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Sample records for tufts university progress

  1. High energy physics at Tufts University. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-09-01

    In the past year the Bubble Chamber Group has been involved in a wide range of activities in experimental high energy physics. Beam momenta varying from 2.9 to 300 GeV/c; bubble chambers including the FNAL 30-inch, BNL 80-inch, ANL 12-foot and FNAL 15-foot; targets which include hydrogen, deuterium, hydrogen with downstream plate, and deuterium with downstream spark chambers; beam particles including K - , anti p and p--one is still waiting for neutrinos--were used. A search was made for exotic particles and charmed particles, continued to study strange baryons and mesons, probed the dimensions of the ''fireball,'' and studied multiplicities and correlations in high energy collisions. The following progress in each of the activities which have taken place is summarized. A list of publications is included

  2. High energy physics at Tufts University: Progress report, July 16, 1987--July 15, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milburn, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    The past year is best characterized in production terms: the Tufts High Energy Physics Group has participated significantly in the successful manufacture of a great mass of raw scientific data and of a major detector system. In summary: the fixed-target study of charm production at Fermilab---Experiment E-769---has yielded upwards of 500 million recorded triggers on some 10 4 standard computer tapes, far more events than planned and a landmark in online data acquisition at an accelerator. The Fermilab 15-foot hydrogen-neon bubble chamber exposure to neutrinos---E-632---has concluded its second and final run yielding interactions from the Tevatron-neutrino spectrum generated by more than 4 /times/ 10 17 protons on target. This set of filmed events is unique for its high neutrino energy and is, moreover, augmented by electronic data identifying energetic muons from charged-current processes and by subsets of high-resolution recordings from specialized holographic and conventional cameras. The Soudan-II nucleon decay program has brought significant portions of its central calorimeter and its Tufts-manufactured veto shield into operation on-line and is preparing to enter an extended data-collection period this summer. These experimental accomplishments, each of them as part of an international collaboration, promise us a flow of new and interesting results during the coming years. Our small theory sub-group continues its prolific activities in several areas of high energy phenomenology. Our progress in each of these activities will be described in more detail in the report

  3. High-energy physics at Tufts University. Progress report, August 1, 1982-July 31, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Progress on the following topics is described: neutrino-deuterium interactions; anti pN interactions; K/sub s/ 0 /K/sub s/ 0 π - p interactions at 300 GeV/c; phi phi final states in 400 GeV/c pp; Fermilab Tevatron MPS proposals; nu D-physics proposed using HBC with internal calorimeter; Talloires neutrino workshop; photoproduction of charmed particles; streamer chamber study of anti K* 0 (890); Soudan-II nucleon decay program; CCD-detector study; optical resolution study; measuring hardware systems and data links; hadronic production of chi mesons; high-p/sub t/ inelastic hadronic reactions; and theoretical investigations

  4. High-energy physics at Tufts University. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This Final Report summarizes research accomplished at Tufts University in High Energy Physics during the period 1957 to 1982, with emphasis on the period since 1979 when next previous such summary report was submitted. Activities and publications up to 31 December 1982 and not earlier reported are listed. Principal accomplishments during the past six years include: measurement of the near equality of the charmed D 0 and D +- lifetimes; determination of important features of nu/sub μ/ cross sections on nucleons, of majority quark momentum distributions, of charmed #betta#/sub c/ + production and decay of quark and di-quark fragmentation, and of Z 0 left-handed couplings to u- and d-quarks; the second observation of the upsilon particle; the hadronic production of the J/psi particle via the chi charmonium state; observation of virtual-photon shadowing in deep-inelastic muon scattering; and observation of evidence for two new scalar meson states. In theoretical work, a detailed understanding of the nature of optimal representations of amplitudes and observables in scattering processes has been achieved

  5. High Energy Physics at Tufts University Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, Gary R. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States); Oliver, William P. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States); Napier, Austin [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States); Gallagher, Hugh R. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    2012-07-18

    In this Final Report, we the researchers of the high energy physics group at Tufts University summarize our works and achievements in three frontier areas of elementary particle physics: (i) Neutrino physics at the Intensity Frontier, (ii) Collider physics at the Energy Frontier, and (iii) Theory investigations of spin structure and quark-gluon dynamics of nucleons using quantum chromodynamics. With our Neutrino research we completed, or else brought to a useful state, the following: Data-taking, physics simulations, physics analysis, physics reporting, explorations of matter effects, and detector component fabrication. We conducted our work as participants in the MINOS, NOvA, and LBNE neutrino oscillation experiments and in the MINERvA neutrino scattering experiment. With our Collider research we completed or else brought to a useful state: Data-taking, development of muon system geometry and tracking codes, software validation and maintenance, physics simulations, physics analysis, searches for new particles, and study of top-quark and B-quark systems. We conducted these activities as participants in the ATLAS proton-proton collider experiment at CERN and in the CDF proton-antiproton collider experiment at Fermilab. In our Theory research we developed QCD-based models, applications of spin phenomenology to fundamental systems, fitting of models to data, presenting and reporting of new concepts and formalisms. The overarching objectives of our research work have always been: 1) to test and clarify the predictions of the Standard Model of elementary particle physics, and 2) to discover new phenomena which may point the way to a more unified theoretical framework.

  6. High energy physics at Tufts University. Progress report. [Summaries of research activities at Tufts University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-09-01

    During the year a final paper was produced on XI* production from 2.9 GeV/c K/sup -/p interactions, and a paper on the ..sigma../sup -/..pi../sup -/..pi../sup +/ (..pi../sup 0/) final state from 2.9 GeV/c K/sup -/d interactions is on the verge of completion. From our 14.75 GeV/c anti pp experiment results have been prepared for publication on three topics: the charm search, V/sup 0/ inclusive production, and ..pi../sup 0/ production. Further analysis of data is continuing. In the 300 GeV/c pp experiment, investigations are completed or underway in three areas: neutral and charged pion correlations, inclusive ..gamma.. and V/sup 0/ production, and inclusive resonance production. Further data on inclusive V/sup 0/ distributions from 6.5 GeV/c K/sup -/p interactions has been obtained and analysis is nearing completion. A good deal of effort went into the development of proposals for new physics. These new directions may be represented by three approved experiments at three different laboratories: Neutrino-deuterium interactions at Fermilab (an approved and a proposed experiment); Search for new states decaying into anti ..lambda lambda.. and K/sup 0//sub s/K/sup 0//sub s/ using the Multiparticle Spectrometer at B.N.L. (approved in May, 1977); Search for baryonium using the SLAC hybrid bubble chamber system, which won approval in September with a recommendation for prompt running from the Program Advisory Committee. A list of publications is included.

  7. Cooling the Campus: Experiences from a Pilot Study to Reduce Electricity Use at Tufts University, USA, Using Social Marketing Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcell, Kristin; Agyeman, Julian; Rappaport, Ann

    2004-01-01

    A community-based social marketing (CBSM) campaign to reduce student electricity use and greenhouse gas emissions was undertaken at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts. Social marketing methods follow a commercial marketing model and involve market research into the planning, pricing, communication, distribution, and evaluation of methods…

  8. High energy physics at Tufts University. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    During the year a final paper was produced on XI* production from 2.9 GeV/c K - p interactions, and a paper on the Σ - π - π + (π 0 ) final state from 2.9 GeV/c K - d interactions is on the verge of completion. From our 14.75 GeV/c anti pp experiment results have been prepared for publication on three topics: the charm search, V 0 inclusive production, and π 0 production. Further analysis of data is continuing. In the 300 GeV/c pp experiment, investigations are completed or underway in three areas: neutral and charged pion correlations, inclusive γ and V 0 production, and inclusive resonance production. Further data on inclusive V 0 distributions from 6.5 GeV/c K - p interactions has been obtained and analysis is nearing completion. A good deal of effort went into the development of proposals for new physics. These new directions may be represented by three approved experiments at three different laboratories: Neutrino-deuterium interactions at Fermilab (an approved and a proposed experiment); Search for new states decaying into anti ΛΛ and K 0 /sub s/K 0 /sub s/ using the Multiparticle Spectrometer at B.N.L. (approved in May, 1977); Search for baryonium using the SLAC hybrid bubble chamber system, which won approval in September with a recommendation for prompt running from the Program Advisory Committee. A list of publications is included

  9. High energy physics at Tufts University: Progress report, July 16, 1986 to July 15, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milburn, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses topics and projects in the following areas: Soudan-II nucleon decay project, neutrino interactions at the Tevatron in the 15-foot bubbble chamber, pion and kaon production of charm and charm-strange states, multiparticle spectrometer studies at Fermilab, general kinematic description of polarization in scattering processes and spin phenomenology, polarization in inclusive hyperon production and measuring quarks helicity underlying hadronic jets

  10. High Energy Physics at Tufts University. Progress report, 1991--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-07-15

    This report discusses the following topics: Neutrino Interactions in the 15-foot Bubble Chamber; Pion and Kaon Production of Charm and Charm-Strange States; Study of Heavy Flavors at the Tagged Particle Spectrometer; Neutrino Oscillations at the Fermilab Main Injector; Soudan II Nucleon Decay Project; Physics at the Antiproton-Proton Collider at {radical}{bar s} = 1.8 TeV; Designing the Solenoidal Detector for the Supercollider; Neutrino Telescope Proposal; Polarization in Inclusive Hyperon Production and QCD Subprocesses; Production and Decay Characteristics of Top Quarks; Scattering in Extended Skyrmion Models and Spin Dependence; Search for Top Quark Production at the Tevatron; Polarization Correlations in Hadronic Production of Top Quarks; and Computation and Networking.

  11. High energy physics at Tufts University. Progress report, August 1, 1984-July 15, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Work is reported in these experimental projects: Soudan-II nucleon decay project; neutrino interactions; photoproduction studies; multiparticle spectrometer studies, such as K/sub s/ 0 K/sub s/ 0 from π - p interactions and phi phi final states in pp reactions; and streamer chamber study of anti K* 0 (890). Theoretical work included general kinematic description of polarization processes and applications of QCD perturbation theory. 67 refs

  12. High energy physics at Tufts University. Progress report, July 16, 1985-July 15, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Experimental projects in high energy physics that are reported include the Soudan-II Nucleon Decay Project, neutrino physics, pion and kaon production of charm and charm-strange states, and multiparticle spectrometer studies at Fermilab. Theoretical efforts include general kinematic description of polarization in scattering processes and spin phenomenology, as well as applications of quantum chromodynamic perturbation theory

  13. Security in an interdependent world. Medford, Massachusetts, 18 May 2003. Statement to the Fletcher School at Tufts University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2003-01-01

    Addressing the members of The Fletcher School Board of Overseers, Director General of the IAEA emphasised the principal actions that will be essential achieve security in an independent world: First, we must modernize and revamp the collective security system of the United Nations Charter - in terms of both preventive diplomacy and enforcement action. To start, the Security Council should be reconstituted to include the major political and economic powers of today's world. In addition, new working concepts, tools and methods are needed to ensure that the Council can effectively discharge its role as the body with 'the primary responsibility' for the maintenance of international peace and security. Second, we must create an environment in which, as foreseen in the UN Charter, the use of force is limited to situations of self-defence or enforcement measures authorized by the Security Council. Preemptive strikes, however tempting, can send the global community into uncharted and dangerous territory. Only an action authorized by the Council will bring international legitimacy and support to such a measure. More importantly, these limitations will restrict the use of force to those situations where force is indeed the last and only alternative. Third, we must take concrete steps to de-legitimize the acquisition or use of weapons of mass destruction. Clearly, a new approach is needed - an approach that applies to all weapons of mass destruction, and would include: universal adherence to conventions that ban such weapons; robust and intrusive systems of verification for all related weapons conventions; a clear road map and the determination to eliminate these weapons in all States, to abolish over time the divide between the nuclear 'haves' and 'have nots'; new doctrines of security that do not rely on the deterrent effect of nuclear weapons; and reliable enforcement measures, under the aegis of the Security Council, to effectively counter efforts by any country to

  14. Tufts academic health information network: concept and scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, N S

    1986-04-01

    Tufts University School of Medicine's new health sciences education building, the Arthur M. Sackler Center for Health Communications, will house a modern medical library and computer center, classrooms, auditoria, and media facilities. The building will also serve as the center for an information and communication network linking the medical school and adjacent New England Medical Center, Tufts' primary teaching hospital, with Tufts Associated Teaching Hospitals throughout New England. Ultimately, the Tufts network will join other gateway networks, information resource facilities, health care institutions, and medical schools throughout the world. The center and the network are intended to facilitate and improve the education of health professionals, the delivery of health care to patients, the conduct of research, and the implementation of administrative management approaches that should provide more efficient utilization of resources and save dollars. A model and scenario show how health care delivery and health care education are integrated through better use of information transfer technologies by health information specialists, practitioners, and educators.

  15. Some progress towards ''universal'' effective interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, J.M.G.

    1983-01-01

    The approximation methods introduced to treat the nuclear many-body problem usually imply that the appropriate nuclear force is an effective interaction, different from the free nucleon-nucleon interaction. An effective interaction is thus intimately related to a given nuclear model and its scope is generally confined to the description of a limited number of nuclei or nuclear states. However, in recent years there has been some progress towards ''universal'' effective nucleon-nucleon interactions, in the sense that they may be reasonably suitable to describe bulk properties of nuclear ground states throughout the periodic table and also properties of excited states. The authors conclude that a finite-range density-dependent effective interaction of the Gogny's type is capable of describing a large number of static and dynamical nuclear properties throughout the periodic table, including open-shell nuclei. Hopefully it may provide clues for the definition of some ''universal'' effective force

  16. Progress toward universal health coverage in ASEAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Minh, Hoang; Pocock, Nicola Suyin; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn; Chhorvann, Chhea; Duc, Ha Anh; Hanvoravongchai, Piya; Lim, Jeremy; Lucero-Prisno, Don Eliseo; Ng, Nawi; Phaholyothin, Natalie; Phonvisay, Alay; Soe, Kyaw Min; Sychareun, Vanphanom

    2014-01-01

    The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) is characterized by much diversity in terms of geography, society, economic development, and health outcomes. The health systems as well as healthcare structure and provisions vary considerably. Consequently, the progress toward Universal Health Coverage (UHC) in these countries also varies. This paper aims to describe the progress toward UHC in the ASEAN countries and discuss how regional integration could influence UHC. Data reported in this paper were obtained from published literature, reports, and gray literature available in the ASEAN countries. We used both online and manual search methods to gather the information and 'snowball' further data. We found that, in general, ASEAN countries have made good progress toward UHC, partly due to relatively sustained political commitments to endorse UHC in these countries. However, all the countries in ASEAN are facing several common barriers to achieving UHC, namely 1) financial constraints, including low levels of overall and government spending on health; 2) supply side constraints, including inadequate numbers and densities of health workers; and 3) the ongoing epidemiological transition at different stages characterized by increasing burdens of non-communicable diseases, persisting infectious diseases, and reemergence of potentially pandemic infectious diseases. The ASEAN Economic Community's (AEC) goal of regional economic integration and a single market by 2015 presents both opportunities and challenges for UHC. Healthcare services have become more available but health and healthcare inequities will likely worsen as better-off citizens of member states might receive more benefits from the liberalization of trade policy in health, either via regional outmigration of health workers or intra-country health worker movement toward private hospitals, which tend to be located in urban areas. For ASEAN countries, UHC should be explicitly considered to mitigate

  17. Progress toward universal health coverage in ASEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoang Van Minh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN is characterized by much diversity in terms of geography, society, economic development, and health outcomes. The health systems as well as healthcare structure and provisions vary considerably. Consequently, the progress toward Universal Health Coverage (UHC in these countries also varies. This paper aims to describe the progress toward UHC in the ASEAN countries and discuss how regional integration could influence UHC. Design: Data reported in this paper were obtained from published literature, reports, and gray literature available in the ASEAN countries. We used both online and manual search methods to gather the information and ‘snowball’ further data. Results: We found that, in general, ASEAN countries have made good progress toward UHC, partly due to relatively sustained political commitments to endorse UHC in these countries. However, all the countries in ASEAN are facing several common barriers to achieving UHC, namely 1 financial constraints, including low levels of overall and government spending on health; 2 supply side constraints, including inadequate numbers and densities of health workers; and 3 the ongoing epidemiological transition at different stages characterized by increasing burdens of non-communicable diseases, persisting infectious diseases, and reemergence of potentially pandemic infectious diseases. The ASEAN Economic Community's (AEC goal of regional economic integration and a single market by 2015 presents both opportunities and challenges for UHC. Healthcare services have become more available but health and healthcare inequities will likely worsen as better-off citizens of member states might receive more benefits from the liberalization of trade policy in health, either via regional outmigration of health workers or intra-country health worker movement toward private hospitals, which tend to be located in urban areas. For ASEAN countries, UHC should

  18. High Energy Physics at Tufts University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Fermilab fixed target experiments; Soudan II nucleon decay project; Physics at the proton-antiproton collider at √s = 1.8 TeV; The Solenoidal Detector for the supercollider; Neutrino telescope proposal; Polarization in massive quark and hadron production; Production characteristics of top quarks; Scattering, spin dependence and mass corrections in Skyrmion models; and computation and networking

  19. High Energy Physics at Tufts University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-07-15

    This report discusses the following topics: Neutrino Interactions in the 15-foot Bubble Chamber; Pion and Kaon Production of Charm and Charm-Strange States; Study of Heavy Flavors at the Tagged Particle Spectrometer; Neutrino Oscillations at the Fermilab Main Injector; Soudan II Nucleon Decay Project; Physics at the Antiproton-Proton Collider at {radical}{bar s} = 1.8 TeV; Designing the Solenoidal Detector for the Supercollider; Neutrino Telescope Proposal; Polarization in Inclusive Hyperon Production and QCD Subprocesses; Production and Decay Characteristics of Top Quarks; Scattering in Extended Skyrmion Models and Spin Dependence; Search for Top Quark Production at the Tevatron; Polarization Correlations in Hadronic Production of Top Quarks; and Computation and Networking.

  20. High Energy Physics at Tufts University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milburn, R.H.; Schneps, J.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following: fermilab fixed target experiments; photoproduction at 20 GeV: SLAC BC72-75; soudan 2 nucleon decay project; physics at the antiproton-proton collider at √s = 1.8 TeV; Designing the solenoidal detector for the supercollider; charm physics at LEP in OPAL; neutrino telescope proposal; general kinematic description of polarization in scattering processes; polarization in inclusive hyperon production and QCD subprocesses; measuring quark helicity underlying hadronic jets; scattering in extended skyrmion models and spin dependence; the diquark-quark model of the excited baryons; computation and networking; and the science and technology center

  1. High Energy Physics at Tufts University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Neutrino Interactions in the 15-foot Bubble Chamber; Pion and Kaon Production of Charm and Charm-Strange States; Study of Heavy Flavors at the Tagged Particle Spectrometer; Neutrino Oscillations at the Fermilab Main Injector; Soudan II Nucleon Decay Project; Physics at the Antiproton-Proton Collider at √ bar s = 1.8 TeV; Designing the Solenoidal Detector for the Supercollider; Neutrino Telescope Proposal; Polarization in Inclusive Hyperon Production and QCD Subprocesses; Production and Decay Characteristics of Top Quarks; Scattering in Extended Skyrmion Models and Spin Dependence; Search for Top Quark Production at the Tevatron; Polarization Correlations in Hadronic Production of Top Quarks; and Computation and Networking

  2. Tuft (caveolated) cells in two human colon carcinoma cell lines.

    OpenAIRE

    Barkla, D. H.; Whitehead, R. H.; Foster, H.; Tutton, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The presence of an unusual cell type in two human colon carcinoma cell lines is reported. The cells show the same morphology as "tuft" (caveolated) cells present in normal gastrointestinal epithelium. Tuft cells were seen in cell line LIM 1863 growing in vitro and in human colon carcinoma cell line LIM 2210 growing as subcutaneous solid tumour xenografts in nude mice. Characteristic morphologic features of tuft cells included a wide base, narrow apex and a tuft of long microvilli projecting f...

  3. Memphis State University Center for Nuclear Studies progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This quarterly report outlines the progress made by the Center for Nuclear Studies at Memphis State University in the development of specialized educational programs for the nuclear industry through the month of February, 1976

  4. University museums: problems, policy and progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Merriman

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available There are some 400 university museums and collections in the United Kingdom. During the 1990s their often neglected state came under close scrutiny and as a result their future role is now being re-assessed. A member of the Institute's staff has recently been appointed to the new position of Curator of UCL Museums and Collections, and he comments here on the national situation and describes some of the initiatives under way at UCL.

  5. Tuft (caveolated) cells in two human colon carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkla, D H; Whitehead, R H; Foster, H; Tutton, P J

    1988-09-01

    The presence of an unusual cell type in two human colon carcinoma cell lines is reported. The cells show the same morphology as "tuft" (caveolated) cells present in normal gastrointestinal epithelium. Tuft cells were seen in cell line LIM 1863 growing in vitro and in human colon carcinoma cell line LIM 2210 growing as subcutaneous solid tumour xenografts in nude mice. Characteristic morphologic features of tuft cells included a wide base, narrow apex and a tuft of long microvilli projecting from the apical surface. The microvilli are attached by a core of long microfilaments passing deep into the apical cytoplasm. Between the microvilli are parallel arrays of vesicles (caveoli) containing flocculent material. Two different but not mutually exclusive explanations for the presence of tuft cells are proposed. The first explanation is that tuft cells came from the resected tumour and have survived by mitotic division during subsequent passages. The second explanation suggests that tuft cells are the progeny of undifferentiated tumour cells. Descriptions of tuft cells in colon carcinomas are uncommon and possible reasons for this are presented. The morphology of tuft cells is consistent with that of a highly differentiated cell specialised for absorption, and these new models provide an opportunity to further investigate the structure and function of tuft cells.

  6. University of Minnesota progress report No. 4215

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintz, N.M.

    1979-01-01

    Medium-energy nuclear physics research at the University of Minnesota is reviewed. The following studies were undertaken: HRS development; 58 60 62 64 Ni(p,p') at 800 MeV; proton scattering on 2s-1d-shell nuclei; search for orbit flip states in 90 Zr, 120 Sn, 144 Sm, and 208 Pb; large-angle A 116 124 Sn, 208 Pb elastic scattering; proton scattering from heavy deformed nuclei; unnatural-parity states in 6 Li, 10 B, 12 C, 14 N, and 28 Si; microscopic form factor calculations - force studies; DEC PDP 11/60 computer; theoretical analysis computer programs; inelastic electron scattering on 90 Zr; and EPICS programs. Three of the above topics, with significant amounts of data, are indexed separately. 40 figures, 1 table

  7. Interpreting heterogeneity in intestinal tuft cell structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Amrita; McKinley, Eliot T; von Moltke, Jakob; Coffey, Robert J; Lau, Ken S

    2018-05-01

    Intestinal tuft cells are a morphologically unique cell type, best characterized by striking microvilli that form an apical tuft. These cells represent approximately 0.5% of gut epithelial cells depending on location. While they are known to express chemosensory receptors, their function has remained unclear. Recently, numerous groups have revealed startling insights into intestinal tuft cell biology. Here, we review the latest developments in understanding this peculiar cell type's structure and function. Recent advances in volumetric microscopy have begun to elucidate tuft cell ultrastructure with respect to its cellular neighbors. Moreover, single-cell approaches have revealed greater diversity in the tuft cell population than previously appreciated and uncovered novel markers to characterize this heterogeneity. Finally, advanced model systems have revealed tuft cells' roles in mucosal healing and orchestrating type 2 immunity against eukaryotic infection. While much remains unknown about intestinal tuft cells, these critical advances have illuminated the physiological importance of these previously understudied cells and provided experimentally tractable tools to interrogate this rare cell population. Tuft cells act as luminal sensors, linking the luminal microbiome to the host immune system, which may make them a potent clinical target for modulating host response to a variety of acute or chronic immune-driven conditions.

  8. Manufacturing of composite parts reinforced through-thickness by tufting

    OpenAIRE

    Dell'Anno, G.; Treiber, J. W G; Partridge, Ivana K

    2016-01-01

    The paper aims at providing practical guidelines for the manufacture of composite parts reinforced by tufting. The need for through-thickness reinforcement of high performance carbon fibre composite structures is reviewed and various options are presented. The tufting process is described in detail and relevant aspects of the technology are analysed such as: equipment configuration and setup, latest advances in tooling, thread selection, preform supporting systems and choice of ancillary mate...

  9. Progress on adenovirus-vectored universal influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Kui; Ying, Guan; Yan, Zhou; Shanshan, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Hongjun, Li; Maosheng, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection causes serious health problems and heavy financial burdens each year worldwide. The classical inactivated influenza virus vaccine (IIVV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) must be updated regularly to match the new strains that evolve due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift. However, with the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved antigens, and the CD8(+) T cell responses targeting viral internal proteins nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein 1 (M1) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1), it is possible to develop a universal influenza vaccine based on the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stem, NP, and matrix proteins. Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) is an ideal influenza vaccine vector because it has an ideal stability and safety profile, induces balanced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses due to activation of innate immunity, provides 'self-adjuvanting' activity, can mimic natural IFV infection, and confers seamless protection against mucosal pathogens. Moreover, this vector can be developed as a low-cost, rapid-response vaccine that can be quickly manufactured. Therefore, an adenovirus vector encoding conserved influenza antigens holds promise in the development of a universal influenza vaccine. This review will summarize the progress in adenovirus-vectored universal flu vaccines and discuss future novel approaches.

  10. A Progress Report by The Committee on University Governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida Atlantic Univ., Boca Raton.

    Based on its conclusion that a unicameral senate would be both desirable and feasible, Florida Atlantic University's Committee on University Governance drafted a proposal to establish a "single university-wide Senate, which truly represents Administration, Faculty, and Students." The two parts of the proposal present (1) the composition…

  11. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1966-07-10

    Progress is reported in the area of acquiring a magnet frame, coils, and magnet handling equipment. Progress is also reported in relation to the design of the rf system. A detailed account is given of magnet system measurements and rf system studies, as well as studies of the amplifier chain. (LEW)

  12. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1967-10-09

    Progress is reported in the design, installation of various components of the cyclotron, including coils, magnets, rf system, and vacuum system. Also reported are measurements on magnets and rf components. (LEW)

  13. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1967-06-30

    Progress is reported in the fabrication and testing of cyclotron components, including magnet system and rf system components. Work on vacuum components and instrumentation and control equipment is also reported. (LEW)

  14. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 26

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1968-01-17

    Progress is reported in the fabrication, installation, and testing of cyclotron components, including magnets and coils, rf components, vacuum and control equipment. Also reported are magnet and rf component measurements. (LEW)

  15. Progress on nuclear data work at Nankai University in 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chonghai, Cai; Ziqiang, Yu; Yixin, Zuo [Nankai Univ., Tianjin (China)

    1996-06-01

    The research work on nuclear model programs and QMD theory are reported. Two nuclear models programs CCRMN and OMHF have finished in 1995. The theoretical research on quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) have made significant progress in 1995.

  16. Memphis State University Center for Nuclear Studies progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-11-01

    Progress made on the development of specialized education programs for the nuclear industry through the month of October, 1975, is outlined. The survey of the nuclear industry includes manpower resources and requirements of nuclear industry, annual training requirements of nuclear plants, and the educational curriculum for nuclear plant operational staff. Also discussed are the general organization of the project, student enrollment and progress and industrial participation

  17. Literature review of tufted reinforcement for composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnaba, I.; Legrand, X.; Wang, P.; Soulat, D.

    2017-10-01

    In order to minimize the damage caused by the 2D structures, several research have been done on more complex structures (3D-preforms) which have more interesting mechanical characteristics. Divers textile technologies are used to manufacture 3D preforms such as weaving, knitting, stitching, z-pinning, tufting… This kind of reinforcement aims to achieve a balance between the in-plane and out-of-plane properties. Recently, the tufting technology shows more opportunities to develop 3D reinforcements especially with the advances in robotics. The present paper focuses not only on the various technologies of reinforcement through the thickness but also on the mechanical behaviour of a tufted preform in a stamping process.

  18. Tufting enteropathy with EpCAM mutation: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Pêgas,Karla Lais; Cambruzzi,Eduardo; Ferrelli,Regis Schander; Silva,Carolina Soares da; Guedes,Renata Rostirola; Adami,Marina; Dias,Eduardo Montagner; Melere,Melina Utz; Ceza,Marilia Rosso; Steinhaus,Cintia; Epifanio,Matias; Salomon,Julie; Ferreira,Cristina Targa

    2014-01-01

    Tufting enteropathy (TE), also known as intestinal epithelial dysplasia (IED), is a rare congenital enteropathy related to an earlyonset of severe intractable diarrhea due to specific abnormalities of the intestinal epithelium and mutations of the EpCAM gene. TE is characterized by clinical and histological heterogeneity, such as with low or without mononuclear cell infiltration of the lamina propria, and abnormalities of basement membrane. TE can be associated with malformations, other epith...

  19. Embryohistiogenesis of Vascular Tufts of Glomeruli: a Possible Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabiri, Shahriar; Moeini-Aghtaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Dabiri, Bahram

    2017-10-01

    Embryogenesis of the kidney glomeruli, especially its vascular component, has not been well documented. Glomeruli capillary tuft is surrounded and enveloped by visceral epithelial cells, which is a unique portal system that connects afferent with efferent arteriole without interaction with venular circulation. We hypothesized that the portal system embryologically has developed by extension of the intima of afferent arteriole into the stroma of glomerulus. We also hypothesized that juxtaglomeruli apparatus was developed from remnants of smooth muscle cells of the media of afferent arteriole at the anastomosing site with the Bowman capsule entrance. We studied 5 human fetal kidneys by hematoxylin-eosin, periodic acid-Schiff, and immunoperoxidase staining techniques. Hematoxylin-eosin staining of fetal kidney showed presence of erythrocytes in early vesicle form of glomeruli that was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining with CD31, smooth muscle actin, and CD34 markers. These stains showed extension of extraglomerular arterioles to the glomeruli. Periodic acid-Schiff staining showed also the continuity of the basement membrane in extraglomeruli and internal glomerular vascular tufts. This study shows that there is a relationship between the metanephric blast cells and major vessel critical for angiogenesis. When afferent arteriole come in contact with the immature glomeruli, its intima migrates into the glomerular tuft to form intraglomerular capillary system, while its smooth muscle remains at the entrance orifice and develops juxtaglomerular apparatus cells.

  20. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 35

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-10-29

    Efforts are reported on the installation and checkout of cyclotron components which had been previously fabricated. Final integration of subsystems and major systems leading to internal beam tests is reported near completion. Progress is reported in relation to control system components, focus and steering magnet design, and rf system testing. (LEW)

  1. University Safety Culture: A Work-in-Progress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Safety management systems in Australian higher education organisations are under-researched. Limited workplace safety information can be found in the various reports on university human resources benchmarking programs, and typically they show only descriptive statistics. With the commencement of new consultation-focused regulations applying to…

  2. Desktop Publishing in the University: Current Progress, Future Visions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Thomas W.

    1989-01-01

    Discussion of the workflow involved in desktop publishing focuses on experiences at the College of Engineering at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Highlights include cost savings and productivity gains in page layout and composition; editing, translation, and revision issues; printing and distribution; and benefits to the reader. (LRW)

  3. Measuring Progress toward Universal Primary Education: An Examination of Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langsten, Ray

    2014-01-01

    The Education Millennium Development Goal of universal primary education (UPE) states that "by 2015, children everywhere, boys and girls alike, will be able to complete a full course of primary schooling." The 2008 midterm Global Monitoring Report claims that "A country's distance from UPE appears most clearly in terms of the net…

  4. Institutional Repositories in Universities in Nigeria: Desirability and Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oye, Peter Olorunlake; Oyeniyi, David Ajibola; Mahan, David Ezekiel

    2017-01-01

    The desire of academic institutions to link up to the virtual repository is a global phenomenon. Traditional scholarly publication through established journals characterized by peer review is being challenged by less formal net-based communication that links scholars essentially instantaneously. The contention is that universities need to preserve…

  5. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1966-10-10

    Technical progress during the past quarter has contributed to increased confidence that MUSIC will exceed its desired performance characteristics in all respects. Design studies on the magnet indicate that a field has been obtained capable of accelerating protons above the 112 MeV design objective. Initial rf study and design work indicates no major technical problems, although there are many difficult engineering problems to be solved. Center studies are just being started. Building installation and interface problems are being dealt with effectively, and no significant problems are anticipated in this area.

  6. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative University Fellowship Program. Final Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    2004-2011 Final Report for AFCI University Fellowship Program. The goal of this effort was to be supportive of university students and university programs - particularly those students and programs that will help to strengthen the development of nuclear-related fields. The program also supported the stability of the nuclear infrastructure and developed research partnerships that are helping to enlarge the national nuclear science technology base. In this fellowship program, the U.S. Department of Energy sought master's degree students in nuclear, mechanical, or chemical engineering, engineering/applied physics, physics, chemistry, radiochemistry, or fields of science and engineering applicable to the AFCI/Gen IV/GNEP missions in order to meet future U.S. nuclear program needs. The fellowship program identified candidates and selected full time students of high-caliber who were taking nuclear courses as part of their degree programs. The DOE Academic Program Managers encouraged fellows to pursue summer internships at national laboratories and supported the students with appropriate information so that both the fellows and the nation's nuclear energy objectives were successful.

  7. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1967-01-10

    The past quarter has seen further progress in the solution of the problem of achieving a cyclotron which meets or exceeds the performance requirements. The magnet system, with the exception of the trim coils and their supplies, is all on order or about to be ordered, and a high confidence level exists that the system will meet all requirements. The rf system studies, nearly complete, have indicated that the solution chosen will meet the frequency requirements and will be within the power expected. The center studies, complete in the first phase, have resulted in a preliminary center design of the electrostatic focusing system and a design of the magnetic center which provides the required axial focusing. A high degree of cooperation on the center study programs between the U of M and CSF has efficiently yielded these results. The overall schedule continues to be maintained, and the program is expected to be completed on the 37-month schedule. For better control and greater visibility on schedule progress, two reference points have been selected as more immediate objectives. These are 17 July 1967 for the start of the magnet testing program and 2 October 1967 as the start of the rf high power tests. Each task involved is being analyzed with these dates in mind, and they appear to be reasonable.

  8. Accelerator mass spectrometry at Peking University: experiments and progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jiaer; Guo Zhiyu; Yan Shengqing; Li Renxing; Xiao Min; Li Kun; Liu Hongtao; Liu Kexin; Wang Jianjun; Li Bin; Lu Xiangyang; Yuan Sixun; Chen Tiemei; Gao Shijun; Zheng Shuhui; Chen Chengye; Liu Yan

    1997-01-01

    The Peking University Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (PKUAMS) has been put into routine operation. 14 C measurements of archaeological samples with fast cycling injection have shown good results. The new multi-target high-intensity sputtering ion source has been tested and 10 Be measurements were carried out with a new detector in which both the stopping of the intense flux of 10 B ions and the identification of 10 Be ions are performed. 26 Al samples were also measured. While various applications show good prospects for PKUAMS, further upgrade is desirable

  9. [Medium energy physics at Syracuse University: Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souder, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The primary focus of research has been an experiment at the MIT-Bates Linear Accelerator Center to measure the spin-dependence of elastic scattering of electrons from carbon. The Syracuse University Medium Energy Physics Group is also part of a collaboration which will measure the tensor polarization of deuterons scattered by electrons. Finally, analysis has been completed for an experiment at LAMPF in which the first observation of the exotic ion μ + e - e - was made. 17 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Dark energy and the accelerating universe: progress, problems and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, J.A.S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IAG/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas

    2012-07-01

    Full text: A large number of recent observational data strongly suggest that we live in a flat, accelerating Universe composed by nearly 1/3 of matter (baryonic + dark) and 2/3 of an exotic component with large negative pressure, usually named Dark Energy. The basic set of experiments includes: observations from SNe Ia, CMB anisotropies, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and X-ray data from galaxy clusters. Within the general relativity, the simplest explanation for dark energy is the cosmological constant associated with the zero-point energy density of all quantum fields present in the Universe. However, all estimates for its value are many orders-of-magnitude too large. Many alternative ideas include more exotic candidates for dark energy among them an extremely light scalar field. However, some possible explanations for the present accelerating stage also invokes gravitational physics beyond general relativity. In this way, several observations using satellites and ground-based telescopes are in operation or being planned to test whether dark energy is the cosmological constant or something more exotic, as well as to decide whether or not the standard general relativity can explain cosmic acceleration. In the current view, dark energy is an interesting example of new physics, and, certainly, its possible existence is one of the most profound mysteries of modern physics. In this talk we present a simplified picture of the main results and discuss briefly the difficulties underlying the dark energy paradigm and some of its possible alternatives. (author)

  11. Elementary particle physics at the Florida State University. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-11-01

    This report covers the thirteen-month period from October 1, 1975, to October 31, 1976. The experimental program involved two bubble chamber experiments: one from SLAG at 15 GeV/c π + d and the other from FNAL at 250 GeV/c. In addition, the preparation for a BNL Multiparticle Spectrometer experiment to search for XI*-has started and is going on at full steam. The theoretical research has concentrated both in gravitation and strong interaction phenomenology. Some of the theoretical work has been in collaboration with the experimental physicists. Two of our members spent three months in the U.S.S.R. as exchange scientists and another member is currently at Cambridge University, England, planning for a possible future bubble chamber experiment

  12. University of Florida, University research program in robotics. Annual technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crane, C.D. III; Tulenko, J.S.

    1994-05-01

    Progress is reported in the areas of environmental hardening, database, world modeling, vision, man-machine interface, advanced liquid metal reactor inspection robot, and articulated transporter/manipulator system (ATMS) development

  13. University of Florida, University research program in robotics. Annual technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crane, C.D. III; Tulenko, J.S.

    1994-05-01

    Progress is reported in the areas of environmental hardening, database, world modeling, vision, man-machine interface, advanced liquid metal reactor inspection robot, and articulated transporter/manipulator system (ATMS) development.

  14. Tufting enteropathy with EpCAM mutation: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Lais Pêgas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Tufting enteropathy (TE, also known as intestinal epithelial dysplasia (IED, is a rare congenital enteropathy related to an earlyonset of severe intractable diarrhea due to specific abnormalities of the intestinal epithelium and mutations of the EpCAM gene. TE is characterized by clinical and histological heterogeneity, such as with low or without mononuclear cell infiltration of the lamina propria, and abnormalities of basement membrane. TE can be associated with malformations, other epithelial diseases, or to abnormal enterocytes development and/or differentiation. The authors report a case of a Brazilian child with TE associated with c.556-14A>G mutation in the EpCAM gene (NM_002354.2.

  15. Dendritic branching of olfactory bulb mitral and tufted cells: regulation by TrkB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiaki Imamura

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Projection neurons of mammalian olfactory bulb (OB, mitral and tufted cells, have dendrites whose morphologies are specifically differentiated for efficient odor information processing. The apical dendrite extends radially and arborizes in single glomerulus where it receives primary input from olfactory sensory neurons that express the same odor receptor. The lateral dendrites extend horizontally in the external plexiform layer and make reciprocal dendrodendritic synapses with granule cells, which moderate mitral/tufted cell activity. The molecular mechanisms regulating dendritic development of mitral/tufted cells is one of the unsolved important problems in the olfactory system. Here, we focused on TrkB receptors to test the hypothesis that neurotrophin-mediate mechanisms contributed to dendritic differentiation of OB mitral/tufted cells.With immunohistochemical analysis, we found that the TrkB neurotrophin receptor is expressed by both apical and lateral dendrites of mitral/tufted cells and that expression is evident during the early postnatal days when these dendrites exhibit their most robust growth and differentiation. To examine the effect of TrkB activation on mitral/tufted cell dendritic development, we cultured OB neurons. When BDNF or NT4 were introduced into the cultures, there was a significant increase in the number of primary neurites and branching points among the mitral/tufted cells. Moreover, BDNF facilitated filopodial extension along the neurites of mitral/tufted cells.In this report, we show for the first time that TrkB activation stimulates the dendritic branching of mitral/tufted cells in developing OB. This suggests that arborization of the apical dendrite in a glomerulus is under the tight regulation of TrkB activation.

  16. Progress report 1982 of the institute of experimental physics of the Leopold Franzens University Innsbruck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howorka, F.; Maerk, T.; Lindinger, W.

    1983-01-01

    This progress report describes the scientific work and research results of the department of atomic physics in the institute of experimental physics of the university of Innsbruck for the period of 1982. A comprehensive list of publications of this department is given. (A.N.)

  17. Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor. Thirtieth annual progress report, July 1, 1984-June 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, S.H.; Totenbier, R.E.

    1985-08-01

    This report is the thirtieth annual progress report of the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor and covers such topics as: personnel; reactor facility; cobalt-60 facility; education and training; Radionuclear Application Laboratory; Low Level Radiation Monitoring Laboratory; and facility research utilization

  18. Research in elementary particle physics at the University of Florida: Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This is a progress report on the Elementary Particle Physics program at the University of Florida. The program has five tasks covering a broad range of topics in theoretical and experimental high energy physics: Theoretical Elementary Particle Physics, Experimental High Energy Physics, Axion Search, Detector Development, and Computer Requisition

  19. North Carolina State University Nuclear Structure Research at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seagondollar, L.W.; Waltner, A.W.; Mitchell, G.E.; Tilley, D.R.; Gould, C.R.

    1975-01-01

    A summary is presented of nuclear structure research completed at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Lab for the period 9/1/74 to 8/31/75. Included are abstracts and titles for studies of electromagnetic transitions in low-medium mass nuclei, high resolution studies, accelerator induced x-ray investigations, and energy related neutron and charged particle cross section measurements. (U.S.)

  20. Progress reports on SCWR-related development projects from Chinese universities for FY2008-2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, L.K.H.

    2010-02-01

    Canada is participating in the international cooperative forum on system research for two designs (supercritical water-cooled reactor, SCWR, and Very High Temperature Reactor, VHTR) of the Gen-IV nuclear reactor. The forum is referred to as the Generation-IV International Forum (or GIF). The Canadian effort focuses mainly on the SCWR. Among various GIF participants, Canada is the leader of this design and has interest mainly on the pressure-tube type reactor, which is a natural extension of the existing CANDU reactor. Several critical research areas (such as material, chemistry, thermalhydraulics, instability, critical flow, etc.) have been identified in the system-research plan for supporting the SCWR design. Collaborative projects have been established between AECL and universities in China to expedite the CANDU SCWR design. These projects focus on research areas beyond the current scope of the AECL and the NSERC/NRCan/AECL collaborative research and development (CRD) project. AECL supports these projects directly and is contributing (in-kind) the results and findings to the Canadian national program. The collaboration between AECL and Chinese universities began in 2007 July. Most projects cover the duration of three years. The Chinese universities submit their annual progress reports each year prior to the project renewal. The objective of this report is to summarize the progress on collaborative projects between AECL and Chinese universities (namely the Tsinghua University, Shanghai Jiaotong University, and Xi'an Jiaotong University) over the duration of 2008 July to 2009 June. (author)

  1. Tufted Angioma in Children: Report of Two Cases and a Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Dutra da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tufted angioma (TA is a benign vascular tumor with endothelial origin. It is extremely rare in oral mucosa; only seven cases have been reported in the literature so far. Here, we describe two cases of tufted angioma observed in children and we also present a review of the literature about this pathology, concerning the differential diagnosis and management of this lesion in children.

  2. Designing and Implementing the Model of Public Assessment of Social and Cultural Progress in Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Khaje Sarvi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Implementing Investigations, analyzes and performance measurements in special and qualitative social/cultural arena in our country, needs local and special methodologies. Thus the aim of present article is investigating these issues: the concept of culture, classification of cultural organizations in Islamic Republic of Iran, the Pyramidal structure of cultural hierarchy, the process of development and mutual influences of institutions, reviewing related literature of policy making in cultural issues, compatibility of strategies to existing realities in cultural performance structure, double division in measures and analyzing and elaborating suggested measures in elaborating weighting model and assessment method and investigating progress measures by focusing on Islamic-Iranian pattern of progress and investigating the effects of implementing this pattern plus weighting method and using related measures and studying some university cases which are implemented in three phases in universities and high education centers overall the country. This research has shown a linear model by considering weighting coefficients.

  3. Color discrimination in the tufted capuchin monkey, Sapajus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulart, Paulo Roney Kilpp; Bonci, Daniela Maria Oliveira; Galvão, Olavo de Faria; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Ventura, Dora Fix

    2013-01-01

    The present study evaluated the efficacy of an adapted version of the Mollon-Reffin test for the behavioral investigation of color vision in capuchin monkeys. Ten tufted capuchin monkeys (Sapajus spp., formerly referred to as Cebus apella) had their DNA analyzed and were characterized as the following: one trichromat female, seven deuteranope dichromats (six males and one female), and two protanope males, one of which was identified as an "ML protanope." For their behavioral characterization, all of the subjects were tested at three regions of the Commission International de l'Eclairage (CIE) 1976 u'v' diagram, with each test consisting of 20 chromatic variation vectors that were radially distributed around the chromaticity point set as the test background. The phenotypes inferred from the behavioral data were in complete agreement with those predicted from the genetic analysis, with the threshold distribution clearly differentiating between trichromats and dichromats and the estimated confusion lines characteristically converging for deuteranopes and the "classic" protanope. The discrimination pattern of the ML protanope was intermediate between protan and deutan, with confusion lines horizontally oriented and parallel to each other. The observed phenotypic differentiation confirmed the efficacy of the Mollon-Reffin test paradigm as a useful tool for evaluating color discrimination in nonhuman primates. Especially noteworthy was the demonstration of behavioral segregation between the "classic" and "ML" protanopes, suggesting identifiable behavioral consequences of even slight variations in the spectral sensitivity of M/L photopigments in dichromats.

  4. Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Colorado, Final Progress Report 14 February 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinney, E.R.

    2004-01-01

    OAK-B135 The results and progress of research funded by DOE grant number DOE-FG03-95ER40913 at the University of Colorado at Boulder is described. Includes work performed at the HERMES experiment at DESY to study the quark structure of the nucleon and the hadronization process in nuclei, as well as hadronic reactions studied at LAMPF, KEK, and Fermilab

  5. Distribution and function of HCN channels in the apical dendritic tuft of neocortical pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnett, Mark T; Magee, Jeffrey C; Williams, Stephen R

    2015-01-21

    The apical tuft is the most remote area of the dendritic tree of neocortical pyramidal neurons. Despite its distal location, the apical dendritic tuft of layer 5 pyramidal neurons receives substantial excitatory synaptic drive and actively processes corticocortical input during behavior. The properties of the voltage-activated ion channels that regulate synaptic integration in tuft dendrites have, however, not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we use electrophysiological and optical approaches to examine the subcellular distribution and function of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated nonselective cation (HCN) channels in rat layer 5B pyramidal neurons. Outside-out patch recordings demonstrated that the amplitude and properties of ensemble HCN channel activity were uniform in patches excised from distal apical dendritic trunk and tuft sites. Simultaneous apical dendritic tuft and trunk whole-cell current-clamp recordings revealed that the pharmacological blockade of HCN channels decreased voltage compartmentalization and enhanced the generation and spread of apical dendritic tuft and trunk regenerative activity. Furthermore, multisite two-photon glutamate uncaging demonstrated that HCN channels control the amplitude and duration of synaptically evoked regenerative activity in the distal apical dendritic tuft. In contrast, at proximal apical dendritic trunk and somatic recording sites, the blockade of HCN channels decreased excitability. Dynamic-clamp experiments revealed that these compartment-specific actions of HCN channels were heavily influenced by the local and distributed impact of the high density of HCN channels in the distal apical dendritic arbor. The properties and subcellular distribution pattern of HCN channels are therefore tuned to regulate the interaction between integration compartments in layer 5B pyramidal neurons. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/351024-14$15.00/0.

  6. The adrenocortical response of tufted puffin chicks to nutritional deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaysky, A.S.; Romano, Marc D.; Piatt, John F.; Wingfield, J.C.; Kikuchi, M.

    2005-01-01

    In several seabirds, nutritional state of a nest-bound chick is negatively correlated with the activity of its hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Increased corticosterone (cort) secretion has been shown to facilitate changes in behavior that allow hungry chicks to obtain more food from parents. However, if parents are not willing/able to buffer their young from temporary food shortages, increased cort secretion could be detrimental to undernourished chicks. In a system where parents are insensitive to chick demands, low benefits and high costs of activation of the HPA-axis in hungry chicks should lead to a disassociation of the nutritional state of the young and the activity of its HPA-axis. We tested this novel hypothesis for the tufted puffin (Fratercula cirrhata), a seabird with intermittent provisioning of a nest-bound semi-precocial chick. We examined the HPA-axis activity of captive chicks exposed to the following: (1) a short-term (24 h) food deprivation; and (2) an array of prolonged (3 weeks) restrictions in feeding regimens. We found that in response to a short-term food deprivation chicks decreased baseline levels of cort and thyroid hormones. In response to prolonged restrictions, food-limited chicks exhibited signs of nutritional deficit: they had lower body mass, endogenous lipid reserves, and thyroid hormone titers compared to chicks fed ad libitum. However, baseline and maximum acute stress-induced levels of cort were also lower in food-restricted chicks compared to those of chicks fed ad libitum. These results support a major prediction of the study hypothesis that puffin chicks suppress HPA-axis activity in response to short- and long-term nutritional deficits. This physiological adaptation may allow a chick to extend its development in the nest, while eluding detrimental effects of chronic cort elevation. 

  7. Attitudes towards digital gap among university students, and its relationship with educational progress and socioeconomic status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Derikvandi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Digital gap may exist in national scale, among organizations and other groups of society, since it is an indicative of inequality in information technology ground and communication. This study aims to investigate the attitude towards digital gap among students, and its relationship with educational progress and socio-economic  status (SES of university students at Alborz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This was a cross sectional analytic study. students were randomly selected according to multistage cluster method. The tools for collecting data were Davis (1989 questionnaire on attitude towards internet, and  a researcher made questionnaire. The formal validity of the questionnaires is confirmed by a panel of experts, Cronbach's alpha's coefficient was also calculated. Pearson coefficient were calculated andindependent T- test was used for analyzing the data. Result: The analysis of data indicates that there is a meaningful relationship between the attitude towards digital gap and educational progress, and also SES of the students. Furthermore, there was adifferences between the attitudes of males (48.7 and felames (46.5 toward digital gap (p=0.01. Conclusion:There is an attitude towards digital gap in university students. Interventions are needed to close the digital gaps in studnets.

  8. Information literacy progression within the Environmental science program at Linköping University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajsa Gustafsson Åman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the Environmental Science program at Linköping University started 1998 the author has been liaison librarian. The program is a three-year candidate program with approximately 60 students enrolled per year. Information literacy is of vital importance for the teachers and the students. Collaboration between the liaison librarian, the teachers and the administrator is the fundament. During the years a curriculum for Information literacy has evolved. The initiative for the evolvement comes from both librarian and teachers. The program consists today of fifteen different parts with education in information literacy with a progression during the three-year program. Special concern is given to progression, learning design, learning environments and quality development. An important part is appendixes in connection to the student essay. The appendixes consist of reflections on the search of information for the essay in order to make the students more conscious about their Information Literacy processes.

  9. Research in theoretical elementary particle physics at the University of Florida: Task A. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, R.D.; Ramond, P.M.; Sikivie, P.; Thorn, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    This is the Annual Progress Report of the theoretical particle theory group at the University of Florida under DOE Grant DE-FG05-86ER40272. At present our group consists of four Full Professors (Field, Ramond, Thorn, Sikivie), one Associate Professor (Woodard), and two Assistant Professors (Qiu, Kennedy). In addition, we have four postdoctoral research associates and seven graduate students. The research of our group covers a broad range of topics in theoretical high energy physics including both theory and phenomenology. Included in this report is a summary of the last several years, an outline of our current research program

  10. Progress of research on plasma facing materials in University of Science and Technology Beijing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge, Chang-Chun; Zhou, Zhang-Jian; Song, Shu-Xiang; Du, Juan; Zhong, Zhi-Hong

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we report some new progress on plasma facing materials in University of Science and Technology Beijing (USTB), China. They include fabrication of tungsten coating with ultra-fine grain size by atmosphere plasma spraying; fabrication of tungsten with ultra-fine grain size by a newly developed method named as resistance sintering under ultra-high pressure; using the concept of functionally graded materials to join tungsten to copper based heat sink; joining silicon doped carbon to copper by brazing using a Ti based amorphous filler and direct casting

  11. Improving equity in health care financing in China during the progression towards Universal Health Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingsheng; Palmer, Andrew J; Si, Lei

    2017-12-29

    China is reforming the way it finances health care as it moves towards Universal Health Coverage (UHC) after the failure of market-oriented mechanisms for health care. Improving financing equity is a major policy goal of health care system during the progression towards universal coverage. We used progressivity analysis and dominance test to evaluate the financing channels of general taxation, pubic health insurance, and out-of-pocket (OOP) payments. In 2012 a survey of 8854 individuals in 3008 households recorded the socioeconomic and demographic status, and health care payments of those households. The overall Kakwani index (KI) of China's health care financing system is 0.0444. For general tax KI was -0.0241 (95% confidence interval (CI): -0.0315 to -0.0166). The indices for public health schemes (Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance, Urban Resident's Basic Medical Insurance, New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme) were respectively 0.1301 (95% CI: 0.1008 to 0.1594), -0.1737 (95% CI: -0.2166 to -0.1308), and -0.5598 (95% CI: -0.5830 to -0.5365); and for OOP payments KI was 0.0896 (95%CI: 0.0345 to 0.1447). OOP payments are still the dominant part of China's health care finance system. China's health care financing system is not really equitable. Reducing the proportion of indirect taxes would considerably improve health care financing equity. The flat-rate contribution mechanism is not recommended for use in public health insurance schemes, and more attention should be given to optimizing benefit packages during China's progression towards UHC.

  12. Twenty-ninth annual progress report of the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor, July 1, 1983-June 30, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, S.H.; Totenbier, R.E.

    1984-07-01

    The twenty-ninth annual progress report of the operation of the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Reactor is submitted in accordance with the requirements of Contract DE-AC02-76ER03409 with the United States Department of Energy. This report also provides the University administration with a summary of the operation of the facility for the past year

  13. Tufted puffins (Fratercula cirrhata) respond to predation danger during colony approach flights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Addison, B.; Ydenberg, R.C.; Smith, B.D.

    2007-01-01

    In spite of their putative importance in the evolution of certain traits (e.g., nocturnality, coloniality, cliff nesting), the effects of aerial predators on behavior of adult seabirds at colonies have been poorly investigated. We hypothesized that Tufted Puffins (Fratercula cirrhata) respond to

  14. Not Waving but Drowning: A Review of Tufte's "The Cognitive Style of PowerPoint"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangas, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    "The Cognitive Style of PowerPoint: Pitching Out Corrupts Within" by Edward Tufte (2006) condemns the software for failing to help users achieve many of the goals of an effective presentation and instead offers a low resolution platform with a deeply hierarchical single-path structure capable of convening a trivial amount of information even over…

  15. Task A: Research in theoretical elementary particle physics at the University of Florida; Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, R.D.; Ramond, P.M.; Sikivie, P.; Thorn, C.B.

    1993-11-01

    This is the Annual Progress Report of the theoretical particle theory group at the University of Florida under DoE Grant DE-FG05-86ER40272. At present our group consists of four Full Professors (Field, Ramond, Thorn, Sikivie) and three Assistant Professors (Qiu, Woodard, Kennedy). Dallas Kennedy recently joined our group increasing the Particle Theory faculty to seven. In addition, we have three postdoctoral research associates, an SSC fellow, and eight graduate students. The research of our group covers a broad range of topics in theoretical high energy physics with balance between theory and phenomenology. Included in this report is a summary of the last several years of operation of the group and an outline of our current research program.

  16. Achieving equity within universal health coverage: a narrative review of progress and resources for measuring success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney, Anna M; Hill, Peter S

    2014-10-10

    Equity should be implicit within universal health coverage (UHC) however, emerging evidence is showing that without adequate focus on measurement of equity, vulnerable populations may continue to receive inadequate or inferior health care. This study undertakes a narrative review which aims to: (i) elucidate how equity is contextualised and measured within UHC, and (ii) describe tools, resources and lessons which will assist decision makers to plan and implement UHC programmes which ensure equity for all. A narrative review of peer-reviewed literature published in English between 2005 and 2013, retrieved from PubMed via the search words, 'universal health coverage/care' and 'equity/inequity' was performed. Websites of key global health organizations were also searched for relevant grey literature. Papers were excluded if they failed to focus on equity (of access, financial risk protection or health outcomes) as well as focusing on one of the following: (i) the impact of UHC programmes, policies or interventions on equity (ii) indicators, measurement, monitoring and/or evaluation of equity within UHC, or (iii) tools or resources to assist with measurement. Eighteen journal articles consisting mostly of secondary analysis of country data and qualitative case studies in the form of commentaries/reviews, and 13 items of grey literature, consisting largely of reports from working groups and expert meetings focusing on defining, understanding and measuring inequity in UHC (including recent drafts of global/country monitoring frameworks) were included. The literature advocates for progressive universalism addressing monetary and non-monetary barriers to access and strengthening existing health systems. This however relies on countries being effectively able to identify and reach disadvantaged populations and estimate unmet need. Countries should assess the new WHO/WB-proposed framework for its ability to adequately track the progress of disadvantaged populations in terms

  17. Progress towards universal health coverage in BRICS: translating economic growth into better health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Krishna D; Petrosyan, Varduhi; Araujo, Edson Correia; McIntyre, Diane

    2014-06-01

    Brazil, the Russian Federation, India, China and South Africa--the countries known as BRICS--represent some of the world's fastest growing large economies and nearly 40% of the world's population. Over the last two decades, BRICS have undertaken health-system reforms to make progress towards universal health coverage. This paper discusses three key aspects of these reforms: the role of government in financing health; the underlying motivation behind the reforms; and the value of the lessons learnt for non-BRICS countries. Although national governments have played a prominent role in the reforms, private financing constitutes a major share of health spending in BRICS. There is a reliance on direct expenditures in China and India and a substantial presence of private insurance in Brazil and South Africa. The Brazilian health reforms resulted from a political movement that made health a constitutional right, whereas those in China, India, the Russian Federation and South Africa were an attempt to improve the performance of the public system and reduce inequities in access. The move towards universal health coverage has been slow. In China and India, the reforms have not adequately addressed the issue of out-of-pocket payments. Negotiations between national and subnational entities have often been challenging but Brazil has been able to achieve good coordination between federal and state entities via a constitutional delineation of responsibility. In the Russian Federation, poor coordination has led to the fragmented pooling and inefficient use of resources. In mixed health systems it is essential to harness both public and private sector resources.

  18. Progress Testing for Medical Students at the University of Auckland: Results from the First Year of Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Lillis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Progress testing is a method of assessing longitudinal progress of students using a single best answer format pitched at the standard of a newly graduated doctor. Aim To evaluate the results of the first year of summative progress testing at the University of Auckland for Years 2 and 4 in 2013. SUBJECTS: Two cohorts of medical students from Years 2 and 4 of the Medical Program. Methods A survey was administered to all involved students. Open text feedback was also sought. Psychometric data were collected on test performance, and indices of reliability and validity were calculated. Results The three tests showed increased mean scores over time. Reliability of the assessments was uniformly high. There was good concurrent validity. Students believe that progress testing assists in integrating science with clinical knowledge and improve learning. Year 4 students reported improved knowledge retention and deeper understanding. Conclusion Progress testing has been successfully introduced into the Faculty for two separate year cohorts and results have met expectations. Other year cohorts will be added incrementally. Recommendation Key success factors for introducing progress testing are partnership with an experienced university, multiple and iterative briefings with staff and students as well as demonstrating the usefulness of progress testing by providing students with detailed feedback on performance.

  19. Progressive universalism? The impact of targeted coverage on health care access and expenditures in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelsen, Sven; O'Donnell, Owen

    2017-12-01

    Like other countries seeking a progressive path to universalism, Peru has attempted to reduce inequalities in access to health care by granting the poor entitlement to tax-financed basic care without charge. We identify the impact of this policy by comparing the target population's change in health care utilization with that of poor adults already covered through employment-based insurance. There are positive effects on receipt of ambulatory care and medication that are largest among the elderly and the poorest. The probability of getting formal health care when sick is increased by almost two fifths, but the likelihood of being unable to afford treatment is reduced by more than a quarter. Consistent with the shallow coverage offered, there is no impact on use of inpatient care. Neither is there any effect on average out-of-pocket health care expenditure, but medical spending is reduced by up to 25% in the top quarter of the distribution. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. University of Colorado at Boulder Nuclear Physics Laboratory technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes experimental work carried out between October 1, 1990, the closing of our Progress Report, and August 14, 1991 at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado, Boulder, under contract DE-FG02-ER40269 with the United States Department of Energy. This contract supports broadly based experimental work in intermediate energy nuclear physics. The program includes pion-nucleon studies at TRIUMF and LAMPF, inelastic pion scattering and charge exchange reactions at LAMPF, and nucleon charge exchange at LAMPF/NTOF. The first results of spin-transfer observables in the isovector (rvec p,rvec n) reaction are included in this report. Our data confirm the tentative result from (rvec p,rvec p') reactions that the nuclear isovector spin response shows neither longitudinal enhancement nor transverse queching. Our program in quasifree scattering of high energy pions shows solid evidence of isoscalar enhancement of the nuclear nonspin response. We include several comparisons of the quasifree scattering of different probes. Results from our efforts in the design of accelerator RF cavities are also included in this report

  1. Extracting quantitative three-dimensional unsteady flow direction from tuft flow visualizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omata, Noriyasu; Shirayama, Susumu, E-mail: omata@nakl.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: sirayama@sys.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Systems Innovation, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8656 (Japan)

    2017-10-15

    We focus on the qualitative but widely used method of tuft flow visualization, and propose a method for quantifying it using information technology. By applying stereo image processing and computer vision, the three-dimensional (3D) flow direction in a real environment can be obtained quantitatively. In addition, we show that the flow can be divided temporally by performing appropriate machine learning on the data. Acquisition of flow information in real environments is important for design development, but it is generally considered difficult to apply simulations or quantitative experiments to such environments. Hence, qualitative methods including the tuft method are still in use today. Although attempts have been made previously to quantify such methods, it has not been possible to acquire 3D information. Furthermore, even if quantitative data could be acquired, analysis was often performed empirically or qualitatively. In contrast, we show that our method can acquire 3D information and analyze the measured data quantitatively. (paper)

  2. Endogenous GABA and Glutamate Finely Tune the Bursting of Olfactory Bulb External Tufted Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayar, Abdallah; Ennis, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    In rat olfactory bulb slices, external tufted (ET) cells spontaneously generate spike bursts. Although ET cell bursting is intrinsically generated, its strength and precise timing may be regulated by synaptic input. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing whether the burst properties are modulated by activation of ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate receptors. Blocking GABAA receptors increased—whereas blocking ionotropic glutamate receptors decreased—the number of spikes/burst without changing the interburst frequency. The GABAA agonist (isoguvacine, 10 μM) completely inhibited bursting or reduced the number of spikes/burst, suggesting a shunting effect. These findings indicate that the properties of ET cell spontaneous bursting are differentially controlled by GABAergic and glutamatergic fast synaptic transmission. We suggest that ET cell excitatory and inhibitory inputs may be encoded as a change in the pattern of spike bursting in ET cells, which together with mitral/tufted cells constitute the output circuit of the olfactory bulb. PMID:17567771

  3. Extracting quantitative three-dimensional unsteady flow direction from tuft flow visualizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omata, Noriyasu; Shirayama, Susumu

    2017-01-01

    We focus on the qualitative but widely used method of tuft flow visualization, and propose a method for quantifying it using information technology. By applying stereo image processing and computer vision, the three-dimensional (3D) flow direction in a real environment can be obtained quantitatively. In addition, we show that the flow can be divided temporally by performing appropriate machine learning on the data. Acquisition of flow information in real environments is important for design development, but it is generally considered difficult to apply simulations or quantitative experiments to such environments. Hence, qualitative methods including the tuft method are still in use today. Although attempts have been made previously to quantify such methods, it has not been possible to acquire 3D information. Furthermore, even if quantitative data could be acquired, analysis was often performed empirically or qualitatively. In contrast, we show that our method can acquire 3D information and analyze the measured data quantitatively. (paper)

  4. Progress Toward Universal Health Coverage: A Comparative Analysis in 5 South Asian Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Mizanur; Karan, Anup; Rahman, Md Shafiur; Parsons, Alexander; Abe, Sarah Krull; Bilano, Ver; Awan, Rabia; Gilmour, Stuart; Shibuya, Kenji

    2017-09-01

    Achieving universal health coverage is one of the key targets in the newly adopted Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations. To investigate progress toward universal health coverage in 5 South Asian countries and assess inequalities in health services and financial risk protection indicators. In a population-based study, nationally representative household (335 373 households) survey data from Afghanistan (2014 and 2015), Bangladesh (2010 and 2014), India (2012 and 2014), Nepal (2014 and 2015), and Pakistan (2014) were used to calculate relative indices of health coverage, financial risk protection, and inequality in coverage among wealth quintiles. The study was conducted from June 2012 to February 2016. Three dimensions of universal health coverage were assessed: access to basic services, financial risk protection, and equity. Composite and indicator-specific coverage rates, stratified by wealth quintiles, were then estimated. Slope and relative index of inequality were used to assess inequalities in service and financial indicators. Access to basic care varied substantially across all South Asian countries, with mean rates of overall prevention coverage and treatment coverage of 53.0% (95% CI, 42.2%-63.6%) and 51.2% (95% CI, 45.2%-57.1%) in Afghanistan, 76.5% (95% CI, 61.0%-89.0%) and 44.8% (95% CI, 37.1%-52.5%) in Bangladesh, 74.2% (95% CI, 57.0%-88.1%) and 83.5% (95% CI, 54.4%-99.1%) in India, 76.8% (95% CI, 66.5%-85.7%) and 57.8% (95% CI, 50.1%-65.4%) in Nepal, and 69.8% (95% CI, 58.3%-80.2%) and 50.4% (95% CI, 37.1%-63.6%) in Pakistan. Financial risk protection was generally low, with 15.3% (95% CI, 14.7%-16.0%) of respondents in Afghanistan, 15.8% (95% CI, 14.9%-16.8%) in Bangladesh, 17.9% (95% CI, 17.7%-18.2%) in India, 11.8% (95% CI, 11.8%-11.9%) in Nepal, and 4.4% (95% CI, 4.0%-4.9%) in Pakistan reporting incurred catastrophic payments due to health care costs. Access to at least 4 antenatal care visits, institutional delivery, and presence

  5. Kocuria kristinae-caused sepsis in an infant with congenital tufting enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Malik; Ganschow, Rainer; Jankofsky, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Aydin M, Ganschow R, Jankofsky M. Kocuria kristinae-caused sepsis in an infant with congenital tufting enteropathy. Turk J Pediatr 2017; 59: 93-96. Congenital tufting enteropathy (CTE) is characterized by the early-onset of chronic diarrhea and the inability to develop. It is a rare congenital disease with a low prevalence of 1:50,000 - 100,000 live births p.a. The histopathology is characterized by villous atrophy and the characteristic epithelial tufts. Recent identification of causative mutations in EpCAM has enhanced our understanding of this disease. Due to its severe clinical course, patients are dependent on parenteral nutrition to thrive successfully. Catheter-associated blood stream infections have become the primary problem for pediatric patients. Infections with Kocuria kristinae are rare. This report is about a 3-month-old girl with CTE suffering from a central venous catheter related mono-sepsis by K. kristinae. A sepsis therapy with meropenem and vancomycin improved her general state rapidly. Only few cases in the literature with CTE and K. kristinae are described. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report presenting two coincidences in one case.

  6. Olfactory aversive conditioning alters olfactory bulb mitral/tufted cell glomerular odor responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max L Fletcher

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The anatomical organization of receptor neuron input into the olfactory bulb (OB allows odor information to be transformed into an odorant-specific spatial map of mitral/tufted cell glomerular activity at the upper level of the olfactory bulb. In other sensory systems, neuronal representations of stimuli can be reorganized or enhanced following learning. While the mammalian OB has been shown to undergo experience-dependent plasticity at the glomerular level, it is still unclear if similar representational change occurs within mitral/tufted cell glomerular odor representations following learning. To address this, odorant-evoked glomerular activity patterns were imaged in mice expressing a GFP-based calcium indicator (GCaMP2 in OB mitral/tufted cells. Glomerular odor responses were imaged before and after olfactory associative conditioning to aversive foot shock. Following conditioning, we found no overall reorganization of the glomerular representation. Training, however, did significantly alter the amplitudes of individual glomeruli within the representation in mice in which the odor was presented together with foot shock. Further, the specific pairing of foot shock with odor presentations lead to increased responses primarily in initially weakly activated glomeruli. Overall, these results suggest that associative conditioning can enhance the initial representation of odors within the olfactory bulb by enhancing responses to the learned odor in some glomeruli.

  7. Differential Axonal Projection of Mitral and Tufted Cells in the Mouse Main Olfactory System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Nagayama

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, much has been elucidated regarding the functional organization of the axonal connection of olfactory sensory neurons to olfactory bulb (OB glomeruli. However, the manner in which projection neurons of the OB process odorant input and send this information to higher brain centers remains unclear. Here, we report long-range, large-scale tracing of the axonal projection patterns of OB neurons using two-photon microscopy. Tracer injection into a single glomerulus demonstrated widely distributed mitral/tufted cell axonal projections on the lateroventral surface of the mouse brain, including the anterior/posterior piriform cortex (PC and olfactory tubercle (OT. We noted two distinct groups of labeled axons: PC-orienting axons and OT-orienting axons. Each group occupied distinct parts of the lateral olfactory tract. PC-orienting axons projected axon collaterals to a wide area of the PC but only a few collaterals to the OT. OT-orienting axons densely projected axon collaterals primarily to the anterolateral OT (alOT. Different colored dye injections into the superficial and deep portions of the OB external plexiform layer revealed that the PC-orienting axon populations originated in presumed mitral cells and the OT-orienting axons in presumed tufted cells. These data suggest that although mitral and tufted cells receive similar odor signals from a shared glomerulus, they process the odor information in different ways and send their output to different higher brain centers via the PC and alOT.

  8. Molecular beams research in the chemistry department of the Complutense university: progress over a decade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Urena, A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports on the progress made over nearly a decade (1980-1990) by the Molecular Beam Group in the Complutense University of Madrid. After the author's stay in the United States as Prof. R.B Bernstein's post doc everything here had to be done from scratch. Designing the apparatus; importing all the equipment; overcoming huge bureaucracy: buying screws, welding, plumbing, etc. Essentially the following experimental techniques were set up: crossed-beam techniques to measure total and differential reaction cross-section for ground and/or excited species. Reaction Energy threshold and excitation functions for elementary chemical reactions. Molecular Beam chemiluminescence either in crossed-beam and beam-gas conditions. Laser-induced fluorescence and laser-induced charge transfer processes in beams and crossed-beam conditions, respectively. The chemiionization technique in crossed-beams was also set up. Our group pioneered: (a) the measurement of high resolution threshold energies and total reaction cross-section (also in absolute units) for many reactions; (b) the production of highly intense pulsed beams of electronically excited atoms; (c) the measurement under high resolution of the crossed-beam dynamics of excited species; (d) the measurement of the role of alkyl groups in the dynamics (stereodynamics) of chemical reactions; (e) the measurement of the spin-orbit effects in laser-induced charge transfer processes; (f) the developing of a novel technique, using the time-of-flight method under crossed-beam conditions, that is able to measure existing quantum effects in the total reaction cross-section; (g) the measurement of dissociation energies of radicals with less than 1% of experimental error. (Author) 76 refs. 32 fig

  9. Recent progress in distributed optical fiber Raman photon sensors at China Jiliang University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zaixuan; Wang, Jianfeng; Li, Yi; Gong, Huaping; Yu, Xiangdong; Liu, Honglin; Jin, Yongxing; Kang, Juan; Li, Chenxia; Zhang, Wensheng; Zhang, Wenping; Niu, Xiaohui; Sun, Zhongzhou; Zhao, Chunliu; Dong, Xinyong; Jin, Shangzhong

    2012-06-01

    A brief review of recent progress in researches, productions and applications of full distributed fiber Raman photon sensors at China Jiliang University (CJLU) is presented. In order to improve the measurement distance, the accuracy, the space resolution, the ability of multi-parameter measurements, and the intelligence of full distributed fiber sensor systems, a new generation fiber sensor technology based on the optical fiber nonlinear scattering fusion principle is proposed. A series of new generation full distributed fiber sensors are investigated and designed, which consist of new generation ultra-long distance full distributed fiber Raman and Rayleigh scattering photon sensors integrated with a fiber Raman amplifier, auto-correction full distributed fiber Raman photon temperature sensors based on Raman correlation dual sources, full distributed fiber Raman photon temperature sensors based on a pulse coding source, full distributed fiber Raman photon temperature sensors using a fiber Raman wavelength shifter, a new type of Brillouin optical time domain analyzers (BOTDAs) integrated with a fiber Raman amplifier for replacing a fiber Brillouin amplifier, full distributed fiber Raman and Brillouin photon sensors integrated with a fiber Raman amplifier, and full distributed fiber Brillouin photon sensors integrated with a fiber Brillouin frequency shifter. The Internet of things is believed as one of candidates of the next technological revolution, which has driven hundreds of millions of class markets. Sensor networks are important components of the Internet of things. The full distributed optical fiber sensor network (Rayleigh, Raman, and Brillouin scattering) is a 3S (smart materials, smart structure, and smart skill) system, which is easy to construct smart fiber sensor networks. The distributed optical fiber sensor can be embedded in the power grids, railways, bridges, tunnels, roads, constructions, water supply systems, dams, oil and gas pipelines and other

  10. Nuclear physics research at the University of Richmond. Progress report, November 1, 1994 - October 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vineyard, M.F.; Gilfoyle, G.P.; Major, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Summarized in this report is the progress achieved during the period from November 1, 1994 to October 31, 1995. The experimental work described in this report is in electromagnetic and heavy-ion nuclear physics. The effort in electromagnetic nuclear physics is in preparation for the research program at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and is focused on the construction and use of the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The heavy-ion experiments were performed at the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility and SUNY, Stony Brook. The physics interests driving these efforts at CEBAF are in the study of the structure, interactions, and nuclear-medium modifications of mesons and baryons. This year, an extension of the experiment to measure the magnetic form factor of the neutron was approved by the CEBAF Program Advisory Committee Nine (PAC9) for beam at 6 GeV. The authors also submitted updates to PAC9 on the experiments to measure inclusive η photoproduction in nuclei and electroproduction of the Λ, Λ*(1520), and f 0 (975). In addition to these experiments, the authors collaborated on a proposal to measure rare radiative decays of the φ meson which was also approved by PAC9. Their contributions to the construction of the CLAS include the development of the drift-chamber gas system, drift-chamber software, and controls software. Major has been leading the effort in the construction of the gas system. In the last year, the Hall B gas shed was constructed and the installation of the gas system components built at the University of Richmond has begun. Over the last six years, the efforts in low-energy heavy-ion physics have decreased due to the change in focus to electromagnetic nuclear physics at CEBAF. Most of the heavy-ion work is completed and there are now new experiments planned. Included in this report are two papers resulting from collaborations on heavy-ion experiments

  11. Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Colorado technical progress report, 1976 and proposal for continuation of contract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This report summarizes the work carried out at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado during the period November 1, 1975 to November 1, 1976. The low energy nuclear physics section is dominated by light-ion reaction studies which span a wide range. These include both two-neutron and two-proton transfer reactions, charge exchange and inelastic scattering, as well as single nucleon transfer reactions. The nuclei studied vary widely in their mass and characteristics. These reaction studies have been aided by the multi-use scattering chamber which now allows the energy-loss-spectrometer beam preparation system (beam swinger) to shift from charged particle studies to neutron time-of-flight studies with a minimum loss of time. The intermediate energy section reflects the increase in activity accompanying the arrival of LAMPF data and the initiation of (p,d) studies at the Indiana separated-sector cyclotron. The nucleon removal results provided by the π beam at EPICS previous to completion of the spectrometer have shown that nuclear effects dominate this process, so that the widely used free interaction picture is inadequate. The section entitled ''Other Activities'' reveals continuing activities in new applications of nuclear techniques to problems in medicine and biology. Reactions important to astrophysics continue to be investigated and our trace-element program remains at a high level of activity. The theoretical section reports new progress in understanding magnitudes of two-step reactions by inclusion of finite-range effects. A new finite-range program which is fast and economical has been completed. Intermediate energy results include calculations of π-γ angular correlations, low energy π-nucleus interactions, as well as (p,d) and nucleon scattering calculations for intermediate energies

  12. Using the SOLO Taxonomy to Analyze Competence Progression of University Science Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabrand, Claus; Dahl, Bettina

    2009-01-01

    During 2007 all Danish university curricula were reformulated to explicitly state course objectives due to the adoption of a new Danish national grading scale which stipulated that grades were to be given based on how well students meet explicit course objectives. The Faculties of Science at University of Aarhus and University of Southern Denmark…

  13. A comparative study on component volumes from outer to inner dental enamel in relation to enamel tufts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setally Azevedo Macena, Marcus; de Alencar e Silva Leite, Maria Luísa; de Lima Gouveia, Cíntia; de Lima, Tamires Alcoforado Sena; Athayde, Priscilla Alves Aguiar; de Sousa, Frederico Barbosa

    2014-06-01

    Dental enamel presents marked mechanical properties gradients from outer to inner enamel, a region lacking component volumes profiles. Tufts, structures of inner enamel, have been shown to play a role in enamel resilience. We aimed at comparing component volumes from inner to outer enamel in relation to enamel tufts. Transversal ground sections from the cervical half of unerupted human third molars (n=10) were prepared and histological points were selected along transversal lines (extending from innermost to outer enamel) traced across tufts and adjacent control areas without tufts. Component volumes were measured at each histological point. Component volumes ranges were: 70.6-98.5% (mineral), 0.02-20.78% (organic), 3.8-9.8% (total water), 3-9% (firmly bound water), and 0.02-3.3% (loosely bound water). Inner enamel presented the lowest mineral volumes and the highest non-mineral volumes. Mineral, water and organic contents differed as a function of the distance from innermost enamel but not between the tuft and control lines. Tufts presented opaqueness in polarizing microscopy (feature of fracture lines). Organic volume gradient correlated with a relatively flat profile of loosely bound water. Inner, but not outer enamel, rehydrated after air-dried enamel was heated to 50°C and re-exposed to room conditions, as predicted by the organic/water gradient profiles. Component volumes vary markedly from outer to inner enamel, but not between areas with or without tufts (that behave like fracture lines under polarizing microscopy). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report, 1 September 1994--31 August 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, E.J.

    1995-01-01

    The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL)--a collaboration of Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--has had a very productive year. This report covers the second year of a three-year grant between the US Department of Energy and the three collaborating universities. The TUNL research program focuses on the following areas of nuclear physics: parity violation in neutron and charged-particle resonances--the mass and energy dependence of the weak interaction spreading width; chaotic behavior in 30 P from studies of eigenvalue fluctuations in nuclear level schemes; studies of few-body systems; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear data evaluation for A = 3--20, for which TUNL is now the international center; high-spin spectroscopy and superdeformation in nuclei, involving collaborations at Argonne National Laboratory. Developments in technology and instrumentation have been vital to the research and training program. In this progress report the author describes: a proposed polarized γ-beam facility at the Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory; cryogenic systems and microcalorimeter development; continuing development of the Low Energy Beam Facility. The research summaries presented in this progress report are preliminary

  15. Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report, 1 September 1994--31 August 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, E.J.

    1995-09-01

    The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL)--a collaboration of Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--has had a very productive year. This report covers the second year of a three-year grant between the US Department of Energy and the three collaborating universities. The TUNL research program focuses on the following areas of nuclear physics: parity violation in neutron and charged-particle resonances--the mass and energy dependence of the weak interaction spreading width; chaotic behavior in {sup 30}P from studies of eigenvalue fluctuations in nuclear level schemes; studies of few-body systems; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear data evaluation for A = 3--20, for which TUNL is now the international center; high-spin spectroscopy and superdeformation in nuclei, involving collaborations at Argonne National Laboratory. Developments in technology and instrumentation have been vital to the research and training program. In this progress report the author describes: a proposed polarized {gamma}-beam facility at the Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory; cryogenic systems and microcalorimeter development; continuing development of the Low Energy Beam Facility. The research summaries presented in this progress report are preliminary.

  16. Tufted capuchin monkeys (Sapajus sp) learning how to crack nuts: does variability decline throughout development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, Briseida Dogo; Nagy-Reis, Mariana Baldy; Lacerda, Fernanda Neves; Pagnotta, Murillo; Savalli, Carine

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the process of nut-cracking acquisition in a semi-free population of tufted capuchin monkeys (Sapajus sp) in São Paulo, Brazil. We analyzed the cracking episodes from monkeys of different ages and found that variability of actions related to cracking declined. Inept movements were more frequent in juveniles, which also showed an improvement on efficient striking. The most effective behavioral sequence for cracking was more frequently used by the most experienced monkeys, which also used non-optimal sequences. Variability in behavior sequences and actions may allow adaptive changes to behavior under changing environmental conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Determining the Relation between General Health and Educational Progress among Paramedical Faculty’s Students of Tehran Medical University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Dargahi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Considering the fact that students studying various fields of Study will have the responsibility to create, maintain and improve society’s level of health, they should be cared for with precision so they can perform and play their role as an educated and expert work force. this is due to the fact that getting accepted in university is a very sensitive period in lives of efficient workforce and active youth in each country, therefore, present study determines the relation between general health and educational progress among paramedical faculty’s Students of Tehran Medical University. Method: present research has a descriptive-analytic nature and was executed in a time period during winter of 2016. the target society included all students of paramedical faculty and required data was gathered by an adults’ health function literacy questionnaire and general health was also gathered by means of general health questionnaire. in order to present descriptive results of percentage and median and to study and analyses quantitative data, parametric statistical tests was used for normal data and in case there were not normal, unparametric tests were applied. Findings: Results of present study showed that there is a positive significant relation between general health and educational progress (r=01 / 0 p <،28 / 0. Still, no significant relation was observed between general health and health literacy (r= 0.038, p=0.569. Conclusion: In studying general health aspects with health literacy and educational health motivation, all aspects of general health (physical aspect, anxiety aspect, social function aspect, depression aspect showed a direct and significant relation with educational progress but presented no significant relation with health literacy. Still, we could observe a positive effect on educational progress and health literacy by trying to improve any of general health factors. In other words, we could use organizational capitals to improve

  18. Experimental particle physics at the University of Pittsburgh: Progress report, April 1, 1988--March 31, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, W.E.; Coon, D.D.; Engels, E. Jr.; Shepard, P.F.; Thompson, J.A.

    1988-12-01

    This report discusses the experimental work in particle physics at the University of Pittsburgh. Topics discussed are: lepton production at the CERN SPS; direct photon production at the Tevatron; and search for fractional charge particles in semiconductors

  19. Corrosion Research Center of the University of Minnesota. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oriani, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Many of the projects which began with the inception of the Corrosion Research Center in early 1980 have progressed from the stage of acquisition and assembly of apparatus to that of generation of research results. In the area of research on surface reactions, notable progress has been made on the microscopic theory of corrosion, most importantly the recognition that the quantum mechanical depletion layer at the metal layer makes an appreciable contribution to the potential drop across the metal-electrolyte interface and to the capacitance of the interface

  20. SIZE SELECTION IN DIVING TUFTED DUCKS AYTHYA-FULIGULA EXPLAINED BY DIFFERENTIAL HANDLING OF SMALL AND LARGE MUSSELS DREISSENA-POLYMORPHA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DELEEUW, JJ; VANEERDEN, MR

    1992-01-01

    We studied prey size selection of Tufted Ducks feeding on fresh-water mussels under semi-natural conditions. In experiments with non-diving birds, we found that Tufted Ducks use two techniques to handle mussels. Mussels less than 16 mm in length are strained from a waterflow generated in the bill

  1. Self-control depletion in tufted capuchin monkeys (Sapajus spp.): does delay of gratification rely on a limited resource?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, Francesca De; Micucci, Antonia; Gori, Emanuele; Truppa, Valentina; Ariely, Dan; Addessi, Elsa

    2015-01-01

    Self-control failure has enormous personal and societal consequences. One of the most debated models explaining why self-control breaks down is the Strength Model, according to which self-control depends on a limited resource. Either previous acts of self-control or taking part in highly demanding cognitive tasks have been shown to reduce self-control, possibly due to a reduction in blood glucose levels. However, several studies yielded negative findings, and recent meta-analyses questioned the robustness of the depletion effect in humans. We investigated, for the first time, whether the Strength Model applies to a non-human primate species, the tufted capuchin monkey. We tested five capuchins in a self-control task (the Accumulation task) in which food items were accumulated within individual's reach for as long as the subject refrained from taking them. We evaluated whether capuchins' performance decreases: (i) when tested before receiving their daily meal rather than after consuming it (Energy Depletion Experiment), and (ii) after being tested in two tasks with different levels of cognitive complexity (Cognitive Depletion Experiment). We also tested, in both experiments, how implementing self-control in each trial of the Accumulation task affected this capacity within each session and/or across consecutive sessions. Repeated acts of self-control in each trial of the Accumulation task progressively reduced this capacity within each session, as predicted by the Strength Model. However, neither experiencing a reduction in energy level nor taking part in a highly demanding cognitive task decreased performance in the subsequent Accumulation task. Thus, whereas capuchins seem to be vulnerable to within-session depletion effects, to other extents our findings are in line with the growing body of studies that failed to find a depletion effect in humans. Methodological issues potentially affecting the lack of depletion effects in capuchins are discussed.

  2. Self-control depletion in tufted capuchin monkeys (Sapajus spp.): does delay of gratification rely on a limited resource?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, Francesca De; Gori, Emanuele; Truppa, Valentina; Ariely, Dan; Addessi, Elsa

    2015-01-01

    Self-control failure has enormous personal and societal consequences. One of the most debated models explaining why self-control breaks down is the Strength Model, according to which self-control depends on a limited resource. Either previous acts of self-control or taking part in highly demanding cognitive tasks have been shown to reduce self-control, possibly due to a reduction in blood glucose levels. However, several studies yielded negative findings, and recent meta-analyses questioned the robustness of the depletion effect in humans. We investigated, for the first time, whether the Strength Model applies to a non-human primate species, the tufted capuchin monkey. We tested five capuchins in a self-control task (the Accumulation task) in which food items were accumulated within individual’s reach for as long as the subject refrained from taking them. We evaluated whether capuchins’ performance decreases: (i) when tested before receiving their daily meal rather than after consuming it (Energy Depletion Experiment), and (ii) after being tested in two tasks with different levels of cognitive complexity (Cognitive Depletion Experiment). We also tested, in both experiments, how implementing self-control in each trial of the Accumulation task affected this capacity within each session and/or across consecutive sessions. Repeated acts of self-control in each trial of the Accumulation task progressively reduced this capacity within each session, as predicted by the Strength Model. However, neither experiencing a reduction in energy level nor taking part in a highly demanding cognitive task decreased performance in the subsequent Accumulation task. Thus, whereas capuchins seem to be vulnerable to within-session depletion effects, to other extents our findings are in line with the growing body of studies that failed to find a depletion effect in humans. Methodological issues potentially affecting the lack of depletion effects in capuchins are discussed. PMID

  3. Experimental nuclear physics at Vanderbilt University. Progress report, August, 1983-August, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Progress summaries are given in the fields of in-beam gamma ray spectroscopy, nuclei far from stability, nuclear reaction mechanism studies, delta-electron spectroscopy, theoretical studies, and other research and activities. Status of the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research is reviewed

  4. Dclk1+ small intestinal epithelial tuft cells display the hallmarks of quiescence and self-renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; May, Randal; Qu, Dongfeng; Weygant, Nathaniel; Taylor, Vivian E.; Li, James D.; Ali, Naushad; Sureban, Sripathi M.; Qante, Michael; Wang, Timothy C.; Bronze, Michael S.; Houchen, Courtney W.

    2015-01-01

    To date, no discrete genetic signature has been defined for isolated Dclk1+ tuft cells within the small intestine. Furthermore, recent reports on the functional significance of Dclk1+ cells in the small intestine have been inconsistent. These cells have been proposed to be fully differentiated cells, reserve stem cells, and tumor stem cells. In order to elucidate the potential function of Dclk1+ cells, we FACS-sorted Dclk1+ cells from mouse small intestinal epithelium using transgenic mice expressing YFP under the control of the Dclk1 promoter (Dclk1-CreER;Rosa26-YFP). Analysis of sorted YFP+ cells demonstrated marked enrichment (~6000 fold) for Dclk1 mRNA compared with YFP− cells. Dclk1+ population display ~6 fold enrichment for the putative quiescent stem cell marker Bmi1. We observed significantly greater expression of pluripotency genes, pro-survival genes, and quiescence markers in the Dclk1+ population. A significant increase in self-renewal capability (14-fold) was observed in in vitro isolated Dclk1+ cells. The unique genetic report presented in this manuscript suggests that Dclk1+ cells may maintain quiescence, pluripotency, and metabolic activity for survival/longevity. Functionally, these reserve characteristics manifest in vitro, with Dclk1+ cells exhibiting greater ability to self-renew. These findings indicate that quiescent stem-like functionality is a feature of Dclk1-expressing tuft cells. PMID:26362399

  5. The Great Diseases Project: a partnership between Tufts Medical School and the Boston public schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacque, Berri; Malanson, Katherine; Bateman, Kathleen; Akeson, Bob; Cail, Amanda; Doss, Chris; Dugan, Matt; Finegold, Brandon; Gauthier, Aimee; Galego, Mike; Roundtree, Eugene; Spezzano, Lawrence; Meiri, Karina F

    2013-05-01

    Medical schools, although the gatekeepers of much biomedical education and research, rarely engage formally with K-12 educators to influence curriculum content or professional development. This segregation of content experts from teachers creates a knowledge gap that limits inclusion of current biomedical science into high school curricula, affecting both public health literacy and the biomedical pipeline. The authors describe how, in 2009, scientists from Tufts Medical School and Boston public school teachers established a partnership of formal scholarly dialogue to create 11th- to 12th-grade high school curricula about critical health-related concepts, with the goal of increasing scientific literacy and influencing health-related decisions. The curricula are based on the great diseases (infectious diseases, neurological disorders, metabolic disease, and cancer). Unlike most health science curricular interventions that provide circumscribed activities, the curricula are comprehensive, each filling one full term of in-class learning and providing extensive real-time support for the teacher. In this article, the authors describe how they developed and implemented the infectious disease curriculum, and its impacts. The high school teachers and students showed robust gains in content knowledge and critical thinking skills, whereas the Tufts scientists increased their pedagogical knowledge and appreciation for health-related science communication. The results show how formal interactions between medical schools and K-12 educators can be mutually beneficial.

  6. Active iris vascular tufts bleeding successfully treated with argon laser photocoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmad, Ambreen; Alfaqawi, Fadi; Chakrabarti, Monali; Mitra, Arijit; Mushtaq, Bushra

    2018-03-01

    Iris vascular tufts (IVT) are rare biomicroscopic capillary outgrowths from the pupillary margins. Patients are usually asymptomatic until presenting with blurred vision due to spontaneous hyphema or with raised intraocular pressure. A 61-year-old woman presented to eye casualty with left eye (LE) blurred vision and discomfort for 1 day. Her external ocular examination was unremarkable and visual acuity was 6/6 in the right eye (RE) and 6/9 in the LE. Biomicroscopic examination revealed a 2-mm hyphema in her LE and bilateral multiple small IVT and active bleeding from IVT at the pupillary margin of the LE at the 5 o'clock position. Diagnosis of LE active bleeding from IVT was made and she underwent argon laser photocoagulation directed at the source of bleeding. The bleeding stopped immediately after the second burn. She was followed up for 3 months; her visual acuity was 6/5 and 6/6 in the RE and LE, respectively, with no further problems. Iris vascular tufts are benign and recurrent hemorrhages are unlikely. Therefore, definitive argon laser photocoagulation or surgical treatment are reserved to arrest further episodes of hyphema. Our case demonstrates the effective use of argon laser photocoagulation to completely arrest active bleeding from IVT and excellent recovery of hyphema with no further problems for 5 years.

  7. The United Nations Global Compact Progress Reports as Management Control Instruments for Social Responsibility at Spanish Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Wigmore-Álvarez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability and social responsibility (SR have emerged as a new way of managing all types of organizations. It is necessary that the resulting policy be integrated transversely in the control processes. The environment is especially demanding of higher education institutions (HEIs and universities when it comes to behaving in a socially responsible manner due to their great influence in society. Many universities have adhered to the United Nations Global Compact (UNGC principles to prove their commitment and gain legitimacy. The Communication on Progress (COP is a management tool that helps to understand the level of implementation of the principles. Furthermore, COP analysis aids in establishing a process of continuous improvement in the management of the impacts that institutions have on their stakeholders. The aim of this study was to analyze the Spanish universities that have joined the Global Compact. Through a descriptive methodology, we identified the aspects that reflect this commitment and how this is integrated into their operational and educational processes. The results have shown that it is necessary to promote the integration of different international initiatives to guide the SR of universities. There are deficiencies in their SR management systems that prevent them from being more transparent, and it was found that in some cases, they are not aware of the implications the commitment can have in developed countries.

  8. Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark - Annual Progress Report 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Korsholm, Søren Bang; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the pla......The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction...... phased out during 2007. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2007....

  9. Progress report for DOE Award Number SC0008482, Colorado State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Stuart [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2017-01-26

    In this project we proposed to study the real-time dynamics of driven superconducting vortices moving in a periodic potential, using the technique of high-bandwidth scanning Hall probe microscopy to understand the local spatial and temporal characteristics of vortex motion in periodic potentials. During the term of the project we made significant progress towards these goals, but the overall project goal was unfortunately not met. Nonetheless, certain intermediate goals were met, and we believe that even though the project has officially ended we will be able to finish the proposed experiments.

  10. The Pennsylvania State University Light Water Ultra-Safe Plant Concept: 3rd quarter progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klevans, E.

    1987-01-01

    Progress in the Ultra Safe study has substantially increased since the last report. The search for pressurizing pump turbine component information is now complete and a final plant layout for detailed evaluation has been chosen. Significant results for the normal operation performance of the Ultra Safe pressurizing technique are included. The plan of attack for the evaluation of the Ultra Safe shutdown scenario and natural circulation capability is discussed. This process is expected to be the next key area for analysis. The reactor design is complete including a change to alleviate the need for a soluble boron system. Material on the reactor building layout is also provided

  11. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Materials Research Laboratory progress report for FY 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois is an interdisciplinary laboratory operated in the College of Engineering. Its focus is the science of materials and it supports research in the areas of condensed matter physics, solid state chemistry, and materials science. This report addresses topics such as: an MRL overview; budget; general programmatic and institutional issues; new programs; research summaries for metallurgy, ceramics, solid state physics, and materials chemistry

  12. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Materials Research Laboratory progress report for FY 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    The Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois is an interdisciplinary laboratory operated in the College of Engineering. Its focus is the science of materials and it supports research in the areas of condensed matter physics, solid state chemistry, and materials science. This report addresses topics such as: an MRL overview; budget; general programmatic and institutional issues; new programs; research summaries for metallurgy, ceramics, solid state physics, and materials chemistry.

  13. Association Euratom - DTU, Technical University of Denmark, Department of Physics - Annual Progress Report 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom – DTU, Technical University of Denmark (until 31-12- 2011: Association Euratom – Risø DTU) covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport...... temperature superconductors. Other activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2011....

  14. Recent progresses in ion beam analysis of aerosol at tandetron laboratory of Beijing Normal University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guangfu; Lu Yongfang; Zhu Guanghua

    2007-01-01

    PIXE analysis of aerosol samples for measuring concentrations of elements with Z>12 is one of major applications at the GIC4117 Tandetron in Beijing Normal University. In order to measure H, C, N and O concentration in aerosol samples, proton non-Rutherford back scattering spectrometry (PNBS) and proton elastic scattering analysis(PESA) were employed with two Au(Si) surface barrier detectors at angles of 160 degree and 40 degree in the PIXE chamber. (authors)

  15. Sleep Quality and Academic Progression among Students of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Northwest of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horyeh Sarbazvatan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep deprivation and drowsiness are very common among university students. The aim of this study was to examine the sleep quality and academic achievement among university students across all medical disciplines in Northwest of Iran. Methods: This study was based on data from a longitudinal study, the "Health and Lifestyle of University Students" (HeLiS. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, a self-administered questionnaire consisting of general information about sleep quality, was completed by students during the first eight weeks of the first semester and academic achievement was assessed via Grade Point Average (GPA in the two semesters following the administration of the PSQI. Results: The mean age of students was 19.16±1.04 and the majority were female (64%. The mean overall score on the PSQI was 6.87±2.25; the majority of students (70% had a global PSQI score greater than 5, indicating they were poor sleepers. Only 28% reported getting over 7 hours of sleep. Female students had higher scores than male students in subjective sleep quality, which was statistically significant (2.15 vs. 1.95 respectively, P = 0.01; however, there was no difference between males and females on other component scores or on the global score. Results of a multiple regression model showed that PSQI score was a predictor of academic achievement (β=-.07, P=0.035, which implies that GPA will be lower among students whose quality of sleep is lower. Conclusion: Based on our sleep quality should be considered and assessed, and sleep hygiene should be promoted among medical university students in order to improve academic achievement.

  16. Distinct ATOH1 and Neurog3 requirements define tuft cells as a new secretory cell type in the intestinal epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerbe, F.; van Es, J.H.; Makrini, L.; Brulin, B.; Mellitzer, G.; Robine, S.; Romagnolo, B.; Shroyer, N.F.; Bourgaux, J.F.; Pignodel, C.; Clevers, H.; Jay, P.

    2011-01-01

    The unique morphology of tuft cells was first revealed by electron microscopy analyses in several endoderm-derived epithelia. Here, we explore the relationship of these cells with the other cell types of the intestinal epithelium and describe the first marker signature allowing their unambiguous

  17. Variation in chick-a-dee calls of tufted titmice, Baeolophus bicolor: note type and individual distinctiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Jessica L; Freeberg, Todd M

    2007-08-01

    The chick-a-dee call of chickadee species (genus Poecile) has been the focus of much research. A great deal is known about the structural complexity and the meaning of variation in notes making up calls in these species. However, little is known about the likely homologous "chick-a-dee" call of the closely related tufted titmouse, Baeolophus bicolor. Tufted titmice are a prime candidate for comparative analyses of the call, because their vocal and social systems share many characteristics with those of chickadees. To address the paucity of data on the structure of chick-a-dee calls of tufted titmice, we recorded birds in field and aviary settings. Four main note types were identified in the call: Z, A, D(h), and D notes. Several acoustic parameters of each note type were measured, and statistical analyses revealed that the note types are acoustically distinct from one another. Furthermore, note types vary in the extent of individual distinctiveness reflected in their acoustic parameters. This first step towards understanding the chick-a-dee call of tufted titmice indicates that the call is comparable in structure and complexity to the calls of chickadees.

  18. Food intake rates and habitat segregation of tufted duck Aythya fuligula and scaup Aythya marila exploiting zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Leeuw, JJ

    1999-01-01

    The foraging skills of Tufted Duck Aythya fuligula and Scaup Aythya marila feeding on Zebra Mussels Dreissena polymorpha were studied in experiments under seminatural diving conditions with relevance to the IJssalmeer/Markermeer area (large lakes in the centre of The Netherlands, former Zuiderzee

  19. Food intake rates and habitat segregation of tufted duck Aythya fuligula scaup Aythya marila exploiting zebra mussels Dreissena Polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, de J.J.

    1999-01-01

    The foraging skills of Tufted Duck Aythya fuligula and Scaup Aythya marila feeding on Zebra Mussels Dreissena polymorpha were studied in experiments under semi-natural diving conditions with relevance to the IJsselmeer/Markermeer area (large lakes in the centre of The Netherlands, former Zuiderzee

  20. The influence of oxygen and carbon dioxide on diving behaviour of tufted ducks, Aythya fuligula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Lewis; Reed, Jane Z; Woakes, Anthony; Butler, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    While optimal diving models focus on the diver's oxygen (O(2)) stores as the predominant factor influencing diving behaviour, many vertebrate species surface from a dive before these stores are exhausted and may commence another dive well after their O(2) stores have been resaturated. This study investigates the influence of hypoxia and also hypercapnia on the dive cycle of tufted ducks, Aythya fuligula, in terms of surface duration and dive duration. The birds were trained to surface into a respirometer box after each dive to a feeding tray so that rates of O(2) uptake (VO2) and carbon dioxide output (VCO2) at the surface could be measured. Although Vco2 initially lagged behind Vo2, both respiratory gas stores were close to full adjustment after the average surface duration, indicating that they probably had a similar degree of influence on surface duration. Chemoreceptors, which are known to influence diving behaviour, detect changes in O(2) and CO(2) partial pressures in the arterial blood. Thus, the need to restore blood gas levels appears to be a strong stimulus to continue ventilation. Mean surface duration coincided with peak instantaneous respiratory exchange ratio due to predive anticipatory hyperventilation causing hypocapnia. For comparison, the relationship between surface duration and O(2) uptake in reanalysed data for two grey seals indicated that one animal tended to dive well after fully restocking its O(2) stores, while the other dived at the point of full restocking. More CO(2) is exchanged than O(2) in tufted ducks during the last few breaths before the first dive of a bout, serving to reduce CO(2) stores and suggesting that hypercapnia rather than hypoxia is more often the limiting factor on asphyxia tolerance during dives. Indeed, according to calculations of O(2) stores and O(2) consumption rates over modal diving durations, a lack of O(2) does not seem to be associated with the termination of a dive in tufted ducks. However, factors other

  1. “Think of it as a Challenge”: Problematizing Pedagogical Strategies for Progression When Assessing Web-based University Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anette Svensson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to analyse how a taxonomy-based course design can support students’ qualitative learning processes in online university courses. The paper presents a case study based on two online courses in comparative literature in Swedish and English. A document analysis has been applied to analyse the empirical material, which includes the syllabuses, study guides, and examination assignments connected to the courses. Socio-cultural aspects of learning processes, assessment and feedback, course design using a taxonomic structure (SOLO, and a progressive theory of literary studies (Langer’s theories of envisionment function as a framework. The results show that the examination assignments aim to further the students’ educational processes from stage 2 to stage 5 of the SOLO-taxonomy and, at the same time, through Langer’s four stances. While the course structure has a positive effect on the students’ general as well as literary progress, there are some pedagogical challenges with online teaching in literature that are discussed. In addition, the examination assignments could have been used as ways to strengthen the students’ socio-cultural learning. Furthermore, with little alterations, the examination assignments, which were all used as means of summative assessment, could also have been used formatively to assess the students’ progress.

  2. Solar pumped lasers: Work in progress at the University of Chicago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Roland

    Of the variety of solar energy conversion schemes that have been explored, the conversion of solar flux to coherent laser radiation is relatively new. Solar flux at sufficiently high concentrations to overcome threshold for the really important laser materials has not been available. This technological inhibition has recently been overcome through the application of nonimaging optics through the demonstration of concentration levels of 84,000 suns at the University of Chicago in a refractive medium (sapphire) and of over 20,000 suns in air at the Solar Energy Research Institute High Flux Facility. A thermodynamic overview is presented of solar lasers including solid state lasers and dye lasers.

  3. Association Euratom - DTU, Technical University of Denmark, Department of Physics - Annual Progress Report 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom – DTU, Technical University of Denmark covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium...... and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities on fusion materials research (Tungsten and ODSFS). Other activities are system analysis...

  4. Association Euratom - DTU, Technical University of Denmark, Department of Physics - Annual Progress Report 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom – DTU, Technical University of Denmark covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium...... and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities on fusion materials research (Tungsten and ODSFS). Other activities are system analysis...

  5. Yangtze River, an insignificant genetic boundary in tufted deer (Elaphodus cephalophus): the evidence from a first population genetics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhonglou; Pan, Tao; Wang, Hui; Pang, Mujia; Zhang, Baowei

    2016-01-01

    Great rivers were generally looked at as the geographical barrier to gene flow for many taxonomic groups. The Yangtze River is the third largest river in the world, and flows across South China and into the East China Sea. Up until now, few studies have been carried out to evaluate its effect as a geographical barrier. In this study, we attempted to determine the barrier effect of the Yangtze River on the tufted deer ( Elaphodus cephalophus ) using the molecular ecology approach. Using mitochondrial DNA control region (CR) sequences and 13 nuclear microsatellite loci, we explored the genetic structure and gene flow in two adjacent tufted deer populations (Dabashan and Wulingshan populations), which are separated by the Yangtze River. Results indicated that there are high genetic diversity levels in the two populations, but no distinguishable haplotype group or potential genetic cluster was detected which corresponded to specific geographical population. At the same time, high gene flow was observed between Wulingshan and Dabashan populations. The tufted deer populations experienced population decrease from 0.3 to 0.09 Ma BP, then followed by a distinct population increase. A strong signal of recent population decline ( T = 4,396 years) was detected in the Wulingshan population by a Markov-Switching Vector Autoregressions(MSVAR) process population demography analysis. The results indicated that the Yangtze River may not act as an effective barrier to gene flow in the tufted deer. Finally, we surmised that the population demography of the tufted deer was likely affected by Pleistocene climate fluctuations and ancient human activities.

  6. University of Florida Training Reactor: Annual progress report, September 1, 1986-August 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1987-11-01

    The University of Florida Training Reactor's overall utilization for the past reporting year (September 1986 through August 1987) has returned to the increased levels of quality usage characteristic of the two years prior to the last reporting year when the maintenance outage to repair sticking control blades reduced availability for the year to near 50%. Indeed, the 91.5% availability factor for this reporting year is the highest in the last five years and probably in the 27 year history of the facility. As a final statement on the effectiveness of the corrective maintenance last year, the overall availability factor has been over 94% since returning to normal operations. The UFTR continues to experience a high rate of utilization in a broad spectrum of areas with total utilization continuing near the highest levels recorded in the early 1970's. This increase has been supported by a variety of usages ranging from research and educational utilization by users within the University of Florida as well as other researchers and educators around the state of Florida through the support of the DOE Reactor Sharing Program and several externally supported usages. Significant usage has also been devoted to facility enhancement where a key ingredient for this usage has been a stable management staff. Uses, reactor operation, maintenance, technical specifications, radioactive releases, and research programs are described in this report

  7. The effect of environmental enrichment on the behavior of captive tufted capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirsten R; Mikkelsen, L F; Hau, J

    2010-01-01

    The authors provided different forms of environmental enrichment to six old laboratory male tufted capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) and studied the behavior of the monkeys during a baseline period and during three enrichment periods. Each observation period lasted 5 d, with an interval of 6 d...... between periods. During the first enrichment period, the authors provided Buster cubes and wood cylinders with drilled holes filled with gum arabic. During the second enrichment period, monkeys were provided with a deep litter of bark shavings, and during the third enrichment period, they were given...... Buster cubes, wood cylinders and bark shavings. When provided with enrichment, the monkeys engaged in natural, species-specific activities and began to exhibit behavioral profiles that more closely resembled those of their natural counterparts. This suggests that their psychological well-being had...

  8. A multi-objective optimization for brush monofilament tufting process design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Salmasnia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the optimization of monofilament tufting process as the most important and the main stage of toothbrush production in sanitary industries. In order to minimize both process time and depreciation costs, and ultimately increase the production efficiency in such an industrial unit, we propose a metaheuristic based optimization approach to solve it. The Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP is used to formulate the proposed problem. Then by using multi-objective evolutionary algorithms, NSGA-II and MOPSO, we seek to obtain the best solution and objective functions described above. Extensive computational experiments on three different kinds of toothbrush handles are performed and the results demonstrate the applicability and appropriate performance of algorithms. The comparison metrics like spacing, number of Pareto solutions, time, mean distance from the ideal solution and diversity are used to evaluate the quality of solutions. Moreover a sensitivity analysis is done for investigation of the performance in various setting of parameters.

  9. Relationship between body temperature, weight, and hematological parameters of black tufted-ear marmosets (Callithrix penicillata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Lucas Cardoso; Barros, Marilia

    2016-06-01

    Basal thermal values of captive adult black tufted-ear marmosets (Callithrix penicillata) in a thermoneutral environment were measured via different methods, along with body weight and hematological parameters. Body temperatures were recorded with rectal (RC), subcutaneous (SC) microchip transponder and infrared (left and right) tympanic membrane (TM) thermometries. Thermal values were correlated with body mass and some hematological data. Similar RC and SC temperatures were observed, these being significantly higher than the left and right TM values. SC temperature was positively correlated and in close agreement with RC measurements. Although body temperatures were not influenced by gender, capture time, or body weight, they were correlated with hematological parameters. Thus, body temperatures in this species seem to reflect some of the characteristics of the assessments' location, with SC microchip transponders being a less invasive method to assess body temperature in these small-bodied non-human primates. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Nuclear and particle physics research at the University of Richmond. Progress report, November 1, 1995 - October 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vineyard, M.F.; Gilfoyle, G.P.; Major, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    Summarized in this report is the progress achieved during the period from November 1, 1995 to October 31, 1996. The experimental work described in this report is in preparation for the electromagnetic nuclear physics research program in Hall B at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF). Much progress has been made this year toward the realization of the physics program in Hall B. The Program Advisory Committee (PAC) reviewed all of the Hall B physics proposals and assigned scientific ratings to those not previously rated. Updates on these proposals were submitted to the PAC for this review and can be found in this report. Also included in this report is a summary of the progress achieved on an experiment that the authors are collaborating on to measure rare radiative decays of the φ meson. This experiment received the PAC's highest rating and will use the Hall B photon tagger and a lead glass calorimeter housed in the alcove upstream of the beam dump. After nearly a decade of planning and construction, the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) will be commissioned next year. The authors have been members of the CLAS Collaboration since its inception and their contributions to the construction of the CLAS include the development of the drift-chamber gas system, drift-chamber software, and controls software. Major has been leading the effort in the construction of the gas system. In the last year, the gas system components built at the University of Richmond have been installed in the Hall B gas shed and the initial operation of the system has begun. Gilfoyle is coordinating the software development for the CLAS drift chambers. Considerable progress has been made this year in developing software for the analysis of the drift-chamber data. Vineyard served as coordinator of the γ3 Running Period for the CLAS Collaboration and he is also responsible for the development of the drift-chamber gas system controls

  11. Climate Literacy: Progress in AMS Climate Studies Undergraduate Course in Meteorology Program at Jackson State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    AMS Climate Studies is an introductory college-level course developed by the American Meteorological Society for implementation at undergraduate institutions nationwide and increasing involvement of under-represented groups The course places students in a dynamic and highly motivational educational environment where they investigate Earth's climate system using real-world environmental data. The AMS Climate Studies course package consists of a textbook, investigations manual, course website, and course management system-compatible files. Instructors can use these resources in combinations that make for an exciting learning experience for their students. The AMS Climate Studies Diversity Project Workshop participation is on a first-come, first-serve basis as determined by the date-of-receipt of the License Order Form. To grow AMS Diversity Programs to their fullest extent, institutions are encouraged to nominate course instructors who did not previously attend Diversity Project workshops. Until three months before the workshop, two-thirds of the workshop positions would be reserved for institutions new to AMS Diversity Projects. The AMS five day course implementation workshop was held in Washington, DC, during May 24-29, 2012. It covered essential course topics in climate science and global climate change, and strategies for course implementation. Talks would feature climate science and sustainability experts from Federal agencies and area research institutions, such as NASA, NOAA, University of Maryland, Howard University, George Mason University, and other Washington, DC, area institutions. The workshop would also include visits to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and NOAA's Climate Prediction Center. JSU Meteorology Program will be offering AMS Climate Studies undergraduate course under MET 210: Climatology in spring 2014. AMS Climate Studies is offered as a 3 credit hour laboratory course with 2 lectures and 1 lab sessions per week. Although this course places

  12. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M. (eds.)

    2011-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Other activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2010. (Author)

  13. Annual progress report of the University of Florida Training Reactor, September 1, 1981-August 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, N.J.; Vernetson, W.G.

    1982-11-01

    The University of Florida Training Reactor's overall utilization for the past reporting year has decreased by about 50% compared to the previous year, approaching the low levels of utilization characteristic of the previous two reporting years ending in August 1979 and August 1980 respectively. The energy generation also continues to be far below average historical levels and represents a drop of nearly 50% from the improved level of the previous year. The UFTR continues to operate with an outstanding safety record and in full compliance with regulatory requirements. The reactor and associated facilities continue to maintain a high in-state visibility and strong industry relationship. It is hoped that more indirect industry training will be accomplished in the upcoming year

  14. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M.

    2010-04-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2009. (Author)

  15. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsholm, S B; Michelsen, P K; Rasmussen, J J; Westergaard, C M [eds.

    2010-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2009. (Author)

  16. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M. (eds.)

    2009-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. New activities in technology related to development of high temperature superconductors have been initiated in 2008. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2008. (Author)

  17. Progress of optical sensor system for health monitoring of bridges at Chongqing University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.; Fu, Y.; Zhu, Y.; Huang, S.

    2005-02-01

    With decades of research experience on optical sensors, Optoelectronic Technology Lab of Chongqing University (OTLCU) has studied on a variety of sensors system designed for practical use in health monitoring. In OTLCU, embedded and surface mounted fiber Fabry-Perot strain sensor has been developed for monitoring the local strain of both concrete and steel truss bridge. Optoelectronic deflect meter, with a group of optical level sensor in a series connected pipe, was developed for deflection monitoring and line shape monitoring of the bridges. Laser deflect meter, with a laser pointer and a sensors array, has been also developed for a dynamic deflection monitoring of the bridges. To monitoring the 2-Dimentional displacement of the bridge, a self-calibrating imaging system was developed. All these sensor systems have been applied in different bridges successfully. This paper briefly describes principle of these optical sensing systems, and also gives some representative results of the system in practical application of bridges.

  18. Indiana University high-energy physics group. Technical progress report, December 1, 1982-October 31, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brabson, B.B.; Crittenden, R.R.; Dzierba, A.R.; Heinz, R.M.; Martin, H.J.; Ogren, H.O.

    1983-01-01

    The Indiana University High-Energy Physics Group has been actively involved in a variety of research programs during the current contract period. These programs are associated with major experiments conducted by our group at SLAC, Fermilab, Brookhaven and CERN. The physics areas under investigation include studies of psi meson production in hadron interactions (CERN WA-11), a study of low-p/sub t/ and high-p/sub t/ collisions utilizing the Multiparticle Spectrometer at Fermilab (E110/557/672), a glueball search (Brookhaven E771), and a high resolution study of e + e - interactions at high energy at SLAC (PEP HRS experiment). The status of the various efforts are discussed

  19. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M.

    2009-04-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. New activities in technology related to development of high temperature superconductors have been initiated in 2008. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2008. (Author)

  20. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M.

    2011-04-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Other activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2010. (Author)

  1. Progress in research April 1, 1993 - March 31, 1994, Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    The period 1 April 1993--31 March 1994 has seen a number of significant developments of the research program as will be noted by the large increase in individual projects reviewed in this annual report. Among the highlights of the K500 experimental program in Sections 1, 2, and 4 are the investigations of excitation energy deposition and of fission dynamics employing both GDR and particle emission probes, measurements of isospin equilibration, studies of (d, 2 He) reactions with the proton spectrometer and of the β decay of 57 Cu with MARS, and the precise studies of ionic charge state distributions using x-ray measurements. Progress in theoretical studies of the nuclear spectral function and the decay of many body systems, on the properties of mesons in hot hadronic matter and on the determination of astrophysical S-factors from experimental studies of very peripheral reactions are presented in Section 3. The status of the LAMPF based MEGA experiment and of the CERN based NA66 experiment, both of which involve institute scientists, is also briefly presented in this report. The shift to a seven day a week operation coupled with installation of cryopanels and more careful temperature control of the cooling water system have resulted in significant improvements in the operational efficiency and beam capabilities. Operating statistics are presented in Section 5

  2. Progress in research April 1, 1993--March 31, 1994, Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-07-01

    The period 1 April 1993--31 March 1994 has seen a number of significant developments of the research program as will be noted by the large increase in individual projects reviewed in this annual report. Among the highlights of the K500 experimental program in Sections 1, 2, and 4 are the investigations of excitation energy deposition and of fission dynamics employing both GDR and particle emission probes, measurements of isospin equilibration, studies of (d, {sup 2}He) reactions with the proton spectrometer and of the {beta} decay of {sup 57}Cu with MARS, and the precise studies of ionic charge state distributions using x-ray measurements. Progress in theoretical studies of the nuclear spectral function and the decay of many body systems, on the properties of mesons in hot hadronic matter and on the determination of astrophysical S-factors from experimental studies of very peripheral reactions are presented in Section 3. The status of the LAMPF based MEGA experiment and of the CERN based NA66 experiment, both of which involve institute scientists, is also briefly presented in this report. The shift to a seven day a week operation coupled with installation of cryopanels and more careful temperature control of the cooling water system have resulted in significant improvements in the operational efficiency and beam capabilities. Operating statistics are presented in Section 5.

  3. Experimental particle physics at the University of Pittsburgh. Progress report, November 1, 1995--October 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudreau, J.F.; Engels, E. Jr.; Shepard, P.F.; Thompson, J.A.

    1996-05-01

    This report covers the progress on two different tasks, Task A and Task B. Task A focuses on rare and semi-rare decays of {phi} and of the short-lived kaon with emphasis on those aspects needed in preparation for the proposed {Phi}-Factory measurements of CPT violation and {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon} from the CP-violating decays of the K{sub L}K{sub S} final state. The second aspect of the kaon decay work is participation in the so-called rare kaon decay experiments, E865, at BNL. The major goals of Task B, Fermilab program, are as follows: (1) participation in the analysis of the E706 data taken during the 1990--1991 fixed target run at Fermilab and (2) the continuation of the work with the CDF collaboration particularly the SVX II upgrade. The E706 part of the program involves the completion of publications reporting the results of the 1990--91 data run. The analysis of these data is now mature and physics results are emerging. The CDF program involves a dedicated effort to the design of a silicon vertex detector upgrade, SVX II, to be accomplished by the time Fermilab run II collider run (1999). In addition they are participating in the 1993--1995 collide run Ib and actively analyzing the data from both runs Ia and Ib.

  4. Nuclear chemistry progress report, Oregon State University. August 1, 1995--August 1, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loveland, W.

    1996-01-01

    In this report, the authors summarize the highlights of the work done between August 1, 1995, and August 1, 1996. The work reported herein is the result of a collaborative effort between the nuclear chemists at Oregon State University and many other individuals and research groups. Each project discussed was the result of a joint effort of the groups, interchanging roles in data acquisition and analysis. The work described is part of a project involving the study of low energy ( 197 Au utilizing the MSU A1200 separator; synthesis of several new neutron-deficient nuclides in reactions of 20 MeV/nucleon 197 Au with heavy targets (Ti, Zr and Au); their participation in exclusive studies of heavy residue formation in the reaction of 35 MeV/nucleon 86 Kr with 197 Au in which it was found that the residues had large associated particle multiplicities indicating their formation in highly dissipative collisions, and that particle emission leading to residue formation relative to fission was favored as the dissipated energy increased

  5. Japan Nuclear Reaction Data Center (JCPRG), Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Steering Committee progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-11-15

    The Japan Nuclear Reaction Data Center (JCPRG) was approved as an organisation of Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University and established on April 1, 2007. In addition to nuclear data activities carried out by JCPRG (Japan-Charged Particle Nuclear Reaction Data Group), the centre is concerned with the evaluation of nuclear reaction data in nucleosynthesis in the universe. In order efficiently to compile reaction data obtained by using radioactive ion beam, the centre signed a research contract with RIKEN Nishina Center. We are scanning 16 journals for Japanese charged-particle and photo-nuclear nuclear reaction data compilation. From April 2006 to March 2007, CPND and PhND in 45 references (453 records, 1.83 MB) have been newly compiled for NRDF. Usually new data are released at the JCPRG web site several months prior to EXFOR. Since the 2006 NRDC meeting, we have made 104 new entries and have revised or deleted 142 old entries. Intensive numerical data compilations have been done. These data were shown in tabular form in dissertations which are (partially) published in Journals. About 30 new entries were compiled from these data. We have prepared CINDA batches for CPND published in Japan every half year. Each batch covers 6 issues of each of 4 Japanese journals JPJ, PTP, NST and JNRS. Bibliographies for neutron induced reaction data have been compiled by JAEA Nuclear Data Center as before. A new web-based NRDF search and plot system on MySQL was released in July, 2007. New compilation, which has been finalized for NRDF, but not for EXFOR, can be obtained from this site. DARPE (another NRDF search and plot system written in Perl) is also available at http://www.jcprg.org/darpe/. EXFOR/ENDF (http://www.jcprg.org/exfor/) search and plot system is available. We have also developed following utilities: PENDL (http://www.jcprg.org/endf/) and RENORM (http://www.jcprg.org/renorm). We are developing a new search system of CINDA. This is an extension of EXFOR/ENDF search

  6. 26Al and 36Cl AMS system at University of Tsukuba: A progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasa, Kimikazu; Nagashima, Yasuo; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Seki, Riki; Tosaki, Yuki; Sueki, Keisuke; Bessho, Kotaro; Matsumura, Hiroshi; Miura, Taichi; He, Ming

    2007-01-01

    With the current AMS system on the 12UD Pelletron tandem accelerator at University of Tsukuba, we are able to measure the long-lived radioisotopes of 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl and 129 I by employing a molecular pilot beam method that stabilizes the terminal voltage with 0.1% accuracy. Several major improvements have been made to increase the sensitivity of the AMS system to 26 Al and 36 Cl radioisotopes. For 26 Al-AMS, the ions extracted from the ion source have been changed from Al - to AlO - by using an Al 2 O 3 target sample. In addition, 26 MgO - molecular ions are used as a pilot beam to control the terminal voltage through slit current feedback. Also, a fully-stripping AMS technique is used to achieve an effective detection limit of better than 5 x 10 -15 for the 26 Al/ 27 Al ratio. For 36 Cl-AMS, the terminal voltage has been increased from 9 MV to 10 MV, thereby increasing the energy of the 36 Cl 9+ beam to 100 MeV. This energy increment helps us to get a clearer separation between 36 Cl and 36 S in a new ΔE-E detector. In addition, the yield of 36 Cl 9+ is increased by 1.5 times as a result of the higher ion energy at the terminal stripper foil. The standard deviation of the fluctuations of the 36 Cl/ 35 Cl ratio is within ±2%, and the effective detection limit is better than 2.0 x 10 -14

  7. Oregon State University nuclear chemistry progress report, August 1, 1988--August 1, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loveland, W.D.

    1989-08-01

    The work described herein is part of a project involving the study of intermediate energy, and relativistic heavy ion reactions. The intermediate energy research focused on the characterization of the heavy residues, the large target fragments with A frag >2/3 A target . For the reaction of 85 MeV/nucleon 12 C with 197 Au, we had measured the heavy residue yields and angular distributions previously. We report herein the measurement of their energy spectra. The average residue energies are quite low, ranging from 15 keV/nucleon to 314 keV/nucleon. These low energies imply errors in some previous measurements of heavy residues in that many residues have energies below counter thresholds, etc. The essential physics of heavy residue production is shown to be correctly described by a VUU calculation. For the reaction of 35 and 43 MeV/nucleon Kr with Au, we found the linear momenta of the near-target heavy residues to be in agreement with models of peripheral collisions. For the heavy residues with large ΔA values, the residue linear momenta approach a limiting value which is far below that expected from the ''universal'' systematics of linear momentum transfer in reactions induced by smaller projectiles. Reasons for this limiting behavior are suggested. In the area of relativistic nuclear collisions, complete target fragment mass distributions were measured for the ultrarelativistic reactions of 13.6 GeV/nucleon 16 O and 28 Si with 197 Au. An unexpected finding in this study was the relatively large cross section for the two neutron removal process via electromagnetic dissociation. Similar measurements for the reaction of 1.1 GeV/nucleon 197 Au with 197 Au furnished the first complete fragment mass distribution for that reaction

  8. Does the level of physical activity in university students influence development and progression of myopia? - A 2-year prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Niels; Jensen, Hanne; Goldschmidt, E.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE. To study whether physical activity has a protective effect on the development and progression of myopia in medical students. METHODS. In a 2-year longitudinal cohort study, 156 Caucasian first-year medical students from the University of Copenhagen were enrolled. The baseline examination...... with a refractive change toward myopia, whereas physical activity was inversely associated with a refractive change toward myopia (P = 0.015). Myopic eyes progressed significantly more than did emmetropic and hyperopic eyes (P = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS. An association between physical activity and myopia was observed......, suggesting a protective effect of physical activity on the development and progression of myopia in university students. The results confirm that intensive studying is a risk factor of myopia and that myopic progression or development is more likely in medical students in their early 20s than in their late...

  9. CXC chemokine receptor 7 (CXCR7 regulates CXCR4 protein expression and capillary tuft development in mouse kidney.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammy Haege

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The CXCL12/CXCR4 axis is involved in kidney development by regulating formation of the glomerular tuft. Recently, a second CXCL12 receptor was identified and designated CXCR7. Although it is established that CXCR7 regulates heart and brain development in conjunction with CXCL12 and CXCR4, little is known about the influence of CXCR7 on CXCL12 dependent kidney development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We provided analysis of CXCR7 expression and function in the developing mouse kidney. Using in situ hybridization, we identified CXCR7 mRNA in epithelial cells including podocytes at all nephron stages up to the mature glomerulus. CXCL12 mRNA showed a striking overlap with CXCR7 mRNA in epithelial structures. In addition, CXCL12 was detected in stromal cells and the glomerular tuft. Expression of CXCR4 was complementary to that of CXCR7 as it occurred in mesenchymal cells, outgrowing ureteric buds and glomerular endothelial cells but not in podocytes. Kidney examination in CXCR7 null mice revealed ballooning of glomerular capillaries as described earlier for CXCR4 null mice. Moreover, we detected a severe reduction of CXCR4 protein but not CXCR4 mRNA within the glomerular tuft and in the condensed mesenchyme. Malformation of the glomerular tuft in CXCR7 null mice was associated with mesangial cell clumping. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We established that there is a similar glomerular pathology in CXCR7 and CXCR4 null embryos. Based on the phenotype and the anatomical organization of the CXCL12/CXCR4/CXCR7 system in the forming glomerulus, we propose that CXCR7 fine-tunes CXCL12/CXCR4 mediated signalling between podocytes and glomerular capillaries.

  10. CXC Chemokine Receptor 7 (CXCR7) Regulates CXCR4 Protein Expression and Capillary Tuft Development in Mouse Kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haege, Sammy; Mueller, Wiebke; Nietzsche, Sandor; Lupp, Amelie; Mackay, Fabienne; Schulz, Stefan; Stumm, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Background The CXCL12/CXCR4 axis is involved in kidney development by regulating formation of the glomerular tuft. Recently, a second CXCL12 receptor was identified and designated CXCR7. Although it is established that CXCR7 regulates heart and brain development in conjunction with CXCL12 and CXCR4, little is known about the influence of CXCR7 on CXCL12 dependent kidney development. Methodology/Principal Findings We provided analysis of CXCR7 expression and function in the developing mouse kidney. Using in situ hybridization, we identified CXCR7 mRNA in epithelial cells including podocytes at all nephron stages up to the mature glomerulus. CXCL12 mRNA showed a striking overlap with CXCR7 mRNA in epithelial structures. In addition, CXCL12 was detected in stromal cells and the glomerular tuft. Expression of CXCR4 was complementary to that of CXCR7 as it occurred in mesenchymal cells, outgrowing ureteric buds and glomerular endothelial cells but not in podocytes. Kidney examination in CXCR7 null mice revealed ballooning of glomerular capillaries as described earlier for CXCR4 null mice. Moreover, we detected a severe reduction of CXCR4 protein but not CXCR4 mRNA within the glomerular tuft and in the condensed mesenchyme. Malformation of the glomerular tuft in CXCR7 null mice was associated with mesangial cell clumping. Conclusions/Significance We established that there is a similar glomerular pathology in CXCR7 and CXCR4 null embryos. Based on the phenotype and the anatomical organization of the CXCL12/CXCR4/CXCR7 system in the forming glomerulus, we propose that CXCR7 fine-tunes CXCL12/CXCR4 mediated signalling between podocytes and glomerular capillaries. PMID:22880115

  11. Mitral and tufted cells are potential cellular targets of nitration in the olfactory bulb of aged mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung Jae Yang

    Full Text Available Olfactory sensory function declines with age; though, the underlying molecular changes that occur in the olfactory bulb (OB are relatively unknown. An important cellular signaling molecule involved in the processing, modulation, and formation of olfactory memories is nitric oxide (NO. However, excess NO can result in the production of peroxynitrite to cause oxidative and nitrosative stress. In this study, we assessed whether changes in the expression of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT, a neurochemical marker of peroxynitrite and thus oxidative damage, exists in the OB of young, adult, middle-aged, and aged mice. Our results demonstrate that OB 3-NT levels increase with age in normal C57BL/6 mice. Moreover, in aged mice, 3-NT immunoreactivity was found in some blood vessels and microglia throughout the OB. Notably, large and strongly immunoreactive puncta were found in mitral and tufted cells, and these were identified as lipofuscin granules. Additionally, we found many small-labeled puncta within the glomeruli of the glomerular layer and in the external plexiform layer, and these were localized to mitochondria and discrete segments of mitral and tufted dendritic plasma membranes. These results suggest that mitral and tufted cells are potential cellular targets of nitration, along with microglia and blood vessels, in the OB during aging.

  12. An assessment of progress towards universal health coverage in Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa (BRICS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marten, Robert; McIntyre, Diane; Travassos, Claudia; Shishkin, Sergey; Longde, Wang; Reddy, Srinath; Vega, Jeanette

    2014-12-13

    Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa (BRICS) represent almost half the world's population, and all five national governments recently committed to work nationally, regionally, and globally to ensure that universal health coverage (UHC) is achieved. This analysis reviews national efforts to achieve UHC. With a broad range of health indicators, life expectancy (ranging from 53 years to 73 years), and mortality rate in children younger than 5 years (ranging from 10·3 to 44·6 deaths per 1000 livebirths), a review of progress in each of the BRICS countries shows that each has some way to go before achieving UHC. The BRICS countries show substantial, and often similar, challenges in moving towards UHC. On the basis of a review of each country, the most pressing problems are: raising insufficient public spending; stewarding mixed private and public health systems; ensuring equity; meeting the demands for more human resources; managing changing demographics and disease burdens; and addressing the social determinants of health. Increases in public funding can be used to show how BRICS health ministries could accelerate progress to achieve UHC. Although all the BRICS countries have devoted increased resources to health, the biggest increase has been in China, which was probably facilitated by China's rapid economic growth. However, the BRICS country with the second highest economic growth, India, has had the least improvement in public funding for health. Future research to understand such different levels of prioritisation of the health sector in these countries could be useful. Similarly, the role of strategic purchasing in working with powerful private sectors, the effect of federal structures, and the implications of investment in primary health care as a foundation for UHC could be explored. These issues could serve as the basis on which BRICS countries focus their efforts to share ideas and strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Streptococcus oricebi sp. nov., isolated from the oral cavity of tufted capuchin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, M; Shinozaki-Kuwahara, N; Hirasawa, M; Takada, K

    2016-02-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, catalase-negative, coccus-shaped organism was isolated from the oral cavity of tufted capuchin (Cebus apella). Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis suggested classification of the organism within the genus Streptococcus. Strain M8T was related most closely to Streptococcus oralis ATCC 35037T (96.17 % similarity) followed by Streptococcus massiliensis CCUG 49690T (95.90 %) based on the 16S rRNA gene. Strain M8T was related most closely to S. massiliensis CCUG 49690T (86.58 %) based on the RNA polymerase β subunit-encoding gene (rpoB), and to Streptococcus tigurinus AZ_3aT (81.26 %) followed by S. massiliensis CCUG 49690T (80.45 %) based on the 60 kDa heat-shock protein gene (groEL). The phylogenetic trees of 16S rRNA, rpoB and groEL gene sequences showed that strain M8T was most closely related to S. massiliensis. Based on phenotypic characterization as well as 16S rRNA gene and housekeeping gene (rpoB and groEL) sequence data, a novel taxon, Streptococcus oricebi sp. nov. (type strain M8T = JCM 30719T = DSM 100101T), is proposed.

  14. 1991 Technical progress report of the University of South Carolina's High Energy Physics Group, February 1990--July 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The high energy physics group at the University of South Carolina includes five teaching faculty members, one research faculty member, and five graduate students. Profs. Childers, Darden, and Wilson devote most of their research effort to Fermilab experiment E789, which is designed to observe charmless two-body decays of b-flavored mesons and baryons. Prof. Wilson works on Fermilab experiment E687 which studies charm physics in the wide-band photon beam. Profs. Rosenfeld and Wang participate in the AMY collaboration, which studies electron-positron interactions using the TRISTAN collider at KEK. Prof. Rosenfeld and one student collaborate with personnel from KEK and INS, Tokyo, on an experiment to detect a 17 keV neutrino in the β-decay spectrum of 63 Ni. Members of the group also participate in Fermilab Proposal P803 which will search for the oscillation of muon neutrino to tau neutrino with sensitivity better than a factor of 40 than previously achieved and in Superconducting Super Collider activities which include the development of an imaging preradiator. A brief discussion is given on progress made for each program

  15. Promoting universal financial protection: evidence from seven low- and middle-income countries on factors facilitating or hindering progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Di; Ranson, Michael K; Aulakh, Bhupinder K; Honda, Ayako

    2013-09-24

    Although universal health coverage (UHC) is a global health policy priority, there remains limited evidence on UHC reforms in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). This paper provides an overview of key insights from case studies in this thematic series, undertaken in seven LMICs (Costa Rica, Georgia, India, Malawi, Nigeria, Tanzania, and Thailand) at very different stages in the transition to UHC.These studies highlight the importance of increasing pre-payment funding through tax funding and sometimes mandatory insurance contributions when trying to improve financial protection by reducing out-of-pocket payments. Increased tax funding is particularly important if efforts are being made to extend financial protection to those outside formal-sector employment, raising questions about the value of pursuing contributory insurance schemes for this group. The prioritisation of insurance scheme coverage for civil servants in the first instance in some LMICs also raises questions about the most appropriate use of limited government funds.The diverse reforms in these countries provide some insights into experiences with policies targeted at the poor compared with universalist reform approaches. Countries that have made the greatest progress to UHC, such as Costa Rica and Thailand, made an explicit commitment to ensuring financial protection and access to needed care for the entire population as soon as possible, while this was not necessarily the case in countries adopting targeted reforms. There also tends to be less fragmentation in funding pools in countries adopting a universalist rather than targeting approach. Apart from limiting cross-subsidies, fragmentation of pools has contributed to differential benefit packages, leading to inequities in access to needed care and financial protection across population groups; once such differentials are entrenched, they are difficult to overcome. Capacity constraints, particularly in purchasing organisations, are a pervasive

  16. Throwing behavior and mass distribution of stone selection in tufted capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, A; Rocca, A R; Wendt, E L; Westergaard, G C

    2003-12-01

    Cannell [Journal of Archaeological Science 29:335-339, 2002] argued that sex-based differences among humans in terms of the mass of chosen throwing stones could be used to infer body mass and patterns of sexual dimorphism in early hominids from Olduvai and Koobi Fora by examining the mass distributions of unaltered stone tools at those sites. We examined this hypothesis in tufted capuchin monkeys using a comparative approach, by investigating the relationships among body mass, sex, stone weight preference, and accuracy in a throwing task. The subject sample consisted of nine monkeys trained to perform an aimed-throwing task in which a food reward could be obtained by throwing a stone into a bucket. We found that 1) the subjects showed a strong mean stone mass preference; 2) the females chose heavier stones than the males, in terms of absolute mean selected stone mass and selected stone mass relative to body mass; 3) subjects threw more accurately when they used stones of preferred mass vs. stones of nonpreferred mass; and 4) overall, the males were more accurate in the throwing task than the females. We conclude that capuchins are highly selective when choosing throwing stones, and that this confers an advantage for throwing accuracy. Our results indicate that the sexually dimorphic pattern in stone mass preference observed among humans does not generalize to Cebus apella. We suggest that researchers examining this pattern in humans in an attempt to explain early hominid patterns of dimorphism and behavior should take into account not only stone weight preference, but also its adaptive advantage. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Understanding odor information segregation in the olfactory bulb by means of mitral and tufted cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Polese

    Full Text Available Odor identification is one of the main tasks of the olfactory system. It is performed almost independently from the concentration of the odor providing a robust recognition. This capacity to ignore concentration information does not preclude the olfactory system from estimating concentration itself. Significant experimental evidence has indicated that the olfactory system is able to infer simultaneously odor identity and intensity. However, it is still unclear at what level or levels of the olfactory pathway this segregation of information occurs. In this work, we study whether this odor information segregation is performed at the input stage of the olfactory bulb: the glomerular layer. To this end, we built a detailed neural model of the glomerular layer based on its known anatomical connections and conducted two simulated odor experiments. In the first experiment, the model was exposed to an odor stimulus dataset composed of six different odorants, each one dosed at six different concentrations. In the second experiment, we conducted an odor morphing experiment where a sequence of binary mixtures going from one odor to another through intermediate mixtures was presented to the model. The results of the experiments were visualized using principal components analysis and analyzed with hierarchical clustering to unveil the structure of the high-dimensional output space. Additionally, Fisher's discriminant ratio and Pearson's correlation coefficient were used to quantify odor identity and odor concentration information respectively. Our results showed that the architecture of the glomerular layer was able to mediate the segregation of odor information obtaining output spiking sequences of the principal neurons, namely the mitral and external tufted cells, strongly correlated with odor identity and concentration, respectively. An important conclusion is also that the morphological difference between the principal neurons is not key to achieve odor

  18. Progress of teaching and learning of nuclear engineering courses at College of Engineering, Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Nasri A.; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz; Yusoff, Mohd. Zamri

    2015-04-01

    Developing human capital in nuclear with required nuclear background and professional qualifications is necessary to support the implementation of nuclear power projects in the near future. Sufficient educational and training skills are required to ensure that the human resources needed by the nuclear power industry meets its high standard. The Government of Malaysia has made the decision to include nuclear as one of the electricity generation option for the country, post 2020 in order to cater for the increasing energy demands of the country as well as to reduce CO2 emission. The commitment by the government has been made clearer with the inclusion of the development of first NPP by 2021 in the Economic Transformation Program (ETP) which was launched by the government in October 2010. The In tandem with the government initiative to promote nuclear energy, Center for Nuclear Energy, College of Engineering, Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN) is taking the responsibility in developing human capital in the area of nuclear power and technology. In the beginning, the College of Engineering has offered the Introduction to Nuclear Technology course as a technical elective course for all undergraduate engineering students. Gradually, other nuclear technical elective courses are offered such as Nuclear Policy, Security and Safeguards, Introduction to Nuclear Engineering, Radiation Detection and Nuclear Instrumentation, Introduction to Reactor Physics, Radiation Safety and Waste Management, and Nuclear Thermal-hydraulics. In addition, another course Advancement in Nuclear Energy is offered as one of the postgraduate elective courses. To enhance the capability of teaching staffs in nuclear areas at UNITEN, several junior lecturers are sent to pursue their postgraduate studies in the Republic of Korea, United States and the United Kingdom, while the others are participating in short courses and workshops in nuclear that are conducted locally and abroad. This paper describes

  19. Progress of teaching and learning of nuclear engineering courses at College of Engineering, Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamid, Nasri A.; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz; Yusoff, Mohd. Zamri

    2015-01-01

    Developing human capital in nuclear with required nuclear background and professional qualifications is necessary to support the implementation of nuclear power projects in the near future. Sufficient educational and training skills are required to ensure that the human resources needed by the nuclear power industry meets its high standard. The Government of Malaysia has made the decision to include nuclear as one of the electricity generation option for the country, post 2020 in order to cater for the increasing energy demands of the country as well as to reduce CO 2 emission. The commitment by the government has been made clearer with the inclusion of the development of first NPP by 2021 in the Economic Transformation Program (ETP) which was launched by the government in October 2010. The In tandem with the government initiative to promote nuclear energy, Center for Nuclear Energy, College of Engineering, Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN) is taking the responsibility in developing human capital in the area of nuclear power and technology. In the beginning, the College of Engineering has offered the Introduction to Nuclear Technology course as a technical elective course for all undergraduate engineering students. Gradually, other nuclear technical elective courses are offered such as Nuclear Policy, Security and Safeguards, Introduction to Nuclear Engineering, Radiation Detection and Nuclear Instrumentation, Introduction to Reactor Physics, Radiation Safety and Waste Management, and Nuclear Thermal-hydraulics. In addition, another course Advancement in Nuclear Energy is offered as one of the postgraduate elective courses. To enhance the capability of teaching staffs in nuclear areas at UNITEN, several junior lecturers are sent to pursue their postgraduate studies in the Republic of Korea, United States and the United Kingdom, while the others are participating in short courses and workshops in nuclear that are conducted locally and abroad. This paper describes

  20. Progress of teaching and learning of nuclear engineering courses at College of Engineering, Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamid, Nasri A., E-mail: Nasri@uniten.edu.my; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz; Yusoff, Mohd. Zamri [Nuclear Energy Center, College of Engineering, Universiti Tenaga Nasional, Jalan IKRAM-UNITEN, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Developing human capital in nuclear with required nuclear background and professional qualifications is necessary to support the implementation of nuclear power projects in the near future. Sufficient educational and training skills are required to ensure that the human resources needed by the nuclear power industry meets its high standard. The Government of Malaysia has made the decision to include nuclear as one of the electricity generation option for the country, post 2020 in order to cater for the increasing energy demands of the country as well as to reduce CO{sub 2} emission. The commitment by the government has been made clearer with the inclusion of the development of first NPP by 2021 in the Economic Transformation Program (ETP) which was launched by the government in October 2010. The In tandem with the government initiative to promote nuclear energy, Center for Nuclear Energy, College of Engineering, Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN) is taking the responsibility in developing human capital in the area of nuclear power and technology. In the beginning, the College of Engineering has offered the Introduction to Nuclear Technology course as a technical elective course for all undergraduate engineering students. Gradually, other nuclear technical elective courses are offered such as Nuclear Policy, Security and Safeguards, Introduction to Nuclear Engineering, Radiation Detection and Nuclear Instrumentation, Introduction to Reactor Physics, Radiation Safety and Waste Management, and Nuclear Thermal-hydraulics. In addition, another course Advancement in Nuclear Energy is offered as one of the postgraduate elective courses. To enhance the capability of teaching staffs in nuclear areas at UNITEN, several junior lecturers are sent to pursue their postgraduate studies in the Republic of Korea, United States and the United Kingdom, while the others are participating in short courses and workshops in nuclear that are conducted locally and abroad. This paper

  1. Jaw-muscle fiber architecture in tufted capuchins favors generating relatively large muscle forces without compromising jaw gape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrea B.; Vinyard, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Cebus apella is renowned for its dietary flexibility and capacity to exploit hard and tough objects. Cebus apella differs from other capuchins in displaying a suite of craniodental features that have been functionally and adaptively linked to their feeding behavior, particularly the generation and dissipation of relatively large jaw forces. We compared fiber architecture of the masseter and temporalis muscles between the tufted capuchin (C. apella; n = 12 ) and two “untufted” capuchins (C. capuchinus, n = 3; C. albifrons, n = 5). These three species share broadly similar diets, but tufted capuchins occasionally exploit mechanically challenging tissues. We tested the hypothesis that C. apella exhibits architectural properties of their jaw muscles that facilitate relatively large forces, including relatively greater physiologic cross-sectional areas (PCSA), more pinnate fibers, and lower ratios of mass to tetanic tension (Mass/P0). Results show some evidence supporting these predictions, as C. apella has relatively greater superficial masseter, whole masseter, and temporalis PCSAs, significantly so only for the temporalis following Bonferroni adjustment. Capuchins did not differ in pinnation angle or Mass/P0. As an architectural trade-off between maximizing muscle force and muscle excursion/contraction velocity, we also tested the hypothesis that C. apella exhibits relatively shorter muscle fibers. Contrary to our prediction, there are no significant differences in relative fiber lengths between tufted and untufted capuchins. Therefore, we attribute the relatively greater PCSAs in C. apella primarily to their larger muscle masses. These findings suggest that relatively large jaw-muscle PCSAs can be added to the suite of masticatory features that have been functionally linked to the exploitation of a more resistant diet by C. apella. By enlarging jaw-muscle mass to increase PCSA, rather than reducing fiber lengths and increasing pinnation, tufted capuchins appear

  2. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  3. Missouri local technical assistance program at Missouri University of Science and Technology (formerly University of Missouri--Rolla) : annual progress report January-December 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    This annual report is a summary of the activities during 2007 for the Missouri Local Technical Assistance Program (Missouri LTAP), which is located at Missouri University of Science and Technology. The report highlights Missouri LTAPs performance ...

  4. A mutation in the tuft mouse disrupts TET1 activity and alters the expression of genes that are crucial for neural tube closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith S. K. Fong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variations affecting neural tube closure along the head result in malformations of the face and brain. Neural tube defects (NTDs are among the most common birth defects in humans. We previously reported a mouse mutant called tuft that arose spontaneously in our wild-type 3H1 colony. Adult tuft mice present midline craniofacial malformations with or without an anterior cephalocele. In addition, affected embryos presented neural tube closure defects resulting in insufficient closure of the anterior neuropore or exencephaly. Here, through whole-genome sequencing, we identified a nonsense mutation in the Tet1 gene, which encodes a methylcytosine dioxygenase (TET1, co-segregating with the tuft phenotype. This mutation resulted in premature termination that disrupts the catalytic domain that is involved in the demethylation of cytosine. We detected a significant loss of TET enzyme activity in the heads of tuft embryos that were homozygous for the mutation and had NTDs. RNA-Seq transcriptome analysis indicated that multiple gene pathways associated with neural tube closure were dysregulated in tuft embryo heads. Among them, the expressions of Cecr2, Epha7 and Grhl2 were significantly reduced in some embryos presenting neural tube closure defects, whereas one or more components of the non-canonical WNT signaling pathway mediating planar cell polarity and convergent extension were affected in others. We further show that the recombinant mutant TET1 protein was capable of entering the nucleus and affected the expression of endogenous Grhl2 in IMCD-3 (inner medullary collecting duct cells. These results indicate that TET1 is an epigenetic determinant for regulating genes that are crucial to closure of the anterior neural tube and its mutation has implications to craniofacial development, as presented by the tuft mouse.

  5. Support of nuclear engineering education and research at the University of Michigan. Progress report, May 15, 1993--May 14, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, W.R.

    1994-05-01

    This report describes progress on four different projects in the fission reactor area that have been supported by the grant during the past year. These projects are: Accelerator transmutation of nuclear waste (Steve Pearson); Neutronic analysis of the Ford Nuclear Reactor (Brent Renkema); and Monte Carlo depletion capability and new perturbation Monte Carlo algorithms, with utilization of massively parallel processors (Amit Majumdar). These tasks are briefly described and progress to date is presented

  6. A Vision in Progress. The Decision To Establish a Public University at Monterey Bay. An Occasional Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, William

    This report describes the decision-making process and problems encountered during the 48 months it took to establish a new university, California State University at Monterey Bay, on the site of Fort Ord, a recently closed military base. After an introduction, the report is organized in four sections, one for each phase of the process. The first…

  7. Wintering Tufted Ducks Aythya fuligula diving for zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha balance feeding costs within narrow margins of their energy budget

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, de J.J.; Eerden, van M.R.; Visser, G.H.

    1999-01-01

    Diving ducks face the strongly cooling properties of aquatic environments. In experiments with Tufted Ducks Aythya fuligula feeding on zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha in outdoor cages, we measured changes in food consumption and diving behaviour in relation to water temperature (3-22°C). Water

  8. Competition between a Lawn-Forming Cynodon dactylon and a Tufted Grass Species Hyparrhenia hirta on a South-African Dystrophic Savanna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerts, J.A.; Prins, H.H.T.; Bomhoff, D.; Verhagen, I.; Swart, J.M.; Boer, de W.F.

    2015-01-01

    South African savanna grasslands are often characterised by indigestible tufted grass species whereas lawn grasses are far more desirable in terms of herbivore sustenance. We aimed to investigate the role of nutrients and/or the disturbance (grazing, trampling) by herbivores on the formation of

  9. Wintering Tufted Ducks Aythya fuligula diving for zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha balance feeding costs within narrow margins of their energy budget

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, JJ; van Eerden, MR; Visser, GH

    Diving ducks face the strongly cooling properties of aquatic environments. In experiments with Tufted Ducks Aythya fuligula feeding on zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha in outdoor cages, we measured changes in food consumption and diving behaviour in relation to water temperature (3-22 degrees C).

  10. High-energy-physics program at Texas A and M University. Annual progress report, July 15-December 1, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, P.M.; Webb, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Progress on development of the forward spectrometer for the Collider Detector Facility at Fermilab's anti p p collider is described. Design and construction of the hadron calorimeter system, development of the microchannel plate intensifier for the Chernkov counter, and developments in software support are briefly discussed

  11. Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report, 1 September 1995--31 August 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL)--a collaboration of Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--has had a very productive year. This report covers parts of the second and third year of a three-year grant between the US Department of Energy and the three collaborating universities. The TUNL research program focuses on the following areas: precision test of parity-invariance violation in resonance neutron scattering at LANSCE/LANL; parity violation measurements using charged-particle resonances in A = 20--40 targets and the A = 4 system at TUNL; chaotic behavior in the nuclei 30 P and 34 Cl from studies of eigenvalue fluctuations in nuclear level schemes; search for anomalies in the level density (pairing phase transition) in 1f-2p shell nuclei using GEANIE at LANSCE/LANL; parity-conserving time-reversal noninvariance tests using 166 Ho resonances at Geel, ORELA, or LANSCE/LANL; nuclear astrophysics; few-body nuclear systems; Nuclear Data evaluation for A = 3--20 for which TUNL is now the international center. Developments in technology and instrumentation are vital to the research and training program. Innovative work was continued in: polarized beam development; polarized target development; designing new cryogenic systems; designing new detectors; improving high-resolution beams for the KN and FN accelerators; development of an unpolarized Low-Energy Beam Facility for radiative capture studies of astrophysical interest. Preliminary research summaries are presented

  12. Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report, 1 September 1995--31 August 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, E.J.

    1996-09-01

    The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL)--a collaboration of Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--has had a very productive year. This report covers parts of the second and third year of a three-year grant between the US Department of Energy and the three collaborating universities. The TUNL research program focuses on the following areas: precision test of parity-invariance violation in resonance neutron scattering at LANSCE/LANL; parity violation measurements using charged-particle resonances in A = 20--40 targets and the A = 4 system at TUNL; chaotic behavior in the nuclei {sup 30}P and {sup 34}Cl from studies of eigenvalue fluctuations in nuclear level schemes; search for anomalies in the level density (pairing phase transition) in 1f-2p shell nuclei using GEANIE at LANSCE/LANL; parity-conserving time-reversal noninvariance tests using {sup 166}Ho resonances at Geel, ORELA, or LANSCE/LANL; nuclear astrophysics; few-body nuclear systems; Nuclear Data evaluation for A = 3--20 for which TUNL is now the international center. Developments in technology and instrumentation are vital to the research and training program. Innovative work was continued in: polarized beam development; polarized target development; designing new cryogenic systems; designing new detectors; improving high-resolution beams for the KN and FN accelerators; development of an unpolarized Low-Energy Beam Facility for radiative capture studies of astrophysical interest. Preliminary research summaries are presented.

  13. Indiana University high energy physics group, task C: Technical progress report, December 1, 1987-November 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bower, C.R.; Heinz, R.M.; Mufson, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Indiana University High Energy Physics Group, Task C has been actively involved in the MACRO experiment at Gran Sasso during the current contract year. MACRO is a large US-Italian Monopole, Astrophysics, and Cosmic Ray Observatory being built under the Gran Sasso Mountain outside of Rome. Indiana University is in charge of the US software effort. We have been performing extensive Monte Carlo design and data analysis calculations. We are also doing development work on the MACRO liquid scintillator. We are setting up a Quality Assurance liquid scintillator laboratory in Frascati, Italy. We are producing vertical scintillator tank endplates and calibration boats in our machine shop

  14. Annual progress report and renewal request for high energy physics at Texas A and M University, January 1-December 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    The experimental high energy physics program at Texas A and M University has continued to make progress in carrying out its research programs begun over the past several years. The GUT magnetic monopole research program started in 1982 has reached the data taking stage within the last six months. The status of that experiment is presented, and preliminary results of this search are discussed. Secondly, our participation in the construction of the forward/backward hadron calorimeter systems for the Fermilab CDF project has begun to make significant progress, following the signing of our experimental agreement in April of this year. The status of our chamber construction and our plans for the coming year are reported. Lastly, efforts to participate in an international collaboration to search for GUT magnetic monopoles at the new Gran Sasso Laboratory under construction in Italy are reported

  15. Leadership of Winter Mixed-Species Flocks by Tufted Titmice (Baeolophus bicolor: Are Titmice Passive Nuclear Species?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A. Contreras

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The tufted titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor, TUTI is a nuclear species in winter foraging flocks whose antipredator calls are used to manage predation risk by diverse heterospecifics. We hypothesized that satellite species in mixed flocks follow TUTI (not vice versa, thereby defining the role of TUTI as a “passive” nuclear species. We followed 20 winter mixed-species flocks in North-Central Florida and assessed angular-angular correlations between overall flock, TUTI, and satellite species movement directions. We observed significant correlations between overall flock movement directions and those of TUTI, confirming our central prediction. Within flocks, however, fine-scale movement directions of satellite species were often more highly correlated with those of other satellites than with TUTI movements. We conclude that TUTI are passive nuclear species whose movements define flock paths, but within flocks, TUTI movements may have less influence on satellite movements than do other factors.

  16. Experimental elementary particle physics at the University of Pittsburgh: Progress report, April 1, 1987-March 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, W.E.; Coon, D.D.; Engels, E. Jr.; Shepard, P.F.; Thompson, J.A.

    1987-12-01

    This paper discusses research activity at the University of Pittsburgh in experimental elementary particle physics. The three main tasks included are: Study of lepton production at the SPS and study of large P/sub T/ direct photon production at the ISR; Direct photon production at the Fermi Tevatron; and Search for fractional charge particles in semiconductors

  17. Theoretical high energy physics research at the University of Chicago: Progress report, April 1, 1987-March 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosner, J.L.; Sachs, R.G.

    1987-12-01

    This paper briefly discusses the high energy physics work done at the University of Chicago. Certain topics discussed are: hadron spectroscopy, CP violation, neutral leptons, supersymmetry, magnetic moments of baryons and quarks, low energy effective field theories, electromagnetic properties of baryons and mass mixing of quarks and neutrinos

  18. Organization of nuclear education at the Faculty of Chemistry of the Byelorussian state university: progress and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savitskaya, T.A.; Kimlenko, I.M.; Sviridov, D.V.; Tolstik, A.L.; Shadyro, O.I.

    2013-01-01

    The strategy of the nuclear education in the Republic of Belarus is discussed. Nuclear knowledge management course is introduced into the curricular according to the IAEA recommendations. Podcasting lectures, advanced handbooks, interdisciplinary courses, cooperative learning is the main components of the nuclear education processes. The aspects of the interaction between the university and employers are considered [ru

  19. Are We There Yet? A Progress Report from Three Turkish University Pioneers in Distance Education and E-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latchem, Colin; Simsek, Nurettin; Balta, Ozlem Cakir; Torkul, Orhan; Cedimoglu, I. Hakki; Altunkopru, Alpaslan

    2009-01-01

    The international literature provides little in-depth analysis of distance education and e-learning activities, achievements, and challenges in Turkish higher education other than the country's mega-university, Anadolu. This paper examines the development of, and lessons to be learned from, such undertakings by three pioneers--two regular state…

  20. Progress, discipline and manhood? A case of sodomy in the National University of the United States of Colombia (1880

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leidy Jazmín Torres Cendales

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, an act of sodomy presumably committed by two Philosophy and Literature students in the National University of the United States of Colombia in 1880 is studied closely. Based on the analysis of the disciplinary system of the University, the possible meanings of sexual contact between men in the late nineteenth century, and the power relations demonstrated in the file, I intend to evince how this case destabilized and, at the same time, reaffirmed the control system and the physical and behavioral standards within the institution. It represented an escape mechanism from the harsh surveillance towards students as well as the replication of those forms of regulation and behavioral rules among students.

  1. Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark - Annual Progress Report 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its...... superconductors. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2009....

  2. Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark - Annual Progress Report 2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its...... been initiated in 2008. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2008....

  3. Policy Choices for Progressive Realization of Universal Health Coverage Comment on "Ethical Perspective: Five Unacceptable Trade-offs on the Path to Universal Health Coverage".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangcharoensathien, Viroj; Patcharanarumol, Walaiporn; Panichkriangkrai, Warisa; Sommanustweechai, Angkana

    2016-07-31

    In responses to Norheim's editorial, this commentary offers reflections from Thailand, how the five unacceptable trade-offs were applied to the universal health coverage (UHC) reforms between 1975 and 2002 when the whole 64 million people were covered by one of the three public health insurance systems. This commentary aims to generate global discussions on how best UHC can be gradually achieved. Not only the proposed five discrete trade-offs within each dimension, there are also trade-offs between the three dimensions of UHC such as population coverage, service coverage and cost coverage. Findings from Thai UHC show that equity is applied for the population coverage extension, when the low income households and the informal sector were the priority population groups for coverage extension by different prepayment schemes in 1975 and 1984, respectively. With an exception of public sector employees who were historically covered as part of fringe benefits were covered well before the poor. The private sector employees were covered last in 1990. Historically, Thailand applied a comprehensive benefit package where a few items are excluded using the negative list; until there was improved capacities on technology assessment that cost-effectiveness are used for the inclusion of new interventions into the benefit package. Not only cost-effectiveness, but long term budget impact, equity and ethical considerations are taken into account. Cost coverage is mostly determined by the fiscal capacities. Close ended budget with mix of provider payment methods are used as a tool for trade-off service coverage and financial risk protection. Introducing copayment in the context of fee-for-service can be harmful to beneficiaries due to supplier induced demands, inefficiency and unpredictable out of pocket payment by households. UHC achieves favorable outcomes as it was implemented when there was a full geographical coverage of primary healthcare coverage in all districts and sub

  4. Using three-dimensional imaging to assess treatment outcomes in orthodontics: a progress report from the University of the Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S; Carlson, S; Beers, A; Curry, S; Norris, K; Boyd, R L

    2003-01-01

    Past research in integrated three-dimensional (3D) craniofacial mapping at the Craniofacial Research Instrumentation Laboratory (CRIL) of the University of the Pacific is summarized in narrative form. The advantages and limitations of recent commercial developments in the application of cone beam geometry volumetric X-ray scanners in dentistry and surface digital mapping of study casts are discussed. The rationale for methods currently in development at CRIL for merging longitudinal information from existing 3D study casts and two-dimensional lateral X-ray cephalograms in studies of orthodontic treatment outcome is presented.

  5. High energy physics at the University of Iowa: Progress report, 1 February 1987-31 January 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCliment, E.R.; Newsom, C.R.; Onel, Y.; Mallik, U.

    1988-01-01

    Research in high-energy physics at Iowa is in three areas--hyperon decay (ERM and CRN), hadronic interactions (Y. Onel), and charm physics (U. Mallik). In this document we report our progress in each of these areas. McCliment and Newsom built a silicon Σ + and Ξ - radiative decays. The SSD system was extensively tested in Proton Center during the 1987-1988 fixed-target run. Studies included alignment, tracking, efficiency, noise, and temperature stability. Work was also completed on a measurement of the Ξ - production polarization and magnetic moment from E715 data. A draft of the paper is included in the progress report as Appendix A. The polarized beam line for experiment E704 was commissioned during the same fixed-target run. Onel and his students were involved in running and developing the analysis for the Coulomb Nuclear Interaction Polarimeter. Our preliminary analysis indicates that the polarization beam is consistent with design expectations. During 1988 we also constructed five drift chambers and a delay line chamber for Fermilab experiment E683. We have also spent a limited amount of time on our CERN activities in designing, planning, and doing calculations and simulations for M258 (SPIN-SPLITTER). At MARK III, U. Mallik completed an amplitude analysis of the decay mode J//Psi/ → Ω + f 2 (1270), which will soon be submitted to Physical Review D. A draft of this paper is included as Appendix B. She presented an invited talk on the MARK III results at the BNL spectroscopy conference, ''Glueballs, Hybrids, and Exotics.'' This talk will be published in the proceedings. She also worked with the e-p physics group at the Snowmass Workshop in Summer, 1988. This work will also be published in the Snowmass proceedings. Her student, Maria Roco, participated in drift chamber repair and software of the MARK III at SLAC in the summer of 1988

  6. Policy Choices for Progressive Realization of Universal Health Coverage; Comment on “Ethical Perspective: Five Unacceptable Trade-offs on the Path to Universal Health Coverage”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viroj Tangcharoensathien

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In responses to Norheim’s editorial, this commentary offers reflections from Thailand, how the five unacceptable trade-offs were applied to the universal health coverage (UHC reforms between 1975 and 2002 when the whole 64 million people were covered by one of the three public health insurance systems. This commentary aims to generate global discussions on how best UHC can be gradually achieved. Not only the proposed five discrete tradeoffs within each dimension, there are also trade-offs between the three dimensions of UHC such as population coverage, service coverage and cost coverage. Findings from Thai UHC show that equity is applied for the population coverage extension, when the low income households and the informal sector were the priority population groups for coverage extension by different prepayment schemes in 1975 and 1984, respectively. With an exception of public sector employees who were historically covered as part of fringe benefits were covered well before the poor. The private sector employees were covered last in 1990. Historically, Thailand applied a comprehensive benefit package where a few items are excluded using the negative list; until there was improved capacities on technology assessment that cost-effectiveness are used for the inclusion of new interventions into the benefit package. Not only costeffectiveness, but long term budget impact, equity and ethical considerations are taken into account. Cost coverage is mostly determined by the fiscal capacities. Close ended budget with mix of provider payment methods are used as a tool for trade-off service coverage and financial risk protection. Introducing copayment in the context of feefor-service can be harmful to beneficiaries due to supplier induced demands, inefficiency and unpredictable out of pocket payment by households. UHC achieves favorable outcomes as it was implemented when there was a full geographical coverage of primary healthcare coverage in all

  7. University of Colorado, Nuclear Physics Laboratory technical progress report, November 1, 1978-October 31, 1979. Report NPL-845

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes work carried out at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado from November 1, 1978 to October 31, 1979, under contract EY-76-C-02-0535.A003 between the University of Colorado and the United States Department of Energy. Experimental studies of light ion-induced reactions were performed with the AVF cyclotron, which continues each year to produce beams of yet higher quality. Charged-particle studies continued to emphasize use of the high-resolution spectrometer system, but some return to broad-range spectroscopic studies using solid state detectors also occurred. Neutron time-of-flight experiments used 9-meter and 30-meter flight paths. Neutron-gamma ray coincidence studies developed into a new and promising field. The new PDP 11/34 data acquisition system was of great value in allowing such multiparameter experiments. Smaller programs in nuclear astrophysics, plasma diagnostic development, and medical physics were also undertaken. Research activities based at other accelerators grew. Studies of future directions for light-ion accelerators, including work on intense pulsed ion sources, orbit dynamics, and storage rings, were greatly enlarged. 19 of the articles in this report were abstracted and indexed individually. Lists of publications and personnel conclude this report

  8. Texas A and M University Nuclear Science Center. Twenty-first progress report, January 1-December 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krohn, J.; Petesch, J.E.; Rogers, R.D.; Sandel, P.; Stasny, G.S.

    1985-03-01

    The Nuclear Science Center is operated by the Texas Engineering Experiment Station as a service to the Texas A and M University System and the State of Texas. The facility is available to the University, other educational institutions, governmental agencies, and private organizations and individuals. Reactor utilization decreased from 1983 as indicated by a slightly smaller number of samples irradiated and of total irradiations. Core VIII, established in December 1982, was used throughout 1984. Several major facility projects modifications, and improvements were completed during the past year. Experimentally the Beam Port No. 4 reflector and shutter was improved, the pulsing instrumentation is being expanded, and the pneumatic system controller developed for Lab No. 4 is now in use in the Center for Trace Characterization (CTC) and Shell Development labs. Several operational problems occurred in 1984 but did not result in a significant loss of reactor operating time. During this reporting period there were no changes made to the site area; however, there has been made a proposal to extend the runway at nearby Easterwood Airport such tha larger aircraft can be accommodated. This extension should occur in 1985 and should have no affect on the air traffic patterns relative to the NSC. Administratively during 1984 efforts have been made to stabilize the reactor operations staff following the mid year resignations of both a Reactor Supervisor and Manager of Reactor Operations. A long term replacement has been hired to fill the vacated Reactor Supervisor position; however, the manager position has not yet been filled and those duties have been assumed by the Assistant Director

  9. Indiana University High Energy Physics Group: Task A: Technical progress report, December 1, 1986 to November 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alyea, E.D.; Brabson, B.B.; Crittenden, R.R.; Dzierba, A.R.; Martin, H.J.; Ogren, H.O.; Zieminski, A.

    1987-05-01

    Data collection on the production of the KKπ state in π - , K - , and p-bar induced reactions is reported, with partial wave analysis in progress. Work on the design of a target calorimeter and data taking for a muon scattering experiment at CERN is completed. Analysis of a fixed-target jet experiment is reported. A dimuon detector has been prepared for an experiment at Fermilab to study hadronic processes yielding high mass dimuons and associated particles. Participation in the coordination and writing of software for the DO collider detector at Fermilab is reported. Some results from the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) are reported, including direct observation of several decay modes of the charmed mesons, directly observed meson resonances, baryon resonances, and some discoveries concerning the tau lepton. Activity is reported in the building of hardware for the muon upgrade for the Mark2 detector at the SLC and the building of the beam position monitors for the SLC, and microprocessors for Mark2 data analysis. Involvement in the SLC polarization collaboration is also reported

  10. Distrofia oftalmoplégica progressiva. Forma de inicio ocular precoce e comprometimento muscular universal tardio Progressive ophthalmoplegic dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João P. Rodrigues

    1968-03-01

    Full Text Available É estudada uma forma particular de distrofia muscular progressiva — forma óculo-faríngea — cujo diagnóstico foi comprovado mediante traçados eletromiográficos e biópsia do músculo orbicular da pálpebra. São analisadas as duas formas de distrofias oftalmoplégicas: 1 miopatia ocular; 2 miopatia óculo-faríngea. A forma óculo-faríngea é mais rara, incide em idades mais avançadas (média de 40 anos em comparação com a forma ocular pura (média de 23 anos; além disso, é ressaltada a alta incidência familiar daquela forma de miopatia. O caso ora registrado parece ser um élo entre as duas formas, pois o início foi precoce, sem incidência familiar e com comprometimento da deglutição e de músculos da face, pescoço, tronco, cintura escapular, pélvica e dos membros.A case of peculiar form of progressive muscular dystrophy — the oculopharyngeal one — is reported. The diagnosis was ascertained by electromiography and biopsy of orbicularis palpebrae muscle. Two forms of ophthalmoplegic dystrophy are analysed: 1 ocular myopathy and 2 oculopharyngeal miopathy. The latter is less frequent, occurring on patients in the fourth decade, in comparison with the pure ocular form affecting patients in the second decade. Besides this, the high familial incidence of the oculo-pharyngeal form is stressed. The reported case seems to be an intermediate form between them. The onset occurred at 11 years of age; there was no other case in the family, the disease involving swallowing, face, neck, trunk, shoulder, pelvic and members muscles.

  11. The expanding world of physics at Manitoba : a hundred years of progress : Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, R.D.

    2004-01-01

    The century covered by this book has seen scientific developments unprecedented in human history, so an endeavour has been made to describe something of the careers in physics of our departmental members past and present. The prologue tells of the lack of decisions, academic and governmental, which delayed until 1904 the arrival of the first university professors, who even then could be appointed only through a private benefaction. Chapters I-IV give the general development from 1904 to the present while Chapter V describes the work of the major groups in the department. A review of each group is followed by a brief selection of the work of the individual members. Few, if any, can hope to keep up with the many facets of the subject today, so a glimpse at what is going on at the cutting edge of the whole field may reveal something of the state of physics at the beginning of the twenty-first century. The final chapter (VI) tells of the department's service and outreach beyond the classroom and the honours and awards gained by the individual members.

  12. The progress of Chinese burn medicine from the Third Military Medical University-in memory of its pioneer, Professor Li Ao.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haisheng; Zhou, Junyi; Peng, Yizhi; Zhang, Jiaping; Peng, Xi; Luo, Qizhi; Yuan, Zhiqiang; Yan, Hong; Peng, Daizhi; He, Weifeng; Wang, Fengjun; Liang, Guangping; Huang, Yuesheng; Wu, Jun; Luo, Gaoxing

    2017-01-01

    Professor Li Ao was one of the founders of Chinese burn medicine and one of the most renowned doctors and researchers of burns in China. He established one of the Chinese earliest special departments for burns at Third Military Medical University (TMMU) in 1958. To memorialize Professor Li Ao on his 100th birthday in 2017 and introduce our extensive experience, it is our honor to briefly review the development and achievement of the Chinese burn medicine from TMMU. The epidemiology and outcomes of admitted burn patients since 1958 were reviewed. Furthermore, main achievements of basic and clinical research for the past roughly 60 years were presented. These achievements mainly included the Chinese Rule of Nine, fluid resuscitation protocol, experience in inhalation injury, wound treatment strategies, prevention and treatment of burn infections, nutrition therapy, organ support therapies, and rehabilitation. The progress shaped and enriched modern Chinese burn medicine and promoted the development of world burn medicine.

  13. Review of core technologies for development of 2G HTS NMR/MRI magnet: A status report of progress in Korea University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. Song

    Full Text Available In this paper, we briefly review our recent progress on development of core technologies for 2G HTS NMR/MRI magnets at Korea University. To outperform the current state-of-art NMR/MRI magnet systems, we have developed the following technologies: 1 a REBCO-REBCO superconducting joint for operation of persistent current mode; 2 partial and grease-insulation winding techniques for self-protection of the HTS magnets; 3 pre-shimming to reduce the screening-current-induced-field; and 4 optimization of multi-width winding to minimize conductor consumption and volume of the HTS magnets. The test results demonstrated the feasibility of employing the developed techniques to achieve ultra-high-field and LHe-free 2G NMR/MRI magnets possessing self-protecting feature.

  14. The Relationship between Respiration-Related Membrane Potential Slow Oscillations and Discharge Patterns in Mitral/Tufted Cells: What Are the Rules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briffaud, Virginie; Fourcaud-Trocmé, Nicolas; Messaoudi, Belkacem; Buonviso, Nathalie; Amat, Corine

    2012-01-01

    Background A slow respiration-related rhythm strongly shapes the activity of the olfactory bulb. This rhythm appears as a slow oscillation that is detectable in the membrane potential, the respiration-related spike discharge of the mitral/tufted cells and the bulbar local field potential. Here, we investigated the rules that govern the manifestation of membrane potential slow oscillations (MPSOs) and respiration-related discharge activities under various afferent input conditions and cellular excitability states. Methodology and Principal Findings We recorded the intracellular membrane potential signals in the mitral/tufted cells of freely breathing anesthetized rats. We first demonstrated the existence of multiple types of MPSOs, which were influenced by odor stimulation and discharge activity patterns. Complementary studies using changes in the intracellular excitability state and a computational model of the mitral cell demonstrated that slow oscillations in the mitral/tufted cell membrane potential were also modulated by the intracellular excitability state, whereas the respiration-related spike activity primarily reflected the afferent input. Based on our data regarding MPSOs and spike patterns, we found that cells exhibiting an unsynchronized discharge pattern never exhibited an MPSO. In contrast, cells with a respiration-synchronized discharge pattern always exhibited an MPSO. In addition, we demonstrated that the association between spike patterns and MPSO types appeared complex. Conclusion We propose that both the intracellular excitability state and input strength underlie specific MPSOs, which, in turn, constrain the types of spike patterns exhibited. PMID:22952828

  15. Universal many-body response of heavy impurities coupled to a Fermi sea: a review of recent progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Richard; Knap, Michael; Ivanov, Dmitri A.; You, Jhih-Shih; Cetina, Marko; Demler, Eugene

    2018-02-01

    In this report we discuss the dynamical response of heavy quantum impurities immersed in a Fermi gas at zero and at finite temperature. Studying both the frequency and the time domain allows one to identify interaction regimes that are characterized by distinct many-body dynamics. From this theoretical study a picture emerges in which impurity dynamics is universal on essentially all time scales, and where the high-frequency few-body response is related to the long-time dynamics of the Anderson orthogonality catastrophe by Tan relations. Our theoretical description relies on different and complementary approaches: functional determinants give an exact numerical solution for time- and frequency-resolved responses, bosonization provides accurate analytical expressions at low temperatures, and the theory of Toeplitz determinants allows one to analytically predict response up to high temperatures. Using these approaches we predict the thermal decoherence rate of the fermionic system and prove that within the considered model the fastest rate of long-time decoherence is given by γ=π k_BT/4 . We show that Feshbach resonances in cold atomic systems give access to new interaction regimes where quantum effects can prevail even in the thermal regime of many-body dynamics. The key signature of this phenomenon is a crossover between different exponential decay rates of the real-time Ramsey signal. It is shown that the physics of the orthogonality catastrophe is experimentally observable up to temperatures T/T_F≲ 0.2 where it leaves its fingerprint in a power-law temperature dependence of thermal spectral weight and we review how this phenomenon is related to the physics of heavy ions in liquid {\\hspace{0pt}}3 He and the formation of Fermi polarons. The presented results are in excellent agreement with recent experiments on LiK mixtures, and we predict several new phenomena that can be tested using currently available experimental technology.

  16. Progress of the research and development on the geological disposal technology of HLW with aid of the industry/university collaboration system and fixed term researcher system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Fumitaka; Sonobe, Hitoshi; Igarashi, Hiroshi

    2008-02-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), various systems associated with the collaboration with industries and universities on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and the Postdoctoral Fellow system, etc. are enacted. These systems have been operated considering the needs of JAEA's program, industry and academia, resultantly contributed, for example, to basic research and the project development. The activities under these collaboration systems contain personal exchanges, the publication of the accomplishments and utilization of those, in research and development concerning geological disposal technology of high-level radioactive waste (HLW). These activities have progressed in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) and Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), which are the successive predecessors of JAEA, through JAEA. The accomplishments from these systems have been not only published as papers in journals and individual technical reports but also integrated into the project reports, accordingly contributed to the advancement of the national program on the geological disposal of HLW. In this report, the progress of the research and development under these systems was investigated from the beginning of the operation of the systems. The contribution to the research and development on geological disposal technology of HLW was also studied. On the basis of these studies, the future utilization of the systems of the collaboration was also discussed from the view point of the management of research and development program. A CD-ROM is attached as an appendix. (J.P.N.)

  17. Individual and seasonal variation in fecal testosterone and cortisol levels of wild male tufted capuchin monkeys, Cebus apella nigritus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Jessica W; Ziegler, Toni E; Strier, Karen B

    2002-05-01

    This study tested the "challenge hypothesis" and rank-based predictions for temporal steroid production in male tufted capuchin monkeys, Cebus apella. Fecal samples (n = 209) collected from six wild males were analyzed for testosterone and cortisol concentration by enzyme immunoassay. The temporal pattern in male steroid production was compared to female sexual activity and rates of male aggression. The top-ranking adult male did not differ from other adult males in testosterone or cortisol concentration. Mean adult testosterone was significantly higher than mean subadult testosterone throughout the year. There was a clear elevation of testosterone and cortisol in both adult and subadult males during the peak of adult female sexual activity after the birth season. In fact, the magnitude of increase in testosterone was higher than predicted for a species with low male-male aggression. However, there was no difference between nonbreeding baseline testosterone levels during the birth season, and the "breeding" baseline of testosterone in males found during asynchronous female sexual activity. Of all behavioral indices examined, the distribution of female-maintained consortships was the best predictor of mean adult male testosterone concentrations. Although in many species, elevated testosterone coincides with increased male-male aggression, in the present study, the sustained high-magnitude increase in steroids during the peak of adult female sexual activity was associated with a relatively low rate of male-male intragroup aggression. (c) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  18. Radiographic changes of the distal phalangeal tuft of the hands in subjects with systemic sclerosis. Systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Yojhan Edilberto; Calvo Páramo, Enrique; Castañeda, Luisa María; Gómez, Sandra Viviana; Zambrano, Fernán Santiago

    To determine abnormal plain radiograph findings of the distal phalanx tuft of the hand (DPTH) associated with systemic sclerosis in adults. A systematic review was developed following the parameters of the PRISMA guidelines in databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIREME, Scielo, Google Scholar and others including as primary outcomes alterations of DPTH (erosions, resorption, sclerosis and proliferation) detected by simple radiography in subjects with systemic sclerosis. The prevalence of radiographic findings was synthesized using the fixed effects model. The statistical associations were expressed in terms of relative risk or odds ratio with their respective confidence intervals and p values. Twenty-two observational studies were included; the prevalence of DPTH resorption was 28.3% (95% CI: 0.256-0.312; p < .001); I 2 =80.4%, the prevalence of calcinosis was 15.6% (95% CI: 0.113-0.210; p < .001); I 2 =0%. No study reported proliferation or erosions and only one study described sclerosis of DPTH in 5 individuals. Resorption and calcinosis of DPTH are the characteristic radiographic findings in patients with systemic sclerosis. However, new studies with greater methodological strength are needed to establish associations between these phenomena and their presence in other connective tissue diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  19. Social modulation of risky decision-making in rats (Rattus norvegicus) and tufted capuchin monkeys (Sapajus spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoratto, F; Oddi, G; Gori, E; Micucci, A; De Petrillo, F; Paglieri, F; Adriani, W; Laviola, G; Addessi, E

    2018-02-24

    Both human and non-human animals frequently deal with risky decisions in a social environment. Nevertheless, the influence of the social context on decision-making has been scarcely investigated. Here, we evaluated for the first time whether the presence of a conspecific influences risk preferences in rats and in tufted capuchin monkeys. Subjects received a series of choices between a constant, safe option and a variable, risky option, both alone (Alone condition) and when paired with a conspecific (Paired condition). The average payoff of the risky option was always lower than that of the safe option. Overall, the two species differed in their attitude towards risk: whereas rats were indifferent between options, capuchins exhibited a preference for the safe option. In both species, risk preferences changed in the Paired condition compared to the Alone condition, although in an opposite way. Whereas rats increased their risk preferences over time when paired with a conspecific, capuchins chose the risky option less in the Paired condition than in the Alone condition. Moreover, whereas anxiety-like behaviours decreased across sessions in rats, these behaviours where more represented in the Paired condition than in the Alone condition in capuchins. Thus, our findings extends to two distantly-related non-human species the evidence, so far available for human beings, that a decrease in anxiety corresponds to an increase in risk preferences, and vice versa. This suggests that the modulation of risk preferences by social influences observed in rats and capuchin monkeys may rely on a common, evolutionarily ancient, mechanism. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A community-based approach to non-communicable chronic disease management within a context of advancing universal health coverage in China: progress and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Nanzi; Long, Qian; Tang, Xiaojun; Tang, Shenglan

    2014-01-01

    Paralleled with the rapid socio-economic development and demographic transition, an epidemic of non-communicable chronic diseases (NCDs) has emerged in China over the past three decades, resulting in increased disease and economic burdens. Over the past decade, with a political commitment of implementing universal health coverage, China has strengthened its primary healthcare system and increased investment in public health interventions. A community-based approach to address NCDs has been acknowledged and recognized as one of the most cost-effective solutions. Community-based strategies include: financial and health administrative support; social mobilization; community health education and promotion; and the use of community health centers in NCD detection, diagnosis, treatment, and patient management. Although China has made good progress in developing and implementing these strategies and policies for NCD prevention and control, many challenges remain. There are a lack of appropriately qualified health professionals at grass-roots health facilities; it is difficult to retain professionals at that level; there is insufficient public funding for NCD care and management; and NCD patients are economically burdened due to limited benefit packages covering NCD treatment offered by health insurance schemes. To tackle these challenges we propose developing appropriate human resource policies to attract greater numbers of qualified health professionals at the primary healthcare level; adjusting the service benefit packages to encourage the use of community-based health services; and increase government investment in public health interventions, as well as investing more on health insurance schemes.

  1. Flow Observations with Tufts and Lampblack of the Stalling of Four Typical Airfoil Sections in the NACA Variable-density Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Ira H; Sherman, Albert

    1938-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of the stalling processes of four typical airfoil sections was made over the critical range of the Reynolds Number. Motion pictures were taken of the movements of small silk tufts on the airfoil surface as the angle of attack increased through a range of angles including the stall. The boundary-layer flow also at certain angles of attack was indicated by the patterns formed by a suspension of lampblack in oil brushed onto the airfoil surface. These observations were analyzed together with corresponding force-test measurements to derive a picture of the stalling processes of airfoils.

  2. Community And Stakeholder Engagement With A University-Based Storm Research Team And Program During Events: Progressive Awareness, Cooperation And Mutual Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayes, P. T.; Bao, S.; Yan, T.; Pietrafesa, L. J.; Hallstrom, J.; Stirling, D.; Mullikin, T.; McClam, M.; Byrd, M.; Aucoin, K.; Marosites, B.

    2017-12-01

    HUGO: The HUrricane Genesis and Outlook program is a research initiative spanning new approaches to Atlantic tropical season outlooking to a storm event-related interactively coupled model system. In addition to supporting faculty and student academic research it has progressively been engaged by diverse regional interests in the public and private sector. The seasonal outlook incorporates 22 regional-to-global climate drivers developed from the historical storm database and has shown good skill related to historical storm seasons within the development of the model as well as the last several years in an outlook capacity. The event scale model is a based upon a fully interactively coupled model system incorporating ocean, atmosphere, wave and surge/flood models. The recent cluster of storms impacting the Southeast US provided an opportunity to test the model system and helped develop strong collaborative interests across diverse groups seeking to facilitate local capacity and access to additional storm-related information, observations and expertise. The SC State Guard has actively engaged the HUGO team in carrying out their charge in emergency responders planning and activities during several recent storms and flooding events. They were instrumental in developing support to expand observational systems aiding model validation and development as well as develop access pathways for deployment of new observational technology developed through NSF sponsored projects (Intelligent River and Hurricane-RAPID) with ISENSE at Florida Atlantic University to advance observational capability and density especially during or immediately following events. At the same time an increasing number of county-level emergency and environmental managers and private sector interests have similarly been working collaborately towards expanding observational systems contributing to the goals of the growing storm-oriented cooperative and as well as broader national MesoUS goals. Collectively

  3. Olfactory bulb short axon cell release of GABA and dopamine produces a temporally biphasic inhibition-excitation response in external tufted cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaolin; Plachez, Celine; Shao, Zuoyi; Puche, Adam; Shipley, Michael T

    2013-02-13

    Evidence for coexpression of two or more classic neurotransmitters in neurons has increased, but less is known about cotransmission. Ventral tegmental area (VTA) neurons corelease dopamine (DA), the excitatory transmitter glutamate, and the inhibitory transmitter GABA onto target cells in the striatum. Olfactory bulb (OB) short axon cells (SACs) form interglomerular connections and coexpress markers for DA and GABA. Using an optogenetic approach, we provide evidence that mouse OB SACs release both GABA and DA onto external tufted cells (ETCs) in other glomeruli. Optical activation of channelrhodopsin specifically expressed in DAergic SACs produced a GABA(A) receptor-mediated monosynaptic inhibitory response, followed by DA-D(1)-like receptor-mediated excitatory response in ETCs. The GABA(A) receptor-mediated hyperpolarization activates I(h) current in ETCs; synaptically released DA increases I(h), which enhances postinhibitory rebound spiking. Thus, the opposing actions of synaptically released GABA and DA are functionally integrated by I(h) to generate an inhibition-to-excitation "switch" in ETCs. Consistent with the established role of I(h) in ETC burst firing, we show that endogenous DA release increases ETC spontaneous bursting frequency. ETCs transmit sensory signals to mitral/tufted output neurons and drive intraglomerular inhibition to shape glomerulus output to downstream olfactory networks. GABA and DA cotransmission from SACs to ETCs may play a key role in regulating output coding across the glomerular array.

  4. Frequency of Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in tufted capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella nigritus from an ecological station in the State of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Costa da Silva

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis is a worldwide zoonosis caused by Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular parasite protozoan. A large percentage of animals presents specific antibodies caused by a previous exposition, resulting in a chronic infection. Felides are the definitive hosts and the other warm-blooded animals, including primates, are the intermediate hosts. This study was aimed to determine the prevalence of T. gondii infection in free-living tufted capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella nigritus from an ecological station located on Mata de Santa Teresa, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil. T. gondii antibodies were analyzed by modified agglutination test (MAT in serum samples of 36 tufted capuchin monkeys, considering eight as cut-off titer. From the studied animals, 3/36 (8.33%; CI95% 3.0-21.9% presented T. gondii antibodies, all with titer 32. No significative difference was observed relating to the sex (1/3 male and 2/3 female, and to the age (1/3 young and 2/3 adult (P>0.05. Thus, these results demonstrate the presence of T. gondii antibodies in primates from São Paulo state.

  5. A pitfall of glomerular sieving: profibrotic and matrix proteins derive from the Bowman's capsule and not the glomerular tuft in rats with renovascular hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, O M; Panzer, U; Fehr, S; Meyer-Schwesinger, C; Stahl, R A K; Wenzel, U O

    2007-10-01

    The glomeruli in the non-clipped kidney of rats with 2-kidney, 1-clip hypertension are a classical model for studying the mechanisms of glomerular injury. In the present study, we compared the glomerular expression of PAI-1 and collagen I alpha1 mRNA from glomeruli isolated by the classic technique of sieving with the recently developed technique of tissue laser microdissection. For quantification of mRNA from both methods, real-time PCR was used. Real-time PCR revealed a 9.0 +/- 1.3- and a 7.1 +/- 0.2-fold induction of PAI-1 and collagen I alpha 1, respectively, in the glomeruli from hypertensive rats isolated by sieving. However, in situ hybridization and microdissection revealed that expression of both mRNAs was mainly from the Bowman's capsule and not from the glomerular tuft (10.7 +/- 1.3- and 7.2 +/- 0.6-fold higher induction in whole glomeruli compared with tuft alone). This emphasizes that studies focusing on processes in the mesangium, endothelial cells or podocytes should not rely on glomeruli obtained by sieving. Rather, a technique like the laser microdissection or in situ hybridization should be applied which allows the clear separation of different glomerular and periglomerular compartments.

  6. Functional Reintegration of Sensory Neurons and Transitional Dendritic Reduction of Mitral/Tufted Cells during Injury-Induced Recovery of the Larval Xenopus Olfactory Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara J. Hawkins

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms involved in maintaining lifelong neurogenesis has a clear biological and clinical interest. In the present study, we performed olfactory nerve transection on larval Xenopus to induce severe damage to the olfactory circuitry. We surveyed the timing of the degeneration, subsequent rewiring and functional regeneration of the olfactory system following injury. A range of structural labeling techniques and functional calcium imaging were performed on both tissue slices and whole brain preparations. Cell death of olfactory receptor neurons and proliferation of stem cells in the olfactory epithelium were immediately increased following lesion. New olfactory receptor neurons repopulated the olfactory epithelium and once again showed functional responses to natural odorants within 1 week after transection. Reinnervation of the olfactory bulb (OB by newly formed olfactory receptor neuron axons also began at this time. Additionally, we observed a temporary increase in cell death in the OB and a subsequent loss in OB volume. Mitral/tufted cells, the second order neurons of the olfactory system, largely survived, but transiently lost dendritic tuft complexity. The first odorant-induced responses in the OB were observed 3 weeks after nerve transection and the olfactory network showed signs of major recovery, both structurally and functionally, after 7 weeks.

  7. Sex differences in study progress at Medical University of Vienna [Geschlechtsunterschiede im Studienfortgang an der Medizinischen Universität Wien

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitterauer, Lukas

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available [english] The analysis of two freshmen’s cohorts at the Medical University of Vienna consistently yielded four predictors for passing the first summative integrative exam (SIP1 at the end of the first study year: male sex, German mother tongue, good school performance, and high learning capacity. In particular the - against international trends - worse ratio of successful female students needs clarification.In this analysis of their further study progress we are able to show that a considerable number of those female students who did not succeed at first or second examination date and thus did not enter third semester immediately, show up in class schedules with at least one year’s delay. While the other three predictors stay effective the large quantity of this group annihilates the initial sex-effect. We conclude that the loss of time results not from a lack of cognitive abilities but from a combination of SIP-specific demands and sex-specific learning behaviour. From our view, the splitting of the SIP into several small chapters could eliminate the disadvantage of female students.[german] Die Untersuchung zweier Jahrgänge an StudienanfängerInnen der Medizinischen Universität Wien ergab übereinstimmend vier Prädiktoren für das Bestehen der ersten summativen integrativen Prüfung (SIP1 am Ende des ersten Studienjahres: männliches Geschlecht, deutsche Muttersprache, gute Schulleistungen, hohe Lernkapazität. Vor allem das schlechtere Abschneiden weiblicher Studierender bedarf angesichts der weltweit gegenläufigen Befunde einer Erklärung. Die vorliegende Untersuchung des weiteren Studienverlaufs zeigt nun, dass ein beträchtlicher Teil jener weiblichen Studierenden, die wegen Nichtbestehens der SIP1 nicht in das dritte Semester zugelassen wurden, mit einem Jahr Verlust wieder im Studium aufscheinen. Der Anteil dieser Gruppe ist so groß, dass der anfängliche Geschlechtseffekt egalisiert wird, während die anderen drei Pr

  8. Progress report from Duke University - Cooperative Research and Training Program in Biological Oceanography from 01 July 1965 to 30 June 1966 (NODC Accession 7200405)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The progress report covers the period from 01 July 1965 to 30 June 1966. The main purpose of the report is to provide cooperating investigators with field and cruise...

  9. Cardiothoracic ratio and vertebral heart size (VHS to standardize the heart size of the tufted capuchin (Cebus apella Linnaeus, 1758 in computerized radiographic images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermínio J. Rocha-Neto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The VHS and CTR were assessed using computerized thoracic radiographs of ten clinically healthy tufted capuchin monkeys (five males and five females from the Wild Animal Screening Center in São Luís (Centro de Triagem de Animais Silvestres de São Luís-MA-CETAS. Radiographs were taken in laterolateral and dorsoventral projections to calculate the cardiothoracic ratio (VHS and vertebral heart size (CTR. The VHS showed mean values of 9.34±0.32v (males and 9.16±0.34v (females and there was no statistical difference between males and females (p>0.05. The CTR showed mean values of 0.55±0.04 (males and 0.52±0.03 (females and there was no statistical difference between the sexes (p>0.05. There was positive correlation between VHS and CTR (r=0.78. The thoracic and heart diameters showed mean values of 5.70±0.48cm and 2.16±0.40cm in the males, respectively. In the females they measured 5.32±0.39cm and 2.94±0.32cm. There was no statistical difference between the sexes. Our results show that the high correlation found between VHS and CTR permitted the verification with similar clinical precision between the two methods to estimate alterations in the heart silhouette by radiographic examination of tufted capuchin, making it an easy technique to apply that can be considered in the investigation of heart problems for this wild species.

  10. Development of collision dynamics models to estimate the results of full-scale rail vehicle impact tests : Tufts University Master's Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-11-01

    In an effort to study occupant survivability in train collisions, analyses and tests were conducted to understand and improve the crashworthiness of rail vehicles. A collision dynamics model was developed in order to estimate the rigid body motion of...

  11. Annual progress report for the high-energy-physics program at Texas A and M University, December 1, 1981-December 1, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, P.M.; Webb, R.C.

    1982-01-01

    The High-Energy Group at Texas A and M has continued to strengthen and grow during this the first full year of funding from the Department of Energy. The past year was marked by several successes: (a) the funding of our group's GUT monopole search, (b) the construction and testing of a prototype hadron calorimeter for the Fermilab Collider Detector, (c) a preliminary agreement on our group's responsibilities for the Fermilab Collider Detector, and (d) the beginning of the assembly of the monopole detector at Avery Island, Louisiana. The accompanying progress report will detail the progress being made by our group in these areas over the past year. In addition, future plans and funding requests for continued DOE support for the period April 1, 1983 to March 31, 1984, are presented

  12. Microorganisms are making large progress. DaimlerChrysler supports biotechnology research at universities; Mikroorganismen geben Gas. DaimlerChrysler unterstuetzt Biotechnologieforschung an Hochschulen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2003-07-01

    In order to improve the cooperation between economy and science the DaimlerChrysler Challenge Fund sponsors research at American universities. Some projects deal with hydrogen that is generated biologically and supposed to be stored in new tanks. (orig.) [German] Um die Kooperation zwischen Wirtschaft und Wissenschaft zu verbessern, sponsert der DaimlerChrysler Challenge Fund die Forschung an nordamerikanischen Hochschulen. Einige Projekte befassen sich mit Wasserstoff, der biologisch erzeugt und in neuartigen Tanks gespeichert werden soll. (orig.)

  13. Sniff-Like Patterned Input Results in Long-Term Plasticity at the Rat Olfactory Bulb Mitral and Tufted Cell to Granule Cell Synapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahua Chatterjee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During odor sensing the activity of principal neurons of the mammalian olfactory bulb, the mitral and tufted cells (MTCs, occurs in repetitive bursts that are synchronized to respiration, reminiscent of hippocampal theta-gamma coupling. Axonless granule cells (GCs mediate self- and lateral inhibitory interactions between the excitatory MTCs via reciprocal dendrodendritic synapses. We have explored long-term plasticity at this synapse by using a theta burst stimulation (TBS protocol and variations thereof. GCs were excited via glomerular stimulation in acute brain slices. We find that TBS induces exclusively long-term depression in the majority of experiments, whereas single bursts (“single-sniff paradigm” can elicit both long-term potentiation and depression. Statistical analysis predicts that the mechanism underlying this bidirectional plasticity involves the proportional addition or removal of presynaptic release sites. Gamma stimulation with the same number of APs as in TBS was less efficient in inducing plasticity. Both TBS- and “single-sniff paradigm”-induced plasticity depend on NMDA receptor activation. Since the onset of plasticity is very rapid and requires little extra activity, we propose that these forms of plasticity might play a role already during an ongoing search for odor sources. Our results imply that components of both short-term and long-term olfactory memory may be encoded at this synapse.

  14. Fatal attack on black-tufted-ear marmosets (Callithrix penicillata) by a Boa constrictor: a simultaneous assault on two juvenile monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Danilo Simonini; dos Santos, Edmilson; Leal, Silvana Gomes; de Jesus, Andrea Karla; Vargas, Waldemir Paixão; Dutra, Irapuan; Barros, Marilia

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the first witnessed attack on a marmoset by a constrictor snake. The incident occurred mid-morning in a gallery forest within an altered landscape of the Cerrado region of central Brazil and refers to a fatal attack by a Boa constrictor on two juvenile black-tufted-ear marmosets (Callithrix penicillata) simultaneously. The snake captured both individuals at a height of ~ 4 m while a group of eight marmosets traveled through the subcanopy. The actual strike was not seen. After 2 min, the boa fell to the ground with both marmosets in its coils and proceeded to kill one animal at a time through constriction. Two adult marmosets immediately descended to where the snake held its victims on the ground and attacked it. The snake showed no apparent reaction, and after ~ 1-2 min, the adults rejoined the remaining group members that were mobbing and vocalizing from 5 to 6 m above. The group left the scene ~ 7 min after the onset of the attack and was not seen again. The snake loosened its coils 10 min after its initial strike, left the two carcasses on the ground and stayed behind a nearby tree. Thus, we are not sure if the victims were in fact ingested. This report confirms that marmosets are vulnerable to boid snakes and capable of highly organized and cooperative antipredation behavior. It also suggests that snakes pose a greater threat to callitrichids than previously thought.

  15. Competition between a Lawn-Forming Cynodon dactylon and a Tufted Grass Species Hyparrhenia hirta on a South-African Dystrophic Savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwerts, J A; Prins, H H T; Bomhoff, D; Verhagen, I; Swart, J M; de Boer, W F

    2015-01-01

    South African savanna grasslands are often characterised by indigestible tufted grass species whereas lawn grasses are far more desirable in terms of herbivore sustenance. We aimed to investigate the role of nutrients and/or the disturbance (grazing, trampling) by herbivores on the formation of grazing lawns. We conducted a series of common garden experiments to test the effect of nutrients on interspecific competition between a typical lawn-forming grass species (Cynodon dactylon) and a species that is frequently found outside grazing lawns (Hyparrhenia hirta), and tested for the effect of herbivore disturbance in the form of trampling and clipping. We also performed a vegetation and herbivore survey to apply experimentally derived insights to field observations. Our results showed that interspecific competition was not affected by soil nutrient concentrations. C. dactylon did show much more resilience to disturbance than H. hirta, presumably due to the regenerative capacity of its rhizomes. Results from the field survey were in line with these findings, describing a correlation between herbivore pressure and C. dactylon abundance. We conclude that herbivore disturbance, and not soil nutrients, provide C. dactylon with a competitive advantage over H. hirta, due to vegetative regeneration from its rhizomes. This provides evidence for the importance of concentrated, high herbivore densities for the creation and maintenance of grazing lawns.

  16. Classificação morfofuncional dos dentes de saguis-de-tufo-branco (Callithrix jacchus, Callitrichidae, saguis-de-tufo-preto (C. penicillata e saguis-de-cara-branca (C. geoffroyi Morphofunctional classification of teeth of marmosets-tufted white (Callithrix jacchus, Callitrichidae, marmosets-tufted black (C. penicillata, and marmosets white-face (C. geoffroyi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Machado Bertassoli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se um estudo para analisar morfologicamente os dentes do saguis-de-tufo-branco (C. jacchus, saguis-de-tufo-preto (C. penicillata e saguis-de-cara-branca (C. geoffroyi, para compara-los entre si e com outras espécies já descritas na literatura. Utilizou-se dentes das três espécies para analises macroscópicas, microscópicas e ultraestrutural e os resultados correlacionados com os obtidos com outras espécies citadas na literatura. Chegou-se a conclusão de que: as três espécies apresentaram uma fórmula dentária idêntica, chegando a um total de 32 dentes, expressa na fórmula 2x: incisivos 2/2; caninos 1/1; pré-molares 3/3 e molares 2/2, estes são classificados como diplodontes, anelodontes, bunodontes, e braquiodontes.A study was conducted to analyze the morphology of the teeth of white-tufted-ear-marmoset (C. jacchus black-tufted-ear-marmoset (C. penicillata and marmosets-white-faced (C. geoffroyi, to compare them among themselves and with other species described in the literature. Teeth of the three species were submitted to macroscopic, microscopic and ultrastructural analyzes. The results were correlated with those of other species. We concluded that: the three species have a similar dental formula, reaching a total of 32 teeth, expressed in the formula 2x: incisors 2/2; canines 1/1, pre-molars 3/3 and molars 2/2, ich are classified as diplodont, anelodont, bunodont and brachyodont.

  17. Fiscal 1982 progress report of 'comprehensive research on the management of long-lived radioactive wastes' in the Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, Akira; Kosako, Toshiso

    1983-01-01

    In the Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, the special research project ''Comprehensive Research on the Management of Long-lived Radioactive Wastes'' is carried out in the three-year period from fiscal 1982 to 1984. The works performed in the fiscal year 1982 are described individually, each short description on research purposes and contents, results, future plans, etc. the research works in the three fields of material science, biology and process technology are buffer materials in land disposal, canisters, corrosion of waste-container materials, thermal analysis of high-level wastes, effects of tritium on cells and marine life, biological effect of long-lived nuclides, separation of tritium wastes, actinoids and krypton-iodine, environmental migration of radionuclides, and accident analysis. (Mori, K.)

  18. AAA - University Fellowship Program for 2001: Process, Progress and Prospects (Report on the Solicitation and Award of AAA-UFP Fellowships)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Freddie; Dixon, Cathy

    2002-01-01

    The AAA University Fellowship Program (AAA-UFP) was developed by the Amarillo National Research Center (ANRC) in fiscal year 2001 for The Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology (NE), Office of Advanced Accelerator Applications (AAA). The AAA-UFP provides financial support for science and engineering students to pursue master's degrees in areas that support the AAA Program. Each fellow's thesis research must relate to the AAA program and must be approved by the Department of Energy. ANRC manages the AAA-UFP program and managed the solicitation in an open and competitive process, resulting in the award of 10 fellowships. This paper discusses the process, the response, results and recommendations for subsequent program years. (authors)

  19. A novel no-insulation winding technique of high temperature-superconducting racetrack coil for rotating applications: A progress report in Korea university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y H; Song, J B; Yang, D G; Kim, Y G; Hahn, S; Lee, H G

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents our recent progress on core technology development for a megawatt-class superconducting wind turbine generator supported by the international collaborative R&D program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning. To outperform the current high-temperature-superconducting (HTS) magnet technology in the wind turbine industry, a novel no-insulation winding technique was first proposed to develop the second-generation HTS racetrack coil for rotating applications. Here, we briefly report our recent studies on no-insulation (NI) winding technique for GdBCO coated conductor racetrack coils in the following areas: (1) Charging-discharging characteristics of no-insulation GdBCO racetrack coils with respect to external pressures applied to straight sections; (2) thermal and electrical stabilities of no-insulation GdBCO racetrack coils encapsulated with various impregnating materials; (3) quench behaviors of no-insulation racetrack coils wound with GdBCO conductor possessing various lamination layers; (4) electromagnetic characteristics of no-insulation GdBCO racetrack coils under time-varying field conditions. Test results confirmed that this novel NI winding technique was highly promising. It could provide development of a compact, mechanically dense, and self-protecting GdBCO magnet for use in real-world superconducting wind turbine generators.

  20. Center for Plant and Microbial Complex Carbohydrates at the University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Center: Progress Report for the Funding Period November 1, 2002 - October 31, 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albersheim, Peter [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Darvill, Alan [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2003-10-31

    This progress report describes the research, service, and training activities conducted with the support of the DOE center grant. The research activities are summarized in the form of reprints or abstracts of 46 papers citing support from the DOE center grant that were produced during the reporting period. These papers include those that are published, in press, submitted, or in preparation. The papers include those produced entirely by CCRC personnel and those papers representing research work conducted in collaboration with scientists at other institutions. (See Appendix I.) A major component of this grant is to provide service to researchers at other academic institutions and industries located throughout the US and other parts of the world. A summary of all our service activities during the reporting period is also included with this report, including samples of poly/oligosaccharides and antibodies distributed to scientists (see Appendix II). A description of the three training courses held at the CCRC during 2003 is also provided, together with the names and affiliations of participants who attended the courses (see Appendix III).

  1. Tulane/Xavier University Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This progress report covers activities for the period January 1 - March 31, 1995 on project concerning 'Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin.' The following activities are each summarized by bullets denoting significant experiments/findings: biotic and abiotic studies on the biological fate, transport and ecotoxicity of toxic and hazardous waste in the Mississippi River Basin; assessment of mechanisms of metal-induced reproductive toxicity in quatic species as a biomarker of exposure; hazardous wastes in aquatic environments: biological uptake and metabolism studies; ecological sentinels of aquatic contamination in the lower Mississippi River system; bioremediation of selected contaminants in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin; a sensitive rapid on-sit immunoassay for heavy metal contamination; pore-level flow, transport, agglomeration and reaction kinetics of microorganism; biomarkers of exposure and ecotoxicity in the Mississippi River Basin; natural and active chemical remediation of toxic metals, organics and radionuclides in the aquatic environment; expert geographical information systems for assessing hazardous wastes in aquatic environments; enhancement of environmental education; and a number of just initiated projects including fate and transport of contaminants in aquatic environments; photocatalytic remediation; radionuclide fate and modeling from Chernobyl

  2. A novel no-insulation winding technique of high temperature-superconducting racetrack coil for rotating applications: A progress report in Korea university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y. H.; Song, J. B.; Yang, D. G.; Kim, Y. G.; Hahn, S.; Lee, H. G.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents our recent progress on core technology development for a megawatt-class superconducting wind turbine generator supported by the international collaborative R&D program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning. To outperform the current high-temperature-superconducting (HTS) magnet technology in the wind turbine industry, a novel no-insulation winding technique was first proposed to develop the second-generation HTS racetrack coil for rotating applications. Here, we briefly report our recent studies on no-insulation (NI) winding technique for GdBCO coated conductor racetrack coils in the following areas: (1) Charging-discharging characteristics of no-insulation GdBCO racetrack coils with respect to external pressures applied to straight sections; (2) thermal and electrical stabilities of no-insulation GdBCO racetrack coils encapsulated with various impregnating materials; (3) quench behaviors of no-insulation racetrack coils wound with GdBCO conductor possessing various lamination layers; (4) electromagnetic characteristics of no-insulation GdBCO racetrack coils under time-varying field conditions. Test results confirmed that this novel NI winding technique was highly promising. It could provide development of a compact, mechanically dense, and self-protecting GdBCO magnet for use in real-world superconducting wind turbine generators.

  3. Evidências de validade das Matrizes Progressivas Avançadas de Raven em universitários Validity Evidence of Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices in university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Oliveira Rosseti

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do estudo foi encontrar evidências de validade das Matrizes Progressivas Avançadas de Raven em universitários. Participaram 369 universitários de duas universidades privadas do estado de São Paulo, sendo 104 (28,2% do sexo masculino e 265 (71,8% do feminino. Em relação aos cursos, 167 (45,3% são de Psicologia, 111 (30,1% de Administração de Empresas, 54 (14,6% de Gestão de Recursos Humanos e 37 (10% de Pedagogia. Os resultados demonstraram que houve diferença significativa com relação ao gênero, com um melhor desempenho do sexo masculino (t=4,21 e pThe aim of the study was to find validity evidence of Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices in university students. The sample consisted of 369 university students from two private universities in the state of Sao Paulo, being a 104 (28,2% of the masculine and 265 (71,8% of the feminine. Regarding the courses, 167 (45,3% is of Psychology, 111 (30,1% is of Business Administration, 54 (14,6 % is of Management of Human Resources and 37 (10% is of Pedagogy. The results showed statistically significant difference of sex, with males having better performance in the instrument (t=4.21; p<0.01. The analysis of variance (ANOVA showed significant difference between averages of the courses (F=13,8; p<0,00, and the courses that are differentiated in accordance with the test ad-hoc of Tukey were Administration and Psychology that obtained scores bigger than the others courses. The results demonstrated what the used instrument showed precisely to value aspects of the general intelligence at university students.

  4. Progress report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After giving a brief description of operations of an improvements to the University of Alberta nuclear physics facilities, this report summarizes the principal research programs. These include work on neutron scattering, thorium 232 fission, iodine 123 production. Progress towards the construction of MARIA, the Medical Accelerator Research Institute in Alberta, is described, and research on relativistic heavy ions is summarized

  5. Assessment of progress towards universal health coverage for people with disabilities in Afghanistan: a multilevel analysis of repeated cross-sectional surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trani, Jean-Francois; Kumar, Praveen; Ballard, Ellis; Chandola, Tarani

    2017-08-01

    Since 2002, Afghanistan has made much effort to achieve universal health coverage. According to the UN Sustainable Development Goal 3, target eight, the provision of quality care to all must include usually underserved groups, including people with disabilities. We investigated whether a decade of international investment in the Afghan health system has brought quality health care to this group. We used data from two representative household surveys, one done in 2005 and one in 2013, in 13 provinces of Afghanistan, that included questions about activity limitations and functioning difficulties, socioeconomic factors, perceived availability of health care, and experience with coverage of health-care needs. We used multilevel modelling and tests for interaction to investigate factors associated with differences in perception between timepoints and whether village remoteness affected changes in perception. The 2005 survey included 334 people, and the 2013 survey included 961 people. Mean age, employment, and asset levels of participants with disabilities increased slightly between 2005 and 2013, but the level of education decreased. Formal education and higher asset level were associated with improved availability of health care and positive experience with coverage of health-care needs, whereas being employed was only associated with the latter. Perceived availability of health care and positive experience with coverage of health-care needs significantly worsened in 2013 compared with in 2005 (227 [69%] perceived that services were available in 2005 vs 405 [44%] in 2013, pAfghanistan, particularly in remote areas. Health policy in Afghanistan will need to address attitudinal, social, and accessibility barriers to health care. Swedish International Development Agency. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Learning-dependent and -independent enhancement of mitral/tufted cell glomerular odor responses following olfactory fear conditioning in awake mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jordan M; Fletcher, Max L

    2018-04-18

    Associative fear learning produces fear toward the conditioned stimulus (CS) and often generalization, the expansion of fear from the CS to similar, unlearned stimuli. However, how fear learning affects early sensory processing of learned and unlearned stimuli in relation to behavioral fear responses to these stimuli remains unclear. We subjected male and female mice expressing the fluorescent calcium indicator GCaMP3 in olfactory bulb mitral and tufted cells to a classical olfactory fear conditioning paradigm. We then used awake, in vivo calcium imaging to quantify learning-induced changes in glomerular odor responses, which constitute the first site of olfactory processing in the brain. The results demonstrate that odor-shock pairing non-specifically enhances glomerular odor representations in a learning-dependent manner and increases representational similarity between the CS and non-conditioned odors, potentially priming the system towards generalization of learned fear. Additionally, CS-specific glomerular enhancements remain even when associative learning is blocked, suggesting two separate mechanisms lead to enhanced glomerular responses following odor-shock pairings. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In the olfactory bulb (OB), odors are uniquely coded in a spatial map that represents odor identity, making the OB a unique model system for investigating how learned fear alters sensory processing. Classical fear conditioning causes fear of the conditioned stimulus (CS) and of neutral stimuli, known as generalization. Combining fear conditioning with fluorescent calcium imaging of OB glomeruli, we found enhanced glomerular responses of the CS as well as neutral stimuli in awake mice, which mirrors fear generalization. We report that CS and neutral stimuli enhancements are, respectively, learning- independent and learning-dependent. Together, these results reveal distinct mechanisms leading to enhanced OB processing of fear-inducing stimuli and provide important

  7. Progress Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer, Karsten

    1999-01-01

    Progress report describing the work carried out by the Danish participant in the ALTSET project in the period January 1999 to July 1999.......Progress report describing the work carried out by the Danish participant in the ALTSET project in the period January 1999 to July 1999....

  8. Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-16

    This report summarizes the annual progress of EPA’s Clean Air Markets Programs such as the Acid Rain Program (ARP) and the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR). EPA systematically collects data on emissions, compliance, and environmental effects, these data are highlighted in our Progress Reports.

  9. Progressive Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christian O.

    2016-01-01

    Guest Post to the Society for U.S. Intellectual History Blog. Brief introduction to the book Progressive Business: An Intellectual History of the Role of Business in American Society, Oxford U.P., 2015.......Guest Post to the Society for U.S. Intellectual History Blog. Brief introduction to the book Progressive Business: An Intellectual History of the Role of Business in American Society, Oxford U.P., 2015....

  10. Harvard University High Energy Physics progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The principal goals of this work are to carry out forefront programs in high energy physics research and to provide first rate educational opportunities for students. The experimental program supported through HEPL is carried out at the major accelerator centers in the world and addresses some of the most important questions in high energy physics. The program is based at Harvard's High Energy Physics Laboratory, which has offices, computing facilities, and engineering support, and both electronics and machine shops

  11. University of Maryland annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1995-02-01

    The two main areas of research of intermediate energy heavy-ion reactions and ultrarelativistic heavy-ion reactions are presented in this report. Among the intermediate energy research topics were {sup 129}Xe reactions, calibration of the plastic elements in the Maryland Forward Array, and a cluster recognition model for treating BUU-generated distributions. The ultrarelativistic energy research program included the LED system for the NMA (New Multiplicity Array) in E866 at BNL AGS, the E866 collaboration (antiprotons and NMA), and PHOBOS magnet work. {sup 139}La reactions were also studied.

  12. University of Maryland annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1995-02-01

    The two main areas of research of intermediate energy heavy-ion reactions and ultrarelativistic heavy-ion reactions are presented in this report. Among the intermediate energy research topics were 129 Xe reactions, calibration of the plastic elements in the Maryland Forward Array, and a cluster recognition model for treating BUU-generated distributions. The ultrarelativistic energy research program included the LED system for the NMA (New Multiplicity Array) in E866 at BNL AGS, the E866 collaboration (antiprotons and NMA), and PHOBOS magnet work. 139 La reactions were also studied

  13. Chronic progressive multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buffoli, A.; Micheletti, E.; Capra, R.; Mattioli, F.; Marciano', N.

    1991-01-01

    A long-lasting immunological suppression action seems to be produced by total lymphoid irradiation; some authors emphasize the favorable effect of this treatment on chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. In order to evaluate the actual role of TLI, 6 patients affected with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis were submitted to TLI with shaped and personalized fields at the Istituto del Radio, University of Brescia, Italy. The total dose delivered was 19.8 Gy in 4 weeks, 1.8 Gy/day, 5d/w; a week elapsed between the first and the second irradiation course. Disability according to Kurtzke scale was evaluated, together with blood lymphocyte count and irradiation side-effects, over a mean follow-up period of 20.8 months (range: 13-24). Our findings indicate that: a) disease progression was not markedly reduced by TLI; b) steroid hormones responsivity was restored after irradiation, and c) side-effects were mild and tolerable

  14. Progression og underviserkompetencer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lene Tortzen Bager

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available På baggrund af en kvalitativ interviewundersøgelse af undervisere ved Aarhus Universitet lavet i 2012, tematiserer artiklen, hvordan undervisere udvikler deres faglige og pædagogiske kompetencer i forhold til at kunne skabe progression inden for innovation og entreprenørskab forstået enten som didaktik, arbejdsformer i faglige forløb eller som fag på universitetet. I arbejdet med progression er det en udfordring at integrere de nye faglige dimensioner i det kernefaglige felt. Den seneste model for progression inden for innovation og entreprenør-skab siger, at det er den lærendes generelle erfaringsniveau, der er den afgørende progressionsskabende faktor (Progressionsmodellen, Fonden for Entreprenørskab, 2013b. Samtidig skelner international forskning inden for studiekompetenceområdet mellem niveauer, hvor indlejret viden er det mest avancerede kompetenceniveau (Barrie, 2002.Ifølge progressionsmodellen og den nævnte kompetenceforskning er erfaring og dybt integreret læring altså centrale dimensioner i progression. Men hvad er underviserens rolle heri? Underviserens professionelle udviklingsarbejde forekommer at være underbelyst i forhold til, at underviseren er den legitime garant for integrationen af nye faglige dimensioner og for den studerendes kompetenceniveau. Interviewundersøgelsen forholder sig til spørgsmålet om progression gennem de deltagende underviseres beskrivelse af betydningslag i entreprenørskabsbegrebet koblet til de praksisformer i undervisningen, der knytter sig hertil samt et indblik i undervisernes refleksioner over deres kompetenceudviklingsprocesser. Artiklens bidrag til progression er at se underviserens motivation og kompetenceudvikling som forudsætninger herfor.     Based on a qualitative study of five teachers in the Faculty of Arts at Aarhus University that took place during 2012, the article thematizes how teachers develop their professional and educational qualifications in innovation and

  15. 北京大学综合自然地理学研究的发展与贡献%Recent research progress at Peking University and contributions to integrated physical geography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李双成; 蒙吉军; 彭建

    2017-01-01

    北京大学的综合自然地理学缘起于1952年全国院系调整时在本校设置的自然地理学学科,在半个多世纪的发展历程中,经历了学科初创和完善等阶段,逐渐形成了面向学科前沿和国家需求的综合自然地理学学科体系.针对日趋严峻的气候变化、资源环境和社会经济发展问题,北京大学综合自然地理学在陆地表层过程及机理、土地利用/覆被变化及其生态环境效应、生态系统服务与人类福祉、生态风险评价与安全格局构建、自然地域系统划分等方面进行了开拓创新,取得了丰硕成果,引领了中国综合自然地理学的发展.展望未来,北京大学综合自然地理学将持续进行水、土、气、生等自然地理要素与过程的综合研究,认识人类活动与全球环境变化对主要自然地理过程和格局的影响机理,通过构建观测数据与地表系统模型融合系统,定量评估要素与过程耦合的区域资源环境效应及其对社会经济的影响,在生态文明建设、主体功能区划、国土开发整治和流域综合管理等国家战略服务方面做出更大贡献.%The development of integrated physical geography at Peking University can be traced back to 1952,when the national department adjustment was taken and the Department of Physical Geography was set up at Peking University.Over the course of more than half a century,a discipline system of integrated physical geography has been gradually formed facing the disciplinary frontier and national needs.In view of the increasingly severe problems related with climate change,natural resources,eco-environment and socio-economic development,integrated physical geography of Peking University has made great progress in land surface process and mechanism,land use/cover change and its eco-environmental effects,ecosystem services and human well-beings,ecological risk assessment and security pattern construction,and physical geographical

  16. Progressive technologies in furniture design

    OpenAIRE

    Šebková, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Šebková, M. Progressive technologies in furniture design. Diploma thesis, Brno, Mendel University in Brno, 2014 Diploma thesis 'Progressive technologies in furniture design' is focused on the use of modern technologies in furniture production. The theoretical part explains the basic terms, technology and material options. It focuses mainly on the production of 3D printed furniture and possibilities of virtual testing, measurements, scanning and rapid prototyping. Practical part of diploma the...

  17. Measuring progress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Ayo

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, sociological examinations of genetics, therapeutic cloning, neuroscience and tissue engineering have suggested that 'life itself' is currently being transformed through technique with profound implications for the ways in which we understand and govern ourselves and others...... in much the same way that mortality rates, life expectancy or morbidity rates can. By analysing the concrete ways in which human progress has been globally measured and taxonomised in the past two centuries or so, I will show how global stratifications of countries according to their states...

  18. Progressivity Enhanced

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Hren

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Rather than a scientific text, the author contributes a concise memorandum from the originator of the idea who has managed the campaign for the conversion of the military barracks into a creative cluster between 1988 and 2002, when he parted ways with Metelkova due to conflicting views on the center’s future. His views shed light on a distant period of time from a perspective of a participant–observer. The information is abundantly supported by primary sources, also available online. However, some of the presented hypotheses are heavily influenced by his personal experiences of xenophobia, elitism, and predatorial behavior, which were already then discernible on the so-called alternative scene as well – so much so that they obstructed the implementation of progressive programs. The author claims that, in spite of the substantially different reality today, the myths and prejudices concerning Metelkova must be done away with in order to enhance its progressive nature. Above all, the paper calls for an objective view on internal antagonisms, mainly originating in deep class divisions between the users. These make a clear distinction between truly marginal ndividuals and the overambitious beau-bourgeois, as the author labels the large part of users of Metelkova of »his« time. On these grounds, he argues for a robust approach to ban all forms of xenophobia and self-ghettoization.

  19. Collaborative Approaches and Policy Opportunities for Accelerated Progress toward Effective Disease Prevention, Care, and Control: Using the Case of Poverty Diseases to Explore Universal Access to Affordable Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Laokri

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThere is a massive global momentum to progress toward the sustainable development and universal health coverage goals. However, effective policies to health-care coverage can only emerge through high-quality services delivered to empowered care users by means of strong local health systems and a translational standpoint. Health policies aimed at removing user fees for a defined health-care package may fail at reaching desired results if not applied with system thinking.MethodSecondary data analysis of two country-based cost-of-illness studies was performed to gain knowledge in informed decision-making toward enhanced access to care in the context of resource-constraint settings. A scoping review was performed to map relevant experiences and evidence underpinning the defined research area, the economic burden of illness.FindingsOriginal studies reflected on catastrophic costs to patients because of care services use and related policy gaps. Poverty diseases such as tuberculosis (TB may constitute prime examples to assess the extent of effective high-priority health-care coverage. Our findings suggest that a share of the economic burden of illness can be attributed to implementation failures of health programs and supply-side features, which may highly impair attainment of the global stated goals. We attempted to define and discuss a knowledge development framework for effective policy-making and foster system levers for integrated care.DiscussionBottlenecks to effective policy persist and rely on interrelated patterns of health-care coverage. Health system performance and policy responsiveness have to do with collaborative work among all health stakeholders. Public–private mix strategies may play a role in lowering the economic burden of disease and solving some policy gaps. We reviewed possible added value and pitfalls of collaborative approaches to enhance dynamic local knowledge development and realize integration with the various

  20. Collaborative Approaches and Policy Opportunities for Accelerated Progress toward Effective Disease Prevention, Care, and Control: Using the Case of Poverty Diseases to Explore Universal Access to Affordable Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laokri, Samia

    2017-01-01

    There is a massive global momentum to progress toward the sustainable development and universal health coverage goals. However, effective policies to health-care coverage can only emerge through high-quality services delivered to empowered care users by means of strong local health systems and a translational standpoint. Health policies aimed at removing user fees for a defined health-care package may fail at reaching desired results if not applied with system thinking. Secondary data analysis of two country-based cost-of-illness studies was performed to gain knowledge in informed decision-making toward enhanced access to care in the context of resource-constraint settings. A scoping review was performed to map relevant experiences and evidence underpinning the defined research area, the economic burden of illness. Original studies reflected on catastrophic costs to patients because of care services use and related policy gaps. Poverty diseases such as tuberculosis (TB) may constitute prime examples to assess the extent of effective high-priority health-care coverage. Our findings suggest that a share of the economic burden of illness can be attributed to implementation failures of health programs and supply-side features, which may highly impair attainment of the global stated goals. We attempted to define and discuss a knowledge development framework for effective policy-making and foster system levers for integrated care. Bottlenecks to effective policy persist and rely on interrelated patterns of health-care coverage. Health system performance and policy responsiveness have to do with collaborative work among all health stakeholders. Public-private mix strategies may play a role in lowering the economic burden of disease and solving some policy gaps. We reviewed possible added value and pitfalls of collaborative approaches to enhance dynamic local knowledge development and realize integration with the various health-care silos. Despite a large political

  1. The universal access handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Stephanidis, Constantine

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the field of Universal Access has made significant progress in consolidating theoretical approaches, scientific methods and technologies, as well as in exploring new application domains. Increasingly, professionals in this rapidly maturing area require a comprehensive and multidisciplinary resource that addresses current principles, methods, and tools. Written by leading international authorities from academic, research, and industrial organizations and nonmarket institutions, The Universal Access Handbook covers the unfolding scientific, methodological, technological, and pol

  2. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.

    1979-01-01

    Progress Report, covering the period up to the end of 1979 year, was sent to the IAEA according to the research agreement No. 1971 /CF. This work covered the following fields: preparation and dummy irradiation experiments with a new experimental capsule of ''CHOUCA-M'' type; measurement of temperature fields and design of specimen holders; measurement of neutron energy spectrum in the irradiation place in our experimental reactor of VVR-S type (Nuclear Research Institute) using a set of activation detectors; unification and calibration of the measurement of neutron fluence with the use of Fe, Cu, Mn-Mg and Co-Al monitors; development and improvement of the measuring apparatus and technique for the dynamic testing of pre-cracked specimens with determination of dynamic parameters of fracture mechanics; preparation and manufacture of testing specimens from the Japanese steels - forging, plate and weld metal; preparation of the irradiation capsule for assembling

  3. Nuclear spectroscopic studies. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, C.R.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes progress in the experimental nuclear physics program of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. It presents findings related to properties of high-spin states, low-energy levels of nuclei far from stability, and high-energy heavy-ion physics, as well as a brief description of the Joint Institute of Heavy Ion Research (a collaboration between the University of Tennessee, Vanderbilt University, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory) and its activities (particularly those of the last few years), and a list of publications. 89 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs

  4. Minority Student Progress Report, 1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Porfirio R.; Luan, Jing

    This report offers a consolidated systemwide analysis of key issues and recommendations for improvement of minority recruitment and retention at Arizona State Universities and an evaluation of progress toward achieving Arizona Board of Regents (ABOR) approved recruitment and graduation goals. A description of ABOR system goals notes three goals:…

  5. Progress report to United States Energy Research and Development Administration, November 1, 1976--October 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported for research completed and in progress at Vanderbilt University in the following areas: in beam spectroscopy, coulomb excitation, nucleon transfer reactions, nuclear theory, radioactivity studies

  6. Universal Alienation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Harvey

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This article is part of a debate between David Harvey, Michael Hardt and Toni Negri. It takes Marx’s bicentenary as occasion for an update of his concept of alienation. The paper asks: how are we to interpret universal alienation and from whence does it come? Marx radically reformulated the concept of alienation in the Grundrisse. The humanism of the early Marx can be re-rooted and reconceptualised in the scientific mode proposed in the Grundrisse. In the Grundrisse, the universality of alienation is specific to capitalism’s historical evolution. Today, alienation exists almost everywhere. It exists at work in production, at home in consumption, and it dominates much of politics and daily life. Such trends intensify through the application of information technologies and artificial intelligence. Widespread alienation has resulted in Occupy movements as well as right-wing populism and bigoted nationalist and racist movements. Donald Trump is the President of alienation. The circulation of capital as totality consists of the three key moments of production, circulation and distribution. A lot of contemporary economic struggles are now occurring at the point of realisation rather than at the point of production. Protests are therefore today often expressions of broad-based discontent. Our future is dictated by the need to redeem our debts. Under such conditions democracy becomes a sham. The big question is what forms of social movement can help us get out of the state-finance nexus. The theory of objective alienation along with an understanding of its subjective consequences is one vital key to unlock the door of a progressive politics for the future.

  7. Universal (Global Evolutionism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkady Ursul

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article investigate a general scientific concept of a global (universal evolution, in which selforganization of the material systems acts as a common ground and a permanent process of progressive development in the visible Universe. The main problem of research of this type of evolution is seen as a superhighway trajectory of evolutionary processes in the Universe, in which there is a continuous selforganization of the material systems, ranging from the Big Bang and to the social level of evolution, which may have an indefinite continuation of society and nature

  8. Suppression of Rapidly Progressive Mouse Glomerulonephritis with the Non-Steroidal Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonist BR-4628.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Frank Y; Han, Yingjie; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Kolkhof, Peter; Tesch, Greg H

    2015-01-01

    Steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) are effective in the treatment of kidney disease; however, the side effect of hyperkalaemia, particularly in the context of renal impairment, is a major limitation to their clinical use. Recently developed non-steroidal MRAs have distinct characteristics suggesting that they may be superior to steroidal MRAs. Therefore, we explored the benefits of a non-steroidal MRA in a model of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Accelerated anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) glomerulonephritis was induced in groups of C57BL/6J mice which received no treatment, vehicle or a non-steroidal MRA (BR-4628, 5mg/kg/bid) from day 0 until being killed on day 15 of disease. Mice were examined for renal injury. Mice with anti-GBM glomerulonephritis which received no treatment or vehicle developed similar disease with severe albuminuria, impaired renal function, glomerular tuft damage and crescents in 40% of glomeruli. In comparison, mice which received BR-4628 displayed similar albuminuria, but had improved renal function, reduced severity of glomerular tuft lesions and a 50% reduction in crescents. The protection seen in BR-4628 treated mice was associated with a marked reduction in glomerular macrophages and T-cells and reduced kidney gene expression of proinflammatory (CCL2, TNF-α, IFN-γ) and profibrotic molecules (collagen I, fibronectin). In addition, treatment with BR-4626 did not cause hyperkalaemia or increase urine Na+/K+ excretion (a marker of tubular dysfunction). The non-steroidal MRA (BR-4628) provided substantial suppression of mouse crescentic glomerulonephritis without causing tubular dysfunction. This finding warrants further investigation of non-steroidal MRAs as a therapy for inflammatory kidney diseases.

  9. Suppression of Rapidly Progressive Mouse Glomerulonephritis with the Non-Steroidal Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonist BR-4628.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Y Ma

    Full Text Available Steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs are effective in the treatment of kidney disease; however, the side effect of hyperkalaemia, particularly in the context of renal impairment, is a major limitation to their clinical use. Recently developed non-steroidal MRAs have distinct characteristics suggesting that they may be superior to steroidal MRAs. Therefore, we explored the benefits of a non-steroidal MRA in a model of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis.Accelerated anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM glomerulonephritis was induced in groups of C57BL/6J mice which received no treatment, vehicle or a non-steroidal MRA (BR-4628, 5mg/kg/bid from day 0 until being killed on day 15 of disease. Mice were examined for renal injury.Mice with anti-GBM glomerulonephritis which received no treatment or vehicle developed similar disease with severe albuminuria, impaired renal function, glomerular tuft damage and crescents in 40% of glomeruli. In comparison, mice which received BR-4628 displayed similar albuminuria, but had improved renal function, reduced severity of glomerular tuft lesions and a 50% reduction in crescents. The protection seen in BR-4628 treated mice was associated with a marked reduction in glomerular macrophages and T-cells and reduced kidney gene expression of proinflammatory (CCL2, TNF-α, IFN-γ and profibrotic molecules (collagen I, fibronectin. In addition, treatment with BR-4626 did not cause hyperkalaemia or increase urine Na+/K+ excretion (a marker of tubular dysfunction.The non-steroidal MRA (BR-4628 provided substantial suppression of mouse crescentic glomerulonephritis without causing tubular dysfunction. This finding warrants further investigation of non-steroidal MRAs as a therapy for inflammatory kidney diseases.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: progressive supranuclear palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... slow and slurred speech (dysarthria) and trouble swallowing (dysphagia). Most affected individuals also experience changes in personality ... UK): Treatment of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Partners in Parkinson's: Movement Disorder Specialist Finder University of California, San ...

  11. Progress report 1981 - 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eder, G.; Rauch, H.; Balcar, E.; Buchtela, K.; Schwertfuehrer, W.; Vana, N.

    1984-06-01

    This progress report describes the research activities of the Atom-institute of the Austrian Universities of the period 1981-1983. The chapter headings are: (1) Electron- and X-ray physics, thermoluminescence and archeometry. (2) Nuclear physics. (3) Nuclear techniques, electronics and EDP. (4) Neutron- and solid state physics with neutron scattering, low temperature physics, theoretical solid state physics and preparation technique. (5) Radiation chemistry. (6) Radiation protection and dosimetry. Each chapter gives a comprimated overview about the research work done in the described period, illustrated by diagrams and tables, a comprehensive list of publications, each citation provided with an (mostly English) Abstract and a comprehensive list of thesis, which are completed or under preparation in the corresponding working group. Additional chapters give lists of educational work, verbal presentation, cooperations with other institutions and personnel. An annex of photos gives an additional impression of the institute. (A.N.)

  12. University Internationalization and University Autonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.; Gulieva, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Turcan and Gulieva deepen our theoretical understanding of the process of university internationalisation by exploring the relationship between university internationalisation and university autonomy. They conjecture that the process of university internationalisation and its sustainability are d......, dissimilar, and sometimes conflicting dimensions of the financial, legal, organisational, staffing, and academic autonomy of the host country, are compromising key aspects of their own autonomy and core mission?......Turcan and Gulieva deepen our theoretical understanding of the process of university internationalisation by exploring the relationship between university internationalisation and university autonomy. They conjecture that the process of university internationalisation and its sustainability...... are determined by the structure and exercise of university autonomy settings at home and in the host countries, and that the process itself cannot be successfully achieved and maintained without changes in the autonomy settings. The key question the authors ask is to what degree universities, in embracing new...

  13. Gammasphere software development. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piercey, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the activities of the nuclear physics group at Mississippi State University which were performed during 1993. Significant progress has been made in the focus areas: chairing the Gammasphere Software Working Group (SWG); assisting with the porting and enhancement of the ORNL UPAK histogramming software package; and developing standard formats for Gammasphere data products. In addition, they have established a new public ftp archive to distribute software and software development tools and information.

  14. Universality of accelerating change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Shlesinger, Michael F.

    2018-03-01

    On large time scales the progress of human technology follows an exponential growth trend that is termed accelerating change. The exponential growth trend is commonly considered to be the amalgamated effect of consecutive technology revolutions - where the progress carried in by each technology revolution follows an S-curve, and where the aging of each technology revolution drives humanity to push for the next technology revolution. Thus, as a collective, mankind is the 'intelligent designer' of accelerating change. In this paper we establish that the exponential growth trend - and only this trend - emerges universally, on large time scales, from systems that combine together two elements: randomness and amalgamation. Hence, the universal generation of accelerating change can be attained by systems with no 'intelligent designer'.

  15. Geothermal progress monitor. Progress report No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    Progress is reported on the following: electrical uses, direct-heat uses, drilling activities, leases, geothermal loan guarantee program, general activities, and legal, institutional, and regulatory activites. (MHR)

  16. Egyptian women in physics: Progress and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsen, M.; Hosni, Hala; Mohamed, Hadeer; Gadalla, Afaf; Kahil, Heba; Hashem, Hassan

    2015-12-01

    The present study shows a progressive increase in the number of female physicists as undergraduates and postgraduates in several governmental universities. For instance, in Ain Shams University, the percentage of women who selected physics as a major course of study increased from 7.2% in 2012 to 10.8% in 2013 and 15.7% in 2014. The study also provides the current gender distribution in the various positions among the teaching staff in seven governmental universities. The data supports the fact that female teaching assistants are increasing in these universities.

  17. Universe symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souriau, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The sky uniformity can be noticed in studying the repartition of objects far enough. The sky isotropy description uses space rotations. The group theory elements will allow to give a meaning at the same time precise and general to the word a ''symmetry''. Universe models are reviewed, which must have both of the following qualities: - conformity with the physic known laws; - rigorous symmetry following one of the permitted groups. Each of the models foresees that universe evolution obeys an evolution equation. Expansion and big-bang theory are recalled. Is universe an open or closed space. Universe is also electrically neutral. That leads to a work hypothesis: the existing matter is not given data of universe but it appeared by evolution from nothing. Problem of matter and antimatter is then raised up together with its place in universe [fr

  18. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes experimental and theoretical work in basic nuclear physics carried out between October 1, 1995, the closing of our last Progress Report, and September 30, 1996 at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado, Boulder, under contracts DE-FG03-93ER-40774 and DE-FG03-95ER-40913 with the United States Department of Energy. The experimental contract supports broadly-based experimental research in intermediate energy nuclear physics. This report includes results from studies of Elementary Systems involving the study of the structure of the nucleon via polarized high-energy positron scattering (the HERMES experiment) and lower energy pion scattering from both polarized and unpolarized nucleon targets. Results from pion- and kaon-induced reactions in a variety of nuclear systems are reported under the section heading Meson Reactions; the impact of these and other results on understanding the nucleus is presented in the Nuclear Structure section. In addition, new results from scattering of high-energy electrons (from CEBAF/TJNAF) and pions (from KEK) from a broad range of nuclei are reported in the section on Incoherent Reactions. Finally, the development and performance of detectors produced by the laboratory are described in the section titled Instrumentation

  19. Our Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Alan

    2001-03-01

    The Universe in which we live is unimaginably vast and ancient, with countless star systems, galaxies, and extraordinary phenomena such as black holes, dark matter, and gamma ray bursts. What phenomena remain mysteries, even to seasoned scientists? Our Universe is a fascinating collection of essays by some of the world's foremost astrophysicists. Some are theorists, some computational modelers, some observers, but all offer their insights into the most cutting-edge, difficult, and curious aspects of astrophysics. Compiled, the essays describe more than the latest techniques and findings. Each of the ten contributors offers a more personal perspective on their work, revealing what motivates them and how their careers and lives have been shaped by their desire to understand our universe. S. Alan Stern is Director of the Department of Space Studies at Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado. He is a planetary scientist and astrophysicist with both observational and theoretical interests. Stern is an avid pilot and a principal investigator in NASA's planetary research program, and he was selected to be a NASA space shuttle mission specialist finalist. He is the author of more than 100 papers and popular articles. His most recent book is Pluto & Charon (Wiley, 1997). Contributors: Dr. John Huchra, Harvard University Dr. Esther Hu, University of Hawaii, Honolulu Dr. John Mather, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Dr. Nick Gnedin, University of Colorado, Boulder Dr. Doug Richstone, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Dr. Bohdan Paczynski, Princeton University, NJ Dr. Megan Donahue, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD Dr. Jerry Ostriker, Princeton University, New Jersey G. Bothun, University of Oregon, Eugene

  20. Around Semipalatinsk nuclear test site: progress of dose estimations relevant to the consequences of nuclear tests (a summary of 3rd Dosimetry Workshop on the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site area, RIRBM, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, 9-11 of March, 2005).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanenko, Valeriy F; Hoshi, Masaharu; Bailiff, Ian K; Ivannikov, Alexander I; Toyoda, Shin; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Simon, Steven L; Matsuo, Masatsugu; Kawano, Noriyuki; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay; Sasaki, Masao S; Rosenson, Rafail I; Apsalikov, Kazbek N

    2006-02-01

    The paper is an analytical overview of the main results presented at the 3rd Dosimetry Workshop in Hiroshima(9-11 of March 2005), where different aspects of the dose reconstruction around the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site(SNTS) were discussed and summarized. The results of the international intercomparison of the retrospective luminescence dosimetry(RLD) method for Dolon' village(Kazakhstan) were presented at the Workshop and good concurrence between dose estimations by different laboratories from 6 countries (Japan, Russia, USA, Germany, Finland and UK) was pointed out. The accumulated dose values in brick for a common depth of 10mm depth obtained independently by all participating laboratories were in good agreement for all four brick samples from Dolon' village, Kazakhstan, with the average value of the local gamma dose due to fallout (near the sampling locations) being about 220 mGy(background dose has been subtracted).Furthermore, using a conversion factor of about 2 to obtain the free-in-air dose, a value of local dose approximately 440 mGy is obtained, which supports the results of external dose calculations for Dolon': recently published soil contamination data, archive information and new models were used for refining dose calculations and the external dose in air for Dolon village was estimated to be about 500 mGy. The results of electron spin resonance(ESR) dosimetry with tooth enamel have demonstrated the notable progress in application of ESR dosimetry to the problems of dose reconstruction around the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site. At the present moment, dose estimates by the ESR method have become more consistent with calculated values and with retrospective luminescence dosimetry data, but differences between ESR dose estimates and RLD/calculation data were noted. For example mean ESR dose for eligible tooth samples from Dolon' village was estimated to be about 140 mGy(above background dose), which is less than dose values obtained by RLD and

  1. Visual Progression Analysis of Student Records Data

    OpenAIRE

    Raji, Mohammad; Duggan, John; DeCotes, Blaise; Huang, Jian; Zanden, Bradley Vander

    2017-01-01

    University curriculum, both on a campus level and on a per-major level, are affected in a complex way by many decisions of many administrators and faculty over time. As universities across the United States share an urgency to significantly improve student success and success retention, there is a pressing need to better understand how the student population is progressing through the curriculum, and how to provide better supporting infrastructure and refine the curriculum for the purpose of ...

  2. Progressive Pigmentary Purpura

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Progressive Pigmentary Purpura Share | Progressive pigmentary purpura (we will call it PPP) is a group ... conditions ( Schamberg's disease , Lichenoid dermatitis of Gourgerot-Blum, purpura annularis telangiectodes of Majocchi and Lichen aureus). Schamberg's ...

  3. Primary Progressive Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which cause different symptoms. Semantic variant primary progressive aphasia Symptoms include these difficulties: Comprehending spoken or written ... word meanings Naming objects Logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia Symptoms include: Having difficulty retrieving words Frequently pausing ...

  4. The progressive tax

    OpenAIRE

    Estrada, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the argumentative structure of Hayek on the relationship between power to tax and the progressive tax. It is observed throughout its work giving special attention to two works: The Constitution of Liberty (1959) and Law, Legislation and Liberty, vol3; The Political Order of Free People, 1979) Hayek describes one of the arguments most complete information bout SFP progressive tax systems (progressive tax). According to the author the history of the tax progressive system...

  5. Intelligent Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyle, F

    1983-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: chance and the universe (synthesis of proteins; the primordial soup); the gospel according to Darwin (discussion of Darwin theory of evolution); life did not originate on earth (fossils from space; life in space); the interstellar connection (living dust between the stars; bacteria in space falling to the earth; interplanetary dust); evolution by cosmic control (microorganisms; genetics); why aren't the others here (a cosmic origin of life); after the big bang (big bang and steady state); the information rich universe; what is intelligence up to; the intelligent universe.

  6. USAID University

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — USAID University is USAID's learning management system. Features include 1) Access online courses 2) Register for instructor-led courses 3)Access your student...

  7. Runaway universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, P

    1978-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters entitled: the emerging universe (general introduction, history of astronomical and cosmological research, origins, the expanding universe, stars, galaxies, electromagnetic radiation); primeval fire (the big bang model, origin of the elements, properties of the elements and of sub-atomic particles); order out of chaos (galactic evolution, star formation, nuclear fusion, the solar system, origin of life on Earth); a star called Sol (properties of the sun and of other stars); life in the universe; the catastrophe principle (the rise and fall of cosmic order); stardoom (star evolution, neutron stars); black holes and superholes (gravitational collapse); technology and survival; the dying universe (second law of thermodynamics); worlds without end (cosmological models).

  8. Rhodes University

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Samridhi Sharma

    2013-10-29

    Oct 29, 2013 ... been taken may improve the reception, by the target audience, of the intended communication. This may ... alcohol marketing. Similarly .... of the intended users (Rhodes University support staff ..... Digital Human Modeling and.

  9. Undulant Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barenboim, Gabriela; /Valencia U.; Mena, Olga; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    If the equation of state for ''dark energy'' varies periodically, the expansion of the Universe may have undergone alternating eras of acceleration and deceleration. We examine a specific form that survives existing observational tests, does not single out the present state of the Universe as exceptional, and suggests a future much like the matter-dominated past: a smooth expansion without a final inflationary epoch.

  10. La comunicación para la salud como disciplina en las universidades estadounidenses Health communication as a field of study in universities in the United States of America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Alcalay

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the state of development of communications related to health in universities of the United States of America. This specialty is essential for people's well-being, and it involves interpersonal, organizational, and mass communications. In the United States, communications for health promotion is an area of applied communications with social relevance and generally performed in interdisciplinary settings. A number of universities in the United States offer communications master's degree programs with an emphasis on health. However, so far, the only program with a formal graduate degree in health and communications is one jointly offered by the Emerson University Department of Communications and the Tufts School of Medicine. Developing and including this specialization in the schools of communications in Latin America is crucial to improving the quality of life of the peoples of the continent.

  11. Hohenheim University. 1991 research report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geiler, U.

    1992-06-01

    The 1991 Research Report of the Hohenheim University near Stuttgart is based on data collected in 1989 and extensively in 1990 and 1991. The progress reports were sent to all of the faculties, institutions, particular research areas and centres of the University. Questions were posed regarding current and recently completed projects. The final version was adapted for print. The survey also enquired about financial support from third parties. The numerous contacts abroad of the Hohenheim University are also documented in this book. Finally, it was asked under which of the nine main Hohenheim research programme headings the particular project could be listed. (orig.) [de

  12. The Necessary University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luis Ibarra Mendívil

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Because of the complex scenarios brought about by globalization, the necessary university will require flexible models oriented toward problem solving and collaborative work, which will also allow students to enter and leave the institution at different times during their training. Among its main features, there will be collegial work, in the sense of collective teaching experimentation; active follow up of students’ progress; trust in the students’ potential; a close relationship of headmasters, teachers and students; and rules that provide certainty to institutional life.

  13. Plasma universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.

    1986-04-01

    Traditionally the views in our cosmic environment have been based on observations in the visual octave of the electromagnetic spectrum, during the last half-century supplemented by infrared and radio observations. Space research has opened the full spectrum. Of special importance are the X-ray-gamma-ray regions, in which a number of unexpected phenomena have been discovered. Radiations in these regions are likely to originate mainly from magnetised cosmic plasma. Such a medium may also emit synchrotron radiation which is observable in the radio region. If we try to base a model of the universe on the plasma phenomena mentioned we find that the plasma universe is drastically different from the traditional visual universe. Information about the plasma universe can also be obtained by extrapolation of laboratory experiments and magnetospheric in situ measurements of plasma. This approach is possible because it is likely that the basic properties of plasma are the same everywhere. In order to test the usefulness of the plasma universe model we apply it to cosmogony. Such an approach seems to be rather successful. For example, the complicated structure of the Saturnian C ring can be accounted for. It is possible to reconstruct certain phenomena 4-5 bilions years ago with an accuracy of better than 1 percent

  14. Baby universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strominger, A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses how the subject of baby universes and their effects on spacetime coupling constants is in its infancy and rapidly developing. The subject is based on the non-existent (even by physicists' standards) Euclidean formulation of quantum gravity, and it is therefore necessary to make a number of assumptions in order to proceed. Nevertheless, the picture which has emerged is quite appealing: all spacetime coupling constants become dynamical variables when the effects of baby universes are taken into account. This fact might even solve the puzzle of the cosmological constant. The subject therefore seems worth further investigation

  15. Pelletron progress report, July 1 1978 - June 30 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Progress is reported in research by the University of Melbourne Pelletron Accelerator Group. Areas covered include lifetime determination of nuclear states, reaction studies and nuclear astrophysics, elemental microanalysis and depth profiling and a report on the pelletron machine

  16. DOE Robotics Project. Summary of progress for 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This document provide the bimonthly progress reports on the Department of Energy (DOE) Robotics Project by the University of Michigan. Reports are provided for the time periods of December 90/January 91 through June 91/July 91. (FI)

  17. Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a disease of the white matter of the brain, caused by a virus infection ...

  18. Progressive supranuclear palsy presenting as primary lateral sclerosis but lacking parkinsonism, gaze palsy, aphasia, or dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Shigeto; Yokota, Osamu; Nanba, Reiko; Takata, Hiroshi; Haraguchi, Takashi; Ishizu, Hideki; Ikeda, Chikako; Takeda, Naoya; Oshima, Etsuko; Sakane, Katsuaki; Terada, Seishi; Ihara, Yuetsu; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2012-12-15

    We report an autopsy case of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) that clinically showed only slowly progressive and symmetric upper motor neuron syndrome over a disease course of 12 years. A female patient initially exhibited dysarthria at the age of 65, followed by gait disturbance and dysphagia. Neurological examination at age 67 disclosed pseudobulbar palsy, spastic gait, hyperreflexia, and presence of bilateral Hoffmann and Babinski signs. However, muscle atrophy, weakness, evidence of denervation on electromyography, vertical gaze palsy, parkinsonism, gait freezing, aphasia, speech apraxia, or dementia was not noted throughout the course. She was clinically diagnosed as having motor neuron disease consistent with so-called primary lateral sclerosis. Pathological examination disclosed histopathological features of PSP, including argyrophilic and tau-positive tufted astrocytes, neurofibrillary tangles, coiled bodies, and thread-like processes in the motor cortex and superior frontal gyrus, and to a lesser degree, in the basal ganglia and brain stem nuclei. In addition, severe fibrillary gliosis was noted in the precentral gyrus and corticospinal tract, being consistent with upper motor neuron syndrome observed in this case. No TAR-DNA binding protein 43-positive lesion, FUS pathology, Bunina body, or Lewy body-like hyaline inclusion was noted in the motor cortex or lower motor neurons. These findings suggest that when tau pathology is prominent in the motor cortex but is minimal in the basal ganglia and brain stem nuclei, a PSP case can lack all classic clinical features of PSP and show only slowly progressive upper motor syndrome, consistent with clinical picture of primary lateral sclerosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Stiegler's University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherstone, Mark

    2017-01-01

    In this article, Mark Featherstone proposes to explore Bernard Stiegler's work through the lens of the politics of education and in particular the idea of the university, which becomes a pharmacological space of, on the one hand, utopian possibility, and, on the other hand, dystopian limitation, destruction, and death in his recent "States of…

  20. Progressive geometric algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alewijnse, S.P.A.; Bagautdinov, T.M.; de Berg, M.T.; Bouts, Q.W.; ten Brink, Alex P.; Buchin, K.A.; Westenberg, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive algorithms are algorithms that, on the way to computing a complete solution to the problem at hand, output intermediate solutions that approximate the complete solution increasingly well. We present a framework for analyzing such algorithms, and develop efficient progressive algorithms

  1. Progressive geometric algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alewijnse, S.P.A.; Bagautdinov, T.M.; Berg, de M.T.; Bouts, Q.W.; Brink, ten A.P.; Buchin, K.; Westenberg, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Progressive algorithms are algorithms that, on the way to computing a complete solution to the problem at hand, output intermediate solutions that approximate the complete solution increasingly well. We present a framework for analyzing such algorithms, and develop efficient progressive algorithms

  2. White matter lesion progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofer, Edith; Cavalieri, Margherita; Bis, Joshua C

    2015-01-01

    10 cohorts. To assess the relative contribution of genetic factors to progression of WML, we compared in 7 cohorts risk models including demographics, vascular risk factors plus single-nucleotide polymorphisms that have been shown to be associated cross-sectionally with WML in the current......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: White matter lesion (WML) progression on magnetic resonance imaging is related to cognitive decline and stroke, but its determinants besides baseline WML burden are largely unknown. Here, we estimated heritability of WML progression, and sought common genetic variants...... associated with WML progression in elderly participants from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium. METHODS: Heritability of WML progression was calculated in the Framingham Heart Study. The genome-wide association study included 7773 elderly participants from...

  3. University writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Zabalza Beraza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Writing in the University is a basic necessity and a long-range educational purpose. One of the basic characteristics of the university context is that it requires writing both as a tool of communication and as a source of intellectual stimulation. After establishing the basic features of academic writing, this article analyzes the role of writing for students (writing to learn and for teachers (write to plan, to reflect, to document what has been done. The article also discusses the contributions of writing for both students and teachers together: writing to investigate. Finally, going beyond what writing is as academic tool, we conclude with a more playful and creative position: writing for pleasure and enjoyment.

  4. Universe unfolding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, I.R.

    1976-01-01

    Topics covered the setting; looking at the stars; the earth; time, place and the sky; our satellite, the moon; orbits and motion; the motions of the planets; the Copernican revolution; the planets; the other bodies of the solar system; ages, origins, and life; introducing the stars; sorting out the stars; binary stars--two are better than one; variable stars--inconstancy as a virtue; the secrets of starlight--unraveling the spectrum; the sun--our own star; the structure of a star; interstellar material; the Milky Way, our home galaxy; galaxies--the stellar continents; cosmic violence--from radio galaxies to quasars; the universe; and epilogue. The primary emphasis is on how we have come to know what we know about the universe. Star maps are included

  5. University physics

    CERN Document Server

    Arfken, George

    1984-01-01

    University Physics provides an authoritative treatment of physics. This book discusses the linear motion with constant acceleration; addition and subtraction of vectors; uniform circular motion and simple harmonic motion; and electrostatic energy of a charged capacitor. The behavior of materials in a non-uniform magnetic field; application of Kirchhoff's junction rule; Lorentz transformations; and Bernoulli's equation are also deliberated. This text likewise covers the speed of electromagnetic waves; origins of quantum physics; neutron activation analysis; and interference of light. This publi

  6. Human universe

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Human life is a staggeringly strange thing. On the surface of a ball of rock falling around a nuclear fireball in the blackness of a vacuum the laws of nature conspired to create a naked ape that can look up at the stars and wonder where it came from. What is a human being? Objectively, nothing of consequence. Particles of dust in an infinite arena, present for an instant in eternity. Clumps of atoms in a universe with more galaxies than people. And yet a human being is necessary for the question itself to exist, and the presence of a question in the universe - any question - is the most wonderful thing. Questions require minds, and minds bring meaning. What is meaning? I don't know, except that the universe and every pointless speck inside it means something to me. I am astonished by the existence of a single atom, and find my civilisation to be an outrageous imprint on reality. I don't understand it. Nobody does, but it makes me smile. This book asks questions about our origins, our destiny, and our place i...

  7. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1968-06-28

    Completion of magnet tests, followed by completion of installation of major cyclotron components, are reported. Intermediate level power tests of the rf system are also reported. Design and fabrication of the control system are reported to be under way. (LEW)

  8. Progress on calculations of nuclear data at Tsinghua University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhenpeng

    1995-01-01

    The calculated cross sections of direct inelastic scattering neutron from Ni, the research on using parameters of SOM in calculation of CCOM (coupled-channel optical model) and the reduced R-matrix analysis of n+ 16 O between 6.2 and 10.5 MeV are described. The total cross section and (n,α) cross section of n + 16 O are shown out. (2 tabs., 1 fig.)

  9. Progress on adenovirus-vectored universal influenza vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Kui; Ying, Guan; Yan, Zhou; Shanshan, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Hongjun, Li; Maosheng, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection causes serious health problems and heavy financial burdens each year worldwide. The classical inactivated influenza virus vaccine (IIVV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) must be updated regularly to match the new strains that evolve due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift. However, with the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved antigens, and the CD8+ T cell responses targeting viral internal proteins nucleoprotein ...

  10. University of Maryland Nuclear Chemistry annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1996-02-01

    The experimental efforts are divided between intermediate energy heavy ion reactions and relativistic heavy ion reactions. The three sections of each effort (6 in all) are processed separately for the data base

  11. Kant’s Theory of Progress

    OpenAIRE

    McCloughan, Meade

    2008-01-01

    My topic is Kant’s theory of historical progress. My approach is primarily textual and contextual. I analyse in some detail Kant’s three most important essays on the topic: ‘Idea for a Universal History’, the third part of ‘Theory and Practice’ and the second part of The Conflict of the Faculties. I devote particular attention to the Kant-Herder debate about progress, but also discuss Rousseau, Mendelssohn, Hegel and others. In presenting, on Kant’s behalf, a strong case for his theory of pro...

  12. Progress test utopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vleuten, Cees; Freeman, Adrian; Collares, Carlos Fernando

    2018-04-01

    This paper discusses the advantages of progress testing. A utopia is described where medical schools would work together to develop and administer progress testing. This would lead to a significant reduction of cost, an increase in the quality of measurement and phenomenal feedback to learner and school. Progress testing would also provide more freedom and resources for more creative in-school assessment. It would be an educationally attractive alternative for the creation of cognitive licensing exams. A utopia is always far away in the future, but by formulating a vision for that future we may engage in discussions on how to get there.

  13. Waste management progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    During the Cold War era, when DOE and its predecessor agencies produced nuclear weapons and components, and conducted nuclear research, a variety of wastes were generated (both radioactive and hazardous). DOE now has the task of managing these wastes so that they are not a threat to human health and the environment. This document is the Waste Management Progress Report for the U.S. Department of Energy dated June 1997. This progress report contains a radioactive and hazardous waste inventory and waste management program mission, a section describing progress toward mission completion, mid-year 1997 accomplishments, and the future outlook for waste management

  14. Sustainable Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2011-01-01

    Declarations on Sustainability in Higher Education (SHE) can be viewed as a piece of international regulation. Over the past 30 years research at universities has produced convincing data to warn about deterioration of the environment, resource scarcity and the need for sustainability. This in turn....... Declarations tend to have impact on three trends. Firstly, there is emerging international consensus on the university’s role and function in relation to sustainable development; secondly, the emergence of national legislation, and thirdly, an emerging international competition to be leader in sustainable...

  15. Open University

    CERN Multimedia

    Pentz,M

    1975-01-01

    Michel Pentz est née en Afrique du Sud et venu au Cern en 1957 comme physicien et président de l'associaion du personnel. Il est également fondateur du mouvement Antiapartheid de Genève et a participé à la fondation de l'Open University en Grande-Bretagne. Il nous parle des contextes pédagogiques, culturels et nationaux dans lesquels la méthode peut s'appliquer.

  16. Progress Report 2004-2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-11-01

    The Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing (FER) as a part of University of Zagreb, has its roots in the Technical Faculty Zagreb, founded in 1919, which evolved into the Faculty of Electrical Engineering in 1956 and was upgraded into the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing in 1994. Due to the increasing progress and advances in electrical and electronic engineering as well as in computer science and information technologies, the Faculty has become the largest technical faculty and the leading educational and R and D institution in the fields of electrical engineering and computing in Croatia. More than 13000 graduate students, more than 1900 postgraduate students who received the Master degree and more than 540 students with PhD degree, are today's total numbers, which highlights our highly spirited activities in teaching. Additional to this number are also 3800 undergraduate students as well as about 500 graduates each year. Organised in 11 departments, the present educational staff comprises 130 professors and 200 teaching assistants and researchers operating in more than 60 laboratories and area of more than 35000 m{sup 2}. Education and research is the crucial factor determining the economic and social progress and equality of opportunity in our societies. It becomes even more so in the digital age in order to ensure life-long-learning and the emergence of new generations of creators, researchers and entrepreneurs and to empower playing an active role in the knowledge society. The experiences at the university level should be transferred to the others. We can help to do that, as a chain the global challenge. The Faculty offers a broad spectrum of services to business and industry, from research and consultancy to conference facilities, training and postgraduate recruitment. The Faculty is a leading research-led institution and undertakes research at the highest levels of international standing. The Faculty is an integral part of the

  17. Progress Report 2004-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    The Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing (FER) as a part of University of Zagreb, has its roots in the Technical Faculty Zagreb, founded in 1919, which evolved into the Faculty of Electrical Engineering in 1956 and was upgraded into the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing in 1994. Due to the increasing progress and advances in electrical and electronic engineering as well as in computer science and information technologies, the Faculty has become the largest technical faculty and the leading educational and R and D institution in the fields of electrical engineering and computing in Croatia. More than 13000 graduate students, more than 1900 postgraduate students who received the Master degree and more than 540 students with PhD degree, are today's total numbers, which highlights our highly spirited activities in teaching. Additional to this number are also 3800 undergraduate students as well as about 500 graduates each year. Organised in 11 departments, the present educational staff comprises 130 professors and 200 teaching assistants and researchers operating in more than 60 laboratories and area of more than 35000 m 2 . Education and research is the crucial factor determining the economic and social progress and equality of opportunity in our societies. It becomes even more so in the digital age in order to ensure life-long-learning and the emergence of new generations of creators, researchers and entrepreneurs and to empower playing an active role in the knowledge society. The experiences at the university level should be transferred to the others. We can help to do that, as a chain the global challenge. The Faculty offers a broad spectrum of services to business and industry, from research and consultancy to conference facilities, training and postgraduate recruitment. The Faculty is a leading research-led institution and undertakes research at the highest levels of international standing. The Faculty is an integral part of the community

  18. Progressive Finland sees progress with nuclear projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, David [NucNet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-02-15

    The Finnish Hanhikivi-1 reactor project is firmly on track and a licence has been granted for construction of a final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel - the first final repository in the world to enter the construction phase. Significant progress has been made with plans for Finland to build its sixth nuclear reactor unit at Hanhikivi. Fennovoima's licensing manager Janne Liuko said the company expects to receive the construction licence for the Generation III+ Hanhikivi-1 plant in late 2017. The application was submitted to the Finnish Ministry of Employment and the Economy in June 2015.

  19. Progression of Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now The Progression of Liver ...

  20. Progression of Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  1. Progress report for '89

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podest, M.

    1990-08-01

    The 1989 Progress Report presents the most important scientific and technical achievements of the Nuclear Research Institute's research work. Some specialized products prepared at or fabricated by the NRI are mentioned as well. (author). 24 figs., 8 tabs., 101 refs

  2. Progress report, Physics Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    This report reviews events and progress in the following areas: development of the TASCC facility; experimental and theoretical nuclear physics research; radionuclide standardization; condensed matter research; applied mathematics; and computer facility operation

  3. Progress for the Paralyzed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contents Latest Advances Help People Regain Function and Independence Founded in 2000, the National Institute for Biomedical ... More "NIBIB Robotics" Articles Progress for the Paralyzed / College Athlete Stands Again…On His Own! / Coffee to ...

  4. Progress report 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Progress report on the meetings and working groups of DAF in 1979, e.g. engineering and industry, public and press, law and administration, business and industry, international cooperation in Europe and with the USA. (GL) [de

  5. Progress report 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This progress report of the nuclear physics institute includes five basic subjects: theoretical physics, high energy and intermediate energy physics, nuclear physics, combined research physics and instrumentation (microelectronics, imaging, multidetectors, scintillators,...) [fr

  6. Modeling Progress in AI

    OpenAIRE

    Brundage, Miles

    2015-01-01

    Participants in recent discussions of AI-related issues ranging from intelligence explosion to technological unemployment have made diverse claims about the nature, pace, and drivers of progress in AI. However, these theories are rarely specified in enough detail to enable systematic evaluation of their assumptions or to extrapolate progress quantitatively, as is often done with some success in other technological domains. After reviewing relevant literatures and justifying the need for more ...

  7. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Monday 9 March 2009 COLLOQUIUM at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Are We Descended From Heavy Neutrinos? Prof. Boris Kayser / Fermilab (Fermi National Accelerator Center, Geneva, Illinois, USA) Neutrinos are among the most abundant particles in the universe. The discovery that they have nonzero masses has raised a number of very interesting questions about them, and about their connections to other areas of physics and to cosmology. After briefly reviewing what has been learned about the neutrinos so far, we will identify the major open questions, explain why they are interesting, and discuss ideas and plans for answering them through future experiments. We will highlight a particularly intriguing question: Are neutrinos the key to understanding why the universe contains matter but almost no antimatter, making it s...

  8. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 13 May 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Observing the extreme universe with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Prof. Olaf Reimer / Stanford University The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST, formerly GLAST) is an international observatory-type satellite mission with a physics program spanning from gamma-ray astronomy to particle astrophysics and cosmology. FGST was launched on June 11, 2008 and is successfully conducting science observations of the high-energy gamma-ray sky since August 2008. A varienty of discoveries has been made already, including monitoring rapid blazar variability, the existence of GeV gamma-ray bursts, and numerous new gamma-ray sources of different types, including those belonging to previously unknown gamma-ray source classes like msPSRs, globula...

  9. [Progressive visual agnosia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Azusa; Futamura, Akinori; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2011-10-01

    Progressive visual agnosia was discovered in the 20th century following the discovery of classical non-progressive visual agnosia. In contrast to the classical type, which is caused by cerebral vascular disease or traumatic injury, progressive visual agnosia is a symptom of neurological degeneration. The condition of progressive visual loss, including visual agnosia, and posterior cerebral atrophy was named posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) by Benson et al. (1988). Progressive visual agnosia is also observed in semantic dementia (SD) and other degenerative diseases, but there is a difference in the subtype of visual agnosia associated with these diseases. Lissauer (1890) classified visual agnosia into apperceptive and associative types, and it in most cases, PCA is associated with the apperceptive type. However, SD patients exhibit symptoms of associative visual agnosia before changing to those of semantic memory disorder. Insights into progressive visual agnosia have helped us understand the visual system and discover how we "perceive" the outer world neuronally, with regard to consciousness. Although PCA is a type of atypical dementia, its diagnosis is important to enable patients to live better lives with appropriate functional support.

  10. Habitable Zones in the Universe

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, G.

    2005-01-01

    Habitability varies dramatically with location and time in the universe. This was recognized centuries ago, but it was only in the last few decades that astronomers began to systematize the study of habitability. The introduction of the concept of the habitable zone was key to progress in this area. The habitable zone concept was first applied to the space around a star, now called the Circumstellar Habitable Zone. Recently, other, vastly broader, habitable zones have been proposed. We review...

  11. Universal acquired melanosis (Carbon baby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviarasan P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 3-year-old girl born with fair complexion which became darker. The color change was insidious in onset at the age of 5 months, asymptomatic and progressive involving the entire body surface. Histopathology revealed increased pigmentation of the epidermal basal layer. Universal acquired melanosis is a rare form of hypermelanosis which was synonymously referred to as "Carbon baby". This is a rare presentation with only one earlier case report.

  12. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Monday 7 December 2009 PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Topological insulators and topological superconductors Professor Shoucheng Zhang Department of Physics, Stanford University, CA   Recently, a new class of topological states has been theoretically predicted and experimentally realized. The topological insulators have an insulating gap in the bulk, but have topologically protected edge or surface states due to the time reversal symmetry. In two dimensions the edge states give rise to the quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect, in the absence of any external magnetic field. I shall review the theoretical prediction of the QSH state in HgTe/CdTe semiconductor quantum wells, and its recent experimental observation. The edge states of the QSH state supports fr...

  13. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 18 November  2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Highlights of the European Strategy Workshop for Future Neutrino Physics Dr Ilias Efthymiopoulos, CERN   Seminar cancelled! Information Organizer : J.-S. Graulich Monday 7 December 2009 PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Topological insulators and topological superconductors Professor Shoucheng Zhang Department of Physics, Stanford University, CA   Recently, a new class of topological states has been theoretically predicted and experimentally realized. The topological insulators have an insulating gap in the bulk, but have topologically protected edge or surface states due to the time reversal symmetry. In two dimensions the edge s...

  14. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Ecole de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Monday 28 April 2008 PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM at 17.00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Gravity : an Emergent Perspective by Prof. Thanu Padmanabhan, Pune University Dean, Ganeshkhind, Pune, India I will motivate and describe a novel perspective in which gravity arises as an emergent phenomenon, somewhat like elasticity. This perspective throws light on several issues which are somewhat of a mystery in the conventional approach. Moreover it provides new insights on the dark energy problem. In fact, I will show that it is necessary to have such an alternative perspective in order to solve the cosmological constant problem.Information: http://theory.physics.unige.ch/~fiteo/seminars/COL/collist.html

  15. Two Belgian University Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Huylebrouck

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bevacizumab (BEV, a humanized immunoglobulin G1 monoclonal antibody that inhibits VEGF has demonstrated activity against recurrent high-grade gliomas (HGG in phase II clinical trials. Patients and Methods. Data were collected from patients with recurrent HGG who initiated treatment with BEV outside a clinical trial protocol at two Belgian university hospitals. Results. 19 patients (11 M/8 F were administered a total of 138 cycles of BEV (median 4, range 1–31. Tumor response assessment by MRI was available for 15 patients; 2 complete responses and 3 partial responses for an objective response rate of 26% for the intent to treat population were observed on gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images; significant regressions on T2/FLAIR were documented in 10 out of 15 patients (67%. A reduced uptake on PET was documented in 3 out of 4 evaluable patients. The six-month progression-free survival was 21% (95% CI 2.7–39.5. Two patients had an ongoing tumor response and remained free from progression after 12 months of BEV treatment. Conclusions. The activity and tolerability of BEV were comparable to results from previous prospective phase II trials. Reduced uptake on PET suggests a metabolic response in addition to an antiangiogenic effect in some cases with favorable clinical outcome.

  16. Physicians’ Progress Notes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bansler, Jørgen; Havn, Erling C.; Mønsted, Troels

    2013-01-01

    in patient care, they have not dealt specifically with the role, structure, and content of the progress notes. As a consequence, CSCW research has not yet taken fully into account the fact that progress notes are coordinative artifacts of a rather special kind, an open-ended chain of prose texts, written...... sequentially by cooperating physicians for their own use as well as for that of their colleagues. We argue that progress notes are the core of the medical record, in that they marshal and summarize the overwhelming amount of data that is available in the modern hospital environment, and that their narrative...... format is uniquely adequate for the pivotal epistemic aspect of cooperative clinical work: the narrative format enables physicians to not only record ‘facts’ but also—by filtering, interpreting, organizing, and qualifying information—to make sense and act concertedly under conditions of uncertainty...

  17. Progress report no. 76

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    8 papers from the Institute of Hydrodynamics and Hydraulic Engineering of the Technical University of Denmark cover the problems of sedimentation, boundary currents, solute transport, advection-dispersion etc. Mathematical models of hydraulic problems are presented. (EG)

  18. CRN: 1986 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Departments activities in high energy physics, nuclear physics, radiation physics and chemistry are reported. Collaboration with university led to creation of SRNU (Service du Reacteur Nucleaire). Vivitron studies are presented [fr

  19. Progress in physical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Hempelmann, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    Progress in Physical Chemistry is a collection of recent ""Review Articles"" published in the ""Zeitschrift für Physikalische Chemie"". The second volume of Progress in Physical Chemistry is a collection of thematically closely related minireview articles written by the members of the Collaborative Research Centre (SFB) 277 of the German Research Foundation (DFG). These articles are based on twelve years of intense coordinated research efforts. Central topics are the synthesis and the characterization of interface-dominated, i.e. nanostructured materials, mainly in the solid state but also as

  20. Progress report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalupka, A.; Dirninger, G.

    1982-01-01

    The progress report describes the scientific work and research results of the institute for radium research and nuclear physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences for the period of 1981. The progress report covers the subject areas of nuclear theory, nuclear model calculations, experimental nuclear physics and neutron involved reactions, medium energy physics, instrumentation and detectors, evaluation of nuclear data and numerical data processing, dating, applications in medicine, dosimetry and environmental studies. A list of publications of this institute is given. (A.N.)

  1. Annual progress report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This annual progress report of the CEA Protection and Nuclear Safety Institut outlines a brief description of the progress made in each section of the Institut. Research activities of the Protection department include, radiation effects on man, radioecology and environment radioprotection techniques. Research activities of the Nuclear Safety department include, reactor safety analysis, fuel cycle facilities safety analysis, safety research programs. The third section deals with nuclear material security including security of facilities, security of nuclear material transport and monitoring of nuclear material management [fr

  2. Progress report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalupka, A.; Wild, E.; Dirninger, G.

    1983-01-01

    The progress report describes the scientific work and research results of the institute for radium research and nuclear physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences for the period of 1982. The progress report covers the subject areas of nuclear theory, nuclear model calculations, experimental nuclear physics and neutron involved reactions, medium energy physics, instrumentation and detectors, evaluation of nuclear data and numerical data processing, dating, applications in medicine, dosimetry and environmental studies. A list of publications of this institute is given. (A.N.)

  3. 1985. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This annual progress report of the CEA Protection and Nuclear Safety Institut outlines a description of the progress made in each sections of the Institut Research activities of the different departments include: reactor safety analysis, fuel cycle facilities analysis; and associated safety research programs (criticality, sites, transport ...), radioecology and environmental radioprotection techniques; data acquisition on radioactive waste storage sites; radiation effects on man, studies on radioprotection techniques; nuclear material security including security of facilities, security of nuclear material transport, and monitoring of nuclear material management; nuclear facility decommissioning; and finally the public information [fr

  4. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 25 March 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Hunting for the Higgs with D0 at the Tevatron Prof. Gustaaf Brooijmans / Columbia University The search for the Higgs boson is one of the most important endeavors in current experimental particle physics. At the eve of the LHC start, the Tevatron is delivering record luminosity allowing both CDF and D0 to explore a new region of possible Higgs masses. In this seminar, the techniques used to search for the Higgs boson at the Tevatron will be explained, limiting factors will be examined, and the sensitivity in the various channels will be reviewed. The newly excluded values of the standard model Higgs mass will be presented. Information : http://dpnc.unige.ch/seminaire/annonce.html Organizer : J.-S. Graulich

  5. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Lundi 6 avril 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR àt 17:00 – Auditoire Stückelberg Hospital superbugs, nanomechanics and statistical physics Prof. Dr G. Aeppli / University College London The alarming growth of the antibiotic-resistant superbug, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is driving the development of new technologies to investigate antibiotics and their modes of action. We report silicon cantilever based studies of self-assembled monolayers of mucopeptides which model drug-sensitive and resistant bacterial walls. The underlying concepts needed to understand the measurements will simplify the design of cantilevers and coatings for biosensing and could even impact our understanding of drug action on bacteria themselves. (Une verrée en compagnie du conférencier sera offerte après le colloque.) Organizer : Prof. Markus Büttiker ...

  6. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Ecole de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 29 October 2008 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Precision measurements of low-energy neutrino-nucleus interactions with the SciBooNE experiment at Fermilab by Dr Michel Sorel, IFIC (CSIC and University of Valencia) «Do all modern accelerator-based neutrino experiments need to make use of kiloton-scale detectors and decade-long exposure times? In order to study the full pattern of neutrino mixing via neutrino oscillation experiments, the answer is probably yes, together with powerful proton sources. Still, to push the sensitivity of future neutrino oscillation searches into unchartered territory, those are necessary, but not sufficient, ingredients. In addition, accurate knowledge of neutrino interactions and neutrino production is mandatory. This knowledge can be acquired via small-scale and short-term dedicated n...

  7. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    Ecole de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tel: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 14 April 2010 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 hrs – Stückelberg Auditorium Dark Matter and the XENON Experiment By Dr. Marc Schumann, Physik Institut, Universität Zürich There is convincing astrophysical and cosmological evidence that most of the matter in the Universe is dark: It is invisible in every band of the electromagnetic spectrum. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are promising Dark Matter candidates that arise naturally in many theories beyond the Standard Model. Several experiments aim to directly detect WIMPs by measuring nuclear recoils from WIMPs scattered on target nuclei. In this talk, I will give an overview on Dark Matter and direct Dark Matter detection. Then I will focus on the XENON100 experiment, a 2-phase liquid/gas time projection chamber (TPC) that ...

  8. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Genève 4 Tél. 022 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 14 October 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Long-lived particle searches at colliders Dr. Philippe Mermod / Oxford University The discovery of exotic long-lived particles would address a number of important questions in modern physics such as the origin and composition of dark matter and the unification of the fundamental forces. This talk will focus on searches for long-lived charged massive particles, where "charged" refers to the magnetic, electric or colour charge. Previous searches at the LEP and Tevatron Colliders allowed to put mass and cross section limits on various kinds of long-lived particles, such as Magnetic Monopoles and metastable leptons and up-type quarks. The new energy regime made available at the LHC will probe physics regions well beyond these limits. F...

  9. Universal algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Grätzer, George

    1979-01-01

    Universal Algebra, heralded as ". . . the standard reference in a field notorious for the lack of standardization . . .," has become the most authoritative, consistently relied on text in a field with applications in other branches of algebra and other fields such as combinatorics, geometry, and computer science. Each chapter is followed by an extensive list of exercises and problems. The "state of the art" account also includes new appendices (with contributions from B. Jónsson, R. Quackenbush, W. Taylor, and G. Wenzel) and a well-selected additional bibliography of over 1250 papers and books which makes this a fine work for students, instructors, and researchers in the field. "This book will certainly be, in the years to come, the basic reference to the subject." --- The American Mathematical Monthly (First Edition) "In this reviewer's opinion [the author] has more than succeeded in his aim. The problems at the end of each chapter are well-chosen; there are more than 650 of them. The book is especially sui...

  10. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 29 April 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 - Stückelberg Auditorium Search for spin-1 excited bosons at the LHC Mihail V. Chizhov (Physics Department, Sofia University, Bulgaria) I will discuss the resonance production of new type spin-1 excited bosons, Z*, at hadron colliders. They can be observed as a Breit-Wigner resonance peak in the invariant dilepton mass distribution in the same way as the well-known hypothetical gauge bosons, Z�. This makes them very interesting objects for early searches with the LHC first data. Moreover, they have unique signatures in transverse momentum and angular distributions, which allow to distinguish them from other resonances. Information : http://dpnc.unige.ch/seminaire/annonce.html Organizer: J.-S. Graulich

  11. BARC progress report - 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyane, V L [comp.; Library and Information Services Div., Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1999-04-01

    This report is a compilation of the progress in various major activities and Research and Development programmes of the different Divisions of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai. The list of publications and papers presented at the various conferences, symposia, workshops and papers published in journal by the staff members of the Divisions are also given. (author) figs., tabs.

  12. BARC progress report - 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyane, V.L.

    1999-04-01

    This report is a compilation of the progress in various major activities and Research and Development programmes of the different Divisions of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai. The list of publications and papers presented at the various conferences, symposia, workshops and papers published in journal by the staff members of the Divisions are also given. (author)

  13. Internationalisering og progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilken, Lisanne; Tange, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    means that programs can attract students from outside Denmark, and these students often come from different academic backgrounds. To investigate how these changes are affecting the way professors who teach on interdisciplinary international masters programs conceive student progress, we carried out semi...

  14. Progress report of CJD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This paper is the progress report of the Russian Nuclear Data Center at F.E.I., Obninsk. Evaluations have been made for dosimetry reactions and neutron reactions. Analysis of the spectra and the production cross sections were made. (a.n.)

  15. Progress report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, H.

    1983-01-01

    This progress report describes the scientific work and research results done by the institute for experimental physics, atom and nuclear physics of the Johannes-Kepler-Universitaet Linz in the period of 1982. The covered subject areas are ionization by cations, investigations of surface areas by light ions, measurement of stopping power in solids, data acquisition and aerosol physics. (A.N.)

  16. Recent progress in Biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bemski, G.

    1980-03-01

    Recent progress in biophysics is reviewed, and three examples of the use of physical techniques and ideas in biological research are given. The first one deals with the oxygen transporting protein-hemoglobin, the second one with photosynthesis, and the third one with image formation, using nuclear magnetic resonance. (Author) [pt

  17. MCNP Progress & Performance Improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bull, Jeffrey S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rising, Michael Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-04-14

    Twenty-eight slides give information about the work of the US DOE/NNSA Nuclear Criticality Safety Program on MCNP6 under the following headings: MCNP6.1.1 Release, with ENDF/B-VII.1; Verification/Validation; User Support & Training; Performance Improvements; and Work in Progress. Whisper methodology will be incorporated into the code, and run speed should be increased.

  18. Scales of Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Lee Ann

    2018-01-01

    What is Goal Attainment Scaling? In this article, Lee Ann Jung defines it as a way to measure a student's progress toward an individualized goal. Instead of measuring a skill at a set time (for instance, on a test or other assignment), Goal Attainment Scaling tracks the steps a student takes over the course of a year in a targeted skill. Together,…

  19. Progressive Retirement Programme

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Following the Standing Concertation Committee meeting of 2 December 2008, please note that the Progressive Retirement Programme has been extended by one year, i.e. until 31 March 2010. Further information is available on : https://hr-services.web.cern.ch/hr-services/services-Ben/prp/prp.asp HR Department, tel. 73903

  20. Progress Report 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document is the 1994 annual progress report of the CEA-Direction of Waste Management (DGD). It comprises four chapters. The first chapter is a general presentation of radioactive wastes, of the management of liquid effluents, solid wastes, sealed sources, of the relations with the ANDRA (The French Agency for the Management of Radioactive Wastes), and of the research and development studies in progress for the improvement of waste management. The second chapter concerns the spent fuels and their reprocessing, in particular AGR and PWR type reactor fuels, the ''Caramel'' fuel from Osiris reactor and the cover elements from the Rapsodie reactor core. The long time storage of ancient fuels is also discussed. The third chapter concerns the dismantling of decommissioned installations, the actions in progress and the planning of dismantling actions up to the year 2000. Chapter four is devoted to the management of wastes from the Direction of Military Applications (DAM), the actions in progress in the different DAM centers and the cleansing projects at Marcoule plant. (J.S.). 5 figs., 28 tabs., 21 photos., 3 appendix

  1. Progress report 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    This progress report deals with technical and research work done at the AAEC Research Establishment in the twelve month period ending September 30, 1979. Work done in the following research divisions is reported: Applied Maths and Computing, Chemical Technology, Engineering Research, Environmental Science, Instrumentation and Control, Isotope, Materials and Physics

  2. Progress in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Emil

    2015-01-01

    The Progress in Optics series contains more than 300 review articles by distinguished research workers, which have become permanent records for many important developments, helping optical scientists and optical engineers stay abreast of their fields. Comprehensive, in-depth reviewsEdited by the leading authority in the field

  3. Progress in inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, W.; Storm, E.

    1985-10-01

    The requirements for high gain in inertial confinement are given in terms of target implosion requirements. Results of experimental studies of the laser/target interaction and of the dynamics of laser implosion. A report of the progress of advanced laser development is also presented. 3 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  4. Progress report 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The Studsvik Science Research Laboratory herewith presents its progress report for 1978. The report summarizes the current projects carried out by the research groups working at the laboratory. Projects within the following fields are presented: neutron physics, neutron absorption and scattering, radiation chemistry, radiation damage studies, radioactivity and theoretical studies of condensed matter. (E.R.)

  5. BARC progress report - 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyane, V L [comp.; Library and Information Services Div., Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1998-07-01

    This report is a compilation of the progress in various major activities and Research and Development programmes of the different Divisions of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai. The list of publications and papers presented at the various conferences, symposia, workshops and papers published in journal by the staff members of the Divisions are also given. (author) figs., tabs.

  6. BARC progress report - 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyane, V.L.

    1998-07-01

    This report is a compilation of the progress in various major activities and Research and Development programmes of the different Divisions of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai. The list of publications and papers presented at the various conferences, symposia, workshops and papers published in journal by the staff members of the Divisions are also given. (author)

  7. Response: Progress Takes Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rist, Marilee C.

    1984-01-01

    Although declining enrollment and administrative seniority have hampered efforts to eliminate sex discrimination in employment practices in three Long Island, New York, school systems (Commack, Smithtown, and Bay Shore), progress is being made. Because of the Reagan administration's lack of support for affirmative action, however, litigation…

  8. Progressive Web applications

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Progressive Web Applications are native-like applications running inside of a browser context. In my presentation I would like describe their characteristics, benchmarks and building process using a quick and simple case study example with focus on Service Workers api.

  9. "Paideia," Progress, Puzzlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrachovec, Herbert

    2018-01-01

    Platonic "paideia" is a mainstream concept in traditional philosophy and humanistic circles generally. It is closely connected with social progress brought about by the dynamics of enlightenment and self-fulfillment, symbolized by the allegory of the cave. The main contention of this paper is that the philosophical grammar of this simile…

  10. Are Forecast Updates Progressive?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C-L. Chang (Chia-Lin); Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMacro-economic forecasts typically involve both a model component, which is replicable, as well as intuition, which is non-replicable. Intuition is expert knowledge possessed by a forecaster. If forecast updates are progressive, forecast updates should become more accurate, on average,

  11. Progress report 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    This progress report deals with service oriented work performed at the AAEC Research Establishment in the twelve month period ending September 30, 1979. Services provided by the Engineering Services Division, the Safety Department, Site Information Services Department and Commercial Applications are described

  12. Evaluation of keratoconus progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shajari, Mehdi; Steinwender, Gernot; Herrmann, Kim; Kubiak, Kate Barbara; Pavlovic, Ivana; Plawetzki, Elena; Schmack, Ingo; Kohnen, Thomas

    2018-06-01

    To define variables for the evaluation of keratoconus progression and to determine cut-off values. In this retrospective cohort study (2010-2016), 265 eyes of 165 patients diagnosed with keratoconus underwent two Scheimpflug measurements (Pentacam) that took place 1 year apart ±3 months. Variables used for keratoconus detection were evaluated for progression and a correlation analysis was performed. By logistic regression analysis, a keratoconus progression index (KPI) was defined. Receiver-operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was performed and Youden Index calculated to determine cut-off values. Variables used for keratoconus detection showed a weak correlation with each other (eg, correlation r=0.245 between RPImin and Kmax, pKPI). KPI was defined by logistic regression and consisted of a Pachymin coefficient of -0.78 (p=0.001), a maximum elevation of back surface coefficient of 0.27 and coefficient of corneal curvature at the zone 3 mm away from the thinnest point on the posterior corneal surface of -12.44 (both pKPI: D-index had a cut-off of 0.4175 (70.6% sensitivity) and Youden Index of 0.606. Cut-off for KPI was -0.78196 (84.7% sensitivity) and a Youden Index of 0.747; both 90% specificity. Keratoconus progression should be defined by evaluating parameters that consider several corneal changes; we suggest D-index and KPI to detect progression. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Tradición y modernización en torno a la cuestión educativa de la segunda mitad del siglo XVIII: Avances de secularización en el Plan General de Estudios para la Universidad de Salamanca (1771 // Tradition and modernization around the education issue in the second half of the eighteenth century: Progress of secularization in the University of Salamanca General Curriculum (1771.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Perrupato

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available (ES Durante el reinado de Carlos III se operan una serie de reformas tendientes a modernizar la sociedad. En este contexto la reforma de la universidad fue una preocupación fundamental. Sin embargo, el predominio de la escolástica dentro de los claustros universitarios hacía de la intrusión de la corona en las altas casas de estudio una empresa difícil. El objetivo del trabajo es analizar estos procesos de reforma a partir del Plan de estudios para la Universidad de Salamanca. Entendemos que el mismo se encuentra dentro de un contexto de reformas mucho más amplio en el que la dialéctica tradición-modernización pone de manifiesto la progresiva tendencia hacia la secularización. (EN During the reign of Carlos III, a series of reforms aimed at modernizing society arose. In this context, the reform of the university was a major concern. However, the dominance of scholasticism within university faculties was a difficulty for the aim of the crown. The objective of this work is to analyze these reform processes from the University of Salamanca Curriculum. We point out that this task is within the context of a much broader reform where the confrontation between the binomial tradition-modernization shows the progressive trend toward secularization.

  14. Nuclear chemistry progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    The activities of the nuclear chemistry group at Indiana University during the period September 1, 1983 to August 31, 1984, are summarized. The primary thrust of our research program has continued to be the investigation of damped collision mechanisms at near-barrier energies and of linear momentum and energy transfer in the low-to-intermediate energy regime. In addition, during the past year we have initiated studies of complex fragment emission from highly excited nuclei and have also completed measurements relevant to understanding the origin and propagation of galactic cosmic rays. Equipment development efforts have resulted in significantly improving the resolution and solid-angle acceptance of our detector systems. The experimental program has been carried out at several accelerators including the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory SuperHILAC, the Holifield Heavy-Ion Research Facility and the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. Publications and activities are listed

  15. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This report summarizes the work carried out by personnel at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado from about August 1, 1981 to October 1, 1982, under contract with the Department of Energy. The intermediate energy studies summarized in this report were carried out at the meson physics facilities at Los Alamos (LAMPF), the cyclotron at Indiana University (IUCF), and the meson physics facilities at Vancouver (TRIUMF). This year, for the first time, intermediate energy experimental studies are being reported in separate documents from the low energy and theoretical nuclear physics efforts. Experimental studies are reported on pion-nucleus interactions, charge exchange reactions, nucleon transfer reactions, and apparatus development

  16. Supersymmetric inflation: Recent progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovrut, B.A.; Steinhardt, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    The new inflationary universe scenario is, in principle, a simple and powerful approach to resolving a large number of fundamental cosmological problems. However, in order for the scenario to be considered a complete theory, one critical question remains to be answered: What is the physics responsible for the phase transition that triggers the exponential expansion (inflation) of the universe? One possibility that the authors and several other groups have been pursuing is that the physics responsible for the phase transition involves (local) supersymmetry. The goal of this paper is to review the present status of ''Supersymmetric Inflation'', particularly emphasizing some very exciting results that they recently obtained

  17. Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Henrique de Gobbi Porto

    Full Text Available Abstract Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction (PPCD is an insidious syndrome characterized by prominent disorders of higher visual processing. It affects both dorsal (occipito-parietal and ventral (occipito-temporal pathways, disturbing visuospatial processing and visual recognition, respectively. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman presenting with progressive impairment of visual functions. Neurologic examination showed agraphia, alexia, hemispatial neglect (left side visual extinction, complete Balint's syndrome and visual agnosia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed circumscribed atrophy involving the bilateral parieto-occipital regions, slightly more predominant to the right . Our aim was to describe a case of this syndrome, to present a video showing the main abnormalities, and to discuss this unusual presentation of dementia. We believe this article can contribute by improving the recognition of PPCD.

  18. Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Fábio Henrique de Gobbi; Machado, Gislaine Cristina Lopes; Morillo, Lilian Schafirovits; Brucki, Sonia Maria Dozzi

    2010-01-01

    Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction (PPCD) is an insidious syndrome characterized by prominent disorders of higher visual processing. It affects both dorsal (occipito-parietal) and ventral (occipito-temporal) pathways, disturbing visuospatial processing and visual recognition, respectively. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman presenting with progressive impairment of visual functions. Neurologic examination showed agraphia, alexia, hemispatial neglect (left side visual extinction), complete Balint’s syndrome and visual agnosia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed circumscribed atrophy involving the bilateral parieto-occipital regions, slightly more predominant to the right. Our aim was to describe a case of this syndrome, to present a video showing the main abnormalities, and to discuss this unusual presentation of dementia. We believe this article can contribute by improving the recognition of PPCD. PMID:29213665

  19. ISABELLE: a progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, H

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the ISABELLE project, which has the objective of constructing a high-energy proton colliding beam facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The major technical features of the intersecting storage accelerators with their projected performance are described. Application of over 1000 superconducting magnets in the two rings represents the salient characteristic of the machine. The status of the entire project, the technical progress made so far, and difficulties encountered are reviewed.

  20. ISABELLE: a progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the ISABELLE project, which has the objective of constructing a high-energy proton colliding beam facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The major technical features of the intersecting storage accelerators with their projected performance are described. Application of over 1000 superconducting magnets in the two rings represents the salient characteristic of the machine. The status of the entire project, the technical progress made so far, and difficulties encountered are reviewed

  1. Progress in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Emil

    2009-01-01

    In the fourty-seven years that have gone by since the first volume of Progress in Optics was published, optics has become one of the most dynamic fields of science. The volumes in this series which have appeared up to now contain more than 300 review articles by distinguished research workers, which have become permanent records for many important developments.- Backscattering and Anderson localization of light- Advances in oliton manipulation in optical lattices- Fundamental quantum noise in optical amplification- Invisibility cloaks

  2. Progress in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Emil

    2008-01-01

    In the fourty-six years that have gone by since the first volume of Progress in Optics was published, optics has become one of the most dynamic fields of science. The volumes in this series which have appeared up to now contain more than 300 review articles by distinguished research workers, which have become permanent records for many important developments.- Metamaterials- Polarization Techniques- Linear Baisotropic Mediums- Ultrafast Optical Pulses- Quantum Imaging- Point-Spread Funcions- Discrete Wigner Functions

  3. Recent progress in microcalorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Calvet, E; Skinner, H A

    2013-01-01

    Recent Progress in Microcalorimetry focuses on the methodologies, processes, and approaches involved in microcalorimetry, as well as heat flow, temperature constancy, and chemistry of alumina and cements.The selection first offers information on the different types of calorimeters; measurement of the heat flow between the calorimeter and jacket boundaries by means of a thermoelectric pile; and constructional details of the microcalorimeter. Discussions focus on classification of calorimeters, use of thermoelectric piles as thermometers, correct measurement of heat flow from a calorimeter conta

  4. Clean Energy Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    For the past several years, the IEA and others have been calling for a clean energy revolution to achieve global energy security, economic growth and climate change goals. This report analyses for the first time progress in global clean energy technology deployment against the pathways that are needed to achieve these goals. It provides an overview of technology deployment status, key policy developments and public spending on RDD&D of clean energy technologies.

  5. Progress in nanophotonics 1

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtsu, Motoichi

    2011-01-01

    This book focuses on the recent progress in nanophotonics technology to be used to develop novel nano-optical devices, fabrication technology, and security systems. It begins with a review of the concept of dressed photons and applications to devices, fabrication, and systems; principles and applications. Further topics include: DNA process for quantum dot chain, photon enhanced emission microscopy, near field spectroscopy of metallic nanostructure, self-organized fabrication of composite semiconductor quantum dots, formation of metallic nanostructure, and nanophotonic information systems with

  6. Three year progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-07-01

    Progress is reported on the following studies: x-ray and uv effects in photosynthetic organisms; effects of alcohols and oxygen concentration on transforming DNA; free radical studies; sensitization by metal ions; role of the solvated electron in radiation damage to cells; effectiveness of organic and inorganic compounds in sensitizing bacterial spores to high energy radiation; oxygen effects; radiosensitivity of enzyme systems in Chlorella; and effects of pre-irradiation of solutions on spores

  7. Progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mampaey, S.; De Schepper, A.; Vanhoenacker, F.; Boven, K.; Hul, W. van

    2000-01-01

    A rare case of progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia (PPD) in a 9-year-old girl is presented. Clinically, chronic painless swollen joints, accompanied by progressive motion restriction and progressive walking difficulties, were found. Radiologically, there was enlargement of the epimetaphyseal portions of the large joints, metacarpal heads, and phalanges, and generalized platyspondyly with irregular delineation of the endplates of the vertebral bodies. The radioclinical features at the peripheral joints were originally misdiagnosed as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), and the structural spinal abnormalities were neglected and interpreted as Scheuermann's disease. However, the absence of active inflammatory parameters argues against JRA, whereas the low age of onset of the irregularities at the vertebral endplates is an argument against the diagnosis of Scheuermann's disease. The combination of the dysplastic abnormalities of the spine, with platyspondyly and Scheuermann-like lesions at an unusually low age of onset, and radiological features mimicking JRA of the peripheral joints, is the clue to the diagnosis of this rare autosomal-recessive disease. This case is the first to document the MRI features of PPD of the spine. (orig.)

  8. The storm of progress

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    modern radiology would not have been possible. The scientific achieve- ments of these pioneers opened up new possibilities in medicine. Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen discov- ered the X-ray on 8 November 1895 in his Institute for Physics at the Julius. Maximilian University in Würtzburg. This achievement of Röntgen gave.

  9. Nuclear theory progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses research performed at University of Washington in nuclear theory. Some of the topics discussed are: nuclear astrophysics; symmetry; time reversal invariance; quark matter; superallowed beta decay; exclusive reactions; nuclear probes; soliton model; relativistic heavy ion collisions; supernova explosions; neutrino processes in dense matter; field theories; weak interaction physics; and nuclear structure

  10. Silicon spintronics: Progress and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sverdlov, Viktor; Selberherr, Siegfried, E-mail: Selberherr@TUWien.ac.at

    2015-07-14

    Electron spin attracts much attention as an alternative to the electron charge degree of freedom for low-power reprogrammable logic and non-volatile memory applications. Silicon appears to be the perfect material for spin-driven applications. Recent progress and challenges regarding spin-based devices are reviewed. An order of magnitude enhancement of the electron spin lifetime in silicon thin films by shear strain is predicted and its impact on spin transport in SpinFETs is discussed. A relatively weak coupling between spin and effective electric field in silicon allows magnetoresistance modulation at room temperature, however, for long channel lengths. Due to tunneling magnetoresistance and spin transfer torque effects, a much stronger coupling between the spin (magnetization) orientation and charge current is achieved in magnetic tunnel junctions. Magnetic random access memory (MRAM) built on magnetic tunnel junctions is CMOS compatible and possesses all properties needed for future universal memory. Designs of spin-based non-volatile MRAM cells are presented. By means of micromagnetic simulations it is demonstrated that a substantial reduction of the switching time can be achieved. Finally, it is shown that any two arbitrary memory cells from an MRAM array can be used to perform a logic operation. Thus, an intrinsic non-volatile logic-in-memory architecture can be realized.

  11. Progress Toward Future Runway Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, Gary W.; Brown, Sherilyn A.; Atkins, Stephen; Eisenhawer, Stephen W.; Bott, Terrance F.; Long, Dou; Hasan, Shahab

    2011-01-01

    The runway is universally acknowledged as a constraining factor to capacity in the National Airspace System (NAS). It follows that investigation of the effective use of runways, both in terms of selection and assignment, is paramount to the efficiency of future NAS operations. The need to address runway management is not a new idea; however, as the complexities of factors affecting runway selection and usage increase, the need for effective research in this area correspondingly increases. Under the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Airspace Systems Program, runway management is a key research area. To address a future NAS which promises to be a complex landscape of factors and competing interests among users and operators, effective runway management strategies and capabilities are required. This effort has evolved from an assessment of current practices, an understanding of research activities addressing surface and airspace operations, traffic flow management enhancements, among others. This work has yielded significant progress. Systems analysis work indicates that the value of System Oriented Runway Management tools is significantly increased in the metroplex environment over that of the single airport case. Algorithms have been developed to provide runway configuration recommendations for a single airport with multiple runways. A benefits analysis has been conducted that indicates the SORM benefits include supporting traffic growth, cost reduction as a result of system efficiency, NAS optimization from metroplex operations, fairness in aircraft operations, and rational decision making.

  12. Silicon spintronics: Progress and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sverdlov, Viktor; Selberherr, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    Electron spin attracts much attention as an alternative to the electron charge degree of freedom for low-power reprogrammable logic and non-volatile memory applications. Silicon appears to be the perfect material for spin-driven applications. Recent progress and challenges regarding spin-based devices are reviewed. An order of magnitude enhancement of the electron spin lifetime in silicon thin films by shear strain is predicted and its impact on spin transport in SpinFETs is discussed. A relatively weak coupling between spin and effective electric field in silicon allows magnetoresistance modulation at room temperature, however, for long channel lengths. Due to tunneling magnetoresistance and spin transfer torque effects, a much stronger coupling between the spin (magnetization) orientation and charge current is achieved in magnetic tunnel junctions. Magnetic random access memory (MRAM) built on magnetic tunnel junctions is CMOS compatible and possesses all properties needed for future universal memory. Designs of spin-based non-volatile MRAM cells are presented. By means of micromagnetic simulations it is demonstrated that a substantial reduction of the switching time can be achieved. Finally, it is shown that any two arbitrary memory cells from an MRAM array can be used to perform a logic operation. Thus, an intrinsic non-volatile logic-in-memory architecture can be realized

  13. U.K. nuclear data progress report for the period April 1975 to March 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gayther, D.B.

    1976-08-01

    The Progress Report describes the activities of the UK Nuclear Data Committee, lists the UK data in a CINDA type index, and reports briefly on each UK activity under the organization concerned (AERE Harwell, AEE Winfrith, NPL, AWRE Aldermaston, University of Aston in Birmingham, University of Edinburgh, University of London Reactor Centre). (U.K.)

  14. Library automation in Nigerian universities: a historical perspective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Library automation in Nigerian universities: a historical perspective. ... Journal Home > Vol 7, No 2 (2005) > ... others are making some progress along this line while the challenges of library automation are discussed and solutions proposed.

  15. Measuring our Universe from Galaxy Redshift Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahav, Ofer; Suto, Yasushi

    2004-01-01

    Galaxy redshift surveys have achieved significant progress over the last couple of decades. Those surveys tell us in the most straightforward way what our local Universe looks like. While the galaxy distribution traces the bright side of the Universe, detailed quantitative analyses of the data have even revealed the dark side of the Universe dominated by non-baryonic dark matter as well as more mysterious dark energy (or Einstein's cosmological constant). We describe several methodologies of using galaxy redshift surveys as cosmological probes, and then summarize the recent results from the existing surveys. Finally we present our views on the future of redshift surveys in the era of precision cosmology.

  16. Changing scene highlights III. [Iowa State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fassel, V. A.; Harl, Neil E.; Legvold, Sam; Ruedenberg, Klaus; Swenson, Clayton A.; Burnet, George; Fisher, Ray W.; Gschneidner, Karl A.; Hansen, Robert S.; Kliewer, Kenneth L.; Wildman, Ruth

    1979-01-01

    The research programs in progress at Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, are reviewed: hydrogen (storage), materials, catalysts, TRISTAN (their laboratory isotope separator), coal preparation, coal classification, land reclamation (after surface mining, nitinol, neutron radiography, grain dust explosions, biomass conversion, etc). (LTC)

  17. Quantum cosmology and the early universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartle, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    Despite the absence of a complete and manageable quantum theory of gravity, it is shown that considerable progress has been made in constructing cosmological models displaying the possible implications such a theory might have for the structure and dynamics of the very early universe. (U.K.)

  18. The Learning University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Glenys

    1999-01-01

    As universities make cross-sectoral alliances, various models for integrating postsecondary education into universities arise: contract, brokerage, collaborative, validation, joint program, dual-sector institution, tertiary university, metaphoric, and federal. The integrated, comprehensive university is the learning university of the 21st century.…

  19. Scalar Potential Model progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, John

    2007-04-01

    Because observations of galaxies and clusters have been found inconsistent with General Relativity (GR), the focus of effort in developing a Scalar Potential Model (SPM) has been on the examination of galaxies and clusters. The SPM has been found to be consistent with cluster cellular structure, the flow of IGM from spiral galaxies to elliptical galaxies, intergalactic redshift without an expanding universe, discrete redshift, rotation curve (RC) data without dark matter, asymmetric RCs, galaxy central mass, galaxy central velocity dispersion, and the Pioneer Anomaly. In addition, the SPM suggests a model of past expansion, past contraction, and current expansion of the universe. GR corresponds to the SPM in the limit in which a flat and static scalar potential field replaces the Sources and Sinks such as between clusters and on the solar system scale which is small relative to the distance to a Source. The papers may be viewed at http://web.infoave.net/˜scjh/ .

  20. ARGUS progress report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darden, C.W. III.

    1982-01-01

    On September 7th, 1982, following four years of planning and construction, the magnetic solenoid detector ARGUS was moved into one of the two interaction regions of the electron-positron storage ring DORIS. A month later the ring started delivering luminosity for physics research, specifically, the study of the formation and decay of members of the Upsilon family of mesons. These mesons are bound states, b anti b, of the heaviest of the five known quarks and therefore of considerable interest. This report describes the progress made during the year from March 1982 to March 1983 with emphasis on the experience gained during the first running period

  1. HSX progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Brief statements on the progress of the design and construction of the HSX experiment are reported. Topics covered include the modular and auxiliary coil systems, the coil support structure, vacuum vessel, the ECH system, the magnet power supply and site. The proposed budget for Year 2 (August 1, 1994 through July 31, 1995) is presented. The effects of a flat funding profile (based on Year 2 budget level of $1137K) on out-years and the HSX project schedule are discussed. The stretching out of the program to accommodate the reduced funding profile should result in only a slight delay in HSX operations

  2. Progress in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Emil

    1977-01-01

    In the thirty-seven years that have gone by since the first volume of Progress in Optics was published, optics has become one of the most dynamic fields of science. At the time of inception of this series, the first lasers were only just becoming operational, holography was in its infancy, subjects such as fiber optics, integrated optics and optoelectronics did not exist and quantum optics was the domain of only a few physicists. The term photonics had not yet been coined. Today these fields are flourishing and have become areas of specialisation for many science and engineering students and n

  3. [Research progress on fascioliasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Cheng, Na; Zhou, Yan; Xu, Xue-Nian

    2013-06-01

    Fascioliasis is an important zoonosis caused by Fasciola spp. It can cause pathological damages to human liver and gallbladder, as well as economic loss in animal husbandry. Fascioliasis can be easily misdiagnosed with other hepatobiliary diseases. The appearance of resistance to triclabendazole is an issue problem for fascioliasis control. Therefore, research for better diagnostic methods, effective drugs and vaccines become to the focus of fascioliasis control. This article summarizes the progress on epidemiological status, diagnostic method, therapy, drug resistance, vaccine and omics of fascioliasis.

  4. Mathieu Progressive Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrei, B. Utkin

    2011-10-01

    A new family of exact solutions to the wave equation representing relatively undistorted progressive waves is constructed using separation of variables in the elliptic cylindrical coordinates and one of the Bateman transforms. The general form of this Bateman transform in an orthogonal curvilinear cylindrical coordinate system is discussed and a specific problem of physical feasibility of the obtained solutions, connected with their dependence on the cyclic coordinate, is addressed. The limiting case of zero eccentricity, in which the elliptic cylindrical coordinates turn into their circular cylindrical counterparts, is shown to correspond to the focused wave modes of the Bessel-Gauss type.

  5. Mathieu Progressive Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utkin, Andrei B.

    2011-01-01

    A new family of exact solutions to the wave equation representing relatively undistorted progressive waves is constructed using separation of variables in the elliptic cylindrical coordinates and one of the Bateman transforms. The general form of this Bateman transform in an orthogonal curvilinear cylindrical coordinate system is discussed and a specific problem of physical feasibility of the obtained solutions, connected with their dependence on the cyclic coordinate, is addressed. The limiting case of zero eccentricity, in which the elliptic cylindrical coordinates turn into their circular cylindrical counterparts, is shown to correspond to the focused wave modes of the Bessel-Gauss type. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  6. TASCC Division progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, J.C.

    1992-10-01

    The TASCC (Tandem Accelerator-Superconducting Cyclotron) facility is devoted to developing and providing beams for an experimental program of basic nuclear research. Beam was on target for 2901 hours during the period of interest. The cyclotron provided beam for 524 hours, and tandem beams were used for a total of 3940 hours. The most exciting experimental result was the first evidence of a rotational band with the characteristics of hyperdeformation: a ridge-valley structure in 152 Dy. This progress report details experimental results and instrumentation and facility development over the period. (L.L.) (refs., tabs., figs.)

  7. Progress in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Emil

    2006-01-01

    In the thirty-seven years that have gone by since the first volume of Progress in Optics was published, optics has become one of the most dynamic fields of science. At the time of inception of this series, the first lasers were only just becoming operational, holography was in its infancy, subjects such as fiber optics, integrated optics and optoelectronics did not exist and quantum optics was the domain of only a few physicists. The term photonics had not yet been coined. Today these fields are flourishing and have become areas of specialisation for many science and engineering students and n

  8. Progress in nanophotonics 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtsu, Motoichi (ed.) [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering

    2011-07-01

    This book focuses on the recent progress in nanophotonics technology to be used to develop novel nano-optical devices, fabrication technology, and security systems. It begins with a review of the concept of dressed photons and applications to devices, fabrication, and systems; principles and applications. Further topics include: DNA process for quantum dot chain, photon enhanced emission microscopy, near field spectroscopy of metallic nanostructure, self-organized fabrication of composite semiconductor quantum dots, formation of metallic nanostructure, and nanophotonic information systems with security. These topics are reviewed by seven leading scientists. This overview is a variable resource for engineers and scientists working in the field of nanophotonics. (orig.)

  9. Progress in quantum cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartle, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    Our observations of the world give us specific facts. Here, there is a galaxy; there is none. Today, there is a supernova explosion; yesterday, there was a star. Here, there are fission fragments; before, there was a uranium nucleus. The task of physics is to compress the message which describes these facts into a shorter form -to compress it, in particular, to a form where the message consists of just a few observed facts together with simple universal laws of nature from which the rest can be deduced. In the past, physics has concentrated on finding dynamical laws which correlate facts at different times. Such laws predict later evolution given observed initial conditions. However, there is no logical reason why we could not look for laws which correlate facts at the same time. Such laws would be, in effect, laws of initial conditions. It was the limited nature of our observations which led to our focus on dynamical laws. Now, however, in cosmology, in the observations of the early universe and even on familiar scales, it is possible to discern regularities of the world which may find a compressed expression in a simple, testable, theory of the initial conditions of the universe as a whole. The search for this law of the initial conditions is the subject of quantum cosmology and the subject whose recent development is reviewed. (author)

  10. Progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia misdiagnosed as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia misdiagnosed as seronegative juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Ozgur Taspinar, Fatih Kelesoglu, Yasar Keskin, Murat Uludag. Abstract. Background: Progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia (PPD) is a rare spondylo- epi-metaphyseal dysplasia (SEMD). It can be confused with juvenile ...

  11. University rankings in computer science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehret, Philip; Zuccala, Alesia Ann; Gipp, Bela

    2017-01-01

    This is a research-in-progress paper concerning two types of institutional rankings, the Leiden and QS World ranking, and their relationship to a list of universities’ ‘geo-based’ impact scores, and Computing Research and Education Conference (CORE) participation scores in the field of computer...... science. A ‘geo-based’ impact measure examines the geographical distribution of incoming citations to a particular university’s journal articles for a specific period of time. It takes into account both the number of citations and the geographical variability in these citations. The CORE participation...... score is calculated on the basis of the number of weighted proceedings papers that a university has contributed to either an A*, A, B, or C conference as ranked by the Computing Research and Education Association of Australasia. In addition to calculating the correlations between the distinct university...

  12. Slowly progressive fluent aphasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Yasuhisa; Momose, Toshimitsu; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Ishikawa, Takashi; Iwata, Makoto; Bando, Mitsuaki.

    1991-01-01

    Three patients with slowly progressive fluent aphasia are reported. One of the patients presented with memory disturbance. They were characterized clinically by having selective deficits in vocabulary, which resulted in impairment of confrontation naming, and auditory comprehension. MRI showed an atrophy not only in the left temporal lobe (including the superior, middle and inferior temporal gyri), hippocampus, parahippocampual gyrus, and fusiform gyrus, but also in the left parietal lobe. I-123 IMP SPECT and F-18 FDG PET were used to determine regional cerebral blood flow and regional cerebral metabolic rate, respectively. In addition to the decreased tracer uptake in the left temporal and/or parietal lobe, a decreased uptake was seen in the bilateral basal ganglia, the inner side of the temporal lobe (including the bilateral hippocampus), the right anterior temporal lobe, and the left thalamus. These findings may deny the previous thought that lesions are localized in slowly progressive fluent aphasia. Furthermore, noticeable difficulty in naming, i.e., patients unable to recognize the right answer, are considered attributable to widespread lesions from the whole left temporal lobe, including the hippocampus, to the right temporal lobe. (N.K.)

  13. Progress in computational toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekins, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Computational methods have been widely applied to toxicology across pharmaceutical, consumer product and environmental fields over the past decade. Progress in computational toxicology is now reviewed. A literature review was performed on computational models for hepatotoxicity (e.g. for drug-induced liver injury (DILI)), cardiotoxicity, renal toxicity and genotoxicity. In addition various publications have been highlighted that use machine learning methods. Several computational toxicology model datasets from past publications were used to compare Bayesian and Support Vector Machine (SVM) learning methods. The increasing amounts of data for defined toxicology endpoints have enabled machine learning models that have been increasingly used for predictions. It is shown that across many different models Bayesian and SVM perform similarly based on cross validation data. Considerable progress has been made in computational toxicology in a decade in both model development and availability of larger scale or 'big data' models. The future efforts in toxicology data generation will likely provide us with hundreds of thousands of compounds that are readily accessible for machine learning models. These models will cover relevant chemistry space for pharmaceutical, consumer product and environmental applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russek, A.

    1975-06-01

    Progress has been made in calculation of cross-sections for dielectronic and radiative recombination when hot electrons are incident on partially stripped impurity ions. Calculations were completed for the cases of 1 keV and 10 keV electrons incident on ions of arbitrary Z with ionization state consistent with a 1 keV plasma temperature. It was found that dielectronic recombination dominates radiative recombination by a factor of 100 at 1 keV incident electron energy to a factor of 1000 at 10 keV incident electron energy. The work is now being extended to other plasma temperatures and is being improved by more accurate calculation of the matrix elements involved. Progress was also made in the calculation of accurate bremsstrahlung and higher order radiative processes which also occur when hot electrons are incident on partially stripped impurity ions. Formal expressions for the matrix elements have been obtained for cross-sections in a fully relativistic partial wave analysis for bremsstrahlung radiation both with and without electron excitation of the target ion. Final evaluation now awaits the evaluation of the relativistic radial integrals involved in these matrix elements. (U.S.)

  15. Ghrelin and cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-Chieh; Hsiao, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Ghrelin is a small peptide with 28 amino acids, and has been characterized as the ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR). In addition to its original function in stimulating pituitary growth hormone release, ghrelin is multifunctional and plays a role in the regulation of energy balance, gastric acid release, appetite, insulin secretion, gastric motility and the turnover of gastric and intestinal mucosa. The discovery of ghrelin and GHSR expression beyond normal tissues suggests its role other than physiological function. Emerging evidences have revealed ghrelin's function in regulating several processes related to cancer progression, especially in metastasis and proliferation. We further show the relative GHRL and GHSR expression in pan-cancers from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), suggesting the potential pathological role of the axis in cancers. This review focuses on ghrelin's biological function in cancer progression, and reveals its clinical significance especially the impact on cancer patient outcome. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Annual progress report 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The technical support activities of the IPSN to competent administrations in 1980 has been marked: namely by the authorizations of divergence for 9 units EdF-PWR of 900 MW, the authorization project of creation and extension of reprocessing plant of COGEMA at the Hague UP 2 -800 and the authorization of starting up of the third unit of production of the EURODIF enrichment plant at Tricastin. On the other hand, IPSN has participated at the elaboration of a certain number of legislative and regulation texts relative to the control of nuclear matter, to radioprotection standards and to criteria of safety. For the safety of breeder, the test made at CABRI pile, in the international research program has given confirmation of the validity of theoretical models used in accidents calculations, hypothetical accidents which has allowed to reactualize safety criteria which have to be used for the development of this type of reactor. In worker radioprotection the results obtained in laboratory on the effect of radon, the progress made in personal dosimetry and the action of radioprotection undertaken in uranium mines constitutes a coherent effort. The deep drilling in granit (1000 m) and the experimental associated program which has finished the indispensable scientific data for the future policy in matter of storage of radioactives wastes. IPSN has contributed to progress made in the rules of exploitation of reactors, in the definition of wastes containment -specially at the output of reprocessing plant- in handling machines in hazardeous areas and in the study of environment [fr

  17. Association for Progressive Communication : Institutional ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Monitoring Progress Toward the Information Society : Digital Divide Index. Orbicom's Digital Divide Index is a rigorous statistical tool for benchmarking access to and use of information and communication technologies (ICT), and monitoring progress toward the... View moreMonitoring Progress Toward the Information ...

  18. Interview with David Tauben: University of Washington, Chief of the Division of Pain Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauben, David

    2017-07-01

    Dr Tauben is Clinical Professor jointly appointed in the Departments of Medicine and Anesthesia & Pain Medicine, and is the Hughes M & Katherine G Blake Endowed Professor, board certified in both Internal Medicine and Pain Medicine. He is also University of Washington (UW) Director of Medical Student and Resident Education in Pain Medicine, and Medical Director of UW TelePain, a tele-video-conferencing program intended to provide innovative pain education and consultative support to a five-state northwest regional primary care providers. He served as a member of the NIH National Pain Strategy task force on pain education and is principal investigator for the UW's prestigious NIH Pain Consortium Center of Excellence for Pain Education, leading curriculum development to extend the pain proficiency qualifications of interprofessional primary care providers. Dr Tauben is a member of the American Pain Society and the International Association for the Study of Pain special interest study groups on Pain Education. He is a founding member of the State of Washington Agency Medical Directors panel of medical experts developing opioid prescription guidelines for the state, and a regular clinical and content expert for regulatory and legislative bodies involved in public policy regarding pain medicine practice and standards. He speaks as a clinical expert in medical management of chronic pain, especially as it applies to primary care practices. Dr Tauben served as an expert for several US Centers for Disease Control clinical outreach programs and policy reviews advising primary care providers on how to prescribe opioids for chronic noncancer pain. He is annually recognized by his peers as recipient of regional awards in care of pain patients, and brings decades of clinical experience of best practice medication management of acute and chronic pain. Dr Tauben received his bachelors degree in philosophy from Yale University, medical degree from Tufts University School of

  19. Controlling myopia progression in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith MJ

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Molly J Smith, Jeffrey J WallineThe Ohio State University College of Optometry, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Myopia is a common disorder, affecting approximately one-third of the US population and over 90% of the population in some East Asian countries. High amounts of myopia are associated with an increased risk of sight-threatening problems, such as retinal detachment, choroidal degeneration, cataracts, and glaucoma. Slowing the progression of myopia could potentially benefit millions of children in the USA. To date, few strategies used for myopia control have proven to be effective. Treatment options such as undercorrection of myopia, gas permeable contact lenses, and bifocal or multifocal spectacles have all been proven to be ineffective for myopia control, although one recent randomized clinical trial using executive top bifocal spectacles on children with progressive myopia has shown to decrease the progression to nearly half of the control subjects. The most effective methods are the use of orthokeratology contact lenses, soft bifocal contact lenses, and topical pharmaceutical agents such as atropine or pirenzepine. Although none of these modalities are US Food and Drug Administration-approved to slow myopia progression, they have been shown to slow the progression by approximately 50% with few risks. Both orthokeratology and soft bifocal contact lenses have shown to slow myopia progression by slightly less than 50% in most studies. Parents and eye care practitioners should work together to determine which modality may be best suited for a particular child. Topical pharmaceutical agents such as anti-muscarinic eye drops typically lead to light sensitivity and poor near vision. The most effective myopia control is provided by atropine, but is rarely prescribed due to the side effects. Pirenzepine provides myopia control with little light sensitivity and few near-vision problems, but it is not yet commercially available as an eye drop or

  20. Let s make progress together!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriana, Mazare; Liliana, Gheorghian

    2015-04-01

    " University in Iasi, Romania were important attractions for our students in the last three years due to the interesting experiences and its minerals museum. In order to be aware of the importance of animal and vegetable resources the students also visited the Botanical Gardens and the Natural Science Museum in Iasi. Our city and capital county, Suceava, hosted the International Astronomy Olympiad, and students wanted to know more about the stars. Equally popular among our students were the trips organized within the national event "Night of the researchers" at the astronomical observatory and planetarium in Suceava where they were fascinated by the stars, equipment and the new discoveries in the study of the cosmos. We keep in mind Henry Ford's words: "Coming together is the beginning. Keeping together is progress. Working together is success.

  1. Scientific progress report 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This is a short description of the research work of the working groups on neutron scattering, radiation damage in solids, reactor chemistry, trace element research in biomedicine, and geochemistry as well as of the available infrastructure for the fields of reactors and radionuclide production. The description is followed by a bibliography of 1978 publications (some of them with abstracts) and papers read by HMI members. Also listed are papers by HMI guest scientists, lectures at Berlin universities, and dissertations and theses written at HMI. (RB) [de

  2. Clinical neurorestorative progress in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen L

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lin Chen,1,2 Hongyun Huang,3–5 Wei-Ming Duan,6 Gengsheng Mao3 1Department of Neurosurgery, Yuquan Hospital, Tsinghua University, 2Department of Neurosurgery, Medical Center, Tsinghua University, 3Department of Neurosurgery, General Hospital of Chinese People's Armed Police Forces, 4Center of Cell Research, Beijing Rehabilitation Hospital of Capital Medical University, 5Beijing Hongtianji Neuroscience Academy, 6Department of Anatomy, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People's Republic of China Abstract: Parkinson’s disease (PD is one of the common neurodegenerative diseases. Besides the symptomatic therapies, the increasing numbers of neurorestorative therapies have shown the potential therapeutic value of reversing the neurodegenerative process and improving the patient's quality of life. Currrently available novel clinical neurorestorative strategies include pharmacological managements (glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor, selegiline, recombinant human erythropoietin, neuromodulation intervention (deep brain stimulation, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, tissue and cell transplantation (fetal ventral mesencephalic tissue, sympathetic neurons, carotid body cells, bone marrow stromal cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, gene therapy, and neurorehabilitative therapy. Herein, we briefly review the progress in this field and describe the neurorestorative mechanisms of the above-mentioned therapies for PD. Keywords: Parkinson’s disease, clinical study, neurorestorative treatment, cell transplantation, neuromodulation

  3. A review on primary progressive aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel C Léger

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Gabriel C Léger1,2, Nancy Johnson31Neurology Service, Hôtel-Dieu du Centre Hospitalier de l’Univertité de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada; 2Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada; 3Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer’s Disease Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Primary progressive aphasia (PPA is a neurodegenerative disease of insidious onset presenting with progressive isolated loss of language function, without significant impairment in other cognitive domains. Current diagnostic criteria require the language dysfunction to remain isolated for at least two years, and to remain the salient feature as the disease progresses, usually to involve other domains such as behavior, executive functions, and judgment. Although PPA in its early stages can usually be differentiated from probable Alzheimer’s disease (PRAD and the behavioral variant of frontotemporal lobar degeneration by the absence of significant changes in memory and behavior, and the preservation of activities daily living, progression of the disease often leads to deficits more consistent with the latter. Underlying etiologies remain heterogeneous: the neuropathological characteristics associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration, cortocobasal degeneration, and motor neuron disease are usually found. There is a strong genetic susceptibility with affliction of first-degree relatives with similar disease in up to 40 to 50% in some series. Pathogenic mutations in genes coding for the proteins tau and progranulin have been isolated. These are leading to a better understanding of the neuropathological mechanisms and hopefully targeted disease-modifying therapy. Current therapy is limited to improving mood symptoms and targeting behavior changes as they develop. Referral to specialized centers where speech therapy, counseling, and education

  4. Progress report 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The O.P.R.I. is in charge of environmental general surveillance and follow-up of natural exposures; To monitor the nuclear installations, it carries out samples campaigns. The technical follow-up of medical installations concerns it too. The workers radiation protection as well as the public protection are in its attributions. We find in particular, three sanitary studies: about the North Cotentin, (the question of excess of leukemia or not, and due or not to the facility of La hague) Nogent-sur-Marne (the case of a nursery school built on a old factory using radium), and the situation of populations living in French Polynesia, areas that have worried the public with alarmist announcements published in newspapers. All the results relative to the radiations measurements for 1998 appear in this progress report. (N.C.)

  5. Progressing batch hydrolysis process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J.D.

    1985-01-10

    A progressive batch hydrolysis process is disclosed for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock. It comprises passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with feed stock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feed stock to glucose. The cooled dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, serially fed through a plurality of pre-hydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose. The dilute acid stream containing glucose is cooled after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

  6. Progressive amusia and aprosody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confavreux, C; Croisile, B; Garassus, P; Aimard, G; Trillet, M

    1992-09-01

    We report a case of slowly progressive amusia and aprosody in association with orofacial and eyelid apraxias. The patient was independent in daily living activities. Insight, judgment, and behavior were intact. Her language was normal, and she demonstrated no limb, dressing, or constructional apraxia. She had no prosopagnosia, no visuospatial disturbances, and no memory impairment. Imaging studies (computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, single photon emission computed tomography) indicated a selective disorder of the right frontal and temporal regions. Review of the literature shows an increasing number of reports of this degenerative syndrome affecting the left dominant hemisphere and language areas, whereas cases of the syndrome affecting the right hemisphere are rare. To our knowledge, this is the first case in which aprosody and amusia were associated with a focal cortical degeneration.

  7. 1985. Progress annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-06-01

    Tore Supra construction has been vigorously continued. The whole cryogenic system has been entirely delivered. On TFR priority has been given to electron cyclotron resonance heating; but also neutral heating mechanisms, pellet injection, plasma-wall interaction in the presence of pumped limiter, impurity transport and plasma turbulence have been studied and progress on diagnostics have been made. On Petula, with lower hybrid wave, the numerous results on ion heating, current drive, plasma stability in the presence of non-inductive current and on Tore Supra technical problems are important. At last, theoretical and numerical results are concerned with plasma equilibrium macroscopic evolution of plasma, RF heating, plasma instabilities, magnetic islands, turbulence, transport coefficients and spectroscopy [fr

  8. Vivitron - Progress report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The 1990 activity report of the Strasbourg Nuclear Research, concerning the Vivitron project, is presented. After having mounted all the Van de Graaff elements of the Vivitron needed for the generator tests, the tank was closed in July 1990. It was then put under vacuum, leaks were searched for and repaired. Voltage tests started in December and a voltage of 17.6 MV was reached in February. Modifications on the charging system and to improvement of the column protection against sparks are necessary before the voltage tests can be carried on. Great progress has been made in the setting up of the new Vivitron injector and analysing magnet. In this report are included the description of project different development steps, the Vivitron budget and the list of publications, congress contributions and internal reports. 18 figs

  9. Progressive brain compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thuomas, K.AA.; Inst. of Surgical Research, National Hospital, Oslo; Vlajkovic, S.; Inst. of Surgical Research, National Hospital, Oslo; Ganz, J.C.; Inst. of Surgical Research, National Hospital, Oslo; Nilsson, P.; Inst. of Surgical Research, National Hospital, Oslo; Bergstroem, K.; Inst. of Surgical Research, National Hospital, Oslo; Ponten, U.; Inst. of Surgical Research, National Hospital, Oslo; Zwetnow, N.N.; Inst. of Surgical Research, National Hospital, Oslo

    1993-01-01

    Continuous recording of vital physiological variables and sequential MR imaging were performed simultaneously during continuous expansion of an epidural rubber balloon over the left hemisphere in anaesthetised dogs. Balloon expansion led to a progressive and slgithly nonlinear rise in intracranial CSF pressures and a full in local perfusion pressures. Changes in systemic arterial pressure, pulse rate, and respiration rate usually appeared at a balloon volume of 4% to 5% of the intracranial volume (reaction volume), together with a marked transtentorial pressure gradient and MR imaging changes consistent with tentorial herniation. Respiratory arrest occurred at a balloon volume of approximately 10% of the intracranial volume (apnoea volume), which was associated with occulsion of the cisterna magna, consistent with some degree of foramen magnum herniation. Increase in tissue water was observed beginning at approximately the reaction volume, presumably due to ischaemic oedema, due to the fall in perfusion pressures. (orig.)

  10. Muon collider progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, Robert J. FNAL

    1998-08-01

    Recent progress in the study of muon colliders is presented. An international collaboration consisting of over 100 individuals is involved in calculations and experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of this new type of lepton collider. Theoretical efforts are now concentrated on low-energy colliders in the 100 to 500 GeV center-of-mass energy range. Credible machine designs are emerging for much of a hypothetical complex from proton source to the final collider. Ionization cooling has been the most difficult part of the concept, and more powerful simulation tools are now in place to develop workable schemes. A collaboration proposal for a muon cooling experiment has been presented to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee, and a proposal for a targetry and pion collection channel experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory is in preparation. Initial proton bunching and space-charge compensation experiments at existing hadron facilities have occurred to demonstrate proton driver feasibility.

  11. Progress in nanophotonics 3

    CERN Document Server

    Yatsui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on the recent progress in nanophotonics technology to be used to develop novel nano-optical devices, fabrication technology and advanced systems. It reviews light-emitting diodes and lasers made of silicon bulk crystals in which the light emission principle is based on dressed-photon-phonons. Further topics include: theoretical studies of optoelectronic properties of molecular condensates for organic solar cells and light-emitting devices, the basics of topological light beams together with their important properties for laser spectroscopy, spatially localized modes emerging in nonlinear discrete dynamic systems and theoretical methods to explore the dynamics of nanoparticles by the light-induced force of tailored light fields under thermal fluctuations. These topics are reviewed by leading scientists. This overview is a variable resource for engineers and scientists working in the field of nanophotonics.

  12. Progress in nanophotonics 4

    CERN Document Server

    Yatsui, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the recent progress in the field of nanophotonics. It contains review-like chapters focusing on various but mutually related topics in nanophotonics written by the world’s leading scientists. Following the elaboration of the idea of nanophotonics, much theoretical and experimental work has been carried out, and several novel photonic devices, high-resolution fabrication, highly efficient energy conversion, and novel information processing have been developed in these years. Novel theoretical models describing the nanometric light-matter interaction, nonequilibrium statistical mechanical models for photon breeding processes and near-field‐assisted chemical reactions as well as light‐matter interaction are also explained in this book. It describes dressed photon technology and its applications, including implementation of nanophotonic devices and systems, fabrication methods and performance characteristics of ultrathin, ultraflexible organic light‐emitting diodes, organic solar cells ...

  13. Nuclear chemistry progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    The activities of the nuclear chemistry program at Indiana University during the period September 1, 1982 to August 31, 1983 are reviewed. As in the past, these investigations have focused on understanding the properties of nucleus-nucleus collisions at low-to-intermediate energies. During the past year new programs have been initiated at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University and the Hollifield Heavy-Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge. With the unique beams provided by these accelerators we have extended our previous studies of energy dissipation phenomena into new energy regimes. The MSU measurements, performed with E/A = 15 to 30 MeV 14 N beams, combined with recent results we have obtained at IUCF, have indicated the existence of a saturation in the average amount of linear momentum that can be transferred in nucleus-nucleus collisions. This saturation value is about 140 (MeV/C)/A and occurs at beam energies in the E/A approx. 30 to 50 MeV range for 3 He- to 20 Ne-projectiles. At HHIRF, studies of the 56 Fe + 56 Fe reaction at E/A = 14.6 MeV have provided additional evidence for structure in the energy spectra of projectile-like fragments formed in symmetric collisions. Studies of near-barrier 56 Fe-induced reactions have continued at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory SuperHILAC

  14. Comparison of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury and selenium in feathers in bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), and comparison with common eider (Somateria mollissima), glaucous-winged gull (Larus glaucescens), pigeon guillemot (Cepphus columba), and tufted puffin (Fratercula cirrhata) from the Aleutian Chain of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael

    2014-01-01

    There is an abundance of field data for levels of metals from a range of places, but relatively few from the North Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea. In this paper we examine the levels of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury and selenium in feathers from common eiders (Somateria mollissima), glaucous-winged gulls (Larus glaucescens), pigeon guillemots (Cepphus columba), tufted puffins (Fratercula cirrhata) and bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) from the Aleutian Chain of Alaska. Our primary objective was to test the hypothesis that there are no trophic levels relationships for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury and selenium among these five species of birds breeding in the marine environment of the Aleutians. There were significant interspecific differences in all metal levels. As predicted bald eagles had the highest levels of arsenic, chromium, lead, and manganese, but puffins had the highest levels of selenium, and pigeon guillemot had higher levels of mercury than eagles (although the differences were not significant). Common eiders, at the lowest trophic level had the lowest levels of some metals (chromium, mercury and selenium). However, eiders had higher levels than all other species (except eagles) for arsenic, cadmium, lead, and manganese. Levels of lead were higher in breast than in wing feathers of bald eagles. Except for lead, there were no significant differences in metal levels in feathers of bald eagles nesting on Adak and Amchitka Island; lead was higher on Adak than Amchitka. Eagle chicks tended to have lower levels of manganese than older eagles. PMID:18521716

  15. Progressive Salafism in Online Fatwa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rusli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the construction of progressive Salafism in online fatwa, particularly in the site of Islam Online. This website is established by Yūsuf al-Qarāḍāwī and his colleagues within the European Council for Fatwa and Research, which has been influenced by reformist-salafists, such as al-Shawkānī, al-Afghānī, ‘Abduh, and Riḍā, who underline the role of text and modernity. The site’s approach is progressive-substantialist (combining teks and reality, which is built on the principles of Islamic law on minorities (fiqh al-aqalliyyāt, like taysīr (facilitation, wasaṭiyyah (moderation, and i’tidāl (equilibrium, that are seen as universal values contributing to the creation of a global-pluralist society. Because of its moderate nature, the language used by the site tends to emphasize not on prohibiting and labelling “heretic”, but on a solution to the problems people encounter. In relation to socio-political language, the concept of ummah is understood in an inclusive way. Ummah is built and based on the principles of belief (īmān and Islam, and tied by the solidarity of the Quranic messages about Islamic monotheism (tawḥīd and divine justice (‘adl. The concept of ummah refers to the Quranic concepts such as ummah wasaṭ or ummah muqtaṣidah, which means “moderate community”.[Artikel ini membahas tentang konstruksi Salafisme progresif dalam fatwa online, terutama situs Islam Online. Website ini didorong oleh Yūsuf al-Qarāḍāwī dan para koleganya dalam European Council for Fatwa and Research, yang dipengaruhi oleh salafi-reformis, seperti al-Shawkānī, al-Afghānī, ‘Abduh, dan Riḍā, yang menghargai teks dan modernitas. Pendekatan situs ini adalah progresif-substansialis (menggabungkan teks dan realitas, yang dibangun pada prinsip-prinsip fikih minoritas (fiqh al-aqalliyyāt, seperti taysīr (memberikan kemudahan, wasaṭiyyah (moderat, dan i’tidāl (keseimbangan,yang dilihat sebagai

  16. Progress in absorber R and D for muon cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, D.M. E-mail: kaplan@fnal.gov; Black, E.L.; Boghosian, M.; Cassel, K.W.; Johnson, R.P.; Geer, S.; Johnstone, C.J.; Popovic, M.; Ishimoto, S.; Yoshimura, K.; Bandura, L.; Cummings, M.A.; Dyshkant, A.; Hedin, D.; Kubik, D.; Darve, C.; Kuno, Y.; Errede, D.; Haney, M.; Majewski, S.; Reep, M.; Summers, D

    2003-05-01

    A stored-muon-beam neutrino factory may require transverse ionization cooling of the muon beam. We describe recent progress in research and development on energy absorbers for muon-beam cooling carried out by a collaboration of university and laboratory groups.

  17. A Small Business Management Entrepreneurship Curriculum: A Dual Progression Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuratko, Donald; LaFollette, William R.

    1986-01-01

    Describes Ball State University's "dual progression" curriculum for the small business management program. The program seeks to combine the best elements of entrepreneurial theory with the difficult facets of practical experience. The five major component courses (small business ventures, entrepreneurship, management information systems,…

  18. Research program in elementary-particle theory. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudarshan, E.C.G.; Ne'eman, Y.

    1982-08-01

    This progress report of the Center for Particle Theory of the University of Texas at Austin reviews the work done over the past year and is part of the renewal proposal for the period from January 1, 1983 to December 31, 1983

  19. A Safe and Welcoming Place?: Workplace Progression for Women Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Jean; O'Rourke, Rebecca

    1995-01-01

    Interviews with seven women lecturers and five administrative/library staff at Leeds University uncovered the following: differential career paths for women and men; a link between the extent of career progression and working full or part time; and few opportunities for gender issues to be openly discussed in the academic workplace. (SK)

  20. Students' Progress throughout Examination Process as a Markov Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavatý, Robert; Dömeová, Ludmila

    2014-01-01

    The paper is focused on students of Mathematical methods in economics at the Czech university of life sciences (CULS) in Prague. The idea is to create a model of students' progress throughout the whole course using the Markov chain approach. Each student has to go through various stages of the course requirements where his success depends on the…

  1. Studies of radiation and chemical toxicity. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Annual report for the Studies of Radiation and Chemical Toxicity Program at the University of Rochester is presented. Progress is reported on four projects: Neurobehavorial Toxicity of Organometallic Fuel Additives, Mechanisms of Permanent and Delayed Pathologic Effects of Ionizing Radiation, Solid State Radiation Chemistry of the DNA Backbone, and Pulmonary Biochemistry

  2. Progress in research, January 1-October 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-11-01

    Progress in basic research in nuclear physics carried out by the theoretical nuclear physics group of the Department of Physics of The University of Texas at Austin is reviewed in the following areas: reactions induced by low energy light ions, heavy ion induced reactions, medium energy physics, and nuclear collective motions

  3. The Invisibility of Evil: Moral Progress and the 'Animal Holocaust ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... while for others it articulates the challenge of bringing non-human sentient beings into the same moral universe as their human counterparts. The paper concludes by asking whether such moral progress can ever render the death of human beings and animals similar in kind. Philosophical Papers Vol.32(2) 2003: 109-131 ...

  4. Students' Knowledge Progression: Sustainable Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovio-Johansson, Airi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenographic study is to examine students' knowledge progression in a three-year Bachelor program in Business Administration. Theoretical sampling was used to select nine students from a group of 200 university students admitted to the program. The students were interviewed on three occasions: Year 1, after their Management…

  5. Development Labs: University Knowledge Production and Global Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Christopher S.

    2017-01-01

    In 2012, the United States Agency for International Development allocated $137 million to fund seven universities to create "development labs" to advance social/economic progress and reduce poverty. International economic development has become a booming field and industry but is also highly contested. The function of the university as a…

  6. A Perspective on Student Learning Outcome Assessment at Qatar University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Thani, Shaikha Jabor; Abdelmoneim, Ali; Daoud, Khaled; Cherif, Adel; Moukarzel, Dalal

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a unique perspective on the student learning outcome assessment process as adopted and implemented at Qatar University from 2006 to 2012. The progress of the student learning outcome assessment and continuous improvement efforts at the university and the initiatives taken to establish a culture of assessment and evidence-based…

  7. The Dissociative University: Pragmatist Reconstructions in Democratic Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachem, Ali H.

    2016-01-01

    The American university is in transition, witnessing major changes to its institutional structures and processes. While the 1960s and 1970s were decades of progressive democratization in American higher education, today's university is more aligned with the economic theory of neoliberalism. Existing at the intersection of two dominant but…

  8. A Fair Path Toward Universal Coverage: National Case Study for ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    A Fair Path Toward Universal Coverage: National Case Study for Ethiopia, Uganda, and Zambia. As national health systems in developing countries make progress toward achieving universal health service coverage, many face ethical challenges. In its 2010 World Health Report, the World Health Assembly called on the ...

  9. The Global University Press

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The modern world's understanding of American university press has long been shaped by university-press books. American university-press books are good international advertisements for the universities whose logos grace their spines. The growth of transnational scholarship and the expansion of digital communications networks are converging in ways…

  10. Factors Affecting Career Progress of MBA Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien T. Supangco

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper explored the factors that affect career progress of students in the MBA program of the University of the Philippines.To understand career progression, four measures of career progress were used in this study, namely: number of promotions, number of years in between promotions, total cash compensation, and number of administrative levels from the company president. On the other hand, the factors used to explain career progess included human capital, organizational, interpersonal and demographic variables.The results showed that the different measures of career progress had distinct determinants implying different dynamics. It appeared that measures of career progress that are sensitive to the value employers attach to the individual (Whitely, Dougherty, & Dreher, 1991 such as total compensation, total number of promotion and years per promotion were related with human capital factors such as work experience and number of companies worked for. On the other hand, measures that relate to centrality if the position, in which market forces have less impact, were associated with organizational variables such as organization size and the demographic variable gender.While gender did not explain variation in total compensation, number of promotions and number of uears between promotions, these null results are important for two reasons. First, it implies that the female MBA students were at par with their male counterparts as fas as these measures of career progress are concerned. Second, it challenges the generalizability of the finding of gender segregation at the organizational level-where men receive significantly higher wages that women-which is a common finding among studies done in the United States. The results using the MBA students as sample show that income and promotion parity may indeed be achievable and this brings hope to women in general.However, the statistical significance of gender in explaining career progress as centrality

  11. Progress report 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Developments in electronics included a hall probe for the TRIUMF facility, a wire chamber delay line amplifier, filter boards, NMR, photomultiplier headers, LED pulsers, wire chambers, and a digital signal amplifier. In addition to their involvement in the TRIUMF experimental program, University of Alberta personnel are involved with the operation and design of primary beamlines and secondary channels. Recent projects included medium resolution spectrometer upgrade and twister, the production of complete longitudinal polarization, the M11 pion channel, kaon factory studies, and beam transport improvements. The current experimental program includes work on n-p, p + 16 O, and p-p scattering, radiative polarized neutron capture, and proton-proton bremsstrahlung. Theoretical studies and the future research program are also outlined

  12. Nuclear chemistry progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viola, V.E.; Kwiatkowski, K.

    1991-08-01

    During the past year the Nuclear Chemistry Group at Indiana University has concentrated its efforts on (1) the analysis and publication of previous experimental studies and (2) the design and construction of ISiS, a 4π detector for multifragment emission studies. No new experiments were undertaken, rather all of our experimental effort has been directed toward component tests of ISiS, with a goal of beginning measurements with this device in 1992. Research projects that have been largely completed during the last year include: (1) multiple fragment emission studies of the 0.90 and 3.6 GeV 3 He + nat Ag reaction; (2) intermediate-mass-fragment (IMF: 3 ≤ Z ≤ 15) excitation function measurements for the E/A = 20-to-100 MeV 14 N + nat Ag and 197 Au reactions, and (3) particle-particle correlation studies for the determination of space-time relationships energy collisions

  13. Dynamically prioritized progressive transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanford, Ronald

    1992-04-01

    Retrieval of image data from a centralized database may be subject to bandwidth limitations, whether due to a low-bandwidth communications link or to contention from simultaneous accesses over a high-bandwidth link. Progressive transmission can alleviate this problem by encoding image data so that any prefix of the data stream approximates the complete image at a coarse level of resolution. The longer the prefix, the finer the resolution. In many cases, as little at 1 percent of the image data may be sufficient to decide whether to discard the image, to permit the retrieval to continue, or to restrict retrieval to a subsection of the image. Our approach treats resolution not as a fixed attribute of the image, but rather as a resource which may be allocated to portions of the image at the direction of a user-specified priority function. The default priority function minimizes error by allocating more resolution to regions of high variance. The user may also point to regions of interest requesting priority transmission. More advanced target recognition strategies may be incorporated at the user's discretion. Multispectral imagery is supported. The user engineering implications are profounded. There is immediate response to a query that might otherwise take minutes to complete. The data is transmitted in small increments so that no single user dominates the communications bandwidth. The user-directed improvement means that bandwidth is focused on interesting information. The user may continue working with the first coarse approximations while further image data is still arriving. The algorithm has been implemented in C on Sun, Silicon Graphics, and NeXT workstations, and in Lisp on a Symbolics. Transmission speeds reach as high as 60,000 baud using a Sparc or 68040 processor when storing data to memory; somewhat less if also updating a graphical display. The memory requirements are roughly five bytes per image pixel. Both computational and memory costs may be reduced

  14. Progression in nuclear classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuying

    1999-01-01

    In this book, summarize the author's achievements of nuclear classification by new method in latest 30 years, new foundational law of nuclear layer in matter world is found. It is explained with a hypothesis of a nucleus which it is made up of two nucleon's clusters with deuteron and triton. Its concrete content is: to advance a new method which analyze data of nuclei with natural abundance using relationship between the numbers of proton and neutron. The relationship of each nucleus increases to 4 sets: S+H=Z H+Z=N Z+N=A and S-H=K. To expand the similarity between proton and neutron to the similarity among p,n, deuteron, triton, and He-5 clusters. According to the distribution law of same kind of nuclei, it obtains that the upper limits of stable region both should be '44s'. New foundational law of nuclear system is 1,2,4,8,16,8,4,2,1. In order to explain new law, a hypothesis which nucleus is made up of deuteron and triton is developing and nuclear field of whole number is built up. And it relates that unity of matter motion, which is the most foundational form atomic nuclear systematic is similar to the most first-class form chromosome numbers of mankind. These achievements will shake the foundations of traditional nuclear science. These achievements will supply new tasks in developing nuclear theory. And shake the ground of which magic number is the basic of nuclear science. It opens up a new field on foundational research. The book will supply new knowledge for researcher, teachers and students in universities and polytechnic schools. Scientific workers read in works of research and technical exploit. It can be stored up for library and laboratory of society and universities. In nowadays of prosperity our nation by science and education, the book is readable for workers of scientific technology and amateurs of natural science

  15. Progress report 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The facilities at the Studsvik Research Centre serve as a basis for fundamental research. The neutron diffraction work aiming at determining crystal structures has continued both with single crystals and with powders in collaboration with university groups from Lund, Goeteborg, Stockholm, Umeaa and Uppsala. Facilities for work on proteins and on liqiuds will be installed. Results for a number of compounds are reported. Neutron diffraction studies are made on molecular motion in liquid metals and salts, the determination of static and dynamic scattering factors in liqiuid metals and the diffusion of hydrogen in alloys. Another field is the elementary excitations in liquid 3 He, and studies of nuclear spin ordering in solid 3 He. On-line-isotope-separator experiments (OSIRIS) has been performed using a conventional target-ion source system. The main research activity has been on decay properties, including delayed neutrons, for short-lived, very neutron rich fission products. Other aspects of fission, and also heavy-ion induced reactions are studied in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Oregon State University. Work is done on construction of a high temperature ion-source. The Van der Graff-accelerator for various experiments in neutron physics, including reference work on scattering of neutrons from carbon. The accelerator is also used for inegral determinations of decay heat in nuclear fuel, for development of neutron diagnostical methods for use in fusion experiments, for study of (α,n)-processes of astrophysical importance, and as an analytical tool using the PIXE technique. The radiation chemical group has continued their studies of primary reactions in crystalline materials using pulse radiolysis and ESR spectrometry techniques. The optical properties and the reactions of trapped electrons have been investigated. Recently cationic species of hydrocarbons have been studied using ESR. (PAa)

  16. Enlistment Propensities of University Students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moskos, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Enlistment propensities of undergraduates were assessed through surveys conducted at Northwestern University, University of Arizona, University of California-Los Angeles, and University of Illinois-Chicago...

  17. IPY Progress and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, D.

    2008-12-01

    We can summarize the IPY goals as: (a) make major advances in polar knowledge and understanding; (b) leave a legacy of new or enhanced observational systems, facilities and infrastructure; (c) excite a new generation of polar scientists and engineers, and (d) elicit exceptional interest and participation from polar residents, schoolchildren, the general public, and decision-makers, worldwide. This talk reports on the progress and prospects in each of those areas from an overall international view; separate talks will describe details of future researcher and the IPY outreach efforts. To achieve major advances in knowledge, IPY has entrained the intellectual resources of thousands of scientists, many more than expected, often from 'non- polar' nations, and representing an unprecedented breadth of scientific specialties; integration of those efforts across disciplines to achieve integrated system-level understanding remains a substantial challenge. Many national and international organizations prepare plans to sustain new and improved observational systems, but clear outcomes and the necessary resources remain elusive. International outreach networks gradually build breadth and strength, largely through IPY Polar Science Days and other internationally- coordinated IPY events. A new Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) devotes talent and energy to shaping the future of polar research. These activities and networks may, with time and with continued international coordination, achieve an exceptional level of interest and participation. In all areas, much work remains.

  18. CERN: LHC progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The push for CERN's next major project, the LHC proton collider to be built in the 27-kilometre LEP tunnel, is advancing on a wide front. For the machine itself, there has been considerable progress in the detailed design. While the main thrust is for proton-proton collisions, heavy ions are also on the LHC collision menu. On the experimental side, proposals are coming into sharper focus. For the machine, the main aim is for the highest possible proton collision energies and collision rates in the confines of the existing LEP tunnel, and the original base design looked to achieve these goals in three collision regions. Early discussions on the experimental programme quickly established that the most probable configuration would have two collision regions rather than three. This, combined with hints that the electronics of several detectors would have to handle several bunch crossings at a time, raised the question whether the originally specified bunch spacing of 15 ns was still optimal

  19. Progress in neuromorphic photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira de Lima, Thomas; Shastri, Bhavin J.; Tait, Alexander N.; Nahmias, Mitchell A.; Prucnal, Paul R.

    2017-03-01

    As society's appetite for information continues to grow, so does our need to process this information with increasing speed and versatility. Many believe that the one-size-fits-all solution of digital electronics is becoming a limiting factor in certain areas such as data links, cognitive radio, and ultrafast control. Analog photonic devices have found relatively simple signal processing niches where electronics can no longer provide sufficient speed and reconfigurability. Recently, the landscape for commercially manufacturable photonic chips has been changing rapidly and now promises to achieve economies of scale previously enjoyed solely by microelectronics. By bridging the mathematical prowess of artificial neural networks to the underlying physics of optoelectronic devices, neuromorphic photonics could breach new domains of information processing demanding significant complexity, low cost, and unmatched speed. In this article, we review the progress in neuromorphic photonics, focusing on photonic integrated devices. The challenges and design rules for optoelectronic instantiation of artificial neurons are presented. The proposed photonic architecture revolves around the processing network node composed of two parts: a nonlinear element and a network interface. We then survey excitable lasers in the recent literature as candidates for the nonlinear node and microring-resonator weight banks as the network interface. Finally, we compare metrics between neuromorphic electronics and neuromorphic photonics and discuss potential applications.

  20. Progress report, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The report describes a number of areas of research at the TRIUMPH facility. Substantial progress has been made in the experiment to measure charge symmetry breaking in the n-p system. The investigations on polarized nucleon radiative capture on light nuclei have been ongoing with results of the excitation function for p + d→γ + 3 He reaction being published. Studies of the n + p→d + γ reactions are continuing. Results have been obtained in the determination of structure in the three nucleon system by studying the reaction anti d + p using tensor polarized deuterons. The Wolfenstein R-parameter in proton - 4 He elastic scattering has been measured at 500 MeV from 15 to 50 degrees (lab.) using the focal plane polarimeter on the MRS. Other experiments involving quasi-elastic scattering of polarized protons at 300 MeV, fission evaporation competition in heavy nuclei and proton-proton bremsstrahlung have been carried out. The status of the Bevelac heavy ion collaboration and the MWPC facility is also included

  1. Progressive myoclonic epilepsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelucci, Roberto; Canafoglia, Laura; Striano, Pasquale; Gambardella, Antonio; Magaudda, Adriana; Tinuper, Paolo; La Neve, Angela; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Visani, Elisa; Panzica, Ferruccio; Avanzini, Giuliano; Tassinari, Carlo Alberto; Bianchi, Amedeo; Zara, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To define the clinical spectrum and etiology of progressive myoclonic epilepsies (PMEs) in Italy using a database developed by the Genetics Commission of the Italian League against Epilepsy. Methods: We collected clinical and laboratory data from patients referred to 25 Italian epilepsy centers regardless of whether a positive causative factor was identified. PMEs of undetermined origins were grouped using 2-step cluster analysis. Results: We collected clinical data from 204 patients, including 77 with a diagnosis of Unverricht-Lundborg disease and 37 with a diagnosis of Lafora body disease; 31 patients had PMEs due to rarer genetic causes, mainly neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses. Two more patients had celiac disease. Despite extensive investigation, we found no definitive etiology for 57 patients. Cluster analysis indicated that these patients could be grouped into 2 clusters defined by age at disease onset, age at myoclonus onset, previous psychomotor delay, seizure characteristics, photosensitivity, associated signs other than those included in the cardinal definition of PME, and pathologic MRI findings. Conclusions: Information concerning the distribution of different genetic causes of PMEs may provide a framework for an updated diagnostic workup. Phenotypes of the patients with PME of undetermined cause varied widely. The presence of separate clusters suggests that novel forms of PME are yet to be clinically and genetically characterized. PMID:24384641

  2. Resistance to technological progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isensee, J.

    1983-01-01

    This article deals with the tolerance test the constitutional system (Basic Law) of the Federal Republic of Germany is currently put to as a consequence of the resistance to the power structure of this country, which is expressed in the name of protection and defense for the environment and world peace. This biopacifistic resistance movment, the author says, has nothing to do with the legal right to resist, as laid down in art. 20 (4) of the Basic Law. According to the author, this attitude is an offspring of fear of the hazards of technological progress, primarily of nuclear hazards. Practical resistance, the author states, is preceded by theoretical resistance in speech: De-legitimation of the democratic legality, of the parliamentary functions, of the supreme power of the government, and denial of the citizens duty of obedience. The author raises the question as to whether this attitude of disobedience on ecological grounds marks the onset of a fourth stage of development of the modern state, after we have passed through stages characterised by fear of civil war, of tyranny, and of social privation and suffering. There are no new ideas brought forward by the ecologically minded movement, the author says, for re-shaping our institutions or constitutional system. (HP) [de

  3. Fusion the energy of the universe

    CERN Document Server

    McCracken, Garry

    2012-01-01

    Fusion: The Energy of the Universe, 2e is an essential reference providing basic principles of fusion energy from its history to the issues and realities progressing from the present day energy crisis. The book provides detailed developments and applications for researchers entering the field of fusion energy research. This second edition includes the latest results from the National Ignition Facility at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at Livermore, CA, and the progress on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak programme at Caderache, France.

  4. Frontotemporal dementia and primary progressive aphasia, a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirshner HS

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Howard S KirshnerDepartment of Neurology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Frontotemporal dementias are neurodegenerative diseases in which symptoms of frontal and/or temporal lobe disease are the first signs of the illness, and as the diseases progress, they resemble a focal left hemisphere process such as stroke or traumatic brain injury, even more than a neurodegenerative disease. Over time, some patients develop a more generalized dementia. Four clinical subtypes characterize the predominant presentations of this illness: behavioral or frontal variant FTD, progressive nonfluent aphasia, semantic dementia, and logopenic primary progressive aphasia. These clinical variants correlate with regional patterns of atrophy on brain imaging studies such as MRI and PET scanning, as well as with biochemical and molecular genetic variants of the disorder. The treatment is as yet only symptomatic, but advances in molecular genetics promise new therapies.Keywords: FTD, behavior variant or frontal variant FTD, pick's disease, PPA, progressive nonfluent aphasia

  5. Progress in fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    thermonuclear research, the work was being conducted on more or less similar lines, the basic problems encountered were the same and the results obtained were strikingly similar. Commenting on this fact, Professor Edward Teller of the United States said: 'it is remarkable how closely parallel the developments are. This is of course due to the fact that we all live in the same world and all obey the same laws of nature'. And this underlined, more than ever before, the need for a wide exchange of knowledge and experience so that duplication of effort could be avoided and progress made quicker by a pooling of information on the latest experimental results and theoretical deductions. A major concrete step in this direction has been taken by the Scientific Advisory Committee of the International Atomic Energy Agency, which recommended that the Agency should serve as the world focal point for the exchange of information on progress in thermonuclear research and plasma physics. Among the Committee's specific recommendations was that the Agency should start a scientific journal devoted exclusively to this subject. The proposed journal is expected to make its first appearance next year. It will contain, among other things, original papers on theoretical and applied research as well as on related engineering developments. Also the need arises for a permanent forum need will be met in large measure by IAEA's programme of work in this field

  6. The Thermochronologist's Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitler, P. K.

    2011-12-01

    We owe our current understanding of thermochronology less to a series of revolutionary insights than to a somewhat uneven intellectual pilgrimage that over fifty years has progressed in fits and starts. Though hampered at times by overenthusiasm, oversimplification, and misunderstandings, on balance the field advanced thanks to a blend of curiosity-driven research, tool-building motivated by new ideas about Earth science, and improvements in technology. But now that we've exploited most radiogenic systems and the major minerals that host them, and now that our models can devour CPU time along with the best of them, are we done? Have we reached peak thermochron? The answer of course is no, and papers in this session will demonstrate what new technologies and techniques might have to offer in the coming years. However, I will argue that the discipline as a whole has matured to a point where if thermochronology is to remain a mainstream tool as opposed to a weekend sport, we need to get serious about several challenges. The most fundamental challenge is that current geodynamic models (and even more complex models we can envision coding) have outpaced our meagre stockpile of kinetic calibrations, our understanding of detailed isotope systematics, and our ability to generate data with sufficient throughput. These issues will not be addressed adequately through the business-as-usual approach that brought us to our current knowledge, and some community effort will probably be needed to coordinate the hard work that will be required. But any serious attempt to answer important questions with accurate thermal histories that have low and well-defined uncertainties will require that we actually know the kinetics for the specific samples we are analyzing, that we fully understand scatter in the data, that we work with the large sample numbers that are required for some problems like landscape evolution, and that inversion tools fully explore the important aspects of both the

  7. Medulloblastoma: progress over time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smee, Robert I.; Williams, Janet R.; De-loyde, Katie J.; Meagher, Nicola S.; Cohn, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common central nervous system tumour in children aged 0–4 years, with 75% of cases occurring in patients <16 years, and rare in adults. The intent of this audit is to review a single centre's experience and to compare outcomes with other centres' outcomes. This Ethics approved retrospective audit evaluates the paediatric population aged <16 years who received radiotherapy as their initial or salvage treatment at the Prince of Wales Hospital Cancer Centre between 1972 and 2007. The primary and secondary end-points were progression-free survival (PFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS), with comparisons made between patients treated before and after 1990, and the impact of high- and low-risk disease. There were 80 eligible patients, 78 who had radiotherapy at initial presentation, and 2 at the time of recurrence. Median age was 6.5 years, 52 were boys and 28 were girls. Seventy-eight patients had a surgical procedure and ultimately received craniospinal radiotherapy. Of these 78 patients, 32 (40%) had a macroscopically complete resection. The 5-year PFS was 69.7%. The 5-year PFS for patients treated pre and post 1990 was 66.1% and 71.8%, respectively. The 5-year CSS for high- and low-risk patients was 61.1% and 78.4%, respectively. Ultimately, 33% of patients were dead due to disease. This audit demonstrates those children referred to this facility for treatment have comparable survival to that of other major centres.

  8. 2004 Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batistoni, Paola; De Marco, Francesco; Pieroni, Leonardo

    2005-01-01

    Fusion research is undertaken all over the world with the objective of realising an environmentally responsible source of energy with essentially unlimited and widely distributed fuel reserves. The results of the worldwide efforts made in recent years are now embodied in ITER, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, designed to produce at least 500 MW of fusion power with a power gain of ten. ITER will test for the first time the interaction of fusion plasma physics with power station technology. In this international framework, during 2004 Fusion Technical and Scientific Unit of ENEA obtained important results in several keys areas. At the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade the lower hybrid microwave system was fully exploited to study the generation and control of the plasma current, and the electron cyclotron heating system reached full power (1.5 MW). With the simultaneous injection of the two waves, good energy confinement regimes with internal transport barriers were obtained at the highest plasma densities ever achieved. Advanced scenario regimes were also addressed in the activities of ENEA at JET. The engineering design of the IGNITOR machine was finalised, and significant progress was made in understanding the plasma physics regimes. Among the technology activities, the qualification of the deposition process of a copper liner on carbon fibre composite (CFC) hollow tiles may be mentioned as the most important achievement. This innovative pre brazed casting process is a competitive candidate for the fabrication of the CFCbased ITER divertor components. ENEA participated in the European activity for the definition and production on an industrial scale of an advanced Nb3Sn strand for the ITER superconducting central solenoid and toroidal field coils. Contributions were also made to the design of the final conductor layout and the characterisation tests. Inertial fusion studies continued along the previous lines, namely, the study of the implosion

  9. 1997 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecchini, M.; Crescentini, L.; Ghezzi, L. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Nuclear fusion division

    1997-12-31

    1997 was another year of intense activity for the ENEA Nuclear Fusion Division in the evolving scenario of fusion research. With respect to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), a major review process has started, originate by the wide perception that the difficult financial situation affecting some of the parties would make it very difficult, practically impossible, to secure funding for the project as it stands. To scale down the size and cost of the machine by reducing the technical objectives, while keeping to the programmatic goal of constructing a demonstration reactor (DEMO) as the following step, appears achievable. Progress in physics was substantial during 1997. Analysis of the huge existing database, complemented by the latest results, had led to a better, more accurate scaling for the confinement time on which to base extrapolation to ITER. Studies of the very promising advanced regimes have been pursued on many tokamaks. The Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) is well placed in this respect since it is equipped with the right tools, lower hybrid and electron cyclotron radiofrequency heating and current drive systems, to explore the new promised land of low transport from the plasma core. The main highlights of FTU operation in 1997 were related to providing information relevant to these future developments. Transient production of low transport regimes with electron temperatures of 8-9 keV at the plasma center was obtained by taking advantage of the plasma skin effect and precise electron cyclotron power deposition. High-efficiency current drive at high density using lower hybrid waves was demonstrated. High-confinement pellet-enhanced modes of operation and good ion Bernstein wave coupling through the waveguide-type coupler were also achieved. Concerning the IGNITOR experiment, funds were made available only for continuation of the engineering design activities, and nothing has been released so far for manufacturing the additional

  10. 2004 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batistoni, Paola; De Marco, Francesco; Pieroni, Leonardo [ed.

    2005-07-01

    Fusion research is undertaken all over the world with the objective of realising an environmentally responsible source of energy with essentially unlimited and widely distributed fuel reserves. The results of the worldwide efforts made in recent years are now embodied in ITER, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, designed to produce at least 500 MW of fusion power with a power gain of ten. ITER will test for the first time the interaction of fusion plasma physics with power station technology. In this international framework, during 2004 Fusion Technical and Scientific Unit of ENEA obtained important results in several keys areas. At the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade the lower hybrid microwave system was fully exploited to study the generation and control of the plasma current, and the electron cyclotron heating system reached full power (1.5 MW). With the simultaneous injection of the two waves, good energy confinement regimes with internal transport barriers were obtained at the highest plasma densities ever achieved. Advanced scenario regimes were also addressed in the activities of ENEA at JET. The engineering design of the IGNITOR machine was finalised, and significant progress was made in understanding the plasma physics regimes. Among the technology activities, the qualification of the deposition process of a copper liner on carbon fibre composite (CFC) hollow tiles may be mentioned as the most important achievement. This innovative pre brazed casting process is a competitive candidate for the fabrication of the CFCbased ITER divertor components. ENEA participated in the European activity for the definition and production on an industrial scale of an advanced Nb3Sn strand for the ITER superconducting central solenoid and toroidal field coils. Contributions were also made to the design of the final conductor layout and the characterisation tests. Inertial fusion studies continued along the previous lines, namely, the study of the implosion

  11. 1997 Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecchini, M.; Crescentini, L.; Ghezzi, L.

    1997-01-01

    1997 was another year of intense activity for the ENEA Nuclear Fusion Division in the evolving scenario of fusion research. With respect to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), a major review process has started, originate by the wide perception that the difficult financial situation affecting some of the parties would make it very difficult, practically impossible, to secure funding for the project as it stands. To scale down the size and cost of the machine by reducing the technical objectives, while keeping to the programmatic goal of constructing a demonstration reactor (DEMO) as the following step, appears achievable. Progress in physics was substantial during 1997. Analysis of the huge existing database, complemented by the latest results, had led to a better, more accurate scaling for the confinement time on which to base extrapolation to ITER. Studies of the very promising advanced regimes have been pursued on many tokamaks. The Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) is well placed in this respect since it is equipped with the right tools, lower hybrid and electron cyclotron radiofrequency heating and current drive systems, to explore the new promised land of low transport from the plasma core. The main highlights of FTU operation in 1997 were related to providing information relevant to these future developments. Transient production of low transport regimes with electron temperatures of 8-9 keV at the plasma center was obtained by taking advantage of the plasma skin effect and precise electron cyclotron power deposition. High-efficiency current drive at high density using lower hybrid waves was demonstrated. High-confinement pellet-enhanced modes of operation and good ion Bernstein wave coupling through the waveguide-type coupler were also achieved. Concerning the IGNITOR experiment, funds were made available only for continuation of the engineering design activities, and nothing has been released so far for manufacturing the additional

  12. HYLIFE-2 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Adamson, M.G.; Bangerter, R.O.; Bieri, R.L.; Condit, R.H.; Hartman, C.W.; House, P.A.; Langdon, A.B.; Logan, B.G.; Orth, C.D.; Petzoldt, R.W.; Pitts, J.H.; Post, R.F.; Sacks, R.A.; Tobin, M.T.; Williams, W.H.; Dolan, T.J.; Longhurst, G.R.; Hoffman, M.A.; Meier, W.R.

    1991-12-01

    LIFE-II inertial confinement fusion power plant design study uses a liquid fall, in the form of jets to protect the first structural wall from neutron damage, x rays, and blast to provide a 30-y lifetime. This is a progress report of an incomplete and ongoing study. HYLIFE-I used liquid lithium. HYLIFE-11 avoids the fire hazard of lithium by using a molten salt composed of fluorine, lithium, and beryllium (Li 2 Be 4 ) called Flibe. Access for heavy-ion beams is provided. Calculations for assumed heavy-ion beam performance show a nominal gain of 70 at 5 MJ producing 350 MJ, about 5.2 times less yield than the 1.8 GJ from a driver energy of 4.5 MJ with gain of 400 for HYLIFE-I. The nominal 1 GWe of power can be maintained by increasing the repetition rate by a factor of about 5.2, from 1.5 to 8 Hz. A higher repetition rate requires faster re-establishment of the jets after a shot, which can be accomplished in part by decreasing the jet fall height and increasing the jet flow velocity. Multiple chambers may be required.In addition, although not considered for HYLIFE-I there is undoubtedly liquid splash that must be forcibly cleared because gravity is too slow, especially at high repetition rates. Splash removal can be accomplished by either pulsed or oscillating jet flows. The cost of electricity is estimated to be 0.10 $/kW· in constant 1990 dollars, about twice that of future coal and light water reactor nuclear power. The driver beam cost is about one-half the total cost

  13. Progress report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Clean Air Hamilton is the new name of the Hamilton-Wentworth Air Quality Initiative and its implementation committee, which began in 1995 as a collaborative, multi-sectoral effort to identify and examine important air quality issues and to implement strategies to reduce many of the harmful emissions that endanger human health. During the year 2000 Clean Air Hamilton focused on nine program areas. Strategies were initiated to (1) reduce single occupancy auto trips, (2) purchase low emission vehicles, (3) model transportation emissions, (4) reduce smog-causing emissions, (5) plant trees, (6) provide advice on air quality related land use and transportation issues for consideration in city-wide planning, (7) promote public awareness through social marketing, (8) study fugitive road dust, and (9) reduce transboundary air pollution. A number of indicators to measure progress in efforts to improve air quality have been developed; many of these indicators show significant improvements which, taken collectively, show a positive trend toward cleaner air. The report highlights major accomplishment of Clean Air Hamilton; reports trends in ambient air quality data; assesses human health impacts of air quality, and recommends strategies for further improvements. Among major improvements, inhalable particulate (PM10) levels have decreased by about 20 per cent since 1991; sulphur dioxide levels dropped by 40 per cent since 1989 at industrial sampling sites and 20 per cent at the downtown sampling site; the air pollution index has remained under the advisory level of 32 at all API stations in Hamilton since June 1996. Benzene levels in air decreased by over 50 per cent near the Dofasco plant compared to the five-year composite average from 1994-1998. Given these accomplishments, participants in Clean Air Hamilton believe that while there is much room for improvement, the efforts to date have been worthwhile and provide encouragement for the future. 14 figs., 4 appendices

  14. 1997 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecchini, M; Crescentini, L; Ghezzi, L [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Nuclear fusion division

    1998-12-31

    1997 was another year of intense activity for the ENEA Nuclear Fusion Division in the evolving scenario of fusion research. With respect to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), a major review process has started, originate by the wide perception that the difficult financial situation affecting some of the parties would make it very difficult, practically impossible, to secure funding for the project as it stands. To scale down the size and cost of the machine by reducing the technical objectives, while keeping to the programmatic goal of constructing a demonstration reactor (DEMO) as the following step, appears achievable. Progress in physics was substantial during 1997. Analysis of the huge existing database, complemented by the latest results, had led to a better, more accurate scaling for the confinement time on which to base extrapolation to ITER. Studies of the very promising advanced regimes have been pursued on many tokamaks. The Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) is well placed in this respect since it is equipped with the right tools, lower hybrid and electron cyclotron radiofrequency heating and current drive systems, to explore the new promised land of low transport from the plasma core. The main highlights of FTU operation in 1997 were related to providing information relevant to these future developments. Transient production of low transport regimes with electron temperatures of 8-9 keV at the plasma center was obtained by taking advantage of the plasma skin effect and precise electron cyclotron power deposition. High-efficiency current drive at high density using lower hybrid waves was demonstrated. High-confinement pellet-enhanced modes of operation and good ion Bernstein wave coupling through the waveguide-type coupler were also achieved. Concerning the IGNITOR experiment, funds were made available only for continuation of the engineering design activities, and nothing has been released so far for manufacturing the additional

  15. Minimising Same Error Repetition and Maximising Progress in SLA: An Integrated Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadd, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Alderson teaches us that, "progress should be the aim of all learning". With the purpose of ensuring progress and enhancing first year students' learning of Italian as a second language, research into feedback and repair was undertaken at The University of Western Australia. The research--funded by the UWA Centre for the Advancement of…

  16. Scientific Progress in Strategic Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul

    Does the RBV represent a case of scientific progress? And has it emerged as the dominant approach to the analysis of competitive advantage for this reason? Conventional criteria for scientific progress, notably those of the growth of knowledge literature, are not particularly helpful for understa...

  17. Periodic progress report, 6 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    This is the first progress report of the BriteEuram project named "High Power Laser Cutting for Heavy Industry" ("Powercut"). The report contains a summary of the objectives of the first period, an overview of the technical progress, a comparison between the planed and the accomplished work...

  18. Progress report. P6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manokhin, V.N.; Maev, S.A.

    2001-01-01

    In CJD the current work continued concerning EXFOR compilation and fulfillment of NRDC-2000 Recommendations and Actions. Much efforts were applied for restoring CJD Web page. Evaluation works were also in process. Compilation into EXFOR continues on steadily. Since March 2000 up to April 2001 four TRANS tapes containing 69 Entries were prepared and sent to other centers. 25 new EXFOR Entries were compiled. An analysis and an evaluation are made for the threshold reactions cross sections leading to production of the long-lived radioactive nuclides on the irradiation of steel by thermonuclear neutron spectrum. Fifty excitation functions were evaluated. Many of them are considerably different from available evaluations of other libraries. During two years, together with JAERI, comparative analysis was performed of (n,2n) and (n,3n) reactions for 150 fission products from available evaluated data libraries. The result of analysis will be published this year. The joint work on consistent evaluation of some (n,2n) and (n,np) excitation functions for even-even isotopes was made on the basis of empirical systematics. The work was completed on evaluation of the spectra and production cross sections of gamma-rays in inelastic interactions of 14-Mev neutrons with the number of nuclei: Li-6, Li-7, Al, Ti, Cr, Fe, Cu, Pb, Bi, U-235. CJD continues the work on evaluation of neutron data for minor actinides. This year Am-242m will be evaluated, and Np-237, Am-241, Am-243, Cm-243, Cm-244 will be tested and improved. Full file of Bi was prepared. Full files for Pb isotopes are in process of preparation. There exist a plan to analyze full files for isotopes of Cr, Fe, Ni from existing evaluated data libraries, to select more reliable cross sections, and to create improved files for these isotopes. Together with the Theoretical Department the work is in progress on the determination of uncertainties of existing evaluated data and development of covariance matrices for some important

  19. Progress Report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The facilities at the Studsvik Research Centre serve as a basis for fundamental research. The neutron diffraction work aiming at determining crystal structures has continued both with single crystals and powders in collaboration with university groups from Lund, Stockholm, Goeteborg and Uppsala. Results are reported for a number of compounds. The neutron scattering studies deal with liquid metals and elementary excitations in liquid 3 He. Another project is to equip a reactor channel with a Sc filter to produce nearly mehoenergetic neutron beams. The R2-0 reactor is used in the isotope-separator-on-line experiment OSIRIS. The main research activity has been connected to studies of the properties of short-lived neutron-rich isotopes of zinc, gallium, germanium, bromine, cadmium, indium and iodine. Thermal neutron induced fission of 235 U at OSIRIS and heavy-ion induced regetions are studied as a collaboration project with a group at Lawrence Barkeley Laboratory. The Van de Graaff-accelerator is used for experiments in elastic scattering from radiogenic Pb and 209 Bi, inelastic scattering from 80 Y and 141 Pr. The accelerator is also used for analytical determinations using the PIXE technique. The radiation chemistry group has continued the studies of primary reactions in crystalline organic materials using pulse radiolysis and ESR spectroscopy techniques. The kinetics of the decay of the ions is determined after irradiations with a pulsed 800 kV electron accelerator of type Febetron. The laboratory has been financially supported by the Natural Science Research Council and the Board of Technical Development. A description of research programs is given and list of publication is presented. (G.B.)

  20. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-09-10

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 × 10{sup 34} cm{sup –2}s{sup –1}. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance (“cooling”). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

  1. The progress of hydrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, V T [University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1967-05-15

    This paper discusses mainly the challenge of hydrology, recent activities, events, and major problems in hydrology, and advances in hydrological techniques. New scientific knowledge and techniques developed in many modern scientific disciplines, and the recognition of the importance of hydrology in water-resources development enable and encourage the hydrologist to advance scientific hydrology. Many programmes to promote hydrology and to expand its attendant activities have been developed in recent years. Therefore, the activities in the United States of America, such as the Universities Council on Water Resources and the President's Water for Peace Programme, and the programmes in the International Hydrological Decade are mentioned. The most important advance in theoretical hydrology is the development of a new concept of dynamic sequential systems for the hydrological cycle, thus creating new fields of systems, parametric, and stochastic hydrology. Modern scientific instrumentation provide the hydrologist with better tools for solving his problems. The most important of these, such as electronic computers, remote sensing, and nuclear techniques are discussed. Today various major problems, both theoretical and practical, face the hydrologist. Theoretical problems concern the basic understanding of hydrological systems and the mathematical simulation and physical interpretation of hydrological phenomena. Major practical problems are numerous and diversified, but they are mostly related to the multiple-purpose development of water resources. Four central problematical subjects are discussed; namely, the effects of man on his environment, the dynamics of aqueous flow systems, hydrological transport mechanism, and groundwater hydrology. Also, the use of nuclear techniques in solving various hydrological problems is discussed. It is believed that the application of nuclear techniques would prove extremely valuable in helping solve problems, but their ultimate use in

  2. Final Technical Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.Y. Hwang; R.C. Greenlund

    2002-12-31

    Michigan Technological University has demonstrated major inroads in establishing the viability of utilizing aluminum smelting by-product waste materials in lightweight concrete product applications. The research identified key elements of producing various forms of lightweight concrete products through utilizing various procedures and mixture components with the by-product materials. A process was developed through pilot plant testing that results in additional aluminum recovery at finer sizes, a clean returnable salt product through spray drying technology, and a low-salt-content oxide product with enough aluminum metal content that it can be used to form lightweight cementitious mixtures. Having three distinct products aids in generating favorable process economics. Revenue projections from aluminum recovery and salt recovery are enough to cover processing costs and create a cost-free oxide product to market for lightweight concrete applications. This supply side commercialization strategy offers aluminum by-product recyclers a potentially no cost product, which has been demonstrated through this project to create desirable and marketable lightweight concrete products of various forms. Environmental benefits to the public are tremendous. At best, all dross and salt cake materials have the potential to be completely recycled and utilized. At worst, disposal sites would see a reduced amount of material: a post processed oxide product with little salt and no hydrogen sulfide or ammonia gas generating capability, which, if isolated from high alkali conditions, would pose no reactivity concerns. The US aluminum industry has historically, along with the steel industry, been a leader in recycling metal. The findings from this project, increased metal recovery, improved salt recycling, and demonstrated end uses for oxide residues, will go a long way in helping the aluminum industry obtain 100% material utilization and zero discharge.

  3. Progress Report for 1947

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Authors, Various

    1947-11-01

    The year 1947 has witnessed the dawn of a new era of atomic science, a flowering of fundamental knowledge of the nature of matter which appears to be unsurpassed even by that period of the 1930's which led to the age of plutonium. A great new cyclotron, an atom-smasher ten times more powerful than the one which brought plutonium into the world, has carried mankind over a new horizon of sub-atomic space. It has brought scientists at last to grips with the infinitely small and rapid forces, until now beyond reach, which operate within the incredibly tiny distances of nuclear space. On the new energy frontier created by the giant machine, now laws govern nuclear reactions. methods are at hand, heretofore unavailable, which permit the measurement and determination of the nature of sub-atomic forces. Under ultra-high energy bombardment, the nucleus presents a different appearance from the nucleus of Bohr and Rutherford, the nucleus of atomic energy fission. The new exploration of the atom has been sponsored by the Atomic Energy Commission with the giant, new 4000-ton cyclotron in the Radiation Laboratory of the University of California. This is the thirdmajor machine built by the Director of the Laboratory and inventor of the cyclotron, Professor Ernest O. Lawrence. Whether the new knowledge will be of immediate practical consequence cannot now be predicted. Nor could Professor Lawrence predict, when in 1934 he established a new atomic energy range for that day with his first cyclotron, that the fundamental knowledge he pursued would be climaxed with the discovery of plutonium. What can be predicted is this: without the new basic knowledge, practical atomic developments of the future would be limited to the applicability of the fundamental information which made possible the initial release of atomic energy. In short, the nation's atomic potential has been greatly expanded.

  4. The progress of hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, V.T.

    1967-01-01

    This paper discusses mainly the challenge of hydrology, recent activities, events, and major problems in hydrology, and advances in hydrological techniques. New scientific knowledge and techniques developed in many modern scientific disciplines, and the recognition of the importance of hydrology in water-resources development enable and encourage the hydrologist to advance scientific hydrology. Many programmes to promote hydrology and to expand its attendant activities have been developed in recent years. Therefore, the activities in the United States of America, such as the Universities Council on Water Resources and the President's Water for Peace Programme, and the programmes in the International Hydrological Decade are mentioned. The most important advance in theoretical hydrology is the development of a new concept of dynamic sequential systems for the hydrological cycle, thus creating new fields of systems, parametric, and stochastic hydrology. Modern scientific instrumentation provide the hydrologist with better tools for solving his problems. The most important of these, such as electronic computers, remote sensing, and nuclear techniques are discussed. Today various major problems, both theoretical and practical, face the hydrologist. Theoretical problems concern the basic understanding of hydrological systems and the mathematical simulation and physical interpretation of hydrological phenomena. Major practical problems are numerous and diversified, but they are mostly related to the multiple-purpose development of water resources. Four central problematical subjects are discussed; namely, the effects of man on his environment, the dynamics of aqueous flow systems, hydrological transport mechanism, and groundwater hydrology. Also, the use of nuclear techniques in solving various hydrological problems is discussed. It is believed that the application of nuclear techniques would prove extremely valuable in helping solve problems, but their ultimate use in

  5. Progress report - August 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    This report has been prepared by the Synroc Study Group (SSG), comprising staff members of The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, The Australian National University, The Broken Hill Proprietary Company Limited, CRA Limited, Energy Resources of Australia Limited and Western Mining Corporation Limited. It also draws upon work undertaken for the SSG by consultants from Nuclear Assurance Corporation (market estimates), the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) (cost estimates and other data) and Wave Hill Associates (US and international perspectives). Synroc is applicable solely to the immobilisation of liquid high-level waste after such waste has been separated from spent fuel in a reprocessing operation; use of Synroc therefore requires prior construction of a reprocessing plant. The study identifies five broad options in which Synroc can contribute to the safe disposal of nuclear spent fuel. These are: licensing Synroc for overseas organisations - allowing overseas use of the technology with royalties remitted to Australia; participation in overseas Synroc plants - using Australian expertise to trial Synroc facilities; reprocessing and Synroc operations in Australia with waste re-exported to customers for disposal overseas; establishment of an integrated spent fuel management facility outside Australia including a Synroc facility and final disposal; establish an integrated spent fuel management facility in Australia, including a Synroc facility and final disposal. An account of the SSG's public acceptance initiatives and activities to date, is found in Appendix II. Appendix III contains material derived from the SKB work on the costs of providing various waste management services, and outlines the economic factors affecting estimates of these costs. 86 refs., 13 tabs., 9 figs

  6. The Toy model: Understanding the early universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Peter H.; Price, Richard H.

    2018-04-01

    In many branches of science, progress is being made by taking advantage of insights from other branches of science. Cosmology, the structure and evolution of the universe, is certainly an area that is currently beset by problems in understanding. We show here that the scientific insights from the studies of early childhood development, in particular, those of Piaget, give a new way of looking at the early universe. This new approach can not only be invaluable in undergraduate teaching, but can even be the basis of semi-quantitative predictions.

  7. Cosmology understanding the evolution of the universe

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Bridging astronomy and physics, cosmology seeks to examine the nature of the universe as a whole. Scientific investigation of cosmology began in ancient times and progressed rapidly after the Scientific Revolution, which produced the discovery of gravity and the heliocentric model of Copernicus. This volume examines the historical developments in the field of cosmology, the evidence supporting the Big Bang theory, and the future implications of dark matter and an expanding universe. Readers will also be introduced to the various thinkers who helped advance study of this endlessly fascinating f

  8. Whither the African University

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sam

    reform. 1. Associate Professor, Department of Philosophy, Addis Ababa University ..... reduce African universities to virtually vocational schools. The World ..... theories, established institutions, and widely held beliefs according to the cannons ...

  9. Origin (?) of the Universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cal models of the universe are based on the idea, which is supported by ... Only the continuous distribution was clearly ... displaced from their natural locations, their observed wave- .... universe? Mathematical Models: Basic Assumptions.

  10. The Alien University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2018-01-01

    - they are alien. The conditions of universities today is not one of crisis and upheaval, as with the postmodern universities, it is one of night travel and exile. The alien university leaves behind the epistemological skirmishes of the postmodern university with all its rhetoric and knowledge activism. Thinking...... in the alien university is a move into a whirlpool of nothingness, a “nocturnal space”, where “[d]arkness fills it like a content; it is full, but full of the nothingness of everything.” (Levinas, 2001, p.53). In the alien university thinking is not situated, and instead of rhizomes, and assemblages of thought......, there is merely an imposing and nightly “swarming of points.” (ibid.). There is no place for the alien university, and exactly this exile of thought makes possible the move beyond postmodernism and the mentality of political crisis. The alien university is not in the future as such, but it is not entirely...

  11. Gambling with the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawking, Stephen

    2002-05-01

    This is an excerpt from Stephen Hawking's book The Universe in a Nutshell. Roger Penrose and Stephen Hawking, Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge, were able to show that Einstein's General Theory of Relativity implied that the universe and time itself must have had a beginning in a tremendous explosion. The discovery of the expansion of the universe is one of the great intellectual revolutions of the twentieth century.

  12. Inflation in the Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrow, J.D.; California Univ., Berkeley; Turner, M.S.; Chicago Univ., IL

    1981-01-01

    The problems of explaining the observed isotropy, homogeneity, flatness and specific entropy of the Universe are discussed in the context of an inflationary Universe which has recently been suggested. It is shown that the isotropy cannot be ignored as a Universe with a large amount of anisotropy will not undergo the inflationary phase. A Universe with only moderate anistropy will undergo inflation and will be rapidly isotropized. (U.K.)

  13. The baryon asymmetry of the Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrow, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    An interaction between cosmology and particle physics has been mediated by the development of a unified approach to the fundamental symmetries of nature. The development of a unified theory of the strong and electro-weak interactions has encountered a potential hurdle to its progress. The underlying symmetry between the strong and electro-weak interactions may only be restored at energies exceeding approximately 10 14 GeV and such conditions can only be probed by an indirect retrospection into the first instants of the hot big bang origin of the Universe. The author aims to describe some of the recent developments surrounding grand unified theories (GUT's) of the strong and electro-weak interactions together with their relation to the question of the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and the relative cosmic abundances of photons and nucleons. Further progress is hindered by the fact that super-unified theory must also encompass the gravitational interaction. (Auth.)

  14. The NPT regime: Progress and promises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhanapala, Jayantha

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Thesis. The 'NPT regime' has arrived at a fateful crossroads. Though extended indefinitely in 1995, its future is my no means secure. The future 'progress' of this treaty will depend upon whether the 'promises' of its States parties are fully implemented and, eventually, upon the treaty's success in achieving fully universal membership. Challenges The treaty faces many short-term and longer-term challenges: Short term - The first Preparatory Committee meeting for the 2005 Review Conference will meet next year. NNWS will want to see some evidence of progress on nuclear disarmament (Art. VI), along the lines prescribed in the 13 'practical steps' agreed at the last Review Conference. Yet progress has been set back by: uncertainties over the future of the ABM Treaty; the failure of START II and the CTBT to enter into force; the lack of a FISMAT treaty and a treaty establishing a NWFZ in Central Asia; continued qualitative improvements in nuclear weapons; hints that nuclear testing may one day resume; the persistence of doctrines of first-use, pre-emptive use, and use against states that use CBW. Other compliance-related questions will arise over safeguards (e.g. the inability of the IAEA to conduct inspections in the DPRK; signs of a breakdown of the norm of full-scope IAEA safeguards, e.g. in South Asia). There are also concerns over the implementation of non-proliferation commitments (e.g. persisting allegations about nuclear weapon programmes in existing NNWS). The terrorist attacks in New York and Washington, D.C. on 11 September should also serve as a reminder of the new terrorist dangers relating to the possible use of weapons of mass destruction and unorthodox delivery systems. Longer term - Selectivity in the enforcement of NPT norms; unilateralism; IAEA funding uncertainties and shortfalls; difficulties in reaching universal membership (India, Pakistan, and Israel); continuing compliance problems with respect to both non-proliferation and

  15. Entrepreneurship in Finnish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmi, Piia; Paasio, Kaisu

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role of universities in fostering and promoting entrepreneurship in Finland. In particular it seeks to examine the university-entrepreneurship relationship: its nature and how universities are addressing the entrepreneurship agenda. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on a large…

  16. Our Particle Universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and “why is the universe the way it is?” Not long before ... to each other. The interactions of particles in the universe ... theory by Jean Perrin in 1908 convinced people that atoms and ..... ing the origin and evolution of our universe13. This is an ...

  17. Hybrid Universities in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Molly; Wan, Chang Da; Sirat, Morshidi

    2017-01-01

    Are Asian universities different from those in Western countries? Premised on the hypothesis that Asian universities are different because of hybridization between Western academic models and local traditional cultures, this paper investigates the hybrid characteristics in Malaysian universities resulting from interaction between contemporary…

  18. Establishing a University Foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemish, Donald L.

    A handbook on how to establish a university foundation is presented. It presupposes that a foundation will be used as the umbrella organization for receiving all private gifts, restricted and unrestricted, for the benefit of a public college or university; and hence it chiefly addresses readers from public colleges and universities. Information is…

  19. The University Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simplicio, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    In this article the author discusses the role university culture can play on a campus and how it can impact policy and practice. The article explores how a university's history, values, and vision form its culture and how this culture in turn affects its stability and continuity. The article discusses how newcomers within the university are…

  20. Motivating University Researchers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, P.H.J.; Alves de Sousa, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical investigation into how universities approach the need and means for motivating university researchers through their management practices. The role of work motivation for this group deserves attention because pressures from outside and within the universities are said

  1. A Universal Reactive Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik Reif; Mørk, Simon; Sørensen, Morten U.

    1997-01-01

    Turing showed the existence of a model universal for the set of Turing machines in the sense that given an encoding of any Turing machine asinput the universal Turing machine simulates it. We introduce the concept of universality for reactive systems and construct a CCS processuniversal...

  2. The early universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steigman, G.

    1989-01-01

    The author discusses the physics of the early universe: the production and survival of relics from the big bang. The author comments on relic WIMPs as the dark matter in the universe. The remainder of this discussion is devoted to a review of the status of the only predictions from the early evolution of the universe that are accessible to astronomical observation: primordial nucleosynthesis

  3. Dropout Phenomena at Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Michael Søgaard; Kornbeck, Kasper Pihl; Kristensen, Rune

    Dropout from university studies comprises a number of complex phenomena with serious complex consequences and profound political attention. Further analysis of the field is, therefore, warranted. Such an analysis is offered here as a systematic review which gives answers based on the best possible...... such dropout phenomena occur at universities? What can be done by the universities to prevent or reduce such dropout phenomena?...

  4. Antimatter in the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigman, G.

    1973-01-01

    The means of detecting the presence of antimatter in the universe are discussed. Both direct, annihilation processes, and indirect, cosmic ray particles, were analyzed. All results were negative and it was concluded that no antimatter exists, if the universe is in fact symmetric. If the universe is not symmetric then matter and antimatter are well separated from each other.

  5. Universities as Development Hubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Aage; Lindegaard, Klaus; Lehmann, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Capacity-building in environment and development has been implemented and tested over the last decade through university and university consortia networking. Universities from Africa (Botswana and South Africa), Asia (Malaysia and Thailand), Central America (Costa Rica, El Salvador and Nicaragua...

  6. CBM progress report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, N.; Rami, F.; Roehrich, D.; Stroth, J.; Wessels, J.; Zaitsev, Yu

    2008-02-15

    This report documents the activities within the CBM project in 2007. Significant progress has been made in the optimization of the simulation software, the layout and development of detectors, the design of front-end electronics, and the concepts for data acquisition. The simulation and analysis routines have been completely integrated into the software framework (FAIRoot and CBMroot), and can be used now easily by users outside GSI. A breakthrough has been achieved in the development of fast algorithms for track and vertex reconstruction which have been improved in speed by a factor of 10{sup 5}. These fast routines permit to perform high-statistics simulations for detailed detector layout optimization. Full event reconstruction based on realistic detector properties and particle multiplicities as given by microscopic transport models are routinely used in the feasibility studies. A version of the Silicon Tracking System is now implemented in the simulation software comprising 8 detector layers based on microstrip technology only, including the readout cables, and the mechanical detector structure. The studies of open charm detection have been extended to D{sub s}{sup +} and {lambda}{sub c}, taking into account a realistic layout of the Silicon Pixel Microvertex detector. The identification of electrons has been optimized by improved ring recognition algorithms and transition radiation simulations. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector has been redesigned, resulting in a reduction by a factor of two in mirror size and number of readout channels without reducing the pion rejection capability. The muon detection system has been optimized with respect to the number of detector layers. The muon simulations take into account detector inefficiencies and a segmentation of the muon chambers into pads according to a nominal occupancy of 5% for central Au+Au collisions. Studies for a dimuon trigger show promising results. Radiation dose simulations using the FLUKA

  7. CBM progress report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, N.; Rami, F.; Roehrich, D.; Stroth, J.; Wessels, J.; Zaitsev, Yu

    2008-02-01

    This report documents the activities within the CBM project in 2007. Significant progress has been made in the optimization of the simulation software, the layout and development of detectors, the design of front-end electronics, and the concepts for data acquisition. The simulation and analysis routines have been completely integrated into the software framework (FAIRoot and CBMroot), and can be used now easily by users outside GSI. A breakthrough has been achieved in the development of fast algorithms for track and vertex reconstruction which have been improved in speed by a factor of 10 5 . These fast routines permit to perform high-statistics simulations for detailed detector layout optimization. Full event reconstruction based on realistic detector properties and particle multiplicities as given by microscopic transport models are routinely used in the feasibility studies. A version of the Silicon Tracking System is now implemented in the simulation software comprising 8 detector layers based on microstrip technology only, including the readout cables, and the mechanical detector structure. The studies of open charm detection have been extended to D s + and Λ c , taking into account a realistic layout of the Silicon Pixel Microvertex detector. The identification of electrons has been optimized by improved ring recognition algorithms and transition radiation simulations. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector has been redesigned, resulting in a reduction by a factor of two in mirror size and number of readout channels without reducing the pion rejection capability. The muon detection system has been optimized with respect to the number of detector layers. The muon simulations take into account detector inefficiencies and a segmentation of the muon chambers into pads according to a nominal occupancy of 5% for central Au+Au collisions. Studies for a dimuon trigger show promising results. Radiation dose simulations using the FLUKA transport code have been

  8. Gender Inequality in University Administration and Services

    OpenAIRE

    Estelles Miguel, Sofia; NAVARRO GARCÍA, ANTONIO; Palmer Gato, Marta Elena; Albarracín Guillem, José Miguel

    2014-01-01

    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. This article addresses inequalities between men and women at work. Inequalities in job access and career progression are addressed. The article reviews literature on equal opportunities at work. A case study of administrative and services staff at a public university in Valencia (Spain) is then presented. The case study assesses the current reality of gender inequality in Spanish public institutions. Spanish public uni...

  9. SMES developments at the University of Wisconsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boom, R.W.; Abdelsalam, M.K.; Eyssa, Y.; Hilal, M.; Huang, X.; McIntosh, G.E.; Pfotenhauer, J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on a long term SMES program in the Applied Superconductivity Center (ASC) in progress at the University of Wisconsin since 1970. The present principal interest in SMES stems from the US DNA-SDI program to build an engineering test model (ETM) for utility and government use. This paper is a review of SMES design highlights and of some small scale SMES studies

  10. The Astronomy Genealogy Project: A Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenn, Joseph S.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is not yet visible, much progress has been made on the Astronomy Genealogy Project (AstroGen) since it was accepted as a project of the Historical Astronomy Division (HAD) three years ago. AstroGen will list the world's astronomers with information about their highest degrees and advisors. (In academic genealogy, your thesis advisor is your parent.) A small group (the AstroGen Team) has compiled a database of approximately 12,000 individuals who have earned doctorates with theses (dissertations) on topics in astronomy, astrophysics, cosmology, or planetary science. These include nearly all those submitted in Australia, Canada, the Netherlands, and New Zealand, and most of those in the United States (all through 2014 for most universities and all through 1990 for all). We are compiling more information than is maintained by the Mathematics Genealogy Project (MGP). In addition to name, degree, university, year of degree, and thesis advisor(s), all provided by MGP as well, we are including years of birth and death when available, mentors in addition to advisors, and links to the thesis when it is online and to the person's web page or obituary, when we can find it. We are still struggling with some questions, such as the boundaries of inclusion and whether or not to include subfields of astronomy. We believe that AstroGen will be a valuable resource for historians of science as well as a source of entertainment for those who like to look up their academic family trees. A dedicated researcher following links from AstroGen will be able to learn quite a lot about the careers of astronomy graduates of a particular university, country, or era. We are still seeking volunteers to enter the graduates of one or more universities.

  11. Solar-thermal energy - How progress will be made

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frei, U.; Hawkins, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    This second part of a two-part article is based on a lecture given by professor Ueli Frei of the University of Applied Science in Rapperswil, Switzerland. It discusses present and future system technologies that can be used for thermal applications of solar energy. The importance of correct engineering and planning is stressed. The evolution of solar collector technology since 1980 is examined and the important progress made in this area is looked at. A selection of graphical representations illustrate the progress that has already been made and that which can be expected in the future

  12. Psychological functioning in primary progressive versus secondary progressive multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vleugels, L; Pfennings, L E; Pouwer, F

    1998-01-01

    Psychological functioning in two types of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is assessed: primary progressive (PP) and secondary progressive (SP) patients. On the basis of differences in clinical course and underlying pathology we hypothesized that primary progressive patients and secondary...... progressive patients might have different psychological functioning. Seventy patients treated in an MS centre were examined cross-sectionally. Forty had an SP course of MS and 30 a PP course. The 33 male and 37 female patients had a mean age of 48.4 years (SD 11.2) and mean age of onset of MS of 30.7 years...... (SD 11.1). Patients completed questionnaires measuring among others the following aspects of psychological functioning: depression (BDI, SCL-90), anxiety (STAI, SCL-90), agoraphobia (SCL-90), somatic complaints (SCL-90), hostility (SCL-90) and attitude towards handicap (GHAS). Patients with a PP...

  13. The inflationary universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guth, A.; Steinhardt, P.

    1993-01-01

    According to the inflationary model, the universe had a brief period of extraordinary rapid expansion, or inflation, during which its diameter increased by a factor at least 10 25 times larger (and perhaps much larger still) than had been previously thought. All the matter and energy in the universe could have been created from virtually nothing. Features of this article are: comparison of standard and inflationary modes, the horizon problem, the geometry of the universe, spontaneous symmetry breaking and the Higgs mechanism (energy density of the Higgs fields), the flatness problem, the new inflationary universe (new Higgs fields and false vacuum), conserved quantities in the universe. 12 figs., 11 refs

  14. The inflationary universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linde, A.D.

    1984-01-01

    According to the inflationary universe scenario the universe in the very early stages of its evolution was exponentially expanding in the unstable vacuum-like state. At the end of the exponential expansion the energy of the unstable vacuum transforms into the energy of hot dense matter. Recently it was realised that the exponential expansion of the universe naturally occurs in a wide class of realistic theories of elementary particles. The inflationary universe scenario makes it possible to obtain a simple solution to many longstanding cosmological problems and leads to a crucial modification of the standard point of view of the large-scale structure of the universe. (author)

  15. The expanding universe

    CERN Document Server

    Lew, Kristi

    2011-01-01

    People have always been fascinated with the stars above and the universe that contains them. Over the years, astronomers have developed numerous theories to explain how the universe began, how it works, and what its ultimate fate will be. But all of the scientists' questions are far from answered. The Expanding Universe goes beyond the creation of the universe to explain how scientists think the universe works, grows, and changes, including what great thinkers Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein had to say about its fate. Readers will also learn about how researchers are slowly shedding light on

  16. The universe a biography

    CERN Document Server

    Gribbin, John

    2008-01-01

    The Universe: A Biography makes cosmology accessible to everyone. John Gribbin navigates the latest frontiers of scientific discovery to tell us what we really know about the history of the universe. Along the way, he describes how the universe began; what the early universe looked like; how its structure developed; and what emerged to hold it all together. He describes where the elements came from; how stars and galaxies formed; and the story of how life emerged. He even looks to the future: is the history of the universe going to end with a Big Crunch or a Big Rip.

  17. Final Performance Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houldin, Joseph [Delaware Valley Industrial Resource Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Saboor, Veronica [Delaware Valley Industrial Resource Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-03-30

    The Accelerator has given the DVIRC an opportunity to get involved in areas of a small and medium-sized manufacturing business that MEP centers typically do not get involved in—the areas of technology development and technical issues. Over the course of the project we’ve come to gain some valuable insights into the market challenges of SMEs, and the market challenges an MEP (such as DVIRC) faces as it seeks to work more deeply and at faster pace on the technology-related aspects of a manufacturing business. For example, while most companies can quantitatively justify investing in an ERP system or a new piece of production equipment, SMEs often struggle with formulating a return-on-investment for advanced technologies. As another example, bringing advanced technology to a company through the individuals interested in the technology (such as engineers or technicians) is not the way to go; as with many MEP services, we need to get to the CEO. And even then, there is a strong reluctance to let outsiders in to these often proprietary areas of the business. As a result of our work in this area, we are now looking more closely at how CEOs that DO invest in advanced technologies justify the investment or make the investment decision. We’ve learned about some of the internal constraints in SMEs that need to be kept in mind as projects get defined and executed—where technical personnel often hinder conversations in this arena rather than contributing value to them. We’ve gained exposure to a new suite of public and private assets that can help us with this work, such as universities and agencies such as NASA. We have also developed relationships with design/engineering companies that can help us as we move more deeply into this area of a company,. Still, defining a technical project takes a huge amount of effort and resources and, once undertaken, has a much longer time trajectory than typical MEP projects. DVIRC field staff and content experts have learned more

  18. Federal Facility Agreement progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    The (SRS) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) was made effective by the US. Environmental Protection Agency Region IV (EPA) on August 16, 1993. To meet the reporting requirements in Section XXV of the Agreement, the FFA Progress Report was developed. The FFA Progress Report is the first of a series of quarterly progress reports to be prepared by the SRS. As such this report describes the information and action taken to September 30, 1993 on the SRS units identified for investigation and remediation in the Agreement. This includes; rubble pits, runoff basins, retention basin, seepage basin, burning pits, H-Area Tank 16, and spill areas.

  19. Progressive Taxation and Tax Morale

    OpenAIRE

    Philipp Doerrenberg; Andreas Peichl

    2010-01-01

    As the link between tax compliance and tax morale is found to be robust, finding the determinants of tax morale can help to understand and fight tax evasion. In this paper we analyze the effect of progressive taxation on tax morale in a cross-country approach - which has not been investigated before. Our theoretical analysis leads to two testable predictions. First, an individual's tax morale is higher, the more progressive the tax schedule is. Second, the impact of tax progressivity on tax m...

  20. Federal Facility Agreement progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    The (SRS) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) was made effective by the US. Environmental Protection Agency Region IV (EPA) on August 16, 1993. To meet the reporting requirements in Section XXV of the Agreement, the FFA Progress Report was developed. The FFA Progress Report is the first of a series of quarterly progress reports to be prepared by the SRS. As such this report describes the information and action taken to September 30, 1993 on the SRS units identified for investigation and remediation in the Agreement. This includes; rubble pits, runoff basins, retention basin, seepage basin, burning pits, H-Area Tank 16, and spill areas