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Sample records for tumor cells labeled

  1. Tracking of [18F]FDG-labeled natural killer cells to HER2/neu-positive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, Reinhard; Piert, Morand; Piontek, Guido; Rudelius, Martina; Oostendorp, Robert A.; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard; Henning, Tobias D.; Wels, Winfried S.; Uherek, Christoph; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Daldrup-Link, Heike E.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: The objective of this study was to label the human natural killer (NK) cell line NK-92 with [ 18 F]fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) for subsequent in vivo tracking to HER2/neu-positive tumors. Methods: NK-92 cells were genetically modified to NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells, which express a chimeric antigen receptor that is specific to the tumor-associated ErbB2 (HER2/neu) antigen. NK-92 and NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells were labeled with [ 18 F]FDG by simple incubation at different settings. Labeling efficiency was evaluated by a gamma counter. Subsequently, [ 18 F]FDG-labeled parental NK-92 or NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells were intravenously injected into mice with implanted HER2/neu-positive NIH/3T3 tumors. Radioactivity in tumors was quantified by digital autoradiography and correlated with histopathology. Results: The NK-92 and NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells could be efficiently labeled with [ 18 F]FDG by simple incubation. Optimal labeling efficiencies (80%) were achieved using an incubation period of 60 min and additional insulin (10 IU/ml). After injection of 5x10 6 [ 18 F]FDG-labeled NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells into tumor-bearing mice, digital autoradiography showed an increased uptake of radioactivity in HER2/neu-positive tumors at 60 min postinjection. Conversely, injection of 5x10 6 NK-92 cells not directed against HER2/neu receptors did not result in increased uptake of radioactivity in the tumors. Histopathology confirmed an accumulation of the NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells, but not the parental NK cells, in tumor tissues. Conclusion: The human NK cell line NK-92 can be directed against HER2/neu antigens by genetic modification. The genetically modified NK cells can be efficiently labeled with [ 18 F]FDG, and the accumulation of these labeled NK cells in HER2/neu-positive tumors can be monitored with autoradiography

  2. Tracking of [{sup 18}F]FDG-labeled natural killer cells to HER2/neu-positive tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, Reinhard [Department of Radiology, University of California San Francisco (United States)], E-mail: reinhardt.meier@gmail.com; Piert, Morand [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, University of Michigan (United States); Piontek, Guido; Rudelius, Martina [Institute of Pathology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Oostendorp, Robert A. [3rd Department of Internal Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Henning, Tobias D. [Department of Radiology, University of California San Francisco (United States); Wels, Winfried S.; Uherek, Christoph [Chemotherapeutisches Forschungsinstitut, Georg-Speyer-Haus, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Rummeny, Ernst J. [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Daldrup-Link, Heike E. [Department of Radiology, University of California San Francisco (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Introduction: The objective of this study was to label the human natural killer (NK) cell line NK-92 with [{sup 18}F]fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) for subsequent in vivo tracking to HER2/neu-positive tumors. Methods: NK-92 cells were genetically modified to NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells, which express a chimeric antigen receptor that is specific to the tumor-associated ErbB2 (HER2/neu) antigen. NK-92 and NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells were labeled with [{sup 18}F]FDG by simple incubation at different settings. Labeling efficiency was evaluated by a gamma counter. Subsequently, [{sup 18}F]FDG-labeled parental NK-92 or NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells were intravenously injected into mice with implanted HER2/neu-positive NIH/3T3 tumors. Radioactivity in tumors was quantified by digital autoradiography and correlated with histopathology. Results: The NK-92 and NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells could be efficiently labeled with [{sup 18}F]FDG by simple incubation. Optimal labeling efficiencies (80%) were achieved using an incubation period of 60 min and additional insulin (10 IU/ml). After injection of 5x10{sup 6} [{sup 18}F]FDG-labeled NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells into tumor-bearing mice, digital autoradiography showed an increased uptake of radioactivity in HER2/neu-positive tumors at 60 min postinjection. Conversely, injection of 5x10{sup 6} NK-92 cells not directed against HER2/neu receptors did not result in increased uptake of radioactivity in the tumors. Histopathology confirmed an accumulation of the NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells, but not the parental NK cells, in tumor tissues. Conclusion: The human NK cell line NK-92 can be directed against HER2/neu antigens by genetic modification. The genetically modified NK cells can be efficiently labeled with [{sup 18}F]FDG, and the accumulation of these labeled NK cells in HER2/neu-positive tumors can be monitored with autoradiography.

  3. Instant magnetic labeling of tumor cells by ultrasound in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mo Runyang; Yang Jian; Wu, Ed X.; Lin Shuyu

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic labeling of living cells creates opportunities for numerous biomedical applications. Here we describe an instantly cell magnetic labeling method based on ultrasound. We present a detailed study on the ultrasound performance of a simple and efficient labeling protocol for H-22 cells in vitro. High frequency focus ultrasound was investigated as an alternative method to achieve instant cell labeling with the magnetic particles without the need for adjunct agents or initiating cell cultures. Mean diameter of 168 nm dextran-T40 coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles were prepared by means of classical coprecipitation in solution in our laboratory. H-22 tumor cells suspended in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, pH=7.2) were exposed to ultrasound at 1.37 MHz for up to 120 s in the presence of SPIOs. The cellular uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles was detected by prussion blue staining. The viability of cells was determined by a trypan blue exclusion test. At 2 W power and 60 s ultrasound exposure in presence of 410 μg/ml SPIOs, H-22 cell labeling efficiency reached 69.4±6.3% and the labeled cells exhibited an iron content of 10.38±2.43 pg per cell. Furthermore, 95.2±3.2% cells remained viable. The results indicated that the ultrasound protocol could be potentially applied to label cells with large-sized magnetic particles. We also calculated the shear stress at the 2 W power and 1.37 MHz used in experiments. The results showed that the shear stress threshold for ultrasonically induced H-22 cell reparable sonoporation was 697 Pa. These findings provide a quantitative guidance in designing ultrasound protocols for cell labeling. - Highlights: → High frequency focus ultrasound can be used as a safe method for instant magnetic labeling of cells. → 8-16 times increased efficiency can be gained by ultrasound versus that by transfection agents. → Calculation of shear stress around cells provide a quantitative design for ultrasound protocols.

  4. Comparison between 125IUdR and 51Cr as cell labels in investigations of tumor cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse, P; Hokland, P; Hokland, M

    1991-01-01

    YAC-1 tumor cells double-labeled with Na2[51Cr]O4 [51Cr] and [125I]iododeoxyuridine [125IUdR] were injected intravenously into Balb/c mice in order to investigate their migration and fate 0-4 h after the injection. Whereas the clearance of tumor cells from the lung tissue was similar as judged...

  5. Tumor-Initiating Label-Retaining Cancer Cells in Human Gastrointestinal Cancers Undergo Asymmetric Cell Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Hari, Danielle M.; Mullinax, John E.; Ambe, Chenwi M.; Koizumi, Tomotake; Ray, Satyajit; Anderson, Andrew J.; Wiegand, Gordon W.; Garfield, Susan H.; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.; Avital, Itzhak

    2012-01-01

    Label-retaining cells (LRCs) have been proposed to represent adult tissue stem cells. LRCs are hypothesized to result from either slow cycling or asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, the stem cell nature and whether LRC undergo ACD remain controversial. Here, we demonstrate label-retaining cancer cells (LRCCs) in several gastrointestinal (GI) cancers including fresh surgical specimens. Using a novel method for isolation of live LRCC, we demonstrate that a subpopulation of LRCC is actively dividing and exhibits stem cells and pluripotency gene expression profiles. Using real-time confocal microscopic cinematography, we show live LRCC undergoing asymmetric nonrandom chromosomal cosegregation LRC division. Importantly, LRCCs have greater tumor-initiating capacity than non-LRCCs. Based on our data and that cancers develop in tissues that harbor normal-LRC, we propose that LRCC might represent a novel population of GI stem-like cancer cells. LRCC may provide novel mechanistic insights into the biology of cancer and regenerative medicine and present novel targets for cancer treatment. PMID:22331764

  6. Flow Cytometric DNA Analysis Using Cytokeratin Labeling for Identification of Tumor Cells in Carcinomas of the Breast and the Female Genital Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Kimmig

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometric assessment of DNA‐ploidy and S‐phase fraction in malignant tumors is compromised by the heterogeneity of cell subpopulations derived from the malignant and surrounding connective tissue, e.g., tumor, stromal and inflammatory cells. To evaluate the effect on quality of DNA cell cycle analysis and determination of DNA ploidy, cytokeratin labeling of epithelial cells was used for tumor cell enrichment in breast, ovarian, cervical and endometrial cancer prior to DNA analysis. In a prospective study, tumor cell subpopulations of 620 malignant tumors were labeled by a FITC‐conjugated cytokeratin antibody (CK 5, 6, CK18 and CK 5, 6, 8 and CK 17, respectively prior to flow cytometric cell cycle analysis. Compared to total cell analysis, detection rate of DNA‐aneuploid tumors following cytokeratin labeling was increased from 62% to 76.5% in breast cancer, from 68% to 77% in ovarian cancer, from 60% to 80% in cervical cancer and from 30% to 53% in endometrial cancer. Predominantly in DNA‐diploid tumors, a significantly improved detection of S‐phase fraction of the tumor cells was shown due to the elimination of contaminating nonproliferating “normal cells”. S‐phase fraction following tumor cell enrichment was increased by 10% (mean following cytokeratin staining in ovarian and endometrial cancer, by 30% in breast cancer and even by 70% in cervical cancer compared to total cell analysis. Thus, diagnostic accuracy of DNA‐analysis was enhanced by cytokeratin labeling of tumor cells for all tumor entities investigated.

  7. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence studies of a bromine-labelled cyclic RGD peptide interacting with individual tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheridan, Erin J.; Austin, Christopher J. D.; Aitken, Jade B.; Vogt, Stefan; Jolliffe, Katrina A.; Harris, Hugh H.; Rendina, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    The first example of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging of cultured mammalian cells in cyclic peptide research is reported. The study reports the first quantitative analysis of the incorporation of a bromine-labelled cyclic RGD peptide and its effects on the biodistribution of endogenous elements (for example, K and Cl) within individual tumor cells. The first example of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging of cultured mammalian cells in cyclic peptide research is reported. The study reports the first quantitative analysis of the incorporation of a bromine-labelled cyclic RGD peptide and its effects on the biodistribution of endogenous elements (for example, K and Cl) within individual tumor cells

  8. [{sup 131}I]FIAU labeling of genetically transduced, tumor-reactive lymphocytes: cell-level dosimetry and dose-dependent toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanzonico, Pat [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Koehne, Guenther; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; O' Reilly, Richard J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Allogeneic Transplantation Service, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Immunology Program, New York, NY (United States); Gallardo, Humilidad F. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Gene Transfer and Somatic Cell Engineering Facility, New York, NY (United States); Doubrovin, Mikhail; Blasberg, Ronald G. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Neurology, New York, NY (United States); Finn, Ronald [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Radiochemistry and Cyclotron Core Facility, New York, NY (United States); Riviere, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Immunology Program, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Gene Transfer and Somatic Cell Engineering Facility, New York, NY (United States); Larson, Steven M. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2006-09-15

    Donor T cells have been shown to be reactive against and effective in adoptive immunotherapy of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lymphomas which develop in some leukemia patients post marrow transplantation. These T cells may be genetically modified by incorporation of a replication-incompetent viral vector (NIT) encoding both an inactive mutant nerve growth factor receptor (LNGFR), as an immunoselectable surface marker, and a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK), rendering the cells sensitive to ganciclovir. The current studies are based on the selective HSV-TK-catalyzed trapping (phosphorylation) of the thymidine analog [{sup 131}I]-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuransyl-5-iodo-uracil (FIAU) as a means of stably labeling such T cells for in vivo trafficking (including tumor targeting) studies. Because of the radiosensitivity of lymphocytes and the potentially high absorbed dose to the nucleus from intracellular {sup 131}I (even at tracer levels), the nucleus absorbed dose (D{sub n}) and dose-dependent immune functionality were evaluated for NIT {sup +} T cells labeled ex vivo in [{sup 131}I ]FIAU-containing medium. Based on in vitro kinetic studies of [{sup 131}I ]FIAU uptake by NIT {sup +} T cells, D{sub n} was calculated using an adaptation of the MIRD formalism and the recently published MIRD cellular S factors. Immune cytotoxicity of [{sup 131}I ]FIAU-labeled cells was assayed against {sup 51}Cr-labeled target cells [B-lymphoblastoid cells (BLCLs) ] in a standard 4-h release assay. At median nuclear absorbed doses up to 830 cGy, a {sup 51}Cr-release assay against BLCLs showed no loss of immune cytotoxicity, thus demonstrating the functional integrity of genetically transduced, tumor-reactive T cells labeled at this dose level for in vivo cell trafficking and tumor targeting studies. (orig.)

  9. Effect of immunomodulation on the fate of tumor cells in the central nervous system and systemic organs of mice. Distribution of [125I]5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine-labeled KHT tumor cells after left intracardial injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conley, F.K.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of systemic immunomodulation on tumor cell arrest and retention in the central nervous system was studied by following radioactively labeled tumor cells. KHT mouse sarcoma tumor cells were labeled in vitro with [ 125 I]IdUrd, and 1x10 5 tumor cells were injected into the left side of the hearts of syngeneic C3H mice. Experimental groups consisted of untreated normal mice, mice pretreated iv with Corynebacterium parvum, and mice chronically infected with Toxoplasma gondii; in this model both groups of immunomodulated mice are protected from developing systemic metastatic tumor, but only Toxoplasma-infected mice have protection against metastatic brain tumor. At time intervals from 1 to 96 hours, groups of mice from each experimental group were killed, and the brain and other organs were monitored for radioactivity to determine the number of viable tumor cells that had been present at the time of death. Normal mice demonstrated significant retention of tumor cells in the brain and kidneys plus adrenals at 96 hours. By contrast, in both groups of immunomodulated mice tumor cells were rapidly eliminated from systemic organs, but tumor cells were significantly retained in the central nervous system even at 96 hours after tumor cell injections. The results indicated that generalized immunomodulation had more effect in elimination of tumor cells from systemic organs than from the brain and that the elimination of tumor cells from the brain in Toxoplasma-infected mice was a delayed phenomenon

  10. Migration of iron-labeled KHYG-1 natural killer cells to subcutaneous tumors in nude mice, as detected by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallett, Christiane L; McFadden, Catherine; Chen, Yuhua; Foster, Paula J

    2012-07-01

    A novel cell line of cytotoxic natural killer (NK) cells, KHYG-1, was examined in vivo for immunotherapy against prostate cancer. The feasibility of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tracking to monitor the fate of injected NK cells following intravenous (i.v.), intraperitoneal (i.p.) and subcutaneous (s.c.) administration was assessed. PC-3M human prostate cancer cells were injected s.c. into the flank of nude mice (day 0). KHYG-1 NK cells were labeled with an iron oxide contrast agent and injected s.c., i.v. or i.p. on day 8. Mice were imaged by MRI on days 7, 9 and 12. Tumor sections were examined with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistologic staining for NK cells. NK cells were detected in the tumors by histology after all three administration routes. NK cells and fluorescence from the iron label were co-localized. Signal loss was seen in the areas around the tumors and between the tumor lobes in the s.c. group. We are the first to label this cell line of NK cells with an iron oxide contrast agent. Accumulation of NK cells was visualized by MRI after s.c. injection but not after i.v. and i.p. injection.

  11. Microfluidic bead-based multienzyme-nanoparticle amplification for detection of circulating tumor cells in the blood using quantum dots labels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, He, E-mail: mzhang_he@126.com; Fu, Xin; Hu, Jiayi; Zhu, Zhenjun

    2013-05-24

    Graphical abstract: A microfluidic beads-based nucleic acid sensor for sensitive detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood using multienzyme-nanoparticle amplification and quantum dots labels was developed. The chip-based CTCs analysis could detect reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) products of tumor cell as low as 1 tumor cell (e.g. CEA expressing cell) in 1 mL blood sample. This microfluidic beads-based nucleic acid sensor is a promising platform for disease-related nucleic acid molecules at the lowest level at their earliest incidence. -- Highlights: •Combination of microfluidic bead-based platform and enzyme–probe–AuNPs is proposed. •The developed nucleic acid sensor could respond to 5 fM of tumor associated DNA. •Microfluidic platform and multienzyme-labeled AuNPs greatly enhanced sensitivity. •The developed nucleic acid sensor could respond to RT-PCR products of tumor cell as low as 1 tumor cell in 1 mL blood sample. •We report a sensitive nucleic acid sensor for detection of circulating tumor cells. -- Abstract: This study reports the development of a microfluidic bead-based nucleic acid sensor for sensitive detection of circulating tumor cells in blood samples using multienzyme-nanoparticle amplification and quantum dot labels. In this method, the microbeads functionalized with the capture probes and modified electron rich proteins were arrayed within a microfluidic channel as sensing elements, and the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with the horseradish peroxidases (HRP) and DNA probes were used as labels. Hence, two signal amplification approaches are integrated for enhancing the detection sensitivity of circulating tumor cells. First, the large surface area of Au nanoparticle carrier allows several binding events of HRP on each nanosphere. Second, enhanced mass transport capability inherent from microfluidics leads to higher capture efficiency of targets because continuous flow within micro

  12. In vivo measurement of cell proliferation in canine brain tumor using C-11-labeled FMAU and PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, Peter S.; Bading, James R.; Mouton, Peter P.; Links, Jonathan M.; Alauddin, Mian M.; Fissekis, John D.; Ravert, Hayden T.; Hilton, John; Wong, Dean F.; Anderson, James H.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Noncatabolized thymidine analogs are being developed for use in imaging DNA synthesis. We sought to relate a labeling index measured by immunohistochemical staining bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) technique to the uptake of 11 C 2'-fluoro-5-methyl-1-β-D-arabinofuranosyluracil (FMAU) measured with positron emission tomography (PET) in a brain tumor model. Methods: Adult beagles (n=8) with implanted brain tumors received [ 11 C]FMAU and dynamic imaging with arterial sampling. Six dogs were then infused with BUdR (200 mg/m 2 ) and sacrificed. Tumor time-activity curves (TACs) obtained from computed-tomography-defined regions of interest were corrected for partial volume effects and crosstalk from brain tissue. Tissue was analyzed for the percentage of tumor volume occupied by viable cells and by viable cells in S-phase as identified by BUdR staining. PET/[ 11 C]FMAU and BUdR were compared by linear regression analysis and analysis of variance, as well as by a nonparametric rank correlation test. Results: Tumor standardized uptake values (SUVs) and tumor-to-contralateral-brain uptake ratios at 50 min were 1.6±0.4 and 5.5±1.2 (n=8; mean±S.E.M.), respectively. No 11 C-labeled metabolites were observed in the blood through 60 min. Tumor TACs were well described with a three-compartment/four-parameter model (k 4 =0) and by Patlak analysis. Parametric statistical analysis showed that FMAU clearance from plasma into tumor Compartment 3 (K FMAU ) was significantly correlated with S-phase percent volume (P=.03), while tumor SUV was significantly correlated with both S-phase percent volume and cell percent volume (P=.02 and .03, respectively). Patlak slope, K FMAU and tumor SUV were equivalent with regard to rank correlation analysis, which showed that tumor uptake and trapping of FMAU were correlated with the volume density of dividing cells (P=.0003) rather than nondividing cells (P=.3). Conclusions: Trapping of [ 11 C]FMAU correlated with tumor growth rate, as

  13. 99mTc labeled anti EGFR Nanobody pentamer for tumor radioimmunoimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Zhiling; Lan Xiaoli; Li Chongjiao; Pei Zhijun; Zhang Yongxue; Wang Lifei; Gao Bin

    2014-01-01

    Novel Nanobody has small molecular weight and lower affinity. Appropriate polymer would be more suitable for radioimmunoimaging. In this study, we labeled anti EGFR Nanobody pentamer with 99m Tc to prepare tumor targeting imaging agent and to investigate its binding characteristics of tumor cells and tissues in vitro and in vivo, and to explore the feasibility of 99m Tc-EGFR Nanobody pentamer for tumor radioimmunoimaging compared with anti EGFR Nanobody monomer. EGFR Nanobody labeled with 99m Tc through tricarbonyl intermediate. The labeled compounds were purified by an ultra centrifugal filter; The labeling efficiency was determined by thin layer chromatography (TLC), and the radiochemical purity more than 95%. In vitro, 99m Tc-EGFR Nanobody monomer and pentamer have the specific binding capability with EGFR overexpression A431 tumor cell. the binding rate of 99m Tc-EGFR Nanobody monomer higher than that of pentamer (11.32% ± 2.73% vs 5.80% ± 0.92%, P < O.05). In A431 xenografted tumor was clearly displayed after intravenous injection of 99m Tc-EGFR Nanobody pentamer at l.5 h, T/NT maximum was 2.9 (1.5 h), whereas, the tumor tissues was not obviously found using 99m Tc-EGFR Nanobody monomer. The negative EGFR expression OCM-I xenografted tumor was not showed in both monomer and pentamer tracer. The experiment indicated that 99m Tc-EGFR Nanobody pentamer are appropriate for tumor radioimmunoimaging and has the potential value for the further study. (authors)

  14. Human CD34+ cells engineered to express membrane-bound tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand target both tumor cells and tumor vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavazza, Cristiana; Carlo-Stella, Carmelo; Giacomini, Arianna; Cleris, Loredana; Righi, Marco; Sia, Daniela; Di Nicola, Massimo; Magni, Michele; Longoni, Paolo; Milanesi, Marco; Francolini, Maura; Gloghini, Annunziata; Carbone, Antonino; Formelli, Franca; Gianni, Alessandro M

    2010-03-18

    Adenovirus-transduced CD34+ cells expressing membrane-bound tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (CD34-TRAIL+ cells) exert potent antitumor activity. To further investigate the mechanism(s) of action of CD34-TRAIL+ cells, we analyzed their homing properties as well as antitumor and antivascular effects using a subcutaneous myeloma model in immunodeficient mice. After intravenous injection, transduced cells homed in the tumor peaking at 48 hours when 188 plus or minus 25 CD45+ cells per 10(5) tumor cells were detected. Inhibition experiments showed that tumor homing of CD34-TRAIL+ cells was largely mediated by vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and stromal cell-derived factor-1. Both CD34-TRAIL+ cells and soluble (s)TRAIL significantly reduced tumor volume by 40% and 29%, respectively. Computer-aided analysis of TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling-stained tumor sections demonstrated significantly greater effectiveness for CD34-TRAIL+ cells in increasing tumor cell apoptosis and necrosis over sTRAIL. Proteome array analysis indicated that CD34-TRAIL+ cells and sTRAIL activate similar apoptotic machinery. In vivo staining of tumor vasculature with sulfosuccinimidyl-6-(biotinamido) hexanoate-biotin revealed that CD34-TRAIL+ cells but not sTRAIL significantly damaged tumor vasculature, as shown by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling+ endothelial cells, appearance of hemorrhagic areas, and marked reduction of endothelial area. These results demonstrate that tumor homing of CD34-TRAIL+ cells induces early vascular disruption, resulting in hemorrhagic necrosis and tumor destruction.

  15. Correlation between the rate of bioreduction of nitroxide spin label by human tumor cells and their low-dose radiation response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halpern, H.J.; Peric, M.; Nguyen, T.D.; Spencer, D.P.; Bowman, M.K.; Beckett, M.; Weichselbaum, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    The authors discuss a correlation observed between the bioreduction of nitroxide spin label by four human tumor cell lines and a normal tissue fibroblast clone and their low-dose radiation response, specifically their D Q . In measurements of the bioreduction rate of several other cell lines, this correlation appears to persist. In order to define the mechanism of this correlation, they have begun by subtly altering the measurement conditions. The original conditions for measurement involved adding the spin label to cells whose culture medium had been changed (the label was added to the new medium). By delaying the addition of the label to the culture medium, they substantially reduced the variation of the bioreduction rate between the cell lines. This implies that the fresh medium provides a nonspecific irritant or disequilibrium to the cultured cell system to which they response variably by accelerating, among other things, the metabolic process responsible for spin label bioreduction

  16. Label-free single-cell separation and imaging of cancer cells using an integrated microfluidic system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antfolk, Maria; Kim, Soo Hyeon; Koizumi, Saori

    2017-01-01

    , an integrated system is presented that efficiently eliminates this risk by integrating label-free separation with single cell arraying of the target cell population, enabling direct on-chip tumor cell identification and enumeration. Prostate cancer cells (DU145) spiked into a sample with whole blood...... a fully integrated system for rapid label-free separation and on-chip phenotypic characterization of circulating tumor cells from peripheral venous blood in clinical practice....

  17. Effect of paclitaxel, epirubicin and tamoxifen on labelling index in cultured ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arican, G. Oe.; Oezalpan, A.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of Paclitaxel (PAC), Epirubicin (EPR) and Tamoxifen (TAM) on ''3H-thymidine labelling index (''3H-TdR LI) of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EAT) was investigated in cultured. In the present study, an estrogen receptor positive ER(+) hyper diploid cell lines were studied. We used optimum doses of PAC, EPR and TAM (12 mg/ml, 12 mg/ml and 2 mg/ml, respectively). Cells were treated with these doses for 0, 4, 8, 16 and 32 hours. At the end of these periods, both control and treated cells were labelled for 5 mCi/ml 3H-thymidine for 30 minutes. The results showed that inhibition of DNA synthesis in cultured EAT cells were increased in the combined treatment of two drugs when compared to the treatment of a single drug (p<0.01). In the treatment of three drugs, however, this effect reached a maximum (p<0.001). As a result, PAC+EPR+TAM treatment's had a maximum synergistic effect at 4 hours treatment

  18. Suicide of EMT-6 tumor cells by decays from radioactively-labelled sensitizer adducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roa, W.H.Y.; Chapman, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Nitroaromatic radiosensitizers become metabolically bound preferentially to hypoxic cells and at least 10/sup 9/ adducts/cell can be tolerated as non-toxic. EMT-6 tumor cells have been incubated in hypoxia in the presence of /sup 3/H-Misonidazole and /sup 125/I-Azomycin Riboside for various times and the amount of /sup 3/H or /sup 125/I bound/cell was determined. Cells were stored as monolayers at 25 0 C for up to 96 hr to accumulate radioactive decays and transferred at various times to 37 0 C for colony-forming assays. No radiation inactivation was measured in cells which had incorporated at least 10/sup 6/ /sup 3/H or 10/sup 5/ /sup 125/I atoms. Previous studies had shown that -- 1% of MISO adducts to EMT-6 cells was associated with cellular DNA. These data indicate that the radiation-induced damage produced by these quantities of bound /sup 3/H or /sup 125/I causes little or not cell inactivation. The results of current studies to measure the colony-forming ability of sensitizer-labelled cells which have been stored in liquid nitrogen to facilitate the accumulation of more decays will be reported. These data suggest that a ''sensitizer-adduct suicide technique'' as a hypoxic cell selective adjunct to other cancer therapies is not feasible. These data are also instructive for those who attempt to develop radiolabelled ''tumor specific'' antibodies for therapeutic purposes

  19. Carbon-11 and Fluorine-18 Labeled Amino Acid Tracers for Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Aixia; Liu, Xiang; Tang, Ganghua

    2017-12-01

    Tumor cells have an increased nutritional demand for amino acids(AAs) to satisfy their rapid proliferation. Positron-emitting nuclide labeled AAs are interesting probes and are of great importance for imaging tumors using positron emission tomography (PET). Carbon-11 and fluorine-18 labeled AAs include the [1-11C] amino acids, labeling alpha-C- amino acids, the branched-chain of amino acids and N-substituted carbon-11 labeled amino acids. These tracers target protein synthesis or amino acid(AA) transport, and their uptake mechanism mainly involves AA transport. AA PET tracers have been widely used in clinical settings to image brain tumors, neuroendocrine tumors, prostate cancer, breast cancer, non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and hepatocellular carcinoma. This review focuses on the fundamental concepts and the uptake mechanism of AAs, AA PET tracers and their clinical applications.

  20. Study on therapy of 188Re labelled stannic sulfur suspension in nude mice bearing human colon tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Huiyuan; Wu Yuanfang; Dong Mo

    2003-01-01

    The effect of therapy, tissue distribution and stability are studied in nude mice bearing human colon tumor after injections of 188 Re labelled stannic sulfur suspension. The tissues are observed with electric microscope. The results show that 188 Re labelled stannic sulfur suspension is stabilized in the tumor and its inhibitive effects on human colon tumor cells are obvious. 188 Re labelled stannic sulfur suspension is a potential radiopharmaceuticals for therapy of human tumor

  1. Radioiodine-labeled disulfide: a novel radiotracer for evaluation of tumor uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, E. K.; Choi, Y. S.; Byun, S. S.; Baek, J. Y.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, S. E.; Choi, Y.; Kim, B. T. [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Diallyl disulfide found in garlic has been known to inhibit the growth of various cancer cells. In this study, iodine-substituted disulfides were synthesized and their growth inhibitory effects on cancer cells (SUN C5 and MCF-7) were investigated. Dibenzyl disulfide was labeled with {sup 123}I/{sup 125}I for evaluation of tumor uptake. Halogen-substituted disulfides were synthesized using 2,2'-dithiobis(benzothiazole) and one equivalent each of the corresponding thiols. Growth inhibition studies were performed on cancer cells that were grown at 37 .deg. C for 48 hr prior to exposure to the disulfides. Radioiodine-labeled disulfide was prepared by halogen exchange reaction on the 4-bromodibenzyl disulfide in the presence of Na{sup 123}I/{sup 125}I and CuCl at 150 .deg. C for 60 min, followed by HPLC purification. Uptake of the radioactivity to SUN C5 cells was measured as a function of time, and inhibition studies were performed in the presence of either S-methyl methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) or diallyl disulfide. Disulfides were synthesized in the high yields (90%). Tumor growth inhibition studies by the 3 iododisulfides showed the inhibition (>95%) comparable to diallyl disulfide (100%). Cu(I)-assisted radioiodination gave 4-{sup 123}I/{sup 125}I-iododibenzyl disulfide in overall 30-40% radiochemical yield and with high specific activity. Cell uptake studies of the radiolabeled disulfide showed a time-dependent increase of the uptake (4-fold increase from 15 min to 2 hr). Both MMTS, a glutathione depleting agent, and diallyl disulfide reduced the uptake of the radioactivity in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition studies suggest that uptake of disulfide to the tumor cells could be mediated by thiol-disulfide exchange. This study demonstrates that radioiodine-labeled dibenzyl disulfide may be useful for evaluation of tumor uptake.

  2. The lifetime of hypoxic human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, Ralph E.; Sham, Edward

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: For hypoxic and anoxic cells in solid tumors to be a therapeutic problem, they must live long enough to be therapeutically relevant, or else be rapidly recruited into the proliferating compartment during therapy. We have, therefore, estimated lifetime and recruitment rate of hypoxic human tumor cells in multicell spheroids in vitro, or in xenografted tumors in SCID mice. Materials and Methods: Cell turnover was followed by flow cytometry techniques, using antibodies directed at incorporated halogenated pyrimidines. The disappearance of labeled cells was quantified, and verified to be cell loss rather than label dilution. Repopulation was studied in SiHa tumor xenografts during twice-daily 2.5-Gy radiation exposures. Results: The longevity of hypoxic human tumor cells in spheroids or xenografts exceeded that of rodent cell lines, and cell turnover was slower in xenografts than under static growth as spheroids. Human tumor cells remained viable in the hypoxic regions of xenografts for 4-10 days, compared to 3-5 days in spheroids, and 1-3 days for most rodent cells in spheroids. Repopulation was observed within the first few radiation treatments for the SiHa xenografts and, with accumulated doses of more than 10 Gy, virtually all recovered cells had progressed through at least one S-phase. Conclusion: Our results suggest an important difference in the ability of human vs. rodent tumor cells to withstand hypoxia, and raise questions concerning the increased longevity seen in vivo relative to the steady-state spheroid system

  3. Label-Free Raman Imaging to Monitor Breast Tumor Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciubuc, John

    Methods built on Raman spectroscopy have shown major potential in describing and discriminating between malignant and benign specimens. Accurate, real-time medical diagnosis benefits in substantial improvements through this vibrational optical method. Not only is acquisition of data possible in milliseconds and analysis in minutes, Raman allows concurrent detection and monitoring of all biological components. Besides validating a significant Raman signature distinction between non-tumorigenic (MCF-10A) and tumorigenic (MCF-7) breast epithelial cells, this study reveals a label-free method to assess overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) in tumor cells. EGFR overexpression sires Raman features associated with phosphorylated threonine and serine, and modifications of DNA/RNA characteristics. Investigations by gel electrophoresis reveal EGF induction of phosphorylated Akt, agreeing with the Raman results. The analysis presented is a vital step toward Raman-based evaluation of EGF receptors in breast cancer cells. With the goal of clinically applying Raman-guided methods for diagnosis of breast tumors, the current results lay the basis for proving label-free optical alternatives in making prognosis of the disease.

  4. Radioimmunodetection of tumor with Ga-67 labeled antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Takako; Endo, Keigo; Ohmomo, Yoshiro

    1986-01-01

    Antibodies against tumor associated antigen; anti-AFP polyclonal antibody, anti-thyroglobulin monoclonal antibody and anti-hCG monoclonal antibody, were labeled with Ga-67, using deferoxamine (DF) as a bifunctional chelating agent. The immunoreactivity and in vivo stability of the Ga-67 labeled antibodies were examined. The effect of DF conjugation to antibodies on the antigen-binding activity was evaluated by RIA and Scatchard analysis or tanned sheep red blood cell hemagglutination technique. When DF was conjugated to antibody at the molar ratio of 1 : 1, the antibody activity of the DF-conjugated antibodies was fully retained. Whereas, in heavily conjugated antibodies, the maximum antigen binding capacity was reduced. Biodistribution study in normal mice demonstrated the high in vivo stability of Ga-67 labeled antibodies. The labeling of DF-antibody conjugated with Ga-67 was performed easily and quickly, with a high labeling efficiency, requiring no further purification. Thus, this labeling method, providing in vivo stability of Ga-67 labeled antibody and full retention of immunoreactivity, would be useful for the radioimmunodetection of various cancers. (author)

  5. Cell Swelling Activates Phospholipase A2 in Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoroed, S.M.; Lauritzen, L.; Lambert, I.H.

    1997-01-01

    Ehrlich ascites tumor cells! loaded with H-labeled arachidonic acid and C-labeled stearic acid for two hours, were washed and transferred to either isotonic or hypotonic media containing BSA to scavenge the labeled fatty acids released from the cells. During the first two minutes of hypo......-osmotic exposure the rate of H-labeled arachidonic acid release is 3.3 times higher than that observed at normal osmolality. Cell swelling also causes an increase in the production of C-stearic acid-labeled lysophosphatidylcholine. This indicates that a phospholipase A is activated by cell swelling in the Ehrlich...... cells. Within the same time frame there is no swelling-induced increase in C-labeled stearic acid release nor in the synthesis of phosphatidyl C-butanol in the presence of C-butanol. Furthermore, U7312, an inhibitor of phospholipase C, does not affect the swelling induced release of C...

  6. Localization of mammary tumors in vivo with 131I-labeled Fab fragments of antibodies against mouse mammary epithelial (MME) antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbanks, T.; Peterson, J.A.; Miller, S.; Kaufman, L.; Ortendahl, D.; Ceriani, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    The Fab fragments of antibodies against cell-type-specific surface antigens of mouse mammary epithelial cells (MME-antigens) were used to localize mammary tumors successfully. The radioiodine-labeled anti-MME (Fab) was injected into mice carrying simulated mammary metastases, and after 24 hours the amount of label per gram of excised tissue was several times greater in the tumor than in liver, brain, lung, or muscle. Kidney showed considerable accumulation of label but this appeared to be nonspecific. Kinetic studies revealed a rapid elimination of labeled Fab in the urine with only 1% of the injected dose remaining in the entire blood pool after 24 hours. Wit a high-purity germanium camera, mammary tumors were clearly located ty the 131 I-labeled anti-MME (Fab), and normalization to /sup 99m/Tc-pertechnetate distribution in the animal increased the specificity. The density of 131 I-label was fourfold greater over the mammary tumor than over comparable areas of the mouse. No accumulation of 131 I-anti-MME (Fab) was observed in nonmammary tumors nor in mammary tumors when labeled nonspecific Fab was used. An analogous system using an antihuman mammary epithelial antiserum is being developed for localization of breast metastases in humans

  7. {sup 18}F-labeled RGD peptide: initial evaluation for imaging brain tumor angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xiaoyuan; Park, Ryan; Shahinian, Anthony H.; Tohme, Michel; Khankaldyyan, Vazgen; Bozorgzadeh, Mohammed H.; Bading, James R.; Moats, Rex; Laug, Walter E.; Conti, Peter S. E-mail: pconti@usc.edu

    2004-02-01

    Brain tumors are highly angiogenesis dependent. The cell adhesion receptor integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} is overexpressed in glioma and activated endothelial cells and plays an important role in brain tumor growth, spread and angiogenesis. Suitably labeled {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-integrin antagonists may therefore be useful for imaging brain tumor associated angiogenesis. Cyclic RGD peptide c(RGDyK) was labeled with {sup 18}F via N-succinimidyl-4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzoate through the side-chain {epsilon}-amino group of the lysine residue. The radiotracer was evaluated in vivo for its tumor targeting efficacy and pharmacokinetics in subcutaneously implanted U87MG and orthotopically implanted U251T glioblastoma nude mouse models by means of microPET, quantitative autoradiography and direct tissue sampling. The N-4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzoyl-RGD ([{sup 18}F]FB-RGD) was produced in less than 2 h with 20-25% decay-corrected yields and specific activity of 230 GBq/{mu}mol at end of synthesis. The tracer showed very rapid blood clearance and both hepatobiliary and renal excretion. Tumor-to-muscle uptake ratio at 30 min was approximately 5 in the subcutaneous U87MG tumor model. MicroPET imaging with the orthotopic U251T brain tumor model revealed very high tumor-to-brain ratio, with virtually no uptake in the normal brain. Successful blocking of tumor uptake of [{sup 18}F]FB-RGD in the presence of excess amount of c(RGDyK) revealed receptor specific activity accumulation. Hence, N-4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzoyl labeled cyclic RGD peptide [{sup 18}F]FB-RGD is a potential tracer for imaging {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-integrin positive tumors in brain and other anatomic locations.

  8. Current status of indium-111 labeled bleomycin for tumor detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.D.; Blahd, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of 111 In-labeled bleomycin for tumor detection are briefly mentioned. Indium-111 labeled bleomycin does localize in human tumors. However, its role in tumor detection and staging as compared with 67 Ga is still somewhat controversial

  9. Radionuclide and Fluorescence Imaging of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Using Dual Labeled Anti-Carbonic Anhydrase IX Antibody G250.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muselaers, Constantijn H J; Rijpkema, Mark; Bos, Desirée L; Langenhuijsen, Johan F; Oyen, Wim J G; Mulders, Peter F A; Oosterwijk, Egbert; Boerman, Otto C

    2015-08-01

    Tumor targeted optical imaging using antibodies labeled with near infrared fluorophores is a sensitive imaging modality that might be used during surgery to assure complete removal of malignant tissue. We evaluated the feasibility of dual modality imaging and image guided surgery with the dual labeled anti-carbonic anhydrase IX antibody preparation (111)In-DTPA-G250-IRDye800CW in mice with intraperitoneal clear cell renal cell carcinoma. BALB/c nu/nu mice with intraperitoneal SK-RC-52 lesions received 10 μg DTPA-G250-IRDye800CW labeled with 15 MBq (111)In or 10 μg of the dual labeled irrelevant control antibody NUH-82 (20 mice each). To evaluate when tumors could be detected, 4 mice per group were imaged weekly during 5 weeks with single photon emission computerized tomography/computerized tomography and the fluorescence imaging followed by ex vivo biodistribution studies. As early as 1 week after tumor cell inoculation single photon emission computerized tomography and fluorescence images showed clear delineation of intraperitoneal clear cell renal cell carcinoma with good concordance between single photon emission computerized tomography/computerized tomography and fluorescence images. The high and specific accumulation of the dual labeled antibody conjugate in tumors was confirmed in the biodistribution studies. Maximum tumor uptake was observed 1 week after inoculation (mean ± SD 58.5% ± 18.7% vs 5.6% ± 2.3% injected dose per gm for DTPA-G250-IRDye800CW vs NUH-82, respectively). High tumor uptake was also observed at other time points. This study demonstrates the feasibility of dual modality imaging with dual labeled antibody (111)In-DTPA-G250-IRDye800CW in a clear cell renal cell carcinoma model. Results indicate that preoperative and intraoperative detection of carbonic anhydrase IX expressing tumors, positive resection margins and metastasis might be feasible with this approach. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research

  10. Tumor localization of 131I-labeled antibodies by radionuclide imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghose, T.; Tai, J.; Aquino, J.; Guclu, A.; Norvell, S.; MacDondald, A.

    1975-01-01

    Intravenous injections of 131 I-labeled anti-EL4 lymphoma antibodies showed progressive localization of radioactivity in EL4 transplants but not in B16 melanoma in mice carrying both tumors. Normal rabbit globulin labeled with 131 I did not localize in either tumor and cleared more slowly from the internal organs. Metastatic localization of intravenous 131 I-labeled anti-tumor antibodies was also observed in two cancer patients. (U.S.)

  11. A fundamental study of immunoscintigraphy with sup 131 I-labeled anti-CA 19-9 and anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies; Imaging of tumor-bearing mice by IMACIS-1 and cell ELISA with human tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogami, Toshihiko; Miura, Hiroshi; Ohmi, Shoichi; Kazahaya, Yasuhiro [CIS DIAGNOSTIC K.K., Chiba (Japan)

    1990-05-01

    A study was made on 2 types of {sup 131}I-labeled anti-CA 19-9 and anti-CEA mouse monoclonal antibodies (IMACIS-1) against human cancer related antigen as to their usefulness in radioimmunoimaging. Tumor-bearing nude mice were used for comparison. The transplanted tumors (SW948, COLO 201) were clearly visualized 48-72 hours after administration of IMACIS-1. Tumor/blood ratio 72 hours after administration: 8.69 in COLO 201 and 5.70 in SW948, showing ca. 10-15 times as high as those in PC-3 and HEp-2. IMACIS-1 therefore is considered useful in radioimmunoimaging of cancer. Analysis was made by in vitro cell ELISA. As a result, both of the cells specifically reacted with anti-CA 19-9 but not anti-CEA. (author).

  12. The preparation of Tc-99m labeled liposomes by a cationic SP/DOPE formulation for tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, M.D.; Hsieh, D.S.; Huang, W.S.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Liposomes can provide a gene delivery system to be used in the cancer gene therapy. Radiolabeled liposomes can be used in tumor imaging and tumor therapy. A new cationic liposome formulation of sphingosin e (SP) and dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) was developed and showed very efficient transfection in a wide variety of mammalian cancer cells, including SKOV-3 (human ovarian carcinoma cells), NPC076 (human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells), and A431 (human epidermoid carcinoma cells) (Kao et al., Oncol Reports. 5:625-629, 1998). The present study is designed and evaluated the labeling and stability of Tc-99m liposomes by SP/DOPE formulation. Material and Methods: A mixture of 8 mg of SP (Sigma Chemical) and 8 mg of DOPE (Sigma Chemical) dissolved in 4 ml absolute ethanol and used as a lipid stock solution (4 mg/ml). In the direct labeling method, taking 0.25 ml (1 mg) stock solution dried under nitrogen gas and then added 1 ml 20 mM HEPES buffer for hydration 8 hours. The remaining stock solution was dried, hydrated 8 hours, and sonicated 10 min to form liposomes for after-loading labeling method (preformed liposomes). The labeling studies included Tc-99m direct labeling (1), Tc-99m HMPAO direct labeling (2), Tc-99m stannous chloride after-loading labeling (3), Tc-99m HMPAO after-loading labeling (4), and Tc-99m pCMVβ DNA inclusion labeling (5). The labeling efficiency (LE) was determined by thin layer chromatography. The labeled liposomes were incubated with fetal bovine serum (FBS) 30 min to evaluate their stability. Results: It is shown that LE (48%) of Tc-99m direct labeling was the highest in the five methods; however, the LE was reduced to 9% (corrected to original LE) after incubating with serum. Tc-99m may be loosely conjugated to the outer surface of the liposomes. The LE (32%) of Tc-99m HMPAO direct labeling was the second; however, LE was most stable when incubating with serum. The LE of the after-loading labeling was not better than that of

  13. A Label Free Disposable Device for Rapid Isolation of Rare Tumor Cells from Blood by Ultrasounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itziar González

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of blood samples as liquid biopsy is a label-free method for cancer diagnosis that offers benefits over traditional invasive biopsy techniques. Cell sorting by acoustic waves offers a means to separate rare cells from blood samples based on their physical properties in a label-free, contactless and biocompatible manner. Herein, we describe a flow-through separation approach that provides an efficient separation of tumor cells (TCs from white blood cells (WBCs in a microfluidic device, “THINUS-Chip” (Thin-Ultrasonic-Separator-Chip, actuated by ultrasounds. We introduce for the first time the concept of plate acoustic waves (PAW applied to acoustophoresis as a new strategy. It lies in the geometrical chip design: different to other microseparators based on either bulk acoustic waves (BAW or surface waves (SAW, SSAW and tSAW, it allows the use of polymeric materials without restrictions in the frequency of work. We demonstrate its ability to perform high-throughput isolation of TCs from WBCs, allowing a recovery rate of 84% ± 8% of TCs with a purity higher than 80% and combined viability of 85% at a flow rate of 80 μL/min (4.8 mL/h. The THINUS-Chip performs cell fractionation with low-cost manufacturing processes, opening the door to possible easy printing fabrication.

  14. Cell kinetics of irradiated experimental tumors: cell transition from the non-proliferating to the proliferating pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potmesil, M.; Goldfeder, A.

    1980-01-01

    In murine mammary carcinomas, parenchymal tumor cells with dense nucleoli traverse the cell cycle and divide, thus constituting the proliferating pool. Cells with trabeculate or ring-shaped nucleoli either proceed slowly through G 1 phase or are arrested in it. The role of these non-proliferating, G 1 phase-confined cells in tumor regeneration was studied in vivo after a subcurative dose of X-irradiation in two transplantable tumor lines. Tumor-bearing mice were continuously injected with methyl[ 3 H]thymidine before and after irradiation. Finally, the labeling was discontinued, mice injected with vincristine sulfate and cells arrested in metaphase were accumulated over 10-hrs. Two clearly delineated groups of vincristine-arrested mitoses emerged in autoradiograms prepared from tumor tissue at the time of starting tumor regrowth: one group with the silver-grain counts corresponding to the background level, the other with heavily labeled mitoses. As the only source of unlabeled mitoses was unlabeled G 1 phase-confined cells persisting in the tumor, this indicated cell transition from the non-proliferating to the proliferating pool, which took place in the initial phase of the tumor regrowth. Unlabeled progenitors have apparently remained in G 1 phase for at least 5-12 days after irradiation. (author)

  15. Cytotoxic effects of 125I-labeled PBZr ligand PK 11195 in prostatic tumor cells: therapeutic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alenfall, J.; Kant, R.; Batra, S.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of [ 125 I]PK 11195 was examined in human prostatic tumor cells (DU 145) in culture and compared with Na[ 125 I] and non-radioactive PK 11195. [ 125 I]PK 11195 was clearly cytocidal. The data for dose-related cell survival with [ 125 I]PK 11195 showed a linear relationship. Na[ 125 I] or non-labeled PK 11195 at similar concentrations did not lead to any cell killing. The uptake of [ 125 I]PK 11195 and [ 3 H]PK 11195 in cells was very similar. Fragmentation of DNA measured by agarose gel electrophoresis showed that exposure of DU 145 cells to [ 125 I]PK 11195 for 1, 4 or 24 h caused no fragmentation. These results indicate that nuclear DNA is not the prime binding site for [ 125 I]PK 11195, which is consistent with the presence of specific peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBZr) in the mitochondria. The cell killing effect of [ 125 I]PK 11195 suggests the use of PBZr ligand for radiotherapy

  16. Hypoxia marker labeling in tumor biopsies: quantification of labeling variation and criteria for biopsy sectioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrall, Donald E.; Rosner, Gary L.; Azuma, Chieko; McEntee, Margaret C.; Raleigh, James A.

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: The error associated with using biopsy-based methods for assessing parameters reflective of the tumor microenvironment depends on the variability in distribution of the parameter throughout the tumor and the biopsy sample. Some attention has been given to intratumoral distribution of parameters, but little attention has been given to their intrabiopsy distribution. We evaluated the intrabiopsy distribution of CCI-103F, a 2-nitroimidazole hypoxia marker. Materials and methods: The hypoxia marker CCI-103F was studied in dogs bearing spontaneous solid tumors. Two biopsies were taken from each of seven tumors, for a total of 14 biopsies. Biopsies were serially sectioned and four to six contiguous slides from each 100-150 μm of the biopsy were used to formulate the best estimate of CCI-103F labeled area throughout the biopsy sample. One, two or four slides were then randomly selected from each biopsy and the labeled area, based on this limited sample, was compared to the estimate obtained from counting all available slides. Random sampling of slides was repeated 1000 times for each biopsy sample. Results: CCI-103F labeling variance throughout the biopsy decreased as the estimated overall labeled area in the biopsy decreased. The error associated with estimating the overall labeled area in a biopsy from a randomly selected subset of slides decreased as the number of slides increased, and as the overall labeled area in the biopsy decreased. No minimally labeled biopsy was classified as unlabeled based on limited sampling. Conclusion: With regard to CCI-103F labeling, quantification of the labeled area in four randomly selected slides from a biopsy can provide, in most biopsies, an estimate of the labeled area in the biopsy within an absolute range of ±0.05

  17. Human breast tumor imaging using 111In labeled monoclonal antibody: Anthymic mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban An Khaw; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston; Bailes, J.S.; Schneider, S.L.; Lancaster, J.; Lasher, J.C.; McGuire, W.L.; Powers, J.; Strauss, H.W.

    1988-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody (MoAb) 323/A3, an IgG1, was raised against the human breast tumor cell line MCF-7 and recognized a 43 Kd membrane associated glycoprotein. Histochemical studies with the antibody detected 75% of metastatic lymph nodes, 59% of primary breast tumors, and showed some staining in 20% of benign breast lesions. For radionuclide imaging, the MoAb 323/A3 was labeled with both 125 I and 111 In, via covalently coupled diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) by the mixed anhydride method. The antibody activity of the DTPA modified 323/A3 was assessed by an immunoassay using viable and fixed MCF-7 target cells. Male athymic nude mice bearing BT-20 human mammary tumors were injected with dual 125 I/ 111 In labeled DTPA 323/A3 via the tail veins. The animals were imaged with a gamma camera equipped with a pinhole collimator at 1-3 h, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 days after the tracer administration. On day 5 or 6, the animals were killed, and the biodistribution of the radiotracers was determined for the blood, thyroid, heart, lungs, liver, spleen, kidneys, gastro-intestinal tract and tumor. Target to blood ratio at 6 days for the 111 In tracer was 24:1 in the group with a mean tumor weight of 0.492 g, and 13:1 in another group with a mean tumor weight of 0.1906 g (day 5). However, the 125 I activity showed only 3.6:1 and 5.4:1 target to blood ratios in the corresponding groups. The larger tumors localized less 111 I tracer (27.13%±7.57% injected dose/g, Mean±SD) than the smaller tumors (52.75%±22.25% ID/g). Analysis of the gamma images showed that the maximum tracer concentration occurred in the tumors at about 2 to 3 days after intravenous tracer administration. The excellent tumor resolution observed with BT-20 tumors may be due to increased 43 Kd glycoprotein antigen density in this tumor cell line. (orig.)

  18. Uptake of labelled tallysomycin by solid Ehrlich ascites tumors in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liniecki, J.; Rembelska, M.; Koniarek, B.

    1983-01-01

    Tumor and normal tissue uptake of 51 Cr- or 57 Co-labelled bleomycin (BLEO) and tallysomycin (TLM) was compared in female solid Ehrlich ascites tumor mice of Swiss strain. The complexes were administered intraperitoneally: 30-50 μg of each complex with an activity of 40-120 μCi. Activity distribution factors (ADF) and tumor/non-tumor ratios for blood, bone, skeletal muscles, kidneys and liver were determined. The ratios were generally higher for complexes labelled with 57 Co than for the 51 Cr-labelled ones; bleomycin appears equivalent or superior to tallysomycin. (orig.) [de

  19. Noninvasive Assessment of Tumor Cell Proliferation in Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Edinger

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Revealing the mechanisms of neoplastic disease and enhancing our ability to intervene in these processes requires an increased understanding of cellular and molecular changes as they occur in intact living animal models. We have begun to address these needs by developing a method of labeling tumor cells through constitutive expression of an optical reporter gene, noninvasively monitoring cellular proliferation in vivo using a sensitive photon detection system. A stable line of HeLa cells that expressed a modified firefly luciferase gene was generated, proliferation of these cells in irradiated severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice was monitored. Tumor cells were introduced into animals via subcutaneous, intraperitoneal and intravenous inoculation and whole body images, that revealed tumor location and growth kinetics, were obtained. The number of photons that were emitted from the labeled tumor cells and transmitted through murine tissues was sufficient to detect 1×103 cells in the peritoneal cavity, 1×104 cells at subcutaneous sites and 1×106 circulating cells immediately following injection. The kinetics of cell proliferation, as measured by photon emission, was exponential in the peritoneal cavity and at subcutaneous sites. Intravenous inoculation resulted in detectable colonies of tumor cells in animals receiving more than 1×103 cells. Our demonstrated ability to detect small numbers of tumor cells in living animals noninvasively suggests that therapies designed to treat minimal disease states, as occur early in the disease course and after elimination of the tumor mass, may be monitored using this approach. Moreover, it may be possible to monitor micrometastases and evaluate the molecular steps in the metastatic process. Spatiotemporal analyses of neoplasia will improve the predictability of animal models of human disease as study groups can be followed over time, this method will accelerate development of novel therapeutic

  20. Diffuse fluorescence tomography of exo- and endogenously labeled tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balalaeva, Irina V.; Turchin, Ilya V.; Orlova, Anna G.; Plekhanov, Vladimir I.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Kleshnin, Michail S.; Fiks, Ilya I.; Zagainova, Elena V.; Kamensky, Vladislav A.

    2007-06-01

    Strong light scattering and absorption limit observation of the internal structure of biological tissue. Only special tools for turbid media imaging, such as optical diffuse tomography, enable noninvasive investigation of the internal biological tissues, including visualization and intravital monitoring of deep tumors. In this work the preliminary results of diffuse fluorescence tomography (DFT) of small animals are presented. Usage of exogenous fluorophores, targeted specifically at tumor cells, and fluorescent proteins expressed endogenously can significantly increase the contrast of obtained images. Fluorescent compounds of different nature, such as sulphonated aluminium phthalocyanine (Photosens), red fluorescing proteins and CdTe/CdSe-core/shell nanocrystals (quantum dots) were applied. We tested diffuse fluorescence tomography method at model media, in post mortem and in vivo experiments. The animal was scanned in transilluminative configuration by low-frequency modulated light (1 kHz) from Nd:YAG laser with second harmonic generation at wavelength of 532 nm or semiconductor laser at wavelength of 655 nm. Quantum dots or protein DsRed2 in glass capsules (inner diameter 2-3 mm) were placed post mortem inside the esophagus of 7-day-old hairless rats to simulate marked tumors. Photosens was injected intravenously to linear mice with metastazing Lewis lung carcinoma. The reconstruction algorithm, based on Algebraic Reconstruction Technique, was created and tested numerically in model experiments. High contrast images of tumor simulating capsules with DsRed2 concentrations about 10 -6 M and quantum dots about 5x10 -11 M have been obtained. Organ distribution of Photosens and its accumulation in tumors and surrounding tissues of animals has been examined. We have conducted the monitoring of tumors, exogenously labeled by photosensitizer. This work demonstrates potential capabilities of DFT method for intravital detection and monitoring of deep fluorescent-labeled

  1. Technetium-99m labeled antisense oligonucleotide-noninvasive tumor imaging in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, G.M.; Zhang, Y.X.; An, R.; Gao, Z.R.; Cao, W.; Cao, G.X.; Hnatowich, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    Single-stranded RNA and DNA oligonucleotides may be useful as radiopharmaceuticals for antisense and other in vivo applications if convenient methods for stably attaching radionuclides such as 99m Tc can be developed. The c-myc oncogene works in cooperation with other oncogenes in a variety of malignant tumors. The concentration of c-myc messenger RNA increases rapidly 30 to 50 fold during DNA synthesis, thus making it a suitable target for following the progression of malignancy by noninvasive imaging with radiolabeled antisense oligonucleotide probes. Methods: 1 Oligonucleotide Conjugation: A solution of single stranded amine-derivatized DNA (100-1000μg) was prepared at a concentration of 2 mg/ml in 0.25M sodium bicarbonate, 1 M sodium chloride, 1mM EDTA, pH8.5. 2 Oligonucleotide Labeling: A fresh 50mg/ml solution of sodium tartrate was prepared in sterile 0.5 M ammonium The ability of the labeled DNA to hybridize to its complement was analyzed by Sep-Pak column chromatography before and after the addition of the complementary DNA. 3 Biodistribution and Tumor Imaging Studies: A colony of KM mice (15-20g) were inoculated with 1x10 6 Ehrlich carcinoma tumor cells in the right thigh, and the tumors were allowed to grow for 6-7 days to a size of 1.0-1.5 cm in diameter. Biodistribution studies were performed in 32 KM mice after 50 μCi per mouse of 99m Tc-labeled oncogene probes were injected intravenously. A total of 8 mice were injected intravenously in the tail vein with 1-2 mCi of 99m Tc-labeled sense or antisense probes, immobilized with ketamine hydrochloride and imaged periodically from 0.5hr to 24hr with a gamma camera. Results: Essentially complete conjugation was achieved by reverse-phase Sep-Pak C18 chromatography analysis. The labeled antisense DNA still remained the ability to hybridize with its complementary DNA. The highest accumulation of label was in the liver first, with the kidney and small bowel next. The injected activity localized in the lesion

  2. Magnetic resonance and photoacoustic imaging of brain tumor mediated by mesenchymal stem cell labeled with multifunctional nanoparticle introduced via carotid artery injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yang; Gumin, Joy; MacLellan, Christopher J.; Gao, Feng; Bouchard, Richard; Lang, Frederick F.; Stafford, R. Jason; Melancon, Marites P.

    2018-04-01

    Objective. To evaluate the feasibility of visualizing bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) labeled with a gold-coated magnetic resonance (MR)-active multifunctional nanoparticle and injected via the carotid artery for assessing the extent of MSC homing in glioma-bearing mice. Materials and methods. Nanoparticles containing superparamagnetic iron oxide coated with gold (SPIO@Au) with a diameter of ˜82 nm and maximum absorbance in the near infrared region were synthesized. Bone marrow-derived MSCs conjugated with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were successfully labeled with SPIO@Au at 4 μg ml-1 and injected via the internal carotid artery in six mice bearing orthotopic U87 tumors. Unlabeled MSCs were used as a control. The ability of SPIO@Au-loaded MSCs to be imaged using MR and photoacoustic (PA) imaging at t = 0 h, 2 h, 24 h, and 72 h was assessed using a 7 T Bruker Biospec experimental MR scanner and a Vevo LAZR PA imaging system with a 5 ns laser as the excitation source. Histological analysis of the brain tissue was performed 72 h after MSC injection using GFP fluorescence, Prussian blue staining, and hematoxylin-and-eosin staining. Results. MSCs labeled with SPIO@Au at 4 μg ml-1 did not exhibit cell death or any adverse effects on differentiation or migration. The PA signal in tumors injected with SPIO@Au-loaded MSCs was clearly more enhanced post-injection, as compared with the tumors injected with unlabeled MSCs at t = 72 h. Using the same mice, T2-weighted MR imaging results taken before injection and at t = 2 h, 24 h, and 72 h were consistent with the PA imaging results, showing significant hypointensity of the tumor in the presence of SPIO@Au-loaded MSCs. Histological analysis also showed co-localization of GFP fluorescence and iron, thereby confirming that SPIO@Au-labeled MSCs continue to carry their nanoparticle payloads even at 72 h after injection. Conclusions. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of tracking carotid artery

  3. Development of a Microfluidic-Based Optical Sensing Device for Label-Free Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs Through Their Lactic Acid Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Keng Chiu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study reports a microfluidic-based optical sensing device for label-free detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs, a rare cell species in blood circulation. Based on the metabolic features of cancer cells, live CTCs can be quantified indirectly through their lactic acid production. Compared with the conventional schemes for CTC detection, this label-free approach could prevent the biological bias due to the heterogeneity of the surface antigens on cancer cells. In this study, a microfluidic device was proposed to generate uniform water-in-oil cell-encapsulating micro-droplets, followed by the fluorescence-based optical detection of lactic acid produced within the micro-droplets. To test its feasibility to quantify cancer cells, experiments were carried out. Results showed that the detection signals were proportional to the number of cancer cells within the micro-droplets, whereas such signals were insensitive to the existence and number of leukocytes within. To further demonstrate its feasibility for cancer cell detection, the cancer cells with known cell number in a cell suspension was detected based on the method. Results revealed that there was no significant difference between the detected number and the real number of cancer cells. As a whole, the proposed method opens up a new route to detect live CTCs in a label-free manner.

  4. Microfluidic flow fractionation device for label-free isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Kyung-A; Kwon, Kiho; Han, Hyunju; Kim, Seung-Il; Jung, Hyo-Il

    2013-02-15

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are dissociated from primary tumor and circulate in peripheral blood. They are regarded as the genesis of metastasis. Isolation and enumeration of CTCs serve as valuable tools for cancer prognosis and diagnosis. However, the rarity and heterogeneity of CTCs in blood makes it difficult to separate intact CTCs without loss. In this paper, we introduce a parallel multi-orifice flow fractionation (p-MOFF) device in which a series of contraction/expansion microchannels are placed parallel on a chip forming four identical channels. CTCs were continuously isolated from the whole blood of breast cancer patients by hydrodynamic forces and cell size differences. Blood samples from 24 breast cancer patients were analyzed (half were from metastatic breast cancer patients and the rest were from adjuvant breast cancer patients). The number of isolated CTCs varied from 0 to 21 in 7.5 ml of blood. Because our devices do not require any labeling processes (e.g., EpCAM antibody), heterogeneous CTCs can be isolated regardless of EpCAM expression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Anti-tumor effect of 131I labeled 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin on human non-small cell lung cancer in xenograft-bearing nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jin; Liu Lu; Zhu Xiaoli; Chen Daozhen; Gao Wen; Jiang Xinyu; Huang Ying

    2008-01-01

    Objective: 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) has been developed as a novel heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitor being used in clinical trials. HSP90 is known as a molecular target for tumor therapy. The goal of this study was to investigate the inhibitive effects of 131 I labeled 17-AAG on human non-small cell lung cancer in xenograft-bearing nude mice. Methods: 17-AAG was labeled with 131 I. Twenty-eight BALB/c nude mice bearing H460 human non-small cell lung carcinoma tumor xenograft were randomly divided into seven groups, one control group and six treatment groups according to the route of administration (via tail vein injection or intratumoral injection) and the doses of injected radio-activity (5.5 MBq x 2 with 8 d interval, 11.0 MBq and 5.5 MBq). Two additional mice were treated with intratumoral injection of Na 131 I solution that was served as seintigraphic imaging controls. In each group two mice underwent scintigraphy at 2 h, 6 h, 24 h, 2 d, 3 d, 7 d, 10 d and 16 d. After 16 d the tumor inhibition rate was calculated. Then all of the mice were sacrificed and the tumor tissues were obtained for histological examination and immunohistochemical assay. Results: Persistent accumulation of 131 I-17-AAG in the tumors was seen on seintigraphic images. Tumor inhibiting effect was demonstrated in all treatment groups with varying degrees. The highest tumor inhibition rate (86.77 ± 4.57)% was shown in the group with interval intratumoral injection (5.5 MBq x 2). There was no significant difference of tumor inhibition rates between 5.5 MBq x 2 group (via tail vein injection) and 11.0 MBq group( via tail vein injection, q=1.67, P>0.05). While among the other treatment groups, there was significant difference in tumor inhibition rates( q=3.16-24.34, all P 131 I-17-AAG may effectively inhibit the tumor growth and expression of HSP90α antigen expression in non-small cell lung cancer bearing nude mice. The more prominent anti-tumor effect may be

  6. Experimental study of radiopharmaceuticals based on technetium-99m labeled derivative of glucose for tumor diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeltchan, R.; Medvedeva, A.; Sinilkin, I.; Bragina, O.; Chernov, V.; Stasyuk, E.; Rogov, A.; Il'ina, E.; Larionova, L.; Skuridin, V.; Dergilev, A.

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: to study the potential utility of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc for cancer imaging in laboratory animals. Materials and method: the study was carried out in cell cultures of normal CHO (Chinese hamster ovary cells CHO) and malignant tissues MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7). To evaluate the uptake of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in normal and tumor tissue cells, 25 MBq of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc was added to the vials with 3 million cells and incubated for 30 minutes at room temperature. After centrifugation of the vials with cells, the supernatant was removed. Radioactivity in vials with normal and tumor cells was then measured. In addition, the study included 40 mice of C57B 1/6j lines with tumor lesion of the right femur. For neoplastic lesions, Lewis lung carcinoma model was used. Following anesthesia, mice were injected intravenously with 25MBq of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose. Planar scintigraphy was performed 15 minutes later in a matrix of 512x512 pixels for 5 minutes. Results: when measuring the radioactivity of normal and malignant cells after incubation with 99mTc-1-thio-D- glucose, it was found that the radioactivity of malignant cells was higher than that of normal cells. The mean values of radioactivity levels in normal and malignant cells were 0.3±0.15MBq and 1.07±0.6MBq, respectively. All examined animals had increased accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio- D-glucose at the tumor site. The accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the tumor was on average twice as high as compared to the symmetric region. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose is a prospective radiopharmaceutical for cancer visualization. In addition, high accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the culture of cancer cells and in tumor tissue of animals demonstrates tumor tropism of the radiopharmaceutical.

  7. Biomimetic brain tumor niche regulates glioblastoma cells towards a cancer stem cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yung-Chiang; Lee, I-Chi; Chen, Pin-Yuan

    2018-05-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most malignant primary brain tumor and contains tumorigenic cancer stem cells (CSCs), which support the progression of tumor growth. The selection of CSCs and facilitation of the brain tumor niches may assist the development of novel therapeutics for GBM. Herein, hydrogel materials composed of agarose and hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HMC) in different concentrations were established and compared to emulate brain tumor niches and CSC microenvironments within a label-free system. Human GBM cell line, U-87 MG, was cultured on a series of HMC-agarose based culture system. Cell aggregation and spheroids formation were investigated after 4 days of culture, and 2.5% HMC-agarose based culture system demonstrated the largest spheroids number and size. Moreover, CD133 marker expression of GBM cells after 6 days of culture in 2.5% HMC-agarose based culture system was 60%, relatively higher than the control group at only 15%. Additionally, cells on 2.5% HMC-agarose based culture system show the highest chemoresistance, even at the high dose of 500 µM temozolomide for 72 h, the live cell ratio was still > 80%. Furthermore, the results also indicate that the expression of ABCG2 gene was up-regulated after culture in 2.5% HMC-agarose based culture system. Therefore, our results demonstrated that biomimetic brain tumor microenvironment may regulate GBM cells towards the CSC phenotype and expression of CSC characteristics. The microenvironment selection and spheroids formation in HMC-agarose based culture system may provide a label-free CSC selection strategy and drug testing model for future biomedical applications.

  8. Improved tumor localization with (strept)avidin and labeled biotin as a substitute for antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hnatowich, D.J.; Fritz, B.; Virzi, F.; Mardirossian, G.; Rusckowski, M.

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated tumor localization with labeled biotin administered subsequent to unlabeled and unconjugated streptavidin. Nude mice bearing anti-CEA tumors (LS174T) received 10 μg of 111 In-labeled anti-CEA antibody (C110) or 111 In-labeled streptavidin with sacrifice 5 h later. In an examination of pretargeting, other animals received 50 μg of unlabeled streptavidin followed 3 h later with 1 μg of 111 In-labeled biotin (EB 1 ) and sacrifice 2 h later. The biodistribution of labeled streptavidin was similar to that of labeled specific antibody except for lower blood and higher kidney levels. Tumor levels were also lower with labeled streptavidin but, because of still lower levels in liver and blood, the tumor/normal tissue ratios were improved. When unlabeled streptavidin was administered and followed by labeled biotin (pretargeting), tumor levels were further reduced modestly; however, normal tissue levels were greatly reduced such that the tumor/blood and tumor/liver ratios were 10.6 and 2.2 vs 1.5 and 0.5 for the specific antibody. Improvements were seen in all tissues sampled with the exception of kidney and muscle. A further control of labeled biotin alone showed minimal accumulation in all tissues with the exception of kidneys. In conclusion, the accumulation of (strept)avidin by passive diffusion in tumor may be comparable, at early times, to the accumulation of specific antibody. By combining the administration of unlabeled (strept)avidin with labeled biotin, tumor targeting may potentially be improved. (author)

  9. Effects of HSP27 chaperone on THP-1 tumor cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaigorodova, E V; Ryazantseva, N V; Novitskii, V V; Maroshkina, A N; Belkina, M V

    2012-11-01

    The role of Hsp27 (heat shock protein 27) chaperone in regulation of THP-1 tumor cell apoptosis was studied. Realization of tumor cell apoptosis under conditions of in vitro culturing with Hsp27 specific inhibitor (KRIBB3) was evaluated by fluorescent microscopy with FITC-labeled annexin V and propidium iodide. Measurements of Bcl-2 family proteins (Bcl-2, Bax, Bad) in tumor cells incubated with Hsp27 inhibitor were carried out by Western blotting. Chaperone Hsp27 acted as apoptosis inhibitor in THP-1 tumor cells modulating the proportion of antiapoptotic (Bcl-2) and proapoptotic (Bax and Bad) proteins.

  10. Improved tumor localization with (strept)avidin and labeled biotin as a substitute for antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hnatowich, D.J.; Fritz, B.; Virzi, F.; Mardirossian, G.; Rusckowski, M.

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated tumor localization with labeled biotin administered subsequent to unlabeled and unconjugated streptavidin. Nude mice bearing anti-CEA tumors (LS174T) received 10 μg of 111 In-labeled anti-CEA antibody (C110) or 111 In-labeled streptavidin with sacrifice 5 h later. In an examination of pretargeting, other animals received 50 μg of unlabeled streptavidin followed 3 h later with 1 μg of 111 In-labeled biotin (EB 1 ) and sacrifice 2 h later. The biodistribution of labeled streptavidin was similar to that of labeled specific antibody except for lower blood and higher kidney levels. Tumor levels were also lower with labeled streptavidin but, because of still lower levels in liver and blood, the tumor/normal tissue ratios were improved. When unlabeled streptavidin was administered and followed by labeled biotin (pretargeting), tumor levels were further reduced modestly; however, normal tissue levels were greatly reduced such that the tumor/blood and tumor/liver ratios were 10.6 and 2.2 vs 1.5 and 0.5 for the specific antibody. Improvements were seen in all tissues sampled with the exception of kidney and muscle. A further control of labeled biotin alone (without the preinjection of streptavidin) showed minimal accumulations in all tissues with the exception of kidneys. In conclusion, the accumulation of (strept)avidin by passive diffusion in tumor may be comparable, at early times, to the accumulation of specific antibody. (author)

  11. Tumor microenvironment derived exosomes pleiotropically modulate cancer cell metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyun; Yang, Lifeng; Baddour, Joelle; Achreja, Abhinav; Bernard, Vincent; Moss, Tyler; Marini, Juan C; Tudawe, Thavisha; Seviour, Elena G; San Lucas, F Anthony; Alvarez, Hector; Gupta, Sonal; Maiti, Sourindra N; Cooper, Laurence; Peehl, Donna; Ram, Prahlad T; Maitra, Anirban; Nagrath, Deepak

    2016-02-27

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are a major cellular component of tumor microenvironment in most solid cancers. Altered cellular metabolism is a hallmark of cancer, and much of the published literature has focused on neoplastic cell-autonomous processes for these adaptations. We demonstrate that exosomes secreted by patient-derived CAFs can strikingly reprogram the metabolic machinery following their uptake by cancer cells. We find that CAF-derived exosomes (CDEs) inhibit mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, thereby increasing glycolysis and glutamine-dependent reductive carboxylation in cancer cells. Through 13C-labeled isotope labeling experiments we elucidate that exosomes supply amino acids to nutrient-deprived cancer cells in a mechanism similar to macropinocytosis, albeit without the previously described dependence on oncogenic-Kras signaling. Using intra-exosomal metabolomics, we provide compelling evidence that CDEs contain intact metabolites, including amino acids, lipids, and TCA-cycle intermediates that are avidly utilized by cancer cells for central carbon metabolism and promoting tumor growth under nutrient deprivation or nutrient stressed conditions.

  12. Radiobiologic significance of apoptosis and micronucleation in quiescent cells within solid tumors following γ-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Ono, Koji; Suzuki, Minoru; Kinashi, Yuko; Takagaki, Masao

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the frequency of apoptosis in quiescent (Q) cells within solid tumors following γ-ray irradiation, using four different tumor cell lines. In addition, to assess the significance of detecting apoptosis in these cell lines. Methods and Materials: C3H/He mice bearing SCC VII or FM3A tumors, Balb/c mice bearing EMT6/KU tumors, and C57BL mice bearing EL4 tumors received 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) continuously for 5 days via implanted mini-osmotic pumps to label all proliferating (P) cells. The mice then received γ-ray irradiation at a dose of 4-25 Gy while alive or after tumor clamping. Immediately after irradiation, the tumors were excised, minced, and trypsinized. The tumor cell suspensions thus obtained were incubated with cytochalasin-B (a cytokinesis blocker), and the micronucleus (MN) frequency in cells without BrdU labeling (=Q cells) was determined using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. Meanwhile, 6 hours after irradiation, tumor cell suspensions obtained in the same manner were fixed. The apoptosis frequency in Q cells was also determined with immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The MN and apoptosis frequency in total (P+Q) tumor cells were determined from the tumors that were not pretreated with BrdU. Results: In total cells, SCC VII, FM3A, and EMT6/KU cells showed reasonable relationships between MN frequency and surviving fraction (SF). However, fewer micronuclei were induced in EL4 cells than the other cell lines. In contrast, a comparatively close relationship between apoptosis frequency and SF was found in total cells of EL4 cell line. Less apoptosis was observed in the other cell lines. Quiescent tumor cells exhibited significantly lower values of MN and apoptosis frequency probably due to their large hypoxic fraction, similar to total tumor cells on clamped irradiation. Conclusion: γ-ray irradiation induced MN formation in SCC VII, FM3A, and EMT6/KU tumor cells, and the apoptosis was marked in EL4 cells compared with

  13. In-111-oxine-labeled negative liposomes in tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatal, J.F.; Guihard, D.; Bardy, A.; Pasqualini, R.

    1983-01-01

    The distribution of In-111-oxine-labelled liposomes in C 57 Bl 6 mice bearing a Lewis lung tumor and the variations contingent on modification of certain parameters have been studied. The distribution has been compared with that of Ga-67 citrate which is known for its affinity for lung tumors. In conclusion, it may be said that In-111-labeled negatively charged liposomes handled in oxygen-free conditions and having a size smaller than 80 nm make it possible to visualize a murine tumor as well, and even better, than does Ga-67 citrate

  14. Natural killer cells and interleukin-1: a possible role in natural killer-tumor cell interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traub, L M

    1986-01-01

    Effector cells with broad cytolytic reactivity against various tumor cell lines have been detected in the peripheral blood of normal individuals. This phenomenon, known as natural killing, appeared to be significantly depressed in a small group of patients with extensive primary hepatocellular carcinoma. These data, together with that of others showing depressed interleukin-1 (IL-1) production in these patients, were taken to indicate that IL-1 played a functional role in natural killer (NK) cell biology. The hypothesis was confirmed by the demonstration that preincubation of tumor target cells with IL-1 enhanced their susceptibility to NK cell killing. In this study tumor target cells were labelled with /sup 51/Cr.

  15. Noninvasive imaging of malignant tumors using laminin peptide fragments YIGSR labeled with Technetium-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, G.M.; Zhang, Y.X.; Hu, J.; An, R.; Gao, Z.R.; Cao, G.X.; Hnatowich, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    The radiopharmaceuticals that localize specifically at certain sites (such as peptides directed against receptors expressed on tumor cells or antibodies with high binding affinities for bacterial determinants) may be expected to display greater specificity of localization. Peptides, which diffuse rapidly into target lesions and clear rapidly elsewhere, may be expected to enjoy a pharmacokinetic advantage over those, such as antibodies, which accumulate and clear more slowly. The laminin peptide fragments YIGSR is known to bind to a 67-kDa laminin receptor. This receptor is understood to be expressed at higher than normal levels in malignant tumor cells, particularly those of breast and colon carcinomas. Methods 1 peptide conjugation and labeling A 2.5 mg/mL solution of YIGSR in 0.1 M N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) buffer, pH8.0, and a fresh 10mg/mL solution of NHS-S-acetyl-MAG 3 in dimethylformamide dried over molecular sieve were prepared. 2 biodistribution and imaging studies A colony of KM mice (15-20g) were inoculated with 1x10 6 Ehrlich (breast) carcinoma tumor cells in the right thigh, and the tumors were allowed to grow for 6-7 days to a size of 1.0-1.5 cm in diameter. Biodistribution studies were performed in 40 KM mice after 50 μCi per mouse of 99m Tc-labeled YIGSR were injected intravenously. A total of 10 mice were injected intravenously in the tail vein with 1-2 mCi of 99m Tc-labeled YIGSR, immobilized with ketamine hydrochloride and imaged periodically from 0.5 hr to 24 hr with a gamma camera. The identical imaging procedure was also performed in mice with sterile infection/inflammation lesions to evaluate the specificity. Results Essentially complete conjugation was achieved by reverse-phase Sep-Pak C18 chromatography analysis. The highest accumulation of label was in the kidney first, with the liver and small bowel next. The injected activity localized in the lesion as early as 15 min and reached a saturation value at 3

  16. Development and evaluation of copper-67 and samarium-153 labeled conjugates for tumor radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mausner, L.F.; Mease, R.C.; Meinken, G.E.; Joshi, V.; Kolsky, K.; Sweet, M.; Steplewski, Z.

    1995-01-01

    The potential of utilizing receptor-specific agents such as monoclonal antibodies (MAb), and MAb-derived smaller molecules, as carriers of radionuclides for the selective destruction of tumors has stimulated much research activity. The success of such applications depends on many factors, especially the tumor binding properties of the antibody reagent, the efficiency of labeling and in-vivo stability of the radioconjugate and, on the careful choice of the radionuclide best suited to treat the tumor under consideration. The radiolabeled antibody technique for radioimmunotherapy (RIT), however, has experienced many limitations, and its success has not matched the expectations that were raised more than a decade ago. The problems that have been identified include: (i) degradation of antibody immunoreactivity resulting from chemical manipulations required for labeling; (ii) lack of suitable radioisotopes and methods for stable attachment of the radiolabel; (iii) in-vivo instability of the radioimmunoconjugates; (iv) excessive accumulation of activity in non-target locations; and (v) lack of radioimmunoconjugate accessibility to cells internal to a tumor mass. A careful choice of the radionuclide(s) best suited to treat the tumor under consideration is one of the most important requirements for successful radioimmunotherapy. This study evaluates copper 67 and samarium 153 for tumor radioimmunotherapy

  17. Investigations of (99m)Tc-labeled glucarate as a SPECT radiotracer for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and potential tumor uptake mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lanfang; Xiu, Yan; Li, Yanli; Xu, Xiaobo; Li, Shanqun; Li, Xiao; Pak, Koon Y; Shi, Hongcheng; Cheng, Dengfeng

    2015-07-01

    This study attempted to evaluate the feasibility of (99m)Tc-labeled glucarate ((99m)Tc-GLA) imaging in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the potential tumor uptake mechanism. Cell lysates from two NSCLC cell lines, H292 and H1975, were immunoblotted with anti-glucose transporter 5 (GLUT5) antibody for Western blotting. Thereafter, the two cell lines were used to examine cellular uptake of (99m)Tc-GLA with or without fructose. SPECT/CT imaging studies were performed on small animals bearing H292 and H1975 tumors. Biodistribution studies were also conducted to achieve accurate tissue uptake of this tracer in two tumor models. Hematoxylin & eosin (H&E) staining and GLUT5, Ki67 and cytokeratin-7 (CK-7) immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis were further investigated on tumor tissues. In Western blotting, H292 cells showed higher levels of GLUT5 compared to the H1975 cells. Meanwhile, the in vitro cell assays indicated GLUT5-dependent uptake of (99m)Tc-GLA in H292 and H1975 cells. The fructose competition assays showed a significant decrease in (99m)Tc-GLA uptake by H292 and H1975 cells when fructose was added. The (99m)Tc-GLA accumulation was as much as two-fold higher in H292 implanted tumors than in H1975 implanted tumors. (99m)Tc-GLA exhibited rapid clearance pharmacokinetics and reasonable uptake in human NSCLC H292 (1.69±0.37 ID%/g) and H1975 (0.89±0.06 ID%/g) implanted tumors at 30min post injection. Finally, the expression of GLUT5, Ki67 and CK-7 on tumor tissues also exhibited positive correlation with the in vitro cell test results and in vivo SPECT/CT imaging results in xenograft tumors. Both in vitro and ex vivo studies demonstrated that the uptake of (99m)Tc-GLA in NSCLC is highly related to GLUT5 expression. Imaging and further IHC results support that (99m)Tc-GLA could be a promising SPECT imaging agent for NSCLC diagnosis and prognosis evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tumor and Endothelial Cell Hybrids Participate in Glioblastoma Vasculature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soufiane El Hallani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recently antiangiogenic therapy with bevacizumab has shown a high but transient efficacy in glioblastoma (GBM. Indeed, GBM is one of the most angiogenic human tumors and endothelial proliferation is a hallmark of the disease. We therefore hypothesized that tumor cells may participate in endothelial proliferation of GBM. Materials and Methods. We used EGFR FISH Probe to detect EGFR amplification and anti-CD31, CD105, VE-cadherin, and vWF to identify endothelial cells. Endothelial and GBM cells were grown separately, labeled with GFP and DsRed lentiviruses, and then cocultured with or without contact. Results. In a subset of GBM tissues, we found that several tumor endothelial cells carry EGFR amplification, characteristic of GBM tumor cells. This observation was reproduced in vitro: when tumor stem cells derived from GBM were grown in the presence of human endothelial cells, a fraction of them acquired endothelial markers (CD31, CD105, VE-cadherin, and vWF. By transduction with GFP and DsRed expressing lentiviral vectors, we demonstrate that this phenomenon is due to cell fusion and not transdifferentiation. Conclusion. A fraction of GBM stem cells thus has the capacity to fuse with endothelial cells and the resulting hybrids may participate in tumor microvascular proliferation and in treatment resistance.

  19. Label-Free Raman Imaging to Monitor Breast Tumor Signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manciu, Felicia S; Ciubuc, John D; Parra, Karla; Manciu, Marian; Bennet, Kevin E; Valenzuela, Paloma; Sundin, Emma M; Durrer, William G; Reza, Luis; Francia, Giulio

    2017-08-01

    Although not yet ready for clinical application, methods based on Raman spectroscopy have shown significant potential in identifying, characterizing, and discriminating between noncancerous and cancerous specimens. Real-time and accurate medical diagnosis achievable through this vibrational optical method largely benefits from improvements in current technological and software capabilities. Not only is the acquisition of spectral information now possible in milliseconds and analysis of hundreds of thousands of data points achieved in minutes, but Raman spectroscopy also allows simultaneous detection and monitoring of several biological components. Besides demonstrating a significant Raman signature distinction between nontumorigenic (MCF-10A) and tumorigenic (MCF-7) breast epithelial cells, our study demonstrates that Raman can be used as a label-free method to evaluate epidermal growth factor activity in tumor cells. Comparative Raman profiles and images of specimens in the presence or absence of epidermal growth factor show important differences in regions attributed to lipid, protein, and nucleic acid vibrations. The occurrence, which is dependent on the presence of epidermal growth factor, of new Raman features associated with the appearance of phosphothreonine and phosphoserine residues reflects a signal transduction from the membrane to the nucleus, with concomitant modification of DNA/RNA structural characteristics. Parallel Western blotting analysis reveals an epidermal growth factor induction of phosphorylated Akt protein, corroborating the Raman results. The analysis presented in this work is an important step toward Raman-based evaluation of biological activity of epidermal growth factor receptors on the surfaces of breast cancer cells. With the ultimate future goal of clinically implementing Raman-guided techniques for the diagnosis of breast tumors (e.g., with regard to specific receptor activity), the current results just lay the foundation for

  20. Tumor microenvironment derived exosomes pleiotropically modulate cancer cell metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyun; Yang, Lifeng; Baddour, Joelle; Achreja, Abhinav; Bernard, Vincent; Moss, Tyler; Marini, Juan C; Tudawe, Thavisha; Seviour, Elena G; San Lucas, F Anthony; Alvarez, Hector; Gupta, Sonal; Maiti, Sourindra N; Cooper, Laurence; Peehl, Donna; Ram, Prahlad T; Maitra, Anirban; Nagrath, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are a major cellular component of tumor microenvironment in most solid cancers. Altered cellular metabolism is a hallmark of cancer, and much of the published literature has focused on neoplastic cell-autonomous processes for these adaptations. We demonstrate that exosomes secreted by patient-derived CAFs can strikingly reprogram the metabolic machinery following their uptake by cancer cells. We find that CAF-derived exosomes (CDEs) inhibit mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, thereby increasing glycolysis and glutamine-dependent reductive carboxylation in cancer cells. Through 13C-labeled isotope labeling experiments we elucidate that exosomes supply amino acids to nutrient-deprived cancer cells in a mechanism similar to macropinocytosis, albeit without the previously described dependence on oncogenic-Kras signaling. Using intra-exosomal metabolomics, we provide compelling evidence that CDEs contain intact metabolites, including amino acids, lipids, and TCA-cycle intermediates that are avidly utilized by cancer cells for central carbon metabolism and promoting tumor growth under nutrient deprivation or nutrient stressed conditions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10250.001 PMID:26920219

  1. Prospects and challenges of quantitative phase imaging in tumor cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Björn; Götte, Martin; Greve, Burkhard; Ketelhut, Steffi

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) techniques provide high resolution label-free quantitative live cell imaging. Here, prospects and challenges of QPI in tumor cell biology are presented, using the example of digital holographic microscopy (DHM). It is shown that the evaluation of quantitative DHM phase images allows the retrieval of different parameter sets for quantification of cellular motion changes in migration and motility assays that are caused by genetic modifications. Furthermore, we demonstrate simultaneously label-free imaging of cell growth and morphology properties.

  2. The relationship between tumor oxygenation and cell proliferation in human soft tissue sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordsmark, Marianne; Hoeyer, Morten; Keller, Johnny; Nielsen, Ole Steen; Jensen, Oluf Myhre; Overgaard, Jens

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: In malignant tumors the oxygenation status and tumor cell proliferation are known to influence local tumor control after radiotherapy. However, the relationship between oxygenation status and tumor cell kinetics in human tumors has not yet been described. Newly developed clinically applicable techniques such as oxygen electrode measurements and assessment of tumor cell proliferation rates have been suggested as promising predictive assays. The purpose of the present study was to characterize tumor oxygenation status in soft tissue sarcomas and to compare this with tumor cell kinetics and clinical parameters. Methods and Materials: Pretreatment tumor oxygenation status was measured by polarographic oxygen needle electrodes and evaluated as the median pO 2 and the percentage of pO 2 values ≤ 5 mmHg and ≤ 2.5 mmHg in 22 patients with primary soft tissue sarcomas. All tumors were characterized by histology, grade of malignancy, the level of microscopic necrosis, the level of effective hemoglobin, and magnetic resonance imaging estimation of tumor volume. The tumor cell potential doubling time and labeling index were measured by flow cytometric and immunohistochemical analysis of tumor biopsy specimens after in vivo incorporation of iododeoxyuridine. Results: There was a significant correlation between the median pO 2 and the tumor cell potential doubling time (p = 0.041), whereas no correlation was found between the level of hypoxia expressed by the percentage of pO 2 values ≤ 2.5 and ≤ 5 mmHg, respectively, and tumor cell potential doubling time. Furthermore, no correlation was found between either of the three tumor oxygenation parameters and labeling index. The material represented large intertumor heterogeneity in oxygenation status, cell kinetics, and tumor volume, and no correlation was found between oxygenation status and either volume, histopathology, grade of malignancy, or effective hemoglobin. Conclusion: This report is the first to suggest

  3. Scintigraphy with In-111 labeled lymphokine-activated killer cells of malignant brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Kazuo; Sawamura, Yutaka; Hosokawa, Masuo; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    1988-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the in vivo distribution and migration of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells to the target malignant foci in four patients with advanced malignant brain tumor. All four patients had failed to respond to prior adoptive immunotherapy. After the intravenous administration of radiolabeled LAK cells, most of the radiolabeled cells were distributed in the liver and spleen, with lesser radioactivity in the lung and bone marrow. Scintigraphy revealed the target malignant foci in all four patients to be areas of increased radioactivity. The number of radiolabeled LAK cells that accumulated in the intracranial malignant lesions, however, seemed to be insufficient to mediate regression of the solid tumor mass by direct cell-to-cell interaction. We conclude that the failure of adoptive immunotherapy could be accounted for by the poor migration of infused LAK cells to the target malignant foci. We also conclude that radionuclide study with radiolabeled lymphokine-activated culture cells against tumors is likely to be helpful as a means to investigate effective possibilities for subsequent adoptive immunotherapy. (author)

  4. Quantitation of circulating tumor cells in blood samples from ovarian and prostate cancer patients using tumor-specific fluorescent ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Kularatne, Sumith A; Kalli, Kimberly R; Prendergast, Franklyn G; Amato, Robert J; Klee, George G; Hartmann, Lynn C; Low, Philip S

    2008-10-15

    Quantitation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can provide information on the stage of a malignancy, onset of disease progression and response to therapy. In an effort to more accurately quantitate CTCs, we have synthesized fluorescent conjugates of 2 high-affinity tumor-specific ligands (folate-AlexaFluor 488 and DUPA-FITC) that bind tumor cells >20-fold more efficiently than fluorescent antibodies. Here we determine whether these tumor-specific dyes can be exploited for quantitation of CTCs in peripheral blood samples from cancer patients. A CTC-enriched fraction was isolated from the peripheral blood of ovarian and prostate cancer patients by an optimized density gradient centrifugation protocol and labeled with the aforementioned fluorescent ligands. CTCs were then quantitated by flow cytometry. CTCs were detected in 18 of 20 ovarian cancer patients (mean 222 CTCs/ml; median 15 CTCs/ml; maximum 3,118 CTCs/ml), whereas CTC numbers in 16 gender-matched normal volunteers were negligible (mean 0.4 CTCs/ml; median 0.3 CTCs/ml; maximum 1.5 CTCs/ml; p < 0.001, chi(2)). CTCs were also detected in 10 of 13 prostate cancer patients (mean 26 CTCs/ml, median 14 CTCs/ml, maximum 94 CTCs/ml) but not in 18 gender-matched healthy donors (mean 0.8 CTCs/ml, median 1, maximum 3 CTC/ml; p < 0.0026, chi(2)). Tumor-specific fluorescent antibodies were much less efficient in quantitating CTCs because of their lower CTC labeling efficiency. Use of tumor-specific fluorescent ligands to label CTCs in peripheral blood can provide a simple, accurate and sensitive method for determining the number of cancer cells circulating in the bloodstream.

  5. An innovative pre-targeting strategy for tumor cell specific imaging and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Si-Yong; Peng, Meng-Yun; Rong, Lei; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Chen, Si; Cheng, Si-Xue; Feng, Jun; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-09-21

    A programmed pre-targeting system for tumor cell imaging and targeting therapy was established based on the "biotin-avidin" interaction. In this programmed functional system, transferrin-biotin can be actively captured by tumor cells with the overexpression of transferrin receptors, thus achieving the pre-targeting modality. Depending upon avidin-biotin recognition, the attachment of multivalent FITC-avidin to biotinylated tumor cells not only offered the rapid fluorescence labelling, but also endowed the pre-targeted cells with targeting sites for the specifically designed biotinylated peptide nano-drug. Owing to the successful pre-targeting, tumorous HepG2 and HeLa cells were effectively distinguished from the normal 3T3 cells via fluorescence imaging. In addition, the self-assembled peptide nano-drug resulted in enhanced cell apoptosis in the observed HepG2 cells. The tumor cell specific pre-targeting strategy is applicable for a variety of different imaging and therapeutic agents for tumor treatments.

  6. Comparative assessment of a 99mTc labeled H1299.2-HYNIC peptide bearing two different co-ligands for tumor-targeted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabizadeh, Seyedeh Atekeh; Abedi, Seyed Mohammad; Noaparast, Zohreh; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal

    2017-05-01

    Peptides are a class of targeting agents that bind to cancer-specific cell surfaces. Since they specifically target cancer cells, they could be used as molecular imaging tools. In this study, the 15-mer peptide Ac-H1299.2 (YAAWPASGAWTGTAP) was conjugated with HYNIC via lysine amino acid on C-terminus and labeled with 99m Tc using tricine and EDDA/tricine as the co-ligands. These radiotracers were evaluated for potential utilization in diagnostic imaging of ovarian cancer cells (SKOV-3). The cell-specificity of these radiolabeled peptides was determined based on their binding on an ovarian cancer cell line (SKOV-3), and displaying a low affinity for lung adenocarcinoma cell line (A549) and breast cancer cell line (MCF7). Biodistribution studies were conducted in normal mice as well as in nude mice bearing SKOV-3 ovarian cancer xenografts. HYNIC-peptide was labeled with 99m Tc with more than 99% efficiency and showed high stability in buffer and serum. We observed nanomolar binding affinities for both radiolabeled peptides. The tumor uptakes were 3.27%±0.46% and 1.55%±0.20% for tricine and 2.34±1.1% and 1.09%±0.18% for EDDA/tricine at 1 and 4h after injection, respectively. A higher tumor to background ratio and lower radioactivity in the blood were observed for EDDA/tricine co-ligands, leading to clear tumor visualization in imaging with injection of this peptide. This new 99m Tc-labeled peptide selectively targeted ovarian cancer and introduction of a (EDDA/tricine) as a co-ligand improved the pharmacokinetics of 99m Tc-labeled H1299.2 for tumor imaging in animals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Synthesis of Fluorine-18 Labeled Glucose-Lys-Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe as a Potential Tumor Imaging Agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyo Chul; Kim, Ji Sun; Sung, Hyun Ju; Jung, Jae Ho; An, Gwang Il; Chi, Dae Yoon; Lee, Byung Chul; Moon, Byung Seok; Choi, Tae Hyun; Chuna, Kwon Soo

    2005-01-01

    The α v β 3 integrin is an important receptor affecting tumor growth, metastatic potential on proliferating endothelial cells as well as on tumor cells of various origin, tumor-induced angiogenesis could be blocked by antagonizing the α v β 3 integrin with RGD. Therefore, α v β 3 integrin is a target for angiogenesis imaging that might be useful in assessing tumor-induced angiogenesis and identifying tumor metastasis. To design potent radiotracer for imaging angiogenesis containing a cRGD moiety should include low hepatic uptake in vivo. Tripeptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), naturally existed in extracellular matrix proteins, is known to be the primary binding site of the α v β 3 integrin. The imaging of α v β 3 receptor expression will give the information of the metastatic ability of the tumor which is not available by [ 18 F]FDG. Our interest in developing new radiopharmaceuticals for in vivo visualization of angiogenesis has led us to synthesize derivatives of cRGD (cyclic arginineglycine-aspartic acid) that contains glucose moiety. Because sugar-protein interaction is a key step in metastasis and angiogenesis, it has also been proposed to play an intriguing role in imaging of tumor. We designed and synthesized two fluorine-18 labeled RGD glycopeptides . N-fluorobenzyl-diaminobutane-N'-glucose-Lys-Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe ([ 18 F]fluorobenzyl-glucose-KRGDf, and Nfluorobenzoyl- diaminobutane-N'-glucose-Lys-Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe ([ 18 F]fluorobenzoyl-glucose-KRGDf, from same precursor as a diagnostic tumor imaging agent for positron emission tomography (PET). Fluorine-18 labeled cRGD glycopeptides were prepared using two different simple labeling methods: one is reductive alkylation of an amine with [ 18 F]fluorobenzaldehyde and the other is amide condensation with [ 18 F]fluorobenzoic acid

  8. Labeled bleomycin as a tumor localizing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, C.M.

    1982-01-01

    The antitumor antibiotics bleomycins labeled with 57 Co are known to possess excellent tumor localizing properties but the rather long halflife of 57 Co prevents its use in clinical routine. It is therefore desirable to label cobalt-bleomycin with a more suitable radionuclide, e.g. 123 I. This thesis reports on further studies on cobalt-bleomycin. It appears from the studies on the structure of cobalt-bleomycin described in this thesis (Chapter B), that cobalt is able to form different complexes with bleomycin (the forms I and II). The difference in structure is not clear, but the biological behavior of both forms is studied (Chapter C). In Chapter D the iodination of cobalt-bleomycin is described. Iodination of free bleomycin yields a product with bad tumor localizing properties, and straight-on iodination of cobalt-bleomycin is prevented by the presence of cobalt. To retain the good tumor-localizing properties of cobalt-bleomycin, possibilities were explored to incorporate the iodine in the terminal amine (a side chain, not involved in complexation). Alkylation of cobalt-bleomycin demethyl A 2 with N-bromoacetyl-3-iodoaniline yielded a product; unfortunately this product possessed bad tumor localizing properties and moreover, was not stable in vivo. The structure of a possibly successful iodinated cobalt-bleomycin is outlined but could not be realized during this research. (Auth.)

  9. Dielectrophoretic capture and genetic analysis of single neuroblastoma tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Carpenter

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the diversity of cells that escape the primary tumor and seed micrometastases remains rudimentary, and approaches for studying circulating and disseminated tumor cells have been limited by low throughput and sensitivity, reliance on single parameter sorting, and a focus on enumeration rather than phenotypic and genetic characterization. Here we utilize a highly sensitive microfluidic and dielectrophoretic approach for the isolation and genetic analysis of individual tumor cells. We employed fluorescence labeling to isolate 208 single cells from spiking experiments conducted with 11 cell lines, including 8 neuroblastoma cell lines, and achieved a capture sensitivity of 1 tumor cell per 106 white blood cells. Sample fixation or freezing had no detectable effect on cell capture. Point mutations were accurately detected in the whole genome amplification product of captured single tumor cells but not in negative control white blood cells. We applied this approach to capture 144 single tumor cells from 10 bone marrow samples from patients suffering from neuroblastoma. In this pediatric malignancy, high-risk patients often exhibit wide-spread hematogenous metastasis, but access to primary tumor can be difficult or impossible. Here we used flow-based sorting to pre-enrich samples with tumor involvement below 0.02%. For all patients for whom a mutation in the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase gene had already been detected in their primary tumor, the same mutation was detected in single cells from their marrow. These findings demonstrate a novel, non-invasive, and adaptable method for the capture and genetic analysis of single tumor cells from cancer patients.

  10. Tumorigenicity and Validity of Fluorescence Labelled Mesenchymal and Epithelial Human Oral Cancer Cell Lines in Nude Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xin Cai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumorigenicity and metastatic activity can be visually monitored in cancer cells that were labelled with stable fluorescence. The aim was to establish and validate local and distant spread of subcutaneously previously injected fluorescence transduced human tongue cancer cell lines of epithelial and mesenchymal phenotype in nude mice. A total of 32 four-week-old male athymic Balb/c nude mice were randomly allocated into 4 groups (n=8. A single dose of 0.3 mL PBS containing 1 × 107 of four different cancer cell-lines (UM1, UM1-GFP, UM2, and UM2-RFP was injected subcutaneously into the right side of their posterolateral back. Validity assessment of the labelled cancer cells’ tumorigenicity was assessed by physical examination, imaging, and histology four weeks after the injection. The tumor take rate of cancer cells was similar in animals injected with either parental or transduced cancer cells. Transduced cancer cells in mice were easily detectable in vivo and after cryosection using fluorescent imaging. UM1 cells showed increased tumor take rate and mean tumor volume, presenting with disorganized histopathological patterns. Fluorescence labelled epithelial and mesenchymal human tongue cancer cell lines do not change in tumorigenicity or cell phenotype after injection in vivo.

  11. Development of lutetium-labeled bombesin derivates: relationship between structure and diagnostic-therapeutic activity for prostate tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujatti, Priscilla Brunelli

    2009-01-01

    Bombesin (BBN) receptors - in particular, the gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptor peptide - have been shown to be massively over expressed in several human tumors types, including prostate cancer, and could be an alternative as target for its treatment by radionuclide therapy (RNT). A large number of BBN analogs had already been synthesized for this purpose and have shown to reduce tumor growth in mice. Nevertheless, most of the studied analogs exhibit high abdominal accumulation, especially in pancreas. This abdominal accumulation may represent a problem in clinical use of radiolabeled bombesin analogs probably due to serious side effects to patients. The goal of the present work was to radiolabel a novel series of bombesin derivatives with lutetium-177 and to evaluate the relationship between their structure and diagnostic-therapeutic activity for prostate tumor. The generic structure of studied peptides is DOTA-Phe-(Gly) n -BBN(6-14), where DOTA is the chelator, n is the number of glycine amino acids of Phe-(Gly) n spacer and BBN(6-14) is the bombesin sequence from the amino acid 6 to the amino acid 14. Preliminary studies were done to establish the ideal labeling conditions for obtaining the highest yield of labeled bombesin derivatives, determined by instant thin layer chromatography (ITLC-SG) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The stability of the preparations was evaluated either after storing at 2-8 degree C or incubation in human serum at 37 degree C and the partition coefficient was determined in n:octanol:water. In vivo studies were performed in both healthy Balb-c and Nude mice bearing PC-3 xenografts, in order to characterize the biological properties of labeled peptides. In vitro studies involved the evaluation of cold bombesin derivatives effect in PC-3 cells proliferation. Bombesin derivatives were successfully labeled with high yield at optimized conditions and exhibited high stability at 4 degree C. The analysis of the

  12. In Vivo Imaging of Xenograft Tumors Using an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Specific Affibody Molecule Labeled with a Near-infrared Fluorophore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibiao Gong

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is associated with many types of cancers. It is of great interest to noninvasively image the EGFR expression in vivo. In this study, we labeled an EGFR-specific Affibody molecule (Eaff with a near-infrared (NIR dye IRDye800CW maleimide and tested the binding of this labeled molecule (Eaff800 in cell culture and xenograft mouse tumor models. Unlike EGF, Eaff did not activate the EGFR signaling pathway. Results showed that Eaff800 was bound and taken up specifically by EGFR-overexpressing A431 cells. When Eaff800 was intravenously injected into nude mice bearing A431 xenograft tumors, the tumor could be identified 1 hour after injection and it became most prominent after 1 day. Images of dissected tissue sections demonstrated that the accumulation of Eaff800 was highest in the liver, followed by the tumor and kidney. Moreover, in combination with a human EGFR type 2 (HER2-specific probe Haff682, Eaff800 could be used to distinguish between EGFR- and HER2-overexpressing tumors. Interestingly, the organ distribution pattern and the clearance rate of Eaff800 were different from those of Haff682. In conclusion, Eaff molecule labeled with a NIR fluorophore is a promising molecular imaging agent for EGFR-overexpressing tumors.

  13. In vivo tracking of genetically engineered, anti-HER2/neu directed natural killer cells to HER2/neu positive mammary tumors with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E.; Meier, Reinhardt; Metz, Stephan; Settles, Marcus; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Rudelius, Martina; Piontek, Guido; Schlegel, Juergen; Piert, Morand; Uherek, Christoph; Wels, Winfried

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to optimize labeling of the human natural killer (NK) cell line NK-92 with iron-oxide-based contrast agents and to monitor the in vivo distribution of genetically engineered NK-92 cells, which are directed against HER2/neu receptors, to HER2/neu positive mammary tumors with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Parental NK-92 cells and genetically modified HER2/neu specific NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells, expressing a chimeric antigen receptor specific to the tumor-associated ErbB2 (HER2/neu) antigen, were labeled with ferumoxides and ferucarbotran using simple incubation, lipofection and electroporation techniques. Labeling efficiency was evaluated by MR imaging, Prussian blue stains and spectrometry. Subsequently, ferucarbotran-labeled NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta (n=3) or parental NK-92 cells were intravenously injected into the tail vein of six mice with HER2/neu-positive NIH 3T3 mammary tumors, implanted in the mammary fat pad. The accumulation of the cells in the tumors was monitored by MR imaging before and 12 and 24 h after cell injection (p.i.). MR data were correlated with histopathology. Both the parental NK-92 and the genetically modified NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells could be labeled with ferucarbotran and ferumoxides by lipofection and electroporation, but not by simple incubation. The intracellular cytoplasmatic iron-oxide uptake was significantly higher after labeling with ferucarbotran than ferumoxides (P 6 NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells into tumor-bearing mice, MR showed a progressive signal decline in HER2/neu-positive mammary tumors at 12 and 24 h (p.i.). Conversely, injection of 5 x 10 6 parental NK-92 control cells, not directed against HER2/neu receptors, did not cause significant signal intensity changes of the tumors. Histopathology confirmed an accumulation of the former, but not the latter cells in tumor tissue. The human natural killer cell line NK-92 can be efficiently labeled with clinically applicable iron-oxide contrast

  14. In vivo tracking of genetically engineered, anti-HER2/neu directed natural killer cells to HER2/neu positive mammary tumors with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E. [UCSF Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Meier, Reinhardt; Metz, Stephan; Settles, Marcus; Rummeny, Ernst J. [Technical University Munich, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Rudelius, Martina; Piontek, Guido; Schlegel, Juergen [Technical University Munich, Institute of Pathology, Division of Neuropathology, Munich (Germany); Piert, Morand [Technical University Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Uherek, Christoph; Wels, Winfried [University of Frankfurt, Georg Speyer House, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to optimize labeling of the human natural killer (NK) cell line NK-92 with iron-oxide-based contrast agents and to monitor the in vivo distribution of genetically engineered NK-92 cells, which are directed against HER2/neu receptors, to HER2/neu positive mammary tumors with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Parental NK-92 cells and genetically modified HER2/neu specific NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells, expressing a chimeric antigen receptor specific to the tumor-associated ErbB2 (HER2/neu) antigen, were labeled with ferumoxides and ferucarbotran using simple incubation, lipofection and electroporation techniques. Labeling efficiency was evaluated by MR imaging, Prussian blue stains and spectrometry. Subsequently, ferucarbotran-labeled NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta (n=3) or parental NK-92 cells were intravenously injected into the tail vein of six mice with HER2/neu-positive NIH 3T3 mammary tumors, implanted in the mammary fat pad. The accumulation of the cells in the tumors was monitored by MR imaging before and 12 and 24 h after cell injection (p.i.). MR data were correlated with histopathology. Both the parental NK-92 and the genetically modified NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells could be labeled with ferucarbotran and ferumoxides by lipofection and electroporation, but not by simple incubation. The intracellular cytoplasmatic iron-oxide uptake was significantly higher after labeling with ferucarbotran than ferumoxides (P<0.05). After intravenous injection of 5 x 10{sup 6} NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells into tumor-bearing mice, MR showed a progressive signal decline in HER2/neu-positive mammary tumors at 12 and 24 h (p.i.). Conversely, injection of 5 x 10{sup 6} parental NK-92 control cells, not directed against HER2/neu receptors, did not cause significant signal intensity changes of the tumors. Histopathology confirmed an accumulation of the former, but not the latter cells in tumor tissue. The human natural killer cell line NK-92 can be efficiently

  15. C-kit-targeted imaging of gastrointestinal stromal tumor using radiolabeled anti-c-kit monoclonal antibody in a mouse tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sogawa, Chizuru; Tsuji, Atsushi B.; Sudo, Hitomi; Sugyo, Aya; Yoshida, Chisato; Odaka, Kenichi; Uehara, Tomoya; Arano, Yasushi; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Saga, Tsuneo

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor arising from the gastrointestinal tract and highly expresses mutated c-kit. We aimed to develop a specific and sensitive method for detecting GISTs using radiolabeled anti-c-kit monoclonal antibody. Methods: A mutated c-kit-expressing cell clone was established by transfecting an expressing vector of mutated c-kit gene into HEK293 human embryonic kidney cells. The tumors were developed by inoculating c-kit-expressing cells into nude mice. 125 I- and 111 In-labeled anti-c-kit antibodies (12A8 and 41A11) were evaluated in vitro by cell binding, competitive inhibition and cellular internalization assays, and in vivo by biodistribution and imaging studies in tumor-bearing mice. Results: Both 125 I- and 111 In-labeled antibodies showed specific binding with c-kit-expressing cells with high affinity (dissociation constants = 2.2-7.1x10 9 M -1 ). Internalization assay showed that 125 I-labeled antibodies were rapidly internalized and dehalogenated, with the release of 125 I from the cells, resulting in reduction of cell-associated radioactivity with time. In contrast, 111 In-labeled antibody was internalized but did not result in the reduced radioactivity associated with tumor cells. Reflecting this phenomenon, the in vivo tumor uptake of 125 I-labeled antibody was low on Day 1, further decreasing with time, while tumor uptake of 111 In-labeled antibody was high on Day 1, further increasing with time. The xenografted tumor was clearly visualized by scintigraphy after injection of 111 In-labeled antibody. Conclusion: The anti-c-kit monoclonal antibody labeled with a metal radionuclide would be promising for c-kit-targeted imaging of GISTs.

  16. Targeting of indium 111-labeled bivalent hapten to human melanoma mediated by bispecific monoclonal antibody conjugates: Imaging of tumors hosted in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Doussal, J.M.; Gruaz-Guyon, A.; Martin, M.; Gautherot, E.; Delaage, M.; Barbet, J.

    1990-01-01

    Antibody conjugates were prepared by coupling F(ab')2 or Fab' fragments of an antibody specific for the human high molecular weight-melanoma associated antigen to Fab' fragments of an antibody specific for indium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate complexes. Monovalent and bivalent haptens were synthesized by reacting the dipeptide tyrosyl-lysine with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic cyclic anhydride. In vitro, the antibody conjugate mediated binding of the 111In-labeled haptens to melanoma cells. In vivo, it allowed specific localization of the haptens in A375 tumors. The bivalent hapten exhibited much higher efficiency at targeting 111In onto cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Antibody conjugate and hapten doses (2 micrograms and 1 pmol, respectively) and the delay between antibody conjugate and tracer injections (24 h) were adjusted to maximize tumor uptake (4% injected dose/g) and tumor to normal tissue contrast (greater than 3) obtained 3 h after injection of the 111In-labeled bivalent hapten. This two-step technique, when compared to direct targeting of 111In-labeled F(ab')2 fragments, provided lower localization of injected activity into the tumor (x 0.25), but higher tumor/tissue ratios, especially with respect to liver (x 7), spleen (x 8), and kidneys (x 10). In addition, high contrast images were obtained within 3 hours, instead of days. Thus, antibody conjugate-mediated targeting of small bivalent haptens, labeled with short half-life isotopes, is proposed as a general method for improving tumor radioimmunolocalization

  17. Imaging Reporters for Proteasome Activity Identify Tumor- and Metastasis-Initiating Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda C. Stacer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-initiating cells, also designated as cancer stem cells, are proposed to constitute a subpopulation of malignant cells central to tumorigenesis, metastasis, and treatment resistance. We analyzed the activity of the proteasome, the primary organelle for targeted protein degradation, as a marker of tumor- and metastasis-initiating cells. Using human and mouse breast cancer cells expressing a validated fluorescent reporter, we found a small subpopulation of cells with low proteasome activity that divided asymmetrically to produce daughter cells with low or high proteasome activity. Breast cancer cells with low proteasome activity had greater local tumor formation and metastasis in immunocompromised and immunocompetent mice. To allow flexible labeling of cells, we also developed a new proteasome substrate based on HaloTag technology. Patient-derived glioblastoma cells with low proteasome activity measured by the HaloTag reporter show key phenotypes associated with tumor-initiating cells, including expression of a stem cell transcription factor, reconstitution of the original starting population, and enhanced neurosphere formation. We also show that patient-derived glioblastoma cells with low proteasome activity have higher frequency of tumor formation in mouse xenografts. These studies support proteasome function as a tool to investigate tumor- and metastasis-initiating cancer cells and a potential biomarker for outcomes in patients with several different cancers.

  18. Clinical applications of cells labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, B.M.

    1994-01-01

    Blood cells labelled with radionuclides are reviewed and main applications are described. Red blood cell labelling by both random and specific principle. A table with most important clinical uses, 99mTc labelling of RBC are described pre tinning and in vivo reduction of Tc, in vitro labelling and administration of labelled RBC and in vivo modified technique. Labelled leucocytes with several 99mTc-complex radiopharmaceuticals by in vitro technique and specific monoclonal s for white cells(neutrofiles). Labelled platelets for clinical use and research by in vitro technique and in vivo labelling

  19. Hypoxic cell turnover in different solid tumor lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungkvist, Anna S.E.; Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.; Rijken, Paulus F.J.W.; Begg, Adrian C.; Raleigh, James A.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Most solid tumors contain hypoxic cells, and the amount of tumor hypoxia has been shown to have a negative impact on the outcome of radiotherapy. The efficacy of combined modality treatments depends both on the sequence and timing of the treatments. Hypoxic cell turnover in tumors may be important for optimal scheduling of combined modality treatments, especially when hypoxic cell targeting is involved. Methods and Materials: Previously we have shown that a double bioreductive hypoxic marker assay could be used to detect changes of tumor hypoxia in relation to the tumor vasculature after carbogen and hydralazine treatments. This assay was used in the current study to establish the turnover rate of hypoxic cells in three different tumor models. The first hypoxic marker, pimonidazole, was administered at variable times before tumor harvest, and the second hypoxic marker, CCI-103F, was injected at a fixed time before harvest. Hypoxic cell turnover was defined as loss of pimonidazole (first marker) relative to CCI-103F (second marker). Results: The half-life of hypoxic cell turnover was 17 h in the murine C38 colon carcinoma line, 23 h and 49 h in the human xenograft lines MEC82 and SCCNij3, respectively. Within 24 h, loss of pimonidazole-stained areas in C38 and MEC82 occurred concurrent with the appearance of pimonidazole positive cell debris in necrotic regions. In C38 and MEC82, most of the hypoxic cells had disappeared after 48 h, whereas in SCCNij3, viable cells that had been labeled with pimonidazole were still observed after 5 days. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates that the double hypoxia marker assay can be used to study changes in both the proportion of hypoxic tumor cells and their lifespan at the same time. The present study shows that large differences in hypoxic cell turnover rates may exist among tumor lines, with half-lives ranging from 17-49 h

  20. Preliminary SPECT study of I-123 labeled 3-iodo-O-methyl-L-α-methyltyrosine (OMIMT) in patients with brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, C. W.; Yang, S. D.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Lee, S. H.; Rhee, C. H.; Jang, J. S.; Hong, S. W.; Lim, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Radioiodine labeled tyrosine analogues, such as L-3-[I-123]iodo-α-methyltyrosine, have been used for the imaging of brain tumors. We added one methyl-group to the L-3-α-methyltyrosine, expecting the increased cellular membrane permeability. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of OMIMT as an agent for tumor image. After synthesis of o-methyl-L-α-methyltyrosine (OMAMT), OMAMT was labeled with I-131/I-123 using Iodogen method. Fifteen female Fischer rats were implanted with the 9L gliosarcoma cell line into right thigh. The biodistribution was evaluated (30 min, 2hr, 24hr) after iv injection of 7.4 MBq I-131 labeled OMIMT. The tumor uptake was higher than the muscle uptake at every time point studied (3.74 vs 1.62%ID/g at 30 min and 0.04 vs 0.01 %ID/g at 24 hr, respectively). Tumor to blood ratios were 1.5 : 1 at 30 min, 2.3 : 1 at 2 hr and 0.9 : 1 at 24 hr. The kidney uptake was peaked at 30 min. Gamma camera images of 9L tumor-bearing rats were obtained at 30 min, 2 and 24 hr. Tumor was visualized as early as at 30 min. After the injection of 555-740MBq of [I-123] OMIMT, the brain SPECT image was obtained at 1 hr in patients with brain tumor (n=5, high grade tumor=3, low grade tumor=2. The average tumor-to-normal (T/N) ratios were 1.31 (range : 1.10-1.61) in high grade tumors and 1.04 90.81, 1.27, respectively) in low grade tumors. In conclusion, radioiodine labeled OMIMT might be useful as a tumor imaging agent

  1. Tumor control probability after a radiation of animal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urano, Muneyasu; Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko; Nesumi, Naofumi

    1975-01-01

    Tumor control and regrowth probability of animal tumors irradiated with a single x-ray dose were determined, using a spontaneous C3H mouse mammary carcinoma. Cellular radiation sensitivity of tumor cells and tumor control probability of the tumor were examined by the TD 50 and TCD 50 assays respectively. Tumor growth kinetics were measured by counting the percentage of labelled mitosis and by measuring the growth curve. A mathematical analysis of tumor control probability was made from these results. A formula proposed, accounted for cell population kinetics or division probability model, cell sensitivity to radiation and number of tumor cells. (auth.)

  2. Glioblastoma cells labeled by robust Raman tags for enhancing imaging contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Ching; Chang, Yung-Ching; Wu, Yi-Syuan; Sun, Wei-Lun; Liu, Chan-Chuan; Sze, Chun-I; Chen, Shiuan-Yeh

    2018-05-01

    Complete removal of a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a highly malignant brain tumor, is challenging due to its infiltrative characteristics. Therefore, utilizing imaging agents such as fluorophores to increase the contrast between GBM and normal cells can help neurosurgeons to locate residual cancer cells during image guided surgery. In this work, Raman tag based labeling and imaging for GBM cells in vitro is described and evaluated. The cell membrane of a GBM adsorbs a substantial amount of functionalized Raman tags through overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and "broadcasts" stronger pre-defined Raman signals than normal cells. The average ratio between Raman signals from a GBM cell and autofluorescence from a normal cell can be up to 15. In addition, the intensity of these images is stable under laser illuminations without suffering from the severe photo-bleaching that usually occurs in fluorescent imaging. Our results show that labeling and imaging GBM cells via robust Raman tags is a viable alternative method to distinguish them from normal cells. This Raman tag based method can be used solely or integrated into an existing fluorescence system to improve the identification of infiltrative glial tumor cells around the boundary, which will further reduce GBM recurrence. In addition, it can also be applied/extended to other types of cancer to improve the effectiveness of image guided surgery.

  3. Evaluation of the first 44Sc-labeled Affibody molecule for imaging of HER2-expressing tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honarvar, Hadis; Müller, Cristina; Cohrs, Susan; Haller, Stephanie; Westerlund, Kristina; Karlström, Amelie Eriksson; Meulen, Nicholas P. van der; Schibli, Roger; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Affibody molecules are small (58 amino acids) high-affinity proteins based on a tri-helix non-immunoglobulin scaffold. A clinical study has demonstrated that PET imaging using Affibody molecules labeled with 68 Ga (T ½ = 68 min) can visualize metastases of breast cancer expressing human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) and provide discrimination between tumors with high and low expression level. This may help to identify breast cancer patients benefiting from HER2-targeting therapies. The best discrimination was at 4 h post injection. Due to longer half-life, a positron-emitting radionuclide 44 Sc (T ½ = 4.04 h) might be a preferable label for Affibody molecules for imaging at several hours after injection. Methods: A synthetic second-generation anti-HER2 Affibody molecule Z HER2:2891 was labeled with 44 Sc via a DOTA-chelator conjugated to the N-terminal amino group. Binding specificity, affinity and cellular processing 44 Sc-DOTA-Z HER2:2891 and 68 Ga-DOTA-Z HER2:2891 were compared in vitro using HER2-expressing cells. Biodistribution and imaging properties of 44 Sc-DOTA-Z HER2:2891 and 68 Ga-DOTA-Z HER2:2891 were evaluated in Balb/c nude mice bearing HER2-expression xenografts. Results: The labeling yield of 98 ± 2% and specific activity of 7.8 GBq/μmol were obtained. The conjugate demonstrated specific binding to HER2-expressing SKOV3.ip cells in vitro and to SKOV3.ip xenografts in nude mice. The distribution of radioactivity at 3 h post injection was similar for 44 Sc-DOTA-Z HER2:2891 and 68 Ga-DOTA-Z HER2:2891 , but the blood clearance of the 44 Sc-labeled variant was slower and the tumor-to-blood ratio was reduced (15 ± 2 for 44 Sc-DOTA-Z HER2:2891 vs 46 ± 9 for 68 Ga-DOTA-Z HER2:2891 ). At 6 h after injection of 44 Sc-DOTA-Z HER2:2891 the tumor uptake was 8 ± 2% IA/g and the tumor-to-blood ratio was 51 ± 8. Imaging using small-animal PET/CT demonstrated that 44 Sc-DOTA-Z HER2:2891 provides specific and high

  4. Label-free imaging of brain and brain tumor specimens with combined two-photon excited fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liwei; Wang, Xingfu; Wu, Zanyi; Du, Huiping; Wang, Shu; Li, Lianhuang; Fang, Na; Lin, Peihua; Chen, Jianxin; Kang, Dezhi; Zhuo, Shuangmu

    2017-10-01

    Label-free imaging techniques are gaining acceptance within the medical imaging field, including brain imaging, because they have the potential to be applied to intraoperative in situ identifications of pathological conditions. In this paper, we describe the use of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy in combination for the label-free detection of brain and brain tumor specimens; gliomas. Two independently detecting channels were chosen to subsequently collect TPEF/SHG signals from the specimen to increase TPEF/SHG image contrasts. Our results indicate that the combined TPEF/SHG microscopic techniques can provide similar rat brain structural information and produce a similar resolution like conventional H&E staining in neuropathology; including meninges, cerebral cortex, white-matter structure corpus callosum, choroid plexus, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellar cortex. It can simultaneously detect infiltrating human brain tumor cells, the extracellular matrix collagen fiber of connective stroma within brain vessels and collagen depostion in tumor microenvironments. The nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio and collagen content can be extracted as quantitative indicators for differentiating brain gliomas from healthy brain tissues. With the development of two-photon fiberscopes and microendoscope probes and their clinical applications, the combined TPEF and SHG microcopy may become an important multimodal, nonlinear optical imaging approach for real-time intraoperative histological diagnostics of residual brain tumors. These occur in various brain regions during ongoing surgeries through the method of simultaneously identifying tumor cells, and the change of tumor microenvironments, without the need for the removal biopsies and without the need for tissue labelling or fluorescent markers.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Tracking of Endothelial Progenitor Cells Labeled with Alkyl-Polyethylenimine 2 kDa/Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide in a Mouse Lung Carcinoma Xenograft Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Chen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The potential of using endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs in novel anticancer therapy and the repair of vascular injury has been increasingly recognized. In the present study, EPCs were labeled with N-alkyl-polyethylenimine 2 kDa (PEI2k-stabilized superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO to facilitate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of EPCs in a mouse lung carcinoma xenograft model. EPCs derived from human peripheral blood were labeled with alkyl-PEI2k/SPIO. The viability and activity of labeled cells were evaluated using proliferation, migration, and tubulogenesis assays. Alkyl-PEI2k/SPIO-labeled EPCs were injected intravenously (group 1 or mixed and injected together with A549 cells subcutaneously (group 2 into groups of six mice with severe combined immunodeficiency. The labeling efficiency with alkyl-PEI2k/SPIO at 7 mg Fe/mL concentration was approximately 100%. Quantitative analysis of cellular iron was 6.062 ± 0.050 pg/cell. No significant effects on EPC proliferation, migration, or tubulogenesis were seen after labeling. Seventesla micro-MRI showed the presence of schistic or linear hypointense regions at the tumor margins starting from days 7 to 8 after EPC administration. This gradually extended into the inner tumor layers in group 1. In group 2, tumor growth was accompanied by dispersion of low-signal intensity regions inside the tumor. Iron-positive cells identified by Prussian blue dye were seen at the sites identified using MRI. Human CD31-positive cells and mouse CD31-positive cells were present in both groups. Labeling EPCs with alkyl-PEI2k/SPIO allows noninvasive magnetic resonance investigation of EPC involvement in tumor neovasculature and is associated with excellent biocompatibility and MRI sensitivity.

  6. In vivo imaging of tumor vascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dawen; Stafford, Jason H.; Zhou, Heling; Thorpe, Philip E.

    2013-02-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS), normally restricted to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, becomes exposed on the outer surface of viable (non-apoptotic) endothelial cells in tumor blood vessels, probably in response to oxidative stresses present in the tumor microenvironment. In the present study, we optically imaged exposed PS on tumor vasculature in vivo using PGN635, a novel human monoclonal antibody that targets PS. PGN635 F(ab')2 was labeled with the near infrared (NIR) dye, IRDye 800CW. Human glioma U87 cells or breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells were implanted subcutaneously or orthotopically into nude mice. When the tumors reached ~5 mm in diameter, 800CW- PGN635 was injected via a tail vein and in vivo dynamic NIR imaging was performed. For U87 gliomas, NIR imaging allowed clear detection of tumors as early as 4 h later, which improved over time to give a maximal tumor/normal ratio (TNR = 2.9 +/- 0.5) 24 h later. Similar results were observed for orthotopic MDA-MB-231 breast tumors. Localization of 800CW-PGN635 to tumors was antigen specific since 800CW-Aurexis, a control probe of irrelevant specificity, did not localize to the tumors, and pre-administration of unlabeled PGN635 blocked the uptake of 800CW-PGN635. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed that 800CW-PGN635 was binding to PS-positive tumor vascular endothelium. Our studies suggest that tumor vasculature can be successfully imaged in vivo to provide sensitive tumor detection.

  7. Quantification of mammalian tumor cell state plasticity with digital holographic cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejna, Miroslav; Jorapur, Aparna; Zhang, Yuntian; Song, Jun S.; Judson, Robert L.

    2018-02-01

    Individual cells within isogenic tumor populations can exhibit distinct cellular morphologies, behaviors, and molecular profiles. Cell state plasticity refers to the propensity of a cell to transition between these different morphologies and behaviors. Elevation of cell state plasticity is thought to contribute to critical stages in tumor evolution, including metastatic dissemination and acquisition of therapeutic resistance. However, methods for quantifying general plasticity in mammalian cells remain limited. Working with a HoloMonitor M4 digital holographic cytometry platform, we have established a machine learning-based pipeline for high accuracy and label-free classification of adherent cells. We use twenty-six morphological and optical density-derived features for label-free identification of cell state in heterogeneous cultures. The system is housed completely within a mammalian cell incubator, permitting the monitoring of changes in cell state over time. Here we present an application of our approach for studying cell state plasticity. Human melanoma cell lines of known metastatic potential were monitored in standard growth conditions. The rate of feature change was quantified for each individual cell in the populations. We observed that cells of higher metastatic potential exhibited more rapid fluctuation of cell state in homeostatic conditions. The approach we demonstrate will be advantageous for further investigations into the factors that influence cell state plasticity.

  8. A brief history of cell labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    The term cell labelling is usually used in the context of labelled leukocytes for imaging inflammation and labelled platelets for imaging thrombosis. Erythrocyte labelling for in vitro measurements of red cell life span, in vivo measurements of splenic red cell pooling, radionuclide ventriculography and imaging sites of bleeding has developed rather separately and has a different history. Labelled platelets and leukocytes were originally developed for cell kinetic studies. Since the current-day applications of labelled platelets and leukocytes depend on a clear understanding of cell kinetics, these classical studies are important and relevant to the history of cell labelling

  9. Evaluation of 99mTc-Labeled Bevacizumab-N-HYNIC Conjugate in Human Ovarian Tumor Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Syed Qaiser; Mahmood, Samia

    2018-03-20

    The aim of the present investigation was to examine the suitability of 99m Tc-N-HYNIC-BZMB as a specific vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-targeting agent. Bevacizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that inhibits VEGF. N-hydroxysuccinimide-2-hydrazinonicotinic acid (N-HYNIC) was conjugated to BZMB, followed by labeling with 99m Tc using N-[Tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl] glycine (tricine), ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid (EDDA), and nicotinic acid as coligands. 99m Tc-labeled BZMB was characterized in terms of 99m TcO 4 , radiocolloids, and labeled N-HYNIC-BZMB using thin-layer chromatography and HPLC. Poor metastatic SKOV-3 and high metastatic SKOV-3.ip1 human ovarian cancer cell lines were used for in vitro binding uptake of 99m Tc-N-HYNIC-BZMB. Biodistribution and scintigraphy accuracy were examined in human ovarian tumor xenografts in rats and rabbits. 99m Tc-N-HYNIC-BZMB prepared by using a mixture of tricine and EDDA demonstrated relatively high radiochemical purity (more than 98%). In L-cysteine and serum, it exhibited a stable behavior up to 16 hours. In vitro binding uptake indicated that it targets high metastatic SKOV-3.ip1 tumors. Biodistribution in human ovarian tumor xenografts in rats confirmed a significant uptake in SKOV-3.ip1 tumors (5.69% ± 1.86%, 4 hours). Scintigraphic accuracy in human ovarian tumor xenografts in rabbits validated its suitability as a high metastatic SKOV-3.ip1 radiotracer. High radiochemical purity, stability in saline and serum, biodistribution, and scintigraphy of 99m Tc-N-HYNIC-BZMB in human ovarian tumor xenografts in rats and rabbits confirmed its suitability as a potential radiotracer for imaging high metastatic SKOV-3.ip1 sites.

  10. Specific Visualization of Tumor Cells Using Upconversion Nanophosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenik, E. A.; Generalova, A. N.; Nechaev, A. V.; Khaydukov, E.V.; Mironova, K. E.; Stremovskiy, O. A.; Lebedenko, E.N.; Zvyagin, A. V.; Deyev, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    The development of targeted constructs on the basis of photoluminescent nanoparticles with a high photo- and chemical stability and absorption/emission spectra in the “transparency window” of biological tissues is an important focus area of present-day medical diagnostics. In this work, a targeted two-component construct on the basis of upconversion nanophosphors (UCNPs) and anti-tumor 4D5 scFv was developed for selective labeling of tumor cells overexpressing the HER2 tumor marker characteristic of a number of human malignant tumors. A high affinity barnase : barstar (Bn : Bs) protein pair, which exhibits high stability in a wide range of pH and temperatures, was exploited as a molecular adapter providing self-assembly of the two-component construct. High selectivity for the binding of the two-component 4D5 scFv-Bn : UCNP-Bs construct to human breast adenocarcinoma SK-BR-3 cells overexpressing HER2 was demonstrated. This approach provides an opportunity to produce similar constructs for the visualization of different specific markers in pathogenic tissues, including malignant tumors. PMID:25558394

  11. Radiolocalization of bovine lymphosarcoma cells in athymic mice, using a monoclonal antibody against tumor-associated antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aida, Y.; Ochiai, K.; Ito, K.; Onuma, M.; Fujimori, F.; Fujimoto, Y.; Izawa, H.

    1987-01-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibody c 143 was purified and F(ab')2 fragments were generated by pepsin digestion and then radiolabeled with 125 I. The 125 I-labeled c 143 F(ab')2 fragments were injected into athymic mice bearing bovine lymphoid tumor cells. The fragments became preferentially localized in tumor tissues, but not in normal tissues, as determined by differential counting of tissue radioactivity. The fragments became localized specifically in those tumors that were reactive with c 143 in vitro, but did not become localized in unrelated tumors. Localization of labeled F(ab')2 fragments of a monoclonal antibody of the same isotype directed against Taka virus (a variant of Newcastle disease virus) was not observed in athymic mice bearing bovine lymphoid tumor cells. Tumors were detectable by radioimmunoscintigraphy, using radiolabeled c 143 F(ab')2 fragments, without background subtraction, and by use of silver-grain scattering in light microscopic autoradiography

  12. Development of a Tc-99m labeled sigma-2 receptor-specific ligand as a potential breast tumor imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seok-Rye; Yang, Biao; Ploessl, Karl; Chumpradit, Sumalee; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Acton, Paul D.; Wheeler, Kenneth; Mach, Robert H.; Kung, Hank F.

    2001-01-01

    A novel in vivo imaging agent, 99m Tc labeled [(N-[2-((3'-N'-propyl-[3,3,1]aza-bicyclononan-3α-yl)(2''-methoxy-5- methyl-phenylcarbamate) (2-mercaptoethyl)amino)acetyl]-2-aminoethanethiolato] technetium(V) oxide), [ 99m Tc]2, displaying specific binding towards sigma-2 receptors was prepared and characterized. In vitro binding assays showed that the rhenium surrogate of [ 99m Tc]2, Re-2, displayed excellent binding affinity and selectivity towards sigma-2 receptors (K i = 2,723 and 22 nM for sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptor, respectively). Preparation of [ 99m Tc]2 was achieved by heating the S-protected starting material, 1, in the presence of acid, reducing agent (stannous glucoheptonate) and sodium [ 99m Tc]pertechnetate. The lipophilic racemic mixture was successfully prepared in 10 to 50% yield and the radiochemical purity was >98%. Separation of the isomers, peak A and peak B, was successfully achieved by using a chiralpak AD column eluted with an isocratic solvent (n-hexane/isopropanol; 3:1; v/v). The peak A and peak B appear to co-elute with the isomers of the surrogate, Re-2, under the same HPLC condition. Biodistribution studies in tumor bearing mice (mouse mammary adenocarcinoma, cell line 66, which is known to over-express sigma-2 receptors) showed that the racemic [ 99m Tc]2 localized in the tumor. Uptake in the tumor was 2.11, 1.30 and 1.11 %dose/gram at 1, 4 and 8 hr post iv injection, respectively, suggesting good uptake and retention in the tumor cells. The tumor uptake was significantly, but incompletely, blocked (about 25-30% blockage) by co-injection of 'cold' (+)pentazocine or haloperidol (1 mg/Kg). A majority of the radioactivity localized in the tumor tissue was extractable (>60%), and the HPLC analysis showed that it is the original compound, racemic [ 99m Tc]2 (>98% pure). The distribution of the purified peak A and peak B was determined in the same tumor bearing mice at 4 hr post iv injection. The tumor uptake was similar for both isomers

  13. In vivo prediction of anti-tumor effect of 3-bromopyruvate in hepatocellular carcinoma using Tc-99m labeled annexin-v imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won; Yoon, Jung Hwan; Kim, Chung Yang [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Gi Jeoog; Lee, Tae Sup; Woo, Kwang Sun; Chung, Wee Sup [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    We have recently demonstrated that hypoxia stimulates hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell growth through hexokinase II induction, and its inhibition induces apoptotic cell death through activating mitochondrial apoptotic signaling cascades. In this study, we were apt to evaluate the antitumoral effect of 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) on in vivo model of HCC by apoptotic imaging using Tc-99m labeled annexin V. In vivo model of HCC was established in C3H mice intradermally implanted with MH134 cells, a mouse HCC cell line, and 3-BP (0, 5, 10 mg/kg) was subsequently administered intraperitoneally. Tc-99m-HYNIC-annexin V (185 KBq) was injected via tail vein at one and three days after the 3-BP treatment, planar scan was acquired at a hour after the injection using gamma camera. The anti-tumor effect was evaluated by measuring tumor volumes and quantification of apoptotic cells using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Tumor volume was significantly reduced in mice treated with 3-BP in a dose-dependent manner (mean tumor volume 1.07 vs. 0.58 vs. 0.39 cm{sup 3} in 3-BP 0, 5, 10 mg/kg, respectively: p=0.047). The percentage of TUNEL staining-positive cells was significantly increased in 3-BP-treated mice (0.53 vs. 1.40 vs. 1.84% in 3-BP 0, 5, 10 mg/kg, respectively; p=0.018). On Tc-99m-HYNIC annexin V imaging, tumor-to-background uptake ratio (UR) was 1.92 at one day and 4.23 at three days after 3-BP treatment of 5 mg/kg (non-treated tumor showed UR of 2.93). Apoptosis-inducing anti-tumor effect of 3-BP was able to be demonstrated in in vivo model of HCC by apoptotic in vivo imaging using Tc-99m-HYNIC annexin V.

  14. In vivo prediction of anti-tumor effect of 3-bromopyruvate in hepatocellular carcinoma using Tc-99m labeled annexin-v imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Won; Yoon, Jung Hwan; Kim, Chung Yang; Cheon, Gi Jeoog; Lee, Tae Sup; Woo, Kwang Sun; Chung, Wee Sup

    2005-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that hypoxia stimulates hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell growth through hexokinase II induction, and its inhibition induces apoptotic cell death through activating mitochondrial apoptotic signaling cascades. In this study, we were apt to evaluate the antitumoral effect of 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) on in vivo model of HCC by apoptotic imaging using Tc-99m labeled annexin V. In vivo model of HCC was established in C3H mice intradermally implanted with MH134 cells, a mouse HCC cell line, and 3-BP (0, 5, 10 mg/kg) was subsequently administered intraperitoneally. Tc-99m-HYNIC-annexin V (185 KBq) was injected via tail vein at one and three days after the 3-BP treatment, planar scan was acquired at a hour after the injection using gamma camera. The anti-tumor effect was evaluated by measuring tumor volumes and quantification of apoptotic cells using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Tumor volume was significantly reduced in mice treated with 3-BP in a dose-dependent manner (mean tumor volume 1.07 vs. 0.58 vs. 0.39 cm 3 in 3-BP 0, 5, 10 mg/kg, respectively: p=0.047). The percentage of TUNEL staining-positive cells was significantly increased in 3-BP-treated mice (0.53 vs. 1.40 vs. 1.84% in 3-BP 0, 5, 10 mg/kg, respectively; p=0.018). On Tc-99m-HYNIC annexin V imaging, tumor-to-background uptake ratio (UR) was 1.92 at one day and 4.23 at three days after 3-BP treatment of 5 mg/kg (non-treated tumor showed UR of 2.93). Apoptosis-inducing anti-tumor effect of 3-BP was able to be demonstrated in in vivo model of HCC by apoptotic in vivo imaging using Tc-99m-HYNIC annexin V

  15. In vivo tomographic imaging with fluorescence and MRI using tumor-targeted dual-labeled nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Yue Zhang,1 Bin Zhang,1 Fei Liu,1,2 Jianwen Luo,1,3 Jing Bai1 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, 2Tsinghua-Peking Center for Life Sciences, 3Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, People's Republic of China Abstract: Dual-modality imaging combines the complementary advantages of different modalities, and offers the prospect of improved preclinical research. The combination of fluorescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provides cross-validated information and direct comparison between these modalities. Here, we report on the application of a novel tumor-targeted, dual-labeled nanoparticle (NP, utilizing iron oxide as the MRI contrast agent and near infrared (NIR dye Cy5.5 as the fluorescent agent. Results of in vitro experiments verified the specificity of the NP to tumor cells. In vivo tumor targeting and uptake of the NPs in a mouse model were visualized by fluorescence and MR imaging collected at different time points. Quantitative analysis was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of MRI contrast enhancement. Furthermore, tomographic images were also acquired using both imaging modalities and cross-validated information of tumor location and size between these two modalities was revealed. The results demonstrate that the use of dual-labeled NPs can facilitate the dual-modal detection of tumors, information cross-validation, and direct comparison by combing fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT and MRI. Keywords: dual-modality, fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, nanoparticle

  16. Cascaded strand displacement for non-enzymatic target recycling amplification and label-free electronic detection of microRNA from tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Kai; Dou, Baoting; Yang, Jianmei; Yuan, Ruo; Xiang, Yun, E-mail: yunatswu@swu.edu.cn

    2016-04-15

    The monitoring of microRNA (miRNA) expression levels is of great importance in cancer diagnosis. In the present work, based on two cascaded toehold-mediated strand displacement reactions (TSDRs), we have developed a label- and enzyme-free target recycling signal amplification approach for sensitive electronic detection of miRNA-21 from human breast cancer cells. The junction probes containing the locked G-quadruplex forming sequences are self-assembled on the senor surface. The presence of the target miRNA-21 initiates the first TSDR and results in the disassembly of the junction probes and the release of the active G-quadruplex forming sequences. Subsequently, the DNA fuel strand triggers the second TSDR and leads to cyclic reuse of the target miRNA-21. The cascaded TSDRs thus generate many active G-quadruplex forming sequences on the sensor surface, which associate with hemin to produce significantly amplified current response for sensitive detection of miRNA-21 at 1.15 fM. The sensor is also selective and can be employed to monitor miRNA-21 from human breast cancer cells. - Highlights: • Amplified and sensitive detection of microRNA from tumor cells is achieved. • Signal amplification is realized by two cascaded strand displacement reactions. • The developed sensor is selective and label-free without involving any enzymes.

  17. Biodistribution, pharmacokinetic, and imaging studies with 186Re-labeled NR-LU-10 whole antibody in LS174T colonic tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldrosen, M.H.; Biddle, W.C.; Pancook, J.; Bakshi, S.; Vanderheyden, J.L.; Fritzberg, A.R.; Morgan, A.C. Jr.; Foon, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    Biodistribution, pharmacokinetic, and radioimaging studies were performed with 186Re-labeled NR-LU-10 whole antibody in athymic nude mice bearing the LS174T tumor growing either s.c. or in an experimental hepatic metastasis model. NR-LU-10 is an IgG2b murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) that reacts with virtually all human tumors of epithelial origin. NR-BC-1, a IgG2b murine MAb that reacts with normal human B-cell and B malignancies, was used as an isotype-matched control. These MAbs were radiolabeled with 186Re by a preformed chelate approach by using the triamide thiolate ligand system. 186Re-labeled NR-LU-10 (50 microCi) was injected into nude mice bearing LS174T tumors growing s.c. Biodistribution studies revealed that the LS174T tumor retained the highest concentration of 186Re-labeled NR-LU-10 at day 6. The tumor:blood ratio ranged from 0.1:1 to 10.8:1 by day 6, the last day of analysis. In contrast the tumor:blood ratio of 186Re-labeled NR-BC-1, the isotype-matched MAb control, was 1:1 on day 6. Pharmacokinetic analysis indicated that the t1/2 beta of NR-LU-10 for blood and other tissues ranged from 21 to 25 h, while the t1/2 beta for the LS174T tumor averaged 52 h. The area under the curve for tumor compared to blood was 2.8- to 5.7-fold higher than the area under the curve for all other tissues and organs. The mean residence time for NR-LU-10 in blood and all other organs ranged from 23 to 26 h, while the mean residence time for NR-LU-10 in the LS174T tumor was 72 h. Scintigraphic images revealed selective uptake of the 186Re-labeled NR-LU-10, but not of the 186Re-labeled NR-BC-1, at the LS174T tumor site. Studies in an experimental model of hepatic metastasis revealed a similar selective pattern of 186Re-labeled NR-LU-10 accumulation. Scintigraphic images of the LS174T tumor growing within the athymic nude mouse liver were obtained

  18. Multicellular tumor spheroid interactions with bone cells and bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wezeman, F.H.; Guzzino, K.M.; Waxler, B.

    1985-01-01

    In vitro coculture techniques were used to study HSDM1C1 murine fibrosarcoma multicellular tumor spheroid (HSDM1C1-MTS) interactions with mouse calvarial bone cells having osteoblastic characteristics and mouse bone explants. HSDM1C1-MTS attached to confluent bone cell monolayers and their attachment rate was quantified. HSDM1C1-MTS interaction with bone cells was further demonstrated by the release of 3 H-deoxyuridine from prelabeled bone cells during coculture with multicellular tumor spheroids. HSDM1C1-MTS-induced cytotoxicity was mimicked by the addition of 10(-5) M prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) to 3 H-deoxyuridine-labeled bone cells. The effects of low (10(-9) M) and high (10(-5) M) concentrations of PGE2 on bone cell proliferation were also studied. Higher concentrations of PGE2 inhibited bone cell proliferation. HSDM1C1-MTS resorbed living explants in the presence of indomethacin, suggesting that other tumor cell products may also participate in bone resorption. HSDM1C1-MTS caused direct bone resorption as measured by the significantly elevated release of 45 Ca from prelabeled, devitalized calvaria. However, the growth of a confluent bone cell layer on devitalized, 45 Ca-prelabeled calvaria resulted in a significant reduction in the amount of 45 Ca released subsequent to the seeding of HSDM1C1-MTS onto the explants. Bone cells at the bone surface may act as a barrier against invasion and tumor cell-mediated bone resorption. Violation of this cellular barrier is achieved, in part, by tumor cell products

  19. Transformation of cell-derived microparticles into quantum-dot-labeled nanovectors for antitumor siRNA delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Zhu, Jun-Yi; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Wei; Ren, Jian-Gang; Wu, Min; Hong, Zheng-Yuan; Lv, Cheng; Pang, Dai-Wen; Zhao, Yi-Fang

    2015-01-12

    Cell-derived microparticles (MPs) have been recently recognized as critical intercellular information conveyors. However, further understanding of their biological behavior and potential application has been hampered by the limitations of current labeling techniques. Herein, a universal donor-cell-assisted membrane biotinylation strategy was proposed for labeling MPs by skillfully utilizing the natural membrane phospholipid exchange of their donor cells. This innovative strategy conveniently led to specific, efficient, reproducible, and biocompatible quantum dot (QD) labeling of MPs, thereby reliably conferring valuable traceability on MPs. By further loading with small interference RNA, QD-labeled MPs that had inherent cell-targeting and biomolecule-conveying ability were successfully employed for combined bioimaging and tumor-targeted therapy. This study provides the first reliable and biofriendly strategy for transforming biogenic MPs into functionalized nanovectors. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Double labeling autoradiography. Cell kinetic studies with 3H- and 14C-thymidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultze, B.

    1981-01-01

    Examples of the multiple applicability of the double labeling method with 3 H- and 14 C-TdR are demonstrated. Double labeling with 3 H- and 14 C-TdR makes it possible to determine the cycle and its phases with high precision by modifying the usual percent labeled mitoses method with a single injection of 3 H-TdR. In addition, data is provided on the variances of the transit times through the cycle phases. For example, in the case of the jejunal crypt cells of the mouse, the transit times through successive cycle phases are uncorrelated. In the case of glial cells the double labeling method provides cell kinetic parameters despite the paucity of proliferating glial cells. In the adult untreated animal, glial cell mitoses are so rare that the percent labeled mitoses method can not be utilized. However, the S-phase duration can be measured by double labeling and the cycle time can be determined by the so-called method of labeled S phases. With the latter method the passage through the S phase of the 3 H-TdR-labeled S phase cells can be registered by injecting 14 C-TdR at different time intervals following 3 H-TdR application. In this way an S-phase duration of about 10 hr and a cycle time of about 20 hr was found for glial cells in the adult untreated mouse. An exchange of glial cells between the growth fraction and the nongrowth fraction has also been shown by double labeling. A quite different application of the double labeling method with 3H- and 14 C-TdR is the in vivo study of the cell cycle phase-specific effect of drugs used in chemotherapy of tumors. The effect of vincristine on these cells has been studied. Vincristine affects cells in S and G2 in such a manner that they are arrested during the next metaphase and subsequently become necrotic. It has no effect on G1 cells

  1. Cell Cycle Regulating Kinase Cdk4 as a Potential Target for Tumor Cell Treatment and Tumor Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Graf

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk-cyclin D/retinoblastoma (pRb/E2F cascade, which controls the G1/S transition of cell cycle, has been found to be altered in many neoplasias. Inhibition of this pathway by using, for example, selective Cdk4 inhibitors has been suggested to be a promising approach for cancer therapy. We hypothesized that appropriately radiolabeled Cdk4 inhibitors are suitable probes for tumor imaging and may be helpful studying cell proliferation processes in vivo by positron emission tomography. Herein, we report the synthesis and biological, biochemical, and radiopharmacological characterizations of two I124-labeled small molecule Cdk4 inhibitors (8-cyclopentyl-6-iodo-5-methyl-2-(4-piperazin-1-yl-phenylamino-8H-pyrido[2,3-d]-pyrimidin-7-one (CKIA and 8-cyclopentyl-6-iodo-5-methyl-2-(5-(piperazin-1-yl-pyridin-2-yl-amino-8H-pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-one (CKIB. Our data demonstrate a defined and specific inhibition of tumor cell proliferation through CKIA and CKIB by inhibition of the Cdk4/pRb/E2F pathway emphasizing potential therapeutic benefit of CKIA and CKIB. Furthermore, radiopharmacological properties of [I124]CKIA and [I124]CKIB observed in human tumor cells are promising prerequisites for in vivo biodistribution and imaging studies.

  2. Preparation and evaluation of a new neurotensin analog labeled with 99mTc for targeted imaging of neurotensin receptor positive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakisa Zarrabi Ahrabi; Kazem Parivar; Davood Beiki

    2014-01-01

    Neurotensin receptors are overexpressed in several human tumors and can be targets for tumors diagnosis and therapy. In this study, a new neurotensin analogue was labeled with 99m Tc via HYNIC and tricine/EDDA as coligands and investigated further. [HYNIC 0 , Gly 7 , Lys 9 , d-Tyr 11 ]-Neurotensin (7-13) was synthesized using a standard Fmoc strategy. Labeling with 99m Tc was performed at 100 deg C for 10 min and radiochemical analysis involved ITLC and HPLC methods. The stability of radiopeptide was checked in the presence of humane serum at 37 deg C up to 24 h. The receptor bound internalization and externalization rates were studied in neurotensin receptor expressing HT-29 cells. Biodistribution of radiopeptide was studied in nude mice bearing HT-29 tumor. Labeling yield of 98.6 ± 0.54 % (n = 3) was obtained corresponding to a specific activity of 81 MBq/nmol. Peptide conjugate showed good stability in the presence of human serum. The radioligand showed specific internalization into HT-29 cells (12.43 ± 0.52 % at 4 h). In biodistribution studies, a receptor-specific uptake was observed in neurotensin receptor positive organs so that after 1 h the uptakes in mouse intestine and tumor were 0.87 ± 0.16 and 0.63 ± 0.12 % ID/g respectively. (author)

  3. Bromine-77-labeled estrogen receptor-binding radiopharmaceuticals for breast tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElvany, K.D.

    1985-01-01

    Two derivatives of 16α-bromoestradiol, both with and without an 11β-methoxy substituent, have been labeled with bromine-77 and evaluated as potential breast tumor imaging agents. Extensive characterization of these radiotracers in animal models has demonstrated their effective concentration in estrogen target tissues. Preliminary clinical studies have demonstrated the potential of radiolabeled estrogens for breast tumor imaging; however, the suboptimal decay properties of bromine-77 limit the utility of these agents in imaging studies. These results with 77 -Br-labeled estrogens suggest that estrogen derivatives labeled with other radionuclides should provide enhanced image resolution with various imaging devices. Although the decay characteristics of bromine-77 are such that it is not ideally suited to imaging with conventional gamma cameras, it may be a useful radionuclide for therapeutic applications

  4. Murine macrophage heparanase: inhibition and comparison with metastatic tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savion, N.; Disatnik, M.H.; Nevo, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Circulating macrophages and metastatic tumor cells can penetrate the vascular endothelium and migrate from the circulatory system to extravascular compartments. Both activated murine macrophages and different metastatic tumor cells attach, invade, and penetrate confluent vascular endothelial cell monolayer in vitro, by degrading heparan sulfate proteoglycans in the subendothelial extracellular matrix. The sensitivity of the enzymes from the various sources degrading the heparan sulfate proteoglycan was challenged and compared by a series of inhibitors. Activated macrophages demonstrate a heparanase with an endoglycosidase activity that cleaves from the [ 35 S]O 4 - -labeled heparan sulfate proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix 10 kDa glycosaminoglycan fragments. The degradation of [ 35 S]O 4 - -labeled extracellular matrix proteoglycans by the macrophages' heparanase is significantly inhibited in the presence of heparan sulfate (10μg/ml), arteparon (10μg/ml), and heparin at a concentration of 3 μg/ml. Degradation of this heparan sulfate proteoglycan is a two-step sequential process involving protease activity followed by heparanase activity. B16-BL6 metastatic melanoma cell heparanase, which is also a cell-associated enzyme, was inhibited by heparin to the same extent as the macrophage haparanase. On the other hand, heparanase of the highly metastatic variant (ESb) of a methylcholanthrene-induced T lymphoma, which is an extracellular enzyme released by the cells to the incubation medium, was more sensitive to heparin and arteparon than the macrophages' heparanase. These results may indicate the potential use of heparin or other glycosaminoglycans as specific and differential inhibitors for the formation in certain cases of blood-borne tumor metastasis

  5. Imaging tumor endothelial marker 8 using an 18F-labeled peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan, Qimeng; Yang, Min; Gao, Haokao; Zhu, Lei; Lin, Xin; Guo, Ning; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Zhang, Guixiang; Eden, Henry S.; Niu, Gang

    2011-01-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8) has been reported to be upregulated in both tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelial cells in several cancer types. TEM8 antagonists and TEM8-targeted delivery of toxins have been developed as effective cancer therapeutics. The ability to image TEM8 expression would be of use in evaluating TEM8-targeted cancer therapy. A 13-meric peptide, KYNDRLPLYISNP (QQM), identified from the small loop in domain IV of protective antigen of anthrax toxin was evaluated for TEM8 binding and labeled with 18 F for small-animal PET imaging in both UM-SCC1 head-and-neck cancer and MDA-MB-435 melanoma models. A modified ELISA showed that QQM peptide bound specifically to the extracellular vWA domain of TEM8 with an IC 50 value of 304 nM. Coupling 4-nitrophenyl 2- 18 F-fluoropropionate with QQM gave almost quantitative yield and a high specific activity (79.2 ± 7.4 TBq/mmol, n = 5) of 18 F-FP-QQM at the end of synthesis. 18 F-FP-QQM showed predominantly renal clearance and had significantly higher accumulation in TEM8 high-expressing UM-SCC1 tumors (2.96 ± 0.84 %ID/g at 1 h after injection) than TEM8 low-expressing MDA-MB-435 tumors (1.38 ± 0.56 %ID/g at 1 h after injection). QQM peptide bound specifically to the extracellular domain of TEM8. 18 F-FP-QQM peptide tracer would be a promising lead compound for measuring TEM8 expression. Further efforts to improve the affinity and specificity of the tracer and to increase its metabolic stability are warranted. (orig.)

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of Tc-99m and fluorescence-labeled elastin-derived peptide, VAPG for multimodal tumor imaging in murine tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Kim, Chang Guhn; Kim, Seul-Gi; Kim, Dae-Weung

    2017-12-01

    We developed a Tc-99m and fluorescence-labeled peptide, Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG to target tumor cells and evaluated the diagnostic performance as a dual-modality imaging agent for tumor in a murine model. TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG was synthesized by using Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis. Radiolabeling of TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG with Tc-99m was done by using ligand exchange via tartrate. Binding affinity and in vitro cellular uptake studies were performed. Gamma camera imaging, biodistribution, and ex vivo imaging studies were performed in murine models with SW620 tumors. Tumor tissue slides were prepared and analyzed with immunohistochemistry by using confocal microscopy. After radiolabeling procedures with Tc-99m, Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG complexes were prepared in high yield (>96%). The K d of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG determined by saturation binding was 16.8 ± 3.6 nM. Confocal microscopy images of SW620 cells incubated with TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG showed strong fluorescence in the cytoplasm. Gamma camera imaging revealed substantial uptake of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG in tumors. Tumor uptake was effectively blocked by the coinjection of an excess concentration of VAPG. Specific uptake of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG was confirmed by biodistribution, ex vivo imaging, and immunohistochemistry stain studies. In vivo and in vitro studies revealed substantial uptake of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG in tumor cells. Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG has potential as a dual-modality tumor imaging agent. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Subcellular SIMS imaging of isotopically labeled amino acids in cryogenically prepared cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, Subhash

    2004-01-01

    Ion microscopy is a potentially powerful technique for localization of isotopically labeled molecules. In this study, L-arginine and phenylalanine amino acids labeled with stable isotopes 13 C and 15 N were localized in cultured cells with the ion microscope at 500 nm spatial resolution. Cells were exposed to the labeled amino acids and cryogenically prepared. SIMS analyses were made in fractured freeze-dried cells. A dynamic distribution was observed from labeled arginine-treated LLC-PK 1 kidney cells at mass 28 ( 13 C 15 N) in negative secondaries, revealing cell-to-cell heterogeneity and preferential accumulation of the amino acid (or its metabolite) in the nucleus and nucleolus of some cells. The smaller nucleolus inside the nucleus was clearly resolved in SIMS images and confirmed by correlative light microscopy. The distribution of labeled phenylalanine contrasted with arginine as it was rather homogeneously distributed in T98G human glioblastoma cells. Images of 39 K, 23 Na and 40 Ca were also recorded to confirm the reliability of sample preparation and authenticity of the observed amino acid distributions. These observations indicate that SIMS techniques can provide a valuable technology for subcellular localization of nitrogen-containing molecules in proteomics since nitrogen does not have a radionuclide tracer isotope. Amino acids labeled with stable isotopes can be used as tracers for studying their transport and metabolism in distinct subcellular compartments with SIMS. Further studies of phenylalanine uptake in human glioblastoma cells may have special significance in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as a boron analogue of phenylalanine, boronophenylalanine is a clinically approved compound for the treatment of brain tumors

  8. Subcellular SIMS imaging of isotopically labeled amino acids in cryogenically prepared cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Subhash

    2004-06-15

    Ion microscopy is a potentially powerful technique for localization of isotopically labeled molecules. In this study, L-arginine and phenylalanine amino acids labeled with stable isotopes {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N were localized in cultured cells with the ion microscope at 500 nm spatial resolution. Cells were exposed to the labeled amino acids and cryogenically prepared. SIMS analyses were made in fractured freeze-dried cells. A dynamic distribution was observed from labeled arginine-treated LLC-PK{sub 1} kidney cells at mass 28 ({sup 13}C{sup 15}N) in negative secondaries, revealing cell-to-cell heterogeneity and preferential accumulation of the amino acid (or its metabolite) in the nucleus and nucleolus of some cells. The smaller nucleolus inside the nucleus was clearly resolved in SIMS images and confirmed by correlative light microscopy. The distribution of labeled phenylalanine contrasted with arginine as it was rather homogeneously distributed in T98G human glioblastoma cells. Images of {sup 39}K, {sup 23}Na and {sup 40}Ca were also recorded to confirm the reliability of sample preparation and authenticity of the observed amino acid distributions. These observations indicate that SIMS techniques can provide a valuable technology for subcellular localization of nitrogen-containing molecules in proteomics since nitrogen does not have a radionuclide tracer isotope. Amino acids labeled with stable isotopes can be used as tracers for studying their transport and metabolism in distinct subcellular compartments with SIMS. Further studies of phenylalanine uptake in human glioblastoma cells may have special significance in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as a boron analogue of phenylalanine, boronophenylalanine is a clinically approved compound for the treatment of brain tumors.

  9. Omega 3 fatty acids increase spontaneous release of cytosolic components from tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenski, L.J.; Sturdevant, L.K.; Ehringer, W.D.; Stillwell, W.

    1991-01-01

    Mice fed menhaden (fish) oil or coconut oil-rich diets were inoculated intraperitoneally with a rapidly growing leukemia, T27A. After one week, the tumor cells were harvested, and 51Cr was used to label intracellular molecules. Spontaneous release of 51Cr was used as a measure of plasma membrane permeability. Compared to cells from mice fed coconut oil (rich in saturated fatty acids), tumor cells from mice fed menhaden oil (rich in long chain polyunsaturated omega 3 fatty acids) showed an increased level of spontaneous 51Cr release, which was exacerbated by increased temperature and reduced by extracellular protein. At physiological salt concentrations, the released 51Cr was detected in particles of approximately 2700 daltons. Enhanced permeability correlated with the incorporation of dietary (fish oil) omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acid into the tumor cells. The results demonstrate that omega 3 fatty acids are incorporated into cellular constituents of tumor cells and change properties associated with the plasma membrane. This result suggests that dietary manipulation may be used to enhance tumor cell permeability and contribute to tumor eradication

  10. The role of heat shock protein 90 in the regulation of tumor cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaigorodova, E V; Ryazantseva, N V; Novitskii, V V; Belkina, M V; Maroshkina, A N

    2011-02-01

    Programmed death of Jurkat tumor cells was studied under conditions of culturing with 17-AAG selective inhibitor of heat shock protein with a molecular weight of 90 kDa and etoposide. Apoptosis realization was evaluated by fluorescent microscopy with FITC-labeled annexin V and propidium iodide. Activity of caspase-3 was evaluated spectrophotometrically. Inhibition of heat shock protein with a molecular weight of 90 kDa activated the apoptotic program in Jurkat tumor cells and etoposide-induced apoptosis. The heat shock protein with a molecular weight of 90 kDa acted as apoptosis inhibitor in tumor cells.

  11. An investigation of the shedding of macromolecules from the Ehrlich mouse ascites tumor cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, E.H.

    1984-01-01

    The spontaneous release, or shedding, of cell surface components into the extracellular medium may be important in the determination of several features of the cancer cell phenotype. The release of macromolecules from the Erhlich mouse ascites tumor cell was studied under a variety of experimental conditions to elucidate the origin and the underlying mechanisms of release. The extrinsic macromolecules are a diverse group with apparent molecular weights ranging from 13,500 to 400,000 daltons. External labeling of the cell surface with tritiated 4,4'-diisothiocyano-1,2-diphenylethane-2,2-disulfonic acid ([ 3 H]H 2 DIDS) reveals a slow loss of labeled components at 4 degrees C, while at 21 degrees C and 37 degrees C an initial rapid loss is followed by a slower release. In vitro metabolic labeling with [1- 14 C]-D-glucosamine hydrochloride, D-[2- 3 H]-mannose and various [ 3 H]-L-amino acids results in the appearance of labeled macromolecules in the medium suggesting tumor, not mouse, origin. These data suggest that the extrinsic macromolecules originate from the cell surface. Macromolecules are shed by a temperature and pH sensitive process. These results suggest that a limited proteolytic digestion, or sublethal autolysis, of the cell surface may occur in this system. The macromolecules shed by the Ehrlich cell originate from the surface and are probably released by sublethal autolysis, direct secretion and a passive process

  12. The negative enrichment by immunomagnetic beads for tumor cells from malignant pleural effusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨俊俊

    2012-01-01

    Objective To establish a method (negative enrichment by immunomagnetic beads) for detection of tumor cells in pleural effusions and to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the method for clinical application. Methods Five,10,20,50 and 100 A549(lung adenocarcinoma) cells were labeled with

  13. Cell kinetics of gastrointestinal tumors after different nutritional regimens. A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franchi, F.; Rossi-Fanelli, F.; Seminara, P.; Cascino, A.; Barone, C.; Scucchi, L.

    1991-01-01

    Forty-four cases of different untreated gastrointestinal tumors were studied with regard to cell kinetic activity. As a pilot experiment, the authors also determined the 3H-TdR Labeling Index (LI) in 28 patients in basal conditions and after 15 days of nutritional manipulation with prevalently lipid-based or glucose-based feeding to ascertain whether selective nutritional regimens could affect tumor proliferation. Preliminary results from this study indicate that a kinetic perturbation is induced in tumor cells by nutritional manipulation. Lipid-based feeding seems to produce effects similar to those of chemical or physical anticancer agents, thus suggesting a possible supporting role of nutritional manipulation in cancer treatment strategy

  14. Development of nano radiopharmaceutical based on Bevacizumab labelled with Technetium-99m for early diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, Thais Ligiero

    2015-01-01

    The development of new radiopharmaceuticals is an essential activity to improve nuclear medicine, and essential for the early and effective diagnosis of oncological diseases. Among the various possibilities current research in the world, the radiopharmaceuticals to chemotherapeutic base may be the most effective in detecting tumors, particularly Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST), the Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma and neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors. However, difficulties in directing, as well as adhesion of the radiopharmaceutical in the desired location, are currently the main problems in the early detection and treatment of some of these tumors. Advances in the field of nanotechnology, particularly in recent years, indicate significant contribution to overcoming these obstacles, particularly in the implementation of molecular barriers as well as the functionalization of the nanoparticles, thereby improving targeting by the use of surface nucleotides, and the increased adhesion, which facilitates the release of the drug and therefore increases the chances of early diagnosis and more effective treatment. This study aimed to the production, characterization and evaluation of cytotoxicity, as well as in vivo biodistribution test Bevacizumab nanoparticles labeled with Technetium-99m radionuclide for detection of type GIST tumors. Bevacizumab was encapsulated in the form of nanoparticles by the emulsification method using double poly-acetic acid and polyvinyl alcohol polymers (PLA / PVA) at a concentration of 2% of the monoclonal antibody. The characterization of the nanoparticles was performed by the technique of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cytotoxicity assessment was performed by XTT assay with various cell lines of solid tumor cells. The labeling with technetium-99m was done by the direct method, and its yield determined by paper chromatography using paper Whatmam 1 as the stationary phase and acetone as mobile phase. In the biodistribution study

  15. Tumor cell adhesion to endothelial cells is increased by endotoxin via an upregulation of beta-1 integrin expression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Andrews, E J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies have demonstrated that metastatic disease develops from tumor cells that adhere to endothelial cells and proliferate intravascularly. The beta-1 integrin family and its ligand laminin have been shown to be important in tumor-to-endothelial cell adhesion. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been implicated in the increased metastatic tumor growth that is seen postoperatively. We postulated that LPS increases tumor cell expression of beta-1 integrins and that this leads to increased adhesion. METHODS: The human metastatic colon cancer cell line LS174T was labeled with an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) using retroviral transfection. Cell cultures were treated with LPS for 1, 2, and 4 h (n = 6 each) and were subsequently cocultured for 30 or 120 min with confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), to allow adherence. Adherent tumor cells were counted using fluorescence microscopy. These experiments were carried out in the presence or absence of a functional blocking beta-1 integrin monoclonal antibody (4B4). Expression of beta-1 integrin and laminin on tumor and HUVECs was assessed using flow cytometric analysis. Tumor cell NF-kappaB activation after incubation with LPS was measured. RESULTS: Tumor cell and HUVEC beta-1 integrin expression and HUVEC expression of laminin were significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced after incubation with LPS. Tumor cell adhesion to HUVECs was significantly increased. Addition of the beta-1 integrin blocking antibody reduced tumor cell adhesion to control levels. LPS increased tumor cell NF-kappaB activation. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to LPS increases tumor cell adhesion to the endothelium through a beta-1 integrin-mediated pathway that is NF-kappaB dependent. This may provide a target for immunotherapy directed at reducing postoperative metastatic tumor growth.

  16. [Heat shock protein 90--modulator of TNFalpha-induced apoptosis of Jurkat tumor cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaĭgorodova, E V; Riazantseva, N V; Novitskiĭ, V V; Moroshkina, A N; Belkina, M V; Iakushina, V D

    2011-01-01

    rTNFalpha-induced programmed death of Jurkat tumor cells cultured with 17-AAG, a selective inhibitor of heat shock protein (Hsp90), was studied by fluorescent microscopy with the use of FITC-labeled annexin V and propidium iodide. Caspase-3 and -8 activities were determined by spectrophotometry using a caspase- 3 and -8 colorimetric assay kit. It was shown that inhibition of Hsp90 leads to activation of Jurkat cell apoptosis while Hsp90 itself suppresses this process. 17-AAG enhances rTNFa-induced apoptosis of tumor cells.

  17. Tumor-reactive immune cells protect against metastatic tumor and induce immunoediting of indolent but not quiescent tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Kyle K; Keim, Rebecca C; Graham, Laura; Idowu, Michael O; Wan, Wen; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Toor, Amir A; Bear, Harry D; Manjili, Masoud H

    2016-09-01

    Two major barriers to cancer immunotherapy include tumor-induced immune suppression mediated by myeloid-derived suppressor cells and poor immunogenicity of the tumor-expressing self-antigens. To overcome these barriers, we reprogrammed tumor-immune cell cross-talk by combined use of decitabine and adoptive immunotherapy, containing tumor-sensitized T cells and CD25(+) NKT cells. Decitabine functioned to induce the expression of highly immunogenic cancer testis antigens in the tumor, while also reducing the frequency of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and the presence of CD25(+) NKT cells rendered T cells, resistant to remaining myeloid-derived suppressor cells. This combinatorial therapy significantly prolonged survival of animals bearing metastatic tumor cells. Adoptive immunotherapy also induced tumor immunoediting, resulting in tumor escape and associated disease-related mortality. To identify a tumor target that is incapable of escape from the immune response, we used dormant tumor cells. We used Adriamycin chemotherapy or radiation therapy, which simultaneously induce tumor cell death and tumor dormancy. Resultant dormant cells became refractory to additional doses of Adriamycin or radiation therapy, but they remained sensitive to tumor-reactive immune cells. Importantly, we discovered that dormant tumor cells contained indolent cells that expressed low levels of Ki67 and quiescent cells that were Ki67 negative. Whereas the former were prone to tumor immunoediting and escape, the latter did not demonstrate immunoediting. Our results suggest that immunotherapy could be highly effective against quiescent dormant tumor cells. The challenge is to develop combinatorial therapies that could establish a quiescent type of tumor dormancy, which would be the best target for immunotherapy. © The Author(s).

  18. An assessment tumor targeting ability of 177Lu labeled cyclic CCK analogue peptide by binding with cholecystokinin receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Ha Cho

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The cholecystokinin (CCK receptor is known as a receptor that is overexpressed in many human tumors. The present study was designed to investigate the targeting ability of cyclic CCK analogue in AR42J pancreatic cells. The CCK analogues, DOTA-K(glucose-Gly-Trp-Nle-Asp-Phe (DOTA-glucose-CCK and DOTA-Nle-cyclo(Glu-Trp-Nle-Asp-Phe-Lys-NH2 (DOTA-[Nle]-cCCK, were synthesized and radiolabeled with 177Lu, and competitive binding was evaluated. The binding appearance of synthesized peptide with AR42J cells was evaluated by confocal microscopy. And bio-distribution was performed in AR42J xenografted mice. Synthesized peptides were prepared by a solid phase synthesis method, and their purity was over 98%. DOTA is the chelating agent for 177Lu-labeling, in which the peptides were radiolabeled with 177Lu by a high radiolabeling yield. A competitive displacement of 125I-CCK8 on the AR42J cells revealed that the 50% inhibitory concentration value (IC50 was 12.3 nM of DOTA-glucose-CCK and 1.7 nM of DOTA-[Nle]-cCCK. Radio-labeled peptides were accumulated in AR42J tumor in vivo, and %ID/g of the tumor was 0.4 and 0.9 at 2 h p.i. It was concluded that 177Lu-DOTA-[Nle]-cCCK has higher binding affinity than 177Lu-DOTA-glucose-CCK and can be a potential candidate as a targeting modality for a CCK receptor over-expressing tumors.

  19. Practical cell labeling with magnetite cationic liposomes for cell manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Nonogaki, Yurika; Kato, Ryuji; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2010-07-01

    Personalization of the cell culture process for cell therapy is an ideal strategy to obtain maximum treatment effects. In a previous report, we proposed a strategy using a magnetic manipulation device that combined a palm-top size device and a cell-labeling method using magnetite cationic liposomes (MCLs) to enable feasible personalized cell processing. In the present study, we focused on optimizing the MCL-labeling technique with respect to cell manipulation in small devices. From detailed analysis with different cell types, 4 pg/cell of MCL-label was found to be obtained immediately after mixing with MCLs, which was sufficient for magnetic cell manipulation. The amount of label increased within 24 h depending on cell type, although in all cases it decreased along with cell doubling, indicating that the labeling potential of MCLs was limited. The role of free MCLs not involved in labeling was also investigated; MCLs' role was found to be a supportive one that maximized the manipulation performance up to 100%. We also determined optimum conditions to manipulate adherent cells by MCL labeling using the MCL dispersed in trypsin solution. Considering labeling feasibility and practical performance with 10(3)-10(5) cells for personalized cell processing, we determined that 10 microg/ml of label without incubation time (0 h incubation) was the universal MCL-labeling condition. We propose the optimum specifications for a device to be combined with this method. 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Noninvasive imaging of tumor integrin expression using 18F-labeled RGD dimer peptide with PEG4 linkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhaofei; Liu, Shuanglong; Wang, Fan; Liu, Shuang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2009-01-01

    Various radiolabeled Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides have been previously investigated for tumor integrin α v β 3 imaging. To further develop RGD radiotracers with enhanced tumor-targeting efficacy and improved in vivo pharmacokinetics, we designed a new RGD homodimeric peptide with two PEG 4 spacers (PEG 4 = 15-amino-4,7,10,13-tetraoxapentadecanoic acid) between the two monomeric RGD motifs and one PEG 4 linker on the glutamate α-amino group ( 18 F-labeled PEG 4 -E[PEG 4 -c(RGDfK)] 2 , P-PRGD2), as a promising agent for noninvasive imaging of integrin expression in mouse models. P-PRGD2 was labeled with 18 F via 4-nitrophenyl 2- 18 F-fluoropropionate ( 18 F-FP) prosthetic group. In vitro and in vivo characteristics of the new dimeric RGD peptide tracer 18 F-FP-P-PRGD2 were investigated and compared with those of 18 F-FP-P-RGD2 ( 18 F-labeled RGD dimer without two PEG 4 spacers between the two RGD motifs). The ability of 18 F-FP-P-PRGD2 to image tumor vascular integrin expression was evaluated in a 4T1 murine breast tumor model. With the insertion of two PEG 4 spacers between the two RGD motifs, 18 F-FP-P-PRGD2 showed enhanced integrin α v β 3 -binding affinity, increased tumor uptake and tumor-to-nontumor background ratios compared with 18 F-FP-P-RGD2 in U87MG tumors. MicroPET imaging with 18 F-FP-P-PRGD2 revealed high tumor contrast and low background in tumor-bearing nude mice. Biodistribution studies confirmed the in vivo integrin α v β 3 -binding specificity of 18 F-FP-P-RGD2. 18 F-FP-P-PRGD2 can specifically image integrin α v β 3 on the activated endothelial cells of tumor neovasculature. 18 F-FP-P-PRGD2 can provide important information on integrin expression on the tumor vasculature. The high integrin binding affinity and specificity, excellent pharmacokinetic properties and metabolic stability make the new RGD dimeric tracer 18 F-FP-P-PRGD2 a promising agent for PET imaging of tumor angiogenesis and for monitoring the efficacy of antiangiogenic

  1. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell tumors; Islet of Langerhans tumor; Neuroendocrine tumors; Peptic ulcer - islet cell tumor; Hypoglycemia - islet cell tumor ... stomach acid. Symptoms may include: Abdominal pain Diarrhea ... and small bowel Vomiting blood (occasionally) Glucagonomas make ...

  2. Leukemic cell labeling with indium-111-oxine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, T.; Takagi, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Yui, T.; Ishibashi, T.; Kimura, H.; Kariyone, S.

    1984-01-01

    Leukemic cells were labeled with In-111-oxine in patients with acute leukemia. In vitro labeling studies revealed that labeling efficiency reached maximum 80.8 +- 3.6% (mean +- 1SD) by 2 times washes after 20 minutes incubation time. Cell viability was assessed by trypan blue exclusion test and in vitro culture of leukemic cells, which showed no cellular damage during labeling procedure. Elution of In-111 from the labeled cells was 10.0 +- 1.2% at 12 hours after labeling. For in vivo leukemic cell kinetic studies, more than 10/sup 8/ leukemic cells separated from Ficoll-Hypacque sedimentation were labeled by 30 minutes of In-111-oxine incubation and two times washes at 37 0 C. In vivo studies were performed in 7 patients with acute myeloblastic, lymphoblastic leukemia and blastic crisis of chronic myelocytic leukemia. Labeled leukemic cells disappeared in single exponential fashion with half life of 9.6 to 31.8 hours. Total leukemic cell pool in peripheral circulation was calculated, which correlated well with peripheral leukemic cell counts (r=0.99). No relationship was observed between total leukemic cell pool and leukemic cell turnover rate. Migration patterns of labeled leukemic cells showed that pulmonary uptake was evident within 15 minutes after the infusion and returned to base-line. Splenic and hepatic uptake showed gradual increase up to 24 hours. Bone marrow accumulation was shown only in 2 cases. Presently, there are no suitable radionuclides for leukemic cell labeling. In-111-oxine labeled leukemic cells would overcome this difficulty

  3. Determination of cytotoxicity in vivo using 111Indium-labelled human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockshin, Arnold; Giovanella, B.C.; Kolielski, Tony; Stehlin, J.S. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Loss of radioactivity from nude mice was determined after inoculation of human tumor cells prelabelled with ( 111 In)indium oxine ( 111 InOx). Elimination of 111 In was increased somewhat by treating the mice with diphtheria toxin (DT), which is toxic selectively for human cells compared to mice. Calcium disodium edetate (CaNa 2 EDTA), a metal chelating agent, facilitated elimination of 111 In and increased the difference in the rates of loss of radioactivity from mice bearing viable compared to DT-killed cells. (author)

  4. FDG uptake in cold and heat treated MCF-7 cells, comparison with cell viability, apoptosis, and tumor marker changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, C.; Sun, X.; Huang, G.; Liu, J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Objectives-To investigate the FDG uptake changes in cold and hyperthermia therapy and its correlation with cell viability, apoptosis and tumor marker changes. Methods: An in vitro cultured breast adenocarcinoma cell line, MCF- 7, was divided into 5 groups. Hyperthermia group: cell was treated in 43 degree centigrade 30 min. Hypothermia group: cell was treated in 0 degree centigrade 30 min. Hypo- and hyperthermia group: cell was treated in 0 degree centigrade 30 min and 43 degree centigrade 30 min. chemotherapy group: cell was treated with 21 microgram Cisplatin for 6 hours. And Control group: cell was untreated. The levels 18F-labelled FDG uptake, a 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)- 2, 5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide viability assay, flow cytometry assay and tumor markers (CA153, CA125) were detected at 24 hour and 48 hour. Results: The change of 18F- FDG uptake (which came out at the 24h) is early than tumor marker (which came out at the 48h) under our study conditions. In treated MCF-7 cells, the levels of 18F-labelled FDG uptake were significantly lower than control group. The levels of 18F-FDG uptake depression were well correlated with cell viability and apoptosis data. Conclusion: FDG uptake is sensitive and well correlated with cell viability and apoptosis assay, and can be used for early response monitoring in hypo- and hyperthermia therapy. (author)

  5. (18)F-labeled positron emission tomographic radiopharmaceuticals in oncology: an overview of radiochemistry and mechanisms of tumor localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallabhajosula, Shankar

    2007-11-01

    Molecular imaging is the visualization, characterization, and measurement of biological processes at the molecular and cellular levels in a living system. At present, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is one the most rapidly growing areas of medical imaging, with many applications in the clinical management of patients with cancer. Although [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/CT imaging provides high specificity and sensitivity in several kinds of cancer and has many applications, it is important to recognize that FDG is not a "specific" radiotracer for imaging malignant disease. Highly "tumor-specific" and "tumor cell signal-specific" PET radiopharmaceuticals are essential to meet the growing demand of radioisotope-based molecular imaging technology. In the last 15 years, many alternative PET tracers have been proposed and evaluated in preclinical and clinical studies to characterize the tumor biology more appropriately. The potential clinical utility of several (18)F-labeled radiotracers (eg, fluoride, FDOPA, FLT, FMISO, FES, and FCH) is being reviewed by several investigators in this issue. An overview of design and development of (18)F-labeled PET radiopharmaceuticals, radiochemistry, and mechanism(s) of tumor cell uptake and localization of radiotracers are presented here. The approval of clinical indications for FDG-PET in the year 2000 by the Food and Drug Administration, based on a review of literature, was a major breakthrough to the rapid incorporation of PET into nuclear medicine practice, particularly in oncology. Approval of a radiopharmaceutical typically involves submission of a "New Drug Application" by a manufacturer or a company clearly documenting 2 major aspects of the drug: (1) manufacturing of PET drug using current good manufacturing practices and (2) the safety and effectiveness of a drug with specific indications. The potential routine clinical utility of (18)F-labeled PET radiopharmaceuticals depends also on

  6. Labeling of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and VIP 10-28 fragment with radioiodine by direct method. Comparative study of the kinetics biodistribution and affinity for neuroendocrine tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colturato, Maria Tereza

    2005-01-01

    mixture (simple purification) and to produce the radiopharmaceutical with high specific activity (complex purification and HPLC), were both efficient in the separation of the species in the reaction mixtures, as demonstrated by quality control procedures. Biological distribution studies were accomplished by venous administration of the radiopharmaceuticals in laboratory animals: biodistribution study of [ 131 I]VIP and [ 131 I]VIP 10-28 in normal Swiss mice, [ 131 I]VIP not purified and purified in Swiss mice with tumor and [ 131 I]VIP and [ 131 I]VIP 10-28 in Nude mice with tumor, scintigraphic images of [ 131/123 I]VIP and [ 123 I]VIP 10-28 in Swiss and Nude mice and Wistar rats with tumor. In vitro studies were accomplished to determine the percentage of [ 131 I]VIP and [ 131 I]VIP 10-28 bound to plasmatic proteins, stability study of [ 131 I]VIP and [ 131 I]VIP 10-28 in human plasma and the affinity and internalization of [ 131 I]VIP and [ 131 I]VIP 10-28 by tumour adenocarcinoma cells of human rectal colon (HT-29). All biological distribution studies demonstrated that both [ 131/123 I]VIP and [ 131/123 I]VIP 10-28 showed fast blood clearance, low renal and liver uptake, relative uptake in thyroid, showing in vivo dehalogenation and good uptake in tumour. Comparative biological distribution of the radiopharmaceuticals showed high uptake in the stomach for both peptides. The blood clearance of the fragment was slower, and influences the visualization of the tumour mass. The radiopharmaceuticals, [ 123 I]VIP and [ 123 I]VIP 10-28, were obtained with high radiochemical purity, but with low radiochemical yield when comparing with labeling procedures using iodine-131. Quality control assays of [ 123 I]Na indicated that the presence of radiochemical and radionuclide impurities influenced on labeling results. (author)

  7. Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells Increase Tumor Growth Rates and Modify Tumor Physiology: Relevance for Therapeutic Targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagan, Jonathan, E-mail: jdpagan@uams.edu; Przybyla, Beata; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Gupta, Kalpna [Vascular Biology Center and Division of Hematology-Oncology Transplantation, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School, MN 72223 (United States); Griffin, Robert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2013-02-18

    Endothelial cell precursors from human peripheral blood have been shown to home to areas of neovascularization and may assist tumor growth by increasing or fortifying blood vessel growth. In the present study, the influence of these cells on tumor growth and physiology was investigated and the role of these cells as a therapeutic target or in determining treatment sensitivity was tested. After isolation from human blood and expansion in vitro, actively growing cells with verified endothelial phenotype (Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cell, BOEC) were injected i.v. into tumor bearing mice for three consecutive days. The growth rate was significantly enhanced in relatively small RERF human lung tumors (i.e., less than 150 mm{sup 3}) grown in immunocompromised mice by an average of 1.5-fold while it had no effect when injections were given to animals bearing larger tumors. There were no signs of toxicity or unwanted systemic effects. We also observed evidence of increased perfusion, vessel number, response to 15 Gy radiation and oxygenation in RERF tumors of animals injected with BOECs compared to control tumors. In addition, FSaII murine fibrosarcoma tumors were found to grow faster upon injection of BOECs. When FSaII tumors were subjected to a partial thermal ablation treatment using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) there was consistently elevated detection of fluorescently labeled and i.v. injected endothelial precursors in the tumor when analyzed with optical imaging and/or histological preparations. Importantly, we also observed that BOECs treated with the novel anti-angiogenic peptide anginex in-vitro, show decreased proliferation and increased sensitivity to radiation. In vivo, the normal increase in FSaII tumor growth induced by injected BOECs was blunted by the addition of anginex treatment. It appears that endothelial precursors may significantly contribute to tumor vessel growth, tumor progression and/or repair of tumor damage and may improve the

  8. Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells Increase Tumor Growth Rates and Modify Tumor Physiology: Relevance for Therapeutic Targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagan, Jonathan; Przybyla, Beata; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat; Gupta, Kalpna; Griffin, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cell precursors from human peripheral blood have been shown to home to areas of neovascularization and may assist tumor growth by increasing or fortifying blood vessel growth. In the present study, the influence of these cells on tumor growth and physiology was investigated and the role of these cells as a therapeutic target or in determining treatment sensitivity was tested. After isolation from human blood and expansion in vitro, actively growing cells with verified endothelial phenotype (Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cell, BOEC) were injected i.v. into tumor bearing mice for three consecutive days. The growth rate was significantly enhanced in relatively small RERF human lung tumors (i.e., less than 150 mm 3 ) grown in immunocompromised mice by an average of 1.5-fold while it had no effect when injections were given to animals bearing larger tumors. There were no signs of toxicity or unwanted systemic effects. We also observed evidence of increased perfusion, vessel number, response to 15 Gy radiation and oxygenation in RERF tumors of animals injected with BOECs compared to control tumors. In addition, FSaII murine fibrosarcoma tumors were found to grow faster upon injection of BOECs. When FSaII tumors were subjected to a partial thermal ablation treatment using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) there was consistently elevated detection of fluorescently labeled and i.v. injected endothelial precursors in the tumor when analyzed with optical imaging and/or histological preparations. Importantly, we also observed that BOECs treated with the novel anti-angiogenic peptide anginex in-vitro, show decreased proliferation and increased sensitivity to radiation. In vivo, the normal increase in FSaII tumor growth induced by injected BOECs was blunted by the addition of anginex treatment. It appears that endothelial precursors may significantly contribute to tumor vessel growth, tumor progression and/or repair of tumor damage and may improve the

  9. Cell cycle kinetics and in vivo micronuclei induction in rat rhabdomyosarcoma tumors using a monoclonal antibody to BrdUrd and cell sorting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuesse, M.; Afzal, S.M.J.; Carr, B.C.; Kavanau, K.S.; Tenforde, T.S.; Curtis, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of the experiments reported here was to investigate the applicability of the BrdUrd/DNA technique to a rat rhabdomyosarcoma tumor system growing in vivo and to study radiation-induced changes in the progression of cells through the cell cycle. Details of this technique are described elsewhere. In addition, the induction of micronuclei in tumor cells irradiated in vivo with x-rays or peak neon ions was studied. Micronuclei found in interphase cells after irradiation represent genetic material that is lost from the genome of the cells during mitosis. The formation of micronuclei that can mainly be ascribed to acentric chromosome or chromatid fragments occurs only after cells go through one or more cell divisions. Cycling cells in the tumors were, therefore, continuously labeled with BrdUrd, and micronuclei induction was measured only in tetraploid cycling tumor cells using the flow cytometric cell sorting technique

  10. Effects of hyperthermia, x-ray irradiation and their combination on ascites tumor cells of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Itsuo

    1982-01-01

    Fibrosarcoma ascites tumor cells (PB8) from NMRI mice were used to investigate cell loss by hyperthermia and/or x-ray irradiation. The tumor cells were labelled by an injection of 125 I-deoxyuridine to the abdominal cavity of the donors 2 days before the physical treatments. The labelled cells, transfered in test tubes, were heated at 44 0 C for 10-20 min and/or irradiated by x-ray at 250-1612 rad, and were transplanted in the recipient abdominal cavity as soon as possible after the treatments. The radioactivity of the tumor cells, as an indicator of cell loss, was measured with a gamma spectrometer. In the irradiated group, the ratio of cell loss increased in a dose-dependent manner, starting from the 4th day after the transplantation to the 9th day. In the heated group, the ratio of cell loss increased in proportion to the heating time, starting without delay after transplantation. In the combination group, the effect of the treatments was more marked than that by each single treatment. In the early stage of this group, cell loss was by heating and then, from the 4th day, the irradiation effect mostly dominated. It is concluded from the above results that cell loss by heating or irradiation is independent and that the effect of the combination is additive. (author)

  11. Destructive impact of t-lymphocytes, NK and mast cells on basal cell layers: implications for tumor invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Hongyan; Hsiao, Yi-Hsuan; Zhang, Yiyu; Wang, Jinlian; Yin, Chao; Shen, Rong; Su, Yiping

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies have suggested that the primary impact of immune cell infiltration into the normal or pre-invasive tissue component is associated with the physical destruction of epithelial capsules, which may promote tumor progression and invasion. Our current study attempted to further verify our previous observations and determine the primary type(s) of infiltrating immune cells and the possible mechanism associated with physical destructions of the epithelial capsules. In total, the study was conducted with 250 primary breast and prostate tumors, the primary immune cell of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL), Natural killer cells (NK) and Mast cells were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, fluorescent labeling and apoptosis assay. qRT-PCR was used for gene expression analysis. Our current study assessed the physical disruption of these immune cells and potential impact on the epithelial capsule of human breast and prostate tumors. Our study yield several clinically-relevant findings that have not been studied before. (1) A vast majority of these infiltrating immune cells are distributed in the normal-appearing or pre-invasive tissue components rather than in invasive cancer tissues. (2) These cells often form rings or semilunar structures that either surround focally-disrupted basal cell layers or physically attach to the basal cells. (3) Basal cells physically associated with these immune cells generally displayed distinct signs of degeneration, including substantially elevated apoptosis, necrosis, and reduced tumor suppressor p63 expression. In contrast, luminal cells overlying focally disrupted basal cell layers had a substantially increased proliferation rate and elevated expression of stem cell markers compared to their adjacent morphologically similar counterparts that overlie a non-disrupted capsule. Our findings suggest that at the early stage of tumor invasion, CTL, NK and Mast cells are the main types of tumor infiltrating immune cells involved in focal

  12. In-Vivo Detection and Tracking of T Cells in Various Organs in a Melanoma Tumor Model by 19F-Fluorine MRS/MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Gonzales

    Full Text Available 19F-MRI and 19F-MRS can identify specific cell types after in-vitro or in-vivo 19F-labeling. Knowledge on the potential to track in-vitro 19F-labeled immune cells in tumor models by 19F-MRI/MRS is scarce.To study 19F-based MR techniques for in-vivo tracking of adoptively transferred immune cells after in-vitro 19F-labeling, i.e. to detect and monitor their migration non-invasively in melanoma-bearing mice.Splenocytes (SP were labeled in-vitro with a perfluorocarbon (PFC and IV-injected into non-tumor bearing mice. In-vitro PFC-labeled ovalbumin (OVA-specific T cells from the T cell receptor-transgenic line OT-1, activated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies (Tact or OVA-peptide pulsed antigen presenting cells (TOVA-act, were injected into B16 OVA melanoma-bearing mice. The distribution of the 19F-labelled donor cells was determined in-vivo by 19F-MRI/MRS. In-vivo 19F-MRI/MRS results were confirmed by ex-vivo 19F-NMR and flow cytometry.SP, Tact, and TOVA-act were successfully PFC-labeled in-vitro yielding 3x1011-1.4x1012 19F-atoms/cell in the 3 groups. Adoptively transferred 19F-labeled SP, TOVA-act, and Tact were detected by coil-localized 19F-MRS in the chest, abdomen, and left flank in most animals (corresponding to lungs, livers, and spleens, respectively, with highest signal-to-noise for SP vs TOVA-act and Tact, p<0.009 for both. SP and Tact were successfully imaged by 19F-MRI (n = 3; liver. These in-vivo data were confirmed by ex-vivo high-resolution 19F-NMR-spectroscopy. By flow cytometric analysis, however, TOVA-act tended to be more abundant versus SP and Tact (liver: p = 0.1313; lungs: p = 0.1073; spleen: p = 0.109. Unlike 19F-MRI/MRS, flow cytometry also identified transferred immune cells (SP, Tact, and TOVA-act in the tumors.SP, Tact, and TOVA-act were successfully PFC-labeled in-vitro and detected in-vivo by non-invasive 19F-MRS/MRI in liver, lung, and spleen. The portion of 19F-labeled T cells in the adoptively transferred cell

  13. Correlation of proliferative and clonogenic tumor cells in multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karp, J.E.; Burke, P.J.; Saylor, P.L.; Humphrey, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    To expand on the findings from previous clinical trials that the growth of residual tumor is increased at a predictable time following initial drug administration, malignant plasma cells from bone marrows of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) were examined for changes in proliferation and clonogenicity induced in vivo by cyclophosphamide and in vitro by drug-induced humoral stimulatory activity. Peak plasma cell [ 3 H]thymidine labeling index (LI) occurred predictably following drug and paralleled changes in agar colony formation by marrow cells obtained during therapy. Colony-forming capacity of pretreatment MM marrow populations was enhanced when those cells were cultured with humoral stimulatory activity, similar to the increased colony formation detected in Day 9 postcyclophosphamide marrows at the time of peak plasma cell LI. To further define a relationship between proliferative plasma cells and colony-forming tumor cells, MM marrows were fractionated by sedimentation on an isokinetic gradient. Enrichment of a proliferative tumor cell cohort was achieved, evidenced by [ 3 H]thymidine LI. Colony-forming cells were also enriched by isokinetic gradient sedimentation, and agar colony formation by MM marrow cell fractions correlated with the kinetic characteristics of the isolated subpopulations. These studies of whole and fractionated human MM marrow cell populations suggest that the kinetically active cells which are induced to proliferate in vivo and in vitro are closely related to the clonogenic tumor cells which produce colonies in agar and which, like those cells measured by [ 3 H]thymidine LI, respond to growth stimulation by drug-induced humoral stimulatory activity

  14. Hyperthermia treatment of tumors by mesenchymal stem cell-delivered superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalber TL

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tammy L Kalber,1,2,* Katherine L Ordidge,1,2,* Paul Southern,3 Michael R Loebinger,1 Panagiotis G Kyrtatos,2,3 Quentin A Pankhurst,3,* Mark F Lythgoe,2,* Sam M Janes1,* 1Lungs for Living Research Centre, UCL Respiratory, University College London, 2UCL Centre for Advanced Biomedical Imaging, Division of Medicine, University College London, 3Healthcare Biomagnetics Laboratory, University College London, London, UK *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Magnetic hyperthermia – a potential cancer treatment in which superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs are made to resonantly respond to an alternating magnetic field (AMF and thereby produce heat – is of significant current interest. We have previously shown that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can be labeled with SPIONs with no effect on cell proliferation or survival and that within an hour of systemic administration, they migrate to and integrate into tumors in vivo. Here, we report on some longer term (up to 3 weeks post-integration characteristics of magnetically labeled human MSCs in an immunocompromized mouse model. We initially assessed how the size and coating of SPIONs dictated the loading capacity and cellular heating of MSCs. Ferucarbotran® was the best of those tested, having the best like-for-like heating capability and being the only one to retain that capability after cell internalization. A mouse model was created by subcutaneous flank injection of a combination of 0.5 million Ferucarbotran-loaded MSCs and 1.0 million OVCAR-3 ovarian tumor cells. After 2 weeks, the tumors reached ~100 µL in volume and then entered a rapid growth phase over the third week to reach ~300 µL. In the control mice that received no AMF treatment, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data showed that the labeled MSCs were both incorporated into and retained within the tumors over the entire 3-week period. In the AMF-treated mice, heat increases of ~4°C were observed

  15. MRI-Monitored Intra-Tumoral Injection of Iron-Oxide Labeled Clostridium novyi-NT Anaerobes in Pancreatic Carcinoma Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Linfeng; Zhang, Zhuoli; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Saha, Saurabh; Lewandowski, Robert J.; Zhang, Guixiang; Larson, Andrew C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To validate the feasibility of labeling Clostridium novyi-NT (C.novyi-NT) anaerobes with iron-oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and demonstrate the potential to use MRI to visualize intra-tumoral delivery of these iron-oxide labeled C.novyi-NT during percutaneous injection procedures. Materials and Methods All studies were approved by IACUC. C.novyi-NT were labeled with hybrid iron-oxide Texas red nanoparticles. Growth of labeled and control samples were evaluated with optical density. Labeling was confirmed with confocal fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). MRI were performed using a 7 Tesla scanner with T2*-weighted (T2*W) sequence. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) measurements were performed for phantoms and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements performed in C57BL/6 mice (n = 12) with Panc02 xenografts before and after percutaneous injection of iron-oxide labeled C.novyi-NT. MRI was repeated 3 and 7 days post-injection. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE), Prussian blue and Gram staining of tumor specimens were performed for confirmation of intra-tumoral delivery. Results Iron-oxide labeling had no influence upon C.novyi-NT growth. The signal intensity (SI) within T2*W images was significantly decreased for iron-oxide labeled C.novyi-NT phantoms compared to unlabeled controls. Under confocal fluorescence microscopy, the iron-oxide labeled C.novyi-NT exhibited a uniform red fluorescence consistent with observed regions of DAPI staining and overall labeling efficiency was 100% (all DAPI stained C.novyi-NT exhibited red fluorescence). Within TEM images, a large number iron granules were observed within the iron-oxide labeled C.novyi-NT; these were not observed within unlabeled controls. Intra-procedural MRI measurements permitted in vivo visualization of the intra-tumoral distribution of iron-oxide labeled C.novyi-NT following percutaneous injection (depicted as punctate regions of SI reductions within T2*-weighted

  16. Pathway-specific differences between tumor cell lines and normal and tumor tissue cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tozeren Aydin

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell lines are used in experimental investigation of cancer but their capacity to represent tumor cells has yet to be quantified. The aim of the study was to identify significant alterations in pathway usage in cell lines in comparison with normal and tumor tissue. Methods This study utilized a pathway-specific enrichment analysis of publicly accessible microarray data and quantified the gene expression differences between cell lines, tumor, and normal tissue cells for six different tissue types. KEGG pathways that are significantly different between cell lines and tumors, cell lines and normal tissues and tumor and normal tissue were identified through enrichment tests on gene lists obtained using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM. Results Cellular pathways that were significantly upregulated in cell lines compared to tumor cells and normal cells of the same tissue type included ATP synthesis, cell communication, cell cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, purine, pyrimidine and pyruvate metabolism, and proteasome. Results on metabolic pathways suggested an increase in the velocity nucleotide metabolism and RNA production. Pathways that were downregulated in cell lines compared to tumor and normal tissue included cell communication, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs, and ECM-receptor interaction. Only a fraction of the significantly altered genes in tumor-to-normal comparison had similar expressions in cancer cell lines and tumor cells. These genes were tissue-specific and were distributed sparsely among multiple pathways. Conclusion Significantly altered genes in tumors compared to normal tissue were largely tissue specific. Among these genes downregulation was a major trend. In contrast, cell lines contained large sets of significantly upregulated genes that were common to multiple tissue types. Pathway upregulation in cell lines was most pronounced over metabolic pathways including cell nucleotide metabolism and oxidative

  17. The biodistribution study of 99mTc labelled anti-CEA monoclonal antibody in tumor bearing nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou Zongxin

    1992-01-01

    The author report the optimal condition of 99m Tc labelling with anti-CEA monoclonal antibody using chelating of 99m Tc with dimethylformamide. The labelling rate of this method is 60%-80%, the radiochemical purity of labelling antibody over 90% and maintain its better immuno activity. The biodistribution of the tumor bearing nude mice demonstrates that as compared with the control group, 24 hours after the intraperitoneal injection the injected labelled antibody has its specific concentration in tumor tissue

  18. Clinical impact of ki-67 labeling index in non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jan Nyrop; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2013-01-01

    The ki-67 index is a marker of proliferation in malignant tumors. Studies from the period 2000 to 2012 on the prognostic and predictive value of ki-67 labeling index (LI) in non-small cell cancer (NSCLC) are reviewed. Twenty-eight studies reported on the prognostic value of ki-67 index with various...

  19. Multiparametric classification links tumor microenvironments with tumor cell phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojana Gligorijevic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available While it has been established that a number of microenvironment components can affect the likelihood of metastasis, the link between microenvironment and tumor cell phenotypes is poorly understood. Here we have examined microenvironment control over two different tumor cell motility phenotypes required for metastasis. By high-resolution multiphoton microscopy of mammary carcinoma in mice, we detected two phenotypes of motile tumor cells, different in locomotion speed. Only slower tumor cells exhibited protrusions with molecular, morphological, and functional characteristics associated with invadopodia. Each region in the primary tumor exhibited either fast- or slow-locomotion. To understand how the tumor microenvironment controls invadopodium formation and tumor cell locomotion, we systematically analyzed components of the microenvironment previously associated with cell invasion and migration. No single microenvironmental property was able to predict the locations of tumor cell phenotypes in the tumor if used in isolation or combined linearly. To solve this, we utilized the support vector machine (SVM algorithm to classify phenotypes in a nonlinear fashion. This approach identified conditions that promoted either motility phenotype. We then demonstrated that varying one of the conditions may change tumor cell behavior only in a context-dependent manner. In addition, to establish the link between phenotypes and cell fates, we photoconverted and monitored the fate of tumor cells in different microenvironments, finding that only tumor cells in the invadopodium-rich microenvironments degraded extracellular matrix (ECM and disseminated. The number of invadopodia positively correlated with degradation, while the inhibiting metalloproteases eliminated degradation and lung metastasis, consistent with a direct link among invadopodia, ECM degradation, and metastasis. We have detected and characterized two phenotypes of motile tumor cells in vivo, which

  20. In vivo targeting of dead tumor cells in a murine tumor model using a monoclonal antibody specific for the La autoantigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ejeh, Fares; Darby, Jocelyn M; Pensa, Katherine; Diener, Kerrilyn R; Hayball, John D; Brown, Michael P

    2007-09-15

    To investigate the potential of the La-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3B9 as an in vivo tumor-targeting agent. The murine EL4 lymphoma cell line was used for in vitro studies and the EL4 model in which apoptosis was induced with cyclophosphamide and etoposide was used for in vivo studies. In vitro studies compared 3B9 binding in the EL4 cell with that in its counterpart primary cell type of the thymocyte. For in vivo studies, 3B9 was intrinsically or extrinsically labeled with carbon-14 or 1,4,7,10-tetra-azacylododecane-N,N',N'',N''''-tetraacetic acid-indium-111, respectively, and biodistribution of the radiotracers was investigated in EL4 tumor-bearing mice, which were treated or not with chemotherapy. La-specific 3B9 mAb bound EL4 cells rather than thymocytes, and binding was detergent resistant. 3B9 binding to dead EL4 cells in vitro was specific, rapid, and saturable. Significantly, more 3B9 bound dead EL4 tumor explant cells after host mice were treated with chemotherapy, which suggested that DNA damage induced 3B9 binding. Tumor binding of 3B9 in vivo was antigen specific and increased significantly after chemotherapy. Tumor accumulation of 3B9 peaked at approximately 50% of the injected dose per gram of tumor 72 h after chemotherapy and correlated with increased tumor cell death. Tumor/organ ratios of 3B9 biodistribution, which included the tumor/blood ratio, exceeded unity 48 or more hours after chemotherapy. La-specific mAb selectively targeted dead tumor cells in vivo, and targeting was augmented by cytotoxic chemotherapy. This novel cell death radioligand may be useful both for radioimmunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy.

  1. Using FDG-PET activity as a surrogate for tumor cell density and its effect on equivalent uniform dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Sumin; Wong, Terence Z.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2004-01-01

    The concept of equivalent uniform dose (EUD) has been suggested as a means to quantitatively consider heterogeneous dose distributions within targets. Tumor cell density/function is typically assumed to be uniform. We herein propose to use 18 F-labeled 2-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) tumor imaging activity as a surrogate marker for tumor cell density to allow the EUD concept to include intratumor heterogeneities and to study its effect on EUD calculation. Thirty-one patients with lung cancer who had computerized tomography (CT)-based 3D planning and PET imaging were studied. Treatment beams were designed based on the information from both the CT and PET scans. Doses were calculated in 3D based on CT images to reflect tissue heterogeneity. The EUD was calculated in two different ways: first, assuming a uniform tumor cell density within the tumor target; second, using FDG-PET activity (counts/cm 3 ) as a surrogate for tumor cell density at different parts of tumor to calculate the functional-imaging-weighted EUD (therefore will be labeled fEUD for convenience). The EUD calculation can be easily incorporated into the treatment planning process. For 28/31 patients, their fEUD and EUD differed by less than 6%. Twenty-one of these twenty-eight patients had tumor volumes 3 . In the three patients with larger tumor volume, the fEUD and EUD differed by 8%-14%. Incorporating information from PET imaging to represent tumor cell density in the EUD calculation is straightforward. This approach provides the opportunity to include heterogeneity in tumor function/metabolism into the EUD calculation. The difference between fEUD and EUD, i.e., whether including or not including the possible tumor cell density heterogeneity within tumor can be significant with large tumor volumes. Further research is needed to assess the usefulness of the fEUD concept in radiation treatment

  2. Properties of internalization factors contributing to the uptake of extracellular DNA into tumor-initiating stem cells of mouse Krebs-2 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgova, Evgeniya V; Potter, Ekaterina A; Proskurina, Anastasiya S; Minkevich, Alexandra M; Chernych, Elena R; Ostanin, Alexandr A; Efremov, Yaroslav R; Bayborodin, Sergey I; Nikolin, Valeriy P; Popova, Nelly A; Kolchanov, Nikolay A; Bogachev, Sergey S

    2016-05-25

    Previously, we demonstrated that poorly differentiated cells of various origins, including tumor-initiating stem cells present in the ascites form of mouse cancer cell line Krebs-2, are capable of naturally internalizing both linear double-stranded DNA and circular plasmid DNA. The method of co-incubating Krebs-2 cells with extracellular plasmid DNA (pUC19) or TAMRA-5'-dUTP-labeled polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product was used. It was found that internalized plasmid DNA isolated from Krebs-2 can be transformed into competent Escherichia coli cells. Thus, the internalization processes taking place in the Krebs-2 cell subpopulation have been analyzed and compared, as assayed by E. coli colony formation assay (plasmid DNA) and cytofluorescence (TAMRA-DNA). We showed that extracellular DNA both in the form of plasmid DNA and a PCR product is internalized by the same subpopulation of Krebs-2 cells. We found that the saturation threshold for Krebs-2 ascites cells is 0.5 μg DNA/10(6) cells. Supercoiled plasmid DNA, human high-molecular weight DNA, and 500 bp PCR fragments are internalized into the Krebs-2 tumor-initiating stem cells via distinct, non-competing internalization pathways. Under our experimental conditions, each cell may harbor 340-2600 copies of intact plasmid material, or up to 3.097 ± 0.044×10(6) plasmid copies (intact or not), as detected by quantitative PCR. The internalization dynamics of extracellular DNA, copy number of the plasmids taken up by the cells, and competition between different types of double-stranded DNA upon internalization into tumor-initiating stem cells of mouse ascites Krebs-2 have been comprehensively analyzed. Investigation of the extracellular DNA internalization into tumor-initiating stem cells is an important part of understanding their properties and possible destruction mechanisms. For example, a TAMRA-labeled DNA probe may serve as an instrument to develop a target for the therapy of cancer, aiming at elimination of

  3. Binding studies of the antitumoral radiopharmaceutical 125I-Crotoxin to Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, Marina B.; Santos, Raquel G. dos; Dias, Consuelo L. Fortes; Cassali, Geovanni D.

    2009-01-01

    The development of tools for functional diagnostic imaging is mainly based on radiopharmaceuticals that specifically target membrane receptors. Crotoxin (Crtx), a polypeptide isolated from Crotalus durissus terrificus venom, has been shown to have an antitumoral activity and is a promising bioactive tracer for tumor detection. More specific radiopharmaceuticals are being studied to complement the techniques applied in the conventional medicine against breast cancer, the most frequent cause of death from malignant disease in women. Crtx's effect has been shown to be related with the overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), present in high levels in 30 to 60% of breast tumor cells. Our objective was to evaluate Crtx as a tracer for cancer diagnosis, investigating its properties as an EGFR-targeting agent. Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EAT cells) were used due to its origin and similar characteristics to breast tumor cells, specially the presence of EGFR. Crtx was labeled with 125I and binding experiments were performed. To evaluate the specific binding in vitro of Crtx, competition binding assay was carried out in the presence of increasing concentrations of non-labelled crotoxin and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Specific binding of 125I-Crtx to EAT cells was determined and the binding was considered saturable, with approximately 70% of specificity, high affinity (Kd = 19.7 nM) and IC50 = 1.6 x 10-11 M. Our results indicate that Crtx's interaction with EAT cells is partially related with EGFR and increases the biotechnological potential of Crtx as a template for radiopharmaceutical design for cancer diagnosis. (author)

  4. Binding studies of the antitumoral radiopharmaceutical 125I-Crotoxin to Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, Marina B.; Santos, Raquel G. dos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Dias, Consuelo L. Fortes [Fundacao Ezequiel Dias (FUNED), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: consuelo@pq.cnpq.br; Cassali, Geovanni D. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Patologia Comparada], e-mail: cassalig@icb.ufmg.br

    2009-07-01

    The development of tools for functional diagnostic imaging is mainly based on radiopharmaceuticals that specifically target membrane receptors. Crotoxin (Crtx), a polypeptide isolated from Crotalus durissus terrificus venom, has been shown to have an antitumoral activity and is a promising bioactive tracer for tumor detection. More specific radiopharmaceuticals are being studied to complement the techniques applied in the conventional medicine against breast cancer, the most frequent cause of death from malignant disease in women. Crtx's effect has been shown to be related with the overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), present in high levels in 30 to 60% of breast tumor cells. Our objective was to evaluate Crtx as a tracer for cancer diagnosis, investigating its properties as an EGFR-targeting agent. Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EAT cells) were used due to its origin and similar characteristics to breast tumor cells, specially the presence of EGFR. Crtx was labeled with 125I and binding experiments were performed. To evaluate the specific binding in vitro of Crtx, competition binding assay was carried out in the presence of increasing concentrations of non-labelled crotoxin and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Specific binding of 125I-Crtx to EAT cells was determined and the binding was considered saturable, with approximately 70% of specificity, high affinity (Kd = 19.7 nM) and IC50 = 1.6 x 10-11 M. Our results indicate that Crtx's interaction with EAT cells is partially related with EGFR and increases the biotechnological potential of Crtx as a template for radiopharmaceutical design for cancer diagnosis. (author)

  5. Radioimmunoassay for tumor antigen of human cervical squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, H.; Torigoe, T.

    1977-01-01

    A heterologous antiserum for human cervical squamous cell carcinoma was prepared and specificity determined by Ouchterlony immunodiffusion and immunofluorescence studies. With this antiserum, a tumor antigen was purified from human cervical squamous cell carcinoma tissue. The specificities of the antigen and the antiserum were then re-examined by a radioimmunoassay method using 125 I-labeled purified antigen. Although normal cervical tissue extract showed a moderate cross-reactivity in the radioimmunoassay, the circulating antigen activity could not be detected in normal women or in several patients with other carcinomas, whereas 27 of 35 patients with cervical squamous cell carcinoma showed detectable serum antigen activity. All patients with advanced stages of cervical squamous cell carcinoma showed detectable antigen levels. These results indicate that there is a quantitative abnormality, at least, of this tumor antigen in patients with cervical squamous cell carcinoma and that the radioimmunoassay for the antigen is a potentially useful tool in clinical care

  6. Synthesis of novel 68Ga-labeled amino acid derivatives for positron emission tomography of cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetty, Dinesh; Jeong, Jae Min; Ju, Chang Hwan; Lee, Yun-Sang; Jeong, Seo Young; Choi, Jae Yeon; Yang, Bo Yeun

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: We developed amino acid derivatives of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,7-diacetic acid (DO2A) and 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,-triacetic acid (DO3A) that can be labeled with 68 Ga, and we investigated their basic biological properties. Materials and methods: Alanine derivatives of DO2A and DO3A were synthesized by regiospecific nucleophilic attack of DO2tBu and DO3tBu on the β-position of Boc-L-serine-β-lactone, followed by acid hydrolysis. Also, homoalanine derivatives were synthesized by reacting with the protected bromo derivative of homoalanine, which was synthesized from N-Cbz-L-homoserine lactone. Further catalytic reduction and acid cleavage of protected groups resulted in the required products. All derivatives were labeled with 68 Ga. Cell uptake assays were carried out in Hep3B (human hepatoma) and U87MG (human glioma) cell lines at 37 o C. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies were performed using balb/c mice xenografted with CT-26 (mouse colon cancer). Results: All compounds were labeled with >97% efficiency. According to in vitro studies, the labeled amino acid derivatives showed significantly greater uptakes than the control ( 68 Ga 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid) in cancer cells. Small animal PET images for labeled compounds showed high tumor uptake, as well as kidney and bladder uptakes, at 30 min postinjection. 68 Ga-DO3A-homoalanine showed the highest standardized uptake value ratio (3.9±0.3), followed by 68 Ga-DO2A-alanine (3.1±0.2), 68 Ga-DO3A-alanine (2.8±0.2) and 68 Ga-DO2A-homoalanine (2.3±0.2). Conclusion: These derivatives were found to have high labeling efficiencies, high stabilities, high tumor cell uptakes, high tumor/nontumor xenograft uptakes and low nonspecific uptake in normal organs, except for the kidneys. However, the uptake mechanism of these derivatives remains unclear, and uptake via specific amino acid transporters needs to be demonstrated.

  7. Targeted Imaging of Tumor-Associated Macrophages by Cyanine 7-Labeled Mannose in Xenograft Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Jiang MD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mannose receptor is considered as a hallmark of M2-oriented tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs, but its utility in TAMs was rarely reported. Therefore, deoxymannose (DM, a high-affinity ligand of mannose receptor, was labeled with near-infrared dye cyanine 7 (Cy7, and its feasibility of targeted imaging on TAMs was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The Cy7-DM was synthesized, and its binding affinity with induced TAMs in vitro, whole-body imaging in xenograft tumor mouse model in vivo, and the cellular localization in dissected tissues were evaluated. We demonstrated a high uptake of Cy7-DM by induced M2 macrophages and TAMs in tumor tissues. In vivo near-infrared live imaging visualized abundant TAMs in tumor lesions instead of inflammatory sites by Cy7-DM imaging, and the quantity of Cy7-DM signals in tumors was significantly higher than that shown in inflammatory sites from 1 to 8 hours of imaging. Our results suggest that mannose could rapidly and specifically target TAMs and is a promising candidate for targeted diagnosis of tumor with rich TAMs.

  8. In vivo fluorescence imaging of an orthotopic rat bladder tumor model indicates differential uptake of intravesically instilled near-infrared labeled 2-deoxyglucose analog by neoplastic urinary bladder tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Daqing; Davis, Carole A.; Hurst, Robert E.; Slaton, Joel W.

    2017-02-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most expensive cancers to manage due to frequent recurrences requiring life-long surveillance and treatment. A near-infrared labeled 2-deoxy-d-glucose probe IRDye800CW-DG targeting glucose metabolism pathway has shown to enhance the sensitivity of diagnosing several types of cancers as tested on tumor models not including bladder tumor. This pilot study has explored differential uptake of intravesically administered IRDye800CW-DG in an orthotopic rat bladder tumor model. Twenty-five female Fischer rats were randomly grouped to four conditions: no-tumor-control (n=3), no-tumor-control intravesically instilled with IRDye800CWDG (n=6), rats bearing GFP-labeled AY-27 rat bladder urothelial cell carcinoma cells and washed with saline (n=5), and rats bearing AY-27 tumors and intravesically instilled with IRDye800CW-DG (n=11). Near-infrared fluorescence was measured from the opened bladder wall of anesthetized rat at an excitation wavelength of 750nm and an emission wavelength of 776nm, by using an in-house fluorescence imaging system. There is no statistically significant difference of the peak fluorescence intensity among the no-tumor-control bladders (n=3), the no-tumorcontrol bladders instilled with IRDye800CW-DG (n=6), and the GFP-labeled AY-27 treated bladders washed by saline (n=5). When compared to that of the no-tumor-control bladders instilled with IRDye800CW-DG (n=6), the fluorescence intensity of GFP-labeled AY-27 treated bladders instilled with IRDye800CW-DG and with histology confirmed neoplastic bladder tissue (n=11) was remarkably more intense (3.34 fold of over the former) and was also statistically significant (pbladder tissues suggests the potential for cystoscopy-adaptation to enhance diagnosis and guiding surgical management of flat urinary bladder cancer.

  9. Tumor cell proliferation kinetics and tumor growth rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tubiana, M

    1989-01-01

    The present knowledge on the growth rate and the proliferation kinetics of human tumor is based on the measurement of the tumor doubling times (DT) in several hundred patients and on the determination of the proportion of proliferating cells with radioactive thymidine or by flow cytometry in large numbers of patients. The results show that the DT of human tumor varies widely, from less than one week to over one year with a median value of approximately 2 months. The DTs are significantly correlated with the histological type. They depend upon (1) the duration of the cell cycle whose mean duration is 2 days with small variations from tumor to tumor, (2) the proportion of proliferating cells and consequently the cell birth rate which varies widely among tumors and which is significantly correlated to the DT, (3) the cell loss factors which also vary widely and which are the greatest when proliferation is most intensive. These studies have several clinical implications: (a) they have further increased our understanding of the natural history of human tumor, (b) they have therapeutic implications since tumor responsiveness and curability by radiation and drugs are strongly influenced by the cell kinetic parameters of the tumor, (c) the proportion of proliferating cells is of great prognostic value in several types of human cancers. The investigation of the molecular defects, which are correlated with the perturbation of control of cell proliferation, should lead to significant fundamental and therapeutic advances. (orig.).

  10. Mutational analysis of circulating tumor cells from colorectal cancer patients and correlation with primary tumor tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lyberopoulou

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs provide a non-invasive accessible source of tumor material from patients with cancer. The cellular heterogeneity within CTC populations is of great clinical importance regarding the increasing number of adjuvant treatment options for patients with metastatic carcinomas, in order to eliminate residual disease. Moreover, the molecular profiling of these rare cells might lead to insight on disease progression and therapeutic strategies than simple CTCs counting. In the present study we investigated the feasibility to detect KRAS, BRAF, CD133 and Plastin3 (PLS3 mutations in an enriched CTCs cell suspension from patients with colorectal cancer, with the hypothesis that these genes` mutations are of great importance regarding the generation of CTCs subpopulations. Subsequently, we compared CTCs mutational status with that of the corresponding primary tumor, in order to access the possibility of tumor cells characterization without biopsy. CTCs were detected and isolated from blood drawn from 52 colorectal cancer (CRC patients using a quantum-dot-labelled magnetic immunoassay method. Mutations were detected by PCR-RFLP or allele-specific PCR and confirmed by direct sequencing. In 52 patients, discordance between primary tumor and CTCs was 5.77% for KRAS, 3.85% for BRAF, 11.54% for CD133 rs3130, 7.69% for CD133 rs2286455 and 11.54% for PLS3 rs6643869 mutations. Our results support that DNA mutational analysis of CTCs may enable non-invasive, specific biomarker diagnostics and expand the scope of personalized medicine for cancer patients.

  11. Single step 18F-labeling of dimeric cycloRGD for functional PET imaging of tumors in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Zhibo; Lozada, Jerome; Wong, May Q.; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Yapp, Donald; Perrin, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Arylboronates afford rapid aqueous 18 F-labeling via the creation of a highly polar 18 F-aryltrifluoroborate anion ( 18 F-ArBF 3 − ). Hypothesis: Radiosynthesis of an 18 F-ArBF 3 − can be successfully applied to a clinically relevant peptide. To test this hypothesis, we labeled dimeric-cylcoRGD, [c(RGDfK)] 2 E because a) it is molecularly complex and provides a challenging substrate to test the application of this technique, and b) [c(RGDfK)] 2 E has already been labeled via several 18 F-labeling methods which provide for a preliminary comparison. Goal: To validate this labeling method in the context of a complex and clinically relevant tracer to show tumor-specific uptake ex vivo with representative PET images in vivo. Methods: An arylborimidine was conjugated to [c(RGDfK)] 2 E to give the precursor [c(RGDfK)] 2 E-ArB(dan), which was aliquoted and stored at − 20 °C. Aliquots of 10 or 25 nmol, containing only micrograms of precursor, were labeled using relatively low levels of 18 F-activity. Following purification eight mice (pre-blocked/unblocked) with U87M xenograft tumors were injected with [c(RGDfK)] 2 E- 18 F-ArBF 3 − (n = 4) for ex vivo tissue dissection. Two sets of mice (pre-blocked/unblocked) were also imaged with PET–CT (n = 2). Results: The [c(RGDfK)] 2 E-ArB(dan) is converted within 15 min to [c(RGDfK)] 2 E- 18 F-ArBF 3 − in isolated radiochemical yields of ∼ 10% (n = 3) at a minimum effective specific activity of 0.3 Ci/μmol. Biodistribution shows rapid clearance to the bladder via the kidney resulting in high tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-muscle ratios of > 9 and > 6 respectively while pre-blocking with [c(RGDfK)] 2 E showed high tumor specificity. PET imaging showed good contrast between tumor and non-target tissues confirming the biodistribution data. Conclusion: An arylborimidine-RGD peptide is rapidly 18 F-labeled in one step, in good yield, at useful specific activity. Biodistribution studies with blocking controls

  12. Ionizing radiation enhances immunogenicity of cells expressing a tumor-specific T-cell epitope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciernik, Ilja F.; Romero, Pedro; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Carbone, David P.

    1999-01-01

    Background: p53 point mutations represent potential tumor-specific cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes. Whether ionizing radiation (IR) alters the immunological properties of cells expressing mutant p53 in respect of the CTL epitope generated by a defined point mutation has not been evaluated. Methods: Mutant p53-expressing syngeneic, nontumor forming BALB/c 3T3 fibroblasts, tumor forming ras-transfected BALB/c 3T3 sarcomas, and DBA/2-derived P815 mastocytoma cells, which differ at the level of minor histocompatibility antigens, were used as cellular vaccines. Cells were either injected with or without prior IR into naive BALB/c mice. Cellular cytotoxicity was assessed after secondary restimulation of effector spleen cells in vitro. Results: Injection of P815 mastocytoma cells expressing the mutant p53 induced mutation-specific CTL in BALB/c mice irrespective of prior irradiation. However, syngeneic fibroblasts or fibrosarcomas endogenously expressing mutant p53 were able to induce significant mutation-specific CTL only when irradiated prior to injection into BALB/c mice. IR of fibroblasts did not detectably alter the expression of cell surface molecules involved in immune response induction, nor did it alter the short-term in vitro viability of the fibroblasts. Interestingly, radioactively-labeled fibroblasts injected into mice after irradiation showed altered organ distribution, suggesting that the in vivo fate of these cells may play a crucial role in their immunogenicity. Conclusions: These findings indicate that IR can alter the immunogenicity of syngeneic normal as well as tumor forming fibroblasts in vivo, and support the view that ionizing radiation enhances immunogenicity of cellular tumor vaccines

  13. Tumor cell surface proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, S.J.; Braslawsky, G.R.; Flynn, K.; Foote, L.J.; Friedman, E.; Hotchkiss, J.A.; Huang, A.H.L.; Lankford, P.K.

    1982-01-01

    Cell surface proteins mediate interaction between cells and their environment. Unique tumor cell surface proteins are being identified and quantified in several tumor systems to address the following questions: (i) how do tumor-specific proteins arise during cell transformation; (ii) can these proteins be used as markers of tumor cell distribution in vivo; (iii) can cytotoxic drugs be targeted specifically to tumor cells using antibody; and (iv) can solid state radioimmunoassay of these proteins provide a means to quantify transformation frequencies. A tumor surface protein of 180,000 M/sub r/ (TSP-180) has been identified on cells of several lung carcinomas of BALB/c mice. TSP-180 was not detected on normal lung tissue, embryonic tissue, or other epithelial or sarcoma tumors, but it was found on lung carcinomas of other strains of mice. Considerable amino acid sequence homology exists among TSP-180's from several cell sources, indicating that TSP-180 synthesis is directed by normal cellular genes although it is not expressed in normal cells. The regulation of synthesis of TSP-180 and its relationship to normal cell surface proteins are being studied. Monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to TSP-180 have been developed. The antibodies have been used in immunoaffinity chromatography to isolate TSP-180 from tumor cell sources. This purified tumor antigen was used to immunize rats. Antibody produced by these animals reacted at different sites (epitopes) on the TSP-180 molecule than did the original MoAb. These sera and MoAb from these animals are being used to identify normal cell components related to the TSP-180 molecule

  14. 188Re labeling and biodistribution of magnetic nanoparticles for the tumor targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guiping; Zhang Hui; Wang Yongxian; Zhang Chunfu

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To prepare 188 Re labeled monoclonal antibody (Herceptin)-coated magnetic nanoparticles for tumor targeting and to study its biodistribution in mice. Methods: Herceptin and histidine were covalently linked to the amine group upon silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles modified by N-[3-(trimethyoxysilyl)prowl]-ethylenediamine using glutaraldehyde method. The Herceptin-coated magnetic nanoparticles and Herceptin were radiolabeled with 188 Re by a direct labelling method, whereas the histidine-coated magnetic nanoparticles was radiolabeled with 188 Re using fac-[ 188 Re(CO) 3 (H 2 0) 3 ] + as a precursor. The labelling efficiency and immunoreactivity as well as labelling stability were determined. Also, the biodistribution of 188 Re-magnetic and 188 Re-Herceptin-magnetic nanoparticles were observed in mice. Results: Herceptin-coated magnetic nanoparticles was characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) with diameter about 60 nm, while histidine-coated magnetic nanoparticles about 30 nm. The labeling efficiency for 188 Re-Herceptin, 188 Re-magnetic nanoparticles and 188 Re-Herceptin-magnetic nanoparticles were all > 90% and had a better stability in vitro. The immunoreactivity of Herceptin linked to magnetic nanoparticles was still high. The biodistribution in mice was shown that 188 Re-magnetic nanoparticles and 188 Re-Herceptin- magnetic nanoparticles had higher radioactivity levels in blood. Magnetic nanoparticles with diameter of 30 or 60 nm had a long half-life in blood stream and were accumulated in liver. Conclusion: The efficiency and stability of labelling Herceptin-coated magnetic nanoparticles and labelling magnetic nanoparticles with 188 Re are suitable for in vivo study in tumor-beating nude mice models. (authors)

  15. Investigation of therapeutic efficiency of phenytoin (PHT) labeled with radioactive 131I in the cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cansu Uzaras; Ugur Avcibasi; Hasan Demiroglu; Emin Ilker Medine; Ayfer Yurt KiIcar; Fazilet Zuemruet Biber Mueftueler; Perihan Uenak

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the incorporations of PHT radiolabeled with 131 I ( 131 I-PHT) on U-87 MG, Daoy and A549 cancerous cell lines. For this, cold and radio-labeling studies were carried out. The radiolabeling yield of 131 I-PHT was obtained about 95 %. Subsequently, cell culture studies were carried out and radio-labeling yields of 131 I, 131 I-PHT on U-87 MG, Daoy and A549 cancerous cells were investigated. Cell culture studies demonstrated that the incorporation values of 131 IPHT on the three cell lines decreased with increasing radioactivity. Consequently, 131 I-PHT may be a good radiopharmaceutical for targeting radionuclide therapy of Central Nervous System Tumors. (author)

  16. Pharmacokinetics of internally labeled monoclonal antibodies as a gold standard: comparison of biodistribution of 75Se-, 111In-, and 125I-labeled monoclonal antibodies in osteogenic sarcoma xenografts in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, M.; Endo, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Saga, T.; Sakahara, H.; Konishi, J.; Yamamuro, T.; Toyama, S.

    1989-01-01

    In order to know the true biodistribution of anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies, three monoclonal antibodies (OST6, OST7, and OST15) against human osteosarcoma and control antibody were internally labeled with 75Se by incubating [75Se]methionine and hybridoma cells. 75Se-labeled monoclonal antibodies were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo using the human osteogenic sarcoma cell line KT005, and the results were compared with those of 125I- and 111In-labeled antibodies. 75Se-, 125I- and 111In-labeled monoclonal antibodies had identical binding activities to KT005 cells, and the immunoreactivity was in the decreasing order of OST6, OST7, and OST15. On the contrary, in vivo tumor uptake (% injected dose/g) of 75Se- and 125I-labeled antibodies assessed using nude mice bearing human osteosarcoma KT005 was in the order of OST7, OST6, and OST15. In the case of 111In, the order was OST6, OST7, and OST15. High liver uptake was similarly seen with 75Se- and 111In-labeled antibodies, whereas 125I-labeled antibodies showed the lowest tumor and liver uptake. These data indicate that tumor targeting of antibody conjugates are not always predictable from cell binding studies due to the difference of blood clearance of labeled antibodies. Furthermore, biodistribution of both 111In- and 125I-labeled antibodies are not identical with internally labeled antibody. Admitting that internally labeled antibody is a ''gold standard'' of biodistribution of monoclonal antibody, high liver uptake of 111In-radiolabeled antibodies may be inherent to antibodies. Little, if any, increase in tumor-to-normal tissue ratios of antibody conjugates will be expected compared to those of 111In-labeled antibodies if stably coupled conjugates are administered i.v

  17. Fluorescent Affibody Molecule Administered In Vivo at a Microdose Level Labels EGFR Expressing Glioma Tumor Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Ana Luiza Ribeiro; Marra, Kayla; Gunn, Jason; Samkoe, Kimberley S; Hoopes, P Jack; Feldwisch, Joachim; Paulsen, Keith D; Pogue, Brian W

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescence guidance in surgical oncology provides the potential to realize enhanced molecular tumor contrast with dedicated targeted tracers, potentially with a microdose injection level. For most glioma tumors, the blood brain barrier is compromised allowing some exogenous drug/molecule delivery and accumulation for imaging. The aberrant overexpression and/or activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with many types of cancers, including glioblastoma, and so the use of a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent molecule targeted to the EGFR receptor provides the potential for improving tumor contrast during surgery. Fluorescently labeled affibody molecule (ABY-029) has high EGFR affinity and high potential specificity with reasonably fast plasma clearance. In this study, ABY-29 was evaluated in glioma versus normal brain uptake from intravenous injection at a range of doses, down to a microdose injection level. Nude rats were inoculated with the U251 human glioma cell line in the brain. Tumors were allowed to grow for 3-4 weeks. ABY-029 fluorescence ex vivo imaging of brain slices was acquired at different time points (1-48 h) and varying injection doses from 25 to 122 μg/kg (from human protein microdose equivalent to five times microdose levels). The tumor was most clearly visualized at 1-h post-injection with 8- to 16-fold average contrast relative to normal brain. However, the tumor still could be identified after 48 h. In all cases, the ABY-029 fluorescence appeared to localize preferentially in EGFR-positive regions. Increasing the injected dose from a microdose level to five times, a microdose level increased the signal by 10-fold, and the contrast was from 8 to 16, showing that there was value in doses slightly higher than the microdose restriction. Normal tissue uptake was found to be affected by the tumor size, indicating that edema was a likely factor affecting the expected tumor to normal tissue contrast. These results suggest

  18. Synthesis of novel {sup 68}Ga-labeled amino acid derivatives for positron emission tomography of cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shetty, Dinesh [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae Min, E-mail: jmjng@snu.ac.k [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Ju, Chang Hwan [Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Life and Nanopharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Sang [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seo Young [Department of Life and Nanopharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jae Yeon; Yang, Bo Yeun [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    Objectives: We developed amino acid derivatives of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,7-diacetic acid (DO2A) and 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,-triacetic acid (DO3A) that can be labeled with {sup 68}Ga, and we investigated their basic biological properties. Materials and methods: Alanine derivatives of DO2A and DO3A were synthesized by regiospecific nucleophilic attack of DO2tBu and DO3tBu on the {beta}-position of Boc-L-serine-{beta}-lactone, followed by acid hydrolysis. Also, homoalanine derivatives were synthesized by reacting with the protected bromo derivative of homoalanine, which was synthesized from N-Cbz-L-homoserine lactone. Further catalytic reduction and acid cleavage of protected groups resulted in the required products. All derivatives were labeled with {sup 68}Ga. Cell uptake assays were carried out in Hep3B (human hepatoma) and U87MG (human glioma) cell lines at 37{sup o}C. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies were performed using balb/c mice xenografted with CT-26 (mouse colon cancer). Results: All compounds were labeled with >97% efficiency. According to in vitro studies, the labeled amino acid derivatives showed significantly greater uptakes than the control ({sup 68}Ga 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid) in cancer cells. Small animal PET images for labeled compounds showed high tumor uptake, as well as kidney and bladder uptakes, at 30 min postinjection. {sup 68}Ga-DO3A-homoalanine showed the highest standardized uptake value ratio (3.9{+-}0.3), followed by {sup 68}Ga-DO2A-alanine (3.1{+-}0.2), {sup 68}Ga-DO3A-alanine (2.8{+-}0.2) and {sup 68}Ga-DO2A-homoalanine (2.3{+-}0.2). Conclusion: These derivatives were found to have high labeling efficiencies, high stabilities, high tumor cell uptakes, high tumor/nontumor xenograft uptakes and low nonspecific uptake in normal organs, except for the kidneys. However, the uptake mechanism of these derivatives remains unclear, and uptake via specific amino acid

  19. Enrichment of tumor cells for cell kinetic analysis in human tumor biopsies using cytokeratin gating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haustermans, K.; Hofland, I.; Ramaekers, M.; Ivanyi, D.; Balm, A.J.M.; Geboes, K.; Lerut, T.; Schueren, E. van der; Begg, A.C.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of using cytokeratin antibodies to distinguish normal and malignant cells in human tumors using flow cytometry. The goal was ultimately to increase the accuracy of cell kinetic measurements on human tumor biopsies. Material and methods: A panel of four antibodies was screened on a series of 48 tumors from two centres; 22 head and neck tumors (Amsterdam) and 26 esophagus carcinomas (Leuven). First, screening was carried out by immunohistochemistry on frozen sections to test intensity of staining and the fraction of cytokeratin-positive tumor cells. The antibody showing the most positive staining was then used for flow cytometry on the same tumor. Results: The two broadest spectrum antibodies (AE1/AE3, E3/C4) showed overall the best results with immunohistochemical staining, being positive in over 95% of tumors. Good cell suspensions for DNA flow cytometry could be made from frozen material by a mechanical method, whereas enzymatic methods with trypsin or collagenase were judged failures in almost all cases. >From fresh material, both collagenase and trypsin produced good suspensions for flow cytometry, although the fraction of tumor cells, judged by proportion aneuploid cells, was markedly higher for trypsin. Using the best cytokeratin antibody for each tumor, two parameter flow cytometry was done (cytokeratin versus DNA content). Enrichment of tumor cells was then tested by measuring the fraction of aneuploid cells (the presumed malignant population) of cytokeratin-positive cells versus all cells. An enrichment factor ranging between 0 (no enrichment) and 1 (perfect enrichment, tumor cells only) was then calculated. The average enrichment was 0.60 for head and neck tumors and 0.59 for esophagus tumors. Conclusions: We conclude that this method can substantially enrich the proportion of tumor cells in biopsies from carcinomas. Application of this method could significantly enhance accuracy of tumor cell kinetic measurements

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of novel Tc-99m labeled NGR-containing hexapeptides as tumor imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Weung; Kim, Woo Hyoung; Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Kim, Chang Guhn

    2015-02-01

    Asparagine-glycine-arginine (NGR)-containing peptides targeting aminopeptidase N (APN)/CD13 can be an excellent candidate for targeting ligands in molecular tumor imaging. In this study, we developed two NGR-containing hexapeptides, and evaluated the diagnostic performance of Tc-99m labeled hexapeptides as molecular imaging agents in an HT-1080 fibrosarcoma-bearing murine model. Peptides were synthesized using Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis. Radiochemical purity of Tc-99m was evaluated using instant thin-layer chromatography. The uptake of two NGR-containing hexapeptides within HT-1080 cells was evaluated in vitro. In HT-1080 fibrosarcoma tumor-bearing mice, gamma images were acquired. A biodistribution study was performed to calculate percentage of the injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g). Two hexapeptides, glutamic acid-cysteine-glycine (ECG)-NGR and NGR-ECG were successfully synthesized. After radiolabeling procedures with Tc-99m, the complexes Tc-99m hexapeptides were prepared in high yield. The uptake of Tc-99m ECG-NGR within the tumor cells had been assured by in vitro studies. The gamma camera imaging in the murine model showed that Tc-99m ECG-NGR was accumulated substantially in the subcutaneously engrafted tumor. However, Tc-99m NGR-ECG was accumulated minimally in the tumor. Two NGR-containing hexapeptides, ECG-NGR and NGR-ECG were developed as molecular imaging agents to target APN/CD13 in HT-1080 fibrosarcoma. Tc-99m ECG-NGR showed a significant uptake in the tumor, and it is a good candidate for tumor imaging. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Exosome-Based Cell-Cell Communication in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Maia

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumors are not isolated entities, but complex systemic networks involving cell-cell communication between transformed and non-transformed cells. The milieu created by tumor-associated cells may either support or halt tumor progression. In addition to cell-cell contact, cells communicate through secreted factors via a highly complex system involving characteristics such as ligand concentration, receptor expression and integration of diverse signaling pathways. Of these, extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes, are emerging as novel cell-cell communication mediators in physiological and pathological scenarios. Exosomes, membrane vesicles of endocytic origin released by all cells (both healthy and diseased, ranging in size from 30 to 150 nm, transport all the main biomolecules, including lipids, proteins, DNAs, messenger RNAs and microRNA, and perform intercellular transfer of components, locally and systemically. By acting not only in tumor cells, but also in tumor-associated cells such as fibroblasts, endothelium, leukocytes and progenitor cells, tumor- and non-tumor cells-derived exosomes have emerged as new players in tumor growth and invasion, tumor-associated angiogenesis, tissue inflammation and immunologic remodeling. In addition, due to their property of carrying molecules from their cell of origin to the peripheral circulation, exosomes have been increasingly studied as sources of tumor biomarkers in liquid biopsies. Here we review the current literature on the participation of exosomes in the communication between tumor and tumor-associated cells, highlighting the role of this process in the setup of tumor microenvironments that modulate tumor initiation and metastasis.

  2. A novel Tc-99m and fluorescence-labeled arginine-arginine-leucine-containing peptide as a multimodal tumor imaging agent in a murine tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Kim, Seul-Gi; Kim, Dae-Weung

    2018-06-15

    We developed a Tc-99m and TAMRA-labeled peptide, Tc-99m arginine-arginine-leucine (RRL) peptide (TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL), to target tumor cells and evaluated the diagnostic performance of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL as a dual-modality imaging agent for tumor in a murine model. TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL was synthesized using Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis. Binding affinity and in vitro cellular uptake studies were performed. Gamma camera imaging, biodistribution, and ex vivo imaging studies were performed in murine models with PC-3 tumors. Tumor tissue slides were prepared and analyzed with immunohistochemistry using confocal microscopy. After radiolabeling procedures with Tc-99m, Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL complexes were prepared in high yield (>96%). The K d of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL determined by saturation binding was 41.7 ± 7.8 nM. Confocal microscopy images of PC-3 cells incubated with TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL showed strong fluorescence in the cytoplasm. Gamma camera imaging revealed substantial uptake of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL in tumors. Tumor uptake was effectively blocked by the coinjection of an excess concentration of RRL. Specific uptake of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL was confirmed by biodistribution, ex vivo imaging, and immunohistochemistry stain studies. In conclusion, in vivo and in vitro studies revealed substantial uptake of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL in tumors. Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL has potential as a dual-modality tumor imaging agent. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Development of Coagulation Factor Probes for the Identification of Procoagulant Circulating Tumor Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tormoen, Garth W.; Cianchetti, Flor A. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Bock, Paul E. [Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); McCarty, Owen J. T., E-mail: tormoeng@ohsu.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States)

    2012-09-06

    Metastatic cancer is associated with a hypercoagulable state, and pathological venous thromboembolic disease is a significant source of morbidity and the second leading cause of death in patients with cancer. Here we aimed to develop a novel labeling strategy to detect and quantify procoagulant circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from patients with metastatic cancer. We hypothesize that the enumeration of procoagulant CTCs may be prognostic for the development of venous thrombosis in patients with cancer. Our approach is based on the observation that cancer cells are capable of initiating and facilitating cell-mediated coagulation in vitro, whereby activated coagulation factor complexes assemble upon cancer cell membrane surfaces. Binding of fluorescently labeled, active site-inhibited coagulation factors VIIa, Xa, and IIa to the metastatic breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, non-metastatic colorectal cell line, SW480, or metastatic colorectal cell line, SW620, was characterized in a purified system, in anticoagulated blood and plasma, and in plasma under conditions of coagulation. We conclude that a CTC labeling strategy that utilizes coagulation factor-based fluorescent probes may provide a functional assessment of the procoagulant potential of CTCs, and that this strategy is amenable to current CTC detection platforms.

  4. Pericytes limit tumor cell metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xian, Xiaojie; Håkansson, Joakim; Ståhlberg, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Previously we observed that neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) deficiency in beta tumor cells facilitates metastasis into distant organs and local lymph nodes. Here, we show that NCAM-deficient beta cell tumors grew leaky blood vessels with perturbed pericyte-endothelial cell-cell interactions...... the microvessel wall. To directly address whether pericyte dysfunction increases the metastatic potential of solid tumors, we studied beta cell tumorigenesis in primary pericyte-deficient Pdgfb(ret/ret) mice. This resulted in beta tumor cell metastases in distant organs and local lymph nodes, demonstrating a role...... and deficient perivascular deposition of ECM components. Conversely, tumor cell expression of NCAM in a fibrosarcoma model (T241) improved pericyte recruitment and increased perivascular deposition of ECM molecules. Together, these findings suggest that NCAM may limit tumor cell metastasis by stabilizing...

  5. Increased blood clearance rate of indium-111 oxine-labeled autologous CD4+ blood cells in untreated patients with Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimfors, G.; Holm, G.; Mellstedt, H.; Schnell, P.O.; Tullgren, O.; Bjoerkholm, M.

    1990-01-01

    Untreated patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) have a blood T-lymphocytopenia mainly caused by a reduction of the CD4+ subset. Indirect support for a sequestration of T cells in the spleen and tumor-involved lymphoid tissue has accumulated. To test the hypothesis that the blood CD4 T-lymphocytopenia in patients with HD is caused by an altered lymphocyte traffic, 12 untreated HD patients and five in complete clinical remission (CCR) were studied. Blood lymphocytes were collected by leukapheresis and gradient centrifugation, and were further purified by an adherence step. The cells were labeled with indium-111 oxine and reinfused intravenously into the patient. The radioactivity of CD4+ and CD8+ blood lymphocytes separated by immunoabsorption was measured from serial blood samples. CD4+ cells were eliminated more rapidly in untreated patients than patients in CCR. Repeated gamma camera imaging after autotransfusion of indium-111 oxine labeled cells demonstrated an accumulation of radioactivity in tumor-involved tissue of untreated patients. These findings support the concept of an enhanced elimination of CD4+ cells in patients with active HD that may contribute to the observed blood T-lymphocytopenia and may reflect a biologic response to the tumor

  6. Tumor-Infiltrating Immune Cells Promoting Tumor Invasion and Metastasis: Existing Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-gao Man, Alexander Stojadinovic, Jeffrey Mason, Itzhak Avital, Anton Bilchik, Bjoern Bruecher, Mladjan Protic, Aviram Nissan, Mina Izadjoo, Xichen Zhang, Anahid Jewett

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a commonly held belief that infiltration of immune cells into tumor tissues and direct physical contact between tumor cells and infiltrated immune cells is associated with physical destructions of the tumor cells, reduction of the tumor burden, and improved clinical prognosis. An increasing number of studies, however, have suggested that aberrant infiltration of immune cells into tumor or normal tissues may promote tumor progression, invasion, and metastasis. Neither the primary reason for these contradictory observations, nor the mechanism for the reported diverse impact of tumor-infiltrating immune cells has been elucidated, making it difficult to judge the clinical implications of infiltration of immune cells within tumor tissues. This mini-review presents several existing hypotheses and models that favor the promoting impact of tumor-infiltrating immune cells on tumor invasion and metastasis, and also analyzes their strength and weakness.

  7. The occurrence of recruitment supported from the finding of an increase in radiosensitivity of quiescent cells in solid tumors after fractionated irradiation with X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masunaga, Shinichiro; Ono, Koji; Kinashi, Yuko; Suzuki, Minoru; Akaboshi, Mitsuhiko

    1998-01-01

    We examined the behavior of quiescent cells in solid tumors irradiated twice at various intervals with X-rays, using our recently developed method for selectively detecting the response of quiescent cells in solid tumors. To determine the labeling indices of tumors at the second irradiation, each mouse group included mice that were continuously administered BrdU until just before the second irradiation using mini-osmotic pumps which had been implanted before the first irradiation. Radiosensitivity of total tumor cells at the second irradiation decreased in proportion to the increase in interval time. However, radiosensitivity of quiescent cells was raised with increase in the interval time. In addition, the labeling index at the second irradiation was higher than that at the first irradiation. These findings supported the occurrence of recruitment from quiescent to proliferating state during fractionated irradiation. (author)

  8. Human induced pluripotent stem cells labeled with fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles for targeted imaging and hyperthermia therapy for gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chao; Ruan, Jing; Yang, Meng; Pan, Fei; Gao, Guo; Qu, Su; Shen, You-Lan; Dang, Yong-Jun; Wang, Kan; Jin, Wei-Lin; Cui, Da-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells exhibit great potential for generating functional human cells for medical therapies. In this paper, we report for use of human iPS cells labeled with fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (FMNPs) for targeted imaging and synergistic therapy of gastric cancer cells in vivo. Human iPS cells were prepared and cultured for 72 h. The culture medium was collected, and then was co-incubated with MGC803 cells. Cell viability was analyzed by the MTT method. FMNP-labeled human iPS cells were prepared and injected into gastric cancer-bearing nude mice. The mouse model was observed using a small-animal imaging system. The nude mice were irradiated under an external alternating magnetic field and evaluated using an infrared thermal mapping instrument. Tumor sizes were measured weekly. iPS cells and the collected culture medium inhibited the growth of MGC803 cells. FMNP-labeled human iPS cells targeted and imaged gastric cancer cells in vivo, as well as inhibited cancer growth in vivo through the external magnetic field. FMNP-labeled human iPS cells exhibit considerable potential in applications such as targeted dual-mode imaging and synergistic therapy for early gastric cancer

  9. Determinates of tumor response to radiation: Tumor cells, tumor stroma and permanent local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wende; Huang, Peigen; Chen, David J.; Gerweck, Leo E.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: The causes of tumor response variation to radiation remain obscure, thus hampering the development of predictive assays and strategies to decrease resistance. The present study evaluates the impact of host tumor stromal elements and the in vivo environment on tumor cell kill, and relationship between tumor cell radiosensitivity and the tumor control dose. Material and methods: Five endpoints were evaluated and compared in a radiosensitive DNA double-strand break repair-defective (DNA-PKcs −/− ) tumor line, and its DNA-PKcs repair competent transfected counterpart. In vitro colony formation assays were performed on in vitro cultured cells, on cells obtained directly from tumors, and on cells irradiated in situ. Permanent local control was assessed by the TCD 50 assay. Vascular effects were evaluated by functional vascular density assays. Results: The fraction of repair competent and repair deficient tumor cells surviving radiation did not substantially differ whether irradiated in vitro, i.e., in the absence of host stromal elements and factors, from the fraction of cells killed following in vivo irradiation. Additionally, the altered tumor cell sensitivity resulted in a proportional change in the dose required to achieve permanent local control. The estimated number of tumor cells per tumor, their cloning efficiency and radiosensitivity, all assessed by in vitro assays, were used to predict successfully, the measured tumor control doses. Conclusion: The number of clonogens per tumor and their radiosensitivity govern the permanent local control dose

  10. CD8+ Tumor-Infiltrating T Cells Are Trapped in the Tumor-Dendritic Cell Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Boissonnas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy enhances the antitumor adaptive immune T cell response, but the immunosuppressive tumor environment often dominates, resulting in cancer relapse. Antigen-presenting cells such as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs and tumor dendritic cells (TuDCs are the main protagonists of tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL immuno-suppression. TAMs have been widely investigated and are associated with poor prognosis, but the immuno-suppressive activity of TuDCs is less well understood. We performed two-photon imaging of the tumor tissue to examine the spatiotemporal interactions between TILs and TuDCs after chemotherapy. In a strongly immuno-suppressive murine tumor model, cyclophosphamide-mediated chemotherapy transiently enhanced the antitumor activity of adoptively transferred ovalbumin-specific CD8+ T cell receptor transgenic T cells (OTI but barely affected TuDC compartment within the tumor. Time lapse imaging of living tumor tissue showed that TuDCs are organized as a mesh with dynamic interconnections. Once infiltrated into the tumor parenchyma, OTI T cells make antigen-specific and long-lasting contacts with TuDCs. Extensive analysis of TIL infiltration on histologic section revealed that after chemotherapy the majority of OTI T cells interact with TuDCs and that infiltration is restricted to TuDC-rich areas. We propose that the TuDC network exerts antigen-dependent unproductive retention that trap T cells and limit their antitumor effectiveness.

  11. Origin of induced pancreatic islet tumors: a radioautographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michels, J.E.; Bauer, G.E.; Dixit, P.K.

    1987-01-01

    Endocrine tumors of the pancreas are induced in a high percentage of young rats by injections of streptozotocin and nicotinamide (SZ/NA). Benign tumors first appear 20 to 36 weeks after drug injections. To determine the possible site of their origin, the incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine into islets, ducts, acini, microtumors, and gross tumors was examined by radioautography of histologic sections at 1 to 36 weeks after drug injection. Drug treatment led to early (1- to 6-week) increases in nuclear 3 H labeling of exocrine pancreatic structures (ductal and acinar cells), which may involve DNA repair processes. A secondary increase in labeling of duct cells during the period of tumor emergence supports the assumption that SZ/NA-induced tumors are of ductal origin. Microtumors and gross tumors also exhibited markedly elevated rates of [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation compared to control islets. Nontumorous islet tissue, which exhibited a gradual decrease in volume due to B-cell destruction by the drug injection, showed about 10-fold higher 3 H labeling than islets of controls at all time points. The results suggest that in addition to ductal precursors, islets that survive SZ/NA-induced injury may also provide sites of focal endocrine cell differentiation to tumor tissue. Once established, both microtumors and gross tumors continue to grow by accelerated cell division

  12. Evaluation of 18F-labeled icotinib derivatives as potential PET agents for tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hongyu Ren; Hongyu Ning; Jin Chang; Mingxia Zhao; Yong He; Yan Chong; Chuanmin Qi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, three 18 F-labeled crown ether fused anilinoquinazoline derivatives ([ 18 F]11a-c) were synthesized and evaluated as potential tumor imaging probes. The biodistribution results of [ 18 F]11b were good. Compared with [ 18 F]-fludeoxyglucose and l-[ 18 F]-fluoroethyltyrosine in the same animal model, [ 18 F]11b had better tumor/brain, tumor/muscle, and tumor/blood uptake ratios. Overall, these results suggest that [ 18 F]11b is promising as a tumor imaging agent for positron emission tomography. (author)

  13. Tumor Cells Express FcγRl Which Contributes to Tumor Cell Growth and a Metastatic Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bud Nelson

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available High levels of circulating immune complexes containing tumor-associated antigens are associated with a poor prognosis for individuals with cancer. The ability of B cells, previously exposed to tumor-associated antigens, to promote both in vitro and in vivo tumor growth formed the rationale to evaluate the mechanism by which immune complexes may promote tumor growth. In elucidating this mechanism, FcγRl expression by tumor cells was characterized by flow cytometry, polymerase chain reaction, and sequence analysis. Immune complexes containing shed tumor antigen and anti-shed tumor antigen Ab cross-linked FcγRl-expressing tumor cells, which resulted in an induction of tumor cell proliferation and of shed tumor antigen production. Use of selective tyrosine kinase inhibitors demonstrated that tumor cell proliferation induced by immune complex cross-linking of FcγRl is dependent on the tyrosine kinase signal transduction pathway. A selective inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase also inhibited this induction of tumor cell proliferation. These findings support a role for immune complexes and FcγRl expression by tumor cells in augmentation of tumor growth and a metastatic phenotype.

  14. Tumor stem cells: A new approach for tumor therapy (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    MENG, MIN; ZHAO, XIN-HAN; NING, QIAN; HOU, LEI; XIN, GUO-HONG; LIU, LI-FENG

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the existence of a minority of tumor cells possessing the stem cell properties of self-renewal and differentiation in leukemia and several solid tumors. However, these cells do not possess the normal regulatory mechanisms of stem cells. Following transplantation, they are capable of initiating tumorigenesis and are therefore known as ‘tumor stem cells’. Cellular origin analysis of tumor stem cells has resulted in three hypotheses: Embryonal rest hypothesis, anaplasia and maturation arrest. Several signaling pathways which are involved in carcinogenesis, including Wnt/β-catenin, Notch and Oct-4 signaling pathways are crucial in normal stem cell self-renewal decisions, suggesting that breakdown in the regulation of self-renewal may be a key event in the development of tumors. Thus, tumors can be regarded as an abnormal organ in which stem cells have escaped from the normal constraints on self-renewal, thus, leading to abnormally differentiated tumor cells that lose the ability to form tumors. This new model for maligancies has significance for clinical research and treatment. PMID:22844351

  15. Study of the cellular uptake and distribution of 57cobalt bleomycin in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metelmann, H.R.

    1980-01-01

    We investigated the dependence of the cellular uptake of 57 cobalt-bleomycin on the exposure time and on the dose. In addition we observed the influences due to the incubation temperature, to the growth phase of the tumor cells and due to the composition of the suspensory medium. In supplementary experiments we investigated the binding of the labelled cytostatic agent to erythrocytes, its adsorption to broken Ehrlich ascites tumor cells and the 57 cobalt-bleomycin outflow from pre-loaded intact Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. The 57 cobalt-bleomycin uptake of intact Ehrlich ascites tumor cells is determined by characteristic kinetics. Moreover, the erythrocytes and injured Ehrlich ascites tumor cells show a qualitatively similar graph of the 57 cobalt-bleomycin binding, which can clearly be distinguished from the kinetics found with intact Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. The uptake of this cytostatic agent depends on an unequivocal time-dose-temperature relationship. The transport mechanism of the 57 cobalt-bleomycin uptake was considered as endocytosis. An endocytosis-stimulating inducer could not be detected. However, we obtained indications that the cell-bound cytostatic agent is taken up in two compartments: on the cellular surface and in the interior of the cell. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Whole tumor antigen vaccination using dendritic cells: Comparison of RNA electroporation and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benencia Fabian

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Because of the lack of full characterization of tumor associated antigens for solid tumors, whole antigen use is a convenient approach to tumor vaccination. Tumor RNA and apoptotic tumor cells have been used as a source of whole tumor antigen to prepare dendritic cell (DC based tumor vaccines, but their efficacy has not been directly compared. Here we compare directly RNA electroporation and pulsing of DCs with whole tumor cells killed by ultraviolet (UV B radiation using a convenient tumor model expressing human papilloma virus (HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes. Although both approaches led to DCs presenting tumor antigen, electroporation with tumor cell total RNA induced a significantly higher frequency of tumor-reactive IFN-gamma secreting T cells, and E7-specific CD8+ lymphocytes compared to pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells. DCs electroporated with tumor cell RNA induced a larger tumor infiltration by T cells and produced a significantly stronger delay in tumor growth compared to DCs pulsed with UV-irradiated tumor cells. We conclude that electroporation with whole tumor cell RNA and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells are both effective in eliciting antitumor immune response, but RNA electroporation results in more potent tumor vaccination under the examined experimental conditions.

  17. Development of lutetium-labeled bombesin derivates: relationship between structure and diagnostic-therapeutic activity for prostate tumor; Desenvolvimento de derivados da bombesina radiomarcados com lutecio-177: relacao estrutura e potencial diagnostico-terapeutico para tumor de prostata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujatti, Priscilla Brunelli

    2009-07-01

    Bombesin (BBN) receptors - in particular, the gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptor peptide - have been shown to be massively over expressed in several human tumors types, including prostate cancer, and could be an alternative as target for its treatment by radionuclide therapy (RNT). A large number of BBN analogs had already been synthesized for this purpose and have shown to reduce tumor growth in mice. Nevertheless, most of the studied analogs exhibit high abdominal accumulation, especially in pancreas. This abdominal accumulation may represent a problem in clinical use of radiolabeled bombesin analogs probably due to serious side effects to patients. The goal of the present work was to radiolabel a novel series of bombesin derivatives with lutetium-177 and to evaluate the relationship between their structure and diagnostic-therapeutic activity for prostate tumor. The generic structure of studied peptides is DOTA-Phe-(Gly){sub n}-BBN(6-14), where DOTA is the chelator, n is the number of glycine amino acids of Phe-(Gly){sub n} spacer and BBN(6-14) is the bombesin sequence from the amino acid 6 to the amino acid 14. Preliminary studies were done to establish the ideal labeling conditions for obtaining the highest yield of labeled bombesin derivatives, determined by instant thin layer chromatography (ITLC-SG) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The stability of the preparations was evaluated either after storing at 2-8 degree C or incubation in human serum at 37 degree C and the partition coefficient was determined in n:octanol:water. In vivo studies were performed in both healthy Balb-c and Nude mice bearing PC-3 xenografts, in order to characterize the biological properties of labeled peptides. In vitro studies involved the evaluation of cold bombesin derivatives effect in PC-3 cells proliferation. Bombesin derivatives were successfully labeled with high yield at optimized conditions and exhibited high stability at 4 degree C. The analysis of

  18. Syntheses and biological evaluation of F-18 and I-123 labeled porphyrins as potential tumor imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H.; Ji, D. Y. [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Moon, B. S.; Lee, T. S.; Lee, D. H.; Lee, K. C.; Ahn, G. I.; Yang, S. D.; Choi, C. W.; Jun, K. S. [KIRAMS, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Photofrin has currently been approved for general use by licensing authorities to treatment for solid tumor and cancer using photodynamic therapy (PDT) that treat to photochemical effect induced by light. Recently, meso-tetra(3-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin has been developed as one of best tumor localizer and also shown a favorable tissue distribution. We have studied to develop I-123 labeled meso-tetra(3-methoxyphenyl)porphyrins for tumor imaging. We have studied to develop iodine-123 labeled meso-tetra(3-carboxymethoxy phenyl)porphyrin for tumor imaging agent. The radioiodinated porphyrin compound was obtained by the iodination reaction of tin precursor (50 ig) of porphyrin with Na-123I (200 {mu}L, 100-200 mCi), in the presence of peracetic acid (40 {mu}L) in ethanol. Iodine-123 labeled porphyrin derivative was obtained in 20-30% radiochemical yield and purified by HPLC at 2 mL/min using EtOH/water gradient condition and the fraction at 24-26 min was collected and characterized to desired compound by co injection with cold porphyrin analogue. Total time was around 120 min. The in vitro and in vivo of I-123 labeled porphyrin derivative is under studying.

  19. Syntheses and biological evaluation of F-18 and I-123 labeled porphyrins as potential tumor imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. H.; Ji, D. Y.; Moon, B. S.; Lee, T. S.; Lee, D. H.; Lee, K. C.; Ahn, G. I.; Yang, S. D.; Choi, C. W.; Jun, K. S.

    2005-01-01

    Photofrin has currently been approved for general use by licensing authorities to treatment for solid tumor and cancer using photodynamic therapy (PDT) that treat to photochemical effect induced by light. Recently, meso-tetra(3-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin has been developed as one of best tumor localizer and also shown a favorable tissue distribution. We have studied to develop I-123 labeled meso-tetra(3-methoxyphenyl)porphyrins for tumor imaging. We have studied to develop iodine-123 labeled meso-tetra(3-carboxymethoxy phenyl)porphyrin for tumor imaging agent. The radioiodinated porphyrin compound was obtained by the iodination reaction of tin precursor (50 ig) of porphyrin with Na-123I (200 μL, 100-200 mCi), in the presence of peracetic acid (40 μL) in ethanol. Iodine-123 labeled porphyrin derivative was obtained in 20-30% radiochemical yield and purified by HPLC at 2 mL/min using EtOH/water gradient condition and the fraction at 24-26 min was collected and characterized to desired compound by co injection with cold porphyrin analogue. Total time was around 120 min. The in vitro and in vivo of I-123 labeled porphyrin derivative is under studying

  20. Radioimmunodetection of human melanoma tumor xenografts with human monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomibuchi, Makoto; Saxton, R.E.; Lake, R.R.; Katano, Mitsuo; Irie, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    A human IgM monoclonal antibody has been established that defines a tumor-associated membrane antigen expressed on human melanoma cells. The antigen has been identified as the ganglioside GD2. In this paper, the authors describe the potential usefulness of the human monoclonal antibody for radioimaging. Nude mice bearing tumors derived from a human melanoma cell line were used as a model. Antibody activity was degradated significantly after labeling with 131 I by the use of a modified chloramine-T method. After testing various concentrations, labeled antibody of a specific activity of 2.8μCi/μg produced the best results. Balb/c nude mice bearing a GD2-positive M14 melanoma cell line were injected with 10-30μg of labeled antibody, and its radiolocalization in different organs and in the whole body were evaluated. The best tumor image was obtained on Day 6. The labeled antibody uptake ratio between tumor and muscle was 9.2:1; the ratio between tumor and liver was 1.4:1. These studies represent the first report of experimental tumor imaging with human monoclonal antibody. Human monoclonals will probably prove to be superior reagents for tumor imaging in melanoma patients if the problem of anti-body radiolysis is resolved. (author)

  1. Quantitative tracking of tumor cells in phase-contrast microscopy exploiting halo artifact pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Song, Soo-Min; Lee, Hana; Kim, Myoung-Hee

    2012-03-01

    Tumor cell morphology is closely related to its invasiveness characteristics and migratory behaviors. An invasive tumor cell has a highly irregular shape, whereas a spherical cell is non-metastatic. Thus, quantitative analysis of cell features is crucial to determine tumor malignancy or to test the efficacy of anticancer treatment. We use phase-contrast microscopy to analyze single cell morphology and to monitor its change because it enables observation of long-term activity of living cells without photobleaching and phototoxicity, which is common in other fluorescence-labeled microscopy. Despite this advantage, there are image-level drawbacks to phase-contrast microscopy, such as local light effect and contrast interference ring, among others. Thus, we first applied a local filter to compensate for non-uniform illumination. Then, we used intensity distribution information to detect the cell boundary. In phase-contrast microscopy images, the cell normally appears as a dark region surrounded by a bright halo. As the halo artifact around the cell body is minimal and has an asymmetric diffusion pattern, we calculated the cross-sectional plane that intersected the center of each cell and was orthogonal to the first principal axis. Then, we extracted the dark cell region by level set. However, a dense population of cultured cells still rendered single-cell analysis difficult. Finally, we measured roundness and size to classify tumor cells into malignant and benign groups. We validated segmentation accuracy by comparing our findings with manually obtained results.

  2. Recent developments in blood cell labeling research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Straub, R.F.; Meinken, G.E.

    1988-09-07

    A number of recent developments in research on blood cell labeling techniques are presented. The discussion relates to three specific areas: (1) a new in vitro method for red blood cell labeling with /sup 99m/Tc; (2) a method for labeling leukocytes and platelets with /sup 99m/Tc; and (3) the use of monoclonal antibody technique for platelet labeling. The advantages and the pitfalls of these techniques are examined in the light of available mechanistic information. Problems that remain to be resolved are reviewed. An assessment is made of the progress as well as prospects in blood cell labeling methodology including that using the monoclonal antibody approach. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Recent developments in blood cell labeling research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Straub, R.F.; Meinken, G.E.

    1988-01-01

    A number of recent developments in research on blood cell labeling techniques are presented. The discussion relates to three specific areas: (1) a new in vitro method for red blood cell labeling with /sup 99m/Tc; (2) a method for labeling leukocytes and platelets with /sup 99m/Tc; and (3) the use of monoclonal antibody technique for platelet labeling. The advantages and the pitfalls of these techniques are examined in the light of available mechanistic information. Problems that remain to be resolved are reviewed. An assessment is made of the progress as well as prospects in blood cell labeling methodology including that using the monoclonal antibody approach. 37 refs., 4 figs

  4. Nondestructive Analysis of Tumor-Associated Membrane Protein Integrating Imaging and Amplified Detection in situ Based on Dual-Labeled DNAzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Jing; Chen, Tianshu; Gao, Tao; Zhu, Xiaoli; Li, Genxi

    2018-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the expression level and location of tumor-associated membrane proteins (TMPs) is of vital importance for the profiling of tumor cells. Currently, two kinds of independent techniques, i.e. ex situ detection and in situ imaging, are usually required for the quantification and localization of TMPs respectively, resulting in some inevitable problems. Methods: Herein, based on a well-designed and fluorophore-labeled DNAzyme, we develop an integrated and facile method, in which imaging and quantification of TMPs in situ are achieved simultaneously in a single system. The labeled DNAzyme not only produces localized fluorescence for the visualization of TMPs but also catalyzes the cleavage of a substrate to produce quantitative fluorescent signals that can be collected from solution for the sensitive detection of TMPs. Results: Results from the DNAzyme-based in situ imaging and quantification of TMPs match well with traditional immunofluorescence and western blotting. In addition to the advantage of two-in-one, the DNAzyme-based method is highly sensitivity, allowing the detection of TMPs in only 100 cells. Moreover, the method is nondestructive. Cells after analysis could retain their physiological activity and could be cultured for other applications. Conclusion: The integrated system provides solid results for both imaging and quantification of TMPs, making it a competitive method over some traditional techniques for the analysis of TMPs, which offers potential application as a toolbox in the future.

  5. Dual-Labeled Near-Infrared/99mTc Imaging Probes Using PAMAM-Coated Silica Nanoparticles for the Imaging of HER2-Expressing Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Yamaguchi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We sought to develop dual-modality imaging probes using functionalized silica nanoparticles to target human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells and achieve efficient target imaging of HER2-expressing tumors. Polyamidoamine-based functionalized silica nanoparticles (PCSNs for multimodal imaging were synthesized with near-infrared (NIR fluorescence (indocyanine green (ICG and technetium-99m (99mTc radioactivity. Anti-HER2 antibodies were bound to the labeled PCSNs. These dual-imaging probes were tested to image HER2-overexpressing breast carcinoma cells. In vivo imaging was also examined in breast tumor xenograft models in mice. SK-BR3 (HER2 positive cells were imaged with stronger NIR fluorescent signals than that in MDA-MB231 (HER2 negative cells. The increased radioactivity of the SK-BR3 cells was also confirmed by phosphor imaging. NIR images showed strong fluorescent signals in the SK-BR3 tumor model compared to muscle tissues and the MDA-MB231 tumor model. Automatic well counting results showed increased radioactivity in the SK-BR3 xenograft tumors. We developed functionalized silica nanoparticles loaded with 99mTc and ICG for the targeting and imaging of HER2-expressing cells. The dual-imaging probes efficiently imaged HER2-overexpressing cells. Although further studies are needed to produce efficient isotope labeling, the results suggest that the multifunctional silica nanoparticles are a promising vehicle for imaging specific components of the cell membrane in a dual-modality manner.

  6. FRET microscopy autologous tumor lysate processing in mature dendritic cell vaccine therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridolfi Ruggero

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antigen processing by dendritic cells (DC exposed to specific stimuli has been well characterized in biological studies. Nonetheless, the question of whether autologous whole tumor lysates (as used in clinical trials are similarly processed by these cells has not yet been resolved. Methods In this study, we examined the transfer of peptides from whole tumor lysates to major histocompatibility complex class II molecules (MHC II in mature dendritic cells (mDC from a patient with advanced melanoma. Tumor antigenic peptides-MHC II proximity was revealed by Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET measurements, which effectively extends the application of fluorescence microscopy to the molecular level ( Results We detected significant energy transfer between donor and acceptor-labelled antibodies against HLA-DR at the membrane surface of mDC. FRET data indicated that fluorescent peptide-loaded MHC II molecules start to accumulate on mDC membranes at 16 hr from the maturation stimulus, steeply increasing at 22 hr with sustained higher FRET detected up to 46 hr. Conclusions The results obtained imply that the patient mDC correctly processed the tumor specific antigens and their display on the mDC surface may be effective for several days. These observations support the rationale for immunogenic efficacy of autologous tumor lysates.

  7. Comparison of the evolution of tumor cells after unique and multiple (accelerated) daily irradiation in mammary carcinoma of C3H mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfersdorff, J.; Sack, H.

    1986-01-01

    The comparison of two fractionation schemes, i.e. the usual irradiation once a day with 2 Gy (SDF) and the fractionation with 3 times 1.6 Gy per day (MDF) at intervals of at least four hours shows the stronger action of higher fractionation on the destruction of tumor cells and the inhibition of their proliferation kinetics. So the number of pycnotic cells is considerably increased in case of multiple daily irradiation, and the mitosis rate as well as the labelling index show a more significant decrease. In case of one irradiation per day, the number of pycnotic cells increases during radiotherapy, too, but the mitosis rate and the labelling index only decrease until the fifth or sixth treatment day, remaining then unchanged or increasing slightly. This suggests a recurring multiplication of tumor cells already during radiotherapy. The higher efficacy of multiple daily fractionation in rapidly proliferating tumors is proved by the measurements of changing tumor volumes in the living animal during irradiation as well as by the observation of the survival time after irradiation. (orig.) [de

  8. Experimental study on 131I-labelled anti-alpha-fetoprotein antibodies in the diagnosis of rat hepatoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terashima, Hiromi

    1980-01-01

    The tumor-specificity of 131 I-labelled anti-α-fetoprotein antibodies was evaluated in rats using α-fetoprotein-producing AH66C4 rat hepatoma as a model. 1) Following the 12 hour incubation of 125 I-labelled anti-α-fetoprotein antibodies and tumor cells, microautoradiography revealed marked radioactivity in and around the tumor cells. This suggested that the labelled antibodies accumulated around the cells and were combined with the α-fetoprotein secreted from the cells. 2) The tumor was transplanted subcutaneously into the thighs of rats. There was marked accumulation of 131 I-antibodies in the tumor with cyst formation, but there was none in the tumor without cyst formation. The accumulation was enhanced by the administration of non-labelled antibodies to the rats before the administration of 131 I-antibodies. The α-fetoprotein level was higher in the cyst than in any other organ. 131 I-labelled horse-γ-globulins administered as a control, also accumulated in the tumor with cyst but the degree of accumulation did not exceed that of the 131 I-antibodies. The amount of 131 I-antibodies accumulated increased, while that of 131 I-horse-γ-globulins decreased with time. This indicated that the accumulation of the γ-globulins in the tumor was nonspecific and that it was related to the blood pool. These results strongly suggest that the accumulation of 131 I-antibodies in the tumor with cyst formation was a specific antigen-antibody reaction, and the present procedure reported is applicable in the specific diagnosis of such kinds of α-fetoprotein secreting tumor. (author)

  9. Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, J

    1976-12-01

    Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle. (Localizabión de receptores para lectinas durante el ciclo celular). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 100-104, 1976. The topographic distribution of specific cell surface receptors for concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin was studied by ultrastructural labeling in the course of the cell cycle. C12TSV5 cells were synchronized by double thymidine block or mechanical selection (shakeoff). They were labeled by means of lectin-peroxidase techniques while in G1 S, G2 and M phases of the cycle. The results obtained were similar for both lectins employed. Interphase cells (G1 S, G2) present a stlihtly discontinous labeling pattern that is similar to the one observed on unsynchronized cells of the same line. Cells in mitosis, on the contrary, present a highly discontinous distribution of reaction product. This pattern disappears after the cells enters G1 and is not present on mitotic cells fixed in aldehyde prior to labeling.

  10. Clinical Evaluation of 57Co-labelled Bleomycin for Tumor Localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Yong Wun; Kim, Jang Hee; Lee, Jhin Oh

    1987-01-01

    Investigation with 57 Co-Bleomycin in patients with the various cancers and in tumor bearing animals are described. In the patients, 57 Co-Bleomycin appears to be one of the useful tumor- seeking radiopharmaceuticals, and worth applicable to clinical uses. Labelled yield of 57 Co-Bleo was about 97% by thin layer chromatography. The pyrogen free tests were performed to meet U.S.P. critical ranges. In clinical studies with 57 Co-Bleo, 4 cases out of 5 patients with lung cancer, 2 cases among 3 thyroid cancer patients, and all 3 hepatoma patients showed positive tumor scans. The patients with stomach cancer, and the esophageal cancer showed false negative scintigraphy. A case with pulmonary tuberculosis showed a positive scan while liver abscess showed a negative picture. The merits of 57 Co-Bleomycin scintigraphy seems to be its relatively high affinity to tumors and low radiation hazard in spite of long physical half life.

  11. Microenvironmental pH Is a Key Factor for Exosome Traffic in Tumor Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolini, Isabella; Federici, Cristina; Raggi, Carla; Lugini, Luana; Palleschi, Simonetta; De Milito, Angelo; Coscia, Carolina; Iessi, Elisabetta; Logozzi, Mariantonia; Molinari, Agnese; Colone, Marisa; Tatti, Massimo; Sargiacomo, Massimo; Fais, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    Exosomes secreted by normal and cancer cells carry and deliver a variety of molecules. To date, mechanisms referring to tumor exosome trafficking, including release and cell-cell transmission, have not been described. To gain insight into this, exosomes purified from metastatic melanoma cell medium were labeled with a lipid fluorescent probe, R18, and analyzed by spectrofluorometry and confocal microscopy. A low pH condition is a hallmark of tumor malignancy, potentially influencing exosome release and uptake by cancer cells. Using different pH conditions as a modifier of exosome traffic, we showed (i) an increased exosome release and uptake at low pH when compared with a buffered condition and (ii) exosome uptake by melanoma cells occurred by fusion. Membrane biophysical analysis, such as fluidity and lipid composition, indicated a high rigidity and sphingomyelin/ganglioside GM3 (N-acetylneuraminylgalactosylglucosylceramide) content in exosomes released at low pH. This was likely responsible for the increased fusion efficiency. Consistent with these results, pretreatment with proton pump inhibitors led to an inhibition of exosome uptake by melanoma cells. Fusion efficiency of tumor exosomes resulted in being higher in cells of metastatic origin than in those derived from primary tumors or normal cells. Furthermore, we found that caveolin-1, a protein involved in melanoma progression, is highly delivered through exosomes released in an acidic condition. The results of our study provide the evidence that exosomes may be used as a delivery system for paracrine diffusion of tumor malignancy, in turn supporting the importance of both exosomes and tumor pH as key targets for future anti-cancer strategies. PMID:19801663

  12. Microenvironmental pH is a key factor for exosome traffic in tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolini, Isabella; Federici, Cristina; Raggi, Carla; Lugini, Luana; Palleschi, Simonetta; De Milito, Angelo; Coscia, Carolina; Iessi, Elisabetta; Logozzi, Mariantonia; Molinari, Agnese; Colone, Marisa; Tatti, Massimo; Sargiacomo, Massimo; Fais, Stefano

    2009-12-04

    Exosomes secreted by normal and cancer cells carry and deliver a variety of molecules. To date, mechanisms referring to tumor exosome trafficking, including release and cell-cell transmission, have not been described. To gain insight into this, exosomes purified from metastatic melanoma cell medium were labeled with a lipid fluorescent probe, R18, and analyzed by spectrofluorometry and confocal microscopy. A low pH condition is a hallmark of tumor malignancy, potentially influencing exosome release and uptake by cancer cells. Using different pH conditions as a modifier of exosome traffic, we showed (i) an increased exosome release and uptake at low pH when compared with a buffered condition and (ii) exosome uptake by melanoma cells occurred by fusion. Membrane biophysical analysis, such as fluidity and lipid composition, indicated a high rigidity and sphingomyelin/ganglioside GM3 (N-acetylneuraminylgalactosylglucosylceramide) content in exosomes released at low pH. This was likely responsible for the increased fusion efficiency. Consistent with these results, pretreatment with proton pump inhibitors led to an inhibition of exosome uptake by melanoma cells. Fusion efficiency of tumor exosomes resulted in being higher in cells of metastatic origin than in those derived from primary tumors or normal cells. Furthermore, we found that caveolin-1, a protein involved in melanoma progression, is highly delivered through exosomes released in an acidic condition. The results of our study provide the evidence that exosomes may be used as a delivery system for paracrine diffusion of tumor malignancy, in turn supporting the importance of both exosomes and tumor pH as key targets for future anti-cancer strategies.

  13. Tumor scintigraphy by the method for subtracting the initial image with technetium-99m labeled antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karube, Yoshiharu; Katsuno, Kentaro; Ito, Sanae; Matsunaga, Kazuhisa; Takata, Jiro; Kuroki, Masahide; Murakami, Masaaki; Matsuoka, Yuji

    1999-01-01

    The method for subtracting the initial image from the localization image was evaluated for radioimmunoscintigraphy of tumors with technetium-99m (Tc-99m) labeled antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies were parental mouse and mouse-human chimeric antibodies to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), designated F11-39 and ChF11-39, respectively, both of which have been found to discriminate CEA in tumor tissues from the CEA-related antigens. After reduction of the intrinsic disulfide bonds, these antibodies were labeled with Tc-99m. In vivo studies were performed on athymic nude mice bearing the human CEA-producing gastric carcinoma xenografts. Though biodistribution results showed selective and progressive accumulation of Tc-99m labeled antibodies at the tumor site, high radioactivity in blood was inappropriate for scintigraphic visualization of the tumors within a few hours. We examined the subtraction of the initial Tc-99m image from the Tc-99m localization image after a few hours. Subtracted images of the same count reflected the in vivo behavior of the Tc-99m radioactivity. The subtracted scintigrams revealed excellent tumor images with no significant extrarenal background. Visualization of the tumor site was dependent on antigen-specific binding and nonspecific exudation. These results demonstrate that a method of subtraction of the initial image may serve as a potentially useful diagnostic method for an abnormal site for agents with a low pharmacokinetic value. (author)

  14. 89Zr-Oxine Complex PET Cell Imaging in Monitoring Cell-based Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haitao; Asiedu, Kingsley O.; Szajek, Lawrence P.; Griffiths, Gary L.; Choyke, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop a clinically translatable method of cell labeling with zirconium 89 (89Zr) and oxine to track cells with positron emission tomography (PET) in mouse models of cell-based therapy. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional animal care committee. 89Zr-oxine complex was synthesized in an aqueous solution. Cell labeling conditions were optimized by using EL4 mouse lymphoma cells, and labeling efficiency was examined by using dendritic cells (DCs) (n = 4), naïve (n = 3) and activated (n = 3) cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), and natural killer (NK) (n = 4), bone marrow (n = 4), and EL4 (n = 4) cells. The effect of 89Zr labeling on cell survival, proliferation, and function were evaluated by using DCs (n = 3) and CTLs (n = 3). Labeled DCs (444–555 kBq/[5 × 106] cells, n = 5) and CTLs (185 kBq/[5 × 106] cells, n = 3) transferred to mice were tracked with microPET/CT. In a melanoma immunotherapy model, tumor targeting and cytotoxic function of labeled CTLs were evaluated with imaging (248.5 kBq/[7.7 × 106] cells, n = 4) and by measuring the tumor size (n = 6). Two-way analysis of variance was used to compare labeling conditions, the Wilcoxon test was used to assess cell survival and proliferation, and Holm-Sidak multiple tests were used to assess tumor growth and perform biodistribution analyses. Results 89Zr-oxine complex was synthesized at a mean yield of 97.3% ± 2.8 (standard deviation). It readily labeled cells at room temperature or 4°C in phosphate-buffered saline (labeling efficiency range, 13.0%–43.9%) and was stably retained (83.5% ± 1.8 retention on day 5 in DCs). Labeling did not affect the viability of DCs and CTLs when compared with nonlabeled control mice (P > .05), nor did it affect functionality. 89Zr-oxine complex enabled extended cell tracking for 7 days. Labeled tumor-specific CTLs accumulated in the tumor (4.6% on day 7) and induced tumor regression (P cell tracking technique for use with PET that is

  15. (89)Zr-Oxine Complex PET Cell Imaging in Monitoring Cell-based Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Noriko; Wu, Haitao; Asiedu, Kingsley O; Szajek, Lawrence P; Griffiths, Gary L; Choyke, Peter L

    2015-05-01

    To develop a clinically translatable method of cell labeling with zirconium 89 ((89)Zr) and oxine to track cells with positron emission tomography (PET) in mouse models of cell-based therapy. This study was approved by the institutional animal care committee. (89)Zr-oxine complex was synthesized in an aqueous solution. Cell labeling conditions were optimized by using EL4 mouse lymphoma cells, and labeling efficiency was examined by using dendritic cells (DCs) (n = 4), naïve (n = 3) and activated (n = 3) cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), and natural killer (NK) (n = 4), bone marrow (n = 4), and EL4 (n = 4) cells. The effect of (89)Zr labeling on cell survival, proliferation, and function were evaluated by using DCs (n = 3) and CTLs (n = 3). Labeled DCs (444-555 kBq/[5 × 10(6)] cells, n = 5) and CTLs (185 kBq/[5 × 10(6)] cells, n = 3) transferred to mice were tracked with microPET/CT. In a melanoma immunotherapy model, tumor targeting and cytotoxic function of labeled CTLs were evaluated with imaging (248.5 kBq/[7.7 × 10(6)] cells, n = 4) and by measuring the tumor size (n = 6). Two-way analysis of variance was used to compare labeling conditions, the Wilcoxon test was used to assess cell survival and proliferation, and Holm-Sidak multiple tests were used to assess tumor growth and perform biodistribution analyses. (89)Zr-oxine complex was synthesized at a mean yield of 97.3% ± 2.8 (standard deviation). It readily labeled cells at room temperature or 4°C in phosphate-buffered saline (labeling efficiency range, 13.0%-43.9%) and was stably retained (83.5% ± 1.8 retention on day 5 in DCs). Labeling did not affect the viability of DCs and CTLs when compared with nonlabeled control mice (P > .05), nor did it affect functionality. (89)Zr-oxine complex enabled extended cell tracking for 7 days. Labeled tumor-specific CTLs accumulated in the tumor (4.6% on day 7) and induced tumor regression (P cell tracking technique for use with PET that is applicable to a broad range of

  16. State of the science of blood cell labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Straub, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    Blood cell labeling can be considered a science in as far as it is based on precise knowledge and can be readily reproduced. This benchmark criterion is applied to all current cell labeling modalities and their relative merits and deficiencies are discussed. Mechanisms are given where they are known as well as labeling yields, label stability, and cell functionality. The focus is on the methodology and its suitability to the clinical setting rather than on clinical applications per se. Clinical results are cited only as proof of efficacy of the various methods. The emphasis is on technetium as the cell label, although comparisons are made between technetium and indium, and all blood cells are covered. 52 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs

  17. Carbon "Quantum" Dots for Fluorescence Labeling of Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Hui; Cao, Li; LeCroy, Gregory E; Wang, Ping; Meziani, Mohammed J; Dong, Yiyang; Liu, Yuanfang; Luo, Pengju G; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2015-09-02

    The specifically synthesized and selected carbon dots of relatively high fluorescence quantum yields were evaluated in their fluorescence labeling of cells. For the cancer cell lines, the cellular uptake of the carbon dots was generally efficient, resulting in the labeling of the cells with bright fluorescence emissions for both one- and two-photon excitations from predominantly the cell membrane and cytoplasm. In the exploration on labeling the live stem cells, the cellular uptake of the carbon dots was relatively less efficient, though fluorescence emissions could still be adequately detected in the labeled cells, with the emissions again predominantly from the cell membrane and cytoplasm. This combined with the observed more efficient internalization of the same carbon dots by the fixed stem cells might suggest some significant selectivity of the stem cells toward surface functionalities of the carbon dots. The needs and possible strategies for more systematic and comparative studies on the fluorescence labeling of different cells, including especially live stem cells, by carbon dots as a new class of brightly fluorescent probes are discussed.

  18. Cell-mediated cytotoxicity for melanome tumor cells: detection by a (3H)proline release assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saal, J.G.; Rieber, E.P.; Riethmueller, G.

    1976-01-01

    An in vitro lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity assay using [ 3 H]proline-labelled target cells is described. The assay, modified from an original procedure of Bean et al., assesses the release of [ 3 H]proline by filtering the total culture fluid containing both trypsinised tumor cells and effector cells. Filtration is performed with a semiautomatic harvesting device using low suction pressure and large-diameter glass filters. Pretreatment of filters with whole serum diminishes adsorption of cell-free radioactive material considerably and thus increases the sensitivity of the assay. Nearly 100% of the radioactivity could be recovered with this harvesting device. The technique allowed the detection of cytolytic activities of lymphocytes after 6 h of incubation. Lymphocytes from patients with primary malignant melanoma showed a significantly higher cytolytic reactivity (p > 0.001) than normal donors' lymphocytes against three different melanoma cell lines. In a series of parallel experiments on 36 patients and 18 normal donors, this modification of the [ 3 ]proline test was compared with three different assays: the conventional microcytotoxicity test of Takasugi and Klein, the original [ 3 H]proline microcytotoxicity test of Bean et al., and the viability count of tumor cells. (Auth.)

  19. Biodistribution of immunoliposome labeled with Tc-99m in tumor xenografted mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Naoto; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Nakahara, Tadaki; Kanoh, Momoe; Hashimoto, Jun; Kunieda, Etsuo; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-01-01

    Immunoliposome (PEG, GAH, liposome; PGL), consisting of F(ab') 2 fragment of monoclonal antibody, GAH and polyethyleneglycol-coated (PEGylated) liposome was provided. Immunoliposome, PGL was labeled with technetium-99m (Tc-99m) by two methods: labeling F(ab') 2 fragment with Tc-99m; Tc-99m-PGL, and entrapping Tc-99m into liposome; PGL[Tc-99m]. The objective of this study was to compare the biodistribution of Tc-99m-PGL and PGL[Tc-99m] in human gastric cancer xenografted mice. Tc-99m-PGL, PGL[Tc-99m], and Tc-99m-entrapped liposome; Lipo[Tc-99m] were prepared. They were injected into human gastric cancer, MKN45, xenografted mice via the tail vein, and their biodistribution was studied. No marked accumulation of either PGL[Tc-99m] or Lipo[Tc-99m] was observed in the stomach. The uptake of Tc-99m-PGL by the liver, spleen, and lung was higher than that by the tumor. On the other hand, the uptake of PGL[Tc-99m] by the lung and spleen was markedly lower as compared with that of Tc-99m-PGL; the accumulation of PGL[Tc-99m] was lower in the lung and higher in the spleen as compared with that of the tumor. Although the liver uptake of PGL[Tc-99m] was markedly decreased as compared with that of Tc-99m-PGL, it was higher than the uptake of the tumor. The Tc-99m-PGL was strongly taken up by the tumor, with a high level of incorporation also seen in the stomach. These findings suggest the need for further study of the labeling stability. PGL[Tc-99m] appears to show promise for high tumor uptake and retention. This is an important implication for the potential application of immunoliposomes entrapped with Re-186, instead of Tc-99m, in internal radiotherapy. (author)

  20. Comparison of tumor biology of two distinct cell sub-populations in lung cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianyu; Sun, Zhiwei; Liu, Yongli; Kong, Liangsheng; Zhou, Shixia; Tang, Junlin; Xing, Hongmei Rosie

    2017-11-14

    Characterization of the stem-like properties of cancer stem cells (CSCs) remain indirect and qualitative, especially the ability of CSCs to undergo asymmetric cell division for self renewal and differentiation, a unique property of cells of stem origin. It is partly due to the lack of stable cellular models of CSCs. In this study, we developed a new approach for CSC isolation and purification to derive a CSC-enriched cell line (LLC-SE). By conducting five consecutive rounds of single cell cloning using the LLC-SE cell line, we obtained two distinct sub-population of cells within the Lewis lung cancer CSCs that employed largely symmetric division for self-renewal (LLC-SD) or underwent asymmetric division for differentiation (LLC-ASD). LLC-SD and LLC-ASD cell lines could be stably passaged in culture and be distinguished by cell morphology, stem cell marker, spheroid formation and subcutaneous tumor initiation efficiency, as well as orthotopic lung tumor growth, progression and survival. The ability LLC-ASD cells to undergo asymmetric division was visualized and quantified by the asymmetric segregation of labeled BrdU and NUMB to one of the two daughter cells in anaphase cell division. The more stem-like LLC-SD cells exhibited higher capacity for tumorigenesis and progression and shorter survival. As few as 10 LLC-SD could initiate subcutaneous tumor growth when transplanted to the athymic mice. Collectively, these observations suggest that the SD-type of cells appear to be on the top of the hierarchical order of the CSCs. Furthermore, they have lead to generated cellular models of CSC self-renewal for future mechanistic investigations.

  1. Optimization of in vitro cell labeling methods for human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, R; Sun, T-J; Han, Y-Q; Xu, G; Liu, J; Han, Y-F

    2014-01-01

    Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) are a novel source of seed cells for cell therapy and tissue engineering. However, in vitro labeling methods for hUCMSCs need to be optimized for better detection of transplanted cells. To identify the most stable and efficient method for labeling hUCMSCs in vitro. hUCMSCs were isolated using a modified enzymatic digestion procedure and cultured. hUCMSCs of passage three (P3) were then labeled with BrdU, PKH26, or lentivirus-GFP and passaged further. Cells from the first labeled passage (LP1), the fourth labeled passage (LP4) and later passages were observed using a fluorescence microscope. The differentiation potential of LP4 cells was assessed by induction with adipogenic and osteogenic medium. Flow cytometry was used to measure the percentage of labeled cells and the percentage of apoptotic or dead cells. The labeling efficiencies of the three hUCMSC-labeling methods were compared in vitro. BrdU, PKH26, and lentivirus-GFP all labeled LP1 cells with high intensity and clarity. However, the BrdU labeling of the LP4 cells was vague and not localized to the cell nuclei; LP9 cells were not detected under a fluorescence microscope. There was also a significant decrease in the fluorescence intensity of PKH26-labeled LP4 cells, and LP11 cells were not detected under a fluorescence microscope. However, the fluorescence of LP4 cells labeled with lentivirus-GFP remained strong, and cells labeled with lentivirus-GFP were detected up to LP14 under a fluorescence microscope. Statistical analyses indicated that percentages of LP1 cells labeled with PKH26 and lentivirus-GFP were significantly higher than that of cells labeled with BrdU (p 0.05) was observed between the death rates of labeled and unlabeled cells. Lentivirus-GFP is a valid method for long-term in vitro labeling, and it may be used as a long-term hUCMSC tracker following transplantation in vivo.

  2. Tumor-altered dendritic cell function: implications for anti-tumor immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Michael Hargadon

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are key regulators of both innate and adaptive immunity, and the array of immunoregulatory functions exhibited by these cells is dictated by their differentiation, maturation, and activation status. Although a major role for these cells in the induction of immunity to pathogens has long been appreciated, data accumulated over the last several years has demonstrated that DC are also critical regulators of anti-tumor immune responses. However, despite the potential for stimulation of robust anti-tumor immunity by DC, tumor-altered DC function has been observed in many cancer patients and tumor-bearing animals and is often associated with tumor immune escape. Such dysfunction has significant implications for both the induction of natural anti-tumor immune responses as well as the efficacy of immunotherapeutic strategies that target endogenous DC in situ or that employ exogenous DC as part of anti-cancer immunization maneuvers. In this review, the major types of tumor-altered DC function will be described, with emphasis on recent insights into the mechanistic bases for the inhibition of DC differentiation from hematopoietic precursors, the altered programming of DC precursors to differentiate into myeloid-derived suppressor cells or tumor-associated macrophages, the suppression of DC maturation and activation, and the induction of immunoregulatory DC by tumors, tumor-derived factors, and tumor-associated cells within the milieu of the tumor microenvironment. The impact of these tumor-altered cells on the quality of the overall anti-tumor immune response will also be discussed. Finally, this review will also highlight questions concerning tumor-altered DC function that remain unanswered, and it will address factors that have limited advances in the study of this phenomenon in order to focus future research efforts in the field on identifying strategies for interfering with tumor-associated DC dysfunction and improving DC-mediated anti-tumor

  3. Development and evaluation of a radiobromine-labeled sigma ligand for tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Kanbara, Hiroya; Kiyono, Yasushi; Kitamura, Yoji; Kiwada, Tatsuto; Kozaka, Takashi; Kitamura, Masanori; Mori, Tetsuya; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Odani, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Sigma receptors are appropriate targets for tumor imaging because they are highly expressed in a variety of human tumors. Previously, we synthesized a vesamicol analog, (+)-2-[4-(4-iodophenyl)piperidino]cyclohexanol ((+)-pIV), with high affinity for sigma receptors, and prepared radioiodinated (+)-pIV. In this study, to develop a radiobromine-labeled vesamicol analog as a sigma receptor imaging agent for PET, nonradioactive and radiobromine-labeled (+)-2-[4-(4-bromophenyl)piperidino]cyclohexanol ((+)-pBrV) was prepared and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. In these initial studies, 77 Br was used because of its longer half-life. Methods: (+)-[ 77 Br]pBrV was prepared by a bromodestannylation reaction with radiochemical purity of 98.8% after HPLC purification. The partition coefficient of (+)-[ 77 Br]pBrV was measured. In vitro binding characteristics of (+)-pBrV to sigma receptors were assayed. Biodistribution experiments were performed by intravenous administration of a mixed solution of (+)-[ 77 Br]pBrV and (+)-[ 125 I]pIV into DU-145 tumor-bearing mice. Results: The lipophilicity of (+)-[ 77 Br]pBrV was lower than that of (+)-[ 125 I]pIV. As a result of in vitro binding assay to sigma receptors, the affinities of (+)-pBrV to sigma receptors were competitive to those of (+)-pIV. In biodistribution experiments, (+)-[ 77 Br]pBrV and (+)-[ 125 I]pIV showed high uptake in tumor via sigma receptors. The biodistributions of both radiotracers showed similar patterns. However, the accumulation of radioactivity in liver after injection of (+)-[ 77 Br]pBrV was significantly lower compared to that of (+)-[ 125 I]pIV. Conclusion: These results indicate that radiobromine-labeled pBrV possesses great potential as a sigma receptor imaging agent for PET

  4. Development and evaluation of a radiobromine-labeled sigma ligand for tumor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Kanbara, Hiroya; Kiyono, Yasushi; Kitamura, Yoji; Kiwada, Tatsuto; Kozaka, Takashi; Kitamura, Masanori; Mori, Tetsuya; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Odani, Akira

    2013-05-01

    Sigma receptors are appropriate targets for tumor imaging because they are highly expressed in a variety of human tumors. Previously, we synthesized a vesamicol analog, (+)-2-[4-(4-iodophenyl)piperidino]cyclohexanol ((+)-pIV), with high affinity for sigma receptors, and prepared radioiodinated (+)-pIV. In this study, to develop a radiobromine-labeled vesamicol analog as a sigma receptor imaging agent for PET, nonradioactive and radiobromine-labeled (+)-2-[4-(4-bromophenyl)piperidino]cyclohexanol ((+)-pBrV) was prepared and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. In these initial studies, (77)Br was used because of its longer half-life. (+)-[(77)Br]pBrV was prepared by a bromodestannylation reaction with radiochemical purity of 98.8% after HPLC purification. The partition coefficient of (+)-[(77)Br]pBrV was measured. In vitro binding characteristics of (+)-pBrV to sigma receptors were assayed. Biodistribution experiments were performed by intravenous administration of a mixed solution of (+)-[(77)Br]pBrV and (+)-[(125)I]pIV into DU-145 tumor-bearing mice. The lipophilicity of (+)-[(77)Br]pBrV was lower than that of (+)-[(125)I]pIV. As a result of in vitro binding assay to sigma receptors, the affinities of (+)-pBrV to sigma receptors were competitive to those of (+)-pIV. In biodistribution experiments, (+)-[(77)Br]pBrV and (+)-[(125)I]pIV showed high uptake in tumor via sigma receptors. The biodistributions of both radiotracers showed similar patterns. However, the accumulation of radioactivity in liver after injection of (+)-[(77)Br]pBrV was significantly lower compared to that of (+)-[(125)I]pIV. These results indicate that radiobromine-labeled pBrV possesses great potential as a sigma receptor imaging agent for PET. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Correlating Intravital Multi-Photon Microscopy to 3D Electron Microscopy of Invading Tumor Cells Using Anatomical Reference Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karreman, Matthia A.; Mercier, Luc; Schieber, Nicole L.; Shibue, Tsukasa; Schwab, Yannick; Goetz, Jacky G.

    2014-01-01

    Correlative microscopy combines the advantages of both light and electron microscopy to enable imaging of rare and transient events at high resolution. Performing correlative microscopy in complex and bulky samples such as an entire living organism is a time-consuming and error-prone task. Here, we investigate correlative methods that rely on the use of artificial and endogenous structural features of the sample as reference points for correlating intravital fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. To investigate tumor cell behavior in vivo with ultrastructural accuracy, a reliable approach is needed to retrieve single tumor cells imaged deep within the tissue. For this purpose, fluorescently labeled tumor cells were subcutaneously injected into a mouse ear and imaged using two-photon-excitation microscopy. Using near-infrared branding, the position of the imaged area within the sample was labeled at the skin level, allowing for its precise recollection. Following sample preparation for electron microscopy, concerted usage of the artificial branding and anatomical landmarks enables targeting and approaching the cells of interest while serial sectioning through the specimen. We describe here three procedures showing how three-dimensional (3D) mapping of structural features in the tissue can be exploited to accurately correlate between the two imaging modalities, without having to rely on the use of artificially introduced markers of the region of interest. The methods employed here facilitate the link between intravital and nanoscale imaging of invasive tumor cells, enabling correlating function to structure in the study of tumor invasion and metastasis. PMID:25479106

  6. Synthesis and biological evaluation of ¹⁸F-labeled fluoropropyl tryptophan analogs as potential PET probes for tumor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiotellis, Aristeidis; Mu, Linjing; Müller, Adrienne; Selivanova, Svetlana V; Keller, Claudia; Schibli, Roger; Krämer, Stefanie D; Ametamey, Simon M

    2013-01-01

    In the search for an efficient, fluorine-18 labeled amino acid based radiotracer for tumor imaging with positron emission tomography (PET), two new tryptophan analogs were synthesized and characterized in vitro and in vivo. Both are tryptophan alkyl-derivatives, namely 2-(3-[(18)F]fluoropropyl)-DL-tryptophan ([(18)F]2-FPTRP) and 5-(3-[(18)F]fluoro-propyl)-DL-tryptophan ([(18)F]5-FPTRP). Standard reference compounds and precursors were prepared by multi step approaches. Radiosynthesis was achieved by no-carrier-added nucleophilic [(18)F]fluorination in 29-34% decay corrected yields with radiochemical purity over 99%. In vitro cell uptake assays showed that both compounds are substrates for amino acid transport and enter small cell lung cancer cells (NCI-H69) most probably almost exclusively via large neutral amino acids transporter(s) (LAT). Small animal PET imaging with xenograft bearing mice revealed high tumor/background ratios for [(18)F]2-FPTRP comparable to the well established tyrosine analog O-(2-[(18)F]fluroethyl)-L-tyrosine ([(18)F]FET). Radiometabolite studies showed no evidence of involvement of a biotransformation step in tumor accumulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Emergent Stratification in Solid Tumors Selects for Reduced Cohesion of Tumor Cells: A Multi-Cell, Virtual-Tissue Model of Tumor Evolution Using CompuCell3D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej H Swat

    Full Text Available Tumor cells and structure both evolve due to heritable variation of cell behaviors and selection over periods of weeks to years (somatic evolution. Micro-environmental factors exert selection pressures on tumor-cell behaviors, which influence both the rate and direction of evolution of specific behaviors, especially the development of tumor-cell aggression and resistance to chemotherapies. In this paper, we present, step-by-step, the development of a multi-cell, virtual-tissue model of tumor somatic evolution, simulated using the open-source CompuCell3D modeling environment. Our model includes essential cell behaviors, microenvironmental components and their interactions. Our model provides a platform for exploring selection pressures leading to the evolution of tumor-cell aggression, showing that emergent stratification into regions with different cell survival rates drives the evolution of less cohesive cells with lower levels of cadherins and higher levels of integrins. Such reduced cohesivity is a key hallmark in the progression of many types of solid tumors.

  8. AgNOR Count in Resting Cells (Resting NOR Is a New Prognostic Marker in Invasive Bladder Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuro Tomobe

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We have previously demonstrated that the AgNOR count in proliferating cells is a predictor of tumor recurrence in superficial bladder tumor (J. Urol. 162 (1999, 63–68. In the present study, we evaluate the type of AgNOR associated with cell cycles as a prognostic factor in invasive bladder tumor using a double staining technique employing both AgNOR and MIB-1 labelling. Materials and methods: Forty-four paraffin sections of invasive bladder tumors were stained simultaneously with AgNOR and MIB-1. The number of AgNORs in proliferating (MIB-1 positive or resting (MIB-1 negative cells were counted from a total of 100 nuclei. Correlations between MIB-1 associated AgNOR count and clinicopathological parameters were statistically analyzed. Results: The AgNOR count in proliferating cells (proliferating NOR was significantly higher than that in resting cells (resting NOR (p < 0.01. The resting NOR in tumors with distant metastases was significantly higher than that in tumors without metastases (p < 0.05. Patients with a low resting NOR tumor had a better prognosis than those with a high resting NOR tumor, whereas the proliferating NOR was not associated with survival. Survival analysis revealed that the resting NOR was the most powerful prognostic marker in patients with invasive bladder tumor (p < 0.05. Conclusions: Resting NOR had a predictive value in the prognosis of patients with invasive bladder tumor. Keywords: Transitional cell carcinoma, invasive, resting cell, AgNORs, MIB-1

  9. Failure of 111In-labeled bleomycin tumor scanning to predict response to bleomycin (NSC-125066) treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.E.; Salmon, S.E.; Durie, B.G.M.

    1974-01-01

    The question of whether or not 111 In-labeled bleomycin is predictive of the response of tumors to bleomycin treatment is answered in the negative. The real test of the value of labeled bleomycin as a predictor of response will be possible only when a tightly labeled bleomycin with fully preserved biologic activity is synthesized. The negative results of this study do not invalidate further investigations of the predictive values of labeled anticancer drugs

  10. Biological mechanisms of gallium-67 tumor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, Shinichi; Takeda, Shumpei; Sato, Tachio; Takusagawa, Kimihiko; Awano, Takayuki.

    1979-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken in order to clarify the tumor deposition mechanisms of 67 Ga citrate, a ''universal tumor labeler''. An interspecies comparison of various tumors in the rat and mouse indicated that its highest deposition was in the undifferentiated cell type. Amongst the siblings of experimental tumors, cellular membrane negative charge is greater in the free-cell types than the island-formers: a short-term labeling study revealed a greater 67 Ga deposition in the free-cell types. A subcellar fractionation showed an initial association of 67 Ga with the nuclear and membrane fractions, and a later transition to the lysosomal. Hypotonic lysis revealed a paralleled release of 67 Ga and lysosomal key enzymes. Morphological abnormality of the cancer lysosomes was thought to agree with their Ga retention. This property was clinically confirmed by a scintiscoring technique. Treatment with cold gallium of tumors modified the biological parameters of tumor growth: in vitro it suppressed cell proliferation, reduced saturation density; and produced cellular pleomorphism. In vivo it increased tumor consistency by reducing central necrosis and increasing the viable cell layer thickness. Thus, 67 Ga deposition is closely related to various biological parameters of malignancy including the cellular membrane negative charge as cancer is a membrane disorder, and the lysosomal morphology and function. (author)

  11. Wortmannin efficiently suppresses the recovery from radiation-induced damage in pimonidazole-unlabeled quiescent tumor cell population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Suzuki, Minoru; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Ono, Koji; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Maruhashi, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Labeling of proliferating (P) cells in mice bearing EL4 tumors was achieved by continuous administration of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Tumors were irradiated with γ-rays at 1 h after pimonidazole administration followed by caffeine or wortmannin treatment. Twenty-four hours later, assessment of the responses of quiescent (Q) and total (=P+Q) cell populations were based on the frequencies of micronucleation and apoptosis using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The response of the pimonidazole-unlabeled tumor cell fractions was assessed by means of apoptosis frequency using immunofluorescence staining for pimonidazole. The pimonidazole-unlabeled cell fraction showed significantly enhanced radio-sensitivity compared with the whole cell fraction more remarkably in Q cells than total cells. However, a significantly greater decrease in radio-sensitivity in the pimonidazole-unlabeled than the whole cell fraction, evaluated using an assay performed 24 hours after irradiation, was more clearly observed in Q cells than total cells. In both the pimonidazole-unlabeled and the whole cell fractions, wortmannin efficiently suppressed the reduction in sensitivity due to delayed assay. Wortmannin combined with γ-ray irradiation is useful for suppressing the recovery from radiation-induced damage especially in the pimonidazole-unlabeled cell fraction within the total and Q tumor cell populations. (author)

  12. Tumor-specific CD4+ T cells develop cytotoxic activity and eliminate virus-induced tumor cells in the absence of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmetzyanova, Ilseyar; Zelinskyy, Gennadiy; Schimmer, Simone; Brandau, Sven; Altenhoff, Petra; Sparwasser, Tim; Dittmer, Ulf

    2013-02-01

    The important role of tumor-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells is well defined in the immune control of the tumors, but the role of effector CD4(+) T cells is poorly understood. In the current research, we have used a murine retrovirus-induced tumor cell line of C57BL/6 mouse origin, namely FBL-3 cells, as a model to study basic mechanisms of immunological control and escape during tumor formation. This study shows that tumor-specific CD4(+) T cells are able to protect against virus-induced tumor cells. We show here that there is an expansion of tumor-specific CD4(+) T cells producing cytokines and cytotoxic molecule granzyme B (GzmB) in the early phase of tumor growth. Importantly, we demonstrate that in vivo depletion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and CD8(+) T cells in FBL-3-bearing DEREG transgenic mice augments IL-2 and GzmB production by CD4(+) T cells and increases FV-specific CD4(+) T-cell effector and cytotoxic responses leading to the complete tumor regression. Therefore, the capacity to reject tumor acquired by tumor-reactive CD4(+) T cells largely depends on the direct suppressive activity of Tregs. We suggest that a cytotoxic CD4(+) T-cell immune response may be induced to enhance resistance against oncovirus-associated tumors.

  13. Exploring the Potential of (99m)Tc(CO)3-Labeled Triazolyl Peptides for Tumor Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaonkar, Raghuvir H; Ganguly, Soumya; Baishya, Rinku; Dewanjee, Saikat; Sinha, Samarendu; Gupta, Amit; Ganguly, Shantanu; Debnath, Mita C

    2016-04-01

    In recent years the authors have reported on (99m)Tc(CO)3-labeled peptides that serve as carriers for biomolecules or radiopharmaceuticals to the tumors. In continuation of that work they report the synthesis of a pentapeptide (Met-Phe-Phe-Gly-His; pep-1), a hexapeptide (Met-Phe-Phe-Asp-Gly-His; pep-2), and a tetrapeptide (Asp-Gly-Arg-His; pep-3) and the attachment of 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole to the β carboxylic function of the aspartic acid unit of pep-2 and pep-3. The pharmacophores were radiolabeled in high yields with [(99m)Tc(CO)3(H2O)3](+) metal aqua ion, characterized for their stability in serum and saline, as well as in His solution, and found to be substantially stable. B16F10 cell line binding studies showed favorable uptake and internalization. In vivo behavior of the radiolabeled triazolyl peptides was assessed in mice bearing induced tumor. The (99m)Tc(CO)3-triazolyl pep-3 demonstrated rapid urinary clearance and comparatively better tumor uptake. Imaging studies showed visualization of the tumor using (99m)Tc(CO)3-triazolyl pep-3, but due to high abdominal background, low delineation occurred. Based on the results further experiments will be carried out for targeting tumor with triazolyl peptides.

  14. Large-scale detection of antigen-specific T cells using peptide-MHC-I multimers labeled with DNA barcodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Amalie Kai; Marquard, Andrea Marion; Lyngaa, Rikke Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    -major histocompatibility complex (MHC) multimers labeled with individual DNA barcodes to screen >1,000 peptide specificities in a single sample, and detect low-frequency CD8 T cells specific for virus- or cancer-restricted antigens. When analyzing T-cell recognition of shared melanoma antigens before and after adoptive...... cell therapy in melanoma patients, we observe a greater number of melanoma-specific T-cell populations compared with cytometry-based approaches. Furthermore, we detect neoepitope-specific T cells in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and peripheral blood from patients with non-small cell lung cancer...

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of ligand targeting the somatostatin receptor for drug delivery to tumor cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Young; Hong, Young Don; Jung, Sung Hee; Choi, Sun Ju [Radioisotope Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Most of targeted therapies block the action of certain enzymes, proteins, or other molecules involved in the growth and spread of cancer cells to produce its cytotoxic effect. Either small molecule drugs or monoclonal antibodies are mostly used in targeted therapies. Unfortunately, targeted therapy has a certain degree of unwanted side effect like other cytotoxicity inducing chemotherapies. To overcome and to reduce unwanted side effects during a cancer therapy, recently radiopeptide therapies has got the worlds' attraction for the tumor targeting modalities due to its beneficial effect on less side effect compared to cytotoxic chemotherapies. Among radiopeptide therapies, {sup 177}Lu-DOTATATE is a major modality as an effective one invented so far in treating neuroendocrine tumor (NET) and it has been in clinical trials at least one decade. Although it does have rather effective therapeutic effect on NET, it has less effective in rather large solid tumor. There are many ways to improve or increase therapeutic effect of radiopeptide are a finding the potent small molecules to target the tumor site selectively, or a labeling with radioisotope of emitting high energy, or an improving its biological half-life by introducing different moieties to increase lipophilicity. Present study was focus to increase a biological halflife of radio somatostatin which will target the somatostatin receptor by altering the bifunctional chelator (BFCA) by introducing lipophilic moiety to the somatostatin, which would make the labeled peptide stay longer in the tumor site and thus it can intensify the therapeutic effect on tumor cell itself and around tissues.

  16. A terminal-labelling microcytotoxity assay with 125I-iododeoxyuridine as a label for target cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stirrat, G.M.

    1976-01-01

    The development of a terminal-labelling microcytotoxicity assay is described in which target cells (fetal fibroblasts) were labelled with 125 I-iododeoxyuridine after effector (lymphoid) cells had been incubated with them for 24 h. The time-course for the development of cell-mediated cytotoxicity was assessed following allogeneic skin grafting. 'Non-specific' cytotoxicity detracts from the sensitivity of all microcytotoxicity assays and the terminal-labelling assay using 125 I is no exception. The non-specific effects can be reduced but not eliminated by the removal of adherent cells. The optimum target cell/effector cell ratio would seem to be between 1:100 and 1:250. Residual lymph node cells did not appear to incorporate enough label to affect the test results. In vivo correlates of in vitro findings are still not easy to determine

  17. Development of nano radiopharmaceutical based on Bevacizumab labelled with Technetium-99m for early diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor; Desenvolvimento de nanorradiofarmaco a base de Bevacizumabe marcado com tecnecio-99m para diagnostico precoce do tumor estromal gastrointestinal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, Thais Ligiero

    2015-06-01

    The development of new radiopharmaceuticals is an essential activity to improve nuclear medicine, and essential for the early and effective diagnosis of oncological diseases. Among the various possibilities current research in the world, the radiopharmaceuticals to chemotherapeutic base may be the most effective in detecting tumors, particularly Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST), the Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma and neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors. However, difficulties in directing, as well as adhesion of the radiopharmaceutical in the desired location, are currently the main problems in the early detection and treatment of some of these tumors. Advances in the field of nanotechnology, particularly in recent years, indicate significant contribution to overcoming these obstacles, particularly in the implementation of molecular barriers as well as the functionalization of the nanoparticles, thereby improving targeting by the use of surface nucleotides, and the increased adhesion, which facilitates the release of the drug and therefore increases the chances of early diagnosis and more effective treatment. This study aimed to the production, characterization and evaluation of cytotoxicity, as well as in vivo biodistribution test Bevacizumab nanoparticles labeled with Technetium-99m radionuclide for detection of type GIST tumors. Bevacizumab was encapsulated in the form of nanoparticles by the emulsification method using double poly-acetic acid and polyvinyl alcohol polymers (PLA / PVA) at a concentration of 2% of the monoclonal antibody. The characterization of the nanoparticles was performed by the technique of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cytotoxicity assessment was performed by XTT assay with various cell lines of solid tumor cells. The labeling with technetium-99m was done by the direct method, and its yield determined by paper chromatography using paper Whatmam 1 as the stationary phase and acetone as mobile phase. In the biodistribution study

  18. Indium-111 oxine labelling of white blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavender, J.P.; Silvester, D.J.; Goldman, J.; Hammersmith Hospital, London

    1978-01-01

    Following work done by Professor John McAfee and Mathew Thakur at the MRS Cyclotron Unit a method is available for labelling cells with indium-111 which results in a stable intracellular marker. The method uses indium-111-8 hydroxyquinoline (111In oxine) which is a lipoid soluble complex which goes across the cell membrane and results in the deposition of indium into various subcellular structures. It has been applied to various preparations of white cells, platelets and also malignant cells. Autologous granulocytes have been used to identify inflammatory lesions in 35 patients. By similar means autologous lymphocytes can also be labelled and reinfused. Lymphocytes have been shown in animals to circulate from the blood via the lymphatic system and then returning to the blood once more. The same phenomenon can be seen in man using indium labelled lymphocytes. Lymph nodes become visible at between 12 and 18 hours and recirculation of labelled cells can be shown on the blood activity curves. Certain problems arise concerning cell behaviour after labelling which appear due to irradiation of cells rather than chemical toxicity. (author)

  19. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated

  20. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated

  1. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  2. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  3. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  4. Phagocytosis (cannibalism) of apoptotic neutrophils by tumor cells in gastric micropapillary carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barresi, Valeria; Branca, Giovanni; Ieni, Antonio; Rigoli, Luciana; Tuccari, Giovanni; Caruso, Rosario Alberto

    2015-05-14

    To identify those with a micropapillary pattern, ascertain relative frequency and document clinicopathological characteristics by reviewing gastric carcinomas. One hundred and fifty-one patients diagnosed with gastric cancer who underwent gastrectomy were retrospectively studied and the presence of a regional invasive micropapillary component was evaluated by light microscopy. All available hematoxylin-eosin (HE)-stained slides were histologically reviewed and 5 tumors were selected as putative micropapillary carcinoma when cancer cell clusters without a vascular core within empty lymphatic-like space comprised at least 5% of the tumor. Tumor tissues from these 5 invasive gastric carcinomas were immunostained using an anti-mucin 1 (MUC1) antibody (clone MA695) to detect the characteristic inside-out pattern and with D2-40 antibody to determine the presence of intratumoral lymph vessels. Detection of intraepithelial neutrophil apoptosis was evaluated in consecutive histological tissue sections by three independent methods, namely light microscopy with HE staining, the conventional terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) method and immunohistochemistry for activated caspase-3 (clone C92-605). Among 151 gastric cancers resected for cure, 5 (3.3%) were adenocarcinomas with a micropapillary component. Four of the patients died of disease from 6 to 23 mo and one patient was alive with metastases at 9 mo. All patients had advanced-stage cancer (≥ pT2) and lymph node metastasis. Positive MUC1 immunostaining on the stroma-facing surface (inside-out pattern) of the carcinomatous cluster cells, together with negative immunostaining for D2-40 in the cells limiting lymphatic-like spaces, confirmed the true micropapillary pattern in these gastric neoplasms. In all five cases, several micropapillae were infiltrated by neutrophils. HE staining, TUNEL assay and immunostaining for caspase-3 demonstrated apoptotic neutrophils within

  5. HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) triggers autophagic tumor cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aits, Sonja; Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Mattias; Trulsson, Maria; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Mograbi, Baharia; Svanborg, Catharina

    2009-03-01

    HAMLET, a complex of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, kills a wide range of tumor cells. Here we propose that HAMLET causes macroautophagy in tumor cells and that this contributes to their death. Cell death was accompanied by mitochondrial damage and a reduction in the level of active mTOR and HAMLET triggered extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and the formation of double-membrane-enclosed vesicles typical of macroautophagy. In addition, HAMLET caused a change from uniform (LC3-I) to granular (LC3-II) staining in LC3-GFP-transfected cells reflecting LC3 translocation during macroautophagy, and this was blocked by the macroautophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. HAMLET also caused accumulation of LC3-II detected by Western blot when lysosomal degradation was inhibited suggesting that HAMLET caused an increase in autophagic flux. To determine if macroautophagy contributed to cell death, we used RNA interference against Beclin-1 and Atg5. Suppression of Beclin-1 and Atg5 improved the survival of HAMLET-treated tumor cells and inhibited the increase in granular LC3-GFP staining. The results show that HAMLET triggers macroautophagy in tumor cells and suggest that macroautophagy contributes to HAMLET-induced tumor cell death.

  6. Labeling of the peptide DOTA-tyr3-octreotate with radioiodine and biodistribution and AR42J neuroendocrine tumor affinity study in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamati, Lucio Takeshi

    2006-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are rare and affect mainly the gastrointestinal tract but other systems are also affected like the skin, lungs and the nervous system. They are rich in type 2 somatostatin (SM) receptors (SSTR2) and may secrete hormones in excess. Synthetic SM derivative peptides are of great utility because presented bigger half life when compared to SM and can be used to clinical improvement of these patients due to its tumoral inhibitory action. The labeling of these peptides with radioisotopes allowed the acquisition of images with favourable cost-efficiency relationship and use in therapy. The peptide, DOTATyr3- octreotate (DOTATATE), has much more affinity for the SSTR2 receptor than the peptide commercially used nowadays, is easily radioiodinated and has a favourable biodistribution for diagnosis and treatment due to the presence of the chelator DOTA. We have studied the influence of various factors on the radiochemical purity of the labeled compound as labeling stability, absorbed dose estimation and biodistribution in normal and AR42J cell tumor-bearing Swiss and Nude mice. We observed easy and stable peptide radioiodination at peptide/radioiodine ( 131 I) ratio of 2.73 that produced a radiochemical species with retention time of 22.7 minutes at high performance liquid chromatography and presented a favourable biodistribution and dosimetry for imaging and therapy of patients with neuroendocrine tumors, just the opposite result observed the radioiodinated compounds without a chelator as described in the literature. Other molar peptide/radioiodine ratios did not showed good results, with various radiochemical species and unfavourable biodistribution. A possible dosimetric study in patients with neuroendocrine tumors may be carried out in the near future. (author)

  7. Human neutrophils facilitate tumor cell transendothelial migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    Tumor cell extravasation plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms by which tumor cells migrate through normal vascular endothelium remain unclear. In this study, using an in vitro transendothelial migration model, we show that human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) assist the human breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 to cross the endothelial barrier. We found that tumor-conditioned medium (TCM) downregulated PMN cytocidal function, delayed PMN apoptosis, and concomitantly upregulated PMN adhesion molecule expression. These PMN treated with TCM attached to tumor cells and facilitated tumor cell migration through different endothelial monolayers. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 cells alone did not transmigrate. FACScan analysis revealed that these tumor cells expressed high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) but did not express CD11a, CD11b, or CD18. Blockage of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and of ICAM-1 on MDA-MB-231 cells significantly attenuated TCM-treated, PMN-mediated tumor cell migration. These tumor cells still possessed the ability to proliferate after PMN-assisted transmigration. These results indicate that TCM-treated PMN may serve as a carrier to assist tumor cell transendothelial migration and suggest that tumor cells can exploit PMN and alter their function to facilitate their extravasation.

  8. Quantification of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide (SPIO)-labeled Cells Using MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Ali M; Arbab, Ali S; Iskander, ASM; Jiang, Quan; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To show the feasibility of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-labeled cells. Materials and Methods Lymphocytes and 9L rat gliosarcoma cells were labeled with Ferumoxides-Protamine Sulfate complex (FE-PRO). Cells were labeled efficiently (more than 95%) and iron concentration inside each cell was measured by spectrophotometry (4.77-30.21 picograms). Phantom tubes containing different number of labeled or unlabeled cells as well as different concentrations of FE-PRO were made. In addition, labeled and unlabeled cells were injected into fresh and fixed rat brains. Results Cellular viability and proliferation of labeled and unlabeled cells were shown to be similar. T2-weighted images were acquired using 7 T and 3 T MRI systems and R2 maps of the tubes containing cells, free FE-PRO, and brains were made. There was a strong linear correlation between R2 values and labeled cell numbers but the regression lines were different for the lymphocytes and gliosarcoma cells. Similarly, there was strong correlation between R2 values and free iron. However, free iron had higher R2 values than the labeled cells for the same concentration of iron. Conclusion Our data indicated that in vivo quantification of labeled cells can be done by careful consideration of different factors and specific control groups. PMID:17623892

  9. Genetic induction of the gastrin releasing peptide receptor on tumor cells for radiolabeled peptide binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raben, David; Stackhouse, Murray; Buchsbaum, Donald J.; Mikheeva, Galeena; Khazaeli, M.B.; McLean, Stephanie; Kirkman, Richard; Krasnykh, Victor; Curiel, David T.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To improve upon existing radioimmunotherapy (RAIT) approaches, we have devised a strategy to genetically induce high levels of new membrane-associated receptors on human cancer cells targetable by radiolabeled peptides. In this context, we report successful adenoviral-mediated transduction of tumor cells to express the murine gastrin releasing peptide receptor (mGRPr) as demonstrated by 125 I-labeled bombesin binding. Materials and Methods: To demonstrate the feasibility of our strategy and to provide rapid proof of principle, we constructed a plasmid encoding the mGRPr gene. We cloned the mGRPr gene into the adenoviral shuttle vector pACMVpLpARS+ (F. Graham). We then utilized the methodology of adenovirus-polylysine-mediated transfection (AdpLmGRPr) to accomplish transient gene expression of mGRPr in two human cancer cell lines including A427 non-small cell lung cancer cells and HeLa cervical cancer cells. Murine GRPr expression was then measured by a live-cell binding assay using 125 I-labeled bombesin. In order to develop this strategy further, it was necessary to construct a vector that would be more efficient for in vivo transduction. In this regard, we constructed a recombinant adenoviral vector (AdCMVGRPr) encoding the mGRPr under the control of the CMV promoter based on in vivo homologous recombination methods. The recombinant shuttle vector containing mGRPr was co-transfected with the adenoviral rescue plasmid pJM17 into the E1A trans complementing cell line 293 allowing for derivation of replication-incompetent, recombinant adenoviral vector. Individual plaques were isolated and subjected to two further rounds of plaque purification. The identity of the virus was confirmed at each step by PCR employing primers for mGRPr. The absence of wild-type adenovirus was confirmed by PCR using primers to the adenoviral E1A gene. SKOV3.ip1 human ovarian cancer cells and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells were transduced in vitro with AdCMVGRPr at

  10. In vivo evaluation of a radiogallium-labeled bifunctional radiopharmaceutical, Ga-DOTA-MN2, for hypoxic tumor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Kohei; Okada, Mayumi; Hisada, Hayato; Shimokawa, Kenta; Saji, Hideo; Maeda, Minoru; Mukai, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of the findings obtained by X-ray crystallography of Ga-DOTA chelates and the drug design concept of bifunctional radiopharmaceuticals, we previously designed and synthesized a radiogallium-labeled DOTA chelate containing two metronidazole moieties, (67)Ga-DOTA-MN2, for hypoxic tumor imaging. As expected, (67)Ga-DOTA-MN2 exhibited high in vivo stability, although two carboxyl groups in the DOTA skeleton were conjugated with metronidazole moieties. In this study, we evaluated (67/68)Ga-DOTA-MN2 as a nuclear imaging agent for hypoxic tumors. (67)Ga-labeling of DOTA-MN2 with (67)GaCl(3) was achieved with high radiochemical yield (>85%) by 1-min of microwave irradiation (50 W). The pharmacokinetics of (67)Ga-DOTA-MN2 were examined in FM3A tumor-bearing mice, and compared with those of (67)Ga-DOTA-MN1 containing one metronidazole unit and (67)Ga-DOTA. Upon administration, (67)Ga-DOTA-MN2 exhibited higher accumulation in the implanted tumors than (67)Ga-DOTA. Tumor-to-blood ratios of (67)Ga-DOTA-MN2 were about two-fold higher than those of (67)Ga-DOTA-MN1. Autoradiographic analysis showed the heterogeneous localization of (67)Ga-DOTA-MN2 in the tumors, which corresponds to hypoxic regions suggested by well-established hypoxia marker drug, pimonidazole. Furthermore, in positron emission tomography (PET) study, the tumors of mice administered (68)Ga-labeled DOTA-MN2 were clearly imaged by small-animal PET at 1 h after administration. This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of (67/68)Ga-DOTA-MN2 as a nuclear imaging agent for hypoxic tumors and suggests that two functional moieties, such as metronidazole, can be conjugated to radiogallium-DOTA chelate without reducing the complex stability. The present findings provide useful information about the chemical design of radiogallium-labeled radiopharmaceuticals for PET and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies.

  11. A magnetic micropore chip for rapid (<1 hour) unbiased circulating tumor cell isolation and in situ RNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jina; Bhagwat, Neha; Yee, Stephanie S; Black, Taylor; Redlinger, Colleen; Romeo, Janae; O'Hara, Mark; Raj, Arjun; Carpenter, Erica L; Stanger, Ben Z; Issadore, David

    2017-09-12

    The use of microtechnology for the highly selective isolation and sensitive detection of circulating tumor cells has shown enormous promise. One challenge for this technology is that the small feature sizes - which are the key to this technology's performance - can result in low sample throughput and susceptibility to clogging. Additionally, conventional molecular analysis of CTCs often requires cells to be taken off-chip for sample preparation and purification before analysis, leading to the loss of rare cells. To address these challenges, we have developed a microchip platform that combines fast, magnetic micropore based negative immunomagnetic selection (>10 mL h -1 ) with rapid on-chip in situ RNA profiling (>100× faster than conventional RNA labeling). This integrated chip can isolate both rare circulating cells and cell clusters directly from whole blood and allow individual cells to be profiled for multiple RNA cancer biomarkers, achieving sample-to-answer in less than 1 hour for 10 mL of whole blood. To demonstrate the power of this approach, we applied our device to the circulating tumor cell based diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. We used a genetically engineered lineage-labeled mouse model of pancreatic cancer (KPCY) to validate the performance of our chip. We show that in a cohort of patient samples (N = 25) that this device can detect and perform in situ RNA analysis on circulating tumor cells in patients with pancreatic cancer, even in those with extremely sparse CTCs (<1 CTC mL -1 of whole blood).

  12. Peculiarities in the CT findings of germ cell tumors in various tumor localizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazoe, Makoto; Miyagami, Mitsusuke; Tsubokawa, Takashi

    1991-01-01

    The CT findings of 17 germ cell tumors were studied in relation to the locations of the tumor, the pathological diagnoses, and the tumor markers (AFP and HCG). Generally, the CT findings of germ cell tumors depended on the pathological diagnoses more strongly than on the location of the tumors. On plain CT of 7 germ cell tumors in the pineal region, all of them demonstrated heterogeneous findings. Hydrocephalus was seen in 6 cases (86%) and calcification in 6 cases (86%) of the germ cell tumors in the pineal region. Calcification and hydrocephalus that appeared more often than in other regions were characteristic of germ cell tumors of the pineal region. The germ cell tumors in the basal ganglia had a slightly homogenous high density, with small cysts and calcification in most of them on plain CT. On enhanced CT, the tumors were moderately enhanced in all cases located in the basal ganglia. Four cases of germ cell tumors located in the basal ganglia revealed the dilatation of lateral ventricle due to hemispheric atrophy in the tumor side. The germ cell tumors showing an increase in the tumor markers such as AFP and HCG, which were usually malignant germ cell tumors, were strongly enhanced on enhanced CT. (author)

  13. In vitro assays for predicting tumor cell response to radiation by apoptotic pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algan, Oe.; Hanks, G.E.; Biade, S.; Chapman, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: We had previously shown that the rate of spontaneous and radiation-induced apoptosis was significantly greater in well-differentiated compared to anaplastic Dunning prostate carcinomas. The goal of this study was to define the most useful assay for quantifying radiation-induced apoptotic cell death and to determine if measured rates of radiation-induced apoptosis in tumor cell populations can predict treatment outcome. Materials and Methods: The time course and extent of radiation-induced apoptosis after single doses of Cesium-137 gamma-rays were measured by five different assays. These included gross DNA degradation, nucleosome ladder formation, labeling of 3'-OH ends in DNA with an immunofluorescence probe, immunofluorescence vital stains (LIVE/DEAD[reg] EUKOLIGHT TM ) and trypan blue. The majority of these studies were performed with DU-145 human prostate cells. Data was analyzed to determine the component of cell inactivation resulting from apoptosis with the modified linear quadratic equation, -1n (SF) = (α a + α p ) D + β p D 2 , were α a represents cell inactivation by radiation-induced apoptosis, α p and β p represent cell death by proliferative mechanisms and D represents radiation dose. Results: These studies indicated that DU-145 cell death after radiation occurs over two distinct time periods. The first phase of death begins shortly after irradiation and plateaus within 16-24 hr. This process of cell death has properties consistent with apoptosis as determined by 3'-OH DNA end-labeling and nucleosome ladder assays. The second phase of cell death (determined by viability staining) begins approximately 48 hr after irradiation and continues until the remainder of inactivated cells express their death. This longer phase of cell inactivation probably represents proliferative cell death and other non-apoptotic mechanisms. The five different assays were performed on DU-145 cells 24 hr after irradiation with 10 Gy. Significant nucleosome ladders

  14. Targeting Mitochondrial Function to Treat Quiescent Tumor Cells in Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaonan Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The disorganized nature of tumor vasculature results in the generation of microenvironments characterized by nutrient starvation, hypoxia and accumulation of acidic metabolites. Tumor cell populations in such areas are often slowly proliferating and thus refractory to chemotherapeutical drugs that are dependent on an active cell cycle. There is an urgent need for alternative therapeutic interventions that circumvent growth dependency. The screening of drug libraries using multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS or glucose-starved tumor cells has led to the identification of several compounds with promising therapeutic potential and that display activity on quiescent tumor cells. Interestingly, a common theme of these drug screens is the recurrent identification of agents that affect mitochondrial function. Such data suggest that, contrary to the classical Warburg view, tumor cells in nutritionally-compromised microenvironments are dependent on mitochondrial function for energy metabolism and survival. These findings suggest that mitochondria may represent an “Achilles heel” for the survival of slowly-proliferating tumor cells and suggest strategies for the development of therapy to target these cell populations.

  15. Isotope release cytotoxicity assay applicable to human tumors: the use of 111-indium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, P; Wiltrout, R; Maciorowski, Z; Rose, N R

    1977-01-01

    We have demonstrated that human tumors can be labelled efficiently with the 111indium-oxine chelate. Subsequently, this isotope can be released by cytotoxic lymphoid cells. Both natural and induced cytotoxicity can be demonstrated utilizing this isotope release method. Because of the slow spontaneous release of 111indium and its efficient labelling of human tumor cells, this isotope release assay can be utilized in long-term cytotoxic assays in the study of human tumor immunology.

  16. Synthesis of Tc-99m labeled 1,2,3-triazole-4-yl c-met binding peptide as a potential c-met receptor kinase positive tumor imaging agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Joung, Min-Hee; Lee, Chang-Moon; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong; Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung-Hee; Kim, Dong Wook

    2010-07-15

    The mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (c-Met), which is related to tumor cell growth, angiogenesis and metastases, is known to be overexpressed in several tumor types. In this study, we synthesized technetium-99m labeled 1,2,3-triazole-4-yl c-Met binding peptide (cMBP) derivatives, prepared by solid phase peptide synthesis and the 'click-to-chelate' protocol for the introduction of tricarbonyl technetium-99m, as a potential c-Met receptor kinase positive tumor imaging agent, and evaluated their in vitro c-Met binding affinity, cellular uptake, and stability. The (99m)Tc labeled cMBP derivatives ([(99m)Tc(CO)(3)]12, [(99m)Tc(CO)(3)]13, and [(99m)Tc(CO)(3)]14) were prepared in 85-90% radiochemical yields. The cold surrogate cMBP derivatives, [Re(CO)(3)]12, [Re(CO)(3)]13, and [Re(CO)(3)]14, were shown to have high binding affinities (0.13 microM, 0.06 microM, and 0.16 microM, respectively) to a purified cMet/Fc chimeric recombinant protein. In addition, the in vitro cellular uptake and inhibition studies demonstrated the high specific binding of these (99m)Tc labeled cMBP derivatives ([(99m)Tc(CO)(3)]12-14) to c-Met receptor positive U87MG cells. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical Evaluation of {sup 57}Co-labelled Bleomycin for Tumor Localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Yong Wun; Kim, Jang Hee; Lee, Jhin Oh [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-03-15

    Investigation with {sup 57}Co-Bleomycin in patients with the various cancers and in tumor bearing animals are described. In the patients, {sup 57}Co-Bleomycin appears to be one of the useful tumor- seeking radiopharmaceuticals, and worth applicable to clinical uses. Labelled yield of {sup 57}Co-Bleo was about 97% by thin layer chromatography. The pyrogen free tests were performed to meet U.S.P. critical ranges. In clinical studies with {sup 57}Co-Bleo, 4 cases out of 5 patients with lung cancer, 2 cases among 3 thyroid cancer patients, and all 3 hepatoma patients showed positive tumor scans. The patients with stomach cancer, and the esophageal cancer showed false negative scintigraphy. A case with pulmonary tuberculosis showed a positive scan while liver abscess showed a negative picture. The merits of {sup 57}Co-Bleomycin scintigraphy seems to be its relatively high affinity to tumors and low radiation hazard in spite of long physical half life.

  18. EMMPRIN regulates tumor growth and metastasis by recruiting bone marrow-derived cells through paracrine signaling of SDF-1 and VEGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanke; Gou, Xingchun; Kong, Derek Kai; Wang, Xiaofei; Wang, Jianhui; Chen, Zeming; Huang, Chen; Zhou, Jiangbing

    2015-10-20

    EMMPRIN, a cell adhesion molecule highly expressed in a variety of tumors, is associated with poor prognosis in cancer patients. Mechanistically, EMMPRIN has been characterized to contribute to tumor development and progression by controlling the expression of MMPs and VEGF. In the present study, by using fluorescently labeled bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs), we found that the down-regulation of EMMPRIN expression in cancer cells reduces tumor growth and metastasis, and is associated with the reduced recruitment of BMDCs. Further protein profiling studies suggest that EMMPRIN controls BMDC recruitment through regulating the secretion of soluble factors, notably, VEGF and SDF-1. We demonstrate that the expression and secretion of SDF-1 in tumor cells are regulated by EMMPRIN. This study reveals a novel mechanism by which EMMPRIN promotes tumor growth and metastasis by recruitment of BMDCs through controlling secretion and paracrine signaling of SDF-1 and VEGF.

  19. In vitro cell studies of technetium-99m labeled RGD-HYNIC peptide, a comparison of tricine and EDDA as co-ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Zifen; He, Jiang; Rusckowski, Mary; Hnatowich, Donald J.

    2003-01-01

    The level of α V β 3 integrins on endothelial cells is elevated in angiogenesis. The high binding specificity to α V β 3 integrins of peptides containing Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) residues suggests that the radiolabeled RGD peptides may be useful as tumor specific imaging agents. In this research, cyclised peptides containing Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) and Arg-Gly-Glu (RGE, as control) residues were conjugated with HYNIC and labeled with 99m Tc. Objective: The goal was to evaluate the influence of co-ligand, either tricine or ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid (EDDA) on protein and integrin binding and on cellular uptake in culture. Methods: The n-octanol/water partition coefficient, binding to bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human umbilical vein endothelial (HUVE) cells, and cell lysate distributions of the radiolabeled peptides were evaluated. Results: The co-ligands had a significant effect on the labeling efficiency of the HYNIC conjugates and on certain properties of the 99m Tc complexes. The labeling efficiency with tricine was 10 fold higher and BSA binding was over 8 fold greater compared to EDDA. Both RGD labels showed higher (6 to 28 fold) binding to HUVE cells than that of the RGE labels, indicating binding specificity. After cell-lysis, only a small percentage of the total RGD label that accumulated in the cells was found bound to cellular proteins (9% of RGD/tricine and 5% of RGD/EDDA), implying that over 90% of the radiolabeled peptides were internalized for both radiolabeled RGDs. The number of the RGD molecules bound to proteins was estimated to be approximately three per cell, suggesting that only a small number of α V β 3 integrin proteins are expressed on the cells. Conclusions: Apart from the differences in radiolabeling, the only important effect of substituting EDDA for tricine as co-ligand on the HYNIC-peptides was the lower degree of serum protein binding. In spite of the lower serum protein binding potential, in vivo tumor accumulation of the RGD

  20. In vitro cell studies of technetium-99m labeled RGD-HYNIC peptide, a comparison of tricine and EDDA as co-ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zi-Fen; He, Jiang; Rusckowski, Mary; Hnatowich, Donald J

    2003-02-01

    The level of alpha(V)beta(3) integrins on endothelial cells is elevated in angiogenesis. The high binding specificity to alpha(V)beta(3) integrins of peptides containing Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) residues suggests that the radiolabeled RGD peptides may be useful as tumor specific imaging agents. In this research, cyclised peptides containing Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) and Arg-Gly-Glu (RGE, as control) residues were conjugated with HYNIC and labeled with (99m)Tc. The goal was to evaluate the influence of co-ligand, either tricine or ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid (EDDA) on protein and integrin binding and on cellular uptake in culture. The n-octanol/water partition coefficient, binding to bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human umbilical vein endothelial (HUVE) cells, and cell lysate distributions of the radiolabeled peptides were evaluated. The co-ligands had a significant effect on the labeling efficiency of the HYNIC conjugates and on certain properties of the (99m)Tc complexes. The labeling efficiency with tricine was 10 fold higher and BSA binding was over 8 fold greater compared to EDDA. Both RGD labels showed higher (6 to 28 fold) binding to HUVE cells than that of the RGE labels, indicating binding specificity. After cell-lysis, only a small percentage of the total RGD label that accumulated in the cells was found bound to cellular proteins (9% of RGD/tricine and 5% of RGD/EDDA), implying that over 90% of the radiolabeled peptides were internalized for both radiolabeled RGDs. The number of the RGD molecules bound to proteins was estimated to be approximately three per cell, suggesting that only a small number of alpha(V)beta(3) integrin proteins are expressed on the cells. Apart from the differences in radiolabeling, the only important effect of substituting EDDA for tricine as co-ligand on the HYNIC-peptides was the lower degree of serum protein binding. In spite of the lower serum protein binding potential, in vivo tumor accumulation of the RGD/EDDA may not be improved

  1. Repair in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanna-Nakamura, S.S.

    1981-01-01

    Unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS), an indicator of excision repair, was induced in freshly drawn Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EAT), using ionizing radiation, far ultraviolet light (254 nm) or near uv light (365 nm) in combination with 8-methoxypsoralen. UDS was scored by grain counts in autoradiographs following the incorporation of tritium-labelled thymidine. The amount of UDS after each of these agents was expressed in terms of two parameters, viz. numer of cells showing repair and the mean number of grains per nucleus. The influence of radiation dose and of the duration of radioactive thymidine incubation were also examined. To test for a possible relationship between low mitotic index and repair capability, EAT cells were incubated in buffered salt media to lower the mitotic index. Cells kept in a buffered salt solution for 7 h show a marked drop in mitotic index compared to those incubated in minimal medium containing 15% fetal calf serum (MEM + FCS). This drop in mitotic index was reversible for up to 5 h, if cells were returned to MEM + FCS. Cells incubated in MEM + FCS also showed a decrease in mitotic activity compared to freshly drawn cells. This reduced mitotic index is approximately constant for up to 24 h. With the drop in mitotic index, EAT cells also show a drop in repair compared to freshly drawn cells. The repair capability of cells incubated in buffer can be restored by returning cells to MEM + FCS

  2. Bioimaging of Fluorescence-Labeled Mitochondria in Subcutaneously Grafted Murine Melanoma Cells by the “In Vivo Cryotechnique”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ting; Huang, Zheng; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Wu, Bao; Sakoh, Takashi; Saitoh, Yurika; Saiki, Ikuo

    2014-01-01

    The microenvironments of organs with blood flow affect the metabolic profiles of cancer cells, which are influenced by mitochondrial functions. However, histopathological analyses of these aspects have been hampered by technical artifacts of conventional fixation and dehydration, including ischemia/anoxia. The purpose of this study was to combine the in vivo cryotechnique (IVCT) with fluorescent protein expression, and examine fluorescently labeled mitochondria in grafted melanoma tumors. The intensity of fluorescent proteins was maintained well in cultured B16-BL6 cells after cryotechniques followed by freeze-substitution (FS). In the subcutaneous tumors of mitochondria-targeted DsRed2 (mitoDsRed)-expressing cells, a higher number of cancer cells were found surrounding the widely opened blood vessels that contained numerous erythrocytes. Such blood vessels were immunostained positively for immunoglobulin M and ensheathed by basement membranes. MitoDsRed fluorescence was detected in scattering melanoma cells using the IVCT-FS method, and the total mitoDsRed volume in individual cancer cells was significantly decreased with the expression of markers of hypoxia. MitoDsRed was frequently distributed throughout the cytoplasm and in processes extending along basement membranes. IVCT combined with fluorescent protein expression is a useful tool to examine the behavior of fluorescently labeled cells and organelles. We propose that the mitochondrial volume is dynamically regulated in the hypoxic microenvironment and that mitochondrial distribution is modulated by cancer cell interactions with basement membranes. PMID:24394469

  3. ⁸⁹Zr-Labeled Versus ¹²⁴I-Labeled αHER2 Fab with Optimized Plasma Half-Life for High-Contrast Tumor Imaging In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendler, Claudia T; Gehring, Torben; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Skerra, Arne

    2015-07-01

    Immuno-PET imaging of the tumor antigen HER2/neu allows for the noninvasive detection and monitoring of oncogene expression; such detection and monitoring are of prognostic value in patients with breast cancer. Compared with the full-size antibody trastuzumab, smaller protein tracers with more rapid blood clearance permit higher imaging contrast at earlier time points. Antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) of antibodies with moderately prolonged circulation achieved through the genetic fusion with a long, conformationally disordered chain of the natural amino acids Pro, Ala, and Ser (PASylation)-a biologic alternative to chemical conjugation with polyethylene glycol, PEG-offer a promising tracer format with improved pharmacokinetics for in vivo imaging. Recently, the transition metal radionuclide (89)Zr has attracted increasing interest for immuno-PET studies, complementing the conventional halogen radionuclide (124)I. To allow direct comparison of these 2 radioactive labels for the same protein tracer, the recombinant αHER2 Fab fused with 200 Pro, Ala, and Ser (PAS200) residues was either conjugated with (124)I via an iodination reagent or coupled with deferoxamine (Df) and complexed with (89)Zr. After confirmation of the stability of both radioconjugates and quality control in vitro, immuno-PET and biodistribution studies were performed with CD1-Foxn1(nu) mice bearing HER2-positive human tumor xenografts. (89)Zr⋅Df-Fab-PAS200 and (124)I-Fab-PAS200 showed specific tumor uptake of 11 and 2.3 percentage injected dose per gram 24 h after injection, respectively; both led to high tumor-to-blood (3.6 and 4.4, respectively) and tumor-to-muscle (20 and 43, respectively) ratios. With regard to off-target accumulation, overt (124)I activity was seen in the thyroid, as expected, whereas high kidney uptake was evident for (89)Zr; the latter was probably due to glomerular filtration and reabsorption of the protein tracer in proximal tubular cells. Both (89)Zr- and (124)I-labeled

  4. Near Infrared Optical Visualization of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors Levels in COLO205 Colorectal Cell Line, Orthotopic Tumor in Mice and Human Biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Lazarovici

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present the applicability of imaging epidermal growth factor (EGF receptor levels in preclinical models of COLO205 carcinoma cells in vitro, mice with orthotopic tumors and ex vivo colorectal tumor biopsies, using EGF-labeled with IRDye800CW (EGF-NIR. The near infrared (NIR bio-imaging of COLO205 cultures indicated specific and selective binding, reflecting EGF receptors levels. In vivo imaging of tumors in mice showed that the highest signal/background ratio between tumor and adjacent tissue was achieved 48 hours post-injection. Dissected colorectal cancer tissues from different patients demonstrated ex vivo specific imaging using the NIR bio-imaging platform of the heterogeneous distributed EGF receptors. Moreover, in the adjacent gastrointestinal tissue of the same patients, which by Western blotting was demonstrated as EGF receptor negative, no labeling with EGF-NIR probe was detected. Present results support the concept of tumor imaging by measuring EGF receptor levels using EGF-NIR probe. This platform is advantageous for EGF receptor bio-imaging of the NCI-60 recommended panel of tumor cell lines including 6–9 colorectal cell lines, since it avoids radioactive probes and is appropriate for use in the clinical setting using NIR technologies in a real-time manner.

  5. Stem cell monitoring with a direct or indirect labeling method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Hwan; Lee, Yong Jin [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The molecular imaging techniques allow monitoring of the transplanted cells in the same individuals over time, from early localization to the survival, migration, and differentiation. Generally, there are two methods of stem cell labeling: direct and indirect labeling methods. The direct labeling method introduces a labeling agent into the cell, which is stably incorporated or attached to the cells prior to transplantation. Direct labeling of cells with radionuclides is a simple method with relatively fewer adverse events related to genetic responses. However, it can only allow short-term distribution of transplanted cells because of the decreasing imaging signal with radiodecay, according to the physical half-lives, or the signal becomes more diffuse with cell division and dispersion. The indirect labeling method is based on the expression of a reporter gene transduced into the cell before transplantation, which is then visualized upon the injection of an appropriate probe or substrate. In this review, various imaging strategies to monitor the survival and behavior change of transplanted stem cells are covered. Taking these new approaches together, the direct and indirect labeling methods may provide new insights on the roles of in vivo stem cell monitoring, from bench to bedside.

  6. Skin-derived mesenchymal stem cells as quantum dot vehicles to tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dapkute D

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Dominyka Dapkute,1,2 Simona Steponkiene,1 Danute Bulotiene,1 Liga Saulite,3 Una Riekstina,3 Ricardas Rotomskis1,4 1Biomedical Physics Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Vilnius, Lithuania; 2Institute of Biosciences, Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania; 3Faculty of Medicine, University of Latvia, Riga, Latvia; 4Biophotonics Group of Laser Research Center, Faculty of Physics, Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania Purpose: Cell-mediated delivery of nanoparticles is emerging as a new method of cancer diagnostics and treatment. Due to their inherent regenerative properties, adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are naturally attracted to wounds and sites of inflammation, as well as tumors. Such characteristics enable MSCs to be used in cellular hitchhiking of nanoparticles. In this study, MSCs extracted from the skin connective tissue were investigated as transporters of semiconductor nanocrystals quantum dots (QDs.Materials and methods: Cytotoxicity of carboxylated CdSe/ZnS QDs was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase cell viability assay. Quantitative uptake of QDs was determined by flow cytometry; their intracellular localization was evaluated by confocal microscopy. In vitro tumor-tropic migration of skin-derived MSCs was verified by Transwell migration assay. For in vivo migration studies of QD-loaded MSCs, human breast tumor-bearing immunodeficient mice were used.Results: QDs were found to be nontoxic to MSCs in concentrations no more than 16 nM. The uptake studies showed a rapid QD endocytosis followed by saturating effects after 6 h of incubation and intracellular localization in the perinuclear region. In vitro migration of MSCs toward MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and their conditioned medium was up to nine times greater than the migration toward noncancerous breast epithelial cells MCF-10A. In vivo, systemically administered QD-labeled MSCs were mainly located in the tumor and metastatic tissues, evading most healthy organs with the

  7. Radioimmunotherapy of Nude Mice Bearing Human Colon Carcinoma with I-131 Labeled Anti-carcinoembryonic Antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Tae; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Sang Eun; Choi, Yong; Chi, Dae Yoon; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Koh, Chang Soon; Chung, Hong Keun

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of various factors on the therapeutic effect of the I-l3l labeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody(anti-CEA antibody). Tetrazolium-based colorimetric assay (MTT) was used to compare in vitro cytotoxicity of 3 Korean colon cancer cell lines (SNU-C2A, SNU-C4, SNU-C5) for selection of proper 2 cell lines in this study. The changes of the size of tumor which was xenografted to nude mice (balb/c nu/nu) were compared in 4 groups (group treated I-131 labeled anti-CEA antibody, group treated with non-radiolabeled anti-CEA antibody, group treated with I-131. labeled anti-human chorionic gonadotropin monoclonal antibody (anti-hCG antibody) as nonspecific antibody, and group injected with normal saline as a control). Immunohistochemical staining and in vivo autoradiography were performed after excision of the xenografted tumor. The results were as below mentioned. The in vitro cytotoxic effect of I-131 labeled anti-CEA antibody is most prominent in SNU-C5 cell line between 3 cancer cell lines. The changes of xenografted tumor size in both SNU-C4 and SNU-C5 cell tumors at the thirteenth day after injection of the antibodies were smallest in the group treated with I-131 labeled anti-CEA antibody (SNU-C4/SNU-C5; 324/342%) comparing with other groups, group treated with anti-CEA antibody (622/660%), group treated with I-131 anti-hCG antibody (538/546%), and control group(1030/724%) (p<0.02 in SNU-C4 and p<0.1in SNU-C5 at the 13th day after injection of antibodies). On the thirteenth day after injection of the antibodies nude mice were sacreficed to count the radiouptake of tumor and to check the changes of tumor size. Correlations between radiouptake and change of tumor size were calculated in each groups and significant negative correlation was only obtained in the group treated with I-131 anti-CEA antibody (p<0.05). There were no correlations between antigenic expression of carcinoembryonic antigen and

  8. Cell-selective metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ran; Hong, Senlian; Chen, Xing

    2013-10-01

    Metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities enables visualization, enrichment, and analysis of the biomolecules of interest in their physiological environments. This versatile strategy has found utility in probing various classes of biomolecules in a broad range of biological processes. On the other hand, metabolic labeling is nonselective with respect to cell type, which imposes limitations for studies performed in complex biological systems. Herein, we review the recent methodological developments aiming to endow metabolic labeling strategies with cell-type selectivity. The cell-selective metabolic labeling strategies have emerged from protein and glycan labeling. We envision that these strategies can be readily extended to labeling of other classes of biomolecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Deep Learning and Texture-Based Semantic Label Fusion for Brain Tumor Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyaratne, L; Alam, M; Shboul, Z; Iftekharuddin, K M

    2018-01-01

    Brain tumor segmentation is a fundamental step in surgical treatment and therapy. Many hand-crafted and learning based methods have been proposed for automatic brain tumor segmentation from MRI. Studies have shown that these approaches have their inherent advantages and limitations. This work proposes a semantic label fusion algorithm by combining two representative state-of-the-art segmentation algorithms: texture based hand-crafted, and deep learning based methods to obtain robust tumor segmentation. We evaluate the proposed method using publicly available BRATS 2017 brain tumor segmentation challenge dataset. The results show that the proposed method offers improved segmentation by alleviating inherent weaknesses: extensive false positives in texture based method, and the false tumor tissue classification problem in deep learning method, respectively. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of patient's gender on the segmentation performance using a subset of validation dataset. Note the substantial improvement in brain tumor segmentation performance proposed in this work has recently enabled us to secure the first place by our group in overall patient survival prediction task at the BRATS 2017 challenge.

  10. Deep learning and texture-based semantic label fusion for brain tumor segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyaratne, L.; Alam, M.; Shboul, Z.; Iftekharuddin, K. M.

    2018-02-01

    Brain tumor segmentation is a fundamental step in surgical treatment and therapy. Many hand-crafted and learning based methods have been proposed for automatic brain tumor segmentation from MRI. Studies have shown that these approaches have their inherent advantages and limitations. This work proposes a semantic label fusion algorithm by combining two representative state-of-the-art segmentation algorithms: texture based hand-crafted, and deep learning based methods to obtain robust tumor segmentation. We evaluate the proposed method using publicly available BRATS 2017 brain tumor segmentation challenge dataset. The results show that the proposed method offers improved segmentation by alleviating inherent weaknesses: extensive false positives in texture based method, and the false tumor tissue classification problem in deep learning method, respectively. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of patient's gender on the segmentation performance using a subset of validation dataset. Note the substantial improvement in brain tumor segmentation performance proposed in this work has recently enabled us to secure the first place by our group in overall patient survival prediction task at the BRATS 2017 challenge.

  11. Cancer stem cells and the tumor microenvironment: interplay in tumor heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albini, Adriana; Bruno, Antonino; Gallo, Cristina; Pajardi, Giorgio; Noonan, Douglas M; Dallaglio, Katiuscia

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells able to recapitulate tumor heterogeneity have been tracked, isolated and characterized in different tumor types, and are commonly named Cancer Stem Cells or Cancer Initiating Cells (CSC/CIC). CSC/CIC are disseminated in the tumor mass and are resistant to anti-cancer therapies and adverse conditions. They are able to divide into another stem cell and a "proliferating" cancer cell. They appear to be responsible for disease recurrence and metastatic dissemination even after apparent eradication of the primary tumor. The modulation of CSC/CIC activities by the tumor microenvironment (TUMIC) is still poorly known. CSC/CIC may mutually interact with the TUMIC in a special and unique manner depending on the TUMIC cells or proteins encountered. The TUMIC consists of extracellular matrix components as well as cellular players among which endothelial, stromal and immune cells, providing and responding to signals to/from the CSC/CIC. This interplay can contribute to the mechanisms through which CSC/CIC may reside in a dormant state in a tissue for years, later giving rise to tumor recurrence or metastasis in patients. Different TUMIC components, including the connective tissue, can differentially activate CIC/CSC in different areas of a tumor and contribute to the generation of cancer heterogeneity. Here, we review possible networking activities between the different components of the tumor microenvironment and CSC/CIC, with a focus on its role in tumor heterogeneity and progression. We also summarize novel therapeutic options that could target both CSC/CIC and the microenvironment to elude resistance mechanisms activated by CSC/CIC, responsible for disease recurrence and metastases.

  12. Tumor immunolocalization using 124I-iodine-labeled JAA-F11 antibody to Thomsen-Friedenreich alpha-linked antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, Richa; Heimburg, Jamie; Yan, Jun; Koury, Stephen; Sajjad, Munawwar; Abdel-Nabi, Hani H.; Rittenhouse-Olson, Kate

    2008-01-01

    Clinical immunolocalization has been attempted by others with an anti-Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (TF-Ag) mAb that bound both alpha- and beta-linked TF-Ag. In this report, 124 I-labeled mAb JAA-F11 specific for alpha-linked TF-Ag showed higher tumor specificity in in vivo micro-positron emission tomography (micro-PET) of the mouse mammary adenocarcinoma line, 4T1, showing no preferential uptake by the kidney. Labeled product remained localized in the tumor for at least 20 days. Glycan array analysis showed structural specificity of the antibody

  13. Antitumor action of 3-bromopyruvate implicates reorganized tumor growth regulatory components of tumor milieu, cell cycle arrest and induction of mitochondria-dependent tumor cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Saveg; Kujur, Praveen Kumar; Pandey, Shrish Kumar; Goel, Yugal; Maurya, Babu Nandan; Verma, Ashish; Kumar, Ajay; Singh, Rana Pratap; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2018-01-15

    Evidences demonstrate that metabolic inhibitor 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) exerts a potent antitumor action against a wide range of malignancies. However, the effect of 3-BP on progression of the tumors of thymic origin remains unexplored. Although, constituents of tumor microenvironment (TME) plays a pivotal role in regulation of tumor progression, it remains unclear if 3-BP can alter the composition of the crucial tumor growth regulatory components of the external surrounding of tumor cells. Thus, the present investigation attempts to understand the effect of 3-BP administration to a host bearing a progressively growing tumor of thymic origin on tumor growth regulatory soluble, cellular and biophysical components of tumor milieu vis-à-vis understanding its association with tumor progression, accompanying cell cycle events and mode of cell death. Further, the expression of cell survival regulatory molecules and hemodynamic characteristics of the tumor milieu were analysed to decipher mechanisms underlying the antitumor action of 3-BP. Administration of 3-BP to tumor-bearing hosts retarded tumor progression accompanied by induction of tumor cell death, cell cycle arrest, declined metabolism, inhibited mitochondrial membrane potential, elevated release of cytochrome c and altered hemodynamics. Moreover, 3-BP reconstituted the external milieu, in concurrence with deregulated glucose and pH homeostasis and increased tumor infiltration by NK cells, macrophages, and T lymphocytes. Further, 3-BP administration altered the expression of key regulatory molecules involved in glucose uptake, intracellular pH and tumor cell survival. The outcomes of this study will help in optimizing the therapeutic application of 3-BP by targeting crucial tumor growth regulatory components of tumor milieu. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Labelling of blood cells with radioactive indium-201: method, results, indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducassou, D.; Brendel, A.; Nouel, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    A modification of the method of Thakur et al. for labelling polynuclear cells with 8-hydroxyquinolein-indium-complexe utilising the water soluble sulfate of the substance was applied. The labelling procedure gave a yield over 98% with erthrocytes and over 80% with platelets and polynuclear cells using at least 1 x 10 8 plasma free cells. Functional capacity of the labelled cells remained unaltered. Injection double labelled ( 111 In, 51 Cr) red cells correlation of values for the red cell volume amounted to r = 0,98 (n=20); red cell life-spane measurements gave comparable results in 5 patients. After injecting labelled platelets a life-spane between 6,5 and 11 days was measured. Scintigraphic visualisation of pulmonary embolism was obtained 30 minutes after injecting labelled platelets. Injection of labelled polynuclear cells allows life-spane measurements as well as detection of abscesses. (author)

  15. Clinical application of antibody monoclonal humanized anti-EGFrnimotuzumab labeled

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera Pintado, Alejandro; Peña Quián, Yamilé; Batista Cuéllar, Juan F.; Prats Capote, Anaís; Torres Aroche, Leonel A.; Casacó Santana, Caridad; Sánchez Mendosa, Elvia L.; Sánchez González, Yolaine; Romero Collado, Susana; Quesada Pozo, Rodobaldo; Valladares Oviedo, Lourdes; Masquida García, Elsa M.; Leyva Montaña, René; Casacó, Angel; Ramos Suzarte, Mayra; Crombet, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Most malignant tumors are of epithelial origin. These are characterized by overexpression of the receptor of epidermal growth factor (EGFR), which the neoplastic cells escape the regulatory mechanisms are allowed, so its high concentration of membrane is generally associated with a poor prognosis . By binding an antibody specifically to this receptor, preventing binding of EGF latter and activation mechanism tyrosine kinase inhibiting cell mitosis and apoptosis causing tumor cell. For this reason, the EGFr has been considered as an attractive target for anti-tumor therapy. The humanized monoclonal antibody anti-EGFr nimotuzumab was developed by the Center of Molecular Immunology (Havana, Cuba). Numerous clinical trials have been developed in the Department of Clinical Research Center Isotopes (Cuba), in which it has been applied this antibody, both labeled with 99mTc for immuno gammagraphic detection of tumors, as labeled with 188 Re for radioimmunotherapy of gliomas high degree of malignancy. The aim of this paper is to show the experience of the Department of Clinical Research of CENTIS in various clinical trials with marking for both immuno gammagraphics detection of tumors, such as for radioimmunotherapy nimotuzumab. (author)

  16. Current state of the art of blood cell labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Straub, R.F.; Meinken, G.E.; Gil, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    An update on some recent developments in the area of blood cell labeling is provided. Specific topics covered include red cell labeling with /sup 99m/Tc, platelet labeling using an antiplatelet monoclonal antibody, and the labeling of leukocytes with /sup 99m/Tc. Mechanistic information, where available, is discussed. A critical evaluation of current techniques, their pitfalls as well as advantages, and the problems that remain to be resolved, is presented. The promise shown by recent results using the antibody approach for cell labeling is emphasized. An assessment of the progress made in these areas is presented. 38 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs

  17. Tumor cell-derived microparticles polarize M2 tumor-associated macrophages for tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ruihua; Ji, Tiantian; Chen, Degao; Dong, Wenqian; Zhang, Huafeng; Yin, Xiaonan; Ma, Jingwei; Liang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Yi; Shen, Guanxin; Qin, Xiaofeng; Huang, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Despite identification of macrophages in tumors (tumor-associated macrophages, TAM) as potential targets for cancer therapy, the origin and function of TAM in the context of malignancy remain poorly characterized. Here, we show that microparticles (MPs), as a by-product, released by tumor cells act as a general mechanism to mediate M2 polarization of TAM. Taking up tumor MPs by macrophages is a very efficient process, which in turn results in the polarization of macrophages into M2 type, not only leading to promoting tumor growth and metastasis but also facilitating cancer stem cell development. Moreover, we demonstrate that the underlying mechanism involves the activation of the cGAS/STING/TBK1/STAT6 pathway by tumor MPs. Finally, in addition to murine tumor MPs, we show that human counterparts also possess consistent effect on human M2 polarization. These findings provide new insights into a critical role of tumor MPs in remodeling of tumor microenvironment and better understanding of the communications between tumors and macrophages.

  18. Proteomic characterization of EL4 lymphoma-derived tumors upon chemotherapy treatment reveals potential roles for lysosomes and caspase-6 during tumor cell death in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David A; Eldeeb, Mohamed A; Wuest, Melinda; Mercer, John; Fahlman, Richard P

    2017-06-01

    The murine mouse lymphoblastic lymphoma cell line (EL4) tumor model is an established in vivo apoptosis model for the investigation of novel cancer imaging agents and immunological treatments due to the rapid and significant response of the EL4 tumors to cyclophosphamide and etoposide combination chemotherapy. Despite the utility of this model system in cancer research, little is known regarding the molecular details of in vivo tumor cell death. Here, we report the first in-depth quantitative proteomic analysis of the changes that occur in these tumors upon cyclophosphamide and etoposide treatment in vivo. Using a label-free quantitative proteomic approach a total of 5838 proteins were identified in the treated and untreated tumors, of which 875 were determined to change in abundance with statistical significance. Initial analysis of the data reveals changes that may have been predicted, such as the downregulation of ribosomes, but demonstrates the robustness of the dataset. Analysis of the dataset also reveals the unexpected downregulation of caspase-3 and an upregulation of caspase-6 in addition to a global upregulation of lysosomal proteins in the bulk of the tumor. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Synthesis and Preliminary Evaluation of a New 99mTc Labeled Substance P Analogue as a Potential Tumor Imaging Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffari, Saeed; Erfani, Mostafa; Beiki, Davood; Johari Daha, Fariba; Kobarfard, Farzad; Balalaie, Saeed; Fallahi, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Neurokinin 1 receptors (NK1R) are overexpressed on several types of important human cancer cells. Substance P (SP) is the most specific endogenous ligand known for NK1Rs. Accordingly,a new SP analogue was synthesized and evaluated for detection of NK1R positive tumors.[6-hydrazinopyridine-3-carboxylic acid (HYNIC)-Tyr8-Met(O)11-SP] was synthesized and radiolabeled with 99mTc using ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid (EDDA)and Tricine as coligands. Common physicochemical properties of radioconjugate were studied and in-vitro cell line biological tests were accomplished to determine the receptor mediated characteristics. In-vivo biodistribution in normal and tumor bearingnude mice was also assessed. The cold peptide was prepared in high purity (>99%) and radiolabeled with 99mTc at high specific activities (84-112GBq/µmol) with an acceptable labeling yield (>95%). The radioconjugate was stable in-vitro in the presence of human serum and showed 44% protein binding to human serumalbumin. In-vitro cell line studies on U373MG cells showed an acceptable uptake up to 4.91 ± 0.22% with the ratio of 60.21 ± 1.19% for its specific fraction and increasing specific internalization during 4 h. Receptor binding assays on U373MG cells indicated a mean Kd of 2.46 ± 0.43 nM and Bmax of 128925 ± 8145 sites/cell. In-vivo investigations determined the specific tumor uptake in 3.36 percent of injected dose per gram (%ID/g) for U373MG cells and noticeable accumulations of activity in the intestines and lung. Predominant renal excretion pathway was demonstrated. Therefore, this new radiolabeled peptide could be a promising radiotracer for detection of NK1R positive primary or secondary tumors. PMID:25561916

  20. ADAM12 produced by tumor cells rather than stromal cells accelerates breast tumor progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frohlich, Camilla; Nehammer, Camilla; Albrechtsen, Reidar

    2011-01-01

    that ADAM12 deficiency reduces breast tumor progression in the PyMT model. However, the catalytic activity of ADAM12 appears to be dispensable for its tumor-promoting effect. Interestingly, we demonstrate that ADAM12 endogenously expressed in tumor-associated stroma in the PyMT model does not influence......Expression of ADAM12 is low in most normal tissues, but is markedly increased in numerous human cancers, including breast carcinomas. We have previously shown that overexpression of ADAM12 accelerates tumor progression in a mouse model of breast cancer (PyMT). In the present study, we found...... hypothesized, however, that the tumor-associated stroma may stimulate ADAM12 expression in tumor cells, based on the fact that TGF-ß1 stimulates ADAM12 expression and is a well-known growth factor released from tumor-associated stroma. TGF-ß1 stimulation of ADAM12-negative Lewis lung tumor cells induced ADAM12...

  1. Effects of serum starvation on radiosensitivity, proliferation and apoptosis in four human tumor cell lines with different p53 status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oya, N.; Zoelzer, F.; Werner, F.; Streffer, C.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of serum starvation on radiation sensitivity, cell proliferation and apoptosis were investigated with particular consideration of the p53 status. Material and Methods: Four human tumor cell lines, Be11 (melanoma, p53 wild-type), MeWo (melanoma, p53 mutant), 4197 (squamous cell carcinoma, p53 wild-type) and 4451 (squamous cell carcinoma, p53 mutant), were used. After the cells had been incubated in starvation medium (0.5% FCS) for 1-6 days, changes in cell cycle distribution, induction of apoptosis and necrosis, and changes in radiation sensitivity were assessed by two-parameter flow cytometric measurements of DNA content/BrdU labeling, two-parameter flow cytometric measurements of DNA-dye-exclusion/Annexin V binding, and a conventional colony assay, respectively. Results: p53 wild-type cell lines showed a decrease in the BrdU labeling index and an increase in the apoptotic cell frequency in starvation medium. p53 mutant cell lines showed a decrease in the BrdU labeling index but no evidence of apoptosis. These cells went into necrosis instead. The radiation sensitivity was increased in 4451 and slightly decreased in Be11 and 4197 in starvation medium. Conclusion: These data suggest a functional involvement of p53 in starvation-induced G1-block and apoptosis in tumor cells. Altered radiosensitivity after culture in starvation medium seemed to be explained at least in part by the starvation-induced G1-block. The frequency of starvation-induced apoptosis or necrosis was not correlated with radiation sensitivity. (orig.)

  2. Non-cell autonomous or secretory tumor suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Christelle En Lin; Chan, Shu Ning; Tang, Bor Luen

    2014-10-01

    Many malignancies result from deletions or loss-of-function mutations in one or more tumor suppressor genes, the products of which curb unrestrained growth or induce cell death in those with dysregulated proliferative capacities. Most tumor suppressors act in a cell autonomous manner, and only very few proteins are shown to exert a non-cell autonomous tumor suppressor function on other cells. Examples of these include members of the secreted frizzled-related protein (SFRP) family and the secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC)-related proteins. Very recent findings have, however, considerably expanded our appreciation of non-cell autonomous tumor suppressor functions. Broadly, this may occur in two ways. Intracellular tumor suppressor proteins within cells could in principle inhibit aberrant growth of neighboring cells by conditioning an antitumor microenvironment through secreted factors. This is demonstrated by an apparent non-cell autonomous tumor suppressing property of p53. On the other hand, a tumor suppressor produced by a cell may be secreted extracellularly, and taken up by another cell with its activity intact. Intriguingly, this has been recently shown to occur for the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) by both conventional and unconventional modes of secretion. These recent findings would aid the development of therapeutic strategies that seek to reinstate tumor suppression activity in therapeutically recalcitrant tumor cells, which have lost it in the first place. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Apoptosis and tumor cell death in response to HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Oskar; Aits, Sonja; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2008-01-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a molecular complex derived from human milk that kills tumor cells by a process resembling programmed cell death. The complex consists of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, and both the protein and the fatty acid are required for cell death. HAMLET has broad antitumor activity in vitro, and its therapeutic effect has been confirmed in vivo in a human glioblastoma rat xenograft model, in patients with skin papillomas and in patients with bladder cancer. The mechanisms of tumor cell death remain unclear, however. Immediately after the encounter with tumor cells, HAMLET invades the cells and causes mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c release, phosphatidyl serine exposure, and a low caspase response. A fraction of the cells undergoes morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis, but caspase inhibition does not rescue the cells and Bcl-2 overexpression or altered p53 status does not influence the sensitivity of tumor cells to HAMLET. HAMLET also creates a state of unfolded protein overload and activates 20S proteasomes, which contributes to cell death. In parallel, HAMLET translocates to tumor cell nuclei, where high-affinity interactions with histones cause chromatin disruption, loss of transcription, and nuclear condensation. The dying cells also show morphological changes compatible with macroautophagy, and recent studies indicate that macroautophagy is involved in the cell death response to HAMLET. The results suggest that HAMLET, like a hydra with many heads, may interact with several crucial cellular organelles, thereby activating several forms of cell death, in parallel. This complexity might underlie the rapid death response of tumor cells and the broad antitumor activity of HAMLET.

  4. Differential expression of cyclin Dl in human pituitary tumors: relation to MIB-1 and p27/Kipl labeling indices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewedi, I.H.; Osman, W.M.; El Mahdy, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Pituitary tumors are a common form of endocrine neoplasia. However few studies assessed the expression of the principal cyclin regulating checkpoint exit, cyclin Dl. Cyclin Dl expression in pituitary tumors and its possible relation to MIB-1 and p27/K.ipl labeling indices (Us) was explored. Design: We studied a total of 199 pituitaries, including normal pituitaries (n = 7), pituitary adenomas (n = 187), and pituitary carcinoma (n = 5). All tissues were tested as cores of archived tissue microarrays that were immuno stained for cyclin Dl, MIB-1 and p27 using a standard technique. Tissue cores were subjected to automated analysis to evaluate the staining LIs, Results: No cyclin Dl positive cells in the normal anterior pituitary gland was found. Sparse nuclear staining was noted in pituitary tumors. Higher expression of cyclin Dl was noted in pituitary carcinomas compared to adenomas (p < 0.001), in non-functioning adenomas compared to functioning ones (p < 0.001) in macroadenomas versus micro adenomas (p — 0.017) and in recurrent non recurrent adenomas (p < 0.001). Cyclin Dl LI and MIB-1 LI were related among adenomas (p < 0.001) and carcinomas (p = 0.041). p27 LI was neither related to pituitary adenoma recurrence nor invasion. Conclusions: Expression of cyclin Dl in pituitary tumors is related to cell proliferation, recurrence, and metastatic potential. Nuclear cyclin Dl expression is a good marker of aggressive behavior in pituitary tumors

  5. Tumor necrosis factor: specific binding and internalization in sensitive and resistant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimoto, M.; Yip, Y.K.; Vilcek, J.

    1985-01-01

    Highly purified, Escherichia coli-derived recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was labeled with 125 I and employed to determine receptor binding, internalization, and intracellular degradation in murine L929 cells (highly sensitive to the cytotoxic action of TNF) and in diploid human FS-4 cells (resistant to TNF cytotoxicity). 125 I-labeled TNF bound specifically to high-affinity receptors on both L929 and FS-4 cells. Scatchard analysis of the binding data indicated the presence of 2200 binding sites per L929 cell and 7500 binding sites per FS-4 cell. The calculated dissociation constants are 6.1 x 10 -10 M and 3.2 x 10 -10 M for L929 and FS-4 cells, respectively. In both L929 and FS-4 cells, incubation at 37 0 C resulted in a rapid internalization of the bulk of the cell-bound TNF, followed by the appearance of trichloroacetic acid-soluble 125 I radioactivity in the tissue culture medium, due to degradation of TNF. Degradation but not cellular uptake of TNF was inhibited in the presence of chloroquine (an inhibitor of lysosomal proteases) in both L929 and FS-4 cells, suggesting that degradation occurs intracellularly, probably within lysosomes. These results show that resistance of FS-4 cells to TNF cytotoxicity is not due to a lack of receptors or their inability to internalize and degrade TNF

  6. Clinical applications of cells labelling; Aplicaciones clinicas del marcado de celulas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, B M [Instituto Nacional de Pediatria (Mexico)

    1994-12-31

    Blood cells labelled with radionuclides are reviewed and main applications are described. Red blood cell labelling by both random and specific principle. A table with most important clinical uses, 99mTc labelling of RBC are described pre tinning and in vivo reduction of Tc, in vitro labelling and administration of labelled RBC and in vivo modified technique. Labelled leucocytes with several 99mTc-complex radiopharmaceuticals by in vitro technique and specific monoclonal s for white cells(neutrofiles). Labelled platelets for clinical use and research by in vitro technique and in vivo labelling.

  7. Retinoid inhibition of in vitro invasion of human amnion basement membrane by human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazely, F.; Ledinko, N.; Smith, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The biological activity of retinoids was assayed in an in vitro quantitative assay of human tumor cell invasion using human amnion basement membrane (BM). The effects measured were the inhibition of tumor cell migration through the BM and tumor cell degradative enzyme activity on 14 C-proline labeled collagenous and noncollagenous components of the BM. The human lung carcinoma A549 or the human Ewing's sarcoma TC-106 cell lines treated with retinoids for two days were incubated on the BM in the absence of retinoids. A dose-dependent inhibition of cell invasion was produced by retinoids. Among the retinoids tested, the most powerful was retinol acetate which inhibited invasion by 50% of A549 cells at a concentration of 0.009 μg/mL, and of TC-106 cells at 0.07 μg/mL. Retinol acetate inhibited A549 and TC-106 cell growth by approximately 50% at levels over 100-fold higher than those needed for antiinvasive activity. Retinol acetate was about 20 times more potent than retinoic acid and 30 times more potent than retinol palmitate. The model system will be useful for investigating antiinvasive activity of other retinoids as well as other compounds

  8. NF-κB functions as a molecular link between tumor cells and Th1/Tc1 T cells in the tumor microenvironment to exert radiation-mediated tumor suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Priscilla S.; Bardhan, Kankana; Chen, May R.; Paschall, Amy V.; Lu, Chunwan; Bollag, Roni J.; Kong, Feng-Chong; Jin, JianYue; Kong, Feng-Ming; Waller, Jennifer L.; Pollock, Raphael E.; Liu, Kebin

    2016-01-01

    Radiation modulates both tumor cells and immune cells in the tumor microenvironment to exert its anti-tumor activity; however, the molecular connection between tumor cells and immune cells that mediates radiation-exerted tumor suppression activity in the tumor microenvironment is largely unknown. We report here that radiation induces rapid activation of the p65/p50 and p50/p50 NF-κB complexes in human soft tissue sarcoma (STS) cells. Radiation-activated p65/p50 and p50/p50 bind to the TNFα promoter to activate its transcription in STS cells. Radiation-induced TNFα induces tumor cell death in an autocrine manner. A sublethal dose of Smac mimetic BV6 induces cIAP1 and cIAP2 degradation to increase tumor cell sensitivity to radiation-induced cell death in vitro and to enhance radiation-mediated suppression of STS xenografts in vivo. Inhibition of caspases, RIP1, or RIP3 blocks radiation/TNFα-induced cell death, whereas inhibition of RIP1 blocks TNFα-induced caspase activation, suggesting that caspases and RIP1 act sequentially to mediate the non-compensatory cell death pathways. Furthermore, we determined in a syngeneic sarcoma mouse model that radiation up-regulates IRF3, IFNβ, and the T cell chemokines CCL2 and CCL5 in the tumor microenvironment, which are associated with activation and increased infiltration of Th1/Tc1 T cells in the tumor microenvironment. Moreover, tumor-infiltrating T cells are in their active form since both the perforin and FasL pathways are activated in irradiated tumor tissues. Consequently, combined BV6 and radiation completely suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Therefore, radiation-induced NF-κB functions as a molecular link between tumor cells and immune cells in the tumor microenvironment for radiation-mediated tumor suppression. PMID:27014915

  9. Endothelial cell labeling with indium-111-oxine as a marker of cell attachment to bioprosthetic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharefkin, J.B.; Lather, C.; Smith, M.; Rich, N.M.

    1983-01-01

    Canine vascular endothelium labeled with indium-111-oxine was used as a marker of cell attachment to vascular prosthetic surfaces with complex textures. Primarily cultured and freshly harvested endothelial cells both took up the label rapidly. An average of 72% of a 32 micro Ci labeling dose was taken up by 1.5 X 10(6) cells in 10 min in serum-free medium. Over 95% of freshly labeled cells were viable by trypan blue tests and only 5% of the label was released after 1 h incubations at 37 degrees C. Labeled and unlabeled cells had similar rates of attachment to plastic dishes. Scanning electron microscopic studies showed that labeled cells retained their ability to spread on tissue culture dishes even at low (1%) serum levels. Labeled endothelial cells seeded onto Dacron or expanded polytetrafluoroethylene vascular prostheses by methods used in current surgical models could be identified by autoradiography of microscopic sections of the prostheses, and the efficiency of cell attachment to the prosthesis could be measured by gamma counting. Indium-111 labeling affords a simple and rapid way to measure initial cell attachment to, and distribution on, vascular prosthetic materials. The method could also allow measurement of early cell loss from a flow surface in vivo by using external gamma imaging

  10. Experimental rat lung tumor model with intrabronchial tumor cell implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Neto, Antero; Simão, Antônio Felipe Leite; Miranda, Samuel de Paula; Mourão, Lívia Talita Cajaseiras; Bezerra, Nilfácio Prado; Almeida, Paulo Roberto Carvalho de; Ribeiro, Ronaldo de Albuquerque

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rat lung tumor model for anticancer drug testing. Sixty-two female Wistar rats weighing 208 +/- 20 g were anesthetized intraperitoneally with 2.5% tribromoethanol (1 ml/100 g live weight), tracheotomized and intubated with an ultrafine catheter for inoculation with Walker's tumor cells. In the first step of the experiment, a technique was established for intrabronchial implantation of 10(5) to 5 x 10(5) tumor cells, and the tumor take rate was determined. The second stage consisted of determining tumor volume, correlating findings from high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with findings from necropsia and determining time of survival. The tumor take rate was 94.7% for implants with 4 x 10(5) tumor cells, HRCT and necropsia findings matched closely (r=0.953; p<0.0001), the median time of survival was 11 days, and surgical mortality was 4.8%. The present rat lung tumor model was shown to be feasible: the take rate was high, surgical mortality was negligible and the procedure was simple to perform and easily reproduced. HRCT was found to be a highly accurate tool for tumor diagnosis, localization and measurement and may be recommended for monitoring tumor growth in this model.

  11. Labelling of anti-human bladder tumor chimeric antibody with 99Tcm and radioimmunoimaging of bladder carcinoma xenograft in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunli; Wang Rongfu; Fu Zhanli; Bai Yin; Ding Yi; Yu Lizhang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the in vitro immunoreactivity and in vivo tissue distribution, tumor targeting property of anti-human bladder tumor human-murine chimeric antibody (ch-BDI) labeled with 99 Tc m and to investigate its possibility for being used in guiding diagnosis and guiding therapy of bladder cancer. Methods: The ch-BDI was labeled with 99 Tc m by improved Schwarz method and the labeled antibody was purified by Sephadex G-50. Labeling yield and radiochemical purity were measured by paper chromatography. The immunoreactive fraction and association constant (K a ) were measured by Lindmo method and Scatchard analysis, respectively. 11.1 MBq (30 μg) 99 Tc m -ch-BDI was intravenously injected into nude mice bearing human bladder cancer xenografts in the right thigh and radioimmunoimaging (RII) was performed 2, 6, 20 and 24 h postinjection. The images were processed by region of interest (ROI) method to acquire the counts of whole body and the tumor and the counts ratios of tumor to contralateral normal tissue or to tissues of other non-tumor bearing organs. The mice were killed after 24 h postinjection imaging and tissue distribution was measured. %ID/g and target to nontarget (T/NT) ratios were calculated. Results: The labeling yield and radiochemical purity of 99 Tc m -ch-BDI were (66.5±7.3)% and >90%, respectively. The immunoreactive fraction was 76% and K a was 3.56 x 10 9 L/mol. RII showed that the tumor was clearly visualized 6 h postinjection and becoming clearer along with time prolonging. The radioactivity of whole body decreased rapidly with time, whereas the radioactivity of the tumor decreased slowly. The T/NT ratios was increased with time. Biodistribution results showed that tumor uptake was 17.4%ID/g 24 h postinjection. T/NT ratios were very high except for the kidney. T/NT ratios for brain, muscle, intestinal wall, bone and heart wall were 136.0, 55.1, 39.3, 29.7 and 27.9, respectively. Conclusion: 99 Tc m -ch-BDI exhibits excellent

  12. Tumor-Induced Generation of Splenic Erythroblast-like Ter-Cells Promotes Tumor Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yanmei; Liu, Qiuyan; Hou, Jin; Gu, Yan; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Zhubo; Fan, Jia; Zhou, Weiping; Qiu, Shuangjian; Zhang, Yonghong; Dong, Tao; Li, Ning; Jiang, Zhengping; Zhu, Ha; Zhang, Qian; Ma, Yuanwu; Zhang, Lianfeng; Wang, Qingqing; Yu, Yizhi; Li, Nan; Cao, Xuetao

    2018-04-19

    Identifying tumor-induced leukocyte subsets and their derived circulating factors has been instrumental in understanding cancer as a systemic disease. Nevertheless, how primary tumor-induced non-leukocyte populations in distal organs contribute to systemic spread remains poorly defined. Here, we report one population of tumor-inducible, erythroblast-like cells (Ter-cells) deriving from megakaryocyte-erythroid progenitor cells with a unique Ter-119 + CD45 - CD71 + phenotype. Ter-cells are enriched in the enlarged spleen of hosts bearing advanced tumors and facilitate tumor progression by secreting neurotrophic factor artemin into the blood. Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and Smad3 activation are important in Ter-cell generation. In vivo blockade of Ter-cell-derived artemin inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) growth, and artemin deficiency abolishes Ter-cells' tumor-promoting ability. We confirm the presence of splenic artemin-positive Ter-cells in human HCC patients and show that significantly elevated serum artemin correlates with poor prognosis. We propose that Ter-cells and the secreted artemin play important roles in cancer progression with prognostic and therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Curcumin targets fibroblast–tumor cell interactions in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudás, József; Fullár, Alexandra; Romani, Angela; Pritz, Christian; Kovalszky, Ilona; Hans Schartinger, Volker; Mathias Sprinzl, Georg; Riechelmann, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of OSCC tumor cells. We hypothesized that Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells. Normal and 2 μM Curcumin-treated co-culture were performed for 4 days, followed by analysis of tumor cell invasivity, mRNA/protein expression of EMT-markers and mediators, activity measure of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), and western blot analysis of signal transduction in tumor cells and fibroblasts. In Curcumin-treated co-culture, in tumor cells, the levels of nuclear factor κB (NFκBα) and early response kinase (ERK)—decreased, in fibroblasts, integrin αv protein synthesis decreased compared to corresponding cells in normal co-culture. The signal modulatory changes induced by Curcumin caused decreased release of EMT-mediators in CAFs and reversal of EMT in tumor cells, which was associated with decreased invasion. These data confirm the palliative potential of Curcumin in clinical application. - Graphical abstract: Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells. Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells by inhibiting the production of EMT mediators in CAFs and by modification of intracellular signaling in tumor cells. This causes less invasivity and reversal of EMT in tumor cells. Highlights: ► Curcumin targets tumor–fibroblast interaction in head and neck cancer. ► Curcumin suppresses mediators of epithelial–mesenchymal transition. ► Curcumin decreases the invasivity of tumor cells

  14. Curcumin targets fibroblast–tumor cell interactions in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudás, József, E-mail: jozsef.dudas@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Fullár, Alexandra, E-mail: fullarsz@gmail.com [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); 1st Department of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University, Üllői út 26, 1085 Budapest (Hungary); Romani, Angela, E-mail: angela.romani@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Pritz, Christian, E-mail: christian.pritz@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kovalszky, Ilona, E-mail: koval@korb1.sote.hu [1st Department of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University, Üllői út 26, 1085 Budapest (Hungary); Hans Schartinger, Volker, E-mail: volker.schartinger@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Mathias Sprinzl, Georg, E-mail: georg.sprinzl@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Riechelmann, Herbert, E-mail: herbert.riechelmann@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2013-04-01

    Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of OSCC tumor cells. We hypothesized that Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells. Normal and 2 μM Curcumin-treated co-culture were performed for 4 days, followed by analysis of tumor cell invasivity, mRNA/protein expression of EMT-markers and mediators, activity measure of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), and western blot analysis of signal transduction in tumor cells and fibroblasts. In Curcumin-treated co-culture, in tumor cells, the levels of nuclear factor κB (NFκBα) and early response kinase (ERK)—decreased, in fibroblasts, integrin αv protein synthesis decreased compared to corresponding cells in normal co-culture. The signal modulatory changes induced by Curcumin caused decreased release of EMT-mediators in CAFs and reversal of EMT in tumor cells, which was associated with decreased invasion. These data confirm the palliative potential of Curcumin in clinical application. - Graphical abstract: Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells. Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells by inhibiting the production of EMT mediators in CAFs and by modification of intracellular signaling in tumor cells. This causes less invasivity and reversal of EMT in tumor cells. Highlights: ► Curcumin targets tumor–fibroblast interaction in head and neck cancer. ► Curcumin suppresses mediators of epithelial–mesenchymal transition. ► Curcumin decreases the invasivity of tumor cells.

  15. Study of the adhesion interaction using 51Cr labelling method between the myeloma cell lines and the endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xueguang; Wang Jiangfang; Mao Zijun

    1995-06-01

    Using 51 Cr labelled multiple myeloma (MM) cell lines U266/XG-7, the regulatory effect of cytokines on the adhesive interaction between myeloma-cell lines U266/XG-7 and the endothelial cells, and the effects of these cytokines on expression of adhesion molecules and secretion of other cytokines were studied. The experimental results were as follows: (1) IL-6 and IL-6 Rgp 130-associated growth factors (such as GM-CSF) are not only myeloma cell growth factors, but also can enhance the adhesion between MM cells and endothelial cells and thus facilitated the metastasis of tumor cells. (2) Cytokines could induce increase in the expression of CD54 and CD44 on the endothelial cells and the secretion of IL-6 and TNF by the endothelial cells. On the other hand, the adhesion could also cause the change of CD11a, CD54, CD44 and VLA-4 on surface of myeloma cells XG-7. Finally, the interaction between MM cells and stromal cells from murine bone marrow could rapidly induce autocrine of IL-6 in human IL-6-dependent MM cells. (3) The interaction between stromal cells and tumor cells regulated by the cytokines and adhesion molecules was a key element in the pathogenesis and development of human MM. Among these factors, VLA-4 might be one of the molecules involved in U266/XG-7-EC interaction. (5 tabs., 8 figs.)

  16. Evaluation of apoptosis and micronucleation induced by reactor neutron beams with two different cadmium ratios in total and quiescent cell populations within solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Ono, Koji; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Takagaki, Masao; Kobayashi, Tooru; Kinashi, Yuko; Suzuki, Minoru

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Response of quiescent (Q) and total tumor cells in solid tumors to reactor neutron beam irradiation with two different cadmium (Cd) ratios was examined in terms of micronucleus (MN) frequency and apoptosis frequency, using four different tumor cell lines. Methods and Materials: C57BL mice bearing EL4 tumors, C3H/He mice bearing SCC VII or FM3A tumors, and Balb/c mice bearing EMT6/KU tumors received 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) continuously for 5 days via implanted mini-osmotic pumps to label all proliferating (P) cells. Thirty min after i.p. injection of sodium borocaptate- 10 B (BSH), or 3 h after oral administration of p-boronophenylalanine- 10 B (BPA), the tumors were irradiated with neutron beams. The tumors without 10 B-compound administration were irradiated with neutron beams or γ-rays. This neutron beam irradiation was performed using neutrons with two different Cd ratios. The tumors were then excised, minced, and trypsinized. The tumor cell suspensions thus obtained were incubated with cytochalasin-B (a cytokinesis blocker), and the MN frequency in cells without BrdU labeling (=Q cells) was determined using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. Meanwhile, for apoptosis assay, 6 h after irradiation, tumor cell suspensions obtained in the same manner were fixed, and the apoptosis frequency in Q cells was also determined with immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The MN and apoptosis frequencies in total (P+Q) tumor cells were determined from the tumors that were not pretreated with BrdU. Results: Without 10 B-compounds, the sensitivity difference between total and Q cells was reduced by neutron beam irradiation. Under our particular neutron beam irradiation condition, relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons was larger in Q cells than in total cells, and the RBE values were larger for low Cd-ratio than high Cd-ratio neutrons. With 10 B-compounds, both frequencies were increased for each cell population, especially for total cells. BPA

  17. Hyperpolarized [U-(2) H, U-(13) C]Glucose reports on glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathway activity in EL4 tumors and glycolytic activity in yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Kerstin N; Hartl, Johannes; Keller, Markus A; Hu, De-En; Kettunen, Mikko I; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Ralser, Markus; Brindle, Kevin M

    2015-12-01

    A resonance at ∼181 ppm in the (13) C spectra of tumors injected with hyperpolarized [U-(2) H, U-(13) C]glucose was assigned to 6-phosphogluconate (6PG), as in previous studies in yeast, whereas in breast cancer cells in vitro this resonance was assigned to 3-phosphoglycerate (3PG). These peak assignments were investigated here using measurements of 6PG and 3PG (13) C-labeling using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) METHODS: Tumor-bearing mice were injected with (13) C6 glucose and the (13) C-labeled and total 6PG and 3PG concentrations measured. (13) C MR spectra of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient (zwf1Δ) and wild-type yeast were acquired following addition of hyperpolarized [U-(2) H, U-(13) C]glucose and again (13) C-labeled and total 6PG and 3PG were measured by LC-MS/MS RESULTS: Tumor (13) C-6PG was more abundant than (13) C-2PG/3PG and the resonance at ∼181 ppm matched more closely that of 6PG. (13) C MR spectra of wild-type and zwf1Δ yeast cells showed a resonance at ∼181 ppm after labeling with hyperpolarized [U-(2) H, U-(13) C]glucose, however, there was no 6PG in zwf1Δ cells. In the wild-type cells 3PG was approximately four-fold more abundant than 6PG CONCLUSION: The resonance at ∼181 ppm in (13) C MR spectra following injection of hyperpolarized [U-(2) H, U-(13) C]glucose originates predominantly from 6PG in EL4 tumors and 3PG in yeast cells. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Antitumor Cell-Complex Vaccines Employing Genetically Modified Tumor Cells and Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Miguel

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluates the immune response mediated by vaccination with cell complexes composed of irradiated B16 tumor cells and mouse fibroblasts genetically modified to produce GM-CSF. The animals were vaccinated with free B16 cells or cell complexes. We employed two gene plasmid constructions: one high producer (pMok and a low producer (p2F. Tumor transplant was performed by injection of B16 tumor cells. Plasma levels of total IgG and its subtypes were measured by ELISA. Tumor volumes were measured and survival curves were obtained. The study resulted in a cell complex vaccine able to stimulate the immune system to produce specific anti-tumor membrane proteins (TMP IgG. In the groups vaccinated with cells transfected with the low producer plasmid, IgG production was higher when we used free B16 cell rather than cell complexes. Nonspecific autoimmune response caused by cell complex was not greater than that induced by the tumor cells alone. Groups vaccinated with B16 transfected with low producer plasmid reached a tumor growth delay of 92% (p ≤ 0.01. When vaccinated with cell complex, the best group was that transfected with high producer plasmid, reaching a tumor growth inhibition of 56% (p ≤ 0.05. Significant survival (40% was only observed in the groups vaccinated with free transfected B16 cells.

  19. Melanoma targeting with alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone analogs labeled with fac-[99mTc(CO)3]+: effect of cyclization on tumor-seeking properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposinho, Paula D; Xavier, Catarina; Correia, João D G; Falcão, Soraia; Gomes, Paula; Santos, Isabel

    2008-03-01

    Early detection of primary melanoma tumors is essential because there is no effective treatment for metastatic melanoma. Several linear and cyclic radiolabeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) analogs have been proposed to target the melanocortin type 1 receptor (MC1R) overexpressed in melanoma. The compact structure of a rhenium-cyclized alpha-MSH analog (Re-CCMSH) significantly enhanced its in vivo tumor uptake and retention. Melanotan II (MT-II), a cyclic lactam analog of alpha-MSH (Ac-Nle-cyclo[Asp-His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-Lys]-NH2]), is a very potent and stable agonist peptide largely used in the characterization of melanocortin receptors. Taking advantage of the superior biological features associated with the MT-II cyclic peptide, we assessed the effect of lactam-based cyclization on the tumor-seeking properties of alpha-MSH analogs by comparing the pharmacokinetics profile of the 99mTc-labeled cyclic peptide betaAla-Nle-cyclo[Asp-His-D-Phe-Arg-Trp-Lys]-NH2 with that of the linear analog betaAla-Nle-Asp-His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-Lys-NH2 in melanoma-bearing mice. We have synthesized and coupled the linear and cyclic peptides to a bifunctional chelator containing a pyrazolyl-diamine backbone (pz) through the amino group of betaAla, and the resulting pz-peptide conjugates were reacted with the fac-[99mTc(CO)3]+ moiety. The 99mTc(CO)3-labeled conjugates were obtained in high yield, high specific activity, and high radiochemical purity. The cyclic 99mTc(CO)3-labeled conjugate presents a remarkable internalization (87.1% of receptor-bound tracer and 50.5% of total applied activity, after 6 h at 37 degrees C) and cellular retention (only 24.7% released from the cells after 5 h) in murine melanoma B16F1 cells. A significant tumor uptake and retention was obtained in melanoma-bearing C57BL6 mice for the cyclic radioconjugate [9.26 +/- 0.83 and 11.31 +/- 1.83% ID/g at 1 and 4 h after injection, respectively]. The linear 99mTc(CO)3-pz-peptide presented lower values for

  20. Studies on cross-immunity among syngeneic tumors by immunization with gamma-irradiated tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Izumi

    1977-01-01

    In order to clarify whether cross-immunity among 3-methyl-cholanthrene (MCA)-induced sarcomas in C3H/He mice can be established or not, transplantations of syngeneic tumors were carried out in mice immunized with gamma-irradiated (13,000 rad 60 Co) tumor cells and in those immunized with living tumor cells thereafter. The following results were obtained. By using immunizing procedure with only gamma-irradiated tumor cells, a pair of tumors originating from one and the same mouse showed cross-resistance to each other. However, no such evidence was seen among tumors originating from different mice. Cross-immunity among syngeneic tumors originating from different mice could be clearly observed, when immunizing procedure using living tumor cells was added after the treatment with gamma-irradiated tumor cells. It was considered that common antigenicity among MCA-induced sarcoma cells was decreased by gamma-irradiation and that individual differences of tumor antigenecity were shown distinctly under such conditions. (auth.)

  1. Application of confocal Raman micro-spectroscopy for label-free monitoring of oxidative stress in living bronchial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmacki, Jakub M.; Quirós Gonzalez, Isabel; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2018-02-01

    Oxidative stress in cancer is implicated in tumor progression, being associated with increased therapy resistance and metastasis. Conventional approaches for monitoring oxidative stress in tissue such as high-performance liquid chromatography and immunohistochemistry are bulk measurements and destroy the sample, meaning that longitudinal monitoring of cancer cell heterogeneity remains elusive. Raman spectroscopy has the potential to overcome this challenge, providing a chemically specific, label free readout from single living cells. Here, we applied a standardized protocol for label-free confocal Raman micro-spectroscopy in living cells to monitor oxidative stress in bronchial cells. We used a quartz substrate in a commercial cell chamber contained within a microscope incubator providing culture media for cell maintenance. We studied the effect of a potent reactive oxygen species inducer, tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP), and antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) on living cells from a human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC). We found that the Raman bands corresponding to nucleic acids, proteins and lipids were significantly different (pmicro-spectroscopy may be able to monitor the biological impact of oxidative and reductive processes in cells, hence enabling longitudinal studies of oxidative stress in therapy resistance and metastasis at the single cell level.

  2. Radiopharmaceutical labeling research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop methods of attaching radionuclides to monoclonal antibodies and antibody fragments for use in tumor imaging and internal radiation therapy. Monoclonal antibodies and their fragments are of interest because they enable the selective targeting of tumors. The labeled antibodies could be employed as carriers to transport radioisotopes to tumors, thus minimizing total-body radiation dose and radiation damage to normal tissue. Because the time required for labeled antibodies to find the tumor antigen and deliver the dose to the tumor is estimated to be about 1-3 days, radionuclides with a l- to 3-day half-life would be optimum for this purpose. Two of the radionuclides produced at LAMPF, 67 Cu and 77 Br, have the suitable half-life and nuclear-decay properties for use in tumor imaging or therapy with radiolabeled antibodies. These radionuclides and the efforts to prepare radiolabeled antibodies with them are described. We have used three different approaches to meet this objective of labeling antibodies: (1) labeling chelating agents with metal radionuclides, then conjugating the labeled chelating agents to antibodies; (2) conjugating activated chelating agents to antibodies, followed by metalation with metal radionuclides; and (3) radiobrominating small molecules that can be conjugated to antibodies

  3. Magnitude of malate-aspartate reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide shuttle activity in intact respiring tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhouse, W V; Lehninger, A L

    1977-11-01

    Measurements of respiration, CO2 and lactate production, and changes in the levels of various key metabolites of the glycolytic sequence and tricarboxylic acid cycle were made on five lines of rodent ascites tumor cells (two strains of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells, Krebs II carcinoma, AS-30D carcinoma, and L1210 cells) incubated aerobically in the presence of uniformly labeled D-[14C]glucose. From these data, as well as earlier evidence demonstrating that the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) shuttle in these cells requires a transaminase step and is thus identified as the malate-aspartate shuttle (W.V.V. Greenhouse and A.L. Lehninger, Cancer Res., 36: 1392-1396, 1976), metabolic flux diagrams were constructed for the five cell lines. These diagrams show the relative rates of glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, electron transport, and the malate-aspartate shuttle in these tumors. Large amounts of cytosolic NADH were oxidized by the mitochondrial respiratory chain via the NADH shuttle, comprising anywhere from about 20 to 80% of the total flow of reducing equivalents to oxygen in these tumors. Calculations of the sources of energy for adenosine triphosphate synthesis indicated that on the average about one-third of the respiratory adenosine triphosphate is generated by electron flow originating from cytosolic NADH via the malate-aspartate shuttle.

  4. Accelerated stem cell labeling with ferucarbotran and protamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovko, Daniel M.; Henning, Tobias; Bauer, Jan S. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Settles, Marcus; Rummeny, Ernst J. [Technical University Munich, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Frenzel, Thomas [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Mayerhofer, Artur [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Institute of Cell Biology, Munich (Germany); Daldrup-Link, Heike E. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); UCSF Medical Center, Contrast Agent Research Group, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2010-03-15

    To develop and characterize a clinically applicable, fast and efficient method for stem cell labeling with ferucarbotran and protamine for depiction with clinical MRI. The hydrodynamic diameter, zeta potential and relaxivities of ferucarbotran and varying concentrations of protamine were measured. Once the optimized ratio was found, human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were labeled at varying incubation times (1-24 h). Viability was assessed via Trypan blue exclusion testing. 150,000 labeled cells in Ficoll solution were imaged with T1-, T2- and T2*-weighted sequences at 3 T, and relaxation rates were calculated. Varying the concentrations of protamine allows for easy modification of the physicochemical properties. Simple incubation with ferucarbotran alone resulted in efficient labeling after 24 h of incubation while assisted labeling with protamine resulted in similar results after only 1 h. Cell viability remained unaffected. R2 and R2* relaxation rates were drastically increased. Electron microscopy confirmed intracellular iron oxide uptake in lysosomes. Relaxation times correlated with results from ICP-AES. Our results show internalization of ferucarbotran can be accelerated in MSCs with protamine, an approved heparin antagonist and potentially clinically applicable uptake-enhancing agent. (orig.)

  5. Role of Axumin PET Scan in Germ Cell Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-01

    Testis Cancer; Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Cancer; Germ Cell Tumor of Testis; Germ Cell Tumor, Testicular, Childhood; Testicular Neoplasms; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Choriocarcinoma; Testicular Diseases; Germ Cell Cancer Metastatic; Germ Cell Neoplasm of Retroperitoneum; Germ Cell Cancer, Nos

  6. Country report: Germany. Preclinical evaluation of Y-90 labelled Rituximab and ERIC-1, two antibodies for tumor therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schomäcker, Klaus; Fischer, Thomas [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    This project focuses on harnessing the great potential of radionuclide therapy, using various different vehicles to transport radionuclides into tumor tissues. A central aim of the project will be to manufacture specific vehicle molecules whose tumor affinity and suitability for radioactive coupling have already been proven through laboratory trials on animals and cell cultures at the Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Cologne and to label it with Y- 90. The vectors to be used to transport radionuclides into tumor tissue for treatment are antibodies against lymphomas and neuroblastomas. The technology applied for coupling Y-90 to various antibodies has been developed to a high level in Cologne and is now ready to be transferred and adapted to GMP (Good Manufacturing Practice) conditions. The antibody against NHL can be acquired commercially and must then be modified for binding to the therapeutically active nuclide Y-90. Similarly, the antibody against neuroblastoma must also be modified to bind to Y-90 but is produced in Cologne. To improve the therapeutic value of antibodies we tried to introduce the pretargeting method.

  7. Country report: Germany. Preclinical evaluation of Y-90 labelled Rituximab and ERIC-1, two antibodies for tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schomäcker, Klaus; Fischer, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This project focuses on harnessing the great potential of radionuclide therapy, using various different vehicles to transport radionuclides into tumor tissues. A central aim of the project will be to manufacture specific vehicle molecules whose tumor affinity and suitability for radioactive coupling have already been proven through laboratory trials on animals and cell cultures at the Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Cologne and to label it with Y- 90. The vectors to be used to transport radionuclides into tumor tissue for treatment are antibodies against lymphomas and neuroblastomas. The technology applied for coupling Y-90 to various antibodies has been developed to a high level in Cologne and is now ready to be transferred and adapted to GMP (Good Manufacturing Practice) conditions. The antibody against NHL can be acquired commercially and must then be modified for binding to the therapeutically active nuclide Y-90. Similarly, the antibody against neuroblastoma must also be modified to bind to Y-90 but is produced in Cologne. To improve the therapeutic value of antibodies we tried to introduce the pretargeting method

  8. Relationship of binding specificity and structural property of the technetium-99m complexes for tumor hypoxia and tumor angiogenesis imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Z.F.

    2005-01-01

    The growth of tumor requires nutrition and oxygen. Tumor cells will become hypoxic when the supply of oxygen is insufficient. Hypoxic tumor cells will not only resist radiation therapy and chemotherapy, but also induce angiogenesis for oxygen supply and for metastasis. Therefore, detection of tumor hypoxia and tumor angiogenesis with high sensitive radio labeled imaging agents is important. Hypoxic tumor cells may display some molecules as tumor markers for the specific binding with radiopharmaceuticals. Radiopharmaceuticals, unlike the non-radioactive drugs, are trace compounds in a given dosage. Due to the extreme low concentration, the non-specific accumulation of the radiotracers by blood cells and proteins, tissues, and organs can be even more serious compared to the non-radioactive drugs. The non-specific accumulation of the radiotracers can make the ratios of tumor/tissue (in terms of i.d.%/g) falling to the range of 2∼7 [1-2]. Non-specific binding of radiopharmaceuticals is common, but detailed studies on it are poor documented. This presentation reports the study of the relationship of non-specific accumulation and the structural property of two type of 99m TC labeled compounds: (a) 99m Tc-(amine o xime) containing either 2-nitroimidazole (2-NI, as hypoxia tumor cells specific agents), or 4-nitro- imidazole (4-NI, as control), or aniline (as reference) groups; (b) 99m Tc-(arginine-glycine- aspartic acid, RGD, as tumor angiogenesis specific agents) and 99m Tc-(arginine-glycine- glutarmic acid, RGE, as control). The 99m Tc-(amine-oxime) complexes, in addition to the 2-NI, 4-NI, and aniline groups, contain methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-, iso-butyl-, t-butyl-, phenyl-, and Benzyl- groups as well to make the radiotracers differing in structure and in lipophilicity , while the lipophilicity of a radiotracer plays an important role in non-specific cellular accumulation and protein binding, The results demonstrated that (1) the complex containing 2-NI showed specific

  9. Necrosis targeted radiotherapy with iodine-131-labeled hypericin to improve anticancer efficacy of vascular disrupting treatment in rabbit VX2 tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Haibo; Zhang, Jian; Sun, Ziping; Chen, Feng; Dai, Xu; Li, Yaming; Ni, Yicheng; Xu, Ke

    2015-06-10

    A viable rim of tumor cells surrounding central necrosis always exists and leads to tumor recurrence after vascular disrupting treatment (VDT). A novel necrosis targeted radiotherapy (NTRT) using iodine-131-labeled hypericin (131I-Hyp) was specifically designed to treat viable tumor rim and improve tumor control after VDT in rabbit models of multifocal VX2 tumors. NTRT was administered 24 hours after VDT. Tumor growth was significantly slowed down by NTRT with a smaller tumor volume and a prolonged tumor doubling time (14.4 vs. 5.7 days), as followed by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging over 12 days. The viable tumor rims were well inhibited in NTRT group compared with single VDT control group, as showed on tumor cross sections at day 12 (1 vs. 3.7 in area). High targetability of 131I-Hyp to tumor necrosis was demonstrated by in vivo SPECT as high uptake in tumor regions lasting over 9 days with 4.26 to 98 times higher radioactivity for necrosis versus the viable tumor and other organs by gamma counting, and with ratios of 7.7-11.7 and 10.5-13.7 for necrosis over peri-tumor tissue by autoradiography and fluorescence microscopy, respectively. In conclusion, NTRT improved the anticancer efficacy of VDT in rabbits with VX2 tumors.

  10. A review of 99mTc labeled myocardial imaging agents for tumor-positive imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Shian; Zhang Yongxue; An Rui

    2002-01-01

    The tumor-positive imaging with high sensitivity and specificity was useful in primary tumor and recurrences and metastases. The 99m Tc labeled myocardial imaging agents are easily available and stable and the radiochemical purity is high. 99m Tc is the preferred choice in routine works because its physical properties. The preparation, quality control, mechanism of accumulation and the clinical use of 99m Tc-sestamibi, 99m Tc-tetrofosmin, 99m Tc-furifosmin, and 99m Tc-N-NOET were reviewed

  11. Regulation of apoptosis by low serum in cells of different stages of neoplastic progression: enhanced susceptibility after loss of a senescence gene and decreased susceptibility after loss of a tumor suppressor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, G A; Lang, J E; Maronpot, R R; Barrett, J C

    1994-08-01

    A cell culture model system has been used to study the susceptibility of cells to apoptotic cell death during different stages of neoplastic progression. This system consists of normal diploid Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells, two preneoplastic cell lines [tumor suppressor stage I (sup +I) and non-tumor suppressor stage II (sup -II)], and hamster tumor cell lines. Stage I preneoplastic cells are nontumorigenic immortal clones that suppress tumorigenicity when hybridized to tumor cells, whereas stage II cells have lost the ability to suppress tumorigenicity in cell hybrids. We refer to these two types of preneoplastic cells as sup +I and sup -II, respectively. Neoplastic progression is generally associated with cellular alterations in growth factor responsiveness. Therefore, to study the regulation of apoptosis in the system described above, cells were cultured in low serum (0.2%) as a means of withdrawing growth factors. In low serum, normal SHE cells were quiescent (labeling index of 0.2%), with little cell death. The sup +I cells showed a relatively low labeling index (1.6%) but, in contrast to the normal cells, died at a high rate (55% cell loss after 48 h) by apoptosis, as evidenced by morphology, DNA fragmentation, and in situ end-labeling of fragmented DNA. The apoptotic cells did not go through a replicative cycle while in low serum, implying that apoptosis was initiated in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. The sup -II cell line showed a high labeling index (40%) after 48 h, but cell growth was balanced by cell death that occurred at approximately the same rate. The cells died, however, predominantly by necrosis. The tumor cell lines continued to proliferate in low serum, with high labeling indices (ranging from 27% to 43%) and a low level of apoptotic or necrotic cell death. To determine the relative ability of these cells to survive in vivo, normal SHE cells, sup +I cells, and sup -II cells were injected s.c. into nude mice. At 5 or 21 days after

  12. Magnetic cell labeling of primary and stem cell-derived pig hepatocytes for MRI-based cell tracking of hepatocyte transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwayne R Roach

    Full Text Available Pig hepatocytes are an important investigational tool for optimizing hepatocyte transplantation schemes in both allogeneic and xenogeneic transplant scenarios. MRI can be used to serially monitor the transplanted cells, but only if the hepatocytes can be labeled with a magnetic particle. In this work, we describe culture conditions for magnetic cell labeling of cells from two different pig hepatocyte cell sources; primary pig hepatocytes (ppHEP and stem cell-derived hepatocytes (PICM-19FF. The magnetic particle is a micron-sized iron oxide particle (MPIO that has been extensively studied for magnetic cell labeling for MRI-based cell tracking. ppHEP could endocytose MPIO with labeling percentages as high as 70%, achieving iron content as high as ~55 pg/cell, with >75% viability. PICM-19FF had labeling >97%, achieving iron content ~38 pg/cell, with viability >99%. Extensive morphological and functional assays indicated that magnetic cell labeling was benign to the cells. The results encourage the use of MRI-based cell tracking for the development and clinical use of hepatocyte transplantation methodologies. Further, these results generally highlight the importance of functional cell assays in the evaluation of contrast agent biocompatibility.

  13. Synthesis of 2-nitroimidazole-glycopeptide 68Ga-labeled for identification of areas of hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez Nario, Arian; Leiria Campo, Vanessa; Soares Bernardes, Emerson

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hypoxia is a pathological condition characterized by a reduction in oxygen delivery to a tissue or cell specific. It is estimated that 60% of solid tumors in advanced stages have areas of hypoxia and anoxia (almost complete absence of oxygen). It is now known that hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment is closely related to: 1) increased tumor aggressiveness; 2) increased relapse rate; 3) increased resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy; 4) poor prognosis of the disease. Therefore the use of non-invasive methods for the identification and quantification of areas of hypoxia in the tumor are extremely important for treating various types of cancers, allowing the use of individualized treatment strategies. Gallium-68 is a radionuclide widely used for positron emission tomography due to the availability of the generator 68 Ge / 68 Ga. With the aim of developing a new potential radiopharmaceutical 68 Ga-labeled for imaging hypoxia, it has been synthesized a new derivative of 2-nitroimidazole. Methods: The new glycopeptide derivative of 2-nitroimidazole was obtained by coupling the derivative of acetic acid 2-nitroimidazole with a glycopeptide obtained by solid phase synthesis, was subsequently conjugated with the chelating agent DOTA-NHS for labeling with the radionuclide 68 Ga . preparation and 68 Ga-labeled glycopeptide optimization marking with respect to solvent, time and temperature was made; also the radiochemical purity was assessed by reversed phase HPLC. Comparison with 18 F-FAZA, radiopharmaceutical used worldwide is also presented. Results: The new glycopeptide conjugate DOTA was conducted successfully synthesized and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Labeling with 68 Ga reached a maximum radiochemical purity of 96.6 ± 0.4% when 15μg glycopeptide was dissolved in 0.2 mL of acetonitrile, chloride 68Ga (5mCi) was evaporated to dryness and reconstituted in 0.1 mL of sterile water at room temperature, followed by heating to 95 ° C for 15 min. In

  14. Libraries of RGD analogs, labeled through ReO3+ or TcO3+ coordination, targeting αVβ3 integrin: development of tracers for the early detection of tumor neo-angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aufort, M.

    2008-11-01

    Integrins form a family of hetero-dimeric integral glycoproteins which play a central role in cell-cell adhesion and cell-matrix interactions. In particular, they are over expressed during tumor neo-angiogenesis. About 10 of them recognize a structured RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) sequence. Analogs of this sequence can be used for the early detection of tumors and metastases. We developed new tracers, labeled with 99m Tc, for the molecular imaging of α V β 3 integrin. Until recently, there was no reliable ab initio structure prediction of complex molecules containing Re and Tc chelates. Therefore, we preferred a combinatorial approach to develop potential ligands of α V β 3 integrin and we attempted to identify efficient tracers by in vivo screening. This method would account for biodistribution and pharmacokinetics properties in the early steps of the study. Tracers were obtained according two strategies: i) cyclization of linear RGD analogs; ii) combinatorial assembling of independent modules through metal core coordination by the well-known NS 2 +S motif. After synthesis and labeling, the stability of the tracers was investigated in presence of glutathione and in murine plasma. In vitro screening on purified integrin showed that a cyclic rhenium coordinate binds specifically α V β 3 . A tumor model (U87-MG tumor on nude mice) was validated in the laboratory and a method was developed to analyze in vivo experiments. Biodistribution data and percentage of activity found in tumors are encouraging for cyclic compounds though identification of efficient tracers is difficult due to their instability in the conditions of analyses. (author)

  15. Tumor cell culture on collagen–chitosan scaffolds as three-dimensional tumor model: A suitable model for tumor studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Mahmoudzadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cells naturally live in three-dimensional (3D microenvironments, while common laboratory tests and evaluations are done in two-dimensional (2D plates. This study examined the impact of cultured 4T1 cancer cells in a 3D collagen–chitosan scaffold compared with 2D plate cultures. Collagen–chitosan scaffolds were provided and passed confirmatory tests. 4T1 tumor cells were cultured on scaffolds and then tumor cells growth rate, resistance to X-ray radiation, and cyclophosphamide as a chemotherapy drug were analyzed. Furthermore, 4T1 cells were extracted from the scaffold model and were injected into the mice. Tumor growth rate, survival rate, and systemic immune responses were evaluated. Our results showed that 4T1 cells infiltrated the scaffolds pores and constructed a 3D microenvironment. Furthermore, 3D cultured tumor cells showed a slower proliferation rate, increased levels of survival to the X-ray irradiation, and enhanced resistance to chemotherapy drugs in comparison with 2D plate cultures. Transfer of extracted cells to the mice caused enhanced tumor volume and decreased life span. This study indicated that collagen–chitosan nanoscaffolds provide a suitable model of tumor that would be appropriate for tumor studies.

  16. Tumor cell culture on collagen-chitosan scaffolds as three-dimensional tumor model: A suitable model for tumor studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudzadeh, Aziz; Mohammadpour, Hemn

    2016-07-01

    Tumor cells naturally live in three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments, while common laboratory tests and evaluations are done in two-dimensional (2D) plates. This study examined the impact of cultured 4T1 cancer cells in a 3D collagen-chitosan scaffold compared with 2D plate cultures. Collagen-chitosan scaffolds were provided and passed confirmatory tests. 4T1 tumor cells were cultured on scaffolds and then tumor cells growth rate, resistance to X-ray radiation, and cyclophosphamide as a chemotherapy drug were analyzed. Furthermore, 4T1 cells were extracted from the scaffold model and were injected into the mice. Tumor growth rate, survival rate, and systemic immune responses were evaluated. Our results showed that 4T1 cells infiltrated the scaffolds pores and constructed a 3D microenvironment. Furthermore, 3D cultured tumor cells showed a slower proliferation rate, increased levels of survival to the X-ray irradiation, and enhanced resistance to chemotherapy drugs in comparison with 2D plate cultures. Transfer of extracted cells to the mice caused enhanced tumor volume and decreased life span. This study indicated that collagen-chitosan nanoscaffolds provide a suitable model of tumor that would be appropriate for tumor studies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Labeling Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Gold Nanocages for in vitro and in vivo Tracking by Two-Photon Microscopy and Photoacoustic Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Wang, Yu; Wang, Lidai; Wang, Yucai; Cai, Xin; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Lihong V.; Xia, Younan

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell tracking is a highly important subject. Current techniques based on nanoparticle-labeling, such as magnetic resonance imaging, fluorescence microscopy, and micro-computed tomography, are plagued by limitations including relatively low sensitivity or penetration depth, involvement of ionizing irradiation, and potential cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles. Here we introduce a new class of contrast agents based on gold nanocages (AuNCs) with hollow interiors and porous walls to label human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) for both in vitro and in vivo tracking using two-photon microscopy and photoacoustic microscopy. As demonstrated by the viability assay, the AuNCs showed negligible cytotoxicity under a reasonable dose, and did not alter the differentiation potential of the hMSCs into desired lineages. We were able to image the cells labeled with AuNCs in vitro for at least 28 days in culture, as well as to track the cells that homed to the tumor region in nude mice in vivo. PMID:23946820

  18. Development of positron emission tomography imaging by 64Cu-labeled Fab for detecting ERC/mesothelin in a mesothelioma mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Chisato; Sogawa, Chizuru; Tsuji, Atsushi B; Sudo, Hitomi; Sugyo, Aya; Uehara, Tomoya; Hino, Okio; Yoshii, Yukie; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Arano, Yasushi; Saga, Tsuneo

    2010-05-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is a highly aggressive form of cancer. Curative surgery is the only effective therapy for mesothelioma, and therefore early diagnosis is important. However, early diagnosis is difficult using current diagnostic imaging techniques, and a new imaging method for early diagnosis is urgently required. We evaluated the affinity of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies to the C-terminal fragment of ERC/mesothelin for this purpose. In-labeled or I-labeled IgG against C-terminal fragment of ERC and its Fab fragment were evaluated in vitro by cell binding, competitive inhibition, and cellular internalization assays, and in vivo by biodistribution in mice bearing ERC-expressing tumors. Next, the Fab fragment was labeled with the positron emitter Cu and evaluated by positron emission tomography (PET). Radiolabeled IgG and Fab showed specific binding to ERC-expressing mesothelioma cells with high affinity. Both radiolabeled IgG and Fab internalized into cells after binding to ERC on the cell surface. In-labeled IgG accumulated in ERC-expressing tumors and resulted in a moderate tumor-to-blood ratio at 4 days after injection. Furthermore, PET using Cu-labeled Fab visualized the tumor at 6 h after injection. Cu-labeled Fab can be useful for ERC-specific PET imaging, and can thus facilitate improved diagnosis of patients with early-stage mesothelioma.

  19. Experimental research for tumor VIP receptor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qianwei; Tan Tianzhi

    1998-01-01

    To study the possibility of radioactive labelled vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) for tumor VIP receptor imaging. 125 I-VIP was prepared by chloramine-T method, and purified by Sephadex G-50 column chromatography. The bioactivity and stability of 125 I-VIP were measured by silica 60 F 254 TLC and competition test to SGC7901 cell in vitro. The biodistribution of 125 I-VIP was studied in the nude mice bearing tumor. The results showed that labelled rate of 125 I was 73.8%, the specific activity was 18.2 PBq/mol, the radiochemical purity (RCP) was over 98% and remained 96.3% after 48 days stored at -80 degree C. The specific binding of 125 I-VIP to the SGC7901 cell was inhibited by VIP in dose dependence in the competition experiment. The radioactivity of tumor was higher than that of muscles in all phases (P<0.05-0.01), the peak activity of tumor occurred at 30 min (3.58 +- 0.48ID%/g) and the peak ratio of T/N occurred at 60 min after the injection. The activity of lungs was obviously higher than that of blood, the intestine was always in low level. Most of the activity in the body was mainly eliminated from kidney. The present study demonstrated that the radioactive labelled VIP is a promising agent for tumor VIP receptor scintigraphy

  20. Labelling of red blood cells with 99m pertechnetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyth, A.; Raam, C.F.

    1979-07-01

    This paper describes a method for labelling red blood cells with 99mTc in vitro, using electrolytically generated stannous ions as the reducing agent for 99mTc-pertechnetate. A labelling of 95% was found. A method for the in vivo labelling of red blood cells is also reported. This involves an injection of a stanno-DTPA-complex followed 20 minutes later by a 99mTc-pertechnetate solution scintillation camera images show more background activity when the in vivo method of labelling is used

  1. Interaction of tumor cells with the microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehnert Hendrik

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent advances in tumor biology have revealed that a detailed analysis of the complex interactions of tumor cells with their adjacent microenvironment (tumor stroma is mandatory in order to understand the various mechanisms involved in tumor growth and the development of metastasis. The mutual interactions between tumor cells and cellular and non-cellular components (extracellular matrix = ECM of the tumor microenvironment will eventually lead to a loss of tissue homeostasis and promote tumor development and progression. Thus, interactions of genetically altered tumor cells and the ECM on the one hand and reactive non-neoplastic cells on the other hand essentially control most aspects of tumorigenesis such as epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT, migration, invasion (i.e. migration through connective tissue, metastasis formation, neovascularisation, apoptosis and chemotherapeutic drug resistance. In this mini-review we will focus on these issues that were recently raised by two review articles in CCS.

  2. Efficient detection of human circulating tumor cells without significant production of false-positive cells by a novel conditionally replicating adenovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuminori Sakurai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are promising biomarkers in several cancers, and thus methods and apparatuses for their detection and quantification in the blood have been actively pursued. A novel CTC detection system using a green fluorescence protein (GFP–expressing conditionally replicating adenovirus (Ad (rAd-GFP was recently developed; however, there is concern about the production of false-positive cells (GFP-positive normal blood cells when using rAd-GFP, particularly at high titers. In addition, CTCs lacking or expressing low levels of coxsackievirus–adenovirus receptor (CAR cannot be detected by rAd-GFP, because rAd-GFP is constructed based on Ad serotype 5, which recognizes CAR. In order to suppress the production of false-positive cells, sequences perfectly complementary to blood cell–specific microRNA, miR-142-3p, were incorporated into the 3′-untranslated region of the E1B and GFP genes. In addition, the fiber protein was replaced with that of Ad serotype 35, which recognizes human CD46, creating rAdF35-142T-GFP. rAdF35-142T-GFP efficiently labeled not only CAR-positive tumor cells but also CAR-negative tumor cells with GFP. The numbers of false-positive cells were dramatically lower for rAdF35-142T-GFP than for rAd-GFP. CTCs in the blood of cancer patients were detected by rAdF35-142T-GFP with a large reduction in false-positive cells.

  3. Localization of tumors in vivo by scintigraphic identification of Clostridium butyricum using 131I-labelled antibodies and F(ab')2-antibody fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, R.; Mehnert, W.H.; Schmidt, H.E.; Altenbrunn, H.J.; Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin-Buch. Zentralinstitut fuer Isotopen- und Strahlenforschung)

    1979-01-01

    Tumor-bearing mice injected with clostridial spores show enrichment and germination of the spores within the tumor. 131 I-labelled anti-Clostridium-antibodies and anti-Clostridium-F(ab') 2 -fragments were used for a possible localization of tumors in vivo by scintiscanning. The application of the antibody revealed increased radioactivity in the tumors of mice pretreated with spores as well as in animals without pretreatment. In using F(ab') 2 -fragments instead of total antibody neither the apparently unspecific increase of radioactivity in not pretreated mice nor the specific fixation of labelled F(ab') 2 -fragments to clostridial rods in the tumors of pretreated animals could be demonstrated. The results are discussed with respect to further investigation

  4. Vulnerability of cultured canine lung tumor cells to NK cell-mediated cytolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haley, P.J.; Kohr, J.M.; Kelly, G.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Guilmette, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Five cell lines, designated as canine lung epithelial cell (CLEP), derived from radiation induced canine lung tumors and canine thyroid adeno-carcinoma (CTAC) cells were compared for their susceptibility to NK cell-mediated cytolysis using peripheral blood lymphocytes from normal, healthy Beagle dogs as effector cells. Effector cells and chromium 51 radiolabeled target cells were incubated for 16 h at ratios of 12.5:1, 25:1, 50:1, and 100:1. Increasing cytolysis was observed for all cell lines as the effector-to-target-cell ratios increased from 12.5:1 to 100:1. The percent cytotoxicity was significantly less for all lung tumor cell lines as compared to CTAC at the 100:1 ratio. One lung tumor cell line, CLEP-9, had 85% of the lytic vulnerability of the CTAC cell line and significantly greater susceptibility to NK cell-mediated lysis than all of the other lung tumor cell lines. Susceptibility to NK cell cytolysis did not correlate with in vivo malignant behavior of the original tumor. These data suggest that cultured canine lung tumor cells are susceptible to NK cell cytolytic activity in vitro and that at least one of these cell lines (CLEP-9) is a candidate for substitution of the standard canine NK cell target, CTAC, in NK cell assays. The use of lung tumor cells in NK cell assays may provide greater insight into the control of lung tumors by immune mechanisms. (author)

  5. Preparation of labelled lipids by the use of plant cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangold, H.K.

    1978-01-01

    The preparation of some radioacitvely labelled lipids by the use of plant cell cultures is discussed and further applications of the new method are suggested. Cell suspension cultures of rape (Brassica napus) and soya (Glycine max) have been used for the preparation of lipids labelled with radioisotopes. Radioactive acetic acid as well as various long-chain fatty acids are readily incorporated into the neutral and ionic lipids of plant cell cultures. In addition, 14 C-labelled glycerol, ethanolamine and choline are well utilized by the cells. Randomly labelled lipids have been obtained by incubating cell suspension cultures of rape and soya with [1- 14 C] acetic acid, and uniformly labelled lipids have been isolated from cultures that had been incubated with a mixture of [1- 14 C] acetic acid plus [2- 14 C] acetic acid. The use of techniques of plant cell cultures for the preparation of lipds labelled with stable or radioactive isotopesappears particularly rewarding because the uptake of precursors by the cells and their incorporation into various lipid compounds proceeds rapidly and often quanitatively.This new approach should be useful also for the biosynthesis of lipids whose acyl moieties contain a spn radical, a fluorescent group, or a light-sensitive label. Thus, plant cell cultures constitute valuable new tools for the biosynthetic preparation of a great variety of labelled lipids. (A.G.)

  6. Tumor imaging and targeting potential of an Hsp70-derived 14-mer peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Gehrmann

    Full Text Available We have previously used a unique mouse monoclonal antibody cmHsp70.1 to demonstrate the selective presence of a membrane-bound form of Hsp70 (memHsp70 on a variety of leukemia cells and on single cell suspensions derived from solid tumors of different entities, but not on non-transformed cells or cells from corresponding 'healthy' tissue. This antibody can be used to image tumors in vivo and target them for antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Tumor-specific expression of memHsp70 therefore has the potential to be exploited for theranostic purposes. Given the advantages of peptides as imaging and targeting agents, this study assessed whether a 14-mer tumor penetrating peptide (TPP; TKDNNLLGRFELSG, the sequence of which is derived from the oligomerization domain of Hsp70 which is expressed on the cell surface of tumor cells, can also be used for targeting membrane Hsp70 positive (memHsp70+ tumor cells, in vitro.The specificity of carboxy-fluorescein (CF- labeled TPP (TPP to Hsp70 was proven in an Hsp70 knockout mammary tumor cell system. TPP specifically binds to different memHsp70+ mouse and human tumor cell lines and is rapidly taken up via endosomes. Two to four-fold higher levels of CF-labeled TPP were detected in MCF7 (82% memHsp70+ and MDA-MB-231 (75% memHsp70+ cells compared to T47D cells (29% memHsp70+ that exhibit a lower Hsp70 membrane positivity. After 90 min incubation, TPP co-localized with mitochondrial membranes in memHsp70+ tumors. Although there was no evidence that any given vesicle population was specifically localized, fluorophore-labeled cmHsp70.1 antibody and TPP preferentially accumulated in the proximity of the adherent surface of cultured cells. These findings suggest a potential association between membrane Hsp70 expression and cytoskeletal elements that are involved in adherence, the establishment of intercellular synapses and/or membrane reorganization.This study demonstrates the specific binding and rapid

  7. Immediate bromodeoxyuridine labelling of unseparated human bone marrow cells ex vivo is superior to labelling after routine laboratory processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P O; Mortensen, B T; Christensen, I J

    1998-01-01

    It is important to evaluate the proliferation of bone marrow cells in several disease conditions and during treatment of patients with for example cytokines. Labelling with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd), immunocytochemical staining with anti-BrdUrd antibody and analysis by flow cytometry provides...... a reliable and reproducible technique for estimation of the fraction of cells that incorporated BrdUrd into DNA during S-phase. We have compared immediate BrdUrd labelling of unseparated bone marrow cells with the previously used labelling in the laboratory after routine separation of the mononuclear cells....... Bone marrow aspirates from seven lymphoma patients without bone marrow involvement were studied with these two methods. We found higher BrdUrd labelling indices (LI) in the mononuclear cells, when cells were labelled immediately. A large variation in LI was found between patients. Our results suggest...

  8. [Isolation and identification of brain tumor stem cells from human brain neuroepithelial tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jia-sheng; Deng, Yong-wen; Li, Ming-chu; Chen, Feng-Hua; Wang, Yan-jin; Lu, Ming; Fang, Fang; Wu, Jun; Yang, Zhuan-yi; Zhou, Xang-yang; Wang, Fei; Chen, Cheng

    2007-01-30

    To establish a simplified culture system for the isolation of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) from the tumors of human neuroepithelial tissue, to observe the growth and differentiation pattern of BTSCs, and to investigate their expression of the specific markers. Twenty-six patients with brain neuroepithelial tumors underwent tumor resection. Two pieces of tumor tissues were taken from each tumor to be dissociated, triturated into single cells in sterile DMEM-F12 medium, and then filtered. The tumor cells were seeded at a concentration of 200,000 viable cells per mL into serum-free DMEM-F12 medium simply supplemented with B27, human basic fibroblast growth factor (20 microg/L), human epidermal growth factor (20 microg /L), insulin (4 U/L), L-glutamine, penicillin and streptomycin. After the primary brain tumor spheres (BTSs) were generated, they were triturated again and passed in fresh medium. Limiting dilution assay was performed to observe the monoclone formation. 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation test was performed to observe the proliferation of the BTS. The BTSCs were cultured in mitogen-free DMEM-F12 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum to observe their differentiation. Immunocytochemistry was used to examine the expression of CD133 and nestin, specific markers of BTSC, and the rate of CD133 positive cells. Only a minority of subsets of cells from the tumors of neuroepithelial tissue had the capacity to survive, proliferate, and generate free-floating neurosphere-like BTSs in the simplified serum-free medium. These cells attached to the poly-L-lysine coated coverslips in the serum-supplemented medium and differentiated. The BTSCs were CD133 and nestin positive. The rate of CD133 positive cells in the tumor specimens was (21 +/- 6.2)% - (38 +/- 7.0)%. A new simplified culture system for the isolation of BTSCs is established. The tumors of human neuroepithelial tissue contain CD133 and nestin positive tumor stem cells which can be isolated

  9. CXCL17 expression by tumor cells recruits CD11b+Gr1 high F4/80- cells and promotes tumor progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Matsui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chemokines are involved in multiple aspects of pathogenesis and cellular trafficking in tumorigenesis. In this study, we report that the latest member of the C-X-C-type chemokines, CXCL17 (DMC/VCC-1, recruits immature myeloid-derived cells and enhances early tumor progression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CXCL17 was preferentially expressed in some aggressive types of gastrointestinal, breast, and lung cancer cells. CXCL17 expression did not impart NIH3T3 cells with oncogenic potential in vitro, but CXCL17-expressing NIH3T3 cells could form vasculature-rich tumors in immunodeficient mice. Our data showed that CXCL17-expressing tumor cells increased immature CD11b(+Gr1(+ myeloid-derived cells at tumor sites in mice and promoted CD31(+ tumor angiogenesis. Extensive chemotactic assays proved that CXCL17-responding cells were CD11b(+Gr1(highF4/80(- cells (≈ 90% with a neutrophil-like morphology in vitro. Although CXCL17 expression could not increase the number of CD11b(+Gr1(+ cells in tumor-burdened SCID mice or promote metastases of low metastatic colon cancer cells, the existence of CXCL17-responding myeloid-derived cells caused a striking enhancement of xenograft tumor formation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that aberrant expression of CXCL17 in tumor cells recruits immature myeloid-derived cells and promotes tumor progression through angiogenesis.

  10. In vivo assessment of 111In-labeled hematoporphyrin derivative in breast tumor-bearing animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, D.W.; Mandal, Ashis; Brown, Jerry; Reese, I.C.; Siegler, Richard; Hyman, Shigeyo

    1989-01-01

    The biological behavior of 111 In-labeled HPD has been investigated in tumor-bearing animals. Mice mammary adenocarcinomas and 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracine induced breast tumors in Sprague-Dawley female rats were clearly visualized by 111 In-HPD nuclear scintigraphy. Optimal scans were obtained after a 48 h delay. In normal and tumor-bearing animals, the highest uptake of 111 In-HPD 72 h post-injection was found in the liver, the spleen and the kidneys. Depending on the size and the extent of necrosis, the uptake of 111 In-HPD by malignant breast tumors varied from 2.5% injected dose (ID) in mice to 1% ID in rats. Benign breast tumor uptake of 111 In-HPD was less than 1% ID. No significant amount of the radiopharmaceutical was found in pulmonary abscesses and abdominal cysts. Scintigrams of these infectious or inflammatory lesions were normal. Malignant tumor to blood, heart and lung ratios averaged 50:1, 10:1 and 3:1 respectively. Tumor to brain ratio ranged from 72 to 444:1. (author)

  11. Molecular imaging of neuroendocrine tumors using 68Ga-labeled peptides (Somatostatin receptor PET/CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Prasad, V.; Hoersch, D.

    2009-01-01

    Receptor PET/CT using 68 Ga-labeled somatostatin analogues (DOTA-NOC, DOTA-TOC or DOTA-TATE) enables the highly sensitive molecular imaging of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) based on the expression of somatostatin receptors and even the detection of receptor subtypes. Our experience after more than 3000 studies shows that receptor PET/CT has a significantly higher tumor detection rate than conventional scintigraphy (even in SPECT/CT technique), and that tumor lesions can be very accurately localized. By calculating standardized uptake values (SUV) - which are reproducible and investigator-independent - patients can be selected for peptide receptor radiotherapy and also the course after therapy can be controlled. Receptor-PET/CT is the most sensitive imaging modality for the detection of unknown primary tumors (CUP syndrome), which is especially true for the detection of neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas and small bowel; whole-body staging (''one stop shop'') as well as restaging and selection of patients for peptide receptor radiotherapy can be performed using a patient-friendly procedure (examination finished within one hour) exposing the patient to less radiation than whole-body CT scanning. The 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generator has proved very reliable over the years - even in a hospital environment. The effective costs for 68 Ga labeled somatostatin analogues might be less than for scintigraphic agents, provided a certain number of studies per year are performed. The development of new tumor-specific peptides as well as of other DOTA- or NOTA-coupled radiopharmaceuticals opens a new avenue into the future: finally, the 68 Ga generator could play a similar important role for PET/CT as did the 99m Tc-Generator for conventional gamma camera imaging over the last decades. (orig.)

  12. 131/123 iodine labeled benzamides for the detection of melanomas and metastases. Synthesis, labeling, animal experiences and preliminary clinical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozzi, Oscar R.; Edreira, Martin M.; Castiglia, Silvia G.; Soroa, Victoria E.

    1999-01-01

    Radioiodine labeled benzamides are being studied as radiopharmaceuticals for the detection of melanomas and metastases. With this purpose the synthesis and labeling of N-(2-diethylaminoethyl)-3-[ 131 I]-4-methoxybenzamide (IMBA) has been carried out. Tissue distribution of the labeled compound has been studied in C 57 mice, showing a fast renal excretion. The labeled benzamide was also injected in mice with previously induced subcutaneous melanomas and lung metastases using B 16-F0 murine melanoma cells. The tumors show a good uptake of the labeled benzamide. The melanoma/other tissues uptake ratio is suitable for scintigraphic detection. Clinical studies in patients are under way. (author)

  13. Isolation of circulating tumor cells using photoacoustic flowmetry and two phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Christine M.; Rood, Kyle D.; Gupta, Sagar K.; Mosley, Jeffrey D.; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Sharma, Nikhilesh; Sengupta, Shramik; Viator, John A.

    2011-03-01

    Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet current diagnostic methods are inadequately sensitive. Patients must wait until secondary tumors form before malignancy can be diagnosed and treatment prescribed. Detection of cells that have broken off the original tumor and flow through the blood or lymph system can provide data for diagnosing and monitoring cancer. Our group utilizes the photoacoustic effect to detect metastatic melanoma cells, which contain the pigmented granule melanin. As a rapid laser pulse irradiates melanoma, the melanin undergoes thermo-elastic expansion and ultimately creates a photoacoustic wave. Thus, melanoma patient's blood samples can be enriched, leaving the melanoma in a white blood cell (WBC) suspension. Irradiated melanoma cells produce photoacoustic waves, which are detected with a piezoelectric transducer, while the optically transparent WBCs create no signals. Here we report an isolation scheme utilizing two-phase flow to separate detected melanoma from the suspension. By introducing two immiscible fluids through a t-junction into one flow path, the analytes are compartmentalized. Therefore, the slug in which the melanoma cell is located can be identified and extracted from the system. Two-phase immiscible flow is a label free technique, and could be used for other types of pathological analytes.

  14. Giant tumor thrombus in the right atrium clearly detected by /sup 111/In-oxine labeled platelet scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, T; Ishikawa, N; Satoh, A; Masuda, Y; Hiramatsu, Y; Akisada, M; Sakakibara, Y

    1985-07-01

    A 54-year-old man was admitted to hospital with a 3-month history of progressive dyspnea with coughing. A giant right atrial mass, originating from a hepatocellular carcinoma, was visualized by computed tomography, and digital subtraction angiography. The volume if the right atrial mass was increasing rapidly. It was therefore essential to determine whether this giant mass was a tumor thrombus or a multiplication of the hepatocellular carcinoma. /sup 111/In-oxine labeled platelet scintigraphy revealed active accumulation in the right atrium caused by the presence of active platelet deposition, and slight accumulation in the lung fields probably due to embolic showers originating from the tumor thrombus in the right atrium. This is the first case report showing that /sup 111/In-oxine labeled platelet scintigraphy can aid in confirming the nature of a giant tumor thrombus in the right atrium and can clarify the pathogenesis of the respiratory symptoms.

  15. HaloTag protein-mediated specific labeling of living cells with quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So, Min-kyung; Yao Hequan; Rao Jianghong

    2008-01-01

    Quantum dots emerge as an attractive alternative to small molecule fluorophores as fluorescent tags for in vivo cell labeling and imaging. This communication presents a method for specific labeling of live cells using quantum dots. The labeling is mediated by HaloTag protein expressed at the cell surface which forms a stable covalent adduct with its ligand (HaloTag ligand). The labeling can be performed in one single step with quantum dot conjugates that are functionalized with HaloTag ligand, or in two steps with biotinylated HaloTag ligand first and followed by streptavidin coated quantum dots. Live cell fluorescence imaging indicates that the labeling is specific and takes place at the cell surface. This HaloTag protein-mediated cell labeling method should facilitate the application of quantum dots for live cell imaging

  16. 64Cu-Labeled Trastuzumab Fab-PEG24-EGF Radioimmunoconjugates Bispecific for HER2 and EGFR: Pharmacokinetics, Biodistribution, and Tumor Imaging by PET in Comparison to Monospecific Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Luke Yongkyu; Scollard, Deborah A; Reilly, Raymond M

    2017-02-06

    Heterodimerization of EGFR with HER2 coexpressed in breast cancer (BC) promotes tumor growth, and increased EGFR expression is associated with trastuzumab resistance. Our aim was to construct 64 Cu-labeled bispecific radioimmunoconjugates (bsRIC) composed of trastuzumab Fab, which binds HER2 linked through a polyethylene glycol (PEG 24 ) spacer to EGF, and to compare their pharmacokinetic, biodistribution, and tumor imaging characteristics by positron-emission tomography (PET). bsRICs were generated by linking maleimide modified trastuzumab Fab with thiolated EGF through a thioether bond. HER2 and EGFR binding were assessed in vitro in MDA-MB-231 (EGFR mod /HER2 low ), MDA-MB-468 (EGFR high /HER2 neg ), MDA-MB-231-H2N (EGFR mod /HER2 mod ), and SKOV3 (EGFR low /HER2 high ) cells by competition and saturation cell binding assays to estimate the dissociation constant (K d ). The elimination of the 64 Cu-NOTA-trastuzumab Fab-PEG 24 -EGF bsRICs from the blood of Balb/c mice was compared to monospecific 64 Cu-NOTA-trastuzumab Fab and 64 Cu-NOTA-EGF. MicroPET/CT imaging was performed in NOD/SCID mice bearing subcutaneous MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-231/H2N, or SKOV3 human BC xenografts at 24 and 48 h postinjection (p.i.) of bsRICs. Tumor and normal tissue uptake were quantified by biodistribution studies and compared to monospecific agents. The binding of bsRICs to MDA-MB-231 cells was decreased to 24.5 ± 5.2% by excess EGF, while the binding of bsRICs to SKOV3 cells was decreased to 38.6 ± 5.4% by excess trastuzumab Fab, demonstrating specific binding to both EGFR and HER2. 64 Cu-labeled bsRICs incorporating the PEG 24 spacer were eliminated more slowly from the blood than 64 Cu-bsRICs without the PEG spacer and were cleared much more slowly than 64 Cu-NOTA-Fab or 64 Cu-NOTA-EGF. All three tumor xenografts were visualized by microPET/CT at 24 and 48 h p.i. of bsRICs. Biodistribution studies at 48 h p.i. in NOD/SCID mice with MDA-MB-231/H2N tumors demonstrated significantly

  17. Metaphyseal giant cell tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, L.F.; Hemais, P.M.P.G.; Aymore, I.L.; Carmo, M.C.R. do; Cunha, M.E.P.R. da; Resende, C.M.C.

    1986-01-01

    Three cases of metaphyseal giant cell tumor are presented. A review of the literature is done, demostrating the lesion is rare and that there are few articles about it. Age incidence and characteristics of the tumor are discussed. (Author) [pt

  18. Synthesis and Bioevaluation of Iodine-131 Directly Labeled Cyclic RGD-PEGylated Gold Nanorods for Tumor-Targeted Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Radiolabeled gold nanoparticles play an important role in biomedical application. The aim of this study was to prepare iodine-131 (131I-labeled gold nanorods (GNRs conjugated with cyclic RGD and evaluate its biological characteristics for targeted imaging of integrin αvβ3-expressing tumors. Methods. HS-PEG(5000-COOH molecules were applied to replace CTAB covering the surface of bare GNRs for better biocompatibility, and c(RGDfK peptides were conjugated onto the carboxyl terminal of GNR-PEG-COOH via EDC/NHS coupling reactions. The nanoconjugate was characterized, and 131I was directly tagged on the surface of GNRs via AuI bonds for SPECT/CT imaging. We preliminarily studied the characteristics of the probe and its feasibility for tumor-targeting SPECT/CT imaging. Results. The [131I]GNR-PEG-cRGD probe was prepared in a simple and rapid manner and was stable in both PBS and fetal bovine serum. It targeted selectively and could be taken up by tumor cells mainly via integrin αvβ3-receptor-mediated endocytosis. In vivo imaging, biodistribution, and autoradiography results showed evident tumor uptake in integrin αvβ3-expressing tumors. Conclusions. These promising results showed that this smart nanoprobe can be used for angiogenesis-targeted SPECT/CT imaging. Furthermore, the nanoprobe possesses a remarkable capacity for highly efficient photothermal conversion in the near-infrared region, suggesting its potential as a multifunctional theranostic agent.

  19. Antigen localization controls T cell-mediated tumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeelenberg, Ingrid S; van Maren, Wendy W C; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Van Hout-Kuijer, Maaike A; Den Brok, Martijn H M G M; Wagenaars, Jori A L; van der Schaaf, Alie; Jansen, Eric J R; Amigorena, Sebastian; Théry, Clotilde; Figdor, Carl G; Adema, Gosse J

    2011-08-01

    Effective antitumor immunotherapy requires the identification of suitable target Ags. Interestingly, many of the tumor Ags used in clinical trials are present in preparations of secreted tumor vesicles (exosomes). In this study, we compared T cell responses elicited by murine MCA101 fibrosarcoma tumors expressing a model Ag at different localizations within the tumor cell in association with secreted vesicles (exosomes), as a nonsecreted cell-associated protein, or as secreted soluble protein. Remarkably, we demonstrated that only the tumor-secreting vesicle-bound Ag elicited a strong Ag-specific CD8(+) T cell response, CD4(+) T cell help, Ag-specific Abs, and a decrease in the percentage of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells in the tumor. Moreover, in a therapeutic tumor model of cryoablation, only in tumors secreting vesicle-bound Ag could Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells still be detected up to 16 d after therapy. We concluded that the localization of an Ag within the tumor codetermines whether a robust immunostimulatory response is elicited. In vivo, vesicle-bound Ag clearly skews toward a more immunogenic phenotype, whereas soluble or cell-associated Ag expression cannot prevent or even delay outgrowth and results in tumor tolerance. This may explain why particular immunotherapies based on these vesicle-bound tumor Ags are potentially successful. Therefore, we conclude that this study may have significant implications in the discovery of new tumor Ags suitable for immunotherapy and that their location should be taken into account to ensure a strong antitumor immune response.

  20. Radiation induction of drug resistance in RIF-1 tumors and tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopwood, L.E.; Moulder, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    The RIF-1 tumor cell line contains a small number of cells (1-20 per 10(6) cells) that are resistant to various single antineoplastic drugs, including 5-fluorouracil (5FU), methotrexate (MTX), and adriamycin (ADR). For 5FU the frequency of drug resistance is lower for tumor-derived cells than for cells from cell culture; for MTX the reverse is true, and for ADR there is no difference. In vitro irradiation at 5 Gy significantly increased the frequency of drug-resistant cells for 5FU, MTX, and ADR. In vivo irradiation at 3 Gy significantly increased the frequency of drug-resistant cells for 5FU and MTX, but not for ADR. The absolute risk for in vitro induction of MTX, 5FU, and ADR resistance, and for in vivo induction of 5FU resistance, was 1-3 per 10(6) cells per Gy; but the absolute risk for in vivo induction of MTX resistance was 54 per 10(6) cells per Gy. The frequency of drug-resistant cells among individual untreated tumors was highly variable; among individual irradiated tumors the frequency of drug-resistant cells was significantly less variable. These studies provide supporting data for models of the development of tumor drug resistance, and imply that some of the drug resistance seen when chemotherapy follows radiotherapy may be due to radiation-induced drug resistance

  1. Influence on bionomics of endothelial progenitor cells labeling with magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai Xiaoli; Teng Gaojun; Ma Zhanlong; Sun Junhui; Zhang Yu; Gu Ning

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the influence of home synthesize magnetic iron oxide (called Fe 2 O 3 -PLL) labeling on peripheral blood endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) bionomics to provide experimental foundation for MR imaging ex and in vivo. Methods: Fe 2 O 3 was incubated with PLL for 2 hours to obtain a complex of Fe 2 O 3 -PLL. Rabbit peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and EPCs were selected by adherence method. Fe 2 O 3 -PLL was used to label EPCs. Prussian blue stain and electron microscope was used for showing intracellular iron. MTF assay was assessed to evaluate the difference of growth curve between unlabeled and labeled with 25 mg/L Fe 2 O 3 -PLL. Flow cytometry was performed to analyze cell cycle, cell apoptosis and the expression of surface markers of labeled and unlabeled cells. Expressions of eNOS, KDR and vWF at mRNA levels among unlabeled and labeled EPCs were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Calcium ion channel and membrane fluidity were observed and analyzed by laser confocal microscopy. Statistical analyses were used with ANOVA and t test. Results: Almost 100% cells were labeled by Fe 2 O 3 -PLL, iron-containing vesicles were intracytoplasma. There was no statistical difference in cells growth curve, cell life cycle [(93.74±3.52)%, (94.57±3.66)%] and cell apoptosis rate (12.89±1.81)%, (11.67±1.18)%) between labeling with Fe 2 O 3 -PLL at a concentration of 25 mg/L and unlabeled cells (t=0.283, P>0.05; t=0.977, P>0.05). There was also no statistical difference in relative amount of eNOS, KDR and vWF at mRNA levels and the expression of surface phenotypic markers (CD34, CD106, CD146 and KDR) between two groups (P>0.05). In addition, Labeling had little influence on calcium ion channel and didn't significantly alter cell membrane fluidity. Conclusions: The rabbit peripheral blood EPCs can be effective labeled with Fe 2 O 3 -PLL and without significant influence on cells bionomics at a low concentration of 25 mg

  2. Harnessing Dendritic Cells for Tumor Antigen Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nierkens, Stefan [Department of Tumor Immunology, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 28, Nijmegen 6525 GA (Netherlands); Janssen, Edith M., E-mail: edith.janssen@cchmc.org [Division of Molecular Immunology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Research Foundation, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2011-04-26

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that are crucial for the induction of anti-tumor T cell responses. As a consequence, research has focused on the harnessing of DCs for therapeutic interventions. Although current strategies employing ex vivo-generated and tumor-antigen loaded DCs have been proven feasible, there are still many obstacles to overcome in order to improve clinical trial successes and offset the cost and complexity of customized cell therapy. This review focuses on one of these obstacles and a pivotal step for the priming of tumor-specific CD8{sup +} and CD4{sup +} T cells; the in vitro loading of DCs with tumor antigens.

  3. In vivo tumor angiogenesis imaging with site-specific labeled 99mTc-HYNIC-VEGF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankenberg, Francis G.; Backer, Marina V.; Patel, Vimalkumar; Backer, Joseph M.; Levashova, Zoia

    2006-01-01

    We recently developed a cysteine-containing peptide tag (C-tag) that allows for site-specific modification of C-tag-containing fusion proteins with a bifunctional chelator, HYNIC (hydrazine nicotinamide)-maleimide. We then constructed and expressed C-tagged vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and labeled it with HYNIC. We wished to test 99m Tc-HYNIC-C-tagged VEGF ( 99m Tc-HYNIC-VEGF) for the imaging of tumor vasculature before and after antiangiogenic (low continuous dosing, metronomic) and tumoricidal (high-dose) cyclophosphamide treatment. HYNIC-maleimide was reacted with the two thiol groups of C-tagged VEGF without any effect on biologic activity in vitro. 99m Tc-HYNIC-VEGF was prepared using tin/tricine as an exchange reagent, and injected via the tail vein (200-300 μCi, 1-2 μg protein) followed by microSPECT imaging 1 h later. Sequencing analysis of HYNIC-containing peptides obtained after digestion confirmed the site-specific labeling of the two accessible thiol groups of C-tagged VEGF. Tumor vascularity was easily visualized with 99m Tc/VEGF in Balb/c mice with 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma 10 days after implantation into the left axillary fat pad in controls (12.3±5.0 tumor/bkg, n=27) along with its decrease following treatment with high (150 mg/kg q.o.d. x 4; 1.14±0.48 tumor/bkg, n=9) or low (25 mg/kg q.d. x 7; 1.03±0.18 tumor/bkg, n=9) dose cyclophosphamide. Binding specificity was confirmed by observing a 75% decrease in tumor uptake of 99m Tc/biotin-inactivated VEGF, as compared with 99m Tc-HYNIC-VEGF. 99m Tc can be loaded onto C-tagged VEGF in a site-specific fashion without reducing its bioactivity. 99m Tc-HYNIC-VEGF can be rapidly prepared for the imaging of tumor vasculature and its response to different types of chemotherapy. (orig.)

  4. Inhibition of hepatocyte gap junctional intercellular communication by tumor promoters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruch, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanisms by which tumor promoters enhance neoplasia are poorly understood. One effect common to most tumor promoters is their ability to inhibit the cell-to-cell exchange of small molecules and ions through gap junctions, i.e., gap junctional intercellular communication (IC). IC maybe necessary for normal growth control and the loss of IC may predispose cells to enhanced growth. In the present studies, the effects of liver tumor promoters and other agents on IC between rodent hepatocytes in primary culture has been studied. IC was detected between hepatocytes: (1) autoradiographically following the passage and incorporation of [5- 3 H]uridine nucleotides from pre-labeled donor hepatocytes to non-labeled, adjacent recipient hepatocytes and (2) by fluorescence microscopy after microinjection of fluorescent Lucifer Yellow CH dye into hepatocytes and visualizing dye spread into adjacent hepatocytes

  5. Evaluation of technetium-99M labeled RGD-containing peptide as potential tumor imaging agents in tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Silong; Zeng Jun; Zhang Lihua

    2004-01-01

    Integrins (especially α v β 3 ) play a important role in angiogenesis, growth and metastasis of a solid tumor. Targeting tumor with radiolabeled ligands of the α V β 3 integrin may provide information about the receptor status and enable specific therapeutic strategy. A tripeptidic sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) is often the primary site of recognition by integrins. The aim of this study examine 99m Tc-labeled elevenfold peptide (GRGDSRGDSCY, GY11) that target the α V β 3 integrin to determine if this agent target tumors for diagnostic imaging and/or targeted radiotherapy of cancer. Methods: GY11 was radiolabelled with 99 Tc m via cystine residue by means of stannous chloride. 99 Tc m -GY11 was injected through tail vein into nude mice bearing A375 human melanoma. Biodistribution was investigated at 1,2,4 and 6 hours after injection. Percentage injected dose/gram of tissue (%ID/g) and tumor/non-tumor ratios were calculated. Planar images were acquired with SPECT at 1,2,4,6hrs, respectively. Results: 99 Tc m -GY11 was rapidly cleared from blood and excreted predominantly from the kidney. Tumor uptake at 2h postinjection was 3.1%ID/g. The ratios of tumor/blood and tumor/muscle increased from 0.9-6.2, 4.3-13.5 from 1-6hrs postinjection, respectively. Planar images confirmed that tumor could be visualized at 4h after administration of 99 Tc m -GY11. Conclusion: The results suggest that 99 Tc m -GY11 is a promising compound for noninvasive determining the α V β 3 integrin status. 99 Tc m -GY11 SPECT may be useful to imaging α V β 3 -positive tumor and also guide proper utility of α V β 3 antagonist therapy and radionuclide therapy for cancer. (authors)

  6. NKT cells as an ideal anti-tumor immunotherapeutic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Shimizu, Kanako; Okamoto, Yoshitaka; Kunii, Naoki; Nakayama, Toshinori; Motohashi, Shinichiro; Taniguchi, Masaru

    2013-12-02

    Human natural killer T (NKT) cells are characterized by their expression of an invariant T cell antigen receptor α chain variable region encoded by a Vα24Jα18 rearrangement. These NKT cells recognize α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) in conjunction with the MHC class I-like CD1d molecule and bridge the innate and acquired immune systems to mediate efficient and augmented immune responses. A prime example of one such function is adjuvant activity: NKT cells augment anti-tumor responses because they can rapidly produce large amounts of IFN-γ, which acts on NK cells to eliminate MHC negative tumors and also on CD8 cytotoxic T cells to kill MHC positive tumors. Thus, upon administration of α-GalCer-pulsed DCs, both MHC negative and positive tumor cells can be effectively eliminated, resulting in complete tumor eradication without tumor recurrence. Clinical trials have been completed in a cohort of 17 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancers and 10 cases of head and neck tumors. Sixty percent of advanced lung cancer patients with high IFN-γ production had significantly prolonged median survival times of 29.3 months with only the primary treatment. In the case of head and neck tumors, 10 patients who completed the trial all had stable disease or partial responses 5 weeks after the combination therapy of α-GalCer-DCs and activated NKT cells. We now focus on two potential powerful treatment options for the future. One is to establish artificial adjuvant vector cells containing tumor mRNA and α-GalCer/CD1d. This stimulates host NKT cells followed by DC maturation and NK cell activation but also induces tumor-specific long-term memory CD8 killer T cell responses, suppressing tumor metastasis even 1 year after the initial single injection. The other approach is to establish induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells that can generate unlimited numbers of NKT cells with adjuvant activity. Such iPS-derived NKT cells produce IFN-γ in vitro and in vivo upon

  7. In Vitro Efficient Expansion of Tumor Cells Deriving from Different Types of Human Tumor Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Turin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining human tumor cell lines from fresh tumors is essential to advance our understanding of antitumor immune surveillance mechanisms and to develop new ex vivo strategies to generate an efficient anti-tumor response. The present study delineates a simple and rapid method for efficiently establishing primary cultures starting from tumor samples of different types, while maintaining the immuno-histochemical characteristics of the original tumor. We compared two different strategies to disaggregate tumor specimens. After short or long term in vitro expansion, cells analyzed for the presence of malignant cells demonstrated their neoplastic origin. Considering that tumor cells may be isolated in a closed system with high efficiency, we propose this methodology for the ex vivo expansion of tumor cells to be used to evaluate suitable new drugs or to generate tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes or vaccines.

  8. The Role of Tumor Associated Macrophage in Recurrent Growth of Tumor Stem Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    recent cancer stem cell (CSC) theory, recurrent tumor must arise from a dormant tumor stem cell whose re-growth is triggered by shifting of...microenvironment. This project aims at clarifying the roles of TAM in recurrent growth of dormant stem cell in breast cancer. We hypothesize that the balance of...dormancy and recurrence is determined by the ability of the tumor stem cells to recruit TAM which in turn promotes self-renewal of the stem cell . We

  9. Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor (SLCT) is a rare cancer of the ovaries. The cancer cells produce and release a male sex hormone ... lead to cancer. SLCT starts in the female ovaries. The cancer cells release a male sex hormone. As a ...

  10. Immune response to UV-induced tumors: mediation of progressor tumor rejection by natural killer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streeter, P.R.; Fortner, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    Skin tumors induced in mice by chronic ultraviolet (UV) irradiation are highly antigenic and can induce a state of transplantation immunity in syngeneic animals. In the present study, the authors compared the in vitro cytolytic activity of splenic lymphocytes from mice immunized with either regressor or progressor UV-tumors. The results of this comparison implicated tumor-specific cytolytic T (Tc) lymphocytes in rejection of regressor UV-tumors, and revealed that immunization with the progressor UV-tumor 2237 failed to elicit detectable levels of progressor tumor-specific Tc cells even as the tumors rejected. Following in vitro resensitization of spleen cells from either regressor or progressor tumor immune animals, the authors found NK-like lymphocytes with anti-tumor activity. As the authors had not detected cells with this activity in splenic lymphocyte preparations prior to in vitro resensitization, the authors examined lymphocytes from the local tumor environment during the course of progressor tumor rejection for this activity. This analysis revealed NK lymphocytes exhibiting significant levels of cytolytic activity against UV-tumors. These results implicate NK cells as potential effector cells in the rejection of progressor UV-tumors by immune animals, and suggests that these cells may be regulated by T lymphocytes

  11. Should direct measurements of tumor oxygenation relate to the radiobiological hypoxic fraction of a tumor?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenton, Bruce M.; Kiani, Mohammad F.; Siemann, Dietmar W.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Numerous previous studies have attempted to relate the radiobiological hypoxic fraction (HF) to direct measures of tumor oxygenation such as HbO 2 saturations, tumor pO 2 levels, or hypoxic cell labeling. Although correlations have been found within tumor lines, no overall relationships were seen across tumor lines. The current objective was to examine the effect on HF of changes in the fractions of the oxygenated and anoxic tumor cells that remain clonogenic. Methods and Materials: A mathematical model was developed that relates the HF to direct measures of tumor oxygenation. The primary assumptions were that: (a) the tumor is divided into distinct compartments of either fully oxygenated or fully anoxic cells, and (b) the survival of the oxygenated cells is negligible compared to that of the anoxic cells. Based on these assumptions, the HF is plotted as a function of the fractions of clonogenic or nonclonogenic, and oxygenated or anoxic cells. Results: If all cells are clonogenic, then the HF equals the fraction of anoxic cells. If a higher fraction of anoxic than oxygenated cells are nonclonogenic, then the HF will be overestimated by the fraction of the tumor measured to be anoxic using direct measuring techniques. If a higher fraction of the oxygenated than anoxic cells are nonclonogenic, the HF will be underestimated by the fraction of anoxic cells. Conclusion: Correlations between the HF and direct measures of tumor oxygenation have been described within tumor lines evaluated under different physiological condition. However, such relationships can be totally unpredictable between different tumors if the fraction of the anoxic cells that is clonogenic varies substantially. Clearly, if tumor anoxia cannot be detected using direct measures, this is an accurate indication that the tumor is well oxygenated. When tumor anoxia is present, however, the conclusions are ambiguous. Even when a small fraction of the tumor is measured as anoxic, direct measures

  12. Different cell moieties and white blood cell (WBC) integrity in In-111 labeled WBC preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, G.B.; Feiglin, D.H.I.; McMahon, J.T.; Go, R.T.; O'Donnell, J.K.; MacIntyre, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    Indium-111 labeled white blood cells (WBC) have become very popular in detecting inflammatory diseases. The purpose of this paper is to determine the distribution of different types of cells in WBC preparation for In-111 oxine labeling, and also to assess the histological integrity of WBC's after labeling with In-111 oxine. Forty to fifty cc of blood was collected from each patient and WBC's were separated by sedimentation and centrifugation. After labeling with In-111 oxine, an aliquot of the WBC sample was used for cell counting and a second aliquot was used for electron microscopic (EM) examination. The different cell moieties were counted, and the mean and standard deviation of twelve determinations calculated. Cells were prepared by the standard technique for electron microscopic examination and images of the cells were obtained at different magnifications (X8,000-25,000). The EM images revealed that although minimal cytoplasmic vacuolization occurred in the WBC's due to the labeling process, the overall histological integrity of the cells remained intact. The relative labeling efficiency of WBC's is greater than those of RBC's and platelets (J Nuc) Med 25:p98, 1984) and, therefore, even a comparatively low population of WBC's gives optimal imaging due to their increased tracer uptake

  13. Next-generation detection of antigen-responsive T cells using DNA barcode-labeled peptidemajor histocompatibility complex I multimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Amalie Kai; Marquard, Andrea Marion; Lyngaa, Rikke Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    diversity of T cell recognition in humans. Consequently it has been impossible to comprehensively analyze T cell responsiveness in cancer, infectious and autoimmune diseases. We present and validate a novel technology that enables parallel detection of numerous different peptide-MHC responsive T cells...... with combinatorial encoding of fluorescent-labeled MHC multimers. Finally, we have demonstrated that this technology can be applied for multiplex T cell detection both in limited biological samples, such as uncultured tumor material, and for simultaneous assessment of target recognition and functional capability...... of T cells. This technology enables true high-throughput detection of antigen-responsive T cells and will advance our understanding of immune recognition from model antigens to genomewide immune assessments on a personalized basis....

  14. Demonstration of tumor-associated antigens in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, R.P.; Tsoi, M.S.; Henderson, B.H.; Weiden, P.L.; Storb, R.

    1975-01-01

    Procedures for the 51 Cr release assay using labeled L cells or lymphocytes and the indirect leukocyte migration test are described. These assays appear capable of detecting cellular immunity against tumor associated antigens in dogs. In 8 of 14 instances, lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity to autochthonous L cells was found as measured by 51 Cr release, and lymphocytes from 12 of 24 dogs produced the migration inhibition factor (MIF) when cultured with autochthonous tumor cells. Chromium-51 release occurred with 4 h of exposure of effector cells to target cells, suggesting that the immunity detected in the tumor dogs against their tumors is also present in vivo. With the leukocyte migration test, however, consistent MIF production was achieved only after 3 to 6 days in culture, suggesting that in vitro sensitization may result in increased MIF production

  15. Preparation and preclinical evaluation of 211At-labelled compounds for α-particle radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R.H.

    1994-01-01

    The present work demonstrate that significant therapeutic gain can be achieved with 211 At-labelled MoAbs on single tumour cells and microscopic disease. Β-emitters are less effective on microscopic disease because of radiation dispersion, while longer halflives (e.g., 90 Y and 131 I) allow favourable therapeutic ratios to be reached in larger tumors. 211 At-labelled MoAbs may therefore possibly be used in combination with β-emitting RIC in systemically delivered radioimunnotherapy. Larger tumor nodules are then irradiated effectively due to cross-fire of the longer ranged β-particles while the fraction of tumour cells distributed as single cells and micrometastases may be more effectively radiated with 211 At-RIC. 76 refs

  16. Evaluation of expansile nanoparticle tumor localization and efficacy in a cancer stem cell-derived model of pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Victoria LM; Colby, Aaron H; Tan, Glaiza AL; Moran, Ann M; O’Brien, Michael J; Colson, Yolonda L; Ruiz-Opazo, Nelson; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the tumor localization and efficacy pH-responsive expansile nanoparticles (eNPs) as a drug delivery system for pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis (PPC) modeled in nude rats. Methods & materials: A Panc-1-cancer stem cell xeno1graft model of PPC was validated in vitro and in vivo. Tumor localization was tracked via in situ imaging of fluorescent eNPs. Survival of animals treated with paclitaxel-loaded eNPs (PTX-eNPs) was evaluated in vivo. Results: The Panc-1-cancer stem cell xenograft model recapitulates significant features of PPC. Rhodamine-labeled eNPs demonstrate tumor-specific, dose- and time-dependent localization to macro- and microscopic tumors following intraperitoneal injection. PTX-eNPs are as effective as free PTX in treating established PPC; but, PTX-eNPs result in fewer side effects. Conclusion: eNPs are a promising tool for the detection and treatment of PPC. PMID:27078118

  17. Precision cancer immunotherapy: optimizing dendritic cell-based strategies to induce tumor antigen-specific T-cell responses against individual patient tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takuya; Nagaoka, Koji; Takahara, Masashi; Yang, Xiao Yi; Liu, Cong-Xiao; Guo, Hongtao; Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Hobeika, Amy; Hartman, Zachary; Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2015-05-01

    Most dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines have loaded the DC with defined antigens, but loading with autologos tumor-derived antigens would generate DCs that activate personalized tumor-specific T-cell responses. We hypothesized that DC matured with an optimized combination of reagents and loaded with tumor-derived antigens using a clinically feasible electroporation strategy would induce potent antitumor immunity. We first studied the effects on DC maturation and antigen presentation of the addition of picibanil (OK432) to a combination of zoledronic acid, tumor necrosis factor-α, and prostaglandin E2. Using DC matured with the optimized combination, we tested 2 clinically feasible sources of autologous antigen for electroloading, total tumor mRNA or total tumor lysate, to determine which stimulated more potent antigen-specific T cells in vitro and activated more potent antitumor immunity in vivo. The combination of tumor necrosis factor-α/prostaglandin E2/zoledronic acid/OK432 generated DC with high expression of maturation markers and antigen-specific T-cell stimulatory function in vitro. Mature DC electroloaded with tumor-derived mRNA [mRNA electroporated dendritic cell (EPDC)] induced greater expansion of antigen-specific T cells in vitro than DC electroloaded with tumor lysate (lysate EPDC). In a therapeutic model of MC38-carcinoembryonic antigen colon cancer-bearing mice, vaccination with mRNA EPDC induced the most efficient anti-carcinoembryonic antigen cellular immune response, which significantly suppressed tumor growth. In conclusion, mature DC electroloaded with tumor-derived mRNA are a potent cancer vaccine, especially useful when specific tumor antigens for vaccination have not been identified, allowing autologous tumor, and if unavailable, allogeneic cell lines to be used as an unbiased source of antigen. Our data support clinical testing of this strategy.

  18. Glycophenotype evaluation in cutaneous tumors using lectins labeled with acridinium ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Luiza Rayanna Amorim; Bezerra, Matheus Filgueira; Almeida, Sinara Mônica Vitalino; Silva, Lúcia Patrícia Bezerra Gomes; Beltrão, Eduardo Isidoro Carneiro; Carvalho Júnior, Luiz Bezerra

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cells show alterations in their glycosylation patterns when compared to normal cells. Lectins can be used to evaluate these glycocode changes. Chemiluminescence assay is an effective technique for quantitative analysis of proteins, nucleic acids, and carbohydrates due to its high sensitivity, specificity, and rapid testing. To use histochemiluminescence based on lectin conjugated to acridinium ester (AE) for the investigation of glycophenotype changes in cutaneous tumors. Concanavalin A (Con A), Peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I), and Maackia amurensis agglutinin (MAA) were conjugated to acridinium ester. Biopsies of cutaneous tumors and normal skin were incubated with the lectins-AE, and chemiluminescence was quantified and expressed as Relative Light Units (RLU). Results. Actinic keratosis (AK), keratoacanthoma (KA), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) showed lower expression of α -D-glucose/mannose and α -L-fucose residues compared to normal tissue. Cutaneous tumors displayed higher expression of Gal- β (1-3)-GalNAc residues than normal tissue. AK and SCC exhibited higher expression of Neu5Ac- α (2,3)Gal residues than normal epidermis. KA and BCC showed equivalent RLU values compared to normal tissue. Lectin histochemiluminescence allowed quantitative assessment of the carbohydrate expression in cutaneous tissues, contributing to eliminate the subjectivity of conventional techniques used in the histopathological diagnosis.

  19. Radioimmunoimaging of tumors with a pantumor antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, D.C.P.; Siegel, M.E.; Chen, F.; Taylor, O.R.; Epstein, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    The TNT-1 antibody was developed to bind intracellular nuclear antigens that are accessible only in degenerative or necrotic cells. Since about 50% of tumor cells are in various stages of cell degeneration or death, this antibody could serve as a pantumor antibody for tumor detection. After intravenous injection of 10 μg of TNT-1F(ab')2 fragments labeled with 20 μCi of I-131, serial images were obtained at 1 and 4 hours and daily for 6 days in mice bearing various human tumors. Accumulation of TNT-1 was imaged in a necrotic tumor as early as 4 hours after injection and because more intense at 48 hours. The tumor-muscle ratio was as high as 29:1. Intense accumulation was noted in the necrotic tumor, about nine times that of healthy tumor. In conclusion, TNT-1, a pantumor antibody, can detect necrotic tumors in animal models. It may be an ideal imaging agent for cancer detection

  20. Granular cell tumor: An uncommon benign neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirthankar Gayen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Granular cell tumor is a distinctly rare neoplasm of neural sheath origin. It mainly presents as a solitary asymptomatic swelling in the oral cavity, skin, and rarely internal organs in the middle age. Histopathology is characteristic, showing polyhedral cells containing numerous fine eosinophilic granules with indistinct cell margins. We present a case of granular cell tumor on the back of a 48-year-old woman which was painful, mimicking an adnexal tumor.

  1. Labeled estrogens as mammary tumor probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feenstra, A.

    1981-01-01

    In this thesis estrogens labeled with a gamma or positron emitting nuclide, called estrogen-receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals are investigated as mammary tumour probes. The requirements for estrogen-receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals are formulated and the literature on estrogens labeled for this purpose is reviewed. The potential of mercury-197/197m and of carbon-11 as label for estrogen-receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals is investigated. The synthesis of 197 Hg-labeled 4-mercury-estradiol and 2-mercury-estradiol and their properties in vitro and in vivo are described. It appears that though basically carbon-11 labeled compounds are very promising as mammary tumour probes, their achievable specific activity has to be increased. (Auth.)

  2. Dynamic interaction of 111indium-labeled monoclonal antibodies with surface antigens of solid tumors visualized in vivo by external scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, K.M.; Keenan, A.M.; Frincke, J.; David, G.; Pearson, J.; Oldham, R.K.; Morgan, A.C. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Two 111 indium-labeled murine monoclonal antibodies (MoAb), D3 and 9.2.27, directed to tumor antigens of L-10 hepatocarcinoma and human melanoma, respectively, selectively localized antigen-positive target cells in guinea pigs and nude mice. The fate of MoAb differed in the two antigen-antibody systems after reacting with their corresponding tumor antigens in vivo as reflected by patterns of distribution and turnover in vivo. The 9.2.27 localized in melanoma xenograft in nude mice after intravenous administration with slow loss from tumor but more rapid loss from normal tissues and thus demonstrated optimal imaging of small tumors (approximately equal to 5 mm) between 3 and 6 days after injection of the radiolabeled antibody. In contrast, D3 demonstrated a biphasic localization in guinea pig L-10 hepatocarcinoma with a maximal activity on the 2d day after administration and showed rapid loss from both tumor and normal tissues. Nonspecific localization of antibodies in liver and in kidney was found both in syngeneic (nude mice) and xenogeneic (guinea pig) hosts but was more pronounced in the xenogeneic species. These results indicate that the nature of the antigen-antibody interaction may be of importance in selecting MoAb for both diagnosis and therapy of malignant diseases

  3. Quantitative imaging of magnesium distribution at single-cell resolution in brain tumors and infiltrating tumor cells with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Subhash; Parker, Dylan J.; Barth, Rolf F.; Pannullo, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the deadliest forms of human brain tumors. The infiltrative pattern of growth of these tumors includes the spread of individual and/or clusters of tumor cells at some distance from the main tumor mass in parts of the brain protected by an intact blood-brain-barrier. Pathophysiological studies of GBM could be greatly enhanced by analytical techniques capable of in situ single-cell resolution measurements of infiltrating tumor cells. Magnesium homeostasis is an area of active investigation in high grade gliomas. In the present study, we have used the F98 rat glioma as a model of human GBM and an elemental/isotopic imaging technique of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), a CAMECA IMS-3f ion microscope, for studying Mg distributions with single-cell resolution in freeze-dried brain tissue cryosections. Quantitative observations were made on tumor cells in the main tumor mass, contiguous brain tissue, and infiltrating tumor cells in adjacent normal brain. The brain tissue contained a significantly lower total Mg concentration of 4.70 ± 0.93 mmol/Kg wet weight (mean ± SD) in comparison to 11.64 ± 1.96 mmol/Kg wet weight in tumor cells of the main tumor mass and 10.72 ± 1.76 mmol/Kg wet weight in infiltrating tumor cells (p<0.05). The nucleus of individual tumor cells contained elevated levels of bound Mg. These observations demonstrate enhanced Mg-influx and increased binding of Mg in tumor cells and provide strong support for further investigation of GBMs for altered Mg homeostasis and activation of Mg-transporting channels as possible therapeutic targets. PMID:26703785

  4. Tumors of germinal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plazas, Ricardo; Avila, Andres

    2002-01-01

    The tumors of germinal cells (TGC) are derived neoplasia of the primordial germinal cells that in the life embryonic migrant from the primitive central nervous system until being located in the gonads. Their cause is even unknown and they represent 95% of the testicular tumors. In them, the intention of the treatment is always healing and the diagnostic has improved thanks to the results of the handling multidisciplinary. The paper includes topics like their incidence and prevalence, epidemiology and pathology, clinic and diagnoses among other topics

  5. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  6. Preparation, radioiodination and in vitro evaluation of a nido-carborane-dextran conjugate, a potential residualizing label for tumor targeting proteins and peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolmachev, V.; Bruskin, A.; Uppsala University; Sjoeberg, S.; Carlsson, J.; Lundqvist, H.

    2004-01-01

    Polysaccharides are not degradable by proteolytic enzymes in lysosomes and do not diffuse through cellular membranes. Thus, attached to an internalizing, targeting protein, such polysaccharide linkers, will remain intracellularly after protein degradation. They can be labeled with halogens and provide then a so called residualizing label. Such an approach improves tumor-to-non-tumor radioactivity ratio and, consequently, the results of radionuclide diagnostics and therapy. A new approach to obtain a stable halogenation of the polysaccharide dextran using 7-(3-amino-propyl)-7,8-dicarba-nido-undecaborate (-) (ANC) is presented. Dextran T10 was partially oxidized by metaperiodate, and ANC was coupled to dextran by reductive amination. The conjugate was then labeled with 125 I using either Chloramine-T or IodoGen as oxidants. Labeling efficiency was 69-85%. Stability of the label was evaluated in rat liver homogenates. Under these conditions, the ANC-dextran conjugate was found to be more stable than labeled albumin, which was used as a control protein. (author)

  7. Effect of Chelator Conjugation Level and Injection Dose on Tumor and Organ Uptake of 111In Labeled MORAb-009, an Anti-mesothelin Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, I. S.; Lee, S.-M.; Kim, H. S.; Yao, Z.; Regino, C.; Sato, N.; Cheng, K. T.; Hassan, R.; Campo, M. F.; Albone, E. F.; Choyke, P. L.; Pastan, I.; Paik, C. H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Radiolabeling of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) with a metallic radionuclide requires the conjugation of a bifunctional chelator to the mAb. The conjugation, however, can alter the physical and immunological properties of the mAb, consequently affecting its tumor targeting pharmacokinetics. In this study, we investigated the effect of the amount of 2-(p-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-cyclohexyl-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (CHX-A″) conjugated to MORAb-009, a mAb directed against mesothelin and the effect of MORAb dose on the biodistribution of 111In labeled MORAb-009. Methods We used nude mice bearing A431/K5 tumor as a mesothelin-positive tumor model and A431 tumor as a mesothelin-negative control. To find the optimal level of CHX-A″ conjugation, CHX-A″-MORAb-009 conjugates with 2.4, 3.5, and 5.5 CHX-A″ molecules were investigated. To investigate the effect of injected MORAb-009 dose on neutralizing the shed-mesothelin in the circulation, the biodistribution studies were performed after the i.v. co-injection of the 111In labeled MORAb-009 (2.4 CHX-A″/MORAb-009) with three different doses, 0.2, 2, and 30 μg of MORAb-009. Results The tumor uptake in A431/K5 tumor was 4 times higher than that in A431 tumor, indicating that the tumor uptake in A431/K5 was mesothelin-mediated. The conjugate with 5.5 CHX-A″ showed a lower isoelectric point (pI) and lower immunoreactivity (IR) than the 2.4 CHX-A″ conjugate. These differences were reflected in biodistribution of the 111In label. The 111In labeled MORAb-009 conjugated with 2.4 CHX-A″ produced higher tumor uptake, and lower liver and spleen uptakes than the 5.5 CHX-A″ conjugate. The biodistribution studies also revealed that the tumor uptake was significantly affected by the injected MORAb-009 dose and tumor size. The 30 μg dose produced higher tumor uptake than the 0.2 and 2 μg doses whereas the 30 μg dose produced lower liver and spleen uptakes than the 0.2 μg dose. Conclusion This study

  8. Radiolabeled bivalent haptens for tumor immunodetection and radioimmunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruaz-Guyon, A.; Janevik-Ivanovska, E.; Raguin, O. [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Faculte' de Medecine, Paris (France); De Labriolle-Vaylet, C. [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Faculte' de Medecine, Paris (France); Hopital Saint-Antoine, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Paris (France); Barbet, J. [Universite' de la Mediterranee, Faculte' de Medecine, Marseille (France)

    2001-06-01

    The pre targeting technique referred to as the Affinity Enhancement System (AES) uses bispecific antibodies and radiolabeled bivalent haptens that bind cooperatively to target cells in vivo. Experimental and clinical data demonstrate that DTPA bivalent haptens can deliver large radiation doses to tumor cells with high tumor to normal tissue contrast ratios and long activity residence time in tumors. Preliminary clinical results of radioimmunotherapy of medullary thyroid carcinomas and lung cancers look promising. Very encouraging results in biodistribution and radioimmunotherapy experiments in animals have been obtained with new haptens bearing two histamine-hemisuccinate suitable for {sup 131}I, {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 188}Re labeling. Targeting isotopes to double antigen positive tumor cells provides a binding enhancement that increases specificity for tumor cells as compared to single antigen targeting on normal cells. This approach may be beneficial for targeting isotopes to B type acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Burkitt lymphoma, as well as others tumors co-expressing two markers of low specificity, and might increase tumor irradiation with minimal irradiation of normal cells.

  9. Radiolabeled bivalent haptens for tumor immunodetection and radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruaz-Guyon, A.; Janevik-Ivanovska, E.; Raguin, O.; De Labriolle-Vaylet, C.; Barbet, J.

    2001-01-01

    The pre targeting technique referred to as the Affinity Enhancement System (AES) uses bispecific antibodies and radiolabeled bivalent haptens that bind cooperatively to target cells in vivo. Experimental and clinical data demonstrate that DTPA bivalent haptens can deliver large radiation doses to tumor cells with high tumor to normal tissue contrast ratios and long activity residence time in tumors. Preliminary clinical results of radioimmunotherapy of medullary thyroid carcinomas and lung cancers look promising. Very encouraging results in biodistribution and radioimmunotherapy experiments in animals have been obtained with new haptens bearing two histamine-hemisuccinate suitable for 131 I, 99m Tc and 188 Re labeling. Targeting isotopes to double antigen positive tumor cells provides a binding enhancement that increases specificity for tumor cells as compared to single antigen targeting on normal cells. This approach may be beneficial for targeting isotopes to B type acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Burkitt lymphoma, as well as others tumors co-expressing two markers of low specificity, and might increase tumor irradiation with minimal irradiation of normal cells

  10. Malignant Solitary Fibrous Tumor Metastatic to Widely Invasive Hurthle Cell Thyroid Carcinoma: A Distinct Tumor-to-Tumor Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolson Kokohaare, Eva; Riva, Francesco M G; Bernstein, Jonathan M; Miah, Aisha B; Thway, Khin

    2018-04-01

    We illustrate a case of synchronous malignant solitary fibrous tumor of the thoracic cavity, and widely invasive thyroid Hurthle cell carcinoma. The Hurthle cell carcinoma was found to harbor distinct areas of malignant solitary fibrous tumor. This is a unique case of tumor-to-tumor metastasis that, to the best of our knowledge, has not been previously reported.

  11. CT and MRI of germ-cell tumors with metastasis or multi-located tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyagami, Mitsusuke; Tazoe, Makoto; Tsubokawa, Takashi

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-seven cases of germ-cell tumors were examined with a CT scan in our clinic. In the 11 cases of metastasis or multi-localized tumors, the CT findings were studied in connection with the MRI findings. There were 6 cases of germ-cell tumors which had broad infiltrating tumors with multiple lesions on first admission. Their tumor sites were different from that in cases of malignant glioma, being frequently localized in the pineal and/or the suprasellar region, on the wall of the third and/or lateral ventricle, and in the region of the basal ganglia. Five of the cases of germ-cell tumors had metastasis with various patterns connected to a remote area - that is, to spinal cords, to the ventricular wall and basal cistern of the brain stem by CSF dissemination, to a lung by hematogeneous metastasis, and to the peritoneal wall or organs by a V-P shunt. The CT findings of germ-cell tumors were correlated mainly with the results of the histological diagnosis; they were found not to differ with the tumor site. The germinoma in the suprasellar region had less calcification than in the pineal region. Cysts, calcification, and an enlargement of the lateral ventricle on the tumor side were frequently seen in the germinoma of the basal ganglia. On the MRI of 5 cases of germinoma, the T 1 -weighted image revealed a slightly low or iso signal intensity, while the T 2 -weighted image showed a high signal intensity. In the case of multiple tumor lesions, some cases demonstrated different CT findings and radiosensitivities for each tumor. The possibility of a multicentric origin for the tumors is thus suggested in some cases of germ-cell tumors. (author)

  12. Studies on the interaction between the Ehrlich ascites tumor cell and its fluid environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnani, B.

    1984-01-01

    In this dissertation, the glycolytic nature of the Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cell is disclosed both in vivo and in vitro by experiments challenging it with glucose. It is demonstrated that EAT cells can cause the extracellular pH to drop to values sufficiently acidic so as to inhibit EAT glycolysis. However, the extracellular fluid or the Ascites Supernatant Fluid (ASF) reduced the extent to which the pH dropped during EAT cell glycolysis. A comparison of the activities of the sera from tumor-bearing mice and normal mice revealed that the serumfrom the tumor-bearing mice reduced the pH fall generated by the EAT cell in the same way as did ASF; normal mouse serum had no such effect. The metabolic pathways utilized during glucose catabolism were examined by radio-respirometry and the results demonstrated that the high percentage of the glucose conversion to lactate occurred because of partial blockade of the TCA cycle. The databolism of glutamine, glutamic acid, asparagine, aspartic acid, and alanine was enhanced by ASF as determined by measuring 14 CO 2 from 14 C-labelled amino acids, with glutamine catabolism enhanced about three-fold. Fractionation experiments revealed that ASF contained a factor(s) responsible for this enhancement that had a molecular weight greater than 300,000 daltons and was heat-labile

  13. Tumor-homing effect of human mesenchymal stem cells in a TH-MYCN mouse model of neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Koseki; Kishida, Tsunao; Wakao, Junko; Tanaka, Tomoko; Higashi, Mayumi; Fumino, Shigehisa; Aoi, Shigeyoshi; Furukawa, Taizo; Mazda, Osam; Tajiri, Tatsuro

    2016-12-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are multipotent stem-like cells that are reported to have tumor-suppression effects and migration ability toward damaged tissues or tumors. The aim of this study was to analyze the tumor-homing ability of hMSCs and antitumor potency in a transgenic TH-MYCN mouse model of neuroblastoma (NB). hMSCs (3×10 6 ) labeled with DiR, a lipophilic near-infrared dye, were intraperitoneally (i.p.) or intravenously (i.v.) administered to the TH-MYCN mice. hMSC in vivo kinetics were assayed using the IVIS® imaging system for 24h after injection. Immunohistochemistry using human CD90 antibody was also performed to confirm the location of hMSCs in various organs and tumors. Furthermore, the survival curve of TH-MYCN mice treated with hMSCs was compared to a control group administered PBS. i.p. hMSCs were recognized in the tumors of TH-MYCN mice by IVIS. hMSCs were also located inside the tumor tissue. Conversely, most of the i.v. hMSCs were captured by the lungs, and migration into the tumors was not noted. There was no significant difference in the survival between the hMSC and control groups. The present study suggested that hMSCs may be potential tumor-specific therapeutic delivery vehicles in NB according to their homing potential to tumors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Labeling proteins on live mammalian cells using click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikić, Ivana; Kang, Jun Hee; Girona, Gemma Estrada; Aramburu, Iker Valle; Lemke, Edward A

    2015-05-01

    We describe a protocol for the rapid labeling of cell-surface proteins in living mammalian cells using click chemistry. The labeling method is based on strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) and strain-promoted inverse-electron-demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition (SPIEDAC) reactions, in which noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) bearing ring-strained alkynes or alkenes react, respectively, with dyes containing azide or tetrazine groups. To introduce ncAAs site specifically into a protein of interest (POI), we use genetic code expansion technology. The protocol can be described as comprising two steps. In the first step, an Amber stop codon is introduced--by site-directed mutagenesis--at the desired site on the gene encoding the POI. This plasmid is then transfected into mammalian cells, along with another plasmid that encodes an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA (RS/tRNA) pair that is orthogonal to the host's translational machinery. In the presence of the ncAA, the orthogonal RS/tRNA pair specifically suppresses the Amber codon by incorporating the ncAA into the polypeptide chain of the POI. In the second step, the expressed POI is labeled with a suitably reactive dye derivative that is directly supplied to the growth medium. We provide a detailed protocol for using commercially available ncAAs and dyes for labeling the insulin receptor, and we discuss the optimal surface-labeling conditions and the limitations of labeling living mammalian cells. The protocol involves an initial cloning step that can take 4-7 d, followed by the described transfections and labeling reaction steps, which can take 3-4 d.

  15. The role of tumor cell-derived connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) in pancreatic tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennewith, Kevin L; Huang, Xin; Ham, Christine M; Graves, Edward E; Erler, Janine T; Kambham, Neeraja; Feazell, Jonathan; Yang, George P; Koong, Albert; Giaccia, Amato J

    2009-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly aggressive and refractory to existing therapies. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is a fibrosis-related gene that is thought to play a role in pancreatic tumor progression. However, CCN2 can be expressed in a variety of cell types, and the contribution of CCN2 derived from either tumor cells or stromal cells as it affects the growth of pancreatic tumors is unknown. Using genetic inhibition of CCN2, we have discovered that CCN2 derived from tumor cells is a critical regulator of pancreatic tumor growth. Pancreatic tumor cells derived from CCN2 shRNA-expressing clones showed dramatically reduced growth in soft agar and when implanted s.c. We also observed a role for CCN2 in the growth of pancreatic tumors implanted orthotopically, with tumor volume measurements obtained by positron emission tomography imaging. Mechanistically, CCN2 protects cells from hypoxia-mediated apoptosis, providing an in vivo selection for tumor cells that express high levels of CCN2. We found that CCN2 expression and secretion was increased in hypoxic pancreatic tumor cells in vitro, and we observed colocalization of CCN2 and hypoxia in pancreatic tumor xenografts and clinical pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Furthermore, we found increased CCN2 staining in clinical pancreatic tumor tissue relative to stromal cells surrounding the tumor, supporting our assertion that tumor cell-derived CCN2 is important for pancreatic tumor growth. Taken together, these data improve our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for pancreatic tumor growth and progression, and also indicate that CCN2 produced by tumor cells represents a viable therapeutic target for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  16. Fluorescent Photo-conversion: A second chance to label unique cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellott, Adam J; Shinogle, Heather E; Moore, David S; Detamore, Michael S

    2015-03-01

    Not all cells behave uniformly after treatment in tissue engineering studies. In fact, some treated cells display no signs of treatment or show unique characteristics not consistent with other treated cells. What if the "unique" cells could be isolated from a treated population, and further studied? Photo-convertible reporter proteins, such as Dendra2 , allow for the ability to selectively identify unique cells with a secondary label within a primary labeled treated population. In the current study, select cells were identified and labeled through photo-conversion of Dendra2 -transfected human Wharton's Jelly cells (hWJCs) for the first time. Robust photo-conversion of green-to-red fluorescence was achieved consistently in arbitrarily selected cells, allowing for precise cell identification of select hWJCs. The current study demonstrates a method that offers investigators the opportunity to selectively label and identify unique cells within a treated population for further study or isolation from the treatment population. Photo-convertible reporter proteins, such as Dendra2 , offer the ability over non-photo-convertible reporter proteins, such as green fluorescent protein, to analyze unique individual cells within a treated population, which allows investigators to gain more meaningful information on how a treatment affects all cells within a target population.

  17. Anti-tumor therapy with macroencapsulated endostatin producer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balduino Keli N

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Theracyte is a polytetrafluoroethylene membrane macroencapsulation system designed to induce neovascularization at the tissue interface, protecting the cells from host's immune rejection, thereby circumventing the problem of limited half-life and variation in circulating levels. Endostatin is a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis and tumor growth. Continuous delivery of endostatin improves the efficacy and potency of the antitumoral therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine whether recombinant fibroblasts expressing endostatin encapsulated in Theracyte immunoisolation devices can be used for delivery of this therapeutic protein for treatment of mice bearing B16F10 melanoma and Ehrlich tumors. Results Mice were inoculated subcutaneously with melanoma (B16F10 cells or Ehrlich tumor cells at the foot pads. Treatment began when tumor thickness had reached 0.5 mm, by subcutaneous implantation of 107 recombinant encapsulated or non-encapsulated endostatin producer cells. Similar melanoma growth inhibition was obtained for mice treated with encapsulated or non-encapsulated endostatin-expressing cells. The treatment of mice bearing melanoma tumor with encapsulated endostatin-expressing cells was decreased by 50.0%, whereas a decrease of 56.7% in tumor thickness was obtained for mice treated with non-encapsulated cells. Treatment of Ehrlich tumor-bearing mice with non-encapsulated endostatin-expressing cells reduced tumor thickness by 52.4%, whereas lower tumor growth inhibition was obtained for mice treated with encapsulated endostatin-expressing cells: 24.2%. Encapsulated endostatin-secreting fibroblasts failed to survive until the end of the treatment. However, endostatin release from the devices to the surrounding tissues was confirmed by immunostaining. Decrease in vascular structures, functional vessels and extension of the vascular area were observed in melanoma microenvironments. Conclusions This study indicates that

  18. Anti-tumor therapy with macroencapsulated endostatin producer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Danielle B; Chammas, Roger; Malavasi, Natália V; da Costa, Patrícia L N; Chura-Chambi, Rosa M; Balduino, Keli N; Morganti, Ligia

    2010-03-02

    Theracyte is a polytetrafluoroethylene membrane macroencapsulation system designed to induce neovascularization at the tissue interface, protecting the cells from host's immune rejection, thereby circumventing the problem of limited half-life and variation in circulating levels. Endostatin is a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis and tumor growth. Continuous delivery of endostatin improves the efficacy and potency of the antitumoral therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine whether recombinant fibroblasts expressing endostatin encapsulated in Theracyte immunoisolation devices can be used for delivery of this therapeutic protein for treatment of mice bearing B16F10 melanoma and Ehrlich tumors. Mice were inoculated subcutaneously with melanoma (B16F10 cells) or Ehrlich tumor cells at the foot pads. Treatment began when tumor thickness had reached 0.5 mm, by subcutaneous implantation of 107 recombinant encapsulated or non-encapsulated endostatin producer cells. Similar melanoma growth inhibition was obtained for mice treated with encapsulated or non-encapsulated endostatin-expressing cells. The treatment of mice bearing melanoma tumor with encapsulated endostatin-expressing cells was decreased by 50.0%, whereas a decrease of 56.7% in tumor thickness was obtained for mice treated with non-encapsulated cells. Treatment of Ehrlich tumor-bearing mice with non-encapsulated endostatin-expressing cells reduced tumor thickness by 52.4%, whereas lower tumor growth inhibition was obtained for mice treated with encapsulated endostatin-expressing cells: 24.2%. Encapsulated endostatin-secreting fibroblasts failed to survive until the end of the treatment. However, endostatin release from the devices to the surrounding tissues was confirmed by immunostaining. Decrease in vascular structures, functional vessels and extension of the vascular area were observed in melanoma microenvironments. This study indicates that immunoisolation devices containing endostatin

  19. INTERNALIZATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PEPTIDE ACIPENSIN 1 INTO HUMAN TUMOR CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Umnyakova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Search for new compounds providing delivery of drugs into infected or neoplastic cells, is an important direction of biomedical research. Cell-penetrating peptides are among those compounds, due to their ability to translocate through membranes of eukaryotic cells, serving as potential carriers of various therapeutic agents to the target cells. The aim of present work was to investigate the ability of acipensin 1, an antimicrobial peptide of innate immune system, for in vitro penetration into human tumor cells. Acipensin 1 is a cationic peptide that we have previously isolated from leukocytes of the Russian sturgeon, Acipenser gueldenstaedtii. Capability of acipensin 1 to enter the human erytroleukemia K-562 cells has been investigated for the first time. A biotechnological procedure for producing a recombinant acipensin 1 peptide has been developed. The obtained peptide was conjugated with a fluorescent probe BODIPY FL. By means of confocal microscopy, we have shown that the tagged acipensin 1 rapidly enters into K-562 cells and can be detected in the intracellular space within 5 min after its addition to the cell culture. Using flow cytometry technique, penetration kinetics of the labeled peptide into K-562 cells (at nontoxic micromolar concentrations has been studied. We have observed a rapid internalization of the peptide to the target cells, thus confirming the results of microscopic analysis, i.e, the labeled acipensin was detectable in K-562 cells as soon as wihin 2-3 seconds after its addition to the incubation medium. The maximum of fluorescence was reached within a period of approx. 45 seconds, with further “plateau” at the terms of >100 seconds following cell stimulation with the test compound. These data support the concept, that the antimicrobial peptides of innate immunity system possess the features of cell-penetrating peptides, and allow us to consider the studied sturgeon peptide a promising template for development of new

  20. Treatment Resistance Mechanisms of Malignant Glioma Tumor Stem Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmalz, Philip G.R.; Shen, Michael J.; Park, John K.

    2011-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are highly lethal because of their resistance to conventional treatments. Recent evidence suggests that a minor subpopulation of cells with stem cell properties reside within these tumors. These tumor stem cells are more resistant to radiation and chemotherapies than their counterpart differentiated tumor cells and may underlie the persistence and recurrence of tumors following treatment. The various mechanisms by which tumor stem cells avoid or repair the damaging effects of cancer therapies are discussed

  1. Evaluation of radioiodinated and radiocopper labeled monovalent fragments of monoclonal antibody chCE7 for targeting of neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrel, Francois; Amstutz, Hanspeter; Novak-Hofer, Ilse; Schubiger, P. August

    1997-01-01

    Monovalent fragments of antineuroblastoma antibody mAb chCE7 were evaluated for their in vitro and in vivo tumor cell binding properties. Single chain fragments were constructed from the variable region genes cloned from hybridoma cells, expressed in E.coli and purified by metal chelate affinity chromatography. Radioiodinated CE7-scFv fragments were found to bind with high affinity (K d ∼10 -9 M) to target cells in vitro but formed aggregates at 37 deg. C, and bound to serum proteins in vitro and in vivo. Circular Dichroism spectra revealed the protein to be in a conformationally altered form and no permanent 'refolding' could be achieved. In contrast, chCE7-Fab fragments were found to bind to target tumor cells with similar affinity than the parent mAb chCE7 (K d ∼10 -10 M), showed no tendency to aggregate and were stable in serum both in vitro and in vivo. Kinetics of association and dissociation of radioiodinated scFv and Fab fragments were found to be rapid. Radioiodination with the Iodogen method led to impaired immunoreactivity which was found to further increase the off- rates of radioiodinated fragments from tumor cells. Radioiodination with the Bolton-Hunter reagent as well as labeling of chCE7-Fab fragments with 67 Cu via the macrocyclic CPTA ligand led to fully immunoreactive Fab fragments. Radioiodinated and radiocopper labeled monovalent CE7 fragments did not internalize into target tumor cells as the parent mAb and its F(ab') 2 fragment. A comparison of the biodistribution in tumor bearing nude mice of the radiocopper labeled monovalent, non internalizing Fab fragments with the internalizing divalent F(ab') 2 fragments showed in both cases high levels of radioactivity in the kidneys. Concerning tumor uptake, radioactivity from both internalizing and non internalizing fragments remained associated with tumor tissue for longer times than in case of the corresponding radioiodinated fragments. When compared with the radioiodinated forms, tumor uptake

  2. Traceless affinity labeling of endogenous proteins for functional analysis in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Hamachi, Itaru

    2012-09-18

    Protein labeling and imaging techniques have provided tremendous opportunities to study the structure, function, dynamics, and localization of individual proteins in the complex environment of living cells. Molecular biology-based approaches, such as GFP-fusion tags and monoclonal antibodies, have served as important tools for the visualization of individual proteins in cells. Although these techniques continue to be valuable for live cell imaging, they have a number of limitations that have only been addressed by recent progress in chemistry-based approaches. These chemical approaches benefit greatly from the smaller probe sizes that should result in fewer perturbations to proteins and to biological systems as a whole. Despite the research in this area, so far none of these labeling techniques permit labeling and imaging of selected endogenous proteins in living cells. Researchers have widely used affinity labeling, in which the protein of interest is labeled by a reactive group attached to a ligand, to identify and characterize proteins. Since the first report of affinity labeling in the early 1960s, efforts to fine-tune the chemical structures of both the reactive group and ligand have led to protein labeling with excellent target selectivity in the whole proteome of living cells. Although the chemical probes used for affinity labeling generally inactivate target proteins, this strategy holds promise as a valuable tool for the labeling and imaging of endogenous proteins in living cells and by extension in living animals. In this Account, we summarize traceless affinity labeling, a technique explored mainly in our laboratory. In our overview of the different labeling techniques, we emphasize the challenge of designing chemical probes that allow for dissociation of the affinity module (often a ligand) after the labeling reaction so that the labeled protein retains its native function. This feature distinguishes the traceless labeling approach from the traditional

  3. Glycophenotype Evaluation in Cutaneous Tumors Using Lectins Labeled with Acridinium Ester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Rayanna Amorim Lima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tumor cells show alterations in their glycosylation patterns when compared to normal cells. Lectins can be used to evaluate these glycocode changes. Chemiluminescence assay is an effective technique for quantitative analysis of proteins, nucleic acids, and carbohydrates due to its high sensitivity, specificity, and rapid testing. Objective. To use histochemiluminescence based on lectin conjugated to acridinium ester (AE for the investigation of glycophenotype changes in cutaneous tumors. Methods. Concanavalin A (Con A, Peanut agglutinin (PNA, Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I, and Maackia amurensis agglutinin (MAA were conjugated to acridinium ester. Biopsies of cutaneous tumors and normal skin were incubated with the lectins-AE, and chemiluminescence was quantified and expressed as Relative Light Units (RLU. Results. Actinic keratosis (AK, keratoacanthoma (KA, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, and basal cell carcinoma (BCC showed lower expression of α-D-glucose/mannose and α-L-fucose residues compared to normal tissue. Cutaneous tumors displayed higher expression of Gal-β(1-3-GalNAc residues than normal tissue. AK and SCC exhibited higher expression of Neu5Ac-α(2,3Gal residues than normal epidermis. KA and BCC showed equivalent RLU values compared to normal tissue. Conclusions. Lectin histochemiluminescence allowed quantitative assessment of the carbohydrate expression in cutaneous tissues, contributing to eliminate the subjectivity of conventional techniques used in the histopathological diagnosis.

  4. Characterization of cell suspensions from solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallavicini, M.

    1985-01-01

    The desirable features of cells in suspension will necessarily be dependent upon the use for which the cells were prepared. Adequate cell yield or recovery is defined by the measurement to be performed. Retention of cellular morphology is important for microscopic identification of cell types in a heterogenous cell suspension, and may be used to determine whether the cells in suspension are representative of those in the tumor in situ. Different dispersal protocols may yield cells with different degrees of clonogenicity, as well as altered biochemical features, such as loss of cellular proteins, surface antigens, nucleotide pools, etc. The quality of the cell suspension can be judged by the degree of cell clumping and level of cellular debris, both of which impact on flow cytometric measurements and studies in which the number of cells be known accurately. Finally, if the data measured on the cells in suspension are to be extrapolated to phenomena occurring in the tumor in situ, it is desirable that the cells in suspension are representative of those in the solid tumor in vivo. This report compares characteristics of tumor cell suspensions obtained by different types of selected disaggregation methods. 33 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Immunogold labels: cell-surface markers in atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, Constant A.J.; Putman, C.A.J.; de Grooth, B.G.; Hansma, Paul K.; van Hulst, N.F.; Greve, Jan

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of using immunogold labels as cell-surface markers in atomic force microscopy is shown in this paper. The atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to image the surface of immunogold-labeled human lymphocytes. The lymphocytes were isolated from whole blood and labeled by an indirect

  6. Monoclonal antibodies and coupling reagents to cell membrane proteins for leukocyte labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAfee, J.G.; Gagne, G.; Subramanian, G.; Schneider, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    Current gamma-emitting agents for tagging leukocytes, In-111 oxine or tropolone, label all cell types indiscriminantly, and nuclear localization in lymphocytes results in radiation damage. Coupling reagents and murine monoclonal antibodies (Mab) specific for cell surface antigens of human leukocytes were tried as cell labeling agents to avoid nuclear localization. 10/sup 8/ mixed human leukocytes in Hepes buffer were added to tubes coated with 5 mg of dry cyclic dianhydride of DTPA for 15 minutes at room temperature. After washing, 0.1 ml of In-111 Cl in ACD (pH 6.8) was added. After 30 minutes, a cell labeling yield of 23% was obtained. Washing the cells in an elutriation centrifuge showed that this label was irreversible. Mab for cell surface antigens of human granulocytes were labeled with 300 μCi of I-125 using the Iodobead technic and unbound activity was removed by gel column chromatography. 1-10 μg were added to 10/sup 8/ mixed leukocytes in 0.5 ml plasma or saline for 1 hr. With Mab anti-leu M4 (clone G7 E11), an IgM, the cell labeling yield was 21%, irreversible, and specific for granulocytes. With anti-human leukocyte Mab NEI-042 (clone 9.4), and IgG2a, and anti-granulocyte Mab MAS-065 (clone FMCl1) an IgG1, the cell labeling was relatively unstable. Labeling of leukocyte subpopulations with Mab is feasible, and the binding of multivalent IgM is stronger than that of other immunoglobulins. DTPA cyclic anhydride is firmly bound to cell membranes, but the labeling is non-specific

  7. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a (18F-labeled high affinity NOTA conjugated bombesin antagonist as a PET ligand for GRPR-targeted tumor imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Varasteh

    Full Text Available Expression of the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR in prostate cancer suggests that this receptor can be used as a potential molecular target to visualize and treat these tumors. We have previously investigated an antagonist analog of bombesin (D-Phe-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Sta-Leu-NH2, RM26 conjugated to 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N',N''-triacetic acid (NOTA via a diethylene glycol (PEG2 spacer (NOTA-P2-RM26 labeled with (68Ga and (111In. We found that this conjugate has favorable properties for in vivo imaging of GRPR-expression. The focus of this study was to develop a (18F-labelled PET agent to visualize GRPR. NOTA-P2-RM26 was labeled with (18F using aluminum-fluoride chelation. Stability, in vitro binding specificity and cellular processing tests were performed. The inhibition efficiency (IC50 of the [(natF]AlF-NOTA-P2-RM26 was compared to that of the (natGa-loaded peptide using (125I-Tyr(4-BBN as the displacement radioligand. The pharmacokinetics and in vivo binding specificity of the compound were studied. NOTA-P2-RM26 was labeled with (18F within 1 h (60-65% decay corrected radiochemical yield, 55 GBq/µmol. The radiopeptide was stable in murine serum and showed high specific binding to PC-3 cells. [(natF]AlF-NOTA-P2-RM26 showed a low nanomolar inhibition efficiency (IC50=4.4±0.8 nM. The internalization rate of the tracer was low. Less than 14% of the cell-bound radioactivity was internalized after 4 h. The biodistribution of [(18F]AlF-NOTA-P2-RM26 demonstrated rapid blood clearance, low liver uptake and low kidney retention. The tumor uptake at 3 h p.i. was 5.5±0.7 %ID/g, and the tumor-to-blood, -muscle and -bone ratios were 87±42, 159±47, 38±16, respectively. The uptake in tumors, pancreas and other GRPR-expressing organs was significantly reduced when excess amount of non-labeled peptide was co-injected. The low uptake in bone suggests a high in vivo stability of the Al-F bond. High contrast PET image was obtained 3 h p

  8. Periurethral granular cell tumor: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong Kon; Choi, Hyo Gyeong; Cho, Kyoung Sik

    1998-01-01

    Granular cell tumors are uncommon soft tissue tumors which arise as solitary or multiple masses. Lesions commonly arise in the head, neck, and chest wall, but can occur in any part of the body. To our knowledge, periurethral granular cell tumor has not been previously reported. We report one such case

  9. [Circulating tumor cells: cornerstone of personalized medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, A; Vidal, F; Rathat, G; Alix-Panabières, C

    2014-11-01

    Cancer treatment has evolved toward personalized medicine. It is mandatory for clinicians to ascertain tumor biological features in order to optimize patients' treatment. Identification and characterization of circulating tumor cells demonstrated a prognostic value in many solid tumors. Here, we describe the main technologies for identification and characterization of circulating tumor cells and their clinical application in gynecologic and breast cancers. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. Micrometastatic cancer cells in bone marrow: in vitro detection with anti-cytokeratin and in vivo labeling with anti-17-1A monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlimok, G.; Funke, I.; Holzmann, B.

    1987-01-01

    The detection of early micrometastasis or disseminated single tumor cells poses a problem for conventional diagnosis procedures. Using a panel of monoclonal antibodies against cytokeratin and the 17-1A epithelial antigen the authors identified immunocytochemically tumor cells in bone marrow of patients with breast cancer and colorectal cancer at the time of surgery of the primary tumor. Monoclonal antibody CK2, recognizing the human cytokeratin component 18 in simple epithelia, appeared to be the most suitable reagent because of its negative reaction with bone marrow samples of the noncarcinoma patients. Its specificity was further demonstrated in a double-marker staining procedure using an anti-leukocyte common antigen monoclonal antibody (T200) as counterstain. A comparative analysis showed that immunocytology was clearly superior to conventional cytology and histology. In 9.5-20.5% of patients without distant metastasis, tumor cells could be detected in bone marrow. They found a significant correlation between tumor cells in bone marrow and conventional risk factors, such as distant metastasis or lymph node involvement. In a first approach toward immunotherapy they demonstrated in 3 patients that infused monoclonal antibody 17-1A can label single tumor cells in bone marrow in vivo. They then used this single approach to follow up on 7 patients undergoing 17-1A therapy in an adjuvant clinical trial

  11. Imaging of intraperitoneal tumors with technetium-99m GSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Zhengsheng; Zhang, Meili; Sakahara, Harumi; Saga, Tsuneo; Nakamoto, Yuji; Sato, Noriko; Zhao, Songji; Konishi, Junji; Arano, Yasushi

    1998-01-01

    99m Tc labeled galactosyl serum albumin (GSA) has been used clinically as a receptor-binding agent for the assessment of liver function. The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of 99m Tc-GSA in intraperitoneal (i.p.) tumor imaging. A tumor model was established by i.p. inoculating nude mice with human ovarian cancer cell SHIN-3, or colon cancer cell LS180. Radiolabels were i.p. injected into the tumor-bearing mice and the biodistribution of radioactivity was examined. After administration, 99m Tc-GSA rapidly accumulated in the tumor. The tumor uptake was 5.82-8.46% ID/g from 30 min to 6 h after the injection. Radioactivity in the blood was very low, less than 0.3% ID/g, resulting in high tumor-to-blood ratio. Tumors could be clearly seen by scintigraphic imaging. Accumulation of i.p.-injected 99m Tc labeled human serum albumin (HSA) in i.p. tumors was similar to that of 99m Tc-GSA, but radioactivity of 99m Tc-HSA in the circulation was high, resulting in a significantly lower tumor-to-blood ratio. In conclusion, 99m Tc-GSA, when i.p. injected, accumulated in i.p. tumors and cleared from circulation rapidly, which would make it useful for the imaging of i.p. tumors. (author)

  12. Tumor Immunology meets…Immunology: Modified cancer cells as professional APC for priming naïve tumor-specific CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou Nasser Eddine, Farah; Ramia, Elise; Tosi, Giovanna; Forlani, Greta; Accolla, Roberto S

    2017-01-01

    Although recent therapeutic approaches have revitalized the enthusiasm of the immunological way to combat cancer, still the comprehension of immunity against tumors is largely incomplete. Due to their specific function, CD8+ T cells with cytolytic activity (CTL) have attracted the attention of most investigators because CTL are considered the main effectors against tumor cells. Nevertheless, CTL activity and persistence is largely dependent on the action of CD4+ T helper cells (TH). Thus establishment of tumor-specific TH cell response is key to the optimal response against cancer. Here we describe emerging new strategies to increase the TH cell recognition of tumor antigens. In particular, we review recent data indicating that tumor cells themselves can act as surrogate antigen presenting cells for triggering TH response and how these findings can help in constructing immunotherapeutic protocols for anti-cancer vaccine development.

  13. Gold namoprtices enhance anti-tumor effect of radiotherapy to hypoxic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sun; Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Jae Won; Keum, Ki Chang; Koom, Woong Sub [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Ui Seok; Koh, Won Gun [Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Hypoxia can impair the therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapy (RT). Therefore, a new strategy is necessary for enhancing the response to RT. In this study, we investigated whether the combination of nanoparticles and RT is effective in eliminating the radioresistance of hypoxic tumors. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) consisting of a silica core with a gold shell were used. CT26 colon cancer mouse model was developed to study whether the combination of RT and GNPs reduced hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) was used as a hypoxia marker. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining were conducted to evaluate cell death. Hypoxic tumor cells had an impaired response to RT. GNPs combined with RT enhanced anti-tumor effect in hypoxic tumor compared with RT alone. The combination of GNPs and RT decreased tumor cell viability compare to RT alone in vitro. Under hypoxia, tumors treated with GNPs + RT showed a higher response than that shown by tumors treated with RT alone. When a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger was added, the enhanced antitumor effect of GNPs + RT was diminished. In the present study, hypoxic tumors treated with GNPs + RT showed favorable responses, which might be attributable to the ROS production induced by GNPs + RT. Taken together, GNPs combined with RT seems to be potential modality for enhancing the response to RT in hypoxic tumors.

  14. Gold namoprtices enhance anti-tumor effect of radiotherapy to hypoxic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Sun; Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Jae Won; Keum, Ki Chang; Koom, Woong Sub; Chung, Ui Seok; Koh, Won Gun

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia can impair the therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapy (RT). Therefore, a new strategy is necessary for enhancing the response to RT. In this study, we investigated whether the combination of nanoparticles and RT is effective in eliminating the radioresistance of hypoxic tumors. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) consisting of a silica core with a gold shell were used. CT26 colon cancer mouse model was developed to study whether the combination of RT and GNPs reduced hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) was used as a hypoxia marker. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining were conducted to evaluate cell death. Hypoxic tumor cells had an impaired response to RT. GNPs combined with RT enhanced anti-tumor effect in hypoxic tumor compared with RT alone. The combination of GNPs and RT decreased tumor cell viability compare to RT alone in vitro. Under hypoxia, tumors treated with GNPs + RT showed a higher response than that shown by tumors treated with RT alone. When a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger was added, the enhanced antitumor effect of GNPs + RT was diminished. In the present study, hypoxic tumors treated with GNPs + RT showed favorable responses, which might be attributable to the ROS production induced by GNPs + RT. Taken together, GNPs combined with RT seems to be potential modality for enhancing the response to RT in hypoxic tumors

  15. Optimization of dendritic cell loading with tumor cell lysates for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Paul; Merrick, Alison E; West, Emma; O'Donnell, Dearbhaile; Selby, Peter; Vile, Richard; Melcher, Alan A

    2008-09-01

    The immune response to cancer is critically determined by the way in which tumor cells die. As necrotic, stress-associated death can be associated with activation of antitumor immunity, whole tumor cell antigen loading strategies for dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccination have commonly used freeze-thaw "necrotic" lysates as an immunogenic source of tumor-associated antigens. In this study, the effect of such lysates on the ability of DCs to mature in response to well-established maturation stimuli was examined, and methods to enhance lysate-induced DC activation explored. Freeze-thaw lysates were prepared from murine tumor cell lines and their effects on bone marrow-derived DC maturation and function examined. Unmodified freeze-thaw tumor cell lysates inhibited the toll-like receptor-induced maturation and function of bone marrow-derived DCs, preventing up-regulation of CD40, CD86, and major histocompatibility complex class II, and reducing secretion of inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-12 p70, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and IL-6]. Although IL-10 secretion was increased by lysate-pulsed DCs, this was not responsible for the observed suppression of IL-12. Although activation of the nuclear factor-kappaB pathway remained intact, the kinase activity of phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase was inhibited in lysate-pulsed DCs. Lysate-induced DC suppression was partially reversed in vitro by induction of tumor cell stress before lysis, and only DCs loaded with stressed lysates afforded protection against tumor challenge in vivo. These data suggest that ex vivo freeze-thaw of tumor cells does not effectively mimic in vivo immunogenic necrosis, and advocates careful characterization and optimization of tumor cell-derived vaccine sources for cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Labelling and evaluation of /sup 99/Tcsup(m)-cyclophosphamide for tumor visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ercan, M T; Sarizi, T; Bekdik, C F [Hacettepe Univ. Medical Center, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    1977-05-01

    Cyclophosphamide, a chemotherapeutic drug, was labelled with sup(99m)Tc. The chemical nature and the in vitro stability of the labelled compound was tested by paper chromatography, ITLC and column chromatography. The biological distribution was studied in a group of ten normal mice and in another group of ten mice bearing an implanted fibrosarcoma. The tumour/muscle ratio was 4.1 +- 0.2 1 hr after the injection. In cancer patients, blood clearance and excretion of the agent in urine and faeces were followed for a period of 24 hr. The radioactive count rate in the normal and tumorous tissues was measured and compared in three patients with breast carcinoma. This ratio was 1.6 +- 0.3, 1 to 4 hr after the injection. In scintigraphic studies positive results were obtained in 12 out of 15 patients.

  17. Antibody guided targeting of non-small cell lung cancer using 111In-labeled HMFG1 F(ab')2 fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalofonos, H.P.; Sivolapenko, G.B.; Courtenay-Luck, N.S.

    1988-01-01

    Immunoscintigraphy using F(ab')2 fragments of tumor-associated monoclonal antibody HMFG1 was performed in 14 patients with primary and metastatic non-small cell carcinoma of lung cancer. The antibody was conjugated with diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid and labeled with 111 In. Quality control studies showed efficient incorporation of 111 In onto antibody (5 mCi/mg), no significant loss of immunoreactivity, and in vitro and in vivo stability. The optimal time for imaging was between 48 and 72 h. Following i.v. administration, serum activity fell rapidly (t1/2a = 2.5 +/- 1.3 (SD) h; t1/2b = 42 +/- 4.5 h). The majority of the radioactivity was associated with the plasma and not with the blood cells. All patients had a significant concentration of 111 In in the liver (approximately 20% of the injected dose, 48 h postadministration). No toxicity was encountered. No human antimurine-IgG antibody was detected in any of the patients within 4 months of follow-up, even in patients receiving two administrations of F(ab')2 fragments. Localization of all primary lesions and the majority (80%) of metastatic lesions was achieved. Seven of 14 patients were also studied using a 111 In-labeled nonspecific antibody (Fab')2 fragment (4C4). In three patients the specificity index was higher than the other four (P less than 0.05). We conclude that although successful targeting of 111 In-labeled (Fab')2 fragments of HMFG1 can be achieved in patients with non-small cell carcinoma of lung, observable tumor localization can also be achieved using a nonspecific antibody

  18. Energy and Redox Homeostasis in Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Fernandes de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells display abnormal morphology, chromosomes, and metabolism. This review will focus on the metabolism of tumor cells integrating the available data by way of a functional approach. The first part contains a comprehensive introduction to bioenergetics, mitochondria, and the mechanisms of production and degradation of reactive oxygen species. This will be followed by a discussion on the oxidative metabolism of tumor cells including the morphology, biogenesis, and networking of mitochondria. Tumor cells overexpress proteins that favor fission, such as GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1. The interplay between proapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family that promotes Drp 1-dependent mitochondrial fragmentation and fusogenic antiapoptotic proteins such as Opa-1 will be presented. It will be argued that contrary to the widespread belief that in cancer cells, aerobic glycolysis completely replaces oxidative metabolism, a misrepresentation of Warburg’s original results, mitochondria of tumor cells are fully viable and functional. Cancer cells also carry out oxidative metabolism and generally conform to the orthodox model of ATP production maintaining as well an intact electron transport system. Finally, data will be presented indicating that the key to tumor cell survival in an ROS rich environment depends on the overexpression of antioxidant enzymes and high levels of the nonenzymatic antioxidant scavengers.

  19. More or less-On the influence of labelling strategies to infer cell population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Michael; Regoes, Roland R; Graw, Frederik

    2017-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of labelled cell populations has been an essential tool to determine and quantify cellular dynamics. The experimental methods to label and track cells over time range from fluorescent dyes over congenic markers towards single-cell labelling techniques, such as genetic barcodes. While these methods have been widely used to quantify cell differentiation and division dynamics, the extent to which the applied labelling strategy actually affects the quantification of the dynamics has not been determined so far. This is especially important in situations where measurements can only be obtained at a single time point, as e.g. due to organ harvest. To this end, we studied the appropriateness of various labelling strategies as characterised by the number of different labels and the initial number of cells per label to quantify cellular dynamics. We simulated adoptive transfer experiments in systems of various complexity that assumed either homoeostatic cellular turnover or cell expansion dynamics involving various steps of cell differentiation and proliferation. Re-sampling cells at a single time point, we determined the ability of different labelling strategies to recover the underlying kinetics. Our results indicate that cell transition and expansion rates are differently affected by experimental shortcomings, such as loss of cells during transfer or sampling, dependent on the labelling strategy used. Furthermore, uniformly distributed labels in the transferred population generally lead to more robust and less biased results than non-equal label sizes. In addition, our analysis indicates that certain labelling approaches incorporate a systematic bias for the identification of complex cell expansion dynamics.

  20. More or less-On the influence of labelling strategies to infer cell population dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gabel

    Full Text Available The adoptive transfer of labelled cell populations has been an essential tool to determine and quantify cellular dynamics. The experimental methods to label and track cells over time range from fluorescent dyes over congenic markers towards single-cell labelling techniques, such as genetic barcodes. While these methods have been widely used to quantify cell differentiation and division dynamics, the extent to which the applied labelling strategy actually affects the quantification of the dynamics has not been determined so far. This is especially important in situations where measurements can only be obtained at a single time point, as e.g. due to organ harvest. To this end, we studied the appropriateness of various labelling strategies as characterised by the number of different labels and the initial number of cells per label to quantify cellular dynamics. We simulated adoptive transfer experiments in systems of various complexity that assumed either homoeostatic cellular turnover or cell expansion dynamics involving various steps of cell differentiation and proliferation. Re-sampling cells at a single time point, we determined the ability of different labelling strategies to recover the underlying kinetics. Our results indicate that cell transition and expansion rates are differently affected by experimental shortcomings, such as loss of cells during transfer or sampling, dependent on the labelling strategy used. Furthermore, uniformly distributed labels in the transferred population generally lead to more robust and less biased results than non-equal label sizes. In addition, our analysis indicates that certain labelling approaches incorporate a systematic bias for the identification of complex cell expansion dynamics.

  1. Cancer stem cells in solid tumors: elusive or illusive?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehrach Hans R

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the past years in vivo transplantation experiments and in vitro colony-forming assays indicated that tumors arise only from rare cells. These cells were shown to bear self-renewal capacities and the ability to recapitulate all cell types within an individual tumor. Due to their phenotypic resemblance to normal stem cells, the term "cancer stem cells" is used. However, some pieces of the puzzle are missing: (a a stringent definition of cancer stem cells in solid tumors (b specific markers that only target cells that meet the criteria for a cancer stem cell in a certain type of tumor. These missing parts started an ongoing debate about which is the best method to identify and characterize cancer stem cells, or even if their mere existence is just an artifact caused by the experimental procedures. Recent findings query the cancer stem cell hypothesis for solid tumors itself since it was shown in xenograft transplantation experiments that under appropriate conditions tumor-initiating cells are not rare. In this review we critically discuss the challenges and prospects of the currently used major methods to identify cancer stem cells. Further on, we reflect the present discussion about the existence of cancer stem cells in solid tumors as well as the amount and characteristics of tumor-initiating cells and finally provide new perspectives like the correlation of cancer stem cells and induced pluripotent cells.

  2. Amplification of tumor inducing putative cancer stem cells (CSCs) by vitamin A/retinol from mammary tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Rohit B. [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Wang, Qingde [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Khillan, Jaspal S., E-mail: khillan@pitt.edu [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Vitamin A supports self renewal of putative CSCs from mammary tumors. •These cells exhibit impaired retinol metabolism into retinoic acid. •CSCs from mammary tumors differentiate into mammary specific cell lineages. •The cells express mammary stem cell specific CD29 and CD49f markers. •Putative CSCs form highly metastatic tumors in NOD SCID mouse. -- Abstract: Solid tumors contain a rare population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that are responsible for relapse and metastasis. The existence of CSC however, remains highly controversial issue. Here we present the evidence for putative CSCs from mammary tumors amplified by vitamin A/retinol signaling. The cells exhibit mammary stem cell specific CD29{sup hi}/CD49f{sup hi}/CD24{sup hi} markers, resistance to radiation and chemo therapeutic agents and form highly metastatic tumors in NOD/SCID mice. The cells exhibit indefinite self renewal as cell lines. Furthermore, the cells exhibit impaired retinol metabolism and do not express enzymes that metabolize retinol into retinoic acid. Vitamin A/retinol also amplified putative CSCs from breast cancer cell lines that form highly aggressive tumors in NOD SCID mice. The studies suggest that high purity putative CSCs can be isolated from solid tumors to establish patient specific cell lines for personalized therapeutics for pre-clinical translational applications. Characterization of CSCs will allow understanding of basic cellular and molecular pathways that are deregulated, mechanisms of tumor metastasis and evasion of therapies that has direct clinical relevance.

  3. SIRB, sans iron oxide rhodamine B, a novel cross-linked dextran nanoparticle, labels human neuroprogenitor and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and serves as a USPIO cell labeling control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wei-Bin; Vaccaro, Dennis E; Fishman, Paul S; Groman, Ernest V; Yarowsky, Paul

    2016-05-01

    This is the first report of the synthesis of a new nanoparticle, sans iron oxide rhodamine B (SIRB), an example of a new class of nanoparticles. SIRB is designed to provide all of the cell labeling properties of the ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticle Molday ION Rhodamine B (MIRB) without containing the iron oxide core. MIRB was developed to label cells and allow them to be tracked by MRI or to be manipulated by magnetic gradients. SIRB possesses a similar size, charge and cross-linked dextran coating as MIRB. Of great interest is understanding the biological and physiological changes in cells after they are labeled with a USPIO. Whether these effects are due to the iron oxide buried within the nanoparticle or to the surface coating surrounding the iron oxide core has not been considered previously. MIRB and SIRB represent an ideal pairing of nanoparticles to identify nanoparticle anatomy responsible for post-labeling cytotoxicity. Here we report the effects of SIRB labeling on the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line and primary human neuroprogenitor cells (hNPCs). These effects are contrasted with the effects of labeling SH-SY5Y cells and hNPCs with MIRB. We find that SIRB labeling, like MIRB labeling, (i) occurs without the use of transfection reagents, (ii) is packaged within lysosomes distributed within cell cytoplasm, (iii) is retained within cells with no loss of label after cell storage, and (iv) does not alter cellular viability or proliferation, and (v) SIRB labeled hNPCs differentiate normally into neurons or astrocytes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Glioma Cells in the Tumor Periphery Have a Stem Cell Phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munthe, Sune; Petterson, Stine Asferg; Dahlrot, Rikke Hedegaard

    2016-01-01

    and a panel of markers was used. The panel comprised of six stem cell-related markers (CD133, Musashi-1, Bmi-1, Sox-2, Nestin and Glut-3), a proliferation marker (Ki-67) as well as a chemo-resistance marker (MGMT). Computer-based automated classifiers were designed to measure the mIDH1 positive nucleus area......-fraction of the chosen markers. Moreover, orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts from five different patient-derived spheroid cultures were obtained and the tumor cells identified by human specific immunohistochemical markers. The results showed that tumor cells in the periphery of patient gliomas expressed stem cell...... in the periphery of patient gliomas have a stem cell phenotype, although it is less pronounced than in the tumor core. Novel therapies aiming at preventing recurrence should therefore take tumor stemness into account. Migrating cells in orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts preserve expression and stem cell markers...

  5. Retinoid inhibition of in vitro invasion of human amnion basement membrane by human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazely, F.

    1988-01-01

    The effects measured were the inhibition of tumor cell migration through the basement membrane (BM) and tumor cell degradative enzyme activity on 3 H-proline labeled collagenous and non collagenous components of the BM. The human lung carcinoma A549 or the human Ewing's sarcoma TC-106 cell lines treated with retinoids for two days were incubated on the BM in the absence of retinoids. A dose-dependent inhibition of cell invasion was produced by retinoids. Among the retinoids tested the most powerful was retinol acetate which inhibited invasion by 50% of A549 cells at a concentration of 0.09 μg/ml, and TC-106 cells at 0.08 μg/ml. Retinol acetate inhibited A549 and TC-106 cell growth by approximately 50% at levels almost 100-fold higher than those needed for antiinvasive activity. Retinol acetate was about 20 times more potent than retinoic acid and 30 times more than retinol palmitate. Furthermore, A549 cells treated with retinol acetate, under conditions whereby an anti-invasive state was induced,showed an increase in the number of cellular retinoic acid binding proteins (CRABP), a decrease in the activity of type IV collagenase and ectosialyltransferase, and no change in the activity of transglutaminase

  6. Tumor associated macrophages protect colon cancer cells from TRAIL-induced apoptosis through IL-1beta-dependent stabilization of Snail in tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Kaler

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported that colon tumor cells stimulate macrophages to release IL-1beta, which in turn inactivates GSK3beta and enhances Wnt signaling in colon cancer cells, generating a self-amplifying loop that promotes the growth of tumor cells.Here we describe that macrophages protect HCT116 and Hke-3 colon cancer cells from TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Inactivation of IL-1beta by neutralizing IL-1beta antibody, or silencing of IL-1beta in macrophages inhibited their ability to counter TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Accordingly, IL-1beta was sufficient to inhibit TRAIL-induced apoptosis. TRAIL-induced collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential (Delta psi and activation of caspases were prevented by macrophages or by recombinant IL-1beta. Pharmacological inhibition of IL-1beta release from macrophages by vitamin D(3, a potent chemopreventive agent for colorectal cancer, restored the ability of TRAIL to induce apoptosis of tumor cells cultured with macrophages. Macrophages and IL-1beta failed to inhibit TRAIL-induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells expressing dnIkappaB, dnAKT or dnTCF4, confirming that they oppose TRAIL-induced cell death through induction of Wnt signaling in tumor cells. We showed that macrophages and IL-1beta stabilized Snail in tumor cells in an NF-kappaB/Wnt dependent manner and that Snail deficient tumor cells were not protected from TRAIL-induced apoptosis by macrophages or by IL-1beta, demonstrating a crucial role of Snail in the resistance of tumor cells to TRAIL.We have identified a positive feedback loop between tumor cells and macrophages that propagates the growth and promotes the survival of colon cancer cells: tumor cells stimulate macrophages to secrete IL-1beta, which in turn, promotes Wnt signaling and stabilizes Snail in tumor cells, conferring resistance to TRAIL. Vitamin D(3 halts this amplifying loop by interfering with the release of IL-1beta from macrophages. Accordingly, vitamin D(3 sensitizes tumor cells to TRAIL

  7. Tumor Cells and Tumor-Associated Macrophages: Secreted Proteins as Potential Targets for Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Baay, Marc; Brouwer, Anja; Pauwels, Patrick; Peeters, Marc; Lardon, Filip

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory pathways, meant to defend the organism against infection and injury, as a byproduct, can promote an environment which favors tumor growth and metastasis. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), which constitute a significant part of the tumor-infiltrating immune cells, have been linked to the growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis of a variety of cancers, most likely through polarization of TAMs to the M2 (alternative) phenotype. The interaction between tumor cells and macrophages pro...

  8. Monoclonal TCR-redirected tumor cell killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddy, Nathaniel; Bossi, Giovanna; Adams, Katherine J; Lissina, Anna; Mahon, Tara M; Hassan, Namir J; Gavarret, Jessie; Bianchi, Frayne C; Pumphrey, Nicholas J; Ladell, Kristin; Gostick, Emma; Sewell, Andrew K; Lissin, Nikolai M; Harwood, Naomi E; Molloy, Peter E; Li, Yi; Cameron, Brian J; Sami, Malkit; Baston, Emma E; Todorov, Penio T; Paston, Samantha J; Dennis, Rebecca E; Harper, Jane V; Dunn, Steve M; Ashfield, Rebecca; Johnson, Andy; McGrath, Yvonne; Plesa, Gabriela; June, Carl H; Kalos, Michael; Price, David A; Vuidepot, Annelise; Williams, Daniel D; Sutton, Deborah H; Jakobsen, Bent K

    2012-06-01

    T cell immunity can potentially eradicate malignant cells and lead to clinical remission in a minority of patients with cancer. In the majority of these individuals, however, there is a failure of the specific T cell receptor (TCR)–mediated immune recognition and activation process. Here we describe the engineering and characterization of new reagents termed immune-mobilizing monoclonal TCRs against cancer (ImmTACs). Four such ImmTACs, each comprising a distinct tumor-associated epitope-specific monoclonal TCR with picomolar affinity fused to a humanized cluster of differentiation 3 (CD3)-specific single-chain antibody fragment (scFv), effectively redirected T cells to kill cancer cells expressing extremely low surface epitope densities. Furthermore, these reagents potently suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Thus, ImmTACs overcome immune tolerance to cancer and represent a new approach to tumor immunotherapy.

  9. Mesothelioma tumor cells modulate dendritic cell lipid content, phenotype and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne K Gardner

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play an important role in the generation of anti-cancer immune responses, however there is evidence that DCs in cancer patients are dysfunctional. Lipid accumulation driven by tumor-derived factors has recently been shown to contribute to DC dysfunction in several human cancers, but has not yet been examined in mesothelioma. This study investigated if mesothelioma tumor cells and/or their secreted factors promote increases in DC lipid content and modulate DC function. Human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs were exposed to human mesothelioma tumor cells and tumor-derived factors in the presence or absence of lipoproteins. The data showed that immature MoDCs exposed to mesothelioma cells or factors contained increased lipid levels relative to control DCs. Lipid accumulation was associated with reduced antigen processing ability (measured using a DQ OVA assay, upregulation of the co-stimulatory molecule, CD86, and production of the tolerogenic cytokine, IL-10. Increases in DC lipid content were further enhanced by co-exposure to mesothelioma-derived factors and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, but not low-density lipoproteins. In vivo studies using a murine mesothelioma model showed that the lipid content of tumor-infiltrating CD4+ CD8α- DCs, CD4- CD8α- DCs DCs and plasmacytoid DCs increased with tumor progression. Moreover, increasing tumor burden was associated with reduced proliferation of tumor-antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in tumor-draining lymph nodes. This study shows that mesothelioma promotes DC lipid acquisition, which is associated with altered activation status and reduced capacity to process and present antigens, which may impair the ability of DCs to generate effective anti mesothelioma T cell responses.

  10. A Comparison between Radiolabeled Fluorodeoxyglucose Uptake and Hyperpolarized 13C-Labeled Pyruvate Utilization as Methods for Detecting Tumor Response to Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy H. Witney

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Detection of early tumor responses to treatment can give an indication of clinical outcome. Positron emission tomography measurements of the uptake of the glucose analog, [18F] 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG, have demonstrated their potential for detecting early treatment response in the clinic. We have shown recently that 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging measurements of the uptake and conversion of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate into [1-13C]lactate can be used to detect treatment response in a murine lymphoma model. The present study compares these magnetic resonance measurements with changes in FDG uptake after chemotherapy. A decrease in FDG uptake was found to precede the decrease in flux of hyperpolarized 13C label between pyruvate and lactate, both in tumor cells in vitro and in tumors in vivo. However, the magnitude of the decrease in FDG uptake and the decrease in pyruvate to lactate flux was comparable at 24 hours after drug treatment. In cells, the decrease in FDG uptake was shown to correlate with changes in plasma membrane expression of the facilitative glucose transporters, whereas the decrease in pyruvate to lactate flux could be explained by an increase in poly(ADP-ribose polymerase activity and subsequent depletion of the NAD(H pool. These results show that measurement of flux between pyruvate and lactate may be an alternative to FDG-positron emission tomography for imaging tumor treatment response in the clinic.

  11. In vitro evaluation of (99m)Tc-EDDA/tricine-HYNIC-Q-Litorin in gastrin-releasing peptide receptor positive tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurt Lambrecht, Fatma; Durkan, Kübra; Ozgür, Aykut; Gündüz, Cumhur; Avcı, Cığır Biray; Susluer, Sunde Yılmaz

    2013-05-01

    Bombesin and its derivatives exhibit a high affinity for gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPr), which is over-expressed in a variety of human cancers (prostate, pancreatic, lung, etc.). The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro potential of the hydrazinonicotinamide (HYNIC)-Q-Litorin. (99m)Tc labeling was performed by using different co-ligands: tricine and ethylenediamine diacetic acid (EDDA). The radiochemical stability of radiolabeled peptide conjugates was checked at room temperature and in cysteine solution up to 24 h. The in vitro cell uptake of (99m)Tc-EDDA-HYNIC-Q-Litorin and (99m)Tc-tricine-HYNIC-Q-Litorin were evaluated on pancreatic tumor and control cell lines. Optimum specific activity and incubation time were determined for all the cell lines. The results showed that the cell uptake of the radiolabeled peptide conjugates in tumor cell lines were higher than in the control cell line. The findings of this study indicated the need for further development of in vivo study as a radiopharmaceutical for pancreatic tumor imaging.

  12. Blood vessel endothelium-directed tumor cell streaming in breast tumors requires the HGF/C-Met signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, E; Xue, A; Wang, Y; Rougerie, P; Sharma, V P; Eddy, R; Cox, D; Condeelis, J

    2017-05-11

    During metastasis to distant sites, tumor cells migrate to blood vessels. In vivo, breast tumor cells utilize a specialized mode of migration known as streaming, where a linear assembly of tumor cells migrate directionally towards blood vessels on fibronectin-collagen I-containing extracellular matrix (ECM) fibers in response to chemotactic signals. We have successfully reconstructed tumor cell streaming in vitro by co-plating tumors cells, macrophages and endothelial cells on 2.5 μm thick ECM-coated micro-patterned substrates. We found that tumor cells and macrophages, when plated together on the micro-patterned substrates, do not demonstrate sustained directional migration in only one direction (sustained directionality) but show random bi-directional walking. Sustained directionality of tumor cells as seen in vivo was established in vitro when beads coated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells were placed at one end of the micro-patterned 'ECM fibers' within the assay. We demonstrated that these endothelial cells supply the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) required for the chemotactic gradient responsible for sustained directionality. Using this in vitro reconstituted streaming system, we found that directional streaming is dependent on, and most effectively blocked, by inhibiting the HGF/C-Met signaling pathway between endothelial cells and tumor cells. Key observations made with the in vitro reconstituted system implicating C-Met signaling were confirmed in vivo in mammary tumors using the in vivo invasion assay and intravital multiphoton imaging of tumor cell streaming. These results establish HGF/C-Met as a central organizing signal in blood vessel-directed tumor cell migration in vivo and highlight a promising role for C-Met inhibitors in blocking tumor cell streaming and metastasis in vivo, and for use in human trials.

  13. In vivo red blood cell compatibility testing using indium-113m tropolone-labeled red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrissey, G.J.; Gravelle, D.; Dietz, G.; Driedger, A.A.; King, M.; Cradduck, T.D.

    1988-01-01

    In vivo radionuclide crossmatch is a method for identifying compatible blood for transfusion when allo- or autoantibodies preclude the use of conventional crossmatching techniques. A technique for labeling small volumes of donor red blood cells with [/sup 113m/In]tropolone is reported. The use of /sup 113m/In minimizes the accumulation of background radioactivity and the radiation dose especially so when multiple crossmatches are performed. Labeling red cells with [/sup 113m/In]tropolone is faster and easier to perform than with other radionuclides. Consistently high labeling efficiencies are obtained and minimal /sup 113m/In activity elutes from the labeled red blood cells. A case study involving 22 crossmatches is presented to demonstrate the technique. The radiation dose equivalent from /sup 113m/In is significantly less than with other radionuclides that may be used to label red cells

  14. Radionuclide imaging of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) using 99mTc-labeled neurotensin peptide 8-13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Kaijun; An Rui; Gao Zairong; Zhang Yongxue; Aruva, Mohan R.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To prepare 99m technetium ( 99m Tc)-labeled neurotensin (NT) peptide and to evaluate the feasibility of imaging oncogene NT receptors overexpressed in human small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells. Methods: The NT analogue (Nα-His)Ac-NT(8-13) was synthesized such that histidine was attached at the N-terminus. The analogue was labeled with [ 99m Tc(H 2 O) 3 (CO) 3 ] at pH 7. 99m Tc-(Nα-His)Ac-NT(8-13) in vitro stability was determined by challenging it with 100 times the molar excess of DTPA, human serum albumin (HSA) and cysteine. The affinity, 99m Tc-(Nα-His)Ac-NT(8-13) binding to SCLC cell line NCI-H446, was studied in vitro. Biodistribution and imaging with 99m Tc-(Nα-His)Ac-NT(8-13) were performed at 4 and 12 h postinjection, and tissue distribution and imaging after receptor blocking were carried out at 4 h in nude mice bearing human SCLC tumor. Blood clearance was determined in normal mice. Results: The affinity constant (K d ) of 99m Tc-(Nα-His)Ac-NT(8-13) to SCLC cells was 0.56 nmol/L. When challenged with 100 times the molar excess of DTPA, HSA or cysteine, more than 97±1.8% radioactivity remained as 99m Tc-(Nα-His)Ac-NT(8-13). Tumor-to-muscle ratio was 3.35±1.01 at 4 h and 4.20±1.35 at 12 h postinjection. The excretory route of 99m Tc-(Nα-His)Ac-NT(8-13) was chiefly through the renal pathway. In the receptor-blocking group treated with unlabeled (Nα-His)Ac-NT(8-13), tumor-to-muscle ratio at 4 h was 1.25±0.55. Conclusion: The results suggest that 99m Tc-(Nα-His)Ac-NT(8-13) specifically binds to the SCLC cells and made 99m Tc-(Nα-His)Ac-NT(8-13) a desirable compound for further studies in planar or SPECT imaging of oncogene receptors overexpressed in SCLC cells

  15. An Effective Approach for Immunotherapy Using Irradiated Tumor Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafa, D.M.B.

    2011-01-01

    This study has been aimed to investigate the effect of injection of Irradiated Ehrlich tumor cells alone or concurrent with immunomodulator in mice before and after challenge with viable Ehrlich tumor cells for enhancement of immune system. This study includes the estimation of survival, tumor size, lymphocyte count, LDH, MTT, granzyme B, and DNA fragmentation. In order to fulfill the target of this study, a total of 120 female swiss albino mice were used. They were divided into two classes vaccinated (injection of vaccine before challenge) and therapeutic class (injection of vaccine after challenge). Each class was divided into four groups, group (1) mice injected with viable Ehrlich tumor cells (G1), group (2) mice injected with irradiated tumor cells (G2), group (3) mice injected with immunomodulator (G3), and group (4) mice injected with irradiated tumor cells + immunomodulator (G4). Results obtained from this study demonstrated that, the lymphocyte count and granzyme B activity were increased in both the vaccinated and therapeutic classes compared with control group. LDH activity was decreased in all groups of vaccinated class and also in G2 and G4 groups of therapeutic class compared with control group. There was a significant increase in percent apoptosis of tumor cells cultured with spleenocytes of the groups of vaccinated class as compared with control group. Cellular DNA from Ehrlich tumor cell line cultured with spleenocytes of immunized groups was fragmented into discrete bands of approximate multiples of 200 bp. Revealing significant apoptosis in tumor cells due to vaccination. It is concluded that, vaccination with irradiated tumor cells is an effective approach in stimulation of immune system against viable tumor cells.

  16. The experimental study on tropism of magnetic labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shuangqing; Wang Peijun; Li Minghua; Zhang Wei; Dai gonghua

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To label rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) and to explore the tropism of BMSCs for hepatocellular carcinoma cells after transplantation in vivo. Methods: BMSCs from bone marrow of Sprague-Dawly (SD) rats were cultured isolated and purified. Labeled BMSCs was achieved using Feridex. Twenty-four hepatocellular carcinoma models of SD rats were induced two weeks before transplantation. The models were divided into three groups in random: the labeled BMSCs and unlabeled BMSCs were transplanted respectively into the rat's livers of experimental group (n=12) and control group A (n=6) via spleens, and no transplant was done for control group B (n=6). MR imaging was performed to monitor the transplanted cells after 1,3,7,14 d using 1.5 T MR system. Signal intensity ratio (SI/SI * ) between tumor and hepatic tissue on T 2 * WI were measured and compared by one-factor analysis of variance. After MR imaging, Prussian blue staining was performed. MR imaging findings were compared with histological sections. Results: Prussian blue staining confirmed the labeling efficiency of BMSCs was above 90%. SI/SI * of experimental group before and 1, 3, 7, 14 d after transplantation were 3.18±0.21, 1.98±0.20, 2.38±0.28, 2.70±0.25 and 3.16±0.24 respectively. Following transplantation of BMSCs, signal intensity decrease was found in hepatocellular carcinoma of experimental group (F=56.65, P 2 * WI (P>0.05). A large number of Prussian blue staining positive cells were found in hepatocellular carcinoma in experimental group. Histological section with Prussian blue staining had a good correlation with the signal intensity changes on MR images at different time. Conclusion: BMSCs display significant tropism to hepatocellular carcinoma and may be an ideal gene therapy vehicle against hepatocellular carcinoma. (authors)

  17. Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make hormones. Yolk sac tumors make the hormone alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Mixed germ cell tumors are made of ... used to diagnose some CNS germ cell tumors: Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG). Blood ...

  18. Transfer of allogeneic CD4+ T cells rescues CD8+ T cells in anti-PD-L1–resistant tumors leading to tumor eradication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arina, Ainhoa; Karrison, Theodore; Galka, Eva; Schreiber, Karin; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Schreiber, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Adoptively transferred CD8+ T cells can stabilize the size of solid tumors over long periods of time by exclusively recognizing antigen cross-presented on tumor stroma. However, these tumors eventually escape T cell–mediated growth control. The aim of this study was to eradicate such persisten