WorldWideScience

Sample records for tuberculosis genome contributes

  1. Genomic insights into tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galagan, James E

    2014-05-01

    Prevalent since pre-history, human tuberculosis - caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis - remains a major source of death worldwide. Moreover, increasing drug resistance poses the threat of disease resurgence. However, the expanding application of genomic techniques is providing new avenues for combating this old foe. Whole-genome sequencing, comparative genomics and systems biology are generating new insights into the origins and ongoing evolution of M. tuberculosis, as well as the molecular basis for its pathogenicity. These have important implications for our perspective of the disease, development of new drugs and vaccines, and treatment of patients using existing therapeutics.

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra genome sequencing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-02-09

    Feb 9, 2007 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 32; Issue 2. Commentary: The value of comparative genomics in understanding mycobacterial virulence: Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra genome sequencing – a worthwhile endeavour. Deepak Sharma Jaya Sivaswami Tyagi. Volume 32 Issue 2 March ...

  3. Genomic diversity of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Lisbon Portugal: Towards tuberculosis genomic epidemiology

    KAUST Repository

    Perdigão, João

    2015-03-01

    Multidrug- (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) present a challenge to disease control and elimination goals. Lisbon, Portugal, has a high TB incidence rate and unusual and successful XDR-TB strains that have been found in circulation for almost two decades. For the last 20. years, a continued circulation of two phylogenetic clades, Lisboa3 and Q1, which are highly associated with MDR and XDR, have been observed. In recent years, these strains have been well characterized regarding the molecular basis of drug resistance and have been inclusively subjected to whole genome sequencing (WGS). Researchers have been studying the genomic diversity of strains circulating in Lisbon and its genomic determinants through cutting-edge next generation sequencing. An enormous amount of whole genome sequence data are now available for the most prevalent and clinically relevant strains circulating in Lisbon.It is the persistence, prevalence and rapid evolution towards drug resistance that has prompted researchers to investigate the properties of these strains at the genomic level and in the future at a global transcriptomic level. Seventy Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) isolates, mostly recovered in Lisbon, were genotyped by 24-. loci Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit - Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (MIRU-VNTR) and the genomes sequenced using a next generation sequencing platform - Illumina HiSeq 2000.The genotyping data revealed three major clusters associated with MDR-TB (Lisboa3-A, Lisboa3-B and Q1), two of which are associated with XDR-TB (Lisboa3-B and Q1), whilst the genomic data contributed to elucidating the phylogenetic positioning of circulating MDR-TB strains, showing a high predominance of a single SNP cluster group 5. Furthermore, a genome-wide phylogeny analysis from these strains, together with 19 publicly available genomes of MTB clinical isolates, revealed two major clades responsible for MDR/XDR-TB in the region: Lisboa3 and Q

  4. Consequences of genomic diversity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscolla, Mireia; Gagneux, Sebastien

    2014-01-01

    The causative agent of human tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), comprises seven phylogenetically distinct lineages associated with different geographical regions. Here we review the latest findings on the nature and amount of genomic diversity within and between MTBC lineages. We then review recent evidence for the effect of this genomic diversity on mycobacterial phenotypes measured experimentally and in clinical settings. We conclude that overall, the most geographically widespread Lineage 2 (includes Beijing) and Lineage 4 (also known as Euro-American) are more virulent than other lineages that are more geographically restricted. This increased virulence is associated with delayed or reduced pro-inflammatory host immune responses, greater severity of disease, and enhanced transmission. Future work should focus on the interaction between MTBC and human genetic diversity, as well as on the environmental factors that modulate these interactions. PMID:25453224

  5. Complex multifractal nature in Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Saurav; Roychowdhury, Tanmoy; Chirom, Keilash; Bhattacharya, Alok; Brojen Singh, R. K.

    2017-04-01

    The mutifractal and long range correlation (C(r)) properties of strings, such as nucleotide sequence can be a useful parameter for identification of underlying patterns and variations. In this study C(r) and multifractal singularity function f(α) have been used to study variations in the genomes of a pathogenic bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Genomic sequences of M. tuberculosis isolates displayed significant variations in C(r) and f(α) reflecting inherent differences in sequences among isolates. M. tuberculosis isolates can be categorised into different subgroups based on sensitivity to drugs, these are DS (drug sensitive isolates), MDR (multi-drug resistant isolates) and XDR (extremely drug resistant isolates). C(r) follows significantly different scaling rules in different subgroups of isolates, but all the isolates follow one parameter scaling law. The richness in complexity of each subgroup can be quantified by the measures of multifractal parameters displaying a pattern in which XDR isolates have highest value and lowest for drug sensitive isolates. Therefore C(r) and multifractal functions can be useful parameters for analysis of genomic sequences.

  6. Deciphering the biology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from thecomplete genome sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cole, S.T.; Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    1998-01-01

    Countless millions of people have died from tuberculosis, a chronic infectious disease caused by the tubercle bacillus. The complete genome sequence of the best-characterized strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, H37Rv, has been determined and analysed in order to improve our understanding....... tuberculosis differs radically from other bacteria in that a very large portion of its coding capacity is devoted to the production of enzymes involved in lipogenesis and lipolysis, and to two new families of glycine-rich proteins with a repetitive structure that may represent a source of antigenic variation....

  7. Unraveling Mycobacterium tuberculosis genomic diversity and evolution in Lisbon, Portugal, a highly drug resistant setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigão, João; Silva, Hugo; Machado, Diana; Macedo, Rita; Maltez, Fernando; Silva, Carla; Jordao, Luisa; Couto, Isabel; Mallard, Kim; Coll, Francesc; Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A; McNerney, Ruth; Pain, Arnab; Clark, Taane G; Viveiros, Miguel; Portugal, Isabel

    2014-11-18

    Multidrug- (MDR) and extensively drug resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) presents a challenge to disease control and elimination goals. In Lisbon, Portugal, specific and successful XDR-TB strains have been found in circulation for almost two decades. In the present study we have genotyped and sequenced the genomes of 56 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates recovered mostly from Lisbon. The genotyping data revealed three major clusters associated with MDR-TB, two of which are associated with XDR-TB. Whilst the genomic data contributed to elucidate the phylogenetic positioning of circulating MDR-TB strains, showing a high predominance of a single SNP cluster group 5. Furthermore, a genome-wide phylogeny analysis from these strains, together with 19 publicly available genomes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates, revealed two major clades responsible for M/XDR-TB in the region: Lisboa3 and Q1 (LAM).The data presented by this study yielded insights on microevolution and identification of novel compensatory mutations associated with rifampicin resistance in rpoB and rpoC. The screening for other structural variations revealed putative clade-defining variants. One deletion in PPE41, found among Lisboa3 isolates, is proposed to contribute to immune evasion and as a selective advantage. Insertion sequence (IS) mapping has also demonstrated the role of IS6110 as a major driver in mycobacterial evolution by affecting gene integrity and regulation. Globally, this study contributes with novel genome-wide phylogenetic data and has led to the identification of new genomic variants that support the notion of a growing genomic diversity facing both setting and host adaptation.

  8. Unraveling Mycobacterium tuberculosis genomic diversity and evolution in Lisbon, Portugal, a highly drug resistant setting

    KAUST Repository

    Perdigão, João

    2014-11-18

    Background Multidrug- (MDR) and extensively drug resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) presents a challenge to disease control and elimination goals. In Lisbon, Portugal, specific and successful XDR-TB strains have been found in circulation for almost two decades. Results In the present study we have genotyped and sequenced the genomes of 56 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates recovered mostly from Lisbon. The genotyping data revealed three major clusters associated with MDR-TB, two of which are associated with XDR-TB. Whilst the genomic data contributed to elucidate the phylogenetic positioning of circulating MDR-TB strains, showing a high predominance of a single SNP cluster group 5. Furthermore, a genome-wide phylogeny analysis from these strains, together with 19 publicly available genomes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates, revealed two major clades responsible for M/XDR-TB in the region: Lisboa3 and Q1 (LAM). The data presented by this study yielded insights on microevolution and identification of novel compensatory mutations associated with rifampicin resistance in rpoB and rpoC. The screening for other structural variations revealed putative clade-defining variants. One deletion in PPE41, found among Lisboa3 isolates, is proposed to contribute to immune evasion and as a selective advantage. Insertion sequence (IS) mapping has also demonstrated the role of IS6110 as a major driver in mycobacterial evolution by affecting gene integrity and regulation. Conclusions Globally, this study contributes with novel genome-wide phylogenetic data and has led to the identification of new genomic variants that support the notion of a growing genomic diversity facing both setting and host adaptation.

  9. Tracing Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission by whole genome sequencing in a high incidence setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjorn-Mortensen, K; Soborg, B; Koch, A

    2016-01-01

    In East Greenland, a dramatic increase of tuberculosis (TB) incidence has been observed in recent years. Classical genotyping suggests a genetically similar Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strain population as cause, however, precise transmission patterns are unclear. We performed whole genome...

  10. Whole genome sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis SB24 isolated from Sabah, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Noraini; Rodrigues, Kenneth Francis; William, Timothy; John, Daisy Vanitha

    2016-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) is the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB) that causes millions of death every year. We have sequenced the genome of M. tuberculosis isolated from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of a patient diagnosed with tuberculous meningitis (TBM). The isolated strain was referred as M. tuberculosis SB24. Genomic DNA of the M. tuberculosis SB24 was extracted and subjected to whole genome sequencing using PacBio platform. The draft genome size of M. tuberculosis SB24 was determined to be 4,452,489 bp with a G + C content of 65.6%. The whole genome shotgun project has been deposited in NCBI SRA under the accession number SRP076503.

  11. Whole genome sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis SB24 isolated from Sabah, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noraini Philip

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis is the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB that causes millions of death every year. We have sequenced the genome of M. tuberculosis isolated from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of a patient diagnosed with tuberculous meningitis (TBM. The isolated strain was referred as M. tuberculosis SB24. Genomic DNA of the M. tuberculosis SB24 was extracted and subjected to whole genome sequencing using PacBio platform. The draft genome size of M. tuberculosis SB24 was determined to be 4,452,489 bp with a G + C content of 65.6%. The whole genome shotgun project has been deposited in NCBI SRA under the accession number SRP076503.

  12. Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using whole genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amlerova, Jana; Bitar, Ibrahim; Hrabak, Jaroslav

    2018-03-17

    Tuberculosis (TB) is considered one of the most serious infectious diseases worldwide. Effective control of tuberculosis infection involves multiple steps, such as reliable detection, treatment, an epidemiological control as a part of case management, and further surveillance and monitoring of TB spread in the human population. Due to the accelerating advances in molecular biology, especially in DNA sequencing, in the past decade, the application of these methods has become crucial for TB evolution studies, differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotypes, and their distribution. Currently, several molecular genetic methods are available. The oldest typing methods (e.g., IS6110-RFLP, spoligotyping, and MIRU-VNTR) can discover the chain of transmission to the patient. Currently, whole genome sequencing facilitates is furthermore able to identify the source of infection, the transmission trays among individuals sharing the same isolate, as well as determination of the TB evolution and its resistance to antituberculotic agents. It is obvious that this technique will become a new gold standard in genotyping methods in tuberculosis molecular epidemiological studies. In this article, molecular genetic typing methods with a special focus on whole genome sequencing and data management are reviewed.

  13. Supplementary Material for: Whole genome sequencing reveals genomic heterogeneity and antibiotic purification in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates

    KAUST Repository

    Black, PA

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Whole genome sequencing has revolutionised the interrogation of mycobacterial genomes. Recent studies have reported conflicting findings on the genomic stability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during the evolution of drug resistance. In an age where whole genome sequencing is increasingly relied upon for defining the structure of bacterial genomes, it is important to investigate the reliability of next generation sequencing to identify clonal variants present in a minor percentage of the population. This study aimed to define a reliable cut-off for identification of low frequency sequence variants and to subsequently investigate genetic heterogeneity and the evolution of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. Methods Genomic DNA was isolated from single colonies from 14 rifampicin mono-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates, as well as the primary cultures and follow up MDR cultures from two of these patients. The whole genomes of the M. tuberculosis isolates were sequenced using either the Illumina MiSeq or Illumina HiSeq platforms. Sequences were analysed with an in-house pipeline. Results Using next-generation sequencing in combination with Sanger sequencing and statistical analysis we defined a read frequency cut-off of 30 % to identify low frequency M. tuberculosis variants with high confidence. Using this cut-off we demonstrated a high rate of genetic diversity between single colonies isolated from one population, showing that by using the current sequencing technology, single colonies are not a true reflection of the genetic diversity within a whole population and vice versa. We further showed that numerous heterogeneous variants emerge and then disappear during the evolution of isoniazid resistance within individual patients. Our findings allowed us to formulate a model for the selective bottleneck which occurs during the course of infection, acting as a genomic purification event. Conclusions Our study demonstrated true levels of genetic

  14. Whole genome sequencing reveals genomic heterogeneity and antibiotic purification in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates

    KAUST Repository

    Black, PA

    2015-10-24

    Background Whole genome sequencing has revolutionised the interrogation of mycobacterial genomes. Recent studies have reported conflicting findings on the genomic stability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during the evolution of drug resistance. In an age where whole genome sequencing is increasingly relied upon for defining the structure of bacterial genomes, it is important to investigate the reliability of next generation sequencing to identify clonal variants present in a minor percentage of the population. This study aimed to define a reliable cut-off for identification of low frequency sequence variants and to subsequently investigate genetic heterogeneity and the evolution of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. Methods Genomic DNA was isolated from single colonies from 14 rifampicin mono-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates, as well as the primary cultures and follow up MDR cultures from two of these patients. The whole genomes of the M. tuberculosis isolates were sequenced using either the Illumina MiSeq or Illumina HiSeq platforms. Sequences were analysed with an in-house pipeline. Results Using next-generation sequencing in combination with Sanger sequencing and statistical analysis we defined a read frequency cut-off of 30 % to identify low frequency M. tuberculosis variants with high confidence. Using this cut-off we demonstrated a high rate of genetic diversity between single colonies isolated from one population, showing that by using the current sequencing technology, single colonies are not a true reflection of the genetic diversity within a whole population and vice versa. We further showed that numerous heterogeneous variants emerge and then disappear during the evolution of isoniazid resistance within individual patients. Our findings allowed us to formulate a model for the selective bottleneck which occurs during the course of infection, acting as a genomic purification event. Conclusions Our study demonstrated true levels of genetic diversity

  15. PolyTB: A genomic variation map for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    KAUST Repository

    Coll, Francesc

    2014-02-15

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is the second major cause of death from an infectious disease worldwide. Recent advances in DNA sequencing are leading to the ability to generate whole genome information in clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC). The identification of informative genetic variants such as phylogenetic markers and those associated with drug resistance or virulence will help barcode Mtb in the context of epidemiological, diagnostic and clinical studies. Mtb genomic datasets are increasingly available as raw sequences, which are potentially difficult and computer intensive to process, and compare across studies. Here we have processed the raw sequence data (>1500 isolates, eight studies) to compile a catalogue of SNPs (n = 74,039, 63% non-synonymous, 51.1% in more than one isolate, i.e. non-private), small indels (n = 4810) and larger structural variants (n = 800). We have developed the PolyTB web-based tool (http://pathogenseq.lshtm.ac.uk/polytb) to visualise the resulting variation and important meta-data (e.g. in silico inferred strain-types, location) within geographical map and phylogenetic views. This resource will allow researchers to identify polymorphisms within candidate genes of interest, as well as examine the genomic diversity and distribution of strains. PolyTB source code is freely available to researchers wishing to develop similar tools for their pathogen of interest. 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Research on tuberculosis: 75 years of IBIT contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Leite

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In 1937, the foundation year of the Brazilian Institute for Tuberculosis Research, three questions persisted in the researchers' mind: "What is the real value of BCG? How to solve the problem of the chest register of large communities? When will we have a specific drug for the treatment of tuberculosis?"; Along with this line of thought, the author presents a list of the Institute's main contributions, by pointing out the following topics: different diagnoses between pulmonary tuberculosis and pulmonary schistosomiasis; innocuity of iodine salts in pulmonary tuberculosis; relative value of Weltmann and Takata-Ara's reactions, and of blood and lipase rates in bacillosis; the value of the bacteriologic diagnosis (method of precipitation, standardization of drug sensitivity tests; identification of non-pathogenetic germs not only in the sputum but also in gastric Broncho-Alveolar Lavage, playing an important role in the infection tropics; probable protective role of BCG in tuberculin positive individuals; increase in awareness of the value of tuberculin; comparative studies of several types of tuberculin; clinical and epidemiological importance of nontoxic drugs; tuberculin surveys in Salvador and Feira de Santana cities; proposed classification of clinical forms of pulmonary tuberculosis; increase in the value of selective miniature chest radiography; standardization of radiological shadows; and tests on the therapeutic value of the drugs. To SILVEIRA, IBIT'S contribution can be summarized in eight points: importance of bacteriology in the diagnosis and therapeutic procedures; increase in the value of tuberculin tests; selective miniature chest radiography; possibility of replacing the hospital by an ambulatory care center; BCG vaccination; wide and general indispensability of a well-done and well-balanced therapeutic scheme; simplified treatment; progressive shortening of the treatment program; no over optimism about the first victories in the

  17. Genomic contributions in livestock gene introgression programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hospital Frédéric

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The composition of the genome after introgression of a marker gene from a donor to a recipient breed was studied using analytical and simulation methods. Theoretical predictions of proportional genomic contributions, including donor linkage drag, from ancestors used at each generation of crossing after an introgression programme agreed closely with simulated results. The obligate drag, the donor genome surrounding the target locus that cannot be removed by subsequent selection, was also studied. It was shown that the number of backcross generations and the length of the chromosome affected proportional genomic contributions to the carrier chromosomes. Population structure had no significant effect on ancestral contributions and linkage drag but it did have an effect on the obligate drag whereby larger offspring groups resulted in smaller obligate drag. The implications for an introgression programme of the number of backcross generations, the population structure and the carrier chromosome length are discussed. The equations derived describing contributions to the genome from individuals from a given generation provide a framework to predict the genomic composition of a population after the introgression of a favourable donor allele. These ancestral contributions can be assigned a value and therefore allow the prediction of genetic lag.

  18. Contributions to In Silico Genome Annotation

    KAUST Repository

    Kalkatawi, Manal M.

    2017-11-30

    Genome annotation is an important topic since it provides information for the foundation of downstream genomic and biological research. It is considered as a way of summarizing part of existing knowledge about the genomic characteristics of an organism. Annotating different regions of a genome sequence is known as structural annotation, while identifying functions of these regions is considered as a functional annotation. In silico approaches can facilitate both tasks that otherwise would be difficult and timeconsuming. This study contributes to genome annotation by introducing several novel bioinformatics methods, some based on machine learning (ML) approaches. First, we present Dragon PolyA Spotter (DPS), a method for accurate identification of the polyadenylation signals (PAS) within human genomic DNA sequences. For this, we derived a novel feature-set able to characterize properties of the genomic region surrounding the PAS, enabling development of high accuracy optimized ML predictive models. DPS considerably outperformed the state-of-the-art results. The second contribution concerns developing generic models for structural annotation, i.e., the recognition of different genomic signals and regions (GSR) within eukaryotic DNA. We developed DeepGSR, a systematic framework that facilitates generating ML models to predict GSR with high accuracy. To the best of our knowledge, no available generic and automated method exists for such task that could facilitate the studies of newly sequenced organisms. The prediction module of DeepGSR uses deep learning algorithms to derive highly abstract features that depend mainly on proper data representation and hyperparameters calibration. DeepGSR, which was evaluated on recognition of PAS and translation initiation sites (TIS) in different organisms, yields a simpler and more precise representation of the problem under study, compared to some other hand-tailored models, while producing high accuracy prediction results. Finally

  19. Comparative genomics of archived pyrazinamide resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates from Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine tuberculosis is a ‘neglected zoonosis’ and its contribution to the proportion of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex infections in humans is unknown. A retrospective study on archived Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) isolates from a reference laboratory in Uganda was undertaken to iden...

  20. Potential contribution of genomics and biotechnology in animal production

    Science.gov (United States)

    The overall objective of the book chapter is to define the potential contribution of genomics in livestock production in Latin American countries. A brief description on what is genomics, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and genomic selection (GS) is provided. Genomics has been rapidly adopte...

  1. Genomic prediction for tuberculosis resistance in dairy cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smaragda Tsairidou

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of bovine tuberculosis (bTB in the UK and the limitations of the currently available diagnostic and control methods require the development of complementary approaches to assist in the sustainable control of the disease. One potential approach is the identification of animals that are genetically more resistant to bTB, to enable breeding of animals with enhanced resistance. This paper focuses on prediction of resistance to bTB. We explore estimation of direct genomic estimated breeding values (DGVs for bTB resistance in UK dairy cattle, using dense SNP chip data, and test these genomic predictions for situations when disease phenotypes are not available on selection candidates.We estimated DGVs using genomic best linear unbiased prediction methodology, and assessed their predictive accuracies with a cross validation procedure and receiver operator characteristic (ROC curves. Furthermore, these results were compared with theoretical expectations for prediction accuracy and area-under-the-ROC-curve (AUC. The dataset comprised 1151 Holstein-Friesian cows (bTB cases or controls. All individuals (592 cases and 559 controls were genotyped for 727,252 loci (Illumina Bead Chip. The estimated observed heritability of bTB resistance was 0.23±0.06 (0.34 on the liability scale and five-fold cross validation, replicated six times, provided a prediction accuracy of 0.33 (95% C.I.: 0.26, 0.40. ROC curves, and the resulting AUC, gave a probability of 0.58, averaged across six replicates, of correctly classifying cows as diseased or as healthy based on SNP chip genotype alone using these data.These results provide a first step in the investigation of the potential feasibility of genomic selection for bTB resistance using SNP data. Specifically, they demonstrate that genomic selection is possible, even in populations with no pedigree data and on animals lacking bTB phenotypes. However, a larger training population will be required to

  2. Genomic prediction for tuberculosis resistance in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsairidou, Smaragda; Woolliams, John A; Allen, Adrian R; Skuce, Robin A; McBride, Stewart H; Wright, David M; Bermingham, Mairead L; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Matika, Oswald; McDowell, Stanley W J; Glass, Elizabeth J; Bishop, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in the UK and the limitations of the currently available diagnostic and control methods require the development of complementary approaches to assist in the sustainable control of the disease. One potential approach is the identification of animals that are genetically more resistant to bTB, to enable breeding of animals with enhanced resistance. This paper focuses on prediction of resistance to bTB. We explore estimation of direct genomic estimated breeding values (DGVs) for bTB resistance in UK dairy cattle, using dense SNP chip data, and test these genomic predictions for situations when disease phenotypes are not available on selection candidates. We estimated DGVs using genomic best linear unbiased prediction methodology, and assessed their predictive accuracies with a cross validation procedure and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves. Furthermore, these results were compared with theoretical expectations for prediction accuracy and area-under-the-ROC-curve (AUC). The dataset comprised 1151 Holstein-Friesian cows (bTB cases or controls). All individuals (592 cases and 559 controls) were genotyped for 727,252 loci (Illumina Bead Chip). The estimated observed heritability of bTB resistance was 0.23±0.06 (0.34 on the liability scale) and five-fold cross validation, replicated six times, provided a prediction accuracy of 0.33 (95% C.I.: 0.26, 0.40). ROC curves, and the resulting AUC, gave a probability of 0.58, averaged across six replicates, of correctly classifying cows as diseased or as healthy based on SNP chip genotype alone using these data. These results provide a first step in the investigation of the potential feasibility of genomic selection for bTB resistance using SNP data. Specifically, they demonstrate that genomic selection is possible, even in populations with no pedigree data and on animals lacking bTB phenotypes. However, a larger training population will be required to improve

  3. Supplementary Material for: Mycobacterium tuberculosis whole genome sequencing and protein structure modelling provides insights into anti-tuberculosis drug resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Phelan, Jody

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Combating the spread of drug resistant tuberculosis is a global health priority. Whole genome association studies are being applied to identify genetic determinants of resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Protein structure and interaction modelling are used to understand the functional effects of putative mutations and provide insight into the molecular mechanisms leading to resistance. Methods To investigate the potential utility of these approaches, we analysed the genomes of 144 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from The Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) collection sourced from 20 countries in four continents. A genome-wide approach was applied to 127 isolates to identify polymorphisms associated with minimum inhibitory concentrations for first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs. In addition, the effect of identified candidate mutations on protein stability and interactions was assessed quantitatively with well-established computational methods. Results The analysis revealed that mutations in the genes rpoB (rifampicin), katG (isoniazid), inhA-promoter (isoniazid), rpsL (streptomycin) and embB (ethambutol) were responsible for the majority of resistance observed. A subset of the mutations identified in rpoB and katG were predicted to affect protein stability. Further, a strong direct correlation was observed between the minimum inhibitory concentration values and the distance of the mutated residues in the three-dimensional structures of rpoB and katG to their respective drugs binding sites. Conclusions Using the TDR resource, we demonstrate the usefulness of whole genome association and convergent evolution approaches to detect known and potentially novel mutations associated with drug resistance. Further, protein structural modelling could provide a means of predicting the impact of polymorphisms on drug efficacy in the absence of phenotypic data. These approaches could ultimately lead to novel

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis whole genome sequencing and protein structure modelling provides insights into anti-tuberculosis drug resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Phelan, Jody

    2016-03-23

    Background Combating the spread of drug resistant tuberculosis is a global health priority. Whole genome association studies are being applied to identify genetic determinants of resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Protein structure and interaction modelling are used to understand the functional effects of putative mutations and provide insight into the molecular mechanisms leading to resistance. Methods To investigate the potential utility of these approaches, we analysed the genomes of 144 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from The Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) collection sourced from 20 countries in four continents. A genome-wide approach was applied to 127 isolates to identify polymorphisms associated with minimum inhibitory concentrations for first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs. In addition, the effect of identified candidate mutations on protein stability and interactions was assessed quantitatively with well-established computational methods. Results The analysis revealed that mutations in the genes rpoB (rifampicin), katG (isoniazid), inhA-promoter (isoniazid), rpsL (streptomycin) and embB (ethambutol) were responsible for the majority of resistance observed. A subset of the mutations identified in rpoB and katG were predicted to affect protein stability. Further, a strong direct correlation was observed between the minimum inhibitory concentration values and the distance of the mutated residues in the three-dimensional structures of rpoB and katG to their respective drugs binding sites. Conclusions Using the TDR resource, we demonstrate the usefulness of whole genome association and convergent evolution approaches to detect known and potentially novel mutations associated with drug resistance. Further, protein structural modelling could provide a means of predicting the impact of polymorphisms on drug efficacy in the absence of phenotypic data. These approaches could ultimately lead to novel resistance

  5. Tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrova, A.V.

    1983-01-01

    Classification of clinical forms of tuberculosis of respiratory organs is m ade. It is shown, that diagnosis, determination of the clinical form of pulmona ry tuberculosis, extent and phase of the process are mainly based on the data of roentgenologic studies and in certain cases tomography is preferable. Roentgenologic picture of primary tuberculosis, tuberculosis of intrathoracis l ymp nodes, dissemenated tuberculosis, focal and infiltrative tuberculosis of lungs, tuberculomas of lungs, cavernous and fibrocavernous form of pulmonary tub erculosis, cirrhotic tuberculosis of lungs, tuberculosis of upper respiratory tracks, tuberculous pleurite and tuberculosis of respiratory organs, combined wi th dust occupational diseases, has been described

  6. Analysis of the genetic variation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains by multiple genome alignments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales Juan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent determination of the complete nucleotide sequence of several Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB genomes allows the use of comparative genomics as a tool for dissecting the nature and consequence of genetic variability within this species. The multiple alignment of the genomes of clinical strains (CDC1551, F11, Haarlem and C, along with the genomes of laboratory strains (H37Rv and H37Ra, provides new insights on the mechanisms of adaptation of this bacterium to the human host. Findings The genetic variation found in six M. tuberculosis strains does not involve significant genomic rearrangements. Most of the variation results from deletion and transposition events preferentially associated with insertion sequences and genes of the PE/PPE family but not with genes implicated in virulence. Using a Perl-based software islandsanalyser, which creates a representation of the genetic variation in the genome, we identified differences in the patterns of distribution and frequency of the polymorphisms across the genome. The identification of genes displaying strain-specific polymorphisms and the extrapolation of the number of strain-specific polymorphisms to an unlimited number of genomes indicates that the different strains contain a limited number of unique polymorphisms. Conclusion The comparison of multiple genomes demonstrates that the M. tuberculosis genome is currently undergoing an active process of gene decay, analogous to the adaptation process of obligate bacterial symbionts. This observation opens new perspectives into the evolution and the understanding of the pathogenesis of this bacterium.

  7. Suboptimal Antigen Presentation Contributes to Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis commonly causes persistent or chronic infection, despite the development of Ag-specific CD4 T cell responses. We hypothesized that M. tuberculosis evades elimination by CD4 T cell responses by manipulating MHC class II Ag presentation and CD4 T cell activation and tested this hypothesis by comparing activation of Ag85B-specific CD4 T cell responses to M. tuberculosis and M. bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Pasteur in vivo and in vitro. We found that, although M. tuberculosis persists in lungs of immunocompetent mice, M. bovis BCG is cleared, and clearance is T cell dependent. We further discovered that M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages and dendritic cells activate Ag85B-specific CD4 T cells less efficiently and less effectively than do BCG-infected cells, in vivo and in vitro, despite higher production and secretion of Ag85B by M. tuberculosis. During BCG infection, activation of Ag85B-specific CD4 T cells requires fewer infected dendritic cells and fewer Ag-producing bacteria than during M. tuberculosis infection. When dendritic cells containing equivalent numbers of M. tuberculosis or BCG were transferred to mice, BCG-infected cells activated proliferation of more Ag85B-specific CD4 T cells than did M. tuberculosis-infected cells. Differences in Ag85B-specific CD4 T cell activation were attributable to differential Ag presentation rather than differential expression of costimulatory or inhibitory molecules. These data indicate that suboptimal Ag presentation contributes to persistent infection and that limiting Ag presentation is a virulence property of M. tuberculosis. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. Horizontal acquisition of a hypoxia-responsive molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis pathway contributed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathoadaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levillain, Florence; Poquet, Yannick; Mallet, Ludovic; Mazères, Serge; Marceau, Michael; Brosch, Roland; Bange, Franz-Christoph; Supply, Philip; Magalon, Axel; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2017-11-01

    The unique ability of the tuberculosis (TB) bacillus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, to persist for long periods of time in lung hypoxic lesions chiefly contributes to the global burden of latent TB. We and others previously reported that the M. tuberculosis ancestor underwent massive episodes of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), mostly from environmental species. Here, we sought to explore whether such ancient HGT played a part in M. tuberculosis evolution towards pathogenicity. We were interested by a HGT-acquired M. tuberculosis-specific gene set, namely moaA1-D1, which is involved in the biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactor. Horizontal acquisition of this gene set was striking because homologues of these moa genes are present all across the Mycobacterium genus, including in M. tuberculosis. Here, we discovered that, unlike their paralogues, the moaA1-D1 genes are strongly induced under hypoxia. In vitro, a M. tuberculosis moaA1-D1-null mutant has an impaired ability to respire nitrate, to enter dormancy and to survive in oxygen-limiting conditions. Conversely, heterologous expression of moaA1-D1 in the phylogenetically closest non-TB mycobacterium, Mycobacterium kansasii, which lacks these genes, improves its capacity to respire nitrate and grants it with a marked ability to survive oxygen depletion. In vivo, the M. tuberculosis moaA1-D1-null mutant shows impaired survival in hypoxic granulomas in C3HeB/FeJ mice, but not in normoxic lesions in C57BL/6 animals. Collectively, our results identify a novel pathway required for M. tuberculosis resistance to host-imposed stress, namely hypoxia, and provide evidence that ancient HGT bolstered M. tuberculosis evolution from an environmental species towards a pervasive human-adapted pathogen.

  9. Pre-Columbian mycobacterial genomes reveal seals as a source of New World human tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Kirsten I.; Harkins, Kelly M.; Herbig, Alexander; Coscolla, Mireia; Weber, Nico; Comas, Iñaki; Forrest, Stephen A.; Bryant, Josephine M.; Harris, Simon R.; Schuenemann, Verena J.; Campbell, Tessa J.; Majander, Kerrtu; Wilbur, Alicia K.; Guichon, Ricardo A.; Wolfe Steadman, Dawnie L.; Cook, Della Collins; Niemann, Stefan; Behr, Marcel A.; Zumarraga, Martin; Bastida, Ricardo; Huson, Daniel; Nieselt, Kay; Young, Douglas; Parkhill, Julian; Buikstra, Jane E.; Gagneux, Sebastien; Stone, Anne C.; Krause, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Modern strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from the Americas are closely related to those from Europe, supporting the assumption that human tuberculosis was introduced post-contact1. This notion, however, is incompatible with archaeological evidence of pre-contact tuberculosis in the New World2. Comparative genomics of modern isolates suggests that M. tuberculosis attained its worldwide distribution following human dispersals out of Africa during the Pleistocene epoch3, although this has yet to be confirmed with ancient calibration points. Here we present three 1,000-year-old mycobacterial genomes from Peruvian human skeletons, revealing that a member of the M. tuberculosis complex caused human disease before contact. The ancient strains are distinct from known human-adapted forms and are most closely related to those adapted to seals and sea lions. Two independent dating approaches suggest a most recent common ancestor for the M. tuberculosis complex less than 6,000 years ago, which supports a Holocene dispersal of the disease. Our results implicate sea mammals as having played a role in transmitting the disease to humans across the ocean. PMID:25141181

  10. Comparative whole-genome sequence analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from tuberculous meningitis and pulmonary tuberculosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faksri, Kiatichai; Xia, Eryu; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Tan, Jun Hao; Nonghanphithak, Ditthawat; Makhao, Nampueng; Thamnongdee, Nongnard; Thanormchat, Arirat; Phurattanakornkul, Arisa; Rattanarangsee, Somcharn; Ratanajaraya, Chate; Suriyaphol, Prapat; Prammananan, Therdsak; Teo, Yik-Ying; Chaiprasert, Angkana

    2018-03-20

    Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is a severe form of tuberculosis with a high mortality rate. The factors associated with TBM pathogenesis are still unclear. Using comparative whole-genome sequence analysis we compared Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) isolates from cerebrospinal fluid of TBM cases (n = 73) with those from sputum of pulmonary tuberculosis (PulTB) patients (n = 220) from Thailand. The aim of this study was to seek genetic variants of Mtb associated with TBM. Regardless of Mtb lineage, we found 242 variants that were common to all TBM isolates. Among these variants, 28 were missense SNPs occurring mainly in the pks genes (involving polyketide synthesis) and the PE/PPE gene. Six lineage-independent SNPs were commonly found in TBM isolates, two of which were missense SNPs in Rv0532 (PE_PGRS6). Structural variant analysis revealed that PulTB isolates had 14 genomic regions containing 2-3-fold greater read depth, indicating higher copy number variants and half of these genes belonged to the PE/PPE gene family. Phylogenetic analysis revealed only two small clusters of TBM clonal isolates without support from epidemiological data. This study reported genetic variants of Mtb commonly found in TBM patients compared to PulTB patients. Variants associated with TBM disease warrant further investigation.

  11. DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: from phage typing to whole-genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürch, Anita C; van Soolingen, Dick

    2012-06-01

    Current typing methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex evolved from simple phenotypic approaches like phage typing and drug susceptibility profiling to DNA-based strain typing methods, such as IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) and variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) typing. Examples of the usefulness of molecular typing are source case finding and epidemiological linkage of tuberculosis (TB) cases, international transmission of MDR/XDR-TB, the discrimination between endogenous reactivation and exogenous re-infection as a cause of relapses after curative treatment of tuberculosis, the evidence of multiple M. tuberculosis infections, and the disclosure of laboratory cross-contaminations. Simultaneously, phylogenetic analyses were developed based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), genomic deletions usually referred to as regions of difference (RDs) and spoligotyping which served both strain typing and phylogenetic analysis. National and international initiatives that rely on the application of these typing methods have brought significant insight into the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis. However, current DNA fingerprinting methods have important limitations. They can often not distinguish between genetically closely related strains and the turn-over of these markers is variable. Moreover, the suitability of most DNA typing methods for phylogenetic reconstruction is limited as they show a high propensity of convergent evolution or misinfer genetic distances. In order to fully explore the possibilities of genotyping in the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis and to study the phylogeny of the causative bacteria reliably, the application of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) analysis for all M. tuberculosis isolates is the optimal, although currently still a costly solution. In the last years WGS for typing of pathogens has been explored and yielded important additional information on strain diversity in comparison to the

  12. Rapid determination of anti-tuberculosis drug resistance from whole-genome sequences

    KAUST Repository

    Coll, Francesc

    2015-05-27

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance (DR) challenges effective tuberculosis disease control. Current molecular tests examine limited numbers of mutations, and although whole genome sequencing approaches could fully characterise DR, data complexity has restricted their clinical application. A library (1,325 mutations) predictive of DR for 15 anti-tuberculosis drugs was compiled and validated for 11 of them using genomic-phenotypic data from 792 strains. A rapid online ‘TB-Profiler’ tool was developed to report DR and strain-type profiles directly from raw sequences. Using our DR mutation library, in silico diagnostic accuracy was superior to some commercial diagnostics and alternative databases. The library will facilitate sequence-based drug-susceptibility testing.

  13. Recombination in pe/ppe genes contributes to genetic variation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineages

    KAUST Repository

    Phelan, Jody E.

    2016-02-29

    Background Approximately 10 % of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome is made up of two families of genes that are poorly characterized due to their high GC content and highly repetitive nature. The PE and PPE families are typified by their highly conserved N-terminal domains that incorporate proline-glutamate (PE) and proline-proline-glutamate (PPE) signature motifs. They are hypothesised to be important virulence factors involved with host-pathogen interactions, but their high genetic variability and complexity of analysis means they are typically disregarded in genome studies. Results To elucidate the structure of these genes, 518 genomes from a diverse international collection of clinical isolates were de novo assembled. A further 21 reference M. tuberculosis complex genomes and long read sequence data were used to validate the approach. SNP analysis revealed that variation in the majority of the 168 pe/ppe genes studied was consistent with lineage. Several recombination hotspots were identified, notably pe_pgrs3 and pe_pgrs17. Evidence of positive selection was revealed in 65 pe/ppe genes, including epitopes potentially binding to major histocompatibility complex molecules. Conclusions This, the first comprehensive study of the pe and ppe genes, provides important insight into M. tuberculosis diversity and has significant implications for vaccine development.

  14. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    C. Robert Horsburgh, Jr

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the published literature on tuberculosis from September 2012 to August 2013 and describes important advances in tuberculosis epidemiology, microbiology, pathology, clinical pharmacology, genetics, treatment and prevention.

  15. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mochammad, Hatta

    2008-01-01

    This book chapter for medical students and researcher Tuberculosis is still one of the leading causes of death by infectious diseases with 2 million deaths per year and 9.2 million new cases of tuberculosis disease annually [1-3]. Besides, more than 2 milliard people are infected with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) [1-3]. Despite continuous effort in the prevention, monitoring and treatment of tuberculosis, the disease remains a major health problem in many countries [4-6...

  16. An adenosine triphosphate-independent proteasome activator contributes to the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrab, Jordan B; Wang, Tong; Murphy, J Patrick; Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Merkx, Remco; Huang, Jessica; Chatterjee, Champak; Ovaa, Huib; Gygi, Steven P; Li, Huilin; Darwin, K Heran

    2015-04-07

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes a proteasome that is highly similar to eukaryotic proteasomes and is required to cause lethal infections in animals. The only pathway known to target proteins for proteasomal degradation in bacteria is pupylation, which is functionally analogous to eukaryotic ubiquitylation. However, evidence suggests that the M. tuberculosis proteasome contributes to pupylation-independent pathways as well. To identify new proteasome cofactors that might contribute to such pathways, we isolated proteins that bound to proteasomes overproduced in M. tuberculosis and found a previously uncharacterized protein, Rv3780, which formed rings and capped M. tuberculosis proteasome core particles. Rv3780 enhanced peptide and protein degradation by proteasomes in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-independent manner. We identified putative Rv3780-dependent proteasome substrates and found that Rv3780 promoted robust degradation of the heat shock protein repressor, HspR. Importantly, an M. tuberculosis Rv3780 mutant had a general growth defect, was sensitive to heat stress, and was attenuated for growth in mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP-independent proteasome activators are not confined to eukaryotes and can contribute to the virulence of one the world's most devastating pathogens.

  17. Genomic and transcriptomic analysis of the streptomycin-dependent Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain 18b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjak, Andrej; Uplekar, Swapna; Zhang, Ming; Piton, Jérémie; Cole, Stewart T; Sala, Claudia

    2016-03-05

    The ability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to establish a latent infection (LTBI) in humans confounds the treatment of tuberculosis. Consequently, there is a need to discover new therapeutic agents that can kill M. tuberculosis both during active disease and LTBI. The streptomycin-dependent strain of M. tuberculosis, 18b, provides a useful tool for this purpose since upon removal of streptomycin (STR) it enters a non-replicating state that mimics latency both in vitro and in animal models. The 4.41 Mb genome sequence of M. tuberculosis 18b was determined and this revealed the strain to belong to clade 3 of the ancient ancestral lineage of the Beijing family. STR-dependence was attributable to insertion of a single cytosine in the 530 loop of the 16S rRNA and to a single amino acid insertion in the N-terminal domain of initiation factor 3. RNA-seq was used to understand the genetic programme activated upon STR-withdrawal and hence to gain insight into LTBI. This revealed reconfiguration of gene expression and metabolic pathways showing strong similarities between non-replicating 18b and M. tuberculosis residing within macrophages, and with the core stationary phase and microaerophilic responses. The findings of this investigation confirm the validity of 18b as a model for LTBI, and provide insight into both the evolution of tubercle bacilli and the functioning of the ribosome.

  18. Use of whole genome sequencing to determine the microevolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during an outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato-Maeda, Midori; Ho, Christine; Passarelli, Ben; Banaei, Niaz; Grinsdale, Jennifer; Flores, Laura; Anderson, Jillian; Murray, Megan; Rose, Graham; Kawamura, L Masae; Pourmand, Nader; Tariq, Muhammad A; Gagneux, Sebastien; Hopewell, Philip C

    2013-01-01

    Current tools available to study the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis do not provide information about the directionality and sequence of transmission for tuberculosis cases occurring over a short period of time, such as during an outbreak. Recently, whole genome sequencing has been used to study molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis over short time periods. To describe the microevolution of M. tuberculosis during an outbreak caused by one drug-susceptible strain. METHOD AND MEASUREMENTS: We included 9 patients with tuberculosis diagnosed during a period of 22 months, from a population-based study of the molecular epidemiology in San Francisco. Whole genome sequencing was performed using Illumina's sequencing by synthesis technology. A custom program written in Python was used to determine single nucleotide polymorphisms which were confirmed by PCR product Sanger sequencing. We obtained an average of 95.7% (94.1-96.9%) coverage for each isolate and an average fold read depth of 73 (1 to 250). We found 7 single nucleotide polymorphisms among the 9 isolates. The single nucleotide polymorphisms data confirmed all except one known epidemiological link. The outbreak strain resulted in 5 bacterial variants originating from the index case A1 with 0-2 mutations per transmission event that resulted in a secondary case. Whole genome sequencing analysis from a recent outbreak of tuberculosis enabled us to identify microevolutionary events observable during transmission, to determine 0-2 single nucleotide polymorphisms per transmission event that resulted in a secondary case, and to identify new epidemiologic links in the chain of transmission.

  19. Guardians of the mycobacterial genome: A review on DNA repair systems in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amandeep

    2017-12-01

    The genomic integrity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is continuously threatened by the harsh survival conditions inside host macrophages, due to immune and antibiotic stresses. Faithful genome maintenance and repair must be accomplished under stress for the bacillus to survive in the host, necessitating a robust DNA repair system. The importance of DNA repair systems in pathogenesis is well established. Previous examination of the M. tuberculosis genome revealed homologues of almost all the major DNA repair systems, i.e. nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair (BER), homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). However, recent developments in the field have pointed to the presence of novel proteins and pathways in mycobacteria. Homologues of archeal mismatch repair proteins were recently reported in mycobacteria, a pathway previously thought to be absent. RecBCD, the major nuclease-helicase enzymes involved in HR in E. coli, were implicated in the single-strand annealing (SSA) pathway. Novel roles of archeo-eukaryotic primase (AEP) polymerases, previously thought to be exclusive to NHEJ, have been reported in BER. Many new proteins with a probable role in DNA repair have also been discovered. It is now realized that the DNA repair systems in M. tuberculosis are highly evolved and have redundant backup mechanisms to mend the damage. This review is an attempt to summarize our current understanding of the DNA repair systems in M. tuberculosis.

  20. Tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latorre Tortello, Pablo

    1998-01-01

    The tuberculosis is an infection bacterial chronicle of world distribution. Three organisms of the family of the mycobacterium, the m. tuberculosis, the m. bovis and m. africanum, phenotypic and genetically similar, produce it, but only the m. tuberculosis has importance; the others rarely produce illness in the human. By definition, the lung tuberculosis is the localization of the m. tuberculosis in the breathing tract, the most common and main form in the affection and the only able to contaminate to other people. The koch bacillus, transmits the illness directly person to person. The paper Includes topics like pathogenesis, natural history, epidemiology, diagnose, symptomatology and treatment

  1. Whole-genome sequencing and social-network analysis of a tuberculosis outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardy, Jennifer L; Johnston, James C; Ho Sui, Shannan J; Cook, Victoria J; Shah, Lena; Brodkin, Elizabeth; Rempel, Shirley; Moore, Richard; Zhao, Yongjun; Holt, Robert; Varhol, Richard; Birol, Inanc; Lem, Marcus; Sharma, Meenu K; Elwood, Kevin; Jones, Steven J M; Brinkman, Fiona S L; Brunham, Robert C; Tang, Patrick

    2011-02-24

    An outbreak of tuberculosis occurred over a 3-year period in a medium-size community in British Columbia, Canada. The results of mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) genotyping suggested the outbreak was clonal. Traditional contact tracing did not identify a source. We used whole-genome sequencing and social-network analysis in an effort to describe the outbreak dynamics at a higher resolution. We sequenced the complete genomes of 32 Mycobacterium tuberculosis outbreak isolates and 4 historical isolates (from the same region but sampled before the outbreak) with matching genotypes, using short-read sequencing. Epidemiologic and genomic data were overlaid on a social network constructed by means of interviews with patients to determine the origins and transmission dynamics of the outbreak. Whole-genome data revealed two genetically distinct lineages of M. tuberculosis with identical MIRU-VNTR genotypes, suggesting two concomitant outbreaks. Integration of social-network and phylogenetic analyses revealed several transmission events, including those involving "superspreaders." Both lineages descended from a common ancestor and had been detected in the community before the outbreak, suggesting a social, rather than genetic, trigger. Further epidemiologic investigation revealed that the onset of the outbreak coincided with a recorded increase in crack cocaine use in the community. Through integration of large-scale bacterial whole-genome sequencing and social-network analysis, we show that a socioenvironmental factor--most likely increased crack cocaine use--triggered the simultaneous expansion of two extant lineages of M. tuberculosis that was sustained by key members of a high-risk social network. Genotyping and contact tracing alone did not capture the true dynamics of the outbreak. (Funded by Genome British Columbia and others.).

  2. Population Genomics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Ethiopia Contradicts the Virgin Soil Hypothesis for Human Tuberculosis in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comas, Iñaki; Hailu, Elena; Kiros, Teklu; Bekele, Shiferaw; Mekonnen, Wondale; Gumi, Balako; Tschopp, Rea; Ameni, Gobena; Hewinson, R Glyn; Robertson, Brian D; Goig, Galo A; Stucki, David; Gagneux, Sebastien; Aseffa, Abraham; Young, Douglas; Berg, Stefan

    2015-12-21

    Colonial medical reports claimed that tuberculosis (TB) was largely unknown in Africa prior to European contact, providing a "virgin soil" for spread of TB in highly susceptible populations previously unexposed to the disease [1, 2]. This is in direct contrast to recent phylogenetic models which support an African origin for TB [3-6]. To address this apparent contradiction, we performed a broad genomic sampling of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Ethiopia. All members of the M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC) arose from clonal expansion of a single common ancestor [7] with a proposed origin in East Africa [3, 4, 8]. Consistent with this proposal, MTBC lineage 7 is almost exclusively found in that region [9-11]. Although a detailed medical history of Ethiopia supports the view that TB was rare until the 20(th) century [12], over the last century Ethiopia has become a high-burden TB country [13]. Our results provide further support for an African origin for TB, with some genotypes already present on the continent well before European contact. Phylogenetic analyses reveal a pattern of serial introductions of multiple genotypes into Ethiopia in association with human migration and trade. In place of a "virgin soil" fostering the spread of TB in a previously naive population, we propose that increased TB mortality in Africa was driven by the introduction of European strains of M. tuberculosis alongside expansion of selected indigenous strains having biological characteristics that carry a fitness benefit in the urbanized settings of post-colonial Africa. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Population Genomics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Ethiopia Contradicts the Virgin Soil Hypothesis for Human Tuberculosis in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comas, Iñaki; Hailu, Elena; Kiros, Teklu; Bekele, Shiferaw; Mekonnen, Wondale; Gumi, Balako; Tschopp, Rea; Ameni, Gobena; Hewinson, R. Glyn; Robertson, Brian D.; Goig, Galo A.; Stucki, David; Gagneux, Sebastien; Aseffa, Abraham; Young, Douglas; Berg, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Colonial medical reports claimed that tuberculosis (TB) was largely unknown in Africa prior to European contact, providing a “virgin soil” for spread of TB in highly susceptible populations previously unexposed to the disease [1, 2]. This is in direct contrast to recent phylogenetic models which support an African origin for TB [3, 4, 5, 6]. To address this apparent contradiction, we performed a broad genomic sampling of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Ethiopia. All members of the M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC) arose from clonal expansion of a single common ancestor [7] with a proposed origin in East Africa [3, 4, 8]. Consistent with this proposal, MTBC lineage 7 is almost exclusively found in that region [9, 10, 11]. Although a detailed medical history of Ethiopia supports the view that TB was rare until the 20th century [12], over the last century Ethiopia has become a high-burden TB country [13]. Our results provide further support for an African origin for TB, with some genotypes already present on the continent well before European contact. Phylogenetic analyses reveal a pattern of serial introductions of multiple genotypes into Ethiopia in association with human migration and trade. In place of a “virgin soil” fostering the spread of TB in a previously naive population, we propose that increased TB mortality in Africa was driven by the introduction of European strains of M. tuberculosis alongside expansion of selected indigenous strains having biological characteristics that carry a fitness benefit in the urbanized settings of post-colonial Africa. PMID:26687624

  4. The copper-responsive RicR regulon contributes to Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoshan; Festa, Richard A; Ioerger, Thomas R; Butler-Wu, Susan; Sacchettini, James C; Darwin, K Heran; Samanovic, Marie I

    2014-02-18

    As with most life on Earth, the transition metal copper (Cu) is essential for the viability of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, infected hosts can also use Cu to control microbial growth. Several Cu-responsive pathways are present in M. tuberculosis, including the regulated in copper repressor (RicR) regulon, which is unique to pathogenic mycobacteria. In this work, we describe the contribution of each RicR-regulated gene to Cu resistance in vitro and to virulence in animals. We found that the deletion or disruption of individual RicR-regulated genes had no impact on virulence in mice, although several mutants had Cu hypersensitivity. In contrast, a mutant unable to activate the RicR regulon was not only highly susceptible to Cu but also attenuated in mice. Thus, these data suggest that several genes of the RicR regulon are required simultaneously to combat Cu toxicity in vivo or that this regulon is also important for resistance against Cu-independent mechanisms of host defense. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the causative agent of tuberculosis, killing millions of people every year. Therefore, understanding the biology of M. tuberculosis is crucial for the development of new therapies to treat this devastating disease. Our studies reveal that although host-supplied Cu can suppress bacterial growth, M. tuberculosis has a unique pathway, the RicR regulon, to defend against Cu toxicity. These findings suggest that Cu homeostasis pathways in both the host and the pathogen could be exploited for the treatment of tuberculosis.

  5. TUBERCULOSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Tarik Bajrović; Mahmud Nurkić; Šukrija Zvizdić

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis, known as the "White Plague" in the early 19th century, is the infectious disease, which is being researched today even in some of the most developed countries in the world. Epidemiological- epizootiological research points to the importance of pasteurizing milk as well as the transmission in aerosolized droplets in humans and animals. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), M. bovis, M. africanum and M. microti are the mycobacteria that cause tuberculosis. Other mycobacteria cause dis...

  6. The use of mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit typing and whole genome sequencing to inform tuberculosis prevention and control activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Gwendolyn L; Sintchenko, Vitali

    2013-07-01

    Molecular strain typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been possible for only about 20 years; it has significantly improved our understanding of the evolution and epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and tuberculosis disease. Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit typing, based on 24 variable number tandem repeat unit loci, is highly discriminatory, relatively easy to perform and interpret and is currently the most widely used molecular typing system for tuberculosis surveillance. Nevertheless, clusters identified by mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit typing sometimes cannot be confirmed or adequately defined by contact tracing and additional methods are needed. Recently, whole genome sequencing has been used to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms and other mutations, between genotypically indistinguishable isolates from the same cluster, to more accurately trace transmission pathways. Rapidly increasing speed and quality and reduced costs will soon make large scale whole genome sequencing feasible, combined with the use of sophisticated bioinformatics tools, for epidemiological surveillance of tuberculosis.

  7. Genome analysis of smooth tubercle bacilli provides insights into ancestry and pathoadaptation of the etiologic agent of tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supply, Philip; Marceau, Michael; Mangenot, Sophie; Roche, David; Rouanet, Carine; Khanna, Varun; Majlessi, Laleh; Criscuolo, Alexis; Tap, Julien; Pawlik, Alexandre; Fiette, Laurence; Orgeur, Mickael; Fabre, Michel; Parmentier, Cécile; Frigui, Wafa; Simeone, Roxane; Boritsch, Eva C.; Debrie, Anne-Sophie; Willery, Eve; Walker, Danielle; Quail, Michael A.; Ma, Laurence; Bouchier, Christiane; Salvignol, Grégory; Sayes, Fadel; Cascioferro, Alessandro; Seemann, Torsten; Barbe, Valérie; Locht, Camille; Gutierrez, Maria-Cristina; Leclerc, Claude; Bentley, Stephen; Stinear, Timothy P.; Brisse, Sylvain; Médigue, Claudine; Parkhill, Julian; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Brosch, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Global spread and genetic monomorphism are hallmarks of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the agent of human tuberculosis. In contrast, Mycobacterium canettii, and related tubercle bacilli that also cause human tuberculosis and exhibit unusual smooth colony morphology, are restricted to East-Africa. Here, we sequenced and analyzed the genomes of five representative strains of smooth tubercle bacilli (STB) using Sanger (4-5x coverage), 454/Roche (13-18x coverage) and/or Illumina DNA sequencing (45-105x coverage). We show that STB are highly recombinogenic and evolutionary early-branching, with larger genome sizes, 25-fold more SNPs, fewer molecular scars and distinct CRISPR-Cas systems relative to M. tuberculosis. Despite the differences, all tuberculosis-causing mycobacteria share a highly conserved core genome. Mouse-infection experiments revealed that STB are less persistent and virulent than M. tuberculosis. We conclude that M. tuberculosis emerged from an ancestral, STB-like pool of mycobacteria by gain of persistence and virulence mechanisms and we provide genome-wide insights into the molecular events involved. PMID:23291586

  8. Genome-wide requirements for Mycobacterium tuberculosis adaptation and survival in macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Rengarajan, Jyothi; Bloom, Barry R.; Rubin, Eric J.

    2005-01-01

    Macrophages are central to host defense against microbes, but intracellular pathogens have evolved to evade their antimicrobial functions. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) has successfully exploited macrophages as its primary niche in vivo, but the bacterial genome-wide requirements that promote its intracellular survival remain undefined. Here we comprehensively identify the MTB genes required for survival by screening for transposon mutants that fail to grow within primary macrophages. We i...

  9. Tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ankrah, Alfred O; Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Maes, Alex; Van de Wiele, Christophe; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Vorster, Mariza; Sathekge, Mike M

    Tuberculosis (TB) is currently the world's leading cause of infectious mortality. Imaging plays an important role in the management of this disease. The complex immune response of the human body to Mycobacterium tuberculosis results in a wide array of clinical manifestations, making clinical and

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Whole Genome Sequences From Southern India Suggest Novel Resistance Mechanisms and the Need for Region-Specific Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, Abigail L; Abeel, Thomas; Galagan, James E; Sundaramurthi, Jagadish Chandrabose; Salazar, Alex; Gehrmann, Thies; Shanmugam, Siva Kumar; Palaniyandi, Kannan; Narayanan, Sujatha; Swaminathan, Soumya; Earl, Ashlee M

    2017-06-01

    India is home to 25% of all tuberculosis cases and the second highest number of multidrug resistant cases worldwide. However, little is known about the genetic diversity and resistance determinants of Indian Mycobacterium tuberculosis, particularly for the primary lineages found in India, lineages 1 and 3. We whole genome sequenced 223 randomly selected M. tuberculosis strains from 196 patients within the Tiruvallur and Madurai districts of Tamil Nadu in Southern India. Using comparative genomics, we examined genetic diversity, transmission patterns, and evolution of resistance. Genomic analyses revealed (11) prevalence of strains from lineages 1 and 3, (11) recent transmission of strains among patients from the same treatment centers, (11) emergence of drug resistance within patients over time, (11) resistance gained in an order typical of strains from different lineages and geographies, (11) underperformance of known resistance-conferring mutations to explain phenotypic resistance in Indian strains relative to studies focused on other geographies, and (11) the possibility that resistance arose through mutations not previously implicated in resistance, or through infections with multiple strains that confound genotype-based prediction of resistance. In addition to substantially expanding the genomic perspectives of lineages 1 and 3, sequencing and analysis of M. tuberculosis whole genomes from Southern India highlight challenges of infection control and rapid diagnosis of resistant tuberculosis using current technologies. Further studies are needed to fully explore the complement of diversity and resistance determinants within endemic M. tuberculosis populations.

  11. Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbara, Khalid F

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to present an update on the manifestations and management of ocular tuberculosis. Tuberculosis affects one-third of the world's population. The incidence of tuberculosis has increased with the increase in the HIV infected population. Following a resurgence of the disease in the US, the incidence has recently declined. Patients may develop scleritis that can be focal, nodular or diffuse with or without keratitis. Anterior granulomatous uveitis may occur. The posterior segment reveals vitritis, choroiditis, and can mimic serpiginous choroiditis and other entities. Patients who are immunosuppressed or HIV infected may develop active mycobacterial disease in the eye leading to rapid destruction of the ocular structures. The diagnosis of ocular tuberculosis is made by isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis on Löwestein-Jensen medium or by PCR. The diagnosis is supported by the clinical findings, imaging techniques including optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green and ultrasonography. Tuberculin skin test helps to confirm the diagnosis. Ocular tuberculosis may occur in the absence of pulmonary disease. Patients present with a spectrum of clinical signs. The disease may mimic several clinical entities. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment of ocular tuberculosis may prevent ocular morbidity and blindness.

  12. Genomics of Human Pulmonary Tuberculosis: from Genes to Pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, Catherine M.; Sausville, Lindsay; Wejse, Christian

    2017-01-01

    and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are largely inconsistent, so a cohesive genetic model underlying TB risk has not emerged. Recent Findings Despite the difficulties in identifying consistent genetic associations, genetic studies of TB and MTB infection have revealed a few well-documented loci...

  13. Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Here, the primary infection has resolved, but the bacteria are dormant , or hibernating. When conditions become favorable (for instance, a lowered immunity), the bacteria become active. Tuberculosis in older children and adults ...

  14. Mining genomic patterns in Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv using a web server Tuber-Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishishwar, Lavanya; Pant, Bhasker; Pant, Kumud; Pardasani, Kamal R

    2011-10-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), causative agent of tuberculosis, is one of the most dreaded diseases of the century. It has long been studied by researchers throughout the world using various wet-lab and dry-lab techniques. In this study, we focus on mining useful patterns at genomic level that can be applied for in silico functional characterization of genes from the MTB complex. The model developed on the basis of the patterns found in this study can correctly identify 99.77% of the input genes from the genome of MTB strain H37Rv. The model was tested against four other MTB strains and the homologue M. bovis to further evaluate its generalization capability. The mean prediction accuracy was 85.76%. It was also observed that the GC content remained fairly constant throughout the genome, implicating the absence of any pathogenicity island transferred from other organisms. This study reveals that dinucleotide composition is an efficient functional class discriminator for MTB complex. To facilitate the application of this model, a web server Tuber-Gene has been developed, which can be freely accessed at http://www.bifmanit.org/tb2/. Copyright © 2011 Beijing Genomics Institute. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Morán López

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available En la actualidad la incidencia de la tuberculosis ha aumentado. El Mycobacterium tuberculosis infecta frecuentemente a las personas con SIDA, debido a que en estos pacientes hay una reducción de la resistencia mediada por células T, lo que propicia que este bacilo pueda desarrollar la enfermedad con una frecuencia superior a la de las personas sanas. La transmisión de la enfermedad puede ser por vía directa, de un individuo afectado a otro, fundamentalmente por las gotitas de saliva que contengan a este microorganismo, o por vía indirecta por la inhalación del bacilo que se puede encontrar por meses en los objetos de uso diario, debido a su gran resistencia. Las micobacterias que producen tuberculosis en el hombre inmunocompetente son la Mycobacterium tuberculosis y la bovis, otros tipos pueden provocar tuberculosis en individuos inmunocomprometidos. La patogenicidad de este bacilo está relacionada con su capacidad para escapar de la destrucción inducida por los macrófagos y para provocar hipersensibilidad de tipo retardado. Esta enfermedad tiene muy pocas manifestaciones bucales, lo que se observa generalmente es una úlcera que toma como asiento fundamental el dorso de la lengua. La tuberculosis amenaza con convertirse en una enfermedad incurable por la deficiente administración de los programas contra ésta, por lo que la OMS plantea para su detección y tratamiento el DOTS (tratamiento observado directamente, de corta duración que comienza a tener resultados satisfactorios, aunque en el último quinquenio, el 88 % de los pacientes que se estimaban como infectados por tuberculosis no recibieron DOTS.At present, the incidence of tuberculosis is on the rise. Mycobacterium tuberculosis often infests AIDS patients due to the fact that these persons´T-cell mediated resistance is reduced, which favors the development of the disease at a higher rate than in healthy people. The disease can be transmitted directly, that is , from an

  16. Genome-Based In Silico Identification of New Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigens Activating Polyfunctional CD8+ T Cells in Human Tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Sheila Tuyet; van Meijgaarden, Krista E.; Caccamo, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    infection, because they were absent from M. tuberculosis-noninfected individuals. Control CMV peptide/HLA-A*0201 tetramers stained CD8(+) T cells in M. tuberculosis-infected and noninfected individuals equally, whereas Ebola peptide/HLA-A*0201 tetramers were negative. In conclusion, the M. tuberculosis...

  17. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Latorre Tortello, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Por definición, la tuberculosis pulmonar es la localizaci6n del M. tuberculosis en el tracto respiratorio, la forma más común y principal de la afección y la única capaz de contagiar a otras personas. El M. tuberculosis, descubierto por Robert Koch en 1882, el bacilo de Koch, es un bacilo delgado, inmóvil, de 4 micras de longitud media, aerobio obligado, que se tiñe de rajo por la tinción de Ziehl-Neelsen. Debido a la coraza lipídica de su pared, lo hace resistente a la decoloración con ácido...

  18. Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Latorre Tortello

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Por definición, la tuberculosis pulmonar es la localizaci6n del M. tuberculosis en el tracto respiratorio, la forma más común y principal de la afección y la única capaz de contagiar a otras personas. El M. tuberculosis, descubierto por Robert Koch en 1882, el bacilo de Koch, es un bacilo delgado, inmóvil, de 4 micras de longitud media, aerobio obligado, que se tiñe de rajo por la tinción de Ziehl-Neelsen. Debido a la coraza lipídica de su pared, lo hace resistente a la decoloración con ácidos y alcohol, de ahí el nombre de bacilos ácido-alcohol resistente (BAAR. Su transmisión es directa, de persona a persona.

  19. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pablo Latorre Tortello

    1998-01-01

    Por definición, la tuberculosis pulmonar es la localizaci6n del M. tuberculosis en el tracto respiratorio, la forma más común y principal de la afección y la única capaz de contagiar a otras personas. El M. tuberculosis, descubierto por Robert Koch en 1882, el bacilo de Koch, es un bacilo delgado, inmóvil, de 4 micras de longitud media, aerobio obligado, que se tiñe de rajo por la tinción de Ziehl-Neelsen. Debido a la coraza lipídica de su pared, lo hace resistente a la decoloración con ácido...

  20. The draft genome of Mycobacterium aurum, a potential model organism for investigating drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Jody; Maitra, Arundhati; McNerney, Ruth; Nair, Mridul; Gupta, Antima; Coll, Francesc; Pain, Arnab; Bhakta, Sanjib; Clark, Taane G

    2015-09-01

    Mycobacterium aurum (M. aurum) is an environmental mycobacteria that has previously been used in studies of anti-mycobacterial drugs due to its fast growth rate and low pathogenicity. The M. aurum genome has been sequenced and assembled into 46 contigs, with a total length of 6.02Mb containing 5684 annotated protein-coding genes. A phylogenetic analysis using whole genome alignments positioned M. aurum close to Mycobacterium vaccae and Mycobacterium vanbaalenii, within a clade related to fast-growing mycobacteria. Large-scale genomic rearrangements were identified by comparing the M. aurum genome to those of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae. M. aurum orthologous genes implicated in resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs in M. tuberculosis were observed. The sequence identity at the DNA level varied from 68.6% for pncA (pyrazinamide drug-related) to 96.2% for rrs (streptomycin, capreomycin). We observed two homologous genes encoding the catalase-peroxidase enzyme (katG) that is associated with resistance to isoniazid. Similarly, two embB homologues were identified in the M. aurum genome. In addition to describing for the first time the genome of M. aurum, this work provides a resource to aid the use of M. aurum in studies to develop improved drugs for the pathogenic mycobacteria M. tuberculosis and M. leprae. Copyright © 2015 Asian-African Society for Mycobacteriology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The draft genome of Mycobacterium aurum, a potential model organism for investigating drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae

    KAUST Repository

    Phelan, Jody

    2015-06-04

    Mycobacterium aurum (M. aurum) is an environmental mycobacteria that has previously been used in studies of anti-mycobacterial drugs due to its fast growth rate and low pathogenicity. The M. aurum genome has been sequenced and assembled into 46 contigs, with a total length of 6.02 Mb containing 5684 annotated protein-coding genes. A phylogenetic analysis using whole genome alignments positioned M. aurum close to Mycobacterium vaccae and Mycobacterium vanbaalenii, within a clade related to fast-growing mycobacteria. Large-scale genomic rearrangements were identified by comparing the M. aurum genome to those of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae. M. aurum orthologous genes implicated in resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs in M. tuberculosis were observed. The sequence identity at the DNA level varied from 68.6% for pncA (pyrazinamide drug-related) to 96.2% for rrs (streptomycin, capreomycin). We observed two homologous genes encoding the catalase-peroxidase enzyme (katG) that is associated with resistance to isoniazid. Similarly, two embB homologues were identified in the M. aurum genome. In addition to describing for the first time the genome of M. aurum, this work provides a resource to aid the use of M. aurum in studies to develop improved drugs for the pathogenic mycobacteria M. tuberculosis and M. leprae.

  2. The draft genome of Mycobacterium aurum , a potential model organism for investigating drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jody Phelan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium aurum (M. aurum is an environmental mycobacteria that has previously been used in studies of anti-mycobacterial drugs due to its fast growth rate and low pathogenicity. The M. aurum genome has been sequenced and assembled into 46 contigs, with a total length of 6.02 Mb containing 5684 annotated protein-coding genes. A phylogenetic analysis using whole genome alignments positioned M. aurum close to Mycobacterium vaccae and Mycobacterium vanbaalenii, within a clade related to fast-growing mycobacteria. Large-scale genomic rearrangements were identified by comparing the M. aurum genome to those of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae. M. aurum orthologous genes implicated in resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs in M. tuberculosis were observed. The sequence identity at the DNA level varied from 68.6% for pncA (pyrazinamide drug-related to 96.2% for rrs (streptomycin, capreomycin. We observed two homologous genes encoding the catalase-peroxidase enzyme (katG that is associated with resistance to isoniazid. Similarly, two emb B homologues were identified in the M. aurum genome. In addition to describing for the first time the genome of M. aurum , this work provides a resource to aid the use of M. aurum in studies to develop improved drugs for the pathogenic mycobacteria M. tuberculosis and M. leprae.

  3. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Morán López; Yaima Lazo Amador

    2001-01-01

    En la actualidad la incidencia de la tuberculosis ha aumentado. El Mycobacterium tuberculosis infecta frecuentemente a las personas con SIDA, debido a que en estos pacientes hay una reducción de la resistencia mediada por células T, lo que propicia que este bacilo pueda desarrollar la enfermedad con una frecuencia superior a la de las personas sanas. La transmisión de la enfermedad puede ser por vía directa, de un individuo afectado a otro, fundamentalmente por las gotitas de saliva que conte...

  4. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mendoza Zuñiga, Marleny; Bastidas Párraga, Gustavo; León Untiveros, Paúl Albert

    2013-01-01

    La tuberculosis es una enfermedad infectocontagiosa producida por el bacilo de Koch, que ataca a los pulmones pero puede ser difuminada por todo el cuerpo. El siguiente artículo de información nos da una visión amplia de la detección, diagnóstico y tratamiento de la misma.

  5. Direct DNA Extraction from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Frozen Stocks as a Reculture-Independent Approach to Whole-Genome Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjorn-Mortensen, K; Zallet, J; Lillebaek, T

    2015-01-01

    Culturing before DNA extraction represents a major time-consuming step in whole-genome sequencing of slow-growing bacteria, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We report a workflow to extract DNA from frozen isolates without reculturing. Prepared libraries and sequence data were comparable...... with results from recultured aliquots of the same stocks....

  6. Supplementary Material for: Recombination in pe/ppe genes contributes to genetic variation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineages

    KAUST Repository

    Phelan, Jody

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Approximately 10 % of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome is made up of two families of genes that are poorly characterized due to their high GC content and highly repetitive nature. The PE and PPE families are typified by their highly conserved N-terminal domains that incorporate proline-glutamate (PE) and proline-proline-glutamate (PPE) signature motifs. They are hypothesised to be important virulence factors involved with host-pathogen interactions, but their high genetic variability and complexity of analysis means they are typically disregarded in genome studies. Results To elucidate the structure of these genes, 518 genomes from a diverse international collection of clinical isolates were de novo assembled. A further 21 reference M. tuberculosis complex genomes and long read sequence data were used to validate the approach. SNP analysis revealed that variation in the majority of the 168 pe/ppe genes studied was consistent with lineage. Several recombination hotspots were identified, notably pe_pgrs3 and pe_pgrs17. Evidence of positive selection was revealed in 65 pe/ppe genes, including epitopes potentially binding to major histocompatibility complex molecules. Conclusions This, the first comprehensive study of the pe and ppe genes, provides important insight into M. tuberculosis diversity and has significant implications for vaccine development.

  7. Construction of a virtual Mycobacterium tuberculosis consensus genome and its application to data from a next generation sequencer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Kayo; Kato, Masako; Kirikae, Teruo; Kayano, Mitsunori; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru

    2015-03-20

    Although Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates are consisted of several different lineages and the epidemiology analyses are usually assessed relative to a particular reference genome, M. tuberculosis H37Rv, which might introduce some biased results. Those analyses are essentially based genome sequence information of M. tuberculosis and could be performed in sillico in theory, with whole genome sequence (WGS) data available in the databases and obtained by next generation sequencers (NGSs). As an approach to establish higher resolution methods for such analyses, whole genome sequences of the M. tuberculosis complexes (MTBCs) strains available on databases were aligned to construct virtual reference genome sequences called the consensus sequence (CS), and evaluated its feasibility in in sillico epidemiological analyses. The consensus sequence (CS) was successfully constructed and utilized to perform phylogenetic analysis, evaluation of read mapping efficacy, which is crucial for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and various MTBC typing methods virtually including spoligotyping, VNTR, Long sequence polymorphism and Beijing typing. SNPs detected based on CS, in comparison with H37Rv, were utilized in concatemer-based phylogenetic analysis to determine their reliability relative to a phylogenetic tree based on whole genome alignment as the gold standard. Statistical comparison of phylogenic trees based on CS with that of H37Rv indicated the former showed always better results that that of later. SNP detection and concatenation with CS was advantageous because the frequency of crucial SNPs distinguishing among strain lineages was higher than those of H37Rv. The number of SNPs detected was lower with the consensus than with the H37Rv sequence, resulting in a significant reduction in computational time. Performance of each virtual typing was satisfactory and accorded with those published when those are available. These results indicated that virtual CS

  8. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Carlos Rodríguez, D.

    2014-01-01

    La tuberculosis sigue constituyendo un problema de salud pública a nivel mundial con casi nueve millones de casos nuevos en 2012 y se estima que un tercio de la humanidad está infectada. A nivel nacional, si bien las tasas son alentadoras, la variación regional es muy importante. En los últimos años se han registrado progresos importantes tanto en el conocimiento de la conducta del bacilo de Koch, el causante de la enfermedad, como en los métodos para detectarlo. Así los IGRAS (Interferon G R...

  9. The contribution of bacterial genome engineering to sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuß, Daniel R; Commichau, Fabian M; Stülke, Jörg

    2017-09-01

    The United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals define important challenges for the prosperous development of mankind. To reach several of these goals, among them the production of value-added compounds, improved economic and ecologic balance of production processes, prevention of climate change and protection of ecosystems, the use of engineered bacteria can make valuable contributions. We discuss the strategies for genome engineering and how they can be applied to meet the United Nations' goals for sustainable development. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Extensively Drug-Resistant Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Belonging to the Euro-American S Lineage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malinga, L.A.; Abeel, T.; Desjardins, C.A.; Dlamini, T.C.; Cassell, G.; Chapman, S.B.; Birren, B.W.; Earl, A.M.; Van der Walt, M.

    2016-01-01

    We report the whole-genome sequencing of two extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis strains belonging to the Euro-American S lineage. The RSA 114 strain showed single-nucleotide polymorphisms predicted to have drug efflux activity.

  11. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Provides Insight into the Evolution and Genetic Composition of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Belarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollenberg, Kurt R; Desjardins, Christopher A; Zalutskaya, Aksana; Slodovnikova, Vervara; Oler, Andrew J; Quiñones, Mariam; Abeel, Thomas; Chapman, Sinead B; Tartakovsky, Michael; Gabrielian, Andrei; Hoffner, Sven; Skrahin, Aliaksandr; Birren, Bruce W; Rosenthal, Alexander; Skrahina, Alena; Earl, Ashlee M

    2017-02-01

    The emergence and spread of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (DR-TB) are critical global health issues. Eastern Europe has some of the highest incidences of DR-TB, particularly multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB. To better understand the genetic composition and evolution of MDR- and XDR-TB in the region, we sequenced and analyzed the genomes of 138 M. tuberculosis isolates from 97 patients sampled between 2010 and 2013 in Minsk, Belarus. MDR and XDR-TB isolates were significantly more likely to belong to the Beijing lineage than to the Euro-American lineage, and known resistance-conferring loci accounted for the majority of phenotypic resistance to first- and second-line drugs in MDR and XDR-TB. Using a phylogenomic approach, we estimated that the majority of MDR-TB was due to the recent transmission of already-resistant M. tuberculosis strains rather than repeated de novo evolution of resistance within patients, while XDR-TB was acquired through both routes. Longitudinal sampling of M. tuberculosis from 34 patients with treatment failure showed that most strains persisted genetically unchanged during treatment or acquired resistance to fluoroquinolones. HIV+ patients were significantly more likely to have multiple infections over time than HIV- patients, highlighting a specific need for careful infection control in these patients. These data provide a better understanding of the genomic composition, transmission, and evolution of MDR- and XDR-TB in Belarus and will enable improved diagnostics, treatment protocols, and prognostic decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Wollenberg et al.

  12. Stabilization of the genome of the mismatch repair deficient Mycobacterium tuberculosis by context-dependent codon choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Roger M; Güthlein, Carolin; Springer, Burkhard; Böttger, Erik C; Ackermann, Martin

    2008-05-28

    The rate at which a stretch of DNA mutates is determined by the cellular systems for DNA replication and repair, and by the nucleotide sequence of the stretch itself. One sequence feature with a particularly strong influence on the mutation rate are nucleotide repeats. Some microbial pathogens use nucleotide repeats in their genome to stochastically vary phenotypic traits and thereby evade host defense. However, such unstable sequences also come at a cost, as mutations are often deleterious. Here, we analyzed how these opposing forces shaped genome stability in the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis lacks a mismatch repair system, and this renders nucleotide repeats particularly unstable. We found that proteins of M. tuberculosis are encoded by using codons in a context-dependent manner that prevents the emergence of nucleotide repeats. This context-dependent codon choice leads to a strong decrease in the estimated frame-shift mutation rate and thus to an increase in genome stability. These results indicate that a context-specific codon choice can partially compensate for the lack of a mismatch repair system, and helps to maintain genome integrity in this pathogen.

  13. Stabilization of the genome of the mismatch repair deficient Mycobacterium tuberculosis by context-dependent codon choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ackermann Martin

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate at which a stretch of DNA mutates is determined by the cellular systems for DNA replication and repair, and by the nucleotide sequence of the stretch itself. One sequence feature with a particularly strong influence on the mutation rate are nucleotide repeats. Some microbial pathogens use nucleotide repeats in their genome to stochastically vary phenotypic traits and thereby evade host defense. However, such unstable sequences also come at a cost, as mutations are often deleterious. Here, we analyzed how these opposing forces shaped genome stability in the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis lacks a mismatch repair system, and this renders nucleotide repeats particularly unstable. Results We found that proteins of M. tuberculosis are encoded by using codons in a context-dependent manner that prevents the emergence of nucleotide repeats. This context-dependent codon choice leads to a strong decrease in the estimated frame-shift mutation rate and thus to an increase in genome stability. Conclusion These results indicate that a context-specific codon choice can partially compensate for the lack of a mismatch repair system, and helps to maintain genome integrity in this pathogen.

  14. PE_PGRS33 Contributes to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Entry in Macrophages through Interaction with TLR2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Palucci

    Full Text Available PE_PGRS represent a large family of proteins typical of pathogenic mycobacteria whose members are characterized by an N-terminal PE domain followed by a large Gly-Ala repeat-rich C-terminal domain. Despite the abundance of PE_PGRS-coding genes in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb genome their role and function in the biology and pathogenesis still remains elusive. In this study, we generated and characterized an Mtb H37Rv mutant (MtbΔ33 in which the structural gene of PE_PGRS33, a prototypical member of the protein family, was inactivated. We showed that this mutant entered macrophages with an efficiency up to ten times lower than parental or complemented strains, while its efficiency in infecting pneumocytes remained unaffected. Interestingly, the lack of PE_PGRS33 did not affect the intracellular growth of this mutant in macrophages. Using a series of functional deletion mutants of the PE_PGRS33 gene to complement the MtbΔ33 strain, we demonstrated that the PGRS domain is required to mediate cell entry into macrophages, with the key domain encompassing position 140-260 amino acids of PE_PGRS33. PE_PGRS33-mediated entry into macrophages was abolished in TLR2-deficient mice, as well as following treatment with wortmannin or an antibody against the complement receptor 3 (CR3, indicating that PE_PGRS33-mediated entry of Mtb in macrophages occurs through interaction with TLR2.

  15. Retrocopy contributions to the evolution of the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haussler David

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolution via point mutations is a relatively slow process and is unlikely to completely explain the differences between primates and other mammals. By contrast, 45% of the human genome is composed of retroposed elements, many of which were inserted in the primate lineage. A subset of retroposed mRNAs (retrocopies shows strong evidence of expression in primates, often yielding functional retrogenes. Results To identify and analyze the relatively recently evolved retrogenes, we carried out BLASTZ alignments of all human mRNAs against the human genome and scored a set of features indicative of retroposition. Of over 12,000 putative retrocopy-derived genes that arose mainly in the primate lineage, 726 with strong evidence of transcript expression were examined in detail. These mRNA retroposition events fall into three categories: I 34 retrocopies and antisense retrocopies that added potential protein coding space and UTRs to existing genes; II 682 complete retrocopy duplications inserted into new loci; and III an unexpected set of 13 retrocopies that contributed out-of-frame, or antisense sequences in combination with other types of transposed elements (SINEs, LINEs, LTRs, even unannotated sequence to form potentially novel genes with no homologs outside primates. In addition to their presence in human, several of the gene candidates also had potentially viable ORFs in chimpanzee, orangutan, and rhesus macaque, underscoring their potential of function. Conclusion mRNA-derived retrocopies provide raw material for the evolution of genes in a wide variety of ways, duplicating and amending the protein coding region of existing genes as well as generating the potential for new protein coding space, or non-protein coding RNAs, by unexpected contributions out of frame, in reverse orientation, or from previously non-protein coding sequence.

  16. Patient-perceived factors contributing to low tuberculosis cure rate at Greater Giyani healthcare facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandzumuni V. Maswanganyi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background:Compliance with tuberculosis (TB treatment is unpredictable. Most patients do not comply because they do not see the importance of doing so, which is usually influenced by lack of knowledge. Objectives:The purpose of the study was to explore and describe the factors contributing to low TB cure rates in Greater Giyani Municipality, as viewed by patients. Method:The study was conducted in the Greater Giyani Municipality in Limpopo Province which had a TB cure rate ranging from 14%to 94%. The research design in this study was qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual in nature. The population consisted of all TB patients diagnosed and referred for treatment and care in Primary Health Care (PHC facilities. Non-probability purposive sampling was used to select TB patients and health facilities which had a cure rate lower than the national target of 85%. One patient was sampled from each PHC facility. An in-depth face-to-face interview was used to collect data using an interview guide. Results:The findings showed that most of the TB patients come from poor families, which makes it difficult for them to obtain financial and food security. The health facilities often run out of food supplements and TB medicine. Cultural beliefs about TB also lead to TB patients seeking assistance from traditional health practitioners and faith-based healers. Conclusion:There is a need to have a policy regarding how discharged tuberculosis patients on treatment are supervised when at home. Healthcare facilities should also ensure that there is enough medication for these patients as lack of medication can lead them to default.

  17. Identifying Likely Transmission Pathways within a 10-Year Community Outbreak of Tuberculosis by High-Depth Whole Genome Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outhred, Alexander C; Holmes, Nadine; Sadsad, Rosemarie; Martinez, Elena; Jelfs, Peter; Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L; Marais, Ben J; Sintchenko, Vitali

    2016-01-01

    Improved tuberculosis control and the need to contain the spread of drug-resistant strains provide a strong rationale for exploring tuberculosis transmission dynamics at the population level. Whole-genome sequencing provides optimal strain resolution, facilitating detailed mapping of potential transmission pathways. We sequenced 22 isolates from a Mycobacterium tuberculosis cluster in New South Wales, Australia, identified during routine 24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit typing. Following high-depth paired-end sequencing using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform, two independent pipelines were employed for analysis, both employing read mapping onto reference genomes as well as de novo assembly, to control biases in variant detection. In addition to single-nucleotide polymorphisms, the analyses also sought to identify insertions, deletions and structural variants. Isolates were highly similar, with a distance of 13 variants between the most distant members of the cluster. The most sensitive analysis classified the 22 isolates into 18 groups. Four of the isolates did not appear to share a recent common ancestor with the largest clade; another four isolates had an uncertain ancestral relationship with the largest clade. Whole genome sequencing, with analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, deletions, structural variants and subpopulations, enabled the highest possible level of discrimination between cluster members, clarifying likely transmission pathways and exposing the complexity of strain origin. The analysis provides a basis for targeted public health intervention and enhanced classification of future isolates linked to the cluster.

  18. Identifying Likely Transmission Pathways within a 10-Year Community Outbreak of Tuberculosis by High-Depth Whole Genome Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander C Outhred

    Full Text Available Improved tuberculosis control and the need to contain the spread of drug-resistant strains provide a strong rationale for exploring tuberculosis transmission dynamics at the population level. Whole-genome sequencing provides optimal strain resolution, facilitating detailed mapping of potential transmission pathways.We sequenced 22 isolates from a Mycobacterium tuberculosis cluster in New South Wales, Australia, identified during routine 24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit typing. Following high-depth paired-end sequencing using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform, two independent pipelines were employed for analysis, both employing read mapping onto reference genomes as well as de novo assembly, to control biases in variant detection. In addition to single-nucleotide polymorphisms, the analyses also sought to identify insertions, deletions and structural variants.Isolates were highly similar, with a distance of 13 variants between the most distant members of the cluster. The most sensitive analysis classified the 22 isolates into 18 groups. Four of the isolates did not appear to share a recent common ancestor with the largest clade; another four isolates had an uncertain ancestral relationship with the largest clade.Whole genome sequencing, with analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, deletions, structural variants and subpopulations, enabled the highest possible level of discrimination between cluster members, clarifying likely transmission pathways and exposing the complexity of strain origin. The analysis provides a basis for targeted public health intervention and enhanced classification of future isolates linked to the cluster.

  19. Origins of a 350-Kilobase Genomic Duplication in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Its Impact on Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenech, Pilar; Rog, Anya; Moolji, Jalal-ud-din; Radomski, Nicolas; Fallow, Ashley; Leon-Solis, Lizbel; Bowes, Julia; Behr, Marcel A.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we have investigated the evolution and impact on virulence of a 350-kb genomic duplication present in the most recently evolved members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis East Asian lineage. In a mouse model of infection, comparing HN878 subclones HN878-27 (no duplication) and HN878-45 (with the 350-kb duplication) revealed that the latter is impaired for in vivo growth during the initial 3 weeks of infection. Furthermore, the median survival time of mice infected with isolate HN878-45 is significantly longer (77 days) than that of mice infected with HN878-27. Whole-genome sequencing of both isolates failed to reveal any mutational events other than the duplication that could account for such a substantial difference in virulence. Although we and others had previously speculated that the 350-kb duplication arose in response to some form of host-applied selective pressure (P. Domenech, G. S. Kolly, L. Leon-Solis, A. Fallow, M. B. Reed, J. Bacteriol. 192:4562–4570, 2010, and B. Weiner, J. Gomez, T. C. Victor, R. M. Warren, A. Sloutsky, B. B. Plikaytis, J. E. Posey, P. D. van Helden, N. C. Gey van Pittius, M. Koehrsen, P. Sisk, C. Stolte, J. White, S. Gagneux, B. Birren, D. Hung, M. Murray, J. Galagan, PLoS One 7:e26038, 2012), here we show that this large chromosomal amplification event is very rapidly selected within standard in vitro broth cultures in a range of isolates. Indeed, subclones harboring the duplication were detectable after just five rounds of in vitro passage. In contrast, the duplication appears to be highly unstable in vivo and is negatively selected during the later stages of infection in mice. We believe that the rapid in vitro evolution of M. tuberculosis is an underappreciated aspect of its biology that is often ignored, despite the fact that it has the potential to confound the data and conclusions arising from comparative studies of isolates at both the genotypic and phenotypic levels. PMID:24778110

  20. The elephant interferon gamma assay: a contribution to diagnosis of tuberculosis in elephants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angkawanish, T.; Morar, D.; Kooten, P.J.; Bontekoning, I.; Schreuder, J.; Maas, M.; Wajjwalku, W.; Sirimalaisuwan, A.; Michel, A.L.; Tijhaar, E.; Rutten, V.P.M.G.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) has been shown to be the main causative agent of tuberculosis in elephants worldwide. M. tb may be transmitted from infected humans to other species including elephants and vice versa, in case of prolonged intensive contact. An accurate diagnostic approach covering

  1. Elucidating emergence and transmission of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in treatment experienced patients by whole genome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taane G Clark

    Full Text Available Understanding the emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB is crucial for its control. MDR-TB in previously treated patients is generally attributed to the selection of drug resistant mutants during inadequate therapy rather than transmission of a resistant strain. Traditional genotyping methods are not sufficient to distinguish strains in populations with a high burden of tuberculosis and it has previously been difficult to assess the degree of transmission in these settings. We have used whole genome analysis to investigate M. tuberculosis strains isolated from treatment experienced patients with MDR-TB in Uganda over a period of four years.We used high throughput genome sequencing technology to investigate small polymorphisms and large deletions in 51 Mycobacterium tuberculosis samples from 41 treatment-experienced TB patients attending a TB referral and treatment clinic in Kampala. This was a convenience sample representing 69% of MDR-TB cases identified over the four year period. Low polymorphism was observed in longitudinal samples from individual patients (2-15 SNPs. Clusters of samples with less than 50 SNPs variation were examined. Three clusters comprising a total of 8 patients were found with almost identical genetic profiles, including mutations predictive for resistance to rifampicin and isoniazid, suggesting transmission of MDR-TB. Two patients with previous drug susceptible disease were found to have acquired MDR strains, one of which shared its genotype with an isolate from another patient in the cohort.Whole genome sequence analysis identified MDR-TB strains that were shared by more than one patient. The transmission of multidrug-resistant disease in this cohort of retreatment patients emphasises the importance of early detection and need for infection control. Consideration should be given to rapid testing for drug resistance in patients undergoing treatment to monitor the emergence of resistance and

  2. Elucidating Emergence and Transmission of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Treatment Experienced Patients by Whole Genome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Taane G.; Mallard, Kim; Coll, Francesc; Preston, Mark; Assefa, Samuel; Harris, David; Ogwang, Sam; Mumbowa, Francis; Kirenga, Bruce; O’Sullivan, Denise M.; Okwera, Alphonse; Eisenach, Kathleen D.; Joloba, Moses; Bentley, Stephen D.; Ellner, Jerrold J.; Parkhill, Julian; Jones-López, Edward C.; McNerney, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is crucial for its control. MDR-TB in previously treated patients is generally attributed to the selection of drug resistant mutants during inadequate therapy rather than transmission of a resistant strain. Traditional genotyping methods are not sufficient to distinguish strains in populations with a high burden of tuberculosis and it has previously been difficult to assess the degree of transmission in these settings. We have used whole genome analysis to investigate M. tuberculosis strains isolated from treatment experienced patients with MDR-TB in Uganda over a period of four years. Methods and Findings We used high throughput genome sequencing technology to investigate small polymorphisms and large deletions in 51 Mycobacterium tuberculosis samples from 41 treatment-experienced TB patients attending a TB referral and treatment clinic in Kampala. This was a convenience sample representing 69% of MDR-TB cases identified over the four year period. Low polymorphism was observed in longitudinal samples from individual patients (2-15 SNPs). Clusters of samples with less than 50 SNPs variation were examined. Three clusters comprising a total of 8 patients were found with almost identical genetic profiles, including mutations predictive for resistance to rifampicin and isoniazid, suggesting transmission of MDR-TB. Two patients with previous drug susceptible disease were found to have acquired MDR strains, one of which shared its genotype with an isolate from another patient in the cohort. Conclusions Whole genome sequence analysis identified MDR-TB strains that were shared by more than one patient. The transmission of multidrug-resistant disease in this cohort of retreatment patients emphasises the importance of early detection and need for infection control. Consideration should be given to rapid testing for drug resistance in patients undergoing treatment to monitor the

  3. Genome-wide analysis of multi- and extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    KAUST Repository

    Coll, Francesc

    2018-01-16

    To characterize the genetic determinants of resistance to antituberculosis drugs, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 6,465 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from more than 30 countries. A GWAS approach within a mixed-regression framework was followed by a phylogenetics-based test for independent mutations. In addition to mutations in established and recently described resistance-associated genes, novel mutations were discovered for resistance to cycloserine, ethionamide and para-aminosalicylic acid. The capacity to detect mutations associated with resistance to ethionamide, pyrazinamide, capreomycin, cycloserine and para-aminosalicylic acid was enhanced by inclusion of insertions and deletions. Odds ratios for mutations within candidate genes were found to reflect levels of resistance. New epistatic relationships between candidate drug-resistance-associated genes were identified. Findings also suggest the involvement of efflux pumps (drrA and Rv2688c) in the emergence of resistance. This study will inform the design of new diagnostic tests and expedite the investigation of resistance and compensatory epistatic mechanisms.

  4. How dormant is Mycobacterium tuberculosis during latency? A study integrating genomics and molecular epidemiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhenhua; Rosenthal, Mariana; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis may survive for decades in the human body in a state termed latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). We investigated the occurrence during LTBI of insertion/deletion events in a selected set of mononucleotide simple sequence repeats, DNA sequence changes in four M. tubercu......Mycobacterium tuberculosis may survive for decades in the human body in a state termed latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). We investigated the occurrence during LTBI of insertion/deletion events in a selected set of mononucleotide simple sequence repeats, DNA sequence changes in four M...

  5. [History of gold--with danish contribution to tuberculosis and rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norn, Svend; Permin, Henrik; Kruse, Poul R; Kruse, Edith

    2011-01-01

    Gold has a long history as a therapeutic agent, first as gold particles and colloidal gold, then as a soluble salt made by the alchemists, and potable gold was recommended almost as a panacea against different diseases. Gold compounds were introduced in the treatment of tuberculosis, based initially on the reputation of Robert Koch, who found gold cyanide effective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in cultures. Although several investigations of gold salts showed no convincing effect in experimental tuberculosis in guinea pigs, the idea of using gold compounds as chemotherapy was furthermore encouraged from the work of Paul Ehrlich with arsenicals. The enthusiasm and the craving desperately for a remedy for tuberculosis forced Danish physicians, in the mid-1920s to treat tuberculosis with Sanocrysin (gold sodium thiosulfate). Professor Holger Møllgaard, in collaboration with the clinicians the professors Knud Secher and Knud Faber, was the theoretical promoter of the project. He recommended sanocrysin-antiserum therapy, since sanocrysin caused serious reactions in tuberculosis animals, possible by releasing toxins from tubercle bacilli "killed" by sanocrysin. However the enthusiastic response to sanocrysin in Europe declined along by controlled trials and reports on toxicity in the 1930s. The belief that rheumatoid arthritis was a form of tuberculosis caused a renaissance in chrysotherapy. In France Jacques Forestier obtained encouraging results in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with myochrysine and other gold salts, and he pointed out the disease modifying effect of chrysotherapy. In Denmark Knud Secher, who was the clinical initiator of Sanocrysin therapy in tuberculosis, now became the founder of chrysotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis. Although new potential agents are now taking over in the treatment of arthritis, it is still believed, that there is a place for the chrysotherapy. However a new future for gold, in the form of nanoparticles, appears on

  6. Proteogenomic Investigation of Strain Variation in Clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates

    KAUST Repository

    Heunis, Tiaan

    2017-08-18

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis consists of a large number of different strains that display unique virulence characteristics. Whole-genome sequencing has revealed substantial genetic diversity among clinical M. tuberculosis isolates, and elucidating the phenotypic variation encoded by this genetic diversity will be of utmost importance to fully understand M. tuberculosis biology and pathogenicity. In this study we integrated whole-genome sequencing and mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS) to reveal strain-specific characteristics in the proteomes of two clinical M. tuberculosis Latin American-Mediterranean isolates. Using this approach we identified 59 peptides containing single amino acid variants, which covered ~9% of all total coding nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants detected by whole-genome sequencing. Furthermore, we identified 29 distinct peptides that mapped to a hypothetical protein not present in the M. tuberculosis H37Rv reference proteome. Here we provide evidence for the expression of this protein in the clinical M. tuberculosis SAWC3651 isolate. The strain-specific databases enabled confirmation of genomic differences (i.e. large genomic regions of difference and nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants) in these two clinical M. tuberculosis isolates and allowed strain differentiation at the proteome level. Our results contribute to the growing field of clinical microbial proteogenomics and can improve our understanding of phenotypic variation in clinical M. tuberculosis isolates.

  7. Inability of 'Whole Genome Amplification' to Improve Success Rates for the Biomolecular Detection of Tuberculosis in Archaeological Samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannine Forst

    Full Text Available We assessed the ability of whole genome amplification (WGA to improve the efficiency of downstream polymerase chain reactions (PCRs directed at ancient DNA (aDNA of members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC. Using extracts from a variety of bones and a tooth from human skeletons with or without lesions indicative of tuberculosis, from multiple time periods, we obtained inconsistent results. We conclude that WGA does not provide any advantage in studies of MTBC aDNA. The sporadic nature of our results are probably due to the fact that WGA is itself a PCR-based procedure which, although designed to deal with fragmented DNA, might be inefficient with the low concentration of templates in an aDNA extract. As such, WGA is subject to similar, if not the same, restrictions as PCR when applied to aDNA.

  8. A multiple genome analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals specific novel genes and mutations associated with pyrazinamide resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, Patricia; Requena, David; Gushiken, Eduardo; Gilman, Robert H; Antiparra, Ricardo; Lucero, Bryan; Lizárraga, Pilar; Cieza, Basilio; Roncal, Elisa; Grandjean, Louis; Pain, Arnab; McNerney, Ruth; Clark, Taane G; Moore, David; Zimic, Mirko

    2017-10-11

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health problem and drug resistance compromises the efforts to control this disease. Pyrazinamide (PZA) is an important drug used in both first and second line treatment regimes. However, its complete mechanism of action and resistance remains unclear. We genotyped and sequenced the complete genomes of 68 M. tuberculosis strains isolated from unrelated TB patients in Peru. No clustering pattern of the strains was verified based on spoligotyping. We analyzed the association between PZA resistance with non-synonymous mutations and specific genes. We found mutations in pncA and novel genes significantly associated with PZA resistance in strains without pncA mutations. These included genes related to transportation of metal ions, pH regulation and immune system evasion. These results suggest potential alternate mechanisms of PZA resistance that have not been found in other populations, supporting that the antibacterial activity of PZA may hit multiple targets.

  9. A multiple genome analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals specific novel genes and mutations associated with pyrazinamide resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Sheen, Patricia

    2017-10-11

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health problem and drug resistance compromises the efforts to control this disease. Pyrazinamide (PZA) is an important drug used in both first and second line treatment regimes. However, its complete mechanism of action and resistance remains unclear.We genotyped and sequenced the complete genomes of 68 M. tuberculosis strains isolated from unrelated TB patients in Peru. No clustering pattern of the strains was verified based on spoligotyping. We analyzed the association between PZA resistance with non-synonymous mutations and specific genes. We found mutations in pncA and novel genes significantly associated with PZA resistance in strains without pncA mutations. These included genes related to transportation of metal ions, pH regulation and immune system evasion.These results suggest potential alternate mechanisms of PZA resistance that have not been found in other populations, supporting that the antibacterial activity of PZA may hit multiple targets.

  10. Comparative Analyses of Nonpathogenic, Opportunistic, and Totally Pathogenic Mycobacteria Reveal Genomic and Biochemical Variabilities and Highlight the Survival Attributes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Yadvir; Kohli, Sakshi; Ahmad, Javeed; Ehtesham, Nasreen Z.; Tyagi, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterial evolution involves various processes, such as genome reduction, gene cooption, and critical gene acquisition. Our comparative genome size analysis of 44 mycobacterial genomes revealed that the nonpathogenic (NP) genomes were bigger than those of opportunistic (OP) or totally pathogenic (TP) mycobacteria, with the TP genomes being smaller yet variable in size—their genomic plasticity reflected their ability to evolve and survive under various environmental conditions. From the 44 mycobacterial species, 13 species, representing TP, OP, and NP, were selected for genomic-relatedness analyses. Analysis of homologous protein-coding genes shared between Mycobacterium indicus pranii (NP), Mycobacterium intracellulare ATCC 13950 (OP), and Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (TP) revealed that 4,995 (i.e., ~95%) M. indicaus pranii proteins have homology with M. intracellulare, whereas the homologies among M. indicus pranii, M. intracellulare ATCC 13950, and M. tuberculosis H37Rv were significantly lower. A total of 4,153 (~79%) M. indicus pranii proteins and 4,093 (~79%) M. intracellulare ATCC 13950 proteins exhibited homology with the M. tuberculosis H37Rv proteome, while 3,301 (~82%) and 3,295 (~82%) M. tuberculosis H37Rv proteins showed homology with M. indicus pranii and M. intracellulare ATCC 13950 proteomes, respectively. Comparative metabolic pathway analyses of TP/OP/NP mycobacteria showed enzymatic plasticity between M. indicus pranii (NP) and M. intracellulare ATCC 13950 (OP), Mycobacterium avium 104 (OP), and M. tuberculosis H37Rv (TP). Mycobacterium tuberculosis seems to have acquired novel alternate pathways with possible roles in metabolism, host-pathogen interactions, virulence, and intracellular survival, and by implication some of these could be potential drug targets. PMID:25370496

  11. Evolution of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis over four decades revealed by whole genome sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keira A Cohen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The largest global outbreak of extensively drug-resistant (XDR tuberculosis (TB was identified in Tugela Ferry, KwaZulu-Natal (KZN, South Africa in 2005. The antecedents and timing of the emergence of drug resistance in this fatal epidemic XDR outbreak are unknown, and it is unclear whether drug resistance in this region continues to be driven by clonal spread or by the development of de novo resistance. A whole genome sequencing and drug susceptibility testing (DST was performed on 337 clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb collected in KZN from 2008 to 2013, in addition to three historical isolates, one of which was isolated during the Tugela Ferry outbreak. Using a variety of whole genome comparative approaches, 11 drug-resistant clones of M.tb circulating from 2008 to 2013 were identified, including a 50-member clone of XDR M.tb that was highly related to the Tugela Ferry XDR outbreak strain. It was calculated that the evolutionary trajectory from first-line drug resistance to XDR in this clone spanned more than four decades and began at the start of the antibiotic era. It was also observed that frequent de novo evolution of MDR and XDR was present, with 56 and 9 independent evolutions, respectively. Thus, ongoing amplification of drug-resistance in KwaZulu-Natal is driven by both clonal spread and de novo acquisition of resistance. In drug-resistant TB, isoniazid resistance was overwhelmingly the initial resistance mutation to be acquired, which would not be detected by current rapid molecular diagnostics that assess only rifampicin resistance.

  12. IS-seq: a novel high throughput survey of in vivo IS6110 transposition in multiple Mycobacterium tuberculosis genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyes Alejandro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The insertion element IS6110 is one of the main sources of genomic variability in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of human tuberculosis. Although IS 6110 has been used extensively as an epidemiological marker, the identification of the precise chromosomal insertion sites has been limited by technical challenges. Here, we present IS-seq, a novel method that combines high-throughput sequencing using Illumina technology with efficient combinatorial sample multiplexing to simultaneously probe 519 clinical isolates, identifying almost all the flanking regions of the element in a single experiment. Results We identified a total of 6,976 IS6110 flanking regions on the different isolates. When validated using reference strains, the method had 100% specificity and 98% positive predictive value. The insertions mapped to both coding and non-coding regions, and in some cases interrupted genes thought to be essential for virulence or in vitro growth. Strains were classified into families using insertion sites, and high agreement with previous studies was observed. Conclusions This high-throughput IS-seq method, which can also be used to map insertions in other organisms, extends previous surveys of in vivo interrupted loci and provides a baseline for probing the consequences of disruptions in M. tuberculosis strains.

  13. Contribution of spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTRs to characterize prevalent Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotypes infecting tuberculosis patients in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaoui, Imane; Zozio, Thierry; Lahlou, Ouafae; Sabouni, Radia; Abid, Mohammed; El Aouad, Rajae; Akrim, Mohammed; Amzazi, Said; Rastogi, Nalin; El Mzibri, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) clinical isolates from culture-positive TB patients in Morocco were studied by spoligotyping and 12-loci MIRU-VNTR typing methods to characterize prevalent genotypes (n = 219 isolates from 208 patients). Spoligotyping resulted in 39 unique patterns and 167 strains in 30 clusters (2-50 strains per cluster). Comparison with international database showed that 29 of 39 unique patterns matched existing shared spoligotype international types (SITs). Nine shared types containing 10 strains were newly created (SIT 2891 to SIT 2899); this led to the description of 69 SITs with 206 strains and two orphan patterns. The most prevalent spoligotype was SIT42 (LAM; n = 50 or 24% of isolates). The repartition of strains according to major MTBC clades was as follows LAM (46.1%)> Haarlem (26%) >ill-defined T superfamily (22.6%) and S clade (0.96%). On the other hand, Beijing, CAS (Central Asian) and EAI (East-African Indian) strains were absent in this setting. Subsequent 12-Loci MIRU typing resulted in a total of 25 SIT/MIT clusters (n = 66 isolates, 2-6 isolates per cluster), with a resulting recent transmission rate of 22.3%. The MIRU-VNTR patterns corresponded to 69 MITs for 138 strains and 46 orphan patterns. The most frequent patterns were MIT43 (n = 8), MIT9 (n = 7) and MIT42 (n = 7). HGDI analysis of the 12 MIRU loci showed that loci 10, 23 and 40 were highly discriminative in our setting. The results also underlined the usefulness of spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR to detect mixed infections among certain of our TB patients. Globally, the results obtained showed that TB is almost exclusively transmitted in Morocco through evolutionary-modern MTBC lineages belonging to principal genetic groups 2/3 strains (Haarlem, LAM, T), with a high level of biodiversity seen by MIRU typing. This study provides with a 1st global snapshot of MTBC population structure in Morocco, and validates the potential use of spoligotyping in

  14. Whole genome sequencing versus traditional genotyping for investigation of a Mycobacterium tuberculosis outbreak: a longitudinal molecular epidemiological study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Roetzer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb transmission is essential to guide efficient tuberculosis control strategies. Traditional strain typing lacks sufficient discriminatory power to resolve large outbreaks. Here, we tested the potential of using next generation genome sequencing for identification of outbreak-related transmission chains. METHODS AND FINDINGS: During long-term (1997 to 2010 prospective population-based molecular epidemiological surveillance comprising a total of 2,301 patients, we identified a large outbreak caused by an Mtb strain of the Haarlem lineage. The main performance outcome measure of whole genome sequencing (WGS analyses was the degree of correlation of the WGS analyses with contact tracing data and the spatio-temporal distribution of the outbreak cases. WGS analyses of the 86 isolates revealed 85 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, subdividing the outbreak into seven genome clusters (two to 24 isolates each, plus 36 unique SNP profiles. WGS results showed that the first outbreak isolates detected in 1997 were falsely clustered by classical genotyping. In 1998, one clone (termed "Hamburg clone" started expanding, apparently independently from differences in the social environment of early cases. Genome-based clustering patterns were in better accordance with contact tracing data and the geographical distribution of the cases than clustering patterns based on classical genotyping. A maximum of three SNPs were identified in eight confirmed human-to-human transmission chains, involving 31 patients. We estimated the Mtb genome evolutionary rate at 0.4 mutations per genome per year. This rate suggests that Mtb grows in its natural host with a doubling time of approximately 22 h (400 generations per year. Based on the genome variation discovered, emergence of the Hamburg clone was dated back to a period between 1993 and 1997, hence shortly before the discovery of the outbreak through epidemiological

  15. Comparative Whole-Genomic Analysis of an Ancient L2 Lineage Mycobacterium tuberculosis Reveals a Novel Phylogenetic Clade and Common Genetic Determinants of Hypervirulent Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Rajwani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Development of improved therapeutics against tuberculosis (TB is hindered by an inadequate understanding of the relationship between disease severity and genetic diversity of its causative agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We previously isolated a hypervirulent M. tuberculosis strain H112 from an HIV-negative patient with an aggressive disease progression from pulmonary TB to tuberculous meningitis—the most severe manifestation of tuberculosis. Human macrophage challenge experiment demonstrated that the strain H112 exhibited significantly better intracellular survivability and induced lower level of TNF-α than the reference virulent strain H37Rv and other 123 clinical isolates.Aim: The present study aimed to identify the potential genetic determinants of mycobacterial virulence that were common to strain H112 and hypervirulent M. tuberculosis strains of the same phylogenetic clade isolated in other global regions.Methods: A low-virulent M. tuberculosis strain H54 which belonged to the same phylogenetic lineage (L2 as strain H112 was selected from a collection of 115 clinical isolates. Both H112 and H54 were whole-genome-sequenced using PacBio sequencing technology. A comparative genomics approach was adopted to identify mutations present in strain H112 but absent in strain H54. Subsequently, an extensive phylogenetic analysis was conducted by including all publically available M. tuberculosis genomes. Single-nucleotide-polymorphisms (SNPs and structural variations (SVs common to hypervirulent strains in the global collection of genomes were considered as potential genetic determinants of hypervirulence.Results:Sequencing data revealed that both H112 and H54 were identified as members of the same sub-lineage L2.2.1. After excluding the lineage-related mutations shared between H112 and H54, we analyzed the phylogenetic relatedness of H112 with global collection of M. tuberculosis genomes (n = 4,338, and identified a novel

  16. Whole Genome Sequencing Based Characterization of Extensively Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Pakistan

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Asho

    2015-02-26

    Improved molecular diagnostic methods for detection drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) strains are required. Resistance to first- and second- line anti-tuberculous drugs has been associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in particular genes. However, these SNPs can vary between MTB lineages therefore local data is required to describe different strain populations. We used whole genome sequencing (WGS) to characterize 37 extensively drug-resistant (XDR) MTB isolates from Pakistan and investigated 40 genes associated with drug resistance. Rifampicin resistance was attributable to SNPs in the rpoB hot-spot region. Isoniazid resistance was most commonly associated with the katG codon 315 (92%) mutation followed by inhA S94A (8%) however, one strain did not have SNPs in katG, inhA or oxyR-ahpC. All strains were pyrazimamide resistant but only 43% had pncA SNPs. Ethambutol resistant strains predominantly had embB codon 306 (62%) mutations, but additional SNPs at embB codons 406, 378 and 328 were also present. Fluoroquinolone resistance was associated with gyrA 91-94 codons in 81% of strains; four strains had only gyr B mutations, while others did not have SNPs in either gyrA or gyrB. Streptomycin resistant strains had mutations in ribosomal RNA genes; rpsL codon 43 (42%); rrs 500 region (16%), and gidB (34%) while six strains did not have mutations in any of these genes. Amikacin/kanamycin/capreomycin resistance was associated with SNPs in rrs at nt1401 (78%) and nt1484 (3%), except in seven (19%) strains. We estimate that if only the common hot-spot region targets of current commercial assays were used, the concordance between phenotypic and genotypic testing for these XDR strains would vary between rifampicin (100%), isoniazid (92%), flouroquinolones (81%), aminoglycoside (78%) and ethambutol (62%); while pncA sequencing would provide genotypic resistance in less than half the isolates. This work highlights the importance of expanded

  17. Transmission of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Shanghai, China: a retrospective observational study using whole-genome sequencing and epidemiological investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Gan, Mingyu; Xu, Peng; Wu, Zheyuan; Lin, Senlin; Tian, Jiyun; Liu, Qingyun; Yuan, ZhengAn; Mei, Jian; DeRiemer, Kathryn; Gao, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a significant threat to tuberculosis elimination worldwide. Understanding the transmission pattern is crucial for its control. We used a genomic epidemiological approach to assess the recent transmission of MDR-TB and potential risk factors for transmission. Methods In a population-based retrospective study, we performed variable-number-of-tandem-repeat (VNTR) genotyping, followed by whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of isolates from all MDR-TB patients in Shanghai, China, 2009-2012. We measured strain diversity within and between genomically clustered patients. Genomic and epidemiologic data were combined to construct transmission networks. Findings 367 (5%) of 7982 patients with tuberculosis had MDR tuberculosis and 324 (88%) of these had isolates available for genomic analysis. 103 (32%) of the 324 MDR strains were in 38 genomic clusters that differed by 12 or fewer single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), indicating recent transmission of MDR strains. Patients who had delayed diagnosis or were older than 45 years had high risk of recent transmission. 235 (73%) patients with MDR tuberculosis probably had transmission of MDR strains. Transmission network analysis showed that 33 (87%) of the 38 clusters accumulated additional drug-resistance mutations through emergence or fixation of mutations during transmission. 68 (66%) of 103 clustered MDR strains had compensatory mutations of rifampicin resistance. Interpretation Recent transmission of MDR strains, with increasing drug-resistance, helps drive the MDR-TB epidemic in Shanghai, China. WGS provides a measure of the heterogeneity of drug-resistant mutations within and between hosts and enhances our ability to determine the transmission patterns of MDR-TB. Funding National Science and Technology Major Project, National Natural Science Foundation of China, and US National Insitutes of Health. PMID:27919643

  18. Draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain B9741 of Beijing B0/W lineage from HIV positive patient from Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.V. Shur

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain B9741 belonging to Beijing B0/W lineage isolated from a HIV patient from Siberia, Russia. This clinical isolate showed MDR phenotype and resistance to isoniazid, rifampin, streptomycin and pyrazinamide. We analyzed SNPs associated with virulence and resistance. The draft genome sequence and annotation have been deposited at GenBank under the accession NZ_LVJJ00000000.

  19. Host genome polymorphisms and tuberculosis infection: What we have to say?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Alfin Khalilullah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several epidemiology studies suggest that host genetic factors play important roles in susceptibility, protection and progression of tuberculosis infection. Here we have reviewed the implications of some genetic polymorphisms in pathways related to tuberculosis susceptibility, severity and development. Large case-control studies examining single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in genes have been performed in tuberculosis patients in some countries. Polymorphisms in natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (NRAMP1, toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2, interleukin-6 (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA, IL-10, vitamin D receptor (VDR, dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, nucleotide oligomerization binding domain 2 (NOD2, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, mannose-binding lectin (MBL and surfactant proteins A (SP-A have been reviewed. These genes have been variably associated with tuberculosis infection and there is strong evidence indicating that host genetic factors play critical roles in tuberculosis susceptibility, severity and development.

  20. [Tuberculosis in Mexico: contributions of the Museum of Anatomopathology, 1895-1899].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Méndez, Santiago; Salinas-Lara, Citlaltepetl; Castañeda-López, Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    In 1895, Rafael Lavista founded the Museum of Anatomopathology at the Hospital de San Andrds in Mexico City, for the purpose of preparing and preserving anatomical pieces useful for the study of different diseases. Porfirio Diaz officially inaugurated the Museum in March 1896, but in June 1899 it was renamed as the Instituto Patológico Nacional. During its four years of activity, a variety of illnesses were studied, including tuberculosis, which spurred great interest among Museum personnel because of its high incidence. This text examines the labors developed at the Museum of Anatomopathology in relation to tuberculosis, discusses the researchers involved, and reviews the articles published in the Museum's journal: Revista quincenal de anatomía patológica.

  1. Are we Genomic Mosaics? Variations of the Genome of Somatic Cells can Contribute to Diversify our Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astolfi, P A; Salamini, F; Sgaramella, V

    2010-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental evidences support the hypothesis that the genomes and the epigenomes may be different in the somatic cells of complex organisms. In the genome, the differences range from single base substitutions to chromosome number; in the epigenome, they entail multiple postsynthetic modifications of the chromatin. Somatic genome variations (SGV) may accumulate during development in response both to genetic programs, which may differ from tissue to tissue, and to environmental stimuli, which are often undetected and generally irreproducible. SGV may jeopardize physiological cellular functions, but also create novel coding and regulatory sequences, to be exposed to intraorganismal Darwinian selection. Genomes acknowledged as comparatively poor in genes, such as humans', could thus increase their pristine informational endowment. A better understanding of SGV will contribute to basic issues such as the "nature vs nurture" dualism and the inheritance of acquired characters. On the applied side, they may explain the low yield of cloning via somatic cell nuclear transfer, provide clues to some of the problems associated with transdifferentiation, and interfere with individual DNA analysis. SGV may be unique in the different cells types and in the different developmental stages, and thus explain the several hundred gaps persisting in the human genomes "completed" so far. They may compound the variations associated to our epigenomes and make of each of us an "(epi)genomic" mosaic. An ensuing paradigm is the possibility that a single genome (the ephemeral one assembled at fertilization) has the capacity to generate several different brains in response to different environments.

  2. The elephant interferon gamma assay: a contribution to diagnosis of tuberculosis in elephants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angkawanish, T; Morar, D; van Kooten, P; Bontekoning, I; Schreuder, J; Maas, M; Wajjwalku, W; Sirimalaisuwan, A; Michel, A; Tijhaar, E; Rutten, V

    2013-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) has been shown to be the main causative agent of tuberculosis in elephants worldwide. M. tb may be transmitted from infected humans to other species including elephants and vice versa, in case of prolonged intensive contact. An accurate diagnostic approach covering all phases of the infection in elephants is required. As M. tb is an intracellular pathogen and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses are elicited early after infection, the skin test is the CMI assay of choice in humans and cattle. However, this test is not applicable in elephants. The interferon gamma (IFN-γ) assay is considered a good alternative for the skin test in general, validated for use in cattle and humans. This study was aimed at development of an IFN-γ assay applicable for diagnosis of tuberculosis in elephants. Recombinant elephant IFN-γ (rEpIFN-γ) produced in eukaryotic cells was used to immunize mice and generate the monoclonal antibodies. Hybridomas were screened for IFN-γ-specific monoclonal antibody production and subcloned, and antibodies were isotyped and affinity purified. Western blot confirmed recognition of the rEpIFN-γ. The optimal combination of capture and detection antibodies selected was able to detect rEpIFN-γ in concentrations as low as 1 pg/ml. The assay was shown to be able to detect the native elephant IFN-γ, elicited in positive-control cultures (pokeweed mitogen (PWM), phorbol myristate acetate plus ionomycin (PMA/I)) of both Asian and African elephant whole-blood cultures (WBC). Preliminary data were generated using WBC from non-infected elephants, a M. tb infection-suspected elephant and a culture-confirmed M. tb-infected elephant. The latter showed measurable production of IFN-γ after stimulation with ESAT6/CFP10 PPDB and PPDA in concentration ranges as elicited in WBC by Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC)-specific antigens in other species. Hence, the IFN-γ assay presented potential as a diagnostic tool for the

  3. DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: from phage typing to whole-genome sequencing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurch, A.C.; Soolingen, D. van

    2012-01-01

    Current typing methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex evolved from simple phenotypic approaches like phage typing and drug susceptibility profiling to DNA-based strain typing methods, such as IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) and variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR)

  4. Evolutionary pathway of the Beijing lineage of Mycobacterium tuberculosis based on genomic deletions and mutT genes polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindi, Laura; Lari, Nicoletta; Cuccu, Barbara; Garzelli, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    Among the genotypes that prevail in the modern spectrum of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, the Beijing genotype is the one that causes major concern, as it is geographically widespread and it is considered hypervirulent. Comparative genomic studies have shown that Beijing strains have principally evolved through mechanisms of deletion of chromosomal regions, designated regions of difference (RD), and mutations. In this paper, we aimed to determine the evolutionary history of Beijing strains through the analysis of polymorphisms generated by deletions of large specific sequences, i.e., RD105, RD181, RD150, and RD142, and by single nucleotide substitutions in genes mutT4 and mutT2, coding for DNA repair enzymes. Based on the molecular characteristics of a collection of Beijing strains recently isolated in Tuscany, Italy, we propose a phylogenetic reconstruction of the Beijing family. According to our model, the Beijing family evolved from a M. tuberculosis progenitor following deletion of the RD207 region, an event responsible for the loss of spacers 1-34 in the direct repeat (DR) locus. The major lineages of the Beijing family then evolved via subsequent deletions of regions RD105, RD181 and RD150. In the most ancient evolutionary lineages genes mutT4 and mutT2 were in wild type configuration; the mutT4 mutation was acquired subsequent to the RD181 deletion in a progenitor strain that, in turn, gave rise to a sublineage bearing the mutT2 mutation. Within the major branches of the Beijing family, deletion of additional spacers in the DR locus led to evolution of sublineages characterized by different spoligotypes. Our evolutionary model of the Beijing family provides a deeper framework than previously proposed for epidemiologic and phylogenetic studies of circulating M. tuberculosis Beijing strains, thus allowing a more systematic and comprehensive evaluation of the relevance of Beijing strain variability.

  5. The effect of genomic information on optimal contribution selection in livestock breeding programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Samuel A; Kinghorn, Brian P; Hickey, John M; van der Werf, Julius H J

    2013-10-30

    Long-term benefits in animal breeding programs require that increases in genetic merit be balanced with the need to maintain diversity (lost due to inbreeding). This can be achieved by using optimal contribution selection. The availability of high-density DNA marker information enables the incorporation of genomic data into optimal contribution selection but this raises the question about how this information affects the balance between genetic merit and diversity. The effect of using genomic information in optimal contribution selection was examined based on simulated and real data on dairy bulls. We compared the genetic merit of selected animals at various levels of co-ancestry restrictions when using estimated breeding values based on parent average, genomic or progeny test information. Furthermore, we estimated the proportion of variation in estimated breeding values that is due to within-family differences. Optimal selection on genomic estimated breeding values increased genetic gain. Genetic merit was further increased using genomic rather than pedigree-based measures of co-ancestry under an inbreeding restriction policy. Using genomic instead of pedigree relationships to restrict inbreeding had a significant effect only when the population consisted of many large full-sib families; with a half-sib family structure, no difference was observed. In real data from dairy bulls, optimal contribution selection based on genomic estimated breeding values allowed for additional improvements in genetic merit at low to moderate inbreeding levels. Genomic estimated breeding values were more accurate and showed more within-family variation than parent average breeding values; for genomic estimated breeding values, 30 to 40% of the variation was due to within-family differences. Finally, there was no difference between constraining inbreeding via pedigree or genomic relationships in the real data. The use of genomic estimated breeding values increased genetic gain in

  6. Genetic contribution of CISH promoter polymorphisms to susceptibility to tuberculosis in Chinese children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Sun

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is the leading cause of death due to an infectious disease worldwide, particularly in developing countries. A series of candidate genes have been suggested to be associated with development of TB disease. Among them, the human Cytokine-inducible Src homology 2(SH2 domain protein (CISH gene has been very recently reported to be involved in T cell activation and differentiation in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Here, we studied the association between CISH promoter polymorphisms and pediatric TB. A case-control study enrolled 352 TB patients and 527 healthy controls, who were of Han Chinese ethnicity and aged from 0.2 to 18 years. CISH gene promoter SNPs rs414171, rs622502 and rs809451 were genotyped in all subjects and transcriptional activity, mRNA level, and plasma cytokine level of subjects with different genotypes were further examined. Carriers with rs414171TT homozygotes and rs809451GC heterozygotes had a 1.78-fold (95% CI,1.16-2.74 and 1.86-fold (95% CI, 1.26-2.74 excess risk of developing TB compared to those with wild-type genotypes. A greater risk of TB disease was observed in population carrying C(-809451-T(-414171-C(-622502 haplotype (OR 3.66, 95% CI:2.12-6.32. The G(-809451-A(-414171-C(-622502-containing CISH promoter drove a 5.43-fold increased reporter expression compared to the C(-809451-T(-414171-C(-622502-containing counterpart in Hela cell lines (P = 0.0009. PBMCs carrying rs414171TT homozygotes and rs809451GC heterozygotes showed a reduced CISH mRNA level compared to cells carrying wild type genotypes. Individuals with the rs414171TT genotype had significantly increased IL-12p40 and IL-10 production. In conclusion, CISH promoter rs414171 and rs809451 polymorphisms may play a vital role in mediating individual susceptibility to tuberculosis.

  7. Genetic contribution of CISH promoter polymorphisms to susceptibility to tuberculosis in Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lin; Jin, Ya-qiong; Shen, Chen; Qi, Hui; Chu, Ping; Yin, Qing-qin; Li, Jie-qiong; Tian, Jian-ling; Jiao, Wei-wei; Xiao, Jing; Shen, A-dong

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death due to an infectious disease worldwide, particularly in developing countries. A series of candidate genes have been suggested to be associated with development of TB disease. Among them, the human Cytokine-inducible Src homology 2(SH2) domain protein (CISH) gene has been very recently reported to be involved in T cell activation and differentiation in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Here, we studied the association between CISH promoter polymorphisms and pediatric TB. A case-control study enrolled 352 TB patients and 527 healthy controls, who were of Han Chinese ethnicity and aged from 0.2 to 18 years. CISH gene promoter SNPs rs414171, rs622502 and rs809451 were genotyped in all subjects and transcriptional activity, mRNA level, and plasma cytokine level of subjects with different genotypes were further examined. Carriers with rs414171TT homozygotes and rs809451GC heterozygotes had a 1.78-fold (95% CI,1.16-2.74) and 1.86-fold (95% CI, 1.26-2.74) excess risk of developing TB compared to those with wild-type genotypes. A greater risk of TB disease was observed in population carrying C(-809451)-T(-414171)-C(-622502) haplotype (OR 3.66, 95% CI:2.12-6.32). The G(-809451)-A(-414171)-C(-622502)-containing CISH promoter drove a 5.43-fold increased reporter expression compared to the C(-809451)-T(-414171)-C(-622502)-containing counterpart in Hela cell lines (P = 0.0009). PBMCs carrying rs414171TT homozygotes and rs809451GC heterozygotes showed a reduced CISH mRNA level compared to cells carrying wild type genotypes. Individuals with the rs414171TT genotype had significantly increased IL-12p40 and IL-10 production. In conclusion, CISH promoter rs414171 and rs809451 polymorphisms may play a vital role in mediating individual susceptibility to tuberculosis.

  8. Genomic distance entrained clustering and regression modelling highlights interacting genomic regions contributing to proliferation in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Tim J; Sims, David; Mitsopoulos, Costas; Mackay, Alan; Grigoriadis, Anita; Ahmad, Amar S; Zvelebil, Marketa

    2010-09-08

    Genomic copy number changes and regional alterations in epigenetic states have been linked to grade in breast cancer. However, the relative contribution of specific alterations to the pathology of different breast cancer subtypes remains unclear. The heterogeneity and interplay of genomic and epigenetic variations means that large datasets and statistical data mining methods are required to uncover recurrent patterns that are likely to be important in cancer progression. We employed ridge regression to model the relationship between regional changes in gene expression and proliferation. Regional features were extracted from tumour gene expression data using a novel clustering method, called genomic distance entrained agglomerative (GDEC) clustering. Using gene expression data in this way provides a simple means of integrating the phenotypic effects of both copy number aberrations and alterations in chromatin state. We show that regional metagenes derived from GDEC clustering are representative of recurrent regions of epigenetic regulation or copy number aberrations in breast cancer. Furthermore, detected patterns of genomic alterations are conserved across independent oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer datasets. Sequential competitive metagene selection was used to reveal the relative importance of genomic regions in predicting proliferation rate. The predictive model suggested additive interactions between the most informative regions such as 8p22-12 and 8q13-22. Data-mining of large-scale microarray gene expression datasets can reveal regional clusters of co-ordinate gene expression, independent of cause. By correlating these clusters with tumour proliferation we have identified a number of genomic regions that act together to promote proliferation in ER+ breast cancer. Identification of such regions should enable prioritisation of genomic regions for combinatorial functional studies to pinpoint the key genes and interactions contributing to

  9. Genomic distance entrained clustering and regression modelling highlights interacting genomic regions contributing to proliferation in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dexter Tim J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic copy number changes and regional alterations in epigenetic states have been linked to grade in breast cancer. However, the relative contribution of specific alterations to the pathology of different breast cancer subtypes remains unclear. The heterogeneity and interplay of genomic and epigenetic variations means that large datasets and statistical data mining methods are required to uncover recurrent patterns that are likely to be important in cancer progression. Results We employed ridge regression to model the relationship between regional changes in gene expression and proliferation. Regional features were extracted from tumour gene expression data using a novel clustering method, called genomic distance entrained agglomerative (GDEC clustering. Using gene expression data in this way provides a simple means of integrating the phenotypic effects of both copy number aberrations and alterations in chromatin state. We show that regional metagenes derived from GDEC clustering are representative of recurrent regions of epigenetic regulation or copy number aberrations in breast cancer. Furthermore, detected patterns of genomic alterations are conserved across independent oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer datasets. Sequential competitive metagene selection was used to reveal the relative importance of genomic regions in predicting proliferation rate. The predictive model suggested additive interactions between the most informative regions such as 8p22-12 and 8q13-22. Conclusions Data-mining of large-scale microarray gene expression datasets can reveal regional clusters of co-ordinate gene expression, independent of cause. By correlating these clusters with tumour proliferation we have identified a number of genomic regions that act together to promote proliferation in ER+ breast cancer. Identification of such regions should enable prioritisation of genomic regions for combinatorial functional studies to pinpoint

  10. Contributing to Tumor Molecular Characterization Projects with a Global Impact | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    My name is Nicholas Griner and I am the Scientific Program Manager for the Cancer Genome Characterization Initiative (CGCI) in the Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG). Until recently, I spent most of my scientific career working in a cancer research laboratory. In my postdoctoral training, my research focused on identifying novel pathways that contribute to both prostate and breast cancers and studying proteins within these pathways that may be targeted with cancer drugs.

  11. Scaling up towards international targets for AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria: contribution of global fund-supported programs in 2011-2015.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itamar Katz

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The paper projects the contribution to 2011-2015 international targets of three major pandemics by programs in 140 countries funded by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, the largest external financier of tuberculosis and malaria programs and a major external funder of HIV programs in low and middle income countries. DESIGN: Estimates, using past trends, for the period 2011-2015 of the number of persons receiving antiretroviral (ARV treatment, tuberculosis case detection using the internationally approved DOTS strategy, and insecticide-treated nets (ITNs to be delivered by programs in low and middle income countries supported by the Global Fund compared to international targets established by UNAIDS, Stop TB Partnership, Roll Back Malaria Partnership and the World Health Organisation. RESULTS: Global Fund-supported programs are projected to provide ARV treatment to 5.5-5.8 million people, providing 30%-31% of the 2015 international target. Investments in tuberculosis and malaria control will enable reaching in 2015 60%-63% of the international target for tuberculosis case detection and 30%-35% of the ITN distribution target in sub-Saharan Africa. CONCLUSION: Global Fund investments will substantially contribute to the achievement by 2015 of international targets for HIV, TB and malaria. However, additional large scale international and domestic financing is needed if these targets are to be reached by 2015.

  12. Genome-wide analysis of synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms: resolution of genetic relationships among closely related microbial strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutacker, Michaela M; Smoot, James C; Migliaccio, Cristi A Lux; Ricklefs, Stacy M; Hua, Su; Cousins, Debby V; Graviss, Edward A; Shashkina, Elena; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Musser, James M

    2002-12-01

    Several human pathogens (e.g., Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Bordetella pertussis, Plasmodium falciparum, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis) have very restricted unselected allelic variation in structural genes, which hinders study of the genetic relationships among strains and strain-trait correlations. To address this problem in a representative pathogen, 432 M. tuberculosis complex strains from global sources were genotyped on the basis of 230 synonymous (silent) single nucleotide polymorphisms (sSNPs) identified by comparison of four genome sequences. Eight major clusters of related genotypes were identified in M. tuberculosis sensu stricto, including a single cluster representing organisms responsible for several large outbreaks in the United States and Asia. All M. tuberculosis sensu stricto isolates of previously unknown phylogenetic position could be rapidly and unambiguously assigned to one of the eight major clusters, thus providing a facile strategy for identifying organisms that are clonally related by descent. Common clones of M. tuberculosis sensu stricto and M. bovis are distinct, deeply branching genotypic complexes whose extant members did not emerge directly from one another in the recent past. sSNP genotyping rapidly delineates relationships among closely related strains of pathogenic microbes and allows construction of genetic frameworks for examining the distribution of biomedically relevant traits such as virulence, transmissibility, and host range.

  13. Tuberculosis verrucosa cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnabharath S

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of 23-year-old male patient with tuberculosis verrucous cutis on the foot for a duration of six months without responding to routine treatment. Tuberculosis is a common disease worldwide. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis contributes to 10% of cases. Cutaneous tuberculosis occupies a small spectrum of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Tuberculosis verrucosa cutis is an exogenous infection occurring in a previously sensitized patient by direct inoculation of the organism. It occurs in sensitized patients with a moderate to high immune response. The diagnosis in our patient was confirmed by history, clinical examination, histopathological examination and the patient’s response to anti-tuberculous therapy.

  14. Small contribution of gold mines to the ongoing tuberculosis epidemic in South Africa: a modeling-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Stewart T; Chihota, Violet N; Fielding, Katherine L; Grant, Alison D; Houben, Rein M; White, Richard G; Churchyard, Gavin J; Eckhoff, Philip A; Wagner, Bradley G

    2018-04-12

    Gold mines represent a potential hotspot for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) transmission and may be exacerbating the tuberculosis (TB) epidemic in South Africa. However, the presence of multiple factors complicates estimation of the mining contribution to the TB burden in South Africa. We developed two models of TB in South Africa, a static risk model and an individual-based model that accounts for longer-term trends. Both models account for four populations - mine workers, peri-mining residents, labor-sending residents, and other residents of South Africa - including the size and prevalence of latent TB infection, active TB, and HIV of each population and mixing between populations. We calibrated to mine- and country-level data and used the static model to estimate force of infection (FOI) and new infections attributable to local residents in each community compared to other residents. Using the individual-based model, we simulated a counterfactual scenario to estimate the fraction of overall TB incidence in South Africa attributable to recent transmission in mines. We estimated that the majority of FOI in each community is attributable to local residents: 93.9% (95% confidence interval 92.4-95.1%), 91.5% (91.4-91.5%), and 94.7% (94.7-94.7%) in gold mining, peri-mining, and labor-sending communities, respectively. Assuming a higher rate of Mtb transmission in mines, 4.1% (2.6-5.8%), 5.0% (4.5-5.5%), and 9.0% (8.8-9.1%) of new infections in South Africa are attributable to gold mine workers, peri-mining residents, and labor-sending residents, respectively. Therefore, mine workers with TB disease, who constitute ~ 2.5% of the prevalent TB cases in South Africa, contribute 1.62 (1.04-2.30) times as many new infections as TB cases in South Africa on average. By modeling TB on a longer time scale, we estimate 63.0% (58.5-67.7%) of incident TB disease in gold mining communities to be attributable to recent transmission, of which 92.5% (92.1-92.9%) is attributable to

  15. Genomic and proteomic analyses of Mycobacterium bovis BCG Mexico 1931 reveal a diverse immunogenic repertoire against tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orduña, Patricia; Cevallos, Miguel A; de León, Samuel Ponce; Arvizu, Adriana; Hernández-González, Ismael L; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; López-Vidal, Yolanda

    2011-10-08

    Studies of Mycobacterium bovis BCG strains used in different countries and vaccination programs show clear variations in the genomes and immune protective properties of BCG strains. The aim of this study was to characterise the genomic and immune proteomic profile of the BCG 1931 strain used in Mexico. BCG Mexico 1931 has a circular chromosome of 4,350,386 bp with a G+C content and numbers of genes and pseudogenes similar to those of BCG Tokyo and BCG Pasteur. BCG Mexico 1931 lacks Region of Difference 1 (RD1), RD2 and N-RD18 and one copy of IS6110, indicating that BCG Mexico 1931 belongs to DU2 group IV within the BCG vaccine genealogy. In addition, this strain contains three new RDs, which are 53 (RDMex01), 655 (RDMex02) and 2,847 bp (REDMex03) long, and 55 single-nucleotide polymorphisms representing non-synonymous mutations compared to BCG Pasteur and BCG Tokyo. In a comparative proteomic analysis, the BCG Mexico 1931, Danish, Phipps and Tokyo strains showed 812, 794, 791 and 701 protein spots, respectively. The same analysis showed that BCG Mexico 1931 shares 62% of its protein spots with the BCG Danish strain, 61% with the BCG Phipps strain and only 48% with the BCG Tokyo strain. Thirty-nine reactive spots were detected in BCG Mexico 1931 using sera from subjects with active tuberculosis infections and positive tuberculin skin tests. BCG Mexico 1931 has a smaller genome than the BCG Pasteur and BCG Tokyo strains. Two specific deletions in BCG Mexico 1931 are described (RDMex02 and RDMex03). The loss of RDMex02 (fadD23) is associated with enhanced macrophage binding and RDMex03 contains genes that may be involved in regulatory pathways. We also describe new antigenic proteins for the first time.

  16. Genomic and proteomic analyses of Mycobacterium bovis BCG Mexico 1931 reveal a diverse immunogenic repertoire against tuberculosis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Vidal Yolanda

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies of Mycobacterium bovis BCG strains used in different countries and vaccination programs show clear variations in the genomes and immune protective properties of BCG strains. The aim of this study was to characterise the genomic and immune proteomic profile of the BCG 1931 strain used in Mexico. Results BCG Mexico 1931 has a circular chromosome of 4,350,386 bp with a G+C content and numbers of genes and pseudogenes similar to those of BCG Tokyo and BCG Pasteur. BCG Mexico 1931 lacks Region of Difference 1 (RD1, RD2 and N-RD18 and one copy of IS6110, indicating that BCG Mexico 1931 belongs to DU2 group IV within the BCG vaccine genealogy. In addition, this strain contains three new RDs, which are 53 (RDMex01, 655 (RDMex02 and 2,847 bp (REDMex03 long, and 55 single-nucleotide polymorphisms representing non-synonymous mutations compared to BCG Pasteur and BCG Tokyo. In a comparative proteomic analysis, the BCG Mexico 1931, Danish, Phipps and Tokyo strains showed 812, 794, 791 and 701 protein spots, respectively. The same analysis showed that BCG Mexico 1931 shares 62% of its protein spots with the BCG Danish strain, 61% with the BCG Phipps strain and only 48% with the BCG Tokyo strain. Thirty-nine reactive spots were detected in BCG Mexico 1931 using sera from subjects with active tuberculosis infections and positive tuberculin skin tests. Conclusions BCG Mexico 1931 has a smaller genome than the BCG Pasteur and BCG Tokyo strains. Two specific deletions in BCG Mexico 1931 are described (RDMex02 and RDMex03. The loss of RDMex02 (fadD23 is associated with enhanced macrophage binding and RDMex03 contains genes that may be involved in regulatory pathways. We also describe new antigenic proteins for the first time.

  17. Genomic Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Strains in Cantabria (Spain), a Moderate TB Incidence Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Del Molino Bernal, Inmaculada C; Lillebaek, Troels; Pedersen, Mathias K; Martinez-Martinez, Luis; Folkvardsen, Dorte B; Agüero, Jesús; Rasmussen, E Michael

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) control strategies are focused mainly on prevention, early diagnosis, compliance to treatment and contact tracing. The objectives of this study were to explore the frequency and risk factors of recent transmission of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) in Cantabria in Northern Spain from 2012 through 2013 and to analyze their clonal complexity for better understanding of the transmission dynamics in a moderate TB incidence setting. DNA from 85 out of 87 isolates from bacteriologically confirmed cases of MTBC infection were extracted directly from frozen stocks and genotyped using the mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) method. The MIRU-VNTRplus database tool was used to identify clusters and lineages and to build a neighbor joining (NJ) phylogenetic tree. In addition, data were compared to the SITVIT2 database at the Pasteur Institute of Guadeloupe. The rate of recent transmission was calculated to 24%. Clustering was associated with being Spanish-born. A high prevalence of isolates of the Euro-American lineage was found. In addition, MIRU-VNTR profiles of the studied isolates corresponded to previously found MIRU-VNTR types in other countries, including Spain, Belgium, Great Britain, USA, Croatia, South Africa and The Netherlands. Six of the strains analyzed represented clonal variants. Transmission of MTBC is well controlled in Cantabria. The majority of TB patients were born in Spain. The population structure of MTBC in Cantabria has a low diversity of major clonal lineages with the Euro-American lineage predominating.

  18. Evolution of Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis over Four Decades: Whole Genome Sequencing and Dating Analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from KwaZulu-Natal

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Keira A.; Abeel, Thomas; Manson McGuire, Abigail; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Munsamy, Vanisha; Shea, Terrance P.; Walker, Bruce J.; Bantubani, Nonkqubela; Almeida, Deepak V.; Alvarado, Lucia; Chapman, Sinéad B.; Mvelase, Nomonde R.; Duffy, Eamon Y.; Fitzgerald, Michael G.; Govender, Pamla

    2015-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Tuberculosis (TB)—a contagious bacterial disease that usually infects the lungs—is a global public health problem. Every year, about 9 million people develop active TB disease, and 1.5 million people die from the disease. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the organism that causes TB, is spread in airborne droplets when people with TB cough. The symptoms of TB include cough, weight loss, and fever. Diagnostic tests for the disease include sputum smear microscopy (microsco...

  19. Contributions of culture and antimicrobial susceptibility tests to the retreatment of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Horta Andrade

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction This study evaluated the efficacy of retreatment of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB with regard to treatment outcomes and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (ST profiles. Methods This retrospective cohort study analyzed 144 patients treated at a referral hospital in Brazil. All of them had undergone prior treatment, were smear-positive for TB and received a standardized retreatment regimen. Fisher's 2-tailed exact test and the χ2 test were used; RRs and 95% CIs were calculated using univariate and multivariate binary logistic regression. Results The patients were cured in 84 (58.3% cases. Failure was associated with relapsed treatment and abandonment (n=34. Culture tests were obtained for 103 (71.5% cases; 70 (48.6% had positive results. ST results were available for 67 (46.5% cases; the prevalence of acquired resistance was 53.7%. There were no significant differences between those who achieved or not therapeutic success (p=0.988, despite being sensitive or resistant to 1 or more drugs. Rifampicin resistance was independently associated with therapeutic failure (OR: 4.4, 95% CI:1.12-17.37, p=0.034. For those cases in which cultures were unavailable, a 2nd model without this information was built. In this, return after abandonment was significantly associated with retreatment failure (OR: 3.59, 95% CI:1.17-11.06, p=0.026. Conclusions In this cohort, the general resistance profile appeared to have no influence on treatment outcome, except in cases of rifampicin resistance. The form of reentry was another independent predictor of failure. The use of bacterial culture identification and ST in TB management must be re-evaluated. The recommendations for different susceptibility profiles must also be improved.

  20. Characterization of genomic variations in SNPs of PE_PGRS genes reveals deletions and insertions in extensively drug resistant (XDR) M. tuberculosis strains from Pakistan

    KAUST Repository

    Kanji, Akbar

    2015-03-01

    Background: Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) PE_PGRS genes belong to the PE multi-gene family. Although the function of the members of the PE_PGRS multi-gene family is not yet known, it is hypothesized that the PE_PGRS genes may be associated with genetic variability. Material and methods: Whole genome sequencing analysis was performed on (n= 37) extensively drug resistant (XDR) MTB strains from Pakistan which included Central Asian (n= 23), East African Indian (n= 2), X3 (n= 1), T group (n= 3) and Orphan (n= 8) MTB strains. Results: By analyzing 42 PE_PGRS genes, 111 SNPs were identified, of which 13 were non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs). The nsSNPs identified in the PE_PGRS genes were as follows: 6, 9, 10 and 55 present in each of the CAS, EAI, Orphan, T1 and X3 XDR MTB strains studied. Deletions in PE_PGRS genes: 19, 21 and 23 were observed in 7 (35.0%) CAS1 and 3 (37.5%) in Orphan XDR MTB strains, while deletions in the PE_PGRS genes: 49 and 50 were observed in 36 (95.0%) CAS1 and all CAS, CAS2 and Orphan XDR MTB strains. An insertion in PE_PGRS6 gene was observed in all CAS, EAI3 and Orphan, while insertions in the PE_PGRS genes 19 and 33 were observed in 19 (95%) CAS1 and all CAS, CAS2, EAI3 and Orphan XDR MTB strains. Conclusion: Genetic diversity in PE_PGRS genes contributes to antigenic variability and may result in increased immunogenicity of strains. This is the first study identifying variations in nsSNPs, Insertions and Deletions in the PE_PGRS genes of XDR-TB strains from Pakistan. It highlights common genetic variations which may contribute to persistence.

  1. Characterization of genomic variations in SNPs of PE_PGRS genes reveals deletions and insertions in extensively drug resistant (XDR) M. tuberculosis strains from Pakistan

    KAUST Repository

    Kanji, Akbar

    2015-01-21

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) PE_PGRS genes belong to the PE multigene family. Although the function of PE_PGRS genes is unknown, it is hypothesized that the PE_PGRS genes may be associated with antigenic variability in MTB. Material and methods Whole genome sequencing analysis was performed on (n = 37) extensively drug-resistant (XDR) MTB strains from Pakistan, which included Lineage 1 (East African Indian, n = 2); Other lineage 1 (n = 3); Lineage 3 (Central Asian, n = 24); Other lineage 3 (n = 4); Lineage 4 (X3, n = 1) and T group (n = 3) MTB strains. Results There were 107 SNPs identified from the analysis of 42 PE_PGRS genes; of these, 13 were non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs). The nsSNPs identified in PE_PGRS genes – 6, 9 and 10 – were common in all EAI, CAS, Other lineages (1 and 3), T1 and X3. Deletions (DELs) in PE_PGRS genes – 3 and 19 – were observed in 17 (80.9%) CAS1 and 6 (85.7%) in Other lineages (1 and 3) XDR MTB strains, while DELs in the PE_PGRS49 were observed in all CAS1, CAS, CAS2 and Other lineages (1 and 3) XDR MTB strains. All CAS, EAI and Other lineages (1 and 3) strains showed insertions (INS) in PE_PGRS6 gene, while INS in the PE_PGRS genes 19 and 33 were observed in 20 (95.2%) CAS1, all CAS, CAS2, EAI and Other lineages (1 and 3) XDR MTB strains. Conclusion Genetic diversity in PE_PGRS genes contributes to antigenic variability and may result in increased immunogenicity of strains. This is the first study identifying variations in nsSNPs and INDELs in the PE_PGRS genes of XDR-TB strains from Pakistan. It highlights common genetic variations which may contribute to persistence.

  2. Genomic Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Strains in Cantabria (Spain, a Moderate TB Incidence Setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada C Pérez Del Molino Bernal

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB control strategies are focused mainly on prevention, early diagnosis, compliance to treatment and contact tracing. The objectives of this study were to explore the frequency and risk factors of recent transmission of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC in Cantabria in Northern Spain from 2012 through 2013 and to analyze their clonal complexity for better understanding of the transmission dynamics in a moderate TB incidence setting.DNA from 85 out of 87 isolates from bacteriologically confirmed cases of MTBC infection were extracted directly from frozen stocks and genotyped using the mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR method. The MIRU-VNTRplus database tool was used to identify clusters and lineages and to build a neighbor joining (NJ phylogenetic tree. In addition, data were compared to the SITVIT2 database at the Pasteur Institute of Guadeloupe.The rate of recent transmission was calculated to 24%. Clustering was associated with being Spanish-born. A high prevalence of isolates of the Euro-American lineage was found. In addition, MIRU-VNTR profiles of the studied isolates corresponded to previously found MIRU-VNTR types in other countries, including Spain, Belgium, Great Britain, USA, Croatia, South Africa and The Netherlands. Six of the strains analyzed represented clonal variants.Transmission of MTBC is well controlled in Cantabria. The majority of TB patients were born in Spain. The population structure of MTBC in Cantabria has a low diversity of major clonal lineages with the Euro-American lineage predominating.

  3. Populations of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis lack a cell wall: Isolation, visualization, and whole-genome characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Velayati

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Here, we show cell-wall free cells of MTB bacilli in their latent state, and the biological adaptation of these cells was more phenotypic in nature than genomic. These cell-wall free cells represent a good model for understanding the nature of TB latency.

  4. A genome-wide approach identifies that the aspartate metabolism pathway contributes to asparaginase sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Hsiang; Yang, Wenjian; Fan, Yiping; Stocco, Gabriele; Crews, Kristine R.; Yang, Jun J.; Paugh, Steven W.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.

    2011-01-01

    Asparaginase is an important component of treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The basis for interindividual differences in asparaginase sensitivity remains unclear. To comprehensively identify genetic variants important in the cytotoxicity of asparaginase, we employed a genome-wide association approach using the HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines (87 CEU trio members) and 54 primary ALL leukemic blast samples at diagnosis. Asparaginase sensitivity was assessed as the drug concentration necessary to inhibit 50% of growth (IC50). In CEU lines, we tested 2,390,203 SNP genotypes at the individual SNP (p ADSL and DARS genes. We validated that SNPs in the aspartate metabolism pathway were also associated with asparaginase sensitivity in primary ALL leukemic blast samples (p = 5.5 × 10−5). Our genome-wide interrogation of CEU cell lines and primary ALL blasts revealed that inherited genomic interindividual variation in a plausible candidate pathway can contribute to asparaginase sensitivity. PMID:21072045

  5. [Evaluation of France's contributions to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria: Ten years later].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerouedan, D

    2014-01-01

    For 30 years, France has been very committed politically in the international combat against AIDS. The discovery of the AIDS virus at the Pasteur Institute in 1983, the AIDS summit meeting convened by Simone Veil in 1994, the excellence of research by French institutions on its virologic and other aspects as well as the socioeconomic and anthropological issues, and the strong commitment to international technical cooperation against this disease - all these have made (and continue to make) France a major political, technical, and financial participant in this battle against the combined pandemic of AIDS and tuberculosis. More than 10 years after the creation of the Global Fund, 5 years after the first evaluation of this Fund, and 2 years before the schedule for meeting the Millennium Development Goals, an assessment commissioned in 2013 from a French consulting firm of the French contributions is timely. The study was expected. Its results are disappointing. Why? Because the team chosen to conduct the assessment has a limited knowledge of the history of the interventions already funded by France and of the results of earlier assessments. The point was not to repeat the same observations but to move forward to see where they lead. In addition, the current and coming challenges are not considered. The countries to which France is providing cooperation are on the continent that after 30 years remains the most heavily affected by the pandemic. Several transitions are occurring there simultaneously: epidemiologic, demographic and urban. These metamorphoses influencing social values quite substantially, as well as risk factors for transmission of the AIDS virus; at the same time, they facilitate overcrowding and the propagation of tuberculosis. Nor do the authors consider the resistance of these infectious agents to the most commonly used drugs. The effects of the propagation of AIDS, of the expansion of armed conflicts in French-speaking Africa and of the sexual

  6. Whole genome sequencing reveals complex evolution patterns of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains in patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Merker

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant (MDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC strains represent a major threat for tuberculosis (TB control. Treatment of MDR-TB patients is long and less effective, resulting in a significant number of treatment failures. The development of further resistances leads to extensively drug-resistant (XDR variants. However, data on the individual reasons for treatment failure, e.g. an induced mutational burst, and on the evolution of bacteria in the patient are only sparsely available. To address this question, we investigated the intra-patient evolution of serial MTBC isolates obtained from three MDR-TB patients undergoing longitudinal treatment, finally leading to XDR-TB. Sequential isolates displayed identical IS6110 fingerprint patterns, suggesting the absence of exogenous re-infection. We utilized whole genome sequencing (WGS to screen for variations in three isolates from Patient A and four isolates from Patient B and C, respectively. Acquired polymorphisms were subsequently validated in up to 15 serial isolates by Sanger sequencing. We determined eight (Patient A and nine (Patient B polymorphisms, which occurred in a stepwise manner during the course of the therapy and were linked to resistance or a potential compensatory mechanism. For both patients, our analysis revealed the long-term co-existence of clonal subpopulations that displayed different drug resistance allele combinations. Out of these, the most resistant clone was fixed in the population. In contrast, baseline and follow-up isolates of Patient C were distinguished each by eleven unique polymorphisms, indicating an exogenous re-infection with an XDR strain not detected by IS6110 RFLP typing. Our study demonstrates that intra-patient microevolution of MDR-MTBC strains under longitudinal treatment is more complex than previously anticipated. However, a mutator phenotype was not detected. The presence of different subpopulations might confound phenotypic and

  7. Gene loss and horizontal gene transfer contributed to the genome evolution of the extreme acidophile Ferrovum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Roxana Ullrich

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage (AMD, associated with active and abandoned mining sites, is a habitat for acidophilic microorganisms that gain energy from the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds and ferrous iron and that thrive at pH below 4. Members of the recently proposed genus Ferrovum are the first acidophilic iron oxidizers to be described within the Betaproteobacteria. Although they have been detected as typical community members in AMD habitats worldwide, knowledge of their phylogenetic and metabolic diversity is scarce. Genomics approaches appear to be most promising in addressing this lacuna since isolation and cultivation of Ferrovum has proven to be extremely difficult and has so far only been successful for the designated type strain Ferrovum myxofaciens P3G. In this study, the genomes of two novel strains of Ferrovum (PN-J185 and Z-31 derived from water samples of a mine water treatment plant were sequenced. These genomes were compared with those of Ferrovum sp. JA12 that also originated from the mine water treatment plant, and of the type strain (P3G. Phylogenomic scrutiny suggests that the four strains represent three Ferrovum species that cluster in two groups (1 and 2. Comprehensive analysis of their predicted metabolic pathways revealed that these groups harbor characteristic metabolic profiles, notably with respect to motility, chemotaxis, nitrogen metabolism, biofilm formation and their potential strategies to cope with the acidic environment. For example, while the F. myxofaciens strains (group 1 appear to be motile and diazotrophic, the non-motile group 2 strains have the predicted potential to use a greater variety of fixed nitrogen sources. Furthermore, analysis of their genome synteny provides first insights into their genome evolution, suggesting that horizontal gene transfer and genome reduction in the group 2 strains by loss of genes encoding complete metabolic pathways or physiological features contributed to the observed

  8. Multilevel comparative analysis of the contributions of genome reduction and heat shock to the Escherichia coli transcriptome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Bei-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both large deletions in genome and heat shock stress would lead to alterations in the gene expression profile; however, whether there is any potential linkage between these disturbances to the transcriptome have not been discovered. Here, the relationship between the genomic and environmental contributions to the transcriptome was analyzed by comparing the transcriptomes of the bacterium Escherichia coli (strain MG1655 and its extensive genomic deletion derivative, MDS42 grown in regular and transient heat shock conditions. Results The transcriptome analysis showed the following: (i there was a reorganization of the transcriptome in accordance with preferred chromosomal periodicity upon genomic or heat shock perturbation; (ii there was a considerable overlap between the perturbed regulatory networks and the categories enriched for differentially expressed genes (DEGs following genome reduction and heat shock; (iii the genes sensitive to genome reduction tended to be located close to genomic scars, and some were also highly responsive to heat shock; and (iv the genomic and environmental contributions to the transcriptome displayed not only a positive correlation but also a negatively compensated relationship (i.e., antagonistic epistasis. Conclusion The contributions of genome reduction and heat shock to the Escherichia coli transcriptome were evaluated at multiple levels. The observations of overlapping perturbed networks, directional similarity in transcriptional changes, positive correlation and epistatic nature linked the two contributions and suggest somehow a crosstalk guiding transcriptional reorganization in response to both genetic and environmental disturbances in bacterium E. coli.

  9. High Persister Mutants in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L Torrey

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms drug-tolerant persister cells that are the probable cause of its recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. While genetically identical to the rest of the population, persisters are dormant, which protects them from killing by bactericidal antibiotics. The mechanism of persister formation in M. tuberculosis is not well understood. In this study, we selected for high persister (hip mutants and characterized them by whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis. In parallel, we identified and characterized clinical isolates that naturally produce high levels of persisters. We compared the hip mutants obtained in vitro with clinical isolates to identify candidate persister genes. Genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, toxin-antitoxin systems, and transcriptional regulators were among those identified. We also found that clinical hip isolates exhibited greater ex vivo survival than the low persister isolates. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis persister formation involves multiple pathways, and hip mutants may contribute to the recalcitrance of the infection.

  10. HLA class II sequence variants influence tuberculosis risk in populations of European ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveinbjornsson, Gardar; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Halldorsson, Bjarni V; Kristinsson, Karl G; Gottfredsson, Magnus; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Gudmundsson, Larus J; Blondal, Kai; Gylfason, Arnaldur; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon Axel; Helgadottir, Hafdis T; Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Karason, Ari; Kardum, Ljiljana Bulat; Knežević, Jelena; Kristjansson, Helgi; Kristjansson, Mar; Love, Arthur; Luo, Yang; Magnusson, Olafur T; Sulem, Patrick; Kong, Augustine; Masson, Gisli; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Dembic, Zlatko; Nejentsev, Sergey; Blondal, Thorsteinn; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Stefansson, Kari

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections cause 9 million new tuberculosis cases and 1.5 million deaths annually. To identify variants conferring risk of tuberculosis, we tested 28.3 million variants identified through whole-genome sequencing of 2,636 Icelanders for association with tuberculosis (8,162 cases and 277,643 controls), pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and M. tuberculosis infection. We found association of three variants in the region harboring genes encoding the class II human leukocyte antigens (HLAs): rs557011[T] (minor allele frequency (MAF) = 40.2%), associated with M. tuberculosis infection (odds ratio (OR) = 1.14, P = 3.1 × 10(-13)) and PTB (OR = 1.25, P = 5.8 × 10(-12)), and rs9271378[G] (MAF = 32.5%), associated with PTB (OR = 0.78, P = 2.5 × 10(-12))--both located between HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DRB1--and a missense variant encoding p.Ala210Thr in HLA-DQA1 (MAF = 19.1%, rs9272785), associated with M. tuberculosis infection (P = 9.3 × 10(-9), OR = 1.14). We replicated association of these variants with PTB in samples of European ancestry from Russia and Croatia (P < 5.9 × 10(-4)). These findings show that the HLA class II region contributes to genetic risk of tuberculosis, possibly through reduced presentation of protective M. tuberculosis antigens to T cells.

  11. Drivers of Tuberculosis Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathema, Barun; Andrews, Jason R; Cohen, Ted; Borgdorff, Martien W; Behr, Marcel; Glynn, Judith R; Rustomjee, Roxana; Silk, Benjamin J; Wood, Robin

    2017-11-03

    Measuring tuberculosis transmission is exceedingly difficult, given the remarkable variability in the timing of clinical disease after Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection; incident disease can result from either a recent (ie, weeks to months) or a remote (ie, several years to decades) infection event. Although we cannot identify with certainty the timing and location of tuberculosis transmission for individuals, approaches for estimating the individual probability of recent transmission and for estimating the fraction of tuberculosis cases due to recent transmission in populations have been developed. Data used to estimate the probable burden of recent transmission include tuberculosis case notifications in young children and trends in tuberculin skin test and interferon γ-release assays. More recently, M. tuberculosis whole-genome sequencing has been used to estimate population levels of recent transmission, identify the distribution of specific strains within communities, and decipher chains of transmission among culture-positive tuberculosis cases. The factors that drive the transmission of tuberculosis in communities depend on the burden of prevalent tuberculosis; the ways in which individuals live, work, and interact (eg, congregate settings); and the capacity of healthcare and public health systems to identify and effectively treat individuals with infectious forms of tuberculosis. Here we provide an overview of these factors, describe tools for measurement of ongoing transmission, and highlight knowledge gaps that must be addressed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  12. Whole genome sequencing-based characterization of extensively drug resistant (XDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Pakistan

    KAUST Repository

    Hasan, Zahra

    2015-03-01

    Objectives: The global increase in drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) strains increases the focus on improved molecular diagnostics for MTB. Extensively drug-resistant (XDR) - TB is caused by MTB strains resistant to rifampicin, isoniazid, fluoroquinolone and aminoglycoside antibiotics. Resistance to anti-tuberculous drugs has been associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in particular MTB genes. However, there is regional variation between MTB lineages and the SNPs associated with resistance. Therefore, there is a need to identify common resistance conferring SNPs so that effective molecular-based diagnostic tests for MTB can be developed. This study investigated used whole genome sequencing (WGS) to characterize 37 XDR MTB isolates from Pakistan and investigated SNPs related to drug resistance. Methods: XDR-TB strains were selected. DNA was extracted from MTB strains, and samples underwent WGS with 76-base-paired end fragment sizes using Illumina paired end HiSeq2000 technology. Raw sequence data were mapped uniquely to H37Rv reference genome. The mappings allowed SNPs and small indels to be called using SAMtools/BCFtools. Results: This study found that in all XDR strains, rifampicin resistance was attributable to SNPs in the rpoB RDR region. Isoniazid resistance-associated mutations were primarily related to katG codon 315 followed by inhA S94A. Fluoroquinolone resistance was attributable to gyrA 91-94 codons in most strains, while one did not have SNPs in either gyrA or gyrB. Aminoglycoside resistance was mostly associated with SNPs in rrs, except in 6 strains. Ethambutol resistant strains had embB codon 306 mutations, but many strains did not have this present. The SNPs were compared with those present in commercial assays such as LiPA Hain MDRTBsl, and the sensitivity of the assays for these strains was evaluated. Conclusions: If common drug resistance associated with SNPs evaluated the concordance between phenotypic and

  13. Tuberculosis (TB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Tuberculosis Go to Information for Researchers ► Tuberculosis (TB) is ... are drug resistant. Why Is the Study of Tuberculosis a Priority for NIAID? Tuberculosis is one of ...

  14. INNOVATIVE STRATEGIES TO IDENTIFY M. TUBERCULOSIS ANTIGENS AND EPITOPES USING GENOME-WIDE ANALYSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemieke eGeluk

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In view of the fact that only a small part of the Mtb expressome has been explored for identification of antigens capable of activating human T-cell responses, which is critically required for the design of better TB vaccination strategies, more emphasis should be placed on innovative ways to discover new Mtb antigens and explore their function at the several stages of infection. Better protective antigens for TB vaccines are urgently needed, also in view of the disappointing results of the MVA85 vaccine which failed to induce additional protection in BCG vaccinated infants [54]. Moreover, immune responses to relevant antigens may be useful to identify TB-specific biomarker signatures. Here we describe the potency of novel tools and strategies to reveal such Mtb antigens. Using proteins specific for different Mtb infection phases, many new antigens of the latency-associated Mtb DosR regulon as well as Rpf proteins, associated with resuscitating TB, were discovered that were recognized by CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. Furthermore, by employing MHC binding algorithms and bioinformatics combined with high throughput human T-cell screens and tetramers, HLA-class Ia restricted poly-functional CD8+ T-cells were identified in TB patients. Comparable methods, led to the identification of HLA-E-restricted Mtb epitopes recognized by CD8+ T-cells. A genome-wide unbiased antigen discovery approach was applied to analyse the in vivo Mtb gene expression profiles in the lungs of mice, resulting in the identification of IVE-TB antigens, which are expressed during infection in the lung, the main target organ of Mtb. IVE-TB antigens induce strong T cell responses in long-term latently Mtb infected individuals, and represent an interesting new group of TB antigens for vaccination. In summary, new tools have helped expand our view on the Mtb antigenome involved in human cellular immunity and provided new candidates for TB vaccination.

  15. The contribution of the mitochondrial genome to sex-specific fitness variance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Shane R T; Connallon, Tim

    2017-05-01

    Maternal inheritance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) facilitates the evolutionary accumulation of mutations with sex-biased fitness effects. Whereas maternal inheritance closely aligns mtDNA evolution with natural selection in females, it makes it indifferent to evolutionary changes that exclusively benefit males. The constrained response of mtDNA to selection in males can lead to asymmetries in the relative contributions of mitochondrial genes to female versus male fitness variation. Here, we examine the impact of genetic drift and the distribution of fitness effects (DFE) among mutations-including the correlation of mutant fitness effects between the sexes-on mitochondrial genetic variation for fitness. We show how drift, genetic correlations, and skewness of the DFE determine the relative contributions of mitochondrial genes to male versus female fitness variance. When mutant fitness effects are weakly correlated between the sexes, and the effective population size is large, mitochondrial genes should contribute much more to male than to female fitness variance. In contrast, high fitness correlations and small population sizes tend to equalize the contributions of mitochondrial genes to female versus male variance. We discuss implications of these results for the evolution of mitochondrial genome diversity and the genetic architecture of female and male fitness. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  16. Human genetic factors in tuberculosis: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tong, Hoang; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P; Thye, Thorsten; Meyer, Christian G

    2017-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major threat to human health, especially in many developing countries. Human genetic variability has been recognised to be of great relevance in host responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and in regulating both the establishment and the progression of the disease. An increasing number of candidate gene and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have focused on human genetic factors contributing to susceptibility or resistance to TB. To update previous reviews on human genetic factors in TB we searched the MEDLINE database and PubMed for articles from 1 January 2014 through 31 March 2017 and reviewed the role of human genetic variability in TB. Search terms applied in various combinations were 'tuberculosis', 'human genetics', 'candidate gene studies', 'genome-wide association studies' and 'Mycobacterium tuberculosis'. Articles in English retrieved and relevant references cited in these articles were reviewed. Abstracts and reports from meetings were also included. This review provides a recent summary of associations of polymorphisms of human genes with susceptibility/resistance to TB. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Genome sequence of Mycobacterium yongonense RT 955-2015 isolate from a patient misdiagnosed with multi-drug resistant tuberculosis: first clinical isolate in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnyambwa, Nicholaus Peter; Kim, Dong-Jin; Ngadaya, Esther; Chun, Jongsik; Ha, Sung-Min; Petrucka, Pammla; Addo, Kennedy Kwasi; Kazwala, Rudovick R; Mfinanga, Sayoki G

    2018-04-24

    Mycobacterium yongonense is a recently described novel species belonging to Mycobacterium avium complex which is the most prevalent etiology of non-tuberculous mycobacteria associated with pulmonary infections, and posing tuberculosis diagnostic challenges in high-burden, resource-constrained settings. We used whole genome shotgun sequencing and comparative microbial genomic analyses to characterize the isolate from a patient diagnosed with multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) after relapse. We present a genome sequence of the first case of M. yongonense (M. yongonense RT 955-2015) in Tanzania. Sequence analysis revealed that the RT 955-2015 strain had a high similarity to M. yongonense 05-1390(T) (98.74%) and M. chimaera DSM 44623(T) (98%). Its 16S rRNA showed similarity to M. paraintracellulare KCTC 290849(T) (100%); M. intracellulare ATCC 13950(T) (100%); M. chimaera DSM 44623(T) (99.9%); and M. yongonense 05-1390(T) (98%). The strain had a substantially different rpoB sequence from that of M. yongonense 05-1390 (95.16%) but exhibited a sequence closely related to M. chimaera DSM 44623(T) (99.86%), M. intracellulare ATCC 13950(T) (99.53%), and M. paraintracellulare KCTC 290849(T) (99.53%). In light of the OrthoANI algorithm, and phylogenetic analysis, we conclude that the isolate was M. yongonense Type II genotype, which is an indication that the patient was misdiagnosed with TB/MDR-TB and received inappropriate treatment. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. The Fight Against Tuberculosis in the Mid-nineteenth Century: The Pivotal Contribution of Edoardo Maragliano (1849-1940).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Mariano; Barberis, Ilaria; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Paluan, Filippo

    2017-11-21

    The second half of the nineteenth century saw the development of new medical "specialties", which, like the idea of constitutional disease, had a profound influence on medical practice. Against this lively "backdrop", Edoardo Maragliano played a central role in medicine's "renaissance" in Italy. Having graduated in medicine in 1870 at the University of Naples, he worked as an assistant in the University Medical Clinic. After beginning his academic career as professor of pathology at the Faculty of Medicine in Genoa in 1877, he became full professor of internal medicine in 1881. While he studied all fields of internal medicine, his research focused mainly on tuberculosis.His experiments in the medical clinic enabled Maragliano to announce the possibility of immunization against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although criticized for using an inactivated vaccine, Maragliano continued to advocate vaccination with any type of vaccine.In the Senate of the Kingdom of Italy, Maragliano actively debated social, economic and sanitary questions, without neglecting his duties as a physician and professor. As an officer during the First World War, he organized military health services and taught medicine at the Military University of Padua.In 1924, Maragliano created the first Italian specialty school in the study of tuberculosis, which provided physicians with specific training in the diagnosis, therapy and prevention of the disease. His scientific zeal and his vision of modern medicine prompted the introduction of new specializations, such as radiology and, especially, pneumology, which led to the creation of one of Europe's most renowned medical schools.

  19. Distinct Contributions of Replication and Transcription to Mutation Rate Variation of Human Genomes

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng

    2012-03-23

    Here, we evaluate the contribution of two major biological processes—DNA replication and transcription—to mutation rate variation in human genomes. Based on analysis of the public human tissue transcriptomics data, high-resolution replicating map of Hela cells and dbSNP data, we present significant correlations between expression breadth, replication time in local regions and SNP density. SNP density of tissue-specific (TS) genes is significantly higher than that of housekeeping (HK) genes. TS genes tend to locate in late-replicating genomic regions and genes in such regions have a higher SNP density compared to those in early-replication regions. In addition, SNP density is found to be positively correlated with expression level among HK genes. We conclude that the process of DNA replication generates stronger mutational pressure than transcription-associated biological processes do, resulting in an increase of mutation rate in TS genes while having weaker effects on HK genes. In contrast, transcription-associated processes are mainly responsible for the accumulation of mutations in highly-expressed HK genes.

  20. G2/M-Phase Checkpoint Adaptation and Micronuclei Formation as Mechanisms That Contribute to Genomic Instability in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsbeek, Danî; Golsteyn, Roy M

    2017-11-06

    One of the most common characteristics of cancer cells is genomic instability. Recent research has revealed that G2/M-phase checkpoint adaptation-entering mitosis with damaged DNA-contributes to genomic changes in experimental models. When cancer cells are treated with pharmacological concentrations of genotoxic agents, they undergo checkpoint adaptation; however, a small number of cells are able to survive and accumulate micronuclei. These micronuclei harbour damaged DNA, and are able to replicate and reincorporate their DNA into the main nucleus. Micronuclei are susceptible to chromothripsis, which is a phenomenon characterised by extensively rearranged chromosomes that reassemble from pulverized chromosomes in one cellular event. These processes contribute to genomic instability in cancer cells that survive a genotoxic anti-cancer treatment. This review provides insight into checkpoint adaptation and its connection to micronuclei and possibly chromothripsis. Knowledge about these mechanisms is needed to improve the poor cancer treatment outcomes that result from genomic instability.

  1. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis homologue of the Mycobacterium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the completion of genome sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and upsurge in the incidence of M. tuberculosis infection worldwide partly as a result of HIV pandemic, there is need for rationale approach to vaccine and chemotherapy discoveries for M. tuberculosis. The homologue of mig gene of. Mycobacterium ...

  2. The occurrence and frequency of genomic mutations that mediate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence and frequency of genomic mutations that mediate Isoniazid and Rifampicin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from untreated pulmonary Tuberculosis cases in urban Blantyre, Malawi.

  3. Caenorhabditis elegans NDX-4 is a MutT-type enzyme that contributes to genomic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arczewska, Katarzyna D; Baumeier, Christian; Kassahun, Henok; Sengupta, Tanima; Bjørås, Magnar; Kuśmierek, Jarosław T; Nilsen, Hilde

    2011-02-07

    MutT enzymes prevent DNA damage by hydrolysis of 8-oxodGTP, an oxidized substrate for DNA synthesis and antimutagenic, anticarcinogenic, and antineurodegenerative functions of MutT enzymes are well established. MutT has been found in almost all kingdoms of life, including many bacterial species, yeasts, plants and mammals. However, a Caenorhabditis elegans MutT homologue was not previously identified. Here, we demonstrate that NDX-4 exhibits both hallmarks of a MutT-type enzyme with an ability to hydrolyze 8-oxodGTP and suppress the Escherichia coli mutT mutator phenotype. Moreover, we show that NDX-4 contributes to genomic stability in vivo in C. elegans. Phenotypic analyses of an ndx-4 mutant reveal that loss of NDX-4 leads to upregulation of key stress responsive genes that likely compensate for the in vivo role of NDX-4 in protection against deleterious consequences of oxidative stress. This discovery will enable us to use this extremely robust genetic model for further research into the contribution of oxidative DNA damage to phenotypes associated with oxidative stress. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Alfred Marcin Sokołowski and Władyslaw Matlakowski. Contribution to history of spa treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierzek, Andrzej; Pozowski, Andrzej; Kuciel-Lewandowska, Jadwiga

    2007-01-01

    The professional, scientific and didactic careers of Alfred Marcin Sokołowski (1849-1924) and Władysław Matlakowski (1851-1895) are presented at the beginning. Sokołowski was an assistant and afterwards a deputy of the head of hospital department Herman Brehmer in health resort in Goerbersdorf. In 1880 Sokołowski organized the internal diseases ward and rhinolaryngological outpatient clinic at St. Spirit Hospital in Warsaw. Sokołowski published "Clinical lectures of diseases of respiratory tract" (1902-1906) and many scientific papers. He was a pioneer of Polish pulmonology, rhinolaryngology and spa treatment of respiratory tract diseases. He was a well-known social worker. Matlakowski, who was a surgeon of Surgical Clinic of Warsaw Emperor University and an assistant of Julian Kosiński specialized in abdominal surgery and gynaecologic surgery. While suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis he moved to Zakopane, where he became famous as an ethnographer, an author of two books: "Country architecture of the Tatra Highlands" and "Decoration and equipment of Polish people of the Tatra Highlands". He translated Shakespearian "Hamlet" into Polish. He was also a well-known philosopher and an ornithologist. The meeting of Sokołowski and Matlakowski in Goerbersdorf, and also their further acquaintance and friendship are described widely by the author. Their work at "Gazeta Lekarska" ("Medical Magazine's") editorial office, which was well-known in three sectors of partitioned Poland is presented with more details by the author. Finally the epitome of spa treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis is presented. Sokołowski and Matlakowski were propagators of spa treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis; Sokołowski made Goerbersdorf famous, Matlakowski did the same for Zakopane.

  5. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type I may contribute to transient, non-specific changes in immunity in the subacute phase of murine tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kager, Liesbeth M.; van der Windt, Gerritje J. W.; Wieland, Catharina W.; Florquin, Sandrine; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis, is a devastating infectious disease causing many deaths worldwide. Non-specific host defense mechanisms such as the coagulation and fibrinolytic system may give insight in possible new therapeutic targets. Plasminogen activator inhibitor

  6. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type I may contribute to transient, non-specific changes in immunity in the subacute phase of murine tuberculosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kager, L.M.; Windt, G.J. van der; Wieland, C.W.; Florquin, S.; Veer, C. van't; Poll, T. van der

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis, is a devastating infectious disease causing many deaths worldwide. Non-specific host defense mechanisms such as the coagulation and fibrinolytic system may give insight in possible new therapeutic targets. Plasminogen activator inhibitor

  7. The genome of Nectria haematococca: contribution of supernumerary chromosomes to gene expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, J.J.; Rounsley, S.D.; Rodriguez-Carres, M.; Kuo, A.; Wasmann, C.c.; Grimwood, J.; Schmutz, J.; Taga, M.; White, G.J.; Zhuo, S.; Schwartz, D.C.; Freitag, M.; Ma, L.-J.; Danchin, E.G.J.; Henrissat, B.; Cutinho, P.M.; Nelson, D.R.; Straney, D.; Napoli, C.A.; Baker, B.M.; Gribskov, M.; Rep, M.; Kroken, S.; Molnar, I.; Rensing, C.; Kennell, J.C.; Zamora, J.; Farman, M.L.; Selker, E.U.; Salamov, A.; Shapiro, H.; Pangilinan, J.; Lindquist, E.; Lamers, C.; Grigoriev, I.V.; Geiser, D.M.; Covert, S.F.; Temporini, S.; VanEtten, H.D.

    2009-04-20

    The ascomycetous fungus Nectria haematococca, (asexual name Fusarium solani), is a member of a group of .50 species known as the"Fusarium solani species complex". Members of this complex have diverse biological properties including the ability to cause disease on .100 genera of plants and opportunistic infections in humans. The current research analyzed the most extensively studied member of this complex, N. haematococca mating population VI (MPVI). Several genes controlling the ability of individual isolates of this species to colonize specific habitats are located on supernumerary chromosomes. Optical mapping revealed that the sequenced isolate has 17 chromosomes ranging from 530 kb to 6.52 Mb and that the physical size of the genome, 54.43 Mb, and the number of predicted genes, 15,707, are among the largest reported for ascomycetes. Two classes of genes have contributed to gene expansion: specific genes that are not found in other fungi including its closest sequenced relative, Fusarium graminearum; and genes that commonly occur as single copies in other fungi but are present as multiple copies in N. haematococca MPVI. Some of these additional genes appear to have resulted from gene duplication events, while others may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. The supernumerary nature of three chromosomes, 14, 15, and 17, was confirmed by their absence in pulsed field gel electrophoresis experiments of some isolates and by demonstrating that these isolates lacked chromosome-specific sequences found on the ends of these chromosomes. These supernumerary chromosomes contain more repeat sequences, are enriched in unique and duplicated genes, and have a lower G+C content in comparison to the other chromosomes. Although the origin(s) of the extra genes and the supernumerary chromosomes is not known, the gene expansion and its large genome size are consistent with this species' diverse range of habitats. Furthermore, the presence of unique genes on

  8. Genome Analysis of the First Extensively Drug-Resistant (XDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Malaysia Provides Insights into the Genetic Basis of Its Biology and Drug Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Sian Kuan

    Full Text Available The outbreak of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB has become an increasing problem in many TB-burdened countries. The underlying drug resistance mechanisms, including the genetic variation favored by selective pressure in the resistant population, are partially understood. Recently, the first case of XDR-TB was reported in Malaysia. However, the detailed genotype family and mechanisms of the formation of multiple drugs resistance are unknown. We sequenced the whole genome of the UM 1072388579 strain with a 2-kb insert-size library and combined with that from previously sequenced 500-bp-insert paired-end reads to produce an improved sequence with maximal sequencing coverage across the genome. In silico spoligotyping and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that UM 1072388579 strain belongs to an ancestral-like, non-Beijing clade of East Asia lineage. This is supported by the presence of a number of lineage-specific markers, including fadD28, embA, nuoD and pks7. Polymorphism analysis showed that the drug-susceptibility profile is correlated with the pattern of resistance mutations. Mutations in drug-efflux pumps and the cell wall biogenesis pathway such as mmpL, pks and fadD genes may play an important role in survival and adaptation of this strain to its surrounding environment. In this work, fifty-seven putative promoter SNPs were identified. Among them, we identified a novel SNP located at -4 T allele of TetR/acrR promoter as an informative marker to recognize strains of East Asian lineage. Our work indicates that the UM 1072388579 harbors both classical and uncommon SNPs that allow it to escape from inhibition by many antibiotics. This study provides a strong foundation to dissect the biology and underlying resistance mechanisms of the first reported XDR M. tuberculosis in Malaysia.

  9. Whole genome sequencing of clinical strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Mumbai, India: A potential tool for determining drug-resistance and strain lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Anirvan; Nilgiriwala, Kayzad; Saranath, Dhananjaya; Rodrigues, Camilla; Mistry, Nerges

    2017-12-01

    Amplification of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) and its transmission are significant barriers in controlling tuberculosis (TB) globally. Diagnostic inaccuracies and delays impede appropriate drug administration, which exacerbates primary and secondary drug resistance. Increasing affordability of whole genome sequencing (WGS) and exhaustive cataloguing of drug resistance mutations is poised to revolutionise TB diagnostics and facilitate personalized drug therapy. However, application of WGS for diagnostics in high endemic areas is yet to be demonstrated. We report WGS of 74 clinical TB isolates from Mumbai, India, characterising genotypic drug resistance to first- and second-line anti-TB drugs. A concordance analysis between phenotypic and genotypic drug susceptibility of a subset of 29 isolates and the sensitivity of resistance prediction to the 4 drugs was calculated, viz. isoniazid-100%, rifampicin-100%, ethambutol-100% and streptomycin-85%. The whole genome based phylogeny showed almost equal proportion of East Asian (27/74) and Central Asian (25/74) strains. Interestingly we also found a clonal group of 9 isolates, of which 7 patients were found to be from the same geographical location and accessed the same health post. This provides the first evidence of epidemiological linkage for tracking TB transmission in India, an approach which has the potential to significantly improve chances of End-TB goals. Finally, the use of Mykrobe Predictor, as a standalone drug resistance and strain typing tool, requiring just few minutes to analyse raw WGS data into tabulated results, implies the rapid clinical applicability of WGS based TB diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Contribution of Short Repeats of Low Sequence Complexity to Large Conifer Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Schmidt; R.L. Doudrick; J.S. Heslop-Harrison; T. Schmidt

    2000-01-01

    Abstract: The abundance and genomic organization of six simple sequence repeats, consisting of di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide sequence motifs, and a minisatellite repeat have been analyzed in different gymnosperms by Southern hybridization. Within the gymnosperm genomes investigated, the abundance and genomic organization of micro- and...

  11. The contribution of co-transcriptional RNA:DNA hybrid structures to DNA damage and genome instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamperl, Stephan; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2014-07-01

    Accurate DNA replication and DNA repair are crucial for the maintenance of genome stability, and it is generally accepted that failure of these processes is a major source of DNA damage in cells. Intriguingly, recent evidence suggests that DNA damage is more likely to occur at genomic loci with high transcriptional activity. Furthermore, loss of certain RNA processing factors in eukaryotic cells is associated with increased formation of co-transcriptional RNA:DNA hybrid structures known as R-loops, resulting in double-strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA damage. However, the molecular mechanisms by which R-loop structures ultimately lead to DNA breaks and genome instability is not well understood. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the formation, recognition and processing of RNA:DNA hybrids, and discuss possible mechanisms by which these structures contribute to DNA damage and genome instability in the cell. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Rapid identification of a Mycobacterium tuberculosis full genetic drug resistance profile through whole genome sequencing directly from sputum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camus Nimmo

    2017-09-01

    Discussion: Compared to rapid molecular tests (which can only examine a limited number of mutations and WGS of culture isolates (which requires a culture step, WGS directly from sputum can quickly generate a complete genetic drug resistance profile. In this case, WGS altered the clinical management of drug-resistant tuberculosis and demonstrated potential for guiding individualized drug treatment where second-line drug resistance is common.

  13. Contribution of copy number variants to schizophrenia from a genome-wide study of 41,321 subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marshall, Christian R.; Howrigan, Daniel P.; Merico, Daniele; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Wu, Wenting; Greer, Douglas S.; Antaki, Danny; Shetty, Aniket; Holmans, Peter A.; Pinto, Dalila; Gujral, Madhusudan; Brandler, William M.; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Wang, Zhouzhi; Fajarado, Karin V. Fuentes; Maile, Michelle S.; Ripke, Stephan; Agartz, Ingrid; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amin, Farooq; Atkins, Joshua; Bacanu, Silviu A.; Belliveau, Richard A.; Bergen, Sarah E.; Ertalan, Marcelo; Bevilacqua, Elizabeth; Bigdeli, Tim B.; Black, Donald W.; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Byerley, William; Cahn, Wiepke; Cai, Guiqing; Cairns, Murray J.; Campion, Dominique; Cantor, Rita M.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Carrera, Noa; Catts, Stanley V.; Chambert, Kimberley D.; Cheng, Wei; Cloninger, C. Robert; Cohen, David; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nick; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Crowley, James J.; Curtis, David; Davidson, Michael; Davis, Kenneth L.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Del Favero, Jurgen; DeLisi, Lynn E.; Dikeos, Dimitris; Dinan, Timothy; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drapeau, Elodie; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Eichhammer, Peter; Eriksson, Johan; Escott-Price, Valentina; Essioux, Laurent; Fanous, Ayman H.; Farh, Kai-How; Farrell, Martilias S.; Frank, Josef; Franke, Lude; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Friedman, Joseph I.; Forstner, Andreas J.; Fromer, Menachem; Genovese, Giulio; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S.; Giegling, Ina; Giusti-Rodriguez, Paola; Godard, Stephanie; Goldstein, Jacqueline I.; Gratten, Jacob; de Haan, Lieuwe; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Haroutunian, Vahram; Hartmann, Annette M.; Henskens, Frans A.; Herms, Stefan; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hoffinann, Per; Hofman, Andrea; Huang, Hailiang; Ikeda, Masashi; Joa, Inge; Kahler, Anna K.; Kahn, Rene S.; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Karjalainen, Juha; Kavanagh, David; Keller, Matthew C.; Kelly, Brian J.; Kennedy, James L.; Kim, Yunjung; Knowles, James A.; Konte, Bettina; Laurent, Claudine; Lee, Phil; Lee, S. Hong; Legge, Sophie E.; Lerer, Bernard; Levy, Deborah L.; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Lonnqvist, Jouko; Loughland, Carmel M.; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Maher, Brion S.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarley, Robert W.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Meier, Sandra; Meijer, Carin J.; Melle, Ingrid; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I.; Metspalu, Andres; Michie, Patricia T.; Milani, Lili; Milanova, Vihra; Mokrab, Younes; Morris, Derek W.; Muller-Myhsok, Bertram; Murphy, Kieran C.; Murray, Robin M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Nenadic, Igor; Nertney, Deborah A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Nicodemus, Kristin K.; Nisenbaum, Laura; Nordin, Annelie; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard; O'Dushlaine, Colm; Oh, Sang-Yun; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; O'Neill, F. Anthony; Van Os, Jim; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George N.; Parkhomenko, Elena; Pato, Michele T.; Paunio, Tiina; Perkins, Diana O.; Pers, Tune H.; Pietilainen, Olli; Pimm, Jonathan; Pocklington, Andrew J.; Powell, John; Price, Alkes; Pulver, Ann E.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Quested, Digby; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Reichenberg, Abraham; Reimers, Mark A.; Richards, Alexander L.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Roussos, Panos; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Savitz, Adam; Schall, Ulrich; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Scolnick, Edward M.; Scott, Rodney J.; Seidman, Larry J.; Shi, Jianxin; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Soderman, Erik; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Stahl, Eli A.; Strengman, Eric; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Suvisaari, Jaana; Svrakic, Dragan M.; Szatkiewicz, Jin P.; Thirumalai, Srinivas; Tooney, Paul A.; Veijola, Juha; Visscher, Peter M.; Waddington, John; Walsh, Dermot; Webb, Bradley T.; Weiser, Mark; Wildenauer, Dieter B.; Williams, Nigel M.; Williams, Stephanie; Witt, Stephanie H.; Wolen, Aaron R.; Wormley, Brandon K.; Wray, Naomi R.; Wu, Jing Qin; Zai, Clement C.; Adolfsson, Rolf; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blackwood, Douglas H. R.; Bramon, Elvira; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cichon, Sven; Collier, David A.; Corvin, Aiden; Daly, Mark J.; Darvasi, Ariel; Domenici, Enrico; Esko, Tonu; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gill, Michael; Gurling, Hugh; Hultman, Christina M.; Iwata, Nakao; Jablensky, Assen V.; Jonsson, Erik G.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Kirov, George; Knight, Jo; Levinson, Douglas F.; Li, Qingqin S.; McCarroll, Steven A.; McQuillin, Andrew; Moran, Jennifer L.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Nothen, Markus M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Owen, Michael J.; Palotie, Aarno; Pato, Carlos N.; Petryshen, Tracey L.; Posthuma, Danielle; Rietschel, Marcella; Riley, Brien P.; Rujescu, Dan; Sklar, Pamela; St Clair, David; Walters, James T. R.; Werge, Thomas; Siillivan, Patrick F.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Sebat, Jonathan

    Copy number variants (CNVs) have been strongly implicated in the genetic etiology of schizophrenia (SCZ). However, genome-wide investigation of the contribution of CNV to risk has been hampered by limited sample sizes. We sought to address this obstacle by applying a centralized analysis pipeline to

  14. Contribution of copy number variants to schizophrenia from a genome-wide study of 41,321 subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marshall, Christian R.; Howrigan, Daniel P.; Merico, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) have been strongly implicated in the genetic etiology of schizophrenia (SCZ). However, genome-wide investigation of the contribution of CNV to risk has been hampered by limited sample sizes. We sought to address this obstacle by applying a centralized analysis pipeline...

  15. ThreaDNA: predicting DNA mechanics' contribution to sequence selectivity of proteins along whole genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevost, Jasmin; Vaillant, Cédric; Meyer, Sam; Rost, Burkhard

    2018-02-15

    Many DNA-binding proteins recognize their target sequences indirectly, by sensing DNA's response to mechanical distortion. ThreaDNA estimates this response based on high-resolution structures of the protein-DNA complex of interest. Implementing an efficient nanoscale modeling of DNA deformations involving essentially no adjustable parameters, it returns the profile of deformation energy along whole genomes, at base-pair resolution, within minutes on usual laptop/desktop computers. Our predictions can also be easily combined with estimations of direct selectivity through a generalized form of position-weight-matrices. The formalism of ThreaDNA is accessible to a wide audience. We demonstrate the importance of indirect readout for the nucleosome as well as the bacterial regulators Fis and CRP. Combined with the direct contribution provided by usual sequence motifs, it significantly improves the prediction of sequence selectivity, and allows quantifying the two distinct physical mechanisms underlying it. Python software available at bioinfo.insa-lyon.fr, natively executable on Linux/MacOS systems with a user-friendly graphical interface. Galaxy webserver version available. sam.meyer@insa-lyon.fr. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. [Research into new methods for diagnosing, treating and preventing tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgdorff, M.W.; Kolk, A.; Soolingen, D. van; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Ottenhoff, T.H.

    2003-01-01

    Tuberculosis control requires improved diagnostics, drugs, and vaccines. Their development is facilitated by progress in immunology, molecular biology, and genomics. In addition to sputum smear and culture, amplification techniques can already be used to diagnose tuberculosis and antigen-detection

  17. Deciphering the recent phylogenetic expansion of the originally deeply rooted Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineage 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimer, Solomon A; Namouchi, Amine; Zegeye, Ephrem Debebe; Holm-Hansen, Carol; Norheim, Gunnstein; Abebe, Markos; Aseffa, Abraham; Tønjum, Tone

    2016-06-30

    A deeply rooted phylogenetic lineage of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) termed lineage 7 was discovered in Ethiopia. Whole genome sequencing of 30 lineage 7 strains from patients in Ethiopia was performed. Intra-lineage genome variation was defined and unique characteristics identified with a focus on genes involved in DNA repair, recombination and replication (3R genes). More than 800 mutations specific to M. tuberculosis lineage 7 strains were identified. The proportion of non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) in 3R genes was higher after the recent expansion of M. tuberculosis lineage 7 strain started. The proportion of nsSNPs in genes involved in inorganic ion transport and metabolism was significantly higher before the expansion began. A total of 22346 bp deletions were observed. Lineage 7 strains also exhibited a high number of mutations in genes involved in carbohydrate transport and metabolism, transcription, energy production and conversion. We have identified unique genomic signatures of the lineage 7 strains. The high frequency of nsSNP in 3R genes after the phylogenetic expansion may have contributed to recent variability and adaptation. The abundance of mutations in genes involved in inorganic ion transport and metabolism before the expansion period may indicate an adaptive response of lineage 7 strains to enable survival, potentially under environmental stress exposure. As lineage 7 strains originally were phylogenetically deeply rooted, this may indicate fundamental adaptive genomic pathways affecting the fitness of M. tuberculosis as a species.

  18. A proportion of mutations fixed in the genomes of in vitro selected isogenic drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutants can be detected as minority variants in the parent culture

    KAUST Repository

    Bergval, Indra

    2015-01-09

    We studied genomic variation in a previously selected collection of isogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis laboratory strains subjected to one or two rounds of antibiotic selection. Whole genome sequencing analysis identified eleven single, unique mutations (four synonymous, six non-synonymous, one intergenic), in addition to drug resistance-conferring mutations, that were fixed in the genomes of six monoresistant strains. Eight loci, present as minority variants (five non-synonymous, three synonymous) in the genome of the susceptible parent strain, became fixed in the genomes of multiple daughter strains. None of these mutations are known to be involved with drug resistance. Our results confirm previously observed genomic stability for M. tuberculosis, although the parent strain had accumulated allelic variants at multiple locations in an antibiotic-free in vitro environment. It is therefore likely to assume that these so-called hitchhiking mutations were co-selected and fixed in multiple daughter strains during antibiotic selection. The presence of multiple allelic variations, accumulated under non-selective conditions, which become fixed during subsequent selective steps, deserves attention. The wider availability of \\'deep\\' sequencing methods could help to detect multiple bacterial (sub)populations within patients with high resolution and would therefore be useful in assisting in the detailed investigation of transmission chains.

  19. Quantitative analysis of polycomb response elements (PREs at identical genomic locations distinguishes contributions of PRE sequence and genomic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okulski Helena

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polycomb/Trithorax response elements (PREs are cis-regulatory elements essential for the regulation of several hundred developmentally important genes. However, the precise sequence requirements for PRE function are not fully understood, and it is also unclear whether these elements all function in a similar manner. Drosophila PRE reporter assays typically rely on random integration by P-element insertion, but PREs are extremely sensitive to genomic position. Results We adapted the ΦC31 site-specific integration tool to enable systematic quantitative comparison of PREs and sequence variants at identical genomic locations. In this adaptation, a miniwhite (mw reporter in combination with eye-pigment analysis gives a quantitative readout of PRE function. We compared the Hox PRE Frontabdominal-7 (Fab-7 with a PRE from the vestigial (vg gene at four landing sites. The analysis revealed that the Fab-7 and vg PREs have fundamentally different properties, both in terms of their interaction with the genomic environment at each site and their inherent silencing abilities. Furthermore, we used the ΦC31 tool to examine the effect of deletions and mutations in the vg PRE, identifying a 106 bp region containing a previously predicted motif (GTGT that is essential for silencing. Conclusions This analysis showed that different PREs have quantifiably different properties, and that changes in as few as four base pairs have profound effects on PRE function, thus illustrating the power and sensitivity of ΦC31 site-specific integration as a tool for the rapid and quantitative dissection of elements of PRE design.

  20. Pathogenicity Locus, Core Genome, and Accessory Gene Contributions to Clostridium difficile Virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany B. Lewis

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that causes colitis in patients with disrupted colonic microbiota. While some individuals are asymptomatic C. difficile carriers, symptomatic disease ranges from mild diarrhea to potentially lethal toxic megacolon. The wide disease spectrum has been attributed to the infected host’s age, underlying diseases, immune status, and microbiome composition. However, strain-specific differences in C. difficile virulence have also been implicated in determining colitis severity. Because patients infected with C. difficile are unique in terms of medical history, microbiome composition, and immune competence, determining the relative contribution of C. difficile virulence to disease severity has been challenging, and conclusions regarding the virulence of specific strains have been inconsistent. To address this, we used a mouse model to test 33 clinical C. difficile strains isolated from patients with disease severities ranging from asymptomatic carriage to severe colitis, and we determined their relative in vivo virulence in genetically identical, antibiotic-pretreated mice. We found that murine infections with C. difficile clade 2 strains (including multilocus sequence type 1/ribotype 027 were associated with higher lethality and that C. difficile strains associated with greater human disease severity caused more severe disease in mice. While toxin production was not strongly correlated with in vivo colonic pathology, the ability of C. difficile strains to grow in the presence of secondary bile acids was associated with greater disease severity. Whole-genome sequencing and identification of core and accessory genes identified a subset of accessory genes that distinguish high-virulence from lower-virulence C. difficile strains.

  1. The past and future of tuberculosis research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iñaki Comas

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Renewed efforts in tuberculosis (TB research have led to important new insights into the biology and epidemiology of this devastating disease. Yet, in the face of the modern epidemics of HIV/AIDS, diabetes, and multidrug resistance--all of which contribute to susceptibility to TB--global control of the disease will remain a formidable challenge for years to come. New high-throughput genomics technologies are already contributing to studies of TB's epidemiology, comparative genomics, evolution, and host-pathogen interaction. We argue here, however, that new multidisciplinary approaches--especially the integration of epidemiology with systems biology in what we call "systems epidemiology"--will be required to eliminate TB.

  2. Regulation of gene expression in Mycoplasmas: contribution from Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma synoviae genome sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Maciel França Madeira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the transcription apparatus of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (strains J and 7448 and Mycoplasma synoviae, using a comparative genomics approach to summarize the main features related to transcription and control of gene expression in mycoplasmas. Most of the transcription-related genes present in the three strains are well conserved among mycoplasmas. Some unique aspects of transcription in mycoplasmas and the scarcity of regulatory proteins in mycoplasma genomes are discussed.

  3. Tuberculosis abdominal Abdominal tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    T. Rubio; M. T. Gaztelu; A. Calvo; M. Repiso; H. Sarasíbar; F. Jiménez Bermejo; A. Martínez Echeverría

    2005-01-01

    La tuberculosis abdominal cursa con un cuadro inespecífico, con difícil diagnóstico diferencial respecto a otras entidades de similar semiología. Presentamos el caso de un varón que ingresa por presentar dolor abdominal, pérdida progresiva y notoria de peso corporal y fiebre de dos meses de evolución. El cultivo de la biopsia de colon mostró presencia de bacilo de Koch.Abdominal tuberculosis develops according to a non-specific clinical picture, with a difficult differential diagnosis with re...

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namugenyi, Sarah B; Aagesen, Alisha M; Elliott, Sarah R; Tischler, Anna D

    2017-07-11

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphate-specific transport (Pst) system controls gene expression in response to phosphate availability by inhibiting the activation of the SenX3-RegX3 two-component system under phosphate-rich conditions, but the mechanism of communication between these systems is unknown. In Escherichia coli , inhibition of the two-component system PhoR-PhoB under phosphate-rich conditions requires both the Pst system and PhoU, a putative adaptor protein. E. coli PhoU is also involved in the formation of persisters, a subpopulation of phenotypically antibiotic-tolerant bacteria. M. tuberculosis encodes two PhoU orthologs, PhoY1 and PhoY2. We generated phoY single- and double-deletion mutants and examined the expression of RegX3-regulated genes by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). Gene expression was increased only in the Δ phoY1 Δ phoY2 double mutant and could be restored to the wild-type level by complementation with either phoY1 or phoY2 or by deletion of regX3 These data suggest that the PhoY proteins function redundantly to inhibit SenX3-RegX3 activation. We analyzed the frequencies of antibiotic-tolerant persister variants in the phoY mutants using several antibiotic combinations. Persister frequency was decreased at least 40-fold in the Δ phoY1 Δ phoY2 mutant compared to the frequency in the wild type, and this phenotype was RegX3 dependent. A Δ pstA1 mutant lacking a Pst system transmembrane component exhibited a similar RegX3-dependent decrease in persister frequency. In aerosol-infected mice, the Δ phoY1 Δ phoY2 and Δ pstA1 mutants were more susceptible to treatment with rifampin but not isoniazid. Our data demonstrate that disrupting phosphate sensing mediated by the PhoY proteins and the Pst system enhances the susceptibility of M. tuberculosis to antibiotics both in vitro and during infection. IMPORTANCE Persister variants, subpopulations of bacteria that are phenotypically antibiotic tolerant, contribute to

  5. Tuberculosis and poverty: the contribution of patient costs in sub-Saharan Africa – a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is known to disproportionately affect the most economically disadvantaged strata of society. Many studies have assessed the association between poverty and TB, but only a few have assessed the direct financial burden TB treatment and care can place on households. Patient costs can be particularly burdensome for TB-affected households in sub-Saharan Africa where poverty levels are high; these costs include the direct costs of medical and non-medical expenditures and the indirect costs of time utilizing healthcare or lost wages. In order to comprehensively assess the existing evidence on the costs that TB patients incur, we undertook a systematic review of the literature. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, Social Science Citation Index, EconLit, Dissertation Abstracts, CINAHL, and Sociological Abstracts databases were searched, and 5,114 articles were identified. Articles were included in the final review if they contained a quantitative measure of direct or indirect patient costs for treatment or care for pulmonary TB in sub-Saharan Africa and were published from January 1, 1994 to Dec 31, 2010. Cost data were extracted from each study and converted to 2010 international dollars (I$). Results Thirty articles met all of the inclusion criteria. Twenty-one studies reported both direct and indirect costs; eight studies reported only direct costs; and one study reported only indirect costs. Depending on type of costs, costs varied from less than I$1 to almost I$600 or from a small fraction of mean monthly income for average annual income earners to over 10 times average annual income for income earners in the income-poorest 20% of the population. Out of the eleven types of TB patient costs identified in this review, the costs for hospitalization, medication, transportation, and care in the private sector were largest. Conclusion TB patients and households in sub-Saharan Africa often incurred high costs when utilizing TB treatment

  6. Tuberculosis and poverty: the contribution of patient costs in sub-Saharan Africa – a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barter Devra M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis (TB is known to disproportionately affect the most economically disadvantaged strata of society. Many studies have assessed the association between poverty and TB, but only a few have assessed the direct financial burden TB treatment and care can place on households. Patient costs can be particularly burdensome for TB-affected households in sub-Saharan Africa where poverty levels are high; these costs include the direct costs of medical and non-medical expenditures and the indirect costs of time utilizing healthcare or lost wages. In order to comprehensively assess the existing evidence on the costs that TB patients incur, we undertook a systematic review of the literature. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, Social Science Citation Index, EconLit, Dissertation Abstracts, CINAHL, and Sociological Abstracts databases were searched, and 5,114 articles were identified. Articles were included in the final review if they contained a quantitative measure of direct or indirect patient costs for treatment or care for pulmonary TB in sub-Saharan Africa and were published from January 1, 1994 to Dec 31, 2010. Cost data were extracted from each study and converted to 2010 international dollars (I$. Results Thirty articles met all of the inclusion criteria. Twenty-one studies reported both direct and indirect costs; eight studies reported only direct costs; and one study reported only indirect costs. Depending on type of costs, costs varied from less than I$1 to almost I$600 or from a small fraction of mean monthly income for average annual income earners to over 10 times average annual income for income earners in the income-poorest 20% of the population. Out of the eleven types of TB patient costs identified in this review, the costs for hospitalization, medication, transportation, and care in the private sector were largest. Conclusion TB patients and households in sub-Saharan Africa often incurred high costs

  7. Tuberculosis and poverty: the contribution of patient costs in sub-Saharan Africa--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barter, Devra M; Agboola, Stephen O; Murray, Megan B; Bärnighausen, Till

    2012-11-14

    Tuberculosis (TB) is known to disproportionately affect the most economically disadvantaged strata of society. Many studies have assessed the association between poverty and TB, but only a few have assessed the direct financial burden TB treatment and care can place on households. Patient costs can be particularly burdensome for TB-affected households in sub-Saharan Africa where poverty levels are high; these costs include the direct costs of medical and non-medical expenditures and the indirect costs of time utilizing healthcare or lost wages. In order to comprehensively assess the existing evidence on the costs that TB patients incur, we undertook a systematic review of the literature. PubMed, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, Social Science Citation Index, EconLit, Dissertation Abstracts, CINAHL, and Sociological Abstracts databases were searched, and 5,114 articles were identified. Articles were included in the final review if they contained a quantitative measure of direct or indirect patient costs for treatment or care for pulmonary TB in sub-Saharan Africa and were published from January 1, 1994 to Dec 31, 2010. Cost data were extracted from each study and converted to 2010 international dollars (I$). Thirty articles met all of the inclusion criteria. Twenty-one studies reported both direct and indirect costs; eight studies reported only direct costs; and one study reported only indirect costs. Depending on type of costs, costs varied from less than I$1 to almost I$600 or from a small fraction of mean monthly income for average annual income earners to over 10 times average annual income for income earners in the income-poorest 20% of the population. Out of the eleven types of TB patient costs identified in this review, the costs for hospitalization, medication, transportation, and care in the private sector were largest. TB patients and households in sub-Saharan Africa often incurred high costs when utilizing TB treatment and care, both within and outside of

  8. Completion of the Chloroplast Genomes of Five ChineseJuglansand Their Contribution to Chloroplast Phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yiheng; Woeste, Keith E; Zhao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Juglans L. (walnuts and butternuts) is an economically and ecologically important genus in the family Juglandaceae. All Juglans are important nut and timber trees. Juglans regia (Common walnut), J. sigillata (Iron walnut), J. cathayensis (Chinese walnut), J. hopeiensis (Ma walnut), and J. mandshurica (Manchurian walnut) are native to or naturalized in China. A strongly supported phylogeny of these five species is not available due to a lack of informative molecular markers. We compared complete chloroplast genomes and determined the phylogenetic relationships among the five Chinese Juglans using IIumina sequencing. The plastid genomes ranged from 159,714 to 160,367 bp encoding 128 functional genes, including 88 protein-coding genes and 40 tRNA genes each. A complete map of the variability across the genomes of the five Juglans species was produced that included single nucleotide variants, indels (insertions and deletions), and large structural variants, as well as differences in simple sequence repeats (SSR) and repeat sequences. Molecular phylogeny strongly supported division of the five walnut species into two previously recognized sections ( Juglans/Dioscaryon and Cardiocaryon ) with a 100% bootstrap (BS) value using the complete cp genomes, protein coding sequences (CDS), and the introns and spacers (IGS) data. The availability of these genomes will provide genetic information for identifying species and hybrids, taxonomy, phylogeny, and evolution in Juglans , and also provide insight into utilization of Juglans plants.

  9. Coping with genetic diversity: the contribution of pathogen and human genomics to modern vaccinology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, D.; Barbosa, T.; Rihet, P.

    2011-01-01

    Vaccine development faces major difficulties partly because of genetic variation in both infectious organisms and humans. This causes antigenic variation in infectious agents and a high interindividual variability in the human response to the vaccine. The exponential growth of genome sequence information has induced a shift from conventional culture-based to genome-based vaccinology, and allows the tackling of challenges in vaccine development due to pathogen genetic variability. Additionally, recent advances in immunogenetics and genomics should help in the understanding of the influence of genetic factors on the interindividual and interpopulation variations in immune responses to vaccines, and could be useful for developing new vaccine strategies. Accumulating results provide evidence for the existence of a number of genes involved in protective immune responses that are induced either by natural infections or vaccines. Variation in immune responses could be viewed as the result of a perturbation of gene networks; this should help in understanding how a particular polymorphism or a combination thereof could affect protective immune responses. Here we will present: i) the first genome-based vaccines that served as proof of concept, and that provided new critical insights into vaccine development strategies; ii) an overview of genetic predisposition in infectious diseases and genetic control in responses to vaccines; iii) population genetic differences that are a rationale behind group-targeted vaccines; iv) an outlook for genetic control in infectious diseases, with special emphasis on the concept of molecular networks that will provide a structure to the huge amount of genomic data

  10. Coping with genetic diversity: the contribution of pathogen and human genomics to modern vaccinology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaire, D. [Universidade Federal da Bahia and Universidade Estadual da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Barbosa, T. [Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Rihet, P. [TAGC-INSERM U928, Aix-Marseille Université, Marseille (France)

    2011-10-28

    Vaccine development faces major difficulties partly because of genetic variation in both infectious organisms and humans. This causes antigenic variation in infectious agents and a high interindividual variability in the human response to the vaccine. The exponential growth of genome sequence information has induced a shift from conventional culture-based to genome-based vaccinology, and allows the tackling of challenges in vaccine development due to pathogen genetic variability. Additionally, recent advances in immunogenetics and genomics should help in the understanding of the influence of genetic factors on the interindividual and interpopulation variations in immune responses to vaccines, and could be useful for developing new vaccine strategies. Accumulating results provide evidence for the existence of a number of genes involved in protective immune responses that are induced either by natural infections or vaccines. Variation in immune responses could be viewed as the result of a perturbation of gene networks; this should help in understanding how a particular polymorphism or a combination thereof could affect protective immune responses. Here we will present: i) the first genome-based vaccines that served as proof of concept, and that provided new critical insights into vaccine development strategies; ii) an overview of genetic predisposition in infectious diseases and genetic control in responses to vaccines; iii) population genetic differences that are a rationale behind group-targeted vaccines; iv) an outlook for genetic control in infectious diseases, with special emphasis on the concept of molecular networks that will provide a structure to the huge amount of genomic data.

  11. Tuberculosis Fluoroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follow-up though Dec 31, 2002 has been completed for a study of site-specific cancer mortality among tuberculosis patients treated with artificial lung collapse therapy in Massachusetts tuberculosis sanatoria (1930-1950).

  12. The contributions of transposable elements to the structure, function, and evolution of plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennetzen, Jeffrey L; Wang, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are the key players in generating genomic novelty by a combination of the chromosome rearrangements they cause and the genes that come under their regulatory sway. Genome size, gene content, gene order, centromere function, and numerous other aspects of nuclear biology are driven by TE activity. Although the origins and attitudes of TEs have the hallmarks of selfish DNA, there are numerous cases where TE components have been co-opted by the host to create new genes or modify gene regulation. In particular, epigenetic regulation has been transformed from a process to silence invading TEs and viruses into a key strategy for regulating plant genes. Most, perhaps all, of this epigenetic regulation is derived from TE insertions near genes or TE-encoded factors that act in trans. Enormous pools of genome data and new technologies for reverse genetics will lead to a powerful new era of TE analysis in plants.

  13. Genomic analysis of a Mycobacterium bovis bacillus [corrected] Calmette-Guérin strain isolated from an adult patient with pulmonary tuberculosis..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuming Li

    Full Text Available For years, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG has served as the unique vaccine against tuberculosis and has generally been regarded as safe. However, a clinical strain labeled 3281 that was isolated from a TB patient was identified to be BCG. Via the combination of next-generation sequencing (NGS and comparative genomic analysis, unique 3281 genetic characteristics were revealed. A region containing the dnaA and dnaN genes that is closely related to the initial chromosome replication was found to repeat three times on the BCG Pasteur-specific tandem duplication region DU1. Due to the minimum number of epitopes in BCG strains, 3281 was inferred to have a high possibility for immune evasion. Additionally, variations in the virulence genes and predictions for potential virulence factors were analyzed. Overall, we report a pathogen that has never previously been thought to be pathogenic and initial insights that are focused on the genetic characteristics of virulent BCG.

  14. Descriptive Epidemiology and Whole Genome Sequencing Analysis for an Outbreak of Bovine Tuberculosis in Beef Cattle and White-Tailed Deer in Northwestern Minnesota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Glaser

    Full Text Available Bovine tuberculosis (bTB was discovered in a Minnesota cow through routine slaughter surveillance in 2005 and the resulting epidemiological investigation led to the discovery of infection in both cattle and white-tailed deer in the state. From 2005 through 2009, a total of 12 beef cattle herds and 27 free-ranging white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus were found infected in a small geographic region of northwestern Minnesota. Genotyping of isolates determined both cattle and deer shared the same strain of bTB, and it was similar to types found in cattle in the southwestern United States and Mexico. Whole genomic sequencing confirmed the introduction of this infection into Minnesota was recent, with little genetic divergence. Aggressive surveillance and management efforts in both cattle and deer continued from 2010-2012; no additional infections were discovered. Over 10,000 deer were tested and 705 whole herd cattle tests performed in the investigation of this outbreak.

  15. Either non-homologous ends joining or homologous recombination is required to repair double-strand breaks in the genome of macrophage-internalized Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzostek, Anna; Szulc, Izabela; Klink, Magdalena; Brzezinska, Marta; Sulowska, Zofia; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is constantly exposed to a multitude of hostile conditions and is confronted by a variety of potentially DNA-damaging assaults in vivo, primarily from host-generated antimicrobial toxic radicals. Exposure to reactive nitrogen species and/or reactive oxygen species causes different types of DNA damage, including oxidation, depurination, methylation and deamination, that can result in single- or double-strand breaks (DSBs). These breaks affect the integrity of the whole genome and, when left unrepaired, can lead to cell death. Here, we investigated the role of the DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous ends joining (NHEJ), in the survival of Mtb inside macrophages. To this end, we constructed Mtb strains defective for HR (ΔrecA), NHEJ [Δ(ku,ligD)], or both DSB repair systems [Δ(ku,ligD,recA)]. Experiments using these strains revealed that either HR or NHEJ is sufficient for the survival and propagation of tubercle bacilli inside macrophages. Inhibition of nitric oxide or superoxide anion production with L-NIL or apocynin, respectively, enabled the Δ(ku,ligD,recA) mutant strain lacking both systems to survive intracellularly. Complementation of the Δ(ku,ligD,recA) mutant with an intact recA or ku-ligD rescued the ability of Mtb to propagate inside macrophages.

  16. Either non-homologous ends joining or homologous recombination is required to repair double-strand breaks in the genome of macrophage-internalized Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Brzostek

    Full Text Available The intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is constantly exposed to a multitude of hostile conditions and is confronted by a variety of potentially DNA-damaging assaults in vivo, primarily from host-generated antimicrobial toxic radicals. Exposure to reactive nitrogen species and/or reactive oxygen species causes different types of DNA damage, including oxidation, depurination, methylation and deamination, that can result in single- or double-strand breaks (DSBs. These breaks affect the integrity of the whole genome and, when left unrepaired, can lead to cell death. Here, we investigated the role of the DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR and non-homologous ends joining (NHEJ, in the survival of Mtb inside macrophages. To this end, we constructed Mtb strains defective for HR (ΔrecA, NHEJ [Δ(ku,ligD], or both DSB repair systems [Δ(ku,ligD,recA]. Experiments using these strains revealed that either HR or NHEJ is sufficient for the survival and propagation of tubercle bacilli inside macrophages. Inhibition of nitric oxide or superoxide anion production with L-NIL or apocynin, respectively, enabled the Δ(ku,ligD,recA mutant strain lacking both systems to survive intracellularly. Complementation of the Δ(ku,ligD,recA mutant with an intact recA or ku-ligD rescued the ability of Mtb to propagate inside macrophages.

  17. Bovine tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) in animals and humans may result from exposure to bacilli within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (i.e., M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. africanum, M. pinnipedii, M. microti, M. caprae, or M. canetti) . Mycobacterium bovis is the species most often isolated from tuberculous cat...

  18. Congenital tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    2012-06-20

    Jun 20, 2012 ... Key words: Congenital tuberculo- sis, case report, miliary tuberculosis. Introduction. Congenital tuberculosis defines tuberculosis in infants of .... tary TB and otitis media, resulting in seizures, deafness, and death. It is therefore not surprising that the index case who presented at twelve weeks of age, had ...

  19. Genome wide association study identifies KCNMA1 contributing to human obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiao, Hong; Arner, Peter; Hoffstedt, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association (GWA) analyses have identified common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with obesity. However, the reported genetic variation in obesity explains only a minor fraction of the total genetic variation expected to be present in the population...

  20. The Adenovirus Genome Contributes to the Structural Stability of the Virion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bratati Saha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus (Ad vectors are currently the most commonly used platform for therapeutic gene delivery in human gene therapy clinical trials. Although these vectors are effective, many researchers seek to further improve the safety and efficacy of Ad-based vectors through detailed characterization of basic Ad biology relevant to its function as a vector system. Most Ad vectors are deleted of key, or all, viral protein coding sequences, which functions to not only prevent virus replication but also increase the cloning capacity of the vector for foreign DNA. However, radical modifications to the genome size significantly decreases virion stability, suggesting that the virus genome plays a role in maintaining the physical stability of the Ad virion. Indeed, a similar relationship between genome size and virion stability has been noted for many viruses. This review discusses the impact of the genome size on Ad virion stability and emphasizes the need to consider this aspect of virus biology in Ad-based vector design.

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of 47 chloroplast genomes clarifies the contribution of wild species to the domesticated apple maternal line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforova, Svetlana V; Cavalieri, Duccio; Velasco, Riccardo; Goremykin, Vadim

    2013-08-01

    Both the origin of domesticated apple and the overall phylogeny of the genus Malus are still not completely resolved. Having this as a target, we built a 134,553-position-long alignment including two previously published chloroplast DNAs (cpDNAs) and 45 de novo sequenced, fully colinear chloroplast genomes from cultivated apple varieties and wild apple species. The data produced are free from compositional heterogeneity and from substitutional saturation, which can adversely affect phylogeny reconstruction. Phylogenetic analyses based on this alignment recovered a branch, having the maximum bootstrap support, subtending a large group of the cultivated apple sorts together with all analyzed European wild apple (Malus sylvestris) accessions. One apple cultivar was embedded in a monophylum comprising wild M. sieversii accessions and other Asian apple species. The data demonstrate that M. sylvestris has contributed chloroplast genome to a substantial fraction of domesticated apple varieties, supporting the conclusion that different wild species should have contributed the organelle and nuclear genomes to the domesticated apple.

  2. Stabilization of the genome of the mismatch repair deficient Mycobacterium tuberculosis by context-dependent codon choice

    OpenAIRE

    Wanner, Roger M; Güthlein, Carolin; Springer, Burkhard; Böttger, Erik C; Ackermann, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The rate at which a stretch of DNA mutates is determined by the cellular systems for DNA replication and repair, and by the nucleotide sequence of the stretch itself. One sequence feature with a particularly strong influence on the mutation rate are nucleotide repeats. Some microbial pathogens use nucleotide repeats in their genome to stochastically vary phenotypic traits and thereby evade host defense. However, such unstable sequences also come at a cost, as mutations are...

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection among Asian Elephants in Captivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Gary; Zimmerman, Ralph; Shashkina, Elena; Chen, Liang; Richard, Michael; Bradford, Carol M; Dragoo, Gwen A; Saiers, Rhonda L; Peloquin, Charles A; Daley, Charles L; Planet, Paul; Narachenia, Apurva; Mathema, Barun; Kreiswirth, Barry N

    2017-03-01

    Although awareness of tuberculosis among captive elephants is increasing, antituberculosis therapy for these animals is not standardized. We describe Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission between captive elephants based on whole genome analysis and report a successful combination treatment. Infection control protocols and careful monitoring of treatment of captive elephants with tuberculosis are warranted.

  4. Genomic Damage in Endstage Renal Disease—Contribution of Uremic Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga Stopper

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD, whether on conservative, peritoneal or hemodialysis therapy, have elevated genomic damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes and an increased cancer incidence, especially of the kidney. The damage is possibly due to accumulation of uremic toxins like advanced glycation endproducts or homocysteine. However, other endogenous substances with genotoxic properties, which are increased in ESRD, could be involved, such as the blood pressure regulating hormones angiotensin II and aldosterone or the inflammatory cytokine TNF-a. This review provides an overview of genomic damage observed in ESRD patients, focuses on possible underlying causes and shows modulations of the damage by modern dialysis strategies and vitamin supplementation.

  5. Colorectal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagi, B.; Kochhar, R.; Bhasin, D.K.; Singh, K.

    2003-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the incidence of colorectal tuberculosis in our series and to study its radiological spectrum. A total of 684 cases of proven gastrointestinal tuberculosis with positive barium contrast findings seen over a period of more than one decade were evaluated. The study did not include cases where colon was involved in direct contiguity with ileo-caecal tuberculosis. Seventy-four patients (10.8%) had colorectal tuberculosis. Commonest site involved was transverse colon, closely followed by rectum and ascending colon. Radiological findings observed were in the form of strictures (54%), colitis (39%) and polypoid lesions (7%). Complications noted were in the form of perforations and fistulae in 18.9% of cases. Colorectal tuberculosis is a very common site for gastrointestinal tuberculosis. Typical findings of colorectal tuberculosis are strictures, signs of colitis and polypoid lesions. Common complications are perforation and fistulae. (orig.)

  6. Centrosome Dysfunction Contributes To Chromosome Instability, Chromoanagenesis And Genome Reprograming In Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    German A Pihan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The unique ability of centrosomes to nucleate and organize microtubules makes them unrivaled conductors of important interphase processes, such as intracellular payload traffic, cell polarity, cell locomotion, and organization of the immunologic synapse. But it is in mitosis that centrosomes loom large, for they orchestrate, with clockmaker’s precision, the assembly and functioning of the mitotic spindle, ensuring the equal partitioning of the replicated genome into daughter cells. Centrosome dysfunction is inextricably linked to aneuploidy and chromosome instability, both hallmarks of cancer cells. Several aspects of centrosome function in normal and cancer cells have been molecularly characterized during the last two decades, greatly enhancing our mechanistic understanding of this tiny organelle. Whether centrosome defects alone can cause cancer, remains unanswered. Until recently, the aggregate of the evidence had suggested that centrosome dysfunction, by deregulating the fidelity of chromosome segregation, promotes and accelerates the characteristic Darwinian evolution of the cancer genome enabled by increased mutational load and/or decreased DNA repair. Very recent experimental work has shown that missegreated chromosomes resulting from centrosome dysfunction may experience extensive DNA damage, suggesting additional dimensions to the role of centrosomes in cancer. Centrosome dysfunction is particularly prevalent in tumors in which the genome has undergone extensive structural rearrangements and chromosome domain reshuffling. Ongoing gene reshuffling reprograms the genome for continuous growth, survival, and evasion of the immune system. Manipulation of molecular networks controlling centrosome function may soon become a viable target for specific therapeutic intervention in cancer, particularly since normal cells, which lack centrosome alterations, may be spared the toxicity of such therapies.

  7. Genomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, T. A. (Terence A.)

    2002-01-01

    ... of genome expression and replication processes, and transcriptomics and proteomics. This text is richly illustrated with clear, easy-to-follow, full color diagrams, which are downloadable from the book's website...

  8. Tuberculosis (TB): Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Training Home Conditions Tuberculosis (TB) Tuberculosis: Treatment Tuberculosis: Treatment Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask ... or bones is treated longer. NEXT: Preventive Treatment Tuberculosis: Diagnosis Tuberculosis: History Clinical Trials For more than ...

  9. Living with Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Tuberculosis (TB) Living With Tuberculosis What to Expect You will need regular checkups ... XML file."); } }); } } --> Blank Section Header Lung Disease Lookup Tuberculosis (TB) Learn About Tuberculosis Tuberculosis Symptoms, Causes & Risk ...

  10. Comparative Genomics and Proteomic Analysis of Four Non-tuberculous Mycobacterium Species and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex : Occurrence of Shared Immunogenic Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gcebe, Nomakorinte; Michel, Anita; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C; Rutten, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The Esx and PE/PPE families of proteins are among the most immunodominant mycobacterial antigens and have thus been the focus of research to develop vaccines and immunological tests for diagnosis of bovine and human tuberculosis, mainly caused by Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis,

  11. Renal tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Džamić Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is still a significant health problem in the world, mostly in developing countries. The special significance lies in immunocompromised patients, particularly those suffering from the HIV. Urogenital tuberculosis is one of the most common forms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, while the most commonly involved organ is the kidney. Renal tuberculosis occurs by hematogenous dissemination of mycobacterium tuberculosis from a primary tuberculosis foci in the body. Tuberculosis is characterized by the formation of pathognomonic lesions in the tissues - granulomata. These granulomata may heal spontaneously or remain stable for years. In certain circumstances in the body associated with immunosuppression, the disease may be activated. Central caseous necrosis occurs within tuberculoma, leading to formation of cavities that destroy renal parenchyma. The process may gain access to the collecting system, forming the caverns. In this way, infection can be spread distally to renal pelvis, ureter and bladder. Scaring of tissue by tuberculosis process may lead to development of strictures of the urinary tract. The clinical manifestations are presented by nonspecific symptoms and signs, so tuberculosis can often be overlooked. Sterile pyuria is characteristic for urinary tuberculosis. Dysuric complaints, flank pain or hematuria may be presented in patients. Constitutional symptoms of fever, weight loss and night sweats are presented in some severe cases. Diagnosis is made by isolation of mycobacterium tuberculosis in urine samples, by cultures carried out on standard solid media optimized for mycobacterial growth. Different imaging studies are used in diagnostics - IVU, CT and NMR are the most important. Medical therapy is the main modality of tuberculosis treatment. The first line anti-tuberculosis drugs include isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol. Surgical treatment is required in some cases, to remove severely damaged kidney, if

  12. Genome-wide bisulfite sequencing in zygotes identifies demethylation targets and maps the contribution of TET3 oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Julian R; Dean, Wendy; Clark, Stephen J; Krueger, Felix; Smallwood, Sébastien A; Ficz, Gabriella; Kim, Jong Kyoung; Marioni, John C; Hore, Timothy A; Reik, Wolf

    2014-12-24

    Fertilization triggers global erasure of paternal 5-methylcytosine as part of epigenetic reprogramming during the transition from gametic specialization to totipotency. This involves oxidation by TET3, but our understanding of its targets and the wider context of demethylation is limited to a small fraction of the genome. We employed an optimized bisulfite strategy to generate genome-wide methylation profiles of control and TET3-deficient zygotes, using SNPs to access paternal alleles. This revealed that in addition to pervasive removal from intergenic sequences and most retrotransposons, gene bodies constitute a major target of zygotic demethylation. Methylation loss is associated with zygotic genome activation and at gene bodies is also linked to increased transcriptional noise in early development. Our data map the primary contribution of oxidative demethylation to a subset of gene bodies and intergenic sequences and implicate redundant pathways at many loci. Unexpectedly, we demonstrate that TET3 activity also protects certain CpG islands against methylation buildup. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Genome-wide Bisulfite Sequencing in Zygotes Identifies Demethylation Targets and Maps the Contribution of TET3 Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian R. Peat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fertilization triggers global erasure of paternal 5-methylcytosine as part of epigenetic reprogramming during the transition from gametic specialization to totipotency. This involves oxidation by TET3, but our understanding of its targets and the wider context of demethylation is limited to a small fraction of the genome. We employed an optimized bisulfite strategy to generate genome-wide methylation profiles of control and TET3-deficient zygotes, using SNPs to access paternal alleles. This revealed that in addition to pervasive removal from intergenic sequences and most retrotransposons, gene bodies constitute a major target of zygotic demethylation. Methylation loss is associated with zygotic genome activation and at gene bodies is also linked to increased transcriptional noise in early development. Our data map the primary contribution of oxidative demethylation to a subset of gene bodies and intergenic sequences and implicate redundant pathways at many loci. Unexpectedly, we demonstrate that TET3 activity also protects certain CpG islands against methylation buildup.

  14. Genomic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains isolated in Tuscany, Italy, based on large sequence deletions, SNPs in putative DNA repair genes and MIRU-VNTR polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzelli, Carlo; Lari, Nicoletta; Rindi, Laura

    2016-03-01

    The Beijing genotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is cause of global concern as it is rapidly spreading worldwide, is considered hypervirulent, and is most often associated to massive spread of MDR/XDR TB, although these epidemiological or pathological properties have not been confirmed for all strains and in all geographic settings. In this paper, to gain new insights into the biogeographical heterogeneity of the Beijing family, we investigated a global sample of Beijing strains (22% from Italian-born, 78% from foreign-born patients) by determining large sequence polymorphism of regions RD105, RD181, RD150 and RD142, single nucleotide polymorphism of putative DNA repair genes mutT4 and mutT2 and MIRU-VNTR profiles based on 11 discriminative loci. We found that, although our sample of Beijing strains showed a considerable genomic heterogeneity, yielding both ancient and recent phylogenetic strains, the prevalent successful Beijing subsets were characterized by deletions of RD105 and RD181 and by one nucleotide substitution in one or both mutT genes. MIRU-VNTR analysis revealed 47 unique patterns and 9 clusters including a total of 33 isolates (41% of total isolates); the relatively high proportion of Italian-born Beijing TB patients, often occurring in mixed clusters, supports the possibility of an ongoing cross-transmission of the Beijing genotype to autochthonous population. High rates of extra-pulmonary localization and drug-resistance, particularly MDR, frequently reported for Beijing strains in other settings, were not observed in our survey. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Genomic Variability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains of the Euro-American Lineage Based on Large Sequence Deletions and 15-Locus MIRU-VNTR Polymorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindi, Laura; Medici, Chiara; Bimbi, Nicola; Buzzigoli, Andrea; Lari, Nicoletta; Garzelli, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    A sample of 260 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains assigned to the Euro-American family was studied to identify phylogenetically informative genomic regions of difference (RD). Mutually exclusive deletions of regions RD115, RD122, RD174, RD182, RD183, RD193, RD219, RD726 and RD761 were found in 202 strains; the RDRio deletion was detected exclusively among the RD174-deleted strains. Although certain deletions were found more frequently in certain spoligotype families (i.e., deletion RD115 in T and LAM, RD174 in LAM, RD182 in Haarlem, RD219 in T and RD726 in the “Cameroon” family), the RD-defined sublineages did not specifically match with spoligotype-defined families, thus arguing against the use of spoligotyping for establishing exact phylogenetic relationships between strains. Notably, when tested for katG463/gyrA95 polymorphism, all the RD-defined sublineages belonged to Principal Genotypic Group (PGG) 2, except sublineage RD219 exclusively belonging to PGG3; the 58 Euro-American strains with no deletion were of either PGG2 or 3. A representative sample of 197 isolates was then analyzed by standard 15-locus MIRU-VNTR typing, a suitable approach to independently assess genetic relationships among the strains. Analysis of the MIRU-VNTR typing results by using a minimum spanning tree (MST) and a classical dendrogram showed groupings that were largely concordant with those obtained by RD-based analysis. Isolates of a given RD profile show, in addition to closely related MIRU-VNTR profiles, related spoligotype profiles that can serve as a basis for better spoligotype-based classification. PMID:25197794

  16. EHR Big Data Deep Phenotyping. Contribution of the IMIA Genomic Medicine Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, L J; Lenert, L; Lopez-Campos, G

    2014-08-15

    Given the quickening speed of discovery of variant disease drivers from combined patient genotype and phenotype data, the objective is to provide methodology using big data technology to support the definition of deep phenotypes in medical records. As the vast stores of genomic information increase with next generation sequencing, the importance of deep phenotyping increases. The growth of genomic data and adoption of Electronic Health Records (EHR) in medicine provides a unique opportunity to integrate phenotype and genotype data into medical records. The method by which collections of clinical findings and other health related data are leveraged to form meaningful phenotypes is an active area of research. Longitudinal data stored in EHRs provide a wealth of information that can be used to construct phenotypes of patients. We focus on a practical problem around data integration for deep phenotype identification within EHR data. The use of big data approaches are described that enable scalable markup of EHR events that can be used for semantic and temporal similarity analysis to support the identification of phenotype and genotype relationships. Stead and colleagues' 2005 concept of using light standards to increase the productivity of software systems by riding on the wave of hardware/processing power is described as a harbinger for designing future healthcare systems. The big data solution, using flexible markup, provides a route to improved utilization of processing power for organizing patient records in genotype and phenotype research.

  17. Bioinformatics in the plant genomic and phenomic domain: The German contribution to resources, services and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmutzer, Thomas; Bolger, Marie E; Rudd, Stephen; Chen, Jinbo; Gundlach, Heidrun; Arend, Daniel; Oppermann, Markus; Weise, Stephan; Lange, Matthias; Spannagl, Manuel; Usadel, Björn; Mayer, Klaus F X; Scholz, Uwe

    2017-11-10

    Plant genetic resources are a substantial opportunity for plant breeding, preservation and maintenance of biological diversity. As part of the German Network for Bioinformatics Infrastructure (de.NBI) the German Crop BioGreenformatics Network (GCBN) focuses mainly on crop plants and provides both data and software infrastructure which are tailored to the needs of the plant research community. Our mission and key objectives include: (1) provision of transparent access to germplasm seeds, (2) the delivery of improved workflows for plant gene annotation, and (3) implementation of bioinformatics services that link genotypes and phenotypes. This review introduces the GCBN's spectrum of web-services and integrated data resources that address common research problems in the plant genomics community. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Extracellular Sphingomyelinase Rv0888 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Contributes to Pathological Lung Injury of Mycobacterium smegmatis in Mice via Inducing Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Guanghui; Cui, Yingying; Wang, Lei; Li, Tiantian; Cui, Ziyin; Song, Ningning; Chen, Liping; Pang, Hai; Liu, Siguo

    2018-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), which mainly causes pulmonary injury and tubercles. Although macrophages are generally considered to harbor the main cells of M. tuberculosis , new evidence suggests that neutrophils are rapidly recruited to the infected lung. M. tuberculosis itself, or its early secreted antigenic target protein 6 (ESAT-6), can induce formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). However, NETs trap mycobacteria but are unable to kill them. The role of NETs' formation in the pathogenesis of mycobacteria remains unclear. Here, we report a new M. tuberculosis extracellular factor, bifunctional enzyme Rv0888, with both nuclease and sphingomyelinase activities. Rv0888 sphingomyelinase activity can induce NETs' formation in vitro and in the lung of the mice and enhance the colonization ability of Mycobacterium smegmatis in the lungs of mice. Mice infected by M. smegmatis harboring Rv0888 sphingomyelinase induced pathological injury and inflammation of the lung, which was mainly mediated by NETs, induced by Rv0888 sphingomyelinase, associated protein (myeloperoxidase) triggered caspase-3. In summary, the study sheds new light on the pathogenesis of mycobacteria and reveals a novel target for TB treatment.

  19. Phosphoproteomics analysis of a clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing isolate: expanding the mycobacterial phosphoproteome catalog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuin, Suereta; Tomazella, Gisele G; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Sampson, Samantha L; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C; Soares, Nelson C; Wiker, Harald G; de Souza, Gustavo A; Warren, Robin M

    2015-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation, regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases, mediates a switch between protein activity and cellular pathways that contribute to a large number of cellular processes. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome encodes 11 Serine/Threonine kinases (STPKs) which show close homology to eukaryotic kinases. This study aimed to elucidate the phosphoproteomic landscape of a clinical isolate of M. tuberculosis. We performed a high throughput mass spectrometric analysis of proteins extracted from an early-logarithmic phase culture. Whole cell lysate proteins were processed using the filter-aided sample preparation method, followed by phosphopeptide enrichment of tryptic peptides by strong cation exchange (SCX) and Titanium dioxide (TiO2) chromatography. The MaxQuant quantitative proteomics software package was used for protein identification. Our analysis identified 414 serine/threonine/tyrosine phosphorylated sites, with a distribution of S/T/Y sites; 38% on serine, 59% on threonine and 3% on tyrosine; present on 303 unique peptides mapping to 214 M. tuberculosis proteins. Only 45 of the S/T/Y phosphorylated proteins identified in our study had been previously described in the laboratory strain H37Rv, confirming previous reports. The remaining 169 phosphorylated proteins were newly identified in this clinical M. tuberculosis Beijing strain. We identified 5 novel tyrosine phosphorylated proteins. These findings not only expand upon our current understanding of the protein phosphorylation network in clinical M. tuberculosis but the data set also further extends and complements previous knowledge regarding phosphorylated peptides and phosphorylation sites in M. tuberculosis.

  20. Grupos de Convivência: contribuições para uma proposta educativa em Tuberculose Grupos de Convivencia: contribuciones para un propuesta educativa en Tuberculosis Living Groups: contributions for an educational proposal for Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina da Silva de Souza

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de um relatório de prática assistencial que teve como objetivo desenvolver uma proposta de educação em saúde com grupo de pessoas com tuberculose, visando a efetivação do tratamento. Os dados foram obtidos através de uma proposta de educação em saúde, desenvolvida em um grupo de convivência. Decorrentes do processo de análise foram identificados dois temas que estavam interligados: a percepção da tuberculose e seus cuidados e tratamentos e o isolamento social ,que representam os elementos que influenciam na educação em saúde das pessoas com tuberculose e o significado que a mesma traz para essas pessoas.Se trata de um retatorio de practica asistencial que teivo como objetivo desenvolver uma propuesta de educación em salud com um grupo de personas com tuberculosis, visando que el tratamiento se a mas efectivo. Los datos fueram obtenidos atravéz de una propuesta de educación en salud, desenvolvida en un grupo de convivencia. Decorrentes del proceso de análisis fueram identificados dos temas que estavam interligados: la percepción de la tuberculosis, sus cuidados y tratamiento y el aislamiento social, que representam los elementos que influenciam en la educación in salud de las personas con tuberculosis e el significado que la misma trae para estas personas.This study is a report on care practice. Its objective was to develop a proposal for education in health care from a group of people with tuberculosis, seeking to increase the effectiveness of their treatment. The data was obtained through a proposal for education in health care, developed through a living group. Two interrelated themes resulted from the process of analyzing the data: the perception of tuberculosis and its care and treatment, and social isolation. These represent the elements that influence education in health care for people with tuberculosis, as well as the meaning that such a situation has to these people.

  1. The evolution of peptide deformylase as a target: contribution of biochemistry, genetics and genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhengyu; White, Richard J

    2006-03-30

    Although peptide deformylase (PDF, EC 3.5.1.27) was first described in 1968, the instability of enzyme preparations prevented it from being seriously considered as a target until this problem was finally solved in 1998. PDFs essentiality was first demonstrated in Escherichia coli in 1994. Genomic analyses have shown this enzyme to be present in all eubacteria. PDF homologs have also been found in eukaryotes including Homo sapiens. The function and relevance of the human chromosomal homolog to the safety of PDF inhibitors as therapeutic agents is not clear at this stage. Although there is considerable sequence variation between the different bacterial PDFs, there are three strongly conserved motifs that together constitute a critical metal binding site. The observation that PDF is a metalloenzyme has led to the design of inhibitors containing metal chelating pharmacophores. The most potent of these synthetic inhibitors are active against a range of clinically relevant respiratory tract pathogens in vitro and in vivo, including those resistant to current antibiotics. Mutants resistant to PDF inhibitors have been obtained in the laboratory; these resulted from mutations in the genes for transformylase (EC 2.1.2.9) or PDF. The mechanism involved and its frequency were pathogen-dependent. The two most advanced PDF inhibitor leads, which are both reverse hydroxamates, have progressed to phase 1 clinical trials and were well tolerated.

  2. Tuberculosis neonatal

    OpenAIRE

    Pastor Durán, Xavier

    1986-01-01

    PROTOCOLOS TERAPEUTICOS. TUBERCULOSIS NEONATAL 1. CONCEPTO La tuberculosis neonatal es la infección del recién nacido producida por el bacilo de Koch. Es una situación rara pero grave que requiere un diagnóstico precoz y un tratamiento enérgico..

  3. Genome-Wide Dosage-Dependent and -Independent Regulation Contributes to Gene Expression and Evolutionary Novelty in Plant Polyploids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Zhang, Changqing; Ko, Dae Kwan; Chen, Z Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Polyploidy provides evolutionary and morphological novelties in many plants and some animals. However, the role of genome dosage and composition in gene expression changes remains poorly understood. Here, we generated a series of resynthesized Arabidopsis tetraploids that contain 0-4 copies of Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis arenosa genomes and investigated ploidy and hybridity effects on gene expression. Allelic expression can be defined as dosage dependent (expression levels correlate with genome dosages) or otherwise as dosage independent. Here, we show that many dosage-dependent genes contribute to cell cycle, photosynthesis, and metabolism, whereas dosage-independent genes are enriched in biotic and abiotic stress responses. Interestingly, dosage-dependent genes tend to be preserved in ancient biochemical pathways present in both plant and nonplant species, whereas many dosage-independent genes belong to plant-specific pathways. This is confirmed by an independent analysis using Arabidopsis phylostratigraphic map. For A. thaliana loci, the dosage-dependent alleles are devoid of TEs and tend to correlate with H3K9ac, H3K4me3, and CG methylation, whereas the majority of dosage-independent alleles are enriched with TEs and correspond to H3K27me1, H3K27me3, and CHG (H = A, T, or C) methylation. Furthermore, there is a parent-of-origin effect on nonadditively expressed genes in the reciprocal allotetraploids especially when A. arenosa is used as the pollen donor, leading to metabolic and morphological changes. Thus, ploidy, epigenetic modifications, and cytoplasmic-nuclear interactions shape gene expression diversity in polyploids. Dosage-dependent expression can maintain growth and developmental stability, whereas dosage-independent expression can facilitate functional divergence between homeologs (subfunctionalization and/or neofunctionalization) during polyploid evolution. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for

  4. The contribution of large genomic deletions at the CDKN2A locus to the burden of familial melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesueur, F; de Lichy, M; Barrois, M; Durand, G; Bombled, J; Avril, M-F; Chompret, A; Boitier, F; Lenoir, G M; Bressac-de Paillerets, B; Baccard, Monique; Bachollet, Bertrand; Berthet, Pascaline; Bonadona, Valérie; Bonnetblanc, Jean-Marie; Caron, Olivier; Chevrant-Breton, Jacqueline; Cuny, Jean-François; Dalle, Stéphane; Delaunay, Michèle; Demange, Liliane; De Quatrebarbes, Julie; Doré, Jean-François; Frénay, Marc; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gesta, Paul; Giraud, Sophie; Gorry, Philippe; Grange, Florent; Green, Andrew; Huiart, Laetitia; Janin, Nicolas; Joly, Pascal; Kérob, Delphine; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Limacher, Jean-Marc; Longy, Michel; Mansard, Sandrine; Marrou, Karine; Martin-Denavit, Tanguy; Mateus, Christine; Maubec, Eve; Olivier-Faivre, Laurence; Orlandini, Vincent; Pujol, Pascal; Sassolas, Bruno; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Thomas, Luc; Vabres, Pierre; Venat, Laurence; Wierzbicka, Ewa; Zattara, Hélène

    2008-07-22

    Mutations in two genes encoding cell cycle regulatory proteins have been shown to cause familial cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). About 20% of melanoma-prone families bear a point mutation in the CDKN2A locus at 9p21, which encodes two unrelated proteins, p16(INK4a) and p14(ARF). Rare mutations in CDK4 have also been linked to the disease. Although the CDKN2A gene has been shown to be the major melanoma predisposing gene, there remains a significant proportion of melanoma kindreds linked to 9p21 in which germline mutations of CDKN2A have not been identified through direct exon sequencing. The purpose of this study was to assess the contribution of large rearrangements in CDKN2A to the disease in melanoma-prone families using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. We examined 214 patients from independent pedigrees with at least two CMM cases. All had been tested for CDKN2A and CDK4 point mutation, and 47 were found positive. Among the remaining 167 negative patients, one carried a novel genomic deletion of CDKN2A exon 2. Overall, genomic deletions represented 2.1% of total mutations in this series (1 of 48), confirming that they explain a very small proportion of CMM susceptibility. In addition, we excluded a new gene on 9p21, KLHL9, as being a major CMM gene.

  5. Tuberculosis screening in patients with HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Stephanie Mia Katrine; Bonsu, Frank; Hanson-Nortey, Nii Nortey

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis screening of people living with HIV (PLHIV) can contribute to early tuberculosis diagnosis and improved patient outcomes. Evidence-based guidelines for tuberculosis screening are available, but literature assessing their implementation and the quality of clinical practice...... is scarce. OBJECTIVES: To assess tuberculosis screening practices and the effectiveness of audit and performance feedback to improve quality of tuberculosis screening at HIV care clinics in Ghana. DESIGN: Healthcare providers at 10 large HIV care clinics prospectively registered patient consultations during...... May and October 2014, before and after a performance feedback intervention in August 2014. The outcomes of interest were overall tuberculosis suspicion rate during consultations and provider adherence to the International Standards for Tuberculosis Care and the World Health Organizations' guidelines...

  6. Neutrophils in Tuberculosis: Heterogeneity Shapes the Way?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Infection with M. tuberculosis remains one of the most common infections in the world. The outcome of the infection depends on host ability to mount effective protection and balance inflammatory responses. Neutrophils are innate immune cells implicated in both processes. Accordingly, during M. tuberculosis infection, they play a dual role. Particularly, they contribute to the generation of effector T cells, participate in the formation of granuloma, and are directly involved in tissue necrosis, destruction, and infection dissemination. Neutrophils have a high bactericidal potential. However, data on their ability to eliminate M. tuberculosis are controversial, and the results of neutrophil depletion experiments are not uniform. Thus, the overall roles of neutrophils during M. tuberculosis infection and factors that determine these roles are not fully understood. This review analyzes data on neutrophil defensive and pathological functions during tuberculosis and considers hypotheses explaining the dualism of neutrophils during M. tuberculosis infection and tuberculosis disease. PMID:28626346

  7. Learn About Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Tuberculosis (TB) Learn About Tuberculosis Tuberculosis (TB) is an airborne bacterial infection caused by the organism Mycobacterium tuberculosis that primarily affects the lungs, although other organs ...

  8. Tuberculosis treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabahi, Marcelo Fouad; da Silva, José Laerte Rodrigues; Ferreira, Anna Carolina Galvão; Tannus-Silva, Daniela Graner Schuwartz; Conde, Marcus Barreto

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tuberculosis treatment remains a challenge due to the need to consider, when approaching it, the context of individual and collective health. In addition, social and economic issues have been shown to be variables that need to be considered when it comes to treatment effectiveness. We conducted a critical review of the national and international literature on the treatment of tuberculosis in recent years with the aims of presenting health care workers with recommendations based on the situation in Brazil and better informing decision-making regarding tuberculosis patients so as to minimize morbidity and interrupt disease transmission. PMID:29340497

  9. Tuberculosis: looking beyond BCG vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Abu S

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is an infectious disease of international importance and ranks among the top 10 causes of death in the World. About one-third of the world′s population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Every year, approximately eight million people develop active disease and two million die of TB. The currently used BCG vaccines have shown variable protective efficacies against TB in different parts of the world. Moreover, being a live vaccine, BCG can be pathogenic in immunocompromised recipients. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new vaccines against TB. The comparative genome analysis has revealed the existence of several M. tuberculosis-specific regions that are deleted in BCG. The work carried out to determine the immunological reactivity of proteins encoded by genes located in these regions revealed several major antigens of M. tuberculosis, including the 6 kDa early secreted antigen target (ESAT6. Immunization with ESAT6 and its peptide (aa51-70 protects mice challenged with M. tuberculosis. The protective efficacy of immunization further improves when ESAT6 is recombinantly fused with M. tuberculosis antigen 85B. In addition, ESAT6 delivered as a DNA vaccine is also protective in mice. Whether these vaccines would be safe or not cannot be speculated. The answer regarding the safety and efficacy of these vaccines has to await human trials in different parts of the world.

  10. The Contribution of Tissue Level Organization to Genomic Stability Following Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Gamma and Proton Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheryl G. Burrell, Ph.D.

    2012-05-14

    The formation of functional tissue units is necessary in maintaining homeostasis within living systems, with individual cells contributing to these functional units through their three-dimensional organization with integrin and adhesion proteins to form a complex extra-cellular matrix (ECM). This is of particular importance in those tissues susceptible to radiation-induced tumor formation, such as epithelial glands. The assembly of epithelial cells of the thyroid is critical to their normal receipt of, and response to, incoming signals. Traditional tissue culture and live animals present significant challenges to radiation exposure and continuous sampling, however, the production of bioreactor-engineered tissues aims to bridge this gap by improve capabilities in continuous sampling from the same functional tissue, thereby increasing the ability to extrapolate changes induced by radiation to animals and humans in vivo. Our study proposes that the level of tissue organization will affect the induction and persistence of low dose radiation-induced genomic instability. Rat thyroid cells, grown in vitro as 3D tissue analogs in bioreactors and as 2D flask grown cultures were exposed to acute low dose (1, 5, 10 and 200 cGy) gamma rays. To assess immediate (6 hours) and delayed (up to 30 days) responses post-irradiation, various biological endpoints were studied including cytogenetic analyses, apoptosis analysis and cell viability/cytotoxicity analyses. Data assessing caspase 3/7 activity levels show that, this activity varies with time post radiation and that, overall, 3D cultures display more genomic instability (as shown by the lower levels of apoptosis over time) when compared to the 2D cultures. Variation in cell viability levels were only observed at the intermediate and late time points post radiation. Extensive analysis of chromosomal aberrations will give further insight on the whether the level of tissue organization influences genomic instability patterns after

  11. Duodenal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, M.R.; Sarwar, M.

    2004-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a world wide communicable disease caused by tubercle bacilli discovered by Robert Kock in 1882. In 1993 WHO declared TB as a global emergency due to its world wide resurgence. It can involve any organ of the body. Abdomen is the fourth commonest site of involvement in the extra pulmonary tuberculosis after the lymph-nodes, skeletal and Genito urinary variants. In the gastro intestinal tract tuberculosis can affect any part from the mouth to the anus but ileocaecal area is a favourite location. Duodenal involvement is uncommon and accounts for only 2.5% of tuberculous enteritis. Major pathogens are Mycobacterium Tuberculosis and bovis and the usual route of entry is by direct penetration of the intestinal mucosa by swallowed organisms. (author)

  12. Pulmonary tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Increase in HIV infections Increase in number of homeless people (poor environment and nutrition) Drug-resistant strains ... Disease Control and Prevention/Infectious Diseases Society of America ... guidelines: treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis. ...

  13. [Perinatal tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáenz-Gómez, Jessica; Karam Bechara, José; Jamaica Balderas, Lourdes

    Perinatal tuberculosis is acquired during birth or during the early neonatal period. Although its incidence is unknown, a search was conducted in Medline and 28 cases were found of perinatal tuberculosis reported from 1983 to 2011. Diagnosis of this disease is important due to having nonspecific symptoms that are mistaken for other infectious diseases. The disease has a high mortality rate (60%); therefore, it requires prompt diagnostic suspicion by the medical staff to prevent a fatal outcome. We describe the case of a 3-month-old male whose 29-year-old mother died of septic shock at 15 days of delivery. The infant's condition began within 30 days of age with cough and difficulty breathing with a diagnosis of multiple foci pneumonia. The infant presented respiratory impairment, meriting change of antibiotics twice, without improvement. The autopsy report of the mother revealed peritoneal tuberculosis. PCR was carried out using tracheal aspirate and pleural fluid of the patient, which were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Perinatal diagnosis of tuberculosis was established. No hepatic granuloma was found. Perinatal infection should be suspected in children with sepsis and/or pneumonia unresponsive to antibiotics. In this care, the history of tuberculosis in the mother should have oriented the diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. Contribution of Large Genomic Rearrangements in Italian Lynch Syndrome Patients: Characterization of a Novel Alu-Mediated Deletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Duraturo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome is associated with germ-line mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes, mainly MLH1 and MSH2. Most of the mutations reported in these genes to date are point mutations, small deletions, and insertions. Large genomic rearrangements in the MMR genes predisposing to Lynch syndrome also occur, but the frequency varies depending on the population studied on average from 5 to 20%. The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of large rearrangements in the MLH1 and MSH2 genes in a well-characterised series of 63 unrelated Southern Italian Lynch syndrome patients who were negative for pathogenic point mutations in the MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 genes. We identified a large novel deletion in the MSH2 gene, including exon 6 in one of the patients analysed (1.6% frequency. This deletion was confirmed and localised by long-range PCR. The breakpoints of this rearrangement were characterised by sequencing. Further analysis of the breakpoints revealed that this rearrangement was a product of Alu-mediated recombination. Our findings identified a novel Alu-mediated rearrangement within MSH2 gene and showed that large deletions or duplications in MLH1 and MSH2 genes are low-frequency mutational events in Southern Italian patients with an inherited predisposition to colon cancer.

  15. Contribution of microbiology in the diagnosis of tuberculosis in Castile and León (Spain): Findings of the GRUMICALE 2013 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Medrano, Ramiro; Nebreda-Mayoral, Teresa; Brezmes-Valdivieso, M Fé; García-de Cruz, Susana; Nogueira-González, Begoña; Sánchez-Arroyo, Rafael; Tinajas-Puertas, Almudena; Gutiérrez-Zufiaurre, Nieves; Labayru-Echeverría, Cristina; Hernando-Real, Susana; López-Urrutia, Luis; Rivero-Lezcano, Octavio; Ullivarri-Francia, Belén; Rodríguez-Tarazona, Raquel; Antolín-Ayala, Isabel

    2018-03-01

    A retrospective study was conducted by collecting microbiological tuberculosis (TB) data in Castile and León during the year 2013 in order to determine the incidence and distribution of TB, and resistance to the tuberculostatic drug, and compare them with the epidemiological data provided by the Department of Epidemiological Surveillance (SIVE). Microbiologists of the 14 hospitals of the Castile and León public health network (GRUMICALE) collected epidemiological, microbiological, and management data from the Microbiology laboratories in the community during the year 2013. A single isolate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) per patient was considered. The study included a total of 270 MTC isolates (an incidence rate of 11.63 cases/100,000 inhab./year). A total of 288 cases of TB (11.43 cases/100,000 inhab. year) were recovered using epidemiological data, which included 243 confirmed, 29 suspected, and 16 as probable cases. Pulmonary TB was predominant, followed a long way off by the pleural TB and the remaining locations. A total of 27,620 samples were processed for mycobacterial detection. Mycobacterial growth was observed in 3.46% of automated fluid cultures, and 50.37% were positive by direct staining of the smear. Resistance to one tuberculostatic drug, mostly to isoniazid, was observed in 16 (5.92%) isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT). The province with greater incidence and number of isolates was León (24.23 cases/100,000 inhab./year), with the highest being observed in El Bierzo health area (30.46 cases/100,000 inhab./year). An adequate collection of microbiological information is essential to determine the epidemiology of TB in our region. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  16. Tuberculosis Multidrogoresistente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    German A Acevedo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available La tuberculosis es una enfermedad infecciosa causada por el Mycobacterium tuberculosis. En el año 2010 se registraron 8.8 millones de casos incidentes en el mundo y en los últimos años han aparecido poblaciones bacterianas de micobacterias con resistencia a los fármacos de primera línea. Se ha definido la presencia de resistencia a rifampicina e isoniacida como multidrogoresistencia, estimándose una incidencia mundial aproximada de 3.6%. Esta revisión de tema se centrará en la situación de la tuberculosis multidrogoresistente en el mundo, incluyendo un análisis regional de la casuística Colombiana. Se comentarán los principales mecanismos de resistencia del microorganismo, los genes implicados en la misma y los factores de riesgo asociados a la generación de resistencia en algunas comunidades.

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Anastasia; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2018-03-23

    In this infographic, the genetics, phylogeny, physiology, and pathogenesis mechanisms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are shown. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB), the leading cause of death due to a single infectious agent, claiming 1.7 million lives in 2016. Of the deaths attributable to TB in 2016, 22% occurred in people coinfected with HIV, and close to 5% of the 10.4 million incident cases of this disease were resistant to at least two of the first-line TB drugs. In this infographic, we describe the fundamental features of the genetics, phylogeny, and physiology of this member of the phylum Actinobacteria, which is associated increasingly with drug resistance mediated by mutations and rearrangements in its single, circular chromosome. We also highlight the key pathogenesis mechanisms employed by this slow-growing, facultative intracellular bacterium, which include avoidance of host cell clearance by arrest of the normal macrophage maturation process. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Whole-genome re-sequencing for the identification of high contribution susceptibility gene variants in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    SUN, XIAOJUAN; SUI, WEIGUO; WANG, XIAOBING; HOU, XIANLIANG; OU, MINGLIN; DAI, YONG; XIANG, YUEYING

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that several genes are associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D); genome-wide association investigations and whole-genome re-sequencing investigations offer a useful approach for the identification of genes involved in common human diseases. To further investigate which polymorphisms confer susceptibility to T2D, the present study screened for high-contribution susceptibility gene variants Chinese patients with T2D using whole-genome re-sequencing with DNA pooling. In total, 100 Chinese individuals with T2D and 100 healthy Chinese individuals were analyzed using whole-genome re-sequencing using DNA pooling. To minimize the likelihood of systematic bias in sampling, paired-end libraries with an insert size of 500 bp were prepared for in T2D in all samples, which were then subjected to whole-genome sequencing. Each library contained four lanes. The average sequencing depth was 35.70. In the present study, 1.36 GB of clean sequence data were generated, and the resulting calculated T2D genome consensus sequence covered 99.88% of the hg19 sequence. A total of 3,974,307 single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified, of which 99.88% were in the dbSNP database. The present study also found 642,189 insertions and deletions, 5,590 structure variants (SVs), 4,713 copy number variants (CNVs) and 13,049 single nucleotide variants. A total of 1,884 somatic CNVs and 74 somatic SVs were significantly different between the cases and controls. Therefore, the present study provided validation of whole-genome re-sequencing using the DNA pooling approach. It also generated a whole-genome re-sequencing genotype database for future investigations of T2D. PMID:27035118

  19. [Gastric tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, E; Oliveira, A; Costa, A; Sa, L; Vieira, A; Oliveira, A

    1994-12-01

    A 37 year old woman with duodenal ulcer not responsive to medical treatment was operated. Antrectomy, truncal vagotomy and Bilroth II gastrojejunostomy were performed. The histopathology revealed epithelioid cell granulomas with multinucleated cells and central ceseation, in the gastric side of the pylorus and in three isolated lymph nodes. With Ziehl-Neelsen staining there were multiple acid-fast bacilli. There was no evidence or previous history, personal or familial, or tuberculosis in an other localization. Epidemiology, pathology, diagnosis, and treatment of gastric tuberculosis are discussed according to the literature.

  20. Genome-Wide Screen for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genes Contributing to Opportunistic Pathogenicity in an Invertebrate Model Host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujal S. Phadke

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental opportunistic pathogens can exploit vulnerable hosts through expression of traits selected for in their natural environments. Pathogenicity is itself a complicated trait underpinned by multiple complex traits, such as thermotolerance, morphology, and stress response. The baker’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a species with broad environmental tolerance that has been increasingly reported as an opportunistic pathogen of humans. Here we leveraged the genetic resources available in yeast and a model insect species, the greater waxmoth Galleria mellonella, to provide a genome-wide analysis of pathogenicity factors. Using serial passaging experiments of genetically marked wild-type strains, a hybrid strain was identified as the most fit genotype across all replicates. To dissect the genetic basis for pathogenicity in the hybrid isolate, bulk segregant analysis was performed which revealed eight quantitative trait loci significantly differing between the two bulks with alleles from both parents contributing to pathogenicity. A second passaging experiment with a library of deletion mutants for most yeast genes identified a large number of mutations whose relative fitness differed in vivo vs. in vitro, including mutations in genes controlling cell wall integrity, mitochondrial function, and tyrosine metabolism. Yeast is presumably subjected to a massive assault by the innate insect immune system that leads to melanization of the host and to a large bottleneck in yeast population size. Our data support that resistance to the innate immune response of the insect is key to survival in the host and identifies shared genetic mechanisms between S. cerevisiae and other opportunistic fungal pathogens.

  1. Idala: An unnamed Function Peptide Vaccine for Tuberculosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate Myt272 protein antigenicity and immunogenicity by trial vaccination in mice and its in silico analysis as a potential peptide vaccine for tuberculosis. Methods: Myt272 gene, which has 100 % identity with Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv unknown function gene Rv3424c, was ligated by genomic ...

  2. Tuberculosis perinatal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Sáenz-Gómez

    2015-01-01

    Conclusiones: La infección perinatal debe sospecharse en niños con sepsis o neumonía sin respuesta a antibióticos. En este caso, el antecedente de la madre con tuberculosis orientó al diagnóstico.

  3. Pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhl, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Dissemination of the tubercle bacillus is of three types: bronchogenic, hematogenous, and lymphangitic. Bronchogenic dissemination occurs when exudate from a cavity or small area of caseation drains into a bronchus and is aspirated into previously uninfected areas either on the same or on the opposite side. This type of spreading occurs frequently after bleeding and when there is a cavity emptying into a bronchus. Hematogenous dissemination leads to miliary tuberculosis and to extrapulmonary lesions throughout the body. Acute massive hematogenous spread causes miliary tuberculosis, while chronic spread in smaller amounts usually results in the chronic extrapulmonary foci. Lymphangitic dissemination is common in primary infection. It is responsible for involvement with subsequent enlargement of hilar and mediastinal nodes that is often seen in children and in young black adults. The reaction to M. tuberculosis depends on the presence or absence of immunity to tuberculoprotein. In individuals having no tissue hypersensitivity or immunity, primary tuberculosis results. In those with immunity produced by previous infection or BCG vaccination, the reactivation (reinfection) disease may develop

  4. Tuberculosis; Eye

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: Through an internet search and review of current literature on tuberculosis and its ocular complications, the information relevant to the objectives was obtained. ' Conclusions: TB can affect any structure in the eye and adnexae. Ocular TB is not easy to diagnose because most times there is no concurrent active ...

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Susan; Burns-Huang, Kristin E; Janssen, Guido V; Li, Huilin; Ovaa, Huib; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Darwin, K Heran

    2017-02-21

    The protein degradation machinery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis includes a proteasome and a ubiquitin-like protein (Pup). Proteasome accessory factor A (PafA) attaches Pup to proteins to target them for degradation by the proteasome. Free Pup is unstable and never observed in extracts of M. tuberculosis , an observation that led us to hypothesize that PafA may need alternative sources of Pup. Here, we show that PafA can move Pup from one proteasome substrate, inositol 1-phosphate synthetase (Ino1), to two different proteins, malonyl coenzyme A (CoA)-acyl carrier protein transacylase (FabD) and lonely guy (Log). This apparent "transpupylation" reaction required a previously unrecognized depupylase activity in PafA, and, surprisingly, this depupylase activity was much more efficient than the activity of the dedicated depupylase Dop (deamidase of Pup). Thus, PafA can potentially use both newly synthesized Pup and recycled Pup to doom proteins for degradation. IMPORTANCE Unlike eukaryotes, which contain hundreds of ubiquitin ligases, Pup-containing bacteria appear to have a single ligase to pupylate dozens if not hundreds of different proteins. The observation that PafA can depupylate and transpupylate in vitro offers new insight into how protein stability is regulated in proteasome-bearing bacteria. Importantly, PafA and the dedicated depupylase Dop are each required for the full virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Thus, inhibition of both enzymes may be extremely attractive for the development of therapeutics against tuberculosis. Copyright © 2017 Zhang et al.

  6. Tuberculosis: General Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    TB Elimination Tuberculosis: General Information What is TB? Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by germs that are spread from person ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination CS227840_A What Does a Positive Test ...

  7. Global Tuberculosis Report 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alt+0 Navigation Alt+1 Content Alt+2 Tuberculosis (TB) Menu Tuberculosis The End TB Strategy Areas ... data News, events and features About us Global tuberculosis report 2017 WHO has published a global TB ...

  8. DNA damage-induced alterations in chromatin contribute to genomic integrity and age-related changes in gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberdoerffer, Philipp; Michan, Shaday; McVay, Michael; Mostoslavsky, Raul; Vann, James; Park, Sang-Kyu; Hartlerode, Andrea; Stegmuller, Judith; Hafner, Angela; Loerch, Patrick; Wright, Sarah M.; Mills, Kevin D.; Bonni, Azad; Yankner, Bruce A.; Scully, Ralph; Prolla, Tomas A.; Alt, Frederick W.; Sinclair, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Genomic instability and alterations in gene expression are hallmarks of eukaryotic aging. The yeast histone deacetylase Sir2 silences transcription and stabilizes repetitive DNA, but during aging or in response to a DNA break, the Sir complex relocalizes to sites of genomic instability, resulting in the desilencing of genes that cause sterility, a characteristic of yeast aging. Using embryonic stem cells, we show that mammalian Sir2, SIRT1, represses repetitive DNA and a functionally diverse set of genes across the mouse genome. In response to DNA damage, SIRT1 dissociates from these loci and relocalizes to DNA breaks to promote repair, resulting in transcriptional changes that parallel those in the aging mouse brain. Increased SIRT1 expression promotes survival in a mouse model of genomic instability and suppresses age-dependent transcriptional changes. Thus, DNA damage-induced redistribution of SIRT1 and other chromatin modifying proteins may be a conserved mechanism of aging in eukaryotes. PMID:19041753

  9. Contribution of type W human endogenous retroviruses to the human genome: characterization of HERV-W proviral insertions and processed pseudogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandi, Nicole; Cadeddu, Marta; Blomberg, Jonas; Tramontano, Enzo

    2016-09-09

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are ancient sequences integrated in the germ line cells and vertically transmitted through the offspring constituting about 8 % of our genome. In time, HERVs accumulated mutations that compromised their coding capacity. A prominent exception is HERV-W locus 7q21.2, producing a functional Env protein (Syncytin-1) coopted for placental syncytiotrophoblast formation. While expression of HERV-W sequences has been investigated for their correlation to disease, an exhaustive description of the group composition and characteristics is still not available and current HERV-W group information derive from studies published a few years ago that, of course, used the rough assemblies of the human genome available at that time. This hampers the comparison and correlation with current human genome assemblies. In the present work we identified and described in detail the distribution and genetic composition of 213 HERV-W elements. The bioinformatics analysis led to the characterization of several previously unreported features and provided a phylogenetic classification of two main subgroups with different age and structural characteristics. New facts on HERV-W genomic context of insertion and co-localization with sequences putatively involved in disease development are also reported. The present work is a detailed overview of the HERV-W contribution to the human genome and provides a robust genetic background useful to clarify HERV-W role in pathologies with poorly understood etiology, representing, to our knowledge, the most complete and exhaustive HERV-W dataset up to date.

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis TlyA Protein Negatively Regulates T Helper (Th) 1 and Th17 Differentiation and Promotes Tuberculosis Pathogenesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md. Aejazur; Sobia, Parveen; Dwivedi, Ved Prakash; Bhawsar, Aakansha; Singh, Dhiraj Kumar; Sharma, Pawan; Moodley, Prashini; Van Kaer, Luc; Bishai, William R; Das, Gobardhan

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is an ancient pathogen and a major cause of death worldwide. Although various virulence factors of M. tuberculosis have been identified, its pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. TlyA is a virulence factor in several bacterial infections and is evolutionarily conserved in many Gram-positive bacteria, but its function in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis has not been elucidated. Here, we report that TlyA significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of M. tuberculosis. We show that a TlyA mutant M. tuberculosis strain induces increased IL-12 and reduced IL-1β and IL-10 cytokine responses, which sharply contrasts with the immune responses induced by wild type M. tuberculosis. Furthermore, compared with wild type M. tuberculosis, TlyA-deficient M. tuberculosis bacteria are more susceptible to autophagy in macrophages. Consequently, animals infected with the TlyA mutant M. tuberculosis organisms exhibited increased host-protective immune responses, reduced bacillary load, and increased survival compared with animals infected with wild type M. tuberculosis. Thus, M. tuberculosis employs TlyA as a host evasion factor, thereby contributing to its virulence. PMID:25847237

  11. Whole Genome Sequencing Investigation of a Tuberculosis Outbreak in Port-au-Prince, Haiti Caused by a Strain with a "Low-Level" rpoB Mutation L511P - Insights into a Mechanism of Resistance Escalation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Ocheretina

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization recommends diagnosing Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB in high burden countries by detection of mutations in Rifampin (RIF Resistance Determining Region of Mycobacterium tuberculosis rpoB gene with rapid molecular tests GeneXpert MTB/RIF and Hain MTBDRplus. Such mutations are found in >95% of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains resistant to RIF by conventional culture-based drug susceptibility testing (DST. However routine diagnostic screening with molecular tests uncovered specific "low level" rpoB mutations conferring resistance to RIF below the critical concentration of 1 μg/ml in some phenotypically susceptible strains. Cases with discrepant phenotypic (susceptible and genotypic (resistant results for resistance to RIF account for at least 10% of resistant diagnoses by molecular tests and urgently require new guidelines to inform therapeutic decision making. Eight strains with a "low level" rpoB mutation L511P were isolated by GHESKIO laboratory between 2008 and 2012 from 6 HIV-negative and 2 HIV-positive patients during routine molecular testing. Five isolates with a single L511P mutation and two isolates with double mutation L511P&M515T had MICs for RIF between 0.125 and 0.5 μg/ml and tested susceptible in culture-based DST. The eighth isolate carried a double mutation L511P&D516C and was phenotypically resistant to RIF. All eight strains shared the same spoligotype SIT 53 commonly found in Haiti but classic epidemiological investigation failed to uncover direct contacts between the patients. Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS revealed that L511P cluster isolates resulted from a clonal expansion of an ancestral strain resistant to Isoniazid and to a very low level of RIF. Under the selective pressure of RIF-based therapy the strain acquired mutation in the M306 codon of embB followed by secondary mutations in rpoB and escalation of resistance level. This scenario highlights the importance of subcritical

  12. Genomic characterization of a novel poxvirus contributing to the decline of the red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris) in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Colin J; Wood, Ann R; Thomas, Kathryn; Sainsbury, Anthony W; Gurnell, John; Dein, F Joshua; Nettleton, Peter F

    2006-08-01

    The genome of a virulent squirrelpox virus (SQPV) isolate was characterized in order to determine its relationship with other poxviruses. Restriction enzyme analysis suggested a genome length of approximately 158 kb, whilst sequence analysis of the two ends of the genome indicated a G + C composition of approximately 66 %. Two contiguous stretches of 23 and 37 kb at the left-hand and right-hand ends of the genome, respectively, were sequenced allowing the identification of at least 59 genes contained therein. The partial sequence of a further 15 genes was determined by spot sequencing of restriction fragments located across the genome. Phylogenetic analysis of 15 genes conserved in all the recognized genera of the subfamily Chordopoxvirinae confirmed that the SQPV does not group within the family Parapoxvirinae, but instead partitions on its own in a separate clade of the poxviruses. Analysis of serum from British woodland rodents failed to find any evidence of SQPV infection in wood mice or bank voles, but for the first time serum samples from grey squirrels in the USA were found to contain antibody against SQPV.

  13. Genome plasticity in filamentous plant pathogens contributes to the emergence of novel effectors and their cellular processes in the host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yanhan; Li, Ying; Qi, Zhongqiang; Zheng, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2016-02-01

    Plant diseases cause extensive yield loss of crops worldwide, and secretory 'warfare' occurs between plants and pathogenic organisms all the time. Filamentous plant pathogens have evolved the ability to manipulate host processes and facilitate colonization through secreting effectors inside plant cells. The stresses from hosts and environment can drive the genome dynamics of plant pathogens. Remarkable advances in plant pathology have been made owing to these adaptable genome regions of several lineages of filamentous phytopathogens. Characterization new effectors and interaction analyses between pathogens and plants have provided molecular insights into the plant pathways perturbed during the infection process. In this mini-review, we highlight promising approaches of identifying novel effectors based on the genome plasticity. We also discuss the interaction mechanisms between plants and their filamentous pathogens and outline the possibilities of effector gene expression under epigenetic control that will be future directions for research.

  14. Tuberculosis ocular

    OpenAIRE

    Infante Barrera, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    La evolución etiológica de la medicina la podemos dividir en dos grandes períodos: período de la sífilis y período de la tuberculosis. El período de la sífilis, gracias a las armas de combate de que hoy disponemos, ocupa un lugar secundario. El período de la tuberculosis y que no es sino el paralelo de la vida moderna, ocupa en vigencia el primer lugar. Es el período presente. Hasta hace poco tiempo el médico en general, iniciaba la exploración de su paciente con un interrogatorio, una inspec...

  15. Systematic review of allelic exchange experiments aimed at identifying mutations that confer drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebenzahl-Guimaraes, Hanna; Jacobson, Karen R; Farhat, Maha R; Murray, Megan B

    2014-02-01

    Improving our understanding of the relationship between the genotype and the drug resistance phenotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis will aid the development of more accurate molecular diagnostics for drug-resistant tuberculosis. Studies that use direct genetic manipulation to identify the mutations that cause M. tuberculosis drug resistance are superior to associational studies in elucidating an individual mutation's contribution to the drug resistance phenotype. We systematically reviewed the literature for publications reporting allelic exchange experiments in any of the resistance-associated M. tuberculosis genes. We included studies that introduced single point mutations using specialized linkage transduction or site-directed/in vitro mutagenesis and documented a change in the resistance phenotype. We summarize evidence supporting the causal relationship of 54 different mutations in eight genes (katG, inhA, kasA, embB, embC, rpoB, gyrA and gyrB) and one intergenic region (furA-katG) with resistance to isoniazid, the rifamycins, ethambutol and fluoroquinolones. We observed a significant role for the strain genomic background in modulating the resistance phenotype of 21 of these mutations and found examples of where the same drug resistance mutations caused varying levels of resistance to different members of the same drug class. This systematic review highlights those mutations that have been shown to causally change phenotypic resistance in M. tuberculosis and brings attention to a notable lack of allelic exchange data for several of the genes known to be associated with drug resistance.

  16. Biochemical and structural studies of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis O6-methylguanine methyltransferase and mutated variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miggiano, Riccardo; Casazza, Valentina; Garavaglia, Silvia; Ciaramella, Maria; Perugino, Giuseppe; Rizzi, Menico; Rossi, Franca

    2013-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis displays remarkable genetic stability despite continuous exposure to the hostile environment represented by the host's infected macrophages. Similarly to other organisms, M. tuberculosis possesses multiple systems to counteract the harmful potential of DNA alkylation. In particular, the suicidal enzyme O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (OGT) is responsible for the direct repair of O(6)-alkylguanine in double-stranded DNA and is therefore supposed to play a central role in protecting the mycobacterial genome from the risk of G · C-to-A · T transition mutations. Notably, a number of geographically widely distributed M. tuberculosis strains shows nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms in their OGT-encoding gene, leading to amino acid substitutions at position 15 (T15S) or position 37 (R37L) of the N-terminal domain of the corresponding protein. However, the role of these mutations in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis is unknown. We describe here the in vitro characterization of M. tuberculosis OGT (MtOGT) and of two point-mutated versions of the protein mimicking the naturally occurring ones, revealing that both mutated proteins are impaired in their activity as a consequence of their lower affinity for alkylated DNA than the wild-type protein. The analysis of the crystal structures of MtOGT and MtOGT-R37L confirms the high level of structural conservation of members of this protein family and provides clues to an understanding of the molecular bases for the reduced affinity for the natural substrate displayed by mutated MtOGT. Our in vitro results could contribute to validate the inferred participation of mutated OGTs in M. tuberculosis phylogeny and biology.

  17. Organization of repeated DNA elements in the genome of the cichlid fish Cichla kelberi and its contributions to the knowledge of fish genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, W G; Ferreira, I A; Cabral-de-Mello, D C; Mazzuchelli, J; Valente, G T; Pinhal, D; Poletto, A B; Venere, P C; Martins, C

    2009-01-01

    Repeated DNA elements have been extensively applied as physical chromosome markers in comparative studies for the identification of chromosomal rearrangements, the identification of sex chromosomes, chromosome evolution analysis and applied genetics. Here, we report the characterization of the transposable elements (TE) Tc1, Rex1, Rex3 and Rex6 and a new element called RCk in the genome of the South American cichlid fish Cichla kelberi using nucleotide sequence analysis and hybridization to metaphase chromosomes. The analysis of the repeated elements demonstrated that they are, in most cases, compartmentalized in heterochromatic regions, as has been observed in several other vertebrates. On the other hand, the elements Rex1 and Rex3 were also observed spanning extensive euchromatic regions on 2 chromosome pairs. The RCk element exhibits a wide distribution among fishes and also in amphibians, and it was spread throughout the chromosomes of C. kelberi. Our results have demonstrated that the compartmentalization of repeated elements is not restricted to heterochromatic segments, which has provided new concepts with regard to the genomic organization of transposons. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Use of whole-genome sequencing and evaluation of the apparent sensitivity and specificity of antemortem tuberculosis tests in the investigation of an unusual outbreak of Mycobacterium bovis infection in a Michigan dairy herd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruning-Fann, Colleen S; Robbe-Austerman, Suelee; Kaneene, John B; Thomsen, Bruce V; Tilden, John D; Ray, Jean S; Smith, Richard W; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Bolin, Steven R; O'Brien, Daniel J; Mullaney, Thomas P; Stuber, Tod P; Averill, James J; Marks, David

    2017-07-15

    OBJECTIVE To describe use of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and evaluate the apparent sensitivity and specificity of antemortem tuberculosis tests during investigation of an unusual outbreak of Mycobacterium bovis infection in a Michigan dairy herd. DESIGN Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) outbreak investigation. ANIMALS Cattle, cats, dog, and wildlife. PROCEDURES All cattle in the index dairy herd were screened for bTB with the caudal fold test (CFT), and cattle ≥ 6 months old were also screened with a γ-interferon (γIFN) assay. The index herd was depopulated along with all barn cats and a dog that were fed unpasteurized milk from the herd. Select isolates from M bovis-infected animals from the index herd and other bTB-affected herds underwent WGS. Wildlife around all affected premises was examined for bTB. RESULTS No evidence of bTB was found in any wildlife examined. Within the index herd, 53 of 451 (11.8%) cattle and 12 of 21 (57%) cats were confirmed to be infected with M bovis. Prevalence of M bovis-infected cattle was greatest among 4- to 7-month-old calves (16/49 [33%]) followed by adult cows (36/203 [18%]). The apparent sensitivity and specificity were 86.8% and 92.7% for the CFT and 80.4% and 96.5% for the γIFN assay when results for those tests were interpreted separately and 96.1% and 91.7% when results were interpreted in parallel. Results of WGS revealed that M bovis-infected barn cats and cattle from the index herd and 6 beef operations were infected with the same strain of M bovis. Of the 6 bTB-affected beef operations identified during the investigation, 3 were linked to the index herd only by WGS results; there was no record of movement of livestock or waste milk from the index herd to those operations. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Whole-genome sequencing enhanced the epidemiological investigation and should be used in all disease investigations. Performing the CFT and γIFN assay in parallel improved the antemortem ability to detect M bovis

  19. Comparative genomic analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum for understanding the mutations contributing to enhanced butanol tolerance and production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mengmeng; Zhao, Jingbo; Yu, Le; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2017-12-10

    Clostridium acetobutylicum JB200 is a hyper butanol tolerant and producing strain obtained from asporogenic C. acetobutylicum ATCC 55025 through mutagenesis and adaptation in a fibrous bed bioreactor. The complete genomes of both strains were sequenced by the Illumina Hiseq2000 technology and assembled using SOAPdenovo approach. Compared to the genomic sequence of the type strain ATCC 824, 143 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 17 insertion/deletion variations (InDels) were identified in the genome of ATCC 55025. Twenty-nine mutations were in genes involved in sporulation, solventogenesis and stress response. Compared to ATCC 55025, there were seven additional point mutations in the chromosome of JB200. Among them, a single-base deletion in cac3319 encoding an orphan histidine kinase caused protein C-terminal truncation. Disruption of this gene in ATCC 55025 and ATCC 824 resulted in significantly elevated butanol tolerance and production. This study provides genome-level information for the better understanding of solventogenic C. acetobutylicum in several key aspects of cell physiology and metabolism, which could help further metabolic engineering of Clostridium for butanol production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Tuberculosis ocular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Infante Barrera

    1950-01-01

    Full Text Available La evolución etiológica de la medicina la podemos dividir en dos grandes períodos: período de la sífilis y período de la tuberculosis. El período de la sífilis, gracias a las armas de combate de que hoy disponemos, ocupa un lugar secundario. El período de la tuberculosis y que no es sino el paralelo de la vida moderna, ocupa en vigencia el primer lugar. Es el período presente. Hasta hace poco tiempo el médico en general, iniciaba la exploración de su paciente con un interrogatorio, una inspección, un tacto y una serología con una obsesión sifilítica. En la época actual el médico y en especial el oftalmólogo debe tener una obsesión tuberculosa en la investigación etiológica. Cuántas veces en una afección ocular que de una manera lenta pero progresiva produce profundas alteraciones oculares, lleva el sello soterrado de una tuberculosis? Cuántos enfermos de una constitución en apariencia envidiable hacen precisamente por un exceso de sus defensas una alergia tuberculosa? Tan traicionera como la sífilis es la tuberculosis. La sífilis quema sus etapas y estalla con una hemorragia cerebral, una locura, una parálisis general, una ataxia locomotriz progresiva, una goma o una meningitis sifilítica. La tuberculosis hace su presentación con una afección ocular, una goma, una granulia, una artritis, una osteítis, o una meningitis óptico-quiasmática. Siendo esto así, es necesario, en la mayoría de las afecciones oculares, tratar de identificarla por los medios de diagnóstico de que hoy disponemos.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of antituberculosis drugs in pulmonary tuberculosis patients with type 2 diabetes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruslami, R.; Nijland, H.M.J.; Adhiarta, I.G.; Kariadi, S.H.; Alisjahbana, B.; Aarnoutse, R.E.; Crevel, R. van

    2010-01-01

    Altered pharmacokinetics of antituberculosis drugs may contribute to an increased risk of tuberculosis treatment failure for diabetic patients. We previously found that rifampin exposure was 2-fold lower in diabetic than in nondiabetic tuberculosis patients during the continuation phase of

  2. Operational research within a Global Fund supported tuberculosis project in India: why, how and its contribution towards change in policy and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagili, Karuna D; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Chadha, Sarabjit S; Wilson, Nevin C; Kumar, Ajay M V; Moonan, Patrick K; Oeltmann, John E; Chadha, Vineet K; Nagaraja, Sharath Burugina; Ghosh, Smita; Q Lo, Terrence; Volkmann, Tyson; Willis, Matthew; Shringarpure, Kalpita; Reddy, Ravichandra Chinnappa; Kumar, Prahlad; Nair, Sreenivas A; Rao, Raghuram; Yassin, Mohammed; Mwangala, Perry; Zachariah, Rony; Tonsing, Jamhoih; Harries, Anthony D; Khaparde, Sunil

    2018-01-01

    The Global Fund encourages operational research (OR) in all its grants; however very few reports describe this aspect. In India, Project Axshya was supported by a Global Fund grant to improve the reach and visibility of the government Tuberculosis (TB) services among marginalised and vulnerable communities. OR was incorporated to build research capacity of professionals working with the national TB programme and to generate evidence to inform policies and practices. To describe how Project Axshya facilitated building OR capacity within the country, helped in addressing several TB control priority research questions, documented project activities and their outcomes, and influenced policy and practice. From September 2010 to September 2016, three key OR-related activities were implemented. First, practical output-oriented modular training courses were conducted (n = 3) to build research capacity of personnel involved in the TB programme, co-facilitated by The Union, in collaboration with the national TB programme, WHO country office and CDC, Atlanta. Second, two large-scale Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) surveys were conducted at baseline and mid-project to assess the changes pertaining to TB knowledge, attitudes and practices among the general population, TB patients and health care providers over the project period. Third, studies were conducted to describe the project's core activities and outcomes. In the training courses, 44 participant teams were supported to develop research protocols on topics of national priority, resulting in 28 peer-reviewed scientific publications. The KAP surveys and description of project activities resulted in 14 peer-reviewed publications. Of the published papers at least 12 have influenced change in policy or practice. OR within a Global Fund supported TB project has resulted in building OR capacity, facilitating research in areas of national priority and influencing policy and practice. We believe this experience will

  3. CLINICAL AND HISTOPATHOLOGICAL CORRELATION OF CUTANEOUS TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhu Babu Chekur

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Cutaneous tuberculosis is a chronic disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It is primarily a granulomatous disease. We studied the clinical pathological profile of 42 cases of cutaneous tuberculosis in Osmania General Hospital from December 2010 – October 2012. METHODS A total of 42 cases of cutaneous tuberculosis attending DVL OPD at Osmania General Hospital were studied along with clinical features, age, sex, duration of illness in correlation with Mantoux test and types of cutaneous lesions. RESULTS Out of 42 cases, commonest variant was Lupus vulgaris (38.06%. Majority (37.5% of the cases were in the age group of 21- 30 years. Male preponderance was noted in the study with highest incidence in the low socioeconomic group. The location of cutaneous tuberculosis was high in head and neck region (23.80% and clinically majority of cases were (38.06% found to be Lupus vulgaris variant. CONCLUSIONS Among the various types of cutaneous tuberculosis, Lupus vulgaris is the commonest variant followed by scrofuloderma in the study population. The other variants like Tuberculosis verrucosa cutis accounted to 19.04% of the study cases. A small percentage were contributed by Lichen scrofulosorum (2.38% and Papulonecrotic tuberculids (2.38% respectively. Lupus vulgaris was the most common histopathological variant. Most of the components of cutaneous tuberculosis on histopathology exhibited hyperkeratosis, hyperplasia, pseudoepitheliomatous changes; lymphocytic dermal infiltrate, epithelioid cell granulomas in the dermis, vasculitis changes in the dermis with changes of septal or lobular panniculitis.

  4. Imaging in Tuberculosis abdominal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, Tatiana; Garcia, Vanessa; Tamara, Estrada; Acosta, Federico

    2010-01-01

    In this article we illustrate and discuss imaging features resulting from Tuberculosis abdominal affectation. We present patients evaluated with several imaging modalities who had abdominal symptoms and findings suggestive of granulomatous disease. Diagnosis was confirm including hystopatology and clinical outgoing. Cases involved presented many affected organs such as lymphatic system, peritoneum, liver, spleen, pancreas, kidneys, ureters, adrenal glands and pelvic organs Tuberculosis, Tuberculosis renal, Tuberculosis hepatic, Tuberculosis splenic Tomography, x-ray, computed

  5. [Osteo-articular tuberculosis and postpartum: a casual association?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvet, F; Imbert, I; Magnin, J; Souviat, C; Ponties, J E; Lechevalier, D

    2005-09-01

    Most cases of active tuberculosis in France are due to a recurrence of latent tuberculosis. It seems that immunorestitution during the postpartum can contribute to the return of latent tuberculosis. We report three observations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis osteo-articular infections (two Pott's diseases and one sterno-clavicular arthritis) occurring during the postpartum of women non infected by HIV. Two patients need a surgical treatment. The response to standard tuberculous treatment was favourable and all patients were cured. One must consider osteo-articular tuberculosis when a patient is suffering from osseous pains not proving reliable during the postpartum. We must remind ourselves of the relationships between tuberculosis and postpartum as well as the necessity to the threat both mother and child. Additional epidemiological studies should be realised. It appears necessary to increase in France measures for tracking tuberculosis in particularly about the latent forms.

  6. A variable region within the genome of Streptococcus pneumoniae contributes to strain-strain variation in virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M Harvey

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial factors responsible for the variation in invasive potential between different clones and serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae are largely unknown. Therefore, the isolation of rare serotype 1 carriage strains in Indigenous Australian communities provided a unique opportunity to compare the genomes of non-invasive and invasive isolates of the same serotype in order to identify such factors. The human virulence status of non-invasive, intermediately virulent and highly virulent serotype 1 isolates was reflected in mice and showed that whilst both human non-invasive and highly virulent isolates were able to colonize the murine nasopharynx equally, only the human highly virulent isolates were able to invade and survive in the murine lungs and blood. Genomic sequencing comparisons between these isolates identified 8 regions >1 kb in size that were specific to only the highly virulent isolates, and included a version of the pneumococcal pathogenicity island 1 variable region (PPI-1v, phage-associated adherence factors, transporters and metabolic enzymes. In particular, a phage-associated endolysin, a putative iron/lead permease and an operon within PPI-1v exhibited niche-specific changes in expression that suggest important roles for these genes in the lungs and blood. Moreover, in vivo competition between pneumococci carrying PPI-1v derivatives representing the two identified versions of the region showed that the version of PPI-1v in the highly virulent isolates was more competitive than the version from the less virulent isolates in the nasopharyngeal tissue, blood and lungs. This study is the first to perform genomic comparisons between serotype 1 isolates with distinct virulence profiles that correlate between mice and humans, and has highlighted the important role that hypervariable genomic loci, such as PPI-1v, play in pneumococcal disease. The findings of this study have important implications for understanding the processes that

  7. Investigation of isoniazid and ethionamide cross-resistance by whole genome sequencing and association with poor treatment outcomes of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Malinga

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Baseline ETH molecular resistance before second-line treatment is a concern. Unfavorable treatment outcomes of patients with ethA, ethR, and inhA mutations highlight the importance of genotypic testing before initiation of treatment containing ETH. The clinical significance of whole genome analysis for early detection of mutations predictive of treatment failure needs further investigation.

  8. Genomic epidemiology of a major Mycobacterium tuberculosis outbreak: Retrospective cohort study in a low incidence setting using sparse time-series sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkvardsen, Dorte Bek; Norman, Anders; Andersen, Åse Bengård

    2017-01-01

    cases belonging to this outbreak via routine MIRU-VNTR typing. Here, we present a retrospective analysis of the C2/1112-15 dataset, based on whole-genome data from a sparse time-series consisting of five randomly selected isolates from each of the 23 years. Even if these data are derived from only 12...

  9. Duodenal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatti, M.; Hussain, M.; Kumar, D.; Samo, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    Duodenal tuberculosis is an uncommon disease. It may be either extrinsic or intrinsic or both. In the extrinsic type there can either be primary duodenal involvement or compression due to enlarged para duodenal lymph nodes. The clinical presentation can be dyspeptic or obstructive symptoms. The dyspeptic symptoms include epigastric pain, nausea, and occasional vomiting and obstructive symptoms include bilious vomiting frequently after meals, epigastric pain, and generalized abdominal pain. This report describes a young lady presenting with gastric outlet obstruction symptoms due to tuberculous adhesion involving the proximal duodenum. (author)

  10. Spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, R N; Ben Husien, M

    2018-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains endemic in many parts of the developing world and is increasingly seen in the developed world due to migration. A total of 1.3 million people die annually from the disease. Spinal TB is the most common musculoskeletal manifestation, affecting about 1 to 2% of all cases of TB. The coexistence of HIV, which is endemic in some regions, adds to the burden and the complexity of management. This review discusses the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, impact of HIV and both the medical and surgical options in the management of spinal TB. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B:425-31.

  11. Recente contribuição da Organização Mundial de Saúde para o controle da tuberculose na infância Recent contribution of the World Health Organization to control childhood tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemax Couto Sant'Anna

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available O artigo comenta a pioneira e recente publicação da Organização Mundial da Saúde denominada Guidance for National Tuberculosis Programmes on the Management of Childhood Tuberculosis in Children, buscando divulgar aspectos que tem interesse na prática dos profissionais de saúde. Estabelece-se paralelo entre a América Latina e o continente africano no que diz respeito à co-infecção TB-HIV e a tuberculose infantil.The article comments the pioneer and recent publication of the World Health Organization called "Guidance for National Tuberculosis Programmes on the Management of Childhood Tuberculosis in Children", aiming at spreading interesting aspects on the practice of health professionals. A parallel between Latin America and the African continent is established, concerning the co-infection TB-HIV and childhood tuberculosis.

  12. Mycobacterial species as case-study of comparative genome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakham, F.; Belayachi, L.; Ussery, David

    2011-01-01

    . Pasteur 1173P2, M. leprae Br4923, M. marinum M, M. sp. KMS, M. sp. MCS, M. tuberculosis CDC1551, M. tuberculosis F11, M. tuberculosis H37Ra, M. tuberculosis H37Rv, M. tuberculosis KZN 1435 , M. ulcerans Agy99,and M. vanbaalenii PYR—1, For this purpose a comparison has been done based on their length...... defined for twelve Mycobacterial species. We have also introduced the genome atlas of the reference strain M. tuberculosis H37Rv which can give a good overview of this genome. And for examining the phylogenetic relationships among these bacteria, a phylogenic tree has been constructed from 16S rRNA gene...... the evolutionary events of these species and improving drugs, vaccines, and diagnostics tools for controlling Mycobacterial diseases. In this present study we aim to outline a comparative genome analysis of fourteen Mycobacterial genomes: M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis K—10, M. bovis AF2122/97, M. bovis BCG str...

  13. Genetic Variants Contributing to Colistin Cytotoxicity: Identification of TGIF1 and HOXD10 Using a Population Genomics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eadon, Michael T.; Hause, Ronald J.; Stark, Amy L.; Cheng, Ying-Hua; Wheeler, Heather E.; Burgess, Kimberly S.; Benson, Eric A.; Cunningham, Patrick N.; Bacallao, Robert L.; Dagher, Pierre C.; Skaar, Todd C.; Dolan, M. Eileen

    2017-01-01

    Colistin sulfate (polymixin E) is an antibiotic prescribed with increasing frequency for severe Gram-negative bacterial infections. As nephrotoxicity is a common side effect, the discovery of pharmacogenomic markers associated with toxicity would benefit the utility of this drug. Our objective was to identify genetic markers of colistin cytotoxicity that were also associated with expression of key proteins using an unbiased, whole genome approach and further evaluate the functional significance in renal cell lines. To this end, we employed International HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) of Yoruban ancestry with known genetic information to perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS) with cellular sensitivity to colistin. Further association studies revealed that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with gene expression and protein expression were significantly enriched in SNPs associated with cytotoxicity (p ≤ 0.001 for gene and p = 0.015 for protein expression). The most highly associated SNP, chr18:3417240 (p = 6.49 × 10−8), was nominally a cis-expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) of the gene TGIF1 (transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)-induced factor-1; p = 0.021) and was associated with expression of the protein HOXD10 (homeobox protein D10; p = 7.17 × 10−5). To demonstrate functional relevance in a murine colistin nephrotoxicity model, HOXD10 immunohistochemistry revealed upregulated protein expression independent of mRNA expression in response to colistin administration. Knockdown of TGIF1 resulted in decreased protein expression of HOXD10 and increased resistance to colistin cytotoxicity. Furthermore, knockdown of HOXD10 in renal cells also resulted in increased resistance to colistin cytotoxicity, supporting the physiological relevance of the initial genomic associations. PMID:28335481

  14. Updates on antibody functions in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and their relevance for developing a vaccine against tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achkar, Jacqueline M; Prados-Rosales, Rafael

    2018-04-12

    A more effective vaccine to control tuberculosis (TB), a major global public health problem, is urgently needed. Current vaccine candidates focus predominantly on eliciting cell-mediated immunity but other arms of the immune system also contribute to protection against TB. We review here recent studies that enhance our current knowledge of antibody-mediated functions against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These findings, which contribute to the increasing evidence that antibodies have a protective role against TB, include demonstrations that firstly distinct human antibody Fc glycosylation patterns, found in latent M. tuberculosis infection but not in active TB, influence the efficacy of the host to control M. tuberculosis infection, secondly antibody isotype influences human antibody functions, and thirdly that antibodies targeting M. tuberculosis surface antigens are protective. We discuss these findings in the context of TB vaccine development and highlight the need for further research on antibody-mediated immunity in M. tuberculosis infection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. DNA repair in Mycobacterium tuberculosis revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Vultos, Tiago; Mestre, Olga; Tonjum, Tone; Gicquel, Brigitte

    2009-05-01

    Our understanding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA repair mechanisms is still poor compared with that of other bacterial organisms. However, the publication of the first complete M. tuberculosis genome sequence 10 years ago boosted the study of DNA repair systems in this organism. A first step in the elucidation of M. tuberculosis DNA repair mechanisms was taken by Mizrahi and Andersen, who identified homologs of genes involved in the reversal or repair of DNA damage in Escherichia coli and related organisms. Genes required for nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, recombination, and SOS repair and mutagenesis were identified. Notably, no homologs of genes involved in mismatch repair were identified. Novel characteristics of the M. tuberculosis DNA repair machinery have been found over the last decade, such as nonhomologous end joining, the presence of Mpg, ERCC3 and Hlr - proteins previously presumed to be produced exclusively in mammalian cells - and the recently discovered bifunctional dCTP deaminase:dUTPase. The study of these systems is important to develop therapeutic agents that can counteract M. tuberculosis evolutionary changes and to prevent adaptive events resulting in antibiotic resistance. This review summarizes our current understanding of the M. tuberculosis DNA repair system.

  16. Plant STAND P-loop NTPases: a current perspective of genome distribution, evolution, and function : Plant STAND P-loop NTPases: genomic organization, evolution, and molecular mechanism models contribute broadly to plant pathogen defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Preeti; Acharya, Vishal

    2018-02-01

    STAND P-loop NTPase is the common weapon used by plant and other organisms from all three kingdoms of life to defend themselves against pathogen invasion. The purpose of this study is to review comprehensively the latest finding of plant STAND P-loop NTPase related to their genomic distribution, evolution, and their mechanism of action. Earlier, the plant STAND P-loop NTPase known to be comprised of only NBS-LRRs/AP-ATPase/NB-ARC ATPase. However, recent finding suggests that genome of early green plants comprised of two types of STAND P-loop NTPases: (1) mammalian NACHT NTPases and (2) NBS-LRRs. Moreover, YchF (unconventional G protein and members of P-loop NTPase) subfamily has been reported to be exceptionally involved in biotic stress (in case of Oryza sativa), thereby a novel member of STAND P-loop NTPase in green plants. The lineage-specific expansion and genome duplication events are responsible for abundance of plant STAND P-loop NTPases; where "moderate tandem and low segmental duplication" trajectory followed in majority of plant species with few exception (equal contribution of tandem and segmental duplication). Since the past decades, systematic research is being investigated into NBS-LRR function supported the direct recognition of pathogen or pathogen effectors by the latest models proposed via 'integrated decoy' or 'sensor domains' model. Here, we integrate the recently published findings together with the previous literature on the genomic distribution, evolution, and distinct models proposed for functional molecular mechanism of plant STAND P-loop NTPases.

  17. Active case finding of tuberculosis in Europe: a Tuberculosis Network European Trials Group (TBNET) survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bothamley, G H; Ditiu, L; Migliori, G B

    2008-01-01

    Tuberculosis control depends on successful case finding and treatment of individuals infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Passive case finding is widely practised: the present study aims to ascertain the consensus and possible improvements in active case finding across Europe. Recommendations...... from national guidelines were collected from 50 countries of the World Health Organization European region using a standard questionnaire. Contacts are universally screened for active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). Most countries (>70%) screen those with HIV infection, prisoners...... and in-patient contacts. Screening of immigrants is related to their contribution to national rates of tuberculosis. Only 25 (50%) out of 50 advise a request for symptoms in their guidelines. A total of 36 (72%) out of 50 countries recommend sputum examination for those with a persistent cough; 13...

  18. Simple sequence repeats in mycobacterial genomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    2006-12-18

    Dec 18, 2006 ... strains of M. tuberculosis (CDC1551 and H37Rv) were analysed for frequencies and abundance of SSRs. .... Figure 1. Tract density profiles of microsatellites in the five genomes: (a) M. avium (MA), (b) M. bovis (MB), (c) M. tuberculosis ...... Jackson A L, Chen R and Loeb L A 1998 Induction of microsatellite.

  19. Strains of bacterial species induce a greatly varied acute adaptive immune response: The contribution of the accessory genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela, Uri; Euler, Chad W; Correa da Rosa, Joel; Fischetti, Vincent A

    2018-01-01

    A fundamental question in human susceptibility to bacterial infections is to what extent variability is a function of differences in the pathogen species or in individual humans. To focus on the pathogen species, we compared in the same individual the human adaptive T and B cell immune response to multiple strains of two major human pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. We found wide variability in the acute adaptive immune response induced by various strains of a species, with a unique combination of activation within the two arms of the adaptive response. Further, this was also accompanied by a dramatic difference in the intensity of the specific protective T helper (Th) response. Importantly, the same immune response differences induced by the individual strains were maintained across multiple healthy human donors. A comparison of isogenic phage KO strains, demonstrated that of the pangenome, prophages were the major contributor to inter-strain immune heterogeneity, as the T cell response to the remaining "core genome" was noticeably blunted. Therefore, these findings extend and modify the notion of an adaptive response to a pathogenic bacterium, by implying that the adaptive immune response signature of a bacterial species should be defined either per strain or alternatively to the species' 'core genome', common to all of its strains. Further, our results demonstrate that the acquired immune response variation is as wide among different strains within a single pathogenic species as it is among different humans, and therefore may explain in part the clinical heterogeneity observed in patients infected with the same species.

  20. Strains of bacterial species induce a greatly varied acute adaptive immune response: The contribution of the accessory genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uri Sela

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental question in human susceptibility to bacterial infections is to what extent variability is a function of differences in the pathogen species or in individual humans. To focus on the pathogen species, we compared in the same individual the human adaptive T and B cell immune response to multiple strains of two major human pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. We found wide variability in the acute adaptive immune response induced by various strains of a species, with a unique combination of activation within the two arms of the adaptive response. Further, this was also accompanied by a dramatic difference in the intensity of the specific protective T helper (Th response. Importantly, the same immune response differences induced by the individual strains were maintained across multiple healthy human donors. A comparison of isogenic phage KO strains, demonstrated that of the pangenome, prophages were the major contributor to inter-strain immune heterogeneity, as the T cell response to the remaining "core genome" was noticeably blunted. Therefore, these findings extend and modify the notion of an adaptive response to a pathogenic bacterium, by implying that the adaptive immune response signature of a bacterial species should be defined either per strain or alternatively to the species' 'core genome', common to all of its strains. Further, our results demonstrate that the acquired immune response variation is as wide among different strains within a single pathogenic species as it is among different humans, and therefore may explain in part the clinical heterogeneity observed in patients infected with the same species.

  1. MULTIDRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kurt

    - associated tuberculosis, particularly related to national and international evidence- based policy. She is the author of several scientific papers and international policy documents, and serves on various interna- tional tuberculosis expert ...

  2. Tuberculosis and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    TUBERCULOSIS www.who.int/tb & DIABETES THE DUAL EPIDEMIC OF TB AND DIABETES DEADLY LINKAGES  People with ... higher risk of progressing from latent to active tuberculosis.  Diabetes triples a person’s risk of developing TB. ...

  3. Tuberculosis Data and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  4. Tuberculosis Treatment and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  5. Tuberculosis Lymphoedema Cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangopadhyay Asok Kumar

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoedema following cutaneous tuberculosis is a rare occurrence. A case of elephantiasis of leg following lupus vulgaris is presented. It can still be seen in rural India in untreated advanced cutaneous tuberculosis.

  6. The epidemic of Tuberculosis on vaccinated population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syahrini, Intan; Sriwahyuni; Halfiani, Vera; Meurah Yuni, Syarifah; Iskandar, Taufiq; Rasudin; Ramli, Marwan

    2017-09-01

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease which has caused a large number of mortality in Indonesia. This disease is caused by Mycrobacterium tuberculosis. Besides affecting lung, this disease also affects other organs such as lymph gland, intestine, kidneys, uterus, bone, and brain. This article discusses the epidemic of tuberculosis through employing the SEIR model. Here, the population is divided into four compartments which are susceptible, exposed, infected and recovered. The susceptible population is further grouped into two which are vaccinated group and unvaccinated group. The behavior of the epidemic is investigated through analysing the equilibrium of the model. The result shows that administering vaccine to the susceptible population contributes to the reduction of the tuberculosis epidemic rate.

  7. pulmonary tuberculosis, jimma hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and National Tuberculosis and Leprosy Control Program manual. RESULTS: A total of 112 extra pulmonary ... Key words: Clinical audit; extra pulmonary Tuberculosis; National Tuberculosis and. Leprosy Control manual. "Addis Ababa ..... intern influence drug regimen selection. Compliance to the 1997 NTLCP inanual is.

  8. Abdominal tuberculosis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heda Melinda Nataprawira

    2001-06-01

    supported the diagnosis. There was no positive results of acid fast bacilli and culture done for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in gastric aspirate as well as ascitic fuid. Peritonitis tuberculosis was most commonly diagnosed (80.0%, followed by mesenterial/nodal tuberculosis (20.0%. All of the children followed (60.0% responded well to the drugs therapy.

  9. HIV status and tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    This hospital based study was done to estimate the magnitude of pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis and to determine predictors of tuberculosis ..... Patient`s risk factors associated with increased risk of tuberculosis includes chronic cough, wasting, advanced age, HIV status, Diabetes Mellitus, Malnutrition etc ...

  10. of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-18

    Aug 18, 2009 ... Recombinant and synthetic peptides to identify. Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens and epitopes of diagnostic and vaccine relevance. Tuberculosis. 85: 367–376. Okkels LM, Andersen P (2004). Protein-protein interactions of proteins from the ESAT-6 family of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. J. Bacteriol.

  11. Genome-wide association study identifies a single major locus contributing to survival into old age; the APOE locus revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deelen, Joris; Beekman, Marian; Uh, Hae-Won

    2011-01-01

    (LLS) and 1670 younger population controls. The strongest candidate SNPs from this GWAS have been analyzed in a meta-analysis of nonagenarian cases from the Rotterdam Study, Leiden 85-plus study and Danish 1905 cohort. Only one of the 62 prioritized SNPs from the GWAS analysis (P ... genome-wide significance with survival into old age in the meta-analysis of 4149 nonagenarian cases and 7582 younger controls (OR = 0.71 (95% CI 0.65-0.77), P = 3.39 x 10(-17) ). This SNP, rs2075650, is located in TOMM40 at chromosome 19q13.32 close to the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene. Although...... of the nonagenarian cases from the LLS and their partners. In addition, we observed a novel association between this locus and serum levels of IGF-1 in females (P = 0.005). In conclusion, the major locus determining familial longevity up to high age as detected by GWAS was marked by rs2075650, which tags...

  12. Contribuciones de la genética y la proteómica al estudio de la enfermedad de Chagas Genomic and proteomic contributions for Chagas disease control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa López-Ordóñez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Chagas representa uno de los problemas más importantes de salud pública en el continente americano. El conocimiento sobre el genoma y el proteoma de los agentes de esta infección es esencial para desarrollar herramientas precisas y eficaces a corto y largo plazo y prevenir la transmisión. En el presente documento se destacan los aportes que han permitido mejorar el diseño, la implementación y la eficacia de las actividades de vigilancia y control de la enfermedad. Se revisan la contribución de la información genómica o proteómica sobre la distribución geográfica de los vectores, y la diversidad y la dinámica poblacional, además de la identificación de poblaciones y especies blanco para control. Por otra parte, se analiza la forma en que el conocimiento del genoma del parásito ha contribuido al diagnóstico de la infección, el estudio de las poblaciones de Trypanosoma cruzi, el tratamiento farmacológico y la interacción del parásito con sus hospederos. Una revisión de estas contribuciones incluye los temas de investigación básica y aplicada más destacados para el futuro inmediato.Chagas disease represents one of the more significant public health problems in the Americas. Information regarding the genome and proteome of vectors and parasite, as well as their interactions, will be essential to develop specific and effective diagnostic and preventive tools. Advances that have contributed to the design, implementation, and efficacy of disease surveillance and control activities are reviewed. Genomic and proteomic information has contributed to a better understanding of vector distributions and dispersion, diversity, population dynamics, and control targets (populations and species. In addition, genomic and proteomic studies have impacted parasite diagnostics, Trypanosoma cruzi population dynamics, pharmacological treatment and knowledge of parasite-host interactions. Discussion of these contributions includes

  13. Delays and care seeking behavior among tuberculosis patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Delayed initiation of treatment among tuberculosis patients is a common problem which might contribute to the high burden of tuberculosis in Ethiopia. There is paucity of evidence on the magnitude of delay and why patients fail to seek modern care early in Tigray. Objectives: To assess patient and health ...

  14. Socio-economic status and adherence to tuberculosis treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishra, P; Hansen, E H; Sabroe, S

    2005-01-01

    SETTING: A western hill district in Nepal, where tuberculosis (TB) treatment under DOTS was offered by the regional tuberculosis centre, two primary health centres, eight health posts, three sub-health posts and one ward of sub-metropolitan Pokhara. OBJECTIVE: To analyse the contribution...

  15. Low tuberculosis case detection in Gokwe North and South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Exit interviews showed 9/42 (21%) of patients presenting with cough were asked to submit sputa for examination and asked about household contacts with tuberculosis. About 27% of patients who were sputum positive in the laboratory register were not recorded in the district tuberculosis register. This contributed to the high ...

  16. Tuberculosis prevention in HIV-infected pregnant women in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-11-02

    Nov 2, 2012 ... The high burden of HIV and tuberculosis (TB) among pregnant women in South Africa contributes to a high maternal mortality rate. Isoniazid ..... and perinatal tuberculosis: impact of the HIV-1 epidemic. Semin Neonatol 2000;5(3):189-196. 17. Oni T, Burke R, Tsekela R, et al. High prevalence of subclinical ...

  17. Molecular Targets Related Drug Resistance Mechanisms in MDR-, XDR-, and TDR-Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Adnan Hameed

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is a formidable infectious disease that remains a major cause of death worldwide today. Escalating application of genomic techniques has expedited the identification of increasing number of mutations associated with drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Unfortunately the prevalence of bacillary resistance becomes alarming in many parts of the world, with the daunting scenarios of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB, extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB and total drug-resistant tuberculosis (TDR-TB, due to number of resistance pathways, alongside some apparently obscure ones. Recent advances in the understanding of the molecular/ genetic basis of drug targets and drug resistance mechanisms have been steadily made. Intriguing findings through whole genome sequencing and other molecular approaches facilitate the further understanding of biology and pathology of M. tuberculosis for the development of new therapeutics to meet the immense challenge of global health.

  18. The kangaroo genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Matthew J.; Graves, Jennifer A. Marshall

    2003-01-01

    The kangaroo genome is a rich and unique resource for comparative genomics. Marsupial genetics and cytology have made significant contributions to the understanding of gene function and evolution, and increasing the availability of kangaroo DNA sequence information would provide these benefits on a genomic scale. Here we summarize the contributions from cytogenetic and genetic studies of marsupials, describe the genomic resources currently available and those being developed, and explore the benefits of a kangaroo genome project. PMID:12612602

  19. Positive selection in the chromosome 16 VKORC1 genomic region has contributed to the variability of anticoagulant response in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blandine Patillon

    Full Text Available VKORC1 (vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1, 16p11.2 is the main genetic determinant of human response to oral anticoagulants of antivitamin K type (AVK. This gene was recently suggested to be a putative target of positive selection in East Asian populations. In this study, we genotyped the HGDP-CEPH Panel for six VKORC1 SNPs and downloaded chromosome 16 genotypes from the HGDP-CEPH database in order to characterize the geographic distribution of footprints of positive selection within and around this locus. A unique VKORC1 haplotype carrying the promoter mutation associated with AVK sensitivity showed especially high frequencies in all the 17 HGDP-CEPH East Asian population samples. VKORC1 and 24 neighboring genes were found to lie in a 505 kb region of strong linkage disequilibrium in these populations. Patterns of allele frequency differentiation and haplotype structure suggest that this genomic region has been submitted to a near complete selective sweep in all East Asian populations and only in this geographic area. The most extreme scores of the different selection tests are found within a smaller 45 kb region that contains VKORC1 and three other genes (BCKDK, MYST1 (KAT8, and PRSS8 with different functions. Because of the strong linkage disequilibrium, it is not possible to determine if VKORC1 or one of the three other genes is the target of this strong positive selection that could explain present-day differences among human populations in AVK dose requirement. Our results show that the extended region surrounding a presumable single target of positive selection should be analyzed for genetic variation in a wide range of genetically diverse populations in order to account for other neighboring and confounding selective events and the hitchhiking effect.

  20. Genomic Island 2 Is an Unstable Genetic Element Contributing to Brucella Lipopolysaccharide Spontaneous Smooth-to-Rough Dissociation ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancilla, Marcos; López-Goñi, Ignacio; Moriyón, Ignacio; Zárraga, Ana María

    2010-01-01

    Brucella is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes a worldwide-distributed zoonosis. The genus includes smooth (S) and rough (R) species that differ in the presence or absence, respectively, of the O-polysaccharide of lipopolysaccharide. In S brucellae, the O-polysaccharide is a critical diagnostic antigen and a virulence determinant. However, S brucellae spontaneously dissociate into R forms, a problem in antigen and S vaccine production. Spontaneous R mutants of Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis, and Brucella suis carried the chromosomal scar corresponding to genomic island 2 (GI-2) excision, an event causing the loss of the wboA and wboB O-polysaccharide genes, and the predicted excised circular intermediate was identified in B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis cultures. Moreover, disruption of a putative phage integrase gene in B. abortus GI-2 caused a reduction in O-polysaccharide loss rates under conditions promoting S-R dissociation. However, spontaneous R mutants not carrying the GI-2 scar were also detected. These results demonstrate that the phage integrase-related GI-2 excision is a cause of S-R brucella dissociation and that other undescribed mechanisms must also be involved. In the R Brucella species, previous works have shown that Brucella ovis but not Brucella canis lacks GI-2, and a chromosomal scar identical to those in R mutants was observed. These results suggest that the phage integrase-promoted GI-2 excision played a role in B. ovis speciation and are consistent with other evidence, suggesting that this species and B. canis have emerged as two independent lineages. PMID:20952568

  1. Why wait? The social determinants underlying tuberculosis diagnostic delay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily Victoria Bonadonna

    Full Text Available Early detection and diagnosis of tuberculosis remain major global priorities for tuberculosis control. Few studies have used a qualitative approach to investigate the social determinants contributing to diagnostic delay and none have compared data collected from individual, community, and health-system levels. We aimed to characterize the social determinants that contribute to diagnostic delay among persons diagnosed with tuberculosis living in resource-constrained settings.Data were collected in public health facilities with high tuberculosis incidence in 19 districts of Lima, Peru. Semi-structured interviews with persons diagnosed with tuberculosis (n = 105 and their family members (n = 63 explored health-seeking behaviours, community perceptions of tuberculosis and socio-demographic circumstances. Focus groups (n = 6 were conducted with health personnel (n = 35 working in the National Tuberculosis Program. All interview data were transcribed and analysed using a grounded theory approach. The median delay between symptom onset and the public health facility visit that led to the first positive diagnostic sample was 57 days (interquartile range 28-126. The great majority of persons diagnosed with tuberculosis distrusted the public health system and sought care at public health facilities only after exhausting other options. It was universally agreed that persons diagnosed with tuberculosis faced discrimination by public and health personnel. Self-medication with medicines bought at local pharmacies was reported as the most common initial health-seeking behaviour due to the speed and low-cost of treatment in pharmacies. Most persons diagnosed with tuberculosis initially perceived their illness as a simple virus.Diagnostic delay was common and prolonged. When individuals reached a threshold of symptom severity, they addressed their health with the least time-consuming, most economically feasible, and well-known healthcare option available to them

  2. Tuberculosis and nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Krishna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition and tuberculosis are both problems of considerable magnitude in most of the underdeveloped regions of the world. These two problems tend to interact with each other. Tuberculosis mortality rates in different economic groups in a community tend to vary inversely with their economic levels. Similarly, nutritional status is significantly lower in patients with active tuberculosis compared with healthy controls. Malnutrition can lead to secondary immunodeficiency that increases the host′s susceptibility to infection. In patients with tuberculosis, it leads to reduction in appetite, nutrient malabsorption, micronutrient malabsorption, and altered metabolism leading to wasting. Both, protein-energy malnutrition and micronutrients deficiencies increase the risk of tuberculosis. It has been found that malnourished tuberculosis patients have delayed recovery and higher mortality rates than well-nourished patients. Nutritional status of patients improves during tuberculosis chemotherapy. High prevalence of human immunodeficiency (HIV infection in the underdeveloped countries further aggravates the problem of malnutrition and tuberculosis. Effect of malnutrition on childhood tuberculosis and tuberculin skin test are other important considerations. Nutritional supplementation may represent a novel approach for fast recovery in tuberculosis patients. In addition, raising nutritional status of population may prove to be an effective measure to control tuberculosis in underdeveloped areas of world.

  3. Tuberculosis in Infants and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Gabriella S; Starke, Jeffrey R

    2017-04-01

    One million children develop tuberculosis disease each year, and 210,000 die from complications of tuberculosis. Childhood tuberculosis is very different from adult tuberculosis in epidemiology, clinical and radiographic presentation, and treatment. This review highlights the many unique features of childhood tuberculosis, with special emphasis on very young children and adolescents, who are most likely to develop disease after infection has occurred.

  4. The Genomic Contributions of Avian H1N1 Influenza A Viruses to the Evolution of Mammalian Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gang; Zhang, Jinghui; Webster, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Among the influenza A viruses (IAVs) in wild aquatic birds, only H1, H2, and H3 subtypes have caused epidemics in humans. H1N1 viruses of avian origin have also caused 3 of 5 pandemics. To understand the reappearance of H1N1 in the context of pandemic emergence, we investigated whether avian H1N1 IAVs have contributed to the evolution of human, swine, and 2009 pandemic H1N1 IAVs. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, we concluded that the polymerase gene segments (especially PB2 and PA) circulating in North American avian H1N1 IAVs have been reintroduced to swine multiple times, resulting in different lineages that led to the emergence of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 IAVs. Moreover, the similar topologies of hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein and neuraminidase and matrix gene segments suggest that each surface glycoprotein coevolved with an internal gene segment within the H1N1 subtype. The genotype of avian H1N1 IAVs of Charadriiformes origin isolated in 2009 differs from that of avian H1N1 IAVs of Anseriformes origin. When the antigenic sites in the hemagglutinin of all 31 North American avian H1N1 IAVs were considered, 60%-80% of the amino acids at the antigenic sites were identical to those in 1918 and/or 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses. Thus, although the pathogenicity of avian H1N1 IAVs could not be inferred from the phylogeny due to the small dataset, the evolutionary process within the H1N1 IAV subtype suggests that the circulation of H1N1 IAVs in wild birds poses a continuous threat for future influenza pandemics in humans. PMID:26208281

  5. Tuberculosis in the lung (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis is caused by a group of organisms: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M bovis , M africanum and a few other rarer subtypes. Tuberculosis usually appears as a lung (pulmonary) infection. However, ...

  6. Tuberculosis Facts - Exposure to TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Exposure to TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  7. Tuberculosis Facts - Testing for TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Testing for TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  8. Alternation of Gut Microbiota in Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mei; Liu, Yong; Wu, Pengfei; Luo, Dong-Xia; Sun, Qun; Zheng, Han; Hu, Richard; Pandol, Stephen J; Li, Qing-Feng; Han, Yuan-Ping; Zeng, Yilan

    2017-01-01

    One-third of the world's population has been infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( M. tuberculosis ), a primary pathogen of the mammalian respiratory system, while about 10% of latent infections progress to active tuberculosis (TB), indicating that host and environmental factors may determine the outcomes such as infection clearance/persistence and treatment prognosis. The gut microbiota is essential for development of host immunity, defense, nutrition and metabolic homeostasis. Thus, the pattern of gut microbiota may contribute to M. tuberculosis infection and prognosis. In current study we characterized the differences in gut bacterial communities in new tuberculosis patients (NTB), recurrent tuberculosis patients (RTB), and healthy control. The abundance-based coverage estimator (ACE) showed the diversity index of the gut microbiota in the patients with recurrent tuberculosis was increased significantly compared with healthy controls ( p gut microbiota and peripheral CD4+ T cell counts in the patients. This study, for the first time, showed associations between gut microbiota with tuberculosis and its clinical outcomes. Maintaining eubiosis, namely homeostasis of gut microbiota, may be beneficial for host recovery and prevention of recurrence of M. tuberculosis infection.

  9. New Insight into the History of Domesticated Apple: Secondary Contribution of the European Wild Apple to the Genome of Cultivated Varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornille, Amandine; Gladieux, Pierre; Smulders, Marinus J. M.; Roldán-Ruiz, Isabel; Laurens, François; Le Cam, Bruno; Nersesyan, Anush; Clavel, Joanne; Olonova, Marina; Feugey, Laurence; Gabrielyan, Ivan; Zhang, Xiu-Guo; Tenaillon, Maud I.; Giraud, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    The apple is the most common and culturally important fruit crop of temperate areas. The elucidation of its origin and domestication history is therefore of great interest. The wild Central Asian species Malus sieversii has previously been identified as the main contributor to the genome of the cultivated apple (Malus domestica), on the basis of morphological, molecular, and historical evidence. The possible contribution of other wild species present along the Silk Route running from Asia to Western Europe remains a matter of debate, particularly with respect to the contribution of the European wild apple. We used microsatellite markers and an unprecedented large sampling of five Malus species throughout Eurasia (839 accessions from China to Spain) to show that multiple species have contributed to the genetic makeup of domesticated apples. The wild European crabapple M. sylvestris, in particular, was a major secondary contributor. Bidirectional gene flow between the domesticated apple and the European crabapple resulted in the current M. domestica being genetically more closely related to this species than to its Central Asian progenitor, M. sieversii. We found no evidence of a domestication bottleneck or clonal population structure in apples, despite the use of vegetative propagation by grafting. We show that the evolution of domesticated apples occurred over a long time period and involved more than one wild species. Our results support the view that self-incompatibility, a long lifespan, and cultural practices such as selection from open-pollinated seeds have facilitated introgression from wild relatives and the maintenance of genetic variation during domestication. This combination of processes may account for the diversification of several long-lived perennial crops, yielding domestication patterns different from those observed for annual species. PMID:22589740

  10. New insight into the history of domesticated apple: secondary contribution of the European wild apple to the genome of cultivated varieties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandine Cornille

    Full Text Available The apple is the most common and culturally important fruit crop of temperate areas. The elucidation of its origin and domestication history is therefore of great interest. The wild Central Asian species Malus sieversii has previously been identified as the main contributor to the genome of the cultivated apple (Malus domestica, on the basis of morphological, molecular, and historical evidence. The possible contribution of other wild species present along the Silk Route running from Asia to Western Europe remains a matter of debate, particularly with respect to the contribution of the European wild apple. We used microsatellite markers and an unprecedented large sampling of five Malus species throughout Eurasia (839 accessions from China to Spain to show that multiple species have contributed to the genetic makeup of domesticated apples. The wild European crabapple M. sylvestris, in particular, was a major secondary contributor. Bidirectional gene flow between the domesticated apple and the European crabapple resulted in the current M. domestica being genetically more closely related to this species than to its Central Asian progenitor, M. sieversii. We found no evidence of a domestication bottleneck or clonal population structure in apples, despite the use of vegetative propagation by grafting. We show that the evolution of domesticated apples occurred over a long time period and involved more than one wild species. Our results support the view that self-incompatibility, a long lifespan, and cultural practices such as selection from open-pollinated seeds have facilitated introgression from wild relatives and the maintenance of genetic variation during domestication. This combination of processes may account for the diversification of several long-lived perennial crops, yielding domestication patterns different from those observed for annual species.

  11. Epidemiology of tuberculosis in Galicia, Spain, 16 years after the launch of the Galician tuberculosis programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Ferro, E; Ursúa-Díaz, M I; Taboada-Rodríguez, J A; Hervada-Vidal, X; Anibarro, L; Túñez, V

    2014-02-01

    Galicia, Spain. To describe changes in tuberculosis (TB) epidemiology and characteristics in Galicia, Spain, during the period 1996-2011. Retrospective observational descriptive study of data obtained from the Tuberculosis Information System. The Galician Tuberculosis Prevention and Control Programme, created in 1994, is based in seven tuberculosis units that actively collect data on case finding and follow-up of all cases of TB in the region. TB incidence fell from 72.9 cases per 100,000 population in 1996 to 24.6 in 2011 (respectively 40.5 and 14.2 in patients aged Galicia is progressively decreasing; however, it is still higher than that of neighbouring regions. A long diagnostic delay was observed, which may have contributed to the high incidence rate in children.

  12. Clinics of ocular tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vishali; Shoughy, Samir S; Mahajan, Sarakshi; Khairallah, Moncef; Rosenbaum, James T; Curi, Andre; Tabbara, Khalid F

    2015-02-01

    Ocular tuberculosis is an extrapulmonary tuberculous condition and has variable manifestations. The purpose of this review is to describe the clinical manifestations of ocular tuberculosis affecting the anterior and posterior segments of the eye in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients. Review of literature using Pubmed database. Mycobacterium tuberculosis may lead to formation of conjunctival granuloma, nodular scleritis, and interstitial keratitis. Lacrimal gland and orbital caseating granulomas are rare but may occur. The intraocular structures are also a target of insult by M. tuberculosis and may cause anterior granulomatous uveitis, anterior and posterior synechiae, secondary glaucoma, and cataract. The bacillus may involve the ciliary body, resulting in the formation of a localized caseating granuloma. Posterior segment manifestations include vitritis, retinal vasculitis, optic neuritis, serpiginous-like choroiditis, choroidal tubercules, subretinal neovascularization, and, rarely, endophthalmitis. The recognition of clinical signs of ocular tuberculosis is of utmost importance as it can provide clinical pathway toward tailored investigations and decision making for initiating anti-tuberculosis therapy.

  13. Tuberculosis concomitant with diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    S. Rodríguez-Rodríguez; S.J.A. Ruy-Díaz-Reynoso; R. Vázquez-López

    2015-01-01

    The resurgence of tuberculosis and the appearance of multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are due to several different factors. Principal among these is the worldwide prevalence of autoimmune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), coupled with misdirected therapeutic practices and patient non-compliance, the latter being derived from the undesirable side effects of anti-tuberculosis drugs. Aside from AIDS, other diseases or immunosuppressive disorders have been associated with this ...

  14. Post liver transplant tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Luis Vaz; Gandara, Judit; Pires, João; Duarte, Raquel; Calvário, Fernando; Dominguez, Miguel; Carvalho, Aurora; Seca, Rui

    2009-01-01

    We report on a patient diagnosed with disseminated (hepatic and pulmonary) tuberculosis in the context of immunosuppression following liver transplant. During the administration of anti-tuberculosis drugs an abrupt elevation of liver enzymes was detected leading us to suspect drug toxicity rather than graft rejection. Nevertheless, careful surveillance and adjustment of serum levels of immunosuppressant drugs permitted continuance of tuberculosis treatment with no further side effects.

  15. Tuberculosis in ancient times

    OpenAIRE

    Louise Cilliers; François Retief

    2008-01-01

    In spite of an array of effective antibiotics, tuberculosis is still very common in developing countries where overcrowding, malnutrition and poor hygienic conditions prevail. Over the past 30 years associated HIV infection has worsened the situation by increasing the infection rate and mortality of tuberculosis. Of those diseases caused by a single organism only HIV causes more deaths internationally than tuberculosis. The tubercle bacillus probably first infected man in Neolithic times, and...

  16. Tuberculosis treatment among smear positive tuberculosis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munir, M.K.; Iqbal, R.; Shabbir, I.; Chaudhry, K

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major health problem in many parts of the world. Delay in initiation of the treatment may result in prolonged infectious state, drug resistance, relapse and death. Objectives: To determine the factors responsible for not starting tuberculosis treatment among smear positive tuberculosis patients. Study type, settings and duration: This cross sectional study was done at Pakistan Medical Research Council TB Research Center, King Edward Medical University, Lahore, from fifth March 2010 to fifth December 2010. Patients and Methods: Fifty sputum smear positive patients of tuberculosis who did not register themselves in treatment register and presumably did not initiate anti tuberculosis treatment were contacted using telephone or traced by their home addresses. Once contact was established, they were inquired about the reasons for not starting tuberculosis treatment. Results: Of 50 patients 38(76%)belonged to the lower socio economic class and 12(24%) to the lower middle class. Fourteen patients (28%) were illiterate and 23(46%) had only 8 years of education. Of the 50 cases 41(82%) were taking treatment from traditional healers and 4% did not go back to the DOTS program. Physical condition of the patient, social, domestic and religious issues also played some role in default. Conclusions: Lack of health education and poverty were the main factors responsible for non compliance from treatment. Policy message: Sputum testing sites should have a paramedic who should educate the patients about the benefits of treatment and the dangers of default or partial treatment. (author)

  17. TUBERCULOSIS COMO ENFERMEDAD OCUPACIONAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Ticona, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Existe evidencia suficiente para declarar a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional en diversos profesionales especialmente entre los trabajadores de salud. En el Perú están normados y reglamentados los derechos laborales inherentes a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional, como la cobertura por discapacidad temporal o permanente. Sin embargo, estos derechos aún no han sido suficientemente socializados. En este trabajo se presenta información sobre el riesgo de adquirir tuberculosis en el lugar de trabajo, se revisan las evidencias para declarar a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional en trabajadores de salud y se presenta la legislación peruana vigente al respecto. PMID:22858771

  18. Isolated Optic Disc Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Ahmad M.; Tabbara, Khalid F.; Tabbarah, Zuhair

    2015-01-01

    We present a healthy male subject who developed progressive visual loss in the left eye initially diagnosed as optic neuritis. Upon suspicion of infectious etiology, testing was positive for tuberculosis. There were no signs or symptoms of active systemic tuberculosis infection. The patient responded swiftly to antimycobacterial therapy with return of vision and resolution of disc swelling. Positive purified protein derivative skin test, negative chest radiograph, negative systemic workup, negative workup for other causes of unilateral optic neuritis and quick response to mycobacterial therapy reaffirm the entity of isolated optic disc tuberculosis similar to isolated choroidal tuberculosis without systemic manifestation. PMID:26483675

  19. Isolated Optic Disc Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M. Mansour

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a healthy male subject who developed progressive visual loss in the left eye initially diagnosed as optic neuritis. Upon suspicion of infectious etiology, testing was positive for tuberculosis. There were no signs or symptoms of active systemic tuberculosis infection. The patient responded swiftly to antimycobacterial therapy with return of vision and resolution of disc swelling. Positive purified protein derivative skin test, negative chest radiograph, negative systemic workup, negative workup for other causes of unilateral optic neuritis and quick response to mycobacterial therapy reaffirm the entity of isolated optic disc tuberculosis similar to isolated choroidal tuberculosis without systemic manifestation.

  20. Abdominal tuberculosis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablin, D.S.; Jain, K.A.; Azouz, E.M.

    1994-01-01

    Four boys with abdominal tuberculosis, one of whom had acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, are presented. Abdominal imaging findings on plain radiography, ultrasonography, computer tomography, and gastrointestinal contrast studies included tuberculous peritonitis and ascites in all patients, tuberculous adenopathy in two, gastrointestinal tuberculosis in two, and omental tuberculosis in two. The radiographic features particularly characteristic of abdominal tuberculosis were: (1) Low attenuating adenopathy with rim enhancement, (2) omental or ileocecal inflammatory mass, (3) high density ascites, and (4) gastrointestinal enteritis involving the ileocecal region. (orig./MG)

  1. Resistance to first-line anti-TB drugs is associated with reduced nitric oxide susceptibility in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idh, Jonna; Mekonnen, Mekidim; Abate, Ebba

    2012-01-01

    The relative contribution of nitric oxide (NO) to the killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human tuberculosis (TB) is controversial, although this has been firmly established in rodents. Studies have demonstrated that clinical strains of M. tuberculosis differ in susceptibility to NO, but how...

  2. 76 FR 82346 - Determination and Waiver Under the United States Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    ... Determination and Waiver Under the United States Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria Act of... States Contribution to the Global Fund To Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria for Fiscal Year 2010 Pursuant to Section 202(d)(4)(A)(ii) of the United States Leadership Against ] HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and...

  3. Species-Specific 5 mC and 5 hmC Genomic Landscapes Indicate Epigenetic Contribution to Human Brain Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, Andy; Chopra, Pankaj; Alisch, Reid S

    2018-01-01

    Human evolution from non-human primates has seen substantial change in the central nervous system, with the molecular mechanisms underlying human brain evolution remaining largely unknown. Methylation of cytosine at the fifth carbon (5-methylcytosine; 5 mC) is an essential epigenetic mark linked to neurodevelopment, as well as neurological disease. The emergence of another modified form of cytosine (5-hydroxymethylcytosine; 5 hmC) that is enriched in the brain further substantiates a role for these epigenetic marks in neurodevelopment, yet little is known about the evolutionary importance of these marks in brain development. Here, human and monkey brain tissue were profiled, identifying 5,516 and 4,070 loci that were differentially methylated and hydroxymethylated, respectively, between the species. Annotation of these loci to the human genome revealed genes critical for the development of the nervous system and that are associated with intelligence and higher cognitive functioning, such as RELN and GNAS . Moreover, ontological analyses of these differentially methylated and hydroxymethylated genes revealed a significant enrichment of neuronal/immunological-related processes, including neurogenesis and axon development. Finally, the sequences flanking the differentially methylated/hydroxymethylated loci contained a significant enrichment of binding sites for neurodevelopmentally important transcription factors (e.g., OTX1 and PITX1 ), suggesting that DNA methylation may regulate gene expression by mediating transcription factor binding on these transcripts. Together, these data support dynamic species-specific epigenetic contributions in the evolution and development of the human brain from non-human primates.

  4. Congenital tuberculosis because of misdiagnosed maternal pulmonary tuberculosis during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakbanpot, Sudarat; Rattanawong, Pattara

    2013-01-01

    We report the death of an infant due to severe sepsis caused by congenital tuberculosis following treatment with antituberculous drugs and antibiotics, who was born to a mother with misdiagnosed symptomatic pulmonary tuberculosis during pregnancy. Therefore, pregnant women with chronic cough and constitutional symptoms must be examined for pulmonary tuberculosis, particularly in tuberculosis endemic areas.

  5. Treatment of congenital tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sonal; DeSantis, Evelyn R Hermes

    2008-11-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of congenital tuberculosis are discussed. Congenital tuberculosis is rare and fatal if left untreated. If a pregnant woman with tuberculosis is not treated, infection of the fetus can occur by hematogenous spread through the umbilical cord or by aspiration or ingestion of amniotic fluid. Signs and symptoms of congenital tuberculosis may be nonspecific, which may preclude early diagnosis and treatment. Criteria for the diagnosis of congenital tuberculosis require the infant to have a tuberculous lesion, as indicated by chest radiography or granulomas, and at least one of the following should be confirmed: (1) onset during the first week of life, (2) primary hepatic tuberculosis complex or caseating hepatic granulomas, (3) infection of the placenta or maternal genital tract, or (4) exclusion of postnatal transmission by a contact investigation. Since 2001, 21 cases of congenital tuberculosis have been reported in English-language medical journals, with the age of presentation ranging from day 1 to 90. Based on findings from published case reports, congenital tuberculosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of newborns who have (1) nonresponsive, worsening pneumonia, especially in regions with high rates of tuberculosis, (2) nonspecific symptoms but have a mother diagnosed with tuberculosis, (3) high lymphocyte counts in the cerebrospinal fluid without an identified bacterial pathogen, or (4) fever and hepatosplenomegaly. Once diagnosed, it is essential to promptly begin treatment with isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and streptomycin in order to decrease the mortality associated with the infection. Early diagnosis and treatment during the neonatal period are crucial in minimizing the fatality associated with congenital tuberculosis.

  6. HIV-1 Infection Is Associated with Depletion and Functional Impairment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific CD4 T Cells in Individuals with Latent Tuberculosis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Cheryl L; Abrahams, Deborah A; Harris, Levelle D; van Rooyen, Michele; Stone, Lynnett; de Kock, Marwou; Hanekom, Willem A

    2017-09-15

    Coinfection with HIV is the single greatest risk factor for reactivation of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and progression to active tuberculosis disease. HIV-associated dysregulation of adaptive immunity by depletion of CD4 Th cells most likely contributes to loss of immune control of LTBI in HIV-infected individuals, although the precise mechanisms whereby HIV infection impedes successful T cell-mediated control of M. tuberculosis have not been well defined. To further delineate mechanisms whereby HIV impairs protective immunity to M. tuberculosis , we evaluated the frequency, phenotype, and functional capacity of M. tuberculosis -specific CD4 T cells in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected adults with LTBI. HIV infection was associated with a lower total frequency of cytokine-producing M. tuberculosis -specific CD4 T cells, and preferential depletion of a discrete subset of M. tuberculosis -specific IFN-γ + IL-2 - TNF-α + CD4 T cells. M. tuberculosis -specific CD4 T cells in HIV-infected individuals expressed significantly higher levels of Ki67, compared with HIV-uninfected individuals, thus indicating recent activation and turnover of these cells in vivo. The ex vivo proliferative capacity of M. tuberculosis -specific CD4 T cells was markedly impaired in HIV-infected individuals, compared with HIV-uninfected individuals. Moreover, HIV infection was associated with increased M. tuberculosis Ag-induced CD4 T cell death ex vivo, indicating a possible mechanism contributing to impaired proliferative capacity of M. tuberculosis -specific CD4 T cells in HIV-infected individuals. These data provide new insights into the parameters of M. tuberculosis -specific CD4 T cell immunity that are impaired in HIV-infected individuals with LTBI, which may contribute to their increased risk of developing active tuberculosis disease. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Mutations in gidB confer low-level streptomycin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sharon Y; Lee, Jong Seok; Kwak, Hyun Kyung; Via, Laura E; Boshoff, Helena I M; Barry, Clifton E

    2011-06-01

    The global threat posed by drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis demands a greater understanding of the genetic basis and molecular mechanisms that govern how such strains develop resistance against various antituberculous drugs. In this report, we examine a new genetic basis for resistance to one of the oldest and most widely used second-line drugs employed in tuberculosis therapy, streptomycin (SM). This marker for SM resistance was first discovered on the basis of genomic data obtained from drug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains collected in Japan, wherein an association was observed between SM resistance and a mutation in gidB, a putative 16S rRNA methyltransferase. By evaluating an isogenic ΔgidB mutant strain constructed from strain H37Rv, we demonstrate the causal role of gidB in conferring a low-level SM-resistant phenotype in M. tuberculosis with a 16-fold increase in the MIC over the parent strain. Among clinical isolates, the modest increase in SM resistance conferred by a gidB mutation leads to an MIC distribution of gidB mutation-containing strains that spans the recommended SM breakpoint concentration currently used in drug susceptibility testing protocols. As such, some gidB mutation-containing isolates are found to be SM sensitive, while others are SM resistant. On the basis of a pharmacodynamic analysis and Monte Carlo simulation, those isolates that are found to be SM sensitive should still respond favorably to SM treatment, while nearly half of those found to be SM resistant will likely respond poorly. This report provides the first microbiological evidence for the contribution of gidB in streptomycin resistance and examines the clinical implications of mutations in the gidB gene.

  8. [Multifocal tuberculosis in immunocompetent patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezgui, Amel; Fredj, Fatma Ben; Mzabi, Anis; Karmani, Monia; Laouani, Chadia

    2016-01-01

    Multifocal tuberculosis is defined as the presence of lesions affecting at least two extrapulmonary sites, with or without pulmonary involvement. This retrospective study of 10 cases aims to investigate the clinical and evolutionary characteristics of multifocal tuberculosis. It included 41 cases with tuberculosis collected between 1999 and 2013. Ten patients had multifocal tuberculosis (24%): 9 women and 1 man, the average age was 50 years (30-68 years). Our patients were correctly BCG vaccinated. The evaluation of immunodepression was negative in all patients. 7 cases had lymph node tuberculosis, 3 cases digestive tuberculosis, 2 cases pericardial tuberculosis, 2 cases osteoarticular tuberculosis, 1 case brain tuberculosis, 2 cases urinary tuberculosis, 4 cases urogenital tuberculosis, 1 case adrenal tuberculosis, 1 case cutaneous and 1 case muscle tuberculosis. All patients received anti-tuberculosis treatment for a mean duration of 10 months, with good evolution. Multifocal tuberculosis is difficult to diagnose. It can affect immunocompetent patients but often has good prognosis. Anti-tuberculosis therapy must be initiated as soon as possible to avoid sequelae.

  9. Drug-resistant tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The epidemic of drug-resistant tuberculosis. (DR-TB) is a public health emergency that threatens to destabilise global TB control. Although TB incidence and mortality are decreasing in several parts of the world, the overall prevalence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is increasing in many high-burden countries, ...

  10. Seasonality of tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auda Fares

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was designed to review previous studies and analyse the current knowledge and controversies related to seasonal variability of tuberculosis (TB to examine whether TB has an annual seasonal pattern. Study Design and Methods: Systematic review of peer reviewed studies identified through literature searches using online databases belonging to PubMed and the Cochrane library with key words "Tuberculosis, Seasonal influence" and " Tuberculosis, Seasonal variation". The search was restricted to articles published in English. The references of the identified papers for further relevant publications were also reviewed. Results: Twelve studies conducted between the period 1971 and 2006 from 11 countries/regions around the world (South Western Cameroon, South Africa, India, Hong Kong, Japan, Kuwait, Spain, UK, Ireland, Russia, and Mongolia were reviewed. A seasonal pattern of tuberculosis with a mostly predominant peak is seen during the spring and summer seasons in all of the countries (except South Western Cameroon and Russia. Conclusions: The observation of seasonality leads to assume that the risk of transmission of M. tuberculosis does appear to be the greatest during winter months. Vitamin D level variability, indoor activities, seasonal change in immune function, and delays in the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis are potential stimuli of seasonal tuberculosis disease. Additionally, seasonal variation in food availability and food intake, age, and sex are important factors which can play a role in the tuberculosis notification variability. Prospective studies regarding this topic and other related subjects are highly recommended.

  11. Drivers of Tuberculosis Transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathema, Barun; Andrews, Jason R.; Cohen, Ted; Borgdorff, Martien W.; Behr, Marcel; Glynn, Judith R.; Rustomjee, Roxana; Silk, Benjamin J.; Wood, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Measuring tuberculosis transmission is exceedingly difficult, given the remarkable variability in the timing of clinical disease after Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection; incident disease can result from either a recent (ie, weeks to months) or a remote (ie, several years to decades) infection

  12. Tuberculosis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infection . Signs and Symptoms In older infants and children, latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), which is the first infection with ... out if someone has been infected by the tuberculosis bacteria) is positive, indicating that the child has been infected. Children with a positive tuberculin ...

  13. Abdominal tuberculosis: Imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Jose M.; Madureira, Antonio J.; Vieira, Alberto; Ramos, Isabel

    2005-01-01

    Radiological findings of abdominal tuberculosis can mimic those of many different diseases. A high level of suspicion is required, especially in high-risk population. In this article, we will describe barium studies, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) findings of abdominal tuberculosis (TB), with emphasis in the latest. We will illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis and describe imaging features that differentiate it from other inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma and Crohn's disease. As tuberculosis can affect any organ in the abdomen, emphasis is placed to ileocecal involvement, lymphadenopathy, peritonitis and solid organ disease (liver, spleen and pancreas). A positive culture or hystologic analysis of biopsy is still required in many patients for definitive diagnosis. Learning objectives:1.To review the relevant pathophysiology of abdominal tuberculosis. 2.Illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis

  14. Imaging of musculoskeletal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussel, L.; Marchand, B.; Blineau, N.; Picaud, G.; Emn, M.; Coulon, A.; Pagnon, P.; Rode, A.; Pin-Leveugle, J.; Berthezene, Y.; Pariset, C.; Boibieux, A.; Hermier, M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose and methods. To perform an illustrated and educational review of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. Results. As the incidence of musculoskeletal tuberculosis still increases, a review appears justified. The following four main presentations are detailed and illustrated, by emphasizing the value of both CT and MR imaging: a) spine tuberculosis (∼ 50 %/) commonly involves two adjacent vertebral bodies with usual large paravertebral abscesses. The following lesions are highly suggestive of tuberculosis: solitary vertebral involvement, solitary epidural abscess with or without erosive spondylitis; b) osteo-arthritis: peripherally located erosions at synovial insertions with gradual narrowing of the joint space are highly suggestive; c) osteomyelitis: unusual, may involve any bones; d) tenosynovitis and bursitis. Conclusion. Imaging studies are essential for diagnosis and to assess the extent of musculo-skeletal tuberculosis. (author)

  15. Abdominal tuberculosis: Imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Jose M. [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal)]. E-mail: jmpjesus@yahoo.com; Madureira, Antonio J. [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal); Vieira, Alberto [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal); Ramos, Isabel [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal)

    2005-08-01

    Radiological findings of abdominal tuberculosis can mimic those of many different diseases. A high level of suspicion is required, especially in high-risk population. In this article, we will describe barium studies, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) findings of abdominal tuberculosis (TB), with emphasis in the latest. We will illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis and describe imaging features that differentiate it from other inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma and Crohn's disease. As tuberculosis can affect any organ in the abdomen, emphasis is placed to ileocecal involvement, lymphadenopathy, peritonitis and solid organ disease (liver, spleen and pancreas). A positive culture or hystologic analysis of biopsy is still required in many patients for definitive diagnosis. Learning objectives:1.To review the relevant pathophysiology of abdominal tuberculosis. 2.Illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis.

  16. Spatial analysis of pulmonary tuberculosis in Antananarivo Madagascar: tuberculosis-related knowledge, attitude and practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitraka Rakotosamimanana

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis infection may remain latent, but the disease is nevertheless a serious public health issue. Various epidemiological studies on pulmonary tuberculosis have considered the spatial component and taken it into account, revealing the tendency of this disease to cluster in particular locations. The aim was to assess the contribution of Knowledge Attitude and Practice (KAP to the distribution of tuberculosis and to provide information for the improvement of the National Tuberculosis Program.We investigated the role of KAP to distribution patterns of pulmonary tuberculosis in Antananarivo. First, we performed spatial scanning of tuberculosis aggregation among permanent cases resident in Antananarivo Urban Township using the Kulldorff method, and then we carried out a quantitative study on KAP, involving TB patients. The KAP study in the population was based on qualitative methods with focus groups.The disease still clusters in the same districts identified in the previous study. The principal cluster covered 22 neighborhoods. Most of them are part of the first district. A secondary cluster was found, involving 18 neighborhoods in the sixth district and two neighborhoods in the fifth. The relative risk was respectively 1.7 (p<10-6 in the principal cluster and 1.6 (p<10-3 in the secondary cluster. Our study showed that more was known about TB symptoms than about the duration of the disease or free treatment. Knowledge about TB was limited to that acquired at school or from relatives with TB. The attitude and practices of patients and the population in general indicated that there is still a stigma attached to tuberculosis.This type of survey can be conducted in remote zones where the tuberculosis-related KAP of the TB patients and the general population is less known or not documented; the findings could be used to adapt control measures to the local particularities.

  17. Tumor-like tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soon Yong

    1975-01-01

    It was known that some of the abdominal tuberculosis can produce tumor-like appearance clinically and radiologically. But these were mainly masses formed in mesenteric and retroperitoneal lymph nodes. The author has experienced the gastrointestinal tuberculosis resembling to a neoplastic process. In the gastric tuberculosis, irregular narrowing and filling defect with mucosal distortion and occasional shoulder effect could be seen in pyloric antrum. Deformity of proximal portion of duodenum was noted in most cases. Difficulty in differential diagnosis from the gastric cancer might be encountered. If duodenum was not involved. No definite sign of mucosal destruction involved area and associated deformity of duodenum was suggestive of an inflammatory lesion. If there is any tuberculous changes in small bowel, than gastric tuberculosis is more likely. There was the tuberculosis of descending duodenum or pancreaticoduodenal group of lymph nodes revealed cancer-like appearance. Long irregular narrowing with nodular filling defect and mucosal distortion or inverted 3 sign was evident. Differential diagnosis from cancer in duodenum or pancreas could not be made radiographically. Short annular stenosis and nodular filling defect with shoulder effect in both ends of stenosis was noted in some of small bowel tuberculosis. The findings were very resemble to malignancy. There was a case of huge hepatoma-like tuberculosis formed a large irregular mass by lymph nodes and adjacent organs. Chest film was not much help in the differential diagnosis. In many cases of the gastrointestinal tuberculosis, radiological findings were resembled to a neoplastic process. Since none of radiologic findings are specific enough to allow one to make a definitive diagnosis of the gastrointestinal tuberculosis and since type of the gastrointestinal tuberculosis could be cured by chemotherapy, careful analyzation of clinical features is emphasized before surgery.

  18. Characteristics of non-clustered tuberculosis in a low burden country

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Zaza; Andersen, Aase Bengaard; Kok-Jensen, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Molecular genotyping studies often focus on clustered tuberculosis and recent transmission. Less attention has been paid to non-clustered tuberculosis. However, non-clustered cases also contribute significantly to the tuberculosis burden, especially in low-incidence countries. The objective...... of this study is to characterize non-clustered tuberculosis cases in Denmark and point out potential implications for tuberculosis control. The study is based on nationwide IS6110-RFLP genotyping of tuberculosis cases from 1992 through 2004, corresponding to 98% of culture verified cases. Of 3988 cases, 45......% were non-clustered. Both Danes and immigrants had a peak incidence of non-clustered tuberculosis at older ages, 80-89 years (4.3 cases/10(5) population/year) and 60-69 years (28.8 cases/10(5) population/year), respectively. In addition, immigrants had a peak at 20-29 years (43.2 cases/10(5) inhabitants...

  19. Tuberculosis and HIV control in sub-Saharan African prisons: "thinking outside the prison cell".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Stewart E; Topp, Stephanie M; Turnbull, Eleanor R; Hatwiinda, Sisa; Harris, Jennifer B; Maggard, Katie R; Roberts, Sarah T; Krüüner, Annika; Morse, Jill C; Kapata, Nathan; Chisela, Chileshe; Henostroza, German

    2012-05-15

    Tuberculosis is one of the fastest-growing epidemics in prison populations in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), constituting a threat to both inmates and the wider community. Various factors have contributed to the breakdown of tuberculosis control in prison facilities in SSA, including slow and insensitive diagnostics, failing prison infrastructure, inadequate funding, and weak prevention and treatment interventions for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In this article, we describe the challenges inherent in current approaches to tuberculosis control in prisons and consider the alternatives. We argue that although improved implementation of conventional tuberculosis control activities is necessary, considerable investment in a broader range of public health interventions, including infrastructure and staffing upgrades, cutting-edge tuberculosis diagnostics, and combination prevention for HIV, will be equally critical. This combination response to tuberculosis in prisons will be essential for tackling existing and nascent prison tuberculosis epidemics and will require high-level political support and financing.

  20. Molecular Identification of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis and Analysis of Its Resistance to Rifampin in Sputa from Tuberculosis Suspected Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syaifudin, M.

    2010-01-01

    An accurate identification of different species of Mycobacterium provides to allow appropriate treatment for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Beside that, drug resistance of M. tuberculosis strains to rifampin is not clearly understood in contributing to the spread of tuberculosis in Indonesia. To assess the molecular mechanism of rifampin resistance, a number of clinical specimens of M. tuberculosis were analyzed their molecular nature of a part of the rpoB gene using polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) methods. DNA's extracted from sputum samples were amplified and 32 P-labeled by PCR with the specific primers and the product was analyzed their mutation conferring resistance by MDE gel electrophoresis. Of the 70 specimens tested, 57 specimens were positive for M. tuberculosis organism only, three specimens contained a mixture of M. tuberculosis and non tuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM), and 10 specimens were negative approved by Duplex PCR. Of these sixty DNA positive samples (thus the sensitivity of PCR was 85.71%), 5 (8.3%) of them suspected to contain mutations in rpoB which were associated with rifampin resistance. Even though the frequency of mutation was low, the results from our study clearly indicate that the molecular mechanism of rifampin resistance in M. tuberculosis isolates from Indonesia involves alterations in the rpoB gene. Molecular diagnosis by PCR which is fast and easy to perform is useful for early and rapid detection of TB in sputum specimen. (author)

  1. Mapping of genotype-phenotype diversity among clinical isolates of mycobacterium tuberculosis by sequence-based transcriptional profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Graham; Cortes, Teresa; Comas, Iñaki; Coscolla, Mireia; Gagneux, Sebastien; Young, Douglas B

    2013-01-01

    Genome sequencing has identified an extensive repertoire of single nucleotide polymorphisms among clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but the extent to which these differences influence phenotypic properties of the bacteria remains to be elucidated. To determine whether these polymorphisms give rise to phenotypic diversity, we have integrated genome data sets with RNA sequencing to assess their impact on the comparative transcriptome profiles of strains belonging to M. tuberculosis Lineages 1 and 2. We observed clear correlations between genotype and transcriptional phenotype. These arose by three mechanisms. First, lineage-specific changes in amino acid sequence of transcriptional regulators were associated with alterations in their ability to control gene expression. Second, changes in nucleotide sequence were associated with alteration of promoter activity and generation of novel transcriptional start sites in intergenic regions and within coding sequences. We show that in some cases this mechanism is expected to generate functionally active truncated proteins involved in innate immune recognition. Finally, genes showing lineage-specific patterns of differential expression not linked directly to primary mutations were characterized by a striking overrepresentation of toxin-antitoxin pairs. Taken together, these findings advance our understanding of mycobacterial evolution, contribute to a systems level understanding of this important human pathogen, and more broadly demonstrate the application of state-of-the-art techniques to provide novel insight into mechanisms by which intergenic and silent mutations contribute to diversity.

  2. Cardiovascular genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wung, Shu-Fen; Hickey, Kathleen T; Taylor, Jacquelyn Y; Gallek, Matthew J

    2013-03-01

    This article provides an update on cardiovascular genomics using three clinically relevant exemplars, including myocardial infarction (MI) and coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, and sudden cardiac death (SCD). ORGANIZATIONAL CONSTRUCT: Recent advances in cardiovascular genomic research, testing, and clinical implications are presented. Genomic nurse experts reviewed and summarized recent salient literature to provide updates on three selected cardiovascular genomic conditions. Research is ongoing to discover comprehensive genetic markers contributing to many common forms of cardiovascular disease (CVD), including MI and stroke. However, genomic technologies are increasingly being used clinically, particularly in patients with long QT syndrome (LQTS) or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) who are at risk for SCD. Currently, there are no clinically recommended genetic tests for many common forms of CVD even though direct-to-consumer genetic tests are being marketed to healthcare providers and the general public. On the other hand, genetic testing for patients with certain single gene conditions, including channelopathies (e.g., LQTS) and cardiomyopathies (e.g., HCM), is recommended clinically. Nurses play a pivotal role in cardiogenetics and are actively engaged in direct clinical care of patients and families with a wide variety of heritable conditions. It is important for nurses to understand current development of cardiovascular genomics and be prepared to translate the new genomic knowledge into practice. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  3. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNerney Ruth

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With almost 9 million new cases each year, tuberculosis remains one of the most feared diseases on the planet. Led by the STOP-TB Partnership and WHO, recent efforts to combat the disease have made considerable progress in a number of countries. However, the emergence of mutated strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that are resistant to the major anti-tuberculosis drugs poses a deadly threat to control efforts. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB has been reported in all regions of the world. More recently, extensively drug resistant-tuberculosis (XDR-TB that is also resistant to second line drugs has emerged in a number of countries. To ensure that adequate resources are allocated to prevent the emergence and spread of drug resistance it is important to understand the scale of the problem. In this article we propose that current methods of describing the epidemiology of drug resistant tuberculosis are not adequate for this purpose and argue for the inclusion of population based statistics in global surveillance data. Discussion Whereas the prevalence of tuberculosis is presented as the proportion of individuals within a defined population having disease, the prevalence of drug resistant tuberculosis is usually presented as the proportion of tuberculosis cases exhibiting resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Global surveillance activities have identified countries in Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union and regions of China as having a high proportion of MDR-TB cases and international commentary has focused primarily on the urgent need to improve control in these settings. Other regions, such as sub-Saharan Africa have been observed as having a low proportion of drug resistant cases. However, if one considers the incidence of new tuberculosis cases with drug resistant disease in terms of the population then countries of sub-Saharan Africa have amongst the highest rates of transmitted MDR-TB in the world. We propose

  4. Mycobacterium bovis (Bovine Tuberculosis) in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycobacterium bovis (Bovine Tuberculosis) in Humans What is Mycobacterium bovis ? In the United States, the majority of tuberculosis (TB) cases in people are caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) is ...

  5. Imaging of pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dyck, P.; De Schepper, A.M.; Vanhoenacker, F.M.; Van den Brande, P.

    2003-01-01

    Tuberculosis, more than any other infectious disease, has always been a challenge, since it has been responsible for a great amount of morbidity and mortality in humans. After a steady decline in the number of new cases during the twentieth century, due to improved social and environmental conditions, early diagnosis, and the development of antituberculous medication, a stagnation and even an increase in the number of new cases was noted in the mid-1980s. The epidemiological alteration is multifactorial: global increase in developing countries; minority groups (HIV and other immunocompromised patients); and elderly patients due to an altered immune status. Other factors that may be responsible are a delayed diagnosis, especially in elderly patients, incomplete or inadequate therapy, and the emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The course of the disease and its corresponding clinicoradiological pattern depends on the interaction between the organism and the host response. Classically, pulmonary tuberculosis has been classified in primary tuberculosis, which occurred previously in children, and postprimary tuberculosis, occurring in adult patients. In industrialized countries, however, there seems to be a shift of primary tuberculosis towards adults. Furthermore, due to an altered immunological response in certain groups, such as immunocompromised and elderly patients, an atypical radioclinical pattern may occur. The changing landscape, in which tuberculosis occurs, as well as the global resurgence, and the changed spectrum of the clinical and radiological presentation, justify a renewed interest of radiologists for the imaging features of pulmonary tuberculosis. This article deals with the usual imaging features of pulmonary tuberculosis as well as the atypical patterns encountered in immunodepressed and elderly patients. (orig.)

  6. Recurrent tuberculosis in an urban area in China: relapse or exogenous reinfection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xin; Yang, Chongguang; Wu, Jie; Lin, Senlin; Gao, Xu; Wu, Zheyuan; Tian, Jiyun; Gan, Mingyu; Luo, Tao; Wang, Lili; Yu, Chenlei; Mei, Jian; Pan, Qichao; DeRiemer, Kathryn; Yuan, ZhengAn; Gao, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent tuberculosis is an important indicator of the effectiveness of tuberculosis control and can occur by relapse or exogenous reinfection. We conducted a retrospective cohort study on all bacteriologically confirmed tuberculosis cases that were successfully treated between 2000 and 2012 in Shanghai, an urban area with a high number but a low prevalence rate of tuberculosis cases and a low prevalence of HIV infection. Genotyping the Mycobacterium tuberculosis from clinical isolates was used to distinguish between relapse and reinfection. In total, 5.3% (710/13,417) of successfully treated cases had a recurrence, a rate of 7.55 (95% CI 7.01–8.13) episodes per 1000 person-years, more than 18 times the rate of tuberculosis in the general population. Patients who were male, age 30–59, retreatment cases, had cavitation, diabetes, drug-resistant or multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in their initial episode of tuberculosis, were at high risk for a recurrence. Among 141 recurrent cases that had paired isolates, 59 (41.8%) had different genotypes, indicating reinfection with a different strain. Patients who completed treatment were still at high risk of another episode of tuberculosis and exogenous reinfection contributed a significant proportion of the recurrent tuberculosis cases. Targeted control strategies are needed to prevent new tuberculosis infections in this setting. PMID:28237039

  7. Peritoneal tuberculosis: radiographic diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Ospina-Moreno

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Peritoneal tuberculosis (TB is an extrapulmonary form of presentation of tuberculosis. HIV infection is a primary risk factor for this condition. Diagnosis requires microbiological or histopathological confirmation in addition to supporting radiological imaging studies. Abdominal ultrasonography and CT are useful to obtain a radiographic diagnosis, with typical findings including diffuse peritoneal thickening, presence of ascites in varying volumes, adenopathies, and caseating nodes. We report 2 cases of patients with ascites and nodular peritoneal thickening on diagnostic images, as well as high CA-125 levels in laboratory tests. In both patients, a diagnosis of peritoneal tuberculosis was reached following a US-guided peritoneal biopsy.

  8. Alternation of Gut Microbiota in Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Luo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available One-third of the world's population has been infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis, a primary pathogen of the mammalian respiratory system, while about 10% of latent infections progress to active tuberculosis (TB, indicating that host and environmental factors may determine the outcomes such as infection clearance/persistence and treatment prognosis. The gut microbiota is essential for development of host immunity, defense, nutrition and metabolic homeostasis. Thus, the pattern of gut microbiota may contribute to M. tuberculosis infection and prognosis. In current study we characterized the differences in gut bacterial communities in new tuberculosis patients (NTB, recurrent tuberculosis patients (RTB, and healthy control. The abundance-based coverage estimator (ACE showed the diversity index of the gut microbiota in the patients with recurrent tuberculosis was increased significantly compared with healthy controls (p < 0.05. At the phyla level, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, which contain many pathogenic species, were significantly enriched in the feces RTB patients. Conversely, phylum Bacteroidetes, containing a variety of beneficial commensal organisms, was reduced in the patients with the recurrent tuberculosis compared to healthy controls. The Gram-negative genus Prevotella of oral origin from phylum of Bacteroidetes and genus Lachnospira from phylum of Firmicutes were significantly decreased in both the new and recurrent TB patient groups, compared with the healthy control group (p < 0.05. We also found that there was a positive correlation between the gut microbiota and peripheral CD4+ T cell counts in the patients. This study, for the first time, showed associations between gut microbiota with tuberculosis and its clinical outcomes. Maintaining eubiosis, namely homeostasis of gut microbiota, may be beneficial for host recovery and prevention of recurrence of M. tuberculosis infection.

  9. Game of 'Somes: Protein Destruction for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanovic, Marie I; Darwin, K Heran

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is required for causing disease. Proteasomes are multisubunit chambered proteases and, until recently, were only known to participate in adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent proteolysis in bacteria. In this review, we discuss the latest advances in understanding how both ATP-dependent and ATP-independent proteasome-regulated pathways contribute to M. tuberculosis virulence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Burden of transmitted multidrug resistance in epidemics of tuberculosis: a transmission modelling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Emily A; Fofana, Mariam O; Dowdy, David W

    2015-12-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis can be acquired through de-novo mutation during tuberculosis treatment or through transmission from other individuals with active MDR tuberculosis. Understanding the balance between these two mechanisms is essential when allocating resources for MDR tuberculosis. We aimed to create a dynamic transmission model of an MDR tuberculosis epidemic to estimate the contributions of treatment-related acquisition and person-to-person transmission of resistance to incident MDR tuberculosis cases. In this modelling analysis, we constructed a dynamic transmission model of an MDR tuberculosis epidemic, allowing for both treatment-related acquisition and person-to-person transmission of resistance. We used national tuberculosis notification data to inform Bayesian estimates of the proportion of each country's 2013 MDR tuberculosis incidence that resulted from MDR transmission rather than treatment-related MDR acquisition. Global estimates of 3·5% MDR tuberculosis prevalence among new tuberculosis notifications and 20·5% among re-treatment notifications translate into an estimate that resistance transmission rather than acquisition accounts for a median 95·9% (95% uncertainty range [UR] 68·0-99·6) of all incident MDR tuberculosis, and 61·3% (16·5-95·2) of incident MDR tuberculosis in previously treated individuals. The estimated proportion of MDR tuberculosis resulting from transmission varied substantially with different countries' notification data-ranging from 48% (95% UR 30-75) in Bangladesh to 99% (91-100) in Uzbekistan. Estimates were most sensitive to estimates of the transmissibility of MDR strains, the probability of acquiring MDR during tuberculosis treatment, and the responsiveness of MDR tuberculosis to first-line treatment. Notifications of MDR prevalence from most high-burden settings are consistent with most incident MDR tuberculosis resulting from transmission rather than new treatment-related acquisition of resistance

  11. Th17-related cytokines contribute to recall-like expansion/effector function of HMBPP-specific Vγ2Vδ2 T cells after Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection or vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Hongbo; Wang, Yunqi; Chen, Crystal Y.; Frencher, James; Huang, Dan; Yang, Enzhuo; Ryan-Payseur, Bridgett; Chen, Zheng W.

    2015-01-01

    Whether cytokines can influence the adaptive immune response by antigen-specific γδ T cells during infections or vaccinations remains unknown. We previously demonstrated that, during BCG/Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infections, Th17-related cytokines markedly upregulated when phosphoantigen-specific VγVδ2 T cells expanded. In this study, we examined the involvement of Th17-related cytokines in the recall-like responses of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells following Mtb infection or vaccination against TB. T...

  12. Tuberculosis concomitant with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rodríguez-Rodríguez

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse the different factors involved in this phenomenon and to give a clear, comprehensive picture of the problem of tuberculosis resurgence and its correlation with diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

  13. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2016.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  14. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2014.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  15. NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis - 2017.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  16. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2015.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  17. HIV and Tuberculosis (TB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV and Opportunistic Infections, Coinfections, and Conditions Home Understanding ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV and Tuberculosis (TB) Last Reviewed: July 26, 2017 ...

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Digby F.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolism underpins the physiology and pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, although experimental mycobacteriology has provided key insights into the metabolic pathways that are essential for survival and pathogenesis, determining the metabolic status of bacilli during different stages of infection and in different cellular compartments remains challenging. Recent advances—in particular, the development of systems biology tools such as metabolomics—have enabled key insights into the biochemical state of M. tuberculosis in experimental models of infection. In addition, their use to elucidate mechanisms of action of new and existing antituberculosis drugs is critical for the development of improved interventions to counter tuberculosis. This review provides a broad summary of mycobacterial metabolism, highlighting the adaptation of M. tuberculosis as specialist human pathogen, and discusses recent insights into the strategies used by the host and infecting bacillus to influence the outcomes of the host–pathogen interaction through modulation of metabolic functions. PMID:25502746

  19. Tuberculosis After Renal Transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbouch, Samia; Hajji, Meriam; Helal, Imed; Ounissi, Mondher; Bacha, Mohammed Mongi; Ben Hamida, Fathi; Abderrahim, Ezzedine; Ben Abdallah, Taieb

    2017-02-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the leading infections after renal transplant, particularly in developing countries where the incidence and prevalence in the general population are high. Diagnosis requires bacteriologic and histologic confirmation. Interactions among the antitubercular drugs and the immunosuppressive agents have to be considered while prescribing, and surveillance for adverse effects is required. Although rare, case reports are available on extrapulmonary tuberculosis in allograft recipients. Here, we present a 25-year-old kidney transplant recipient who was diagnosed with lymph node tuberculosis under uncommon circumstances but who had a good outcome. This case report illustrates the difficulties in diagnosis of tuberculosis, changes in therapeutic protocols, and prognostic factors and highlights the effects of infectious complications with immunosuppressive therapy in this particular patient population.

  20. Chronic Miliary Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Bajaj

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient with chronic miliary tuberculosis is being reported. The patient had miliary mottling of the lung, tubercular lymphadenitis, cervicitis and disseminated lupus vulgaris of skin lesions.

  1. Whole genome sequence analysis of Mycobacterium suricattae

    KAUST Repository

    Dippenaar, Anzaan

    2015-10-21

    Tuberculosis occurs in various mammalian hosts and is caused by a range of different lineages of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). A recently described member, Mycobacterium suricattae, causes tuberculosis in meerkats (Suricata suricatta) in Southern Africa and preliminary genetic analysis showed this organism to be closely related to an MTBC pathogen of rock hyraxes (Procavia capensis), the dassie bacillus. Here we make use of whole genome sequencing to describe the evolution of the genome of M. suricattae, including known and novel regions of difference, SNPs and IS6110 insertion sites. We used genome-wide phylogenetic analysis to show that M. suricattae clusters with the chimpanzee bacillus, previously isolated from a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) in West Africa. We propose an evolutionary scenario for the Mycobacterium africanum lineage 6 complex, showing the evolutionary relationship of M. africanum and chimpanzee bacillus, and the closely related members M. suricattae, dassie bacillus and Mycobacterium mungi.

  2. Cutaneous Tuberculosis Ineastern Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A J Kanwar

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the clinical and laboratory data from 21 patents of cutaneous tuberculosis seen over a period of 10 years revealed that it is rare in eastern Libya. There were 15 males and 6 females. Lupus vulgaris was seen in 11, scrofuloderma in 4. Three patients each had tuberculosis verrucosa cutis and papulonecrotic tuberculid. The diagnosis in each case was confirmed histopathologically.

  3. Isolated Coccygeal Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Do Un; Kim, Seok Won; Ju, Chang IL

    2012-01-01

    Isolated tuberculosis of the coccyx is extremely rare. A 35-year-old man presented with a 3-month history of coccygeal and gluteal pain. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed osseous destruction and a large enhancing mass involving the coccyx with anterior and posterior extension. Pathologic examination of the surgical specimen revealed necrosis, chronic granulomatous inflammation, and multinucleated giant cells consistent with tuberculosis. This case highlights the impo...

  4. Tuberculosis in quebec: a review of trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Alexander; Harouna, Abdoulaye; Smith, Andrew F

    2012-06-15

    The aim of this research was to conduct a thorough review on the literature of tuberculosis in Canada and the Province of Quebec. To achieve this aim, an exhaustive literature review of tuberculosis in the Province of Quebec was undertaken. Data was collected with the goal of creating an epidemiological and public health evidence base to forecast the spread of tuberculosis. A keyword search strategy was used to find relevant articles from the peer-reviewed literature using the electronic search engine PubMed and a search of other relevant federal and provincial government databases. Twenty-nine peer-reviewed publications and twenty government reports containing information about the incidence or prevalence of tuberculosis in the Province of Quebec were included in the analysis. An analysis of the data revealed that while tuberculosis rates have been decreasing in both Canada and Quebec with an overall incidence below 3 per 100,000 of population in 2007, among immigrants and the Inuit communities in Quebec, the incidence and prevalence of the disease still remains high and reached 18 per 100,000 and 100 per 100,000, respectively in 2007. In general, while tuberculosis does not pose a significant burden to the general population, it does continue to affect certain sub-groups disproportionately, including select immigrants and Inuit communities in Quebec. Efforts to ensure that cost-effective healthcare interventions are delivered in a timely fashion should be pursued to reduce the associated morbidity and mortality of tuberculosis in the Province of Quebec. Funding for this research was provided to Medmetrics Inc., by McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Génome Québec and the Ministère de Développement Economique, Innovation et Exportation du Gouvernement du Québec. The authors also wish to thank Drs. John White and Marcel Behr, both of McGill University and Dr Suneil Malik of the Infectious Disease Program in the Office of Biotechnology, Genomics and Population

  5. [Rd7 genotyping of M. tuberculosis strains isolated from patients with lung tuberculosis in different areas of Kazakhstan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demkin, V V; Korneva, I N; Riazanova, Iu A; Muminov, T A; Beĭsembaeva, Sh A; Zhakipbaeva, B T; Shopaeva, G A; Dauletbakova, A M

    2008-01-01

    A three-primer PCR assay was designed for detection of possible deletions in the RD7 region of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex chromosome. The assay produced amplicons of different size depending on the presence or absence of the deletions. The PCR assay was applied to 176 isolates from patients with lung tuberculosis collected in different areas of Kazakhstan in summer 2004. The isolates were initially characterized by culture and biochemical tests. The RD7 genotyping results demonstrated no polymorphism and the absence of deletions in the RD7 genome region. Some strains were additionally characterized using PCR-RFLP analysis of gyrB and hsp64 genes. The RFLP-patterns obtained corresponded to the M. tuberculosis genotypes. The results of this work are consistent with certain previous studies, indicating population stability of the RD7 region in M. tuberculosis strains. Species characterization of the isolates shows that M. tuberculosis sensu stricto is the principal causative agent of human lung tuberculosis in Kazakhstan.

  6. Diagnóstico bacteriológico de tuberculosis renal: experiencia del Laboratorio Regional de Tuberculosis de la provincia de Córdoba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Berta

    2011-09-01

    accounted for 4.2 % of the cases. The association of pulmonary and renal tuberculosis was found in 6 cases. The isolation of Mycobacterium bovis indicates the importance of including Stonebrink medium along with Lowenstein- Jensen medium. The liquid medium made no significant contribution to the diagnosis of renal tuberculosis, but indeed, cultivating serial samples increases sensitivity.

  7. Vaccination against tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Carlos; Aguilo, Nacho; Gonzalo-Asensio, Jesús

    2018-04-04

    BCG (Bacille Calmette-Guérin) vaccination is included in the immunization schedule for tuberculosis endemic countries with a global coverage at birth close to 90% worldwide. BCG was attenuated from Mycobacterium bovis almost a century ago, and provides a strong protection against disseminated forms of the disease, though very limited against pulmonary forms of tuberculosis, responsible for transmission. Novel prophylactic tuberculosis vaccines are in clinical development either to replace BCG or to improve its protection against respiratory forms of the disease. There are limitations understanding the immunological responses involved and the precise type of long-lived immunity that new vaccines need to induce. MTBVAC is the first and only tuberculosis vaccine candidate based on live-attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis in clinical evaluation. MTBVAC clinical development plans to target tuberculosis prevention in newborns, as a BCG replacement strategy, and as secondary objective to be tested in adolescents and adults previous vaccinated with BCG. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in cattle from the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlokwe, Tiny Motlatso; Said, Halima; Gcebe, Nomakorinte

    2017-10-10

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the main causative agent of tuberculosis (TB) in human and Mycobacterium bovis commonly causes tuberculosis in animals. Transmission of tuberculosis caused by both pathogens can occur from human to animals and vice versa. In the current study, M. tuberculosis, as confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers targeting 3 regions of difference (RD4, RD9 and RD12) on the genomes, was isolated from cattle originating from two epidemiologically unrelated farms in the Eastern Cape (E.C) Province of South Africa. Although the isolates were genotyped with variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) typing, no detailed epidemiological investigation was carried out on the respective farms to unequivocally confirm or link humans as sources of TB transmission to cattle, a move that would have embraced the 'One Health' concept. In addition, strain comparison with human M. tuberculosis in the database from the E.C Province and other provinces in the country did not reveal any match. This is the first report of cases of M. tuberculosis infection in cattle in South Africa. The VNTR profiles of the M. tuberculosis strains identified in the current study will form the basis for creating M. tuberculosis VNTR database for animals including cattle for future epidemiological studies. Our findings however, call for urgent reinforcement of collaborative efforts between the veterinary and the public health services of the country.

  9. Systems-based approaches to probing metabolic variation within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma K Lofthouse

    Full Text Available The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex includes bovine and human strains of the tuberculosis bacillus, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis and the Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine strain. M. bovis has evolved from a M. tuberculosis-like ancestor and is the ancestor of the BCG vaccine. The pathogens demonstrate distinct differences in virulence, host range and metabolism, but the role of metabolic differences in pathogenicity is poorly understood. Systems biology approaches have been used to investigate the metabolism of M. tuberculosis, but not to probe differences between tuberculosis strains. In this study genome scale metabolic networks of M. bovis and M. bovis BCG were constructed and interrogated, along with a M. tuberculosis network, to predict substrate utilisation, gene essentiality and growth rates. The models correctly predicted 87-88% of high-throughput phenotype data, 75-76% of gene essentiality data and in silico-predicted growth rates matched measured rates. However, analysis of the metabolic networks identified discrepancies between in silico predictions and in vitro data, highlighting areas of incomplete metabolic knowledge. Additional experimental studies carried out to probe these inconsistencies revealed novel insights into the metabolism of these strains. For instance, that the reduction in metabolic capability observed in bovine tuberculosis strains, as compared to M. tuberculosis, is not reflected by current genetic or enzymatic knowledge. Hence, the in silico networks not only successfully simulate many aspects of the growth and physiology of these mycobacteria, but also provide an invaluable tool for future metabolic studies.

  10. Identification of moaA3 gene in patient isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Kerala, which is absent in M. tuberculosis H37Rv and H37Ra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishnan Indulakshmi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis is endemic to developing countries like India. Though the whole genome sequences of the type strain M. tuberculosis H37Rv and the clinical strain M. tuberculosis CDC1551 are available, the clinical isolates from India have not been studied extensively at the genome level. This study was carried out in order to have a better understanding of isolates from Kerala, a state in southern India. Results A PCR based strategy was followed making use of the deletion region primers to understand the genome level differences between the type strain H37Rv and the clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis from Kerala. PCR analysis of patient isolates using RD1 region primers revealed the amplification of a 386 bp region, in addition to the expected 652 bp amplicon. Southern hybridization of genomic DNA with the 386 bp amplicon confirmed the presence of this new region in a majority of the patient isolates from Kerala. Sequence comparison of this amplicon showed close homology with the moaA3 gene of M. bovis. In M. bovis this gene is present in the RvD5 region, an IS6110 mediated deletion that is absent in M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Conclusion This study demonstrates the presence of moaA3 gene, that is absent in M. tuberculosis H37Rv and H37Ra, in a large number of local isolates. Whether the moaA3 gene provides any specific advantage to the field isolates of the pathogen is unclear. Field strains from Kerala have fewer IS6110 sequences and therefore are likely to have fewer IS6110 dependent rearrangements. But as deletions and insertions account for much of the genomic diversity of M. tuberculosis, the mechanisms of formation of sequence polymorphisms in the local isolates should be further examined. These results suggest that studies should focus on strains from endemic areas to understand the complexities of this pathogen.

  11. Tuberculosis of the prostate and urethra: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Gupta

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Genitourinary tuberculosis contributes to 10-14% of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and is a major health problem in India. Prostate tuberculosis is uncommon and is usually found incidentally following transurethral resection. The most common mode of involvement is hematogenous, though descending infection and direct intracanalicular extension is known. Predisposing factors include prior tubercular infection, immuno-compromised status, previous BCG therapy. The presentation is diffuse caseating epitheloid cell granulomas, which can be confirmed by prostate biopsy. Urine PCR has good sensitivity (95.5% and specificity ( 98.12% in diagnosis. Imaging techniques like TRUS and CT/MRI also allow good visualization of the lesion and its extension. Urethral tuberculosis is very rare and is usually secondary to upper tract or genital tuberculosis. The presentation may be acute urethritis or chronic stricture or fistulae. The treatment of choice is chemotherapy with 3-4 anti tubercular drugs for initial 6-12 weeks and later 2 drugs for additional 3-6 months. Surgery is usually reserved for cases where chemotherapy fails and is done after 4-6 weeks of ATT. With a high index of suspicion it may be possible to diagnose a larger number of cases of prostatic and urethral tuberculosis especially in this country where tuberculosis is almost endemic.

  12. Association between diabetes and tuberculosis: case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Martins Pereira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To test the association between diabetes and tuberculosis. METHODS It is a case-control study, matched by age and sex. We included 323 new cases of tuberculosis with positive results for bacilloscopy. The controls were 323 respiratory symptomatic patients with negative bacilloscopy, from the same health services, such as: ambulatory cases from three referral hospitals and six basic health units responsible for the notifications of new cases of tuberculosis in Salvador, Bahia. Data collection occurred between 2008 and 2010. The instruments used were structured interview, including clinical data, capillary blood glucose (during fasting or postprandial, and the CAGE questionnaire for screening of abusive consumption of alcohol. Descriptive, exploratory, and multivariate analysis was performed using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS The average age of the cases was 38.5 (SD = 14.2 years and of the controls, 38.5 (SD = 14.3 years. Among cases and controls, most subjects (61% were male. In univariate analysis we found association between the occurrence of diabetes and tuberculosis (OR = 2.37; 95%CI 1.04–5.42, which remained statistically significant after adjustment for potential confounders (OR = 3.12; 95%CI 1.12–7.94. CONCLUSIONS The association between diabetes and tuberculosis can hinder the control of tuberculosis, contributing to the maintainance of the disease burden. The situation demands increasing early detection of diabetes among people with tuberculosis, in an attempt to improve disease control strategies.

  13. Breaking Transmission with Vaccines: The Case of Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo-Asensio, Jesus; Aguilo, Nacho; Marinova, Dessislava; Martin, Carlos

    2017-07-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) have evolved causing tuberculosis (TB) in different mammalian hosts. MTBC ecotypes have adapted to diverse animal species, with M. bovis being the most common cause of TB in livestock. Cattle-to-human transmission of M. bovis through ingestion of raw milk was common before introduction of the pasteurization process. TB in humans is mainly caused by M. tuberculosis . This bacterium is considered a genetically clonal pathogen that has coevolved with humans due to its ability to manipulate and subvert the immune response. TB is a major public health problem due to airborne person-to-person transmission of M. tuberculosis . The essential yet unanswered question on the natural history of TB is when M. tuberculosis decides to establish latent infection in the host (resambling the lysogenic cycle of lambda phage) or to cause pulmonary disease (comparable to the lytic cycle of lambda phage). In this latter case, M. tuberculosis kills the host with the aim of achieving transmission to new hosts. Combating the TB epidemic requires stopping transmission. M. bovis BCG, the present vaccine against TB, is derived from M. bovis and only protects against disseminated forms of TB. Thus, a priority in TB research is development of new effective vaccines to prevent pulmonary disease. Attenuated vaccines based on M. tuberculosis as MTBVAC are potential candidates that could contribute to break the TB transmission cycle.

  14. The gene expression data of Mycobacterium tuberculosis based on Affymetrix gene chips provide insight into regulatory and hypothetical genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Liu Casey S

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis remains a leading infectious disease with global public health threat. Its control and management have been complicated by multi-drug resistance and latent infection, which prompts scientists to find new and more effective drugs. With the completion of the genome sequence of the etiologic bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, it is now feasible to search for new drug targets by sieving through a large number of gene products and conduct genome-scale experiments based on microarray technology. However, the full potential of genome-wide microarray analysis in configuring interrelationships among all genes in M. tuberculosis has yet to be realized. To date, it is only possible to assign a function to 52% of proteins predicted in the genome. Results We conducted a functional-genomics study using the high-resolution Affymetrix oligonucleotide GeneChip. Approximately one-half of the genes were found to be always expressed, including more than 100 predicted conserved hypotheticals, in the genome of M. tuberculosis during the log phase of in vitro growth. The gene expression profiles were analyzed and visualized through cluster analysis to epitomize the full details of genomic behavior. Broad patterns derived from genome-wide expression experiments in this study have provided insight into the interrelationships among genes in the basic cellular processes of M. tuberculosis. Conclusion Our results have confirmed several known gene clusters in energy production, information pathways, and lipid metabolism, and also hinted at potential roles of hypothetical and regulatory proteins.

  15. Taking medicines to treat tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis - medicines; DOT; Directly observed therapy; TB - medicines ... Ellner JJ. Tuberculosis. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 324. ...

  16. Fine mapping of genetic polymorphisms of pulmonary tuberculosis within chromosome 18q11.2 in the Chinese population: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Yaoyao

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, one genome-wide association study identified a susceptibility locus of rs4331426 on chromosome 18q11.2 for tuberculosis in the African population. To validate the significance of this susceptibility locus in other areas, we conducted a case-control study in the Chinese population. Methods The present study consisted of 578 cases and 756 controls. The SNP rs4331426 and other six tag SNPs in the 100 Kbp up and down stream of rs4331426 on chromosome 18q11.2 were genotyped by using the Taqman-based allelic discrimination system. Results As compared with the findings from the African population, genetic variation of the SNP rs4331426 was rare among the Chinese. No significant differences were observed in genotypes or allele frequencies of the tag SNPs between cases and controls either before or after adjusting for age, sex, education, smoking, and drinking history. However, we observed strong linkage disequilibrium of SNPs. Constructed haplotypes within this block were linked the altered risks of tuberculosis. For example, in comparison with the common haplotype AA(rs8087945-rs12456774, haplotypes AG(rs8087945-rs12456774 and GA(rs8087945-rs12456774 were associated with a decreased risk of tuberculosis, with the adjusted odds ratio(95% confidence interval of 0.34(0.27-0.42 and 0.22(0.16-0.29, respectively. Conclusions Susceptibility locus of rs4331426 discovered in the African population could not be validated in the Chinese population. None of genetic polymorphisms we genotyped were related to tuberculosis in the single-point analysis. However, haplotypes on chromosome 18q11.2 might contribute to an individual's susceptibility. More work is necessary to identify the true causative variants of tuberculosis.

  17. Perinatal tuberculosis: a diagnostic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Lúcia S. de Souza

    Full Text Available Despite the high prevalence of tuberculosis in adults and children, the congenital and perinatal forms of tuberculosis are rare. In Brazil, there has been only one published case of congenital tuberculosis and two cases of the perinatal form of this disease. We report a case of perinatal tuberculosis presenting with pneumonia. Alcohol-acid-resistant bacilli were found in the gastric lavage. Diagnosis of this disease presentation requires a high index of suspicion.

  18. Imaging of Esophageal Tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagi, B.; Kochhar, R.; Bhasin, D.K.; Singh, K. [PGIMER, Chandigarh (India). Dept. of Gastroenterology; Lal, A.; Gulati, M.; Suri, S. [PGIMER, Chandigarh (India). Dept. of Radiodiagnosis

    2003-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the various radiological abnormalities in patients with proven esophageal tuberculosis. Material and Methods: The case records of 23 patients with proven esophageal tuberculosis were evaluated retrospectively for various radiological abnormalities. Twenty-two patients had secondary involvement of esophagus in the form of direct extension of mediastinal and pulmonary tuberculosis or spinal tuberculosis. Only 1 patient had primary involvement of the esophagus with no evidence of disease elsewhere. The diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopic and CT-guided biopsy/aspiration cytology in 7 and 6 cases, respectively. Diagnosis was made on the basis of surgical biopsy of lymph node and autopsy in 1 patient each. In the remaining 8 patients the diagnosis was based on radiological and endoscopic findings and the response to antituberculous treatment. Results: Chest radiography (CXR) was abnormal in 65% patients. While the findings were non-conclusive for esophageal tuberculosis, characteristic lesions of tuberculosis in lungs or spine were suggestive of tuberculous etiology. In 15 patients, CT of the chest confirmed the corresponding CXR findings and also showed additional findings of mediastinal lymphadenopathy when CXR was normal. Fourteen patients showed mediastinal lymphadenopathy on CT of the chest. In all these patients, more than one group of lymph nodes was involved. The characteristic hypodense center of lymph nodes suggestive of tuberculosis was seen in 12 patients. Radiological abnormalities seen in barium swallow examination were extrinsic compression, traction diverticula, strictures, sinus/fistulous tracts, kinking and pseudotumor mass of esophagus in decreasing order of frequency. The middle third of the esophagus was found to be the most frequent site of involvement.

  19. Imaging of Esophageal Tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagi, B.; Kochhar, R.; Bhasin, D.K.; Singh, K.; Lal, A.; Gulati, M.; Suri, S.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the various radiological abnormalities in patients with proven esophageal tuberculosis. Material and Methods: The case records of 23 patients with proven esophageal tuberculosis were evaluated retrospectively for various radiological abnormalities. Twenty-two patients had secondary involvement of esophagus in the form of direct extension of mediastinal and pulmonary tuberculosis or spinal tuberculosis. Only 1 patient had primary involvement of the esophagus with no evidence of disease elsewhere. The diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopic and CT-guided biopsy/aspiration cytology in 7 and 6 cases, respectively. Diagnosis was made on the basis of surgical biopsy of lymph node and autopsy in 1 patient each. In the remaining 8 patients the diagnosis was based on radiological and endoscopic findings and the response to antituberculous treatment. Results: Chest radiography (CXR) was abnormal in 65% patients. While the findings were non-conclusive for esophageal tuberculosis, characteristic lesions of tuberculosis in lungs or spine were suggestive of tuberculous etiology. In 15 patients, CT of the chest confirmed the corresponding CXR findings and also showed additional findings of mediastinal lymphadenopathy when CXR was normal. Fourteen patients showed mediastinal lymphadenopathy on CT of the chest. In all these patients, more than one group of lymph nodes was involved. The characteristic hypodense center of lymph nodes suggestive of tuberculosis was seen in 12 patients. Radiological abnormalities seen in barium swallow examination were extrinsic compression, traction diverticula, strictures, sinus/fistulous tracts, kinking and pseudotumor mass of esophagus in decreasing order of frequency. The middle third of the esophagus was found to be the most frequent site of involvement

  20. Vulnerability and tuberculosis in Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriana Cátia Rainho Brás

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at understanding social causality of Tuberculosis in Rio de Janeiro. This is one of the Brazilian states with the highest incidence of this disease. We follow the story of Paulo, a patient who received care at the outpatient clinic for multi-drug resistant Tuberculosis, in Rio de Janeiro. To make sense of his story, we will look at it through the concept of vulnerability in life conditions. Along with Sabroza (2006, we argue that this vulnerability is a collective expression of the economic insertion of a growing segment of Rio’s population in the current technical-scientific-informational capitalism (Santos, 2002 [1979]. Limitations in the health services add directly to vulnerability in life conditions of patients making treatment a hard endeavour. We propose to think and act on Tuberculosis at the collective level of reality, through intersectoral actions. We aim at contributing to the current debates on the social determination of Tuberculosis, to inform actions that can significantly reduce the suffering associated to this and other similarly caused diseases.

  1. Tuberculosis of the cervical spine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculosis of the cervical spine is rare, comprising 3 -. 5% of cases of tuberculosis of the spine. Eight patients with tuberculosis of the cervicaJ spine seen during 1989 -. 1992 were reviewed. They all presented with neck pain. The 4 children presented with a kyphotic deformity. In all the children the disease was extensive, ...

  2. Tuberculosis: A Problem for Lifeguards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaros, Susan

    1996-01-01

    Lifeguards run the risk of workplace infection by tuberculosis-carrying swimmers. Even if they work in ventilated, sunlit areas (which reduces risk), they can contract tuberculosis when performing respiratory resuscitation. Without appropriate precautions, lifeguards may be unnecessarily exposed. A tuberculosis infection control plan is needed in…

  3. Tuberculosis among Children in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Bradford D.

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis among Alaskan children under 15 was more than twice the national rate, with Alaska Native children showing a much higher incidence. Children with household exposure to adults with active tuberculosis had a high risk of infection. About 22 percent of pediatric tuberculosis cases were identified through school…

  4. New Insight into the History of Domesticated Apple: Secondary Contribution of the European Wild Apple to the Genome of Cultivated Varieties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornille, A.; Gladieux, P.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Roldán-Ruiz, I.; Laurens, F.; Cam, le B.; Nersesyan, A.; Clavel, J.; Olonova, M.; Feugey, L.; Gabrielyan, I.; Zhang, Xiu-Guo; Tenaillon, M.I.; Giraud, T.

    2012-01-01

    The apple is the most common and culturally important fruit crop of temperate areas. The elucidation of its origin and domestication history is therefore of great interest. The wild Central Asian species Malus sieversii has previously been identified as the main contributor to the genome of the

  5. The Contribution of Health Technology Assessment, Health Needs Assessment, and Health Impact Assessment to the Assessment and Translation of Technologies in the Field of Public Health Genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkotter, N.; Vondeling, H.; Blancquaert, I.

    2011-01-01

    or to identify infrastructural needs. HIA delivers information on the impact of technologies in a wider scope and promotes informed decision making. HTA, HNA and HIA provide a partly overlapping and partly unique set of methodologies and infrastructure for the translation and assessment of genomic health...

  6. The Contribution of Health Technology Assessment, Health Needs Assessment, and Health Impact Assessment to the Assessment and Translation of Technologies in the Field of Public Health Genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenköttera, N.; Vondeling, Hindrik; Blancquaert, I.; Mekel, O.C.L.; Kristensen, F.B.; Brand, A.

    2011-01-01

    The European Union has named genomics as one of the promising research fields for the development of new health technologies. Major concerns with regard to these fields are, on the one hand, the rather slow and limited translation of new knowledge and, on the other hand, missing insights into the

  7. The Impact of Transcriptomics on the Fight against Tuberculosis : Focus on Biomarkers, BCG Vaccination, and Immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarate-Blades, Carlos Rodrigo; Silva, Celio Lopes; Passos, Geraldo A.

    2011-01-01

    In 1882 Robert Koch identified Mycobacterium tuberculosis as the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), a disease as ancient as humanity. Although there has been more than 125 years of scientific effort aimed at understanding the disease, serious problems in TB persist that contribute to the

  8. Causes of genome instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langie, Sabine A S; Koppen, Gudrun; Desaulniers, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    , genome instability can be defined as an enhanced tendency for the genome to acquire mutations; ranging from changes to the nucleotide sequence to chromosomal gain, rearrangements or loss. This review raises the hypothesis that in addition to known human carcinogens, exposure to low dose of other......Genome instability is a prerequisite for the development of cancer. It occurs when genome maintenance systems fail to safeguard the genome's integrity, whether as a consequence of inherited defects or induced via exposure to environmental agents (chemicals, biological agents and radiation). Thus...... chemicals present in our modern society could contribute to carcinogenesis by indirectly affecting genome stability. The selected chemicals with their mechanisms of action proposed to indirectly contribute to genome instability are: heavy metals (DNA repair, epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling...

  9. Tuberculosis in ancient times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Cilliers

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In spite of an array of effective antibiotics, tuberculosis is still very common in developing countries where overcrowding, malnutrition and poor hygienic conditions prevail. Over the past 30 years associated HIV infection has worsened the situation by increasing the infection rate and mortality of tuberculosis. Of those diseases caused by a single organism only HIV causes more deaths internationally than tuberculosis. The tubercle bacillus probably first infected man in Neolithic times, and then via infected cattle, but the causative Mycobacteriacea have been in existence for 300 million years. Droplet infection is the most common way of acquiring tuberculosis, although ingestion (e.g. of infected cows’ milk may occur. Tuberculosis probably originated in Africa. The earliest path gnomonic evidence of human tuberculosis in man was found in osteo-archaeological findings of bone tuberculosis (Pott’s disease of the spine in the skeleton of anEgyptian priest from the 21st Dynasty (approximately 1 000 BC. Suggestive but not conclusiveevidence of tuberculotic lesions had been found in even earlier skeletons from Egypt and Europe. Medical hieroglyphics from ancient Egypt are silent on the disease, which could be tuberculosis,as do early Indian and Chinese writings. The Old Testament refers to the disease schachapeth, translated as phthisis in the Greek Septuagint. Although the Bible is not specific about this condition, tuberculosis is still called schachapeth in modern Hebrew. In pre-Hippocratic Greece Homer did not mention phthisis, a word meaning non-specific wasting of the body. However. Alexander of Tralles (6th century BC seemed to narrow the concept down to a specific disease, and in the Hippocratic Corpus (5th-4th centuries BC phthisis can be recognised as tuberculosis. It was predominantly a respiratory disease commonly seen and considered to be caused by an imbalance of bodily humours. It was commonest in autumn, winter and spring

  10. [Archaeology of tubercle bacilli and tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Kazuro; Maeda, Shinji; Murase, Yoshirou

    2010-05-01

    Accumulated information obtained in the 10 years since the clarification of the whole genome arrangement of tubercle bacilli has enabled us to presume a long history of tubercle bacilli from its first appearance on earth to the present epidemics in the world. It is presumed that tubercle bacilli appeared around 35,000 years ago through horizontal transfer mutation from a kind of environmental mycobacteria that could be tracked back 2,500,000 years, and expanded thereafter by 'bottleneck effects'. These mutated mycobacterial species adapted to humans, appearing in central Africa and then being carried to India-Oceanian and Middle East countries. The oldest human bone tuberculosis in a mummy of 9,000 years ago was found on the east coast of the Mediterranean Sea. Explosive transmission of tuberculosis was presumed to have progressed along with urbanized human life in the world-oldest Mesopotamian culture, followed by spreading to other areas, including East Asia, the Mediterranean region, Russia, and North Europe. The second epidemics, caused by a mutated Beijing family of the modern type, prevailed in central China and Southeast Asian countries, following the marked population growth in this area during the next 1,000 years. The majority of Beijing family strains isolated in Japan and Korea are, however, found to be of the ancient type, differing from the isolates from continental China, which are mainly of the modern type. The results of these studies may cast a new light on the understanding of tuberculosis epidemiology and also clinical medicine.

  11. Control of M. tuberculosis ESAT-6 Secretion and Specific T Cell Recognition by PhoP

    OpenAIRE

    Frigui, Wafa; Bottai, Daria; Majlessi, Laleh; Monot, Marc; Josselin, Emmanuelle; Brodin, Priscille; Garnier, Thierry; Gicquel, Brigitte; Martin, Carlos; Leclerc, Claude; Cole, Stewart T; Brosch, Roland

    2008-01-01

    Author Summary Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human tuberculosis is an extremely successful human pathogen in spite of its lack of classical virulence factors, such as toxins. The pathogenesis of this bacterium is closely linked with its ability to circumvent destruction by the host cell, which depends on a large variety of mycobacterial lipids and secreted proteins. Genome comparison of fully virulent strains with closely related, but attenuated strains that have lost the...

  12. Evolution and Diversity of Clonal Bacteria: The Paradigm of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Dos Vultos, Tiago; Mestre, Olga; Rauzier, Jean; Golec, Marcin; Rastogi, Nalin; Rasolofo, Voahangy; Tonjum, Tone; Sola, Christophe; Matic, Ivan; Gicquel, Brigitte

    2008-01-01

    International audience; BACKGROUND: Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species display relatively static genomes and 99.9% nucleotide sequence identity. Studying the evolutionary history of such monomorphic bacteria is a difficult and challenging task. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis of DNA repair, recombination and replication (3R) genes in a comprehensive selection of M. tuberculosis complex strains from across the world, yielded surprisingly ...

  13. The Response of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis to Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species

    OpenAIRE

    Voskuil, Martin I.; Bartek, Iona L.; Visconti, Kevin; Schoolnik, Gary K.

    2011-01-01

    The bacteriostatic and bactericidal effects and the transcriptional response of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to representative oxidative and nitrosative stresses were investigated by growth and survival studies and whole genome expression analysis. The M. tuberculosis reaction to a range of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations fell into three distinct categories: (1) low level exposure resulted in induction of a few highly sensitive H2O2-responsive genes, (2) intermediate exposure resulted i...

  14. [Preventive measures against tuberculosis in working facilities and companies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kiminori; Satou, Ken

    2007-03-01

    IMOTO (Taito Health Center, Tokyo) and Toru MORI (Research Institute of Tuberculosis, JATA). We surveyed environmental conditions in working places and domestic conditions of employees who were working for small-sized companies located in Taito ward, based on written questionnaires. The companies were selected as those which had the patients of tuberculosis in the past one-year period, and the number of employees was less than ten. Compared with control people, TB patients had more frequent smoking habit (p personnel with unspecified and high occupational contact with tuberculosis patients: Hidetoshi IGARI (Division of Control and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Chiba University Hospital), Kiminori SUZUKI (Chiba Foundation for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention). Tuberculosis prevalence is as high as 500-1500 per 100,000 peoples among the homeless and construction workers living in "Hanba", a bunkhouse. We surveyed their medical conditions through periodical or extraperiodical health check-up. We retrospectively analyzed some medical factors contributing to successful treatment of the disease. Hospital admission and enhancement of counseling opportunities were two factors leading to the success of the treatment. The ambulance attendants have a significant possibility to contact patients with TB and are high at risk of acquiring the infection. As there are often limited information on TB in patients in an emergency condition, it is difficult to protect themselves from its contagion properly. Periodical and extraperiodical health check-up is important for these personnel and application of QuantiFERON-TB 2nd generation to the personnel is new and useful for diagnosis

  15. Molecular Strain Typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a Review of Frequently Used Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ei, Phyu Win; Aung, Wah Wah; Lee, Jong Seok; Choi, Go Eun; Chang, Chulhun L

    2016-11-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis, remains one of the most serious global health problems. Molecular typing of M. tuberculosis has been used for various epidemiologic purposes as well as for clinical management. Currently, many techniques are available to type M. tuberculosis. Choosing the most appropriate technique in accordance with the existing laboratory conditions and the specific features of the geographic region is important. Insertion sequence IS6110-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis is considered the gold standard for the molecular epidemiologic investigations of tuberculosis. However, other polymerase chain reaction-based methods such as spacer oligonucleotide typing (spoligotyping), which detects 43 spacer sequence-interspersing direct repeats (DRs) in the genomic DR region; mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeats, (MIRU-VNTR), which determines the number and size of tandem repetitive DNA sequences; repetitive-sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR), which provides high-throughput genotypic fingerprinting of multiple Mycobacterium species; and the recently developed genome-based whole genome sequencing methods demonstrate similar discriminatory power and greater convenience. This review focuses on techniques frequently used for the molecular typing of M. tuberculosis and discusses their general aspects and applications.

  16. Radiologic diagnosis of lung tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenhuber, E.; Mostbeck, G.; Bankier, A.; Stadler, A.; Rumetshofer, R.

    2007-01-01

    The radiologic knowledge of tuberculosis-associated lung disease is an essential tool in the clinical diagnosis of tuberculosis. Chest radiography is the primary imaging method, but the importance of CT is still increasing, as CT is more sensitive in the detection of cavitation, of hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathie, of endobronchial spread and of complications in the course of the disease. In addition, CT has been proven as a valuable technique in the assessment of tuberculosis activity, especially in patients where M. tuberculosis has not been detected in the sputum or in patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Depending on the immune status of the patient, the morphologic spectrum of tuberculosis is quite variable. Early diagnosis of tuberculosis is essential to prevent further spread of the disease. (orig.) [de

  17. Nanomedicine for the Treatment of Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Zabih; Athar, Md Tanwir; Samad, Abdus

    2017-10-06

    The diseases tuberculosis, triggered by intracellular pathogens, is a major problem for the global medical professionals. Treatments for these diseases through conventional dosage form consist of long-term therapy with multiple drugs leads to several side effects and contribute to low patient compliance and drug resistance. The pathogens are fond to be situated in the intracellular compartments of the cells, which ultimately results in additional blockades to effective treatment. Therefore, improved and more efficient therapies for such intracellular diseases are required. Nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems are suitable for the treatment of illnesses such as tuberculosis. Due to the unique size-dependent properties, nanocarriers such as nanoparticles, liposomes, niosomes, microspheres offer the opportunity to develop new therapeutic and diagnostic tools. The ability to integrate drugs into nanosystems displays a new standard in pharmacotherapy that could be used for cell-targeted drug therapy. Experimental data showed the possibility of intermittent chemotherapy with the main antituberculosis drugs by employing nanocarriers. Besides the advantage of controlled release of medications in organs, the other benefits of the nanocarriers include the possibility of various routes of therapy,reduction in drug dosage and adverse effects, reduced possibility of drug interactions, and drug-resistant targeting.This review discuss the potential of nanomedicine and related patents to improve intracellular disease chemotherapy by offering benefits such as targeting to the specific organs, sustained and controlled drug release, tuberculosis diagnosis, drug delivery to the pathogen's intracellular location, and tuberculosis vaccine development. The properties of nanomedicine may prove beneficial in developing improved, efficacious or alternative therapies for tuberculosis diseases. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. XV Conferencia : Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Varón Rico

    1958-05-01

    Full Text Available La tuberculosis se puede evitar en el niño en varias formas: en primer lugar se puede hacer una profilaxis que se llama de disposición, o sea, como la consideran los autores alemanes, mediante las prácticas de una puericultura bien realizada, ojalá en todas las clases sociales, su nutrición, sus hábitos higiénicos y dietéticos correctos, se va levantando por medio de ello resistencia no sólo a la tuberculosis sino a todas las enfermedades.

  19. The Bandim tuberculosis score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolf, Frauke; Joaquim, Luis Carlos; Vieira, Cesaltina

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study was carried out in Guinea-Bissau ’ s capital Bissau among inpatients and outpatients attending for tuberculosis (TB) treatment within the study area of the Bandim Health Project, a Health and Demographic Surveillance Site. Our aim was to assess the variability between 2...... physicians in performing the Bandim tuberculosis score (TBscore), a clinical severity score for pulmonary TB (PTB), and to compare it to the Karnofsky performance score (KPS). Method : From December 2008 to July 2009 we assessed the TBscore and the KPS of 100 PTB patients at inclusion in the TB cohort and...

  20. Tuberculosis-Related Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aftab, Huma; Christensen, Dirk L.; Ambreen, Atiqa

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with newly diagnosed tuberculosis (TB) were screened for diabetes (DM) with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in Pakistan. A significant decrease in FPG was observed when TB was treated. Of those with newly diagnosed DM, 46% and 62% no longer had hyperglycemia after 3 and 6 months, respect......Individuals with newly diagnosed tuberculosis (TB) were screened for diabetes (DM) with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in Pakistan. A significant decrease in FPG was observed when TB was treated. Of those with newly diagnosed DM, 46% and 62% no longer had hyperglycemia after 3 and 6 months...

  1. Tuberculosis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Tania A

    2017-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the leading cause of death worldwide from a single bacterial pathogen. The World Health Organization estimates that annually 1 million children have tuberculosis (TB) disease and many more harbor a latent form. Accurate estimates are hindered by under-recognition and challenges in diagnosis. To date, an accurate diagnostic test to confirm TB in children does not exist. Treatment is lengthy but outcomes are generally favorable with timely initiation. With the End TB Strategy, there is an urgent need for improved diagnostics and treatment to prevent the unnecessary morbidity and mortality from TB in children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Tuberculosis and human rights].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Hideaki; Inagaki, Tomokazu; Toyoda, Emiko; Kawabe, Yoshiko; Fujiwara, Keiko; Masuyama, Hidenori; Takahashi, Shigeru

    2005-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) patients must be hospitalized while the smear of sputum is positive because TB spreads through air. Cooperation of a patient is important in order to complete the treatment of TB. However, a small number of patients are noncooperative for the treatment and may sometimes refuse it. At this symposium, we discussed about whether we could restrict the human rights of noncooperative TB patients. Although the patients' human rights must be protected, we also have to protect the human rights of people who may receive TB infection. The balance of the both people's rights is fully considered in the TB control policy. It is epoch-making that the TB society took up the theme about the human rights' restriction of TB patients. Five speakers presented their papers from each position. There were presentations about the scientific evidence of isolation, the actual cases, the situation of the United States, and the legal view on the human rights' restriction of TB patients. The present situation and the legal problems in Japan became clear at this symposium. We need further discussion about the human rights' restriction of TB patients for the revision of the Tuberculosis Protection Act and have to obtain the national consensus on it. 1. The evidence for isolation: Emiko TOYODA (International Medical Center of Japan) To determine appropriate periods of respiratory isolation, available biological, clinical, and epidemiological issues and data were studied. Although absolute lack of infectiousness requires consecutive culture negative and it takes too long and impractical periods. There seems to be no established evidence for noncontagiousness after 2 to 3 weeks effective treatment. Practically conversion to 3 negative consecutive smear results may used as a surrogate for noninfectiousness, even though a small risk of transmission still be present. Chemical isolation has been more important and administration with DOT should be indicated to keep compliance. 2

  3. Mechanistically Distinct Pathways of Divergent Regulatory DNA Creation Contribute to Evolution of Human-Specific Genomic Regulatory Networks Driving Phenotypic Divergence of Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinsky, Gennadi V

    2016-09-19

    Thousands of candidate human-specific regulatory sequences (HSRS) have been identified, supporting the hypothesis that unique to human phenotypes result from human-specific alterations of genomic regulatory networks. Collectively, a compendium of multiple diverse families of HSRS that are functionally and structurally divergent from Great Apes could be defined as the backbone of human-specific genomic regulatory networks. Here, the conservation patterns analysis of 18,364 candidate HSRS was carried out requiring that 100% of bases must remap during the alignments of human, chimpanzee, and bonobo sequences. A total of 5,535 candidate HSRS were identified that are: (i) highly conserved in Great Apes; (ii) evolved by the exaptation of highly conserved ancestral DNA; (iii) defined by either the acceleration of mutation rates on the human lineage or the functional divergence from non-human primates. The exaptation of highly conserved ancestral DNA pathway seems mechanistically distinct from the evolution of regulatory DNA segments driven by the species-specific expansion of transposable elements. Genome-wide proximity placement analysis of HSRS revealed that a small fraction of topologically associating domains (TADs) contain more than half of HSRS from four distinct families. TADs that are enriched for HSRS and termed rapidly evolving in humans TADs (revTADs) comprise 0.8-10.3% of 3,127 TADs in the hESC genome. RevTADs manifest distinct correlation patterns between placements of human accelerated regions, human-specific transcription factor-binding sites, and recombination rates. There is a significant enrichment within revTAD boundaries of hESC-enhancers, primate-specific CTCF-binding sites, human-specific RNAPII-binding sites, hCONDELs, and H3K4me3 peaks with human-specific enrichment at TSS in prefrontal cortex neurons (P Homo sapiens is driven by the evolution of human-specific genomic regulatory networks via at least two mechanistically distinct pathways of

  4. REMap: Operon Map of M. tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fang Fang; Stevens, Rick L.; Bishai, William R.; Lamichhane, Gyanu

    2016-01-01

    A map of the transcriptional organization of genes of an organism is a basic tool that is necessary to understand and facilitate a more accurate genetic manipulation of the organism. Operon maps are largely generated by computational prediction programs that rely on gene conservation and genome architecture and may not be physiologically relevant. With the widespread use of RNA sequencing (RNAseq), the prediction of operons based on actual transcriptome sequencing rather than computational genomics alone is much needed. Here, we report a validated operon map of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, developed using RNAseq data from both the exponential and stationary phases of growth. At least 58.4% of M. tuberculosis genes are organized into 749 operons. Our prediction algorithm, REMap (RNA Expression Mapping of operons), considers the many cases of transcription coverage of intergenic regions, and avoids dependencies on functional annotation and arbitrary assumptions about gene structure. As a result, we demonstrate that REMap is able to more accurately predict operons, especially those that contain long intergenic regions or functionally unrelated genes, than previous operon prediction programs. The REMap algorithm is publicly available as a user-friendly tool that can be readily modified to predict operons in other bacteria. PMID:27450008

  5. Correlates between Models of Virulence for Mycobacterium tuberculosis among Isolates of the Central Asian Lineage: a Case for Lysozyme Resistance Testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casali, Nicola; Clark, Simon O.; Hooper, Richard; Williams, Ann; Velji, Preya; Gonzalo, Ximena

    2015-01-01

    Virulence factors (VFs) contribute to the emergence of new human Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, are lineage dependent, and are relevant to the development of M. tuberculosis drugs/vaccines. VFs were sought within M. tuberculosis lineage 3, which has the Central Asian (CAS) spoligotype. Three isolates were selected from clusters previously identified as dominant in London, United Kingdom. Strain-associated virulence was studied in guinea pig, monocyte-derived macrophage, and lysozyme resistance assays. Whole-genome sequencing, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis, and a literature review contributed to the identification of SNPs of interest. The animal model revealed borderline differences in strain-associated pathogenicity. Ex vivo, isolate C72 exhibited statistically significant differences in intracellular growth relative to C6 and C14. SNP candidates inducing lower fitness levels included 123 unique nonsynonymous SNPs, including three located in genes (lysX, caeA, and ponA2) previously identified as VFs in the laboratory-adapted reference strain H37Rv and shown to confer lysozyme resistance. C72 growth was most affected by lysozyme in vitro. A BLAST search revealed that all three SNPs of interest (C35F, P76Q, and P780R) also occurred in Tiruvallur, India, and in Uganda. Unlike C72, however, no single isolate identified through BLAST carried all three SNPs simultaneously. CAS isolates representative of three medium-sized human clusters demonstrated differential outcomes in models commonly used to estimate strain-associated virulence, supporting the idea that virulence varies within, not just across, M. tuberculosis lineages. Three VF SNPs of interest were identified in two additional locations worldwide, which suggested independent selection and supported a role for these SNPs in virulence. The relevance of lysozyme resistance to strain virulence remains to be established. PMID:25776753

  6. 76 FR 35507 - Assistance to Southern Sudan and the United States Contribution to the Global Fund To Fight AIDS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-17

    ... Contribution to the Global Fund To Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund) for Fiscal Year 2009... the United States Leadership against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria Act of 2003, as amended, for... the United States Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria Act of 2003, as amended by...

  7. [Tuberculosis in Iceland. 1976].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdsson, Sigurdur

    2005-01-01

    Because of signs of tuberculous lesions in old skeletons it can be stated with certainty that tuberculosis has occurred in the country shortly after the settlement. From that time and up to the seventeenth century, little or nothing is known about the occurrence of the disease. A few preserved descriptions of diseases and deaths indicate that tuberculosis has existed in the country before the advent of qualified physicians in 1760. On the basis of papers and reports from the first physicians and the first tuberculosis registers the opinions is set forth that the disease has been rare up to the latter part of the nineteenth century. During the two last decades of that century the disease began to spread more rapidly and increased steadily up to the turn of the century. Although reporting of the disease was started in the last decade of the nineteenth century the reporting was first ordered by law with the passage of the first tuberculosis Act in the year 1903. With this legislation official measures for tuberculosis control work really started in the country. The first sanatorium was built in 1910. In 1921 the tuberculosis Act was revised and since then practically all the expenses for the hospitalization and treatment of tuberculous cases has been defrayed by the state. In the year 1935 organized tuberculosis control work was begun and a special physician appointed to direct it. From then on systematic surveys were made, partly in health centers i.e. tuberculosis clinics, which were established in the main towns, and partly by means of transportable X ray units in outlying rural areas of the country. In 1939 the tuberculosis Act was again revised with special reference to the surveys and the activities of the tuberculosis clinics. This act is still in force. Some items of it are described. The procedure of the surveys and the methods of examination are described. The great majority of subjects were tuberculin tested and all positive reactors X rayed. Furthermore, X

  8. Genome-wide analysis of ivermectin response by Onchocerca volvulus reveals that genetic drift and soft selective sweeps contribute to loss of drug sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R Doyle

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of onchocerciasis using mass ivermectin administration has reduced morbidity and transmission throughout Africa and Central/South America. Mass drug administration is likely to exert selection pressure on parasites, and phenotypic and genetic changes in several Onchocerca volvulus populations from Cameroon and Ghana-exposed to more than a decade of regular ivermectin treatment-have raised concern that sub-optimal responses to ivermectin's anti-fecundity effect are becoming more frequent and may spread.Pooled next generation sequencing (Pool-seq was used to characterise genetic diversity within and between 108 adult female worms differing in ivermectin treatment history and response. Genome-wide analyses revealed genetic variation that significantly differentiated good responder (GR and sub-optimal responder (SOR parasites. These variants were not randomly distributed but clustered in ~31 quantitative trait loci (QTLs, with little overlap in putative QTL position and gene content between the two countries. Published candidate ivermectin SOR genes were largely absent in these regions; QTLs differentiating GR and SOR worms were enriched for genes in molecular pathways associated with neurotransmission, development, and stress responses. Finally, single worm genotyping demonstrated that geographic isolation and genetic change over time (in the presence of drug exposure had a significantly greater role in shaping genetic diversity than the evolution of SOR.This study is one of the first genome-wide association analyses in a parasitic nematode, and provides insight into the genomics of ivermectin response and population structure of O. volvulus. We argue that ivermectin response is a polygenically-determined quantitative trait (QT whereby identical or related molecular pathways but not necessarily individual genes are likely to determine the extent of ivermectin response in different parasite populations. Furthermore, we propose that genetic

  9. Genome-wide transcript profiling of endosperm without paternal contribution identifies parent-of-origin-dependent regulation of AGAMOUS-LIKE36.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Shirzadi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Seed development in angiosperms is dependent on the interplay among different transcriptional programs operating in the embryo, the endosperm, and the maternally-derived seed coat. In angiosperms, the embryo and the endosperm are products of double fertilization during which the two pollen sperm cells fuse with the egg cell and the central cell of the female gametophyte. In Arabidopsis, analyses of mutants in the cell-cycle regulator CYCLIN DEPENDENT KINASE A;1 (CKDA;1 have revealed the importance of a paternal genome for the effective development of the endosperm and ultimately the seed. Here we have exploited cdka;1 fertilization as a novel tool for the identification of seed regulators and factors involved in parent-of-origin-specific regulation during seed development. We have generated genome-wide transcription profiles of cdka;1 fertilized seeds and identified approximately 600 genes that are downregulated in the absence of a paternal genome. Among those, AGAMOUS-LIKE (AGL genes encoding Type-I MADS-box transcription factors were significantly overrepresented. Here, AGL36 was chosen for an in-depth study and shown to be imprinted. We demonstrate that AGL36 parent-of-origin-dependent expression is controlled by the activity of METHYLTRANSFERASE1 (MET1 maintenance DNA methyltransferase and DEMETER (DME DNA glycosylase. Interestingly, our data also show that the active maternal allele of AGL36 is regulated throughout endosperm development by components of the FIS Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2, revealing a new type of dual epigenetic regulation in seeds.

  10. Basic Tuberculosis Facts

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-12

    In this podcast, Dr. Kenneth Castro, Director of the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, discusses basic TB prevention, testing, and treatment information.  Created: 3/12/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/12/2012.

  11. La tuberculosis pulmonar

    OpenAIRE

    Suñé Ysamat, Bertila

    1982-01-01

    La tuberculosis pulmonar todavía no es una enfermedad erradicada, aunque su incidencia ha disminuido considerablemente. El tratamiento y el pronóstico de esta enfermedad han dado un cambio profundo durante estos últimos 30 años con el descubrimiento de nuevos medicamentos antituberculosos.

  12. Cutaneous tuberculosis in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmalek, R; Mebazaa, A; Berriche, A; Kilani, B; Ben Osman, A; Mokni, M; Tiouiri Benaissa, H

    2013-09-01

    Tuberculosis is endemic in Tunisia. Pulmonary tuberculosis is the most common presentation in our country. Cutaneous presentations are rare (1-2% of cases). The diagnosis of cutaneous tuberculosis (CT) is difficult. Histological and clinical presentations are polymorphous, many differential diagnoses are available, and it is difficult to isolate Mycobacterium. We had for aim to study the epidemiological and clinical features of CT in Tunisia, and to compare presentations before and after 1990. We conducted a retrospective study between January 1991 and December 2011, in which we included all cases of CT observed at the Infectious Diseases and Dermatology Units of the Tunis la Rabta Hospital. Hundred and thirty-seven patients were included, with a mean age of 43.8years; 72.3% were female patients. Hundred and fifty locations were observed, most of which on the head and neck. Scrofuloderma was the most frequent presentation, observed in 65% of cases. The diagnosis was confirmed by histology and/or microbiology in 75.8% of cases. The treatment was prescribed for a mean 11.3months, leading to full recovery in most cases. CT is still reported in Tunisia. The diagnosis relies mainly on histology. Controlling this mutilating tuberculosis requires a global control of this disease, and especially lymph node location, given the high rate of scrofuloderma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Tuberculosis in African lions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, M.

    2013-01-01

    Lions (Panthera leo) are susceptible to Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) infection, resulting in bovine tuberculosis (BTB). This chronic, debilitating disease can affect multiple organs, particularly the lungs, and may ultimately lead to death of the infected animal. Cases of lion BTB have been

  14. Tuberculosis and anorexia nervosa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    recently our experience in the Eating Disorders Unit at Tara, where three patients with pulmonary tuberculosis were only diagnosed after admission for treatment of anorexia nervosa.· It appears that despite the presence of a persistent dry cough in each case, no investigation was undertaken. Did demographic stereotyping ...

  15. TUBERCULOSIS IN ORTHOPAEDICS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    D.M. Kamau, MBChB, MMed (Orth. Surg), UON,. Menelik Medical Centre, P.O. Box 55164-00200,. Nairobi, Kenya. Email: drkamaudm@gmail.com. REFERENCES. 1. Spiegel, D.A., Singh, G.K. and Banskota, A.K.. Tuberculosis of the musculoskeletal system. Tech. Orthopaed. 2005; 20:167-178. 2. WHO. Fact Sheet 104.

  16. Antigen smuggling in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2014-06-11

    The importance of CD4 T lymphocytes in immunity to M. tuberculosis is well established; however, how dendritic cells activate T cells in vivo remains obscure. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Srivastava and Ernst (2014) report a mechanism of antigen transfer for efficient activation of antimycobacterial T cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Tuberculosis Facts - TB and HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB and HIV/AIDS What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  18. Safety assessment in primary Mycobacterium tuberculosis smear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Safety assessment in primary Mycobacterium tuberculosis smear microscopy centres in Blantyre. Malawi: a facility based cross sectional survey. ABSTRACT. Introduction. Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is.

  19. TUBERCULOSIS AS AN INFECTIOUS PATHOLOGY OF IMMUNE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martynov AV

    2016-09-01

    antigens to provide high adhesion and allergenicity of human strains M. tuberculosis. Most allergens that cause obvious signs of active tuberculosis are the antigens ESAT6 and CFP10. Such protein antigens can be called endotoxins. Also to pathogenicity factors include cord-factor, it main component is a polysaccharide-mycolic complex from cell wall (Figure 2 containing ftiolic and mycolic acid - to ensure the stability of mycobacteria to lysosomal enzymes. Currently available diagnostic tools tuberculin preferably contain the above components of the cell wall and differences (from BCG allergens ESAT6 and CFP10. Currently well established that the virulence of M. tuberculosis, mainly responsible genes encoding antigens ESAT-6 and CFP10. When comparing the genomic sequence of M. tuberculosis with attenuated M. bovis BCG was detected genomic deletion of the three sites in the vaccine strain (RD1, RD2, RD3. BCG vaccine strain genome stripped areas in the RD1, encoding mycobacterial antigens ESAT-6 and CFP-10 present in virulent strains of M. tuberculosis. Many researchers believe that mutations in genomic regions RD1, encoding mycobacterial antigens ESAT-6 and CFP-10, occurred in the process of creating a BCG strain. It remains not examine the question of whether all strains of M. bovis other than BCG have antigens ESAT-6 and CFP-10, and whether they depend on the degree of virulence of the mycobacteria strains. About a third of the population is infected with the MBT. Tuberculosis statistics show that out of every 100 man infected MTB, only 10 appear open clinical forms. In the remaining patients, positive skin test and/or gamma-interferon test, clinical symptoms of tuberculosis never does occur, and no signs of sensitization other than to MBT antigens and presence ESAT6 - antibodies in the blood. Thus, if the focus is not on the infection, but on the prevention of tuberculosis reactivation, can significantly reduce the number of cases with clinical manifestations. There have

  20. Assessment of the contribution of cocoa-derived strains of Acetobacter ghanensis and Acetobacter senegalensis to the cocoa bean fermentation process through a genomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illeghems, Koen; Pelicaen, Rudy; De Vuyst, Luc; Weckx, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Acetobacter ghanensis LMG 23848(T) and Acetobacter senegalensis 108B are acetic acid bacteria that originate from a spontaneous cocoa bean heap fermentation process and that have been characterised as strains with interesting functionalities through metabolic and kinetic studies. As there is currently little genetic information available for these species, whole-genome sequencing of A. ghanensis LMG 23848(T) and A. senegalensis 108B and subsequent data analysis was performed. This approach not only revealed characteristics such as the metabolic potential and genomic architecture, but also allowed to indicate the genetic adaptations related to the cocoa bean fermentation process. Indeed, evidence was found that both species possessed the genetic ability to be involved in citrate assimilation and displayed adaptations in their respiratory chain that might improve their competitiveness during the cocoa bean fermentation process. In contrast, other properties such as the dependence on glycerol or mannitol and lactate as energy sources or a less efficient acid stress response may explain their low competitiveness. The presence of a gene coding for a proton-translocating transhydrogenase in A. ghanensis LMG 23848(T) and the genes involved in two aromatic compound degradation pathways in A. senegalensis 108B indicate that these strains have an extended functionality compared to Acetobacter species isolated from other ecosystems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. INFLUENCE OF IMMUNOLOGICAL DISORDERS ON AN OUTCOME FOR THE FIRST TIME DIAGNOSED INFILTRATIVE TUBERCULOSIS IN SOCIALLY SAFE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Mordyk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of immunological indicators in 76 first time diagnosed infiltrative tuberculosis of lungs in socially safe patients prior to treatment and in 2 months of chemotherapy was carried out. It is revealed that immunological disorders are connected with efficiency of tuberculosis treatment . It can be criterion of quality of provided chemotherapy. The activation of cell immunity, stimulation of phagocytosis activity of neutrophils would contribute for effective treatment of tuberculosis.

  2. Genomic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events and Multimedia Implementation Genetics 101 Family Health History Genomics and Diseases Genetic Counseling Genomic Testing Epidemiology Pathogen Genomics Resources Genomic Testing Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Fact Sheet: Identifying Opportunities to ...

  3. Radiographic differentiation of atypical tuberculosis from mycobacterium tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarver, R.D.; Pearcy, E.A.; Conces, D.J. Jr.; Mathur, P.N.

    1987-01-01

    The chest radiographs of 95 patients with the new diagnosis of atypical turberculosis were reviewed to determine if any significant differences between atypical tuberculosis and that caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis could be discerned. Findings included upper lobe involvement in B4 of the 95 patients and cavities in 76, with nearly equal groups having no, moderate, or extensive surrounding alveolar disease. Nodules were common; in six patients a nodule was the sole manifestation of disease. Adenopathy was seen in 12 of the 95 patients, atlectasis in 45, pleural thickening in 90, and effusions in three. These radiographic findings did not allow the radiographic differentiation of atypical tuberculosis from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

  4. Overview of errors in the reference sequence and annotation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, and variation amongst its isolates

    KAUST Repository

    Köser, Claudio U.

    2012-06-01

    Since its publication in 1998, the genome sequence of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv laboratory strain has acted as the cornerstone for the study of tuberculosis. In this review we address some of the practical aspects that have come to light relating to the use of H37Rv throughout the past decade which are of relevance for the ongoing genomic and laboratory studies of this pathogen. These include errors in the genome reference sequence and its annotation, as well as the recently detected variation amongst isolates of H37Rv from different laboratories. © 2011 Elsevier B.V..

  5. Changing patterns in pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tytle, T.L.; Johnson, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    The authors reviewed the initial chest roentgenograms of 182 consecutive adult patients with proven active tuberculosis. Less than 50% of all cases were known or suspected at the time of initial presentation. There is a low degree of correlation between radiologically discernible active pulmonary tuberculosis and extrapulmonary tuberculosis. A high percentage of cases represent uncommon pulmonary locations. The frequency of occurrence of four common pulmonary patterns is presented. 21 references, 4 figures, 5 tables

  6. [Treatment of tuberculosis. Current standards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaberg, T

    2015-12-01

    The treatment of drug-sensitive tuberculosis consists of 2 months of isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol, followed by 4 months of isoniazid and rifampin. These drugs are well tolerated and cure rate are above 95 %. In contrast the treatment of drug-resistent tuberculosis is difficult, mostly due to side effects of the drugs used under these circumstances. Therefore, any treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis has to be done by experts.

  7. Greater Trochanter Tuberculosis : MRI Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    My Youssef Alaoui Lamrani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis has been reported in almost all bones of body. The great trochanter tuberculosis (GTT installation is insidious and clinical symptoms are often vague with moderate painful swelling and stiffness. GTT is about 0,2 to 2% of all osteo-articular tuberculosis, occurring most commonly by hematogenous seeding secondary to primary focus elsewhere, more commonly in the lungs. Isolated GTT is unusual and thus its awareness is slow and diagnosis is often delayed.

  8. Pulmonary tuberculosis specificities in smokers

    OpenAIRE

    Rhanim Aziza; Hammi Sanae; Kouismi Hatim; Jamal Eddine Bourkadi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Smoking and tuberculosis are two major challenges in public health system. The aim of our study is to identify the impact of smoking on clinical, radiological manifestations and evolutive pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods: This retrospective case–control study examined the files of 104 patients. The patients monitored for pulmonary tuberculosis were divided into 2 groups. We studied the clinical and radiological profile, and evolution in both groups. Results: 104 patients were...

  9. Comparative mitochondrial and chloroplast genomics of a genetically distinct form of Sargassum contributing to recent "Golden Tides" in the Western Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral-Zettler, Linda A; Dragone, Nicholas B; Schell, Jeffrey; Slikas, Beth; Murphy, Leslie G; Morrall, Clare E; Zettler, Erik R

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 5 years, massive accumulations of holopelagic species of the brown macroalga Sargassum in coastal areas of the Caribbean have created "golden tides" that threaten local biodiversity and trigger economic losses associated with beach deterioration and impact on fisheries and tourism. In 2015, the first report identifying the cause of these extreme events implicated a rare form of the holopelagic species Sargassum natans (form VIII ). However, since the first mention of S. natans VIII in the 1930s, based solely on morphological characters, no molecular data have confirmed this identification. We generated full-length mitogenomes and partial chloroplast genomes of all representative holopelagic Sargassum species, S. fluitans III and S. natans I alongside the putatively rare S. natans VIII , to demonstrate small but consistent differences between S. natans I and VIII (7 bp differences out of the 34,727). Our comparative analyses also revealed that both S. natans I and S. natans VIII share a very close phylogenetic relationship with S. fluitans III (94- and 96-bp differences of 34,727). We designed novel primers that amplified regions of the cox2 and cox3 marker genes with consistent polymorphic sites that enabled differentiation between the two S. natans forms ( I and VIII ) from each other and both from S. fluitans III in over 150 Sargassum samples including those from the 2014 golden tide event. Despite remarkable gene synteny and sequence conservation, the three Sargassum forms differ in morphology, ecology, and distribution patterns, warranting more extensive interrogation of holopelagic Sargassum genomes as a whole.

  10. Extrapulmonary involvement in pediatric tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritsaneepaiboon, Supika; Andres, Mariaem M; Tatco, Vincent R; Lim, Cielo Consuelo Q; Concepcion, Nathan David P

    2017-09-01

    Tuberculosis in childhood is clinically challenging, but it is a preventable and treatable disease. Risk factors depend on age and immunity status. The most common form of pediatric tuberculosis is pulmonary disease, which comprises more than half of the cases. Other forms make up the extrapulmonary tuberculosis that involves infection of the lymph nodes, central nervous system, gastrointestinal system, hepatobiliary tree, and renal and musculoskeletal systems. Knowledge of the imaging characteristics of pediatric tuberculosis provides clues to diagnosis. This article aims to review the imaging characteristics of common sites for extrapulmonary tuberculous involvement in children.

  11. Tuberculosis in camelids: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernery, U; Kinne, J

    2012-12-01

    Tuberculosis is a chronic, contagious, granulomatous disease caused by mycobacterial species belonging to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Camelids were not considered highly susceptible to tuberculosis, but in recent years increased numbers of cases have been experienced in some countries. In most of the cases, transmission probably occurs through contact with infected cattle or wildlife. None of the ante-mortem tests currently available can consistently provide accurate diagnosis of the infection in live camelids. Recently developed serological assays have the potential for rapid and accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis but still need to be validated.

  12. Genetic contributions to variation in general cognitive function: A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in the CHARGE consortium (N=53 949)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Davies (Gail); N.J. Armstrong (Nicola J.); J.C. Bis (Joshua); J. Bressler (Jan); V. Chouraki (Vincent); S. Giddaluru (Sudheer); E. Hofer; C.A. Ibrahim-Verbaas (Carla); M. Kirin (Mirna); J. Lahti; S.J. van der Lee (Sven); S. Le Hellard (Stephanie); T. Liu; R.E. Marioni (Riccardo); C. Oldmeadow (Christopher); D. Postmus (Douwe); G.D. Smith; J.A. Smith (Jennifer A); A. Thalamuthu (Anbupalam); R. Thomson (Russell); V. Vitart (Veronique); J. Wang; L. Yu; L. Zgaga (Lina); W. Zhao (Wei); R. Boxall (Ruth); S.E. Harris (Sarah); W.D. Hill (W. David); D.C. Liewald (David C.); M. Luciano (Michelle); H.H.H. Adams (Hieab); D. Ames (David); N. Amin (Najaf); P. Amouyel (Philippe); A.A. Assareh; R. Au; J.T. Becker (James); A. Beiser; C. Berr (Claudine); L. Bertram (Lars); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); B.M. Buckley (Brendan M.); H. Campbell (Harry); J. Corley; P.L. De Jager; C. Dufouil (Carole); J.G. Eriksson (Johan G.); T. Espeseth (Thomas); J.D. Faul; I. Ford; G. Scotland (Generation); R.F. Gottesman (Rebecca); M.D. Griswold (Michael); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); T.B. Harris; G. Heiss (Gerardo); A. Hofman (Albert); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); S.L.R. Kardia (Sharon); N.A. Kochan (Nicole A.); D.S. Knopman (David); J.B. Kwok; J.-C. Lambert; T. Lee; G. Li; S.-C. Li; M. Loitfelder (Marisa); O.L. Lopez (Oscar); A.J. Lundervold; A. Lundqvist; R. Mather; S.S. Mirza (Saira); L. Nyberg; B.A. Oostra (Ben); A. Palotie (Aarno); G. Papenberg; A. Pattie (Alison); K. Petrovic (Katja); O. Polasek (Ozren); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); P. Redmond (Paul); S. Reppermund; J.I. Rotter; R. Schmidt (Reinhold); M. Schuur (Maaike); P.W. Schofield; R.J. Scott; V.M. Steen (Vidar); D.J. Stott (David J.); J.C. van Swieten (John); K.D. Taylor (Kent); J. Trollor; S. Trompet (Stella); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); G. Weinstein; E. Widen (Elisabeth); B.G. Windham (B Gwen); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); A. Wright (Alan); M.J. Wright (Margaret); Q. Yang (Qiong Fang); H. Amieva (Hélène); J. Attia (John); D.A. Bennett (David); H. Brodaty (Henry); A.J. de Craen (Anton); C. Hayward; M.A. Ikram (Arfan); U. Lindenberger; L.-G. Nilsson; D.J. Porteous (David J.); K. Räikkönen (Katri); I. Reinvang (Ivar); I. Rudan (Igor); P.S. Sachdev (Perminder); R. Schmidt; P. Schofield (Peter); V. Srikanth; J.M. Starr (John); S.T. Turner (Stephen); D.R. Weir (David R.); J.F. Wilson (James F); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); L.J. Launer (Lenore); A.L. Fitzpatrick (Annette); S. Seshadri (Sudha); T.H. Mosley (Thomas H.); I.J. Deary (Ian J.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractGeneral cognitive function is substantially heritable across the human life course from adolescence to old age. We investigated the genetic contribution to variation in this important, health- and well-being-related trait in middle-aged and older adults. We conducted a meta-analysis of

  13. Tuberculosis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnyani, C N; McIntyre, J A

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains an important infection in women globally. It is responsible for 700 000 deaths annually and is a major contributor to maternal mortality. Mycobacterium tuberculosis/HIV co-infection is common in areas of high HIV prevalence, and may be associated with significant perinatal and maternal morbidity. Improved diagnosis and treatment of TB in pregnant women are important interventions for both maternal and child health. Controlling TB in pregnancy in high-prevalence areas requires a range of interventions, including active TB screening in pregnant women, TB preventative therapy for HIV-infected pregnant women, treatment of active TB and linking mothers and children to TB care services. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © RCOG 2010 BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

  14. Tuberculosis ganglionar cervical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmany Leonel Mendoza Cruz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available La tuberculosis es una enfermedad reemergente en la actual sociedad globalizada y puede presentarse prácticamente ante cualquier especialista. Las formas extrapulmonares pueden representar hasta la cuarta parte de los casos, y entre ellos la afectación ganglionar se ubica entre las más frecuentes. Se reportan dos pacientes estudiados y tratados en el Servicio de Otorrinolaringología del Hospital General de Bata, Litoral de Guinea Ecuatorial, África Central, afectados por tumoraciones laterocervicales subagudas, con escasos síntomas y excelente evolución, tras su diagnóstico de tuberculosis ganglionar cervical y terapéutica antibiótica. Aunque la punción y aspiración con aguja fina no fue concluyente, ambos casos resultaron positivos por medio de la tinción de Ziehl-Neelsen

  15. Genome-wide association studies and susceptibility to infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newport, Melanie J; Finan, Chris

    2011-03-01

    Progress in genomics and the associated technological, statistical and bioinformatics advances have facilitated the successful implementation of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) towards understanding the genetic basis of common diseases. Infectious diseases contribute significantly to the global burden of disease and there is robust epidemiological evidence that host genetic factors are important determinants of the outcome of interactions between host and pathogen. Indeed, infectious diseases have exerted profound selective pressure on human evolution. However, the application of GWAS to infectious diseases has been relatively limited compared with non-communicable diseases. Here we review GWAS findings for important infectious diseases, including malaria, tuberculosis and HIV. We highlight some of the pitfalls recognized more generally for GWAS, as well as issues specific to infection, including the role of the pathogen which also has a genome. We also discuss the challenges encountered when studying African populations which are genetically more ancient and more diverse that other populations and disproportionately bear the main global burden of serious infectious diseases.

  16. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-10-28

    In this podcast, Dr. Oeltmann discusses multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. An outbreak occurred in Thailand, which led to 45 cases in the U.S. This serious illness can take up to 2 years to treat. MDR TB is a real threat and a serious condition.  Created: 10/28/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 10/28/2008.

  17. Primary prostatic tuberculosis: A rare form of genitourinary tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J.M. Ratkal

    HOSTED BY. Pan African Urological Surgeons' Association. African Journal of Urology www.ees.elsevier.com/afju · www.sciencedirect.com. Case report. Primary prostatic tuberculosis: A rare form of genitourinary tuberculosis. J.M. Ratkal. KIMS, Hubli, India. Received 6 August 2014; received in revised form 28 August 2014 ...

  18. Host immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and risk of tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Sascha Wilk; Soborg, Bolette; Agger, Else-Marie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human immune responses to latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection (LTBI) may enable individuals to control Mtb infection and halt progression to tuberculosis (TB), a hypothesis applied in several novel TB vaccines. We aimed to evaluate whether immune responses to selected LTBI...

  19. Tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional Tuberculosis as occupational disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Mendoza-Ticona

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Existe evidencia suficiente para declarar a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional en diversos profesionales especialmente entre los trabajadores de salud. En el Perú están normados y reglamentados los derechos laborales inherentes a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional, como la cobertura por discapacidad temporal o permanente. Sin embargo, estos derechos aún no han sido suficientemente socializados. En este trabajo se presenta información sobre el riesgo de adquirir tuberculosis en el lugar de trabajo, se revisan las evidencias para declarar a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional en trabajadores de salud y se presenta la legislación peruana vigente al respecto.There is enough evidence to declare tuberculosis as an occupational disease among healthcare workers. In Peru, there are regulations granting employment rights regarding tuberculosis as an occupational disease, such as healthcare coverage for temporary or permanent disability. However, these rights have not been sufficiently socialized. This study presents information on the risk of acquiring tuberculosis in the workplace, and a review of the evidence to declare tuberculosis as an occupational disease among health care workers, presenting the current Peruvian law related.

  20. Implication of the RD(Rio) Mycobacterium tuberculosis sublineage in multidrug resistant tuberculosis in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Susana; Duarte, Elsa L; Leite, Clarice Queico Fugimura; Ribeiro, João-Nuno; Maio, José-Nuno; Paixão, Eleonora; Portugal, Clara; Sancho, Luísa; Germano de Sousa, José

    2012-10-01

    Multidrug and extensively drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis are a threat to tuberculosis control programs. Genotyping methods, such as spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR typing (Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Units), are useful in monitoring potentially epidemic strains and estimating strain phylogenetic lineages and/or genotypic families. M. tuberculosis Latin American Mediterranean (LAM) family is a major worldwide contributor to tuberculosis (TB). LAM specific molecular markers, Ag85C(103) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and RD(Rio) long-sequence polymorphism (LSP), were used to characterize spoligotype signatures from 859 patient isolates from Portugal. LAM strains were found responsible for 57.7% of all tuberculosis cases. Strains with the RD(Rio) deletion (referred to as RD(Rio)) were estimated to represent 1/3 of all the strains and over 60% of the multidrug resistant (MDR) strains. The major spoligotype signature SIT20 belonging to the LAM1 RD(Rio) sublineage, represented close to 1/5th of all the strains, over 20% of which were MDR. Analysis of published datasets according to stipulated 12loci MIRU-VNTR RD(Rio) signatures revealed that 96.3% (129/134) of MDR and extensively drug resistant (XDR) clusters were RD(Rio). This is the first report associating the LAM RD(Rio) sublineage with MDR. These results are an important contribution to the monitoring of these strains with heightened transmission for future endeavors to arrest MDR-TB and XDR-TB. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from patients with tuberculosis in Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Senia; Pineda-García, Lelany; Ghebremichael, Solomon; Rastogi, Nalin; Hoffner, Sven E

    2010-08-03

    Tuberculosis persists as a public health problem in Honduras. A better knowledge of the molecular characteristics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains will contribute to understand the transmission dynamics of the disease within the country. The aim of this study was to provide an insight of the genetic biodiversity of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates collected in Honduras between 1994 and 2002. Genotyping was performed using spoligotyping and RFLP. The spoligotypes obtained were compared with the SITVIT2 proprietary database of the Pasteur Institute of Guadeloupe. Spoligotyping grouped 84% of the isolates into 27 clusters (2 to 43 strains per cluster). Of the 44 shared international types (SITs) identified among the Honduran stains, 8 SITs were newly identified either within the present study or after match with an orphan type previously identified in the SITVIT2 database. In addition, 16 patterns corresponded to orphan, previously unreported isolates.The Latin American Mediterranean (LAM) lineage was the most common in this study; 55% of the strains belonged to this family. Other genotypes found were Haarlem (16%), T (16%), X-clade (6%), Unknown signature (5%) and S (1%). Only one Beijing strain was identified (0.5%).We observed a high degree of diversity after characterizing the 43 isolates belonging to the main spoligotyping cluster (SIT 33, LAM3) with IS6110-RFLP. A total of 35 different RFLP-fingerprints were detected, of which 6 patterns corresponded to the same number of clusters comprising 14 strains. The findings obtained in this study show that tuberculosis transmission in Honduras is due to modern M. tuberculosis lineages with high level of biodiversity.

  2. Molecular diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from patients with tuberculosis in Honduras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghebremichael Solomon

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis persists as a public health problem in Honduras. A better knowledge of the molecular characteristics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains will contribute to understand the transmission dynamics of the disease within the country. The aim of this study was to provide an insight of the genetic biodiversity of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates collected in Honduras between 1994 and 2002. Genotyping was performed using spoligotyping and RFLP. The spoligotypes obtained were compared with the SITVIT2 proprietary database of the Pasteur Institute of Guadeloupe. Results Spoligotyping grouped 84% of the isolates into 27 clusters (2 to 43 strains per cluster. Of the 44 shared international types (SITs identified among the Honduran stains, 8 SITs were newly identified either within the present study or after match with an orphan type previously identified in the SITVIT2 database. In addition, 16 patterns corresponded to orphan, previously unreported isolates. The Latin American Mediterranean (LAM lineage was the most common in this study; 55% of the strains belonged to this family. Other genotypes found were Haarlem (16%, T (16%, X-clade (6%, Unknown signature (5% and S (1%. Only one Beijing strain was identified (0.5%. We observed a high degree of diversity after characterizing the 43 isolates belonging to the main spoligotyping cluster (SIT 33, LAM3 with IS6110-RFLP. A total of 35 different RFLP-fingerprints were detected, of which 6 patterns corresponded to the same number of clusters comprising 14 strains. Conclusions The findings obtained in this study show that tuberculosis transmission in Honduras is due to modern M. tuberculosis lineages with high level of biodiversity.

  3. Molecular diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from patients with tuberculosis in Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis persists as a public health problem in Honduras. A better knowledge of the molecular characteristics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains will contribute to understand the transmission dynamics of the disease within the country. The aim of this study was to provide an insight of the genetic biodiversity of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates collected in Honduras between 1994 and 2002. Genotyping was performed using spoligotyping and RFLP. The spoligotypes obtained were compared with the SITVIT2 proprietary database of the Pasteur Institute of Guadeloupe. Results Spoligotyping grouped 84% of the isolates into 27 clusters (2 to 43 strains per cluster). Of the 44 shared international types (SITs) identified among the Honduran stains, 8 SITs were newly identified either within the present study or after match with an orphan type previously identified in the SITVIT2 database. In addition, 16 patterns corresponded to orphan, previously unreported isolates. The Latin American Mediterranean (LAM) lineage was the most common in this study; 55% of the strains belonged to this family. Other genotypes found were Haarlem (16%), T (16%), X-clade (6%), Unknown signature (5%) and S (1%). Only one Beijing strain was identified (0.5%). We observed a high degree of diversity after characterizing the 43 isolates belonging to the main spoligotyping cluster (SIT 33, LAM3) with IS6110-RFLP. A total of 35 different RFLP-fingerprints were detected, of which 6 patterns corresponded to the same number of clusters comprising 14 strains. Conclusions The findings obtained in this study show that tuberculosis transmission in Honduras is due to modern M. tuberculosis lineages with high level of biodiversity. PMID:20678242

  4. Targeting phenotypically tolerant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Ben; Nathan, Carl

    2016-01-01

    While the immune system is credited with averting tuberculosis in billions of individuals exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the immune system is also culpable for tempering the ability of antibiotics to deliver swift and durable cure of disease. In individuals afflicted with tuberculosis, host immunity produces diverse microenvironmental niches that support suboptimal growth, or complete growth arrest, of M. tuberculosis. The physiological state of nonreplication in bacteria is associated with phenotypic drug tolerance. Many of these host microenvironments, when modeled in vitro by carbon starvation, complete nutrient starvation, stationary phase, acidic pH, reactive nitrogen intermediates, hypoxia, biofilms, and withholding streptomycin from the streptomycin-addicted strain SS18b, render M. tuberculosis profoundly tolerant to many of the antibiotics that are given to tuberculosis patients in a clinical setting. Targeting nonreplicating persisters is anticipated to reduce the duration of antibiotic treatment and rate of post-treatment relapse. Some promising drugs to treat tuberculosis, such as rifampicin and bedaquiline, only kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis in vitro at concentrations far greater than their minimal inhibitory concentrations against replicating bacilli. There is an urgent demand to identify which of the currently used antibiotics, and which of the molecules in academic and corporate screening collections, have potent bactericidal action on nonreplicating M. tuberculosis. With this goal, we review methods of high throughput screening to target nonreplicating M. tuberculosis and methods to progress candidate molecules. A classification based on structures and putative targets of molecules that have been reported to kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis revealed a rich diversity in pharmacophores. However, few of these compounds were tested under conditions that would exclude the impact of adsorbed compound acting during the recovery phase of

  5. [Tuberculosis and immigration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Coronas, Joaquín; Rogado-González, M Cruz; Lozano-Serrano, Ana Belén; Cabezas-Fernández, M Teresa

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis worldwide is declining. However, in Western countries this decline is slower due to the impact of immigration. Tuberculosis in the immigrant population is related to health status in the country of origin and with overcrowding and poverty conditions in the host country. Immigrants with tuberculosis are younger, have a higher prevalence of extrapulmonary forms, greater proportion of drug resistance and higher treatment default rates than those of natives. New molecular techniques not only reduce diagnostic delay time but also allow the rapid identification of resistances and improve knowledge of transmission patterns. It is necessary to implement measures to improve treatment compliance in this population group like facilitating access to health card, the use of fixed-dose combination drugs, the participation of cultural mediators and community health workers and gratuity of drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  6. Tuberculosis in Tanzanian wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleaveland, S; Mlengeya, T; Kazwala, R R; Michel, A; Kaare, M T; Jones, S L; Eblate, E; Shirima, G M; Packer, C

    2005-04-01

    Bovine tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium bovis, is a pathogen of growing concern in free-ranging wildlife in Africa, but little is known about the disease in Tanzanian wildlife. Here, we report the infection status of Mycobacterium bovis in a range of wildlife species sampled from protected areas in northern Tanzania. M. bovis was isolated from 11.1% (2/18) migratory wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) and 11.1% (1/9) topi (Damaliscus lunatus) sampled systematically in 2000 during a meat cropping program in the Serengeti ecosystem, and from one wildebeest and one lesser kudu (Tragelaphus imberbis) killed by sport hunters adjacent to Tarangire National Park. A tuberculosis antibody enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was used to screen serum samples collected from 184 Serengeti lions (Panthera leo) and 19 lions from Ngorongoro Crater sampled between 1985 and 2000. Samples from 212 ungulates collected throughout the protected area network between 1998 and 2001 also were tested by EIA. Serological assays detected antibodies to M. bovis in 4% of Serengeti lions; one positive lion was sampled in 1984. Antibodies were detected in one of 17 (6%) buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in Tarangire and one of 41 (2%) wildebeest in the Serengeti. This study confirms for the first time the presence of bovine tuberculosis in wildlife of northern Tanzania, but further investigation is required to assess the impact on wildlife populations and the role of different wildlife species in maintenance and transmission.

  7. Primary multidrug resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Supriya

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A 37-year old man presented at our institution with back pain, low-grade fever and weight-loss. X-ray of chest (postero-anterior view showed multiple opacities with erosion of right 2nd and left 6th ribs. CT-scan of thorax and CT-guided FNAC con-firmed the diagnosis of tuberculosis of ribs. Even after 5-months of treatment with four first line drugs, the patient developed a cold abscess at the back. Mycobacterial culture and drug sensitivity of material aspirated by Radiometric method from the cold abscess showed growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and those bacilli were resistant to both isoniazide and rifampicin. The patient did not have anti-tubercu-lar medication in the past, and that established the diagnosis of primary multidrug resistant tuberculosis of ribs. Patient was treated successfully with 2nd line drugs at the cost of moderate degree of hearing loss. After one and half years of treatment X-ray of chest (PA view showed complete healing of rib erosions with new bone formation.

  8. System-level strategies for studying the metabolism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beste, Dany J V; McFadden, Johnjoe

    2010-12-01

    Despite decades of research many aspects of the biology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis remain unclear and this is reflected in the antiquated tools available to treat and prevent tuberculosis and consequently this disease remains a serious public health problem. Important discoveries linking M. tuberculosis's metabolism and pathogenesis have renewed interest in this area of research. Previous experimental studies were limited to the analysis of individual genes or enzymes whereas recent advances in computational systems biology and high throughput experimental technologies now allow metabolism to be studied on a genome scale. Here we discuss the progress being made in applying system level approaches to studying the metabolism of this important pathogen. The information from these studies will fundamentally change our approach to tuberculosis research and lead to new targets for therapeutic drugs and vaccines.

  9. Rad54 is required for the normal development of male and female germ cells and contributes to the maintainance of their genome integrity after genotoxic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messiaen, S; Le Bras, A; Duquenne, C; Barroca, V; Moison, D; Déchamps, N; Doussau, M; Bauchet, A L; Guerquin, M J; Livera, G; Essers, J; Kanaar, R; Habert, R; Bernardino-Sgherri, J

    2013-08-15

    Rad54 is an important factor in the homologous recombination pathway of DNA double-strand break repair. However, Rad54 knockout (KO) mice do not exhibit overt phenotypes at adulthood, even when exposed to radiation. In this study, we show that in Rad54 KO mouse the germline is actually altered. Compared with the wild-type (WT) animals, these mice have less premeiotic germ cells. This germ cell loss is found as early as in E11.5 embryos, suggesting an early failure during mutant primordial germ cells development. Both testicular and ovarian KO germ cells exhibited high radiation sensitivity leading to a long-term gametogenesis defect at adulthood. The KO female germline was particularly affected displaying decreased litter size or sterility. Spermatogenesis recovery after irradiation was slower and incomplete in Rad54 KO mice compared with that of WT mice, suggesting that loss of germ stem cell precursors is not fully compensated along the successive rounds of spermatogenesis. Finally, spermatogenesis recovery after postnatal irradiation is in part regulated by glial-cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in KO but not in irradiated WT mice, suggesting that Sertoli cell GDNF production is stimulated upon substantial germ cell loss only. Our findings suggest that Rad54 has a key function in maintaining genomic integrity of the developing germ cells.

  10. Mitochondrial genome diversity in the Tubalar, Even, and Ulchi: contribution to prehistory of native Siberians and their affinities to Native Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukernik, Rem I; Volodko, Natalia V; Mazunin, Ilya O; Eltsov, Nikolai P; Dryomov, Stanislav V; Starikovskaya, Elena B

    2012-05-01

    To fill remaining gaps in mitochondrial DNA diversity in the least surveyed eastern and western flanks of Siberia, 391 mtDNA samples (144 Tubalar from Altai, 87 Even from northeastern Siberia, and 160 Ulchi from the Russian Far East) were characterized via high-resolution restriction fragment length polymorphism/single nucleotide polymorphisms analysis. The subhaplogroup structure was extended through complete sequencing of 67 mtDNA samples selected from these and other related native Siberians. Specifically, we have focused on the evolutionary histories of the derivatives of M and N haplogroups, putatively reflecting different phases of settling Siberia by early modern humans. Population history and phylogeography of the resulting mtDNA genomes, combined with those from previously published data sets, revealed a wide range of tribal- and region-specific mtDNA haplotypes that emerged or diversified in Siberia before or after the last glacial maximum, ∼18 kya. Spatial distribution and ages of the "east" and "west" Eurasian mtDNA haploclusters suggest that anatomically modern humans that originally colonized Altai derived from macrohaplogroup N and came from Southwest Asia around 38,000 years ago. The derivatives of macrohaplogroup M, which largely emerged or diversified within the Russian Far East, came along with subsequent migrations to West Siberia millennia later. The last glacial maximum played a critical role in the timing and character of the settlement of the Siberian subcontinent. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Genetic variants in MARCO are associated with the susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis in Chinese Han population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai-Juan Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Susceptibility to tuberculosis is not only determined by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, but also by the genetic component of the host. Macrophage receptor with a collagenous structure (MARCO is essential components required for toll like receptor-signaling in macrophage response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which may contribute to tuberculosis risk. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To specifically investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in MARCO gene are associated with pulmonary tuberculosis in Chinese Han population. By selecting tagging SNPs in MARCO gene, 17 tag SNPs were identified and genotyped in 923 pulmonary tuberculosis patients and 1033 healthy control subjects using a hospital based case-control association study. Single-point and haplotype analysis revealed an association in intron and exon region of MARCO gene. One SNP (rs17009726 was associated with susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis, where the carriers of the G allele had a 1.65 fold (95% CI = 1.32-2.05, p(corrected = 9.27E-5 increased risk of pulmonary tuberculosis. Haplotype analysis revealed that haplotype GC containing G allele of 17009726 and haplotype TGCC (rs17795618T/A, rs1371562G/T, rs6761637T/C, rs2011839C/T were also associated with susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis (p(corrected = 0.0001 and 0.029, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggested that genetic variants in MARCO gene were associated with pulmonary tuberculosis susceptibility in Chinese Han population, and the findings emphasize the importance of MARCO mediated immune responses in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis.

  12. Factors associated with mortality in patients with drug-susceptible pulmonary tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawamura L Masae

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis is a leading cause of death worldwide, yet the determinants of death are not well understood. We sought to determine risk factors for mortality during treatment of drug-susceptible pulmonary tuberculosis under program settings. Methods Retrospective chart review of patients with drug-susceptible tuberculosis reported to the San Francisco Tuberculosis Control Program from 1990-2001. Results Of 565 patients meeting eligibility criteria, 37 (6.6% died during the study period. Of 37 deaths, 12 (32.4% had tuberculosis listed as a contributing factor. In multivariate analysis controlling for follow-up time, four characteristics were independently associated with mortality: HIV co-infection (HR = 2.57, p = 0.02, older age at tuberculosis diagnosis (HR = 1.52 per 10 years, p = 0.001; initial sputum smear positive for acid fast bacilli (HR = 3.07, p = 0.004; and experiencing an interruption in tuberculosis therapy (HR = 3.15, p = 0.002. The association between treatment interruption and risk of death was due to non-adherence during the intensive phase of treatment (HR = 3.20, p = 0.001. The median duration of treatment interruption did not differ significantly in either intensive or continuation phases between those who died and survived (23 versus 18 days, and 37 versus 29 days, respectively. No deaths were directly attributed to adverse drug reactions. Conclusions In addition to advanced age, HIV and characteristics of advanced tuberculosis, experiencing an interruption in anti-tuberculosis therapy, primarily due to non-adherence, was also independently associated with increased risk of death. Improving adherence early during treatment for tuberculosis may both improve tuberculosis outcomes as well as decrease mortality.

  13. Cutaneous Tuberculosis – A Profile of Cases 3 Years Cross Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita P Javalgi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tuberculosis is an ancient disease known since pre-historic times and remains important infectious disease today in terms of morbidity, mortality and economic impact. Cutaneous tuberculosis makes up a small proportion (1.5% of all cases of extra pulmonary tuberculosis. In a recent study from India cases of cutaneous tuberculosis make upto 0.15% of all skin outpatients. Irrespective of immunodeficiency status, cutaneous tuberculosis still contributes markedly in morbidity of developing countries and it remains at times a diagnostic challenge in dermatology clinic due to its varied clinical manifestations and varied histomorphology, hence proper clinical management with assisted histopathological diagnosis, the morbidity can be reduced. Aim and Objective: To study clinical and morphological variants of cutaneous tuberculosis with age and sex distribution. Materials and Methods: 3 years prospective study was done in the Department of Pathology, Shri Nijilingappa Medical College, Bagalkot from 2009 to 2011. Total 267 skin biopsies were received in the histopathology section. The biopsy tissue was processed as per routine procedure and stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin stains and special stains (ZN with 20% H2SO4. Microscopic features were studied and diagnosis of cutaneous tuberculosis made with sub typing and clinical co-relation. Results: Out of 267 skin biopsies, 37 were diagnosed as cutaneous tuberculosis based on clinical examination and morphology, Lupus vulgaris (62.16% was a commonest variant affecting males (64.86% predominantly. Most frequent age group affected was 21-40 years (59.45%. Face and neck were the usual sites for manifestation. Forty one percent of cases were mantoux test positive. All cases were HIV negative and free from active pulmonary tuberculosis. Conclusion: Lupus vulgaris remains most frequent form of cutaneous tuberculosis in dermatopathology irrespective of HIV status. Strong clinical suspicion

  14. A Tuberculin Skin Test Survey and the Annual Risk of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Gambian School Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adetifa, Ifedayo M. O.; Muhammad, Abdul Khalie; Jeffries, David; Donkor, Simon; Borgdorff, Martien W.; Corrah, Tumani; d'Alessandro, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    A Tuberculin skin test (TST) survey was conducted to assess the prevalence of latent TB Infection (LTBI) and to estimate the annual risk of M. tuberculosis infection (ARTI) in Gambian school children. The results are expected to contribute to understanding of Tuberculosis epidemiology in The Gambia.

  15. VIH/SIDA- tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Peñuela-Epalza

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo general: Establecer la prevalencia y los factores asociados a la coinfección TBC/VIH-SIDA en adolescentes y adultos de la consulta externa y el servicio de hospitalización de las Instituciones Prestadoras de Servicios de Salud (IPS de Barranquilla de julio de 2003 a junio de 2004. Materiales y métodos: Estudio observacional descriptivo transversal realizado en 173 afiliados a las Empresas Promotoras de Salud (EPS, inscritos en los Programas de Control de VIH-SIDA. Fuente de información secundaria primordialmente, obtenida previa autorización de las instituciones y con el consentimiento informado de los pacientes. Variables estudiadas: demográficas, socioeconómicas, hábitos personales y clínicas (índice de masa corporal, Combe, enfermedades oportunistas, carga viral, recuento de CD4 y terapia antirretroviral. Para el análisis univariado y bivariado se utilizó el software Epi-Info versión 6.04d. Resultados: La mayoría de los pacientes fueron de sexo masculino y de estrato socioeconómico bajo (estratos 1 y 2. De los 173 pacientes VIH positivos estudiados, 19 fueron positivos para tuberculosis, con una prevalencia del 11%. La forma de tuberculosis predominante fue la pulmonar (17 casos. El análisis bivariado mostró asociación estadística significativa entre la presencia de tuberculosis y la concomitancia con enfermedades oportunistas previas o actuales (p=0.001, la fármacodependencia (p=0.026, el índice de masa corporal por debajo de 20 (p=0.042 y el bajo uso de terapia antirretroviral (p=0.0002. Aunque el recuento de linfocitos T-CD4 <200 u/L fue más común entre los pacientes con TBC y VIH que en los que solo estaban infectados por VIH, no se alcanzó a mostrar una relación estadísticamente significativa entre ellas. Conclusiones: La prevalencia de coinfección Tuberculosis-VIH/SIDA fue similar a la de varios países del Caribe y Centroamérica pero inferior a la de Jamaica. Se resaltó el predominio de la forma

  16. Tuberculosis vaccine strain Mycobacterium bovis BCG Russia is a natural recA mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Böttger Erik C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current tuberculosis vaccine is a live vaccine derived from Mycobacterium bovis and attenuated by serial in vitro passaging. All vaccine substrains in use stem from one source, strain Bacille Calmette-Guérin. However, they differ in regions of genomic deletions, antigen expression levels, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy. Results As a RecA phenotype increases genetic stability and may contribute restricting the ongoing evolution of the various BCG substrains while maintaining their protective efficacy, we aimed to inactivate recA by allelic replacement in BCG vaccine strains representing different phylogenetic lineages (Pasteur, Frappier, Denmark, Russia. Homologous gene replacement was achieved successfully in three out of four strains. However, only illegitimate recombination was observed in BCG substrain Russia. Sequence analyses of recA revealed that a single nucleotide insertion in the 5' part of recA led to a translational frameshift with an early stop codon making BCG Russia a natural recA mutant. At the protein level BCG Russia failed to express RecA. Conclusion According to phylogenetic analyses BCG Russia is an ancient vaccine strain most closely related to the parental M. bovis. We hypothesize that recA inactivation in BCG Russia occurred early and is in part responsible for its high degree of genomic stability, resulting in a substrain that has less genetic alterations than other vaccine substrains with respect to M. bovis AF2122/97 wild-type.

  17. TUBERCULOSIS IN A NIGERIAN MEDIUM SECURITY PRISON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    Prison, tuberculosis, control, mortality. INTRODUCTION. Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by mainly. Mycobacterium tuberculosis in humans1. .... LA, Santos DS. The resumption of consumption -- a review on tuberculosis. Mem Inst Oswaldo. Cruz. 2006; 101(7):697-714. 6. World Health Organization (WHO).

  18. TUBERCULOSIS IN AFRICA - ANY NEWS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERWERF, TS

    1994-01-01

    The tuberculosis situation in Africa in the AIDS era has become bleak. The tuberculosis incidence has increased in most sub-Saharan African countries, diagnosis has become more difficult, response to treatment, though initially good, is eventually less effective, and patient compliance, which has

  19. Risk for tuberculosis among children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakaoka, Hiroshi; Lawson, Lovett; Squire, S Bertel

    2006-01-01

    Contacts of adults with tuberculosis (TB) are at risk for infection. Tests based on interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) expression in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens may be more sensitive than the tuberculin skin test (TST). Risk for infection was assessed by using TST and an IFN...

  20. Tuberculosis: the implications for anaesthesia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S19. Anaesthetics Supplement: Tuberculosis: the implications for anaesthesia. S Afr Fam Pract 2014. Vol 56 No 2 Supplement 1. Introduction. Tuberculosis is a common problem, especially in the developing world. In 2010, the World Health Organization estimated 8.8 million new cases worldwide.1 South Africa is one of the ...

  1. Innate immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crevel, R. van; Ottenhoff, T.H.; Meer, J.W.M. van der

    2002-01-01

    The different manifestations of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis reflect the balance between the bacillus and host defense mechanisms. Traditionally, protective immunity to tuberculosis has been ascribed to T-cell-mediated immunity, with CD4(+) T cells playing a crucial role. Recent

  2. Tuberculosis, Fiji, 2002-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzoli, Lorenzo; Gounder, Shakti; Tamani, Talatoka; Daulako, Mary Raori; Underwood, Frank; Mainawalala, Sakiusa; Nawadra-Taylor, Vasiti; Rafai, Eric; Gillini, Laura

    2016-03-01

    During 2002-2013, a total of 1,890 tuberculosis cases were recorded in Fiji. Notification rates per 100,000 population increased from 17.4 cases in 2002 to 28.4 in 2013. Older persons were most affected, but tuberculosis also increased sharply in persons 25-44 years of age.

  3. Tuberculosis, Fiji, 2002–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gounder, Shakti; Tamani, Talatoka; Daulako, Mary Raori; Underwood, Frank; Mainawalala, Sakiusa; Nawadra-Taylor, Vasiti; Rafai, Eric; Gillini, Laura

    2016-01-01

    During 2002–2013, a total of 1,890 tuberculosis cases were recorded in Fiji. Notification rates per 100,000 population increased from 17.4 cases in 2002 to 28.4 in 2013. Older persons were most affected, but tuberculosis also increased sharply in persons 25–44 years of age. PMID:26890215

  4. Inhibition of phosphorylated Ser473-Akt from translocating into the nucleus contributes to 2-cell arrest and defective zygotic genome activation in mouse preimplantation embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junming; Lian, Xiuli; Du, Juan; Xu, Songhua; Wei, Jianen; Pang, Lili; Song, Chanchan; He, Lin; Wang, Shie

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorylated Ser473-Akt (p-Ser473-Akt) is extensively studied as a correlate for the activity of Akt, which plays an important role in mouse oogenesis and preimplantation embryogenesis. However, little progress has been made about its effect on the mouse zygotic genome activation (ZGA) of 2-cell stage in mouse preimplantation embryos. In this study, we confirmed its localization in the pronuclei of 1-cell embryos and found that p-Ser473-Akt acquired prominent nucleus localization in 2-cell embryos physiologically. Akt specific inhibitors API-2 and MK2206 could inhibit the development of mouse preimplantation embryos in vitro, and induce 2-cell arrest at certain concentrations. 2-cell embryos exposed to 2.0 μmol/L API-2 or 30 μmol/L MK2206 displayed attenuated immunofluorescence intensity of p-Ser473-Akt in the nucleus. Simultaneously, qRT-PCR results revealed that 2.0 μmol/L API-2 treatment significantly downregulated the mRNA pattern of MuERV-L and eIF-1A, two marker genes of ZGA, suggesting a defect in ZGA compared with that of control group. Collectively, our work demonstrated the nuclear localization of p-Ser473-Akt during major ZGA, and Akt specific inhibitors API-2 and MK2206 which led to 2-cell arrest inhibited p-Ser473-Akt from translocating into the nucleus of 2-cell embryos with defective ZGA as well, implying p-Ser473-Akt may be a potential player in the major ZGA of 2-cell mouse embryos. © 2016 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  5. Self-reported color-race and genomic ancestry in an admixed population: a contribution of a nationwide survey in patients with type 1 diabetes in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito Gomes, Marília; Brazão Gabrielli, Aline; Conte Santos, Deborah; Haas Pizarro, Marcela; Barros, Bianca S V; Antonio Negrato, Carlos; Atala Dib, Sergio; Cristóvão Porto, Luís; Silva, Dayse A

    2018-03-21

    The development of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and its chronic complications may have a genetic background. The primary objective of our study is to characterize the relationship between self-reported color-race and genomic ancestry (GA) in patients with T1D. As secondary objective, we aimed to characterize GA of patients with T1D from different urban geographical regions of Brazil, compared to healthy Brazilian controls from the same regions. This was a cross-sectional, nationwide survey conducted in 14 public clinics from 10 Brazilian cities. Global and individual GA were inferred using a panel of 46 ancestry informative markers (AIMs) in 1,698 T1D patients. Ancestry percentage was compared with published data of Brazilian healthy controls (n=936) for the same AIMs. A higher median individual European ancestry was observed in T1D patients in comparison to controls 67.8 [31.2] vs. 56.3 [25.7]%, respectively (median [IQR]; pself-reported color-race in T1D group, 923 (54.3%) participants reported to be White, 610 (35.9%) Brown, 132 (7.8%) Black, 18 (1.1%) Asian and 15 (0.9%) Indigenous. European GA prevailed in those who self-reported as White (74.6%) and Brown (61.1%) and constituted 39.1% in Black self-reported patients. Our study showed that T1D patients presented a higher percentage of European GA than the healthy population. Additionally, European GA was found in a considerable percentage of T1D patients who self-reported as non-white. Further studies are necessary to establish the influence of GA in the development of T1D as well its related chronic complications in admixed populations. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. TUBERCULOSIS IN CHILDREN IN IRKUTSK REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. Yu. Zorkaltseva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiology situation and factors its determinates was analyzed. Reports of tuberculosis hospitals used and results of observed two hundred and sixty-three children with tuberculosis. It was determinate that reasons of increase children morbidity of tuberculosis: bad epidemiology situation in adults in region, not all adult patients with tuberculosis was hospitalized, defects of prophylactic of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis in children having contact with tuberculosis was determinates earlier and structure of clinical forms was better than in children which have no contact.

  7. Transformative tools for tackling tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Jennifer L; Karp, Christopher L

    2015-10-19

    The world is in need of more effective approaches to controlling tuberculosis. The development of improved control strategies has been hampered by deficiencies in the tools available for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis and defining the dynamic consequences of the interaction of M. tuberculosis with its human host. Key needs include a highly sensitive, specific nonsputum diagnostic; biomarkers predictive of responses to therapy; correlates of risk for disease development; and host response-independent markers of M. tuberculosis infection. Tools able to sensitively detect and quantify total body M. tuberculosis burden might well be transformative across many needed use cases. Here, we review the current state of the field, paying particular attention to needed changes in experimental paradigms that would facilitate the discovery, validation, and development of such tools. © 2015 Gardiner and Karp.

  8. Radiology in silico-tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, H.

    1981-01-01

    In spite of a decreasing number of new cases of silico-tuberculosis even today there still remains a serious complication of silicosis. The job of radiology is to recognise the disease, evaluate the course of the disease during therapy and classify the disease for compensation purposes. Due to the pathogenetic and pathomorphologic similarities of silicosis and tuberculosis, it is often difficult and sometimes even impossible to recognise the presence of tuberculosis in cases of silicoses or to identify and isolate the TB component in silico-tuberculosis. Careful consideration of all radiological and clinical parameters improves the accuracy of diagnosis. Since the radiographic examination provides the only method of evaluating the morphologic state of the disease, radiology will keep its central position in the diagnosis of silico-tuberculosis. (orig.) [de

  9. Uracil excision repair in Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell-free extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Varshney, Umesh

    2011-05-01

    Uracil excision repair is ubiquitous in all domains of life and initiated by uracil DNA glycosylases (UDGs) which excise the promutagenic base, uracil, from DNA to leave behind an abasic site (AP-site). Repair of the resulting AP-sites requires an AP-endonuclease, a DNA polymerase, and a DNA ligase whose combined activities result in either short-patch or long-patch repair. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, has an increased risk of accumulating uracils because of its G + C-rich genome, and its niche inside host macrophages where it is exposed to reactive nitrogen and oxygen species, two major causes of cytosine deamination (to uracil) in DNA. In vitro assays to study DNA repair in this important human pathogen are limited. To study uracil excision repair in mycobacteria, we have established assay conditions using cell-free extracts of M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis (a fast-growing mycobacterium) and oligomer or plasmid DNA substrates. We show that in mycobacteria, uracil excision repair is completed primarily via long-patch repair. In addition, we show that M. tuberculosis UdgB, a newly characterized family 5 UDG, substitutes for the highly conserved family 1 UDG, Ung, thereby suggesting that UdgB might function as backup enzyme for uracil excision repair in mycobacteria. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cloning and Characterization of Secretory Tyrosine Phosphatases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Anil; Choidas, Axel; Treder, Martin; Tyagi, Anil K.; Drlica, Karl; Singh, Yogendra; Ullrich, Axel

    2000-01-01

    Two genes with sequence homology to those encoding protein tyrosine phosphatases were cloned from genomic DNA of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. The calculated molecular masses of these two putative tyrosine phosphatases, designated MPtpA and MPtpB, were 17.5 and 30 kDa, respectively. MPtpA and MPtpB were expressed as glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. The affinity-purified proteins dephosphorylated the phosphotyrosine residue of myelin basic protein (MBP), but they failed to dephosphorylate serine/threonine residues of MBP. The activity of these phosphatases was inhibited by sodium orthovanadate, a specific inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatases, but not by okadaic acid, an inhibitor of serine/threonine phosphatases. Mutations at the catalytic site motif, cysteine 11 of MPtpA and cysteine 160 of MPtpB, abolished enzyme activity. Southern blot analysis revealed that, while mptpA is present in slow-growing mycobacterial species as well as fast-growing saprophytes, mptpB was restricted to members of the M. tuberculosis complex. These phosphatases were present in both whole-cell lysates and culture filtrates of M. tuberculosis, suggesting that these proteins are secreted into the extracellular medium. Since tyrosine phosphatases are essential for the virulence of several pathogenic bacteria, the restricted distribution of mptpB makes it a good candidate for a virulence gene of M. tuberculosis. PMID:10986245

  11. Cloning and characterization of secretory tyrosine phosphatases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, A; Choidas, A; Treder, M; Tyagi, A K; Drlica, K; Singh, Y; Ullrich, A

    2000-10-01

    Two genes with sequence homology to those encoding protein tyrosine phosphatases were cloned from genomic DNA of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H(37)Rv. The calculated molecular masses of these two putative tyrosine phosphatases, designated MPtpA and MPtpB, were 17. 5 and 30 kDa, respectively. MPtpA and MPtpB were expressed as glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. The affinity-purified proteins dephosphorylated the phosphotyrosine residue of myelin basic protein (MBP), but they failed to dephosphorylate serine/threonine residues of MBP. The activity of these phosphatases was inhibited by sodium orthovanadate, a specific inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatases, but not by okadaic acid, an inhibitor of serine/threonine phosphatases. Mutations at the catalytic site motif, cysteine 11 of MPtpA and cysteine 160 of MPtpB, abolished enzyme activity. Southern blot analysis revealed that, while mptpA is present in slow-growing mycobacterial species as well as fast-growing saprophytes, mptpB was restricted to members of the M. tuberculosis complex. These phosphatases were present in both whole-cell lysates and culture filtrates of M. tuberculosis, suggesting that these proteins are secreted into the extracellular medium. Since tyrosine phosphatases are essential for the virulence of several pathogenic bacteria, the restricted distribution of mptpB makes it a good candidate for a virulence gene of M. tuberculosis.

  12. Implementation contexts of a Tuberculosis Control Program in Brazilian prisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Gonçalves Dutra de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze the influence from context characteristics in the control of tuberculosis in prisons, and the influence from the program implementation degrees in observed effects.METHODS A multiple case study, with a qualitative approach, conducted in the prison systems of two Brazilian states in 2011 and 2012. Two prisons were analyzed in each state, and a prison hospital was analyzed in one of them. The data were submitted to a content analysis, which was based on external, political-organizational, implementation, and effect dimensions. Contextual factors and the ones in the program organization were correlated. The independent variable was the program implementation degree and the dependent one, the effects from the Tuberculosis Control Program in prisons.RESULTS The context with the highest sociodemographic vulnerability, the highest incidence rate of tuberculosis, and the smallest amount of available resources were associated with the low implementation degree of the program. The results from tuberculosis treatment in the prison system were better where the program had already been partially implemented than in the case with low implementation degree in both cases.CONCLUSIONS The implementation degree and its contexts – external and political-organizational dimensions – simultaneously contribute to the effects that are observed in the control of tuberculosis in analyzed prisons.

  13. Laparoscopy in the diagnosis of tuberculosis in chronic pelvic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, Shalini; Gupta, Priyanka; Gupta, Bindiya; Kaur, Iqbal R; Goel, Neerja

    2016-09-01

    To estimate the prevalence of genital tuberculosis in women with idiopathic chronic pelvic pain on laparoscopy, correlate laparoscopic findings with microbiological and histological diagnosis of tuberculosis and assess the response to anti tubercular treatment (ATT) in these cases. In a prospective cohort study, fifty women with idiopathic chronic pelvic pain were enrolled. Diagnostic laparoscopy was done in all women and fluid from pouch of Douglas and/or saline washings were sent for acid fast bacilli (AFB) smear, conventional and rapid culture and DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis for diagnosis of genital TB. The results of these tests were analyzed and agreement with laparoscopy was assessed using Kappa statistics. Pain scores using visual analogue scale were compared before and after treatment. Pelvic pathology was present in 44 (88%) women of idiopathic chronic pelvic pain, with a 34% prevalence rate of genital tuberculosis. Pelvic inflammation was associated with positive peritoneal fluid PCR (n=4) and AFB culture (n=3). Acid fast bacilli PCR had substantial agreement (kappa statistics=0.716) with visual findings at laparoscopy. There was a significant reduction in pain scores after treatment. Genital tuberculosis contributes to one-third cases of chronic pelvic pain. Pelvic inflammation is an early feature of genital TB and peritoneal fluid PCR has the best co-relation with laparoscopic findings of genital tuberculosis. Copyright © 2016 Asian-African Society for Mycobacteriology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Common variants at 11p13 are associated with susceptibility to tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thye, Thorsten; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Vannberg, Fredrik O.; van Crevel, Reinout; Curtis, James; Sahiratmadja, Edhyana; Balabanova, Yanina; Ehmen, Christa; Muntau, Birgit; Ruge, Gerd; Sievertsen, Jürgen; Gyapong, John; Nikolayevskyy, Vladyslav; Hill, Philip C.; Sirugo, Giorgio; Drobniewski, Francis; van de Vosse, Esther; Newport, Melanie; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Nejentsev, Sergey; Ottenhoff, Tom H.M.; Hill, Adrian V.S.; Horstmann, Rolf D.; Meyer, Christian G.

    2012-01-01

    After imputation of data of the 1000 Genomes Project into a genome-wide data set of Ghanaian tuberculosis cases and controls, we identified a resistance locus on chromosome 11p13, downstream of the Wilms' tumour 1 gene. The strongest signal was obtained at SNP rs2057178 (P = 2.63 × 10−9). Replication in Gambian, Indonesian and Russian TB case-control study groups increased the significance level to P = 2.57 × 10−11. PMID:22306650

  15. LTBI: latent tuberculosis infection or lasting immune responses to M. tuberculosis? A TBNET consensus statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mack, U.; Migliori, G. B.; Sester, M.; Rieder, H. L.; Ehlers, S.; Goletti, D.; Bossink, A.; Magdorf, K.; Hölscher, C.; Kampmann, B.; Arend, S. M.; Detjen, A.; Bothamley, G.; Zellweger, J. P.; Milburn, H.; Diel, R.; Ravn, P.; Cobelens, F.; Cardona, P. J.; Kan, B.; Solovic, I.; Duarte, R.; Cirillo, D. M.

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculosis control relies on the identification and preventive treatment of individuals who are latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, direct identification of latent tuberculosis infection is not possible. The diagnostic tests used to identify individuals latently infected

  16. Factors associated with tuberculosis among patients attending a treatment centre in Zaria, North-west Nigeria, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waziri, Ndadilnasiya Endie; Cadmus, Simeon; Nguku, Patrick; Fawole, Olufunmilayo; Owolodun, Olajide Adewale; Waziri, Hyelshilni; Ibrahim, Luka; Biya, Oladayo; Gidado, Saheed; Badung, Samuel; Kumbish, Peterside; Nsubuga, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a global public health problem. In 2011, tuberculosis incidence was 133 per 100,000 in Nigeria. In Nigeria, little is known about the factors associated with tuberculosis, especially in the northern part and only few studies have characterized the Mycobacterium species that cause tuberculosis infection in humans. This study determined factors associated with tuberculosis and identified Mycobacterium species causing human tuberculosis in North-West, Nigeria. We conducted a hospital based case control study between April and July 2010 in Zaria. Cases were newly diagnosed sputum smear-positive tuberculosis patients >15 years while controls were patients >15 years attending the hospital for other reasons but were negative for tuber-culosis. We used a structured questionnaire to obtain information on demographics, knowledge of transmission of tuberculosis, and exposure to some factors. We preformed descriptive, bivariate and backward elimination logistic regression. Sputa from cases were analyzed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on genomic regions of difference. The mean ages of the cases and controls were 36, standard deviation (SD) 9.0 and 36, SD 9.7 respectively. Only 10 (9.8%) and nine (8.8%) of cases and controls respectively had a good knowledge of the transmission of tuberculosis. Contact with a tuberculosis patient (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 12.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 5.2-28.8), consumption of unpasteurized milk (AOR 6.4, CI 2.4-17.2), keeping pets (AOR 5.6, CI 2.3-13.7), associating closely with cattle (AOR 5.6, CI 1.3-6.8), and overcrowding (AOR 4.8, CI 1.8-13.1) were significantly associated with tuberculosis. Of the 102 sputa analyzed, 91 (89%) were M. tuberculosis, 8 (7.8%) were M africanum. We identified possible opportunities for intervention to limit the spread of tuberculosis. We recommend that the Nigeria tuberculosis control program consider some of these factors as a way to mitigate the spread of

  17. Insights on the Emergence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from the Analysis of Mycobacterium kansasii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Joyce; McIntosh, Fiona; Radomski, Nicolas; Dewar, Ken; Simeone, Roxane; Enninga, Jost; Brosch, Roland; Rocha, Eduardo P.; Veyrier, Frédéric J.; Behr, Marcel A.

    2015-01-01

    By phylogenetic analysis, Mycobacterium kansasii is closely related to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Yet, although both organisms cause pulmonary disease, M. tuberculosis is a global health menace, whereas M. kansasii is an opportunistic pathogen. To illuminate the differences between these organisms, we have sequenced the genome of M. kansasii ATCC 12478 and its plasmid (pMK12478) and conducted side-by-side in vitro and in vivo investigations of these two organisms. The M. kansasii genome is 6,432,277 bp, more than 2 Mb longer than that of M. tuberculosis H37Rv, and the plasmid contains 144,951 bp. Pairwise comparisons reveal conserved and discordant genes and genomic regions. A notable example of genomic conservation is the virulence locus ESX-1, which is intact and functional in the low-virulence M. kansasii, potentially mediating phagosomal disruption. Differences between these organisms include a decreased predicted metabolic capacity, an increased proportion of toxin–antitoxin genes, and the acquisition of M. tuberculosis-specific genes in the pathogen since their common ancestor. Consistent with their distinct epidemiologic profiles, following infection of C57BL/6 mice, M. kansasii counts increased by less than 10-fold over 6 weeks, whereas M. tuberculosis counts increased by over 10,000-fold in just 3 weeks. Together, these data suggest that M. kansasii can serve as an image of the environmental ancestor of M. tuberculosis before its emergence as a professional pathogen, and can be used as a model organism to study the switch from an environmental opportunistic pathogen to a professional host-restricted pathogen. PMID:25716827

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of vitamin B12-related metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Douglas B.; Comas, I?aki; de Carvalho, Luiz P. S.

    2015-01-01

    Comparison of genome sequences from clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with phylogenetically-related pathogens Mycobacterium marinum, Mycobacterium kansasii, and Mycobacterium leprae reveals diversity amongst genes associated with vitamin B12-related metabolism. Diversity is generated by gene deletion events, differential acquisition of genes by horizontal transfer, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with predicted impact on protein function and transcriptional regulation...

  19. Substantial molecular evolution and mutation rates in prolonged latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillebaek, Troels; Norman, Anders; Rasmussen, Erik Michael

    2016-01-01

    The genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) of latently infected individuals may hold the key to understanding the processes that lead to reactivation and progression to clinical disease. We report here analysis of pairs of Mtb isolates from putative prolonged latent TB cases. We identified tw...

  20. PhyTB: Phylogenetic tree visualisation and sample positioning for M. tuberculosis

    KAUST Repository

    Benavente, Ernest D

    2015-05-13

    Background Phylogenetic-based classification of M. tuberculosis and other bacterial genomes is a core analysis for studying evolutionary hypotheses, disease outbreaks and transmission events. Whole genome sequencing is providing new insights into the genomic variation underlying intra- and inter-strain diversity, thereby assisting with the classification and molecular barcoding of the bacteria. One roadblock to strain investigation is the lack of user-interactive solutions to interrogate and visualise variation within a phylogenetic tree setting. Results We have developed a web-based tool called PhyTB (http://pathogenseq.lshtm.ac.uk/phytblive/index.php webcite) to assist phylogenetic tree visualisation and identification of M. tuberculosis clade-informative polymorphism. Variant Call Format files can be uploaded to determine a sample position within the tree. A map view summarises the geographical distribution of alleles and strain-types. The utility of the PhyTB is demonstrated on sequence data from 1,601 M. tuberculosis isolates. Conclusion PhyTB contextualises M. tuberculosis genomic variation within epidemiological, geographical and phylogenic settings. Further tool utility is possible by incorporating large variants and phenotypic data (e.g. drug-resistance profiles), and an assessment of genotype-phenotype associations. Source code is available to develop similar websites for other organisms (http://sourceforge.net/projects/phylotrack webcite).

  1. A Molecular Biological and Biochemical Investigation on Mycobacterium tuberculosis MutT Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsiu-Lin; Su, Ho-Ting; Wu, Chung-Hsiun Herbert; Tsai-Wu, Jyy-Jih

    2014-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a vicious microbe co-existing with the infected host. This pathogen exploited opportunities to spread during periods of urbanization and social upheaval, and got retreated with improved hygiene. This investigation was designed to clone and characterize M. tuberculosis mutT gene, a homologue of a DNA repair protein in Escherichia coli. The aim was to depict the possible role of this homologue in the virulent microbe. A DNA fragment of the mutT gene was amplified with PCR from the genomic DNA of strain H37Rv M. tuberculosis. The expression vector was transformed into E. coli strains BL21 (DE3) and MK602 (DE3) (mutT-). The protein activity assay was performed by biochemical methods. M. tuberculosis MutT shares 23% identity with the E. coli MutT protein. The mutT gene DNA fragment was subcloned into the expression vector pET28a(+) and the recombinant plasmid was overexpressed in E. coli. Purified and refolded M. tuberculosis MutT possesses a dGTPase activity, which is one of the most well-known preference nucleotidase activities of MutT in E. coli. This study also showed that the dGTPase activity of M. tuberculosis MutT was enhanced by magnesium and inhibited by Ni(2+) or EDTA. Endogenous MutT protein in M. tuberculosis lysate displayed a smear pattern in the Western blot, suggesting instability of this protein in the bacteria similar to the important proteins, such as P53 protein, tightly regulated by protein degradation. The cloned M. tuberculosis mutT gene and MutT protein were characterized. M. tuberculosis MutT has a dGTPase activity, which is one of the most well-known preference nucleotidase activities of MutT in E. coli. These findings provide further understanding about the vicious bacterium.

  2. Characteristics of tuberculosis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a retrospective single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Takashi; Takayanagi, Noboru; Kagiyama, Naho; Yanagisawa, Tsutomu; Sugita, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the characteristics of hospitalized patients suffering from tuberculosis with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), focusing specifically on those treated without anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy. We conducted a retrospective review to assess the characteristics of 1,022 hospitalized Japanese patients suffering from tuberculosis with and without RA between 2002 and 2011. Compared with the 995 non-RA patients with tuberculosis, the 24 RA patients with tuberculosis treated without anti-TNF therapy were older and predominantly female. They less frequently had a history of smoking, with a higher rate of underlying respiratory diseases, an impaired performance status and side effects. The three RA patients receiving anti-TNF therapy had extrapulmonary tuberculosis; however, the rate of extrapulmonary tuberculosis in the other RA patients treated without anti-TNF therapy did not differ from that observed in the non-RA patients. Five patients died during hospitalization. The in-hospital mortality of the RA patients did not differ significantly from that of the non-RA patients. Independent factors contributing to in-hospital mortality did not include RA. In this study, the RA patients treated without anti-TNF therapy did not differ from the non-RA patients in terms of the rate of extrapulmonary tuberculosis or bilateral pulmonary lesions, although they did exhibit a higher frequency of side effects of antituberculosis treatment. RA was not found to be an independent factor contributing to in-hospital mortality.

  3. [Tuberculosis in Asia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-10-01

    1. Philippines: The development, expansion and maintenance of pilot area activities: Cristina B. Giango (Technical Division, Cebu Provincial Health Office, the Philippines) In 1994, the Department of Health developed the new NTP policies based on WHO recommendations and started a pilot project in Cebu Province in collaboration with the Japan International Cooperation Agency. To test its feasibility and effectiveness, the new NTP policies were pre-tested in one city and one Rural Health Unit. The test showed a high rate of three sputum collection (90%), high positive rate (10%), and high cure rate (80%). Before the new guidelines were introduced, the new policy was briefed, a baseline survey of the facility was conducted, equipment was provided, and intensive training was given. Recording/Reporting forms and procedures were also developed to ensure accurate reporting. Supervision, an important activity to ensure effective performance, was institutionalized. Laboratory services were strengthened, and a quality-control system was introduced in 1995 to ensure the quality of the laboratory services. With the implementation of DOTS strategy, barangay health workers were trained as treatment partners. In partnership with the private sector, the TB Diagnostic Committee was organized to deliberate and assess sputum negative but X-ray positive cases. The implementation of the new NTP guidelines in Cebe Province has reached a satisfactory level, the cure rate and positive rate have increased, and laboratory services have improved. Because of its successful implementation, the new NTP guidelines are now being used nationwide. 2. Nepal: The DOTS Strategy in the area with hard geographic situation: Dirgh Singh Bam (National Tuberculosis Center, Nepal) Three groups of factors characterize the population of Nepal: 1) Socio-cultural factors, e.g. migration, poverty, language; 2) Environmental factors, e.g. geography and climate; and 3) Political factors, prisoners and refugee

  4. Tuberculosis: a global emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, D

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of Tuberculosis (TB). Specifically addressed are the history of its development and treatment; its current resurgence; the global impact of this resurgence; the social issues responsible for the resurgence including poverty, homelessness, substance abuse, the HIV/AIDS epidemic, and increased immigration from TB endemic areas of the world; and the political, economic and ethical issues affecting its incidence today including inadequate funding, California's Proposition 187, pharmaceutical corporation profit motives, directly observed therapy and forced confinement of non-compliant patients.

  5. Tuberculosis among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Tadao; Matsushita, Hiroshi.

    1980-01-01

    Effects of atomic bomb on tuberculosis among atomic bomb survivors necropsied after 1956 when Atomic Bomb Hospital was opened were observed statistically and the following results were obtained. The morbidity of tuberculosis in the group exposed within 2 km from the hypocenter was higher than that of the control group, but there was not a significant difference between the both groups. The morbidity of all types of tuberculosis was significantly higher in the group exposed within 2 km from the hypocenter than in the control group. The morbidity of tuberculosis tended to decrease in both exposed and non-exposed groups with time. However, the morbidity of miliary or active tuberculosis has tended to rise in the exposed since 1975. The morbidity in young a-bomb survivors exposed within 2 km was higher than that in those of other groups, but there was not a difference in the morbidity among the aged. The higher the rate of complication of active tuberculosis with stomach cancer or acute myelocytic leukemia or liver cirrhosis, the nearer the places of exposure were to the hypocenter. Out of 26 patients with miliary tuberculosis, 6 were suspected to have leukemia while they were alive and were suggested to have leukemoid reaction by autopsy. They all were a-bomb survivors, and 4 of them were exposed within 2 km from the hypocenter. (Tsunoda, M.)

  6. Radiological manifestations of intestinal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Jae Hoon

    1974-01-01

    Radiological findings of 87 cases of intestinal tuberculosis are analyzed and presented. The diagnosis was based on histopathology in 29 cases, and on clinical ground and radiological findings in 58 cases. The radio of male and female patients was 4:6, and peak incidence is between 10 and 30. Abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, fever and general weakness are frequent symptoms, and tenderness of abdomen, ascites with abdominal distension, malnutrition and emaciation are frequent signs of the patients. Laboratory investigation reveal anemia, raised ESR, hypoalbuminaemia and positive occult blood reaction in the stool in most of the patients. Chest film show activity pulmonary tuberculosis in only 1/3 patients. There is no pathognomonic radiological findings in intestinal tuberculosis and their manifestations are protean, and differentiation from other inflammatory diseases and malignant tumors in gastrointestinal tract is very difficult on radiological ground alone. However, in patients with complaining vague abdominal symptoms and signs, the radiological diagnosis is most certain means in the decision of existence of organic lesion and suggestion of tuberculosis in the gastrointestinal tract and its extent as yet. Multiplicity of the lesion, involvement of adjacent organ such as peritoneum or mesenteric lymph nodes, typical nodularity or irregularity of mesenteric border and existence of active pulmonary tuberculosis are the suggestive findings of intestinal tuberculosis. In the diagnosis of inflammatory disease or malignant tumor of gastrointestinal tract, the possibility of tuberculosis should be borne in mind, and vice versa

  7. Tuberculosis diagnostic methods in buffaloes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Capriogli Oliveira

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The low productivity of buffalo herds and condemnation of carcasses in slaughterhouses due to tuberculosis lesions have resulted in increasing economic losses because these animals cannot be treated and must be destroyed by sanitary slaughter. Tuberculosis is a widely distributed zoonosis that affects the beef supply chain of the Brazilian agribusiness economically and socially. Like cattle, buffaloes are sensitive to Mycobacterium bovis, which is the main causative agent of zoonotic tuberculosis. Tuberculosis in buffaloes has been reported in several countries, including Brazil. In order to control and eradicate this disease among cattle and buffaloes in Brazil, the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, and Supply created the National Program for the Control and Eradication of Brucellosis and Tuberculosis with the main objective of finding a significant number of disease-free herds throughout the national territory using reliable methods. This review summarizes the main data on the history of occurrence of M. bovis in Brazilian herds and the diagnostic methods for the disease in buffaloes. Little information is available on buffalo tuberculosis. Due to the increasing population of buffaloes and their economic importance, more studies investigating the occurrence and identification of tuberculosis in this species are clearly needed.

  8. Fungal Genomics Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-03-12

    The JGI Fungal Genomics Program aims to scale up sequencing and analysis of fungal genomes to explore the diversity of fungi important for energy and the environment, and to promote functional studies on a system level. Combining new sequencing technologies and comparative genomics tools, JGI is now leading the world in fungal genome sequencing and analysis. Over 120 sequenced fungal genomes with analytical tools are available via MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a web-portal for fungal biologists. Our model of interacting with user communities, unique among other sequencing centers, helps organize these communities, improves genome annotation and analysis work, and facilitates new larger-scale genomic projects. This resulted in 20 high-profile papers published in 2011 alone and contributing to the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, which targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts). Our next grand challenges include larger scale exploration of fungal diversity (1000 fungal genomes), developing molecular tools for DOE-relevant model organisms, and analysis of complex systems and metagenomes.

  9. [THE RESULTS OF IMPLEMENTATION OF THE INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT LOAN PROJECT "PREVENTION, DIAGNOSIS, AND TREATMENT OF TUBERCULOSIS AND AIDS", A "TUBERCULOSIS" COMPONENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Due to the implementation of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) loan project "Prevention, diagnosis, treatment of tuberculosis and AIDS", a "Tuberculosis" component that is an addition to the national tuberculosis control program in 15 subjects of the Russian Federation, followed up by the Central Research Institute of Tuberculosis, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, the 2005-2008 measures stipulated by the Project have caused substantial changes in the organization of tuberculosis control: implementation of Orders Nos. 109, 50, and 690 and supervision of their implementation; modernization of the laboratories of the general medical network and antituberbulosis service (404 kits have been delivered for clinical diagnostic laboratories and 12 for bacteriological laboratories, including BACTEC 960 that has been provided in 6 areas); 91 training seminars have been held at the federal and regional levels; 1492 medical workers have been trained in the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with tuberculosis; 8 manuals and guidelines have been prepared and sent to all areas. In the period 2005-2008, the tuberculosis morbidity and mortality rates in the followed-up areas reduced by 1.2 and 18.6%, respectively. The analysis of patient cohorts in 2007 and 2005 revealed that the therapeutic efficiency evaluated from sputum smear microscopy increased by 16.3%; there were reductions in the proportion of patients having ineffective chemotherapy (from 16.1 to 11.1%), patients who died from tuberculosis (from 11.6 to 9.9%), and those who interrupted therapy ahead of time (from 11.8 to 7.8%). Implementation of the IBR project has contributed to the improvement of the national strategy and the enhancement of the efficiency of tuberculosis control.

  10. Oesophageal tuberculosis mimicking a tumour during treatment for nodal tuberculosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur, U; Katariya, S; Bhusnurmath, S R; Bambery, P; Dilawari, J B

    1993-01-01

    A patient with cervical lymph node tuberculosis developed a tubercular ulcer in the oesophagus eight weeks after starting treatment. This was probably due to a drug related hypersensitivity reaction in an adjacent mediastinal lymph node and subsided with continued treatment.

  11. Genital tuberculosis in females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Angeline Grace

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The morbidity and mortality due to tuberculosis (TB is high worldwide, and the burden of disease among women is significant, especially in developing countries. Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli reach the genital tract primarily by haematogenous spread and dissemination from foci outside the genitalia with lungs as the common primary focus. Genital TB in females is a chronic disease with low-grade symptoms. The fallopian tubes are affected in almost all cases of genital TB, and along with endometrial involvement, it causes infertility in patients. Many women present with atypical symptoms which mimic other gynaecological conditions. A combination of investigations is needed to establish the diagnosis of female genital TB (FGTB. Multidrug anti-TB treatment is the mainstay of management and surgery may be required in advanced cases. Conception rates are low among infertile women with genital TB even after multidrug therapy for TB, and the risk of complications such as ectopic pregnancy and miscarriage is high. More research is needed on the changing trends in the prevalence and on the appropriate methods for diagnosis of FGTB.

  12. TUBERCULOSIS: EPIDEMIOLOGY AND CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia Sulis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is a major public health concern worldwide: despite a regular, although slow, decline in incidence over the last decade, as many as 8.6 million new cases and 1.3 million deaths were estimated to have occurred in 2012. TB is by all means a poverty-related disease, mainly affecting the most vulnerable populations in the poorest countries. The presence of multidrug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis in most countries, with some where prevalence is high, is among the major challenges for TB control, which may hinder recent achievements especially in some settings. Early TB case detection especially in resource-constrained settings and in marginalized groups remains a challenge, and about 3 million people are estimated to remain undiagnosed or not notified and untreated. The World Health Organization (WHO has recently launched the new global TB strategy for the “post-2015 era” aimed at “ending the global TB epidemic” by 2035, based on the three pillars that emphasize patient-centred TB care and prevention, bold policies and supportive systems, and intensified research and innovation. This paper aims to provide an overview of the global TB epidemiology as well as of the main challenges that must be faced to eliminate the disease as a public health problem everywhere.

  13. Simultaneous immunization against tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elma Z Tchilian

    Full Text Available BCG, the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis, provides some protection against disseminated disease in infants but has little effect on prevention of adult pulmonary disease. Newer parenteral immunization prime boost regimes may provide improved protection in experimental animal models but are unproven in man so that there remains a need for new and improved immunization strategies.Mice were immunized parenterally, intranasally or simultaneously by both routes with BCG or recombinant mycobacterial antigens plus appropriate adjuvants. They were challenged with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb and the kinetics of Mtb growth in the lungs measured. We show that simultaneous immunization (SIM of mice by the intranasal and parenteral routes is highly effective in increasing protection over parenteral BCG administration alone. Intranasal immunization induces local pulmonary immunity capable of inhibiting the growth of Mtb in the early phase (the first week of infection, while parenteral immunization has a later effect on Mtb growth. Importantly, these two effects are additive and do not depend on priming and boosting the immune response. The best SIM regimes reduce lung Mtb load by up to 2 logs more than BCG given by either route alone.These data establish SIM as a novel and highly effective immunization strategy for Mtb that could be carried out at a single clinic visit. The efficacy of SIM does not depend on priming and boosting an immune response, but SIM is complementary to prime boost strategies and might be combined with them.

  14. Targeting protein biotinylation enhances tuberculosis chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Divya; Park, Sae Woong; Essawy, Maram M; Dawadi, Surendra; Mason, Alan; Nandakumar, Madhumitha; Zimmerman, Matthew; Mina, Marizel; Ho, Hsin Pin; Engelhart, Curtis A; Ioerger, Thomas; Sacchettini, James C; Rhee, Kyu; Ehrt, Sabine; Aldrich, Courtney C; Dartois, Véronique; Schnappinger, Dirk

    2018-04-25

    Successful drug treatment for tuberculosis (TB) depends on the unique contributions of its component drugs. Drug resistance poses a threat to the efficacy of individual drugs and the regimens to which they contribute. Biologically and chemically validated targets capable of replacing individual components of current TB chemotherapy are a major unmet need in TB drug development. We demonstrate that chemical inhibition of the bacterial biotin protein ligase (BPL) with the inhibitor Bio-AMS (5'-[ N -(d-biotinoyl)sulfamoyl]amino-5'-deoxyadenosine) killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( Mtb ), the bacterial pathogen causing TB. We also show that genetic silencing of BPL eliminated the pathogen efficiently from mice during acute and chronic infection with Mtb Partial chemical inactivation of BPL increased the potency of two first-line drugs, rifampicin and ethambutol, and genetic interference with protein biotinylation accelerated clearance of Mtb from mouse lungs and spleens by rifampicin. These studies validate BPL as a potential drug target that could serve as an alternate frontline target in the development of new drugs against Mtb . Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  15. Proteins with complex architecture as potential targets for drug design: a case study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bálint Mészáros

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Lengthy co-evolution of Homo sapiens and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the main causative agent of tuberculosis, resulted in a dramatically successful pathogen species that presents considerable challenge for modern medicine. The continuous and ever increasing appearance of multi-drug resistant mycobacteria necessitates the identification of novel drug targets and drugs with new mechanisms of action. However, further insights are needed to establish automated protocols for target selection based on the available complete genome sequences. In the present study, we perform complete proteome level comparisons between M. tuberculosis, mycobacteria, other prokaryotes and available eukaryotes based on protein domains, local sequence similarities and protein disorder. We show that the enrichment of certain domains in the genome can indicate an important function specific to M. tuberculosis. We identified two families, termed pkn and PE/PPE that stand out in this respect. The common property of these two protein families is a complex domain organization that combines species-specific regions, commonly occurring domains and disordered segments. Besides highlighting promising novel drug target candidates in M. tuberculosis, the presented analysis can also be viewed as a general protocol to identify proteins involved in species-specific functions in a given organism. We conclude that target selection protocols should be extended to include proteins with complex domain architectures instead of focusing on sequentially unique and essential proteins only.

  16. BCG: the only available vaccine against tuberculosis: review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roghayeh Teimourpour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite advances in the vaccinology and chemotherapy in the past century, tuberculosis is still responsible for two million deaths every year. Emergence of multi-drug resistant strain and coinfection of TB-HIV make it a serious concern. Treatment and control of tuberculosis is a great health burden in every community. Active tuberculosis in children has very severe consequences especially those who are under 5-years-old, therefore vaccine indication should be taken. Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG is a live attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis that has been used for providing immunity or protection against tuberculosis (TB. In addition, BCG provides relative protection against leprosy and Buruli ulcer, it also can be used for treatment of bladder cancer. BCG is the most widely administered vaccine around the world. It has been given to over three billion individuals over the past decades. At first it was developed in 1908 at the Pasteur Institute in Lille by Albert Calmette and Camille Guérin. In fact BCG is a strain of Mycobacterium bovis that bear deletion in its genome following too long subculture in special media. Deletion in region of deletion 1 (RD1, a specific region of Mycobacterium bovis genome, has decreased pathogenicity of BCG strain. Following culture of BCG on different media since 1921 make genetic variation in the BCG strains that have specific characteristics. BCG should begin given to only immune-competent individuals and should not be administered to immunocompromised people. This vaccine is not effective in people formerly infected or sensitized with environmental mycobacteria. Previous meta-analysis studies indicate that BCG has variable range of protection from 0 to 80 percent against pulmonary TB, but is very effective against severe disseminated forms such as meningitis and miliary form of TB. Despite many research and develop new generation vaccine against TB, BCG vaccine still remains as the only

  17. Local genes for local bacteria: Evidence of allopatry in the genomes of transatlantic Campylobacter populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Ben; Méric, Guillaume; Yahara, Koji; Wimalarathna, Helen; Murray, Susan; Hitchings, Matthew D; Sproston, Emma L; Carrillo, Catherine D; Taboada, Eduardo N; Cooper, Kerry K; Huynh, Steven; Cody, Alison J; Jolley, Keith A; Maiden, Martin C J; McCarthy, Noel D; Didelot, Xavier; Parker, Craig T; Sheppard, Samuel K

    2017-09-01

    The genetic structure of bacterial populations can be related to geographical locations of isolation. In some species, there is a strong correlation between geographical distance and genetic distance, which can be caused by different evolutionary mechanisms. Patterns of ancient admixture in Helicobacter pylori can be reconstructed in concordance with past human migration, whereas in Mycobacterium tuberculosis it is the lack of recombination that causes allopatric clusters. In Campylobacter, analyses of genomic data and molecular typing have been successful in determining the reservoir host species, but not geographical origin. We investigated biogeographical variation in highly recombining genes to determine the extent of clustering between genomes from geographically distinct Campylobacter populations. Whole-genome sequences from 294 Campylobacter isolates from North America and the UK were analysed. Isolates from within the same country shared more recently recombined DNA than isolates from different countries. Using 15 UK/American closely matched pairs of isolates that shared ancestors, we identify regions that have frequently and recently recombined to test their correlation with geographical origin. The seven genes that demonstrated the greatest clustering by geography were used in an attribution model to infer geographical origin which was tested using a further 383 UK clinical isolates to detect signatures of recent foreign travel. Patient records indicated that in 46 cases, travel abroad had occurred Campylobacter genomes will contribute to improved source attribution of clinical Campylobacter infection and inform intervention strategies to reduce campylobacteriosis. © 2017 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Genomic Prediction in Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edriss, Vahid; Cericola, Fabio; Jensen, Jens D

    2015-01-01

    Genomic prediction uses markers (SNPs) across the whole genome to predict individual breeding values at an early growth stage potentially before large scale phenotyping. One of the applications of genomic prediction in plant breeding is to identify the best individual candidate lines to contribute...... to next generation. The main goal of this study was to see the potential of using genomic prediction in a commercial Barley breeding program. The data used in this study was from Nordic Seed company which is located in Denmark. Around 350 advanced lines were genotyped with 9K Barely chip from Illumina....... Traits used in this study were grain yield, plant height and heading date. Heading date is number days it takes after 1st June for plant to head. Heritabilities were 0.33, 0.44 and 0.48 for yield, height and heading, respectively for the average of nine plots. The GBLUP model was used for genomic...

  19. Crystal structure of DNA polymerase III β sliding clamp from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Wen-Jun; Lin, Shi-Qiang; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Xian-En; Bi, Li-Jun; Jiang, Tao

    2011-02-11

    The sliding clamp is a key component of DNA polymerase III (Pol III) required for genome replication. It is known to function with diverse DNA repair proteins and cell cycle-control proteins, making it a potential drug target. To extend our understanding of the structure/function relationship of the sliding clamp, we solved the crystal structure of the sliding clamp from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), a human pathogen that causes most cases of tuberculosis (TB). The sliding clamp from M. tuberculosis forms a ring-shaped head-to-tail dimer with three domains per subunit. Each domain contains two α helices in the inner ring that lie against two β sheets in the outer ring. Previous studies have indicated that many Escherichia coli clamp-binding proteins have a conserved LF sequence, which is critical for binding to the hydrophobic region of the sliding clamp. Here, we analyzed the binding affinities of the M. tuberculosis sliding clamp and peptides derived from the α and δ subunits of Pol III, which indicated that the LF motif also plays an important role in the binding of the α and δ subunits to the sliding clamp of M. tuberculosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The roles of microRNAs on tuberculosis infection: meaning or myth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harapan, Harapan; Fitra, Fitra; Ichsan, Ichsan; Mulyadi, Mulyadi; Miotto, Paolo; Hasan, Nabeeh A; Calado, Marta; Cirillo, Daniela M

    2013-11-01

    The central proteins for protection against tuberculosis are attributed to interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β, while IL-10 primarily suppresses anti-mycobacterial responses. Several studies found alteration of expression profile of genes involved in anti-mycobacterial responses in macrophages and natural killer (NK) cells from active and latent tuberculosis and from tuberculosis and healthy controls. This alteration of cellular composition might be regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs). Albeit only 1% of the genomic transcripts in mammalian cells encode miRNA, they are predicted to control the activity of more than 60% of all protein-coding genes and they have a huge influence in pathogenesis theory, diagnosis and treatment approach to some diseases. Several miRNAs have been found to regulate T cell differentiation and function and have critical role in regulating the innate function of macrophages, dendritic cells and NK cells. Here, we have reviewed the role of miRNAs implicated in tuberculosis infection, especially related to their new roles in the molecular pathology of tuberculosis immunology and as new targets for future tuberculosis diagnostics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Multidrug resistant tuberculosis diagnosed by synovial fluid analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. van Zeller

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis remains a major public health problem worldwide. HIV co-infection is contributing to an increased incidence of the disease, particularly that caused by multidrug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT. We describe an HIV-infected patient with pleural and lymph node tuberculosis diagnosed by pleural effusion characteristics and biopsy specimens, without MT identification, that further presented with knee-joint involvement. Arthrocentesis allowed MT isolation and drug susceptibility testing, resulting in a diagnosis of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and an appropriate treatment regimen.MT identification and drug susceptibility tests are very important, especially for HIV co-infected patients. Resumo: A tuberculose constitui um importante problema de saúde pública mundial. A co-infecção pelo HIV contribui para o aumento da incidência da doença e em particular a causada por estirpes de Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT multirresistentes. Os autores descrevem um doente HIV-positivo com tuberculose pleural e ganglionar diagnosticada pelas características bioquímicas do líquido pleural e resultados anatomo-patológicos de biopsias mas sem identificação do agente, que posteriormente apresentou envolvimento do joelho. A artrocentese do joelho permitiu o isolamento do MT e a realização de teste de sensibilidade possibilitando o diagnóstico de tuberculose multirresistente e a instituição de um esquema terapêutico adequado.A identificação do MT e a realização de testes de sensibilidade são muito importantes, especialmente em doentes com co-infecção por HIV. Keywords: Multidrug resistant tuberculosis, Drug susceptibility test, HIV, Palavras-chave: Tuberculose multirresistente, Teste de sensibilidade aos antimicrobiana, Infecção VIH

  2. Imaging diagnosis of breast tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Oh, Ki Keun

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the radiologic findings of breast tuberculosis. The authors evaluated the radiologic findings of five cases of surgically confirmed tuberculosis of the breast. Patients were examined with mammography (n=5), ultrasonography (n=3), and MRI (n=2). All patients were female. Four patients had unilateral lesion and the remaining one patient had bilateral breast tuberculosis. Mammographic findings were mainly radiopaque mass density without secondary signs. Two patients showed secondary signs such as skin thickening, parenchymal distortion, and nipple retraction. Ultrasonographic findings were variable but helpful in differentiating benign from malignant breast lesion, MRI findings were more helpful in differentiating abscess from malignant lesions. Radiologic findings were useful to diagnose tuberculosis of the breast, but fine needle aspiration biopsy and culture were needed for suspicious radiologic findings

  3. Radiologic observation of renal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. W.; Ra, Y. W.; Kim, Y. J.

    1981-01-01

    Radiographic findings of thirty eight cases of renal tuberculosis treated at this hospital during last 4 years were analysed with following results. The cases examined were 24 male and 14 female patients. Age distribution was broad and evenly distributed ranging from 2nd decades to 5th decades. Main symptoms complained were urinary frequency, hematuria, dysuria and flank pain. Findings of physical examination revealed tenderness of costovertebral angle, palpable mass on flank area and epididymal indutration. The simple chest films showed pulmonary tuberculosis in 22 cases including 6 cases of active military type. Thirty one cases showed increased ESR, 8 cases showed AFB positive in urine and 12 cases showed bilateral renal tuberculosis. Through urographic findings nonvisualization, cyceopelviectasis, motheaten appearance of minor calyx, contracted bladder, delayed visualization, ureteral stricture and beading were observed in order of frequency. Five cases with miliary tuberculosis showed advanced renal lesion on urogram

  4. Novel nanoparticles for Tuberculosis chemotherapy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Semete, B

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Current therapeutic management of tuberculosis is inadequate due to non-compliance, lengthy course of treatment and drug- related side effects. In order to address these setbacks, the authors are developing a nanotechnology drug delivery system...

  5. Peritonitis due to genital tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Mikkelsen, A L; Siemssen, O J

    1985-01-01

    A case of genital tuberculosis is presented. The diagnosis was made by laparotomy and histological examination of biopsies from peritoneum and the Fallopian tube. The literature is reviewed and the diagnostic approach and treatment discussed....

  6. Pulmonary tuberculosis specificities in smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhanim Aziza

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Our study raised the harmful impact of smoking on the clinical and radiological presentation of tuberculosis, and late bacteriological negativity, therefore we need to integrate smoking control into the national TB control program.

  7. Peritonitis due to genital tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Mikkelsen, A L; Siemssen, O J

    1985-01-01

    A case of genital tuberculosis is presented. The diagnosis was made by laparotomy and histological examination of biopsies from peritoneum and the Fallopian tube. The literature is reviewed and the diagnostic approach and treatment discussed.......A case of genital tuberculosis is presented. The diagnosis was made by laparotomy and histological examination of biopsies from peritoneum and the Fallopian tube. The literature is reviewed and the diagnostic approach and treatment discussed....

  8. Psoriatic Disease and Tuberculosis Nowadays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Balato

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic, relapsing and remitting inflammatory skin and joint disease that has a prevalence of 2-3% in the world’s population, whereas of 1–2% in Europe. The traditional concept of psoriasis as the “healthy people’s” disease has been recently revised because of ever-increasing reports of associations with various pathological conditions (hypertension, Crohn’s disease, type II diabetes mellitus, obesity, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome, infectious conditions. Particularly, advances in psoriasis therapies have introduced biologic agents. All the tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors are associated with an increased risk of developing active disease in patients with latent tuberculosis infection, because of TNF-α key role against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. For this reason, exclusion of active tuberculosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection are clinical imperatives prior to starting this therapy. Moreover active surveillance for a history of untreated or partially treated tuberculosis or latent form has already been shown to be effective in reducing the number of incident tuberculosis cases.

  9. Radiological manifestations of pulmonary tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreu, J. E-mail: andreuj@hg.vhebron.es; Caceres, J.; Pallisa, E.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M

    2004-08-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is a common worldwide lung infection. The radiological features show considerable variation, but in most cases they are characteristic enough to suggest the diagnosis. Classically, tuberculosis is divided into primary, common in childhood, and postprimary, usually presenting in adults. The most characteristic radiological feature in primary tuberculosis is lymphadenopathy. On enhanced CT, hilar and mediastinal nodes with a central hypodense area suggest the diagnosis. Cavitation is the hallmark of postprimary tuberculosis and appears in around half of patients. Patchy, poorly defined consolidation in the apical and posterior segments of the upper lobes, and in the superior segment of the lower lobe is also commonly observed. Several complications are associated with tuberculous infection, such as hematogenous dissemination (miliary tuberculosis) or extension to the pleura, resulting in pleural effusion. Late complications of tuberculosis comprise a heterogeneous group of processes including tuberculoma, bronchial stenosis bronchiectasis, broncholithiasis, aspergilloma, bronchoesophageal fistula and fibrosing mediastinitis. Radiology provides essential information for the management and follow up of these patients and is extremely valuable for monitoring complications.

  10. EFFECT OF SOME MEDICINAL PLANTS ON GROWTH OF MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS, MULTI DRUG RESISTANT MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS AND MYCOBACTERIUM OTHER THAN TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Shukla

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Six plants of medicinal uses were tried for their inhibitory effect on Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB, multi drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR MTB and Mycobacterium other than tuberculosis (MOTT. MTB, MDR MTB and MOTT were cultured in 12B medium vials for Bacterc 460 TB system and incubated at 37˚C. The vials were read in Bacterc 460 TB system. Garlic, Ocimum sanctum, onion and neem showed effectiveness towards Mycobacterium tuberculosis and multi drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis to some extent but ginger showed no effect at all. None of the plants studied had any inhibitory effect on Mycobacterium other than tuberculosis. Aloe vera had opposite effect on the growth and it was found to be assisting the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and multi drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The tests performed were in-vitro and the authors conlude that in-vivo the results may vary.

  11. Progression to active tuberculosis, but not transmission, varies by Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineage in The Gambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Bouke C.; Hill, Philip C.; Aiken, Alex; Awine, Timothy; Antonio, Martin; Adetifa, Ifedayo M.; Jackson-Sillah, Dolly J.; Fox, Annette; Deriemer, Kathryn; Gagneux, Sebastien; Borgdorff, Martien W.; McAdam, Keith P. W. J.; Corrah, Tumani; Small, Peter M.; Adegbola, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is considerable variability in the outcome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. We hypothesized that Mycobacterium africanum was less likely than M. tuberculosis to transmit and progress to tuberculosis disease. METHODS: In a cohort study of patients with tuberculosis and their

  12. Molecular epidemiology and drug resistance of widespread genotypes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in northwestern Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, A A; Mariandyshev, A O; Mannsåker, T; Dahle, U R; Bjune, G A

    2009-10-01

    Four administrative territories (Archangel Oblast, Murmansk Oblast, Republic of Karelia, Republic of Komi) in the northwestern federal region of Russia. To describe the genetic diversity and level of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from new cases of pulmonary tuberculosis. A total of 176 isolates of M. tuberculosis were tested for drug susceptibility and typed with insertion sequence (IS) 6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and spoligotyping. The Beijing family was found to be the most prevalent (47.1%), most frequently clustered and significantly associated with drug resistance to all first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs (isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, streptomycin and pyrazinamide) and ethionamide, when compared to the T and Haarlem families of M. tuberculosis, which were also prevalent in the study population. Some RFLP clusters (4/10) included isolates that originated from patients residing in different territories, and cases infected with multiple strains of M. tuberculosis were apparently present in the collection. The M. tuberculosis population in northwestern Russia appears to be genetically diverse and geographically widespread. Although dominated by isolates assigned to the Beijing family, other families also contribute to the current epidemic, and multiple strain infections may represent a problem in many cases. Extended genetic studies should be encouraged.

  13. The PCR-Based Diagnosis of Central Nervous System Tuberculosis: Up to Date

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruyuki Takahashi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS tuberculosis, particularly tuberculous meningitis (TBM, is the severest form of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.Tb infection, causing death or severe neurological defects in more than half of those affected, in spite of recent advancements in available anti-tuberculosis treatment. The definitive diagnosis of CNS tuberculosis depends upon the detection of M.Tb bacilli in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. At present, the diagnosis of CNS tuberculosis remains a complex issue because the most widely used conventional “gold standard” based on bacteriological detection methods, such as direct smear and culture identification, cannot rapidly detect M.Tb in CSF specimens with sufficient sensitivity in the acute phase of TBM. Recently, instead of the conventional “gold standard”, the various molecular-based methods including nucleic acid amplification (NAA assay technique, particularly polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay, has emerged as a promising new method for the diagnosis of CNS tuberculosis because of its rapidity, sensitivity and specificity. In addition, the innovation of nested PCR assay technique is worthy of note given its contribution to improve the diagnosis of CNS tuberculosis. In this review, an overview of recent progress of the NAA methods, mainly highlighting the PCR assay technique, was presented.

  14. The granuloma in tuberculosis: Dynamics of a host-pathogen collusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eEhlers

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A granuloma is defined as an inflammatory mononuclear cell infiltrate that, while capable of limiting growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, also provides a survival niche from which the bacteria may disseminate. The tuberculosis lesion is highly dynamic and shaped by both, immune response elements and the pathogen. In the granuloma, M. tuberculosis switches to a non-replicating but energy-generating life style whose detailed molecular characterization can identify novel targets for chemotherapy. To secure transmission to a new host, M. tuberculosis has evolved to drive T cell immunity to the point that necrotizing granulomas leak into bronchial cavities to facilitate expectoration of bacilli. From an evolutionary perspective it is therefore questionable whether vaccination and immunity enhancing strategies that merely mimic the natural immune response directed against M. tuberculosis infection can overcome pulmonary tuberculosis in the adult population. Juxtaposition of molecular pathology and immunology with microbial physiology and the use of novel imaging approaches afford an integrative view of the granuloma’s contribution to the life cycle of M. tuberculosis. This review revisits the different input of innate and adaptive immunity in granuloma biogenesis, with a focus on the co-evolutionary forces that redirect immune responses also to the benefit of the pathogen, i.e. its survival, propagation and transmission.

  15. Genetics of human susceptibility to active and latent tuberculosis: present knowledge and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Laurent; Fellay, Jacques; Haas, David W; Schurr, Erwin; Srikrishna, Geetha; Urbanowski, Michael; Chaturvedi, Nimisha; Srinivasan, Sudha; Johnson, Daniel H; Bishai, William R

    2018-03-01

    Tuberculosis is an ancient human disease, estimated to have originated and evolved over thousands of years alongside modern human populations. Despite considerable advances in disease control, tuberculosis remains one of the world's deadliest communicable diseases with 10 million incident cases and 1·8 million deaths in 2015 alone based on the annual WHO report, due to inadequate health service resources in less-developed regions of the world, and exacerbated by the HIV/AIDS pandemic and emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Recent findings from studies of tuberculosis infection and of patients with Mendelian predisposition to severe tuberculosis have started to reveal human loci influencing tuberculosis outcomes. In this Review, we assess the current understanding of the contribution of host genetics to disease susceptibility and to drug treatment. Despite remarkable progress in technology, only a few associated genetic variants have so far been identified, strongly indicating the need for larger global studies that investigate both common and under-represented rare variants to develop new approaches to combat the disease. Pharmacogenomic discoveries are also likely to lead to more efficient drug design and development, and ultimately safer and more effective therapies for tuberculosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in lupus vulgaris caused by drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthu S Kumaran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is still a major public health problem in the world, with many factors contributing to this burden, including poor living conditions, overcrowding, poverty, malnutrition, illiteracy, and rapid spread of human immunodeficiency virus infection. Cutaneous tuberculosis is a less common form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, and in this paucibacillary form the diagnosis depends on histopathology, tuberculin positivity, and response to treatment. The diagnosis is even more difficult in cases with drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis due to lack of awareness and lack of facilities to diagnose drug resistant tuberculosis. In this article, we describe an unusual case of multidrug resistant lupus vulgaris (LV, in a 34-year-old male who responded to anti-tubercular treatment (ATT initially, but developed recurrent disease which failed to respond to standard four-drug ATT; subsequently, tissue culture showed growth of multidrug resistant M. tuberculosis. Subsequently, he also developed cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. This article aims to exemplify a grave complication that can occur in long-standing case of LV, the limitations faced by clinicians in developing countries where tuberculosis is endemic, and classical methods of proving drug resistance are generally unavailable or fail.

  17. Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Lupus Vulgaris Caused by Drug Resistant Mycobacterium Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaran, Muthu S; Narang, Tarun; Jitendriya, Madhukara; Tirumale, Rajalakshmi; Manjunath, Suraj; Savio, Jayanthi

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major public health problem in the world, with many factors contributing to this burden, including poor living conditions, overcrowding, poverty, malnutrition, illiteracy, and rapid spread of human immunodeficiency virus infection. Cutaneous tuberculosis is a less common form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, and in this paucibacillary form the diagnosis depends on histopathology, tuberculin positivity, and response to treatment. The diagnosis is even more difficult in cases with drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis due to lack of awareness and lack of facilities to diagnose drug resistant tuberculosis. In this article, we describe an unusual case of multidrug resistant lupus vulgaris (LV), in a 34-year-old male who responded to anti-tubercular treatment (ATT) initially, but developed recurrent disease which failed to respond to standard four-drug ATT; subsequently, tissue culture showed growth of multidrug resistant M. tuberculosis . Subsequently, he also developed cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. This article aims to exemplify a grave complication that can occur in long-standing case of LV, the limitations faced by clinicians in developing countries where tuberculosis is endemic, and classical methods of proving drug resistance are generally unavailable or fail.

  18. Pediatric postprimary pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shewchuk, Jason R.; Reed, Martin H.

    2002-01-01

    Heading AbstractBackground. Postprimary pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is not commonly seen in children.Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine the radiographic findings and patient characteristics of pediatric postprimary pulmonary TB.Materials and methods. We reviewed the clinical charts and chest radiographs in six patients.Results. The radiographic findings of pediatric postprimary pulmonary TB include upper-lobe consolidation and cavitation, multifocal ill-defined airspace opacities, evidence of prior pulmonary TB, and apical pleural thickening. Pleural effusions and lymphadenopathy are not commonly present. Although postprimary disease typically does not affect young children, five of the children in this series were less than ten years of age at the time of presentation.Conclusion The possibility of postprimary TB should be considered in pediatric patients at risk for this disease who present with upper-lobe pulmonary consolidation and cavitation. These patients are highly infectious and early recognition and treatment can limit transmission of TB. (orig.)

  19. Thoracic manifestation of tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienzl-Palma, D.; Prosch, H.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a granulomatous disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and transmission is via an airborne route by droplet infection. In the majority of cases patients have thoracic TB, which most frequently presents with hilar lymphadenopathy and pulmonary manifestation. Due to the rise in incidence of TB in central Europe to be expected over the coming years, it is essential to be acquainted with the radiological manifestations of pulmonary TB, particularly to be able to discriminate active from inactive TB. Due to the use of molecular techniques entailing DNA fingerprinting, the traditional classification of TB in primary and postprimary TB is being challenged. These genetic studies have revealed that variations in the clinical and radiographic appearance of TB are mainly affected by the immune status of the patients. Due to the low prevalence of TB in central Europe and the wide variation of radiological presentations, the diagnosis and therapy of TB is often delayed. In this article, the radiographic manifestations of thoracic TB are summarized and discussed. Together with the medical history and bacteriological tests, chest X-ray imaging and computed tomography (CT) play a major role not only in the detection of TB but also in the follow-up during and after therapy. Chest X-radiographs should be the primary diagnostic method in patients with suspected TB in screening as well as for diagnosis and therapy monitoring. The use of CT is more sensitive than chest radiographs and is frequently performed after chest radiographs to obtain detailed information about subtle parenchymal changes or lymph node manifestation. When active TB is suspected CT should be performed. Tree in bud, lobular consolidations, centrilobular nodules, cavities and ground-glass opacification are typical changes in active TB. (orig.) [de

  20. Tuberculosis prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Anita; Fackelmann, Janice; Pigott, Wendy; Tolomeo, Ornella

    2004-11-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the oldest known diseases and has claimed more lives than any other Today, about one-third of the world's population is infected with TB. In 2003, 1,379 cases of new, active and relapsed TB were reported in Canada. TB is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Only 10 per cent of infected individuals will develop active TB. Pulmonary TB can be spread by an infectious person through the aerosolization of droplets when coughing, talking, spitting, sneezing or singing. Symptoms of pulmonary TB are a cough with or without sputum production lasting at least three weeks, chest pain, hemoptysis, fever, night sweats, weight loss, lack of appetite, chills and weakness. Extrapulmonary TB is generally not associated with person-to-person spread. Common sites include the throat, lymph nodes, abdomen, intestines, long bones of the legs, spine, kidneys, bladder, skin, eyes and meninges. The risk factors for TB infection and disease include close contact with an active pulmonary TB case, HIV infection or AIDS, inactive disease not adequately treated, low income, underlying medical condition, homelessness, alcoholism, injection drug use, aboriginal background or occupation in health care. Risk settings include travel or residence in an endemic area or work or residence in a correctional facility, shelter, rooming house, residential facility, hospital or long-term care facility. Nurses need to advocate for the prompt diagnosis and isolation of suspected and confirmed TB cases. Knowing when to institute such measures as isolation in a negative pressure room, using respirator masks and limiting interpersonal contacts is vital to the nursing care of TB patients. In addition, the role of the public health department needs to be understood; for example, all jurisdictions have legislated requirements for reporting new positive TB skin tests to public health.