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Sample records for tumor amide proton

  1. Amide proton transfer imaging of high intensity focused ultrasound-treated tumor tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hectors, S.J.C.G.; Jacobs, I.; Strijkers, G.J.; Nicolay, K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the suitability of amide proton transfer (APT) imaging as a biomarker for the characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-treated tumor tissue was assessed. Methods: APT imaging was performed on tumor-bearing mice before (n=15), directly after (n=15) and at 3

  2. Amide Proton Transfer Imaging of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound-Treated Tumor Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hectors, Stefanie J. C. G.; Jacobs, Igor; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Nicolay, Klaas

    2014-01-01

    PurposeIn this study, the suitability of amide proton transfer (APT) imaging as a biomarker for the characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-treated tumor tissue was assessed. MethodsAPT imaging was performed on tumor-bearing mice before (n=15), directly after (n=15) and at 3

  3. Amide proton transfer (APT) imaging of brain tumors at 7 T : The role of tissue water T1 -Relaxation properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khlebnikov, V; Polders, Daniel; Hendrikse, J; Robe, Pierre A.; Voormolen, Eduard H; Luijten, Peter R; Klomp, DWJ; Hoogduin, Hans

    PURPOSE: To provide insight into the effect of water T1 relaxation (T1wat ) on amide proton transfer (APT) contrast in tumors. Three different metrics of APT contrast-magnetization transfer ratio (MTRRex ), relaxation-compensated MTRRex (AREX), and traditional asymmetry (MTRasym )-were compared in

  4. Amide proton transfer imaging in clinics: Basic concepts and current and future use in brain tumors and stoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Eun [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jahng, Geon Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Ha Kyu [Philips Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Amide proton transfer (APT) imaging is gaining attention as a relatively new in vivo molecular imaging technique that has higher sensitivity and spatial resolution than magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging. APT imaging is a subset of the chemical exchange saturation transfer mechanism, which can offer unique image contrast by selectively saturating protons in target molecules that get exchanged with protons in bulk water. In this review, we describe the basic concepts of APT imaging, particularly with regard to the benefit in clinics from the current literature. Clinical applications of APT imaging are described from two perspectives: in the diagnosis and monitoring of the treatment response in brain glioma by reflecting endogenous mobile proteins and peptides, and in the potential for stroke imaging with respect to tissue acidity.

  5. Amide proton temperature coefficients as hydrogen bond indicators in proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cierpicki, Tomasz; Otlewski, Jacek

    2001-01-01

    Correlations between amide proton temperature coefficients (Δσ HN /ΔT) and hydrogen bonds were investigated for a data set of 793 amides derived from 14 proteins. For amide protons showing temperature gradients more positive than -4.6 ppb/K there is a hydrogen bond predictivity value exceeding 85%. It increases to over 93% for amides within the range between -4 and -1 ppb/K. Detailed analysis shows an inverse proportionality between amide proton temperature coefficients and hydrogen bond lengths. Furthermore, for hydrogen bonds of similar bond lengths, values of temperature gradients in α-helices are on average 1 ppb/K more negative than in β-sheets. In consequence, a number of amide protons in α-helices involved in hydrogen bonds shorter than 2 A show Δσ HN /ΔT 10 helices and 98% in β-turns have temperature coefficients more positive than -4.6ppb/K. Ring current effect also significantly influences temperature coefficients of amide protons. In seven out of eight cases non-hydrogen bonded amides strongly deshielded by neighboring aromatic rings show temperature coefficients more positive than -2 ppb/K. In general, amide proton temperature gradients do not change with pH unless they correspond to conformational changes. Three examples of pH dependent equilibrium showing hydrogen bond formation at higher pH were found. In conclusion, amide proton temperature coefficients offer an attractive and simple way to confirm existence of hydrogen bonds in NMR determined structures

  6. Protein proton-proton dynamics from amide proton spin flip rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, Daniel S.; Zuiderweg, Erik R. P.

    2009-01-01

    Residue-specific amide proton spin-flip rates K were measured for peptide-free and peptide-bound calmodulin. K approximates the sum of NOE build-up rates between the amide proton and all other protons. This work outlines the theory of multi-proton relaxation, cross relaxation and cross correlation, and how to approximate it with a simple model based on a variable number of equidistant protons. This model is used to extract the sums of K-rates from the experimental data. Error in K is estimated using bootstrap methodology. We define a parameter Q as the ratio of experimental K-rates to theoretical K-rates, where the theoretical K-rates are computed from atomic coordinates. Q is 1 in the case of no local motion, but decreases to values as low as 0.5 with increasing domination of sidechain protons of the same residue to the amide proton flips. This establishes Q as a monotonous measure of local dynamics of the proton network surrounding the amide protons. The method is applied to the study of proton dynamics in Ca 2+ -saturated calmodulin, both free in solution and bound to smMLCK peptide. The mean Q is 0.81 ± 0.02 for free calmodulin and 0.88 ± 0.02 for peptide-bound calmodulin. This novel methodology thus reveals the presence of significant interproton disorder in this protein, while the increase in Q indicates rigidification of the proton network upon peptide binding, confirming the known high entropic cost of this process

  7. Solvent Exchange Rates of Side-chain Amide Protons in Proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajagopal, Ponni; Jones, Bryan E.; Klevit, Rachel E.

    1998-01-01

    Solvent exchange rates and temperature coefficients for Asn/Gln side-chain amide protons have been measured in Escherichia coli HPr. The protons of the eight side-chain amide groups (two Asn and six Gln) exhibit varying exchange rates which are slower than some of the fast exchanging backbone amide protons. Differences in exchange rates of the E and Z protons of the same side-chain amide group are obtained by measuring exchange rates at pH values > 8. An NOE between a side-chain amide proton and a bound water molecule was also observed

  8. An Efficient Computational Model to Predict Protonation at the Amide Nitrogen and Reactivity along the C–N Rotational Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostak, Roman; Aubé, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    N-protonation of amides is critical in numerous biological processes, including amide bonds proteolysis and protein folding, as well as in organic synthesis as a method to activate amide bonds towards unconventional reactivity. A computational model enabling prediction of protonation at the amide bond nitrogen atom along the C–N rotational pathway is reported. Notably, this study provides a blueprint for the rational design and application of amides with a controlled degree of rotation in synthetic chemistry and biology. PMID:25766378

  9. Proton Therapy for Thoracoabdominal Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Hideyuki; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sugahara, Shinji; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Tokuuye, Koichi

    In advanced-stage disease of certain thoracoabdominal tumors, proton therapy (PT) with concurrent chemotherapy may be an option to reduce side effects. Several technological developments, including a respiratory gating system and implantation of fiducial markers for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), are necessary for the treatment in thoracoabdominal tumors. In this chapter, the role of PT for tumors of the lung, the esophagus, and liver are discussed.

  10. Measurement of Lactate Content and Amide Proton Transfer Values in the Basal Ganglia of a Neonatal Piglet Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury Model Using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y; Wang, X-M

    2017-04-01

    As amide proton transfer imaging is sensitive to protein content and intracellular pH, it has been widely used in the nervous system, including brain tumors and stroke. This work aimed to measure the lactate content and amide proton transfer values in the basal ganglia of a neonatal piglet hypoxic-ischemic brain injury model by using MR spectroscopy and amide proton transfer imaging. From 58 healthy neonatal piglets (3-5 days after birth; weight, 1-1.5 kg) selected initially, 9 piglets remained in the control group and 43 piglets, in the hypoxic-ischemic brain injury group. Single-section amide proton transfer imaging was performed at the coronal level of the basal ganglia. Amide proton transfer values of the bilateral basal ganglia were measured in all piglets. The ROI of MR spectroscopy imaging was the right basal ganglia, and the postprocessing was completed with LCModel software. After hypoxic-ischemic insult, the amide proton transfer values immediately decreased, and at 0-2 hours, they remained at their lowest level. Thereafter, they gradually increased and finally exceeded those of the control group at 48-72 hours. After hypoxic-ischemic insult, the lactate content increased immediately, was maximal at 2-6 hours, and then gradually decreased to the level of the control group. The amide proton transfer values were negatively correlated with lactate content ( r = -0.79, P < .05). This observation suggests that after hypoxic-ischemic insult, the recovery of pH was faster than that of lactate homeostasis. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  11. Amide proton exchange rates of a bound pepsin inhibitor determined by isotope-edited proton NMR experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesik, S.W.; Luly, J.R.; Stein, H.H.; BaMaung, N.

    1987-01-01

    From a series of isotope-edited proton NMR spectra, amide proton exchange rates were measured at 20 C, 30 C, and 40 0 C for a tightly bound 15 N-labeled tripeptide inhibitor of porcine pepsin (IC50 = 1.7 X 10(-) M). Markedly different NH exchange rates were observed for the three amide protons of the bound inhibitor. The P1 NH exchanged much more slowly than the P2 NH and P3 NH. These results are discussed in terms of the relative solvent accessibility in the active site and the role of the NH protons of the inhibitor for hydrogen bonding to the enzyme. In this study a useful approach is demonstrated for obtaining NH exchange rates on ligands bound to biomacromolecules, the knowledge of which could be of potential utility in the design of therapeutically useful nonpeptide enzyme inhibitors from peptide leads

  12. Characterizing amide proton transfer imaging in haemorrhage brain lesions using 3T MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ha-Kyu [Philips Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Korea Basic Science Institute, Chungcheongbuk-do (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kyunghwa [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Zhou, Jinyuan [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of MRI Research, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhao, Yansong [Philips Healthcare, MR Clinical Science, Cleveland, OH (United States); Choi, Yoon Seong; Lee, Seung-Koo; Ahn, Sung Soo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this study was to characterize amide proton transfer (APT)-weighted signals in acute and subacute haemorrhage brain lesions of various underlying aetiologies. Twenty-three patients with symptomatic haemorrhage brain lesions including tumorous (n = 16) and non-tumorous lesions (n = 7) were evaluated. APT imaging was performed and analyzed with magnetization transfer ratio asymmetry (MTR{sub asym}). Regions of interest were defined as the enhancing portion (when present), acute or subacute haemorrhage, and normal-appearing white matter based on anatomical MRI. MTR{sub asym} values were compared among groups and components using a linear mixed model. MTR{sub asym} values were 3.68 % in acute haemorrhage, 1.6 % in subacute haemorrhage, 2.65 % in the enhancing portion, and 0.38 % in normal white matter. According to the linear mixed model, the distribution of MTR{sub asym} values among components was not significantly different between tumour and non-tumour groups. MTR{sub asym} in acute haemorrhage was significantly higher than those in the other regions regardless of underlying pathology. Acute haemorrhages showed high MTR{sub asym} regardless of the underlying pathology, whereas subacute haemorrhages showed lower MTR{sub asym} than acute haemorrhages. These results can aid in the interpretation of APT imaging in haemorrhage brain lesions. (orig.)

  13. Protein structure validation and refinement using amide proton chemical shifts derived from quantum mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Steen; Linnet, Troels Emtekær; Borg, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    We present the ProCS method for the rapid and accurate prediction of protein backbone amide proton chemical shifts - sensitive probes of the geometry of key hydrogen bonds that determine protein structure. ProCS is parameterized against quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and reproduces high level...

  14. Protein folding kinetics by combined use of rapid mixing techniques and NMR observation of individual amide protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roder, H.; Wuethrich, K.

    1986-01-01

    A method to be used for experimental studies of protein folding introduced by Schmid and Baldwin, which is based on the competition between amide hydrogen exchange and protein refolding, was extended by using rapid mixing techniques and 1 H NMR to provide site-resolved kinetic information on the early phases of protein structure acquisition. In this method, a protonated solution of the unfolded protein is rapidly mixed with a deuterated buffer solution at conditions assuring protein refolding in the mixture. This simultaneously initiates the exchange of unprotected amide protons with solvent deuterium and the refolding of protein segments which can protect amide groups from further exchange. After variable reaction times the amide proton exchange is quenched while folding to the native form continues to completion. By using 1 H NMR, the extent of exchange at individual amide sites is then measured in the refolded protein. Competition experiments at variable reaction times or variable pH indicate the time at which each amide group is protected in the refolding process. This technique was applied to the basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, for which sequence-specific assignments of the amide proton NMR lines had previously been obtained. For eight individual amide protons located in the beta-sheet and the C-terminal alpha-helix of this protein, apparent refolding rates in the range from 15 s-1 to 60 s-1 were observed. These rates are on the time scale of the fast folding phase observed with optical probes

  15. Intramolecular migration of amide hydrogens in protonated peptides upon collisional activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Gårdsvoll, H.; Ploug, M.

    2005-01-01

    Presently different opinions exist as to the degree of scrambling of amide hydrogens in gaseous protonated peptides and proteins upon collisional activation in tandem mass spectrometry experiments. This unsettled controversy is not trivial, since only a very low degree of scrambling is tolerable...... if collision-induced dissociation (CID) should provide reliable site-specific information from (1)H/(2)H exchange experiments. We have explored a series of unique, regioselectively deuterium-labeled peptides as model systems to probe for intramolecular amide hydrogen migration under low-energy collisional...... are protected against exchange with the solvent, while the amide hydrogens of the nonbinding sequences exchange rapidly with the solvent. We have utilized such long-lived complexes to generate peptides labeled with deuterium in either the binding or nonbinding region, and the expected regioselectivity...

  16. Amide proton solvent protection in amylin fibrils probed by quenched hydrogen exchange NMR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei T Alexandrescu

    Full Text Available Amylin is an endocrine hormone that accumulates in amyloid plaques in patients with advanced type 2 diabetes. The amyloid plaques have been implicated in the destruction of pancreatic β-cells, which synthesize amylin and insulin. To better characterize the secondary structure of amylin in amyloid fibrils we assigned the NMR spectrum of the unfolded state in 95% DMSO and used a quenched hydrogen-deuterium exchange technique to look at amide proton solvent protection in the fibrils. In this technique, partially exchanged fibrils are dissolved in 95% DMSO and information about amide proton occupancy in the fibrils is determined from DMSO-denatured monomers. Hydrogen exchange lifetimes at pH 7.6 and 37°C vary between ∼5 h for the unstructured N-terminus to 600 h for amide protons in the two β-strands that form inter-molecular hydrogen bonds between amylin monomers along the length of the fibril. Based on the protection data we conclude that residues A8-H18 and I26-Y37 comprise the two β-strands in amylin fibrils. There is variation in protection within the β-strands, particularly for strand β1 where only residues F15-H18 are strongly protected. Differences in protection appear to be due to restrictions on backbone dynamics imposed by the packing of two-layers of C2-symmetry-related β-hairpins in the protofilament structure, with strand β1 positioned on the surface and β2 in the interior.

  17. Guanidinium chloride induction of partial unfolding in amide proton exchange in RNase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, S L; Baldwin, R L

    1993-11-05

    Amide (NH) proton exchange rates were measured in 0.0 to 0.7 M guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) for 23 slowly exchanging peptide NH protons of ribonuclease A (RNase A) at pH* 5.5 (uncorrected pH measured in D2O), 34 degrees C. The purpose was to find out whether GdmCl induces exchange through binding to exchange intermediates that are partly or wholly unfolded. It was predicted that, when the logarithm of the exchange rate is plotted as a function of the molarity of GdmCl, the slope should be a measure of the amount of buried surface area exposed to GdmCl in the exchange intermediate. The results indicate that these concentrations of GdmCl do induce exchange by means of a partial unfolding mechanism for all 23 protons; this implies that exchange reactions can be used to study the unfolding and stability of local regions. Of the 23 protons, nine also show a second mechanism of exchange at lower concentrations of GdmCl, a mechanism that is nearly independent of GdmCl concentration and is termed "limited structural fluctuation."

  18. Collisional activation by MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry induces intramolecular migration of amide hydrogens in protonated peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Bache, Nicolai; Roepstorff, Peter

    2005-01-01

    of doubly protonated peptides that the original regioselective deuterium pattern of these peptides is completely erased (Jørgensen, T. J. D., Gårdsvoll, H., Ploug, M., and Roepstorff, P. (2005) Intramolecular migration of amide hydrogens in protonated peptides upon collisional activation. J. Am. Chem. Soc...... randomization among all exchangeable sites (i.e. all N- and O-linked hydrogens) also occurs upon high energy collisional activation of singly protonated peptides. This intense proton/deuteron traffic precludes the use of MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry to obtain reliable information...

  19. Stereospecific assignment of the asparagine and glutamine sidechain amide protons in proteins from chemical shift analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harsch, Tobias; Schneider, Philipp; Kieninger, Bärbel; Donaubauer, Harald; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert, E-mail: hans-robert.kalbitzer@biologie.uni-regensburg.de [University of Regensburg, Institute of Biophysics and Physical Biochemistry and Centre of Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry and Biomedicine (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Side chain amide protons of asparagine and glutamine residues in random-coil peptides are characterized by large chemical shift differences and can be stereospecifically assigned on the basis of their chemical shift values only. The bimodal chemical shift distributions stored in the biological magnetic resonance data bank (BMRB) do not allow such an assignment. However, an analysis of the BMRB shows, that a substantial part of all stored stereospecific assignments is not correct. We show here that in most cases stereospecific assignment can also be done for folded proteins using an unbiased artificial chemical shift data base (UACSB). For a separation of the chemical shifts of the two amide resonance lines with differences ≥0.40 ppm for asparagine and differences ≥0.42 ppm for glutamine, the downfield shifted resonance lines can be assigned to H{sup δ21} and H{sup ε21}, respectively, at a confidence level >95%. A classifier derived from UASCB can also be used to correct the BMRB data. The program tool AssignmentChecker implemented in AUREMOL calculates the Bayesian probability for a given stereospecific assignment and automatically corrects the assignments for a given list of chemical shifts.

  20. Proton MRS imaging in pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarifi, Maria [Aghia Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Athens (Greece); Tzika, A.A. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Shriners Burn Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) techniques offer a noninvasive, non-irradiating yet sensitive approach to diagnosing and monitoring pediatric brain tumors. Proton MR spectroscopy (MRS), as an adjunct to MRI, is being more widely applied to monitor the metabolic aspects of brain cancer. In vivo MRS biomarkers represent a promising advance and may influence treatment choice at both initial diagnosis and follow-up, given the inherent difficulties of sequential biopsies to monitor therapeutic response. When combined with anatomical or other types of imaging, MRS provides unique information regarding biochemistry in inoperable brain tumors and can complement neuropathological data, guide biopsies and enhance insight into therapeutic options. The combination of noninvasively acquired prognostic information and the high-resolution anatomical imaging provided by conventional MRI is expected to surpass molecular analysis and DNA microarray gene profiling, both of which, although promising, depend on invasive biopsy. This review focuses on recent data in the field of MRS in children with brain tumors. (orig.)

  1. R1 correction in amide proton transfer imaging: indication of the influence of transcytolemmal water exchange on CEST measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Li, Ke; Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Zu, Zhongliang; Zaiss, Moritz; Gochberg, Daniel F; Gore, John C; Xu, Junzhong

    2015-12-01

    Amide proton transfer (APT) imaging may potentially detect mobile proteins/peptides non-invasively in vivo, but its specificity may be reduced by contamination from other confounding effects such as asymmetry of non-specific magnetization transfer (MT) effects and spin-lattice relaxation with rate R1 (=1/T1). Previously reported spillover, MT and R1 correction methods were based on a two-pool model, in which the existence of multiple water compartments with heterogeneous relaxation properties in real tissues was ignored. Such simple models may not adequately represent real tissues, and thus such corrections may be unreliable. The current study investigated the effectiveness and accuracy of correcting for R1 in APT imaging via simulations and in vivo experiments using tumor-bearing rats subjected to serial injections of Gd-DTPA that produced different tissue R1 values in regions of blood-brain-barrier breakdown. The results suggest that conventional measurements of APT contrast (such as APT* and MTRasym ) may be significantly contaminated by R1 variations, while the R1 -corrected metric AREX* was found to be relatively unaffected by R1 changes over a broad range (0.4-1 Hz). Our results confirm the importance of correcting for spin-lattice relaxation effects in quantitative APT imaging, and demonstrate the reliability of using the observed tissue R1 for corrections to obtain more specific and accurate measurements of APT contrast in vivo. The results also indicate that, due to relatively fast transcytolemmal water exchange, the influence of intra- and extracellular water compartments on CEST measurements with seconds long saturation time may be ignored in tumors. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Applying protein-based amide proton transfer MR imaging to distinguish solitary brain metastases from glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hao; Zou, Tianyu; Wang, Xianlong; Du, Yongxing; Jiang, Chunxiu; Ma, Ling; Zhu, Jianbin; He, Wen; Rui, Qihong; Wen, Zhibo [Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Lou, Huiling [The First People' Hospital of Guangzhou, Department of Geriatrics, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Jiang, Shanshan [Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of MR Research, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Huang, Zhongqing [Shantou University Medical College, Department of Medical Image Center, Yuebei People' s Hospital, Shantou, Guangdong (China); Zhou, Jianyuan [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of MR Research, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2017-11-15

    To determine the utility of amide proton transfer-weighted (APTw) MR imaging in distinguishing solitary brain metastases (SBMs) from glioblastomas (GBMs). Forty-five patients with SBMs and 43 patients with GBMs underwent conventional and APT-weighted sequences before clinical intervention. The APTw parameters and relative APTw (rAPTw) parameters in the tumour core and the peritumoral brain zone (PBZ) were obtained and compared between SBMs and GBMs. The receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to assess the best parameter for distinguishing between the two groups. The APTw{sub max}, APTw{sub min}, APTw{sub mean}, rAPTw{sub max}, rAPTw{sub min} or rAPTw{sub mean} values in the tumour core were not significantly different between the SBM and GBM groups (P = 0.141, 0.361, 0.221, 0.305, 0.578 and 0.448, respectively). However, the APTw{sub max}, APTw{sub min}, APTw{sub mean}, rAPTw{sub max}, rAPTw{sub min} or rAPTw{sub mean} values in the PBZ were significantly lower in the SBM group than in the GBM group (P < 0.001). The APTw{sub min} values had the highest area under the ROC curve 0.905 and accuracy 85.2% in discriminating between the two neoplasms. As a noninvasive imaging method, APT-weighted MR imaging can be used to distinguish SBMs from GBMs. (orig.)

  3. Amide Proton Transfer (APT) MR imaging and Magnetization Transfer (MT) MR imaging of pediatric brain development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hong; Kang, Huiying; Peng, Yun; Zhao, Xuna; Jiang, Shanshan; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Jinyuan

    2016-01-01

    To quantify the brain maturation process during childhood using combined amide proton transfer (APT) and conventional magnetization transfer (MT) imaging at 3 Tesla. Eighty-two neurodevelopmentally normal children (44 males and 38 females; age range, 2-190 months) were imaged using an APT/MT imaging protocol with multiple saturation frequency offsets. The APT-weighted (APTW) and MT ratio (MTR) signals were quantitatively analyzed in multiple brain areas. Age-related changes in MTR and APTW were evaluated with a non-linear regression analysis. The APTW signals followed a decreasing exponential curve with age in all brain regions measured (R"2 = 0.7-0.8 for the corpus callosum, frontal and occipital white matter, and centrum semiovale). The most significant changes appeared within the first year. At maturation, larger decreases in APTW and lower APTW values were found in the white matter. On the contrary, the MTR signals followed an increasing exponential curve with age in the same brain regions measured, with the most significant changes appearing within the initial 2 years. There was an inverse correlation between the MTR and APTW signal intensities during brain maturation. Together with MT imaging, protein-based APT imaging can provide additional information in assessing brain myelination in the paediatric population. (orig.)

  4. Amide proton transfer imaging for differentiation of benign and atypical meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Bio [The Armed Forces Capital Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kyunghwa; Choi, Yoon Seong; Lee, Seung-Koo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sung Soo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Jong Hee; Kang, Seok-Gu [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se Hoon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Zhou, Jinyuan [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of MRI Research, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2018-01-15

    To investigate the difference in amide proton transfer (APT)-weighted signals between benign and atypical meningiomas and determine the value of APT imaging for differentiating the two. Fifty-seven patients with pathologically diagnosed meningiomas (benign, 44; atypical, 13), who underwent preoperative MRI with APT imaging between December 2014 and August 2016 were included. We compared normalised magnetisation transfer ratio asymmetry (nMTR{sub asym}) values between benign and atypical meningiomas on APT-weighted images. Conventional MRI features were qualitatively assessed. Both imaging features were evaluated by multivariable logistic regression analysis. The discriminative value of MRI with and without nMTR{sub asym} was evaluated. The nMTR{sub asym} of atypical meningiomas was significantly greater than that of benign meningiomas (2.46% vs. 1.67%; P < 0.001). In conventional MR images, benign and atypical meningiomas exhibited significant differences in maximum tumour diameter, non-skull base location, and heterogeneous enhancement. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, high nMTR{sub asym} was an independent predictor of atypical meningiomas (adjusted OR, 11.227; P = 0.014). The diagnostic performance of MRI improved with nMTR{sub asym} for predicting atypical meningiomas. Atypical meningiomas exhibited significantly higher APT-weighted signal intensities than benign meningiomas. The discriminative value of conventional MRI improved significantly when combined with APT imaging for diagnosis of atypical meningioma. (orig.)

  5. Amide Proton Transfer (APT) MR imaging and Magnetization Transfer (MT) MR imaging of pediatric brain development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hong; Kang, Huiying; Peng, Yun [Beijing Children' s Hospital, Capital Medical University, Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Zhao, Xuna [Philips Healthcare, Beijing (China); Jiang, Shanshan; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Jinyuan [Johns Hopkins University, Division of MR Research, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-10-15

    To quantify the brain maturation process during childhood using combined amide proton transfer (APT) and conventional magnetization transfer (MT) imaging at 3 Tesla. Eighty-two neurodevelopmentally normal children (44 males and 38 females; age range, 2-190 months) were imaged using an APT/MT imaging protocol with multiple saturation frequency offsets. The APT-weighted (APTW) and MT ratio (MTR) signals were quantitatively analyzed in multiple brain areas. Age-related changes in MTR and APTW were evaluated with a non-linear regression analysis. The APTW signals followed a decreasing exponential curve with age in all brain regions measured (R{sup 2} = 0.7-0.8 for the corpus callosum, frontal and occipital white matter, and centrum semiovale). The most significant changes appeared within the first year. At maturation, larger decreases in APTW and lower APTW values were found in the white matter. On the contrary, the MTR signals followed an increasing exponential curve with age in the same brain regions measured, with the most significant changes appearing within the initial 2 years. There was an inverse correlation between the MTR and APTW signal intensities during brain maturation. Together with MT imaging, protein-based APT imaging can provide additional information in assessing brain myelination in the paediatric population. (orig.)

  6. Picolyl amides of betulinic acid as antitumor agents causing tumor cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bildziukevich, Uladzimir; Rárová, Lucie; Šaman, David; Wimmer, Zdeněk

    2018-02-10

    A series of picolyl amides of betulinic acid (3a-3c and 6a-6c) was prepared and subjected to the cytotoxicity screening tests. Structure-activity relationships studies resulted in finding differences in biological activity in dependence on o-, m- and p-substitution of the pyridine ring in the target amides, when cytotoxicity data of 3a-3c and 6a-6c were obtained and compared. The amides 3b and 3a displayed cytotoxicity (given in the IC 50 values) in G-361 (0.5 ± 0.1 μM and 2.4 ± 0.0 μM, respectively), MCF7 (1.4 ± 0.1 μM and 2.2 ± 0.2 μM, respectively), HeLa (2.4 ± 0.4 μM and 2.3 ± 0.5 μM, respectively) and CEM (6.5 ± 1.5 μM and 6.9 ± 0.4 μM, respectively) tumor cell lines, and showed weak effect in the normal human fibroblasts (BJ). Selectivity against all tested cancer cells was determined and compared to normal cells with therapeutic index (TI) between 7 and 100 for compounds 3a and 3b. The therapeutic index (TI = 100) was calculated for human malignant melanoma cell line (G-361) versus normal human fibroblasts (BJ). The cytotoxicity of other target amides (3c and 6a-6c) revealed lower effects than 3a and 3b in the tested cancer cell lines. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimization of 7-T Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer Parameters for Validation of Glycosaminoglycan and Amide Proton Transfer of Fibroglandular Breast Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dula, Adrienne N.; Dewey, Blake E.; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Williams, Jason M.; Klomp, DWJ; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Smith, Seth

    Purpose: To (a) implement simulation-optimized chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) measurements sensitive to amide proton transfer (APT) and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) hydroxyl proton transfer effects in the human breast at 7 T and (b) determine the reliability of these techniques for

  8. Applying Amide Proton Transfer MR Imaging to Hybrid Brain PET/MR: Concordance with Gadolinium Enhancement and Added Value to [18F]FDG PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongzan; Xin, Jun; Zhou, Jinyuan; Lu, Zaiming; Guo, Qiyong

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic concordance and metric correlations of amide proton transfer (APT) imaging with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F-]fluoro-D-glucose ([ 18 F]FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), using hybrid brain PET/MRI. Twenty-one subjects underwent brain gadolinium-enhanced [ 18 F]FDG PET/MRI prospectively. Imaging accuracy was compared between unenhanced MRI, MRI with enhancement, APT-weighted (APTW) images, and PET based on six diagnostic criteria. Among tumors, the McNemar test was further used for concordance assessment between gadolinium-enhanced imaging, APT imaging, and [ 18 F]FDG PET. As well, the relation of metrics between APT imaging and PET was analyzed by the Pearson correlation analysis. APT imaging and gadolinium-enhanced MRI showed superior and similar diagnostic accuracy. APTW signal intensity and gadolinium enhancement were concordant in 19 tumors (100 %), while high [ 18 F]FDG avidity was shown in only 12 (63.2 %). For the metrics from APT imaging and PET, there was significant correlation for 13 hypermetabolic tumors (P PET in the evaluation of tumor metabolic activity during brain PET/MR studies.

  9. Increased CEST specificity for amide and fast-exchanging amine protons using exchange-dependent relaxation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Feng; Xu, Junzhong; Gochberg, Daniel F; Gore, John C; Zu, Zhongliang

    2018-02-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging of amides at 3.5 ppm and fast-exchanging amines at 3 ppm provides a unique means to enhance the sensitivity of detection of, for example, proteins/peptides and neurotransmitters, respectively, and hence can provide important information on molecular composition. However, despite the high sensitivity relative to conventional magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), in practice, CEST often has relatively poor specificity. For example, CEST signals are typically influenced by several confounding effects, including direct water saturation (DS), semi-solid non-specific magnetization transfer (MT), the influence of water relaxation times (T 1w ) and nearby overlapping CEST signals. Although several editing techniques have been developed to increase the specificity by removing DS, semi-solid MT and T 1w influences, it is still challenging to remove overlapping CEST signals from different exchanging sites. For instance, the amide proton transfer (APT) signal could be contaminated by CEST effects from fast-exchanging amines at 3 ppm and intermediate-exchanging amines at 2 ppm. The current work applies an exchange-dependent relaxation rate (R ex ) to address this problem. Simulations demonstrate that: (1) slowly exchanging amides and fast-exchanging amines have distinct dependences on irradiation powers; and (2) R ex serves as a resonance frequency high-pass filter to selectively reduce CEST signals with resonance frequencies closer to water. These characteristics of R ex provide a means to isolate the APT signal from amines. In addition, previous studies have shown that CEST signals from fast-exchanging amines have no distinct features around their resonance frequencies. However, R ex gives Lorentzian lineshapes centered at their resonance frequencies for fast-exchanging amines and thus can significantly increase the specificity of CEST imaging for amides and fast-exchanging amines. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons

  10. Detection of atmospheric gaseous amines and amides by a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer with protonated ethanol reagent ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Amines and amides are important atmospheric organic-nitrogen compounds but high time resolution, highly sensitive, and simultaneous ambient measurements of these species are rather sparse. Here, we present the development of a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS method, utilizing protonated ethanol as reagent ions to simultaneously detect atmospheric gaseous amines (C1 to C6 and amides (C1 to C6. This method possesses sensitivities of 5.6–19.4 Hz pptv−1 for amines and 3.8–38.0 Hz pptv−1 for amides under total reagent ion signals of  ∼  0.32 MHz. Meanwhile, the detection limits were 0.10–0.50 pptv for amines and 0.29–1.95 pptv for amides at 3σ of the background signal for a 1 min integration time. Controlled characterization in the laboratory indicates that relative humidity has significant influences on the detection of amines and amides, whereas the presence of organics has no obvious effects. Ambient measurements of amines and amides utilizing this method were conducted from 25 July to 25 August 2015 in urban Shanghai, China. While the concentrations of amines ranged from a few parts per trillion by volume to hundreds of parts per trillion by volume, concentrations of amides varied from tens of parts per trillion by volume to a few parts per billion by volume. Among the C1- to C6-amines, the C2-amines were the dominant species with concentrations up to 130 pptv. For amides, the C3-amides (up to 8.7 ppb were the most abundant species. The diurnal and backward trajectory analysis profiles of amides suggest that in addition to the secondary formation of amides in the atmosphere, industrial emissions could be important sources of amides in urban Shanghai. During the campaign, photo-oxidation of amines and amides might be a main loss pathway for them in daytime, and wet deposition was also an important sink.

  11. Rapid and accurate processing method for amide proton exchange rate measurement in proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koskela, Harri; Heikkinen, Outi; Kilpelaeinen, Ilkka; Heikkinen, Sami

    2007-01-01

    Exchange between protein backbone amide hydrogen and water gives relevant information about solvent accessibility and protein secondary structure stability. NMR spectroscopy provides a convenient tool to study these dynamic processes with saturation transfer experiments. Processing of this type of NMR spectra has traditionally required peak integration followed by exponential fitting, which can be tedious with large data sets. We propose here a computer-aided method that applies inverse Laplace transform in the exchange rate measurement. With this approach, the determination of exchange rates can be automated, and reliable results can be acquired rapidly without a need for manual processing

  12. Proton radiotherapy in management of pediatric base of skull tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hug, Eugen B.; Sweeney, Reinhart A.; Nurre, Pamela M.; Holloway, Kitty C.; Slater, Jerry D.; Munzenrider, John E.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Primary skull base tumors of the developing child are rare and present a formidable challenge to both surgeons and radiation oncologists. Gross total resection with negative margins is rarely achieved, and the risks of functional, structural, and cosmetic deficits limit the radiation dose using conventional radiation techniques. Twenty-nine children and adolescents treated with conformal proton radiotherapy (proton RT) were analyzed to assess treatment efficacy and safety. Methods and Materials: Between July 1992 and April 1999, 29 patients with mesenchymal tumors underwent fractionated proton (13 patients) or fractionated combined proton and photon (16 patients) irradiation. The age at treatment ranged from 1 to 19 years (median 12); 14 patients were male and 15 female. Tumors were grouped as malignant or benign. Twenty patients had malignant histologic findings, including chordoma (n=10), chondrosarcoma (n=3), rhabdomyosarcoma (n=4), and other sarcomas (n=3). Target doses ranged between 50.4 and 78.6 Gy/cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE), delivered at doses of 1.8-2.0 Gy/CGE per fraction. The benign histologic findings included giant cell tumors (n=6), angiofibromas (n=2), and chondroblastoma (n=1). RT doses for this group ranged from 45.0 to 71.8 Gy/CGE. Despite maximal surgical resection, 28 (97%) of 29 patients had gross disease at the time of proton RT. Follow-up after proton RT ranged from 13 to 92 months (mean 40). Results: Of the 20 patients with malignant tumors, 5 (25%) had local failure; 1 patient had failure in the surgical access route and 3 patients developed distant metastases. Seven patients had died of progressive disease at the time of analysis. Local tumor control was maintained in 6 (60%) of 10 patients with chordoma, 3 (100%) of 3 with chondrosarcoma, 4 (100%) of 4 with rhabdomyosarcoma, and 2 (66%) of 3 with other sarcomas. The actuarial 5-year local control and overall survival rate was 72% and 56%, respectively, and the overall survival

  13. Proton therapy for tumors of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munzenrider, J.E.; Liebsch, N.J. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Univ. Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1999-06-01

    Charged particle beams are ideal for treating skull base and cervical spine tumors: dose can be focused in the target, while achieving significant sparing of the brain, brain stem, cervical cord, and optic nerves and chiasm. For skull base tumors, 10-year local control rates with combined proton-photon therapy are highest for chondrosarcomas, intermediate for male chordomas, and lowest for female chordomas (94%, 65%, and 42%, respectively). For cervical spine tumors, 10-year local control rates are not significantly different for chordomas and chondrosarcomas (54% and 48%, respectively), nor is there any difference in local control between males and females. Observed treatment-related morbidity has been judged acceptable, in view of the major morbidity and mortality which accompany uncontrolled tumor growth. (orig.)

  14. Proton therapy for tumors of the skull base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munzenrider, J.E.; Liebsch, N.J.

    1999-01-01

    Charged particle beams are ideal for treating skull base and cervical spine tumors: dose can be focused in the target, while achieving significant sparing of the brain, brain stem, cervical cord, and optic nerves and chiasm. For skull base tumors, 10-year local control rates with combined proton-photon therapy are highest for chondrosarcomas, intermediate for male chordomas, and lowest for female chordomas (94%, 65%, and 42%, respectively). For cervical spine tumors, 10-year local control rates are not significantly different for chordomas and chondrosarcomas (54% and 48%, respectively), nor is there any difference in local control between males and females. Observed treatment-related morbidity has been judged acceptable, in view of the major morbidity and mortality which accompany uncontrolled tumor growth. (orig.)

  15. Picolyl amides of betulinic acid as antitumor agents causing tumor cell apoptosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bildziukevich, Uladzimir; Rárová, L.; Šaman, David; Wimmer, Zdeněk

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 145, FEB 10 (2018), s. 41-50 ISSN 0223-5234 R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FV10599 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : Amide * Betulinic acid * Cytotoxicity * Picolyl amine * Therapeutic index Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 4.519, year: 2016

  16. Evaluation of human thyroid tumors by proton nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    deCertaines, J.; Herry, J.Y.; Lancien, G.; Benoist, L.; Bernard, A.M.; LeClech, G.

    1982-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used in a study of 40 patients with thyroid tumors following partial or total thyroidectomy. Three patient groups were considered: those with nodules showing increased uptake, those with solitary nodules with decreased uptake, and those with multinodular goiters. Spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times (T 1 and T 2 ) were measured on samples of nodular and extranodular tissue from each patient. Increased T 1 and T 2 were observed for benign cold nodules, an increase in T 1 alone for nodules with increased uptake, and a wide fluctuation in T 1 and T 2 for multinodular goiters. The four cancers in the series did not show a distinctive proton NMR pattern in comparison with the other nodular structures studied. The results point to the feasibility of applying NMR techniques to the detection of thyroid disease

  17. Methodologies and tools for proton beam design for lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyers, Michael F.; Miller, Daniel W.; Bush, David A.; Slater, Jerry D.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Proton beams can potentially increase the dose delivered to lung tumors without increasing the dose to critical normal tissues because protons can be stopped before encountering the normal tissues. This potential can only be realized if tissue motion and planning uncertainties are correctly included during planning. This study evaluated several planning strategies to determine which method best provides adequate tumor coverage, minimal normal tissue irradiation, and simplicity of use. Methods and Materials: Proton beam treatment plans were generated using one or more of three different planning strategies. These strategies included designing apertures and boluses to the PTV, apertures to the PTV and boluses to the CTV, and aperture and bolus to the CTV. Results: The planning target volume as specified in ICRU Report 50 can be used only to design the lateral margins of beams, because the distal and proximal margins resulting from CT number uncertainty, beam range uncertainty, tissue motions, and setup uncertainties, are different than the lateral margins resulting from these same factors. The best strategy for target coverage with the planning tools available overirradiated some normal tissues unnecessarily. The available tools also made the planning of lung tumors difficult. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that inclusion of target motion and setup uncertainties into a plan should be performed in the beam design step instead of creating new targets. New computerized treatment planning system tools suggested by this study will ease planning, facilitate abandonment of the PTV concept, improve conformance of the dose distribution to the target, and improve conformal avoidance of critical normal tissues

  18. 4D Proton treatment planning strategy for mobile lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Yixiu; Zhang Xiaodong; Chang, Joe Y.; Wang He; Wei Xiong; Liao Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Balter, Peter A.; Liu, Helen; Zhu, X. Ronald; Mohan, Radhe; Dong Lei

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate strategies for designing compensator-based 3D proton treatment plans for mobile lung tumors using four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional CT sets for 10 lung cancer patients were used in this study. The internal gross tumor volume (IGTV) was obtained by combining the tumor volumes at different phases of the respiratory cycle. For each patient, we evaluated four planning strategies based on the following dose calculations: (1) the average (AVE) CT; (2) the free-breathing (FB) CT; (3) the maximum intensity projection (MIP) CT; and (4) the AVE CT in which the CT voxel values inside the IGTV were replaced by a constant density (AVE R IGTV). For each strategy, the resulting cumulative dose distribution in a respiratory cycle was determined using a deformable image registration method. Results: There were dosimetric differences between the apparent dose distribution, calculated on a single CT dataset, and the motion-corrected 4D dose distribution, calculated by combining dose distributions delivered to each phase of the 4DCT. The AVE R IGTV plan using a 1-cm smearing parameter had the best overall target coverage and critical structure sparing. The MIP plan approach resulted in an unnecessarily large treatment volume. The AVE and FB plans using 1-cm smearing did not provide adequate 4D target coverage in all patients. By using a larger smearing value, adequate 4D target coverage could be achieved; however, critical organ doses were increased. Conclusion: The AVE R IGTV approach is an effective strategy for designing proton treatment plans for mobile lung tumors

  19. Adjuvant Ab Interno Tumor Treatment After Proton Beam Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibel, Ira; Riechardt, Aline I; Heufelder, Jens; Cordini, Dino; Joussen, Antonia M

    2017-06-01

    This study was performed to show long-term outcomes concerning globe preservation in uveal melanoma patients after proton beam therapy with the main focus on outcomes according to different adjuvant ab interno surgical procedures. Retrospective cohort study. All patients treated with primary proton beam therapy for choroidal or ciliary body melanoma between June 1998 and June 2015 were included. A total of 2499 patients underwent primary proton beam therapy, with local tumor control and globe preservation rates of 95.9% and 94.8% after 5 years, respectively. A total of 110 (4.4%) patients required secondary enucleation. Unresponsive neovascular glaucoma was the leading cause of secondary enucleation in 78 of the 2499 patients (3.1%). The 5-year enucleation-free survival rate was 94.8% in the endoresection group, 94.3% in the endodrainage group, and 93.5% in the comparator group. The log-rank test showed P = .014 (comparator group vs endoresection group) and P = .06 (comparator group vs endodrainage-vitrectomy group). Patients treated with endoresection or endodrainage-vitrectomy developed less radiation retinopathy (30.5% and 37.4% after 5 years, P = .001 and P = .048 [Kaplan-Meier], respectively) and less neovascular glaucoma (11.6% and 21.3% after 5 years, P = .001 and P = .01 [Kaplan-Meier], respectively) compared with the comparator group (52.3% radiation retinopathy and 57.8% neovascular glaucoma after 5 years). This study suggests that in larger tumors the enucleation and neovascular glaucoma rates might be reduced by adjuvant surgical procedures. Although endoresection is the most promising adjuvant treatment option, the endodrainage-vitrectomy is recommended in patients who are ineligible for endoresection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Amide Proton Transfer Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Alzheimer′s Disease at 3.0 Tesla: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Amide proton transfer (APT imaging has recently emerged as an important contrast mechanism for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in the field of molecular and cellular imaging. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of APT imaging to detect cerebral abnormality in patients with Alzheimer′s disease (AD at 3.0 Tesla. Methods: Twenty AD patients (9 men and 11 women; age range, 67-83 years and 20 age-matched normal controls (11 men and 9 women; age range, 63-82 years underwent APT and traditional MRI examination on a 3.0 Tesla MRI system. The magnetic resonance ratio asymmetry (MTR asym values at 3.5 ppm of bilateral hippocampi (Hc, temporal white matter regions, occipital white matter regions, and cerebral peduncles were measured on oblique axial APT images. MTR asym (3.5 ppm values of the cerebral structures between AD patients and control subjects were compared with independent samples t-test. Controlling for age, partial correlation analysis was used to investigate the associations between mini-mental state examination (MMSE and the various MRI measures among AD patients. Results: Compared with normal controls, MTR asym (3.5 ppm values of bilateral Hc were significantly increased in AD patients (right 1.24% ± 0.21% vs. 0.83% ± 0.19%, left 1.18% ± 0.18% vs. 0.80%± 0.17%, t = 3.039, 3.328, P = 0.004, 0.002, respectively. MTR asym (3.5 ppm values of bilateral Hc were significantly negatively correlated with MMSE (right r = −0.559, P = 0.013; left r = −0.461, P = 0.047. Conclusions: Increased MTR asym (3.5 ppm values of bilateral Hc in AD patients and its strong correlations with MMSE suggest that APT imaging could potentially provide imaging biomarkers for the noninvasive molecular diagnosis of AD.

  1. Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors: proton MR spectroscopy, diffusion and perfusion characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulakbasi, Nail; Kocaoglu, Murat; Sanal, Tuba H.; Tayfun, Cem [Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Department of Radiology, Military Medical Faculty, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-10-15

    We describe the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics of dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNT) and discuss their differential diagnosis. Proton MR spectroscopy (TE 30 and 136 ms), diffusion-weighted and perfusion images were retrospectively evaluated in 22 patients with pathologically proven DNT (17 male and 5 female, mean age 18.7 years) and 14 control subjects (10 male and 4 female, mean age 16.9 years). The results from the DNT patients and from the control subjects were compared using an independent sample t-test and the degree of correlation was tested by Pearson's correlation. All DNTs were solitary and in a supratentorial cortical or subcortical location (ten temporal, eight frontal and four parietal). They had low-signal on T1-weighted images and high-signal on T2-weighted images without a prominent mass effect. Additionally a cystic appearance (six patients, 27.3%), cortical dysplasia (six patients, 27.3%) and contrast enhancement (four patients, 18.2%) were also noted. No significant differences were detected in NAA/Cho, NAA/Cr, NAA/Cho+Cr or Cho/Cr ratios between DNT and normal brain. DNTs had a significantly higher mI/Cr ratio and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and lower cerebral blood values than normal parenchyma (P < 0.001). ADC had the highest correlation with the diagnosis of DNT (r = 0.996) followed by relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) (r = -0.883) and mI/Cr ratio (r = 0.663). Proton MR spectroscopy, diffusion-weighted and perfusion imaging characteristics of DNTs provide additional information to their MR imaging findings. The MR spectrum showing a slight increase in mI/Cr ratio, and higher ADC and lower rCBV values than normal parenchyma help to differentiate DNTs from other cortical tumors, which had higher rCBV and lower ADC values than DNTs. (orig.)

  2. Determination of the equilibrium micelle-inserting position of the fusion peptide of gp41 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 at amino acid resolution by exchange broadening of amide proton resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, D.-K.; Cheng, S.-F.

    1998-01-01

    The exchange broadening of backbone amide proton resonances of a 23-mer fusion peptide of the transmembrane subunit of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp41, gp41-FP, was investigated at pH 5 and 7 at room temperature in perdeuterated sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micellar solution. Comparison of resonance peaks for these pHs revealed an insignificant change in exchange rate between pH 5 and 7 for amide protons of residues 4 through 14, while the exchange rate increase at neutral pH was more prominent for amide protons of the remaining residues, with peaks from some protons becoming undetectable. The relative insensitivity to pH of the exchange for the amide protons of residues 4 through 14 is attributable to the drastic reduction in [OH-] in the micellar interior, leading to a decreased exchange rate. The A15-G16 segment represents a transition between these two regimes. The data are thus consistent with the notion that the peptide inserts into the hydrophobic core of a membrane-like structure and the A15-G16 dipeptide is located at the micellar-aqueous boundary

  3. Proton and carbon ion radiotherapy for primary brain tumors and tumors of the skull base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Kessel, Kerstin; Habermehl, Daniel; Debus, Jurgen; Haberer, Thomas; Jaekel, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    To analyze clinical concepts, toxicity and treatment outcome in patients with brain and skull base tumors treated with photons and particle therapy. Material and methods: In total 260 patients with brain tumors and tumors of the skull base were treated at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT). Patients enrolled in and randomized within prospective clinical trials as well as bony or soft tissue tumors are not included in this analysis. Treatment was delivered as protons, carbon ions, or combinations of photons and a carbon ion boost. All patients are included in a tight follow-up program. The median follow-up time is 12 months (range 2-39 months). Results: Main histologies included meningioma (n = 107) for skull base lesions, pituitary adenomas (n = 14), low-grade gliomas (n = 51) as well as high-grade gliomas (n = 55) for brain tumors. In all patients treatment could be completed without any unexpected severe toxicities. No side effects > CTC Grade III were observed. To date, no severe late toxicities were observed, however, for endpoints such as secondary malignancies or neuro cognitive side effects follow-up time still remains too short. Local recurrences were mainly seen in the group of high-grade gliomas or atypical meningiomas; for benign skull base meningiomas, to date, no recurrences were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: The specific benefit of particle therapy will potentially reduce the risk of secondary malignancies as well as improve neuro cognitive outcome and quality of life (QOL); thus, longer follow-up will be necessary to confirm these endpoints. Indication-specific trials on meningiomas and gliomas are underway to elucidate the role of protons and carbon ions in these indications

  4. Proton and carbon ion radiotherapy for primary brain tumors and tumors of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Kessel, Kerstin; Habermehl, Daniel; Debus, Jurgen [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany)], e-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Haberer, Thomas [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Jaekel, Oliver [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    To analyze clinical concepts, toxicity and treatment outcome in patients with brain and skull base tumors treated with photons and particle therapy. Material and methods: In total 260 patients with brain tumors and tumors of the skull base were treated at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT). Patients enrolled in and randomized within prospective clinical trials as well as bony or soft tissue tumors are not included in this analysis. Treatment was delivered as protons, carbon ions, or combinations of photons and a carbon ion boost. All patients are included in a tight follow-up program. The median follow-up time is 12 months (range 2-39 months). Results: Main histologies included meningioma (n = 107) for skull base lesions, pituitary adenomas (n = 14), low-grade gliomas (n = 51) as well as high-grade gliomas (n = 55) for brain tumors. In all patients treatment could be completed without any unexpected severe toxicities. No side effects > CTC Grade III were observed. To date, no severe late toxicities were observed, however, for endpoints such as secondary malignancies or neuro cognitive side effects follow-up time still remains too short. Local recurrences were mainly seen in the group of high-grade gliomas or atypical meningiomas; for benign skull base meningiomas, to date, no recurrences were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: The specific benefit of particle therapy will potentially reduce the risk of secondary malignancies as well as improve neuro cognitive outcome and quality of life (QOL); thus, longer follow-up will be necessary to confirm these endpoints. Indication-specific trials on meningiomas and gliomas are underway to elucidate the role of protons and carbon ions in these indications.

  5. Radiosensitizing effect of nitric oxide in tumor cells and experimental tumors irradiated with gamma rays and proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Policastro, Lucia L.; Duran, Hebe; Molinari, Beatriz L.; Somacal, Hector R.; Valda, Alejandro A.

    2003-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been reported to be a radiosensitizer of mammalian cells under hypoxic conditions. In a previous study, we demonstrated an enhancement in radiation response induced by NO in mouse tumor cells under aerobic conditions, with an increasing effect as a function of malignancy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of NO in tumor cells and in experimental tumors irradiated with γ rays and proton beams. Irradiations were performed with a 137 Cs γ source and with proton beams generated by the TANDAR accelerator. Tumor cells were treated with the NO donor DETA-NO and the sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER) was calculated using the α parameter of the survival curve fitted to the linear-quadratic model. Tumor cells irradiated with protons were radio sensitized by DETA-NO only in the more malignant cells irradiated with low LET protons (2.69±0.08 keV/μm). For higher LET protons there were no radiosensitizing effect. For human tumor cells pre-treated with DETA-NO and irradiated with γ rays, a significantly greater effect was demonstrated in the malignant cells (MCF-7) as compared with the near normal cells (HBL-100). Moreover, a significant decrease in tumor growth was demonstrated in mice pre-treated with the NO donor spermine and irradiated with γ rays and low LET protons as compared with mice irradiated without pre-treatment with the NO donor. In conclusion, we demonstrated a differential effect of NO as a radiosensitizer of malignant cells, both with γ rays and low LET protons. This selectivity, coupled to the in vivo inhibition of tumor growth, is of great interest for the potential use of NO releasing agents in radiotherapy. (author)

  6. Detection of Amide and Aromatic Proton Resonances of Human Brain Metabolites Using Localized Correlated Spectroscopy Combined with Two Different Water Suppression Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajakumar Nagarajan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to demonstrate the J-coupling connectivity network between the amide, aliphatic, and aromatic proton resonances of metabolites in human brain using two-dimensional (2D localized correlated spectroscopy (L-COSY. Two different global water suppression techniques were combined with L-COSY, one before and another after localizing the volume of interest (VOI. Phantom solutions containing several cerebral metabolites at physiological concentrations were evaluated initially for sequence optimization. Nine healthy volunteers were scanned using a 3T whole body MRI scanner. The VOI for 2D L-COSY was placed in the right occipital white/gray matter region. The 2D cross and diagonal peak volumes were measured for several metabolites such as N-acetyl aspartate (NAA, creatine (Cr, free choline (Ch, glutamate/glutamine (Glx, aspartate (Asp, myo-inositol (mI, GABA, glutathione (GSH, phosphocholine (PCh, phosphoethanolamine (PE, tyrosine (Tyr, lactate (Lac, macromolecules (MM and homocarnosine (Car. Using the pre-water suppression technique with L-COSY, the above mentioned metabolites were clearly identifiable and the relative ratios of metabolites were calculated. In addition to detecting multitude of aliphatic resonances in the high field region, we have demonstrated that the amide and aromatic resonances can also be detected using 2D L-COSY by pre water suppression more reliably than the post-water suppression.

  7. Proton irradiation augments the reduction in tumor progression observed with advanced age

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proton irradiation is touted for its improved tumor targeting due to the physical advantages of ion beams for radiotherapy. Recent studies from our laboratory have...

  8. Enhanced relative biological effectiveness of proton radiotherapy in tumor cells with internalized gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polf, Jerimy C.; Gillin, Michael; Bronk, Lawrence F.; Driessen, Wouter H. P.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2011-01-01

    The development and use of sensitizing agents to improve the effectiveness of radiotherapy have long been sought to improve our ability to treat cancer. In this letter, we have studied the relative biological effectiveness of proton beam radiotherapy on prostate tumor cells with and without internalized gold nanoparticles. The effectiveness of proton radiotherapy for the killing of prostate tumor cells was increased by approximately 15%-20% for those cells containing internalized gold nanoparticles.

  9. Enhanced relative biological effectiveness of proton radiotherapy in tumor cells with internalized gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polf, Jerimy C.; Bronk, Lawrence F.; Driessen, Wouter H. P.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata; Gillin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The development and use of sensitizing agents to improve the effectiveness of radiotherapy have long been sought to improve our ability to treat cancer. In this letter, we have studied the relative biological effectiveness of proton beam radiotherapy on prostate tumor cells with and without internalized gold nanoparticles. The effectiveness of proton radiotherapy for the killing of prostate tumor cells was increased by approximately 15%–20% for those cells containing internalized gold nanoparticles. PMID:21915155

  10. Catalytic Proton Coupled Electron Transfer from Metal Hydrides to Titanocene Amides, Hydrazides and Imides: Determination of Thermodynamic Parameters Relevant to Nitrogen Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Iraklis; Chirik, Paul J

    2016-10-03

    The hydrogenolysis of titanium-nitrogen bonds in a series of bis(cyclopentadienyl) titanium amides, hydrazides and imides by proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) is described. Twelve different N-H bond dissociation free energies (BDFEs) among the various nitrogen-containing ligands were measured or calculated, and effects of metal oxidation state and N-ligand substituent were determined. Two metal hydride complexes, (η 5 -C 5 Me 5 )(py-Ph)Rh-H (py-Ph = 2-pyridylphenyl, [Rh]-H) and (η 5 -C 5 R 5 )(CO) 3 Cr-H ([Cr] R -H, R= H, Me) were evaluated for formal H atom transfer reactivity and were selected due to their relatively weak M-H bond strengths yet ability to activate and cleave molecular hydrogen. Despite comparable M-H BDFEs, disparate reactivity between the two compounds was observed and was traced to the vastly different acidities of the M-H bonds and overall redox potentials of the molecules. With [Rh]-H, catalytic syntheses of ammonia, silylamine and N,N-dimethylhydrazine have been accomplished from the corresponding titanium(IV) complex using H 2 as the stoichiometric H atom source. The data presented in this study provides the thermochemical foundation for the synthesis of NH 3 by proton coupled electron transfer at a well-defined transition metal center.

  11. Induction of cancer cell death by proton beam in tumor hypoxic region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, T. R.; Lee, Y. M.; Park, J. W.; Sohn, E. J.

    2006-05-01

    The physical properties of charged particles such as protons are uniquely suited to target the radiation dose precisely in the tumor. In proton therapy, the Bragg peak is spread out by modulating or degrading the energy of the particles to cover a well defined target volume at a given depth. Due to heterogeneity in the various tumors and end-points as well as in the physical properties of the beams considered, it is difficult to fit the various results into a clear general description of the biological effect of proton in tumor therapy. Tumor hypoxia is a main obstacle to radiotherapy, including gamma-ray. Survived tumor cells under hypoxic region are resistant to radiation and more aggressive to be metastasized. To investigate the dose of proton beam to induce cell death of various tumor cells and hypoxic tumor cells at the Bragg peak in vitro, we used 3 kinds of tumor cells, lung cancer, leukemia and hepatoma cells. Proton beam induces apoptosis in Lewis lung carcinoma cells dose dependently and, slightly in leukemia but not in hepatoma cells at all. Above 1000 gray of proton beam, 60% of cells died even the hypoxic cells in Lewis lung carcinoma cells. But the Molt-4 leukemia cells showed milder effect, 20% cell death by the above 1000 Gray of proton beam and typical resistant pattern (5-10%) of hypoxia in desferrioxamine treated cells. Hepatoma cells (HepG2) were not responsive to proton beam even in rather higher dose (4000G). However, by the gamma-irradiation, Molt-4 was more sensitive than hepatoma or lung cancer cells, but still showed hypoxic resistance. The cell death by proton beam in Lewis lung carcinoma cells was confirmed by PARP cleavage and may be mediated by increased p53. Pro-caspases were also activated and cleaved by the proton beam irradiations for lung cancer cell death. In conclusion, high dose of proton beam (above 1000 gray) may be a good therapeutic radiation even in hypoxic region at the Bragg peak, but further investigations about the

  12. Response of melanoma tumor phospholipid metabolism to chloroethyle nitrosourea: a high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morvan, Daniel; Demidem, Aïcha; Madelmont, Jean-Claude

    2003-07-01

    Phospholipid metabolism is tightly involved in tumor growth regulation and tumor cell survival. The response of phospholipid metabolism to chloroethyle nitrosourea treatment is investigated in a murine B16 melanoma model. Measurements of phospholipid derivatives are performed on intact tumor tissue samples using one- and two-dimensional proton NMR spectroscopy. During the tumor growth inhibition phase under treatment, tumors overexpress phosphocholine, phosphoethanolamine, glycerophosphocholine and glycerophosphoethanolamine, whereas phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine levels are maintained to control levels. During re-growth, which remained quantitatively much below control growth, chloroethyle nitrosourea-treated melanoma tumors overexpress phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine only. In treated melanoma, phosphatidylcholine levels show an inverse relationship with tumor growth rates. In conclusion, chloroethyle nitrosourea-treated melanoma tumors maintain their phosphatidylcholine levels and exhibit transformed phospholipid metabolism phenotype, by mechanisms that could participate in tumor cell survival.

  13. Radiosensitizing effect of nitric oxide in tumor cells and experimental tumors irradiated with gamma rays and proton beams; Efecto radiosensibilizador del oxido nitrico en celulas tumorales y en tumores experimentales irradiados con radiacion gamma y con haces de protones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Policastro, Lucia L; Duran, Hebe; Molinari, Beatriz L [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, General San Martin (Argentina). Dept. de Radiobiologia; Schuff, Juan A; Kreiner, Andres J; Burlon, Alejandro A; Debray, Mario E; Kesque, Jose M; Ozafran, Mabel J; Vazquez, Monica E [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, General San Martin (Argentina). Dept. de Fisica; Davidson, Jorge; Davidson, Miguel [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Somacal, Hector R; Valda, Alejandro A [Universidad Nacional de General San Martin , Villa Ballester (Argentina). Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia

    2003-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been reported to be a radiosensitizer of mammalian cells under hypoxic conditions. In a previous study, we demonstrated an enhancement in radiation response induced by NO in mouse tumor cells under aerobic conditions, with an increasing effect as a function of malignancy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of NO in tumor cells and in experimental tumors irradiated with {gamma} rays and proton beams. Irradiations were performed with a {sup 137}Cs {gamma} source and with proton beams generated by the TANDAR accelerator. Tumor cells were treated with the NO donor DETA-NO and the sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER) was calculated using the {alpha} parameter of the survival curve fitted to the linear-quadratic model. Tumor cells irradiated with protons were radio sensitized by DETA-NO only in the more malignant cells irradiated with low LET protons (2.69{+-}0.08 keV/{mu}m). For higher LET protons there were no radiosensitizing effect. For human tumor cells pre-treated with DETA-NO and irradiated with {gamma} rays, a significantly greater effect was demonstrated in the malignant cells (MCF-7) as compared with the near normal cells (HBL-100). Moreover, a significant decrease in tumor growth was demonstrated in mice pre-treated with the NO donor spermine and irradiated with {gamma} rays and low LET protons as compared with mice irradiated without pre-treatment with the NO donor. In conclusion, we demonstrated a differential effect of NO as a radiosensitizer of malignant cells, both with {gamma} rays and low LET protons. This selectivity, coupled to the in vivo inhibition of tumor growth, is of great interest for the potential use of NO releasing agents in radiotherapy. (author)

  14. Amide proton transfer imaging to discriminate between low- and high-grade gliomas: added value to apparent diffusion coefficient and relative cerebral blood volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yoon Seong; Ahn, Sung Soo; Lee, Seung-Koo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Jong Hee; Kang, Seok-Gu [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se Hoon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Zhou, Jinyuan [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of MRI Research, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2017-08-15

    To evaluate the added value of amide proton transfer (APT) imaging to the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) from perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for discriminating between high- and low-grade gliomas. Forty-six consecutive adult patients with diffuse gliomas who underwent preoperative APT imaging, DTI and perfusion MRI were enrolled. APT signals were compared according to the World Health Organization grade. The diagnostic ability and added value of the APT signal to the ADC and rCBV for discriminating between low- and high-grade gliomas were evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses and integrated discrimination improvement. The APT signal increased as the glioma grade increased. The discrimination abilities of the APT, ADC and rCBV values were not significantly different. Using both the APT signal and ADC significantly improved discrimination vs. the ADC alone (area under the ROC curve [AUC], 0.888 vs. 0.910; P = 0.007), whereas using both the APT signal and rCBV did not improve discrimination vs. the rCBV alone (AUC, 0.927 vs. 0.923; P = 0.222). APT imaging may be a useful imaging biomarker that adds value to the ADC for discriminating between low- and high-grade gliomas. (orig.)

  15. Grading diffuse gliomas without intense contrast enhancement by amide proton transfer MR imaging: comparisons with diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togao, Osamu; Hiwatashi, Akio; Yamashita, Koji; Kikuchi, Kazufumi; Honda, Hiroshi [Kyushu University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Keupp, Jochen [Philips Research, Hamburg (Germany); Yoshimoto, Koji; Kuga, Daisuke; Iihara, Koji [Kyushu University, Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Yoneyama, Masami [Philips Electronics Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, Satoshi O.; Iwaki, Toru [Kyushu University, Department of Neuropathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Takahashi, Masaya [Advanced Imaging Research Center, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-02-15

    To investigate whether amide proton transfer (APT) MR imaging can differentiate high-grade gliomas (HGGs) from low-grade gliomas (LGGs) among gliomas without intense contrast enhancement (CE). This retrospective study evaluated 34 patients (22 males, 12 females; age 36.0 ± 11.3 years) including 20 with LGGs and 14 with HGGs, all scanned on a 3T MR scanner. Only tumours without intense CE were included. Two neuroradiologists independently performed histogram analyses to measure the 90th-percentile (APT{sub 90}) and mean (APT{sub mean}) of the tumours' APT signals. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) were also measured. The parameters were compared between the groups with Student's t-test. Diagnostic performance was evaluated with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The APT{sub 90} (2.80 ± 0.59 % in LGGs, 3.72 ± 0.89 in HGGs, P = 0.001) and APT{sub mean} (1.87 ± 0.49 % in LGGs, 2.70 ± 0.58 in HGGs, P = 0.0001) were significantly larger in the HGGs compared to the LGGs. The ADC and rCBV values were not significantly different between the groups. Both the APT{sub 90} and APT{sub mean} showed medium diagnostic performance in this discrimination. APT imaging is useful in discriminating HGGs from LGGs among diffuse gliomas without intense CE. (orig.)

  16. Density overwrites of internal tumor volumes in intensity modulated proton therapy plans for mobile lung tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botas, Pablo; Grassberger, Clemens; Sharp, Gregory; Paganetti, Harald

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate internal tumor volume density overwrite strategies to minimize intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan degradation of mobile lung tumors. Four planning paradigms were compared for nine lung cancer patients. Internal gross tumor volume (IGTV) and internal clinical target volume (ICTV) structures were defined encompassing their respective volumes in every 4DCT phase. The paradigms use different planning CT (pCT) created from the average intensity projection (AIP) of the 4DCT, overwriting the density within the IGTV to account for movement. The density overwrites were: (a) constant filling with 100 HU (C100) or (b) 50 HU (C50), (c) maximum intensity projection (MIP) across phases, and (d) water equivalent path length (WEPL) consideration from beam’s-eye-view. Plans were created optimizing dose-influence matrices calculated with fast GPU Monte Carlo (MC) simulations in each pCT. Plans were evaluated with MC on the 4DCTs using a model of the beam delivery time structure. Dose accumulation was performed using deformable image registration. Interplay effect was addressed applying 10 times rescanning. Significantly less DVH metrics degradation occurred when using MIP and WEPL approaches. Target coverage (D99≥slant 70 Gy(RBE)) was fulfilled in most cases with MIP and WEPL (D{{99}WEPL}=69.2+/- 4.0 Gy (RBE)), keeping dose heterogeneity low (D5-D{{95}WEPL}=3.9+/- 2.0 Gy(RBE)). The mean lung dose was kept lowest by the WEPL strategy, as well as the maximum dose to organs at risk (OARs). The impact on dose levels in the heart, spinal cord and esophagus were patient specific. Overall, the WEPL strategy gives the best performance and should be preferred when using a 3D static geometry for lung cancer IMPT treatment planning. Newly available fast MC methods make it possible to handle long simulations based on 4D data sets to perform studies with high accuracy and efficiency, even prior to individual treatment planning.

  17. Induction of cancer cell death by proton beam in tumor hypoxic region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. M.; Heo, T. R.; Lee, K. B.; Jang, K. H.; Kim, H. N.; Lee, S. H.; Jeong, M. H.

    2008-04-01

    Proton beam has been applied to treat various tumor patients in clinical studies. However, it is still undefined whether proton radiation can inhibit the blood vessel formation and induce the cell death in vascular endothelial cells in growing organs. The aim of this study are first, to develop an optimal animal model for the observation of blood vessel development with low dose of proton beam and second, to investigate the effect of low dose proton beam on the inhibition of blood vessel formation induced by hypoxic conditions. In this study, flk1-GFP transgenic zebrafish embryos were used to directly visualize and determine the inhibition of blood vessels by low dose (1, 2, 5 Gy) of proton beam with spread out Bragg peak (SOBP). And we observed cell death by acridine orange staining at 96 hours post fertilization (hpf) stage of embryos after proton irradiation. We also compared the effects of proton beam with those of gamma-ray. An antioxidant, N-acetyl cystein (NAC) was used to investigate whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) were involved in the cell deaths induced by proton irradiation. Irradiated flk-1-GFP transgenic embryos with proton beam irradiation (35 MeV, spread out Bragg peak, SOBP) demonstrated a marked inhibition of embryonic growth and an altered fluorescent blood vessel development in the trunk region. When the cells with DNA damage in the irradiated zebrafish were stained with acridine orange, green fluorescent cell death spots were increased in trunk regions compared to non-irradiated control embryos. Proton beam also significantly increased the cell death rate in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), but pretreatment of N-acetyl cystein (NAC), an antioxidant, recovered the proton-induced cell death rate (p<0.01). Moreover, pretreatment of NAC abrogated the effect of proton beam on the inhibition of trunk vessel development and malformation of trunk truncation. From this study, we found that proton radiation therapy can inhibit the

  18. Proton stoichiometry of electron transport in rodent tumor mitoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, J; Reynafarje, B; Costa, L E; Lehninger, A L

    1988-02-01

    The mechanistic vectorial H+/O translocation ratios characteristic of energy-conserving sites 2 + 3 and site 3 of the respiratory chain of two tumor cell lines were determined using succinate and ferrocytochrome c, respectively, as electron donors. The measurements were carried out on mitoplasts in order to allow ferrocytochrome c free access to its binding site on the inner mitochondrial membrane. The tumor cell lines used were Ehrlich ascites tumor and the AS30-D ascites tumor. K+ was used as charge-compensating cation in the presence of valinomycin. The O2 uptake rate measurements were made with a fast-responding membrane-less electrode whose response time was closely matched with that of a pH electrode. The rates of O2 uptake and H+ ejection during the apparent zero-order rate phase of respiration, analyzed by computer, were extrapolated to zero time. The observed H+/O ratios for succinate oxidation in both tumors exceeded 7 and approached 8 and the H+/O ratios for the cytochrome oxidase reaction closely approached 4.0, in agreement with data or normal mitochondria. However, the rates of H+ back decay in the tumor mitochondria are relatively high and may influence the net efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation under intracellular conditions.

  19. Calculation of primary and secondary dose in proton therapy of brain tumors using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moghbel Esfahani, F.; Alamatsaz, M.; Karimian, A.

    2012-01-01

    High-energy beams of protons offer significant advantages for the treatment of deep-seated local tumors. Their physical depth-dose distribution in tissue is characterized by a small entrance dose and a distinct maximum - Bragg peak - near the end of range with a sharp falloff at the distal edge. Therefore, research must be done to investigate the possible negative and positive effects of using proton therapy as a treatment modality. In proton therapy, protons do account for the vast majority of dose. However, when protons travel through matter, secondary particles are created by the interactions of protons and matter en route to and within the patient. It is believed that secondary dose can lead to secondary cancer, especially in pediatric cases. Therefore, the focus of this work is determining both primary and secondary dose. Dose calculations were performed by MCNPX in tumoral and healthy parts of brain. The brain tumor has a 10 mm diameter and is located 16 cm under the skin surface. The brain was simulated by a cylindrical water phantom with the dimensions of 19 x 19cm 2 (length x diameter), with 0.5 cm thickness of plexiglass (C 4 H 6 O 2 ). Then beam characteristics were investigated to ensure the accuracy of the model. Simulations were initially validated with against packages such as SRIM/TRIM. Dose calculations were performed using different configurations to evaluate depth-dose profiles and dose 2D distributions.The results of the simulation show that the best proton energy interval, to cover completely the brain tumor, is from 152 to 154 MeV. (authors)

  20. Transarterial Fiducial Marker Placement for Image-guided Proton Therapy for Malignant Liver Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Kengo; Shimohira, Masashi; Sasaki, Shigeru; Iwata, Hiromitsu; Nishikawa, Hiroko; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Hara, Masaki; Hashizume, Takuya; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2015-01-01

    PurposeThe aim of this study is to analyze the technical and clinical success rates and safety of transarterial fiducial marker placement for image-guided proton therapy for malignant liver tumors.Methods and MaterialsFifty-five patients underwent this procedure as an interventional treatment. Five patients had 2 tumors, and 4 tumors required 2 markers each, so the total number of procedures was 64. The 60 tumors consisted of 46 hepatocellular carcinomas and 14 liver metastases. Five-mm-long straight microcoils of 0.018 inches in diameter were used as fiducial markers and placed in appropriate positions for each tumor. We assessed the technical and clinical success rates of transarterial fiducial marker placement, as well as the complications associated with it. Technical success was defined as the successful delivery and placement of the fiducial coil, and clinical success was defined as the completion of proton therapy.ResultsAll 64 fiducial coils were successfully installed, so the technical success rate was 100 % (64/64). Fifty-four patients underwent proton therapy without coil migration. In one patient, proton therapy was not performed because of obstructive jaundice due to bile duct invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, the clinical success rate was 98 % (54/55). Slight bleeding was observed in one case, but it was stopped immediately and then observed. None of the patients developed hepatic infarctions due to fiducial marker migration.ConclusionTransarterial fiducial marker placement appears to be a useful and safe procedure for proton therapy for malignant liver tumors

  1. Transarterial Fiducial Marker Placement for Image-guided Proton Therapy for Malignant Liver Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, Kengo, E-mail: yesterday.is.yesterday@gmail.com; Shimohira, Masashi, E-mail: mshimohira@gmail.com [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology (Japan); Sasaki, Shigeru, E-mail: ssasaki916@yahoo.co.jp; Iwata, Hiromitsu, E-mail: h-iwa-ncu@nifty.com; Nishikawa, Hiroko, E-mail: piroko1018@gmail.com; Ogino, Hiroyuki, E-mail: oginogio@gmail.com; Hara, Masaki, E-mail: mhara@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Nagoya City West Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center (Japan); Hashizume, Takuya, E-mail: tky300@gmail.com; Shibamoto, Yuta, E-mail: yshiba@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeThe aim of this study is to analyze the technical and clinical success rates and safety of transarterial fiducial marker placement for image-guided proton therapy for malignant liver tumors.Methods and MaterialsFifty-five patients underwent this procedure as an interventional treatment. Five patients had 2 tumors, and 4 tumors required 2 markers each, so the total number of procedures was 64. The 60 tumors consisted of 46 hepatocellular carcinomas and 14 liver metastases. Five-mm-long straight microcoils of 0.018 inches in diameter were used as fiducial markers and placed in appropriate positions for each tumor. We assessed the technical and clinical success rates of transarterial fiducial marker placement, as well as the complications associated with it. Technical success was defined as the successful delivery and placement of the fiducial coil, and clinical success was defined as the completion of proton therapy.ResultsAll 64 fiducial coils were successfully installed, so the technical success rate was 100 % (64/64). Fifty-four patients underwent proton therapy without coil migration. In one patient, proton therapy was not performed because of obstructive jaundice due to bile duct invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, the clinical success rate was 98 % (54/55). Slight bleeding was observed in one case, but it was stopped immediately and then observed. None of the patients developed hepatic infarctions due to fiducial marker migration.ConclusionTransarterial fiducial marker placement appears to be a useful and safe procedure for proton therapy for malignant liver tumors.

  2. Induction of cancer cell death by proton beam in tumor hypoxic region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. M.; Hur, T. R.; Lee, K. B.; Jeong, M. H.; Park, J. W. [Kyungbook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Proton beam induced apoptosis significantly in Lewis lung carcinoma cells and hepatoma HepG2 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, but slightly in leukemia Molt-4 cells. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for death rate relative to gamma ray were ranged from 1.3 to 2.1 in LLC or HepG2 but 0.7 in Molt-4 cells at 72h after irradiation. The typical apoptosis was observed by nuclear DNA staining with DAPI. By FACS analysis after stained with PI, sub-G1 cell fraction was significantly increased but G2/M phase was not altered by proton beam irradiation measured at 24 h after irradiation. Proton beam-irradiated tumor cells induced cleavage of PARP-1 and procaspases (-3 and -9) and increased the level of p53 and p21. decreased pro-lamin B. Acitivity of caspases was significantly increased after proton beam irradiation. Furthermore, ROS were significantly increased and N-acetyl cystein (NAC) pretreatment restored the apoptotic cell death induced in proton beam-irradiated cells. In conclusion, single treatment of low energy proton beam with SOBP induced apoptosis of solid tumor cells via increased ROS, active caspase -3,-9 and p53, p2.

  3. Induction of cancer cell death by proton beam in tumor hypoxic region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. M.; Hur, T. R.; Lee, K. B.; Jeong, M. H.; Park, J. W.

    2007-04-01

    Proton beam induced apoptosis significantly in Lewis lung carcinoma cells and hepatoma HepG2 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, but slightly in leukemia Molt-4 cells. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for death rate relative to gamma ray were ranged from 1.3 to 2.1 in LLC or HepG2 but 0.7 in Molt-4 cells at 72h after irradiation. The typical apoptosis was observed by nuclear DNA staining with DAPI. By FACS analysis after stained with PI, sub-G1 cell fraction was significantly increased but G2/M phase was not altered by proton beam irradiation measured at 24 h after irradiation. Proton beam-irradiated tumor cells induced cleavage of PARP-1 and procaspases (-3 and -9) and increased the level of p53 and p21. decreased pro-lamin B. Acitivity of caspases was significantly increased after proton beam irradiation. Furthermore, ROS were significantly increased and N-acetyl cystein (NAC) pretreatment restored the apoptotic cell death induced in proton beam-irradiated cells. In conclusion, single treatment of low energy proton beam with SOBP induced apoptosis of solid tumor cells via increased ROS, active caspase -3,-9 and p53, p2

  4. Added value of amide proton transfer imaging to conventional and perfusion MR imaging for evaluating the treatment response of newly diagnosed glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kye Jin; Kim, Ho Sung; Park, Ji Eun; Shim, Woo Hyun; Kim, Sang Joon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Smith, Seth A. [Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2016-12-15

    To determine the added value of amide proton transfer (APT) imaging to conventional and perfusion MRI for differentiating tumour progression (TP) from the treatment-related effect (TE) in patients with post-treatment glioblastomas. Sixty-five consecutive patients with enlarging contrast-enhancing lesions following concurrent chemoradiotherapy were assessed using contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI (CE-T1WI), 90th percentile histogram parameters of normalized cerebral blood volume (nCBV90) and APT asymmetry value (APT90). Diagnostic performance was determined using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and cross validations. There were statistically significant differences in the mean APT90 between the TP and the TE groups (3.87-4.01 % vs. 1.38-1.41 %; P <.001). Compared with CE-T1WI alone, the addition of APT90 to CE-T1WI significantly improved cross-validated AUC from 0.58-0.74 to 0.89-0.91 for differentiating TP from TE. The combination of CE-T1WI, nCBV90 and APT90 resulted in greater diagnostic accuracy for differentiating TP from TE than the combination of CE-T1WI and nCBV90 (cross-validated AUC, 0.95-0.97 vs. 0.84-0.91). The inter-reader agreement between the expert and trainee was excellent for the measurements of APT90 (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.94). Adding APT imaging to conventional and perfusion MRI improves the diagnostic performance for differentiating TP from TE. (orig.)

  5. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiation, Proton beam therapy and proton arc therapy for para-aortic lymph node tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Konyang University Hospital. Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To test feasibility of proton arc therapy (PAT) in the treatment of para-aortic lymph node tumor and compare its dosimetric properties with advanced radiotherapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional 3D conformal proton beam therapy (PBT). The treatment plans for para-aortic lymph node tumor were planned for 9 patients treated at our institution using IMRT, PBT, and PAT. Feasibility test and dosimetric evaluation were based on comparisons of dose volume histograms (DVHs) which reveal mean dose, D{sub 30%}, D{sub 60%}, D{sub 90%}, V{sub 30%}, V{sub 60%}, V{sub 90}%, organ equivalent doses (OEDs), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI). The average doses delivered by PAT to the liver, kidney, small bowel, duodenum, stomach were 7.6%, 3%, 17.3%, 26.7%, and 14.4%, of the prescription dose (PD), respectively, which is higher than the doses delivered by IMRT (0.4%, 7.2%, 14.2%, 15.9%, and 12.8%, respectively) and PBT (4.9%, 0.5%, 14.12%, 16.1% 9.9%, respectively). The average homogeneity index and conformity index of tumor using PAT were 12.1 and 1.21, respectively which were much better than IMRT (21.5 and 1.47, respectively) and comparable to PBT (13.1 and 1.23, respectively). The result shows that both NTCP and OED of PAT are generally lower than IMRT and PBT. This study demonstrates that PAT is better in target conformity and homogeneity than IMRT and PBT but worse than IMRT and PBT for most of dosimetric factor which indicate that PAT is not recommended for the treatment of para-aortic lymph node tumor.

  6. Poster - 31: Predicting IQ and hearing loss following radiotherapy in pediatric brain tumors: proton vs photon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortin, Dominique; Ng, Angela; Tsang, Derek; Sharpe, Michael; Laperriere, Norm; Hodgson, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The increased sparing of normal tissues in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) in pediatric brain tumor treatments should translate into improved neurocognitive outcomes. Models were used to estimate the intelligence quotient (IQ) and the risk of hearing loss 5 years post radiotherapy and to compare outcomes of proton against photon in pediatric brain tumors. Methods: Patients who had received intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were randomly selected from our retrospective database. The existing planning CT and contours were used to generate IMPT plans. The RBE-corrected dose was calculated for both IMPT and IMRT. For each patient, the IQ was estimated via a Monte Carlo technique, whereas the reported incidence of hearing loss as a function of cochlear dose was used to estimate the probability of occurrence. Results: The integrated brain dose was reduced in all IMPT plans, translating into a gain of 2 IQ points on average for protons for the whole cohort at 5 years post-treatment. In terms of specific diseases, the gains in IQ ranged from 0.8 points for medulloblastoma, to 2.7 points for craniopharyngioma. Hearing loss probability was evaluated on a per-ear-basis and was found to be systematically less for proton versus photon: overall 2.9% versus 7.2%. Conclusions: A method was developed to predict IQ and hearing outcomes in pediatric brain tumor patients on a case-by-case basis. A modest gain was systematically observed for proton in all patients. Given the uncertainties within the model used and our reinterpretation, these gains may be underestimated.

  7. Poster - 31: Predicting IQ and hearing loss following radiotherapy in pediatric brain tumors: proton vs photon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortin, Dominique; Ng, Angela; Tsang, Derek; Sharpe, Michael; Laperriere, Norm; Hodgson, David [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: The increased sparing of normal tissues in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) in pediatric brain tumor treatments should translate into improved neurocognitive outcomes. Models were used to estimate the intelligence quotient (IQ) and the risk of hearing loss 5 years post radiotherapy and to compare outcomes of proton against photon in pediatric brain tumors. Methods: Patients who had received intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were randomly selected from our retrospective database. The existing planning CT and contours were used to generate IMPT plans. The RBE-corrected dose was calculated for both IMPT and IMRT. For each patient, the IQ was estimated via a Monte Carlo technique, whereas the reported incidence of hearing loss as a function of cochlear dose was used to estimate the probability of occurrence. Results: The integrated brain dose was reduced in all IMPT plans, translating into a gain of 2 IQ points on average for protons for the whole cohort at 5 years post-treatment. In terms of specific diseases, the gains in IQ ranged from 0.8 points for medulloblastoma, to 2.7 points for craniopharyngioma. Hearing loss probability was evaluated on a per-ear-basis and was found to be systematically less for proton versus photon: overall 2.9% versus 7.2%. Conclusions: A method was developed to predict IQ and hearing outcomes in pediatric brain tumor patients on a case-by-case basis. A modest gain was systematically observed for proton in all patients. Given the uncertainties within the model used and our reinterpretation, these gains may be underestimated.

  8. Importance of Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Diagnosis of Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polacek, H.; Zelenak, K.; Bittsansky, M.; Cisarikova, V.; DeRiggo, J.; Tichterova, R.

    2011-01-01

    Most brain tumors are routinely examined by CT and magnetic resonance (MR). MR plays a crucial role in the preoperative diagnosis and postoperative monitoring. In some cases, proton MR spectroscopy (MRS) provides additional diagnostic information to standard MR results. MRS analyzes important cerebral biochemical substances containing choline, N-acetylaspartate and more. We present a case of 42-year old patient with high-grade glioblastoma examined using MRS in addition to MR imaging before and after surgery. (author)

  9. Proton radiation therapy for retinoblastoma: Comparison of various intraocular tumor locations and beam arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krengli, Marco; Hug, Eugen B.; Adams, Judy A.; Smith, Alfred R.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Munzenrider, John E.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To study the optimization of proton beam arrangements for various intraocular tumor locations; and to correlate isodose distributions with various target and nontarget structures. Methods and materials: We considered posterior-central, nasal, and temporal tumor locations, with straight, intrarotated, or extrarotated eye positions. Doses of 46 cobalt grey equivalent (CGE) to gross tumor volume (GTV) and 40 CGE to clinical target volume (CTV) (2 CGE per fraction) were assumed. Using three-dimensional planning, we compared isodose distributions for lateral, anterolateral oblique, and anteromedial oblique beams and dose-volume histograms of CTVs, GTVs, lens, lacrimal gland, bony orbit, and soft tissues. Results: All beam arrangements fully covered GTVs and CTVs with optimal lens sparing. Only 15% of orbital bone received doses ≥20 CGE with a lateral beam, with 20-26 CGE delivered to two of three growth centers. The anterolateral oblique approach with an intrarotated eye resulted in additional reduction of bony volume and exposure of only one growth center. No appreciable dose was delivered to the contralateral eye, brain tissue, or pituitary gland. Conclusions: Proton therapy achieved homogeneous target coverage with true lens sparing. Doses to orbit structures, including bony growth centers, were minimized with different beam arrangements and eye positions. Proton therapy could reduce the risks of second malignancy and cosmetic and functional sequelae

  10. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of musculoskeletal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Flavia Martins; Setti, Marcela; Vianna, Evandro Miguelote; Domingues, Romulo Cortes; Meohas, Walter; Rezende, Jose Francisco; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the role of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in the differentiation between malignant and benign musculoskeletal tumors. Materials And Methods: Fifty-five patients with musculoskeletal tumors (27 malignant and 28 benign) were studied. The examinations were performed in a 1.5 T magnetic resonance scanner with standard protocol, and single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy with 135 msec echo time. The dynamic contrast study was performed using T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence after intravenous gadolinium injection. Time signal intensity curves and slope values were calculated. The statistical analysis was performed with the Levene's test, followed by a Student's t-test, besides the Pearson's chi-squared and Fischer's exact tests. Results: Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were, respectively, 87.5%, 92.3% and 90.9% (p < 0.0001). Statistically significant difference was observed in the slope (%/min) between benign (mean, 27.5%/min) and malignant (mean, 110.9%/min) lesions (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The time-intensity curve and slope values using dynamic-enhanced perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in association with the presence of choline peak demonstrated by single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy study are useful in the differentiation between malignant and benign musculoskeletal tumors. (author)

  11. Proton magnetic spectroscopic imaging of the child's brain: the response of tumors to treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzika, A.A.; Young Poussaint, T.; Astrakas, L.G.; Barnes, P.D.; Goumnerova, L.; Scott, R.M.; Black, P.McL.; Anthony, D.C.; Billett, A.L.; Tarbell, N.J.

    2001-01-01

    Our aim was to determine and/or predict response to treatment of brain tumors in children using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). We studied 24 patients aged 10 months to 24 years, using MRI and point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS; TR 2000 TE 65 ms) with volume preselection and phase-encoding in two dimensions on a 1.5 T imager. Multiple logistic regression was used to establish independent predictors of active tumor growth. Biologically vital cell metabolites, such as N-acetyl aspartate and choline-containing compounds (Cho), were significantly different between tumor and control tissues (P<0.001). The eight brain tumors which responded to radiation or chemotherapy, exhibited lower Cho (P=0.05), higher total creatine (tCr) (P=0.02) and lower lactate and lipid (L) (P=0.04) than16 tumors which were not treated (except by surgery) or did not respond to treatment. The only significant independent predictor of active tumor growth was tCr (P<0.01). We suggest that tCr is useful in assessing response of brain tumors to treatment. (orig.)

  12. Proton therapy for pediatric cranial tumors: preliminary report on treatment and disease-related morbidities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAllister, Bruce; Archambeau, John O.; Nguyen, M. Connie; Slater, Jerry D.; Loredo, Lilia; Schulte, Reinhard; Alvarez, Ofelia; Bedros, Antranik A.; Kaleita, Thomas; Moyers, Michael; Miller, Daniel; Slater, James M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Accelerated protons were used in an attempt to limit treatment-related morbidity in children with tumors in or near the developing brain, by reducing the integral dose to adjacent normal tissues. Methods and Materials: Children treated with protons at Loma Linda University Medical Center between August 1991 and December 1994 were analyzed retrospectively. Twenty-eight children, aged 1 to 18 years, were identified as at risk for brain injury from treatment. Medical records, physical examinations, and correspondence with patients, their parents, and referring physicians were analyzed. The investigators tabulated post-treatment changes in pre-treatment signs and symptoms and made judgments as to whether improvement, no change, or worsening related to disease or treatment had supervened. Magnetic resonance images were correlated with clinical findings and radiographic impressions were tabulated. Results: Follow-up ranged from 7 to 49 months (median 25 months). Four instances of treatment-related morbidity were identified. Forty-one instances of site-specific, disease-related morbidity were identified: 15 improved or resolved and 26 remained unchanged after treatment. Four patients had radiographic evidence of local failure. Three of these patients, including two with high-grade glioma, have died. Conclusion: Early treatment-related morbidity associated with proton therapy is low. Tumor progression remains a problem when treating certain histologies such as high-grade glioma. Escalating the dose delivered to target volumes may benefit children with tumors associated with poor rates of local control. Long-term follow-up, including neurocognitive testing, is in progress to assess integral-dose effects on cognitive, behavioral and developmental outcomes in children with cranial tumors

  13. Prognostic value of proton MR spectroscopy of cerebral hemisphere tumors in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, N. [Department of Neuroradiology and Vascular Radiology, Hopital de la Timone, Marseille (France); Wang, Z.J.; Zimmerman, R.A. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States); Erbetta, A. [Department of Neuroradiology, Istituto Nazionale Neurologico C. Besta, Milan (Italy); Sutton, L.N. [Division of Neurosurgery, Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States); Phillips, P.C. [Neurooncology Program, Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States); Rorke, L.B. [Department of Neuropathology, Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1998-02-01

    We studied 14 young people with newly diagnosed hemisphere tumors, aged from 3 to 20 years (average 10 years). All underwent surgery following MR imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS). The tumors studied were three glioblastomas, one each of ganglio-glioblastoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET), rhabdoid teratoid tumor, pilocytic astrocytoma, ependymoma, anaplastic ependymoma, and gliomatosis cerebri, and four gangliogliomas. Four patients died; ten patients are alive (five with stable residual tumor, five with no evident tumor). Images and spectra were acquired on a 1.5-T imager. Proton MRS was performed before gadolinium injection in all but one case. Single-voxel techniques were utilized in all cases, using a spin-echo or STEAM sequence with a long echo time (135 or 270 ms). Peak areas of N -acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), and creatine and phosphocreatine (Cr) were assessed. The NAA/Cho peak-area ratio was very low in the patients who died (mean {+-} s. d. 0.20 {+-} 0.14), and higher in the patients who are alive (0.74 {+-} 0.47; P = 0.007 by two-tailed t -test). The Cr/Cho peak-area ratio also followed a similar trend for the two groups (mean {+-} s. d. 0.17 {+-} 0.07 and 0.49 {+-} 0.30, respectively; P = 0.01 by two-tailed t -test). (orig.) With 4 figs., 3 tabs., 22 refs.

  14. Eye tracking and gating system for proton therapy of orbital tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Dongho; Yoo, Seung Hoon; Moon, Sung Ho; Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Se Byeong; Park, Sung Yong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A new motion-based gated proton therapy for the treatment of orbital tumors using real-time eye-tracking system was designed and evaluated. Methods: We developed our system by image-pattern matching, using a normalized cross-correlation technique with LabVIEW 8.6 and Vision Assistant 8.6 (National Instruments, Austin, TX). To measure the pixel spacing of an image consistently, four different calibration modes such as the point-detection, the edge-detection, the line-measurement, and the manual measurement mode were suggested and used. After these methods were applied to proton therapy, gating was performed, and radiation dose distributions were evaluated. Results: Moving phantom verification measurements resulted in errors of less than 0.1 mm for given ranges of translation. Dosimetric evaluation of the beam-gating system versus nongated treatment delivery with a moving phantom shows that while there was only 0.83 mm growth in lateral penumbra for gated radiotherapy, there was 4.95 mm growth in lateral penumbra in case of nongated exposure. The analysis from clinical results suggests that the average of eye movements depends distinctively on each patient by showing 0.44 mm, 0.45 mm, and 0.86 mm for three patients, respectively. Conclusions: The developed automatic eye-tracking based beam-gating system enabled us to perform high-precision proton radiotherapy of orbital tumors.

  15. The protons of space and brain tumors: I. Clinical and dosimetric considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalrymple, G.V.; Nagle, W.A.; Moss, A.J.; Cavin, L.A.; Broadwater, J.R.; McGuire, E.L.; Eason, C.S.

    1989-01-01

    Almost 25 years ago a large group of Rhesus monkeys were irradiated with protons (32--2300 MeV). The experiments were designed: (1) To estimate the RBE of protons, per se, and (2) To provide some estimate of the hazards of the radiation environment of space. The initial results showed the RBE to be about 1.0 for acute radiation effects (mortality, hematologic changes, etc). The colony has been maintained at Brooks AFB, TX since irradiation. The survivors of 55 MeV proton irradiation have developed a very high incidence of Glioblastoma multiforme, a highly malignant primary brain tumor. These tumors appeared 1--20 yrs after surface doses of 400--800 rads. Reconstruction of the dosimetry suggests that some areas within the brain may have received doses of 1500--2500 rads. More than 30 radiation induced Glioblastomas have been reported in human patients who had received therapeutic head irradiation. The radiation doses required to induce Glioblastoma were of the same order of magnitude as required to induce Glioblastoma in the Rhesus monkey

  16. Sequential backbone assignment based on dipolar amide-to-amide correlation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, ShengQi; Grohe, Kristof; Rovó, Petra; Vasa, Suresh Kumar; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Linser, Rasmus, E-mail: rali@nmr.mpibpc.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department for NMR-Based Structural Biology (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Proton detection in solid-state NMR has seen a tremendous increase in popularity in the last years. New experimental techniques allow to exploit protons as an additional source of information on structure, dynamics, and protein interactions with their surroundings. In addition, sensitivity is mostly improved and ambiguity in assignment experiments reduced. We show here that, in the solid state, sequential amide-to-amide correlations turn out to be an excellent, complementary way to exploit amide shifts for unambiguous backbone assignment. For a general assessment, we compare amide-to-amide experiments with the more common {sup 13}C-shift-based methods. Exploiting efficient CP magnetization transfers rather than less efficient INEPT periods, our results suggest that the approach is very feasible for solid-state NMR.

  17. Sequential backbone assignment based on dipolar amide-to-amide correlation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, ShengQi; Grohe, Kristof; Rovó, Petra; Vasa, Suresh Kumar; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Linser, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    Proton detection in solid-state NMR has seen a tremendous increase in popularity in the last years. New experimental techniques allow to exploit protons as an additional source of information on structure, dynamics, and protein interactions with their surroundings. In addition, sensitivity is mostly improved and ambiguity in assignment experiments reduced. We show here that, in the solid state, sequential amide-to-amide correlations turn out to be an excellent, complementary way to exploit amide shifts for unambiguous backbone assignment. For a general assessment, we compare amide-to-amide experiments with the more common 13 C-shift-based methods. Exploiting efficient CP magnetization transfers rather than less efficient INEPT periods, our results suggest that the approach is very feasible for solid-state NMR

  18. Influence of the proton pump inhibitor lansoprazole on distribution and activity of doxorubicin in solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Man; Lee, Carol; Wang, Marina; Tannock, Ian F

    2015-10-01

    Cellular causes of resistance and limited drug distribution within solid tumors limit therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs. Acidic endosomes in cancer cells mediate autophagy, which facilitates survival of stressed cells, and may contribute to drug resistance. Basic drugs (e.g. doxorubicin) are sequestered in acidic endosomes, thereby diverting drugs from their target DNA and decreasing penetration to distal cells. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may raise endosomal pH, with potential to improve drug efficacy and distribution in solid tumors. We determined the effects of the PPI lansoprazole to modify the activity of doxorubicin. To gain insight into its mechanisms, we studied the effects of lansoprazole on endosomal pH, and on the spatial distribution of doxorubicin, and of biomarkers reflecting its activity, using in vitro and murine models. Lansoprazole showed concentration-dependent effects to raise endosomal pH and to inhibit endosomal sequestration of doxorubicin in cultured tumor cells. Lansoprazole was not toxic to cancer cells but potentiated the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin and enhanced its penetration through multilayered cell cultures. In solid tumors, lansoprazole improved the distribution of doxorubicin but also increased expression of biomarkers of drug activity throughout the tumor. Combined treatment with lansoprazole and doxorubicin was more effective in delaying tumor growth as compared to either agent alone. Together, lansoprazole enhances the therapeutic effects of doxorubicin both by improving its distribution and increasing its activity in solid tumors. Use of PPIs to improve drug distribution and to inhibit autophagy represents a promising strategy to enhance the effectiveness of anticancer drugs in solid tumors. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  19. Evaluation and comparison of New 4DCT based strategies for proton treatment planning for lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ning; Patyal, Baldev; Ghebremedhin, Abiel; Bush, David

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate different strategies for proton lung treatment planning based on four-dimensional CT (4DCT) scans. Twelve cases, involving only gross tumor volumes (GTV), were evaluated. Single image sets of (1) maximum intensity projection (MIP3) of end inhale (EI), middle exhale (ME) and end exhale (EE) images; (2) average intensity projection (AVG) of all phase images; and (3) EE images from 4DCT scans were selected as primary images for proton treatment planning. Internal target volumes (ITVs) outlined by a clinician were imported into MIP3, AVG, and EE images as planning targets. Initially, treatment uncertainties were not included in planning. Each plan was imported into phase images of 4DCT scans. Relative volumes of GTVs covered by 95% of prescribed dose and mean ipsilateral lung dose of a phase image obtained by averaging the dose in inspiration and expiration phases were used to evaluate the quality of a plan for a particular case. For comparing different planning strategies, the mean of the averaged relative volumes of GTVs covered by 95% of prescribed dose and its standard deviation for each planning strategy for all cases were used. Then, treatment uncertainties were included in planning. Each plan was recalculated in phase images of 4DCT scans. Same strategies were used for plan evaluation except dose-volume histograms of the planning target volumes (PTVs) instead of GTVs were used and the mean and standard deviation of the relative volumes of PTVs covered by 95% of prescribed dose and the ipsilateral lung dose were used to compare different planning strategies. MIP3 plans without treatment uncertainties yielded 96.7% of the mean relative GTV covered by 95% of prescribed dose (standard deviations of 5.7% for all cases). With treatment uncertainties, MIP3 plans yielded 99.5% of mean relative PTV covered by 95% of prescribed dose (standard deviations of 0.7%). Inclusion of treatment uncertainties improved PTV dose coverage but also increased the ipsilateral

  20. The acidity of the tumor microenvironment is a mechanism of immune escape that can be overcome by proton pump inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellone, Matteo; Calcinotto, Arianna; Filipazzi, Paola; De Milito, Angelo; Fais, Stefano; Rivoltini, Licia

    2013-01-01

    We have recently reported that lowering the pH to values that are frequently detected in tumors causes reversible anergy in both human and mouse CD8+ T lymphocytes in vitro. The same occurs in vivo, in the tumor microenvironment and the administration of proton pump inhibitors, which buffer tumor acidity, can revert T-cell anergy and increase the efficacy of immunotherapy. PMID:23483769

  1. The protons of space and brain tumors: II. Cellular and molecular considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagle, W.A.; Moss, A.J. Jr.; Dalrymple, G.V.; Cox, A.B.; Wigle, J.F.; Mitchell, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    An increased incidence of highly malignant gliomas, termed glioblastoma multiforme has been observed in Rhesus monkeys irradiated with 55 MeV protons, and in humans treated with therapeutic irradiation to the head. The results suggest a radiation etiology for these tumors. In this paper, we review briefly some characteristics of glioma tumors, and summarize the genetic changes associated with malignant gliomas in experimental animals and in humans. The genetic abnormalities include cytogenetic alterations, and changes in the structure and expression of specific oncogenes. We discuss the potential for these genetic changes to contribute to several putative mechanism leading to aberrant growth stimulation and, ultimately, to tumorigenesis. In addition, we review briefly some recent data concerning the molecular nature of radiation-induced somatic cell mutation and oncogene activation, and discuss the significance of these results for the radiation etiology of malignant gliomas. Finally, some implications of these results are discussed in relation to human radiation exposure in space

  2. Early Cognitive Outcomes Following Proton Radiation in Pediatric Patients With Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsifer, Margaret B.; Sethi, Roshan V.; Kuhlthau, Karen A.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report, from a longitudinal study, cognitive outcome in pediatric patients treated with proton radiation therapy (PRT) for central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients receiving PRT for medulloblastoma (38.3%), gliomas (18.3%), craniopharyngioma (15.0%), ependymoma (11.7%), and other CNS tumors (16.7%) were administered age-appropriate measures of cognitive abilities at or near PRT initiation (baseline) and afterward (follow-up). Patients were aged ≥6 years at baseline to ensure consistency in neurocognitive measures. Results: Mean age was 12.3 years at baseline; mean follow-up interval was 2.5 years. Treatment included prior surgical resection (76.7%) and chemotherapy (61.7%). Proton radiation therapy included craniospinal irradiation (46.7%) and partial brain radiation (53.3%). At baseline, mean Wechsler Full Scale IQ was 104.6; means of all 4 Index scores were also in the average range. At follow-up, no significant change was observed in mean Wechsler Full Scale IQ, Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning/Organization, or Working Memory. However, Processing Speed scores declined significantly (mean 5.2 points), with a significantly greater decline for subjects aged <12 years at baseline and those with the highest baseline scores. Cognitive outcome was not significantly related to gender, extent of radiation, radiation dose, tumor location, histology, socioeconomic status, chemotherapy, or history of surgical resection. Conclusions: Early cognitive outcomes after PRT for pediatric CNS tumors are encouraging, compared with published outcomes from photon radiation therapy

  3. Early Cognitive Outcomes Following Proton Radiation in Pediatric Patients With Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulsifer, Margaret B., E-mail: mpulsifer@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sethi, Roshan V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kuhlthau, Karen A. [Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); MacDonald, Shannon M.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To report, from a longitudinal study, cognitive outcome in pediatric patients treated with proton radiation therapy (PRT) for central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients receiving PRT for medulloblastoma (38.3%), gliomas (18.3%), craniopharyngioma (15.0%), ependymoma (11.7%), and other CNS tumors (16.7%) were administered age-appropriate measures of cognitive abilities at or near PRT initiation (baseline) and afterward (follow-up). Patients were aged ≥6 years at baseline to ensure consistency in neurocognitive measures. Results: Mean age was 12.3 years at baseline; mean follow-up interval was 2.5 years. Treatment included prior surgical resection (76.7%) and chemotherapy (61.7%). Proton radiation therapy included craniospinal irradiation (46.7%) and partial brain radiation (53.3%). At baseline, mean Wechsler Full Scale IQ was 104.6; means of all 4 Index scores were also in the average range. At follow-up, no significant change was observed in mean Wechsler Full Scale IQ, Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning/Organization, or Working Memory. However, Processing Speed scores declined significantly (mean 5.2 points), with a significantly greater decline for subjects aged <12 years at baseline and those with the highest baseline scores. Cognitive outcome was not significantly related to gender, extent of radiation, radiation dose, tumor location, histology, socioeconomic status, chemotherapy, or history of surgical resection. Conclusions: Early cognitive outcomes after PRT for pediatric CNS tumors are encouraging, compared with published outcomes from photon radiation therapy.

  4. Multifield Optimization Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Head and Neck Tumors: A Translation to Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gillin, Michael; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Garden, Adam S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Gunn, G. Brandon [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Weber, Randal S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kies, Merrill S. [Department of Head and Neck Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lewin, Jan S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Palmer, Matthew B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sahoo, Narayan; Zhang, Xiaodong; Liu, Wei; Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Background: We report the first clinical experience and toxicity of multifield optimization (MFO) intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for patients with head and neck tumors. Methods and Materials: Fifteen consecutive patients with head and neck cancer underwent MFO-IMPT with active scanning beam proton therapy. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) had comprehensive treatment extending from the base of the skull to the clavicle. The doses for chemoradiation therapy and radiation therapy alone were 70 Gy and 66 Gy, respectively. The robustness of each treatment plan was also analyzed to evaluate sensitivity to uncertainties associated with variations in patient setup and the effect of uncertainties with proton beam range in patients. Proton beam energies during treatment ranged from 72.5 to 221.8 MeV. Spot sizes varied depending on the beam energy and depth of the target, and the scanning nozzle delivered the spot scanning treatment “spot by spot” and “layer by layer.” Results: Ten patients presented with SCC and 5 with adenoid cystic carcinoma. All 15 patients were able to complete treatment with MFO-IMPT, with no need for treatment breaks and no hospitalizations. There were no treatment-related deaths, and with a median follow-up time of 28 months (range, 20-35 months), the overall clinical complete response rate was 93.3% (95% confidence interval, 68.1%-99.8%). Xerostomia occurred in all 15 patients as follows: grade 1 in 10 patients, grade 2 in 4 patients, and grade 3 in 1 patient. Mucositis within the planning target volumes was seen during the treatment of all patients: grade 1 in 1 patient, grade 2 in 8 patients, and grade 3 in 6 patients. No patient experienced grade 2 or higher anterior oral mucositis. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first clinical report of MFO-IMPT for head and neck tumors. Early clinical outcomes are encouraging and warrant further investigation of proton therapy in prospective clinical trials.

  5. Optic neuropathy following combined proton and photon radiotherapy for base of skull tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, June; Munzenrider, John; Maas, Alicea; Finkelstein, Dianne; Liebsch, Norbert; Hug, Eugen; Suit, Herman; Smith, Al; Goitein, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate the risk of radiation injury to the optic pathway following high dose radiation therapy (RT) for base of skull tumors with regard to the following variables: diabetes, hypertension, number of surgical procedures, use of patch, patch distance, radiation dose, and volume of optic structures receiving 50, 55, or 60 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE). Materials and Methods: A total of 359 patients with base of skull chordoma or low grade chondrosarcoma received high dose radiation therapy. Patients were treated with external beam radiotherapy utilizing protons alone or combined protons and photons. Protons of 160 MeV were delivered at the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory using a modulated Bragg peak. The tumor dose ranged from 61 to 76 CGE. CGE was used because modulated protons have an RBE of 1.1 compared to 60 Co. Among 359 patients, 85 patients were excluded from evaluation based on age, tumor location, and pre-RT treatment criteria. All 274 evaluable patients had a minimum follow up of 12 months. Medical records were reviewed to determine the actual cause of vision changes. A total of 12 patients with grade II, III, and IV radiation-induced optic neuropathy were identified. Twenty-four patients without complications who closely matched the aforementioned 12 cases with optic neuropathy were selected from the 274 patients as a control group. Dose volume histograms of 12 cases and 24 controls were reviewed to determine minimum, median, and maximum dose to the optic apparatus as well as dose volume at 50, 55, and 60 CGE. Other information regarding remaining potential risk factors, such as diabetes, hypertension, number of surgical procedures, use of patch, and patch distance, was also obtained. Results: A total of 12 patients (4.4%) developed radiation-induced optic neuropathy: 1 grade II, 9 grade III, and 2 grade IV. Specific sites of involvement were left optic nerve in 9, right optic nerve in 5, and chiasm in 4 cases. The duration to the onset

  6. Proton pump inhibitors while belonging to the same family of generic drugs show different anti-tumor effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugini, Luana; Federici, Cristina; Borghi, Martina; Azzarito, Tommaso; Marino, Maria Lucia; Cesolini, Albino; Spugnini, Enrico Pierluigi; Fais, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    Tumor acidity represents a major cause of chemoresistance. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) can neutralize tumor acidity, sensitizing cancer cells to chemotherapy. To compare the anti-tumor efficacy of different PPIs in vitro and in vivo. In vitro experiments PPIs anti-tumor efficacy in terms of cell proliferation and cell death/apoptosis/necrosis evaluation were performed. In vivo PPIs efficacy experiments were carried out using melanoma xenograft model in SCID mice. Lansoprazole showed higher anti-tumor effect when compared to the other PPIs. The lansoprazole effect lasted even upon drug removal from the cell culture medium and it was independent from the lipophilicity of the PPIs formulation. These PPIs have shown different anti-tumoral efficacy, and the most effective at low dose was lansoprazole. The possibility to contrast tumor acidity by off-label using PPIs opens a new field of oncology investigation.

  7. A Treatment Planning Comparison of Combined Photon-Proton Beams Versus Proton Beams-Only for the Treatment of Skull Base Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feuvret, Loic; Noel, Georges; Weber, Damien C.; Pommier, Pascal; Ferrand, Regis; De Marzi, Ludovic; Dhermain, Frederic; Alapetite, Claire; Mammar, Hamid; Boisserie, Gilbert; Habrand, Jean-Louis; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment planning between combined photon-proton planning (CP) and proton planning (PP) for skull base tumors, so as to assess the potential limitations of CP for these tumors. Methods and Materials: Plans for 10 patients were computed for both CP and PP. Prescribed dose was 67 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE) for PP; 45 Gy (photons) and 22 CGE (protons) for CP. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were calculated for gross target volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), normal tissues (NT), and organs at risk (OARs) for each plan. Results were analyzed using DVH parameters, inhomogeneity coefficient (IC), and conformity index (CI). Results: Mean doses delivered to the GTVs and CTVs with CP (65.0 and 61.7 CGE) and PP (65.3 and 62.2 Gy CGE) were not significantly different (p > 0.1 and p = 0.72). However, the dose inhomogeneity was drastically increased with CP, with a mean significant incremental IC value of 10.5% and CP of 6.8%, for both the GTV (p = 0.01) and CTV (p = 0.04), respectively. The CI 80% values for the GTV and CTV were significantly higher with PP compared with CP. Compared with CP, the use of protons only led to a significant reduction of NT and OAR irradiation, in the intermediate-to-low dose (≤80% isodose line) range. Conclusions: These results suggest that the use of CP results in levels of target dose conformation similar to those with PP. Use of PP significantly reduced the tumor dose inhomogeneity and the delivered intermediate-to-low dose to NT and OARs, leading us to conclude that this treatment is mainly appropriate for tumors in children

  8. Endocrine function following high dose proton therapy for tumors of the upper clivus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, J.D.; Austin-Seymour, M.; Munzenrider, J.; Birnbaum, S.; Carroll, R.; Klibanski, A.; Riskind, P.; Urie, M.; Verhey, L.; Goitein, M.

    1988-09-01

    The endocrine status of patients receiving proton radiation for tumors of the upper clivus was reviewed to evaluate the effect of high dose treatment on the pituitary gland. The fourteen patients had chordomas or low grade chondrosarcomas and were all treated by the same techniques. The median tumor dose was 69.7 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) with a range from 66.6 to 74.4 CGE. (CGE is used because modulated protons have an RBE of 1.1 compared to 60Co). The daily fraction size was 1.8-2.1 CGE. The median follow-up time is 48 months, ranging from 30 to 68 months. All treatments were planned using a computerized multi-dimensional system with the position of the pituitary outlined on the planning CT scan. Review of the dose distribution indicated that the dose to the pituitary ranged from 60.5 to 72.3 CGE, with a median of 67.6 CGE. One female patient had decreased thyroid and gonadotropin function at the time of diagnosis and has been on hormone replacement since that time. The other three females were all pre-menopausal at the time of radiotherapy. At this time four patients (3 males and 1 female) have developed endocrine abnormalities 14 to 45 months after irradiation. All four had evidence of hypothyroidism and two have also developed corticotropin deficiency. The three males had decreased testosterone levels; the female patient developed amenorrhea and hyperprolactinemia. All four are asymptomatic with ongoing hormone replacement.

  9. Endocrine function following high dose proton therapy for tumors of the upper clivus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, J.D.; Austin-Seymour, M.; Munzenrider, J.

    1988-01-01

    The endocrine status of patients receiving proton radiation for tumors of the upper clivus was reviewed to evaluate the effect of high dose treatment on the pituitary gland. The fourteen patients had chordomas or low grade chondrosarcomas and were all treated by the same techniques. The median tumor dose was 69.7 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) with a range from 66.6 to 74.4 CGE. (CGE is used because modulated protons have an RBE of 1.1 compared to 60Co). The daily fraction size was 1.8-2.1 CGE. The median follow-up time is 48 months, ranging from 30 to 68 months. All treatments were planned using a computerized multi-dimensional system with the position of the pituitary outlined on the planning CT scan. Review of the dose distribution indicated that the dose to the pituitary ranged from 60.5 to 72.3 CGE, with a median of 67.6 CGE. One female patient had decreased thyroid and gonadotropin function at the time of diagnosis and has been on hormone replacement since that time. The other three females were all pre-menopausal at the time of radiotherapy. At this time four patients (3 males and 1 female) have developed endocrine abnormalities 14 to 45 months after irradiation. All four had evidence of hypothyroidism and two have also developed corticotropin deficiency. The three males had decreased testosterone levels; the female patient developed amenorrhea and hyperprolactinemia. All four are asymptomatic with ongoing hormone replacement

  10. Multivoxel proton MRS for differentiation of radiation-induced necrosis and tumor recurrence after gamma knife radiosurgery for brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernov, M.F.; Hayashi, Motohiro; Izawa, Masahiro

    2006-01-01

    Multivoxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used for differentiation of radiation-induced necrosis and tumor recurrence after gamma knife radiosurgery for intracranial metastases in 33 consecutive cases. All patients presented with enlargement of the treated lesion, increase of perilesional brain edema, and aggravation or appearance of neurological signs and symptoms on average 9.3±4.9 months after primary treatment. Metabolic imaging defined four types of lesions: pure tumor recurrence (11 cases), partial tumor recurrence (11 cases), radiation-induced tumor necrosis (10 cases), and radiation-induced necrosis of the peritumoral brain (1 case). In 1 patient, radiation-induced tumor necrosis was diagnosed 9 months after radiosurgery; however, partial tumor recurrence was identified 6 months later. With the exception of midline shift, which was found to be more typical for radiation-induced necrosis (P<0.01), no one clinical, radiologic, or radiosurgical parameter either at the time of primary treatment or at the time of deterioration showed a statistically significant association with the type of the lesion. Proton MRS-based diagnosis was confirmed histologically in all surgically treated patients (7 cases) and corresponded well to the clinical course in others. In conclusion, multivoxel proton MRS is an effective diagnostic modality for identification of radiation-induced necrosis and tumor recurrence that can be used for monitoring of metabolic changes in intracranial neoplasms after radiosurgical treatment. It can be also helpful for differentiation of radiation-induced necrosis of the tumor and that of the peritumoral brain, which may have important clinical and medicolegal implications. (author)

  11. Reaction mechanism of the acidic hydrolysis of highly twisted amides: Rate acceleration caused by the twist of the amide bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujika, Jon I; Formoso, Elena; Mercero, Jose M; Lopez, Xabier

    2006-08-03

    We present an ab initio study of the acid hydrolysis of a highly twisted amide and a planar amide analogue. The aim of these studies is to investigate the effect that the twist of the amide bond has on the reaction barriers and mechanism of acid hydrolysis. Concerted and stepwise mechanisms were investigated using density functional theory and polarizable continuum model calculations. Remarkable differences were observed between the mechanism of twisted and planar amide, due mainly to the preference for N-protonation of the former and O-protonation of the latter. In addition, we were also able to determine that the hydrolytic mechanism of the twisted amide will be pH dependent. Thus, there is a preference for a stepwise mechanism with formation of an intermediate in the acid hydrolysis, whereas the neutral hydrolysis undergoes a concerted-type mechanism. There is a nice agreement between the characterized intermediate and available X-ray data and a good agreement with the kinetically estimated rate acceleration of hydrolysis with respect to analogous undistorted amide compounds. This work, along with previous ab initio calculations, describes a complex and rich chemistry for the hydrolysis of highly twisted amides as a function of pH. The theoretical data provided will allow for a better understanding of the available kinetic data of the rate acceleration of amides upon twisting and the relation of the observed rate acceleration with intrinsic differential reactivity upon loss of amide bond resonance.

  12. Spot-scanning proton therapy for malignant soft tissue tumors in childhood: First experiences at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmermann, Beate; Schuck, Andreas; Niggli, Felix; Weiss, Markus; Lomax, Antony Jonathan; Pedroni, Eros; Coray, Adolf; Jermann, Martin; Rutz, Hans Peter; Goitein, Gudrun

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy plays a major role in the treatment strategy of childhood sarcomas. Consequences of treatment are likely to affect the survivor's quality of life significantly. We investigated the feasibility of spot-scanning proton therapy (PT) for soft tissue tumors in childhood. Methods and Materials: Sixteen children with soft tissue sarcomas were included. Median age at PT was 3.3 years. In 10 children the tumor histology was embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. All tumors were located in the head or neck, parameningeal, or paraspinal, or pelvic region. In the majority of children, the tumor was initially unresectable (Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study [IRS] Group III in 75%). In 50% of children the tumors exceeded 5 cm. Fourteen children had chemotherapy before and during PT. Median total dose of radiotherapy was 50 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE). All 16 children were treated with spot-scanning proton therapy at the Paul Scherrer Institute, and in 3 children the PT was intensity-modulated (IMPT). Results: After median follow-up of 1.5 years, local control was achieved in 12 children. Four children failed locally, 1 at the border of the radiation field and 3 within the field. All 4 children died of tumor recurrence. All 4 showed unfavorable characteristic either of site or histopathology of the tumor. Acute toxicity was low, with Grade 3 or 4 side effects according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) criteria occurring in the bone marrow only. Conclusions: Proton therapy was feasible and well tolerated. Early local control rates are comparable to those being achieved after conventional radiotherapy. For investigations on late effect, longer follow-up is needed

  13. Salt forms of the pharmaceutical amide dihydrocarbamazepine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buist, Amanda R; Kennedy, Alan R

    2016-02-01

    Carbamazepine (CBZ) is well known as a model active pharmaceutical ingredient used in the study of polymorphism and the generation and comparison of cocrystal forms. The pharmaceutical amide dihydrocarbamazepine (DCBZ) is a less well known material and is largely of interest here as a structural congener of CBZ. Reaction of DCBZ with strong acids results in protonation of the amide functionality at the O atom and gives the salt forms dihydrocarbamazepine hydrochloride {systematic name: [(10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,f]azepin-5-yl)(hydroxy)methylidene]azanium chloride, C15H15N2O(+)·Cl(-)}, dihydrocarbamazepine hydrochloride monohydrate {systematic name: [(10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,f]azepin-5-yl)(hydroxy)methylidene]azanium chloride monohydrate, C15H15N2O(+)·Cl(-)·H2O} and dihydrocarbamazepine hydrobromide monohydrate {systematic name: [(10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,f]azepin-5-yl)(hydroxy)methylidene]azanium bromide monohydrate, C15H15N2O(+)·Br(-)·H2O}. The anhydrous hydrochloride has a structure with two crystallographically independent ion pairs (Z' = 2), wherein both cations adopt syn conformations, whilst the two hydrated species are mutually isostructural and have cations with anti conformations. Compared to neutral dihydrocarbamazepine structures, protonation of the amide group is shown to cause changes to both the molecular (C=O bond lengthening and C-N bond shortening) and the supramolecular structures. The amide-to-amide and dimeric hydrogen-bonding motifs seen for neutral polymorphs and cocrystalline species are replaced here by one-dimensional polymeric constructs with no direct amide-to-amide bonds. The structures are also compared with, and shown to be closely related to, those of the salt forms of the structurally similar pharmaceutical carbamazepine.

  14. How amide hydrogens exchange in native proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Filip; Halle, Bertil

    2015-08-18

    Amide hydrogen exchange (HX) is widely used in protein biophysics even though our ignorance about the HX mechanism makes data interpretation imprecise. Notably, the open exchange-competent conformational state has not been identified. Based on analysis of an ultralong molecular dynamics trajectory of the protein BPTI, we propose that the open (O) states for amides that exchange by subglobal fluctuations are locally distorted conformations with two water molecules directly coordinated to the N-H group. The HX protection factors computed from the relative O-state populations agree well with experiment. The O states of different amides show little or no temporal correlation, even if adjacent residues unfold cooperatively. The mean residence time of the O state is ∼100 ps for all examined amides, so the large variation in measured HX rate must be attributed to the opening frequency. A few amides gain solvent access via tunnels or pores penetrated by water chains including native internal water molecules, but most amides access solvent by more local structural distortions. In either case, we argue that an overcoordinated N-H group is necessary for efficient proton transfer by Grotthuss-type structural diffusion.

  15. How amide hydrogens exchange in native proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Filip; Halle, Bertil

    2015-01-01

    Amide hydrogen exchange (HX) is widely used in protein biophysics even though our ignorance about the HX mechanism makes data interpretation imprecise. Notably, the open exchange-competent conformational state has not been identified. Based on analysis of an ultralong molecular dynamics trajectory of the protein BPTI, we propose that the open (O) states for amides that exchange by subglobal fluctuations are locally distorted conformations with two water molecules directly coordinated to the N–H group. The HX protection factors computed from the relative O-state populations agree well with experiment. The O states of different amides show little or no temporal correlation, even if adjacent residues unfold cooperatively. The mean residence time of the O state is ∼100 ps for all examined amides, so the large variation in measured HX rate must be attributed to the opening frequency. A few amides gain solvent access via tunnels or pores penetrated by water chains including native internal water molecules, but most amides access solvent by more local structural distortions. In either case, we argue that an overcoordinated N–H group is necessary for efficient proton transfer by Grotthuss-type structural diffusion. PMID:26195754

  16. Clinical value of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for differentiating recurrent or residual brain tumor from delayed cerebral necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, June S.; Langston, James W.; Reddick, Wilburn E.; Kingsley, Peter B.; Ogg, Robert J.; Pui, Margaret H.; Kun, Larry E.; Jenkins, Jesse J.; Gang, Chen; Ochs, Judith J.; Sanford, Robert A.; Heideman, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Delayed cerebral necrosis (DN) is a significant risk for brain tumor patients treated with high-dose irradiation. Although differentiating DN from tumor progression is an important clinical question, the distinction cannot be made reliably by conventional imaging techniques. We undertook a pilot study to assess the ability of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H MRS) to differentiate prospectively between DN or recurrent/residual tumor in a series of children treated for primary brain tumors with high-dose irradiation. Methods and Materials: Twelve children (ages 3-16 years), who had clinical and MR imaging (MRI) changes that suggested a diagnosis of either DN or progressive/recurrent brain tumor, underwent localized 1 H MRS prior to planned biopsy, resection, or other confirmatory histological procedure. Prospective 1 H MRS interpretations were based on comparison of spectral peak patterns and quantitative peak area values from normalized spectra: a marked depression of the intracellular metabolite peaks from choline, creatine, and N-acetyl compounds was hypothesized to indicate DN, and median-to-high choline with easily visible creatine metabolite peaks was labeled progressive/recurrent tumor. Subsequent histological studies identified the brain lesion as DN or recurrent/residual tumor. Results: The patient series included five cases of DN and seven recurrent/residual tumor cases, based on histology. The MRS criteria prospectively identified five out of seven patients with active tumor, and four out of five patients with histologically proven DN correctly. Discriminant analysis suggested that the primary diagnostic information for differentiating DN from tumor lay in the normalized MRS peak areas for choline and creatine compounds. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance spectroscopy shows promising sensitivity and selectivity for differentiating DN from recurrent/progressive brain tumor. A novel diagnostic index based on peak areas for choline and

  17. Dose comparison according to Smooth Thickness application of Range compensator during proton therapy for brain tumor patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tase Woan; Kim, Dae Woong; Kim, Jae Weon; Jeong, Kyeong Sik [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Range Compensator used for proton therapy compensates the proton beam dose which delivers to the normal tissues according to the Target's Distal Margin dose. We are going to check the improvement of dose on the target part by comparing the dose of PTV and OAR according to applying in different method of Smooth Thickness of Range Compensator which is used in brain tumor therapy. For 10 brain tumor patients taking proton therapy in National Cancer Center, Apply Smooth Thickness applied in Range Compensator in order from one to five by using Compensator Editor of Eclipse Proton Planning System(Version 10.0, Varian, USA). The therapy plan algorithm used Proton Convolution Superposition(version 8.1.20 or 10.0.28), and we compared Dmax, Dmin, Homogeneity Index, Conformity Index and OAR dose around tumor by applying Smooth Thickness in phase. When Smooth Thickness was applied from one to five, the Dmax of PTV was decreased max 4.3%, minimum at 0.8 and average of 1.81%. Dmin increased max 1.8%, min 1.8% and average. Difference between max dose and minimum dose decreased at max 5.9% min 1.4% and average 2.6%. Homogeneity Index decreased average of 0.018 and Conformity Index didn't had a meaningful change. OAR dose decreased in Brain Stem at max 1.6%, min 0.1% and average 0.6% and in Optic Chiasm max 1.3%, min 0.3%, and average 0.5%. However, patient C and patient E had an increase each 0.3% and 0.6%. Additionally, in Rt. Optic Nerve, there was a decrease at max 1.5%, min 0.3%, and average 0.8%, however, patient B had 0.1% increase. In Lt. Optic Nerve, there was a decrease at max 1.8%, min 0.3%, and average 0.7%, however, patient H had 0.4 increase. As Smooth Thickness of Range Compensator which is used as the proton treatment for brain tumor patients is applied in stages, the resolution of Compensator increased and as a result the most optimized amount of proton beam dose can be delivered. This is considered to be able to irradiate the equal amount at PTV and

  18. pH-dependent antitumor activity of proton pump inhibitors against human melanoma is mediated by inhibition of tumor acidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Milito, Angelo; Canese, Rossella; Marino, Maria Lucia; Borghi, Martina; Iero, Manuela; Villa, Antonello; Venturi, Giulietta; Lozupone, Francesco; Iessi, Elisabetta; Logozzi, Mariantonia; Della Mina, Pamela; Santinami, Mario; Rodolfo, Monica; Podo, Franca; Rivoltini, Licia; Fais, Stefano

    2010-07-01

    Metastatic melanoma is associated with poor prognosis and still limited therapeutic options. An innovative treatment approach for this disease is represented by targeting acidosis, a feature characterizing tumor microenvironment and playing an important role in cancer malignancy. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI), such as esomeprazole (ESOM) are prodrugs functionally activated by acidic environment, fostering pH neutralization by inhibiting proton extrusion. We used human melanoma cell lines and xeno-transplated SCID mice to provide preclinical evidence of ESOM antineoplastic activity. Human melanoma cell lines, characterized by different mutation and signaling profiles, were treated with ESOM in different pH conditions and evaluated for proliferation, viability and cell death. SCID mice engrafted with human melanoma were used to study ESOM administration effects on tumor growth and tumor pH by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). ESOM inhibited proliferation of melanoma cells in vitro and induced a cytotoxicity strongly boosted by low pH culture conditions. ESOM-induced tumor cell death occurred via rapid intracellular acidification and activation of several caspases. Inhibition of caspases activity by pan-caspase inhibitor z-vad-fmk completely abrogated the ESOM-induced cell death. ESOM administration (2.5 mg kg(-1)) to SCID mice engrafted with human melanoma reduced tumor growth, consistent with decrease of proliferating cells and clear reduction of pH gradients in tumor tissue. Moreover, systemic ESOM administration dramatically increased survival of human melanoma-bearing animals, in absence of any relevant toxicity. These data show preclinical evidence supporting the use of PPI as novel therapeutic strategy for melanoma, providing the proof of concept that PPI target human melanoma modifying tumor pH gradients.

  19. Microenvironment acidity as a major determinant of tumor chemoresistance: Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) as a novel therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Sophie; Spugnini, Enrico Pierluigi; Assaraf, Yehuda G; Azzarito, Tommaso; Rauch, Cyril; Fais, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    Despite the major progresses in biomedical research and the development of novel therapeutics and treatment strategies, cancer is still among the dominant causes of death worldwide. One of the crucial challenges in the clinical management of cancer is primary (intrinsic) and secondary (acquired) resistance to both conventional and targeted chemotherapeutics. Multiple mechanisms have been identifiedthat underlie intrinsic and acquired chemoresistance: these include impaired drug uptake, increased drug efflux, deletion of receptors, altered drug metabolism, quantitative and qualitative alterations in drug targets, increased DNA damage repair and various mechanisms of anti-apoptosis. The fast efflux of anticancer drugs mediated by multidrug efflux pumps and the partial or complete reversibility of chemoresistance combined with the absence of genetic mutations suggests a multifactorial process. However, a growing body of recent evidence suggests that chemoresistance is often triggered by the highly acidic microenvironment of tumors. The vast majority of drugs, including conventional chemotherapeutics and more recent biological agents, are weak bases that are quickly protonated and neutralized in acidic environments, such as the extracellular microenvironment and the acidic organelles of tumor cells. It is therefore essential to develop new strategies to overcome the entrapment and neutralization of weak base drugs. One such strategy is the use of proton pump inhibitors which can enhance tumor chemosensitivity by increasing the pH of the tumor microenvironment. Recent clinical trials in animals with spontaneous tumors have indicated that patient alkalization is capable of reversing acquired chemoresistance in a large percentage of tumors that are refractory to chemotherapy. Of particular interest was the benefit of alkalization for patients undergoing metronomic regimens which are becoming more widely used in veterinary medicine. Overall, these results provide

  20. Tumor Cells Surviving Exposure to Proton or Photon Radiation Share a Common Immunogenic Modulation Signature, Rendering Them More Sensitive to T Cell–Mediated Killing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gameiro, Sofia R.; Malamas, Anthony S. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Bernstein, Michael B. [Division of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tsang, Kwong Y. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Vassantachart, April; Sahoo, Narayan; Tailor, Ramesh; Pidikiti, Rajesh [Division of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Guha, Chandan P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States); Hahn, Stephen M.; Krishnan, Sunil [Division of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hodge, James W., E-mail: jh241d@nih.gov [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To provide the foundation for combining immunotherapy to induce tumor antigen–specific T cells with proton radiation therapy to exploit the activity of those T cells. Methods and Materials: Using cell lines of tumors frequently treated with proton radiation, such as prostate, breast, lung, and chordoma, we examined the effect of proton radiation on the viability and induction of immunogenic modulation in tumor cells by flow cytometric and immunofluorescent analysis of surface phenotype and the functional immune consequences. Results: These studies show for the first time that (1) proton and photon radiation induced comparable up-regulation of surface molecules involved in immune recognition (histocompatibility leukocyte antigen, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and the tumor-associated antigens carcinoembryonic antigen and mucin 1); (2) proton radiation mediated calreticulin cell-surface expression, increasing sensitivity to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte killing of tumor cells; and (3) cancer stem cells, which are resistant to the direct cytolytic activity of proton radiation, nonetheless up-regulated calreticulin after radiation in a manner similar to non-cancer stem cells. Conclusions: These findings offer a rationale for the use of proton radiation in combination with immunotherapy, including for patients who have failed radiation therapy alone or have limited treatment options.

  1. Outcomes and Acute Toxicities of Proton Therapy for Pediatric Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor of the Central Nervous System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGovern, Susan L.; Okcu, M. Fatih; Munsell, Mark F.; Kumbalasseriyil, Nancy; Grosshans, David R.; McAleer, Mary F.; Chintagumpala, Murali; Khatua, Soumen; Mahajan, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) of the central nervous system is a rare cancer primarily affecting children younger than 5 years old. Because patients are young and receive intensive chemotherapy, there is concern regarding late radiation toxicity, particularly as survival rates improve. Therefore, there is interest in using proton therapy to treat these tumors. This study was undertaken to investigate outcomes and acute toxicities associated with proton therapy for AT/RT. Methods and Materials: The records of 31 patients with AT/RT treated with proton radiation from October 2008 to August 2013 were reviewed. Demographics, treatment characteristics, and outcomes were recorded and analyzed. Results: Median age at diagnosis was 19 months (range, 4-55 months), with a median age at radiation start of 24 months (range, 6-62 months). Seventeen patients received local radiation with a median dose of 50.4 GyRBE (range, 9-54 GyRBE). Fourteen patients received craniospinal radiation; half received 24 GyRBE or less, and half received 30.6 GyRBE or more. For patients receiving craniospinal radiation, the median tumor dose was 54 GyRBE (range, 43.2-55.8 GyRBE). Twenty-seven patients (87%) completed the planned radiation. With median follow-up of 24 months for all patients (range, 3-53 months), median progression-free survival was 20.8 months and median overall survival was 34.3 months. Five patients (16%) developed clinical findings and imaging changes in the brainstem 1 to 4 months after radiation, consistent with radiation reaction; all cases resolved with steroids or bevacizumab. Conclusions: This is the largest report of children with AT/RT treated with proton therapy. Preliminary survival outcomes in this young pediatric population are encouraging compared to historic results, but further study is warranted

  2. Outcomes and Acute Toxicities of Proton Therapy for Pediatric Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor of the Central Nervous System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGovern, Susan L., E-mail: slmcgove@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Okcu, M. Fatih [Texas Children' s Hematology and Oncology Centers, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kumbalasseriyil, Nancy; Grosshans, David R.; McAleer, Mary F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chintagumpala, Murali [Texas Children' s Hematology and Oncology Centers, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Khatua, Soumen [Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mahajan, Anita [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) of the central nervous system is a rare cancer primarily affecting children younger than 5 years old. Because patients are young and receive intensive chemotherapy, there is concern regarding late radiation toxicity, particularly as survival rates improve. Therefore, there is interest in using proton therapy to treat these tumors. This study was undertaken to investigate outcomes and acute toxicities associated with proton therapy for AT/RT. Methods and Materials: The records of 31 patients with AT/RT treated with proton radiation from October 2008 to August 2013 were reviewed. Demographics, treatment characteristics, and outcomes were recorded and analyzed. Results: Median age at diagnosis was 19 months (range, 4-55 months), with a median age at radiation start of 24 months (range, 6-62 months). Seventeen patients received local radiation with a median dose of 50.4 GyRBE (range, 9-54 GyRBE). Fourteen patients received craniospinal radiation; half received 24 GyRBE or less, and half received 30.6 GyRBE or more. For patients receiving craniospinal radiation, the median tumor dose was 54 GyRBE (range, 43.2-55.8 GyRBE). Twenty-seven patients (87%) completed the planned radiation. With median follow-up of 24 months for all patients (range, 3-53 months), median progression-free survival was 20.8 months and median overall survival was 34.3 months. Five patients (16%) developed clinical findings and imaging changes in the brainstem 1 to 4 months after radiation, consistent with radiation reaction; all cases resolved with steroids or bevacizumab. Conclusions: This is the largest report of children with AT/RT treated with proton therapy. Preliminary survival outcomes in this young pediatric population are encouraging compared to historic results, but further study is warranted.

  3. Backbone amide linker strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shelton, Anne Pernille Tofteng; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    In the backbone amide linker (BAL) strategy, the peptide is anchored not at the C-terminus but through a backbone amide, which leaves the C-terminal available for various modifications. This is thus a very general strategy for the introduction of C-terminal modifications. The BAL strategy...

  4. WE-G-BRE-07: Proton Therapy Enhanced by Tumor-Targeting Gold Nanoparticles: A Pilot in Vivo Experiment at The Proton Therapy Center at MD Anderson Cancer Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, T; Grant, J; Wolfe, A; Gillin, M; Krishnan, S [MD Anderson Cancer Ctr., Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Assess tumor-growth delay and survival in a mouse model of prostate cancer treated with tumor-targeting gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and proton therapy. Methods: We first examined the accumulation of targeting nanoparticles within prostate tumors by imaging AuNPs with ultrasound-guided photoacoustics at 24h after the intravenous administration of goserelin-conjugated AuNPs (gAuNP) in three mice. Nanoparticles were also imaged at the cellular level with TEM in PC3 cells incubated with gAuNP for 24h. Pegylated AuNPs (pAuNP) were also imaged in vivo and in vitro for comparison. PC3 cells were then implanted subcutaneously in nude mice; 51mice with 8–10mm tumors were included. AuNPs were injected intravenously at 0.2%w/w final gold concentration 24h before irradiation. A special jig was designed to facilitate tumor irradiation perpendicular to the proton beam. Proton energy was set to 180MeV, the radiation field was 18×18cm{sup 2}, and 9cm or 13.5cm thick solid-water compensators were used to position the tumors at either the beam entrance (BE) or the SOBP. Physical doses of 5Gy were delivered to all tumors on a patient beam line at MD Anderson's Proton Therapy Center. Results: The photoacoustic experiment reveled that our nanoparticles leak from the tumor-feeding vasculature and accumulate within the tumor volume over time. Additionally, TEM images showed gAuNP are internalized in cancer cells, accumulating within the cytoplasm, whereas pAuNP are not. Tumor-growth was delayed by 11 or 32days in mice receiving gAuNP irradiated at the BE or the SOBP, relative to proton radiation alone. Survival curves (ongoing experiment) reveal that gAuNPs improved survival by 36% or 74% for tumors irradiated at the BE or SOBP. Conclusion: These important, albeit preliminary, in vivo findings reveal nanoparticles to be potent sensitizers to proton therapy. Further, conjugation of AuNPs to tumor-specific antigens that promote enhanced cellular internalization improved

  5. Effectiveness and safety of proton beam therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Park, Joong-Won; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Yeon-Joo; Woo, Sang Myung; Koh, Young-Hwan; Lee, Woo Jin; Park, Sang-Jae; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Chang-Min [National Cancer Center, Center for Liver Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of proton beam therapy (PBT) in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT). Twenty-seven HCC patients with PVTT underwent PBT, including 22 patients with modified International Union Against Cancer (mUICC) stage IVA,five patients with stage IVB primary tumors, and 16 with main PVTT. A median dose of 55 GyE (range, 50-66 GyE) in 20-22 fractions was delivered to a target volume encompassing both the PVTT and primary tumor. Overall, treatment was well tolerated, with no toxicity of grade ≥ 3. Median overall survival (OS) times in all patients and in stage IVA patients were 13.2 months and 16 months, respectively. Assessments of PVTT response showed complete response in 0 of 27 (0 %) patients, partial response in 15 (55.6 %), stable disease in 10 (37 %), and progressive disease in 2 (7.4 %) patients, with an objective response rate of 55.6 %. PVTT responders showed significantly higher actuarial 1-year local progression-free survival (LPFS; 85.6 % vs. 51.3 %), relapse-free survival (RFS; 20 % vs. 0 %) and OS (80 % vs. 25 %) rates than nonresponders (p < 0.05 each). Multivariate analysis showed that PVTT response and mUICC stage were independent prognostic factors for OS. Our data suggest that PBT could improve LPFS, RFS, and OS in advanced HCC patients with PVTT and it is feasible and safe for these patients. (orig.) [German] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde versucht, die klinische Wirksamkeit und Sicherheit der Protonenstrahltherapie (PBT) fuer Patienten mit fortgeschrittenem Leberzellkarzinom (HCC) in Verbindung mit Portadertumorthrombosen (PVTT) zu bewerten. Ausgefuehrt wurde die PBT fuer 27 HCC-Patienten mit PVTT, einschliesslich 22 Patienten im mUICC-Stadium (''International Union Against Cancer'') IVA sowie 5 Patienten mit Primaertumor im Stadium IVB und 16 Patienten mit PVTT im primaeren Stadium nach der geaenderten UICC-Klassifikation. Eine

  6. Evaluation of the breath-hold approach in proton therapy of lung tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorgisyan, Jenny

    Proton therapy has the potential to improve the treatment effect as compared to conventional radiation therapy for lung cancer patients. However, the proton therapy delivery is prone to uncertainties caused by anatomical changes and motion during the treatment and between the treatment fractions ...

  7. Radiotherapy of uveal melanomas experiences with proton beam irradiation of high risk parapapillary, paramaculary tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hideghety, K.; Sauerwein, W.; Fluehs, D.; Sack, H.; Quast

    1999-01-01

    The role of the radiotherapy in the treatment of malignant chorioidal melanomas has been established by means of 106 Ru or 125 I applicators and proton therapy. The rationale of the indication to utilize brachytherapy or proton therapy is presented on the basis of the clinical situation and physical characteristic of the different radiation modalities. (author)

  8. Development of the compact proton beam therapy system dedicated to spot scanning with real-time tumor-tracking technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezawa, Masumi; Fujimoto, Rintaro; Umekawa, Tooru; Fujii, Yuusuke; Takayanagi, Taisuke; Ebina, Futaro; Aoki, Takamichi; Nagamine, Yoshihiko; Matsuda, Koji; Hiramoto, Kazuo; Matsuura, Taeko; Miyamoto, Naoki; Nihongi, Hideaki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Shirato, Hiroki

    2013-04-01

    Hokkaido University and Hitachi Ltd. have started joint development of the Gated Spot Scanning Proton Therapy with Real-Time Tumor-Tracking System by integrating real-time tumor tracking technology (RTRT) and the proton therapy system dedicated to discrete spot scanning techniques under the "Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology (FIRST Program)". In this development, we have designed the synchrotron-based accelerator system by using the advantages of the spot scanning technique in order to realize a more compact and lower cost proton therapy system than the conventional system. In the gated irradiation, we have focused on the issues to maximize irradiation efficiency and minimize the dose errors caused by organ motion. In order to understand the interplay effect between scanning beam delivery and target motion, we conducted a simulation study. The newly designed system consists of the synchrotron, beam transport system, one compact rotating gantry treatment room with robotic couch, and one experimental room for future research. To improve the irradiation efficiency, the new control function which enables multiple gated irradiations per synchrotron cycle has been applied and its efficacy was confirmed by the irradiation time estimation. As for the interplay effect, we confirmed that the selection of a strict gating width and scan direction enables formation of the uniform dose distribution.

  9. An Analysis of Plan Robustness for Esophageal Tumors: Comparing Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plans and Spot Scanning Proton Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, Samantha; Partridge, Mike; Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Anthony J.; Hurt, Chris; Crosby, Thomas; Hawkins, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Planning studies to compare x-ray and proton techniques and to select the most suitable technique for each patient have been hampered by the nonequivalence of several aspects of treatment planning and delivery. A fair comparison should compare similarly advanced delivery techniques from current clinical practice and also assess the robustness of each technique. The present study therefore compared volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and single-field optimization (SFO) spot scanning proton therapy plans created using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) for dose escalation in midesophageal cancer and analyzed the effect of setup and range uncertainties on these plans. Methods and Materials: For 21 patients, SIB plans with a physical dose prescription of 2 Gy or 2.5 Gy/fraction in 25 fractions to planning target volume (PTV)_5_0_G_y or PTV_6_2_._5_G_y (primary tumor with 0.5 cm margins) were created and evaluated for robustness to random setup errors and proton range errors. Dose–volume metrics were compared for the optimal and uncertainty plans, with P<.05 (Wilcoxon) considered significant. Results: SFO reduced the mean lung dose by 51.4% (range 35.1%-76.1%) and the mean heart dose by 40.9% (range 15.0%-57.4%) compared with VMAT. Proton plan robustness to a 3.5% range error was acceptable. For all patients, the clinical target volume D_9_8 was 95.0% to 100.4% of the prescribed dose and gross tumor volume (GTV) D_9_8 was 98.8% to 101%. Setup error robustness was patient anatomy dependent, and the potential minimum dose per fraction was always lower with SFO than with VMAT. The clinical target volume D_9_8 was lower by 0.6% to 7.8% of the prescribed dose, and the GTV D_9_8 was lower by 0.3% to 2.2% of the prescribed GTV dose. Conclusions: The SFO plans achieved significant sparing of normal tissue compared with the VMAT plans for midesophageal cancer. The target dose coverage in the SIB proton plans was less robust to random setup errors and might be

  10. An Analysis of Plan Robustness for Esophageal Tumors: Comparing Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plans and Spot Scanning Proton Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Samantha, E-mail: samantha.warren@oncology.ox.ac.uk [Cancer Research UK/Medical Research Council Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratories, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Partridge, Mike [Cancer Research UK/Medical Research Council Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratories, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Anthony J. [Centre for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Hurt, Chris [Wales Cancer Trials Unit, School of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Crosby, Thomas [Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Hawkins, Maria A. [Cancer Research UK/Medical Research Council Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratories, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Planning studies to compare x-ray and proton techniques and to select the most suitable technique for each patient have been hampered by the nonequivalence of several aspects of treatment planning and delivery. A fair comparison should compare similarly advanced delivery techniques from current clinical practice and also assess the robustness of each technique. The present study therefore compared volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and single-field optimization (SFO) spot scanning proton therapy plans created using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) for dose escalation in midesophageal cancer and analyzed the effect of setup and range uncertainties on these plans. Methods and Materials: For 21 patients, SIB plans with a physical dose prescription of 2 Gy or 2.5 Gy/fraction in 25 fractions to planning target volume (PTV){sub 50Gy} or PTV{sub 62.5Gy} (primary tumor with 0.5 cm margins) were created and evaluated for robustness to random setup errors and proton range errors. Dose–volume metrics were compared for the optimal and uncertainty plans, with P<.05 (Wilcoxon) considered significant. Results: SFO reduced the mean lung dose by 51.4% (range 35.1%-76.1%) and the mean heart dose by 40.9% (range 15.0%-57.4%) compared with VMAT. Proton plan robustness to a 3.5% range error was acceptable. For all patients, the clinical target volume D{sub 98} was 95.0% to 100.4% of the prescribed dose and gross tumor volume (GTV) D{sub 98} was 98.8% to 101%. Setup error robustness was patient anatomy dependent, and the potential minimum dose per fraction was always lower with SFO than with VMAT. The clinical target volume D{sub 98} was lower by 0.6% to 7.8% of the prescribed dose, and the GTV D{sub 98} was lower by 0.3% to 2.2% of the prescribed GTV dose. Conclusions: The SFO plans achieved significant sparing of normal tissue compared with the VMAT plans for midesophageal cancer. The target dose coverage in the SIB proton plans was less robust to random setup

  11. Proton pump inhibition and cancer therapeutics: A specific tumor targeting or it is a phenomenon secondary to a systemic buffering?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spugnini, Enrico; Fais, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    One of the unsolved mysteries in oncology includes the strategies that cancer cells adopt to cope with an adverse microenvironment. However, we knew, from the Warburg's discovery that through their metabolism based on sugar fermentation, cancer cells acidify their microenvironment and this progressive acidification induces a selective pressure, leading to the development of very malignant cells entirely armed to survive in the hostile microenvironment generated by their own metabolism. In the last decades a primordial role for proton exchangers has been supported as a key tumor advantage in facing off the acidic milieu. Proton exchangers do not allow intracellular acidification through a continuous elimination of H+ either outside the cells or within the internal vacuoles. This article wants to comment a translational process through that led to the preclinical demonstration that a class of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) exploited worldwide for peptic ulcer treatment and gastroprotection are indeed powerful chemosensitizers as well. In this process we achieved the clinical proof of concept that PPI may well be included in new anti-cancer strategies with a solid background and rationale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A Multidisciplinary Orbit-Sparing Treatment Approach That Includes Proton Therapy for Epithelial Tumors of the Orbit and Ocular Adnexa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holliday, Emma B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Esmaeli, Bita [Orbital Oncology and Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery Program, Department of Plastic Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Pinckard, Jamie [School of Medicine, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Garden, Adam S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Morrison, William H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kies, Merrill S. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gunn, G. Brandon; Fuller, C. David; Phan, Jack; Beadle, Beth M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhu, Xiarong Ronald; Zhang, Xiaodong [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Postoperative radiation is often indicated in the treatment of malignant epithelial tumors of the orbit and ocular adnexa. We present details of radiation technique and toxicity data after orbit-sparing surgery followed by adjuvant proton radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients underwent orbit-sparing surgery followed by proton therapy for newly diagnosed malignant epithelial tumors of the lacrimal gland (n=7), lacrimal sac/nasolacrimal duct (n=10), or eyelid (n=3). Tumor characteristics, treatment details, and visual outcomes were obtained from medical records. Acute and chronic toxicity were prospectively scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results: The median radiation dose was 60 Gy(RBE) (relative biological effectiveness; [range 50-70 Gy]); 11 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Dose to ipsilateral anterior optic structures was reduced in 13 patients by having them gaze away from the target during treatment. At a median follow-up time of 27.1 months (range 2.6-77.2 months), no patient had experienced local recurrence; 1 had regional and 1 had distant recurrence. Three patients developed chronic grade 3 epiphora, and 3 developed grade 3 exposure keratopathy. Four patients experienced a decrease in visual acuity from baseline but maintained vision sufficient to perform all activities of daily living without difficulty. Patients with grade ≥3 chronic ocular toxicity had higher maximum dose to the ipsilateral cornea (median 46.3 Gy[RBE], range 36.6-52.7 Gy[RBE] vs median 37.4 Gy[RBE], range 9.0-47.3 Gy(RBE); P=.017). Conclusions: Orbit-sparing surgery for epithelial tumors of the orbit and ocular adnexa followed by proton therapy successfully achieved disease control and was well tolerated. No patient required orbital exenteration or enucleation. Chronic grade 3 toxicity was associated with high maximum dose to the cornea. An eye-deviation technique can be used to limit the maximum

  13. Impact of Real-Time Image Gating on Spot Scanning Proton Therapy for Lung Tumors: A Simulation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanehira, Takahiro [Department of Radiation Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Matsuura, Taeko, E-mail: matsuura@med.hokudai.ac.jp [Proton Beam Therapy Center, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Global Station for Quantum Medical Science and Engineering, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Division of Quantum Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Takao, Seishin; Matsuzaki, Yuka; Fujii, Yusuke; Fujii, Takaaki [Proton Beam Therapy Center, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Ito, Yoichi M. [Department of Biostatistics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Miyamoto, Naoki [Department of Medical Physics, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Inoue, Tetsuya [Department of Radiation Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Katoh, Norio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Shimizu, Shinichi [Global Station for Quantum Medical Science and Engineering, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Umegaki, Kikuo [Proton Beam Therapy Center, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Division of Quantum Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiation Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Global Station for Quantum Medical Science and Engineering, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effectiveness of real-time-image gated proton beam therapy for lung tumors and to establish a suitable size for the gating window (GW). Methods and Materials: A proton beam gated by a fiducial marker entering a preassigned GW (as monitored by 2 fluoroscopy units) was used with 7 lung cancer patients. Seven treatment plans were generated: real-time-image gated proton beam therapy with GW sizes of ±1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 8 mm and free-breathing proton therapy. The prescribed dose was 70 Gy (relative biological effectiveness)/10 fractions to 99% of the target. Each of the 3-dimensional marker positions in the time series was associated with the appropriate 4-dimensional computed tomography phase. The 4-dimensional dose calculations were performed. The dose distribution in each respiratory phase was deformed into the end-exhale computed tomography image. The D99 and D5 to D95 of the clinical target volume scaled by the prescribed dose with criteria of D99 >95% and D5 to D95 <5%, V20 for the normal lung, and treatment times were evaluated. Results: Gating windows ≤ ±2 mm fulfilled the CTV criteria for all patients (whereas the criteria were not always met for GWs ≥ ±3 mm) and gave an average reduction in V20 of more than 17.2% relative to free-breathing proton therapy (whereas GWs ≥ ±4 mm resulted in similar or increased V20). The average (maximum) irradiation times were 384 seconds (818 seconds) for the ±1-mm GW, but less than 226 seconds (292 seconds) for the ±2-mm GW. The maximum increased considerably at ±1-mm GW. Conclusion: Real-time-image gated proton beam therapy with a GW of ±2 mm was demonstrated to be suitable, providing good dose distribution without greatly extending treatment time.

  14. Impact of Real-Time Image Gating on Spot Scanning Proton Therapy for Lung Tumors: A Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanehira, Takahiro; Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Matsuzaki, Yuka; Fujii, Yusuke; Fujii, Takaaki; Ito, Yoichi M; Miyamoto, Naoki; Inoue, Tetsuya; Katoh, Norio; Shimizu, Shinichi; Umegaki, Kikuo; Shirato, Hiroki

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of real-time-image gated proton beam therapy for lung tumors and to establish a suitable size for the gating window (GW). A proton beam gated by a fiducial marker entering a preassigned GW (as monitored by 2 fluoroscopy units) was used with 7 lung cancer patients. Seven treatment plans were generated: real-time-image gated proton beam therapy with GW sizes of ±1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 8 mm and free-breathing proton therapy. The prescribed dose was 70 Gy (relative biological effectiveness)/10 fractions to 99% of the target. Each of the 3-dimensional marker positions in the time series was associated with the appropriate 4-dimensional computed tomography phase. The 4-dimensional dose calculations were performed. The dose distribution in each respiratory phase was deformed into the end-exhale computed tomography image. The D99 and D5 to D95 of the clinical target volume scaled by the prescribed dose with criteria of D99 >95% and D5 to D95 lung, and treatment times were evaluated. Gating windows ≤ ±2 mm fulfilled the CTV criteria for all patients (whereas the criteria were not always met for GWs ≥ ±3 mm) and gave an average reduction in V20 of more than 17.2% relative to free-breathing proton therapy (whereas GWs ≥ ±4 mm resulted in similar or increased V20). The average (maximum) irradiation times were 384 seconds (818 seconds) for the ±1-mm GW, but less than 226 seconds (292 seconds) for the ±2-mm GW. The maximum increased considerably at ±1-mm GW. Real-time-image gated proton beam therapy with a GW of ±2 mm was demonstrated to be suitable, providing good dose distribution without greatly extending treatment time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Survival of tumor cells after proton irradiation with ultra-high dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auer, Susanne; Hable, Volker; Greubel, Christoph; Drexler, Guido A; Schmid, Thomas E; Belka, Claus; Dollinger, Günther; Friedl, Anna A

    2011-01-01

    Laser acceleration of protons and heavy ions may in the future be used in radiation therapy. Laser-driven particle beams are pulsed and ultra high dose rates of >10 9 Gy s -1 may be achieved. Here we compare the radiobiological effects of pulsed and continuous proton beams. The ion microbeam SNAKE at the Munich tandem accelerator was used to directly compare a pulsed and a continuous 20 MeV proton beam, which delivered a dose of 3 Gy to a HeLa cell monolayer within < 1 ns or 100 ms, respectively. Investigated endpoints were G2 phase cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and colony formation. At 10 h after pulsed irradiation, the fraction of G2 cells was significantly lower than after irradiation with the continuous beam, while all other endpoints including colony formation were not significantly different. We determined the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for pulsed and continuous proton beams relative to x-irradiation as 0.91 ± 0.26 and 0.86 ± 0.33 (mean and SD), respectively. At the dose rates investigated here, which are expected to correspond to those in radiation therapy using laser-driven particles, the RBE of the pulsed and the (conventional) continuous irradiation mode do not differ significantly

  16. Hepatoprotective amide constituents from the fruit of Piper chaba: Structural requirements, mode of action, and new amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Hisashi; Ninomiya, Kiyofumi; Morikawa, Toshio; Yasuda, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Itadaki; Yoshikawa, Masayuki

    2009-10-15

    The 80% aqueous acetone extract from the fruit of Piper chaba (Piperaceae) was found to have hepatoprotective effects on D-galactosamine (D-GalN)/lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury in mice. From the ethyl acetate-soluble fraction, three new amides, piperchabamides E, G, and H, 33 amides, and four aromatic constituents were isolated. Among the isolates, several amide constituents inhibited D-GalN/tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-induced death of hepatocytes, and the following structural requirements were suggested: (i) the amide moiety is essential for potent activity; and (ii) the 1,9-decadiene structure between the benzene ring and the amide moiety tended to enhance the activity. Moreover, a principal constituent, piperine, exhibited strong in vivo hepatoprotective effects at doses of 5 and 10 mg/kg, po and its mode of action was suggested to depend on the reduced sensitivity of hepatocytes to TNF-alpha.

  17. Metabolomics by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the response to chloroethylnitrosourea reveals drug efficacy and tumor adaptive metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morvan, Daniel; Demidem, Aicha

    2007-03-01

    Metabolomics of tumors may allow discovery of tumor biomarkers and metabolic therapeutic targets. Metabolomics by two-dimensional proton high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was applied to investigate metabolite disorders following treatment by chloroethylnitrosourea of murine B16 melanoma (n = 33) and 3LL pulmonary carcinoma (n = 31) in vivo. Treated tumors of both types resumed growth after a delay. Nitrosoureas provoke DNA damage but the metabolic consequences of genotoxic stress are little known yet. Although some differences were observed in the metabolite profile of untreated tumor types, the prominent metabolic features of the response to nitrosourea were common to both. During the growth inhibition phase, there was an accumulation of glucose (more than x10; P < 0.05), glutamine (x3 to 4; P < 0.01), and aspartate (x2 to 5; P < 0.01). This response testified to nucleoside de novo synthesis down-regulation and drug efficacy. However, this phase also involved the increase in alanine (P < 0.001 in B16 melanoma), the decrease in succinate (P < 0.001), and the accumulation of serine-derived metabolites (glycine, phosphoethanolamine, and formate; P < 0.01). This response witnessed the activation of pathways implicated in energy production and resumption of nucleotide de novo synthesis, thus metabolic pathways of DNA repair and adaptation to treatment. During the growth recovery phase, it remained polyunsaturated fatty acid accumulation (x1.5 to 2; P < 0.05) and reduced utilization of glucose compared with glutamine (P < 0.05), a metabolic fingerprint of adaptation. Thus, this study provides the proof of principle that metabolomics of tumor response to an anticancer agent may help discover metabolic pathways of drug efficacy and adaptation to treatment.

  18. SU-F-J-64: Comparison of Dosimetric Robustness Between Proton Therapy and IMRT Plans Following Tumor Regression for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, C; Ainsley, C; Teo, B; Burgdorf, B; Berman, A; Levin, W; Xiao, Y; Lin, L; Simone, C; Solberg, T [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Janssens, G [IBA, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In the light of tumor regression and normal tissue changes, dose distributions can deviate undesirably from what was planned. As a consequence, replanning is sometimes necessary during treatment to ensure continued tumor coverage or to avoid overdosing organs at risk (OARs). Proton plans are generally thought to be less robust than photon plans because of the proton beam’s higher sensitivity to changes in tissue composition, suggesting also a higher likely replanning rate due to tumor regression. The purpose of this study is to compare dosimetric deviations between forward-calculated double scattering (DS) proton plans with IMRT plans upon tumor regression, and assesses their impact on clinical replanning decisions. Methods: Ten consecutive locally advanced NSCLC patients whose tumors shrank > 50% in volume and who received four or more CT scans during radiotherapy were analyzed. All the patients received proton radiotherapy (6660 cGy, 180 cGy/fx). Dosimetric robustness during therapy was characterized by changes in the planning objective metrics as well as by point-by-point root-mean-squared differences for the entire PTV, ITV, and OARs (heart, cord, esophagus, brachial plexus and lungs) DVHs. Results: Sixty-four pairs of DVHs were reviewed by three clinicians, who requested a replanning rate of 16.7% and 18.6% for DS and IMRT plans, respectively, with a high agreement between providers. Robustness of clinical indicators was found to depend on the beam orientation and dose level on the DVH curve. Proton dose increased most in OARs distal to the PTV along the beam path, but these changes were primarily in the mid to low dose levels. In contrast, the variation in IMRT plans occurred primarily in the high dose region. Conclusion: Robustness of clinical indicators depends where on the DVH curves comparisons are made. Similar replanning rates were observed for DS and IMRT plans upon large tumor regression.

  19. Brain Injury After Proton Therapy or Carbon Ion Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer and Skull Base Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyawaki, Daisuke; Murakami, Masao; Demizu, Yusuke; Sasaki, Ryohei; Niwa, Yasue; Terashima, Kazuki; Nishimura, Hideki; Hishikawa, Yoshio; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the incidence of early delayed or late morbidity of Brain after particle therapy for skull base tumors and head-and-neck cancers. Methods and Materials: Between May 2001 and December 2005, 59 patients with cancerous invasion of the skull base were treated with proton or carbon ion therapy at the Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center. Adverse events were assessed according to the magnetic resonance imaging findings (late effects of normal tissue-subjective, objective, management, analytic [LENT-SOMA]) and symptoms (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events [CTCAE], version 3.0). Dose-volume histograms were used to analyze the relationship between the dose and volume of the irradiated brain and the occurrence of brain injury. The median follow-up time was 33 months. Results: Of the 48 patients treated with proton therapy and 11 patients treated with carbon ion radiotherapy, 8 (17%) and 7 (64%), respectively, developed radiation-induced brain changes (RIBCs) on magnetic resonance imaging (LENT-SOMA Grade 1-3). Four patients (7%) had some clinical symptoms, such as vertigo and headache (CTCAE Grade 2) or epilepsy (CTCAE Grade 3). The actuarial occurrence rate of RIBCs at 2 and 3 years was 20% and 39%, respectively, with a significant difference in the incidence between the proton and carbon ion radiotherapy groups. The dose-volume histogram analyses revealed significant differences between Brain lobes with and without RIBCs in the actuarial volume of brain lobes receiving high doses. Conclusion: Particle therapies produced minimal symptomatic brain toxicities, but sequential evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging detected a greater incidence of RIBCs. Significant differences were observed in the irradiated brain volume between Brain lobes with and without RIBCs.

  20. Dose distributions of a proton beam for eye tumor therapy: Hybrid pencil-beam ray-tracing calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rethfeldt, Ch.; Fuchs, H.; Gardey, K.-U.

    2006-01-01

    For the case of eye tumor therapy with protons, improvements are introduced compared to the standard dose calculation which implies straight-line optics and the constant-density assumption for the eye and its surrounding. The progress consists of (i) taking account of the lateral scattering of the protons in tissue by folding the entrance fluence distribution with the pencil beam distribution widening with growing depth in the tissue, (ii) rescaling the spread-out Bragg peak dose distribution in water with the radiological path length calculated voxel by voxel on ray traces through a realistic density matrix for the treatment geometry, yielding a trajectory dependence of the geometrical range. Distributions calculated for some specific situations are compared to measurements and/or standard calculations, and differences to the latter are discussed with respect to the requirements of therapy planning. The most pronounced changes appear for wedges placed in front of the eye, causing additional widening of the lateral falloff. The more accurate prediction of the dose dependence at the field borders is of interest with respect to side effects in the risk organs of the eye

  1. Effect of carbogen on tumor oxygenation: combined fluorine-19 and proton MRI measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Xiaobing; River, Jonathan N.; Zamora, Marta; Al-Hallaq, Hania A.; Karczmar, Gregory S.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been widely used for noninvasive evaluation of the effects of tumor-oxygenating agents. However, there have been few tests of the validity of this method. The goal of the present work was to use the T 1 of fluorine-19 in perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions as a 'gold standard' for comparison with BOLD MRI. Methods and Materials: Rats bearing R3230AC tumors implanted in the hind limb were injected with an emulsion of perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether for 2-3 days before experiments, which ensured that the PFC emulsion concentrated in the tumors. We correlated changes in tumor oxygenation caused by carbogen inhalation measured by 1 H BOLD MRI with quantitative 19 F measurements. The 19 F spin-lattice relaxation rate R 1 (= 1/T 1 ) was measured to determine initial oxygen tension (pO 2 ) in each image pixel containing the PFC, and changes in pO 2 during carbogen (95% O 2 , 5% CO 2 ) breathing. In a second carbogen breathing period, changes in water signal linewidth were measured using high spectral and spatial resolution imaging. 19 F and 1 H measurements were used to classify pixels as responders to carbogen (pixels where oxygen increased significantly) or nonresponders (no significant change in tumor oxygenation). Results: The 19 F and 1 H measurements agreed in 65% ± 11% of pixels (n = 14). Agreement was even stronger among pixels where 1 H showed increased oxygenation; 19 F measurements agreed with 1 H measurements in over 79% ± 11% of these pixels. Similarly, there was strong agreement between the two modalities in pixels where 19 F reported no change in pO 2 ; 1 H also showed no changes in 76% ± 18% of these pixels. Quantitative correlation of changes T 2 * (ΔT 2 *) in 1 H and changes R 1 (ΔR 1 ) in 19 F was weak during carbogen breathing, and averaged over the whole tumor was ∼0.40 for 14 experiments. However, the spatial patterns of 1 H and 19 F changes were qualitatively

  2. Robustness of the Voluntary Breath-Hold Approach for the Treatment of Peripheral Lung Tumors Using Hypofractionated Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dueck, Jenny; Knopf, Antje-Christin; Lomax, Antony

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The safe clinical implementation of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy for lung tumors is complicated by the delivery uncertainties caused by breathing motion. The purpose of this feasibility study was to investigate whether a voluntary breath-hold technique could limit the delive...

  3. Preliminary study for differential diagnosis of intracranial tumors using in vivo quantitative proton MR spectroscopy with correction for T2 relaxation time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, Tomonori; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Akutsu, Hiroyoshi; Shiigai, Masanari; Shibata, Yasushi; Takada, Kenta; Masumoto, Tomohiko; Anno, Izumi; Matsumura, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The intent of this study was to differentiate intracranial tumors using the metabolite concentrations obtained by quantification with correction for T2 relaxation time, and to analyze whether the spectrum peak was generated by the existence of metabolites in proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Methods: All proton MRS studies were performed on a clinical 1.5T MR system. 7 normal volunteers and 57 patients (gliomas, metastases, meningiomas, acoustic neuromas, and pituitary adenomas) underwent single voxel proton MRS with different echo times (TE: 68, 136, 272 ms) for T2 correction of signal derived from metabolites and tissue water. With tissue water employed as an internal reference, the concentrations of metabolite (i.e. N-acetylaspartate (NAA), total creatine (t-Cr) and choline-containing compounds (Cho)) were calculated. Moreover, proton MRS data of previously published typical literatures were critically reviewed and compared with our data. Results: Extramedullary tumors were characterized by absence of NAA compared with intramedullary tumors. High-grade glioma differed from low-grade glioma by lower t-Cr concentrations. Metastasis differed from cystic glioblastoma by higher Cho concentrations, lower t-Cr concentrations, an absence of NAA, and a prominent Lipids peak. Based on these results and review of previous reports, we suggest a clinical pathway for the differentiation of intracranial tumors. Conclusion: The metabolite concentrations obtained by quantification with correction for T2 relaxation time, and to analyze whether the spectrum peak was generated by the existence of metabolites in proton MRS is useful for the diagnosis of the intracranial tumors

  4. Classification of brain tumors by means of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sottile, V.S.; Zanchi, D.E.

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, at the request of health professionals, a computer application named “ViDa” was developed. The aim of this study is to differentiate brain lesions according to whether or not they are tumors, and their subsequent classification into different tumor types using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (SVS) with an echo time of 30 milliseconds. For this development, different areas of knowledge were integrated, among which are Artificial intelligence, physics, programming, physiopathology, images in medicine, among others. Biomedical imaging can be divided into two stages: the pre-processing, performed by the resonator, and post-processing software, performed by ViDa, for the interpretation of the data. This application is included within the Medical Informatics area, as it provides assistance for clinical decision making. The role of the biomedical engineer is fulfilled by developing a health technology in response to a manifested real-life problem. The tool developed shows promising results achieving a 100% Sensitivity, 73% Specificity, 77% Positive Predictive Value and 100% Negative Predictive Value reported in 21 cases tested. The correct classifications of the tumor’s origin reach 70%, the classification of non-astrocytic lesions achieves 67% of correct classifications in that the gradation of astrocytomas achieves a 57% of gradations that agree with biopsies and 43% of slight errors. It was possible to develop an application of assistance to the diagnosis, which together with others medical tests, will make it possible to sharpen the diagnoses of brain tumors. (authors) [es

  5. Projected Second Tumor Risk and Dose to Neurocognitive Structures After Proton Versus Photon Radiotherapy for Benign Meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvold, Nils D. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej; Broussard, George P.; Adams, Judith; Fullerton, Barbara; Loeffler, Jay S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Shih, Helen A., E-mail: hshih@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To calculated projected second tumor rates and dose to organs at risk (OAR) in patients with benign intracranial meningioma (BM), according to dosimetric comparisons between proton radiotherapy (PRT) and photon radiotherapy (XRT) treatment plans. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with BM treated at Massachusetts General Hospital during 2006-2010 with PRT were replanned with XRT (intensity-modulated or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy), optimizing dose to the tumor while sparing OAR. Total dose was 54 Gy in 1.8 Gy per fraction for all plans. We calculated equivalent uniform doses, normal tissue complication probabilities, and whole brain-based estimates of excess risk of radiation-associated intracranial second tumors. Results: Excess risk of second tumors was significantly lower among PRT compared with XRT plans (1.3 vs. 2.8 per 10,000 patients per year, p < 0.002). Mean equivalent uniform doses were lower among PRT plans for the whole brain (19.0 vs. 22.8 Gy, p < 0.0001), brainstem (23.8 vs. 35.2 Gy, p = 0.004), hippocampi (left, 13.5 vs. 25.6 Gy, p < 0.0001; right, 7.6 vs. 21.8 Gy, p = 0.001), temporal lobes (left, 25.8 vs. 34.6 Gy, p = 0.007; right, 25.8 vs. 32.9 Gy, p = 0.008), pituitary gland (29.2 vs. 37.0 Gy, p = 0.047), optic nerves (left, 28.5 vs. 33.8 Gy, p = 0.04; right, 25.1 vs. 31.1 Gy, p = 0.07), and cochleas (left, 12.2 vs. 15.8 Gy, p = 0.39; right,1.5 vs. 8.8 Gy, p = 0.01). Mean normal tissue complication probability was <1% for all structures and not significantly different between PRT and XRT plans. Conclusions: Compared with XRT, PRT for BM decreases the risk of RT-associated second tumors by half and delivers significantly lower doses to neurocognitive and critical structures of vision and hearing.

  6. Projected Second Tumor Risk and Dose to Neurocognitive Structures After Proton Versus Photon Radiotherapy for Benign Meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvold, Nils D.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Broussard, George P.; Adams, Judith; Fullerton, Barbara; Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To calculated projected second tumor rates and dose to organs at risk (OAR) in patients with benign intracranial meningioma (BM), according to dosimetric comparisons between proton radiotherapy (PRT) and photon radiotherapy (XRT) treatment plans. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with BM treated at Massachusetts General Hospital during 2006–2010 with PRT were replanned with XRT (intensity-modulated or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy), optimizing dose to the tumor while sparing OAR. Total dose was 54 Gy in 1.8 Gy per fraction for all plans. We calculated equivalent uniform doses, normal tissue complication probabilities, and whole brain–based estimates of excess risk of radiation-associated intracranial second tumors. Results: Excess risk of second tumors was significantly lower among PRT compared with XRT plans (1.3 vs. 2.8 per 10,000 patients per year, p < 0.002). Mean equivalent uniform doses were lower among PRT plans for the whole brain (19.0 vs. 22.8 Gy, p < 0.0001), brainstem (23.8 vs. 35.2 Gy, p = 0.004), hippocampi (left, 13.5 vs. 25.6 Gy, p < 0.0001; right, 7.6 vs. 21.8 Gy, p = 0.001), temporal lobes (left, 25.8 vs. 34.6 Gy, p = 0.007; right, 25.8 vs. 32.9 Gy, p = 0.008), pituitary gland (29.2 vs. 37.0 Gy, p = 0.047), optic nerves (left, 28.5 vs. 33.8 Gy, p = 0.04; right, 25.1 vs. 31.1 Gy, p = 0.07), and cochleas (left, 12.2 vs. 15.8 Gy, p = 0.39; right,1.5 vs. 8.8 Gy, p = 0.01). Mean normal tissue complication probability was <1% for all structures and not significantly different between PRT and XRT plans. Conclusions: Compared with XRT, PRT for BM decreases the risk of RT-associated second tumors by half and delivers significantly lower doses to neurocognitive and critical structures of vision and hearing.

  7. 1H NMR spectra. Part 30(+): 1H chemical shifts in amides and the magnetic anisotropy, electric field and steric effects of the amide group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Raymond J; Griffiths, Lee; Perez, Manuel

    2013-03-01

    The (1)H spectra of 37 amides in CDCl(3) solvent were analysed and the chemical shifts obtained. The molecular geometries and conformational analysis of these amides were considered in detail. The NMR spectral assignments are of interest, e.g. the assignments of the formamide NH(2) protons reverse in going from CDCl(3) to more polar solvents. The substituent chemical shifts of the amide group in both aliphatic and aromatic amides were analysed using an approach based on neural network data for near (≤3 bonds removed) protons and the electric field, magnetic anisotropy, steric and for aromatic systems π effects of the amide group for more distant protons. The electric field is calculated from the partial atomic charges on the N.C═O atoms of the amide group. The magnetic anisotropy of the carbonyl group was reproduced with the asymmetric magnetic anisotropy acting at the midpoint of the carbonyl bond. The values of the anisotropies Δχ(parl) and Δχ(perp) were for the aliphatic amides 10.53 and -23.67 (×10(-6) Å(3)/molecule) and for the aromatic amides 2.12 and -10.43 (×10(-6) Å(3)/molecule). The nitrogen anisotropy was 7.62 (×10(-6) Å(3)/molecule). These values are compared with previous literature values. The (1)H chemical shifts were calculated from the semi-empirical approach and also by gauge-independent atomic orbital calculations with the density functional theory method and B3LYP/6-31G(++) (d,p) basis set. The semi-empirical approach gave good agreement with root mean square error of 0.081 ppm for the data set of 280 entries. The gauge-independent atomic orbital approach was generally acceptable, but significant errors (ca. 1 ppm) were found for the NH and CHO protons and also for some other protons. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Investigation of in vivo PIXE effect within superficial tumor model of high-Z metalnanoplatform for PIXE-based proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Ki; Seo, Seung Jun; Lee, Ju Hong

    2010-04-01

    Metallic nanoparticles (MNP) are able to release localized X-ray when activated with high energy proton beam by particle induced X-ray emissions (PIXE) effect. The exploitation of this phenomenon in the therapeutic irradiation of tumors has been investigated. PIXE-based X-ray emission directed at CT-26 tumor cells in vitro, when administered with either gold (average diameter, 2 nm and 13 nm) or iron (average diameter, 14 nm) nanoparticles, increased with MNP solution concentration over the range of 0.1-2 mg/mL. With irradiation by 45-MeV proton therapy (PT) beam, higher concentrations had a decreased cell survival fraction. An in vivo study with tumor regression assay demonstrated significant tumor dose enhancement, thought to be result of the PIXE effect when compared to conventional PT without MNP using a 45 MeV proton beam (p<0.01). These effects were observed for gold and iron MNP, injected in doses of 100-300mg/kg body weight into CT-26 mouse tumor models via tail vein. A therapeutic effective MNP concentration range, in vivo,was estimated at 30-79 μg/g tissue for both gold and iron nanoparticles. The tumor dose enhancement may compensate for an increase in entrance dose associated with conventional PT when treating large, solid tumors with a spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) technique. The use of combined high energy Bragg peak PT with PIXE generated by MNP, or PIXE alone may result in new treatment options for infiltrative metastatic tumors and other diffuse inflammatory diseases

  9. Proton Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Medulloblastoma and Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors: Outcomes for Very Young Children Treated With Upfront Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, Rachel B., E-mail: rbjimenez@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sethi, Roshan [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Depauw, Nicolas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Pulsifer, Margaret B. [Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Adams, Judith [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); McBride, Sean M. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ebb, David [Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Fullerton, Barbara C.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.; MacDonald, Shannon M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To report the early outcomes for very young children with medulloblastoma or supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor (SPNET) treated with upfront chemotherapy followed by 3-dimensional proton radiation therapy (3D-CPT). Methods and Materials: All patients aged <60 months with medulloblastoma or SPNET treated with chemotherapy before 3D-CPT from 2002 to 2010 at our institution were included. All patients underwent maximal surgical resection, chemotherapy, and adjuvant 3D-CPT with either craniospinal irradiation followed by involved-field radiation therapy or involved-field radiation therapy alone. Results: Fifteen patients (median age at diagnosis, 35 months) were treated with high-dose chemotherapy and 3D-CPT. Twelve of 15 patients had medulloblastoma; 3 of 15 patients had SPNET. Median time from surgery to initiation of radiation was 219 days. Median craniospinal irradiation dose was 21.6 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness); median boost dose was 54.0 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness). At a median of 39 months from completion of radiation, 1 of 15 was deceased after a local failure, 1 of 15 had died from a non-disease-related cause, and the remaining 13 of 15 patients were alive without evidence of disease recurrence. Ototoxicity and endocrinopathies were the most common long-term toxicities, with 2 of 15 children requiring hearing aids and 3 of 15 requiring exogenous hormones. Conclusions: Proton radiation after chemotherapy resulted in good disease outcomes for a small cohort of very young patients with medulloblastoma and SPNET. Longer follow-up and larger numbers of patients are needed to assess long-term outcomes and late toxicity.

  10. SU-F-BRD-14: Dose Weighted Linear Energy Transfer Analysis of Critical Structures in Proton Therapy of Pediatric Brain Tumor Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirlepesov, F.; Shin, J.; Moskvin, V. P.; Gray, J.; Hua, C.; Gajjar, A.; Krasin, M. J.; Merchant, T. E.; Farr, J. B. [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Li, Z. [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dose weighted Linear Energy Transfer (LETd) analysis of critical structures may be useful in understanding the side effects of the proton therapy. The objective is to analyze the differences between LETd and dose distributions in brain tumor patients receiving double scattering proton therapy, to quantify LETd variation in critical organs, and to identify beam arrangements contributing to high LETd in critical organs. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations of 9 pediatric brain tumor patients were performed. The treatment plans were reconstructed with the TOPAS Monte Carlo code to calculate LETd and dose. The beam data were reconstructed proximal to the aperture of the double scattering nozzle. The dose and LETd to target and critical organs including brain stem, optic chiasm, lens, optic nerve, pituitary gland, and hypothalamus were computed for each beam. Results: Greater variability in LETd compared to dose was observed in the brainstem for patients with a variety of tumor types including 5 patients with tumors located in the posterior fossa. Approximately 20%–44% brainstem volume received LETd of 5kev/µm or greater from beams within gantry angles 180°±30° for 5 patients treated with a 3 beam arrangement. Critical organs received higher LETd when located in the vicinity of the beam distal edge. Conclusion: This study presents a novel strategy in the evaluation of the proton treatment impact on critical organs. While the dose to critical organs is confined below the required limits, the LETd may have significant variation. Critical organs in the vicinity of beam distal edge receive higher LETd and depended on beam arrangement, e.g. in posterior fossa tumor treatment, brainstem receive higher LETd from posterior-anterior beams. This study shows importance of the LETd analysis of the radiation impact on the critical organs in proton therapy and may be used to explain clinical imaging observations after therapy.

  11. Amides in Nature and Biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitzer, Julia; Steiner, Kerstin

    2016-10-10

    Amides are widespread in biologically active compounds with a broad range of applications in biotechnology, agriculture and medicine. Therefore, as alternative to chemical synthesis the biocatalytic amide synthesis is a very interesting field of research. As usual, Nature can serve as guide in the quest for novel biocatalysts. Several mechanisms for carboxylate activation involving mainly acyl-adenylate, acyl-phosphate or acyl-enzyme intermediates have been discovered, but also completely different pathways to amides are found. In addition to ribosomes, selected enzymes of almost all main enzyme classes are able to synthesize amides. In this review we give an overview about amide synthesis in Nature, as well as biotechnological applications of these enzymes. Moreover, several examples of biocatalytic amide synthesis are given. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Structural study of salt forms of amides; paracetamol, benzamide and piperine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Alan R.; King, Nathan L. C.; Oswald, Iain D. H.; Rollo, David G.; Spiteri, Rebecca; Walls, Aiden

    2018-02-01

    Single crystal x-ray diffraction has been used to investigate the structures of six complexes containing O-atom protonated cations derived from the pharmaceutically relevant amides benzamide (BEN), paracetamol (PAR) and piperine (PIP). The structures of the salt forms [PAR(H)][SO3C6H4Cl], [BEN(H)][O3SC6H4Cl] and [BEN(H)][Br]·H2O are reported along with those of the hemi-halide salt forms [PAR(H)][I3]. PAR, [PIP(H)][I3]·PIP and [PIP(H)][I3]0·5[I]0.5. PIP. The structure of the cocrystal BEN. HOOCCH2Cl is also presented for comparison. The geometry of the amide group is found to systematically change upon protonation, with the Cdbnd O distance increasing and the Csbnd N distance decreasing. The hemi-halide species all feature strongly hydrogen bonded amide(H)/amide pairs. The amide group Cdbnd O and Csbnd N distances for both elements of each such pair are intermediate between those found for simple neutral amide and protonated amide forms. It was found that crystallising paracetamol from aqueous solutions containing Ba2+ ions gave orthorhombic paracetamol.

  13. Attention, processing speed, and executive functioning in pediatric brain tumor survivors treated with proton beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, Tanya N; Ris, M Douglas; Grosshans, David R; Mahajan, Anita; Okcu, M Fatih; Chintagumpala, Murali; Paulino, Arnold; Child, Amanda E; Orobio, Jessica; Stancel, Heather H; Kahalley, Lisa S

    2017-07-01

    This study examines attention, processing speed, and executive functioning in pediatric brain tumor survivors treated with proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT). We examined 39 survivors (age 6-19years) who were 3.61years post-PBRT on average. Craniospinal (CSI; n=21) and focal (n=18) subgroups were analyzed. Attention, processing speed, and executive functioning scores were compared to population norms, and clinical/demographic risk factors were examined. As a group, survivors treated with focal PBRT exhibited attention, processing speed, and executive functioning that did not differ from population norms (all p>0.05). Performance in the CSI group across attention scales was normative (all p>0.05), but areas of relative weakness were identified on one executive functioning subtest and several processing speed subtests (all pexecutive functioning remained intact and within normal limits for survivors treated with focal PBRT. Among survivors treated with CSI, a score pattern emerged that was suggestive of difficulties in underlying component skills (i.e., processing speed) rather than true executive dysfunction. No evidence of profound cognitive impairment was found in either group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Robustness of the Voluntary Breath-Hold Approach for the Treatment of Peripheral Lung Tumors Using Hypofractionated Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dueck, Jenny, E-mail: jenny.dueck@psi.ch [Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Knopf, Antje-Christin [Joint Department of Physics at the Institute of Cancer Research and the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Lomax, Antony [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Department of Physics, ETH Zürich, Zürich (Switzerland); Albertini, Francesca [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Persson, Gitte F. [Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Josipovic, Mirjana [Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Aznar, Marianne [Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Weber, Damien C. [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); University of Zürich, Zürich (Switzerland); Munck af Rosenschöld, Per [Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: The safe clinical implementation of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy for lung tumors is complicated by the delivery uncertainties caused by breathing motion. The purpose of this feasibility study was to investigate whether a voluntary breath-hold technique could limit the delivery uncertainties resulting from interfractional motion. Methods and Materials: Data from 15 patients with peripheral lung tumors previously treated with stereotactic radiation therapy were included in this study. The patients had 1 computed tomographic (CT) scan in voluntary breath-hold acquired before treatment and 3 scans during the treatment course. PBS proton treatment plans with 2 fields (2F) and 3 fields (3F), respectively, were calculated based on the planning CT scan and subsequently recalculated on the 3 repeated CT scans. Recalculated plans were considered robust if the V{sub 95%} (volume receiving ≥95% of the prescribed dose) of the gross target volume (GTV) was within 5% of what was expected from the planning CT data throughout the simulated treatment. Results: A total of 14/15 simulated treatments for both 2F and 3F met the robustness criteria. Reduced V{sub 95%} was associated with baseline shifts (2F, P=.056; 3F, P=.008) and tumor size (2F, P=.025; 3F, P=.025). Smaller tumors with large baseline shifts were also at risk for reduced V{sub 95%} (interaction term baseline/size: 2F, P=.005; 3F, P=.002). Conclusions: The breath-hold approach is a realistic clinical option for treating lung tumors with PBS proton therapy. Potential risk factors for reduced V{sub 95%} are small targets in combination with large baseline shifts. On the basis of these results, the baseline shift of the tumor should be monitored (eg, through image guided therapy), and appropriate measures should be taken accordingly. The intrafractional motion needs to be investigated to confirm that the breath-hold approach is robust.

  15. Robustness of the Voluntary Breath-Hold Approach for the Treatment of Peripheral Lung Tumors Using Hypofractionated Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dueck, Jenny; Knopf, Antje-Christin; Lomax, Antony; Albertini, Francesca; Persson, Gitte F.; Josipovic, Mirjana; Aznar, Marianne; Weber, Damien C.; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The safe clinical implementation of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy for lung tumors is complicated by the delivery uncertainties caused by breathing motion. The purpose of this feasibility study was to investigate whether a voluntary breath-hold technique could limit the delivery uncertainties resulting from interfractional motion. Methods and Materials: Data from 15 patients with peripheral lung tumors previously treated with stereotactic radiation therapy were included in this study. The patients had 1 computed tomographic (CT) scan in voluntary breath-hold acquired before treatment and 3 scans during the treatment course. PBS proton treatment plans with 2 fields (2F) and 3 fields (3F), respectively, were calculated based on the planning CT scan and subsequently recalculated on the 3 repeated CT scans. Recalculated plans were considered robust if the V 95% (volume receiving ≥95% of the prescribed dose) of the gross target volume (GTV) was within 5% of what was expected from the planning CT data throughout the simulated treatment. Results: A total of 14/15 simulated treatments for both 2F and 3F met the robustness criteria. Reduced V 95% was associated with baseline shifts (2F, P=.056; 3F, P=.008) and tumor size (2F, P=.025; 3F, P=.025). Smaller tumors with large baseline shifts were also at risk for reduced V 95% (interaction term baseline/size: 2F, P=.005; 3F, P=.002). Conclusions: The breath-hold approach is a realistic clinical option for treating lung tumors with PBS proton therapy. Potential risk factors for reduced V 95% are small targets in combination with large baseline shifts. On the basis of these results, the baseline shift of the tumor should be monitored (eg, through image guided therapy), and appropriate measures should be taken accordingly. The intrafractional motion needs to be investigated to confirm that the breath-hold approach is robust.

  16. SU-F-T-116: Predicting IQ and the Risk of Hearing Loss Following Proton Versus Photon Radiotherapy for Pediatric Brain Tumor Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortin, D; Sharpe, M; Laperriere, N; Hodgson, D; Ng, A; Tsang, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The increased sparing of normal tissues in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) compared to photon intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in brain tumor treatments should translate into improved neurocognitive outcomes. Models were used to estimate the intelligence quotient (IQ) and the risk of hearing loss 5 years post radiotherapy and to compare outcomes of proton against photon in pediatric brain tumors. Methods: Patients who had received radical IMRT were randomly selected from our retrospective database: 10 cases each of craniopharyngioma, ependymoma and medulloblastoma, and 20 cases of glioma. The existing planning CT and contours were used to generate IMPT plans. The RBE-corrected dose to brain structures and cochleas were calculated for both IMPT and IMRT. A model was applied to estimate IQ using a Markov chain Monte Carlo technique. The reported incidence of hearing loss as a function of cochlear dose was used to estimate the rate of occurrence. Results: The average brain dose was less in all IMPT plans compared to IMRT: ranging from a 6.7% reduction (P=0.003) in the case of medulloblastoma to 38% (P=0.007) for craniopharyngioma. This dose reduction translated into a gain in IQ of 1.9 points on average for protons vs photons for the whole cohort at 5 years post-treatment (P=0.011). In terms of specific diseases, the gains in IQ ranged from 0.8 points for medulloblastoma, to 2.7 points for craniopharyngioma. Hearing loss probability was evaluated on a per-ear-basis and was found to be systematically less for proton versus photon: overall 2.9% versus 7.2% (P < 0.001). Conclusion: A novel method was developed to predict neurocognitive outcomes in pediatric brain tumor patients on a case-by-case basis. A modest gain in IQ was systematically observed for proton in all patients. Given the uncertainties within the model used and our reinterpretation, these gains may be underestimated.

  17. SU-F-T-116: Predicting IQ and the Risk of Hearing Loss Following Proton Versus Photon Radiotherapy for Pediatric Brain Tumor Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortin, D; Sharpe, M; Laperriere, N; Hodgson, D [UHN Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Ng, A [UHN Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Tsang, D [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The increased sparing of normal tissues in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) compared to photon intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in brain tumor treatments should translate into improved neurocognitive outcomes. Models were used to estimate the intelligence quotient (IQ) and the risk of hearing loss 5 years post radiotherapy and to compare outcomes of proton against photon in pediatric brain tumors. Methods: Patients who had received radical IMRT were randomly selected from our retrospective database: 10 cases each of craniopharyngioma, ependymoma and medulloblastoma, and 20 cases of glioma. The existing planning CT and contours were used to generate IMPT plans. The RBE-corrected dose to brain structures and cochleas were calculated for both IMPT and IMRT. A model was applied to estimate IQ using a Markov chain Monte Carlo technique. The reported incidence of hearing loss as a function of cochlear dose was used to estimate the rate of occurrence. Results: The average brain dose was less in all IMPT plans compared to IMRT: ranging from a 6.7% reduction (P=0.003) in the case of medulloblastoma to 38% (P=0.007) for craniopharyngioma. This dose reduction translated into a gain in IQ of 1.9 points on average for protons vs photons for the whole cohort at 5 years post-treatment (P=0.011). In terms of specific diseases, the gains in IQ ranged from 0.8 points for medulloblastoma, to 2.7 points for craniopharyngioma. Hearing loss probability was evaluated on a per-ear-basis and was found to be systematically less for proton versus photon: overall 2.9% versus 7.2% (P < 0.001). Conclusion: A novel method was developed to predict neurocognitive outcomes in pediatric brain tumor patients on a case-by-case basis. A modest gain in IQ was systematically observed for proton in all patients. Given the uncertainties within the model used and our reinterpretation, these gains may be underestimated.

  18. On the unconventional amide I band in acetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, Alexander; Campa, Alessandro; Giansanti, Andrea

    1987-04-01

    We developed a new model to study the molecular dynamics of the acetanilide (ACN) crystal by computer simulation. Low-frequency oscillations of the molecules as a whole were considered with high-frequency vibrations of the amidic degrees of freedom involved in hydrogen bonding. The low-temperature power spectrum has two peaks, shifted by 15 cm -1, in the region of the amide I band: one of them corresponds to the so-called anomalous amide I band in the IR and Raman spectra of ACN. We found that this peak is due to the coupling of the low-frequency motion in the chain of molecules with the motion of the hydrogen-bonded protons, at variance with current suggestions.

  19. Amides in Nature and Biocatalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitzer, J.; Steiner, K.

    2016-01-01

    Amides are widespread in biologically active compounds with a broad range of applications in biotechnology, agriculture and medicine. Therefore, as alternative to chemical synthesis the biocatalytic amide synthesis is a very interesting field of research. As usual, Nature can serve as guide in the

  20. WE-D-BRE-03: Late Toxicity Following Photon Or Proton Radiotherapy in Patients with Brain Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munbodh, R; Ding, X; Yin, L; Anamalayil, S; Dorsey, J; Lustig, R; Alonso-Basanta, M [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To identify indicators of Late Grade 3 (LG3) toxicity, late vision and hearing changes in patients treated for primary brain tumors with photon (XRT) or proton radiotherapy (PRT). Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 102 patients who received brain XRT or PRT to doses of 54 or 59.6 Gy in daily fractions of 1.8–2 Gy. Of the 80 patients (34 XRT, 39 PRT and 7 both modalities) reviewed for indicators of LG3 toxicity, 25 developed LG3 toxicity 90 to 500 days after radiotherapy completion. 55 patients had less than LG3 toxicity > 500 days after treatment. In that time, late vision and hearing changes were seen in 44 of 75 and 25 of 78 patients, respectively. The correlation between late toxicity and prescription dose, planning target volume (PTV) size, and doses to the brainstem, brain, optic chiasm, optic nerves, eyes and cochlea was evaluated. A two-tailed Fisher's exact test and Wilcoxon rank sum test were used for the statistical analysis for XRT, PRT and all patients combined. Results: Exceeding the 54 Gy-5% dose-volume brainstem constraint, but not the optic structure constraints, was significantly correlated (p < 0.05) with late vision changes in all three groups. Exceeding maximum and mean cochlear doses of 45 and 30 Gy, respectively, was a significant indicator of hearing changes (p < 0.05) in PRT patients and all patients combined. In a sub-group of 52 patients in whom the brain was contoured, the absolute brain volume receiving ≤ 50 Gy and > 60 Gy was significantly larger in patients with LG3 toxicity for all patients combined (p < 0.05). Prescription dose, brainstem dose and PTV volume were not correlated to LG3 toxicity. Conclusion: Our results indicate the importance of minimizing the brain volume irradiated, and brainstem and cochlea doses to reduce the risk of late toxicities following brain radiotherapy.

  1. Determination of Structures and Energetics of Small- and Medium-Sized One-Carbon-Bridged Twisted Amides using ab Initio Molecular Orbital Methods: Implications for Amidic Resonance along the C-N Rotational Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostak, Roman; Aubé, Jeffrey; Szostak, Michal

    2015-08-21

    Twisted amides containing nitrogen at the bridgehead position are attractive practical prototypes for the investigation of the electronic and structural properties of nonplanar amide linkages. Changes that occur during rotation around the N-C(O) axis in one-carbon-bridged twisted amides have been studied using ab initio molecular orbital methods. Calculations at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level performed on a set of one-carbon-bridged lactams, including 20 distinct scaffolds ranging from [2.2.1] to [6.3.1] ring systems, with the C═O bond on the shortest bridge indicate significant variations in structures, resonance energies, proton affinities, core ionization energies, frontier molecular orbitals, atomic charges, and infrared frequencies that reflect structural changes corresponding to the extent of resonance stabilization during rotation along the N-C(O) axis. The results are discussed in the context of resonance theory and activation of amides toward N-protonation (N-activation) by distortion. This study demonstrates that one-carbon-bridged lactams-a class of readily available, hydrolytically robust twisted amides-are ideally suited to span the whole spectrum of the amide bond distortion energy surface. Notably, this study provides a blueprint for the rational design and application of nonplanar amides in organic synthesis. The presented findings strongly support the classical amide bond resonance model in predicting the properties of nonplanar amides.

  2. Proton pump inhibitors induce apoptosis of human B-cell tumors through a caspase-independent mechanism involving reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Milito, Angelo; Iessi, Elisabetta; Logozzi, Mariantonia; Lozupone, Francesco; Spada, Massimo; Marino, Maria Lucia; Federici, Cristina; Perdicchio, Maurizio; Matarrese, Paola; Lugini, Luana; Nilsson, Anna; Fais, Stefano

    2007-06-01

    Proton pumps like the vacuolar-type H+ ATPase (V-ATPase) are involved in the control of cellular pH in normal and tumor cells. Treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI) induces sensitization of cancer cells to chemotherapeutics via modifications of cellular pH gradients. It is also known that low pH is the most suitable condition for a full PPI activation. Here, we tested whether PPI treatment in unbuffered culture conditions could affect survival and proliferation of human B-cell tumors. First, we showed that PPI treatment increased the sensitivity to vinblastine of a pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell line. PPI, per se, induced a dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation of tumor B cells, which was associated with a dose- and time-dependent apoptotic-like cytotoxicity in B-cell lines and leukemic cells from patients with pre-B ALL. The effect of PPI was mediated by a very early production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), that preceded alkalinization of lysosomal pH, lysosomal membrane permeabilization, and cytosol acidification, suggesting an early destabilization of the acidic vesicular compartment. Lysosomal alterations were followed by mitochondrial membrane depolarization, release of cytochrome c, chromatin condensation, and caspase activation. However, inhibition of caspase activity did not affect PPI-induced cell death, whereas specific inhibition of ROS by an antioxidant (N-acetylcysteine) significantly delayed cell death and protected both lysosomal and mitochondrial membranes. The proapoptotic activity of PPI was consistent with a clear inhibition of tumor growth following PPI treatment of B-cell lymphoma in severe combined immunodeficient mice. This study further supports the importance of acidity and pH gradients in tumor cell homeostasis and suggests new therapeutic approaches for human B-cell tumors based on PPI.

  3. SU-E-J-212: MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Assessment of Tumor and Normal Brain Tissue Responses of Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytoma Treated by Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, P; Park, P; Li, H; Zhu, X; Mahajan, A; Grosshans, D [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can measure molecular mobility at the cellular level, quantified by the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). DTI may also reveal axonal fiber directional information in the white matter, quantified by the fractional anisotropy (FA). Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA) is a rare brain tumor that occurs in children and young adults. Proton therapy (PT) is increasingly used in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors including JPA. However, the response of both tumors and normal tissues to PT is currently under investigation. We report tumor and normal brain tissue responses for a pediatric case of JPA treated with PT assessed using DTI. Methods: A ten year old male with JPA of the left thalamus received passive scattered PT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in 28 fractions. Post PT, the patient has been followed up in seven years. At each follow up, MRI imaging including DTI was performed to assess response. MR images were registered to the treatment planning CT and the GTV mapped onto each MRI. The GTV contour was then mirrored to the right side of brain through the patient’s middle line to represent normal brain tissue. ADC and FA were measured within the ROIs. Results: Proton therapy can completely spare contra lateral brain while the target volume received full prescribed dose. From a series of MRI ADC images before and after PT at different follow ups, the enhancement corresponding to GTV had nearly disappeared more than 2 years after PT. Both ADC and FA demonstrate that contralateral normal brain tissue were not affect by PT and the tumor volume reverted to normal ADC and FA values. Conclusion: DTI allowed quantitative evaluation of tumor and normal brain tissue responses to PT. Further study in a larger cohort is warranted.

  4. SU-E-J-212: MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Assessment of Tumor and Normal Brain Tissue Responses of Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytoma Treated by Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, P; Park, P; Li, H; Zhu, X; Mahajan, A; Grosshans, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can measure molecular mobility at the cellular level, quantified by the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). DTI may also reveal axonal fiber directional information in the white matter, quantified by the fractional anisotropy (FA). Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA) is a rare brain tumor that occurs in children and young adults. Proton therapy (PT) is increasingly used in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors including JPA. However, the response of both tumors and normal tissues to PT is currently under investigation. We report tumor and normal brain tissue responses for a pediatric case of JPA treated with PT assessed using DTI. Methods: A ten year old male with JPA of the left thalamus received passive scattered PT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in 28 fractions. Post PT, the patient has been followed up in seven years. At each follow up, MRI imaging including DTI was performed to assess response. MR images were registered to the treatment planning CT and the GTV mapped onto each MRI. The GTV contour was then mirrored to the right side of brain through the patient’s middle line to represent normal brain tissue. ADC and FA were measured within the ROIs. Results: Proton therapy can completely spare contra lateral brain while the target volume received full prescribed dose. From a series of MRI ADC images before and after PT at different follow ups, the enhancement corresponding to GTV had nearly disappeared more than 2 years after PT. Both ADC and FA demonstrate that contralateral normal brain tissue were not affect by PT and the tumor volume reverted to normal ADC and FA values. Conclusion: DTI allowed quantitative evaluation of tumor and normal brain tissue responses to PT. Further study in a larger cohort is warranted

  5. Equilibrium amide hydrogen exchange and protein folding kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Yawen

    1999-01-01

    The classical Linderstrom-Lang hydrogen exchange (HX) model is extended to describe the relationship between the HX behaviors (EX1 and EX2) and protein folding kinetics for the amide protons that can only exchange by global unfolding in a three-state system including native (N), intermediate (I), and unfolded (U) states. For these slowly exchanging amide protons, it is shown that the existence of an intermediate (I) has no effect on the HX behavior in an off-pathway three-state system (I↔U↔N). On the other hand, in an on-pathway three-state system (U↔I↔N), the existence of a stable folding intermediate has profound effect on the HX behavior. It is shown that fast refolding from the unfolded state to the stable intermediate state alone does not guarantee EX2 behavior. The rate of refolding from the intermediate state to the native state also plays a crucial role in determining whether EX1 or EX2 behavior should occur. This is mainly due to the fact that only amide protons in the native state are observed in the hydrogen exchange experiment. These new concepts suggest that caution needs to be taken if one tries to derive the kinetic events of protein folding from equilibrium hydrogen exchange experiments

  6. Accurate Quantitation of Water-amide Proton Exchange Rates Using the Phase-Modulated CLEAN Chemical EXchange (CLEANEX-PM) Approach with a Fast-HSQC (FHSQC) Detection Scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Tsang-Lin; Zijl, Peter C.M. van; Mori, Susumu

    1998-01-01

    Measurement of exchange rates between water and NH protons by magnetization transfer methods is often complicated by artifacts, such as intramolecular NOEs, and/or TOCSY transfer from Cα protons coincident with the water frequency, or exchange-relayed NOEs from fast exchanging hydroxyl or amine protons. By applying the Phase-Modulated CLEAN chemical EXchange (CLEANEX-PM) spin-locking sequence, 135 o (x) 120 o (-x) 110 o (x) 110 o (-x) 120 o (x) 135 o (-x) during the mixing period, these artifacts can be eliminated, revealing an unambiguous water-NH exchange spectrum. In this paper, the CLEANEX-PM mixing scheme is combined with Fast-HSQC (FHSQC) detection and used to obtain accurate chemical exchange rates from the initial slope analysis for a sample of 15N labeled staphylococcal nuclease. The results are compared to rates obtained using Water EXchange filter (WEX) II-FHSQC, and spin-echo-filtered WEX II-FHSQC measurements, and clearly identify the spurious NOE contributions in the exchange system

  7. SU-F-T-189: Dosimetric Comparison of Spot-Scanning Proton Therapy Techniques for Liver Tumors Close to the Skin Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takao, S; Matsuzaki, Y; Matsuura, T; Umegaki, K; Fujii, Y; Fujii, T; Katoh, N; Shimizu, S; Shirato, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Spot-scanning technique has been utilized to achieve conformal dose distribution to large and complicated tumors. This technique generally does not require patient-specific devices such as aperture and compensator. The commercially available spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT) systems, however, cannot deliver proton beams to the region shallower than 4 g/cm2. Therefore some range compensation device is required to treat superficial tumors with SSPT. This study shows dosimetric comparison of the following treatment techniques: (i) with a tabletop bolus, (ii) with a nozzle-mounted applicator, and (iii) without any devices and using intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) technique. Methods: The applicator composed of a combination of a mini-ridge filter and a range shifter has been manufactured by Hitachi, Ltd., and the tabletop bolus was made by .decimal, Inc. Both devices have been clinically implemented in our facility. Three patients with liver tumors close to the skin surface were examined in this study. Each treatment plan was optimized so that the prescription dose of 76 Gy(RBE) or 66 Gy(RBE) would be delivered to 99% of the clinical target volume in 20 fractions. Three beams were used for tabletop bolus plan and IMPT plan, whereas two beams were used in the applicator plan because the gantry angle available was limited due to potential collision to patient and couch. The normal liver, colon, and skin were considered as organs at risk (OARs). Results: The target heterogeneity index (HI = D_5/D_9_5) was 1.03 on average in each planning technique. The mean dose to the normal liver was considerably less than 20 Gy(RBE) in all cases. The dose to the skin could be reduced by 20 Gy(RBE) on average in the IMPT plan compared to the applicator plan. Conclusion: It has been confirmed that all treatment techniques met the dosimetric criteria for the OARs and could be implemented clinically.

  8. SU-F-T-189: Dosimetric Comparison of Spot-Scanning Proton Therapy Techniques for Liver Tumors Close to the Skin Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takao, S; Matsuzaki, Y [Proton Beam Therapy Center, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Matsuura, T; Umegaki, K [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education (GI-CoRE), Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Fujii, Y; Fujii, T [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Katoh, N [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Shimizu, S; Shirato, H [Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education (GI-CoRE), Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Spot-scanning technique has been utilized to achieve conformal dose distribution to large and complicated tumors. This technique generally does not require patient-specific devices such as aperture and compensator. The commercially available spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT) systems, however, cannot deliver proton beams to the region shallower than 4 g/cm2. Therefore some range compensation device is required to treat superficial tumors with SSPT. This study shows dosimetric comparison of the following treatment techniques: (i) with a tabletop bolus, (ii) with a nozzle-mounted applicator, and (iii) without any devices and using intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) technique. Methods: The applicator composed of a combination of a mini-ridge filter and a range shifter has been manufactured by Hitachi, Ltd., and the tabletop bolus was made by .decimal, Inc. Both devices have been clinically implemented in our facility. Three patients with liver tumors close to the skin surface were examined in this study. Each treatment plan was optimized so that the prescription dose of 76 Gy(RBE) or 66 Gy(RBE) would be delivered to 99% of the clinical target volume in 20 fractions. Three beams were used for tabletop bolus plan and IMPT plan, whereas two beams were used in the applicator plan because the gantry angle available was limited due to potential collision to patient and couch. The normal liver, colon, and skin were considered as organs at risk (OARs). Results: The target heterogeneity index (HI = D{sub 5}/D{sub 95}) was 1.03 on average in each planning technique. The mean dose to the normal liver was considerably less than 20 Gy(RBE) in all cases. The dose to the skin could be reduced by 20 Gy(RBE) on average in the IMPT plan compared to the applicator plan. Conclusion: It has been confirmed that all treatment techniques met the dosimetric criteria for the OARs and could be implemented clinically.

  9. Locally challenging osteo- and chondrogenic tumors of the axial skeleton: results of combined proton and photon radiation therapy using three-dimensional treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hug, Eugen B; Fitzek, Markus M; Liebsch, Norbert J; Munzenrider, John E

    1995-02-01

    Purpose: Tumors of the axial skeleton are at high risk for local failure. Total surgical resection is rarely possible. Critical normal tissues limit the efficacy of conventional photon therapy. This study reviews our experience of using combined high dose proton and photon radiation therapy following three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Between December 1980 and September 1992, 47 patients were treated at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory for primary or recurrent chordomas and chondrosarcomas (group 1, 20 patients), osteogenic sarcomas (group 2, 15 patients) and giant cell tumors, osteo- or chondroblastomas (group 3, 12 patients). Radiation treatment was given postoperatively in 23 patients, pre- and postoperatively in 17 patients, and 7 patients received radiation therapy as definitive treatment modality following biopsy only. The proton radiation component was delivered using a 160 MeV proton beam and the photon component using megavoltage photons up to 23 MV energy with 1.8-2.0 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) per fraction, once a day. Total external beam target dose ranged from 55.3 CGE to 82.0 CGE with mean target doses of 73.9 CGE (group 1), 69.8 CGE (group 2), and 61.8 CGE (group 3). Results: Group 1 (chordoma and chondrosarcoma): Five of 14 patients (36%) with chordoma recurred locally, and 2 out of 5 patients developed distant metastasis, resulting in 1 death from disease. A trend for improved local control was noted for primary vs. recurrent tumors, target doses > 77 CGE and gross total resection. All patients with chondrosarcoma achieved and maintained local control and disease-free status. Five-year actuarial local control and overall survival rates were 53% and 50% for chordomas and 100% and 100% for chondrosarcomas, respectively. Group 2 (osteogenic sarcoma): Three of 15 patients (20%) never achieved local control and died within 6 months of completion of radiation treatment. Only 1 out of 12

  10. Noninvasive monitoring of radiation-induced treatment response using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in a colorectal tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seierstad, Therese; Roe, Kathrine; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: To examine whether in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H MRS) and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) can monitor radiation-induced changes in HT29 xenografts in mice. Materials and methods: HT29 xenografts in mice received a dose of 15 Gy. In vivo 1 H MRS and DW-MRI were acquired pretreatment and 1, 3, 6 and 10 days post-irradiation. After imaging, tumors were excised for histological analysis. The amounts of necrosis, fibrosis and viable cells in the cross sections were scored and compared to changes in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and choline/water ratio. Results: Radiation-induced necrosis in the xenografts was observed as increased tumor ADC. In-growth of fibrosis three days post-irradiation restricting water mobility was accompanied by decreased tumor ADC. Choline/water ratio correlated with metabolic activity and tumor growth. Conclusions: ADC and choline/water ratio assessed by in vivo DW-MRI and 1 H MRS depicts radiation-induced changes in HT29 xenografts following irradiation

  11. Measurements of diagnostic examination performance using quantitative apparent diffusion coefficient and proton MR spectroscopic imaging in the preoperative evaluation of tumor grade in cerebral gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, Andres; Kulle, Bettina; Gadmar, Oystein B.; Josefsen, Roger; Kumar, Theresa; Nakstad, Per H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Tumor grading is very important both in treatment decision and evaluation of prognosis. While tissue samples are obtained as part of most therapeutic approaches, factors that may result in inaccurate grading due to sampling error (namely, heterogeneity in tissue sampling, as well as tumor-grade heterogeneity within the same tumor specimen), have led to a desire to use imaging better to ascertain tumor grade. The purpose in our study was to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), area under the curve (AUC), and accuracy of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI), proton MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) or both in grading primary cerebral gliomas. Materials and methods: We performed conventional MR imaging (MR), DWI, and MRSI in 74 patients with newly diagnosed brain gliomas: 59 patients had histologically verified high-grade gliomas: 37 glioblastomas multiform (GBM) and 22 anaplastic astrocytomas (AA), and 15 patients had low-grade gliomas. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of tumor and peritumoral edema, and ADC ratios (ADC in tumor or peritumoral edema to ADC of contralateral white matter, as well as ADC in tumor to ADC in peritumoral edema) were determined from three regions of interest. The average of the mean, maximum, and minimum for ADC variables was calculated for each patient. The metabolite ratios of Cho/Cr and Cho/NAA at intermediate TE were assessed from spectral maps in the solid portion of tumor, peritumoral edema and contralateral normal-appearing white matter. Tumor grade determined with the two methods was then compared with that from histopathologic grading. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis were performed to determine optimum thresholds for tumor grading. Measures of diagnostic examination performance, such as sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, AUC, and accuracy for identifying high-grade gliomas were also calculated

  12. Potential role of proton therapy in the treatment of pediatric medulloblastoma/primitive neuro-ectodermal tumors: spinal theca irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miralbell, Raymond; Lomax, Anthony; Russo, Mariateresa

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Conventional postoperative photon-beam radiotherapy to the spine in children with medulloblastoma/PNET is associated with severe late effects. This morbidity (growth and developmental) is related to the exit dose of the beams and is particularly severe in young children. With the purpose of reducing this toxicity, a dosimetric study was undertaken in which proton therapy was compared to standard megavoltage photon treatment. Methods and materials: The results of a comparative dosimetric study are presented in such a way that the dose distribution achievable with a posterior modulated 100 MeV proton beam (spot scanning method) is compared with that of a standard set of posterior 6 MV x-ray fields. The potential improvements with protons are evaluated, using dose-volume histograms to examine the coverage of the target as well as the dose to the vertebral bodies (growth plates), lungs, heart, and liver. Results: The target (i.e., the spinal dural sac) received the full prescribed dose in both treatment plans. However, the proportions of the vertebral body volume receiving ≥50% of the prescribed dose were 100 and 20% for 6 MV x-rays and protons, respectively. For 6 MV x-rays >60% of the dose prescribed to the target was delivered to 44% of the heart volume, while the proton beam was able to completely avoid the heart, the liver, and in all likelihood the thyroid and gonads as well. Conclusion: The present study demonstrates a potential role of proton therapy in decreasing the dose (and toxicity) to the critical structures in the irradiation of the spinal neuraxis in medulloblastoma/PNET. The potential bone marrow and growth arrest sparing effects make this approach specially attractive for intensive chemotherapy protocols and for very young children. Sparing the thyroid gland, the posterior heart wall, and the gonads may be additional advantages in assuring a long-term posttreatment morbidity-free survival

  13. Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Further Reduces Normal Tissue Exposure During Definitive Therapy for Locally Advanced Distal Esophageal Tumors: A Dosimetric Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gomez, Daniel; Palmer, Matthew B.; Riley, Beverly A.; Mayankkumar, Amin V.; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong, Lei; Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Likhacheva, Anna; Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hofstetter, Wayne L. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: We have previously found that {<=} 75% of treatment failures after chemoradiotherapy for unresectable esophageal cancer appear within the gross tumor volume and that intensity-modulated (photon) radiotherapy (IMRT) might allow dose escalation to the tumor without increasing normal tissue toxicity. Proton therapy might allow additional dose escalation, with even lower normal tissue toxicity. In the present study, we compared the dosimetric parameters for photon IMRT with that for intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for unresectable, locally advanced, distal esophageal cancer. Patients and Methods: Four plans were created for each of 10 patients. IMPT was delivered using anteroposterior (AP)/posteroanterior beams, left posterior oblique/right posterior oblique (LPO/RPO) beams, or AP/LPO/RPO beams. IMRT was delivered with a concomitant boost to the gross tumor volume. The dose was 65.8 Gy to the gross tumor volume and 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume in 28 fractions. Results: Relative to IMRT, the IMPT (AP/posteroanterior) plan led to considerable reductions in the mean lung dose (3.18 vs. 8.27 Gy, p < .0001) and the percentage of lung volume receiving 5, 10, and 20 Gy (p {<=} .0006) but did not reduce the cardiac dose. The IMPT LPO/RPO plan also reduced the mean lung dose (4.9 Gy vs. 8.2 Gy, p < .001), the heart dose (mean cardiac dose and percentage of the cardiac volume receiving 10, 20, and 30 Gy, p {<=} .02), and the liver dose (mean hepatic dose 5 Gy vs. 14.9 Gy, p < .0001). The IMPT AP/LPO/RPO plan led to considerable reductions in the dose to the lung (p {<=} .005), heart (p {<=} .003), and liver (p {<=} .04). Conclusions: Compared with IMRT, IMPT for distal esophageal cancer lowered the dose to the heart, lung, and liver. The AP/LPO/RPO beam arrangement was optimal for sparing all three organs. The dosimetric benefits of protons will need to be tailored to each patient according to their specific cardiac and pulmonary risks. IMPT for

  14. TH-C-BRD-07: Minimizing Dose Uncertainty for Spot Scanning Beam Proton Therapy of Moving Tumor with Optimization of Delivery Sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H; Zhang, X; Zhu, X; Li, Y

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) has been shown to be able to reduce dose to normal tissue compared to intensity modulated photon radio-therapy (IMRT), and has been implemented for selected lung cancer patients. However, respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty remain one of the major concerns for the radiotherapy of lung cancer, and the utility of IMPT for lung patients was limited because of the proton dose uncertainty induced by motion. Strategies such as repainting and tumor tracking have been proposed and studied but repainting could result in unacceptable long delivery time and tracking is not yet clinically available. We propose a novel delivery strategy for spot scanning proton beam therapy. Method: The effective number of delivery (END) for each spot position in a treatment plan was calculated based on the parameters of the delivery system, including time required for each spot, spot size and energy. The dose uncertainty was then calculated with an analytical formula. The spot delivery sequence was optimized to maximize END and minimize the dose uncertainty. 2D Measurements with a detector array on a 1D moving platform were performed to validate the calculated results. Results: 143 2D measurements on a moving platform were performed for different delivery sequences of a single layer uniform pattern. The measured dose uncertainty is a strong function of the delivery sequence, the worst delivery sequence results in dose error up to 70% while the optimized delivery sequence results in dose error of <5%. END vs. measured dose uncertainty follows the analytical formula. Conclusion: With optimized delivery sequence, it is feasible to minimize the dose uncertainty due to motion in spot scanning proton therapy

  15. Biosynthesis of amidated joining peptide from pro-adrenocorticotropin-endorphin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, E.I.; Mains, R.E. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1987-09-01

    Joining peptide is the major alpha-amidated product of pro-ACTH/endorphin (PAE) in AtT-20 corticotropic tumor cells. To study intracellular joining peptide synthesis, affinity purified antibodies directed against gamma-MSH, joining peptide, and ACTH were used to immunoprecipitate extracts from biosynthetically labeled AtT-20 cells. Immunoprecipitates were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by tryptic peptide mapping on HPLC. In steady labeling experiments, radioactivity in amidated joining peptide (JP) increased roughly linearly with time, in the manner of a final product, whereas radioactivity associated with PAE (1-94)NH2 reached a constant value after 2-4 h, indicating that PAE(1-94)NH2 is an intermediate in the biosynthesis of JP. Radioactivity appeared in ACTH(1-39) well before JP, consistent with a cleavage order in which ACTH is cleaved from PAE(1-95) before JP sequences are cleaved from PAE(1-74). This conclusion was supported by tryptic peptide analyses of immunoprecipitates, which indicated that less than 5% of JP-related material is cleaved from PAE(1-74) before being cleaved from ACTH-related sequences. After a pulse label, radioactivity in PAE(1-94)NH2 reached a peak value after 1 h of chase and declined with a half-life of less than 1 h. Amidated JP increased to a constant level after 2 h of chase. Enough radiolabeled PAE(1-94)NH2 was detected to account for about half of the radioactivity found in amidated JP, indicating that about half of JP-related material is first cleaved from PAE(1-95) before being amidated. This result was corroborated using HPLC purification to determine both amidated and glycine-extended forms of JP.

  16. Biosynthesis of amidated joining peptide from pro-adrenocorticotropin-endorphin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, E.I.; Mains, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Joining peptide is the major alpha-amidated product of pro-ACTH/endorphin (PAE) in AtT-20 corticotropic tumor cells. To study intracellular joining peptide synthesis, affinity purified antibodies directed against gamma-MSH, joining peptide, and ACTH were used to immunoprecipitate extracts from biosynthetically labeled AtT-20 cells. Immunoprecipitates were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by tryptic peptide mapping on HPLC. In steady labeling experiments, radioactivity in amidated joining peptide (JP) increased roughly linearly with time, in the manner of a final product, whereas radioactivity associated with PAE (1-94)NH2 reached a constant value after 2-4 h, indicating that PAE(1-94)NH2 is an intermediate in the biosynthesis of JP. Radioactivity appeared in ACTH(1-39) well before JP, consistent with a cleavage order in which ACTH is cleaved from PAE(1-95) before JP sequences are cleaved from PAE(1-74). This conclusion was supported by tryptic peptide analyses of immunoprecipitates, which indicated that less than 5% of JP-related material is cleaved from PAE(1-74) before being cleaved from ACTH-related sequences. After a pulse label, radioactivity in PAE(1-94)NH2 reached a peak value after 1 h of chase and declined with a half-life of less than 1 h. Amidated JP increased to a constant level after 2 h of chase. Enough radiolabeled PAE(1-94)NH2 was detected to account for about half of the radioactivity found in amidated JP, indicating that about half of JP-related material is first cleaved from PAE(1-95) before being amidated. This result was corroborated using HPLC purification to determine both amidated and glycine-extended forms of JP

  17. A Geant4 simulation of the depth dose percentage in brain tumors treatments using protons and carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, José A. M., E-mail: joadiazme@unal.edu.co; Torres, D. A., E-mail: datorresg@unal.edu.co [Physics Department, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogot (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    The deposited energy and dose distribution of beams of protons and carbon over a head are simulated using the free tool package Geant4 and the data analysis package ROOT-C++. The present work shows a methodology to understand the microscopical process occurring in a session of hadron-therapy using advance simulation tools.

  18. Poly(ether ester amide)s for tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deschamps, A.A.; van Apeldoorn, Aart A.; de Bruijn, Joost Dick; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Feijen, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Poly(ether ester amide) (PEEA) copolymers based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), 1,4-butanediol and dimethyl-7,12-diaza-6,13-dione-1,18-octadecanedioate were evaluated as scaffold materials for tissue engineering. A PEEA copolymer based on PEG with a molecular weight of 300 g/mol and 25 wt% of soft

  19. SU-E-CAMPUS-T-01: Analysis of the Precision of Patient Set-Up, and Fidelity of the Delivered Dose Distribution in Proton Therapy of Ocular Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trofimov, A; Carpenter, K; Shih, HA

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify daily set-up variations in fractionated proton therapy of ocular melanomas, and to assess the effect on the fidelity of delivered distribution to the plan. Methods: In a typical five-fraction course, daily set-up is achieved by matching the position of fiducial markers in orthogonal radiographs to the images generated by treatment planning program. A patient maintains the required gaze direction voluntarily, without the aid of fixation devices. Confirmation radiographs are acquired to assess intrafractional changes. For this study, daily radiographs were analyzed to determine the daily iso-center position and apparent gaze direction, which were then transferred to the planning system to calculate the dose delivered in individual fractions, and accumulated dose for the entire course. Dose-volume metrics were compared between the planned and accumulated distributions for the tumor and organs at risk, for representative cases that varied by location within the ocular globe. Results: The analysis of the first set of cases (3 posterior, 3 transequatorial and 4 anterior tumors) revealed varying dose deviation patterns, depending on the tumor location. For anterior and posterior tumors, the largest dose increases were observed in the lens and ciliary body, while for the equatorial tumors, macula, optic nerve and disk, were most often affected. The iso-center position error was below 1.3 mm (95%-confidence interval), and the standard deviation of daily polar and azimuthal gaze set-up were 1.5 and 3 degrees, respectively. Conclusion: We quantified interfractional and intrafractional set-up variation, and estimated their effect on the delivered dose for representative cases. Current safety margins are sufficient to maintain the target coverage, however, the dose delivered to critical structures often deviates from the plan. The ongoing analysis will further explore the patterns of dose deviation, and may help to identify particular treatment scenarios

  20. SU-E-CAMPUS-T-01: Analysis of the Precision of Patient Set-Up, and Fidelity of the Delivered Dose Distribution in Proton Therapy of Ocular Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trofimov, A; Carpenter, K; Shih, HA [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify daily set-up variations in fractionated proton therapy of ocular melanomas, and to assess the effect on the fidelity of delivered distribution to the plan. Methods: In a typical five-fraction course, daily set-up is achieved by matching the position of fiducial markers in orthogonal radiographs to the images generated by treatment planning program. A patient maintains the required gaze direction voluntarily, without the aid of fixation devices. Confirmation radiographs are acquired to assess intrafractional changes. For this study, daily radiographs were analyzed to determine the daily iso-center position and apparent gaze direction, which were then transferred to the planning system to calculate the dose delivered in individual fractions, and accumulated dose for the entire course. Dose-volume metrics were compared between the planned and accumulated distributions for the tumor and organs at risk, for representative cases that varied by location within the ocular globe. Results: The analysis of the first set of cases (3 posterior, 3 transequatorial and 4 anterior tumors) revealed varying dose deviation patterns, depending on the tumor location. For anterior and posterior tumors, the largest dose increases were observed in the lens and ciliary body, while for the equatorial tumors, macula, optic nerve and disk, were most often affected. The iso-center position error was below 1.3 mm (95%-confidence interval), and the standard deviation of daily polar and azimuthal gaze set-up were 1.5 and 3 degrees, respectively. Conclusion: We quantified interfractional and intrafractional set-up variation, and estimated their effect on the delivered dose for representative cases. Current safety margins are sufficient to maintain the target coverage, however, the dose delivered to critical structures often deviates from the plan. The ongoing analysis will further explore the patterns of dose deviation, and may help to identify particular treatment scenarios

  1. Updated Outcome and Analysis of Tumor Response in Mobile Spine and Sacral Chordoma Treated With Definitive High-Dose Photon/Proton Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabolizadeh, Peyman; Chen, Yen-Lin; Liebsch, Norbert; Hornicek, Francis J.; Schwab, Joseph H.; Choy, Edwin; Rosenthal, Daniel I.; Niemierko, Andrzej; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Treatment of spine and sacral chordoma generally involves surgical resection, usually in conjunction with radiation therapy. In certain circumstances where resection may result in significant neurologic or organ dysfunction, patients can be treated definitively with radiation therapy alone. Herein, we report the outcome and the assessment of tumor response to definitive radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on 40 patients with unresected chordoma treated with photon/proton radiation therapy. Nineteen patients had complete sets of imaging scans. The soft tissue and bone compartments of the tumor were defined separately. Tumor response was evaluated by the modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and volumetric analysis. Results: With a median follow-up time of 50.3 months, the rates of 5-year local control, overall survival, disease-specific survival, and distant failure were 85.4%, 81.9%, 89.4%, and 20.2%, respectively. Eighty-four computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging scans were reviewed. Among the 19 patients, only 4 local failures occurred, and the median tumor dose was 77.4 GyRBE. Analysis at a median follow-up time of 18 months showed significant volumetric reduction of the total target volume (TTV) and the soft tissue target volume (STTV) within the first 24 months after treatment initiation, followed by further gradual reduction throughout the rest of the follow-up period. The median maximum percentage volumetric regressions of TTV and STTV were 43.2% and 70.4%, respectively. There was only a small reduction in bone target volume over time. In comparison with the modified RECIST, volumetric analysis was more reliable, more reproducible, and could help in measuring minimal changes in the tumor volume. Conclusion: These results continue to support the use of high-dose definitive radiation therapy for selected patients with unresected spine and sacral chordomas

  2. Updated Outcome and Analysis of Tumor Response in Mobile Spine and Sacral Chordoma Treated With Definitive High-Dose Photon/Proton Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabolizadeh, Peyman, E-mail: peyman.kabolizadeh@beaumont.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chen, Yen-Lin; Liebsch, Norbert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hornicek, Francis J.; Schwab, Joseph H. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Choy, Edwin [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Rosenthal, Daniel I. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej; DeLaney, Thomas F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: Treatment of spine and sacral chordoma generally involves surgical resection, usually in conjunction with radiation therapy. In certain circumstances where resection may result in significant neurologic or organ dysfunction, patients can be treated definitively with radiation therapy alone. Herein, we report the outcome and the assessment of tumor response to definitive radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on 40 patients with unresected chordoma treated with photon/proton radiation therapy. Nineteen patients had complete sets of imaging scans. The soft tissue and bone compartments of the tumor were defined separately. Tumor response was evaluated by the modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and volumetric analysis. Results: With a median follow-up time of 50.3 months, the rates of 5-year local control, overall survival, disease-specific survival, and distant failure were 85.4%, 81.9%, 89.4%, and 20.2%, respectively. Eighty-four computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging scans were reviewed. Among the 19 patients, only 4 local failures occurred, and the median tumor dose was 77.4 GyRBE. Analysis at a median follow-up time of 18 months showed significant volumetric reduction of the total target volume (TTV) and the soft tissue target volume (STTV) within the first 24 months after treatment initiation, followed by further gradual reduction throughout the rest of the follow-up period. The median maximum percentage volumetric regressions of TTV and STTV were 43.2% and 70.4%, respectively. There was only a small reduction in bone target volume over time. In comparison with the modified RECIST, volumetric analysis was more reliable, more reproducible, and could help in measuring minimal changes in the tumor volume. Conclusion: These results continue to support the use of high-dose definitive radiation therapy for selected patients with unresected spine and sacral chordomas

  3. MO-FG-CAMPUS-TeP3-01: A Model of Baseline Shift to Improve Robustness of Proton Therapy Treatments of Moving Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souris, K; Barragan Montero, A; Di Perri, D; Geets, X; Lee, J [Universite catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Sterpin, E [Universite catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The shift in mean position of a moving tumor also known as “baseline shift”, has been modeled, in order to automatically generate uncertainty scenarios for the assessment and robust optimization of proton therapy treatments in lung cancer. Methods: An average CT scan and a Mid-Position CT scan (MidPCT) of the patient at the planning time are first generated from a 4D-CT data. The mean position of the tumor along the breathing cycle is represented by the GTV contour in the MidPCT. Several studies reported both systematic and random variations of the mean tumor position from fraction to fraction. Our model can simulate this baseline shift by generating a local deformation field that moves the tumor on all phases of the 4D-CT, without creating any non-physical artifact. The deformation field is comprised of normal and tangential components with respect to the lung wall in order to allow the tumor to slip within the lung instead of deforming the lung surface. The deformation field is eventually smoothed in order to enforce its continuity. Two 4D-CT series acquired at 1 week of interval were used to validate the model. Results: Based on the first 4D-CT set, the model was able to generate a third 4D-CT that reproduced the 5.8 mm baseline-shift measured in the second 4D-CT. Water equivalent thickness (WET) of the voxels have been computed for the 3 average CTs. The root mean square deviation of the WET in the GTV is 0.34 mm between week 1 and week 2, and 0.08 mm between the simulated data and week 2. Conclusion: Our model can be used to automatically generate uncertainty scenarios for robustness analysis of a proton therapy plan. The generated scenarios can also feed a TPS equipped with a robust optimizer. Kevin Souris, Ana Barragan, and Dario Di Perri are financially supported by Televie Grants from F.R.S.-FNRS.

  4. 40 CFR 721.3720 - Fatty amide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fatty amide. 721.3720 Section 721.3720... Fatty amide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a fatty amide (PMN P-91-87) is subject to reporting under this section...

  5. 40 CFR 721.2120 - Cyclic amide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cyclic amide. 721.2120 Section 721... Cyclic amide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as a cyclic amide (PMN P-92-131) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  6. Reducing Dose Uncertainty for Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Therapy of Moving Tumors by Optimizing the Spot Delivery Sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Heng; Zhu, X. Ronald; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and validate a novel delivery strategy for reducing the respiratory motion–induced dose uncertainty of spot-scanning proton therapy. Methods and Materials: The spot delivery sequence was optimized to reduce dose uncertainty. The effectiveness of the delivery sequence optimization was evaluated using measurements and patient simulation. One hundred ninety-one 2-dimensional measurements using different delivery sequences of a single-layer uniform pattern were obtained with a detector array on a 1-dimensional moving platform. Intensity modulated proton therapy plans were generated for 10 lung cancer patients, and dose uncertainties for different delivery sequences were evaluated by simulation. Results: Without delivery sequence optimization, the maximum absolute dose error can be up to 97.2% in a single measurement, whereas the optimized delivery sequence results in a maximum absolute dose error of ≤11.8%. In patient simulation, the optimized delivery sequence reduces the mean of fractional maximum absolute dose error compared with the regular delivery sequence by 3.3% to 10.6% (32.5-68.0% relative reduction) for different patients. Conclusions: Optimizing the delivery sequence can reduce dose uncertainty due to respiratory motion in spot-scanning proton therapy, assuming the 4-dimensional CT is a true representation of the patients' breathing patterns.

  7. Quantitative structure-cytotoxicity relationship of phenylpropanoid amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Chiyako; Uesawa, Yoshihiro; Ishihara, Mariko; Kagaya, Hajime; Kanamoto, Taisei; Terakubo, Shigemi; Nakashima, Hideki; Takao, Koichi; Saito, Takayuki; Sugita, Yoshiaki; Sakagami, Hiroshi

    2014-07-01

    A total of 12 phenylpropanoid amides were subjected to quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis, based on their cytotoxicity, tumor selectivity and anti-HIV activity, in order to investigate on their biological activities. Cytotoxicity against four human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines and three human oral normal cells was determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method. Tumor selectivity was evaluated by the ratio of the mean CC50 (50% cytotoxic concentration) against normal oral cells to that against OSCC cell lines. Anti-HIV activity was evaluated by the ratio of CC50 to EC50 (50% cytoprotective concentration from HIV infection). Physicochemical, structural, and quantum-chemical parameters were calculated based on the conformations optimized by the LowModeMD method followed by density functional theory (DFT) method. Twelve phenylpropanoid amides showed moderate cytotoxicity against both normal and OSCC cell lines. N-Caffeoyl derivatives coupled with vanillylamine and tyramine exhibited relatively higher tumor selectivity. Cytotoxicity against normal cells was correlated with descriptors related to electrostatic interaction such as polar surface area and chemical hardness, whereas cytotoxicity against tumor cells correlated with free energy, surface area and ellipticity. The tumor-selective cytotoxicity correlated with molecular size (surface area) and electrostatic interaction (the maximum electrostatic potential). The molecular size, shape and ability for electrostatic interaction are useful parameters for estimating the tumor selectivity of phenylpropanoid amides. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  8. Risk Factors for Neovascular Glaucoma After Proton Beam Therapy of Uveal Melanoma: A Detailed Analysis of Tumor and Dose–Volume Parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Kavita K.; Daftari, Inder K.; Weinberg, Vivian; Cole, Tia; Quivey, Jeanne M.; Castro, Joseph R.; Phillips, Theodore L.; Char, Devron H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine neovascular glaucoma (NVG) incidence and identify contributing tumor and dosing factors in uveal melanoma patients treated with proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 704 PBRT patients treated by a single surgeon (DHC) for uveal melanoma (1996-2010) were reviewed for NVG in our prospectively maintained database. All patients received 56 GyE in 4 fractions. Median follow-up was 58.3 months. Analyses included the Kaplan-Meier method to estimate NVG distributions, univariate log–rank tests, and Cox's proportional hazards multivariate analysis using likelihood ratio tests to identify independent risk factors of NVG among patient, tumor, and dose–volume histogram parameters. Results: The 5-year PBRT NVG rate was 12.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 10.2%-15.9%). The 5-year rate of enucleation due to NVG was 4.9% (95% CI 3.4%-7.2%). Univariately, the NVG rate increased significantly with larger tumor diameter (P 30% of the lens or ciliary body received ≥50% dose (≥28 GyE), there was a higher probability of NVG (P 0%-30% vs >30%) (P=.01), and optic nerve length treated to ≥90% Dose (≤1 mm vs >1 mm) (P=.02). Conclusions: Our current PBRT patients experience a low rate of NVG and resultant enucleation compared with historical data. The present analysis shows that tumor height, diameter, and anterior as well as posterior critical structure dose–volume parameters may be used to predict NVG risk

  9. Emerging Techniques in Brain Tumor Imaging: What Radiologists Need to Know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Minjae; Kim, Ho Sung [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Among the currently available brain tumor imaging, advanced MR imaging techniques, such as diffusion-weighted MR imaging and perfusion MR imaging, have been used for solving diagnostic challenges associated with conventional imaging and for monitoring the brain tumor treatment response. Further development of advanced MR imaging techniques and postprocessing methods may contribute to predicting the treatment response to a specific therapeutic regimen, particularly using multi-modality and multiparametric imaging. Over the next few years, new imaging techniques, such as amide proton transfer imaging, will be studied regarding their potential use in quantitative brain tumor imaging. In this review, the pathophysiologic considerations and clinical validations of these promising techniques are discussed in the context of brain tumor characterization and treatment response.

  10. Specific expression of the human voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 in highly metastatic breast cancer cells, promotes tumor progression and metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yifan; Li, Shu Jie; Pan, Juncheng; Che, Yongzhe; Yin, Jian; Zhao, Qing

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Hv1 is specifically expressed in highly metastatic human breast tumor tissues. → Hv1 regulates breast cancer cytosolic pH. → Hv1 acidifies extracellular milieu. → Hv1 exacerbates the migratory ability of metastatic cells. -- Abstract: The newly discovered human voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is essential for proton transfer, which contains a voltage sensor domain (VSD) without a pore domain. We report here for the first time that Hv1 is specifically expressed in the highly metastatic human breast tumor tissues, but not in poorly metastatic breast cancer tissues, detected by immunohistochemistry. Meanwhile, real-time RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry showed that the expression levels of Hv1 have significant differences among breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-453, T-47D and SK-BR-3, in which Hv1 is expressed at a high level in highly metastatic human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, but at a very low level in poorly metastatic human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Inhibition of Hv1 expression in the highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly decreases the invasion and migration of the cells. The intracellular pH of MDA-MB-231 cells down-regulated Hv1 expression by siRNA is obviously decreased compared with MDA-MB-231 with the scrambled siRNA. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and gelatinase activity in MDA-MB-231 cells suppressed Hv1 by siRNA were reduced. Our results strongly suggest that Hv1 regulates breast cancer intracellular pH and exacerbates the migratory ability of metastatic cells.

  11. Electromagnetic design of a pos-accelerator of protons for ocular neoplasm therapy; Projeto eletromagnético de um pós-acelerador de prótons para tratamento de tumor ocular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabelo, Luísa de Araújo

    2016-07-01

    Proton therapy is an effective technique in the treatment and control of cancer, which is not available in most countries. The low number of specialized centers for this type of treatment is because of the high cost of implementing and maintaining the accelerators. This study presents a model for the Electromagnetic (EM) acceleration of protons to sufficient energies for the treatment of ocular tumors. This is the scientific possibility of a compact technology that uses cyclotrons to produce radioisotopes (present in various countries) as accelerator guns via an analytical assessment of the physical parameters of the beam and a simulation of the electromagnetic equipment structures, acceleration, and movement of the proton beam using CST STUDIO® 3D 2015 (Computer Simulation Technology) software. In addition, the geometry required to provide synchronization between the acceleration and beam path was analyzed using the motion equations of the protons. The simulations show a final model that is compact and simplified as compared with the isochronic cyclotron and synchrotron (used for proton therapy). The synchronism requirements of a circular accelerator are fulfilled in this model so that in all orbits the beam has the same movement time. The extraction energy of the presented model is sufficient for the treatment of ocular tumors. This is an alternative method that could improve the quality of life for patients with ocular tumors in developing countries. Future studies will be conducted to complete the technical design presentation and evaluate the accelerated beam's interaction with neoplastic tissues. (author)

  12. Quantitative structure-cytotoxicity relationship of piperic acid amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Chiyako; Uesawa, Yoshihiro; Ishihara, Mariko; Kagaya, Hajime; Kanamoto, Taisei; Terakubo, Shigemi; Nakashima, Hideki; Takao, Koichi; Miyashiro, Takaki; Sugita, Yoshiaki; Sakagami, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    A total of 12 piperic acid amides, including piperine, were subjected to quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis, based on their cytotoxicity, tumor selectivity and anti-HIV activity, in order to find new biological activities. Cytotoxicity against four human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines and three human oral normal cells was determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method. Tumor selectivity was evaluated by the ratio of the mean 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50) against normal oral cells to that against OSCC cell lines. Anti-HIV activity was evaluated by the ratio of the CC50 to 50% HIV infection-cytoprotective concentration (EC50). Physicochemical, structural, and quantum-chemical parameters were calculated based on the conformations optimized by LowModeMD method followed by density functional theory method. All compounds showed low-to-moderate tumor selectivity, but no anti-HIV activity. N-Piperoyldopamine ( 8: ) which has a catechol moiety, showed the highest tumor selectivity, possibly due to its unique molecular shape and electrostatic interaction, especially its largest partial equalization of orbital electronegativities and vsurf descriptors. The present study suggests that molecular shape and ability for electrostatic interaction are useful parameters for estimating the tumor selectivity of piperic acid amides. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  13. Risk Factors for Neovascular Glaucoma After Proton Beam Therapy of Uveal Melanoma: A Detailed Analysis of Tumor and Dose–Volume Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Kavita K., E-mail: kmishra@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Daftari, Inder K.; Weinberg, Vivian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Cole, Tia [The Tumori Foundation, San Francisco, California (United States); Quivey, Jeanne M.; Castro, Joseph R.; Phillips, Theodore L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Char, Devron H. [The Tumori Foundation, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To determine neovascular glaucoma (NVG) incidence and identify contributing tumor and dosing factors in uveal melanoma patients treated with proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 704 PBRT patients treated by a single surgeon (DHC) for uveal melanoma (1996-2010) were reviewed for NVG in our prospectively maintained database. All patients received 56 GyE in 4 fractions. Median follow-up was 58.3 months. Analyses included the Kaplan-Meier method to estimate NVG distributions, univariate log–rank tests, and Cox's proportional hazards multivariate analysis using likelihood ratio tests to identify independent risk factors of NVG among patient, tumor, and dose–volume histogram parameters. Results: The 5-year PBRT NVG rate was 12.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 10.2%-15.9%). The 5-year rate of enucleation due to NVG was 4.9% (95% CI 3.4%-7.2%). Univariately, the NVG rate increased significantly with larger tumor diameter (P<.0001), greater height (P<.0001), higher T stage (P<.0001), and closer proximity to the disc (P=.002). Dose–volume histogram analysis revealed that if >30% of the lens or ciliary body received ≥50% dose (≥28 GyE), there was a higher probability of NVG (P<.0001 for both). Furthermore, if 100% of the disc or macula received ≥28 GyE, the NVG rate was higher (P<.0001 and P=.03, respectively). If both anterior and posterior doses were above specified cut points, NVG risk was highest (P<.0001). Multivariate analysis confirmed significant independent risk factors to include tumor height (P<.0001), age (P<.0001), %disc treated to ≥50% Dose (<100% vs 100%) (P=.0007), larger tumor diameter (P=.01), %lens treated to ≥90% Dose (0 vs >0%-30% vs >30%) (P=.01), and optic nerve length treated to ≥90% Dose (≤1 mm vs >1 mm) (P=.02). Conclusions: Our current PBRT patients experience a low rate of NVG and resultant enucleation compared with historical data. The present analysis shows that tumor height

  14. TH-CD-209-11: Simulation Study of Real-Time-Image Gating On Spot Scanning Proton Therapy for Lung Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanehira, T; Inoue, T; Katoh, N [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Matsuura, T; Umegaki, K [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Proton Beam Therapy Center, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Global Station for Quantum Medical Science and Engineering, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education (GI-CoRE), Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Takao, S; Matsuzaki, Y; Fujii, Y; Fujii, T; Miyamoto, N [Proton Beam Therapy Center, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Shimizu, S; Shirato, H [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Proton Beam Therapy Center, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Global Station for Quantum Medical Science and Engineering, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education (GI-CoRE), Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study the impact of a real-time-image gating on spot scanning proton therapy for lung tumors and to examine the suitable size of the gating window (GW). Methods: We investigated a real-time-image gated proton therapy (RGPT), in which two fluoroscopic units monitor a gold sphere fiducial in real-time, and the proton beam is irradiated only when the marker enters within the pre-assigned GW. We designed 5 treatment plans for 7 lung cancer patients: RGPT with a GW of ±1, 2, 5, and 8 mm and free-breathing proton therapy (FBPT) using the end-exhale and average images of 4-dimensional (4D) CT, respectively. 70 Gy(RBE)/10fr was prescribed to 99% of the targets. The time-series data of the three-dimensional marker positions (RTRT data) were grouped into 10 phases to associate with the phases of 4DCT. The 4D dose distributions were calculated using the plan information, RTRT Data, 4DCT, and modeled accelerator pattern. The dose distribution in each respiratory phase was deformed into the end-exhale CT. The D99 and D5-95 of CTV (with a criteria of D99>95% and D5-95<5%), V20 of Lung-GTV, and treatment times were evaluated. Results: GWs ≤ ±2 mm satisfied the criteria of CTV in all cases, whereas GWs ≥ ±5 mm did not satisfy the criteria in some cases. The V20 was reduced by more than 18.9% (relative to FBPT) for GW ≤ ±2 mm, but equaled or even surpassed the FBPT for GWs ≥ ±5 mm. The irradiation times for the ±1, 2, 5, and 8 mm GWs and FBPT were 372.4±208.3, 215.2±51.5, 180.9±31.6, 178.4±21.2, and 140.1±15.2 s, respectively. The GW of ±1 mm caused large variation in irradiation time among the patients. Conclusion: In RGPT for lung cancer, the most suitable GW, in terms of good dose preservation without prolonging the therapeutic beam delivery, is ±2 mm.

  15. 1H NMR spectra part 31: 1H chemical shifts of amides in DMSO solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Raymond J; Griffiths, Lee; Perez, Manuel

    2014-07-01

    The (1)H chemical shifts of 48 amides in DMSO solvent are assigned and presented. The solvent shifts Δδ (DMSO-CDCl3 ) are large (1-2 ppm) for the NH protons but smaller and negative (-0.1 to -0.2 ppm) for close range protons. A selection of the observed solvent shifts is compared with calculated shifts from the present model and from GIAO calculations. Those for the NH protons agree with both calculations, but other solvent shifts such as Δδ(CHO) are not well reproduced by the GIAO calculations. The (1)H chemical shifts of the amides in DMSO were analysed using a functional approach for near ( ≤ 3 bonds removed) protons and the electric field, magnetic anisotropy and steric effect of the amide group for more distant protons. The chemical shifts of the NH protons of acetanilide and benzamide vary linearly with the π density on the αN and βC atoms, respectively. The C=O anisotropy and steric effect are in general little changed from the values in CDCl3. The effects of substituents F, Cl, Me on the NH proton shifts are reproduced. The electric field coefficient for the protons in DMSO is 90% of that in CDCl3. There is no steric effect of the C=O oxygen on the NH proton in an NH…O=C hydrogen bond. The observed deshielding is due to the electric field effect. The calculated chemical shifts agree well with the observed shifts (RMS error of 0.106 ppm for the data set of 257 entries). Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the distinction of high-grade cerebral gliomas from single metastatic brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, Andres; Schellhorn, Till; Haakonsen, Monika; Nakstad, Per H.; Josefsen, Roger; Kulle, Bettina; Maehlen, Jan; Kumar, Theresa; Gadmar, Oeystein; Langberg, Carl W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Brain metastases and primary high-grade gliomas, including glioblastomas multiforme (GBM) and anaplastic astrocytomas (AA), may be indistinguishable by conventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Identification of these tumors may have therapeutic consequences. Purpose: To assess the value of MR spectroscopy (MRS) using short and intermediate echo time (TE) in differentiating solitary brain metastases and high-grade gliomas on the basis of differences in metabolite ratios in the intratumoral and peritumoral region. Material and Methods: We performed MR imaging and MRS in 73 patients with histologically verified intraaxial brain tumors: 53 patients with high-grade gliomas (34 GBM and 19 AA) and 20 patients with metastatic brain tumors. The metabolite ratios of Cho/Cr, Cho/NAA, and NAA/Cr at intermediate TE and the presence of lipids at short TE were assessed from spectral maps in the tumoral core, peritumoral edema, and contralateral normal-appearing white matter. The differences in the metabolite ratios between high-grade gliomas/GBM/AA and metastases were analyzed statistically. Cutoff values of Cho/Cr, Cho/NAA, and NAA/Cr ratios in the peritumoral edema, as well as Cho/Cr and NAA/Cr ratios in the tumoral core for distinguishing high-grade gliomas/GBM/AA from metastases were determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: Significant differences were noted in the peritumoral Cho/Cr, Cho/NAA, and NAA/ Cr ratios between high-grade gliomas/GBM/AA and metastases. ROC analysis demonstrated a cutoff value of 1.24 for peritumoral Cho/Cr ratio to provide sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV), and negative predictive values (NPV) of 100%, 88.9%, 80.0%, and 100%, respectively, for discrimination between high-grade gliomas and metastases. By using a cutoff value of 1.11 for peritumoral Cho/NAA ratio, the sensitivity was 100%, the specificity was 91.1%, the PPV was 83.3%, and the NPV was 100%. Conclusion: The results of this

  17. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearing, H.W.

    1990-01-01

    We summarize some of the information about the nucleon-nucleon force which has been obtained by comparing recent calculations of proton-proton bremsstrahlung with cross section and analyzing power data from the new TRIUMF bremsstrahlung experiment. Some comments are made as to how these results can be extended to neutron-proton bremsstrahlung. (Author) 17 refs., 6 figs

  18. Predicting Patient-specific Dosimetric Benefits of Proton Therapy for Skull-base Tumors Using a Geometric Knowledge-based Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, David C.; Trofimov, Alexei V.; Winey, Brian A.; Liebsch, Norbert J.; Paganetti, Harald, E-mail: hpaganetti@mgh.harvard.edu

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To predict the organ at risk (OAR) dose levels achievable with proton beam therapy (PBT), solely based on the geometric arrangement of the target volume in relation to the OARs. A comparison with an alternative therapy yields a prediction of the patient-specific benefits offered by PBT. This could enable physicians at hospitals without proton capabilities to make a better-informed referral decision or aid patient selection in model-based clinical trials. Methods and Materials: Skull-base tumors were chosen to test the method, owing to their geometric complexity and multitude of nearby OARs. By exploiting the correlations between the dose and distance-to-target in existing PBT plans, the models were independently trained for 6 types of OARs: brainstem, cochlea, optic chiasm, optic nerve, parotid gland, and spinal cord. Once trained, the models could estimate the feasible dose–volume histogram and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) for OAR structures of new patients. The models were trained using 20 patients and validated using an additional 21 patients. Validation was achieved by comparing the predicted gEUD to that of the actual PBT plan. Results: The predicted and planned gEUD were in good agreement. Considering all OARs, the prediction error was +1.4 ± 5.1 Gy (mean ± standard deviation), and Pearson's correlation coefficient was 93%. By comparing with an intensity modulated photon treatment plan, the model could classify whether an OAR structure would experience a gain, with a sensitivity of 93% (95% confidence interval: 87%-97%) and specificity of 63% (95% confidence interval: 38%-84%). Conclusions: We trained and validated models that could quickly and accurately predict the patient-specific benefits of PBT for skull-base tumors. Similar models could be developed for other tumor sites. Such models will be useful when an estimation of the feasible benefits of PBT is desired but the experience and/or resources required for treatment

  19. Interplay effects in proton scanning for lung: a 4D Monte Carlo study assessing the impact of tumor and beam delivery parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowdell, S; Grassberger, C; Sharp, G C; Paganetti, H

    2013-01-01

    Relative motion between a tumor and a scanning proton beam results in a degradation of the dose distribution (interplay effect). This study investigates the relationship between beam scanning parameters and the interplay effect, with the goal of finding parameters that minimize interplay. 4D Monte Carlo simulations of pencil beam scanning proton therapy treatments were performed using the 4DCT geometry of five lung cancer patients of varying tumor size (50.4–167.1 cc) and motion amplitude (2.9–30.1 mm). Treatments were planned assuming delivery in 35 × 2.5 Gy(RBE) fractions. The spot size, time to change the beam energy (τ es ), time required for magnet settling (τ ss ), initial breathing phase, spot spacing, scanning direction, scanning speed, beam current and patient breathing period were varied for each of the five patients. Simulations were performed for a single fraction and an approximation of conventional fractionation. For the patients considered, the interplay effect could not be predicted using the superior–inferior motion amplitude alone. Larger spot sizes (σ ∼ 9–16 mm) were less susceptible to interplay, giving an equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of 99.0 ± 4.4% (1 standard deviation) in a single fraction compared to 86.1 ± 13.1% for smaller spots (σ ∼ 2–4 mm). The smaller spot sizes gave EUD values as low as 65.3% of the prescription dose in a single fraction. Reducing the spot spacing improved the target dose homogeneity. The initial breathing phase can have a significant effect on the interplay, particularly for shorter delivery times. No clear benefit was evident when scanning either parallel or perpendicular to the predominant axis of motion. Longer breathing periods decreased the EUD. In general, longer delivery times led to lower interplay effects. Conventional fractionation showed significant improvement in terms of interplay, giving a EUD of at least 84.7% and 100.0% of the prescription dose for the small and larger spot sizes

  20. Interplay effects in proton scanning for lung: a 4D Monte Carlo study assessing the impact of tumor and beam delivery parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdell, S; Grassberger, C; Sharp, G C; Paganetti, H

    2013-06-21

    Relative motion between a tumor and a scanning proton beam results in a degradation of the dose distribution (interplay effect). This study investigates the relationship between beam scanning parameters and the interplay effect, with the goal of finding parameters that minimize interplay. 4D Monte Carlo simulations of pencil beam scanning proton therapy treatments were performed using the 4DCT geometry of five lung cancer patients of varying tumor size (50.4-167.1 cc) and motion amplitude (2.9-30.1 mm). Treatments were planned assuming delivery in 35 × 2.5 Gy(RBE) fractions. The spot size, time to change the beam energy (τes), time required for magnet settling (τss), initial breathing phase, spot spacing, scanning direction, scanning speed, beam current and patient breathing period were varied for each of the five patients. Simulations were performed for a single fraction and an approximation of conventional fractionation. For the patients considered, the interplay effect could not be predicted using the superior-inferior motion amplitude alone. Larger spot sizes (σ ~ 9-16 mm) were less susceptible to interplay, giving an equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of 99.0 ± 4.4% (1 standard deviation) in a single fraction compared to 86.1 ± 13.1% for smaller spots (σ ~ 2-4 mm). The smaller spot sizes gave EUD values as low as 65.3% of the prescription dose in a single fraction. Reducing the spot spacing improved the target dose homogeneity. The initial breathing phase can have a significant effect on the interplay, particularly for shorter delivery times. No clear benefit was evident when scanning either parallel or perpendicular to the predominant axis of motion. Longer breathing periods decreased the EUD. In general, longer delivery times led to lower interplay effects. Conventional fractionation showed significant improvement in terms of interplay, giving a EUD of at least 84.7% and 100.0% of the prescription dose for the small and larger spot sizes respectively. The

  1. Diverse amide analogs of sulindac for cancer treatment and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Bini; Hobrath, Judith V; Connelly, Michele C; Kiplin Guy, R; Reynolds, Robert C

    2017-10-15

    Sulindac is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that has shown significant anticancer activity. Sulindac sulfide amide (1) possessing greatly reduced COX-related inhibition relative to sulindac displayed in vivo antitumor activity that was comparable to sulindac in a human colon tumor xenograft model. Inspired by these observations, a panel of diverse sulindac amide derivatives have been synthesized and their activity probed against three cancer cell lines (prostate, colon and breast). A neutral analog, compound 79 was identified with comparable potency relative to lead 1 and activity against a panel of lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines. Several new series also show good activity relative to the parent (1), including five analogs that also possess nanomolar inhibitory potencies against acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Several new analogs identified may serve as anticancer lead candidates for further development. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigation of the complex reaction coordinate of acid catalyzed amide hydrolysis from molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahn, Dirk

    2004-01-01

    The rate-determining step of acid catalyzed peptide hydrolysis is the nucleophilic attack of a water molecule to the carbon atom of the amide group. Therein the addition of the hydroxyl group to the amide carbon atom involves the association of a water molecule transferring one of its protons to an adjacent water molecule. The protonation of the amide nitrogen atom follows as a separate reaction step. Since the nucleophilic attack involves the breaking and formation of several bonds, the underlying reaction coordinate is rather complex. We investigate this reaction step from path sampling Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. This approach does not require the predefinition of reaction coordinates and is thus particularly suited for investigating reaction mechanisms. From our simulations the most relevant components of the reaction coordinate are elaborated. Though the C···O distance of the oxygen atom of the water molecule performing the nucleophilic attack and the corresponding amide carbon atom is a descriptor of the reaction progress, a complete picture of the reaction coordinate must include all three molecules taking part in the reaction. Moreover, the proton transfer is found to depend on favorable solvent configurations. Thus, also the arrangement of non-reacting, i.e. solvent water molecules needs to be considered in the reaction coordinate

  3. A phase I study on combined therapy with proton-beam radiotherapy and in situ tumor vaccination for locally advanced recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abei, Masato; Mizumoto, Masashi; Sakae, Takeji; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Zenkoh, Junko; Ariungerel, Gerelchuluun; Sogo, Yu; Ito, Atsuo; Ohno, Tadao; Tsuboi, Koji; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Fukuda, Kuniaki; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Araki, Masahiro; Ishige, Kazunori; Hyodo, Ichinosuke; Kanemoto, Ayae; Numajiri, Haruko

    2013-01-01

    Proton-beam radiotherapy (PBT) has been shown to be effective to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) as a nonsurgical local treatment option. However, HCC still remains as one of the most difficult cancers to be cured because of frequent recurrences. Thus, methods to inhibit the recurrence need to be explored. To prevent the HCC recurrence, we here report on a prospective phase I study of ‘in situ’ tumor vaccination using CalTUMP, a newly developed immunoadjuvant consisting of BCG extract bound to hydroxyapatite and microparticulated tuberculin, following local PBT for HCC. Patients with locally advanced recurrent HCC, which had been heavily pretreated with various treatments, were enrolled. PBT was performed with the conventional method to the target HCC. Subsequently, CalTUMP was injected into the same irradiated-tumor three times at one-week intervals. Three dose-levels of CalTUMP (1/10, 1/3, and 1/1) were administered to 3 patients each. Vital signs, blood samples, ultrasound, and computed tomographic scans were monitored to evaluate the safety. Three intratumoral injections of CalTUMP following PBT (median dose: 72.6 GyE) were accomplished in 9 patients. Transient low-grade fever and minor laboratory changes were observed in 7 patients after CalTUMP injections. No other treatment-related adverse events were observed. Median progression-free survival was 6.0 months (range: 2.1-14.2) and 4 patients were progression-free for more than 1 year. Intratumoral injection of CalTUMP following PBT was feasible and safe in patients with heavily pre-treated HCC. Further clinical studies to evaluate the efficacy of this in situ tumor vaccination are warranted

  4. Effect of titanium dental implants on proton therapy delivered for head tumors: experimental validation using an anthropomorphic head phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oancea, C.; Shipulin, K.; Mytsin, G.; Molokanov, A.; Niculae, D.; Ambrožová, I.; Davídková, M.

    2017-03-01

    A dosimetric experiment was performed at the Medico-Technical Complex in the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, to investigate the effects of metallic dental implants in the treatment of head and neck tumours with proton therapy. The goal of the study was to evaluate the 2D dose distributions of different clinical treatment plans measured in an anthropomorphic phantom, and compare them to predictions from a treatment planning system. The anthropomorphic phantom was sliced into horizontal segments. Two grade 4 Titanium implants were inserted between 2 slices, corresponding to a maxillary area. GafChromic EBT2 films were placed between the segments containing the implants to measure the 2D delivered dose. Two different targets were designed: the first target includes the dental implants in the isocentre, and in the second target, the proton beam is delivered through the implants, which are located at the entrance region of the Bragg curve. The experimental results were compared to the treatment plans made using our custom 3D Treatment Planning System, named RayTreat. To quantitatively determine differences in the isodose distributions (measured and calculated), the gamma index (3 mm, 3%) was calculated for each target for the matrix value in the region of high isodose (> 90%): for the experimental setup, which includes the implants in the SOBP region, the result obtained was 84.3%. When the implants were localised in the entrance region of the Bragg curve, the result obtained was 86.4%. In conclusion, the uncertainties introduced by the clinically planned dose distribution are beyond reasonable limits. The linear energy transfer spectra in close proximity to the implants were investigated using solid state nuclear track detectors (TED). Scattered particles outside the target were detected.

  5. Effect of titanium dental implants on proton therapy delivered for head tumors: experimental validation using an anthropomorphic head phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oancea, C.; Shipulin, K.; Mytsin, G.; Molokanov, A.; Niculae, D.; Ambrožová, I.; Davídková, M.

    2017-01-01

    A dosimetric experiment was performed at the Medico-Technical Complex in the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, to investigate the effects of metallic dental implants in the treatment of head and neck tumours with proton therapy. The goal of the study was to evaluate the 2D dose distributions of different clinical treatment plans measured in an anthropomorphic phantom, and compare them to predictions from a treatment planning system. The anthropomorphic phantom was sliced into horizontal segments. Two grade 4 Titanium implants were inserted between 2 slices, corresponding to a maxillary area. GafChromic EBT2 films were placed between the segments containing the implants to measure the 2D delivered dose. Two different targets were designed: the first target includes the dental implants in the isocentre, and in the second target, the proton beam is delivered through the implants, which are located at the entrance region of the Bragg curve. The experimental results were compared to the treatment plans made using our custom 3D Treatment Planning System, named RayTreat. To quantitatively determine differences in the isodose distributions (measured and calculated), the gamma index (3 mm, 3%) was calculated for each target for the matrix value in the region of high isodose (> 90%): for the experimental setup, which includes the implants in the SOBP region, the result obtained was 84.3%. When the implants were localised in the entrance region of the Bragg curve, the result obtained was 86.4%. In conclusion, the uncertainties introduced by the clinically planned dose distribution are beyond reasonable limits. The linear energy transfer spectra in close proximity to the implants were investigated using solid state nuclear track detectors (TED). Scattered particles outside the target were detected.

  6. Understanding Chemistry and Unique NMR Characters of Novel Amide and Ester Leflunomide Analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morkos A. Henen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of diverse substituted 5-methyl-isoxazole-4-carboxylic acid amides, imide and esters in which the benzene ring is mono or disubstituted was prepared. Spectroscopic and conformational examination was investigated and a new insight involving steric interference and interesting downfield deviation due to additional diamagnetic anisotropic effect of the amidic carbonyl group and the methine protons in 2,6-diisopropyl-aryl derivative (2 as conformationaly restricted analogues Leflunomide was discussed. Individual substituent electronic effects through π resonance of p-substituents and most stable conformation of compound (2 are discussed.

  7. EXCI-CEST: Exploiting pharmaceutical excipients as MRI-CEST contrast agents for tumor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Dario Livio; Moustaghfir, Fatima Zzahra; Zerbo, Alexandre; Consolino, Lorena; Anemone, Annasofia; Bracesco, Martina; Aime, Silvio

    2017-06-15

    Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) approach is a novel tool within magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that allows visualization of molecules possessing exchangeable protons with water. Many molecules, employed as excipients for the formulation of finished drug products, are endowed with hydroxyl, amine or amide protons, thus can be exploitable as MRI-CEST contrast agents. Their high safety profiles allow them to be injected at very high doses. Here we investigated the MRI-CEST properties of several excipients (ascorbic acid, sucrose, N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, meglumine and 2-pyrrolidone) and tested them as tumor-detecting agents in two different murine tumor models (breast and melanoma cancers). All the investigated molecules showed remarkable CEST contrast upon i.v. administration in the range 1-3ppm according to the type of mobile proton groups. A marked increase of CEST contrast was observed in tumor regions up to 30min post injection. The combination of marked tumor contrast enhancement and lack of toxicity make these molecules potential candidates for the diagnosis of tumors within the MRI-CEST approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Improvements in pencil beam scanning proton therapy dose calculation accuracy in brain tumor cases with a commercial Monte Carlo algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widesott, Lamberto; Lorentini, Stefano; Fracchiolla, Francesco; Farace, Paolo; Schwarz, Marco

    2018-05-04

    validation of a commercial Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm (RayStation ver6.0.024) for the treatment of brain tumours with pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy, comparing it via measurements and analytical calculations in clinically realistic scenarios. Methods: For the measurements a 2D ion chamber array detector (MatriXX PT)) was placed underneath the following targets: 1) anthropomorphic head phantom (with two different thickness) and 2) a biological sample (i.e. half lamb's head). In addition, we compared the MC dose engine vs. the RayStation pencil beam (PB) algorithm clinically implemented so far, in critical conditions such as superficial targets (i.e. in need of range shifter), different air gaps and gantry angles to simulate both orthogonal and tangential beam arrangements. For every plan the PB and MC dose calculation were compared to measurements using a gamma analysis metrics (3%, 3mm). Results: regarding the head phantom the gamma passing rate (GPR) was always >96% and on average > 99% for the MC algorithm; PB algorithm had a GPR ≤90% for all the delivery configurations with single slab (apart 95 % GPR from gantry 0° and small air gap) and in case of two slabs of the head phantom the GPR was >95% only in case of small air gaps for all the three (0°, 45°,and 70°) simulated beam gantry angles. Overall the PB algorithm tends to overestimate the dose to the target (up to 25%) and underestimate the dose to the organ at risk (up to 30%). We found similar results (but a bit worse for PB algorithm) for the two targets of the lamb's head where only two beam gantry angles were simulated. Conclusions: our results suggest that in PBS proton therapy range shifter (RS) need to be used with extreme caution when planning the treatment with an analytical algorithm due to potentially great discrepancies between the planned dose and the dose delivered to the patients, also in case of brain tumours where this issue could be underestimated. Our results also

  9. Association Between Proton Pump Inhibitors and Metronomic Capecitabine as Salvage Treatment for Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Tumors: A Randomized Phase II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Paolo; Milano, Annalisa; D'Antonio, Chiara; Romiti, Adriana; Falcone, Rosa; Roberto, Michela; Fais, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    The acidification of extracellular compartment represents a conceivable mechanism of drug resistance in malignant cells. In addition, it has been reported to drive proliferation and promote invasion and metastasis. Experimental evidence has shown that proton pump inhibitors can counteract tumor acidification and restore sensitivity to anticancer drugs. Moreover, early clinical data have supported the role of proton pump inhibitors in anticancer treatments. Metronomic capecitabine has demonstrated beneficial effects as salvage chemotherapy for heavily pretreated or frail patients with gastrointestinal cancer. The present study (EudraCT Number: 2013-001096-20) was aimed at investigating the activity and safety of high-dose rabeprazole in combination with metronomic capecitabine in patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancer refractory to standard treatment. A total of 66 patients will be randomized 1:1 to receive capecitabine 1500 mg/daily, continuously with or without rabeprazole 1.5 mg/kg twice a day, 3 days a week until disease progression, undue toxicity, or withdrawal of informed consent. The primary endpoint is progression-free survival. The secondary endpoints are clinical benefit, which reflects the proportion of patients with complete response, partial response, and stable disease, and overall survival. Progression-free and overall survival will be evaluated using a log-rank test to determine the effect of rabeprazole independently at the 2-sided α-level of 0.05. Other assessments will include the frequency and severity of adverse events and changes in laboratory parameters to measure the safety, and the pharmacokinetics of capecitabine. The results are expected in 2016. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Uncertainties in planned dose due to the limited voxel size of the planning CT when treating lung tumors with proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espana, Samuel; Paganetti, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Dose calculation for lung tumors can be challenging due to the low density and the fine structure of the geometry. The latter is not fully considered in the CT image resolution used in treatment planning causing the prediction of a more homogeneous tissue distribution. In proton therapy, this could result in predicting an unrealistically sharp distal dose falloff, i.e. an underestimation of the distal dose falloff degradation. The goal of this work was the quantification of such effects. Two computational phantoms resembling a two-dimensional heterogeneous random lung geometry and a swine lung were considered applying a variety of voxel sizes for dose calculation. Monte Carlo simulations were used to compare the dose distributions predicted with the voxel size typically used for the treatment planning procedure with those expected to be delivered using the finest resolution. The results show, for example, distal falloff position differences of up to 4 mm between planned and expected dose at the 90% level for the heterogeneous random lung (assuming treatment plan on a 2 x 2 x 2.5 mm 3 grid). For the swine lung, differences of up to 38 mm were seen when airways are present in the beam path when the treatment plan was done on a 0.8 x 0.8 x 2.4 mm 3 grid. The two-dimensional heterogeneous random lung phantom apparently does not describe the impact of the geometry adequately because of the lack of heterogeneities in the axial direction. The differences observed in the swine lung between planned and expected dose are presumably due to the poor axial resolution of the CT images used in clinical routine. In conclusion, when assigning margins for treatment planning for lung cancer, proton range uncertainties due to the heterogeneous lung geometry and CT image resolution need to be considered.

  11. SU-F-T-208: An Efficient Planning Approach to Posterior Fossa Tumor Bed Boosts Using Proton Pencil Beam Scanning in Fixed-Beam Room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, N; Chen, C; Gans, S; Hug, E; Cahlon, O; Chon, B; Tsai, H; Sine, K; Mah, D; Wolden, S; Yeh, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A fixed-beam room could be underutilized in a multi-room proton center. We investigated the use of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) on a fixed-beam as an alternative for posterior fossa tumor bed (PF-TB) boost treatments which were usually treating on a gantry with uniform scanning. Methods: Five patients were treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI, 23.4 or 36.0 Gy(RBE)) followed by a PF-TB boost to 54 Gy(RBE) with proton beams. Three PF-TB boost plans were generated for each patient: (1) a uniform scanning (US) gantry plan with 4–7 posterior fields shaped with apertures and compensators (2) a PBS plan using bi-lateral and vertex fields with a 3-mm planning organ-at-risk volume (PRV) expansion around the brainstem and (3) PBS fields using same beam arrangement but replacing the PRV with robust optimization considering a 3-mm setup uncertainty. Results: A concave 54-Gy(RBE) isodose line surrounding the brainstem could be achieved using all three techniques. The mean V95% of the PTV was 99.7% (range: 97.6% to 100%) while the V100% of the PTV ranged from 56.3% to 93.1% depending on the involvement of the brainstem with the PTV. The mean doses received by 0.05 cm"3 of the brainstem were effectively identical: 54.0 Gy(RBE), 53.4 Gy(RBE) and 53.3 Gy(RBE) for US, PBS optimized with PRV, and PBS optimized with robustness plans respectively. The cochlea mean dose increased by 23% of the prescribed boost dose in average from the bi-lateral fields used in the PBS plan. Planning time for the PBS plan with PRV was 5–10 times less than the US plan and the robustly optimized PBS plan. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that a fixed-beam with PBS can deliver a dose distribution comparable to a gantry plan using uniform scanning. Planning time can be reduced substantially using a PRV around the brainstem instead of robust optimization.

  12. SU-F-T-208: An Efficient Planning Approach to Posterior Fossa Tumor Bed Boosts Using Proton Pencil Beam Scanning in Fixed-Beam Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, N; Chen, C; Gans, S; Hug, E; Cahlon, O; Chon, B; Tsai, H; Sine, K; Mah, D [Procure Treatment Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Wolden, S [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Yeh, B [Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A fixed-beam room could be underutilized in a multi-room proton center. We investigated the use of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) on a fixed-beam as an alternative for posterior fossa tumor bed (PF-TB) boost treatments which were usually treating on a gantry with uniform scanning. Methods: Five patients were treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI, 23.4 or 36.0 Gy(RBE)) followed by a PF-TB boost to 54 Gy(RBE) with proton beams. Three PF-TB boost plans were generated for each patient: (1) a uniform scanning (US) gantry plan with 4–7 posterior fields shaped with apertures and compensators (2) a PBS plan using bi-lateral and vertex fields with a 3-mm planning organ-at-risk volume (PRV) expansion around the brainstem and (3) PBS fields using same beam arrangement but replacing the PRV with robust optimization considering a 3-mm setup uncertainty. Results: A concave 54-Gy(RBE) isodose line surrounding the brainstem could be achieved using all three techniques. The mean V95% of the PTV was 99.7% (range: 97.6% to 100%) while the V100% of the PTV ranged from 56.3% to 93.1% depending on the involvement of the brainstem with the PTV. The mean doses received by 0.05 cm{sup 3} of the brainstem were effectively identical: 54.0 Gy(RBE), 53.4 Gy(RBE) and 53.3 Gy(RBE) for US, PBS optimized with PRV, and PBS optimized with robustness plans respectively. The cochlea mean dose increased by 23% of the prescribed boost dose in average from the bi-lateral fields used in the PBS plan. Planning time for the PBS plan with PRV was 5–10 times less than the US plan and the robustly optimized PBS plan. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that a fixed-beam with PBS can deliver a dose distribution comparable to a gantry plan using uniform scanning. Planning time can be reduced substantially using a PRV around the brainstem instead of robust optimization.

  13. SU-F-T-121: Abdominal Compression Effectively Reduces the Interplay Effect and Enables Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy of Liver Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souris, K; Glick, A; Kang, M; Lin, H; McDonough, J; Simone, C; Solberg, T; Ben-Josef, E; Lin, L; Janssens, G; Sterpin, E; Lee, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To study if abdominal compression can reduce breathing motion and mitigate interplay effect in pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PBSPT) treatment of liver tumors in order to better spare healthy liver volumes compared with photon therapy. Methods: Ten patients, six having large tumors initially treated with IMRT and four having small tumors treated with SBRT, were replanned for PBSPT. ITV and beam-specific PTVs based on 4D-CT were used to ensure target coverage in PBSPT. The use of an abdominal compression belt and volumetric repainting was investigated to mitigate the interplay effect between breathing motion and PBSPT dynamic delivery. An in-house Matlab script has been developed to simulate this interplay effect. The dose is computed on each phase individually by sorting all spots according to their simulated delivery timing. The final dose distribution is then obtained by accumulating all dose maps to a reference phase. Results: For equivalent target coverage PBSPT reduced average healthy liver dose by 9.5% of the prescription dose compared with IMRT/SBRT. Abdominal compression of 113.2±42.2 mmHg was effective for all 10 patients and reduced average motion by 2.25 mm. As a result, the average ITV volume decreased from 128.2% to 123.1% of CTV volume. Similarly, the average beam-specific PTV volume decreased from 193.2% to 183.3%. For 8 of the 10 patients, the average motion was reduced below 5 mm, and up to 3 repainting were sufficient to mitigate interplay. For the other two patients with larger residual motion, 4–5 repainting were needed. Conclusion: We recommend evaluation of the 4DCT motion histogram following simulation and the interplay effect following treatment planning in order to personalize the use of compression and volumetric repainting for each patient. Abdominal compression enables safe and more effective PBS treatment of liver tumors by reduction of motion and interplay effect. Kevin Souris is supported by IBA and Televie Grant

  14. SU-F-T-121: Abdominal Compression Effectively Reduces the Interplay Effect and Enables Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy of Liver Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souris, K [Universite catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Glick, A; Kang, M; Lin, H; McDonough, J; Simone, C; Solberg, T; Ben-Josef, E; Lin, L [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Janssens, G [IBA, Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium); Sterpin, E [Universite catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Lee, J [Universite catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study if abdominal compression can reduce breathing motion and mitigate interplay effect in pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PBSPT) treatment of liver tumors in order to better spare healthy liver volumes compared with photon therapy. Methods: Ten patients, six having large tumors initially treated with IMRT and four having small tumors treated with SBRT, were replanned for PBSPT. ITV and beam-specific PTVs based on 4D-CT were used to ensure target coverage in PBSPT. The use of an abdominal compression belt and volumetric repainting was investigated to mitigate the interplay effect between breathing motion and PBSPT dynamic delivery. An in-house Matlab script has been developed to simulate this interplay effect. The dose is computed on each phase individually by sorting all spots according to their simulated delivery timing. The final dose distribution is then obtained by accumulating all dose maps to a reference phase. Results: For equivalent target coverage PBSPT reduced average healthy liver dose by 9.5% of the prescription dose compared with IMRT/SBRT. Abdominal compression of 113.2±42.2 mmHg was effective for all 10 patients and reduced average motion by 2.25 mm. As a result, the average ITV volume decreased from 128.2% to 123.1% of CTV volume. Similarly, the average beam-specific PTV volume decreased from 193.2% to 183.3%. For 8 of the 10 patients, the average motion was reduced below 5 mm, and up to 3 repainting were sufficient to mitigate interplay. For the other two patients with larger residual motion, 4–5 repainting were needed. Conclusion: We recommend evaluation of the 4DCT motion histogram following simulation and the interplay effect following treatment planning in order to personalize the use of compression and volumetric repainting for each patient. Abdominal compression enables safe and more effective PBS treatment of liver tumors by reduction of motion and interplay effect. Kevin Souris is supported by IBA and Televie Grant

  15. SU-E-T-147: Beam Specific Planning Target Volumes Incorporating 4DCT for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy of Thoracic Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, L; Kang, M; Huang, S; McDonough, J; Solberg, T; Simone, C [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mayer, R [Henry Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD (United States); Thomas, A [ATC healthcare, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine whether organ sparing and target coverage can be simultaneously maintained for pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy treatment of thoracic tumors in the presence of motion, stopping power uncertainties and patient setup variations. Methods: Ten consecutive patients that were previously treated with proton therapy to 66.6/1.8 Gy (RBE) using double scattering (DS) were replanned with PBS. Minimum and maximum intensity images from 4DCT were used to introduce flexible smearing in the determination of the beam specific PTV (BSPTV). Datasets from eight 4DCT phases, using ±3% uncertainty in stopping power, and ±3 mm uncertainty in patient setup in each direction were used to create 8*12*10=960 PBS plans for the evaluation of ten patients. Plans were normalized to provide identical coverage between DS and PBS. Results: The average lung V20, V5, and mean doses were reduced from 29.0%, 35.0%, and 16.4 Gy with DS to 24.6%, 30.6%, and 14.1 Gy with PBS, respectively. The average heart V30 and V45 were reduced from 10.4% and 7.5% in DS to 8.1% and 5.4% for PBS, respectively. Furthermore, the maximum spinal cord, esophagus and heart dose were decreased from 37.1 Gy, 71.7 Gy and 69.2 Gy with DS to 31.3 Gy, 67.9 Gy and 64.6 Gy with PBS. The conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and global maximal dose were improved from 3.2, 0.08, 77.4 Gy with DS to 2.8, 0.04 and 72.1 Gy with PBS. All differences are statistically significant, with p values <0.05, with the exception of the heart V45 (p= 0.146). Conclusion: PBS with BSPTV achieves better organ sparing and improves target coverage using a repainting method for the treatment of thoracic tumors. Incorporating motion-related uncertainties is essential This work was supported by the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command under Contract Agreement No. DAMD17-W81XWH-07-2-0121 and W81XWH-09-2-0174.

  16. On the importance of exchangeable NH protons in creatine for the magnetic coupling of creatine methyl protons in skeletal muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruiskamp, M.J.; Nicolaij, K.

    2001-01-01

    The methyl protons of creatine in skeletal muscle exhibit a strong off-resonance magnetization transfer effect. The mechanism of this process is unknown. We previously hypothesized that the exchangeable amide/amino protons of creatine might be involved. To test this the characteristics of the

  17. Development of Surface-Variable Polymeric Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery to Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ning; Pang, Liang; Xu, Jun; Hyun, Hyesun; Park, Jinho; Yeo, Yoon

    2017-05-01

    To develop nanoparticle drug carriers that interact with cells specifically in the mildly acidic tumor microenvironment, we produced polymeric nanoparticles modified with amidated TAT peptide via a simple surface modification method. Two types of core poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (NL and NP) were prepared with a phospholipid shell as an optional feature and covered with polydopamine that enabled the conjugation of TAT peptide on the surface. Subsequent treatment with acid anhydrides such as cis-aconitic anhydride (CA) and succinic anhydride (SA) converted amines of lysine residues in TAT peptide to β-carboxylic amides, introducing carboxylic groups that undergo pH-dependent protonation and deprotonation. The nanoparticles modified with amidated TAT peptide (NLpT-CA and NPpT-CA) avoided interactions with LS174T colon cancer cells and J774A.1 macrophages at pH 7.4 but restored the ability to interact with LS174T cells at pH 6.5, delivering paclitaxel efficiently to the cells following a brief contact time. In LS174T tumor-bearing nude mice, NPpT-CA showed less accumulation in the lung than NPpT, reflecting the shielding effect of amidation, but tumor accumulation of NPpT and NPpT-CA was equally minimal. Comparison of particle stability and protein corona formation in media containing sera from different species suggests that NPpT-CA has been activated and opsonized in mouse blood to a greater extent than those in bovine serum-containing medium, thus losing the benefits of pH-sensitivity expected from in vitro experiments.

  18. Antiproliferative activity of synthetic fatty acid amides from renewable resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Daiane S; Piovesan, Luciana A; D'Oca, Caroline R Montes; Hack, Carolina R Lopes; Treptow, Tamara G M; Rodrigues, Marieli O; Vendramini-Costa, Débora B; Ruiz, Ana Lucia T G; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; D'Oca, Marcelo G Montes

    2015-01-15

    In the work, the in vitro antiproliferative activity of a series of synthetic fatty acid amides were investigated in seven cancer cell lines. The study revealed that most of the compounds showed antiproliferative activity against tested tumor cell lines, mainly on human glioma cells (U251) and human ovarian cancer cells with a multiple drug-resistant phenotype (NCI-ADR/RES). In addition, the fatty methyl benzylamide derived from ricinoleic acid (with the fatty acid obtained from castor oil, a renewable resource) showed a high selectivity with potent growth inhibition and cell death for the glioma cell line-the most aggressive CNS cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Catalytic synthesis of amides via aldoximes rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crochet, Pascale; Cadierno, Victorio

    2015-02-14

    Amide bond formation reactions are among the most important transformations in organic chemistry because of the widespread occurrence of amides in pharmaceuticals, natural products and biologically active compounds. The Beckmann rearrangement is a well-known method to generate secondary amides from ketoximes. However, under the acidic conditions commonly employed, aldoximes RHC=NOH rarely rearrange into the corresponding primary amides RC(=O)NH2. In recent years, it was demonstrated that this atom-economical transformation can be carried out efficiently and selectively with the help of metal catalysts. Several homogeneous and heterogenous systems have been described. In addition, protocols offering the option to generate the aldoximes in situ from the corresponding aldehydes and hydroxylamine, or even from alcohols, have also been developed, as well as a series of tandem processes allowing the access to N-substituted amide products. In this Feature article a comprehensive overview of the advances achieved in this particular research area is presented.

  20. Reversible Twisting of Primary Amides via Ground State N-C(O) Destabilization: Highly Twisted Rotationally Inverted Acyclic Amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Guangrong; Shi, Shicheng; Lalancette, Roger; Szostak, Roman; Szostak, Michal

    2018-01-17

    Since the seminal studies by Pauling in 1930s, planarity has become the defining characteristic of the amide bond. Planarity of amides has central implications for the reactivity and chemical properties of amides of relevance to a range of chemical disciplines. While the vast majority of amides are planar, nonplanarity has a profound effect on the properties of the amide bond, with the most common method to restrict the amide bond relying on the incorporation of the amide function into a rigid cyclic ring system. In a major departure from this concept, here, we report the first class of acyclic twisted amides that can be prepared, reversibly, from common primary amides in a single, operationally trivial step. Di-tert-butoxycarbonylation of the amide nitrogen atom yields twisted amides in which the amide bond exhibits nearly perpendicular twist. Full structural characterization of a range of electronically diverse compounds from this new class of twisted amides is reported. Through reactivity studies we demonstrate unusual properties of the amide bond, wherein selective cleavage of the amide bond can be achieved by a judicious choice of the reaction conditions. Through computational studies we evaluate structural and energetic details pertaining to the amide bond deformation. The ability to selectively twist common primary amides, in a reversible manner, has important implications for the design and application of the amide bond nonplanarity in structural chemistry, biochemistry and organic synthesis.

  1. Microorganisms hydrolyse amide bonds; knowledge enabling read-across of biodegradability of fatty acid amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerts, Roy; Kuijer, Patrick; van Ginkel, Cornelis G; Plugge, Caroline M

    2014-07-01

    To get insight in the biodegradation and potential read-across of fatty acid amides, N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl] cocoamide and N-(1-ethylpiperazine) tall oil amide were used as model compounds. Two bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PK1 and Pseudomonas putida PK2 were isolated with N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl] cocoamide and its hydrolysis product N,N-dimethyl-1,3-propanediamine, respectively. In mixed culture, both strains accomplished complete mineralization of N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl] cocoamide. Aeromonas hydrophila PK3 was enriched with N-(1-ethylpiperazine) tall oil amide and subsequently isolated using agar plates containing dodecanoate. N-(2-Aminoethyl)piperazine, the hydrolysis product of N-(1-ethylpiperazine) tall oil amide, was not degraded. The aerobic biodegradation pathway for primary and secondary fatty acid amides of P. aeruginosa and A. hydrophila involved initial hydrolysis of the amide bond producing ammonium, or amines, where the fatty acids formed were immediately metabolized. Complete mineralization of secondary fatty acid amides depended on the biodegradability of the released amine. Tertiary fatty acid amides were not transformed by P. aeruginosa or A. hydrophila. These strains were able to utilize all tested primary and secondary fatty acid amides independent of the amine structure and fatty acid. Read-across of previous reported ready biodegradability results of primary and secondary fatty acid amides is justified based on the broad substrate specificity and the initial hydrolytic attack of the two isolates PK1 and PK3.

  2. Hydrogen abstraction reactions by amide electron adducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.; Sevilla, C.L.; Swarts, S.

    1982-01-01

    Electron reactions with a number of peptide model compounds (amides and N-acetylamino acids) in aqueous glasses at low temperature have been investigated using ESR spectroscopy. The radicals produced by electron attachment to amides, RC(OD)NDR', are found to act as hydrogen abstracting agents. For example, the propionamide electron adduct is found to abstract from its parent propionamide. Electron adducts of other amides investigated show similar behavior except for acetamide electron adduct which does not abstract from its parent compound, but does abstract from other amides. The tendency toward abstraction for amide electron adducts are compared to electron adducts of several carboxylic acids, ketones, aldehydes and esters. The comparison suggests the hydrogen abstraction tendency of the various deuterated electron adducts (DEAs) to be in the following order: aldehyde DEA > acid DEA = approximately ester DEA > ketone DEA > amide DEA. In basic glasses the hydrogen abstraction ability of the amide electron adducts is maintained until the concentration of base is increased sufficiently to convert the DEA to its anionic form, RC(O - )ND 2 . In this form the hydrogen abstracting ability of the radical is greatly diminished. Similar results were found for the ester and carboxylic acid DEA's tested. (author)

  3. Simulation and dosimetric analysis of protons, {sup 4}He ions and {sup 12}C ions beams for brain neoplasm therapy; Simulacao e analise dosimetrica de feixes de protons e ions de {sup 4}He e {sup 12}C em tratamento de tumor cerebral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Guilherme M.; Mello, Victor Barreto Braga [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mello Neto, Joao R.T. de [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    This study aims to simulate protons, {sup 4}He ions and {sup 12}C ions beams, radiating the head of an average-sized man with the purpose of treating a hypothalamic tumor. GEANT4 was used to simulate the head (skin, skull and brain), and the beam, giving their characteristics and also the physical processes involved. The results sought herein are graphs of depth for relative dose for each of the three particles incident on the settings mentioned above. (author)

  4. Theoretical Benefits of Dynamic Collimation in Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy for Brain Tumors: Dosimetric and Radiobiological Metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moignier, Alexandra, E-mail: alexandra-moignier@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Gelover, Edgar; Wang, Dongxu; Smith, Blake; Flynn, Ryan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Kirk, Maura; Lin, Liyong; Solberg, Timothy; Lin, Alexander [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Hyer, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric benefit of using a dynamic collimation system (DCS) for penumbra reduction during the treatment of brain tumors by pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PBS PT). Methods and Materials: Collimated and uncollimated brain treatment plans were created for 5 patients previously treated with PBS PT and retrospectively enrolled in an institutional review board–approved study. The in-house treatment planning system, RDX, was used to generate the plans because it is capable of modeling both collimated and uncollimated beamlets. The clinically delivered plans were reproduced with uncollimated plans in terms of target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) sparing to ensure a clinically relevant starting point, and collimated plans were generated to improve the OAR sparing while maintaining target coverage. Physical and biological comparison metrics, such as dose distribution conformity, mean and maximum doses, normal tissue complication probability, and risk of secondary brain cancer, were used to evaluate the plans. Results: The DCS systematically improved the dose distribution conformity while preserving the target coverage. The average reduction of the mean dose to the 10-mm ring surrounding the target and the healthy brain were 13.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.6%-15.7%; P<.0001) and 25.1% (95% CI 16.8%-33.4%; P<.001), respectively. This yielded an average reduction of 24.8% (95% CI 0.8%-48.8%; P<.05) for the brain necrosis normal tissue complication probability using the Flickinger model, and 25.1% (95% CI 16.8%-33.4%; P<.001) for the risk of secondary brain cancer. A general improvement of the OAR sparing was also observed. Conclusion: The lateral penumbra reduction afforded by the DCS increases the normal tissue sparing capabilities of PBS PT for brain cancer treatment while preserving target coverage.

  5. Theoretical Benefits of Dynamic Collimation in Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy for Brain Tumors: Dosimetric and Radiobiological Metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moignier, Alexandra; Gelover, Edgar; Wang, Dongxu; Smith, Blake; Flynn, Ryan; Kirk, Maura; Lin, Liyong; Solberg, Timothy; Lin, Alexander; Hyer, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric benefit of using a dynamic collimation system (DCS) for penumbra reduction during the treatment of brain tumors by pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PBS PT). Methods and Materials: Collimated and uncollimated brain treatment plans were created for 5 patients previously treated with PBS PT and retrospectively enrolled in an institutional review board–approved study. The in-house treatment planning system, RDX, was used to generate the plans because it is capable of modeling both collimated and uncollimated beamlets. The clinically delivered plans were reproduced with uncollimated plans in terms of target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) sparing to ensure a clinically relevant starting point, and collimated plans were generated to improve the OAR sparing while maintaining target coverage. Physical and biological comparison metrics, such as dose distribution conformity, mean and maximum doses, normal tissue complication probability, and risk of secondary brain cancer, were used to evaluate the plans. Results: The DCS systematically improved the dose distribution conformity while preserving the target coverage. The average reduction of the mean dose to the 10-mm ring surrounding the target and the healthy brain were 13.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.6%-15.7%; P<.0001) and 25.1% (95% CI 16.8%-33.4%; P<.001), respectively. This yielded an average reduction of 24.8% (95% CI 0.8%-48.8%; P<.05) for the brain necrosis normal tissue complication probability using the Flickinger model, and 25.1% (95% CI 16.8%-33.4%; P<.001) for the risk of secondary brain cancer. A general improvement of the OAR sparing was also observed. Conclusion: The lateral penumbra reduction afforded by the DCS increases the normal tissue sparing capabilities of PBS PT for brain cancer treatment while preserving target coverage.

  6. SU-G-TeP1-06: Fast GPU Framework for Four-Dimensional Monte Carlo in Adaptive Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) for Mobile Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botas, P [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Heidelberg University, Heidelberg (Germany); Grassberger, C; Sharp, G; Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Qin, N; Jia, X; Jiang, S [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of fast Monte Carlo (MC) treatment planning and verification using four-dimensional CT (4DCT) for adaptive IMPT for lung cancer patients. Methods: A validated GPU MC code, gPMC, has been linked to the patient database at our institution and employed to compute the dose-influence matrices (Dij) on the planning CT (pCT). The pCT is an average of the respiratory motion of the patient. The Dijs and patient structures were fed to the optimizer to calculate a treatment plan. To validate the plan against motion, a 4D dose distribution averaged over the possible starting phases is calculated using the 4DCT and a model of the time structure of the delivered spot map. The dose is accumulated using vector maps created by a GPU-accelerated deformable image registration program (DIR) from each phase of the 4DCT to the reference phase using the B-spline method. Calculation of the Dij matrices and the DIR are performed on a cluster, with each field and vector map calculated in parallel. Results: The Dij production takes ∼3.5s per beamlet for 10e6 protons, depending on the energy and the CT size. Generating a plan with 4D simulation of 1000 spots in 4 fields takes approximately 1h. To test the framework, IMPT plans for 10 lung cancer patients were generated for validation. Differences between the planned and the delivered dose of 19% in dose to some organs at risk and 1.4/21.1% in target mean dose/homogeneity with respect to the plan were observed, suggesting potential for improvement if adaptation is considered. Conclusion: A fast MC treatment planning framework has been developed that allows reliable plan design and verification for mobile targets and adaptation of treatment plans. This will significantly impact treatments for lung tumors, as 4D-MC dose calculations can now become part of planning strategies.

  7. Increase in tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities in advanced head-and-neck cancer for dose-escalated intensity-modulated photon and proton therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika eJakobi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Presently used radio-chemotherapy regimens result in moderate local control rates for patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. Dose escalation (DE may be an option to improve patient outcome, but may also increase the risk of toxicities in healthy tissue. The presented treatment planning study evaluated the feasibility of two DE levels for advanced HNSCC patients, planned with either intensity-modulated photon therapy (IMXT or proton therapy (IMPT.Materials and Methods:For 45 HNSCC patients, IMXT and IMPT treatment plans were created including DE via a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB in the high-risk volume, while maintaining standard fractionation with 2 Gy per fraction in the remaining target volume. Two DE levels for the SIB were compared: 2.3 Gy and 2.6 Gy. Treatment plan evaluation included assessment of tumor control probabilities (TCP and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP.Results:An increase of approximately 10% in TCP was estimated between the DE levels. A pronounced high-dose rim surrounding the SIB volume was identified in IMXT treatment. Compared to IMPT, this extra dose slightly increased the TCP values and to a larger extent the NTCP values. For both modalities, the higher DE level led only to a small increase in NTCP values (mean differences < 2% in all models, except for the risk of aspiration, which increased on average by 8% and 6% with IMXT and IMPT, respectively, but showed a considerable patient dependence. Conclusions:Both DE levels appear applicable to patients with IMXT and IMPT since all calculated NTCP values, except for one, increased only little for the higher DE level. The estimated TCP increase is of relevant magnitude. The higher DE schedule needs to be investigated carefully in the setting of a prospective clinical trial, especially regarding toxicities caused by high local doses that lack a sound dose response description, e.g., ulcers.

  8. Proton dynamics in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Veronica; De Milito, Angelo; Harguindey, Salvador; Reshkin, Stephan J; Wahl, Miriam L; Rauch, Cyril; Chiesi, Antonio; Pouysségur, Jacques; Gatenby, Robert A; Rivoltini, Licia; Fais, Stefano

    2010-06-15

    Cancer remains a leading cause of death in the world today. Despite decades of research to identify novel therapeutic approaches, durable regressions of metastatic disease are still scanty and survival benefits often negligible. While the current strategy is mostly converging on target-therapies aimed at selectively affecting altered molecular pathways in tumor cells, evidences are in parallel pointing to cell metabolism as a potential Achilles' heel of cancer, to be disrupted for achieving therapeutic benefit. Critical differences in the metabolism of tumor versus normal cells, which include abnormal glycolysis, high lactic acid production, protons accumulation and reversed intra-extracellular pH gradients, make tumor site a hostile microenvironment where only cancer cells can proliferate and survive. Inhibiting these pathways by blocking proton pumps and transporters may deprive cancer cells of a key mechanism of detoxification and thus represent a novel strategy for a pleiotropic and multifaceted suppression of cancer cell growth.Research groups scattered all over the world have recently started to investigate various aspects of proton dynamics in cancer cells with quite encouraging preliminary results. The intent of unifying investigators involved in this research line led to the formation of the "International Society for Proton Dynamics in Cancer" (ISPDC) in January 2010. This is the manifesto of the newly formed society where both basic and clinical investigators are called to foster translational research and stimulate interdisciplinary collaboration for the development of more specific and less toxic therapeutic strategies based on proton dynamics in tumor cell biology.

  9. Proton dynamics in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouysségur Jacques

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer remains a leading cause of death in the world today. Despite decades of research to identify novel therapeutic approaches, durable regressions of metastatic disease are still scanty and survival benefits often negligible. While the current strategy is mostly converging on target-therapies aimed at selectively affecting altered molecular pathways in tumor cells, evidences are in parallel pointing to cell metabolism as a potential Achilles' heel of cancer, to be disrupted for achieving therapeutic benefit. Critical differences in the metabolism of tumor versus normal cells, which include abnormal glycolysis, high lactic acid production, protons accumulation and reversed intra-extracellular pH gradients, make tumor site a hostile microenvironment where only cancer cells can proliferate and survive. Inhibiting these pathways by blocking proton pumps and transporters may deprive cancer cells of a key mechanism of detoxification and thus represent a novel strategy for a pleiotropic and multifaceted suppression of cancer cell growth. Research groups scattered all over the world have recently started to investigate various aspects of proton dynamics in cancer cells with quite encouraging preliminary results. The intent of unifying investigators involved in this research line led to the formation of the "International Society for Proton Dynamics in Cancer" (ISPDC in January 2010. This is the manifesto of the newly formed society where both basic and clinical investigators are called to foster translational research and stimulate interdisciplinary collaboration for the development of more specific and less toxic therapeutic strategies based on proton dynamics in tumor cell biology.

  10. Metal extraction by amides of carboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skorovarov, D.I.; Chumakova, G.M.; Rusin, L.I.; Ul'anov, V.S.; Sviridova, R.A.; Sviridov, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    Extraction ability of various amides was studied. Data on extraction of rare earths, vanadium, molybdenum, rhenium, uranium, niobium, tantalum by N,N-dibutyl-amides of acetic, nonanic acids and fatly synthetic acids of C 7 -C 9 fractions are presented. Effect of salting-out agents, inorganic acid concentrations on extraction process was studied. Potential ability of using amides of carboxylic acids for extractional concentration of rare earths as well as for recovery and separation of iron, rhenium, vanadium, molybdenum, uranium, niobium, and tantalum was shown

  11. SU-E-T-529: Is MFO-IMPT Robust Enough for the Treatment of Head and Neck Tumors? A 2-Year Outcome Analysis Following Proton Therapy On the First 50 Oropharynx Patients at the MD Anderson Cancer Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, S; Garden, A; Anderson, M; Rosenthal, D; Morrison, W; Gunn, B; Fuller, C; Phan, J; Zhang, X; Poenisch, F; Wu, R; Li, H; Gautam, A; Sahoo, N; Gillin, M; Zhu, X [MD Anderson Cancer Ctr., Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Multi-field optimization intensity modulated proton therapy (MFO-IMPT) for oropharyngeal tumors has been established using robust planning, robust analysis, and robust optimization techniques. While there are inherent uncertainties in proton therapy treatment planning and delivery, outcome reporting are important to validate the proton treatment process. The purpose of this study is to report the first 50 oropharyngeal tumor patients treated de-novo at a single institution with MFO-IMPT. Methods: The data from the first 50 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx treated at MD Anderson Cancer Center from January 2011 to December 2014 on a prospective IRB approved protocol were analyzed. Outcomes were analyzed to include local, regional, and distant treatment failures. Acute and late toxicities were analyzed by CTCAE v4.0. Results: All patients were treated with definitive intent. The median follow-up time of the 50 patients was 25 months. Patients by gender were male (84%) and female (16%). The average age was 61 years. 50% of patients were never smokers and 4% were current smokers. Presentation by stage; I–1, II–0, III– 9, IVA–37 (74%), IVB–3. 88% of patients were HPV/p16+. Patients were treated to 66–70 CGE. One local failure was reported at 13 months following treatment. One neck failure was reported at 12 months. 94% of patients were alive with no evidence of disease. One patient died without evidence of disease. There were no Grade 4 or Grade 5 toxicities. Conclusion: MFO-IMPT for oropharyngeal tumors is robust and provides excellent outcomes 2 years after treatment. A randomized trial is underway to determine if proton therapy will reduce chronic late toxicities of IMRT.

  12. Dissecting Hofmeister Effects: Direct Anion-Amide Interactions Are Weaker than Cation-Amide Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balos, Vasileios; Kim, Heejae; Bonn, Mischa; Hunger, Johannes

    2016-07-04

    Whereas there is increasing evidence for ion-induced protein destabilization through direct ion-protein interactions, the strength of the binding of anions to proteins relative to cation-protein binding has remained elusive. In this work, the rotational mobility of a model amide in aqueous solution was used as a reporter for the interactions of different anions with the amide group. Protein-stabilizing salts such as KCl and KNO3 do not affect the rotational mobility of the amide. Conversely, protein denaturants such as KSCN and KI markedly reduce the orientational freedom of the amide group. Thus these results provide evidence for a direct denaturation mechanism through ion-protein interactions. Comparing the present findings with results for cations shows that in contrast to common belief, anion-amide binding is weaker than cation-amide binding. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Synthesis and proapoptotic activity of oleanolic acid derived amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Lucie; Knorrscheidt, Anja; Flemming, Franziska; Wiemann, Jana; Sommerwerk, Sven; Pavel, Ioana Z; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Csuk, René

    2016-10-01

    Thirty-one different 3-O-acetyl-OA derived amides have been prepared and screened for their cytotoxic activity. In the SRB assays nearly all the carboxamides displayed good cytotoxicity in the low μM range for several human tumor cell lines. Low EC50 values were obtained especially for the picolinylamides 14-16, for a N-[2-(dimethylamino)-ethyl] derivative 27 and a N-[2-(pyrrolinyl)-ethyl] carboxamide 28. These compounds were submitted to an extensive biological testing and proved compound 15 to act mainly by an arrest of the tumor cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. Cell death occurred by autophagy while compounds 27 and 28 triggered apoptosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. An Experimental and Computational Study of the Gas-Phase Acidities of the Common Amino Acid Amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Chelsea E; Stover, Michele L; Bokatzian, Samantha S; Davis, John T M; Dixon, David A; Cassady, Carolyn J

    2015-07-30

    Using proton-transfer reactions in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer and correlated molecular orbital theory at the G3(MP2) level, gas-phase acidities (GAs) and the associated structures for amides corresponding to the common amino acids have been determined for the first time. These values are important because amino acid amides are models for residues in peptides and proteins. For compounds whose most acidic site is the C-terminal amide nitrogen, two ions populations were observed experimentally with GAs that differ by 4-7 kcal/mol. The lower energy, more acidic structure accounts for the majority of the ions formed by electrospray ionization. G3(MP2) calculations predict that the lowest energy anionic conformer has a cis-like orientation of the [-C(═O)NH](-) group whereas the higher energy, less acidic conformer has a trans-like orientation of this group. These two distinct conformers were predicted for compounds with aliphatic, amide, basic, hydroxyl, and thioether side chains. For the most acidic amino acid amides (tyrosine, cysteine, tryptophan, histidine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid amides) only one conformer was observed experimentally, and its experimental GA correlates with the theoretical GA related to side chain deprotonation.

  15. CHROMIUM(II) AMIDES - SYNTHESIS AND STRUCTURES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EDEMA, JJH; GAMBAROTTA, S; MEETSMA, A; SPEK, AL; SMEETS, WJJ; CHIANG, MY

    1993-01-01

    A novel class of mono- and di-meric chromium(II) amides has been prepared and characterized. Reaction of [CrCl2(thf)2] (thf = tetrahydrofuran) with 2 equivalents of M(NR2) (R = C6H11, Pr(i), Ph, or phenothiazinyl; M = Li or Na) allowed the formation of the homoleptic amides [{Cr(mu-NR2)(NR2)}2] (R =

  16. Photochemical reduction of uranyl ion with amides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brar, A.S.; Chander, R.; Sandhu, S.S.

    1981-01-01

    The photochemical reduction of uranyl ion by formamide, acetamide, propionamide, butyramide, iso butyramids, n-methylformamide, N, N-dimethylformamide and N, N-diethylformamide in aqueous medium using radiation >= 380 nm from a medium pressure mercury vapour lamp has been investigated. The reduction with the said amides has been found to obey pseudo first order kinetics. The magnitude of the rate of reduction for the simple amides has been found to follow the following order formamide > isobutyramide approx. butyramide > propionamide > acetamide while the rate order for N-alkylformamides compared with that of the formamide has been found to be formamide > N-methylformamide > N,N-diethylformamide approx. N,N-dimethylformamide. The pseudo first order rate constants and quenching constants have been found from the kinetic data. It has been found that physical and chemical quenching compete with each other. Plots of reciprocal of quantum yields versus reciprocal [amide] have been found to be linear with intercepts on the ordinate axis. Absorption spectra of uranyl ion in doubly distilled water, in the presence of acid and in the presence of acid and amide reveal that there is no ground state interaction between uranyl ion and the amide. A mechanism of photoreduction of uranyl ion with amides has been proposed. (author)

  17. Biodegradable gadolinium-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide) copolymers for gene transfection and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Xiaolong; Wang, Gangmin; Shi, Ting; Shao, Zhihong; Zhao, Peng; Shi, Donglu; Ren, Jie; Lin, Chao; Wang, Peijun

    2016-01-01

    Theranostic nano-polyplexes containing gene and imaging agents hold a great promise for tumor diagnosis and therapy. In this work, we develop a group of new gadolinium (Gd)-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide)s for gene delivery and T 1 -weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Cationic poly(urethane amide)s (denoted as CPUAs) having multiple disulfide bonds, urethane and amide linkages were synthesized by stepwise polycondensation reaction between 1,4-bis(3-aminopropyl)piperazine and a mixture of di(4-nitrophenyl)-2, 2′-dithiodiethanocarbonate (DTDE-PNC) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) dianhydride at varied molar ratios. Then, Gd-chelated CPUAs (denoted as GdCPUAs) were produced by chelating Gd(III) ions with DTPA residues of CPUAs. These GdCPUAs could condense gene into nanosized and positively-charged polyplexes in a physiological condition and, however, liberated gene in an intracellular reductive environment. In vitro transfection experiments revealed that the GdCPUA at a DTDE-PNC/DTPA residue molar ratio of 85/15 induced the highest transfection efficiency in different cancer cells. This efficiency was higher than that yielded with 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine as a positive control. GdCPUAs and their polyplexes exhibited low cytotoxicity when an optimal transfection activity was detected. Moreover, GdCPUAs may serve as contrast agents for T 1 -weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The results of this work indicate that biodegradable Gd-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide) copolymers have high potential for tumor theranostics. - Highlights: • Novel cationic gadolinium-chelated poly(urethane amide)s (GdCPUAs) are prepared. • GdCPUAs can induce a high transfection efficacy in different cancer cells. • GdCPUAs reveal good cyto-compatibility against cancer cells. • GdCPUAs may be applied as T 1 -contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. • GdCPUAs hold high potential for cancer theranostics.

  18. TU-F-CAMPUS-T-02: Risk Assessment of Scattered Neutrons for a Fetus From Proton Therapy of a Brain Tumor During Pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, C [Massachusetts General Hospotal and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Moteabbed, M; Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospotal and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Xu, X [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the scattered neutron dose and the resulting risk for a fetus from proton therapy for brain tumors during pregnancy. Methods: Using the Monte Carlo platform TOPAS, the ICRP reference parameters based anthropomorphic pregnancy phantoms for three stages (3-, 6-, 9-month) were applied to evaluate the scattered neutron dose and dose equivalent. To calculate the dose equivalent, organ specific linear energy transfer (LET) based quality factor was used. Treatment plans from both passive scattering (PS) and pencil beam scanning (PBS) methods were considered in this study. Results: For pencil beam scanning, the neutron dose equivalent in the soft tissue of the fetus increases from 1.53x10−{sup 3} to 2.84x10−{sup 3} mSv per treatment Gy with increasing stage of gestation. This is due to scattered neutrons from the patient as the main contaminant source in PBS and a decrease in distance between the soft tissue of the fetus and GTV with increasing stage of gestation. For passive scattering, neutron dose equivalent to the soft tissue of the fetus shows a decrease from 0.17 to 0.13 mSv per treatment Gy in different stages, while the dose to the brain shows little difference around 0.18 mSv per treatment Gy because scattered neutrons from the treatment head contribute predominantly in passive scattering. Conclusion: The results show that the neutron dose to the fetus assuming a prescribed dose of 52.2 Gy is negligible for PBS, and is comparable to the scattered dose (0–10 mSv) from a head and neck CT scan for PS. It can be concluded that the dose to fetus is far lower than the thresholds of malformation, SMR and lethal death. The excess relative risk of childhood cancer induction would be increased by 0.48 and 0.103 using the Oxford Survey of Childhood Cancers and Japanese atomic model, respectively. Changran Geng is supported by the Chinese Scholarship Council (CSC) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11475087)

  19. Amide-induced phase separation of hexafluoroisopropanol-water mixtures depending on the hydrophobicity of amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamuku, Toshiyuki; Wada, Hiroshi; Kawatoko, Chiemi; Shimomura, Takuya; Kanzaki, Ryo; Takeuchi, Munetaka

    2012-06-21

    Amide-induced phase separation of hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP)-water mixtures has been investigated to elucidate solvation properties of the mixtures by means of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), (1)H and (13)C NMR, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The amides included N-methylformamide (NMF), N-methylacetamide (NMA), and N-methylpropionamide (NMP). The phase diagrams of amide-HFIP-water ternary systems at 298 K showed that phase separation occurs in a closed-loop area of compositions as well as an N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) system previously reported. The phase separation area becomes wider as the hydrophobicity of amides increases in the order of NMF amides due to the hydrophobic interaction gives rise to phase separation of the mixtures. In contrast, the disruption of HFIP clusters causes the recovery of the homogeneity of the ternary systems. The present results showed that HFIP clusters are evolved with increasing amide content to the lower phase separation concentration in the same mechanism among the four amide systems. However, the disruption of HFIP clusters in the NMP and DMF systems with further increasing amide content to the upper phase separation concentration occurs in a different way from those in the NMF and NMA systems.

  20. Poly(ether amide) segmented block copolymers with adipicacid based tetra amide segments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemond, G.J.E.; Feijen, Jan; Gaymans, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Poly(tetramethylene oxide)-based poly(ether ester amide)s with monodisperse tetraamide segments were synthesized. The tetraamide segment was based on adipic acid, terephthalic acid, and hexamethylenediamine. The synthesis method of the copolymers and the influence of the tetraamide concentration,

  1. Microorganisms hydrolyse amide bonds; knowledge enabling read-across of biodegradability of fatty acid amides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, R.; Kuijer, P.; Ginkel, van C.G.; Plugge, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    To get insight in the biodegradation and potential read-across of fatty acid amides, N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl] cocoamide and N-(1-ethylpiperazine) tall oil amide were used as model compounds. Two bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PK1 and Pseudomonas putida PK2 were isolated with

  2. Multidrug resistance-selective antiproliferative activity of Piper amide alkaloids and synthetic analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue-Hu; Goto, Masuo; Wang, Li-Ting; Hsieh, Kan-Yen; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Tang, Gui-Hua; Long, Chun-Lin; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2014-10-15

    Twenty-five amide alkaloids (1-25) from Piper boehmeriifolium and 10 synthetic amide alkaloid derivatives (39-48) were evaluated for antiproliferative activity against eight human tumor cell lines, including chemosensitive and multidrug-resistant (MDR) cell lines. The results suggested tumor type-selectivity. 1-[7-(3,4,5-Trimethoxyphenyl)heptanoyl]piperidine (46) exhibited the best inhibitory activity (IC50=4.94 μM) against the P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-overexpressing KBvin MDR sub-line, while it and all other tested compounds, except 9, were inactive (IC50 >40 μM) against MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3. Structure-activity relationships (SARs) indicated that (i) 3,4,5-trimethoxy phenyl substitution is critical for selectivity against KBvin, (ii) the 4-methoxy group in this pattern is crucial for antiproliferative activity, (iii) double bonds in the side chain are not needed for activity, and (iv), in arylalkenylacyl amide alkaloids, replacement of an isobutylamino group with pyrrolidin-1-yl or piperidin-1-yl significantly improved activity. Further study on Piper amides is warranted, particularly whether side chain length affects the ability to overcome the MDR cancer phenotype. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Chemoselective reductive nucleophilic addition to tertiary amides, secondary amides, and N-methoxyamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Minami; Oda, Yukiko; Wada, Takamasa; Minamikawa, Ryo; Shirokane, Kenji; Sato, Takaaki; Chida, Noritaka

    2014-12-22

    As the complexity of targeted molecules increases in modern organic synthesis, chemoselectivity is recognized as an important factor in the development of new methodologies. Chemoselective nucleophilic addition to amide carbonyl centers is a challenge because classical methods require harsh reaction conditions to overcome the poor electrophilicity of the amide carbonyl group. We have successfully developed a reductive nucleophilic addition of mild nucleophiles to tertiary amides, secondary amides, and N-methoxyamides that uses the Schwartz reagent [Cp2 ZrHCl]. The reaction took place in a highly chemoselective fashion in the presence of a variety of sensitive functional groups, such as methyl esters, which conventionally require protection prior to nucleophilic addition. The reaction will be applicable to the concise synthesis of complex natural alkaloids from readily available amide groups. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Amides and neolignans from the aerial parts of Piper bonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Duo-Duo; Wang, Yue-Hu; Chen, Ya-Hui; Mei, Ren-Qiang; Yang, Jun; Luo, Ji-Feng; Li, Yan; Long, Chun-Lin; Kong, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Six amides, piperbonamides A-F, three neolignans piperbonins A-C, and 11 known compounds were isolated from the aerial parts of Piper bonii (Piperaceae). The structures of piperbonamides A-F and piperbonins A-C were elucidated based on the analysis of 1D and 2D NMR and MS data. Piperbonin A, (+)-trans-acuminatin, (+)-cis-acuminatin, (+)-kadsurenone, and pipernonaline showed weak activity against platelet aggregation with IC50 values of 118.2, 108.5, 90.02, 107.3, and 116.3 μM, respectively, as compared with the positive control, tirofiban, with an IC50 value of 5.24 μM. Piperbonamides A-F were inactive against five tumor cell lines at concentrations up to 40 μM. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Effect of amides on lithium tetraborate solubility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsekhanskij, R S; Skvortsov, V C; Molodkin, A K; Sadetdi-pov, Sh V [Chuvashskij Gosudarstvennyj Pedagogicheskij Inst., Cheboksary (USSR); Universitet Druzhby Narodov, Moscow (USSR))

    1983-03-01

    Using the methods of solubility, densi- and refractometry at 25 deg C, it has been established that the systems lithium tetraborate-formamide (acetamide, dimethyl-formamide)-water are of a simple eutonic type. Amides decrease the salt solubility. Lyotropic effect, as calculated for molar concentrations (-Lsub(M)) relative to the absolute value, increases from formamide to dimethyl-formamide. The sequence is determined by the fact that, when there is one or two hydrophilic methyl groups in amide molecules which are in contact with tetraborate, they decrease the hydration energy of lithium cations.

  6. Effect of amides on sodium tetraborate solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsekhanskij, R.S.; Skvortsov, V.G.; Molodkin, A.K.; Sadetdinov, Sh.V.

    1986-01-01

    Methods of solubility and refractometry at 25 deg C were applied to investigate sodium tetraborate - formamide (dimethylformamide) - water systems. It is stated that they are of simple eutonic type as well as the earlier described sodium tetraborate-acetamide-water system. Amides reduce solubility of the salt. The effect of contact interaction between dissolved substances on salt cation hydration and thus on the value of liotropic amide effect is confirmed. This value is found to be also depend on the number of molecules of coordination water in the initial crystalline hydrate

  7. Effect of amides on lithium tetraborate solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsekhanskij, R.S.; Skvortsov, V.C.; Molodkin, A.K.; Sadetdi- pov, Sh.V.

    1983-01-01

    Using the methods of solubility, densi- and refractometry at 25 deg C, it has been established that the systemS lithium tetraborate-formamide (acetamide, dimethyl-formamide)-water are of a simple eutonic type. Amides decrease the salt solubility. Lyotropic effect, as calculated for molar concentrations (-Lsub(M)) relative to the absolute value, increases from formamide to dimethylformamide. The sequence is determined by the fact that, when there is one or two hydrophilic methyl groups in amide molecules which are in contact with tetraborate, they decrease the hydration energy of lithium cations

  8. Effect of amides on sodium tetraborate solubility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsekhanskij, R S; Skvortsov, V G; Molodkin, A K; Sadetdinov, Sh V

    1986-11-01

    Methods of solubility and refractometry at 25 deg C were applied to investigate sodium tetraborate - formamide (dimethylformamide) - water systems. It is stated that they are of simple eutonic type as well as the earlier described sodium tetraborate-acetamide-water system. Amides reduce solubility of the salt. The effect of contact interaction between dissolved substances on salt cation hydration and thus on the value of liotropic amide effect is confirmed. This value is found to be also depend on the number of molecules of coordination water in the initial crystalline hydrate.

  9. Polyimides Containing Amide And Perfluoroisopropyl Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezem, James F.

    1993-01-01

    New polyimides synthesized from reactions of aromatic hexafluoroisopropyl dianhydrides with asymmetric amide diamines. Soluble to extent of at least 10 percent by weight at temperature of about 25 degrees C in common amide solvents such as N-methylpyrrolidone, N,N-dimethylacetamide, and N,N-dimethylformamide. Polyimides form tough, flexible films, coatings, and moldings. Glass-transition temperatures ranged from 300 to 365 degrees C, and crystalline melting temperatures observed between 543 and 603 degrees C. Display excellent physical, chemical, and electrical properties. Useful as adhesives, laminating resins, fibers, coatings for electrical and decorative purposes, films, wire enamels, and molding compounds.

  10. Friedel-Crafts Acylation with Amides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Erum K.; DeSchepper, Daniel J.; Nilsson Lill, Sten O.; Klumpp, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    Friedel-Crafts acylation has been known since the 1870s and it is an important organic synthetic reaction leading to aromatic ketone products. Friedel-Crafts acylation is usually done with carboxylic acid chlorides or anhydrides while amides are generally not useful substrates in these reactions. Despite being the least reactive carboxylic acid derivative, we have found a series of amides capable of providing aromatic ketones in good yields (55–96%, 17 examples). We propose a mechanism involving diminished C-N resonance through superelectrophilic activation and subsequent cleavage to acyl cations. PMID:22690740

  11. Amide-transforming activity of Streptomyces: possible application to the formation of hydroxy amides and aminoalcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shinya; Miyagawa, Taka-Aki; Yamada, Ren; Shiratori-Takano, Hatsumi; Sayo, Noboru; Saito, Takao; Takano, Hideaki; Beppu, Teruhiko; Ueda, Kenji

    2013-07-01

    To develop an efficient bioconversion process for amides, we screened our collection of Streptomyces strains, mostly obtained from soil, for effective transformers. Five strains, including the SY007 (NBRC 109343) and SY435 (NBRC 109344) of Streptomyces sp., exhibited marked conversion activities from the approximately 700 strains analyzed. These strains transformed diverse amide compounds such as N-acetyltetrahydroquinoline, N-benzoylpyrrolidine, and N-benzoylpiperidine into alcohols or N,O-acetals with high activity and regioselectivity. N,O-acetal was transformed into alcohol by serial tautomerization and reduction reactions. As such, Streptomyces spp. can potentially be used for the efficient preparation of hydroxy amides and aminoalcohols.

  12. Enantioselective synthesis of α-oxy amides via Umpolung amide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighty, Matthew W; Shen, Bo; Johnston, Jeffrey N

    2012-09-19

    α-Oxy amides are prepared through enantioselective synthesis using a sequence beginning with a Henry addition of bromonitromethane to aldehydes and finishing with Umpolung Amide Synthesis (UmAS). Key to high enantioselection is the finding that ortho-iodo benzoic acid salts of the chiral copper(II) bis(oxazoline) catalyst deliver both diastereomers of the Henry adduct with high enantiomeric excess, homochiral at the oxygen-bearing carbon. Overall, this approach to α-oxy amides provides an innovative complement to alternatives that focus almost entirely on the enantioselective synthesis of α-oxy carboxylic acids.

  13. Nickel-Catalyzed Reductive Transamidation of Secondary Amides with Nitroarenes

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Chi Wai; Ploeger, Marten Leendert; Hu, Xile

    2017-01-01

    Transmidation is an attractive method for amide synthesis. However, transamidation of secondary amides is challenging. Here, we describe a reductive transamidation method that employs readily available nitro(hetero)arenes as the nitrogen sources, zinc or manganese as reductant, and simple nickel salt and ligand as a catalyst system. The scope of amides includes both alkyl and aryl secondary amides, with high functional group compatibility.

  14. Identification of fatty acids and fatty acid amides in human meibomian gland secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Kelly K; Ham, Bryan M; Nichols, Jason J; Ziegler, Corrie; Green-Church, Kari B

    2007-01-01

    The complex superficial lipid layer of the tear film functions to prevent evaporation and maintain tear stability. Although classes of lipids found in the tear film have been reported, individual lipid species are currently being studied with more sophisticated. The purpose of this work was to show the identification of fatty acids and the fatty acid amides in human meibomian gland secretions by using electrospray mass spectrometry. methods. Human meibomian gland secretions (meibum) were analyzed by electrospray quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (positive- and negative-ion mode). Accurate mass determination and collision-induced dissociation of meibum, and lipid standards were used to identify lipid species. Mass analysis of meibum in an acidic chloroform-methanol solution in positive-ion mode revealed a mass peak of m/z 282.3, which was identified as the protonated molecule of oleamide [C(18)H(35)NO+H](+). The high-resolution mass analysis of the m/z 282.2788 peak (oleamide) demonstrated a mass accuracy of 3.2 parts per million (ppm). Collision-induced dissociation of this species from meibum, compared with an oleamide standard, confirmed its identification. Myristic, palmitic, stearic, and oleic free fatty acids were identified in a similar manner, as were the other fatty acid amides (myristamide, palmitamide, stearamide, and erucamide). The findings indicate that oleamide (cis-9-octadecenamide), an endogenous fatty acid primary amide, is a predominant component of meibum when examined by electrospray mass spectrometry. The novel finding of oleamide and other members of the fatty acid amide family in the tear film could lead to additional insights into the role of fatty acid amide activity in human biological systems and may indicate a new function for this lipid class of molecules in ocular surface signaling and/or in the maintenance of the complex tear film.

  15. Diagnosis by proton bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steward, V.W.; Koehler, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    Beams of monoenergetic protons or other charged ions are passed through the living human body to detect abnormalities and obstructions in body tissue, which abnormalities and obstructions are visualized as density variations in the particle image emerging from the body part under investigation. The particles used are preferably protons having an energy of 100 to 300 MeV, more especially 200 to 300 MeV. The method is of use in detecting inter alia tumors, blood clots, infarcts, soft tissue lesions and multiple sclerosis in patients without exposure to high radiation dosages. 6 claims, 2 drawing figures

  16. Metabolism of amino acid amides in Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, H.F.M.; Croes, L.M.; Peeters, W.P.H.; Peters, P.J.H.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    1993-01-01

    The metabolism of the natural amino acid L-valine, the unnatural amino acids D-valine, and D-, L-phenylglycine (D-, L-PG), and the unnatural amino acid amides D-, L-phenylglycine amide (D, L-PG-NH2) and L-valine amide (L-Val-NH2) was studied in Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633. The organism possessed

  17. Mass Spectra Analyses of Amides and Amide Dimers of Steviol, Isosteviol, and Steviolbioside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-Wen Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The mass spectra of a series of stevioside analogues including the amide and dimer compounds of steviol, isosteviol, and steviolbioside were examined. Positive ion mass spectral fragmentation of new steviol, isosteviol, and steviolbioside amides and the amide dimers are reported and discussed. The techniques included their synthesis procedures, fast-atom bombardment (FAB, and LC/MS/MS mass spectra. Intense [M+H]+ and [M+Na]+ ion peaks were observed on the FAB and ESI spectra. LC/MS/MS also yielded ES+ and ES− ion peaks that fairly agreed with the results of the FAB and ESI studies. Mass spectral analysis of compounds 4p-q, 5a-g, 6, and 7 revealed the different cleavage pathway patterns that can help in identifying the structures of steviolbioside and its amide derivatives.

  18. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Alfred R

    2006-01-01

    Proton therapy has become a subject of considerable interest in the radiation oncology community and it is expected that there will be a substantial growth in proton treatment facilities during the next decade. I was asked to write a historical review of proton therapy based on my personal experiences, which have all occurred in the United States, so therefore I have a somewhat parochial point of view. Space requirements did not permit me to mention all of the existing proton therapy facilities or the names of all of those who have contributed to proton therapy. (review)

  19. Amides and an alkaloid from Portulaca oleracea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubun, Tetsuo; Kite, Geoffrey C; Veitch, Nigel C; Simmonds, Monique S J

    2012-08-01

    A total of 16 phenolic compounds, including one new and five known N-cinnamoyl phenylethylamides, one new pyrrole alkaloid named portulacaldehyde, five phenylpropanoid acids and amides, and derivatives of benzaldehyde and benzoic acid, were isolated and identified from a polar fraction of an extract of Portulaca oleracea. Their structures were determined through spectroscopic analyses.

  20. 76 FR 69636 - Amides, C5

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ... in guinea pigs showed that amides, C 5 - C 9 , N-[3-(dimethylamino) propyl] was not a skin sensitizer.... Potentially affected entities may include, but are not limited to: Crop production (NAICS code 111). Animal production (NAICS code 112). Food manufacturing (NAICS code 311). Pesticide manufacturing (NAICS code 32532...

  1. Direct Amination of alpha-Hydroxy Amides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chandgude, Ajay L.; Dömling, Alexander

    A TiCl4-mediated reaction for the direct amination of alpha-hydroxy amides has been developed. This simple, general, additive/base/ligand-free reaction is mediated by economical TiCl4. The reaction runs under mild conditions. This highly efficient C-N bond formation protocol is valid for diverse

  2. Steroids linked with amide bond - extended cholesterol

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, Ivan; Buděšínský, Miloš; Pouzar, Vladimír; Drašar, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 1 (2009), s. 88-94 ISSN 0039-128X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06077; GA AV ČR KAN200200651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : synthesis * oligomers * amides Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.905, year: 2009

  3. Rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric hydroboration of γ,δ-unsaturated amide derivatives: δ-borylated amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, G L; Zhang, S; Takacs, J M

    2018-05-08

    γ,δ-Unsaturated amides in which the alkene moiety bears an aryl or heteroaryl substituent undergo regioselective rhodium-catalyzed δ-borylation by pinacolborane to afford chiral secondary benzylic boronic esters. The results contrast the γ-borylation of γ,δ-unsaturated amides in which the disubstituted alkene moiety bears only alkyl substituents; the reversal in regiochemistry is coupled with a reversal in the sense of π-facial selectivity.

  4. Apoptosis-inducing Factor (AIF) and Its Family Member Protein, AMID, Are Rotenone-sensitive NADH:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductases (NDH-2)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elguindy, Mahmoud M.; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and AMID (AIF-homologous mitochondrion-associated inducer of death) are flavoproteins. Although AIF was originally discovered as a caspase-independent cell death effector, bioenergetic roles of AIF, particularly relating to complex I functions, have since emerged. However, the role of AIF in mitochondrial respiration and redox metabolism has remained unknown. Here, we investigated the redox properties of human AIF and AMID by comparing them with yeast Ndi1, a type 2 NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NDH-2) regarded as alternative complex I. Isolated AIF and AMID containing naturally incorporated FAD displayed no NADH oxidase activities. However, after reconstituting isolated AIF or AMID into bacterial or mitochondrial membranes, N-terminally tagged AIF and AMID displayed substantial NADH:O2 activities and supported NADH-linked proton pumping activities in the host membranes almost as efficiently as Ndi1. NADH:ubiquinone-1 activities in the reconstituted membranes were highly sensitive to 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (IC50 = ∼1 μm), a quinone-binding inhibitor. Overexpressing N-terminally tagged AIF and AMID enhanced the growth of a double knock-out Escherichia coli strain lacking complex I and NDH-2. In contrast, C-terminally tagged AIF and NADH-binding site mutants of N-terminally tagged AIF and AMID failed to show both NADH:O2 activity and the growth-enhancing effect. The disease mutant AIFΔR201 showed decreased NADH:O2 activity and growth-enhancing effect. Furthermore, we surprisingly found that the redox activities of N-terminally tagged AIF and AMID were sensitive to rotenone, a well known complex I inhibitor. We propose that AIF and AMID are previously unidentified mammalian NDH-2 enzymes, whose bioenergetic function could be supplemental NADH oxidation in cells. PMID:26063804

  5. Apoptosis-inducing Factor (AIF) and Its Family Member Protein, AMID, Are Rotenone-sensitive NADH:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductases (NDH-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elguindy, Mahmoud M; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko

    2015-08-21

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and AMID (AIF-homologous mitochondrion-associated inducer of death) are flavoproteins. Although AIF was originally discovered as a caspase-independent cell death effector, bioenergetic roles of AIF, particularly relating to complex I functions, have since emerged. However, the role of AIF in mitochondrial respiration and redox metabolism has remained unknown. Here, we investigated the redox properties of human AIF and AMID by comparing them with yeast Ndi1, a type 2 NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NDH-2) regarded as alternative complex I. Isolated AIF and AMID containing naturally incorporated FAD displayed no NADH oxidase activities. However, after reconstituting isolated AIF or AMID into bacterial or mitochondrial membranes, N-terminally tagged AIF and AMID displayed substantial NADH:O₂ activities and supported NADH-linked proton pumping activities in the host membranes almost as efficiently as Ndi1. NADH:ubiquinone-1 activities in the reconstituted membranes were highly sensitive to 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (IC₅₀ = ∼1 μm), a quinone-binding inhibitor. Overexpressing N-terminally tagged AIF and AMID enhanced the growth of a double knock-out Escherichia coli strain lacking complex I and NDH-2. In contrast, C-terminally tagged AIF and NADH-binding site mutants of N-terminally tagged AIF and AMID failed to show both NADH:O₂ activity and the growth-enhancing effect. The disease mutant AIFΔR201 showed decreased NADH:O₂ activity and growth-enhancing effect. Furthermore, we surprisingly found that the redox activities of N-terminally tagged AIF and AMID were sensitive to rotenone, a well known complex I inhibitor. We propose that AIF and AMID are previously unidentified mammalian NDH-2 enzymes, whose bioenergetic function could be supplemental NADH oxidation in cells. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. [Why proton therapy? And how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thariat, Juliette; Habrand, Jean Louis; Lesueur, Paul; Chaikh, Abdulhamid; Kammerer, Emmanuel; Lecomte, Delphine; Batalla, Alain; Balosso, Jacques; Tessonnier, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    Proton therapy is a radiotherapy, based on the use of protons, charged subatomic particles that stop at a given depth depending on their initial energy (pristine Bragg peak), avoiding any output beam, unlike the photons used in most of the other modalities of radiotherapy. Proton therapy has been used for 60 years, but has only become ubiquitous in the last decade because of recent major advances in particle accelerator technology. This article reviews the history of clinical implementation of protons, the nature of the technological advances that now allows its expansion at a lower cost. It also addresses the technical and physical specificities of proton therapy and the clinical situations for which proton therapy may be relevant but requires evidence. Different proton therapy techniques are possible. These are explained in terms of their clinical potential by explaining the current terminology (such as cyclotrons, synchrotrons or synchrocyclotrons, using superconducting magnets, fixed line or arm rotary with passive diffusion delivery or active by scanning) in basic words. The requirements associated with proton therapy are increased due to the precision of the depth dose deposit. The learning curve of proton therapy requires that clinical indications be prioritized according to their associated uncertainties (such as range uncertainties and movement in lung tumors). Many clinical indications potentially fall under proton therapy ultimately. Clinical strategies are explained in a paralleled manuscript. Copyright © 2018 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Hydrogen exchange kinetics in a membrane protein determined by 15N NMR spectroscopy: Use of the INEPT [insensitive nucleus enhancement by polarization transfer] experiment to follow individual amides in detergent-solubilized M13 coat protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, G.D.; Sykes, B.D.

    1990-01-01

    The coat protein of the filamentous coliphage M13 is a 50-residue polypeptide which spans the inner membrane of the Escherichia coli host upon infection. Amide hydrogen exchange kinetics have been used to probe the structure and dynamics of M13 coat protein which has been solubilized in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles. In a previous 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study, multiple exponential analysis of the unresolved amide proton envelope revealed the existence of two slow kinetic sets containing a total of about 30 protons. The slower set (15-20 amides) originates from the hydrophobic membrane-spanning region and exchanges at least 10 5 -fold slower than the unstructured, non-H-bonded model polypeptide poly(DL-alanine). Herein the authors use 15 N NMR spectroscopy of biosynthetically labeled coat protein to follow individual, assigned, slowly exchanging amides in or near the hydrophobic segment. The INEPT (insensitive nucleus enhancement by polarization transfer) experiments can be used to transfer magnetization to the 15 N nucleus from a coupled proton; when 15 N-labeled protonated protein is dissolved in 2 H 2 O, the INEPT signal disappears with time as the amide protons are replaced by solvent deuterons. Amide hydrogen exchange is catalyzed by both H + and OH - ions. The time-dependent exchange-out experiment is suitable for slow exchange rates (k ex ). The INEPT experiment was also adapted to measure some of the more rapidly exchanging amides in the coat protein using either saturation transfer from water or exchange effects on the polarization transfer step itself. The results of all of these experiments are consistent with previous models of the coat protein in which a stable segment extends from the hydrophobic membrane-spanning region through to the C-terminus, whereas the N-terminal region is undergoing more extensive dynamic fluctuations

  8. N-Methylamino Pyrimidyl Amides (MAPA): Highly Reactive, Electronically-Activated Amides in Catalytic N-C(O) Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Guangrong; Lalancette, Roger; Szostak, Roman; Szostak, Michal

    2017-09-01

    Despite recent progress in catalytic cross-coupling technologies, the direct activation of N-alkyl-N-aryl amides has been a challenging transformation. Here, we report the first Suzuki cross-coupling of N-methylamino pyrimidyl amides (MAPA) enabled by the controlled n N → π Ar conjugation and the resulting remodeling of the partial double bond character of the amide bond. The new mode of amide activation is suitable for generating acyl-metal intermediates from unactivated primary and secondary amides.

  9. Comparison of proton therapy treatment planning for head tumors with a pencil beam algorithm on dual and single energy CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudobivnik, Nace; Dedes, George; Parodi, Katia; Landry, Guillaume, E-mail: g.landry@lmu.de [Department of Medical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich 85748 (Germany); Schwarz, Florian; Johnson, Thorsten; Sommer, Wieland H. [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, 81377 Munich (Germany); Agolli, Linda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich 81377, Germany and Radiation Oncology, Sant’ Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University, Rome 00189 (Italy); Tessonnier, Thomas [Department of Medical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich 85748, Germany and Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht 6229 ET, the Netherlands and Medical Physics Unit, Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 0G4 (Canada); Thieke, Christian; Belka, Claus [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich 81377 (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Dual energy CT (DECT) has recently been proposed as an improvement over single energy CT (SECT) for stopping power ratio (SPR) estimation for proton therapy treatment planning (TP), thereby potentially reducing range uncertainties. Published literature investigated phantoms. This study aims at performing proton therapy TP on SECT and DECT head images of the same patients and at evaluating whether the reported improved DECT SPR accuracy translates into clinically relevant range shifts in clinical head treatment scenarios. Methods: Two phantoms were scanned at a last generation dual source DECT scanner at 90 and 150 kVp with Sn filtration. The first phantom (Gammex phantom) was used to calibrate the scanner in terms of SPR while the second served as evaluation (CIRS phantom). DECT images of five head trauma patients were used as surrogate cancer patient images for TP of proton therapy. Pencil beam algorithm based TP was performed on SECT and DECT images and the dose distributions corresponding to the optimized proton plans were calculated using a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation platform using the same patient geometry for both plans obtained from conversion of the 150 kVp images. Range shifts between the MC dose distributions from SECT and DECT plans were assessed using 2D range maps. Results: SPR root mean square errors (RMSEs) for the inserts of the Gammex phantom were 1.9%, 1.8%, and 1.2% for SECT phantom calibration (SECT{sub phantom}), SECT stoichiometric calibration (SECT{sub stoichiometric}), and DECT calibration, respectively. For the CIRS phantom, these were 3.6%, 1.6%, and 1.0%. When investigating patient anatomy, group median range differences of up to −1.4% were observed for head cases when comparing SECT{sub stoichiometric} with DECT. For this calibration the 25th and 75th percentiles varied from −2% to 0% across the five patients. The group median was found to be limited to 0.5% when using SECT{sub phantom} and the 25th and 75th percentiles

  10. Twisted Amides: From Obscurity to Broadly Useful Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Reactions by N-C Amide Bond Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengwei; Szostak, Michal

    2017-05-29

    The concept of using amide bond distortion to modulate amidic resonance has been known for more than 75 years. Two classic twisted amides (bridged lactams) ingeniously designed and synthesized by Kirby and Stoltz to feature fully perpendicular amide bonds, and as a consequence emanate amino-ketone-like reactivity, are now routinely recognized in all organic chemistry textbooks. However, only recently the use of amide bond twist (distortion) has advanced to the general organic chemistry mainstream enabling a host of highly attractive N-C amide bond cross-coupling reactions of broad synthetic relevance. In this Minireview, we discuss recent progress in this area and present a detailed overview of the prominent role of amide bond destabilization as a driving force in the development of transition-metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions by N-C bond activation. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. NMR studies of the influence of dodecyl sulfate on the amide hydrogen exchange kinetics of a micelle-solubilized hydrophobic tripeptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neil, J.D.J.; Sykes, B.D.

    1989-01-01

    Backbone amide hydrogen exchange measurements are an important source of information about the internal dynamics of proteins. Before such measurements can be interpreted unambiguously, contributions to hydrogen exchange rates from the chemical and physical environment of the amides must be taken into account. Membrane proteins are often solubilized in detergents, yet there have not been any systematic investigations of the possible effects detergents may have on the amide hydrogen exchange rates of proteins. To address this question, the authors have measured individual backbone and carboxyl-terminal amide exchange rates for the amphipathic tripeptide Leu-Val-Ile-amide dissolved in water and dodecyl sulfate micelles. Proton NMR spectroscopy was used to measure exchange using the direct exchange-out into D 2 O technique at 5 degree C and using an indirect steady-state saturation-transfer technique at 25 degree C. The broadening effect of micelle-incorporated spin-labeled fatty acid (12-doxylsterate) on the 1 H NMR spectra of both the detergent and the peptide resonances was used to demonstrate that the tripeptide is intimately associated with the micelle. These experiments help to explain the elevated pH min observed for backbone amides in the sodium dodecyl sulfate solubilized M13 coat protein

  12. Vibrational lifetimes of protein amide modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, K.A.; Rella, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    Measurement of the lifetimes of vibrational modes in proteins has been achieved with a single frequency infrared pump-probe technique using the Stanford Picosecond Free-electron Laser, These are the first direct measurements of vibrational dynamics in the polyamide structure of proteins. In this study, modes associated with the protein backbone are investigated. Results for the amide I band, which consists mainly of the stretching motion of the carbonyl unit of the amide linkage, show that relaxation from the first vibrational excited level (v=1) to the vibrational ground state (v=0) occurs within 1.5 picoseconds with apparent first order kinetics. Comparison of lifetimes for myoglobin and azurin, which have differing secondary structures, show a small but significant difference. The lifetime for the amide I band of myoglobin is 300 femtoseconds shorter than for azurin. Further measurements are in progress on other backbone vibrational modes and on the temperature dependence of the lifetimes. Comparison of vibrational dynamics for proteins with differing secondary structure and for different vibrational modes within a protein will lead to a greater understanding of energy transfer and dissipation in biological systems. In addition, these results have relevance to tissue ablation studies which have been conducted with pulsed infrared lasers. Vibrational lifetimes are necessary for calculating the rate at which the energy from absorbed infrared photons is converted to equilibrium thermal energy within the irradiated volume. The very fast vibrational lifetimes measured here indicate that mechanisms which involve direct vibrational up-pumping of the amide modes with consecutive laser pulses, leading to bond breakage or weakening, are not valid

  13. Polyimides containing amide and perfluoroisopropylidene connecting groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezern, James F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    New, thermooxidatively stable polyimides were prepared from the reaction of aromatic dianhydrides containing isopropylidene bridging groups with aromatic diamines containing amide connecting groups between the rings. Several of these polyimides were shown to be semi-crystalline as evidenced by wide angle x ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry. Most of the polyimides form tough, flexible films with high tensile properties. These polyimide films exhibit enhanced solubility in organic solvents.

  14. Sacral chordomas: Impact of high-dose proton/photon-beam radiation therapy combined with or without surgery for primary versus recurrent tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Lily; De Laney, Thomas F.; Liebsch, Norbert J.; Hornicek, Francis J.; Goldberg, Saveli; Mankin, Henry; Rosenberg, Andrew E.; Rosenthal, Daniel I.; Suit, Herman D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of definitive treatment of sacral chordoma by high-dose proton/photon-beam radiation therapy alone or combined with surgery. Methods and Materials: The records of 16 primary and 11 recurrent sacral chordoma patients treated from November 1982 to November 2002 by proton/photon radiation therapy alone (6 patients) or combined with surgery (21 patients) have been analyzed for local control, survival, and treatment-related morbidity. The outcome analysis is based on follow-up information as of 2005. Results: Outcome results show a large difference in local failure rate between patients treated for primary and recurrent chordomas. Local control results by surgery and radiation were 12/14 vs. 1/7 for primary and recurrent lesions. For margin-positive patients, local control results were 10 of 11 and 0 of 5 in the primary and recurrent groups, respectively; the mean follow-up on these locally controlled patients was 8.8 years (4 at 10.3, 12.8, 17, and 21 years). Radiation alone was used in 6 patients, 4 of whom received ≥73.0 Gy (E); local control was observed in 3 of these 4 patients for 2.9, 4.9, and 7.6 years. Conclusion: These data indicate a high local control rate for surgical and radiation treatment of primary (12 of 14) as distinct from recurrent (1 of 7) sacral chordomas. Three of 4 chordomas treated by ≥73.0 Gy (E) of radiation alone had local control; 1 is at 91 months. This indicates that high-dose proton/photon therapy offers an effective treatment option

  15. Synthesis and uses of the amides extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musikas, C.

    1989-01-01

    Carboxylic acids amides (RR'NCOCR''), malonic acid amides (RR'NCOCH 2 CONRR') and substituted malonic acid amides (RR'NCOCHR'' CONRR') are extractants of the actinides ions. They show good prospects for use in the nuclear industry because of their complete incinerability. In addition, their degradation products interfer much more less in the separation processes when compared with organophosphorus extractants. The synthesis and the purification of two typical extractants: N-N-di (2-ethylhexyl) butyramide (C 4 H 9 CHC 2 H 5 CH 2 ) 2 NCOC 3 H 7 and N,N'-dimethyl N,N'-dibutyl 1.3 diamide 2(3-oxa)nonyl propane (C 4 H 9 CH 3 NCO) 2 CHC 2 H 4 OC 6 H 13 are described. The purities, checked by NMR, elemental analysis and potentiometry, were in the range 98 to 99.5%. The yields for monoamides were in the range 70 to 90% and for the diamides 20 to 40%. 3 figs, 3 tabs, 10 refs

  16. Structures of Highly Twisted Amides Relevant to Amide N-C Cross-Coupling: Evidence for Ground-State Amide Destabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Vittorio; Holzer, Wolfgang; Meng, Guangrong; Shi, Shicheng; Lalancette, Roger; Szostak, Roman; Szostak, Michal

    2016-10-04

    Herein, we show that acyclic amides that have recently enabled a series of elusive transition-metal-catalyzed N-C activation/cross-coupling reactions are highly twisted around the N-C(O) axis by a new destabilization mechanism of the amide bond. A unique effect of the N-glutarimide substituent, leading to uniformly high twist (ca. 90°) irrespective of the steric effect at the carbon side of the amide bond has been found. This represents the first example of a twisted amide that does not bear significant steric hindrance at the α-carbon atom. The (15) N NMR data show linear correlations between electron density at nitrogen and amide bond twist. This study strongly supports the concept of amide bond ground-state twist as a blueprint for activation of amides toward N-C bond cleavage. The new mechanism offers considerable opportunities for organic synthesis and biological processes involving non-planar amide bonds. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. An Efficient Amide-Aldehyde-Alkene Condensation: Synthesis for the N-Allyl Amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Zheng-Jun; Wang, Xi-Cun

    2016-02-01

    The allylamine skeleton represents a significant class of biologically active nitrogen compounds that are found in various natural products and drugs with well-recognized pharmacological properties. In this personal account, we will briefly discuss the synthesis of allylamine skeletons. We will focus on showing a general protocol for Lewis acid-catalyzed N-allylation of electron-poor N-heterocyclic amides and sulfonamide via an amide-aldehyde-alkene condensation reaction. The substrate scope with respect to N-heterocyclic amides, aldehydes, and alkenes will be discussed. This method is also capable of preparing the Naftifine motif from N-methyl-1-naphthamide or methyl (naphthalene-1-ylmethyl)carbamate, with paraformaldehyde and styrene in a one-pot manner. © 2016 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Luciferin Amides Enable in Vivo Bioluminescence Detection of Endogenous Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofford, David M; Adams, Spencer T; Reddy, G S Kiran Kumar; Reddy, Gadarla Randheer; Miller, Stephen C

    2015-07-15

    Firefly luciferase is homologous to fatty acyl-CoA synthetases. We hypothesized that the firefly luciferase substrate d-luciferin and its analogs are fatty acid mimics that are ideally suited to probe the chemistry of enzymes that release fatty acid products. Here, we synthesized luciferin amides and found that these molecules are hydrolyzed to substrates for firefly luciferase by the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). In the presence of luciferase, these molecules enable highly sensitive and selective bioluminescent detection of FAAH activity in vitro, in live cells, and in vivo. The potency and tissue distribution of FAAH inhibitors can be imaged in live mice, and luciferin amides serve as exemplary reagents for greatly improved bioluminescence imaging in FAAH-expressing tissues such as the brain.

  19. Conversion of amides to esters by the nickel-catalysed activation of amide C-N bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hie, Liana; Fine Nathel, Noah F; Shah, Tejas K; Baker, Emma L; Hong, Xin; Yang, Yun-Fang; Liu, Peng; Houk, K N; Garg, Neil K

    2015-08-06

    Amides are common functional groups that have been studied for more than a century. They are the key building blocks of proteins and are present in a broad range of other natural and synthetic compounds. Amides are known to be poor electrophiles, which is typically attributed to the resonance stability of the amide bond. Although amides can readily be cleaved by enzymes such as proteases, it is difficult to selectively break the carbon-nitrogen bond of an amide using synthetic chemistry. Here we demonstrate that amide carbon-nitrogen bonds can be activated and cleaved using nickel catalysts. We use this methodology to convert amides to esters, which is a challenging and underdeveloped transformation. The reaction methodology proceeds under exceptionally mild reaction conditions, and avoids the use of a large excess of an alcohol nucleophile. Density functional theory calculations provide insight into the thermodynamics and catalytic cycle of the amide-to-ester transformation. Our results provide a way to harness amide functional groups as synthetic building blocks and are expected to lead to the further use of amides in the construction of carbon-heteroatom or carbon-carbon bonds using non-precious-metal catalysis.

  20. New Umami Amides: Structure-Taste Relationship Studies of Cinnamic Acid Derived Amides and the Natural Occurrence of an Intense Umami Amide in Zanthoxylum piperitum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerot, Eric; Neirynck, Nathalie; Cayeux, Isabelle; Yuan, Yoyo Hui-Juan; Yuan, Yong-Ming

    2015-08-19

    A series of aromatic amides were synthesized from various acids and amines selected from naturally occurring structural frameworks. These synthetic amides were evaluated for umami taste in comparison with monosodium glutamate. The effect of the substitution pattern of both the acid and the amine parts on umami taste was investigated. The only intensely umami-tasting amides were those made from 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid. The amine part was more tolerant to structural changes. Amides bearing an alkyl- or alkoxy-substituted phenylethylamine residue displayed a clean umami taste as 20 ppm solutions in water. Ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with a high quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer (UPLC/MS) was subsequently used to show the natural occurrence of these amides. (E)-3-(3,4-Dimethoxyphenyl)-N-(4-methoxyphenethyl)acrylamide was shown to occur in the roots and stems of Zanthoxylum piperitum, a plant of the family Rutaceae growing in Korea, Japan, and China.

  1. Poly(ester-amide)s derived from PET containing uniform bisester amide segments

    OpenAIRE

    Ascanio Nuñez, Yanireth

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ethylene terephthalate) has experienced a growth in its demand as a bottle container and food packaging material. However, in order to expand its uses, its barrier properties to gases like carbon dioxide and oxygen, have to be improved. In this way, bisester amide units have been introduced as a third component in the main chain of PET, with the aim to reduce both CO2 and O2 permeability. In this project, poly(ester-amide)s based on PET (PETxMXy) have been synthesized, according to th...

  2. Synthesis of Nitriles via Palladium-Catalyzed Water Shuffling from Amides to Acetonitrile

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Wandi; Haskins, Christopher W.; Yang, Yang; Dai, Mingji

    2014-01-01

    Palladium-catalyzed synthesis of nitriles from amides has been described. Two similar, but complementary reaction conditions have been identified to convert various amides including α,β,γ,δ-unsaturated amides, cinnamides, aromatic amides and alkyl amides to the corresponding nitriles in good to excellent yield.

  3. Synthesis of nitriles via palladium-catalyzed water shuffling from amides to acetonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wandi; Haskins, Christopher W; Yang, Yang; Dai, Mingji

    2014-12-07

    Palladium-catalyzed synthesis of nitriles from amides has been described. Two similar, but complementary reaction conditions have been identified to convert various amides including α,β,γ,δ-unsaturated amides, cinnamides, aromatic amides and alkyl amides to the corresponding nitriles in good to excellent yield.

  4. Analytical applications of resins containing amide and polyamine functional groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orf, G.M.

    1977-12-01

    A dibutyl amide resin is used for the separation of uranium(VI), thorium(IV), and zirconium(IV) from each other and several other metal ions. Uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) are determined in the presence of large excesses of foreign metal ions and anions. A practical application of the amide resin is studied by determining uranium in low grade uranium ores. The amide resin is also used for the selective concentration of gold(III) from sea water

  5. Analytical applications of resins containing amide and polyamine functional groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orf, Gene Michael [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1977-12-01

    A dibutyl amide resin is used for the separation of uranium(VI), thorium(IV), and zirconium(IV) from each other and several other metal ions. Uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) are determined in the presence of large excesses of foreign metal ions and anions. A practical application of the amide resin is studied by determining uranium in low grade uranium ores. The amide resin is also used for the selective concentration of gold(III) from sea water.

  6. Facile access to amides and hydroxamic acids directly from nitroarenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shreyans K; Aravinda Kumar, K A; Bharate, Sandip B; Vishwakarma, Ram A

    2014-09-07

    A new method for synthesis of amides and hydroxamic acids from nitroarenes and aldehydes is described. The MnO2 catalyzed thermal deoxygenation of nitrobenzene resulted in formation of a reactive nitroso intermediate which on reaction with aldehydes provided amides and hydroxamic acids. The thermal neat reaction in the presence of 0.01 mmol KOH predominantly led to formation of hydroxamic acid whereas reaction in the presence of 1 mmol acetic acid produced amides as the only product.

  7. SU-E-T-598: Parametric Equation for Quick and Reliable Estimate of Stray Neutron Doses in Proton Therapy and Application for Intracranial Tumor Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfrate, A; Farah, J; Sayah, R; Clairand, I [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Fontenay-aux-roses (France); De Marzi, L; Delacroix, S [Institut Curie Centre de Protontherapie d Orsay (CPO), Orsay (France); Herault, J [Centre Antoine Lacassagne (CAL) Cyclotron biomedical, Nice (France); Lee, C [National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States); Bolch, W [Univ Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Development of a parametric equation suitable for a daily use in routine clinic to provide estimates of stray neutron doses in proton therapy. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) calculations using the UF-NCI 1-year-old phantom were exercised to determine the variation of stray neutron doses as a function of irradiation parameters while performing intracranial treatments. This was done by individually changing the proton beam energy, modulation width, collimator aperture and thickness, compensator thickness and the air gap size while their impact on neutron doses were put into a single equation. The variation of neutron doses with distance from the target volume was also included in it. Then, a first step consisted in establishing the fitting coefficients by using 221 learning data which were neutron absorbed doses obtained with MC simulations while a second step consisted in validating the final equation. Results: The variation of stray neutron doses with irradiation parameters were fitted with linear, polynomial, etc. model while a power-law model was used to fit the variation of stray neutron doses with the distance from the target volume. The parametric equation fitted well MC simulations while establishing fitting coefficients as the discrepancies on the estimate of neutron absorbed doses were within 10%. The discrepancy can reach ∼25% for the bladder, the farthest organ from the target volume. Finally, the validation showed results in compliance with MC calculations since the discrepancies were also within 10% for head-and-neck and thoracic organs while they can reach ∼25%, again for pelvic organs. Conclusion: The parametric equation presents promising results and will be validated for other target sites as well as other facilities to go towards a universal method.

  8. Electrochemical reduction of nitrate in the presence of an amide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of nitrates in aqueous solutions thereof in the presence of amides to gaseous nitrogen (N.sub.2) is described. Generally, electrochemical reduction of NO.sub.3 proceeds stepwise, from NO.sub.3 to N.sub.2, and subsequently in several consecutive steps to ammonia (NH.sub.3) as a final product. Addition of at least one amide to the solution being electrolyzed suppresses ammonia generation, since suitable amides react with NO.sub.2 to generate N.sub.2. This permits nitrate reduction to gaseous nitrogen to proceed by electrolysis. Suitable amides include urea, sulfamic acid, formamide, and acetamide.

  9. SOLID-PHASE PEPTIDE SYNTHESIS OF ISOTOCIN WITH AMIDE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SOLID-PHASE PEPTIDE SYNTHESIS OF ISOTOCIN WITH AMIDE OF ASPARAGINE PROTECTED WITH 1-TETRALINYL. TRIFLUOROMETHANESULPHONIC ACID (TFMSA) DEPROTECTION, CLEAVAGE AND AIR OXIDATION OF MERCAPTO GROUPS TO DISULPHIDE.

  10. Biodegradable gadolinium-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide) copolymers for gene transfection and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xiaolong [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200065 (China); Wang, Gangmin [Department of Urology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Shi, Ting [The Institute for Translational Nanomedicine, Shanghai East Hospital, Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Nanoscience, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Shao, Zhihong [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200065 (China); Zhao, Peng; Shi, Donglu [The Institute for Translational Nanomedicine, Shanghai East Hospital, Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Nanoscience, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Ren, Jie [Institute of Nano and Biopolymeric Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 4800 Caoan Road, Shanghai 201804 (China); Lin, Chao, E-mail: chaolin@tongji.edu.cn [The Institute for Translational Nanomedicine, Shanghai East Hospital, Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Nanoscience, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Wang, Peijun, E-mail: tjpjwang@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200065 (China)

    2016-08-01

    Theranostic nano-polyplexes containing gene and imaging agents hold a great promise for tumor diagnosis and therapy. In this work, we develop a group of new gadolinium (Gd)-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide)s for gene delivery and T{sub 1}-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Cationic poly(urethane amide)s (denoted as CPUAs) having multiple disulfide bonds, urethane and amide linkages were synthesized by stepwise polycondensation reaction between 1,4-bis(3-aminopropyl)piperazine and a mixture of di(4-nitrophenyl)-2, 2′-dithiodiethanocarbonate (DTDE-PNC) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) dianhydride at varied molar ratios. Then, Gd-chelated CPUAs (denoted as GdCPUAs) were produced by chelating Gd(III) ions with DTPA residues of CPUAs. These GdCPUAs could condense gene into nanosized and positively-charged polyplexes in a physiological condition and, however, liberated gene in an intracellular reductive environment. In vitro transfection experiments revealed that the GdCPUA at a DTDE-PNC/DTPA residue molar ratio of 85/15 induced the highest transfection efficiency in different cancer cells. This efficiency was higher than that yielded with 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine as a positive control. GdCPUAs and their polyplexes exhibited low cytotoxicity when an optimal transfection activity was detected. Moreover, GdCPUAs may serve as contrast agents for T{sub 1}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The results of this work indicate that biodegradable Gd-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide) copolymers have high potential for tumor theranostics. - Highlights: • Novel cationic gadolinium-chelated poly(urethane amide)s (GdCPUAs) are prepared. • GdCPUAs can induce a high transfection efficacy in different cancer cells. • GdCPUAs reveal good cyto-compatibility against cancer cells. • GdCPUAs may be applied as T{sub 1}-contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. • GdCPUAs hold high potential for cancer theranostics.

  11. Backbone dynamics of a model membrane protein: measurement of individual amide hydrogen-exchange rates in detergent-solubilized M13 coat protein using 13C NMR hydrogen/deuterium isotope shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, G.D.; Weiner, J.H.; Sykes, B.D.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogen-exchange rates have been measured for individual assigned amide protons in M13 coat protein, a 50-residue integral membrane protein, using a 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) equilibrium isotope shift technique. The locations of the more rapidly exchanging amides have been determined. In D 2 O solutions, a peptide carbonyl resonance undergoes a small upfield isotope shift (0.08-0.09 ppm) from its position in H 2 O solutions; in 1:1 H 2 O/D 2 O mixtures, the carbonyl line shape is determined by the exchange rate at the adjacent nitrogen atom. M13 coat protein was labeled biosynthetically with 13 C at the peptide carbonyls of alanine, glycine, phenylalanine, proline, and lysine, and the exchange rates of 12 assigned amide protons in the hydrophilic regions were measured as a function of pH by using the isotope shift method. This equilibrium technique is sensitive to the more rapidly exchanging protons which are difficult to measure by classical exchange-out experiments. In proteins, structural factors, notably H bonding, can decrease the exchange rate of an amide proton by many orders of magnitude from that observed in the freely exposed amides of model peptides such as poly(DL-alanine). With corrections for sequence-related inductive effects, the retardation of amide exchange in sodium dodecyl sulfate solubilized coat protein has been calculated with respect to poly(DL-alanine). The most rapidly exchanging protons, which are retarded very little or not at all, are shown to occur at the N- and C-termini of the molecule. A model of the detergent-solubilized coat protein is constructed from these H-exchange data which is consistent with circular dichroism and other NMR results

  12. Conversion of Amides to Esters by the Nickel-Catalyzed Activation of Amide C–N Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hie, Liana; Fine Nathel, Noah F.; Shah, Tejas K.; Baker, Emma L.; Hong, Xin; Yang, Yun-Fang; Liu, Peng; Houk, K. N.; Garg, Neil K.

    2015-01-01

    Amides are common functional groups that have been well studied for more than a century.1 They serve as the key building blocks of proteins and are present in an broad range of other natural and synthetic compounds. Amides are known to be poor electrophiles, which is typically attributed to resonance stability of the amide bond.1,2 Whereas Nature can easily cleave amides through the action of enzymes, such as proteases,3 the ability to selectively break the C–N bond of an amide using synthetic chemistry is quite difficult. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that amide C–N bonds can be activated and cleaved using nickel catalysts. We have used this methodology to convert amides to esters, which is a challenging and underdeveloped transformation. The reaction methodology proceeds under exceptionally mild reaction conditions, and avoids the use of a large excess of an alcohol nucleophile. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations provide insight into the thermodynamics and catalytic cycle of this unusual transformation. Our results provide a new strategy to harness amide functional groups as synthons and are expected fuel the further use of amides for the construction of carbon–heteroatom or carbon–carbon bonds using non-precious metal catalysis. PMID:26200342

  13. Integrated beam orientation and scanning-spot optimization in intensity-modulated proton therapy for brain and unilateral head and neck tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wenbo; O'Connor, Daniel; Nguyen, Dan; Yu, Victoria Y; Ruan, Dan; Dong, Lei; Sheng, Ke

    2018-04-01

    Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) is the state-of-the-art method of delivering proton radiotherapy. Previous research has been mainly focused on optimization of scanning spots with manually selected beam angles. Due to the computational complexity, the potential benefit of simultaneously optimizing beam orientations and spot pattern could not be realized. In this study, we developed a novel integrated beam orientation optimization (BOO) and scanning-spot optimization algorithm for intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). A brain chordoma and three unilateral head-and-neck patients with a maximal target size of 112.49 cm 3 were included in this study. A total number of 1162 noncoplanar candidate beams evenly distributed across 4π steradians were included in the optimization. For each candidate beam, the pencil-beam doses of all scanning spots covering the PTV and a margin were calculated. The beam angle selection and spot intensity optimization problem was formulated to include three terms: a dose fidelity term to penalize the deviation of PTV and OAR doses from ideal dose distribution; an L1-norm sparsity term to reduce the number of active spots and improve delivery efficiency; a group sparsity term to control the number of active beams between 2 and 4. For the group sparsity term, convex L2,1-norm and nonconvex L2,1/2-norm were tested. For the dose fidelity term, both quadratic function and linearized equivalent uniform dose (LEUD) cost function were implemented. The optimization problem was solved using the Fast Iterative Shrinkage-Thresholding Algorithm (FISTA). The IMPT BOO method was tested on three head-and-neck patients and one skull base chordoma patient. The results were compared with IMPT plans created using column generation selected beams or manually selected beams. The L2,1-norm plan selected spatially aggregated beams, indicating potential degeneracy using this norm. L2,1/2-norm was able to select spatially separated beams and achieve

  14. Photoinduced gelation by stilbene oxalyl amide compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljanić, Snezana; Frkanec, Leo; Meić, Zlatko; Zinić, Mladen

    2005-03-29

    Oxalyl amide derivatives bearing 4-dodecyloxy-stilbene as a cis-trans photoisomerizing unit were synthesized. The trans derivative acted as a versatile gelator of various organic solvents, whereas the corresponding cis derivative showed a poor gelation ability or none at all. In diluted solution (c = 2.0 x10(-5) mol dm(-3), ethanol), the cis isomer was photochemically converted into the trans isomer within 4 min. Depending on the radiation wavelength, the trans isomer was stable or liable to photodecomposition. When exposed to irradiation, a concentrated solution of the cis isomer (c = 2.0 x 10(-2) mol dm(-3), ethanol) turned into a gel. The FT-Raman, FT-IR, and 1H NMR spectra demonstrated that the gelation process occurred because of a rapid cis --> trans photoisomerization followed by a self-assembly of the trans molecules. Apart from the formation of hydrogen bonding between the oxalyl amide parts of the molecules, confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy, it was assumed that the pi-pi stacking between the trans-stilbene units of the molecule and a lipophilic interaction between long alkyl chains were the interactions responsible for gelation.

  15. Amide-N-oxide heterosynthon and amide dimer homosynthon in cocrystals of carboxamide drugs and pyridine N-oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, N Jagadeesh; Reddy, L Sreenivas; Nangia, Ashwini

    2007-01-01

    The carboxamide-pyridine N-oxide heterosynthon is sustained by syn(amide)N-H...O-(oxide) hydrogen bond and auxiliary (N-oxide)C-H...O(amide) interaction (Reddy, L. S.; Babu, N. J.; Nangia, A. Chem. Commun. 2006, 1369). We evaluate the scope and utility of this heterosynthon in amide-containing molecules and drugs (active pharmaceutical ingredients, APIs) with pyridine N-oxide cocrystal former molecules (CCFs). Out of 10 cocrystals in this study and 7 complexes from previous work, amide-N-oxide heterosynthon is present in 12 structures and amide dimer homosynthon occurs in 5 structures. The amide dimer is favored over amide-N-oxide synthon in cocrystals when there is competition from another H-bonding functional group, e.g., 4-hydroxybenzamide, or because of steric factors, as in carbamazepine API. The molecular organization in carbamazepine.quinoxaline N,N'-dioxide 1:1 cocrystal structure is directed by amide homodimer and anti(amide)N-H...O-(oxide) hydrogen bond. Its X-ray crystal structure matches with the third lowest energy frame calculated in Polymorph Predictor (Cerius(2), COMPASS force field). Apart from generating new and diverse supramolecular structures, hydration is controlled in one substance. 4-Picoline N-oxide deliquesces within a day, but its cocrystal with barbital does not absorb moisture at 50% RH and 30 degrees C up to four weeks. Amide-N-oxide heterosynthon has potential utility in both amide and N-oxide type drug molecules with complementary CCFs. Its occurrence probability in the Cambridge Structural Database is 87% among 27 structures without competing acceptors and 78% in 41 structures containing OH, NH, H(2)O functional groups.

  16. Fatty acid amides from freshwater green alga Rhizoclonium hieroglyphicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembitsky, V M; Shkrob, I; Rozentsvet, O A

    2000-08-01

    Freshwater green algae Rhizoclonium hieroglyphicum growing in the Ural Mountains were examined for their fatty acid amides using capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Eight fatty acid amides were identified by GC-MS. (Z)-9-octadecenamide was found to be the major component (2.26%).

  17. Oxidative activation of dihydropyridine amides to reactive acyl donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Erik Daa; Trads, Julie Brender; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2015-01-01

    Amides of 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP) are activated by oxidation for acyl transfer to amines, alcohols and thiols. In the reduced form the DHP amide is stable towards reaction with amines at room temperature. However, upon oxidation with DDQ the acyl donor is activated via a proposed pyridinium...

  18. Cytotoxic Amides from Fruits of Kawakawa, Macropiper excelsum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jeremy; Burgess, Elaine J; Richardson, Alistair T B; Hawkins, Bill C; Baird, Sarah K; Smallfield, Bruce M; van Klink, John W; Perry, Nigel B

    2015-08-01

    Cytotoxic amides have been isolated from the fruits of the endemic New Zealand medicinal plant kawakawa, Macropiper excelsum (Piperaceae). The main amide was piperchabamide A and this is the first report of this rare compound outside the genus Piper. Eleven other amides were purified including two new compounds with the unusual 3,4-dihydro-1(2H)-pyridinyl group. The new compounds were fully characterized by 2D NMR spectroscopy, which showed a slow exchange between two rotamers about the amide bond, and they were chemically synthesized. In view of the antitumor activity of the related piperlongumine, all of these amides plus four synthetic analogs were tested for cytotoxicity. The most active was the piperine homolog piperdardine, with an IC50 of 14 µM against HT 29 colon cancer cells. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Biosynthesis and function of simple amides in Xenorhabdus doucetiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Edna; He, Yue; Vo, Tien Duy; Schultz, Roland; Kaiser, Marcel; Bode, Helge B

    2017-11-01

    Xenorhabdus doucetiae, the bacterial symbiont of the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema diaprepesi produces several different fatty acid amides. Their biosynthesis has been studied using a combination of analysis of gene deletions and promoter exchanges in X. doucetiae and heterologous expression of candidate genes in E. coli. While a decarboxylase is required for the formation of all observed phenylethylamides and tryptamides, the acyltransferase XrdE encoded in the xenorhabdin biosynthesis gene cluster is responsible for the formation of short chain acyl amides. Additionally, new, long-chain and cytotoxic acyl amides were identified in X. doucetiae infected insects and when X. doucetiae was grown in Galleria Instant Broth (GIB). When the bioactivity of selected amides was tested, a quorum sensing modulating activity was observed for the short chain acyl amides against the two different quorum sensing systems from Chromobacterium and Janthinobacterium. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Experimental and theoretical understanding of the gas phase oxidation of atmospheric amides with OH radicals: kinetics, products, and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borduas, Nadine; da Silva, Gabriel; Murphy, Jennifer G; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2015-05-14

    Atmospheric amides have primary and secondary sources and are present in ambient air at low pptv levels. To better assess the fate of amides in the atmosphere, the room temperature (298 ± 3 K) rate coefficients of five different amides with OH radicals were determined in a 1 m(3) smog chamber using online proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Formamide, the simplest amide, has a rate coefficient of (4.44 ± 0.46) × 10(-12) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1) against OH, translating to an atmospheric lifetime of ∼1 day. N-methylformamide, N-methylacetamide and propanamide, alkyl versions of formamide, have rate coefficients of (10.1 ± 0.6) × 10(-12), (5.42 ± 0.19) × 10(-12), and (1.78 ± 0.43) × 10(-12) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1), respectively. Acetamide was also investigated, but due to its slow oxidation kinetics, we report a range of (0.4-1.1) × 10(-12) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1) for its rate coefficient with OH radicals. Oxidation products were monitored and quantified and their time traces were fitted using a simple kinetic box model. To further probe the mechanism, ab initio calculations are used to identify the initial radical products of the amide reactions with OH. Our results indicate that N-H abstractions are negligible in all cases, in contrast to what is predicted by structure-activity relationships. Instead, the reactions proceed via C-H abstraction from alkyl groups and from formyl C(O)-H bonds when available. The latter process leads to radicals that can readily react with O2 to form isocyanates, explaining the detection of toxic compounds such as isocyanic acid (HNCO) and methyl isocyanate (CH3NCO). These contaminants of significant interest are primary oxidation products in the photochemical oxidation of formamide and N-methylformamide, respectively.

  1. Proton Therapy for Skull Base Chordomas: An Outcome Study from the University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute

    OpenAIRE

    Deraniyagala, Rohan L.; Yeung, Daniel; Mendenhall, William M.; Li, Zuofeng; Morris, Christopher G.; Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Okunieff, Paul; Malyapa, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Skull base chordoma is a rare, locally aggressive tumor located adjacent to critical structures. Gross total resection is difficult to achieve, and proton therapy has the conformal advantage of delivering a high postoperative dose to the tumor bed. We present our experience using proton therapy to treat 33 patients with skull base chordomas.

  2. Amide to Alkyne Interconversion via a Nickel/Copper-Catalyzed Deamidative Cross-Coupling of Aryl and Alkenyl Amides

    KAUST Repository

    Srimontree, Watchara

    2017-06-05

    A nickel-catalyzed deamidative cross-coupling reaction of amides with terminal alkynes as coupling partners was disclosed. This newly developed methodology allows the direct interconversion of amides to alkynes and enables a facile route for C(sp2)-C(sp) bond formation in a straightforward and mild fashion.

  3. Amide to Alkyne Interconversion via a Nickel/Copper-Catalyzed Deamidative Cross-Coupling of Aryl and Alkenyl Amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srimontree, Watchara; Chatupheeraphat, Adisak; Liao, Hsuan-Hung; Rueping, Magnus

    2017-06-16

    A nickel-catalyzed deamidative cross-coupling reaction of amides with terminal alkynes as coupling partners was disclosed. This newly developed methodology allows the direct interconversion of amides to alkynes and enables a facile route for C(sp2)-C(sp) bond formation in a straightforward and mild fashion.

  4. Amide to Alkyne Interconversion via a Nickel/Copper-Catalyzed Deamidative Cross-Coupling of Aryl and Alkenyl Amides

    KAUST Repository

    Srimontree, Watchara; Chatupheeraphat, Adisak; Liao, Hsuan-Hung; Rueping, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    A nickel-catalyzed deamidative cross-coupling reaction of amides with terminal alkynes as coupling partners was disclosed. This newly developed methodology allows the direct interconversion of amides to alkynes and enables a facile route for C(sp2)-C(sp) bond formation in a straightforward and mild fashion.

  5. Proton beam therapy how protons are revolutionizing cancer treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Yajnik, Santosh

    2013-01-01

    Proton beam therapy is an emerging technology with promise of revolutionizing the treatment of cancer. While nearly half of all patients diagnosed with cancer in the US receive radiation therapy, the majority is delivered via electron accelerators, where photons are used to irradiate cancerous tissue. Because of the physical properties of photon beams, photons may deposit energy along their entire path length through the body. On the other hand, a proton beam directed at a tumor travels in a straight trajectory towards its target, gives off most of its energy at a defined depth called the Bragg peak, and then stops. While photons often deposit more energy within the healthy tissues of the body than within the cancer itself, protons can deposit most of their cancer-killing energy within the area of the tumor. As a result, in the properly selected patients, proton beam therapy has the ability to improve cure rates by increasing the dose delivered to the tumor and simultaneously reduce side-effects by decreasing...

  6. Structural Characterization of N-Alkylated Twisted Amides: Consequences for Amide Bond Resonance and N-C Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Feng; Lalancette, Roger; Szostak, Michal

    2016-04-11

    Herein, we describe the first structural characterization of N-alkylated twisted amides prepared directly by N-alkylation of the corresponding non-planar lactams. This study provides the first experimental evidence that N-alkylation results in a dramatic increase of non-planarity around the amide N-C(O) bond. Moreover, we report a rare example of a molecular wire supported by the same amide C=O-Ag bonds. Reactivity studies demonstrate rapid nucleophilic addition to the N-C(O) moiety of N-alkylated amides, indicating the lack of n(N) to π*(C=O) conjugation. Most crucially, we demonstrate that N-alkylation activates the otherwise unreactive amide bond towards σ N-C cleavage by switchable coordination. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Stereospecific assignment of the NH2 resonances from the primary amides of asparagine and glutamine side chains in isotopically labeled proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntosh, Lawrence P.; Brun, Emmanuel; Kay, Lewis E.

    1997-01-01

    An HMQC-based pulse scheme is presented for the stereospecific assignment of asparagine and glutamine side-chain amide protons. The approach makes use of the recently developed quantitative-J correlation spectroscopy [Bax, A. et al. (1994) Methods Enzymol., 239,79-105] to distinguish the E and Z primary amide protons and, as such, eliminates the need for assignments derived from more time-consuming and potentially ambiguous NOE methods. An application of this method to a uniformly 15N,13C-labeled cellulose-binding domain is presented. When used in combination with a NOESY-HSQC experiment, the predominant χ2 dihedral angles of two asparagine side chains in this protein can also be defined

  8. Cytotoxic cassaine diterpenoid-diterpenoid amide dimers and diterpenoid amides from the leaves of Erythrophleum fordii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Dan; Qu, Jing; Wang, Jia-Ming; Yu, Shi-Shan; Chen, Xiao-Guang; Xu, Song; Ma, Shuang-Gang; Li, Yong; Ding, Guang-Zhi; Fang, Lei

    2010-10-01

    Detailed phytochemical investigation from the leaves of Erythrophleum fordii resulted in the isolation of 13 compounds, including three cassaine diterpenoid-diterpenoid amide dimers (1, 3 and 5), and seven cassaine diterpenoid amides (6 and 8-13), together with three previously reported ones, erythrophlesins D (2), C (4) and 3beta-hydroxynorerythrosuamide (7). Compounds 1, 3 and 5 are further additions to the small group of cassaine diterpenoid dimers represented by erythrophlesins A-D. Their structures were determined by analysis of extensive one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments and ESIMS methods. Cytotoxic activities of the isolated compounds were tested against HCT-8, Bel-7402, BGC-823, A549 and A2780 human cancer cell lines in the MTT test. Results showed that compounds 1 and 3-5 exhibited significantly selective cytotoxic activities (IC(50)<10 microM) against these cells, respectively. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Catalytic alkylation of remote C-H bonds enabled by proton-coupled electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gilbert J; Zhu, Qilei; Miller, David C; Gu, Carol J; Knowles, Robert R

    2016-11-10

    Despite advances in hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) catalysis, there are currently no molecular HAT catalysts that are capable of homolysing the strong nitrogen-hydrogen (N-H) bonds of N-alkyl amides. The motivation to develop amide homolysis protocols stems from the utility of the resultant amidyl radicals, which are involved in various synthetically useful transformations, including olefin amination and directed carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bond functionalization. In the latter process-a subset of the classical Hofmann-Löffler-Freytag reaction-amidyl radicals remove hydrogen atoms from unactivated aliphatic C-H bonds. Although powerful, these transformations typically require oxidative N-prefunctionalization of the amide starting materials to achieve efficient amidyl generation. Moreover, because these N-activating groups are often incorporated into the final products, these methods are generally not amenable to the direct construction of carbon-carbon (C-C) bonds. Here we report an approach that overcomes these limitations by homolysing the N-H bonds of N-alkyl amides via proton-coupled electron transfer. In this protocol, an excited-state iridium photocatalyst and a weak phosphate base cooperatively serve to remove both a proton and an electron from an amide substrate in a concerted elementary step. The resultant amidyl radical intermediates are shown to promote subsequent C-H abstraction and radical alkylation steps. This C-H alkylation represents a catalytic variant of the Hofmann-Löffler-Freytag reaction, using simple, unfunctionalized amides to direct the formation of new C-C bonds. Given the prevalence of amides in pharmaceuticals and natural products, we anticipate that this method will simplify the synthesis and structural elaboration of amine-containing targets. Moreover, this study demonstrates that concerted proton-coupled electron transfer can enable homolytic activation of common organic functional groups that are energetically inaccessible using

  10. Benzoylureas as removable cis amide inducers: synthesis of cyclic amides via ring closing metathesis (RCM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Ryan M; Khakham, Yelena; Lessene, Guillaume; Baell, Jonathan B

    2011-02-07

    Rapid and high yielding synthesis of medium ring lactams was made possible through the use of a benzoylurea auxiliary that serves to stabilize a cisoid amide conformation, facilitating cyclization. The auxiliary is released after activation under the mild conditions required to deprotect a primary amine, such as acidolysis of a Boc group in the examples given here. This methodology is a promising tool for the synthesis of medium ring lactams, macrocyclic natural products and peptides.

  11. Proton channels and exchangers in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spugnini, Enrico Pierluigi; Sonveaux, Pierre; Stock, Christian; Perez-Sayans, Mario; De Milito, Angelo; Avnet, Sofia; Garcìa, Abel Garcìa; Harguindey, Salvador; Fais, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    Although cancer is characterized by an intratumoral genetic heterogeneity, a totally deranged pH control is a common feature of most cancer histotypes. Major determinants of aberrant pH gradient in cancer are proton exchangers and transporters, including V-ATPase, Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE), monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) and carbonic anhydrases (CAs). Thanks to the activity of these proton transporters and exchangers, cancer becomes isolated and/or protected not only from the body reaction against the growing tumor, but also from the vast majority of drugs that when protonated into the acidic tumor microenvironment do not enter into cancer cells. Proton transporters and exchangers represent a key feature tumor cells use to survive in the very hostile microenvironmental conditions that they create and maintain. Detoxifying mechanisms may thus represent both a key survival option and a selection outcome for cells that behave as unicellular microorganisms rather than belonging to an organ, compartment or body. It is, in fact, typical of malignant tumors that, after a clinically measurable yet transient initial response to a therapy, resistant tumor clones emerge and proliferate, thus bursting a more malignant behavior and rapid tumor progression. This review critically presents the background of a novel and efficient approach that aims to fight cancer through blocking or inhibiting well characterized proton exchangers and transporters active in human cancer cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Naturally occurring antifungal aromatic esters and amides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, M.S.; Shahnaz; Tabassum, S.; Ogunwande, I.A.; Pervez, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    During the search of antifungal natural products from terrestrial plants, a new long chained aromatic ester named grandiflorate along with spatazoate from Portulaca grandiflora and N-[2-methoxy-2-(4-methoxyphenyl) ethyl]-trans-cinnamide and aegeline from Solanum erianthum of Nigeria were isolated and tested against six fungal species. The known constituents have not been reported so far from mentioned investigated plants. Structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated with the aid of spectroscopic techniques including two dimensional NMR experiments. Among the compounds, the esters found more potent than amides against Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus. The new compound grandiflorate gave response against all tested fungal species while aegeline was found to give lowest inhibition during this study. (author)

  13. Naturally occurring antifungal aromatic esters and amides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, M S; Shahnaz,; Tabassum, S; Ogunwande, I A; Pervez, M K [University of Karachi (Pakistan). HEJ Research Inst. of Chemistry, International Centre for Chemical and Biological Sciences

    2010-08-15

    During the search of antifungal natural products from terrestrial plants, a new long chained aromatic ester named grandiflorate along with spatazoate from Portulaca grandiflora and N-[2-methoxy-2-(4-methoxyphenyl) ethyl]-trans-cinnamide and aegeline from Solanum erianthum of Nigeria were isolated and tested against six fungal species. The known constituents have not been reported so far from mentioned investigated plants. Structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated with the aid of spectroscopic techniques including two dimensional NMR experiments. Among the compounds, the esters found more potent than amides against Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus. The new compound grandiflorate gave response against all tested fungal species while aegeline was found to give lowest inhibition during this study. (author)

  14. SU-G-IeP1-07: Inaccuracy of Lesion Blood Flow Quantification Related to the Proton Density Reference Image in Arterial Spin Labeling MRI of Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jen, M; Johnson, J; Hou, P; Liu, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Cerebral blood flow quantification in arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI requires an estimate of the equilibrium magnetization of blood, which is often obtained by a set of proton density (PD) reference image. Normally, a constant blood-brain partition coefficient is assumed across the brain. However, this assumption may not be valid for brain lesions. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of lesion-related PD variations on ASL quantification in patients with brain tumors. Methods: MR images for posttreatment evaluation of 42 patients with brain tumors were retrospectively analyzed. These images were acquired on a 3T MRI scanner, including T2-weighted FLAIR, 3D pseudo-continuous ASL and post-contrast T1-weighted images. Anatomical images were coregistered with ASL images using the SPM software. Regions of interest (ROIs) of the enhancing and FLAIR lesions were manually drawn on the coregistered images. ROIs of the contralateral normal appearing tissues were also determined, with the consideration of approximating coil sensitivity patterns in lesion ROIs. Relative lesion blood flow (lesion/contralateral tissue) was calculated from both the CBF map (dependent on the PD) and the ΔM map for comparison. Results: The signal intensities in both enhancing and FLAIR lesions were significantly different than contralateral tissues on the PD reference image (p<0.001). The percent signal difference ranged from −15.9 to 19.2%, with a mean of 5.4% for the enhancing lesion, and from −2.8 to 22.9% with a mean of 10.1% for the FLAIR lesion. The high/low lesion-related PD signal resulted in inversely proportional under-/over-estimation of blood flow in both enhancing and FLAIR lesions. Conclusion: Significant signal differences were found between lesions and contralateral tissues in the PD reference image, which introduced errors in blood flow quantification in ASL. The error can be up to 20% in individual patients with an average of 5- 10% for the group of patients

  15. SU-G-IeP1-07: Inaccuracy of Lesion Blood Flow Quantification Related to the Proton Density Reference Image in Arterial Spin Labeling MRI of Brain Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jen, M; Johnson, J; Hou, P; Liu, H [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Cerebral blood flow quantification in arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI requires an estimate of the equilibrium magnetization of blood, which is often obtained by a set of proton density (PD) reference image. Normally, a constant blood-brain partition coefficient is assumed across the brain. However, this assumption may not be valid for brain lesions. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of lesion-related PD variations on ASL quantification in patients with brain tumors. Methods: MR images for posttreatment evaluation of 42 patients with brain tumors were retrospectively analyzed. These images were acquired on a 3T MRI scanner, including T2-weighted FLAIR, 3D pseudo-continuous ASL and post-contrast T1-weighted images. Anatomical images were coregistered with ASL images using the SPM software. Regions of interest (ROIs) of the enhancing and FLAIR lesions were manually drawn on the coregistered images. ROIs of the contralateral normal appearing tissues were also determined, with the consideration of approximating coil sensitivity patterns in lesion ROIs. Relative lesion blood flow (lesion/contralateral tissue) was calculated from both the CBF map (dependent on the PD) and the ΔM map for comparison. Results: The signal intensities in both enhancing and FLAIR lesions were significantly different than contralateral tissues on the PD reference image (p<0.001). The percent signal difference ranged from −15.9 to 19.2%, with a mean of 5.4% for the enhancing lesion, and from −2.8 to 22.9% with a mean of 10.1% for the FLAIR lesion. The high/low lesion-related PD signal resulted in inversely proportional under-/over-estimation of blood flow in both enhancing and FLAIR lesions. Conclusion: Significant signal differences were found between lesions and contralateral tissues in the PD reference image, which introduced errors in blood flow quantification in ASL. The error can be up to 20% in individual patients with an average of 5- 10% for the group of patients

  16. Proton minibeam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girst, Stefanie

    2016-03-08

    The risk of developing adverse side effects in the normal tissue after radiotherapy is often limiting for the dose that can be applied to the tumor. Proton minibeam radiotherapy, a spatially fractionated radiotherapy method using sub-millimeter proton beams, similar to grid therapy or microbeam radiation radiotherapy (MRT) using X-rays, has recently been invented at the ion microprobe SNAKE in Munich. The aim of this new concept is to minimize normal tissue injuries in the entrance channel and especially in the skin by irradiating only a small percentage of the cells in the total irradiation field, while maintaining tumor control via a homogeneous dose in the tumor, just like in conventional broad beam radiotherapy. This can be achieved by optimizing minibeam sizes and distances according to the prevailing tumor size and depth such that after widening of the minibeams due to proton interactions in the tissue, the overlapping minibeams produce a homogeneous dose distribution throughout the tumor. The aim of this work was to elucidate the prospects of minibeam radiation therapy compared to conventional homogeneous broad beam radiotherapy in theory and in experimental studies at the ion microprobe SNAKE. Treatment plans for model tumors of different sizes and depths were created using the planning software LAPCERR, to elaborate suitable minibeam sizes and distances for the individual tumors. Radiotherapy-relevant inter-beam distances required to obtain a homogeneous dose in the target volume were found to be in the millimeter range. First experiments using proton minibeams of only 10 μm and 50 μm size (termed microchannels in the corresponding publication Zlobinskaya et al. 2013) and therapy-conform larger dimensions of 100 μm and 180 μm were performed in the artificial human in-vitro skin model EpiDermFT trademark (MatTek). The corresponding inter-beam distances were 500 μm, 1mm and 1.8 mm, respectively, leading to irradiation of only a few percent of the cells

  17. Proton decay theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Topics include minimal SU(5) predictions, gauge boson mediated proton decay, uncertainties in tau/sub p/, Higgs scalar effects, proton decay via Higgs scalars, supersymmetric SU(5), dimension 5 operators and proton decay, and Higgs scalars and proton decay

  18. The clinical case for proton beam therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foote Robert L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over the past 20 years, several proton beam treatment programs have been implemented throughout the United States. Increasingly, the number of new programs under development is growing. Proton beam therapy has the potential for improving tumor control and survival through dose escalation. It also has potential for reducing harm to normal organs through dose reduction. However, proton beam therapy is more costly than conventional x-ray therapy. This increased cost may be offset by improved function, improved quality of life, and reduced costs related to treating the late effects of therapy. Clinical research opportunities are abundant to determine which patients will gain the most benefit from proton beam therapy. We review the clinical case for proton beam therapy. Summary sentence Proton beam therapy is a technically advanced and promising form of radiation therapy.

  19. The clinical case for proton beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foote, Robert L; Haddock, Michael G; Yan, Elizabeth; Laack, Nadia N; Arndt, Carola A S

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, several proton beam treatment programs have been implemented throughout the United States. Increasingly, the number of new programs under development is growing. Proton beam therapy has the potential for improving tumor control and survival through dose escalation. It also has potential for reducing harm to normal organs through dose reduction. However, proton beam therapy is more costly than conventional x-ray therapy. This increased cost may be offset by improved function, improved quality of life, and reduced costs related to treating the late effects of therapy. Clinical research opportunities are abundant to determine which patients will gain the most benefit from proton beam therapy. We review the clinical case for proton beam therapy. Proton beam therapy is a technically advanced and promising form of radiation therapy

  20. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jongen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Ideal radiotherapy deposits a large amount of energy in the tumour volume, and none in the surrounding healthy tissues. Proton therapy comes closer to this goal because of a greater concentration of dose, well defined proton ranges and points of energy release which are precisely known - the Bragg peak1. In the past, the development of clinical proton therapy has been hampered by complexity, size, and cost. To be clinically effective, energies of several hundred MeV are required; these were previously unavailable for hospital installations, and pioneering institutions had to work with complex, inadequate equipment originally intended for nuclear physics research. Recently a number of specialist organizations and commercial companies have been working on dedicated systems for proton therapy. One, IBA of Belgium, has equipment for inhouse hospital operation which encompasses a complete therapy centre, delivered as a turnkey package and incorporating a compact, automated, higher energy cyclotron with isocentric gantries. Their system will be installed at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. The proton therapy system comprises: - a 235 MeV isochronous cyclotron to deliver beams of up to 1.5 microamps, but with a hardware limitation to restrict the maximum possible dose; - variable energy beam (235 to 70 MeV ) with energy spread and emittance verification; - a beam transport and switching system to connect the exit of the energy selection system to the entrances of a number of gantries and fixed beamlines. Along the beam transport system, the beam characteristics are monitored with non-interceptive multiwire ionization chambers for automatic tuning; - gantries fitted with nozzles and beamline elements for beam control; both beam scattering and beam wobbling techniques are available for shaping the beam;

  1. New organic semiconductors with imide/amide-containing molecular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zitong; Zhang, Guanxin; Cai, Zhengxu; Chen, Xin; Luo, Hewei; Li, Yonghai; Wang, Jianguo; Zhang, Deqing

    2014-10-29

    Due to their high electron affinities, chemical and thermal stabilities, π-conjugated molecules with imide/amide frameworks have received considerable attentions as promising candidates for high-performance optoelectronic materials, particularly for organic semiconductors with high carrier mobilities. The purpose of this Research News is to give an overview of recent advances in development of high performance imide/amide based organic semiconductors for field-effect transistors. It covers naphthalene diimide-, perylene diimide- and amide-based conjugated molecules and polymers for organic semiconductors. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Biosynthesis, degradation, and pharmacological importance of the fatty acid amides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Emma K.; Merkler, David J.

    2008-01-01

    The identification of two biologically active fatty acid amides, N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide) and oleamide, has generated a great deal of excitement and stimulated considerable research. However, anandamide and oleamide are merely the best-known and best-understood members of a much larger family of biologically-occurring fatty acid amides. In this review, we will outline which fatty acid amides have been isolated from mammalian sources, detail what is known about how these molecules are made and degraded in vivo, and highlight their potential for the development of novel therapeutics. PMID:18598910

  3. Picosecond thermometer in the amide I band of myoglobin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, R.H.; Xie, A.; Meer, L. van der

    2005-01-01

    The amide I and II bands in myoglobin show a heterogeneous temperature dependence, with bands at 6.17 and 6.43 mu m which are more intense at low temperatures. The amide I band temperature dependence is on the long wavelength edge of the band, while the short wavelength side has almost...... can be used to determine the time it takes vibrational energy to flow into the hydration shell. We determine that vibrational energy flow to the hydration shell from the amide I takes approximately 20 ps to occur....

  4. A reduced-amide inhibitor of Pin1 binds in a conformation resembling a twisted-amide transition state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoyan G; Zhang, Yan; Mercedes-Camacho, Ana Y; Etzkorn, Felicia A

    2011-11-08

    The mechanism of the cell cycle regulatory peptidyl prolyl isomerase (PPIase), Pin1, was investigated using reduced-amide inhibitors designed to mimic the twisted-amide transition state. Inhibitors, R-pSer-Ψ[CH(2)N]-Pro-2-(indol-3-yl)ethylamine, 1 [R = fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc)] and 2 (R = Ac), of Pin1 were synthesized and bioassayed. Inhibitor 1 had an IC(50) value of 6.3 μM, which is 4.5-fold better for Pin1 than our comparable ground-state analogue, a cis-amide alkene isostere-containing inhibitor. The change of Fmoc to Ac in 2 improved aqueous solubility for structural determination and resulted in an IC(50) value of 12 μM. The X-ray structure of the complex of 2 bound to Pin1 was determined to 1.76 Å resolution. The structure revealed that the reduced amide adopted a conformation similar to the proposed twisted-amide transition state of Pin1, with a trans-pyrrolidine conformation of the prolyl ring. A similar conformation of substrate would be destabilized relative to the planar amide conformation. Three additional reduced amides, with Thr replacing Ser and l- or d-pipecolate (Pip) replacing Pro, were slightly weaker inhibitors of Pin1.

  5. Reduced-Amide Inhibitor of Pin1 Binds in a Conformation Resembling a Twisted-Amide Transition State†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoyan G.; Zhang, Yan; Mercedes-Camacho, Ana Y.; Etzkorn, Felicia A.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of the cell cycle regulatory peptidyl prolyl isomerase (PPIase), Pin1, was investigated using reduced-amide inhibitors designed to mimic the twisted-amide transition state. Inhibitors, R–pSer–Ψ[CH2N]–Pro–2-(indol-3-yl)-ethylamine, 1 (R = fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl, Fmoc), and 2 (R = Ac), of Pin1 were synthesized and bioassayed. Inhibitor 1 had an IC50 value of 6.3 μM, which is 4.5-fold better inhibition for Pin1 than our comparable ground state analogue, a cis-amide alkene isostere containing inhibitor. The change of Fmoc to Ac in 2 improved aqueous solubility for structural determination, and resulted in an IC50 value of 12 μM. The X-ray structure of the complex of 2 bound to Pin1 was determined to 1.76 Å resolution. The structure revealed that the reduced amide adopted a conformation similar to the proposed twisted-amide transition state of Pin1, with a trans-pyrrolidine conformation of the prolyl ring. A similar conformation of substrate would be destabilized relative to the planar amide conformation. Three additional reduced amides, with Thr replacing Ser, and l- or d-pipecolate (Pip) replacing Pro, were slightly weaker inhibitors of Pin1. PMID:21980916

  6. Proton therapy project at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, K.; Akanuma, A.; Karasawa, K.

    1990-01-01

    Particle radiation which might present steeper dose distribution has received much attention as the third particle facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland. Proton conformation with sharp fall-off is considered to be the radiation beam suitable for confining high doses to a target volume without complications and for verifying which factor out of high RBE or physical dose distribution is more essential for local control in malignant tumors. This paper discusses the current status of the spot scanning method, which allows three dimensional conformation radiotherapy, and preliminary results. Preliminary dose distribution with proton conformation technique was acquired by modifying a computer program for treatment planning in pion treatment. In a patient with prostate carcinoma receiving both proton and pion radiation therapy, proton conformation was found to confine high doses to the target area and spare both the bladder and rectum well; and pion therapy was found to deliver non-homogeneous radiation to these organs. Although there are some obstacles in the proton project at PSI, experimental investigations are encouraging. The dynamic spot scanning method with combination of the kicker magnet, wobbler magnet, range shifter, patient transporter, and position sensitive monitor provides highly confined dose distribution, making it possible to increase total doses and thus to improve local control rate. Proton confirmation is considered to be useful for verifying possible biological effectiveness of negative pion treatment of PSI as well. (N.K.)

  7. Neutral glycoconjugated amide-based calix[4]arenes: complexation of alkali metal cations in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cindro, Nikola; Požar, Josip; Barišić, Dajana; Bregović, Nikola; Pičuljan, Katarina; Tomaš, Renato; Frkanec, Leo; Tomišić, Vladislav

    2018-02-07

    Cation complexation in water presents a unique challenge in calixarene chemistry, mostly due to the fact that a vast majority of calixarene-based cation receptors is not soluble in water or their solubility has been achieved by introducing functionalities capable of (de)protonation. Such an approach inevitably involves the presence of counterions which compete with target cations for the calixarene binding site, and also rather often requires the use of ion-containing buffer solutions in order to control the pH. Herein we devised a new strategy towards the solution of this problem, based on introducing carbohydrate units at the lower or upper rim of calix[4]arenes which comprise efficient cation binding sites. In this context, we prepared neutral, water-soluble receptors with secondary or tertiary amide coordinating groups, and studied their complexation with alkali metal cations in aqueous and methanol (for the comparison purpose) solutions. Complexation thermodynamics was quantitatively characterized by UV spectrometry and isothermal titration calorimetry, revealing that one of the prepared tertiary amide derivatives is capable of remarkably efficient (log K ≈ 5) and selective binding of sodium cations among alkali metal cations in water. Given the ease of the synthetic procedure used, and thus the variety of accessible analogues, this study can serve as a platform for the development of reagents for diverse purposes in aqueous media.

  8. Imaging of endogenous exchangeable proton signals in the human brain using frequency labeled exchange transfer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Nirbhay N; Jones, Craig K; Hua, Jun; Xu, Jiadi; van Zijl, Peter C M

    2013-04-01

    To image endogenous exchangeable proton signals in the human brain using a recently reported method called frequency labeled exchange transfer (FLEX) MRI. As opposed to labeling exchangeable protons using saturation (i.e., chemical exchange saturation transfer, or CEST), FLEX labels exchangeable protons with their chemical shift evolution. The use of short high-power frequency pulses allows more efficient labeling of rapidly exchanging protons, while time domain acquisition allows removal of contamination from semi-solid magnetization transfer effects. FLEX-based exchangeable proton signals were detected in human brain over the 1-5 ppm frequency range from water. Conventional magnetization transfer contrast and the bulk water signal did not interfere in the FLEX spectrum. The information content of these signals differed from in vivo CEST data in that the average exchange rate of these signals was 350-400 s(-1) , much faster than the amide signal usually detected using direct saturation (∼30 s(-1) ). Similarly, fast exchanging protons could be detected in egg white in the same frequency range where amide and amine protons of mobile proteins and peptides are known to resonate. FLEX MRI in the human brain preferentially detects more rapidly exchanging amide/amine protons compared to traditional CEST experiments, thereby changing the information content of the exchangeable proton spectrum. This has the potential to open up different types of endogenous applications as well as more easy detection of rapidly exchanging protons in diaCEST agents or fast exchanging units such as water molecules in paracest agents without interference of conventional magnetization transfer contrast. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. New and Efficient Synthesis of Amides from Acid Chlorides Using Diisobutyl(amino)aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Kyo; Shin, Won Kyu; An, Duk Keun [Kangwon National Univ., Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    In conclusion, we have developed a facile, alternative method for the formation of secondary and tertiary amides including morpholine amides from acid chlorides by using diisobutyl(amino)aluminum under mild reaction conditions. The advantages of the present method include the high product yields, simple experimental procedure, short reaction time (10 min), and the fact that an excess amount of amine is not required. This result suggests that our new method can provide an alternative method for the synthesis of useful amides from acid chlorides. Amides are valuable functional groups in biological, agrochemical, and pharmaceutical molecules. Several amides such as Weinreb amides, morpholine amides, and pyrrolidine amides are useful intermediates for the synthesis of aldehydes or ketones. Among them, morpholine amides are a cheap and good substitute for Weinreb amides.

  10. New and Efficient Synthesis of Amides from Acid Chlorides Using Diisobutyl(amino)aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Kyo; Shin, Won Kyu; An, Duk Keun

    2013-01-01

    In conclusion, we have developed a facile, alternative method for the formation of secondary and tertiary amides including morpholine amides from acid chlorides by using diisobutyl(amino)aluminum under mild reaction conditions. The advantages of the present method include the high product yields, simple experimental procedure, short reaction time (10 min), and the fact that an excess amount of amine is not required. This result suggests that our new method can provide an alternative method for the synthesis of useful amides from acid chlorides. Amides are valuable functional groups in biological, agrochemical, and pharmaceutical molecules. Several amides such as Weinreb amides, morpholine amides, and pyrrolidine amides are useful intermediates for the synthesis of aldehydes or ketones. Among them, morpholine amides are a cheap and good substitute for Weinreb amides

  11. Efficient Synthesis of Single-Chain Polymer Nanoparticles via Amide Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Sanchez-Sanchez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-chain technology (SCT allows the transformation of individual polymer chains to folded/collapsed unimolecular soft nanoparticles. In this work we contribute to the enlargement of the SCT toolbox by demonstrating the efficient synthesis of single-chain polymer nanoparticles (SCNPs via intrachain amide formation. In particular, we exploit cross-linking between active methylene groups and isocyanate moieties as powerful “click” chemistry driving force for SCNP construction. By employing poly(methyl methacrylate- (PMMA- based copolymers bearing β-ketoester units distributed randomly along the copolymer chains and bifunctional isocyanate cross-linkers, SCNPs were successfully synthesized at r.t. under appropriate reaction conditions. Characterization of the resulting SCNPs was carried out by means of a combination of techniques including size exclusion chromatography (SEC, infrared (IR spectroscopy, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS, and elemental analysis (EA.

  12. NMR structure of the glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide fragment, GIP(1-30)amide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alana, Inigo; Hewage, Chandralal M.; G. Malthouse, J. Paul; Parker, Jeremy C.; Gault, Victor A.; O'Harte, Finbarr P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide is an incretin hormone that stimulates insulin secretion and reduces postprandial glycaemic excursions. The glucose-dependent action of GIP on pancreatic β-cells has attracted attention towards its exploitation as a potential drug for type 2 diabetes. Use of NMR or X-ray crystallography is vital to determine the three-dimensional structure of the peptide. Therefore, to understand the basic structural requirements for the biological activity of GIP, the solution structure of the major biologically active fragment, GIP(1-30)amide, was investigated by proton NMR spectroscopy and molecular modelling. The structure is characterised by a full length α-helical conformation between residues F 6 and A 28 . This structural information could play an important role in the design of therapeutic agents based upon GIP receptor agonists

  13. AMIDE: A Free Software Tool for Multimodality Medical Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Markus Loening

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Amide's a Medical Image Data Examiner (AMIDE has been developed as a user-friendly, open-source software tool for displaying and analyzing multimodality volumetric medical images. Central to the package's abilities to simultaneously display multiple data sets (e.g., PET, CT, MRI and regions of interest is the on-demand data reslicing implemented within the program. Data sets can be freely shifted, rotated, viewed, and analyzed with the program automatically handling interpolation as needed from the original data. Validation has been performed by comparing the output of AMIDE with that of several existing software packages. AMIDE runs on UNIX, Macintosh OS X, and Microsoft Windows platforms, and it is freely available with source code under the terms of the GNU General Public License.

  14. Synthesis of amide isosteres of schweinfurthin-based stilbenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdale, David P; Beutler, John A; Wiemer, David F

    2017-10-15

    The schweinfurthins are plant-derived stilbenes with an intriguing profile of anti-cancer activity. To obtain analogues of the schweinfurthins that might preserve the biological activity but have greater water solubility, a formal replacement of the central olefin with an amide has been explored. Two pairs of amides have been prepared, each containing the same hexahydroxanthene "left half" joined through an amide linkage to two different "right halves." In each series, the amide has been inserted in both possible orientations, placing the carbonyl group on the tricyclic ABC ring system and the amine on the D-ring, or placing the amine on the hexahydroxanthene and the carbonyl group on the D-ring. The four new schweinfurthin analogues have been tested in the NCI 60 cell line screen, and in both cases the more active isomer carried the carbonyl group on the C-ring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. ‘Umpolung’ Reactivity in Semiaqueous Amide and Peptide Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bo; Makley, Dawn M.; Johnston, Jeffrey N.

    2010-01-01

    The amide functional group is one of Nature’s key functional and structural elements, most notably within peptides. Amides are also key intermediates in the preparation of a diverse range of therapeutic small molecules. Its construction using available methods focuses principally upon dehydrative approaches, although oxidative and radical-based methods are representative alternatives. During the carbon-nitrogen bond forming step in most every example, the carbon and nitrogen bear electrophilic and nucleophilic character, respectively. Here we show that activation of amines and nitroalkanes with an electrophilic iodine source in wet THF can lead directly to amide products. Preliminary observations support a mechanistic construct in which reactant polarity is reversed (umpolung) during C-N bond formation relative to traditional approaches. The use of nitroalkanes as acyl anion equivalents provides a conceptually innovative approach to amide and peptide synthesis, and one that might ultimately provide for efficient peptide synthesis that is fully reliant on enantioselective methods. PMID:20577205

  16. Synthesis and characterization of new optically active poly(amide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Synthesis and characterization of new optically active poly(amide-imide)s based on N -trimellitimido- ... Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia ... (DMAc), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) at room temperature.

  17. MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF SEVEN AMIDES BY SUSPENDED BACTERIAL POPULATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial transformation rate constants were determined for seven amides in natural pond water. A second-order mathematical rate expression served as the model for describing the microbial transformation. Also investigated was the relationship between the infrared spectra and the...

  18. Silver-catalyzed synthesis of amides from amines and aldehydes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madix, Robert J; Zhou, Ling; Xu, Bingjun; Friend, Cynthia M; Freyschlag, Cassandra G

    2014-11-18

    The invention provides a method for producing amides via the reaction of aldehydes and amines with oxygen adsorbed on a metallic silver or silver alloy catalyst. An exemplary reaction is shown in Scheme 1: (I), (II), (III). ##STR00001##

  19. Stability of Medium-Bridged Twisted Amides in Aqueous Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostak, Michal; Yao, Lei; Aubé, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    “Twisted” amides containing non-standard dihedral angles are typically hypersensitive to hydrolysis, a feature that has stringently limited their utility in water. We have synthesized a series of bridged lactams that contain a twisted amide linkage but which exhibit enhanced stability in aqueous environments. Many of these compounds were extracted unchanged from aqueous mixtures ranging from the strongly basic to the strongly acidic. NMR experiments showed that tricyclic lactams undergo reversible hydrolysis at extreme pH ranges, but that a number of compounds in this structure class are indefinitely stable under physiologically relevant pH conditions; one bicyclic example was additionally water-soluble. We examined the effect of structure on the reversibility of amide bond hydrolysis, which we attributed to the transannular nature of the amino acid analogs. These data suggest that medium-bridged lactams of these types should provide useful platforms for studying the behavior of twisted amides in aqueous systems. PMID:19178141

  20. Novel amide-based inhibitors of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watterson, Scott H; Liu, Chunjian; Dhar, T G Murali; Gu, Henry H; Pitts, William J; Barrish, Joel C; Fleener, Catherine A; Rouleau, Katherine; Sherbina, N Z; Hollenbaugh, Diane L; Iwanowicz, Edwin J

    2002-10-21

    A series of novel amide-based small molecule inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) was explored. The synthesis and the structure-activity relationships (SARs) derived from in vitro studies are described.

  1. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, Jan; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT)

  2. Conformation of antifreeze glycoproteins as determined from conformational energy calculations and fully assigned proton NMR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, C.A.; Rao, B.N.N.

    1986-01-01

    The 1 H NMR spectra of AFGP's ranging in molecular weight from 2600 to 30,000 Daltons isolated from several different species of polar fish have been measured. The spectrum of AFGP 1-4 from Pagothenia borchgrevinki with an average of 30 repeating subunits has a single resonance for each proton of the glycotripeptide repeating unit, (ala-[gal-(β-1→3) galNAc-(α--O-]thr-ala)/sub n/. Its 1 H NMR spectrum including resonances of the amide protons has been completely assigned. Coupling constants and nuclear Overhauser enhancements (n.O.e.) between protons on distant residues imply conformational order. The 2600 dalton molecular weight glycopeptides (AFGP-8) have pro in place of ala at certain specific points in the sequence and AFGP-8R of Eleginus gracilis has arg in place of one thr. The resonances of pro and arg were assigned by decoupling. The resonances of the carboxy and amino terminals have distinct chemical shifts and were assigned in AFGP-8 of Boreogadus saida by titration. n.O.e. between α--protons and amide protons of the adjacent residue (sequential n.O.e.) were used in assignments of additional resonances and to assign the distinctive resonances of thr followed by pro. Conformational energy calculations on the repeating glycotripeptide subunit of AFGP show that the α--glucosidic linkage has a fixed conformation while the β--linkage is less rigid. A conformational model for AFGP 1-4, which is based on the calculations has the peptide in an extended left-handed helix with three residues per turn similar to polyproline II. The model is consistent with CD data, amide proton coupling constants, temperature dependence of amide proton chemical shifts

  3. Phase space investigation of the lithium amide halides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, Rosalind A. [Hydrogen Storage Chemistry Group, School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Group, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Hewett, David R.; Korkiakoski, Emma [Hydrogen Storage Chemistry Group, School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Thompson, Stephen P. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Anderson, Paul A., E-mail: p.a.anderson@bham.ac.uk [Hydrogen Storage Chemistry Group, School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • The lower limits of halide incorporation in lithium amide have been investigated. • The only amide iodide stoichiometry observed was Li{sub 3}(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}I. • Solid solutions were observed in both the amide chloride and amide bromide systems. • A 46% reduction in chloride content resulted in a new phase: Li{sub 7}(NH{sub 2}){sub 6}Cl. • New low-chloride phase maintained improved H{sub 2} desorption properties of Li{sub 4}(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}Cl. - Abstract: An investigation has been carried out into the lower limits of halide incorporation in lithium amide (LiNH{sub 2}). It was found that the lithium amide iodide Li{sub 3}(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}I was unable to accommodate any variation in stoichiometry. In contrast, some variation in stoichiometry was accommodated in Li{sub 7}(NH{sub 2}){sub 6}Br, as shown by a decrease in unit cell volume when the bromide content was reduced. The amide chloride Li{sub 4}(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}Cl was found to adopt either a rhombohedral or a cubic structure depending on the reaction conditions. Reduction in chloride content generally resulted in a mixture of phases, but a new rhombohedral phase with the stoichiometry Li{sub 7}(NH{sub 2}){sub 6}Cl was observed. In comparison to LiNH{sub 2}, this new low-chloride phase exhibited similar improved hydrogen desorption properties as Li{sub 4}(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}Cl but with a much reduced weight penalty through addition of chloride. Attempts to dope lithium amide with fluoride ions have so far proved unsuccessful.

  4. Actinides complexes in solvent extraction. The amide type of extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musikas, C.; Condamines, N.; Charbonnel, M.C.; Hubert, H.

    1989-01-01

    The N,N-dialkylamides and the N,N'-tetraalkyl. 2-alkyl 1,3-diamide propane are two promising classes of extractants which could replace advantageously the organophosphorus molecules for the separations of the actinide. The main advantages of the amides lie in their complete incinerability and the small interference of their radiolytic and hydrolytic degradation products for the processes. The actinide extraction chemistry with various amides is reviewed in this paper

  5. Highly Stereoselective Intermolecular Haloetherification and Haloesterification of Allyl Amides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanzadeh, Bardia; Jaganathan, Arvind; Staples, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    An organocatalytic and highly regio-, diastereo-, and enantioselective intermolecular haloetherification and haloesterification reaction of allyl amides is reported. A variety of alkene substituents and substitution patterns are compatible with this chemistry. Notably, electronically unbiased alkene substrates exhibit exquisite regio- and diastereoselectivity for the title transformation. We also demonstrate that the same catalytic system can be used in both chlorination and bromination reactions of allyl amides with a variety of nucleophiles with little or no modification. PMID:26110812

  6. A new phenylethyl alkyl amide from the Ambrostoma quadriimpressum Motschulsky

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guolei Zhao

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A new phenylethyl alkyl amide, (10R-10-hydroxy-N-phenethyloctadecanamide (1, was isolated from the beetle Ambrostoma quadriimpressum Motschulsky. The structure of the amide was determined by NMR and MS. The absolute configuration of compound 1 was confirmed by an asymmetric total synthesis, which was started from L-glutamic acid. The construction of the aliphatic chain was accomplished by the selective protection of the hydroxy groups and two-time implementation of the Wittig olefination reaction.

  7. Predicting protein amidation sites by orchestrating amino acid sequence features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuqiu; Yu, Hua; Gong, Xiujun

    2017-08-01

    Amidation is the fourth major category of post-translational modifications, which plays an important role in physiological and pathological processes. Identifying amidation sites can help us understanding the amidation and recognizing the original reason of many kinds of diseases. But the traditional experimental methods for predicting amidation sites are often time-consuming and expensive. In this study, we propose a computational method for predicting amidation sites by orchestrating amino acid sequence features. Three kinds of feature extraction methods are used to build a feature vector enabling to capture not only the physicochemical properties but also position related information of the amino acids. An extremely randomized trees algorithm is applied to choose the optimal features to remove redundancy and dependence among components of the feature vector by a supervised fashion. Finally the support vector machine classifier is used to label the amidation sites. When tested on an independent data set, it shows that the proposed method performs better than all the previous ones with the prediction accuracy of 0.962 at the Matthew's correlation coefficient of 0.89 and area under curve of 0.964.

  8. Hydrogen Bonding Interaction between Atmospheric Gaseous Amides and Methanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailiang Zhao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Amides are important atmospheric organic–nitrogen compounds. Hydrogen bonded complexes of methanol (MeOH with amides (formamide, N-methylformamide, N,N-dimethylformamide, acetamide, N-methylacetamide and N,N-dimethylacetamide have been investigated. The carbonyl oxygen of the amides behaves as a hydrogen bond acceptor and the NH group of the amides acts as a hydrogen bond donor. The dominant hydrogen bonding interaction occurs between the carbonyl oxygen and the OH group of methanol as well as the interaction between the NH group of amides and the oxygen of methanol. However, the hydrogen bonds between the CH group and the carbonyl oxygen or the oxygen of methanol are also important for the overall stability of the complexes. Comparable red shifts of the C=O, NH- and OH-stretching transitions were found in these MeOH–amide complexes with considerable intensity enhancement. Topological analysis shows that the electron density at the bond critical points of the complexes fall in the range of hydrogen bonding criteria, and the Laplacian of charge density of the O–H∙∙∙O hydrogen bond slightly exceeds the upper value of the Laplacian criteria. The energy decomposition analysis further suggests that the hydrogen bonding interaction energies can be mainly attributed to the electrostatic, exchange and dispersion components.

  9. Synthesis and biological activity of pyridazine amides, hydrazones and hydrazides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buysse, Ann M; Yap, Maurice Ch; Hunter, Ricky; Babcock, Jonathan; Huang, Xinpei

    2017-04-01

    Optimization studies on compounds initially designed to be herbicides led to the discovery of a series of [6-(3-pyridyl)pyridazin-3-yl]amides exhibiting aphicidal properties. Systematic modifications of the amide moiety as well as the pyridine and pyridazine rings were carried out to determine if these changes could improve insecticidal potency. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies showed that changes to the pyridine and pyridazine rings generally resulted in a significant loss of insecticidal potency against green peach aphids [Myzus persicae (Sulzer)] and cotton aphids [(Aphis gossypii (Glover)]. However, replacement of the amide moiety with hydrazines, hydrazones, or hydrazides appeared to be tolerated, with small aliphatic substituents being especially potent. A series of aphicidal [6-(3-pyridyl)pyridazin-3-yl]amides were discovered as a result of random screening of compounds that were intially investigated as herbicides. Follow-up studies of the structure-activity relationship of these [6-(3-pyridyl)pyridazin-3-yl]amides showed that biosteric replacement of the amide moiety was widely tolerated suggesting that further opportunities for exploitation may exist for this new area of insecticidal chemistry. Insecticidal efficacy from the original hit, compound 1, to the efficacy of compound 14 produced greater than 10-fold potency improvement against Aphis gossypii and greater than 14-fold potency improvement against Myzus persicae. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Hydrogen Bonding Interaction between Atmospheric Gaseous Amides and Methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hailiang; Tang, Shanshan; Xu, Xiang; Du, Lin

    2016-12-30

    Amides are important atmospheric organic-nitrogen compounds. Hydrogen bonded complexes of methanol (MeOH) with amides (formamide, N -methylformamide, N , N -dimethylformamide, acetamide, N -methylacetamide and N , N -dimethylacetamide) have been investigated. The carbonyl oxygen of the amides behaves as a hydrogen bond acceptor and the NH group of the amides acts as a hydrogen bond donor. The dominant hydrogen bonding interaction occurs between the carbonyl oxygen and the OH group of methanol as well as the interaction between the NH group of amides and the oxygen of methanol. However, the hydrogen bonds between the CH group and the carbonyl oxygen or the oxygen of methanol are also important for the overall stability of the complexes. Comparable red shifts of the C=O, NH- and OH-stretching transitions were found in these MeOH-amide complexes with considerable intensity enhancement. Topological analysis shows that the electron density at the bond critical points of the complexes fall in the range of hydrogen bonding criteria, and the Laplacian of charge density of the O-H∙∙∙O hydrogen bond slightly exceeds the upper value of the Laplacian criteria. The energy decomposition analysis further suggests that the hydrogen bonding interaction energies can be mainly attributed to the electrostatic, exchange and dispersion components.

  11. Amide temperature coefficients in the protein G B1 domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomlinson, Jennifer H.; Williamson, Mike P.

    2012-01-01

    Temperature coefficients have been measured for backbone amide 1 H and 15 N nuclei in the B1 domain of protein G (GB1), using temperatures in the range 283–313 K, and pH values from 2.0 to 9.0. Many nuclei display pH-dependent coefficients, which were fitted to one or two pK a values. 1 H coefficients showed the expected behaviour, in that hydrogen-bonded amides have less negative values, but for those amides involved in strong hydrogen bonds in regular secondary structure there is a negative correlation between strength of hydrogen bond and size of temperature coefficient. The best correlation to temperature coefficient is with secondary shift, indicative of a very approximately uniform thermal expansion. The largest pH-dependent changes in coefficient are for amides in loops adjacent to sidechain hydrogen bonds rather than the amides involved directly in hydrogen bonds, indicating that the biggest determinant of the temperature coefficient is temperature-dependent loss of structure, not hydrogen bonding. Amide 15 N coefficients have no clear relationship with structure.

  12. Nonplanar tertiary amides in rigid chiral tricyclic dilactams. Peptide group distortions and vibrational optical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazderková, Markéta; Profant, Václav; Hodačová, Jana; Sebestík, Jaroslav; Pazderka, Tomáš; Novotná, Pavlína; Urbanová, Marie; Safařík, Martin; Buděšínský, Miloš; Tichý, Miloš; Bednárová, Lucie; Baumruk, Vladimír; Maloň, Petr

    2013-08-22

    We investigate amide nonplanarity in vibrational optical activity (VOA) spectra of tricyclic spirodilactams 5,8-diazatricyclo[6,3,0,0(1,5)]undecan-4,9-dione (I) and its 6,6',7,7'-tetradeuterio derivative (II). These rigid molecules constrain amide groups to nonplanar geometries with twisted pyramidal arrangements of bonds to amide nitrogen atoms. We have collected a full range vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra including signals of C-H and C-D stretching vibrations. We report normal-mode analysis and a comparison of calculated to experimental VCD and ROA. The data provide band-to-band assignment and offer a possibility to evaluate roles of constrained nonplanar tertiary amide groups and rigid chiral skeletons. Nonplanarity shows as single-signed VCD and ROA amide I signals, prevailing the couplets expected to arise from the amide-amide interaction. Amide-amide coupling dominates amide II (mainly C'-N stretching, modified in tertiary amides by the absence of a N-H bond) transitions (strong couplet in VCD, no significant ROA) probably due to the close proximity of amide nitrogen atoms. At lower wavenumbers, ROA spectra exhibit another likely manifestation of amide nonplanarity, showing signals of amide V (δ(oop)(N-C) at ~570 cm(-1)) and amide VI (δ(oop)(C'═O) at ~700 cm(-1) and ~650 cm(-1)) vibrations.

  13. Synthesis of Secondary Aromatic Amides via Pd-Catalyzed Aminocarbonylation of Aryl Halides Using Carbamoylsilane as an Amide Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wenting; Cao, Pei; Liu, Yanhong; Chen, Jianxin

    2017-11-03

    Using N-methoxymethyl-N-organylcarbamoyl(trimethyl)silanes as secondary amides source, the direct transformation of aryl halides into the corresponding secondary aromatic amides via palladium-catalyzed aminocarbonylation is described. The reactions tolerated a broad range of functional groups on the aryl ring except big steric hindrance of substituent. The types and the relative position of substituents on the aryl ring impact the coupling efficiency.

  14. Selective Formation of Secondary Amides via the Copper-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling of Alkylboronic Acids with Primary Amides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Steven A.; Shimkin, Kirk W.; Xu, Qun; Mori-Quiroz, Luis M.; Watson, Donald A.

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, a general catalytic procedure for the cross coupling of primary amides and alkylboronic acids is demonstrated. The key to the success of this reaction was the identification of a mild base (NaOSiMe3) and oxidant (di-tert-butyl peroxide) to promote the copper-catalyzed reaction in high yield. This transformation provides a facile, high-yielding method for the mono-alkylation of amides. PMID:23611591

  15. Phenolic Amides Are Potent Inhibitors of De Novo Nucleotide Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisithkul, Tippapha; Jacobson, Tyler B; O'Brien, Thomas J; Stevenson, David M; Amador-Noguez, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    An outstanding challenge toward efficient production of biofuels and value-added chemicals from plant biomass is the impact that lignocellulose-derived inhibitors have on microbial fermentations. Elucidating the mechanisms that underlie their toxicity is critical for developing strategies to overcome them. Here, using Escherichia coli as a model system, we investigated the metabolic effects and toxicity mechanisms of feruloyl amide and coumaroyl amide, the predominant phenolic compounds in ammonia-pretreated biomass hydrolysates. Using metabolomics, isotope tracers, and biochemical assays, we showed that these two phenolic amides act as potent and fast-acting inhibitors of purine and pyrimidine biosynthetic pathways. Feruloyl or coumaroyl amide exposure leads to (i) a rapid buildup of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP), a key precursor in nucleotide biosynthesis, (ii) a rapid decrease in the levels of pyrimidine biosynthetic intermediates, and (iii) a long-term generalized decrease in nucleotide and deoxynucleotide levels. Tracer experiments using (13)C-labeled sugars and [(15)N]ammonia demonstrated that carbon and nitrogen fluxes into nucleotides and deoxynucleotides are inhibited by these phenolic amides. We found that these effects are mediated via direct inhibition of glutamine amidotransferases that participate in nucleotide biosynthetic pathways. In particular, feruloyl amide is a competitive inhibitor of glutamine PRPP amidotransferase (PurF), which catalyzes the first committed step in de novo purine biosynthesis. Finally, external nucleoside supplementation prevents phenolic amide-mediated growth inhibition by allowing nucleotide biosynthesis via salvage pathways. The results presented here will help in the development of strategies to overcome toxicity of phenolic compounds and facilitate engineering of more efficient microbial producers of biofuels and chemicals. Copyright © 2015, Pisithkul et al.

  16. Phenolic Amides Are Potent Inhibitors of De Novo Nucleotide Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisithkul, Tippapha; Jacobson, Tyler B.; O'Brien, Thomas J.; Stevenson, David M.

    2015-01-01

    An outstanding challenge toward efficient production of biofuels and value-added chemicals from plant biomass is the impact that lignocellulose-derived inhibitors have on microbial fermentations. Elucidating the mechanisms that underlie their toxicity is critical for developing strategies to overcome them. Here, using Escherichia coli as a model system, we investigated the metabolic effects and toxicity mechanisms of feruloyl amide and coumaroyl amide, the predominant phenolic compounds in ammonia-pretreated biomass hydrolysates. Using metabolomics, isotope tracers, and biochemical assays, we showed that these two phenolic amides act as potent and fast-acting inhibitors of purine and pyrimidine biosynthetic pathways. Feruloyl or coumaroyl amide exposure leads to (i) a rapid buildup of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP), a key precursor in nucleotide biosynthesis, (ii) a rapid decrease in the levels of pyrimidine biosynthetic intermediates, and (iii) a long-term generalized decrease in nucleotide and deoxynucleotide levels. Tracer experiments using 13C-labeled sugars and [15N]ammonia demonstrated that carbon and nitrogen fluxes into nucleotides and deoxynucleotides are inhibited by these phenolic amides. We found that these effects are mediated via direct inhibition of glutamine amidotransferases that participate in nucleotide biosynthetic pathways. In particular, feruloyl amide is a competitive inhibitor of glutamine PRPP amidotransferase (PurF), which catalyzes the first committed step in de novo purine biosynthesis. Finally, external nucleoside supplementation prevents phenolic amide-mediated growth inhibition by allowing nucleotide biosynthesis via salvage pathways. The results presented here will help in the development of strategies to overcome toxicity of phenolic compounds and facilitate engineering of more efficient microbial producers of biofuels and chemicals. PMID:26070680

  17. External proton and Li beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuff, Juan A.; Burlon, Alejandro A.; Debray, Mario E.; Kesque, Jose M.; Kreiner, Andres J.; Stoliar, Pablo A.; Naab, Fabian; Ozafran, Mabel J.; Vazquez, Monica E.; Perez de la Hoz, A.; Somacal, Hector; Valda, Alejandro; Canevas, S.; Ruffolo, M.; Tasat, D.R.; Muhlmann, M. C.

    2000-01-01

    In the frame of a feasibility study to introduce proton therapy in Argentina in a collaborative agreement between the Physics and Radiobiology Departments of the National Atomic Energy Commission or Argentina and the Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay, France, external proton and Li beams were produced at the TANDAR accelerator in Buenos Aires. The specific aim of this work was to start radiobiology studies on cell cultures and small laboratory animals. In particular we seek to determine here the relative biological effectiveness, RBE, for proton and Li beams as a function of energy for different tumor and normal cell lines. The 24 MeV proton beam was diffused using a 25 μm gold foil and extracted through a Kapton window to obtain a homogeneous field (constant to 95%) of about 7 cm in diameter. Measurements were carried out with quasi-monoenergetic beams (of 20.2 ± 0.07 MeV, 2.9 ± 0.10 MeV y 1.5 ± 0.1 MeV for protons and 21.4 ± 0.4 MeV for Lithium). Proton fluence and Bragg peaks were measured. The dose delivered in each case was monitored on-line with a calibrated transmission ionization chamber. Three cell lines PDV, PDVC 57 and V 79 (as a reference) were irradiated with γ-rays, proton and lithium beams with linear energy transfer (LET) from 2 to 100 keV/μm. RBE values in the range of 1.2-5.9 were obtained. In addition preliminary studies on chromosomal aberrations and viability of alveolar macrophages were carried out. (author)

  18. Proton diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Besten, J.L.; Jamieson, D.N.; Allen, L.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Lindhard theory on ion channeling in crystals has been widely accepted throughout ion beam analysis for use in simulating such experiments. The simulations use a Monte Carlo method developed by Barret, which utilises the classical 'billiard ball' theory of ions 'bouncing' between planes or tubes of atoms in the crystal. This theory is not valid for 'thin' crystals where the planes or strings of atoms can no longer be assumed to be of infinite proportions. We propose that a theory similar to that used for high energy electron diffraction can be applied to MeV ions, especially protons, in thin crystals to simulate the intensities of transmission channeling and of RBS spectra. The diffraction theory is based on a Bloch wave solution of the Schroedinger equation for an ion passing through the periodic crystal potential. The widely used universal potential for proton-nucleus scattering is used to construct the crystal potential. Absorption due to thermal diffuse scattering is included. Experimental parameters such as convergence angle, beam tilt and scanning directions are considered in our calculations. Comparison between theory and experiment is encouraging and suggests that further work is justified. (authors)

  19. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  20. Design, synthesis and optimization of bis-amide derivatives as CSF1R inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Sreekanth A; Jadhavar, Pradeep S; Miglani, Sandeep K; Singh, Manvendra P; Kalane, Deepak P; Agarwal, Anil K; Sathe, Balaji D; Mukherjee, Kakoli; Gupta, Ashu; Haldar, Srijan; Raja, Mohd; Singh, Siddhartha; Pham, Son M; Chakravarty, Sarvajit; Quinn, Kevin; Belmar, Sebastian; Alfaro, Ivan E; Higgs, Christopher; Bernales, Sebastian; Herrera, Francisco J; Rai, Roopa

    2017-05-15

    Signaling via the receptor tyrosine kinase CSF1R is thought to play an important role in recruitment and differentiation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). TAMs play pro-tumorigenic roles, including the suppression of anti-tumor immune response, promotion of angiogenesis and tumor cell metastasis. Because of the role of this signaling pathway in the tumor microenvironment, several small molecule CSF1R kinase inhibitors are undergoing clinical evaluation for cancer therapy, either as a single agent or in combination with other cancer therapies, including immune checkpoint inhibitors. Herein we describe our lead optimization effort that resulted in the identification of a potent, cellular active and orally bioavailable bis-amide CSF1R inhibitor. Docking and biochemical analysis allowed the removal of a metabolically labile and poorly permeable methyl piperazine group from an early lead compound. Optimization led to improved metabolic stability and Caco2 permeability, which in turn resulted in good oral bioavailability in mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Proton imaging apparatus for proton therapy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sipala, V.; Lo Presti, D.; Brianzi, M.; Civinini, C.; Bruzzi, M.; Scaringella, M.; Talamonti, C.; Bucciolini, M.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G.; Randazzo, N.; Stancampiano, C.; Tesi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy with protons, due to the physical properties of these particles, offers several advantages for cancer therapy as compared to the traditional radiotherapy and photons. In the clinical use of proton beams, a p CT (Proton Computer Tomography) apparatus can contribute to improve the accuracy of the patient positioning and dose distribution calculation. In this paper a p CT apparatus built by the Prima (Proton Imaging) Italian Collaboration will be presented and the preliminary results will be discussed.

  2. Proton radioactivity from proton-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman, F.; Goncalves, M.; Tavares, O.A.P.; Duarte, S.B.; Garcia, F.; Rodriguez, O.

    1999-03-01

    Half-lives for proton emission from proton-rich nuclei have been calculated by using the effective liquid drop model of heavy-particle decay of nuclei. It is shown that this model is able to offer results or spontaneous proton-emission half-life-values in excellent agreement with the existing experimental data. Predictions of half-life-values for other possible proton-emission cases are present for null orbital angular momentum. (author)

  3. TROSY of side-chain amides in large proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Aizhuo; Yao, Lishan; Li, Yue; Yan, Honggao

    2012-01-01

    By using the mixed solvent of 50% H2O/50% D2O and employing deuterium decoupling, TROSY experiments exclusively detect NMR signals from semideuterated isotopomers of carboxamide groups with high sensitivities for proteins with molecular weights up to 80 kDa. This isotopomer-selective strategy extends TROSY experiments from exclusively detecting backbone to both backbone and side-chain amides, particularly in large proteins. Because of differences in both TROSY effect and dynamics between 15N–HE{DZ} and 15N–HZ{DE} isotopomers of the same carboxamide, the 15N transverse magnetization of the latter relaxes significantly faster than that of the former, which provides a direct and reliable stereospecific distinction between the two configurations. The TROSY effects on the 15N–HE{DZ} isotopomers of side-chain amides are as significant as on backbone amides. PMID:17347000

  4. The radiation chemistry of organic amides: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langan, J.R.; Liu, K.J.; Salmon, G.A.; Edwards, P.P.; Ellaboudy, A.; Holton, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    Pulse radiolysis of four cyclic amides including N-methylpyrrolidinone (NMP), and the non-cyclic amide tetramethylurea (TMU) yielded absorption spectra in the near infrared that are attributed to solvated electrons. Addition of a variety of alkali-metal salts caused no detectable change in the absorption spectrum of e s - and no new absorptions attributable to alkali-metal anions were detected. The effect of dose on the decay of e s - in NMP was studied in detail. The yields of e s - in these amides were estimated by using trans-stilbene as an electron scavenger. Absorption spectra, which are not removed by saturation with N 2 O and CO 2 , are observed in the wavelength range 300-500 nm. (author)

  5. VCD Robustness of the Amide-I and Amide-II Vibrational Modes of Small Peptide Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góbi, Sándor; Magyarfalvi, Gábor; Tarczay, György

    2015-09-01

    The rotational strengths and the robustness values of amide-I and amide-II vibrational modes of For(AA)n NHMe (where AA is Val, Asn, Asp, or Cys, n = 1-5 for Val and Asn; n = 1 for Asp and Cys) model peptides with α-helix and β-sheet backbone conformations were computed by density functional methods. The robustness results verify empirical rules drawn from experiments and from computed rotational strengths linking amide-I and amide-II patterns in the vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra of peptides with their backbone structures. For peptides with at least three residues (n ≥ 3) these characteristic patterns from coupled amide vibrational modes have robust signatures. For shorter peptide models many vibrational modes are nonrobust, and the robust modes can be dependent on the residues or on their side chain conformations in addition to backbone conformations. These robust VCD bands, however, provide information for the detailed structural analysis of these smaller systems. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Isentropic compressibilities of (amide + water) mixtures: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papamatthaiakis, Dimitris; Aroni, Fryni; Havredaki, Vasiliki

    2008-01-01

    The density and ultrasonic velocity of aqueous solutions of formamide (FA), N-methylformamide (NMF), N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA), pyrrolidin-2-one (PYR), N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP), and their pure phases have been measured at 298.15 K and atmospheric pressure. Densities and ultrasonic velocities in pure amides have been also measured at the temperature range 288.15 K to 308.15 K for the computation of their thermal expansivities. Isentropic compressibility, intermolecular free length, relative association, apparent molar compressibility, as well as the excess quantities, ultrasonic velocity, isentropic compressibility, intermolecular free length, have been evaluated and fitted to the Redlich-Kister type equation. The deviation from ideal mixing law in ultrasonic velocity is positive while the deviations in isentropic compressibility and intermolecular free length are negative for all (amide + water) mixtures. This behavior reveals the nature and the magnitude of intermolecular interactions between the amide-water molecules. The sequence of superimposed curves of various ultrasonic parameters vs. the amide mole fraction is related to the strength of interactions between the unlike molecules and the role of -CH 3 substitution in amides. The comparison of ultrasonic to volumetric properties reveals differences on the position of the extrema and their relation with the degree of substitution while the interpretation of these differences is discussed. Two different approaches on the computation of excess functions, applied in this work, brought out a difference in the magnitude of deviations and a partial reversion to the sequence of amides curves suggesting a different estimation in terms of deviations from ideal mixing law and therefore of the relative molecular interactions

  7. l-theanine: A potential multifaceted natural bioactive amide as health supplement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajsekhar Adhikary

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural bioactive compounds from plants are of great importance in modern therapeutics, which are used to prepare antibiotics, growth supplements or some other therapeutics. l-theanine is such a bioactive amide amino acid presented in different plants and fungi, especially in tea. Theanine has influential effects on lifestyle associated diseases, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disorders, hypertension, stress relief, tumor suppression, menstruation and liver injury. This amino acid can maintain normal sleep and improve memory function and nullify effect of the neurotoxins. The rate of bioavailability and its medium of ingestion in the body is one of the great concerns for its additional antioxidant properties. Pharmacokinetics of the bioactive compound and its mode of action are described herewith. The biosynthesis and industrial synthesis are also reviewed to promote accelerated production of this bioactive compound in the pharmaceutical industries.

  8. The temperature dependent amide I band of crystalline acetanilide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruzeiro, Leonor; Freedman, Holly

    2013-01-01

    The temperature dependent anomalous peak in the amide I band of crystalline acetanilide is thought to be due to self-trapped states. On the contrary, according to the present model, the anomalous peak comes from the fraction of ACN molecules strongly hydrogen-bonded to a neighboring ACN molecule, and its intensity decreases because, on average, this fraction decreases as temperature increases. This model provides, for the first time, an integrated and theoretically consistent view of the temperature dependence of the full amide I band and a qualitative explanation of some of the features of nonlinear pump–probe experiments.

  9. Synthesis and antituberculosis activity of new fatty acid amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Oca, Caroline Da Ros Montes; Coelho, Tatiane; Marinho, Tamara Germani; Hack, Carolina Rosa Lopes; Duarte, Rodrigo da Costa; da Silva, Pedro Almeida; D'Oca, Marcelo Gonçalves Montes

    2010-09-01

    This work reports the synthesis of new fatty acid amides from C16:0, 18:0, 18:1, 18:1 (OH), and 18:2 fatty acids families with cyclic and acyclic amines and demonstrate for the first time the activity of these compounds as antituberculosis agents against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H(37)Rv, M. tuberculosis rifampicin resistance (ATCC 35338), and M. tuberculosis isoniazid resistance (ATCC 35822). The fatty acid amides derivate from ricinoleic acid were the most potent one among a series of tested compounds, with a MIC 6.25 microg/mL for resistance strains. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The temperature dependent amide I band of crystalline acetanilide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruzeiro, Leonor [CCMAR, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Physics Department, FCT, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Freedman, Holly [CCMAR, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2013-10-01

    The temperature dependent anomalous peak in the amide I band of crystalline acetanilide is thought to be due to self-trapped states. On the contrary, according to the present model, the anomalous peak comes from the fraction of ACN molecules strongly hydrogen-bonded to a neighboring ACN molecule, and its intensity decreases because, on average, this fraction decreases as temperature increases. This model provides, for the first time, an integrated and theoretically consistent view of the temperature dependence of the full amide I band and a qualitative explanation of some of the features of nonlinear pump–probe experiments.

  11. The temperature dependent amide I band of crystalline acetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruzeiro, Leonor; Freedman, Holly

    2013-10-01

    The temperature dependent anomalous peak in the amide I band of crystalline acetanilide is thought to be due to self-trapped states. On the contrary, according to the present model, the anomalous peak comes from the fraction of ACN molecules strongly hydrogen-bonded to a neighboring ACN molecule, and its intensity decreases because, on average, this fraction decreases as temperature increases. This model provides, for the first time, an integrated and theoretically consistent view of the temperature dependence of the full amide I band and a qualitative explanation of some of the features of nonlinear pump-probe experiments.

  12. Direct Reaction of Amides with Nitric Oxide To Form Diazeniumdiolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We report the apparently unprecedented direct reaction of nitric oxide (NO) with amides to generate ions of structure R(C=O)NH–N(O)=NO–, with examples including R = Me (1a) or 3-pyridyl (1b). The sodium salts of both released NO in pH 7.4 buffer, with 37 °C half-lives of 1–3 min. As NO-releasing drug candidates, diazeniumdiolated amides would have the advantage of generating only 1 equiv of base on hydrolyzing exhaustively to NO, in contrast to their amine counterparts, which generate 2 equiv of base. PMID:25210948

  13. Amides Do Not Always Work: Observation of Guest Binding in an Amide-Functionalized Porous Metal-Organic Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Oguarabau; da Silva, Ivan; Argent, Stephen P; Cabot, Rafel; Savage, Mathew; Godfrey, Harry G W; Yan, Yong; Parker, Stewart F; Manuel, Pascal; Lennox, Matthew J; Mitra, Tamoghna; Easun, Timothy L; Lewis, William; Blake, Alexander J; Besley, Elena; Yang, Sihai; Schröder, Martin

    2016-11-16

    An amide-functionalized metal organic framework (MOF) material, MFM-136, shows a high CO 2 uptake of 12.6 mmol g -1 at 20 bar and 298 K. MFM-136 is the first example of an acylamide pyrimidyl isophthalate MOF without open metal sites and, thus, provides a unique platform to study guest binding, particularly the role of free amides. Neutron diffraction reveals that, surprisingly, there is no direct binding between the adsorbed CO 2 /CH 4 molecules and the pendant amide group in the pore. This observation has been confirmed unambiguously by inelastic neutron spectroscopy. This suggests that introduction of functional groups solely may not necessarily induce specific guest-host binding in porous materials, but it is a combination of pore size, geometry, and functional group that leads to enhanced gas adsorption properties.

  14. Concurrent Increases and Decreases in Local Stability and Conformational Heterogeneity in Cu, Zn Superoxide Dismutase Variants Revealed by Temperature-Dependence of Amide Chemical Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Colleen M; Rumfeldt, Jessica A; Broom, Helen R; Sekhar, Ashok; Kay, Lewis E; Meiering, Elizabeth M

    2016-03-08

    The chemical shifts of backbone amide protons in proteins are sensitive reporters of local structural stability and conformational heterogeneity, which can be determined from their readily measured linear and nonlinear temperature-dependences, respectively. Here we report analyses of amide proton temperature-dependences for native dimeric Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (holo pWT SOD1) and structurally diverse mutant SOD1s associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Holo pWT SOD1 loses structure with temperature first at its periphery and, while having extremely high global stability, nevertheless exhibits extensive conformational heterogeneity, with ∼1 in 5 residues showing evidence for population of low energy alternative states. The holo G93A and E100G ALS mutants have moderately decreased global stability, whereas V148I is slightly stabilized. Comparison of the holo mutants as well as the marginally stable immature monomeric unmetalated and disulfide-reduced (apo(2SH)) pWT with holo pWT shows that changes in the local structural stability of individual amides vary greatly, with average changes corresponding to differences in global protein stability measured by differential scanning calorimetry. Mutants also exhibit altered conformational heterogeneity compared to pWT. Strikingly, substantial increases as well as decreases in local stability and conformational heterogeneity occur, in particular upon maturation and for G93A. Thus, the temperature-dependence of amide shifts for SOD1 variants is a rich source of information on the location and extent of perturbation of structure upon covalent changes and ligand binding. The implications for potential mechanisms of toxic misfolding of SOD1 in disease and for general aspects of protein energetics, including entropy-enthalpy compensation, are discussed.

  15. Proton movies

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    A humorous short film made by three secondary school students received an award at a Geneva film festival. Even without millions of dollars or Hollywood stars at your disposal, it is still possible to make a good science fiction film about CERN. That is what three students from the Collège Madame de Staël in Carouge, near Geneva, demonstrated. For their amateur short film on the LHC, they were commended by the jury of the video and multimedia festival for schools organised by the "Media in education" service of the Canton of Geneva’s Public Education Department. The film is a spoof of a television news report on the LHC start-up. In sequences full of humour and imagination, the reporter conducts interviews with a very serious "Professor Sairne", some protons preparing for their voyage and even the neutrons that were rejected by the LHC. "We got the idea of making a film about CERN at the end of the summer," explains Lucinda Päsche, one of the three students. "We did o...

  16. Radiobiology of Proton Therapy - Results of an international expert workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin; von Neubeck, Cläre; Pawelke, Jörg

    2018-01-01

    The physical properties of proton beams offer the potential to reduce toxicity in tumor-adjacent normal tissues. Toward this end, the number of proton radiotherapy facilities has steeply increased over the last 10-15 years to currently around 70 operational centers worldwide. However, taking full...... in proton therapy combined with systemic treatments, and (4) testing biological effects of protons in clinical trials. Finally, important research avenues for improvement of proton radiotherapy based on radiobiological knowledge are identified. The clinical distribution of radiobiological effectiveness...... of protons alone or in combination with systemic chemo- or immunotherapies as well as patient stratification based on biomarker expressions are key to reach the full potential of proton beam therapy. Dedicated preclinical experiments, innovative clinical trial designs, and large high-quality data...

  17. Bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unni, K.K.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on bone tumors. Topics covered include: Bone tumor imaging: Contribution of CT and MRI, staging of bone tumors, perind cell tumors of bone, and metastatic bone disease

  18. Citral derived amides as potent bacterial NorA efflux pump inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thota, Niranjan; Koul, Surrinder; Reddy, Mallepally V

    2008-01-01

    Monoterpene citral and citronellal have been used as starting material for the preparation of 5,9-dimethyl-deca-2,4,8-trienoic acid amides and 9-formyl-5-methyl-deca-2,4,8-trienoic acid amides. The amides on bioevaluation as efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) against Staphylococcus aureus 1199 and NorA...

  19. Use of triphenyl phosphate as risk mitigant for metal amide hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Concepcion, Jose A.; Anton, Donald L.

    2016-04-26

    A process in a resulting product of the process in which a hydrogen storage metal amide is modified by a ball milling process using an additive of TPP. The resulting product provides for a hydrogen storage metal amide having a coating that renders the hydrogen storage metal amide resistant to air, ambient moisture, and liquid water while improving useful hydrogen storage and release kinetics.

  20. 40 CFR 721.720 - Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkoxylated fatty acid amide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.720 Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt. (a) Chemical... as an alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt (PMN P-97-136) is subject to reporting under...

  1. 40 CFR 721.9075 - Quaternary ammonium salt of fluorinated alkylaryl amide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... fluorinated alkylaryl amide. 721.9075 Section 721.9075 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... amide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as quaternary ammonium salt of fluorinated alkylaryl amide (PMN No. P-92-688) is...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10063 - Halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl amide (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... amide (generic). 721.10063 Section 721.10063 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10063 Halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl amide (generic). (a) Chemical... as halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl amide (PMN P-04-792) is subject to reporting under this...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10191 - Amides, coco, N-[3-(dibutylamino)propyl].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amides, coco, N-[3-(dibutylamino... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10191 Amides, coco, N-[3-(dibutylamino)propyl]. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, coco...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10176 - Amides, peanut-oil, N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amides, peanut-oil, N-[3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10176 Amides, peanut-oil, N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10192 - Amides, coco, N-[3-(dibutylamino)propyl], acrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amides, coco, N-[3-(dibutylamino... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10192 Amides, coco, N-[3-(dibutylamino)propyl], acrylates. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides...

  6. Laryngeal adenocystic carcinoma treated by proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Tomonori; Araki, Mamika; Fukukita, Kouhei; Yamada, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Adenocystic carcinoma most commonly develops in the major salivary glands, on the other hand it is rare for adenocystic carcinoma to develop in the larynx. We report a case of adenocystic carcinoma in the larynx. A 54-year-old male was hospitalized with symptoms of hoarseness and dyspnea on exertion. He presented a tumor that developed at the base of the right arytenoid, and covered over the glottis. It was confirmed to be adenocystic carcinoma (solid type) by biopsy. Positron emission tomography (PET)-CT also revealed a left cervical lymph node metastasis and multiple pulmonary metastases (T1N2cM1). He was treated with proton therapy to the larynx to prevent airway obstruction by growth of the tumor and to preserve the larynx because he had uncontrollable pulmonary metastasis. Although the tumor vanished after the treatment, one month later he had halitosis, dyspnea and bilateral vocal cord palsy. Despite administration of an antibacterial drug and steroid, there was no improvement to the narrowness of the glottis. A tracheotomy was therefore performed three months after the proton therapy. PET-CT, which was performed after the tracheotomy, suggested growth of the residual tumor or laryngeal radionecrosis. This study confirmed that proton therapy is effective for adenocystic carcinoma in the larynx. However, proton therapy also was found to cause laryngeal radionecrosis. These results indicate the importance of evaluating the side effects of radiation therapy and providing that information to the patient. (author)

  7. Proton radiation therapy for clivus chordoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Yoshihiko; Tsunoda, Takashi; Hyodo, Akio; Nose, Tadao; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Inada, Tetsuo; Maruhashi, Akira; Hayakawa, Yoshinori.

    1993-01-01

    A 57-year-old male with clival chordoma developed severe hoarseness, dysphagia, and dysphonia 1 month after a second removal of the tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a mass 10 cm in diameter in the region of the middle clivus enhanced inhomogeneously by gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid, and a defect in the skull base. There was evidence of compression of the anterior surface of the pons. He received proton irradiation employing a pair of parallel opposed lateral proton beams. The dose aimed at the tumor mass was 75.5 Gy, to the pharyngeal wall less than 38 Gy, and to the anterior portion of the pons less than 30 Gy. Time dose and fractionation factor was calculated at 148. Thirty-one months following treatment, he was free of clinical neurological sequelae. Proton therapy should be considered in treatment planning following initial surgical removal or for inoperable clivus chordoma. (author)

  8. Straightforward uranium-catalyzed dehydration of primary amides to nitriles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enthaler, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    The efficient uranium-catalyzed dehydration of a variety of primary amides, using N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) as a dehydration reagent, to the corresponding nitriles has been investigated. With this catalyst system, extraordinary catalyst activities and selectivities were feasible. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Method for enhancing amidohydrolase activity of fatty acid amide hydrolase

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, George; Nagarajan, Subbiah; Chapman, Kent; Faure, Lionel; Koulen, Peter

    2017-12-26

    A method for enhancing amidohydrolase activity of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) is disclosed. The method comprising administering a phenoxyacyl-ethanolamide that causes the enhanced activity. The enhanced activity can have numerous effects on biological organisms including, for example, enhancing the growth of certain seedlings.

  10. Polyurethanes elastomers with amide chain extenders of uniform length

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schuur, J.M.; Noordover, B.A.J.; Noordover, Bart; Gaymans, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    Toluene diisocyanate based polyurethanes with amide extenders were synthesized poly(propylene oxide) with a number average molecular weight of 2000 and endcapped with toluene diisocyanate was used as the polyether segment. The chain extenders were based on poly(hexamethylene terephthalamide):

  11. Polyuretehane elastomers with amide chain extenders of uniform length

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuur, van der M.; Noordover, B.A.J.; Gaymans, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    Toluene diisocyanate based polyurethanes with amide extenders were synthesized poly(propylene oxide) with a number average molecular weight of 2000 and endcapped with toluene diisocyanate was used as the polyether segment. The chain extenders were based on poly(hexamethylene terephthalamide):

  12. Method for enhancing amidohydrolase activity of fatty acid amide hydrolase

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, George; Nagarajan, Subbiah; Chapman, Kent; Faure, Lionel; Koulen, Peter

    2016-10-25

    A method for enhancing amidohydrolase activity of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) is disclosed. The method comprising administering a phenoxyacylethanolamide that causes the enhanced activity. The enhanced activity can have numerous effects on biological organisms including, for example, enhancing the growth of certain seedlings. The subject matter disclosed herein relates to enhancers of amidohydrolase activity.

  13. Unconventional Passerini Reaction toward α-Aminoxy-amides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chandgude, Ajay L; Dömling, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The Passerini multicomponent reaction (P-3CR) toward the one-step synthesis of α-aminoxy-amide, by employing for the first time a N-hydroxamic acid component, has been reported. The sonication-accelerated, catalyst-free, simple, fast, and highly efficient Passerini reaction is used for the synthesis

  14. Synthesis, characterization and photo behavior of new poly(amide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and the interaction between clay and polymeric chains on the properties of nanocomposites films were investigated by using UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and water uptake measurements. KEY WORDS: Nanocomposite, Poly(amide-imide), Silicate particle, Polycondensation, Thermal behavior.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of new optically active poly(amide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Six new optically active poly(amide-imide)s (8a-f) were synthesized through the direct ... polyimides are widely used in the semiconductor and electronic packaging ... chiral polymers is of particular interest from the viewpoint of material science ...

  16. Synthesis and quantitation of six phenolic amides in Amaranthus spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Hans; Steffensen, Stine K; Christophersen, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    Cinnamoylphenethylamines are phenolic amides in which cinnamic acid provides the acid moiety and phenethylamine the amine moiety. Single ion monitoring (SIM) in LC-MS was performed on amaranth leaf extracts. Masses corresponding to sets of regioisomers, including previously reported compounds, were...

  17. Amides and Hydrazides from Amine and Hydrazine Hydrochlorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shama, Sami A.; Tran, Thuan L.

    1978-01-01

    This safe and efficient procedure for the synthesis of N-substituted amides and hydrazides is a modification of the Schotten-Bausmann procedure in which the amine or hydrazide is replaced by the corresponding hydrochloride salt, and the use of alkali is eliminated. (Author/BB)

  18. Chiral amides via copper-catalysed enantioselective conjugate addition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonen, Anne K.; Fernández-Ibáñez, M. Ángeles; Fañanás-Mastral, Martín; Teichert, Johannes F.; Feringa, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    A highly enantioselective one pot procedure for the synthesis of beta-substituted amides was developed starting from the corresponding alpha,beta-unsaturated esters. This new methodology is based on the copper-catalysed enantioselective conjugate addition of Grignard reagents to

  19. N-Hydroxyimide Ugi Reaction toward α-Hydrazino Amides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chandgude, Ajay L; Dömling, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The Ugi four-component reaction (U-4CR) with N-hydroxyimides as a novel carboxylic acid isostere has been reported. This reaction provides straightforward access to α-hydrazino amides. A broad range of aldehydes, amines, isocyanides and N-hydroxyimides were employed to give products in moderate to

  20. Synthesis, antiproliferative and antibacterial activity of new amides of salinomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoszczak, Michał; Maj, Ewa; Stefańska, Joanna; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Janczak, Jan; Brzezinski, Bogumil; Huczyński, Adam

    2014-04-01

    A series of 11 novel amides of salinomycin were synthesized for the first time. All the obtained compounds were found to show potent antiproliferative activity against human cancer cell lines including the drug-resistant cancer cells. Four new salinomycin derivatives revealed good antibacterial activity against clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Insecticidal, repellent and fungicidal properties of novel trifluoromethylphenyl amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikolia, Maia; Bernier, Ulrich R; Coy, Monique R; Chalaire, Katelyn C; Becnel, James J; Agramonte, Natasha M; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Wedge, David E; Clark, Gary G; Linthicum, Kenneth J; Swale, Daniel R; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R

    2013-09-01

    Twenty trifluoromethylphenyl amides were synthesized and evaluated as fungicides and as mosquito toxicants and repellents. Against Aedes aegypti larvae, N-(2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-3,5-dinitrobenzamide (1e) was the most toxic compound (24 h LC50 1940 nM), while against adults N-(2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2,2,2-trifluoroacetamide (1c) was most active (24 h LD50 19.182 nM, 0.5 μL/insect). However, the 24 h LC50 and LD50 values of fipronil against Ae. aegypti larvae and adults were significantly lower: 13.55 nM and 0.787 × 10(-4) nM, respectively. Compound 1c was also active against Drosophila melanogaster adults with 24 h LC50 values of 5.6 and 4.9 μg/cm(2) for the Oregon-R and 1675 strains, respectively. Fipronil had LC50 values of 0.004 and 0.017 μg/cm(2) against the two strains of D. melanogaster, respectively. In repellency bioassays against female Ae. aegypti, 2,2,2-trifluoro-N-(2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)acetamide (4c) had the highest repellent potency with a minimum effective dosage (MED) of 0.039 μmol/cm(2) compared to DEET (MED of 0.091 μmol/cm(2)). Compound N-(2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)hexanamide (4a) had an MED of 0.091 μmol/cm(2) which was comparable to DEET. Compound 4c was the most potent fungicide against Phomopsis obscurans. Several trends were discerned between the structural configuration of these molecules and the effect of structural changes on toxicity and repellency. Para- or meta- trifluoromethylphenyl amides with an aromatic ring attached to the carbonyl carbon showed higher toxicity against Ae. aegypti larvae, than ortho- trifluoromethylphenyl amides. Ortho- trifluoromethylphenyl amides with trifluoromethyl or alkyl group attached to the carbonyl carbon produced higher repellent activity against female Ae. aegypti and Anopheles albimanus than meta- or para- trifluoromethylphenyl amides. The presence of 2,6-dichloro- substitution on the phenyl ring of the amide had an influence on larvicidal and repellent

  2. Discovery of competing anaerobic and aerobic pathways in umpolung amide synthesis allows for site-selective amide 18O-labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackleford, Jessica P.; Shen, Bo; Johnston, Jeffrey N.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of umpolung amide synthesis was probed by interrogating potential sources for the oxygen of the product amide carbonyl that emanates from the α-bromo nitroalkane substrate. Using a series of 18O-labeled substrates and reagents, evidence is gathered to advance two pathways from the putative tetrahedral intermediate. Under anaerobic conditions, a nitro-nitrite isomerization delivers the amide oxygen from nitro oxygen. The same homolytic nitro-carbon fragmentation can be diverted by capture of the carbon radical intermediate with oxygen gas (O2) to deliver the amide oxygen from O2. This understanding was used to develop a straightforward protocol for the preparation of 18O-labeled amides in peptides by simply performing the umpolung amide synthesis reaction under an atmosphere of . PMID:22184227

  3. Amide Bond Formation Assisted by Vicinal Alkylthio Migration in Enaminones: Metal- and CO-Free Synthesis of α,β-Unsaturated Amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuqing; Huang, Fei; Wu, Ping; Wang, Quannan; Yu, Zhengkun

    2018-05-18

    Amide bond formation is one of the most important transformations in organic synthesis, drug development, and materials science. Efficient construction of amides has been among the most challenging tasks for organic chemists. Herein, we report a concise methodology for amide bond (-CONH-) formation assisted by vicinal group migration in alkylthio-functionalized enaminones (α-oxo ketene N, S-acetals) under mild conditions. Simple treatment of such enaminones with PhI(OAc) 2 at ambient temperature in air afforded diverse multiply functionalized α,β-unsaturated amides including β-cyclopropylated acrylamides, in which a wide array of functional groups such as aryl, (hetero)aryl, alkenyl, and alkyl can be conveniently introduced to a ketene moiety. The reaction mechanism was investigated by exploring the origins of the amide oxygen and carbon atoms as well as isolation and structural characterization of the reaction intermediates. The amide bond formation reactions could also be efficiently performed under solventless mechanical milling conditions.

  4. In vivo growth-inhibition of Sarcoma 180 by piplartine and piperine, two alkaloid amides from Piper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.P. Bezerra

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Piplartine {5,6-dihydro-1-[1-oxo-3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl-2-propenyl]-2(1Hpyridinone} and piperine {1-5-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl-1-oxo-2,4-pentadienyl]piperidine} are alkaloid amides isolated from Piper. Both have been reported to show cytotoxic activity towards several tumor cell lines. In the present study, the in vivo antitumor activity of these compounds was evaluated in 60 female Swiss mice (N = 10 per group transplanted with Sarcoma 180. Histopathological and morphological analyses of the tumor and the organs, including liver, spleen, and kidney, were performed in order to evaluate the toxicological aspects of the treatment with these amides. Administration of piplartine or piperine (50 or 100 mg kg-1 day-1 intraperitoneally for 7 days starting 1 day after inoculation inhibited solid tumor development in mice transplanted with Sarcoma 180 cells. The inhibition rates were 28.7 and 52.3% for piplartine and 55.1 and 56.8% for piperine, after 7 days of treatment, at the lower and higher doses, respectively. The antitumor activity of piplartine was related to inhibition of the tumor proliferation rate, as observed by reduction of Ki67 staining, a nuclear antigen associated with G1, S, G2, and M cell cycle phases, in tumors from treated animals. However, piperine did not inhibit cell proliferation as observed in Ki67 immunohistochemical analysis. Histopathological analysis of liver and kidney showed that both organs were reversibly affected by piplartine and piperine treatment, but in a different way. Piperine was more toxic to the liver, leading to ballooning degeneration of hepatocytes, accompanied by microvesicular steatosis in some areas, than piplartine which, in turn, was more toxic to the kidney, leading to discrete hydropic changes of the proximal tubular and glomerular epithelium and tubular hemorrhage in treated animals.

  5. Proton-air and proton-proton cross sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Ralf

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Different attempts to measure hadronic cross sections with cosmic ray data are reviewed. The major results are compared to each other and the differences in the corresponding analyses are discussed. Besides some important differences, it is crucial to see that all analyses are based on the same fundamental relation of longitudinal air shower development to the observed fluctuation of experimental observables. Furthermore, the relation of the measured proton-air to the more fundamental proton-proton cross section is discussed. The current global picture combines hadronic proton-proton cross section data from accelerator and cosmic ray measurements and indicates a good consistency with predictions of models up to the highest energies.

  6. Porphyrin amino acids-amide coupling, redox and photophysical properties of bis(porphyrin) amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melomedov, Jascha; Wünsche von Leupoldt, Anica; Meister, Michael; Laquai, Frédéric; Heinze, Katja

    2013-07-14

    New trans-AB2C meso-substituted porphyrin amino acid esters with meso-substituents of tunable electron withdrawing power (B = mesityl, 4-C6H4F, 4-C6H4CF3, C6F5) were prepared as free amines 3a-3d, as N-acetylated derivatives Ac-3a-Ac-3d and corresponding zinc(II) complexes Zn-Ac-3a-Zn-Ac-3d. Several amide-linked bis(porphyrins) with a tunable electron density at each porphyrin site were obtained from the amino porphyrin precursors by condensation reactions (4a-4d) and mono- and bis(zinc(II)) complexes Zn(2)-4d and Zn(1)Zn(2)-4d were prepared. The electronic interaction between individual porphyrin units in bis(porphyrins) 4 is probed by electrochemical experiments (CV, EPR), electronic absorption spectroscopy, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with DFT/PCM calculations on diamagnetic neutral bis(porphyrins) 4 and on respective charged mixed-valent radicals 4(+/-). The interaction via the -C6H4-NHCO-C6H4- bridge, the site of oxidation and reduction and the lowest excited singlet state S1, is tuned by the substituents on the individual porphyrins and the metalation state.

  7. Recircular accelerator to proton ocular therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabelo, Luisa A.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R., E-mail: luisarabelo88@gmail.com, E-mail: tprcampos@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    Proton therapy has been used for the treatment of Ocular Tumors, showing control in most cases as well as conservation of the eyeball, avoiding the enucleation. The protons provide higher energetic deposition in depth with reduced lateral spread, compared to the beam of photons and electrons, with characteristic dose deposition peak (Bragg peak). This technique requires large particle accelerators hampering the deployment a Proton Therapy Center in some countries due to the need for an investment of millions of dollars. This study is related to a new project of an electromagnetic unit of proton circular accelerator to be coupled to the national radiopharmaceutical production cyclotrons, to attend ocular therapy. This project evaluated physical parameters of proton beam circulating through classical and relativistic mechanical formulations and simulations based on an ion transport code in electromagnetic fields namely CST (Computer Simulation Technology). The structure is differentiated from other circular accelerations (patent CTIT/UFMG NRI research group/UFMG). The results show the feasibility of developing compact proton therapy equipment that works like pre-accelerator or post-accelerator to cyclotrons, satisfying the interval energy of 15 MeV to 64 MeV. Methods of reducing costs of manufacture, installation and operation of this equipment will facilitate the dissemination of the proton treatment in Brazil and consequently advances in fighting cancer. (author)

  8. Recircular accelerator to proton ocular therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabelo, Luisa A.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.

    2013-01-01

    Proton therapy has been used for the treatment of Ocular Tumors, showing control in most cases as well as conservation of the eyeball, avoiding the enucleation. The protons provide higher energetic deposition in depth with reduced lateral spread, compared to the beam of photons and electrons, with characteristic dose deposition peak (Bragg peak). This technique requires large particle accelerators hampering the deployment a Proton Therapy Center in some countries due to the need for an investment of millions of dollars. This study is related to a new project of an electromagnetic unit of proton circular accelerator to be coupled to the national radiopharmaceutical production cyclotrons, to attend ocular therapy. This project evaluated physical parameters of proton beam circulating through classical and relativistic mechanical formulations and simulations based on an ion transport code in electromagnetic fields namely CST (Computer Simulation Technology). The structure is differentiated from other circular accelerations (patent CTIT/UFMG NRI research group/UFMG). The results show the feasibility of developing compact proton therapy equipment that works like pre-accelerator or post-accelerator to cyclotrons, satisfying the interval energy of 15 MeV to 64 MeV. Methods of reducing costs of manufacture, installation and operation of this equipment will facilitate the dissemination of the proton treatment in Brazil and consequently advances in fighting cancer. (author)

  9. Segmented poly(ether ester)s and poly(ether ester amide)s for use in tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Deschamps, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the studies described in this thesis is to investigate the applicability of these slowly degradable thermoplastic elastomers as scaffolds for tissue engineering, with emphasis on their phase separation and degradation properties. A second thermoplastic elastomer in which the terephthalic moieties have been replaced by ester-amide segments, is also investigated for use in scaffolding.

  10. Carryover potassium amide in cracker at HWP, Hazira - a case study (Paper No. 1.5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The liquid ammonia fed to cracker is made available from potassium amide catalyst recovery unit, where catalyst potassium amide is separated by distillation. Extreme care is taken to ensure that ammonia is totally free from potassium. Also the gas used for catalyst heating during start up, should be free of any possible amide contamination and should be pure and dry as moisture is a poison for the catalyst. In order to prevent the recurrence of amide carryover to cracker tubes from start up gas line, certain modifications were carried out besides removal of amide from pipings. Details are discussed. (author)

  11. Nine of 16 stereoisomeric polyhydroxylated proline amides are potent β-N-acetylhexosaminidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, Benjamin J; Glawar, Andreas F G; Martínez, R Fernando; Ngo, Nigel; Liu, Zilei; Fleet, George W J; Butters, Terry D; Nash, Robert J; Yu, Chu-Yi; Wormald, Mark R; Nakagawa, Shinpei; Adachi, Isao; Kato, Atsushi; Jenkinson, Sarah F

    2014-04-18

    All 16 stereoisomeric N-methyl 5-(hydroxymethyl)-3,4-dihydroxyproline amides have been synthesized from lactones accessible from the enantiomers of glucuronolactone. Nine stereoisomers, including all eight with a (3R)-hydroxyl configuration, are low to submicromolar inhibitors of β-N-acetylhexosaminidases. A structural correlation between the proline amides is found with the ADMDP-acetamide analogues bearing an acetamidomethylpyrrolidine motif. The proline amides are generally more potent than their ADMDP-acetamide equivalents. β-N-Acetylhexosaminidase inhibition by an azetidine ADMDP-acetamide analogue is compared to an azetidine carboxylic acid amide. None of the amides are good α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase inhibitors.

  12. Semi-catalytic reduction of secondary amides to imines and aldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Hwa; Nikonov, Georgii I

    2014-06-21

    Secondary amides can be reduced by silane HSiMe2Ph into imines and aldehydes by a two-stage process involving prior conversion of amides into iminoyl chlorides followed by catalytic reduction mediated by the ruthenium complex [Cp(i-Pr3P)Ru(NCCH3)2]PF6 (1). Alkyl and aryl amides bearing halogen, ketone, and ester groups were converted with moderate to good yields under mild reaction conditions to the corresponding imines and aldehydes. This procedure does not work for substrates bearing the nitro-group and fails for heteroaromatic amides. In the case of cyano substituted amides, the cyano group is reduced to imine.

  13. Fractionated proton beam irradiation of pituitary adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronson, Brian B.; Schulte, Reinhard W.; Han, Khanh P.; Loredo, Lilia N.; Slater, James M.; Slater, Jerry D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Various radiation techniques and modalities have been used to treat pituitary adenomas. This report details our experience with proton treatment of these tumors. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients with pituitary adenomas treated with protons, who had at least 6 months of follow-up, were included in this analysis. Forty-two patients underwent a prior surgical resection; 5 were treated with primary radiation. Approximately half the tumors were functional. The median dose was 54 cobalt-gray equivalent. Results: Tumor stabilization occurred in all 41 patients available for follow-up imaging; 10 patients had no residual tumor, and 3 had greater than 50% reduction in tumor size. Seventeen patients with functional adenomas had normalized or decreased hormone levels; progression occurred in 3 patients. Six patients have died; 2 deaths were attributed to functional progression. Complications included temporal lobe necrosis in 1 patient, new significant visual deficits in 3 patients, and incident hypopituitarism in 11 patients. Conclusion: Fractionated conformal proton-beam irradiation achieved effective radiologic, endocrinological, and symptomatic control of pituitary adenomas. Significant morbidity was uncommon, with the exception of postradiation hypopituitarism, which we attribute in part to concomitant risk factors for hypopituitarism present in our patient population

  14. Discovery of novel N-(5-(arylcarbonyl)thiazol-2-yl)amides and N-(5-(arylcarbonyl)thiophen-2-yl)amides as potent RORγt inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yonghui; Cai, Wei; Zhang, Guifeng; Yang, Ting; Liu, Qian; Cheng, Yaobang; Zhou, Ling; Ma, Yingli; Cheng, Ziqiang; Lu, Sijie; Zhao, Yong-Gang; Zhang, Wei; Xiang, Zhijun; Wang, Shuai; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Qianqian; Orband-Miller, Lisa A; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Gao, Ruina; Huxdorf, Melanie; Xiang, Jia-Ning; Zhong, Zhong; Elliott, John D; Leung, Stewart; Lin, Xichen

    2014-01-15

    Novel series of N-(5-(arylcarbonyl)thiazol-2-yl)amides and N-(5-(arylcarbonyl)thiophen-2-yl)amides were discovered as potent retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor-gamma-t (RORγt) inhibitors. SAR studies of the RORγt HTS hit 6a led to identification of thiazole ketone amide 8h and thiophene ketone amide 9g with high binding affinity and inhibitory activity of Th17 cell differentiation. Compound 8h showed in vivo efficacy in both mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and collagen induced arthritis (CIA) models via oral administration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Proton therapy device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronc, D.

    1994-01-01

    The invention concerns a proton therapy device using a proton linear accelerator which produces a proton beam with high energies and intensities. The invention lies in actual fact that the proton beam which is produced by the linear accelerator is deflected from 270 deg in its plan by a deflecting magnetic device towards a patient support including a bed the longitudinal axis of which is parallel to the proton beam leaving the linear accelerator. The patient support and the deflecting device turn together around the proton beam axis while the bed stays in an horizontal position. The invention applies to radiotherapy. 6 refs., 5 figs

  16. Adsorption equilibrium of uranium from seawater on chelating resin containing amide oxime group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Takahiro; Saito, Kyoichi; Furusaki, Shintaro; Sugo, Takanobu; Okamoto, Jiro.

    1987-01-01

    Chelating resins containing amide oxime group were synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization. The amount of the amide oxime groups was controlled below about 0.1 mol per kg of base polymer. The adsorption equilibrium of uranium from seawater on this resin was investigated. It was suggested that two neighboring amide oxime groups on the grafted chain captured one uranyl ion, and that single amide oxime ligand had little capacity for the adsorption of uranium. The adsorption equilibrium was correlated by a Langmuir-type equation. The content of neighboring amide oxime groups was 0.406 x 10 -3 mol per kg of base polymer, which corresponded to 0.39 % of the total amount of amide oxime groups. The apparent stoichiometric stability constant for the complex of uranyl ion with the neighboring amide oxime groups in seawater was calculated to be 10 -21.7 . (author)

  17. Partially Fluorinated Sulfonated Poly(ether amide Fuel Cell Membranes: Influence of Chemical Structure on Membrane Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chulsung Bae

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of fluorinated sulfonated poly (ether amides (SPAs were synthesized for proton exchange membrane fuel cell applications. A polycondensation reaction of 4,4’-oxydianiline, 2-sulfoterephthalic acid monosodium salt, and tetrafluorophenylene dicarboxylic acids (terephthalic and isophthalic or fluoroaliphatic dicarboxylic acids produced SPAs with sulfonation degrees of 80–90%. Controlling the feed ratio of the sulfonated and unsulfonated dicarboxylic acid monomers afforded random SPAs with ion exchange capacities between 1.7 and 2.2 meq/g and good solubility in polar aprotic solvents. Their structures were characterized using NMR and FT IR spectroscopies. Tough, flexible, and transparent films were obtained with dimethylsulfoxide using a solution casting method. Most SPA membranes with 90% sulfonation degree showed high proton conductivity (>100 mS/cm at 80 °C and 100% relative humidity. Among them, two outstanding ionomers (ODA-STA-TPA-90 and ODA-STA-IPA-90 showed proton conductivity comparable to that of Nafion 117 between 40 and 80 °C. The influence of chemical structure on the membrane properties was systematically investigated by comparing the fluorinated polymers to their hydrogenated counterparts. The results suggest that the incorporation of fluorinated moieties in the polymer backbone of the membrane reduces water absorption. High molecular weight and the resulting physical entanglement of the polymers chains played a more important role in improving stability in water, however.

  18. Three-Dimensional Protein Fold Determination from Backbone Amide Pseudocontact Shifts Generated by Lanthanide Tags at Multiple Sites

    KAUST Repository

    Yagi, Hiromasa

    2013-06-01

    Site-specific attachment of paramagnetic lanthanide ions to a protein generates pseudocontact shifts (PCS) in the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of the protein that are easily measured as changes in chemical shifts. By labeling the protein with lanthanide tags at four different sites, PCSs are observed for most amide protons and accurate information is obtained about their coordinates in three-dimensional space. The approach is demonstrated with the chaperone ERp29, for which large differences have been reported between X-ray and NMR structures of the C-terminal domain, ERp29-C. The results unambiguously show that the structure of rat ERp29-C in solution is similar to the crystal structure of human ERp29-C. PCSs of backbone amides were the only structural restraints required. Because these can be measured for more dilute protein solutions than other NMR restraints, the approach greatly widens the range of proteins amenable to structural studies in solution. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Elastic proton-proton scattering at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, K.

    2011-09-03

    Here we describe elastic proton+proton (p+p) scattering measurements at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run. We present preliminary results of single and double spin asymmetries.

  20. Baryon production in proton-proton collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, F.M.; Werner, K.

    2002-01-01

    Motivated by the recent rapidity spectra of baryons and antibaryons in pp collisions at 158 GeV and the Ω-bar/Ω ratio discussion, we reviewed string formation mechanism and some string models. This investigation told us how color strings are formed in ultrarelativistic proton-proton collisions

  1. Proton: the particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All

  2. Proton: The Particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10{sup 80}. Protons were created at 10{sup −6} –1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10{sup 10} years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10{sup 34} years; that is, the age of the universe is 10{sup −24}th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W{sup +}, W{sup −}, Z{sup 0}, and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  3. Spectroscopic and molecular modeling investigation on the binding of a synthesized steroidal amide to protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hua-xin, E-mail: h.x.zhang@yeah.net; Liu, E.

    2014-09-15

    Owing to the various valuable biological activities, steroidal amides have become a hot topic in steroidal pharmaceutical chemistry. In this paper, an anti-tumor steroid derivate (DAAO) was synthesized and identified. The interaction between DAAO and human serum albumin (HSA) was studied by fluorescence spectra, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, molecular modeling and molecular probe techniques. The results suggested that DAAO had reacted with HSA through hydrogen bonds and van der Waals power. The formation of DAAO–HSA complex at ground state led to static quenching of HSA's fluorescence. The number of binding sites, binding constants, enthalpy change (ΔH{sup θ}), Gibbs free energy change (ΔG{sup θ}) and entropy change (ΔS{sup θ}) were calculated at different temperatures based on fluorescence quenching theory and classic equation. Molecular modeling investigation indicated that DAAO was more inclined to absorb on Sudlow's site I in subdomain IIA of HSA molecule on grounds of the lowest energy principle and steric hindrance effect. The binding location was further confirmed by fluorescence probe experiment using warfarin (site I probe) for displacement. Furthermore, the conformational changes of HSA in presence of DAAO were investigated by CD spectra. The results could provide new evidence explaining the relationship between the chemical structure and biological activity and may be useful for understanding the anti-cancer mechanism of steroidal drug. - Highlights: • A designed steroidal amide compound (DAAO) was synthesized by introducing amido bonds into a steroid nucleus. • DAAO binds to Sudlow's site I in HSA through hydrogen bonds and van der Waals power. • The interaction was a spontaneous and exothermic process with modest degree of reversibility. • The secondary structure of HSA and the microenvironment of TRP214 altered. • Amido bond in steroid nucleus (–NH–CO–) plays important role in stabling the structure of

  4. Simple Amides of Oleanolic Acid as Effective Penetration Enhancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarczyk-Cwynar, Barbara; Partyka, Danuta; Zaprutko, Lucjusz

    2015-01-01

    Transdermal transport is now becoming one of the most convenient and safe pathways for drug delivery. In some cases it is necessary to use skin penetration enhancers in order to allow for the transdermal transport of drugs that are otherwise insufficiently skin-permeable. A series of oleanolic acid amides as potential transdermal penetration enhancers was formed by multistep synthesis and the synthesis of all newly prepared compounds is presented. The synthetized amides of oleanolic acid were tested for their in vitro penetration promoter activity. The above activity was evaluated by means of using the Fürst method. The relationships between the chemical structure of the studied compounds and penetration activity are presented. PMID:26010090

  5. Fine structure of the amide i band in acetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Careri, G.; Gratton, E.; Shyamsunder, E.

    1988-05-01

    Their absorption spectrum of both single crystals and powdered samples of acetanilide (a model system for proteins) has been studied in the amide i region, where a narrow band has been identified as a highly trapped soliton state. The powder-sample spectra have been decomposed using four Lorentzian bands. A strong temperature dependence has been found for the intensity of two of the subbands, which also show a complementary behavior. Polarization studies performed on thin crystals have shown that the subbands have the same polarization. Low-temperature spectra of partially deuterated samples show the presence of the subbands at the same absorption frequencies found using the fitting procedure in the spectra of nondeuterated samples. The soliton model currently proposed to explain the origin of the anomalous amide i component at 1650 cm-1 still holds, but some modification of the model is required to account for the new features revealed by this study.

  6. Coumarin amide derivatives as fluorescence chemosensors for cyanide anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qianqian [School of Material Science and Engineering, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022, Shandong (China); Liu, Zhiqiang [State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100, Shandong (China); Cao, Duxia, E-mail: duxiacao@ujn.edu.cn [School of Material Science and Engineering, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022, Shandong (China); Guan, Ruifang, E-mail: mse_guanrf@ujn.edu.cn [School of Material Science and Engineering, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022, Shandong (China); Wang, Kangnan; Shan, Yanyan; Xu, Yongxiao; Ma, Lin [School of Material Science and Engineering, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022, Shandong (China)

    2015-07-01

    Four coumarin amide derivatives with 4-methyl coumarin or pyrene as terminal group have been synthesized. Their photophysical properties and recognition properties for cyanide anions have been examined. The results indicate that the compounds can recognize cyanide anions with obvious absorption and fluorescence spectra change, at the same time, obvious color and fluorescence change can be observed by naked eye. The in situ hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and photophysical properties change confirm that Michael additions between the chemosensors and cyanide anions take place at the 4-position of coumarin. - Highlights: • Four coumarin amide derivatives with 4-methyl coumarin or pyrene as terminal group were synthesized. • The compounds can recognize cyanide anions with obvious absorption and fluorescence spectra change. • Michael additions between the chemosensors and cyanide anions take place at the 4-position of coumarin.

  7. Simple amides of oleanolic acid as effective penetration enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarczyk-Cwynar, Barbara; Partyka, Danuta; Zaprutko, Lucjusz

    2015-01-01

    Transdermal transport is now becoming one of the most convenient and safe pathways for drug delivery. In some cases it is necessary to use skin penetration enhancers in order to allow for the transdermal transport of drugs that are otherwise insufficiently skin-permeable. A series of oleanolic acid amides as potential transdermal penetration enhancers was formed by multistep synthesis and the synthesis of all newly prepared compounds is presented. The synthetized amides of oleanolic acid were tested for their in vitro penetration promoter activity. The above activity was evaluated by means of using the Fürst method. The relationships between the chemical structure of the studied compounds and penetration activity are presented.

  8. Medipix2 as a tool for proton beam characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisogni, M. G.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Del Guerra, A.; Lojacono, P.; Piliero, M. A.; Romano, F.; Rosso, V.; Sipala, V.; Stefanini, A.

    2009-08-01

    Proton therapy is a technique used to deliver a highly accurate and effective dose for the treatment of a variety of tumor diseases. The possibility to have an instrument able to give online information could reduce the time necessary to characterize the proton beam. To this aim we propose a detection system for online proton beam characterization based on the Medipix2 chip. Medipix2 is a detection system based on a single event counter read-out chip, bump-bonded to silicon pixel detector. The read-out chip is a matrix of 256×256 cells, 55×55 μm 2 each. To demonstrate the capabilities of Medipix2 as a proton detector, we have used a 62 MeV flux proton beam at the CATANA beam line of the LNS-INFN laboratory. The measurements performed confirmed the good imaging performances of the Medipix2 system also for the characterization of proton beams.

  9. Medipix2 as a tool for proton beam characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisogni, M.G. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Del Guerra, A. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Lojacono, P. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Piliero, M.A. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Romano, F. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Rosso, V. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: valeria.rosso@pi.infn.it; Sipala, V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania and INFN Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Stefanini, A. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2009-08-01

    Proton therapy is a technique used to deliver a highly accurate and effective dose for the treatment of a variety of tumor diseases. The possibility to have an instrument able to give online information could reduce the time necessary to characterize the proton beam. To this aim we propose a detection system for online proton beam characterization based on the Medipix2 chip. Medipix2 is a detection system based on a single event counter read-out chip, bump-bonded to silicon pixel detector. The read-out chip is a matrix of 256x256 cells, 55x55 {mu}m{sup 2} each. To demonstrate the capabilities of Medipix2 as a proton detector, we have used a 62 MeV flux proton beam at the CATANA beam line of the LNS-INFN laboratory. The measurements performed confirmed the good imaging performances of the Medipix2 system also for the characterization of proton beams.

  10. Medipix2 as a tool for proton beam characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisogni, M.G.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G.; Del Guerra, A.; Lojacono, P.; Piliero, M.A.; Romano, F.; Rosso, V.; Sipala, V.; Stefanini, A.

    2009-01-01

    Proton therapy is a technique used to deliver a highly accurate and effective dose for the treatment of a variety of tumor diseases. The possibility to have an instrument able to give online information could reduce the time necessary to characterize the proton beam. To this aim we propose a detection system for online proton beam characterization based on the Medipix2 chip. Medipix2 is a detection system based on a single event counter read-out chip, bump-bonded to silicon pixel detector. The read-out chip is a matrix of 256x256 cells, 55x55 μm 2 each. To demonstrate the capabilities of Medipix2 as a proton detector, we have used a 62 MeV flux proton beam at the CATANA beam line of the LNS-INFN laboratory. The measurements performed confirmed the good imaging performances of the Medipix2 system also for the characterization of proton beams.

  11. T. thermophila group I introns that cleave amide bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to nucleic acid enzymes or enzymatic RNA molecules that are capable of cleaving a variety of bonds, including phosphodiester bonds and amide bonds, in a variety of substrates. Thus, the disclosed enzymatic RNA molecules are capable of functioning as nucleases and/or peptidases. The present invention also relates to compositions containing the disclosed enzymatic RNA molecule and to methods of making, selecting, and using such enzymes and compositions.

  12. Enzymatically and reductively degradable α-amino acid-based poly(ester amide)s: Synthesis, cell compatibility, and intracellular anticancer drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, H.; Cheng, Ru; Deng, Chao; Meng, Fenghua; Dias, Aylvin A.; Hendriks, Marc; Feijen, Jan; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2015-01-01

    A novel and versatile family of enzymatically and reductively degradable α-amino acid-based poly(ester amide)s (SS-PEAs) were developed from solution polycondensation of disulfide-containing di-p-toluenesulfonic acid salts of bis-l-phenylalanine diesters (SS-Phe-2TsOH) with di-p-nitrophenyl adipate

  13. (13)C MRS of human brain at 7 Tesla using [2-(13)C]glucose infusion and low power broadband stochastic proton decoupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shizhe; An, Li; Yu, Shao; Ferraris Araneta, Maria; Johnson, Christopher S; Wang, Shumin; Shen, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Carbon-13 ((13)C) MR spectroscopy (MRS) of the human brain at 7 Tesla (T) may pose patient safety issues due to high radiofrequency (RF) power deposition for proton decoupling. The purpose of present work is to study the feasibility of in vivo (13)C MRS of human brain at 7 T using broadband low RF power proton decoupling. Carboxylic/amide (13)C MRS of human brain by broadband stochastic proton decoupling was demonstrated on a 7 T scanner. RF safety was evaluated using the finite-difference time-domain method. (13)C signal enhancement by nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) and proton decoupling was evaluated in both phantoms and in vivo. At 7 T, the peak amplitude of carboxylic/amide (13)C signals was increased by a factor of greater than 4 due to the combined effects of NOE and proton decoupling. The 7 T (13)C MRS technique used decoupling power and average transmit power of less than 35 watts (W) and 3.6 W, respectively. In vivo (13)C MRS studies of human brain can be performed at 7 T, well below the RF safety threshold, by detecting carboxylic/amide carbons with broadband stochastic proton decoupling. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Proton Irradiation Impacts Age Driven Modulations of Cancer Progression Influenced by Immune System Transcriptome Modifications from Splenic Tissue

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Age plays a crucial role in the interplay between tumor and host; with further perturbations induced by irradiation. Proton irradiation on tumors induces biological...

  15. Composition of amino acid using carbon monoxide. Amide carbonylation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izawa, Kunisuke (Ajinomoto Co., Inc., Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-02-01

    Amide carbonylation reaction is a method to compose N-acyl-{alpha}-amino acid from aldehyde, carboxylic acid amide, and carbon monoxide in a phase and with high yield. Unlike the conventional Strecker reaction, this method does not use HCN which is in question on public pollution and does not require hydrolysis. This amide carbonylation reaction was discovered by Wakamatsu and others of Ajinomoto Co.,Ltd. Present application examples of this method are the composition of N-acetyl amino acid from the aldehyde class, the composition of N-Acyl amino acid from olefin, the composition of N-acyl or acetyl amino acid from the raw material of alcohol and the halide class, the composition of N-acyl or acetyl amino acid via the isomerization of epoxide and allyl alcohol, the composition of amino dicarboxylic acid, applying deoxidation of ring acid anhydride, the composition of N-acyl amino acid from the raw material of the amine class, the stereoselective composition of -substitution ring-{alpha}-amino acid, and the composition of amino aldehyde. 24 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Supercritical fluid extraction of uranium and thorium employing dialkyl amides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Ankita; Kumar, Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    Extraction and purification of actinides from different matrices is of utmost importance to the nuclear industry. In recent decades, supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) has emerged as a promising alternative to solvent extraction owing to its inherent potential of minimization of liquid waste generation. N,N-dialkyl aliphatic amides have been proposed to be an alternative to TBP in the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel due to several attractive features like innocuous nature of degradation products (mainly carboxylic acids/ amines), possibility of complete incineration of the used extractant leading to reduction in volume of secondary waste. Also, physico-chemical properties of this class of extractants can be tuned by the judicious choice of alkyl groups. In the present work, N,N-dialkyl aliphatic amides with varying alkyl groups viz. N,N-dibutyl-2-ethylhexanamide (DBEHA), N,N-dibutyl-3,3-dimethylbutanamide (DBDMBA), N,N-dihexyloctanamide (DHOA), N,N-disecbutylpentamide (DBPA), N,N-dibutyloctanamide (DBOA), have been evaluated for supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of uranium and thorium from nitric acid medium as well as tissue paper matrix. Amides were obtained from Department of Chemistry, Delhi University and were used as such. This fact could be exploited for separation of thorium and uranium

  17. Pain and beyond: fatty acid amides and fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillarisetti, Sivaram; Alexander, Christopher W; Khanna, Ish

    2009-12-01

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is responsible for the hydrolysis of several important endogenous fatty acid amides (FAAs), including anandamide, oleoylethanolamide and palmitoylethanolamide. Because specific FAAs interact with cannabinoid and vanilloid receptors, they are often referred to as 'endocannabinoids' or 'endovanilloids'. Initial interest in this area, therefore, has focused on developing FAAH inhibitors to augment the actions of FAAs and reduce pain. However, recent literature has shown that these FAAs - through interactions with unique receptors (extracellular and intracellular) - can induce a diverse array of effects that include appetite suppression, modulation of lipid and glucose metabolism, vasodilation, cardiac function and inflammation. This review gives an overview of FAAs and diverse FAAH inhibitors and their potential therapeutic utility in pain and non-pain indications.

  18. A zinc enolate of amide: Preparation and application in reformasky-like reaction leading to β-hydroxy amides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hyun Hee; Kim, Seung Hoi [Dept. of Chemistry, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    One of the best known functionalized organic complexes is the β-hydroxy carbonyl compound. This unique functionality has been frequently found in naturally occurring bioactive derivatives. The cross-coupling reaction of A with aldehydes were carried out in the absence of any catalyst and completed in most cases within 1.0 h at room temperature. We have developed an efficient synthetic route for the preparation of β-hydroxy amides. The method involved the preparation of room-temperature-stable organo zinc reagents (A, B, and C) in THF and their subsequent coupling reactions with various carbonyl derivatives under mild conditions. Significantly, this approach using zinc enolate of amides could expand the scope of Reformatsky-like reactions. Further studies to elucidate this synthetic protocol are currently under way in our laboratory.

  19. Spherical proton emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, S.; Semmes, P.B.; Nazarewicz, W.

    1997-01-01

    Various theoretical approaches to proton emission from spherical nuclei are investigated, and it is found that all the methods employed give very similar results. The calculated decay widths are found to be qualitatively insensitive to the parameters of the proton-nucleus potential, i.e., changing the potential parameters over a fairly large range typically changes the decay width by no more than a factor of ∼3. Proton half-lives of observed heavy proton emitters are, in general, well reproduced by spherical calculations with the spectroscopic factors calculated in the independent quasiparticle approximation. The quantitative agreement with experimental data obtained in our study requires that the parameters of the proton-nucleus potential be chosen carefully. It also suggests that deformed proton emitters will provide invaluable spectroscopic information on the angular momentum decomposition of single-proton orbitals in deformed nuclei. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  20. Proton therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Proton Therapy Physics goes beyond current books on proton therapy to provide an in-depth overview of the physics aspects of this radiation therapy modality, eliminating the need to dig through information scattered in the medical physics literature. After tracing the history of proton therapy, the book summarizes the atomic and nuclear physics background necessary for understanding proton interactions with tissue. It describes the physics of proton accelerators, the parameters of clinical proton beams, and the mechanisms to generate a conformal dose distribution in a patient. The text then covers detector systems and measuring techniques for reference dosimetry, outlines basic quality assurance and commissioning guidelines, and gives examples of Monte Carlo simulations in proton therapy. The book moves on to discussions of treatment planning for single- and multiple-field uniform doses, dose calculation concepts and algorithms, and precision and uncertainties for nonmoving and moving targets. It also exami...

  1. Proton solvation and proton transfer in chemical and electrochemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengyel, S.; Conway, B.E.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter examines the proton solvation and characterization of the H 3 O + ion, proton transfer in chemical ionization processes in solution, continuous proton transfer in conductance processes, and proton transfer in electrode processes. Topics considered include the condition of the proton in solution, the molecular structure of the H 3 O + ion, thermodynamics of proton solvation, overall hydration energy of the proton, hydration of H 3 O + , deuteron solvation, partial molal entropy and volume and the entropy of proton hydration, proton solvation in alcoholic solutions, analogies to electrons in semiconductors, continuous proton transfer in conductance, definition and phenomenology of the unusual mobility of the proton in solution, solvent structure changes in relation to anomalous proton mobility, the kinetics of the proton-transfer event, theories of abnormal proton conductance, and the general theory of the contribution of transfer reactions to overall transport processes

  2. Accurate determination of interfacial protein secondary structure by combining interfacial-sensitive amide I and amide III spectral signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shuji; Li, Hongchun; Yang, Weilai; Luo, Yi

    2014-01-29

    Accurate determination of protein structures at the interface is essential to understand the nature of interfacial protein interactions, but it can only be done with a few, very limited experimental methods. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy can unambiguously differentiate the interfacial protein secondary structures by combining surface-sensitive amide I and amide III spectral signals. This combination offers a powerful tool to directly distinguish random-coil (disordered) and α-helical structures in proteins. From a systematic study on the interactions between several antimicrobial peptides (including LKα14, mastoparan X, cecropin P1, melittin, and pardaxin) and lipid bilayers, it is found that the spectral profiles of the random-coil and α-helical structures are well separated in the amide III spectra, appearing below and above 1260 cm(-1), respectively. For the peptides with a straight backbone chain, the strength ratio for the peaks of the random-coil and α-helical structures shows a distinct linear relationship with the fraction of the disordered structure deduced from independent NMR experiments reported in the literature. It is revealed that increasing the fraction of negatively charged lipids can induce a conformational change of pardaxin from random-coil to α-helical structures. This experimental protocol can be employed for determining the interfacial protein secondary structures and dynamics in situ and in real time without extraneous labels.

  3. Decarbonylative Phosphorylation of Amides by Palladium and Nickel Catalysis: The Hirao Cross-Coupling of Amide Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengwei; Szostak, Michal

    2017-10-02

    Considering the ubiquity of organophosphorus compounds in organic synthesis, pharmaceutical discovery agrochemical crop protection and materials chemistry, new methods for their construction hold particular significance. A conventional method for the synthesis of C-P bonds involves cross-coupling of aryl halides and dialkyl phosphites (the Hirao reaction). We report a catalytic deamidative phosphorylation of a wide range of amides using a palladium or nickel catalyst giving aryl phosphonates in good to excellent yields. The present method tolerates a wide range of functional groups. The reaction constitutes the first example of a transition-metal-catalyzed generation of C-P bonds from amides. This redox-neutral protocol can be combined with site-selective conventional cross-coupling for the regioselective synthesis of potential pharmacophores. Mechanistic studies suggest an oxidative addition/transmetallation pathway. In light of the importance of amides and phosphonates as synthetic intermediates, we envision that this Pd and Ni-catalyzed C-P bond forming method will find broad application. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Well-Defined Poly(Ortho Ester Amides) for Potential Drug Carriers: Probing the Effect of Extra- and Intracellular Drug Release on Chemotherapeutic Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guoqing; Wang, Jun; Qin, Jiejie; Hu, Liefeng; Zhang, Panpan; Wang, Xin; Tang, Rupei

    2017-07-01

    To compare the chemotherapeutic efficacy determined by extra- and intracellular drug release strategies, poly(ortho ester amide)-based drug carriers (POEAd-C) with well-defined main-chain lengths, are successfully constructed by a facile method. POEAd-C3-doxorubicin (DOX) can be rapidly dissolved to release drug at tumoral extracellular pH (6.5-7.2), while POEAd-C6-DOX can rapidly release drug following gradual swelling at intracellular pH (5.0-6.0). In vitro cytotoxicity shows that POEAd-C3-DOX exhibits more toxic effect on tumor cells than POEAd-C6-DOX at extracellular pH, but POEAd-C6-DOX has stronger tumor penetration and inhibition in vitro and in vivo tumor models. So, POEAd-C6-DOX with the intracellular drug release strategy has stronger overall chemotherapeutic efficacy than POEAd-C3-DOX with extracellular drug release strategy. It is envisioned that these poly(ortho ester amides) can have great potential as drug carriers for efficient chemotherapy with further optimization. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Study of proton radioactivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  6. Binary and ternary cocrystals of sulfa drug acetazolamide with pyridine carboxamides and cyclic amides

    OpenAIRE

    Bolla, Geetha; Nangia, Ashwini

    2016-01-01

    A novel design strategy for cocrystals of a sulfonamide drug with pyridine carboxamides and cyclic amides is developed based on synthon identification as well as size and shape match of coformers. Binary adducts of acetazolamide (ACZ) with lactams (valerolactam and caprolactam, VLM, CPR), cyclic amides (2-pyridone, labeled as 2HP and its derivatives MeHP, OMeHP) and pyridine amides (nicotinamide and picolinamide, NAM, PAM) were obtained by manual grinding, and their single crystals by solutio...

  7. Synthesis of new fatty acids amides from aminolysis of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Carolina R.; Montes D'Oca, Caroline da Ros; Duarte, Rodrigo da C.; Kurz, Marcia H.S.; Primel, Ednei G.; Clementin, Rosilene M.; Villarreyes, Joaquin Ariel M.; Montes D'Oca, Marcelo G.

    2010-01-01

    Recent biochemical and pharmacological studies have led to the characterization of different fatty acid amides as a new family of biologically active lipids. Here, we describe the synthesis of new amides from C16:0, 18:0, 18:1 and 18:1, OH fatty acids (FFA) families with cyclic and acyclic amines and demonstrate for the first time that these compounds produce cytotoxic effects. Application of this method to the synthesis of fatty acid amides was performed using the esters aminolysis as a key step and various carboxylic amides were prepared in good yield from fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). (author)

  8. FMRF-amide-like immunoreactivity in brain and pituitary of the hagfish Eptatretus burgeri (Cyclostomata)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jirikowski, G; Erhart, G; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1984-01-01

    Paraffin sections of brain and pituitary of the hagfish Eptatretus burgeri were immunostained with an antiserum to FMRF-amide. Immunoreactivity was visible in a large number of neurons in the posterior part of the ventromedial hypothalamus and in long neuronal processes extending cranially from...... the hypothalamus to the olfactory system and caudally to the medulla oblongata. FMRF-amide-like immunoreactivity was also found in cells of the adenohypophysis. These observations suggest that the hagfish possesses a brain FMRF-amide-like transmitter system and pituitary cells containing FMRF-amide-like material...

  9. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    2014-01-01

    In the last five decades, proton–proton and proton–antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion–ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  10. Development of circular protons accelerator for ocular teletherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabelo, L. A.; Campos, T.P.R.

    2011-01-01

    The proton therapy has been used for ocular tumors providing tumor control in most cases and vision preservations. The protons show high doses in depth depict lower scattering from beam than other particles, electrons and photons. The cyclotron is a type of accelerator that increases the kinetic energy of the charged particle, recirculating it on a magnetic field and crossing an accelerating electrical field. It can be used to produce radioisotopes to hospitals. The goal of this study is to investigate a unit of circular accelerator to be coupled in existing national cyclotrons to generate a proton beams suitable to ocular therapy. Herein, physical parameters are evaluable, including relativistic corrections. That result shows the viability of developing an accelerator unit to ocular proton therapy. (author)

  11. Monte-Carlo simulation of proton radiotherapy for human eye

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yunpeng; Tang Xiaobin; Xie Qin; Chen Feida; Geng Changran; Chen Da

    2010-01-01

    The 62 MeV proton beam was selected to develop a MCNPX model of the human eye to approximate dose delivered from proton therapy by. In the course of proton therapy, two treatment simulations were considered. The first simulation was an ideal treatment scenario. In this case, the dose of tumor was 50.03 Gy, which was at the level of effective treatment, while other organizations were in the range of acceptable dose. The second case was a worst case scenario to simulate a patient gazing directly into the treatment beam during therapy. The bulk of dose deposited in the cornea, lens, and anterior chamber region. However, the dose of tumor area was zero. The calculated results show an agreement accordance with the relative reference, which confirmed that the MCNPX code can simulate proton radiotherapy perfectly, and is a capable platform for patient planning. The data from the worst case can be used for dose reconstruction of the clinical accident. (authors)

  12. Clinical results of proton beam therapy for skull base chordoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igaki, Hiroshi; Tokuuye, Koichi; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sugahara, Shinji; Kagei, Kenji; Hata, Masaharu; Ohara, Kiyoshi; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Tsuboi, Koji; Takano, Shingo; Matsumura, Akira; Akine, Yasuyuki

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical results of proton beam therapy for patients with skull base chordoma. Methods and materials: Thirteen patients with skull base chordoma who were treated with proton beams with or without X-rays at the University of Tsukuba between 1989 and 2000 were retrospectively reviewed. A median total tumor dose of 72.0 Gy (range, 63.0-95.0 Gy) was delivered. The patients were followed for a median period of 69.3 months (range, 14.6-123.4 months). Results: The 5-year local control rate was 46.0%. Cause-specific, overall, and disease-free survival rates at 5 years were 72.2%, 66.7%, and 42.2%, respectively. The local control rate was higher, without statistical significance, for those with preoperative tumors <30 mL. Partial or subtotal tumor removal did not yield better local control rates than for patients who underwent biopsy only as the latest surgery. Conclusion: Proton beam therapy is effective for patients with skull base chordoma, especially for those with small tumors. For a patient with a tumor of <30 mL with no prior treatment, biopsy without tumor removal seems to be appropriate before proton beam therapy

  13. Quantitative description of proton exchange processes between water and endogenous and exogenous agents for WEX, CEST, and APT experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jinyuan; Wilson, David A; Sun, Phillip Zhe; Klaus, Judith A; Van Zijl, Peter C M

    2004-05-01

    The proton exchange processes between water and solutes containing exchangeable protons have recently become of interest for monitoring pH effects, detecting cellular mobile proteins and peptides, and enhancing the detection sensitivity of various low-concentration endogenous and exogenous species. In this work, the analytic expressions for water exchange (WEX) filter spectroscopy, chemical exchange-dependent saturation transfer (CEST), and amide proton transfer (APT) experiments are derived by the use of Bloch equations with exchange terms. The effects of the initial states for the system, the difference between a steady state and a saturation state, and the relative contributions of the forward and backward exchange processes are discussed. The theory, in combination with numerical calculations, provides a useful tool for designing experimental schemes and assessing magnetization transfer (MT) processes between water protons and solvent-exchangeable protons. As an example, the case of endogenous amide proton exchange in the rat brain at 4.7 T is analyzed in detail. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. MSPT: Motion Simulator for Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In proton therapy, the delivery method named spot scanning, can provide a particularly efficient treatment in terms of tumor coverage and healthy tissues protection. The dosimetric benefits of proton therapy may be greatly degraded due to intra-fraction motions. Hence, the study of mitigation or adaptive methods is necessary. For this purpose, we developed an open-source 4D dose computation and evaluation software, MSPT (Motion Simulator for Proton Therapy), for the spot-scanning delivery technique. It aims at highlighting the impact of intra-fraction motions during a treatment delivery by computing the dose distribution in the moving patient. In addition, the use of MSPT allowed us to develop and propose a new motion mitigation strategy based on the adjustment of the beam's weight when the proton beam is scanning across the tumor. In photon therapy, a main concern for deliveries using a multi-leaf collimator (MLC) relies on finding a series of MLC configurations to deliver properly the treatment. The efficiency of such series is measured by the total beam-on time and the total setup time. In our work, we study the minimization of these efficiency criteria from an algorithmic point of view, for new variants of MLCs: the rotating MLC and the dual-layer MLC. In addition, we propose an approximation algorithm to find a series of configurations that minimizes the total beam-on time for the rotating MLC. (author) [fr

  15. Copper(II)-catalyzed amidations of alkynyl bromides as a general synthesis of ynamides and Z-enamides. An intramolecular amidation for the synthesis of macrocyclic ynamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuejun; Zhang, Yanshi; Huang, Jian; Hsung, Richard P; Kurtz, Kimberly C M; Oppenheimer, Jossian; Petersen, Matthew E; Sagamanova, Irina K; Shen, Lichun; Tracey, Michael R

    2006-05-26

    A general and efficient method for the coupling of a wide range of amides with alkynyl bromides is described here. This novel amidation reaction involves a catalytic protocol using copper(II) sulfate-pentahydrate and 1,10-phenanthroline to direct the sp-C-N bond formation, leading to a structurally diverse array of ynamides including macrocyclic ynamides via an intramolecular amidation. Given the surging interest in ynamide chemistry, this atom economical synthesis of ynamides should invoke further attention from the synthetic organic community.

  16. Amides are novel protein modifications formed by physiological sugars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glomb, M A; Pfahler, C

    2001-11-09

    The Maillard reaction, or nonenzymatic browning, proceeds in vivo, and the resulting protein modifications (advanced glycation end products) have been associated with various pathologies. Despite intensive research only very few structures have been established in vivo. We report here for the first time N(6)-[2-[(5-amino-5-carboxypentyl)amino]-2-oxoethyl]lysine (GOLA) and N(6)-glycoloyllysine (GALA) as prototypes for novel amide protein modifications produced by reducing sugars. Their identity was confirmed by independent synthesis and coupled liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Model reactions with N(alpha)-t-butoxycarbonyl-lysine showed that glyoxal and glycolaldehyde are immediate precursors, and reaction pathways are directly linked to N(epsilon)-carboxymethyllysine via glyoxal-imine structures. GOLA, the amide cross-link, and 1,3-bis(5-amino-5-carboxypentyl)imidazolium salt (GOLD), the imidazolium cross-link, share a common intermediate. The ratio of GOLA to GOLD is greater when glyoxal levels are low at constant lysine concentrations. GOLA and GALA formation from the Amadori product of glucose and lysine depends directly upon oxidation. With the advanced glycation end product inhibitors aminoguanidine and pyridoxamine we were able to dissect oxidative fragmentation of the Amadori product as a second mechanism of GOLA formation exactly coinciding with N(epsilon)-carboxymethyllysine synthesis. In contrast, the formation of GALA appears to depend solely upon glyoxal-imines. After enzymatic hydrolysis GOLA was found at 66 pmol/mg of brunescent lens protein. This suggests amide protein modifications as important markers of pathophysiological processes.

  17. Analytical applications of resins containing amide and polyamine functional groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orf, G.M.

    1977-01-01

    Resins are prepared by chemically bonding N,N-dialkylamides and polyamine functional groups to Amberlite XAD-4. These resins are applied to the concentration of metal ions from dilute aqueous solution and the rapid separation of metal ions by high-speed liquid chromatography with continuous on-line detection of the eluent stream. A dibutyl amide resin is used for the separation of uranium(VI), thorium(IV), and zirconium(IV) from each other and several other metal ions. Uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) are determined in the presence of large excesses of foreign metal ions and anions. A practical application of the amide resin is studied by determining uranium in low grade uranium ores. The amide resin is also used for the selective concentration of gold(III) from seawater. A triethylenetetramine resin is used for the separation of copper(II) from equal molar amounts and large excesses of nickel(II), cobalt(II), zinc(II), cadmium(II), iron(III) and aluminum(III). Copper(II), nickel(II), zinc(II), cobalt(II) and cadmium(II) are determined in the presence of large excesses of calcium(II) and magnesium(II). The resin was found to be selective for silver(I) and mercury(II) at low pH values and a rapid separation of equal molar amounts of copper(II) and silver(I) was performed. The resin was also found to have an affinity for anionic metal complexes such as iron(III)-tartrate when the resin is in the hydrogen form. A study of the retention of the anions chromium(III)-tartrate and dichromate at various pH values was performed to better understand the anion exchange properties of the resin. Triethylenetetramine resins were also prepared from polystyrene gel to make a resin with higher capacities for copper

  18. Bulk functionalization of graphene using diazonium compounds and amide reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chang; Xiong, Yuzi; Liu, Zhibo; Zhang, Fan; Ou, Encai; Qian, Jiangtao; Xiong, Yuanqin; Xu, Weijian

    2013-09-01

    An efficient and convenient method is applied to introduce varieties of simple functionalities onto the graphene surface for the bulk preparation, which begins with pristine graphite that does not require initial oxidative damage of the graphene basal planes. Diazonium compounds functionalized reaction is demonstrated and it successfully prevented the aggregation of graphene for which providing solubility in high polar organic media or even in volatile solvents such as ethanol and acetone. This approach is complemented by the phenyl carboxylic diazonium salt functionalized graphene (PCFG) attachment of a symmetrically substituted zinc phthalocyanine (PCFG-Pc) using the amide reaction, which is used for the covalent introduction of a complex phthalocyanine molecule.

  19. Antifungal activity of natural and synthetic amides from Piper species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Joaquim V.; Oliveira, Alberto de; Kato, Massuo J., E-mail: majokato@iq.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IQ/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Raggi, Ludmila; Young, Maria C. [Instituto de Botanica, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Secao de Fisiologia e Bioquimica de Plantas

    2010-07-01

    The antifungal leaves extract from Piper scutifolium was submitted to bioactivity-guided chromatographic separation against Cladosporium cladosporioides and C. sphaerospermum yielding piperine, piperlonguminine and corcovadine as the active principles which displayed a detection limit of 1 {mu}g. Structure-activity relationships were investigated with the preparation of twelve analogs having differences in the number of unsaturations, aromatic ring substituents and in the amide moiety. Analogs having a single double-bond and no substituent in the aromatic ring displayed higher activity, while N,N,-diethyl analogs displayed higher dose-dependent activity. (author)

  20. Identification of nitrogen compounds and amides from spent hydroprocessing catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, J.H.K.; Gray, M.R. (University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1991-06-01

    A spent commercial naphtha hydrotreating catalyst was analyzed to identify compounds which had accumulated on the catalyst surface during its active life. The catalyst was extracted with methylene chloride, methanol and pyridine to remove adsorbed organic material, which was rich in nitrogen and oxygen. A series of quinolones were identified in the methanol extract after enrichment with HCl-modified silica gel adsorption and subsequent silica gel chromatography. Tetra- and hexahydroquinolones with alkyl substituents up to C{sub 3} were identified. Similar amides have been identified in asphaltenes, and are very resistant to hydrogenation. Tetrahydroquinolines and piperidines were detected in the pyridine extract. 36 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Coordination compounds of cobalt and cadmium with isobutyric acid amide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsivadze, A.Yu.; Ivanova, I.S.; Solovkina, O.A.

    1983-01-01

    Coordination compounds of cobalt and cadmium with isobutyric acid amide (IBAA) of Co(NCS) 2 x(IBAA) 2 (H 2 O) 2 , CoCl 2 (IBAA) 4 , CoI 2 (IBAA) 8 (H 2 O) 2 , CdI 2 (IBAA) 2 composition have been synthesized and characterized. Their infrared absorption spectra (200-400 cm -1 ), electron reflection spectra (200-750 nm) were studied. It is shown that in all compounds there are IBAA molecUles coordinated through an oxygen atom. Thiocyanogroups are coordinated throUgh nitrogen atoms

  2. Proton Fast Ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, M H; Freeman, R R; Hatchett, S P; MacKinnon, A J; Patel, P K; Snavely, R A; Stephens, R B

    2006-04-01

    Fast ignition (FI) by a laser generated ballistically focused proton beam is a more recently proposed alternative to the original concept of FI by a laser generated beam of relativistic electrons. It has potential advantages in less complex energy transport into dense plasma. Recent successful target heating experiments motivate further investigation of the feasibility of proton fast ignition. The concept, the physics and characteristics of the proton beams, the recent experimental work on focusing of the beams and heating of solid targets and the overall prospects for proton FI are discussed

  3. Analysis of the critical step in catalytic carbodiimide transformation: proton transfer from amines, phosphines, and alkynes to guanidinates, phosphaguanidinates, and propiolamidinates with Li and Al catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Christopher N; Ong, Tiow-Gan; Priem, Jessica; Richeson, Darrin S; Woo, Tom K

    2008-12-15

    While lithium amides supported by tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA) are efficient catalysts in the synthesis of substituted guanidines via the guanylation of an amine with carbodiimide, as well as the guanylation of phosphines and conversion of alkynes into propiolamidines, aluminum amides are only efficient catalysts for the guanylation of amides. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to explain this difference in activity. The origin of this behavior is apparent in the critical step where a proton is transferred from the substrate to a metal guanidinate. The activation energies of these steps are modest for amines, phosphines, and alkynes when a lithium catalyst was used, but are prohibitively high for the analogous reactions with phosphines and alkynes for aluminum amide catalysts. Energy decomposition analysis (EDA) indicates that these high activations energies are due to the high energetic cost of the detachment of a chelating guanidinate nitrogen from the aluminum in the proton transfer transition state. Amines are able to adopt an ideal geometry for facile proton transfer to the aluminum guanidinate and concomitant Al-N bond formation, while phosphines and alkynes are not.

  4. An analytical reconstruction model of the spread-out Bragg peak using laser-accelerated proton beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Li; Zhu, Kun; Zhu, Jungao; Xu, Xiaohan; Lin, Chen; Ma, Wenjun; Lu, Haiyang; Zhao, Yanying; Lu, Yuanrong; Chen, Jia-Er; Yan, Xueqing

    2017-07-07

    With the development of laser technology, laser-driven proton acceleration provides a new method for proton tumor therapy. However, it has not been applied in practice because of the wide and decreasing energy spectrum of laser-accelerated proton beams. In this paper, we propose an analytical model to reconstruct the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) using laser-accelerated proton beams. Firstly, we present a modified weighting formula for protons of different energies. Secondly, a theoretical model for the reconstruction of SOBPs with laser-accelerated proton beams has been built. It can quickly calculate the number of laser shots needed for each energy interval of the laser-accelerated protons. Finally, we show the 2D reconstruction results of SOBPs for laser-accelerated proton beams and the ideal situation. The final results show that our analytical model can give an SOBP reconstruction scheme that can be used for actual tumor therapy.

  5. Hospital-based proton linear accelerator for particle therapy and radioisotope production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Arlene J.

    1991-05-01

    Taking advantage of recent advances in linear accelerator technology, it is possible for a hospital to use a 70 MeV proton linac for fast neutron therapy, boron neutron capture therapy, proton therapy for ocular melanomas, and production of radiopharmaceuticals. The linac can also inject protons into a synchrotron for proton therapy of deep-seated tumors. With 180 μA average current, a single linac can support all these applications. This paper presents a conceptual design for a medical proton linac, switchyard, treatment rooms, and isotope production rooms. Special requirements for each application are outlined and a layout for sharing beam among the applications is suggested.

  6. Power of protons in the fight against cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, W.

    2011-01-01

    a large percentage of patients with cancer are receiving radiotherapy as part of their treatment. At present it is possible to plan with precision these treatments, reducing the risk of side effects and increasing therapeutic efficiency. Proton therapy (also known as particle therapy) is a form external radiotherapy that uses beams of energized protons to treat cancer. The main advantage of proton therapy is its ability to accurately manage an optimal dose of radiation to the tumor, without damaging surrounding healthy tissues and significantly reducing the likelihood and/or severity of side effects. (Author)

  7. Proton decay: spectroscopic probe beyond the proton drip line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seweryniak, D; Davids, C N; Robinson, A; Woods, P J; Blank, B; Carpenter, M P; Davinson, T; Freeman, S J; Hammond, N; Hoteling, N; Janssens, R V F; Khoo, T L; Liu, Z; Mukherjee, G; Shergur, J; Sinha, S; Sonzogni, A A; Walters, W B; Woehr, A

    2005-01-01

    Proton decay has been transformed in recent years from an exotic phenomenon into a powerful spectroscopic tool. The frontiers of experimental and theoretical proton-decay studies will be reviewed. Different aspects of proton decay will be illustrated with recent results on the deformed proton emitter 135 Tb, the odd-odd deformed proton emitter 130 Eu, the complex fine structure in the odd-odd 146 Tm nucleus and on excited states in the transitional proton emitter 145 Tm

  8. Review of inelastic proton-proton reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Morrison, Douglas Robert Ogston

    1973-01-01

    The most important new results on inelastic proton-proton scattering obtained with the new machines, I.S.R. and N.A.L., are: (1) The inelastic cross-section increases monotonically with energy from threshold to 1500 GeV/c. Above 6 GeV/c the energy variation has a s /sup +0.04/ behaviour. (2) Scaling is observed at I.S.R. energies in pion production. Confirmation is obtained of the hypothesis of limiting fragmentation. (3) The results are in general, consistent with the two-component model-one class of events being produced by diffraction dissociation and the other by a short-range-order process (e.g. the multiperipheral model). (4) There are indications that the protons have a granular structure; this from observation of secondaries of large transverse momenta. (33 refs).

  9. Proton beam stereotactic radiosurgery of vestibular schwannomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harsh, Griffith R.; Thornton, Allan F.; Chapman, Paul H.; Bussiere, Marc R.; Rabinov, James D.; Loeffler, Jay S.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The proton beam's Bragg peak permits highly conformal radiation of skull base tumors. This study, prompted by reports of transient (30% each) and permanent (10% each) facial and trigeminal neuropathy after stereotactic radiosurgery of vestibular schwannomas with marginal doses of 16-20 Gy, assessed whether proton beam radiosurgery using a marginal dose of only 12 Gy could control vestibular schwannomas while causing less neuropathy. Methods and Materials: Sixty-eight patients (mean age 67 years) were treated between 1992 and 1998. The mean tumor volume was 2.49 cm 3 . The dose to the tumor margin (70% isodose line) was 12 Gy. The prospectively specified follow-up consisted of neurologic evaluation and MRI at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. Results: After a mean clinical follow-up of 44 months and imaging follow-up of 34 months in 64 patients, 35 tumors (54.7%) were smaller and 25 (39.1%) were unchanged (tumor control rate 94%; actuarial control rate 94% at 2 years and 84% at 5 years). Three tumors enlarged: one shrank after repeated radiosurgery, one remained enlarged at the time of unrelated death, and one had not been imaged for 4 years in a patient who remained asymptomatic at last follow-up. Intratumoral hemorrhage into one stable tumor required craniotomy that proved successful. Thus, 97% of tumors required no additional treatment. Three patients (4.7%) underwent shunting for hydrocephalus evident as increased ataxia. Of 6 patients with functional hearing ipsilaterally, 1 improved, 1 was unchanged, and 4 progressively lost hearing. Cranial neuropathies were infrequent: persistent facial hypesthesia (2 new, 1 exacerbated; 4.7%); intermittent facial paresthesias (5 new, 1 exacerbated; 9.4%); persistent facial weakness (2 new, 1 exacerbated; 4.7%) requiring oculoplasty; transient partial facial weakness (5 new, 1 exacerbated; 9.4%), and synkinesis (5 new, 1 exacerbated; 9.4%). Conclusion: Proton beam stereotactic radiosurgery of vestibular schwannomas at the

  10. Sinus Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RESOURCES Medical Societies Patient Education About this Website Font Size + - Home > CONDITIONS > Sinus Tumors Adult Sinusitis Pediatric ... and they vary greatly in location, size and type. Care for these tumors is individualized to each ...

  11. Tumors markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi-Mizumoto, N.H.

    1989-01-01

    In order to study blood and cell components alterations (named tumor markers) that may indicate the presence of a tumor, several methods are presented. Aspects as diagnostic, prognostic, therapeutic value and clinical evaluation are discussed. (M.A.C.)

  12. Wilms tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... suggested. Alternative Names Nephroblastoma; Kidney tumor - Wilms Images Kidney anatomy Wilms tumor References Babaian KN, Delacroix SE, Wood CG, Jonasch E. Kidney cancer. In: Skorecki K, Chertow GM, Marsden PA, ...

  13. Review of medical radiography and tomography with proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert P.

    2018-01-01

    The use of hadron beams, especially proton beams, in cancer radiotherapy has expanded rapidly in the past two decades. To fully realize the advantages of hadron therapy over traditional x-ray and gamma-ray therapy requires accurate positioning of the Bragg peak throughout the tumor being treated. A half century ago, suggestions had already been made to use protons themselves to develop images of tumors and surrounding tissue, to be used for treatment planning. The recent global expansion of hadron therapy, coupled with modern advances in computation and particle detection, has led several collaborations around the world to develop prototype detector systems and associated reconstruction codes for proton computed tomography (pCT), as well as more simple proton radiography, with the ultimate intent to use such systems in clinical treatment planning and verification. Recent imaging results of phantoms in hospital proton beams are encouraging, but many technical and programmatic challenges remain to be overcome before pCT scanners will be introduced into clinics. This review introduces hadron therapy and the perceived advantages of pCT and proton radiography for treatment planning, reviews its historical development, and discusses the physics related to proton imaging, the associated experimental and computation issues, the technologies used to attack the problem, contemporary efforts in detector and computational development, and the current status and outlook.

  14. Complexation of di-amides of dipicolinic acid with neodymium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapka, J.L.; Paulenova, A. [Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University: 100 Radiation Center, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Di-amides have undergone significant studies as possible ligands for use in the partitioning of trivalent minor actinides and lanthanides. The binding affinities of three isomeric ligands with neodymium in acetonitrile solution have been investigated. The stability constants of the metal-ligand complexes formed between different isomers of N,N'-diethyl-N,N'- ditolyl-di-picolinamide (EtTDPA) and trivalent neodymium in acetonitrile have been determined by spectrophotometric and calorimetric methods. Each isomer of EtTDPA has been found to be capable of forming three complexes with trivalent neodymium, Nd(EtTDPA), Nd(EtTDPA){sub 2}, and Nd(EtTDPA){sub 3}. Values from spectrophotometric and calorimetric titrations are within reasonable agreement with each other. The order of stability constants for each metal:ligand complex decreases in the order Et(m)TDPA > Et(p)TDPA > Et(o)TDPA. The obtained values are comparable to other di-amidic ligands obtained under similar system conditions and mirror previously obtained solvent extraction data for EtTDPA at low ionic strengths. (authors.

  15. Poly(ester amide)s based on (L)-lactic acid oligomers and α-amino acids: influence of the α-amino acid side chain in the poly(ester amide)s properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Ana C; Coelho, Jorge F J; Valente, Joana F A; Correia, Tiago R; Correia, Ilídio J; Gil, Maria H; Simões, Pedro N

    2013-01-01

    Novel biodegradable and low cytotoxic poly(ester amide)s (PEAs) based on α-amino acids and (L)-lactic acid (L-LA) oligomers were successfully synthesized by interfacial polymerization. The chemical structure of the new polymers was confirmed by spectroscopic analyses. Further characterization suggests that the α-amino acid plays a critical role on the final properties of the PEA. L-phenylalanine provides PEAs with higher glass transition temperature, whereas glycine enhances the crystallinity. The hydrolytic degradation in PBS (pH = 7.4) at 37 °C also depends on the α-amino acid, being faster for glycine-based PEAs. The cytotoxic profiles using fibroblast human cells indicate that the PEAs did not elicit an acute cytotoxic effect. The strategy presented in this work opens the possibility of synthesizing biodegradable PEAs with low citotoxicity by an easy and fast method. It is worth to mention also that the properties of these materials can be fine-tuned only by changing the α-amino acid.

  16. AMID: Accurate Magnetic Indoor Localization Using Deep Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namkyoung Lee

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Geomagnetic-based indoor positioning has drawn a great attention from academia and industry due to its advantage of being operable without infrastructure support and its reliable signal characteristics. However, it must overcome the problems of ambiguity that originate with the nature of geomagnetic data. Most studies manage this problem by incorporating particle filters along with inertial sensors. However, they cannot yield reliable positioning results because the inertial sensors in smartphones cannot precisely predict the movement of users. There have been attempts to recognize the magnetic sequence pattern, but these attempts are proven only in a one-dimensional space, because magnetic intensity fluctuates severely with even a slight change of locations. This paper proposes accurate magnetic indoor localization using deep learning (AMID, an indoor positioning system that recognizes magnetic sequence patterns using a deep neural network. Features are extracted from magnetic sequences, and then the deep neural network is used for classifying the sequences by patterns that are generated by nearby magnetic landmarks. Locations are estimated by detecting the landmarks. AMID manifested the proposed features and deep learning as an outstanding classifier, revealing the potential of accurate magnetic positioning with smartphone sensors alone. The landmark detection accuracy was over 80% in a two-dimensional environment.

  17. Evaluation of amides and centrifugation temperature in boar semen cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, I; Calderam, K; Maschio, E F; Madeira, E M; da Rosa Ulguim, R; Corcini, C D; Bongalhardo, D C; Corrêa, E K; Lucia, T; Deschamps, J C; Corrêa, M N

    2008-03-15

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of amides as cryoprotectants and two centrifugation temperatures (15 or 24 degrees C) in boar semen cryopreservation protocols. Semen was diluted in BTS, cooled centrifuged, added to cooling extenders, followed by the addition of various cryoprotectants. In experiment 1, mean (+/-S.E.M.) sperm motility for 5% dimethylformamide (DMF; 50.6+/-1.9%) and 5% dimethylacetamide (DMA; 53.8+/-1.7%) were superior (P0.05). In experiment 2, we tested MF, DMF, and DMA at 3, 5, and 7%. Sperm motility and membrane integrity were higher for 5% DMA (53.8+/-1.7 and 50.9+/-1.9%) and 5% DMF (50.6+/-1.9 and 47.9+/-2.1%), in comparison with 7% DMF and all MF concentrations (P0.05). In conclusion, boar semen was successfully cryopreserved by replacement of glycerol with amides (especially 5% DMA) and centrifugation at 15 degrees C, with benefits for post-thaw sperm motility and membrane integrity.

  18. Study on patient-induced radioactivity during proton treatment in hengjian proton medical facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qingbiao; Wang, Qingbin; Liang, Tianjiao; Zhang, Gang; Ma, Yinglin; Chen, Yu; Ye, Rong; Liu, Qiongyao; Wang, Yufei; Wang, Huaibao

    2016-09-01

    At present, increasingly more proton medical facilities have been established globally for better curative effect and less side effect in tumor treatment. Compared with electron and photon, proton delivers more energy and dose at its end of range (Bragg peak), and has less lateral scattering for its much larger mass. However, proton is much easier to produce neutron and induced radioactivity, which makes radiation protection for proton accelerators more difficult than for electron accelerators. This study focuses on the problem of patient-induced radioactivity during proton treatment, which has been ignored for years. However, we confirmed it is a vital factor for radiation protection to both patient escort and positioning technician, by FLUKA's simulation and activation formula calculation of Hengjian Proton Medical Facility (HJPMF), whose energy ranges from 130 to 230MeV. Furthermore, new formulas for calculating the activity buildup process of periodic irradiation were derived and used to study the relationship between saturation degree and half-life of nuclides. Finally, suggestions are put forward to lessen the radiation hazard from patient-induced radioactivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Pedersen, Morten Jeppe; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Nissen, Poul

    2008-01-01

    molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological...... proton pumps emerge. Most notably, the minimal pumping apparatus of all pumps consists of a central proton acceptor/donor, a positively charged residue to control pK (a) changes of the proton acceptor/donor, and bound water molecules to facilitate rapid proton transport along proton wires....

  20. [Synthetic transformations of higher terpenoids. XXX. Synthesis and cytotoxic activity of betulonic acid amides with a piperidine or pyrrolidine nitroxide moiety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antimonova, A N; Petrenko, N I; Shults, E E; Polienko, Iu F; Shakirov, M M; Irtegova, I G; Pokrovskiĭ, M A; Sherman, K M; Grigor'ev, I A; Pokrovskiĭ, A G; Tolstikov, G A

    2013-01-01

    The reaction of betulonic acid chloride with 4-amino-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpeperidine-1-oxyl, 3-amino-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-1-oxyl and 3-aminomethyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-1-oxyl gave corresponding triterpenoid amides. It was found that new derivatives exhibit cytotoxic activity against tumor cells CEM-13, U-937, MT-4. CCID50 value for most activity compound--N-[3-oxolup-20(29)-en-30-yl]-(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-4-yl)-1-oxyl--was 5.7-33.1 microM.

  1. Cross-Coupling of Amides with Alkylboranes via Nickel-Catalyzed C–N Bond Cleavage

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xiangqian; Hsiao, Chien-Chi; Guo, Lin; Rueping, Magnus

    2018-01-01

    A protocol for the nickel-catalyzed alkylation of amides was established. The use of alkylboranes as nucleophilic partners allowed the use of mild reaction conditions and compatibility of various functional groups with respect to both coupling partners. The catalytic alkylation proceeded selectively at the amides in the presence of other functional groups as well as other carboxylic acid derived moieties.

  2. Cross-Coupling of Amides with Alkylboranes via Nickel-Catalyzed C–N Bond Cleavage

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xiangqian

    2018-05-09

    A protocol for the nickel-catalyzed alkylation of amides was established. The use of alkylboranes as nucleophilic partners allowed the use of mild reaction conditions and compatibility of various functional groups with respect to both coupling partners. The catalytic alkylation proceeded selectively at the amides in the presence of other functional groups as well as other carboxylic acid derived moieties.

  3. Hydrophilic segmented block copolymers based on poly(ethylene oxide) and monodisperse amide segments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Husken, D.; Feijen, Jan; Gaymans, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Segmented block copolymers based on poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) flexible segments and monodisperse crystallizable bisester tetra-amide segments were made via a polycondensation reaction. The molecular weight of the PEO segments varied from 600 to 4600 g/mol and a bisester tetra-amide segment (T6T6T)

  4. Shear and dielectric responses of propylene carbonate, tripropylene glycol, and a mixture of two secondary amides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gainaru, Catalin; Hecksher, Tina; Olsen, Niels Boye

    2012-01-01

    Propylene carbonate and a mixture of two secondary amides, N-ethylformamide and Nethylacetamide, are investigated by means of broadband dielectric and mechanical shear spectroscopy. The similarities between the rheological and the dielectric responses of these liquids and of the previously invest...... in the secondary amides. In addition, the predictions of the shoving model are confirmed for the investigated liquids...

  5. Uranyl Photocleavage of Phosphopeptides Yields Truncated C-Terminally Amidated Peptide Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elnegaard, Rasmus L B; Møllegaard, Niels Erik; Zhang, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    photocleavage reaction of a tetraphosphorylated β-casein model peptide. We show that the primary photocleavage products of the uranyl-catalysed reaction are C-terminally amidated. This could be of great interest to the pharmaceutical industry, as efficient peptide amidation reactions are one of the top...

  6. Solvent and conformation dependence of amide I vibrations in peptides and proteins containing proline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, Santanu; Lessing, Joshua; Meisl, Georg; Ganim, Ziad; Tokmakoff, Andrei; Knoester, Jasper; Jansen, Thomas L. C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a mixed quantum-classical model for studying the amide I vibrational dynamics (predominantly CO stretching) in peptides and proteins containing proline. There are existing models developed for determining frequencies of and couplings between the secondary amide units. However, these are

  7. Metal-Free N-Arylation of Secondary Amides at Room Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Tinnis, Fredrik; Stridfeldt, Elin; Lundberg, Helena; Adolfsson, Hans; Olofsson, Berit

    2015-01-01

    The arylation of secondary acyclic amides has been achieved with diaryliodonium salts under mild and metal-free conditions. The methodology has a wide scope, allows synthesis of tertiary amides with highly congested aryl moieties, and avoids the regioselectivity problems observed in reactions with (diacetoxyiodo)benzene.

  8. A Convenient Approach to Synthesizing Peptide C-Terminal N-Alkyl Amides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wei-Jie; Yakovleva, Tatyana; Aldrich, Jane V.

    2014-01-01

    Peptide C-terminal N-alkyl amides have gained more attention over the past decade due to their biological properties, including improved pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles. However, the synthesis of this type of peptide on solid phase by current available methods can be challenging. Here we report a convenient method to synthesize peptide C-terminal N-alkyl amides using the well-known Fukuyama N-alkylation reaction on a standard resin commonly used for the synthesis of peptide C-terminal primary amides, the PAL-PEG-PS (Peptide Amide Linker-polyethylene glycol-polystyrene) resin. The alkylation and oNBS deprotection were conducted under basic conditions and were therefore compatible with this acid labile resin. The alkylation reaction was very efficient on this resin with a number of different alkyl iodides or bromides, and the synthesis of model enkephalin N-alkyl amide analogs using this method gave consistently high yields and purities, demonstrating the applicability of this methodology. The synthesis of N-alkyl amides was more difficult on a Rink amide resin, especially the coupling of the first amino acid to the N-alkyl amine, resulting in lower yields for loading the first amino acid onto the resin. This method can be widely applied in the synthesis of peptide N-alkyl amides. PMID:22252422

  9. Comparing Amide-Forming Reactions Using Green Chemistry Metrics in an Undergraduate Organic Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennie, Michael W.; Roth, Jessica M.

    2016-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, upper-division undergraduate chemistry and biochemistry majors investigate amide-bond-forming reactions from a green chemistry perspective. Using hydrocinnamic acid and benzylamine as reactants, students perform three types of amide-forming reactions: an acid chloride derivative route; a coupling reagent promoted…

  10. Spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Oezsarlak, Oe.; Schepper, A.M.A. de; Parizel, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal tumors are uncommon lesions but may cause significant morbidity in terms of limb dysfunction. In establishing the differential diagnosis for a spinal lesion, location is the most important feature, but the clinical presentation and the patient's age and gender are also important. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays a central role in the imaging of spinal tumors, easily allowing tumors to be classified as extradural, intradural-extramedullary or intramedullary, which is very useful in tumor characterization. In the evaluation of lesions of the osseous spine both computed tomography (CT) and MR are important. We describe the most common spinal tumors in detail. In general, extradural lesions are the most common with metastasis being the most frequent. Intradural tumors are rare, and the majority is extramedullary, with meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors being the most frequent. Intramedullary tumors are uncommon spinal tumors. Astrocytomas and ependymomas comprise the majority of the intramedullary tumors. The most important tumors are documented with appropriate high quality CT or MR images and the characteristics of these tumors are also summarized in a comprehensive table. Finally we illustrate the use of the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of neoplasms affecting the central nervous system

  11. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  12. Urogenital tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    An overview is provided for veterinary care of urogenital tumors in companion animals, especially the dog. Neoplasms discussed include tumors of the kidney, urinary bladder, prostate, testis, ovary, vagina, vulva and the canine transmissible venereal tumor. Topics addressed include description, diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Giving Protons a Boost

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The first of LHC's superconducting radio-frequency cavity modules has passed its final test at full power in the test area of building SM18. These modules carry an oscillating electric field that will accelerate protons around the LHC ring and help maintain the stability of the proton beams.

  14. On the proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonda, L.; Ghirardi, G.C.; Weber, T.

    1983-07-01

    The problem of the proton decay is considered taking into account that in actual experiments there is an interaction of the proton with its environment which could imply an increase of its theoretical lifetime. It is seen that, by application of the time-energy uncertainty relation, no prolongation of the lifetime is obtained in this case. (author)

  15. PROTON RADIATION THERAPY: CLINICAL APPLICATION OPPORTUNITIES AND RESEARCH PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Zabelin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is the review of literature concerning use of proton beam therapy in treatment of oncology. The staticized data on comparison of effi ciency of this method at an eye melanoma are lit. Advantages of proton therapy on the level of local control and depression of frequency of development of the radio induced cataract are refl ected in the provided data. In evident material the technology of preparation and carrying out radiation of an eye is shortly covered with a fascicle of protons. The experience of use of proton therapy of tumors of a skull base got for the last several decades, showed good results. Physical properties of a fascicle of protons allow to achieve the maximum dose conformality, having lowered, thereby, a radial load on the next crucial anatomical structures. The presented material on an oncopediatrics shows insuffi cient knowledge of scientists concerning advantage of a fascicle of protons over modern methods of photon radiation. There are only preliminary clinical results concerning generally of treatment of cranyopharyngiomas. At cancer therapy of a mammary gland, proton therapy showed the best local control of postoperative recurrent tumors, and also depression of a dose load on the contralateral party. The available results of the retrospective analysis of clinical data in the University medical center of Lome Linda, testify to advantages of proton therapy of the localized prostate cancer. The lack of a biochemical recurrence and a local tumoral progression within 5 years after radiation was shown. The data obtained from experience of use of proton radiation therapy with passively scattered fascicle for cancer therapy of a prostate at an early stage showed the admixed results in comparison with modern methods of radiation therapy with the modulated intensity. In treatment of non-small cell cancer of mild advantage of proton therapy aren’t absolutely proved yet. There are data on extreme toxicity of a combination

  16. PS proton source

    CERN Multimedia

    1959-01-01

    The first proton source used at CERN's Proton Synchrotron (PS) which started operation in 1959. This is CERN's oldest accelerator still functioning today (2018). It is part of the accelerator chain that supplies proton beams to the Large Hadron Collider. The source is a Thonemann type. In order to extract and accelerate the protons at high energy, a high frequency electrical field is used (140Mhz). The field is transmitted by a coil around a discharge tube in order to maintain the gas hydrogen in an ionised state. An electrical field pulse, in the order of 15kV, is then applied via an impulse transformer between anode and cathode of the discharge tube. The electrons and protons of the plasma formed in the ionised gas in the tube, are then separated. Currents in the order of 200mA during 100 microseconds have benn obtained with this type of source.

  17. Chemical-exchange-sensitive MRI of amide, amine and NOE at 9.4 T versus 15.2 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Julius Juhyun; Choi, Wonmin; Jin, Tao; Lee, Jung Hee; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2017-09-01

    Chemical exchange (CE)-sensitive MRI benefits greatly from stronger magnetic fields; however, field effects on CE-sensitive imaging have not yet been studied well in vivo. We have compared CE-sensitive Z-spectra and maps obtained at the fields of 9.4 T and 15.2 T in phantoms and rats with off-resonance chemical-exchange-sensitive spin lock (CESL), which is similar to conventional chemical exchange saturation transfer. At higher fields, the background peak at water resonance has less spread and the exchange rate relative to chemical shift decreases, thus CESL intensity is dependent on B 0 . For the in vivo amide and nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) composite resonances of rat brains, intensities were similar for both magnetic fields, but effective amide proton transfer and NOE values obtained with three-point quantification or a curve fitting method were larger at 15.2 T due to the reduced spread of attenuation at the direct water resonance. When using intermediate exchange-sensitive irradiation parameters, the amine proton signal was 65% higher at 15.2 T than at 9.4 T due to a reduced ratio of exchange rate to chemical shift. In summary, increasing magnetic field provides enhancements to CE-sensitive signals in the intermediate exchange regime and reduces contamination from background signals in the slow exchange regime. Consequently, ultrahigh magnetic field is advantageous for CE-sensitive MRI, especially for amine and hydroxyl protons. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Food emulsions with amidated pectin from celery (Apium graveolens var. rapaceum D.C. tubers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iv. Petrova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Hydrocolloids, especially polysaccharides from traditional plant sources and their derivatives possessed significant emulsifying properties. Pectin was isolated from celery tubers by accelerated “green” method for extraction based on ultrasonic irradiation. Further chemical modification of celery pectin was performed with 4 mol/L NH The amidated celery pectin was obtained with the following characteristics: the degree of esterification (DE 31%, the degree of 3. amidation (DA 16%, degree of acetylation (DAc 2% and anhydrouronic acid content (AUAC 68%. This modified pectin was incorporated in preparation of model 30, 40 and 50% oil-in-water emulsions. The effect of amidation of celery pectin on the stability of emulsions was investigated. The results showed that amidation increased the emulsifying properties of pectic polysaccharides. It affected also the rheological characteristics of model emulsion. The current study demonstrated preparation of emulsion with low-caloric amidated pectin as proper alternative to the traditional emulsifiers.

  19. Synthesis of amide-functionalized cellulose esters by olefin cross-metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangtao; Edgar, Kevin J

    2015-11-05

    Cellulose esters with amide functionalities were synthesized by cross-metathesis (CM) reaction of terminally olefinic esters with different acrylamides, catalyzed by Hoveyda-Grubbs 2nd generation catalyst. Chelation by amides of the catalyst ruthenium center caused low conversions using conventional solvents. The effects of both solvent and structure of acrylamide on reaction conversion were investigated. While the inherent tendency of acrylamides to chelate Ru is governed by the acrylamide N-substituents, employing acetic acid as a solvent significantly improved the conversion of certain acrylamides, from 50% to up to 99%. Homogeneous hydrogenation using p-toluenesulfonyl hydrazide successfully eliminated the α,β-unsaturation of the CM products to give stable amide-functionalized cellulose esters. The amide-functionalized product showed higher Tg than its starting terminally olefinic counterpart, which may have resulted from strong hydrogen bonding interactions of the amide functional groups. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nickel-catalysed retro-hydroamidocarbonylation of aliphatic amides to olefins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiefeng; Wang, Minyan; Pu, Xinghui; Shi, Zhuangzhi

    2017-05-01

    Amide and olefins are important synthetic intermediates with complementary reactivity which play a key role in the construction of natural products, pharmaceuticals and manmade materials. Converting the normally highly stable aliphatic amides into olefins directly is a challenging task. Here we show that a Ni/NHC-catalytic system has been established for decarbonylative elimination of aliphatic amides to generate various olefins via C-N and C-C bond cleavage. This study not only overcomes the acyl C-N bond activation in aliphatic amides, but also encompasses distinct chemical advances on a new type of elimination reaction called retro-hydroamidocarbonylation. This transformation shows good functional group compatibility and can serve as a powerful synthetic tool for late-stage olefination of amide groups in complex compounds.

  1. Tumor Volume and Metabolism of Prostate Cancer Determined by Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging at 3T Without Endorectal Coil Reveal Potential Clinical Implications in the Context of Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crehange, Gilles; Parfait, Sebastien; Liegard, Melanie; Maingon, Philippe; Ben Salem, Douraied; Cochet, Alexandre; Funes de la Vega, Mathilde; Cormier, Luc; Bonnetain, Franck; Mirjolet, Celine; Brunotte, Francois; Walker, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether a relationship exists between the tumor volume (TV) or relative choline content determined using magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) at 3T and the clinical prognostic parameters for patients with localized prostate cancer (PCa). Methods and Materials: A total of 72 men (mean age, 67.8 ± 6.2 years) were stratified as having low-risk (n = 26), intermediate-risk (n = 24), or high-risk (n = 22) PCa. MRSI was performed at 3T using a phased-array coil. Spectra are expressed as the total choline/citrate, total choline plus creatine/citrate, and total choline plus polyamines plus creatine/citrate ratios. The mean ratio of the most pathologic voxels and the MRSI-based TV were also determined. Results: The mean values of the total choline/citrate, total choline plus creatine/citrate, and total choline plus polyamine plus creatine/citrate ratios were greater for Stage T2b or greater tumors vs. Stage T2a or less tumors: 7.53 ± 13.60 vs. 2.31 ± 5.65 (p = .018), 8.98 ± 14.58 vs. 2.56 ± 5.70 (p = .016), and 10.32 ± 15.47 vs. 3.55 ± 6.16 (p = .014), respectively. The mean MRSI-based TV for Stage T2b or greater and Stage T2a or less tumors was significantly different (2.23 ± 2.62 cm 3 vs. 1.26 ± 2.06 cm 3 , respectively; p = .030). This TV correlated with increased prostate-specific antigen levels (odds ratio, 1.293; p = .012). Patients with high-risk PCa had a larger TV than did the patients with intermediate-risk PCa. A similar result was found for the intermediate-risk group compared with the low-risk group (odds ratio, 1.225; p = .041). Conclusion: Biomarkers expressing the relative choline content and TV were significant parameters for the localization of PCa and could be helpful for determining the prognosis more accurately.

  2. Biomimetic L-aspartic acid-derived functional poly(ester amide)s for vascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Darryl K; Gillies, Elizabeth R; Mequanint, Kibret

    2014-08-01

    Functionalization of polymeric biomaterials permits the conjugation of cell signaling molecules capable of directing cell function. In this study, l-phenylalanine and l-aspartic acid were used to synthesize poly(ester amide)s (PEAs) with pendant carboxylic acid groups through an interfacial polycondensation approach. Human coronary artery smooth muscle cell (HCASMC) attachment, spreading and proliferation was observed on all PEA films. Vinculin expression at the cell periphery suggested that HCASMCs formed focal adhesions on the functional PEAs, while the absence of smooth muscle α-actin (SMαA) expression implied the cells adopted a proliferative phenotype. The PEAs were also electrospun to yield nanoscale three-dimensional (3-D) scaffolds with average fiber diameters ranging from 130 to 294nm. Immunoblotting studies suggested a potential increase in SMαA and calponin expression from HCASMCs cultured on 3-D fibrous scaffolds when compared to 2-D films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and immunofluorescence demonstrated the conjugation of transforming growth factor-β1 to the surface of the functional PEA through the pendant carboxylic acid groups. Taken together, this study demonstrates that PEAs containing aspartic acid are viable biomaterials for further investigation in vascular tissue engineering. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Proton-proton colliding beam facility ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper attempts to present the status of the ISABELLE construction project, which has the objective of building a 400 + 400 GeV proton colliding beam facility. The major technical features of the superconducting accelerators with their projected performance are described. Progress made so far, difficulties encountered, and the program until completion in 1986 is briefly reviewed

  4. Tumor immunology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otter, W. den

    1987-01-01

    Tumor immunology, the use of immunological techniques for tumor diagnosis and approaches to immunotherapy of cancer are topics covered in this multi-author volume. Part A, 'Tumor Immunology', deals with present views on tumor-associated antigens, the initiation of immune reactions of tumor cells, effector cell killing, tumor cells and suppression of antitumor immunity, and one chapter dealing with the application of mathematical models in tumor immunology. Part B, 'Tumor Diagnosis and Imaging', concerns the use of markers to locate the tumor in vivo, for the histological diagnosis, and for the monitoring of tumor growth. In Part C, 'Immunotherapy', various experimental approaches to immunotherapy are described, such as the use of monoclonal antibodies to target drugs, the use of interleukin-2 and the use of drugs inhibiting suppression. In the final section, the evaluation, a pathologist and a clinician evaluate the possibilities and limitations of tumor immunology and the extent to which it is useful for diagnosis and therapy. refs.; figs.; tabs

  5. 40 CFR 721.6183 - Amides, from ammonium hydroxide - maleic anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow alkyl amines...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amides, from ammonium hydroxide... Substances § 721.6183 Amides, from ammonium hydroxide - maleic anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, from ammonium hydroxide - maleic...

  6. The future and progress of proton beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujii, Hirohiko

    1994-01-01

    The advantage of proton therapy is reduction of treatment volumes relative to those feasible with conventional photon therapy. The consequence is that the radiation dose to the target can be raised, with a resultant increase in tumor control probability. Proton beams, however, yield no biological gains because their biological properties are similar to conventional low LET radiations. As more sophisticated technologies are needed, there have been many advances which are applicable to photon therapy; 3-D treatment planning, DVH analysis, and systems for positioning, etc. As of January 1994, a total of about 13,000 cases were reported as having had treatments with proton beams in 16 centers world wide. The tumor sites for those include uveal melanoma (30-40%), intra-cranial small targets (40%), and others. Uveal melanomas had been most extensively treated with 70 Gy/5 fx or 60 Gy/4 fx which resulted in local control and survival rates of >96% and 80%, respectively. For chordoma and chondrosarcoma of the skull base and cervical spine, the 5 year local control rates were 65% and 91%, respectively. Promising results are also being obtained for head and neck and pelvic tumors. Deeper-seated tumors have been treated only at Tsukuba University with successful results in some anatomic sites. Among these, inoperable primary hepatocellular carcinomas were effectively treated with a total dose of 75-85 Gy (3.0-4.5 Gy/fx). The 3 year survival rates for all patients, Child A+B patient, and Child A patients were 38%, 47%, and 60%, respectively, which compare favorably to other modalities. These successful results of world wide proton therapy have led us to the conclusion that a hospital-based proton facility will provide opportunities for additional patients to be treated with protons. Thus, new plans are proposed from more than 10 institutions to build a new treatment center or upgrade the energy of currently available proton beams. (author)

  7. Proton therapy for uveal melanomas and other eye lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munzenrider, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    Charged particle beams are ideal for treating intra-ocular lesions, since they can be made to deposit their dose in the target, while significantly limiting dose received by non-involved ocular and orbital structures. Proton beam treatment of large numbers of uveal melanoma patients consistently achieves local control rates in excess of 95%, and eye retention rates of approximately 90%. Visual preservation is related to initial visual acuity, tumor size and location, and dose received by the macula, disc, and lens. The probability of distant metastasis is increased by larger tumor diameter, more anterior tumor location, and older patient age. Proton therapy is also effective treatment for patients with ocular angiomas, hemangiomas, metastatic tumors, and retinoblastomas, and may be beneficial for patients with exudative ('wet') age-related macular degeneration. (orig.)

  8. Proton therapy for uveal melanomas and other eye lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munzenrider, J.E. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Univ. Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1999-06-01

    Charged particle beams are ideal for treating intra-ocular lesions, since they can be made to deposit their dose in the target, while significantly limiting dose received by non-involved ocular and orbital structures. Proton beam treatment of large numbers of uveal melanoma patients consistently achieves local control rates in excess of 95%, and eye retention rates of approximately 90%. Visual preservation is related to initial visual acuity, tumor size and location, and dose received by the macula, disc, and lens. The probability of distant metastasis is increased by larger tumor diameter, more anterior tumor location, and older patient age. Proton therapy is also effective treatment for patients with ocular angiomas, hemangiomas, metastatic tumors, and retinoblastomas, and may be beneficial for patients with exudative (`wet`) age-related macular degeneration. (orig.)

  9. Multiparametric MR assessment of pediatric brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzika, A.A.; Astrakas, L.G.; Zarifi, M.K.; Petridou, N.; Young-Poussaint, T.; Goumnerova, L.; Black, P.McL.; Zurakowski, D.; Anthony, D.C.

    2003-01-01

    MR assessment of pediatric brain tumors has expanded to include physiologic information related to cellular metabolites, hemodynamic and diffusion parameters. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between MR and proton MR spectroscopic imaging in children with primary brain tumors. Twenty-one patients (mean age 9 years) with histologically verified brain tumors underwent conventional MR imaging, hemodynamic MR imaging (HMRI) and proton MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). Fourteen patients also had diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWMRI). Metabolic indices including choline-containing compounds (Cho), total creatine (tCr) and lipids/lactate (L) were derived by proton MRSI, relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) by HMRI, and apparent tissue water diffusion coefficients (ADC) by DWMRI. Variables were examined by linear regression and correlation as well as by ANOVA. Cho (suggestive of tumor cellularity and proliferative activity) correlated positively with rCBV, while the relationship between Cho and ADC (suggestive of cellular density) was inverse (P<0.001). The relationship between rCBV and ADC was also inverse (P=0.004). Cho and lipids (suggestive of necrosis and/or apoptosis) were not significantly correlated (P=0.51). A positive relationship was found between lipids and ADC (P=0.002). The relationships between Cho, rCBV, ADC and lipids signify that tumor physiology is influenced by the tumor's physical and chemical environment. Normalized Cho and lipids distinguished high-grade from low-grade tumors (P<0.05). Multiparametric MR imaging using MRSI, HMRI and DWMRI enhances assessment of brain tumors in children and improves our understanding of tumor physiology while promising to distinguish higher- from lower-malignancy tumors, a distinction that is particularly clinically important among inoperable tumors. (orig.)

  10. Imaging Tumor Necrosis with Ferumoxytol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Aghighi

    Full Text Available Ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIO are promising contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. USPIO mediated proton relaxation rate enhancement is strongly dependent on compartmentalization of the agent and can vary depending on their intracellular or extracellular location in the tumor microenvironment. We compared the T1- and T2-enhancement pattern of intracellular and extracellular USPIO in mouse models of cancer and pilot data from patients. A better understanding of these MR signal effects will enable non-invasive characterizations of the composition of the tumor microenvironment.Six 4T1 and six MMTV-PyMT mammary tumors were grown in mice and imaged with ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI. R1 relaxation rates were calculated for different tumor types and different tumor areas and compared with histology. The transendothelial leakage rate of ferumoxytol was obtained by our measured relaxivity of ferumoxytol and compared between different tumor types, using a t-test. Additionally, 3 patients with malignant sarcomas were imaged with ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI. T1- and T2-enhancement patterns were compared with histopathology in a descriptive manner as a pro