplasmic barriers and so the chromatin materials are stained by both, but since PI quenches bisbenzimide fluorescence, necrotic blastomeres are seen in red to pinky red, while live cells are seen just as blue.Conclusion: Obtained results clearly indicated that this novel approach can be used as a simple, feasible and precise method for every embryology lab and with all the mammalian blastocysts produced either in vitro or in vivo. The basic assay can be completed in 60 min, and valuable and reliable information can be obtained about the quality of the embryos.

  14. Podoplanin expression in primary brain tumors induces platelet aggregation and increases risk of venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, Julia; Preusser, Matthias; Nazari, Pegah Mir Seyed; Posch, Florian; Panzer, Simon; Marosi, Christine; Birner, Peter; Thaler, Johannes; Brostjan, Christine; Lötsch, Daniela; Berger, Walter; Hainfellner, Johannes A; Pabinger, Ingrid; Ay, Cihan

    2017-03-30

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is common in patients with brain tumors, and underlying mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesized that podoplanin, a sialomucin-like glycoprotein, increases the risk of VTE in primary brain tumors via its ability to induce platelet aggregation. Immunohistochemical staining against podoplanin and intratumoral platelet aggregates was performed in brain tumor specimens of 213 patients (mostly high-grade gliomas [89%]) included in the Vienna Cancer and Thrombosis Study, a prospective observational cohort study of patients with newly diagnosed cancer or progressive disease aimed at identifying patients at risk of VTE. Platelet aggregation in response to primary human glioblastoma cells was investigated in vitro. During 2-year follow-up, 29 (13.6%) patients developed VTE. One-hundred fifty-one tumor specimens stained positive for podoplanin (33 high expression, 47 medium expression, 71 low expression). Patients with podoplanin-positive tumors had lower peripheral blood platelet counts ( P < .001) and higher D-dimer levels ( P < .001). Podoplanin staining intensity was associated with increasing levels of intravascular platelet aggregates in tumor specimens ( P < .001). High podoplanin expression was associated with an increased risk of VTE (hazard ratio for high vs no podoplanin expression: 5.71; 95% confidence interval, 1.52-21.26; P = 010), independent of age, sex, and tumor type. Podoplanin-positive primary glioblastoma cells induced aggregation of human platelets in vitro, which could be abrogated by an antipodoplanin antibody. In conclusion, high podoplanin expression in primary brain tumors induces platelet aggregation, correlates with hypercoagulability, and is associated with increased risk of VTE. Our data indicate novel insights into the pathogenesis of VTE in primary brain tumors. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  15. PDGFR-Β expression in small cell lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Eric T.; Gonzalez, Adriana; Massion, Pierre P.; Olson, Sandra J.; Albert, Jeffrey M.; Shyr, Yu; Carbone, David P.; Johnson, David H.; Hallahan, Dennis E.; Lu Bo

    2007-01-01

    Background: Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and PDGFR-β are expressed and have been found to have prognostic value in several human cancers. Data in non-small-cell cancer cell lines have suggested that PDGFR is a therapeutic target for drug development. In the current study PDGFR-β expression and prognostic value in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) was investigated. Methods and Materials: Paraffin-embedded tissue blocks from 53 patients with limited and extensive stage SCLC were obtained for immunohistochemical staining. Tumors from each patient were sampled 3 times and stained with PDGFR-β specific antibody. Patients were divided into low and high staining groups based on intensity. Results: There was high intensity PDGFR-β staining in 20 patients with SCLC. Another 29 expressed low intensity PDGFR-β staining, with only 4 patients showing no PDGFR-β staining. There was no statistically significant difference in 5 year overall survival between patients with low levels of PDGFR-β staining vs. those with high level staining SCLC tumors (p = 0.538). Conclusions: The present study found that the majority of SCLC patients express, at least, a low level of PDGF-β. However, the level of PDGFR-β expression was not a statistically significant predictor of 5 year overall survival in SCLC

  16. Mast cells: potential positive and negative roles in tumor biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marichal, Thomas; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J

    2013-11-01

    Mast cells are immune cells that reside in virtually all vascularized tissues. Upon activation by diverse mechanisms, mast cells can secrete a broad array of biologically active products that either are stored in the cytoplasmic granules of the cells (e.g., histamine, heparin, various proteases) or are produced de novo upon cell stimulation (e.g., prostaglandins, leukotrienes, cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors). Mast cells are best known for their effector functions during anaphylaxis and acute IgE-associated allergic reactions, but they also have been implicated in a wide variety of processes that maintain health or contribute to disease. There has been particular interest in the possible roles of mast cells in tumor biology. In vitro studies have shown that mast cells have the potential to influence many aspects of tumor biology, including tumor development, tumor-induced angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling, and the shaping of adaptive immune responses to tumors. Yet, the actual contributions of mast cells to tumor biology in vivo remain controversial. Here, we review some basic features of mast cell biology with a special emphasis on those relevant to their potential roles in tumors. We discuss how using in vivo tumor models in combination with models in which mast cell function can be modulated has implicated mast cells in the regulation of host responses to tumors. Finally, we summarize data from studies of human tumors that suggest either beneficial or detrimental roles for mast cells in tumors. ©2013 AACR.

  17. A Comparative Study of Sample Preparation for Staining and Immunodetection of Plant Cell Walls by Light Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhertbruggen, Yves; Walker, Jesse L.; Guillon, Fabienne; Scheller, Henrik V.

    2017-01-01

    Staining and immunodetection by light microscopy are methods widely used to investigate plant cell walls. The two techniques have been crucial to study the cell wall architecture in planta, its deconstruction by chemicals or cell wall-degrading enzymes. They have been instrumental in detecting the presence of cell types, in deciphering plant cell wall evolution and in characterizing plant mutants and transformants. The success of immunolabeling relies on how plant materials are embedded and sectioned. Agarose coating, wax and resin embedding are, respectively, associated with vibratome, microtome and ultramicrotome sectioning. Here, we have systematically carried out a comparative analysis of these three methods of sample preparation when they are applied for cell wall staining and cell wall immunomicroscopy. In order to help the plant community in understanding and selecting adequate methods of embedding and sectioning for cell wall immunodetection, we review in this article the advantages and limitations of these three methods. Moreover, we offer detailed protocols of embedding for studying plant materials through microscopy. PMID:28900439

  18. Acromegaly due to a Macroinvasive Plurihormonal Pituitary Adenoma and a Rectal Carcinoid Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Ouk Chin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A macroinvasive pituitary adenoma with plurihormonality usually causes acromegaly and hyperprolactinemia, and also accompanies with neurologic symptoms such as visual disturbances. However, its concurrent presentation with a rectal carcinoid tumor is rarely observed. This study reports the history, biochemical, colonoscopic and immunohistochemical results of a 48-year-old female with acromegaly and hyperprolactinemia. Despite the large size and invasive nature of the pituitary adenoma to adjacent anatomical structures, she did not complain of any neurologic symptoms such as visual disturbance or headache. Immunohistochemical staining of the surgical specimen from the pituitary adenoma revealed that the tumor cells were positive for growth hormone (GH, prolactin (PRL, and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH. Staining for pituitary-specific transcription factor-1 (Pit-1 was shown to be strongly positive, which could have been possibly contributing to the plurihormonality of this adenoma. Colonoscopy found a rectal polyp that was identified to be a carcinoid tumor using immunohistochemical staining. A macroinvasive pituitary adenoma with concomitant rectal carcinoid tumor was secreting GH, PRL, and TSH, which were believed to be in association with over-expression of Pit-1. This is the first case report of double primary tumors comprising a plurihormonal pituitary macroadenoma and rectal carcinoid tumor.

  19. A solitary fibrous tumor of the kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuruddha M Abeygunasekera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A solitary fibrous tumor (SFT is an uncommon spindle cell neoplasm that usually occurs in the pleura, but may occur in extrapleural sites. Its occurrence in the kidney is rare. We report a SFT, clinically thought to be a renal cell carcinoma arising in the kidney of a 68-year-old female. The tumor was well-circumscribed and composed of a mixture of spindle cells and dense collagenous bands. Immunohistochemical studies revealed reactivity for CD34, CD99, and Bcl-2 protein, with no staining for keratin or muscle markers, confirming the diagnosis. The immunohistochemical study was the key to diagnosis. Several younger members of her family had colorectal and lung cancers suggesting the possibility of a familial or genetic susceptibility.

  20. Elevated S100A9 expression in tumor stroma functions as an early recurrence marker for early-stage oral cancer patients through increased tumor cell invasion, angiogenesis, macrophage recruitment and interleukin-6 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wei-Yu; Chen, Yi-Wen; Hsiao, Jenn-Ren; Liu, Chiang-Shin; Kuo, Yi-Zih; Wang, Yi-Ching; Chang, Kung-Chao; Tsai, Sen-Tien; Chang, Mei-Zhu; Lin, Siao-Han; Wu, Li-Wha

    2015-09-29

    S100A9 is a calcium-binding protein with two EF-hands and frequently deregulated in several cancer types, however, with no clear role in oral cancer. In this report, the expression of S100A9 in cancer and adjacent tissues from 79 early-stage oral cancer patients was detected by immunohistochemical staining. Although S100A9 protein was present in both tumor and stromal cells, only the early-stage oral cancer patients with high stromal expression had reduced recurrence-free survival. High stromal S100A9 expression was also significantly associated with non-well differentiation and recurrence. In addition to increasing cell migration and invasion, ectopic S100A9 expression in tumor cells promoted xenograft tumorigenesis as well as the dominant expression of myeloid cell markers and pro-inflammatory IL-6. The expression of S100A9 in one stromal component, monocytes, stimulated the aggressiveness of co-cultured oral cancer cells. We also detected the elevation of serum S100A9 levels in early-stage oral cancer patients of a separate cohort of 73 oral cancer patients. The release of S100A9 protein into extracellular milieu enhanced tumor cell invasion, transendothelial monocyte migration and angiogenic activity. S100A9-mediated release of IL-6 requires the crosstalk of tumor cells with monocytes through the activation of NF-κB and STAT-3. Early-stage oral cancer patients with both high S100A9 expression and high CD68+ immune infiltrates in stroma had shortest recurrence-free survival, suggesting the use of both S100A9 and CD68 as poor prognostic markers for oral cancer. Together, both intracellular and extracellular S100A9 exerts a tumor-promoting action through the activation of oral cancer cells and their associated stroma in oral carcinogenesis.

  1. Influence of stain etching on low minority carrier lifetime areas of multicrystalline silicon for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montesdeoca-Santana, A. [Departamento de Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, Avda. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez, 38206 La Laguna (Spain); Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Laboratory and Servicecenter Gelsenkirchen, Auf der Reihe 2, 45884 Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Gonzalez-Diaz, B. [Departamento de Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, Avda. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez, 38206 La Laguna (Spain); Departamento de Energia Fotovoltaica, Instituto Tecnologico y de Energias Renovables. Poligono Industrial de Granadilla s/n, 38600 San Isidro-Granadilla de Abona (Spain); Jimenez-Rodriguez, E. [Departamento de Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, Avda. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez, 38206 La Laguna (Spain); Ziegler, J. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Laboratory- and Servicecenter Gelsenkirchen. Auf der Reihe 2, 45884 Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Velazquez, J.J. [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental y Experimental, Electronica y Sistemas, Universidad de La Laguna. Avda. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez, 38206 La Laguna (Spain); Hohage, S.; Borchert, D. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Laboratory and Servicecenter Gelsenkirchen. Auf der Reihe 2, 45884 Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Guerrero-Lemus, R., E-mail: rglemus@ull.es [Departamento de Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, Avda. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez, 38206 La Laguna (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > An enhanced minority carrier lifetime at extended defects in multicrystalline silicon is observed with the use of HF/HNO{sub 3} stain etching to texture the surface. > FTIR analysis shows no influence of oxide passivation in this effect. > SEM images show a preferential etching at extended defects suggesting smoothing at defects as one of the causes for the reduced recombination activity. > LBIC images show a reduction in IQE at extended defects in HF/HNO{sub 3} textured multicrystalline solar cells. - Abstract: In this work the use of HF/HNO{sub 3} solutions for texturing silicon-based solar cell substrates by stain etching and the influence of texturing on minority carrier lifetimes are studied. Stain etching is currently used to decrease the reflectance and, subsequently improve the photogenerated current of the cells, but also produces nanostructures on the silicon surface. In the textured samples it has been observed that an improvement on the minority carrier lifetime with respect to the samples treated with a conventional saw damage etching process is produced on grain boundaries and defects, and the origin of this effect has been discussed.

  2. Influence of stain etching on low minority carrier lifetime areas of multicrystalline silicon for solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montesdeoca-Santana, A.; Gonzalez-Diaz, B.; Jimenez-Rodriguez, E.; Ziegler, J.; Velazquez, J.J.; Hohage, S.; Borchert, D.; Guerrero-Lemus, R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → An enhanced minority carrier lifetime at extended defects in multicrystalline silicon is observed with the use of HF/HNO 3 stain etching to texture the surface. → FTIR analysis shows no influence of oxide passivation in this effect. → SEM images show a preferential etching at extended defects suggesting smoothing at defects as one of the causes for the reduced recombination activity. → LBIC images show a reduction in IQE at extended defects in HF/HNO 3 textured multicrystalline solar cells. - Abstract: In this work the use of HF/HNO 3 solutions for texturing silicon-based solar cell substrates by stain etching and the influence of texturing on minority carrier lifetimes are studied. Stain etching is currently used to decrease the reflectance and, subsequently improve the photogenerated current of the cells, but also produces nanostructures on the silicon surface. In the textured samples it has been observed that an improvement on the minority carrier lifetime with respect to the samples treated with a conventional saw damage etching process is produced on grain boundaries and defects, and the origin of this effect has been discussed.

  3. Adoptively transferred human lung tumor specific cytotoxic T cells can control autologous tumor growth and shape tumor phenotype in a SCID mouse xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrone Soldano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anti-tumor efficacy of human immune effector cells, such as cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs, has been difficult to study in lung cancer patients in the clinical setting. Improved experimental models for the study of lung tumor-immune cell interaction as well as for evaluating the efficacy of adoptive transfer of immune effector cells are needed. Methods To address questions related to the in vivo interaction of human lung tumor cells and immune effector cells, we obtained an HLA class I + lung tumor cell line from a fresh surgical specimen, and using the infiltrating immune cells, isolated and characterized tumor antigen-specific, CD8+ CTLs. We then established a SCID mouse-human tumor xenograft model with the tumor cell line and used it to study the function of the autologous CTLs provided via adoptive transfer. Results The tumor antigen specific CTLs isolated from the tumor were found to have an activated memory phenotype and able to kill tumor cells in an antigen specific manner in vitro. Additionally, the tumor antigen-specific CTLs were fully capable of homing to and killing autologous tumors in vivo, and expressing IFN-γ, each in an antigen-dependent manner. A single injection of these CTLs was able to provide significant but temporary control of the growth of autologous tumors in vivo without the need for IL-2. The timing of injection of CTLs played an essential role in the outcome of tumor growth control. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of surviving tumor cells following CTL treatment indicated that the surviving tumor cells expressed reduced MHC class I antigens on their surface. Conclusion These studies confirm and extend previous studies and provide additional information regarding the characteristics of CTLs which can be found within a patient's tumor. Moreover, the in vivo model described here provides a unique window for observing events that may also occur in patients undergoing adoptive cellular

  4. Clinical relevance and biology of circulating tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Most breast cancer patients die due to metastases, and the early onset of this multistep process is usually missed by current tumor staging modalities. Therefore, ultrasensitive techniques have been developed to enable the enrichment, detection, isolation and characterization of disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow and circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood of cancer patients. There is increasing evidence that the presence of these cells is associated with an unfavorable prognosis related to metastatic progression in the bone and other organs. This review focuses on investigations regarding the biology and clinical relevance of circulating tumor cells in breast cancer. PMID:22114869

  5. Overexpression of the duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) by NSCLC tumor cells results in increased tumor necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addison, Christina L; Belperio, John A; Burdick, Marie D; Strieter, Robert M

    2004-01-01

    The Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) is known to be a promiscuous chemokine receptor that binds a variety of CXC and CC chemokines in the absence of any detectable signal transduction events. Within the CXC group of chemokines, DARC binds the angiogenic CXC chemokines including IL-8 (CXCL8), GROα (CXCL1) and ENA-78 (CXCL5), all of which have previously been shown to be important in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) tumor growth. We hypothesized that overexpression of DARC by a NSCLC tumor cell line would result in the binding of the angiogenic ELR+ CXC chemokines by the tumor cells themselves, and thus interfere with the stimulation of endothelial cells and induction of angiogenesis by the tumor cell-derived angiogenic chemokines. NSCLC tumor cells that constitutively expressed DARC were generated and their growth characteristics were compared to control transfected cells in vitro and in vivo in SCID animals. We found that tumors derived from DARC-expressing cells were significantly larger in size than tumors derived from control-transfected cells. However, upon histological examination we found that DARC-expressing tumors had significantly more necrosis and decreased tumor cellularity, as compared to control tumors. Expression of DARC by NSCLC cells was also associated with a decrease in tumor-associated vasculature and a reduction in metastatic potential. The expression of DARC in the context of NSCLC tumors may act as a chemokine decoy receptor and interferes with normal tumor growth and chemokine-induced tumor neovascularization

  6. Turnover rate of hypoxic cells in solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungkvist, A.S.E.; Bussink, J.; Rijken, P.F.J.W.; Van Der Kogel, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Most solid tumors contain hypoxic cells, and both the amount and duration of tumor hypoxia has been shown to influence the effect of radiation treatment negatively. It is important to understand the dynamic processes within the hypoxic cell population in non-treated tumors, and the effect of different treatment modalities on the kinetics of hypoxic cells to be able to design optimal combined modality treatments. The turnover rate of hypoxic cells was analyzed in three different solid tumor models with a double bio-reductive hypoxic marker assay with sequential injection of the two hypoxic markers. Previously it was shown that this assay could be used to detect both a decrease and an increase of tumor hypoxia in relation to the tumor vasculature with high spatial resolution. In this study the first hypoxic marker, pimonidazole, was administered at variable times relative to tumor harvest, and the second hypoxic marker, CCI-103F, was injected at a fixed time before harvest. The hypoxic cell turnover rate was calculated as the loss of pimonidazole positive cells relative to CCI-103F. The murine C38 line had the fastest hypoxic turnover rate of 60% /24h and the human xenograft line SCCNij3 had the slowest hypoxic turnover rate of 30% /24 h. The hypoxic turnover rate was most heterogeneous in the SCCNij3 line that even contained viable groups of cells that had been hypoxic for at least 5 days. The human xenograft line MEC82 fell in between with a hypoxic turnover rate of 50% /24 h. The hypoxic cell turnover was related to the potential tumor volume doubling time (Tpot) with a Tpot of 26h in C38 and 103h in SCCNij3. The dynamics of hypoxic cells, quantified with a double hypoxic marker method, showed large differences in hypoxic cell turnover rate and were related to Tpot

  7. MHC-I modulation due to changes in tumor cell metabolism regulates tumor sensitivity to CTL and NK cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán, Elena; Charni, Seyma; Jaime, Paula; Aguiló, Juan Ignacio; Enríquez, José Antonio; Naval, Javier; Pardo, Julián; Villalba, Martín; Anel, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells have a tendency to use glucose fermentation to obtain energy instead of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). We demonstrated that this phenotype correlated with loss of ERK5 expression and with reduced MHC class I expression. Consequently, tumor cells could evade cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated immune surveillance, but also increase their sensitivity to natural killer (NK) cells. These outcomes were evaluated using two cellular models: leukemic EL4 cells and L929 transformed fibroblasts and their derived ρ° cell lines, which lack mitochondrial DNA. We have also used a L929 cell sub-line that spontaneously lost matrix attachment (L929dt), reminiscent of metastasis generation, that also downregulated MHC-I and ERK5 expression. MHC-I expression is lower in ρ° cells than in the parental cell lines, but they were equally sensitive to CTL. On the contrary, ρ° cells were more sensitive to activated NK cells than parental cells. On the other hand, L929dt cells were resistant to CTL and NK cells, showed reduced viability when forced to perform OXPHOS, and surviving cells increased MHC-I expression and became sensitive to CTL. The present results suggest that when the reduction in MHC-I levels in tumor cells due to glycolytic metabolism is partial, the increase in sensitivity to NK cells seems to predominate. However, when tumor cells completely lose MHC-I expression, the combination of treatments that increase OXPHOS with CTL-mediated immunotherapy could be a promising therapeutic approach. PMID:25949869

  8. MHC-I modulation due to changes in tumor cell metabolism regulates tumor sensitivity to CTL and NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán, Elena; Charni, Seyma; Jaime, Paula; Aguiló, Juan Ignacio; Enríquez, José Antonio; Naval, Javier; Pardo, Julián; Villalba, Martín; Anel, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells have a tendency to use glucose fermentation to obtain energy instead of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). We demonstrated that this phenotype correlated with loss of ERK5 expression and with reduced MHC class I expression. Consequently, tumor cells could evade cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated immune surveillance, but also increase their sensitivity to natural killer (NK) cells. These outcomes were evaluated using two cellular models: leukemic EL4 cells and L929 transformed fibroblasts and their derived ρ° cell lines, which lack mitochondrial DNA. We have also used a L929 cell sub-line that spontaneously lost matrix attachment (L929dt), reminiscent of metastasis generation, that also downregulated MHC-I and ERK5 expression. MHC-I expression is lower in ρ° cells than in the parental cell lines, but they were equally sensitive to CTL. On the contrary, ρ° cells were more sensitive to activated NK cells than parental cells. On the other hand, L929dt cells were resistant to CTL and NK cells, showed reduced viability when forced to perform OXPHOS, and surviving cells increased MHC-I expression and became sensitive to CTL. The present results suggest that when the reduction in MHC-I levels in tumor cells due to glycolytic metabolism is partial, the increase in sensitivity to NK cells seems to predominate. However, when tumor cells completely lose MHC-I expression, the combination of treatments that increase OXPHOS with CTL-mediated immunotherapy could be a promising therapeutic approach.

  9. Tumor-derived circulating endothelial cell clusters in colorectal cancer.

    KAUST Repository

    Cima, Igor; Kong, Say Li; Sengupta, Debarka; Tan, Iain B; Phyo, Wai Min; Lee, Daniel; Hu, Min; Iliescu, Ciprian; Alexander, Irina; Goh, Wei Lin; Rahmani, Mehran; Suhaimi, Nur-Afidah Mohamed; Vo, Jess H; Tai, Joyce A; Tan, Joanna H; Chua, Clarinda; Ten, Rachel; Lim, Wan Jun; Chew, Min Hoe; Hauser, Charlotte; van Dam, Rob M; Lim, Wei-Yen; Prabhakar, Shyam; Lim, Bing; Koh, Poh Koon; Robson, Paul; Ying, Jackie Y; Hillmer, Axel M; Tan, Min-Han

    2016-01-01

    Clusters of tumor cells are often observed in the blood of cancer patients. These structures have been described as malignant entities for more than 50 years, although their comprehensive characterization is lacking. Contrary to current consensus, we demonstrate that a discrete population of circulating cell clusters isolated from the blood of colorectal cancer patients are not cancerous but consist of tumor-derived endothelial cells. These clusters express both epithelial and mesenchymal markers, consistent with previous reports on circulating tumor cell (CTC) phenotyping. However, unlike CTCs, they do not mirror the genetic variations of matched tumors. Transcriptomic analysis of single clusters revealed that these structures exhibit an endothelial phenotype and can be traced back to the tumor endothelium. Further results show that tumor-derived endothelial clusters do not form by coagulation or by outgrowth of single circulating endothelial cells, supporting a direct release of clusters from the tumor vasculature. The isolation and enumeration of these benign clusters distinguished healthy volunteers from treatment-naïve as well as pathological early-stage (≤IIA) colorectal cancer patients with high accuracy, suggesting that tumor-derived circulating endothelial cell clusters could be used as a means of noninvasive screening for colorectal cancer. In contrast to CTCs, tumor-derived endothelial cell clusters may also provide important information about the underlying tumor vasculature at the time of diagnosis, during treatment, and throughout the course of the disease.

  10. Tumor-derived circulating endothelial cell clusters in colorectal cancer.

    KAUST Repository

    Cima, Igor

    2016-06-29

    Clusters of tumor cells are often observed in the blood of cancer patients. These structures have been described as malignant entities for more than 50 years, although their comprehensive characterization is lacking. Contrary to current consensus, we demonstrate that a discrete population of circulating cell clusters isolated from the blood of colorectal cancer patients are not cancerous but consist of tumor-derived endothelial cells. These clusters express both epithelial and mesenchymal markers, consistent with previous reports on circulating tumor cell (CTC) phenotyping. However, unlike CTCs, they do not mirror the genetic variations of matched tumors. Transcriptomic analysis of single clusters revealed that these structures exhibit an endothelial phenotype and can be traced back to the tumor endothelium. Further results show that tumor-derived endothelial clusters do not form by coagulation or by outgrowth of single circulating endothelial cells, supporting a direct release of clusters from the tumor vasculature. The isolation and enumeration of these benign clusters distinguished healthy volunteers from treatment-naïve as well as pathological early-stage (≤IIA) colorectal cancer patients with high accuracy, suggesting that tumor-derived circulating endothelial cell clusters could be used as a means of noninvasive screening for colorectal cancer. In contrast to CTCs, tumor-derived endothelial cell clusters may also provide important information about the underlying tumor vasculature at the time of diagnosis, during treatment, and throughout the course of the disease.

  11. Dendritic cell-tumor cell hybrids and immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cathelin, Dominique; Nicolas, Alexandra; Bouchot, André

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells currently being used as a cellular adjuvant in cancer immunotherapy strategies. Unfortunately, DC-based vaccines have not demonstrated spectacular clinical results. DC loading with tumor antigens and DC differentiation and activation...

  12. Migratory neighbors and distant invaders: tumor-associated niche cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wels, Jared; Kaplan, Rosandra N.; Rafii, Shahin; Lyden, David

    2008-01-01

    The cancer environment is comprised of tumor cells as well as a wide network of stromal and vascular cells participating in the cellular and molecular events necessary for invasion and metastasis. Tumor secretory factors can activate the migration of host cells, both near to and far from the primary tumor site, as well as promote the exodus of cells to distant tissues. Thus, the migration of stromal cells and tumor cells among specialized microenvironments takes place throughout tumor and metastatic progression, providing evidence for the systemic nature of a malignancy. Investigations of the tumor–stromal and stromal–stromal cross-talk involved in cellular migration in cancer may lead to the design of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:18316475

  13. CD200-expressing human basal cell carcinoma cells initiate tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmont, Chantal S; Benketah, Antisar; Reed, Simon H; Hawk, Nga V; Telford, William G; Ohyama, Manabu; Udey, Mark C; Yee, Carole L; Vogel, Jonathan C; Patel, Girish K

    2013-01-22

    Smoothened antagonists directly target the genetic basis of human basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the most common of all cancers. These drugs inhibit BCC growth, but they are not curative. Although BCC cells are monomorphic, immunofluorescence microscopy reveals a complex hierarchical pattern of growth with inward differentiation along hair follicle lineages. Most BCC cells express the transcription factor KLF4 and are committed to terminal differentiation. A small CD200(+) CD45(-) BCC subpopulation that represents 1.63 ± 1.11% of all BCC cells resides in small clusters at the tumor periphery. By using reproducible in vivo xenograft growth assays, we determined that tumor initiating cell frequencies approximate one per 1.5 million unsorted BCC cells. The CD200(+) CD45(-) BCC subpopulation recreated BCC tumor growth in vivo with typical histological architecture and expression of sonic hedgehog-regulated genes. Reproducible in vivo BCC growth was achieved with as few as 10,000 CD200(+) CD45(-) cells, representing ~1,500-fold enrichment. CD200(-) CD45(-) BCC cells were unable to form tumors. These findings establish a platform to study the effects of Smoothened antagonists on BCC tumor initiating cell and also suggest that currently available anti-CD200 therapy be considered, either as monotherapy or an adjunct to Smoothened antagonists, in the treatment of inoperable BCC.

  14. Metabolic changes in tumor cells and tumor-associated macrophages: A mutual relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netea-Maier, Romana T; Smit, Johannes W A; Netea, Mihai G

    2018-01-28

    In order to adapt to the reduced availability of nutrients and oxygen in the tumor microenvironment and the increased requirements of energy and building blocks necessary for maintaining their high proliferation rate, malignant cells undergo metabolic changes that result in an increased production of lactate, nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species, prostaglandins and other byproducts of arachidonic acid metabolism that influence both the composition of the inflammatory microenvironment and the function of the tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). In response to cues present in the TME, among which products of altered tumor cell metabolism, TAMs are also required to reprogram their metabolism, with activation of glycolysis, fatty acid synthesis and altered nitrogen cycle metabolism. These changes result in functional reprogramming of TAMs which includes changes in the production of cytokines and angiogenetic factors, and contribute to the tumor progression and metastasis. Understanding the metabolic changes governing the intricate relationship between the tumor cells and the TAMs represents an essential step towards developing novel therapeutic approaches targeting the metabolic reprogramming of the immune cells to potentiate their tumoricidal potential and to circumvent therapy resistance. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Multiphoton microscopic imaging of histological sections without hematoxylin and eosin staining differentiates carcinoma in situ lesion from normal oesophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianxin; Xu, Jian; Kang, Deyong; Xu, Meifang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Jiang, Xingshan

    2013-10-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become a powerful, important tool for tissues imaging at the molecular level. In this paper, this technique was extended to histological investigations, differentiating carcinoma in situ (CIS) lesion from normal oesophagus by imaging histological sections without hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. The results show that the histology procedures of dehydration, paraffin embedding, and de-paraffinizing highlighted two photon excited fluorescence of cytoplasm and nucleolus of epithelial cell and collagen in stroma. MPM has the ability to identify the characteristics of CIS lesion including changes of squamous cells and full epithelium, identification of basement membrane, especially prominent nucleolus. The studies described here show that MPM has the potential for future retrospective studies of tumor staging by employing on histological section specimens without H&E staining.

  16. Utility of Modified Ultrafast Papanicolaou Stain in Cytological Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkar, Prachi; Arakeri, Surekha Ulhas

    2017-03-01

    Need for minimal turnaround time for assessing Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) has encouraged innovations in staining techniques that require lesser staining time with unequivocal cell morphology. The standard protocol for conventional Papanicolaou (PAP) stain requires about 40 minutes. To overcome this, Ultrafast Papanicolaou (UFP) stain was introduced which reduces staining time to 90 seconds and also enhances the quality. However, reagents required for this were not easily available hence, Modified Ultrafast Papanicolaou (MUFP) stain was introduced subsequently. To assess the efficacy of MUFP staining by comparing the quality of MUFP stain with conventional PAP stain. FNAC procedure was performed by using 10 ml disposable syringe and 22-23 G needle. Total 131 FNAC cases were studied which were lymph node (30), thyroid (38), breast (22), skin and soft tissue (24), salivary gland (11) and visceral organs (6). Two smears were prepared and stained by MUFP and conventional PAP stain. Scores were given on four parameters: background of smears, overall staining pattern, cell morphology and nuclear staining. Quality Index (QI) was calculated from ratio of total score achieved to maximum score possible. Statistical analysis using chi square test was applied to each of the four parameters before obtaining the QI in both stains. Students t-test was applied to evaluate the efficacy of MUFP in comparison with conventional PAP stain. The QI of MUFP for thyroid, breast, lymph node, skin and soft tissue, salivary gland and visceral organs was 0.89, 0.85, 0.89, 0.83, 0.92, and 0.78 respectively. Compared to conventional PAP stain QI of MUFP smears was better in all except visceral organ cases and was statistically significant. MUFP showed clear red blood cell background, transparent cytoplasm and crisp nuclear features. MUFP is fast, reliable and can be done with locally available reagents with unequivocal morphology which is the need of the hour for a cytopathology set-up.

  17. Detection of Gene Rearrangements in Circulating Tumor Cells: Examples of ALK-, ROS1-, RET-Rearrangements in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and ERG-Rearrangements in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catelain, Cyril; Pailler, Emma; Oulhen, Marianne; Faugeroux, Vincent; Pommier, Anne-Laure; Farace, Françoise

    2017-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) hold promise as biomarkers to aid in patient treatment stratification and disease monitoring. Because the number of cells is a critical parameter for exploiting CTCs for predictive biomarker's detection, we developed a FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) method for CTCs enriched on filters (filter-adapted FISH [FA-FISH]) that was optimized for high cell recovery. To increase the feasibility and reliability of the analyses, we combined fluorescent staining and FA-FISH and developed a semi-automated microscopy method for optimal FISH signal identification in filtration-enriched CTCs . Here we present these methods and their use for the detection and characterization of ALK-, ROS1-, RET-rearrangement in CTCs from non-small-cell lung cancer and ERG-rearrangements in CTCs from prostate cancer patients.

  18. Metabolic markers in relation to hypoxia; staining patterns and colocalization of pimonidazole, HIF-1α, CAIX, LDH-5, GLUT-1, MCT1 and MCT4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rademakers, Saskia E; Lok, Jasper; Kogel, Albert J van der; Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes HAM

    2011-01-01

    The cellular response of malignant tumors to hypoxia is diverse. Several important endogenous metabolic markers are upregulated under hypoxic conditions. We examined the staining patterns and co-expression of HIF-1α, CAIX, LDH-5, GLUT-1, MCT1 and MCT4 with the exogenous hypoxic cell marker pimonidazole and the association of marker expression with clinicopathological characteristics. 20 biopsies of advanced head and neck carcinomas were immunohistochemically stained and analyzed. All patients were given the hypoxia marker pimonidazole intravenously 2 h prior to biopsy taking. The tumor area positive for each marker, the colocalization of the different markers and the distribution of the markers in relation to the blood vessels were assessed by semiautomatic quantitative analysis. MCT1 staining was present in hypoxic (pimonidazole stained) as well as non-hypoxic areas in almost equal amounts. MCT1 expression showed a significant overall correlation (r = 0.75, p < 0.001) and strong spatial relationship with CAIX. LDH-5 showed the strongest correlation with pimonidazole (r = 0.66, p = 0.002). MCT4 and GLUT-1 demonstrated a typical diffusion-limited hypoxic pattern and showed a high degree of colocalization. Both MCT4 and CAIX showed a higher expression in the primary tumor in node positive patients (p = 0.09 both). Colocalization and staining patterns of metabolic and hypoxia-related proteins provides valuable additional information over single protein analyses and can improve the understanding of their functions and environmental influences

  19. Radiosensitivity of four human tumor xenografts. Influence of hypoxia and cell-cell contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guichard, M.; Dertinger, H.; Malaise, E.P.

    1983-01-01

    Contact effect (CE) and hypoxia have been studied in human tumor cell lines transplanted in athymic nude mice. Four cell lines - one melanoma (Bell) and three colorectal adenocarcinomas (HT29, HRT18, and HCT8) - were studied. Cell survival was determined with an in vivo in vitro colony-forming assay. Survival curves were obtained under three different conditions: (1) tumor cells irradiated in air-breathing mice, (2) tumor cells irradiated in animals asphyxiated for 10 min, and (3) tumor cells plated and irradiated either immediately or 5 hr later. For all cell lines, radiosensitivity appeared to be lower when cells were irradiated in vivo than when they were irradiated in vitro. Only in the case of the HCT8 tumor did the relative in vivo radioresistance seem to be linked to hypoxia; in the other cell lines, hypoxia alone could not account for the lower in vivo radiosensitivity. Our results suggest that a CE plays an important role in the response of human xenografts to irradiation

  20. Identification of the key pathway of oxazolinoanthracyclines mechanism of action in cells derived from human solid tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denel-Bobrowska, Marta, E-mail: mdenel@biol.uni.lodz.pl [Department of Medical Biophysics, Institute of Biophysics, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, University of Lodz, Pomorska 141/143, 90-236 Lodz (Poland); Łukawska, Małgorzata [Department of Modified Antibiotics, Institute of Biotechnology and Antibiotics, 5 Staroscinska St., 02-516 Warsaw (Poland); Rogalska, Aneta [Department of Medical Biophysics, Institute of Biophysics, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, University of Lodz, Pomorska 141/143, 90-236 Lodz (Poland); Forma, Ewa; Bryś, Magdalena [Department of Cytobiochemistry, Institute of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, University of Lodz, Pomorska 141/143, 90-236 Lodz (Poland); Oszczapowicz, Irena [Department of Modified Antibiotics, Institute of Biotechnology and Antibiotics, 5 Staroscinska St., 02-516 Warsaw (Poland); Marczak, Agnieszka [Department of Medical Biophysics, Institute of Biophysics, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, University of Lodz, Pomorska 141/143, 90-236 Lodz (Poland)

    2016-12-15

    Oxazolinodoxorubicin (O-DOX) and oxazolinodaunorubicin (O-DAU) are novel anthracycline derivatives with a modified daunosamine moiety. In the present study, we evaluated the cytotoxicities, genotoxicities and abilities of O-DOX and O-DAU to induce apoptosis in cancer cell lines (SKOV-3; A549; HepG2), and compared the results with their parent drugs. We assessed antiproliferative activity by MTT assay. We evaluated apoptosis-inducing ability by double-staining with fluorescent probes (Hoechst 33258/propidium iodide), and by determining expression levels of genes involved in programmed cell death by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Genotoxicities of the compounds were tested by comet assays. Oxazolinoanthracyclines demonstrated high anti-tumor activity. O-DOX had significantly higher cytotoxicity, apoptosis-inducing ability, and genotoxicity compared with parental doxorubicin (DOX) in all tested conditions, while O-DAU activity differed among cell lines. The mechanism of oxazoline analog action appeared to involve the mitochondrial pathway of programmed cell death. These results provide further information about oxazoline derivatives of commonly used anthracycline chemotherapy agents. O-DOX and O-DAU have the ability to induce apoptosis in tumor cells. - Highlights: • Substituted amino group increased the anticancer activity of anthracyclines. • Mitochondrial apoptotic pathway seems to be involved in the mechanism of action. • Favorable biological properties of oxazoline derivatives were confirmed.

  1. Small cell type neuroendocrine carcinoma colliding with squamous cell carcinoma at esophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Luoluo; Sun, Xun; Zou, Yabin; Meng, Xiangwei

    2014-01-01

    Collision tumor is an extremely rare tumor which defined as the concrescence of two distinct primaries neoplasms. We report here a case of collision tumor at lower third esophagus composed of small cell type neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC), which is an very rare, highly aggressive and poorly prognostic carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC). In our case, pathologically, the small cell carcinoma display the characteristic of small, round, ovoid or spindle-shaped tumor cells with scant cytoplasm, which colliding with a moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated positive activities for CD56, synaptophysin, 34βE12, CK 5/6, ki-67 (70%-80%), but negative for CD99, chromogranin A, and TTF-1. Accurate diagnosis was made base on these findings. PMID:24817981

  2. Evaluation of Tumor Angiogenesis with a Second-Generation US Contrast Medium in a Rat Breast Tumor Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Eun Young; Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hak Hee; Kim, Sung Moon; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Nam Kug; Gong, Gyung Yub

    2008-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is an important factor for tumor growth, treatment response and prognosis. Noninvasive imaging methods for the evaluation of tumor angiogenesis have been studied, but a method for the quantification of tumor angiogenesis has not been established. This study was designed to evaluate tumor angiogenesis in a rat breast tumor model by the use of a contrast enhanced ultrasound (US) examination with a second-generation US contrast agent. The alkylating agent 19N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) was injected into the intraperitoneal cavity of 30-day-old female Sprague-Dawley rats. Three to four months later, breast tumors were detected along the mammary lines of the rats. A total of 17 breast tumors larger than 1 cm in nine rats were evaluated by gray-scale US, color Doppler US and contrast-enhanced US using SonoVue. The results were recorded as digital video images; time-intensity curves and hemodynamic parameters were analyzed. Pathological breast tumor specimens were obtained just after the US examinations. The tumor specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) and the expression of CD31, an endothelial cell marker, was determined by immunohistochemical staining. We also evaluated the pathological diagnosis of the tumors and the microvessel density (MVD). Spearman's correlation and the Kruskal-Wallis test were used for the analysis. The pathological diagnoses were 11 invasive ductal carcinomas and six benign intraductal epithelial proliferations. The MVD did not correlate with the pathological diagnosis. However, blood volume (BV) showed a statistically significant correlation with MVD (Spearman's correlation, p < 0.05). Contrast-enhanced US using a second-generation US contrast material was useful for the evaluation of tumor angiogenesis of breast tumors in the rat

  3. 1-variation in cell morphology and gram-staining property of bacilli under different salt stresses and media composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuaib, I.; Mehmood, U.; Hasnain, S.

    2004-01-01

    Hs-3, Hs-4 and Az-9 are soil tolerant strains, which show Gram negative to Gram-variable staining behavior under varying environmental conditions. These strains were grown in different media composition (lowry, nutrient, pennassy and M-9 minimal both in broth cultures and agar media) and salt stresses (Mg SO/sub 4/, KCl, KNO/sub 3/) supplemented with 0.1 and 1M of NaCl at 37 deg. Centi grade for 4, 8, 16 and 24 hours. Media composition and various salts stress manifested great variation in staining behavior and cell morphology. Az-9 exhibited maximum variation in staining and morphology in rich medium. Hs-3 showed maximum filamentation under KCl stress in pennassy medium. KCl and KNO/sub 3/ stresses caused filamentation in all strains while spore formation was pronounced under MgSO/sub 4/ and NaCl stress in Az-9 in nutrient agar. Potassium salt caused adverse affects on cell morphology by degeneration or lysis of cells with passage of time. (author)

  4. Establishment and characterization of 7 novel hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines from patient-derived tumor xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Xin

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a common cancer with poor prognosis worldwide and the molecular mechanism is not well understood. This study aimed to establish a collection of human HCC cell lines from patient-derived xenograft (PDX models. From the 20 surgical HCC sample collections, 7 tumors were successfully developed in immunodeficient mice and further established 7 novel HCC cell lines (LIXC002, LIXC003, LIXC004, LIXC006, LIXC011, LIXC012 and CPL0903 by primary culture. The characterization of cell lines was defined by morphology, growth kinetics, cell cycle, chromosome analysis, short tandem repeat (STR analysis, molecular profile, and tumorigenicity. Additionally, response to clinical chemotherapeutics was validated both in vitro and in vivo. STR analysis indicated that all cell lines were unique cells different from known cell lines and free of contamination by bacteria or mycoplasma. The other findings were quite heterogeneous between individual lines. Chromosome aberration could be found in all cell lines. Alpha-fetoprotein was overexpressed only in 3 out of 7 cell lines. 4 cell lines expressed high level of vimentin. Ki67 was strongly stained in all cell lines. mRNA level of retinoic acid induced protein 3 (RAI3 was decreased in all cell lines. The 7 novel cell lines showed variable sensitivity to 8 tested compounds. LIXC011 and CPL0903 possessed multiple drug resistance property. Sorafenib inhibited xenograft tumor growth of LIXC006, but not of LIXC012. Our results indicated that the 7 novel cell lines with low passage maintaining their clinical and pathological characters could be good tools for further exploring the molecular mechanism of HCC and anti-cancer drug screening.

  5. Dielectrophoretic capture and genetic analysis of single neuroblastoma tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Carpenter

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the diversity of cells that escape the primary tumor and seed micrometastases remains rudimentary, and approaches for studying circulating and disseminated tumor cells have been limited by low throughput and sensitivity, reliance on single parameter sorting, and a focus on enumeration rather than phenotypic and genetic characterization. Here we utilize a highly sensitive microfluidic and dielectrophoretic approach for the isolation and genetic analysis of individual tumor cells. We employed fluorescence labeling to isolate 208 single cells from spiking experiments conducted with 11 cell lines, including 8 neuroblastoma cell lines, and achieved a capture sensitivity of 1 tumor cell per 106 white blood cells. Sample fixation or freezing had no detectable effect on cell capture. Point mutations were accurately detected in the whole genome amplification product of captured single tumor cells but not in negative control white blood cells. We applied this approach to capture 144 single tumor cells from 10 bone marrow samples from patients suffering from neuroblastoma. In this pediatric malignancy, high-risk patients often exhibit wide-spread hematogenous metastasis, but access to primary tumor can be difficult or impossible. Here we used flow-based sorting to pre-enrich samples with tumor involvement below 0.02%. For all patients for whom a mutation in the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase gene had already been detected in their primary tumor, the same mutation was detected in single cells from their marrow. These findings demonstrate a novel, non-invasive, and adaptable method for the capture and genetic analysis of single tumor cells from cancer patients.

  6. Contribution to Tumor Angiogenesis From Innate Immune Cells Within the Tumor Microenvironment: Implications for Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Albini

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The critical role of angiogenesis in promoting tumor growth and metastasis is strongly established. However, tumors show considerable variation in angiogenic characteristics and in their sensitivity to antiangiogenic therapy. Tumor angiogenesis involves not only cancer cells but also various tumor-associated leukocytes (TALs and stromal cells. TALs produce chemokines, cytokines, proteases, structural proteins, and microvescicles. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and inflammatory chemokines are not only major proangiogenic factors but are also immune modulators, which increase angiogenesis and lead to immune suppression. In our review, we discuss the regulation of angiogenesis by innate immune cells in the tumor microenvironment, specific features, and roles of major players: macrophages, neutrophils, myeloid-derived suppressor and dendritic cells, mast cells, γδT cells, innate lymphoid cells, and natural killer cells. Anti-VEGF or anti-inflammatory drugs could balance an immunosuppressive microenvironment to an immune permissive one. Anti-VEGF as well as anti-inflammatory drugs could therefore represent partners for combinations with immune checkpoint inhibitors, enhancing the effects of immune therapy.

  7. Spatial Organization and Molecular Correlation of Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes Using Deep Learning on Pathology Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Saltz

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Beyond sample curation and basic pathologic characterization, the digitized H&E-stained images of TCGA samples remain underutilized. To highlight this resource, we present mappings of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs based on H&E images from 13 TCGA tumor types. These TIL maps are derived through computational staining using a convolutional neural network trained to classify patches of images. Affinity propagation revealed local spatial structure in TIL patterns and correlation with overall survival. TIL map structural patterns were grouped using standard histopathological parameters. These patterns are enriched in particular T cell subpopulations derived from molecular measures. TIL densities and spatial structure were differentially enriched among tumor types, immune subtypes, and tumor molecular subtypes, implying that spatial infiltrate state could reflect particular tumor cell aberration states. Obtaining spatial lymphocytic patterns linked to the rich genomic characterization of TCGA samples demonstrates one use for the TCGA image archives with insights into the tumor-immune microenvironment. : Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs were identified from standard pathology cancer images by a deep-learning-derived “computational stain” developed by Saltz et al. They processed 5,202 digital images from 13 cancer types. Resulting TIL maps were correlated with TCGA molecular data, relating TIL content to survival, tumor subtypes, and immune profiles. Keywords: digital pathology, immuno-oncology, machine learning, lymphocytes, tumor microenvironment, deep learning, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, artificial intelligence, bioinformatics, computer vision

  8. Osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas: an immunohistochemical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dizon, M A; Multhaupt, H A; Paskin, D L

    1996-01-01

    A case of an osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas is presented. Immunohistochemical studies were performed, which showed keratin (CAM, AE1) and epithelial membrane antigen positivity in the tumor cells. The findings support an epithelial origin for this tumor.......A case of an osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas is presented. Immunohistochemical studies were performed, which showed keratin (CAM, AE1) and epithelial membrane antigen positivity in the tumor cells. The findings support an epithelial origin for this tumor....

  9. Molecular mechanisms of celery seed extract induced apoptosis via s phase cell cycle arrest in the BGC-823 human stomach cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lin-Lin; Feng, Lei; Yao, Shu-Tong; Jiao, Peng; Qin, Shu-Cun; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Ya-Bin; Li, Fu-Rong

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms of apoptosis in tumor cells is an important field of tumor therapy and cancer molecular biology. Loss of cell cycle control, leading to uncontrolled proliferation, is common in cancer. Therefore, the identification of potent and selective cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors is a priority for anti-cancer drug discovery. There are at least two major apoptotic pathways, initiated by caspase-8 and caspase-9, respectively, which can activate caspase cascades. Apoptosis triggered by activation of the mitochondrial-dependent caspase pathway represents the main programmed cell death mechanism. This is activated by various intracellular stresses that induce permeabilization of the mitochondrial membrane. Anti-tumor effects of celery seed extract (CSE) and related mechanisms regarding apoptosis were here investigated in human gastric cancer BGC-823 cells. CSE was produced by supercritical fluid extraction. Cell viability was analyzed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)- 2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and apoptosis by flow cytometry using Annexin/PI staining and DAPI staining and a laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM). Cell cycling was evaluated using PI staining with flow cytometry and expression of cell cycle and apoptosis-related proteins cyclin A, CDK2, bcl-2 and bax was assessed by immunohistochemical staining. CSE had an anti-proliferation effect on human gastric cancer BGC-823 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. After treatment, the apoptotic rate significantly increased, with morphological changes typical of apoptosis observed with LSCM by DAPI staining. Cell cycle and apoptosis related proteins, such as cyclin A, CDK2 and bcl-2 were all down-regulated, whereas bax was up-regulated. The molecular determinants of inhibition of cell proliferation as well as apoptosis of CSE may be associated with cycle arrest in the S phase.

  10. Activation of Stat3 in renal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Charles; Yang, Guanyu; Khun, Kyle; Kong, Xiantian; Levy, David; Lee, Peng; Melamed, Jonathan

    2009-02-28

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) plays a vital role in signal transduction pathways that mediate transformation and inhibit apoptosis. Oncogenic Stat3 is persistently activated in several human cancers and transformed cell lines. Previous studies indicate activation of Stat3 in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, the detailed characterization of the Stat3 expression pattern in different histologic types of RCC is lacking. We have analyzed the immunoprofile of activated or phosphorylated Stat3 (pStat3) in a tissue microarray of renal tumors of different histologic types, including 42 cases of conventional clear cell type, 24 chromophobe, and 7 papillary, 15 oncocytoma, 7 urothelial carcinoma and 21 normal kidney tissues using an anti-pStat3 antibody (recognizes only activated STAT3). pStat3 nuclear staining was observed in 25 of 42 conventional clear cell RCC (59.5 %), 8 of 24 chromophobe RCC (33.3%), 4 of 7 papillary RCC (57.1%). In the other tumor groups, 4 of 15 oncocytomas (26.7%) and 6 of 7 urothelial carcinomas (85.7%) showed positive nuclear staining. Weak nuclear immunoreactivity for pStat3 was seen in 4 of 21 cases of non-neoplastic kidney tissue (19.0%). The extent of Stat3 activation as determined by nuclear expression of its phosphorylated form is increased in histologic types of renal tumors with greater malignant potential, specifically conventional clear cell RCC, papillary RCC and urothelial carcinoma, only slightly increased in chromophobe RCC, and not increased in oncocytoma. These results suggest a role of Stat3 activation in different types of renal neoplasia, possibly serving as a prognostic marker or therapeutic target.

  11. Cell mediated therapeutics for cancer treatment: Tumor homing cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balivada, Sivasai

    Many cell types were known to have migratory properties towards tumors and different research groups have shown reliable results regarding cells as delivery vehicles of therapeutics for targeted cancer treatment. Present report discusses proof of concept for 1. Cell mediated delivery of Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and targeted Magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) as a cancer treatment by using in vivo mouse cancer models, 2. Cells surface engineering with chimeric proteins for targeted cancer treatment by using in vitro models. 1. Tumor homing cells can carry MNPs specifically to the tumor site and tumor burden will decrease after alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure. To test this hypothesis, first we loaded Fe/Fe3O4 bi-magnetic NPs into neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which were previously shown to migrate towards melanoma tumors. We observed that NPCs loaded with MNPs travel to subcutaneous melanoma tumors. After alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure, the targeted delivery of MNPs by the NPCs resulted in a mild decrease in tumor size (Chapter-2). Monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) are known to infiltrate tumor sites, and also have phagocytic activity which can increase their uptake of MNPs. To test Mo/Ma-mediated MHT we transplanted Mo/Ma loaded with MNPs into a mouse model of pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis. We observed that MNP-loaded Mo/Ma infiltrated pancreatic tumors and, after AMF treatment, significantly prolonged the lives of mice bearing disseminated intraperitoneal pancreatic tumors (Chapter-3). 2. Targeted cancer treatment could be achieved by engineering tumor homing cell surfaces with tumor proteases cleavable, cancer cell specific recombinant therapeutic proteins. To test this, Urokinase and Calpain (tumor specific proteases) cleavable; prostate cancer cell (CaP) specific (CaP1 targeting peptide); apoptosis inducible (Caspase3 V266ED3)- rCasp3V266ED3 chimeric protein was designed in silico. Hypothesized membrane anchored chimeric protein (rCasp3V

  12. Diagnostic value of HMB-45 and anti-Melan A staining of sentinel lymph nodes with isolated positive cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Muhammad N; Lee, Min W; Linden, Michael D; Nathanson, S D; Hornyak, Thomas J; Zarbo, Richard J

    2002-12-01

    Numerous immunohistochemical stains have been employed to detect metastatic melanoma in sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsies. HMB-45 is considered by some as a specific tool to detect early metastatic melanoma (1). Occasionally, one or two isolated HMB-45-positive cells may cause complications in diagnostic interpretation. The goal of this study was to evaluate the reliability of HMB-45 staining of SLNs with sparse isolated positive cells and to compare its staining with anti-Melan A antibody. HMB-45 and anti-Melan A antibody immunostaining was performed on (Group A) 15 histologically negative SLNs excised from patients with malignant melanoma (MM) and on (Group B) 15 histologically negative SLNs excised from patients with breast carcinoma (BC). None of the patients had clinical evidence of systemic metastasis at the time of SLN biopsy. Five cutaneous biopsies with changes of postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIHP) were also stained with both antibodies. HMB-45 staining was repeated in all Group B SLNs after blocking endogenous biotins. Electron-microscopic studies were performed on all cases of PIHP. Isolated HMB-45-stained cells were present in 6 of 15 SLNs removed for MM; 8 of 15 for BC; and 3 of 5 cutaneous biopsies of PIHP. HMB-45 reactivity persisted after blocking endogenous biotins in 6 of 8 positive SLNs from Group B. Anti-Melan A antibody was negative in all SLNs of group A and B and in dermal melanophages of all five cases of PIHP. HMB-45 positivity was demonstrated in histologically negative SLNs and cutaneous biopsies, especially in the milieu of aggregated melanophages. Phagocytosis of premelanosomes by macrophages in the draining lymph nodes may account for isolated cell positivity and can hinder correct diagnostic interpretation. HMB-45 may not be a reliable marker for the detection of micro-metastasis of MM and requires correlation with other immunohistochemical markers, such as anti-Melan A antibody, to enhance specificity.

  13. Fascin and EMMPRIN expression in primary mucinous tumors of ovary: a tissue microarray study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alici, Omer; Kefeli, Mehmet; Yildiz, Levent; Baris, Sancar; Karagoz, Filiz; Kandemir, Bedri

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the expressions of fascin and EMMPRIN in primary malignant, borderline and benign mucinous ovarian tumors, and to investigate the relationship of these markers with tumor progression and their applicability to differential diagnosis. An immunohistochemical study was performed for fascin and EMMPRIN using the tissue microarray technique. Eighty-one cases were included in the study; there were 37 benign, 25 borderline and 19 malignant primary mucinous ovarian tumors. For each case, a total staining score was determined, consisting of scores for extent of staining and intensity of staining. The cases were allocated to negative, weakly positive and strongly positive staining categories, according to the total staining score. Both of the markers were significantly negative in benign tumors as compared with borderline and malignant tumors. There was no significant difference between borderline and malignant groups for both markers. Sixty-eight percent of malignant tumors were stained positive by fascin, while this rate was 40% for borderline mucinous tumors. All malignant tumors were strongly stained positive for EMMPRIN, while this rate was 92% for borderline mucinous tumors. The rest of the cases stained weakly positive. No significant difference in staining score was found between fascin and EMMPRIN expression. In ovarian primary mucinous tumors, fascin and EMMPRIN may play an important role in tumor progression from benign tumor to carcinoma. In that context, EMMPRIN and fascin expression may have potential application in the differential diagnosis of some diagnostically problematic mucinous ovarian tumors. However, the differential diagnostic applicability of EMMPRIN appears to be more limited than that of fascin due to its wide spectrum of staining in mucinous ovarian tumors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Tumor Cells and Tumor-Associated Macrophages: Secreted Proteins as Potential Targets for Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baay, Marc; Brouwer, Anja; Pauwels, Patrick; Peeters, Marc; Lardon, Filip

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory pathways, meant to defend the organism against infection and injury, as a byproduct, can promote an environment which favors tumor growth and metastasis. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), which constitute a significant part of the tumor-infiltrating immune cells, have been linked to the growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis of a variety of cancers, most likely through polarization of TAMs to the M2 (alternative) phenotype. The interaction between tumor cells and macrophages provides opportunities for therapy. This paper will discuss secreted proteins as targets for intervention. PMID:22162712

  15. Tumor Cells and Tumor-Associated Macrophages: Secreted Proteins as Potential Targets for Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Baay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory pathways, meant to defend the organism against infection and injury, as a byproduct, can promote an environment which favors tumor growth and metastasis. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs, which constitute a significant part of the tumor-infiltrating immune cells, have been linked to the growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis of a variety of cancers, most likely through polarization of TAMs to the M2 (alternative phenotype. The interaction between tumor cells and macrophages provides opportunities for therapy. This paper will discuss secreted proteins as targets for intervention.

  16.  An Uncommon Presentation of Giant Cell Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Malhotra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available  Giant Cell Tumors commonly occur at the ends of long bones. However in rare cases, they can occur in the bones of the hands and feet. Tumors in these locations occur in younger patients; in addition, these tumors are more commonly multifocal and are associated with a higher risk for local recurrence than tumors at the ends of long bones. Since lesions in the small bones may be multifocal, a patient with a giant cell tumor of the small bones should undergo a skeletal survey to exclude similar lesions elsewhere. Primary surgical treatment ranges from curettage or excision with or without bone grafting to amputation. The success of surgical treatment depends on the completeness with which the tumor was removed. We are presenting a case report of a 34 year old female, who presented with a swelling in the right hand, following trauma. X-ray of the hand showed an osteolytic expansile lesion at the base of the 1st metacarpal bone. The lesion was initially curetted and then treated by local resection with bone grafting. Histological examination revealed a typical benign giant cell tumor composed of closely packed stromal cells with a variable admixture of giant cells. Follow up at the end of one year did not reveal any recurrence of the tumor.

  17. Cytology of cardiac myxomas: presence of Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I) lectin by immunoperoxidase staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwa, N; Yutani, C

    1993-12-01

    Cytological findings are presented of seven cases of cardiac myxomas. Avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (ABC) method was employed to demonstrate Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I) lectin in imprint smears as well as in paraffin-embedded tissue sections in cardiac myxomas. The cytology was characterized by tumor cells with polyhedral or stellate and mucinous background with lymphocytes, neutrophils, and hemosiderin-laden macrophages. In smears as well as tissue sections, UEA-I lectin was detected throughout the cytoplasm of myxoma cells. This study established the applicability of the immunoperoxidase staining for cardiac myxoma as an aid in cytopathological diagnosis.

  18. Distribution of a 69-kD laminin-binding protein in aortic and microvascular endothelial cells: modulation during cell attachment, spreading, and migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yannariello-Brown, J; Wewer, U; Liotta, L

    1988-01-01

    cells identified this protein in BAEC lysates. In frozen sections, these polyclonal antibodies and monoclonal antibodies raised against human tumor 69-kD stained the endothelium of bovine aorta and the medial smooth muscle cells, but not surrounding connective tissue or elastin fibers. When...... nonpermeabilized BAEC were stained in an in vitro migration assay, there appeared to be apical patches of 69 kD staining in stationary cells. However, when released from contact inhibition, 69 kD was localized to ruffling membranes on cells at the migrating front. Permeabilized BAEC stained for 69 kD diffusely...... in permeabilized cultured microvascular endothelial cells in a continuous staining pattern at 6 h postplating which redistributed to punctate patches along the length of the filaments at confluence (96 h). In addition, 69 kD co-distribution with laminin could also be demonstrated in cultured subconfluent cells...

  19. Residual tumor cells that drive disease relapse after chemotherapy do not have enhanced tumor initiating capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganapati V Hegde

    Full Text Available Although chemotherapy is used to treat most advanced solid tumors, recurrent disease is still the major cause of cancer-related mortality. Cancer stem cells (CSCs have been the focus of intense research in recent years because they provide a possible explanation for disease relapse. However, the precise role of CSCs in recurrent disease remains poorly understood and surprisingly little attention has been focused on studying the cells responsible for re-initiating tumor growth within the original host after chemotherapy treatment. We utilized both xenograft and genetically engineered mouse models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC to characterize the residual tumor cells that survive chemotherapy treatment and go on to cause tumor regrowth, which we refer to as tumor re-initiating cells (TRICs. We set out to determine whether TRICs display characteristics of CSCs, and whether assays used to define CSCs also provide an accurate readout of a cell's ability to cause tumor recurrence. We did not find consistent enrichment of CSC marker positive cells or enhanced tumor initiating potential in TRICs. However, TRICs from all models do appear to be in EMT, a state that has been linked to chemoresistance in numerous types of cancer. Thus, the standard CSC assays may not accurately reflect a cell's ability to drive disease recurrence.

  20. The use of bispecific antibodies in tumor cell and tumor vasculature directed immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molema, G; Kroesen, BJ; Helfrich, W; Meijer, DKF; de Leij, LFMH

    2000-01-01

    To overcome dose limiting toxicities and to increase efficacy of immunotherapy of cancer, a number of strategies are under development for selectively redirecting effector cells/molecules towards tumor cells. Many of these strategies exploit the specificity of tumor associated antigen recognition by

  1. Interface between breast cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment using platelet-rich plasma to promote tumor angiogenesis - influence of platelets and fibrin bundles on the behavior of breast tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Sheila Siqueira; Sumikawa, Joana Tomomi; Castro, Eloísa Dognani; Batista, Fabricio Pereira; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar; Oliveira, Lilian Carolina; Guerra, Izabel Monastério; Peres, Giovani Bravin; Cavalheiro, Renan Pelluzzi; Juliano, Luiz; Nazário, Afonso Pinto; Facina, Gil; Tsai, Siu Mui; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello

    2017-03-07

    Cancer progression is associated with an evolving tissue interface of direct epithelial-tumor microenvironment interactions. In biopsies of human breast tumors, extensive alterations in molecular pathways are correlated with cancer staging on both sides of the tumor-stroma interface. These interactions provide a pivotal paracrine signaling to induce malignant phenotype transition, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We explored how the direct contact between platelets-fibrin bundles primes metastasis using platelet-rich plasma (PRP) as a source of growth factors and mimics the provisional fibrin matrix between actively growing breast cancer cells and the tumor stroma. We have demonstrated PRP functions, modulating cell proliferation that is tumor-subtype and cancer cell-type-specific. Epithelial and stromal primary cells were prepared from breast cancer biopsies from 21 women with different cancer subtypes. Cells supplemented with PRP were immunoblotted with anti-phospho and total Src-Tyr-416, FAK-Try-925, E-cadherin, N-cadherin, TGF-β, Smad2, and Snail monoclonal antibodies. Breast tumor cells from luminal B and HER2 subtypes showed the most malignant profiles and the expression of thrombin and other classes of proteases at levels that were detectable through FRET peptide libraries. The angiogenesis process was investigated in the interface obtained between platelet-fibrin-breast tumor cells co-cultured with HUVEC cells. Luminal B and HER2 cells showed robust endothelial cell capillary-like tubes ex vivo. The studied interface contributes to the attachment of endothelial cells, provides a source of growth factors, and is a solid substrate. Thus, replacement of FBS supplementation with PRP supplementation represents an efficient and simple approach for mimicking the real multifactorial tumor microenvironment.

  2. Malignant primary germ-cell tumor of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Toyoshiro; Sato, Shinichi; Nakao, Satoshi; Ban, Sadahiko; Namba, Koh

    1983-01-01

    The unusual case of a 15 year old boy with three discrete paraventricular germ-cell tumors is reported.FThe first tumor was located just lateral to the left thalamus and included a massive cystic part around it, the second tumor in the paraventricular region above the head of the left caudate nucleus and the third tumor in the medial part of the left parietal lobe.FTotal removal of all tumors was successfully accomplished in stages at four separate operations, namely, the first tumor was removed through the left transsylvian approach, the second tumor via left superior frontal gyrus and the third tumor via left superior frontal gyrus and left superior parietal lobule.FHistological examination revealed that the first tumor was teratoma, the second was choriocarcinoma and the third was germinoma.FPrimary germ-cell tumors of the brain can be divided into 5 groups: 1) germinoma; 2) embryonal carcinoma; 3) choriocarcinoma; 4) yolk-sac tumor; or 5) teratoma.FIn this case, a combination of three different histological patterns was seen. If malignant germ-cell tumor is supected on CT, aggressive extirpation should be done, not only to determine the exact diagnosis, but also to provide the basis for subsequent adjunctive therapy. (author)

  3. Quantifying metabolic heterogeneity in head and neck tumors in real time: 2-DG uptake is highest in hypoxic tumor regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica C Nakajima

    Full Text Available Intratumoral metabolic heterogeneity may increase the likelihood of treatment failure due to the presence of a subset of resistant tumor cells. Using a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC xenograft model and a real-time fluorescence imaging approach, we tested the hypothesis that tumors are metabolically heterogeneous, and that tumor hypoxia alters patterns of glucose uptake within the tumor.Cal33 cells were grown as xenograft tumors (n = 16 in nude mice after identification of this cell line's metabolic response to hypoxia. Tumor uptake of fluorescent markers identifying hypoxia, glucose import, or vascularity was imaged simultaneously using fluorescent molecular tomography. The variability of intratumoral 2-deoxyglucose (IR800-2-DG concentration was used to assess tumor metabolic heterogeneity, which was further investigated using immunohistochemistry for expression of key metabolic enzymes. HNSCC tumors in patients were assessed for intratumoral variability of (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18F-FDG uptake in clinical PET scans.IR800-2-DG uptake in hypoxic regions of Cal33 tumors was 2.04 times higher compared to the whole tumor (p = 0.0001. IR800-2-DG uptake in tumors containing hypoxic regions was more heterogeneous as compared to tumors lacking a hypoxic signal. Immunohistochemistry staining for HIF-1α, carbonic anhydrase 9, and ATP synthase subunit 5β confirmed xenograft metabolic heterogeneity. We detected heterogeneous (18F-FDG uptake within patient HNSCC tumors, and the degree of heterogeneity varied amongst tumors.Hypoxia is associated with increased intratumoral metabolic heterogeneity. (18F-FDG PET scans may be used to stratify patients according to the metabolic heterogeneity within their tumors, which could be an indicator of prognosis.

  4. Tumor necrosis factor (cachetin) decreases adipose cell differentiation in primary cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.J.; Jones, D.D.; Jewell, D.E.; Hausman, G.J.

    1986-01-01

    Cachetin has been shown to effect gene product expression in the established adipose cell line 3T3-L1. Expression of messenger RNA for lipoprotein lipase is suppressed in cultured adipocytes. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of Cachetin on adipose cell differentiation in primary cell culture. Stromalvascular cells obtained from the inguinal fat pad of 4-5 week old Sprague-Dawley rats were grown in culture for two weeks. During the proliferative growth phase all cells were grown on the same medium and labelled with 3 H-thymidine. Cachetin treatment (10 -6 to 10 -10 M) was initiated on day 5, the initial phase of preadipocyte differentiation. Adipocytes and stromal cells were separated using density gradient, and 3 H-thymidine was determined for both cell types. Thymidine incorporation into adipose cells was decreased maximally (∼ 50%) at 10 -10 M. Stromalvascular cells were not influenced at any of the doses tested. Adipose cell lipid content as indicated by oil red-O staining was decreased by Cachetin. Esterase staining by adipose cells treated with Cachetin was increased indicating an increase in intracellular lipase. These studies show that Cachetin has specific effects on primary adipose cell differentiation

  5. Affinity cytochemistry of vascular endothelia in brain tumors by biotinylated Ulex europaeus type I lectin (UEA I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, T; Seitz, R J; Liebert, U G; Gallasch, E; Wechsler, W

    1985-01-01

    The vascularization of 50 tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) including 17 meningiomas, 25 neuroectodermal tumors, i.e., astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, mixed gliomas, glioblastomas, medulloblastomas, seven metastatic carcinomas, and one malignant hemangioendothelioma were investigated using biotinylated Ulex europaeus type I lectin (UEA I) in an indirect avidinbiotin-peroxidase procedure. The cytochemical staining pattern of UEA I on paraffin sections was compared with that of biotinylated Dolichos biflorus lectin (DBA), and with the immunocytochemical staining of factor VIII related antigen (F VIII/RAG) by polyclonal antisera using the PAP technique. UEA I visualized the endothelia of blood vessels with equal intensity, sensitivity, and reliability in normal brain and in tumor tissue with neovascularization. While large, medium, and small vessels were equally well demonstrated by UEA I and antibodies against FVIII/RAG, capillaries and endothelial sprouts were stained more consistently and intensely by UEA I. No reliable cytochemical staining could be obtained by DBA regardless of tissue or cell type investigated. It is concluded that UEA I is a highly useful cytochemical marker for the identification of vascular endothelia in paraffin sections of human brain tumors.

  6. Centrosome clustering and cyclin D1 gene amplification in double minutes are common events in chromosomal unstable bladder tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, Javier del; Prat, Esther; Ponsa, Immaculada; Lloreta, Josep; Gelabert, Antoni; Algaba, Ferran; Camps, Jordi; Miró, Rosa

    2010-01-01

    Aneuploidy, centrosome abnormalities and gene amplification are hallmarks of chromosome instability (CIN) in cancer. Yet there are no studies of the in vivo behavior of these phenomena within the same bladder tumor. Twenty-one paraffin-embedded bladder tumors were analyzed by conventional comparative genome hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a cyclin D1 gene (CCND1)/centromere 11 dual-color probe. Immunofluorescent staining of α, β and γ tubulin was also performed. Based on the CIN index, defined as the percentage of cells not displaying the modal number for chromosome 11, tumors were classified as CIN-negative and CIN-positive. Fourteen out of 21 tumors were considered CIN-positive. All T1G3 tumors were included in the CIN-positive group whereas the majority of Ta samples were classified as CIN-negative tumors. Centrosome clustering was observed in six out of 12 CIN-positive tumors analyzed. CCND1 amplification in homogeneously staining regions was present in six out of 14 CIN-positive tumors; three of them also showed amplification of this gene in double minutes. Complex in vivo behavior of CCND1 amplicon in bladder tumor cells has been demonstrated by accurate FISH analysis on paraffin-embedded tumors. Positive correlation between high heterogeneity, centrosome abnormalities and CCND1 amplification was found in T1G3 bladder carcinomas. This is the first study to provide insights into the coexistence of CCND1 amplification in homogeneously staining regions and double minutes in primary bladder tumors. It is noteworthy that those patients whose tumors showed double minutes had a significantly shorter overall survival rate (p < 0.001)

  7. Effects of low dose radiation combined with cyclophosphamide on tumor cell apoptosis, cell cycle and proliferation of bone marrow in tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hongsheng; Fei Conghe; Shen Fangzhen; Liang Jun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of low dose radiation (LDR) combined with cyclophosphamide on tumor cell apoptosis, cell cycle, and proliferation of bone marrow in mice tumor-bearing mice. Methods: Kunming strain male mice were implanted with S180 sarcoma cells in the left hind leg subcutaneously as an experimental animal model. Five and 8 days after implantation, the mice were given 75 mGy whole-body γ-ray radiation and CTX(300 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection 36 hour after LDR. All mice were sacrificed to measure the tumor volume, tumor cell apoptosis, and cell cycle; the proliferation of bone marrow was analyzed by flow cytometry. Results: Tumor growth was significantly slowed down in the treated groups. The apoptosis of tumor cells increased significantly after LDR. The tumor cells were arrested in G 1 phase in CTX and CTX+LDR groups, more significantly in the latter group than in the former group. Concentration of bone marrow cells and proliferation index in CTX + LDR group were higher than those in CTX group, although concentration of bone marrow cells in CTX and CTX+LDR groups were much lower than that in normal mice. Conclusion: Low dose radiation combined with cyclophosphamide causes more significant G 1 -phase arrest than cyclophosphamide alone and enhances anti-tumor effect markedly. At the same time LDR significantly protects hematopoietic function of bone marrow, which is of practical significance as an adjuvant chemotherapy

  8. The Human Cell Surfaceome of Breast Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Júlia Pinheiro Chagas; Galante, Pedro Alexandre Favoretto; de Souza, Jorge Estefano Santana; Pieprzyk, Martin; Carraro, Dirce Maria; Old, Lloyd J.; Camargo, Anamaria Aranha; de Souza, Sandro José

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Cell surface proteins are ideal targets for cancer therapy and diagnosis. We have identified a set of more than 3700 genes that code for transmembrane proteins believed to be at human cell surface. Methods. We used a high-throuput qPCR system for the analysis of 573 cell surface protein-coding genes in 12 primary breast tumors, 8 breast cell lines, and 21 normal human tissues including breast. To better understand the role of these genes in breast tumors, we used a series of bioinformatics strategies to integrates different type, of the datasets, such as KEGG, protein-protein interaction databases, ONCOMINE, and data from, literature. Results. We found that at least 77 genes are overexpressed in breast primary tumors while at least 2 of them have also a restricted expression pattern in normal tissues. We found common signaling pathways that may be regulated in breast tumors through the overexpression of these cell surface protein-coding genes. Furthermore, a comparison was made between the genes found in this report and other genes associated with features clinically relevant for breast tumorigenesis. Conclusions. The expression profiling generated in this study, together with an integrative bioinformatics analysis, allowed us to identify putative targets for breast tumors. PMID:24195083

  9. Programmed death-ligand 1 expression correlates with diminished CD8+ T cell infiltration and predicts poor prognosis in anal squamous cell carcinoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Y

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Jie Zhao,1 Wei-Peng Sun,2 Jian-Hong Peng,1 Yu-Xiang Deng,1 Yu-Jing Fang,1 Jun Huang,2 Hui-Zhong Zhang,3 De-Sen Wan,1 Jun-Zhong Lin,1,* Zhi-Zhong Pan,1,* 1Department of Colorectal Surgery, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, 2Department of Colorectal Surgery, The Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, 3Department of Pathology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Increased expression of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1 on tumor cells can be found in various malignancies; however, very limited information is known about its role in anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC. This study explored PD-L1 expression in ASCC patients and its association with patients’ clinicopathological features, CD8+ T cell infiltration, and prognosis.Methods: Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples from 26 patients with ASCC were retrieved. The levels of PD-L1 expression on the membrane of both tumor cells and tumor-infiltrating mononuclear cells (TIMCs were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. CD8+ T cell densities, both within tumors and at the tumor–stromal interface, were also analyzed. Baseline clinicopathological characteristics, human papilloma virus (HPV status, and outcome data correlated with PD-L1-positive staining.Results: PD-L1 expression on tumor cells and TIMCs was observed in 46% and 50% of patients, respectively. Nineteen patients (73% were HPV positive, with 7 showing PD-L1-positive staining on tumor cells and 9 showing PD-L1-positive staining on TIMCs. Increasing CD8+ density within tumors, but not immune stroma, was significantly associated with decreased PD-L1 expression by both tumor cells and TIMCs (P=0.0043 and P=0.0007. Patients with negative PD-L1 expression had significantly better progression-free survival (P=0.038 and P

  10. The raccoon polyomavirus genome and tumor antigen transcription are stable and abundant in neuroglial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brostoff, Terza; Dela Cruz, Florante N; Church, Molly E; Woolard, Kevin D; Pesavento, Patricia A

    2014-11-01

    Raccoon polyomavirus (RacPyV) is associated with 100% of neuroglial tumors in free-ranging raccoons. Other tumor-associated polyomaviruses (PyVs), including simian virus 40 (SV40), murine PyV, and Merkel cell PyV, are found integrated in the host genome in neoplastic cells, where they constitutively express splice variants of the tumor antigen (TAg) gene. We have previously reported that RacPyV exists only as an episome (nonintegrated) in neuroglial tumors. Here, we have investigated TAg transcription in primary tumor tissue by transcriptome analysis, and we identified the alternatively spliced TAg transcripts for RacPyV. We also determined that TAg was highly transcribed relative to host cellular genes. We further colocalized TAg DNA and mRNA by in situ hybridization and found that the majority of tumor cells showed positive staining. Lastly, we examined the stability of the viral genome and TAg transcription by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR in cultured tumor cells in vitro and in a mouse xenograft model. When tumor cells were cultured in vitro, TAg transcription increased nearly 2 log-fold over that of parental tumor tissue by passage 17. Both episomal viral genome and TAg transcription were faithfully maintained in culture and in tumors arising from xenotransplantation of cultured cells in mice. This study represents a minimal criterion for RacPyV's association with neuroglial tumors and a novel mechanism of stability for a polyomavirus in cancer. The natural cycle of polyomaviruses in mammals is to persist in the host without causing disease, but they can cause cancer in humans or in other animals. Because this is an unpredictable and rare event, the oncogenic potential of polyomavirus is primarily evaluated in laboratory animal models. Recently, raccoon polyomavirus (RacPyV) was identified in neuroglial tumors of free-ranging raccoons. Viral copy number was consistently high in these tumors but was low or undetectable in nontumor tissue or in

  11. Standardized orthotopic xenografts in zebrafish reveal glioma cell-line-specific characteristics and tumor cell heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra M. Welker

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is a deadly brain cancer, for which few effective drug treatments are available. Several studies have used zebrafish models to study GBM, but a standardized approach to modeling GBM in zebrafish was lacking to date, preventing comparison of data across studies. Here, we describe a new, standardized orthotopic xenotransplant model of GBM in zebrafish. Dose-response survival assays were used to define the optimal number of cells for tumor formation. Techniques to measure tumor burden and cell spread within the brain over real time were optimized using mouse neural stem cells as control transplants. Applying this standardized approach, we transplanted two patient-derived GBM cell lines, serum-grown adherent cells and neurospheres, into the midbrain region of embryonic zebrafish and analyzed transplanted larvae over time. Progressive brain tumor growth and premature larval death were observed using both cell lines; however, fewer transplanted neurosphere cells were needed for tumor growth and lethality. Tumors were heterogeneous, containing both cells expressing stem cell markers and cells expressing markers of differentiation. A small proportion of transplanted neurosphere cells expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP or vimentin, markers of more differentiated cells, but this number increased significantly during tumor growth, indicating that these cells undergo differentiation in vivo. By contrast, most serum-grown adherent cells expressed GFAP and vimentin at the earliest times examined post-transplant. Both cell types produced brain tumors that contained Sox2+ cells, indicative of tumor stem cells. Transplanted larvae were treated with currently used GBM therapeutics, temozolomide or bortezomib, and this resulted in a reduction in tumor volume in vivo and an increase in survival. The standardized model reported here facilitates robust and reproducible analysis of glioblastoma tumor cells in real time and provides a

  12. A rare case of primary clear cell sarcoma of the pubic bone resembling small round cell tumor: an unusual morphological variant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Shoko; Tsuji, Motomu; Hanafusa, Toshiaki; Yokote, Taiji; Iwaki, Kazuki; Akioka, Toshikazu; Miyoshi, Takuji; Hirata, Yuji; Takayama, Ayami; Nishiwaki, Uta; Masuda, Yuki

    2012-01-01

    Clear cell sarcoma (CCS) and malignant melanoma share overlapping immunohistochemistry with regard to the melanocytic markers HMB45, S100, and Melan-A. However, the translocation t(12; 22)(q13; q12) is specific to CCS. Therefore, although these neoplasms are closely related, they are now considered to be distinct entities. However, the translocation is apparently detectable only in 50%–70% of CCS cases. Therefore, the absence of a detectable EWS/AFT1 rearrangement may occasionally lead to erroneous exclusion of a translocation-negative CCS. Therefore, histological assessment is essential for the correct diagnosis of CCS. Primary CCS of the bone is exceedingly rare. Only a few cases of primary CCS arising in the ulna, metatarsals, ribs, radius, sacrum, and humerus have been reported, and primary CCS arising in the pubic bone has not been reported till date. We present the case of an 81-year-old man with primary CCS of the pubic bone. Histological examination of the pubic bone revealed monomorphic small-sized cells arranged predominantly as a diffuse sheet with round, hyperchromatic nuclei and inconspicuous nucleoli. The cells had scant cytoplasm, and the biopsy findings indicated small round cell tumor (SRCT). Immunohistochemical staining revealed the tumor cells to be positive for HMB45, S100, and Melan-A but negative for cytokeratin (AE1/AE3) and epithelial membrane antigen. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of primary CCS of the pubic bone resembling SRCT. This ambiguous appearance underscores the difficulties encountered during the histological diagnosis of this rare variant of CCS. Awareness of primary CCS of the bone is clinically important for accurate diagnosis and management when the tumor is located in unusual locations such as the pubic bone and when the translocation t(12; 22)(q13; q12) is absent

  13. Hypofractionation results in reduced tumor cell kill compared to conventional fractionation for tumors with regions of hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, David J; Keall, Paul J; Loo, Billy W; Chen, Zhe J; Brown, J Martin

    2011-03-15

    Tumor hypoxia has been observed in many human cancers and is associated with treatment failure in radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to quantify the effect of different radiation fractionation schemes on tumor cell killing, assuming a realistic distribution of tumor oxygenation. A probability density function for the partial pressure of oxygen in a tumor cell population is quantified as a function of radial distance from the capillary wall. Corresponding hypoxia reduction factors for cell killing are determined. The surviving fraction of a tumor consisting of maximally resistant cells, cells at intermediate levels of hypoxia, and normoxic cells is calculated as a function of dose per fraction for an equivalent tumor biological effective dose under normoxic conditions. Increasing hypoxia as a function of distance from blood vessels results in a decrease in tumor cell killing for a typical radiotherapy fractionation scheme by a factor of 10(5) over a distance of 130 μm. For head-and-neck cancer and prostate cancer, the fraction of tumor clonogens killed over a full treatment course decreases by up to a factor of ∼10(3) as the dose per fraction is increased from 2 to 24 Gy and from 2 to 18 Gy, respectively. Hypofractionation of a radiotherapy regimen can result in a significant decrease in tumor cell killing compared to standard fractionation as a result of tumor hypoxia. There is a potential for large errors when calculating alternate fractionations using formalisms that do not account for tumor hypoxia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Modified Field's staining--a rapid stain for Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzan, M Yusuf; Sivanandam, S; Kumar, G Suresh

    2010-10-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis, a flagellate protozoan parasite commonly found in the human genitourinary tract, is transmitted primarily by sexual intercourse. Diagnosis is usually by in vitro culture method and staining with Giemsa stain. There are laboratories that use Gram stain as well. We compared the use of modified Field's (MF), Giemsa, and Gram stains on 2 axenic and xenic isolates of T. vaginalis, respectively. Three smears from every sediment of spun cultures of all 4 isolates were stained, respectively, with each of the stains. We showed that MF staining, apart from being a rapid stain (20 s), confers sharper staining contrast, which differentiates the nucleus and the cytoplasm of the organism when compared to Giemsa and Gram staining especially on parasites from spiked urine samples. The alternative staining procedure offers in a diagnostic setting a rapid stain that can easily visualize the parasite with sharp contrasting characteristics between organelles especially the nucleus and cytoplasm. Vacuoles are more clearly visible in parasites stained with MF than when stained with Giemsa. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. LncRNA TUG1 acts as a tumor suppressor in human glioma by promoting cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Meng; An, Gang; Ma, Qingfang

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have revealed multiple functional roles of long non-coding RNA taurine upregulated gene 1 in different types of malignant tumors, except for human glioma. Here, it was designed to study the potential function of taurine upregulated gene 1 in glioma pathogenesis focusing on its regulation on cell apoptosis. The expression of taurine upregulated gene 1 in glioma tissues was detected by quantitative RT-PCR and compared with that in adjacent normal tissues. Further correlation analysis was conducted to show the relationship between taurine upregulated gene 1 expression and different clinicopathologic parameters. Functional studies were performed to investigate the influence of taurine upregulated gene 1 on apoptosis and cell proliferation by using Annexin V/PI staining and cell counting kit-8 assays, respectively. And, caspase activation and Bcl-2 expression were analyzed to explore taurine upregulated gene 1-induced mechanism. taurine upregulated gene 1 expression was significantly inhibited in glioma and showed significant correlation with WHO Grade,