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Sample records for tuberculosis dna topoisomerase

  1. Analysis of DNA relaxation and cleavage activities of recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA topoisomerase I from a new expression and purification protocol

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    Annamalai Thirunavukkarasu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA topoisomerase I is an attractive target for discovery of novel TB drugs that act by enhancing the accumulation of the topoisomerase-DNA cleavage product. It shares a common transesterification domain with other type IA DNA topoisomerases. There is, however, no homology between the C-terminal DNA binding domains of Escherichia coli and M. tuberculosis DNA topoisomerase I proteins. Results A new protocol for expression and purification of recombinant M. tuberculosis DNA topoisomerase I (MtTOP has been developed to produce enzyme of much higher specific activity than previously characterized recombinant enzyme. MtTOP was found to be less efficient than E. coli DNA topoisomerase I (EcTOP in removal of remaining negative supercoils from partially relaxed DNA. DNA cleavage by MtTOP was characterized for the first time. Comparison of DNA cleavage site selectivity with EcTOP showed differences in cleavage site preferences, but the preferred sites of both enzymes have a C nucleotide in the -4 position. Conclusion Recombinant M. tuberculosis DNA topoisomerase I can be expressed as a soluble protein and purified in high yield from E. coli host with a new protocol. Analysis of DNA cleavage with M. tuberculosis DNA substrate showed that the preferred DNA cleavage sites have a C nucleotide in the -4 position.

  2. DNA Topoisomerases in Transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2015-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most of the ex......This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most...... topoisomerase-DNA cleavage complex. The second study is an investigation of how topoisomerases influence gene regulation by keeping the genome in an optimal topological state....

  3. Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I by small-molecule inhibitors.

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    Godbole, Adwait Anand; Ahmed, Wareed; Bhat, Rajeshwari Subray; Bradley, Erin K; Ekins, Sean; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2015-03-01

    We describe inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I (MttopoI), an essential mycobacterial enzyme, by two related compounds, imipramine and norclomipramine, of which imipramine is clinically used as an antidepressant. These molecules showed growth inhibition of both Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. tuberculosis cells. The mechanism of action of these two molecules was investigated by analyzing the individual steps of the topoisomerase I (topoI) reaction cycle. The compounds stimulated cleavage, thereby perturbing the cleavage-religation equilibrium. Consequently, these molecules inhibited the growth of the cells overexpressing topoI at a low MIC. Docking of the molecules on the MttopoI model suggested that they bind near the metal binding site of the enzyme. The DNA relaxation activity of the metal binding mutants harboring mutations in the DxDxE motif was differentially affected by the molecules, suggesting that the metal coordinating residues contribute to the interaction of the enzyme with the drug. Taken together, the results highlight the potential of these small molecules, which poison the M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis topoisomerase I, as leads for the development of improved molecules to combat mycobacterial infections. Moreover, targeting metal coordination in topoisomerases might be a general strategy to develop new lead molecules. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. DNA Topoisomerases as Targets for Antibacterial Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiasa, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are proven therapeutic targets of antibacterial agents. Quinolones, especially fluoroquinolones, are the most successful topoisomerase-targeting antibacterial drugs. These drugs target type IIA topoisomerases in bacteria. Recent structural and biochemical studies on fluoroquinolones have provided the molecular basis for both their mechanism of action, as well as the molecular basis of bacterial resistance. Due to the development of drug resistance, including fluoroquinolone resistance, among bacterial pathogens, there is an urgent need to discover novel antibacterial agents. Recent advances in topoisomerase inhibitors may lead to the development of novel antibacterial drugs that are effective against fluoroquinolone-resistant pathogens. They include type IIA topoisomerase inhibitors that either interact with the GyrB/ParE subunit or form nick-containing ternary complexes. In addition, several topoisomerase I inhibitors have recently been identified. Thus, DNA topoisomerases remain important targets of antibacterial agents.

  5. Insights from the Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Topoisomerase I with a Novel Protein Fold.

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    Tan, Kemin; Cao, Nan; Cheng, Bokun; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2016-01-16

    The DNA topoisomerase I enzyme of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtTOP1) is essential for the viability of the organism and survival in a murine model. This topoisomerase is being pursued as a novel target for the discovery of new therapeutic agents for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis. In this study, we succeeded in obtaining a structure of MtTOP1 by first predicting that the C-terminal region of MtTOP1 contains four repeated domains that do not involve the Zn-binding tetracysteine motifs seen in the C-terminal domains of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I. A construct (amino acids A2-T704), MtTOP1-704t, that includes the N-terminal domains (D1-D4) and the first predicted C-terminal domain (D5) of MtTOP1 was expressed and found to retain DNA cleavage-religation activity and catalyze single-stranded DNA catenation. MtTOP1-704t was crystallized, and a structure of 2.52Å resolution limit was obtained. The structure of the MtTOP1 N-terminal domains has features that have not been observed in other previously available bacterial topoisomerase I crystal structures. The first C-terminal domain D5 forms a novel protein fold of a four-stranded antiparallel β-sheet stabilized by a crossing-over α-helix. Since there is only one type IA topoisomerase present in Mycobacteriaceae and related Actinobacteria, this subfamily of type IA topoisomerase may be required for multiple functions in DNA replication, transcription, recombination, and repair. The unique structural features observed for MtTOP1 may allow these topoisomerase I enzymes to carry out physiological functions associated with topoisomerase III enzyme in other bacteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Insights from the Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Topoisomerase I with a Novel Protein Fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Kemin; Cao, Nan; Cheng, Bokun; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2016-01-16

    The DNA topoisomerase I enzyme of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtTOP1) is essential for the viability of the organism and survival in a murine model. This topoisomerase is being pursued as a novel target for the discovery of new therapeutic agents for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis. In this study, we succeeded in obtaining a structure of MtTOP1 by first predicting that the C-terminal region of MtTOP1 contains four repeated domains that do not involve the Zn-binding tetracysteine motifs seen in the C-terminal domains of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I. A construct (amino acids A2-T704), MtTOP1-704t, that includes the N-terminal domains (D1-D4) and the first predicted C-terminal domain (D5) of MtTOP1 was expressed and found to retain DNA cleavage-religation activity and catalyze single-stranded DNA catenation. MtTOP1-704t was crystallized, and a structure of 2.52 angstrom resolution limit was obtained. The structure of the MtTOP1 N-terminal domains has features that have not been observed in other previously available bacterial topoisomerase I crystal structures. The first C-terminal domain D5 forms a novel protein fold of a four-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet stabilized by a crossing-over alpha-helix. Since there is only one type IA topoisomerase present in Mycobacteriaceae and related Actinobacteria, this subfamily of type IA topoisomerase may be required for multiple functions in DNA replication, transcription, recombination, and repair. The unique structural features observed for MtTOP1 may allow these topoisomerase I enzymes to carry out physiological functions associated with topoisomerase III enzyme in other bacteria.

  7. Fluoroquinolone-dependent DNA supercoiling by Vaccinia topoisomerase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamau, Edwin; Grove, Anne

    2004-09-10

    Vaccinia topoisomerase I is a site-specific DNA strand transferase that acts through a DNA-(3'-phosphotyrosyl)-enzyme intermediate, resulting in relaxation of supercoiled DNA. Although Vaccinia topoisomerase I is not an essential enzyme, its role in early transcription makes it a potential antiviral target. We describe the interaction of Vaccinia topoisomerase I with fluoroquinolone antibiotics otherwise known to target DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV in bacterial cells. The fluoroquinolone enrofloxacin inhibits DNA relaxation by Vaccinia topoisomerase I at concentrations similar to those required for inhibition by the coumarin drugs coumermycin and novobiocin. When Vaccinia topoisomerase I is presented with relaxed DNA in the presence of enrofloxacin, it executes the reverse reaction, supercoiling the DNA. Further characterization indicates that enrofloxacin does not interfere with the initial strand scission by Vaccinia topoisomerase I. The structurally related fluoroquinolones moxifloxacin and lomefloxacin have no effect on the topoisomerase at the concentrations at which enrofloxacin mediates DNA supercoiling. The mechanism with which Vaccinia topoisomerase I supercoils relaxed DNA, an energetically unfavorable, yet ATP-independent process, must entail protein-DNA contacts downstream of the cleavage site, as opposed to the free rotation mechanism proposed for DNA relaxation; as proposed for fluoroquinolone-mediated inhibition of gyrase, the drug may target a preformed topoisomerase I-DNA complex to induce conformational changes in the enzyme that permit such contacts.

  8. The dynamic interplay between DNA topoisomerases and DNA topology.

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    Seol, Yeonee; Neuman, Keir C

    2016-11-01

    Topological properties of DNA influence its structure and biochemical interactions. Within the cell, DNA topology is constantly in flux. Transcription and other essential processes, including DNA replication and repair, not only alter the topology of the genome but also introduce additional complications associated with DNA knotting and catenation. These topological perturbations are counteracted by the action of topoisomerases, a specialized class of highly conserved and essential enzymes that actively regulate the topological state of the genome. This dynamic interplay among DNA topology, DNA processing enzymes, and DNA topoisomerases is a pervasive factor that influences DNA metabolism in vivo. Building on the extensive structural and biochemical characterization over the past four decades that has established the fundamental mechanistic basis of topoisomerase activity, scientists have begun to explore the unique roles played by DNA topology in modulating and influencing the activity of topoisomerases. In this review we survey established and emerging DNA topology-dependent protein-DNA interactions with a focus on in vitro measurements of the dynamic interplay between DNA topology and topoisomerase activity.

  9. The DNA relaxation activity and covalent complex accumulation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I can be assayed in Escherichia coli: application for identification of potential FRET-dye labeling sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrenica Maria V

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I (MtTOP1 and Escherichia coli topoisomerase I have highly homologous transesterification domains, but the two enzymes have distinctly different C-terminal domains. To investigate the structure-function of MtTOP1 and to target its activity for development of new TB therapy, it is desirable to have a rapid genetic assay for its catalytic activity, and potential bactericidal consequence from accumulation of its covalent complex. Results We show that plasmid-encoded recombinant MtTOP1 can complement the temperature sensitive topA function of E. coli strain AS17. Moreover, expression of MtTOP1-G116 S enzyme with the TOPRIM mutation that inhibits DNA religation results in SOS induction and loss of viability in E. coli. The absence of cysteine residues in the MtTOP1 enzyme makes it an attractive system for introduction of potentially informative chemical or spectroscopic probes at specific positions via cysteine mutagenesis. Such probes could be useful for development of high throughput screening (HTS assays. We employed the AS17 complementation system to screen for sites in MtTOP1 that can tolerate cysteine substitution without loss of complementation function. These cysteine substitution mutants were confirmed to have retained the relaxation activity. One such mutant of MtTOP1 was utilized for fluorescence probe incorporation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurement with fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotide substrate. Conclusions The DNA relaxation and cleavage complex accumulation of M. tuberculosis topoisomerase I can be measured with genetic assays in E. coli, facilitating rapid analysis of its activities, and discovery of new TB therapy targeting this essential enzyme.

  10. Role for DNA topoisomerase II in prostatic growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.G. V.

    1987-01-01

    In the studies presented the role of the mammalian type II topoisomerase in the proliferation of normal and neoplastic rat prostate cells in vitro and in vivo was evaluated. First, the utility of mammalian type II topoisomerase inhibitors for the study of the biologic functions of the enzyme was assessed. Novobiocin inhibited rat topoisomerase II, but also interacted directly with chromatin in rat ventral prostate nuclei as well. Teniposide and amsacrine both trapped topoisomerase II in a covalent enzyme-DNA reaction intermediate that could be recovered using a K-SDS precipitation assay. The specific trapping of covalent topoisomerase II-DNA complexes by teniposide was exploited to implicate topoisomerase II in DNA replication in cultured Dunning R3327-G rat prostatic adenocarcinoma cells. In 3 H-thymidine pulse and pulse-chase labelling experiments, newly replicated DNA was found to be enriched among DNA linked topoisomerase II following teniposide treatment. Additional experiments demonstrated that topoisomerase II formed covalent complexes in the presence of teniposide directly with nascent DNA chains. On the basis of this data, a model for topoisomerase II function in untangling intertwined daughter DNA strands during replication by acting in the wake of the DNA replication fork near the site of DNA synthesis was proposed

  11. Conditional silencing of topoisomerase I gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis validates its essentiality for cell survival.

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    Ahmed, Wareed; Menon, Shruti; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Karthik, Pullela V D N B; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2014-04-01

    Topoisomerases are an important class of enzymes for regulating the DNA transaction processes. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is one of the most formidable pathogens also posing serious challenges for therapeutic interventions. The organism contains only one type IA topoisomerase (Rv3646c), offering an opportunity to test its potential as a candidate drug target. To validate the essentiality of M. tuberculosis topoisomerase I (TopoI(Mt) ) for bacterial growth and survival, we have generated a conditionally regulated strain of topoI in Mtb. The conditional knockdown mutant exhibited delayed growth on agar plate. In liquid culture, the growth was drastically impaired when TopoI expression was suppressed. Additionally, novobiocin and isoniazid showed enhanced inhibitory potential against the conditional mutant. Analysis of the nucleoid revealed its altered architecture upon TopoI depletion. These studies establish the essentiality of TopoI for the M. tuberculosis growth and open up new avenues for targeting the enzyme. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Increment of DNA topoisomerases in chemically and virally transformed cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespi, M.D.; Mladovan, A.G.; Baldi, A.

    1988-01-01

    The activities of topoisomerases I and II were assayed in subcellular extracts obtained from nontumorigenic BALB/c 3T3 A31 and normal rat kidney (NRK) cell lines and from the same cells transformed by benzo[a]pyrene (BP-A31), Moloney (M-MSV-A31) and Kirsten (K-A31) sarcoma viruses, and simian virus 40 (SV-NRK). The enzymatic activity of topoisomerase I was monitored by the relaxation of negatively supercoiled pBR322 DNA and by the formation of covalent complexes between 32 P-labeled DNA and topoisomerase I. Topoisomerase II activity was determined by decatenation of kinetoplast DNA (k-DNA). It was found that nuclear and cytoplasmic type I topoisomerase specific activities were higher in every transformed cell line than in the normal counterparts. These differences cannot be attributed to an inhibitory factor present in A31 cells. When chromatin was treated at increasing ionic strengths, the 0.4 M NaCl extract showed the highest topoisomerase I specific activity. Spontaneously transformed A31 cells showed topoisomerase I activity similar to that of extracts of cells transformed by benzo[a]pyrene. Topoisomerase II specific activity was also increased in SV-NRK cells, as judged by the assay for decatenation of k-DNA to yield minicircle DNA

  13. BACTERIAL CELL KILLING MEDIATED BY TOPOISOMERASE I DNA CLEAVAGE ACTIVITY

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    Cheng, Bokun; Shukla, Shikha; Vasunilashorn, Sarinnapha; Mukhopadhyay, Somshuvra; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2005-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are important clinical targets for antibacterial and anticancer therapy. At least one type IA DNA topoisomerases can be found in every bacterium, making it a logical target for antibacterial agents that can convert the enzyme into poison by trapping its covalent complex with DNA. However, it has not been possible previously to observe the consequence of having such stabilized covalent complex of bacterial topoisomerase I in vivo. We isolated a mutant of recombinant Yersinia pestis topoisomerase I that forms a stabilized covalent complex with DNA by screening for the ability to induce the SOS response in Escherichia coli. Overexpression of this mutant topoisomerase I resulted in bacterial cell death. From sequence analysis and site-directed mutagenesis, it was determined that a single amino acid substitution in the TOPRIM domain changing a strictly conserved glycine residue to serine in either the Y. pestis or E. coli topoisomerase I can result in a mutant enzyme that has the SOS inducing and cell killing properties. Analysis of the purified mutant enzymes showed that they have no relaxation activity but retain the ability to cleave DNA and form a covalent complex. These results demonstrate that perturbation of the active site region of bacterial topoisomerase I can result in stabilization of the covalent intermediate, with the in vivo consequence of bacterial cell death. Small molecules that induce similar perturbation in the enzyme-DNA complex should be candidates as leads for novel antibacterial agents. PMID:16159875

  14. Conversion of DNA gyrase into a conventional type II topoisomerase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Maxwell, A

    1996-01-01

    -dependent manner. Novobiocin, a competitive inhibitor of ATP binding by gyrase, inhibits this reaction. The truncated enzyme, unlike gyrase, does not introduce a right-handed wrap when bound to DNA and stabilizes DNA crossovers; characteristics reminiscent of conventional type II topoisomerases. This new enzyme...

  15. Exploring DNA topoisomerases as targets of novel therapeutic agents in the treatment of infectious diseases.

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    Tse-Dinh, Y-C

    2007-03-01

    DNA topoisomerases are ubiquitous enzymes needed to overcome topological problems encountered during DNA replication, transcription, recombination and maintenance of genomic stability. They have proved to be valuable targets for therapy, in part because some anti-topoisomerase agents act as poisons. Bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV (type IIA topoisomerases) are targets of fluoroquinolones while human topoisomerase I (a type IB topoisomerase) and topoisomerase II are targets of various anticancer drugs. Bacterial type IA topoisomerase share little sequence homology to type IB or type IIA topoisomerases, but all topoisomerases have the potential of having the covalent phosphotyrosine DNA cleavage intermediate trapped by drug action. Recent studies have demonstrated that stabilization of the covalent complex formed by bacterial topoisomerase I and cleaved DNA can lead to bacterial cell death, supporting bacterial topoisomerase I as a promising target for the development of novel antibiotics. For current antibacterial therapy, the prevalence of fluoroquinolone-resistant bacterial pathogens has become a major public health concern, and efforts are directed towards identifying novel inhibitors of bacterial type IIA topoisomerases that are not affected by fluoroquinolone resistant mutations on the gyrase or topoisomerase IV genes. For anti-viral therapy, poxviruses encode their own type IB topoisomerases; these enzymes differ in drug sensitivity from human topoisomerase I. To confront potential threat of small pox as a weapon in terrorist attacks, vaccinia virus topoisomerase I has been targeted for discovery of anti-viral agents. These new developments of DNA topoisomerases as targets of novel therapeutic agents being reviewed here represent excellent opportunities for drug discovery in the treatment of infectious diseases.

  16. Topoisomerase II minimizes DNA entanglements by proofreading DNA topology after DNA strand passage.

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    Martínez-García, Belén; Fernández, Xavier; Díaz-Ingelmo, Ofelia; Rodríguez-Campos, Antonio; Manichanh, Chaysavanh; Roca, Joaquim

    2014-02-01

    By transporting one DNA double helix (T-segment) through a double-strand break in another (G-segment), topoisomerase II reduces fractions of DNA catenanes, knots and supercoils to below equilibrium values. How DNA segments are selected to simplify the equilibrium DNA topology is enigmatic, and the biological relevance of this activity is unclear. Here we examined the transit of the T-segment across the three gates of topoisomerase II (entry N-gate, DNA-gate and exit C-gate). Our experimental results uncovered that DNA transport probability is determined not only during the capture of a T-segment at the N-gate. When a captured T-segment has crossed the DNA-gate, it can backtrack to the N-gate instead of exiting by the C-gate. When such backtracking is precluded by locking the N-gate or by removing the C-gate, topoisomerase II no longer simplifies equilibrium DNA topology. Therefore, we conclude that the C-gate enables a post-DNA passage proofreading mechanism, which challenges the release of passed T-segments to either complete or cancel DNA transport. This proofreading activity not only clarifies how type-IIA topoisomerases simplify the equilibrium topology of DNA in free solution, but it may explain also why these enzymes are able to solve the topological constraints of intracellular DNA without randomly entangling adjacent chromosomal regions.

  17. DNA topoisomerases participate in fragility of the oncogene RET.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura W Dillon

    Full Text Available Fragile site breakage was previously shown to result in rearrangement of the RET oncogene, resembling the rearrangements found in thyroid cancer. Common fragile sites are specific regions of the genome with a high susceptibility to DNA breakage under conditions that partially inhibit DNA replication, and often coincide with genes deleted, amplified, or rearranged in cancer. While a substantial amount of work has been performed investigating DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint proteins vital for maintaining stability at fragile sites, little is known about the initial events leading to DNA breakage at these sites. The purpose of this study was to investigate these initial events through the detection of aphidicolin (APH-induced DNA breakage within the RET oncogene, in which 144 APH-induced DNA breakpoints were mapped on the nucleotide level in human thyroid cells within intron 11 of RET, the breakpoint cluster region found in patients. These breakpoints were located at or near DNA topoisomerase I and/or II predicted cleavage sites, as well as at DNA secondary structural features recognized and preferentially cleaved by DNA topoisomerases I and II. Co-treatment of thyroid cells with APH and the topoisomerase catalytic inhibitors, betulinic acid and merbarone, significantly decreased APH-induced fragile site breakage within RET intron 11 and within the common fragile site FRA3B. These data demonstrate that DNA topoisomerases I and II are involved in initiating APH-induced common fragile site breakage at RET, and may engage the recognition of DNA secondary structures formed during perturbed DNA replication.

  18. DNA topoisomerase II enzyme activity appears in mouse sperm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-22

    Aug 22, 2011 ... Sperm suspensions of 4 male mice (A, B, C and D), having an initial motility grade of 3.5 were used to examine the presence of DNA topoisomerase II (top 2) activity in sperm heads. The initial percentage motile of male A was 75%, male B was 80%, male C was 70% and male D was 60%. Top 2 activity was.

  19. DNA topoisomerase II enzyme activity appears in mouse sperm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sperm suspensions of 4 male mice (A, B, C and D), having an initial motility grade of 3.5 were used to examine the presence of DNA topoisomerase II (top 2) activity in sperm heads. The initial percentage motile of male A was 75%, male B was 80%, male C was 70% and male D was 60%. Top 2 activity was examined by ...

  20. Electrostatics of DNA-DNA juxtapositions: consequences for type II topoisomerase function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, Graham L; Pettitt, B Montgomery; Buck, Gregory R; Zechiedrich, E Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Type II topoisomerases resolve problematic DNA topologies such as knots, catenanes, and supercoils that arise as a consequence of DNA replication and recombination. Failure to remove problematic DNA topologies prohibits cell division and can result in cell death or genetic mutation. Such catastrophic consequences make topoisomerases an effective target for antibiotics and anticancer agents. Despite their biological and clinical importance, little is understood about how a topoisomerase differentiates DNA topologies in a molecule that is significantly larger than the topoisomerase itself. It has been proposed that type II topoisomerases recognize angle and curvature between two DNA helices characteristic of knotted and catenated DNA to account for the enzyme's preference to unlink instead of link DNA. Here we consider the electrostatic potential of DNA juxtapositions to determine the possibility of juxtapositions occurring through Brownian diffusion. We found that despite the large negative electrostatic potential formed between two juxtaposed DNA helices, a bulk counterion concentration as small as 50 mM provides sufficient electrostatic screening to prohibit significant interaction beyond an interhelical separation of 3 nm in both hooked and free juxtapositions. This suggests that instead of electrostatics, mechanical forces such as those occurring in anaphase, knots, catenanes, or the writhe of supercoiled DNA may be responsible for the formation of DNA juxtapositions

  1. Structural insights into the quinolone resistance mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase.

    OpenAIRE

    Piton , Jérémie; Petrella , Stéphanie; Delarue , Marc; André-Leroux , Gwénaëlle; Jarlier , Vincent; Aubry , Alexandra; Mayer , Claudine

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase, an indispensable nanomachine involved in the regulation of DNA topology, is the only type II topoisomerase present in this organism and is hence the sole target for quinolone action, a crucial drug active against multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. To understand at an atomic level the quinolone resistance mechanism, which emerges in extensively drug resistant tuberculosis, we performed combined functional, biophysical and structural...

  2. Collaborating functions of BLM and DNA topoisomerase I in regulating human rDNA transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grierson, Patrick M.; Acharya, Samir; Groden, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is an inherited disorder caused by loss of function of the recQ-like BLM helicase. It is characterized clinically by severe growth retardation and cancer predisposition. BLM localizes to PML nuclear bodies and to the nucleolus; its deficiency results in increased intra- and inter-chromosomal recombination, including hyper-recombination of rDNA repeats. Our previous work has shown that BLM facilitates RNA polymerase I-mediated rRNA transcription in the nucleolus (Grierson et al., 2012 [18]). This study uses protein co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro transcription/translation (IVTT) to identify a direct interaction of DNA topoisomerase I with the C-terminus of BLM in the nucleolus. In vitro helicase assays demonstrate that DNA topoisomerase I stimulates BLM helicase activity on a nucleolar-relevant RNA:DNA hybrid, but has an insignificant effect on BLM helicase activity on a control DNA:DNA duplex substrate. Reciprocally, BLM enhances the DNA relaxation activity of DNA topoisomerase I on supercoiled DNA substrates. Our study suggests that BLM and DNA topoisomerase I function coordinately to modulate RNA:DNA hybrid formation as well as relaxation of DNA supercoils in the context of nucleolar transcription

  3. Regulation of Xenopus laevis DNA topoisomerase I activity by phosphorylation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiserman, H.B.; Ingebritsen, T.S.; Benbow, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase I has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from ovaries of the frog Xenopus laevis. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the most purified fraction revealed a single major band at 110 kDa and less abundant minor bands centered at 62 kDa. Incubation of the most purified fraction with immobilized calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase abolished all DNA topoisomerase enzymatic activity in a time-dependent reaction. Treatment of the dephosphorylated X. laevis DNA topoisomerase I with a X. laevis casein kinase type II activity and ATP restored DNA topoisomerase activity to a level higher than that observed in the most purified fraction. In vitro labeling experiments which employed the most purified DNA topoisomerase I fraction, [γ- 32 P]ATP, and the casein kinase type II enzyme showed that both the 110- and 62-kDa bands became phosphorylated in approximately molar proportions. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that only serine residues became phosphorylated. Phosphorylation was accompanied by an increase in DNA topoisomerase activity in vitro. Dephosphorylation of DNA topoisomerase I appears to block formation of the initial enzyme-substrate complex on the basis of the failure of the dephosphorylated enzyme to nick DNA in the presence of camptothecin. The authors conclude that X. laevis DNA topoisomerase I is partially phosphorylated as isolated and that this phosphorylation is essential for expression of enzymatic activity in vitro. On the basis of the ability of the casein kinase type II activity to reactivate dephosphorylated DNA topoisomerase I, they speculate that this kinase may contribute to the physiological regulation of DNA topoisomerase I activity

  4. Structural insight into the quinolone-DNA cleavage complex of type IIA topoisomerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laponogov, Ivan; Sohi, Maninder K; Veselkov, Dennis A; Pan, Xiao-Su; Sawhney, Ritica; Thompson, Andrew W; McAuley, Katherine E; Fisher, L Mark; Sanderson, Mark R

    2009-06-01

    Type II topoisomerases alter DNA topology by forming a covalent DNA-cleavage complex that allows DNA transport through a double-stranded DNA break. We present the structures of cleavage complexes formed by the Streptococcus pneumoniae ParC breakage-reunion and ParE TOPRIM domains of topoisomerase IV stabilized by moxifloxacin and clinafloxacin, two antipneumococcal fluoroquinolones. These structures reveal two drug molecules intercalated at the highly bent DNA gate and help explain antibacterial quinolone action and resistance.

  5. Effects of Olive Metabolites on DNA Cleavage Mediated by Human Type II Topoisomerases.

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    Vann, Kendra R; Sedgeman, Carl A; Gopas, Jacob; Golan-Goldhirsh, Avi; Osheroff, Neil

    2015-07-28

    Several naturally occurring dietary polyphenols with chemopreventive or anticancer properties are topoisomerase II poisons. To identify additional phytochemicals that enhance topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage, a library of 341 Mediterranean plant extracts was screened for activity against human topoisomerase IIα. An extract from Phillyrea latifolia L., a member of the olive tree family, displayed high activity against the human enzyme. On the basis of previous metabolomics studies, we identified several polyphenols (hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, verbascoside, tyrosol, and caffeic acid) as potential candidates for topoisomerase II poisons. Of these, hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, and verbascoside enhanced topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage. The potency of these olive metabolites increased 10-100-fold in the presence of an oxidant. Hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, and verbascoside displayed hallmark characteristics of covalent topoisomerase II poisons. (1) The activity of the metabolites was abrogated by a reducing agent. (2) Compounds inhibited topoisomerase II activity when they were incubated with the enzyme prior to the addition of DNA. (3) Compounds were unable to poison a topoisomerase IIα construct that lacked the N-terminal domain. Because hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, and verbascoside are broadly distributed across the olive family, extracts from the leaves, bark, and fruit of 11 olive tree species were tested for activity against human topoisomerase IIα. Several of the extracts enhanced enzyme-mediated DNA cleavage. Finally, a commercial olive leaf supplement and extra virgin olive oils pressed from a variety of Olea europea subspecies enhanced DNA cleavage mediated by topoisomerase IIα. Thus, olive metabolites appear to act as topoisomerase II poisons in complex formulations intended for human dietary consumption.

  6. Effects of Olive Metabolites on DNA Cleavage Mediated by Human Type II Topoisomerases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Several naturally occurring dietary polyphenols with chemopreventive or anticancer properties are topoisomerase II poisons. To identify additional phytochemicals that enhance topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage, a library of 341 Mediterranean plant extracts was screened for activity against human topoisomerase IIα. An extract from Phillyrea latifolia L., a member of the olive tree family, displayed high activity against the human enzyme. On the basis of previous metabolomics studies, we identified several polyphenols (hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, verbascoside, tyrosol, and caffeic acid) as potential candidates for topoisomerase II poisons. Of these, hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, and verbascoside enhanced topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage. The potency of these olive metabolites increased 10–100-fold in the presence of an oxidant. Hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, and verbascoside displayed hallmark characteristics of covalent topoisomerase II poisons. (1) The activity of the metabolites was abrogated by a reducing agent. (2) Compounds inhibited topoisomerase II activity when they were incubated with the enzyme prior to the addition of DNA. (3) Compounds were unable to poison a topoisomerase IIα construct that lacked the N-terminal domain. Because hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, and verbascoside are broadly distributed across the olive family, extracts from the leaves, bark, and fruit of 11 olive tree species were tested for activity against human topoisomerase IIα. Several of the extracts enhanced enzyme-mediated DNA cleavage. Finally, a commercial olive leaf supplement and extra virgin olive oils pressed from a variety of Olea europea subspecies enhanced DNA cleavage mediated by topoisomerase IIα. Thus, olive metabolites appear to act as topoisomerase II poisons in complex formulations intended for human dietary consumption. PMID:26132160

  7. The dual topoisomerase inhibitor A35 preferentially and specially targets topoisomerase 2? by enhancing pre-strand and post-strand cleavage and inhibiting DNA religation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Wuli; Jiang, Guohua; Bi, Chongwen; Li, Yangbiao; Liu, Jingbo; Ye, Cheng; He, Hongwei; Li, Liang; Song, Danqing; Shao, Rongguang

    2015-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases play a key role in tumor proliferation. Chemotherapeutics targeting topoisomerases have been widely used in clinical oncology, but resistance and side effects, particularly cardiotoxicity, usually limit their application. Clinical data show that a decrease in topoisomerase (top) levels is the primary factor responsible for resistance, but in cells there is compensatory effect between the levels of top1 and top2?. Here, we validated cyclizing-berberine A35, which is a dual t...

  8. Voreloxin is an anticancer quinolone derivative that intercalates DNA and poisons topoisomerase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael E Hawtin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase II is critical for DNA replication, transcription and chromosome segregation and is a well validated target of anti-neoplastic drugs including the anthracyclines and epipodophyllotoxins. However, these drugs are limited by common tumor resistance mechanisms and side-effect profiles. Novel topoisomerase II-targeting agents may benefit patients who prove resistant to currently available topoisomerase II-targeting drugs or encounter unacceptable toxicities. Voreloxin is an anticancer quinolone derivative, a chemical scaffold not used previously for cancer treatment. Voreloxin is completing Phase 2 clinical trials in acute myeloid leukemia and platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. This study defined voreloxin's anticancer mechanism of action as a critical component of rational clinical development informed by translational research.Biochemical and cell-based studies established that voreloxin intercalates DNA and poisons topoisomerase II, causing DNA double-strand breaks, G2 arrest, and apoptosis. Voreloxin is differentiated both structurally and mechanistically from other topoisomerase II poisons currently in use as chemotherapeutics. In cell-based studies, voreloxin poisoned topoisomerase II and caused dose-dependent, site-selective DNA fragmentation analogous to that of quinolone antibacterials in prokaryotes; in contrast etoposide, the nonintercalating epipodophyllotoxin topoisomerase II poison, caused extensive DNA fragmentation. Etoposide's activity was highly dependent on topoisomerase II while voreloxin and the intercalating anthracycline topoisomerase II poison, doxorubicin, had comparable dependence on this enzyme for inducing G2 arrest. Mechanistic interrogation with voreloxin analogs revealed that intercalation is required for voreloxin's activity; a nonintercalating analog did not inhibit proliferation or induce G2 arrest, while an analog with enhanced intercalation was 9.5-fold more potent.As a first-in-class anticancer

  9. [Isolation and partial characterization of DNA topoisomerase I from the nucleoids of white mustard chloroplasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkina, G G; Pogul'skaia, E V; Iurina, N P

    2004-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase was isolated for the first time from nucleoids of white mustard (Sinapis alba L.) chloroplasts. The enzyme had a molecular weight of 70 kDa; it was ATP-independent, required the presence of mono- (K+) and bivalent (Mg2+) cations, and was capable of relaxing both negatively and positively supercoiled DNA. These results suggest that the enzyme isolated belongs to type IB DNA topoisomerases.

  10. Identification of proximal sites for unwound DNA substrate in E. coli topoisomerase I with oxidative crosslinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bokun; Zhou, Qingxuan; Weng, Liwei; Leszyk, John D.; Greenberg, Marc M.; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerases catalyze changes in DNA topology by directing the movement of DNA strands through consecutive cleavage-rejoining reactions of the DNA backbone. We describe the use of a phenylselenyl-modified thymidine incorporated into a specific position of a partially unwound DNA substrate in crosslinking studies of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I to gain new insights into its catalytic mechanism. Crosslinking of the phenylselenyl-modified thymidine to the topoisomerase protein was achieved by the addition of a mild oxidant. Following nuclease and trypsin digestion, lysine residues on topoisomerase I crosslinked to the modified thymidine were identified by mass spectrometry. The crosslinked sites may correspond to proximal sites for the unwound DNA strand as it interacts with enzyme in the different stages of the catalytic cycle. PMID:27926785

  11. Human topoisomerase IIIalpha is a single-stranded DNA decatenase that is stimulated by BLM and RMI1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jay; Bachrati, Csanad Z; Ou, Jiongwen

    2010-01-01

    -passage mechanism. We generated single-stranded catenanes that resemble the proposed dissolution intermediate recognized by human topoisomerase IIIalpha. We demonstrate that human topoisomerase IIIalpha is a single-stranded DNA decatenase that is specifically stimulated by the BLM-RMI1 pair. In addition, RMI1......Human topoisomerase IIIalpha is a type IA DNA topoisomerase that functions with BLM and RMI1 to resolve DNA replication and recombination intermediates. BLM, human topoisomerase IIIalpha, and RMI1 catalyze the dissolution of double Holliday junctions into noncrossover products via a strand...

  12. Reduction in DNA topoisomerase I level affects growth, phenotype and nucleoid architecture of Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Wareed; Menon, Shruti; Karthik, Pullela V; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2015-02-01

    The steady-state negative supercoiling of eubacterial genomes is maintained by the action of DNA topoisomerases. Topoisomerase distribution varies in different species of mycobacteria. While Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) contains a single type I (TopoI) and a single type II (Gyrase) enzyme, Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm) and other members harbour additional relaxases. TopoI is essential for Mtb survival. However, the necessity of TopoI or other relaxases in Msm has not been investigated. To recognize the importance of TopoI for growth, physiology and gene expression of Msm, we have developed a conditional knock-down strain of TopoI in Msm. The TopoI-depleted strain exhibited extremely slow growth and drastic changes in phenotypic characteristics. The cessation of growth indicates the essential requirement of the enzyme for the organism in spite of having additional DNA relaxation enzymes in the cell. Notably, the imbalance in TopoI level led to the altered expression of topology modulatory proteins, resulting in a diffused nucleoid architecture. Proteomic and transcript analysis of the mutant indicated reduced expression of the genes involved in central metabolic pathways and core DNA transaction processes. RNA polymerase (RNAP) distribution on the transcription units was affected in the TopoI-depleted cells, suggesting global alteration in transcription. The study thus highlights the essential requirement of TopoI in the maintenance of cellular phenotype, growth characteristics and gene expression in mycobacteria. A decrease in TopoI level led to altered RNAP occupancy and impaired transcription elongation, causing severe downstream effects. © 2015 The Authors.

  13. Inhibition of Hsp90 acts synergistically with topoisomerase II poisons to increase the apoptotic killing of cells due to an increase in topoisomerase II mediated DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Catherine R; McNamara, Anne V; Rackstraw, Stephen A; Nelson, David E; White, Mike R; Watson, Alastair J M; Jenkins, John R

    2006-01-01

    Topoisomerase II plays a crucial role during chromosome condensation and segregation in mitosis and meiosis and is a highly attractive target for chemotherapeutic agents. We have identified previously topoisomerase II and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) as part of a complex. In this paper we demonstrate that drug combinations targeting these two enzymes cause a synergistic increase in apoptosis. The objective of our study was to identify the mode of cell killing and the mechanism behind the increase in topoisomerase II mediated DNA damage. Importantly we demonstrate that Hsp90 inhibition results in an increased topoiosmerase II activity but not degradation of topoisomerase II and it is this, in the presence of a topoisomerase II poison that causes the increase in cell death. Our results suggest a novel mechanism of action where the inhibition of Hsp90 disrupts the Hsp90-topoisomerase II interaction leading to an increase in and activation of unbound topoisomerase II, which, in the presence of a topoisomerase II poison leads to the formation of an increased number of cleavable complexes ultimately resulting in rise in DNA damage and a subsequent increase cell death.

  14. Crystal structure of a covalent intermediate in DNA cleavage and rejoining by Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongtao; Cheng, Bokun; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2011-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases control DNA topology by breaking and rejoining DNA strands via covalent complexes with cleaved DNA substrate as catalytic intermediates. Here we report the structure of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I catalytic domain (residues 2–695) in covalent complex with a cleaved single-stranded oligonucleotide substrate, refined to 2.3-Å resolution. The enzyme-substrate intermediate formed after strand cleavage was captured due to the presence of the D111N mutation. This structure of the covalent topoisomerase-DNA intermediate, previously elusive for type IA topoisomerases, shows distinct conformational changes from the structure of the enzyme without bound DNA and provides detailed understanding of the covalent catalysis required for strand cleavage to take place. The portion of cleaved DNA 5′ to the site of cleavage is anchored tightly with extensive noncovalent protein–DNA interactions as predicted by the “enzyme-bridged” model. Distortion of the scissile strand at the -4 position 5′ to the cleavage site allows specific selectivity of a cytosine base in the binding pocket. Many antibacterial and anticancer drugs initiate cell killing by trapping the covalent complexes formed by topoisomerases. We have demonstrated in previous mutagenesis studies that accumulation of the covalent complex of bacterial topoisomerase I is bactericidal. This structure of the covalent intermediate provides the basis for the design of novel antibiotics that can trap the enzyme after formation of the covalent complex. PMID:21482796

  15. Isolation and quantitation of topoisomerase complexes accumulated on Escherichia coli chromosomal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aedo, Sandra; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2012-11-01

    DNA topoisomerases are important targets in anticancer and antibacterial therapy because drugs can initiate cell death by stabilizing the transient covalent topoisomerase-DNA complex. In this study, we employed a method that uses CsCl density gradient centrifugation to separate unbound from DNA-bound GyrA/ParC in Escherichia coli cell lysates after quinolone treatment, allowing antibody detection and quantitation of the covalent complexes on slot blots. Using these procedures modified from the in vivo complexes of enzyme (ICE) bioassay, we found a correlation between gyrase-DNA complex formation and DNA replication inhibition at bacteriostatic (1× MIC) norfloxacin concentrations. Quantitation of the number of gyrase-DNA complexes per E. coli cell permitted an association between cell death and chromosomal gyrase-DNA complex accumulation at norfloxacin concentrations greater than 1× MIC. When comparing levels of gyrase-DNA complexes to topoisomerase IV-DNA complexes in the absence of drug, we observed that the gyrase-DNA complex level was higher (∼150-fold) than that of the topoisomerase IV-DNA complex. In addition, levels of gyrase and topoisomerase IV complexes reached a significant increase after 30 min of treatment at 1× and 1.7× MIC, respectively. These results are in agreement with gyrase being the primary target for quinolones in E. coli. We further validated the utility of this method for the study of topoisomerase-drug interactions in bacteria by showing the gyrase covalent complex reversibility after removal of the drug from the medium, and the resistant effect of the Ser83Leu gyrA mutation on accumulation of gyrase covalent complexes on chromosomal DNA.

  16. Contribution of Topoisomerase IV and DNA Gyrase Mutations in Streptococcus pneumoniae to Resistance to Novel Fluoroquinolones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestova, Ekaterina; Beyer, Rebecca; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.; Noskin, Gary A.; Peterson, Lance R.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the activity of ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, sparfloxacin, and trovafloxacin against clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae that were resistant to the less-recently developed fluoroquinolones by using defined amino acid substitutions in DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. The molecular basis for resistance was assessed by using mutants selected with trovafloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and levofloxacin in vitro. This demonstrated that the primary target of trovafloxacin in S. pneumoniae is the ParC subunit of DNA topoisomerase IV, similar to most other fluoroquinolones. However, first-step mutants bearing the Ser79→Phe/Tyr substitution in topoisomerase IV subunit ParC were susceptible to trovafloxacin with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.25 μg/ml, and mutations in the structural genes for both topoisomerase IV subunit ParC (parC) and the DNA gyrase subunit (gyrA) were required to achieve levels of resistance above the breakpoint. The data also suggest that enhanced activity of trovafloxacin against pneumococci is due to a combination of factors that may include reduced efflux of this agent and an enhanced activity against both DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. PMID:10428926

  17. Bioassays and in silico methods in the identification of human DNA topoisomerase IIa inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergant, Kaja; Janezic, Matej; Perdih, Andrej

    2018-03-06

    The family of DNA topoisomerases comprises a group of enzymes that catalyse the induction of topological changes to DNA. These enzymes play a role in the cell replication machinery and are, therefore, important targets for anticancer drugs - with human DNA topoisomerase IIα being one of the most prominent. Active compounds targeting this enzyme are classified into two groups with diverse mechanisms of action: DNA poisons act by stabilizing a covalent cleavage complex between DNA and the topoisomerase enzyme, transforming it into a cellular toxin, while the second diverse group of catalytic inhibitors, provides novel inhibition avenues for tackling this enzyme due to frequent occurrence of side effects observed during the DNA poison therapy. Based on a comprehensive literature search we present an overview of available bioassays and in silico methods in the identification of human DNA topoisomerase IIα inhibitors. A comprehensive outline of the available methods and approaches that explore in detail the in vitro mechanistic and functional aspects of the topoisomerase IIα inhibition of both topo IIα inhibitor groups is presented. The utilized in vitro cell-based assays and in vivo studies to further explore the validated topo IIα inhibitors in subsequent preclinical stages of the drug discovery are discussed. The potential of in silico methods in topoisomerase IIα inhibitor discovery is outlined. A list of practical guidelines was compiled to aid new as well experienced researchers in how to optimally approach the design of targeted inhibitors and validation in the preclinical drug development stages. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Identification and localization of a gene that specifies production of Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trucksis, M.; Depew, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    A gene that specifies production of Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I (ω protein) was identified with the aid of a radioimmunoassay for this protein. E. coli DNA topoisomerase I was produced by Salmonella typhimurium merodiploids that harbored E. coli plasmid F' 123, but not by strains that lost this plasmid. Analysis of strains with spontaneous deletions of F' 123 showed that the gene, topA, required for production of the E. coli ω protein was between the trp operon and the cysB gene. Deletions that eliminated topA also eliminated the supX gene. We suggest that topA is the structural gene of E. coli DNA topoisomerase I and that topA is identical to supX

  19. Inhibition of DNA topoisomerase I and growth inhibition of human cancer cell lines by an oleanane from Junellia aspera (Verbenaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pungitore, C R; Padron, J M; Leon, L G; Garcia, C; Ciuffo, G M; Martin, V S; Tonn, C E

    2007-05-15

    DNA topoisomerases and DNA polymerases are enzymes that play a crucial role in DNA metabolism events such as replication, transcription, recombination, and chromosome segregation during mitosis. Thus, DNA topoisomerases and DNA polymerases inhibitors could be expected to have antitumor effects. Naturally occurring triterpenoids isolated from Junellia aspera (Gillies & Hook; Moldenke) (Verbenaceae) were assayed for human DNA topoisomerase I and Taq DNA polymerase inhibitory activities. Maslinic acid (2) and its diacetyl derivative (7) showed human DNA topoisomerase I inhibitory activity with IC50 values in the range of 76-80 microM and growth inhibition against various human solid tumour cell lines with GI50 values in the range of 5-18 microM. The triterpene frames could be used for screening new inhibitors of the enzyme, and computer-simulated drug design using the frame and pocket structure of enzyme may in theory be a possible approach to develop new inhibitors.

  20. Streptococcus pneumoniae DNA Gyrase and Topoisomerase IV: Overexpression, Purification, and Differential Inhibition by Fluoroquinolones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiao-Su; Fisher, L. Mark

    1999-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae gyrA and gyrB genes specifying the DNA gyrase subunits have been cloned into pET plasmid vectors under the control of an inducible T7 promoter and have been separately expressed in Escherichia coli. Soluble 97-kDa GyrA and 72-kDa GyrB proteins bearing polyhistidine tags at their respective C-terminal and N-terminal ends were purified to apparent homogeneity by one-step nickel chelate column chromatography and were free of host E. coli topoisomerase activity. Equimolar amounts of the gyrase subunits reconstituted ATP-dependent DNA supercoiling with comparable activity to gyrase of E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus. In parallel, S. pneumoniae topoisomerase IV ParC and ParE subunits were similarly expressed in E. coli, purified to near homogeneity as 93- and 73-kDa proteins, and shown to generate efficient ATP-dependent DNA relaxation and DNA decatenation activities. Using the purified enzymes, we examined the inhibitory effects of three paradigm fluoroquinolones—ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, and clinafloxacin—which previous genetic studies with S. pneumoniae suggested act preferentially through topoisomerase IV, through gyrase, and through both enzymes, respectively. Surprisingly, all three quinolones were more active in inhibiting purified topoisomerase IV than gyrase, with clinafloxacin showing the greatest inhibitory potency. Moreover, the tested agents were at least 25-fold more effective in stabilizing a cleavable complex (the relevant cytotoxic lesion) with topoisomerase IV than with gyrase, with clinafloxacin some 10- to 32-fold more potent against either enzyme, in line with its superior activity against S. pneumoniae. The uniform target preference of the three fluoroquinolones for topoisomerase IV in vitro is in apparent contrast to the genetic data. We interpret these results in terms of a model for bacterial killing by quinolones in which cellular factors can modulate the effects of target affinity to determine the cytotoxic

  1. Use of divalent metal ions in the DNA cleavage reaction of topoisomerase IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Steven L.; Liou, Grace F.; Mitchenall, Lesley A.; Burgin, Alex B.; Maxwell, Anthony; Neuman, Keir C.; Osheroff, Neil

    2011-01-01

    It has long been known that type II topoisomerases require divalent metal ions in order to cleave DNA. Kinetic, mutagenesis and structural studies indicate that the eukaryotic enzymes utilize a novel variant of the canonical two-metal-ion mechanism to promote DNA scission. However, the role of metal ions in the cleavage reaction mediated by bacterial type II enzymes has been controversial. Therefore, to resolve this critical issue, this study characterized the DNA cleavage reaction of Escherichia coli topoisomerase IV. We utilized a series of divalent metal ions with varying thiophilicities in conjunction with oligonucleotides that replaced bridging and non-bridging oxygen atoms at (and near) the scissile bond with sulfur atoms. DNA scission was enhanced when thiophilic metal ions were used with substrates that contained bridging sulfur atoms. In addition, the metal-ion dependence of DNA cleavage was sigmoidal in nature, and rates and levels of DNA cleavage increased when metal ion mixtures were used in reactions. Based on these findings, we propose that topoisomerase IV cleaves DNA using a two-metal-ion mechanism in which one of the metal ions makes a critical interaction with the 3′-bridging atom of the scissile phosphate and facilitates DNA scission by the bacterial type II enzyme. PMID:21300644

  2. Topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage by adocia- and xestoquinones from the Philippine sponge Xestospongia sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concepción, G P; Foderaro, T A; Eldredge, G S; Lobkovsky, E; Clardy, J; Barrows, L R; Ireland, C M

    1995-10-27

    Investigation of an orange Xestospongia sp. sponge collected at Cape Bolinao in northern Luzon, Philippines, yielded the known compounds adociaquinones A and B (1, 2) and six new metabolites, secoadociaquinones A and B (3, 4), 14-methoxyxestoquinone (5), 15-methoxyxestoquinone (6), 15-chloro-14-hydroxyxestoquinone (7), and 14-chloro-15-hydroxyxestoquinone (8). All compounds showed inhibition of topoisomerase II in catalytic DNA unwinding and/or decatenation assays. Furthermore, adociaquinone B showed activity in a KSDS assay, suggesting it inhibits the enzyme by freezing the enzyme-DNA cleavable complex. Interestingly, adociaquinone B did not displace ethidium bromide from DNA or unwind supercoiled DNA, implying it does not intercalate DNA.

  3. DNA binding induces conformational transition within human DNA topoisomerase I in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleinikov, Vladimir; Sukhanova, Alyona; Mochalov, Konstantin; Ustinova, Olga; Kudelina, Irina; Bronstein, Igor; Nabiev, Igor

    2002-01-01

    We employed Raman and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to probe the molecular structure of 68-kDa recombinant human DNA topoisomerase I (TopoI) in solution, in a complex with a 16-bp DNA fragment containing a camptothecin-enhanced TopoI cleavage site, and in a ternary complex with this oligonucleotide and topotecan. Raman spectroscopy reveals a TopoI secondary structure transition and significant changes in the hydrogen bonding of the tyrosine residues induced by the DNA binding. CD spectroscopy confirms the Raman data and identifies a DNA-induced (>7%) decrease of the TopoI alpha helix accompanied by at least a 6% increase of the beta structure. The Raman DNA molecular signatures demonstrated a bandshift that is expected for a net change in the environment of guanine C6 [double bond] O groups from pairing to solvent exposure. The formation of a ternary cleavage complex with TopoI, DNA, and topotecan as probed by CD spectroscopy reveals neither additional modifications of the TopoI secondary structure nor of the oligonucleotide structure, compared to the TopoI-oligonucleotide complex. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Chromatin structure and dynamics in hot environments: architectural proteins and DNA topoisomerases of thermophilic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visone, Valeria; Vettone, Antonella; Serpe, Mario; Valenti, Anna; Perugino, Giuseppe; Rossi, Mosè; Ciaramella, Maria

    2014-09-25

    In all organisms of the three living domains (Bacteria, Archaea, Eucarya) chromosome-associated proteins play a key role in genome functional organization. They not only compact and shape the genome structure, but also regulate its dynamics, which is essential to allow complex genome functions. Elucidation of chromatin composition and regulation is a critical issue in biology, because of the intimate connection of chromatin with all the essential information processes (transcription, replication, recombination, and repair). Chromatin proteins include architectural proteins and DNA topoisomerases, which regulate genome structure and remodelling at two hierarchical levels. This review is focussed on architectural proteins and topoisomerases from hyperthermophilic Archaea. In these organisms, which live at high environmental temperature (>80 °C <113 °C), chromatin proteins and modulation of the DNA secondary structure are concerned with the problem of DNA stabilization against heat denaturation while maintaining its metabolic activity.

  5. Chromatin Structure and Dynamics in Hot Environments: Architectural Proteins and DNA Topoisomerases of Thermophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Visone

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In all organisms of the three living domains (Bacteria, Archaea, Eucarya chromosome-associated proteins play a key role in genome functional organization. They not only compact and shape the genome structure, but also regulate its dynamics, which is essential to allow complex genome functions. Elucidation of chromatin composition and regulation is a critical issue in biology, because of the intimate connection of chromatin with all the essential information processes (transcription, replication, recombination, and repair. Chromatin proteins include architectural proteins and DNA topoisomerases, which regulate genome structure and remodelling at two hierarchical levels. This review is focussed on architectural proteins and topoisomerases from hyperthermophilic Archaea. In these organisms, which live at high environmental temperature (>80 °C <113 °C, chromatin proteins and modulation of the DNA secondary structure are concerned with the problem of DNA stabilization against heat denaturation while maintaining its metabolic activity.

  6. Probing Conformational Changes in Human DNA Topoisomerase IIα by Pulsed Alkylation Mass Spectrometry*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-tsung; Collins, Tammy R. L.; Guan, Ziqiang; Chen, Vincent B.; Hsieh, Tao-Shih

    2012-01-01

    Type II topoisomerases are essential enzymes for solving DNA topological problems by passing one segment of DNA duplex through a transient double-strand break in a second segment. The reaction requires the enzyme to precisely control DNA cleavage and gate opening coupled with ATP hydrolysis. Using pulsed alkylation mass spectrometry, we were able to monitor the solvent accessibilities around 13 cysteines distributed throughout human topoisomerase IIα by measuring the thiol reactivities with monobromobimane. Most of the measured reactivities are in accordance with the predicted ones based on a homology structural model generated from available crystal structures. However, these results reveal new information for both the residues not covered in the structural model and potential differences between the modeled and solution holoenzyme structures. Furthermore, on the basis of the reactivity changes of several cysteines located at the N-gate and DNA gate, we could monitor the movement of topoisomerase II in the presence of cofactors and detect differences in the DNA gate between two closed clamp enzyme conformations locked by either 5′-adenylyl β,γ-imidodiphosphate or the anticancer drug ICRF-193. PMID:22679013

  7. Cloning and biochemical characterization of Staphylococcus aureus type IA DNA topoisomerase comprised of distinct five domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Eun; Kim, Hyun Ik; Park, Jong Woo; Park, Jong Kun; Lee, Jung Sup

    2011-04-01

    DNA topoisomerases play critical roles in regulating DNA topology and are essential enzymes for cell survival. In this study, a gene encoding type IA DNA topoisomerase was cloned from Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) sp. strain C-66, and the biochemical properties of recombinant enzyme was characterized. The nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the cloned gene contained an open reading frame (2070 bp) that could encode a polypeptide of 689 amino acids. The cloned gene actually produced 79.1 kDa functional enzyme (named Sau-TopoI) in Escherichia coli (E. coli). Sau-TopoI enzyme purified from E. coli showed ATP-independent and Mg(2+)-dependent manners for relaxing negatively supercoiled DNA. The relaxation activity of Sau-TopoI was inhibited by camptothecin, but not by nalidixic acid and etoposide. Cleavage site mapping showed that the enzyme could preferentially bind to and cleave the sequence GGNN↓CAT (N and ↓ represent any nucleotide and cleavage site, respectively). All these results suggest that the purified enzyme is type IA DNA topoisomerase. In addition, domain mapping analysis showed that the enzyme was composed of conserved four domains (I through IV), together with a variable C-terminal region containing a unique domain V. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Carboxyl terminal domain basic amino acids of mycobacterial topoisomerase I bind DNA to promote strand passage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Wareed; Bhat, Anuradha Gopal; Leelaram, Majety Naga; Menon, Shruti; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial DNA topoisomerase I (topoI) carries out relaxation of negatively supercoiled DNA through a series of orchestrated steps, DNA binding, cleavage, strand passage and religation. The N-terminal domain (NTD) of the type IA topoisomerases harbor DNA cleavage and religation activities, but the carboxyl terminal domain (CTD) is highly diverse. Most of these enzymes contain a varied number of Zn(2+) finger motifs in the CTD. The Zn(2+) finger motifs were found to be essential in Escherichia coli topoI but dispensable in the Thermotoga maritima enzyme. Although, the CTD of mycobacterial topoI lacks Zn(2+) fingers, it is indispensable for the DNA relaxation activity of the enzyme. The divergent CTD harbors three stretches of basic amino acids needed for the strand passage step of the reaction as demonstrated by a new assay. We also show that the basic amino acids constitute an independent DNA-binding site apart from the NTD and assist the simultaneous binding of two molecules of DNA to the enzyme, as required during the catalytic step. Although the NTD binds to DNA in a site-specific fashion to carry out DNA cleavage and religation, the basic residues in CTD bind to non-scissile DNA in a sequence-independent manner to promote the crucial strand passage step during DNA relaxation. The loss of Zn(2+) fingers from the mycobacterial topoI could be associated with Zn(2+) export and homeostasis.

  9. Sequence-selective topoisomerase II inhibition by anthracycline derivatives in SV40 DNA: Relationship with DNA binding affinity and cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capranico, G.; Kohn, K.W.; Pommier, Y.; Zunino, F.

    1990-01-01

    Topoisomerase II mediated double-strand breaks produced by anthracycline analogues were studied in SV40 DNA. The compounds included doxorubicin, daunorubicin, two doxorubicin stereoisomers (4'-epimer and β-anomer), and five chromophore-modified derivatives, with a wide range of cytotoxic activity and DNA binding affinity. Cleavage of 32 P-end-labeled DNA fragments was visualized by autoradiography of agarose and polyacrylamide gels. Structure-activity relationships indicated that alterations in the chromophore structure greatly affected drug action on topoisomerase II. In particular, removal of substituents on position 4 of the D ring resulted in more active inducers of cleavage with lower DNA binding affinity. The stereochemistry between the sugar and the chromophore was also essential for activity. All the active anthracyclines induced a single region of prominent cleavage in the entire SV40 DNA, which resulted from a cluster of sites between nucleotides 4237 and 4294. DNA cleavage intensity patterns exhibited differences among analogues and were also dependent upon drug concentration. Intensity at a given site dependent on both stimulatory and suppressive effects depending upon drug concentration and DNA sequence. A good correlation was found between cytotoxicity and intensity of topoisomerase II mediated DNA breakage

  10. DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV mutations in an in vitro fluoroquinolone-resistant Coxiella burnetii strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranakis, Iosif; Sandalakis, Vassilios; Chochlakis, Dimosthenis; Tselentis, Yannis; Psaroulaki, Anna

    2010-06-01

    The etiological agent of Q fever, Coxiella burnetii, is an obligate intracellular bacterium that multiplies within a vacuole with lysosomal characteristics. Quinolones have been used as an alternative therapy for Q fever. In this study, quinolone-resistance-determining regions of the genes coding for DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV were analyzed by DNA sequencing from an in vitro fluoroquinolone-resistant C. burnetii strain (Q212). Sequencing and aligning of DNA gyrase encoding genes (gyrA and gyrB) and topoisomerase IV genes (parC and parE) revealed one gyrA mutation leading to the amino acid substitution Asp87Gly (Escherichia coli numbering), two gyrB mutations leading to the amino acid substitutions Ser431Pro and Met518Ile, and three parC mutations leading to the amino acid substitutions Asp69Asn, Thr80Ile, and Gly104Ser. The corresponding alignment of the C. burnetii Q212 reference strain, the in vitro developed fluoroquinolone-resistant C. burnetii Q212 strain, and E. coli resulted in the identification of several other naturally occurring mutations within and outside the quinolone-resistance-determining regions of C. burnetii providing indications of possible natural resistance to fluoroquinolones. The present study adds additional potential mutations in the DNA topoisomerases that may be involved in fluoroquinolone resistance in C. burnetii due to their previous characterization in other bacterial species.

  11. Molecular modeling of cationic porphyrin-anthraquinone hybrids as DNA topoisomerase IIβ inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arba, Muhammad; Ruslin; Ihsan, Sunandar; Tri Wahyudi, Setyanto; Tjahjono, Daryono H

    2017-12-01

    Human DNA Topoisomerase II has been regarded as a promising target in anticancer drug discovery. In the present study, we designed six porphyrin-anthraquinone hybrids bearing pyrazole or pyridine group as meso substituents and evaluated their potentials as DNA Topoisomerase IIβ inhibitor. First, we investigated the binding orientation of porphyrin hybrids into DNA topoisomerase IIβ employing AutoDock 4.2 and then performed 20-ns molecular dynamics simulations to see the dynamic stability of each porphyrin-Topo IIβ complex using Amber 14. We found that the binding of porphyrin hybrids occured through intercalation and groove binding mode in addition interaction with the amino acid residues constituting the active cavity of Topo IIβ. Each porphyrin-Topo IIβ complex was stabilized during 20-ns dynamics simulations. The MM-PBSA free energy calculation shows that the binding affinities of porphyrin hybrids were modified with the number of meso substituent. Interestingly, the affinity of all porphyrin hybrids to Topo IIβ was stronger than that of native ligand (EVP), indicating the potential of the designed porphyrin to be considered in experimental research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Decreased nuclear matrix DNA topoisomerase II in human leukemia cells resistant to VM-26 and m-AMSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, D.J.; Danks, M.K.; Beck, W.T.

    1990-01-01

    CEM leukemia cells selected for resistance to VM-26 (CEM/VM-1) are cross-resistant to various other DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors but not to Vinca alkaloids. Since DNA topoisomerase II is a major protein of the nuclear matrix, the authors asked if alterations in nuclear matrix topoisomerase II might be important in this form of multidrug resistance. Pretreatment of drug-sensitive CEM cells for 2 h with either 5 μM VM-26 or 3 μM m-AMSA reduced the specific activity of newly replicated DNA on the nuclear matrix by 75 and 50%, respectively, relative to that of the bulk DNA. The decatenating and unknotting activities of DNA topoisomerase II were 6- and 7-fold lower, respectively, in the nuclear matrix preparations from the CEM/VM-1 cells compared to parental CEM cells. Western blot analysis revealed that the amount of immunoreactive topoisomerase II in the nuclear matrices of the CEM/VM-1 cells decreased 3.2-fold relative to that in CEM cells. Increasing the NaCl concentration used in the matrix isolation procedure from 0.2 to 1.8 M resulted in a progressive decrease in the specific activity of topoisomerase II in matrices of CEM/VM-1 but not CEM cells, which suggested that the association of the enzyme with the matrix is altered in the resistant cells. These data support the hypothesis that resistance to VM-26 and m-AMSA is directly related to the decreased activity of nuclear matrix topoisomerase II. In CEM/VM-1 cells the interaction of either VM-26 or m-AMSA with nuclear matrix topoisomerase II is specifically diminished

  13. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase CTD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darmon, Amélie; Piton, Jérémie; Roué, Mélanie; Petrella, Stéphanie; Aubry, Alexandra; Mayer, Claudine

    2012-01-01

    The M. tuberculosis DNA gyrase A C-terminal domain (CTD) was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 and diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 1.55 Å. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase, a nanomachine involved in regulation of DNA topology, is the only type II topoisomerase present in this organism and hence is the sole target of fluoroquinolone in the treatment of tuberculosis. The C-terminal domain (CTD) of the DNA gyrase A subunit possesses a unique feature, the ability to wrap DNA in a chiral manner, that plays an essential role during the catalytic cycle. A construct of 36 kDa corresponding to this domain has been overproduced, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 1.55 Å resolution. Cleavage of the N-terminal His tag was crucial for obtaining crystals. The crystals belonged to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with one molecule in the asymmetric unit and a low solvent content (33%). This is the first report of the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a DNA gyrase CTD from a species that contains one unique type II topoisomerase

  14. Human topoisomerase IIα uses a two-metal-ion mechanism for DNA cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deweese, Joseph E.; Burgin, Alex B.; Osheroff, Neil

    2008-01-01

    The DNA cleavage reaction of human topoisomerase IIα is critical to all of the physiological and pharmacological functions of the protein. While it has long been known that the type II enzyme requires a divalent metal ion in order to cleave DNA, the role of the cation in this process is not known. To resolve this fundamental issue, the present study utilized a series of divalent metal ions with varying thiophilicities in conjunction with DNA cleavage substrates that replaced the 3′-bridging oxygen of the scissile bond with a sulfur atom (i.e. 3′-bridging phosphorothiolates). Rates and levels of DNA scission were greatly enhanced when thiophilic metal ions were included in reactions that utilized sulfur-containing substrates. Based on these results and those of reactions that employed divalent cation mixtures, we propose that topoisomerase IIα mediates DNA cleavage via a two-metal-ion mechanism. In this model, one of the metal ions makes a critical interaction with the 3′-bridging atom of the scissile phosphate. This interaction greatly accelerates rates of enzyme-mediated DNA cleavage, and most likely is needed to stabilize the leaving 3′-oxygen. PMID:18653531

  15. Cytotoxic and DNA-topoisomerase effects of lapachol amine derivatives and interactions with DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Esteves-Souza

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The cytotoxic activity of amino (3a-e, aza-1-antraquinone (4a-e lapachol derivatives against Ehrlich carcinoma and human K562 leukemia cells was investigated. Cell viability was determined using MTT assay, after 48 (Ehrlich or 96 h (K562 of culture, and vincristine (for K562 leukemia and quercetin (for Ehrlich carcinoma were used as positive controls. The results showed dose-dependent growth-inhibiting activities and that the amino derivatives were active against the assayed cells, whereas the 4a-e derivatives were not. The allylamine derivative 3a was the most active against Ehrlich carcinoma, with IC50 = 16.94 ± 1.25 µM, and against K562 leukemia, with IC50 = 14.11 ± 1.39 µM. The analogous lawsone derivative, 5a, was also active against Ehrlich carcinoma (IC50 = 23.89 ± 2.3 µM, although the 5d and 5e derivatives showed lower activity. The interaction between 3a-d and calf thymus DNA was investigated by fluorimetric titration and the results showed a hyperchromic effect indicating binding to DNA as presented of ethidium bromide, used as positive control. The inhibitory action on DNA-topoisomerase II-a was also evaluated by a relaxation assay of supercoiled DNA plasmid, and the etoposide (200 µM was used as positive control. Significant inhibitory activities were observed for 3a-d at 200 µM and a partial inhibitory action was observed for lapachol and methoxylapachol.

  16. Cytotoxic and DNA-topoisomerase effects of lapachol amine derivatives and interactions with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves-Souza, A; Figueiredo, D V; Esteves, A; Câmara, C A; Vargas, M D; Pinto, A C; Echevarria, A

    2007-10-01

    The cytotoxic activity of amino (3a-e), aza-1-antraquinone (4a-e) lapachol derivatives against Ehrlich carcinoma and human K562 leukemia cells was investigated. Cell viability was determined using MTT assay, after 48 (Ehrlich) or 96 h (K562) of culture, and vincristine (for K562 leukemia) and quercetin (for Ehrlich carcinoma) were used as positive controls. The results showed dose-dependent growth-inhibiting activities and that the amino derivatives were active against the assayed cells, whereas the 4a-e derivatives were not. The allylamine derivative 3a was the most active against Ehrlich carcinoma, with IC50 = 16.94 +/- 1.25 microM, and against K562 leukemia, with IC50 = 14.11 +/- 1.39 microM. The analogous lawsone derivative, 5a, was also active against Ehrlich carcinoma (IC50 = 23.89 +/- 2.3 microM), although the 5d and 5e derivatives showed lower activity. The interaction between 3a-d and calf thymus DNA was investigated by fluorimetric titration and the results showed a hyperchromic effect indicating binding to DNA as presented of ethidium bromide, used as positive control. The inhibitory action on DNA-topoisomerase II-a was also evaluated by a relaxation assay of supercoiled DNA plasmid, and the etoposide (200 microM) was used as positive control. Significant inhibitory activities were observed for 3a-d at 200 microM and a partial inhibitory action was observed for lapachol and methoxylapachol.

  17. Cloning of the mouse cDNA encoding DNA topoisomerase I and chromosomal location of the gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koiwai, O; Yasui, Y; Sakai, Y; Watanabe, T; Ishii, K; Yanagihara, S; Andoh, T

    1993-03-30

    The mouse cDNA encoding DNA topoisomerase I (TopoI) was cloned and the nucleotide sequence of 3512 bp was determined. The cDNA clone contained an open reading frame encoding a protein of 767 amino acids (aa), which is 2 aa longer than its human counterpart. Overall aa sequence homology between the mouse and human, and between the mouse and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) sequences was 96% and 42%, respectively. The mouse TopI gene was mapped at position 54.5 on chromosome 2 from linkage analyses of a three-point cross test with Geg, Ada, and a as marker genes.

  18. Activity of Topotecan toward the DNA/Topoisomerase I Complex: A Theoretical Rationalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Semiha Kevser; Marion, Antoine; Ugur, Ilke; Dikmenli, Ayse Kumru; Catak, Saron; Aviyente, Viktorya

    2018-03-06

    Topotecan (TPT) is a nontoxic anticancer drug characterized by a pH-dependent lactone/carboxyl equilibrium. TPT acts on the covalently bonded DNA/topoisomerase I (DNA/TopoI) complex by intercalating between two DNA bases at the active site. This turns TopoI into a DNA-damaging agent and inhibits supercoil relaxation. Although only the lactone form of the drug is active and effectively inhibits TopoI, both forms have been co-crystallized at the same location within the DNA/TopoI complex. To gain further insights into the pH-dependent activity of TPT, the differences between two TPT:DNA/TopoI complexes presenting either the lactone (acidic pH) or the carboxyl (basic pH) form of TPT were studied by means of molecular dynamic simulations, quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations, and topological analysis. We identified two specific amino acids that have a direct relationship with the activity of the drug, i.e., lysine 532 (K532) and asparagine 722 (N722). K532 forms a stable hydrogen bond bridge between TPT and DNA only when the drug is in its active lactone form. The presence of the active drug triggers the formation of an additional stable interaction between DNA and protein residues, where N722 acts as a bridge between the two fragments, thus increasing the binding affinity of DNA for TopoI and further slowing the release of DNA. Overall, our results provide a clear understanding of the activity of the TPT-like class of molecules and can help in the future design of new anticancer drugs targeting topoisomerase enzymes.

  19. Cell cycle stage dependent variations in drug-induced topoisomerase II mediated DNA cleavage and cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estey, E.; Adlakha, R.C.; Hittelman, W.N.; Zwelling, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    The DNA cleavage produced by 4'-(9-acridinylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide (m-AMSA) in mammalian cells is putatively mediated by topoisomerase II. The authors found that in synchronized HeLa cells the frequency of such cleavage was 4-15-fold greater in mitosis than in S while the DNA of G 1 and G 2 cells exhibited an intermediate susceptibility to cleavage. The hypersensitivity of mitotic DNA to m-AMSA-induced cleavage was acquired relatively abruptly in late G 2 and was lost similarly abruptly in early G 1 . The susceptibility of mitotic cells to m-AMSA-induced DNA cleavage was not clearly paralleled by an increase in topoisomerase II activity in 350 mM NaCl extracts from mitotic cells compared to similar extracts from cells in G 1 , S, or G 2 . Furthermore, equal amounts of decatenating activity from cells in mitosis and S produced equal amounts of m-AMSA-induced cleavage of simian virus 40 (SV40) DNA; i.e., the interaction between m-AMSA and extractable enzyme was similar in mitosis and S. The DNA of mitotic cells was also hypersensitive to cleavage by 4'-demethylepipodophyllotoxin 4-(4,6-O-ethylidene-β-D-glucopyranoside) (etoposide), a drug that produces topoisomerase II mediated DNA cleavage without binding to DNA. Cell cycle stage dependent fluctuations in m-AMSA-induced DNA cleavage may result from fluctuations in the structure of chromatin per se that occur during the cell cycle. Surprisingly, cell cycle stage dependent differences in m-AMSA-induced DNA cleavage did not correlate with differences in the susceptibility to the cytotoxic effects of the drug. In fact, cells in S were most sensitive to these effects. These results are an exception to the previously observed parallel between the susceptibility of mammalian cells to drug-induced DNA cleavage and the susceptibility of the cells to drug-induced cytotoxicity and indicate the complexity of any relationship between the two phenomena

  20. cDNA cloning of human DNA topoisomerase I. Catalytic activity of a 67.7-kDa carboxyl-terminal fragment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Arpa, P.; Machlin, P.S.; Ratrie, H. III; Rothfield, N.F.; Cleveland, D.W.; Earnshaw, W.C.

    1988-01-01

    cDNA clones encoding human topoisomerase I were isolated from an expression vector library (λgt11) screened with autoimmune anti-topoisomerase I serum. One of these clones has been expressed as a fusion protein comprised of a 32-kDa fragment of the bacterial TrpE protein linked to 67.7 kDa of protein encoded by the cDNA. Three lines of evidence indicate that the cloned cDNA encodes topoisomerase I. (i) Proteolysis maps of the fusion protein and human nuclear topoisomerase I are essentially identical. (ii) The fusion protein relaxes supercoiled DNA, an activity that can be immunoprecipitated by anti-topoisomerase I serum. (iii) Sequence analysis has revealed that the longest cDNA clone (3645 base pairs) encodes a protein of 765 amino acids that shares 42% identity with Saccharomyces cerevisiae topoisomerase I. The sequence data also show that the catalytically active 67.7-kDa fragment is comprised of the carboxyl terminus

  1. Type IA topoisomerase inhibition by clamp closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelaram, Majety Naga; Bhat, Anuradha Gopal; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Bhat, Rajeshwari Subray; Manjunath, Ramanathapuram; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial DNA topoisomerase I (topoI) catalyzes relaxation of negatively supercoiled DNA. The enzyme alters DNA topology through protein-operated DNA gate, switching between open and closed conformations during its reaction. We describe the mechanism of inhibition of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoI by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind with high affinity and inhibit at 10-50 nM concentration. Unlike other inhibitors of topoisomerases, the mAbs inhibited several steps of relaxation reaction, namely DNA binding, cleavage, strand passage, and enzyme-DNA dissociation. The enhanced religation of the cleaved DNA in presence of the mAb indicated closing of the enzyme DNA gate. The formation of enzyme-DNA heterocatenane in the presence of the mAbs as a result of closing the gate could be inferred by the salt resistance of the complex, visualized by atomic force microscopy and confirmed by fluorescence measurements. Locking the enzyme-DNA complex as a closed clamp restricted the movements of the DNA gate, affecting all of the major steps of the relaxation reaction. Enzyme trapped on DNA in closed clamp conformation formed roadblock for the elongating DNA polymerase. The unusual multistep inhibition of mycobacterial topoisomerases may facilitate lead molecule development, and the mAbs would also serve as valuable tools to probe the enzyme mechanism.

  2. Rac1 protein signaling is required for DNA damage response stimulated by topoisomerase II poisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huelsenbeck, Stefanie C; Schorr, Anne; Roos, Wynand P; Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Henninger, Christian; Kaina, Bernd; Fritz, Gerhard

    2012-11-09

    To investigate the potency of the topoisomerase II (topo II) poisons doxorubicin and etoposide to stimulate the DNA damage response (DDR), S139 phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX) was analyzed using rat cardiomyoblast cells (H9c2). Etoposide caused a dose-dependent increase in the γH2AX level as shown by Western blotting. By contrast, the doxorubicin response was bell-shaped with high doses failing to increase H2AX phosphorylation. Identical results were obtained by immunohistochemical analysis of γH2AX focus formation, comet assay-based DNA strand break analysis, and measuring the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. At low dose, doxorubicin activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) but not ATM and Rad3-related (ATR). Both the lipid-lowering drug lovastatin and the Rac1-specific inhibitor NSC23766 attenuated doxorubicin- and etoposide-stimulated H2AX phosphorylation, induction of DNA strand breaks, and topo II-DNA complex formation. Lovastatin and NSC23766 acted in an additive manner. They did not attenuate doxorubicin-induced increase in p-ATM and p-Chk2 levels. DDR stimulated by topo II poisons was partially blocked by inhibition of type I p21-associated kinases. DDR evoked by the topoisomerase I poison topotecan remained unaffected by lovastatin. The data show that the mechanisms involved in DDR stimulated by topo II poisons are agent-specific with anthracyclines lacking DDR-stimulating activity at high doses. Pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 signaling counteracts doxorubicin- and etoposide-stimulated DDR by disabling the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. Based on the data we suggest that Rac1-regulated mechanisms are required for DNA damage induction and subsequent activation of the DDR following treatment with topo II but not topo I poisons.

  3. Rac1 Protein Signaling Is Required for DNA Damage Response Stimulated by Topoisomerase II Poisons*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huelsenbeck, Stefanie C.; Schorr, Anne; Roos, Wynand P.; Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Henninger, Christian; Kaina, Bernd; Fritz, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the potency of the topoisomerase II (topo II) poisons doxorubicin and etoposide to stimulate the DNA damage response (DDR), S139 phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX) was analyzed using rat cardiomyoblast cells (H9c2). Etoposide caused a dose-dependent increase in the γH2AX level as shown by Western blotting. By contrast, the doxorubicin response was bell-shaped with high doses failing to increase H2AX phosphorylation. Identical results were obtained by immunohistochemical analysis of γH2AX focus formation, comet assay-based DNA strand break analysis, and measuring the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. At low dose, doxorubicin activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) but not ATM and Rad3-related (ATR). Both the lipid-lowering drug lovastatin and the Rac1-specific inhibitor NSC23766 attenuated doxorubicin- and etoposide-stimulated H2AX phosphorylation, induction of DNA strand breaks, and topo II-DNA complex formation. Lovastatin and NSC23766 acted in an additive manner. They did not attenuate doxorubicin-induced increase in p-ATM and p-Chk2 levels. DDR stimulated by topo II poisons was partially blocked by inhibition of type I p21-associated kinases. DDR evoked by the topoisomerase I poison topotecan remained unaffected by lovastatin. The data show that the mechanisms involved in DDR stimulated by topo II poisons are agent-specific with anthracyclines lacking DDR-stimulating activity at high doses. Pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 signaling counteracts doxorubicin- and etoposide-stimulated DDR by disabling the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. Based on the data we suggest that Rac1-regulated mechanisms are required for DNA damage induction and subsequent activation of the DDR following treatment with topo II but not topo I poisons. PMID:23012366

  4. Inhibition of DNA topoisomerases I and II and cytotoxicity of compounds from Ulmus davidiana var. japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ming Shan; Lee, Yeun-Kyung; Li, Ying; Hwangbo, Kyoung; Lee, Chong-Soon; Kim, Jae-Ryong; Lee, Sunny Kyung-Seon; Chang, Hyun-Wook; Son, Jong-Keun

    2010-09-01

    Twenty five compounds including ten triterpenes (1-3, 5-11), six flavonoids (12-15, 24, 25), five lignans (17, 18, 21-23), two butenyl clohexnone glycosides (19-20), one fructofuranoside (16) and one fatty acid (4) were isolated from the roots of Ulmus davidiana var. japonica. The structures of those compounds were identified by comparing their physicochemical and spectral data with those of published in literatures. All the compounds were evaluated for DNA topoisomerase inhibitory activities and cytotoxicities. Among the purified compounds, 4 and 19 showed more potent inhibitory acitivities (IC(50): 39 and 19 μM, respectively) than camptothecin, as the positive control (IC(50): 46 μM) against topoisomerase I. Compounds, 4, 10, 12, 19, 24 and 25 showed strong inhibitory activities toward DNA topoisomerase II (IC(50): 0.1, 0.52, 0.47, 0.42, 0.17 μM and 17 nM, respectively), which were more potent than that of etoposide as positive control (IC(50): 20 μM). In A549 cell line, 5 and 6 showed cytotoxicities (IC(50): 4 μM and 3 μM, respectively, with IC(50) of camptothecin as positive control: 10.3 μM). In the HepG2 cell line, 3, 5 and 7 showed cytotoxicity (IC(50): 4, 3 and 4 μM, respectively, with IC(50) of camptothecin: 0.3 μM). Compounds 6, 12 and 23 showed cytotoxicities in the HT-29 cell line (IC(50): 19, 19 and 15 μM, respectively, with IC(50) of camptothecin: 2 μM).

  5. Structural insights into the quinolone resistance mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémie Piton

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase, an indispensable nanomachine involved in the regulation of DNA topology, is the only type II topoisomerase present in this organism and is hence the sole target for quinolone action, a crucial drug active against multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. To understand at an atomic level the quinolone resistance mechanism, which emerges in extensively drug resistant tuberculosis, we performed combined functional, biophysical and structural studies of the two individual domains constituting the catalytic DNA gyrase reaction core, namely the Toprim and the breakage-reunion domains. This allowed us to produce a model of the catalytic reaction core in complex with DNA and a quinolone molecule, identifying original mechanistic properties of quinolone binding and clarifying the relationships between amino acid mutations and resistance phenotype of M. tuberculosis DNA gyrase. These results are compatible with our previous studies on quinolone resistance. Interestingly, the structure of the entire breakage-reunion domain revealed a new interaction, in which the Quinolone-Binding Pocket (QBP is blocked by the N-terminal helix of a symmetry-related molecule. This interaction provides useful starting points for designing peptide based inhibitors that target DNA gyrase to prevent its binding to DNA.

  6. Woodfruticosin (woodfordin C), a new inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase II. Experimental antitumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramochi-Motegi, A; Kuramochi, H; Kobayashi, F; Ekimoto, H; Takahashi, K; Kadota, S; Takamori, Y; Kikuchi, T

    1992-11-17

    Woodfruticosin (woodfordin C) (WFC), a new inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase II (topo-II), was isolated from methanol extract of Woodfordia fruticosa Kurz (Lythraceae) and studied for in vitro and in vivo antitumor activities in comparison with Adriamycin (ADR) and etoposide (ETP), well known inhibitors of topo-II. The inhibitory activity against DNA topo-II shown by WFC was much stronger than that shown by ETP or ADR. WFC inhibited strongly intracellular DNA synthesis but not RNA and protein synthesis. On the other hand, WFC had a weaker growth inhibitory activity against various human tumor cells than ETP or ADR, but it showed remarkable activity against PC-1 cells and moderate activity against MKN45 and KB cells. Furthermore, WFC had in vivo growth inhibitory activity against s.c. inoculated colon38. These results indicate that the mechanism by which WFC exhibits antitumor activity may be through inhibition of topo-II.

  7. Inhibition of Zn(II binding type IA topoisomerases by organomercury compounds and Hg(II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bokun Cheng

    Full Text Available Type IA topoisomerase activities are essential for resolving DNA topological barriers via an enzyme-mediated transient single strand DNA break. Accumulation of topoisomerase DNA cleavage product can lead to cell death or genomic rearrangement. Many antibacterial and anticancer drugs act as topoisomerase poison inhibitors that form stabilized ternary complexes with the topoisomerase covalent intermediate, so it is desirable to identify such inhibitors for type IA topoisomerases. Here we report that organomercury compounds were identified during a fluorescence based screening of the NIH diversity set of small molecules for topoisomerase inhibitors that can increase the DNA cleavage product of Yersinia pestis topoisomerase I. Inhibition of relaxation activity and accumulation of DNA cleavage product were confirmed for these organomercury compounds in gel based assays of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I. Hg(II, but not As(III, could also target the cysteines that form the multiple Zn(II binding tetra-cysteine motifs found in the C-terminal domains of these bacterial topoisomerase I for relaxation activity inhibition. Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I activity is not sensitive to Hg(II or the organomercury compounds due to the absence of the Zn(II binding cysteines. It is significant that the type IA topoisomerases with Zn(II binding domains can still cleave DNA when interfered by Hg(II or organomercury compounds. The Zn(II binding domains found in human Top3α and Top3β may be potential targets of toxic metals and organometallic complexes, with potential consequence on genomic stability and development.

  8. DNA repair in Mycobacterium tuberculosis revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Vultos, Tiago; Mestre, Olga; Tonjum, Tone; Gicquel, Brigitte

    2009-05-01

    Our understanding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA repair mechanisms is still poor compared with that of other bacterial organisms. However, the publication of the first complete M. tuberculosis genome sequence 10 years ago boosted the study of DNA repair systems in this organism. A first step in the elucidation of M. tuberculosis DNA repair mechanisms was taken by Mizrahi and Andersen, who identified homologs of genes involved in the reversal or repair of DNA damage in Escherichia coli and related organisms. Genes required for nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, recombination, and SOS repair and mutagenesis were identified. Notably, no homologs of genes involved in mismatch repair were identified. Novel characteristics of the M. tuberculosis DNA repair machinery have been found over the last decade, such as nonhomologous end joining, the presence of Mpg, ERCC3 and Hlr - proteins previously presumed to be produced exclusively in mammalian cells - and the recently discovered bifunctional dCTP deaminase:dUTPase. The study of these systems is important to develop therapeutic agents that can counteract M. tuberculosis evolutionary changes and to prevent adaptive events resulting in antibiotic resistance. This review summarizes our current understanding of the M. tuberculosis DNA repair system.

  9. Phaeophytins from Thyrsacanthus ramosissimus Moric. with inhibitory activity on human DNA topoisomerase II-{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, Analucia Guedes Silveira; Tenorio-Souza, Fabio Henrique; Moura, Marcelo Dantas; Mota, Sabrina Gondim Ribeiro; Silva Lins, Antonio Claudio da; Dias, Celidarque da Silva; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Frmaceuticas; Giulietti, Ana Maria [Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, Feira de Santana, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Biologicas; Silva, Tania Maria Sarmento da [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Moleculares; Santos, Creusioni Figueredo dos, E-mail: jbarbosa@ltf.ufpb.br [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Molecular

    2012-07-01

    Our study reports the extraction and isolation of a new phaeophytin derivative 15{sup 1}-hydroxy-(15{sup 1}-S)-porphyrinolactone, designated anamariaine (1) herein, isolated from the chloroform fraction of aerial parts of Thyrsacanthus ramosissimus Moric. along with the known 15{sup 1}-ethoxy-(15{sup 1}-S)-porphyrinolactone (2). These compounds were identified by usual spectroscopic methods. Both compounds were subjected to in vitro (inhibitory activity) tests by means of supercoiled DNA relaxation techniques and were shown to display inhibitory activity against human DNA topoisomerase II-{alpha} at 50 {mu}M. Interconversion of these two pigments under the mild conditions of the isolation techniques should be highly unlikely but cannot be entirely ruled out. (author)

  10. The RecQ helicase-topoisomerase III-Rmi1 complex: a DNA structure-specific 'dissolvasome'?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mankouri, Hocine W; Hickson, Ian D

    2007-01-01

    RecQ helicases, together with topoisomerase III and Rmi1 family proteins, form an evolutionarily conserved complex that is essential for the maintenance of genome integrity. This complex, which we term RTR, is capable of, or has been implicated in, the processing of a diverse array of DNA...

  11. Cloning and sequencing of cDNA encoding human DNA topoisomerase II and localization of the gene to chromosome region 17q21-22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai-Pflugfelder, M.; Liu, L.F.; Liu, A.A.; Tewey, K.M.; Whang-Peng, J.; Knutsen, T.; Huebner, K.; Croce, C.M.; Wang, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Two overlapping cDNA clones encoding human DNA topoisomerase II were identified by two independent methods. In one, a human cDNA library in phage λ was screened by hybridization with a mixed oligonucleotide probe encoding a stretch of seven amino acids found in yeast and Drosophila DNA topoisomerase II; in the other, a different human cDNA library in a λgt11 expression vector was screened for the expression of antigenic determinants that are recognized by rabbit antibodies specific to human DNA topoisomerase II. The entire coding sequences of the human DNA topoisomerase II gene were determined from these and several additional clones, identified through the use of the cloned human TOP2 gene sequences as probes. Hybridization between the cloned sequences and mRNA and genomic DNA indicates that the human enzyme is encoded by a single-copy gene. The location of the gene was mapped to chromosome 17q21-22 by in situ hybridization of a cloned fragment to metaphase chromosomes and by hybridization analysis with a panel of mouse-human hybrid cell lines, each retaining a subset of human chromosomes

  12. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase ATPase domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roué, Mélanie; Agrawal, Alka; Volker, Craig; Mossakowska, Danuta; Mayer, Claudine; Bax, Benjamin D.

    2013-01-01

    The ATPase domain of M. tuberculosis DNA gyrase was crystallized using hanging-drop vapour diffusion. The crystals belonged to space groups P1 and P2 1 . Diffraction data were collected to resolutions of 2.9 and 3.3 Å, respectively. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase, a nanomachine involved in the regulation of DNA topology, is the only type II topoisomerase present in this organism and hence is the sole target of fluoroquinolones in the treatment of tuberculosis. The ATPase domain provides the energy required for catalysis by ATP hydrolysis. Two constructs corresponding to this 43 kDa domain, Mtb-GyrB47 C1 and Mtb-GyrB47 C2 , have been overproduced, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected from three crystal forms. The crystals belonged to space groups P1 and P2 1 and diffracted to resolutions of 2.9 and 3.3 Å, respectively

  13. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract induces DNA damage by inhibiting topoisomerase II activity in human hepatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuhong; Chen, Si; Mei, Hu; Xuan, Jiekun; Guo, Xiaoqing; Couch, Letha; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Guo, Lei; Mei, Nan

    2015-09-30

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been shown to increase the incidence in liver tumors in mice in a 2-year bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program. In this study, the DNA damaging effects of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract and many of its constituents were evaluated in human hepatic HepG2 cells and the underlying mechanism was determined. A molecular docking study revealed that quercetin, a flavonoid constituent of Ginkgo biloba, showed a higher potential to interact with topoisomerase II (Topo II) than did the other Ginkgo biloba constituents; this in silico prediction was confirmed by using a biochemical assay to study Topo II enzyme inhibition. Moreover, as measured by the Comet assay and the induction of γ-H2A.X, quercetin, followed by keampferol and isorhamnetin, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in HepG2 cells. In Topo II knockdown cells, DNA damage triggered by Ginkgo biloba leaf extract or quercetin was dramatically decreased, indicating that DNA damage is directly associated with Topo II. DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available Ginkgo biloba extract product. Our findings suggest that Ginkgo biloba leaf extract- and quercetin-induced in vitro genotoxicity may be the result of Topo II inhibition.

  14. ZATT (ZNF451)-mediated resolution of topoisomerase 2 DNA-protein cross-links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Matthew J; Lieberman, Jenna Ariel; Herrero-Ruiz, Andrés; Butler, Logan R; Williams, Jason G; Muñoz-Cabello, Ana M; Mueller, Geoffrey A; London, Robert E; Cortés-Ledesma, Felipe; Williams, R Scott

    2017-09-29

    Topoisomerase 2 (TOP2) DNA transactions proceed via formation of the TOP2 cleavage complex (TOP2cc), a covalent enzyme-DNA reaction intermediate that is vulnerable to trapping by potent anticancer TOP2 drugs. How genotoxic TOP2 DNA-protein cross-links are resolved is unclear. We found that the SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier) ligase ZATT (ZNF451) is a multifunctional DNA repair factor that controls cellular responses to TOP2 damage. ZATT binding to TOP2cc facilitates a proteasome-independent tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) hydrolase activity on stalled TOP2cc. The ZATT SUMO ligase activity further promotes TDP2 interactions with SUMOylated TOP2, regulating efficient TDP2 recruitment through a "split-SIM" SUMO2 engagement platform. These findings uncover a ZATT-TDP2-catalyzed and SUMO2-modulated pathway for direct resolution of TOP2cc. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  15. Value of urinary topoisomerase-IIA cell-free DNA for diagnosis of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ye-Hwan; Yan, Chunri; Lee, Il-Seok; Piao, Xuan-Mei; Byun, Young Joon; Jeong, Pildu; Kim, Won Tae; Yun, Seok-Joong; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2016-03-01

    Topoisomerase-II alpha (TopoIIA ), a DNA gyrase isoform that plays an important role in the cell cycle, is present in normal tissues and various human cancers, and can show altered expression in both. The aim of the current study was to examine the value of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA as a noninvasive diagnosis of bladder cancer (BC). Two patient cohorts were examined. Cohort 1 (73 BC patients and seven controls) provided bladder tissue samples, whereas cohort 2 (83 BC patients, 54 nonmalignant hematuric patients, and 61 normal controls) provided urine samples. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure expression of TopoIIA mRNA in tissues and TopoIIA cell-free DNA in urine samples. The results showed that expression of TopoIIA mRNA in BC tissues was significantly higher than that in noncancer control tissues (pbladder cancer (MIBC) when compared with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) (p=0.002). Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was performed to examine the sensitivity/specificity of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA for diagnosing BC, NMIBC, and MIBC. The areas under the ROC curve for BC, NMIBC, and MIBC were 0.741, 0.701, and 0.838, respectively. In summary, the results of this study provide evidence that cell-free TopoIIA DNA may be a potential biomarker for BC.

  16. Mechanistic studies on E. coli DNA topoisomerase I: Divalent ion effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanico, P.L.; Tse-Dinh, Y.C.

    1991-01-01

    E. coli DNA topoisomerase I catalyzes the hydrolysis of short, single stranded oligodeoxynucleotides. It also forms a covalent protein-DNA complex with negatively supercoiled DNA in the absence of Mg2+ but requires Mg2+ for the relaxation of negatively supercoiled DNA. In this paper we investigate the effects of various divalent metals on catalysis. For the relaxation reaction, maximum enzyme activity plateaus after 2.5 mM Mg2+. However, the rate of cleavage of short oligodeoxynucleotide increased linearly between 0 and 15 mM Mg2+. In the oligodeoxynucleotide cleavage reaction, Ca2+, Mn2+, Co2+, and Zn2+ inhibit enzymatic activity. When these metals are coincubated with Mg2+ at equimolar concentrations, the normal effect of Mg2+ is not detectable. Of these metals, only Ca2+ can be substituted for Mg2+ as a metal cofactor in the relaxation reaction. And when Mg2+ is coincubated with Mn2+, Co2+, or Zn2+ at equimolar concentrations, the normal effect of Mg2+ on relaxation is not detectable. The authors propose that Mg2+ allows the protein-DNA complex to assume a conformation necessary for strand passage and enhance the rate of enzyme turnover

  17. [Mutations of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV in clinical isolates of fluoroquinolone-resistant Proteus mirabilis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Ryoichi; Sato, Kenya; Kumita, Wakako; Inami, Natsuko; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki; Okamura, Noboru; Moriya, Kyoji; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2006-02-01

    The presence of fluoroquinolone resistance-associated mutations within the quinolone resistance-determining region of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV was investigated genetically in clinical isolates of Proteus mirabilis recovered from patients with urinay tract infections. Two isolates of fluoroquinolone-resistant P. mirabilis possessed the mutations in GyrA (Ser-83 --> Arg or Ile), GyrB (Ser-464 --> Tyr or Phe) and ParC (Ser-80 --> Ile). A novel mutation with Glu-87 --> Lys in GyrA, where suggested to be responsible for fluoroquinolone resistance, was identified. These results demonstrate that the presence of an additional mutation at Glu-87 in GyrA may contribute to high-level fluoroquinolone resistance, too.

  18. QSAR and docking studies on xanthone derivatives for anticancer activity targeting DNA topoisomerase IIα

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alam S

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarfaraz Alam, Feroz KhanMetabolic and Structural Biology Department, Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, IndiaAbstract: Due to the high mortality rate in India, the identification of novel molecules is important in the development of novel and potent anticancer drugs. Xanthones are natural constituents of plants in the families Bonnetiaceae and Clusiaceae, and comprise oxygenated heterocycles with a variety of biological activities along with an anticancer effect. To explore the anticancer compounds from xanthone derivatives, a quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR model was developed by the multiple linear regression method. The structure–activity relationship represented by the QSAR model yielded a high activity–descriptors relationship accuracy (84% referred by regression coefficient (r2=0.84 and a high activity prediction accuracy (82%. Five molecular descriptors – dielectric energy, group count (hydroxyl, LogP (the logarithm of the partition coefficient between n-octanol and water, shape index basic (order 3, and the solvent-accessible surface area – were significantly correlated with anticancer activity. Using this QSAR model, a set of virtually designed xanthone derivatives was screened out. A molecular docking study was also carried out to predict the molecular interaction between proposed compounds and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA topoisomerase IIα. The pharmacokinetics parameters, such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity, were also calculated, and later an appraisal of synthetic accessibility of organic compounds was carried out. The strategy used in this study may provide understanding in designing novel DNA topoisomerase IIα inhibitors, as well as for other cancer targets.Keywords: drug likeness, ADMET, regression model, HeLa cell line

  19. Novel insights into the apoptosis mechanism of DNA topoisomerase I inhibitor isoliquiritigenin on HCC tumor cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ze-xin; Li, Jian; Li, Yan; You, Kun; Xu, Hongwei; Wang, Jianguo, E-mail: wangjianguoxx@163.com

    2015-08-21

    The inhibitory effect of DNA topoisomerase (Top I) by isoliquiritigenin(ISO) were investigated and their interaction mechanism was evaluated using methods including UV–vis absorption, fluorescence, coupled with molecular simulation, and using the MTT method of inhibition rate of HCC tumor cell SNU475 proliferation assay, finally, the interaction of ISO with calf thymus DNA was investigated by melting measurements and molecular docking studies. It was found that isoliquiritigenin reversibly inhibited DNA Top I in a competitive manner with the concentrations of ISO resulting in 50% activity lost (IC{sub 50}) were estimated to be 0.178 ± 0.12 mM. Isoliquiritigenin exhibited a strong ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of Top I through a static quenching procedure. The positive values of enthalpy change and entropy change suggested that the binding of isoliquiritigenin to Top I was driven mainly by hydrophobic interactions. The molecular docking results revealed isoliquiritigenin actually interacted with the primary amino acid residues on the active site of Top I, and the detection results of fluorescence staining and the inhibitory effect on the growth of HCC SUN475 showed that isoliquiritigenin induced the apoptosis cells increased gradually. The interaction of ISO with DNA can cause the denaturation temperature to be increased, which indicated that the stabilization of the DNA helix was increased in the presence of ISO, which indicated that the results provide strong evidence for intercalative binding of ISO with DNA. - Highlights: • ISO reversibly inhibits TOP I activity in an A dose dependent manner. • Hydrophobic interactions play a major role in ISO–TOP I interaction. • ISO has a high affinity close to the active site pocket of TOP I. • The binding of ISO to DNA induces the stability of the structure of DNA.

  20. Synthesis, DNA Binding and Topoisomerase I Inhibition Activity of Thiazacridine and Imidazacridine Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Almeida Lafayette

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Thiazacridine and imidazacridine derivatives have shown promising results as tumors suppressors in some cancer cell lines. For a better understanding of the mechanism of action of these compounds, binding studies of 5-acridin-9-ylmethylidene-3-amino-2-thioxo-thiazolidin-4-one, 5-acridin-9-ylmethylidene-2-thioxo-thiazolidin-4-one, 5-acridin-9-ylmethylidene-2-thioxo-imidazolidin-4-one and 3-acridin-9-ylmethyl-thiazolidin-2,4-dione with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA by electronic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy were performed. The binding constants ranged from 1.46 × 104 to 6.01 × 104 M−1. UV-Vis, fluorescence and circular dichroism measurements indicated that the compounds interact effectively with ctDNA, both by intercalation or external binding. They demonstrated inhibitory activities to human topoisomerase I, except for 5-acridin-9-ylmethylidene-2-thioxo-1,3-thiazolidin-4-one. These results provide insight into the DNA binding mechanism of imidazacridines and thiazacridines.

  1. Protection of halogenated DNA from strand breakage and sister-chromatid exchange induced by the topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orta, Manuel Luis; Mateos, Santiago; Cantero, Gloria; Wolff, Lisa J.; Cortes, Felipe

    2008-01-01

    The fundamental nuclear enzyme DNA topoisomerase I (topo I), cleaves the double-stranded DNA molecule at preferred sequences within its recognition/binding sites. We have recently reported that when cells incorporate halogenated nucleosides analogues of thymidine into DNA, it interferes with normal chromosome segregation, as shown by an extraordinarily high yield of endoreduplication, and results in a protection against DNA breakage induced by the topo II poison m-AMSA [F. Cortes, N. Pastor, S. Mateos, I. Dominguez, The nature of DNA plays a role in chromosome segregation: endoreduplication in halogen-substituted chromosomes, DNA Repair 2 (2003) 719-726; G. Cantero, S. Mateos, N. Pastor; F. Cortes, Halogen substitution of DNA protects from poisoning of topoisomerase II that results in DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), DNA Repair 5 (2006) 667-674]. In the present investigation, we have assessed whether the presence of halogenated nucleosides in DNA diminishes the frequency of interaction of topo I with DNA and thus the frequency with which the stabilisation of cleavage complexes by the topo I poison camptothecin (CPT) takes place, in such a way that it protects from chromosome breakage and sister-chromatid exchange. This protective effect is shown to parallel a loss in halogen-substituted cells of the otherwise CPT-increased catalytic activity bound to DNA

  2. Inhibitory effects of lapachol on rat C6 glioma in vitro and in vivo by targeting DNA topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huanli; Chen, Qunying; Wang, Hong; Xu, Pingxiang; Yuan, Ru; Li, Xiaorong; Bai, Lu; Xue, Ming

    2016-11-16

    Lapachol is a natural naphthoquinone compound that possesses extensive biological activities. The aim of this study is to investigate the inhibitory effects of lapachol on rat C6 glioma both in vitro and in vivo, as well as the potential mechanisms. The antitumor effect of lapachol was firstly evaluated in the C6 glioma model in Wistar rats. The effects of lapachol on C6 cell proliferation, apoptosis and DNA damage were detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS)/ phenazinemethosulfate (PMS) assay, hoechst 33358 staining, annexin V-FITC/PI staining, and comet assay. Effects of lapachol on topoisomerase I (TOP I) and topoisomerase II (TOP II) activities were detected by TOP I and TOP II mediated supercoiled pBR322 DNA relaxation assays and molecular docking. TOP I and TOP II expression levels in C6 cells were also determined. High dose lapachol showed significant inhibitory effect on the C6 glioma in Wistar rats (P lapachol could inhibit proliferation, induce apoptosis and DNA damage of C6 cells in dose dependent manners. Lapachol could inhibit the activities of both TOP I and II. Lapachol-TOP I showed relatively stronger interaction than that of lapachol-TOP II in molecular docking study. Also, lapachol could inhibit TOP II expression levels, but not TOP I expression levels. These results showed that lapachol could significantly inhibit C6 glioma both in vivo and in vitro, which might be related with inhibiting TOP I and TOP II activities, as well as TOP II expression.

  3. Inhibitory effects of lapachol on rat C6 glioma in vitro and in vivo by targeting DNA topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanli Xu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lapachol is a natural naphthoquinone compound that possesses extensive biological activities. The aim of this study is to investigate the inhibitory effects of lapachol on rat C6 glioma both in vitro and in vivo, as well as the potential mechanisms. Methods The antitumor effect of lapachol was firstly evaluated in the C6 glioma model in Wistar rats. The effects of lapachol on C6 cell proliferation, apoptosis and DNA damage were detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl-2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium (MTS/ phenazinemethosulfate (PMS assay, hoechst 33358 staining, annexin V-FITC/PI staining, and comet assay. Effects of lapachol on topoisomerase I (TOP I and topoisomerase II (TOP II activities were detected by TOP I and TOP II mediated supercoiled pBR322 DNA relaxation assays and molecular docking. TOP I and TOP II expression levels in C6 cells were also determined. Results High dose lapachol showed significant inhibitory effect on the C6 glioma in Wistar rats (P < 0.05. It was showed that lapachol could inhibit proliferation, induce apoptosis and DNA damage of C6 cells in dose dependent manners. Lapachol could inhibit the activities of both TOP I and II. Lapachol-TOP I showed relatively stronger interaction than that of lapachol-TOP II in molecular docking study. Also, lapachol could inhibit TOP II expression levels, but not TOP I expression levels. Conclusion These results showed that lapachol could significantly inhibit C6 glioma both in vivo and in vitro, which might be related with inhibiting TOP I and TOP II activities, as well as TOP II expression.

  4. Dynamics of tobacco DNA topoisomerases II in cell cycle regulation: to manage topological constrains during replication, transcription and mitotic chromosome condensation and segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Badri Nath; Achary, V Mohan Murali; Panditi, Varakumar; Sopory, Sudhir K; Reddy, Malireddy K

    2017-08-01

    The topoisomerase II expression varies as a function of cell proliferation. Maximal topoisomerase II expression was tightly coupled to S phase and G2/M phase via both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Investigation in meiosis using pollen mother cells also revealed that it is not the major component of meiotic chromosomes, it seems to diffuse out once meiotic chromosomal condensation is completed. Synchronized tobacco BY-2 cell cultures were used to study the role of topoisomerase II in various stages of the cell cycle. Topoisomerase II transcript accumulation was observed during the S- and G2/M- phase of cell cycle. This biphasic expression pattern indicates the active requirement of topoisomerase II during these stages of the cell cycle. Through immuno-localization of topoisomerase II was observed diffusely throughout the nucleoplasm in interphase nuclei, whereas, the nucleolus region exhibited a more prominent immuno-positive staining that correlated with rRNA transcription, as shown by propidium iodide staining and BrUTP incorporation. The immuno-staining analysis also showed that topoisomerase II is the major component of mitotic chromosomes and remain attached to the chromosomes during cell division. The inhibition of topoisomerase II activity using specific inhibitors revealed quite dramatic effect on condensation of chromatin and chromosome individualization from prophase to metaphase transition. Partially condensed chromosomes were not arranged on metaphase plate and chromosomal perturbations were observed when advance to anaphase, suggesting the importance of topoisomerase II activity for proper chromosome condensation and segregation during mitosis. Contrary, topoisomerase II is not the major component of meiotic chromosomes, even though mitosis and meiosis share many processes, including the DNA replication, chromosome condensation and precisely regulated partitioning of chromosomes into daughter cells. Even if topoisomerase II is

  5. DNA topoisomerase 1α promotes transcriptional silencing of transposable elements through DNA methylation and histone lysine 9 dimethylation in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanh Theresa Dinh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM and histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2 are related transcriptional silencing mechanisms that target transposable elements (TEs and repeats to maintain genome stability in plants. RdDM is mediated by small and long noncoding RNAs produced by the plant-specific RNA polymerases Pol IV and Pol V, respectively. Through a chemical genetics screen with a luciferase-based DNA methylation reporter, LUCL, we found that camptothecin, a compound with anti-cancer properties that targets DNA topoisomerase 1α (TOP1α was able to de-repress LUCL by reducing its DNA methylation and H3K9me2 levels. Further studies with Arabidopsis top1α mutants showed that TOP1α silences endogenous RdDM loci by facilitating the production of Pol V-dependent long non-coding RNAs, AGONAUTE4 recruitment and H3K9me2 deposition at TEs and repeats. This study assigned a new role in epigenetic silencing to an enzyme that affects DNA topology.

  6. Analysis of RuvABC and RecG Involvement in the Escherichia coli Response to the Covalent Topoisomerase-DNA Complex▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Jeanette H.; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2010-01-01

    Topoisomerases form a covalent enzyme-DNA intermediate after initial DNA cleavage. Trapping of the cleavage complex formed by type IIA topoisomerases initiates the bactericidal action of fluoroquinolones. It should be possible also to identify novel antibacterial lead compounds that act with a similar mechanism on type IA bacterial topoisomerases. The cellular response and repair pathways for trapped topoisomerase complexes remain to be fully elucidated. The RuvAB and RecG proteins could play a role in the conversion of the initial protein-DNA complex to double-strand breaks and also in the resolution of the Holliday junction during homologous recombination. Escherichia coli strains with ruvA and recG mutations are found to have increased sensitivity to low levels of norfloxacin treatment, but the mutations had more pronounced effects on survival following the accumulation of covalent complexes formed by mutant topoisomerase I defective in DNA religation. Covalent topoisomerase I and DNA gyrase complexes are converted into double-strand breaks for SOS induction by the RecBCD pathway. SOS induction following topoisomerase I complex accumulation is significantly lower in the ruvA and recG mutants than in the wild-type background, suggesting that RuvAB and RecG may play a role in converting the initial single-strand DNA-protein cleavage complex into a double-strand break prior to repair by homologous recombination. The use of a ruvB mutant proficient in homologous recombination but not in replication fork reversal demonstrated that the replication fork reversal function of RuvAB is required for SOS induction by the covalent complex formed by topoisomerase I. PMID:20601468

  7. Analysis of RuvABC and RecG involvement in the escherichia coli response to the covalent topoisomerase-DNA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Jeanette H; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2010-09-01

    Topoisomerases form a covalent enzyme-DNA intermediate after initial DNA cleavage. Trapping of the cleavage complex formed by type IIA topoisomerases initiates the bactericidal action of fluoroquinolones. It should be possible also to identify novel antibacterial lead compounds that act with a similar mechanism on type IA bacterial topoisomerases. The cellular response and repair pathways for trapped topoisomerase complexes remain to be fully elucidated. The RuvAB and RecG proteins could play a role in the conversion of the initial protein-DNA complex to double-strand breaks and also in the resolution of the Holliday junction during homologous recombination. Escherichia coli strains with ruvA and recG mutations are found to have increased sensitivity to low levels of norfloxacin treatment, but the mutations had more pronounced effects on survival following the accumulation of covalent complexes formed by mutant topoisomerase I defective in DNA religation. Covalent topoisomerase I and DNA gyrase complexes are converted into double-strand breaks for SOS induction by the RecBCD pathway. SOS induction following topoisomerase I complex accumulation is significantly lower in the ruvA and recG mutants than in the wild-type background, suggesting that RuvAB and RecG may play a role in converting the initial single-strand DNA-protein cleavage complex into a double-strand break prior to repair by homologous recombination. The use of a ruvB mutant proficient in homologous recombination but not in replication fork reversal demonstrated that the replication fork reversal function of RuvAB is required for SOS induction by the covalent complex formed by topoisomerase I.

  8. The Strictly Conserved Arg-321 Residue in the Active Site of Escherichia coli Topoisomerase I Plays a Critical Role in DNA Rejoining*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Gagandeep; Annamalai, Thirunavukkarasu; Aedo, Sandra; Cheng, Bokun; Sorokin, Elena; Wong, Agnes; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2011-01-01

    The strictly conserved arginine residue proximal to the active site tyrosine of type IA topoisomerases is required for the relaxation of supercoiled DNA and was hypothesized to be required for positioning of the scissile phosphate for DNA cleavage to take place. Mutants of recombinant Yersinia pestis topoisomerase I with hydrophobic substitutions at this position were found in genetic screening to exhibit a dominant lethal phenotype, resulting in drastic loss in Escherichia coli viability when overexpressed. In depth biochemical analysis of E. coli topoisomerase I with the corresponding Arg-321 mutation showed that DNA cleavage can still take place in the absence of this arginine function if Mg2+ is present to enhance the interaction of the enzyme with the scissile phosphate. However, DNA rejoining is inhibited in the absence of this conserved arginine, resulting in accumulation of the cleaved covalent intermediate and loss of relaxation activity. These new experimental results demonstrate that catalysis of DNA rejoining by type IA topoisomerases has a more stringent requirement than DNA cleavage. In addition to the divalent metal ions, the side chain of this arginine residue is required for the precise positioning of the phosphotyrosine linkage for nucleophilic attack by the 3′-OH end to result in DNA rejoining. Small molecules that can interfere or distort the enzyme-DNA interactions required for DNA rejoining by bacterial type IA topoisomerases could be developed into novel antibacterial drugs. PMID:21478161

  9. The RNA splicing factor ASF/SF2 inhibits human topoisomerase I mediated DNA relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Félicie Faucon; Tange, Thomas Ø.; Sinnathamby, Thayaline

    2002-01-01

    Human topoisomerase I interacts with and phosphorylates the SR-family of RNA splicing factors, including ASF/SF2, and has been suggested to play an important role in the regulation of RNA splicing. Here we present evidence to support the theory that the regulation can go the other way around...... mutants of the two proteins to interact directly, suggesting that an interaction between the RS-domain of ASF/SF2 and a region between amino acid residues 208-735 on topoisomerase I accounts for the observed effect. Consistently, phosphorylation of the RS-domain with either topoisomerase I or a human cell...... extract reduced the inhibition of relaxation activity. Taken together with the previously published studies of the topoisomerase I kinase activity, these observations suggest that topoisomerase I activity is shifted from relaxation to kinasing by specific interaction with SR-splicing factors....

  10. Topoisomerase II Inhibitors Induce DNA Damage-Dependent Interferon Responses Circumventing Ebola Virus Immune Evasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Luthra

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV protein VP35 inhibits production of interferon alpha/beta (IFN by blocking RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathways, thereby promoting virus replication and pathogenesis. A high-throughput screening assay, developed to identify compounds that either inhibit or bypass VP35 IFN-antagonist function, identified five DNA intercalators as reproducible hits from a library of bioactive compounds. Four, including doxorubicin and daunorubicin, are anthracycline antibiotics that inhibit topoisomerase II and are used clinically as chemotherapeutic drugs. These compounds were demonstrated to induce IFN responses in an ATM kinase-dependent manner and to also trigger the DNA-sensing cGAS-STING pathway of IFN induction. These compounds also suppress EBOV replication in vitro and induce IFN in the presence of IFN-antagonist proteins from multiple negative-sense RNA viruses. These findings provide new insights into signaling pathways activated by important chemotherapy drugs and identify a novel therapeutic approach for IFN induction that may be exploited to inhibit RNA virus replication.

  11. Expression of stable and active human DNA topoisomerase I in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mooi Kwai; Lim, Shern Kwok; Miswan, Noorizan; Chew, Ai Lan; Noordin, Rahmah; Khoo, Boon Yin

    2018-01-01

    This study described the isolation of the coding region of human topoisomerase I (TopoI) from MDA-MB-231 and the expression of multiple copy recombinant genes in four Pichia pastoris strains. First, polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplification of the enzyme coding region was performed. The PCR fragment was cloned into pPICZ-α-A vector and sequenced. It was then transformed into X33, GS115, SMD1168H and KM71H strains of Pichia. PCR-screening for positive clones was performed, and estimation of multiple copy integrants in each Pichia strain was carried out using agar plates containing increasing concentrations of Zeocin ® . The selected clones of multiple copy recombinant genes were then induced for TopoI expression in shaker flasks. GS115 and SMD1168 were found to be better Pichia strains to accommodate the recombinant gene for the expression of TopoI extracellularly. However, the DNA relaxation activity revealed that only the target enzyme in the culture supernatants of GS115-pPICZ-α-A-TopoI exhibited consistent enzyme activity over the cultivation time-points. Active enzyme activity was inhibited by Camptothecin. The enzyme produced can be used for in-house gel-based DNA relaxation assay development in performing high throughput screening for target-specific growth inhibitors that display similar effect as the TopoI inhibitors. These inhibitors may contribute to the improvement of the treatment of cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Construction, characterization, and complementation of a conditional-lethal DNA topoisomerase IIalpha mutant human cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Adam J; Porter, Andrew C G

    2004-12-01

    DNA Topoisomerase IIalpha (topoIIalpha) is a DNA decatenating enzyme, abundant constituent of mammalian mitotic chromosomes, and target of numerous antitumor drugs, but its exact role in chromosome structure and dynamics is unclear. In a powerful new approach to this important problem, with significant advantages over the use of topoII inhibitors or RNA interference, we have generated and characterized a human cell line (HTETOP) in which >99.5% topoIIalpha expression can be silenced in all cells by the addition of tetracycline. TopoIIalpha-depleted HTETOP cells enter mitosis and undergo chromosome condensation, albeit with delayed kinetics, but normal anaphases and cytokineses are completely prevented, and all cells die, some becoming polyploid in the process. Cells can be rescued by expression of topoIIalpha fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP), even when certain phosphorylation sites have been mutated, but not when the catalytic residue Y805 is mutated. Thus, in addition to validating GFP-tagged topoIIalpha as an indicator for endogenous topoIIalpha dynamics, our analyses provide new evidence that topoIIalpha plays a largely redundant role in chromosome condensation, but an essential catalytic role in chromosome segregation that cannot be complemented by topoIIbeta and does not require phosphorylation at serine residues 1106, 1247, 1354, or 1393.

  13. Topoisomerase II Inhibitors Induce DNA Damage-Dependent Interferon Responses Circumventing Ebola Virus Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Priya; Aguirre, Sebastian; Yen, Benjamin C; Pietzsch, Colette A; Sanchez-Aparicio, Maria T; Tigabu, Bersabeh; Morlock, Lorraine K; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Leung, Daisy W; Williams, Noelle S; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Bukreyev, Alexander; Basler, Christopher F

    2017-04-04

    Ebola virus (EBOV) protein VP35 inhibits production of interferon alpha/beta (IFN) by blocking RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathways, thereby promoting virus replication and pathogenesis. A high-throughput screening assay, developed to identify compounds that either inhibit or bypass VP35 IFN-antagonist function, identified five DNA intercalators as reproducible hits from a library of bioactive compounds. Four, including doxorubicin and daunorubicin, are anthracycline antibiotics that inhibit topoisomerase II and are used clinically as chemotherapeutic drugs. These compounds were demonstrated to induce IFN responses in an ATM kinase-dependent manner and to also trigger the DNA-sensing cGAS-STING pathway of IFN induction. These compounds also suppress EBOV replication in vitro and induce IFN in the presence of IFN-antagonist proteins from multiple negative-sense RNA viruses. These findings provide new insights into signaling pathways activated by important chemotherapy drugs and identify a novel therapeutic approach for IFN induction that may be exploited to inhibit RNA virus replication. IMPORTANCE Ebola virus and other emerging RNA viruses are significant but unpredictable public health threats. Therapeutic approaches with broad-spectrum activity could provide an attractive response to such infections. We describe a novel assay that can identify small molecules that overcome Ebola virus-encoded innate immune evasion mechanisms. This assay identified as hits cancer chemotherapeutic drugs, including doxorubicin. Follow-up studies provide new insight into how doxorubicin induces interferon (IFN) responses, revealing activation of both the DNA damage response kinase ATM and the DNA sensor cGAS and its partner signaling protein STING. The studies further demonstrate that the ATM and cGAS-STING pathways of IFN induction are a point of vulnerability not only for Ebola virus but for other RNA viruses as well, because viral innate immune antagonists consistently fail to

  14. A surface plasmon resonance study of the intermolecular interaction between Escherichia coli topoisomerase I and pBAD/Thio supercoiled plasmid DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Purushottam Babu; Annamalai, Thirunavukkarasu; Cheng, Bokun; Narula, Gagandeep; Wang, Xuewen; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; He, Jin; Darici, Yesim

    2014-01-01

    To date, the bacterial DNA topoisomerases are one of the major target biomolecules for the discovery of new antibacterial drugs. DNA topoisomerase regulates the topological state of DNA, which is very important for replication, transcription and recombination. The relaxation of negatively supercoiled DNA is catalyzed by bacterial DNA topoisomerase I (topoI) and this reaction requires Mg2+. In this report, we first quantitatively studied the intermolecular interactions between Escherichia coli topoisomerase I (EctopoI) and pBAD/Thio supercoiled plasmid DNA using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for EctopoI-pBAD/Thio interactions is determined to be about 8 nM. We then studied the effect of Mg2+ on the catalysis of EctopoI-pBAD/Thio reaction. A slightly higher equilibrium dissociation constant (~15 nM) was obtained for Mg2+ coordinated EctopoI (Mg2+EctopoI)-pBAD/Thio interactions. In addition, we observed a larger dissociation rate constant (kd) for Mg2+EctopoI-pBAD/Thio interactions (~0.043 s−1), compared to EctopoI-pBAD/Thio interactions (~0.017 s−1). These results suggest that enzyme turnover during plasmid DNA relaxation is enhanced due to the presence of Mg2+ and furthers the understanding of importance of the Mg2+ ion for bacterial topoisomerase I catalytic activity. PMID:24530905

  15. A surface plasmon resonance study of the intermolecular interaction between Escherichia coli topoisomerase I and pBAD/Thio supercoiled plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Purushottam Babu; Annamalai, Thirunavukkarasu; Cheng, Bokun; Narula, Gagandeep; Wang, Xuewen; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; He, Jin; Darici, Yesim

    2014-03-07

    To date, the bacterial DNA topoisomerases are one of the major target biomolecules for the discovery of new antibacterial drugs. DNA topoisomerase regulates the topological state of DNA, which is very important for replication, transcription and recombination. The relaxation of negatively supercoiled DNA is catalyzed by bacterial DNA topoisomerase I (topoI) and this reaction requires Mg(2+). In this report, we first quantitatively studied the intermolecular interactions between Escherichia coli topoisomerase I (EctopoI) and pBAD/Thio supercoiled plasmid DNA using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for EctopoI-pBAD/Thio interactions was determined to be about 8 nM. We then studied the effect of Mg(2+) on the catalysis of EctopoI-pBAD/Thio reaction. A slightly higher equilibrium dissociation constant (~15 nM) was obtained for Mg(2+) coordinated EctopoI (Mg(2+)EctopoI)-pBAD/Thio interactions. In addition, we observed a larger dissociation rate constant (kd) for Mg(2+)EctopoI-pBAD/Thio interactions (~0.043 s(-1)), compared to EctopoI-pBAD/Thio interactions (~0.017 s(-1)). These results suggest that enzyme turnover during plasmid DNA relaxation is enhanced due to the presence of Mg(2+) and furthers the understanding of importance of the Mg(2+) ion for bacterial topoisomerase I catalytic activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Experimental and computational investigations of Ser10 and Lys13 in the binding and cleavage of DNA substrates by Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahs, Daniel; Zhu, Chang-Xi; Cheng, Bokun; Chen, Jason; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2006-01-01

    Ser10 and Lys13 found near the active site tyrosine of Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I are conserved among the type IA topoisomerases. Site-directed mutagenesis of these two residues to Ala reduced the relaxation and DNA cleavage activity, with a more severe effect from the Lys13 mutation. Changing Ser10 to Thr or Lys13 to Arg also resulted in loss of DNA cleavage and relaxation activity of the enzyme. In simulations of the open form of the topoisomerase–DNA complex, Lys13 interacts directly with Glu9 (proposed to be important in the catalytic mechanism). This interaction is removed in the K13A mutant, suggesting the importance of lysine as either a proton donor or a stabilizing cation during strand cleavage, while the Lys to Arg mutation significantly distorts catalytic residues. Ser10 forms a direct hydrogen bond with a phosphate group near the active site and is involved in direct binding of the DNA substrate; this interaction is disturbed in the S10A and S10T mutants. This combination of a lysine and a serine residue conserved in the active site of type IA topoisomerases may be required for correct positioning of the scissile phosphate and coordination of catalytic residues relative to each other so that DNA cleavage and subsequent strand passage can take place. PMID:16582104

  17. Mutations of human DNA topoisomerase I at poly(ADP-ribose) binding sites: modulation of camptothecin activity by ADP-ribose polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesauro, Cinzia; Graziani, Grazia; Arnò, Barbara; Zuccaro, Laura; Muzi, Alessia; D'Annessa, Ilda; Santori, Elettra; Tentori, Lucio; Leonetti, Carlo; Fiorani, Paola; Desideri, Alessandro

    2014-09-17

    DNA topoisomerases are key enzymes that modulate the topological state of DNA through the breaking and rejoining of DNA strands. Human topoisomerase I belongs to the family of poly(ADP-ribose)-binding proteins and is the target of camptothecin derived anticancer drugs. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation occurs at specific sites of the enzyme inhibiting the cleavage and enhancing the religation steps during the catalytic cycle. Thus, ADP-ribose polymers antagonize the activity of topoisomerase I poisons, whereas PARP inhibitors increase their antitumor effects. Using site-directed mutagenesis we have analyzed the interaction of human topoisomerase I and poly(ADP-ribose) through enzymatic activity and binding procedures. Mutations of the human topoisomerase I hydrophobic or charged residues, located on the putative polymer binding sites, are not sufficient to abolish or reduce the binding of the poly(ADP-ribose) to the protein. These results suggest either the presence of additional binding sites or that the mutations are not enough perturbative to destroy the poly(ADP-ribose) interaction, although in one mutant they fully abolish the enzyme activity. It can be concluded that mutations at the hydrophobic or charged residues of the putative polymer binding sites do not interfere with the ability of poly(ADP-ribose) to antagonize the antitumor activity of topoisomerase I poisons.

  18. [Clinical significant of semiquantificating DNA topoisomerase- I mRNA in colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Hideyuki; Shirakawa, Kazuo; Ohsawa, Tomonori; Hayashi, Yoichi; Okada, Norimichi; Nakada, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Masaru

    2005-09-01

    To examine the clinical significance of determining the expression levels of DNA topoisomerase- I (topo-I) mRNA of colorectal cancer. The relative expression levels of topo-I mRNA in primary colorectal cancer and adjacent normal mucosa were semiquantificated by the RT-PCR method. The relative expression of thymidylate synthase (TS) mRNA of the primary lesions was also examined. The topo- I mRNA expression was higher in the tumorous tissue than in the normal mucosa (n=22, ptopoI mRNA expression did not differ nor correlate with the response to CPT-11 (PR, n=14; SD, n=11; PR; n=24) (p=0.91). In these patients, there was no relationship between the topo I mRNA expression and the TS mRNA expression (p=0.22, r=0.18). In addition, the efficacy of CPT-11 did not correlate with combinations subdivided according to the expression levels of topo- I mRNA and TS mRNA. Determination of topo- I mRNA levels of primary colorectal cancer may not be useful for predicting the efficacy of CPT-11 treatment alone or in combination with TS mRNA levels.

  19. Design and synthesis of 2-phenylnaphthalenoids and 2-phenylbenzofuranoids as DNA topoisomerase inhibitors and antitumor agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Huilin; Chen, Wang; Zhu, Jing; Lu, Chunhua; Shen, Yuemao

    2015-09-18

    Eight 2-phenylnaphthalenoids (2PNs) (3a-h) and twenty four 2-phenylbenzofuranoids (2PBFs) (4a--4j, 5a-5j, 6a, 6f-6h) were successfully designed, synthesized and their antiproliferative and in vitro DNA topoisomerase inhibitory activities were evaluated. Nine compounds (four 2PNs and five 2PBFs) showed either TopoI or TopoIIα inhibitory activities. Six compounds (four 2PNs and two 2PBFs) exhibited potent cytotoxicity with IC50 values for 72 h exposure ranging from 0.3 to above 20 μM against MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-435, HepG2 and PC3 cell lines. The two 2PBFs displayed comparable and even better antiproliferative as well as TopoIIα inhibitory activities than 2PNs. Interestingly, the active 2PBFs displayed different mechanisms of TopoIIα inhibition from that of 2PNs, suggesting that the chromophore scaffold replacement may result in a change of the binding site of inhibitors to TopoIIα. Furthermore, the mechanisms of antiproliferation on MDA-MB-231 cells indicate that compounds 5a and 5f are promising for further development of anticancer agents. The results of this study reveal that the evolutionary strategy of medicinal chemistry through scaffold hopping is a promising strategy for structure optimization of TopoIIα inhibitors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural Insights into the Fluoroquinolone Resistance Mechanism of Shigella flexneri DNA Gyrase and Topoisomerase IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamanna; Ramana, Jayashree

    2016-07-01

    Traveler's diarrhea (TD) is an important public health concern that can result from a variety of intestinal pathogens, including bacteria, parasites, and virus. A number of antibiotics are being used to cure TD, but due to widespread use of these antibiotics, the pathogens are becoming resistant to them. In this work, we performed docking studies of DNA gyraseA (GyrA) and topoisomerase IV (ParC) of Shigella flexneri and their mutants with two different fluoroquinolones, ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin, to understand their resistance mechanism at the structural level. S. flexneri strains with mutations at serine 83 to leucine and aspartic acid 87 to glutamate or asparagine of GyrA and that of serine 80 to isoleucine in ParC have decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. This analysis revealed that interaction of ciprofloxacin/norfloxacin with all the mutants was weaker than the interaction of ciprofloxacin/norfloxacin with the wild type. This study highlights the importance of aspartic acid and serine in GyrA and that of serine in ParC, forming bonds with ciprofloxacin/norfloxacin, which may play a crucial role in antibiotic resistance. This work corelates very well with the experimental outcomes and gives a good explanation for fluoroquinolone resistance in S. flexneri.

  1. DNA damage response (DDR) induced by topoisomerase II poisons requires nuclear function of the small GTPase Rac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartlick, Friedrich; Bopp, Anita; Henninger, Christian; Fritz, Gerhard

    2013-12-01

    Here, we investigated the influence of Rac family small GTPases on mechanisms of the DNA damage response (DDR) stimulated by topoisomerase II poisons. To this end, we examined the influence of the Rac-specific small molecule inhibitor EHT1864 on Ser139 phosphorylation of histone H2AX, a widely used marker of the DDR triggered by DNA double-strand breaks. EHT1864 attenuated the doxorubicin-stimulated DDR in a subset of cell lines tested, including HepG2 hepatoma cells. EHT1864 reduced the level of DNA strand breaks and increased viability following treatment of HepG2 cells with topo II poisons. Protection by EHT1864 was observed in both p53 wildtype (HepG2) and p53 deficient (Hep3B) human hepatoma cells and, furthermore, remained unaffected upon pharmacological inhibition of p53 in HepG2. Apparently, the impact of Rac on the DDR is independent of p53. Protection from doxorubicin-induced DNA damage by EHT1864 comprises both S and G2 phase cells. The inhibitory effect of EHT1864 on doxorubicin-stimulated DDR was mimicked by pharmacological inhibition of various protein kinases, including JNK, ERK, PI3K, PAK and CK1. EHT1864 and protein kinase inhibitors also attenuated the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. Moreover, EHT1864 mitigated the constitutive phosphorylation of topoisomerase IIα at positions S1106, S1213 and S1247. Doxorubicin transport, nuclear import/export of topoisomerase II and Hsp90-related mechanisms are likely not of relevance for doxorubicin-stimulated DDR impaired by EHT1864. We suggest that multiple kinase-dependent but p53- and heat shock protein-independent Rac-regulated nuclear mechanisms are required for activation of the DDR following treatment with topo II poisons. © 2013.

  2. Fluoroquinolones stimulate the DNA cleavage activity of topoisomerase IV by promoting the binding of Mg(2+) to the second metal binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppegard, Lisa M; Schwanz, Heidi A; Towle, Tyrell R; Kerns, Robert J; Hiasa, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Fluoroquinolones target bacterial type IIA topoisomerases, DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV (Topo IV). Fluoroquinolones trap a topoisomerase-DNA covalent complex as a topoisomerase-fluoroquinolone-DNA ternary complex and ternary complex formation is critical for their cytotoxicity. A divalent metal ion is required for type IIA topoisomerase-catalyzed strand breakage and religation reactions. Recent studies have suggested that type IIA topoisomerases use two metal ions, one structural and one catalytic, to carry out the strand breakage reaction. We conducted a series of DNA cleavage assays to examine the effects of fluoroquinolones and quinazolinediones on Mg(2+)-, Mn(2+)-, or Ca(2+)-supported DNA cleavage activity of Escherichia coli Topo IV. In the absence of any drug, 20-30 mM Mg(2+) was required for the maximum levels of the DNA cleavage activity of Topo IV, whereas approximately 1mM of either Mn(2+) or Ca(2+) was sufficient to support the maximum levels of the DNA cleavage activity of Topo IV. Fluoroquinolones promoted the Topo IV-catalyzed strand breakage reaction at low Mg(2+) concentrations where Topo IV alone could not efficiently cleave DNA. At low Mg(2+) concentrations, fluoroquinolones may stimulate the Topo IV-catalyzed strand breakage reaction by promoting Mg(2+) binding to metal binding site B through the structural distortion in DNA. As Mg(2+) concentration increases, fluoroquinolones may inhibit the religation reaction by either stabilizing Mg(2+) at site B or inhibition the binding of Mg(2+) to site A. This study provides a molecular basis of how fluoroquinolones stimulate the Topo IV-catalyzed strand breakage reaction by modulating Mg(2+) binding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Fluoroquinolones stimulate the DNA cleavage activity of topoisomerase IV by promoting the binding of Mg2+ to the second metal binding site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppegard, Lisa M.; Schwanz, Heidi A.; Towle, Tyrell R.; Kerns, Robert J.; Hiasa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Fluoroquinolones target bacterial type IIA topoisomerases, DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV (Topo IV). Fluoroquinolones trap a topoisomerase-DNA covalent complex as a topoisomerase-fluoroquinolone-DNA ternary complex and ternary complex formation is critical for their cytotoxicity. A divalent metal ion is required for type IIA topoisomerase-catalyzed strand breakage and religation reactions. Recent studies have suggested that type IIA topoisomerases use two metal ions, one structural and one catalytic, to carry out the strand breakage reaction. Methods We conducted a series of DNA cleavage assays to examine the effects of fluoroquinolones and quinazolinediones on Mg2+-, Mn2+-, or Ca2+-supported DNA cleavage activity of Esherichia coli Topo IV. Results In the absence of any drug, 20–30 mM Mg2+ was required for the maximum levels of the DNA cleavage activity of Topo IV, whereas approximately 1 mM of either Mn2+ or Ca2+ was sufficient to support the maximum levels of the DNA cleavage activity of Topo IV. Fluoroquinolones promoted the Topo IV-catalyzed strand breakage reaction at low Mg2+ concentrations where Topo IV alone could not efficiently cleave DNA. Conclusions and General Significance At low Mg2+ concentrations, fluoroquinolones may stimulate the Topo IV-catalyzed strand breakage reaction by promoting Mg2+ binding to metal binding site B through the structural distortion in DNA. As Mg2+ concentration increases, fluoroquinolones may inhibit the religation reaction by either stabilizing Mg2+ at site B or inhibition the binding of Mg2+ to site A. This study provides a molecular basis of how fluoroquinolones stimulate the Topo IV-catalyzed strand breakage reaction by modulating Mg2+ binding. PMID:26723176

  4. Residues of E. coli topoisomerase I conserved for interaction with a specific cytosine base to facilitate DNA cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Gagandeep; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial and archaeal topoisomerase I display selectivity for a cytosine base 4 nt upstream from the DNA cleavage site. Recently, the solved crystal structure of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I covalently linked to a single-stranded oligonucleotide revealed that R169 and R173 interact with the cytosine base at the −4 position via hydrogen bonds while the phenol ring of Y177 wedges between the bases at the −4 and the −5 position. Substituting R169 to alanine changed the selectivity of the enzyme for the base at the −4 position from a cytosine to an adenine. The R173A mutant displayed similar sequence selectivity as the wild-type enzyme, but weaker cleavage and relaxation activity. Mutation of Y177 to serine or alanine rendered the enzyme inactive. Although mutation of each of these residues led to different outcomes, R169, R173 and Y177 work together to interact with a cytosine base at the −4 position to facilitate DNA cleavage. These strictly conserved residues might act after initial substrate binding as a Molecular Ruler to form a protein–DNA complex with the scissile phosphate positioned at the active site for optimal DNA cleavage by the tyrosine hydroxyl nucleophile to facilitate DNA cleavage in the reaction pathway. PMID:22833607

  5. Novel symmetric and asymmetric DNA scission determinants for Streptococcus pneumoniae topoisomerase IV and gyrase are clustered at the DNA breakage site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Elisabetta; Gould, Katherine A; Pan, Xiao-Su; Capranico, Giovanni; Sanderson, Mark R; Palumbo, Manlio; Fisher, L Mark

    2005-04-08

    Topoisomerase (topo) IV and gyrase are bacterial type IIA DNA topoisomerases essential for DNA replication and chromosome segregation that act via a transient double-stranded DNA break involving a covalent enzyme-DNA "cleavage complex." Despite their mechanistic importance, the DNA breakage determinants are not understood for any bacterial type II enzyme. We investigated DNA cleavage by Streptococcus pneumoniae topo IV and gyrase stabilized by gemifloxacin and other antipneumococcal fluoroquinolones. Topo IV and gyrase induce distinct but overlapping repertoires of double-strand DNA breakage sites that were essentially identical for seven different quinolones and were augmented (in intensity) by positive or negative supercoiling. Sequence analysis of 180 topo IV and 126 gyrase sites promoted by gemifloxacin on pneumococcal DNA revealed the respective consensus sequences: G(G/c)(A/t)A*GNNCt(T/a)N(C/a) and GN4G(G/c)(A/c)G*GNNCtTN(C/a) (preferred bases are underlined; disfavored bases are in small capitals; N indicates no preference; and asterisk indicates DNA scission between -1 and +1 positions). Both enzymes show strong preferences for bases clustered symmetrically around the DNA scission site, i.e. +1G/+4C, -4G/+8C, and particularly the novel -2A/+6T, but with no preference at +2/+3 within the staggered 4-bp overhang. Asymmetric elements include -3G and several unfavored bases. These cleavage preferences, the first for Gram-positive type IIA topoisomerases, differ markedly from those reported for Escherichia coli topo IV (consensus (A/G)*T/A) and gyrase, which are based on fewer sites. However, both pneumococcal enzymes cleaved an E. coli gyrase site suggesting overlap in gyrase determinants. We propose a model for the cleavage complex of topo IV/gyrase that accommodates the unique -2A/+6T and other preferences.

  6. The role of the Zn(II binding domain in the mechanism of E. coli DNA topoisomerase I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tse-Dinh Yuk-Ching

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I binds three Zn(II with three tetracysteine motifs which, together with the 14 kDa C-terminal region, form a 30 kDa DNA binding domain (ZD domain. The 67 kDa N-terminal domain (Top67 has the active site tyrosine for DNA cleavage but cannot relax negatively supercoiled DNA. We analyzed the role of the ZD domain in the enzyme mechanism. Results Addition of purified ZD domain to Top67 partially restored the relaxation activity, demonstrating that covalent linkage between the two domains is not necessary for removal of negative supercoils from DNA. The two domains had similar affinities to ssDNA. However, only Top67 could bind dsDNA with high affinity. DNA cleavage assays showed that the Top67 had the same sequence and structure selectivity for DNA cleavage as the intact enzyme. DNA rejoining also did not require the presence of the ZD domain. Conclusions We propose that during relaxation of negatively supercoiled DNA, Top67 by itself can position the active site tyrosine near the junction of double-stranded and single-stranded DNA for cleavage. However, the interaction of the ZD domain with the passing single-strand of DNA, coupled with enzyme conformational change, is needed for removal of negative supercoils.

  7. C-terminal lysine repeats in Streptomyces topoisomerase I stabilize the enzyme–DNA complex and confer high enzyme processivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzałka, Agnieszka; Szafran, Marcin J.; Strick, Terence

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Streptomyces topoisomerase I (TopA) exhibits exceptionally high processivity. The enzyme, as other actinobacterial topoisomerases I, differs from its bacterial homologs in its C-terminal domain (CTD). Here, bioinformatics analyses established that the presence of lysine repeats is a characteristic feature of actinobacterial TopA CTDs. Streptomyces TopA contains the longest stretch of lysine repeats, which terminate with acidic amino acids. DNA-binding studies revealed that the lysine repeats stabilized the TopA–DNA complex, while single-molecule experiments showed that their elimination impaired enzyme processivity. Streptomyces coelicolor TopA processivity could not be restored by fusion of its N-terminal domain (NTD) with the Escherichia coli TopA CTD. The hybrid protein could not re-establish the distribution of multiple chromosomal copies in Streptomyces hyphae impaired by TopA depletion. We expected that the highest TopA processivity would be required during the growth of multigenomic sporogenic hyphae, and indeed, the elimination of lysine repeats from TopA disturbed sporulation. We speculate that the interaction of the lysine repeats with DNA allows the stabilization of the enzyme–DNA complex, which is additionally enhanced by acidic C-terminal amino acids. The complex stabilization, which may be particularly important for GC-rich chromosomes, enables high enzyme processivity. The high processivity of TopA allows rapid topological changes in multiple chromosomal copies during Streptomyces sporulation. PMID:28981718

  8. QUANTITATION OF DNA TOPOISOMERASE-II-ALPHA MESSENGER-RIBONUCLEIC-ACID LEVELS IN A SMALL-CELL LUNG-CANCER CELL-LINE AND 2 DRUG-RESISTANT SUBLINES USING A POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION-AIDED TRANSCRIPT TITRATION ASSAY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WITHOFF, S; SMIT, EF; MEERSMA, GJ; van den Berg, Anke; TIMMERBOSSCHA, H; KOK, K; POSTMUS, PE; MULDER, NH; DEVRIES, EGE; BUYS, CHCM

    BACKGROUND: We have modified a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-aided transcript titration assay (1) in order to allow quantitation of low amounts of DNA topoisomerase II alpha mRNA in small RNA samples. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The titration assay was used to quantitate the amount of DNA topoisomerase

  9. Discovery of membrane active benzimidazole quinolones-based topoisomerase inhibitors as potential DNA-binding antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Addla, Dinesh; Ponmani, Jeyakkumar; Wang, Ao; Xie, Dan; Wang, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Shao-Lin; Geng, Rong-Xia; Cai, Gui-Xin; Li, Shuo; Zhou, Cheng-He

    2016-03-23

    A series of novel benzimidazole quinolones as potential antimicrobial agents were designed and synthesized. Most of the prepared compounds exhibited good or even stronger antimicrobial activities in comparison with reference drugs. The most potent compound 15m was membrane active and did not trigger the development of resistance in bacteria. It not only inhibited the formation of biofilms but also disrupted the established Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli biofilms. It was able to inhibit the relaxation activity of E. coli topoisomerase IV at 10 μM concentration. Moreover, this compound also showed low toxicity against mammalian cells. Molecular modeling and experimental investigation of compound 15m with DNA suggested that this compound could effectively bind with DNA to form a steady 15m-DNA complex which might further block DNA replication to exert the powerful bioactivities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Inhibition of Hsp90 acts synergistically with topoisomerase II poisons to increase the apoptotic killing of cells due to an increase in topoisomerase II mediated DNA damage

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, Catherine R.; McNamara, Anne V.; Rackstraw, Stephen A.; Nelson, David E.; White, Mike R.; Watson, Alastair J. M.; Jenkins, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Topoisomerase II plays a crucial role during chromosome condensation and segregation in mitosis and meiosis and is a highly attractive target for chemotherapeutic agents. We have identified previously topoisomerase II and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) as part of a complex. In this paper we demonstrate that drug combinations targeting these two enzymes cause a synergistic increase in apoptosis. The objective of our study was to identify the mode of cell killing and the mechanism behind the inc...

  11. Topoisomerase II and leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, MaryJean; Lindsey, R. Hunter; Felix, Carolyn A.; Grimwade, David; Osheroff, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Type II topoisomerases are essential enzymes that modulate DNA under- and overwinding, knotting, and tangling. Beyond their critical physiological functions, these enzymes are the targets for some of the most widely prescribed anticancer drugs (topoisomerase II poisons) in clinical use. Topoisomerase II poisons kill cells by increasing levels of covalent enzyme-cleaved DNA complexes that are normal reaction intermediates. Drugs such as etoposide, doxorubicin, and mitoxantrone are frontline therapies for a variety of solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Unfortunately, their use is also associated with the development of specific leukemias. Regimens that include etoposide or doxorubicin are linked to the occurrence of acute myeloid leukemias that feature rearrangements at chromosomal band 11q23. Similar rearrangements are seen in infant leukemias and are associated with gestational diets that are high in naturally occurring topoisomerase II–active compounds. Finally, regimens that include mitoxantrone and epirubicin are linked to acute promyelocytic leukemias that feature t(15;17) rearrangements. The first part of this article will focus on type II topoisomerases and describe the mechanism of enzyme and drug action. The second part will discuss how topoisomerase II poisons trigger chromosomal breaks that lead to leukemia and potential approaches for dissociating the actions of drugs from their leukemogenic potential. PMID:24495080

  12. Protein expression of DNA damage repair proteins dictates response to topoisomerase and PARP inhibitors in triple-negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie L Boerner

    Full Text Available Patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC have a poor prognosis. New approaches for the treatment of TNBC are needed to improve patient survival. The concept of synthetic lethality, brought about by inactivating complementary DNA repair pathways, has been proposed as a promising therapeutic option for these tumors. The TNBC tumor type has been associated with BRCA mutations, and inhibitors of Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, a family of proteins that facilitates DNA repair, have been shown to effectively kill BRCA defective tumors by preventing cells from repairing DNA damage, leading to a loss of cell viability and clonogenic survival. Here we present preclinical efficacy results of combining the PARP inhibitor, ABT-888, with CPT-11, a topoisomerase I inhibitor. CPT-11 binds to topoisomerase I at the replication fork, creating a bulky adduct that is recognized as damaged DNA. When DNA damage was stimulated with CPT-11, protein expression of the nucleotide excision repair enzyme ERCC1 inversely correlated with cell viability, but not clonogenic survival. However, 4 out of the 6 TNBC cells were synergistically responsive by cell viability and 5 out of the 6 TNBC cells were synergistically responsive by clonogenic survival to the combination of ABT-888 and CPT-11. In vivo, the BRCA mutant cell line MX-1 treated with CPT-11 alone demonstrated significant decreased tumor growth; this decrease was enhanced further with the addition of ABT-888. Decrease in tumor growth correlated with an increase in double strand DNA breaks as measured by γ-H2AX phosphorylation. In summary, inhibiting two arms of the DNA repair pathway simultaneously in TNBC cell lines, independent of BRCA mutation status, resulted in un-repairable DNA damage and subsequent cell death.

  13. Flavonoids from Annona dioica leaves and their effects in Ehrlich carcinoma cells, DNA-topoisomerase I and II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega, Maria R.G.; Esteves-Souza, Andressa; Echevarria, Aurea; Vieira, Ivo J.C.; Mathias, Leda; Braz-Filho, Raimundo

    2007-01-01

    Chemical investigation of methanol extract leaves from Annona dioica (Annonaceae) resulted in the identification of flavonoids kaempferol (1), 3-O-[3'',6''-di-O-p-hydroxycinnamoyl]-β- galactopyranosyl-kaempferol (2), 6''-O-p-hydroxycinnamoyl-β-galactopyranosyl-kaempferol (3) and 3-O-β-galactopyranosyl-kaempferol (4). The structures were unequivocally characterized by 1 H and 13 C NMR spectroscopic analyses using 1D and 2D experiments. The cytotoxic effects of the flavonoids and flavonoid fraction (FF) were evaluated by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2- yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay against Ehrlich carcinoma cells. The results indicated that 1, 2, 3 and FF exhibit significant antiproliferative action when compared to quercetin. The inhibitory action on DNA-topoisomerase I and II of all the flavonoids was evaluated by relaxation assays on pBR322 plasmid DNA. The results indicated the inhibitory and non-selective effects of the flavonoids on DNA-topoisomerase I and II. (author)

  14. Flavonoids from Annona dioica leaves and their effects in Ehrlich carcinoma cells, DNA-topoisomerase I and II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, Maria R.G.; Esteves-Souza, Andressa; Echevarria, Aurea [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropedica, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: echevarr@ufrrj.br; Vieira, Ivo J.C.; Mathias, Leda; Braz-Filho, Raimundo [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacases, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ciencias Quimicas

    2007-07-01

    Chemical investigation of methanol extract leaves from Annona dioica (Annonaceae) resulted in the identification of flavonoids kaempferol (1), 3-O-[3'',6''-di-O-p-hydroxycinnamoyl]-{beta}- galactopyranosyl-kaempferol (2), 6''-O-p-hydroxycinnamoyl-{beta}-galactopyranosyl-kaempferol (3) and 3-O-{beta}-galactopyranosyl-kaempferol (4). The structures were unequivocally characterized by {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopic analyses using 1D and 2D experiments. The cytotoxic effects of the flavonoids and flavonoid fraction (FF) were evaluated by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2- yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay against Ehrlich carcinoma cells. The results indicated that 1, 2, 3 and FF exhibit significant antiproliferative action when compared to quercetin. The inhibitory action on DNA-topoisomerase I and II of all the flavonoids was evaluated by relaxation assays on pBR322 plasmid DNA. The results indicated the inhibitory and non-selective effects of the flavonoids on DNA-topoisomerase I and II. (author)

  15. Emergence of fluoroquinolone-resistant Propionibacterium acnes caused by amino acid substitutions of DNA gyrase but not DNA topoisomerase IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakase, Keisuke; Sakuma, Yui; Nakaminami, Hidemasa; Noguchi, Norihisa

    2016-12-01

    With the aim of elucidating the mechanisms of fluoroquinolones resistance in Propionibacterium acnes, we determined the susceptibility of fluoroquinolones in 211 isolates from patients with acne vulgaris. We identified five isolates (2.4%) with reduced susceptibility to nadifloxacin (minimum inhibitory concentration ≥ 4 μg/ml). Determination of the sequences of the DNA gyrase (gyrA and gyrB) and DNA topoisomerase (parC and parE) genes showed the amino acid substitutions Ser101Leu and Asp105Gly of GyrA in four and one of the isolates, respectively. In vitro mutation experiments showed that low-level fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants with the Ser101Leu or Asp105Gly substitution in GyrA could be obtained from selection with ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin. The pattern of substitution (Ser101Trp in GyrA) caused by nadifloxacin selection was different from that induced by the other fluoroquinolones. In the isolation of further high-level resistant mutants, acquisition of another amino acid substitution of GyrB in addition to those of GyrA was detected, but there were no substitutions of ParC and ParE. In addition, the mutant prevention concentration and mutation frequency of nadifloxacin were lowest among the tested fluoroquinolones. The growth of the Ser101Trp mutant was lower than that of the other mutants. Our findings suggest that the Ser101Trp mutant of P. acnes emerges rarely and disappears immediately, and the risk for the prevalence of fluoroquinolones-resistant P. acnes differs according to the GyrA mutation type. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate the mechanisms of resistance to fluoroquinolones in P. acnes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Design and docking of novel series of hybrid xanthones as anti-cancer agent to target human DNA topoisomerase 2-alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit Mohan Nainwal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase (topo IIα is a homodimeric protein catalyzes topological vicissitudes by adding or by soothing super coiling transpiration, occurs in human DNA during DNA replication as an outcome chromosome segregation and condensation occurs during meiosis I and recombination. To prevent the cleavage and religation activity we administered novel hybrid substituted Xanthone series of drugs. The toxicity prediction showed outstanding results which impetus to study its anticancer activities by targeting topoisomerase (topo IIα. We developed the homology model of the topoisomerase (topo IIα due to the unavailability of 3D structure in the Protein Data Bank. Structural assessment of the modeled protein and confirmed the quality of the model. The ligands were docked using Autodock4.2 software and binding energy was reported. The compound XM9, XN2, XM7, XLNU and XNS scored lowest binding energy and highest binding affinity. The interaction sites and the hydrogen bond were observed.

  17. Topoisomerase II poisoning by indazole and imidazole complexes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    of topoisomerase II by forming a ternary cleavage complex of DNA, drug and topoisomerase II. The thymidine incorporation assays show that the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation correlates with topoisomerase II poisoning. The present study on topoisomerase II poisoning by these two compounds opens a new avenue ...

  18. Alterations in DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV in resistant mutants of Clostridium perfringens found after in vitro treatment with fluoroquinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, Fatemeh; Park, Miseon; Novak, John S

    2005-02-01

    To compare mutations in the DNA gyrase (gyrA and gyrB) and topoisomerase IV (parC and parE) genes of Clostridium perfringens, which are associated with in vitro exposure to fluoroquinolones, resistant mutants were selected from eight strains by serial passage in the presence of increasing concentrations of norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin, or trovafloxacin. The nucleotide sequences of the entire gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes of 42 mutants were determined. DNA gyrase was the primary target for each fluoroquinolone, and topoisomerase IV was the secondary target. Most mutations appeared in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of gyrA (resulting in changes of Asp-87 to Tyr or Gly-81 to Cys) and parC (resulting in changes of Asp-93 or Asp-88 to Tyr or Ser-89 to Ile); only two mutations were found in gyrB, and only two mutations were found in parE. More mutants with multiple gyrA and parC mutations were produced with gatifloxacin than with the other fluoroquinolones tested. Allelic diversity was observed among the resistant mutants, for which the drug MICs increased 2- to 256-fold. Both the structures of the drugs and their concentrations influenced the selection of mutants.

  19. Alpha, beta-unsaturated lactones 2-furanone and 2-pyrone induce cellular DNA damage, formation of topoisomerase I- and II-DNA complexes and cancer cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Orta, Manuel Luis; Pastor, Nuria; Austin, Caroline A; Mateos, Santiago; López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2013-09-12

    The alpha, beta-unsaturated lactones 2-furanone and 2-pyrone are part of the chemical structure of a variety of naturally occurring compounds (e.g., cardenolides, bufadienolides, acetogenins, coumarins, and food-flavoring furanones), some of which have shown anticancer activity and/or DNA damaging effects. Here we report that 2-furanone and 2-pyrone induce cellular DNA damage (assessed by the comet assay and the gamma-H2AX focus assay) and the formation of topoisomerase I- and topoisomerase II-DNA complexes in cells (visualized and quantified in situ by the TARDIS assay). Cells mutated in BRCA2 (deficient in homologous recombination repair) were significantly hypersensitive to the cytotoxic activity of 2-pyrone, therefore suggesting that BRCA2 plays an important role in the repair of DNA damage induced by this lactone. Both lactones were cytotoxic in A549 lung cancer cells at lower concentrations than in MRC5 non-malignant lung fibroblasts. The possible involvement of 2-furanone and 2-pyrone in the anticancer and DNA-damaging activities of compounds containing these lactones is discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Structure-based design, synthesis and biological testing of etoposide analog epipodophyllotoxin-N-mustard hybrid compounds designed to covalently bind to topoisomerase II and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Arun A; Wu, Xing; Patel, Daywin; Yalowich, Jack C; Hasinoff, Brian B

    2014-11-01

    Drugs that target DNA topoisomerase II isoforms and alkylate DNA represent two mechanistically distinct and clinically important classes of anticancer drugs. Guided by molecular modeling and docking a series of etoposide analog epipodophyllotoxin-N-mustard hybrid compounds were designed, synthesized and biologically characterized. These hybrids were designed to alkylate nucleophilic protein residues on topoisomerase II and thus produce inactive covalent adducts and to also alkylate DNA. The most potent hybrid had a mean GI(50) in the NCI-60 cell screen 17-fold lower than etoposide. Using a variety of in vitro and cell-based assays all of the hybrids tested were shown to target topoisomerase II. A COMPARE analysis indicated that the hybrids had NCI 60-cell growth inhibition profiles matching both etoposide and the N-mustard compounds from which they were derived. These results supported the conclusion that the hybrids displayed characteristics that were consistent with having targeted both topoisomerase II and DNA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Direct regulation of topoisomerase activity by a nucleoid-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumitra; Mallick, Bratati; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2014-01-01

    The topological homeostasis of bacterial chromosomes is maintained by the balance between compaction and the topological organization of genomes. Two classes of proteins play major roles in chromosome organization: the nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs) and topoisomerases. The NAPs bind DNA to compact the chromosome, whereas topoisomerases catalytically remove or introduce supercoils into the genome. We demonstrate that HU, a major NAP of Mycobacterium tuberculosis specifically stimulates the DNA relaxation ability of mycobacterial topoisomerase I (TopoI) at lower concentrations but interferes at higher concentrations. A direct physical interaction between M. tuberculosis HU (MtHU) and TopoI is necessary for enhancing enzyme activity both in vitro and in vivo. The interaction is between the amino terminal domain of MtHU and the carboxyl terminal domain of TopoI. Binding of MtHU did not affect the two catalytic trans-esterification steps but enhanced the DNA strand passage, requisite for the completion of DNA relaxation, a new mechanism for the regulation of topoisomerase activity. An interaction-deficient mutant of MtHU was compromised in enhancing the strand passage activity. The species-specific physical and functional cooperation between MtHU and TopoI may be the key to achieve the DNA relaxation levels needed to maintain the optimal superhelical density of mycobacterial genomes. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Distinct Mechanism Evolved for Mycobacterial RNA Polymerase and Topoisomerase I Protein-Protein Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banda, Srikanth; Cao, Nan; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2017-09-15

    We report here a distinct mechanism of interaction between topoisomerase I and RNA polymerase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis that has evolved independently from the previously characterized interaction between bacterial topoisomerase I and RNA polymerase. Bacterial DNA topoisomerase I is responsible for preventing the hyper-negative supercoiling of genomic DNA. The association of topoisomerase I with RNA polymerase during transcription elongation could efficiently relieve transcription-driven negative supercoiling. Our results demonstrate a direct physical interaction between the C-terminal domains of topoisomerase I (TopoI-CTDs) and the β' subunit of RNA polymerase of M. smegmatis in the absence of DNA. The TopoI-CTDs in mycobacteria are evolutionarily unrelated in amino acid sequence and three-dimensional structure to the TopoI-CTD found in the majority of bacterial species outside Actinobacteria, including Escherichia coli. The functional interaction between topoisomerase I and RNA polymerase has evolved independently in mycobacteria and E. coli, with distinctively different structural elements of TopoI-CTD utilized for this protein-protein interaction. Zinc ribbon motifs in E. coli TopoI-CTD are involved in the interaction with RNA polymerase. For M. smegmatis TopoI-CTD, a 27-amino-acid tail that is rich in basic residues at the C-terminal end is responsible for the interaction with RNA polymerase. Overexpression of recombinant TopoI-CTD in M. smegmatis competed with the endogenous topoisomerase I for protein-protein interactions with RNA polymerase. The TopoI-CTD overexpression resulted in decreased survival following treatment with antibiotics and hydrogen peroxide, supporting the importance of the protein-protein interaction between topoisomerase I and RNA polymerase during stress response of mycobacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Pim kinase inhibition sensitizes FLT3-ITD acute myeloid leukemia cells to topoisomerase 2 inhibitors through increased DNA damage and oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Kshama A.; Trotta, Rossana; Natarajan, Karthika; Rassool, Feyruz V.; Tron, Adriana E.; Huszar, Dennis; Perrotti, Danilo; Baer, Maria R.

    2016-01-01

    Internal tandem duplication of fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3-ITD) is frequent (30 percent) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and is associated with short disease-free survival following chemotherapy. The serine threonine kinase Pim-1 is a pro-survival oncogene transcriptionally upregulated by FLT3-ITD that also promotes its signaling in a positive feedback loop. Thus inhibiting Pim-1 represents an attractive approach in targeting FLT3-ITD cells. Indeed, co-treatment with the pan-Pim kinase inhibitor AZD1208 or expression of a kinase-dead Pim-1 mutant sensitized FLT3-ITD cell lines to apoptosis triggered by chemotherapy drugs including the topoisomerase 2 inhibitors daunorubicin, etoposide and mitoxantrone, but not the nucleoside analog cytarabine. AZD1208 sensitized primary AML cells with FLT3-ITD to topoisomerase 2 inhibitors, but did not sensitize AML cells with wild-type FLT3 or remission bone marrow cells, supporting a favorable therapeutic index. Mechanistically, the enhanced apoptosis observed with AZD1208 and topoisomerase 2 inhibitor combination treatment was associated with increased DNA double-strand breaks and increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and co-treatment with the ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine rescued FLT3-ITD cells from AZD1208 sensitization to topoisomerase 2 inhibitors. Our data support testing of Pim kinase inhibitors with topoisomerase 2 inhibitors, but not with cytarabine, to improve treatment outcomes in AML with FLT3-ITD. PMID:27374090

  4. Structure of the N-terminal fragment of topoisomerase V reveals a new family of topoisomerases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taneja, Bhupesh; Patel, Asmita; Slesarev, Alexei; Mondragon, Alfonso (NWU); (FSI)

    2010-09-02

    Topoisomerases are involved in controlling and maintaining the topology of DNA and are present in all kingdoms of life. Unlike all other types of topoisomerases, similar type IB enzymes have only been identified in bacteria and eukarya. The only putative type IB topoisomerase in archaea is represented by Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V. Despite several common functional characteristics, topoisomerase V shows no sequence similarity to other members of the same type. The structure of the 61 kDa N-terminal fragment of topoisomerase V reveals no structural similarity to other topoisomerases. Furthermore, the structure of the active site region is different, suggesting no conservation in the cleavage and religation mechanism. Additionally, the active site is buried, indicating the need of a conformational change for activity. The presence of a topoisomerase in archaea with a unique structure suggests the evolution of a separate mechanism to alter DNA.

  5. Importance of a stable topoisomerase IB clamping for an efficient DNA processing: Effect of the Lys(369)Glu mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Sara; Castelli, Silvia; Desideri, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    The role of lysine 369 of human topoisomerase IB in recognizing, clamping and processing its DNA substrate was experimentally investigated. Lys(369) is located in one of the two lips that interact to each other allowing the protein to embrace and firmly bind the DNA substrate. The lysine was mutated to a glutamate residue and the catalytic activity of the mutant enzyme was assayed. The mutant shows a distributive behavior, has a reduced binding to the substrate and a lower cleavage extent when compared to the wild type enzyme. The mutant displays reduced sensitivity to CPT both "in vitro" and in an "in vivo" yeast model, likely because of the low amount of cleaved DNA, however it displays cleavage and religation rates comparable to the wild type. These results demonstrate that the mutation causes a destabilization of the lips clamping around the DNA, impairing the protein-DNA interaction, emphasizing the importance of the ionic pair in tuning the stability of the protein-DNA complex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Intercalating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts poison DNA religation by Vaccinia topoisomerase and act as roadblocks to digestion by exonuclease III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovleva, Lyudmila; Handy, Christopher J; Yagi, Haruhiko; Sayer, Jane M; Jerina, Donald M; Shuman, Stewart

    2006-06-20

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-DNA adducts pervert the execution or fidelity of enzymatic DNA transactions and cause mutations and cancer. Here, we examine the effects of intercalating PAH-DNA adducts on the religation reaction of vaccinia DNA topoisomerase, a prototypal type IB topoisomerase (TopIB), and the 3' end-resection reaction of Escherichia coli exonuclease III (ExoIII), a DNA repair enzyme. Vaccinia TopIB forms a covalent DNA-(3'-phosphotyrosyl)-enzyme intermediate at a target site 5'-C(+5)C(+4)C(+3)T(+2)T(+1)p / N(-1) in duplex DNA. The rate of the forward cleavage reaction is suppressed to varying degrees by benzo[a]pyrene (BP) or benzo[c]phenanthrene (BPh) adducts at purine bases within the 3'-G(+5)G(+4)G(+3)A(+2)A(+1)T(-1)A(-2) sequence of the nonscissile strand. We report that BP adducts at the +1 and -2 N6-deoxyadenosine (dA) positions flanking the scissile phosphodiester slow the rate of DNA religation to a greater degree than they do the cleavage rate. By increasing the cleavage equilibrium constant > or = 10-fold, the BPdA adducts, which are intercalated via the major groove, act as TopIB poisons. With respect to ExoIII, we find that (i) single BPdA adducts act as durable roadblocks to ExoIII digestion, which is halted at sites 1 and 2 nucleotides prior to the modified base; (ii) single BPhdA adducts, which also intercalate via the major groove, elicit a transient pause prior to the lesion, which is eventually resected; and (iii) BPh adducts at N2-deoxyguanosine, which intercalate via the minor groove, are durable impediments to ExoIII digestion. These results highlight the sensitivity of repair outcomes to the structure of the PAH ring system and whether intercalation occurs via the major or minor groove.

  7. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiments on the breakage-reunion domain of the DNA gyrase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piton, Jérémie; Matrat, Stéphanie; Petrella, Stéphanie; Jarlier, Vincent; Aubry, Alexandra; Mayer, Claudine

    2009-01-01

    The breakage-reunion domain of M. tuberculosis DNA gyrase was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. One of the four crystal forms obtained belonged to space group C2 and diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.7 Å. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase, a nanomachine that is involved in the regulation of DNA topology, is the only type II topoisomerase present in this organism and hence is the sole target for fluoroquinolone action. The breakage-reunion domain of the A subunit plays an essential role in DNA binding during the catalytic cycle. Two constructs of 53 and 57 kDa (termed GA53BK and GA57BK) corresponding to this domain have been overproduced, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected from four crystal forms. The resolution limits ranged from 4.6 to 2.7 Å depending on the crystal form. The best diffracting crystals belonged to space group C2, with a biological dimer in the asymmetric unit. This is the first report of the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the breakage-reunion domain of DNA gyrase from a species containing one unique type II topoisomerase

  8. Postincubation with aclarubicin reverses topoisomerase II mediated DNA cleavage, strand breaks, and cytotoxicity induced by VP-16

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, L N; Jensen, P B; Sørensen, B S

    1994-01-01

    In previous studies, we found that VP-16 (etoposide) induced cytotoxicity and protein-concealed strand break formation was prevented in a small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell line, when the cells were incubated with aclarubicin prior to treatment with VP-16. In the present work, we studied the effect...... of adding aclarubicin to the cell suspension after VP-16. In a clonogenic assay, we found that the cytotoxicity induced by VP-16 in SCLC cells was inhibited when cells were postincubated with aclarubicin. The addition of aclarubicin at any time in relation to VP-16 was able to stop further cytotoxicity...... induced by the topoisomerase II (topo-II) targeting drug. Aclarubicin was also found to antagonize the cytotoxicity induced by VM-26 (teniposide), and m-AMSA. With the alkaline elution technique we found that postincubating the cells with aclarubicin inhibited VP-16-induced DNA strand break formation...

  9. An RNA Topoisomerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; di Gate, Russell J.; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    1996-09-01

    A synthetic strand of RNA has been designed so that it can adopt two different topological states (a circle and a trefoil knot) when ligated into a cyclic molecule. The RNA knot and circle have been characterized by their behavior in gel electrophoresis and sedimentation experiments. This system allows one to assay for the existence of an RNA topoisomerase, because the two RNA molecules can be interconverted only by a strand passage event. We find that the interconversion of these two species can be catalyzed by Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase III, indicating that this enzyme can act as an RNA topoisomerase. The conversion of circles to knots is accompanied by a small amount of RNA catenane generation. These findings suggest that strand passage must be considered a potential component of the folding and modification of RNA structures.

  10. Role of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV mutations in fluoroquinolone resistance of Capnocytophaga spp. clinical isolates and laboratory mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmann, Elodie; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Fosse, Thierry

    2017-08-01

    Capnocytophaga spp. are often reported to cause bacteraemia and extra-oral infections and are characterized by their significant contribution to resistance to β-lactam and macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin antibiotics in the human oral microbiota. The implication of mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of DNA gyrase A and B ( gyrA and gyrB ) and topoisomerase IV ( parC and parE ) of fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant Capnocytophaga spp., hitherto unknown, was explored in this study. Two reference strains ( Capnocytophaga gingivalis ATCC 33624 and Capnocytophaga sputigena ATCC 33612) and four Capnocytophaga spp. isolated from clinical samples were studied. Nine in vitro FQ-resistant mutants, derived from two reference strains and one FQ-susceptible clinical isolate, were selected by successive inoculations onto medium containing levofloxacin. MICs of ofloxacin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin were determined. The presumed QRDRs of GyrA, GyrB, ParC and ParE from Capnocytophaga spp. were determined by sequence homology to Bacteroides fragilis and Escherichia coli . PCR primers were designed to amplify the presumed QRDR genetic region of Capnocytophaga spp. and sequence analyses were performed using the BLAST program at the National Center for Biotechnology Information. gyrA mutations leading to a substitution from amino acid position 80 to 86 were systematically detected in Capnocytophaga spp. with ciprofloxacin MIC >1 mg/L and considered as the primary target of FQs. No mutational alteration in the QRDR of gyrB was detected. Other mutations in parC and parE led to spontaneous amino acid substitutions of DNA topoisomerase IV subunit B with no alteration in FQ susceptibility. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Exploring the active site of the Streptococcus pneumoniae topoisomerase IV-DNA cleavage complex with novel 7,8-bridged fluoroquinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laponogov, Ivan; Pan, Xiao-Su; Veselkov, Dennis A; Cirz, Ryan T; Wagman, Allan; Moser, Heinz E; Fisher, L Mark; Sanderson, Mark R

    2016-09-01

    As part of a programme of synthesizing and investigating the biological properties of new fluoroquinolone antibacterials and their targeting of topoisomerase IV from Streptococcus pneumoniae, we have solved the X-ray structure of the complexes of two new 7,8-bridged fluoroquinolones (with restricted C7 group rotation favouring tight binding) in complex with the topoisomerase IV from S. pneumoniae and an 18-base-pair DNA binding site-the E-site-found by our DNA mapping studies to bind drug strongly in the presence of topoisomerase IV (Leo et al. 2005 J. Biol. Chem. 280, 14 252-14 263, doi:10.1074/jbc.M500156200). Although the degree of antibiotic resistance towards fluoroquinolones is much lower than that of β-lactams and a range of ribosome-bound antibiotics, there is a pressing need to increase the diversity of members of this successful clinically used class of drugs. The quinolone moiety of the new 7,8-bridged agents ACHN-245 and ACHN-454 binds similarly to that of clinafloxocin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin and trovofloxacin but the cyclic scaffold offers the possibility of chemical modification to produce interactions with other topoisomerase residues at the active site. © 2016 The Authors.

  12. Exploring the active site of the Streptococcus pneumoniae topoisomerase IV–DNA cleavage complex with novel 7,8-bridged fluoroquinolones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laponogov, Ivan; Pan, Xiao-Su; Veselkov, Dennis A.; Cirz, Ryan T.; Wagman, Allan; Moser, Heinz E.

    2016-01-01

    As part of a programme of synthesizing and investigating the biological properties of new fluoroquinolone antibacterials and their targeting of topoisomerase IV from Streptococcus pneumoniae, we have solved the X-ray structure of the complexes of two new 7,8-bridged fluoroquinolones (with restricted C7 group rotation favouring tight binding) in complex with the topoisomerase IV from S. pneumoniae and an 18-base-pair DNA binding site—the E-site—found by our DNA mapping studies to bind drug strongly in the presence of topoisomerase IV (Leo et al. 2005 J. Biol. Chem. 280, 14 252–14 263, doi:10.1074/jbc.M500156200). Although the degree of antibiotic resistance towards fluoroquinolones is much lower than that of β-lactams and a range of ribosome-bound antibiotics, there is a pressing need to increase the diversity of members of this successful clinically used class of drugs. The quinolone moiety of the new 7,8-bridged agents ACHN-245 and ACHN-454 binds similarly to that of clinafloxocin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin and trovofloxacin but the cyclic scaffold offers the possibility of chemical modification to produce interactions with other topoisomerase residues at the active site. PMID:27655731

  13. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded LANA recruits topoisomerase IIβ for latent DNA replication of the terminal repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushothaman, Pravinkumar; McDowell, Maria E; McGuinness, James; Salas, Ruth; Rumjahn, Sharif M; Verma, Subhash C

    2012-09-01

    The latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) plays a major role in maintaining latency and is critical for the perpetual segregation of viral episomes to the progeny nuclei of newly divided cells. LANA binds to KSHV terminal repeat (TR) DNA and tethers the viral episomes to host chromosomes through the association of chromatin-bound cellular proteins. TR elements serve as potential origin sites of KSHV replication and have been shown to play important roles in latent DNA replication and transcription of adjacent genes. Affinity chromatography and proteomics analysis using KSHV TR DNA and the LANA binding site as the affinity column identified topoisomerase IIβ (TopoIIβ) as a LANA-interacting protein. Here, we show that TopoIIβ forms complexes with LANA that colocalize as punctuate bodies in the nucleus of KSHV-infected cells. The specific TopoIIβ binding region of LANA has been identified to its N terminus and the first 32 amino acid residues containing the nucleosome-binding region crucial for binding. Moreover, this region could also act as a dominant negative to disrupt association of TopoIIβ with LANA. TopoIIβ plays an important role in LANA-dependent latent DNA replication, as addition of ellipticine, a selective inhibitor of TopoII, negatively regulated replication mediated by the TR. DNA break labeling and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay using biotin-16-dUTP and terminal deoxynucleotide transferase showed that TopoIIβ mediates a transient DNA break on viral DNA. These studies confirm that LANA recruits TopoIIβ at the origins of latent replication to unwind the DNA for replication.

  14. Role of Flexibility in Protein-DNA-Drug Recognition: The Case of Asp677Gly-Val703Ile Topoisomerase Mutant Hypersensitive to Camptothecin

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Annessa, Ilda; Tesauro, Cinzia; Fiorani, Paola; Chillemi, Giovanni; Castelli, Silvia; Vassallo, Oscar; Capranico, Giovanni; Desideri, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Topoisomerases I are ubiquitous enzymes that control DNA topology within the cell. They are the unique target of the antitumor drug camptothecin that selectively recognizes the DNA-topoisomerase covalent complex and reversibly stabilizes it. The biochemical and structural-dynamical properties of the Asp677Gly-Val703Ile double mutant with enhanced CPT sensitivity have been investigated. The mutant displays a lower religation rate of the DNA substrate when compared to the wild-type protein. Analyses of the structural dynamical properties by molecular dynamics simulation show that the mutant has reduced flexibility and an active site partially destructured at the level of the Lys532 residue. These results demonstrate long-range communication mechanism where reduction of the linker flexibility alters the active site geometry with the consequent lowering of the religation rate and increase in drug sensitivity. PMID:22315664

  15. Role of Flexibility in Protein-DNA-Drug Recognition: The Case of Asp677Gly-Val703Ile Topoisomerase Mutant Hypersensitive to Camptothecin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilda D'Annessa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Topoisomerases I are ubiquitous enzymes that control DNA topology within the cell. They are the unique target of the antitumor drug camptothecin that selectively recognizes the DNA-topoisomerase covalent complex and reversibly stabilizes it. The biochemical and structural-dynamical properties of the Asp677Gly-Val703Ile double mutant with enhanced CPT sensitivity have been investigated. The mutant displays a lower religation rate of the DNA substrate when compared to the wild-type protein. Analyses of the structural dynamical properties by molecular dynamics simulation show that the mutant has reduced flexibility and an active site partially destructured at the level of the Lys532 residue. These results demonstrate long-range communication mechanism where reduction of the linker flexibility alters the active site geometry with the consequent lowering of the religation rate and increase in drug sensitivity.

  16. Ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes with 1,8-naphthalimide group as DNA binder, photonuclease, and dual inhibitors of topoisomerases I and IIα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanmei; Li, Jia; Zhao, Hong; Tan, Lifeng

    2016-10-01

    Two ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes containing 1,8-naphthalimide group as DNA binders, photonucleases, and inhibitors of topoisomerases I and IIα are evaluated. The binding properties of [Ru(phen) 2 (pnip)] 2+ {1; phen=1,10-phenanthroline; pnip=12-[N-(p-phenyl)-1,8-napthalimide]- imidazo[4',5'-f] [1,10]phenanthroline} and [Ru(bpy) 2 (pnip)] 2+ (2; bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) with calf thymus DNA increases with increasing the bulkiness and hydrophobic character of ancillary ligands, although the two complexes possess high affinities for DNA via intercalation. Moreover, photoirradiation (λ=365nm) of the two complexes are found to induce strand cleavage of closed circular pBR322 plasmid DNA via singlet oxygen mechanism, while complex 1 displays more effective photocleavage activity than complex 2 under the same conditions. Topoisomerase inhibition and DNA strand passage assay reflect that complexes 1 and 2 are efficient dual poisons of topoisomerases I and IIα. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. DNA Topoisomerases Maintain Promoters in a State Competent for Transcriptional Activation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Madsen; Fredsøe, Jacob Christian; Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2012-01-01

    -depth analysis of the inducible PHO5 gene reveals that topoisomerases are essential for binding of the Pho4p transcription factor to the PHO5 promoter, which is required for promoter nucleosome removal during activation. In contrast, topoisomerases are dispensable for constitutive transcription initiation...... and elongation of PHO5, as well as the nuclear entrance of Pho4p. Finally, we provide evidence that topoisomerases are required to maintain the PHO5 promoter in a superhelical state, which is competent for proper activation. In conclusion, our results reveal a hitherto unknown function of topoisomerases during...

  18. Synthesis of novel naphthoquinone-spermidine conjugates and their effects on DNA-topoisomerases I and II-{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Andrea S.; Lima, Edson L.S.; Pinto, Angelo C.; Esteves-Souza, Andressa; Torrese, Jose C. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Echevarria, Aurea [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Camara, Celso A. [Paraiba Univ., Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Lab. de Tecnologia Farmaceutica; Vargas, Maria D. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica]. E-mail: mdvargas@vm.uff.br

    2006-05-15

    Novel derivatives of lapachol 2, nor-lapachol 3 and lawsone 4 have been synthesized by nucleophilic displacement of the methoxynaphthoquinones 2a, 3a and 4a with the polyamine (PA) N{sup 1}-Boc-N{sup 5}-Bn-spermidine 1a. The respective products 2b-4b were obtained in good yields and characterized by spectroscopic and analytical methods. The inhibitory action of these naphthoquinone-PA conjugates on DNA-topoisomerases (topo) I and II-{alpha} was evaluated by relaxation assay of supercoiled DNA plasmid. All compounds (1a 2b, 3b and 4b) presented significant inhibition of topo II-{alpha} catalytic activity at the 2 {mu}M dose. Considering that only PA 1a did not inhibit the enzyme catalytic activity at the 0.2 {mu}M dose, the appended naphthoquinone moiety acts as a 'value added' fragment. Compounds 1a 2b, 3b and 4b did not inhibit the enzyme DNA-topo I at the 200 {mu}M dose. (author)

  19. Synthesis of novel naphthoquinone-spermidine conjugates and their effects on DNA-topoisomerases I and II-alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunha Andréa S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel derivatives of lapachol 2, nor-lapachol 3 and lawsone 4 have been synthesized by nucleophilic displacement of the methoxynaphthoquinones 2a, 3a and 4a with the polyamine (PA N¹-Boc-N5-Bn-spermidine 1a. The respective products 2b-4b were obtained in good yields and characterized by spectroscopic and analytical methods. The inhibitory action of these naphthoquinone-PA conjugates on DNA-topoisomerases (topo I and II-alpha was evaluated by relaxation assay of supercoiled DNA plasmid. All compounds (1a 2b, 3b and 4b presented significant inhibition of topo II-alpha catalytic activity at the 2 µM dose. Considering that only PA 1a did not inhibit the enzyme catalytic activity at the 0.2 µM dose, the appended naphthoquinone moiety acts as a "value added" fragment. Compounds 1a 2b, 3b and 4b did not inhibit the enzyme DNA-topo I at the 200 µM dose.

  20. Salicylate, a catalytic inhibitor of topoisomerase II, inhibits DNA cleavage and is selective for the α isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bau, Jason T; Kang, Zhili; Austin, Caroline A; Kurz, Ebba U

    2014-02-01

    Topoisomerase II (topo II) is a ubiquitous enzyme that is essential for cell survival through its role in regulating DNA topology and chromatid separation. Topo II can be poisoned by common chemotherapeutics (such as doxorubicin and etoposide), leading to the accumulation of cytotoxic enzyme-linked DNA double-stranded breaks. In contrast, nonbreak-inducing topo II catalytic inhibitors have also been described and have more limited use in clinical chemotherapy. These agents, however, may alter the efficacy of regimens incorporating topo II poisons. We previously identified salicylate, the primary metabolite of aspirin, as a novel catalytic inhibitor of topo II. We have now determined the mechanism by which salicylate inhibits topo II. As catalytic inhibitors can act at a number of steps in the topo II catalytic cycle, we used multiple independent, biochemical approaches to interrogate the catalytic cycle. Furthermore, as mammalian cells express two isoforms of topo II (α and β), we examined whether salicylate was isoform selective. Our results demonstrate that salicylate is unable to intercalate DNA, and does not prevent enzyme-DNA interaction, nor does it promote stabilization of topo IIα in closed clamps on DNA. Although salicylate decreased topo IIα ATPase activity in a dose-dependent noncompetitive manner, this was secondary to salicylate-mediated inhibition of DNA cleavage. Surprisingly, comparison of salicylate's effects using purified human topo IIα and topo IIβ revealed that salicylate selectively inhibits the α isoform. These findings provide a definitive mechanism for salicylate-mediated inhibition of topo IIα and provide support for further studies determining the basis for its isoform selectivity.

  1. DNA Topoisomerase Inhibitory Activity of Constituents from the Fruits of Illicium verum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae In; Shin, Bora; Kim, Geum Jin; Choi, Hyukjae; Lee, Chong Soon; Woo, Mi Hee; Oh, Dong-Chan; Son, Jong Keun

    2017-12-01

    Three new compounds, a sesquilignan (1) and two glucosylated phenylpropanoids (2, 3), and seven known compounds (4-10), were isolated from the fruits of Illicium verum HOOK. FIL. (Illiciaceae). The structures of 1-3 were determined based on one and two dimensional (1D- and 2D-) NMR data and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra analyses. Compounds 3, 5, 6, and 8-10 exhibited potent inhibitory activities against topoisomerase II with IC 50 values of 54.6, 25.5, 17.9, 12.1, 0.3 and 1.0 µM, respectively, compared to etoposide, the positive control, with an IC 50 of 43.8 µM.

  2. Novel Bacterial Topoisomerase Inhibitors Exploit Asp83 and the Intrinsic Flexibility of the DNA Gyrase Binding Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Franco-Ulloa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA gyrases are enzymes that control the topology of DNA in bacteria cells. This is a vital function for bacteria. For this reason, DNA gyrases are targeted by widely used antibiotics such as quinolones. Recently, structural and biochemical investigations identified a new class of DNA gyrase inhibitors called NBTIs (i.e., novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors. NBTIs are particularly promising because they are active against multi-drug resistant bacteria, an alarming clinical issue. Structural data recently demonstrated that these NBTIs bind tightly to a newly identified pocket at the dimer interface of the DNA–protein complex. In the present study, we used molecular dynamics (MD simulations and docking calculations to shed new light on the binding of NBTIs to this site. Interestingly, our MD simulations demonstrate the intrinsic flexibility of this binding site, which allows the pocket to adapt its conformation and form optimal interactions with the ligand. In particular, we examined two ligands, AM8085 and AM8191, which induced a repositioning of a key aspartate (Asp83B, whose side chain can rotate within the binding site. The conformational rearrangement of Asp83B allows the formation of a newly identified H-bond interaction with an NH on the bound NBTI, which seems important for the binding of NBTIs having such functionality. We validated these findings through docking calculations using an extended set of cognate oxabicyclooctane-linked NBTIs derivatives (~150, in total, screened against multiple target conformations. The newly identified H-bond interaction significantly improves the docking enrichment. These insights could be helpful for future virtual screening campaigns against DNA gyrase.

  3. Producing irreversible topoisomerase II-mediated DNA breaks by site-specific Pt(II)-methionine coordination chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Ren; Chen, Shin-Fu; Wu, Chyuan-Chuan; Liao, Yi-Wen; Lin, Te-Sheng; Liu, Ko-Ting; Chen, Yi-Song; Li, Tsai-Kun; Chien, Tun-Cheng; Chan, Nei-Li

    2017-10-13

    Human type II topoisomerase (Top2) isoforms, hTop2α and hTop2β, are targeted by some of the most successful anticancer drugs. These drugs induce Top2-mediated DNA cleavage to trigger cell-death pathways. The potency of these drugs correlates positively with their efficacy in stabilizing the enzyme-mediated DNA breaks. Structural analysis of hTop2α and hTop2β revealed the presence of methionine residues in the drug-binding pocket, we therefore tested whether a tighter Top2-drug association may be accomplished by introducing a methionine-reactive Pt2+ into a drug to further stabilize the DNA break. Herein, we synthesized an organoplatinum compound, etoplatin-N2β, by replacing the methionine-juxtaposing group of the drug etoposide with a cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum(II) moiety. Compared to etoposide, etoplatin-N2β more potently inhibits both human Top2s. While the DNA breaks arrested by etoposide can be rejoined, those captured by etoplatin-N2β are practically irreversible. Crystallographic analyses of hTop2β complexed with DNA and etoplatin-N2β demonstrate coordinate bond formation between Pt2+ and a flanking methionine. Notably, this stable coordinate tether can be loosened by disrupting the structural integrity of drug-binding pocket, suggesting that Pt2+ coordination chemistry may allow for the development of potent inhibitors with protein conformation-dependent reversibility. This approach may be exploited to achieve isoform-specific targeting of human Top2s. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Chromosome damage induced by DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors combined with g-radiation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina P. Araújo

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Combined radiation and antineoplastic drug treatment have important applications in cancer therapy. In the present work, an evaluation was made of two known topoisomerase II inhibitors, doxorubicin (DXR and mitoxantrone (MXN, with g-radiation. The effects of DXR or MXN on g-radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells were analyzed. Two concentrations of each drug, 0.5 and 1.0 µg/ml DXR, and 0.02 and 0.04 µg/ml MXN, were applied in combination with two doses of g-radiation (20 and 40 cGy. A significant potentiating effect on chromosomal aberrations was observed in CHO cells exposed to 1.0 µg/ml DXR plus 40 cGy. In the other tests, the combination of g-radiation with DXR or MXN gave approximately additive effects. Reduced mitotic indices reflected higher toxicity of the drugs when combined with radiation.A associação de radiação ionizante com drogas antineoplásicas tem importante aplicação na terapia do câncer. No presente trabalho, foram avaliados os efeitos de dois inibidores de topoisomerase II, doxorubicina (DXR e mitoxantrona (MXN, sobre as aberrações cromossômicas induzidas pelas radiações-g em células do ovário de hamster chinês (CHO. Foram usadas as concentrações 0,5 e 1,0 mg/ml de DXR e 0,02 e 0,04 mg/ml de MXN, combinadas com duas doses de radiações gama (20 e 40 cGy. Um significativo efeito potenciador das aberrações cromossômicas foi observado em células CHO tratadas com 1,0 mg/ml de DXR e expostas a 40 cGy de radiação. Nos outros testes, a combinação da radiação-g com a DXR ou MXN apresentou um efeito próximo ao aditivo. A redução dos índices mitóticos refletiu a alta citotoxicidade das drogas quando combinadas às radiações-g.

  5. Characterization of DNA topoisomerase-1 in Spodoptera exigua for toxicity evaluation of camptothecin and hydoxy-camptothecin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Zhang

    Full Text Available Camptothecin (CPT, a plant alkaloid originally isolated from the native Chinese tree, Camptotheca acuminate, exerts the toxic effect by targeting eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase 1 (DNA Topo1. Besides as potent anti-cancer agents, CPT and its derivatives are now being explored as potential pesticides for insect control. In this study, we assessed their toxicity to an insect homolog, the Topo1 protein from beet armyworms (Spodoptera exigua Hübner, a worldwide pest of many important crops. The S. exigua Topo1 gene contains an ORF of 2790 base pairs that is predicted to encode a polypeptide of 930 amino acids. The deduced polypeptide exhibits polymorphism at residue sites V420, L530, A653 and T729 (numbered according to human Topo1 among insect species, which are predicted to confer sensitivity to CPT. The DNA relaxation activity of this protein was subsequently examined using a truncated form that contained the residues 337-930 and was expressed in bacteria BL21 cells. The purified protein retained the ability to relax double-stranded DNA and was susceptible to CPT and its derivative hydroxy-camptothecin (HCPT in a dose-dependent manner. The same inhibitory effect was also found on the native Topo1 extracted from IOZCAS-Spex-II cells, a cell line established from beet armyworms. Additionally, CPT and HCPT treatment reduced the steady accumulation of Topo1 protein despite the increased mRNA expression in response to the treatment. Our studies provide information of the S. exigua Topo1 gene and its amino acid polymorphism in insects and uncover some clues about potential mechanisms of CPT toxicity against insect pests. These results also are useful for development of more effective Topo1-targeted CPT insecticides in the future.

  6. Topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage and mutagenesis activated by nitric oxide underlie the inflammation-associated tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Chen; Chou, Han-Yi E; Shen, Tang-Long; Chang, Wei-Jer; Tai, Pei-Han; Li, Tsai-Kun

    2013-04-01

    Both cancer-suppressing and cancer-promoting properties of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species (RNOS) have been suggested to play a role in tumor pathology, particularly those activities associated with chronic inflammation. Here, we address the impact of nitric oxide (NO) on the induction of DNA damage and genome instability with a specific focus on the involvement of topoisomerase II (TOP2). We also investigate the contribution of NO to the formation of skin melanoma in mice. Similar to the TOP2-targeting drug, etoposide (VP-16), the NO-donor, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), induces skin melanomas formation in 7,12-dimethyl- benz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-initiated mice. To explore the mechanism(s) underlying this NO-induced tumorigenesis, we use a co-culture model system to demonstrate that inflamed macrophages with inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression cause γ-H2AX activation, p53 phosphorylation, and chromosome DNA breaks in the target cells. Inhibitor experiments revealed that NO and TOP2 isozymes are responsible for the above described cellular phenotypes. Notably, NO, unlike VP-16, preferentially induces the formation of TOP2β cleavable complexes (TOP2βcc) in cells. Moreover, GSNO induced TOP2-dependent DNA sequence rearrangements and cytotoxicity. Furthermore, the incidences of GSNO- and VP-16-induced skin melanomas were also observed to be lower in the skin-specific top2β-knockout mice. Our results suggest that TOP2 isozymes contribute to NO-induced mutagenesis and subsequent cancer development during chronic inflammation. We provide the first experimental evidence for the functional role of TOP2 in NO-caused DNA damage, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis. Notably, these studies contribute to our molecular understanding of the cancer-promoting actions of RNOS during chronic inflammation.

  7. Identification and characterization of the regions involved in the nuclear translocation of the heterodimeric leishmanial DNA topoisomerase IB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Prada

    Full Text Available Leishmania donovani, the causative organism for visceral leishmaniasis, contains a unique heterodimeric DNA-topoisomerase IB (LdTopIB. LdTopIB is a heterodimer made up of a large subunit and a small subunit that must interact with each other to build an active enzyme able to solve the topological tensions on the DNA. As LdTopIB is located within the nucleus, one or more nuclear localization signals (NLS should exist to ensure its nuclear translocation. In this report three novel NLS have been identified through a sequential deletion study of the genes encoding of both subunits fused to that encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP. NLS1 is a highly basic sequence of 43 amino acids in the C-terminal extension of the large protomer. We found two well-defined sequences in the small protomer: NLS2 is a 10-amino acid motif located in the N-terminal extension of the protein; NLS3 consists of a complex region of 28 amino acids placed in the vicinity of the catalytic Tyr-222 included at the conserved SKINY signature within the C-terminal. Furthermore, by means of yeast cell viability assays, conducted with several LdTopIB chimeras lacking any of the NLS motives, we have revealed that both subunits are transported independently to the nucleus. There was no evidence of LdTopIB accumulation in mitochondria or association to the kinetoplast DNA network. The results rule out the former hypothesis, which attributes nucleocytoplasmic transport of LdTopIB entirely to the large subunit. The LdTopIB is localized to the nucleus only.

  8. DNA topoisomerase IIα inhibitory and anti-HIV-1 flavones from leaves and twigs of Gardenia carinata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongkum, Naowarat; Tuchinda, Patoomratana; Pohmakotr, Manat; Reutrakul, Vichai; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Jariyawat, Surawat; Suksen, Kanoknetr; Yoosook, Chalobon; Kasisit, Jitra; Napaswad, Chanita

    2012-03-01

    Four new flavones, 5,2'-dihydroxy-7,3',4',5'-tetramethoxyflavone (1), 5,2',5'-trihydroxy-7,3',4'-trimethoxyflavone (2), 5,7,2',5'-tetrahydroxy-6,3',4'-trimethoxyflavone (3) and 5,2',5'-trihydroxy-6,7,3',4'-tetramethoxyflavone (4), along with the known 5,3'-dihydroxy-6,7,4',5'-tetramethoxyflavone (5), 5,7,3',5'-tetrahydroxy-6,4'-dimethoxyflavone (6), syringaldehyde, vanillic acid and scopoletin were isolated from the leaves and twigs of Gardenia carinata (Rubiaceae). Their structures were determined by spectroscopic methods. Flavone 2 exhibited cytotoxic activity against P-388 and MCF-7 cell lines, while 3, 5 and 6 were active only in P-388 cell line. All active compounds were found to inhibit DNA topoisomerase IIα activity, which may be responsible for the observed cytotoxicity. Flavones 1-3, 5 and 6 also exhibited anti-HIV-1 activity in the anti-syncytium assay using (∆Tat/rev)MC99 virus and 1A2 cell line system; 2 was most potent. Only flavones 1 and 6 showed considerably activity against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Inhibition of topoisomerase II by liriodenine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, S H; Reynolds, M C; Sun, N J; Cassady, J M; Snapka, R M

    1997-08-15

    The cytotoxic oxoaporphine alkaloid liriodenine, isolated from Cananga odorata, was found to be a potent inhibitor of topoisomerase II (EC 5.99.1.3) both in vivo and in vitro. Liriodenine treatment of SV40 (simian virus 40)-infected CV-1 cells caused highly catenated SV40 daughter chromosomes, a signature of topoisomerase II inhibition. Strong catalytic inhibition of topoisomerase II by liriodenine was confirmed by in vitro assays with purified human topoisomerase II and kinetoplast DNA. Liriodenine also caused low-level protein-DNA cross-links to pulse-labeled SV40 chromosomes in vivo, suggesting that it may be a weak topoisomerase II poison. This was supported by the finding that liriodenine caused topoisomerase II-DNA cross-links in an in vitro assay for topoisomerase II poisons. Verapamil did not increase either liriodenine-induced protein-DNA cross-links or catalytic inhibition of topoisomerase II in SV40-infected cells. This indicates that liriodenine is not a substrate for the verapamil-sensitive drug efflux pump in CV-1 cells.

  10. Real-time analysis of cleavage and religation activity of human topoisomerase 1 based on ternary fluorescence resonance energy transfer DNA substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenxing; Ouyang, Hui; Tesauro, Cinzia; Ottaviani, Alessio; He, Yong; Fiorani, Paola; Xie, Hui; Desideri, Alessandro; Fu, Zhifeng

    2018-02-16

    Human topoisomerase 1B is a ubiquitous and essential enzyme involved in relaxing the topological state of supercoiled DNA to allow the progression of fundamental DNA metabolism. Its enzymatic catalytic cycle consists of cleavage and religation reaction. A ternary fluorescence resonance energy transfer biosensor based on a suicide DNA substrate conjugated with three fluorophores has been developed to monitor both cleavage and religation Topoisomerase I catalytic function. The presence of fluorophores does not alter the specificity of the enzyme catalysis on the DNA substrate. The enzyme-mediated reaction can be tracked in real-time by simple fluorescence measurement, avoiding the use of risky radioactive substrate labeling and time-consuming denaturing gel electrophoresis. The method is applied to monitor the perturbation brought by single mutation on the cleavage or religation reaction and to screen the effect of the camptothecin anticancer drug monitoring the energy transfer decrease during religation reaction. Pathological mutations usually affect only the cleavage or the religation reaction and the proposed approach represent a fast protocol for assessing chemotherapeutic drug efficacy and analyzing mutant's properties. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Genome stability: recent insights in the topoisomerase reverse gyrase and thermophilic DNA alkyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettone, Antonella; Perugino, Giuseppe; Rossi, Mosè; Valenti, Anna; Ciaramella, Maria

    2014-09-01

    Repair and defence of genome integrity from endogenous and environmental hazard is a primary need for all organisms. Natural selection has driven the evolution of multiple cell pathways to deal with different DNA damaging agents. Failure of such processes can hamper cell functions and induce inheritable mutations, which in humans may cause cancerogenicity or certain genetic syndromes, and ultimately cell death. A special case is that of hyperthermophilic bacteria and archaea, flourishing at temperatures higher than 80 °C, conditions that favor genome instability and thus call for specific, highly efficient or peculiar mechanisms to keep their genome intact and functional. Over the last few years, numerous studies have been performed on the activity, function, regulation, physical and functional interaction of enzymes and proteins from hyperthermophilic microorganisms that are able to bind, repair, bypass damaged DNA, or modify its structure or conformation. The present review is focused on two enzymes that act on DNA catalyzing unique reactions: reverse gyrase and DNA alkyltransferase. Although both enzymes belong to evolutionary highly conserved protein families present in organisms of the three domains (Eucarya, Bacteria and Archaea), recently characterized members from hyperthermophilic archaea show both common and peculiar features.

  12. DNA-binding, topoisomerases I and II inhibition and in vitro cytotoxicity of ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes: [Ru(dppz)2L](2+) (L=dppz-11-CO2Me and dppz).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaojun; Jin, Lianhe; Tan, Lifeng

    2015-01-25

    Two ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes, [Ru(dppz)2dppz-11-CO2Me](ClO4)2 (Ru1) and [Ru(dppz)3](ClO4)2 (Ru2), have been synthesized and characterized. The spectral characteristics of Ru1 and Ru2 were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and revealed that both complexes were sensitive to solvent polarity. The binding properties of the two complexes towards calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA) have been investigated by different spectrophotometric methods and viscosity measurements, indicating that both complexes bind to CT-DNA by means of intercalation, but with different binding affinities. Topoisomerase inhibition and DNA strand passage assay demonstrates that the two complexes are dual inhibitors of topoisomerases I and IIa. On the other hand, the cytotoxicity of both complexes has been evaluated by MTT assays and Giemsa staining experiments. The main results reveal that the ester functional group has a significant effect on the DNA-binding affinities and topoisomerases inhibition effects of Ru1 and Ru2, and further advance our knowledge on the DNA-binding and topoisomerase inhibition by Ru(II) complexes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The importance of topoisomerases for chromatin regulated genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsøe, Jacob Christian; Pedersen, Jakob Madsen; Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2013-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are enzymes, which function to relieve torsional stress in the DNA helix by introducing transient breaks into the DNA molecule. By use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and microarray technology we have previously shown that topoisomerases are required for the activation of chromatin...... topoisomerases for optimal activation, but in contrast to the PHO5 gene, topoisomerases are not required for chromatin remodeling of the GAL1/10 promoter region, indicating a different role of the enzymes. We are currently performing a detailed investigation of the GAL genes to elucidate the precise role...

  14. Accumulation of mutations in DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes contributes to fluoroquinolone resistance in Vibrio cholerae O139 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanyan; Yu, Li; Li, Jie; Zhang, Lijuan; Tong, Ying; Kan, Biao

    2013-07-01

    High resistance rates to nalidixic acid (NAL) in Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 strains have been found, and ciprofloxacin (CIP) resistance is also observed. In this study, mutations within the quinolone-resistance determining regions (QRDRs) of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV from NAL-resistant O139 strains were analysed. The predominant mutation profile was S83I in GyrA in combination with S85L in ParC. In addition, the combination substitutions of D87N in GyrA and D420N in ParE in combination with S83I in GyrA and S85L in ParC as well as D87N in GyrA and P439S in ParE in combination with S83I in GyrA and S85L in ParC were found in the CIP-resistant strains. A series of site-directed mutants comprising D87 in GyrA, D420 in ParE and P439 in ParE were constructed from a wild-type V. cholerae O139 strain carrying the common mutations S83I in GyrA and S85L in ParC. Introduction of the mutation D87N in GyrA increased the CIP minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the mutant strain by nearly 4-fold compared with the initial strain. The second introduction of D420N in ParE further significantly increased the CIP MIC to ca. 23-fold compared with the initial strain. A second introduction of P439S in ParE also increased the CIP MIC by 17-fold. Therefore, it is concluded that the emergence of D87N in GyrA and D420N or P439S in ParE dramatically induces resistance to fluoroquinolones in V. cholerae O139, and the accumulation of multiple mutations in the QRDRs confers significant resistance to fluoroquinolones in V. cholerae. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern and sequence analysis of DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV in Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A isolates with decreased susceptibility to ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Richa; Thakare, Ritesh; Amrin, N; Prasad, Kashi Nath; Chopra, Sidharth; Dhole, Tapan Nirodhechand

    2016-08-01

    We describe the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of 100 typhoidal Salmonella isolates recovered from blood cultures and also investigate the association of decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility with mutations in the genes coding for DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV in 55 isolates. The study was conducted between January 2013 and December 2015 at a tertiary care centre in north India. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion and E-test. Genotypic characterization included the screening of mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE by PCR. DNA sequence analysis was done for 55 isolates. Out of 100 isolates recovered 80 were S. Typhi, 18 were Paratyphi A and two were Paratyphi B. Eighty two percent (66/80) of S. Typhi and 15/18 S. Paratyphi A showed decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility. The most common mutation in gyrA led to a change at codon 83 of serine to phenylalanine (n=37) or tyrosine (n=12). Five S. Typhi isolates that were resistant to ciprofloxacin (MICs of 12, 16, 24 and 32 μg/ml) had a second mutation at codon 87 in the gyrA gene changing aspartate to asparagine. There is a need to urgently review the use of fluoroquinolones for the management of enteric fever in endemic areas. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Inhibitory effects of lapachol on rat C6 glioma in vitro and in vivo by targeting DNA topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Huanli; Chen, Qunying; Wang, Hong; Xu, Pingxiang; Yuan, Ru; Li, Xiaorong; Bai, Lu; Xue, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Lapachol is a natural naphthoquinone compound that possesses extensive biological activities. The aim of this study is to investigate the inhibitory effects of lapachol on rat C6 glioma both in vitro and in vivo, as well as the potential mechanisms. Methods The antitumor effect of lapachol was firstly evaluated in the C6 glioma model in Wistar rats. The effects of lapachol on C6 cell proliferation, apoptosis and DNA damage were detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3...

  17. DNA encoding individual mycobacterial antigens protects mice against tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.L. Silva

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, some of our experiments in which mycobacterial antigens were presented to the immune system as if they were viral antigens have had a significant impact on our understanding of protective immunity against tuberculosis. They have also markedly enhanced the prospects for new vaccines. We now know that individual mycobacterial protein antigens can confer protection equal to that from live BCG vaccine in mice. A critical determinant of the outcome of immunization appears to be the degree to which antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells are generated by the immune response. Our most recent studies indicate that DNA vaccination is an effective way to establish long-lasting cytotoxic T cell memory and protection against tuberculosis.

  18. Yeast cytotoxic sensitivity to the antitumour agent β-lapachone depends mainly on oxidative stress and is largely independent of microtubule- or topoisomerase-mediated DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Pérez, Cristina; Lorenzo-Castrillejo, Isabel; Quevedo, Oliver; García-Luis, Jonay; Matos-Perdomo, Emiliano; Medina-Coello, Chaxiraxi; Estévez-Braun, Ana; Machín, Félix

    2014-11-15

    β-Lapachone (β-lap) is a promising antitumour drug currently undergoing clinical trials. Although it is known that β-lap generates reactive oxygen species (ROS), its actual mechanism of action is still controversial. Especially important is to determine whether concomitant DNA or microtubule damage is the key target of its antitumour properties and whether DNA damage is mediated by topoisomerases as previously suggested. Here, we have searched for determinants of β-lap cytotoxicity in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae through a mechanism-driven approach whereby several pathways of the DNA and microtubule integrity responses, as well as the anti-oxidant response, were downregulated and the outcome of β-lap treatment examined. We also included in the analysis several β-lap derivatives expected to modify drug bioavailability and activity. We found that neither topoisomerase II nor microtubules contributed to yeast sensitivity to β-lap and its equitoxic derivative 3-bromo-β-lapachone. Instead, we found that oxidative and related environmental stresses were primarily responsible for toxicity. Accordingly, Yap1, the central transcription factor in the antioxidant response in yeast, together with several components involved in stress tolerance (i.e., Snf1 and Hog1) and chromatin remodelling (i.e., the SWR1 and RSC complexes), played major roles in protection against β-lapachone. Critically, we show that dioxygen enhanced toxicity and that ROS scavengers protected cells from it. Furthermore, we show that both quinones resulted in cell death in a manner which cytologically resembled apoptosis/necrosis. We thus conclude that β-lap is toxic to yeast through massive ROS production that either directly kills the cells or else triggers programmed cell death. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Biomolecular structure manipulation using tailored electromagnetic radiation: a proof of concept on a simplified model of the active site of bacterial DNA topoisomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarukanont, Daungruthai; Coimbra, João T S; Bauerhenne, Bernd; Fernandes, Pedro A; Patel, Shekhar; Ramos, Maria J; Garcia, Martin E

    2014-10-21

    We report on the viability of breaking selected bonds in biological systems using tailored electromagnetic radiation. We first demonstrate, by performing large-scale simulations, that pulsed electric fields cannot produce selective bond breaking. Then, we present a theoretical framework for describing selective energy concentration on particular bonds of biomolecules upon application of tailored electromagnetic radiation. The theory is based on the mapping of biomolecules to a set of coupled harmonic oscillators and on optimal control schemes to describe optimization of temporal shape, the phase and polarization of the external radiation. We have applied this theory to demonstrate the possibility of selective bond breaking in the active site of bacterial DNA topoisomerase. For this purpose, we have focused on a model that was built based on a case study. Results are given as a proof of concept.

  20. Novel Bacterial Topoisomerase Inhibitors with Potent Broad-Spectrum Activity against Drug-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrier, Cédric; Salisbury, Anne-Marie; Savage, Victoria J; Duffy, Thomas; Moyo, Emmanuel; Chaffer-Malam, Nathan; Ooi, Nicola; Newman, Rebecca; Cheung, Jonathan; Metzger, Richard; McGarry, David; Pichowicz, Mark; Sigerson, Ralph; Cooper, Ian R; Nelson, Gary; Butler, Hayley S; Craighead, Mark; Ratcliffe, Andrew J; Best, Stuart A; Stokes, Neil R

    2017-05-01

    The novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitor class is an investigational type of antibacterial inhibitor of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV that does not have cross-resistance with the quinolones. Here, we report the evaluation of the in vitro properties of a new series of this type of small molecule. Exemplar compounds selectively and potently inhibited the catalytic activities of Escherichia coli DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV but did not block the DNA breakage-reunion step. Compounds showed broad-spectrum inhibitory activity against a wide range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens, including biodefence microorganisms and Mycobacterium tuberculosis No cross-resistance with fluoroquinolone-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and E. coli isolates was observed. Measured MIC 90 values were 4 and 8 μg/ml against a panel of contemporary multidrug-resistant isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii and E. coli , respectively. In addition, representative compounds exhibited greater antibacterial potency than the quinolones against obligate anaerobic species. Spontaneous mutation rates were low, with frequencies of resistance typically 100 μM). In summary, the compounds' distinct mechanism of action relative to the fluoroquinolones, whole-cell potency, low potential for resistance development, and favorable in vitro safety profile warrant their continued investigation as potential broad-spectrum antibacterial agents. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Alterations in the GyrA Subunit of DNA Gyrase and the ParC Subunit of DNA Topoisomerase IV Associated with Quinolone Resistance in Enterococcus faecalis

    OpenAIRE

    Kanematsu, Emiko; Deguchi, Takashi; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Kawamura, Takeshi; Nishino, Yoshinori; Kawada, Yukimichi

    1998-01-01

    The gyrA and parC genes of 31 clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis, including fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates, were partially sequenced and analyzed for target alterations. Topoisomerase IV may be a primary target in E. faecalis, but high-level fluoroquinolone resistance was associated with simultaneous alterations in both GyrA and ParC.

  2. Immunogenicity of candidate chimeric DNA vaccine against tuberculosis and leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Ayan; Kumar, Umesh; Sharma, Pawan; Singh, Sarman

    2009-08-13

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Leishmania donovani are important intracellular pathogens, especially in Indian context. In India and other South East Asian countries, both these infections are highly endemic and in about 20% cases co-infection of these pathogens is reported. For both these pathogens cell mediated immunity plays most important role. The available treatment of these infections is either prolonged or cumbersome or it is ineffective in controlling the outbreaks and spread. Therefore, potentiation of a common host defense mechanism can be used to prevent both the infections simultaneously. In this study we have developed a novel chimeric DNA vaccine candidate comprising the esat-6 gene of M. tuberculosis and kinesin motor domain gene of L. donovani. After developing this novel chimera, its immunogenicity was studied in mouse model. The immune response was compared with individual constructs of esat-6 and kinesin motor domain. The results showed that immunization with chimeric DNA vaccine construct resulted in stronger IFN-gamma and IL-2 response against kinesin (3012+/-102 and 367.5+/-8.92pg/ml) and ESAT-6 (1334+/-46.5 and 245.1+/-7.72pg/ml) in comparison to the individual vaccine constructs. The reciprocal immune response (IFN-gamma and IL-2) against individual construct was lower (kinesin motor domain: 1788+/-36.48 and 341.8+/-9.801pg/ml and ESAT-6: 867.0+/-47.23 and 170.8+/-4.578pg/ml, respectively). The results also suggest that using the chimeric construct both proteins yielded a reciprocal adjuvant affect over each other as the IFN-gamma production against chimera vaccination is statistically significant (pleishmaniasis and tuberculosis and have important implication in future vaccine design.

  3. Targeting bacterial topoisomerases: how to counter mechanisms of resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2016-06-01

    DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV are type IIA bacterial topoisomerases that are targeted by highly effective antibiotics. However, resistance via multiple mechanisms arises to limit the efficacies of these drugs. Continued research on type IIA bacterial topoisomerases has provided novel approaches to counter the most common resistance mechanism for utilization of these proven targets in antibacterial therapy. Bacterial topoisomerase I is being explored as an alternative target that is not expected to show cross-resistance. Dual targeting or combination therapy could be strategies for circumventing the development of resistance to topoisomerase-targeting antibiotics. Bacterial topoisomerases are high-value bactericidal targets that could continue to be exploited for antibacterial therapy, if new tactics to counter resistance can be adopted.

  4. Developing T lymphocytes are uniquely sensitive to a lack of topoisomerase III alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mönnich, Maren; Hess, Isabell; Wiest, Waltraud

    2010-01-01

    All organisms possess at least one type IA DNA topoisomerase. These topoisomerases function as part of a DNA structure-specific "dissolvasome," also known as the RTR complex, which has critical functions in faithful DNA replication, recombination, and chromosome segregation. In humans, the hetero......All organisms possess at least one type IA DNA topoisomerase. These topoisomerases function as part of a DNA structure-specific "dissolvasome," also known as the RTR complex, which has critical functions in faithful DNA replication, recombination, and chromosome segregation. In humans...

  5. A computational docking study for prediction of binding mode of diospyrin and derivatives: Inhibitors of human and leishmanial DNA topoisomerase-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Sandeep; Sharma, Pooja; Ghoshal, Nanda

    2007-08-15

    A computational approach was utilized to study the relative binding modes of diospyrin (bisnaphthoquinonoid) with the crystal structure of human DNA-TopoI and the recently reported Leishmania donavani DNA-TopoI. Additionally, the binding site interactions of amino derivatives of diospyrin with human TopoI were studied extensively. Based on the docking results, binding modes of diospyrin with the human and leishmanial TopoI catalytic core were predicted. The parallel use of two efficient and predictive docking programs, GOLD and Ligandfit, allowed mutual validation of the predicted binding poses. A reasonably good correlation coefficient between the calculated docking scores and the experimentally determined cytotoxicity helped in validating the docking method. Furthermore, a structure-based pharmacophore model was developed for L. donavani DNA-TopoI inhibition which helped in elucidating the topological and spatial requirements of the ligand-receptor interactions. This study provides an understanding of the structural basis of ligand binding to the topoisomerase receptor, which may be used for the structure-based design of potent and novel ligands for anticancer and antileishmanial therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a binding mode exploration study for diospyrin and its derivatives as inhibitors of the leishmanial and human TopoI enzymes.

  6. Topoisomerase II poisoning by indazole and imidazole complexes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    of topoisomerase II by forming a ternary cleavage complex of DNA, drug and topoisomerase II. The thymidine incorporation assays ... sage reaction is central to the various functions of topo II, as well as for targeting the .... or imidazole. These cationic ligands may be released from the main molecules in biological systems.

  7. Topoisomerases, new targets in cancer chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, J G; de Jong, Steven; de Vries, Liesbeth; Mulder, Nanno

    1990-01-01

    The enzymes involved in the regulation of the three-dimensional structure of DNA, topoisomerase I and II, are important for the handling of DNA during vital cellular processes such as translation, transcription and mitosis. The enzymes are currently being studied intensively, they are being

  8. Topoisomerase IB of Deinococcus radiodurans resolves guanine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-28

    Nov 28, 2015 ... structure in vitro and it may be one such protein that could resolve G4 DNA under normal growth conditions in. D. radiodurans. [Kota S and Misra HS 2015 Topoisomerase IB of ..... 2004 Intracellular transcription of G-rich DNAs induces forma- tion of G-loops, novel structures containing G4 DNA. Genes. Dev.

  9. Topoisomerase IB of Deinococcus radiodurans resolves guanine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-28

    Nov 28, 2015 ... [Kota S and Misra HS 2015 Topoisomerase IB of Deinococcus radiodurans resolves guanine quadruplex DNA structures in vitro. J. Biosci. 40 833–843] ... known for its efficient DNA double strand break repair. (Zahradka et al. ..... These samples were analysed on 12% native PAGE in KCl buffer (a). For CD ...

  10. A functional type I topoisomerase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roper Benjamin J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes a putative topoisomerase with sequence similarity to the eukaryotic type IB topoisomerase from Vaccinia virus. Residues in the active site are conserved, notably Tyr292 which would be predicted to form the transient covalent bond to DNA. Results The gene encoding the P. aeruginosa topoisomerase I was cloned and expressed in E. coli. The enzyme relaxes supercoiled DNA, while a mutant containing a Tyr292 to Phe substitution at the active site was found to be catalytically inert. This is consistent with the role of Tyr in forming the covalent intermediate. Like Vaccinia topoisomerase, the P. aeruginosa topoisomerase relaxes DNA in the absence of ATP, but unlike Vaccinia topoisomerase, P. aeruginosa topoisomerase does not relax supercoiled DNA without MgCl2 present. In addition, high concentration of NaCl is not able to substitute for MgCl2 as seen for Vaccinia topoisomerase. A truncated derivative of the topoisomerase lacking residues 1–98 relaxes DNA, with both full length and truncated enzyme exhibiting equivalent requirements for divalent cations and the ability to relax DNA to completion, suggesting a shared domain organization. DNA-binding assays suggest an only modest preference for the CCCTT pentameric sequence required for transesterification by Vaccinia topoisomerase IB. Conclusion P. aeruginosa encodes a functional topoisomerase with significant similarity to the type IB enzyme encoded by poxviruses. In contrast to the Vaccinia-encoded homolog, the P. aeruginosa-encoded enzyme requires divalent cations for catalytic activity, relaxes DNA to completion, and does not exhibit a strong preference for the pentameric sequence stringently required by the Vaccinia-encoded homolog. A comparison with the structure of poxviral topoisomerase in complex with DNA suggests that bacterial homologs of the eukaryotic type IB topoisomerase may exhibit a relaxed sequence preference due to the lack of

  11. Crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protein clusters assembled on to damaged DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miggiano, R.; Perugino, G.; Ciaramella, M.; Serpe, M.; Rejman, Dominik; Páv, Ondřej; Pohl, Radek; Garavaglia, S.; Lahiri, S.; Rizzi, M.; Rossi, F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 473, č. 2 (2016), s. 123-133 ISSN 0264-6021 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 241587 - SYSTEMTB Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : DNA repair * DNA-binding protein * Mycobacterium tuberculosis * O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase * co-operativity * crystal structure Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.797, year: 2016

  12. Autoregulation of topoisomerase I expression by supercoiling sensitive transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Wareed; Menon, Shruti; Karthik, Pullela V D N B; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2016-02-29

    The opposing catalytic activities of topoisomerase I (TopoI/relaxase) and DNA gyrase (supercoiling enzyme) ensure homeostatic maintenance of bacterial chromosome supercoiling. Earlier studies in Escherichia coli suggested that the alteration in DNA supercoiling affects the DNA gyrase and TopoI expression. Although, the role of DNA elements around the promoters were proposed in regulation of gyrase, the molecular mechanism of supercoiling mediated control of TopoI expression is not yet understood. Here, we describe the regulation of TopoI expression from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis by a mechanism termed Supercoiling Sensitive Transcription (SST). In both the organisms, topoI promoter(s) exhibited reduced activity in response to chromosome relaxation suggesting that SST is intrinsic to topoI promoter(s). We elucidate the role of promoter architecture and high transcriptional activity of upstream genes in topoI regulation. Analysis of the promoter(s) revealed the presence of sub-optimal spacing between the -35 and -10 elements, rendering them supercoiling sensitive. Accordingly, upon chromosome relaxation, RNA polymerase occupancy was decreased on the topoI promoter region implicating the role of DNA topology in SST of topoI. We propose that negative supercoiling induced DNA twisting/writhing align the -35 and -10 elements to facilitate the optimal transcription of topoI. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Enzymatic activities and DNA substrate specificity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA helicase XPB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasingham, Seetha V; Zegeye, Ephrem Debebe; Homberset, Håvard; Rossi, Marie L; Laerdahl, Jon K; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Tønjum, Tone

    2012-01-01

    XPB, also known as ERCC3 and RAD25, is a 3' → 5' DNA repair helicase belonging to the superfamily 2 of helicases. XPB is an essential core subunit of the eukaryotic basal transcription factor complex TFIIH. It has two well-established functions: in the context of damaged DNA, XPB facilitates nucleotide excision repair by unwinding double stranded DNA (dsDNA) surrounding a DNA lesion; while in the context of actively transcribing genes, XPB facilitates initiation of RNA polymerase II transcription at gene promoters. Human and other eukaryotic XPB homologs are relatively well characterized compared to conserved homologs found in mycobacteria and archaea. However, more insight into the function of bacterial helicases is central to understanding the mechanism of DNA metabolism and pathogenesis in general. Here, we characterized Mycobacterium tuberculosis XPB (Mtb XPB), a 3'→5' DNA helicase with DNA-dependent ATPase activity. Mtb XPB efficiently catalyzed DNA unwinding in the presence of significant excess of enzyme. The unwinding activity was fueled by ATP or dATP in the presence of Mg(2+)/Mn(2+). Consistent with the 3'→5' polarity of this bacterial XPB helicase, the enzyme required a DNA substrate with a 3' overhang of 15 nucleotides or more. Although Mtb XPB efficiently unwound DNA model substrates with a 3' DNA tail, it was not active on substrates containing a 3' RNA tail. We also found that Mtb XPB efficiently catalyzed ATP-independent annealing of complementary DNA strands. These observations significantly enhance our understanding of the biological roles of Mtb XPB.

  14. Enzymatic activities and DNA substrate specificity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA helicase XPB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seetha V Balasingham

    Full Text Available XPB, also known as ERCC3 and RAD25, is a 3' → 5' DNA repair helicase belonging to the superfamily 2 of helicases. XPB is an essential core subunit of the eukaryotic basal transcription factor complex TFIIH. It has two well-established functions: in the context of damaged DNA, XPB facilitates nucleotide excision repair by unwinding double stranded DNA (dsDNA surrounding a DNA lesion; while in the context of actively transcribing genes, XPB facilitates initiation of RNA polymerase II transcription at gene promoters. Human and other eukaryotic XPB homologs are relatively well characterized compared to conserved homologs found in mycobacteria and archaea. However, more insight into the function of bacterial helicases is central to understanding the mechanism of DNA metabolism and pathogenesis in general. Here, we characterized Mycobacterium tuberculosis XPB (Mtb XPB, a 3'→5' DNA helicase with DNA-dependent ATPase activity. Mtb XPB efficiently catalyzed DNA unwinding in the presence of significant excess of enzyme. The unwinding activity was fueled by ATP or dATP in the presence of Mg(2+/Mn(2+. Consistent with the 3'→5' polarity of this bacterial XPB helicase, the enzyme required a DNA substrate with a 3' overhang of 15 nucleotides or more. Although Mtb XPB efficiently unwound DNA model substrates with a 3' DNA tail, it was not active on substrates containing a 3' RNA tail. We also found that Mtb XPB efficiently catalyzed ATP-independent annealing of complementary DNA strands. These observations significantly enhance our understanding of the biological roles of Mtb XPB.

  15. Synthesis of pharmacologically important naphthoquinones and anticancer activity of 2-benzyllawsone through DNA topoisomerase-II inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Balagani Sathish; Ravi, Kusumoori; Verma, Amit Kumar; Fatima, Kaneez; Hasanain, Mohammad; Singh, Arjun; Sarkar, Jayanta; Luqman, Suaib; Chanda, Debabrata; Negi, Arvind S

    2017-02-15

    Naphthoquinones are naturally occurring biologically active entities. Practical de novo syntheses of three naphthoquinones i.e. lawsone (1), lapachol (2), and β-lapachone (3b) have been achieved from commercially available starting materials. The conversion of lapachol (2) to β-lapachone (3b) was achieved through p-TSA/Iodine/BF 3 -etherate mediated regioselective cyclisation. Further, 2-alkyl and 2-benzyllawsone derivatives have been prepared as possible anticancer agents. Four derivatives exhibited significant anticancer activity and the best analogue i.e. compound 21a exhibited potential anticancer activity (IC 50 =5.2μM) against FaDu cell line. Compound 21a induced apoptosis through activation of caspase pathway and exerted cell cycle arrest at S phase in FaDU cells. It also exhibited significant topoisomerase-II inhibition activity. Compound 21a was found to be safe in Swiss albino mice up to 1000mg/kg oral dose. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Description of polymerase chain reaction and sequencing DNA Mycobacterium tuberculosis from specimen sputum of tuberculosis patients in Medan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lily; Siregar, Y.; Ilyas, S.

    2018-03-01

    This study purposed to describe the product Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and sequencing of DNA Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis from sputum of tuberculosis (TB) patients in Medan. Sputum was collected from patients that diagnosed with pulmonary TB by a physician. Specimen processed by PCR method of Li et al. and sequencing at Macrogen Laboratory. All of 12 product PCR were showed brightness bands at 126 base pair (bp). These results indicated similarity to the study of Li et al. Sequencing analysis showed the presence of a mutation and non-mutation groups of M. tuberculosis. The reference and outcome berange of the mutation and non-mutation of M. tuberculosis were 56-107, 59-85, 60-120 and 63-94, respectively. The percentage bp difference between the outcome and references for mutation and non-mutation were 3.448-6.569and 3.278-7.428%, respectively. In conclusion, the successful amplification of PCR products in a 1.5% agarose gel electrophoresis where all 12 sputa contained rpoB-positive M. tuberculosis and 0.644% difference was found between the outcome with reference bp of the mutation and non-mutation M. tuberculosis groups.

  17. Single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis discloses the dynamics of the DNA-topoisomerase II (Top2) interaction in the presence of TOP2-targeting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wan-Chen; Lee, Chun-Ying; Hsieh, Tao-Shih

    2017-07-28

    Topoisomerases play crucial roles in DNA replication, transcription, and recombination. For instance, topoisomerase II (Top2) is critically important for resolving DNA tangles during cell division, and as such, it is a broad anticancer drug target. Top2 regulates DNA topology by transiently breaking one double-stranded DNA molecule (cleavage), allowing a second double strand to pass through the opened DNA gate (opening), and then closing the gate by rejoining the broken ends. Drugs that modulate Top2 catalysis may therefore affect enzymatic activity at several different steps. Previous studies have focused on examining DNA cleavage and ligation; however, the dynamic opening and closing of the DNA gate has been less explored. Here, we used the single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) method to observe the open and closed state of the DNA gate and to measure dwell times in each state. Our results show that Top2 binds and bends DNA to increase the energy transfer efficiency ( E FRET ), and ATP treatment further induces the fluctuation of E FRET , representing the gate opening and closing. Additionally, our results demonstrate that both types of Top2-targeting anticancer drugs, the catalytic inhibitor dexrazoxane (ICRF187) and mechanistic poison teniposide (VM26), can interfere with DNA gate dynamics and shorten the dwell time in the closed state. Moreover, Top2 bound to the nonhydrolyzable ATP analog 5'-adenylyl-β,γ-imidodiphosphate exhibits altered DNA gate dynamics, but the DNA gate appears to open and close even after N-gate closure. In summary, we have utilized single-molecule detection to unravel Top2 DNA gate dynamics and reveal previously unknown effects of Top2 drugs on these dynamics. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrova, A.V.

    1983-01-01

    Classification of clinical forms of tuberculosis of respiratory organs is m ade. It is shown, that diagnosis, determination of the clinical form of pulmona ry tuberculosis, extent and phase of the process are mainly based on the data of roentgenologic studies and in certain cases tomography is preferable. Roentgenologic picture of primary tuberculosis, tuberculosis of intrathoracis l ymp nodes, dissemenated tuberculosis, focal and infiltrative tuberculosis of lungs, tuberculomas of lungs, cavernous and fibrocavernous form of pulmonary tub erculosis, cirrhotic tuberculosis of lungs, tuberculosis of upper respiratory tracks, tuberculous pleurite and tuberculosis of respiratory organs, combined wi th dust occupational diseases, has been described

  19. RNA topoisomerase is prevalent in all domains of life and associates with polyribosomes in animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Muzammil; Xue, Yutong; Lee, Seung Kyu; Martindale, Jennifer L.; Shen, Weiping; Li, Wen; Zou, Sige; Ciaramella, Maria; Debat, Hélène; Nadal, Marc; Leng, Fenfei; Zhang, Hongliang; Wang, Quan; Siaw, Grace Ee-Lu; Niu, Hengyao; Pommier, Yves; Gorospe, Myriam; Hsieh, Tao-Shih; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; Xu, Dongyi; Wang, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    DNA Topoisomerases are essential to resolve topological problems during DNA metabolism in all species. However, the prevalence and function of RNA topoisomerases remain uncertain. Here, we show that RNA topoisomerase activity is prevalent in Type IA topoisomerases from bacteria, archaea, and eukarya. Moreover, this activity always requires the conserved Type IA core domains and the same catalytic residue used in DNA topoisomerase reaction; however, it does not absolutely require the non-conserved carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD), which is necessary for relaxation reactions of supercoiled DNA. The RNA topoisomerase activity of human Top3β differs from that of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I in that the former but not the latter requires the CTD, indicating that topoisomerases have developed distinct mechanisms during evolution to catalyze RNA topoisomerase reactions. Notably, Top3β proteins from several animals associate with polyribosomes, which are units of mRNA translation, whereas the Top3 homologs from E. coli and yeast lack the association. The Top3β-polyribosome association requires TDRD3, which directly interacts with Top3β and is present in animals but not bacteria or yeast. We propose that RNA topoisomerases arose in the early RNA world, and that they are retained through all domains of DNA-based life, where they mediate mRNA translation as part of polyribosomes in animals. PMID:27257063

  20. Mutations reducing replication from R-loops suppress the defects of growth, chromosome segregation and DNA supercoiling in cells lacking topoisomerase I and RNase HI activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usongo, Valentine; Martel, Makisha; Balleydier, Aurélien; Drolet, Marc

    2016-04-01

    R-loop formation occurs when the nascent RNA hybridizes with the template DNA strand behind the RNA polymerase. R-loops affect a wide range of cellular processes and their use as origins of replication was the first function attributed to them. In Escherichia coli, R-loop formation is promoted by the ATP-dependent negative supercoiling activity of gyrase (gyrA and gyrB) and is inhibited by topoisomerase (topo) I (topA) relaxing transcription-induced negative supercoiling. RNase HI (rnhA) degrades the RNA moiety of R-loops. The depletion of RNase HI activity in topA null mutants was previously shown to lead to extensive DNA relaxation, due to DNA gyrase inhibition, and to severe growth and chromosome segregation defects that were partially corrected by overproducing topo III (topB). Here, DNA gyrase assays in crude cell extracts showed that the ATP-dependent activity (supercoiling) of gyrase but not its ATP-independent activity (relaxation) was inhibited in topA null cells lacking RNase HI. To characterize the cellular event(s) triggered by the absence of RNase HI, we performed a genetic screen for suppressors of the growth defect of topA rnhA null cells. Suppressors affecting genes in replication (holC2::aph and dnaT18::aph) nucleotide metabolism (dcd49::aph), RNA degradation (rne59::aph) and fimbriae synthesis (fimD22::aph) were found to reduce replication from R-loops and to restore supercoiling, thus pointing to a correlation between R-loop-dependent replication in topA rnhA mutants and the inhibition of gyrase activity and growth. Interestingly, the position of fimD on the E. coli chromosome corresponds to the site of one of the five main putative origins of replication from R-loops in rnhA null cells recently identified by next-generation sequencing, thus suggesting that the fimD22::aph mutation inactivated one of these origins. Furthermore, we show that topo III overproduction is unable to complement the growth defect of topA rnhA null mutants at low

  1. The significance of Epstein Barr Virus (EBV & DNA Topoisomerase II alpha (DNA-Topo II alpha immunoreactivity in normal oral mucosa, Oral Epithelial Dysplasia (OED and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Mohamed M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Head and neck cancer including oral cancer is considered to develop by accumulated genetic alterations and the major pathway is cancerization from lesions such as intraepithelial dysplasia in oral leukoplakia and erythroplakia. The relationship of proliferation markers with the grading of dysplasia is uncertain. The involvement of EBV in oral carcinogenesis is not fully understood. Aim The present study was designed to investigate the role of EBV and DNA Topoisomerase II∝ (DNA-Topo II∝ during oral carcinogenesis and to examine the prognostic significance of these protein expressions in OSCCs. Methods Using specific antibodies for EBV and DNA-Topo II∝, we examined protein expressions in archival lesion tissues from 16 patients with oral epithelial dysplasia, 22 oral squamous cell carcinoma and 20 normal oral mucosa by immunohistochemistry. Clinical information was obtained through the computerized retrospective database from the tumor registry. Results DNA-Topo II∝ was expressed in all examined specimens. Analysis of Variance ANOVA revealed highly significant difference (P 0.05 in inferior surface of tongue and in hard palatal tissues. Significant differences were observed between OEDs and NSE (P Conclusion EBV and DNA Topo II-αLI expression are possible indicators in oral carcinogenesis and may be valuable diagnostic and prognostic indices in oral carcinoma.

  2. Quantification of DNA by Agarose Gel Electrophoresis and Analysis of the Topoisomers of Plasmid and M13 DNA Following Treatment with a Restriction Endonuclease or DNA Topoisomerase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweedie, John W.; Stowell, Kathryn M.

    2005-01-01

    A two-session laboratory exercise for advanced undergraduate students in biochemistry and molecular biology is described. The first session introduces students to DNA quantification by ultraviolet absorbance and agarose gel electrophoresis followed by ethidium bromide staining. The second session involves treatment of various topological forms of…

  3. Ru/Fe bimetallic complexes: Synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity and study of their interactions with DNA/HSA and human topoisomerase IB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takarada, Jessica E; Guedes, Adriana P M; Correa, Rodrigo S; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela de P; Castelli, Silvia; Iacovelli, Federico; Deflon, Victor Marcelo; Batista, Alzir Azevedo; Desideri, Alessandro

    2017-12-15

    Three ruthenium/iron-based compounds, 1: [Ru(MIm)(bipy)(dppf)]PF 6 (MIm = 2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole anion), 2: [RuCl(Im)(bipy)(dppf)]PF 6 (Im = imidazole), and 3: [Ru(tzdt)(bipy)(dppf)]PF 6 (tzdt = 1,3-thiazolidine-2-thione anion) (dppf = 1,1'-bis(diphenylphosphine)ferrocene and bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine), were synthesized, and characterized by elemental analyses, conductivity, UV/Vis, IR, 1 H, 13 C and 31 P{1H} NMR spectroscopies, and by electrochemical technique. The complex 3 was also characterized by single-crystal X-ray. The three ruthenium(II) complexes show cytotoxicity against DU-145 (prostate carcinoma cells) and A549 (lung carcinoma cells) tumor cells. The free ligands do not exhibit any cytotoxic activity, such as evident by the IC 50 values higher than 200 μM. UV/Vis and viscosity experiments showed that the complexes interact weakly with the DNA molecule, via electrostatic forces. The interaction of the complexes 1-3 with the HSA is moderate, with K b values in range of 10 5 -10 7  M -1 , presenting a static mechanism of interaction stabilized by hydrophobic. Complexes 2 and 3 showed high affinity for the FA7 HSA site as evidenced by fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular docking. Complexes 1-3 were tested as potential human Topoisomerase IB inhibitors by analysing the different steps of the enzyme catalytic cycle. The results indicate that all compounds efficiently inhibit the DNA relaxation and the cleavage reaction, in which the effect increases upon pre-incubation. Complexes 1 and 2 are also able to slow down the religation reaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Phytochemicals as Anticancer and Chemopreventive Topoisomerase II Poisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketron, Adam C.

    2013-01-01

    Phytochemicals are a rich source of anticancer drugs and chemopreventive agents. Several of these chemicals appear to exert at least some of their effects through interactions with topoisomerase II, an essential enzyme that regulates DNA supercoiling and removes knots and tangles from the genome. Topoisomerase II-active phytochemicals function by stabilizing covalent protein-cleaved DNA complexes that are intermediates in the catalytic cycle of the enzyme. As a result, these compounds convert topoisomerase II to a cellular toxin that fragments the genome. Because of their mode of action, they are referred to as topoisomerase II poisons as opposed to catalytic inhibitors. The first sections of this article discuss DNA topology, the catalytic cycle of topoisomerase II, and the two mechanisms (interfacial vs. covalent) by which different classes of topoisomerase II poisons alter enzyme activity. Subsequent sections discuss the effects of several phytochemicals on the type II enzyme, including demethyl-epipodophyllotoxins (semisynthetic anticancer drugs) as well as flavones, flavonols, isoflavones, catechins, isothiocyanates, and curcumin (dietary chemopreventive agents). Finally, the leukemogenic potential of topoisomerase II-targeted phytochemicals is described. PMID:24678287

  5. DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: from phage typing to whole-genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürch, Anita C; van Soolingen, Dick

    2012-06-01

    Current typing methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex evolved from simple phenotypic approaches like phage typing and drug susceptibility profiling to DNA-based strain typing methods, such as IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) and variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) typing. Examples of the usefulness of molecular typing are source case finding and epidemiological linkage of tuberculosis (TB) cases, international transmission of MDR/XDR-TB, the discrimination between endogenous reactivation and exogenous re-infection as a cause of relapses after curative treatment of tuberculosis, the evidence of multiple M. tuberculosis infections, and the disclosure of laboratory cross-contaminations. Simultaneously, phylogenetic analyses were developed based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), genomic deletions usually referred to as regions of difference (RDs) and spoligotyping which served both strain typing and phylogenetic analysis. National and international initiatives that rely on the application of these typing methods have brought significant insight into the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis. However, current DNA fingerprinting methods have important limitations. They can often not distinguish between genetically closely related strains and the turn-over of these markers is variable. Moreover, the suitability of most DNA typing methods for phylogenetic reconstruction is limited as they show a high propensity of convergent evolution or misinfer genetic distances. In order to fully explore the possibilities of genotyping in the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis and to study the phylogeny of the causative bacteria reliably, the application of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) analysis for all M. tuberculosis isolates is the optimal, although currently still a costly solution. In the last years WGS for typing of pathogens has been explored and yielded important additional information on strain diversity in comparison to the

  6. Deficiency of Double-Strand DNA Break Repair Does Not Impair Mycobacterium tuberculosis Virulence in Multiple Animal Models of Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Heaton, Brook E.; Barkan, Daniel; Bongiorno, Paola; Karakousis, Petros C.; Glickman, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persistence within its human host requires mechanisms to resist the effector molecules of host immunity, which exert their bactericidal effects through damaging pathogen proteins, membranes, and DNA. Substantial evidence indicates that bacterial pathogens, including M. tuberculosis, require DNA repair systems to repair the DNA damage inflicted by the host during infection, but the role of double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair systems is unclear. Double-strand DNA bre...

  7. Guardians of the mycobacterial genome: A review on DNA repair systems in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amandeep

    2017-12-01

    The genomic integrity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is continuously threatened by the harsh survival conditions inside host macrophages, due to immune and antibiotic stresses. Faithful genome maintenance and repair must be accomplished under stress for the bacillus to survive in the host, necessitating a robust DNA repair system. The importance of DNA repair systems in pathogenesis is well established. Previous examination of the M. tuberculosis genome revealed homologues of almost all the major DNA repair systems, i.e. nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair (BER), homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). However, recent developments in the field have pointed to the presence of novel proteins and pathways in mycobacteria. Homologues of archeal mismatch repair proteins were recently reported in mycobacteria, a pathway previously thought to be absent. RecBCD, the major nuclease-helicase enzymes involved in HR in E. coli, were implicated in the single-strand annealing (SSA) pathway. Novel roles of archeo-eukaryotic primase (AEP) polymerases, previously thought to be exclusive to NHEJ, have been reported in BER. Many new proteins with a probable role in DNA repair have also been discovered. It is now realized that the DNA repair systems in M. tuberculosis are highly evolved and have redundant backup mechanisms to mend the damage. This review is an attempt to summarize our current understanding of the DNA repair systems in M. tuberculosis.

  8. Anti-topoisomerase drugs as potent inducers of chromosomal aberrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Bassi

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA topoisomerases catalyze topological changes in DNA that are essential for normal cell cycle progression and therefore they are a preferential target for the development of anticancer drugs. Anti-topoisomerase drugs can be divided into two main classes: "cleavable complex" poisons and catalytic inhibitors. The "cleavable complex" poisons are very effective as anticancer drugs but are also potent inducers of chromosome aberrations so they can cause secondary malignancies. Catalytic inhibitors are cytotoxic but they do not induce chromosome aberrations. Knowledge about the mechanism of action of topoisomerase inhibitors is important to determine the best anti-topoisomerase combinations, with a reduced risk of induction of secondary malignancies.As topoisomerases de DNA catalisam alterações topológicas no DNA que são essenciais para a progressão do ciclo celular normal e, portanto, são um alvo preferencial para o desenvolvimento de drogas anticâncer. Drogas anti-topoisomerases podem ser divididas em duas classes principais: drogas anti-"complexos cliváveis" e inibidores catalíticos. As drogas anti-"complexos cliváveis" são muito eficazes como drogas anticancerígenas, mas são também potentes indutores de aberrações cromossômicas, podendo causar neoplasias malignas secundárias. Inibidores catalíticos são citotóxicos mas não induzem aberrações cromossômicas. Conhecimento a respeito do mecanismo de ação de inibidores de topoisomerases é importante para determinar as melhores combinações anti-topoisomerases, com um reduzido risco de indução de neoplasias malignas secundárias.

  9. [Application of Gene Xpert Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA and resistance to rifampicin assay in the rapid detection of tuberculosis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, A M; Li, F; Liu, X H; Xia, L; Lu, S H

    2016-05-01

    To detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and rifampin resistance of the clinical specimens in children by Xpert MTB DNA and resistance to rifampicin(MTB/RIF) detection system, and evaluate the application value of this method in children with tuberculosis. Data of 109 children cases of clinically suspected tuberculosis were collected (including 46 gastric lavage aspirate, 19 sputum, 10 fine needle aspiration biopsy, 4 pus, 14 cerebrospinal fluid, 11 Serous membrance fluid, 1 marrow, 3 stool, 1 urine specimens)between April 2014 and March 2015. All specimens were detected by smear fluorescence staining microscopy, MGIT 960 BACTEC liquid culture, Xpert MTB/RIF assay and T-SPOT.TB test respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of Xpert MTB/RIF assay were analyzed in those clinical specimens. The sensitivity and specificity of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay for MTB detection in childhood tuberculosis clinical specimen were 28.6% and 87.5%. The sensitivity of 65 pulmonary tuberculosis(46 gastric lavage aspirate, 19 sputum) which included gastric lavage aspirates and sputum was 33.3% and 57.1%, the specificity of the two was 100.0%. In 44 extrapulmonary tuberculosis, the sensitivity of the pus and the puncture fluid was higher and approached 100.0%. The detection rate of the cerebrospinal fluid and serous cavity effusion was very low. The sensitivity was 100.0% in smear-positive and culture-positive samples and only 30.8% to 50.0% in smear-negative and culture-positive samples. The sensitivity and specificity of Xpert MTB/RIF assay to detect rifampin resistance were 100.0%. In clinical samples, the sensitivity of Xpert MTB/RIF assay was higher than that of smear fluorescence staining microscopy, but the difference was not statistically significant (χ(2)=0, P>0.05). The result was equivalent to that of MGIT 960 BACTEC liquid culture (28.6% vs. 27.3%, χ(2)=2.50, P>0.05), and far below that of T-SPOT.TB(28.6% vs 59.7%, χ(2)=13.92, Ptuberculosis, especially in serous

  10. DNA supercoiling in Escherichia coli is under tight and subtle homeostatic control, involving gene-expression and metabolic regulation of both topoisomerase I and DNA gyrase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoep, J.L.; van der Weijden, C.C.; Andersen, H.W.

    2002-01-01

    DNA of prokaryotes is in a nonequilibrium. structural state, characterized as 'active' DNA supercoiling. Alterations in this state affect many life processes and a homeostatic control of DNA supercoiling has been suggested [Menzel, R. & Gellert. M. (1983) Cell 34, 105-113]. We here report on a ne...... of the nonequilibrium DNA structure in wild-type Escherichia coli is almost complete and subtle (i.e. involving at least three regulatory mechanisms)....

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA repair in response to subinhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, D M; Hinds, J; Butcher, P D; Gillespie, S H; McHugh, T D

    2008-12-01

    To investigate how the SOS response, an error-prone DNA repair pathway, is expressed following subinhibitory quinolone treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Genome-wide expression profiling followed by quantitative RT (qRT)-PCR was used to study the effect of ciprofloxacin on M. tuberculosis gene expression. Microarray analysis showed that 16/110 genes involved in DNA protection, repair and recombination were up-regulated. There appeared to be a lack of downstream genes involved in the SOS response. qRT-PCR detected an induction of lexA and recA after 4 h and of dnaE2 after 24 h of subinhibitory treatment. The pattern of gene expression observed following subinhibitory quinolone treatment differed from that induced after other DNA-damaging agents (e.g. mitomycin C). The expression of the DnaE2 polymerase response was significantly delayed following subinhibitory quinolone exposure.

  12. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    C. Robert Horsburgh, Jr

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the published literature on tuberculosis from September 2012 to August 2013 and describes important advances in tuberculosis epidemiology, microbiology, pathology, clinical pharmacology, genetics, treatment and prevention.

  13. Crystal structure of DNA polymerase III β sliding clamp from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Wen-Jun; Lin, Shi-Qiang; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Xian-En; Bi, Li-Jun; Jiang, Tao

    2011-02-11

    The sliding clamp is a key component of DNA polymerase III (Pol III) required for genome replication. It is known to function with diverse DNA repair proteins and cell cycle-control proteins, making it a potential drug target. To extend our understanding of the structure/function relationship of the sliding clamp, we solved the crystal structure of the sliding clamp from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), a human pathogen that causes most cases of tuberculosis (TB). The sliding clamp from M. tuberculosis forms a ring-shaped head-to-tail dimer with three domains per subunit. Each domain contains two α helices in the inner ring that lie against two β sheets in the outer ring. Previous studies have indicated that many Escherichia coli clamp-binding proteins have a conserved LF sequence, which is critical for binding to the hydrophobic region of the sliding clamp. Here, we analyzed the binding affinities of the M. tuberculosis sliding clamp and peptides derived from the α and δ subunits of Pol III, which indicated that the LF motif also plays an important role in the binding of the α and δ subunits to the sliding clamp of M. tuberculosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mochammad, Hatta

    2008-01-01

    This book chapter for medical students and researcher Tuberculosis is still one of the leading causes of death by infectious diseases with 2 million deaths per year and 9.2 million new cases of tuberculosis disease annually [1-3]. Besides, more than 2 milliard people are infected with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) [1-3]. Despite continuous effort in the prevention, monitoring and treatment of tuberculosis, the disease remains a major health problem in many countries [4-6...

  15. Real-time PCR using mycobacteriophage DNA for rapid phenotypic drug susceptibility results for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pholwat, Suporn; Ehdaie, Beeta; Foongladda, Suporn; Kelly, Kimberly; Houpt, Eric

    2012-03-01

    Managing drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires drug susceptibility testing, yet conventional drug susceptibility testing is slow, and molecular testing does not yield results for all antituberculous drugs. We addressed these challenges by utilizing real-time PCR of mycobacteriophage D29 DNA to evaluate the drug resistance of clinical M. tuberculosis isolates. Mycobacteriophages infect and replicate in viable bacterial cells faster than bacterial cells replicate and have been used for detection and drug resistance testing for M. tuberculosis either by using reporter cells or phages with engineered reporter constructs. Our primary protocol involved culturing M. tuberculosis isolates for 48 h with and without drugs at critical concentrations, followed by incubation with 10(3) PFU/ml of D29 mycobacteriophage for 24 h and then real-time PCR. Many drugs could be incubated instantly with M. tuberculosis and phage for 24 h alone. The change in phage DNA real-time PCR cycle threshold (C(T)) between control M. tuberculosis and M. tuberculosis treated with drugs was calculated and correlated with conventional agar proportion drug susceptibility results. Specifically, 9 susceptible clinical isolates, 22 multidrug-resistant (MDR), and 1 extensively drug-resistant (XDR) M. tuberculosis strains were used and C(T) control-C(T) drug cutoffs of between +0.3 and -6.0 yielded 422/429 (98%) accurate results for isoniazid, rifampin, streptomycin, ethambutol, amikacin, kanamycin, capreomycin, ofloxacin, moxifloxacin, ethionamide, para-aminosalicylic acid, cycloserine, and linezolid. Moreover, the ΔC(T) values correlated with isolate MIC for most agents. This D29 quantitative PCR assay offers a rapid, accurate, 1- to 3-day phenotypic drug susceptibility test for first- and second-line drugs and may suggest an approximate MIC.

  16. Tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latorre Tortello, Pablo

    1998-01-01

    The tuberculosis is an infection bacterial chronicle of world distribution. Three organisms of the family of the mycobacterium, the m. tuberculosis, the m. bovis and m. africanum, phenotypic and genetically similar, produce it, but only the m. tuberculosis has importance; the others rarely produce illness in the human. By definition, the lung tuberculosis is the localization of the m. tuberculosis in the breathing tract, the most common and main form in the affection and the only able to contaminate to other people. The koch bacillus, transmits the illness directly person to person. The paper Includes topics like pathogenesis, natural history, epidemiology, diagnose, symptomatology and treatment

  17. DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: from phage typing to whole-genome sequencing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurch, A.C.; Soolingen, D. van

    2012-01-01

    Current typing methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex evolved from simple phenotypic approaches like phage typing and drug susceptibility profiling to DNA-based strain typing methods, such as IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) and variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR)

  18. DNA alkylation damage as a sensor of nitrosative stress in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Durbach, S I; Springer, B; Machowski, E E; North, R J; Papavinasasundaram, K G; Colston, M J; Böttger, E C; Mizrahi, V

    2003-01-01

    One of the cellular consequences of nitrosative stress is alkylation damage to DNA. To assess whether nitrosative stress is registered on the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, mutants lacking an alkylation damage repair and reversal operon were constructed. Although hypersensitive to the genotoxic effects of N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine in vitro, the mutants displayed no phenotype in vivo, suggesting that permeation of nitrosative stress to the level of cytotoxic DNA damage is res...

  19. The ada operon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes two DNA methyltransferases for inducible repair of DNA alkylation damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingyi; Aamodt, Randi M; Dalhus, Bjørn; Balasingham, Seetha; Helle, Ina; Andersen, Pernille; Tønjum, Tone; Alseth, Ingrun; Rognes, Torbjørn; Bjørås, Magnar

    2011-06-10

    The ada operon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which encodes a composite protein of AdaA and AlkA and a separate AdaB/Ogt protein, was characterized. M. tuberculosis treated with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine induced transcription of the adaA-alkA and adaB genes, suggesting that M. tuberculosis mount an inducible response to methylating agents. Survival assays of the methyltransferase defective Escherichia coli mutant KT233 (ada ogt), showed that expression of the adaB gene rescued the alkylation sensitivity. Further, adaB but not adaA-alkA complemented the hypermutator phenotype of KT233. Purified AdaA-AlkA and AdaB possessed methyltransferase activity. These data suggested that AdaB counteract the cytotoxic and mutagenic effect of O(6)-methylguanine, while AdaA-AlkA most likely transfers methyl groups from innocuous methylphosphotriesters. AdaA-AlkA did not possess alkylbase DNA glycosylase activity nor rescue the alkylation sensitivity of the E. coli mutant BK2118 (tag alkA). We propose that AdaA-AlkA is a positive regulator of the adaptive response in M. tuberculosis. It thus appears that the ada operon of M. tuberculosis suppresses the mutagenic effect of alkylation but not the cytotoxic effect of lesions such as 3-methylpurines. Collectively, these data indicate that M. tuberculosis hypermutator strains with defective adaptive response genes might sustain robustness to cytotoxic alkylation DNA damage and confer a selective advantage contributing to host adaptation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. TUBERCULOSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Tarik Bajrović; Mahmud Nurkić; Šukrija Zvizdić

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis, known as the "White Plague" in the early 19th century, is the infectious disease, which is being researched today even in some of the most developed countries in the world. Epidemiological- epizootiological research points to the importance of pasteurizing milk as well as the transmission in aerosolized droplets in humans and animals. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), M. bovis, M. africanum and M. microti are the mycobacteria that cause tuberculosis. Other mycobacteria cause dis...

  1. Bacterial topoisomerase I as a target for discovery of antibacterial compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2009-02-01

    Bacterial topoisomerase I is a potential target for discovery of new antibacterial compounds. Mutant topoisomerases identified by SOS induction screening demonstrated that accumulation of the DNA cleavage complex formed by type IA topoisomerases is bactericidal. Characterization of these mutants of Yersinia pestis and Escherichia coli topoisomerase I showed that DNA religation can be inhibited while maintaining DNA cleavage activity by decreasing the binding affinity of Mg(II) ions. This can be accomplished either by mutation of the TOPRIM motif involved directly in Mg(II) binding or by altering the charge distribution of the active site region. Besides being used to elucidate the key elements for the control of the cleavage-religation equilibrium, the SOS-inducing mutants of Y. pestis and E. coli topoisomerase I have also been utilized as models to study the cellular response following the accumulation of bacterial topoisomerase I cleavage complex. Bacterial topoisomerase I is required for preventing hypernegative supercoiling of DNA during transcription. It plays an important role in transcription of stress genes during bacterial stress response. Topoisomerase I targeting poisons may be particularly effective when the bacterial pathogen is responding to host defense, or in the presence of other antibiotics that induce the bacterial stress response.

  2. SOS Induction by Stabilized Topoisomerase IA Cleavage Complex Occurs via the RecBCD Pathway▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Sutherland, Jeanette H.; Cheng, Bokun; Liu, I-Fen; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2008-01-01

    Accumulation of mutant topoisomerase I cleavage complex can lead to SOS induction and cell death in Escherichia coli. The single-stranded break associated with mutant topoisomerase I cleavage complex is converted to double-stranded break, which then is processed by the RecBCD pathway, followed by association of RecA with the single-stranded DNA.

  3. Crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protein clusters assembled on to damaged DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miggiano, Riccardo; Perugino, Giuseppe; Ciaramella, Maria; Serpe, Mario; Rejman, Dominik; Páv, Ondřej; Pohl, Radek; Garavaglia, Silvia; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rizzi, Menico; Rossi, Franca

    2016-01-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MtOGT) contributes to protect the bacterial GC-rich genome against the pro-mutagenic potential of O(6)-methylated guanine in DNA. Several strains of M. tuberculosis found worldwide encode a point-mutated O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (OGT) variant (MtOGT-R37L), which displays an arginine-to-leucine substitution at position 37 of the poorly functionally characterized N-terminal domain of the protein. Although the impact of this mutation on the MtOGT activity has not yet been proved in vivo, we previously demonstrated that a recombinant MtOGT-R37L variant performs a suboptimal alkylated-DNA repair in vitro, suggesting a direct role for the Arg(37)-bearing region in catalysis. The crystal structure of MtOGT complexed with modified DNA solved in the present study reveals details of the protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions occurring during alkylated-DNA binding, and the protein capability also to host unmodified bases inside the active site, in a fully extrahelical conformation. Our data provide the first experimental picture at the atomic level of a possible mode of assembling three adjacent MtOGT monomers on the same monoalkylated dsDNA molecule, and disclose the conformational flexibility of discrete regions of MtOGT, including the Arg(37)-bearing random coil. This peculiar structural plasticity of MtOGT could be instrumental to proper protein clustering at damaged DNA sites, as well as to protein-DNA complexes disassembling on repair. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  4. Tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ankrah, Alfred O; Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Maes, Alex; Van de Wiele, Christophe; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Vorster, Mariza; Sathekge, Mike M

    Tuberculosis (TB) is currently the world's leading cause of infectious mortality. Imaging plays an important role in the management of this disease. The complex immune response of the human body to Mycobacterium tuberculosis results in a wide array of clinical manifestations, making clinical and

  5. Targeting DNA Replication and Repair for the Development of Novel Therapeutics against Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Reiche

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB, an infectious disease which results in approximately 10 million incident cases and 1.4 million deaths globally each year, making it the leading cause of mortality from infection. An effective frontline combination chemotherapy exists for TB; however, this regimen requires the administration of four drugs in a 2 month long intensive phase followed by a continuation phase of a further 4 months with two of the original drugs, and is only effective for the treatment of drug-sensitive TB. The emergence and global spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR as well as extensively drug-resistant (XDR strains of M. tuberculosis, and the complications posed by co-infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and other co-morbidities such as diabetes, have prompted urgent efforts to develop shorter regimens comprising new compounds with novel mechanisms of action. This demands that researchers re-visit cellular pathways and functions that are essential to M. tuberculosis survival and replication in the host but which are inadequately represented amongst the targets of current anti-mycobacterial agents. Here, we consider the DNA replication and repair machinery as a source of new targets for anti-TB drug development. Like most bacteria, M. tuberculosis encodes a complex array of proteins which ensure faithful and accurate replication and repair of the chromosomal DNA. Many of these are essential; so, too, are enzymes in the ancillary pathways of nucleotide biosynthesis, salvage, and re-cycling, suggesting the potential to inhibit replication and repair functions at multiple stages. To this end, we provide an update on the state of chemotherapeutic inhibition of DNA synthesis and related pathways in M. tuberculosis. Given the established links between genotoxicity and mutagenesis, we also consider the potential implications of targeting DNA metabolic pathways implicated in the

  6. Targeting DNA Replication and Repair for the Development of Novel Therapeutics against Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiche, Michael A; Warner, Digby F; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB), an infectious disease which results in approximately 10 million incident cases and 1.4 million deaths globally each year, making it the leading cause of mortality from infection. An effective frontline combination chemotherapy exists for TB; however, this regimen requires the administration of four drugs in a 2 month long intensive phase followed by a continuation phase of a further 4 months with two of the original drugs, and is only effective for the treatment of drug-sensitive TB. The emergence and global spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) as well as extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains of M. tuberculosis , and the complications posed by co-infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other co-morbidities such as diabetes, have prompted urgent efforts to develop shorter regimens comprising new compounds with novel mechanisms of action. This demands that researchers re-visit cellular pathways and functions that are essential to M. tuberculosis survival and replication in the host but which are inadequately represented amongst the targets of current anti-mycobacterial agents. Here, we consider the DNA replication and repair machinery as a source of new targets for anti-TB drug development. Like most bacteria, M. tuberculosis encodes a complex array of proteins which ensure faithful and accurate replication and repair of the chromosomal DNA. Many of these are essential; so, too, are enzymes in the ancillary pathways of nucleotide biosynthesis, salvage, and re-cycling, suggesting the potential to inhibit replication and repair functions at multiple stages. To this end, we provide an update on the state of chemotherapeutic inhibition of DNA synthesis and related pathways in M. tuberculosis . Given the established links between genotoxicity and mutagenesis, we also consider the potential implications of targeting DNA metabolic pathways implicated in the development of drug

  7. Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbara, Khalid F

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to present an update on the manifestations and management of ocular tuberculosis. Tuberculosis affects one-third of the world's population. The incidence of tuberculosis has increased with the increase in the HIV infected population. Following a resurgence of the disease in the US, the incidence has recently declined. Patients may develop scleritis that can be focal, nodular or diffuse with or without keratitis. Anterior granulomatous uveitis may occur. The posterior segment reveals vitritis, choroiditis, and can mimic serpiginous choroiditis and other entities. Patients who are immunosuppressed or HIV infected may develop active mycobacterial disease in the eye leading to rapid destruction of the ocular structures. The diagnosis of ocular tuberculosis is made by isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis on Löwestein-Jensen medium or by PCR. The diagnosis is supported by the clinical findings, imaging techniques including optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green and ultrasonography. Tuberculin skin test helps to confirm the diagnosis. Ocular tuberculosis may occur in the absence of pulmonary disease. Patients present with a spectrum of clinical signs. The disease may mimic several clinical entities. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment of ocular tuberculosis may prevent ocular morbidity and blindness.

  8. Mechanistic studies of the modulation of cleavage activity of topoisomerase I by DNA adducts of mono- and bi-functional Pt-II complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malina, Jaroslav; Vrána, Oldřich; Brabec, Viktor

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 16 (2009), s. 5432-5442 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06030; GA MŠk(CZ) ME08017; GA MŠk(CZ) OC08003; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040581; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200200651; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : cisplatin * camptothecin * topoisomerase I Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 7.479, year: 2009

  9. DNA vaccine constructs expressing Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific genes induce immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, S N M; Al-Attiyah, R; Mustafa, A S

    2010-11-01

    RD1 PE35, PPE68, EsxA, EsxB and RD9 EsxV genes are present in Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome but deleted in Mycobacterium bovis BCG. The aim of this study was to clone these genes into DNA vaccine vectors capable of expressing them in eukaryotic cells as fusion proteins, fused with immunostimulatory signal peptides of human interleukin-2 (hIL-2) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), and evaluate the recombinant DNA vaccine constructs for induction of antigen-specific cellular immune responses in mice. DNA corresponding to the aforementioned RD1 and RD9 genes was cloned into DNA vaccine plasmid vectors pUMVC6 and pUMVC7 (with hIL-2 and tPA signal peptides, respectively), and a total of 10 recombinant DNA vaccine constructs were obtained. BALB/c mice were immunized with the parent and recombinant plasmids and their spleen cells were tested for antigen-induced proliferation with antigens of M. tuberculosis and pure proteins corresponding to the cloned genes. The results showed that antigen-specific proliferation responses were observed for a given antigen only with spleen cells of mice immunized with the homologous recombinant DNA vaccine construct. The mice immunized with the parent plasmids did not show positive immune responses to any of the antigens of the cloned genes. The ability of the DNA vaccine constructs to elicit cellular immune responses makes them an attractive weapon as a safer vaccine candidate for preventive and therapeutic applications against tuberculosis. © 2010 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Here, the primary infection has resolved, but the bacteria are dormant , or hibernating. When conditions become favorable (for instance, a lowered immunity), the bacteria become active. Tuberculosis in older children and adults ...

  11. DNA repair systems and the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: varying activities at different stages of infection

    OpenAIRE

    Gorna, AE; Bowater, RP; Dziadek, J

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacteria, including most of all MTB (Mycobacterium tuberculosis), cause pathogenic infections in humans and, during the infectious process, are exposed to a range of environmental insults, including the host's immune response. From the moment MTB is exhaled by infected individuals, through an active and latent phase in the body of the new host, until the time they reach the reactivation stage, MTB is exposed to many types of DNA-damaging agents. Like all cellular organisms, MTB has effici...

  12. Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Morán López

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available En la actualidad la incidencia de la tuberculosis ha aumentado. El Mycobacterium tuberculosis infecta frecuentemente a las personas con SIDA, debido a que en estos pacientes hay una reducción de la resistencia mediada por células T, lo que propicia que este bacilo pueda desarrollar la enfermedad con una frecuencia superior a la de las personas sanas. La transmisión de la enfermedad puede ser por vía directa, de un individuo afectado a otro, fundamentalmente por las gotitas de saliva que contengan a este microorganismo, o por vía indirecta por la inhalación del bacilo que se puede encontrar por meses en los objetos de uso diario, debido a su gran resistencia. Las micobacterias que producen tuberculosis en el hombre inmunocompetente son la Mycobacterium tuberculosis y la bovis, otros tipos pueden provocar tuberculosis en individuos inmunocomprometidos. La patogenicidad de este bacilo está relacionada con su capacidad para escapar de la destrucción inducida por los macrófagos y para provocar hipersensibilidad de tipo retardado. Esta enfermedad tiene muy pocas manifestaciones bucales, lo que se observa generalmente es una úlcera que toma como asiento fundamental el dorso de la lengua. La tuberculosis amenaza con convertirse en una enfermedad incurable por la deficiente administración de los programas contra ésta, por lo que la OMS plantea para su detección y tratamiento el DOTS (tratamiento observado directamente, de corta duración que comienza a tener resultados satisfactorios, aunque en el último quinquenio, el 88 % de los pacientes que se estimaban como infectados por tuberculosis no recibieron DOTS.At present, the incidence of tuberculosis is on the rise. Mycobacterium tuberculosis often infests AIDS patients due to the fact that these persons´T-cell mediated resistance is reduced, which favors the development of the disease at a higher rate than in healthy people. The disease can be transmitted directly, that is , from an

  13. Examining DNA fingerprinting as an epidemiology tool in the tuberculosis program in the Northwest Territories, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Cheryl; Kandola, Kami; Chui, Linda; Li, Vincent; Nix, Nancy; Johnson, Rhonda

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an important public health problem in the Northwest Territories (NWT), particularly among Canadian Aboriginal people. To analyse the transmission patterns of tuberculosis among the population living in the NWT, a territorial jurisdiction located within Northern Canada. This population-based retrospective study examined the DNA fingerprints of all laboratory confirmed cases of TB in the NWT, Canada, between 1990 and 2009. An isolate of each lab-confirmed case had genotyping done using IS6110 Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism. DNA patterns were assigned to each DNA fingerprint, and indistinguishable fingerprints patterns were assigned a cluster. Social network analysis (SNA) was used to examine direct linkages among cases determined through conventional contact tracing (CCT), their DNA fingerprint and home community. Of the 225 lab-confirmed cases identified, the study was limited to 195 subjects due to DNA fingerprinting data availability. The mean age of the cases was 43.8 years (±22.6) and 120 (61.5%) males. The Dene (First Nations) encompassed 120 of the cases (87.7%), 8 cases (4.1%) were Inuit, 2 cases (1.0%) were Metis, 7 cases (3.6%) were Immigrants and 1 case had unknown ethnicity. One hundred and eighty six (95.4%) subjects were clustered, resulting in 8 clusters. Trend analysis showed significant relationships between with risk factors for unemployment (p=0.020), geographic location (p≤0.001) and homelessness (p≤0.001). Other significant risk factors included excessive alcohol consumption, prior infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and prior contact with a case of TB. This study demonstrates how DNA fingerprinting and SNA can be additional epidemiological tools, along with CCT method, to determine transmission patterns of TB.

  14. Examining DNA fingerprinting as an epidemiology tool in the tuberculosis program in the Northwest Territories, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Case

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tuberculosis (TB is an important public health problem in the Northwest Territories (NWT, particularly among Canadian Aboriginal people. Objective. To analyse the transmission patterns of tuberculosis among the population living in the NWT, a territorial jurisdiction located within Northern Canada. Methods. This population-based retrospective study examined the DNA fingerprints of all laboratory confirmed cases of TB in the NWT, Canada, between 1990 and 2009. An isolate of each lab-confirmed case had genotyping done using IS6110 Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism. DNA patterns were assigned to each DNA fingerprint, and indistinguishable fingerprints patterns were assigned a cluster. Social network analysis (SNA was used to examine direct linkages among cases determined through conventional contact tracing (CCT, their DNA fingerprint and home community. Results. Of the 225 lab-confirmed cases identified, the study was limited to 195 subjects due to DNA fingerprinting data availability. The mean age of the cases was 43.8 years (±22.6 and 120 (61.5% males. The Dene (First Nations encompassed 120 of the cases (87.7%, 8 cases (4.1% were Inuit, 2 cases (1.0% were Metis, 7 cases (3.6% were Immigrants and 1 case had unknown ethnicity. One hundred and eighty six (95.4% subjects were clustered, resulting in 8 clusters. Trend analysis showed significant relationships between with risk factors for unemployment (p=0.020, geographic location (p≤0.001 and homelessness (p≤0.001. Other significant risk factors included excessive alcohol consumption, prior infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and prior contact with a case of TB. Conclusions. This study demonstrates how DNA fingerprinting and SNA can be additional epidemiological tools, along with CCT method, to determine transmission patterns of TB.

  15. Structure of uracil-DNA glycosylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: insights into interactions with ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushal, Prem Singh; Talawar, Ramappa K.; Varshney, Umesh; Vijayan, M.

    2010-01-01

    The molecule of uracil-DNA glycosylase from M. tuberculosis exhibits domain motion on binding to DNA or a proteinaceous inhibitor. The highly conserved DNA-binding region interacts with a citrate ion in the structure. Uracil N-glycosylase (Ung) is the most thoroughly studied of the group of uracil DNA-glycosylase (UDG) enzymes that catalyse the first step in the uracil excision-repair pathway. The overall structure of the enzyme from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is essentially the same as that of the enzyme from other sources. However, differences exist in the N- and C-terminal stretches and some catalytic loops. Comparison with appropriate structures indicate that the two-domain enzyme closes slightly when binding to DNA, while it opens slightly when binding to the proteinaceous inhibitor Ugi. The structural changes in the catalytic loops on complexation reflect the special features of their structure in the mycobacterial protein. A comparative analysis of available sequences of the enzyme from different sources indicates high conservation of amino-acid residues in the catalytic loops. The uracil-binding pocket in the structure is occupied by a citrate ion. The interactions of the citrate ion with the protein mimic those of uracil, in addition to providing insights into other possible interactions that inhibitors could be involved in

  16. High-fidelity DNA replication in Mycobacterium tuberculosis relies on a trinuclear zinc center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baños-Mateos, Soledad; van Roon, Anne-Marie M; Lang, Ulla F; Maslen, Sarah L; Skehel, J Mark; Lamers, Meindert H

    2017-10-11

    High-fidelity DNA replication depends on a proofreading 3'-5' exonuclease that is associated with the replicative DNA polymerase. The replicative DNA polymerase DnaE1 from the major pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) uses its intrinsic PHP-exonuclease that is distinct from the canonical DEDD exonucleases found in the Escherichia coli and eukaryotic replisomes. The mechanism of the PHP-exonuclease is not known. Here, we present the crystal structure of the Mtb DnaE1 polymerase. The PHP-exonuclease has a trinuclear zinc center, coordinated by nine conserved residues. Cryo-EM analysis reveals the entry path of the primer strand in the PHP-exonuclease active site. Furthermore, the PHP-exonuclease shows a striking similarity to E. coli endonuclease IV, which provides clues regarding the mechanism of action. Altogether, this work provides important insights into the PHP-exonuclease and reveals unique properties that make it an attractive target for novel anti-mycobacterial drugs.The polymerase and histidinol phosphatase (PHP) domain in the DNA polymerase DnaE1 is essential for mycobacterial high-fidelity DNA replication. Here, the authors determine the DnaE1 crystal structure, which reveals the PHP-exonuclease mechanism that can be exploited for antibiotic development.

  17. Comparison of nine DNA extraction methods for the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis by real time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Moura

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Bovine tuberculosis is an infectious disease with a high impact on the cattle industry, particularly in developing countries. PCR is a very sensitive method for detection of infectious agents, but the sensitivity of molecular diagnosis is largely dependent on the efficiency of the DNA extraction methods. The objective of this study was to evaluate DNA extraction methods for direct detection of Mycobacterium bovis in bovine tissue. Nine commercial kits for DNA extraction were evaluated when combined with two real time PCRs. The DNeasy Blood & Tissue Kit from QIAGEN showed better performance and sensitivity followed by the DNA Mini Kit RBC and FTA Elute Micro Card. Results suggested that, even when the analytical sensitivity of the qPCR is very high, the extraction method can influence the diagnostic sensitivity.

  18. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Latorre Tortello, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Por definición, la tuberculosis pulmonar es la localizaci6n del M. tuberculosis en el tracto respiratorio, la forma más común y principal de la afección y la única capaz de contagiar a otras personas. El M. tuberculosis, descubierto por Robert Koch en 1882, el bacilo de Koch, es un bacilo delgado, inmóvil, de 4 micras de longitud media, aerobio obligado, que se tiñe de rajo por la tinción de Ziehl-Neelsen. Debido a la coraza lipídica de su pared, lo hace resistente a la decoloración con ácido...

  19. Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Latorre Tortello

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Por definición, la tuberculosis pulmonar es la localizaci6n del M. tuberculosis en el tracto respiratorio, la forma más común y principal de la afección y la única capaz de contagiar a otras personas. El M. tuberculosis, descubierto por Robert Koch en 1882, el bacilo de Koch, es un bacilo delgado, inmóvil, de 4 micras de longitud media, aerobio obligado, que se tiñe de rajo por la tinción de Ziehl-Neelsen. Debido a la coraza lipídica de su pared, lo hace resistente a la decoloración con ácidos y alcohol, de ahí el nombre de bacilos ácido-alcohol resistente (BAAR. Su transmisión es directa, de persona a persona.

  20. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pablo Latorre Tortello

    1998-01-01

    Por definición, la tuberculosis pulmonar es la localizaci6n del M. tuberculosis en el tracto respiratorio, la forma más común y principal de la afección y la única capaz de contagiar a otras personas. El M. tuberculosis, descubierto por Robert Koch en 1882, el bacilo de Koch, es un bacilo delgado, inmóvil, de 4 micras de longitud media, aerobio obligado, que se tiñe de rajo por la tinción de Ziehl-Neelsen. Debido a la coraza lipídica de su pared, lo hace resistente a la decoloración con ácido...

  1. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Morán López; Yaima Lazo Amador

    2001-01-01

    En la actualidad la incidencia de la tuberculosis ha aumentado. El Mycobacterium tuberculosis infecta frecuentemente a las personas con SIDA, debido a que en estos pacientes hay una reducción de la resistencia mediada por células T, lo que propicia que este bacilo pueda desarrollar la enfermedad con una frecuencia superior a la de las personas sanas. La transmisión de la enfermedad puede ser por vía directa, de un individuo afectado a otro, fundamentalmente por las gotitas de saliva que conte...

  2. Direct control of type IIA topoisomerase activity by a chromosomally encoded regulatory protein

    OpenAIRE

    Vos, Seychelle M.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Hershey, David M.; Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Sengupta, Sugopa; Nagaraja, Valakunja; Berger, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Topoisomerases are central regulators of DNA supercoiling; how these enzymes are regulated to suit specific cellular needs is poorly understood. Vos et al. now report the structure of E. coli gyrase, a type IIA topoisomerase bound to an inhibitor, YacG. YacG represses gyrase through steric occlusion of its DNA-binding site. Further studies show that YacG engages two spatially segregated regions associated with small-molecule inhibitor interactions—fluoroquinolone antibiotics and a gyrase agon...

  3. Direct DNA Extraction from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Frozen Stocks as a Reculture-Independent Approach to Whole-Genome Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjorn-Mortensen, K; Zallet, J; Lillebaek, T

    2015-01-01

    Culturing before DNA extraction represents a major time-consuming step in whole-genome sequencing of slow-growing bacteria, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We report a workflow to extract DNA from frozen isolates without reculturing. Prepared libraries and sequence data were comparable...... with results from recultured aliquots of the same stocks....

  4. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mendoza Zuñiga, Marleny; Bastidas Párraga, Gustavo; León Untiveros, Paúl Albert

    2013-01-01

    La tuberculosis es una enfermedad infectocontagiosa producida por el bacilo de Koch, que ataca a los pulmones pero puede ser difuminada por todo el cuerpo. El siguiente artículo de información nos da una visión amplia de la detección, diagnóstico y tratamiento de la misma.

  5. Deficiency of double-strand DNA break repair does not impair Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence in multiple animal models of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Brook E; Barkan, Daniel; Bongiorno, Paola; Karakousis, Petros C; Glickman, Michael S

    2014-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persistence within its human host requires mechanisms to resist the effector molecules of host immunity, which exert their bactericidal effects through damaging pathogen proteins, membranes, and DNA. Substantial evidence indicates that bacterial pathogens, including M. tuberculosis, require DNA repair systems to repair the DNA damage inflicted by the host during infection, but the role of double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair systems is unclear. Double-strand DNA breaks are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage and must be repaired for chromosome replication to proceed. M. tuberculosis elaborates three genetically distinct DSB repair systems: homologous recombination (HR), nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), and single-strand annealing (SSA). NHEJ, which repairs DSBs in quiescent cells, may be particularly relevant to M. tuberculosis latency. However, very little information is available about the phenotype of DSB repair-deficient M. tuberculosis in animal models of infection. Here we tested M. tuberculosis strains lacking NHEJ (a Δku ΔligD strain), HR (a ΔrecA strain), or both (a ΔrecA Δku strain) in C57BL/6J mice, C3HeB/FeJ mice, guinea pigs, and a mouse hollow-fiber model of infection. We found no difference in bacterial load, histopathology, or host mortality between wild-type and DSB repair mutant strains in any model of infection. These results suggest that the animal models tested do not inflict DSBs on the mycobacterial chromosome, that other repair pathways can compensate for the loss of NHEJ and HR, or that DSB repair is not required for M. tuberculosis pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. In vitro antibacterial activity of AZD0914, a new spiropyrimidinetrione DNA gyrase/topoisomerase inhibitor with potent activity against Gram-positive, fastidious Gram-Negative, and atypical bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huband, Michael D; Bradford, Patricia A; Otterson, Linda G; Basarab, Gregory S; Kutschke, Amy C; Giacobbe, Robert A; Patey, Sara A; Alm, Richard A; Johnstone, Michele R; Potter, Marie E; Miller, Paul F; Mueller, John P

    2015-01-01

    AZD0914 is a new spiropyrimidinetrione bacterial DNA gyrase/topoisomerase inhibitor with potent in vitro antibacterial activity against key Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Streptococcus agalactiae), fastidious Gram-negative (Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria gonorrhoeae), atypical (Legionella pneumophila), and anaerobic (Clostridium difficile) bacterial species, including isolates with known resistance to fluoroquinolones. AZD0914 works via inhibition of DNA biosynthesis and accumulation of double-strand cleavages; this mechanism of inhibition differs from those of other marketed antibacterial compounds. AZD0914 stabilizes and arrests the cleaved covalent complex of gyrase with double-strand broken DNA under permissive conditions and thus blocks religation of the double-strand cleaved DNA to form fused circular DNA. Whereas this mechanism is similar to that seen with fluoroquinolones, it is mechanistically distinct. AZD0914 exhibited low frequencies of spontaneous resistance in S. aureus, and if mutants were obtained, the mutations mapped to gyrB. Additionally, no cross-resistance was observed for AZD0914 against recent bacterial clinical isolates demonstrating resistance to fluoroquinolones or other drug classes, including macrolides, β-lactams, glycopeptides, and oxazolidinones. AZD0914 was bactericidal in both minimum bactericidal concentration and in vitro time-kill studies. In in vitro checkerboard/synergy testing with 17 comparator antibacterials, only additivity/indifference was observed. The potent in vitro antibacterial activity (including activity against fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates), low frequency of resistance, lack of cross-resistance, and bactericidal activity of AZD0914 support its continued development. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Homology modeling, molecular docking and DNA binding studies of nucleotide excision repair UvrC protein from M. tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parulekar, Rishikesh S; Barage, Sagar H; Jalkute, Chidambar B; Dhanavade, Maruti J; Fandilolu, Prayagraj M; Sonawane, Kailas D

    2013-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a Gram positive, acid-fast bacteria belonging to genus Mycobacterium, is the leading causative agent of most cases of tuberculosis. The pathogenicity of the bacteria is enhanced by its developed DNA repair mechanism which consists of machineries such as nucleotide excision repair. Nucleotide excision repair consists of excinuclease protein UvrABC endonuclease, multi-enzymatic complex which carries out repair of damaged DNA in sequential manner. UvrC protein is a part of this complex and thus helps to repair the damaged DNA of M. tuberculosis. Hence, structural bioinformatics study of UvrC protein from M. tuberculosis was carried out using homology modeling and molecular docking techniques. Assessment of the reliability of the homology model was carried out by predicting its secondary structure along with its model validation. The predicted structure was docked with the ATP and the interacting amino acid residues of UvrC protein with the ATP were found to be TRP539, PHE89, GLU536, ILE402 and ARG575. The binding of UvrC protein with the DNA showed two different domains. The residues from domain I of the protein VAL526, THR524 and LEU521 interact with the DNA whereas, amino acids interacting from the domain II of the UvrC protein included ARG597, GLU595, GLY594 and GLY592 residues. This predicted model could be useful to design new inhibitors of UvrC enzyme to prevent pathogenesis of Mycobacterium and so the tuberculosis.

  8. Programmed activation of cancer cell apoptosis: A tumor-targeted phototherapeutic topoisomerase I inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Weon Sup; Han, Jiyou; Kumar, Rajesh; Lee, Gyung Gyu; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Kim, Jong Seung

    2016-07-01

    We report here a tumor-targeting masked phototherapeutic agent 1 (PT-1). This system contains SN-38—a prodrug of the topoisomerase I inhibitor irinotecan. Topoisomerase I is a vital enzyme that controls DNA topology during replication, transcription, and recombination. An elevated level of topoisomerase I is found in many carcinomas, making it an attractive target for the development of effective anticancer drugs. In addition, PT-1 contains both a photo-triggered moiety (nitrovanillin) and a cancer targeting unit (biotin). Upon light activation in cancer cells, PT-1 interferes with DNA re-ligation, diminishes the expression of topoisomerase I, and enhances the expression of inter alia mitochondrial apoptotic genes, death receptors, and caspase enzymes, inducing DNA damage and eventually leading to apoptosis. In vitro and in vivo studies showed significant inhibition of cancer growth and the hybrid system PT-1 thus shows promise as a programmed photo-therapeutic (“phototheranostic”).

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA detection using surface plasmon resonance modulated by telecommunication wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shih-Hsiang; Lin, Yan-Yu; Lu, Shao-Hsi; Tsai, I-Fang; Lu, Yen-Ta; Ho, Hsin-Tsung

    2013-12-27

    A surface plasmon resonance sensor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is developed using repeatable telecommunication wavelength modulation based on optical fiber communications laser wavelength and stability. MTB DNA concentrations of 1 μg/mL and 10 μg/mL were successfully demonstrated to have the same spectral half-width in the dip for optimum coupling. The sensitivity was shown to be -0.087 dB/(μg/mL) at all applied telecommunication wavelengths and the highest sensitivity achieved was 115 ng/mL without thiolated DNA immobilization onto a gold plate, which is better than the sensor limit of 400 ng/mL possible with commercial biosensor equipment.

  10. Characterization of topoisomerase I and II activities in nuclear extracts during callogenesis in immature embryos of Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo, M; Giné, R; Santos, M; Puigdomènech, P

    1991-01-01

    We have characterized the topoisomerase I and II activities in nuclear extracts from immature embryos of Zea mays and the effect of the treatment with 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and abscisic acid (ABA). These extracts were shown to be essentially devoid of protease and nuclease activities and they were tested for their ability to relax supercoiled DNA, unknotting P4 DNA and catenate circular duplex DNA under catalytic conditions. Unknotting and catenation reactions are strictly magnesium- and ATP-dependent, but not the relaxation of circular supercoiled DNA allowing the detection of both topoisomerase I and II activities. Two cytotoxic drugs, camptothecin, a plant alkaloid that inhibits eukaryotic topoisomerase I, and epipodophyllotoxin VM-26 (teniposide) that inhibits topoisomerase II, have been assayed in our extracts showing similar inhibitory effects on topoisomerase enzymes. Alkaline phosphatase treatment of nuclear extracts abolishes both topoisomerase activities. Nuclear extracts from embryos treated with 2,4-D showed 200% increase on topoisomerase II activity as compared with untreated ones, but only residual activity was detected in ABA-treated embryos. Nuclear extracts from hormone-treated and untreated embryos showed similar topoisomerase I activity with deviations of less than 25%. These differences are discussed in terms of possible post-translational modifications of the enzymes associated with the increase in proliferation activity of calli.

  11. The effects of anti-DNA topoisomerase II drugs, etoposide and ellipticine, are modified in root meristem cells of Allium cepa by MG132, an inhibitor of 26S proteasomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żabka, Aneta; Winnicki, Konrad; Polit, Justyna Teresa; Maszewski, Janusz

    2015-11-01

    DNA topoisomerase II (Topo II), a highly specialized nuclear enzyme, resolves various entanglement problems concerning DNA that arise during chromatin remodeling, transcription, S-phase replication, meiotic recombination, chromosome condensation and segregation during mitosis. The genotoxic effects of two Topo II inhibitors known as potent anti-cancer drugs, etoposide (ETO) and ellipticine (EPC), were assayed in root apical meristem cells of Allium cepa. Despite various types of molecular interactions between these drugs and DNA-Topo II complexes at the chromatin level, which have a profound negative impact on the genome integrity (production of double-strand breaks, chromosomal bridges and constrictions, lagging fragments of chromosomes and their uneven segregation to daughter cell nuclei), most of the elicited changes were apparently similar, regarding both their intensity and time characteristics. No essential changes between ETO- and EPC-treated onion roots were noticed in the frequency of G1-, S-, G2-and M-phase cells, nuclear morphology, chromosome structures, tubulin-microtubule systems, extended distribution of mitosis-specific phosphorylation sites of histone H3, and the induction of apoptosis-like programmed cell death (AL-PCD). However, the important difference between the effects induced by the ETO and EPC concerns their catalytic activities in the presence of MG132 (proteasome inhibitor engaged in Topo II-mediated formation of cleavage complexes) and relates to the time-variable changes in chromosomal aberrations and AL-PCD rates. This result implies that proteasome-dependent mechanisms may contribute to the course of physiological effects generated by DNA lesions under conditions that affect the ability of plant cells to resolve topological problems that associated with the nuclear metabolic activities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Domain structure of a NHEJ DNA repair ligase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Robert S; Tonkin, Louise M; Green, Andrew J; Doherty, Aidan J

    2005-08-19

    A prokaryotic non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) system for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), composed of a Ku homodimer (Mt-Ku) and a multidomain multifunctional ATP-dependent DNA ligase (Mt-Lig), has been described recently in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mt-Lig exhibits polymerase and nuclease activity in addition to DNA ligation activity. These functions were ascribed to putative polymerase, nuclease and ligase domains that together constitute a monomeric protein. Here, the separate polymerase, nuclease and ligase domains of Mt-Lig were cloned individually, over-expressed and the soluble proteins purified to homogeneity. The polymerase domain demonstrated DNA-dependent RNA primase activity, catalysing the synthesis of unprimed oligoribonucleotides on single-stranded DNA templates. The polymerase domain can also extend DNA in a template-dependent manner. This activity was eliminated when the catalytic aspartate residues were replaced with alanine. The ligase domain catalysed the sealing of nicked double-stranded DNA designed to mimic a DSB, consistent with the role of Mt-Lig in NHEJ. Deletion of the active-site lysine residue prevented the formation of an adenylated ligase complex and consequently thwarted ligation. The nuclease domain did not function independently as a 3'-5' exonuclease. DNA-binding assays revealed that both the polymerase and ligase domains bind DNA in vitro, the latter with considerably higher affinity. Mt-Ku directly stimulated the polymerase and nuclease activities of Mt-Lig. The polymerase domain bound Mt-Ku in vitro, suggesting it may recruit Mt-Lig to Ku-bound DNA in vivo. Consistent with these data, Mt-Ku stimulated the primer extension activity of the polymerase domain, suggestive of a functional interaction relevant to NHEJ-mediated DSB repair processes.

  13. SigG Does Not Control Gene Expression in Response to DNA Damage in Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv ▿ §

    OpenAIRE

    Smollett, Katherine L.; Dawson, Lisa F.; Davis, Elaine O.

    2010-01-01

    Expression of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis sigG sigma factor was induced by a variety of DNA-damaging agents, but inactivation of sigG did not affect induction of gene expression or bacterial survival under these conditions. Therefore, SigG does not control the DNA repair response of M. tuberculosis H37Rv.

  14. Efficacy Testing of H56 cDNA Tattoo Immunization against Tuberculosis in a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platteel, Anouk C M; Nieuwenhuizen, Natalie E; Domaszewska, Teresa; Schürer, Stefanie; Zedler, Ulrike; Brinkmann, Volker; Sijts, Alice J A M; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( Mtb ), remains a global threat. The only approved vaccine against TB, Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), provides insufficient protection and, being a live vaccine, can cause disseminated disease in immunocompromised individuals. Previously, we found that intradermal cDNA tattoo immunization with cDNA of tetanus toxoid fragment C domain 1 fused to cDNA of the fusion protein H56, comprising the Mtb antigens Ag85B, ESAT-6, and Rv2660c, induced antigen-specific CD8 + T cell responses in vivo . As cDNA tattoo immunization would be safer than a live vaccine in immunocompromised patients, we tested the protective efficacy of intradermal tattoo immunization against TB with H56 cDNA, as well as with H56_E, a construct optimized for epitope processing in a mouse model. As Mtb antigens can be used in combination with BCG to boost immune responses, we also tested the protective efficacy of heterologous prime-boost, using dermal tattoo immunization with H56_E cDNA to boost BCG immunization in mice. Dermal H56 and H56_E cDNA immunization induced H56-specific CD4 + and CD8 + T cell responses and Ag85B-specific IgG antibodies, but did not reduce bacterial loads, although immunization with H56_E ameliorated lung pathology. Both subcutaneous and intradermal immunization with BCG resulted in broad cellular immune responses, with increased frequencies of CD4 + T effector memory cells, T follicular helper cells, and germinal center B cells, and resulted in reduced bacterial loads and lung pathology. Heterologous vaccination with BCG/H56_E cDNA induced increased H56-specific CD4 + and CD8 + T cell cytokine responses compared to vaccination with BCG alone, and lung pathology was significantly decreased in BCG/H56_E cDNA immunized mice compared to unvaccinated controls. However, bacterial loads were not decreased after heterologous vaccination compared to BCG alone. CD4 + T cells responding to Ag85B- and ESAT-6

  15. Identification of anziaic acid, a lichen depside from Hypotrachyna sp., as a new topoisomerase poison inhibitor.

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    Bokun Cheng

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase inhibitors are effective for antibacterial and anticancer therapy because they can lead to the accumulation of the intermediate DNA cleavage complex formed by the topoisomerase enzymes, which trigger cell death. Here we report the application of a novel enzyme-based high-throughput screening assay to identify natural product extracts that can lead to increased accumulation of the DNA cleavage complex formed by recombinant Yersinia pestis topoisomerase I as part of a larger effort to identify new antibacterial compounds. Further characterization and fractionation of the screening positives from the primary assay led to the discovery of a depside, anziaic acid, from the lichen Hypotrachyna sp. as an inhibitor for both Y. pestis and Escherichia coli topoisomerase I. In in vitro assays, anziaic acid exhibits antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis and a membrane permeable strain of E. coli. Anziaic acid was also found to act as an inhibitor of human topoisomerase II but had little effect on human topoisomerase I. This is the first report of a depside with activity as a topoisomerase poison inhibitor and demonstrates the potential of this class of natural products as a source for new antibacterial and anticancer compounds.

  16. DNA repair systems and the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: varying activities at different stages of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorna, Alina E; Bowater, Richard P; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2010-05-25

    Mycobacteria, including most of all MTB (Mycobacterium tuberculosis), cause pathogenic infections in humans and, during the infectious process, are exposed to a range of environmental insults, including the host's immune response. From the moment MTB is exhaled by infected individuals, through an active and latent phase in the body of the new host, until the time they reach the reactivation stage, MTB is exposed to many types of DNA-damaging agents. Like all cellular organisms, MTB has efficient DNA repair systems, and these are believed to play essential roles in mycobacterial pathogenesis. As different stages of infection have great variation in the conditions in which mycobacteria reside, it is possible that different repair systems are essential for progression to specific phases of infection. MTB possesses homologues of DNA repair systems that are found widely in other species of bacteria, such as nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair and repair by homologous recombination. MTB also possesses a system for non-homologous end-joining of DNA breaks, which appears to be widespread in prokaryotes, although its presence is sporadic within different species within a genus. However, MTB does not possess homologues of the typical mismatch repair system that is found in most bacteria. Recent studies have demonstrated that DNA repair genes are expressed differentially at each stage of infection. In the present review, we focus on different DNA repair systems from mycobacteria and identify questions that remain in our understanding of how these systems have an impact upon the infection processes of these important pathogens.

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DinG is a structure-specific helicase that unwinds G4 DNA: implications for targeting G4 DNA as a novel therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Roshan Singh; Desingu, Ambika; Basavaraju, Shivakumar; Subramanya, Shreelakshmi; Rao, Desirazu N; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2014-09-05

    The significance of G-quadruplexes and the helicases that resolve G4 structures in prokaryotes is poorly understood. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome is GC-rich and contains >10,000 sequences that have the potential to form G4 structures. In Escherichia coli, RecQ helicase unwinds G4 structures. However, RecQ is absent in M. tuberculosis, and the helicase that participates in G4 resolution in M. tuberculosis is obscure. Here, we show that M. tuberculosis DinG (MtDinG) exhibits high affinity for ssDNA and ssDNA translocation with a 5' → 3' polarity. Interestingly, MtDinG unwinds overhangs, flap structures, and forked duplexes but fails to unwind linear duplex DNA. Our data with DNase I footprinting provide mechanistic insights and suggest that MtDinG is a 5' → 3' polarity helicase. Notably, in contrast to E. coli DinG, MtDinG catalyzes unwinding of replication fork and Holliday junction structures. Strikingly, we find that MtDinG resolves intermolecular G4 structures. These data suggest that MtDinG is a multifunctional structure-specific helicase that unwinds model structures of DNA replication, repair, and recombination as well as G4 structures. We finally demonstrate that promoter sequences of M. tuberculosis PE_PGRS2, mce1R, and moeB1 genes contain G4 structures, implying that G4 structures may regulate gene expression in M. tuberculosis. We discuss these data and implicate targeting G4 structures and DinG helicase in M. tuberculosis could be a novel therapeutic strategy for culminating the infection with this pathogen. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Activities of Fluoroquinolones against Streptococcus pneumoniae Type II Topoisomerases Purified as Recombinant Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Ian; George, John

    1999-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae topoisomerase IV and DNA gyrase have been purified from a fluoroquinolone-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae strain, from first-step mutants showing low-level resistance to ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, levofloxacin, and ofloxacin, and from two clinical isolates showing intermediate- and high-level fluoroquinolone resistance by a gene cloning method that produces recombinant proteins from Escherichia coli. The concentrations of ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, levofloxacin, or ofloxacin required to inhibit wild-type topoisomerase IV were 8 to 16 times lower than those required to inhibit wild-type DNA gyrase. Furthermore, low-level resistance to these fluoroquinolones was entirely due to the reduced inhibitory activity of fluoroquinolones against topoisomerase IV. For all the laboratory strains, the 50% inhibitory concentration for topoisomerase IV directly correlated with the MIC. We therefore propose that with S. pneumoniae, ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, levofloxacin, and ofloxacin target topoisomerase IV in preference to DNA gyrase. Sitafloxacin, on the other hand, was found to be equipotent against either enzyme. This characteristic is unique for a fluoroquinolone. A reduction in the sensitivities of both topoisomerase IV and DNA gyrase are required, however, to achieve intermediate- or high-level fluoroquinolone resistance in S. pneumoniae. PMID:10543732

  19. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Carlos Rodríguez, D.

    2014-01-01

    La tuberculosis sigue constituyendo un problema de salud pública a nivel mundial con casi nueve millones de casos nuevos en 2012 y se estima que un tercio de la humanidad está infectada. A nivel nacional, si bien las tasas son alentadoras, la variación regional es muy importante. En los últimos años se han registrado progresos importantes tanto en el conocimiento de la conducta del bacilo de Koch, el causante de la enfermedad, como en los métodos para detectarlo. Así los IGRAS (Interferon G R...

  20. Clinical value of polymerase chain reaction in the diagnosis of joint tuberculosis by detecting the DNA of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yong-sheng; Lou, Si-quan; Wen, Jian-min; Lv, Wei-xin; Jiao, Chang-geng; Yang, Su-min; Xu, Hai-bin

    2011-02-01

    To assess the clinical value of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of joint tuberculosis (TB). PCR was used blindly to detect the DNA of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.TB) in five specimens of M.TB, 5 of BCG, and 10 of other bacteria. Then, M. TB in 98 samples from patients with joint TB and 100 samples from patients with non-tubercular joint disorders were detected by PCR, acid-fast staining and culture,. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of PCR were calculated. The χ2 test was used for statistical analysis of the frequency of various factors. At the same time, some problems with PCR were also systematically analyzed. (1) In the "standard samples", both M. TB and BCG showed positive while other bacteria were negative. (2) In 98 cases from patients with joint TB, 81 were positive by PCR, 6 by acid-fast staining, and 17 by culture. In 100 cases from patients with non-tuberculous joint disorders, 9 were positive by PCR, and none by either acid-fast staining or culture. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive value of PCR were 82.65% (81/98), 91.00% (91/100), 86.87% (172/198), 90.00% (81/90) and 84.26% (91/108), respectively. (3) The positive rates for PCR, acid-fast staining and culture in detection of M. TB were 82.65% (81/98), 6.12% (6/98), and 17.34% (17/98), respectively. There were statistically significant differences between the three methods (P < 0.001). (4) The process of PCR is automatic, and can be completed within 3 to 6 hours, whereas 4 to 8 weeks are required for the conventional culture of M. TB. PCR is a sensitive, specific, rapid, simple and minimally invasive method for detection of M. TB in samples from joint TB, and can play an important role in early and rapid diagnosis and differential diagnosis of joint TB. But it also has some limitations, such as false positivity and false negativity. © 2011 Tianjin Hospital

  1. Genotypic detection of rifampicin and isoniazid resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains by DNA sequencing: a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El mashad Noha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis is a growing international health concern. It is the biggest killer among the infectious diseases in the world today. Early detection of drug resistance allows starting of an appropriate treatment. Resistance to drugs is due to particular genomic mutations in specific genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis(MTB. The aim of this study was to identify the presence of Isoniazid (INH and Rifampicin(RIF drug resistance in new and previously treated tuberculosis (TB cases using DNA sequencing. Methods This study was carried out on 153 tuberculous patients with positive Bactec 460 culture for acid fast bacilli. Results Of the 153 patients, 105 (68.6% were new cases and 48 (31.4% were previously treated cases. Drug susceptibility testing on Bactec revealed 50 resistant cases for one or more of the first line antituberculous. Genotypic analysis was done only for rifampicin resistant specimens (23 cases and INH resistant specimens (26 cases to detect mutations responsible for drug resistance by PCR amplification of rpoB gene for rifampicin resistant cases and KatG gene for isoniazid resistant cases. Finally, DNA sequencing was done for detection of mutation within rpoB and KatG genes. Genotypic analysis of RIF resistant cases revealed that 20/23 cases (86.9% of RIF resistance were having rpoB gene mutation versus 3 cases (13.1% having no mutation with a high statistical significant difference between them (P Conclusion We can conclude that rifampicin resistance could be used as a useful surrogate marker for estimation of multidrug resistance. In addition, Genotypic method was superior to that of the traditional phenotypic method which is time-consuming taking several weeks or longer.

  2. The majority of inducible DNA repair genes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis are induced independently of RecA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Lucinda; Hinds, Jason; Springer, Burkhard; Sander, Peter; Buxton, Roger S; Davis, Elaine O

    2003-11-01

    In many species of bacteria most inducible DNA repair genes are regulated by LexA homologues and are dependent on RecA for induction. We have shown previously by analysing the induction of recA that two mechanisms for the induction of gene expression following DNA damage exist in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Whereas one of these depends on RecA and LexA in the classical way, the other mechanism is independent of both of these proteins and induction occurs in the absence of RecA. Here we investigate the generality of each of these mechanisms by analysing the global response to DNA damage in both wild-type M. tuberculosis and a recA deletion strain of M. tuberculosis using microarrays. This revealed that the majority of the genes that were induced remained inducible in the recA mutant stain. Of particular note most of the inducible genes with known or predicted functions in DNA repair did not depend on recA for induction. Amongst these are genes involved in nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, damage reversal and recombination. Thus, it appears that this novel mechanism of gene regulation is important for DNA repair in M. tuberculosis.

  3. Anucleate Cell Blue Assay: a Useful Tool for Identifying Novel Type II Topoisomerase Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Oyamada, Yoshihiro; Ito, Hideaki; Fujimoto-Nakamura, Mika; Tanitame, Akihiko; Iwai, Noritaka; Nagai, Kazuo; Yamagishi, Jun-ichi; Wachi, Masaaki

    2006-01-01

    About 95,000 compounds were screened by the anucleate cell blue assay. Fifty-one of the hit compounds had various structures and showed inhibitory activity against DNA gyrase and/or topoisomerase IV. Moreover, the compounds exhibited antibacterial activity against a fluoroquinolone- and novobiocin-resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus. The anucleate cell blue assay is therefore a useful tool for finding novel type II topoisomerase inhibitors.

  4. Biochemical Characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA Repair Enzymes – Nfo, XthA and Nei2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailau Abeldenov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tuberculosis (TB is a human disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb. Treatment of TB requires long-term courses of multi-drug therapies to eliminate subpopulations of bacteria, which sometimes persist against antibiotics. Therefore, understanding of the mechanism of Mtb antibiotic-resistance is extremely important. During infection, Mtb overcomes a variety of body defense mechanisms, including treatment with the reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen. The bases in DNA molecule are susceptible to the damages caused by reactive forms of intermediate compounds of oxygen and nitrogen. Most of this damage is repaired by the base excision repair (BER pathway. In this study, we aimed to biochemically characterize three Mtb DNA repair enzymes of BER pathway. Methods: XthA, nfo, and nei genes were identified in mycobacteria by homology search of genomic sequences available in the GenBank database. We used standard methods of genetic engineering  to clone and sequence Mtb genes, which coded Nfo, XthA and Nei2 repair enzymes. The protein products of Mtb genes were expressed and purified in Escherichia coli using affinity tags. The enzymatic activity of purified Nfo, XthA, and Nei2 proteins were measured using radioactively labeled DNA substrates containing various modified residues. Results: The genes end (Rv0670, xthA (Rv0427c, and nei (Rv3297 were PCR amplified using genomic DNA of Mtb H37Rv with primers that contain specific restriction sites. The amplified products were inserted into pET28c(+ expression vector in such a way that the recombinant proteins contain C-terminal histidine tags. The plasmid constructs were verified by sequencing and then transformed into the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 strain. Purification of recombinant proteins was performed using Ni2+ ions immobilized affinity column, coupled with the fast performance liquid chromatography machine AKTA. Identification of the isolated proteins was performed by

  5. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2540c DNA sequence encodes a bifunctional chorismate synthase

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    Santos Diógenes S

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of multi- and extensively-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains has created an urgent need for new agents to treat tuberculosis (TB. The enzymes of shikimate pathway are attractive targets to the development of antitubercular agents because it is essential for M. tuberculosis and is absent from humans. Chorismate synthase (CS is the seventh enzyme of this route and catalyzes the NADH- and FMN-dependent synthesis of chorismate, a precursor of aromatic amino acids, naphthoquinones, menaquinones, and mycobactins. Although the M. tuberculosis Rv2540c (aroF sequence has been annotated to encode a chorismate synthase, there has been no report on its correct assignment and functional characterization of its protein product. Results In the present work, we describe DNA amplification of aroF-encoded CS from M. tuberculosis (MtCS, molecular cloning, protein expression, and purification to homogeneity. N-terminal amino acid sequencing, mass spectrometry and gel filtration chromatography were employed to determine identity, subunit molecular weight and oligomeric state in solution of homogeneous recombinant MtCS. The bifunctionality of MtCS was determined by measurements of both chorismate synthase and NADH:FMN oxidoreductase activities. The flavin reductase activity was characterized, showing the existence of a complex between FMNox and MtCS. FMNox and NADH equilibrium binding was measured. Primary deuterium, solvent and multiple kinetic isotope effects are described and suggest distinct steps for hydride and proton transfers, with the former being more rate-limiting. Conclusion This is the first report showing that a bacterial CS is bifunctional. Primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects show that C4-proS hydrogen is being transferred during the reduction of FMNox by NADH and that hydride transfer contributes significantly to the rate-limiting step of FMN reduction reaction. Solvent kinetic isotope effects and

  6. M. tuberculosis Sliding β-Clamp Does Not Interact Directly with the NAD+ -Dependent DNA Ligase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukshal, Vandna; Khanam, Taran; Chopra, Deepti; Singh, Nidhi; Sanyal, Sabyasachi; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2012-01-01

    The sliding β-clamp, an important component of the DNA replication and repair machinery, is drawing increasing attention as a therapeutic target. We report the crystal structure of the M. tuberculosis β-clamp (Mtbβ-clamp) to 3.0 Å resolution. The protein crystallized in the space group C2221 with cell-dimensions a = 72.7, b = 234.9 & c = 125.1 Å respectively. Mtbβ-clamp is a dimer, and exhibits head-to-tail association similar to other bacterial clamps. Each monomer folds into three domains with similar structures respectively and associates with its dimeric partner through 6 salt-bridges and about 21 polar interactions. Affinity experiments involving a blunt DNA duplex, primed-DNA and nicked DNA respectively show that Mtbβ-clamp binds specifically to primed DNA about 1.8 times stronger compared to the other two substrates and with an apparent Kd of 300 nM. In bacteria like E. coli, the β-clamp is known to interact with subunits of the clamp loader, NAD+ -dependent DNA ligase (LigA) and other partners. We tested the interactions of the Mtbβ-clamp with MtbLigA and the γ-clamp loader subunit through radioactive gel shift assays, size exclusion chromatography, yeast-two hybrid experiments and also functionally. Intriguingly while Mtbβ-clamp interacts in vitro with the γ-clamp loader, it does not interact with MtbLigA unlike in bacteria like E. coli where it does. Modeling studies involving earlier peptide complexes reveal that the peptide-binding site is largely conserved despite lower sequence identity between bacterial clamps. Overall the results suggest that other as-yet-unidentified factors may mediate interactions between the clamp, LigA and DNA in mycobacteria. PMID:22545130

  7. Detection of streptomycin and quinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis by a low-density DNA array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moure, Raquel; Tudó, Griselda; Medina, Rebeca; Vicente, Eva; Caldito, José María; Codina, Maria Gemma; Coll, Pere; Español, Montserrat; Gonzalez-Martin, Julian; Rey-Jurado, Emma; Salvadó, Margarita; Tórtola, Maria Teresa; Alcaide, Fernando

    2013-09-01

    In cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, it is crucial to rule out resistance to second-line antituberculous (anti-TB) agents. In the present study, a low-cost low-density DNA array including four genetic regions (rrs 530 loop, rrs 1400, rpsL and gyrA) was designed for the rapid detection of the most important mutations related to anti-TB injectable drugs (mainly streptomycin) and fluoroquinolone resistance (LD-SQ array). A total of 108 streptomycin- and/or ofloxacin-resistant and 20 streptomycin- and ofloxacin-susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates were analysed with the array. The results obtained were compared with sequencing data and phenotypic susceptibility pattern. The LD-SQ array offered a good sensitivity compared to sequencing, especially among resistant strains: 92.5% (37/40) for streptomycin and 87.5% (7/8) for fluoroquinolones. Therefore, this array could be considered a good approach for the rapid detection of mutations related to streptomycin and fluoroquinolone resistance. On the other hand, there were discordant results in 16 resistant strains and six susceptible isolates, mostly concerning the gyrA region, in which the existence of polymorphisms next to informative positions might cause cross-hybridization. These discrepancies were caused by some technical limitations; consequently, the present array should be considered as a first-step prior to a forthcoming optimized version of the array. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. [Detection of streptomycin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and DNA sequencing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Rui-ru; Zhang, Jian-yuan; Yuan, Xue-qin; Sun, Zhao-gang; Li, Chuan-you

    2008-05-27

    To determine the rpsL and rrs gene mutation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) and compare the consistency between the results of denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and those of DNA sequencing. The values of streptomycin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against 215 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates, 115 being streptomycin-resistant and 100 being susceptible by a routine proportional method, were tested by DHPLC. DNA sequencing was conducted to detect the rpsL and rrs mutation. 98 of the 115 streptomycin-resistant isolates (85.2%) harbored rpsL and/or rrs mutation, 76.5% of which being rpsL mutation (88/115). There was no significant correlation between the MIC values and mutation types. No mutation was found in all the susceptible isolates. There was a complete consistency between the DHPLC results and those of DNA sequencing. DHPLC can be regarded as a useful and powerful tool to detect the streptomycin resistance detection in M. tuberculosis.

  9. Structural plasticity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis uracil-DNA glycosylase (MtUng) and its functional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, S M; Geethanandan, K; Mishra, P; Surolia, A; Varshney, U; Vijayan, M

    2015-07-01

    17 independent crystal structures of family I uracil-DNA glycosylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtUng) and its complexes with uracil and its derivatives, distributed among five distinct crystal forms, have been determined. Thermodynamic parameters of binding in the complexes have been measured using isothermal titration calorimetry. The two-domain protein exhibits open and closed conformations, suggesting that the closure of the domain on DNA binding involves conformational selection. Segmental mobility in the enzyme molecule is confined to a 32-residue stretch which plays a major role in DNA binding. Uracil and its derivatives can bind to the protein in two possible orientations. Only one of them is possible when there is a bulky substituent at the 5' position. The crystal structures of the complexes provide a reasonable rationale for the observed thermodynamic parameters. In addition to providing fresh insights into the structure, plasticity and interactions of the protein molecule, the results of the present investigation provide a platform for structure-based inhibitor design.

  10. Design and use of mouse control DNA for DNA biomarker extraction and PCR detection from urine: Application for transrenal Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordelon, Hali; Ricks, Keersten M; Pask, Megan E; Russ, Patricia K; Solinas, Francesca; Baglia, Mark L; Short, Philip A; Nel, Andrew; Blackburn, Jonathan; Dheda, Keertan; Zamudio, Carlos; Cáceres, Tatiana; Wright, David W; Haselton, Frederick R; Pettit, April C

    2017-05-01

    Urine samples are increasingly used for diagnosing infections including Escherichia coli, Ebola virus, and Zika virus. However, extraction and concentration of nucleic acid biomarkers from urine is necessary for many molecular detection strategies such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Since urine samples typically have large volumes with dilute biomarker concentrations making them prone to false negatives, another impediment for urine-based diagnostics is the establishment of appropriate controls particularly to rule out false negatives. In this study, a mouse glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) DNA target was added to retrospectively collected urine samples from tuberculosis (TB)-infected and TB-uninfected patients to indicate extraction of intact DNA and removal of PCR inhibitors from urine samples. We tested this design on surrogate urine samples, retrospective 1milliliter (mL) urine samples from patients in Lima, Peru and retrospective 5mL urine samples from patients in Cape Town, South Africa. Extraction/PCR control DNA was detectable in 97% of clinical samples with no statistically significant differences among groups. Despite the inclusion of this control, there was no difference in the amount of TB IS6110 Tr-DNA detected between TB-infected and TB-uninfected groups except for samples from known HIV-infected patients. We found an increase in TB IS6110 Tr-DNA between TB/HIV co-infected patients compared to TB-uninfected/HIV-infected patients (N=18, p=0.037). The inclusion of an extraction/PCR control DNA to indicate successful DNA extraction and removal of PCR inhibitors should be easily adaptable as a sample preparation control for other acellular sample types. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Induction of cell-mediated immunity against mycobacterium tuberculosis using DNA vaccines encoding cytotoxic and helper T-cell epitopes of the 38-kilodalton protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonseca, DPAJ; Benaissa-Trouw, B; Kraaijeveld, CA; Snippe, H; Verheul, AFM

    Cell-mediated immune responses are crucial in the protection against tuberculosis. In this study, we constructed DNA vaccines encoding cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and T helper cell (Th) epitopes of the 38-kDa lipoglycoprotein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and analyzed and compared their

  12. Comparison of fastsure tb dna and mgit 960 for the detection of mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in clinical specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A.; Mirza, I.A.; Abbasi, S.A.; Ali, S.; Zia, F.; Ahmed, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of Fastsure TB DNA with fully automated MGIT 960 method for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB) in clinical specimens. Study Design: Comparative cross sectional study. Methodology: After decontamination procedure, the clinical specimens were subjected to DNA extraction and amplification. Extracted DNA was separated in a separate tube provided with fastsure TB DNA kit and was then inserted into the cartridge provided and results were observed within 30 minutes. For Processing in MGIT 960, OADC and PANTA were added to the clinical specimens after decontamination and then the tubes were processed in MGIT 960. Results: A total of 80 specimens were tested by both MGIT 960 and fastsure TB DNA. On MGIT 960 system, 57 specimens showed growth of MTB while 23 were negative. On Fastsure TB DNA, 47 Specimens were tested as positive and 33 specimens showed negative result. Sensitivity and specificity of Fastsure TB DNA method was calculated to be 82.45 % and 100 % respectively, while positive and negative predictive values were 100 % and 69.69 % respectively. Conclusion: Fast sure TB DNA is a rapid and accurate method for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB) from clinical specimens. (author)

  13. Novel Ser79Leu and Ser81Ile substitutions in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of ParC topoisomerase IV and GyrA DNA gyrase subunits from recent fluoroquinolone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzheva, Nataliya; Davies, Todd A; Goldschmidt, Raul

    2005-06-01

    Resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae to fluoroquinolones is caused predominantly by amino acid substitutions at positions Ser79 of ParC and Ser81 of GyrA to either Phe or Tyr encoded in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of the parC topoisomerase IV and gyrA DNA gyrase genes. Analysis of highly resistant clinical isolates identified novel second-step substitutions, Ser79Leu (ParC) and Ser81Ile (GyrA). To determine contributions of these new mutations to fluoroquinolone resistance either alone or in combination with other Ser79/81 alleles, the substitutions Ser79Leu/Phe/Tyr in ParC and Ser81Ile/Phe/Tyr in GyrA were introduced into the R6 background, resulting in 15 isogenic strains. Their level of fluoroquinolone resistance was determined by susceptibility testing for ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, gemifloxacin, garenoxacin, and norfloxacin. Leu79 and Ile81 alone as well as 79/81Phe/Tyr substitutions did not contribute significantly to resistance, with fluoroquinolone MICs increasing two- to fourfold compared to wild type for all agents tested. Fluoroquinolone MICs for double transformants ParC Ser79Phe/Tyr/Leu-GyrA Ser81Phe/Tyr were uniformly increased by 8- to 64-fold regardless of pairs of amino acid substitutions. However, combinations including Ile81 conferred two- to fourfold-higher levels of resistance than did combinations including any other Ser81 GyrA substitution, thus demonstrating the differential effects of diverse amino acid substitutions at particular hotspots on fluoroquinolone MICs.

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ku can bind to nuclear DNA damage and sensitize mammalian cells to bleomycin sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castore, Reneau; Hughes, Cameron; Debeaux, Austin; Sun, Jingxin; Zeng, Cailing; Wang, Shih-Ya; Tatchell, Kelly; Shi, Runhua; Lee, Kyung-Jong; Chen, David J; Harrison, Lynn

    2011-11-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are effective cancer treatments due to their ability to generate DNA damage. The major lethal lesion is the DNA double-strand break (DSB). Human cells predominantly repair DSBs by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), which requires Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PKcs, DNA ligase IV and accessory proteins. Repair is initiated by the binding of the Ku heterodimer at the ends of the DSB and this recruits DNA-PKcs, which initiates damage signaling and functions in repair. NHEJ also exists in certain types of bacteria that have dormant phases in their life cycle. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ku (Mt-Ku) resembles the DNA-binding domain of human Ku but does not have the N- and C-terminal domains of Ku70/80 that have been implicated in binding mammalian NHEJ repair proteins. The aim of this work was to determine whether Mt-Ku could be used as a tool to bind DSBs in mammalian cells and sensitize cells to DNA damage. We generated a fusion protein (KuEnls) of Mt-Ku, EGFP and a nuclear localization signal that is able to perform bacterial NHEJ and hence bind DSBs. Using transient transfection, we demonstrated that KuEnls is able to bind laser damage in the nucleus of Ku80-deficient cells within 10 sec and remains bound for up to 2 h. The Mt-Ku fusion protein was over-expressed in U2OS cells and this increased the sensitivity of the cells to bleomycin sulfate. Hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation do not predominantly produce DSBs and there was little or no change in sensitivity to these agents. Since in vitro studies were unable to detect binding of Mt-Ku to DNA-PKcs or human Ku70/80, this work suggests that KuEnls sensitizes cells by binding DSBs, preventing human NHEJ. This study indicates that blocking or decreasing the binding of human Ku to DSBs could be a method for enhancing existing cancer treatments.

  15. Characterization of DNA substrate specificities of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeldenov, Sailau; Talhaoui, Ibtissam; Zharkov, Dmitry O; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Ramanculov, Erlan; Saparbaev, Murat; Khassenov, Bekbolat

    2015-09-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases are key enzymes involved in the repair of abasic sites and DNA strand breaks. Pathogenic bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains two AP endonucleases: MtbXthA and MtbNfo members of the exonuclease III and endonuclease IV families, which are exemplified by Escherichia coli Xth and Nfo, respectively. It has been shown that both MtbXthA and MtbNfo contain AP endonuclease and 3'→5' exonuclease activities. However, it remains unclear whether these enzymes hold 3'-repair phosphodiesterase and nucleotide incision repair (NIR) activities. Here, we report that both mycobacterial enzymes have 3'-repair phosphodiesterase and 3'-phosphatase, and MtbNfo contains in addition a very weak NIR activity. Interestingly, depending on pH, both enzymes require different concentrations of divalent cations: 0.5mM MnCl2 at pH 7.6 and 10 mM at pH 6.5. MtbXthA requires a low ionic strength and 37 °C, while MtbNfo requires high ionic strength (200 mM KCl) and has a temperature optimum at 60 °C. Point mutation analysis showed that D180 and N182 in MtbXthA and H206 and E129 in MtbNfo are critical for enzymes activities. The steady-state kinetic parameters indicate that MtbXthA removes 3'-blocking sugar-phosphate and 3'-phosphate moieties at DNA strand breaks with an extremely high efficiency (kcat/KM=440 and 1280 μM(-1)∙min(-1), respectively), while MtbNfo exhibits much lower 3'-repair activities (kcat/KM=0.26 and 0.65 μM(-1)∙min(-1), respectively). Surprisingly, both MtbXthA and MtbNfo exhibited very weak AP site cleavage activities, with kinetic parameters 100- and 300-fold lower, respectively, as compared with the results reported previously. Expression of MtbXthA and MtbNfo reduced the sensitivity of AP endonuclease-deficient E. coli xth nfo strain to methylmethanesulfonate and H2O2 to various degrees. Taken together, these data establish the DNA substrate specificity of M. tuberculosis AP endonucleases and suggest their possible role

  16. Antioxidant, DNA interaction, VEGFR2 kinase, topoisomerase I and in vitro cytotoxic activities of heteroleptic copper(II) complexes of tetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines and diimines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleel, A; Mahendiran, D; Veena, V; Sakthivel, N; Rahiman, A Kalilur

    2016-11-01

    A series of heteroleptic mononuclear copper(II) complexes of the type [Cu(L(1-3))(diimine)]ClO4 (1-6) containing three tetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine core ligands, ethyl 5-methyl-7-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL(1)), ethyl 5-methyl-7-(4-diethylamino-2-hydroxyphenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL(2)) or ethyl 5-methyl-7-(2-hydroxy-4-nitrophenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL(3)), and two diimine coligands, 2,2'-bipyridyl (bpy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) have been synthesized and characterized by spectral methods. The geometry of complexes have been determined with the help of electronic absorption and EPR splitting patterns, which suggest four coordinated square planar geometry around copper(II) ion. The lowering of HOMO-LUMO band gap value of complex 4 implies its higher biological activity compared to other complexes. Antioxidant studies revealed that the complexes possess considerable radical scavenging potency against DPPH. The binding studies of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) revealed groove mode of binding, which was further supported by docking simulation. The complexes 3 and 4 strongly inhibit the topoisomerase I, and also strongly interact with VEGFR2 kinase receptor via π-π, σ-π and hydrogen bonding interaction. Gel electrophoresis experiments demonstrated the ability of the complexes to cleave plasmid DNA in the absence of activators. In vitro cytotoxic activities of the complexes were examined on three cancerous cell lines such as human lung (A549), cervical (HeLa) and colon (HCT-15), and two normal cells such as human embryonic kidney (HEK) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The live cell and fluorescent imaging of cancer cells were observed with acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining assay. All encouraging chemical and biological findings indicate that the complex 4 is a suitable candidate for drug target. Copyright © 2016

  17. Differential cytotoxic pathways of topoisomerase I and II anticancer agents after overexpression of the E2F-1/DP-1 transcription factor complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofland, K; Petersen, B O; Falck, J

    2000-01-01

    and drug sensitivity in detail, we established human osteosarcoma U-20S-TA cells expressing full-length E2F-1/ DP-1 under the control of a tetracycline-responsive promoter, designated UE1DP-1 cells. Topoisomerase I levels and activity as well as the number of camptothecin-induced DNA single- and double...... of an E2F-1/ DP-1-induced post-DNA damage pathway rather than an increase in the number of replication forks caused by the S-phase initiation. In contrast, topoisomerase IIalpha levels (but not topoisomerase IIbeta levels), together with topoisomerase IIalpha promoter activity, increased 2--3-fold in UE1......-targeted anticancer drugs. However, the mechanism by which this occurs appears to be qualitatively different. The UE1DP-1 cell model may be used to elucidate post-DNA damage mechanisms of cell death induced by topoisomerase I-directed anticancer agents....

  18. Efficacy Testing of H56 cDNA Tattoo Immunization against Tuberculosis in a Mouse Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platteel, Anouk C M; Nieuwenhuizen, Natalie E; Domaszewska, Teresa; Schürer, Stefanie; Zedler, Ulrike; Brinkmann, Volker; Sijts, Alice; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), remains a global threat. The only approved vaccine against TB, Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), provides insufficient protection and, being a live vaccine, can cause disseminated disease in immunocompromised

  19. Evaluation of DNA extraction techniques for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms in Asian elephant trunk wash samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Meagan K; Linke, Lyndsey; Triantis, Joni; Salman, M D; Larsen, R Scott

    2011-02-01

    Rapid and sensitive diagnostic assays for the detection of tuberculous mycobacteria in elephants are lacking. DNA extraction with PCR analysis is useful for tuberculosis screening in many species but has not been validated on elephant trunk wash samples. We estimated the analytical sensitivity and specificity of three DNA extraction methods to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms in trunk wash specimens. A ZR soil microbe DNA kit (ZR) and a traditional salt and ethanol precipitation (TSEP) approach were evaluated under three different treatment conditions: heat treatment, phenol treatment, and contamination with Mycobacterium avium. A third approach, using a column filtration method, was evaluated for samples contaminated with soil. Trunk wash samples from uninfected elephants were spiked with various concentrations of M. bovis cells and subjected to the described treatment conditions prior to DNA extraction. Extracted DNA was amplified using IS6110-targeted PCR analysis. The ZR and TSEP methods detected as low as 1 to 5 M. bovis cells and 10 M. bovis cells, respectively, per 1.5 ml of trunk wash under all three conditions. Depending on the amount of soil present, the column filtration method detected as low as 5 to 50 M. bovis cells per 1.5 ml of trunk wash. Analytical specificity was assessed by DNA extraction from species of nontuberculous mycobacteria and amplification using the same PCR technique. Only M. bovis DNA was amplified, indicating 100% analytical specificity of this PCR technique. Our results indicate that these DNA extraction techniques offer promise as useful tests for detection of M. tuberculosis complex organisms in elephant trunk wash specimens.

  20. The oxidative DNA glycosylases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis exhibit different substrate preferences from their Escherichia coli counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yin; Bandaru, Viswanath; Jaruga, Pawel; Zhao, Xiaobei; Burrows, Cynthia J; Iwai, Shigenori; Dizdaroglu, Miral; Bond, Jeffrey P; Wallace, Susan S

    2010-02-04

    The DNA glycosylases that remove oxidized DNA bases fall into two general families: the Fpg/Nei family and the Nth superfamily. Based on protein sequence alignments, we identified four putative Fpg/Nei family members, as well as a putative Nth protein in Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. All four Fpg/Nei proteins were successfully overexpressed using a bicistronic vector created in our laboratory. The MtuNth protein was also overexpressed in soluble form. The substrate specificities of the purified enzymes were characterized in vitro with oligodeoxynucleotide substrates containing single lesions. Some were further characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of products released from gamma-irradiated DNA. MtuFpg1 has substrate specificity similar to that of EcoFpg. Both EcoFpg and MtuFpg1 are more efficient at removing spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) than 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG). However, MtuFpg1 shows a substantially increased opposite base discrimination compared to EcoFpg. MtuFpg2 contains only the C-terminal domain of an Fpg protein and has no detectable DNA binding activity or DNA glycosylase/lyase activity and thus appears to be a pseudogene. MtuNei1 recognizes oxidized pyrimidines on both double-stranded and single-stranded DNA and exhibits uracil DNA glycosylase activity. MtuNth recognizes a variety of oxidized bases, including urea, 5,6-dihydrouracil (DHU), 5-hydroxyuracil (5-OHU), 5-hydroxycytosine (5-OHC) and methylhydantoin (MeHyd). Both MtuNei1 and MtuNth excise thymine glycol (Tg); however, MtuNei1 strongly prefers the (5R) isomers, whereas MtuNth recognizes only the (5S) isomers. MtuNei2 did not demonstrate activity in vitro as a recombinant protein, but like MtuNei1 when expressed in Escherichia coli, it decreased the spontaneous mutation frequency of both the fpg mutY nei triple and nei nth double mutants, suggesting that MtuNei2 is functionally active in vivo recognizing both guanine and cytosine oxidation products

  1. Detection of streptomycin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from China as determined by denaturing HPLC analysis and DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ruiru; Zhang, Jianyuan; Li, Chuanyou; Kazumi, Yuko; Sugawara, Isamu

    2007-01-01

    China is regarded by the World Health Organization as a major hot-spot region for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Streptomycin has been deployed in China for over 50 years and is still widely used for tuberculosis treatment. We have developed a denaturing HPLC (DHPLC) method for detecting various gene mutations conferring drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. The present study focused on rpsL and rrs mutation analysis. Two hundred and fifteen M. tuberculosis clinical isolates (115 proved to be streptomycin-resistant and 100 susceptible by a routine proportional method) from China were tested to determine the streptomycin minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), and subjected to DHPLC and concurrent DNA sequencing to determine rpsL and rrs mutations. The results showed that 85.2% (98/115) of streptomycin-resistant isolates harbored rpsL or rrs mutation, while rpsL mutation (76.5%, 88/115) dominated. MIC of 98 mutated isolates revealed no close correlation between mutation types and levels of streptomycin resistance. No mutation was found in any of the susceptible isolates. The DHPLC results were completely consistent with those of sequencing. The DHPLC method devised in this study can be regarded as a useful and powerful tool for detection of streptomycin resistance. This is the first report to describe DHPLC analysis of mutations in the rpsL and rrs genes of M. tuberculosis in a large number of clinical isolates.

  2. Toward the virtual screening of potential drugs in the homology modeled NAD+ dependent DNA ligase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijai; Somvanshi, Pallavi

    2010-02-01

    DNA ligase is an important enzyme and it plays vital role in the replication and repair; also catalyzes nick joining between adjacent bases of DNA. The NAD(+) dependent DNA ligase is selectively present in eubacteria and few viruses; but missing in humans. Homology modeling was used to generate 3-D structure of NAD(+) dependent DNA ligase (LigA) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using the known template (PDB: 2OWO). Furthermore, the stereochemical quality and torsion angle of 3-D structure was validated. Numerous effective drugs were selected and the active amino acid residue in LigA was targeted and virtual screening through molecular docking was done. In this analysis, four drugs Chloroquine, Hydroxychloroquine, Putrienscine and Adriamycin were found more potent in inhibition of M. tuberculosis through the robust binding affinity between protein-drug interactions in comparison with the other studied drugs. A phylogenetic tree was constructed and it was observed that homology of LigA in M. tuberculosis resembled with other Mycobacterium species. The conserved active amino acids of LigA may be useful to target these drugs. These findings could be used as the starting point of a rational design of novel antibacterial drugs and its analogs.

  3. Mixed ligand complexes of Cu(II)/Zn(II) ions containing (m-)/(p-) carboxylato phenyl azo pentane 2,4-dione and 2,2‧-bipyridine/1,10 phenanthroline: Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding, nuclease and topoisomerase I inhibitory activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Md. Amin; Kumari, Niraj; Singh, Kanhaiya; Singh, Kiran; Mishra, Lallan

    2016-01-01

    Metal complexes of type [Cu(L1H)2(bpy)] (1), [Zn(L1H)2(bpy)] (2), [Cu(L2H)2(bpy)] (3) and [Cu(L2H)2(Phen)] (4) (L1H2 = 3-[N‧-(1-acetyl-2-oxo-propylidene)-hydrazino]-benzoic acid, L2H2 = 4-[N‧-(1-acetyl-2-oxo-propylidene)-hydrazino]-benzoic acid, bpy = 2,2‧-bipyridine, Phen = 1,10 phenanthroline) are synthesized and characterized using spectroscopic techniques (FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, electronic absorption and emission) and elemental analysis data. The assembly of the complexes involving intramolecular H-bonding is displayed using corresponding crystal structure. Binding of the complexes separately with Calf Thymus DNA is monitored using UV-vis spectral titrations. The displacement of ethidium bromide (EB) bound to DNA by the complexes, in phosphate buffer solution (pH ∼ 7.2) is monitored using fluorescence spectral titrations. Nuclease activity of the complexes follow the order 4 > 3 > 1 > 2. The gel electrophoretic mobility assay measurement in presence of minor groove binder 4‧,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), suggests that complexes preferably bind with the minor groove of DNA. Topoisomerase I inhibitory activity of the complexes 3 and 4 inhibit topoisomerase I activity with IC50 values of 112 and 87 μM respectively.

  4. Mixed ligand complexes of Cu(II)/Zn(II) ions containing (m-)/(p-) carboxylato phenyl azo pentane 2,4-dione and 2,2'-bipyridine/1,10 phenanthroline: Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding, nuclease and topoisomerase I inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Md Amin; Kumari, Niraj; Singh, Kanhaiya; Singh, Kiran; Mishra, Lallan

    2016-01-05

    Metal complexes of type [Cu(L1H)2(bpy)] (1), [Zn(L1H)2(bpy)] (2), [Cu(L2H)2(bpy)] (3) and [Cu(L2H)2(Phen)] (4) (L1H2=3-[N'-(1-acetyl-2-oxo-propylidene)-hydrazino]-benzoic acid, L2H2=4-[N'-(1-acetyl-2-oxo-propylidene)-hydrazino]-benzoic acid, bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, Phen=1,10 phenanthroline) are synthesized and characterized using spectroscopic techniques (FT-IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, electronic absorption and emission) and elemental analysis data. The assembly of the complexes involving intramolecular H-bonding is displayed using corresponding crystal structure. Binding of the complexes separately with Calf Thymus DNA is monitored using UV-vis spectral titrations. The displacement of ethidium bromide (EB) bound to DNA by the complexes, in phosphate buffer solution (pH∼7.2) is monitored using fluorescence spectral titrations. Nuclease activity of the complexes follow the order 4>3>1>2. The gel electrophoretic mobility assay measurement in presence of minor groove binder 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), suggests that complexes preferably bind with the minor groove of DNA. Topoisomerase I inhibitory activity of the complexes 3 and 4 inhibit topoisomerase I activity with IC50 values of 112 and 87μM respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of the major formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase homolog in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its linkage to variable tandem repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Ingrid; Balasingham, Seetha V; Davidsen, Tonje; Debebe, Ephrem; Rødland, Einar A; van Soolingen, Dick; Kremer, Kristin; Alseth, Ingrun; Tønjum, Tone

    2009-07-01

    The ability to repair DNA damage is likely to play an important role in the survival of facultative intracellular parasites because they are exposed to high levels of reactive oxygen species and nitrogen intermediates inside phagocytes. Correcting oxidative damage in purines and pyrimidines is the primary function of the enzymes formamidopyrimidine (faPy)-DNA glycosylase (Fpg) and endonuclease VIII (Nei) of the base excision repair pathway, respectively. Four gene homologs, belonging to the fpg/nei family, have been identified in Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. The recombinant protein encoded by M. tuberculosis Rv2924c, termed Mtb-Fpg1, was overexpressed, purified and biochemically characterized. The enzyme removed faPy and 5-hydroxycytosine lesions, as well as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8oxoG) opposite to C, T and G. Mtb-Fpg1 thus exhibited substrate specificities typical for Fpg enzymes. Although Mtb-fpg1 showed nearly complete nucleotide sequence conservation in 32 M. tuberculosis isolates, the region upstream of Mtb-fpg1 in these strains contained tandem repeat motifs of variable length. A relationship between repeat length and Mtb-fpg1 expression level was demonstrated in M. tuberculosis strains, indicating that an increased length of the tandem repeats positively influenced the expression levels of Mtb-fpg1. This is the first example of such a tandem repeat region of variable length being linked to the expression level of a bacterial gene.

  6. Catalytic inhibition of topoisomerase II by a novel rationally designed ATP-competitive purine analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chène, Patrick; Rudloff, Joëlle; Schoepfer, Joseph; Furet, Pascal; Meier, Peter; Qian, Zhiyan; Schlaeppi, Jean-Marc; Schmitz, Rita; Radimerski, Thomas

    2009-01-07

    Topoisomerase II poisons are in clinical use as anti-cancer therapy for decades and work by stabilizing the enzyme-induced DNA breaks. In contrast, catalytic inhibitors block the enzyme before DNA scission. Although several catalytic inhibitors of topoisomerase II have been described, preclinical concepts for exploiting their anti-proliferative activity based on molecular characteristics of the tumor cell have only recently started to emerge. Topoisomerase II is an ATPase and uses the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to orchestrate the movement of the DNA double strands along the enzyme. Thus, interfering with ATPase function with low molecular weight inhibitors that target the nucleotide binding pocket should profoundly affect cells that are committed to undergo mitosis. Here we describe the discovery and characterization of a novel purine diamine analogue as a potent ATP-competitive catalytic inhibitor of topoisomerase II. Quinoline aminopurine compound 1 (QAP 1) inhibited topoisomerase II ATPase activity and decatenation reaction at sub-micromolar concentrations, targeted both topoisomerase II alpha and beta in cell free assays and, using a quantitative cell-based assay and a chromosome segregation assay, displayed catalytic enzyme inhibition in cells. In agreement with recent hypothesis, we show that BRCA1 mutant breast cancer cells have increased sensitivity to QAP 1. The results obtained with QAP 1 demonstrate that potent and selective catalytic inhibition of human topoisomerase II function with an ATP-competitive inhibitor is feasible. Our data suggest that further drug discovery efforts on ATP-competitive catalytic inhibitors are warranted and that such drugs could potentially be developed as anti-cancer therapy for tumors that bear the appropriate combination of molecular alterations.

  7. Catalytic inhibition of topoisomerase II by a novel rationally designed ATP-competitive purine analogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlaeppi Jean-Marc

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Topoisomerase II poisons are in clinical use as anti-cancer therapy for decades and work by stabilizing the enzyme-induced DNA breaks. In contrast, catalytic inhibitors block the enzyme before DNA scission. Although several catalytic inhibitors of topoisomerase II have been described, preclinical concepts for exploiting their anti-proliferative activity based on molecular characteristics of the tumor cell have only recently started to emerge. Topoisomerase II is an ATPase and uses the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to orchestrate the movement of the DNA double strands along the enzyme. Thus, interfering with ATPase function with low molecular weight inhibitors that target the nucleotide binding pocket should profoundly affect cells that are committed to undergo mitosis. Results Here we describe the discovery and characterization of a novel purine diamine analogue as a potent ATP-competitive catalytic inhibitor of topoisomerase II. Quinoline aminopurine compound 1 (QAP 1 inhibited topoisomerase II ATPase activity and decatenation reaction at sub-micromolar concentrations, targeted both topoisomerase II alpha and beta in cell free assays and, using a quantitative cell-based assay and a chromosome segregation assay, displayed catalytic enzyme inhibition in cells. In agreement with recent hypothesis, we show that BRCA1 mutant breast cancer cells have increased sensitivity to QAP 1. Conclusion The results obtained with QAP 1 demonstrate that potent and selective catalytic inhibition of human topoisomerase II function with an ATP-competitive inhibitor is feasible. Our data suggest that further drug discovery efforts on ATP-competitive catalytic inhibitors are warranted and that such drugs could potentially be developed as anti-cancer therapy for tumors that bear the appropriate combination of molecular alterations.

  8. Increased topoisomerase IIalpha expression in colorectal cancer is associated with advanced disease and chemotherapeutic resistance via inhibition of apoptosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coss, Alan

    2012-02-01

    Topoisomerase IIalpha is a nuclear enzyme that regulates the tertiary structure of DNA. The influence of topoisomerase IIalpha gene (TOP2A) or protein alterations on disease progression and treatment response in colorectal cancer (CRC) is unknown. The study investigated the clinical relevance of topoisomerase IIalpha in CRC using in vivo and in vitro models. Differentially expressed genes in early and late-stage CRC were identified by array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). Cellular location of gene amplifications was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Topoisomerase IIalpha levels, proliferation index, and HER2 expression were examined in 228 colorectal tumors by immunohistochemistry. Overexpression of topoisomerase IIalpha in vitro was achieved by liposome-based transfection. Cell growth inhibition and apoptosis were quantified using the crystal violet assay and flow cytometry, respectively, in response to drug treatment. Amplification of TOP2A was identified in 3 (7.7%) tumors using array CGH and confirmed using FISH. At the protein level, topoisomerase IIalpha staining was observed in 157 (69%) tumors, and both staining and intensity levels were associated with an aggressive tumor phenotype (p values 0.04 and 0.005, respectively). Using logistic regression analysis, topoisomerase IIalpha remained significantly associated with advanced tumor stage when corrected for tumor proliferation (p=0.007) and differentiation (p=0.001). No association was identified between topoisomerase IIalpha and HER2. In vitro, overexpression of topoisomerase IIalpha was associated with resistance to irinotecan (p=0.001) and etoposide chemotherapy (p=0.03), an effect mediated by inhibition of apoptosis. Topoisomerase IIalpha overexpression is significantly associated with alterations in tumor behavior and response to drug treatment in CRC. Our results suggest that gene amplification may represent an important mechanism underlying these changes.

  9. Investigating direct interaction between Escherichia coli topoisomerase I and RecA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darici, Yesim; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are of special importance in cellular processes, including replication, transcription, recombination, and repair. Escherichia coli topoisomerase I (EcTOP1) is primarily involved in the relaxation of negative DNA supercoiling. E. coli RecA, the key protein for homologous recombination and SOS DNA-damage response, has been shown to stimulate the relaxation activity of EcTOP1. The evidence for their direct protein-protein interaction has not been previously established. We report here the direct physical interaction between E. coli RecA and topoisomerase I. We demonstrated the RecA-topoisomerase I interaction via pull-down assays, and surface plasmon resonance measurements. Molecular docking supports the observation that the interaction involves the topoisomerase I N-terminal domains that form the active site. Our results from pull-down assays showed that ATP, although not required, enhances the RecA-EcTOP1 interaction. We propose that E. coli RecA physically interacts with topoisomerase I to modulate the chromosomal DNA supercoiling. PMID:27001450

  10. Direct control of type IIA topoisomerase activity by a chromosomally encoded regulatory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Seychelle M; Lyubimov, Artem Y; Hershey, David M; Schoeffler, Allyn J; Sengupta, Sugopa; Nagaraja, Valakunja; Berger, James M

    2014-07-01

    Precise control of supercoiling homeostasis is critical to DNA-dependent processes such as gene expression, replication, and damage response. Topoisomerases are central regulators of DNA supercoiling commonly thought to act independently in the recognition and modulation of chromosome superstructure; however, recent evidence has indicated that cells tightly regulate topoisomerase activity to support chromosome dynamics, transcriptional response, and replicative events. How topoisomerase control is executed and linked to the internal status of a cell is poorly understood. To investigate these connections, we determined the structure of Escherichia coli gyrase, a type IIA topoisomerase bound to YacG, a recently identified chromosomally encoded inhibitor protein. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that YacG is frequently associated with coenzyme A (CoA) production enzymes, linking the protein to metabolism and stress. The structure, along with supporting solution studies, shows that YacG represses gyrase by sterically occluding the principal DNA-binding site of the enzyme. Unexpectedly, YacG acts by both engaging two spatially segregated regions associated with small-molecule inhibitor interactions (fluoroquinolone antibiotics and the newly reported antagonist GSK299423) and remodeling the gyrase holoenzyme into an inactive, ATP-trapped configuration. This study establishes a new mechanism for the protein-based control of topoisomerases, an approach that may be used to alter supercoiling levels for responding to changes in cellular state. © 2014 Vos et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  11. Molecular evolution perspectives on intraspecific lateral DNA transfer of topoisomerase and gyrase loci in Streptococcus pneumoniae, with implications for fluoroquinolone resistance development and spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhope, Michael J; Walsh, Stacey L; Becker, Julie A; Italia, Michael J; Ingraham, Karen A; Gwynn, Michael N; Mathie, Tom; Poupard, James A; Miller, Linda A; Brown, James R; Amrine-Madsen, Heather

    2005-10-01

    Fluoroquinolones are an important class of antibiotics for the treatment of infections arising from the gram-positive respiratory pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Although there is evidence supporting interspecific lateral DNA transfer of fluoroquinolone target loci, no studies have specifically been designed to assess the role of intraspecific lateral transfer of these genes in the spread of fluoroquinolone resistance. This study involves a comparative evolutionary perspective, in which the evolutionary history of a diverse set of S. pneumoniae clinical isolates is reconstructed from an expanded multilocus sequence typing data set, with putative recombinants excluded. This control history is then assessed against networks of each of the four fluoroquinolone target loci from the same isolates. The results indicate that although the majority of fluoroquinolone target loci from this set of 60 isolates are consistent with a clonal dissemination hypothesis, 3 to 10% of the sequences are consistent with an intraspecific lateral transfer hypothesis. Also evident were examples of interspecific transfer, with two isolates possessing a parE-parC gene region arising from viridans group streptococci. The Spain 23F-1 clone is the most dominant fluoroquinolone-nonsusceptible clone in this set of isolates, and the analysis suggests that its members act as frequent donors of fluoroquinolone-nonsusceptible loci. Although the majority of fluoroquinolone target gene sequences in this set of isolates can be explained on the basis of clonal dissemination, a significant number are more parsimoniously explained by intraspecific lateral DNA transfer, and in situations of high S. pneumoniae population density, such events could be an important means of resistance spread.

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis UvrB Is a Robust DNA-Stimulated ATPase That Also Possesses Structure-Specific ATP-Dependent DNA Helicase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Manoj; Kumar, Mohan B J; Muniyappa, K

    2016-10-18

    Much is known about the Escherichia coli nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway; however, very little is understood about the proteins involved and the molecular mechanism of NER in mycobacteria. In this study, we show that Mycobacterium tuberculosis UvrB (MtUvrB), which exists in solution as a monomer, binds to DNA in a structure-dependent manner. A systematic examination of MtUvrB substrate specificity reveals that it associates preferentially with single-stranded DNA, duplexes with 3' or 5' overhangs, and linear duplex DNA with splayed arms. Whereas E. coli UvrB (EcUvrB) binds weakly to undamaged DNA and has no ATPase activity, MtUvrB possesses intrinsic ATPase activity that is greatly stimulated by both single- and double-stranded DNA. Strikingly, we found that MtUvrB, but not EcUvrB, possesses the DNA unwinding activity characteristic of an ATP-dependent DNA helicase. The helicase activity of MtUvrB proceeds in the 3' to 5' direction and is strongly modulated by a nontranslocating 5' single-stranded tail, indicating that in addition to the translocating strand it also interacts with the 5' end of the substrate. The fraction of DNA unwound by MtUvrB decreases significantly as the length of the duplex increases: it fails to unwind duplexes longer than 70 bp. These results, on one hand, reveal significant mechanistic differences between MtUvrB and EcUvrB and, on the other, support an alternative role for UvrB in the processing of key DNA replication intermediates. Altogether, our findings provide insights into the catalytic functions of UvrB and lay the foundation for further understanding of the NER pathway in M. tuberculosis.

  13. Prospects for developing new antibacterials targeting bacterial type IIA topoisomerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomašić, Tihomir; Mašič, Lucija Peterlin

    2014-01-01

    The modulation of DNA topology by DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, both of which are type IIA topoisomerases and found in most bacteria, is a function vital to DNA replication, repair and decatenation. Despite the potential for resistance development, DNA gyrase and/or topoisomerase IV have been proven to be and remain highly attractive targets in antibacterial drug discovery due to their potential for dual targeting. The search for new GyrA and/or ParC inhibitors that can overcome the increasing spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria has been successfully focused in the last decades on the modification of the known fluoroquinolone scaffold as primarily guided by ligand-based design via classical structure-activity relationship studies and the optimisation of physicochemical properties. This focus has resulted in several novel fluoroquinolones that have been introduced into clinical practice since 2000, and several of these new compounds are currently in different phases of clinical trials. Due to increasing resistance to fluoroquinolones, a significant part of DNA gyrase research has shifted to the discovery of new GyrB and/or ParE inhibitors, which are commonly identified through fragment-based design as well as virtual screening techniques and structure-based hit optimisation programs. This research often results in lead compounds with potent inhibitory activity and promising antibacterial activity profiles. Nevertheless, it is important to understand how different physicochemical properties (e.g., logD and total polar surface area) and different structural motifs influence the compounds' permeability to ensure the efficient discovery of potent, small-molecule antibacterials particularly against Gram-negative strains.

  14. The Effects of Arolycoricidine and Narciprimine on Tumor Cell Killing and Topoisomerase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buket Bozkurt Sarikaya

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, narciprimine and arolycoricidine were isolated from G. rizehensis Stern (Amaryllidaceae. The structures of the alkaloids were elucidated by spectroscopic methods (1D NMR, EI-MS. Due to the previous reports on anti-cancer activity of this group of alkaloids, we investigated their effects on DNA topoisomerase reactions, which are known as the cellular targets of a number of chemotherapeutical drugs. The results revealed that arolycoricidine and narciprimine were effective in both type I and type II DNA topoisomerase reactions in a dose-dependent manner. Topoisomerase-interfering ability of these alkaloids partially correlated with cytostaticity assays, using HeLa (cervix adenocarcinoma, MCF7 (breast adenocarcinoma and A431 (skin epidermoid carcinoma cells. Our results are discussed in relation to the potential significance of these alkaloids in the course of drug-development studies.

  15. Analysis of an immunodominant epitope of topoisomerase I in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesters, T M; Hoet, M; van den Hoogen, F H; Verheijen, R; Habets, W J; van Venrooij, W J

    1992-05-01

    In this paper an immunodominant epitope of Topoisomerase I is described. An epitope expression sublibrary was constructed from Topoisomerase I cDNA. The subclones were screened with an antiserum from a patient with systemic sclerosis (SSc). The positive clones defined one immunodominant B cell epitope (epitope III), which was located at the carboxyterminal part of the protein. The epitope, 52 amino acids in length, neither contains the p30gag sequence nor the suggested active site Tyr-723, both presumed antibody recognition sites. More than 70% of our anti-TopoI sera recognize this epitope III, indicating that it is a major recognition site of the anti-TopoI autoantibodies in SSc sera. DNA relaxation experiments show that all sera that recognize epitope III and most sera with antibodies to other epitopes inhibit Topoisomerase I activity.

  16. A small organic compound enhances the religation reaction of human topoisomerase I and identifies crucial elements for the religation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnò, Barbara; Coletta, Andrea; Tesauro, Cinzia; Zuccaro, Laura; Fiorani, Paola; Lentini, Sara; Galloni, Pierluca; Conte, Valeria; Floris, Barbara; Desideri, Alessandro

    2013-03-07

    The different steps of the human Top1 (topoisomerase I) catalytic cycle have been analysed in the presence of a pentacyclic-diquinoid synthetic compound. The experiments indicate that it efficiently inhibits the cleavage step of the enzyme reaction, fitting well into the catalytic site. Surprisingly the compound, when incubated with the binary topoisomerase-DNA cleaved complex, helps the enzyme to remove itself from the cleaved DNA and close the DNA gap, increasing the religation rate. The compound also induces the religation of the stalled enzyme-CPT (camptothecin)-DNA ternary complex. Analysis of the molecule docked over the binary complex, together with its chemical properties, suggests that the religation enhancement is due to the presence on the compound of two oxygen atoms that act as hydrogen acceptors. This property facilitates the deprotonation of the 5' DNA end, suggesting that this is the limiting step in the topoisomerase religation mechanism.

  17. Consistent rationalization of type-2 topoisomerases' unknotting, decatenating, supercoil-relaxing actions and their scaling relation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhirong; Chan, Hue Sun

    2015-09-09

    How type-2 topoisomerases discern global topology from local properties of DNA is not known precisely but the hypothesis that the enzymes selectively pass double-helix strands at hook-like juxtapositions is promising. Building upon an investigation of unknotting and decatenating using an improved wormlike DNA model, here we focus primarily on the enzymes' action in narrowing the distribution of linking number (Lk) in supercoiled DNA. Consistent with experiments, with selective passage at a hooked juxtaposition, the simulated narrowing factor RLk diminishes with decreasing DNA circle size but approaches an asymptotic RLk ≈ 1.7-1.8 for circle size ≳3.5 kb. For the larger DNA circles, we found that (RLk - 1) ≈ 0.42log10RK ≈ 0.68log10RL and thus RK ≈ (RL)(1.6) holds for the computed RLk and knot and catenane reduction factors RK and RL attained by selective passage at different juxtaposition geometries. Remarkably, this general scaling relation is essentially identical to that observed experimentally for several type-2 topoisomerases from a variety of organisms, indicating that the different disentangling powers of the topoisomerases likely arise from variations in the hooked geometries they select. Taken together, our results suggest strongly that type-2 topoisomerases recognize not only the curvature of the G-segment but also that of the T-segment.

  18. Contact tracing using DNA fingerprinting in an asylum seeker with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loenhout-Rooyackers, J.H. van; Sebek, M.M.; Verbeek, A.L.M.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The diagnosis of tuberculosis in asylum seekers is followed by contact tracing, which is routinely performed by the Municipal Health Service (MHS). We investigated cases of tuberculosis whose symptoms became apparent after closure of regular contact tracing. METHODS: Analysis of data

  19. Mutations in DNA repair genes are associated with the Haarlem lineage of Mycobacterium tuberculosis independently of their antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olano, Juanita; López, Beatriz; Reyes, Alejandro; Lemos, María del Pilar; Correa, Nidia; Del Portillo, Patricia; Barrera, Lucia; Robledo, Jaime; Ritacco, Viviana; Zambrano, María Mercedes

    2007-11-01

    The analysis of the DNA repair genes ogt and ung was carried out in 117 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from Argentina and Colombia in order to explore correlation between mutations in these genes and multi-drug resistance. With the exception of two Beijing family isolates, the rest of the strains harbored either two wild-type or two mutant alleles with identical single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in each gene (ogt44 and ung501). These ogt44 and ung501 mutations were not associated with multi-drug resistance and occurred simultaneously in circulating Haarlem genotype M. tuberculosis strains. We therefore propose the use of these markers as tools in phylogenetic and epidemiologic studies.

  20. Maternal topoisomerase II alpha, not topoisomerase II beta, enables embryonic development of zebrafish top2a-/- mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapetto-Rebow Beata

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic alterations in human topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A are linked to cancer susceptibility. TOP2A decatenates chromosomes and thus is necessary for multiple aspects of cell division including DNA replication, chromosome condensation and segregation. Topoisomerase II alpha is also required for embryonic development in mammals, as mouse Top2a knockouts result in embryonic lethality as early as the 4-8 cell stage. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the extended developmental capability of zebrafish top2a mutants arises from maternal expression of top2a or compensation from its top2b paralogue. Results Here, we describe bloody minded (blm, a novel mutant of zebrafish top2a. In contrast to mouse Top2a nulls, zebrafish top2a mutants survive to larval stages (4-5 day post fertilization. Developmental analyses demonstrate abundant expression of maternal top2a but not top2b. Inhibition or poisoning of maternal topoisomerase II delays embryonic development by extending the cell cycle M-phase. Zygotic top2a and top2b are co-expressed in the zebrafish CNS, but endogenous or ectopic top2b RNA appear unable to prevent the blm phenotype. Conclusions We conclude that maternal top2a enables zebrafish development before the mid-zygotic transition (MZT and that zebrafish top2a and top2b are not functionally redundant during development after activation of the zygotic genome.

  1. Maternal topoisomerase II alpha, not topoisomerase II beta, enables embryonic development of zebrafish top2a-/- mutants

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sapetto-Rebow, Beata

    2011-11-23

    Abstract Background Genetic alterations in human topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A) are linked to cancer susceptibility. TOP2A decatenates chromosomes and thus is necessary for multiple aspects of cell division including DNA replication, chromosome condensation and segregation. Topoisomerase II alpha is also required for embryonic development in mammals, as mouse Top2a knockouts result in embryonic lethality as early as the 4-8 cell stage. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the extended developmental capability of zebrafish top2a mutants arises from maternal expression of top2a or compensation from its top2b paralogue. Results Here, we describe bloody minded (blm), a novel mutant of zebrafish top2a. In contrast to mouse Top2a nulls, zebrafish top2a mutants survive to larval stages (4-5 day post fertilization). Developmental analyses demonstrate abundant expression of maternal top2a but not top2b. Inhibition or poisoning of maternal topoisomerase II delays embryonic development by extending the cell cycle M-phase. Zygotic top2a and top2b are co-expressed in the zebrafish CNS, but endogenous or ectopic top2b RNA appear unable to prevent the blm phenotype. Conclusions We conclude that maternal top2a enables zebrafish development before the mid-zygotic transition (MZT) and that zebrafish top2a and top2b are not functionally redundant during development after activation of the zygotic genome.

  2. Surface plasmon resonator using high sensitive resonance telecommunication wavelengths for DNA sensors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with thiol-modified probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shih-Hsiang; Hung, Shao-Chiang; Chen, Yu-Kun; Jian, Zhi-Hao

    2014-12-25

    Various analytes can be verified by surface plasmon resonance, thus continuous improvement of this sensing technology is crucial for better sensing selection and higher sensitivity. The SPR sensitivity on the wavelength modulation is enhanced with increasing wavelengths. The telecommunication wavelength range was then utilized to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) under two situations, without immobilization and with 5'-thiol end labeled IS6100 DNA probes, for SPR sensitivity comparison. The experimental data demonstrated that the SPR sensitivity increased more than 13 times with the wavelength modulation after immobilization. Since the operating wavelength accuracy of a tunable laser source can be controlled within 0.001 nm, the sensitivity and resolution on immobilized MTB DNA were determined as 1.04 nm/(μg/mL) and 0.9 ng/mL, respectively.

  3. Structural and mechanistic insight into Holliday-junction dissolution by topoisomerase IIIα and RMI1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bocquet, Nicolas; Bizard, Anna H; Abdulrahman, Wassim

    2014-01-01

    to TopIIIα influences it to behave as a hemicatenane dissolvase, rather than as an enzyme that relaxes DNA topology, is unknown. Here, we present the crystal structure of human TopIIIα complexed to the first oligonucleotide-binding domain (OB fold) of RMI1. TopIII assumes a toroidal type 1A topoisomerase...

  4. Evidence for the role of Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecG helicase in DNA repair and recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Roshan S; Basavaraju, Shivakumar; Somyajit, Kumar; Jain, Akshatha; Subramanya, Shreelakshmi; Muniyappa, Kalappa; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2013-04-01

    In order to survive and replicate in a variety of stressful conditions during its life cycle, Mycobacterium tuberculosis must possess mechanisms to safeguard the integrity of the genome. Although DNA repair and recombination related genes are thought to play key roles in the repair of damaged DNA in all organisms, so far only a few of them have been functionally characterized in the tubercle bacillus. In this study, we show that M. tuberculosis RecG (MtRecG) expression was induced in response to different genotoxic agents. Strikingly, expression of MtRecG in Escherichia coli ∆recG mutant strain provided protection against mitomycin C, methyl methane sulfonate and UV induced cell death. Purified MtRecG exhibited higher binding affinity for the Holliday junction (HJ) compared with a number of canonical recombinational DNA repair intermediates. Notably, although MtRecG binds at the core of the mobile and immobile HJs, and with higher binding affinity for the immobile HJ, branch migration was evident only in the case of the mobile HJ. Furthermore, immobile HJs stimulate MtRecG ATPase activity less efficiently than mobile HJs. In addition to HJ substrates, MtRecG exhibited binding affinity for a variety of branched DNA structures including three-way junctions, replication forks, flap structures, forked duplex and a D-loop structure, but demonstrated strong unwinding activity on replication fork and flap DNA structures. Together, these results support that MtRecG plays an important role in processes related to DNA metabolism under normal as well as stress conditions. © 2013 The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 FEBS.

  5. Real-Time Label-Free Direct Electronic Monitoring of Topoisomerase Enzyme Binding Kinetics on Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccaro, Laura; Tesauro, Cinzia; Kurkina, Tetiana; Fiorani, Paola; Yu, Hak Ki; Knudsen, Birgitta R; Kern, Klaus; Desideri, Alessandro; Balasubramanian, Kannan

    2015-11-24

    Monolayer graphene field-effect sensors operating in liquid have been widely deployed for detecting a range of analyte species often under equilibrium conditions. Here we report on the real-time detection of the binding kinetics of the essential human enzyme, topoisomerase I interacting with substrate molecules (DNA probes) that are immobilized electrochemically on to monolayer graphene strips. By monitoring the field-effect characteristics of the graphene biosensor in real-time during the enzyme-substrate interactions, we are able to decipher the surface binding constant for the cleavage reaction step of topoisomerase I activity in a label-free manner. Moreover, an appropriate design of the capture probes allows us to distinctly follow the cleavage step of topoisomerase I functioning in real-time down to picomolar concentrations. The presented results are promising for future rapid screening of drugs that are being evaluated for regulating enzyme activity.

  6. La ADN topoisomerasa tipo I de protozoos patógenos como Diana terapéutica de fármacos antitumorales Type I DNA topoisomerase from protozoan pathogens as a potential target for anti-tumoral drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa M Reguera

    2007-12-01

    , Chagas disease or leishmaniasis, among others, are unicellular protozoan parasites with no immune-prophylactic treatment and where the chemotherapeutical treatment is still under controversy. At present, the chemotherapeutic approach to these diseases is expensive, has side or toxic effects and it does not provide economic profits to the Pharmaceuticals which then have no or scarce enthusiasm in R & D investments in this field. The identification of type I DNAtopoisomerases as promising drug targets is based on the excellent results obtained with camptothecin derivatives in anticancer therapy. The recent finding of significant structural differences between human type I DNAtopoisomerase and their counterparts in trypanosomatids has open a new field in drug discovery, the aim is to find structural insights to be targeted by new drugs. This review is an update of DNA-topoisomerases as potential chemotherapeutic targets against the most important protozoan agents of medical interest.

  7. Essential roles for imuA′- and imuB-encoded accessory factors in DnaE2-dependent mutagenesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Warner, Digby F.; Ndwandwe, Duduzile E.; Abrahams, Garth L.; Kana, Bavesh D.; Machowski, Edith E.; Venclovas, Česlovas; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), damage-induced mutagenesis is dependent on the C-family DNA polymerase, DnaE2. Included with dnaE2 in the Mtb SOS regulon is a putative operon comprising Rv3395c, which encodes a protein of unknown function restricted primarily to actinomycetes, and Rv3394c, which is predicted to encode a Y-family DNA polymerase. These genes were previously identified as components of an imuA-imuB-dnaE2–type mutagenic cassette widespread among bacterial genomes. Here, we c...

  8. Insights into the mechanism of inhibition of novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors from characterization of resistant mutants of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Sushmita D; Kutschke, Amy; McCormack, Kathy; Alm, Richard A

    2015-09-01

    The type II topoisomerases DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV are clinically validated bacterial targets that catalyze the modulation of DNA topology that is vital to DNA replication, repair, and decatenation. Increasing resistance to fluoroquinolones, which trap the topoisomerase-DNA complex, has led to significant efforts in the discovery of novel inhibitors of these targets. AZ6142 is a member of the class of novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors (NBTIs) that utilizes a distinct mechanism to trap the protein-DNA complex. AZ6142 has very potent activity against Gram-positive organisms, including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Streptococcus pyogenes. In this study, we determined the frequencies of resistance to AZ6142 and other representative NBTI compounds in S. aureus and S. pneumoniae. The frequencies of selection of resistant mutants at 4× the MIC were 1.7 × 10(-8) for S. aureus and topoisomerase subunits were identified. Many of these substitutions were located outside the NBTI binding pocket and impact the susceptibility of AZ6142, resulting in a 4- to 32-fold elevation in the MIC over the wild-type parent strain. Data on cross-resistance with other NBTIs and fluoroquinolones enabled the differentiation of scaffold-specific changes from compound-specific variations. Our results suggest that AZ6142 inhibits both type II topoisomerases in S. aureus but that DNA gyrase is the primary target. Further, the genotype of the resistant mutants suggests that domain conformations and DNA interactions may uniquely impact NBTIs compared to fluoroquinolones. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Topoisomerase Inhibitors: Fluoroquinolone Mechanisms of Action and Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, David C; Jacoby, George A

    2016-09-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are widely used in clinical medicine and are the only current class of agents that directly inhibit bacterial DNA synthesis. Quinolones dually target DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV binding to specific domains and conformations so as to block DNA strand passage catalysis and stabilize DNA-enzyme complexes that block the DNA replication apparatus and generate double breaks in DNA that underlie their bactericidal activity. Resistance has emerged with clinical use of these agents and is common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include mutational alterations in drug target affinity and efflux pump expression and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParC subunits of gyrase and topoisomerase IV, respectively, and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include other antimicrobials as well as quinolones. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is because of Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, a mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  10. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-derived DNA in circulating cell-free DNA from a patient with disseminated infection using digital PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Yamamoto

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB can disseminate to extrapulmonary organs, particularly in severely immunosuppressed patients. Confirmation of active MTB infection is often difficult in subjects with a contraindication for invasive procedures. A case of disseminated MTB infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is reported herein. Circulating cell-free DNA from the patient showed positive amplification of an MTB complex-specific sequence using a digital PCR technique. The MTB infection was confirmed by positive acid-fast staining and an approved quantitative PCR assay using liver tissue obtained at autopsy. The detection of MTB in circulating cell-free DNA using this technique may represent a less invasive diagnostic tool for pulmonary and extrapulmonary MTB infections.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis class II apurinic/apyrimidinic-endonuclease/3'-5' exonuclease III exhibits DNA regulated modes of interaction with the sliding DNA β-clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanam, Taran; Rai, Niyati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2015-10-01

    The class-II AP-endonuclease (XthA) acts on abasic sites of damaged DNA in bacterial base excision repair. We identified that the sliding DNA β-clamp forms in vivo and in vitro complexes with XthA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A novel 239 QLRFPKK245 motif in the DNA-binding domain of XthA was found to be important for the interactions. Likewise, the peptide binding-groove (PBG) and the C-terminal of β-clamp located on different domains interact with XthA. The β-clamp-XthA complex can be disrupted by clamp binding peptides and also by a specific bacterial clamp inhibitor that binds at the PBG. We also identified that β-clamp stimulates the activities of XthA primarily by increasing its affinity for the substrate and its processivity. Additionally, loading of the β-clamp onto DNA is required for activity stimulation. A reduction in XthA activity stimulation was observed in the presence of β-clamp binding peptides supporting that direct interactions between the proteins are necessary to cause stimulation. Finally, we found that in the absence of DNA, the PBG located on the second domain of the β-clamp is important for interactions with XthA, while the C-terminal domain predominantly mediates functional interactions in the substrate's presence. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Interaction between natural compounds and human topoisomerase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Silvia; Coletta, Andrea; D'Annessa, Ilda; Fiorani, Paola; Tesauro, Cinzia; Desideri, Alessandro

    2012-11-01

    Eukaryotic topoisomerase I (Top1) is a monomeric enzyme that catalyzes the relaxation of supercoiled DNA during important processes including DNA replication, transcription, recombination and chromosome condensation. Human Top1 I is of significant medical interest since it is the unique cellular target of camptothecin (CPT), a plant alkaloid that rapidly blocks both DNA and RNA synthesis. In this review, together with CPT, we point out the interaction between human Top1 and some natural compounds, such us terpenoids, flavonoids, stilbenes and fatty acids. The drugs can interact with the enzyme at different levels perturbing the binding, cleavage, rotation or religation processes. Here we focus on different assays that can be used to identify the catalytic step of the enzyme inhibited by different natural compounds.

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecG binds and unwinds model DNA substrates with a preference for Holliday junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegeye, Ephrem Debebe; Balasingham, Seetha V; Laerdahl, Jon K; Homberset, Håvard; Tønjum, Tone

    2012-08-01

    The RecG enzyme, a superfamily 2 helicase, is present in nearly all bacteria. Here we report for the first time that the recG gene is also present in the genomes of most vascular plants as well as in green algae, but is not found in other eukaryotes or archaea. The precise function of RecG is poorly understood, although ample evidence shows that it plays critical roles in DNA repair, recombination and replication. We further demonstrate that Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecG (RecG(Mtb)) DNA binding activity had a broad substrate specificity, whereas it only unwound branched-DNA substrates such as Holliday junctions (HJs), replication forks, D-loops and R-loops, with a strong preference for the HJ as a helicase substrate. In addition, RecG(Mtb) preferentially bound relatively long (≥40 nt) ssDNA, exhibiting a higher affinity for the homopolymeric nucleotides poly(dT), poly(dG) and poly(dC) than for poly(dA). RecG(Mtb) helicase activity was supported by hydrolysis of ATP or dATP in the presence of Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Cu(2+) or Fe(2+). Like its Escherichia coli orthologue, RecG(Mtb) is also a strictly DNA-dependent ATPase.

  14. HMGB1 interacts with human topoisomerase IIalpha and stimulates its catalytic activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štros, Michal; Bačíková, Alena; Muselíková Polanská, Eva; Štokrová, Jitka; Strauss, F.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 15 (2007), s. 5001-5013 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/05/2031; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702; CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : HMGB1 * DNA topoisomerase IIalpha * DNA repair Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 6.954, year: 2007

  15. topIb, a phylogenetic hallmark gene of Thaumarchaeota encodes a functional eukaryote-like topoisomerase IB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmane, Narimane; Gadelle, Danièle; Delmas, Stéphane; Criscuolo, Alexis; Eberhard, Stephan; Desnoues, Nicole; Collin, Sylvie; Zhang, Hongliang; Pommier, Yves; Forterre, Patrick; Sezonov, Guennadi

    2016-04-07

    Type IB DNA topoisomerases can eliminate torsional stresses produced during replication and transcription. These enzymes are found in all eukaryotes and a short version is present in some bacteria and viruses. Among prokaryotes, the long eukaryotic version is only observed in archaea of the phylum Thaumarchaeota. However, the activities and the roles of these topoisomerases have remained an open question. Here, we demonstrate that all available thaumarchaeal genomes contain a topoisomerase IB gene that defines a monophyletic group closely related to the eukaryotic enzymes. We show that the topIB gene is expressed in the model thaumarchaeon Nitrososphaera viennensis and we purified the recombinant enzyme from the uncultivated thaumarchaeon Candidatus Caldiarchaeum subterraneum. This enzyme is active in vitro at high temperature, making it the first thermophilic topoisomerase IB characterized so far. We have compared this archaeal type IB enzyme to its human mitochondrial and nuclear counterparts. The archaeal enzyme relaxes both negatively and positively supercoiled DNA like the eukaryotic enzymes. However, its pattern of DNA cleavage specificity is different and it is resistant to camptothecins (CPTs) and non-CPT Top1 inhibitors, LMP744 and lamellarin D. This newly described thermostable topoisomerases IB should be a promising new model for evolutionary, mechanistic and structural studies. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Type IIA topoisomerase inhibition by a new class of antibacterial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bax, Benjamin D; Chan, Pan F; Eggleston, Drake S; Fosberry, Andrew; Gentry, Daniel R; Gorrec, Fabrice; Giordano, Ilaria; Hann, Michael M; Hennessy, Alan; Hibbs, Martin; Huang, Jianzhong; Jones, Emma; Jones, Jo; Brown, Kristin Koretke; Lewis, Ceri J; May, Earl W; Saunders, Martin R; Singh, Onkar; Spitzfaden, Claus E; Shen, Carol; Shillings, Anthony; Theobald, Andrew J; Wohlkonig, Alexandre; Pearson, Neil D; Gwynn, Michael N

    2010-08-19

    Despite the success of genomics in identifying new essential bacterial genes, there is a lack of sustainable leads in antibacterial drug discovery to address increasing multidrug resistance. Type IIA topoisomerases cleave and religate DNA to regulate DNA topology and are a major class of antibacterial and anticancer drug targets, yet there is no well developed structural basis for understanding drug action. Here we report the 2.1 A crystal structure of a potent, new class, broad-spectrum antibacterial agent in complex with Staphylococcus aureus DNA gyrase and DNA, showing a new mode of inhibition that circumvents fluoroquinolone resistance in this clinically important drug target. The inhibitor 'bridges' the DNA and a transient non-catalytic pocket on the two-fold axis at the GyrA dimer interface, and is close to the active sites and fluoroquinolone binding sites. In the inhibitor complex the active site seems poised to cleave the DNA, with a single metal ion observed between the TOPRIM (topoisomerase/primase) domain and the scissile phosphate. This work provides new insights into the mechanism of topoisomerase action and a platform for structure-based drug design of a new class of antibacterial agents against a clinically proven, but conformationally flexible, enzyme class.

  17. Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A topoisomerase IIIα, an archaeal enzyme with promiscuity in divalent cation dependence.

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    Raymond Morales

    Full Text Available Topoisomerases play a fundamental role in genome stability, DNA replication and repair. As a result, topoisomerases have served as therapeutic targets of interest in Eukarya and Bacteria, two of the three domains of life. Since members of Archaea, the third domain of life, have not been implicated in any diseased state to-date, there is a paucity of data on archaeal topoisomerases. Here we report Methanosarcina acetivorans TopoIIIα (MacTopoIIIα as the first biochemically characterized mesophilic archaeal topoisomerase. Maximal activity for MacTopoIIIα was elicited at 30-35°C and 100 mM NaCl. As little as 10 fmol of the enzyme initiated DNA relaxation, and NaCl concentrations above 250 mM inhibited this activity. The present study also provides the first evidence that a type IA Topoisomerase has activity in the presence of all divalent cations tested (Mg(2+, Ca(2+, Sr(2+, Ba(2+, Mn(2+, Fe(2+, Co(2+, Ni(2+, Cu(2+, Zn(2+ and Cd(2+. Activity profiles were, however, specific to each metal. Known type I (ssDNA and camptothecin and type II (etoposide, novobiocin and nalidixic acid inhibitors with different mechanisms of action were used to demonstrate that MacTopoIIIα is a type IA topoisomerase. Alignment of MacTopoIIIα with characterized topoisomerases identified Y317 as the putative catalytic residue, and a Y317F mutation ablated DNA relaxation activity, demonstrating that Y317 is essential for catalysis. As the role of Domain V (C-terminal domain is unclear, MacTopoIIIα was aligned with the canonical E. coli TopoI 67 kDa fragment in order to construct an N-terminal (1-586 and a C-terminal (587-752 fragment for analysis. Activity could neither be elicited from the fragments individually nor reconstituted from a mixture of the fragments, suggesting that native folding is impaired when the two fragments are expressed separately. Evidence that each of the split domains plays a role in Zn(2+ binding of the enzyme is also provided.

  18. Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A topoisomerase IIIα, an archaeal enzyme with promiscuity in divalent cation dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Raymond; Sriratana, Palita; Zhang, Jing; Cann, Isaac K O

    2011-01-01

    Topoisomerases play a fundamental role in genome stability, DNA replication and repair. As a result, topoisomerases have served as therapeutic targets of interest in Eukarya and Bacteria, two of the three domains of life. Since members of Archaea, the third domain of life, have not been implicated in any diseased state to-date, there is a paucity of data on archaeal topoisomerases. Here we report Methanosarcina acetivorans TopoIIIα (MacTopoIIIα) as the first biochemically characterized mesophilic archaeal topoisomerase. Maximal activity for MacTopoIIIα was elicited at 30-35°C and 100 mM NaCl. As little as 10 fmol of the enzyme initiated DNA relaxation, and NaCl concentrations above 250 mM inhibited this activity. The present study also provides the first evidence that a type IA Topoisomerase has activity in the presence of all divalent cations tested (Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Ba(2+), Mn(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+) and Cd(2+)). Activity profiles were, however, specific to each metal. Known type I (ssDNA and camptothecin) and type II (etoposide, novobiocin and nalidixic acid) inhibitors with different mechanisms of action were used to demonstrate that MacTopoIIIα is a type IA topoisomerase. Alignment of MacTopoIIIα with characterized topoisomerases identified Y317 as the putative catalytic residue, and a Y317F mutation ablated DNA relaxation activity, demonstrating that Y317 is essential for catalysis. As the role of Domain V (C-terminal domain) is unclear, MacTopoIIIα was aligned with the canonical E. coli TopoI 67 kDa fragment in order to construct an N-terminal (1-586) and a C-terminal (587-752) fragment for analysis. Activity could neither be elicited from the fragments individually nor reconstituted from a mixture of the fragments, suggesting that native folding is impaired when the two fragments are expressed separately. Evidence that each of the split domains plays a role in Zn(2+) binding of the enzyme is also provided.

  19. Novel trifluoromethylated 9-amino-3,4-dihydroacridin-1(2H)-ones act as covalent poisons of human topoisomerase IIα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante Lara, Lorena; Sledge, Alexis; Laradji, Amine; Okoro, Cosmas O; Osheroff, Neil

    2017-02-01

    A number of topoisomerase II-targeted anticancer drugs, including amsacrine, utilize an acridine or related aromatic core as a scaffold. Therefore, to further explore the potential of acridine-related compounds to act as topoisomerase II poisons, we synthesized a series of novel trifluoromethylated 9-amino-3,4-dihydroacridin-1(2H)-one derivatives and examined their ability to enhance DNA cleavage mediated by human topoisomerase IIα. Derivatives containing a H, Cl, F, and Br at C7 enhanced enzyme-mediated double-stranded DNA cleavage ∼5.5- to 8.5-fold over baseline, but were less potent than amsacrine. The inclusion of an amino group at C9 was critical for activity. The compounds lost their activity against topoisomerase IIα in the presence of a reducing agent, displayed no activity against the catalytic core of topoisomerase IIα, and inhibited DNA cleavage when incubated with the enzyme prior to the addition of DNA. These findings strongly suggest that the compounds act as covalent, rather than interfacial, topoisomerase II poisons. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis UvrD1 and UvrA proteins suppress DNA strand exchange promoted by cognate and noncognate RecA proteins.

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    Singh, Pawan; Patil, K Neelakanteshwar; Khanduja, Jasbeer Singh; Kumar, P Sanjay; Williams, Alan; Rossi, Franca; Rizzi, Menico; Davis, Elaine O; Muniyappa, K

    2010-06-15

    DNA helicases are present in all kingdoms of life and play crucial roles in processes of DNA metabolism such as replication, repair, recombination, and transcription. To date, however, the role of DNA helicases during homologous recombination in mycobacteria remains unknown. In this study, we show that Mycobacterium tuberculosis UvrD1 more efficiently inhibited the strand exchange promoted by its cognate RecA, compared to noncognate Mycobacterium smegmatis or Escherichia coli RecA proteins. The M. tuberculosis UvrD1(Q276R) mutant lacking the helicase and ATPase activities was able to block strand exchange promoted by mycobacterial RecA proteins but not of E. coli RecA. We observed that M. tuberculosis UvrA by itself has no discernible effect on strand exchange promoted by E. coli RecA but impedes the reaction catalyzed by the mycobacterial RecA proteins. Our data also show that M. tuberculosis UvrA and UvrD1 can act together to inhibit strand exchange promoted by mycobacterial RecA proteins. Taken together, these findings raise the possibility that UvrD1 and UvrA might act together in vivo to counter the deleterious effects of RecA nucleoprotein filaments and/or facilitate the dissolution of recombination intermediates. Finally, we provide direct experimental evidence for a physical interaction between M. tuberculosis UvrD1 and RecA on one hand and RecA and UvrA on the other hand. These observations are consistent with a molecular mechanism, whereby M. tuberculosis UvrA and UvrD1, acting together, block DNA strand exchange promoted by cognate and noncognate RecA proteins.

  1. Contribution of Type II Topoisomerase Mutations to Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Enterococcus faecium from Japanese Clinical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urushibara, Noriko; Suzaki, Keisuke; Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Aung, Meiji Soe; Shinagawa, Masaaki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    High-level fluoroquinolone resistance is conferred by the mutation of conserved serine and acidic amino acids in the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of the A subunits of the type II topoisomerases, DNA gyrase (GyrA) and topoisomerase IV (ParC). In Japan, fluoroquinolone-resistant Enterococcus faecium continues to emerge in clinical settings. We analyzed 131 Japanese E. faecium clinical isolates for susceptibility to levofloxacin (LVFX), and QRDR mutational status. The bacterial collection had a high percentage of resistance (79%) and showed elevated drug minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs). Eighty-three isolates had single or combined mutations in gyrA and/or parC; all were resistant to LVFX. A strong correlation was evident between log-transformed MICs and the total number of QRDR mutations (r = 0.7899), confirming the involvement of QRDR mutations in drug resistance, as previously described. Three-dimensional modeling indicated that the amino acid change(s) in QRDR could disrupt the interaction between the enzymes and drugs: the most common cause of quinolone resistance. Interestingly, eight isolates had a single mutation on gyrA and exhibited significantly reduced susceptibility. These data imply that either DNA gyrase or topoisomerase IV can be the primary target of fluoroquinolones, although topoisomerase IV is commonly thought to be the primary target in gram-positive bacteria.

  2. Label-free DNA-based detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and rifampicin resistance through hydration induced stress in microcantilevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Carmen M; Kosaka, Priscila M; Sotillo, Alma; Mingorance, Jesús; Tamayo, Javier; Calleja, Montserrat

    2015-02-03

    We have developed a label-free assay for the genomic detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and rifampicin resistance. The method relies on the quantification of the hydration induced stress on microcantilever biosensors functionalized with oligonucleotide probes, before and after hybridization with specific targets. We have found a limit of detection of 10 fg/mL for PCR amplified products of 122 bp. Furthermore, the technique can successfully target genomic DNA (gDNA) fragments of length >500 bp, and it can successfully discriminate single mismatches. We have used both loci IS6110 and rpoB as targets to detect the mycobacteria and the rifampicin resistance from gDNA directly extracted from bacterial culture and without PCR amplification. We have been able to detect 2 pg/mL target concentration in samples with an excess of interfering DNA and in a total analysis time of 1 h and 30 min. The detection limit found demonstrates the capability to develop direct assays without the need for long culture steps or PCR amplification. The methodology can be easily translated to different microbial targets, and it is suitable for further development of miniaturized devices and multiplexed detection.

  3. Characterization of molecular interactions between E. coli RNA polymerase and topoisomerase I by molecular simulations

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    Tiwari, Purushottam Babu; Chapagain, Prem P.; Banda, Srikanth; Darici, Yesim; Üren, Aykut; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli topoisomerase I (EctopoI), a type IA DNA topoisomerase, relaxes the negative DNA supercoiling generated by RNA polymerase (RNAP) during transcription elongation. Due to the lack of structural information on the complex, the exact nature of the RNAP-EctopoI interactions remains unresolved. Herein, we report for the first time, the structure-based modeling of the RNAP-EctopoI interactions using computational methods. Our results predict that the salt-bridge as well as hydrogen bond interactions are responsible for the formation and stabilization of the RNAP-EctopoI complex. Our investigations provide molecular insights for understanding how EctopoI interacts with RNAP, a critical step for preventing hypernegative DNA supercoiling during transcription. PMID:27448274

  4. Role of the Water–Metal Ion Bridge in Mediating Interactions between Quinolones and Escherichia coli Topoisomerase IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Although quinolones have been in clinical use for decades, the mechanism underlying drug activity and resistance has remained elusive. However, recent studies indicate that clinically relevant quinolones interact with Bacillus anthracis (Gram-positive) topoisomerase IV through a critical water–metal ion bridge and that the most common quinolone resistance mutations decrease drug activity by disrupting this bridge. As a first step toward determining whether the water–metal ion bridge is a general mechanism of quinolone–topoisomerase interaction, we characterized drug interactions with wild-type Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) topoisomerase IV and a series of ParC enzymes with mutations (S80L, S80I, S80F, and E84K) in the predicted bridge-anchoring residues. Results strongly suggest that the water–metal ion bridge is essential for quinolone activity against E. coli topoisomerase IV. Although the bridge represents a common and critical mechanism that underlies broad-spectrum quinolone function, it appears to play different roles in B. anthracis and E. coli topoisomerase IV. The water–metal ion bridge is the most important binding contact of clinically relevant quinolones with the Gram-positive enzyme. However, it primarily acts to properly align clinically relevant quinolones with E. coli topoisomerase IV. Finally, even though ciprofloxacin is unable to increase levels of DNA cleavage mediated by several of the Ser80 and Glu84 mutant E. coli enzymes, the drug still retains the ability to inhibit the overall catalytic activity of these topoisomerase IV proteins. Inhibition parallels drug binding, suggesting that the presence of the drug in the active site is sufficient to diminish DNA relaxation rates. PMID:25115926

  5. Phylogeny of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains constructed from polymorphisms in genes involved in DNA replication, recombination and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Olga; Luo, Tao; Dos Vultos, Tiago; Kremer, Kristin; Murray, Alan; Namouchi, Amine; Jackson, Céline; Rauzier, Jean; Bifani, Pablo; Warren, Rob; Rasolofo, Voahangy; Mei, Jian; Gao, Qian; Gicquel, Brigitte

    2011-01-20

    The Beijing family is a successful group of M. tuberculosis strains, often associated with drug resistance and widely distributed throughout the world. Polymorphic genetic markers have been used to type particular M. tuberculosis strains. We recently identified a group of polymorphic DNA repair replication and recombination (3R) genes. It was shown that evolution of M. tuberculosis complex strains can be studied using 3R SNPs and a high-resolution tool for strain discrimination was developed. Here we investigated the genetic diversity and propose a phylogeny for Beijing strains by analyzing polymorphisms in 3R genes. A group of 3R genes was sequenced in a collection of Beijing strains from different geographic origins. Sequence analysis and comparison with the ones of non-Beijing strains identified several SNPs. These SNPs were used to type a larger collection of Beijing strains and allowed identification of 26 different sequence types for which a phylogeny was constructed. Phylogenetic relationships established by sequence types were in agreement with evolutionary pathways suggested by other genetic markers, such as Large Sequence Polymorphisms (LSPs). A recent Beijing genotype (Bmyc10), which included 60% of strains from distinct parts of the world, appeared to be predominant. We found SNPs in 3R genes associated with the Beijing family, which enabled discrimination of different groups and the proposal of a phylogeny. The Beijing family can be divided into different groups characterized by particular genetic polymorphisms that may reflect pathogenic features. These SNPs are new, potential genetic markers that may contribute to better understand the success of the Beijing family.

  6. Phylogeny of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains constructed from polymorphisms in genes involved in DNA replication, recombination and repair.

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    Olga Mestre

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Beijing family is a successful group of M. tuberculosis strains, often associated with drug resistance and widely distributed throughout the world. Polymorphic genetic markers have been used to type particular M. tuberculosis strains. We recently identified a group of polymorphic DNA repair replication and recombination (3R genes. It was shown that evolution of M. tuberculosis complex strains can be studied using 3R SNPs and a high-resolution tool for strain discrimination was developed. Here we investigated the genetic diversity and propose a phylogeny for Beijing strains by analyzing polymorphisms in 3R genes.A group of 3R genes was sequenced in a collection of Beijing strains from different geographic origins. Sequence analysis and comparison with the ones of non-Beijing strains identified several SNPs. These SNPs were used to type a larger collection of Beijing strains and allowed identification of 26 different sequence types for which a phylogeny was constructed. Phylogenetic relationships established by sequence types were in agreement with evolutionary pathways suggested by other genetic markers, such as Large Sequence Polymorphisms (LSPs. A recent Beijing genotype (Bmyc10, which included 60% of strains from distinct parts of the world, appeared to be predominant.We found SNPs in 3R genes associated with the Beijing family, which enabled discrimination of different groups and the proposal of a phylogeny. The Beijing family can be divided into different groups characterized by particular genetic polymorphisms that may reflect pathogenic features. These SNPs are new, potential genetic markers that may contribute to better understand the success of the Beijing family.

  7. Synthesis and enantiopreferential DNA-binding profile of late 3d transition metal R- and S-enantiomeric complexes derived from N,N-bis-(1-benzyl-2-ethoxyethane): Validation of R-enantiomer of copper(II) complex as a human topoisomerase II inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjmand, Farukh; Sharma, Girish Chandra; Muddassir, Mohd; Tabassum, Sartaj

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate the biological preference of chiral drug candidates for molecular target DNA, new potential metal-based chemotherapeutic agents 1-3 (a and b) of late 3d transition metals Ni(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II), respectively, derived from (R)- and (S)-2-amino-2-phenylethanol with CH(2) CH(2)  linker were synthesized and thoroughly characterized. Interaction studies of 1-3 (a and b) with calf thymus DNA in Tris buffer were studied by electronic absorption titrations, luminescence titrations, cyclic voltammetry, and circular dichroism. The results reveal that the extent of DNA binding of R-enantiomer of copper 1a was highest in comparison to rest of the complexes via electrostatic interaction mode. The nuclease activity of 1(a and b) with supercoiled pBR322 DNA was further examined by gel electrophoresis, which reveals that complex 1a exhibits a remarkable DNA cleavage activity (concentration dependent) with pBR322DNA, and the cleavage activity of both enantiomers of complex 1 was significantly enhanced in the presence of activators. The activating efficiency follows the order Asc > H(2) O(2) > MPA for 1a, and reverse order was observed for 1b, because of the differences in enantioselectivity and conformation. Further, it was observed that cleavage reaction involves singlet oxygen species and superoxide radicals via oxidative cleavage mechanism. In addition, complex 1a exhibits significant inhibitory effects on the topoisomerase II (topo II) activity at a very low concentration ∼24 μM, which suggest that complex 1a is indeed catalytic inhibitor or (poison) of human topo II. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Comparison of Culture, Real-Time DNA Amplification Assay and Ehrlich-Ziehl-Neelsen for Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Adil Karadağ

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Mycobacterium tuberculosis is still a substantial health problem universally. Although culture is the gold standard method, reliable, rapid and new methods are required for effective struggle with disease. We retrospectively compared the results of Ehrlich-Ziehl-Neelsen (EZN stain and real-time DNA amplification assay (BD ProbeTec ET system with culture. Study Design: Retrospective study. Material and Methods: A total of 703 samples, 182 pulmonary and 521 extra pulmonary, collected from 630 patients between May 2008 and February 2011 were evaluated. Culture was considered the gold standard. Results: For pulmonary specimens, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive and negative predictive values of BD ProbeTec ET and EZN were calculated to be 100%, 98.8%, 87.5%, 100% and 71.4%, 98.8%, 83.3%, 97.6%, respectively. For extra pulmonary specimens, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive and negative predictive values of BD ProbeTec ET and EZN were calculated to be 80%, 98.7%, 76.9%, 98.9% and 24%, 98.3%, 42.8%, 96.2%, respectively. Conclusion: According to these results, we suggest that the BD ProbeTec ET system is more reliable than EZN. In addition, the BD ProbeTec ET system produces faster results. Based upon these results, we consider that the BD ProbeTec ET system may be employed in the diagnosis of M. tuberculosis.

  9. The C-terminal 20 Amino Acids of Drosophila Topoisomerase 2 Are Required for Binding to a BRCA1 C Terminus (BRCT) Domain-containing Protein, Mus101, and Fidelity of DNA Segregation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-tsung Shane; Wu, Jianhong; Modrich, Paul; Hsieh, Tao-shih

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic topoisomerase 2 (Top2) and one of its interacting partners, topoisomerase IIβ binding protein 1 (TopBP1) are two proteins performing essential cellular functions. We mapped the interacting domains of these two proteins using co-immunoprecipitation and pulldown experiments with truncated or mutant Drosophila Top2 with various Ser-to-Ala substitutions. We discovered that the last 20 amino acids of Top2 represent the key region for binding with Mus101 (the Drosophila homolog of TopBP1) and that phosphorylation of Ser-1428 and Ser-1443 is important for Top2 to interact with the N terminus of Mus101, which contains the BRCT1/2 domains. The interaction between Mus101 and the Top2 C-terminal regulatory domain is phosphorylation-dependent because treatment with phosphatase abolishes their association in pulldown assays. The binding affinity of N-terminal Mus101 with a synthetic phosphorylated peptide spanning the last 25 amino acids of Top2 (with Ser(P)-1428 and Ser(P)-1443) was determined by surface plasmon resonance with a Kd of 0.57 μm. In an in vitro decatenation assay, Mus101 can specifically reduce the decatenation activity of Top2, and dephosphorylation of Top2 attenuates this response. Next, we endeavored to establish a cellular system for testing the biological function of Top2-Mus101 interaction. Top2-silenced S2 cells rescued by Top2Δ20, Top2 with 20 amino acids truncated from the C terminus, developed abnormally high chromosome numbers, which implies that Top2-Mus101 interaction is important for maintaining the fidelity of chromosome segregation during mitosis. PMID:27129233

  10. A Mycobacterium bovis BCG-Naked DNA Prime-Boost Vaccination Strategy Induced CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Immunogens

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    Miao Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is still a major global public health problem. Presently the only tuberculosis (TB vaccine available is Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG, although it fails to adequately protect against pulmonary TB in adults. To solve this problem, the development of a new effective vaccine is urgently desired. BCG-prime DNA-booster vaccinations strategy has been shown to induce greater protection against tuberculosis (TB than BCG alone. Some studies have demonstrated that the two genes (Rv1769 and Rv1772 are excellent T-cell antigens and could induce T-cell immune responses. In this research, we built BCG-C or BCG-P prime-recombination plasmid PcDNA3.1-Rv1769 or PcDNA3.1-Rv1772 boost vaccinations strategy to immunize BALB/c mice and evaluated its immunogenicity. The data suggests that the BCG-C+3.1-72 strategy could elicit the most long-lasting and strongest Th1-type cellular immune responses and the BCG-C+3.1-69 strategy could induce the high level CD8+ T-cell response at certain time points. These findings support the ideas that the prime-boost strategy as a combination of vaccines may be better than a single vaccine for protection against tuberculosis.

  11. Construction of human MASP-2-CCP1/2SP, CCP2SP, SP plasmid DNA nanolipoplexes and the effects on tuberculosis in BCG-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qi; Dong, Xinfang; Luo, Yanping; Zhang, Guochao; Shan, Jinyu; Wang, Qian; He, Qi; Zhang, Lifeng; Wang, Jingqiu; Zhu, Bingdong; Ma, Xingming

    2017-08-01

    The lectin pathway, one of the complement cascade systems, provides the primary line of defense against invading pathogens. The serine protease of MASP-2 plays an essential role in complement activation of the lectin pathway. The C-terminal segment of MASP-2 is comprised of the CCP1-CCP2-SP domains, and is the crucial catalytic segment. However, what is the effect of CCP1-CCP2-SP domains in controlling chronic infection is unknown. In order to evaluate the potential impact of CCP1-CCP2-SP domains on tuberculosis, we constructed the human MASP-2 CCP1/2SP, CCP2SP and SP recombinant plasmids, and delivered these plasmids by DNA-DOTAP:cholesterol cationic nanolipoplexes to BCG-infected mice. After 21 days post DNA-DOTAP:chol nanolipoplexes application, we analyzed bacteria loads of pulmonary, pathology of granuloma, lymphocyte subpopulations. The C3a, C4a and MASP-2 levels in serum were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Compared to the control group that received GFP DNA-DOTAP:chol nanolipoplexes, MASP-2 CCP1/2SP DNA-DOTAP:chol nanolipoplexes treated group showed significantly enlarged pulmonary granulomas lesion (P  0.05). These findings provided experimental evidence that MASP-2 CCP1/2SP DNA nanolipoplexes shown the negative efficacy in controlling Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, and displayed a potential role of down-regulating T-cell-mediated immunity in tuberculosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Induction of apoptosis in colon cancer cells by a novel topoisomerase I inhibitor TopIn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Soo Kyung; Gwak, Jungsug; Song, Im-Sook; Park, Hyung-Soon; Oh, Sangtaek

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → TopIn activates p53-dependent transcription in colon cancer cells. → TopIn induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells. → TopIn selectively inhibits topoisomerase I activity. → TopIn does not affect the activity of BCRP and MDR-1. -- Abstract: The tumor suppressor p53 plays an important role in cellular emergency mechanisms through regulating the genes involved in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. To identify small molecules that can activate p53-responsive transcription, we performed chemical screening using genetically engineered HCT116 reporter cells. We found that TopIn (7-phenyl-6H-[1,2,5]oxadiazolo[3,4-e]indole 3-oxide) efficiently activated p53-mediated transcriptional activity and induced phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15, thereby stabilizing the p53 protein. Furthermore, TopIn upregulated the expression of p21 WAF1/CIP1 , a downstream target of p53, and suppressed cellular proliferation in various colon cancer cells. Additionally, TopIn induced DNA fragmentation, caspase-3/7 activation and poly ADP ribose polymerase cleavage, typical biochemical markers of apoptosis, in p53 wild-type and mutated colon cancer cells. Finally, we found that TopIn inhibited topoisomerase I activity, but not topoisomerase II, in vitro and induced the formation of the topoisomerase I-DNA complex in HCT116 colon cancer cells. Unlike camptothecin (CPT) and its derivative SN38, TopIn did not affect the activity of the ATP-binding cassette transporter breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) or multidrug-resistant protein-1 (MDR-1). These results suggest that TopIn may present a promising new topoisomerase I-targeting anti-tumor therapeutics.

  13. Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis protect against DNA damage but are dispensable for the growth of the pathogen in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Rupangi Verma; Reddy, P Vineel; Tyagi, Anil K

    2014-01-01

    In host cells, Mycobacterium tuberculosis encounters an array of reactive molecules capable of damaging its genome. Non-bulky DNA lesions are the most common damages produced on the exposure of the pathogen to reactive species and base excision repair (BER) pathway is involved in the repair of such damage. During BER, apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease enzymes repair the abasic sites that are generated after spontaneous DNA base loss or by the action of DNA glycosylases, which if left unrepaired lead to inhibition of replication and transcription. However, the role of AP endonucleases in imparting protection against DNA damage and in the growth and pathogenesis of M.tuberculosis has not yet been elucidated. To demonstrate the biological significance of these enzymes in M.tuberculosis, it would be desirable to disrupt the relevant genes and evaluate the resulting mutants for their ability to grow in the host and cause disease. In this study, we have generated M.tuberculosis mutants of the base excision repair (BER) system, disrupted in either one (MtbΔend or MtbΔxthA) or both the AP endonucleases (MtbΔendΔxthA). We demonstrate that these genes are crucial for bacteria to withstand alkylation and oxidative stress in vitro. In addition, the mutant disrupted in both the AP endonucleases (MtbΔendΔxthA) exhibited a significant reduction in its ability to survive inside human macrophages. However, infection of guinea pigs with either MtbΔend or MtbΔxthA or MtbΔendΔxthA resulted in the similar bacillary load and pathological damage in the organs as observed in the case of infection with wild-type M.tuberculosis. The implications of these observations are discussed.

  14. Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis protect against DNA damage but are dispensable for the growth of the pathogen in guinea pigs.

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    Rupangi Verma Puri

    Full Text Available In host cells, Mycobacterium tuberculosis encounters an array of reactive molecules capable of damaging its genome. Non-bulky DNA lesions are the most common damages produced on the exposure of the pathogen to reactive species and base excision repair (BER pathway is involved in the repair of such damage. During BER, apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP endonuclease enzymes repair the abasic sites that are generated after spontaneous DNA base loss or by the action of DNA glycosylases, which if left unrepaired lead to inhibition of replication and transcription. However, the role of AP endonucleases in imparting protection against DNA damage and in the growth and pathogenesis of M.tuberculosis has not yet been elucidated. To demonstrate the biological significance of these enzymes in M.tuberculosis, it would be desirable to disrupt the relevant genes and evaluate the resulting mutants for their ability to grow in the host and cause disease. In this study, we have generated M.tuberculosis mutants of the base excision repair (BER system, disrupted in either one (MtbΔend or MtbΔxthA or both the AP endonucleases (MtbΔendΔxthA. We demonstrate that these genes are crucial for bacteria to withstand alkylation and oxidative stress in vitro. In addition, the mutant disrupted in both the AP endonucleases (MtbΔendΔxthA exhibited a significant reduction in its ability to survive inside human macrophages. However, infection of guinea pigs with either MtbΔend or MtbΔxthA or MtbΔendΔxthA resulted in the similar bacillary load and pathological damage in the organs as observed in the case of infection with wild-type M.tuberculosis. The implications of these observations are discussed.

  15. Nitric Oxide Down-Regulates Topoisomerase I and Induces Camptothecin Resistance in Human Breast MCF-7 Tumor Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh K Sharma

    Full Text Available Camptothecin (CPT, a topoisomerase I poison, is an important drug for the treatment of solid tumors in the clinic. Nitric oxide (·NO, a physiological signaling molecule, is involved in many cellular functions, including cell proliferation, survival and death. We have previously shown that ·NO plays a significant role in the detoxification of etoposide (VP-16, a topoisomerase II poison in vitro and in human melanoma cells. ·NO/·NO-derived species are reported to modulate activity of several important cellular proteins. As topoisomerases contain a number of free sulfhydryl groups which may be targets of ·NO/·NO-derived species, we have investigated the roles of ·NO/·NO-derived species in the stability and activity of topo I. Here we show that ·NO/·NO-derived species induces a significant down-regulation of topoisomerase I protein via the ubiquitin/26S proteasome pathway in human colon (HT-29 and breast (MCF-7 cancer cell lines. Importantly, ·NO treatment induced a significant resistance to CPT only in MCF-7 cells. This resistance to CPT did not result from loss of topoisomerase I activity as there were no differences in topoisomerase I-induced DNA cleavage in vitro or in tumor cells, but resulted from the stabilization/induction of bcl2 protein. This up-regulation of bcl2 protein in MCF-7 cells was wtp53 dependent as pifithrine-α, a small molecule inhibitor of wtp53 function, completely reversed CPT resistance, suggesting that wtp53 and bcl2 proteins played important roles in CPT resistance. Because tumors in vivo are heterogeneous and contaminated by infiltrating macrophages, ·NO-induced down-regulation of topoisomerase I protein combined with bcl2 protein stabilization could render certain tumors highly resistant to CPT and drugs derived from it in the clinic.

  16. Synthesis and biological activity of ferrocenyl indeno[1,2-c]isoquinolines as topoisomerase II inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambang, Nathalie; Schifano-Faux, Nadège; Aillerie, Alexandre; Baldeyrou, Brigitte; Jacquet, Camille; Bal-Mahieu, Christine; Bousquet, Till; Pellegrini, Sylvain; Ndifon, Peter T; Meignan, Samuel; Goossens, Jean-François; Lansiaux, Amélie; Pélinski, Lydie

    2016-02-15

    Three series of indeno[1,2-c]isoquinolines bearing a ferrocenyl entity were synthesized and evaluated for DNA interaction, topoisomerase I and II inhibition, and cytotoxicity against breast human cancer cell lines. In the first and second series, the ferrocenyl scaffold was inserted as a linker between the two nitrogen atoms. In the last series, it was introduced at the end of the carbon chain. The present study showed that the ferrocenyl entity enhanced the topoisomerase II inhibition. Most compounds showed a potent growth inhibitory effect on MDA-MB-231 cell line with the IC50 in μM range. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Inhibition of Topoisomerase IIα and Induction of Apoptosis in Gastric Cancer Cells by 19-Triisopropyl Andrographolide

    OpenAIRE

    Monger, Adeep; Boonmuen, Nittaya; Suksen, Kanoknetr; Saeeng, Rungnapha; Kasemsuk, Teerapich; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Saengsawang, Witchuda; Chairoungdua, Arthit

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the most common cancer in Eastern Asia. Increasing chemoresistance and general systemic toxicities have complicated the current chemotherapy leading to an urgent need of more effective agents. The present study reported a potent DNA topoisomerase IIα inhibitory activity of an andrographolide analogue (19-triisopropyl andrographolide, analogue-6) in gastric cancer cells; MKN-45, and AGS cells. The analogue was potently cytotoxic to both gastric cancer cell lines with the half...

  18. Activities of Fluoroquinolones against Streptococcus pneumoniae Type II Topoisomerases Purified as Recombinant Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Morrissey, Ian; George, John

    1999-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae topoisomerase IV and DNA gyrase have been purified from a fluoroquinolone-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae strain, from first-step mutants showing low-level resistance to ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, levofloxacin, and ofloxacin, and from two clinical isolates showing intermediate- and high-level fluoroquinolone resistance by a gene cloning method that produces recombinant proteins from Escherichia coli. The concentrations of ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, levofloxac...

  19. Effects of an unusual poison identify a lifespan role for Topoisomerase 2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Tombline, Gregory; Millen, Jonathan I.; Polevoda, Bogdan; Rapaport, Matan; Baxter, Bonnie; Van Meter, Michael; Gilbertson, Matthew; Madrey, Joe; Piazza, Gary A.; Rasmussen, Lynn; Wennerberg, Krister; White, E. Lucile; Nitiss, John L.; Goldfarb, David S.

    2017-01-01

    A progressive loss of genome maintenance has been implicated as both a cause and consequence of aging. Here we present evidence supporting the hypothesis that an age-associated decay in genome maintenance promotes aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) due to an inability to sense or repair DNA damage by topoisomerase 2 (yTop2). We describe the characterization of LS1, identified in a high throughput screen for small molecules that shorten the replicative lifespan of yeast. LS1 accelerates...

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium marinum non-homologous end-joining proteins can function together to join DNA ends in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Douglas G; Castore, Reneau; Shi, Runhua; Mallick, Amrita; Ennis, Don G; Harrison, Lynn

    2017-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis express a Ku protein and a DNA ligase D and are able to repair DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). This pathway protects against DNA damage when bacteria are in stationary phase. Mycobacterium marinum is a member of this mycobacterium family and like M. tuberculosis is pathogenic. M. marinum lives in water, forms biofilms and infects fish and frogs. M. marinum is a biosafety level 2 (BSL2) organism as it can infect humans, although infections are limited to the skin. M. marinum is accepted as a model to study mycobacterial pathogenesis, as M. marinum and M. tuberculosis are genetically closely related and have similar mechanisms of survival and persistence inside macrophage. The aim of this study was to determine whether M. marinum could be used as a model to understand M. tuberculosis NHEJ repair. We identified and cloned the M. marinum genes encoding NHEJ proteins and generated E. coli strains that express the M. marinum Ku (Mm-Ku) and ligase D (Mm-Lig) individually or together (LHmKumLig strain) from expression vectors integrated at phage attachment sites in the genome. We demonstrated that Mm-Ku and Mm-Lig are both required to re-circularize Cla I-linearized plasmid DNA in E. coli. We compared repair of strain LHmKumLig with that of an E. coli strain (BWKuLig#2) expressing the M. tuberculosis Ku (Mt-Ku) and ligase D (Mt-Lig), and found that LHmKumLig performed 3.5 times more repair and repair was more accurate than BWKuLig#2. By expressing the Mm-Ku with the Mt-Lig, or the Mt-Ku with the Mm-Lig in E. coli, we have shown that the NHEJ proteins from M. marinum and M. tuberculosis can function together to join DNA DSBs. NHEJ repair is therefore conserved between the two species. Consequently, M. marinum is a good model to study NHEJ repair during mycobacterial pathogenesis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen

  1. Exploring tuberculosis by molecular tests on DNA isolated from smear microscopy slides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niaina Rakotosamimanana

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is an infectious disease of global public health importance caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. The disease has worsened with the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB strains. The timely diagnosis and treatment of TB remains a key public health priority, and laboratories have a critical role in the rapid and accurate detection of TB and drug resistance. Molecular assays based on nucleic acid amplification techniques have been developed for the rapid, sensitive, and specific diagnosis of TB, with the ability to determine the drug sensitivity status. These molecular techniques are now available or are being implemented in developing countries. However, traditional microscopy and culture methods cannot yet be replaced; the molecular assays can be applied in parallel with these tests for the diagnosis of TB or for drug susceptibility testing. Performing such molecular tests is often restricted by constraints with regard to sputum sample storage and safe transportation from remote health centres to central laboratories. Since smear slides are performed routinely for the diagnosis of TB in most TB diagnostic laboratories, they are readily available and could be the ideal tool to transport sputum for further molecular tests. The aim of this review was to provide a comprehensive survey on the use of smear slides for both TB diagnosis and the molecular test approach. Based on the literature, stained smear microscopy slides can be a safe system for the transportation of sputum specimens from remote health centres to reference TB laboratories for further molecular TB or MDR-TB detection, and could help in the rapid diagnosis and therefore timely management of TB patients.

  2. Mutation of Gly717Phe in human topoisomerase 1B has an effect on enzymatic function, reactivity to the camptothecin anticancer drug and on the linker domain orientation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhenxing; D'Annessa, Ilda; Tesauro, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    Human topoisomerase 1B controls the topological state of supercoiled DNA allowing the progression of fundamental cellular processes. The enzyme, which is the unique molecular target of the natural anticancer compound camptothecin, acts by cleaving one DNA strand and forming a transient protein–DN...

  3. Crystal Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv AldR (Rv2779c), a Regulator of the ald Gene: DNA BINDING AND IDENTIFICATION OF SMALL MOLECULE INHIBITORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Abhishek; Shree, Sonal; Pandey, Sarvesh Kumar; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2016-06-03

    Here we report the crystal structure of M. tuberculosis AldR (Rv2779c) showing that the N-terminal DNA-binding domains are swapped, forming a dimer, and four dimers are assembled into an octamer through crystal symmetry. The C-terminal domain is involved in oligomeric interactions that stabilize the oligomer, and it contains the effector-binding sites. The latter sites are 30-60% larger compared with homologs like MtbFFRP (Rv3291c) and can consequently accommodate larger molecules. MtbAldR binds to the region upstream to the ald gene that is highly up-regulated in nutrient-starved tuberculosis models and codes for l-alanine dehydrogenase (MtbAld; Rv2780). Further, the MtbAldR-DNA complex is inhibited upon binding of Ala, Tyr, Trp and Asp to the protein. Studies involving a ligand-binding site G131T mutant show that the mutant forms a DNA complex that cannot be inhibited by adding the amino acids. Comparative studies suggest that binding of the amino acids changes the relative spatial disposition of the DNA-binding domains and thereby disrupt the protein-DNA complex. Finally, we identified small molecules, including a tetrahydroquinoline carbonitrile derivative (S010-0261), that inhibit the MtbAldR-DNA complex. The latter molecules represent the very first inhibitors of a feast/famine regulatory protein from any source and set the stage for exploring MtbAldR as a potential anti-tuberculosis target. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Targeting the gyrase of Plasmodium falciparum with topoisomerase poisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang Girdwood, Sonya C; Nenortas, Elizabeth; Shapiro, Theresa A

    2015-06-15

    Drug-resistant malaria poses a major public health problem throughout the world and the need for new antimalarial drugs is growing. The apicoplast, a chloroplast-like organelle essential for malaria parasite survival and with no counterpart in humans, offers an attractive target for selectively toxic new therapies. The apicoplast genome (plDNA) is a 35 kb circular DNA that is served by gyrase, a prokaryotic type II topoisomerase. Gyrase is poisoned by fluoroquinolone antibacterials that stabilize a catalytically inert ternary complex of enzyme, its plDNA substrate, and inhibitor. We used fluoroquinolones to study the gyrase and plDNA of Plasmodium falciparum. New methods for isolating and separating plDNA reveal four topologically different forms and permit a quantitative exam of perturbations that result from gyrase poisoning. In keeping with its role in DNA replication, gyrase is most abundant in late stages of the parasite lifecycle, but several lines of evidence indicate that even in these cells the enzyme is present in relatively low abundance: about 1 enzyme for every two plDNAs or a ratio of 1 gyrase: 70 kb DNA. For a spectrum of quinolones, correlation was generally good between antimalarial activity and gyrase poisoning, the putative molecular mechanism of drug action. However, in P. falciparum there is evidence for off-target toxicity, particularly for ciprofloxacin. These studies highlight the utility of the new methods and of fluoroquinolones as a tool for studying the in situ workings of gyrase and its plDNA substrate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Topoisomerase Mutations in Fluoroquinolone-Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible and -Resistant Clinical Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Kaatz, Glenn W.; Seo, Susan M.

    1998-01-01

    The incidence of the various mutations in the genes encoding topoisomerase IV and DNA gyrase in fluoroquinolone-resistant clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus is not known. Using restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing, we found that in fluoroquinolone- and methicillin-resistant strains, mutations in grlA and gyrA are quite likely to be present together. For fluoroquinolone-resistant but methicillin-susceptible strains, mutations in grlA alone are more common.

  6. Rolling circle amplification-based detection of human topoisomerase I activity on magnetic beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccaro, Laura; Tesauro, Cinzia; Cerroni, Barbara; Ottaviani, Alessio; Knudsen, Birgitta Ruth; Balasubramanian, Kannan; Desideri, Alessandro

    2014-04-15

    A high-sensitivity assay has been developed for the detection of human topoisomerase I with single molecule resolution. The method uses magnetic sepharose beads to concentrate rolling circle products, produced by the amplification of DNA molecules circularized by topoisomerase I and detectable with a confocal microscope as single and discrete dots, once reacted with fluorescent probes. Each dot, corresponding to a single cleavage-religation event mediated by the enzyme, can be counted due to its high signal/noise ratio, allowing detection of 0.3pM enzyme and representing a valid method to detect the enzyme activity in highly diluted samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Human topoisomerase IB is a target of a thiosemicarbazone copper(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vutey, Venn; Castelli, Silvia; D'Annessa, Ilda; Sâmia, Luciana B P; Souza-Fagundes, Elaine M; Beraldo, Heloisa; Desideri, Alessandro

    2016-09-15

    The human topoisomerase IB inhibition and the antiproliferative activity of 3-(4-bromophenyl)-1-pyridin-2-ylprop-2-en-1-one thiosemicarbazone HPyCT4BrPh alone and its copper(II) complex [Cu(PyCT4BrPh)Cl] was investigated. [Cu(PyCT4BrPh)Cl] inhibits both the DNA cleavage and religation step of the enzyme, whilst the ligand alone does not display any effect. In addition we show that coordination to copper(II) improves the cytotoxicity of HPyCT4BrPh against THP-1 leukemia and MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The data indicate that the copper(II) thiosemicarbazone complex may hit human topoisomerase IB and that metal coordination can be useful to improve cytotoxicity of this versatile class of compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of lapachol derivatives possessing indole scaffolds as topoisomerase I inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chong; Qu, Yan; Niu, Bingxuan

    2016-11-15

    A series of novel lapachol derivatives possessing indole scaffolds was designed and synthesized. The in vitro anti-proliferative activity of these novel compounds was evaluated in Eca109 and Hela cell lines. Almost all the tested compounds showed manifested potent inhibitory activity against the two tested cancer cell lines. Topo I-mediated DNA relaxation activity indicated that these novel compounds have potent Topoisomerase I inhibition activity. The most potent compounds 4n and 4k demonstrated more cytotoxicity than camptothecin and was comparable to camptothecin in inhibitory activities on Topoisomerase I in our biological assay. In addition, the Hoechst 33342 staining method also showed that the complex can induce Hela cell apoptosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Resistance to topoisomerase cleavage complex induced lethality in Escherichia coli via titration of transcription regulators PurR and FNR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu I-Fen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulation of gyrase cleavage complex in Escherichia coli from the action of quinolone antibiotics induces an oxidative damage cell death pathway. The oxidative cell death pathway has also been shown to be involved in the lethality following accumulation of cleavage complex formed by bacterial topoisomerase I with mutations that result in defective DNA religation. Methods A high copy number plasmid clone spanning the upp-purMN region was isolated from screening of an E. coli genomic library and analyzed for conferring increased survival rates following accumulation of mutant topoisomerase I proteins as well as treatment with the gyrase inhibitor norfloxacin. Results Analysis of the intergenic region upstream of purM demonstrated a novel mechanism of resistance to the covalent protein-DNA cleavage complex through titration of the cellular transcription regulators FNR and PurR responsible for oxygen sensing and repression of purine nucleotide synthesis respectively. Addition of adenine to defined growth medium had similar protective effect for survival following accumulation of topoisomerase cleavage complex, suggesting that increase in purine level can protect against cell death. Conclusions Perturbation of the global regulator FNR and PurR functions as well as increase in purine nucleotide availability could affect the oxidative damage cell death pathway initiated by topoisomerase cleavage complex.

  10. Advantages of an optical nanosensor system for the mechanistic analysis of a novel topoisomerase I targeting drug: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Marie B; Tesauro, Cinzia; Gonzalez, María; Kristoffersen, Emil L; Alonso, Concepción; Rubiales, Gloria; Coletta, Andrea; Frøhlich, Rikke; Stougaard, Magnus; Ho, Yi-Ping; Palacios, Francisco; Knudsen, Birgitta R

    2017-02-02

    The continuous need for the development of new small molecule anti-cancer drugs calls for easily accessible sensor systems for measuring the effect of vast numbers of new drugs on their potential cellular targets. Here we demonstrate the use of an optical DNA biosensor to unravel the inhibitory mechanism of a member of a new family of small molecule human topoisomerase I inhibitors, the so-called indeno-1,5-naphthyridines. By analysing human topoisomerase I catalysis on the biosensor in the absence or presence of added drug complemented with a few traditional assays, we demonstrate that the investigated member of the indeno-1,5-naphthyridine family inhibited human topoisomerase I activity by blocking enzyme-DNA dissociation. To our knowledge, this represents the first characterized example of a small molecule drug that inhibits a post-ligation step of catalysis. The elucidation of a completely new and rather surprising drug mechanism-of-action using an optical real time sensor highlights the value of this assay system in the search for new topoisomerase I targeting small molecule drugs.

  11. DNA Detection Reveals Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Shedding Routes in Its Wildlife Reservoir the Eurasian Wild Boar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barasona, J A; Torres, M J; Aznar, J; Gortázar, C; Vicente, J

    2017-06-01

    Since the intensity and frequency of pathogen shedding by hosts determine the probability of infection through direct and indirect contact, the shedding characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) in the key host reservoir in Iberia, the Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa), is crucial. We aimed (i) to describe the natural shedding routes of MTC in free-ranging wild boar by a new semi-automated PCR method and (ii) to determine the association of MTC shedding pattern with tuberculosis (TB) progression and individual factors. MTC shedding (by any of the possible routes) was detected in a total of 30.8% (±7.5) out of the sampled individuals with valid or interpretable test results (n = 39). The proportion of TB-positive shedders according to the route was 13.6% (±7.5) for oral swabs, 4.5% (±4.5) for nasal swabs, 4.5% (±4.4) for faecal swabs and 13.6% (±7.5) for individuals being positive to all swabs concomitantly. The probability of shedding mycobacteria (by any route) statistically associated with TB generalization, and the TB score was significantly higher in individuals testing positive to at least one route compared to negatives. Overall, a diversity of shedding routes in wild boar is possible, and it is remarkable that for the first time, the faecal shedding is confirmed for naturally infected wild boar. Our results are consistent with the role wild boar plays for TB maintenance in host communities and environments in Iberia and confirm that it is an important source of mycobacteria infection by different routes. Finally, we evidenced the use of a new PCR technique to detect MTC DNA in excretions can be practical and defined the target routes for sampling wild boar shedding in future studies, such as interventions to control TB in wild boar that can be measured in terms of impact on mycobacteria excretion and transmission (i.e. vaccination). © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. A novel method for the purification of DNA by capturing nucleic acid and magnesium complexes on non-woven fabric filters under alkaline conditions for the gene diagnosis of tuberculosis by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukasawa, Tadashi; Oda, Naozumi; Wada, Yasunao; Tamaru, Aki; Fukushima, Yukari; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2010-07-01

    A novel method for purifying DNA from clinical samples based on the complex formation of DNA and magnesium ion (Mg(2+)) was developed for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The formation of a DNA-Mg(2+) complex under alkaline conditions was observed by analyzing electrophoretic mobility reduction of DNA on agarose gel. The DNA-Mg(2+) complex increases the efficacy of DNA recovery from the sample solution on polyethylene terephthalate non-woven fabric (PNWF) filters. Among the various divalent metal cations, only Mg(2+) was associated with this effect. The applicability of DNA recovered on the PNWF filter was examined for the gene amplification method; loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). DNA on the PNWF filter could be used for the amplification of specific DNA fragments without elution from the filter. Using this method, DNA was directly purified from M. tuberculosis spiked sputum and examined by LAMP assay, showing a high sensitivity in comparison to the commercially available DNA extraction kit. These results indicated that the method developed in this study is useful for rapid gene diagnosis of tuberculosis.

  13. Bacillus anthracis GrlAV96A topoisomerase IV, a quinolone resistance mutation that does not affect the water-metal ion bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldred, Katie J; Breland, Erin J; McPherson, Sylvia A; Turnbough, Charles L; Kerns, Robert J; Osheroff, Neil

    2014-12-01

    The rise in quinolone resistance is threatening the clinical use of this important class of broad-spectrum antibacterials. Quinolones kill bacteria by increasing the level of DNA strand breaks generated by the type II topoisomerases gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Most commonly, resistance is caused by mutations in the serine and acidic amino acid residues that anchor a water-metal ion bridge that facilitates quinolone-enzyme interactions. Although other mutations in gyrase and topoisomerase IV have been reported in quinolone-resistant strains, little is known regarding their contributions to cellular quinolone resistance. To address this issue, we characterized the effects of the V96A mutation in the A subunit of Bacillus anthracis topoisomerase IV on quinolone activity. The results indicate that this mutation causes an ∼ 3-fold decrease in quinolone potency and reduces the stability of covalent topoisomerase IV-cleaved DNA complexes. However, based on metal ion usage, the V96A mutation does not disrupt the function of the water-metal ion bridge. A similar level of resistance to quinazolinediones (which do not use the bridge) was seen. V96A is the first topoisomerase IV mutation distal to the water-metal ion bridge demonstrated to decrease quinolone activity. It also represents the first A subunit mutation reported to cause resistance to quinazolinediones. This cross-resistance suggests that the V96A change has a global effect on the structure of the drug-binding pocket of topoisomerase IV. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Tuberculosis (TB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Tuberculosis Go to Information for Researchers ► Tuberculosis (TB) is ... are drug resistant. Why Is the Study of Tuberculosis a Priority for NIAID? Tuberculosis is one of ...

  15. Microfluidic method for rapid turbidimetric detection of the DNA of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using loop-mediated isothermal amplification in capillary tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafati, Adele; Gill, Pooria

    2015-01-01

    We describe a microfluidic method for rapid isothermal turbidimetric detection of the DNA of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification is accomplished in capillary tubes for amplifying DNA in less than 15 min, and sensitivity and specificity were compared to conventional loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). The method can detect as little as 1 pg mL −1 DNA in a sample. Results obtained with clinical specimens indicated 90 % sensitivity and 95 % specificity for microfluidic LAMP in comparison to culture methods. No interference occurred due to the presence of nonspecific DNAs. The findings demonstrate the power of the new microfluidic LAMP test for rapid molecular detection of microorganisms even when using bare eyes. (author)

  16. In-house PCR with DNA extracted directly from positive slides to confirm or exclude the diagnosis of tuberculosis: focus on biosafety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Isabela Neves; Aleixo, Agdemir Valéria; Carvalho, Wânia da Silva; de Miranda, Silvana Spindola

    2015-01-01

    The possibility to obtain DNA from smears is a valuable alternative to remedy the lack of samples when they are totally used for bacilloscopy; this technique solves the biosafety problem related to a possible accident with the transportation of flasks containing potentially transmissible clinical samples. Hence, the purpose of this study was to utilize the insertion sequence IS6110 for amplification of DNA from a smear-positive sample for tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis. Among the 52 positive bacilloscopies, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 52.3%, 100%, 100% and 89.7%, respectively whereas accuracy was 90.7%. The IS6110-based PCR for TB diagnosis developed in DNA extracted from a positive smear is a fast, simple, specific, and safe method. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. A study of topoisomerase activity in human testicular cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, K; Shuhin, T

    1995-01-01

    Topoisomerases are widely detected in rapidly proliferating cancer cells. Many anti-topoisomerase agents are utilized for cancer chemotherapy. Testicular cancers are highly chemotherapy sensitive, however, 10% of them are refractory to the standard regimen. To investigate the topoisomerase activities in human testicular neoplasms, we examined the activity of topoisomerase I (TopoI) and topoisomerase II (TopoII) in 29 testicular tumors. TopoI activity was observed irrespective of pathological types of the tumor (21/29). TopoII was detected in seminoma and teratocarcinoma (5/29). In our experience, seminoma was relatively sensitive to chemotherapy including anti-TopoII agents. Our results suggest that Topol inhibitors could be more effective against seminoma as well as the other types of testicular tumors.

  18. Construction of a DNA vaccine based on the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ag85A/MPT64 fusion gene and evaluation of its immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Hong; Yu, Ting; Jin, Yufen; Teng, Chunyan; Liu, Ximing; Li, Yanlei

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to construct a DNA vaccine based on the Ag85A/MPT64 gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and analyze its immunogenicity by enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay. The fusion gene encoding Ag85A/MPT64 was amplified by PCR from the genome of the MTB H37Rv strain and cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector followed by confirmation using restriction endonuclease digestion and DNA sequencing. The immunogenicity of the recombinant vector was tested in vivo in BALB/c mice. The serum antibody titers against Ag85A/MPT64 were detected by ELISPOT assay. The number of ELISPOT spots for the mice following immunization with Ag85A/MPT64 was significantly greater than for the negative and blank controls. A DNA vaccine based on the gene encoding the Ag85A/MPT64 fusion protein of MTB was successfully constructed and expressed. Our data may serve as a foundation for further research into the prevention and treatment of tuberculosis and carcinomas.

  19. Inhibition of Topoisomerase IIα and Induction of Apoptosis in Gastric Cancer Cells by 19-Triisopropyl Andrographolide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monger, Adeep; Boonmuen, Nittaya; Suksen, Kanoknetr; Saeeng, Rungnapha; Kasemsuk, Teerapich; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Saengsawang, Witchuda; Chairoungdua, Arthit

    2017-10-26

    Gastric cancer is the most common cancer in Eastern Asia. Increasing chemoresistance and general systemic toxicities have complicated the current chemotherapy leading to an urgent need of more effective agents. The present study reported a potent DNA topoisomerase IIα inhibitory activity of an andrographolide analogue (19-triisopropyl andrographolide, analogue-6) in gastric cancer cells; MKN-45, and AGS cells. The analogue was potently cytotoxic to both gastric cancer cell lines with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 values) of 6.3±0.7 μM, and 1.7±0.05 μM at 48 h for MKN-45, and AGS cells, respectively. It was more potent than the parent andrographolide and the clinically used, etoposide with the IC50 values of >50 μM in MKN-45 and 11.3±2.9 μM in AGS cells for andrographolide and 28.5±4.4 μM in MKN-45 and 4.08±0.5 μM in AGS cells for etoposide. Analogue-6 at 2 μM significantly inhibited DNA topoisomerase IIα enzyme in AGS cells, induced DNA damage, activated cleaved PARP-1, and Caspase3 leading to late cellular apoptosis. Interestingly, the expression of tumor suppressor p53 was not activated. These results show the importance of 19-triisopropyl-andrographolide in its emerging selectivity to primary target on topoisomerase IIα enzyme, inducing DNA damage and apoptosis by p53- independent mechanism. Thereby, the results provide insights of the potential of 19-triisopropyl andrographolide as an anticancer agent for gastric cancer. The chemical transformation of andrographolide is a promising strategy in drug discovery of a novel class of anticancer drugs from bioactive natural products. Creative Commons Attribution License

  20. Molecular mechanism of the camptothecin resistance of Glu710Gly topoisomerase IB mutant analyzed in vitro and in silico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesauro, Cinzia; Morozzo della Rocca, Blasco; Ottaviani, Alessio; Coletta, Andrea; Zuccaro, Laura; Arnò, Barbara; D'Annessa, Ilda; Fiorani, Paola; Desideri, Alessandro

    2013-09-03

    DNA topoisomerases are key enzymes that modulate the topological state of DNA through the breaking and rejoining of DNA strands. Human topoisomerase IB can be inhibited by several compounds that act through different mechanisms, including clinically used drugs, such as the derivatives of the natural compound camptothecin that reversibly bind the covalent topoisomerase-DNA complex, slowing down the religation of the cleaved DNA strand, thus inducing cell death. Three enzyme mutations, which confer resistance to irinotecan in an adenocarcinoma cell line, were recently identified but the molecular mechanism of resistance was unclear. The three resistant mutants have been investigated in S. cerevisiae model system following their viability in presence of increasing amounts of camptothecin. A systematical analysis of the different catalytic steps has been made for one of these mutants (Glu710Gly) and has been correlated with its structural-dynamical properties studied by classical molecular dynamics simulation. The three mutants display a different degree of camptothecin resistance in a yeast cell viability assay. Characterization of the different steps of the catalytic cycle of the Glu710Gly mutant indicated that its resistance is related to a high religation rate that is hardly affected by the presence of the drug. Analysis of the dynamic properties through simulation indicate that the mutant displays a much lower degree of correlation in the motion between the different protein domains and that the linker almost completely loses its correlation with the C-terminal domain, containing the active site tyrosine. These results indicate that a fully functional linker is required to confer camptothecin sensitivity to topoisomerase I since the destabilization of its structural-dynamical properties is correlated to an increase of religation rate and drug resistance.

  1. Lack of cross-resistance to fostriecin in a human small-cell lung carcinoma cell line showing topoisomerase II-related drug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Steven; Zijlstra, J G; Mulder, Nanno; de Vries, Liesbeth

    1991-01-01

    Cells exhibiting decreased topoisomerase II (Topo II) activity are resistant to several drugs that require Topo II as an intermediate. These drugs are cytotoxic due to the formation of a cleavable complex between the drug, Topo II and DNA. Fostriecin belongs to a new class of drugs that inhibit Topo

  2. Human small cell lung cancer NYH cells selected for resistance to the bisdioxopiperazine topoisomerase II catalytic inhibitor ICRF-187 demonstrate a functional R162Q mutation in the Walker A consensus ATP binding domain of the alpha isoform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessel, I; Jensen, L H; Jensen, P B

    1999-01-01

    Bisdioxopiperazine drugs such as ICRF-187 are catalytic inhibitors of DNA topoisomerase II, with at least two effects on the enzyme: namely, locking it in a closed-clamp form and inhibiting its ATPase activity. This is in contrast to topoisomerase II poisons as etoposide and amsacrine (m...... inactive at enzyme at 1 mM ATP was not resistant to ICRF-187 compared to wt, whereas it was clearly less sensitive than wt to ICRF-187 at low ATP concentrations. This suggests that it is a shift in the equilibrium to an open......-AMSA), which act by stabilizing enzyme-DNA-drug complexes at a stage in which the DNA gate strand is cleaved and the protein is covalently attached to DNA. Human small cell lung cancer NYH cells selected for resistance to ICRF-187 (NYH/187) showed a 25% increase in topoisomerase IIalpha level and no change...

  3. Next generation topoisomerase I inhibitors: Rationale and biomarker strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teicher, Beverly A

    2008-03-15

    Topoisomerase I (TopoI), an essential enzyme, produces a DNA single strand break allowing DNA relaxation for replication. The enzymatic mechanism involves sequential transesterifcations. The breakage and closure reactions generate phosphodiester bonds and similar free energies, so the reaction is freely reversible. The TopoI reaction intermediate consists of enzyme covalently linked to DNA dubbed a 'cleavable complex'. Covalently bound TopoI-DNA complexes can be recovered. Camptothecin analogs, topotecan and irinotecan, are approved TopoI-targeted drugs. Both have limitations due to the equilibrium between the camptothecin lactone and ring-opened forms. Several strategies are being explored to develop improved TopoI inhibitors. Homocamptothecins, in which the metabolically labile camptothecin lactone is replaced with a more stable seven-membered beta-hydroxylactone, are potent anticancer agents. Gimatecan is a seven-position modified lipophilic camptothecin developed to provide rapid uptake and accumulation in cells and a stable TopoI-DNA-drug ternary complex. Diflomotecan, a homocamptothecin, and gimatecan are in Phase II clinical trial. Among non-camptothecins, edotecarin, an indolocarbazole that results in DNA C/T-G cleavage compared with T-G/A for camptothecins, is in Phase II clinical trial. Indenoisoquinolines were identified as TopoI inhibitors by the NCI 60-cell line COMPARE analysis. Co-crystal structures of two indenoisoquinolines with TopoI-DNA elucidated the structure of the ternary complex. Indenoisoquinolines are in preclinical development. Dibenzonaphthyridinone TopoI inhibitors have undergone extensive structure-activity examination. ARC-111 was selected for in-depth preclinical study. Biomarkers are under investigation to predict clinical efficacy from preclinical models, to allow determination of drug targeting in vivo and to aid selection of patients most likely to benefit from TopoI inhibitor therapy. gamma-H2AX formation may be a useful

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis nucleoid-associated DNA-binding protein H-NS binds with high-affinity to the Holliday junction and inhibits strand exchange promoted by RecA protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharadamma, N; Harshavardhana, Y; Singh, Pawan; Muniyappa, K

    2010-06-01

    A number of studies have shown that the structure and composition of bacterial nucleoid influences many a processes related to DNA metabolism. The nucleoid-associated proteins modulate not only the DNA conformation but also regulate the DNA metabolic processes such as replication, recombination, repair and transcription. Understanding of how these processes occur in the context of Mycobacterium tuberculosis nucleoid is of considerable medical importance because the nucleoid structure may be constantly remodeled in response to environmental signals and/or growth conditions. Many studies have concluded that Escherichia coli H-NS binds to DNA in a sequence-independent manner, with a preference for A-/T-rich tracts in curved DNA; however, recent studies have identified the existence of medium- and low-affinity binding sites in the vicinity of the curved DNA. Here, we show that the M. tuberculosis H-NS protein binds in a more structure-specific manner to DNA replication and repair intermediates, but displays lower affinity for double-stranded DNA with relatively higher GC content. Notably, M. tuberculosis H-NS was able to bind Holliday junction (HJ), the central recombination intermediate, with substantially higher affinity and inhibited the three-strand exchange promoted by its cognate RecA. Likewise, E. coli H-NS was able to bind the HJ and suppress DNA strand exchange promoted by E. coli RecA, although much less efficiently compared to M. tuberculosis H-NS. Our results provide new insights into a previously unrecognized function of H-NS protein, with implications for blocking the genome integration of horizontally transferred genes by homologous and/or homeologous recombination.

  5. Resveratrol: A novel type of topoisomerase II inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joyce H; Wendorff, Timothy J; Berger, James M

    2017-12-22

    Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in various plant sources, has gained attention as a possible agent responsible for the purported health benefits of certain foods, such as red wine. Despite annual multi-million dollar market sales as a nutriceutical, there is little consensus about the physiological roles of resveratrol. One suggested molecular target of resveratrol is eukaryotic topoisomerase II (topo II), an enzyme essential for chromosome segregation and DNA supercoiling homeostasis. Interestingly, resveratrol is chemically similar to ICRF-187, a clinically approved chemotherapeutic that stabilizes an ATP-dependent dimerization interface in topo II to block enzyme activity. Based on this similarity, we hypothesized that resveratrol may antagonize topo II by a similar mechanism. Using a variety of biochemical assays, we find that resveratrol indeed acts through the ICRF-187 binding locus, but that it inhibits topo II by preventing ATPase domain dimerization rather than stabilizing it. This work presents the first comprehensive analysis of the biochemical effects of both ICRF-187 and resveratrol on the human isoforms of topo II, and reveals a new mode for the allosteric regulation of topo II through modulation of ATPase status. Natural polyphenols related to resveratrol that have been shown to impact topo II function may operate in a similar manner. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Two alternative DNA extraction methods to improve the detection of Mycobacterium-tuberculosis-complex members in cattle and red deer tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fell, Shari; Bröckl, Stephanie; Büttner, Mathias; Rettinger, Anna; Zimmermann, Pia; Straubinger, Reinhard K

    2016-09-15

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB), which is caused by Mycobacterium bovis and M. caprae, is a notifiable animal disease in Germany. Diagnostic procedure is based on a prescribed protocol that is published in the framework of German bTB legislation. In this protocol small sample volumes are used for DNA extraction followed by real-time PCR analyses. As mycobacteria tend to concentrate in granuloma and the infected tissue in early stages of infection does not necessarily show any visible lesions, it is likely that DNA extraction from only small tissue samples (20-40 mg) of a randomly chosen spot from the organ and following PCR testing may result in false negative results. In this study two DNA extraction methods were developed to process larger sample volumes to increase the detection sensitivity of mycobacterial DNA in animal tissue. The first extraction method is based on magnetic capture, in which specific capture oligonucleotides were utilized. These nucleotides are linked to magnetic particles and capture Mycobacterium-tuberculosis-complex (MTC) DNA released from 10 to 15 g of tissue material. In a second approach remaining sediments from the magnetic capture protocol were further processed with a less complex extraction protocol that can be used in daily routine diagnostics. A total number of 100 tissue samples from 34 cattle (n = 74) and 18 red deer (n = 26) were analyzed with the developed protocols and results were compared to the prescribed protocol. All three extraction methods yield reliable results by the real-time PCR analysis. The use of larger sample volume led to a sensitivity increase of DNA detection which was shown by the decrease of Ct-values. Furthermore five samples which were tested negative or questionable by the official extraction protocol were detected positive by real time PCR when the alternative extraction methods were used. By calculating the kappa index, the three extraction protocols resulted in a moderate (0.52; protocol 1 vs 3

  7. Lichen secondary metabolites as DNA-interacting agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plšíková, J.; Štěpánková, Jana; Kašpárková, Jana; Brabec, Viktor; Bačkor, M.; Kozurková, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 2 (2014), s. 182-186 ISSN 0887-2333 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Lichens * DNA-binding * Topoisomerase I, II Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.903, year: 2014

  8. Enhanced immune response and protective effects of nano-chitosan-based DNA vaccine encoding T cell epitopes of Esat-6 and FL against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganzhu Feng

    Full Text Available Development of a novel and effective vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb is a challenging for preventing TB infection. In this study, a novel nanoparticle-based recombinant DNA vaccine was developed, which contains Esat-6 three T cell epitopes (Esat-6/3e and fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (FL genes (termed Esat-6/3e-FL, and was enveloped with chitosan (CS nanoparticles (nano-chitosan. The immunologic and protective efficacy of the nano-chitosan-based DNA vaccine (termed nano-Esat-6/3e-FL was assessed in C57BL/6 mice after intramuscular prime vaccination with the plasmids DNA and nasal boost with the Esat-6/3e peptides. The results showed that the immunized mice remarkably elicited enhanced T cell responses and protection against M.tb H37Rv challenge. These findings indicate that the nano-chitosan can significantly elevate the immunologic and protective effects of the DNA vaccine, and the nano-Esat-6/3e-FL is a useful vaccine for preventing M.tb infection in mice.

  9. Studies of viomycin, an anti-tuberculosis antibiotic: copper(ii) coordination, DNA degradation and the impact on delta ribozyme cleavage activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokowa-Sołtys, K; Barbosa, N A; Kasprowicz, A; Wieczorek, R; Gaggelli, N; Gaggelli, E; Valensin, G; Wrzesiński, J; Ciesiołka, J; Kuliński, T; Szczepanik, W; Jeżowska-Bojczuk, M

    2016-05-17

    Viomycin is a basic peptide antibiotic, which is among the most effective agents against multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. In this paper we provide the characteristics of its acid base properties, coordination preferences towards the Cu(ii) ions, as well as the reactivity of the resulting complexes against plasmid DNA and HDV ribozyme. Careful coordination studies throughout the wide pH range allow for the characterisation of all the Cu(ii)-viomycin complex species. The assignment of proton chemical shifts was achieved by NMR experiments, while the DTF level of theory was applied to support molecular structures of the studied complexes. The experiments with the plasmid DNA reveal that at the physiological levels of hydrogen peroxide the Cu(ii)-viomycin complex is more aggressive against DNA than uncomplexed metal ions. Moreover, the degradation of DNA by viomycin can be carried out without the presence of transition metal ions. In the studies of antigenomic delta ribozyme catalytic activity, viomycin and its complex are shown to modulate the ribozyme functioning. The molecular modelling approach allows the indication of two different locations of viomycin binding sites to the ribozyme.

  10. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology. Volume XLVII, Part 1. Structures of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    The proceedings for the 47th Annual Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology are presented. This symposium focused on the Structure of DNA. Topics presented covered research in the handedness of DNA, conformational analysis, chemically modified DNA, chemical synthesis of DNA, DNA-protein interactions, DNA within nucleosomes, DNA methylation, DNA replication, gyrases and topoisomerases, recombining and mutating DNA, transcription of DNA and its regulation, the organization of genes along DNA, repetitive DNA and pseudogenes, and origins of replication, centromeres, and teleomeres

  11. Topoisomerase IB of Deinococcus radiodurans resolves guanine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DNA synthesis by Taq DNA polymerase through G4 DNA structure was attenuated in the presence of G4 DNA binding drugs, which was abrogated by DraTopolB. This implies that DraTopolB could destabilize the G4 DNA structure, which is required for G4 drugs binding and stabilization. Camptothecin treatment inhibited ...

  12. Oxabicyclooctane-Linked Novel Bacterial Topoisomerase Inhibitors as Broad Spectrum Antibacterial Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sheo B.; Kaelin, David E.; Wu, Jin; Miesel, Lynn; Tan, Christopher M.; Meinke, Peter T.; Olsen, David; Lagrutta, Armando; Bradley, Prudence; Lu, Jun; Patel, Sangita; Rickert, Keith W.; Smith, Robert F.; Soisson, Stephen; Wei, Changqing; Fukuda, Hideyuki; Kishii, Ryuta; Takei, Masaya; Fukuda, Yasumichi (Merck); (WuXi App Tec); (Kyorin)

    2014-05-08

    Bacterial resistance is eroding the clinical utility of existing antibiotics necessitating the discovery of new agents. Bacterial type II topoisomerase is a clinically validated, highly effective, and proven drug target. This target is amenable to inhibition by diverse classes of inhibitors with alternative and distinct binding sites to quinolone antibiotics, thus enabling the development of agents that lack cross-resistance to quinolones. Described here are novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors (NBTIs), which are a new class of gyrase and topo IV inhibitors and consist of three distinct structural moieties. The substitution of the linker moiety led to discovery of potent broad-spectrum NBTIs with reduced off-target activity (hERG IC50 > 18 μM) and improved physical properties. AM8191 is bactericidal and selectively inhibits DNA synthesis and Staphylococcus aureus gyrase (IC50 = 1.02 μM) and topo IV (IC50 = 10.4 μM). AM8191 showed parenteral and oral efficacy (ED50) at less than 2.5 mg/kg doses in a S. aureus murine infection model. A cocrystal structure of AM8191 bound to S. aureus DNA-gyrase showed binding interactions similar to that reported for GSK299423, displaying a key contact of Asp83 with the basic amine at position-7 of the linker.

  13. Beyond topoisomerase inhibition: antitumor 1,4-naphthoquinones as potential inhibitors of human monoamine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho-Cerqueira, Eduardo; Netz, Paulo A; do Canto, Vanessa P; Pinto, Angelo C; Follmer, Cristian

    2014-04-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) action has been involved in the regulation of neurotransmitters levels, cell signaling, cellular growth, and differentiation as well as in the balance of the intracellular polyamine levels. Although so far obscure, MAO inhibitors are believed to have some effect on tumors progression. 1,4-naphthoquinone (1,4-NQ) has been pointed out as a potential pharmacophore for inhibition of both MAO and DNA topoisomerase activities, this latter associated with antitumor activity. Herein, we demonstrated that certain antitumor 1,4-NQs, including spermidine-1,4-NQ, lapachol, and nor-lapachol display inhibitory activity on human MAO-A and MAO-B. Kinetic studies indicated that these compounds are reversible and competitive MAO inhibitors, being the enzyme selectivity greatly affected by substitutions on 1,4-NQ ring. Molecular docking studies suggested that the most potent MAO inhibitors are capable to bind to the MAO active site in close proximity of flavin moiety. Furthermore, ability to inhibit both MAO-A and MAO-B can be potentialized by the formation of hydrogen bonds between these compounds and FAD and/or the residues in the active site. Although spermidine-1,4-NQs exhibit antitumor action primarily by inhibiting topoisomerase via DNA intercalation, our findings suggest that their effect on MAO activity should be taken into account when their application in cancer therapy is considered. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility determined by the E test, Löwenstein-Jensen proportion, and DNA sequencing methods among Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates discrepancies, preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Inês Moura Freixo

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains resistant to streptomycin (SM, isoniazid (INH, and/or rifampin (RIF as determined by the conventional Löwenstein-Jensen proportion method (LJPM were compared with the E test, a minimum inhibitory concentration susceptibility method. Discrepant isolates were further evaluated by BACTEC and by DNA sequence analyses for mutations in genes most often associated with resistance to these drugs (rpsL, katG, inhA, and rpoB. Preliminary discordant E test results were seen in 75% of isolates resistant to SM and in 11% to INH. Discordance improved for these two drugs (63% for SM and none for INH when isolates were re-tested but worsened for RIF (30%. Despite good agreement between phenotypic results and sequencing analyses, wild type profiles were detected on resistant strains mainly for SM and INH. It should be aware that susceptible isolates according to molecular methods might contain other mechanisms of resistance. Although reproducibility of the LJPM susceptibility method has been established, variable E test results for some M. tuberculosis isolates poses questions regarding its reproducibility particularly the impact of E test performance which may vary among laboratories despite adherence to recommended protocols. Further studies must be done to enlarge the evaluated samples and looked possible mutations outside of the hot spot sequenced gene among discrepant strains.

  15. The Identification of a Novel Mutant Allele of topoisomerase II in Caenorhabditis elegans Reveals a Unique Role in Chromosome Segregation During Spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Lambert, Aimee; Fabritius, Amy S; Hansen, Tyler J; Smith, Harold E; Golden, Andy

    2016-12-01

    Topoisomerase II alleviates DNA entanglements that are generated during mitotic DNA replication, transcription, and sister chromatid separation. In contrast to mitosis, meiosis has two rounds of chromosome segregation following one round of DNA replication. In meiosis II, sister chromatids segregate from each other, similar to mitosis. Meiosis I, on the other hand, segregates homologs, which requires pairing, synapsis, and recombination. The exact role that topoisomerase II plays during meiosis is unknown. In a screen reexamining Caenorhabditis elegans legacy mutants isolated 30 years ago, we identified a novel allele of the gene encoding topoisomerase II, top-2(it7). In this study, we demonstrate that top-2(it7) males produce dead embryos, even when fertilizing wild-type oocytes. Characterization of early embryonic events indicates that fertilization is successful and sperm components are transmitted to the embryo. However, sperm chromatin is not detected in these fertilized embryos. Examination of top-2(it7) spermatogenic germ lines reveals that the sperm DNA fails to segregate properly during anaphase I of meiosis, resulting in anucleate sperm. top-2(it7) chromosome-segregation defects observed during anaphase I are not due to residual entanglements incurred during meiotic DNA replication and are not dependent on SPO-11-induced double-strand DNA breaks. Finally, we show that TOP-2 associates with chromosomes in meiotic prophase and that chromosome association is disrupted in the germ lines of top-2(it7) mutants. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  16. Synthesis and topoisomerase II inhibitory and cytotoxic activity of oxiranylmethoxy- and thiiranylmethoxy-chalcone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Younghwa; Nam, Jung-Min

    2011-01-01

    In order to find potential anticancer drug candidate targeting topoisomerases enzyme, we have designed and synthesized oxiranylmethoxy- and thiiranylmethoxy-retrochalcone derivatives and evaluated their pharmacological activity including topoisomerases inhibitory and cytotoxic activity. Of the compounds prepared compound 25 showed comparable or better cytotoxic activity against cancer cell lines tested. Compound 25 inhibited MCF7 (IC(50): 0.49 ± 0.21 μM) and HCT15 (IC(50): 0.23 ± 0.02 μM) carcinoma cell growth more efficiently than references. In the topoisomerases inhibition test, all the compounds were inactive to topoisomerase I but moderate inhibitors to topoisomerase II enzyme. Especially, compound 25 inhibited topoisomerase II activity with comparable extent to etoposide at 100 μM concentrations. Correlation between cytotoxicity and topoisomerase II inhibitory activity implies that compound 25 can be a possible lead compound for anticancer drug impeding the topoisomerase II function. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization of the roles of the catalytic domains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis ligase D in Ku-dependent error-prone DNA end joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Douglas; DeBeaux, Austin; Shi, Runhua; Doherty, Aidan J; Harrison, Lynn

    2010-09-01

    We previously established an Escherichia coli strain capable of re-circularizing linear plasmid DNA by expressing the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ku (Mt-Ku) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis ligase D (Mt-LigD) proteins from the E.coli chromosome. Repair was predominately mutagenic due to deletions at the termini. We hypothesized that these deletions could be due to a nuclease activity of Mt-LigD that was previously detected in vitro. Mt-LigD has three domains: an N-terminal polymerase domain (PolDom), a central domain with 3'-phosphoesterase and nuclease activity and a C-terminal ligase domain (LigDom). We generated bacterial strains expressing Mt-Ku and mutant versions of Mt-LigD. Plasmid re-circularization experiments in bacteria showed that the PolDom alone had no re-circularization activity. However, an increase in the total and accurate repair was found when the central domain was deleted. This provides further evidence that this central domain does have nuclease activity that can generate deletions during repair. Deletion of only the PolDom of Mt-LigD resulted in a complete loss of accurate repair and a significant reduction in total repair. This is in agreement with published in vitro work indicating that the PolDom is the major Mt-Ku-binding site. Interestingly, the LigDom alone was able to re-circularize plasmid DNA but only in an Mt-Ku-dependent manner, suggesting a potential second site for Ku-LigD interaction. This work has increased our understanding of the mutagenic repair by Mt-Ku and Mt-LigD and has extended the in vitro biochemical experiments by examining the importance of the Mt-LigD domains during repair in bacteria.

  18. Camptothecin resistance is determined by the regulation of topoisomerase I degradation mediated by ubiquitin proteasome pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Koji; Shah, Ankur K; Sachdev, Vibhu; Kleinstiver, Benjamin P; Taylor-Parker, Julian; Welch, Moira M; Hu, Yiheng; Salgia, Ravi; White, Forest M; Parvin, Jeffrey D; Ozonoff, Al; Rameh, Lucia E; Joung, J Keith; Bharti, Ajit K

    2017-07-04

    Proteasomal degradation of topoisomerase I (topoI) is one of the most remarkable cellular phenomena observed in response to camptothecin (CPT). Importantly, the rate of topoI degradation is linked to CPT resistance. Formation of the topoI-DNA-CPT cleavable complex inhibits DNA re-ligation resulting in DNA-double strand break (DSB). The degradation of topoI marks the first step in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) dependent DNA damage response (DDR). Here, we show that the Ku70/Ku80 heterodimer binds with topoI, and that the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) phosphorylates topoI on serine 10 (topoI-pS10), which is subsequently ubiquitinated by BRCA1. A higher basal level of topoI-pS10 ensures rapid topoI degradation leading to CPT resistance. Importantly, PTEN regulates DNA-PKcs kinase activity in this pathway and PTEN deletion ensures DNA-PKcs dependent higher topoI-pS10, rapid topoI degradation and CPT resistance.

  19. A Fluorescence-Based Assay for Identification of Bacterial Topoisomerase I Poisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Thirunavukkarasu; Cheng, Bokun; Keswani, Neelam; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial Topoisomerase I is a potential target for the identification of novel topoisomerase poison inhibitors that could provide leads for a new class of antibacterial compounds. Here we describe in detail a fluorescence-based cleavage assay that is successfully used in HTS for the discovery of bacterial topoisomerase Ι poisons.

  20. The gene encoding topoisomerase I from the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosh, K; Kilbey, B

    1995-09-22

    Part of the topoisomerase I (TopoI)-encoding gene from Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) was isolated by PCR from cDNA using oligodeoxyribonucleotides modelled on the highly conserved regions of sequence from other species. The entire TopoI gene was obtained by screening a Pf K1 HindIII-EcoRI genomic library in lambda NM1149 with a random-labeled heterologous probe from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae TopoI gene. DNA sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 2520 nt encoding a deduced protein of 839 amino acids (aa) with no detectable introns. The Pf TopoI aa sequence has about 40% identity with most eukaryotic TopoI homologues. The gene is located as a single copy on chromosome 5 and Northern analysis identified a transcript of 3.8 kb.

  1. Dual inhibition of topoisomerases I and IIα by ruthenium(II) complexes containing asymmetric tridentate ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Kejie; Liang, Jiewen; Wang, Yi; Kou, Junfeng; Qian, Chen; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2014-12-14

    Five novel ruthenium(II) complexes, [Ru(dtzp)(dppt)](2+) (1), [Ru(dtzp)(pti)](2+) (2), [Ru(dtzp)(ptn)](2+) (3), [Ru(dtzp)(pta)](2+) (4) and [Ru(dtzp)(ptp)](2+) (5) (where dtzp = 2,6-di(thiazol-2-yl)pyridine, dppt = 3-(1,10-phenanthroline-2-yl)-5,6-diphenyl-as-triazine), pti = 3-(1,10-phenanthroline-2-yl)-as-triazino-[5,6-f]isatin, ptn = 3-(1,10-phenanthroline-2-yl)-as-triazino[5,6-f]naphthalene, pta = 3-(1,10-phenanthroline-2-yl)-as-triazino[5,6-f]acenaphthylene, and ptp = 3-(1,10-phenanthroline-2-yl)-as-triazino[5,6-f]-phenanthrene), were synthesised and characterised. The structures of complexes 3-5 were determined by X-ray diffraction. The DNA binding behaviours of the complexes were studied by spectroscopic and viscosity measurements. The results suggested that the Ru(II) complexes, except for complex 1, bind to DNA in an intercalative mode. Topoisomerase inhibition and DNA strand passage assay confirmed that Ru(II) complexes 3, 4, and 5 acted as efficient dual inhibitors of topoisomerases I and IIα. In vitro cytotoxicity assays indicated that these complexes exhibited anticancer activity against various cancer cell lines. Ruthenium(ii) complexes were confirmed to preferentially accumulate in the nucleus of cancer cells and induced DNA damage. Flow cytometric analysis and AO/EB staining assays indicated that these complexes induced cell apoptosis. With the loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential, the Ru(ii) complexes induce apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway.

  2. Detection of circulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific DNA by droplet digital PCR for vaccine evaluation in challenged monkeys and TB diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Neng; Tan, Yang; Zhang, Lingyun; Luo, Wei; Guan, Qing; Yan, Ming-Zhe; Zuo, Ruiqi; Liu, Weixiang; Luo, Feng-Ling; Zhang, Xiao-Lian

    2018-04-24

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) is emerging as a more serious pathogen due to the increased multidrug-resistant TB and co-infection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The development of an effective and sensitive detection method is urgently needed for bacterial load evaluation in vaccine development, early TB diagnosis, and TB treatment. Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) is a newly developed sensitive PCR method for the absolute quantification of nucleic acid concentrations. Here, we used ddPCR to quantify the circulating virulent M. tb-specific CFP10 (10-kDa culture filtrate protein, Rv3874) and Rv1768 DNA copy numbers in the blood samples from Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG)-vaccinated and/or virulent M. tb H37Rv-challenged rhesus monkeys. We found that ddPCR was more sensitive compared to real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR (qPCR), as the detection limits of CFP10 were 1.2 copies/μl for ddPCR, but 15.8 copies/μl for qPCR. We demonstrated that ddPCR could detect CFP10 and Rv1768 DNA after 3 weeks of infection and at least two weeks earlier than qPCR in M.tb H37Rv-challenged rhesus monkey models. DdPCR could also successfully quantify CFP10 and Rv1768 DNA copy numbers in clinical TB patients' blood samples (active pulmonary TB, extrapulmonary TB (EPTB), and infant TB). To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that ddPCR is an effective and sensitive method of measuring the circulating CFP10 and Rv1768 DNA for vaccine development, bacterial load evaluation in vivo, and early TB (including EPTB and infant TB) diagnosis as well.

  3. Context-dependent antagonism between Akt inhibitors and topoisomerase poisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez-Peralta, Marina; Flatten, Karen S; Loegering, David A; Peterson, Kevin L; Schneider, Paula A; Erlichman, Charles; Kaufmann, Scott H

    2014-05-01

    Signaling through the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway, which is aberrantly activated in >50% of carcinomas, inhibits apoptosis and contributes to drug resistance. Accordingly, several Akt inhibitors are currently undergoing preclinical or early clinical testing. To examine the effect of Akt inhibition on the activity of multiple widely used classes of antineoplastic agents, human cancer cell lines were treated with the Akt inhibitor A-443654 [(2S)-1-(1H-indol-3-yl)-3-[5-(3-methyl-2H-indazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-yl]oxypropan-2-amine; ATP-competitive] or MK-2206 (8-[4-(1-aminocyclobutyl)phenyl]-9-phenyl-2H-[1,2,4]triazolo[3,4-f][1,6]naphthyridin-3-one;dihydrochloride; allosteric inhibitor) or with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) along with cisplatin, melphalan, camptothecin, or etoposide and assayed for colony formation. Surprisingly different results were observed when Akt inhibitors were combined with different drugs. Synergistic effects were observed in multiple cell lines independent of PI3K pathway status when A-443654 or MK-2206 was combined with the DNA cross-linking agents cisplatin or melphalan. In contrast, effects of the Akt inhibitors in combination with camptothecin or etoposide were more complicated. In HCT116 and DLD1 cells, which harbor activating PI3KCA mutations, A-443654 over a broad concentration range enhanced the effects of camptothecin or etoposide. In contrast, in cell lines lacking activating PI3KCA mutations, partial inhibition of Akt signaling synergized with camptothecin or etoposide, but higher A-443654 or MK-2206 concentrations (>80% inhibition of Akt signaling) or PDK1 siRNA antagonized the topoisomerase poisons by diminishing DNA synthesis, a process that contributes to effective DNA damage and killing by these agents. These results indicate that the effects of combining inhibitors of the PI3K/Akt pathway with certain classes of chemotherapeutic agents might be more

  4. Topoisomerase IV-quinolone interactions are mediated through a water-metal ion bridge: mechanistic basis of quinolone resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldred, Katie J.; McPherson, Sylvia A.; Turnbough, Charles L.; Kerns, Robert J.; Osheroff, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Although quinolones are the most commonly prescribed antibacterials, their use is threatened by an increasing prevalence of resistance. The most common causes of quinolone resistance are mutations of a specific serine or acidic residue in the A subunit of gyrase or topoisomerase IV. These amino acids are proposed to serve as a critical enzyme-quinolone interaction site by anchoring a water-metal ion bridge that coordinates drug binding. To probe the role of the proposed water-metal ion bridge, we characterized wild-type, GrlAE85K, GrlAS81F/E85K, GrlAE85A, GrlAS81F/E85A and GrlAS81F Bacillus anthracis topoisomerase IV, their sensitivity to quinolones and related drugs and their use of metal ions. Mutations increased the Mg2+ concentration required to produce maximal quinolone-induced DNA cleavage and restricted the divalent metal ions that could support quinolone activity. Individual mutation of Ser81 or Glu85 partially disrupted bridge function, whereas simultaneous mutation of both residues abrogated protein–quinolone interactions. Results provide functional evidence for the existence of the water-metal ion bridge, confirm that the serine and glutamic acid residues anchor the bridge, demonstrate that the bridge is the primary conduit for interactions between clinically relevant quinolones and topoisomerase IV and provide a likely mechanism for the most common causes of quinolone resistance. PMID:23460203

  5. Dual targeting of topoisomerase IV and gyrase to reduce mutant selection: direct testing of the paradigm by using WCK-1734, a new fluoroquinolone, and ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahilevitz, Jacob; Hooper, David C

    2005-05-01

    Quinolones that act equally against DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV are a desirable modality to decrease the selection of resistant strains. We first determined by genetic and biochemical studies in Staphylococcus aureus that the primary target enzyme of WCK-1734, a new quinolone, was DNA gyrase. A single mutation in gyrase, but not topoisomerase IV, caused a two- to fourfold increase in the MIC. Studies with purified topoisomerase IV and gyrase from S. aureus also showed that gyrase was more sensitive than topoisomerase IV to WCK-1734 (50% inhibitory concentration, 1.25 and 2.5 to 5.0 microg/ml, respectively; 50% stimulation of cleavage complex formation, 0.62 and 2.5 to 5.0 microg/ml, respectively). To test the effect of balanced activity of quinolones against the two target enzymes, we measured the frequency of selection of mutants with ciprofloxacin (which targets topoisomerase IV) and WCK-1734 alone and in combination. With the combination of ciprofloxacin and WCK-1734, each at its MIC, the ratio of frequency of mutants selected was significantly lower than that with each drug alone at two times their respective MICs. We further characterized resistant strains selected with the combination of ciprofloxacin and WCK-1734 and found evidence to suggest the existence of novel mutational mechanisms for low-level quinolone resistance. By use of a combination of differentially targeting quinolones, this study provides novel data in direct support of the paradigm for dual targeting of quinolone action and reduced development of resistance.

  6. A single dose of a DNA vaccine encoding apa coencapsulated with 6,6'-trehalose dimycolate in microspheres confers long-term protection against tuberculosis in Mycobacterium bovis BCG-primed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlétti, Dyego; Morais da Fonseca, Denise; Gembre, Ana Flávia; Masson, Ana Paula; Weijenborg Campos, Lívia; Leite, Luciana C C; Rodrigues Pires, Andréa; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Lopes Silva, Célio; Bonato, Vânia Luiza Deperon; Horn, Cynthia

    2013-08-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG prime DNA (Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes)-booster vaccinations have been shown to induce greater protection against tuberculosis (TB) than BCG alone. This heterologous prime-boost strategy is perhaps the most realistic vaccination for the future of TB infection control, especially in countries where TB is endemic. Moreover, a prime-boost regimen using biodegradable microspheres seems to be a promising immunization to stimulate a long-lasting immune response. The alanine proline antigen (Apa) is a highly immunogenic glycoprotein secreted by M. tuberculosis. This study investigated the immune protection of Apa DNA vaccine against intratracheal M. tuberculosis challenge in mice on the basis of a heterologous prime-boost regimen. BALB/c mice were subcutaneously primed with BCG and intramuscularly boosted with a single dose of plasmid carrying apa and 6,6'-trehalose dimycolate (TDM) adjuvant, coencapsulated in microspheres (BCG-APA), and were evaluated 30 and 70 days after challenge. This prime-boost strategy (BCG-APA) resulted in a significant reduction in the bacterial load in the lungs, thus leading to better preservation of the lung parenchyma, 70 days postinfection compared to BCG vaccinated mice. The profound effect of this heterologous prime-boost regimen in the experimental model supports its development as a feasible strategy for prevention of TB.

  7. Type II topoisomerase mutations in Bacillus anthracis associated with high-level fluoroquinolone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bast, Darrin J; Athamna, Abed; Duncan, Carla L; de Azavedo, Joyce C S; Low, Donald E; Rahav, Galia; Farrell, David; Rubinstein, Ethan

    2004-07-01

    To identify and characterize the mechanisms of high-level fluoroquinolone resistance in two strains of Bacillus anthracis following serial passage in increasing concentrations of fluoroquinolones. Fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates of the Sterne and Russian Anthrax Vaccine STi strains were obtained following serial passage in the presence of increasing concentrations of four different fluoroquinolones. The quinolone-resistance-determining regions of the type II topoisomerase genes from the resistant strains were amplified by PCR and characterized by DNA sequence analysis. The MICs in the presence and absence of reserpine were determined using broth microdilution as a means of detecting active efflux. Single and double amino acid substitutions in the GyrA (Ser-85-Leu; Glu-89-Arg/Gly/Lys) and GrlA (Ser-81-Tyr; Val-96-Ala; Asn-70-Lys) were most common. A single amino acid substitution in GyrB (Asp-430-Asn) was also identified. Efflux only applied to isolates selected for by either levofloxacin or ofloxacin. Specific amino acid substitutions in the type II topoisomerase enzymes significantly contributed to the development of high-level fluoroquinolone resistance in B. anthracis. However, notable differences between the strains and the drugs tested were identified including the role of efflux and the numbers and types of mutations identified.

  8. Tuberculosis abdominal Abdominal tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    T. Rubio; M. T. Gaztelu; A. Calvo; M. Repiso; H. Sarasíbar; F. Jiménez Bermejo; A. Martínez Echeverría

    2005-01-01

    La tuberculosis abdominal cursa con un cuadro inespecífico, con difícil diagnóstico diferencial respecto a otras entidades de similar semiología. Presentamos el caso de un varón que ingresa por presentar dolor abdominal, pérdida progresiva y notoria de peso corporal y fiebre de dos meses de evolución. El cultivo de la biopsia de colon mostró presencia de bacilo de Koch.Abdominal tuberculosis develops according to a non-specific clinical picture, with a difficult differential diagnosis with re...

  9. Synergy between the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis HupB is essential for high-affinity binding, DNA supercoiling and inhibition of RecA-promoted strand exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharadamma, N; Khan, Krishnendu; Kumar, Sandeep; Patil, K Neelakanteshwar; Hasnain, Seyed E; Muniyappa, K

    2011-09-01

    The occurrence of DNA architectural proteins containing two functional domains derived from two different architectural proteins is an interesting emerging research theme in the field of nucleoid structure and function. Mycobacterium tuberculosis HupB, unlike Escherichia coli HU, is a two-domain protein that, in the N-terminal region, shows broad sequence homology with bacterial HU. The long C-terminal extension, on the other hand, contains seven PAKK/KAAK motifs, which are characteristic of the histone H1/H5 family of proteins. In this article, we describe several aspects of HupB function, in comparison with its truncated derivatives lacking either the C-terminus or N-terminus. We found that HupB binds a variety of DNA repair and replication intermediates with K(d) values in the nanomolar range. By contrast, the N-terminal fragment of M. tuberculosis HupB (HupB(MtbN)) showed diminished DNA-binding activity, with K(d) values in the micromolar range, and the C-terminal domain was completely devoid of DNA-binding activity. Unlike HupB(MtbN) , HupB was able to constrain DNA in negative supercoils and introduce negative superhelical turns into relaxed DNA. Similarly, HupB exerted a robust inhibitory effect on DNA strand exchange promoted by cognate and noncognate RecA proteins, whereas HupB(MtbN), even at a 50-fold molar excess, had no inhibitory effect. Considered together, these results suggest that synergy between the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of HupB is essential for its DNA-binding ability, and to modulate the topological features of DNA, which has implications for processes such as DNA compaction, gene regulation, homologous recombination, and DNA repair. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  10. Performance of a molecular assay to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex DNA in clinical specimens: multicenter study in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Verza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND In high tuberculosis (TB burden countries, there are few data on the performance of new molecular commercialised assays developed locally. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the performance of a new molecular commercialised assay for TB diagnosis (Detect-TB in three laboratories. METHODS A total of 302 sputum samples from an equal number of patients with presumptive diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB were submitted for routine smear microscopy, culture, and Detect-TB assay at three different sites in Brazil (the cities of Caxias do Sul, São Paulo and Canoas. FINDINGS Seventy four (24.7% TB cases were diagnosed (65 bacteriologically confirmed. When compared to smear microscopy/culture results, the overall sensitivity and specificity of Detect-TB assay was 84.6% (CI 95%; 73.7-91.6 and 93.1% (CI 95%; 89.1-95.8, respectively. When compared to bacteriological and clinical diagnostic criteria, the sensitivity and specificity of Detect-TB assay was 74.3% (CI 95%; 63.3-82.9 and 92.9% (CI 95%; 88.7-95.6, respectively. Among the three sites - Caxias do Sul, São Paulo and Canoas - the sensitivity and specificity were respectively 94.7% and 97.8%; 71.4% and 93.9%, 82.1% and 88.9%. MAIN CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that the Detect-TB assay could be applied routinely in reference laboratories across different regions in Brazil.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Latent Antigen Rv2029c from the Multistage DNA Vaccine A39 Drives TH1 Responses via TLR-mediated Macrophage Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Su

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Targeting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB latent antigens comprises a crucial strategy for the development of alternative tuberculosis (TB vaccine(s that protects against TB reactivation. Here, we generated a multistage DNA vaccine, A39, containing the early antigens Ag85A and Rv3425 as well as the latency-associated protein Rv2029c, which conferred protective immunity in a pre-exposure mouse model. Moreover, administration of the A39 vaccination after MTB exposure inhibited reactivation and resulted in significantly lower bacterial loads in the lungs and spleen of mice, compared to those in the control population. Subsequently, we investigated the effect of Rv2029c on innate immunity and characterized the molecular details of the interaction of this protein with the host via iTRAQ proteomic and biochemical assay analyses. Rv2029c activated macrophages, triggered the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and promoted toll-like receptor/mitogen-activated protein kinase (TLR/MAPK-dependent macrophage apoptosis. Furthermore, Rv2029c treatment enhanced the ability of Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG-infected macrophages to present antigens to CD4+ T cells in vitro, which correlated with an increase in MHC-II expression. Lastly, Rv2029c-treated macrophages activated T cells, effectively polarized CD4+ and CD8+ T cells to secrete IFN-γ and IL-2, and specifically expanded a population of CD44highCD62LlowCD4+/CD8+ effector/memory cells, indicating that Rv2029c, as a specific recall antigen, contributes to Th1 polarization in T cell immunity. These results suggest that Rv2029c and A39 comprise promising targets for the development of next-generation clinical TB therapeutic vaccines.

  12. ATP-dependent partitioning of the DNA template into supercoiled domains by Escherichia coli UvrAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Hyeon-Sook; Liu, L.F.; Claassen, L.; Grossman, L.

    1991-01-01

    The helicase action of the Escherichia coli UvrAB complex on a covalently closed circular DNA template was monitored using bacterial DNA topoisomerase I, which specifically removes negative supercoils. In the presence of E. coli DNA topoisomerase I and ATP, the UvrAB complex gradually introduced positive supercoils into the input relaxed plasmid DNA template. Positive supercoils were not produced when E. coli DNA topoisomerase I was replaced by eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase I or when both E. coli and eukaryotic DNA topoisomerases I were added simultaneously. These results suggest that like other DNA helix-tracking processes, the ATP-dependent action of the UvrAM complex on duplex DNA simultaneously generates both positive and negative supercoils, which are not constrained by protein binding but are torsionally strained. The supercoiling activity of UvrAB on UV-damaged DNA was also studied using UV-damaged plasmid DNA and a mutant UvrA protein that lacks the 40 C-terminal amino acids and is defective in preferential binding to UV-damaged DNA. UvrAB was found to preferentially supercoil the UV-damaged DNA template, whereas the mutant protein supercoiled UV-damaged and undamaged DNA with equal efficiency. The authors results therefore suggest that the DNA helix-tracking activity of UvrAB may be involved in searching and/or prepriming the damaged DNA for UvrC incision. A possible role of supercoiled domains in the incision process is discussed

  13. Tuberculosis Fluoroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follow-up though Dec 31, 2002 has been completed for a study of site-specific cancer mortality among tuberculosis patients treated with artificial lung collapse therapy in Massachusetts tuberculosis sanatoria (1930-1950).

  14. Model of DNA topology simplification has come full (supercoiled) circle after two decades of research. Comment on "Disentangling DNA molecules" by Alexander Vologodskii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiak, Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    Being a geek of DNA topology, I remember very well the stir caused by 1997 Science paper showing that DNA topoisomerases have the ability to simplify DNA topology below the topological equilibrium values [1]. In their seminal experiments Rybenkov et al. [1] started with linear double-stranded DNA molecules with cohesive ends. The mutual cohesiveness of DNA ends was due to mutual complementarity of single-stranded extensions at both ends of linear double-stranded DNA molecules. When such DNA molecules were heated up and then slowly cooled down the single-stranded ends eventually annealed with each other causing DNA circularization. This experimental protocol permitted the authors to establish topological/thermodynamic equilibrium within samples of circularized DNA molecules. Among simple unknotted circles one also observed knotted and catenated DNA molecules. The fraction of knotted molecules in DNA samples at topological equilibrium was increasing with the length of DNA molecules undergoing slow circularization. The fraction of catenated molecules was increasing with the length and the concentration of the molecules undergoing slow circularization. Rybenkov et al. incubated then such equilibrated DNA samples with type II DNA topoisomerases, which pass DNA duplex regions through each other, and observed that as the result of it the fraction of knotted and catenated DNA molecules was dramatically decreased (up to 80-fold). This elegant experiment indicated for the first time that type II DNA topoisomerases acting on knotted or catenated DNA molecules have the ability to select among many potential sites of DNA-DNA passages these that result in DNA unknotting or decatenation. Without such a selection topoisomerases could only maintain the original topological equilibrium obtained during the slow cyclization. The big question was how DNA topoisomerases can be directed to do DNA-DNA passages that preferentially result in DNA unknotting and decatenation.

  15. Anticancer activity of botanical alkyl hydroquinones attributed to topoisomerase II poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, C.-P.; Fang, W.-H.; Lin, L.-I.; Chiou, Robin Y.; Kan, L.-S.; Chi, N.-H.; Chen, Y.-R.; Lin, T.-Y.; Lin, S.-B.

    2008-01-01

    Cytotoxic alkyl hydroquinone compounds have been isolated from many plants. We previously isolated 3 structurally similar cytotoxic alkyl hydroquinone compounds from the sap of the lacquer tree Rhus succedanea L. belonging to the sumac family, which have a long history of medicinal use in Asia. Each has an unsaturated alkyl chain attached to the 2-position of a hydroquinone ring. One of these isolates, 10'(Z),13'(E),15'(E)-heptadecatrienylhydroquinone [HQ17(3)], being the most cytotoxic, was chosen for studying the anticancer mechanism of these compounds. We found that HQ17(3) was a topoisomerase (Topo) II poison. It irreversibly inhibited Topo IIα activity through the accumulation of Topo II-DNA cleavable complexes. A cell-based assay showed that HQ17(3) inhibited the growth of leukemia HL-60 cells with an EC 50 of 0.9 μM, inhibited the topoisomerase-II-deficient cells HL-60/MX2 with an EC 50 of 9.6 μM, and exerted no effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells at concentrations up to 50 μM. These results suggest that Topo II is the cellular drug target. In HL-60 cells, HQ17(3) promptly inhibited DNA synthesis, induced chromosomal breakage, and led to cell death with an EC 50 about one-tenth that of hydroquinone. Pretreatment of the cells with N-acetylcysteine could not attenuate the cytotoxicity and DNA damage induced by HQ17(3). However, N-acetylcysteine did significantly reduce the cytotoxicity of hydroquinone. In F344 rats, intraperitoneal injection of HQ17(3) for 28 days induced no clinical signs of toxicity. These results indicated that HQ17(3) is a potential anticancer agent, and its structural features could be a model for anticancer drug design

  16. Bovine tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) in animals and humans may result from exposure to bacilli within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (i.e., M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. africanum, M. pinnipedii, M. microti, M. caprae, or M. canetti) . Mycobacterium bovis is the species most often isolated from tuberculous cat...

  17. Congenital tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    2012-06-20

    Jun 20, 2012 ... Key words: Congenital tuberculo- sis, case report, miliary tuberculosis. Introduction. Congenital tuberculosis defines tuberculosis in infants of .... tary TB and otitis media, resulting in seizures, deafness, and death. It is therefore not surprising that the index case who presented at twelve weeks of age, had ...

  18. A novel filarial topoisomerase II inhibitor produced by native isolate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A novel inhibitor of filarial topoisomerase II was isolated from the culture filtrate of native isolate Micrococcus luteus B1252. The methanolic extract of the cell pellet was partially purified by silica column chromatography and preparative high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The active fraction obtained from HPLC ...

  19. Topoisomerase II poisoning by indazole and imidazole complexes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... compounds. This is because they could be effective lead candidates for the development of more potent and less toxic ruthenium containing topoisomerase II poisons. Specificity of action on this molecular target may reduce the toxic effects of these ruthenium-containing molecules and thus improve their therapeutic index.

  20. Colorectal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagi, B.; Kochhar, R.; Bhasin, D.K.; Singh, K.

    2003-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the incidence of colorectal tuberculosis in our series and to study its radiological spectrum. A total of 684 cases of proven gastrointestinal tuberculosis with positive barium contrast findings seen over a period of more than one decade were evaluated. The study did not include cases where colon was involved in direct contiguity with ileo-caecal tuberculosis. Seventy-four patients (10.8%) had colorectal tuberculosis. Commonest site involved was transverse colon, closely followed by rectum and ascending colon. Radiological findings observed were in the form of strictures (54%), colitis (39%) and polypoid lesions (7%). Complications noted were in the form of perforations and fistulae in 18.9% of cases. Colorectal tuberculosis is a very common site for gastrointestinal tuberculosis. Typical findings of colorectal tuberculosis are strictures, signs of colitis and polypoid lesions. Common complications are perforation and fistulae. (orig.)

  1. Analysis of topoisomerase mutations in fluoroquinolone-resistant and -susceptible Campylobacter jejuni strains isolated in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinana, Alfred Dieudonné; Cardinale, Eric; Bahsoun, Ibrahim; Tall, Fatou; Sire, Jean-Marie; Garin, Benoit; Boye, Cheikh Saad-Bouh; Dromigny, Jacques-Albert; Perrier-Gros-Claude, Jean-David

    2007-04-01

    In this study, topoisomerase mutations in ciprofloxacin-resistant and -susceptible Campylobacter jejuni were analysed by DNA sequencing. In certain ciprofloxacin-resistant C. jejuni, the mechanism of resistance was complex. The Thr86-Ala substitution in the GyrA protein appears to play a role in increasing the minimum inhibitory concentration of nalidixic acid only. In addition, isolates with this amino acid change and those resistant to quinolones but lacking a mutation in the GyrA quinolone resistance-determining region could be derived from two different clones. Based on gyrA and gyrB polymorphisms, C. jejuni isolates from the Dakar region of Senegal appeared to be less diverse than those from other countries. Moreover, C. jejuni isolates in Senegal appeared to differ from European isolates by lack of a silent mutation at codon 120 of the gyrA gene.

  2. Inhibition of topoisomerase II α activity and induction of apoptosis in mammalian cells by semi-synthetic andrographolide analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nateewattana, Jintapat; Saeeng, Rungnapha; Kasemsook, Sakkasem; Suksen, Kanoknetr; Dutta, Suman; Jariyawat, Surawat; Chairoungdua, Arthit; Suksamrarn, Apichart; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee

    2013-04-01

    Topoisomerase II α enzyme plays a critical role in DNA replication process. It controls the topologic states of DNA during transcription and is essential for cell proliferation. Human DNA topoisomerase II α (hTopo II α) is a promising chemotherapeutic target for anticancer agents against a variety of cancer types. In the present study, andrographolide and its structurally modified analogues were investigated for their inhibitory activities on hTopo II α enzyme. Five out of nine andrographolide analogues potently reduced hTopo II α activity and inhibited cell proliferation in four mammalian cell lines (Hela, CHO, BCA-1 and HepG2 cells). IC50 values for cytotoxicity of analogues 3A.1, 3A.2, 3A.3, 1B and 2C were 4 to 7 μM. Structure-activity relationship studies revealed that both core structure of andrographolide and silicon based molecule of functional group were important for the inhibition of hTopo II α activity whereas position C-19 of analogues was required for anti-proliferation. In addition, the analogue 2C at 10 μM concentration inhibited hTopo II α, and induced apoptosis with nuclear fragmentation and formation of apoptotic bodies in HepG2 cells. The analogue 2C may, therefore, have a therapeutic potential as effective anticancer agent targeting the hTopo II α functions.

  3. Development of derivatives of 3, 3'-diindolylmethane as potent Leishmania donovani bi-subunit topoisomerase IB poisons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Roy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of 3, 3'-diindolyl methane (DIM resistant parasite Leishmania donovani (LdDR50 by adaptation with increasing concentrations of the drug generates random mutations in the large and small subunits of heterodimeric DNA topoisomerase I of Leishmania (LdTOP1LS. Mutation of large subunit of LdTOP1LS at F270L is responsible for resistance to DIM up to 50 µM concentration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In search of compounds that inhibit the growth of the DIM resistant parasite and inhibit the catalytic activity of mutated topoisomerase I (F270L, we have prepared three derivatives of DIM namely DPDIM (2,2'-diphenyl 3,3'-diindolyl methane, DMDIM (2,2'-dimethyl 3,3'-diindolyl methane and DMODIM (5,5'-dimethoxy 3,3'-diindolyl methane from parent compound DIM. All the compounds inhibit the growth of DIM resistant parasites, induce DNA fragmentation and stabilize topo1-DNA cleavable complex with the wild type and mutant enzyme. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that the three derivatives of DIM can act as promising lead molecules for the generation of new anti-leishmanial agents.

  4. Tuberculosis (TB): Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Training Home Conditions Tuberculosis (TB) Tuberculosis: Treatment Tuberculosis: Treatment Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask ... or bones is treated longer. NEXT: Preventive Treatment Tuberculosis: Diagnosis Tuberculosis: History Clinical Trials For more than ...

  5. Living with Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Tuberculosis (TB) Living With Tuberculosis What to Expect You will need regular checkups ... XML file."); } }); } } --> Blank Section Header Lung Disease Lookup Tuberculosis (TB) Learn About Tuberculosis Tuberculosis Symptoms, Causes & Risk ...

  6. Cinnamomum verum component 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde: a novel antiproliferative drug inducing cell death through targeting both topoisomerase I and II in human colorectal adenocarcinoma COLO 205 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuen-daw Tsai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cinnamomum verum is used to manufacture the spice cinnamon. In addition, the plant has been used as a Chinese herbal medication. Methods: We investigated the antiproliferative effect of 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde (2-MCA, a constituent of the cortex of the plant, and the molecular biomarkers associated with tumorigenesis in human colorectal adenocarcinoma COLO 205 cells. Specifically, cell viability was evaluated by colorimetric assay; apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry and morphological analysis with bright field, acridine orange, and neutral red stainings, as well as comet assay; topoisomerase I activity was determined by assay based upon DNA relaxation and topoisomerase II by DNA relaxation plus decatentation of kinetoplast DNA; lysosomal vacuolation and volume of acidic compartments (VACs were determined by neutral red staining. Results: The results demonstrate that 2-MCA inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis as implicated by mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm loss, activation of both caspase-3 and -9, increase of annexin V+PI+ cells, as well as morphological characteristics of apoptosis. Furthermore, 2-MCA also induced lysosomal vacuolation with elevated VAC, cytotoxicity, and inhibitions of topoisomerase I as well as II activities. Additional study demonstrated the antiproliferative effect of 2-MCA found in a nude mice model. Conclusions: Our data implicate that the antiproliferative activity of 2-MCA in vitro involved downregulation of cell growth markers, both topoisomerase I and II, and upregulation of pro-apoptotic molecules, associated with increased lysosomal vacuolation. In vivo 2-MCA reduced the tumor burden that could have significant clinical impact. Indeed, similar effects were found in other tested cell lines, including human hepatocellular carcinoma SK-Hep-1 and Hep 3B, lung adenocarcinoma A549 and squamous cell carcinoma NCI-H520, and T-lymphoblastic MOLT-3 (results not shown. Our data implicate

  7. Targeting phenotypically tolerant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Ben; Nathan, Carl

    2016-01-01

    While the immune system is credited with averting tuberculosis in billions of individuals exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the immune system is also culpable for tempering the ability of antibiotics to deliver swift and durable cure of disease. In individuals afflicted with tuberculosis, host immunity produces diverse microenvironmental niches that support suboptimal growth, or complete growth arrest, of M. tuberculosis. The physiological state of nonreplication in bacteria is associated with phenotypic drug tolerance. Many of these host microenvironments, when modeled in vitro by carbon starvation, complete nutrient starvation, stationary phase, acidic pH, reactive nitrogen intermediates, hypoxia, biofilms, and withholding streptomycin from the streptomycin-addicted strain SS18b, render M. tuberculosis profoundly tolerant to many of the antibiotics that are given to tuberculosis patients in a clinical setting. Targeting nonreplicating persisters is anticipated to reduce the duration of antibiotic treatment and rate of post-treatment relapse. Some promising drugs to treat tuberculosis, such as rifampicin and bedaquiline, only kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis in vitro at concentrations far greater than their minimal inhibitory concentrations against replicating bacilli. There is an urgent demand to identify which of the currently used antibiotics, and which of the molecules in academic and corporate screening collections, have potent bactericidal action on nonreplicating M. tuberculosis. With this goal, we review methods of high throughput screening to target nonreplicating M. tuberculosis and methods to progress candidate molecules. A classification based on structures and putative targets of molecules that have been reported to kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis revealed a rich diversity in pharmacophores. However, few of these compounds were tested under conditions that would exclude the impact of adsorbed compound acting during the recovery phase of

  8. Renal tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Džamić Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is still a significant health problem in the world, mostly in developing countries. The special significance lies in immunocompromised patients, particularly those suffering from the HIV. Urogenital tuberculosis is one of the most common forms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, while the most commonly involved organ is the kidney. Renal tuberculosis occurs by hematogenous dissemination of mycobacterium tuberculosis from a primary tuberculosis foci in the body. Tuberculosis is characterized by the formation of pathognomonic lesions in the tissues - granulomata. These granulomata may heal spontaneously or remain stable for years. In certain circumstances in the body associated with immunosuppression, the disease may be activated. Central caseous necrosis occurs within tuberculoma, leading to formation of cavities that destroy renal parenchyma. The process may gain access to the collecting system, forming the caverns. In this way, infection can be spread distally to renal pelvis, ureter and bladder. Scaring of tissue by tuberculosis process may lead to development of strictures of the urinary tract. The clinical manifestations are presented by nonspecific symptoms and signs, so tuberculosis can often be overlooked. Sterile pyuria is characteristic for urinary tuberculosis. Dysuric complaints, flank pain or hematuria may be presented in patients. Constitutional symptoms of fever, weight loss and night sweats are presented in some severe cases. Diagnosis is made by isolation of mycobacterium tuberculosis in urine samples, by cultures carried out on standard solid media optimized for mycobacterial growth. Different imaging studies are used in diagnostics - IVU, CT and NMR are the most important. Medical therapy is the main modality of tuberculosis treatment. The first line anti-tuberculosis drugs include isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol. Surgical treatment is required in some cases, to remove severely damaged kidney, if

  9. Effects of an unusual poison identify a lifespan role for Topoisomerase 2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombline, Gregory; Millen, Jonathan I; Polevoda, Bogdan; Rapaport, Matan; Baxter, Bonnie; Van Meter, Michael; Gilbertson, Matthew; Madrey, Joe; Piazza, Gary A; Rasmussen, Lynn; Wennerberg, Krister; White, E Lucile; Nitiss, John L; Goldfarb, David S

    2017-01-05

    A progressive loss of genome maintenance has been implicated as both a cause and consequence of aging. Here we present evidence supporting the hypothesis that an age-associated decay in genome maintenance promotes aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) due to an inability to sense or repair DNA damage by topoisomerase 2 (yTop2). We describe the characterization of LS1, identified in a high throughput screen for small molecules that shorten the replicative lifespan of yeast. LS1 accelerates aging without affecting proliferative growth or viability. Genetic and biochemical criteria reveal LS1 to be a weak Top2 poison. Top2 poisons induce the accumulation of covalent Top2-linked DNA double strand breaks that, if left unrepaired, lead to genome instability and death. LS1 is toxic to cells deficient in homologous recombination, suggesting that the damage it induces is normally mitigated by genome maintenance systems. The essential roles of yTop2 in proliferating cells may come with a fitness trade-off in older cells that are less able to sense or repair yTop2-mediated DNA damage. Consistent with this idea, cells live longer when yTop2 expression levels are reduced. These results identify intrinsic yTop2-mediated DNA damage as potentially manageable cause of aging.

  10. Structure and Chromosomal Organization of Yeast Genes Regulated by Topoisomerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ricky S; Nikolaou, Christoforos; Roca, Joaquim

    2018-01-03

    Cellular DNA topoisomerases (topo I and topo II) are highly conserved enzymes that regulate the topology of DNA during normal genome transactions, such as DNA transcription and replication. In budding yeast, topo I is dispensable whereas topo II is essential, suggesting fundamental and exclusive roles for topo II, which might include the functions of the topo IIa and topo IIb isoforms found in mammalian cells. In this review, we discuss major findings of the structure and chromosomal organization of genes regulated by topo II in budding yeast. Experimental data was derived from short (10 min) and long term (120 min) responses to topo II inactivation in top-2 ts mutants. First, we discuss how short term responses reveal a subset of yeast genes that are regulated by topo II depending on their promoter architecture. These short term responses also uncovered topo II regulation of transcription across multi-gene clusters, plausibly by common DNA topology management. Finally, we examine the effects of deactivated topo II on the elongation of RNA transcripts. Each study provides an insight into the particular chromatin structure that interacts with the activity of topo II. These findings are of notable clinical interest as numerous anti-cancer therapies interfere with topo II activity.

  11. Identification of a minimal functional linker in human topoisomerase I by domain swapping with Cre recombinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Rikke Frøhlich; Juul, Sissel; Vinther, Maria

    2008-01-01

    . In this study we replace 86 amino acids including the linker domain of the cellular type IB topoisomerase, human topoisomerase I, with four, six, or eight amino acids from the corresponding short loop region in Cre recombinase. In vitro characterization of the resulting chimeras, denoted Cropos, reveals...... that six amino acids from the Cre linker loop constitute the minimal length of a functional linker in human topoisomerase I....

  12. Biosafety evaluation of the DNA extraction protocol for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species, as implemented at the Instituto Nacional de Salud, Colombia Evaluación de la bioseguridad del protocolo de extracción de ADN para especies del complejo Mycobacterium tuberculosis implementado en el Instituto Nacional de Salud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Rozo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Manipulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical specimens and cultures represents a risk factor for laboratory personnel. One of the processes that requires high concentrations of microorganisms is DNA extraction for molecular procedures. Pulmonary tuberculosis cases have occurred among professionals in charge of molecular procedures that require manipulation of massive quantities of microorganisms. This has prompted research studies on biosafety aspects of extraction protocols; however, as yet, no consensus has been reached regarding risks associated with the process.
    Objective. The biosafety was evaluated for the DNA extraction protocol of van Soolingen, et al. 2002 by determining M. tuberculosis viability at each process stage.
    Materials and methods. Eight hundred eighty cultures were grown from 220 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates that had been processed through the first three DNA extraction stages. Molecular identifications of positive cultures used a PCR isolation of a fragment of the heat shock protein PRA-hsp65 and examination of its restriction enzyme profile (spoligotyping.
    Results. Growth was seen in one culture with one of the procedures used. The molecular characterization did not correspond to the initially analyzed isolate, and therefore was deduced to be the product of a cross-contamination.
    Conclusion. The DNA extraction protocol, as described by van Soolingen, et al. 2002 and as implemented at the Instituto Nacional de Salud, was established to be safe for laboratory personnel as well as for the environment.Introducción. El trabajo con Mycobacterium tuberculosis se considera un factor de riesgo para el personal de laboratorio que manipula especímenes clínicos y cultivos. Uno de los procesos que requiere de una alta concentración de microorganismos es la extracción de ADN para realizar metodologías moleculares. Se han reportado casos de tuberculosis pulmonar en profesionales que

  13. The Cytotoxicity of Benzaldehyde Nitrogen Mustard-2-Pyridine Carboxylic Acid Hydrazone Being Involved in Topoisomerase IIα Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Fu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The antitumor property of iron chelators and aromatic nitrogen mustard derivatives has been well documented. Combination of the two pharmacophores in one molecule in drug designation is worth to be explored. We reported previously the syntheses and preliminary cytotoxicity evaluation of benzaldehyde nitrogen mustard pyridine carboxyl acid hydrazones (BNMPH as extended study, more tumor cell lines (IC50 for HepG2: 26.1 ± 3.5 μM , HCT-116: 57.5 ± 5.3 μM, K562: 48.2 ± 4.0 μM, and PC-12: 19.4 ± 2.2 μM were used to investigate its cytotoxicity and potential mechanism. In vitro experimental data showed that the BNMPH chelating Fe2+ caused a large number of ROS formations which led to DNA cleavage, and this was further supported by comet assay, implying that ROS might be involved in the cytotoxicity of BNMPH. The ROS induced changes of apoptosis related genes, but the TFR1 and NDRG1 metastatic genes were not obviously regulated, prompting that BNMPH might not be able to deprive Fe2+ of ribonucleotide reductase. The BNMPH induced S phase arrest was different from that of iron chelators (G1 and alkylating agents (G2. BNMPH also exhibited its inhibition of human topoisomerase IIα. Those revealed that the cytotoxic mechanism of the BNMPH could stem from both the topoisomerase II inhibition, ROS generation and DNA alkylation.

  14. Refined Method for Droplet Microfluidics-Enabled Detection of Plasmodium falciparum Encoded Topoisomerase I in Blood from Malaria Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Smedegaard Hede

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Rapid and reliable diagnosis is essential in the fight against malaria, which remains one of the most deadly infectious diseases in the world. In the present study we take advantage of a droplet microfluidics platform combined with a novel and user-friendly biosensor for revealing the main malaria-causing agent, the Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum parasite. Detection of the parasite is achieved through detection of the activity of a parasite-produced DNA-modifying enzyme, topoisomerase I (pfTopoI, in the blood from malaria patients. The assay presented has three steps: (1 droplet microfluidics-enabled extraction of active pfTopoI from a patient blood sample; (2 pfTopoI-mediated modification of a specialized DNA biosensor; (3 readout. The setup is quantitative and specific for the detection of Plasmodium topoisomerase I. The procedure is a considerable improvement of the previously published Rolling Circle Enhanced Enzyme Activity Detection (REEAD due to the advantages of involving no signal amplification steps combined with a user-friendly readout. In combination these alterations represent an important step towards exploiting enzyme activity detection in point-of-care diagnostics of malaria.

  15. Dual-Acting Histone Deacetylase-Topoisomerase I Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrant, William; Patil, Vishal; Canzoneri, Joshua C.; Yao, Li-Pan; Hood, Rebecca; Oyelere, Adegboyega K.

    2013-01-01

    Current chemotherapy regimens are comprised mostly of single-target drugs which are often plagued by toxic side effects and resistance development. A pharmacological strategy for circumventing these drawbacks could involve designing multivalent ligands that can modulate multiple targets while avoiding the toxicity of a single-targeted agent. Two attractive targets, histone deacetylase (HDAC) and topoisomerase I (Topo I), are cellular modulators that can broadly arrest cancer proliferation through a range of downstream effects. Both are clinically validated targets with multiple inhibitors in therapeutic use. We describe herein the design and synthesis of dual-acting histone deacetylase-topoisomerase I inhibitors. We also show that these dual-acting agents retain activity against HDAC and Topo I, and potently arrest cancer proliferation. PMID:23622981

  16. Dual-Acting Histone Deacetylase-Topoisomerase I Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrant, William; Patil, Vishal; Canzoneri, Joshua C.; Yao, Li-Pan; Hood, Rebecca; Oyelere, Adegboyega K.

    2013-01-01

    Current chemotherapy regimens are comprised mostly of single-target drugs which are often plagued by toxic side effects and resistance development. A pharmacological strategy for circumventing these drawbacks could involve designing multivalent ligands that can modulate multiple targets while avoiding the toxicity of a single-targeted agent. Two attractive targets, histone deacetylase (HDAC) and topoisomerase I (Topo I), are cellular modulators that can broadly arrest cancer proliferation thr...

  17. STUDI PEMETAAN AWAL DNA Mycobacterium tuberculosis COMPLEX SECARA Spoligotyping PADA HASIL ISOLASI DAHAK PASIEN TUBERKULOSIS PARU DARI 10 IBU KOTA PROPINSI (BAGIAN I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivi Lisdawati

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Mapping TB genotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is an important study to identify their distribution or characteristic and also may lead to improve control of the disease. This study conducted a preliminary mapping of the tubercle bacilli which had been circulating in Indonesia. Cultures of DNA isolated from TB patients at urban areas in 16 provinces in Indonesia, are chosen based on TB Case Detection Rate (CDR 2006 from Indonesia Directorate General of Communicable Disease Control and Environment Health (Ministry of Health, were analyzed by spoligotyping for strain differentiation. In this first part, the analyzed result only came from urban areas in 10 provinces, i.e. Palembang, Bandar Lampung, Serang, Jakarta, Bandung, Surabaya, Banjarmasin, Makassar, Pontianak and Ambon. Sample were 269 DNA from 294 isolates collected from sputum of suspect TB patients with sputum-smear positive (SS+ and age above 15 years old. All samples were obtained from peripheral health laboratory in each province. The procedure collection is accordance to Indonesia DOTs guidelines (AFB smears and samples were transported from those 10 areas to Bacteriology Laboratory at CBPRD. Sputum was taken for culture in liquid media MGIT Bactec 960 and solid media Lowenstein Jensen. The DNAs from positive liquid media MGIT Bactec 960 were isolated and analyzed by spoligotyping to identify the spoligo pattern. The spoligotyping results converted into octal format within Words & Excel spreadsheets and compared to International Spoligotype-database (SpolDB4. The previous study (Parwati et.al. found some differences geographical distribution between Beijing genotype strain of tubercle bacilli in West Indonesia compare to East Indonesia, and the same pattern was also found in this study. Furthermore, the results in this study showed the differences in spoligo pattern of Mtb complex at 10 urban areas in West, Middle and East Indonesia. The percentage of Beijing strain

  18. Genomic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains isolated in Tuscany, Italy, based on large sequence deletions, SNPs in putative DNA repair genes and MIRU-VNTR polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzelli, Carlo; Lari, Nicoletta; Rindi, Laura

    2016-03-01

    The Beijing genotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is cause of global concern as it is rapidly spreading worldwide, is considered hypervirulent, and is most often associated to massive spread of MDR/XDR TB, although these epidemiological or pathological properties have not been confirmed for all strains and in all geographic settings. In this paper, to gain new insights into the biogeographical heterogeneity of the Beijing family, we investigated a global sample of Beijing strains (22% from Italian-born, 78% from foreign-born patients) by determining large sequence polymorphism of regions RD105, RD181, RD150 and RD142, single nucleotide polymorphism of putative DNA repair genes mutT4 and mutT2 and MIRU-VNTR profiles based on 11 discriminative loci. We found that, although our sample of Beijing strains showed a considerable genomic heterogeneity, yielding both ancient and recent phylogenetic strains, the prevalent successful Beijing subsets were characterized by deletions of RD105 and RD181 and by one nucleotide substitution in one or both mutT genes. MIRU-VNTR analysis revealed 47 unique patterns and 9 clusters including a total of 33 isolates (41% of total isolates); the relatively high proportion of Italian-born Beijing TB patients, often occurring in mixed clusters, supports the possibility of an ongoing cross-transmission of the Beijing genotype to autochthonous population. High rates of extra-pulmonary localization and drug-resistance, particularly MDR, frequently reported for Beijing strains in other settings, were not observed in our survey. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Deacetylation of topoisomerase I is an important physiological function of E. coli CobB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qingxuan; Zhou, Yan Ning; Jin, Ding Jun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Escherichia coli topoisomerase I (TopA), a regulator of global and local DNA supercoiling, is modified by Nε-Lysine acetylation. The NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase CobB can reverse both enzymatic and non-enzymatic lysine acetylation modification in E. coli. Here, we show that the absence of CobB in a ΔcobB mutant reduces intracellular TopA catalytic activity and increases negative DNA supercoiling. TopA expression level is elevated as topA transcription responds to the increased negative supercoiling. The slow growth phenotype of the ΔcobB mutant can be partially compensated by further increase of intracellular TopA level via overexpression of recombinant TopA. The relaxation activity of purified TopA is decreased by in vitro non-enzymatic acetyl phosphate mediated lysine acetylation, and the presence of purified CobB protects TopA from inactivation by such non-enzymatic acetylation. The specific activity of TopA expressed from His-tagged fusion construct in the chromosome is inversely proportional to the degree of in vivo lysine acetylation during growth transition and growth arrest. These findings demonstrate that E. coli TopA catalytic activity can be modulated by lysine acetylation–deacetylation, and prevention of TopA inactivation from excess lysine acetylation and consequent increase in negative DNA supercoiling is an important physiological function of the CobB protein deacetylase. PMID:28398568

  20. In vitro inhibition of African swine fever virus-topoisomerase II disrupts viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Ferdinando B; Frouco, Gonçalo; Martins, Carlos; Leitão, Alexandre; Ferreira, Fernando

    2016-10-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the etiological agent of a highly-contagious and fatal disease of domestic pigs, leading to serious socio-economic impact in affected countries. To date, neither a vaccine nor a selective anti-viral drug are available for prevention or treatment of African swine fever (ASF), emphasizing the need for more detailed studies at the role of ASFV proteins involved in viral DNA replication and transcription. Notably, ASFV encodes for a functional type II topoisomerase (ASFV-Topo II) and we recently showed that several fluoroquinolones (bacterial DNA topoisomerase inhibitors) fully abrogate ASFV replication in vitro. Here, we report that ASFV-Topo II gene is actively transcribed throughout infection, with transcripts being detected as early as 2 hpi and reaching a maximum peak concentration around 16 hpi, when viral DNA synthesis, transcription and translation are more active. siRNA knockdown experiments showed that ASFV-Topo II plays a critical role in viral DNA replication and gene expression, with transfected cells presenting lower viral transcripts (up to 89% decrease) and reduced cytopathic effect (-66%) when compared to the control group. Further, a significant decrease in the number of both infected cells (75.5%) and viral factories per cell and in virus yields (up to 99.7%, 2.5 log) was found only in cells transfected with siRNA targeting ASFV-Topo II. We also demonstrate that a short exposure to enrofloxacin during the late phase of infection (from 15 to 1 hpi) induces fragmentation of viral genomes, whereas no viral genomes were detected when enrofloxacin was added from the early phase of infection (from 2 to 16 hpi), suggesting that fluoroquinolones are ASFV-Topo II poisons. Altogether, our results demonstrate that ASFV-Topo II enzyme has an essential role during viral genome replication and transcription, emphasizing the idea that this enzyme can be a potential target for drug and vaccine development against ASF

  1. Tuberculosis neonatal

    OpenAIRE

    Pastor Durán, Xavier

    1986-01-01

    PROTOCOLOS TERAPEUTICOS. TUBERCULOSIS NEONATAL 1. CONCEPTO La tuberculosis neonatal es la infección del recién nacido producida por el bacilo de Koch. Es una situación rara pero grave que requiere un diagnóstico precoz y un tratamiento enérgico..

  2. Tuberculosis in early medieval Switzerland--osteological and molecular evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Christine; Fellner, Robert; Heubi, Olivier; Maixner, Frank; Zink, Albert; Lösch, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Lesions consistent with skeletal tuberculosis were found in 13 individuals from an early medieval skeletal sample from Courroux (Switzerland). One case of Pott's disease as well as lytic lesions in vertebrae and joints, rib lesions and endocranial new bone formation were identified. Three individuals with lesions and one without were tested for the presence of Myobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) ancient DNA (aDNA), and in two cases, evidence for MTBC aDNA was detected. Our results suggest the presence of tuberculosis in the analysed material, which is in accordance with other osteological and biomolecular research that reported a high prevalence of tuberculosis in medieval skeletons.

  3. Defects of mitochondrial DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, William C

    2014-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA is replicated by DNA polymerase γ in concert with accessory proteins such as the mitochondrial DNA helicase, single-stranded DNA binding protein, topoisomerase, and initiating factors. Defects in mitochondrial DNA replication or nucleotide metabolism can cause mitochondrial genetic diseases due to mitochondrial DNA deletions, point mutations, or depletion, which ultimately cause loss of oxidative phosphorylation. These genetic diseases include mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes such as Alpers or early infantile hepatocerebral syndromes, and mitochondrial DNA deletion disorders, such as progressive external ophthalmoplegia, ataxia-neuropathy, or mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy. This review focuses on our current knowledge of genetic defects of mitochondrial DNA replication (POLG, POLG2, C10orf2, and MGME1) that cause instability of mitochondrial DNA and mitochondrial disease. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Learn About Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Tuberculosis (TB) Learn About Tuberculosis Tuberculosis (TB) is an airborne bacterial infection caused by the organism Mycobacterium tuberculosis that primarily affects the lungs, although other organs ...

  5. Synthesis and antibacterial evaluation of anziaic acid and analogues as topoisomerase I inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Hao; Annamalai, Thirunavukkarasu; Bansod, Priyanka; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; Sun, Dianqing

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring anziaic acid was very recently reported as a topoisomerase I inhibitor with antibacterial activity. Herein total synthesis of anziaic acid and structural analogues is described and the preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) has been developed based on topoisomerase inhibition and whole cell antibacterial activity.

  6. Real-time investigation of human topoisomerase I reaction kinetics using an optical sensor: a fast method for drug screening and determination of active enzyme concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Emil L.; Jørgensen, Line A.; Franch, Oskar; Etzerodt, Michael; Frøhlich, Rikke; Bjergbæk, Lotte; Stougaard, Magnus; Ho, Yi-Ping; Knudsen, Birgitta R.

    2015-05-01

    Human DNA topoisomerase I (hTopI) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes relaxation of super helical tension that arises in the genome during essential DNA metabolic processes. This is accomplished through a common reaction mechanism shared among the type IB topoisomerase enzymes, including eukaryotic and poxvirus topoisomerase I. The mechanism of hTopI is specifically targeted in cancer treatment using camptothecin derivatives. These drugs convert the hTopI activity into a cellular poison, and hence the cytotoxic effects of camptothecin derivatives correlate with the hTopI activity. Therefore, fast and reliable techniques for high throughput measurements of hTopI activity are of high clinical interest. Here we demonstrate potential applications of a fluorophore-quencher based DNA sensor designed for measurement of hTopI cleavage-ligation activities, which are the catalytic steps affected by camptothecin. The kinetic analysis of the hTopI reaction with the DNA sensor exhibits a characteristic burst profile. This is the result of a two-step ping-pong reaction mechanism, where a fast first reaction, the one creating the signal, is followed by a slower second reaction necessary for completion of the catalytic cycle. Hence, the burst profile holds information about two reactions in the enzymatic mechanism. Moreover, it allows the amount of active enzyme in the reaction to be determined. The presented results pave the way for future high throughput drug screening and the potential of measuring active hTopI concentrations in clinical samples for individualized treatment.Human DNA topoisomerase I (hTopI) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes relaxation of super helical tension that arises in the genome during essential DNA metabolic processes. This is accomplished through a common reaction mechanism shared among the type IB topoisomerase enzymes, including eukaryotic and poxvirus topoisomerase I. The mechanism of hTopI is specifically targeted in cancer treatment using

  7. Tuberculosis treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabahi, Marcelo Fouad; da Silva, José Laerte Rodrigues; Ferreira, Anna Carolina Galvão; Tannus-Silva, Daniela Graner Schuwartz; Conde, Marcus Barreto

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tuberculosis treatment remains a challenge due to the need to consider, when approaching it, the context of individual and collective health. In addition, social and economic issues have been shown to be variables that need to be considered when it comes to treatment effectiveness. We conducted a critical review of the national and international literature on the treatment of tuberculosis in recent years with the aims of presenting health care workers with recommendations based on the situation in Brazil and better informing decision-making regarding tuberculosis patients so as to minimize morbidity and interrupt disease transmission. PMID:29340497

  8. A Mycobacterium tuberculosis cluster demonstrating the use of genotyping in urban tuberculosis control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. de Vries (Gerard); R.M. van Hest (Reinier); C.C.A. Burdo (Conny); D. van Soolingen (Dick); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates offers better opportunities to study links between tuberculosis (TB) cases and can highlight relevant issues in urban TB control in low-endemic countries. Methods: A medium-sized molecular cluster of TB cases with

  9. Thiophene antibacterials that allosterically stabilize DNA-cleavage complexes with DNA gyrase

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Pan F.; Germe, Thomas; Bax, Benjamin D.; Huang, Jianzhong; Thalji, Reema K.; Bacqu��, Eric; Checchia, Anna; Chen, Dongzhao; Cui, Haifeng; Ding, Xiao; Ingraham, Karen; McCloskey, Lynn; Raha, Kaushik; Srikannathasan, Velupillai; Maxwell, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria constitutes a significant unmet medical need. Fluoroquinolone antibiotics have been compromised by resistance mutations in their targets: DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Using biochemical and genetic techniques, we have identified and characterized a class of antibacterials which transforms DNA gyrase into toxic DNA-cleavage complexes, similar to fluoroquinolones, but with a distinct mechanism of action. X-ray crystallography shows that the inhibito...

  10. Dual Inhibition of Topoisomerase II and Tyrosine Kinases by the Novel Bis-Fluoroquinolone Chalcone-Like Derivative HMNE3 in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yong-Chao; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Jin, Shao-Ju; Zhang, Yan-Xin; Hu, Guo-Qiang; Cui, Dong-Tao; Wang, Jiang-Shuan; Wang, Min; Wang, Fu-Qing; Zhao, Zhi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Both tyrosine kinase and topoisomerase II (TopII) are important anticancer targets, and their respective inhibitors are widely used in cancer therapy. However, some combinations of anticancer drugs could exhibit mutually antagonistic actions and drug resistance, which further limit their therapeutic efficacy. Here, we report that HMNE3, a novel bis-fluoroquinolone chalcone-like derivative that targets both tyrosine kinase and TopII, induces tumor cell proliferation and growth inhibition. The viabilities of 6 different cancer cell lines treated with a range of HMNE3 doses were detected using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cellular apoptosis was determined using Hoechst 33258 fluorescence staining and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The expression of activated Caspase-3 was examined by immunocytochemistry. The tyrosine kinase activity was measured with a human receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) detection kit using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated phosphotyrosine (pY20) antibody as the substrate. The topoisomerase II activity was measured using agarose gel electrophoresis with the DNA plasmid pBR322 as the substrate. The expression levels of the P53, Bax, Bcl-2, Caspase-3, -8, -9, p-cSrc, c-Src and topoisomerase II proteins were detected by western blot analysis. The proliferation of five of the six cancer cell lines was significantly inhibited by HMNE3 at 0.312 to 10 μmol/L in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Treatment of the Capan-1 and Panc-1 cells with 1.6 to 3.2 μM HMNE3 for 48 h significantly increased the percentage of apoptotic cells (Ptopoisomerase IIβ activity was noted following treatment with HMNE3 for 24 h. Our data suggest that HMNE3 induced apoptosis in Capan-1 and Panc-1 cells by inhibiting the activity of both tyrosine kinases and topoisomerase II.

  11. Topoisomerase 3alpha and RMI1 suppress somatic crossovers and are essential for resolution of meiotic recombination intermediates in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Hartung

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Topoisomerases are enzymes with crucial functions in DNA metabolism. They are ubiquitously present in prokaryotes and eukaryotes and modify the steady-state level of DNA supercoiling. Biochemical analyses indicate that Topoisomerase 3alpha (TOP3alpha functions together with a RecQ DNA helicase and a third partner, RMI1/BLAP75, in the resolution step of homologous recombination in a process called Holliday Junction dissolution in eukaryotes. Apart from that, little is known about the role of TOP3alpha in higher eukaryotes, as knockout mutants show early lethality or strong developmental defects. Using a hypomorphic insertion mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (top3alpha-2, which is viable but completely sterile, we were able to define three different functions of the protein in mitosis and meiosis. The top3alpha-2 line exhibits fragmented chromosomes during mitosis and sensitivity to camptothecin, suggesting an important role in chromosome segregation partly overlapping with that of type IB topoisomerases. Furthermore, AtTOP3alpha, together with AtRECQ4A and AtRMI1, is involved in the suppression of crossover recombination in somatic cells as well as DNA repair in both mammals and A. thaliana. Surprisingly, AtTOP3alpha is also essential for meiosis. The phenotype of chromosome fragmentation, bridges, and telophase I arrest can be suppressed by AtSPO11 and AtRAD51 mutations, indicating that the protein is required for the resolution of recombination intermediates. As Atrmi1 mutants have a similar meiotic phenotype to Attop3alpha mutants, both proteins seem to be involved in a mechanism safeguarding the entangling of homologous chromosomes during meiosis. The requirement of AtTOP3alpha and AtRMI1 in a late step of meiotic recombination strongly hints at the possibility that the dissolution of double Holliday Junctions via a hemicatenane intermediate is indeed an indispensable step of meiotic recombination.

  12. Chiral ruthenium(II) complexes with phenolic hydroxyl groups as dual poisons of topoisomerases I and IIα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pingyu; Wang, Jinquan; Huang, Huaiyi; Qiao, Liping; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2013-06-28

    A series of novel chiral ruthenium(II) complexes with phenolic hydroxyl groups were synthesized and characterized. These ruthenium(II) complexes exhibited strong dual inhibition of topoisomerases I and IIα, with approximate IC50 values of 3-15 mM, which were more efficient than the widely clinically used single TopoI poison camptothecin (CPT) or TopoIIα poison etoposide (VP-16). Δ-1 and Λ-1 with more hydroxyls were observed to be more potent inhibitors. To further evaluate the mechanism of the complexes at a cellular level, these complexes were investigated for their effect on cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and induction of apoptosis. The results indicated that ruthenium(II) complexes permeated the nuclei in cancer cells and inhibited the activities of nuclear enzymes topoisomerases I and IIα, then triggered DNA damage and induced apoptosis in the cancer cells. The simultaneous inhibition of TopoI and TopoIIα induced the death of cancer cells, which may be a promising and effective strategy for cancer therapy.

  13. Resveratrol Modulates the Topoisomerase Inhibitory Potential of Doxorubicin in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anika Schroeter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (RSV is currently being widely discussed as potentially useful for anticancer therapy in combination with classical chemotherapeutics, e.g., the topoisomerase II (TOP II poison doxorubicin (DOX. However, there is still a lack of knowledge of possible interference at the target enzyme, especially since RSV itself has recently been described to act as a TOP poison. We therefore sought to address the question whether RSV affects DOX-induced genotoxic and cytotoxic effects with special emphasis on TOP II in HT-29 colon carcinoma cells. RSV was found to counteract DOX-induced formation of DNA-TOP-intermediates at ≥100 µM for TOP IIα and at 250 µM for TOP IIβ. As a consequence, RSV modulated the DNA-strand breaking potential of DOX by mediating protective effects with an apparent maximum at 100 µM. At higher concentration ranges (≥200 µM RSV diminished the intracellular concentrations of DOX. Nevertheless, the presence of RSV slightly enhanced the cytotoxic effects of DOX after 1.5 h and 24 h of incubation. Taken together, at least in cell culture RSV was found to affect the TOP-poisoning potential of DOX and to modulate its cytotoxic effectiveness. Thus, further studies are needed to clarify the impact of RSV on the therapeutic effectiveness of DOX under in vivo conditions.

  14. Topoisomerase IIbeta is required for proper retinal development and survival of postmitotic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Li

    2014-01-01

    Topoisomerase IIbeta (Top2b is an enzyme that modulates DNA supercoiling by catalyzing the passage of DNA duplexes through one another. It is ubiquitously expressed in postmitotic cells and known to function during the development of neuromuscular junctions in the diaphragm and the proper formation of laminar structure in the cerebral cortex. However, due to the perinatal death phenotype of the traditional constitutive and brain-specific Top2b knockout mice, the precise in vivo function of Top2b, especially during postnatal neural development, remains to be determined. Using both the constitutive and retina-specific knockout mouse models, we showed that Top2b deficiency resulted in delayed neuronal differentiation, degeneration of the plexiform layers and outer segment of photoreceptors, as well as dramatic reduction in cell number in the retina. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis by RNA sequencing revealed that genes involved in neuronal survival and neural system development were preferentially affected in Top2b-deficient retinas. Collectively, our findings have indicated an important function of Top2b in proper development and the maintenance/survival of postmitotic neurons in the retina.

  15. Induction of apoptosis in cholangiocarcinoma by an andrographolide analogue is mediated through topoisomerase II alpha inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nateewattana, Jintapat; Dutta, Suman; Reabroi, Somrudee; Saeeng, Rungnapha; Kasemsook, Sakkasem; Chairoungdua, Arthit; Weerachayaphorn, Jittima; Wongkham, Sopit; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee

    2014-01-15

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), the common primary malignant tumor of bile duct epithelial cells, is unresponsive to most chemotherapeutic drugs. Diagnosis with CCA has a poor prognosis, and therefore urgently requires effective therapeutic agents. In the present study we investigated anti-cancer effects of andrographolide analogue 3A.1 (19-tert-butyldiphenylsilyl-8, 17-epoxy andrographolide) and its mechanism in human CCA cell line KKU-M213 derived from a Thai CCA patient. By 24h after exposure, the analogue 3A.1 exhibited a potent cytotoxic effect on KKU-M213 cells with an inhibition concentration 50 (IC50) of approximately 8.0µM. Analogue 3A.1 suppressed DNA topoisomerase II α (Topo II α) protein expression, arrested the cell cycle at sub G0/G1 phase, induced cleavage of DNA repair protein poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases-1 (PARP-1), and enhanced expression of tumor suppressor protein p53 and pro-apoptotic protein Bax. In addition, analogue 3A.1 induced caspase 3 activity and inhibited cyclin D1, CDK6, and COX-2 protein expression. These results suggest that andrographolide analogue 3A.1, a novel topo II inhibitor, has significant potential to be developed as a new anticancer agent for the treatment of CCA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A recombinant topoisomerase I used for autoantibody detection in sera from patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheijen, R; Van den Hoogen, F; Beijer, R; Richter, A; Penner, E; Habets, W J; van Venrooij, W J

    1990-04-01

    We report the expression of a cDNA clone encoding 695 carboxyl-terminal amino acids of human DNA topoisomerase I (topoI) in Escherichia coli. More than 96% of the anti-HeLa topoI-positive sera from patients with a connective tissue disease displayed also an immunoreactivity with this recombinant protein (the HTopoA protein). Sera from patients with a definite diagnosis systemic sclerosis and reacting with HeLa topoI, all reacted with the HTopoA protein as well. Sera from patients with systemic sclerosis that did not contain anti-topoI antibodies (about 30% of the systemic sclerosis sera), as concluded from HeLa immunoblot, displayed also no immunoreactivity with our recombinant antigen. By expressing different fragments of HTopoA, we were able to assign at least three different autoimmune epitope regions on the HTopoA protein and we show that over a period of 5 years the amount of anti-topoI antibodies against these regions may fluctuate.

  17. Duodenal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, M.R.; Sarwar, M.

    2004-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a world wide communicable disease caused by tubercle bacilli discovered by Robert Kock in 1882. In 1993 WHO declared TB as a global emergency due to its world wide resurgence. It can involve any organ of the body. Abdomen is the fourth commonest site of involvement in the extra pulmonary tuberculosis after the lymph-nodes, skeletal and Genito urinary variants. In the gastro intestinal tract tuberculosis can affect any part from the mouth to the anus but ileocaecal area is a favourite location. Duodenal involvement is uncommon and accounts for only 2.5% of tuberculous enteritis. Major pathogens are Mycobacterium Tuberculosis and bovis and the usual route of entry is by direct penetration of the intestinal mucosa by swallowed organisms. (author)

  18. Pulmonary tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Increase in HIV infections Increase in number of homeless people (poor environment and nutrition) Drug-resistant strains ... Disease Control and Prevention/Infectious Diseases Society of America ... guidelines: treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis. ...

  19. [Perinatal tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáenz-Gómez, Jessica; Karam Bechara, José; Jamaica Balderas, Lourdes

    Perinatal tuberculosis is acquired during birth or during the early neonatal period. Although its incidence is unknown, a search was conducted in Medline and 28 cases were found of perinatal tuberculosis reported from 1983 to 2011. Diagnosis of this disease is important due to having nonspecific symptoms that are mistaken for other infectious diseases. The disease has a high mortality rate (60%); therefore, it requires prompt diagnostic suspicion by the medical staff to prevent a fatal outcome. We describe the case of a 3-month-old male whose 29-year-old mother died of septic shock at 15 days of delivery. The infant's condition began within 30 days of age with cough and difficulty breathing with a diagnosis of multiple foci pneumonia. The infant presented respiratory impairment, meriting change of antibiotics twice, without improvement. The autopsy report of the mother revealed peritoneal tuberculosis. PCR was carried out using tracheal aspirate and pleural fluid of the patient, which were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Perinatal diagnosis of tuberculosis was established. No hepatic granuloma was found. Perinatal infection should be suspected in children with sepsis and/or pneumonia unresponsive to antibiotics. In this care, the history of tuberculosis in the mother should have oriented the diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  20. Tuberculosis: looking beyond BCG vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Abu S

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is an infectious disease of international importance and ranks among the top 10 causes of death in the World. About one-third of the world′s population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Every year, approximately eight million people develop active disease and two million die of TB. The currently used BCG vaccines have shown variable protective efficacies against TB in different parts of the world. Moreover, being a live vaccine, BCG can be pathogenic in immunocompromised recipients. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new vaccines against TB. The comparative genome analysis has revealed the existence of several M. tuberculosis-specific regions that are deleted in BCG. The work carried out to determine the immunological reactivity of proteins encoded by genes located in these regions revealed several major antigens of M. tuberculosis, including the 6 kDa early secreted antigen target (ESAT6. Immunization with ESAT6 and its peptide (aa51-70 protects mice challenged with M. tuberculosis. The protective efficacy of immunization further improves when ESAT6 is recombinantly fused with M. tuberculosis antigen 85B. In addition, ESAT6 delivered as a DNA vaccine is also protective in mice. Whether these vaccines would be safe or not cannot be speculated. The answer regarding the safety and efficacy of these vaccines has to await human trials in different parts of the world.

  1. Inhibition of topoisomerase IIα activity in CHO K1 cells by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grdina, D.J.

    1993-06-01

    The aminothiol 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065) is the active thiol of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). WR-1065 is an effective radiation protector and antimutagenic agent when it is administered 30 min prior to radiation exposure to Chinese hamster ovary Kl cells at a concentration of 4 mM. Under these exposure conditions, topoisomerase (topo) I and II activities and associated protein contents were measured in the K1 cell line using the DNA relaxation assay, the P4 unknotting assay, and immunoblotting, respectively. WR-1065 was ineffective in modifying topo I activity, but it did reduce topo IIa activity by an average of 50 percent. The magnitude of topo IIa protein content, however, was not affected by these exposure conditions. Cell cycle effects were monitored by the method of flow cytometry. Exposure of cells to 4 mM WR-1065 for a period of up to 6 h resulted in a buildup of cells in the G2 compartment. However, in contrast to topo II inhibitors used in chemotherapy, WR-1065 is an effective radioprotector agent capable of protecting against both radiation-induced cell lethality and mutagenesis. One of several mechanisms of radiation protection attributed to aminothiol compounds such as WR-1065 has been their ability to affect endogenous enzymatic reactions involved in DNA synthesis, repair, and cell cycle progression. These results are consistent with such a proposed mechanism and demonstrate in particular a modifying effect by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol on type II topoisomerase, which is involved in DNA synthesis

  2. Molecular Beacon Enables Combination of Highly Processive and Highly Sensitive Rolling Circle Amplification Readouts for Detection of DNA-Modifying Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Emil Laust; Gonzales, Maria; Stougaard, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Here we present an optimized readout format for detection of the circularized products from a DNA-based sensor for measurement of DNA-modifying enzymes including DNA Topoisomerase I. The basic design of the DNA-sensor relies on the use of a substrate that can be circularized by the activity of DN...

  3. Sequential inflammatory processes define human progression from M. tuberculosis infection to tuberculosis disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scriba, Thomas J; Penn-Nicholson, Adam; Shankar, Smitha; Hraha, Tom; Thompson, Ethan G; Sterling, David; Nemes, Elisa; Darboe, Fatoumatta; Suliman, Sara; Amon, Lynn M; Mahomed, Hassan; Erasmus, Mzwandile; Whatney, Wendy; Johnson, John L; Boom, W Henry; Hatherill, Mark; Valvo, Joe; De Groote, Mary Ann; Ochsner, Urs A; Aderem, Alan; Hanekom, Willem A; Zak, Daniel E

    2017-11-01

    Our understanding of mechanisms underlying progression from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection to pulmonary tuberculosis disease in humans remains limited. To define such mechanisms, we followed M. tuberculosis-infected adolescents longitudinally. Blood samples from forty-four adolescents who ultimately developed tuberculosis disease (“progressors”) were compared with those from 106 matched controls, who remained healthy during two years of follow up. We performed longitudinal whole blood transcriptomic analyses by RNA sequencing and plasma proteome analyses using multiplexed slow off-rate modified DNA aptamers. Tuberculosis progression was associated with sequential modulation of immunological processes. Type I/II interferon signalling and complement cascade were elevated 18 months before tuberculosis disease diagnosis, while changes in myeloid inflammation, lymphoid, monocyte and neutrophil gene modules occurred more proximally to tuberculosis disease. Analysis of gene expression in purified T cells also revealed early suppression of Th17 responses in progressors, relative to M. tuberculosis-infected controls. This was confirmed in an independent adult cohort who received BCG re-vaccination; transcript expression of interferon response genes in blood prior to BCG administration was associated with suppression of IL-17 expression by BCG-specific CD4 T cells 3 weeks post-vaccination. Our findings provide a timeline to the different immunological stages of disease progression which comprise sequential inflammatory dynamics and immune alterations that precede disease manifestations and diagnosis of tuberculosis disease. These findings have important implications for developing diagnostics, vaccination and host-directed therapies for tuberculosis. Clincialtrials.gov, NCT01119521.

  4. Sequential inflammatory processes define human progression from M. tuberculosis infection to tuberculosis disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Scriba

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of mechanisms underlying progression from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection to pulmonary tuberculosis disease in humans remains limited. To define such mechanisms, we followed M. tuberculosis-infected adolescents longitudinally. Blood samples from forty-four adolescents who ultimately developed tuberculosis disease (“progressors” were compared with those from 106 matched controls, who remained healthy during two years of follow up. We performed longitudinal whole blood transcriptomic analyses by RNA sequencing and plasma proteome analyses using multiplexed slow off-rate modified DNA aptamers. Tuberculosis progression was associated with sequential modulation of immunological processes. Type I/II interferon signalling and complement cascade were elevated 18 months before tuberculosis disease diagnosis, while changes in myeloid inflammation, lymphoid, monocyte and neutrophil gene modules occurred more proximally to tuberculosis disease. Analysis of gene expression in purified T cells also revealed early suppression of Th17 responses in progressors, relative to M. tuberculosis-infected controls. This was confirmed in an independent adult cohort who received BCG re-vaccination; transcript expression of interferon response genes in blood prior to BCG administration was associated with suppression of IL-17 expression by BCG-specific CD4 T cells 3 weeks post-vaccination. Our findings provide a timeline to the different immunological stages of disease progression which comprise sequential inflammatory dynamics and immune alterations that precede disease manifestations and diagnosis of tuberculosis disease. These findings have important implications for developing diagnostics, vaccination and host-directed therapies for tuberculosis.Clincialtrials.gov, NCT01119521.

  5. Increased B and T Cell Responses in M. bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin Vaccinated Pigs Co-Immunized with Plasmid DNA Encoding a Prototype Tuberculosis Antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruffaerts, Nicolas; Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle

    2015-01-01

    two regions with strong predicted SLA-1*0401/SLA-1*0801 binding affinity, was promiscuously recognized by 6/6 animals vaccinated with the BCG-pAg85A combination. Our study provides a proof of concept in a large mammalian species, for a new Th1 and CD8+ targeting tuberculosis vaccine, based on BCG...

  6. Mutaciones asociadas con resistencia a rifampicina o isoniazida en aislamientos clínicos de M. tuberculosis de Sonora, México DNA mutations associated to rifampicin or isoniazid resistance in M. tuberculosis clinical isolates from Sonora, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Bolado-Martínez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Realizar el análisis de regiones específicas de genes asociados con resistencia a isoniazida o rifampicina. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se estudiaron 22 cepas de M. tuberculosis, aisladas en Sonora, México. Se utilizaron iniciadores para regiones específicas de los genes rpoB, katG e inhA y la región ahpC-oxyR. Los productos de PCR se secuenciaron y analizaron. RESULTADOS: Se identificaron mutaciones en la región promotora del gen inhA, región ahpC-oxyR, codón 315 del gen katG y codones 451 ó 456 del gen rpoB. CONCLUSIONES: La identificación de mutaciones no descritas previamente obliga a continuar el análisis genotípico de cepas aisladas en Sonora.OBJECTIVE: To perform the analysis of specific regions of the major genes associated with resistance to isoniazid or rifampin. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty two M. tuberculosis strains, isolated from human samples obtained in Sonora, Mexico. Specific primers for hotspots of the rpoB, katG, inhA genes and the ahpC-oxyR intergenic region were used. The purified PCR products were sequenced. RESULTS: Mutations in the promoter of inhA, the ahpC-oxyR region, and codon 315 of katG and in 451 or 456 codons of rpoB, were identified. CONCLUSIONS: Detection of mutations not previously reported requires further genotypic analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Sonora.

  7. Potent Antipneumococcal Activity of Gemifloxacin Is Associated with Dual Targeting of Gyrase and Topoisomerase IV, an In Vivo Target Preference for Gyrase, and Enhanced Stabilization of Cleavable Complexes In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Victoria J.; Ambler, Jane E.; Fisher, L. Mark

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the roles of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV in determining the susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae to gemifloxacin, a novel fluoroquinolone which is under development as an antipneumococcal drug. Gemifloxacin displayed potent activity against S. pneumoniae 7785 (MIC, 0.06 μg/ml) compared with ciprofloxacin (MIC, 1 to 2 μg/ml). Complementary genetic and biochemical approaches revealed the following. (i) The gemifloxacin MICs for isogenic 7785 mutants bearing either parC or gyrA quinolone resistance mutations were marginally higher than wild type at 0.12 to 0.25 μg/ml, whereas the presence of both mutations increased the MIC to 0.5 to 1 μg/ml. These data suggest that both gyrase and topoisomerase IV contribute significantly as gemifloxacin targets in vivo. (ii) Gemifloxacin selected first-step gyrA mutants of S. pneumoniae 7785 (gemifloxacin MICs, 0.25 μg/ml) encoding Ser-81 to Phe or Tyr, or Glu-85 to Lys mutations. These mutants were cross resistant to sparfloxacin (which targets gyrase) but not to ciprofloxacin (which targets topoisomerase IV). Second-step mutants (gemifloxacin MICs, 1 μg/ml) exhibited an alteration in parC resulting in changes of ParC hot spot Ser-79 to Phe or Tyr. Thus, gyrase appears to be the preferential in vivo target. (iii) Gemifloxacin was at least 10- to 20-fold more effective than ciprofloxacin in stabilizing a cleavable complex (the cytotoxic lesion) with either S. pneumoniae gyrase or topoisomerase IV enzyme in vitro. These data suggest that gemifloxacin is an enhanced affinity fluoroquinolone that acts against gyrase and topoisomerase IV in S. pneumoniae, with gyrase the preferred in vivo target. The marked potency of gemifloxacin against wild type and quinolone-resistant mutants may accrue from greater stabilization of cleavable complexes with the target enzymes. PMID:11036032

  8. Tuberculosis Multidrogoresistente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    German A Acevedo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available La tuberculosis es una enfermedad infecciosa causada por el Mycobacterium tuberculosis. En el año 2010 se registraron 8.8 millones de casos incidentes en el mundo y en los últimos años han aparecido poblaciones bacterianas de micobacterias con resistencia a los fármacos de primera línea. Se ha definido la presencia de resistencia a rifampicina e isoniacida como multidrogoresistencia, estimándose una incidencia mundial aproximada de 3.6%. Esta revisión de tema se centrará en la situación de la tuberculosis multidrogoresistente en el mundo, incluyendo un análisis regional de la casuística Colombiana. Se comentarán los principales mecanismos de resistencia del microorganismo, los genes implicados en la misma y los factores de riesgo asociados a la generación de resistencia en algunas comunidades.

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Anastasia; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2018-03-23

    In this infographic, the genetics, phylogeny, physiology, and pathogenesis mechanisms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are shown. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB), the leading cause of death due to a single infectious agent, claiming 1.7 million lives in 2016. Of the deaths attributable to TB in 2016, 22% occurred in people coinfected with HIV, and close to 5% of the 10.4 million incident cases of this disease were resistant to at least two of the first-line TB drugs. In this infographic, we describe the fundamental features of the genetics, phylogeny, and physiology of this member of the phylum Actinobacteria, which is associated increasingly with drug resistance mediated by mutations and rearrangements in its single, circular chromosome. We also highlight the key pathogenesis mechanisms employed by this slow-growing, facultative intracellular bacterium, which include avoidance of host cell clearance by arrest of the normal macrophage maturation process. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis cAMP Receptor Protein (Rv3676) Differs from the Escherichia coli Paradigm in Its cAMP Binding and DNA Binding Properties and Transcription Activation Properties*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Melanie; Haq, Ihtshamul; Hunt, Debbie M.; Arnvig, Kristine B.; Artymiuk, Peter J.; Buxton, Roger S.; Green, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis produces a burst of cAMP upon infection of macrophages. Bacterial cyclic AMP receptor proteins (CRP) are transcription factors that respond to cAMP by binding at target promoters when cAMP concentrations increase. Rv3676 (CRPMt) is a CRP family protein that regulates expression of genes (rpfA and whiB1) that are potentially involved in M. tuberculosis persistence and/or emergence from the dormant state. Here, the CRPMt homodimer is shown to bind two molecules of cAMP (one per protomer) at noninteracting sites. Furthermore, cAMP binding by CRPMt was relatively weak, entropy driven, and resulted in a relatively small enhancement in DNA binding. Tandem CRPMt-binding sites (CRP1 at −58.5 and CRP2 at −37.5) were identified at the whiB1 promoter (PwhiB1). In vitro transcription reactions showed that CRP1 is an activating site and that CRP2, which was only occupied in the presence of cAMP or at high CRPMt concentrations in the absence of cAMP, is a repressing site. Binding of CRPMt to CRP1 was not essential for open complex formation but was required for transcription activation. Thus, these data suggest that binding of CRPMt to the PwhiB1 CRP1 site activates transcription at a step after open complex formation. In contrast, high cAMP concentrations allowed occupation of both CRP1 and CRP2 sites, resulting in inhibition of open complex formation. Thus, M. tuberculosis CRP has evolved several distinct characteristics, compared with the Escherichia coli CRP paradigm, to allow it to regulate gene expression against a background of high concentrations of cAMP. PMID:20028978

  11. Dynamic Effects of Topoisomerase I Inhibition on R-Loops and Short Transcripts at Active Promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Marinello

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase I-DNA-cleavage complexes (Top1cc stabilized by camptothecin (CPT have specific effects at transcriptional levels. We recently reported that Top1cc increase antisense transcript (aRNAs levels at divergent CpG-island promoters and, transiently, DNA/RNA hybrids (R-loop in nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of colon cancer HCT116 cells. However, the relationship between R-loops and aRNAs was not established. Here, we show that aRNAs can form R-loops in N-TERA-2 cells under physiological conditions, and that promoter-associated R-loops are somewhat increased and extended in length immediately upon cell exposure to CPT. In contrast, persistent Top1ccs reduce the majority of R-loops suggesting that CPT-accumulated aRNAs are not commonly involved in R-loops. The enhancement of aRNAs by Top1ccs is present both in human colon cancer HCT116 cells and WI38 fibroblasts suggesting a common response of cancer and normal cells. Although Top1ccs lead to DSB and DDR kinases activation, we do not detect a dependence of aRNA accumulation on ATM or DNA-PK activation. However, we showed that the cell response to persistent Top1ccs can involve an impairment of aRNA turnover rather than a higher synthesis rate. Finally, a genome-wide analysis shows that persistent Top1ccs also determine an accumulation of sense transcripts at 5'-end gene regions suggesting an increased occurrence of truncated transcripts. Taken together, the results indicate that Top1 may regulate transcription initiation by modulating RNA polymerase-generated negative supercoils, which can in turn favor R-loop formation at promoters, and that transcript accumulation at TSS is a response to persistent transcriptional stress by Top1 poisoning.

  12. Nitric oxide inhibits topoisomerase II activity and induces resistance to topoisomerase II-poisons in human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Tokar, Erik J; Mason, Ronald P; Sinha, Birandra K

    2016-07-01

    Etoposide and doxorubicin, topoisomerase II poisons, are important drugs for the treatment of tumors in the clinic. Topoisomerases contain several free sulfhydryl groups which are important for their activity and are also potential targets for nitric oxide (NO)-induced nitrosation. NO, a physiological signaling molecule nitrosates many cellular proteins, causing altered protein and cellular functions. Here, we have evaluated the roles of NO/NO-derived species in the activity/stability of topo II both in vitro and in human tumor cells, and in the cytotoxicity of topo II-poisons, etoposide and doxorubicin. Treatment of purified topo IIα with propylamine propylamine nonoate (PPNO), an NO donor, resulted in inhibition of both the catalytic and relaxation activity in vitro, and decreased etoposide-dependent cleavable complex formation in both human HT-29 colon and MCF-7 breast cancer cells. PPNO treatment also induced significant nitrosation of topo IIα protein in these human tumor cells. These events, taken together, caused a significant resistance to etoposide in both cell lines. However, PPNO had no effect on doxorubicin-induced cleavable complex formation, or doxorubicin cytotoxicity in these cell lines. Inhibition of topo II function by NO/NO-derived species induces significant resistance to etoposide, without affecting doxorubicin cytotoxicity in human tumor cells. As tumors express inducible nitric oxide synthase and generate significant amounts of NO, modulation of topo II functions by NO/NO-derived species could render tumors resistant to certain topo II-poisons in the clinic. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Dual Inhibition of Topoisomerase II and Tyrosine Kinases by the Novel Bis-Fluoroquinolone Chalcone-Like Derivative HMNE3 in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Chao Ma

    Full Text Available Both tyrosine kinase and topoisomerase II (TopII are important anticancer targets, and their respective inhibitors are widely used in cancer therapy. However, some combinations of anticancer drugs could exhibit mutually antagonistic actions and drug resistance, which further limit their therapeutic efficacy. Here, we report that HMNE3, a novel bis-fluoroquinolone chalcone-like derivative that targets both tyrosine kinase and TopII, induces tumor cell proliferation and growth inhibition. The viabilities of 6 different cancer cell lines treated with a range of HMNE3 doses were detected using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Cellular apoptosis was determined using Hoechst 33258 fluorescence staining and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL assay. The expression of activated Caspase-3 was examined by immunocytochemistry. The tyrosine kinase activity was measured with a human receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK detection kit using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP-conjugated phosphotyrosine (pY20 antibody as the substrate. The topoisomerase II activity was measured using agarose gel electrophoresis with the DNA plasmid pBR322 as the substrate. The expression levels of the P53, Bax, Bcl-2, Caspase-3, -8, -9, p-cSrc, c-Src and topoisomerase II proteins were detected by western blot analysis. The proliferation of five of the six cancer cell lines was significantly inhibited by HMNE3 at 0.312 to 10 μmol/L in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Treatment of the Capan-1 and Panc-1 cells with 1.6 to 3.2 μM HMNE3 for 48 h significantly increased the percentage of apoptotic cells (P<0.05, and this effect was accompanied by a decrease in tyrosine kinase activity. HMNE3 potentially inhibited tyrosine kinase activity in vitro with an IC50 value of 0.64±0.34 μmol/L in Capan-1 cells and 3.1±0.86 μmol/L in Panc-1 cells. The activity of c-Src was significantly inhibited by HMNE3 in a dose

  14. [Gastric tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, E; Oliveira, A; Costa, A; Sa, L; Vieira, A; Oliveira, A

    1994-12-01

    A 37 year old woman with duodenal ulcer not responsive to medical treatment was operated. Antrectomy, truncal vagotomy and Bilroth II gastrojejunostomy were performed. The histopathology revealed epithelioid cell granulomas with multinucleated cells and central ceseation, in the gastric side of the pylorus and in three isolated lymph nodes. With Ziehl-Neelsen staining there were multiple acid-fast bacilli. There was no evidence or previous history, personal or familial, or tuberculosis in an other localization. Epidemiology, pathology, diagnosis, and treatment of gastric tuberculosis are discussed according to the literature.

  15. Topoisomerase mutations and efflux are associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyamada, Yoshihiro; Ito, Hideaki; Inoue, Matsuhisa; Yamagishi, Jun-ichi

    2006-10-01

    To understand better the mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in Enterococcus faecalis, fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants isolated from Ent. faecalis ATCC 29212 by stepwise selection with sparfloxacin (SPX) and norfloxacin (NOR) were analysed. The results showed the following. (i) In general, fluoroquinolone-resistance mechanisms in Ent. faecalis are similar to those in other Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae, namely, mutants with amino acid changes in both GyrA and ParC exhibited high fluoroquinolone resistance, and single GyrA mutants and a single ParC mutant were more resistant to SPX and NOR, respectively, than the parent strain, indicating that the primary targets of SPX and NOR in Ent. faecalis are DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, respectively. (ii) Alterations in GyrB (DeltaKGA, residues 395-397) and ParE (Glu-459 to Lys) were associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in some mutants. Moreover, the facts that the NOR MIC, but not the SPX MIC, decreased in the presence of multidrug efflux pump inhibitors, that NOR accumulation decreased in the cells, and that the EmeA mRNA expression level did not change, strongly suggested that a NorA-like efflux pump, rather than EmeA, was involved in resistance to NOR.

  16. Frequent topoisomerase IV mutations associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in Ureaplasma species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jingjuan; Qiao, Yingli; Kong, Yingying; Ruan, Zhi; Huang, Jun; Song, Tiejun; Zhang, Jun; Xie, Xinyou

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of DNA gyrase (encoded by gyrA and gyrB) and topoisomerase IV (encoded by parC and parE) associated with fluoroquinolone resistance. A total of 114 Ureaplasma spp. strains, isolated from clinical female patients with symptomatic infection, were tested for species distribution and susceptibility to four fluoroquinolones. Moreover, we analysed the QRDRs and compared these with 14 ATCC reference strains of Ureaplasma spp. serovars to identify mutations that caused antimicrobial resistance. Our study indicated that moxifloxacin was the most effective fluoroquinolone against Ureaplasma spp. (MIC range: 0.125-32 μg ml⁻¹). However, extremely high MICs were estimated for ciprofloxacin (MIC range: 1-256 μg ml⁻¹) and ofloxacin (MIC range: 0.5-128 μg ml⁻¹), followed by levofloxacin (MIC range: 0.5-64 μg ml⁻¹). Seven amino acid substitutions were discovered in GyrB, ParC and ParE, but not in GyrA. Ser-83 → Leu/Trp (C248T/G) in ParC and Arg-448 → Lys (G1343A) in ParE, which were potentially responsible for fluoroquinolone resistance, were observed in 89 (77.2 %) and three (2.6 %) strains, respectively. Pro-462 → Ser (C1384T), Asn-481 → Ser (A1442G) and Ala-493 → Val (C1478T) in GyrB and Met-105 → Ile (G315T) in ParC seemed to be neutral polymorphisms, and were observed and occurred along with the amino acid change of Ser-83 → Leu (C248T) in ParC. Interestingly, two novel mutations of ParC and ParE were independently found in four strains. These observations suggest that amino acid mutation in topoisomerase IV appears to be the leading cause of fluoroquinolone resistance, especially the mutation of Ser-83 → Leu (C248T) in ParC. Moxifloxacin had the best activity against strains with Ser-83 → Leu mutation.

  17. A mouse model for studying the interaction of bisdioxopiperazines with topoisomerase IIα in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grauslund, Morten; Vinding, Annemette; Füchtbauer, Annette C.

    2007-01-01

    The bisdioxopiperazines such as (+)-(S)-4,4′-propylenedi-2,6-piperazinedione (dexrazoxane; ICRF-187), 1,2-bis(3,5-dioxopiperazin-1-yl)ethane (ICRF-154), and 4,4′-(1,2-dimethyl-1,2-ethanediyl)bis-2,6-piperazinedione (ICRF-193) are agents that inhibit eukaryotic topoisomerase II, whereas their ring......-opened hydrolysis products are strong iron chelator. The clinically approved analog ICRF-187 is a pharmacological modulator of topoisomerase II poisons such as etoposide in preclinical animal models. ICRF-187 is also used to protect against anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy and has recently been approved...... their intracellular iron chelating activity. In an attempt to distinguish between these possibilities, we here present a transgenic mouse model aimed at identifying the contribution of topoisomerase IIα to the effects of bisdioxopiperazines. A tyrosine 165 to serine mutation (Y165S) in topoisomerase IIα, demonstrated...

  18. [Comparison study on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and standard culture technique in detecting mycobacterium tuberculosis to diagnose of joint tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yong-sheng; Wen, Jian-min; Lü, Wei-xin; Lou, Si-quan; Jiao, Chang-geng; Yang, Su-min; Xu, Hai-bin; Duan, Yong-zhuang

    2009-07-01

    To study the role of PCR technique in detection of mycobacterium tuberculosis in the samples from joint tuberculosis, and to evaluate the clinical value of PCR in diagnosis of joint tuberculosis. From June 1993 to August 2001, PCR was used to detect DNA of mycobacterium tuberculosis, and the standard culture was applied to detect mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacterium tuberculosis were respectively blindly by the two techniques in the samples obtained from 95 patients with joint tuberculosis (55 males and 40 females, the age ranging from 2 to 75 years, with an average of 34 years). The positive rate of mycobacterium tuberculosis detection was calculated. In the detection of mycobacterium tuberculosis, positive rate was 82% (78/95) in PCR technique, and 16% (15/95) in standard culture technique. There were statistical differences between the two groups (chi2=67, Ptechnique is a rapid, simple, sensitive and specific method for detection of mycobacterium tuberculosis in the samples of joint tuberculosis, showing more marked advantages than the standard culture technique. It is valuable in the early rapid diagnosis and differential diagnosis of joint tuberculosis.

  19. Activities of Trovafloxacin Compared with Those of Other Fluoroquinolones against Purified Topoisomerases and gyrA and grlA Mutants of Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gootz, Thomas D.; Zaniewski, Richard P.; Haskell, Suzanne L.; Kaczmarek, Frank S.; Maurice, Alison E.

    1999-01-01

    Frequencies of mutation to resistance with trovafloxacin and four other quinolones were determined with quinolone-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus RN4220 by a direct plating method. First-step mutants were selected less frequently with trovafloxacin (1.1 × 10−10 at 2 to 4× the MIC) than with levofloxacin or ciprofloxacin (3.0 × 10−7 to 3.0 × 10−8 at 2 to 4× the MIC). Mutants with a change in GrlA (Ser80→Phe or Tyr) were most commonly selected with trovafloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, or pefloxacin. First-step mutants were difficult to select with sparfloxacin; however, second-step mutants with mutations in gyrA were easily selected when a preexisting mutation in grlA was present. Against 29 S. aureus clinical isolates with known mutations in gyrA and/or grlA, trovafloxacin was the most active quinolone tested (MIC at which 50% of isolates are inhibited [MIC50] and MIC90, 1 and 4 μg/ml, respectively); in comparison, MIC50s and MIC90s were 32 and 128, 16 and 32, 8 and 32, and 128 and 256 μg/ml for ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, levofloxacin, and pefloxacin, respectively. Strains with a mutation in grlA only were generally susceptible to all of the quinolones tested. For mutants with changes in both grlA and gyrA MICs were higher and were generally above the susceptibility breakpoint for ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, levofloxacin, and pefloxacin. Addition of reserpine (20 μg/ml) lowered the MICs only of ciprofloxacin fourfold or more for 18 of 29 clinical strains. Topoisomerase IV and DNA gyrase genes were cloned from S. aureus RN4220 and from two mutants with changes in GrlA (Ser80→Phe and Glu84→Lys). The enzymes were overexpressed in Escherichia coli GI724, purified, and used in DNA catalytic and cleavage assays that measured the relative potency of each quinolone. Trovafloxacin was at least five times more potent than ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, levofloxacin, or pefloxacin in stimulating topoisomerase IV-mediated DNA cleavage. While all of

  20. Type II Topoisomerase Mutations in Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Clinical Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated in 1998 and 1999: Role of Target Enzyme in Mechanism of Fluoroquinolone Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Mayumi; Yamaguchi, Akihito; Sato, Kenichi

    2001-01-01

    The major mechanism of resistance to fluoroquinolones for Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the modification of type II topoisomerases (DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV). We examined the mutations in quinolone-resistance-determining regions (QRDR) of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes of recent clinical isolates. There were 150 isolates with reduced susceptibilities to levofloxacin and 127 with reduced susceptibilities to ciprofloxacin among 513 isolates collected during 1998 and 1999 in Japan. Sequencing results predicted replacement of an amino acid in the QRDR of DNA gyrase (GyrA or GyrB) for 124 of the 150 strains (82.7%); among these, 89 isolates possessed mutations in parC or parE which lead to amino acid changes. Substitutions of both Ile for Thr-83 in GyrA and Leu for Ser-87 in ParC were the principal changes, being detected in 48 strains. These replacements were obviously associated with reduced susceptibilities to levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and sparfloxacin; however, sitafloxacin showed high activity against isolates with these replacements. We purified GyrA (The-83 to Ile) and ParC (Ser-87 to Leu) by site-directed mutagenesis and compared the inhibitory activities of the fluoroquinolones. Sitafloxacin showed the most potent inhibitory activities against both altered topoisomerases among the fluoroquinolones tested. These results indicated that, compared with other available quinolones, sitafloxacin maintained higher activity against recent clinical isolates with multiple mutations in gyrA and parC, which can be explained by the high inhibitory activities of sitafloxacin against both mutated enzymes. PMID:11451683

  1. A rapid high-resolution method for resolving DNA topoisomers

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchenall, Lesley A.; Hipkin, Rachel E.; Piperakis, Michael M.; Burton, Nicolas P.; Maxwell, Anthony

    2018-01-01

    Objective Agarose gel electrophoresis has been the mainstay technique for the analysis of DNA samples of moderate size. In addition to separating linear DNA molecules, it can also resolve different topological forms of plasmid DNAs, an application useful for the analysis of the reactions of DNA topoisomerases. However, gel electrophoresis is an intrinsically low-throughput technique and suffers from other potential disadvantages. We describe the application of the QIAxcel Advanced System, a h...

  2. Tuberculosis perinatal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Sáenz-Gómez

    2015-01-01

    Conclusiones: La infección perinatal debe sospecharse en niños con sepsis o neumonía sin respuesta a antibióticos. En este caso, el antecedente de la madre con tuberculosis orientó al diagnóstico.

  3. Pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhl, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Dissemination of the tubercle bacillus is of three types: bronchogenic, hematogenous, and lymphangitic. Bronchogenic dissemination occurs when exudate from a cavity or small area of caseation drains into a bronchus and is aspirated into previously uninfected areas either on the same or on the opposite side. This type of spreading occurs frequently after bleeding and when there is a cavity emptying into a bronchus. Hematogenous dissemination leads to miliary tuberculosis and to extrapulmonary lesions throughout the body. Acute massive hematogenous spread causes miliary tuberculosis, while chronic spread in smaller amounts usually results in the chronic extrapulmonary foci. Lymphangitic dissemination is common in primary infection. It is responsible for involvement with subsequent enlargement of hilar and mediastinal nodes that is often seen in children and in young black adults. The reaction to M. tuberculosis depends on the presence or absence of immunity to tuberculoprotein. In individuals having no tissue hypersensitivity or immunity, primary tuberculosis results. In those with immunity produced by previous infection or BCG vaccination, the reactivation (reinfection) disease may develop

  4. Tuberculosis; Eye

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: Through an internet search and review of current literature on tuberculosis and its ocular complications, the information relevant to the objectives was obtained. ' Conclusions: TB can affect any structure in the eye and adnexae. Ocular TB is not easy to diagnose because most times there is no concurrent active ...

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Susan; Burns-Huang, Kristin E; Janssen, Guido V; Li, Huilin; Ovaa, Huib; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Darwin, K Heran

    2017-02-21

    The protein degradation machinery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis includes a proteasome and a ubiquitin-like protein (Pup). Proteasome accessory factor A (PafA) attaches Pup to proteins to target them for degradation by the proteasome. Free Pup is unstable and never observed in extracts of M. tuberculosis , an observation that led us to hypothesize that PafA may need alternative sources of Pup. Here, we show that PafA can move Pup from one proteasome substrate, inositol 1-phosphate synthetase (Ino1), to two different proteins, malonyl coenzyme A (CoA)-acyl carrier protein transacylase (FabD) and lonely guy (Log). This apparent "transpupylation" reaction required a previously unrecognized depupylase activity in PafA, and, surprisingly, this depupylase activity was much more efficient than the activity of the dedicated depupylase Dop (deamidase of Pup). Thus, PafA can potentially use both newly synthesized Pup and recycled Pup to doom proteins for degradation. IMPORTANCE Unlike eukaryotes, which contain hundreds of ubiquitin ligases, Pup-containing bacteria appear to have a single ligase to pupylate dozens if not hundreds of different proteins. The observation that PafA can depupylate and transpupylate in vitro offers new insight into how protein stability is regulated in proteasome-bearing bacteria. Importantly, PafA and the dedicated depupylase Dop are each required for the full virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Thus, inhibition of both enzymes may be extremely attractive for the development of therapeutics against tuberculosis. Copyright © 2017 Zhang et al.

  6. Metal ions and inter-domains interactions as functional networks in E. coli Topoisomerase I

    OpenAIRE

    Sissi, Claudia; Cheng, Bokun; Lombardo, Valentina; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; Palumbo, Manlio

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli Topoisomerase I (EcTopoI) is a type IA bacterial topoisomerase which is receiving large attention due to its potential application as novel target for antibacterial therapeutics. Nevertheless, a detailed knowledge of its mechanism of action at molecular level is to some extent lacking. This is partly due to the requirement of several factors (metal ions, nucleic acid) to the proper progress of the enzyme catalytic cycle. Additionally, each of them can differently affect the p...

  7. Tuberculosis: General Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    TB Elimination Tuberculosis: General Information What is TB? Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by germs that are spread from person ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination CS227840_A What Does a Positive Test ...

  8. Global Tuberculosis Report 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alt+0 Navigation Alt+1 Content Alt+2 Tuberculosis (TB) Menu Tuberculosis The End TB Strategy Areas ... data News, events and features About us Global tuberculosis report 2017 WHO has published a global TB ...

  9. Expression of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ku and Ligase D in Escherichia coli results in RecA and RecB-independent DNA end-joining at regions of microhomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyarchuk, Svitlana; Wright, Douglas; Castore, Reneau; Klepper, Emily; Weiss, Bernard; Doherty, Aidan J; Harrison, Lynn

    2007-10-01

    Unlike Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mt) expresses a Ku-like protein and an ATP-dependent DNA ligase that can perform non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). We have expressed the Mt-Ku and Mt-Ligase D in E. coli using an arabinose-inducible promoter and expression vectors that integrate into specific sites in the E. coli chromosome. E. coli strains have been generated that express the Mt-Ku and Mt-Ligase D on a genetic background that is wild-type for repair, or deficient in either the RecA or RecB protein. Transformation of these strains with linearized plasmid DNA containing a 2bp overhang has demonstrated that expression of both the Mt-Ku and Mt-Ligase D is required for DNA end-joining and that loss of RecA does not prevent this double-strand break repair. Analysis of the re-joined plasmid has shown that repair is predominantly inaccurate and results in the deletion of sequences. Loss of RecB did not prevent the formation of large deletions, but did increase the amount of end-joining. Sequencing the junctions has revealed that the majority of the ligations occurred at regions of microhomology (1-4bps), eliminating one copy of the homologous sequence at the junction. The Mt-Ku and Mt-Ligase D can therefore function in E. coli to re-circularize linear plasmid.

  10. Unique features of the structure and interactions of mycobacterial uracil-DNA glycosylase: structure of a complex of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enzyme in comparison with those from other sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Prem Singh; Talawar, Ramappa K; Krishna, P D V; Varshney, Umesh; Vijayan, M

    2008-05-01

    Uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG), a repair enzyme involved in the excision of uracil from DNA, from mycobacteria differs from UNGs from other sources, particularly in the sequence in the catalytically important loops. The structure of the enzyme from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtUng) in complex with a proteinaceous inhibitor (Ugi) has been determined by X-ray analysis of a crystal containing seven crystallographically independent copies of the complex. This structure provides the first geometric characterization of a mycobacterial UNG. A comparison of the structure with those of other UNG proteins of known structure shows that a central core region of the molecule is relatively invariant in structure and sequence, while the N- and C-terminal tails exhibit high variability. The tails are probably important in folding and stability. The mycobacterial enzyme exhibits differences in UNG-Ugi interactions compared with those involving UNG from other sources. The MtUng-DNA complex modelled on the basis of the known structure of the complex involving the human enzyme indicates a domain closure in the enzyme when binding to DNA. The binding involves a larger burial of surface area than is observed in binding by human UNG. The DNA-binding site of MtUng is characterized by the presence of a higher proportion of arginyl residues than is found in the binding site of any other UNG of known structure. In addition to the electrostatic effects produced by the arginyl residues, the hydrogen bonds in which they are involved compensate for the loss of some interactions arising from changes in amino-acid residues, particularly in the catalytic loops. The results arising from the present investigation represent unique features of the structure and interaction of mycobacterial Ungs.

  11. Synthesis and Topoisomerase I inhibitory properties of klavuzon derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçok, İsmail; Mete, Derya; Şen, Ayhan; Kasaplar, Pınar; Korkmaz, Kemal S; Çağır, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Klavuzon is a naphthalen-1-yl substituted α,β-unsaturated δ-lactone derivative, and is one of the anti-proliferative members of this class of compounds. Asymmetric and racemic syntheses of novel α,β-unsaturated δ-lactone derivatives are important to investigate their potential for the treatment of cancer. In this study, asymmetric and racemic syntheses of heteroatom-substituted klavuzon derivatives are reported. The syntheses were completed by a well-known three-step procedure. Anti-proliferative activity of seven novel racemic klavuzon derivatives were reported against MCF-7, PC3, HCT116 p53+/+ and HCT116 p53-/- cancer cell lines. Topoisomerase I inhibitory properties of 5,6-dihydro-2H-pyran-2-one derivatives were also studied. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Exogenous re-infection as a cause of recurrent tuberculosis in a low-incidence area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, A. S.; Borgdorff, M. W.; Vynnycky, E.; Sebek, M. M.; van Soolingen, D.

    2003-01-01

    SETTING: Surveillance data from the National Tuberculosis Register for the period 1993-1997 complemented with DNA fingerprinting results of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the proportion of disease attributable to recent re-infection among Dutch tuberculosis patients with

  13. The Role of the MAPK Signaling, Topoisomerase and Dietary Bioactives in Controlling Cancer Incidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled A. Selim

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are common products of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, xenobiotics metabolism and are generated in response to several environmental stress conditions. Some of them play important biochemical roles in cellular signal transduction and gene transcription. On the other hand, ROS are known to be involved in a wide range of human diseases, including cancer. The excessive production of such ROS together with disruption of homeostasis detoxifying mechanisms can mediate a series of cellular oxidative stresses. The oxidative stress of redundant free radicals production can lead to oxidative denaturation of cellular macromolecules including proteins, lipids and DNA. Moreover, oxidative damage is one of the major causes of DNA mutations, replication errors and genomic abnormalities which result in either inhibition or induction of transcription, and end with the disturbance of signal transduction pathways. Among affected signaling pathways are redox-sensitive kinases. The stimulation of these kinases induces several transcription factors through the phosphorylation of their module proteins. The activation of such pathways induces proliferation and cellular transformation. A diet rich in antioxidant compounds has potential health benefits, and there is a growing interest in the role of natural antioxidants in nutrition for prevention and cure of cancer diseases. A controversy has risen regarding the relation between antioxidants and the significant decrease in the risk of cancer incidence. In this review, we will focus on redox-sensitive kinases signaling pathways, highlighting the effects of dietary antioxidant on the prevention, incidence, prognosis or even treatment of human cancers. In addition, we will place emphasis on the chemical classes of pterocarpans as natural anti-oxidants/cancers as well as their underlying mechanisms of action, including their effects on MAPKs and topoisomerase activities.

  14. Evaluation of the topoisomerase II-inactive bisdioxopiperazine ICRF-161 as a protectant against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, E.; Thougaard, A.V.; Grauslund, M.

    2009-01-01

    of topoisomerase II, resulting in the risk of additional myelosuppression in patients receiving ICRF-187 as a cardioprotectant in combination with doxorubicin. The development of a topoisomerase II-inactive iron chelating compound thus appeared attractive. In the present paper we evaluate the topoisomerase II......-inactive 3 carbon linker bisdioxopiperazine analog ICRF-161 as a cardioprotectant. We demonstrate that this compound does chelate iron and protects against doxorubicin-induced LDH release from primary rat cardiomyocytes in vitro, similarly to ICRF-187. The compound does not target topoisomerase II in vitro...... chelation alone does not appear to be sufficient for protection against anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy Udgivelsesdato: 2009/1/8...

  15. Topological Linkage of DNA Tiles Bonded by Paranemic Cohesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohayon, Yoel P; Sha, Ruojie; Flint, Ortho; Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard; Abdallah, Hatem O; Wang, Tong; Wang, Xing; Zhang, Xiaoping; Seeman, Nadrian C

    2015-10-27

    Catenation is the process by which cyclic strands are combined like the links of a chain, whereas knotting changes the linking properties of a single strand. In the cell, topoisomerases catalyzing strand passage operations enable the knotting and catenation of DNA so that single- or double-stranded segments can be passed through each other. Here, we use a system of closed DNA structures involving a paranemic motif, called PX-DNA, to bind double strands of DNA together. These PX-cohesive closed molecules contain complementary loops whose linking by Escherichia coli topoisomerase 1 (Topo 1) leads to various types of catenated and knotted structures. We were able to obtain specific DNA topological constructs by varying the lengths of the complementary tracts between the complementary loops. The formation of the structures was analyzed by denaturing gel electrophoresis, and the various topologies of the constructs were characterized using the program Knotilus.

  16. The association between the p53/topoisomerase I and p53/ topoisomerase IIalpha immunophenotypes and the progression of ovarian carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Julia K; Grelewski, Piotr; Noga, Leszek; Rabczyński, Jerzy; Gryboś, Marian; Jeleń, Michał

    2012-01-01

    In in vitro studies it has been revealed that p53 protein expression might regulate topoisomerase I (topo I) and topoisomerase IIalpha (topo IIalpha) levels in tumor cells. So far, the association between the p53 protein and topo I and topo IIalpha expression and its impact on ovarian carcinoma progression has not been analyzed. The aim of the study was to examine the association between topo I and topo IIalpha expression and p53 protein overexpression with respect to the morphological features and progressive growth of ovarian tumors. The expression of the studied biomarkers was estimated by immunohistochemical staining in tumor sections from 136 malignant and 30 benign ovarian neoplasms. Significant differences for topo I, topo IIalpha and p53 expression between malignant and benign tumors were observed (p p53 protein was associated with advanced stages of ovarian carcinomas (p ovarian carcinomas, positive correlations between topo I and topo IIalpha, topo I and p53 and topo Ilalpha and p53 protein expression were revealed (p = 0.001). No relationship between the studied biomarkers was found in benign ovarian tumors (p > 0.05). p53/topo I and p53/topo IIalpha immunophenotypes were associated with advanced stages of ovarian carcinoma (p = 0.045 and p = 0.009, respectively), p53/topo IIalpha positive ovarian carcinomas were more frequently observed in high than in low tumor grades and the differences were only of borderline significance (p = 0.07). Current findings suggest that on the one hand, cooperation between topo I, topo IIalpha and p53 protein participates in the progressive growth of ovarian tumors. On the other hand, simultaneous expression of the studied proteins identifies the subgroup of ovarian cancers with aggressive biological features which might be considered in therapy.

  17. Topoisomerase mutations that are associated with high-level resistance to earlier fluoroquinolones in Staphylococcus aureus have less effect on the antibacterial activity of besifloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Christine M; Hesje, Christine K; Haas, Wolfgang; Morris, Timothy W

    2011-01-01

    The impact of mutations in DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV on minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) was investigated to better understand why besifloxacin has a higher potency against Staphylococcus aureus when compared to other fluoroquinolones, which was especially pronounced against ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates. MICs were determined for 52 clinical isolates against besifloxacin, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and levofloxacin. The genes encoding GyrA, GyrB, ParC, and ParE were sequenced and the potential impact of mutations assessed in light of recent structural data. For all fluoroquinolones tested, the MICs increased with the number of mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions. However, this increase was the smallest for besifloxacin and the largest for ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin. In addition to the commonly observed mutations in ParC and GyrA, more unusual mutations in ParE, such as Asp-432→His or Pro-585→Ser, were also detected. Compared to earlier fluoroquinolones, the higher potency of besifloxacin suggests that the drug's unique combination of a 7-azepinyl ring and an 8-chloro-substituent results in unique interactions with DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Tuberculosis ocular

    OpenAIRE

    Infante Barrera, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    La evolución etiológica de la medicina la podemos dividir en dos grandes períodos: período de la sífilis y período de la tuberculosis. El período de la sífilis, gracias a las armas de combate de que hoy disponemos, ocupa un lugar secundario. El período de la tuberculosis y que no es sino el paralelo de la vida moderna, ocupa en vigencia el primer lugar. Es el período presente. Hasta hace poco tiempo el médico en general, iniciaba la exploración de su paciente con un interrogatorio, una inspec...

  19. Nitric oxide inhibits ATPase activity and induces resistance to topoisomerase II-poisons in human MCF-7 breast tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Birandra K; Kumar, Ashutosh; Mason, Ronald P

    2017-07-01

    Topoisomerase poisons are important drugs for the management of human malignancies. Nitric oxide ( • NO), a physiological signaling molecule, induces nitrosylation (or nitrosation) of many cellular proteins containing cysteine thiol groups, altering their cellular functions. Topoisomerases contain several thiol groups which are important for their activity and are also targets for nitrosation by nitric oxide. Here, we have evaluated the roles of • NO/ • NO-derived species in the stability and activity of topo II (α and β) both in vitro and in human MCF-7 breast tumor cells. Furthermore, we have examined the effects of • NO on the ATPase activity of topo II. Treatment of purified topo IIα and β with propylamine propylamine nonoate (PPNO), an NO donor, resulted in inhibition of the catalytic activity of topo II. Furthermore, PPNO significantly inhibited topo II-dependent ATP hydrolysis. • NO-induced inhibition of these topo II (α and β) functions resulted in a decrease in cleavable complex formation in MCF-7 cells in the presence of m-AMSA and XK469 and induced significant resistance to both drugs in MCF-7 cells. PPNO treatment resulted in the nitrosation of the topo II protein in MCF-7 cancer cells and inhibited both catalytic-, and ATPase activities of topo II. Furthermore, PPNO significantly affected the DNA damage and cytotoxicity of m-AMSA and XK469 in MCF-7 tumor cells. As tumors express nitric oxide synthase and generate • NO, inhibition of topo II functions by • NO/ • NO-derived species could render tumors resistant to certain topo II-poisons in the clinic.

  20. Detection of the Malaria causing Plasmodium Parasite in Saliva from Infected Patients using Topoisomerase I Activity as a Biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hede, Marianne Smedegaard; Fjelstrup, Søren; Lötsch, Felix; Zoleko, Rella Manego; Klicpera, Anna; Groger, Mirjam; Mischlinger, Johannes; Endame, Lilian; Veletzky, Luzia; Neher, Ronja; Simonsen, Anne Katrine Wrist; Petersen, Eskild; Mombo-Ngoma, Ghyslain; Stougaard, Magnus; Ho, Yi-Ping; Labouriau, Rodrigo; Ramharter, Michael; Knudsen, Birgitta Ruth

    2018-03-07

    Malaria is among the major threats to global health with the main burden of disease being in rural areas of developing countries where accurate diagnosis based on non-invasive samples is in high demand. We here present a novel molecular assay for detection of malaria parasites based on technology that may be adapted for low-resource settings. Moreover, we demonstrate the exploitation of this assay for detection of malaria in saliva. The setup relies on pump-free microfluidics enabled extraction combined with a DNA sensor substrate that is converted to a single-stranded DNA circle specifically by topoisomerase I expressed by the malaria causing Plasmodium parasite. Subsequent rolling circle amplification of the generated DNA circle in the presence of biotin conjugated deoxynucleotides resulted in long tandem repeat products that was visualized colorimetrically upon binding of horse radish peroxidase (HRP) and addition of 3,3',5,5'-Tetramethylbenzidine that was converted to a blue colored product by HRP. The assay was directly quantitative, specific for Plasmodium parasites, and allowed detection of Plasmodium infection in a single drop of saliva from 35 out of 35 infected individuals tested. The results could be determined directly by the naked eye and documented by quantifying the color intensity using a standard paper scanner.

  1. Hypoxia-Targeted Drug Q6 Induces G2-M Arrest and Apoptosis via Poisoning Topoisomerase II under Hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Chang

    Full Text Available In spite of the tremendous efforts dedicated to developing hypoxia-activated prodrugs, no agents yet have been approved for clinical therapy. In the present study, the hypoxic selective anti-cancer activity as well as the cellular target of a novel tirapazamine (TPZ analogue, 7-methyl-3-(3-chlorophenyl-quinoxaline-2-carbonitrile 1,4-dioxide (Q6 were investigated. Q6 implemented anti-cancer effects via poisoning topoisomerase II (topo II under hypoxia. Modified trapped in agarose DNA immunostaining (TARDIS assay showed more topo II-DNA cleavage complexes trapped by Q6 than TPZ at even lower concentration. In addition, by introducing ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM kinase inhibitors caffeine and KU-60019, we displayed that Q6-triggered apoptosis was attributed, at least partially, to DNA double-strand breaks generated by the topo II-targeting effect. Collectively, Q6 stood out for its better hypoxia-selectivity and topo II-poisoning than the parental compound TPZ. All these data shed light on the research of Q6 as a promising hypoxia-activated prodrug candidate for human hepatocellular carcinoma therapy.

  2. Tuberculosis ocular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Infante Barrera

    1950-01-01

    Full Text Available La evolución etiológica de la medicina la podemos dividir en dos grandes períodos: período de la sífilis y período de la tuberculosis. El período de la sífilis, gracias a las armas de combate de que hoy disponemos, ocupa un lugar secundario. El período de la tuberculosis y que no es sino el paralelo de la vida moderna, ocupa en vigencia el primer lugar. Es el período presente. Hasta hace poco tiempo el médico en general, iniciaba la exploración de su paciente con un interrogatorio, una inspección, un tacto y una serología con una obsesión sifilítica. En la época actual el médico y en especial el oftalmólogo debe tener una obsesión tuberculosa en la investigación etiológica. Cuántas veces en una afección ocular que de una manera lenta pero progresiva produce profundas alteraciones oculares, lleva el sello soterrado de una tuberculosis? Cuántos enfermos de una constitución en apariencia envidiable hacen precisamente por un exceso de sus defensas una alergia tuberculosa? Tan traicionera como la sífilis es la tuberculosis. La sífilis quema sus etapas y estalla con una hemorragia cerebral, una locura, una parálisis general, una ataxia locomotriz progresiva, una goma o una meningitis sifilítica. La tuberculosis hace su presentación con una afección ocular, una goma, una granulia, una artritis, una osteítis, o una meningitis óptico-quiasmática. Siendo esto así, es necesario, en la mayoría de las afecciones oculares, tratar de identificarla por los medios de diagnóstico de que hoy disponemos.

  3. Topoisomerase I function during Escherichia coli response to antibiotics and stress enhances cell killing from stabilization of its cleavage complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, I-Fen; Sutherland, Jeanette H.; Cheng, Bokun; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To explore the role of topoisomerase I in gene activation and increased RecA levels during the bacterial SOS response, as well as the effect of antibiotic treatment and stress challenge on cell killing initiated by trapped topoisomerase I cleavage complex. Methods A mutant Escherichia coli strain with a ΔtopA mutation was used to investigate the role of topoisomerase I function in the SOS response to trimethoprim and mitomycin C. Induction of the recA and dinD1 promoters was measured using luciferase reporters of these promoters fused to luxCDABE. An increase in the RecA level following trimethoprim treatment was quantified directly by western blotting. The effect of stress challenge from trimethoprim and acidified nitrite treatments on cell killing by topoisomerase I cleavage complex accumulation was measured by the decrease in viability following induction of recombinant mutant topoisomerase I that forms a stabilized cleavage complex. Results Topoisomerase I function was found to be required for efficient transcriptional activation of the recA and dinD1 promoters during the E. coli SOS response to trimethoprim and mitomycin C. The role of topoisomerase I in the SOS response was confirmed with quantitative western blot analysis of RecA following trimethoprim treatment. The bactericidal effect from topoisomerase I cleavage complex accumulation was shown to be enhanced by stress challenge from trimethoprim and acidified nitrite. Conclusions Bacterial topoisomerase I function is actively involved in the SOS response to antibiotics and stress challenge. Cell killing initiated by the topoisomerase I cleavage complex would be enhanced by antibiotics and the host response. These findings provide further support for bacterial topoisomerase I as a therapeutic target. PMID:21486853

  4. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in cerebrospinal fluid following immunomagnetic enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, G H; Reddy, V; Murphy, D; Ansari, T

    1996-01-01

    The detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by culture of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is unacceptably slow. Low numbers of organisms and the presence of reaction inhibitors may prevent detection of M. tuberculosis by PCR. We used immunomagnetic enrichment to accelerate and enhance the detection of mycobacteria in CSF after demonstrating the utility of the method with pure suspensions. Growth was detected earlier in Bactec cultures of magnetically recovered mycobacteria than in untreated CSF (7 versus 15 days). We detected M. tuberculosis DNA by PCR in the immunomagnetically enriched sample but not in untreated CSF. PCR fingerprintings of the immunomagnetically recovered M. tuberculosis and of the isolate subsequently recovered by culture were identical. PMID:8789037

  5. Asp to Asn substitution at the first position of the DxD TOPRIM motif of recombinant bacterial topoisomerase I is extremely lethal to E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bokun; Annamalai, Thirunavakkarasu; Sorokin, Elena; Abrenica, Maria; Aedo, Sandra; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The TOPRIM domain found in many nucleotidyl transferases contains a DxD motif involved in magnesium ion coordination for catalysis. Medium to high copy number plasmid clones of Yersinia pestis topoisomerase I (YpTOP) with Asp to Asn substitution at the first aspartate residue (D117N) of this motif could not be generated in Escherichia coli without second site mutation even when expression was under the control of the tightly regulated BAD promoter and suppressed by 2% glucose in the medium. Arabinose induction of a single copy YpTOP-D117N mutant gene integrated into the chromosome resulted in ~105 fold of cell killing in 2.5 h. Attempt to induce expression of the corresponding E. coli topoisomerase I mutant (EcTOP-D111N) encoded on a high copy number plasmid resulted in either loss of viability or reversion of the clone to wild-type. High copy plasmid clones of YpTOP-D119N and EcTOP-D113N with the Asn substitution at the second Asp of the TOPRIM motif could be stably maintained, but overexpression also decreased cell viability significantly. The Asp to Asn substitutions at these TOPRIM residues can selectively decrease Mg2+ binding affinity with minimal disruption of the active site geometry, leading to trapping of the covalent complex with cleaved DNA and causing bacterial cell death. The extreme sensitivity of the first TOPRIM position suggested that this might be a useful site for binding of small molecules that could act as topoisomerase poisons. PMID:19013470

  6. Emergence of a new mutation and its accumulation in the topoisomerase IV gene confers high levels of resistance to fluoroquinolones in Escherichia coli isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Dong Chan; Seol, Sung Yong; Gurung, Mamata; Jin, Jong Sook; Choi, Chul Hee; Kim, Jungmin; Lee, Yoo Chul; Cho, Dong Taek; Lee, Je Chul

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes are the main mechanisms of resistance to quinolones. In this study, we determined mutations in gyrA, gyrB, parC and parE among 57 ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from a South Korean hospital and analysed the relationship between the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of fluoroquinolones and mutations in the topoisomerase IV gene. All ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli isolates carried double mutations in gyrA and at least a single mutation in parC; some isolates also carried a single mutation in parE. The most common mutations were S83L and D87N in gyrA, S80I in parC and S458A in parE, which accounted for 25% of isolates. Single mutations in parE at L445I, S458P and S458W were identified for the first time. Double mutations in parC and a combination of single mutations in parC and parE significantly increased the MIC values of fluoroquinolones. In vitro induction of resistance to ciprofloxacin showed that double mutations in gyrA were a prerequisite to conferring a resistant phenotype to fluoroquinolones, and an additional mutation in the topoisomerase IV gene increased the MIC values of ciprofloxacin. In conclusion, emergence of a new mutation in parC and parE and its accumulation induces high levels of resistance to fluoroquinolones in E. coli.

  7. Structural determinants of the catalytic inhibition of human topoisomerase IIα by salicylate analogs and salicylate-based drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bau, Jason T; Kurz, Ebba U

    2014-06-15

    We previously identified salicylate as a novel catalytic inhibitor of human DNA topoisomerase II (topo II; EC 5.99.1.3) that preferentially targets the alpha isoform by interfering with topo II-mediated DNA cleavage. Many pharmaceuticals and compounds found in foods are salicylate-based. We have now investigated whether these are also catalytic inhibitors of topo II and the structural determinants modulating these effects. We have determined that a number of hydroxylated benzoic acids attenuate doxorubicin-induced DNA damage signaling mediated by the ATM protein kinase and inhibit topo II decatenation activity in vitro with varying potencies. Based on the chemical structures of these and other derivatives, we identified unique properties influencing topo II inhibition, including the importance of substitutions at the 2'- and 5'-positions. We extended our findings to a number of salicylate-based pharmaceuticals including sulfasalazine and diflunisal and found that both were effective at attenuating doxorubicin-induced DNA damage signaling, topo II DNA decatenation and they blocked stabilization of doxorubicin-induced topo II cleavable complexes in cells. In a manner similar to salicylate, we determined that these agents inhibit topo II-mediated DNA cleavage. This was accompanied by a concomitant decrease in topo II-mediated ATP-hydrolysis. Taken together, these findings reveal a novel function for the broader class of salicylate-related compounds and highlight the need for additional studies into whether they may impact the efficacy of chemotherapy regimens that include topo II poisons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Thiophene antibacterials that allosterically stabilize DNA-cleavage complexes with DNA gyrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Pan F; Germe, Thomas; Bax, Benjamin D; Huang, Jianzhong; Thalji, Reema K; Bacqué, Eric; Checchia, Anna; Chen, Dongzhao; Cui, Haifeng; Ding, Xiao; Ingraham, Karen; McCloskey, Lynn; Raha, Kaushik; Srikannathasan, Velupillai; Maxwell, Anthony; Stavenger, Robert A

    2017-05-30

    A paucity of novel acting antibacterials is in development to treat the rising threat of antimicrobial resistance, particularly in Gram-negative hospital pathogens, which has led to renewed efforts in antibiotic drug discovery. Fluoroquinolones are broad-spectrum antibacterials that target DNA gyrase by stabilizing DNA-cleavage complexes, but their clinical utility has been compromised by resistance. We have identified a class of antibacterial thiophenes that target DNA gyrase with a unique mechanism of action and have activity against a range of bacterial pathogens, including strains resistant to fluoroquinolones. Although fluoroquinolones stabilize double-stranded DNA breaks, the antibacterial thiophenes stabilize gyrase-mediated DNA-cleavage complexes in either one DNA strand or both DNA strands. X-ray crystallography of DNA gyrase-DNA complexes shows the compounds binding to a protein pocket between the winged helix domain and topoisomerase-primase domain, remote from the DNA. Mutations of conserved residues around this pocket affect activity of the thiophene inhibitors, consistent with allosteric inhibition of DNA gyrase. This druggable pocket provides potentially complementary opportunities for targeting bacterial topoisomerases for antibiotic development.

  9. Imaging in Tuberculosis abdominal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, Tatiana; Garcia, Vanessa; Tamara, Estrada; Acosta, Federico

    2010-01-01

    In this article we illustrate and discuss imaging features resulting from Tuberculosis abdominal affectation. We present patients evaluated with several imaging modalities who had abdominal symptoms and findings suggestive of granulomatous disease. Diagnosis was confirm including hystopatology and clinical outgoing. Cases involved presented many affected organs such as lymphatic system, peritoneum, liver, spleen, pancreas, kidneys, ureters, adrenal glands and pelvic organs Tuberculosis, Tuberculosis renal, Tuberculosis hepatic, Tuberculosis splenic Tomography, x-ray, computed

  10. Natural variation in a single amino acid substitution underlies physiological responses to topoisomerase II poisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdraljevic, Stefan; Strand, Christine; Seidel, Hannah S; Cook, Daniel E; Doench, John G; Andersen, Erik C

    2017-07-01

    Many chemotherapeutic drugs are differentially effective from one patient to the next. Understanding the causes of this variability is a critical step towards the development of personalized treatments and improvements to existing medications. Here, we investigate sensitivity to a group of anti-neoplastic drugs that target topoisomerase II using the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that wild strains of C. elegans vary in their sensitivity to these drugs, and we use an unbiased genetic approach to demonstrate that this natural variation is explained by a methionine-to-glutamine substitution in topoisomerase II (TOP-2). The presence of a non-polar methionine at this residue increases hydrophobic interactions between TOP-2 and its poison etoposide, as compared to a polar glutamine. We hypothesize that this stabilizing interaction results in increased genomic instability in strains that contain a methionine residue. The residue affected by this substitution is conserved from yeast to humans and is one of the few differences between the two human topoisomerase II isoforms (methionine in hTOPIIα and glutamine in hTOPIIβ). We go on to show that this amino acid difference between the two human topoisomerase isoforms influences cytotoxicity of topoisomerase II poisons in human cell lines. These results explain why hTOPIIα and hTOPIIβ are differentially affected by various poisons and demonstrate the utility of C. elegans in understanding the genetics of drug responses.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namugenyi, Sarah B; Aagesen, Alisha M; Elliott, Sarah R; Tischler, Anna D

    2017-07-11

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphate-specific transport (Pst) system controls gene expression in response to phosphate availability by inhibiting the activation of the SenX3-RegX3 two-component system under phosphate-rich conditions, but the mechanism of communication between these systems is unknown. In Escherichia coli , inhibition of the two-component system PhoR-PhoB under phosphate-rich conditions requires both the Pst system and PhoU, a putative adaptor protein. E. coli PhoU is also involved in the formation of persisters, a subpopulation of phenotypically antibiotic-tolerant bacteria. M. tuberculosis encodes two PhoU orthologs, PhoY1 and PhoY2. We generated phoY single- and double-deletion mutants and examined the expression of RegX3-regulated genes by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). Gene expression was increased only in the Δ phoY1 Δ phoY2 double mutant and could be restored to the wild-type level by complementation with either phoY1 or phoY2 or by deletion of regX3 These data suggest that the PhoY proteins function redundantly to inhibit SenX3-RegX3 activation. We analyzed the frequencies of antibiotic-tolerant persister variants in the phoY mutants using several antibiotic combinations. Persister frequency was decreased at least 40-fold in the Δ phoY1 Δ phoY2 mutant compared to the frequency in the wild type, and this phenotype was RegX3 dependent. A Δ pstA1 mutant lacking a Pst system transmembrane component exhibited a similar RegX3-dependent decrease in persister frequency. In aerosol-infected mice, the Δ phoY1 Δ phoY2 and Δ pstA1 mutants were more susceptible to treatment with rifampin but not isoniazid. Our data demonstrate that disrupting phosphate sensing mediated by the PhoY proteins and the Pst system enhances the susceptibility of M. tuberculosis to antibiotics both in vitro and during infection. IMPORTANCE Persister variants, subpopulations of bacteria that are phenotypically antibiotic tolerant, contribute to

  12. Duodenal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatti, M.; Hussain, M.; Kumar, D.; Samo, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    Duodenal tuberculosis is an uncommon disease. It may be either extrinsic or intrinsic or both. In the extrinsic type there can either be primary duodenal involvement or compression due to enlarged para duodenal lymph nodes. The clinical presentation can be dyspeptic or obstructive symptoms. The dyspeptic symptoms include epigastric pain, nausea, and occasional vomiting and obstructive symptoms include bilious vomiting frequently after meals, epigastric pain, and generalized abdominal pain. This report describes a young lady presenting with gastric outlet obstruction symptoms due to tuberculous adhesion involving the proximal duodenum. (author)

  13. Spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn