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Sample records for tumor biology-based approach

  1. Parametric motion control of robotic arms: A biologically based approach using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, O.; D'Eleuterio, G. M. T.; Lipitkas, J.; Grodski, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    A neural network based system is presented which is able to generate point-to-point movements of robotic manipulators. The foundation of this approach is the use of prototypical control torque signals which are defined by a set of parameters. The parameter set is used for scaling and shaping of these prototypical torque signals to effect a desired outcome of the system. This approach is based on neurophysiological findings that the central nervous system stores generalized cognitive representations of movements called synergies, schemas, or motor programs. It has been proposed that these motor programs may be stored as torque-time functions in central pattern generators which can be scaled with appropriate time and magnitude parameters. The central pattern generators use these parameters to generate stereotypical torque-time profiles, which are then sent to the joint actuators. Hence, only a small number of parameters need to be determined for each point-to-point movement instead of the entire torque-time trajectory. This same principle is implemented for controlling the joint torques of robotic manipulators where a neural network is used to identify the relationship between the task requirements and the torque parameters. Movements are specified by the initial robot position in joint coordinates and the desired final end-effector position in Cartesian coordinates. This information is provided to the neural network which calculates six torque parameters for a two-link system. The prototypical torque profiles (one per joint) are then scaled by those parameters. After appropriate training of the network, our parametric control design allowed the reproduction of a trained set of movements with relatively high accuracy, and the production of previously untrained movements with comparable accuracy. We conclude that our approach was successful in discriminating between trained movements and in generalizing to untrained movements.

  2. A Biologically-Based Computational Approach to Drug Repurposing for Anthrax Infection

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    Jane P. F. Bai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Developing drugs to treat the toxic effects of lethal toxin (LT and edema toxin (ET produced by B. anthracis is of global interest. We utilized a computational approach to score 474 drugs/compounds for their ability to reverse the toxic effects of anthrax toxins. For each toxin or drug/compound, we constructed an activity network by using its differentially expressed genes, molecular targets, and protein interactions. Gene expression profiles of drugs were obtained from the Connectivity Map and those of anthrax toxins in human alveolar macrophages were obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus. Drug rankings were based on the ability of a drug/compound’s mode of action in the form of a signaling network to reverse the effects of anthrax toxins; literature reports were used to verify the top 10 and bottom 10 drugs/compounds identified. Simvastatin and bepridil with reported in vitro potency for protecting cells from LT and ET toxicities were computationally ranked fourth and eighth. The other top 10 drugs were fenofibrate, dihydroergotamine, cotinine, amantadine, mephenytoin, sotalol, ifosfamide, and mefloquine; literature mining revealed their potential protective effects from LT and ET toxicities. These drugs are worthy of investigation for their therapeutic benefits and might be used in combination with antibiotics for treating B. anthracis infection.

  3. Geometrical approach to tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Carlos

    2006-08-01

    Tumor growth has a number of features in common with a physical process known as molecular beam epitaxy. Both growth processes are characterized by the constraint of growth development to the body border, and surface diffusion of cells and particles at the growing edge. However, tumor growth implies an approximate spherical symmetry that makes necessary a geometrical treatment of the growth equations. The basic model was introduced in a former paper [C. Escudero, Phys. Rev. E 73, 020902(R) (2006)], and in the present work we extend our analysis and try to shed light on the possible geometrical principles that drive tumor growth. We present two-dimensional models that reproduce the experimental observations, and analyze the unexplored three-dimensional case, for which interesting conclusions on tumor growth are derived.

  4. Geometrical approach to tumor growth

    OpenAIRE

    Escudero, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    Tumor growth has a number of features in common with a physical process known as molecular beam epitaxy. Both growth processes are characterized by the constraint of growth development to the body border, and surface diffusion of cells/particles at the growing edge. However, tumor growth implies an approximate spherical symmetry that makes necessary a geometrical treatment of the growth equations. The basic model was introduced in a former article [C. Escudero, Phys. Rev. E 73, 020902(R) (200...

  5. An allometric approach of tumor-angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szasz, Oliver; Vincze, Gyula; Szigeti, Gyula Peter; Benyo, Zoltan; Szasz, Andras

    2018-07-01

    Angiogenesis is one of the main supporting factors of tumor-progression. It is a complex set of interactions together with hypoxia and inflammation, regulating tumor growth. The objective of this study is to examine the effect of angiogenesis with an allometric approach applied to angiogenesis and the regulating factors. The results show that allometry has the potential to describe this aspect, including the sigmoid-like transport function. There are particular conditions under which the complex control maximizes the relative tumor mass. Linear growth of malignancy diameter with an allometric approach was proven. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Endoscopic transnasal approach for removing pituitary tumors

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    Mirian Cabral Moreira de Castro

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To describe a series of 129 consecutive patients submitted to the resection of pituitary tumors using the endoscopic transsphenoidal approach in a public medical center. Method: Retrospective analysis based on the records of patients submitted to the resection of a pituitary tumor through the endoscopic transsphenoidal approach between 2004 and 2009. Results: One hundred and twenty-nine records were analyzed. The tumor was non-secreting in 96 (74.42% and secreting in 33 patients (22.58%. Out of the secretory tumors, the most prevalent was the growth hormone producer (7.65%, followed by the prolactinoma, (6.98%. Eleven patients developed cerebral spinal fluid (CSF fistulas, and four of them developed meningitis. One patient died due to intracerebral hemorrhage in the postoperative period. Conclusion: The endoscopic transsphenoidal approach to sellar tumors proved to be safe when the majority of the tumors were non-secreting. The most frequent complication was CSF. This technique can be done even in a public hospital with financial limits, since the health professionals are integrated.

  7. Tumor stem cells: A new approach for tumor therapy (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    MENG, MIN; ZHAO, XIN-HAN; NING, QIAN; HOU, LEI; XIN, GUO-HONG; LIU, LI-FENG

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the existence of a minority of tumor cells possessing the stem cell properties of self-renewal and differentiation in leukemia and several solid tumors. However, these cells do not possess the normal regulatory mechanisms of stem cells. Following transplantation, they are capable of initiating tumorigenesis and are therefore known as ‘tumor stem cells’. Cellular origin analysis of tumor stem cells has resulted in three hypotheses: Embryonal rest hypothesis, anaplasia and maturation arrest. Several signaling pathways which are involved in carcinogenesis, including Wnt/β-catenin, Notch and Oct-4 signaling pathways are crucial in normal stem cell self-renewal decisions, suggesting that breakdown in the regulation of self-renewal may be a key event in the development of tumors. Thus, tumors can be regarded as an abnormal organ in which stem cells have escaped from the normal constraints on self-renewal, thus, leading to abnormally differentiated tumor cells that lose the ability to form tumors. This new model for maligancies has significance for clinical research and treatment. PMID:22844351

  8. Current diagnostic approach of bone tumors in childhood; Abordagem diagnostica atual dos tumores osseos na infancia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torre, Marcia Barbosa; Scatigno Neto, Andre [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas

    1995-09-01

    The authors analyze the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the imaging modality of choice for evaluation of patients with bone tumors or soft tissue tumors. The advent of such a sensitive imaging modality is fortuitous and coincides with a recent change in the therapeutic approach to primary bone tumors. MRI is extremely valuable in monitoring the tumor response to the initial chemotherapy and is accurate defining the margins of tumor, facilitating planning of limb salvage surgical procedures. (author). 5 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Current diagnostic approach of bone tumors in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torre, Marcia Barbosa; Scatigno Neto, Andre

    1995-01-01

    The authors analyze the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the imaging modality of choice for evaluation of patients with bone tumors or soft tissue tumors. The advent of such a sensitive imaging modality is fortuitous and coincides with a recent change in the therapeutic approach to primary bone tumors. MRI is extremely valuable in monitoring the tumor response to the initial chemotherapy and is accurate defining the margins of tumor, facilitating planning of limb salvage surgical procedures. (author). 5 refs., 8 figs

  10. A Genomics Approach to Tumor Gemome Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Collins, Colin

    2002-01-01

    Genomes of solid tumors are often highly rearranged and these rearrangements promote cancer progression through disruption of genes mediating immortality, survival, metastasis, and resistance to therapy...

  11. Giant cell tumor of bone: Multimodal approach

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    Gupta A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical behavior and treatment of giant cell tumor of bone is still perplexing. The aim of this study is to clarify the clinico-pathological correlation of tumor and its relevance in treatment and prognosis. Materials and Methods: Ninety -three cases of giant cell tumor were treated during 1980-1990 by different methods. The age of the patients varied from 18-58 yrs with male and female ratio as 5:4. The upper end of the tibia was most commonly involved (n=31, followed by the lower end of the femur(n=21, distal end of radius(n=14,upper end of fibula (n=9,proximal end of femur(n=5, upper end of the humerus(n=3, iliac bone(n=2,phalanx (n=2 and spine(n=1. The tumors were also encountered on uncommon sites like metacarpals (n=4 and metatarsal(n=1. Fifty four cases were treated by curettage and bone grafting. Wide excision and reconstruction was performed in twenty two cases . Nine cases were treated by wide excision while primary amputation was performed in four cases. One case required only curettage. Three inaccessible lesions of ilium and spine were treated by radiotherapy. Results: 19 of 54 treated by curettage and bone grafting showed a recurrence. The repeat curettage and bone grafting was performed in 18 cases while amputation was done in one. One each out of the cases treated by wide excision and reconstruction and wide excision alone recurred. In this study we observed that though curettage and bone grafting is still the most commonly adopted treatment, wide excision of tumor with reconstruction has shown lesser recurrence. Conclusion: For radiologically well-contained and histologically typical tumor, curettage and autogenous bone grafting is the treatment of choice . The typical tumors with radiologically deficient cortex, clinically aggressive tumors and tumors with histological Grade III should be treated by wide excision and reconstruction.

  12. Primary cardiac and pericardial tumors, imaging approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu-Qing Liu, M D [Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, BJ (China). Dept. of Radiology, Fu Wai Hospital and Cardiovascular Inst.

    1996-12-31

    The incidence of cardiac tumor and its classification was discussed. Imaging study i.e. conventional radiology, echocardiagoaphy (echo), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), angiography and computed tomography (CT) used also discussed briefly. (8 refs.).

  13. Primary cardiac and pericardial tumors, imaging approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu-Qing Liu, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    The incidence of cardiac tumor and its classification was discussed. Imaging study i.e. conventional radiology, echocardiagoaphy (echo), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), angiography and computed tomography (CT) used also discussed briefly. (8 refs.)

  14. Central nervous system tumors: Radiologic pathologic correlation and diagnostic approach

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    Ishita Pant

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was conducted to formulate location-wise radiologic diagnostic algorithms and assess their concordance with the final histopathological diagnosis so as to evaluate their utility in a rural setting where only basic facilities are available. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis to assess the concordance of radiology (primarily MRI with final histopathology report was done. Based on the most common incidence of tumor location and basic radiology findings, diagnostic algorithms were prepared. Results: For supratentorial intraaxial parenchymal location concordance was seen in all high-grade astrocytomas, low- and high-grade oligodendrogliomas, metastatic tumors, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, high-grade ependymomas, neuronal and mixed neuro-glial tumors and tumors of hematopoietic system. Lowest concordance was seen in low-grade astrocytomas. In the supratentorial intraaxial ventricular location, agreement was observed in choroid plexus tumors, ependymomas, low-grade astrocytomas and meningiomas; in the supratentorial extraaxial location, except for the lack of concordance in the only case of metastatic tumor, concordance was observed in meningeal tumors, tumors of the sellar region, tumors of cranial and paraspinal nerves; the infratentorial intraaxial parenchymal location showed agreement in low- as well as high-grade astrocytomas, metastatic tumors, high-grade ependymoma, embryonal tumors and hematopoietic tumors; in the infratentorial intraaxial ventricular location, except for the lack of concordance in one case of low-grade astrocytoma and two cases of medulloblastomas, agreement was observed in low- and high-grade ependymoma; infratentorial extraaxial tumors showed complete agreement in all tumors of cranial and paraspinal nerves, meningiomas, and hematopoietic tumors. Conclusion: A location-based approach to central nervous system (CNS tumors is helpful in establishing an appropriate differential diagnosis.

  15. A systems approach for tumor pharmacokinetics.

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    Greg Michael Thurber

    Full Text Available Recent advances in genome inspired target discovery, small molecule screens, development of biological and nanotechnology have led to the introduction of a myriad of new differently sized agents into the clinic. The differences in small and large molecule delivery are becoming increasingly important in combination therapies as well as the use of drugs that modify the physiology of tumors such as anti-angiogenic treatment. The complexity of targeting has led to the development of mathematical models to facilitate understanding, but unfortunately, these studies are often only applicable to a particular molecule, making pharmacokinetic comparisons difficult. Here we develop and describe a framework for categorizing primary pharmacokinetics of drugs in tumors. For modeling purposes, we define drugs not by their mechanism of action but rather their rate-limiting step of delivery. Our simulations account for variations in perfusion, vascularization, interstitial transport, and non-linear local binding and metabolism. Based on a comparison of the fundamental rates determining uptake, drugs were classified into four categories depending on whether uptake is limited by blood flow, extravasation, interstitial diffusion, or local binding and metabolism. Simulations comparing small molecule versus macromolecular drugs show a sharp difference in distribution, which has implications for multi-drug therapies. The tissue-level distribution differs widely in tumors for small molecules versus macromolecular biologic drugs, and this should be considered in the design of agents and treatments. An example using antibodies in mouse xenografts illustrates the different in vivo behavior. This type of transport analysis can be used to aid in model development, experimental data analysis, and imaging and therapeutic agent design.

  16. The “Trojan Horse” Approach to Tumor Immunotherapy: Targeting the Tumor Microenvironment

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    Delia Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most anticancer therapies including immunotherapies are given systemically; yet therapies given directly into tumors may be more effective, particularly those that overcome natural suppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment. The “Trojan Horse” approach of intratumoural delivery aims to promote immune-mediated destruction by inducing microenvironmental changes within the tumour at the same time as avoiding the systemic toxicity that is often associated with more “full frontal” treatments such as transfer of large numbers of laboratory-expanded tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes or large intravenous doses of cytokine. Numerous studies have demonstrated that intratumoural therapy has the capacity to minimizing local suppression, inducing sufficient “dangerous” tumor cell death to cross-prime strong immune responses, and rending tumor blood vessels amenable to immune cell traffic to induce effector cell changes in secondary lymphoid organs. However, the key to its success is the design of a sound rational approach based on evidence. There is compelling preclinical data for local immunotherapy approaches in tumor immunology. This review summarises how immune events within a tumour can be modified by local approaches, how this can affect systemic antitumor immunity such that distal sites are attacked, and what approaches have been proven most successful so far in animals and patients.

  17. Preauricular infratemporal fossa approach for advanced malignant parotid tumors.

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    Leonetti, John P; Benscoter, Brent J; Marzo, Sam J; Borrowdale, Richard W; Pontikis, George C

    2012-09-01

    The aims of this study were to demonstrate the surgical technique involved in the preauricular infratemporal fossa (ITF) approach, outline the clinical indications for use of this technique, and present the results in using this approach in 159 patients with malignant parotid tumors. At the conclusion of this article, the reader should be able to understand the utility of the preauricular infratemporal fossa approach in the management of patients with advanced malignant parotid tumors. This was a retrospective chart review of 159 patients treated at a tertiary care academic medical center following institutional review board approval. A comprehensive medical records review was performed for all patients with malignant parotid tumors who underwent a preauricular ITF approach between July 1988 and July 2010. The most common presenting symptoms were pain and trismus, whereas the presence of a parotid mass and facial paralysis were the most common clinical signs. Mucoepidermoid and adenoid cystic carcinoma accounted for 63% of the tumors, and perineural invasion was found in nearly 71% of the patients. Despite negative surgical margins in 92% of the patients, local or regional tumor recurrence was found in 17% of the cases. The mean follow-up time was 12.8 years. The preauricular ITF approach should be used in the surgical extirpation of advanced malignant parotid neoplasms. This technique provides proximal facial nerve identification, internal carotid artery protection, and negative tumor margins at the skull base. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. An Effective Approach for Immunotherapy Using Irradiated Tumor Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafa, D.M.B.

    2011-01-01

    This study has been aimed to investigate the effect of injection of Irradiated Ehrlich tumor cells alone or concurrent with immunomodulator in mice before and after challenge with viable Ehrlich tumor cells for enhancement of immune system. This study includes the estimation of survival, tumor size, lymphocyte count, LDH, MTT, granzyme B, and DNA fragmentation. In order to fulfill the target of this study, a total of 120 female swiss albino mice were used. They were divided into two classes vaccinated (injection of vaccine before challenge) and therapeutic class (injection of vaccine after challenge). Each class was divided into four groups, group (1) mice injected with viable Ehrlich tumor cells (G1), group (2) mice injected with irradiated tumor cells (G2), group (3) mice injected with immunomodulator (G3), and group (4) mice injected with irradiated tumor cells + immunomodulator (G4). Results obtained from this study demonstrated that, the lymphocyte count and granzyme B activity were increased in both the vaccinated and therapeutic classes compared with control group. LDH activity was decreased in all groups of vaccinated class and also in G2 and G4 groups of therapeutic class compared with control group. There was a significant increase in percent apoptosis of tumor cells cultured with spleenocytes of the groups of vaccinated class as compared with control group. Cellular DNA from Ehrlich tumor cell line cultured with spleenocytes of immunized groups was fragmented into discrete bands of approximate multiples of 200 bp. Revealing significant apoptosis in tumor cells due to vaccination. It is concluded that, vaccination with irradiated tumor cells is an effective approach in stimulation of immune system against viable tumor cells.

  19. A Percutaneous Transtubular Middle Fossa Approach for Intracanalicular Tumors.

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    Bernardo, Antonio; Evins, Alexander I; Tsiouris, Apostolos J; Stieg, Philip E

    2015-07-01

    In cases of small intracanalicular tumors (≤ 1.5 cm), the middle fossa approach (MFA) provides the ability for adequate tumor removal with preservation of existing auditory function. Application of a minimally invasive tubular retractor in this approach may help mitigate the risk of postoperative seizures, aphasia, and venous complications by minimizing intraoperative retraction of the temporal lobe. We propose a minimally invasive microscopic and/or endoscopic percutaneous transtubular MFA for the management of intracanalicular tumors. Subtemporal keyhole craniectomies were performed on 5 preserved cadaveric heads (10 sides), with 6 sides previously injected with a synthetic tumor model. A ViewSite Brain Access System tubular retractor (Vycor Medical, Inc., Boca Raton, Florida, USA) was used to provide minimal temporal retraction and protection of the surrounding anatomy. An extradural dissection of the internal auditory canal was performed under microscopic and endoscopic visualization with a minimally invasive surgical drill and tube shaft instruments, the intracanalicular tumors were removed, and degree of resection was assessed. All 10 approaches were completed successfully through the tubular retractor with minimal retraction of the temporal lobe. Excellent visualization of the structures within the internal auditory canal was achieved with both the microscope and 3-dimensional endoscope. On the 6 synthetic intracanalicular tumors resected, 5 gross total (Grade I) and 1 near total (Grade II) resections were achieved. A percutaneous transtubular MFA is a feasible minimally invasive option for resection of small intracanalicular tumors with potential preservation of auditory function, reduced temporal retraction, and enhanced protection of surrounding structures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dorsal approaches to intradural extramedullary tumors of the craniovertebral junction

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    D Refai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumors of the craniovertebral junction (CVJ pose significant challenges to cranial and spine surgeons. Familiarity with the complex anatomy and avoidance of injury to neurologic and vascular structures are essential to success. Multiple surgical approaches to address lesions at the CVJ have been promoted, including ventral and dorsal-based trajectories. However, optimal selection of the surgical vector to manage the pathology requires a firm understanding of the limitations and advantages of each approach. The selection of the best surgical trajectory must include several factors, such as obtaining the optimal exposure of the region of interest, avoiding injury to critical neurologic or vascular structures, identification of normal anatomical landmarks, the familiarity and comfort level of the surgeon to the approach, and the need for fixation. This review article focuses on dorsal approaches to the CVJ and the advantages and limitations in managing intradural extramedullary tumors.

  1. Current Perspectives on Desmoid Tumors: The Mayo Clinic Approach

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    Scott Okuno

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Desmoid tumors are a rare group of locally aggressive, non malignant tumors of fibroblastic origin that can lead to significant morbidity due to local invasion. Despite advances in the understanding of these tumors, their natural history is incompletely understood and the optimal treatment is still a matter of debate. Local control is the main goal of treatment and there has been a change in philosophy regarding the management of these tumors from aggressive surgical resection to function preservation. A multidisciplinary approach is essential to plan local control with acceptable morbidity. The current Mayo Clinic algorithm for the treatment of these tumors is based on institutional experience and the available evidence in the literature: asymptomatic/non progressive lesions away from vital structures are managed with observation and regular imaging; primary or recurrent desmoid tumors which are symptomatic or progressive or near vital structures are managed with wide surgical resection when wide surgical margins are possible with minimal functional and cosmetic loss. When positive or close surgical margins are likely, surgical resection with adjuvant radiotherapy or definitive radiotherapy is preferred. If likely functional or cosmetic deficit is unacceptable, radiotherapy is the treatment of choice. Unresectable lesions are considered for radiotherapy, chemotherapy or newer modalities however an unresectable lesion associated with a painful, functionless, infected extremity is managed with an amputation.

  2. Current Perspectives on Desmoid Tumors: The Mayo Clinic Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joglekar, Siddharth B.; Rose, Peter S.; Sim, Franklin; Okuno, Scott; Petersen, Ivy

    2011-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are a rare group of locally aggressive, non malignant tumors of fibroblastic origin that can lead to significant morbidity due to local invasion. Despite advances in the understanding of these tumors, their natural history is incompletely understood and the optimal treatment is still a matter of debate. Local control is the main goal of treatment and there has been a change in philosophy regarding the management of these tumors from aggressive surgical resection to function preservation. A multidisciplinary approach is essential to plan local control with acceptable morbidity. The current Mayo Clinic algorithm for the treatment of these tumors is based on institutional experience and the available evidence in the literature: asymptomatic/non progressive lesions away from vital structures are managed with observation and regular imaging; primary or recurrent desmoid tumors which are symptomatic or progressive or near vital structures are managed with wide surgical resection when wide surgical margins are possible with minimal functional and cosmetic loss. When positive or close surgical margins are likely, surgical resection with adjuvant radiotherapy or definitive radiotherapy is preferred. If likely functional or cosmetic deficit is unacceptable, radiotherapy is the treatment of choice. Unresectable lesions are considered for radiotherapy, chemotherapy or newer modalities however an unresectable lesion associated with a painful, functionless, infected extremity is managed with an amputation

  3. A transseptal approach in transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary (hypophyseal) tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gierek, T.; Galuszko-Ignasiak, B.; Krauze, J.; Rudnik, A.

    1994-01-01

    The authors described the direct transseptal approach in transsphenoidal surgery for hypophyseal tumors. This route gives a good insight into the area of the sella. The above mentioned method is also less destructive to nasal structures in the nasal cavity, because preserves the anterior nasal septum. It is uniformity of actually views of rhinological school. 20 patients were operated using this method and none of them noticed the changes of nasal airway and the sense of smell. (author)

  4. A systems biology-based approach to deciphering the etiology of steatosis employing patient-derived dermal fibroblasts and iPS cells

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    Justyna eJozefczuk

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD comprises a broad spectrum of disease states ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. As a result of increases in the prevalences of obesity, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia, the number of people with hepatic steatosis continues to increase. Differences in susceptibility to steatohepatitis and its progression to cirrhosis have been attributed to a complex interplay of genetic and external factors all addressing the intracellular network. Increase in sugar or refined carbohydrate consumption results in an increase of insulin and insulin resistance that can lead to the accumulation of fat in the liver. Here we demonstrate how a multidisciplinary approach encompassing cellular reprogramming, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, modeling, network reconstruction and data management can be employed to unveil the mechanisms underlying the progression of steatosis. Proteomics revealed reduced AKT/mTOR signaling in fibroblasts derived from steatosis patients and further establishes that the insulin-resistant phenotype is present not only in insulin-metabolizing central organs, e.g. the liver, but is also manifested in skin fibroblasts. Transcriptome data enabled the generation of a regulatory network based on the transcription factor SREBF1, linked to a metabolic network of glycerolipid and fatty acid biosynthesis including the downstream transcriptional targets of SREBF1 which include LIPIN1 (LPIN and low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR. Glutathione metabolism was among the pathways enriched in steatosis patients in comparison to healthy controls. By using a model of the glutathione pathway we predict a significant increase in the flux through glutathione synthesis as both gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase and glutathione synthetase have an increased flux. We anticipate that a larger sample of patients and matching controls will confirm our preliminary findings presented

  5. Blocking Blood Flow to Solid Tumors by Destabilizing Tubulin: An Approach to Targeting Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, María-Jesús; Priego, Eva-María; Bueno, Oskía; Martins, Maria Solange; Canela, María-Dolores; Liekens, Sandra

    2016-10-13

    The unique characteristics of the tumor vasculature offer the possibility to selectively target tumor growth and vascularization using tubulin-destabilizing agents. Evidence accumulated with combretastatin A-4 (CA-4) and its prodrug CA-4P support the therapeutic value of compounds sharing this mechanism of action. However, the chemical instability and poor solubility of CA-4 demand alternative compounds that are able to surmount these limitations. This Perspective illustrates the different classes of compounds that behave similar to CA-4, analyzes their binding mode to αβ-tubulin according to recently available structural complexes, and includes described approaches to improve their delivery. In addition, dissecting the mechanism of action of CA-4 and analogues allows a closer insight into the advantages and drawbacks associated with these tubulin-destabilizing agents that behave as vascular disrupting agents (VDAs).

  6. Complex diagnostic approaches in metastases of tumors in skeleton. VII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bek, V.; Stepan, J.; Hausner, P.; Vosecky, M.; Konopasek, B.; Novy, F.

    1987-01-01

    In addition to the current methods of imaging the skeleton and of histomorphological and cytomorphological examinations of the bone marrow and the bone tissue, an ever growing attention is devoted to humoral factors affecting the metabolism of the skeleton. Prostaglandins, or in a broader sense, eicosanoids are in the forefront of the attention. Their relations is studied to immune and endocrine mechanisms and to growth factors (TGF (transforming growth factor), EDF (epidermal growth factor), PDGF (platelet derived growth factor)). Specific monoclonal antibodies to the membrane and cytoplasma structures of malignant cells represent an important shift towards improved detection of disseminated tumor cells in the bone marrow. Computerized tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance contribute to improved definition in bone diagnosis. The condition of bone metabolism can be assessed by whole-body retention using technetium-labelled phosphate complexes. The methods offering information on the state of blood supply for the skeleton are also important. Common tests of bone marrow metastasis detection combine with the determination of the presence of tumor markers (CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen), TPA (tissue polypeptide antigen), plasminogen activator, polyamine, etc.). Upon heterogeneity of cell populations in the tumor, an urgent need arises for the clinician to penetrate down to the cellular and the subcellular levels of the malignant growth with the aim of identifying biological potency of the individual cell clones, including their capability of produce and proliferate metastases. We are approaching this desirable target through the flow cytometry method. (author). 30 refs

  7. A systems biology-based approach to uncovering the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of dragon's blood tablet in colitis, involving the integration of chemical analysis, ADME prediction, and network pharmacology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyu Xu

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM is one of the oldest East Asian medical systems. The present study adopted a systems biology-based approach to provide new insights relating to the active constituents and molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of dragon's blood (DB tablets for the treatment of colitis. This study integrated chemical analysis, prediction of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME, and network pharmacology. Firstly, a rapid, reliable, and accurate ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method was employed to identify 48 components of DB tablets. In silico prediction of the passive absorption of these compounds, based on Caco-2 cell permeability, and their P450 metabolism enabled the identification of 22 potentially absorbed components and 8 metabolites. Finally, networks were constructed to analyze interactions between these DB components/metabolites absorbed and their putative targets, and between the putative DB targets and known therapeutic targets for colitis. This study provided a great opportunity to deepen the understanding of the complex pharmacological mechanisms underlying the effects of DB in colitis treatment.

  8. Medulloblastoma: toward biologically based management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkari, Ayman; White, Jason C; Packer, Roger J

    2015-03-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children and, as such, has been the focus of tremendous efforts to genomically characterize it. What was once thought to be a single disease has been divided into multiple, molecularly unique subgroups through gene expression profiling. Each subgroup is not only unique in its origin and pathogenesis but also in the prognosis and potential therapeutic options. Targeted therapy of malignancies has long been the goal of clinical oncology. The progress made in the classification of medulloblastoma should be used as a model for future studies. With the evolution of epigenetic and genomic sequencing, especially when used in tandem with high-throughput pharmacologic screening protocols, the potential for subgroup-specific targeting is closer than ever. This review focuses on the development of the molecular classification system and its potential use in developing prognostic models as well as for the advancement of targeted therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Recent novel tumor gatekeepers and potential therapeutic approaches

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tumor remains a challenging task for oncology community. ... Development of novel anti-cancer drugs or new targeted strategies to conquer drug ... In this respect, novel tumor gatekeepers and innovative targeted strategies can be helpful in ...

  10. Lateral skull base approaches in the management of benign parapharyngeal space tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sampath Chandra; Piccirillo, Enrico; Chovanec, Martin; La Melia, Claudio; De Donato, Giuseppe; Sanna, Mario

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the role of lateral skull base approaches in the management of benign parapharyngeal space tumors and to propose an algorithm for their surgical approach. Retrospective study of patients with benign parapharyngeal space tumors. The clinical features, radiology and preoperative management of skull base neurovasculature, the surgical approaches and overall results were recorded. 46 patients presented with 48 tumors. 12 were prestyloid and 36 poststyloid. 19 (39.6%) tumors were paragangliomas, 15 (31.25%) were schwannomas and 11 (23%) were pleomorphic adenomas. Preoperative embolization was performed in 19, stenting of the internal carotid artery in 4 and permanent balloon occlusion in 2 patients. 19 tumors were approached by the transcervical, 13 by transcervical-transparotid, 5 by transcervical-transmastoid, 6, 1 and 2 tumors by the infratemporal fossa approach types A, B and D, respectively. Total radical tumor removal was achieved in 46 (96%) of the cases. Lateral skull base approaches have an advantage over other approaches in the management of benign tumors of the parapharyngeal space due to the fact that they provide excellent exposure with less morbidity. The use of microscope combined with bipolar cautery reduces morbidity. Stenting of internal carotid artery gives a chance for complete tumor removal with arterial preservation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Brown tumor of secondary hyperparathyroidism: surgical approach and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Isaac Vieira; Queiroz, Samara Pereira; Medeiros, Rui; Ribeiro, Rodolfo Bonfim; Crusoé-Rebello, Iêda Margarida; Leão, Jair Carneiro

    2016-12-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism is a frequent complication of chronic renal failure. The brown tumor is an unusual presentation of fibrous osteitis that represents a serious complication of renal osteodystrophy, affecting predominantly the hands, feet, skull, and facial bones. The aim of this paper is to describe the case of a 53-year-old female patient, with renal failure who has been on dialysis for 6 years and developed severe secondary hyperparathyroidism and brown tumor of the maxilla and mandible, confirmed by incisional biopsy. Parathyroidectomy was indicated as a result of rapid growth of the tumor and the maintenance of laboratory findings. Despite the normalization of serum parathyroid hormone and alkaline phosphatase, tumor regression was slow and patient's important functional and esthetic deficits persisted. Excision of the mandible tumor was conservative. Osteoplasty was recommended because during a 5-year follow-up there was regression of the lesion, decreased pain, bleeding, and tooth mobility.

  12. Tumor metabolism, the ketogenic diet and β-hydroxybutyrate: novel approaches to adjuvant brain tumor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C. Woolf

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Malignant brain tumors are devastating despite aggressive treatments such as surgical resection, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The average life expectancy of patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma is approximately ~18 months. It is clear that increased survival of brain tumor patients requires the design of new therapeutic modalities, especially those that enhance currently available treatments and/or limit tumor growth. One novel therapeutic arena is the metabolic dysregulation that results in an increased need for glucose in tumor cells. This phenomenon suggests that a reduction in tumor growth could be achieved by decreasing glucose availability, which can be accomplished through pharmacological means or through the use of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD. The KD, as the name implies, also provides increased blood ketones to support the energy needs of normal tissues. Preclinical work from a number of laboratories has shown that the KD does indeed reduce tumor growth in vivo. In addition, the KD has been shown to reduce angiogenesis, inflammation, peri-tumoral edema, migration and invasion. Furthermore, this diet can enhance the activity of radiation and chemotherapy in a mouse model of glioma, thus increasing survival. Additional studies in vitro have indicated that increasing ketones such as β-hydroxybutyrate in the absence of glucose reduction can also inhibit cell growth and potentiate the effects of chemotherapy and radiation. Thus, while we are only beginning to understand the pluripotent mechanisms through which the KD affects tumor growth and response to conventional therapies, the emerging data provide strong support for the use of a KD in the treatment of malignant gliomas. This has led to a limited number of clinical trials investigating the use of a KD in patients with primary and recurrent glioma.

  13. Quest: A New Approach to Molecular Staging of Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    nerve sheath tumors. Cancer Investigation 21:901-918, 2003. "* Book Chapter. Stephens K. Neurofibromatosis. In Molecular Pathology in Clinical Practice...sheath tumors. Cancer Investigation 21:901-918, 2003. (a preprint is provided for your review). 2. Book Chapter. Stephens K. Neurofibromatosis. In...neurofibromatosis. Cancer Res 2002, 62, 1573-1577. 49. Molenaar , W.M., Dijkhuizen, T., van Echten, J., Hoekstra, H.J., van den Berg, E. Cytogenetic support

  14. Virtual Reality Tumor Resection: The Force Pyramid Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaya, Robin; Bugdadi, Abdulgadir; Azarnoush, Hamed; Winkler-Schwartz, Alexander; Alotaibi, Fahad E; Bajunaid, Khalid; AlZhrani, Gmaan A; Alsideiri, Ghusn; Sabbagh, Abdulrahman J; Del Maestro, Rolando F

    2017-09-05

    The force pyramid is a novel visual representation allowing spatial delineation of instrument force application during surgical procedures. In this study, the force pyramid concept is employed to create and quantify dominant hand, nondominant hand, and bimanual force pyramids during resection of virtual reality brain tumors. To address 4 questions: Do ergonomics and handedness influence force pyramid structure? What are the differences between dominant and nondominant force pyramids? What is the spatial distribution of forces applied in specific tumor quadrants? What differentiates "expert" and "novice" groups regarding their force pyramids? Using a simulated aspirator in the dominant hand and a simulated sucker in the nondominant hand, 6 neurosurgeons and 14 residents resected 8 different tumors using the CAE NeuroVR virtual reality neurosurgical simulation platform (CAE Healthcare, Montréal, Québec and the National Research Council Canada, Boucherville, Québec). Position and force data were used to create force pyramids and quantify tumor quadrant force distribution. Force distribution quantification demonstrates the critical role that handedness and ergonomics play on psychomotor performance during simulated brain tumor resections. Neurosurgeons concentrate their dominant hand forces in a defined crescent in the lower right tumor quadrant. Nondominant force pyramids showed a central peak force application in all groups. Bimanual force pyramids outlined the combined impact of each hand. Distinct force pyramid patterns were seen when tumor stiffness, border complexity, and color were altered. Force pyramids allow delineation of specific tumor regions requiring greater psychomotor ability to resect. This information can focus and improve resident technical skills training. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  15. Pathophysiological aspects and therapeutic approaches of tumoral osteolysis and hypercalcemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonjour, J P; Rizzoli, R

    1989-01-01

    Malignant tumors can affect the integrity of the skeletal tissue and the homeostasis of the two main components of bone mineral, calcium (Ca) and inorganic phosphate (Pi). Various tumoral cell products can increase bone resorption by influencing the number of osteoclasts and/or their activity. These tumoral products could act either directly on bone cells of the osteoblastic or osteoclastic lineages, or indirectly by influencing cells secreting osteotropic factors, such as interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factors, transforming growth factors, and colony-stimulating factor. Among the classical calciotropic hormones, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 could be implicated in lymphoma. In hypercalcemia of malignancy, an increase in bone resorption is observed in most patients. However, in many cases an increased tubular reabsorption of Ca has been documented as well. This phenomenon when present after adequate rehydration is probably due to the secretion by the tumoral cells of a parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP). This factor has been recently identified as a protein containing 141 amino acids. This protein or some very close analogs have been shown to be secreted by lung, kidney and also breast carcinoma. Besides increasing bone resorption and stimulating tubular reabsorption of Ca, PTHrP also selectively decreases the tubular reabsorption of Pi, an action that may explain the hypophosphatemia observed in some types of neoplasm. Therapeutically, administration of antiresorbing agents such as clodronate or other bisphosphonates can normalize the increased osteolysis and, if present, the associated elevation in the plasma level of Ca in most cancer patients. However in some cases, wherein the prevailing hypercalcemic mechanism is due to an enhancement in the tubular reabsorption of Ca, other therapeutic means should be associated with the antiosteolytic bisphosphonate therapy.

  16. hTe exciting potential of nanotherapy in brain-tumor targeted drug delivery approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vivek Agrahari

    2017-01-01

    Delivering therapeutics to the central nervous system (CNS) and brain-tumor has been a major challenge. hTe current standard treatment approaches for the brain-tumor comprise of surgical resection followed by immunotherapy, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. However, the current treatments are limited in provid-ing signiifcant beneifts to the patients and despite recent technological advancements; brain-tumor is still challenging to treat. Brain-tumor therapy is limited by the lack of effective and targeted strategies to deliver chemotherapeutic agents across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). hTe BBB is the main obstacle that must be overcome to allow compounds to reach their targets in the brain. Recent advances have boosted the nan-otherapeutic approaches in providing an attractive strategy in improving the drug delivery across the BBB and into the CNS. Compared to conventional formulations, nanoformulations offer signiifcant ad vantages in CNS drug delivery approaches. Considering the above facts, in this review, the physiological/anatomical features of the brain-tumor and the BBB are brielfy discussed. hTe drug transport mechanisms at the BBB are outlined. hTe approaches to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs across the CNS into the brain-tumor using nanocarriers are summarized. In addition, the challenges that need to be addressed in nanotherapeutic ap-proaches for their enhanced clinical application in brain-tumor therapy are discussed.

  17. The exciting potential of nanotherapy in brain-tumor targeted drug delivery approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Agrahari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Delivering therapeutics to the central nervous system (CNS and brain-tumor has been a major challenge. The current standard treatment approaches for the brain-tumor comprise of surgical resection followed by immunotherapy, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. However, the current treatments are limited in providing significant benefits to the patients and despite recent technological advancements; brain-tumor is still challenging to treat. Brain-tumor therapy is limited by the lack of effective and targeted strategies to deliver chemotherapeutic agents across the blood-brain barrier (BBB. The BBB is the main obstacle that must be overcome to allow compounds to reach their targets in the brain. Recent advances have boosted the nanotherapeutic approaches in providing an attractive strategy in improving the drug delivery across the BBB and into the CNS. Compared to conventional formulations, nanoformulations offer significant advantages in CNS drug delivery approaches. Considering the above facts, in this review, the physiological/anatomical features of the brain-tumor and the BBB are briefly discussed. The drug transport mechanisms at the BBB are outlined. The approaches to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs across the CNS into the brain-tumor using nanocarriers are summarized. In addition, the challenges that need to be addressed in nanotherapeutic approaches for their enhanced clinical application in brain-tumor therapy are discussed.

  18. Complex diagnostic approaches in skeletal metastases of tumors. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bek, V.; Janko, L.; Hausner, P.; Konopasek, B.; Novy, F.; Vosecky, M.; Stepan, J.

    1986-01-01

    The results are presented of radionuclide examinations of the skeleton obtained during long-term research of comprehensive diagnosis of metastatic osteopathies. In a group of 922 patients with different malignant tumors where the largest sub-groups are represented by female patients with breast cancer (623 cases), patients with tumors of the testicles (66 patients) and patients with renal carcinoma (64 patients), assessed are the sensitivity, specificity and reliability of two radionuclide methods, i.e., the strontium test ( 85 Sr) and whole-body scanning after administration of technetium-labelled pyrophosphate ( 99m Tc-PYP). During long-term investigations of patients, as a reference finding the evidence of bone metastases by radiography and/or necropsy was selected. Whole-body scanning with technetium-labelled phosphate complexes is at present the method of choice. (author). 10 tabs., 17 refs

  19. Breast cancer tumor classification using LASSO method selection approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celaya P, J. M.; Ortiz M, J. A.; Martinez B, M. R.; Solis S, L. O.; Castaneda M, R.; Garza V, I.; Martinez F, M.; Ortiz R, J. M.

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide among women. Early tumor detection is key in reducing breast cancer deaths and screening mammography is the widest available method for early detection. Mammography is the most common and effective breast cancer screening test. However, the rate of positive findings is very low, making the radiologic interpretation monotonous and biased toward errors. In an attempt to alleviate radiological workload, this work presents a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD x) method aimed to automatically classify tumor lesions into malign or benign as a means to a second opinion. The CAD x methos, extracts image features, and classifies the screening mammogram abnormality into one of two categories: subject at risk of having malignant tumor (malign), and healthy subject (benign). In this study, 143 abnormal segmentation s (57 malign and 86 benign) from the Breast Cancer Digital Repository (BCD R) public database were used to train and evaluate the CAD x system. Percentile-rank (p-rank) was used to standardize the data. Using the LASSO feature selection methodology, the model achieved a Leave-one-out-cross-validation area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Auc) of 0.950. The proposed method has the potential to rank abnormal lesions with high probability of malignant findings aiding in the detection of potential malign cases as a second opinion to the radiologist. (Author)

  20. Breast cancer tumor classification using LASSO method selection approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celaya P, J. M.; Ortiz M, J. A.; Martinez B, M. R.; Solis S, L. O.; Castaneda M, R.; Garza V, I.; Martinez F, M.; Ortiz R, J. M., E-mail: morvymm@yahoo.com.mx [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Av. Ramon Lopez Velarde 801, Col. Centro, 98000 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2016-10-15

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide among women. Early tumor detection is key in reducing breast cancer deaths and screening mammography is the widest available method for early detection. Mammography is the most common and effective breast cancer screening test. However, the rate of positive findings is very low, making the radiologic interpretation monotonous and biased toward errors. In an attempt to alleviate radiological workload, this work presents a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD x) method aimed to automatically classify tumor lesions into malign or benign as a means to a second opinion. The CAD x methos, extracts image features, and classifies the screening mammogram abnormality into one of two categories: subject at risk of having malignant tumor (malign), and healthy subject (benign). In this study, 143 abnormal segmentation s (57 malign and 86 benign) from the Breast Cancer Digital Repository (BCD R) public database were used to train and evaluate the CAD x system. Percentile-rank (p-rank) was used to standardize the data. Using the LASSO feature selection methodology, the model achieved a Leave-one-out-cross-validation area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Auc) of 0.950. The proposed method has the potential to rank abnormal lesions with high probability of malignant findings aiding in the detection of potential malign cases as a second opinion to the radiologist. (Author)

  1. An approach to malignant mammary phyllodes tumors detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Mammary phyllodes tumors (MPT are uncommon fibroepithelial (biphasic neoplasms whose clinical behavior is difficult to predict on the basis of histological criteria only. They are divided into benign, borderline malignant and malignant groups. Sometimes it appears difficult to distinguish these tumors from other types of soft tissue sarcomas. Because of the relatively scant data on the role of biological markers in MPT histogenesis, we have decided to undertake the following study, trying to shed more light on the issue by investigating the following elements that make up MPT: their histological patterns, biological behavior, enzymohistochemical, histochemical and immunohistochemical characteristics (ICH together with the mast cell analysis. Methods. We examined the biopsy material of 35 MPT in our laboratory. Enzymohistochemistry was performed on frozen sections (method of Crowford, Nachlas and Seligman. The used methods were classical hematoxylin-eosin (H&E; histochemical Massontrichrome, Alcian-blue, Periodic acid Schiff and immunohistochemical LSAB2 method (DacoCytomation. Ki-67, ckit, vimentin, estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR and Her-2 oncoprotein immunohistochemistry was performed on all tumors. Results. The patients were ranged per age from 30-62 years (mean 43.3 years, median 39 years. A total of 35 cases of MPT were included: 20 benign (57%, 6 borderline malignant (17% and 9 malignant (26%. Twenty-two patients (62.8 % underwent segmental mastectomy, while 13 (37.2% had total mastectomies. Twenty-eight patients had negative surgical margins at original resection. The mean size of malignant MPT (7.8 cm was larger than that of benign MPT (4.5 cm. Significant features of the malignant MPT were: stromal cellularity, stromal cellular atypism, high mitotic activity, atypic mitoses, stromal overgrowth, infiltrative tumor contour and heterologous stromal elements. Benign MPT showed strong enzymohistochemical

  2. Skin tumor area extraction using an improved dynamic programming approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Qaisar; Celebi, M E; Fondón García, Irene

    2012-05-01

    Border (B) description of melanoma and other pigmented skin lesions is one of the most important tasks for the clinical diagnosis of dermoscopy images using the ABCD rule. For an accurate description of the border, there must be an effective skin tumor area extraction (STAE) method. However, this task is complicated due to uneven illumination, artifacts present in the lesions and smooth areas or fuzzy borders of the desired regions. In this paper, a novel STAE algorithm based on improved dynamic programming (IDP) is presented. The STAE technique consists of the following four steps: color space transform, pre-processing, rough tumor area detection and refinement of the segmented area. The procedure is performed in the CIE L(*) a(*) b(*) color space, which is approximately uniform and is therefore related to dermatologist's perception. After pre-processing the skin lesions to reduce artifacts, the DP algorithm is improved by introducing a local cost function, which is based on color and texture weights. The STAE method is tested on a total of 100 dermoscopic images. In order to compare the performance of STAE with other state-of-the-art algorithms, various statistical measures based on dermatologist-drawn borders are utilized as a ground truth. The proposed method outperforms the others with a sensitivity of 96.64%, a specificity of 98.14% and an error probability of 5.23%. The results demonstrate that this STAE method by IDP is an effective solution when compared with other state-of-the-art segmentation techniques. The proposed method can accurately extract tumor borders in dermoscopy images. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Parotidectomy for benign parotid tumors: An aesthetic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, A.; Mostafa, A.; Rifaat, M.; Shallan, M.; Rabie, A.; Elzohairy, M.; Nabawi, A.

    2011-01-01

    The sternocleidomastoid (SCM) partial thickness muscle flap is among the various methods described to correct parotidectomy defects, but its indications and limitations are not clearly demonstrated in several reports. This study was done to test the aesthetic outcome of this method, its indications and limitations. The technique was combined with a face lift incision to further improve the outcome. Patients and methods: At the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt, 23 patients presenting with benign tumors underwent parotidectomy, 19 had superficial parotidectomy and four had total parotidectomy done. The superiorly based (SCM) muscle flap was used to correct the contour deformity. The aesthetic result was evaluated by assessing arid scoring the overall appearance of the scar, the degree of symmetry of the reconstructed parotid region and the site of the donor muscle to their contralateral normal sides. The overall aesthetic appearance was then calculated by the summation of the scores of the latter three parameters. Patients' satisfaction was assessed by patients' questionnaire. Result: The overall aesthetic appearance was good in 17 patients, and moderate in six patients. 16/23 patients had an overall deep satisfaction with the result. The residual hollowness of the parotid following reconstruction of the total parotidectomy defect and the poor quality of scars were the main reasons affecting the aesthetic outcome. Conclusion: Superficial parotidectomy through facelift incision with immediate reconstruction with superiorly based partial thickness SCM flap allows adequate resection of most benign parotid tumors with a satisfactory aesthetic outcome and minimal donor site morbidity

  4. Complex diagnostic approaches to skeletal metastases of tumors. IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bek, V.; Hermanska, Z.; Stepan, J.; Hausner, P.; Vosecky, M.; Janko, L.; Konopasek, B.; Novy, F.

    1987-01-01

    The results of cytomorphological examination of the bone marrow from sternal punctates in groups of patients, were evaluated in relation to radiographic and radionuclide skeletal findings. In this respect, the correlation of medullary findings from the quantitative aspect, i.e., the cellularity of bone marrow, as well as from the aspect of qualitative deviations, i.e., the finding of tumor cells, proved unimportant. The detection of a typical nest of metastatic tumor cells in the bone marow, even if all other findings are negative, is beyond doubt of diagnostic and prognostic importance. A comparison of the results obtained by trepanobiopsy with the other examinations revealed interesting correlations, however, in view of the limited number of patients examined no general conclusions can be drawn. A detailed analysis of the results of biochemical examinations showed that for practice two biochemical indicators are important: urinary hydroxyproline excretion and the serum levels of the bone isoenzyme of alkaline phosphatase. Detailed evaluation of the validity of both tests allowed to assess the range of values which indicate a high, i.e., 90% probability of the presence or absence of bone metastases. From the significant correlation of biochemical tests with the results of bone scintigraphy ensues the necessity to combine the above procedures in the practical diagnosis of metastatic osteopathies. (author). 12 tabs., 6 refs

  5. Complex diagnostic approaches to skeletal metastases of tumors. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolar, J.; Bek, V.; Janko, L.; Stepan, J.; Hausner, P.; Konopasek, B.; Novy, F.

    1987-01-01

    The importance is evaluated of scintigraphy of the skeleton in the following conditions: a) detection of a pathological process in general, b) assessment of its extent, i.e., solitary or multiple pathological foci, c) estimate of the activity of bone reconstruction and d) evaluation of changes in the course of treatment. The problem of interpretation of the results are dealt with of radionuclide examinations of the skeleton with regard to their lack of specificity. The accumulation of osteotropic radionuclides can be influenced by an increased turnover of bone minerals as a result of collateral or whole-body response reaction, the systemic action of various humoral factors, hypercalcaemic conditions, etc. In the differential diagnosis of metastatic osteopathies it is important to take into consideration the positive character of radionuclide examinations in many non-tumorous bone and joint affections. For interpretation of the results also the possibility of depositing radionuclides in extraosseous tissues is important. (author). 2 figs., 30 refs

  6. Individualized Surgical Approach Planning for Petroclival Tumors Using a 3D Printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muelleman, Thomas John; Peterson, Jeremy; Chowdhury, Naweed Iffat; Gorup, Jason; Camarata, Paul; Lin, James

    2016-06-01

    Objectives To determine the utility of three-dimensional (3D) printed models in individualized petroclival tumor resection planning by measuring the fidelity of printed anatomical structures and comparing tumor exposure afforded by different approaches. Design Case series and review of the literature. Setting Tertiary care center. Participants Three patients with petroclival lesions. Main Outcome Measures Subjective opinion of access by neuro-otologists and neurosurgeons as well as surface area of tumor exposure. Results Surgeons found the 3D models of each patient's skull and tumor useful for preoperative planning. Limitations of individual surgical approaches not identified through preoperative imaging were apparent after 3D models were evaluated. Significant variability in exposure was noted between models for similar or identical approaches. A notable drawback is that our printing process did not replicate mastoid air cells. Conclusions We found that 3D modeling is useful for individualized preoperative planning for approaching petroclival tumors. Our printing techniques did produce authentic replicas of the tumors in relation to bony structures.

  7. Recent novel tumor gatekeepers and potential therapeutic approaches

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Cancer, Potent inhibitors, Gatekeepers, Therapeutic approaches, Oncogenic pathways. Tropical Journal ..... effects of the target suppression support change from a one gene .... Siegel RL, Miller KD, Jemal A. Cancer statistics, 2017.

  8. Sensitivity of Tumor Motion Simulation Accuracy to Lung Biomechanical Modeling Approaches and Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Tehrani, Joubin Nasehi; Yang, Yin; Werner, Rene; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Guo, Xiaohu; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA)-based biomechanical modeling can be used to predict lung respiratory motion. In this technique, elastic models and biomechanical parameters are two important factors that determine modeling accuracy. We systematically evaluated the effects of lung and lung tumor biomechanical modeling approaches and related parameters to improve the accuracy of motion simulation of lung tumor center of mass (TCM) displacements. Experiments were conducted with four-dimensional com...

  9. Bases biológicas de la dependencia de las drogas: hacia un enfoque integral del proglema Biologic bases of drug dependence: toward an integral approach of the problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Mario Tamayo

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available El abuso y la dependencia de las drogas son problemas complejos y costosos que requieren una intervención terapéutica polimodal e integral. En los últimos años se han dado varios descubrimientos científicos relacionados con las bases biológicas de estos trastornos. Ello ha permitido desarrollar programas que incluyen el uso de diferentes psicofármacos y técnicas psicoterapéuticas que posibilitan una modulación de las vías neuronales disfuncionales. La investigación del sistema mesolímbico dopaminérgico y de los receptores opioides del tallo cerebral y del núcleo accumbens sumada al develamiento de los diferentes mecanismos intraneuronales, han permitido comprender me. jorlos cambios cerebrales ycomportamentales debidos al consumo agudo y crónico de drogas. Tales hallazgos biológicos son el propósito de esta revisión basada en una búsqueda de artículos a través de MEDLINE.. Drugs abuse and dependence are complex and expensive disorders that require a polymodal and integral therapeutic intervention. Several scientific discoveries related to the biological bases of these disorders have recently arisen. These discoveries guide the design of programs that include different psychotropic drugs and psychotherapeutic technics that allow a modulation of the neuronal dysfunction process. Research on the mesolimbic dopaminergic system and the opioid receptors in the brain stem and the nucleus accumbens added to new knowledge of different intraneuronal mechanisms, allow a better understanding of cerebral and behavioral changes due to acute and chronic consumption of drugs. Such biological findings are the purpose of this review based on a MEDLINE search of articles.

  10. 'Image and treat': an individualized approach to urological tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Capala, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    The current treatment options for advanced urologic cancers demonstrate limited efficacy. To obtain optimal clinical results, there is a need for new, individualized, therapeutic strategies, which have only recently been applied to these malignancies. Nuclear medicine plays an important role in e...... in establishing imaging biomarkers necessary for personalized medicine. This review focuses on the current status of the 'image and treat' approach combining molecular imaging with targeted radionuclide therapy of urological malignancies...

  11. A robotic approach to 4D real-time tumor tracking for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzurovic, I; Yu, Y; Huang, K; Podder, T K

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions induce displacement and deformation of the tumor volumes in various internal organs. To accommodate this undesired movement and other errors, physicians incorporate a large margin around the tumor to delineate the planning target volume, so that the clinical target volume receives the prescribed radiation dose under any scenario. Consequently, a large volume of healthy tissue is irradiated and sometimes it is difficult to spare critical organs adjacent to the tumor. In this study we have proposed a novel approach to the 4D active tracking and dynamic delivery incorporating the tumor motion prediction technique. This method has been applied to the two commercially available robotic treatment couches. The proposed algorithm can predict the tumor position and the robotic systems are able to continuously track the tumor during radiation dose delivery. Therefore a precise dose is given to a moving target while the dose to the nearby critical organs is reduced to improve the patient treatment outcome. The efficacy of the proposed method has been investigated by extensive computer simulation. The tumor tracking method is simulated for two couches: HexaPOD robotic couch and ELEKTA Precise Table. The comparison results have been presented in this paper. In order to assess the clinical significance, dosimetric effects of the proposed method have been analyzed.

  12. Anterior Trans Cervicothoracic Approach for Complete Resection of Cervicothoracic Mediastinal Neurogenic Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Bagheri

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Neurogenic mediastinal tumors comprise a wide range of benign and malignant diseases. A group of these tumors, located at thoracic apex, sometimes spread to cervical spaces causing numerous surgical difficulties. In thoracotomy approaches, due to proximity of the tumors to major blood vessels, complete removal of these tumors from cervical spaces is impossible or may cause intraoperative severe bleeding or other dangerous incidents Because of the adjacent major vessels  that are not visible.The aim of this study is to report cases of surgical treatment of such tumors using Anterior Trans Cervicothoracic Approach (ATCA. Materials and Methods:All patients with neurogenic tumors and cervicomediastinal (CM spread who underwent surgey with ATCA technique during 2005-2011 were included in our study. Then they were evaluated in terms of age, sex, clinical symptoms, radiological and pathological findings, technical success rate of the surgery, surgical complications and first-year relapse rate after the surgery. Results:Our study included 10 patients from whom 9 were female and 1 was male (M/F= 1/9 and the mean age was 27 years. The most common symptoms were pain and feeling of a lump. All patients were operated by this technique successfully. The most common pathological finding was neurofibroma (in 5 patients and surgical complications occurred in 2 patients (20% (Wound infection in 1 patient and brachial plexus injury in another patient. There was no mortality. Disease relapse was reported in 1 patient  ganglioneuroblastoma who underwent surgical resection for the second time. Conclusion: Considering the successful removal of the tumors and favorable exposure of major vessels in cervicomediastinal spaces, this technique is recommended to resect mediastinal tumors with spread to cervical spaces. However, a more definite conclusion requires further studies.

  13. How to Boost the Breast Tumor Bed? A Multidisciplinary Approach in Eight Steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirova, Youlia M.; Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Servois, Vincent; Laki, Fatima; Pollet, Guillaume A.; Salmon, Remy; Thomas, Alexandra; Dendale, Remi; Bollet, Marc A.; Campana, Francois M.D.; Fourquet, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a new procedure for breast radiotherapy that will improve tumor bed localization and radiotherapy treatment using a multidisciplinary approach. Patients and Methods: This pilot study was conducted by departments of radiation oncology, surgery, and radiology. A new procedure has been implemented, summarized as eight steps: from pre-surgery contrast CT to surgery, tumor bed planning target volume (PTV) determination, and finally breast and tumor bed irradiation. Results: Twenty patients presenting with T1N0M0 tumors were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent lumpectomy with the placement of surgical clips in the tumor bed region. During surgery, 1 to 5 clips were placed in the lumpectomy cavity before the plastic procedure. All patients underwent pre- and postoperative CT scans in the treatment position. The two sets of images were registered with a match-point registration. All volumes were contoured and the results evaluated. The PTV included the clips region, the gross tumor volume, and the surgical scar, with an overall margin of 5-10 mm in all directions, corresponding to localization and setup uncertainties. For each patient the boost PTV was discussed and compared with our standard forward-planned PTV. Conclusions: We demonstrate the feasibility of a tumor bed localization and treatment procedure that seems adaptable to routine practice. Our study shows the advantages of a multidisciplinary approach for tumor bed localization and treatment. The use of more than 1 clip associated with pre- to postoperative CT image registration allows better definition of the PTV boost volume

  14. TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis as a novel approach to eliminate tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, Susann; Kalthoff, Holger; Adam, Dieter; Philipp, Stephan; Davarnia, Parvin; Winoto-Morbach, Supandi; Röder, Christian; Arenz, Christoph; Trauzold, Anna; Kabelitz, Dieter; Schütze, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The cytokine TRAIL represents one of the most promising candidates for the apoptotic elimination of tumor cells, either alone or in combination therapies. However, its efficacy is often limited by intrinsic or acquired resistance of tumor cells to apoptosis. Programmed necrosis is an alternative, molecularly distinct mode of programmed cell death that is elicited by TRAIL under conditions when the classical apoptosis machinery fails or is actively inhibited. The potential of TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis in tumor therapy is, however, almost completely uncharacterized. We therefore investigated its impact on a panel of tumor cell lines of wide-ranging origin. Cell death/viability was measured by flow cytometry/determination of intracellular ATP levels/crystal violet staining. Cell surface expression of TRAIL receptors was detected by flow cytometry, expression of proteins by Western blot. Ceramide levels were quantified by high-performance thin layer chromatography and densitometric analysis, clonogenic survival of cells was determined by crystal violet staining or by soft agarose cloning. TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis killed eight out of 14 tumor cell lines. Clonogenic survival was reduced in all sensitive and even one resistant cell lines tested. TRAIL synergized with chemotherapeutics in killing tumor cell lines by programmed necrosis, enhancing their effect in eight out of 10 tested tumor cell lines and in 41 out of 80 chemotherapeutic/TRAIL combinations. Susceptibility/resistance of the investigated tumor cell lines to programmed necrosis seems to primarily depend on expression of the pro-necrotic kinase RIPK3 rather than the related kinase RIPK1 or cell surface expression of TRAIL receptors. Furthermore, interference with production of the lipid ceramide protected all tested tumor cell lines. Our study provides evidence that TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis represents a feasible approach for the elimination of tumor cells, and that this treatment may

  15. A safe transoral surgical approach to parapharyngeal tumor arising from deep lobe of parotid gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuele Casale

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The management of parapharyngeal tumor is surgical, but the approach remains a challenge. Attention should be paid to avoidance intra-operative bleeding or cranial nerves damage. We report a case of a 67-year-old male complaining of left-ear fullness. A submucosal mass arising from the lateral wall of oropharynx on the left side was observed. Magnetic resonance imaging detected a mass arising from the parotid gland, in particular from the deep lobe, and a fine needle biopsy was compatible with “Warthin tumor.” We performed a mini-invasive transoral approach under magnification, previous isolation of homolateral vessels. The decision on which surgical approach to be used is determined by site, size vascularity, and histology of the tumor. A literature review of the main surgical approaches was performed. We performed a combined transoral dissection under magnification with cervicotomic exposure of the neck vascular bundle allowing to dissect the tumor and manage any intra-operative complications.

  16. A Biologically Based Chemo-Sensing UAV for Humanitarian Demining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul F.M.J. Verschure

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Antipersonnel mines, weapons of cheap manufacture but lethal effect, have a high impact on the population even decades after the conflicts have finished. Here we investigate the use of a chemo-sensing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (cUAV for demining tasks. We developed a blimp based UAV that is equipped with a broadly tuned metal-thin oxide chemo-sensor. A number of chemical mapping strategies were investigated including two biologically based localization strategies derived from the moth chemical search that can optimize the efficiency of the detection and localization of explosives and therefore be used in the demining process. Additionally, we developed a control layer that allows for both fully autonomous and manual controlled flight, as well as for the scheduling of a fleet of cUAVs. Our results confirm the feasibility of this technology for demining in real-world scenarios and give further support to a biologically based approach where the understanding of biological systems is used to solve difficult engineering problems.

  17. A Biologically Based Chemo-Sensing UAV for Humanitarian Demining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Bermúdez i Badia

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Antipersonnel mines, weapons of cheap manufacture but lethal effect, have a high impact on the population even decades after the conflicts have finished. Here we investigate the use of a chemo-sensing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (cUAV for demining tasks. We developed a blimp based UAV that is equipped with a broadly tuned metal-thin oxide chemo-sensor. A number of chemical mapping strategies were investigated including two biologically based localization strategies derived from the moth chemical search that can optimize the efficiency of the detection and localization of explosives and therefore be used in the demining process. Additionally, we developed a control layer that allows for both fully autonomous and manual controlled flight, as well as for the scheduling of a fleet of cUAVs. Our results confirm the feasibility of this technology for demining in real-world scenarios and give further support to a biologically based approach where the understanding of biological systems is used to solve difficult engineering problems.

  18. A Multimodal Imaging Approach for Longitudinal Evaluation of Bladder Tumor Development in an Orthotopic Murine Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Scheepbouwer

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy amongst men in Western industrialized countries with an initial response rate of 70% for the non-muscle invasive type, and improving therapy efficacy is highly needed. For this, an appropriate, reliable animal model is essential to gain insight into mechanisms of tumor growth for use in response monitoring of (new agents. Several animal models have been described in previous studies, but so far success has been hampered due to the absence of imaging methods to follow tumor growth non-invasively over time. Recent developments of multimodal imaging methods for use in animal research have substantially strengthened these options of in vivo visualization of tumor growth. In the present study, a multimodal imaging approach was addressed to investigate bladder tumor proliferation longitudinally. The complementary abilities of Bioluminescence, High Resolution Ultrasound and Photo-acoustic Imaging permit a better understanding of bladder tumor development. Hybrid imaging modalities allow the integration of individual strengths to enable sensitive and improved quantification and understanding of tumor biology, and ultimately, can aid in the discovery and development of new therapeutics.

  19. Split and Splice Approach for Highly Selective Targeting of Human NSCLC Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    development and implementation of the “split-and- spice ” approach required optimization of many independent parameters, which were addressed in parallel...verify the feasibility of the “split and splice” approach for targeting human NSCLC tumor cell lines in culture and prepare the optimized toxins for...for cultured cells (months 2- 8). 2B. To test the efficiency of cell targeting by the toxin variants reconstituted in vitro (months 3-6). 2C. To

  20. Initial impact of a systematic multidisciplinary approach on the management of patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tamagno, Gianluca

    2013-10-01

    According to the international guidelines, a multidisciplinary approach is currently advised for the optimal care of patients with a gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (GEP NET). In our institution (tertiary care center), a systematic multidisciplinary approach was established in May 2007. In this study, we have aimed to assess the initial impact of establishing a systematic multidisciplinary approach to the management of GEP NET patients. We have collected and compared the biochemical, imaging, and pathological data and the therapeutic strategies in GEP NET patients diagnosed, treated, or followed-up from January 1993 to April 2007 versus GEP NET patients attending our institution after the multidisciplinary approach starting, from May 2007 to October 2008. Data of 91 patients before and 42 patients after the establishment of the multidisciplinary approach (total: 133 consecutive GEP NET patients) have been finally collected and analyzed. Before the establishment of the multidisciplinary approach, a lack of consistency in the biochemical, imaging, and pathological findings before treatment initiation as well as during follow-up of GEP NET patients was identified. These inconsistencies have been reduced by the systematic multidisciplinary approach. In addition, the therapeutic management of GEP NET patients has been altered by the multidisciplinary approach and became more consistent with recommended guidelines. We think that a systematic multidisciplinary approach significantly impacts on GEP NET patient care and should be established in all centers dealing with these tumors.

  1. A minimally invasive multiple marker approach allows highly efficient detection of meningioma tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meese Eckart

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of effective frameworks that permit an accurate diagnosis of tumors, especially in their early stages, remains a grand challenge in the field of bioinformatics. Our approach uses statistical learning techniques applied to multiple antigen tumor antigen markers utilizing the immune system as a very sensitive marker of molecular pathological processes. For validation purposes we choose the intracranial meningioma tumors as model system since they occur very frequently, are mostly benign, and are genetically stable. Results A total of 183 blood samples from 93 meningioma patients (WHO stages I-III and 90 healthy controls were screened for seroreactivity with a set of 57 meningioma-associated antigens. We tested several established statistical learning methods on the resulting reactivity patterns using 10-fold cross validation. The best performance was achieved by Naïve Bayes Classifiers. With this classification method, our framework, called Minimally Invasive Multiple Marker (MIMM approach, yielded a specificity of 96.2%, a sensitivity of 84.5%, and an accuracy of 90.3%, the respective area under the ROC curve was 0.957. Detailed analysis revealed that prediction performs particularly well on low-grade (WHO I tumors, consistent with our goal of early stage tumor detection. For these tumors the best classification result with a specificity of 97.5%, a sensitivity of 91.3%, an accuracy of 95.6%, and an area under the ROC curve of 0.971 was achieved using a set of 12 antigen markers only. This antigen set was detected by a subset selection method based on Mutual Information. Remarkably, our study proves that the inclusion of non-specific antigens, detected not only in tumor but also in normal sera, increases the performance significantly, since non-specific antigens contribute additional diagnostic information. Conclusion Our approach offers the possibility to screen members of risk groups as a matter of routine

  2. A Practical Approach to Tumor Heterogeneity in Clinical Research and Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanta, Giorgio; Bonin, Serena

    2018-01-01

    This Pathobiology issue tries to better define the complex phenomenon of intratumor heterogeneity (ITH), mostly from a practical point of view. This topic has been chosen because ITH is a central issue in tumor development and has to be investigated directly in patient tissue and immediately applied in the treatment of the presenting patient. Different types of ITH should be considered: clonal genetic and epigenetic evolution, morphological heterogeneity, and tumor sampling, heterogeneity resulting from microenvironmental autocrine and paracrine interaction, and stochastic plasticity related to different functional cell efficiencies. For a higher level of reproducibility in clinical research and diagnostics, it is necessary to establish standardized analytical methods, including microdissection. In situ techniques can be pivotal to explore tumor microenvironment and can be improved with associated digital analysis. Liquid biopsies for plasma DNA analysis are at present the best method to study recurrent tumors with treatment adaptation, and widespread clinical use could be beneficial. The different types of tumor genomic instabilities could have pragmatic applications to rank ITH for clinical applications: treatment approaches differ in patients with a high nucleotide mutation rate and patients with high copy number alterations. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Skull base tumors: a comprehensive review of transfacial swing osteotomy approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira-Gonzalez, Andrea; Pieper, Daniel R; Cambra, Jorge Balaguer; Simman, Richard; Jackson, Ian T

    2005-03-01

    Numerous techniques have been proposed for the resection of skull base tumors, each one unique with regard to the region exposed and degree of technical complexity. This study describes the use of transfacial swing osteotomies in accessing lesions located at various levels of the cranial base. Eight patients who underwent transfacial swings for exposure and resection of cranial base lesions between 1996 and 2002 were studied. The mandible was the choice when wide exposure of nasopharyngeal and midline skull base tumors was necessary, especially when they involved the infratemporal fossa. The midfacial swing osteotomy was an option when access to the entire clivus was necessary. An orbital swing approach was used to access large orbital tumors lying inferior to the optic nerve and posterior to the globe, a region that is often difficult to visualize. Gross total tumor excision was possible in all patients. Six patients achieved disease control and two had recurrences. The complications of cerebrospinal fluid leak, infection, hematoma, or cranial nerve damage did not occur. After surgery, some patients experienced temporary symptoms caused by local swelling. The aesthetic result was considered good. Transfacial swing osteotomies provide a wide exposure to tumors that occur in the central skull base area. Excellent knowledge of the detailed anatomy of this region is paramount to the success of this surgery. The team concept is essential; it is built around the craniofacial surgeon and an experienced skull base neurosurgeon.

  4. A Proteogenomic Approach to Understanding MYC Function in Metastatic Medulloblastoma Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome A. Staal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in children, and medulloblastoma is the most prevalent malignant childhood/pediatric brain tumor. Providing effective treatment for these cancers, with minimal damage to the still-developing brain, remains one of the greatest challenges faced by clinicians. Understanding the diverse events driving tumor formation, maintenance, progression, and recurrence is necessary for identifying novel targeted therapeutics and improving survival of patients with this disease. Genomic copy number alteration data, together with clinical studies, identifies c-MYC amplification as an important risk factor associated with the most aggressive forms of medulloblastoma with marked metastatic potential. Yet despite this, very little is known regarding the impact of such genomic abnormalities upon the functional biology of the tumor cell. We discuss here how recent advances in quantitative proteomic techniques are now providing new insights into the functional biology of these aggressive tumors, as illustrated by the use of proteomics to bridge the gap between the genotype and phenotype in the case of c-MYC-amplified/associated medulloblastoma. These integrated proteogenomic approaches now provide a new platform for understanding cancer biology by providing a functional context to frame genomic abnormalities.

  5. Percutaneous vertebroplasty via anterolateral approach for the treatment of C4 to C7 vertebral tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Chungen; Cheng Yongde; Gu Yifeng; Zhang Ji; Wang Tao; Li Minghua; Apitzsch, D.E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the feasibility and clinical efficacy of percutaneous vertebroplasty via anterolateral approach in treating the middle and lower cervical (C4-C7) vertebral tumor. Methods: During the past four years, percutaneous vertebroplasty via anterolateral approach was performed in 16 patients with middle or lower cervical tumor, including metastases (n=12), myeloma (n=3) and eosinophilic granuloma (n=1). Under fluoroscopic guidance, needle puncture was operated via the anterolateral approach, bone cement was injected into the target cervical body when the needle was in place. A follow-up of three months was made. Results: Twenty-one cervical bodies in the range of C4 to C7 were successfully punctured and injected with bone cement. Marked pain relief was obtained in all 16 patients. The average score of visual analogue scale (VAS) was dramatically decreased from 7 before the procedure to 1.7 after the procedure. The cervical motor function returned to good condition. Conclusion: Percutaneous vertebroplasty via anterolateral approach is a safe, effective and minimally-invasive technique in treating the middle and lower cervical (C4-C7) vertebral tumor. (authors)

  6. Classification of malignant and benign liver tumors using a radiomics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starmans, Martijn P. A.; Miclea, Razvan L.; van der Voort, Sebastian R.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Thomeer, Maarten G.; Klein, Stefan

    2018-03-01

    Correct diagnosis of the liver tumor phenotype is crucial for treatment planning, especially the distinction between malignant and benign lesions. Clinical practice includes manual scoring of the tumors on Magnetic Resonance (MR) images by a radiologist. As this is challenging and subjective, it is often followed by a biopsy. In this study, we propose a radiomics approach as an objective and non-invasive alternative for distinguishing between malignant and benign phenotypes. T2-weighted (T2w) MR sequences of 119 patients from multiple centers were collected. We developed an efficient semi-automatic segmentation method, which was used by a radiologist to delineate the tumors. Within these regions, features quantifying tumor shape, intensity, texture, heterogeneity and orientation were extracted. Patient characteristics and semantic features were added for a total of 424 features. Classification was performed using Support Vector Machines (SVMs). The performance was evaluated using internal random-split cross-validation. On the training set within each iteration, feature selection and hyperparameter optimization were performed. To this end, another cross validation was performed by splitting the training sets in training and validation parts. The optimal settings were evaluated on the independent test sets. Manual scoring by a radiologist was also performed. The radiomics approach resulted in 95% confidence intervals of the AUC of [0.75, 0.92], specificity [0.76, 0.96] and sensitivity [0.52, 0.82]. These approach the performance of the radiologist, which were an AUC of 0.93, specificity 0.70 and sensitivity 0.93. Hence, radiomics has the potential to predict the liver tumor benignity in an objective and non-invasive manner.

  7. Research toward the development of a biologically based dose response assessment for inorganic arsenic carcinogenicity: A progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clewell, Harvey J.; Thomas, Russell S.; Gentry, P. Robinan; Crump, Kenny S.; Kenyon, Elaina M.; El-Masri, Hisham A.; Yager, Janice W.

    2007-01-01

    Cancer risk assessments for inorganic arsenic have been based on human epidemiological data, assuming a linear dose response below the range of observation of tumors. Part of the reason for the continued use of the linear approach in arsenic risk assessments is the lack of an adequate biologically based dose response (BBDR) model that could provide a quantitative basis for an alternative nonlinear approach. This paper describes elements of an ongoing collaborative research effort between the CIIT Centers for Health Research, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ENVIRON International, and EPRI to develop BBDR modeling approaches that could be used to inform a nonlinear cancer dose response assessment for inorganic arsenic. These efforts are focused on: (1) the refinement of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models of the kinetics of inorganic arsenic and its metabolites in the mouse and human; (2) the investigation of mathematical solutions for multi-stage cancer models involving multiple pathways of cell transformation; (3) the review and evaluation of the literature on the dose response for the genomic effects of arsenic; and (4) the collection of data on the dose response for genomic changes in the urinary bladder (a human target tissue for arsenic carcinogenesis) associated with in vivo drinking water exposures in the mouse as well as in vitro exposures of both mouse and human cells. An approach is proposed for conducting a biologically based margin of exposure risk assessment for inorganic arsenic using the in vitro dose response for the expression of genes associated with the obligatory precursor events for arsenic tumorigenesis

  8. Biologically based multistage modeling of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Hazelton; Suresh Moolgavkar; E. Georg Luebeck

    2005-08-30

    This past year we have made substantial progress in modeling the contribution of homeostatic regulation to low-dose radiation effects and carcinogenesis. We have worked to refine and apply our multistage carcinogenesis models to explicitly incorporate cell cycle states, simple and complex damage, checkpoint delay, slow and fast repair, differentiation, and apoptosis to study the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation in mouse intestinal crypts, as well as in other tissues. We have one paper accepted for publication in ''Advances in Space Research'', and another manuscript in preparation describing this work. I also wrote a chapter describing our combined cell-cycle and multistage carcinogenesis model that will be published in a book on stochastic carcinogenesis models edited by Wei-Yuan Tan. In addition, we organized and held a workshop on ''Biologically Based Modeling of Human Health Effects of Low dose Ionizing Radiation'', July 28-29, 2005 at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. We had over 20 participants, including Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff as keynote speaker, talks by most of the low-dose modelers in the DOE low-dose program, experimentalists including Les Redpath (and Mary Helen), Noelle Metting from DOE, and Tony Brooks. It appears that homeostatic regulation may be central to understanding low-dose radiation phenomena. The primary effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are cell killing, delayed cell cycling, and induction of mutations. However, homeostatic regulation causes cells that are killed or damaged by IR to eventually be replaced. Cells with an initiating mutation may have a replacement advantage, leading to clonal expansion of these initiated cells. Thus we have focused particularly on modeling effects that disturb homeostatic regulation as early steps in the carcinogenic process. There are two primary considerations that support our focus on homeostatic regulation. First, a number of

  9. Advanced Imaging Approaches to Characterize Stromal and Metabolic Changes in In Vivo Mammary Tumor Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Bird , L. Yan, K. M. Vrotsos, K. W. Eliceiri, E. M. Vaughan, P. J. Keely, J. G. White, N. Ramanujam, Metabolic mapping of MCF10A human breast cells...1   Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0025 TITLE: Advanced Imaging Approaches to Characterize Stromal and Metabolic Changes in In Vivo Mammary... Metabolic Changes in In Vivo Mammary Tumor Models 5b. GRANT NUMBER BC112240 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Betty Diamond 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  10. Tumor Microenvironment In Experimental Models Of Human Cancer: Morphological Investigational Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Minoli

    2017-05-01

    Discussion and conclusions. Due to the microenvironmental heterogeneity which influence tumor development and biological behavior, a sole quantification is unreliable for characterizing the TME. Considering that, morphological techniques proved to be a valuable approach, allowing the evaluation of the spatial distribution and mutual interaction between the different elements. Additional studies are needed for further investigate the biological significance of spatial distribution of the components of the TME.

  11. Sensitivity of tumor motion simulation accuracy to lung biomechanical modeling approaches and parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, Joubin Nasehi; Yang, Yin; Werner, Rene; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Guo, Xiaohu; Wang, Jing

    2015-11-21

    Finite element analysis (FEA)-based biomechanical modeling can be used to predict lung respiratory motion. In this technique, elastic models and biomechanical parameters are two important factors that determine modeling accuracy. We systematically evaluated the effects of lung and lung tumor biomechanical modeling approaches and related parameters to improve the accuracy of motion simulation of lung tumor center of mass (TCM) displacements. Experiments were conducted with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). A Quasi-Newton FEA was performed to simulate lung and related tumor displacements between end-expiration (phase 50%) and other respiration phases (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%). Both linear isotropic and non-linear hyperelastic materials, including the neo-Hookean compressible and uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin models, were used to create a finite element model (FEM) of lung and tumors. Lung surface displacement vector fields (SDVFs) were obtained by registering the 50% phase CT to other respiration phases, using the non-rigid demons registration algorithm. The obtained SDVFs were used as lung surface displacement boundary conditions in FEM. The sensitivity of TCM displacement to lung and tumor biomechanical parameters was assessed in eight patients for all three models. Patient-specific optimal parameters were estimated by minimizing the TCM motion simulation errors between phase 50% and phase 0%. The uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin material model showed the highest TCM motion simulation accuracy. The average TCM motion simulation absolute errors for the Mooney-Rivlin material model along left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions were 0.80 mm, 0.86 mm, and 1.51 mm, respectively. The proposed strategy provides a reliable method to estimate patient-specific biomechanical parameters in FEM for lung tumor motion simulation.

  12. Sensitivity of tumor motion simulation accuracy to lung biomechanical modeling approaches and parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehrani, Joubin Nasehi; Wang, Jing; Yang, Yin; Werner, Rene; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Guo, Xiaohu

    2015-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA)-based biomechanical modeling can be used to predict lung respiratory motion. In this technique, elastic models and biomechanical parameters are two important factors that determine modeling accuracy. We systematically evaluated the effects of lung and lung tumor biomechanical modeling approaches and related parameters to improve the accuracy of motion simulation of lung tumor center of mass (TCM) displacements. Experiments were conducted with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). A Quasi-Newton FEA was performed to simulate lung and related tumor displacements between end-expiration (phase 50%) and other respiration phases (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%). Both linear isotropic and non-linear hyperelastic materials, including the neo-Hookean compressible and uncoupled Mooney–Rivlin models, were used to create a finite element model (FEM) of lung and tumors. Lung surface displacement vector fields (SDVFs) were obtained by registering the 50% phase CT to other respiration phases, using the non-rigid demons registration algorithm. The obtained SDVFs were used as lung surface displacement boundary conditions in FEM. The sensitivity of TCM displacement to lung and tumor biomechanical parameters was assessed in eight patients for all three models. Patient-specific optimal parameters were estimated by minimizing the TCM motion simulation errors between phase 50% and phase 0%. The uncoupled Mooney–Rivlin material model showed the highest TCM motion simulation accuracy. The average TCM motion simulation absolute errors for the Mooney–Rivlin material model along left-right, anterior–posterior, and superior–inferior directions were 0.80 mm, 0.86 mm, and 1.51 mm, respectively. The proposed strategy provides a reliable method to estimate patient-specific biomechanical parameters in FEM for lung tumor motion simulation. (paper)

  13. Tumor-induced Osteomalacia: A Sherlock Holmes Approach to Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanukya, G V; Mengade, Manoj; Goud, Jagadishwar; Rao, I Satish; Jain, Anuj

    2017-01-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a subtype of paraneoplastic syndrome associated with hypophosphatemia due to renal phosphate wasting in adults. The humoral factor responsible for clinical picture known as fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is most often secreted by benign yet elusive mesenchymal tumors, difficult to localize, access, and excise completely; rarely, they are multiple and malignant. Paradoxical inappropriately normal or low levels of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in the setting of hypophosphatemia is due to suppressive effect of FGF23. The following case report describes a 31-year-old male with symptoms of multiple fractures and severe muscle weakness, hypophosphatemia with elevated tubular maximum reabsorption of phosphate/glomerular filtration rate with low active Vitamin D, prompted assay for C-terminal FGF23, which was elevated multifold. The tumor was localized with whole body 68-Gadolinium DOTANOC positron emission tomography-computed tomography fusion scan in the left nasal cavity with ipsilateral maxillary antrum. It was excised through transnasal approach and found to be mesenchymal tumor on histopathology. At 1 week of follow-up, serum phosphate became normalized without supplementation. The patient is in follow-up for further measurement of FGF23 level and signs of recurrence. Because the occurrence of such a condition is rare and most often misdiagnosed or mismanaged for years, it is important to recognize this condition in differential diagnosis as potential curative surgical option is a reality.

  14. A Biologically Based Approach to the Mutation of Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    instructions called a genome. This genome contains the master blueprint for all cellular structures and functions within the organism for the duration of...structures known as chromosomes, which are found in the nucleus of all non-somatic cells. Many procaryotic organisms have single-stranded DNA. An...coding sequence of a gene, or by an aberrant cellular recombination process. One way to reduce the chances of a harmful mutation occuring is to

  15. Microsurgery Resection of Intrinsic Insular Tumors via Transsylvian Surgical Approach in 12 Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Peng; Wu, Ming-can; Chen, Shi-jie; Xu, Xian-ping; Yang, Yong; Cai, Jie

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the clinical characteristics, operative methods, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in the resection of intrinsic insular gliomas via transsylvian approach. From June 2008 to June 2010, 12 patients with intrinsic insular gliomas were treated via transsylvian microsurgical approach, with preoperative magnetic resonance imaging diffusion tensor imaging (MR DTI) evaluation. The data of these patients were retrospectively analyzed. All patients had astrocytoma, including 8 patients of Grades I to II, 2 patients of Grades III to IV, and 2 patients of mixed glial tumors. The insular tumors were completely removed in 9 patients, whereas they were only partially removed from 3 patients. No death was related to the operations. Two patients had transient aphasia, 2 experienced worsened hemiplegia on opposite sides of their bodies, and 2 had mild hemiplegia and language function disturbance. Most of the insular gliomas are of low grade. By evaluating the damage of the corticospinal tract through DTI and using ultrasonography to locate the tumors during operation, microsurgery treatment removes the lesions as much as possible, protects the surrounding areas, reduces the mobility rate, and improves the postoperative quality of life

  16. Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches for the Diagnosis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Ciulla

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This research presents signal-image post-processing techniques called Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches with application to the diagnosis of human brain tumors detected through Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI. Post-processing of the MRI of the human brain encompasses the following model functions: (i bivariate cubic polynomial, (ii bivariate cubic Lagrange polynomial, (iii monovariate sinc, and (iv bivariate linear. The following Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches were used: (i classic-curvature, (ii signal resilient to interpolation, (iii intensity-curvature measure and (iv intensity-curvature functional. The results revealed that the classic-curvature, the signal resilient to interpolation and the intensity-curvature functional are able to add additional information useful to the diagnosis carried out with MRI. The contribution to the MRI diagnosis of our study are: (i the enhanced gray level scale of the tumor mass and the well-behaved representation of the tumor provided through the signal resilient to interpolation, and (ii the visually perceptible third dimension perpendicular to the image plane provided through the classic-curvature and the intensity-curvature functional.

  17. Oxygen distribution in tumors: A qualitative analysis and modeling study providing a novel Monte Carlo approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerlöf, Jakob H.; Kindblom, Jon; Bernhardt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    end, due to anoxia, but smaller tumors showed undisturbed oxygen distributions. The six different models with correlated parameters generated three classes of oxygen distributions. The first was a hypothetical, negative covariance between vessel proximity and pO 2 (VPO-C scenario); the second was a hypothetical positive covariance between vessel proximity and pO 2 (VPO+C scenario); and the third was the hypothesis of no correlation between vessel proximity and pO 2 (UP scenario). The VPO-C scenario produced a distinctly different oxygen distribution than the two other scenarios. The shape of the VPO-C scenario was similar to that of the nonvariable DOC model, and the larger the tumor, the greater the similarity between the two models. For all simulations, the mean oxygen tension decreased and the hypoxic fraction increased with tumor size. The absorbed dose required for definitive tumor control was highest for the VPO+C scenario, followed by the UP and VPO-C scenarios. Conclusions: A novel MC algorithm was presented which simulated oxygen distributions and radiation response for various biological parameter values. The analysis showed that the VPO-C scenario generated a clearly different oxygen distribution from the VPO+C scenario; the former exhibited a lower hypoxic fraction and higher radiosensitivity. In future studies, this modeling approach might be valuable for qualitative analyses of factors that affect oxygen distribution as well as analyses of specific experimental and clinical situations

  18. [Maxillary swing approach in the management of tumors in the central and lateral cranial base].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hua; Hua, Qing-quan; Wu, Zhan-yuan

    2006-04-01

    A retrospective review of seventeen patients who were operated through the maxillary swing approach was carried out to assess the efficacy of this approach in the management of tumors of the central and lateral cranial base. From May 2000 to January 2005, 17 patients with primary or recurrent neoplasms involving the central cranial or lateral base underwent surgical resection via maxillary swing approach. Ten patients were male, and other seven patients were female, and age range was 7 to 58 years, with a mean age of 42. 6 years. Eight patients had tumors originally involving lateral cranial base, and nine patients had tumors originated from central cranial base. The pathology spectrum was very wide. Among them, five suffered from chordoma, two had rhabdomyosarcoma, two had squamous cell carcinoma, one had malignant fibrous histiocytoma, one had malignant melanoma, one had esthesioneuroblastoma, one had invaded hypophysoma, two had schwannoma, one had pleomorphic adenoma, and one had angiofibroma. Three patients had received previous surgery, two patients had previous radiation therapy and nine patients received postoperative radiotherapy. Sixteen of all seventeen patients had oncologically complete resection, one had near-total resection. This group patients was followed up from 10 to 60 months, with a median follow-up time of 28 months. Two patients died 14 and 26 months after surgery respectively, as a result of local recurrence and metastasis. One patient defaulted follow-up at 12 months after operation, and the other 14 patients were alive at the time of analysis. Of the 12 malignant tumors, the 1-and 2-year survival rate were 91.67% and 72.92%, respectively. The facial wounds of all patients healed primarily, and there were no necrosis of the maxilla, damage of the temporal branch of the facial nerve, lower-lid ectropion, and facial deformity. Epiphora and facial hypoesthesia were detected in all patients. Four patients (23.5%) developed palatal fistula, ten

  19. Promising novel therapeutic approaches in the management of gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szucs, Zoltan; Thway, Khin; Fisher, Cyril; Bulusu, Ramesh; Constantinidou, Anastasia; Benson, Charlotte; van der Graaf, Winette Ta; Jones, Robin L

    2017-01-01

    Primary and secondary resistance to currently available licensed tyrosine kinase inhibitors poses a real clinical challenge in the management of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Within the frame of early phase clinical trials novel systemic treatments are currently being evaluated to target both the well explored and novel emerging downstream effectors of KIT and PDGFRA signaling. Alternative therapeutic approaches also include exploring novel inhibitors of the KIT/PDGFRA receptors, immune checkpoint and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. The final clinical trial outcome data for these agents are highly anticipated. Integration of new diagnostic techniques into routine clinical practice can potentially guide tailored delivery of agents in the treatment of a highly polyclonal, heterogeneous disease such as heavily pretreated advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

  20. Retromolar trigone--oropharynx junction maligns tumor surgery: transmandibular versus oral approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobzeanu, B M; Popescu, Eugenia; Costan, V V; Ungureanu, Didona; Cobzeanu, M D

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes a new approach to a borderline pathology between Otorhinolaryngology (E.N.T.) and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (O.M.F.), the malignant tumors of the oropharyngeal and retromolar trigone junction. 52 cases of retromolar trigone and oropharynx malign tumors were solved in the ENT department of "St. Spiridon" Universitary Hospital Iasi between 2012 and 2014. All patients were males, 35-64 years old, in different TNM stages. The novelty stands in the multidisciplinary approach, with an operating team consisting of both E.N.T. and O.M.F. surgeons, which joined their knowledge and expertise in order to offer a better treatment for the patient. Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) infection has been known as a trigger factor in head and neck cancers. The connection between HPV infection and malignant tumors of the oropharyngeal--retromolar trigone junction, together with the other traditional risk factors (smoking, alcohol, stress and sexual behavior) are involved in the therapeutic protocols, improving the life quality, the survival rate and reducing the treatment costs. Excision of the malignant tumors at the level of the junction between the oropharynx and retromolar trigone often requires repairing the tissular defects that remain using different flaps. Postsurgical mecanotherapy (physiotherapy) under the surveillance of an experienced physiotherapist is also needed for a complete recovery. This therapeutical protocol aims to assure a better life quality for the patients, with a faster postsurgical recovery and social reinsertion by reducing the healing time of the areas affected by inflammation and necrosis generated by the neoplastic process.

  1. Robotic Approach in Benign and Malignant Esophageal Tumors; A Preliminary Seven Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomulescu, Victor; Stanescu, Codrut; Blajut, Cristian; Barbulescu, Loredana; Droc, Gabriela; Herlea, Vlad; Popescu, Irinel

    2018-01-01

    Esophageal surgery has been recognized as very challenging for surgeons and risky for patients. Thoracoscopic approach have proved its benefit in esophageal surgery but has some drawbacks as tremor and limited degrees of freedom, contra-intuitive movements and fulcrum effect of the surgical tools. Robotic technology has been developed with the intent to overcome these limitations of the standard laparoscopy or thoracoscopy. These benefits of robotic procedure are most advantageous when operating in remote areas difficult to reach as in esophageal surgery. The aim of this paper is to present our small experience related with robotic approach in benign and malignant esophageal tumors and critically revise the evidence available about the use of the robotic technology for the treatment of these pathology. Methods: From January 2008 to September 2016 robotic surgery interventions related with benign or malignant esophageal tumors were performed in "Dan Setlacec" Center for General Surgery and Liver Transplantation of Fundeni Clinical Institute in seven patients. This consisted of dissection of the entire esophagus as part of an abdomino-thoracic-cervical procedure for esophageal cancer in 3 patients and the extirpation of an esophageal leiomyoma in 3 cases and a foregut esophageal cyst in one case. Results: All procedures except one were completed entirely using the da Vinci robotic system. The exception was the first case - a 3 cm leiomyoma of the inferior esophagus with ulceration of the superjacent esophageal mucosa. Pathology reports revealed three esophageal leiomyoma, one foregut cyst and three squamous cell carcinomas with free of tumor resection margins. The mean number of retrieved mediastinal nodes was 24 (22 - 27). The postoperative course was uneventful in four cases, in the other three a esophageal fistula occurred in the converted leiomyoma case (closed in the 14th postoperative day), a prolonged drainage in one esophageal cancer case and a temporary

  2. Biologically Based Restorative Management of Tooth Wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin G. D. Kelleher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence and severity of tooth wear is increasing in industrialised nations. Yet, there is no high-level evidence to support or refute any therapeutic intervention. In the absence of such evidence, many currently prevailing management strategies for tooth wear may be failing in their duty of care to first and foremost improve the oral health of patients with this disease. This paper promotes biologically sound approaches to the management of tooth wear on the basis of current best evidence of the aetiology and clinical features of this disease. The relative risks and benefits of the varying approaches to managing tooth wear are discussed with reference to long-term follow-up studies. Using reference to ethical standards such as “The Daughter Test”, this paper presents case reports of patients with moderate-to-severe levels of tooth wear managed in line with these biologically sound principles.

  3. Interventional Pain Management for Sacroiliac Tumors in the Oncologic Population: A Case Series and Paradigm Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Nathan; Hung, Joseph C; Puttanniah, Vinay; Lis, Eric; Laufer, Ilya; Gulati, Amitabh

    2017-05-01

    Tumors invading the sacrum and/or ilium often represent incurable metastatic disease, and treatment is targeted toward palliation of symptoms and control of pain. As systemic opioid therapy is frequently inadequate and limited by side effects, a variety of interventional techniques are available to better optimize analgesia. Using six patients as a paradigm for interventional approaches to pain relief, we present a therapeutic algorithm for treating sacroiliac tumor-related pain in the oncologic population. We describe the use of ultrasound-guided proximal sacroiliac joint corticosteroid injection, sacroiliac lateral branch radiofrequency ablation, percutaneous sacroplasty, and implantable neuraxial drug delivery devices to treat malignant sacroiliac pain in six patients. Pre- and postprocedure numerical rating scale (NRS) pain scores, duration of pain relief, and postprocedure pain medication requirements were studied for each patient. Each patient had marked improvement in their pain based on an average postprocedure NRS difference of six points. The average duration of pain relief was eight months. In all cases, opioid requirements decreased after the intervention. Depending on tumor location, burden of disease, and patient preference, patients suffering from metastatic disease to the sacrum may find benefit from use of ultrasound-guided proximal sacroiliac joint corticosteroid injection, sacroiliac lateral branch radiofrequency ablation, percutaneous sacroplasty, dorsal column stimulator leads, and/or implantable neuraxial drug delivery devices. We provide a paradigm for treatment in this patient population. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  4. Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Approach for Apoplectic Pituitary Tumor: Surgical Outcomes and Complications in 45 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Rucai; Li, Xueen; Li, Xingang

    2016-02-01

    Objective To assess the safety and effectiveness of the endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach (EETA) for apoplectic pituitary adenoma. Design A retrospective study. Setting Qilu Hospital of Shandong University; Brain Science Research Institute, Shandong University. Participants Patients admitted to Qilu Hospital of Shandong University who were diagnosed with an apoplectic pituitary tumor and underwent EETA for resection of the tumor. Main Outcome Measures In total 45 patients were included in a retrospective chart review. Data regarding patient age, sex, presentation, lesion size, surgical procedure, extent of resection, clinical outcome, and surgical complications were obtained from the chart review. Results In total, 38 (92.7%) of 41 patients with loss of vision obtained visual remission postoperatively. In addition, 16 patients reported a secreting adenoma, and postsurgical hormonal levels were normal or decreased in 14 patients. All other symptoms, such as headache and alteration of mental status, recovered rapidly after surgery. Two patients (4.4%) incurred cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Six patients (13.3%) experienced transient diabetes insipidus (DI) postoperatively, but none of these patients developed permanent DI. Five patients (11.1%) developed hypopituitarism and were treated with replacement of hormonal medicine. No cases of meningitis, carotid artery injury, or death related to surgery were reported. Conclusion EETA offers a safe and effective surgical option for apoplectic pituitary tumors and is associated with low morbidity and mortality.

  5. Endoscopic endonasal approach for craniopharyngioma: the importance of the relationship between pituitary stalk and tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dho, Yun-Sik; Kim, Yong Hwy; Se, Young-Bem; Han, Doo Hee; Kim, Jung Hee; Park, Chul-Kee; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Kim, Dong Gyu

    2017-09-29

    OBJECTIVE The endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) is commonly used for the treatment of craniopharyngioma; therefore, it is essential to analyze outcomes in order to understand the benefits and drawbacks. The goal of this paper was to evaluate the clinical features and outcomes associated with this treatment approach. METHODS From July 2010 to March 2016, 82 adult craniopharyngioma patients underwent an EEA at the authors' institution. Of these cases, intraoperative records and immediate postoperative MR images were available for 68 patients. The patients underwent systemized endocrinological evaluation. Eighteen of 68 patients who underwent EEA for recurrence or regrowth of residual lesions after previous surgical management were excluded in the analysis of the anatomical tumor classification. The authors retrospectively analyzed preoperative clinical features and previous anatomical classifications, focusing on the relationship of the pituitary stalk and tumor, to determine predictive factors for the clinical outcome, such as the extent of resection, visual function, endocrinological function, recurrence rate, and complications. RESULTS The mean tumor size was 2.5 cm (3.1 cm for primary tumors and 1.9 cm for recurrent lesions). Gross-total resection (GTR) was achieved in 62 (91.1%) patients (48 [96.0%] patients with primary tumors and 14 [77.8%] patients with recurrent tumors). The rate of GTR was higher in the primary group than in the group with recurrence (p = 0.038). The overall pre- and postoperative visual impairment scale (VIS) scores were 40.8 and 22.1, respectively (50.9 and 14.3 in the primary group and 30.7 and 29.9 in patients with recurrence, respectively). The improvement rate in VIS score was higher in the primary group than in the recurrent group (p = 0.001). Endocrinological function was improved in 4 patients (5.9%) and deteriorated in 32 of 68 patients (47.1%). Tumor invasion into the center of the pituitary stalk affected the postoperative

  6. Neuropsychological assessment of individuals with brain tumor: Comparison of approaches used in the classification of impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Maree Dwan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Approaches to classifying neuropsychological impairment after brain tumor vary according to testing level (individual tests, domains or global index and source of reference (i.e., norms, controls and premorbid functioning. This study aimed to compare rates of impairment according to different classification approaches. Participants were 44 individuals (57% female with a primary brain tumor diagnosis (mean age = 45.6 years and 44 matched control participants (59% female, mean age = 44.5 years. All participants completed a test battery that assesses premorbid IQ (Wechsler Adult Reading Test, attention/processing speed (Digit Span, Trail Making Test A, memory (Hopkins Verbal Learning Test – Revised, Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure-recall and executive function (Trail Making Test B, Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure copy, Controlled Oral Word Association Test. Results indicated that across the different sources of reference, 86-93% of participants were classified as impaired at a test-specific level, 61-73% were classified as impaired at a domain-specific level, and 32-50% were classified as impaired at a global level. Rates of impairment did not significantly differ according to source of reference (p>.05; however, at the individual participant level, classification based on estimated premorbid IQ was often inconsistent with classification based on the norms or controls. Participants with brain tumor performed significantly poorer than matched controls on tests of neuropsychological functioning, including executive function (p=.001 and memory (p.05. These results highlight the need to examine individuals’ performance across a multi-faceted neuropsychological test battery to avoid over- or under-estimation of impairment.

  7. A Multi-targeted Approach to Suppress Tumor-Promoting Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi, Abbas K.; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Amedei, Amedeo; Amin, Amr; Bishayee, Anupam; Lokeshwar, Bal L.; Grue, Brendan; Panis, Carolina; Boosani, Chandra S.; Poudyal, Deepak; Stafforini, Diana M.; Bhakta, Dipita; Niccolai, Elena; Guha, Gunjan; Rupasinghe, H.P. Vasantha; Fujii, Hiromasa; Honoki, Kanya; Mehta, Kapil; Aquilano, Katia; Lowe, Leroy; Hofseth, Lorne J.; Ricciardiello, Luigi; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Singh, Neetu; Whelan, Richard L.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Ashraf, S. Salman; Kumara, HMC Shantha; Nowsheen, Somaira; Mohammed, Sulma I.; Helferich, William G.; Yang, Xujuan

    2015-01-01

    Cancers harbor significant genetic heterogeneity and patterns of relapse following many therapies are due to evolved resistance to treatment. While efforts have been made to combine targeted therapies, significant levels of toxicity have stymied efforts to effectively treat cancer with multi-drug combinations using currently approved therapeutics. We discuss the relationship between tumor-promoting inflammation and cancer as part of a larger effort to develop a broad-spectrum therapeutic approach aimed at a wide range of targets to address this heterogeneity. Specifically, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, cyclooxygenase-2, transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB, tumor necrosis factor alpha, inducible nitric oxide synthase, protein kinase B, and CXC chemokines are reviewed as important antiinflammatory targets while curcumin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate, genistein, lycopene, and anthocyanins are reviewed as low-cost, low toxicity means by which these targets might all be reached simultaneously. Future translational work will need to assess the resulting synergies of rationally designed antiinflammatory mixtures (employing low-toxicity constituents), and then combine this with similar approaches targeting the most important pathways across the range of cancer hallmark phenotypes. PMID:25951989

  8. Hyperparathyroidism with Bone Tumor-Like Presentation, Approach for Diagnosis and Surgical Intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, H.A.; Mebeed, A.H.; Saber, T.Kh.; Farhat, I.G.

    2009-01-01

    Aim of Work: This work aims to find out a clinical approach for diagnosis of cases with hyperparathyroidism presented with bone tumor like condition as first and main presentation in order to differentiate primary bone tumors or secondary bone metastases from different types of hyperparathyroidism and to clear out the indications and type of surgery in such cases. Patients and Methods: It is a prospective case series study done in the National Cancer Institute from April 2000 to May 2009. During this period we followed 45 cases of hyperparathyroidism (HPT) presented with a main complaint of bone tumor-like lesion. We started by clinical evaluation, laboratory investigations including: Parathormone hormone, total and ionic calcium, renal function tests, alkaline phosphatase, 24h urine calcium, C-AMP in urine or inappropriate parathormone like peptide if needed and radiological investigations for preoperative localization including neck ultrasound, Tc 99m Sestamibi scan, C-T neck and superior mediastinum or M.R.I. Intraoperative ultrasound was used in some cases. Postoperative bone dosimetry and plain-X ray to follow bone mineral deposition were done. Results: Preoperative diagnosis was: 80% cases of primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT), 15.5% cases of secondary hyperparathyroidism (sHPT), 4.5% tertiary hyperparathyroidism (tHPT), benign adenoma in 73.3%, diffuse hyperplasia in 8.8% and one case of parathyroid carcinoma. Neck ultrasound localized 29/38 adenoma (sensitivity = 73.3%), sestamibi localized 23/38 including another 2 cases of diffuse hyperplasia not detected by ultrasound (sensitivity = 63.8%), C-T scan detected adenoma in upper mediastinum. Total preoperative localization was 84.2%. We used unilateral exploration in 27 cases, and bilateral in 11 cases. Intraoperative ultrasound was useful in detection of 2 additional cases in the thyroid lobe tissue. Intraoperative parathormone hormone after 10 minutes dropped in all of cases. Recurrence of the disease

  9. A Case of Nongerminomatous Germ Cell Tumor of the Pineal Region: Risks and Advantages of Biopsy by Endoscopic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobran, Mauro; Nasi, Davide; Mancini, Fabrizio; Gladi, Maurizio; Scerrati, Massimo

    2018-01-01

    A 21-year-old male was admitted to our department with headache and drowsiness. CT scan and MRI revealed acute obstructive hydrocephalus caused by a pineal region mass. The serum and CSF levels of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG) were 215 IU/L and 447 IU/L, respectively, while levels of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) were normal. A germ cell tumor (GCT) was suspected, and the patient underwent endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) with biopsy. After four days from surgery, the tumor bled with mass expansion and ETV stoma occlusion; thus, a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was positioned. After ten months, the tumor metastasized to the thorax and abdomen with progression of intracerebral tumor mass. Despite the aggressive nature of this tumor, ETV remains a valid approach for a pineal region mass, but in case of GCT, the risk of bleeding should be taken into account, during and after the surgical procedure.

  10. A Case of Nongerminomatous Germ Cell Tumor of the Pineal Region: Risks and Advantages of Biopsy by Endoscopic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Dobran

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 21-year-old male was admitted to our department with headache and drowsiness. CT scan and MRI revealed acute obstructive hydrocephalus caused by a pineal region mass. The serum and CSF levels of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG were 215 IU/L and 447 IU/L, respectively, while levels of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP were normal. A germ cell tumor (GCT was suspected, and the patient underwent endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV with biopsy. After four days from surgery, the tumor bled with mass expansion and ETV stoma occlusion; thus, a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was positioned. After ten months, the tumor metastasized to the thorax and abdomen with progression of intracerebral tumor mass. Despite the aggressive nature of this tumor, ETV remains a valid approach for a pineal region mass, but in case of GCT, the risk of bleeding should be taken into account, during and after the surgical procedure.

  11. Imaging of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaensler, E.H.L.

    1995-01-01

    The contents are diagnostic approaches, general features of tumors -hydrocephalus, edema, attenuation and/or intensity value, hemorrhage, fat, contrast enhancement, intra-axial supratentorial tumors - tumors of glial origin, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, subependymomas, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, choroid plexus papilloma; midline tumors - colloid cysts, craniopharyngiomas; pineal region tumors and miscellaneous tumors i.e. primary intracerebral lymphoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, hemangioblastomas; extraaxial tumors - meningiomas; nerve sheath tumors -schwannomas, epidermoids, dermoids, lipomas, arachnoid cysts; metastatic tumors (8 refs.)

  12. Imaging of brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaensler, E H.L. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-12-31

    The contents are diagnostic approaches, general features of tumors -hydrocephalus, edema, attenuation and/or intensity value, hemorrhage, fat, contrast enhancement, intra-axial supratentorial tumors - tumors of glial origin, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, subependymomas, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, choroid plexus papilloma; midline tumors - colloid cysts, craniopharyngiomas; pineal region tumors and miscellaneous tumors i.e. primary intracerebral lymphoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, hemangioblastomas; extraaxial tumors - meningiomas; nerve sheath tumors -schwannomas, epidermoids, dermoids, lipomas, arachnoid cysts; metastatic tumors (8 refs.).

  13. Facilitating tumor functional assessment by spatially relating 3D tumor histology and in vivo MRI: image registration approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lejla Alic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, together with histology, is widely used to diagnose and to monitor treatment in oncology. Spatial correspondence between these modalities provides information about the ability of MRI to characterize cancerous tissue. However, registration is complicated by deformations during pathological processing, and differences in scale and information content. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study proposes a methodology for establishing an accurate 3D relation between histological sections and high resolution in vivo MRI tumor data. The key features of the methodology are: 1 standardized acquisition and processing, 2 use of an intermediate ex vivo MRI, 3 use of a reference cutting plane, 4 dense histological sampling, 5 elastic registration, and 6 use of complete 3D data sets. Five rat pancreatic tumors imaged by T2*-w MRI were used to evaluate the proposed methodology. The registration accuracy was assessed by root mean squared (RMS distances between manually annotated landmark points in both modalities. After elastic registration the average RMS distance decreased from 1.4 to 0.7 mm. The intermediate ex vivo MRI and the reference cutting plane shared by all three 3D images (in vivo MRI, ex vivo MRI, and 3D histology data were found to be crucial for the accurate co-registration between the 3D histological data set and in vivo MRI. The MR intensity in necrotic regions, as manually annotated in 3D histology, was significantly different from other histologically confirmed regions (i.e., viable and hemorrhagic. However, the viable and the hemorrhagic regions showed a large overlap in T2(*-w MRI signal intensity. CONCLUSIONS: The established 3D correspondence between tumor histology and in vivo MRI enables extraction of MRI characteristics for histologically confirmed regions. The proposed methodology allows the creation of a tumor database of spatially registered multi-spectral MR images and multi-stained 3D

  14. Transzygomatic approach with intraoperative neuromonitoring for resection of middle cranial fossa tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Byung Chul; Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Sup; Hong, Jae Taek; Sung, Jae Hoon; Yang, Seung-Ho

    2012-02-01

    The authors reviewed the surgical experience and operative technique in a series of 11 patients with middle fossa tumors who underwent surgery using the transzygomatic approach and intraoperative neuromonitoring (IOM) at a single institution. This approach was applied to trigeminal schwannomas (n = 3), cavernous angiomas (n = 3), sphenoid wing meningiomas (n = 3), a petroclival meningioma (n = 1), and a hemangiopericytoma (n = 1). An osteotomy of the zygoma, a low-positioned frontotemporal craniotomy, removal of the remaining squamous temporal bone, and extradural drilling of the sphenoid wing made a flat trajectory to the skull base. Total resection was achieved in 9 of 11 patients. Significant motor pathway damage can be avoided using a change in motor-evoked potentials as an early warning sign. Four patients experienced cranial nerve palsies postoperatively, even though free-running electromyography of cranial nerves showed normal responses during the surgical procedure. A simple transzygomatic approach provides a wide surgical corridor for accessing the cavernous sinus, petrous apex, and subtemporal regions. Knowledge of the middle fossa structures is essential for anatomic orientation and avoiding injuries to neurovascular structures, although a neuronavigation system and IOM helps orient neurosurgeons.

  15. Staging of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: how we do it based on an evidence-based approach.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDermott, Shaunagh

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to other common types of malignant tumors, the vast majority of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are well differentiated and slowly growing with only a minority showing aggressive behavior. It is important to accurately stage patients radiologically so the correct treatment can be implemented and to improve prognosis. In this article, we critically appraise the current literature in an effort to establish the current role of radiologic imaging in the staging of neuroendocrine tumors. We also discuss our protocol for staging neuroendocrine tumors.

  16. Metastasis in context : modeling the tumor microenvironment with cancer-on-a-chip approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sleeboom, Jelle J.F.; Amirabadi, Hossein Eslami; Nair, Poornima; Sahlgren, Cecilia M.; Den Toonder, Jaap M.J.

    2018-01-01

    Most cancer deaths are not caused by the primary tumor, but by secondary tumors formed through metastasis, a complex and poorly understood process. Cues from the tumor microenvironment, such as the biochemical composition, cellular population, extracellular matrix, and tissue (fluid) mechanics, have

  17. Multidisciplinary Approach to Wilms’ Tumor: A Retrospective Analytical Study of 53 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NAGUIB, S.F.; ZAGHLOUL, A.S.; EL HADDAD, A.; EL BADAWY, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Aim of the Work: The aim of this work was to assess the epidemiologic aspects, clinico-pathological features and the results of multidisciplinary treatment of Wilms' tumor (WT) in pediatric patients treated at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), Cairo University, between January 2002 and December 2004. Patients and Methods: This study included 53 patients, all under the age of 16 years, with previously untreated WT. Initial evaluation of all patients comprised laboratory investigations and radiological assessment which included chest X-ray and CT, abdomin-opelvic ultrasonography and CT. Doppler study of the renal vein and vena cava and bone scan were done when needed. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was given to patients suffering from poor general condition, extensive tumor thrombus in the renal vein, irresectable and bilateral (stage V) nephroblastoma. Otherwise, up-front nephrectomy was the standard therapeutic approach in this study. Results: The age of the patients ranged from 2 to 108 months with a mean of 39.9 months ( ± 22.56). Males and females were almost equal in number (50.9% and 49.1% respectively). Tumors were located in the left kidney in 52.8%, right kidney in 41.5% and bilaterally in only 5.7% of the cases. An abdominal mass was the most common clinical presentation (77.4%). Favorable histology was found in 86.3% while unfavorable histology was elicited in 13.7% of the cases. Congenital anomalies were recorded in 4 patients. Stage I and III were the most common (29.4% each), followed by stage II and IV (17.7% each), and finally by stage V (5.9%). Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was given to 27 cases while up-front nephrectomy was undertaken in 26 cases. Intra-operative spillage occurred in 12% of patients who had preoperative chemotherapy and 31% of those who had up front nephrectomy. Postoperative abdominal radiotherapy was given to 32 patients. Twenty five patients underwent renal bed irradiation only, while in the other 7 whole abdominal irradiation was

  18. Defining Survivorship Trajectories Across Patients With Solid Tumors: An Evidence-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dood, Robert L; Zhao, Yang; Armbruster, Shannon D; Coleman, Robert L; Tworoger, Shelley; Sood, Anil K; Baggerly, Keith A

    2018-06-02

    Survivorship involves a multidisciplinary approach to surveillance and management of comorbidities and secondary cancers, overseen by oncologists, surgeons, and primary care physicians. Optimal timing and coordination of care, however, is unclear and often based on arbitrary 5-year cutoffs. To determine high- and low-risk periods for all tumor types that could define when survivorship care might best be overseen by oncologists and when to transition to primary care physicians. In this pan-cancer, longitudinal, observational study, excess mortality hazard, calculated as an annualized mortality risk above a baseline population, was plotted over time. The time this hazard took to stabilize defined a high-risk period. The percent morality elevation above age- and sex-matched controls in the latter low-risk period was reported as a mortality gap. The US population-based Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database defined the cancer population, and the US Census life tables defined controls. Incident cases of patients with cancer were separated into tumor types based on International Classification of Diseases for Oncology definitions. Population-level data on incident cancer cases was compared with the general US population. Overall mortality and cause of death were reported on observed cancer cases. A total of 2 317 185 patients (median age, 63 years; 49.8% female) with 66 primary tumor types were evaluated. High-risk surveillance period durations ranged from less than 1 year (breast, prostate, lip, ocular, and parathyroid cancers) up to 19 years (unspecified gastrointestinal cancers). The annualized mortality gap, representing the excess mortality in the stable period, ranged from a median 0.26% to 9.33% excess annual mortality (thyroid and hypopharyngeal cancer populations, respectively). Cluster analysis produced 6 risk cluster groups: group 1, with median survival of 16.2 (5th to 95th percentile range [PR], 10.7-40.2) years and median high-risk period

  19. Macromolecular contrast media. A new approach for characterising breast tumors with MR-mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daldrup, H.E.; Gossmann, A.; Koeln Univ.; Wendland, M.; Brasch, R.C.; Rosenau, W.

    1997-01-01

    The value of macromolecular contrast agents (MMCM) for the characterization of benign and malignant breast tumors will be demonstrated in this review. Animal studies suggest a high potential of MMCM to increase the specificity of MR-mammography. The concept of tumor differentiation is based on the pathological hyperpermeability of microvessels in malignant tumors. MMCM show a leak into the interstitium of carcinomas, whereas they are confined to the intravascular space in benign tumors. Capabilities and limitations of the MMCM-prototype. Albumin-Gd-DTPA, for breast tumor characterization will be summarized and compared to the standard low molecular weight contrast agent Gd-DTPA. Initial experience with new MMCM, such as Dendrimers, Gd-DTPA-Polylysine and MS-325 will be outlined. The potential of 'blood-pool'-iron oxides, such as AMI-227 for the evaluation of tumor microvascular permeabilities will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  20. Nonvestibular schwannoma tumors in the cerebellopontine angle: A structured approach and management guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, J.B.; Poulsgaard, L.; Thomsen, Jens Christian

    2008-01-01

    The most common cerebellopontine angle (CPA) tumor is a vestibular schwannoma, but one in five CPA tumors are not vestibular schwannomas. These tumors may require different management strategies. Compared with vestibular schwannomas, symptoms and signs from cranial nerve VIII are less frequent......: other cranial nerve and cerebellar symptoms and signs predominate in patients with these less common CPA tumors. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging often show features leading to the correct diagnosis. Treatment most often includes surgery, but a policy of observation or subtotal...

  1. Cognitive performance change of pediatric patients after conducting frontal transcortical approach to treat lateral ventricular tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wanchun; He, Jintao; Li, Xiang; Wang, Lei; Lu, Zheng; Li, Chunde; Gong, Jian

    2017-12-01

    Applying frontal transcortical approach to treat lateral ventricular tumor is one of the most common neurosurgical manipulations. The frontal transcortical approach generally passes through the middle frontal gyrus in which there is no major function involved in the traditional sense. However, current researches have suggested that the prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays a central role in the whole network of the brain cognitive frame. In addition, cognitive function is crucial in growing and developmental stages and essential for the educational achievement, especially for children. Based on this, the authors in this study analyzed cognitive performance change of pediatric patients who had accepted frontal transcortical operation in 1-year follow-up and discussed the possibility of higher cognitive functions of the damaged region. In this single-center study, 15 pediatric patients (median age at surgery, 9.21 years old; range, 6.42-14.17 years old) who had been treated with frontal transcortical approach for lateral ventricular tumors were selected as research objects. The cognitive function assessment was conducting by adopting the revised Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-fourth edition (WISC-IV). In addition, the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (resting-state fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were carried out to measure the level of co-activation and to explore the functional connectivity between the brain regions at the preoperative period and 1-year follow-up after surgery. GTR was achieved in all patients, and all patients were in good condition after surgery. Compared to the preoperative indices of WISC-IV, patients generally had a lower level of indices of the WISC-IV after surgery, for example, the total IQ was declined to M = 83.60, SD = 9.500 from M = 95.33, SD = 13.844 within 1 year convalescence. The data of perceptual reasoning (t = - 2.392, p = 0.016), processing speed (t = - 2.121, p = 0.033), and

  2. Can Laws Be a Potential PET Image Texture Analysis Approach for Evaluation of Tumor Heterogeneity and Histopathological Characteristics in NSCLC?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacavus, Seyhan; Yılmaz, Bülent; Tasdemir, Arzu; Kayaaltı, Ömer; Kaya, Eser; İçer, Semra; Ayyıldız, Oguzhan

    2018-04-01

    We investigated the association between the textural features obtained from 18 F-FDG images, metabolic parameters (SUVmax , SUVmean, MTV, TLG), and tumor histopathological characteristics (stage and Ki-67 proliferation index) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The FDG-PET images of 67 patients with NSCLC were evaluated. MATLAB technical computing language was employed in the extraction of 137 features by using first order statistics (FOS), gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), gray-level run length matrix (GLRLM), and Laws' texture filters. Textural features and metabolic parameters were statistically analyzed in terms of good discrimination power between tumor stages, and selected features/parameters were used in the automatic classification by k-nearest neighbors (k-NN) and support vector machines (SVM). We showed that one textural feature (gray-level nonuniformity, GLN) obtained using GLRLM approach and nine textural features using Laws' approach were successful in discriminating all tumor stages, unlike metabolic parameters. There were significant correlations between Ki-67 index and some of the textural features computed using Laws' method (r = 0.6, p = 0.013). In terms of automatic classification of tumor stage, the accuracy was approximately 84% with k-NN classifier (k = 3) and SVM, using selected five features. Texture analysis of FDG-PET images has a potential to be an objective tool to assess tumor histopathological characteristics. The textural features obtained using Laws' approach could be useful in the discrimination of tumor stage.

  3. Approaches to drug resistance in solid tumors : with emphasis on lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Marleen

    2005-01-01

    De novo or acquired resistance of tumor cells to anticancer agents remains a major problem for the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs. Most solid tumors are intrinsically insensitive or acquire resistance after initial response to chemotherapy. Different mechanisms seem to play a role in

  4. Biological Bases for Radiation Adaptive Responses in the Lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Bobby R. [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lin, Yong [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wilder, Julie [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Belinsky, Steven [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Our main research objective was to determine the biological bases for low-dose, radiation-induced adaptive responses in the lung, and use the knowledge gained to produce an improved risk model for radiation-induced lung cancer that accounts for activated natural protection, genetic influences, and the role of epigenetic regulation (epiregulation). Currently, low-dose radiation risk assessment is based on the linear-no-threshold hypothesis, which now is known to be unsupported by a large volume of data.

  5. Endo-laparoscopic rendezvous approach for pericardia with gastric posterior wall of gastrointestinal stromal tumor: analysis of 52 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Po; Zhao, Yongjie

    2014-12-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor in the gastrointestinal tract and most frequently developed in the stomach, and surgical therapy is limited on removal of the tumor lesion. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical values of endo-laparoscopic rendezvous approach for pericardial GISTs within gastric posterior wall. Surgical outcome and clinical data of 52 patients with pericardial GISTs within gastric posterior wall treated at Tianjin Peoples' Hospital from January 2004 to October 2013 were analyzed. Endo-laparoscopic rendezvous approach was used as an operative procedure for tumor resection ranged from 10 to 50 mm. Endoscopic ultrasound, computed tomography and microscopic findings all certified the gastric spindle type GIST locating in the submucosa to muscle proper. Endo-laparoscopic rendezvous approach was attempted in 52 patients (male/female: 31/21) with median age of 51 years (25-71 years). The median operating time was 80 min (range: 40-120 min) and median intra-operative blood loss was 26 ml (range: 10-50 ml). The median hospital stay was 5 days (range: 4-6 days), while the median tumor size was 25 mm (range: 7-50 mm). All operative margins were clear. There were no recurrences or metastases of all patients in a median follow-up of 24 months (range: 6-36 months). Endo-laparoscopic rendezvous approach is considered to represent the next revolution in surgery. The new technique is reliable and effective in clinical application, due to the advantages of accurate and quick localization for pericardial GIST within gastric posterior wall.

  6. Tailored Beta-catenin mutational approach in extra-abdominal sporadic desmoid tumor patients without therapeutic intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broekhoven, Danique L.M. van; Grünhagenl, Dirk J.; Dalen, Thijs van; Coevorden, Frits van; Bonenkamp, Han J.; Been, Lukas B.; Bemelmans, Marc H.A.; Dijkstra, Sander D.S.; Colombo, Chiara; Gronchi, Alessandro; Verhoef, Cornelis

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of the classical treatment modalities surgery and radiotherapy in the treatment of aggressive fibromatosis is presently disputed and there is a shift towards a more conservative approach. The aim of the present study is to objectify tumor growth in patients with extra-abdominal or abdominal wall aggressive fibromatosis, while adhering to a “watchful waiting” policy. Other objectives are to investigate quality of life and to identify factors associated with tumor growth, in particular the relation with the presence of a CTNNB1-gene mutation in the tumor. GRAFITI is a nationwide, multicenter, prospective registration trial. All patients with extra-abdominal or abdominal wall aggressive fibromatosis are eligible for inclusion in the study. Main exclusion criteria are: history of familiar adenomatous polyposis, severe pain, functional impairment, life/limb threating situations in case of progressive disease. Patients included in the study will be treated with a watchful waiting policy during a period of 5 years. Imaging studies with ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging scan will be performed during follow-up to monitor possible growth: the first years every 3 months, the second year twice and the yearly. In addition patients will be asked to complete a quality of life questionnaire on specific follow-up moments. The primary endpoint is the rate of progression per year, defined by the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST). Secondary endpoints are quality of life and the rate of influence on tumor progression for several factors, such as CTNNB1-mutations, age and localization. This study will provide insight in tumor behavior, the effect on quality of life and clinicopathological factors predictive of tumor progression. The GRAFITI trial is registered in the Netherlands National Trial Register (NTR), number: NTR4714

  7. Evaluation of a commercial biologically based IMRT treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenenko, Vladimir A.; Reitz, Bodo; Day, Ellen; Qi, X. Sharon; Miften, Moyed; Li, X. Allen

    2008-01-01

    A new inverse treatment planning system (TPS) for external beam radiation therapy with high energy photons is commercially available that utilizes both dose-volume-based cost functions and a selection of cost functions which are based on biological models. The purpose of this work is to evaluate quality of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans resulting from the use of biological cost functions in comparison to plans designed using a traditional TPS employing dose-volume-based optimization. Treatment planning was performed independently at two institutions. For six cancer patients, including head and neck (one case from each institution), prostate, brain, liver, and rectal cases, segmental multileaf collimator IMRT plans were designed using biological cost functions and compared with clinically used dose-based plans for the same patients. Dose-volume histograms and dosimetric indices, such as minimum, maximum, and mean dose, were extracted and compared between the two types of treatment plans. Comparisons of the generalized equivalent uniform dose (EUD), a previously proposed plan quality index (fEUD), target conformity and heterogeneity indices, and the number of segments and monitor units were also performed. The most prominent feature of the biologically based plans was better sparing of organs at risk (OARs). When all plans from both institutions were combined, the biologically based plans resulted in smaller EUD values for 26 out of 33 OARs by an average of 5.6 Gy (range 0.24 to 15 Gy). Owing to more efficient beam segmentation and leaf sequencing tools implemented in the biologically based TPS compared to the dose-based TPS, an estimated treatment delivery time was shorter in most (five out of six) cases with some plans showing up to 50% reduction. The biologically based plans were generally characterized by a smaller conformity index, but greater heterogeneity index compared to the dose-based plans. Overall, compared to plans based on dose

  8. Middle infratemporal fossa less invasive approach for radical resection of parapharyngeal tumors: surgical microanatomy and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Yoichi; Fukushima, Takanori; Watanabe, Kentaro; Sakai, Jun; Friedman, Allan H; Zomorodi, Ali R

    2016-01-01

    Surgery of the infratemporal fossa (ITF) and parapharyngeal area presents a formidable challenge to the surgeon due to its anatomical complexity and limited access. Conventional surgical approaches to these regions were often too invasive and necessitate sacrifice of normal function and anatomy. To describe a less invasive transcranial extradural approach to ITF parapharyngeal lesions and to determine its advantages, 17 patients with ITF parapharyngeal neoplasms who underwent tumor resection via this approach were enrolled in the study. All lesions located in the ITF precarotid parapharyngeal space were resected through a small operative corridor between the trigeminal nerve third branch (V3) and the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Surgical outcomes and postoperative complications were evaluated. Pathological diagnosis included schwannoma in eight cases, paraganglioma in two cases, gangliocytoma in two cases, carcinosarcoma in one case, giant cell tumor in one case, pleomorphic adenoma in one case, chondroblastoma in one case, and juvenile angiofibroma in one case. Gross total resection was achieved in 12 cases, near-total and subtotal resection were in 3 and 2 cases, respectively. The most common postoperative complication was dysphagia. Surgical exposure can be customized from minimal (drilling of retrotrigeminal area) to maximal (full skeletonization of V3, removal of all structures lying lateral to the petrous segment of internal carotid artery) according to tumor size and location. Since the space between the V3 and TMJ is the main corridor of this approach, the key maneuver is the anterior translocation of V3 to obtain an acceptable surgical field.

  9. Tumor immunology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otter, W. den

    1987-01-01

    Tumor immunology, the use of immunological techniques for tumor diagnosis and approaches to immunotherapy of cancer are topics covered in this multi-author volume. Part A, 'Tumor Immunology', deals with present views on tumor-associated antigens, the initiation of immune reactions of tumor cells, effector cell killing, tumor cells and suppression of antitumor immunity, and one chapter dealing with the application of mathematical models in tumor immunology. Part B, 'Tumor Diagnosis and Imaging', concerns the use of markers to locate the tumor in vivo, for the histological diagnosis, and for the monitoring of tumor growth. In Part C, 'Immunotherapy', various experimental approaches to immunotherapy are described, such as the use of monoclonal antibodies to target drugs, the use of interleukin-2 and the use of drugs inhibiting suppression. In the final section, the evaluation, a pathologist and a clinician evaluate the possibilities and limitations of tumor immunology and the extent to which it is useful for diagnosis and therapy. refs.; figs.; tabs

  10. New Approaches for Early Detection of Breast Tumor Invasion or Progression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Man, Yan-Gao

    2003-01-01

    To assess interactions between epithelial (EP) and myoepithelial (ME) cells in association with breast tumor progression and invasion, a double immunostaining technique with antibodies to smooth muscle actin (SMA...

  11. The Advantages of Multi-Epitope Tumor Antigens as an Approach to Treating Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kiertscher, Sylvia

    1999-01-01

    .... We hypothesized that the processing and presentation of multiple tumor antigen epitopes by DC is a more efficient and effective way of stimulating T cell responses than current HLA-restricted peptide-based methods...

  12. Modeling protective anti-tumor immunity via preventative cancer vaccines using a hybrid agent-based and delay differential equation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Peter S; Lee, Peter P

    2012-01-01

    A next generation approach to cancer envisions developing preventative vaccinations to stimulate a person's immune cells, particularly cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), to eliminate incipient tumors before clinical detection. The purpose of our study is to quantitatively assess whether such an approach would be feasible, and if so, how many anti-cancer CTLs would have to be primed against tumor antigen to provide significant protection. To understand the relevant dynamics, we develop a two-compartment model of tumor-immune interactions at the tumor site and the draining lymph node. We model interactions at the tumor site using an agent-based model (ABM) and dynamics in the lymph node using a system of delay differential equations (DDEs). We combine the models into a hybrid ABM-DDE system and investigate dynamics over a wide range of parameters, including cell proliferation rates, tumor antigenicity, CTL recruitment times, and initial memory CTL populations. Our results indicate that an anti-cancer memory CTL pool of 3% or less can successfully eradicate a tumor population over a wide range of model parameters, implying that a vaccination approach is feasible. In addition, sensitivity analysis of our model reveals conditions that will result in rapid tumor destruction, oscillation, and polynomial rather than exponential decline in the tumor population due to tumor geometry.

  13. Do biological-based strategies hold promise to biofouling control in MBRs?

    KAUST Repository

    Malaeb, Lilian

    2013-10-01

    Biofouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs) remains a primary challenge for their wider application, despite the growing acceptance of MBRs worldwide. Research studies on membrane fouling are extensive in the literature, with more than 200 publications on MBR fouling in the last 3 years; yet, improvements in practice on biofouling control and management have been remarkably slow. Commonly applied cleaning methods are only partially effective and membrane replacement often becomes frequent. The reason for the slow advancement in successful control of biofouling is largely attributed to the complex interactions of involved biological compounds and the lack of representative-for-practice experimental approaches to evaluate potential effective control strategies. Biofouling is driven by microorganisms and their associated extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) and microbial products. Microorganisms and their products convene together to form matrices that are commonly treated as a black box in conventional control approaches. Biological-based antifouling strategies seem to be a promising constituent of an effective integrated control approach since they target the essence of biofouling problems. However, biological-based strategies are in their developmental phase and several questions should be addressed to set a roadmap for translating existing and new information into sustainable and effective control techniques. This paper investigates membrane biofouling in MBRs from the microbiological perspective to evaluate the potential of biological-based strategies in offering viable control alternatives. Limitations of available control methods highlight the importance of an integrated anti-fouling approach including biological strategies. Successful development of these strategies requires detailed characterization of microorganisms and EPS through the proper selection of analytical tools and assembly of results. Existing microbiological/EPS studies reveal a number of

  14. Insights into the role of components of the tumor microenvironment in oral carcinoma call for new therapeutic approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salo, Tuula; Vered, Marilena; Bello, Ibrahim O.; Nyberg, Pia; Bitu, Carolina Cavalcante; Zlotogorski Hurvitz, Ayelet; Dayan, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The research on oral cancer has focused mainly on the cancer cells, their genetic changes and consequent phenotypic modifications. However, it is increasingly clear that the tumor microenvironment (TME) has been shown to be in a dynamic state of inter-relations with the cancer cells. The TME contains a variety of components including the non-cancerous cells (i.e., immune cells, resident fibroblasts and angiogenic vascular cells) and the ECM milieu [including fibers (mainly collagen and fibronectin) and soluble factors (i.e., enzymes, growth factors, cytokines and chemokines)]. Thus, it is currently assumed that TME is considered a part of the cancerous tissue and the functionality of its key components constitutes the setting on which the hallmarks of the cancer cells can evolve. Therefore, in terms of controlling a malignancy, one should control the growth, invasion and spread of the cancer cells through modifications in the TME components. This mini review focuses on the TME as a diagnostic approach and reports the recent insights into the role of different TME key components [such as carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and inflammation (CAI) cells, angiogenesis, stromal matrix molecules and proteases] in the molecular biology of oral carcinoma. Furthermore, the impact of TME components on clinical outcomes and the concomitant need for development of new therapeutic approaches will be discussed. - Highlights: • Tumor depth and budding, hypoxia and TME cells associate with worse prognosis. • Pro-tumoral CAFs and CAI cells aid proliferation, invasion and spread hypoxia. • Some ECM-bound factors exert pro-angiogenic or pro-tumor activities. • Tumor spread is greatly dependent on ECM proteolysis, mediated by TME cells. • Direct targeting of TME components for treatment is still experimental

  15. Insights into the role of components of the tumor microenvironment in oral carcinoma call for new therapeutic approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salo, Tuula, E-mail: Tuula.salo@oulu.fi [Department of Diagnostics and Oral Medicine, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, and Medical Research Center, Oulu (Finland); Oulu University Central Hospital, Oulu (Finland); Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Vered, Marilena [Institute of Pathology, The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Ramat Gan (Israel); Department of Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Bello, Ibrahim O. [Department of Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Nyberg, Pia [Oulu University Central Hospital, Oulu (Finland); Bitu, Carolina Cavalcante [Department of Diagnostics and Oral Medicine, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, and Medical Research Center, Oulu (Finland); Zlotogorski Hurvitz, Ayelet [Department of Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Campus, Petah Tikva (Israel); Dayan, Dan [Department of Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2014-07-15

    The research on oral cancer has focused mainly on the cancer cells, their genetic changes and consequent phenotypic modifications. However, it is increasingly clear that the tumor microenvironment (TME) has been shown to be in a dynamic state of inter-relations with the cancer cells. The TME contains a variety of components including the non-cancerous cells (i.e., immune cells, resident fibroblasts and angiogenic vascular cells) and the ECM milieu [including fibers (mainly collagen and fibronectin) and soluble factors (i.e., enzymes, growth factors, cytokines and chemokines)]. Thus, it is currently assumed that TME is considered a part of the cancerous tissue and the functionality of its key components constitutes the setting on which the hallmarks of the cancer cells can evolve. Therefore, in terms of controlling a malignancy, one should control the growth, invasion and spread of the cancer cells through modifications in the TME components. This mini review focuses on the TME as a diagnostic approach and reports the recent insights into the role of different TME key components [such as carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and inflammation (CAI) cells, angiogenesis, stromal matrix molecules and proteases] in the molecular biology of oral carcinoma. Furthermore, the impact of TME components on clinical outcomes and the concomitant need for development of new therapeutic approaches will be discussed. - Highlights: • Tumor depth and budding, hypoxia and TME cells associate with worse prognosis. • Pro-tumoral CAFs and CAI cells aid proliferation, invasion and spread hypoxia. • Some ECM-bound factors exert pro-angiogenic or pro-tumor activities. • Tumor spread is greatly dependent on ECM proteolysis, mediated by TME cells. • Direct targeting of TME components for treatment is still experimental.

  16. Biological-based optimization and volumetric modulated arc therapy delivery for stereotactic body radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diot, Quentin; Kavanagh, Brian; Timmerman, Robert; Miften, Moyed

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To describe biological-based optimization and Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation-based treatment planning for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in lung, liver, and prostate patients. Methods: Optimization strategies and VMAT planning parameters using a biological-based optimization MC planning system were analyzed for 24 SBRT patients. Patients received a median dose of 45 Gy [range, 34-54 Gy] for lung tumors in 1-5 fxs and a median dose of 52 Gy [range, 48-60 Gy] for liver tumors in 3-6 fxs. Prostate patients received a fractional dose of 10 Gy in 5 fxs. Biological-cost functions were used for plan optimization, and its dosimetric quality was evaluated using the conformity index (CI), the conformation number (CN), the ratio of the volume receiving 50% of the prescription dose over the planning target volume (Rx/PTV50). The quality and efficiency of the delivery were assessed according to measured quality assurance (QA) passing rates and delivery times. For each disease site, one patient was replanned using physical cost function and compared to the corresponding biological plan. Results: Median CI, CN, and Rx/PTV50 for all 24 patients were 1.13 (1.02-1.28), 0.79 (0.70-0.88), and 5.3 (3.1-10.8), respectively. The median delivery rate for all patients was 410 MU/min with a maximum possible rate of 480 MU/min (85%). Median QA passing rate was 96.7%, and it did not significantly vary with the tumor site. Conclusions: VMAT delivery of SBRT plans optimized using biological-motivated cost-functions result in highly conformal dose distributions. Plans offer shorter treatment-time benefits and provide efficient dose delivery without compromising the plan conformity for tumors in the prostate, lung, and liver, thereby improving patient comfort and clinical throughput. The short delivery times minimize the risk of patient setup and intrafraction motion errors often associated with long SBRT treatment

  17. A panoramic view of the skull base: systematic review of open and endoscopic endonasal approaches to four tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffeo, Christopher S; Dietrich, August R; Grobelny, Bartosz; Zhang, Meng; Goldberg, Judith D; Golfinos, John G; Lebowitz, Richard; Kleinberg, David; Placantonakis, Dimitris G

    2014-08-01

    Endoscopic endonasal surgery has been established as the safest approach to pituitary tumors, yet its role in other common skull base lesions has not been established. To answer this question, we carried out a systematic review of reported series of open and endoscopic endonasal approaches to four major skull base tumors: olfactory groove meningiomas (OGM), tuberculum sellae meningiomas (TSM), craniopharyngiomas (CRA), and clival chordomas (CHO). Data from 162 studies containing 5,701 patients were combined and compared for differences in perioperative mortality, gross total resection (GTR), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, neurological morbidity, post-operative visual function, post-operative anosmia, post-operative diabetes insipidus (DI), and post-operative obesity/hyperphagia. Weighted average rates for each outcome were calculated using relative study size. Our findings indicate similar rates of GTR and perioperative mortality between open and endoscopic approaches for all tumor types. CSF leak was increased after endoscopic surgery. Visual function symptoms were more likely to improve after endoscopic surgery for TSM, CRA, and CHO. Post-operative DI and obesity/hyperphagia were significantly increased after open resection in CRA. Recurrence rates per 1,000 patient-years of follow-up were higher in endoscopy for OGM, TSM, and CHO. Trends for open and endoscopic surgery suggested modest improvement in all outcomes over time. Our observations suggest that endonasal endoscopy is a safe alternative to craniotomy and may be preferred for certain tumor types. However, endoscopic surgery is associated with higher rates of CSF leak, and possibly increased recurrence rates. Prospective study with long-term follow-up is required to verify these preliminary observations.

  18. A neuropathology-based approach to epilepsy surgery in brain tumors and proposal for a new terminology use for long-term epilepsy-associated brain tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blumcke, Ingmar; Aronica, Eleonora; Urbach, Horst; Alexopoulos, Andreas; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Every fourth patient submitted to epilepsy surgery suffers from a brain tumor. Microscopically, these neoplasms present with a wide-ranging spectrum of glial or glio-neuronal tumor subtypes. Gangliogliomas (GG) and dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNTs) are the most frequently recognized

  19. Radiotherapy in conjunction with 7-hydroxystaurosporine: a multimodal approach with tumor pO2 as a potential marker of therapeutic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nadeem; Mupparaju, Sriram P; Hou, Huagang; Lariviere, Jean P; Demidenko, Eugene; Swartz, Harold M; Eastman, Alan

    2009-11-01

    Checkpoint inhibitors potentially could be used to enhance cell killing by DNA-targeted therapeutic modalities such as radiotherapy. UCN-01 (7-hydroxystaurosporine) inhibits S and G2 checkpoint arrest in the cells of various malignant cell lines and has been investigated in combination with chemotherapy. However, little is known about its potential use in combination with radiotherapy. We report the effect of 20 Gy radiation given in conjunction with UCN-01 on the pO2 and growth of subcutaneous RIF-1 tumors. Multisite EPR oximetry was used for repeated, non-invasive tumor pO2 measurements. The effect of UCN-01 and/or 20 Gy on tumor pO2 and tumor volume was investigated to determine therapeutic outcomes. Untreated RIF-1 tumors were hypoxic with a tissue pO2 of 5-7 mmHg. Treatment with 20 Gy or UCN-01 significantly reduced tumor growth, and a modest increase in tumor pO2 was observed in tumors treated with 20 Gy. However, irradiation with 20 Gy 12 h after UCN-01 treatment resulted in a significant inhibition of tumor growth and a significant increase in tumor pO2 to 16-28 mmHg from day 1 onward compared to the control, UCN-01 or 20-Gy groups. Treatment with UCN-01 12 h after 20 Gy also led to a similar growth inhibition of the tumors and a similar increase in tumor pO2. The changes in tumor pO2 observed after the treatment correlated inversely with the tumor volume in the groups receiving UCN-01 with 20 Gy. This multimodal approach could be used to enhance the outcome of radiotherapy. Furthermore, tumor pO2 could be a potential marker of therapeutic response.

  20. Accurate and reproducible invasive breast cancer detection in whole-slide images: A Deep Learning approach for quantifying tumor extent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Roa, Angel; Gilmore, Hannah; Basavanhally, Ajay; Feldman, Michael; Ganesan, Shridar; Shih, Natalie N. C.; Tomaszewski, John; González, Fabio A.; Madabhushi, Anant

    2017-04-01

    With the increasing ability to routinely and rapidly digitize whole slide images with slide scanners, there has been interest in developing computerized image analysis algorithms for automated detection of disease extent from digital pathology images. The manual identification of presence and extent of breast cancer by a pathologist is critical for patient management for tumor staging and assessing treatment response. However, this process is tedious and subject to inter- and intra-reader variability. For computerized methods to be useful as decision support tools, they need to be resilient to data acquired from different sources, different staining and cutting protocols and different scanners. The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and robustness of a deep learning-based method to automatically identify the extent of invasive tumor on digitized images. Here, we present a new method that employs a convolutional neural network for detecting presence of invasive tumor on whole slide images. Our approach involves training the classifier on nearly 400 exemplars from multiple different sites, and scanners, and then independently validating on almost 200 cases from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Our approach yielded a Dice coefficient of 75.86%, a positive predictive value of 71.62% and a negative predictive value of 96.77% in terms of pixel-by-pixel evaluation compared to manually annotated regions of invasive ductal carcinoma.

  1. A correlative optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy approach to locating nanoparticles in brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempen, Paul J; Kircher, Moritz F; de la Zerda, Adam; Zavaleta, Cristina L; Jokerst, Jesse V; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Sinclair, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications, including cancer diagnosis and treatment, demands the capability to exactly locate them within complex biological systems. In this work a correlative optical and scanning electron microscopy technique was developed to locate and observe multi-modal gold core nanoparticle accumulation in brain tumor models. Entire brain sections from mice containing orthotopic brain tumors injected intravenously with nanoparticles were imaged using both optical microscopy to identify the brain tumor, and scanning electron microscopy to identify the individual nanoparticles. Gold-based nanoparticles were readily identified in the scanning electron microscope using backscattered electron imaging as bright spots against a darker background. This information was then correlated to determine the exact location of the nanoparticles within the brain tissue. The nanoparticles were located only in areas that contained tumor cells, and not in the surrounding healthy brain tissue. This correlative technique provides a powerful method to relate the macro- and micro-scale features visible in light microscopy with the nanoscale features resolvable in scanning electron microscopy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A novel gene therapy-based approach that selectively targets hypoxic regions within solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, S.T.; Dougherty, G.J.; Davis, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that malignant cells present within the hypoxic regions that are commonly found within solid tumors contribute significantly to local recurrence following radiation therapy. We describe now a novel strategy designed to target such cells that exploits the differential production within hypoxic regions of the pro-angiogenic cytokine vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF). Specifically, we have generated cDNA constructs that encode two distinct chimeric cell surface proteins that incorporate, respectively, the extracellular domains of the VEGF receptors Flk-1 or Flt-1, fused in frame to the membrane spanning and cytoplasmic domains of the pro-apoptotic protein Fas. Both chimeric proteins (Flk/Fas and Flt/Fas) appear stable and can be readily detected on the surface of transfected cells by Western blot and/or FACS analysis. Importantly, tumor cells expressing the chimeric proteins were rapidly killed in a dose-dependent fashion upon the addition of exogenous recombinant VEGF. Adenoviral vectors encoding Flk/Fas have been generated and shown to induce tumor cells to undergo apoptosis upon transfer to hypoxic conditions in vitro. This activity is dependent upon the endogenous production of VEGF. Studies are currently underway to test the ability of adenoviral Flk/Fas (Ad.Flk/Fas) to reduce tumor recurrence in vivo when used as an adjuvant therapy in conjunction with clinically relevant doses of ionizing radiation

  3. Scalable Open Science Approach for Mutation Calling of Tumor Exomes Using Multiple Genomic Pipelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellrott, Kyle; Bailey, Matthew H.; Saksena, Gordon; Covington, Kyle R.; Kandoth, Cyriac; Stewart, Chip; Hess, Julian; Ma, Singer; Chiotti, Kami E.; McLellan, Michael; Sofia, Heidi J.; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Getz, Gad; Wheeler, David A.; Ding, Li; Caesar-Johnson, Samantha J.; Demchok, John A.; Felau, Ina; Kasapi, Melpomeni; Ferguson, Martin L.; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Sofia, Heidi J.; Tarnuzzer, Roy; Wang, Zhining; Yang, Liming; Zenklusen, Jean C.; Zhang, Jiashan (Julia); Chudamani, Sudha; Liu, Jia; Lolla, Laxmi; Naresh, Rashi; Pihl, Todd; Sun, Qiang; Wan, Yunhu; Wu, Ye; Cho, Juok; DeFreitas, Timothy; Frazer, Scott; Gehlenborg, Nils; Getz, Gad; Heiman, David I.; Kim, Jaegil; Lawrence, Michael S.; Lin, Pei; Meier, Sam; Noble, Michael S.; Saksena, Gordon; Voet, Doug; Zhang, Hailei; Bernard, Brady; Chambwe, Nyasha; Dhankani, Varsha; Knijnenburg, Theo; Kramer, Roger; Leinonen, Kalle; Liu, Yuexin; Miller, Michael; Reynolds, Sheila; Shmulevich, Ilya; Thorsson, Vesteinn; Zhang, Wei; Akbani, Rehan; Broom, Bradley M.; Hegde, Apurva M.; Ju, Zhenlin; Kanchi, Rupa S.; Korkut, Anil; Li, Jun; Liang, Han; Ling, Shiyun; Liu, Wenbin; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B.; Ng, Kwok Shing; Rao, Arvind; Ryan, Michael; Wang, Jing; Weinstein, John N.; Zhang, Jiexin; Abeshouse, Adam; Armenia, Joshua; Chakravarty, Debyani; Chatila, Walid K.; de Bruijn, Ino; Gao, Jianjiong; Gross, Benjamin E.; Heins, Zachary J.; Kundra, Ritika; La, Konnor; Ladanyi, Marc; Luna, Augustin; Nissan, Moriah G.; Ochoa, Angelica; Phillips, Sarah M.; Reznik, Ed; Sanchez-Vega, Francisco; Sander, Chris; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sheridan, Robert; Sumer, S. Onur; Sun, Yichao; Taylor, Barry S.; Wang, Jioajiao; Zhang, Hongxin; Anur, Pavana; Peto, Myron; Spellman, Paul; Benz, Christopher; Stuart, Joshua M.; Wong, Christopher K.; Yau, Christina; Hayes, D. Neil; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Ally, Adrian; Balasundaram, Miruna; Bowlby, Reanne; Brooks, Denise; Carlsen, Rebecca; Chuah, Eric; Dhalla, Noreen; Holt, Robert; Jones, Steven J.M.; Kasaian, Katayoon; Lee, Darlene; Ma, Yussanne; Marra, Marco A.; Mayo, Michael; Moore, Richard A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Mungall, Karen; Robertson, A. Gordon; Sadeghi, Sara; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Sipahimalani, Payal; Tam, Angela; Thiessen, Nina; Tse, Kane; Wong, Tina; Berger, Ashton C.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Cibulskis, Carrie; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gao, Galen F.; Ha, Gavin; Meyerson, Matthew; Schumacher, Steven E.; Shih, Juliann; Kucherlapati, Melanie H.; Kucherlapati, Raju S.; Baylin, Stephen; Cope, Leslie; Danilova, Ludmila; Bootwalla, Moiz S.; Lai, Phillip H.; Maglinte, Dennis T.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Auman, J. Todd; Balu, Saianand; Bodenheimer, Tom; Fan, Cheng; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Hoyle, Alan P.; Jefferys, Stuart R.; Jones, Corbin D.; Meng, Shaowu; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Mose, Lisle E.; Perou, Amy H.; Perou, Charles M.; Roach, Jeffrey; Shi, Yan; Simons, Janae V.; Skelly, Tara; Soloway, Matthew G.; Tan, Donghui; Veluvolu, Umadevi; Fan, Huihui; Hinoue, Toshinori; Laird, Peter W.; Shen, Hui; Zhou, Wanding; Bellair, Michelle; Chang, Kyle; Covington, Kyle; Creighton, Chad J.; Dinh, Huyen; Doddapaneni, Harsha Vardhan; Donehower, Lawrence A.; Drummond, Jennifer; Gibbs, Richard A.; Glenn, Robert; Hale, Walker; Han, Yi; Hu, Jianhong; Korchina, Viktoriya; Lee, Sandra; Lewis, Lora; Li, Wei; Liu, Xiuping; Morgan, Margaret; Morton, Donna; Muzny, Donna; Santibanez, Jireh; Sheth, Margi; Shinbrot, Eve; Wang, Linghua; Wang, Min; Wheeler, David A.; Xi, Liu; Zhao, Fengmei; Hess, Julian; Appelbaum, Elizabeth L.; Bailey, Matthew; Cordes, Matthew G.; Ding, Li; Fronick, Catrina C.; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Fulton, Robert S.; Kandoth, Cyriac; Mardis, Elaine R.; McLellan, Michael D.; Miller, Christopher A.; Schmidt, Heather K.; Wilson, Richard K.; Crain, Daniel; Curley, Erin; Gardner, Johanna; Lau, Kevin; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Paulauskis, Joseph; Penny, Robert; Shelton, Candace; Shelton, Troy; Sherman, Mark; Thompson, Eric; Yena, Peggy; Bowen, Jay; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Gerken, Mark; Leraas, Kristen M.; Lichtenberg, Tara M.; Ramirez, Nilsa C.; Wise, Lisa; Zmuda, Erik; Corcoran, Niall; Costello, Tony; Hovens, Christopher; Carvalho, Andre L.; de Carvalho, Ana C.; Fregnani, José H.; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Reis, Rui M.; Scapulatempo-Neto, Cristovam; Silveira, Henrique C.S.; Vidal, Daniel O.; Burnette, Andrew; Eschbacher, Jennifer; Hermes, Beth; Noss, Ardene; Singh, Rosy; Anderson, Matthew L.; Castro, Patricia D.; Ittmann, Michael; Huntsman, David; Kohl, Bernard; Le, Xuan; Thorp, Richard; Andry, Chris; Duffy, Elizabeth R.; Lyadov, Vladimir; Paklina, Oxana; Setdikova, Galiya; Shabunin, Alexey; Tavobilov, Mikhail; McPherson, Christopher; Warnick, Ronald; Berkowitz, Ross; Cramer, Daniel; Feltmate, Colleen; Horowitz, Neil; Kibel, Adam; Muto, Michael; Raut, Chandrajit P.; Malykh, Andrei; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Barrett, Wendi; Devine, Karen; Fulop, Jordonna; Ostrom, Quinn T.; Shimmel, Kristen; Wolinsky, Yingli; Sloan, Andrew E.; De Rose, Agostino; Giuliante, Felice; Goodman, Marc; Karlan, Beth Y.; Hagedorn, Curt H.; Eckman, John; Harr, Jodi; Myers, Jerome; Tucker, Kelinda; Zach, Leigh Anne; Deyarmin, Brenda; Hu, Hai; Kvecher, Leonid; Larson, Caroline; Mural, Richard J.; Somiari, Stella; Vicha, Ales; Zelinka, Tomas; Bennett, Joseph; Iacocca, Mary; Rabeno, Brenda; Swanson, Patricia; Latour, Mathieu; Lacombe, Louis; Têtu, Bernard; Bergeron, Alain; McGraw, Mary; Staugaitis, Susan M.; Chabot, John; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Sepulveda, Antonia; Su, Tao; Wang, Timothy; Potapova, Olga; Voronina, Olga; Desjardins, Laurence; Mariani, Odette; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Sastre, Xavier; Stern, Marc Henri; Cheng, Feixiong; Signoretti, Sabina; Berchuck, Andrew; Bigner, Darell; Lipp, Eric; Marks, Jeffrey; McCall, Shannon; McLendon, Roger; Secord, Angeles; Sharp, Alexis; Behera, Madhusmita; Brat, Daniel J.; Chen, Amy; Delman, Keith; Force, Seth; Khuri, Fadlo; Magliocca, Kelly; Maithel, Shishir; Olson, Jeffrey J.; Owonikoko, Taofeek; Pickens, Alan; Ramalingam, Suresh; Shin, Dong M.; Sica, Gabriel; Van Meir, Erwin G.; Zhang, Hongzheng; Eijckenboom, Wil; Gillis, Ad; Korpershoek, Esther; Looijenga, Leendert; Oosterhuis, Wolter; Stoop, Hans; van Kessel, Kim E.; Zwarthoff, Ellen C.; Calatozzolo, Chiara; Cuppini, Lucia; Cuzzubbo, Stefania; DiMeco, Francesco; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Mattei, Luca; Perin, Alessandro; Pollo, Bianca; Chen, Chu; Houck, John; Lohavanichbutr, Pawadee; Hartmann, Arndt; Stoehr, Christine; Stoehr, Robert; Taubert, Helge; Wach, Sven; Wullich, Bernd; Kycler, Witold; Murawa, Dawid; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Chung, Ki; Edenfield, W. Jeffrey; Martin, Julie; Baudin, Eric; Bubley, Glenn; Bueno, Raphael; De Rienzo, Assunta; Richards, William G.; Kalkanis, Steven; Mikkelsen, Tom; Noushmehr, Houtan; Scarpace, Lisa; Girard, Nicolas; Aymerich, Marta; Campo, Elias; Giné, Eva; Guillermo, Armando López; Van Bang, Nguyen; Hanh, Phan Thi; Phu, Bui Duc; Tang, Yufang; Colman, Howard; Evason, Kimberley; Dottino, Peter R.; Martignetti, John A.; Gabra, Hani; Juhl, Hartmut; Akeredolu, Teniola; Stepa, Serghei; Hoon, Dave; Ahn, Keunsoo; Kang, Koo Jeong; Beuschlein, Felix; Breggia, Anne; Birrer, Michael; Bell, Debra; Borad, Mitesh; Bryce, Alan H.; Castle, Erik; Chandan, Vishal; Cheville, John; Copland, John A.; Farnell, Michael; Flotte, Thomas; Giama, Nasra; Ho, Thai; Kendrick, Michael; Kocher, Jean Pierre; Kopp, Karla; Moser, Catherine; Nagorney, David; O'Brien, Daniel; O'Neill, Brian Patrick; Patel, Tushar; Petersen, Gloria; Que, Florencia; Rivera, Michael; Roberts, Lewis; Smallridge, Robert; Smyrk, Thomas; Stanton, Melissa; Thompson, R. Houston; Torbenson, Michael; Yang, Ju Dong; Zhang, Lizhi; Brimo, Fadi; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Angulo Gonzalez, Ana Maria; Behrens, Carmen; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Broaddus, Russell; Czerniak, Bogdan; Esmaeli, Bita; Fujimoto, Junya; Gershenwald, Jeffrey; Guo, Charles; Lazar, Alexander J.; Logothetis, Christopher; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Moran, Cesar; Ramondetta, Lois; Rice, David; Sood, Anil; Tamboli, Pheroze; Thompson, Timothy; Troncoso, Patricia; Tsao, Anne; Wistuba, Ignacio; Carter, Candace; Haydu, Lauren; Hersey, Peter; Jakrot, Valerie; Kakavand, Hojabr; Kefford, Richard; Lee, Kenneth; Long, Georgina; Mann, Graham; Quinn, Michael; Saw, Robyn; Scolyer, Richard; Shannon, Kerwin; Spillane, Andrew; Stretch, Jonathan; Synott, Maria; Thompson, John; Wilmott, James; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Chan, Timothy A.; Ghossein, Ronald; Gopalan, Anuradha; Levine, Douglas A.; Reuter, Victor; Singer, Samuel; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Tien, Nguyen Viet; Broudy, Thomas; Mirsaidi, Cyrus; Nair, Praveen; Drwiega, Paul; Miller, Judy; Smith, Jennifer; Zaren, Howard; Park, Joong Won; Hung, Nguyen Phi; Kebebew, Electron; Linehan, W. Marston; Metwalli, Adam R.; Pacak, Karel; Pinto, Peter A.; Schiffman, Mark; Schmidt, Laura S.; Vocke, Cathy D.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Worrell, Robert; Yang, Hannah; Moncrieff, Marc; Goparaju, Chandra; Melamed, Jonathan; Pass, Harvey; Botnariuc, Natalia; Caraman, Irina; Cernat, Mircea; Chemencedji, Inga; Clipca, Adrian; Doruc, Serghei; Gorincioi, Ghenadie; Mura, Sergiu; Pirtac, Maria; Stancul, Irina; Tcaciuc, Diana; Albert, Monique; Alexopoulou, Iakovina; Arnaout, Angel; Bartlett, John; Engel, Jay; Gilbert, Sebastien; Parfitt, Jeremy; Sekhon, Harman; Thomas, George; Rassl, Doris M.; Rintoul, Robert C.; Bifulco, Carlo; Tamakawa, Raina; Urba, Walter; Hayward, Nicholas; Timmers, Henri; Antenucci, Anna; Facciolo, Francesco; Grazi, Gianluca; Marino, Mirella; Merola, Roberta; de Krijger, Ronald; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne Paule; Piché, Alain; Chevalier, Simone; McKercher, Ginette; Birsoy, Kivanc; Barnett, Gene; Brewer, Cathy; Farver, Carol; Naska, Theresa; Pennell, Nathan A.; Raymond, Daniel; Schilero, Cathy; Smolenski, Kathy; Williams, Felicia; Morrison, Carl; Borgia, Jeffrey A.; Liptay, Michael J.; Pool, Mark; Seder, Christopher W.; Junker, Kerstin; Omberg, Larsson; Dinkin, Mikhail; Manikhas, George; Alvaro, Domenico; Bragazzi, Maria Consiglia; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Carpino, Guido; Gaudio, Eugenio; Chesla, David; Cottingham, Sandra; Dubina, Michael; Moiseenko, Fedor; Dhanasekaran, Renumathy; Becker, Karl Friedrich; Janssen, Klaus Peter; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed H.; Aziz, Dina; Bell, Sue; Cebulla, Colleen M.; Davis, Amy; Duell, Rebecca; Elder, J. Bradley; Hilty, Joe; Kumar, Bahavna; Lang, James; Lehman, Norman L.; Mandt, Randy; Nguyen, Phuong; Pilarski, Robert; Rai, Karan; Schoenfield, Lynn; Senecal, Kelly; Wakely, Paul; Hansen, Paul; Lechan, Ronald; Powers, James; Tischler, Arthur; Grizzle, William E.; Sexton, Katherine C.; Kastl, Alison; Henderson, Joel; Porten, Sima; Waldmann, Jens; Fassnacht, Martin; Asa, Sylvia L.; Schadendorf, Dirk; Couce, Marta; Graefen, Markus; Huland, Hartwig; Sauter, Guido; Schlomm, Thorsten; Simon, Ronald; Tennstedt, Pierre; Olabode, Oluwole; Nelson, Mark; Bathe, Oliver; Carroll, Peter R.; Chan, June M.; Disaia, Philip; Glenn, Pat; Kelley, Robin K.; Landen, Charles N.; Phillips, Joanna; Prados, Michael; Simko, Jeffry; Smith-McCune, Karen; VandenBerg, Scott; Roggin, Kevin; Fehrenbach, Ashley; Kendler, Ady; Sifri, Suzanne; Steele, Ruth; Jimeno, Antonio; Carey, Francis; Forgie, Ian; Mannelli, Massimo; Carney, Michael; Hernandez, Brenda; Campos, Benito; Herold-Mende, Christel; Jungk, Christin; Unterberg, Andreas; von Deimling, Andreas; Bossler, Aaron; Galbraith, Joseph; Jacobus, Laura; Knudson, Michael; Knutson, Tina; Ma, Deqin; Milhem, Mohammed; Sigmund, Rita; Godwin, Andrew K.; Madan, Rashna; Rosenthal, Howard G.; Adebamowo, Clement; Adebamowo, Sally N.; Boussioutas, Alex; Beer, David; Giordano, Thomas; Mes-Masson, Anne Marie; Saad, Fred; Bocklage, Therese; Landrum, Lisa; Mannel, Robert; Moore, Kathleen; Moxley, Katherine; Postier, Russel; Walker, Joan; Zuna, Rosemary; Feldman, Michael; Valdivieso, Federico; Dhir, Rajiv; Luketich, James; Mora Pinero, Edna M.; Quintero-Aguilo, Mario; Carlotti, Carlos Gilberto; Dos Santos, Jose Sebastião; Kemp, Rafael; Sankarankuty, Ajith; Tirapelli, Daniela; Catto, James; Agnew, Kathy; Swisher, Elizabeth; Creaney, Jenette; Robinson, Bruce; Shelley, Carl Simon; Godwin, Eryn M.; Kendall, Sara; Shipman, Cassaundra; Bradford, Carol; Carey, Thomas; Haddad, Andrea; Moyer, Jeffey; Peterson, Lisa; Prince, Mark; Rozek, Laura; Wolf, Gregory; Bowman, Rayleen; Fong, Kwun M.; Yang, Ian; Korst, Robert; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Fantacone-Campbell, J. Leigh; Hooke, Jeffrey A.; Kovatich, Albert J.; Shriver, Craig D.; DiPersio, John; Drake, Bettina; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Heath, Sharon; Ley, Timothy; Van Tine, Brian; Westervelt, Peter; Rubin, Mark A.; Lee, Jung Il; Aredes, Natália D.; Mariamidze, Armaz

    2018-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) cancer genomics dataset includes over 10,000 tumor-normal exome pairs across 33 different cancer types, in total >400 TB of raw data files requiring analysis. Here we describe the Multi-Center Mutation Calling in Multiple Cancers project, our effort to generate a

  4. Quantitative diagnosis of breast tumors by morphometric classification of microenvironmental myoepithelial cells using a machine learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yoichiro; Saito, Akira; Tateishi, Ayako; Shimojo, Hisashi; Kanno, Hiroyuki; Tsuchiya, Shinichi; Ito, Ken-Ichi; Cosatto, Eric; Graf, Hans Peter; Moraleda, Rodrigo R; Eils, Roland; Grabe, Niels

    2017-04-25

    Machine learning systems have recently received increased attention for their broad applications in several fields. In this study, we show for the first time that histological types of breast tumors can be classified using subtle morphological differences of microenvironmental myoepithelial cell nuclei without any direct information about neoplastic tumor cells. We quantitatively measured 11661 nuclei on the four histological types: normal cases, usual ductal hyperplasia and low/high grade ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Using a machine learning system, we succeeded in classifying the four histological types with 90.9% accuracy. Electron microscopy observations suggested that the activity of typical myoepithelial cells in DCIS was lowered. Through these observations as well as meta-analytic database analyses, we developed a paracrine cross-talk-based biological mechanism of DCIS progressing to invasive cancer. Our observations support novel approaches in clinical computational diagnostics as well as in therapy development against progression.

  5. Quantitative ultrasound assessment of breast tumor response to chemotherapy using a multi-parameter approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadayyon, Hadi; Sannachi, Lakshmanan; Gangeh, Mehrdad; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Tran, William; Trudeau, Maureen E; Pritchard, Kathleen; Ghandi, Sonal; Verma, Sunil; Czarnota, Gregory J

    2016-07-19

    This study demonstrated the ability of quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parameters in providing an early prediction of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). Using a 6-MHz array transducer, ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data were collected from 58 LABC patients prior to NAC treatment and at weeks 1, 4, and 8 of their treatment, and prior to surgery. QUS parameters including midband fit (MBF), spectral slope (SS), spectral intercept (SI), spacing among scatterers (SAS), attenuation coefficient estimate (ACE), average scatterer diameter (ASD), and average acoustic concentration (AAC) were determined from the tumor region of interest. Ultrasound data were compared with the ultimate clinical and pathological response of the patient's tumor to treatment and patient recurrence-free survival. Multi-parameter discriminant analysis using the κ-nearest-neighbor classifier demonstrated that the best response classification could be achieved using the combination of MBF, SS, and SAS, with an accuracy of 60 ± 10% at week 1, 77 ± 8% at week 4 and 75 ± 6% at week 8. Furthermore, when the QUS measurements at each time (week) were combined with pre-treatment (week 0) QUS values, the classification accuracies improved (70 ± 9% at week 1, 80 ± 5% at week 4, and 81 ± 6% at week 8). Finally, the multi-parameter QUS model demonstrated a significant difference in survival rates of responding and non-responding patients at weeks 1 and 4 (p=0.035, and 0.027, respectively). This study demonstrated for the first time, using new parameters tested on relatively large patient cohort and leave-one-out classifier evaluation, that a hybrid QUS biomarker including MBF, SS, and SAS could, with relatively high sensitivity and specificity, detect the response of LABC tumors to NAC as early as after 4 weeks of therapy. The findings of this study also suggested that incorporating pre-treatment QUS parameters of a tumor improved the

  6. Biology-based combined-modality radiotherapy: workshop report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, Kathryn A.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Milas, Luka

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this workshop summary is to provide an overview of preclinical and clinical data on combined-modality radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The 8th Annual Radiation Workshop at Round Top was held April 13-16, 2000 at the International Festival Institute (Round Top, TX). Results: Presentations by 30 speakers (from Germany, Netherlands, Australia, England, and France along with U.S. participants and M. D. Anderson Cancer Center faculty) formed the framework for discussions on the current status and future perspectives of biology-based combined-modality radiotherapy. Conclusion: Cellular and molecular pathways available for radiation modification by chemical and biologic agents are numerous, providing new opportunities for translational research in radiation oncology and for more effective combined-modality treatment of cancer

  7. A systems biology-based classifier for hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanqiong Zhang

    Full Text Available AIM: The diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in the early stage is crucial to the application of curative treatments which are the only hope for increasing the life expectancy of patients. Recently, several large-scale studies have shed light on this problem through analysis of gene expression profiles to identify markers correlated with HCC progression. However, those marker sets shared few genes in common and were poorly validated using independent data. Therefore, we developed a systems biology based classifier by combining the differential gene expression with topological features of human protein interaction networks to enhance the ability of HCC diagnosis. METHODS AND RESULTS: In the Oncomine platform, genes differentially expressed in HCC tissues relative to their corresponding normal tissues were filtered by a corrected Q value cut-off and Concept filters. The identified genes that are common to different microarray datasets were chosen as the candidate markers. Then, their networks were analyzed by GeneGO Meta-Core software and the hub genes were chosen. After that, an HCC diagnostic classifier was constructed by Partial Least Squares modeling based on the microarray gene expression data of the hub genes. Validations of diagnostic performance showed that this classifier had high predictive accuracy (85.88∼92.71% and area under ROC curve (approximating 1.0, and that the network topological features integrated into this classifier contribute greatly to improving the predictive performance. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that this modeling strategy is not only applicable to HCC, but also to other cancers. CONCLUSION: Our analysis suggests that the systems biology-based classifier that combines the differential gene expression and topological features of human protein interaction network may enhance the diagnostic performance of HCC classifier.

  8. The Impact of Laparoscopic Approaches on Short-term Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Liver Surgery for Metastatic Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagkounis, Georgios; Seicean, Andreea; Berber, Eren

    2015-06-01

    To compare the perioperative outcomes associated with open and laparoscopic (LAP) surgical approaches for liver metastases. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was used to identify all adult patients who underwent surgical therapy for metastatic liver tumors between 2006 and 2012 (N=7684). Patients who underwent >1 procedure were excluded. Logistic regression after matching on propensity scores was used to assess the association between surgical approaches and perioperative outcomes. A total of 4555 patients underwent open resection, 387 LAP resection, 297 open radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and 265 LAP RFA. In propensity-matched samples (over 95% of patients successfully matched), there was no significant difference between LAP resection and LAP RFA in perioperative complications and length of stay and both compared favorably with their open counterparts. Minimally invasive approaches for secondary hepatic malignancies were associated with improved postoperative morbidity and length of stay and should be preferred in appropriate patients.

  9. Pre- and postoperative management of pineal region tumors and the occipital transtentorial approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuwelt, E.A.; Batjer, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    With the use of the operating microscope, a variety of malignant as well as benign lesions of the pineal region can be excised safely. In cases in which complete excision is impossible, obtaining tissue for a histological diagnosis has been extremely helpful in planning appropriate postoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Reducing tumor bulk may also be beneficial, as has been shown to be the case in medulloblastoma. As adjunctive modes of therapy for malignant pineal tumors become available, such as chemotherapy and possibly immunotherapy, the authors believe that the burden will be on the neurosurgeon to provide a tissue diagnosis. Complete myelography should be considered preoperatively or postoperatively to detect asymptomatic meningeal implants. The presence of such metastases makes postoperative craniospinal irradiation essential. The authors advocate liberal dosages of corticosteroids (i.e. 10-20 mg dexamethasone/day) for 24-48 hr prior to surgery. The authors recommend postoperative radiotherapy in all patients with malignant pineal region lesions regardless of whether or not complete excision was possible. The lowest incidence of recurrence in the literature seems to occur following 5,000-5,500 rads. In the face of negative myelography and CSF cytology, there is controversy regarding prophylactic spinal axis irradiation. The use of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy is probably the initial therapy of choice in such a patient. Following this, if a small, localized tumor burden remains, it can be removed surgically, as is done with localized residual tumor in testicular cancer. Failure to adequately assess the presence of meningeal seeding by cytology and melography may make certain patients vulnerable to spinal recurrence of disease in the face of complete local remission

  10. A genome editing approach to study cancer stem cells in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortina, Carme; Turon, Gemma; Stork, Diana; Hernando-Momblona, Xavier; Sevillano, Marta; Aguilera, Mònica; Tosi, Sébastien; Merlos-Suárez, Anna; Stephan-Otto Attolini, Camille; Sancho, Elena; Batlle, Eduard

    2017-07-01

    The analysis of stem cell hierarchies in human cancers has been hampered by the impossibility of identifying or tracking tumor cell populations in an intact environment. To overcome this limitation, we devised a strategy based on editing the genomes of patient-derived tumor organoids using CRISPR/Cas9 technology to integrate reporter cassettes at desired marker genes. As proof of concept, we engineered human colorectal cancer (CRC) organoids that carry EGFP and lineage-tracing cassettes knocked in the LGR5 locus. Analysis of LGR5-EGFP + cells isolated from organoid-derived xenografts demonstrated that these cells express a gene program similar to that of normal intestinal stem cells and that they propagate the disease to recipient mice very efficiently. Lineage-tracing experiments showed that LGR5 + CRC cells self-renew and generate progeny over long time periods that undergo differentiation toward mucosecreting- and absorptive-like phenotypes. These genetic experiments confirm that human CRCs adopt a hierarchical organization reminiscent of that of the normal colonic epithelium. The strategy described herein may have broad applications to study cell heterogeneity in human tumors. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  11. Reclassification of Mixed Oligoastrocytic Tumors Using a Genetically Integrated Diagnostic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Ik Kim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Mixed gliomas, such as oligoastrocytomas (OA, anaplastic oligoastrocytomas, and glioblastomas (GBMs with an oligodendroglial component (GBMO are defined as tumors composed of a mixture of two distinct neoplastic cell types, astrocytic and oligodendroglial. Recently, mutations ATRX and TP53, and codeletion of 1p/19q are shown to be genetic hallmarks of astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors, respectively. Subsequent molecular analyses of mixed gliomas preferred the reclassification to either oligodendroglioma or astrocytoma. This study was designed to apply genetically integrated diagnostic criteria to mixed gliomas and determine usefulness and prognostic value of new classification in Korean patients. Methods Fifty-eight cases of mixed OAs and GBMOs were retrieved from the pathology archives of Seoul National University Hospital from 2004 to 2015. Reclassification was performed according to genetic and immunohistochemical properties. Clinicopathological characteristics of each subgroup were evaluated. Overall survival was assessed and compared between subgroups. Results We could reclassify all mixed OAs and GBMOs into either astrocytic or oligodendroglial tumors. Notably, 29 GBMOs could be reclassified into 11 cases of GBM, IDH-mutant, 16 cases of GBM, IDH-wildtype, and two cases of anaplastic oligodendroglioma, IDH mutant. Overall survival was significantly different among these new groups (p<.001. Overall survival and progression-free survival were statistically better in gliomas with IDH mutation, ATRX mutation, no microscopic necrosis, and young patient age (cut off, 45 years old. Conclusions Our results strongly suggest that a genetically integrated diagnosis of glioma better reflects prognosis than former morphology-based methods.

  12. A novel approach for the detection and genetic analysis of live melanoma circulating tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody J Xu

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cell (CTC detection and genetic analysis may complement currently available disease assessments in patients with melanoma to improve risk stratification and monitoring. We therefore sought to establish the feasibility of a telomerase-based assay for detecting and isolating live melanoma CTCs.The telomerase-based CTC assay utilizes an adenoviral vector that, in the presence of elevated human telomerase activity, drives the amplification of green fluorescent protein. Tumor cells are then identified via an image processing system. The protocol was tested on melanoma cells in culture or spiked into control blood, and on samples from patients with metastatic melanoma. Genetic analysis of the isolated melanoma CTCs was then performed for BRAF mutation status.The adenoviral vector was effective for all melanoma cell lines tested with sensitivity of 88.7% (95%CI 85.6-90.4% and specificity of 99.9% (95%CI 99.8-99.9%. In a pilot trial of patients with metastatic disease, CTCs were identified in 9 of 10 patients, with a mean of 6.0 CTCs/mL. At a cutoff of 1.1 CTCs/mL, the telomerase-based assay exhibits test performance of 90.0% sensitivity and 91.7% specificity. BRAF mutation analysis of melanoma cells isolated from culture or spiked control blood, or from pilot patient samples was found to match the known BRAF mutation status of the cell lines and primary tumors.To our knowledge, this is the first report of a telomerase-based assay effective for detecting and isolating live melanoma CTCs. These promising findings support further studies, including towards integrating into the management of patients with melanoma receiving multimodality therapy.

  13. Molecular subtypes of osteosarcoma identified by reducing tumor heterogeneity through an interspecies comparative approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Milcah C.; Sarver, Aaron L.; Gavin, Katherine J.; Thayanithy, Venugopal; Getzy, David M.; Newman, Robert A.; Cutter, Gary R.; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Kisseberth, William C.; Hunter, Lawrence E.; Subramanian, Subbaya; Breen, Matthew; Modiano, Jaime F.

    2011-01-01

    The heterogeneous and chaotic nature of osteosarcoma has confounded accurate molecular classification, prognosis, and prediction for this tumor. The occurrence of spontaneous osteosarcoma is largely confined to humans and dogs. While the clinical features are remarkably similar in both species, the organization of dogs into defined breeds provides a more homogeneous genetic background that may increase the likelihood to uncover molecular subtypes for this complex disease. We thus hypothesized that molecular profiles derived from canine osteosarcoma would aid in molecular subclassification of this disease when applied to humans. To test the hypothesis, we performed genome wide gene expression profiling in a cohort of dogs with osteosarcoma, primarily from high-risk breeds. To further reduce inter-sample heterogeneity, we assessed tumor-intrinsic properties through use of an extensive panel of osteosarcoma-derived cell lines. We observed strong differential gene expression that segregated samples into two groups with differential survival probabilities. Groupings were characterized by the inversely correlated expression of genes associated with G2/M transition and DNA damage checkpoint and microenvironment-interaction categories. This signature was preserved in data from whole tumor samples of three independent dog osteosarcoma cohorts, with stratification into the two expected groups. Significantly, this restricted signature partially overlapped a previously defined, predictive signature for soft tissue sarcomas, and it unmasked orthologous molecular subtypes and their corresponding natural histories in five independent data sets from human patients with osteosarcoma. Our results indicate that the narrower genetic diversity of dogs can be utilized to group complex human osteosarcoma into biologically and clinically relevant molecular subtypes. This in turn may enhance prognosis and prediction, and identify relevant therapeutic targets. PMID:21621658

  14. a Novel Approach to Veterinary Spatial Epidemiology: Dasymetric Refinement of the Swiss Dog Tumor Registry Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, G.; Fabrikant, S. I.; Leyk, S.

    2015-08-01

    In spatial epidemiology, disease incidence and demographic data are commonly summarized within larger regions such as administrative units because of privacy concerns. As a consequence, analyses using these aggregated data are subject to the Modifiable Areal Unit Problem (MAUP) as the geographical manifestation of ecological fallacy. In this study, we create small area disease estimates through dasymetric refinement, and investigate the effects on predictive epidemiological models. We perform a binary dasymetric refinement of municipality-aggregated dog tumor incidence counts in Switzerland for the year 2008 using residential land as a limiting ancillary variable. This refinement is expected to improve the quality of spatial data originally aggregated within arbitrary administrative units by deconstructing them into discontinuous subregions that better reflect the underlying population distribution. To shed light on effects of this refinement, we compare a predictive statistical model that uses unrefined administrative units with one that uses dasymetrically refined spatial units. Model diagnostics and spatial distributions of model residuals are assessed to evaluate the model performances in different regions. In particular, we explore changes in the spatial autocorrelation of the model residuals due to spatial refinement of the enumeration units in a selected mountainous region, where the rugged topography induces great shifts of the analytical units i.e., residential land. Such spatial data quality refinement results in a more realistic estimation of the population distribution within administrative units, and thus, in a more accurate modeling of dog tumor incidence patterns. Our results emphasize the benefits of implementing a dasymetric modeling framework in veterinary spatial epidemiology.

  15. Biologically based modelling and simulation of carcinogenesis at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouchi, Noriyuki B.

    2003-01-01

    The process of the carcinogenesis is studied by computer simulation. In general, we need a large number of experimental samples to detect mutations at low doses, but in practice it is difficult to get such a large number of data. To satisfy the requirements of the situation at low doses, it is good to study the process of carcinogenesis using biologically based mathematical model. We have mainly studied it by using as known as 'multi-stage model'; the model seems to get complicated, as we adopt the recent new findings of molecular biological experiments. Moreover, the basic idea of the multi-stage model is based on the epidemiologic data of log-log variation of cancer incidence with age, it seems to be difficult to compare with experimental data of irradiated cell culture system, which has been increasing in recent years. Taking above into consideration, we concluded that we had better make new model with following features: 1) a unit of the target system is a cell, 2) the new information of the molecular biology can be easily introduced, 3) having spatial coordinates for checking a colony formation or tumorigenesis. In this presentation, we will show the detail of the model and some simulation results about the carcinogenesis. (author)

  16. A Bayesian approach to real-time 3D tumor localization via monoscopic x-ray imaging during treatment delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ruijiang; Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Xing, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Monoscopic x-ray imaging with on-board kV devices is an attractive approach for real-time image guidance in modern radiation therapy such as VMAT or IMRT, but it falls short in providing reliable information along the direction of imaging x-ray. By effectively taking consideration of projection data at prior times and/or angles through a Bayesian formalism, the authors develop an algorithm for real-time and full 3D tumor localization with a single x-ray imager during treatment delivery. Methods: First, a prior probability density function is constructed using the 2D tumor locations on the projection images acquired during patient setup. Whenever an x-ray image is acquired during the treatment delivery, the corresponding 2D tumor location on the imager is used to update the likelihood function. The unresolved third dimension is obtained by maximizing the posterior probability distribution. The algorithm can also be used in a retrospective fashion when all the projection images during the treatment delivery are used for 3D localization purposes. The algorithm does not involve complex optimization of any model parameter and therefore can be used in a ''plug-and-play'' fashion. The authors validated the algorithm using (1) simulated 3D linear and elliptic motion and (2) 3D tumor motion trajectories of a lung and a pancreas patient reproduced by a physical phantom. Continuous kV images were acquired over a full gantry rotation with the Varian TrueBeam on-board imaging system. Three scenarios were considered: fluoroscopic setup, cone beam CT setup, and retrospective analysis. Results: For the simulation study, the RMS 3D localization error is 1.2 and 2.4 mm for the linear and elliptic motions, respectively. For the phantom experiments, the 3D localization error is < 1 mm on average and < 1.5 mm at 95th percentile in the lung and pancreas cases for all three scenarios. The difference in 3D localization error for different scenarios is small and is not

  17. Combined approach of perioperative 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging and intraoperative 18F-FDG handheld gamma probe detection for tumor localization and verification of complete tumor resection in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knopp Michael V

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT has become an established method for detecting hypermetabolic sites of known and occult disease and is widely used in oncology surgical planning. Intraoperatively, it is often difficult to localize tumors and verify complete resection of tumors that have been previously detected on diagnostic PET/CT at the time of the original evaluation of the cancer patient. Therefore, we propose an innovative approach for intraoperative tumor localization and verification of complete tumor resection utilizing 18F-FDG for perioperative PET/CT imaging and intraoperative gamma probe detection. Methods Two breast cancer patients were evaluated. 18F-FDG was administered and PET/CT was acquired immediately prior to surgery. Intraoperatively, tumors were localized and resected with the assistance of a handheld gamma probe. Resected tumors were scanned with specimen PET/CT prior to pathologic processing. Shortly after the surgical procedure, patients were re-imaged with PET/CT utilizing the same preoperatively administered 18F-FDG dose. Results One patient had primary carcinoma of breast and a metastatic axillary lymph node. The second patient had a solitary metastatic liver lesion. In both cases, preoperative PET/CT verified these findings and demonstrated no additional suspicious hypermetabolic lesions. Furthermore, intraoperative gamma probe detection, specimen PET/CT, and postoperative PET/CT verified complete resection of the hypermetabolic lesions. Conclusion Immediate preoperative and postoperative PET/CT imaging, utilizing the same 18F-FDG injection dose, is feasible and image quality is acceptable. Such perioperative PET/CT imaging, along with intraoperative gamma probe detection and specimen PET/CT, can be used to verify complete tumor resection. This innovative approach demonstrates promise for assisting the oncologic surgeon in localizing and

  18. Coupling biomechanics to a cellular level model: an approach to patient-specific image driven multi-scale and multi-physics tumor simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Christian P; Kolokotroni, Eleni; Stamatakos, Georgios S; Büchler, Philippe

    2011-10-01

    Modeling of tumor growth has been performed according to various approaches addressing different biocomplexity levels and spatiotemporal scales. Mathematical treatments range from partial differential equation based diffusion models to rule-based cellular level simulators, aiming at both improving our quantitative understanding of the underlying biological processes and, in the mid- and long term, constructing reliable multi-scale predictive platforms to support patient-individualized treatment planning and optimization. The aim of this paper is to establish a multi-scale and multi-physics approach to tumor modeling taking into account both the cellular and the macroscopic mechanical level. Therefore, an already developed biomodel of clinical tumor growth and response to treatment is self-consistently coupled with a biomechanical model. Results are presented for the free growth case of the imageable component of an initially point-like glioblastoma multiforme tumor. The composite model leads to significant tumor shape corrections that are achieved through the utilization of environmental pressure information and the application of biomechanical principles. Using the ratio of smallest to largest moment of inertia of the tumor material to quantify the effect of our coupled approach, we have found a tumor shape correction of 20% by coupling biomechanics to the cellular simulator as compared to a cellular simulation without preferred growth directions. We conclude that the integration of the two models provides additional morphological insight into realistic tumor growth behavior. Therefore, it might be used for the development of an advanced oncosimulator focusing on tumor types for which morphology plays an important role in surgical and/or radio-therapeutic treatment planning. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of tumor cell cytoskeleton organization on invasiveness and migration: a microchannel-based approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio G Rolli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration is a fundamental feature of the interaction of cells with their surrounding. The cell's stiffness and ability to deform itself are two major characteristics that rule migration behavior especially in three-dimensional tissue. We simulate this situation making use of a micro-fabricated migration chip to test the active invasive behavior of pancreatic cancer cells (Panc-1 into narrow channels. At a channel width of 7 microm cell migration through the channels was significantly impeded due to size exclusion. A striking increase in cell invasiveness was observed once the cells were treated with the bioactive lipid sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC that leads to a reorganization of the cell's keratin network, an enhancement of the cell's deformability, and also an increase in the cell's migration speed on flat surfaces. The migration speed of the highly deformed cells inside the channels was three times higher than of cells on flat substrates but was not affected upon SPC treatment. Cells inside the channels migrated predominantly by smooth sliding while maintaining constant cell length. In contrast, cells on adhesion mediating narrow lines moved in a stepwise way, characterized by fluctuations in cell length. Taken together, with our migration chip we demonstrate that the dimensionality of the environment strongly affects the migration phenotype and we suggest that the spatial cytoskeletal keratin organization correlates with the tumor cell's invasive potential.

  20. Inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and cancer therapy: An evolutionary game theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadem, Heydar; Kebriaei, Hamed; Veisi, Zahra

    2017-06-01

    Inactivation of alleles in tumor suppressor genes (TSG) is one of the important issues resulting in evolution of cancerous cells. In this paper, the evolution of healthy, one and two missed allele cells is modeled using the concept of evolutionary game theory and replicator dynamics. The proposed model also takes into account the interaction rates of the cells as designing parameters of the system. Different combinations of the equilibrium points of the parameterized nonlinear system is studied and categorized into some cases. In each case, the interaction rates' values are suggested in a way that the equilibrium points of the replicator dynamics are located on an appropriate region of the state space. Based on the suggested interaction rates, it is proved that the system doesn't have any undesirable interior equilibrium point as well. Therefore, the system will converge to the desirable region, where there is a scanty level of cancerous cells. In addition, the proposed conditions for interaction rates guarantee that, when a trajectory of the system reaches the boundaries, then it will stay there forever which is a desirable property since the equilibrium points have been already located on the boundaries, appropriately. The simulation results show the effectiveness of the suggestions in the elimination of the cancerous cells in different scenarios. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Miniaturized Chemical Proteomic Approach for Target Profiling of Clinical Kinase Inhibitors in Tumor Biopsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamrád, Ivo; Rix, Uwe; Stukalov, Alexey; Gridling, Manuela; Parapatics, Katja; Müller, André C.; Altiok, Soner; Colinge, Jacques; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Haura, Eric B.; Bennett, Keiryn L.

    2014-01-01

    While targeted therapy based on the idea of attenuating the activity of a preselected, therapeutically relevant protein has become one of the major trends in modern cancer therapy, no truly specific targeted drug has been developed and most clinical agents have displayed a degree of polypharmacology. Therefore, the specificity of anticancer therapeutics has emerged as a highly important but severely underestimated issue. Chemical proteomics is a powerful technique combining postgenomic drug-affinity chromatography with high-end mass spectrometry analysis and bioinformatic data processing to assemble a target profile of a desired therapeutic molecule. Due to high demands on the starting material, however, chemical proteomic studies have been mostly limited to cancer cell lines. Herein, we report a down-scaling of the technique to enable the analysis of very low abundance samples, as those obtained from needle biopsies. By a systematic investigation of several important parameters in pull-downs with the multikinase inhibitor bosutinib, the standard experimental protocol was optimized to 100 µg protein input. At this level, more than 30 well-known targets were detected per single pull-down replicate with high reproducibility. Moreover, as presented by the comprehensive target profile obtained from miniaturized pull-downs with another clinical drug, dasatinib, the optimized protocol seems to be extendable to other drugs of interest. Sixty distinct human and murine targets were finally identified for bosutinib and dasatinib in chemical proteomic experiments utilizing core needle biopsy samples from xenotransplants derived from patient tumor tissue. Altogether, the developed methodology proves robust and generic and holds many promises for the field of personalized health care. PMID:23901793

  2. Anaesthetic management of supratentorial tumor craniotomy using awake-throughout approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafiq, F.; Salim, F.; Parkash, J.

    2017-01-01

    The authors are reporting an anaesthetic management of patient presenting with left parietal lobe space occupying lesion and scheduled for Awake-craniotomy. Awake-throughout approach using scalp block was planned. Among techniques reported for keeping patient awake during the surgery, this one is really underutilized. The successful conduct requires thorough preoperative assessment and psychological preparation. We used powerpoint presentation as a preoperative teaching tool. The anatomical landmark technique was used to institute scalp block, where individual nerves were targeted bilaterally. Patient remained stable throughout and participated actively in intraoperative neurological monitoring. Postoperative period showed remarkable recovery, better pain control, and shorter length of stay in hospital. (author)

  3. Anaesthetic Management of Supratentorial Tumor Craniotomy Using Awake-Throughout Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, Faraz; Salim, Fahad; Enam, Ather; Parkash, Jai; Faheem, Mohammad

    2017-12-01

    The authors are reporting an anaesthetic management of patient presenting with left parietal lobe space occupying lesion and scheduled for Awake-craniotomy. Awake-throughout approach using scalp block was planned. Among techniques reported for keeping patient awake during the surgery, this one is really underutilized. The successful conduct requires thorough preoperative assessment and psychological preparation. We used powerpoint presentation as a preoperative teaching tool. The anatomical landmark technique was used to institute scalp block, where individual nerves were targeted bilaterally. Patient remained stable throughout and participated actively in intraoperative neurological monitoring. Postoperative period showed remarkable recovery, better pain control, and shorter length of stay in hospital.

  4. Manipulation of tumor oxygenation and radiosensitivity through modification of cell respiration. A critical review of approaches and imaging biomarkers for therapeutic guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallez, Bernard; Neveu, Marie-Aline; Danhier, Pierre; Jordan, Bénédicte F

    2017-08-01

    Tumor hypoxia has long been considered as a detrimental factor for the response to irradiation. In order to improve the sensitivity of tumors cells to radiation therapy, tumor hypoxia may theoretically be alleviated by increasing the oxygen delivery or by decreasing the oxygen consumption by tumor cells. Mathematical modelling suggested that decreasing the oxygen consumption should be more efficient than increasing oxygen delivery in order to alleviate tumor hypoxia. In this paper, we review several promising strategies targeting the mitochondrial respiration for which alleviation of tumor hypoxia and increase in sensitivity to irradiation have been demonstrated. Because the translation of these approaches into the clinical arena requires the use of pharmacodynamics biomarkers able to identify shift in oxygen consumption and tumor oxygenation, we also discuss the relative merits of imaging biomarkers (Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance) that may be used for therapeutic guidance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Mitochondria in Cancer, edited by Giuseppe Gasparre, Rodrigue Rossignol and Pierre Sonveaux. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A bispecific nanobody approach to leverage the potent and widely applicable tumor cytolytic capacity of Vγ9Vδ2-T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Renée C G; Veluchamy, John P; Lougheed, Sinéad M; Schneiders, Famke L; Lopez-Lastra, Silvia; Lameris, Roeland; Stam, Anita G; Sebestyen, Zsolt; Kuball, Jürgen; Molthoff, Carla F M; Hooijberg, Erik; Roovers, Rob C; Santo, James P Di; van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P; Verheul, Henk M W; de Gruijl, Tanja D; van der Vliet, Hans J

    2017-01-01

    Though Vγ9Vδ2-T cells constitute only a small fraction of the total T cell population in human peripheral blood, they play a vital role in tumor defense and are therefore of major interest to explore for cancer immunotherapy. Vγ9Vδ2-T cell-based cancer immunotherapeutic approaches developed so far have been generally well tolerated and were able to induce significant clinical responses. However, overall results were inconsistent, possibly due to the fact that these strategies induced systemic activation of Vγ9Vδ2-T cells without preferential accumulation and targeted activation in the tumor. Here we show that a novel bispecific nanobody-based construct targeting both Vγ9Vδ2-T cells and EGFR induced potent Vγ9Vδ2-T cell activation and subsequent tumor cell lysis both in vitro and in an in vivo mouse xenograft model. Tumor cell lysis was independent of KRAS and BRAF tumor mutation status and common Vγ9Vδ2-T cell receptor sequence variations. In combination with the conserved monomorphic nature of the Vγ9Vδ2-TCR and the facile replacement of the tumor-specific nanobody, this immunotherapeutic approach can be applied to a large group of cancer patients.

  6. Parallel evolution of tumor subclones mimics diversity between tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Pierre; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Gerlinger, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) may foster tumor adaptation and compromise the efficacy of personalized medicines approaches. The scale of heterogeneity within a tumor (intratumor heterogeneity) relative to genetic differences between tumors (intertumor heterogeneity) is unknown. To address this, ...

  7. Surgical Application of the Suboccipital Subtonsillar Approach to Reach the Inferior Half of Medulla Oblongata Tumors in Adult Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabadán, Alejandra T; Campero, Alvaro; Hernández, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Medulla oblongata (MO) tumors are uncommon in adults. Controversies about their treatment arise regarding the need for histological diagnosis in this eloquent area of the brain, weighing benefits of a reliable diagnosis, and the potential disadvantages of invasive procedures. As a broader variety of pathological findings could be found in this localization, the accurate histopathological definition could not only allow an adequate therapy but also can prevent the disastrous consequences of empiric treatments. There are few publications about their surgical management and all belongs to small retrospective cohorts. In this scenario, we are reporting two patients with exophytic or focal lesions in the inferior half of the medulla, who underwent surgery by suboccipital midline subtonsillar approach. This approach was not specifically described to reach MO before, and we found that the lesions produced a mild elevation of the tonsils providing a wide surgical view from the medulla to the foramen of Luchska laterally, and up to the middle cerebellar peduncle, offering a wide and safe access.

  8. Biologically Based Methods for Control of Fumonisin-Producing Fusarium Species and Reduction of the Fumonisins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Johanna F; van Zyl, Willem H; Gelderblom, Wentzel C A

    2016-01-01

    selected biologically based treatments, mild chemical and physical treatments could reduce fumonisin contamination effectively. In rural subsistence farming communities, simple, practical, and culturally acceptable hand-sorting, maize kernel washing, and dehulling intervention methods proved to be effective as a last line of defense for reducing fumonisin exposure. Biologically based methods for control of fumonisin-producing Fusarium spp. and decontamination of the fumonisins could have potential commercial application, while simple and practical intervention strategies could also impact positively on food safety and security, especially in rural populations reliant on maize as a dietary staple.

  9. Biologically Based Methods for Control of Fumonisin-producing Fusarium species and Reduction of the Fumonisins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Francina Alberts

    2016-04-01

    , together with selected biologically based treatments, mild chemical and physical treatments could reduce fumonisin contamination effectively. In rural subsistence farming communities, simple, practical and culturally acceptable hand-sorting, maize kernel washing and dehulling intervention methods proved to be effective as a last line of defence for reducing fumonisin exposure. Biologically based methods for control of fumonisin-producing Fusarium spp. and decontamination of the fumonisins could have potential commercial application, while simple and practical intervention strategies could also impact positively on food safety and security, especially in rural populations reliant on maize as a dietary staple.

  10. Biologically Based Methods for Control of Fumonisin-Producing Fusarium Species and Reduction of the Fumonisins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Johanna F.; van Zyl, Willem H.; Gelderblom, Wentzel C. A.

    2016-01-01

    selected biologically based treatments, mild chemical and physical treatments could reduce fumonisin contamination effectively. In rural subsistence farming communities, simple, practical, and culturally acceptable hand-sorting, maize kernel washing, and dehulling intervention methods proved to be effective as a last line of defense for reducing fumonisin exposure. Biologically based methods for control of fumonisin-producing Fusarium spp. and decontamination of the fumonisins could have potential commercial application, while simple and practical intervention strategies could also impact positively on food safety and security, especially in rural populations reliant on maize as a dietary staple. PMID:27199904

  11. A bispecific nanobody approach to leverage the potent and widely applicable tumor cytolytic capacity of Vγ9Vδ2-T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, Renée C G; Veluchamy, John P.; Lougheed, Sinéad M; Schneiders, Famke L.; Lopez-Lastra, Silvia; Lameris, Roeland; Stam, Anita G M; Sebestyen, Zsolt; Kuball, Jürgen; Molthoff, Carla F M; Hooijberg, Erik; Roovers, Rob C.; Santo, James P.Di; van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P; Verheul, Henk M. W.; de Gruijl, Tanja D; van Vliet, Hans J

    2017-01-01

    Though Vγ9Vδ2-T cells constitute only a small fraction of the total T cell population in human peripheral blood, they play a vital role in tumor defense and are therefore of major interest to explore for cancer immunotherapy. Vγ9Vδ2-T cell-based cancer immunotherapeutic approaches developed so far

  12. Application of Biologically Based Lumping To Investigate the Toxicokinetic Interactions of a Complex Gasoline Mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, Micah N; Martin, Sheppard A; Oshiro, Wendy M; Ford, Jermaine; Bushnell, Philip J; El-Masri, Hisham

    2016-03-15

    People are often exposed to complex mixtures of environmental chemicals such as gasoline, tobacco smoke, water contaminants, or food additives. We developed an approach that applies chemical lumping methods to complex mixtures, in this case gasoline, based on biologically relevant parameters used in physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. Inhalation exposures were performed with rats to evaluate the performance of our PBPK model and chemical lumping method. There were 109 chemicals identified and quantified in the vapor in the chamber. The time-course toxicokinetic profiles of 10 target chemicals were also determined from blood samples collected during and following the in vivo experiments. A general PBPK model was used to compare the experimental data to the simulated values of blood concentration for 10 target chemicals with various numbers of lumps, iteratively increasing from 0 to 99. Large reductions in simulation error were gained by incorporating enzymatic chemical interactions, in comparison to simulating the individual chemicals separately. The error was further reduced by lumping the 99 nontarget chemicals. The same biologically based lumping approach can be used to simplify any complex mixture with tens, hundreds, or thousands of constituents.

  13. Systems Biology-Based Platforms to Accelerate Research of Emerging Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Soo Jin; Choi, Young Ki; Shin, Ok Sarah

    2018-03-01

    Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) pose a major threat to public health and security. Given the dynamic nature and significant impact of EIDs, the most effective way to prevent and protect against them is to develop vaccines in advance. Systems biology approaches provide an integrative way to understand the complex immune response to pathogens. They can lead to a greater understanding of EID pathogenesis and facilitate the evaluation of newly developed vaccine-induced immunity in a timely manner. In recent years, advances in high throughput technologies have enabled researchers to successfully apply systems biology methods to analyze immune responses to a variety of pathogens and vaccines. Despite recent advances, computational and biological challenges impede wider application of systems biology approaches. This review highlights recent advances in the fields of systems immunology and vaccinology, and presents ways that systems biology-based platforms can be applied to accelerate a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms of immunity against EIDs. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2018.

  14. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  15. Advantages and disadvantages of intraoperative language tasks in awake surgery: a three-task approach for prefrontal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofes, A; Spena, G; Miozzo, A; Fontanella, M M; Miceli, G

    2015-12-01

    Multidisciplinary efforts are being made to provide surgical teams with sensitive and specific tasks for language mapping in awake surgery. Researchers and clinicians have elaborated different tasks over time. A fair amount of work has been directed to study the neurofunctional correlates of some of these tasks, and there is recent interest in their standardization. However, little discussion exists on the advantages and disadvantages that each task poses from the perspective of the cognitive neuroscience of language. Such an approach may be a relevant step to assess task validity, to avoid using tasks that tap onto similar processes, and to provide patients with a surgical treatment that ensures maximal tumor resection while avoiding postoperative language deficits. An understanding of the language components that each task entails may also be relevant to improve the current assessments and the ways in which tasks are administered, and to disentangle neurofunctional questions. We reviewed 17 language mapping tasks that have been used in awake surgery. Overt production tasks have been a preferred choice over comprehension tasks. Tasks tapping lexico-semantic processes, particularly object-naming, maintain their role as gold standards. Automated speech tasks are used to detect speech errors and to set the amplitude of the stimulator. Comprehension tasks, reading and writing tasks, and tasks that assess grammatical aspects of language may be regularly administered in the near future. We provide examples of a three-task approach we are administering to patients with prefrontal lesions. We believe that future advances in this area are contingent upon reviewing gold standards and introducing new assessment tools.

  16. Biological bases for radiation protection standards and implications for policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beninson, D.

    1987-01-01

    The author sums up the principles involved in radiation as being composed of three basic requirements: 1) the individual dose limitation 2) the justification of radiation sources or practices 3) the optimization of protection. This philosophy is more sophisticated than the old approach of threshold and safety factors, which, however, is still valid for protection against non-stochastic effects. Discussion following presentation of the paper ranged over cost benefit analysis and optimization of protection systems, uranium mining, and the varying reactions of different governments. (U.K.)

  17. Composite Resection of Tumors of the Rostral Maxilla and Dorsolateral Muzzle Utilizing an Upper Lip-Sparing, Combined Approach in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Amy E; Soukup, Jason W

    2018-01-01

    Tumors of the rostral maxilla that involve both the oral mucosa and the dermis or subdermis of the dorsolateral muzzle provide unique challenges for the oromaxillofacial surgeon. Traditionally described approaches to such lesions may involve an intraoral incision that extends and involves the upper lip to envelope the involved dermis of the dorsolateral muzzle. However, such an approach unnecessarily resects upper lip tissue resulting in a large defect that likely requires advanced skin flaps or grafts for reconstruction. Such flaps are technically challenging and introduce potential for significance postoperative complications. In this article, we provide a detailed description a combined intra- and extraoral approach that allows for composite resection of tumors of the rostral maxilla that also involve the dorsolateral muzzle. The described technique allows for excellent intraoperative visualization and provides a superior cosmetic outcome that minimizes postoperative complications. In addition, we describe our experience utilizing the technique in three clinical cases.

  18. Composite Resection of Tumors of the Rostral Maxilla and Dorsolateral Muzzle Utilizing an Upper Lip-Sparing, Combined Approach in Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy E. Thomson

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumors of the rostral maxilla that involve both the oral mucosa and the dermis or subdermis of the dorsolateral muzzle provide unique challenges for the oromaxillofacial surgeon. Traditionally described approaches to such lesions may involve an intraoral incision that extends and involves the upper lip to envelope the involved dermis of the dorsolateral muzzle. However, such an approach unnecessarily resects upper lip tissue resulting in a large defect that likely requires advanced skin flaps or grafts for reconstruction. Such flaps are technically challenging and introduce potential for significance postoperative complications. In this article, we provide a detailed description a combined intra- and extraoral approach that allows for composite resection of tumors of the rostral maxilla that also involve the dorsolateral muzzle. The described technique allows for excellent intraoperative visualization and provides a superior cosmetic outcome that minimizes postoperative complications. In addition, we describe our experience utilizing the technique in three clinical cases.

  19. Tumor immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; Lise, Mario; Nitti, Donato

    2007-01-01

    Advances in tumor immunology are supporting the clinical implementation of several immunological approaches to cancer in the clinical setting. However, the alternate success of current immunotherapeutic regimens underscores the fact that the molecular mechanisms underlying immune-mediated tumor rejection are still poorly understood. Given the complexity of the immune system network and the multidimensionality of tumor/host interactions, the comprehension of tumor immunology might greatly benefit from high-throughput microarray analysis, which can portrait the molecular kinetics of immune response on a genome-wide scale, thus accelerating the discovery pace and ultimately catalyzing the development of new hypotheses in cell biology. Although in its infancy, the implementation of microarray technology in tumor immunology studies has already provided investigators with novel data and intriguing new hypotheses on the molecular cascade leading to an effective immune response against cancer. Although the general principles of microarray-based gene profiling have rapidly spread in the scientific community, the need for mastering this technique to produce meaningful data and correctly interpret the enormous output of information generated by this technology is critical and represents a tremendous challenge for investigators, as outlined in the first section of this book. In the present Chapter, we report on some of the most significant results obtained with the application of DNA microarray in this oncology field.

  20. Molecular biology-based diagnosis and therapy for pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Hayato; Ohuchida, Kenoki; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Masao

    2011-01-01

    Mainly described are author's investigations of the title subject through clinical and basic diagnosis/therapeutic approach. Based on their consideration of carcinogenesis and pathological features of pancreatic cancer (PC), analysis of expression of cancer-related genes in clinically available samples like pancreatic juice and cells biopsied can result in attaining their purposes. Desmoplasia, a pathological feature of PC, possibly induces resistance to therapy and one of strategies is probably its suppression. Targeting stem cells of the mesenchyma as well as those of PC is also a strategy in future. Authors' studies have revealed that quantitation of hTERT (coding teromerase) mRNA levels in PC cells micro-dissected from cytological specimens is an accurate molecular biological diagnostic method applicable clinically. Other cancer-related genes are also useful for the diagnosis and mucin (MUC) family genes are shown to be typical ones for differentiating the precancerous PC, PC and chronic pancreatisis. Efficacy of standard gemcitabine chemotherapy can be individualized with molecular markers concerned to metabolism of the drug like dCK. Radiotherapy/radio-chemotherapy are not so satisfactory for PC treatment now. Authors have found elevated MMP-2 expression and HGF/c-Met signal activation in irradiated PC cells, which can increase the invasive capability; and stimulation of phosphorylation and activation of c-Met/MARK in co-culture of irradiated PC cells with messenchymal cells from PC, which possibly leads to progression of malignancy of PC through their interaction, of which suppression, therefore, can be a new approach to increase the efficacy of radiotherapy. Authors are making effort to introducing adenovirus therapy in clinic; exempli gratia (e.g.), the virus carrying wild type p53, a cancer-suppressive gene, induces apoptosis of PC cells often having its mutated gene. (T.T.)

  1. WORKSHOP ON APPLICATION OF STATISTICAL METHODS TO BIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING FOR RISK ASSESSMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biologically-based pharmacokinetic models are being increasingly used in the risk assessment of environmental chemicals. These models are based on biological, mathematical, statistical and engineering principles. Their potential uses in risk assessment include extrapolation betwe...

  2. Robustness of the Voluntary Breath-Hold Approach for the Treatment of Peripheral Lung Tumors Using Hypofractionated Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dueck, Jenny, E-mail: jenny.dueck@psi.ch [Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Knopf, Antje-Christin [Joint Department of Physics at the Institute of Cancer Research and the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Lomax, Antony [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Department of Physics, ETH Zürich, Zürich (Switzerland); Albertini, Francesca [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Persson, Gitte F. [Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Josipovic, Mirjana [Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Aznar, Marianne [Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Weber, Damien C. [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); University of Zürich, Zürich (Switzerland); Munck af Rosenschöld, Per [Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: The safe clinical implementation of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy for lung tumors is complicated by the delivery uncertainties caused by breathing motion. The purpose of this feasibility study was to investigate whether a voluntary breath-hold technique could limit the delivery uncertainties resulting from interfractional motion. Methods and Materials: Data from 15 patients with peripheral lung tumors previously treated with stereotactic radiation therapy were included in this study. The patients had 1 computed tomographic (CT) scan in voluntary breath-hold acquired before treatment and 3 scans during the treatment course. PBS proton treatment plans with 2 fields (2F) and 3 fields (3F), respectively, were calculated based on the planning CT scan and subsequently recalculated on the 3 repeated CT scans. Recalculated plans were considered robust if the V{sub 95%} (volume receiving ≥95% of the prescribed dose) of the gross target volume (GTV) was within 5% of what was expected from the planning CT data throughout the simulated treatment. Results: A total of 14/15 simulated treatments for both 2F and 3F met the robustness criteria. Reduced V{sub 95%} was associated with baseline shifts (2F, P=.056; 3F, P=.008) and tumor size (2F, P=.025; 3F, P=.025). Smaller tumors with large baseline shifts were also at risk for reduced V{sub 95%} (interaction term baseline/size: 2F, P=.005; 3F, P=.002). Conclusions: The breath-hold approach is a realistic clinical option for treating lung tumors with PBS proton therapy. Potential risk factors for reduced V{sub 95%} are small targets in combination with large baseline shifts. On the basis of these results, the baseline shift of the tumor should be monitored (eg, through image guided therapy), and appropriate measures should be taken accordingly. The intrafractional motion needs to be investigated to confirm that the breath-hold approach is robust.

  3. Robustness of the Voluntary Breath-Hold Approach for the Treatment of Peripheral Lung Tumors Using Hypofractionated Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dueck, Jenny; Knopf, Antje-Christin; Lomax, Antony; Albertini, Francesca; Persson, Gitte F.; Josipovic, Mirjana; Aznar, Marianne; Weber, Damien C.; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The safe clinical implementation of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy for lung tumors is complicated by the delivery uncertainties caused by breathing motion. The purpose of this feasibility study was to investigate whether a voluntary breath-hold technique could limit the delivery uncertainties resulting from interfractional motion. Methods and Materials: Data from 15 patients with peripheral lung tumors previously treated with stereotactic radiation therapy were included in this study. The patients had 1 computed tomographic (CT) scan in voluntary breath-hold acquired before treatment and 3 scans during the treatment course. PBS proton treatment plans with 2 fields (2F) and 3 fields (3F), respectively, were calculated based on the planning CT scan and subsequently recalculated on the 3 repeated CT scans. Recalculated plans were considered robust if the V 95% (volume receiving ≥95% of the prescribed dose) of the gross target volume (GTV) was within 5% of what was expected from the planning CT data throughout the simulated treatment. Results: A total of 14/15 simulated treatments for both 2F and 3F met the robustness criteria. Reduced V 95% was associated with baseline shifts (2F, P=.056; 3F, P=.008) and tumor size (2F, P=.025; 3F, P=.025). Smaller tumors with large baseline shifts were also at risk for reduced V 95% (interaction term baseline/size: 2F, P=.005; 3F, P=.002). Conclusions: The breath-hold approach is a realistic clinical option for treating lung tumors with PBS proton therapy. Potential risk factors for reduced V 95% are small targets in combination with large baseline shifts. On the basis of these results, the baseline shift of the tumor should be monitored (eg, through image guided therapy), and appropriate measures should be taken accordingly. The intrafractional motion needs to be investigated to confirm that the breath-hold approach is robust.

  4. Oxaliplatin immuno hybrid nanoparticles for active targeting: an approach for enhanced apoptotic activity and drug delivery to colorectal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummala, Shashank; Gowthamarajan, K; Satish Kumar, M N; Wadhwani, Ashish

    2016-06-01

    Tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) proved to be a promising new target for colorectal cancer treatment. Elevated expression of TRAIL protein in tumor cells distinguishes it from healthy cells, thereby delivering the drug at the specific site. Here, we formulated oxaliplatin immunohybrid nanoparticles (OIHNPs) to deliver oxaliplatin and anti-TRAIL for colorectal cancer treatment in xenograft tumor models. The polymeric chitosan layer binds to the lipid film with the mixture of phospholipids by an ultra sound method followed by conjugating with thiolated antibody using DSPE-PEG-mal3400, resulting in the formation of OIHNPs. The polymer layer helps in more encapsulation of the drug (71 ± 0.09%) with appreciable particle size (95 ± 0.01 nm), and lipid layer prevents degradation of the drug in serum by preventing nanoparticle aggregation. OIHNPs have shown a 4-fold decrease in the IC50 value compared to oxaliplatin in HT-29 cells by the MTT assay. These immuno-nanoparticles represent the successful uptake and internalization of oxaliplatin in HT-29 cells rather than in MCF-7 cells determined by triple fluorescence method. Apoptotic activity in vitro of OIHNPs was determined by the change in the mitochondria membrane potential that further elevates its anti-tumor property. Furthermore, the conjugated nanoparticles can effectively deliver the drug to the tumor sites, which can be attributed to its ability in reducing tumor mass and tumor volume in xenograft tumor models in vivo along with sustaining its release in vitro. These findings indicated that the oxaliplatin immuno-hybrid nanoparticles would be a promising nano-sized active targeted formulation for colorectal-tumor targeted therapy.

  5. Application of Biologically-Based Lumping To Investigate the ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    People are often exposed to complex mixtures of environmental chemicals such as gasoline, tobacco smoke, water contaminants, or food additives. However, investigators have often considered complex mixtures as one lumped entity. Valuable information can be obtained from these experiments, though this simplification provides little insight into the impact of a mixture's chemical composition on toxicologically-relevant metabolic interactions that may occur among its constituents. We developed an approach that applies chemical lumping methods to complex mixtures, in this case gasoline, based on biologically relevant parameters used in physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. Inhalation exposures were performed with rats to evaluate performance of our PBPK model. There were 109 chemicals identified and quantified in the vapor in the chamber. The time-course kinetic profiles of 10 target chemicals were also determined from blood samples collected during and following the in vivo experiments. A general PBPK model was used to compare the experimental data to the simulated values of blood concentration for the 10 target chemicals with various numbers of lumps, iteratively increasing from 0 to 99. Large reductions in simulation error were gained by incorporating enzymatic chemical interactions, in comparison to simulating the individual chemicals separately. The error was further reduced by lumping the 99 non-target chemicals. Application of this biologic

  6. Biologically based neural network for mobile robot navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Muniz, Raul E.

    1999-01-01

    The new tendency in mobile robots is to crete non-Cartesian system based on reactions to their environment. This emerging technology is known as Evolutionary Robotics, which is combined with the Biorobotic field. This new approach brings cost-effective solutions, flexibility, robustness, and dynamism into the design of mobile robots. It also provides fast reactions to the sensory inputs, and new interpretation of the environment or surroundings of the mobile robot. The Subsumption Architecture (SA) and the action selection dynamics developed by Brooks and Maes, respectively, have successfully obtained autonomous mobile robots initiating this new trend of the Evolutionary Robotics. Their design keeps the mobile robot control simple. This work present a biologically inspired modification of these schemes. The hippocampal-CA3-based neural network developed by Williams Levy is used to implement the SA, while the action selection dynamics emerge from iterations of the levels of competence implemented with the HCA3. This replacement by the HCA3 results in a closer biological model than the SA, combining the Behavior-based intelligence theory with neuroscience. The design is kept simple, and it is implemented in the Khepera Miniature Mobile Robot. The used control scheme obtains an autonomous mobile robot that can be used to execute a mail delivery system and surveillance task inside a building floor.

  7. Endoscopic-assisted interhemispheric parieto-occipital transtentorial approach for microsurgical resection of a pineal region tumor: operative video and technical nuances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, James K

    2016-01-01

    The angle of the straight sinus and tentorium cerebelli can often influence the choice of surgical approach to the pineal region. The supracerebellar infratentorial approach can be technically challenging and a relative contraindication in cases where the angle of the straight sinus and tentorium is very steep. Similarly, an occipital transtentorial approach, which uses a low occipital craniotomy at the junction of the superior sagittal sinus and transverse sinus, may not provide the best trajectory to the pineal region in patients with a steep tentorium. In addition, this approach often necessitates retraction on the occipital lobe to access the tentorial incisura and pineal region, which can increase the risk of visual compromise. In this operative video, the author demonstrates an alternative route using an endoscopic-assisted interhemispheric parieto-occipital transtentorial approach to a pineal region tumor in a patient with a steep straight sinus and tentorium. The approach provided a shorter route and more direct trajectory to the tumor at the tentorial incisura, and avoided direct fixed retraction on the occipital lobe when performed using the lateral position, thereby minimizing visual complications. This video atlas demonstrates the operative technique and surgical nuances, including the application of endoscopic-assisted microsurgical resection and operative pearls for preservation of the deep cerebral veins. In summary, the parieto-occipital transtentorial approach with endoscopic assistance is an important approach in the armamentarium for surgical management of pineal region tumors. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/Ph4veG14aTk .

  8. A hybrid approach for fusing 4D-MRI temporal information with 3D-CT for the study of lung and lung tumor motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y. X.; Van Reeth, E.; Poh, C. L., E-mail: clpoh@ntu.edu.sg [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637459 (Singapore); Teo, S.-K. [Institute of High Performance Computing, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore 138632 (Singapore); Tan, C. H. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore 308433 (Singapore); Tham, I. W. K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, National University Cancer Institute, Singapore 119082 (Singapore)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: Accurate visualization of lung motion is important in many clinical applications, such as radiotherapy of lung cancer. Advancement in imaging modalities [e.g., computed tomography (CT) and MRI] has allowed dynamic imaging of lung and lung tumor motion. However, each imaging modality has its advantages and disadvantages. The study presented in this paper aims at generating synthetic 4D-CT dataset for lung cancer patients by combining both continuous three-dimensional (3D) motion captured by 4D-MRI and the high spatial resolution captured by CT using the authors’ proposed approach. Methods: A novel hybrid approach based on deformable image registration (DIR) and finite element method simulation was developed to fuse a static 3D-CT volume (acquired under breath-hold) and the 3D motion information extracted from 4D-MRI dataset, creating a synthetic 4D-CT dataset. Results: The study focuses on imaging of lung and lung tumor. Comparing the synthetic 4D-CT dataset with the acquired 4D-CT dataset of six lung cancer patients based on 420 landmarks, accurate results (average error <2 mm) were achieved using the authors’ proposed approach. Their hybrid approach achieved a 40% error reduction (based on landmarks assessment) over using only DIR techniques. Conclusions: The synthetic 4D-CT dataset generated has high spatial resolution, has excellent lung details, and is able to show movement of lung and lung tumor over multiple breathing cycles.

  9. Endoscopic endonasal approach for the treatment of a large clival giant cell tumor complicated by an intraoperative internal carotid artery rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iacoangeli M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Maurizio Iacoangeli,1 Alessandro Di Rienzo,1 Massimo Re,2 Lorenzo Alvaro,1 Niccolò Nocchi,1 Maurizio Gladi,1 Maurizio De Nicola,3 Massimo Scerrati11Department of Neurosurgery, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Umberto I General Hospital, Ancona, Italy; 2Department of Ear, Nose, and Throat Surgery, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Umberto I General Hospital, Ancona, Italy; 3Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology Section, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Umberto I General Hospital, Ancona, ItalyAbstract: Giant cell tumors (GCTs are primary bone neoplasms that rarely involve the skull base. These lesions are usually locally aggressive and require complete removal, including the surrounding apparently healthy bone, to provide the best chance of cure. GCTs, as well as other lesions located in the clivus, can nowadays be treated by a minimally invasive fully endoscopic extended endonasal approach. This approach ensures a more direct route to the craniovertebral junction than other possible approaches (transfacial, extended lateral, and posterolateral approaches. The case reported is a clival GCT operated on by an extended endonasal approach that provides another contribution on how to address one of the most feared complications attributed to this approach: a massive bleed due to an internal carotid artery injury.Keywords: clival giant cell tumor, endoscopic endonasal approach, internal carotid artery injury, minimally invasive surgery

  10. Quantitative diagnosis of breast tumors by morphometric classification of microenvironmental myoepithelial cells using a machine learning approach

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Yoichiro; Saito, Akira; Tateishi, Ayako; Shimojo, Hisashi; Kanno, Hiroyuki; Tsuchiya, Shinichi; Ito, Ken-ichi; Cosatto, Eric; Graf, Hans Peter; Moraleda, Rodrigo R.; Eils, Roland; Grabe, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Machine learning systems have recently received increased attention for their broad applications in several fields. In this study, we show for the first time that histological types of breast tumors can be classified using subtle morphological differences of microenvironmental myoepithelial cell nuclei without any direct information about neoplastic tumor cells. We quantitatively measured 11661 nuclei on the four histological types: normal cases, usual ductal hyperplasia and low/high grade du...

  11. Developing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    ABT-263 (Fig. 2I and SI Appendix, Fig. S6A). We therefore sought to identify pharmacological strategies that could suppress MCL-1 levels and increase...resonance imaging ( MRI ) of the thorax was performed 1 day before starting treatment and on day 21 of treatment, and lung tumor volumes pre- and...spread on MRI were included in the analysis. Tumors progressed in all untreated animals (n = 7), although we observed significant variability in the

  12. Tumor macroenvironment and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zoughbi, Wael; Al-Zhoughbi, Wael; Huang, Jianfeng; Paramasivan, Ganapathy S; Till, Holger; Pichler, Martin; Guertl-Lackner, Barbara; Hoefler, Gerald

    2014-04-01

    In this review we introduce the concept of the tumor macroenvironment and explore it in the context of metabolism. Tumor cells interact with the tumor microenvironment including immune cells. Blood and lymph vessels are the critical components that deliver nutrients to the tumor and also connect the tumor to the macroenvironment. Several factors are then released from the tumor itself but potentially also from the tumor microenvironment, influencing the metabolism of distant tissues and organs. Amino acids, and distinct lipid and lipoprotein species can be essential for further tumor growth. The role of glucose in tumor metabolism has been studied extensively. Cancer-associated cachexia is the most important tumor-associated systemic syndrome and not only affects the quality of life of patients with various malignancies but is estimated to be the cause of death in 15%-20% of all cancer patients. On the other hand, systemic metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes are known to influence tumor development. Furthermore, the clinical implications of the tumor macroenvironment are explored in the context of the patient's outcome with special consideration for pediatric tumors. Finally, ways to target the tumor macroenvironment that will provide new approaches for therapeutic concepts are described. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unni, K.K.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on bone tumors. Topics covered include: Bone tumor imaging: Contribution of CT and MRI, staging of bone tumors, perind cell tumors of bone, and metastatic bone disease

  14. Microenvironment acidity as a major determinant of tumor chemoresistance: Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) as a novel therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Sophie; Spugnini, Enrico Pierluigi; Assaraf, Yehuda G; Azzarito, Tommaso; Rauch, Cyril; Fais, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    Despite the major progresses in biomedical research and the development of novel therapeutics and treatment strategies, cancer is still among the dominant causes of death worldwide. One of the crucial challenges in the clinical management of cancer is primary (intrinsic) and secondary (acquired) resistance to both conventional and targeted chemotherapeutics. Multiple mechanisms have been identifiedthat underlie intrinsic and acquired chemoresistance: these include impaired drug uptake, increased drug efflux, deletion of receptors, altered drug metabolism, quantitative and qualitative alterations in drug targets, increased DNA damage repair and various mechanisms of anti-apoptosis. The fast efflux of anticancer drugs mediated by multidrug efflux pumps and the partial or complete reversibility of chemoresistance combined with the absence of genetic mutations suggests a multifactorial process. However, a growing body of recent evidence suggests that chemoresistance is often triggered by the highly acidic microenvironment of tumors. The vast majority of drugs, including conventional chemotherapeutics and more recent biological agents, are weak bases that are quickly protonated and neutralized in acidic environments, such as the extracellular microenvironment and the acidic organelles of tumor cells. It is therefore essential to develop new strategies to overcome the entrapment and neutralization of weak base drugs. One such strategy is the use of proton pump inhibitors which can enhance tumor chemosensitivity by increasing the pH of the tumor microenvironment. Recent clinical trials in animals with spontaneous tumors have indicated that patient alkalization is capable of reversing acquired chemoresistance in a large percentage of tumors that are refractory to chemotherapy. Of particular interest was the benefit of alkalization for patients undergoing metronomic regimens which are becoming more widely used in veterinary medicine. Overall, these results provide

  15. [Augmented reality for image guided therapy (ARIGT) of kidney tumor during nephron sparing surgery (NSS): animal model and clinical approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewniak, Tomasz; Rzepecki, Maciej; Juszczak, Kajetan; Kwiatek, Wojciech; Bielecki, Jakub; Zieliński, Krzysztof; Ruta, Andrzej; Czekierda, Łukasz; Moczulskis, Zbigniew

    2011-01-01

    The main problem in nephron sparing surgery (NSS) is to preserve renal tumors oncological purity during the removal of the tumor with a margin of macroscopically unchanged kidney tissue while keeping the largest possible amount of normal parenchyma of the operated kidney. The development of imaging techniques, in particular IGT (Image Guided Therapy) allows precise imaging of the surgical field and, therefore, is essential in improving the effectiveness of NSS (increase of nephron sparing with the optimal radicality). The aim of this study was to develop a method of the three-dimensional (3D) imaging of the kidney tumor and its lodge in the operated kidney using 3D laser scanner during NSS procedure. Additionally, the animal model of visualization was developed. The porcine kidney model was used to test the set built up with HD cameras and linear laser scanner connected to a laptop with graphic software (David Laser Scanner, Germany) showing the surface of the kidney and the lodge after removal the chunk of renal parenchyma. Additionally, the visualization and reconstruction was performed on animal porcine model. Moreover, 5 patients (3 women, 2 men) aged from 37 to 68 years (mean 56), diagnosed with kidney tumors in CT scans with a diameter of 3.7-6.9 cm (mean 4.9) were operated in our Department this year, scanning the surface during the treatment with the kidney tumor and kidney tumor after it is removed with a margin of renal tissue. In one case, the lodge of removed tumor was scanned. Dimensions in 3D reconstruction images of laser scans in the study of animal model and the images obtained intraoperatively were compared with the dimensions evaluated during preoperative CT scans, intraoperative measurements. Three-dimensional imaging laser scanner operating field loge resected tumor and the tumor on the kidney of animal models and during NSS treatments for patients with kidney tumors is possible in real time with an accuracy of -2 mm do +9 mm (+/- 3 mm). The

  16. The role of tumor molecular subtypes in formation of personalized approach to the theatment of the breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondarenko I.N.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Extreme heterogeneity of breast cancer (BC is considered to be one of the reasons that affects the success of treatment. According to current classifications, there are 4 molecular subtypes (MS. The basis for subtypes division is immunohistochemical testing of tumor cell receptors - estrogen (ER, progesterone (PR, HER2-neu and Ki-67. The doctrine of the tumor MS was the basis for the individualization of therapeutic tactics in patients with breast cancer. It was studied that luminal A subtype is the most common and the most favorable, with hormone therapy being a highly effective treatment method. Luminal B subtype, HER2 - positive and triple negative MS is characterized by a high ag­gressiveness, worse survival rate of patients and better prognostic effect of chemotherapy. The importance of determining the level of Ki-67 for assessment of tumor aggressiveness was revealed. Significant differences in receptor status of the primary tumor and metastases were proven. Data on the impact of changes in receptor status of the tumor prognosis are ambiguous and need further study. The use of targeted agents in the treatment of HER2 + patients can significantly improve treatment outcomes, turning this MS from historically aggressive subgroup to quite favorable.

  17. A molecular approach to immunoscintigraphy: A study of the T-antigen conformation on the surface of tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noujaim, A.; Selvaraj, S.; Suresh, M.R.; Turner, C.; McLean, G.; Willans, D.; Longenecker, B.M.; Haines, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    The role of glycoconjugates in tumor cell differentiation has been well documented. We have examined the expression of the two anomers of the Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen on the surface of human, canine and murine tumor cell membranes both in vitro and in vivo. This has been accomplished through the synthesis of the disaccharide terminal residues in both α and β configuration. Both entities were used to generate murine monoclonal antibodies which recognized the carbohydrate determinants. The determination of fine specificities of these antibodies was effected by means of cellular uptake, immunohistopathology and immunoscintigraphy. Examination of pathological specimens of human and canine tumor tissue indicated that the expressed antigen was in the β configuration. More than 89% of all human carcinomas tested expressed the antigen in the above anomeric form. The combination of synthetic antigens and monoclonal antibodies raised specifically against them provide us with invaluable tools for the study of tumor marker expression in humans and their respective animal tumor models. (orig.) [de

  18. Significance of serum and bile tumor markers in the diagnostic approach of patients with malignant pancreatobiliary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsios, Athanasios; Vezakis, Antonios; Kaparos, Georgios; Fragulidis, Georgios; Karakostas, Nikolaos; Kouskouni, Evangelia; Logothetis, Emmanouil; Polydorou, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Serum and bile tumor markers are under intense scrutiny for the diagnosis of malignant disease. The purpose of our study was to report the usefulness of serum and bile tumor markers for the discrimination between benign and malignant pancreatobiliary diseases. Between March 2010 and May 2013, 95 patients with obstructive jaundice or history of biliary obstruction, were included in the study. During ERCP, bile samples were obtained for measurement of tumor markers CEA, CA19- 9, CA125, CA72-4 and CA242. Serum samples were taken before ERCP for the same measurements. The patients were divided into two groups: patients with malignant disease and patients with benign disease. Serum tumor marker levels were significantly higher in patients with malignant disease. Serum CA242 and CA19-9 exhibited the highest diagnostic accuracy (76.8% and 73.7%, respectively). CA125 and CA72-4 levels in bile samples were significantly higher in patients with malignant disease. Bile CA125, CEA and CA72-4 achieved the best diagnostic accuracy (69, 65 and 65), respectively). The combined detection of CA19-9, CA242 in serum and CA125, CA72-4 in bile along with total bilirubin levels, showed the best diagnostic accuracy (81%). Serum and bile tumor markers, when studied alone, lack the diagnostic yield to discriminate benign from malignant pancreatobiliary diseases. In cases of diagnostic dilemmas the combination of serum and bile markers might be helpful.

  19. A biology-based approach for quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) in ecotoxicity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, T.; Kooijman, S.A.L.M.

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for ecotoxicity can be used to fill data gaps and limit toxicity testing on animals. QSAR development may additionally reveal mechanistic information based on observed patterns in the data. However, the use of descriptive summary statistics for

  20. Comparison of three approaches to delineate internal gross tumor volume based on four-dimensional CT simulation images of non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fengxiang; Li Jianbin; Zhang Yingjie; Shang Dongping; Liu Tonghai; Tian Shiyu; Xu Min; Ma Changsheng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare positional and volumetric differences of internal gross tumor volume (IGTV) delineated separately by three approaches based on four-dimensional CT (4DCT) for the primary tumor of non-small cell lung cancer (NLCLC). Methods: Twenty-one patients with NLCLC underwent big bore 4DCT simulation scan of the thorax. IGTVs of the primary tumor of NSCLC were delineated using three approaches as followed: (1) the gross tumor volume (GTV) on each of the ten the respiratory phases of the 4DCT image set were delineated and the ten GTV were fused to produce IGTV 10 ; (2) the GTV delineated separately based on 0% and 50% phase were fused to produce IGTV EI+EE ; (3) the visible tumor on the MIP images were delineated to produce IGTV MIP . The position of the target center, the volume of target, the degree of inclusion (DI) and the matching index (MI) were compared reciprocally between IGTV 10 , IGTV EI+EE and IGTV MIP . Results: Average differences between the position of the center of IGTVs on direction of x, y and z axes were less than 1 mm, with no statistically significant difference. The volume of IGTV 10 was larger than that of IGTV EI+EE , the difference was statistically significant (t=2.37, P=0.028); the volume of IGTV 10 was larger than that of IGTV MIP , but the difference was not statistically significant (t=1.95, P=0.065). The ratio of IGTV EI+EE with IGTV 10 , IGTV MIP with IGTV 10 were 0.85±0.08 and 0.92±0.11, respectively. DI of IGTV EI+EE in IGTV 10 , IGTV MIP in IGTV 10 were 84.78% ± 8. 95% and 88.47% ±9.04%. MI between IGTV 10 and IGTV EI+EE , IGTV 10 and IGTV MIP were 0.85 ±0.09, 0.86±0.09, respectively. Conclusions: The center displacement of the IGTVs delineated separately by the three different techniques based on 4DCT images are not obvious; IGTV EI+EE and IGTV MIP can not replace IGTV 10 , however, IGTV MIP is more close to IGTV 10 comparing to IGTV EI+EE . The ratio of GTV EI+EE with IGTV 10 is correlated to the tumor motion

  1. Model-Independent Evaluation of Tumor Markers and a Logistic-Tree Approach to Diagnostic Decision Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizeng Ni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensitivity and specificity of using individual tumor markers hardly meet the clinical requirement. This challenge gave rise to many efforts, e.g., combing multiple tumor markers and employing machine learning algorithms. However, results from different studies are often inconsistent, which are partially attributed to the use of different evaluation criteria. Also, the wide use of model-dependent validation leads to high possibility of data overfitting when complex models are used for diagnosis. We propose two model-independent criteria, namely, area under the curve (AUC and Relief to evaluate the diagnostic values of individual and multiple tumor markers, respectively. For diagnostic decision support, we propose the use of logistic-tree which combines decision tree and logistic regression. Application on a colorectal cancer dataset shows that the proposed evaluation criteria produce results that are consistent with current knowledge. Furthermore, the simple and highly interpretable logistic-tree has diagnostic performance that is competitive with other complex models.

  2. The use of biologically based cancer risk models in radiation epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krewski, D.; Zielinski, J.M.; Hazelton, W.D.; Garner, M.J.; Moolgavkar, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Biologically based risk projection models for radiation carcinogenesis seek to describe the fundamental biological processes involved in neoplastic transformation of somatic cells into malignant cancer cells. A validated biologically based model, whose parameters have a direct biological interpretation, can also be used to extrapolate cancer risks to different exposure conditions with some confidence. In this article, biologically based models for radiation carcinogenesis, including the two-stage clonal expansion (TSCE) model and its extensions, are reviewed. The biological and mathematical bases for such models are described, and the implications of key model parameters for cancer risk assessment examined. Specific applications of versions of the TSCE model to important epidemiologic datasets are discussed, including the Colorado uranium miners' cohort; a cohort of Chinese tin miners; the lifespan cohort of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; and a cohort of over 200,000 workers included in the National Dose Registry (NDR) of Canada. (author)

  3. A hybrid approach for fusing 4D-MRI temporal information with 3D-CT for the study of lung and lung tumor motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y X; Teo, S-K; Van Reeth, E; Tan, C H; Tham, I W K; Poh, C L

    2015-08-01

    Accurate visualization of lung motion is important in many clinical applications, such as radiotherapy of lung cancer. Advancement in imaging modalities [e.g., computed tomography (CT) and MRI] has allowed dynamic imaging of lung and lung tumor motion. However, each imaging modality has its advantages and disadvantages. The study presented in this paper aims at generating synthetic 4D-CT dataset for lung cancer patients by combining both continuous three-dimensional (3D) motion captured by 4D-MRI and the high spatial resolution captured by CT using the authors' proposed approach. A novel hybrid approach based on deformable image registration (DIR) and finite element method simulation was developed to fuse a static 3D-CT volume (acquired under breath-hold) and the 3D motion information extracted from 4D-MRI dataset, creating a synthetic 4D-CT dataset. The study focuses on imaging of lung and lung tumor. Comparing the synthetic 4D-CT dataset with the acquired 4D-CT dataset of six lung cancer patients based on 420 landmarks, accurate results (average error lung details, and is able to show movement of lung and lung tumor over multiple breathing cycles.

  4. Tumor Molecular Profiling for an Individualized Approach to the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Patient Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Posadas

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is increasing in incidence, and the associated mortality rate remains among the highest. For advanced HCC, sorafenib has been shown to slightly prolong survival, and regorafenib and nivolumab, both recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA, may produce clinical benefits to a limited extent. Systemic chemotherapy has been shown to produce a modest response, but there is no clinically valid biomarker that can be used to predict which patients may benefit. In this case study, we present two patients with metastatic HCC, they received systemic treatment using capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and either bevacizumab or sorafenib. The tumor response to treatment was determined by the progression-free survival (PFS. Molecular profiling of the tumors showed differential expression of biochemical markers and different mutational status of the TP53 and β-catenin (CTNNB1 genes. We hypothesize that the PFS correlates with the tumor molecular profiles, which may be predictive of the therapeutic response to systemic chemotherapy. Further investigation is indicated to correlate tumor biomarkers and treatment responses, with the objective of personalizing the therapies for patients with advanced HCC.

  5. Tumor radiosensitizers-current status of development of various approaches: Report of an International Atomic Energy Agency meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsman, Michael R.; Bohm, Lothar; Margison, Geoffrey P.; Milas, Luka; Rosier, Jean-Francois; Safrany, Geza; Selzer, Edgar; Verheij, Marcel; Hendry, Jolyon H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held a Technical Meeting of Consultants to (1) discuss a selection of relatively new agents, not those well-established in clinical practice, that operated through a variety of mechanisms to sensitize tumors to radiation and (2) to compare and contrast their tumor efficacy, normal tissue toxicity, and status of development regarding clinical application. The aim was to advise the IAEA as to which developing agent or class of agents would be worth promoting further, by supporting additional laboratory research or clinical trials, with the eventual goal of improving cancer control rates using radiotherapy, in developing countries in particular. Results: The agents under discussion included a wide, but not complete, range of different types of drugs, and antibodies that interfered with molecules in cell signaling pathways. These were contrasted with new molecular antisense and gene therapy strategies. All the drugs discussed have previously been shown to act as tumor cell radiosensitizers or to kill hypoxic cells present in tumors. Conclusion: Specific recommendations were made for more preclinical studies with certain of the agents and for clinical trials that would be suitable for industrialized countries, as well as trials that were considered more appropriate for developing countries

  6. Endoscopic trans-nasal approach for biopsy of orbital tumors using image-guided neuro-navigation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieskiewicz, A.; Mariak, Z.; Rogowski, M.; Lyson, T.

    2008-01-01

    Histopathological diagnosis of intraorbital tumors is of crucial value for planning further therapy. The aim of the study was to explore clinical utility of image-guided endoscopy for biopsy of orbital tumors. Trans-nasal endoscopic biopsy of intraorbital mass lesions was performed in 6 patients using a neuro-navigation system (Medtronic Stealth Station Treon plus). The CT and MRI 1 mm slice images were fused by the system in order to visualise both bony and soft tissue structures. The anatomic fiducial registration protocol was used during the procedure. All lesions were precisely localised and the biopsies could be taken from the representative part of the pathological mass. None of the patients developed aggravation of ocular symptoms after the procedure. The operative corridor as well as the size of orbital wall fenestration could be limited to a minimum. The accuracy of neuro-navigation remained high and stable during the entire procedure. The image-guided neuro-navigation system facilitated endoscopic localisation and biopsy of intraorbital tumors and contributed to the reduction of surgical trauma during the procedure. The technique was particularly useful in small, medially located, retrobulbar tumors and in unclear situations when the structure of the lesion resembled surrounding intraorbital tissue. (author)

  7. Non-toxic approach for treatment of breast cancer and its cutaneous metastasis: Capecitabine (Xeloda) enhanced photodynamic therapy in a murine tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sanjay; Denisyuk, Anton; Bullock, Taylor; Govande, Mukul; Maytin, Edward V.

    2018-02-01

    Breast cancer (BCA) is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women, with distant metastases to lung, liver, bone and skin occurring in approximately 40% of cases. Radiation therapy (RT) has been successfully employed for the treatment of BCA; however, multiple rounds of RT are associated with undesirable cutaneous side effects. This study explores PDT as a therapeutic alternative, to be given alone or in combination with RT and chemotherapy. Earlier, we had developed differentiation-enhanced combination photodynamic therapy (cPDT) using a neoadjuvant (5-fluorouracil; 5FU) prior to PDT. The neoadjuvant increases the levels of PpIX, leading to better efficacy following aminolevulinate (ALA)- based PDT. Here, to avoid the toxicity of systemic 5FU, we used a nontoxic 5FU precursor (Capecitabine; CPBN) in a new cPDT regimen. CBPN, a standard chemotherapeutic for BCA, is metabolized to 5FU specifically within tumor tissue. Murine (4T1) BCA cells were injected into breast fat pads of nude mice. CPBN was administered by oral gavage followed by intraperitoneal ALA and red light for PDT. CPBN pretreatment of 4T1 tumors led to increased tumor cell differentiation (3.5 fold), homogenous elevation of intratumoral PpIX levels (4.5 fold), and enhanced tumor cell death post-PDT (5 fold), relative to vehicle control. Using an in vivo imaging system (IVIS), a decline in tumor growth following CPBN-PDT was observed. Results showing the effect of CPBN-PDT on distant metastases of BCA to lung, lymph nodes and skin will be presented. In summary, CPBN-PDT, a novel combination approach, has a significant potential for translation into the clinic.

  8. Clinical History of the Theranostic Radionuclide Approach to Neuroendocrine Tumors and Other Types of Cancer: Historical Review Based on an Interview of Eric P. Krenning by Rachel Levine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Rachel; Krenning, Eric P

    2017-09-01

    In nuclear medicine, the term theranostics describes the combination of therapy and diagnostic imaging. In practice, this concept dates back more than 50 years; however, among the most successful examples of theranostics are peptide receptor scintigraphy and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of neuroendocrine tumors. The development of these modalities through the radiolabeling of somatostatin analogs with various radionuclides has led to a revolution in patient management and established a foundation for expansion of the theranostic principle into other oncology indications. This article provides a review of the evolution and development of the theranostic radionuclide approach to the management of neuroendocrine tumors, as described by the inventor of this technique, Eric P. Krenning, in an interview with Rachel Levine. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  9. A Simplified Approach to Measure the Effect of the Microvasculature in Diffusion-weighted MR Imaging Applied to Breast Tumors: Preliminary Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruel, Jose R; Goa, Pål E; Sjøbakk, Torill E; Østlie, Agnes; Fjøsne, Hans E; Bathen, Tone F

    2016-11-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relative change of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) at low- and medium-b-value regimens as a surrogate marker of microcirculation, to study its correlation with dynamic contrast agent-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-derived parameters, and to assess its potential for differentiation between malignant and benign breast tumors. Materials and Methods Ethics approval and informed consent were obtained. From May 2013 to June 2015, 61 patients diagnosed with either malignant or benign breast tumors were prospectively recruited. All patients were scanned with a 3-T MR imager, including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and DCE MR imaging. Parametric analysis of DWI and DCE MR imaging was performed, including a proposed marker, relative enhanced diffusivity (RED). Spearman correlation was calculated between DCE MR imaging and DWI parameters, and the potential of the different DWI-derived parameters for differentiation between malignant and benign breast tumors was analyzed by dividing the sample into equally sized training and test sets. Optimal cut-off values were determined with receiver operating characteristic curve analysis in the training set, which were then used to evaluate the independent test set. Results RED had a Spearman rank correlation of 0.61 with the initial area under the curve calculated from DCE MR imaging. Furthermore, RED differentiated cancers from benign tumors with an overall accuracy of 90% (27 of 30) on the test set with 88.2% (15 of 17) sensitivity and 92.3% (12 of 13) specificity. Conclusion This study presents promising results introducing a simplified approach to assess results from a DWI protocol sensitive to the intravoxel incoherent motion effect by using only three b values. This approach could potentially aid in the differentiation, characterization, and monitoring of breast pathologies. © RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  10. Tumor radiosensitizers - current status of development of various approaches: Report of an International Atomic Energy Agency meeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsman, Michael Robert; Bohm, Lothar; Margison, Geoffrey P.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held a Technical Meeting of Consultants to (1) discuss a selection of relatively new agents, not those well-established in clinical practice, that operated through a variety of mechanisms to sensitize tumors to radiation and (2) to compare...... and contrast their tumor efficacy, normal tissue toxicity, and status of development regarding clinical application. The aim was to advise the IAEA as to which developing agent or class of agents would be worth promoting further, by supporting additional laboratory research or clinical trials...... and for clinical trials that would be suitable for industrialized countries, as well as trials that were considered more appropriate for developing countries.PURPOSE: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held a Technical Meeting of Consultants to (1) discuss a selection of relatively new agents, not those...

  11. Translating Response During Therapy into Ultimate Treatment Outcome: A Personalized 4-Dimensional MRI Tumor Volumetric Regression Approach in Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayr, Nina A.; Wang, Jian Z.; Lo, Simon S.; Zhang Dongqing; Grecula, John C.; Lu Lanchun; Montebello, Joseph F.; Fowler, Jeffrey M.; Yuh, William T.C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess individual volumetric tumor regression pattern in cervical cancer during therapy using serial four-dimensional MRI and to define the regression parameters' prognostic value validated with local control and survival correlation. Methods and Materials: One hundred and fifteen patients with Stage IB 2 -IVA cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT) underwent serial MRI before (MRI 1) and during RT, at 2-2.5 weeks (MRI 2, at 20-25 Gy), and at 4-5 weeks (MRI 3, at 40-50 Gy). Eighty patients had a fourth MRI 1-2 months post-RT. Mean follow-up was 5.3 years. Tumor volume was measured by MRI-based three-dimensional volumetry, and plotted as dose(time)/volume regression curves. Volume regression parameters were correlated with local control, disease-specific, and overall survival. Results: Residual tumor volume, slope, and area under the regression curve correlated significantly with local control and survival. Residual volumes ≥20% at 40-50 Gy were independently associated with inferior 5-year local control (53% vs. 97%, p <0.001) and disease-specific survival rates (50% vs. 72%, p = 0.009) than smaller volumes. Patients with post-RT residual volumes ≥10% had 0% local control and 17% disease-specific survival, compared with 91% and 72% for <10% volume (p <0.001). Conclusion: Using more accurate four-dimensional volumetric regression analysis, tumor response can now be directly translated into individual patients' outcome for clinical application. Our results define two temporal thresholds critically influencing local control and survival. In patients with ≥20% residual volume at 40-50 Gy and ≥10% post-RT, the risk for local failure and death are so high that aggressive intervention may be warranted.

  12. Lack of Evolution Acceptance Inhibits Students' Negotiation of Biology-Based Socioscientific Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, S. R.; Zeidler, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore science content used during college students' negotiation of biology-based socioscientific issues (SSI) and examine how it related to students' conceptual understanding and acceptance of biological evolution. The Socioscientific Issues Questionnaire (SSI-Q) was developed to measure depth of evolutionary…

  13. Neoplastic Meningitis from Solid Tumors: A Prospective Clinical Study in Lombardia and a Literature Review on Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Silvani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoplastic dissemination to the leptomeninges is an increasingly common occurrence in patients with both haematological and solid tumors arising outside the central nervous system. Both refinement of diagnostic techniques (Magnetic resonance imaging and increased survival in patients treated with targeted therapies for systemic tumors account for this increased frequency. Cerebrospinal fluid cytological analysis and MRI confirm clinical diagnosis based on multifocal central nervous system signs/symptoms in a patient with known malignancy. Overall survival in patients with leptomeningeal neoplastic dissemination from solid tumors is short, rarely exceeding 3-4 months. However, selected patients may benefit from aggressive therapies, Apart from symptomatic treatment, intrathecal chemotherapy is used, with both free (methotrexate, Thiotepa, AraC and liposomal antitumor agents (liposomal AraC. Palliative radiotherapy is indicated only in cases of symptomatic bulky disease, surgery is limited to positioning of Ommaya recervoirs or C5F shunting. We report clinical data on a cohort of 26 prospectively followed patients with neoplastic leptomeningitis followed in Lombardia, Italy, in 2011. Prognostic factors and pattern of care are reported.

  14. Giant cell tumor of cervicothoracic region treated by triple corpectomy from posterior only approach: A case report with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat Mahajan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor (GCT is a benign aggressive tumor, which affects axial as well as a peripheral skeleton. It affects epiphysis of long bones and can result in pathological fractures. GCT affects cervical spine rarely and has been known to affect almost all vertebra in the human body. It has a predilection for fixed spine, that is, sacrum though it can affect mobile spine as well. GCT of cervicothoracic region poses a challenge for the surgeon because of the difficulty in approaching this region anteriorly. This situation is further compounded when GCT involves multiple contiguous vertebral bodies in this region and has already spread beyond the confines of its capsule. We report a case of GCT involving three vertebral bodies C7, D1, and D2 at cervicothoracic region who presented to us and was treated with triple corpectomy from the posterior only approach. This is the first ever case report of triple corpectomy and anterior reconstruction by a posterior only approach for GCT at the cervicothoracic junction to the best of author′s knowledge.

  15. Tissue Elasticity Bridges Cancer Stem Cells to the Tumor Microenvironment Through microRNAs: Implications for a “Watch-and-Wait” Approach to Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengwen Calvin; Vu, Long T.; Luo, Jane Jianying; Zhong, Jiang F.; Li, Zhongjun; Dethlefs, Brent A; Loudon, William G.; Kabeer, Mustafa H.

    2017-01-01

    Targeting the tumor microenvironment (TME) through which cancer stem cells (CSCs) crosstalk for cancer initiation and progression, may open up new treatments different from those centered on the original hallmarks of cancer genetics thereby implying a new approach for suppression of TME-driven activation of CSCs. Cancer is dynamic, heterogeneous, evolving with the TME and can be influenced by tissue-specific elasticity. One of the mediators and modulators of the crosstalk between CSCs and mechanical forces is miRNA, which can be developmentally regulated, in a tissue- and cell-specific manner. Here, based on our previous data, we provide a framework through which such gene expression changes in response to external mechanical forces can be understood during cancer progression. Recognizing the ways mechanical forces regulate and affect intracellular signals with applications in cancer stem cell biology. Such TME-targeted pathways shed new light on strategies for attacking cancer stem cells with fewer side effects than traditional gene-based treatments for cancer, requiring a “watch-and-wait” approach. We attempt to address both normal brain microenvironment and tumor microenvironment as both works together, intertwining in pathology and physiology – a balance that needs to be maintained for the “watch-and-wait” approach to cancer. Thus, this review connected the subjects of tissue elasticity, tumor microenvironment, epigenetic of miRNAs, and stem-cell biology that are very relevant in cancer research and therapy. It attempts to unify apparently separate entities in a complex biological web, network, and system in a realistic and practical manner, i.e., to bridge basic research with clinical application. PMID:28270089

  16. A Multidisciplinary Orbit-Sparing Treatment Approach That Includes Proton Therapy for Epithelial Tumors of the Orbit and Ocular Adnexa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holliday, Emma B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Esmaeli, Bita [Orbital Oncology and Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery Program, Department of Plastic Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Pinckard, Jamie [School of Medicine, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Garden, Adam S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Morrison, William H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kies, Merrill S. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gunn, G. Brandon; Fuller, C. David; Phan, Jack; Beadle, Beth M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhu, Xiarong Ronald; Zhang, Xiaodong [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Postoperative radiation is often indicated in the treatment of malignant epithelial tumors of the orbit and ocular adnexa. We present details of radiation technique and toxicity data after orbit-sparing surgery followed by adjuvant proton radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients underwent orbit-sparing surgery followed by proton therapy for newly diagnosed malignant epithelial tumors of the lacrimal gland (n=7), lacrimal sac/nasolacrimal duct (n=10), or eyelid (n=3). Tumor characteristics, treatment details, and visual outcomes were obtained from medical records. Acute and chronic toxicity were prospectively scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results: The median radiation dose was 60 Gy(RBE) (relative biological effectiveness; [range 50-70 Gy]); 11 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Dose to ipsilateral anterior optic structures was reduced in 13 patients by having them gaze away from the target during treatment. At a median follow-up time of 27.1 months (range 2.6-77.2 months), no patient had experienced local recurrence; 1 had regional and 1 had distant recurrence. Three patients developed chronic grade 3 epiphora, and 3 developed grade 3 exposure keratopathy. Four patients experienced a decrease in visual acuity from baseline but maintained vision sufficient to perform all activities of daily living without difficulty. Patients with grade ≥3 chronic ocular toxicity had higher maximum dose to the ipsilateral cornea (median 46.3 Gy[RBE], range 36.6-52.7 Gy[RBE] vs median 37.4 Gy[RBE], range 9.0-47.3 Gy(RBE); P=.017). Conclusions: Orbit-sparing surgery for epithelial tumors of the orbit and ocular adnexa followed by proton therapy successfully achieved disease control and was well tolerated. No patient required orbital exenteration or enucleation. Chronic grade 3 toxicity was associated with high maximum dose to the cornea. An eye-deviation technique can be used to limit the maximum

  17. Distal Pancreatectomy With En Bloc Resection of the Celiac Trunk for Extended Pancreatic Tumor Disease: An Interdisciplinary Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denecke, Timm; Andreou, Andreas; Podrabsky, Petr; Grieser, Christian; Warnick, Peter; Bahra, Marcus; Klein, Fritz; Hamm, Bernd; Neuhaus, Peter; Glanemann, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Infiltration of the celiac trunk by adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic body has been considered a contraindication for surgical treatment, thus resulting in a very poor prognosis. The concept of distal pancreatectomy with resection of the celiac trunk offers a curative treatment option but implies the risk of relevant hepatic or gastric ischemia. We describe initial experiences in a small series of patients with left celiacopancreatectomy with or without angiographic preconditioning of arterial blood flow to the stomach and the liver. Materials and Methods: Between January 2007 and October 2009, six patients underwent simultaneous resection of the celiac trunk for adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic body involving the celiac axis. In four of these cases, angiographic occlusion of the celiac trunk before surgery was performed to enhance collateral flow from the gastroduodenal artery. Radiologic and surgical procedures, findings, and outcome were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Complete tumor removal (R0) succeeded in two patients, whereas four patients underwent R1-tumor resection. After surgery, one of the two patients without angiographic preparation experienced an ischemic stomach perforation 1 week after surgery. The other patient died from severe bleeding from an ischemic gastric ulcer. Of the four patients with celiac trunk embolization, none presented ischemic complications after surgery. Mean survival was 371 days. Conclusion: In this small series, ischemic complications after celiacopancreatectomy occurred only in those patients who did not receive preoperative celiac trunk embolization.

  18. Development of an approach for qualitative and quantitative analysis of trace elements present in canine breast tumors by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozer, Thamara C.; Conceicao, Andre L.C.; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Rocha, Anna S.S. da; Fagundes, Alana C.F.; Maciel, Karla F.R.; Pimentel, Gustavo R.O.; Badelli, Juliana C.

    2015-01-01

    Studies performed with canines indicate that one of the main neoplasia which affect these animals are the breast tumors, representing from 25% to 50% of all kinds of tumors. Moreover, half of them are classified as malignant. In this sense, recent researches on humans have been associated the presence of certain trace elements with the development of breast neoplasia in those individuals. Then, as the breast tissue composition in canines is very similar to the humans, it is expected the same behavior. In this direction, a very effective technique to identify and to determinate trace elements concentration is the EDXRF. However, studies on this area are scarce in the literature. Therefore, in this work it was developed an approach to quantify the main trace elements present into these tumors with high sensitivity. For this purpose, it was determined calibration curves of standards samples diluted in water, with concentrations of Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn, ranging from 400mg/kg to 35mg/kg, from 20mg/kg to 2mg/kg, from 10mg/kg to 1mg/kg and from 100mg/kg to 10mg/kg, respectively. All calibration curves were linearly fitted and on basis in this behavior it was determined the sensitivity of our approach to quantify the concentration of the trace elements mentioned above. In addition, it is important to mention that studies in this area are of great potential, because EDXRF represents a quickly practical and non-destructive alternative to quantify trace elements. (author)

  19. Development of an approach for qualitative and quantitative analysis of trace elements present in canine breast tumors by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozer, Thamara C.; Conceicao, Andre L.C.; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Rocha, Anna S.S. da; Fagundes, Alana C.F.; Maciel, Karla F.R.; Pimentel, Gustavo R.O.; Badelli, Juliana C., E-mail: thamara.cozer@gmail.com, E-mail: alconceicao@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: sergei@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: anna@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: alanacarolinef@gmail.com, E-mail: karla_rimanski@hotmail.com, E-mail: g_rop@hotmail.com, E-mail: jubadellin@gmail.com [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Lab. de Espectroscopia de Raio-X

    2015-07-01

    Studies performed with canines indicate that one of the main neoplasia which affect these animals are the breast tumors, representing from 25% to 50% of all kinds of tumors. Moreover, half of them are classified as malignant. In this sense, recent researches on humans have been associated the presence of certain trace elements with the development of breast neoplasia in those individuals. Then, as the breast tissue composition in canines is very similar to the humans, it is expected the same behavior. In this direction, a very effective technique to identify and to determinate trace elements concentration is the EDXRF. However, studies on this area are scarce in the literature. Therefore, in this work it was developed an approach to quantify the main trace elements present into these tumors with high sensitivity. For this purpose, it was determined calibration curves of standards samples diluted in water, with concentrations of Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn, ranging from 400mg/kg to 35mg/kg, from 20mg/kg to 2mg/kg, from 10mg/kg to 1mg/kg and from 100mg/kg to 10mg/kg, respectively. All calibration curves were linearly fitted and on basis in this behavior it was determined the sensitivity of our approach to quantify the concentration of the trace elements mentioned above. In addition, it is important to mention that studies in this area are of great potential, because EDXRF represents a quickly practical and non-destructive alternative to quantify trace elements. (author)

  20. Surgical management of dentigerous cyst and keratocystic odontogenic tumor in children: a conservative approach and 7-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Zindel Deboni

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Dentigerous cyst (DC is one of the most common odontogenic cysts of the jaws and rarely recurs. On the other hand, keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT, formerly known as odontogenic keratocyst (OKC, is considered a benign unicystic or multicystic intraosseous neoplasm and one of the most aggressive odontogenic lesions presenting relatively high recurrence rate and a tendency to invade adjacent tissue. Two cases of these odontogenic lesions occurring in children are presented. They were very similar in clinical and radiographic characteristics, and both were treated by marsupialization. The treatment was chosen in order to preserve the associated permanent teeth with complementary orthodontic treatment to direct eruption of the associated permanent teeth. At 7-years of follow-up, none of the cases showed recurrence.

  1. Image-guided ablation of painful metastatic bone tumors: a new and effective approach to a difficult problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callstrom, Matthew R.; Charboneau, J. William; Atwell, Thomas D.; Farrell, Michael A.; Welch, Timothy J.; Maus, Timothy P.; Goetz, Matthew P.; Rubin, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Painful skeletal metastases are a common problem in cancer patients. Although external beam radiation therapy is the current standard of care for cancer patients who present with localized bone pain, 20-30% of patients treated with this modality do not experience pain relief, and few further options exist for these patients. For many patients with painful metastatic skeletal disease, analgesics remain the only alternative treatment option. Recently, image-guided percutaneous methods of tumor destruction have proven effective for treatment of this difficult problem. This review describes the application, limitations, and effectiveness of percutaneous ablative methods including ethanol, methyl methacrylate, laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT), cryoablation, and percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for palliation of painful skeletal metastases. (orig.)

  2. Effectiveness of Biology-Based Methods for Inhibiting Orthodontic Tooth Movement. A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadenas de Llano-Pérula, M; Yañez-Vico, R M; Solano-Reina, E; Palma-Fernandez, J C; Iglesias-Linares, A

    Several experimental studies in the literature have tested different biology-based methods for inhibiting or decreasing orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) in humans. This systematic review investigated the effects of these interventions on the rate of tooth movement. Electronic [MedLine; SCOPUS; Cochrane Library; OpenGrey;Web of Science] and manual searches were conducted up to January 26th, 2016 in order to identify publications of clinical trials that compared the decreasing or inhibiting effects of different biology-based methods over OTM in humans. A primary outcome (rate of OTM deceleration/inhibition) and a number of secondary outcomes were examined (clinical applicability, orthodontic force used, possible side effects). Two reviewers selected the studies complying with the eligibility criteria (PICO format) and assessed risk of bias [Cochrane Collaboration's tool]. Data collection and analysis were performed following the Cochrane recommendations. From the initial electronic search, 3726 articles were retrieved and 5 studies were finally included. Two types of biology-based techniques used to reduce the rate of OTM in humans were described: pharmacological and low-level laser therapy. In the first group, human Relaxin was compared to a placebo and administered orally. It was described as having no effect on the inhibition of OTM in humans after 32 days, while the drug tenoxicam, injected locally, inhibited the rate of OTM by up to 10% in humans after 42 days. In the second group, no statistically significant differences were reported, compared to placebo, for the rate of inhibition of OTM in humans after 90 days of observation when a 860 nm continuous wave GaAlA slow-level laser was used. The currently available data do not allow us to draw definitive conclusions about the use of various pharmacological substances and biology-based therapies in humans able to inhibit or decrease the OTM rate. There is an urgent need for more sound well-designed randomized

  3. Molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and tumor microenvironment components suggests potential targets for new therapeutic approaches in mobile tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayan, Dan; Salo, Tuula; Salo, Sirpa; Nyberg, Pia; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Costea, Daniela Elena; Vered, Marilena

    2012-01-01

    We characterized tumor microenvironment (TME) components of mobile tongue (MT) cancer patients in terms of overall inflammatory infiltrate, focusing on the protumorigenic/anti-inflammatory phenotypes and on cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in order to determine their interrelations and associations with clinical outcomes. In addition, by culturing tongue carcinoma cells (HSC-3) on a three-dimensional myoma organotypic model that mimics TME, we attempted to investigate the possible existence of a molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and TME components. Analysis of 64 cases of MT cancer patients revealed that the overall density of the inflammatory infiltrate was inversely correlated to the density of CAFs (P = 0.01), but that the cumulative density of the protumorigenic/anti-inflammatory phenotypes, including regulatory T cells (Tregs, Foxp3+), tumor-associated macrophages (TAM2, CD163+), and potentially Tregs-inducing immune cells (CD80+), was directly correlated with the density of CAFs (P = 0.01). The hazard ratio (HR) for recurrence in a TME rich in CD163+ Foxp3+ CD80+ was 2.9 (95% CI 1.03–8.6, P = 0.043 compared with low in CD163+ Foxp3+ CD80+). The HR for recurrence in a TME rich in CAFs was 4.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3–12.8, P = 0.012 compared with low in CAFs). In vitro studies showed cancer-derived exosomes, epithelial–mesenchymal transition process, fibroblast-to-CAF-like cell transdifferentiation, and reciprocal interrelations between different cytokines suggesting the presence of molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and TME components. Collectively, these results highlighted the emerging need of new therapies targeting this crosstalk between the cancer cells and TME components in MT cancer

  4. Malignant and borderline phyllodes tumor of breast treated with a multi-modality approach in a tertiary cancer care centre in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Mallick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Phyllodes tumor (PT of the breast can be categorized into benign, borderline and malignant subgroups depending on various histopathological factors. Although malignant PTs may be indolent and controlled by local excision, they frequently show local and distant relapses. Literature reveals local recurrence to be the predominant pattern of failure and thus emphasizes the importance of adjuvant radiation in these tumors. The role of systemic chemotherapy has remained doubtful. Materials and Methods: We have analyzed details of all patients of PT (n = 33 treated with adjuvant multi-modality approach in our institute since 1994–2009. The demographic data, treatment details, recurrence patterns and salvage treatment options were documented. Results: All patients received adjuvant radiation. Seven patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. The mean survival of the entire cohort was 150.618 months. There was a trend for better overall survival with borderline grade (193.6 vs. 160.2 months; P = 0.08, log rank. The disease free survival (DFS favored borderline grade (193.6 months vs. 82.9 months for high grade; P = 0.02, log rank. The DFS was significantly better in tumors having negative margins on postoperative histopathological examination (DFS rate at 5 years being 100% vs. 69.2% for positive or close margins; P = 0.015. The mode of surgery did not have any impact on survival. Conclusion: Adjuvant Radiation should be discussed taking into account surgical margins, size and various pathological factors of the primary. Adjuvant radiation may be utilized in high risk patients to enhance loco-regional control. Systemic chemotherapy is an option, worth exploring, in cases of systemic failure.

  5. Surgical approaches to tumors and epileptogenic zones close to Wernicke's area Abordagens cirúrgicas a tumores e zonas epileptógenas junto à área de Wernicke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Cukiert

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available Surgical procedures near to language related brain regions may cause severe morbidity in relation to speech. Operations performed under local anesthesia and intraoperative cortical mapping may minimize these risks. Six patients with tumors near the Wernicke's area were treated (2 low-grade astrocytomas, 1 ganglioglioma, 1 xanthoastrocytoma, 1 metastasis, 1 glioblastoma. Their clinical presentation consisted of epilepsy (n=4 and dysphasia (n=2. The skin and periosteum were infiltrated with local anesthetic and an ample craniotomy was performed. Cortical stimulation with an unipolar electrode was then carried out with concomitant speech testing (mainly comprehension and sequential speech. After mapping, the best surgical approach aiming to avoid the mapped area was elected. In 5 cases the resection was total and in 1, partial (glioblastoma. There was a transitory (10 days worsening of the pre-operative deficit in 1 case (glioblastoma. In 3 patients, the speech areas were displaced: posteriorly (n=2 or anteriorly (n=l. Surgical procedures under local anesthesia are safe and may avoid post-operative language disturbances in patients with tumors near to Wernicke's area.A ressecção de processos expansivos em áreas relacionadas à fala pode causar morbidade severa de linguagem. A realização de procedimentos cirúrgicos sob anestesia local e mapeamento intra-operatório das áreas relacionadas à linguagem pode ser empregada para minimizar estes deficits. Seis pacientes com tumores da área de Wernicke foram mapeados (2 astrocitomas de baixo grau, 1 ganglioglioma, 1 xantoastrocitoma, 1 metástase, 1 glioblastoma. Sua apresentação clínica incluía epilepsia (n=4 e disfiasia de compreensão (n=2. Após infiltração dos planos superficiais com anestésico local e craniotomia, procedia-se à estimulação com eletrodo unipolar do córtex temporal amplamente exposto, com testagem simultânea de linguagem, principalmente compreensão e fala

  6. Diffusion profiling of tumor volumes using a histogram approach can predict proliferation and further microarchitectural features in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schob, Stefan; Beeskow, Anne; Dieckow, Julia; Meyer, Hans-Jonas; Krause, Matthias; Frydrychowicz, Clara; Hirsch, Franz-Wolfgang; Surov, Alexey

    2018-05-31

    Medulloblastomas are the most common central nervous system tumors in childhood. Treatment and prognosis strongly depend on histology and transcriptomic profiling. However, the proliferative potential also has prognostical value. Our study aimed to investigate correlations between histogram profiling of diffusion-weighted images and further microarchitectural features. Seven patients (age median 14.6 years, minimum 2 years, maximum 20 years; 5 male, 2 female) were included in this retrospective study. Using a Matlab-based analysis tool, histogram analysis of whole apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) volumes was performed. ADC entropy revealed a strong inverse correlation with the expression of the proliferation marker Ki67 (r = - 0.962, p = 0.009) and with total nuclear area (r = - 0.888, p = 0.044). Furthermore, ADC percentiles, most of all ADCp90, showed significant correlations with Ki67 expression (r = 0.902, p = 0.036). Diffusion histogram profiling of medulloblastomas provides valuable in vivo information which potentially can be used for risk stratification and prognostication. First of all, entropy revealed to be the most promising imaging biomarker. However, further studies are warranted.

  7. Functional computed tomography imaging of tumor-induced angiogenesis. Preliminary results of new tracer kinetic modeling using a computer discretization approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneoya, Katsuhiko; Ueda, Takuya; Suito, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish functional computed tomography (CT) imaging as a method for assessing tumor-induced angiogenesis. Functional CT imaging was mathematically analyzed for 14 renal cell carcinomas by means of two-compartment modeling using a computer-discretization approach. The model incorporated diffusible kinetics of contrast medium including leakage from the capillary to the extravascular compartment and back-flux to the capillary compartment. The correlations between functional CT parameters [relative blood volume (rbv), permeability 1 (Pm1), and permeability 2 (Pm2)] and histopathological markers of angiogenesis [microvessel density (MVD) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)] were statistically analyzed. The modeling was successfully performed, showing similarity between the mathematically simulated curve and the measured time-density curve. There were significant linear correlations between MVD grade and Pm1 (r=0.841, P=0.001) and between VEGF grade and Pm2 (r=0.804, P=0.005) by Pearson's correlation coefficient. This method may be a useful tool for the assessment of tumor-induced angiogenesis. (author)

  8. Endo-laparoscopic rendezvous approach for pericardia with gastric posterior wall of gastrointestinal stromal tumor: Analysis of 52 consecutive cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po Ding

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Endo-laparoscopic rendezvous approach is considered to represent the next revolution in surgery. The new technique is reliable and effective in clinical application, due to the advantages of accurate and quick localization for pericardial GIST within gastric posterior wall.

  9. [Mechanism of action of intravesical BCG. Biological bases and clinical applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballido, Joaquín A; Rodríguez Monsalve, María

    2018-05-01

    The therapeutic approaches developed around immune system modulation find the therapeutic contribution of intravesical Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) for transitional cell bladder cancer an unquestionable example as a proof of concept of antitumor immunotherapy since more than 30 years ago. Intravesical immunotherapy for urothelial carcinomas is considered with periodic intravesical instillations schedules, and the one with longer historic development and wider diffusion is BCG in the form of suspension. BCG is a unique strain obtained from Mycobacterium bovis at the end of the first third of the XX century and represents the historically most successful immunotherapeutic modality of all tumors with a high level body of evidence. Currently, we even see an unpredictable development potential of this therapeutic modality based on immunomodulation related with activation or suppression of T lymphocytes by blocking the immune system checkpoints. This option is at this time a decisive step in the treatment of chemotherapy refractory metastatic urothelial carcinoma. Over the last years, there have been advances in the intimate mechanism of action of intravesical BCG, but there are many open questions that will only be answered from complex basic and translational research platforms. The objective of this review article is to try to translate the basic mechanisms currently implicated in the different phases of antitumor response of BCG in its routine use in clinical practice. Also, to analyze the future lines already active under clinical research with and without implications of the mechanisms of action of BCG. We describe the role of interactions basally established between urothelial tumor cells and cellular and molecular elements of the immune system of the patients with ulterior antitumor effector capacity. After intravesical BCG therapy and its interaction, we describe the various phases of its mechanism of action, namely fixation, internalization and triggering of

  10. Application of a global proteomic approach to archival precursor lesions: deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 and tissue transglutaminase 2 are upregulated in pancreatic cancer precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheung, Wang; Darfler, Marlene M; Alvarez, Hector

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is an almost uniformly fatal disease, and early detection is a critical determinant of improved survival. A variety of noninvasive precursor lesions of pancreatic adenocarcinoma have been identified, which provide a unique opportunity for intervention prior to onset ...... their overexpression in IPMNs. CONCLUSION: Global proteomics analysis using the Liquid Tissue workflow is a feasible approach for unbiased biomarker discovery in limited archival material, particularly applicable to precursor lesions of cancer......., and mass spectrometry to conduct a global proteomic analysis of an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). Tissue microarrays comprised of 38 IPMNs were used for validation of candidate proteins. RESULTS: The proteomic analysis of the IPMN Liquid Tissue lysate resulted in identification of 1......,534 peptides corresponding to 523 unique proteins. A subset of 25 proteins was identified that had previously been reported as upregulated in pancreatic cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis for two of these, deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) and tissue transglutaminase 2 (TGM2), confirmed...

  11. Sinus Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RESOURCES Medical Societies Patient Education About this Website Font Size + - Home > CONDITIONS > Sinus Tumors Adult Sinusitis Pediatric ... and they vary greatly in location, size and type. Care for these tumors is individualized to each ...

  12. Tumors markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi-Mizumoto, N.H.

    1989-01-01

    In order to study blood and cell components alterations (named tumor markers) that may indicate the presence of a tumor, several methods are presented. Aspects as diagnostic, prognostic, therapeutic value and clinical evaluation are discussed. (M.A.C.)

  13. Wilms tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... suggested. Alternative Names Nephroblastoma; Kidney tumor - Wilms Images Kidney anatomy Wilms tumor References Babaian KN, Delacroix SE, Wood CG, Jonasch E. Kidney cancer. In: Skorecki K, Chertow GM, Marsden PA, ...

  14. PLGA nanoparticles for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of neuroendocrine tumors: a novel approach towards reduction of renal radiation dose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetanjali Arora

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT, employed for treatment of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs is based on over-expression of Somatostatin Receptors (SSTRs on NETs. It is, however, limited by high uptake and retention of radiolabeled peptide in kidneys resulting in unnecessary radiation exposure thus causing nephrotoxicity. Employing a nanocarrier to deliver PRRT drugs specifically to the tumor can reduce the associated nephrotoxicity. Based on this, (177Lu-DOTATATE loaded PLGA nanoparticles (NPs were formulated in the present study, as a potential therapeutic model for NETs. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: DOTATATE was labeled with Lutetium-177 ((177Lu (labeling efficiency 98%; R(f∼0.8. Polyethylene Glycol (PEG coated (177Lu-DOTATATE-PLGA NPs (50:50 and 75:25 formulated, were spherical with mean size of 304.5±80.8 and 733.4±101.3 nm (uncoated and 303.8±67.2 and 494.3±71.8 nm (coated for PLGA(50:50 and PLGA(75:25 respectively. Encapsulation efficiency (EE and In-vitro release kinetics for uncoated and coated NPs of PLGA (50:50 & 75:25 were assessed and compared. Mean EE was 77.375±4.98% & 67.885±5.12% (uncoated and 65.385±5.67% & 58.495±5.35% (coated. NPs showed initial burst release between 16.64-21.65% with total 42.83-44.79% over 21 days. The release increased with coating to 20.4-23.95% initially and 60.97-69.12% over 21 days. In-vivo studies were done in rats injected with (177Lu-DOTATATE and (177Lu-DOTATATE-NP (uncoated and PEG-coated by imaging and organ counting after sacrificing rats at different time points over 24 hr post-injection. With (177Lu-DOTATATE, renal uptake of 37.89±10.2%ID/g was observed, which reduced to 4.6±1.97% and 5.27±1.66%ID/g with uncoated and coated (177Lu-DOTATATE-NP. The high liver uptake with uncoated (177Lu-DOTATATE-NP (13.68±3.08% ID/g, reduced to 7.20±2.04%ID/g (p = 0.02 with PEG coating. CONCLUSION: PLGA NPs were easily formulated and modified for desired release properties. PLGA

  15. Spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Oezsarlak, Oe.; Schepper, A.M.A. de; Parizel, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal tumors are uncommon lesions but may cause significant morbidity in terms of limb dysfunction. In establishing the differential diagnosis for a spinal lesion, location is the most important feature, but the clinical presentation and the patient's age and gender are also important. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays a central role in the imaging of spinal tumors, easily allowing tumors to be classified as extradural, intradural-extramedullary or intramedullary, which is very useful in tumor characterization. In the evaluation of lesions of the osseous spine both computed tomography (CT) and MR are important. We describe the most common spinal tumors in detail. In general, extradural lesions are the most common with metastasis being the most frequent. Intradural tumors are rare, and the majority is extramedullary, with meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors being the most frequent. Intramedullary tumors are uncommon spinal tumors. Astrocytomas and ependymomas comprise the majority of the intramedullary tumors. The most important tumors are documented with appropriate high quality CT or MR images and the characteristics of these tumors are also summarized in a comprehensive table. Finally we illustrate the use of the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of neoplasms affecting the central nervous system

  16. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  17. Urogenital tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    An overview is provided for veterinary care of urogenital tumors in companion animals, especially the dog. Neoplasms discussed include tumors of the kidney, urinary bladder, prostate, testis, ovary, vagina, vulva and the canine transmissible venereal tumor. Topics addressed include description, diagnosis and treatment.

  18. Assessment of refinery effluents and receiving waters using biologically-based effect methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Within the EU it is apparent that the regulatory focus on the use of biologically-based effects methods in the assessment of refinery effluents and receiving waters has increased in the past decade. This has been reflected in a recent refinery survey which revealed an increased use of such methods for assessing the quality of refinery effluents and their receiving waters. This report provides an overview of recent techniques used for this purpose. Several case studies provided by CONCAWE member companies describe the application of biological methods to effluent discharge assessment and surface water monitoring. The case studies show that when biological methods are applied to refinery effluents and receiving waters they raise different questions compared with those obtained using physical and chemical methods. Although direct measurement of the toxicity of effluent and receiving to aquatic organisms is the most cited technique, more recent efforts include tests that also address the persistence of effluent toxicity once discharged into the receiving water. Similarly, ecological monitoring of receiving waters can identify effects of effluent inputs arising from species interactions and other secondary effects that would not always be apparent from the results of biological tests conducted on single aquatic organisms. In light of recent and proposed regulatory developments the objectives of this report are therefore to: Discuss the application of biologically-based effects methods (including ecological monitoring) to refinery discharges and receiving waters; Assess the implications of such methods for future regulation of refinery discharges; and Provide guidance on good practice that can be used by refineries and the downstream oil industry to carry out and interpret data obtained using biologically-based effects methods. While the emphasis is on the toxic effects of effluents, other properties will also be covered because of their interdependency in determining

  19. Assessment of refinery effluents and receiving waters using biologically-based effect methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-01-15

    Within the EU it is apparent that the regulatory focus on the use of biologically-based effects methods in the assessment of refinery effluents and receiving waters has increased in the past decade. This has been reflected in a recent refinery survey which revealed an increased use of such methods for assessing the quality of refinery effluents and their receiving waters. This report provides an overview of recent techniques used for this purpose. Several case studies provided by CONCAWE member companies describe the application of biological methods to effluent discharge assessment and surface water monitoring. The case studies show that when biological methods are applied to refinery effluents and receiving waters they raise different questions compared with those obtained using physical and chemical methods. Although direct measurement of the toxicity of effluent and receiving to aquatic organisms is the most cited technique, more recent efforts include tests that also address the persistence of effluent toxicity once discharged into the receiving water. Similarly, ecological monitoring of receiving waters can identify effects of effluent inputs arising from species interactions and other secondary effects that would not always be apparent from the results of biological tests conducted on single aquatic organisms. In light of recent and proposed regulatory developments the objectives of this report are therefore to: Discuss the application of biologically-based effects methods (including ecological monitoring) to refinery discharges and receiving waters; Assess the implications of such methods for future regulation of refinery discharges; and Provide guidance on good practice that can be used by refineries and the downstream oil industry to carry out and interpret data obtained using biologically-based effects methods. While the emphasis is on the toxic effects of effluents, other properties will also be covered because of their interdependency in determining

  20. Radiotherapy of pineal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danoff, B.; Sheline, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    Radiotherapy has universally been used in the treatment of pineal tumors and suprasellar germinomas. Recently however, major technical advances related to the use of the operating microscope and development of microsurgical techniques have prompted a renewed interest in the direct surgical approach for biopsy and/or excision. This interest has resulted in a controversy regarding the role of surgery prior to radiotherapy. Because of the heterogeneity of tumors occurring in the pineal region (i.e., germ cell tumors, pineal parenchymal tumors, glial tumors, and cysts) and their differing biological behavior, controversy also surrounds aspects of radiotherapy such as: the optimal radiation dose, the volume to be irradiated, and indications for prophylactic spinal irradiation. A review of the available data is presented in an attempt to answer these questions

  1. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenny, P.A.; Lee, G.Y.; Bissell, M.J.

    2006-11-07

    Despite some notable successes cancer remains, for the most part, a seemingly intractable problem. There is, however, a growing appreciation that targeting the tumor epithelium in isolation is not sufficient as there is an intricate mutually sustaining synergy between the tumor epithelial cells and their surrounding stroma. As the details of this dialogue emerge, new therapeutic targets have been proposed. The FDA has already approved drugs targeting microenvironmental components such as VEGF and aromatase and many more agents are in the pipeline. In this article, we describe some of the 'druggable' targets and processes within the tumor microenvironment and review the approaches being taken to disrupt these interactions.

  2. Antibody tumor penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have proven to be effective agents in cancer imaging and therapy. One of the major challenges still facing the field is the heterogeneous distribution of these agents in tumors when administered systemically. Large regions of untargeted cells can therefore escape therapy and potentially select for more resistant cells. We present here a summary of theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze and improve antibody penetration in tumor tissue. PMID:18541331

  3. A structured proteomic approach identifies 14-3-3Sigma as a novel and reliable protein biomarker in panel based differential diagnostics of liver tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Henning; Pütter, Carolin; Megger, Dominik A; Bracht, Thilo; Weber, Frank; Hoffmann, Andreas-C; Bertram, Stefanie; Wohlschläger, Jeremias; Hagemann, Sascha; Eisenacher, Martin; Scherag, André; Schlaak, Jörg F; Canbay, Ali; Meyer, Helmut E; Sitek, Barbara; Baba, Hideo A

    2015-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major lethal cancer worldwide. Despite sophisticated diagnostic algorithms, the differential diagnosis of small liver nodules still is difficult. While imaging techniques have advanced, adjuvant protein-biomarkers as glypican3 (GPC3), glutamine-synthetase (GS) and heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) have enhanced diagnostic accuracy. The aim was to further detect useful protein-biomarkers of HCC with a structured systematic approach using differential proteome techniques, bring the results to practical application and compare the diagnostic accuracy of the candidates with the established biomarkers. After label-free and gel-based proteomics (n=18 HCC/corresponding non-tumorous liver tissue (NTLT)) biomarker candidates were tested for diagnostic accuracy in immunohistochemical analyses (n=14 HCC/NTLT). Suitable candidates were further tested for consistency in comparison to known protein-biomarkers in HCC (n=78), hepatocellular adenoma (n=25; HCA), focal nodular hyperplasia (n=28; FNH) and cirrhosis (n=28). Of all protein-biomarkers, 14-3-3Sigma (14-3-3S) exhibited the most pronounced up-regulation (58.8×) in proteomics and superior diagnostic accuracy (73.0%) in the differentiation of HCC from non-tumorous hepatocytes also compared to established biomarkers as GPC3 (64.7%) and GS (45.4%). 14-3-3S was part of the best diagnostic three-biomarker panel (GPC3, HSP70, 14-3-3S) for the differentiation of HCC and HCA which is of most important significance. Exclusion of GS and inclusion of 14-3-3S in the panel (>1 marker positive) resulted in a profound increase in specificity (+44.0%) and accuracy (+11.0%) while sensitivity remained stable (96.0%). 14-3-3S is an interesting protein biomarker with the potential to further improve the accuracy of differential diagnostic process of hepatocellular tumors. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Medical Proteomics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Trans-eyebrow supraorbital approach in large suprasellar craniopharyngioma surgery in adults: analysis of optic nerve length and extent of tumor resection. Original article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Ricardo; Galeano, Inma; Evangelista, Rocío; Pancucci, Giovanni; Guarín, Juliana; Ayuso, Angel; Misra, Mukesh

    2017-05-01

    One of the main drawbacks in the surgery of large craniopharyngiomas is the presence of a prefixed optic chiasm. Our main objective in this study is to compare the predictive value of the optic nerve length and optic chiasm location on large craniopharyngiomas' extent of resection. We retrospectively studied 21 consecutive patients with large craniopharyngiomas who underwent tumor resection through the trans-eyebrow supraorbital approach. Clinical and radiological findings on preoperative MRI were recorded, including the optic chiasm location classified as prefixed, postfixed or normal. We registered the optic nerve length measured intraoperatively prior to tumor removal and confirmed the measurements on preoperative MRI. Using a linear regression model, we calculated a prediction formula of the percentage of the extent of resection as a function of optic nerve length. On preoperative MRI, 15 patients were considered to have an optic chiasm in a normal location, 3 cases had a prefixed chiasm, and the remaining 3 had a postfixed chiasm. In the group with normal optic chiasm location, a wide range of percentage of extent of resection was observed (75-100%). The percentage of extent of resection of large craniopharyngiomas was observed to be dependent on the optic nerve length in a linear regression model (p < 0.0001). According to this model in the normal optic chiasm location group, we obtained an 87% resection in 9-mm optic nerve length patients, a 90.5% resection in 10-mm optic nerve length patients and 100% resection in 11-mm optic nerve length patients. Optic chiasm location provides useful information to predict the percentage of resection in both prefixed and postfixed chiasm patients but not in the normal optic chiasm location group. Optic nerve length was proven to provide a more accurate way to predict the percentage of resection than the optic chiasm location in the normal optic chiasm location group.

  5. Proteomics approaches for identification of tumor relevant protein targets in pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma by 2D-DIGE-MS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Lihong

    Full Text Available Potential markers for progression of pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC were identified by examining samples of lung SCC and adjacent normal tissues using a combination of fluorescence two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS, and electrospray ionization quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (ESI-Q-TOF. The PANTHER System was used for gel image based quantification and statistical analysis. An analysis of proteomic data revealed that 323 protein spots showed significantly different levels of expression (P ≤ 0.05 in lung SCC tissue compared to expression in normal lung tissue. A further analysis of these protein spots by MALDI-TOF-MS identified 81 different proteins. A systems biology approach was used to map these proteins to major pathways involved in numerous cellular processes, including localization, transport, cellular component organization, apoptosis, and reproduction. Additionally, the expression of several proteins in lung SCC and normal tissues was examined using immunohistochemistry and western blot. The functions of individual proteins are being further investigated and validated, and the results might provide new insights into the mechanism of lung SCC progression, potentially leading to the design of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  6. Tumoral tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, E.E.

    1979-01-01

    Direct tumor tracers are subdivided in the following categories:metabolite tracers, antitumoral tracers, radioactive proteins and cations. Use of 67 Ga-citrate as a clinically important tumoral tracer is emphasized and gallium-67 whole-body scintigraphy is discussed in detail. (M.A.) [pt

  7. Animal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    There are few trained veterinary radiation oncologists and the expense of facilities has limited the extent to which this modality is used. In recent years, a few cobalt teletherapy units and megavoltage x-ray units have been employed in larger veterinary institutions. In addition, some radiation oncologists of human medical institutions are interested and willing to cooperate with veterinarians in the treatment of animal tumors. Carefully designed studies of the response of animal tumors to new modalities serve two valuable purposes. First, these studies may lead to improved tumor control in companion animals. Second, these studies may have important implications to the improvement of therapy of human tumors. Much remains to be learned of animal tumor biology so that appropriate model systems can be described for such studies. Many of the latter studies can be sponsored by agencies interested in the improvement of cancer management

  8. Brain tumor-targeted drug delivery strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Wei

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the application of aggressive surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy in clinics, brain tumors are still a difficult health challenge due to their fast development and poor prognosis. Brain tumor-targeted drug delivery systems, which increase drug accumulation in the tumor region and reduce toxicity in normal brain and peripheral tissue, are a promising new approach to brain tumor treatments. Since brain tumors exhibit many distinctive characteristics relative to tumors growing in peripheral tissues, potential targets based on continuously changing vascular characteristics and the microenvironment can be utilized to facilitate effective brain tumor-targeted drug delivery. In this review, we briefly describe the physiological characteristics of brain tumors, including blood–brain/brain tumor barriers, the tumor microenvironment, and tumor stem cells. We also review targeted delivery strategies and introduce a systematic targeted drug delivery strategy to overcome the challenges.

  9. WE-AB-207B-02: A Bayesian Network Approach for Joint Prediction of Tumor Control and Radiation Pneumonitis (RP) in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y; McShan, D; Matuszak, M; Hobson, S; Jolly, S; Ten Haken, R; El Naqa, I [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: NSCLC radiotherapy treatment is a trade-off between controlling the tumor while limiting radiation-induced toxicities. Here we identify hierarchical biophysical relationships that could simultaneously influence both local control (LC) and RP by using an integrated Bayesian Networks (BN) approach. Methods: We studied 79 NSCLC patients treated on prospective protocol with 56 cases of LC and 21 events of RP. Beyond dosimetric information, each patient had 193 features including 12 clinical factors, 60 circulating blood cytokines before and during radiotherapy, 62 microRNAs, and 59 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The most relevant biophysical predictors for both LC and RP were identified using a Markov blanket local discovery algorithm and the corresponding BN was constructed using a score-learning algorithm. The area under the free-response receiver operating characteristics (AU-FROC) was used for performance evaluation. Cross-validation was employed to guard against overfitting pitfalls. Results: A BN revealing the biophysical interrelationships jointly in terms of LC and RP was developed and evaluated. The integrated BN included two SNPs, one microRNA, one clinical factor, three pre-treatment cytokines, relative changes of two cytokines between pre and during-treatment, and gEUDs of the GTV (a=-20) and lung (a=1). On cross-validation, the AUC prediction of independent LC was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.75–0.95) and RP was 0.83 (0.73–0.92). The AU-FROC of the integrated BN to predict both LC/RP was 0.81 (0.71–0.90) based on 2000 stratified bootstrap, indicating minimal loss in joint prediction power. Conclusions: We developed a new approach for multiple outcome utility application in radiotherapy based on integrated BN techniques. The BN developed from large-scale retrospective data is able to simultaneously predict LC and RP in NSCLC treatments based on individual patient characteristics. The joint prediction is only slightly compromised compared to

  10. WE-AB-207B-02: A Bayesian Network Approach for Joint Prediction of Tumor Control and Radiation Pneumonitis (RP) in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Y; McShan, D; Matuszak, M; Hobson, S; Jolly, S; Ten Haken, R; El Naqa, I

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: NSCLC radiotherapy treatment is a trade-off between controlling the tumor while limiting radiation-induced toxicities. Here we identify hierarchical biophysical relationships that could simultaneously influence both local control (LC) and RP by using an integrated Bayesian Networks (BN) approach. Methods: We studied 79 NSCLC patients treated on prospective protocol with 56 cases of LC and 21 events of RP. Beyond dosimetric information, each patient had 193 features including 12 clinical factors, 60 circulating blood cytokines before and during radiotherapy, 62 microRNAs, and 59 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The most relevant biophysical predictors for both LC and RP were identified using a Markov blanket local discovery algorithm and the corresponding BN was constructed using a score-learning algorithm. The area under the free-response receiver operating characteristics (AU-FROC) was used for performance evaluation. Cross-validation was employed to guard against overfitting pitfalls. Results: A BN revealing the biophysical interrelationships jointly in terms of LC and RP was developed and evaluated. The integrated BN included two SNPs, one microRNA, one clinical factor, three pre-treatment cytokines, relative changes of two cytokines between pre and during-treatment, and gEUDs of the GTV (a=-20) and lung (a=1). On cross-validation, the AUC prediction of independent LC was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.75–0.95) and RP was 0.83 (0.73–0.92). The AU-FROC of the integrated BN to predict both LC/RP was 0.81 (0.71–0.90) based on 2000 stratified bootstrap, indicating minimal loss in joint prediction power. Conclusions: We developed a new approach for multiple outcome utility application in radiotherapy based on integrated BN techniques. The BN developed from large-scale retrospective data is able to simultaneously predict LC and RP in NSCLC treatments based on individual patient characteristics. The joint prediction is only slightly compromised compared to

  11. A systematic literature review on reviews and meta-analyses of biologically based CAM-practices for cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paludan-Müller, Christine; Lunde, Anita; Johannessen, Helle

    2010-01-01

    levels of evidence and were excluded from further evaluation. Among the 32 high-quality reviews the most reviewed practices were soy/plant hormones (7), Chinese herbal medicine (7), antioxidants (5) and mistletoe (4). Fifteen of the 32 reviews included data on the efficacy of biologically-based CAM......-practices against cancer, but none of the reviews concluded a positive effect on the cancer. Reviews including data on quality of life (10) and/or reduction of side effects (12) showed promising, but yet insufficient evidence for Chinese herbal medicine against pain  and side effects of chemotherapy, and mistletoe......Purpose To provide an overview and evaluate the evidence of biologically based CAM-practices for cancer patients. Methods Pubmed, Social Science Citation Index, AMED and the Cochrane library were systematically searched for reviews on effects of biologically based CAM-practices, including herbal...

  12. Pituitary Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Association (ABTA) International RadioSurgery Association National Brain Tumor Society National Institute of Child Health and Human Development ... Definition The pituitary is a small, bean-sized gland ...

  13. Hypothalamic tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the brain to reduce spinal fluid pressure. Risks of radiation therapy include damage to healthy brain cells when tumor cells are destroyed. Common side effects from chemotherapy include loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting, and fatigue.

  14. Biologically Based Methods for Pest Management in Agriculture under Changing Climates: Challenges and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidawanyika, Frank; Mudavanhu, Pride; Nyamukondiwa, Casper

    2012-11-09

    The current changes in global climatic regimes present a significant societal challenge, affecting in all likelihood insect physiology, biochemistry, biogeography and population dynamics. With the increasing resistance of many insect pest species to chemical insecticides and an increasing organic food market, pest control strategies are slowly shifting towards more sustainable, ecologically sound and economically viable options. Biologically based pest management strategies present such opportunities through predation or parasitism of pests and plant direct or indirect defense mechanisms that can all be important components of sustainable integrated pest management programs. Inevitably, the efficacy of biological control systems is highly dependent on natural enemy-prey interactions, which will likely be modified by changing climates. Therefore, knowledge of how insect pests and their natural enemies respond to climate variation is of fundamental importance in understanding biological insect pest management under global climate change. Here, we discuss biological control, its challenges under climate change scenarios and how increased global temperatures will require adaptive management strategies to cope with changing status of insects and their natural enemies.

  15. Biologically Based Methods for Pest Management in Agriculture under Changing Climates: Challenges and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casper Nyamukondiwa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The current changes in global climatic regimes present a significant societal challenge, affecting in all likelihood insect physiology, biochemistry, biogeography and population dynamics. With the increasing resistance of many insect pest species to chemical insecticides and an increasing organic food market, pest control strategies are slowly shifting towards more sustainable, ecologically sound and economically viable options. Biologically based pest management strategies present such opportunities through predation or parasitism of pests and plant direct or indirect defense mechanisms that can all be important components of sustainable integrated pest management programs. Inevitably, the efficacy of biological control systems is highly dependent on natural enemy-prey interactions, which will likely be modified by changing climates. Therefore, knowledge of how insect pests and their natural enemies respond to climate variation is of fundamental importance in understanding biological insect pest management under global climate change. Here, we discuss biological control, its challenges under climate change scenarios and how increased global temperatures will require adaptive management strategies to cope with changing status of insects and their natural enemies.

  16. Piggy-back Hepatic Transplant Technique and Veno-venous Bypass Without Cardiac Arrest: A Multidisciplinary Approach in Borderline T3b/T3c Renal Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nechifor-Boila IA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Surgery for renal cell carcinomas with tumor thrombus extending in the Inferior Vena Cava (IVC can be particularly challenging, especially in the retrohepatic and intraatrial situations (T3b and T3c. Classically, these tumors require the intraoperative use of cardio-pulmonary by-pass (CPB and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA, that can result in specific complications (stroke, platelet dysfunction, with increased postoperative morbidity rates.

  17. Modulating the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Tumor Nanomedicine Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanomedicines including liposomes, micelles, and nanoparticles based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR effect have become the mainstream for tumor treatment owing to their superiority over conventional anticancer agents. Advanced design of nanomedicine including active targeting nanomedicine, tumor-responsive nanomedicine, and optimization of physicochemical properties to enable highly effective delivery of nanomedicine to tumors has further improved their therapeutic benefits. However, these strategies still could not conquer the delivery barriers of a tumor microenvironment such as heterogeneous blood flow, dense extracellular matrix, abundant stroma cells, and high interstitial fluid pressure, which severely impaired vascular transport of nanomedicines, hindered their effective extravasation, and impeded their interstitial transport to realize uniform distribution inside tumors. Therefore, modulation of tumor microenvironment has now emerged as an important strategy to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumors. Here, we review the existing strategies and approaches for tumor microenvironment modulation to improve tumor perfusion for helping more nanomedicines to reach the tumor site, to facilitate nanomedicine extravasation for enhancing transvascular transport, and to improve interstitial transport for optimizing the distribution of nanomedicines. These strategies may provide an avenue for the development of new combination chemotherapeutic regimens and reassessment of previously suboptimal agents.

  18. Modulating the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Tumor Nanomedicine Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing

    2017-01-01

    Nanomedicines including liposomes, micelles, and nanoparticles based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect have become the mainstream for tumor treatment owing to their superiority over conventional anticancer agents. Advanced design of nanomedicine including active targeting nanomedicine, tumor-responsive nanomedicine, and optimization of physicochemical properties to enable highly effective delivery of nanomedicine to tumors has further improved their therapeutic benefits. However, these strategies still could not conquer the delivery barriers of a tumor microenvironment such as heterogeneous blood flow, dense extracellular matrix, abundant stroma cells, and high interstitial fluid pressure, which severely impaired vascular transport of nanomedicines, hindered their effective extravasation, and impeded their interstitial transport to realize uniform distribution inside tumors. Therefore, modulation of tumor microenvironment has now emerged as an important strategy to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumors. Here, we review the existing strategies and approaches for tumor microenvironment modulation to improve tumor perfusion for helping more nanomedicines to reach the tumor site, to facilitate nanomedicine extravasation for enhancing transvascular transport, and to improve interstitial transport for optimizing the distribution of nanomedicines. These strategies may provide an avenue for the development of new combination chemotherapeutic regimens and reassessment of previously suboptimal agents. PMID:29311946

  19. Tumor Types: Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... May cause excessive secretion of hormones Common among men and women in their 50s-80s Accounts for about 13 percent of all brain tumors Symptoms Headache Depression Vision loss Nausea or vomiting Behavioral and cognitive ...

  20. Application of far lateral craniocervical approach in the microsurgical treatment of the jugular foramen tumors%颅颈部远外侧入路显微切除颈静脉孔区肿瘤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴波; 刘卫东; 陈隆益; 黄光富

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨颅颈部远外侧入路在显微手术切除颈静脉孔区肿瘤中的应用.方法 回顾总结2009年1月至2012年1月经远外侧入路切除颈静脉孔区肿瘤的14例患者临床资料,包括神经鞘瘤9例、脑膜瘤3例、颈静脉球瘤1例、腺样囊性癌1例,6例并发脑积水.肿瘤分型:Ⅰ型(颅内-孔内型)5例,Ⅱ型(颅内-颈椎管型)1例,Ⅲ型(颅外-孔内型)4例,Ⅳ型(颅内外沟通哑铃型)4例.手术采用远外侧枕髁后(FLPC)入路2例,远外侧经颈静脉突(FLTJP)入路3例,FLPC+经C1-2椎板入路1例,FLTJP+经C1横突入路7例,FLTJP+颈部经颈动脉鞘入路1例.1例颈静脉球瘤术前栓塞.结果 肿瘤全切除12例,次全切除2例,无患者出现术后脑脊液漏及死亡.患者术后随访5~32个月,平均13.7个月.术后新发面瘫1例,部分恢复;新发吞咽困难、声音嘶哑及呼吸困难1例,与6例术前即有后组脑神经损害症状患者均逐渐恢复,吞咽功能正常或接近正常,4例仍存在声音嘶哑;但1例术前有后组脑神经损害症状的腺样囊性癌患者无恢复.6例患者术前并发脑积水均趋于消退.肿瘤全切除者无复发,次全切除者无进展.结论 FLTJP入路是处理颈静脉孔区病变的基本入路,根据肿瘤向咽旁间隙或颈椎管扩展范围可联合颈部入路,脑积水通常无需额外手术处理.%Objective To investigate the administration of far lateral craniocervical approach in the jugular foramen (JF) tumors.Methods A retrospective analysis was performed in 14 cases of JF tumors (9 neurilemmomas,3 meningiomas,1 glomus jugulare tumor,and 1 adenoid cystic carcinoma) surgically treated between January 2009 and January 2012,with focus on the surgical approach.Six patients (6/14) showed hydrocephalus.The tumor type was composed of 5 intracranial and intraforamen tumors with patent or occluded jugular bulb,1 intracranial tumor with extension into the upper cervical canal,4 extracranial and intra foramen

  1. Biological-based and physical-based optimization for biological evaluation of prostate patient's plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhikh, E.; Sheino, I.; Vertinsky, A.

    2017-09-01

    Modern modalities of radiation treatment therapy allow irradiation of the tumor to high dose values and irradiation of organs at risk (OARs) to low dose values at the same time. In this paper we study optimal radiation treatment plans made in Monaco system. The first aim of this study was to evaluate dosimetric features of Monaco treatment planning system using biological versus dose-based cost functions for the OARs and irradiation targets (namely tumors) when the full potential of built-in biological cost functions is utilized. The second aim was to develop criteria for the evaluation of radiation dosimetry plans for patients based on the macroscopic radiobiological criteria - TCP/NTCP. In the framework of the study four dosimetric plans were created utilizing the full extent of biological and physical cost functions using dose calculation-based treatment planning for IMRT Step-and-Shoot delivery of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in prostate case (5 fractions per 7 Gy).

  2. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell tumors; Islet of Langerhans tumor; Neuroendocrine tumors; Peptic ulcer - islet cell tumor; Hypoglycemia - islet cell tumor ... stomach acid. Symptoms may include: Abdominal pain Diarrhea ... and small bowel Vomiting blood (occasionally) Glucagonomas make ...

  3. Evaluation of iodide deficiency in the lactating rat and pup using a biologically based dose response (BBDR) Model***

    Science.gov (United States)

    A biologically-based dose response (BBDR) model for the hypothalamic-pituitary thyroid (HPT) axis in the lactating rat and nursing pup was developed to describe the perturbations caused by iodide deficiency on the 1-IPT axis. Model calibrations, carried out by adjusting key model...

  4. Evaluation of iodide deficiency in the lactating rat and pup using a biologically based dose-response model

    Science.gov (United States)

    A biologically-based dose response (BBDR) model for the hypothalamic-pituitary thyroid (BPT) axis in the lactating rat and nursing pup was developed to describe the perturbations caused by iodide deficiency on the HPT axis. Model calibrations, carried out by adjusting key model p...

  5. A biological-based model that links genomic instability, bystander effects, and adaptive response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper links genomic instability, bystander effects, and adaptive response in mammalian cell communities via a novel biological-based, dose-response model called NEOTRANS 3 . The model is an extension of the NEOTRANS 2 model that addressed stochastic effects (genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) associated with brief exposure to low radiation doses. With both models, ionizing radiation produces DNA damage in cells that can be associated with varying degrees of genomic instability. Cells with persistent problematic instability (PPI) are mutants that arise via misrepair of DNA damage. Progeny of PPI cells also have PPI and can undergo spontaneous neoplastic transformation. Unlike NEOTRANS 2 , with NEOTRANS 3 newly induced mutant PPI cells and their neoplastically transformed progeny can be suppressed via our previously introduced protective apoptosis-mediated (PAM) process, which can be activated by low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. However, with NEOTRANS 3 (which like NEOTRANS 2 involves cross-talk between nongenomically compromised [e.g., nontransformed, nonmutants] and genomically compromised [e.g., mutants, transformants, etc.] cells), it is assumed that PAM is only activated over a relatively narrow, dose-rate-dependent interval (D PAM ,D off ); where D PAM is a small stochastic activation threshold, and D off is the stochastic dose above which PAM does not occur. PAM cooperates with activated normal DNA repair and with activated normal apoptosis in guarding against genomic instability. Normal repair involves both error-free repair and misrepair components. Normal apoptosis and the error-free component of normal repair protect mammals by preventing the occurrence of mutant cells. PAM selectively removes mutant cells arising via the misrepair component of normal repair, selectively removes existing neoplastically transformed cells, and probably selectively removes other genomically compromised cells when it is activated

  6. Treatment of AVN using the induction chamber technique and a biological-based approach: indications and clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calori, G M; Mazza, E; Colombo, M; Mazzola, S; Mineo, G V; Giannoudis, P V

    2014-02-01

    To determine the efficacy of core decompression (CD) technique combined with recombinant morphogenetic proteins, autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and xenograft bone substitute into the necrotic lesion of the femoral head on clinical symptoms and on the progression of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. A total of 38 patients (40 hips) with early stage osteonecrosis of the femoral head were studied over a 4-year period. CD technique combined with recombinant morphogenetic proteins, autologous MSCs and xenograft bone substitute was associated with a significant reduction in both pain and joint symptoms and reduced the incidence of fractural stages. At 36 months, 33 patients achieved clinical and radiographic healing. This long-term follow-up study confirmed that CD technique combined with recombinant morphogenetic proteins, autologous MSCs and xenograft bone substitute may be an effective treatment for patients with early stage osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Radiology of neuroendocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hako, R.; Hakova, H.; Gulova, I.

    2011-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors arise in the bronchopulmonary or gastrointestinal tract, but they can arise in almost any organ. The tumors have varied malignant potential depending on the site of their origin. Metastases may be present at the time of diagnosis, which often occurs at a late stage of the disease. Most NETs have nonspecific imaging characteristics. Imaging plays a pivotal role in the localization and staging of neuroendocrine tumors and in monitoring the treatment response. Imaging should involve multi-phase computed tomography, contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, contrast-enhanced ultrasonography and other one. Hepatic metastatic disease in particular lends itself to a wide range of interventional treatment options. Transcatheter arterial embolization may be used alone or in combination with chemo embolization. Ablative techniques, hepatic cryotherapy and percutaneous ethanol injection may then be undertaken. A multidisciplinary approach to treatment and follow-up is important. (author)

  8. Bilateral Wilms' tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malcolm, A.W.; Jaffe, N.; Folkman, M.J.; Cassady, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty children with bilateral Wilms' tumor were presented to the Children's Hospital Medical Center and Children's Cancer Research Foundation, Sidney Farber Cancer Institute, and Joint Center for Radiation Therapy (CHMC-CCRF, SFCI, JCRT) from January 1, 1956 to December 31, 1976. Of these 20, 16 had simultaneous and 4 had metachronous disease on presentation. All patients were treated with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Of the 16 patients with simultaneous disease, 10 (63%) are alive and free of disease 12+ to 175+ months post diagnosis and treatment, with median follow-up of 121 months. There were no long-term survivors in the metachronous group; all were dead of disease within 21 months from initial presentation of original tumor. With these data we relate prognosis to extent of disease and discuss a general approach to the management of bilateral Wilms' tumor

  9. Bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moylan, D.J.; Yelovich, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    Primary bone malignancies are relatively rare with less than 4,000 new cases per year. Multiple myeloma (more correctly a hematologic malignancy) accounts for 40%; osteosarcomas, 28%; chondrosarcomas, 13%; fibrosarcomas arising in bone, 4%; and Ewing's sarcoma, 7%. The authors discuss various treatments for bone tumors, including radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery

  10. Wilms Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a child's general health and to detect any adverse side effects (such as low red or white blood cell ... medicine needed, which helps reduce long-term side effects. The most common ... can be completely removed by surgery. About 41% of all Wilms tumors are stage ...

  11. Nephrogenic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesbauer, P.

    2008-01-01

    Nephroblastomas are the most common malignant renal tumors in childhood. According to the guidelines of the SIOP (Societe Internationale d'Oncologie Pediatrique) and GPOH (Gesellschaft fuer Paediatrische Onkologie und Haematologie) pre-operative chemotherapy can be started without histological confirmation and thus initial imaging studies, in particular ultrasound, play an outstanding role for diagnostic purposes

  12. Tumor-induced osteomalacia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Florenzano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome clinically characterized by bone pain, fractures and muscle weakness. It is caused by tumoral overproduction of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23 that acts primarily at the proximal renal tubule, decreasing phosphate reabsorption and 1α-hydroxylation of 25 hydroxyvitamin D, thus producing hypophosphatemia and osteomalacia. Lesions are typically small, benign mesenchymal tumors that may be found in bone or soft tissue, anywhere in the body. In up to 60% of these tumors, a fibronectin-1(FN1 and fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1 fusion gene has been identified that may serve as a tumoral driver. The diagnosis is established by the finding of acquired chronic hypophosphatemia due to isolated renal phosphate wasting with concomitant elevated or inappropriately normal blood levels of FGF23 and decreased or inappropriately normal 1,25-OH2-Vitamin D (1,25(OH2D. Locating the tumor is critical, as complete removal is curative. For this purpose, a step-wise approach is recommended, starting with a thorough medical history and physical examination, followed by functional imaging. Suspicious lesions should be confirmed by anatomical imaging, and if needed, selective venous sampling with measurement of FGF23. If the tumor is not localized, or surgical resection is not possible, medical therapy with phosphate and active vitamin D is usually successful in healing the osteomalacia and reducing symptoms. However, compliance is often poor due to the frequent dosing regimen and side effects. Furthermore, careful monitoring is needed to avoid complications such us secondary/tertiary hyperparathyroidism, hypercalciuria, and nephrocalcinosis. Novel therapeutical approaches are being developed for TIO patients, such as image-guided tumor ablation and medical treatment with the anti-FGF23 monoclonal antibody KRN23 or anti FGFR medications. The case of a patient with TIO is presented to

  13. Robustness of the Voluntary Breath-Hold Approach for the Treatment of Peripheral Lung Tumors Using Hypofractionated Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dueck, Jenny; Knopf, Antje-Christin; Lomax, Antony

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The safe clinical implementation of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy for lung tumors is complicated by the delivery uncertainties caused by breathing motion. The purpose of this feasibility study was to investigate whether a voluntary breath-hold technique could limit the delive...

  14. Spectral Clustering Predicts Tumor Tissue Heterogeneity Using Dynamic 18F-FDG PET: A Complement to the Standard Compartmental Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, Prateek; Divine, Mathew R; Kohlhofer, Ursula; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Schölkopf, Bernhard; Pichler, Bernd J; Disselhorst, Jonathan A

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we described and validated an unsupervised segmentation algorithm for the assessment of tumor heterogeneity using dynamic 18 F-FDG PET. The aim of our study was to objectively evaluate the proposed method and make comparisons with compartmental modeling parametric maps and SUV segmentations using simulations of clinically relevant tumor tissue types. Methods: An irreversible 2-tissue-compartmental model was implemented to simulate clinical and preclinical 18 F-FDG PET time-activity curves using population-based arterial input functions (80 clinical and 12 preclinical) and the kinetic parameter values of 3 tumor tissue types. The simulated time-activity curves were corrupted with different levels of noise and used to calculate the tissue-type misclassification errors of spectral clustering (SC), parametric maps, and SUV segmentation. The utility of the inverse noise variance- and Laplacian score-derived frame weighting schemes before SC was also investigated. Finally, the SC scheme with the best results was tested on a dynamic 18 F-FDG measurement of a mouse bearing subcutaneous colon cancer and validated using histology. Results: In the preclinical setup, the inverse noise variance-weighted SC exhibited the lowest misclassification errors (8.09%-28.53%) at all noise levels in contrast to the Laplacian score-weighted SC (16.12%-31.23%), unweighted SC (25.73%-40.03%), parametric maps (28.02%-61.45%), and SUV (45.49%-45.63%) segmentation. The classification efficacy of both weighted SC schemes in the clinical case was comparable to the unweighted SC. When applied to the dynamic 18 F-FDG measurement of colon cancer, the proposed algorithm accurately identified densely vascularized regions from the rest of the tumor. In addition, the segmented regions and clusterwise average time-activity curves showed excellent correlation with the tumor histology. Conclusion: The promising results of SC mark its position as a robust tool for quantification of tumor

  15. Tumor targeted gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Joo Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of molecular mechanisms governing malignant transformation brings new opportunities for therapeutic intervention against cancer using novel approaches. One of them is gene therapy based on the transfer of genetic material to an organism with the aim of correcting a disease. The application of gene therapy to the cancer treatment had led to the development of new experimental approaches such as suicidal gene therapy, inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. Suicidal gene therapy is based on the expression in tumor cells of a gene encoding an enzyme that converts a prodrug into a toxic product. Representative suicidal genes are Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and cytosine deaminase (CD). Especially, physicians and scientists of nuclear medicine field take an interest in suicidal gene therapy because they can monitor the location and magnitude, and duration of expression of HSV1-tk and CD by PET scanner

  16. Whole tumor antigen vaccination using dendritic cells: Comparison of RNA electroporation and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benencia Fabian

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Because of the lack of full characterization of tumor associated antigens for solid tumors, whole antigen use is a convenient approach to tumor vaccination. Tumor RNA and apoptotic tumor cells have been used as a source of whole tumor antigen to prepare dendritic cell (DC based tumor vaccines, but their efficacy has not been directly compared. Here we compare directly RNA electroporation and pulsing of DCs with whole tumor cells killed by ultraviolet (UV B radiation using a convenient tumor model expressing human papilloma virus (HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes. Although both approaches led to DCs presenting tumor antigen, electroporation with tumor cell total RNA induced a significantly higher frequency of tumor-reactive IFN-gamma secreting T cells, and E7-specific CD8+ lymphocytes compared to pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells. DCs electroporated with tumor cell RNA induced a larger tumor infiltration by T cells and produced a significantly stronger delay in tumor growth compared to DCs pulsed with UV-irradiated tumor cells. We conclude that electroporation with whole tumor cell RNA and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells are both effective in eliciting antitumor immune response, but RNA electroporation results in more potent tumor vaccination under the examined experimental conditions.

  17. Multiparametric classification links tumor microenvironments with tumor cell phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojana Gligorijevic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available While it has been established that a number of microenvironment components can affect the likelihood of metastasis, the link between microenvironment and tumor cell phenotypes is poorly understood. Here we have examined microenvironment control over two different tumor cell motility phenotypes required for metastasis. By high-resolution multiphoton microscopy of mammary carcinoma in mice, we detected two phenotypes of motile tumor cells, different in locomotion speed. Only slower tumor cells exhibited protrusions with molecular, morphological, and functional characteristics associated with invadopodia. Each region in the primary tumor exhibited either fast- or slow-locomotion. To understand how the tumor microenvironment controls invadopodium formation and tumor cell locomotion, we systematically analyzed components of the microenvironment previously associated with cell invasion and migration. No single microenvironmental property was able to predict the locations of tumor cell phenotypes in the tumor if used in isolation or combined linearly. To solve this, we utilized the support vector machine (SVM algorithm to classify phenotypes in a nonlinear fashion. This approach identified conditions that promoted either motility phenotype. We then demonstrated that varying one of the conditions may change tumor cell behavior only in a context-dependent manner. In addition, to establish the link between phenotypes and cell fates, we photoconverted and monitored the fate of tumor cells in different microenvironments, finding that only tumor cells in the invadopodium-rich microenvironments degraded extracellular matrix (ECM and disseminated. The number of invadopodia positively correlated with degradation, while the inhibiting metalloproteases eliminated degradation and lung metastasis, consistent with a direct link among invadopodia, ECM degradation, and metastasis. We have detected and characterized two phenotypes of motile tumor cells in vivo, which

  18. "Cancer tumor".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronshtehn, V. A.

    The title is a phrase borrowed from a speech by a Leningrad pressman, V. E. Lvov, who called upon those attending a theoretical conference on ideological issues in astronomy held by the Leningrad Branch of the All-Union Astronomic and Geodetic Society (13 - 4 December 1948), "to make a more radical emphasis on the negative role of relativistic cosmology which is a cancer tumor disintegrating the contemporary astronomy theory, and a major ideological enemy of a materialist astronomy".

  19. Monitoring of Tumor Growth with [(18)F]-FET PET in a Mouse Model of Glioblastoma: SUV Measurements and Volumetric Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzgreve, Adrien; Brendel, Matthias; Gu, Song; Carlsen, Janette; Mille, Erik; Böning, Guido; Mastrella, Giorgia; Unterrainer, Marcus; Gildehaus, Franz J; Rominger, Axel; Bartenstein, Peter; Kälin, Roland E; Glass, Rainer; Albert, Nathalie L

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive tumor growth monitoring is of particular interest for the evaluation of experimental glioma therapies. This study investigates the potential of positron emission tomography (PET) using O-(2-(18)F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ([(18)F]-FET) to determine tumor growth in a murine glioblastoma (GBM) model-including estimation of the biological tumor volume (BTV), which has hitherto not been investigated in the pre-clinical context. Fifteen GBM-bearing mice (GL261) and six control mice (shams) were investigated during 5 weeks by PET followed by autoradiographic and histological assessments. [(18)F]-FET PET was quantitated by calculation of maximum and mean standardized uptake values within a universal volume-of-interest (VOI) corrected for healthy background (SUVmax/BG, SUVmean/BG). A partial volume effect correction (PVEC) was applied in comparison to ex vivo autoradiography. BTVs obtained by predefined thresholds for VOI definition (SUV/BG: ≥1.4; ≥1.6; ≥1.8; ≥2.0) were compared to the histologically assessed tumor volume (n = 8). Finally, individual "optimal" thresholds for BTV definition best reflecting the histology were determined. In GBM mice SUVmax/BG and SUVmean/BG clearly increased with time, however at high inter-animal variability. No relevant [(18)F]-FET uptake was observed in shams. PVEC recovered signal loss of SUVmean/BG assessment in relation to autoradiography. BTV as estimated by predefined thresholds strongly differed from the histology volume. Strikingly, the individual "optimal" thresholds for BTV assessment correlated highly with SUVmax/BG (ρ = 0.97, p GBM mouse model. PVEC is beneficial to improve accuracy of [(18)F]-FET PET SUV quantification. Although SUVmax/BG and SUVmean/BG increase during the disease course, these parameters do not correlate with the respective tumor size. For the first time, we propose a histology-verified method allowing appropriate individual BTV estimation for volumetric in vivo monitoring of tumor growth

  20. Do biological-based strategies hold promise to biofouling control in MBRs?

    KAUST Repository

    Malaeb, Lilian; Le-Clech, Pierre; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S.; Ayoub, George M.; Saikaly, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    . The reason for the slow advancement in successful control of biofouling is largely attributed to the complex interactions of involved biological compounds and the lack of representative-for-practice experimental approaches to evaluate potential effective

  1. Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  2. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  3. Brain tumor - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children) ... The cause of primary brain tumors is unknown. Primary brain tumors may ... (spread to nearby areas) Cancerous (malignant) Brain tumors ...

  4. Adrenal Gland Tumors: Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gland Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Adrenal Gland Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 03/ ... primary adrenal gland tumor is very uncommon. Exact statistics are not available for this type of tumor ...

  5. A Theoretical Methodology and Prototype Implementation for Detection Segmentation Classification of Digital Mammogram Tumor by Machine Learning and Problem Solving Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Raman Valliappan; Sumari Putra; Rajeswari Mandava

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer continues to be a significant public health problem in the world. Early detection is the key for improving breast cancer prognosis. The CAD systems can provide such help and they are important and necessary for breast cancer control. Microcalcifications and masses are the two most important indicators of malignancy, and their automated detection is very valuable for early breast cancer diagnosis. The main objective of this paper is to detect, segment and classify the tumor from ...

  6. Preoperative Y-90 microsphere selective internal radiation treatment for tumor downsizing and future liver remnant recruitment: a novel approach to improving the safety of major hepatic resections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulec, Seza A; Pennington, Kenneth; Hall, Michael; Fong, Yuman

    2009-01-08

    Extended liver resections are being performed more liberally than ever. The extent of resection of liver metastases, however, is restricted by the volume of the future liver remnant (FLR). An intervention that would both accomplish tumor control and induce compensatory hypertrophy, with good patient tolerability, could improve clinical outcomes. A 53-year-old woman with a history of cervical cancer presented with a large liver mass. Subsequent biopsy indicated poorly differentiated carcinoma with necrosis suggestive of squamous cell origin. A decision was made to proceed with pre-operative chemotherapy and Y-90 microsphere SIRT with the intent to obtain systemic control over the disease, downsize the hepatic lesion, and improve the FLR. A surgical exploration was performed six months after the first SIRT (three months after the second). There was no extrahepatic disease. The tumor was found to be significantly decreased in size with central and peripheral scarring. The left lobe was satisfactorily hypertrophied. A formal right hepatic lobectomy was performed with macroscopic negative margins. Selective internal radiation treatment (SIRT) with yttrium-90 (Y-90) microspheres has emerged as an effective liver-directed therapy with a favorable therapeutic ratio. We present this case report to suggest that the portal vein radiation dose can be substantially increased with the intent of inducing portal/periportal fibrosis. Such a therapeutic manipulation in lobar Y-90 microsphere treatment could accomplish the end points of PVE with avoidance of the concern regarding tumor progression.

  7. Quantification of B16 Melanoma Cells in Lungs Using Triplex Q-PCR - A New Approach to Evaluate Melanoma Cell Metastasis and Tumor Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Maria R; Pedersen, Sara R; Lindkvist, Annika

    2014-01-01

    of survival once the tumor has metastasized. In the present study, we have developed a new assay for quantitative analysis of B16 melanoma metastasis in the lungs. We have used a triplex Q-PCR to determine the expression of the melanoma genes GP100/Pmel and tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP-2), and found...... that B16.F10gp cells were detectable in the lungs as early as 2 hours after intravenous challenge with ≥10(4) tumor cells. When investigating the gene expression as a function of time, we observed a gradual decrease from 2-24 hours post tumor challenge followed by an increase of approximately 2 log10...... the outgrowth of subcutaneous melanomas. Results obtained using Q-PCR were compared to conventional counting of metastatic foci under a dissection microscope. A marked reduction in gene expression was observed in the lungs after vaccination with both vectors; however, Ad-Ii-GP showed the highest protection...

  8. Pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poussaint, Tina Y. [Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Panigrahy, Ashok [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Huisman, Thierry A.G.M. [Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children' s Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology and Pediatric Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Among all causes of death in children from solid tumors, pediatric brain tumors are the most common. This article includes an overview of a subset of infratentorial and supratentorial tumors with a focus on tumor imaging features and molecular advances and treatments of these tumors. Key to understanding the imaging features of brain tumors is a firm grasp of other disease processes that can mimic tumor on imaging. We also review imaging features of a common subset of tumor mimics. (orig.)

  9. Tumor-induced osteomalacia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, William H; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Chen, Clara C; Collins, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare and fascinating paraneoplastic syndrome in which patients present with bone pain, fractures, and muscle weakness. The cause is high blood levels of the recently identified phosphate and vitamin D-regulating hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). In TIO, FGF23 is secreted by mesenchymal tumors that are usually benign, but are typically very small and difficult to locate. FGF23 acts primarily at the renal tubule and impairs phosphate reabsorption and 1α-hydroxylation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, leading to hypophosphatemia and low levels of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D. A step-wise approach utilizing functional imaging (F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and octreotide scintigraphy) followed by anatomical imaging (computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging), and, if needed, selective venous sampling with measurement of FGF23 is usually successful in locating the tumors. For tumors that cannot be located, medical treatment with phosphate supplements and active vitamin D (calcitriol or alphacalcidiol) is usually successful; however, the medical regimen can be cumbersome and associated with complications. This review summarizes the current understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and provides guidance in evaluating and treating these patients. Novel imaging modalities and medical treatments, which hold promise for the future, are also reviewed. PMID:21490240

  10. Neurosurgical treatment of extracerebral tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoniadis, G.; Kretschmer, T.; Braun, V.; Rath, S.; Richter, H.P.

    1998-01-01

    Extracerebral tumors represent 29-30% of the intracranial tumors. Meningiomas rank first in incidence with 13-19%, followed by neurinomas and pituitary adenomas, 6-8% each. Due to their slow growth rate, meningiomas in the initial stages do not produce symptoms. Complete recovery can be achieved by complete removal of the tumor, which in general is possible in case of tumor sites at the convexity. Meningiomas at the basis, or meningiomas spreading into the sinus sagittalis superior often cannot be totally removed, so that for treatment of remaining or recurrent tumors and anaplastic meningiomas, post-operative radiation therapy is recommended. Neurinomas of the nervus acusticus originate at the N. vestibularis and may spread from the Meatus acusticus internus into the brain stem. With the modern methods of microsurgery combined with intraoperative monitoring it is possible to preserve the Nn. facialis and cochlearis and their functions. As an alternative to surgery, radiosurgery techniques have been on trial in the last few years. Via transsphenoidal approach, intra- and suprasellar pituitary adenomas can be completely destroyed. Parasellar tumors can be resected by transcranial approach only. Remaining tumors in the Sinus cavernosus, or recurrent adenomas, should receive post-surgery radiation treatment. (orig./CB) [de

  11. Tumor markers in colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Luís César [UNIFESP; Matos, Delcio [UNIFESP

    2002-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a clinical entity of a persistent relevance in clinical practice and its early diagnosis is a determinant factor to obtain better therapeutic results. Tumor markers are helpful means for a better approach to individuals with such neoplasm. In the present review, the authors analyze the phases in which surgical-clinical treatment markers must be used: diagnosis, determination of tumor stage, establishment of prognosis and detection of recurrence. Current and future markers...

  12. Testis tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.L.; Maier, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    Clinical trials are evaluating new combinations of drugs with the goal of diminishing the toxicity associated with the current regimens while not compromising the chance for cure. The evolution of information and staging studies such as tumor markers, CT scanning and MR scanning has made possible the detection of residual metastatic disease while obviating the need for surgical staging procedures. This has made less treatment possible for a large number of patients. The regularity of follow-up studies has made early detection of recurrences a possibility, so that effective and curative treatment is generally possible

  13. Teratoid Wilms′ tumor - A rare renal tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswanath Mukhopadhyay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Teratoid Wilms′ tumor is an extremely rare renal tumor. We report a case of unilateral teratoid Wilms′ tumor in a 4-year-old girl. The patient was admitted with a right-sided abdominal mass. The mass was arising from the right kidney. Radical nephrectomy was done and the patient had an uneventful recovery. Histopathology report showed teratoid Wilms′ tumor.

  14. Systems biology-based diagnostic principles as pillars of the bridge between Chinese and Western medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greef, J. van der; Wietmarschen, H. van; Schroën, J.; Wang, M.; Hankemeier, T.; Xu, G.

    2010-01-01

    Innovative systems approaches to develop medicine and health care are emerging from the integration of Chinese and Western medicine strategies, philosophies and practices. The two medical systems are highly complementary as the reductionist aspects of Western medicine are favourable in acute disease

  15. Tumor-associated antigens identified by mRNA expression profiling induce protective anti-tumor immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiassen, S; Lauemøller, S L; Ruhwald, M

    2001-01-01

    Defined tumor-associated antigens (TAA) are attractive targets for anti-tumor immunotherapy. Here, we describe a novel genome-wide approach to identify multiple TAA from any given tumor. A panel of transplantable thymomas was established from an inbred p53-/- mouse strain. The resulting tumors were...... of autoimmune reactions were observed. Thus, it appears possible to evaluate the entire metabolism of any given tumor and use this information rationally to identify multiple epitopes of value in the generation of tumor-specific immunotherapy. We expect that human tumors express similar tumor-specific metabolic...

  16. Identification of networks of co-occurring, tumor-related DNA copy number changes using a genome-wide scoring approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiaan Klijn

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumorigenesis is a multi-step process in which normal cells transform into malignant tumors following the accumulation of genetic mutations that enable them to evade the growth control checkpoints that would normally suppress their growth or result in apoptosis. It is therefore important to identify those combinations of mutations that collaborate in cancer development and progression. DNA copy number alterations (CNAs are one of the ways in which cancer genes are deregulated in tumor cells. We hypothesized that synergistic interactions between cancer genes might be identified by looking for regions of co-occurring gain and/or loss. To this end we developed a scoring framework to separate truly co-occurring aberrations from passenger mutations and dominant single signals present in the data. The resulting regions of high co-occurrence can be investigated for between-region functional interactions. Analysis of high-resolution DNA copy number data from a panel of 95 hematological tumor cell lines correctly identified co-occurring recombinations at the T-cell receptor and immunoglobulin loci in T- and B-cell malignancies, respectively, showing that we can recover truly co-occurring genomic alterations. In addition, our analysis revealed networks of co-occurring genomic losses and gains that are enriched for cancer genes. These networks are also highly enriched for functional relationships between genes. We further examine sub-networks of these networks, core networks, which contain many known cancer genes. The core network for co-occurring DNA losses we find seems to be independent of the canonical cancer genes within the network. Our findings suggest that large-scale, low-intensity copy number alterations may be an important feature of cancer development or maintenance by affecting gene dosage of a large interconnected network of functionally related genes.

  17. ZnO-Based Microfluidic pH Sensor: A Versatile Approach for Quick Recognition of Circulating Tumor Cells in Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Ganesh Kumar; Morohoshi, Madoka; Yasoda, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Sho; Kimura, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Kazuyoshi

    2017-02-15

    The present study is concerned about the development of highly sensitive and stable microfluidic pH sensor for possible identification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood. The precise pH measurements between silver-silver chloride (Ag/AgCl) reference electrode and zinc oxide (ZnO) working electrode have been investigated in the microfluidic device. Since there is a direct link between pH and cancer cells, the developed device is one of the valuable tools to examine circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood. The ZnO-based working electrode was deposited by radio frequency (rf) sputtering technique. The potential voltage difference between the working and reference electrodes (Ag/AgCl) is evaluated on the microfluidic device. The ideal Nernstian response of -43.71165 mV/pH was achieved along with high stability and quick response time. Finally, to evaluate the real time capability of the developed microfluidic device, in vitro testing was done with A549, A7r5, and MDCK cells.

  18. MiR-221 and -222-based therapeutic approach in melanoma and GIST (Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor): in vitro and in vivo preclinical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Care, A; Bonci, D [Department of Haematology, Oncology and Molecular Medicine, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Peschle, C [IRCCS MultiMedica, Milan (Italy)

    2009-07-01

    Micro RNAs (miRs) are small ({approx}22 nucleotides) non coding RNAs involved in gene expression, as negative regulators of specific mRNA targets. Growing evidences indicated miR functional roles in all the main biological processes, including cancer where they can act as oncogenes as well as tumor suppressor genes. Several studies reported the involvement of miR- 221 and -222 in the induction and/or progression of different neoplasias. We have analyzed miR-221/-222 functional role in a panel of differently staged melanoma cell lines and primary bioptic samples, showing their capabilities to regulate two distinct, but functionally convergent pathways of melanocyte transformation through the cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip and c-kit receptor. We also demonstrated the lack of the tumor suppressor gene PLZF as a direct cause of miR-221/-222 up regulation in melanoma cells. In vitro and, more important, in vivo studies confirmed that suppression of miR-221/-222 strongly reduced melanoma growth and dissemination.

  19. MiR-221 and -222-based therapeutic approach in melanoma and GIST (Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor): in vitro and in vivo preclinical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Care, A.; Bonci, D.; Peschle, C.

    2009-01-01

    Micro RNAs (miRs) are small (∼22 nucleotides) non coding RNAs involved in gene expression, as negative regulators of specific mRNA targets. Growing evidences indicated miR functional roles in all the main biological processes, including cancer where they can act as oncogenes as well as tumor suppressor genes. Several studies reported the involvement of miR- 221 and -222 in the induction and/or progression of different neoplasias. We have analyzed miR-221/-222 functional role in a panel of differently staged melanoma cell lines and primary bioptic samples, showing their capabilities to regulate two distinct, but functionally convergent pathways of melanocyte transformation through the cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip and c-kit receptor. We also demonstrated the lack of the tumor suppressor gene PLZF as a direct cause of miR-221/-222 up regulation in melanoma cells. In vitro and, more important, in vivo studies confirmed that suppression of miR-221/-222 strongly reduced melanoma growth and dissemination

  20. Tumor Macroenvironment and Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Zhoughbi, Wael; Huang, Jianfeng; Paramasivan, Ganapathy S.; Till, Holger; Pichler, Martin; Guertl-Lackner, Barbara; Hoefler, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    In this review we introduce the concept of the tumor macroenvironment and explore it in the context of metabolism. Tumor cells interact with the tumor microenvironment including immune cells. Blood and lymph vessels are the critical components that deliver nutrients to the tumor and also connect the tumor to the macroenvironment. Several factors are then released from the tumor itself but potentially also from the tumor microenvironment, influencing the metabolism of distant tissues and organ...

  1. Tomografia computadorizada na análise dos padrões de calcificações nos tumores ósseos da bacia em pediatria: nova abordagem Computed tomography in the analysis of calcification patterns in pediatric bone tumors of the hip: a new approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Antônio de Oliveira

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: No grupo pediátrico, o diagnóstico radiológico dos tumores dos ossos ilíacos, ísquios e púbis apresenta dificuldades e peculiaridades próprias, mas a literatura revisada não trata especificamente desse tema. Este trabalho pretende investigar a existência de padrões radiológicos confiáveis para o diagnóstico diferencial desses tumores. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram revistos os achados radiológicos de tumores dos ossos do quadril em dez pacientes com idades entre 8 e 19 anos. RESULTADOS: Reação óssea (esclerose ou lise, reação periosteal (lamelar em camada única, múltiplas camadas ou radial, extensão do tumor no osso e grau de invasão das partes moles revelaram baixa especificidade. As calcificações nas partes moles, consideradas em conjunto, foram inespecíficas. Contudo, separando as próximas do osso comprometido, que apresentam formas e tamanhos variados - padrão I -, daquelas afastadas do osso, finas e amorfas - padrão II -, observamos que o padrão I foi totalmente inespecífico e o padrão II foi identificado nos três casos de osteossarcoma (100% e em apenas um dos casos de Ewing (16,6%. CONCLUSÃO: Neste material, as calcificações padrão II revelaram sensibilidade de 100% e especificidade de 90% para osteossarcoma. Contudo, sua importância pode não se limitar ao diagnóstico radiológico. As calcificações padrão II indicam, provavelmente, os sítios ideais para biópsia.OBJECTIVE: In the pediatric group, the radiological diagnosis of bone tumors of the hip is difficult and presents some peculiarities, but reviewed literature does not approach this specific problem. The objective of the present study was to investigate the existence of reliable radiological patterns for the differential diagnosis of these tumors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Radiological findings of bone tumors of the hip in ten patients in the age range between 8 and 19 years have been reviewed. RESULTS: Bone reaction (sclerosis or

  2. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... navigate their brain tumor diagnosis. WATCH AND SHARE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Central Nervous System Cancers Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  3. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Brain Tumors KidsHealth / For Parents / Brain Tumors What's in ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  4. Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  5. Malignant bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zedgenidze, G.A.; Kishkovskij, A.N.; Elashov, Yu.G.

    1984-01-01

    Clinicoroentgenologic semiotics of malignant bone tumors as well as metastatic bone tumors are presented. Diagnosis of malignant and metastatic bone tumors should be always complex, representing a result of cooperation of a physician, roentgenologist, pathoanatomist

  6. Tumors and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumors during pregnancy are rare, but they can happen. Tumors can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. The most common cancers in pregnancy are breast cancer, cervical cancer, lymphoma, and melanoma. ...

  7. Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumor > Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 01/ ... the body. It is important to remember that statistics on the survival rates for people with a ...

  8. Surgical treatment of tumor-induced osteomalacia: a retrospective review of 40 cases with extremity tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhi-jian; Jin, Jin; Qiu, Gui-xing; Gao, Peng; Liu, Yong

    2015-02-26

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare syndrome typically caused by mesenchymal tumors. It has been shown that complete tumor resection may be curative. However, to our knowledge, there has been no report of a large cohort to exam different surgical approaches. This study was aimed to assess outcomes of different surgical options of patients with tumor-induced osteomalacia at a single institution. Patients with extremity tumors treated in our hospital from January, 2004 to July, 2012 were identified. The minimum follow-up period was 12 months. Patient's demography, tumor location, preoperative preparation, type of surgeries were summarized, and clinical outcomes were recorded. Successful treatment was defined as significant symptom improvement, normal serum phosphorus and significant improvement or normalization of bone mineral density at the last follow-up. Differences between patients with soft tissue tumors and bone tumors were compared. There were 40 (24 male and 16 female) patients identified, with an average age of 44 years. The tumors were isolated in either soft tissue (25 patients) or bone (12 patients) and combined soft tissue and bone invasion was observed in 3 patients. For the primary surgery, tumor resection and tumor curettage were performed. After initial surgical treatment, six patients then received a second surgery. Four patients were found to have malignant tumors base on histopathology. With a minimum follow-up period of 12 months, 80% of patients (32/40) were treated successfully, including 50% of patients (2/4) with malignant tumors. Compared to patients with bone tumor, surgical results were better in patient with soft tissue tumor. Surgical treatment was an effective way for TIO. Other than tumor curettage surgery, tumor resection is the preferred options for these tumors.

  9. Music in our ears: the biological bases of musical timbre perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailash Patil

    Full Text Available Timbre is the attribute of sound that allows humans and other animals to distinguish among different sound sources. Studies based on psychophysical judgments of musical timbre, ecological analyses of sound's physical characteristics as well as machine learning approaches have all suggested that timbre is a multifaceted attribute that invokes both spectral and temporal sound features. Here, we explored the neural underpinnings of musical timbre. We used a neuro-computational framework based on spectro-temporal receptive fields, recorded from over a thousand neurons in the mammalian primary auditory cortex as well as from simulated cortical neurons, augmented with a nonlinear classifier. The model was able to perform robust instrument classification irrespective of pitch and playing style, with an accuracy of 98.7%. Using the same front end, the model was also able to reproduce perceptual distance judgments between timbres as perceived by human listeners. The study demonstrates that joint spectro-temporal features, such as those observed in the mammalian primary auditory cortex, are critical to provide the rich-enough representation necessary to account for perceptual judgments of timbre by human listeners, as well as recognition of musical instruments.

  10. Pharmacotherapy for Adults with Tumors of the Central Nervous System

    OpenAIRE

    Schor, Nina F.

    2008-01-01

    Tumors of the adult central nervous system are among the most common and most chemoresistant neoplasms. Malignant tumors of the brain and spinal cord collectively account for approximately 1.3% of all cancers and 2.2% of all cancer-related deaths. Novel pharmacological approaches to nervous system tumors are urgently needed. This review presents the current approaches and challenges to successful pharmacotherapy of adults with malignant tumors of the central nervous system and discusses novel...

  11. Biologically based machine vision: signal analysis of monopolar cells in the visual system of Musca domestica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Jenny; Barrett, Steven F; Wilcox, Michael J; Popp, Stephanie

    2002-01-01

    Machine vision for navigational purposes is a rapidly growing field. Many abilities such as object recognition and target tracking rely on vision. Autonomous vehicles must be able to navigate in dynamic enviroments and simultaneously locate a target position. Traditional machine vision often fails to react in real time because of large computational requirements whereas the fly achieves complex orientation and navigation with a relatively small and simple brain. Understanding how the fly extracts visual information and how neurons encode and process information could lead us to a new approach for machine vision applications. Photoreceptors in the Musca domestica eye that share the same spatial information converge into a structure called the cartridge. The cartridge consists of the photoreceptor axon terminals and monopolar cells L1, L2, and L4. It is thought that L1 and L2 cells encode edge related information relative to a single cartridge. These cells are thought to be equivalent to vertebrate bipolar cells, producing contrast enhancement and reduction of information sent to L4. Monopolar cell L4 is thought to perform image segmentation on the information input from L1 and L2 and also enhance edge detection. A mesh of interconnected L4's would correlate the output from L1 and L2 cells of adjacent cartridges and provide a parallel network for segmenting an object's edges. The focus of this research is to excite photoreceptors of the common housefly, Musca domestica, with different visual patterns. The electrical response of monopolar cells L1, L2, and L4 will be recorded using intracellular recording techniques. Signal analysis will determine the neurocircuitry to detect and segment images.

  12. Peripheral epithelial odontogenic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carzoglio, J.; Tancredi, N.; Capurro, S.; Ravecca, T.; Scarrone, P.

    2006-01-01

    A new case of peripheral epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor) is reported. It is localized in the superior right gingival region, a less frequent site, and has the histopathological features previously reported. Immunochemical studies were performed, revealing a differential positive stain to cytokeratins in tumor cells deeply seated in the tumor mass, probably related to tumoral cell heterogeneity.Interestingly, in this particular case S-100 protein positive reactivity was also detected in arborescent cells intermingled with tumoral cells, resembling Langerhans cells. Even though referred in the literature in central Pindborg tumors, no references were found about their presence in peripheral tumors, like the one that is presented here

  13. Prevalence of bone and soft tissue tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücetürk, Güven; Sabah, Dündar; Keçeci, Burçin; Kara, Ahmet Duran; Yalçinkaya, Selçuk

    2011-01-01

    Multidisciplinary approach is a necessity for the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of bone and soft tissue tumors. The Ege University Musculoskeletal Tumor Council offers consultation services to other hospitals in the Aegean region. Since 1988 the Council has met weekly and spent approximately 1,500 hours evaluating almost 6,000 patients with suspected skeletal system tumors. Our objective was to present the data obtained from this patient group. A total of 5,658 patients, suspected to have a musculoskeletal tumor, were evaluated retrospectively. Multiple records of the patients due to multiple attendance to the Council were excluded. The prevalance of the bone and soft tissue tumors in these patients were analysed. Malignant mesenchymal tumors accounted for 39.7% of the total patients, benign tumors for 17%, tumor-like lesions for 17.8% and metastatic carsinomas for 8.6%. Malignant bone tumors were 50.2% and malignant soft tissue tumors were 49.8% of all the sarcomas. Among the malignant bone tumors the most common was osteosarcomas at a rate of 33.6%, followed by Ewing-PNET at 25.5%, chondrosarcomas at 19.4% and haematopoietic tumors at 17.6%. Pleomorphic sarcomas (24.5%), liposarcoma (16.4%), synovial sarcoma (13%) and undifferential sarcomas (8.8%) were the most common types of malignant sof tissue tumors. Benign soft tissue tumors (48%), benign cartilage tumors (28%), giant cell tumor (15%) and osteogenic tumors (9%) were found among the benign tumors. Hemangioma, lipoma, agressive fibromatosis, enchondroma, solitary chondroma and osteoid osteoma were the most common tumors in their groups. Lung (27%), breast (24%), gastrointestinal system (10.5%) and kidney (8.2%) carcinomas were the most common primary sites of the bone metastasis. Turkey still lacks a comprehensive series indicating the incidence and diagnostic distribution of bone and soft tissue tumors. The presented data would add to our knowledge on the specific rates of the bone and soft tissue

  14. Biopsy in Musculoskeletal Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Gharehdaghi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of bone tumors is based on careful evaluation of clinical, imaging and a pathologic findings. So the biopsy of bone and soft tissue sarcomas is the final step in evaluation and a fundamental step in the diagnosis of the lesion. It should not be performed as a shortcut to diagnosis (1. The biopsy should be performed in order to confirm the diagnosis and differentiate among few diagnoses after careful staged studies. Real and artificial changes in imaging studies will be superimposed after performing biopsy, which may alter the interpretation if done after biopsy is taken (1. The correct management of a sarcoma depends on the accurate diagnosis. Inadequate, inapprppriate, or inaccurate non-representative biopsy leads to poorer outcome in terms of survivorship and limb salvage. An incorrect, unplanned incision and biopsy may unnecessarily contaminate uninvolved compartments which may convert a salvageable limb to amputation. Anatomic approach along with the proper biopsy techniques may lead to success or catastrophe. It is clear that in patients with inappropriate biopsy, the chance of the need to change the treatment to more radical than would originally be expected is significantly higher. Also it is more probable to need to  convert curative to palliative treatment and to require adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with inappropriate biopsies. Patients with sarcoma are best served by early referral to a specialized center where staged investigations and biopsy can be performed with minimal morbidity (3. Open biopsy is still considered the gold standard; however, recent studies suggest comparable results with percutaneous core needle biopsy. Our study on 103 consecutive CNB and open biopsy showed comparable results as well. Surgeons need to answer to two questions prior to performing a biopsy: 1-          Where is the best part of the lesion to be biopsied? 2-          What is the safest route without contaminating

  15. Radiological diagnostics of skeletal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhl, M.; Herget, G.W.

    2008-01-01

    The book contains contributions concerning the following topics: 1. introduction and fundamentals: WHO classification of bone tumors, imaging diagnostics and their function; localization, typical clinical and radiological criteria, TNM classification and status classification, invasive tumor diagnostics; 2. specific tumor diagnostics: chondrogenic bone tumors, osseous tumors, connective tissue bony tumors, osteoclastoma, osteomyelogenic bone tumors, vascular bone tumors, neurogenic bone tumors, chordoma; adamantinoma of the long tubular bone; tumor-like lesions, bony metastases, bone granulomas, differential diagnostics: tumor-like lesions

  16. Genetic background and 227Thorium as risk factors in biologically based models for induction of bone cancer in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidenreich, W.F.; Rosemann, M.

    2012-01-01

    We explore the potential for the biologically based two-stage clonal expansion model to make statements about the influence of genetic factors on the steps in the model. We find evidence that the different susceptibility of BALB/C and CBA/Ca mice to bone cancer after 227 Thorium injection may be mostly due to different promotional responses to radiation. In BALB/C x CBA/Ca back-crossed mice, we analyzed the specific contribution of two individual loci in the carcinogenic process. This analysis suggests that the two high- or low-risk alleles are acting on promotion or on the background parameters, but not on radiation-induced initiation. Taken together with the comparison of CBA/Ca and BALB/C mice, this hints at the possibility that the two loci are candidates for modifying radiation-induced promotion. (orig.)

  17. Current evidence of anti-tumor necrosis factor α treatment efficacy in childhood chronic uveitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis approach of individual drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonini, Gabriele; Druce, Katie; Cimaz, Rolando; Macfarlane, Gary J; Jones, Gareth T

    2014-07-01

    To summarize evidence regarding the effectiveness of anti-tumor necrosis factor α (anti-TNFα) treatments in childhood autoimmune chronic uveitis (ACU), refractory to previous disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). A systematic search between January 2000 and October 2012 was conducted using EMBase, Ovid Medline, Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) Reviews: American College of Physicians Journal Club, Cochrane libraries, and EBM Reviews. Studies investigating the efficacy of anti-TNFα therapy, in children ages ≤16 years, as the first treatment with a biologic agent for ACU, refractory to topical and/or systemic steroid therapy and at least 1 DMARD, were eligible for inclusion. The primary outcome measure was the improvement of intraocular inflammation, as defined by the Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature Working Group criteria. We determined a combined estimate of the proportion of children responding to anti-TNFα treatment, including etanercept (ETA), infliximab (INF), or adalimumab (ADA). We initially identified 989 articles, of which 148 were potentially eligible. In total, 22 retrospective chart reviews and 1 randomized clinical trial were deemed eligible, thus including 229 children (ADA: n = 31, ETA: n = 54, and INF: n = 144). On pooled analysis of observational studies, the proportion of responding children was 87% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 75-98%) for ADA, 72% (95% CI 64-79%) for INF, and 33% (95% CI 19-47%) for ETA. There was no difference in the proportion of responders between ADA and INF (χ(2) = 3.06, P = 0.08), although both showed superior efficacy compared with ETA (ADA versus ETA: χ(2) = 20.9, P < 0.001 and INF versus ETA: χ(2) = 20.9, P < 0.001). Although randomized controlled trials are needed, the available evidence suggests that INF and ADA provide proven similar benefits in the treatment of childhood ACU, and they are both superior to ETA. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  18. Blocking the chaperone kinome pathway: Mechanistic insights into a novel dual inhibition approach for supra-additive suppression of malignant tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grover, Abhinav [Department of Biochemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); Shandilya, Ashutosh [Supercomputing Facility for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); Agrawal, Vibhuti; Pratik, Piyush; Bhasme, Divya; Bisaria, Virendra S. [Department of Biochemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); Sundar, Durai, E-mail: sundar@dbeb.iitd.ac.in [Department of Biochemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Withaferin A and 17-DMAG synergistically inhibit the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone pair. {yields} Binding of WA to Cdc37 cleft suppresses its kinase binding activity. {yields} 17-DMAG binding to the association complex results in H-bonds with 60% clustering. {yields} The ligands' bound complex was found structurally and thermodynamically stable. -- Abstract: The chaperone Hsp90 is involved in regulating the stability and activation state of more than 200 'client' proteins and takes part in the cancer diseased states. The major clientele-protein kinases depend on Hsp90 for their proper folding and functioning. Cdc37, a kinase targeting co-chaperone of Hsp90, mediates the interactions between Hsp90 and protein kinases. Targeting of Cdc37 has the prospect of delivering predominantly kinase-selective molecular responses as compared to the current pharmacologic Hsp90 inhibitors. The present work reports a bio-computational study carried out with the aim of exploring the dual inhibition of Hsp90/Cdc37 chaperone/co-chaperone association complex by the naturally occurring drug candidates withaferin A and 17-DMAG along with their possible modes of action. Our molecular docking studies reveal that withaferin A in combination with 17-DMAG can act as potent chaperone system inhibitors. The structural and thermodynamic stability of the ligands' bound complex was also observed from molecular dynamics simulations in water. Our results suggest a novel tumor suppressive action mechanism of herbal ligands which can be looked forward for further clinical investigations for possible anticancer drug formulations.

  19. Quantitative global sensitivity analysis of a biologically based dose-response pregnancy model for the thyroid endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumen, Annie; McNally, Kevin; George, Nysia; Fisher, Jeffrey W; Loizou, George D

    2015-01-01

    A deterministic biologically based dose-response model for the thyroidal system in a near-term pregnant woman and the fetus was recently developed to evaluate quantitatively thyroid hormone perturbations. The current work focuses on conducting a quantitative global sensitivity analysis on this complex model to identify and characterize the sources and contributions of uncertainties in the predicted model output. The workflow and methodologies suitable for computationally expensive models, such as the Morris screening method and Gaussian Emulation processes, were used for the implementation of the global sensitivity analysis. Sensitivity indices, such as main, total and interaction effects, were computed for a screened set of the total thyroidal system descriptive model input parameters. Furthermore, a narrower sub-set of the most influential parameters affecting the model output of maternal thyroid hormone levels were identified in addition to the characterization of their overall and pair-wise parameter interaction quotients. The characteristic trends of influence in model output for each of these individual model input parameters over their plausible ranges were elucidated using Gaussian Emulation processes. Through global sensitivity analysis we have gained a better understanding of the model behavior and performance beyond the domains of observation by the simultaneous variation in model inputs over their range of plausible uncertainties. The sensitivity analysis helped identify parameters that determine the driving mechanisms of the maternal and fetal iodide kinetics, thyroid function and their interactions, and contributed to an improved understanding of the system modeled. We have thus demonstrated the use and application of global sensitivity analysis for a biologically based dose-response model for sensitive life-stages such as pregnancy that provides richer information on the model and the thyroidal system modeled compared to local sensitivity analysis.

  20. Quantitative global sensitivity analysis of a biologically based dose-response pregnancy model for the thyroid endocrine system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie eLumen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A deterministic biologically based dose-response model for the thyroidal system in a near-term pregnant woman and the fetus was recently developed to evaluate quantitatively thyroid hormone perturbations. The current work focuses on conducting a quantitative global sensitivity analysis on this complex model to identify and characterize the sources and contributions of uncertainties in the predicted model output. The workflow and methodologies suitable for computationally expensive models, such as the Morris screening method and Gaussian Emulation processes, were used for the implementation of the global sensitivity analysis. Sensitivity indices, such as main, total and interaction effects, were computed for a screened set of the total thyroidal system descriptive model input parameters. Furthermore, a narrower sub-set of the most influential parameters affecting the model output of maternal thyroid hormone levels were identified in addition to the characterization of their overall and pair-wise parameter interaction quotients. The characteristic trends of influence in model output for each of these individual model input parameters over their plausible ranges were elucidated using Gaussian Emulation processes. Through global sensitivity analysis we have gained a better understanding of the model behavior and performance beyond the domains of observation by the simultaneous variation in model inputs over their range of plausible uncertainties. The sensitivity analysis helped identify parameters that determine the driving mechanisms of the maternal and fetal iodide kinetics, thyroid function and their interactions, and contributed to an improved understanding of the system modeled. We have thus demonstrated the use and application of global sensitivity analysis for a biologically based dose-response model for sensitive life-stages such as pregnancy that provides richer information on the model and the thyroidal system modeled compared to local

  1. Skull base tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragnaniello, Cristian; Nader, Remi; van Doormaal, Tristan; Kamel, Mahmoud; Voormolen, Eduard H J; Lasio, Giovanni; Aboud, Emad; Regli, Luca; Tulleken, Cornelius A F; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2010-11-01

    Resident duty-hours restrictions have now been instituted in many countries worldwide. Shortened training times and increased public scrutiny of surgical competency have led to a move away from the traditional apprenticeship model of training. The development of educational models for brain anatomy is a fascinating innovation allowing neurosurgeons to train without the need to practice on real patients and it may be a solution to achieve competency within a shortened training period. The authors describe the use of Stratathane resin ST-504 polymer (SRSP), which is inserted at different intracranial locations to closely mimic meningiomas and other pathological entities of the skull base, in a cadaveric model, for use in neurosurgical training. Silicone-injected and pressurized cadaveric heads were used for studying the SRSP model. The SRSP presents unique intrinsic metamorphic characteristics: liquid at first, it expands and foams when injected into the desired area of the brain, forming a solid tumorlike structure. The authors injected SRSP via different passages that did not influence routes used for the surgical approach for resection of the simulated lesion. For example, SRSP injection routes included endonasal transsphenoidal or transoral approaches if lesions were to be removed through standard skull base approach, or, alternatively, SRSP was injected via a cranial approach if the removal was planned to be via the transsphenoidal or transoral route. The model was set in place in 3 countries (US, Italy, and The Netherlands), and a pool of 13 physicians from 4 different institutions (all surgeons and surgeons in training) participated in evaluating it and provided feedback. All 13 evaluating physicians had overall positive impressions of the model. The overall score on 9 components evaluated--including comparison between the tumor model and real tumor cases, perioperative requirements, general impression, and applicability--was 88% (100% being the best possible

  2. Liver Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Liver Tumors KidsHealth / For Parents / Liver Tumors What's in this article? Types of Tumors ... Cancerous) Tumors Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Coping Print The liver is the body's largest solid organ. Lying next ...

  3. SU-F-T-208: An Efficient Planning Approach to Posterior Fossa Tumor Bed Boosts Using Proton Pencil Beam Scanning in Fixed-Beam Room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, N; Chen, C; Gans, S; Hug, E; Cahlon, O; Chon, B; Tsai, H; Sine, K; Mah, D; Wolden, S; Yeh, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A fixed-beam room could be underutilized in a multi-room proton center. We investigated the use of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) on a fixed-beam as an alternative for posterior fossa tumor bed (PF-TB) boost treatments which were usually treating on a gantry with uniform scanning. Methods: Five patients were treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI, 23.4 or 36.0 Gy(RBE)) followed by a PF-TB boost to 54 Gy(RBE) with proton beams. Three PF-TB boost plans were generated for each patient: (1) a uniform scanning (US) gantry plan with 4–7 posterior fields shaped with apertures and compensators (2) a PBS plan using bi-lateral and vertex fields with a 3-mm planning organ-at-risk volume (PRV) expansion around the brainstem and (3) PBS fields using same beam arrangement but replacing the PRV with robust optimization considering a 3-mm setup uncertainty. Results: A concave 54-Gy(RBE) isodose line surrounding the brainstem could be achieved using all three techniques. The mean V95% of the PTV was 99.7% (range: 97.6% to 100%) while the V100% of the PTV ranged from 56.3% to 93.1% depending on the involvement of the brainstem with the PTV. The mean doses received by 0.05 cm"3 of the brainstem were effectively identical: 54.0 Gy(RBE), 53.4 Gy(RBE) and 53.3 Gy(RBE) for US, PBS optimized with PRV, and PBS optimized with robustness plans respectively. The cochlea mean dose increased by 23% of the prescribed boost dose in average from the bi-lateral fields used in the PBS plan. Planning time for the PBS plan with PRV was 5–10 times less than the US plan and the robustly optimized PBS plan. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that a fixed-beam with PBS can deliver a dose distribution comparable to a gantry plan using uniform scanning. Planning time can be reduced substantially using a PRV around the brainstem instead of robust optimization.

  4. SU-F-T-208: An Efficient Planning Approach to Posterior Fossa Tumor Bed Boosts Using Proton Pencil Beam Scanning in Fixed-Beam Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, N; Chen, C; Gans, S; Hug, E; Cahlon, O; Chon, B; Tsai, H; Sine, K; Mah, D [Procure Treatment Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Wolden, S [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Yeh, B [Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A fixed-beam room could be underutilized in a multi-room proton center. We investigated the use of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) on a fixed-beam as an alternative for posterior fossa tumor bed (PF-TB) boost treatments which were usually treating on a gantry with uniform scanning. Methods: Five patients were treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI, 23.4 or 36.0 Gy(RBE)) followed by a PF-TB boost to 54 Gy(RBE) with proton beams. Three PF-TB boost plans were generated for each patient: (1) a uniform scanning (US) gantry plan with 4–7 posterior fields shaped with apertures and compensators (2) a PBS plan using bi-lateral and vertex fields with a 3-mm planning organ-at-risk volume (PRV) expansion around the brainstem and (3) PBS fields using same beam arrangement but replacing the PRV with robust optimization considering a 3-mm setup uncertainty. Results: A concave 54-Gy(RBE) isodose line surrounding the brainstem could be achieved using all three techniques. The mean V95% of the PTV was 99.7% (range: 97.6% to 100%) while the V100% of the PTV ranged from 56.3% to 93.1% depending on the involvement of the brainstem with the PTV. The mean doses received by 0.05 cm{sup 3} of the brainstem were effectively identical: 54.0 Gy(RBE), 53.4 Gy(RBE) and 53.3 Gy(RBE) for US, PBS optimized with PRV, and PBS optimized with robustness plans respectively. The cochlea mean dose increased by 23% of the prescribed boost dose in average from the bi-lateral fields used in the PBS plan. Planning time for the PBS plan with PRV was 5–10 times less than the US plan and the robustly optimized PBS plan. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that a fixed-beam with PBS can deliver a dose distribution comparable to a gantry plan using uniform scanning. Planning time can be reduced substantially using a PRV around the brainstem instead of robust optimization.

  5. Novel Treatment Shrinks Ovarian Tumors in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have developed a new approach for treating tumors that express mutant versions of the p53 protein, which are present in more than half of all cancers, including an aggressive and common subtype of ovarian cancer.

  6. Endocrine tumors other than thyroid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeichi, Norio; Dohi, Kiyohiko

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the tendency for the occurrence of tumors in the endocrine glands, other than the thyroid gland, in A-bomb survivors using both autopsy and clinical data. ABCC-RERF sample data using 4136 autopsy cases (1961-1977) revealed parathyroid tumors in 13 A-bomb survivors, including 3 with the associated hyperparathyroidism, with the suggestion of dose-dependent increase in the occurrence of tumors. Based on clinical data from Hiroshima University, 7 (46.7%) of 15 parathyroid tumors cases were A-bomb survivors. Data (1974-1987) from the Tumor Registry Committee (TRC) in Hiroshima Prefecture revealed that a relative risk of parathyroid tumors was 5.6 times higher in the entire group of A-bomb survivors and 16.2 times higher in the group of heavily exposed A-bomb survivors, suggesting the dose-dependent increase in their occurrence. Adrenal tumors were detected in 47 of 123 cases from the TRC data, and 15 (31.5%) of these 47 were A-bomb survivors. Particularly, 11 cases of adrenal tumors associated with Cushing syndrome included 6 A-bomb survivors (54.5%). The incidence of multiple endocrine gonadial tumors (MEGT) tended to be higher with increasing exposure doses; and the 1-9 rad group, the 10-99 rad group, and the 100 or more rad group had a risk of developing MEGT of 4.1, 5.7, and 7.1, respectively, relative to both the not-in the city group and the 0 rad group. These findings suggested that there is a correlation between A-bomb radiation and the occurrence of parathyroid tumors (including hyperparathyroidism), adrenal tumors associated with Cushing syndrome and MEGT (especially, the combined thyroid and ovarian tumors and the combined thyroid and parathyroid tumors). (N.K.)

  7. Tumor-targeting peptides from combinatorial libraries*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruiwu; Li, Xiaocen; Xiao, Wenwu; Lam, Kit S.

    2018-01-01

    Cancer is one of the major and leading causes of death worldwide. Two of the greatest challenges infighting cancer are early detection and effective treatments with no or minimum side effects. Widespread use of targeted therapies and molecular imaging in clinics requires high affinity, tumor-specific agents as effective targeting vehicles to deliver therapeutics and imaging probes to the primary or metastatic tumor sites. Combinatorial libraries such as phage-display and one-bead one-compound (OBOC) peptide libraries are powerful approaches in discovering tumor-targeting peptides. This review gives an overview of different combinatorial library technologies that have been used for the discovery of tumor-targeting peptides. Examples of tumor-targeting peptides identified from each combinatorial library method will be discussed. Published tumor-targeting peptide ligands and their applications will also be summarized by the combinatorial library methods and their corresponding binding receptors. PMID:27210583

  8. CT of abdominal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Satoshi; Yamada, Kenji; Ito, Masatoshi; Ito, Hisao; Yamaura, Harutsugu

    1981-01-01

    CT findings in 33 patients who had an abdominal tumor were evaluated. CT revealed a tumor in 31 cases. The organ from which the tumor originated was correctly diagnosed in 18 patients. Whether the tumor was solid or cystic was correctly predicted in 28 patients. The diagnosis malignant or benign nature of tumor was correct, incorrect and impossible, in 23, 3, and five patiens, respectively. (Kondo, M.)

  9. Liquid biopsy for brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Ganesh M.; Balaj, Leonora; Stott, Shannon L.; Nahed, Brian; Carter, Bob S.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Minimally invasive methods will augment the clinical approach for establishing the diagnosis or monitoring treatment response of central nervous system tumors. Liquid biopsy by blood or cerebrospinal fluid sampling holds promise in this regard. Areas covered In this literature review, the authors highlight recent studies describing the analysis of circulating tumor cells, cell free nucleic acids, and extracellular vesicles as strategies to accomplish liquid biopsy in glioblastoma and metastatic tumors. The authors then discuss the continued efforts to improve signal detection, standardize the liquid biopsy handling and preparation, develop platforms for clinical application, and establish a role for liquid biopsies in personalized medicine. Expert commentary As the technologies used to analyze these biomarkers continue to evolve, we propose that there is a future potential to precisely diagnose and monitor treatment response with liquid biopsies. PMID:28875730

  10. Skull base tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikinis, R.; Matsumae, M.; Jolesz, F.A.; Black, P.M.; Cline, H.E.; Lorenson, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on an image processing procedure for the planning of surgery of skull base tumors that can extract bone, vessels, tumor, and brain parenchyma and that permits resolution of cranial nerves. Three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions were generated from double-echo long TR interleaved conventional spin-echo and fast-spin-echo MR imaging data. Sixteen cases have been analyzed preoperatively. Image processing consisted of a multistep procedure combining a supervised multivariate analysis with neighborhood operations such as connectivity and erosion/dilation. 3D renderings of anatomic structures of interest were then generated. Cases were evaluated preoperatively and manipulated interactively with the computer-generated images by a team consisting of neuroradiologists, neurosurgeons, and craniofacial surgeons. The preparation of 3D reconstructions required only a few hours and was performed mostly by a research assistant. The preoperative analysis of the 3D reconstructions was found to be a valuable tool, providing information complementing the surgeon's understanding of a case as derived from conventional imaging. The interactive manipulation of data proved to be a powerful way to evaluate alternative surgical approaches

  11. Cirurgia da hipófise por via trans-esfenoidal sob controle radiofluoroscópico e microdissecção novo tratamento da retinopatia diabética, tumores selares e neoplasias endocrinodependentes The surgery of the pituitary gland using a transphenoidal approach under radiofluoroscopic control and microdisection: a new treatment for diabetic retinopathy, pituitary tumors and endocrinodependent growths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jules Hardy

    1968-03-01

    Full Text Available É apresentada nova técnica para a ablação total ou seletiva da hipófise utilizando via de acesso trans-esfenoidal, controle radiofluoroscópico e microdissecção, com traumatismo desprezível às estruturas circunvizinhas. Os autores comentam as aplicações do método à prática neurocirúrgica, relatando parte de uma série de mais 140 casos já operados. São discutidos os resultados obtidos no tratamento de 17 casos de retinopatia diabética, em 11 dos quais apenas o lobo anterior da hipófise foi removido, assim como aqueles obtidos na exérese de 20 casos de tumores selares. As indicações da hipofisectomia por via trans-esfenoidal no controle da sintomatologia das neoplasias endòcrinodependentes é estudada à luz dos resultados obtidos em 17 casos, sendo os resultados comparados com casos nos quais foi feita a implantação selar de ítrio90. As complicações operatorias em relação às três entidades nosológicas acima estudadas são também analisadas. Os autores salientam que a técnica descrita constitui, no presente estado das técnicas neurocirúrgicas utilizadas para a produção de uma insuficiência hipofisária duradoura, a intervenção de escolha.A new neurosurgical technique for the partial or total exéresis of the pituitary gland, using a transphenoidal approach under radiofluoroscopic control and microdisection is described. Part of a series of more than 140 cases operated upon by this method is reported. Results obtained in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy in 17 cases, 11 of which had only the pars anterior removed, are discussed. The applications of the transphenoidal route in 20 cases of pituitary fossa tumors are analysed. The indications of this type of operation in the management of endocrinodependent cancer is studied in 17 cases and compared with the results of 36 cases submitted to implant of Yttrium90 in the sella turcica. The operative complications following transphenoidal exéresis of the

  12. Tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisma, H.; Hilgers, J.

    1987-01-01

    Many monoclonal antibodies directed against tumor-associated antigens have been identified, but so far none of these are tumor specific. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have been used for imaging of a wide variety of tumors with success. Radiolabeling of antibody is usually done with iodine isotopes of which 123 I is the best candidate for radioimmunodetection purposes. The labeling of antibodies through chelates makes it possible to use metal radioisotopes like 111 In, which is the best radioisotope for imaging with monoclonal antibodies due to its favorable half-life of 2.5 days. Usually imaging cannot be performed within 24 h after injection, but clearance of antibody can be increased by using F(ab) 2 of Fab. Another approach is to clear non-bound antibody by a second antibody, directed against the first. The detection limit of immunoimaging is about 2 cm, but will be improved by tomography or SPECT. There is still a high false positive and false negative rate, which makes it impossible to use radioimmunodetection as the only technique for diagnosis of tumors. In combination with other detection techniques, tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies can improve diagnosis. 44 refs.; 3 tabs

  13. Mapping In Vivo Tumor Oxygenation within Viable Tumor by 19F-MRI and Multispectral Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhou Shi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying oxygenation in viable tumor remains a major obstacle toward a better understanding of the tumor microenvironment and improving treatment strategies. Current techniques are often complicated by tumor heterogeneity. Herein, a novel in vivo approach that combines 19F magnetic resonance imaging (19F-MRIR1 mapping with diffusionbased multispectral (MS analysis is introduced. This approach restricts the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2 measurements to viable tumor, the tissue of therapeutic interest. The technique exhibited sufficient sensitivity to detect a breathing gas challenge in a xenograft tumor model, and the hypoxic region measured by MS 19F-MRI was strongly correlated with histologic estimates of hypoxia. This approach was then applied to address the effects of antivascular agents on tumor oxygenation, which is a research question that is still under debate. The technique was used to monitor longitudinal pO2 changes in response to an antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (B20.4.1.1 and a selective dual phosphoinositide 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor (GDC-0980. GDC-0980 reduced viable tumor pO2 during a 3-day treatment period, and a significant reduction was also produced by B20.4.1.1. Overall, this method provides an unprecedented view of viable tumor pO2 and contributes to a greater understanding of the effects of antivascular therapies on the tumor's microenvironment.

  14. Posterior Mediastinal Tumors: Outcome of Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Rahman, A.M.; Sedera, M.A.; Mourad, I.A.; Aziz, S.A.; Saber, T.K.H.; Al Sakary, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of posterior mediastinal tumors relative to all tumors of the mediastinum is 23% to 30%. The posterior mediastinum is a potential space along each side of the vertebral column and adjacent proximal portion of the ribs. Primary tumors of posterior mediastinum are usually neurogenic. The aim of this study was to evaluate different surgical approaches used for the resection of posterior mediastinal tumors, and to assess morbidity, mortality and patients survival. Patients and Methods: Between January 200 I and January 2004, 30 patients with posterior mediastinal tumors were included. CT scan of the chest and CT guided biopsy were done for all patients; whereas MRI was done for suspected intraspinal extension. Posterolateral thoracotomy was the approach used in most of the patients. The Akwari approach was used in most of the patients with Dumbbell tumors. Neurogenic tumors constituted 67% of cases, being neuroblastoma in 60%. The non neurogenic tumors included a heterogenous group of rare tumors (n=10). Dumbbell tumors were found in 10 patients. Neuroblastoma was the commonest tumor to cause intraspinal extension (40%). Wide local excision was done in 13 patients; whereas extended resection was done in the remaining 17 patients. The mean intra-operative blood loss was 800cc and the mean hospital stay was 12 days. The size of the resected tumor ranged from 3X4cm to 30X22cm, 80% of tumors were malignant. Morbidity in relation to the procedures developed in 8 patients (atelectasis, meningitis, paraplegia, Horner syndrome and mild wound sepsis in 4, I, I, 1 and I of the patients; respectively). One postoperative mortality, due to meningitis was recorded. The overall survival by the end of three years was 87.7% with a mean survival of 30.4 months. The overall disease free survival was 55.9% with a mean disease free survival of 26.2 months. Posterior mediastinal tumors may reach large size before becoming symptomatic. Complete surgical excision (including

  15. Bronchial carcinoid tumors: A rare malignant tumor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-02-03

    Feb 3, 2015 ... Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice • Sep-Oct 2015 • Vol 18 • Issue 5. Abstract. Bronchial carcinoid tumors (BCTs) are an uncommon group of lung tumors. They commonly affect the young adults and the middle aged, the same age group affected by other more common chronic lung conditions such as ...

  16. Regenerative endodontics--biologically-based treatment for immature permanent teeth: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, A; Kahler, B

    2010-12-01

    A paradigm shift in the treatment of immature, necrotic teeth has occurred with biologically-based principles and regenerative endodontic protocols replacing traditional 'apexification' procedures. Preliminary research suggests that stem and progenitor cells from the pulp and/or periodontium contribute to continued root development when regenerative procedures are followed. A mandibular premolar tooth with a chronic periapical abscess was irrigated with sodium hypochlorite with minimal instrumentation and then dressed with tri-antibiotic paste consisting of ciprofloxacin, metronidazole and amoxicillin. At a subsequent visit a blood clot was evoked in the canal by irritating periapical tissues and the canal sealed with mineral trioxide aggregate, glass ionomer cement and composite resin. Resolution of apical periodontitis and the draining sinus, continued root maturation and apical closure occurred over an 18-month period. The tooth became responsive to pulp sensibility testing. It is important that dentists recognize the potential of regenerative endodontics in the treatment of necrotic, immature teeth. Initial management should involve irrigation with sodium hypochlorite only. Intra-canal medicaments, such as calcium hydroxide, are contraindicated as they inhibit further root growth. This report uses a variation of the tri-antibiotic paste currently recommended for regenerative procedures that avoided the discolouration of the crown associated with current protocols. Regenerative endodontics with continued root growth may reduce the risk of fracture and premature tooth loss associated with traditional 'apexification' procedures where the root remains thin and weak. © 2010 Australian Dental Association.

  17. Radiation-induced autologous in situ tumor vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guha, Chandan

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) has been used as a definitive treatment for many solid tumors. While tumoricidal properties of RT are instrumental for standard clinical application, irradiated tumors can potentially serve as a source of tumor antigens in vivo, where dying tumor cells would release tumor antigens and danger signals and serve as autologous in situ tumor vaccines. Using murine tumor models of prostate, metastatic lung cancer and melanoma, we have demonstrated evidence of radiation-enhanced tumor-specific immune response that resulted in improved primary tumor control and reduction in systemic metastasis and cure. We will discuss the immunogenic properties of RT and determine how immunotherapeutic approaches can synergize with RT in boosting immune cells cell function. (author)

  18. Children's Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 Family Donate Volunteer Justin's Hope Fund Children’s Brain Tumor Foundation, A non-profit organization, was founded ... and the long term outlook for children with brain and spinal cord tumors through research, support, education, ...

  19. Metaphyseal giant cell tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, L.F.; Hemais, P.M.P.G.; Aymore, I.L.; Carmo, M.C.R. do; Cunha, M.E.P.R. da; Resende, C.M.C.

    1986-01-01

    Three cases of metaphyseal giant cell tumor are presented. A review of the literature is done, demostrating the lesion is rare and that there are few articles about it. Age incidence and characteristics of the tumor are discussed. (Author) [pt

  20. Testicular germinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fresco, R.

    2010-01-01

    This work is about diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of testicular germinal tumors. The presumed diagnosis is based in the anamnesis, clinical examination, testicular ultrasound and tumor markers. The definitive diagnosis is obtained through the inguinal radical orchidectomy

  1. Tissue engineered tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M; Techy, G B; Ward, B R; Imam, S A; Atkinson, R; Ho, H; Taylor, C R

    2010-08-01

    Many research programs use well-characterized tumor cell lines as tumor models for in vitro studies. Because tumor cells grown as three-dimensional (3-D) structures have been shown to behave more like tumors in vivo than do cells growing in monolayer culture, a growing number of investigators now use tumor cell spheroids as models. Single cell type spheroids, however, do not model the stromal-epithelial interactions that have an important role in controlling tumor growth and development in vivo. We describe here a method for generating, reproducibly, more realistic 3-D tumor models that contain both stromal and malignant epithelial cells with an architecture that closely resembles that of tumor microlesions in vivo. Because they are so tissue-like we refer to them as tumor histoids. They can be generated reproducibly in substantial quantities. The bioreactor developed to generate histoid constructs is described and illustrated. It accommodates disposable culture chambers that have filled volumes of either 10 or 64 ml, each culture yielding on the order of 100 or 600 histoid particles, respectively. Each particle is a few tenths of a millimeter in diameter. Examples of histological sections of tumor histoids representing cancers of breast, prostate, colon, pancreas and urinary bladder are presented. Potential applications of tumor histoids include, but are not limited to, use as surrogate tumors for pre-screening anti-solid tumor pharmaceutical agents, as reference specimens for immunostaining in the surgical pathology laboratory and use in studies of invasive properties of cells or other aspects of tumor development and progression. Histoids containing nonmalignant cells also may have potential as "seeds" in tissue engineering. For drug testing, histoids probably will have to meet certain criteria of size and tumor cell content. Using a COPAS Plus flow cytometer, histoids containing fluorescent tumor cells were analyzed successfully and sorted using such criteria.

  2. Tumor interstitial fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina; Olsen, Charlotta J.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) is a proximal fluid that, in addition to the set of blood soluble phase-borne proteins, holds a subset of aberrantly externalized components, mainly proteins, released by tumor cells and tumor microenvironment through various mechanisms, which include classical...

  3. Comparison of single-injection ultrasound-guided approach versus multilevel landmark-based approach for thoracic paravertebral blockade for breast tumor resection: a retrospective analysis at a tertiary care teaching institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saran JS

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Jagroop Singh Saran,1 Amie L Hoefnagel,1 Kristin A Skinner,2 Changyong Feng,3 Daryl Irving Smith1 1Acute Pain Service, Department of Anesthesiology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, 2Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester Medical Center, 3Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY, USA Background: The role of thoracic paravertebral blockade (TPVB in decreasing opioid requirements in breast cancer surgery is well documented, and there is mounting evidence that this may improve survival and reduce the rate of malignancy recurrence following cancer-related mastectomy. We compared the two techniques currently in use at our institution, the anatomic landmark-guided (ALG multilevel versus an ultrasound-guided (USG single injection, to determine an optimal technique.Methods: We retrospectively reviewed records of patients who received TPVB from January 2013 to December 2014. Perioperative opioid use, post anesthesia care unit (PACU pain scores and length of stay, block performance, and complications were compared between the two groups.Results: We found no statistical difference between the two approaches in the studied outcomes. We did find that the number of times attending physicians in the ALG group took over the blocks from residents was significantly greater than that of the USG group (p=0.006 and more local anesthetic was used in the USG group (p=0.04.Conclusion: This study compared the ALG approach with the USG approach for patients undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer. Based on our observations, an attending physician is more likely to take over an ALG injection, and more local anesthetic is administered during USG single injection. Keywords: thoracic paravertebral block, regional anesthesia, mastectomy, breast cancer 

  4. Targeting Nanomedicine to Brain Tumors: Latest Progress and Achievements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van't Root, Moniek; Lowik, Clemens; Mezzanotte, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Targeting nanomedicine to brain tumors is hampered by the heterogeneity of brain tumors and the blood brain barrier. These represent the main reasons of unsuccessful treatments. Nanomedicine based approaches hold promise for improved brain tissue distribution of drugs and delivery of combination therapies. In this review, we describe the recent advancements and latest achievements in the use of nanocarriers, virus and cell-derived nanoparticles for targeted therapy of brain tumors. We provide successful examples of nanomedicine based approaches for direct targeting of receptors expressed in brain tumor cells or modulation of pathways involved in cell survival as well as approaches for indirect targeting of cells in the tumor stroma and immunotherapies. Although the field is at its infancy, clinical trials involving nanomedicine based approaches for brain tumors are ongoing and many others will start in the near future. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells Increase Tumor Growth Rates and Modify Tumor Physiology: Relevance for Therapeutic Targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagan, Jonathan, E-mail: jdpagan@uams.edu; Przybyla, Beata; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Gupta, Kalpna [Vascular Biology Center and Division of Hematology-Oncology Transplantation, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School, MN 72223 (United States); Griffin, Robert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2013-02-18

    oxygenation and subsequent radiation response of tumors. We surmise that these cells are preferentially stimulated to divide in the tumor microenvironment, thereby inducing the significant increase in tumor growth observed and that the use of injected BOECs could be a viable approach to modulate the tumor microenvironment for therapeutic gain. Conversely, agents or approaches to block their recruitment and integration of BOECs into primary or metastatic lesions may be an effective way to restrain cancer progression before or after other treatments are applied.

  6. Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells Increase Tumor Growth Rates and Modify Tumor Physiology: Relevance for Therapeutic Targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagan, Jonathan; Przybyla, Beata; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat; Gupta, Kalpna; Griffin, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    oxygenation and subsequent radiation response of tumors. We surmise that these cells are preferentially stimulated to divide in the tumor microenvironment, thereby inducing the significant increase in tumor growth observed and that the use of injected BOECs could be a viable approach to modulate the tumor microenvironment for therapeutic gain. Conversely, agents or approaches to block their recruitment and integration of BOECs into primary or metastatic lesions may be an effective way to restrain cancer progression before or after other treatments are applied

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of intraorbital tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Tooru; Fukui, Masashi; Matsushima, Toshio; Fujii, Kiyotaka; Hasuo, Kanehiro

    1991-01-01

    Ten cases of histologically confirmed intraorbital tumors were studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two meningiomas were nearly isointense on the T 1 -weighted image (T 1 WI) and the T 2 -weighted image (T 2 WI) relative on the cerebral cortex. The hemangiopericytoma, lacrimal gland tumor, optic glioma, and encephalocele were hypointense on the T 1 WI. The pseudotumor was hypoisointense on both the T 1 WI and the T 2 WI. The metastatic tumor (prostatic carcinoma) was hyperintense on both the T 1 WI and the T 2 WI. Gd-DTPA MRI was performed in five cases. The anatomical relationships between the tumor and the orbital tissue could be discriminated well by means of the coronal and sagittal views. MRI is thus found to be useful for the preoperative diagnosis of the intraorbital tumor and the selection of the surgical approach. (author)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of intraorbital tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Tooru; Fukui, Masashi; Matsushima, Toshio; Fujii, Kiyotaka; Hasuo, Kanehiro (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1991-12-01

    Ten cases of histologically confirmed intraorbital tumors were studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two meningiomas were nearly isointense on the T[sub 1]-weighted image (T[sub 1]WI) and the T[sub 2]-weighted image (T[sub 2]WI) relative on the cerebral cortex. The hemangiopericytoma, lacrimal gland tumor, optic glioma, and encephalocele were hypointense on the T[sub 1]WI. The pseudotumor was hypoisointense on both the T[sub 1]WI and the T[sub 2]WI. The metastatic tumor (prostatic carcinoma) was hyperintense on both the T[sub 1]WI and the T[sub 2]WI. Gd-DTPA MRI was performed in five cases. The anatomical relationships between the tumor and the orbital tissue could be discriminated well by means of the coronal and sagittal views. MRI is thus found to be useful for the preoperative diagnosis of the intraorbital tumor and the selection of the surgical approach. (author).

  9. PET and endocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigo, P.; Belhocine, T.; Hustinx, R.; Foidart-Willems, J.

    2000-01-01

    The authors review the main indications of PET examination, and specifically of 18 FDG, in the assessment of endocrine tumors: of the thyroid, of the parathyroid, of the adrenal and of the pituitary glands. Neuroendocrine tumors, gastro-entero-pancreatic or carcinoid tumors are also under the scope. Usually, the most differentiated tumors show only poor uptake of the FDG as they have a weak metabolic and proliferative activity. In the assessment of endocrine tumors, FDG-PET should be used only after most specific nuclear examinations been performed. (author)

  10. Tumor penetrating peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambet eTeesalu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC, contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular zip code of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is

  11. Epilepsy and Brain Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-yi Sha

    2009-01-01

    @@ Epidemiology It is estimated 61,414 new cases of primary brain tumors are expected to be diagnosed in 2009 in the U.S. The incidence statistic of 61,414 persons diagnosed per year includes both malignant (22,738) and non-malignant (38,677) brain tumors. (Data from American Brain Tumor Association). During the years 2004-2005, approximately 359,000 people in the United States were living with the diagnosis of a primary brain or central nervous system tumor. Specifically, more than 81,000 persons were living with a malignant tumor, more than 267,000 persons with a benign tumor. For every 100,000 people in the United States, approximately 131 are living following the diagnosis of a brain tumor. This represents a prevalence rate of 130.8 per 100,000 person years[1].

  12. Glycan Markers as Potential Immunological Targets in Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Denong; Wu, Lisa; Liu, Xiaohe

    2017-01-01

    We present here an experimental approach for exploring a new class of tumor biomarkers that are overexpressed by circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and are likely targetable in immunotherapy against tumor metastasis. Using carbohydrate microarrays, anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were scanned against a large panel of carbohydrate antigens to identify potential tumor glycan markers. Subsequently, flow cytometry and fiber-optic array scanning technology (FAST) were applied to determine whether the identified targets are tumor-specific cell-surface markers and are, therefore, likely suitable for targeted immunotherapy. Finally, the tumor glycan-specific antibodies identified were validated using cancer patients' blood samples for their performance in CTC-detection and immunotyping analysis. In this article, identifying breast CTC-specific glycan markers and targeting mAbs serve as examples to illustrate this tumor biomarker discovery strategy.

  13. Selected anti-tumor vaccines merit a place in multimodal tumor therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Eva-Maria; Wunderlich, Roland [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen (Germany); Ebel, Nina [Department of Process Technology and Machinery, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen (Germany); Rubner, Yvonne [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen (Germany); Schlücker, Eberhard [Department of Process Technology and Machinery, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen (Germany); Meyer-Pittroff, Roland [Competence Pool Weihenstephan, Technische Universität München, Freising (Germany); Ott, Oliver J.; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S.; Frey, Benjamin, E-mail: benjamin.frey@uk-erlangen.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-10-09

    Multimodal approaches are nowadays successfully applied in cancer therapy. Primary locally acting therapies such as radiotherapy (RT) and surgery are combined with systemic administration of chemotherapeutics. Nevertheless, the therapy of cancer is still a big challenge in medicine. The treatments often fail to induce long-lasting anti-tumor responses. Tumor recurrences and metastases result. Immunotherapies are therefore ideal adjuncts to standard tumor therapies since they aim to activate the patient's immune system against malignant cells even outside the primary treatment areas (abscopal effects). Especially cancer vaccines may have the potential both to train the immune system against cancer cells and to generate an immunological memory, resulting in long-lasting anti-tumor effects. However, despite promising results in phase I and II studies, most of the concepts finally failed. There are some critical aspects in development and application of cancer vaccines that may decide on their efficiency. The time point and frequency of medication, usage of an adequate immune adjuvant, the vaccine's immunogenic potential, and the tumor burden of the patient are crucial. Whole tumor cell vaccines have advantages compared to peptide-based ones since a variety of tumor antigens (TAs) are present. The master requirements of cell-based, therapeutic tumor vaccines are the complete inactivation of the tumor cells and the increase of their immunogenicity. Since the latter is highly connected with the cell death modality, the inactivation procedure of the tumor cell material may significantly influence the vaccine's efficiency. We therefore also introduce high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) as an innovative inactivation technology for tumor cell-based vaccines and outline that HHP efficiently inactivates tumor cells by enhancing their immunogenicity. Finally studies are presented proving that anti-tumor immune responses can be triggered by combining RT with selected

  14. Mathematical models of tumor growth: translating absorbed dose to tumor control probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sgouros, G.

    1996-01-01

    cell loss due to irradiation, the log-kill model, therefore, predicts that incomplete treatment of a kinetically heterogeneous tumor will yield a more proliferative tumor. The probability of tumor control in such a simulation may be obtained from the nadir in tumor cell number. If the nadir is not sufficiently low to yield a high probability of tumor control, then the tumor will re-grow. Since tumors in each sub-population are assumed lost at the same rate, cells comprising the sub-population with the shortest potential doubling time will re-grow the fastest, yielding a recurrent tumor that is more proliferative. A number of assumptions and simplifications are both implicitly and explicitly made in converting absorbed dose to tumor control probability. The modeling analyses described above must, therefore, be viewed in terms of understanding and evaluating different treatment approaches with the goal of treatment optimization rather than outcome prediction

  15. [Immune system and tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terme, Magali; Tanchot, Corinne

    2017-02-01

    Despite having been much debated, it is now well established that the immune system plays an essential role in the fight against cancer. In this article, we will highlight the implication of the immune system in the control of tumor growth and describe the major components of the immune system involved in the antitumoral immune response. The immune system, while exerting pressure on tumor cells, also will play a pro-tumoral role by sculpting the immunogenicity of tumors cells as they develop. Finally, we will illustrate the numerous mechanisms of immune suppression that take place within the tumoral microenvironment which allow tumor cells to escape control from the immune system. The increasingly precise knowledge of the brakes to an effective antitumor immune response allows the development of immunotherapy strategies more and more innovating and promising of hope. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Imaging of pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Juchems, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma is the most frequent solid tumor of the pancreas. This tumor has distinct features including early obstruction of the pancreatic duct, diminished enhancement after administration of contrast material due to desmoplastic growth, high propensity to infiltrate adjacent structures and to metastasize into the liver and the peritoneum. Hormone active endocrine tumors cause specific clinical symptoms. Imaging is aimed at localization of these hypervascular tumors. Non hormone active tumors are most frequently malignant and demonstrate very varying features. Cystic pancreatic tumors are increasingly detected by means of cross sectional imaging. Exact classification can be achieved with knowledge of the macropathology and considering clinical presentation as well as age and gender of the patients. (orig.)

  17. Morphogenesis and Complexity of the Tumor Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    A mechanism to describe the apoptosis process at mesoscopic level through p53 is proposed in this paper. A deterministic model given by three differential equations is deduced from the mesoscopic approach, which exhibits sustained oscillations caused by a supercritical Andronov-Hopf bifurcation. Taking as hypothesis that the p53 sustained oscillation is the fundamental mechanism for apoptosis regulation; the model predicts that it is necessary a strict control of p53 to stimulated it, which is an important consideration to established new therapy strategy to fight cancer. The mathematical modeling of tumor growth allows us to describe the most important regularities of these systems. A stochastic model, based on the most important processes that take place at the level of individual cells, is proposed to predict the dynamical behavior of the expected radius of the tumor and its fractal dimension. It was found that the tumor has a characteristic fractal dimension, which contains the necessary information to predict the tumor growth until it reaches a stationary state. The mathematical modeling of tumor growth is an approach to explain the complex nature of these systems. A model that describes tumor growth was obtained by using a mesoscopic formalism and fractal dimension. This model theoretically predicts the relation between the morphology of the cell pattern and the mitosis/apoptosis quotient that helps to predict tumor growth from tumoral cells fractal dimension. The relation between the tumor macroscopic morphology and the cell pattern morphology is also determined. This could explain why the interface fractal dimension decreases with the increase of the cell pattern fractal dimension and consequently with the increase of the mitosis/apoptosis relation. Indexes to characterize tumoral cell proliferation and invasion capacities are proposed and used to predict the growth of different types of tumors. These indexes also show that the proliferation capacity is

  18. Surgery of malignant pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loos, M.; Friess, H.; Kleeff, J.

    2009-01-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common malignant tumor of the pancreas. Despite great efforts in basic and clinical pancreatic cancer research, the prognosis remains poor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Complete surgical resection represents the only curative treatment option and 5-year survival rates of 20-25% can be achieved following curative resection and adjuvant chemotherapy. Although pancreatic surgery is considered one of the most technically demanding and challenging procedures, there has been constant progress in surgical techniques and advances in perioperative care with a modern interdisciplinary approach including anesthesiology, oncology, radiology and nursing. This has reduced morbidity and especially mortality rates in high-volume centers. Among extended resection procedures multivisceral and venous resections are technically feasible and should be considered if a complete tumor resection can be achieved. Multimodal regimens have shown promising results, however, only adjuvant chemotherapy is supported by solid evidence from randomized controlled trials. (orig.) [de

  19. Endoscopic resection of subepithelial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Arthur; Bauder, Markus; Riecken, Bettina; Caca, Karel

    2014-12-16

    Management of subepithelial tumors (SETs) remains challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has improved differential diagnosis of these tumors but a definitive diagnosis on EUS findings alone can be achieved in the minority of cases. Complete endoscopic resection may provide a reasonable approach for tissue acquisition and may also be therapeutic in case of malignant lesions. Small SET restricted to the submucosa can be removed with established basic resection techniques. However, resection of SET arising from deeper layers of the gastrointestinal wall requires advanced endoscopic methods and harbours the risk of perforation. Innovative techniques such as submucosal tunneling and full thickness resection have expanded the frontiers of endoscopic therapy in the past years. This review will give an overview about endoscopic resection techniques of SET with a focus on novel methods.

  20. Central nervous system tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curran, W.J. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Intrinsic tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) pose a particularly challenging problem to practicing oncologists. These tumors rarely metastasize outside the CNS, yet even histologically benign tumors can be life-threatening due to their local invasiveness and strategic location. The surrounding normal tissues of the nervous system is often incapable of full functional regeneration, therefore prohibiting aggressive attempts to use either complete surgical resection or high doses of irradiation. Despite these limitations, notable achievements have recently been recorded in the management of these tumors

  1. Management of CNS tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griem, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    The treatment of tumors of the CNS has undergone a number of changes based on the impact of CT. The use of intraoperative US for the establishment of tumor location and tumor histology is demonstrated. MR imaging also is beginning to make an impact on the diagnosis and treatment of tumors of the CNS. Examples of MR images are shown. The authors then discuss the important aspects of tumor histology as it affects management and newer concepts in surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy on tumor treatment. The role of intraoperative placement of radioactive sources, the utilization of heavy particle radiation therapy, and the potential role of other experimental radiation therapy techniques are discussed. The role of hyperfractionated radiation and of neutrons and x-ray in a mixed-beam treatment are discussed in perspective with standard radiation therapy. Current chemotherapy techniques, including intraarterial chemotherapy, are discussed. The complications of radiation therapy alone and in combination with chemotherapy in the management of primary brain tumors, brain metastases, and leukemia are reviewed. A summary of the current management of pituitary tumors, including secreting pituitary adenomas and chromophobe adenomas, are discussed. The treatment with heavy particle radiation, transsphenoidal microsurgical removal, and combined radiotherapeutic and surgical management are considered. Tumor metastasis management of lesions of the brain and spinal cord are considered

  2. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Chapman, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Rao, Aarti [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Davis, CA (United States); Shen, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Quinlan-Davidson, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, McMaster University, Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Filion, Edith J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Departement de Medecine, Service de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios [Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Whyte, Richard I. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Division of General Thoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); and others

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18-25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume {>=}12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED {>=}100 Gy (total dose, 50-60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  3. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy; Chapman, Christopher; Rao, Aarti; Shen, John; Quinlan-Davidson, Sean; Filion, Edith J.; Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Whyte, Richard I.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18–25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume ≥12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED ≥100 Gy (total dose, 50–60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  4. Tumor carcinoide apendicular Appendiceal carcinoid tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Vázquez Palanco

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue dar a conocer un interesante caso de tumor carcinoide que se presentó con cuadro clínico de apendicitis aguda. El paciente fue un varón de 8 años de edad, al cual se realizó apendicectomía a causa de una apendicitis aguda. El resultado anatomopatológico confirmó un tumor de células endocrinas (argentafinoma, tumor carcinoide en el tercio distal del órgano, que infiltraba hasta la serosa, y apendicitis aguda supurada. El paciente fue enviado a un servicio de oncohematología para tratamiento oncoespecífico. Por lo inusual de estos tumores en edades tempranas y por lo que puede representar para el niño una conducta no consecuente, decidimos presentar este caso a la comunidad científica nacional e internacional. Es extremadamente importante el seguimiento de los pacientes con apendicitis aguda y de las conclusiones del examen histológico, por lo que puede representar para el niño una conducta inadecuada en una situación como esta.The objective of this paper was to make known an interesting case of carcinoid tumor that presented a clinical picture of acute appendicitis.The patient was an eight-year-old boy that underwent appendectomy due to an acute appendicitis. The anatomopathological report confirmed an endocrine cell tumor (argentaffinoma, carcinoid tumor in the distal third of the organ that infiltrated up to the serosa, and acute suppurative appendicitis. The patient was referred to an oncohematology service for oncospecific treatment. As it is a rare tumor at early ages, and taking into account what a inconsequent behavior may represent for the child, it was decided to present this case to the national and international scientific community. The follow-up of the patients with acute appendicitis and of the conclusions of the histological examination is extremely important considering what an inadequate conduct may represent for the child in a situation like this.

  5. An exceptional collision tumor: gastric calcified stromal tumor and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The authors report an exceptional case of collision tumor comprised of a gastric calcified stromal tumor and a pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The pancreatic tumor was detected fortuitously on the histological exam of resection specimen. Key words: Collision tumor, stromal tumor, adenocarcinoma ...

  6. Pituitary gland tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesser, J.; Schlamp, K.; Bendszus, M.

    2014-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the most common tumors of the pituitary gland and the differential diagnostics with special emphasis on radiological diagnostic criteria. A selective search of the literature in PubMed was carried out. Pituitary adenomas constitute 10-15 % of all intracranial tumors and are the most common tumors of the sellar region. Tumors smaller than 1 cm in diameter are called microadenomas while those larger than 1 cm in diameter are called macroadenomas. Approximately 65 % of pituitary gland adenomas secrete hormones whereby approximately 50 % secrete prolactin, 10 % secrete growth hormone (somatotropin) and 6 % secrete corticotropin. Other tumors located in the sella turcica can also cause endocrinological symptoms, such as an oversecretion of pituitary hormone or pituitary insufficiency by impinging on the pituitary gland or its stalk. When tumors spread into the space cranial to the sella turcica, they can impinge on the optic chiasm and cause visual disorders. A common differential diagnosis of a sellar tumor is a craniopharyngeoma. In children up to 10 % of all intracranial tumors are craniopharyngeomas. Other differential diagnoses for sellar tumors are metastases, meningiomas, epidermoids and in rare cases astrocytomas, germinomas or Rathke cleft cysts As these tumors are located in an anatomically complex region of the skull base and are often very small, a highly focused imaging protocol is required. The currently favored modality is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the administration of a contrast agent. The sellar region should be mapped in thin slices. In cases of suspected microadenoma the imaging protocol should also contain a sequence with dynamic contrast administration in order to assess the specific enhancement characteristics of the tumor and the pituitary gland. (orig.) [de

  7. [Pituitary gland tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesser, J; Schlamp, K; Bendszus, M

    2014-10-01

    This article gives an overview of the most common tumors of the pituitary gland and the differential diagnostics with special emphasis on radiological diagnostic criteria. A selective search of the literature in PubMed was carried out. Pituitary adenomas constitute 10-15% of all intracranial tumors and are the most common tumors of the sellar region. Tumors smaller than 1 cm in diameter are called microadenomas while those larger than 1 cm in diameter are called macroadenomas. Approximately 65% of pituitary gland adenomas secrete hormones whereby approximately 50% secrete prolactin, 10% secrete growth hormone (somatotropin) and 6% secrete corticotropin. Other tumors located in the sella turcica can also cause endocrinological symptoms, such as an oversecretion of pituitary hormone or pituitary insufficiency by impinging on the pituitary gland or its stalk. When tumors spread into the space cranial to the sella turcica, they can impinge on the optic chiasm and cause visual disorders. A common differential diagnosis of a sellar tumor is a craniopharyngeoma. In children up to 10% of all intracranial tumors are craniopharyngeomas. Other differential diagnoses for sellar tumors are metastases, meningiomas, epidermoids and in rare cases astrocytomas, germinomas or Rathke cleft cysts As these tumors are located in an anatomically complex region of the skull base and are often very small, a highly focused imaging protocol is required. The currently favored modality is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the administration of a contrast agent. The sellar region should be mapped in thin slices. In cases of suspected microadenoma the imaging protocol should also contain a sequence with dynamic contrast administration in order to assess the specific enhancement characteristics of the tumor and the pituitary gland.

  8. Robotic partial nephrectomy for complex renal tumors: surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Craig G; Singh, Amar; Blatt, Adam M; Linehan, W Marston; Pinto, Peter A

    2008-03-01

    Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy requires advanced training to accomplish tumor resection and renal reconstruction while minimizing warm ischemia times. Complex renal tumors add an additional challenge to a minimally invasive approach to nephron-sparing surgery. We describe our technique, illustrated with video, of robotic partial nephrectomy for complex renal tumors, including hilar, endophytic, and multiple tumors. Robotic assistance was used to resect 14 tumors in eight patients (mean age: 50.3 yr; range: 30-68 yr). Three patients had hereditary kidney cancer. All patients had complex tumor features, including hilar tumors (n=5), endophytic tumors (n=4), and/or multiple tumors (n=3). Robotic partial nephrectomy procedures were performed successfully without complications. Hilar clamping was used with a mean warm ischemia time of 31 min (range: 24-45 min). Mean blood loss was 230 ml (range: 100-450 ml). Histopathology confirmed clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (n=3), hybrid oncocytic tumor (n=2), chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (n=2), and oncocytoma (n=1). All patients had negative surgical margins. Mean index tumor size was 3.6 cm (range: 2.6-6.4 cm). Mean hospital stay was 2.6 d. At 3-mo follow-up, no patients experienced a statistically significant change in serum creatinine or estimated glomerular filtration rate and there was no evidence of tumor recurrence. Robotic partial nephrectomy is safe and feasible for select patients with complex renal tumors, including hilar, endophytic, and multiple tumors. Robotic assistance may facilitate a minimally invasive, nephron-sparing approach for select patients with complex renal tumors who might otherwise require open surgery or total nephrectomy.

  9. Ewing tumors in infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Henk; Dirksen, Uta; Ranft, Andreas; Jürgens, Heribert

    2008-01-01

    Malignancies in infancy are extremely rare. Ewing tumors are hardly ever noted in these children. Since it is generally assumed that malignancies in infancy have an extremely poor outcome, we wanted to investigate whether this was also the case in Ewing tumors. We identified in the Munster data

  10. GASTROENTEROPANCREATIC NEUROENDOCRINE TUMORS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pavel M.E., Baum U., Hahn E.G., Hensen J. Doxorubucin and streptozocin after failed biotherapy of Neuroendocrine tumors. Int J. Gastrointest Cancer 2005; 35 179-185. 33. Yao J.C., Phan A., Hoff P.M., et al. Targeting vas- cular endothelial growth factor in advanced carci- noid tumors: a random assignment phase II study.

  11. Atypically localized glomus tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meric Ugurlar

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: When a painful mass is found in the body, glomus tumors should be kept in mind. The consideration of symptoms, including pain, temperature sensitivity, point tenderness, and discoloration, common characteristics of glomus tumors, may aid diagnosis. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(3.000: 112-117

  12. Renal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heerwagen, S T; Jensen, C; Bagi, P

    2007-01-01

    Renal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare soft-tissue tumor of controversial etiology with a potential for local recurrence after incomplete surgical resection. The radiological findings in renal IMT are not well described. We report two cases in adults with a renal mass treated...

  13. Pseudoanaplastic tumors of bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Won-Jong [Uijongbu St. Mary Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Gyunggido, 480-821 (Korea); Mirra, Joseph M. [Orthopaedic Hospital, Orthopedic Oncology, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2004-11-01

    To discuss the concept of pseudoanaplastic tumors of bone, which pathologically show hyperchromatism and marked pleomorphism with quite enlarged, pleomorphic nuclei, but with no to extremely rare, typical mitoses, and to propose guidelines for their diagnosis. From a database of 4,262 bone tumors covering from 1971 to 2001, 15 cases of pseudoanaplastic bone tumors (0.35% of total) were retrieved for clinical, radiographic and pathologic review. Postoperative follow-up after surgical treatment was at least 3 years and a maximum of 7 years. There were eight male and seven female patients. Their ages ranged from 10 to 64 years with average of 29.7 years. Pathologic diagnoses of pseudoanaplastic variants of benign bone tumors included: osteoblastoma (4 cases), giant cell tumor (4 cases), chondromyxoid fibroma (3 cases), fibrous dysplasia (2 cases), fibrous cortical defect (1 case) and aneurysmal bone cyst (1 case). Radiography of all cases showed features of a benign bone lesion. Six cases, one case each of osteoblastoma, fibrous dysplasia, aneurysmal bone cyst, chondromyxoid fibroma, giant cell tumor and osteoblastoma, were initially misdiagnosed as osteosarcoma. The remaining cases were referred for a second opinion to rule out sarcoma. Despite the presence of significant cytologic aberrations, none of our cases showed malignant behavior following simple curettage or removal of bony lesions. Our observation justifies the concept of pseudoanaplasia in some benign bone tumors as in benign soft tissue tumors, especially in their late evolutionary stage when bizarre cytologic alterations strongly mimic a sarcoma. (orig.)

  14. Vanishing tumor in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M V Vimal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient with microprolactinoma, who had two successful pregnancies, is described for management issues. First pregnancy was uneventful. During the second pregnancy, the tumor enlarged to macroprolactinoma with headache and blurring of vision which was managed successfully with bromocriptine. Post delivery, complete disappearance of the tumor was documented.

  15. Vanishing tumor in pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimal, M. V.; Budyal, Sweta; Kasliwal, Rajeev; Jagtap, Varsha S.; Lila, Anurag R.; Bandgar, Tushar; Menon, Padmavathy; Shah, Nalini S.

    2012-01-01

    A patient with microprolactinoma, who had two successful pregnancies, is described for management issues. First pregnancy was uneventful. During the second pregnancy, the tumor enlarged to macroprolactinoma with headache and blurring of vision which was managed successfully with bromocriptine. Post delivery, complete disappearance of the tumor was documented. PMID:23226664

  16. Childhood brain tumors: epidemiology, current management and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Ian F; Jakacki, Regina I

    2011-07-26

    Brain tumors are the most common solid tumors in children. With the increasingly widespread availability of MRI, the incidence of childhood brain tumors seemed to rise in the 1980s, but has subsequently remained relatively stable. However, management of brain tumors in children has evolved substantially during this time, reflecting refinements in classification of tumors, delineation of risk groups within histological subsets of tumors, and incorporation of molecular techniques to further define tumor subgroups. Although considerable progress has been made in the outcomes of certain tumors, prognosis in other childhood brain tumor types is poor. Among the tumor groups with more-favorable outcomes, attention has been focused on reducing long-term morbidity without sacrificing survival rates. Studies for high-risk groups have examined the use of intensive therapy or novel, molecularly targeted approaches to improve disease control rates. In addition to reviewing the literature and providing an overview of the complexities in diagnosing childhood brain tumors, we will discuss advances in the treatment and categorization of several tumor types in which progress has been most apparent, as well as those in which improvements have been lacking. The latest insights from molecular correlative studies that hold potential for future refinements in therapy will also be discussed.

  17. Malignant primary germ-cell tumor of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Toyoshiro; Sato, Shinichi; Nakao, Satoshi; Ban, Sadahiko; Namba, Koh

    1983-01-01

    The unusual case of a 15 year old boy with three discrete paraventricular germ-cell tumors is reported.FThe first tumor was located just lateral to the left thalamus and included a massive cystic part around it, the second tumor in the paraventricular region above the head of the left caudate nucleus and the third tumor in the medial part of the left parietal lobe.FTotal removal of all tumors was successfully accomplished in stages at four separate operations, namely, the first tumor was removed through the left transsylvian approach, the second tumor via left superior frontal gyrus and the third tumor via left superior frontal gyrus and left superior parietal lobule.FHistological examination revealed that the first tumor was teratoma, the second was choriocarcinoma and the third was germinoma.FPrimary germ-cell tumors of the brain can be divided into 5 groups: 1) germinoma; 2) embryonal carcinoma; 3) choriocarcinoma; 4) yolk-sac tumor; or 5) teratoma.FIn this case, a combination of three different histological patterns was seen. If malignant germ-cell tumor is supected on CT, aggressive extirpation should be done, not only to determine the exact diagnosis, but also to provide the basis for subsequent adjunctive therapy. (author)

  18. Glial tumors with neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chul-Kee; Phi, Ji Hoon; Park, Sung-Hye

    2015-01-01

    Immunohistochemical studies for neuronal differentiation in glial tumors revealed subsets of tumors having both characteristics of glial and neuronal lineages. Glial tumors with neuronal differentiation can be observed with diverse phenotypes and histologic grades. The rosette-forming glioneuronal tumor of the fourth ventricle and papillary glioneuronal tumor have been newly classified as distinct disease entities. There are other candidates for classification, such as the glioneuronal tumor without pseudopapillary architecture, glioneuronal tumor with neuropil-like islands, and the malignant glioneuronal tumor. The clinical significance of these previously unclassified tumors should be confirmed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Tumors of the central nervous system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegría-Loyola, Marco Antonio; Galnares-Olalde, Javier Andrés; Mercado, Moisés

    2017-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) tumors constitute a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that share a considerable morbidity and mortality rate. Recent advances in the underlying oncogenic mechanisms of these tumors have led to new classification systems, which, in turn, allow for a better diagnostic approach and therapeutic planning. Most of these neoplasms occur sporadically and several risk factors have been found to be associated with their development, such as exposure to ionizing radiation or electromagnetic fields and the concomitant presence of conditions like diabetes, hypertension and Parkinson's disease. A relatively minor proportion of primary CNS tumors occur in the context of hereditary syndromes. The purpose of this review is to analyze the etiopathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and therapy of CNS tumors with particular emphasis in the putative risk factors mentioned above.

  20. Ewing's sarcoma, a rare but dangerous tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theophilus Maksha Dabkana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ewing's sarcoma or Ewing tumor is a rare primary bone tumor that affects mainly children and adolescents. It belongs to a group of cancers known collectively as Ewing sarcoma family tumors or Ewing family tumors. By the time, the patients present and diagnosis is made, the disease is usually advanced. We reviewed the case files of two patients managed in our hospital within one (2013. Fine-needle aspirations for cytology (FNAC and tissue biopsy were used for diagnosis in the two patients we had. The two patients, both males aged 20 years and 38 years presented late and FNAC and tissue biopsy revealed Ewing's sarcoma. They were referred for radio- and chemotherapy. However, due to poor socioeconomic status, they died of their primary disease. Unless diagnosed early, and in the absence of a multidisciplinary approach, Ewing's sarcoma is a fatal disease.

  1. Tumorous interstitial lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinkel, E.; Meyer, E.; Mundinger, A.; Helwig, A.; Blum, U.; Wuertemberger, G.

    1990-01-01

    The radiological findings in pulmonary lymphangitic carcinomatosis and in leukemic pulmonary infiltrates mirror the tumor-dependent monomorphic interstitial pathology of lung parenchyma. It is a proven fact that pulmonary lymphangitic carcinomatosis is caused by hematogenous tumor embolization to the lungs; pathogenesis by contiguous lymphangitic spread is the exception. High-resolution CT performed as a supplement to the radiological work-up improves the sensitivity for pulmonary infiltrates in general and thus makes the differential diagnosis decided easier. Radiological criteria cannot discriminate the different forms of leukemia. Plain chest X-ray allows the diagnosis of pulmonary involvement in leukemia due to tumorous infiltrates and of tumor- or therapy-induced complications. It is essential that the radiological findings be interpreted with reference to the stage of tumor disease and the clinical parameters to make the radiological differential diagnosis of opportunistic infections more reliable. (orig.) [de

  2. Tumors of peripheral nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Michael; Lutz, Amelie M.

    2017-01-01

    Differentiation between malignant and benign tumors of peripheral nerves in the early stages is challenging; however, due to the unfavorable prognosis of malignant tumors early identification is required. To show the possibilities for detection, differential diagnosis and clinical management of peripheral nerve tumors by imaging appearance in magnetic resonance (MR) neurography. Review of current literature available in PubMed and MEDLINE, supplemented by the authors' own observations in clinical practice. Although not pathognomonic, several imaging features have been reported for a differentiation between distinct peripheral nerve tumors. The use of MR neurography enables detection and initial differential diagnosis in tumors of peripheral nerves. Furthermore, it plays an important role in clinical follow-up, targeted biopsy and surgical planning. (orig.) [de

  3. Wilm's tumor in adulthood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveev, B.P.; Bukharkin, B.V.; Gotsadze, D.T.

    1984-01-01

    Wilms' tumor occurs extremely rarely in adults. There is no consensus in the literature on the problems of clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of the diseasa. Ten adult patients (aged 16-29) with Wilms' tumor formed the study group. They made up 0.9 per cent of the total number of kidney tumor patients. The peculiarities of the clinical course that distinguish adult nephroblastoma from renal cancer and Wilms' tumor of the infancy were analysed. The latent period appeared to be long. Problems of diagnosis are discussed. Angiography proved to be of the highest diagnostic value. Complex treatment including transperitoneal nephrectory, radiation and chemotherapy was carried out in 7 cases, palliative radiation treatmenchemotherapy andn 3. Unlike pediatric nephroblastomt - i Wilms' tumor in adults was resistant to radiation. Treatment results still remained unsatisfactory: 6 patients died 7-19 months after the beginning of treatment

  4. SEMIAUTOMATIC DETECTION OF TUMORAL ZONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezzeddine Zagrouba

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a robust method based on the cooperation of fuzzy classification and regions segmentation algorithms, in order to detect the tumoral zone in the brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI. On one hand, the classification in fuzzy sets is done by the Fuzzy C-Means algorithm (FCM, where a study of its different parameters and its complexity has been previously realised, which led us to improve it. On the other hand, the segmentation in regions is obtained by an hierarchical method through adaptive thresholding. Then, an operator expert selects a germ in the tumoral zone, and the class containing the sick zone is localised in return for the FCM algorithm. Finally, the superposition of the two partitions of the image will determine the sick zone. The originality of our approach is the parallel exploitation of different types of information in the image by the cooperation of two complementary approaches. This allows us to carry out a pertinent approach for the detection of sick zone in MRI images.

  5. Therapeutic Implications from Sensitivity Analysis of Tumor Angiogenesis Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleszczuk, Jan; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Enderling, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic cancer treatments induce tumor starvation and regression by targeting the tumor vasculature that delivers oxygen and nutrients. Mathematical models prove valuable tools to study the proof-of-concept, efficacy and underlying mechanisms of such treatment approaches. The effects of parameter value uncertainties for two models of tumor development under angiogenic signaling and anti-angiogenic treatment are studied. Data fitting is performed to compare predictions of both models and to obtain nominal parameter values for sensitivity analysis. Sensitivity analysis reveals that the success of different cancer treatments depends on tumor size and tumor intrinsic parameters. In particular, we show that tumors with ample vascular support can be successfully targeted with conventional cytotoxic treatments. On the other hand, tumors with curtailed vascular support are not limited by their growth rate and therefore interruption of neovascularization emerges as the most promising treatment target. PMID:25785600

  6. Endocrine Tumors Causing Arterial Hypertension: Pathophysiological Mechanisms and Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonacera, Agata; Stancanelli, Benedetta; Malatino, Lorenzo

    2017-09-01

    Some tumors are a relatively rare and amendable cause of hypertension, often associated with a higher cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, as compared with that of both general population and patients with essential hypertension. This worse prognosis is not entirely related to blood pressure increase, because the release of substances from the tumor can directly influence blood pressure behavior. Diagnostic approach is challenging and needs a deep knowledge of the different neuro-hormonal and genetic mechanisms determining blood pressure increase. Surgical tumor removal can, but not always, cause blood pressure normalization, depending on how early was tumor detection, since a long-standing history of hypertension is often associated with a much weaker effect on blood pressure. Moreover, target organ damage can be affected by the substances themselves released by the tumors as well as by tumor removal. In this review we consider the phenotype and genetic features of patients with tumor-induced hypertension and focus on their diagnostic work-up.

  7. Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonelli, Francesco; Giudici, Francesco; Giusti, Francesca; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2012-01-01

    We reviewed the literature about entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 syndrome (MEN1) to clarify their demographic features, localization imaging, practice, and appropriate therapeutical strategies, analyzing the current approach to entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in MEN1. Despite the fact that hyperparathyroidism is usually the first manifestation of MEN1, the penetrance of these tumors is similar. They are characterized by multiplicity of lesions, variable expression of the tumors, and propensity for malignant degeneration. Both the histological type and the size of MEN1 neuroendocrine tumors correlate with malignancy. Monitoring of pancreatic peptides and use of imaging exams allow early diagnosis and prompt surgical treatment, resulting in prevention of metastatic disease and improvement of long-term survival. Surgery is often the treatment of choice for MEN1-neuroendocrine tumors. The rationale for surgical approach is to curtail malignant progression of the disease, and to cure the associated biochemical syndrome, should it be present

  8. Tumor control probability after a radiation of animal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urano, Muneyasu; Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko; Nesumi, Naofumi

    1975-01-01

    Tumor control and regrowth probability of animal tumors irradiated with a single x-ray dose were determined, using a spontaneous C3H mouse mammary carcinoma. Cellular radiation sensitivity of tumor cells and tumor control probability of the tumor were examined by the TD 50 and TCD 50 assays respectively. Tumor growth kinetics were measured by counting the percentage of labelled mitosis and by measuring the growth curve. A mathematical analysis of tumor control probability was made from these results. A formula proposed, accounted for cell population kinetics or division probability model, cell sensitivity to radiation and number of tumor cells. (auth.)

  9. The Tumor Macroenvironment: Cancer-Promoting Networks Beyond Tumor Beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, Melanie R; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R

    2015-01-01

    During tumor progression, alterations within the systemic tumor environment, or macroenvironment, result in the promotion of tumor growth, tumor invasion to distal organs, and eventual metastatic disease. Distally produced hormones, commensal microbiota residing within mucosal surfaces, myeloid cells and even the bone marrow impact the systemic immune system, tumor growth, and metastatic spread. Understanding the reciprocal interactions between the cells and soluble factors within the macroenvironment and the primary tumor will enable the design of specific therapies that have the potential to prevent dissemination and metastatic spread. This chapter will summarize recent findings detailing how the primary tumor and systemic tumor macroenvironment coordinate malignant progression. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Localization of liver tumors in freehand 3D laparoscopic ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, O.; Martens, V.; Besirevic, A.; Kleemann, M.; Schlaefer, A.

    2012-02-01

    The aim of minimally invasive laparoscopic liver interventions is to completely resect or ablate tumors while minimizing the trauma caused by the operation. However, restrictions such as limited field of view and reduced depth perception can hinder the surgeon's capabilities to precisely localize the tumor. Typically, preoperative data is acquired to find the tumor(s) and plan the surgery. Nevertheless, determining the precise position of the tumor is required, not only before but also during the operation. The standard use of ultrasound in hepatic surgery is to explore the liver and identify tumors. Meanwhile, the surgeon mentally builds a 3D context to localize tumors. This work aims to upgrade the use of ultrasound in laparoscopic liver surgery. We propose an approach to segment and localize tumors intra-operatively in 3D ultrasound. We reconstruct a 3D laparoscopic ultrasound volume containing a tumor. The 3D image is then preprocessed and semi-automatically segmented using a level set algorithm. During the surgery, for each subsequent reconstructed volume, a fast update of the tumor position is accomplished via registration using the previously segmented and localized tumor as a prior knowledge. The approach was tested on a liver phantom with artificial tumors. The tumors were localized in approximately two seconds with a mean error of less than 0.5 mm. The strengths of this technique are that it can be performed intra-operatively, it helps the surgeon to accurately determine the location, shape and volume of the tumor, and it is repeatable throughout the operation.

  11. Theranostic GO-based nanohybrid for tumor induced imaging and potential combinational tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Si-Yong; Feng, Jun; Rong, Lei; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Chen, Si; Liu, Xiang-Ji; Luo, Guo-Feng; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2014-02-12

    Graphene oxide (GO)-based theranostic nanohybrid is designed for tumor induced imaging and potential combinational tumor therapy. The anti-tumor drug, Doxorubicin (DOX) is chemically conjugated to the poly(ethylenimine)-co-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEI-PEG) grafted GO via a MMP2-cleavable PLGLAG peptide linkage. The therapeutic efficacy of DOX is chemically locked and its intrinsic fluorescence is quenched by GO under normal physiological condition. Once stimulated by the MMP2 enzyme over-expressed in tumor tissues, the resulting peptide cleavage permits the unloading of DOX for tumor therapy and concurrent fluorescence recovery of DOX for in situ tumor cell imaging. Attractively, this PEI-bearing nanohybrid can mediate efficient DNA transfection and shows great potential for combinational drug/gene therapy. This tumor induced imaging and potential combinational therapy will open a window for tumor treatment by offering a unique theranostic approach through merging the diagnostic capability and pathology-responsive therapeutic function. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Tumor targeted delivery of doxorubicin in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A B Madhankumar

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve sheath tumors are benign tumors that have the potential to transform into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs. Interleukin-13 receptor alpha 2 (IL13Rα2 is a cancer associated receptor expressed in glioblastoma and other invasive cancers. We analyzed IL13Rα2 expression in several MPNST cell lines including the STS26T cell line, as well as in several peripheral nerve sheath tumors to utilize the IL13Rα2 receptor as a target for therapy. In our studies, we demonstrated the selective expression of IL13Rα2 in several peripheral nerve sheath tumors by immunohistochemistry (IHC and immunoblots. We established a sciatic nerve MPNST mouse model in NIH III nude mice using a luciferase transfected STS26T MPNST cell line. Similarly, analysis of the mouse sciatic nerves after tumor induction revealed significant expression of IL13Rα2 by IHC when compared to a normal sciatic nerve. IL13 conjugated liposomal doxorubicin was formulated and shown to bind and internalized in the MPNST cell culture model demonstrating cytotoxic effect. Our subsequent in vivo investigation in the STS26T MPNST sciatic nerve tumor model indicated that IL13 conjugated liposomal doxorubicin (IL13LIPDXR was more effective in inhibiting tumor progression compared to unconjugated liposomal doxorubicin (LIPDXR. This further supports that IL13 receptor targeted nanoliposomes is a potential approach for treating MPNSTs.

  13. Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) / Microwave Ablation (MWA) of Lung Tumors ... and Microwave Ablation of Lung Tumors? What are Radiofrequency and Microwave Ablation of Lung Tumors? Radiofrequency ablation, ...

  14. The PCa Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sottnik, Joseph L; Zhang, Jian; Macoska, Jill A; Keller, Evan T

    2011-12-01

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) is a very complex niche that consists of multiple cell types, supportive matrix and soluble factors. Cells in the TME consist of both host cells that are present at tumor site at the onset of tumor growth and cells that are recruited in either response to tumor- or host-derived factors. PCa (PCa) thrives on crosstalk between tumor cells and the TME. Crosstalk results in an orchestrated evolution of both the tumor and microenvironment as the tumor progresses. The TME reacts to PCa-produced soluble factors as well as direct interaction with PCa cells. In return, the TME produces soluble factors, structural support and direct contact interactions that influence the establishment and progression of PCa. In this review, we focus on the host side of the equation to provide a foundation for understanding how different aspects of the TME contribute to PCa progression. We discuss immune effector cells, specialized niches, such as the vascular and bone marrow, and several key protein factors that mediate host effects on PCa. This discussion highlights the concept that the TME offers a potentially very fertile target for PCa therapy.

  15. Epilepsy and brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ENGLOT, DARIO J.; CHANG, EDWARD F.; VECHT, CHARLES J.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common in patients with brain tumors, and epilepsy can significantly impact patient quality of life. Therefore, a thorough understanding of rates and predictors of seizures, and the likelihood of seizure freedom after resection, is critical in the treatment of brain tumors. Among all tumor types, seizures are most common with glioneuronal tumors (70–80%), particularly in patients with frontotemporal or insular lesions. Seizures are also common in individuals with glioma, with the highest rates of epilepsy (60–75%) observed in patients with low-grade gliomas located in superficial cortical or insular regions. Approximately 20–50% of patients with meningioma and 20–35% of those with brain metastases also suffer from seizures. After tumor resection, approximately 60–90% are rendered seizure-free, with most favorable seizure outcomes seen in individuals with glioneuronal tumors. Gross total resection, earlier surgical therapy, and a lack of generalized seizures are common predictors of a favorable seizure outcome. With regard to anticonvulsant medication selection, evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of focal epilepsy should be followed, and individual patient factors should also be considered, including patient age, sex, organ dysfunction, comorbidity, or cotherapy. As concomitant chemotherapy commonly forms an essential part of glioma treatment, enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants should be avoided when possible. Seizure freedom is the ultimate goal in the treatment of brain tumor patients with epilepsy, given the adverse effects of seizures on quality of life. PMID:26948360

  16. CNS tumors: postoperative evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayanir, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Imaging assessment of brain tumors following surgery is complex and depends upon several factors, including the location of the tumor, the surgical procedure and the disease process for which it was performed. Depending upon these factors, one or a combination of complementary imaging modalities may be required to demonstrate any clinically relevant situation, to assist the surgeon in deciding if repeat surgery is necessary. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can show the shape, size, signal intensity, and enhancement of a brain tumor. It has been widely used to diagnose and differentiate brain tumors and to assess the surgery outcomes. Longitudinal MRI scans have also been applied for the assessment of treatment and response to surgery. The newly developed MRI techniques, including diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), have the potential to provide the molecular, functional and metabolic information of preoperative and postoperative brain tumors. Postoperative diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging are especially useful in predicting early functional recovery from new deficits after brain tumor surgery.This lecture will stress the principles, applications, and pitfalls of conventional as well as newly developing functional imaging techniques following operation of brain tumors

  17. Tumor cell surface proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, S.J.; Braslawsky, G.R.; Flynn, K.; Foote, L.J.; Friedman, E.; Hotchkiss, J.A.; Huang, A.H.L.; Lankford, P.K.

    1982-01-01

    Cell surface proteins mediate interaction between cells and their environment. Unique tumor cell surface proteins are being identified and quantified in several tumor systems to address the following questions: (i) how do tumor-specific proteins arise during cell transformation; (ii) can these proteins be used as markers of tumor cell distribution in vivo; (iii) can cytotoxic drugs be targeted specifically to tumor cells using antibody; and (iv) can solid state radioimmunoassay of these proteins provide a means to quantify transformation frequencies. A tumor surface protein of 180,000 M/sub r/ (TSP-180) has been identified on cells of several lung carcinomas of BALB/c mice. TSP-180 was not detected on normal lung tissue, embryonic tissue, or other epithelial or sarcoma tumors, but it was found on lung carcinomas of other strains of mice. Considerable amino acid sequence homology exists among TSP-180's from several cell sources, indicating that TSP-180 synthesis is directed by normal cellular genes although it is not expressed in normal cells. The regulation of synthesis of TSP-180 and its relationship to normal cell surface proteins are being studied. Monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to TSP-180 have been developed. The antibodies have been used in immunoaffinity chromatography to isolate TSP-180 from tumor cell sources. This purified tumor antigen was used to immunize rats. Antibody produced by these animals reacted at different sites (epitopes) on the TSP-180 molecule than did the original MoAb. These sera and MoAb from these animals are being used to identify normal cell components related to the TSP-180 molecule

  18. Central nervous system tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavin, P.R.; Fike, J.R.; Hoopes, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) tumors are relatively common in veterinary medicine, with most diagnoses occurring in the canine and feline species. Numerous tumor types from various cells or origins have been identified with the most common tumors being meningiomas and glial cell tumors. Radiation therapy is often used as an aid to control the clinical signs associated with these neoplasms. In general, these tumors have a very low metastatic potential, such that local control offers substantial benefit. Experience in veterinary radiation oncology would indicate that many patients benefit from radiation treatment. Current practice indicates the need for computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging studies. These highly beneficial studies are used for diagnosis, treatment planning, and to monitor treatment response. Improvements in treatment planning and radiation delivered to the tumor, while sparing the normal tissues, should improve local control and decrease potential radiation related problems to the CNS. When possible, multiple fractions of 3 Gy or less should be used. The tolerance dose to the normal tissue with this fractionation schedule is 50 to 55 Gy. The most common and serious complications of radiation for CNS tumors is delayed radiation myelopathy and necrosis. Medical management of the patient during radiation therapy requires careful attention to anesthetic protocols, and medications to reduce intracranial pressure that is often elevated in these patients. Canine brain tumors have served as an experimental model to test numerous new treatments. Increased availability of advanced imaging modalities has spawned increased detection of these neoplasms. Early detection of these tumors with appropriate aggressive therapy should prove beneficial to many patients

  19. Surgery of resectable nonfunctioning neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dralle, Henning; Krohn, Sabine L; Karges, Wolfram; Boehm, Bernhard O; Brauckhoff, Michael; Gimm, Oliver

    2004-12-01

    Nonfunctioning neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors (NFNEPTs) comprise about one-third of pancreatic endocrine tumors. Based on immunohistochemistry, nonfunctioning tumors are difficult to distinguish from functioning ones; therefore the final diagnosis is basically the result of a synopsis of pathology and clinical data. Owing to their incapacity to produce hormone-dependent symptoms, NFNEPTs are detected incidentally or because of uncharacteristic symptoms resulting from local or distant growth. About two-thirds of NFNEPTs are located in the pancreatic head, so jaundice may be a late symptom of this tumor. Modern diagnostic procedures are best applied by a stepwise approach: first endoscopic ultrasonography and computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging followed by somatostatin receptor scintigraphy or positron emission tomography (or both). Due to significant false-positive and false-negative findings, for decision-making the latter should be confirmed by a second imaging modality. Regarding indications for surgery and the surgical approach to the pancreas, three pancreatic manifestations of NFNEPTs can be distinguished: (1) solitary benign non-multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (non-MEN-1); (2) multiple benign MEN-1; and (3) malignant NFNEPTs. Reviewing the literature and including our experience with 18 NFNEPTs (8 benign, 10 malignant) reported here, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) Solitary benign non-MEN-1 NFNEPTs can be removed by enucleation or by pancreas-, spleen-, and duodenum-preserving techniques in most cases. The choice of surgical technique depends on the location and site of the tumor and its anatomic relation to the pancreatic duct. (2) With multiple benign MEN-1 NFNEPTs, because of the characteristics of the underlying disease a preferred, more conservative concept (removal of only macrolesions) competes with a more radical procedure (left pancreatic resection with enucleation of head macrolesions). Further studies are necessary to

  20. Stochastic models for tumoral growth

    OpenAIRE

    Escudero, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    Strong experimental evidence has indicated that tumor growth belongs to the molecular beam epitaxy universality class. This type of growth is characterized by the constraint of cell proliferation to the tumor border, and surface diffusion of cells at the growing edge. Tumor growth is thus conceived as a competition for space between the tumor and the host, and cell diffusion at the tumor border is an optimal strategy adopted for minimizing the pressure and helping tumor development. Two stoch...

  1. Uterine mesenchymal tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil A Sangle

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Uterine mesenchymal tumors are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that can frequently be diagnostically challenging. Differentiation between the benign and malignant counterparts of mesenchymal tumors is significant due to differences in clinical outcome, and the role of the surgical pathologist in making this distinction (especially in the difficult cases cannot be underestimated. Although immunohistochemical stains are supportive toward establishing a final diagnosis, the morphologic features trump all the other ancillary techniques for this group of neoplasms. This review therefore emphasizes the key morphologic features required to diagnose and distinguish uterine mesenchymal tumors from their mimics, with a brief description of the relevant immunohistochemical features.

  2. Macromolecular contrast media. A new approach for characterising breast tumors with MR-mammography; Makromolekulare Kontrastmittel fuer die MR-Mammographie. Ein neuer Ansatz fuer die Charakterisierung von Mammatumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daldrup, H.E. [Contrast Media Lab., Dept. of Radiology, California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States)]|[Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Roberts, T.P.L.; Roberts, H.C. [Contrast Media Lab., Dept. of Radiology, California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States)]|[Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie; Muehler, A. [Contrast Media Lab., Dept. of Radiology, California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States)]|[Berlex Laboratories, Wayne, NJ (United States); Gossmann, A. [Contrast Media Lab., Dept. of Radiology, California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States)]|[Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Wendland, M.; Brasch, R.C. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Rosenau, W. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Pathology

    1997-09-01

    The value of macromolecular contrast agents (MMCM) for the characterization of benign and malignant breast tumors will be demonstrated in this review. Animal studies suggest a high potential of MMCM to increase the specificity of MR-mammography. The concept of tumor differentiation is based on the pathological hyperpermeability of microvessels in malignant tumors. MMCM show a leak into the interstitium of carcinomas, whereas they are confined to the intravascular space in benign tumors. Capabilities and limitations of the MMCM-prototype. Albumin-Gd-DTPA, for breast tumor characterization will be summarized and compared to the standard low molecular weight contrast agent Gd-DTPA. Initial experience with new MMCM, such as Dendrimers, Gd-DTPA-Polylysine and MS-325 will be outlined. The potential of `blood-pool`-iron oxides, such as AMI-227 for the evaluation of tumor microvascular permeabilities will be discussed. (orig.) [Deutsch] Diese Uebersicht stellt den Stellenwert makromolekularer Kontrastmittel (MMKM) fuer die MR-tomographische Charakterisierung von benignen und malignen Mammatumoren dar. Aufgrund experimenteller Studien lassen MMKM eine signifikante Verbesserung der Spezifitaet der dynamischen kontrastmittelunterstuetzten MR-Mammographie erwarten. Das differentialdiagnostische Konzept beruht auf der pathologischen Hyperpermeabilitaet von Kapillaren in Karzinomen, die einen MMKM-Austritt in das Tumorinterstitium bedingt, waehrend die intakten Kapillaren benigner Tumoren nicht permeabel fuer MMKM sind. Diagnostische Moeglichkeiten und Grenzen des MMKM-Prototyps, Albumin-Gd-DTPA (92 kD), werden dargestellt und mit dem niedermolekularen Standard-Kontrastmittel Gd-DTPA (500 D) verglichen. Erste Erfahrungen mit neuen, fuer die klinische Anwendung optimierten MMKM-Praeparaten, wie das Kaskadenpolymer, Gd-DTPA-Polylysine und das MS-325 werden vorgestellt. Das Potential von Blood-pool-Eisenoxidpraeparaten, z.B. AMI-227, fuer die Bestimmung von

  3. Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Neutrophils in Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehong Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Distinct tumor microenvironment forms in each progression step of cancer and has diverse capacities to induce both adverse and beneficial consequences for tumorigenesis. It is now known that immune cells can be activated to favor tumor growth and progression, most probably influenced by the tumor microenvironment. Tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils can exert protumoral functions, enhancing tumor cell invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, and extracellular matrix remodeling, while inhibiting the antitumoral immune surveillance. Considering that neutrophils in inflammatory environments recruit macrophages and that recruited macrophages affect neutrophil functions, there may be various degrees of interaction between tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. Platelets also play an important role in the recruitment and regulation of monocytic and granulocytic cells in the tumor tissues, suggesting that platelet function may be essential for generation of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. In this review, we will explore the biology of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils and their possible interactions in the tumor microenvironment. Special attention will be given to the recruitment and activation of these tumor-associated cells and to the roles they play in maintenance of the tumor microenvironment and progression of tumors.

  4. Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Brain Tumor Diagnosis and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu; Morshed, Ramin; Auffinger, Brenda; Tobias, Alex L.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2013-01-01

    Brain tumors are a diverse group of neoplasms that often carry a poor prognosis for patients. Despite tremendous efforts to develop diagnostic tools and therapeutic avenues, the treatment of brain tumors remains a formidable challenge in the field of neuro-oncology. Physiological barriers including the blood-brain barrier result in insufficient accumulation of therapeutic agents at the site of a tumor, preventing adequate destruction of malignant cells. Furthermore, there is a need for improvements in brain tumor imaging to allow for better characterization and delineation of tumors, visualization of malignant tissue during surgery, and tracking of response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Multifunctional nanoparticles offer the potential to improve upon many of these issues and may lead to breakthroughs in brain tumor management. In this review, we discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic applications of nanoparticles for brain tumors with an emphasis on innovative approaches in tumor targeting, tumor imaging, and therapeutic agent delivery. Clinically feasible nanoparticle administration strategies for brain tumor patients are also examined. Furthermore, we address the barriers towards clinical implementation of multifunctional nanoparticles in the context of brain tumor management. PMID:24060923

  5. A noninvasive multimodal technique to monitor brain tumor vascularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Vishal; Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio; Laug, Walter E.

    2007-09-01

    Determination of tumor oxygenation at the microvascular level will provide important insight into tumor growth, angiogenesis, necrosis and therapeutic response and will facilitate to develop protocols for studying tumor behavior. The non-ionizing near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique has the potential to differentiate lesion and hemoglobin dynamics; however, it has a limited spatial resolution. On the other hand, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has achieved high spatial resolution with excellent tissue discrimination but is more susceptible to limited ability to monitor the hemoglobin dynamics. In the present work, the vascular status and the pathophysiological changes that occur during tumor vascularization are studied in an orthotopic brain tumor model. A noninvasive multimodal approach based on the NIRS technique, namely steady state diffuse optical spectroscopy (SSDOS) along with MRI, is applied for monitoring the concentrations of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin and water within tumor region. The concentrations of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin and water within tumor vasculature are extracted at 15 discrete wavelengths in a spectral window of 675-780 nm. We found a direct correlation between tumor size, intratumoral microvessel density and tumor oxygenation. The relative decrease in tumor oxygenation with growth indicates that though blood vessels infiltrate and proliferate the tumor region, a hypoxic trend is clearly present.

  6. A noninvasive multimodal technique to monitor brain tumor vascularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, Vishal; Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio; Laug, Walter E

    2007-01-01

    Determination of tumor oxygenation at the microvascular level will provide important insight into tumor growth, angiogenesis, necrosis and therapeutic response and will facilitate to develop protocols for studying tumor behavior. The non-ionizing near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique has the potential to differentiate lesion and hemoglobin dynamics; however, it has a limited spatial resolution. On the other hand, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has achieved high spatial resolution with excellent tissue discrimination but is more susceptible to limited ability to monitor the hemoglobin dynamics. In the present work, the vascular status and the pathophysiological changes that occur during tumor vascularization are studied in an orthotopic brain tumor model. A noninvasive multimodal approach based on the NIRS technique, namely steady state diffuse optical spectroscopy (SSDOS) along with MRI, is applied for monitoring the concentrations of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin and water within tumor region. The concentrations of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin and water within tumor vasculature are extracted at 15 discrete wavelengths in a spectral window of 675-780 nm. We found a direct correlation between tumor size, intratumoral microvessel density and tumor oxygenation. The relative decrease in tumor oxygenation with growth indicates that though blood vessels infiltrate and proliferate the tumor region, a hypoxic trend is clearly present

  7. Reduction-sensitive nanogels for tumor vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, D.

    2016-01-01

    An attractive approach to induce a strong immune response against a certain tumor antigen is targeting it to DCs with a nano-sized carrier that keeps the antigen encapsulated or associated with the particles until the carriers are internalized by DCs. Given the superior properties of nanogels as

  8. Benign Liver Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now Benign Liver Tumors Back ...

  9. Overview of Heart Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors By Siddique A. Abbasi, MD, MSc, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University; Attending Cardiologist, Director of Heart Failure, and Director of Cardiac MRI, Providence VA Medical ...

  10. Renal tumors in infancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucaya, J.; Garcia, P.

    1997-01-01

    The classification of childhood renal masses in updated, including the clinical signs and imaging techniques currently employed to confirm their presence and type them. Several bening and malignant childhood tumors are described in substantial detail. (Author) 24 refs

  11. Radioimmunoassays for tumor diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dressler, J.

    1983-01-01

    Aside from imaging techniques several (radio-)immunological analyses are used for tumor diagnosis. Oncofetal antigens, for instance the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), have become the most important substances for many malignancies. However, nearly all of the so-called tumor markers are not suitable for early diagnosis or screening either because of low sensitivity or low tumor specifity. On the other hand follow-up measurements give a very sensitive index of the success of treatment and may indicate tumor progression when other signs are still not present. In some carcinomas and under some clinical circumstances tumorspecific markers are available and mandatory for detection and/or staging: AFP in hepatoma, acid phosphatase in metastasizing carcinoma of the prostate and serum thyreoglobulin in differentiated thyroid cancer. (orig.) [de

  12. GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMOR (GIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi eTornillo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are the most frequent mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The discovery that these tumors, formerly thought of smooth muscle origin, are indeed better characterized by specific activating mutation in genes coding for the receptor tyrosine kinases CKIT and PDGFRA and that these mutations are strongly predictive for the response to targeted therapy with receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors has made GISTs the typical example of the integration of basic molecular knowledge in the daily clinical activity. The information on the mutational status of these tumors is essential to predict (and subsequently to plan the therapy. As resistant cases are frequently wild-type, other possible oncogenic events, defining other entities, have been discovered (e.g. succinil dehydrogenase mutation/dysregulation, insuline growth factor expression, mutations in the RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway. The classification of disease must nowadays rely on the integration of the clinico-morphological characteristics with the molecular data.

  13. Allogeneic tumor cell vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivatsan, Sanjay; Patel, Jaina M; Bozeman, Erica N; Imasuen, Imade E; He, Sara; Daniels, Danielle; Selvaraj, Periasamy

    2014-01-01

    The high mortality rate associated with cancer and its resistance to conventional treatments such as radiation and chemotherapy has led to the investigation of a variety of anti-cancer immunotherapies. The development of novel immunotherapies has been bolstered by the discovery of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), through gene sequencing and proteomics. One such immunotherapy employs established allogeneic human cancer cell lines to induce antitumor immunity in patients through TAA presentation. Allogeneic cancer immunotherapies are desirable in a clinical setting due to their ease of production and availability. This review aims to summarize clinical trials of allogeneic tumor immunotherapies in various cancer types. To date, clinical trials have shown limited success due potentially to extensive degrees of inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity found among cancer patients. However, these clinical results provide guidance for the rational design and creation of more effective allogeneic tumor immunotherapies for use as monotherapies or in combination with other therapies. PMID:24064957

  14. Multiple Primary Tumors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-05

    Dec 5, 2017 ... Multiple primary tumors occur in clinical practice causing diagnostic dilemma. It is not very .... was estrogen receptor negative, progesterone receptor negative, and ... cervical, ovarian, and urinary bladder cancers. Multiple.

  15. Pituitary Tumors: Condition Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones. They can press on or damage the pituitary gland and prevent it from secreting adequate levels of hormones. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. (2010). NINDS pituitary tumors information page . ...

  16. Improved outcome of resection of hilar cholangiocarcinoma (Klatskin tumor)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dinant, Sander; Gerhards, Michael F.; Rauws, E. A. J.; Busch, Olivier R. C.; Gouma, Dirk J.; van Gulik, Thomas M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment of hilar cholangiocarcinoma (Klatskin tumors) has changed in many aspects. A more extensive surgical approach, as proposed by Japanese surgeons, has been applied in our center over the last 5 years; it combines hilar resection with partial hepatectomy for most tumors. The aim

  17. Pituitary tumors containing cholecystokinin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, J F; Lindholm, J; Andersen, B N

    1987-01-01

    We found small amounts of cholecystokinin in the normal human adenohypophysis and therefore examined pituitary tumors from 87 patients with acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome, prolactinoma, or inactive pituitary adenomas. Five adenomas associated with Nelson's syndrome contained......'s disease and 7 acromegaly with adenomas containing ACTH. The cholecystokinin peptides from the tumors were smaller and less sulfated than cholecystokinin from normal pituitary glands. We conclude that ACTH-producing pituitary cells may also produce an altered form of cholecystokinin....

  18. Perlecan and tumor angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Xinnong; Couchman, John R

    2003-01-01

    Perlecan is a major heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) of basement membranes (BMs) and connective tissues. The core protein of perlecan is divided into five domains based on sequence homology to other known proteins. Commonly, the N-terminal domain I of mammalian perlecan is substituted with thr...... have unwanted promoting effects on tumor cell proliferation and tumor angiogenesis. Understanding of these attributes at the molecular level may offer opportunities for therapeutic intervention....

  19. Adrenocortical tumors in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C. Ribeiro

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Childhood adrenocortical tumors (ACT are rare. In the USA, only about 25 new cases occur each year. In Southern Brazil, however, approximately 10 times that many cases are diagnosed each year. Most cases occur in the contiguous states of São Paulo and Paraná. The cause of this higher rate has not been identified. Familial genetic predisposition to cancer (p53 mutations and selected genetic syndromes (Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome have been associated with childhood ACT in general but not with the Brazilian counterpart. Most of the affected children are young girls with classic endocrine syndromes (virilizing and/or Cushing. Levels of urinary 17-ketosteroids and plasma dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S, which are abnormal in approximately 90% of the cases, provide the pivotal clue to a diagnosis of ACT. Typical imaging findings of pediatric ACT consist of a large, well-defined suprarenal tumor containing calcifications with a thin capsule and central necrosis or hemorrhage. The pathologic classification of pediatric ACT is troublesome. Even an experienced pathologist can find it difficult to differentiate carcinoma from adenoma. Surgery is the single most important procedure in the successful treatment of ACT. The role of chemotherapy in the management of childhood ACT has not been established although occasional tumors are responsive to mitotane or cisplatin-containing regimens. Because of the heterogeneity and rarity of the disease, prognostic factors have been difficult to establish in pediatric ACT. Patients with incomplete tumor resection or with metastatic disease at diagnosis have a dismal prognosis. In patients with localized and completely resected tumors, the size of the tumor has predictive value. Patients with large tumors have a much higher relapse rate than those with small tumors.

  20. Innovations in the management of Wilms' tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Joseph M; Lorenzo, Armando J; Bowlin, Paul R; Koyle, Martin A

    2014-08-01

    Advances in the management of Wilms' tumor have been dramatic over the past half century, not in small part due to the institution of multimodal therapy and the formation of collaborative study groups. While different opinions exist in the management of Wilms' tumors depending on where one lives and practices, survival rates have surpassed 90% across the board in Western societies. With more children surviving into adulthood, the concerns about morbidity have reached the forefront and now represent as much a consideration as oncologic outcomes these days. Innovations in treatment are on the horizon in the form of potential tumor markers, molecular biological means of testing for chemotherapeutic responsiveness, and advances in the delivery of chemotherapy for recurrent or recalcitrant tumors. Other technological innovations are being applied to childhood renal tumors, such as minimally invasive and nephron-sparing approaches. Risk stratification also allows for children to forego potentially unnecessary treatments and their associated morbidities. Wilms' tumor stands as a great example of the gains that can be made through protocol-driven therapy with strenuous outcomes analyses. These gains continue to spark interest in minimization of morbidity, while avoiding any compromise in oncologic efficacy. While excitement and innovation are important in the advancement of treatment delivery, we must continue to temper this enthusiasm and carefully evaluate options in order to continue to provide the highest standard of care in the management of this now highly curable disease.

  1. Medical Treatment of Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gress

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of the clinically and prognostically heterogeneous neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN should be based on a multidisciplinary approach, including surgical, interventional, medical and nuclear medicine-based therapeutic options. Medical therapies include somatostatin analogues, interferon-a, mTOR inhibitors, multikinase inhibitors and systemic chemotherapy. For the selection of the appropriate medical treatment the hormonal activity, primary tumor localization, tumor grading and growth behaviour as well as the extent of the disease must be considered. Somatostatin analogues are mainly indicated in hormonally active tumors for symptomatic relief, but antiproliferative effects have also been demonstrated, especially in well-differentiated intestinal NET. The efficacy of everolimus and sunitinib in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET has been demonstrated in large placebo-controlled clinical trials. pNETs are also chemosensitive. Streptozocin-based chemotherapeutic regimens are regarded as current standard of care. Temozolomide in combination with capecitabine is an alternative that has shown promising results that need to be confirmed in larger trials. Currently, no comparative studies and no molecular markers are established that predict the response to medical treatment. Therefore the choice of treatment for each pNET patient is based on individual parameters taking into account the patient’s preference, expected side effects and established response criteria such as proliferation rate and tumor load. Platin-based chemotherapy is still the standard treatment for poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas. Clearly, there is an unmet need for new systemic treatment options in patients with extrapancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

  2. A system for tumor heterogeneity evaluation and diagnosis based on tumor markers measured routinely in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Liu; Rixv, Liu; Xiuying, Zhou

    2015-12-01

    To develop an efficient and reliable approach to estimate tumor heterogeneity and improve tumor diagnosis using multiple tumor markers measured routinely in the clinical laboratory. A total of 161 patients with different cancers were recruited as the cancer group, and 91 patients with non-oncological conditions were required as the non-oncological disease group. The control group comprised 90 randomly selected healthy subjects. AFP, CEA, CYFRA, CA125, CA153, CA199, CA724, and NSE levels were measured in all these subjects with a chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay. The tumor marker with the maximum S/CO value (sample test value:cutoff value for discriminating individuals with and without tumors) was considered as a specific tumor marker (STM) for an individual. Tumor heterogeneity index (THI)=N/P (N: number of STMs; P: percentage of individuals with STMs in a certain tumor population) was used to quantify tumor heterogeneity: high THI indicated high tumor heterogeneity. The tumor marker index (TMI), TMI = STM×(number of positive tumor markers+1), was used for diagnosis. The THIs of lung, gastric, and liver cancers were 8.33, 9.63, and 5.2, respectively, while the ROC-areas under the curve for TMI were 0.862, 0.809, and 0.966. In this study, we developed a novel index for tumor heterogeneity based on the expression of various routinely evaluated serum tumor markers. Development of an evaluation system for tumor heterogeneity on the basis of this index could provide an effective diagnostic tool for some cancers. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantifying metabolic heterogeneity in head and neck tumors in real time: 2-DG uptake is highest in hypoxic tumor regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica C Nakajima

    Full Text Available Intratumoral metabolic heterogeneity may increase the likelihood of treatment failure due to the presence of a subset of resistant tumor cells. Using a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC xenograft model and a real-time fluorescence imaging approach, we tested the hypothesis that tumors are metabolically heterogeneous, and that tumor hypoxia alters patterns of glucose uptake within the tumor.Cal33 cells were grown as xenograft tumors (n = 16 in nude mice after identification of this cell line's metabolic response to hypoxia. Tumor uptake of fluorescent markers identifying hypoxia, glucose import, or vascularity was imaged simultaneously using fluorescent molecular tomography. The variability of intratumoral 2-deoxyglucose (IR800-2-DG concentration was used to assess tumor metabolic heterogeneity, which was further investigated using immunohistochemistry for expression of key metabolic enzymes. HNSCC tumors in patients were assessed for intratumoral variability of (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18F-FDG uptake in clinical PET scans.IR800-2-DG uptake in hypoxic regions of Cal33 tumors was 2.04 times higher compared to the whole tumor (p = 0.0001. IR800-2-DG uptake in tumors containing hypoxic regions was more heterogeneous as compared to tumors lacking a hypoxic signal. Immunohistochemistry staining for HIF-1α, carbonic anhydrase 9, and ATP synthase subunit 5β confirmed xenograft metabolic heterogeneity. We detected heterogeneous (18F-FDG uptake within patient HNSCC tumors, and the degree of heterogeneity varied amongst tumors.Hypoxia is associated with increased intratumoral metabolic heterogeneity. (18F-FDG PET scans may be used to stratify patients according to the metabolic heterogeneity within their tumors, which could be an indicator of prognosis.

  4. Neuroendocrine tumors and smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Miličević

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine cells are dispersed around the body and can be found within the gastrointestinal system, lungs, larynx, thymus, thyroid, adrenal, gonads, skin and other tissues. These cells form the so-called ''diffuse neuroendocrine system'' and tumors arising from them are defined as neuroendocrine tumors (NETs. The traditional classification of NETs based on their embryonic origin includes foregut tumors (lung, thymus, stomach, pancreas and duodenum, midgut tumors (beyond the ligament of Treitz of the duodenum to the proximal transverse colon and hindgut tumors (distal colon and rectum. NETs at each site are biologically and clinically distinct from their counterparts at other sites. Symptoms in patients with early disease are often insidious in onset, leading to a delay in diagnosis. The majority of these tumors are thus diagnosed at a stage at which the only curative treatment, radical surgical intervention, is no longer an option. Due to the increasing incidence and mortality, many studies have been conducted in order to identify risk factors for the development of NETs. Still, little is known especially when it comes to preventable risk factors such as smoking. This review will focus on smoking and its contribution to the development of different subtypes of NETs.

  5. Development of an acellular tumor extracellular matrix as a three-dimensional scaffold for tumor engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Dong Lü

    Full Text Available Tumor engineering is defined as the construction of three-dimensional (3D tumors in vitro with tissue engineering approaches. The present 3D scaffolds for tumor engineering have several limitations in terms of structure and function. To get an ideal 3D scaffold for tumor culture, A549 human pulmonary adenocarcinoma cells were implanted into immunodeficient mice to establish xenotransplatation models. Tumors were retrieved at 30-day implantation and sliced into sheets. They were subsequently decellularized by four procedures. Two decellularization methods, Tris-Trypsin-Triton multi-step treatment and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS treatment, achieved complete cellular removal and thus were chosen for evaluation of histological and biochemical properties. Native tumor tissues were used as controls. Human breast cancer MCF-7 cells were cultured onto the two 3D scaffolds for further cell growth and growth factor secretion investigations, with the two-dimensional (2D culture and cells cultured onto the Matrigel scaffolds used as controls. Results showed that Tris-Trypsin-Triton multi-step treated tumor sheets had well-preserved extracellular matrix structures and components. Their porosity was increased but elastic modulus was decreased compared with the native tumor samples. They supported MCF-7 cell repopulation and proliferation, as well as expression of growth factors. When cultured within the Tris-Trypsin-Triton treated scaffold, A549 cells and human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (SW-480 had similar behaviors to MCF-7 cells, but human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells (KYSE-510 had a relatively slow cell repopulation rate. This study provides evidence that Tris-Trypsin-Triton treated acellular tumor extracellular matrices are promising 3D scaffolds with ideal spatial arrangement, biomechanical properties and biocompatibility for improved modeling of 3D tumor microenvironments.

  6. Predicting the efficacy of radiotherapy in individual glioblastoma patients in vivo: a mathematical modeling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockne, R; Alvord, E C Jr; Swanson, K R; Rockhill, J K; Kalet, I; Hendrickson, K; Mrugala, M; Spence, A M; Lai, A; Cloughesy, T

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant form of primary brain tumors known as gliomas. They proliferate and invade extensively and yield short life expectancies despite aggressive treatment. Response to treatment is usually measured in terms of the survival of groups of patients treated similarly, but this statistical approach misses the subgroups that may have responded to or may have been injured by treatment. Such statistics offer scant reassurance to individual patients who have suffered through these treatments. Furthermore, current imaging-based treatment response metrics in individual patients ignore patient-specific differences in tumor growth kinetics, which have been shown to vary widely across patients even within the same histological diagnosis and, unfortunately, these metrics have shown only minimal success in predicting patient outcome. We consider nine newly diagnosed GBM patients receiving diagnostic biopsy followed by standard-of-care external beam radiation therapy (XRT). We present and apply a patient-specific, biologically based mathematical model for glioma growth that quantifies response to XRT in individual patients in vivo. The mathematical model uses net rates of proliferation and migration of malignant tumor cells to characterize the tumor's growth and invasion along with the linear-quadratic model for the response to radiation therapy. Using only routinely available pre-treatment MRIs to inform the patient-specific bio-mathematical model simulations, we find that radiation response in these patients, quantified by both clinical and model-generated measures, could have been predicted prior to treatment with high accuracy. Specifically, we find that the net proliferation rate is correlated with the radiation response parameter (r = 0.89, p = 0.0007), resulting in a predictive relationship that is tested with a leave-one-out cross-validation technique. This relationship predicts the tumor size post-therapy to within inter

  7. THE TUMOR MACROENVIRONMENT: CANCER-PROMOTING NETWORKS BEYOND TUMOR BEDS

    OpenAIRE

    Rutkowski, Melanie R.; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Puchalt, Alfredo Perales; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2015-01-01

    During tumor progression, alterations within the systemic tumor environment, or macroenvironment, result in the promotion of tumor growth, tumor invasion to distal organs, and eventual metastatic disease. Distally produced hormones, commensal microbiota residing within mucosal surfaces, and myeloid cells and even the bone marrow impact the systemic immune system, tumor growth, and metastatic spread. Understanding the reciprocal interactions between the cells and soluble factors within the mac...

  8. Tumor detection using feature extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankar, A.S.; Amudhavalli, N.; Sivakolundu, M.K.

    2008-01-01

    The assistance system for brain tumor detection helps the doctor to analyse the brain tumor in MRI image and help to make decision. The manual detection system takes 3 -5 hours time to analyse the tumor. Doctors are in a position to analyze the tumor faster and make a correct decision with an assistance system

  9. Wilms tumors: genotypes and phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Segers (Heidi)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWilms tumor, or nephroblastoma, represents about 90% of all pediatric renal tumors and about 7% of all pediatric malignancies. Most Wilms tumors are unilateral, although in 5-10 % of the patients both kidneys are infected. Wilms tumor typically occurs between the age of 2 and 4 years,

  10. Selective Killing of Prostate Tumor Cells by Cytocidal Viruses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lyles, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    .... The novelty in our approach is our ability to enhance the selectivity of killing of tumor cells versus normal cells by manipulating the viral genes that control the antiviral interferon response...

  11. Selective Killing of Prostate Tumor Cells by Cytocidal Viruses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lyles, Douglas

    2004-01-01

    .... The novelty in our approach is our ability to enhance the selectivity of killing of tumor cells versus normal cells by manipulating the viral genes that control the antiviral interferon response...

  12. Selective Killing of Prostate Tumor Cells by Cytocidal Viruses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lyles, Douglas S

    2005-01-01

    ...). The novelty in our approach is our ability to enhance the selectivity of VSV-induced killing of tumor cells versus normal cells by manipulating the viral genes that control the antiviral interferon response...

  13. Surgical management of spinal intramedullary tumors: radical and safe strategy for benign tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, Toshihiro; Naito, Kentaro; Yamagata, Toru; Ohata, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Surgery for spinal intramedullary tumors remains one of the major challenges for neurosurgeons, due to their relative infrequency, unknown natural history, and surgical difficulty. We are sure that safe and precise resection of spinal intramedullary tumors, particularly encapsulated benign tumors, can result in acceptable or satisfactory postoperative outcomes. General surgical concepts and strategies, technical consideration, and functional outcomes after surgery are discussed with illustrative cases of spinal intramedullary benign tumors such as ependymoma, cavernous malformation, and hemangioblastoma. Selection of a posterior median sulcus, posterolateral sulcus, or direct transpial approach was determined based on the preoperative imaging diagnosis and careful inspection of the spinal cord surface. Tumor-cord interface was meticulously delineated in cases of benign encapsulated tumors. Our retrospective functional analysis of 24 consecutive cases of spinal intramedullary ependymoma followed for at least 6 months postoperatively demonstrated a mean grade on the modified McCormick functional schema of 1.8 before surgery, deteriorating significantly to 2.6 early after surgery ( 6 months after surgery). The risk of functional deterioration after surgery should be taken into serious consideration. Functional deterioration after surgery, including neuropathic pain even long after surgery, significantly affects patient quality of life. Better balance between tumor control and functional preservation can be achieved not only by the surgical technique or expertise, but also by intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring, vascular image guidance, and postoperative supportive care. Quality of life after surgery should inarguably be given top priority.

  14. Quantum Dots for Molecular Diagnostics of Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdobnova, T.A.; Lebedenko, E.N.; Deyev, S.М.

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are a new class of fluorophores with unique physical and chemical properties, which allow to appreciably expand the possibilities for the current methods of fluorescent imaging and optical diagnostics. Here we discuss the prospects of QD application for molecular diagnostics of tumors ranging from cancer-specific marker detection on microplates to non-invasive tumor imagingin vivo. We also point out the essential problems that require resolution in order to clinically promote QD, and we indicate innovative approaches to oncology which are implementable using QD. PMID:22649672

  15. Pituitary gland tumors; Hypophysentumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesser, J.; Schlamp, K.; Bendszus, M. [Radiologische Klinik, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    This article gives an overview of the most common tumors of the pituitary gland and the differential diagnostics with special emphasis on radiological diagnostic criteria. A selective search of the literature in PubMed was carried out. Pituitary adenomas constitute 10-15 % of all intracranial tumors and are the most common tumors of the sellar region. Tumors smaller than 1 cm in diameter are called microadenomas while those larger than 1 cm in diameter are called macroadenomas. Approximately 65 % of pituitary gland adenomas secrete hormones whereby approximately 50 % secrete prolactin, 10 % secrete growth hormone (somatotropin) and 6 % secrete corticotropin. Other tumors located in the sella turcica can also cause endocrinological symptoms, such as an oversecretion of pituitary hormone or pituitary insufficiency by impinging on the pituitary gland or its stalk. When tumors spread into the space cranial to the sella turcica, they can impinge on the optic chiasm and cause visual disorders. A common differential diagnosis of a sellar tumor is a craniopharyngeoma. In children up to 10 % of all intracranial tumors are craniopharyngeomas. Other differential diagnoses for sellar tumors are metastases, meningiomas, epidermoids and in rare cases astrocytomas, germinomas or Rathke cleft cysts As these tumors are located in an anatomically complex region of the skull base and are often very small, a highly focused imaging protocol is required. The currently favored modality is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the administration of a contrast agent. The sellar region should be mapped in thin slices. In cases of suspected microadenoma the imaging protocol should also contain a sequence with dynamic contrast administration in order to assess the specific enhancement characteristics of the tumor and the pituitary gland. (orig.) [German] Diese Arbeit ist eine Uebersicht ueber die haeufigsten Hypophysentumoren und deren Differenzialdiagnosen mit Augenmerk auf die

  16. Molecular biology based assessment of green tea effects on oxidative stress and cardiac remodelling in dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calo, Lorenzo A; Vertolli, Ugo; Davis, Paul A; Maso, Lucia Dal; Pagnin, Elisa; Ravarotto, Verdiana; Maiolino, Giuseppe; Lupia, Mario; Seccia, Teresa M; Rossi, Gian Paolo

    2014-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease, the most common cause for morbidity and mortality in end-stage renal disease (ESRD), has prompted the exploration of multiple approaches to improve outcomes. Cardiovascular risk factors such as oxidative stress (OxSt) and cardiac remodelling are common in ESRD and dialysis patients. Green tea (GT) is well recognized as reducing OxSt. This 6 months study evaluated in 20 ESRD patients under chronic dialysis, the effect of GT treatment (1 g/day as commercially available capsule) on cellular and plasma OxSt and proliferation related markers using a molecular biology approach. Mononuclear cell p22(phox), Haeme Oxygenase (HO)-1 protein expression, and phosphorylated ERK1/2 status were evaluated in dialysis patients at baseline, after 3 and 6 months of GT treatment by Western blot analysis and plasma oxLDL by ELISA. Cardiac remodelling was assessed by echocardiographic left ventricular (LV) mass determination at baseline and at the end of the study. GT treatment reduced p22(phox) and pERK1/2 from baseline while HO-1 increased. At baseline, LV mass correlated with both p22(phox) and oxLDL. GT treatment decreased LV mass from baseline, which correlated with oxLDL. 9 patients had LV hypertrophy at baseline, which, at 6 months, was normalized in 5 and reduced in 3, showing a parallel decrease of p22(phox), pERK1/2, oxLDL and increase of HO-1. Treatment with GT decreased the expression of OxSt-related proteins tightly associated with cardiovascular disease and decreased LV mass. It appears highly likely that the addition of GT can provide a benefit in terms of cardiovascular protection in dialysis patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  17. Tumor scintigram, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Shunichi; Hasegawa, Yoshihisa; Shimura, Kazuo; Ifuka, Keijiro

    1975-01-01

    In various cases of malignant tumors, especially those of lung cancer and liver cancer, scans were made with 57 Co-bleomycin(BLM), and its diagnostic significance was evaluated. Tumors were visualized with 57 Co-BLM in 22 of the 26 cases of lung cancer (84.6%). Concentrations of the RI were noted in all of the cases of squamous epithelium cancer, adenoid cancer and cellule-type undifferentiated cancer. The smallest tumor that could be detected was a 2 x 2 cm adenoid cancer. Tumors were imaged in 19 of the 27 cases of liver cancer (70.4%). This detection rate was increased by a combination of 57 Co-BLM and 198 Au-colloid scanning. The authors believe that 57 Co-BLM will help to establish the diagnosis of lung cancer or liver cancer. Tumors were also imaged in 6 of the 15 cases of breast cancer, but no distinct concentration was noted in the 7 cases of thyroid cancer. (Ueda, J.)

  18. Parotid hybrid tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bravo C, Gustavo; Seymour M, Camila; Fernandez R, Lara; Villanueva I, Maria Elena; Scott C, Carlos; Celedon L, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Tumors of the salivary glands represent 33%-10% of head and neck neoplasms. The most common location is the parotid gland, accounting for 50%-85% of the cases, with 20%-30% of them being malignant. The following are known to be indicative of a malignant tumor: fast growing, painless mass, associated facial paralysis and lymphadenopathy. Most parotid neoplasm derive from a single histological type but eventually the development of more than one type on the same gland can occur. This paper presents a case of a parotid neoplasm with two different histological tumors, with uncharacteristic clinical presentation. The patient presented initially with ear pain and otorrhoea, in the clinical examination highlighted an external auditory canal tumor. The complementary study revealed a parotid neoplasm and a total resection of the gland was performed. The biopsy revealed an adenoid-cystic carcinoma with differentiated basaloid areas. Adjuvant radio-chemotherapy was administered, and the imaging control with PET-CT showed no evidence of recurrence or dissemination of the tumor

  19. Remodeling of Tumor Stroma and Response to Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Anna; Ganss, Ruth, E-mail: ganss@waimr.uwa.edu.au [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research, Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Perth 6000 (Australia)

    2012-03-27

    Solid tumors are intrinsically resistant to therapy. Cancer progression occurs when tumor cells orchestrate responses from diverse stromal cell types such as blood vessels and their support cells, inflammatory cells, and fibroblasts; these cells collectively form the tumor microenvironment and provide direct support for tumor growth, but also evasion from cytotoxic, immune and radiation therapies. An indirect result of abnormal and leaky blood vessels in solid tumors is high interstitial fluid pressure, which reduces drug penetration, but also creates a hypoxic environment that further augments tumor cell growth and metastatic spread. Importantly however, studies during the last decade have shown that the tumor stroma, including the vasculature, can be modulated, or re-educated, to allow better delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs or enhance the efficiency of active immune therapy. Such remodeling of the tumor stroma using genetic, pharmacological and other therapeutic approaches not only enhances selective access into tumors but also reduces toxic side effects. This review focuses on recent novel concepts to modulate tumor stroma and thus locally increase therapeutic efficacy.

  20. Remodeling of Tumor Stroma and Response to Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Anna; Ganss, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Solid tumors are intrinsically resistant to therapy. Cancer progression occurs when tumor cells orchestrate responses from diverse stromal cell types such as blood vessels and their support cells, inflammatory cells, and fibroblasts; these cells collectively form the tumor microenvironment and provide direct support for tumor growth, but also evasion from cytotoxic, immune and radiation therapies. An indirect result of abnormal and leaky blood vessels in solid tumors is high interstitial fluid pressure, which reduces drug penetration, but also creates a hypoxic environment that further augments tumor cell growth and metastatic spread. Importantly however, studies during the last decade have shown that the tumor stroma, including the vasculature, can be modulated, or re-educated, to allow better delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs or enhance the efficiency of active immune therapy. Such remodeling of the tumor stroma using genetic, pharmacological and other therapeutic approaches not only enhances selective access into tumors but also reduces toxic side effects. This review focuses on recent novel concepts to modulate tumor stroma and thus locally increase therapeutic efficacy

  1. Molecular imaging of tumor blood vessels in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilki, Derya; Seitz, Michael; Singer, Bernhard B; Irmak, Ster; Stief, Christian G; Reich, Oliver; Ergün, Süleyman

    2009-05-01

    In the past three decades many efforts have been undertaken to understand the mechanisms of tumor angiogenesis. The introduction of anti-angiogenic drugs in tumor therapy during the last few years necessitates the establishment of new techniques enabling molecular imaging of tumor vascular remodelling. The determination of tumor size as commonly used is not appropriate since the extended necrosis under anti-angiogenic therapy does not necessarily result in the reduction of tumor diameter. The basis for the molecular imaging of tumor blood vessels is the remodelling of the tumor vessels under anti-angiogenic therapy which obviously occurs at an early stage and seems to be a convincing parameter. Beside the enormous progress in this field during the last few years the resolution is still not high enough to evaluate the remodelling of the micro tumor vessels. New imaging approaches combining specific molecular markers for tumor vessels with the different imaging techniques are needed to overcome this issue as exemplarily discussed for prostate cancer in this review. Molecular contrast agents targeting the vasculature will allow clinicians the visualization of vascular remodelling processes taking place under anti-angiogenic therapy and improve tumor diagnosis and follow-up.

  2. Tumor radiation responses and tumor oxygenation in aging mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockwell, S.

    1989-01-01

    EMT6 mouse mammary tumors transplanted into aging mice are less sensitive to radiation than tumors growing in young adult animals. The experiments reported here compare the radiation dose-response curves defining the survivals of tumor cells in aging mice and in young adult mice. Cell survival curves were assessed in normal air-breathing mice and in mice asphyxiated with N 2 to produce uniform hypoxia throughout the tumors. Analyses of survival curves revealed that 41% of viable malignant cells were severely hypoxic in tumors in aging mice, while only 19% of the tumor cells in young adult animals were radiobiologically hypoxic. This did not appear to reflect anaemia in the old animals. Treatment of aging animals with a perfluorochemical emulsion plus carbogen (95% O 2 /5% CO 2 ) increased radiation response of the tumors, apparently by improving tumor oxygenation and decreasing the number of severely hypoxic, radiation resistant cells in the tumors. (author)

  3. Upper urinary tract tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gandrup, Karen L; Nordling, Jørgen; Balslev, Ingegerd

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Computed tomography urography (CTU) is used widely in the work-up of patients with symptoms of urinary tract lesions. Preoperative knowledge of whether a tumor is invasive or non-invasive is important for the choice of surgery. So far there are no studies about the distinction...... of invasive and non-invasive tumors in ureter and renal pelvis based on the enhancement measured with Hounsfield Units. PURPOSE: To examine the value of CTU using split-bolus technique to distinguish non-invasive from invasive urothelial carcinomas in the upper urinary tract. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients...... obtained at CTU could distinguish between invasive and non-invasive lesions. No patients had a CTU within the last year before the examination that resulted in surgery. CONCLUSION: A split-bolus CTU cannot distinguish between invasive and non-invasive urothelial tumors in the upper urinary tract...

  4. Dysembryoplastic Neuroepithelial Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon-Lim Suh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNT is a benign glioneuronal neoplasm that most commonly occurs in children and young adults and may present with medically intractable, chronic seizures. Radiologically, this tumor is characterized by a cortical topography and lack of mass effect or perilesional edema. Partial complex seizures are the most common presentation. Three histologic subtypes of DNTs have been described. Histologically, the recognition of a unique, specific glioneuronal element in brain tumor samples from patients with medically intractable, chronic epilepsy serves as a diagnostic feature for complex or simple DNT types. However, nonspecific DNT has diagnostic difficulty because its histology is indistinguishable from conventional gliomas and because a specific glioneuronal element and/or multinodularity are absent. This review will focus on the clinical, radiographic, histopathological, and immunohistochemical features as well as the molecular genetics of all three variants of DNTs. The histological and cytological differential diagnoses for this lesion, especially the nonspecific variant, will be discussed.

  5. Mediastinal tumors. Update 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.E.; Thomas, C.R. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    This volume represents the premier work devoted solely to the complex myriad of mediastinal tumors. The contributors to the state-of-the-art text are clinical investigators of international renown. The diagnosis, natural history, and therapeutic strategies in respect of all mediastinal tumors are thoroughly addressed in a concise and logical manner. An emphasis on the multidisciplinary nature of mediastinal tumors is thematic throughout the text. Moreover, the combined-modality treatment schemes that have been increasingly developed worldwide are analyzed. This textbook will prove of value to all general surgeons, thoracic surgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, pulmonologists, and endocrinologists, as well as to nursing and medical students, residents and fellows-in training. (orig.). 55 figs., 21 tabs

  6. State of the Art in Tumor Antigen and Biomarker Discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even-Desrumeaux, Klervi; Baty, Daniel; Chames, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Our knowledge of tumor immunology has resulted in multiple approaches for the treatment of cancer. However, a gap between research of new tumors markers and development of immunotherapy has been established and very few markers exist that can be used for treatment. The challenge is now to discover new targets for active and passive immunotherapy. This review aims at describing recent advances in biomarkers and tumor antigen discovery in terms of antigen nature and localization, and is highlighting the most recent approaches used for their discovery including “omics” technology

  7. Extremely acidic mine lake ecosystems in Lusatia (Germany) : characterisation and development of sustainable, biology-based acidity removal technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fyson, A.; Deneke, R.; Nixdorf, B.; Steinberg, C.E.W.

    2003-01-01

    There are approximately 500 infilled open-cast lignite pits in Germany that are extremely acidic because of high concentrations of dissolved metals, mostly iron and aluminium. The mining lakes have pH values of 2.4 to 3.4 and also have high sulphate concentrations. Efforts are being made to neutralize the lakes for recreational purposes. The acidity can be removed from the lakes in an economical and environmentally sustainable manner by flooding through diversion of neutral, nutrient-rich river water. This paper described the living conditions of the acidic mining lakes in the Lausitz region of Germany and summarized the benefits of the controlled eutrophication approach to enhance natural, self-sustaining processes for acid neutralization. Compared to infilling with river water, eutrophication increases lake productivity and removes acidity through sediment bound and water column biologically-mediated processes. The study involved basic research on particle transport in streams and lakes, pelagic food web interactions and submerged macrophyte metabolism. It also looked at the role of wetlands, bacterial interactions at the water-sediment interface, and modelling. It was shown that the addition of phosphorus and carbon to the water column can enhance primary production. Future studies will examine environmentally acceptable treatment strategies that offer an alternative to chemical treatment. 20 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  8. Comparing 2-nt 3' overhangs against blunt-ended siRNAs: a systems biology based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Preetam; Dullea, Robert; Fischer, James E; Turi, Tom G; Sarver, Ronald W; Zhang, Chaoyang; Basu, Kalyan; Das, Sajal K; Poland, Bradley W

    2009-07-07

    In this study, we formulate a computational reaction model following a chemical kinetic theory approach to predict the binding rate constant for the siRNA-RISC complex formation reaction. The model allowed us to study the potency difference between 2-nt 3' overhangs against blunt-ended siRNA molecules in an RNA interference (RNAi) system. The rate constant predicted by this model was fed into a stochastic simulation of the RNAi system (using the Gillespie stochastic simulator) to study the overall potency effect. We observed that the stochasticity in the transcription/translation machinery has no observable effects in the RNAi pathway. Sustained gene silencing using siRNAs can be achieved only if there is a way to replenish the dsRNA molecules in the cell. Initial findings show about 1.5 times more blunt-ended molecules will be required to keep the mRNA at the same reduced level compared to the 2-nt overhang siRNAs. However, the mRNA levels jump back to saturation after a longer time when blunt-ended siRNAs are used. We found that the siRNA-RISC complex formation reaction rate was 2 times slower when blunt-ended molecules were used pointing to the fact that the presence of the 2-nt overhangs has a greater effect on the reaction in which the bound RISC complex cleaves the mRNA.

  9. Circulating tumor cells: utopia or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conteduca, Vincenza; Zamarchi, Rita; Rossi, Elisabetta; Condelli, Valentina; Troiani, Laura; Aieta, Michele

    2013-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could be considered a sign of tumor aggressiveness, but highly sensitive and specific methods of CTC detection are necessary owing to the rarity and heterogeneity of CTCs in peripheral blood. This review summarizes recent studies on tumor biology, with particular attention to the metastatic cascade, and the molecular characterization and clinical significance of CTCs. Recent technological approaches to enrich and detect these cells and challenges of CTCs for individualized cancer treatment are also discussed. This review also provides an insight into the positive and negative features of the future potential applications of CTC detection, which sometimes remains still a 'utopia', but its actual utility remains among the fastest growing research fields in oncology.

  10. Monoclonal TCR-redirected tumor cell killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddy, Nathaniel; Bossi, Giovanna; Adams, Katherine J; Lissina, Anna; Mahon, Tara M; Hassan, Namir J; Gavarret, Jessie; Bianchi, Frayne C; Pumphrey, Nicholas J; Ladell, Kristin; Gostick, Emma; Sewell, Andrew K; Lissin, Nikolai M; Harwood, Naomi E; Molloy, Peter E; Li, Yi; Cameron, Brian J; Sami, Malkit; Baston, Emma E; Todorov, Penio T; Paston, Samantha J; Dennis, Rebecca E; Harper, Jane V; Dunn, Steve M; Ashfield, Rebecca; Johnson, Andy; McGrath, Yvonne; Plesa, Gabriela; June, Carl H; Kalos, Michael; Price, David A; Vuidepot, Annelise; Williams, Daniel D; Sutton, Deborah H; Jakobsen, Bent K

    2012-06-01

    T cell immunity can potentially eradicate malignant cells and lead to clinical remission in a minority of patients with cancer. In the majority of these individuals, however, there is a failure of the specific T cell receptor (TCR)–mediated immune recognition and activation process. Here we describe the engineering and characterization of new reagents termed immune-mobilizing monoclonal TCRs against cancer (ImmTACs). Four such ImmTACs, each comprising a distinct tumor-associated epitope-specific monoclonal TCR with picomolar affinity fused to a humanized cluster of differentiation 3 (CD3)-specific single-chain antibody fragment (scFv), effectively redirected T cells to kill cancer cells expressing extremely low surface epitope densities. Furthermore, these reagents potently suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Thus, ImmTACs overcome immune tolerance to cancer and represent a new approach to tumor immunotherapy.

  11. Proton MRS imaging in pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarifi, Maria [Aghia Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Athens (Greece); Tzika, A.A. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Shriners Burn Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) techniques offer a noninvasive, non-irradiating yet sensitive approach to diagnosing and monitoring pediatric brain tumors. Proton MR spectroscopy (MRS), as an adjunct to MRI, is being more widely applied to monitor the metabolic aspects of brain cancer. In vivo MRS biomarkers represent a promising advance and may influence treatment choice at both initial diagnosis and follow-up, given the inherent difficulties of sequential biopsies to monitor therapeutic response. When combined with anatomical or other types of imaging, MRS provides unique information regarding biochemistry in inoperable brain tumors and can complement neuropathological data, guide biopsies and enhance insight into therapeutic options. The combination of noninvasively acquired prognostic information and the high-resolution anatomical imaging provided by conventional MRI is expected to surpass molecular analysis and DNA microarray gene profiling, both of which, although promising, depend on invasive biopsy. This review focuses on recent data in the field of MRS in children with brain tumors. (orig.)

  12. Circulating Tumor Cells in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Brian; Rochefort, Holly; Goldkorn, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can provide a non-invasive, repeatable snapshot of an individual patient’s tumor. In prostate cancer, CTC enumeration has been extensively studied and validated as a prognostic tool and has received FDA clearance for use in monitoring advanced disease. More recently, CTC analysis has been shifting from enumeration to more sophisticated molecular characterization of captured cells, which serve as a “liquid biopsy” of the tumor, reflecting molecular changes in an individual’s malignancy over time. Here we will review the main CTC studies in advanced and localized prostate cancer, highlighting the important gains as well as the challenges posed by various approaches, and their implications for advancing prostate cancer management

  13. Tumors of germinal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plazas, Ricardo; Avila, Andres

    2002-01-01

    The tumors of germinal cells (TGC) are derived neoplasia of the primordial germinal cells that in the life embryonic migrant from the primitive central nervous system until being located in the gonads. Their cause is even unknown and they represent 95% of the testicular tumors. In them, the intention of the treatment is always healing and the diagnostic has improved thanks to the results of the handling multidisciplinary. The paper includes topics like their incidence and prevalence, epidemiology and pathology, clinic and diagnoses among other topics

  14. Wilms' tumor: past, present and (possibly) future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreafico, Filippo; Bellani, Franca Fossati

    2006-02-01

    Wilms' tumor is one of the successes of pediatric oncology, with an overall cure rate of over 85%, using relatively simple therapies. This excellent outcome has been the result of collaborative efforts among surgeons, pediatricians, pathologists and radiation oncologists. The results that have been achieved in children with Wilms' tumors support the strong value of the multidisciplinary team approach to cancer. The two largest cooperative groups that have studied the optimum treatment for Wilms' tumor are the National Wilms' Tumor Study group in North America and the International Society of Pediatric Oncology, involving European and other countries. The National Wilms' Tumor Study group recommends primary surgery before any adjuvant treatment, whereas the International Society of Pediatric Oncology trials are based on the use of preoperative chemotherapy. The debate on primary chemotherapy versus primary nephrectomy appears to have been overcome, in the sense that the advantages and disadvantages of these two diverse methods have emerged from large and well-performed clinical trials, and comparably low doses of anthracyclines and radiotherapy are now used. Challenges remain in identifying novel molecular, histological and clinical risk factors for stratification of treatment intensity. This could allow a safe reduction in therapy for patients known to have an excellent chance of cure with the current therapy, while identifying, at diagnosis, the minority of children at risk of relapse, who will necessitate more aggressive treatments. Another positive factor is the substantial progress that has been made in the cure for recurrent patients, with long-term survivals shifting from 30 to almost 60% in more recently treated patients with intensive-dose chemotherapy regimens. The combination of lower relapses and higher salvage rates translated into significantly improved overall survival for Wilms' tumor patients as a whole. This review covers current concepts on

  15. Naturally occurring, tumor-specific, therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argiris, Konstantinos; Panethymitaki, Chrysoula; Tavassoli, Mahvash

    2011-05-01

    The emerging approach to cancer treatment known as targeted therapies offers hope in improving the treatment of therapy-resistant cancers. Recent understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of cancer has led to the development of targeted novel drugs such as monoclonal antibodies, small molecule inhibitors, mimetics, antisense and small interference RNA-based strategies, among others. These compounds act on specific targets that are believed to contribute to the development and progression of cancers and resistance of tumors to conventional therapies. Delivered individually or combined with chemo- and/or radiotherapy, such novel drugs have produced significant responses in certain types of cancer. Among the most successful novel compounds are those which target tyrosine kinases (imatinib, trastuzumab, sinutinib, cetuximab). However, these compounds can cause severe side-effects as they inhibit pathways such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or platelet-derived growth factor receptor, which are also important for normal functions in non-transformed cells. Recently, a number of proteins have been identified which show a remarkable tumor-specific cytotoxic activity. This toxicity is independent of tumor type or specific genetic changes such as p53, pRB or EGFR aberrations. These tumor-specific killer proteins are either derived from common human and animal viruses such as E1A, E4ORF4 and VP3 (apoptin) or of cellular origin, such as TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) and MDA-7 (melanoma differentiation associated-7). This review aims to present a current overview of a selection of these proteins with preferential toxicity among cancer cells and will provide an insight into the possible mechanism of action, tumor specificity and their potential as novel tumor-specific cancer therapeutics.

  16. Radio-immunotherapy of solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatal, J.F.; Faivre Chauvet, A.; Bardies, M.; Kraeber-Bodere, F.; Barbet, J.

    2001-01-01

    A convincing efficacy of radio-immunotherapy of solid tumors has not been documented yet in clinical studies. Consequently, a methodological optimization is needed within the scope in increasing absorbed doses delivered to tumor targets by amplifying cumulative tumor activity and in the same time in reducing absorbed doses delivered normal organs. Multi-step pre-targeting techniques allow to approach these goals. The most developed technique is based on the high affinity for biotin. In a first step an anti-tumor antibody coupled to avidin or biodin is injected. In a second step, 24 hours later, the circulating residual immuno-conjugate is bound to a molecular complex and eliminated through the reticulo endothelial system of the liver ('chase'phase). A third step, a few hours later, consists in injecting biotin coupled to DOTA chelating agent and labeled with yttrium 90. This small molecule rapidly diffuses to tumor targets and binds to pre-localized immuno-conjugate. Another technique, designed and developed in France, is based on antigen-antibody affinity. In a first step an anti-tumor / anti-hapten bi-specific antibody is injected and, in a second step, a few days later, the small hapten molecule is radiolabeled with I-131 and injected. It diffuses rapidly to the tumor targets and binds to the anti-hapten arm of the pre-localized bi-specific antibody. An alternative way to increase radio-immunotherapy efficacy consists in combining this low-dose rate irradiation to radiosensitizing molecules within the scope of an additive or supra additive effect which has previously documented. (author)

  17. Systems Biology-Based Investigation of Cellular Antiviral Drug Targets Identified by Gene-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feixiong Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Viruses require host cellular factors for successful replication. A comprehensive systems-level investigation of the virus-host interactome is critical for understanding the roles of host factors with the end goal of discovering new druggable antiviral targets. Gene-trap insertional mutagenesis is a high-throughput forward genetics approach to randomly disrupt (trap host genes and discover host genes that are essential for viral replication, but not for host cell survival. In this study, we used libraries of randomly mutagenized cells to discover cellular genes that are essential for the replication of 10 distinct cytotoxic mammalian viruses, 1 gram-negative bacterium, and 5 toxins. We herein reported 712 candidate cellular genes, characterizing distinct topological network and evolutionary signatures, and occupying central hubs in the human interactome. Cell cycle phase-specific network analysis showed that host cell cycle programs played critical roles during viral replication (e.g. MYC and TAF4 regulating G0/1 phase. Moreover, the viral perturbation of host cellular networks reflected disease etiology in that host genes (e.g. CTCF, RHOA, and CDKN1B identified were frequently essential and significantly associated with Mendelian and orphan diseases, or somatic mutations in cancer. Computational drug repositioning framework via incorporating drug-gene signatures from the Connectivity Map into the virus-host interactome identified 110 putative druggable antiviral targets and prioritized several existing drugs (e.g. ajmaline that may be potential for antiviral indication (e.g. anti-Ebola. In summary, this work provides a powerful methodology with a tight integration of gene-trap insertional mutagenesis testing and systems biology to identify new antiviral targets and drugs for the development of broadly acting and targeted clinical antiviral therapeutics.

  18. Current diagnosis of tumors developed in the internal auditory canal and cerebellopontine angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignaud, J.; Doyon, D.

    1988-01-01

    The introduction of CT scan and, more recently, magnetic resonance imaging, has radically changed the diagnostic approach to tumors developed in the internal auditory canal and cerebellopontine angle. CT scan with intravenous injection visualizes tumors lying in the cerebellopontine angle. Magnetic resonance imaging, especially using gadolinium, is a very accurate means for diagnosing tumors of both the auditory canal and cerebellopontine angle [fr

  19. Tumor Heterogeneity and Drug Resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucerova, L.; Skolekova, S.; Kozovska, Z.

    2015-01-01

    New generation of sequencing methodologies revealed unexpected complexity and genomic alterations linked with the tumor subtypes. This diversity exists across the tumor types, histologic tumor subtypes and subsets of the tumor cells within the same tumor. This phenomenon is termed tumor heterogeneity. Regardless of its origin and mechanisms of development it has a major impact in the clinical setting. Genetic, phenotypic and expression pattern diversity of tumors plays critical role in the selection of suitable treatment and also in the prognosis prediction. Intratumoral heterogeneity plays a key role in the intrinsic and acquired chemoresistance to cytotoxic and targeted therapies. In this review we focus on the mechanisms of intratumoral and inter tumoral heterogeneity and their relationship to the drug resistance. Understanding of the mechanisms and spatiotemporal dynamics of tumor heterogeneity development before and during the therapy is important for the ability to design individual treatment protocols suitable in the given molecular context. (author)

  20. Stochastic models for tumoral growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Carlos

    2006-02-01

    Strong experimental evidence has indicated that tumor growth belongs to the molecular beam epitaxy universality class. This type of growth is characterized by the constraint of cell proliferation to the tumor border and the surface diffusion of cells at the growing edge. Tumor growth is thus conceived as a competition for space between the tumor and the host, and cell diffusion at the tumor border is an optimal strategy adopted for minimizing the pressure and helping tumor development. Two stochastic partial differential equations are reported in this paper in order to correctly model the physical properties of tumoral growth in (1+1) and (2+1) dimensions. The advantage of these models is that they reproduce the correct geometry of the tumor and are defined in terms of polar variables. An analysis of these models allows us to quantitatively estimate the response of the tumor to an unfavorable perturbation during growth.

  1. Design of radiation dose tumor response assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suit, H.D.; Hwang, T.; Hsieh, C.; Thames, H.

    1985-01-01

    The efficient utilization of animals in a radiation dose response assay for tumor control requires a definition of the goal, e.g., TCD50 or slope. A series of computer modelled ''experiments'' have been performed for each of a number of allocations of dose levels (DL) and number of animals/DL. The authors stipulated that the assumed TCD50 was .85 of true value; assumed slope was correct. They stipulated a binominal distribution of observed tumor control results at each dose level. A pilot assay used 6 tumors at 7 DL (from TCD1-TCD97). The second assay used 30 tumors assigned to 2,3,5 or 9 DL and to selected tumor control probabilities (TCP derived from the pilot run. Results from 100 test runs were combined with the pilot run for each of the combination of DL and TCP values. Logit regression lines were fitted through these ''data'' and the 95% CL around the TCD50 and the TCD37 values and the variances of the slopes were computed. These experiments were repeated using the method suggested by Porter (1980). Results show that a different strategy is needed depending upon the goal, viz. TCD50 or TCD37 vs slope. The differences between the two approaches are discussed

  2. Energy and Redox Homeostasis in Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Fernandes de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells display abnormal morphology, chromosomes, and metabolism. This review will focus on the metabolism of tumor cells integrating the available data by way of a functional approach. The first part contains a comprehensive introduction to bioenergetics, mitochondria, and the mechanisms of production and degradation of reactive oxygen species. This will be followed by a discussion on the oxidative metabolism of tumor cells including the morphology, biogenesis, and networking of mitochondria. Tumor cells overexpress proteins that favor fission, such as GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1. The interplay between proapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family that promotes Drp 1-dependent mitochondrial fragmentation and fusogenic antiapoptotic proteins such as Opa-1 will be presented. It will be argued that contrary to the widespread belief that in cancer cells, aerobic glycolysis completely replaces oxidative metabolism, a misrepresentation of Warburg’s original results, mitochondria of tumor cells are fully viable and functional. Cancer cells also carry out oxidative metabolism and generally conform to the orthodox model of ATP production maintaining as well an intact electron transport system. Finally, data will be presented indicating that the key to tumor cell survival in an ROS rich environment depends on the overexpression of antioxidant enzymes and high levels of the nonenzymatic antioxidant scavengers.

  3. In silico modeling for tumor growth visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanquartier, Fleur; Jean-Quartier, Claire; Cemernek, David; Holzinger, Andreas

    2016-08-08

    Cancer is a complex disease. Fundamental cellular based studies as well as modeling provides insight into cancer biology and strategies to treatment of the disease. In silico models complement in vivo models. Research on tumor growth involves a plethora of models each emphasizing isolated aspects of benign and malignant neoplasms. Biologists and clinical scientists are often overwhelmed by the mathematical background knowledge necessary to grasp and to apply a model to their own research. We aim to provide a comprehensive and expandable simulation tool to visualizing tumor growth. This novel Web-based application offers the advantage of a user-friendly graphical interface with several manipulable input variables to correlate different aspects of tumor growth. By refining model parameters we highlight the significance of heterogeneous intercellular interactions on tumor progression. Within this paper we present the implementation of the Cellular Potts Model graphically presented through Cytoscape.js within a Web application. The tool is available under the MIT license at https://github.com/davcem/cpm-cytoscape and http://styx.cgv.tugraz.at:8080/cpm-cytoscape/ . In-silico methods overcome the lack of wet experimental possibilities and as dry method succeed in terms of reduction, refinement and replacement of animal experimentation, also known as the 3R principles. Our visualization approach to simulation allows for more flexible usage and easy extension to facilitate understanding and gain novel insight. We believe that biomedical research in general and research on tumor growth in particular will benefit from the systems biology perspective.

  4. Radiogenetic therapy: strategies to overcome tumor resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marples, B; Greco, O; Joiner, M C; Scott, S D

    2003-01-01

    The aim of cancer gene therapy is to selectively kill malignant cells at the tumor site, by exploiting traits specific to cancer cells and/or solid tumors. Strategies that take advantage of biological features common to different tumor types are particularly promising, since they have wide clinical applicability. Much attention has focused on genetic methods that complement radiotherapy, the principal treatment modality, or that exploit hypoxia, the most ubiquitous characteristic of most solid cancers. The goal of this review is to highlight two promising gene therapy methods developed specifically to target the tumor volume that can be readily used in combination with radiotherapy. The first approach uses radiation-responsive gene promoters to control the selective expression of a suicide gene (e.g., herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase) to irradiated tissue only, leading to targeted cell killing in the presence of a prodrug (e.g., ganciclovir). The second method utilizes oxygen-dependent promoters to produce selective therapeutic gene expression and prodrug activation in hypoxic cells, which are refractive to conventional radiotherapy. Further refining of tumor targeting can be achieved by combining radiation and hypoxia responsive elements in chimeric promoters activated by either and dual stimuli. The in vitro and in vivo studies described in this review suggest that the combination of gene therapy and radiotherapy protocols has potential for use in cancer care, particularly in cases currently refractory to treatment as a result of inherent or hypoxia-mediated radioresistance.

  5. Multiple Primary Tumors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... breast and ascending colon. KEYWORDS: Carcinoid, colorectal cancer, metachronous, synchronous. Multiple Primary Tumors. MA Adeyanju, AA Ilori. Address for correspondence: Dr. MA Adeyanju,. Department of Surgery, Federal Medical Centre, Ebute Metta,. Lagos, Nigeria. E-mail: mbadeyanju@yahoo.

  6. Surgery for adrenal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamah, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the presentation, localization, pathology, surgical management and outcome of surgery for adrenal gland tumors. Design: Prospective clinico epidemiological study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at the Department of General Surgery, University Unit, Riyadh medical Complex Kingdom of Saudi Rabia from June, 1991 to may, 2001. Subjects and Methods: A total of 21 cases with adrenal tumors were studied for demographic data, clinical presentation, diagnostic workup, localization, surgical management, pathology and outcome. The outcome of these patients was followed prospectively. Results: The study included 12 female and 9 male patients. The mean age at surgery was 36.7 years. Hypertension (69.%) was the commonest presentation in hypersecretory functional tumors. The localization accuracy for ultrasonography, computerized tomography, MRI and MIBG scan was 95.2%, 98.3% 87.8% and 83.6% respectively. Pheochromocytoma was the most common adrenal pathology observed in 14 (66.6%) cases. The overall morbidity was 19% with no hospital mortality. Complete follow-up of available 19 patients (90.5 %) revealed no tumor recurrence and persistent hypertension in 14.3% cases. Conclusion: surgery on adrenal glands is safe in experienced hands and is recommended in institutes with all backup facilities. (author)

  7. Study of wilms' tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.H.; Yaqub, N.

    2001-01-01

    This study is an effort to bring into light data related to children with Wilms' tumor managed at Islamabad as local literature on this topic is lacking. It was retrospective study. The study was conducted at Children Hospital, Pakistan Institute of Medical Science, Islamabad between January, 1987 and December 1995. All patients managed during the study period were included in the study. In all the patients complete blood count (CBC), urine analysis (D/R),X-ray abdomen and chest, ultrasound abdomen and in selected cases CT scan were performed. National Wilms' Tumor Study Group (NWTS 3) protocol was followed for further management. Fifty patients including 28 males and 22 females with the age range from 9 months to 8 years were managed in 9 years period. Left kidney was involved in 31 patients. Most of the tumors were solid on ultrasound, 76% patients were in stage III and IV. In one case bilateral involvement of kidney was found. Forty patients underwent primary surgery. Only 14 patients received complete course of chemotherapy while 31 radiotherapy. Nineteen patients died and 15 lost to follow-up. The survival and mortality rates are comparable to NWTS-3 results, although, most of the patients were presented in advance stage of Wilms tumor. The survival of these patients can be improved by increasing awareness of society through electronic and print media. (author)

  8. Imaging findings of sacral tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Hong, Sung Hwan; Choi, Ja Young; Koh, Sung Hye; Chung, Hye Won; Choi, Jung Ah; Kang, Heung Sik

    2003-01-01

    The various pathologic conditions detected at CT and MRI and subsumed by the term 'sacral tumor' include primary bone tumors, sacral canal tumors and metastases. Among these, metastases are much more common than primary bone tumors, of which chordoma is the most common. Although the imaging findings of sacral tumors are nonspecific, a patient's age and sex, and specific findings such as calcification or fluid-fluid levels, can help radiologists in their differential diagnosis. We describe the imaging findings of primary sacral tumors, emphasizing the MRI findings

  9. [The safety of biologics : a risk-benefit assessment of treating rheumatoid arthritis with biologics based on registry data on mortality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, O

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study is a risk-benefit assessment of treating rheumatoid arthritis with biologics based on registry data on mortality.UK, Sweden and Spain have published evaluable data on mortality. A parallel control group was conducted in the UK. Sweden and Spain used an historical cohort for comparison.Central registries supported British and Swedish research by sending details on all deaths. The variety of possible confounders prevents direct comparisons of the registers and safe predictions for individual patients.The death rate in TNF-inhibitor-treated patients is higher than in the general population but lower than in the control groups with RA. Thus comorbidities are not balanced, the weighted mortality rate scaled down the difference between exposed patients and controls. When TNF-inhibitors are given for the usual indication, mortality is reduced compared to conventional therapy.

  10. Tumor Blood Vessel Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Lance

    2009-11-01

    ``Normalization'' of tumor blood vessels has shown promise to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutics. In theory, anti-angiogenic drugs targeting endothelial VEGF signaling can improve vessel network structure and function, enhancing the transport of subsequent cytotoxic drugs to cancer cells. In practice, the effects are unpredictable, with varying levels of success. The predominant effects of anti-VEGF therapies are decreased vessel leakiness (hydraulic conductivity), decreased vessel diameters and pruning of the immature vessel network. It is thought that each of these can influence perfusion of the vessel network, inducing flow in regions that were previously sluggish or stagnant. Unfortunately, when anti-VEGF therapies affect vessel structure and function, the changes are dynamic and overlapping in time, and it has been difficult to identify a consistent and predictable normalization ``window'' during which perfusion and subsequent drug delivery is optimal. This is largely due to the non-linearity in the system, and the inability to distinguish the effects of decreased vessel leakiness from those due to network structural changes in clinical trials or animal studies. We have developed a mathematical model to calculate blood flow in complex tumor networks imaged by two-photon microscopy. The model incorporates the necessary and sufficient components for addressing the problem of normalization of tumor vasculature: i) lattice-Boltzmann calculations of the full flow field within the vasculature and within the tissue, ii) diffusion and convection of soluble species such as oxygen or drugs within vessels and the tissue domain, iii) distinct and spatially-resolved vessel hydraulic conductivities and permeabilities for each species, iv) erythrocyte particles advecting in the flow and delivering oxygen with real oxygen release kinetics, v) shear stress-mediated vascular remodeling. This model, guided by multi-parameter intravital imaging of tumor vessel structure

  11. Information dynamics in carcinogenesis and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatenby, Robert A; Frieden, B Roy

    2004-12-21

    The storage and transmission of information is vital to the function of normal and transformed cells. We use methods from information theory and Monte Carlo theory to analyze the role of information in carcinogenesis. Our analysis demonstrates that, during somatic evolution of the malignant phenotype, the accumulation of genomic mutations degrades intracellular information. However, the degradation is constrained by the Darwinian somatic ecology in which mutant clones proliferate only when the mutation confers a selective growth advantage. In that environment, genes that normally decrease cellular proliferation, such as tumor suppressor or differentiation genes, suffer maximum information degradation. Conversely, those that increase proliferation, such as oncogenes, are conserved or exhibit only gain of function mutations. These constraints shield most cellular populations from catastrophic mutator-induced loss of the transmembrane entropy gradient and, therefore, cell death. The dynamics of constrained information degradation during carcinogenesis cause the tumor genome to asymptotically approach a minimum information state that is manifested clinically as dedifferentiation and unconstrained proliferation. Extreme physical information (EPI) theory demonstrates that altered information flow from cancer cells to their environment will manifest in-vivo as power law tumor growth with an exponent of size 1.62. This prediction is based only on the assumption that tumor cells are at an absolute information minimum and are capable of "free field" growth that is, they are unconstrained by external biological parameters. The prediction agrees remarkably well with several studies demonstrating power law growth in small human breast cancers with an exponent of 1.72+/-0.24. This successful derivation of an analytic expression for cancer growth from EPI alone supports the conceptual model that carcinogenesis is a process of constrained information degradation and that malignant

  12. Tumor heterogeneity and progression: conceptual foundations for modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greller, L D; Tobin, F L; Poste, G

    1996-01-01

    A conceptual foundation for modeling tumor progression, growth, and heterogeneity is presented. The purpose of such models is to aid understanding, test ideas, formulate experiments, and to model cancer 'in machina' to address the dynamic features of tumor cell heterogeneity, progression, and growth. The descriptive capabilities of such an approach provides a consistent language for qualitatively reasoning about tumor behavior. This approach provides a schema for building conceptual models that combine three key phenomenological driving elements: growth, progression, and genetic instability. The growth element encompasses processes contributing to changes in tumor bulk and is distinct from progression per se. The progression element subsumes a broad collection of processes underlying phenotypic progression. The genetics elements represents heritable changes which potentially affect tumor character and behavior. Models, conceptual and mathematical, can be built for different tumor situations by drawing upon the interaction of these three distinct driving elements. These models can be used as tools to explore a diversity of hypotheses concerning dynamic changes in cellular populations during tumor progression, including the generation of intratumor heterogeneity. Such models can also serve to guide experimentation and to gain insight into dynamic aspects of complex tumor behavior.

  13. Biologically based therapies are commonly self-prescribed by Brazilian women for the treatment of advanced breast cancer or its symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano, Ana Camila Callado; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo; Rugno, Fernanda Capella; da Silva, Raquel Haas; Paiva, Bianca Sakamoto Ribeiro

    2014-05-01

    Breast cancer (BC) might be associated with loss of function in affected patients, with a direct impact on their quality of life (QOL). Many women with metastatic BC seek relief of symptoms, including the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to cure cancer. The present study aimed to identify the pattern of CAM used by patients with metastatic BC and to assess the correlation between CAM use and scores on anxiety, depression, and QOL scales. A total of 126 women with metastatic BC were interviewed using four instruments: (1) a questionnaire containing socioeconomic, clinical, and demographic data and CAM use; (2) European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ)-C30; (3) EORTC QLQ-BR23; and (4) the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Fifty percent of the participants reported the use of at least one CAM modality. Biologically based practices were the most frequently used to treat BC and/or its symptoms, the most commonly discussed with the oncologists, and one of the CAM categories in which more patients reported a desire to learn more about. The overall use of CAM was not correlated with the scores on the anxiety, depression, and QOL scales. However, analysis of the association of the QOL scores with specific CAM modalities revealed some potential associations (especially for food supplements, art therapy, psychotherapy, and prayer). Women with metastatic BC frequently make use of CAM to treat the cancer and/or its symptoms. Biologically based practices seem to be particularly important in Brazil. An association between specific CAM modalities and some QOL domains was suggested, but it needs further confirmation.

  14. Epidemiological features of brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Nenad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumors account for 1.4% of all cancers and 2.4% of all cancer-related deaths. The incidence of brain tumors varies and it is higher in developed countries of Western Europe, North America, Australia and New Zealand. In Serbia, according to data from 2009, malignant brain tumors account for 2. 2 of all tumors, and from all cancer­related deaths, 3.2% is caused by malignant brain tumors. According to recent statistical reports, an overall incidence of brain tumors for benign and malignant tumors combined is 18.71 per 100,000 persons/year. The most common benign brain tumor in adults is meningioma, which is most present in women, and the most common malignant tumor is glioblastoma, which is most present in adult men. Due to high mortality, especially in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma and significant brain tumor morbidity, there is a constant interest in understanding its etiology in order to possibly prevent tumor occurrence in future and enable more efficient treatment strategies for this fatal brain disease. Despite the continuously growing number of epidemiological studies on possible factors of tumor incidence, the etiology remains unclear. The only established environmental risk factor of gliomas is ionizing radiation exposure. Exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields via cell phone use has gained a lot of attention as a potential risk factor of brain tumor development. However, studies have been inconsistent and inconclusive, so more definite results are still expected.

  15. The 2017 World Health Organization classification of tumors of the pituitary gland: a summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, M Beatriz S

    2017-10-01

    The 4th edition of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of endocrine tumors has been recently released. In this new edition, major changes are recommended in several areas of the classification of tumors of the anterior pituitary gland (adenophypophysis). The scope of the present manuscript is to summarize these recommended changes, emphasizing a few significant topics. These changes include the following: (1) a novel approach for classifying pituitary neuroendocrine tumors according to pituitary adenohypophyseal cell lineages; (2) changes to the histological grading of pituitary neuroendocrine tumors with the elimination of the term "atypical adenoma;" and (3) introduction of new entities like the pituitary blastoma and re-definition of old entities like the null-cell adenoma. This new classification is very practical and mostly based on immunohistochemistry for pituitary hormones, pituitary-specific transcription factors, and other immunohistochemical markers commonly used in pathology practice, not requiring routine ultrastructural analysis of the tumors. Evaluation of tumor proliferation potential, by mitotic count and Ki-67 labeling index, and tumor invasion is strongly recommended on individual case basis to identify clinically aggressive adenomas. In addition, the classification offers the treating clinical team information on tumor prognosis by identifying specific variants of adenomas associated with an elevated risk for recurrence. Changes in the classification of non-neuroendocrine tumors are also proposed, in particular those tumors arising in the posterior pituitary including pituicytoma, granular cell tumor of the posterior pituitary, and spindle cell oncocytoma. These changes endorse those previously published in the 2016 WHO classification of CNS tumors. Other tumors arising in the sellar region are also reviewed in detail including craniopharyngiomas, mesenchymal and stromal tumors, germ cell tumors, and hematopoietic tumors. It is

  16. Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors: challenges and search for solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Ahitagni; Kashyap, Lakhan; Kakkar, Aanchal; Sarkar, Chitra; Julka, Pramod Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) is a highly malignant embryonal central nervous system tumor commonly affecting children <3 years of age. It roughly constitutes 1%–2% of all pediatric central nervous system tumors. Recent data show that it is the most common malignant central nervous system tumor in children <6 months of age. Management of this aggressive tumor is associated with a myriad of diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. On the basis of radiology and histopathology alone, distinction of AT/RT from medulloblastoma or primitive neuroectodermal tumor is difficult, and hence this tumor has been commonly misdiagnosed as primitive neuroectodermal tumor for decades. Presence of a bulky heterogeneous solid-cystic mass with readily visible calcification and intratumor hemorrhage, occurring off-midline in children <3 years of age, should alert the radiologist toward the possibility of AT/RT. Presence of rhabdoid cells on histopathology and polyphenotypic immunopositivity for epithelial, mesenchymal, and neuroectodermal markers along with loss of expression of SMARCB1/INI1 or SMARCA4/BRG1 help in establishing a diagnosis of AT/RT. The optimal management comprises maximal safe resection followed by radiation therapy and multiagent intensive systemic chemotherapy. Gross total excision is difficult to achieve in view of the large tumor size and location and young age at presentation. Leptomeningeal spread is noted in 15%–30% of patients, and hence craniospinal irradiation followed by boost to tumor bed is considered standard in children older than 3 years. However, in younger children, craniospinal irradiation may lead to long-term neurocognitive and neuroendocrine sequel, and hence focal radiation therapy may be a pragmatic approach. In this age group, high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue may also be considered to defer radiation therapy, but this approach is also associated with significant treatment-related morbidity and mortality

  17. Dielectrophoretic capture and genetic analysis of single neuroblastoma tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Carpenter

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the diversity of cells that escape the primary tumor and seed micrometastases remains rudimentary, and approaches for studying circulating and disseminated tumor cells have been limited by low throughput and sensitivity, reliance on single parameter sorting, and a focus on enumeration rather than phenotypic and genetic characterization. Here we utilize a highly sensitive microfluidic and dielectrophoretic approach for the isolation and genetic analysis of individual tumor cells. We employed fluorescence labeling to isolate 208 single cells from spiking experiments conducted with 11 cell lines, including 8 neuroblastoma cell lines, and achieved a capture sensitivity of 1 tumor cell per 106 white blood cells. Sample fixation or freezing had no detectable effect on cell capture. Point mutations were accurately detected in the whole genome amplification product of captured single tumor cells but not in negative control white blood cells. We applied this approach to capture 144 single tumor cells from 10 bone marrow samples from patients suffering from neuroblastoma. In this pediatric malignancy, high-risk patients often exhibit wide-spread hematogenous metastasis, but access to primary tumor can be difficult or impossible. Here we used flow-based sorting to pre-enrich samples with tumor involvement below 0.02%. For all patients for whom a mutation in the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase gene had already been detected in their primary tumor, the same mutation was detected in single cells from their marrow. These findings demonstrate a novel, non-invasive, and adaptable method for the capture and genetic analysis of single tumor cells from cancer patients.

  18. Tyrosine isomers mediate the classical phenomenon of concomitant tumor resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Raúl A; Bruzzo, Juan; Chiarella, Paula; di Gianni, Pedro; Isturiz, Martín A; Linskens, Susana; Speziale, Norma; Meiss, Roberto P; Bustuoabad, Oscar D; Pasqualini, Christiane D

    2011-11-15

    Concomitant tumor resistance (CR) is a phenomenon originally described in 1906 in which a tumor-bearing host is resistant to the growth of secondary tumor implants and metastasis. Although recent studies have indicated that T-cell-dependent processes mediate CR in hosts bearing immunogenic small tumors, manifestations of CR induced by immunogenic and nonimmunogenic large tumors have been associated with an elusive serum factor. In this study, we identify this serum factor as tyrosine in its meta and ortho isoforms. In three different murine models of cancer that generate CR, both meta-tyrosine and ortho-tyrosine inhibited tumor growth. In addition, we showed that both isoforms of tyrosine blocked metastasis in a fourth model that does not generate CR but is sensitive to CR induced by other tumors. Mechanistic studies showed that the antitumor effects of the tyrosine isoforms were mediated, in part, by early inhibition of mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway and inactivation of STAT3, potentially driving tumor cells into a state of dormancy. By revealing a molecular basis for the classical phenomenon of CR, our findings may stimulate new generalized approaches to limit the development of metastases that arise after resection of primary tumors, an issue of pivotal importance to oncologists and their patients. ©2011 AACR

  19. Antibody-radioisotope conjugates for tumor localization and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, S.M.; Carrasquillo, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    In principle, anti-tumor antibodies can be used to carry radioactivity to tumors for in-vivo diagnosis and treatment of cancer. First, for diagnostic purposes, an antibody that targets a specific antigen (for example, the p97 antigen of human melanoma tumor), is labeled with a tracer amount of radioactivity. When this antibody-radioisotope conjugate is injected into the blood stream, the antibody carries the radioactivity throughout the body and in time, percolates through all the tissues of the body. Because the tumor has specific antigens to which the antibody can bind, the antibody conjugate progressively accumulates in the tumor. Using conventional nuclear medicine imaging equipment, the body of the patient is scanned for radioactivity content, and a map of the distribution of the radioactivity is displayed on photographic film. The tumor shows up as a dense area of radio-activity. These same antibody-radioisotope conjugates may be used for therapy of tumors, except that in this case large amounts of radioactivity are loaded on the antibody. After localization of the conjugate there is sufficient radiation deposited in the tumor of radiotherapy. The success of this approach in the clinic is determined in large measure by the concentration gradient that can be achieved between tissue antibody conjugate in tumor versus normal tissue

  20. Distinguishing benign and malignant breast tumors: preliminary comparison of kinetic modeling approaches using multi-institutional dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data from the International Breast MR Consortium 6883 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorace, Anna G; Partridge, Savannah C; Li, Xia; Virostko, Jack; Barnes, Stephanie L; Hippe, Daniel S; Huang, Wei; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2018-01-01

    Comparative preliminary analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) data collected in the International Breast MR Consortium 6883 multicenter trial was performed to distinguish benign and malignant breast tumors. Prebiopsy DCE-MRI data from 45 patients with suspicious breast lesions were obtained. Semiquantitative mean signal-enhancement ratio ([Formula: see text]) was calculated for all lesions, and quantitative pharmacokinetic, parameters [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text], were calculated for the subset with available [Formula: see text] maps ([Formula: see text]). Diagnostic performance was estimated for DCE-MRI parameters and compared to standard clinical MRI assessment. Quantitative and semiquantitative metrics discriminated benign and malignant lesions, with receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC) values of 0.71, 0.70, and 0.82 for [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text], respectively ([Formula: see text]). At equal 94% sensitivity, the specificity and positive predictive value of [Formula: see text] (53% and 63%, respectively) and K trans (42% and 58%) were higher than clinical MRI assessment (32% and 54%). A multivariable model combining [Formula: see text] and clinical MRI assessment had an AUC value of 0.87. Quantitative pharmacokinetic and semiquantitative analyses of DCE-MRI improves discrimination of benign and malignant breast tumors, with our findings suggesting higher diagnostic accuracy using [Formula: see text]. [Formula: see text] has potential to help reduce unnecessary biopsies resulting from routine breast imaging.

  1. Neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davies, Karen

    2009-04-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors are rare neoplasms accounting for less than 5% of pancreatic malignancies. They are broadly classified into either functioning tumors (insulinomas, gastrinomas, glucagonomas, VIPomas, and somatostatinomas) or nonfunctioning tumors. The diagnosis of these tumors is difficult and requires a careful history and examination combined with laboratory tests and radiologic imaging. Signs and symptoms are usually related to hormone hypersecretion in the case of functioning tumors and to tumor size or metastases with nonfunctioning tumors. Surgical resection remains the treatment of choice even in the face of metastatic disease. Further development of novel diagnostic and treatment modalities offers potential to greatly improve quality of life and prolong disease-free survival for patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors.

  2. Neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davies, Karen

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors are rare neoplasms accounting for less than 5% of pancreatic malignancies. They are broadly classified into either functioning tumors (insulinomas, gastrinomas, glucagonomas, VIPomas, and somatostatinomas) or nonfunctioning tumors. The diagnosis of these tumors is difficult and requires a careful history and examination combined with laboratory tests and radiologic imaging. Signs and symptoms are usually related to hormone hypersecretion in the case of functioning tumors and to tumor size or metastases with nonfunctioning tumors. Surgical resection remains the treatment of choice even in the face of metastatic disease. Further development of novel diagnostic and treatment modalities offers potential to greatly improve quality of life and prolong disease-free survival for patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors.

  3. Tumor Biology and Microenvironment Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Part of NCI's Division of Cancer Biology's research portfolio, research in this area seeks to understand the role of tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment (TME) in driving cancer initiation, progression, maintenance and recurrence.

  4. 3D tumor tissue analogs and their orthotopic implants for understanding tumor-targeting of microenvironment-responsive nanosized chemotherapy and radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Pallavi; Jyoti, Amar; Swindell, Elden P; Chan, Ryan; Langner, Ulrich W; Feddock, Jonathan M; Nagarajan, Radhakrishnan; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Upreti, Meenakshi

    2015-11-01

    An appropriate representation of the tumor microenvironment in tumor models can have a pronounced impact on directing combinatorial treatment strategies and cancer nanotherapeutics. The present study develops a novel 3D co-culture spheroid model (3D TNBC) incorporating tumor cells, endothelial cells and fibroblasts as color-coded murine tumor tissue analogs (TTA) to better represent the tumor milieu of triple negative breast cancer in vitro. Implantation of TTA orthotopically in nude mice, resulted in enhanced growth and aggressive metastasis to ectopic sites. Subsequently, the utility of the model is demonstrated for preferential targeting of irradiated tumor endothelial cells via radiation-induced stromal enrichment of galectin-1 using anginex conjugated nanoparticles (nanobins) carrying arsenic trioxide and cisplatin. Demonstration of a multimodal nanotherapeutic system and inclusion of the biological response to radiation using an in vitro/in vivo tumor model incorporating characteristics of tumor microenvironment presents an advance in preclinical evaluation of existing and novel cancer nanotherapies. Existing in-vivo tumor models are established by implanting tumor cells into nude mice. Here, the authors described their approach 3D spheres containing tumor cells, enodothelial cells and fibroblasts. This would mimic tumor micro-environment more realistically. This interesting 3D model should reflect more accurately tumor response to various drugs and would enable the design of new treatment modalities. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mass Spectrometry Analyses of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acland, Mitchell; Mittal, Parul; Lokman, Noor A; Klingler-Hoffmann, Manuela; Oehler, Martin K; Hoffmann, Peter

    2018-05-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) are a powerful biological in vitro model, which closely mimics the 3D structure of primary avascularized tumors. Mass spectrometry (MS) has established itself as a powerful analytical tool, not only to better understand and describe the complex structure of MCTS, but also to monitor their response to cancer therapeutics. The first part of this review focuses on traditional mass spectrometry approaches with an emphasis on elucidating the molecular characteristics of these structures. Then the mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) approaches used to obtain spatially defined information from MCTS is described. Finally the analysis of primary spheroids, such as those present in ovarian cancer, and the great potential that mass spectrometry analysis of these structures has for improved understanding of cancer progression and for personalized in vitro therapeutic testing is discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Bednar Tumor: An Uncommon Entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amonkar, Gayathri P; Rupani, Asha; Shah, Ajay; Deshpande, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Bednar tumor is an uncommon variant of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans. Also known as pigmented dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, this tumor is of intermediate grade. It is seen in adults and has a predisposition to affect the shoulder region. We report a rare case of Bednar tumor in a 40-year-old female patient. The diagnosis of Bednar tumor must be considered while reporting pigmented subcutaneous spindle cell lesions.

  7. Tumor tracking and motion compensation with an adaptive tumor tracking system (ATTS): System description and prototype testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbert, Juergen; Meyer, Juergen; Baier, Kurt; Guckenberger, Matthias; Herrmann, Christian; Hess, Robin; Janka, Christian; Ma Lei; Mersebach, Torben; Richter, Anne; Roth, Michael; Schilling, Klaus; Flentje, Michael

    2008-01-01

    A novel system for real-time tumor tracking and motion compensation with a robotic HexaPOD treatment couch is described. The approach is based on continuous tracking of the tumor motion in portal images without implanted fiducial markers, using the therapeutic megavoltage beam, and tracking of abdominal breathing motion with optical markers. Based on the two independently acquired data sets the table movements for motion compensation are calculated. The principle of operation of the entire prototype system is detailed first. In the second part the performance of the HexaPOD couch was investigated with a robotic four-dimensional-phantom capable of simulating real patient tumor trajectories in three-dimensional space. The performance and limitations of the HexaPOD table and the control system were characterized in terms of its dynamic behavior. The maximum speed and acceleration of the HexaPOD were 8 mm/s and 34.5 mm/s 2 in the lateral direction, and 9.5 mm/s and 29.5 mm/s 2 in longitudinal and anterior-posterior direction, respectively. Base line drifts of the mean tumor position of realistic lung tumor trajectories could be fully compensated. For continuous tumor tracking and motion compensation a reduction of tumor motion up to 68% of the original amplitude was achieved. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that it is technically feasible to compensate breathing induced tumor motion in the lung with the adaptive tumor tracking system

  8. Determinates of tumor response to radiation: Tumor cells, tumor stroma and permanent local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wende; Huang, Peigen; Chen, David J.; Gerweck, Leo E.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: The causes of tumor response variation to radiation remain obscure, thus hampering the development of predictive assays and strategies to decrease resistance. The present study evaluates the impact of host tumor stromal elements and the in vivo environment on tumor cell kill, and relationship between tumor cell radiosensitivity and the tumor control dose. Material and methods: Five endpoints were evaluated and compared in a radiosensitive DNA double-strand break repair-defective (DNA-PKcs −/− ) tumor line, and its DNA-PKcs repair competent transfected counterpart. In vitro colony formation assays were performed on in vitro cultured cells, on cells obtained directly from tumors, and on cells irradiated in situ. Permanent local control was assessed by the TCD 50 assay. Vascular effects were evaluated by functional vascular density assays. Results: The fraction of repair competent and repair deficient tumor cells surviving radiation did not substantially differ whether irradiated in vitro, i.e., in the absence of host stromal elements and factors, from the fraction of cells killed following in vivo irradiation. Additionally, the altered tumor cell sensitivity resulted in a proportional change in the dose required to achieve permanent local control. The estimated number of tumor cells per tumor, their cloning efficiency and radiosensitivity, all assessed by in vitro assays, were used to predict successfully, the measured tumor control doses. Conclusion: The number of clonogens per tumor and their radiosensitivity govern the permanent local control dose

  9. Tumor uptake of radioruthenium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Richards, P.; Meinken, G.E.; Larson, S.M.; Grunbaum, Z.

    1980-01-01

    The use of ruthenium-97 as a scintigraphic agent, particularly for tumor localization, is investigated. The tumor uptake of ruthenium chloride and ruthenium-labelled transferrin is evaluated and their application as tumor-imagine agents is compared to gallium-67 citrate

  10. Intravascular bronchio-alveolar tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mata, J.M.; Caceres, J.; Prat, J.; Lopez, J.I.; Velilla, O.

    1991-01-01

    In 1975 Dail and Liebow described the clinical and pathological characteristics of a pulmonary tumor which they dominated intravascular bronchio-alveolar tumor (IVBAT). Our aim is to acquaint radiologists with the existence of this tumor by describing the radiologic findings in 2 patients with IVBAT, 1 with hepatic involvement ant the other with pulmonary osteoarthropathy. (author). 7 refs.; 2 figs

  11. Neonatal umbilical inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    antenatal scan. The preferred treatment option is resection of the tumor. Spontaneous regression has been described. Ann Pediatr Surg 13:160–162 c 2017 Annals of Pediatric. Surgery. ... Keywords: inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, neonatal tumor, surgical resection ... Other anatomical regions were the brain, the.

  12. Notch Signaling and Brain Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie; Kristoffersen, Karina; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2011-01-01

    Human brain tumors are a heterogenous group of neoplasms occurring inside the cranium and the central spinal cord. In adults and children, astrocytic glioma and medulloblastoma are the most common subtypes of primary brain tumors. These tumor types are thought to arise from cells in which Notch...

  13. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in human tumor cells

    OpenAIRE

    LI, HUI; HONG, ZE-HUI

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria play significant roles in cellular energy metabolism, free radical generation and apoptosis. The dysfunction of mitochondria is correlated with the origin and progression of tumors; thus, mutations in the mitochondrial genome that affect mitochondrial function may be one of the causal factors of tumorigenesis. Although the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in carcinogenesis has been investigated extensively by various approaches, the conclusions remain controversial to ...

  14. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Hyung Kyu

    1983-01-01

    A 18-year-old man had a painless swelling in the right anterior portion of maxilla for 2 years. On radiographic examination, a radiolucent region that was not associated with an unerupted tooth was seen. Small scattered radiopaque foci were seen in the cystic lumen. At second case, a 16-year-old girl had a painless swelling in the anterior portion of maxilla for 3 years. On radio graphic examination, a radiolucent region that associated with an unerupted tooth was seen. Multiple scattered radiopaque foci were seen in the radiolucent cystic lumen. With the patient under local anesthesia, well encapsulated tumors were enucleated. The diagnosis made in the pathologist's report was Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor, benign lesion often having distinct clinical and radiographic features.

  15. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Palaskar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is an uncommon lesion of unknown cause. It encompasses a spectrum of myofibroblastic proliferation along with varying amount of inflammatory infiltrate. A number of terms have been applied to the lesion, namely, inflammatory pseudotumor, fibrous xanthoma, plasma cell granuloma, pseudosarcoma, lymphoid hamartoma, myxoid hamartoma, inflammatory myofibrohistiocytic proliferation, benign myofibroblatoma, and most recently, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. The diverse nomenclature is mostly descriptive and reflects the uncertainty regarding true biologic nature of these lesions. Recently, the concept of this lesion being reactive has been challenged based on the clinical demonstration of recurrences and metastasis and cytogenetic evidence of acquired clonal chromosomal abnormalities. We hereby report a case of inflammatory pseudotumor and review its inflammatory versus neoplastic behavior.

  16. Tumor of small bowel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz Lobo, Elmer Jair; Rubio Vargas, Romulo; Cecilia Hani, Albis

    2009-01-01

    Young woman who is having episodes of overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding that requires transfusions. The endoscopic study consists of 2 endoscopies of the upper digestive system and two colonoscopies. The tests do not find the cause of the digestive hemorrhage. A double-balloon enteroscopy is performed and it is found that the Ileum has an ulcerate subepithelial lesion with neoplasia appearance which is marked with Chinese ink and biopsies are taken from the tissue which are not diagnosed. Studies of staging are performed ant the result is negative. A laparotomy is performed for diagnosis and treatment which includes the intestinal resection of ileum where the tumor is placed. The result of the test shows to be a neuroendocrine carcinoma of high degree of large cells undifferentiated. One appears in addition a revision to overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and neuroendocrine tumor of small

  17. CT findings of parotid gland tumors: benign versus malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Moon Ok; Han, Chun Hwan; Kim, Mie Young; Yi, Jeong Geun; Park, Kyung Joo; Lee, Joo Hyuk; Bae, Sang Hoon; Kim, Jeung Sook

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the characteristics of parotid gland tumors to help in the differentiation between benign and malignant lesions. The CT findings of 22 patients with surgically proven parotid gland tumors were reviewed. Analysis was focused on the density and margin characteristics of the tumors, and the relationship between the tumor and surrounding structures. Those tumors were pleomorphic adenoma (n = 8), Warthin's tumor (n = 5), basal cell adenoma (n = 1), lipoma (n = 1), dermoid cyst (n = 1), adenoid cystic carcinoma (n = 2), mucoepidermoid carcinoma (n 1), epidermoid carcinoma (n = 1), and carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma (n 1). Most of benign and malignant tumors were heterogeneous in density on contrast enhanced CT scans. In 5 of 6 malignant cases, the tumors had irregular or ill-defined margin and a tendancy to involve or cross the superficial layer of deep cervical fascia with obliteration of subcutaneous fat. Two malignant tumors invaded surrounding structures. Although the heterogeneous density of tumor is not a specific finding for malignancy at CT, following findings, such as, irregular or blurred margin of the lesion, the involvement of fascial plane, and the infiltration of surrounding structures may suggest the possibility of malignant parotid tumor

  18. Bone tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLeod, R.A.; Berquist, T.H.

    1988-01-01

    The emphasis of this chapter is on the contribution of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the care of patients with bone neoplasms. These modalities are emphasized because of their relative newness and not because they are considered more significant than the other more established examinations. Routine radiographs remain the most informative and essential imaging procedures for the diagnosis of bone tumors

  19. Stereotactic irradiation of tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinbacher, L.

    1989-01-01

    In the Federal German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg, a specific brain tumor localization system has been developed. The system offers precise and easy manipulation, and pin-pointed application for diagnostic evaluation and therapy. The radiation source for radiotherapy are 125 J-seeds. The method so far is applied primarily for treatment of astrocytomas in children. The article reviews applications and results. (MG) [de

  20. Stromal gastrointestinal tumors (GIST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balev, B.; Boykova, K.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: GIST are a heterogeneous group of mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract with varying tumor grade and frequency of 1: 100 000 per year. Mazur and Clark introduced the term for the first time in 1983. GIST constitute approximately 2% of the tumors in the gastrointestinal tract. The average age is 60 years. The most common locations are the stomach (60%), small intestine (30%), esophagus (1%), and rectum (5%). Learning objective: to demonstrate the imaging characteristics of the disease according to the current ESMO guidelines and to present the diagnostic accuracy of different imaging modalitiesnbased on review of literature and on own observations. GIST originate from interstitial cells (of Cajal) in the GIT wall, belonging to the autonomic nervous system, which is responsible for motility. 90% of GIST show overexpression of the KIT receptor, also known as CD117 or stem cell factor receptor. those that do not express c-KIT mutations, activate mutations in PDGFRA gene. Tumor’s macromorphology determines the imaging features on different modalities. Most of these tumors are exophytic, subepithelial, reach large size and enhance inhomogeneous due to necrosis. They usually do not cause obstruction. Ultrasound as the initiation method shows low sensitivity and specificity in GIST detection, CT with intravenous contrast is the gold standard. MRI contributes with assessing the vascularisation, cellularity and pH. FDG-PET/CT registers the metabolism of intratumoral acidosis. CT is the method of choice in the early diagnosis and determination of resectability of GIST. MRI is an additional method. PET FDG-CT is useful for the monitoring of patients treated with Imatinib

  1. Combined tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrba, H.

    1990-01-01

    This comprehensive survey of current methods and achievements first takes a look at the two basic therapies, devoting a chapter each to the surgery and radiotherapy of tumors. The principal subjects of the book, however, are the systemic, adjuvant therapy, biological therapies, hyperthermia and various other therapies (as e.g. treatment with ozone, oxygen, or homeopathic means), and psychotherapy. (MG) With 54 figs., 86 tabs [de

  2. Neuroendocrine Tumor, diagnostic difficulties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Oliveira

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH secretion is a rare disease. A 51 years old woman, with a Cushing syndrome secondary to ectopic ACTH secretion, diagnosed in 2009, with mediastinal lymphadenopathy, whose biopsy was compatible with lung small cell carcinoma, staged as IIIB using TNM classification. No other lesions were found in patient study. The patient was submitted to chemotherapy, associated to ketoconazole 200 mg twice daily, with partial remission of both conditions. Three years later was admitted with an aggravation of Cushing syndrome. There was no evidence of progression of pulmonary disease. A cystic lesion in the pancreatic uncinated process was found by abdominal CT scan and with avid uptake by DOTANOC PET discreet in anterior mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Biopsy of pancreatic mass revealed a neuroendocrine tumor. Pulmonary masses were biopsied again and was in favor of neuroendocrine tumor. It was assumed the diagnosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with mediastinal metastasis. The patient initiated lanreotid (120 mg, monthly, subcutaneous in association with ketoconazole. After 5 months of therapy, patient died with sepsis secondary to pneumonia. Neuroendocrine tumours are rare, difficult to diagnose and with poor prognosis when associated with ectopic ACTH secreting Cushing syndrome.

  3. Targeted drug delivery and penetration into solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Angelo; Pastorino, Fabio; Curnis, Flavio; Arap, Wadih; Ponzoni, Mirco; Pasqualini, Renata

    2012-09-01

    Delivery and penetration of chemotherapeutic drugs into tumors are limited by a number of factors related to abnormal vasculature and altered stroma composition in neoplastic tissues. Coupling of chemotherapeutic drugs with tumor vasculature-homing peptides or administration of drugs in combination with biological agents that affect the integrity of the endothelial lining of tumor vasculature is an appealing strategy to improve drug delivery to tumor cells. Promising approaches to achieve this goal are based on the use of Asn-Gly-Arg (NGR)-containing peptides as ligands for drug delivery and of NGR-TNF, a peptide-tumor necrosis factor-α fusion protein that selectively alters drug penetration barriers and that is currently tested in a randomized Phase III trial in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. MR findings of ovarian tumors with hormonal activity, with emphasis on tumors other than sex cord-stromal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Yumiko Oishi [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan)]. E-mail: ytanaka@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Saida, Tsukasa Sasaki [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tsukuba University Hospital (Japan); Minami, Rie [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Yagi, Takako [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tsukuba University Hospital (Japan); Tsunoda, Hajime [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kanto Medical Center, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone East Corporation (Japan); Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Minami, Manabu [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    Sex cord-stromal tumors including granulosa cell tumor, thecoma, Sertoli stromal cell tumor and steroid cell tumor are noted for their hormonal activity. However, there are many kinds of ovarian tumors other than sex cord-stromal tumors and tumor-like conditions with endocrine manifestations. Cross-sectional imaging, especially MR, can provide precise features of ovarian tumors and uterine morphological change even in a clinically latent excess of estrogen. In this article, we demonstrate typical imaging findings of ovarian tumors with hormonal activity. We also shortly explain the mechanism of the virilization and hyperestrogenism caused by ovarian tumors and tumor-like conditions.

  5. MR findings of ovarian tumors with hormonal activity, with emphasis on tumors other than sex cord-stromal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yumiko Oishi; Saida, Tsukasa Sasaki; Minami, Rie; Yagi, Takako; Tsunoda, Hajime; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Minami, Manabu

    2007-01-01

    Sex cord-stromal tumors including granulosa cell tumor, thecoma, Sertoli stromal cell tumor and steroid cell tumor are noted for their hormonal activity. However, there are many kinds of ovarian tumors other than sex cord-stromal tumors and tumor-like conditions with endocrine manifestations. Cross-sectional imaging, especially MR, can provide precise features of ovarian tumors and uterine morphological change even in a clinically latent excess of estrogen. In this article, we demonstrate typical imaging findings of ovarian tumors with hormonal activity. We also shortly explain the mechanism of the virilization and hyperestrogenism caused by ovarian tumors and tumor-like conditions

  6. Tumor regression patterns in retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, S.N.; Siddique, S.N.; Zaheer, N.

    2016-01-01

    To observe the types of tumor regression after treatment, and identify the common pattern of regression in our patients. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, Al-Shifa Trust Eye Hospital, Rawalpindi, Pakistan, from October 2011 to October 2014. Methodology: Children with unilateral and bilateral retinoblastoma were included in the study. Patients were referred to Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad, for chemotherapy. After every cycle of chemotherapy, dilated funds examination under anesthesia was performed to record response of the treatment. Regression patterns were recorded on RetCam II. Results: Seventy-four tumors were included in the study. Out of 74 tumors, 3 were ICRB group A tumors, 43 were ICRB group B tumors, 14 tumors belonged to ICRB group C, and remaining 14 were ICRB group D tumors. Type IV regression was seen in 39.1% (n=29) tumors, type II in 29.7% (n=22), type III in 25.6% (n=19), and type I in 5.4% (n=4). All group A tumors (100%) showed type IV regression. Seventeen (39.5%) group B tumors showed type IV regression. In group C, 5 tumors (35.7%) showed type II regression and 5 tumors (35.7%) showed type IV regression. In group D, 6 tumors (42.9%) regressed to type II non-calcified remnants. Conclusion: The response and success of the focal and systemic treatment, as judged by the appearance of different patterns of tumor regression, varies with the ICRB grouping of the tumor. (author)

  7. A simple, quantitative method using alginate gel to determine rat colonic tumor volume in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Amy A; Young, Lindsay B; Pleiman, Jennifer K; Konrath, Michael J; Marzella, Blake; Nonte, Michael; Cacciatore, Justin; Ford, Madeline R; Clipson, Linda; Amos-Landgraf, James