WorldWideScience

Sample records for tuberculosis chemotherapy current

  1. Novel nanoparticles for Tuberculosis chemotherapy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Semete, B

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Current therapeutic management of tuberculosis is inadequate due to non-compliance, lengthy course of treatment and drug- related side effects. In order to address these setbacks, the authors are developing a nanotechnology drug delivery system...

  2. Targeting protein biotinylation enhances tuberculosis chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Divya; Park, Sae Woong; Essawy, Maram M; Dawadi, Surendra; Mason, Alan; Nandakumar, Madhumitha; Zimmerman, Matthew; Mina, Marizel; Ho, Hsin Pin; Engelhart, Curtis A; Ioerger, Thomas; Sacchettini, James C; Rhee, Kyu; Ehrt, Sabine; Aldrich, Courtney C; Dartois, Véronique; Schnappinger, Dirk

    2018-04-25

    Successful drug treatment for tuberculosis (TB) depends on the unique contributions of its component drugs. Drug resistance poses a threat to the efficacy of individual drugs and the regimens to which they contribute. Biologically and chemically validated targets capable of replacing individual components of current TB chemotherapy are a major unmet need in TB drug development. We demonstrate that chemical inhibition of the bacterial biotin protein ligase (BPL) with the inhibitor Bio-AMS (5'-[ N -(d-biotinoyl)sulfamoyl]amino-5'-deoxyadenosine) killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( Mtb ), the bacterial pathogen causing TB. We also show that genetic silencing of BPL eliminated the pathogen efficiently from mice during acute and chronic infection with Mtb Partial chemical inactivation of BPL increased the potency of two first-line drugs, rifampicin and ethambutol, and genetic interference with protein biotinylation accelerated clearance of Mtb from mouse lungs and spleens by rifampicin. These studies validate BPL as a potential drug target that could serve as an alternate frontline target in the development of new drugs against Mtb . Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  3. Ocular tuberculosis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakarchi FI

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Faiz I Shakarchi1,21Ibn Al-Haetham Teaching Eye Hospital, 2Department of Opthalmology, Medical College, Al-Mustansiriya University, Baghdad, IraqAbstract: The World Health Organization currently estimates that nearly two billion people, or one-third of the world’s population, are infected by tuberculosis, and that roughly 10% of the infected people are symptomatic. Tuberculosis affects the lungs in 80% of patients, while in the remaining 20% the disease may affect other organs, including the eye. Uveitis can be seen concurrently with tuberculosis, but a direct association is difficult to prove. Ocular tuberculosis is usually not associated with clinical evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis, as up to 60% of extrapulmonary tuberculosis patients may not have pulmonary disease. The diagnosis of tuberculous uveitis is often problematic and in nearly all reported cases, the diagnosis was only presumptive. Tuberculous uveitis is a great mimicker of various uveitis entities and it can be considered in the differential diagnosis of any type of intraocular inflammation. It is still unknown if ocular manifestations result from a direct mycobacterium infection or hypersensitivity reaction and this is reflected on the management of tuberculous uveitis. Prevalence of tuberculosis as an etiology of uveitis may reach up to 10% in endemic areas. Tuberculous uveitis is a vision-threatening disease that inevitably leads to blindness if not properly diagnosed and treated. The aim of this review is to illustrate the various clinical features and management of presumed tuberculous uveitis. The current review focuses on the diagnostic criteria, significance of tuberculin skin test, and use of systemic corticosteroids in the management of tuberculous uveitis as recommended in recent publications.Keywords: tuberculosis, uveitis, choroiditis, tuberculin skin test

  4. Routine surgery in addition to chemotherapy for treating spinal tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jutte, PC; Van Loenhout-Rooyackers, JH; Loenhout-Rooyackers, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is generally curable with chemotherapy, but there is controversy in the literature about the need for surgical intervention in the one to two per cent of people with tuberculosis of the spine. Objectives To compare chemotherapy plus surgery with chemotherapy alone for

  5. Plasma vitamins and essential trace elements in newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients and at different durations of anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.F. Edem

    2015-07-01

    This study concluded that there is micronutrient (Fe, Zn, Cu, Vit A, C, D and E malnutrition in tuberculosis patients at diagnosis and throughout the duration (6 months of chemotherapy. Supplementation with vitamins and zinc is advised within the first 4 months of commencing anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy.

  6. Tuberculosis control in the Americas: current approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pio, A; Western, K

    1976-01-01

    Tuberculosi remains a serious public health problem in the Americas, and it has not declined as rapidly or as much as experts projected it would in the 1940's. Scientific advances in control of the disease over the last three decades have produced effective chemotherapeutic agents, established the immunizing capacity of BCG vaccine, and demonstrated the superior value of bacteriologic diagnosis in symptomatic individuals over mass community x-ray surveys, which are both inefficient and costly. They have also shown that most cases can be treated on an ambulatory basis, obviating the need for the lengthy hospital stays which have heretofore weighed so heavily on budgets. By standardization of control methods, both for diagnosis and for chemotherapy, these tasks can be taken on by polyvalent staff in the general health services, whose wide coverage places them in a position to reach a much larger segment of the population than that attended by the traditional vertical system. To a greater or lesser degree, all the countries in the Americas are beginning to orient their strategies in this direction, and some of them already have considerable progress to report.

  7. Evaluating the impact of tuberculosis control: number of deaths prevented by short-course chemotherapy in China

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dye, C

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB) is still amongst the most important causes of human morbidity and mortality killing approximately two million people each year. Standard short-course chemotherapy (SSCC) can rapidly control illness and dramatically reduce...

  8. [Current tuberculosis mortality world-wide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haefliger, E; Rieder, H L

    1992-04-21

    The mortality rate still is an important index for assessment of tuberculosis. Statistical records are kept on the mortality rate on a worldwide basis--more than in the case of other tuberculosis parameters. They allow us to make valuable comparisons. They are also useful because the mortality is closely related to the morbidity. The present thesis is based on comparative figures from the 1989 volume of the WHO Health Statistics Annual. Various countries have been specially selected by the publisher--and subsequently also by us--for sake of clarity. The figures vary strongly within these countries, which was to be expected. The mortality rate varies in Europe (for each 100,000 residents) e.g. from 0.2 in the Netherlands to 8.15 in the Soviet Union. In the Americas the rates vary from 0.4 for Canada to 12.9 for Ecuador. In the Western Pacific region the mortality rates vary from 0.35 for Australia to 14.65 for China. On a worldwide basis, the share of deaths from tuberculosis among all causes of death varies from 0.02% in the Netherlands to 2.10% in the Republic of Korea. The relation of tuberculosis deaths with regard to sexes in Switzerland: 75.7% men, 24.3% women, which is more or less the European average. The lower the mortality rate for tuberculosis are, the lower the difference between the sexes appears to be. Similar facts are found with regard to the distribution of tuberculosis deaths according to age groups: the lower the tuberculosis rate, the more tuberculosis is found in older age groups. The tuberculosis deaths are percentage-wise similarly distributed to the respiratory organs and the other tuberculosis forms.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. A multi-antigenic MVA vaccine increases efficacy of combination chemotherapy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung-Theung-Long, Stéphane; Coupet, Charles-Antoine; Gouanvic, Marie; Schmitt, Doris; Ray, Aurélie; Hoffmann, Chantal; Schultz, Huguette; Tyagi, Sandeep; Soni, Heena; Converse, Paul J; Arias, Lilibeth; Kleinpeter, Patricia; Sansas, Benoît; Mdluli, Khisimuzi; Vilaplana, Cristina; Cardona, Pere-Joan; Nuermberger, Eric; Marchand, Jean-Baptiste; Silvestre, Nathalie; Inchauspé, Geneviève

    2018-01-01

    Despite the existence of the prophylactic Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine, infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) remains a major public health issue causing up to 1.8 million annual deaths worldwide. Increasing prevalence of Mtb strains resistant to antibiotics represents an urgent threat for global health that has prompted a search for alternative treatment regimens not subject to development of resistance. Immunotherapy constitutes a promising approach to improving current antibiotic treatments through engagement of the host's immune system. We designed a multi-antigenic and multiphasic vaccine, based on the Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA) virus, denoted MVATG18598, which expresses ten antigens classically described as representative of each of different phases of Mtb infection. In vitro analysis coupled with multiple-passage evaluation demonstrated that this vaccine is genetically stable, i.e. fit for manufacturing. Using different mouse strains, we show that MVATG18598 vaccination results in both Th1-associated T-cell responses and cytolytic activity, targeting all 10 vaccine-expressed Mtb antigens. In chronic post-exposure mouse models, MVATG18598 vaccination in combination with an antibiotic regimen decreases the bacterial burden in the lungs of infected mice, compared with chemotherapy alone, and is associated with long-lasting antigen-specific Th1-type T cell and antibody responses. In one model, co-treatment with MVATG18598 prevented relapse of the disease after treatment completion, an important clinical goal. Overall, results demonstrate the capacity of the therapeutic MVATG18598 vaccine to improve efficacy of chemotherapy against TB. These data support further development of this novel immunotherapeutic in the treatment of Mtb infections.

  10. A multi-antigenic MVA vaccine increases efficacy of combination chemotherapy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Leung-Theung-Long

    Full Text Available Despite the existence of the prophylactic Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG vaccine, infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb remains a major public health issue causing up to 1.8 million annual deaths worldwide. Increasing prevalence of Mtb strains resistant to antibiotics represents an urgent threat for global health that has prompted a search for alternative treatment regimens not subject to development of resistance. Immunotherapy constitutes a promising approach to improving current antibiotic treatments through engagement of the host's immune system. We designed a multi-antigenic and multiphasic vaccine, based on the Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA virus, denoted MVATG18598, which expresses ten antigens classically described as representative of each of different phases of Mtb infection. In vitro analysis coupled with multiple-passage evaluation demonstrated that this vaccine is genetically stable, i.e. fit for manufacturing. Using different mouse strains, we show that MVATG18598 vaccination results in both Th1-associated T-cell responses and cytolytic activity, targeting all 10 vaccine-expressed Mtb antigens. In chronic post-exposure mouse models, MVATG18598 vaccination in combination with an antibiotic regimen decreases the bacterial burden in the lungs of infected mice, compared with chemotherapy alone, and is associated with long-lasting antigen-specific Th1-type T cell and antibody responses. In one model, co-treatment with MVATG18598 prevented relapse of the disease after treatment completion, an important clinical goal. Overall, results demonstrate the capacity of the therapeutic MVATG18598 vaccine to improve efficacy of chemotherapy against TB. These data support further development of this novel immunotherapeutic in the treatment of Mtb infections.

  11. Controlled-release approaches towards the chemotherapy of tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saifullah B

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Bullo Saifullah,1 Mohd Zobir B Hussein,1,2 Samer Hasan Hussein Al Ali11Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; 2Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Institute of Advanced Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, MalaysiaAbstract: Tuberculosis (TB, caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is notorious for its lethality to humans. Despite technological advances, the tubercle bacillus continues to threaten humans. According to the World Health Organization's 2011 global report on TB, 8.8 million cases of TB were reported in 2010, with a loss of 1.7 million human lives. As drug-susceptible TB requires long-term treatment of between 6 and 9 months, patient noncompliance remains the most important reason for treatment failure. For multidrug-resistant TB, patients must take second-line anti-TB drugs for 18–24 months and many adverse effects are associated with these drugs. Drug-delivery systems (DDSs seem to be the most promising option for advancement in the treatment of TB. DDSs reduce the adverse effects of drugs and their dosing frequency as well as shorten the treatment period, and hence improve patient compliance. Further advantages of these systems are that they target the disease area, release the drugs in a sustained manner, and are biocompatible. In addition, targeted delivery systems may be useful in dealing with extensively drug-resistant TB because many side effects are associated with the drugs used to cure the disease. In this paper, we discuss the DDSs developed for the targeted and slow delivery of anti-TB drugs and their possible advantages and disadvantages.Keywords: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, drug-delivery system, targeted delivery, anti-TB drug, TB, patient compliance

  12. Is cytotoxic chemotherapy for lymphoma currently feasible for

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is currently no systematic provision for chemotherapy of adult patients with cancer .... lymphomas by experimenting on African children in. Uganda24. ..... improve treatment outcomes in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in older patients: the ...

  13. Tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ankrah, Alfred O; Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Maes, Alex; Van de Wiele, Christophe; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Vorster, Mariza; Sathekge, Mike M

    Tuberculosis (TB) is currently the world's leading cause of infectious mortality. Imaging plays an important role in the management of this disease. The complex immune response of the human body to Mycobacterium tuberculosis results in a wide array of clinical manifestations, making clinical and

  14. Short-course chemotherapy for paediatric respiratory tuberculosis: 5-year report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, S; Raghavan, A; Duraipandian, M; Kripasankar, A S; Ramachandran, P

    2005-06-01

    This report presents the 5-year follow-up of 137 children with respiratory tuberculosis enrolled in a randomised clinical trial of two different anti-tuberculosis regimens 9HR and 2HRZ3/4RH2. Both regimens had similar cure rates, with low relapse rates and mortality. Of 134 children followed up to 5 years, 86% had normal radiographs, with more sequelae in the 9HR group (15% vs. 1.5%, P < 0.01). One patient relapsed and there was one accidental death. Short-course chemotherapy in children is safe, effective and well tolerated, and leads to excellent long-term results, with a small proportion of children left with radiological sequelae.

  15. Current management options for latent tuberculosis: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norton BL

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Brianna L Norton, David P HollandDepartment of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: Tuberculosis remains the world’s second leading infectious cause of death, with nearly one-third of the global population latently infected. Treatment of latent tuberculosis infection is a mainstay of tuberculosis-control efforts in low-to medium-incidence countries. Isoniazid monotherapy has been the standard of care for decades, but its utility is impaired by poor completion rates. However, new, shorter-course regimens using rifamycins improve completion rates and are cost-saving compared with standard isoniazid monotherapy. We review the currently available therapies for latent tuberculosis infection and their toxicities and include a brief economic comparison of the different regimens.Keywords: isoniazid, rifampin, rifapentine, tuberculin skin test, interferon-gamma release assay

  16. Adjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancer: Current evidence and future challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miceli, Rosalba; Tomasello, Gianluca; Bregni, Giacomo; Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Pietrantonio, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer still represents one of the major causes of cancer mortality worldwide. Patients survival is mainly related to stage, with a high proportion of patients with metastatic disease at presentation. Thus, the cure rate largely depend upon surgical resection. Despite the additional, albeit small, benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy has been clearly demonstrated, no general consensus has been reached on the best treatment option. Moreover, the narrow therapeutic index of adjuvant chemotherapy (i.e., limited survival benefit with considerable toxicity) requires a careful assessment of expected risks and benefits for individual patients. Treatment choices vary widely based on the different geographic areas, with chemotherapy alone more often preferred in Europe or Asia and chemoradiotherapy in the United States. In the present review we discuss the current evidence and future challenges regarding adjuvant chemotherapy in curatively resected gastric cancer with particular emphasis on the recently completed landmark studies and meta-analyses. The most recent patient-level meta-analysis demonstrated the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy over curative surgery; the same Authors also showed that disease-free survival may be used as a surrogate end-point for overall survival. We finally discuss future research issues such as the need of economic evaluations, development of prognostic or predictive biomarkers, and the unmet clinical need of trials comparing perioperative chemotherapy with adjuvant treatment. PMID:24782604

  17. SPECIFIC FEATURES OF ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS CHEMOTHERAPY TOLERANCE IN THE LIGHT OF PSYCHOLOGICAL STATUS OF PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Zolotova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific features of psychological state were studied in 295 pulmonary tuberculosis patients with satisfactory tolerance to anti-tuberculosis medications and 75 patients poorly tolerating the treatment.Before the treatment start the patients who later demonstrated adverse reactions to treatment were diagnosed with more intense neurotic and hypochondriac personal features, destructive reactions and higher level of emotional tension and frustration – all the above promote dysregulation of the host adaptation. The research demonstrated the need to consider psychological aspects when studying the tolerance to anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy

  18. Efficacy of Mycobacterium indicus pranii immunotherapy as an adjunct to chemotherapy for tuberculosis and underlying immune responses in the lung.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankan Gupta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The 9-month-long chemotherapy of tuberculosis often results in poor compliance and emergence of drug-resistant strains. So, improved therapeutic strategy is urgently needed. Immunotherapy could be beneficial for the effective management of the disease. Previously we showed the protective efficacy of Mycobacterium indicus pranii (MIP when given as prophylactic vaccine in animal models of tuberculosis. METHODS: We sought to investigate whether MIP can be used as an adjunct to the chemotherapy in guinea pig models of tuberculosis. Efficacy of MIP was evaluated when given subcutaneously or by aerosol. RESULTS: MIP-therapy as an adjunct to the chemotherapy was found to be effective in accelerating bacterial killing and improving organ pathology. MIP-immunotherapy resulted in higher numbers of activated antigen-presenting cells and lymphocytes in the infected lungs and also modulated the granulomatous response. Early increase in protective Th1 immune response was observed in the immunotherapy group. Following subsequent doses of MIP, decrease in the inflammatory response and increase in the immunosuppressive response was observed, which resulted in the improvement of lung pathology. CONCLUSION: MIP immunotherapy is a valuable adjunct to chemotherapy for tuberculosis. Aerosol route of immunotherapy can play a crucial role for inducing immediate local immune response in the lung.

  19. Review: New Vaccine Against Tuberculosis: Current Developments and Future Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun

    2009-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a global health threat. BCG was developed as an attenuated live vaccine for tuberculosis control nearly a century ago. Despite being the most widely used vaccine in human history, BCG is not an ideal vaccine and has two major limitations: its poor efficacy against adult pulmonary TB and its disconcerting safety in immunocompromised individuals. A safer and more effective TB vaccine is urgently needed. This review article discusses current strategies to develop the next generation of TB vaccines to replace BCG. While some progresses have been made in the past decade, significant challenges lie ahead.

  20. Factors that influence current tuberculosis epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, Juan-Pablo; Moreno, Antonio; Fina, Laia; del Baño, Lucía; Orcau, Angels; de Olalla, Patricia García; Caylà, Joan A

    2013-06-01

    According to WHO estimates, in 2010 there were 8.8 million new cases of tuberculosis (TB) and 1.5 million deaths. TB has been classically associated with poverty, overcrowding and malnutrition. Low income countries and deprived areas, within big cities in developed countries, present the highest TB incidences and TB mortality rates. These are the settings where immigration, important social inequalities, HIV infection and drug or alcohol abuse may coexist, all factors strongly associated with TB. In spite of the political, economical, research and community efforts, TB remains a major global health problem worldwide. Moreover, in this new century, new challenges such as multidrug-resistance extension, migration to big cities and the new treatments with anti-tumour necrosis alpha factor for inflammatory diseases have emerged and threaten the decreasing trend in the global number of TB cases in the last years. We must also be aware about the impact that smoking and diabetes pandemics may be having on the incidence of TB. The existence of a good TB Prevention and Control Program is essential to fight against TB. The coordination among clinicians, microbiologists, epidemiologists and others, and the link between surveillance, control and research should always be a priority for a TB Program. Each city and country should define their needs according to the epidemiological situation. Local TB control programs will have to adapt to any new challenge that arises in order to respond to the needs of their population.

  1. Drug-resistant tuberculosis--current dilemmas, unanswered questions, challenges, and priority needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Raviglione, Mario; Hoelscher, Michael; Ditiu, Lucica; McHugh, Timothy D; Squire, S Bertel; Cox, Helen; Ford, Nathan; McNerney, Ruth; Marais, Ben; Grobusch, Martin; Lawn, Stephen D; Migliori, Giovanni-Battista; Mwaba, Peter; O'Grady, Justin; Pletschette, Michel; Ramsay, Andrew; Chakaya, Jeremiah; Schito, Marco; Swaminathan, Soumya; Memish, Ziad; Maeurer, Markus; Atun, Rifat

    2012-05-15

    Tuberculosis was declared a global emergency by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1993. Following the declaration and the promotion in 1995 of directly observed treatment short course (DOTS), a cost-effective strategy to contain the tuberculosis epidemic, nearly 7 million lives have been saved compared with the pre-DOTS era, high cure rates have been achieved in most countries worldwide, and the global incidence of tuberculosis has been in a slow decline since the early 2000s. However, the emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis, extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis, and more recently, totally drug-resistant tuberculosis pose a threat to global tuberculosis control. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is a man-made problem. Laboratory facilities for drug susceptibility testing are inadequate in most tuberculosis-endemic countries, especially in Africa; thus diagnosis is missed, routine surveillance is not implemented, and the actual numbers of global drug-resistant tuberculosis cases have yet to be estimated. This exposes an ominous situation and reveals an urgent need for commitment by national programs to health system improvement because the response to MDR tuberculosis requires strong health services in general. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and XDR tuberculosis greatly complicate patient management within resource-poor national tuberculosis programs, reducing treatment efficacy and increasing the cost of treatment to the extent that it could bankrupt healthcare financing in tuberculosis-endemic areas. Why, despite nearly 20 years of WHO-promoted activity and >12 years of MDR tuberculosis-specific activity, has the country response to the drug-resistant tuberculosis epidemic been so ineffectual? The current dilemmas, unanswered questions, operational issues, challenges, and priority needs for global drug resistance screening and surveillance, improved treatment regimens, and management of outcomes and prevention of DR

  2. Tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrova, A.V.

    1983-01-01

    Classification of clinical forms of tuberculosis of respiratory organs is m ade. It is shown, that diagnosis, determination of the clinical form of pulmona ry tuberculosis, extent and phase of the process are mainly based on the data of roentgenologic studies and in certain cases tomography is preferable. Roentgenologic picture of primary tuberculosis, tuberculosis of intrathoracis l ymp nodes, dissemenated tuberculosis, focal and infiltrative tuberculosis of lungs, tuberculomas of lungs, cavernous and fibrocavernous form of pulmonary tub erculosis, cirrhotic tuberculosis of lungs, tuberculosis of upper respiratory tracks, tuberculous pleurite and tuberculosis of respiratory organs, combined wi th dust occupational diseases, has been described

  3. Clinical and high-resolution computed tomographic findings in five patients with pulmonary tuberculosis who developed respiratory failure following chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akira, Masanori; Sakatani, Mitsunori

    2001-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical and high-resolution computed tomographic (HRCT) findings in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis who developed respiratory failure after starting chemotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The clinical records, chest radiographs, and HRCT findings in five patients with non-miliary pulmonary tuberculosis who developed respiratory failure after starting chemotherapy were reviewed. RESULTS: Chest radiographs taken early in the course of acute respiratory failure showed progression of the original lesions with (n = 4) or without (n = 1) new areas of opacity away from the site of the original lesions. HRCT demonstrated widespread ground-glass attenuation with a reticular pattern as well as segmental or lobar consolidation with cavitation and nodules, consistent with active tuberculous foci in all five cases. Prominent interlobular septal thickening was seen in two cases. Four of the five patients had received corticosteroids. Of these five, two died and three recovered with continued corticosteroid therapy. Transbronchial biopsy in three cases showed evidence of acute alveolar damage. CONCLUSION: In selected patients with tuberculosis who develop respiratory failure following the initiation of antituberculous therapy, HRCT may be a helpful adjunct to clinical evaluation in differentiating hypersensitivity reactions (presumed to be due to the release of mycobacterial antigens) from other pulmonary complications. Akira, M. and Sakatani, M. (2001)

  4. COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF CHEMOTHERAPY EFFICIENCY MONITORING IN PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS PATIENTS BY X-RAY EXAMINATION AND DIGITAL TOMOSYNTHESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Nikitin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Goal of the study: to investigate the capabilities of digital tomosynthesis for monitoring of tuberculous changes in the lungs against the background of chemotherapy.Materials and methods. Results of chemotherapy efficiency monitored by X-ray in 55 respiratory tuberculosis patients were analyzed. Before treatment and in 2 months after chemotherapy start all patients had X-ray and DT with consequent analysis of the obtained data.Results. When monitoring the efficiency of drug therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis by DT some additional diagnostic data were obtained in 36,4% of cases compared to X-ray. The article describes specific features of tuberculous changes visualization of the chest with the follow-up of changes by DT; opportunities for X-ray monitoring efficiency enhancement in these patients are presented.Conclusions. DT provides more accurate evaluation of tuberculous changes in the lungs compared to X-ray, which greatly enhances understanding of the course of the disease and registration of the pulmonary disease cure. 

  5. Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nurse can help you balance the risks of chemotherapy against the potential benefits. It is important to note that the information provided here is basic and does not take the place of professional advice. If you have any questions ... Publication Quimioterapia (Chemotherapy) Una publicación de ...

  6. Outcomes after chemotherapy with WHO category II regimen in a population with high prevalence of drug resistant tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francine Matthys

    Full Text Available Standard short course chemotherapy is recommended by the World Health Organization to control tuberculosis worldwide. However, in settings with high drug resistance, first line standard regimens are linked with high treatment failure. We evaluated treatment outcomes after standardized chemotherapy with the WHO recommended category II retreatment regimen in a prison with a high prevalence of drug resistant tuberculosis (TB. A cohort of 233 culture positive TB patients was followed through smear microscopy, culture, drug susceptibility testing and DNA fingerprinting at baseline, after 3 months and at the end of treatment. Overall 172 patients (74% became culture negative, while 43 (18% remained positive at the end of treatment. Among those 43 cases, 58% of failures were determined to be due to treatment with an inadequate drug regimen and 42% to either an initial mixed infection or re-infection while under treatment. Overall, drug resistance amplification during treatment occurred in 3.4% of the patient cohort. This study demonstrates that treatment failure is linked to initial drug resistance, that amplification of drug resistance occurs, and that mixed infection and re-infection during standard treatment contribute to treatment failure in confined settings with high prevalence of drug resistance.

  7. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    C. Robert Horsburgh, Jr

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the published literature on tuberculosis from September 2012 to August 2013 and describes important advances in tuberculosis epidemiology, microbiology, pathology, clinical pharmacology, genetics, treatment and prevention.

  8. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mochammad, Hatta

    2008-01-01

    This book chapter for medical students and researcher Tuberculosis is still one of the leading causes of death by infectious diseases with 2 million deaths per year and 9.2 million new cases of tuberculosis disease annually [1-3]. Besides, more than 2 milliard people are infected with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) [1-3]. Despite continuous effort in the prevention, monitoring and treatment of tuberculosis, the disease remains a major health problem in many countries [4-6...

  9. Is there a rationale for pulmonary rehabilitation following successful chemotherapy for tuberculosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Torrico, Marcela; Rendon, Adrian; Centis, Rosella; D'Ambrosio, Lia; Fuentes, Zhenia; Torres-Duque, Carlos; Mello, Fernanda; Dalcolmo, Margareth; Pérez-Padilla, Rogelio; Spanevello, Antonio; Migliori, Giovanni Battista

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The role of tuberculosis as a public health care priority and the availability of diagnostic tools to evaluate functional status (spirometry, plethysmography, and DLCO determination), arterial blood gases, capacity to perform exercise, lesions (chest X-ray and CT), and quality of life justify the effort to consider what needs to be done when patients have completed their treatment. To our knowledge, no review has ever evaluated this topic in a comprehensive manner. Our objective was to review the available evidence on this topic and draw conclusions regarding the future role of the "post-tuberculosis treatment" phase, which will potentially affect several million cases every year. We carried out a non-systematic literature review based on a PubMed search using specific keywords (various combinations of the terms "tuberculosis", "rehabilitation", "multidrug-resistant tuberculosis", "pulmonary disease", "obstructive lung disease", and "lung volume measurements"). The reference lists of the most important studies were retrieved in order to improve the sensitivity of the search. Manuscripts written in English, Spanish, and Russian were selected. The main areas of interest were tuberculosis sequelae following tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment; "destroyed lung"; functional evaluation of sequelae; pulmonary rehabilitation interventions (physiotherapy, long-term oxygen therapy, and ventilation); and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.The evidence found suggests that tuberculosis is definitively responsible for functional sequelae, primarily causing an obstructive pattern on spirometry (but also restrictive and mixed patterns), and that there is a rationale for pulmonary rehabilitation. We also provide a list of variables that should be discussed in future studies on pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with post-tuberculosis sequelae. PMID:27812638

  10. Imaging of thoracic tuberculosis in children: current and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh; Bhalla, Ashu S.; Mahomed, Nasreen; Laya, Bernard F.

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis continues to be an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is the leading cause of infection-related deaths worldwide. Children are amongst the high-risk groups for developing tuberculosis and often pose a challenge to the clinicians in making a definitive diagnosis. The newly released global tuberculosis report from World Health Organization reveals a 50% increase in fatality from tuberculosis in children. Significantly, diagnostic and treatment algorithms of tuberculosis for children differ from those of adults. Bacteriologic confirmation of the disease is often difficult in children; hence radiologists have an important role to play in early diagnosis of this disease. Despite advancing technology, the key diagnostic imaging modalities for primary care and emergency services, especially in rural and low-resource areas, are chest radiography and ultrasonography. In this article, we discuss various diagnostic imaging modalities used in diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis and their indications. We highlight the use of US as point-of-care service along with mediastinal US and rapid MRI protocols, especially in mediastinal lymphadenopathy and thoracic complications. MRI is the ideal modality in high-resource areas when adequate infrastructure is available. Because the prevalence of tuberculosis is highest in lower-resource countries, we also discuss global initiatives in low-resource settings. (orig.)

  11. Imaging of thoracic tuberculosis in children: current and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh [Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Chandigarh (India); Bhalla, Ashu S. [All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Department of Radiodiagnosis, New Delhi (India); Mahomed, Nasreen [University of Witwatersrand, Department of Radiology, Rahima Moosa Mother and Child Hospital, Johannesburg (South Africa); Laya, Bernard F. [St. Luke' s Medical Center-Global City, Institute of Radiology, Taguig City (Philippines)

    2017-09-15

    Tuberculosis continues to be an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is the leading cause of infection-related deaths worldwide. Children are amongst the high-risk groups for developing tuberculosis and often pose a challenge to the clinicians in making a definitive diagnosis. The newly released global tuberculosis report from World Health Organization reveals a 50% increase in fatality from tuberculosis in children. Significantly, diagnostic and treatment algorithms of tuberculosis for children differ from those of adults. Bacteriologic confirmation of the disease is often difficult in children; hence radiologists have an important role to play in early diagnosis of this disease. Despite advancing technology, the key diagnostic imaging modalities for primary care and emergency services, especially in rural and low-resource areas, are chest radiography and ultrasonography. In this article, we discuss various diagnostic imaging modalities used in diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis and their indications. We highlight the use of US as point-of-care service along with mediastinal US and rapid MRI protocols, especially in mediastinal lymphadenopathy and thoracic complications. MRI is the ideal modality in high-resource areas when adequate infrastructure is available. Because the prevalence of tuberculosis is highest in lower-resource countries, we also discuss global initiatives in low-resource settings. (orig.)

  12. Imaging of thoracic tuberculosis in children: current and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh; Bhalla, Ashu S; Mahomed, Nasreen; Laya, Bernard F

    2017-09-01

    Tuberculosis continues to be an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is the leading cause of infection-related deaths worldwide. Children are amongst the high-risk groups for developing tuberculosis and often pose a challenge to the clinicians in making a definitive diagnosis. The newly released global tuberculosis report from World Health Organization reveals a 50% increase in fatality from tuberculosis in children. Significantly, diagnostic and treatment algorithms of tuberculosis for children differ from those of adults. Bacteriologic confirmation of the disease is often difficult in children; hence radiologists have an important role to play in early diagnosis of this disease. Despite advancing technology, the key diagnostic imaging modalities for primary care and emergency services, especially in rural and low-resource areas, are chest radiography and ultrasonography. In this article, we discuss various diagnostic imaging modalities used in diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis and their indications. We highlight the use of US as point-of-care service along with mediastinal US and rapid MRI protocols, especially in mediastinal lymphadenopathy and thoracic complications. MRI is the ideal modality in high-resource areas when adequate infrastructure is available. Because the prevalence of tuberculosis is highest in lower-resource countries, we also discuss global initiatives in low-resource settings.

  13. Tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latorre Tortello, Pablo

    1998-01-01

    The tuberculosis is an infection bacterial chronicle of world distribution. Three organisms of the family of the mycobacterium, the m. tuberculosis, the m. bovis and m. africanum, phenotypic and genetically similar, produce it, but only the m. tuberculosis has importance; the others rarely produce illness in the human. By definition, the lung tuberculosis is the localization of the m. tuberculosis in the breathing tract, the most common and main form in the affection and the only able to contaminate to other people. The koch bacillus, transmits the illness directly person to person. The paper Includes topics like pathogenesis, natural history, epidemiology, diagnose, symptomatology and treatment

  14. Arginine as an adjuvant to chemotherapy improves clinical outcome in active tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schön, T; Elias, D; Moges, F

    2003-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the host defence against tuberculosis (TB). Patients with TB exhibit increased catabolism and reduced energy intake. Thus the hypothesis for this study was that restoring a relative deficiency in the amino acid arginine, the substrate for mycobactericidal NO produ......Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the host defence against tuberculosis (TB). Patients with TB exhibit increased catabolism and reduced energy intake. Thus the hypothesis for this study was that restoring a relative deficiency in the amino acid arginine, the substrate for mycobactericidal...... virus-negative patients with active tuberculosis, most likely mediated by increased production of nitric oxide....

  15. TUBERCULOSIS EPIDEMIC SITUATION IN THE CHECHEN REPUBLIC IN CURRENT SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Mikhailovna Alekseeva

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Tuberculosis is one of the most important medical and social problems in the whole world as well as in Russia and its separate regions. Purpose. The study was aimed at assessment of tuberculosis epidemic situation in the Chechen Republic in the current socio-economic conditions after counterterrorist operations. Materials and methods. The authors analyzed the annual reports of the Ministry of Health of the Chechen Republic for 2010–2015, data of Rosstat, statistical data form for tuberculosis (№ 8 and № 30. Results. The results shown a threefold increase in the main tuberculosis indicators (incidence, prevalence and mortality after counterterrorist operations (1994–1996, and a decrease in these indicators in 2010–2015. The authors have found the cities and rural municipal districts with the most and the least favorable tuberculosis situation. The study results demonstrated an increase in the number of patients with bacillary, with fibrous-cavernous form, as well as patients with tuberculosis in combination with HIV infection. The authors proved the relation between the prevalence of fibrous-cavernous form of tuberculosis and mortality rate. Tuberculosis incidence in children (0–14 years and adolescents (15–17 years decreased in 2010–2015 while the incidence in adolescents remains higher than the incidence in children. Conclusion. Effective antituberculosis work in the Chechen Republic needs to improve the quality of medical examinations, early detection of tuberculosis, timely immunization, and health education.

  16. current trends in the laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    has a high concentration of lipids in the cell wall, which .... culture. Media- The common media for the culture of mycobacterium tuberculosis can be classified ..... optimum growth temperature and ... catalase test which is inactivated at. 680 C.

  17. Tuberculosis: current trends in diagnosis and treatment | Njoku ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among communicable diseases, tuberculosis (TB) is the second leading ... There may be need to modify the treatment modalities especially with the ... liver disease, renal failure or even in coexistence with HIV/AIDS or the drug resistant state.

  18. Adjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancer: Current evidence and future challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Miceli, Rosalba; Tomasello, Gianluca; Bregni, Giacomo; Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Pietrantonio, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer still represents one of the major causes of cancer mortality worldwide. Patients survival is mainly related to stage, with a high proportion of patients with metastatic disease at presentation. Thus, the cure rate largely depend upon surgical resection. Despite the additional, albeit small, benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy has been clearly demonstrated, no general consensus has been reached on the best treatment option. Moreover, the narrow therapeutic index of adjuvant chemoth...

  19. TUBERCULOSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Tarik Bajrović; Mahmud Nurkić; Šukrija Zvizdić

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis, known as the "White Plague" in the early 19th century, is the infectious disease, which is being researched today even in some of the most developed countries in the world. Epidemiological- epizootiological research points to the importance of pasteurizing milk as well as the transmission in aerosolized droplets in humans and animals. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), M. bovis, M. africanum and M. microti are the mycobacteria that cause tuberculosis. Other mycobacteria cause dis...

  20. Prognosis of development of unfavorable phenomena of chemotherapy in patients with for the first time revealed tuberculosis of lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilov A.N.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: development of criteria and a method of prognosing of emergence of adverse side effects to the first mode of chemotherapy at patients with for the first time revealed tuberculosis. Materials and Methods: The analysis of the collateral reactions (CR on tubercular preparations has been carried out at 214 patients receiving treatment at the first mode of chemotherapy. During the treatment an indicator of quality of life by a technique the DIGNITY (health, activity, mood, a condition of intersystem interaction of respiratory and cardiovascular systems of an organism (Hildebrant's coefficient, a vegetative index of Kerdo were estimated at patients. Results. Ufavorable effects on PTP develop at every third patient (33,6%. The CR different types depends on the age and availability of the accompanying pathology. Allergic reactions develop at patients with existence of endocrine pathology (27,8% authentically more often, toxic — at patients with defeats of nervous system (56,3%. Extent of change of an index of Kerdo of 59,4±2,4%, Hildebrant's coefficient 48,9± 1,6% in the first 4 weeks of treatment of the patient corresponds to emergence of CR in the first 3 months of chemotherapy. Conclusion. Dynamics of coefficient of Hildebrant, Kerdo's index and an indicator of treatment, SAN at the initial stages, are considerably associated with the risk of development of side effects of chemotherapy and were a basis of the developed computer system expert for prognosing the development of these complications. The predictive value of system is 76,3% of sensitivity at 84,7% of specificity.

  1. Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Milton

    1999-01-01

    Avian tuberculosis is usually caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium avium. At least 20 different types of M. avium have been identified, only three of which are known to cause disease in birds. Other types of Mycobacterium rarely cause tuberculosis in most avian species; however, parrots, macaws, and other large perching birds are susceptible to human and bovine types of tuberculosis bacilli. Avian tuberculosis generally is transmitted by direct contact with infected birds, ingestion of contaminated feed and water, or contact with a contaminated environment. Inhalation of the bacterium can cause respiratory tract infections. Wild bird studies in the Netherlands disclosed tuberculosis-infected puncture-type injuries in birds of prey that fight at the nest site (kestrels) or on the ground (buteo-type buzzards), but tuberculosisinfected injuries were not found in accipiters (falco

  2. Evaluation of isoprinosine to be repurposed as an adjunct anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Alok K; Yabaji, Shivraj M; Dubey, Rikesh K

    2018-06-01

    Isoprinosine (Inos) or immunovir is a synthetic purine derivative with immune-modulatory and antiviral properties. The drug shows apparent in vivo enhancement of host immune responses by inducing pro-inflammatory cytokines and rapid proliferation of T-cell subsets. Strikingly, the cytokines induced by Inos also play crucial roles in providing immune resistance against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Inos has been licensed for several antiviral diseases; however, its efficacy against Mtb has not been tested yet. Since Mtb subverts the host immune system to survive within the host. Therefore, we hypothesized that the immune-stimulatory properties of Inos can be explored as an adjunct therapy for the management of tuberculosis. We have also outlined a systematic direction of study to evaluate if Inos could be repurposed for tuberculosis. The in vivo studies for therapeutic evaluation of Inos alone or in combination with the first line anti-TB drugs in a suitable TB disease model would provide a clearer picture of its utility as a host-directed anti-TB drug and may endow us with a new application of an existing drug to combat tuberculosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Current features of primary tuberculosis on medical imaging based on a series of fourteen cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouzidane, L.; Adamsbaum, C.; Cohen, P.A.; Kalifa, G.; Gendrel, D.

    1995-01-01

    Active pulmonary tuberculosis, a source of contamination, is currently undergoing a recrudescence in developed countries, particularly in clinical contexts of immuno-depression. The authors report a retrospective series of 14 cases of primary tuberculosis in a paediatric population (7 girls and 7 boys) with a mean age of 3.5 years (range: 4 months - 16 years) observed over a 3-year period. After reviewing the current radiological features of patent primary tuberculosis, the authors emphasize the contribution of chest CT scan in latent forms with a normal chest x-ray and a difficult bacteriological diagnosis. Imaging remains an essential tool in early diagnosis, therapeutic management and active surveillance of this form. The authors propose a decisional flow-chart in the case of suspected primary tuberculosis in children. (authors). 20 refs., 8 figs

  4. Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbara, Khalid F

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to present an update on the manifestations and management of ocular tuberculosis. Tuberculosis affects one-third of the world's population. The incidence of tuberculosis has increased with the increase in the HIV infected population. Following a resurgence of the disease in the US, the incidence has recently declined. Patients may develop scleritis that can be focal, nodular or diffuse with or without keratitis. Anterior granulomatous uveitis may occur. The posterior segment reveals vitritis, choroiditis, and can mimic serpiginous choroiditis and other entities. Patients who are immunosuppressed or HIV infected may develop active mycobacterial disease in the eye leading to rapid destruction of the ocular structures. The diagnosis of ocular tuberculosis is made by isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis on Löwestein-Jensen medium or by PCR. The diagnosis is supported by the clinical findings, imaging techniques including optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green and ultrasonography. Tuberculin skin test helps to confirm the diagnosis. Ocular tuberculosis may occur in the absence of pulmonary disease. Patients present with a spectrum of clinical signs. The disease may mimic several clinical entities. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment of ocular tuberculosis may prevent ocular morbidity and blindness.

  5. TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Bajrović

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis, known as the "White Plague" in the early 19th century, is the infectious disease, which is being researched today even in some of the most developed countries in the world. Epidemiological- epizootiological research points to the importance of pasteurizing milk as well as the transmission in aerosolized droplets in humans and animals. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, M. bovis, M. africanum and M. microti are the mycobacteria that cause tuberculosis. Other mycobacteria cause diseases commonly known as mycobacteriosae. Pathogenesis of tuberculosis includes both host- related and mycobacterium-related factors (virulence. Mtb acts through the expression of various genes and their proteins that are detectable in the serums of the diseased only, proving these proteins are formed in the course of the disease. In humans, a diagnosis is established by the detection of antigens (and antibodies, and in animals, with the allergy tests. As far as the bovine tuberculosis is concerned, the combination of skin tuberculin and blood gamma interferon test is recommended. Sequential genome (Mtb analysis has given the basis for further research of the new vaccines.Key words: Tuberculosis, pathogenesis, immunity

  6. Liver toxicity associated with tuberculosis chemotherapy in the REMoxTB study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweed, Conor Duncan; Wills, Genevieve Helen; Crook, Angela M; Dawson, Rodney; Diacon, Andreas H; Louw, Cheryl E; McHugh, Timothy D; Mendel, Carl; Meredith, Sarah; Mohapi, Lerato; Murphy, Michael E; Murray, Stephen; Murthy, Sara; Nunn, Andrew J; Phillips, Patrick P J; Singh, Kasha; Spigelman, M; Gillespie, S H

    2018-03-28

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a common complication of tuberculosis treatment. We utilised data from the REMoxTB clinical trial to describe the incidence of predisposing factors and the natural history in patients with liver enzyme levels elevated in response to tuberculosis treatment. Patients received either standard tuberculosis treatment (2EHRZ/4HR), or a 4-month regimen in which moxifloxacin replaced either ethambutol (isoniazid arm, 2MHRZ/2MHR) or isoniazid (ethambutol arm, 2EMRZ/2MR). Hepatic enzymes were measured at 0, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 17 weeks and as clinically indicated during reported adverse events. Patients included were those receiving at least one dose of drug and with two or more hepatic enzyme measurements. A total of 1928 patients were included (639 2EHRZ/4HR, 654 2MHRZ/2MHR and 635 2EMRZ/2MR). DILI was defined as peak alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ≥ 5 times the upper limit of normal (5 × ULN) or ALT ≥ 3 × ULN with total bilirubin > 2 × ULN. DILI was identified in 58 of the 1928 (3.0%) patients at a median time of 28 days (interquartile range IQR 14-56). Of 639 (6.4%) patients taking standard tuberculosis therapy, 41 experienced clinically significant enzyme elevations (peak ALT ≥ 3 × ULN). On standard therapy, 21.1% of patients aged >55 years developed a peak ALT/aspartate aminotransferase (AST) ≥ 3 × ULN (p = 0.01) and 15% of HIV-positive patients experienced a peak ALT/AST ≥ 3 × ULN compared to 9% of HIV-negative patients (p = 0.160). The median peak ALT/AST was higher in isoniazid-containing regimens vs no-isoniazid regimens (p tuberculosis patients on standard treatment. Older patients on standard therapy, HIV-positive patients, Asian patients and those receiving isoniazid were at higher risk of elevated enzyme levels. Monitoring hepatic enzymes during the first 2 months of standard therapy detected approximately 75% of patients with a peak enzyme elevation ≥3 × ULN, suggesting this should be a standard of care. These

  7. Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Morán López

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available En la actualidad la incidencia de la tuberculosis ha aumentado. El Mycobacterium tuberculosis infecta frecuentemente a las personas con SIDA, debido a que en estos pacientes hay una reducción de la resistencia mediada por células T, lo que propicia que este bacilo pueda desarrollar la enfermedad con una frecuencia superior a la de las personas sanas. La transmisión de la enfermedad puede ser por vía directa, de un individuo afectado a otro, fundamentalmente por las gotitas de saliva que contengan a este microorganismo, o por vía indirecta por la inhalación del bacilo que se puede encontrar por meses en los objetos de uso diario, debido a su gran resistencia. Las micobacterias que producen tuberculosis en el hombre inmunocompetente son la Mycobacterium tuberculosis y la bovis, otros tipos pueden provocar tuberculosis en individuos inmunocomprometidos. La patogenicidad de este bacilo está relacionada con su capacidad para escapar de la destrucción inducida por los macrófagos y para provocar hipersensibilidad de tipo retardado. Esta enfermedad tiene muy pocas manifestaciones bucales, lo que se observa generalmente es una úlcera que toma como asiento fundamental el dorso de la lengua. La tuberculosis amenaza con convertirse en una enfermedad incurable por la deficiente administración de los programas contra ésta, por lo que la OMS plantea para su detección y tratamiento el DOTS (tratamiento observado directamente, de corta duración que comienza a tener resultados satisfactorios, aunque en el último quinquenio, el 88 % de los pacientes que se estimaban como infectados por tuberculosis no recibieron DOTS.At present, the incidence of tuberculosis is on the rise. Mycobacterium tuberculosis often infests AIDS patients due to the fact that these persons´T-cell mediated resistance is reduced, which favors the development of the disease at a higher rate than in healthy people. The disease can be transmitted directly, that is , from an

  8. Is there a rationale for pulmonary rehabilitation following successful chemotherapy for tuberculosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Torrico, Marcela; Rendon, Adrian; Centis, Rosella; D'Ambrosio, Lia; Fuentes, Zhenia; Torres-Duque, Carlos; Mello, Fernanda; Dalcolmo, Margareth; Pérez-Padilla, Rogelio; Spanevello, Antonio; Migliori, Giovanni Battista

    2016-01-01

    The role of tuberculosis as a public health care priority and the availability of diagnostic tools to evaluate functional status (spirometry, plethysmography, and DLCO determination), arterial blood gases, capacity to perform exercise, lesions (chest X-ray and CT), and quality of life justify the effort to consider what needs to be done when patients have completed their treatment. To our knowledge, no review has ever evaluated this topic in a comprehensive manner. Our objective was to review the available evidence on this topic and draw conclusions regarding the future role of the "post-tuberculosis treatment" phase, which will potentially affect several million cases every year. We carried out a non-systematic literature review based on a PubMed search using specific keywords (various combinations of the terms "tuberculosis", "rehabilitation", "multidrug-resistant tuberculosis", "pulmonary disease", "obstructive lung disease", and "lung volume measurements"). The reference lists of the most important studies were retrieved in order to improve the sensitivity of the search. Manuscripts written in English, Spanish, and Russian were selected. The main areas of interest were tuberculosis sequelae following tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment; "destroyed lung"; functional evaluation of sequelae; pulmonary rehabilitation interventions (physiotherapy, long-term oxygen therapy, and ventilation); and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.The evidence found suggests that tuberculosis is definitively responsible for functional sequelae, primarily causing an obstructive pattern on spirometry (but also restrictive and mixed patterns), and that there is a rationale for pulmonary rehabilitation. We also provide a list of variables that should be discussed in future studies on pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with post-tuberculosis sequelae. RESUMO O papel da tuberculose como uma prioridade de saúde pública e a disponibilidade de ferramentas diagnósticas para avaliar o estado

  9. Short-course chemotherapy for pulmonary tuberculosis with a rifampicin-isoniazid-pyrazinamide combination tablet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, R L; Brink, B A

    1990-04-21

    The effectiveness of a tablet containing a combination of rifampicin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide (Rifater; Mer-National) in the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis was examined by comparing it with a previously evaluated four-drug regimen. Of 150 black goldminers with a first case of pulmonary tuberculosis, 69 were randomly allocated to receive the combination tablet (RHZ), 5 tablets per day on weekdays for 100 treatment-days, and 81 the four-drug regimen (streptomycin, rifampicin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide) (RHZS). Non-compliance was detected in 42% of the RHZ group and in 16% of the RHZS group. Two patients in the RHZ group and 4 in the RHZS group had to have their treatment altered because routine investigations revealed drug-resistant mycobacteria. Treatment was unsuccessful in 10 patients in the RHZ group, with 4 men failing to complete the regimen and being lost to follow-up, 3 cases of failure of conversion of sputum on the regimen, and 3 relapses. The results for the RHZS group were similar, with 4 failures to complete the regimen, 2 treatment failures and 4 relapses. Evaluation of RHZ showed it to be comparable with a previously evaluated, successful short-course regimen (RHZS). The high incidence of non-compliance probably reflects reduced supervision of this wholly oral regimen.

  10. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Latorre Tortello, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Por definición, la tuberculosis pulmonar es la localizaci6n del M. tuberculosis en el tracto respiratorio, la forma más común y principal de la afección y la única capaz de contagiar a otras personas. El M. tuberculosis, descubierto por Robert Koch en 1882, el bacilo de Koch, es un bacilo delgado, inmóvil, de 4 micras de longitud media, aerobio obligado, que se tiñe de rajo por la tinción de Ziehl-Neelsen. Debido a la coraza lipídica de su pared, lo hace resistente a la decoloración con ácido...

  11. Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Latorre Tortello

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Por definición, la tuberculosis pulmonar es la localizaci6n del M. tuberculosis en el tracto respiratorio, la forma más común y principal de la afección y la única capaz de contagiar a otras personas. El M. tuberculosis, descubierto por Robert Koch en 1882, el bacilo de Koch, es un bacilo delgado, inmóvil, de 4 micras de longitud media, aerobio obligado, que se tiñe de rajo por la tinción de Ziehl-Neelsen. Debido a la coraza lipídica de su pared, lo hace resistente a la decoloración con ácidos y alcohol, de ahí el nombre de bacilos ácido-alcohol resistente (BAAR. Su transmisión es directa, de persona a persona.

  12. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pablo Latorre Tortello

    1998-01-01

    Por definición, la tuberculosis pulmonar es la localizaci6n del M. tuberculosis en el tracto respiratorio, la forma más común y principal de la afección y la única capaz de contagiar a otras personas. El M. tuberculosis, descubierto por Robert Koch en 1882, el bacilo de Koch, es un bacilo delgado, inmóvil, de 4 micras de longitud media, aerobio obligado, que se tiñe de rajo por la tinción de Ziehl-Neelsen. Debido a la coraza lipídica de su pared, lo hace resistente a la decoloración con ácido...

  13. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mendoza Zuñiga, Marleny; Bastidas Párraga, Gustavo; León Untiveros, Paúl Albert

    2013-01-01

    La tuberculosis es una enfermedad infectocontagiosa producida por el bacilo de Koch, que ataca a los pulmones pero puede ser difuminada por todo el cuerpo. El siguiente artículo de información nos da una visión amplia de la detección, diagnóstico y tratamiento de la misma.

  14. Regional hyperthermia combined with chemotherapy in paediatric, adolescent and young adult patients: current and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, Georg; Budach, Volker; Keilholz, Ulrich; Wust, Peter; Eggert, Angelika; Ghadjar, Pirus

    2016-01-01

    Here we evaluate the current status of clinical research on regional hyperthermia (RHT) in combination with chemotherapy or radiation therapy in paediatric oncology. Data were identified in searches of MEDLINE, Current Contents, PubMed, and references from relevant articles using medical subject headings including hyperthermia, cancer, paediatric oncology, children, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Currently, only two RHT centres exist in Europe which treat children. Clinical RHT research in paediatric oncology has as yet been limited to children with sarcomas and germ cell tumours that respond poorly to or recur after chemotherapy. RHT is a safe and effective treatment delivering local thermic effects, which may also stimulate immunological processes via heat-shock protein reactions. RHT is used chiefly in children and adolescents with sarcomas or germ cell tumours located in the abdomino-pelvic region, chest wall or extremities to improve operability or render the tumour operable. It could potentially be combined with radiation therapy in a post-operative R1 setting where more radical surgery is not possible or combined with chemotherapy instead of radiation therapy in cases where the necessary radiation dose is impossible to achieve or would have mutilating consequences. RHT might also be an option for chemotherapy intensification in the neoadjuvant first-line treatment setting for children and adolescents, as was recently reflected in the promising long-term outcome data in adults with high-risk soft tissue sarcomas (EORTC 62961/ESHO trial). The limited data available indicate that combining RHT with chemotherapy is a promising option to treat germ cell tumours and, potentially, sarcomas. RHT may also be beneficial in first-line therapy in children, adolescents and young adults. The research should focus on optimising necessary technical demands and then initiate several clinical trials incorporating RHT into interdisciplinary treatment of children

  15. Prevalence, putative mechanisms, and current management of sleep problems during chemotherapy for cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palesh O

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxana Palesh,1 Luke Peppone,2 Pasquale F Innominato,3–5 Michelle Janelsins,2 Monica Jeong,1 Lisa Sprod,7 Josee Savard,6 Max Rotatori,1 Shelli Kesler,1 Melinda Telli,1 Karen Mustian21Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 2University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY, USA; 3INSERM, UMRS 776, Biological Rhythms and Cancers, Villejuif, France; 4Faculty of Medicine, Universite Paris Sud, le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France; 5APHP, Chronotherapy Unit, Department of Oncology, Paul Brousse Hospital, Villejuif, France; 6Laval University, Quebec, Canada; 7University of North Carolina, Wilmington, NC, USAAbstract: Sleep problems are highly prevalent in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. This article reviews existing evidence on etiology, associated symptoms, and management of sleep problems associated with chemotherapy treatment during cancer. It also discusses limitations and methodological issues of current research. The existing literature suggests that subjectively and objectively measured sleep problems are the highest during the chemotherapy phase of cancer treatments. A possibly involved mechanism reviewed here includes the rise in the circulating proinflammatory cytokines and the associated disruption in circadian rhythm in the development and maintenance of sleep dysregulation in cancer patients during chemotherapy. Various approaches to the management of sleep problems during chemotherapy are discussed with behavioral intervention showing promise. Exercise, including yoga, also appear to be effective and safe at least for subclinical levels of sleep problems in cancer patients. Numerous challenges are associated with conducting research on sleep in cancer patients during chemotherapy treatments and they are discussed in this review. Dedicated intervention trials, methodologically sound and sufficiently powered, are needed to test current and novel treatments of sleep problems in cancer patients

  16. Current use and acceptability of novel diagnostic tests for active tuberculosis: a worldwide survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Amicosante

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the current use and potential acceptance (by tuberculosis experts worldwide of novel rapid tests for the diagnosis of tuberculosis that are in line with World Health Organization target product profiles. Methods: A multilingual survey was disseminated online between July and November of 2016. Results: A total of 723 individuals from 114 countries responded to the survey. Smear microscopy was the most commonly used rapid tuberculosis test (available to 90.9% of the respondents, followed by molecular assays (available to 70.7%. Only a small proportion of the respondents in middle- and low-income countries had access to interferon-gamma-release assays. Serological and lateral flow immunoassays were used by more than a quarter (25.4% of the respondents. Among the respondents who had access to molecular tests, 46.7% were using the Xpert assay overall, that proportion being higher in lower middle-income countries (55.6% and low-income countries (76.6%. The data also suggest that there was some alignment of pricing for molecular assays. Respondents stated they would accept novel rapid tuberculosis tests if available, including molecular assays (acceptable to 86.0% or biomarker-based serological assays (acceptable to 81.7%. Simple biomarker-based assays were more commonly deemed acceptable in middle- and low-income countries. Conclusions: Second-generation molecular assays have become more widely available in high- and low-resource settings. However, the development of novel rapid tuberculosis tests continues to be considered important by tuberculosis experts. Our data also underscore the need for additional training and education of end users.

  17. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Carlos Rodríguez, D.

    2014-01-01

    La tuberculosis sigue constituyendo un problema de salud pública a nivel mundial con casi nueve millones de casos nuevos en 2012 y se estima que un tercio de la humanidad está infectada. A nivel nacional, si bien las tasas son alentadoras, la variación regional es muy importante. En los últimos años se han registrado progresos importantes tanto en el conocimiento de la conducta del bacilo de Koch, el causante de la enfermedad, como en los métodos para detectarlo. Así los IGRAS (Interferon G R...

  18. [Current Status and Development of Traditional Chemotherapy in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer under the Background of Targeted Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guowei; Wang, Huijuan; Zhang, Mina; Li, Peng; Ma, Zhiyong

    2015-09-20

    In recent years, along with rapid development of targeted therapy in non-small cell lung cancer, traditional chemotherapy get less and less attention. Yet it still can not be ignored in the current that how to locate and use traditional chemotherapy so patients could derive maximum benefit. For this purpose, through the literature review and analysis, we point out there are still many traditional chemotherapy irreplaceable places whatever patients' driver gene status. And there are some new treatment modalities of traditional chemotherapy which have been developed to further improve patients' survival. At the same time, through exposition of predictive bio-markers development in chemotherapy, we pointed out that the future of traditional chemotherapy must be part of "targeted therapy".

  19. Chemotherapy-Induced Constipation and Diarrhea: Pathophysiology, Current and Emerging Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuade, Rachel M.; Stojanovska, Vanesa; Abalo, Raquel; Bornstein, Joel C.; Nurgali, Kulmira

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) side-effects of chemotherapy are a debilitating and often overlooked clinical hurdle in cancer management. Chemotherapy-induced constipation (CIC) and Diarrhea (CID) present a constant challenge in the efficient and tolerable treatment of cancer and are amongst the primary contributors to dose reductions, delays and cessation of treatment. Although prevalence of CIC is hard to estimate, it is believed to affect approximately 16% of cancer patients, whilst incidence of CID has been estimated to be as high as 80%. Despite this, the underlying mechanisms of both CID and CIC remain unclear, but are believed to result from a combination of intersecting mechanisms including inflammation, secretory dysfunctions, GI dysmotility and alterations in GI innervation. Current treatments for CIC and CID aim to reduce the severity of symptoms rather than combating the pathophysiological mechanisms of dysfunction, and often result in worsening of already chronic GI symptoms or trigger the onset of a plethora of other side-effects including respiratory depression, uneven heartbeat, seizures, and neurotoxicity. Emerging treatments including those targeting the enteric nervous system present promising avenues to alleviate CID and CIC. Identification of potential targets for novel therapies to alleviate chemotherapy-induced toxicity is essential to improve clinical outcomes and quality of life amongst cancer sufferers. PMID:27857691

  20. Can Brazil play a more important role in global tuberculosis drug production? An assessment of current capacity and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemal, Andre; Keravec, Joel; Menezes, Alexandre; Trajman, Anete

    2013-03-27

    Despite the existence of effective treatment, tuberculosis is still a global public health issue. The World Health Organization recommends a six-month four-drug regimen in fixed-dose combination formulation to treat drug sensitive tuberculosis, and long course regimens with several second-line drugs to treat multi-drug resistant tuberculosis. To achieve the projected tuberculosis elimination goal by 2050, it will be essential to ensure a non-interrupted supply of quality-assured tuberculosis drugs. However, quality and affordable tuberculosis drug supply is still a significant challenge for National Tuberculosis Programs. Quality drug production requires a combination of complex steps. The first challenge is to guarantee the quality of tuberculosis active pharmaceutical ingredients, then ensure an adequate manufacturing process, according to international standards, to guarantee final product's safety, efficacy and quality. Good practices for storage, transport, distribution and quality control procedures must follow. In contrast to other high-burden countries, Brazil produces tuberculosis drugs through a strong network of public sector drug manufacturers regulated by a World Health Organization-certified national sanitary authority. The installed capacity for production surpasses the 71,000 needed treatments in the country. However, in order to be prepared to act as a global supplier, important bottlenecks are to be overcome. This article presents an in-depth analysis of the current status of production of tuberculosis drugs in Brazil and the bottlenecks and opportunities for the country to sustain national demand and play a role as a potential global supplier. Raw material and drug production, quality control, international certification and pre-qualification, political commitment and regulatory aspects are discussed, as well recommendations for tackling these bottlenecks. This discussion becomes more important as new drugs and regimens to treat tuberculosis are

  1. Current approaches to improve the anticancer chemotherapy with alkylating agents: state of the problem in world and Ukraine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iatsyshyna A. P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alkylating agents are frequently used in many established anticancer chemotherapies. They alkylate the genomic DNA at various sites. Alkylation of the guanine at the O6-position is cytotoxic, it has the strongest mutagenic potential, as well as can cause the tumor development. Alkyl groups at the O6-position of guanine are removed by the DNA repair enzyme O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT. The effectiveness of alkylating chemotherapy is limited by MGMT in cancer cells and adverse toxic side effects in normal cells. Different approaches consisting in the modulation of the MGMT expression and activity are under development now to improve the cancer chemotherapy. They include two main directions, in particular, the increase in chemosensitivity of cancer cells to alkylating drugs and the protection of normal cells from the toxic side effects of chemotherapy. This review is focused on current attempts to improve the alkylating chemotherapy of malignant tumours worldwide and state of the issue in Ukraine

  2. Induction of a specific strong polyantigenic cellular immune response after short-term chemotherapy controls bacillary reactivation in murine and guinea pig experimental models of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirado, Evelyn; Gil, Olga; Cáceres, Neus; Singh, Mahavir; Vilaplana, Cristina; Cardona, Pere-Joan

    2008-08-01

    RUTI is a therapeutic vaccine that is generated from detoxified and liposomed Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell fragments that has demonstrated its efficacy in the control of bacillus reactivation after short-term chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to characterize the cellular immune response generated after the therapeutic administration of RUTI and to corroborate the lack of toxicity of the vaccine. Mouse and guinea pig experimental models were infected with a low-dose M. tuberculosis aerosol. RUTI-treated animals showed the lowest bacillary load in both experimental models. RUTI also decreased the percentage of pulmonary granulomatous infiltration in the mouse and guinea pig models. This was not the case after Mycobacterium bovis BCG treatment. Cellular immunity was studied through the characterization of the intracellular gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-producing cells after the splenocytes' stimulation with M. tuberculosis-specific structural and growth-related antigens. Our data show that the difference between the therapeutic administration of BCG and RUTI resides mainly in the stronger activation of IFN-gamma(+) CD4(+) cells and CD8(+) cells against tuberculin purified protein derivative, ESAT-6, and Ag85B that RUTI generates. Both vaccines also triggered a specific immune response against the M. tuberculosis structural antigens Ag16kDa and Ag38kDa and a marked mRNA expression of IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-12, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and RANTES in the lung. The results show that RUTI's therapeutic effect is linked not only to the induction of a Th1 response but also to the stimulation of a quicker and stronger specific immunity against structural and growth-related antigens that reduces both the bacillary load and the pulmonary pathology.

  3. Current Methods in the Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Other Mycobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ingen, Jakko; Dziadek, Jarosław; Mazur, Paweł K.; Bielecki, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    In the epidemiology of tuberculosis (TB) and nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) diseases, as in all infectious diseases, the key issue is to define the source of infection and to disclose its routes of transmission and dissemination in the environment. For this to be accomplished, the ability of discerning and tracking individual Mycobacterium strains is of critical importance. Molecular typing methods have greatly improved our understanding of the biology of mycobacteria and provide powerful tools to combat the diseases caused by these pathogens. The utility of various typing methods depends on the Mycobacterium species under investigation as well as on the research question. For tuberculosis, different methods have different roles in phylogenetic analyses and person-to-person transmission studies. In NTM diseases, most investigations involve the search for environmental sources or phylogenetic relationships. Here, too, the type of setting determines which methodology is most suitable. Within this review, we summarize currently available molecular methods for strain typing of M. tuberculosis and some NTM species, most commonly associated with human disease. For the various methods, technical practicalities as well as discriminatory power and accomplishments are reviewed. PMID:24527454

  4. Gastrointestinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, D J; Scott, R N

    1986-10-01

    In the developed countries gastrointestinal tuberculosis is no longer common in clinical practice. In this setting the importance of the condition lies in the vagaries of its presentation and the fact that it is eminently treatable, usually by a combination of chemotherapy and surgery. The clinical features and complications of gastrointestinal tuberculosis are highlighted by the seven cases which we report. Diagnosis and treatment of this condition is discussed and attention is drawn to the importance of case notification. Clinicians should bear in mind the diagnosis of gastrointestinal tuberculosis when dealing with any patient with non-specific abdominal symptoms.

  5. Current concepts of chemotherapy and radiotherapy for small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, T.J.; Bunn, P.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) was projected to account for 20%-25% of the greater than 140,000 newly diagnosed lung cancers in 1985. If considered a separate disease entity, it would be the fourth leading cause of death by cancer. Previous studies have demonstrated distinct clinical and biologic features of small cell lung cancer, and early therapeutic trial results have demonstrated a high sensitivity to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. More recent results demonstrated a marked survival improvement with the use of combination chemotherapy, which potentially cured a small minority of patients. Unfortunately, in most patients, drug resistance usually develops, as do chronic, often debilitating toxicities in the few long-term survivors. Although therapeutic advances have plateaued, new and important insights into the basic biology of the disease made the last several years offer the possibility of exciting new treatment approaches within the next decade. This chapter addresses our current understanding of therapy for small cell lung cancer, the current therapy questions under investigation, and potential future directions in clinical research

  6. Current status and future prospects of hyperthermic intraoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) clinical trials in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Renee A; O'Cearbhaill, Roisin E; Zivanovic, Oliver; Chi, Dennis S

    2017-08-01

    The natural history of advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer is one of clinical remission after surgery and platinum/taxane-based intravenous (IV) and/or intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy followed by early or late recurrence in the majority of patients. Prevention of progression and recurrence remains a major hurdle in the management of ovarian cancer. Recently, many investigators have evaluated the use of normothermic and hyperthermic intraoperative IP drug delivery as a management strategy. This is a narrative review of the current status of clinical trials of hyperthermic intraoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) in ovarian cancer and the future directions for this treatment strategy. The existing studies on HIPEC in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer are mostly retrospective in nature, are heterogeneous with regards to combined inclusion of primary and recurrent disease and lack unbiased data. Until data are available from evidence-based trials, it is reasonable to conclude that surgical cytoreduction and HIPEC is a rational and interesting, though still investigative, approach in the management of epithelial ovarian cancer, whose use should be employed within prospective clinical trials.

  7. Current trends and intricacies in the management of HIV-associated pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Narendran; Chandrasekaran, Padmapriyadarsini; Swaminathan, Soumya; Tripathy, Srikanth

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic has undoubtedly increased the incidence of tuberculosis (TB) globally, posing a formidable global health challenge affecting 1.2 million cases. Pulmonary TB assumes utmost significance in the programmatic perspective as it is readily transmissible as well as easily diagnosable. HIV complicates every aspect of pulmonary tuberculosis from diagnosis to treatment, demanding a different approach to effectively tackle both the diseases. In order to control these converging epidemics, it is important to diagnose early, initiate appropriate therapy for both infections, prevent transmission and administer preventive therapy. Liquid culture methods and nucleic acid amplification tests for TB confirmation have replaced conventional solid media, enabling quicker and simultaneous detection of mycobacterium and its drug sensitivity profile Unique problems posed by the syndemic include Acquired rifampicin resistance, drug-drug interactions, malabsorption of drugs and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome or paradoxical reaction that complicate dual and concomitant therapy. While the antiretroviral therapy armamentarium is constantly reinforced by discovery of newer and safer drugs every year, only a few drugs for anti tuberculosis treatment have successfully emerged. These include bedaquiline, delamanid and pretomanid which have entered phase III B trials and are also available through conditional access national programmes. The current guidelines by WHO to start Antiretroviral therapy irrespective of CD4+ cell count based on benefits cited by recent trials could go a long way in preventing various complications caused by the deadly duo. This review provides a consolidated gist of the advancements, concepts and updates that have emerged in the management of HIV-associated pulmonary TB for maximizing efficacy, offering latest solutions for tackling drug-drug interactions and remedial measures for immune reconstitution inflammatory

  8. SPECIFIC FEATURES OF PSYCHOLOGICAL CARE FOR PATIENTS WITH PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS DURING INTENSIVE CHEMOTHERAPY (IN THE HOSPITAL SETTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Streltsov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The psychological trauma of pulmonary tuberculosis and long-term treatment may cause the development and progression of different borderline neuropsychic disorders in patients, lower therapeutic effectiveness, and prematurely discontinue therapy. The main practical tasks of psychological rehabilitation during intensive treatment are to render care for a patient during his adaptation to the hospital setting, to correct inadequate attitude towards disease, and to motivate active cooperation with specialists. Competent psychological support of drug therapy promotes a reduction in the intensity of psychic and somatic experiences in the patient and an increase in his psychological resources. A respective microclimate in the tuberculosis control facility and a patient-centered doctorpatient model should be considered as the most important rehabilitation factors.

  9. Integration of PET/CT in Current Diagnostic and Response Evaluation Methods in Patients with Tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezmen, Oelem; Goekcek, Atila; Tatci, Ebru; Biner, Inci; Akkalyoncu, Behiye

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a systemic disease that still affects many people. While pleural involvement is frequently observed in extrapulmonary tuberculosis, multiple skeletal system and articular involvements are quite rare. FDG PET imaging could be a promising diagnostic and treatment monitoring method, especially in complicated cases and if the other methods are inadequate. In this case study, we report a patient who was admitted with suspected malignancy and then diagnosed with tuberculosis pleuritis, lymphadenitis, spondylodiscitis, and sacroiliitis with specific symptoms; the response to anti-tuberculosis therapy was shown using FDG PET/CT

  10. Integration of PET/CT in Current Diagnostic and Response Evaluation Methods in Patients with Tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezmen, Oelem; Goekcek, Atila; Tatci, Ebru; Biner, Inci; Akkalyoncu, Behiye [Atatuerk Chest Diseases and Thoracic Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2014-03-15

    Tuberculosis is a systemic disease that still affects many people. While pleural involvement is frequently observed in extrapulmonary tuberculosis, multiple skeletal system and articular involvements are quite rare. FDG PET imaging could be a promising diagnostic and treatment monitoring method, especially in complicated cases and if the other methods are inadequate. In this case study, we report a patient who was admitted with suspected malignancy and then diagnosed with tuberculosis pleuritis, lymphadenitis, spondylodiscitis, and sacroiliitis with specific symptoms; the response to anti-tuberculosis therapy was shown using FDG PET/CT.

  11. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: an update on the current understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addington, James; Freimer, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is a common side effect of selected chemotherapeutic agents. Previous work has suggested that patients often under report the symptoms of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and physicians fail to recognize the presence of such symptoms in a timely fashion. The precise pathophysiology that underlies chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, in both the acute and the chronic phase, remains complex and appears to be medication specific. Recent work has begun to demonstrate and further clarify potential pathophysiological processes that predispose and, ultimately, lead to the development of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. There is increasing evidence that the pathway to neuropathy varies with each agent. With a clearer understanding of how these agents affect the peripheral nervous system, more targeted treatments can be developed in order to optimize treatment and prevent long-term side effects.

  12. Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis-Current Dilemmas, Unanswered Questions, Challenges, and Priority Needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Raviglione, Mario; Hoelscher, Michael; Ditiu, Lucica; McHugh, Timothy D.; Squire, S. Bertel; Cox, Helen; Ford, Nathan; McNerney, Ruth; Marais, Ben; Grobusch, Martin; Lawn, Stephen D.; Migliori, Giovanni-Battista; Mwaba, Peter; O'Grady, Justin; Pletschette, Michel; Ramsay, Andrew; Chakaya, Jeremiah; Schito, Marco; Swaminathan, Soumya; Memish, Ziad; Maeurer, Markus; Atun, Rifat

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis was declared a global emergency by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1993. Following the declaration and the promotion in 1995 of directly observed treatment short course (DOTS), a cost-effective strategy to contain the tuberculosis epidemic, nearly 7 million lives have been saved

  13. Integration of chemotherapy into current treatment strategies for brain metastases from solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thamm Reinhard

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Patients with brain metastases represent a heterogeneous group where selection of the most appropriate treatment depends on many patient- and disease-related factors. Eventually, a considerable proportion of patients are treated with palliative approaches such as whole-brain radiotherapy. Whole-brain radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy has recently gained increasing attention and is hoped to augment the palliative effect of whole-brain radiotherapy alone and to extend survival in certain subsets of patients with controlled extracranial disease and good performance status. The randomized trials of whole-brain radiotherapy vs. whole-brain radiotherapy plus chemotherapy suggest that this concept deserves further study, although they failed to improve survival. However, survival might not be the most relevant endpoint in a condition, where most patients die from extracranial progression. Sometimes, the question arises whether patients with newly detected brain metastases and the indication for systemic treatment of extracranial disease can undergo standard systemic chemotherapy with the option of deferred rather than immediate radiotherapy to the brain. The literature contains numerous small reports on this issue, mainly in malignant melanoma, breast cancer, lung cancer and ovarian cancer, but very few sufficiently powered randomized trials. With chemotherapy alone, response rates were mostly in the order of 20–40%. The choice of chemotherapy regimen is often complicated by previous systemic treatment and takes into account the activity of the drugs in extracranial metastatic disease. Because the blood-brain barrier is partially disrupted in most macroscopic metastases, systemically administered agents can gain access to such tumor sites. Our systematic literature review suggests that both chemotherapy and radiochemotherapy for newly diagnosed brain metastases need further critical evaluation before standard clinical

  14. Integration of chemotherapy into current treatment strategies for brain metastases from solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieder, Carsten; Grosu, Anca L; Astner, Sabrina; Thamm, Reinhard; Molls, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Patients with brain metastases represent a heterogeneous group where selection of the most appropriate treatment depends on many patient- and disease-related factors. Eventually, a considerable proportion of patients are treated with palliative approaches such as whole-brain radiotherapy. Whole-brain radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy has recently gained increasing attention and is hoped to augment the palliative effect of whole-brain radiotherapy alone and to extend survival in certain subsets of patients with controlled extracranial disease and good performance status. The randomized trials of whole-brain radiotherapy vs. whole-brain radiotherapy plus chemotherapy suggest that this concept deserves further study, although they failed to improve survival. However, survival might not be the most relevant endpoint in a condition, where most patients die from extracranial progression. Sometimes, the question arises whether patients with newly detected brain metastases and the indication for systemic treatment of extracranial disease can undergo standard systemic chemotherapy with the option of deferred rather than immediate radiotherapy to the brain. The literature contains numerous small reports on this issue, mainly in malignant melanoma, breast cancer, lung cancer and ovarian cancer, but very few sufficiently powered randomized trials. With chemotherapy alone, response rates were mostly in the order of 20–40%. The choice of chemotherapy regimen is often complicated by previous systemic treatment and takes into account the activity of the drugs in extracranial metastatic disease. Because the blood-brain barrier is partially disrupted in most macroscopic metastases, systemically administered agents can gain access to such tumor sites. Our systematic literature review suggests that both chemotherapy and radiochemotherapy for newly diagnosed brain metastases need further critical evaluation before standard clinical implementation. A potential chemotherapy

  15. Diagnosis of tuberculosis in camelids: old problems, current solutions and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, J; Bezos, J; Juan, L de; Vordermeier, M; Rodriguez, S; Fernandez-de-Mera, I G; Mateos, A; Domínguez, L

    2012-02-01

    In spite of great efforts for its control and eradication, tuberculosis remains one of the most important zoonosis worldwide. Its causative agents, the members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, have a wide host range that complicates the epidemiology of this disease. Among susceptible species to these pathogens, camelids from the New World (llama, alpaca and vicuña) and Old World (Bactrian camel and dromedary) are acquiring an increasing importance in several European countries because of its growing number and could act as reservoirs of the disease for livestock and humans in their natural habitat. In addition, tuberculosis caused by a number of M. tuberculosis complex members is a life-threatening disease in these animal species. Although tuberculosis has been known to affect camelids for a long time, ante-mortem diagnosis is still challenging because of the lack of standardized diagnostic techniques and the limited sensitivity and specificity of the most widely applied tests. However, in recent years, several techniques that can at least partially overcome these limitations have been developed. This paper reviews the results and advances achieved in tuberculosis diagnosis in camelids in the last decade as well as the progresses on ongoing investigations, with special attention to the remaining challenges that still have to be faced to assure the availability of reliable tools for the detection of tuberculosis-infected animals and herds. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Natural History of Tuberculosis: Duration and Fatality of Untreated Pulmonary Tuberculosis in HIV Negative Patients: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiemersma, Edine W.; van der Werf, Marieke J.; Borgdorff, Martien W.; Williams, Brian G.; Nagelkerke, Nico J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The prognosis, specifically the case fatality and duration, of untreated tuberculosis is important as many patients are not correctly diagnosed and therefore receive inadequate or no treatment. Furthermore, duration and case fatality of tuberculosis are key parameters in interpreting epidemiological data. Methodology and Principal Findings To estimate the duration and case fatality of untreated pulmonary tuberculosis in HIV negative patients we reviewed studies from the pre-chemotherapy era. Untreated smear-positive tuberculosis among HIV negative individuals has a 10-year case fatality variously reported between 53% and 86%, with a weighted mean of 70%. Ten-year case fatality of culture-positive smear-negative tuberculosis was nowhere reported directly but can be indirectly estimated to be approximately 20%. The duration of tuberculosis from onset to cure or death is approximately 3 years and appears to be similar for smear-positive and smear-negative tuberculosis. Conclusions Current models of untreated tuberculosis that assume a total duration of 2 years until self-cure or death underestimate the duration of disease by about one year, but their case fatality estimates of 70% for smear-positive and 20% for culture-positive smear-negative tuberculosis appear to be satisfactory. PMID:21483732

  17. Potential of nanotechnology as a delivery platform against tuberculosis: current research review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, S; Kusum Devi, V

    2015-03-28

    This review focusses on the current ongoing research in the field of tuberculosis comprising the resistant strains. It specifies a proper data analysis with results in concise form from areas gripping in: diagnostic nanotechnology, vaccine nanotechnology and the prime field of interest i.e., therapeutic nanotechnology. Primarily, therapeutic area recollects the research findings from advanced drug delivery (primary era) to the targeted drug delivery (modern era). The vaccine-based area derives the immune-specific targeting with enhanced emphasis on vaccine extraction and preparation of nanoparticles. Finally, the diagnostic area signifies the imaging techniques that may be employed in the diagnosis of TB. Not only that, there are some researches that emphasized on finding the comparable diagnostic differences between normal and resistant strains. With the advent of carbon nanotubes, metallic NPs, a newer hope has emerged out in diagnostic research, which may extend to therapeutic research applications too. Modifications of natural polymers, least or no use of organic solvents, size controlled NPs, optimized methodology, etc., are fields that need more effort to bypass toxicity. If above desired possibilities get the priority during research, it may lead to shift in the timeline towards much more oriented research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Reviewing current and emerging antiemetics for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, James J

    2015-01-01

    This review provides background information on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) classification and pathophysiology and reviews various antiemetic agents for CINV prophylaxis, including corticosteroids, serotonin receptor antagonists (5-HT3 RAs), tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonists (NK1 RAs), and olanzapine. Other less commonly used agents are briefly discussed. Practical considerations are reviewed as well, including emetogenicity of chemotherapeutic regimens, patient-specific risk factors for CINV, principles of CINV management, health economics outcome research, and quality of life. Available data on the newly FDA-approved antiemetic combination netupitant/palonosetron (NEPA) is also reviewed. Prevention of CINV is an important goal in managing patients with cancer and is especially difficult with respect to nausea and delayed CINV. Corticosteroids are a mainstay of CINV prophylaxis and are usually given in combination with other therapies. The 5-HT3 RA palonosetron has shown increased efficacy over other agents in the same class for prevention of delayed emesis with moderately emetogenic chemotherapy and NK1 RAs improve emesis prevention in combination with 5-HT3 RAs and dexamethasone. Olanzapine has shown efficacy for CINV prophylaxis and the treatment of breakthrough CINV. The new combination therapy, NEPA, has been shown to be efficacious for the prevention of acute, delayed, and overall CINV. Risk factors that have been identified for CINV include gender, age, and alcohol intake. It is important to assess the emetogenicity of chemotherapy regimens as well as the potential impact of patient risk factors in order to provide adequate prophylaxis. Acute and delayed CINV are severe, burdensome side effects of chemotherapy; however, new data on prevention and the discovery of new agents can further improve CINV control.

  19. Current status of secondary leukemia following cancer chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Kohei; Nagura, Ei-ichi.

    1990-01-01

    As part of a study on hematopoietic effects of A-bombing, a nationwide questionnaire survey was made in 1,487 facilities to analyze secondary leukemia. A total of 232 patients, who were reported to have developed secondary hematopoietic or solid tumor, were eligible for this study. For 62 each evaluable male and female patients, the most common primary solid cancer was gastric cancer (27/62) for men; and breast cancer (25/62) and urinary cancer (27/62) for women. Of a total of 124 patients, 73 (59%) developed acute leukemia as secondary hematopoietic tumor, 53 of whom had underwent chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy for primary cancer. For primary hematopoietic tumor seen in 90 patients, non-Hodgkin's disease was the most common (38%, 34/90), followed by multiple myeloma (20%, 18/90). Of a total of 155 patients developing secondary hematopoietic tumor, 111 had received chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Chemotherapy or radiotherapy for primary cancer may have the potential risk for developing secondary cancer. (N.K.)

  20. Tuberculosis and nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Krishna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition and tuberculosis are both problems of considerable magnitude in most of the underdeveloped regions of the world. These two problems tend to interact with each other. Tuberculosis mortality rates in different economic groups in a community tend to vary inversely with their economic levels. Similarly, nutritional status is significantly lower in patients with active tuberculosis compared with healthy controls. Malnutrition can lead to secondary immunodeficiency that increases the host′s susceptibility to infection. In patients with tuberculosis, it leads to reduction in appetite, nutrient malabsorption, micronutrient malabsorption, and altered metabolism leading to wasting. Both, protein-energy malnutrition and micronutrients deficiencies increase the risk of tuberculosis. It has been found that malnourished tuberculosis patients have delayed recovery and higher mortality rates than well-nourished patients. Nutritional status of patients improves during tuberculosis chemotherapy. High prevalence of human immunodeficiency (HIV infection in the underdeveloped countries further aggravates the problem of malnutrition and tuberculosis. Effect of malnutrition on childhood tuberculosis and tuberculin skin test are other important considerations. Nutritional supplementation may represent a novel approach for fast recovery in tuberculosis patients. In addition, raising nutritional status of population may prove to be an effective measure to control tuberculosis in underdeveloped areas of world.

  1. Intratumoral chemotherapy for lung cancer: re-challenge current targeted therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hohenforst-Schmidt W

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Wolfgang Hohenforst-Schmidt,1 Paul Zarogoulidis,2,3 Kaid Darwiche,3 Thomas Vogl,4 Eugene P Goldberg,5 Haidong Huang,6 Michael Simoff,7 Qiang Li,6 Robert Browning,8 J Francis Turner,9 Patrick Le Pivert,10 Dionysios Spyratos,2 Konstantinos Zarogoulidis,2 Seyhan I Celikoglu,11 Firuz Celikoglu,11 Johannes Brachmann11II Medical Clinic, Coburg Hospital, University of Wuerzburg, Coburg, Germany; 2Pulmonary Department-Oncology Unit, G Papanikolaou General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece; 3Department of Interventional Pneumology, Ruhrlandklinik, West German Lung Center, University Hospital, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany; 4Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Goethe University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany; 5Biomaterials Science and Engineering, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, FL, USA; 6Department of Respiratory Diseases, Changhai Hospital/First Affiliated Hospital of the Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 7Bronchoscopy and Interventional Pulmonology, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Henry Ford Hospital, Wayne State University, School of Medicine, MI, USA; 8Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Interventional Pulmonology, National Naval Medical Center, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Bethesda, USA; 9Pulmonary Medicine, University of Nevada School of Medicine, National Supercomputing Center for Energy and the Environment University of Nevada, Las Vegas, USA; 10Interventional Drug Delivery Systems and Strategies (ID2S2, Medical Cryogenics, Jupiter, FL, USA; 11Pulmonary Department, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul, Istanbul, TurkeyAbstract: Strategies to enhance the already established doublet chemotherapy regimen for lung cancer have been investigated for more than 20 years. Initially, the concept was to administer chemotherapy drugs locally to the tumor site for efficient diffusion

  2. Modeling of novel diagnostic strategies for active tuberculosis - a systematic review: current practices and recommendations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Zwerling

    Full Text Available The field of diagnostics for active tuberculosis (TB is rapidly developing. TB diagnostic modeling can help to inform policy makers and support complicated decisions on diagnostic strategy, with important budgetary implications. Demand for TB diagnostic modeling is likely to increase, and an evaluation of current practice is important. We aimed to systematically review all studies employing mathematical modeling to evaluate cost-effectiveness or epidemiological impact of novel diagnostic strategies for active TB.Pubmed, personal libraries and reference lists were searched to identify eligible papers. We extracted data on a wide variety of model structure, parameter choices, sensitivity analyses and study conclusions, which were discussed during a meeting of content experts.From 5619 records a total of 36 papers were included in the analysis. Sixteen papers included population impact/transmission modeling, 5 were health systems models, and 24 included estimates of cost-effectiveness. Transmission and health systems models included specific structure to explore the importance of the diagnostic pathway (n = 4, key determinants of diagnostic delay (n = 5, operational context (n = 5, and the pre-diagnostic infectious period (n = 1. The majority of models implemented sensitivity analysis, although only 18 studies described multi-way sensitivity analysis of more than 2 parameters simultaneously. Among the models used to make cost-effectiveness estimates, most frequent diagnostic assays studied included Xpert MTB/RIF (n = 7, and alternative nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs (n = 4. Most (n = 16 of the cost-effectiveness models compared new assays to an existing baseline and generated an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER.Although models have addressed a small number of important issues, many decisions regarding implementation of TB diagnostics are being made without the full benefits of insight from mathematical

  3. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis homologue of the Mycobacterium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the completion of genome sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and upsurge in the incidence of M. tuberculosis infection worldwide partly as a result of HIV pandemic, there is need for rationale approach to vaccine and chemotherapy discoveries for M. tuberculosis. The homologue of mig gene of. Mycobacterium ...

  4. Metronomic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutsaers, Anthony J

    2009-08-01

    Chemotherapy drugs are usually administered at doses that are high enough to result in an obligatory break period to allow for the observation of potential side effects and institution of supportive care, if required. In recent years, efforts to administer chemotherapy on a more continuous basis, with a much shorter break period, or none at all, have received increased interest, and the practice has come to be known as metronomic chemotherapy. The basis for success with this currently investigational approach may be rooted in continuous drug exposure to susceptible cancer cells, inhibition of tumor blood vessel growth-a process known as tumor angiogenesis, and/or alterations in tumor immunology. Increased benefit also appears to occur when metronomic chemotherapy is used in combination with newer, targeted antiangiogenic agents, and therefore represents a promising approach to combination therapy, particularly as targeted oncology drugs make their way into veterinary oncology applications. There is still much to be learned in this field, especially with regard to optimization of the proper drugs, dose, schedule, and tumor applications. However, the low cost, ease of administration, and acceptable toxicity profiles potentially associated with this therapeutic strategy make metronomic chemotherapy protocols attractive and suitable to veterinary applications. Preliminary clinical trial results have now been reported in both human and veterinary medicine, including adjuvant treatment of canine splenic hemangiosarcoma and incompletely resected soft tissue sarcoma, and, further, more powerful studies are currently ongoing.

  5. Drug therapy in spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, S; Khandelwal, Gaurav

    2013-06-01

    Although the discovery of effective anti-tuberculosis drugs has made uncomplicated spinal tuberculosis a medical disease, the advent of multi-drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the co-infection of HIV with tuberculosis have led to a resurgence of the disease recently. The principles of drug treatment of spinal tuberculosis are derived from our experience in treating pulmonary tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis is classified to be a severe form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and hence is included in Category I of the WHO classification. The tuberculosis bacilli isolated from patients are of four different types with different growth kinetics and metabolic characteristics. Hence multiple drugs, which act on the different groups of the mycobacteria, are included in each anti-tuberculosis drug regimen. Prolonged and uninterrupted chemotherapy (which may be 'short course' and 'intermittent' but preferably 'directly observed') is effective in controlling the infection. Spinal Multi-drug-resistant TB and spinal TB in HIV-positive patients present unique problems in management and have much poorer prognosis. Failure of chemotherapy and emergence of drug resistance are frequent due to the failure of compliance hence all efforts must be made to improve patient compliance to the prescribed drug regimen.

  6. Alternating current electrical stimulation enhanced chemotherapy: a novel strategy to bypass multidrug resistance in tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janigro, Damir; Perju, Catalin; Fazio, Vincent; Hallene, Kerri; Dini, Gabriele; Agarwal, Mukesh K; Cucullo, Luca

    2006-01-01

    Tumor burden can be pharmacologically controlled by inhibiting cell division and by direct, specific toxicity to the cancerous tissue. Unfortunately, tumors often develop intrinsic pharmacoresistance mediated by specialized drug extrusion mechanisms such as P-glycoprotein. As a consequence, malignant cells may become insensitive to various anti-cancer drugs. Recent studies have shown that low intensity very low frequency electrical stimulation by alternating current (AC) reduces the proliferation of different tumor cell lines by a mechanism affecting potassium channels while at intermediate frequencies interfere with cytoskeletal mechanisms of cell division. The aim of the present study is to test the hypothesis that permeability of several MDR1 over-expressing tumor cell lines to the chemotherapic agent doxorubicin is enhanced by low frequency, low intensity AC stimulation. We grew human and rodent cells (C6, HT-1080, H-1299, SKOV-3 and PC-3) which over-expressed MDR1 in 24-well Petri dishes equipped with an array of stainless steel electrodes connected to a computer via a programmable I/O board. We used a dedicated program to generate and monitor the electrical stimulation protocol. Parallel cultures were exposed for 3 hours to increasing concentrations (1, 2, 4, and 8 μM) of doxorubicin following stimulation to 50 Hz AC (7.5 μA) or MDR1 inhibitor XR9576. Cell viability was assessed by determination of adenylate kinase (AK) release. The relationship between MDR1 expression and the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin as well as the cellular distribution of MDR1 was investigated by computerized image analysis immunohistochemistry and Western blot techniques. By the use of a variety of tumor cell lines, we show that low frequency, low intensity AC stimulation enhances chemotherapeutic efficacy. This effect was due to an altered expression of intrinsic cellular drug resistance mechanisms. Immunohistochemical, Western blot and fluorescence analysis revealed

  7. Population pharmacokinetics of rifampicin, pyrazinamide and isoniazid in children with tuberculosis: in silico evaluation of currently recommended doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvada, Simbarashe P; Denti, Paolo; Donald, Peter R; Schaaf, H Simon; Thee, Stephanie; Seddon, James A; Seifart, Heiner I; Smith, Peter J; McIlleron, Helen M; Simonsson, Ulrika S H

    2014-05-01

    To describe the population pharmacokinetics of rifampicin, pyrazinamide and isoniazid in children and evaluate the adequacy of steady-state exposures. We used previously published data for 76 South African children with tuberculosis to describe the population pharmacokinetics of rifampicin, pyrazinamide and isoniazid. Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict steady-state exposures in children following doses in fixed-dose combination tablets in accordance with the revised guidelines. Reference exposures were derived from an ethnically similar adult population with tuberculosis taking currently recommended doses. The final models included allometric scaling of clearance and volume of distribution using body weight. Maturation was included for clearance of isoniazid and clearance and absorption transit time of rifampicin. For a 2-year-old child weighing 12.5 kg, the estimated typical oral clearances of rifampicin and pyrazinamide were 8.15 and 1.08 L/h, respectively. Isoniazid typical oral clearance (adjusted for bioavailability) was predicted to be 4.44, 11.6 and 14.6 L/h for slow, intermediate and fast acetylators, respectively. Higher oral clearance values in intermediate and fast acetylators also resulted from 23% lower bioavailability compared with slow acetylators. Simulations based on our models suggest that with the new WHO dosing guidelines and utilizing available paediatric fixed-dose combinations, children will receive adequate rifampicin exposures when compared with adults, but with a larger degree of variability. However, pyrazinamide and isoniazid exposures in many children will be lower than in adults. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings in children administered the revised dosages and to optimize pragmatic approaches to dosing.

  8. [On the way to shortening tuberculosis treatments: clinical trials of the Unitat d' Investagació en Tuberculosi de Barcelona supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Antonio; Sánchez, Francesca; Nelson, Jeanne; Miró, José M; Caylà, Joan A

    2010-01-01

    New treatment guidelines are required to improve the tuberculosis control strategies that have been used for 30 years. Seven centers of the Barcelona Tuberculosis Research Unit (BTRU) (Unitat d'Investigació en Tuberculosi de Barcelona) are collaborating with the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination of the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in a series of clinical trials on latent tuberculosis infection and tuberculosis disease. BTRU participation began in 2004 with Study 26, an evaluation of the efficacy and tolerability of rifapentine plus isoniazid administered once weekly for 3 months compared with the standard treatment for latent tuberculosis infection. The BTRU centers together enrolled 246 patients (3% of the total). General enrollment was completed in February, 2008. HIV-infected patient and child enrollment continues. Treatment with 12 doses instead of 270 doses is expected to be a clear success. However, the analysis will be completed in 2010. Study 28 (started in 2006), designed for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis, compared standard treatment with an experimental regimen substituting moxifloxacin for isoniazid. BTRU centers together enrolled 15 patients (3.5% of the total). The provisional results (presented at the 47th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy in Chicago, 2007) showed no difference between the sputum conversion rate of each regimen at week 8 of treatment. Study 29 is currently underway, in which rifapentine was introduced in the experimental regimen for active tuberculosis treatment. Copyright (c) 2009 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Tumor-like tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soon Yong

    1975-01-01

    It was known that some of the abdominal tuberculosis can produce tumor-like appearance clinically and radiologically. But these were mainly masses formed in mesenteric and retroperitoneal lymph nodes. The author has experienced the gastrointestinal tuberculosis resembling to a neoplastic process. In the gastric tuberculosis, irregular narrowing and filling defect with mucosal distortion and occasional shoulder effect could be seen in pyloric antrum. Deformity of proximal portion of duodenum was noted in most cases. Difficulty in differential diagnosis from the gastric cancer might be encountered. If duodenum was not involved. No definite sign of mucosal destruction involved area and associated deformity of duodenum was suggestive of an inflammatory lesion. If there is any tuberculous changes in small bowel, than gastric tuberculosis is more likely. There was the tuberculosis of descending duodenum or pancreaticoduodenal group of lymph nodes revealed cancer-like appearance. Long irregular narrowing with nodular filling defect and mucosal distortion or inverted 3 sign was evident. Differential diagnosis from cancer in duodenum or pancreas could not be made radiographically. Short annular stenosis and nodular filling defect with shoulder effect in both ends of stenosis was noted in some of small bowel tuberculosis. The findings were very resemble to malignancy. There was a case of huge hepatoma-like tuberculosis formed a large irregular mass by lymph nodes and adjacent organs. Chest film was not much help in the differential diagnosis. In many cases of the gastrointestinal tuberculosis, radiological findings were resembled to a neoplastic process. Since none of radiologic findings are specific enough to allow one to make a definitive diagnosis of the gastrointestinal tuberculosis and since type of the gastrointestinal tuberculosis could be cured by chemotherapy, careful analyzation of clinical features is emphasized before surgery.

  10. Tumor-like tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soon Yong [Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1975-06-15

    It was known that some of the abdominal tuberculosis can produce tumor-like appearance clinically and radiologically. But these were mainly masses formed in mesenteric and retroperitoneal lymph nodes. The author has experienced the gastrointestinal tuberculosis resembling to a neoplastic process. In the gastric tuberculosis, irregular narrowing and filling defect with mucosal distortion and occasional shoulder effect could be seen in pyloric antrum. Deformity of proximal portion of duodenum was noted in most cases. Difficulty in differential diagnosis from the gastric cancer might be encountered. If duodenum was not involved. No definite sign of mucosal destruction involved area and associated deformity of duodenum was suggestive of an inflammatory lesion. If there is any tuberculous changes in small bowel, than gastric tuberculosis is more likely. There was the tuberculosis of descending duodenum or pancreaticoduodenal group of lymph nodes revealed cancer-like appearance. Long irregular narrowing with nodular filling defect and mucosal distortion or inverted 3 sign was evident. Differential diagnosis from cancer in duodenum or pancreas could not be made radiographically. Short annular stenosis and nodular filling defect with shoulder effect in both ends of stenosis was noted in some of small bowel tuberculosis. The findings were very resemble to malignancy. There was a case of huge hepatoma-like tuberculosis formed a large irregular mass by lymph nodes and adjacent organs. Chest film was not much help in the differential diagnosis. In many cases of the gastrointestinal tuberculosis, radiological findings were resembled to a neoplastic process. Since none of radiologic findings are specific enough to allow one to make a definitive diagnosis of the gastrointestinal tuberculosis and since type of the gastrointestinal tuberculosis could be cured by chemotherapy, careful analyzation of clinical features is emphasized before surgery.

  11. Tratamento da tuberculose de infecção latente: As recomendações actuais Latent tuberculosis infection treatment: Current recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Duarte

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available O diagnóstico e tratamento da infecção latente por Mycobacterium tuberculosis reduz significativamente o risco de desenvolvimento de tuberculose activa e a transmissão da doença na comunidade. O rastreio da tuberculose infecção latente deve passar pela exclusão de doença activa (inquérito de sintomas e radiografia pulmonar e avaliação da resposta imunológica ao M. tuberculosis através dos testes actualmente ao dispor, como o teste tuberculínico e os testes IGRA (interferon-gamma release assay. A escolha do esquema de tratamento deve ter em linha de conta a eficácia, a adesão e os efeitos colaterais associados ao mesmo Este documento actualiza as recomendações sobre tratamento da tuberculose infecção latente. São apresentadas indicações sobre quem deve ser rastreado e revistos os esquemas de tratamento.Diagnosis and treatment of latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (LTBI, significantly reduces the risk of developing active tuberculosis and the transmission of the disease in the community. LTBI screening must pass by the exclusion of active disease (symptoms enquiry and chest radiography and assessment of immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis testing with the tests currently available - tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA. The choice of treatment must take into account the efficacy and side effects associated with the same. This document provides updated recommendations on latent tuberculosis infection treatment. Topics covered include whom to test for TB and reviewed LTBI treatment regimens.

  12. Rapid, automated, nonradiometric susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex to four first-line antituberculous drugs used in standard short-course chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Isik Somuncu; Thomsen, Vibeke Østergaard; Marjamäki, Merja

    2004-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis necessitates rapid and accurate susceptibility testing. The nonradiometric BACTEC Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube 960 (MGIT) system for susceptibility testing was evaluated on 222 clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates...... for isoniazid, rifampin, and ethambutol. Fifty-seven of the isolates were tested for pyrazinamide. Results were compared to those of radiometric BACTEC 460 system and discrepancies were resolved by the agar proportion method. We found an overall agreement of 99.0% for isoniazid, 99.5% for rifampin, 98.......2% for ethambutol, and 100% for pyrazinamide. After resolution of discrepancies, MGIT yielded no false susceptibility for rifampin and isoniazid. Although turnaround times were comparable, MGIT provides an advantage as inoculation can be done on any weekday as the growth is monitored automatically. The automated...

  13. Preoperative evaluation and monitoring chemotherapy in patients with high-grade osteogenic and Ewing's sarcoma: review of current imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woude, H.-J. van der; Bloem, J.L.; Hogendoorn, P.C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging is pivotal in the initial detection, characterization, staging and post-treatment follow-up of patients with high-grade osteogenic and Ewing's sarcoma. In the present review article, conventional and new imaging modalities are discussed with regard to the monitoring of the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in such patients. Presurgical monitoring of response to chemotherapy may have an impact on modification of neoadjuvant treatment protocols, on patient selection for the performance and timing of limb-salvage surgery and on planning of radiation therapy (in non-operated Ewing's sarcomas) and selection of postoperative chemotherapy regimens. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging, as part of a routine MR protocol, assists in the detection of the most viable parts of the tumour and serves as an initial standard for follow-up of the metabolic activity of the tumour during and after chemotherapy, both in small intraosseous tumours and in tumours with an associated soft tissue mass. In combination with selected morphological features, dynamic imaging parameters are therefore advocated for monitoring the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with osteogenic and Ewing's sarcoma. (orig.)

  14. Pulmonary tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    TB; Tuberculosis - pulmonary; Mycobacterium - pulmonary ... Pulmonary TB is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M tuberculosis) . TB is contagious. This means the bacteria is easily spread from an infected person ...

  15. Tuberculosis (TB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Tuberculosis Go to Information for Researchers ► Credit: NIAID Scanning ... are drug resistant. Why Is the Study of Tuberculosis a Priority for NIAID? Tuberculosis is one of ...

  16. [Research and control of relapse tuberculosis cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Fumio; Toyota, Makoto

    2009-12-01

    With this symposium, we focused on the relapse of tuberculosis in Japan. Out of 19,893 tuberculosis patients registered in 2007 in Japan, 7.48% were classified as relapse cases. Relapse cases have the risk of acquired drug resistance. But we have few analyses of the proportion of relapse tuberculosis cases with standard short course regimens for six months, factors contributing to tuberculosis relapse and the proportion of drug resistance among relapse TB cases in Japan. Therefore we analyzed the relapse tuberculosis cases in two rural areas and three urban areas. We also analyzed the proportion of drug resistance among relapse cases with the data of drug susceptibility survey of Ryoken. 1. Research of relapse tuberculosis cases: Makoto TOYOTA (Kochi City Public Health Center). To clarify the relapse rate and factors contributing to tuberculosis relapse, we investigated the relapse tuberculosis cases in the municipality where the proportion of elderly tuberculosis patients was high. Out of 902 tuberculosis patients registered in Kochi City Public Health Center during 10 years, 20 pulmonary tuberculosis patients were confirmed relapse cases with initial registered records. Pretreatment cavitations, sputum culture positivity at 2 months, medical miss-management (e.g. number of doses, duration of therapy) and poor adherence were considered to be factors contributing to tuberculosis relapse. Out of 20 relapse cases, 12 cases were detected with symptoms, while only 3 cases were detected by examination in law. 2. A clinical study on relapse cases of pulmonary tuberculosis: Shuichi TAKIKAWA (National Hospital Organization Nishibeppu National Hospital). The relapse of pulmonary tuberculosis was investigated. In the cases with a treatment history before short course chemotherapy, drug resistance rate was high, and thus it needs to be cautious of drug resistance at the time of the retreatment. In the cases with a treatment history of short course chemotherapy, relapse cases

  17. PREDICTORS OF OVERALL SURVIVAL IN PATIENTS WITH RECURRENT NON-SEMINOMATOUS GERMINAL TESTICULAR TUMORS ON CURRENT SECOND-LINE CHEMOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Fedyanin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to define predictors that influence longevity in patients with recurrent non-seminomatous germinal testicular tumors (NGTT on standard second-line chemotherapy (CT including cisplatin and iphosphamide. Statistical analysis was performed using the statistical packages Graph Pad Prism 4.00 for Windows and SPSS 15.0 for Windows. Subjects and methods. Case history data were analyzed in 693 patients with disseminated NGTT who had received current CT and followed up at the Department of Clinical Pharmacology and CT, N.N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences. The median follow-up was 32 (range 3-215 months. The disease progressed in 181 (26% patients. Detailed information was available on the nature of second-line CT in only 138 patients. Half (71 (51.7% of the 138 patients had second-line CT including iphosphamide. Uni- and multivariate analyses were made to identify predictors that influence longevity in patients with recurrent NGTT on standard secondline CT including cisplatin and iphosphamide. Results. Five-year overall survival (OS was 32% (95% confidence interval 25-41%. The multivariate analysis showed the morphological pattern of a primary tumor (a yolk sac tumor component, a pre-induction CT lactate dehydrogenase (LDH level of ?d1.5 units of the upper normal range, progression during induction CT, and a pre-second-line CT LDH level of ?d 1000 U/l to be negative predictors. According to the number of negative factors, the patients were classified into 3 groups: 1 good prognosis [n = 10 (14% of the 71 patients], 100% 3-year OS; 2 intermediate prognosis (one negative factor [n = 33 (46.5% of the 71 patients], 50.2% 3-year OS; 3 poor prognosis (?d 2 negative factors, 6.7% 3-year OS. Conclusion. Standard iphosphamide-containing therapy enables all patients to be treated in the good prognosis group of those with recurrent NGTT. That fails to achieve such striking results in the intermediate and

  18. Cystic change in pulmonary tuberculosis in an immunocompetent adult: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Sung Min; Seo, Soo Ji; Choi, Won Il; Jeon, Young June

    2008-01-01

    Cystic change associated with pulmonary tuberculosis is rarely encountered, and few reports are available on the radiologic findings of pulmonary tuberculosis presenting as multiple cystic lesions associated with consolidation or bronchohematogenous nodules. The cystic lesions in our pulmonary tuberculosis patient occurred during steroid treatment without antituberculous chemotherapy and progressively increased in size, but subsequently became smaller after the initiation of antituberculous chemotherapy. Herein, we report the chest radiographic and computed tomographic findings of cystic change in pulmonary tuberculosis in an immunocompetent adult

  19. Current integration of tuberculosis (TB and HIV services in South Africa, 2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel C Chehab

    Full Text Available SETTING: Public Health Facilities in South Africa. OBJECTIVE: To assess the current integration of TB and HIV services in South Africa, 2011. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study of 49 randomly selected health facilities in South Africa. Trained interviewers administered a standardized questionnaire to one staff member responsible for TB and HIV in each facility on aspects of TB/HIV policy, integration and recording and reporting. We calculated and compared descriptive statistics by province and facility type. RESULTS: Of the 49 health facilities 35 (71% provided isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT and 35 (71% offered antiretroviral therapy (ART. Among assessed sites in February 2011, 2,512 patients were newly diagnosed with HIV infection, of whom 1,913 (76% were screened for TB symptoms, and 616 of 1,332 (46% of those screened negative for TB were initiated on IPT. Of 1,072 patients newly registered with TB in February 2011, 144 (13% were already on ART prior to Tb clinical diagnosis, and 451 (42% were newly diagnosed with HIV infection. Of those, 84 (19% were initiated on ART. Primary health clinics were less likely to offer ART compared to district hospitals or community health centers (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: As of February 2011, integration of TB and HIV services is taking place in public medical facilities in South Africa. Among these services, IPT in people living with HIV and ART in TB patients are the least available.

  20. Tuberculosis treatment outcome in a tertiary care setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukhary, Zakeya A.; Alrajhi, Abdulrahman A.

    2007-01-01

    The outcome of the chemotherapy for pulmonary, extraplumonary and disseminated tuberculosis is not well documented, especially in developing countries. This study assessed tuberculosis treatment outcome, cure-to-treatment ratio and mortality among all types of tuberculosis patients in a tertiary care setting in Saudi Arabia. All cases diagnosed and treated for active Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection between 1991 and 2000 were included retrospectively. Data collected included type of tuberculosis involvement, treatment outcome, relapse and co-morbidities. Over a ten-year period, 535 case of tuberculosis were diagnosed and treated. Isolated pulmonary tuberculosis was identified in 141 cases (26.4%), extrapulmonary tuberculosis in 339 cases (63.3%). Co-morbidities were noted in 277 (52%) patients. Immunosuppression was found in 181 (34%) cases. The cure rate was 82%. The cure-to-treatment ratio was 86% in extrapulmonary tuberculosis and 65% in disseminated tuberculosis. Overall mortality was 18%. Disseminated tuberculosis had the highest mortality (34.9%), followed by pulmonary (21.8%), the extrapulmonary tuberculosis (13.6%). Forty-seven percent of all mortalities were directly related to tuberculosis. Relapse was documented in 14 out of 349 patients (4%) who had 24 months of follow-up. Despite tertiary care support, complicated tuberculosis carries a high mortality. Earlier diagnosis and complete appropriate chemotherapy are essential for improved outcome. (author)

  1. LTBI: latent tuberculosis infection or lasting immune responses to M. tuberculosis? A TBNET consensus statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mack, U; Migliori, G B; Sester, M

    2009-01-01

    . tuberculosis after tuberculin skin test or IGRA conversion is unknown. It is also uncertain how long adaptive immune responses towards mycobacterial antigens persist in the absence of live mycobacteria. Clinical management and public healthcare policies for preventive chemotherapy against tuberculosis could...

  2. Bursectomy, Curettage, and Chemotherapy in Tuberculous Trochanteric Bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Pascua, Luis R; Carro-Fernández, José A; Santos-Sánchez, José A; Casas Ramos, Paula; Díez-Romero, Luis J; Izquierdo-García, Francisco M

    2016-03-01

    We presented three patients with trochanteric tuberculosis and described the clinical and imaging findings of the infection. Histology revealed a necrotizing granulomatous bursitis and microbiology confirmed tuberculosis. All cases were successfully treated with bursectomy and curettage of the trochanteric lesion and antituberculous chemotherapy including isoniazid, pyrazinamide, rifampicin, and ethambutol.

  3. Tuberculosis abdominal Abdominal tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    T. Rubio; M. T. Gaztelu; A. Calvo; M. Repiso; H. Sarasíbar; F. Jiménez Bermejo; A. Martínez Echeverría

    2005-01-01

    La tuberculosis abdominal cursa con un cuadro inespecífico, con difícil diagnóstico diferencial respecto a otras entidades de similar semiología. Presentamos el caso de un varón que ingresa por presentar dolor abdominal, pérdida progresiva y notoria de peso corporal y fiebre de dos meses de evolución. El cultivo de la biopsia de colon mostró presencia de bacilo de Koch.Abdominal tuberculosis develops according to a non-specific clinical picture, with a difficult differential diagnosis with re...

  4. Genitourinary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, Maria Joao; Bacelar, Maria Teresa; Pinto, Pedro; Ramos, Isabel

    2005-01-01

    Although uncommon, genitourinary tuberculosis is the most common site of extrapulmonary tuberculosis infection. Its diagnosis is often difficult. This article provides an overview of the pathologic and radiologic findings of this disease process

  5. Tuberculosis Fluoroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follow-up though Dec 31, 2002 has been completed for a study of site-specific cancer mortality among tuberculosis patients treated with artificial lung collapse therapy in Massachusetts tuberculosis sanatoria (1930-1950).

  6. Congenital tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    2012-06-20

    Jun 20, 2012 ... Key words: Congenital tuberculo- sis, case report, miliary tuberculosis. Introduction. Congenital tuberculosis defines tuberculosis in infants of .... tary TB and otitis media, resulting in seizures, deafness, and death. It is therefore not surprising that the index case who presented at twelve weeks of age, had ...

  7. Bovine tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) in animals and humans may result from exposure to bacilli within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (i.e., M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. africanum, M. pinnipedii, M. microti, M. caprae, or M. canetti) . Mycobacterium bovis is the species most often isolated from tuberculous cat...

  8. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNerney Ruth

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With almost 9 million new cases each year, tuberculosis remains one of the most feared diseases on the planet. Led by the STOP-TB Partnership and WHO, recent efforts to combat the disease have made considerable progress in a number of countries. However, the emergence of mutated strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that are resistant to the major anti-tuberculosis drugs poses a deadly threat to control efforts. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB has been reported in all regions of the world. More recently, extensively drug resistant-tuberculosis (XDR-TB that is also resistant to second line drugs has emerged in a number of countries. To ensure that adequate resources are allocated to prevent the emergence and spread of drug resistance it is important to understand the scale of the problem. In this article we propose that current methods of describing the epidemiology of drug resistant tuberculosis are not adequate for this purpose and argue for the inclusion of population based statistics in global surveillance data. Discussion Whereas the prevalence of tuberculosis is presented as the proportion of individuals within a defined population having disease, the prevalence of drug resistant tuberculosis is usually presented as the proportion of tuberculosis cases exhibiting resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Global surveillance activities have identified countries in Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union and regions of China as having a high proportion of MDR-TB cases and international commentary has focused primarily on the urgent need to improve control in these settings. Other regions, such as sub-Saharan Africa have been observed as having a low proportion of drug resistant cases. However, if one considers the incidence of new tuberculosis cases with drug resistant disease in terms of the population then countries of sub-Saharan Africa have amongst the highest rates of transmitted MDR-TB in the world. We propose

  9. Malaria chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstanley, Peter; Ward, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Most malaria control strategies today depend on safe and effective drugs, as they have done for decades. But sensitivity to chloroquine, hitherto the workhorse of malaria chemotherapy, has rapidly declined throughout the tropics since the 1980s, and this drug is now useless in many high-transmission areas. New options for resource-constrained governments are few, and there is growing evidence that the burden from malaria has been increasing, as has malaria mortality in Africa. In this chapter, we have tried to outline the main pharmacological properties of current drugs, and their therapeutic uses and limitations. We have summarised the ways in which these drugs are employed, both in the formal health sector and in self-medication. We have briefly touched on the limitations of current drug development, but have tried to pick out a few promising drugs that are under development. Given that Plasmodium falciparum is the organism that kills, and that has developed multi-drug resistance, we have tended to focus upon it. Similarly, given that around 90% of global mortality from malaria occurs in Africa, there is the tendency to dwell on this continent. We give no apology for placing our emphasis upon the use of antimalarial drugs in endemic populations rather than their use for prophylaxis in travellers.

  10. Colorectal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagi, B.; Kochhar, R.; Bhasin, D.K.; Singh, K.

    2003-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the incidence of colorectal tuberculosis in our series and to study its radiological spectrum. A total of 684 cases of proven gastrointestinal tuberculosis with positive barium contrast findings seen over a period of more than one decade were evaluated. The study did not include cases where colon was involved in direct contiguity with ileo-caecal tuberculosis. Seventy-four patients (10.8%) had colorectal tuberculosis. Commonest site involved was transverse colon, closely followed by rectum and ascending colon. Radiological findings observed were in the form of strictures (54%), colitis (39%) and polypoid lesions (7%). Complications noted were in the form of perforations and fistulae in 18.9% of cases. Colorectal tuberculosis is a very common site for gastrointestinal tuberculosis. Typical findings of colorectal tuberculosis are strictures, signs of colitis and polypoid lesions. Common complications are perforation and fistulae. (orig.)

  11. Contralateral paradoxical response to chemotherapy in tuberculous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pleural effusions may occur as a complication of primary tuberculosis or an established pulmonary or extrapulmonary infection. New formation or expansion of a tuberculous lesion during chemotherapy is referred to as paradoxical response. Paradoxical response has been described to occur weeks or months after starting ...

  12. Tuberculosis (TB): Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Training Home Conditions Tuberculosis (TB) Tuberculosis: Treatment Tuberculosis: Treatment Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask ... or bones is treated longer. NEXT: Preventive Treatment Tuberculosis: Diagnosis Tuberculosis: History Clinical Trials For more than ...

  13. Living with Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Tuberculosis (TB) Living With Tuberculosis What to Expect You will need regular checkups ... XML file."); } }); } } --> Blank Section Header Lung Disease Lookup Tuberculosis (TB) Learn About Tuberculosis Tuberculosis Symptoms, Causes & Risk ...

  14. Multi drug resistant tuberculosis: a challenge in the management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multi drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) will not usually respond to short course chemotherapy. Unless the individual infected with this bug is treated appropriately, they can continue spreading resistant strains in the community and further fuel the tuberculosis epidemic. Diagnosis requires drug sensitivity testing and the ...

  15. Renal tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Džamić Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is still a significant health problem in the world, mostly in developing countries. The special significance lies in immunocompromised patients, particularly those suffering from the HIV. Urogenital tuberculosis is one of the most common forms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, while the most commonly involved organ is the kidney. Renal tuberculosis occurs by hematogenous dissemination of mycobacterium tuberculosis from a primary tuberculosis foci in the body. Tuberculosis is characterized by the formation of pathognomonic lesions in the tissues - granulomata. These granulomata may heal spontaneously or remain stable for years. In certain circumstances in the body associated with immunosuppression, the disease may be activated. Central caseous necrosis occurs within tuberculoma, leading to formation of cavities that destroy renal parenchyma. The process may gain access to the collecting system, forming the caverns. In this way, infection can be spread distally to renal pelvis, ureter and bladder. Scaring of tissue by tuberculosis process may lead to development of strictures of the urinary tract. The clinical manifestations are presented by nonspecific symptoms and signs, so tuberculosis can often be overlooked. Sterile pyuria is characteristic for urinary tuberculosis. Dysuric complaints, flank pain or hematuria may be presented in patients. Constitutional symptoms of fever, weight loss and night sweats are presented in some severe cases. Diagnosis is made by isolation of mycobacterium tuberculosis in urine samples, by cultures carried out on standard solid media optimized for mycobacterial growth. Different imaging studies are used in diagnostics - IVU, CT and NMR are the most important. Medical therapy is the main modality of tuberculosis treatment. The first line anti-tuberculosis drugs include isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol. Surgical treatment is required in some cases, to remove severely damaged kidney, if

  16. Trends of anti-tuberculosis drug resistance pattern in new cases and previously treated cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis cases in referral hospitals in northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Maurya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug-resistant tuberculosis is one of major current challenges to global public health. The transmission of resistant strains is increasing as a burden of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB patients in extra pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB cases in India. Aim and Objectives: The aim was to study trends of anti-tuberculosis drug resistance pattern in new cases and previously treated cases of EPTB in referral hospitals in northern India. Study Design and Setting: A prospectively observational study and referral medical institutions in northern India. Materials and Methods: All EPTB specimens were processed for Ziehl Neelsen staining, BACTEC culture and BACTEC NAP test for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. All M. tuberculosis complex isolates were performed for radiometric-based drug susceptibility pattern against streptomycin, isoniazid, rifampicin and ethambutol using the 1% proportion method. Results: We found that 165/756 (20.5% isolates were identified as M. tuberculosis complex by the NAP test. We observed that 39.9% were resistant to first-line antitubercular drugs. The resistance rate was higher in previously treated patients: H (30.3%, R (16.3%, E (15.7% and S (16.3%. MDR-TB was observed in 13.4%, but, in new cases, this was 11.4% and 19.1% of the previously treated patients (P<0.05. Conclusion: MDR-TB is gradually increased in EPTB cases and predominant resistance to previous treated cases of EPTB. The molecular drug sensitivity test (DST method can be an early decision for chemotherapy in MDR-TB patients. The International Standards of TB Care need to be used by the RNTCP and professional medical associations as a tool to improve TB care in the country.

  17. Mathematical Models of Tuberculosis Reactivation and Relapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Steven Wallis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The natural history of human infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is highly variable, as is the response to treatment of active tuberculosis. There is presently no direct means to identify individuals in whom Mtb infection has been eradicated, whether by a bactericidal immune response or sterilizing antimicrobial chemotherapy. Mathematical models can assist in such circumstances by measuring or predicting events that cannot be directly observed. The 3 models discussed in this review illustrate instances in which mathematical models were used to identify individuals with innate resistance to Mtb infection, determine the etiology of tuberculosis in patients treated with tumor necrosis factor antagonists, and predict the risk of relapse in persons undergoing tuberculosis treatment. These examples illustrate the power of various types of mathematic models to increase knowledge and thereby inform interventions in the present global tuberculosis epidemic.

  18. A Phase II/III Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Clinical Trial of Ginger (Zingiber officinale) for Nausea Caused by Chemotherapy for Cancer: A Currently Accruing URCC CCOP Cancer Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickok, Jane T; Roscoe, Joseph A; Morrow, Gary R; Ryan, Julie L

    2007-09-01

    Despite the widespread use of 5-HT3 receptor antagonist antiemetics such as ondansetron and granistron, up to 70% of patients with cancer receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy agents experience postchemotherapy nausea and vomiting. Delayed postchemotherapy nausea (nausea that occurs >/= 24 hours after chemotherapy administration) and anticipatory nausea (nausea that develops before chemotherapy administration, in anticipation of it) are poorly controlled by currently available antiemetic agents. Scientific studies suggest that ginger (Zingiber officinale) might have beneficial effects on nausea and vomiting associated with motion sickness, surgery, and pregnancy. In 2 small studies of patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy, addition of ginger to standard antiemetic medication further reduced the severity of postchemotherapy nausea. This article describes a phase II/III randomized, dose-finding, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial to assess the efficacy of ginger for nausea associated with chemotherapy for cancer. The study is currently being conducted by private practice oncology groups that are funded by the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program and affiliated with the University of Rochester Cancer Center Community Clinical Oncology Program Research Base.

  19. Combination Chemotherapy for Influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Webster

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses in April 2009 and the continuous evolution of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses underscore the urgency of novel approaches to chemotherapy for human influenza infection. Anti-influenza drugs are currently limited to the neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir and zanamivir and to M2 ion channel blockers (amantadine and rimantadine, although resistance to the latter class develops rapidly. Potential targets for the development of new anti-influenza agents include the viral polymerase (and endonuclease, the hemagglutinin, and the non-structural protein NS1. The limitations of monotherapy and the emergence of drug-resistant variants make combination chemotherapy the logical therapeutic option. Here we review the experimental data on combination chemotherapy with currently available agents and the development of new agents and therapy targets.

  20. Tuberculosis care among refugees arriving in Europe: a ERS/WHO Europe Region survey of current practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dara, Masoud; Solovic, Ivan; Sotgiu, Giovanni; D'Ambrosio, Lia; Centis, Rosella; Tran, Richard; Goletti, Delia; Duarte, Raquel; Aliberti, Stefano; de Benedictis, Fernando Maria; Bothamley, Graham; Schaberg, Tom; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Teixeira, Vitor; Ward, Brian; Gratziou, Christina; Migliori, Giovanni Battista

    2016-09-01

    No evidence exists on tuberculosis (TB) and latent TB infection (LTBI) management policies among refugees in European countries.A questionnaire investigating screening and management practices among refugees was sent to 38 national TB programme representatives of low and intermediate TB incidence European countries/territories of the WHO European Region.Out of 36 responding countries, 31 (86.1%) reported screening for active TB, 19 for LTBI, and eight (22.2%) reporting outcomes of LTBI treatment. Screening for TB is based on algorithms including different combinations of symptom-based questionnaires, bacteriology and chest radiography and LTBI screening on different combinations of tuberculin skin test and interferon-γ release assays. In 22 (61.1%) countries, TB and LTBI screening are performed in refugee centres. In 22 (61.1%) countries, TB services are organised in collaboration with the private sector. 27 (75%) countries answered that screening for TB is performed as per national and international guidelines, while 19 (52.7%) gave the same answer with regards to LTBI screening. Infection control measures are inadequate in several of the countries surveyed.There is need for improved coordination of TB screening in Europe to implement the End TB Strategy and achieve TB elimination. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  1. Tuberculosis neonatal

    OpenAIRE

    Pastor Durán, Xavier

    1986-01-01

    PROTOCOLOS TERAPEUTICOS. TUBERCULOSIS NEONATAL 1. CONCEPTO La tuberculosis neonatal es la infección del recién nacido producida por el bacilo de Koch. Es una situación rara pero grave que requiere un diagnóstico precoz y un tratamiento enérgico..

  2. Targeting phenotypically tolerant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Ben; Nathan, Carl

    2016-01-01

    While the immune system is credited with averting tuberculosis in billions of individuals exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the immune system is also culpable for tempering the ability of antibiotics to deliver swift and durable cure of disease. In individuals afflicted with tuberculosis, host immunity produces diverse microenvironmental niches that support suboptimal growth, or complete growth arrest, of M. tuberculosis. The physiological state of nonreplication in bacteria is associated with phenotypic drug tolerance. Many of these host microenvironments, when modeled in vitro by carbon starvation, complete nutrient starvation, stationary phase, acidic pH, reactive nitrogen intermediates, hypoxia, biofilms, and withholding streptomycin from the streptomycin-addicted strain SS18b, render M. tuberculosis profoundly tolerant to many of the antibiotics that are given to tuberculosis patients in a clinical setting. Targeting nonreplicating persisters is anticipated to reduce the duration of antibiotic treatment and rate of post-treatment relapse. Some promising drugs to treat tuberculosis, such as rifampicin and bedaquiline, only kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis in vitro at concentrations far greater than their minimal inhibitory concentrations against replicating bacilli. There is an urgent demand to identify which of the currently used antibiotics, and which of the molecules in academic and corporate screening collections, have potent bactericidal action on nonreplicating M. tuberculosis. With this goal, we review methods of high throughput screening to target nonreplicating M. tuberculosis and methods to progress candidate molecules. A classification based on structures and putative targets of molecules that have been reported to kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis revealed a rich diversity in pharmacophores. However, few of these compounds were tested under conditions that would exclude the impact of adsorbed compound acting during the recovery phase of

  3. Tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional Tuberculosis as occupational disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Mendoza-Ticona

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Existe evidencia suficiente para declarar a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional en diversos profesionales especialmente entre los trabajadores de salud. En el Perú están normados y reglamentados los derechos laborales inherentes a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional, como la cobertura por discapacidad temporal o permanente. Sin embargo, estos derechos aún no han sido suficientemente socializados. En este trabajo se presenta información sobre el riesgo de adquirir tuberculosis en el lugar de trabajo, se revisan las evidencias para declarar a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional en trabajadores de salud y se presenta la legislación peruana vigente al respecto.There is enough evidence to declare tuberculosis as an occupational disease among healthcare workers. In Peru, there are regulations granting employment rights regarding tuberculosis as an occupational disease, such as healthcare coverage for temporary or permanent disability. However, these rights have not been sufficiently socialized. This study presents information on the risk of acquiring tuberculosis in the workplace, and a review of the evidence to declare tuberculosis as an occupational disease among health care workers, presenting the current Peruvian law related.

  4. HIV INFECTION AS A RISK FACTOR OF TUBERCULOSIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Eremenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of three year follow-up over 96 HIV positive children registered in the AIDS Center. During 3 year follow up the infection with tuberculous mycobacteria was diagnosed in 27.3% (n = 23 of HIV positive children from the followed up group. The leading risk factor of tuberculosis is family exposure to a tuberculosis patient – 22.6% (n = 19. Compliance to follow-up and treatment, timely prescribed preventive anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy and highly active antiretroviral therapy enhanced prevention of development of local forms of tuberculosis in the followed up group of children.

  5. Learn About Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Tuberculosis (TB) Learn About Tuberculosis Tuberculosis (TB) is an airborne bacterial infection caused by the organism Mycobacterium tuberculosis that primarily affects the lungs, although other organs ...

  6. Radiological diagnosis of skeletal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numberger, J.

    1982-01-01

    The general X-ray-symptoms follow one another or appear at the same time: Swelling of soft tissues by fungus; toxic perifocal and sometimes parafocal osteoporosis; osteolysis by specific granulation tissues; destruction of adjacent discs and articulation cartilages; formation of sequesters; cold abscess and formation of fistulas because of perforation of the corticalis by liquified tuberculous tissue; bone compression and deformation; amorphous calcifications; perifocal osteosclerosis as a repairing process. The spondylitis tuberculosis is the most frequent form with about 50%; usually narrowing of the discspace is the earliest X-ray-finding. On the second and third place follow the tuberculosis of the hip- and the knee-joint, the rest shows up at other locations of red bone marrow. Very often the perifocal osteoporosis is the earliest X-ray-symptom of joint tuberculosis. All X-ray-findings, even the earliest, in reality are late symptoms, because at that time the disease exists at least some months. Radiologically only the differential diagnosis can be made, final diagnosis is established by histologic examination only. Because the course of untreated skeletal tuberculosis usually is chronic and destructive and, on the other hand early antituberculous chemotherapy as well as surgical treatment show excellent results early radiological suggestion of tuberculosis is of great importance for initiating other diagnostic procedures to establish the diagnosis. (orig./MG) [de

  7. INFLUENCE OF IMMUNOLOGICAL DISORDERS ON AN OUTCOME FOR THE FIRST TIME DIAGNOSED INFILTRATIVE TUBERCULOSIS IN SOCIALLY SAFE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Mordyk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of immunological indicators in 76 first time diagnosed infiltrative tuberculosis of lungs in socially safe patients prior to treatment and in 2 months of chemotherapy was carried out. It is revealed that immunological disorders are connected with efficiency of tuberculosis treatment . It can be criterion of quality of provided chemotherapy. The activation of cell immunity, stimulation of phagocytosis activity of neutrophils would contribute for effective treatment of tuberculosis.

  8. Controlling the Seedbeds of Tuberculosis: Diagnosis and Treatment of Tuberculosis Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaka, Molebogeng X.; Cavalcante, Solange C.; Marais, Ben J.; Thim, Sok; Martinson, Neil A.; Swaminathan, Soumya; Chaisson, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    The billions of people with latent tuberculosis infection serve as the seedbeds for future cases of active tuberculosis. Virtually all episodes of tuberculosis disease are preceded by a period of asymptomatic Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection; therefore, identifying infected individuals most likely to progress to disease and treating such subclinical infections to prevent future disease provides a critical opportunity to interrupt tuberculosis transmission and reduce the global burden of tuberculosis disease. Programs focusing on single strategies rather than comprehensive programs that deliver an integrated arsenal for tuberculosis control may continue to struggle. Tuberculosis preventive therapy is a poorly utilized tool that is essential for controlling the reservoirs of disease that drive the current epidemic. Comprehensive control strategies that combine preventive therapy for the most high-risk populations and communities with improved case-finding and treatment, control of transmission and health systems strengthening could ultimately lead to worldwide tuberculosis elimination. This paper outlines challenges to implementation of preventive therapy and provides pragmatic suggestions for overcoming them. It further advocates for tuberculosis preventive therapy as the core of a renewed global focus to implement a comprehensive epidemic control strategy that would reduce new tuberculosis cases to elimination targets. This strategy would be underpinned by accelerated research to further understand the biology of subclinical tuberculosis infections, develop novel diagnostics, and drug regimens specifically for subclinical tuberculosis infection, strengthen health systems, community engagement, and enhance sustainable large scale implementation of preventive therapy programs. PMID:26515679

  9. Are current case-finding methods under-diagnosing tuberculosis among women in Myanmar? An analysis of operational data from Yangon and the nationwide prevalence survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M S; Khine, T M; Hutchison, C; Coker, R J; Hane, K M; Innes, A L; Aung, S

    2016-03-03

    Although there is a large increase in investment for tuberculosis control in Myanmar, there are few operational analyses to inform policies. Only 34% of nationally reported cases are from women. In this study, we investigate sex differences in tuberculosis diagnoses in Myanmar in order to identify potential health systems barriers that may be driving lower tuberculosis case finding among women. From October 2014 to March 2015, we systematically collected data on all new adult smear positive tuberculosis cases in ten township health centres across Yangon, the largest city in Myanmar, to produce an electronic tuberculosis database. We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional analysis of sex differences in tuberculosis diagnoses at the township health centres. We also analysed national prevalence survey data to calculate additional case finding in men and women by using sputum culture when smear microscopy was negative, and estimated the sex-specific impact of using a more sensitive diagnostic tool at township health centres. Overall, only 514 (30%) out of 1371 new smear positive tuberculosis patients diagnosed at the township health centres were female. The proportion of female patients varied by township (from 21% to 37%, p = 0.0172), month of diagnosis (37% in February 2015 and 23% in March 2015 p = 0.0004) and age group (26% in 25-64 years and 49% in 18-25 years, p Myanmar, found that substantially fewer women than men were diagnosed in all study townships. The sex ratio of newly diagnosed cases varied by age group, month of diagnosis and township of diagnosis. Low sensitivity of tuberculosis diagnosis may lead to a potential under-diagnosis of tuberculosis among women.

  10. Current trends in malarial chemotherapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-02-19

    Feb 19, 2008 ... carried by mosquito while the asexual stage is carried by man. .... Mosquitoes are also are moving, highly adaptable and ... attacks because of its slow onset of action. .... history of adverse reactions to the combination drugs. It.

  11. Duodenal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, M.R.; Sarwar, M.

    2004-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a world wide communicable disease caused by tubercle bacilli discovered by Robert Kock in 1882. In 1993 WHO declared TB as a global emergency due to its world wide resurgence. It can involve any organ of the body. Abdomen is the fourth commonest site of involvement in the extra pulmonary tuberculosis after the lymph-nodes, skeletal and Genito urinary variants. In the gastro intestinal tract tuberculosis can affect any part from the mouth to the anus but ileocaecal area is a favourite location. Duodenal involvement is uncommon and accounts for only 2.5% of tuberculous enteritis. Major pathogens are Mycobacterium Tuberculosis and bovis and the usual route of entry is by direct penetration of the intestinal mucosa by swallowed organisms. (author)

  12. Wild-type MIC distributions of four fluoroquinolones active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in relation to current critical concentrations and available pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeby, K A; Jureen, P; Giske, C G; Chryssanthou, E; Sturegård, E; Nordvall, M; Johansson, A G; Werngren, J; Kahlmeter, G; Hoffner, S E; Schön, T

    2010-05-01

    To describe wild-type distributions of the MIC of fluoroquinolones for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in relation to current critical concentrations used for drug susceptibility testing and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) data. A 96-stick replicator on Middlebrook 7H10 medium was used to define the MICs of ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, moxifloxacin and levofloxacin for 90 consecutive clinical strains and 24 drug-resistant strains. The MICs were compared with routine BACTEC 460 susceptibility results and with MIC determinations in the BACTEC MGIT 960 system in a subset of strains using ofloxacin as a class representative. PK/PD data for each drug were reviewed in relation to the wild-type MIC distribution. The wild-type MICs of ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, moxifloxacin and levofloxacin were distributed from 0.125 to 1, 0.25 to 1, 0.032 to 0.5 and 0.125 to 0.5 mg/L, respectively. The MIC data correlated well with the BACTEC 960 MGIT and BACTEC 460 results. PD indices were the most favourable for levofloxacin, followed by moxifloxacin, ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin. We propose S (susceptible) current critical concentrations of S

  13. TUBERCULOSIS AS AN INFECTIOUS PATHOLOGY OF IMMUNE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martynov AV

    2016-09-01

    antigens to provide high adhesion and allergenicity of human strains M. tuberculosis. Most allergens that cause obvious signs of active tuberculosis are the antigens ESAT6 and CFP10. Such protein antigens can be called endotoxins. Also to pathogenicity factors include cord-factor, it main component is a polysaccharide-mycolic complex from cell wall (Figure 2 containing ftiolic and mycolic acid - to ensure the stability of mycobacteria to lysosomal enzymes. Currently available diagnostic tools tuberculin preferably contain the above components of the cell wall and differences (from BCG allergens ESAT6 and CFP10. Currently well established that the virulence of M. tuberculosis, mainly responsible genes encoding antigens ESAT-6 and CFP10. When comparing the genomic sequence of M. tuberculosis with attenuated M. bovis BCG was detected genomic deletion of the three sites in the vaccine strain (RD1, RD2, RD3. BCG vaccine strain genome stripped areas in the RD1, encoding mycobacterial antigens ESAT-6 and CFP-10 present in virulent strains of M. tuberculosis. Many researchers believe that mutations in genomic regions RD1, encoding mycobacterial antigens ESAT-6 and CFP-10, occurred in the process of creating a BCG strain. It remains not examine the question of whether all strains of M. bovis other than BCG have antigens ESAT-6 and CFP-10, and whether they depend on the degree of virulence of the mycobacteria strains. About a third of the population is infected with the MBT. Tuberculosis statistics show that out of every 100 man infected MTB, only 10 appear open clinical forms. In the remaining patients, positive skin test and/or gamma-interferon test, clinical symptoms of tuberculosis never does occur, and no signs of sensitization other than to MBT antigens and presence ESAT6 - antibodies in the blood. Thus, if the focus is not on the infection, but on the prevention of tuberculosis reactivation, can significantly reduce the number of cases with clinical manifestations. There have

  14. Treatment of Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Patrick; Johnston, James

    2017-01-01

    Opinion statement The treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is an essential component of tuberculosis (TB) elimination in regions that have a low incidence of TB. However, the decision to treat individuals with LTBI must consider the limitations of current diagnostic tests for LTBI, the risk of developing active TB disease, the potential adverse effects from chemoprophylactic therapy, and the importance of treatment adherence. When an individual has been diagnosed with LTBI and ac...

  15. The effects of poverty and ageing on the increase in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, P D

    1999-04-01

    Among the causes of the current increase in tuberculosis worldwide are poverty and ageing. It has been widely accepted that tuberculosis and poverty have been closely linked since the scientific study of the disease began. The decline of tuberculosis in developed countries before the arrival of specific chemotherapy was largely attributed to improvement in social conditions. With the rapidly increasing world population and the wider disparity of income, more and more people are falling into poverty, whichever way it is defined. Studies in the developed world show that the close association between tuberculosis and poverty remains. Some workers in the field even suggest that tuberculosis cannot be controlled until the issue of global poverty has been addressed. This may be too pessimistic. It may be possible to define accurately which aspects of poverty are most closely associated with tuberculosis and to deal with those specifically. Within developed countries longevity is increasing. The population now in their seventies, or older, even in developed countries, will have been alive when the disease was highly prevalent in the communities in which they lived. The majority will, therefore, have acquired infection, and in a substantial minority of these infection may reactivate to cause disease as the ageing process weakens host immunity. In the indigenous Caucasian population of Western Europe, rates of disease are highest in elderly males. Previous research showed that beyond the age of forty, the incidence of disease declined with increasing age. The higher rates in the elderly were a result of the residue of higher rates from birth cohorts born earlier. Data presented in this article suggest that this pattern may be altering such that the incidence of disease actually increases after a certain age is reached. This could have important repercussions for disease incidence in the emerging economies of the Pacific Rim, where longevity is increasing most rapidly.

  16. Is Technetium-99m Sestamibi Imaging Able to Predict Pathologic Nonresponse to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Breast Cancer? : A Meta-analysis Evaluating Current Use and Shortcomings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collarino, Angela; de Koster, Elizabeth J.; Valdés Olmos, Renato A.; de Geus-Oei, Lioe Fee; Pereira Arias-Bouda, Lenka M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Interest in technetium-99m (99mTc)-sestamibi imaging for neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) response monitoring in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) is increasing but remains matter of discussion. The present study conducted a meta-analysis of the diagnostic performance of

  17. Tuberculosis Multidrogoresistente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    German A Acevedo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available La tuberculosis es una enfermedad infecciosa causada por el Mycobacterium tuberculosis. En el año 2010 se registraron 8.8 millones de casos incidentes en el mundo y en los últimos años han aparecido poblaciones bacterianas de micobacterias con resistencia a los fármacos de primera línea. Se ha definido la presencia de resistencia a rifampicina e isoniacida como multidrogoresistencia, estimándose una incidencia mundial aproximada de 3.6%. Esta revisión de tema se centrará en la situación de la tuberculosis multidrogoresistente en el mundo, incluyendo un análisis regional de la casuística Colombiana. Se comentarán los principales mecanismos de resistencia del microorganismo, los genes implicados en la misma y los factores de riesgo asociados a la generación de resistencia en algunas comunidades.

  18. Surgical aspects of pulmonary tuberculosis: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, Ravindra Kumar; Pezzella, A Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major global medical challenge and concern. In the world's population of over 7.4 billion people, 8.6 million are estimated to be infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis; another 2.2 billion have latent tuberculosis. There is an annual incidence of 16,000 new cases in the USA and 7-8 million new cases worldwide, of which 440,000 are multidrug-resistant or extensively multidrug-resistant, mainly in developing countries or emerging economies. According to the World Health Organization, the incidence of tuberculosis is 133 cases per 100,000 of the population; 3.3% new cases are drug resistant and 20% are already treated cases. Of the drug-resistant cases, 9.7% are extensively drug-resistant. The annual global mortality attributable to tuberculosis is over 1.3 million people. The association with HIV/AIDS in 430,000 people has compounded the global concern and challenge. This review presents the historical indications for surgical treatment of tuberculosis, reviews the current literature and clinical experience, and collates this into increased awareness and contemporary understanding of the indications and need for surgery in primary active tuberculosis, adjuvant surgical therapy for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, and the complications of chronic tuberculosis sequelae or previous tuberculosis surgery. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Types of chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000910.htm Types of chemotherapy To use the sharing features on this page, ... cancer.org/treatment/treatments-and-side-effects/treatment-types/chemotherapy/how-chemotherapy-drugs-work.html . Updated February 15, ...

  20. CT imaging of coexisting pulmonary tuberculosis and lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Yan; Xie Ruming; Zhou Xinhua; Zhou Zhen; Xu Jinping; He Wei; Guo Lifang; Ning Fenggang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the CT characteristics of coexisting pulmonary tuberculosis and lung cancer. Methods: One hundred and four patients of coexisting pulmonary tuberculosis and lung cancer proved by histology, cytology or clinical underwent CT examination. All patients were divided into two groups, group Ⅰ were the patients with the lung cancer after tuberculosis or both found simultaneously (group Ⅰ a with peripheral lung cancer and group Ⅰ b with central lung cancer), group Ⅱ with tuberculosis during lung cancer chemotherapy (group Ⅱ a with peripheral lung cancer and group Ⅱ b with central lung cancer). Imaging characteristics of tuberculosis and lung cancer were compared. χ"2 test and t test were used for the statistical analysis. Results: Of 104 patients, there were 92 patients (88.5%) in group Ⅰ and 12 patients (11.5%) in group Ⅱ. Seventy patients (76.1%) of lung cancer and tuberculosis were located in the same lobe and 22 patients (23.9%) in the different lobes in group Ⅰ. There was no significant difference in distribution of tuberculosis between group Ⅰ and group Ⅱ (χ"2 = 4.302, P = 0.507). The fibrous stripes, nodules of calcification and pleural adhesion of tuberculosis were statistically significant between the two groups (χ"2 = 22.737, 15.193, 27.792, P < 0.05). There were 33 central lung cancers and 71 peripheral lung cancers. In group Ⅰ a (64 patients of peripheral lung cancers), 39 patients (60.9%) had typical manifestations and most of the lesions were ≥ 3 cm (n = 49, 76.6%), solid lesions showed variable enhancement. Conclusions: Secondary tuberculosis during lung cancer chemotherapy has the same CT characteristics with the common active tuberculosis. The morphology, enhancement pattern of lesion and follow-up are helpful for the diagnosis of lung cancer after tuberculosis. (authors)

  1. Autopsy case of pulmonary aspergilloma. [After long chemotherapy for TB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    II, Yohei; Akizuki, S

    1973-01-01

    A 73-year-old female received anti-TB chemotherapy for pulmonary tuberculosis for a long period and died from severe hemoptysis which suddenly developed after recovery from the disease. Autopsy showed a large aspergilloma in the upper lobe of the right lung. This case is reported along with a review of the literature on aspergillosis. (30 refs) (DLC)

  2. Pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhl, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Dissemination of the tubercle bacillus is of three types: bronchogenic, hematogenous, and lymphangitic. Bronchogenic dissemination occurs when exudate from a cavity or small area of caseation drains into a bronchus and is aspirated into previously uninfected areas either on the same or on the opposite side. This type of spreading occurs frequently after bleeding and when there is a cavity emptying into a bronchus. Hematogenous dissemination leads to miliary tuberculosis and to extrapulmonary lesions throughout the body. Acute massive hematogenous spread causes miliary tuberculosis, while chronic spread in smaller amounts usually results in the chronic extrapulmonary foci. Lymphangitic dissemination is common in primary infection. It is responsible for involvement with subsequent enlargement of hilar and mediastinal nodes that is often seen in children and in young black adults. The reaction to M. tuberculosis depends on the presence or absence of immunity to tuberculoprotein. In individuals having no tissue hypersensitivity or immunity, primary tuberculosis results. In those with immunity produced by previous infection or BCG vaccination, the reactivation (reinfection) disease may develop

  3. Tuberculosis Treatment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculosis Treatment, Lusaka, Zambia. 1. 2. 2. 3. 3 ... TB treatment has contributed to the steady rise of TB incidence in ... respondents (89.4%) had positive attitude towards TB treatment ..... respondents described feelings of depression, anger and apathy .... Journal of Personality and Social Psychology,. 1979, 37:1-11.

  4. Tuberculosis: General Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    TB Elimination Tuberculosis: General Information What is TB? Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by germs that are spread from person ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination CS227840_A What Does a Positive Test ...

  5. Global Tuberculosis Report 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alt+0 Navigation Alt+1 Content Alt+2 Tuberculosis (TB) Menu Tuberculosis Data and statistics Regional Framework Resources Meetings and events Global tuberculosis report 2017 WHO has published a global TB ...

  6. chemotherapy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Augustyniuk

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background . Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM practices for cancer have become popular among oncology patients. An increasing interest in alternative medicine can be explained by the inefficiency of conventional treatment, dissatisfaction with treating patients like objects, and the will to use all available treatment methods. Objectives . The authors assessed how often patients use CAM methods, and which of them are most popular. Material and methods . The study was conducted in Military Hospital no. 109 and the Independent Public Clinical Hospital no. 1 in Szczecin among 100 chemotherapy patients. This survey-based study was performed using an original questionnaire. Results. Most respondents (68% did not use alternative methods to fight the disease. The most popular treatment methods were: herbal medicine (50%, alternative medicine preparations (38% and diet (25%, and the least common: hypnosis (3% and aromatherapy (3%. Analyzed sociodemographic factors had no effects on a choice of a CAM method. Patients obtained information about CAM methods mainly from the Internet (40%, medical staff (37% and literature (31%. Conclusions . 1. Using CAM by patients receiving chemotherapy for neoplasms is quite a common phenomenon. 2. CAM were more often chosen by women. Neither the duration of the disease nor sociodemographic data had effects on making the decision to use CAM methods. 3. The most popular CAM were: herbal medicine, alternative medicine preparations, and diet. 4. Cancer patients should receive special support from nurses and doctors as well as other members of the therapeutic team. Oncology patients should never be left on their own so that they were forced to seek help and support in therapies unconfirmed by scientific investigation.

  7. Infection control, genetic assessment of drug resistance and drug susceptibility testing in the current management of multidrug/extensively-resistant tuberculosis (M/XDR-TB) in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bothamley, Graham H.; Lange, Christoph; Albrecht, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Europe has the highest documented caseload and greatest increase in multidrug and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (M/XDR-TB) of all World Health Organization (WHO) regions. This survey examines how recommendations for M/XDR-TB management are being implemented. METHODS: TBNET is a pan...

  8. The predictive value of current haemoglobin levels for incident tuberculosis and/or mortality during long-term antiretroviral therapy in South Africa: a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoff, Andrew D.; Wood, Robin; Cobelens, Frank G.; Gupta-Wright, Ankur; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Lawn, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Low haemoglobin concentrations may be predictive of incident tuberculosis (TB) and death in HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART), but data are limited and inconsistent. We examined these relationships retrospectively in a long-term South African ART cohort with multiple

  9. Double trouble: Prevalence and factors associated with tuberculosis and diabetes comorbidity in Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarker, M.; Barua, M.; Guerra, F.; Saha, A.; Aftab, A.; Latif, A.H.M.; Islam, S.; Islam, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes among tuberculosis patients increases the risk of tuberculosis treatment failure, death, and development of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Yet, there is no data is available in Bangladesh on the prevalence of diabetes among tuberculosis patients. The objective of the current

  10. Tuberculosis: looking beyond BCG vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Abu S

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is an infectious disease of international importance and ranks among the top 10 causes of death in the World. About one-third of the world′s population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Every year, approximately eight million people develop active disease and two million die of TB. The currently used BCG vaccines have shown variable protective efficacies against TB in different parts of the world. Moreover, being a live vaccine, BCG can be pathogenic in immunocompromised recipients. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new vaccines against TB. The comparative genome analysis has revealed the existence of several M. tuberculosis-specific regions that are deleted in BCG. The work carried out to determine the immunological reactivity of proteins encoded by genes located in these regions revealed several major antigens of M. tuberculosis, including the 6 kDa early secreted antigen target (ESAT6. Immunization with ESAT6 and its peptide (aa51-70 protects mice challenged with M. tuberculosis. The protective efficacy of immunization further improves when ESAT6 is recombinantly fused with M. tuberculosis antigen 85B. In addition, ESAT6 delivered as a DNA vaccine is also protective in mice. Whether these vaccines would be safe or not cannot be speculated. The answer regarding the safety and efficacy of these vaccines has to await human trials in different parts of the world.

  11. Tuberculosis of the prostate and urethra: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Gupta

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Genitourinary tuberculosis contributes to 10-14% of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and is a major health problem in India. Prostate tuberculosis is uncommon and is usually found incidentally following transurethral resection. The most common mode of involvement is hematogenous, though descending infection and direct intracanalicular extension is known. Predisposing factors include prior tubercular infection, immuno-compromised status, previous BCG therapy. The presentation is diffuse caseating epitheloid cell granulomas, which can be confirmed by prostate biopsy. Urine PCR has good sensitivity (95.5% and specificity ( 98.12% in diagnosis. Imaging techniques like TRUS and CT/MRI also allow good visualization of the lesion and its extension. Urethral tuberculosis is very rare and is usually secondary to upper tract or genital tuberculosis. The presentation may be acute urethritis or chronic stricture or fistulae. The treatment of choice is chemotherapy with 3-4 anti tubercular drugs for initial 6-12 weeks and later 2 drugs for additional 3-6 months. Surgery is usually reserved for cases where chemotherapy fails and is done after 4-6 weeks of ATT. With a high index of suspicion it may be possible to diagnose a larger number of cases of prostatic and urethral tuberculosis especially in this country where tuberculosis is almost endemic.

  12. High incidence of tuberculosis, low sensitivity of current diagnostic scheme and prolonged culture positivity in four colombian prisons. A cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulma Vanessa Rueda

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB in inmates, factors associated with TB, and the time to sputum smear and culture conversion during TB treatment. METHODS: Prospective cohort study. All prisoners with respiratory symptoms (RS of any duration were evaluated. After participants signed consent forms, we collected three spontaneous sputum samples on consecutive days. We performed auramine-rhodamine staining, culturing with the thin-layer agar method, Löwestein-Jensen medium and MGIT, susceptibility testing for first-line drugs; and HIV testing. TB cases were followed, and the times to smear and culture conversion to negative were evaluated. RESULTS: Of 9,507 prisoners held in four prisons between April/30/2010 and April/30/2012, among them 4,463 were screened, 1,305 were evaluated for TB because of the lower RS of any duration, and 72 were diagnosed with TB. The annual incidence was 505 cases/100,000 prisoners. Among TB cases, the median age was 30 years, 25% had <15 days of cough, 12.5% had a history of prior TB, and 40.3% had prior contact with a TB case. TB-HIV coinfection was diagnosed in three cases. History of prior TB, contact with a TB case, and being underweight were risk factors associated with TB. Overweight was a protective factor. Almost a quarter of TB cases were detected only by culture; three cases were isoniazid resistant, and two resistant to streptomycin. The median times to culture conversion was 59 days, and smear conversion was 33. CONCLUSIONS: The TB incidence in prisons is 20 times higher than in the general Colombian population. TB should be considered in inmates with lower RS of any duration. Our data demonstrate that patients receiving adequate anti-TB treatment remain infectious for prolonged periods. These findings suggest that current recommendations regarding isolation of prisoners with TB should be reconsidered, and suggest the need for mycobacterial cultures during follow-up.

  13. [Treatment of tuberculosis in patients with comorbidities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Masahiro; Fujita, Akira

    2013-12-01

    Early detection and appropriate treatment are the keys to tuberculosis control. In particular, providing appropriate treatment for tuberculosis in patients with HIV infection, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), chronic hepatic disease, or renal failure necessitating hemodialysis, and taking appropriate measures against adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs are issues of critical importance. This mini-symposium, four experts explained the current status of "treatment of tuberculosis in patients with comorbidities" and proposed measures to address these problems. Dr. Aoki talked about "HIV infection complicated by tuberculosis." To the next, Dr. Yoshinaga gave a talk on "treatment of tuberculosis in RA patients receiving biological agents. Further, Dr. Sasaki lectured on "tuberculosis in patients with hepatic disease/impairment". Lastly, Dr. Takamori gave a lecture on "tuberculosis in patients with renal disease and those on hemodialysis. Tuberculosis patients often have some underlying diseases, and adverse reactions caused by antituberculosis drugs, such as hepatic and renal impairments, are matters of concern. I believe that this mini-symposium has provided useful information for physicians engaged in tuberculosis treatment and for many other healthcare professionals as well.

  14. Molecular Diagnosis of Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Handayani, Diah; Burhan, Erlina; Yunus, Faisal

    2018-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the leading causes of adult death in the Asia-Pacific Region, including Indonesia. As an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), TB remains a major public health issue especially in developing nations due to the lack of adequate diagnostic testing facilities. Diagnosis of TB has entered an era of molecular detection that provides faster and more cost-effective methods to diagnose and confirm drug resistance in TB cases, meanwhile, diagnosis by conventional culture systems requires several weeks. New advances in the molecular detection of TB, including the faster and simpler nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) and whole-genome sequencing (WGS), have resulted in a shorter time for diagnosis and, therefore, faster TB treatments. In this review, we explored the current findings on molecular diagnosis of TB and drug-resistant TB to see how this advancement could be integrated into public health systems in order to control TB.

  15. Tuberculosis ocular

    OpenAIRE

    Infante Barrera, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    La evolución etiológica de la medicina la podemos dividir en dos grandes períodos: período de la sífilis y período de la tuberculosis. El período de la sífilis, gracias a las armas de combate de que hoy disponemos, ocupa un lugar secundario. El período de la tuberculosis y que no es sino el paralelo de la vida moderna, ocupa en vigencia el primer lugar. Es el período presente. Hasta hace poco tiempo el médico en general, iniciaba la exploración de su paciente con un interrogatorio, una inspec...

  16. Ankle tuberculosis. A case in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, F E; Gómez-Alessandri, J; Tintó, M; Sánchez-González, M; Vicent, V

    Articular tuberculosis of the ankle joint is a rare presentation of skeletal tuberculosis (10% of cases). This unusual location and the low index of clinical suspicion leads to delays in diagnosis and treatment. Radiographic and analytic studies are unspecific in the first stage. CAT and MRI are useful in diagnosis. Chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment and surgery is often required to establish the diagnosis and in the treatment. We report a case of ankle tuberculosis in a 22 month-old child. The diagnosis was confirmed by synovial biopsy. There was no patient or family contact with tuberculosis patients. There was no risk factor. There was no lung disease. Diagnosis was made 1 year after onset of symptoms. The treatment was with chemotherapy and surgery was performed as preventive treatment of equinus deformity and osteoarthritis. Good clinical and functional outcome was achieved after 20 years of follow up. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Medical management of genitourinary tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamilarasu Kadhiravan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimycobacterial chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for the majority of patients with genitourinary tuberculosis (GUTB. A large body of evidence from clinical trials suggests that short-course chemotherapy regimens, employing four drugs including rifampicin and pyrazinamide, achieve cure in most of the patients with tuberculosis (TB and are associated with the lowest rates of relapse. Standard six-month regimens are adequate for the treatment of GUTB. Directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS is the internationally recommended comprehensive strategy to control TB, and directly observed treatment is just one of its five elements. DOTS cures not only the individual with TB but also reduces the incidence of TB as well as the prevalence of primary drug-resistance in the community. Corticosteroids have no proven role in the management of patients with GUTB. Errors in prescribing anti-TB drugs are common in clinical practice. Standardized treatment regimens at correct doses and assured completion of treatment have made DOTS the present-day standard of care for the management of all forms of TB including GUTB.

  18. Tuberculosis ocular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Infante Barrera

    1950-01-01

    Full Text Available La evolución etiológica de la medicina la podemos dividir en dos grandes períodos: período de la sífilis y período de la tuberculosis. El período de la sífilis, gracias a las armas de combate de que hoy disponemos, ocupa un lugar secundario. El período de la tuberculosis y que no es sino el paralelo de la vida moderna, ocupa en vigencia el primer lugar. Es el período presente. Hasta hace poco tiempo el médico en general, iniciaba la exploración de su paciente con un interrogatorio, una inspección, un tacto y una serología con una obsesión sifilítica. En la época actual el médico y en especial el oftalmólogo debe tener una obsesión tuberculosa en la investigación etiológica. Cuántas veces en una afección ocular que de una manera lenta pero progresiva produce profundas alteraciones oculares, lleva el sello soterrado de una tuberculosis? Cuántos enfermos de una constitución en apariencia envidiable hacen precisamente por un exceso de sus defensas una alergia tuberculosa? Tan traicionera como la sífilis es la tuberculosis. La sífilis quema sus etapas y estalla con una hemorragia cerebral, una locura, una parálisis general, una ataxia locomotriz progresiva, una goma o una meningitis sifilítica. La tuberculosis hace su presentación con una afección ocular, una goma, una granulia, una artritis, una osteítis, o una meningitis óptico-quiasmática. Siendo esto así, es necesario, en la mayoría de las afecciones oculares, tratar de identificarla por los medios de diagnóstico de que hoy disponemos.

  19. The association between smoking and tuberculosis La asociación entre tabaquismo y tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.M. Hassmiller

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To review epidemiological evidence on the association between smoking and tuberculosis. METHODS: Reviewed articles were identified by searching Pubmed for the terms "smoking" or "tobacco" and "tuberculosis". Additional articles were obtained from the bibliographies of identified papers. RESULTS: Thirty-four studies were reviewed: five investigate the association between smoking and mortality from tuberculosis, 13 investigate the association between smoking and development of tuberculosis, eigth investigate the association between smoking and infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and nine estimate the impact of smoking on characteristics of tuberculosis and disease outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, evidence suggests that smoking (both current and former is associated with: risk of being infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, risk of developing tuberculosis, development of more severe forms of tuberculosis, and risk of dying of tuberculosis. In many cases, there is a strong dose-response relationship -both in terms of quantity and duration of smoking. These relationships are not explained away by controlling for potentially confounding variables such as age, gender, alcohol consumption, and HIV status.OBJETIVO: Revisar evidencia epidemiológica relativa a la asociación entre el tabaquismo y la tuberculosis. MATERIALES Y MÉTODOS: Se identificaron artículos de revisión mediante la búsqueda en Pubmed de los términos "tabaquismo", "tabaco" y "tuberculosis". Se obtuvieron artículos adicionales de las bibliografías de los trabajos identificados. RESULTADOS: Se revisaron 34 estudios: cinco investigan la asociación entre tabaquismo y mortalidad a partir de la tuberculosis; 13, la asociación entre tabaquismo y el desarrollo de tuberculosis; ocho, la asociación entre tabaquismo y la infección con Mycobacterium tuberculosis; y nueve estiman el impacto del tabaquismo en las características de la tuberculosis y las

  20. En el camino para acortar los tratamientos de la tuberculosis: los ensayos clínicos de la Unitat d'Investigació en la Tuberculosi de Barcelona impulsados por los Centres for Disease Control and Prevention On the way to shortening tuberculosis treatments: clinical trials of the Unitat d' Investagació en Tuberculosi de Barcelona supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Moreno

    2010-04-01

    Control and Prevention in a series of clinical trials on latent tuberculosis infection and tuberculosis disease. BTRU participation began in 2004 with Study 26, an evaluation of the efficacy and tolerability of rifapentine plus isoniazid administered once weekly for 3 months compared with the standard treatment for latent tuberculos isinfection. The BTRU centers together enrolled 246 patients (3% of the total.General enrollment was completed in February, 2008. HIV-infected patient and child enrollment continues. Treatment with 12 doses instead of 270 doses is expected to be a clear success. However, the analysis will be completed in 2010. Study 28 (startedin2006, designed for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis, compared standard treatment with an experimental regimen substituting moxifloxacin for isoniazid. BTRU centers together enrolled 15 patients (3.5 % of the total.The provisional results (presented at the 47th Interscience Conferenceon Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy in Chicago, 2007 showed no difference between the sputum conversion rate of each regimen at week 8 of treatment. Study 29 is currently underway,in which rifapentine was introduced in the experimental regimen for active tuberculosis treatment.

  1. Imaging in Tuberculosis abdominal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, Tatiana; Garcia, Vanessa; Tamara, Estrada; Acosta, Federico

    2010-01-01

    In this article we illustrate and discuss imaging features resulting from Tuberculosis abdominal affectation. We present patients evaluated with several imaging modalities who had abdominal symptoms and findings suggestive of granulomatous disease. Diagnosis was confirm including hystopatology and clinical outgoing. Cases involved presented many affected organs such as lymphatic system, peritoneum, liver, spleen, pancreas, kidneys, ureters, adrenal glands and pelvic organs Tuberculosis, Tuberculosis renal, Tuberculosis hepatic, Tuberculosis splenic Tomography, x-ray, computed

  2. Primary breast tuberculosis. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippou, D.C.; Rizos, S.; Nissiotis, A.

    2003-01-01

    Background. The differential diagnosis of primary breast tuberculosis with other benign or malignant conditions can be difficult with the current imaging techniques that used to recognize breast pathologies. In many cases mammographic and ultrasound characteristics of breast tuberculosis are similar to those of breast cancer. Case report. We present a case of primary breast tuberculosis, with no previous history of the disease, which was diagnosed during the operation. Conclusions. Primary breast tuberculosis can be misdiagnosed. In these cases a tuberculosis infection history is negative, the mammographic and radiological findings obscure and the mass can be misdiagnosed as carcinoma. The diagnosis is achieved after the surgical removal of the mass and histological examination of the specimen. (author)

  3. Extended spectrum of antibiotic susceptibility for tuberculosis, Djibouti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzid, Fériel; Astier, Hélène; Osman, Djaltou Aboubaker; Javelle, Emilie; Hassan, Mohamed Osman; Simon, Fabrice; Garnotel, Eric; Drancourt, Michel

    2018-02-01

    In the Horn of Africa, there is a high prevalence of tuberculosis that is reported to be partly driven by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis strictu sensu strains. We conducted a prospective study to investigate M. tuberculosis complex species causing tuberculosis in Djibouti, and their in vitro susceptibility to standard anti-tuberculous antibiotics in addition to clofazimine, minocycline, chloramphenicol and sulfadiazine. Among the 118 mycobacteria isolates from 118 successive patients with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis, 111 strains of M. tuberculosis, five Mycobacterium canettii, one 'Mycobacterium simulans' and one Mycobacterium kansasii were identified. Drug-susceptibility tests performed on the first 78 isolates yielded nine MDR M. tuberculosis isolates. All isolates were fully susceptible to clofazimine, minocycline and chloramphenicol, and 75 of 78 isolates were susceptible to sulfadiazine. In the Horn of Africa, patients with confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis caused by an in vitro susceptible strain may benefit from anti-leprosy drugs, sulfamides and phenicol antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  4. Stopping tuberculosis: a biosocial model for sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortblad, Katrina F; Salomon, Joshua A; Bärnighausen, Till; Atun, Rifat

    2015-12-05

    Tuberculosis transmission and progression are largely driven by social factors such as poor living conditions and poor nutrition. Increased standards of living and social approaches helped to decrease the burden of tuberculosis before the introduction of chemotherapy in the 1940s. Since then, management of tuberculosis has been largely biomedical. More funding for tuberculosis since 2000, coinciding with the Millennium Development Goals, has yielded progress in tuberculosis mortality but smaller reductions in incidence, which continues to pose a risk to sustainable development, especially in poor and susceptible populations. These at-risk populations need accelerated progress to end tuberculosis as resolved by the World Health Assembly in 2015. Effectively addressing the worldwide tuberculosis burden will need not only enhancement of biomedical approaches but also rebuilding of the social approaches of the past. To combine a biosocial approach, underpinned by social, economic, and environmental actions, with new treatments, new diagnostics, and universal health coverage, will need multisectoral coordination and action involving the health and other governmental sectors, as well as participation of the civil society, and especially the poor and susceptible populations. A biosocial approach to stopping tuberculosis will not only target morbidity and mortality from disease but would also contribute substantially to poverty alleviation and sustainable development that promises to meet the needs of the present, especially the poor, and provide them and subsequent generations an opportunity for a better future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, R N; Ben Husien, M

    2018-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains endemic in many parts of the developing world and is increasingly seen in the developed world due to migration. A total of 1.3 million people die annually from the disease. Spinal TB is the most common musculoskeletal manifestation, affecting about 1 to 2% of all cases of TB. The coexistence of HIV, which is endemic in some regions, adds to the burden and the complexity of management. This review discusses the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, impact of HIV and both the medical and surgical options in the management of spinal TB. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B:425-31.

  6. Increased complement C1q level marks active disease in human tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Cai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Complement functions as an important host defense system and complement C5 and C7 have been implicated in immunopathology of tuberculosis. However, little is known about the role of other complement components in tuberculosis. METHODS: Complement gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of tuberculosis patients and controls were determined using whole genome transcriptional microarray assays. The mRNA and protein levels of three C1q components, C1qA, C1qB, and C1qC, were further validated by qRT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The percentages of C1q expression in CD14 positive cells were determined by flow cytometry. Finally, C1qC protein level was quantified in the pleural fluid of tuberculosis and non-tuberculosis pleurisy. RESULTS: C1q expression increases significantly in the peripheral blood of patients with active tuberculosis compared to healthy controls and individuals with latent TB infection. The percentage of C1q-expressing CD14 positive cells is significantly increased in active TB patients. C1q expression in the peripheral blood correlates with sputum smear positivity in tuberculosis patients and is reduced after anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy. Notably, receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that C1qC mRNA levels in peripheral blood efficiently discriminate active from latent tuberculosis infection and healthy controls. Additionally, C1qC protein level in pleural effusion shows improved power in discriminating tuberculosis from non-tuberculosis pleurisy when compared to other inflammatory markers, such as IL-6 and TNF-α. CONCLUSIONS: C1q expression correlates with active disease in human tuberculosis. C1q could be a potential diagnostic marker to discriminate active tuberculosis from latent tuberculosis infection as well as tuberculosis pleurisy from non-tuberculosis pleurisy.

  7. Surgery and pleuro-pulmonary tuberculosis: a scientific literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subotic, Dragan; Yablonskiy, Piotr; Sulis, Giorgia; Cordos, Ioan; Petrov, Danail; Centis, Rosella; D’Ambrosio, Lia; Sotgiu, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major public health concern, mostly affecting resource-constrained settings and marginalized populations. The fight against the disease is hindered by the growing emergence of drug-resistant forms whose management can be rather challenging. Surgery may play an important role to support diagnosis and treatment of the most complex cases and improve their therapeutic outcome. We conducted a non-systematic review of the literature based on relevant keywords through PubMed database. Papers in English and Russian were included. The search was focused on five main areas of intervention as follows: (I) diagnosis of complicated cases; (II) elimination of contagious persisting cavities, despite appropriate chemotherapy; (III) treatment of destroyed lung; (V) resection of tuberculomas; (VI) treatment of tuberculous pleural empyema. Although specific practical guidelines concerning surgical indications and approaches are currently unavailable, a summary of the evidence emerged from the scientific literature was elaborated to help the clinician in the management of severely compromised TB patients. The decision to proceed to surgery is usually individualized and a careful assessment of the patient’s risk profile is always recommended before performing any procedure in addition to appropriate chemotherapy. PMID:27499980

  8. Chemotherapy to Treat Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses drugs to kill cancer cells. Learn how chemotherapy works against cancer, why it causes side effects, and how it is used with other cancer treatments.

  9. Retinoblastoma: Achieving new standards with methods of chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swathi Kaliki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of retinoblastoma (RB has dramatically changed over the past two decades from previous radiotherapy methods to current chemotherapy strategies. RB is a remarkably chemotherapy-sensitive tumor. Chemotherapy is currently used as a first-line approach for children with this malignancy and can be delivered by intravenous, intra-arterial, periocular, and intravitreal routes. The choice of route for chemotherapy administration depends upon the tumor laterality and tumor staging. Intravenous chemotherapy (IVC is used most often in bilateral cases, orbital RB, and as an adjuvant treatment in high-risk RB. Intra-arterial chemotherapy (IAC is used in cases with group C or D RB and selected cases of group E tumor. Periocular chemotherapy is used as an adjunct treatment in eyes with group D and E RB and those with persistent/recurrent vitreous seeds. Intravitreal chemotherapy is reserved for eyes with persistent/recurrent vitreous seeds. In this review, we describe the various forms of chemotherapy used in the management of RB. A database search was performed on PubMed, using the terms "RB," and "treatment," "chemotherapy," "systemic chemotherapy," "IVC," "IAC," "periocular chemotherapy," or "intravitreal chemotherapy." Relevant English language articles were extracted, reviewed, and referenced appropriately.

  10. Targeting DNA Replication and Repair for the Development of Novel Therapeutics against Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiche, Michael A; Warner, Digby F; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB), an infectious disease which results in approximately 10 million incident cases and 1.4 million deaths globally each year, making it the leading cause of mortality from infection. An effective frontline combination chemotherapy exists for TB; however, this regimen requires the administration of four drugs in a 2 month long intensive phase followed by a continuation phase of a further 4 months with two of the original drugs, and is only effective for the treatment of drug-sensitive TB. The emergence and global spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) as well as extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains of M. tuberculosis , and the complications posed by co-infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other co-morbidities such as diabetes, have prompted urgent efforts to develop shorter regimens comprising new compounds with novel mechanisms of action. This demands that researchers re-visit cellular pathways and functions that are essential to M. tuberculosis survival and replication in the host but which are inadequately represented amongst the targets of current anti-mycobacterial agents. Here, we consider the DNA replication and repair machinery as a source of new targets for anti-TB drug development. Like most bacteria, M. tuberculosis encodes a complex array of proteins which ensure faithful and accurate replication and repair of the chromosomal DNA. Many of these are essential; so, too, are enzymes in the ancillary pathways of nucleotide biosynthesis, salvage, and re-cycling, suggesting the potential to inhibit replication and repair functions at multiple stages. To this end, we provide an update on the state of chemotherapeutic inhibition of DNA synthesis and related pathways in M. tuberculosis . Given the established links between genotoxicity and mutagenesis, we also consider the potential implications of targeting DNA metabolic pathways implicated in the development of drug

  11. Targeting DNA Replication and Repair for the Development of Novel Therapeutics against Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Reiche

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB, an infectious disease which results in approximately 10 million incident cases and 1.4 million deaths globally each year, making it the leading cause of mortality from infection. An effective frontline combination chemotherapy exists for TB; however, this regimen requires the administration of four drugs in a 2 month long intensive phase followed by a continuation phase of a further 4 months with two of the original drugs, and is only effective for the treatment of drug-sensitive TB. The emergence and global spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR as well as extensively drug-resistant (XDR strains of M. tuberculosis, and the complications posed by co-infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and other co-morbidities such as diabetes, have prompted urgent efforts to develop shorter regimens comprising new compounds with novel mechanisms of action. This demands that researchers re-visit cellular pathways and functions that are essential to M. tuberculosis survival and replication in the host but which are inadequately represented amongst the targets of current anti-mycobacterial agents. Here, we consider the DNA replication and repair machinery as a source of new targets for anti-TB drug development. Like most bacteria, M. tuberculosis encodes a complex array of proteins which ensure faithful and accurate replication and repair of the chromosomal DNA. Many of these are essential; so, too, are enzymes in the ancillary pathways of nucleotide biosynthesis, salvage, and re-cycling, suggesting the potential to inhibit replication and repair functions at multiple stages. To this end, we provide an update on the state of chemotherapeutic inhibition of DNA synthesis and related pathways in M. tuberculosis. Given the established links between genotoxicity and mutagenesis, we also consider the potential implications of targeting DNA metabolic pathways implicated in the

  12. Correlations between major risk factors and closely related Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates grouped by three current enotyping procedures: a population-based study in northeast Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Peñuelas-Urquides

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of tuberculosis (TB patients related to a chain of recent TB transmissions were investigated. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB isolates (120 were genotyped using the restriction fragment length polymorphism-IS6110 (R, spacer oligotyping (S and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (M methods. The MTB isolates were clustered and the clusters were grouped according to the similarities of their genotypes. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients between the groups of MTB isolates with similar genotypes and those patient characteristics indicating a risk for a pulmonary TB (PTB chain transmission were ana- lysed. The isolates showing similar genotypes were distributed as follows: SMR (5%, SM (12.5%, SR (1.67%, MR (0%, S (46.67%, M (5% and R (0%. The remaining 35 cases were orphans. SMR exhibited a significant correlation (p < 0.05 with visits to clinics, municipalities and comorbidities (primarily diabetes mellitus. S correlated with drug consumption and M with comorbidities. SMR is needed to identify a social network in metropolitan areas for PTB transmission and S and M are able to detect risk factors as secondary components of a transmission chain of TB.

  13. Correlations between major risk factors and closely related Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates grouped by three current genotyping procedures: a population-based study in northeast Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñuelas-Urquides, Katia; Martínez-Rodríguez, Herminia Guadalupe; Enciso-Moreno, José Antonio; Molina-Salinas, Gloria María; Silva-Ramírez, Beatriz; Padilla-Rivas, Gerardo Raymundo; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Torres-de-la-Cruz, Víctor Manuel; Martínez-Martínez, Yazmin Berenice; Ortega-García, Jorge Luis; Garza-Treviño, Elsa Nancy; Enciso-Moreno, Leonor; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila; Becerril-Montes, Pola; Said-Fernández, Salvador

    2014-09-01

    The characteristics of tuberculosis (TB) patients related to a chain of recent TB transmissions were investigated. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) isolates (120) were genotyped using the restriction fragment length polymorphism-IS6110 (R), spacer oligotyping (S) and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (M) methods. The MTB isolates were clustered and the clusters were grouped according to the similarities of their genotypes. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients between the groups of MTB isolates with similar genotypes and those patient characteristics indicating a risk for a pulmonary TB (PTB) chain transmission were ana- lysed. The isolates showing similar genotypes were distributed as follows: SMR (5%), SM (12.5%), SR (1.67%), MR (0%), S (46.67%), M (5%) and R (0%). The remaining 35 cases were orphans. SMR exhibited a significant correlation (p < 0.05) with visits to clinics, municipalities and comorbidities (primarily diabetes mellitus). S correlated with drug consumption and M with comorbidities. SMR is needed to identify a social network in metropolitan areas for PTB transmission and S and M are able to detect risk factors as secondary components of a transmission chain of TB.

  14. Correlations between major risk factors and closely related Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates grouped by three current enotyping procedures: a population-based study in northeast Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñuelas-Urquides, Katia; Martínez-Rodríguez, Herminia Guadalupe; Enciso-Moreno, José Antonio; Molina-Salinas, Gloria María; Silva-Ramírez, Beatriz; Padilla-Rivas, Gerardo Raymundo; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Torres-de-la-Cruz, Víctor Manuel; Martínez-Martínez, Yazmin Berenice; Ortega-García, Jorge Luis; Garza-Treviño, Elsa Nancy; Enciso-Moreno, Leonor; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila; Becerril-Montes, Pola; Said-Fernández/, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of tuberculosis (TB) patients related to a chain of recent TB transmissions were investigated. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) isolates (120) were genotyped using the restriction fragment length polymorphism-IS6110 (R), spacer oligotyping (S) and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (M) methods. The MTB isolates were clustered and the clusters were grouped according to the similarities of their genotypes. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients between the groups of MTB isolates with similar genotypes and those patient characteristics indicating a risk for a pulmonary TB (PTB) chain transmission were ana- lysed. The isolates showing similar genotypes were distributed as follows: SMR (5%), SM (12.5%), SR (1.67%), MR (0%), S (46.67%), M (5%) and R (0%). The remaining 35 cases were orphans. SMR exhibited a significant correlation (p < 0.05) with visits to clinics, municipalities and comorbidities (primarily diabetes mellitus). S correlated with drug consumption and M with comorbidities. SMR is needed to identify a social network in metropolitan areas for PTB transmission and S and M are able to detect risk factors as secondary components of a transmission chain of TB. PMID:25317710

  15. Distribution of pathogens in central line-associated bloodstream infections among patients with and without neutropenia following chemotherapy: evidence for a proposed modification to the current surveillance definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, James P; Robichaux, Chad; Tejedor, Sheri Chernetsky; Reyes, Mary Dent; Jacob, Jesse T

    2013-02-01

    Many bloodstream infections (BSIs) occurring in patients with febrile neutropenia following cytotoxic chemotherapy are due to translocation of intestinal microbiota. However, these infections meet the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) definition of central line-associated BSIs (CLABSIs). We sought to determine the differences in the microbiology of NHSN-defined CLABSIs in patients with and without neutropenia and, using these data, to propose a modification of the CLABSI definition. Retrospective review. Two large university hospitals over 18 months. All hospital-acquired BSIs occurring in patients with central venous catheters in place were classified using the NHSN CLABSI definition. Patients with postchemotherapy neutropenia (500 neutrophils/mm(3) or lower) at the time of blood culture were considered neutropenic. Pathogens overrepresented in the neutropenic group were identified to inform development of a modified CLABSI definition. Organisms that were more commonly observed in the neutropenic group compared with the nonneutropenic group included Escherichia coli (22.7% vs 2.5%; P definition (removing BSI with enterococci, streptococci, or E. coli) excluded 33 of 66 neutropenic CLABSIs and decreased the CLABSI rate in one study hospital with large transplant and oncology populations from 2.12 to 1.79 cases per 1,000 line-days. Common gastrointestinal organisms were more common in the neutropenia group, suggesting that many BSIs meeting the NHSN criteria for CLABSI in the setting of neutropenia may represent translocation of gut organisms. These findings support modification of the NHSN CLABSI definition.

  16. Current Evidence on Auricular Therapy for Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Yu Tan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Auricular therapy (AT has been historically viewed as a convenient approach adjunct to pharmacological therapy for cancer patients with chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV. The aim of this study was to assess the evidence of the therapeutic effect of AT for CINV management in cancer patients. Relevant randomized controlled trials were retrieved from 12 electronic databases without language restrictions. Meanwhile, manual search was conducted for Chinese journals on complementary medicine published within the last five years, and the reference lists of included studies were also checked to identify any possible eligible studies. Twenty-one studies with 1713 participants were included. The effect rate of AT for managing acute CINV ranged from 44.44% to 93.33% in the intervention groups and 15% to 91.67% in the control groups. For delayed CINV, it was 62.96% to 100% and 25% to 100%, respectively. AT seems to be a promising approach in managing CINV. However, the level of evidence was low and the definite effect cannot be concluded as there were significant methodological flaws identified in the analyzed studies. The implications drawn from the 21 studies put some clues for future practice in this area including the need to conduct more rigorously designed randomized controlled trials.

  17. Current Evidence on Auricular Therapy for Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molassiotis, Alexander; Wang, Tao; Suen, Lorna K. P.

    2014-01-01

    Auricular therapy (AT) has been historically viewed as a convenient approach adjunct to pharmacological therapy for cancer patients with chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). The aim of this study was to assess the evidence of the therapeutic effect of AT for CINV management in cancer patients. Relevant randomized controlled trials were retrieved from 12 electronic databases without language restrictions. Meanwhile, manual search was conducted for Chinese journals on complementary medicine published within the last five years, and the reference lists of included studies were also checked to identify any possible eligible studies. Twenty-one studies with 1713 participants were included. The effect rate of AT for managing acute CINV ranged from 44.44% to 93.33% in the intervention groups and 15% to 91.67% in the control groups. For delayed CINV, it was 62.96% to 100% and 25% to 100%, respectively. AT seems to be a promising approach in managing CINV. However, the level of evidence was low and the definite effect cannot be concluded as there were significant methodological flaws identified in the analyzed studies. The implications drawn from the 21 studies put some clues for future practice in this area including the need to conduct more rigorously designed randomized controlled trials. PMID:25525445

  18. Tuberculosis verrucosa cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnabharath S

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of 23-year-old male patient with tuberculosis verrucous cutis on the foot for a duration of six months without responding to routine treatment. Tuberculosis is a common disease worldwide. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis contributes to 10% of cases. Cutaneous tuberculosis occupies a small spectrum of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Tuberculosis verrucosa cutis is an exogenous infection occurring in a previously sensitized patient by direct inoculation of the organism. It occurs in sensitized patients with a moderate to high immune response. The diagnosis in our patient was confirmed by history, clinical examination, histopathological examination and the patient’s response to anti-tuberculous therapy.

  19. Learning from epidemiological, clinical, and immunological studies on Mycobacterium africanum for improving current understanding of host–pathogen interactions, and for the development and evaluation of diagnostics, host-directed therapies, and vaccines for tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimuddin Zumla

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium africanum comprises two phylogenetic lineages within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC. M. africanum was first described and isolated in 1968 from the sputum of a Senegalese patient with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB and it has been identified increasingly as an important cause of human TB, particularly prevalent in West Africa. The restricted geographical distribution of M. africanum, in contrast to the widespread global distribution of other species of MTBC, requires explanation. Available data indicate that M. africanum may also have important differences in transmission, pathogenesis, and host–pathogen interactions, which could affect the evaluation of new TB intervention tools (diagnostics and vaccines–those currently in use and those under development. The unequal geographical distribution and spread of MTBC species means that individual research findings from one country or region cannot be generalized across the continent. Thus, generalizing data from previous and ongoing research studies on MTBC may be inaccurate and inappropriate. A major rethink is required regarding the design and structure of future clinical trials of new interventions. The West, Central, East, and Southern African EDCTP Networks of Excellence provide opportunities to take forward these pan-Africa studies. More investments into molecular, epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic, and immunological studies across the African continent are required to enable further understanding of host–M. africanum interactions, leading to the development of more specific diagnostics, biomarkers, host-directed therapies, and vaccines for TB.

  20. Seqüência do tratamento de curta duração da tuberculose pulmonar em Unidades Sanitárias do Vale do Paraíba, 1980-1981, São Paulo, Brasil Evaluation of short-term chemotherapy for pulmonary tuberculosis in the Health Institutions of the Vale do Paraíba, 1980-1981, S. Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Belluomini

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available Estuda-se a seqüência do tratamento de curta duração em doentes com tuberculose pulmonar, inscritos e com alta no período de outubro de 1980 a outubro de 1981, nas Unidades Sanitárias do Departamento Regional de Saúde do Vale do Paraíba - DRS-3 - da Secretaria da Saúde do Estado de São Paulo, Brasil. Os dados obtidos pela verificação dos prontuários dos doentes foram analisados sob os seguintes aspectos: distrito sanitário, idade e sexo do paciente, tipo de alta, esquema de tratamento, hospitalização, intolerância medicamentosa e tempo de negativação do escarro. Dos 308 doentes que constituíram a população de estudo, 254 (82,5% tiveram alta por cura, 21 (6,8% por abandono e 33 (10,7% por mudança de diagnóstico, óbito ou transferência. Os resultados confirmam a efetividade do tratamento encurtado da tuberculose pulmonar com os esquemas recomendados, apresentando na área trabalhada baixas taxas de abandono e de hospitalização e resultados bastante favoráveis quanto à negativação dos bacilíferos.The results of the short-term chemotherapy for pulmonary tuberculosis performed on patients who were admitted to the Health Clinics of one of the S. Paulo State's Health Divisions and who completed the treatment during the period from October 1980 to October 1981 are shown. Such aspects of the records as Health Districts, patient's age and sex, success and regimen of treatment, hospitalization, drug toxicity and smear negativity period were analysed. The findings confirm the effectiveness of short-term chemotherapy under program conditions as corroborated by its acceptability to the patients, the success achieved and the benefits in the decrease of the number of admissions to hospital and in the reduction of the sources of infection within a shorter period.

  1. [Tuberculosis and malaria global prophylaxis in the light of decisions of the Big Eight].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishchenko, G G

    2008-01-01

    At the present time about two million people, one third of the Earth's population, are carriers of tuberculosis agent. Though tuberculosis is curable disease, it continues to take away lives of about 4400 persons; most of them are young and are in the most productive age. The most active incidence rate of tuberculosis occurs in the countries of Africa to the south of Sahara (29% of all cases of tuberculosis per head); half of new cases of tuberculosis fall on Asian countries: Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Pakistan, Philippines. The governments of Big Eight maintain activities that have stabilized morbidity of tuberculosis on a world scale. Over 11 years (1995 - 2006) World Health Organization (WHO) implemented the DOTS strategy (Directly Observed Treatment with Short course of chemotherapy) in 183 countries and tested it on 26 millions patients with tuberculosis. Global data acquisition in 2005 found out morbidity of tuberculosis in 59% (the aim is 70%) and successful cure in 84% cases (the aim is 85 %). In 2006 WHO started realization of the Global Plan "Stop tuberculosis" (2006 - 2012). At the present time Global Fund use about 17% its resources to finance programs against tuberculosis. These funds help to reveal 5 millions extra cases of tuberculosis and cure 3 millions patients in the network of DOTS.

  2. Cancer chemotherapy and biotherapy: principles and practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chabner, Bruce; Longo, Dan L

    2011-01-01

    "Updated to include the newest drugs and those currently in development, Cancer Chemotherapy and Biotherapy, Fifth Edition is a comprehensive reference on the preclinical and clinical pharmacology of anticancer agents...

  3. Rapid determination of anti-tuberculosis drug resistance from whole-genome sequences

    KAUST Repository

    Coll, Francesc; McNerney, Ruth; Preston, Mark D; Guerra-Assunç ã o, José Afonso; Warry, Andrew; Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A.; Mallard, Kim; Nair, Mridul; Miranda, Anabela; Alves, Adriana; Perdigã o, Joã o; Viveiros, Miguel; Portugal, Isabel; Hasan, Zahra; Hasan, Rumina; Glynn, Judith R; Martin, Nigel; Pain, Arnab; Clark, Taane G

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance (DR) challenges effective tuberculosis disease control. Current molecular tests examine limited numbers of mutations, and although whole genome sequencing approaches could fully characterise DR, data

  4. Repurposing and Revival of the Drugs: A New Approach to Combat the Drug Resistant Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divakar Sharma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Emergence of drug resistant tuberculosis like multi drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB, extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB and totally drug resistant tuberculosis (TDR-TB has created a new challenge to fight against these bad bugs of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Repurposing and revival of the drugs are the new trends/options to combat these worsen situations of tuberculosis in the antibiotics resistance era or in the situation of global emergency. Bactericidal and synergistic effect of repurposed/revived drugs along with the latest drugs bedaquiline and delamanid used in the treatment of MDR-TB, XDR-TB, and TDR-TB might be the choice for future promising combinatorial chemotherapy against these bad bugs.

  5. Nanotechnology for Cancer Therapy Based on Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Yang Zhao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy has been widely applied in clinics. However, the therapeutic potential of chemotherapy against cancer is seriously dissatisfactory due to the nonspecific drug distribution, multidrug resistance (MDR and the heterogeneity of cancer. Therefore, combinational therapy based on chemotherapy mediated by nanotechnology, has been the trend in clinical research at present, which can result in a remarkably increased therapeutic efficiency with few side effects to normal tissues. Moreover, to achieve the accurate pre-diagnosis and real-time monitoring for tumor, the research of nano-theranostics, which integrates diagnosis with treatment process, is a promising field in cancer treatment. In this review, the recent studies on combinational therapy based on chemotherapy will be systematically discussed. Furthermore, as a current trend in cancer treatment, advance in theranostic nanoparticles based on chemotherapy will be exemplified briefly. Finally, the present challenges and improvement tips will be presented in combination therapy and nano-theranostics.

  6. HIV status and tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Failure to perform mycobacterium culture bacterial blood culture and results of other causes of .... for Identification of Highly Infectious Tuberculosis in People Living with HIV in Southeast Asia. ... Indian Journal of Tuberculosis 58, 108-112.

  7. Tuberculosis Lymphoedema Cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangopadhyay Asok Kumar

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoedema following cutaneous tuberculosis is a rare occurrence. A case of elephantiasis of leg following lupus vulgaris is presented. It can still be seen in rural India in untreated advanced cutaneous tuberculosis.

  8. Tuberculosis and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    TUBERCULOSIS www.who.int/tb & DIABETES THE DUAL EPIDEMIC OF TB AND DIABETES DEADLY LINKAGES  People with ... higher risk of progressing from latent to active tuberculosis.  Diabetes triples a person’s risk of developing TB. ...

  9. Tuberculosis Treatment and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  10. Play the Tuberculosis Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Questionnaire Tuberculosis Play Tuberculosis Experiments & Discoveries About the game Discover and experience some of the classic methods ... last will in Paris. Play the Blood Typing Game Try to save some patients and learn about ...

  11. Tuberculosis as occupational disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mendoza-Ticona, Alberto; Instituto de Medicina Tropical Alexander von Humboldt, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Médico infectólogo tropicalista magister en Epidemiología Clínica.

    2014-01-01

    There is enough evidence to declare tuberculosis as an occupational disease among healthcare workers. In Peru, there are regulations granting employment rights regarding tuberculosis as an occupational disease, such as healthcare coverage for temporary or permanent disability. However, these rights have not been sufficiently socialized. This study presents information on the risk of acquiring tuberculosis in the workplace, and a review of the evidence to declare tuberculosis as an occupationa...

  12. Cutaneous tuberculosis, tuberculosis verrucosa cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilamani Mohanty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous tuberculosis because of its variability in presentation, wider differential diagnosis, and difficulty in obtaining microbiological confirmation continues to be the most challenging to diagnose for dermatologists in developing countries. Despite the evolution of sophisticated techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR and enzyme-linked-immunosorbent serologic assay (ELISA, the sensitivity of new methods are not better than the isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosum in culture. Even in the 21 st century, we rely on methods as old as the intradermal reaction purified protein derivative standard test and therapeutic trials, as diagnostic tools. We describe a case which has been diagnosed and treated as eczema by renowned physicians for 2 years. Incisional biopsy showed the presence of well-defined granulomas and ZN staining of the biopsy specimen showed the presence of acid fast bacilli; a trial of ATT (antitubercular therapy for 6 months lead to permanent cure of the lesion.

  13. Abdominal tuberculosis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heda Melinda Nataprawira

    2001-06-01

    supported the diagnosis. There was no positive results of acid fast bacilli and culture done for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in gastric aspirate as well as ascitic fuid. Peritonitis tuberculosis was most commonly diagnosed (80.0%, followed by mesenterial/nodal tuberculosis (20.0%. All of the children followed (60.0% responded well to the drugs therapy.

  14. pulmonary tuberculosis, jimma hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and National Tuberculosis and Leprosy Control Program manual. RESULTS: A total of 112 extra pulmonary ... Key words: Clinical audit; extra pulmonary Tuberculosis; National Tuberculosis and. Leprosy Control manual. "Addis Ababa ..... intern influence drug regimen selection. Compliance to the 1997 NTLCP inanual is.

  15. Updates on antibody functions in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and their relevance for developing a vaccine against tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achkar, Jacqueline M; Prados-Rosales, Rafael

    2018-04-12

    A more effective vaccine to control tuberculosis (TB), a major global public health problem, is urgently needed. Current vaccine candidates focus predominantly on eliciting cell-mediated immunity but other arms of the immune system also contribute to protection against TB. We review here recent studies that enhance our current knowledge of antibody-mediated functions against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These findings, which contribute to the increasing evidence that antibodies have a protective role against TB, include demonstrations that firstly distinct human antibody Fc glycosylation patterns, found in latent M. tuberculosis infection but not in active TB, influence the efficacy of the host to control M. tuberculosis infection, secondly antibody isotype influences human antibody functions, and thirdly that antibodies targeting M. tuberculosis surface antigens are protective. We discuss these findings in the context of TB vaccine development and highlight the need for further research on antibody-mediated immunity in M. tuberculosis infection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Current scenario

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Current scenario. India , like other parts of the world, is also facing the problem of increase in the incidence of drug resistance in tuberculosis. Multi-drug resistance (MDR, resistance to RIF & INH) and extensively drug resistant strains (X-DR, resistance to RIF, INH, FQs ...

  17. Risk assessment of hepatotoxicity among tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS-coinfected patients under tuberculosis treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Williams Ngouleun; Prosper Cabral Biapa Nya; Anatole Constant Pieme; Phelix Bruno Telefo

    2016-01-01

    Objective/background: Tuberculosis (TB) is a worldwide public health problem. It is a contagious and grave disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Current drugs such as isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and rifampicin used for the treatment of tuberculosis are potentially hepatotoxic and can lead to drug hepatitis. In order to improve the follow-up of TB patients in Cameroon, we carried out a study which aimed to evaluate the hepatotoxicity risk factors associated with anti-TB drugs. Methods:...

  18. Factors associated with myelopathy in spinal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitada, Yuki; Izawa, Kazutaka; Imoto, Kazuhiko; Yonenobu, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    To identity factors associated with Pott's disease, 49 spinal tuberculosis patients were classified into a group of 22 patients with a neurological deficit and a group of 27 patients with no neurological deficits, and their clinical findings (gender, age, pulmonary tuberculosis, antituberculous chemotherapy, C reactive protein (CRP), nutritional status, and duration of disease) and radiographic findings (degree of canal encroachment, pathology and level of dural compression, number of affected vertebral bodies, range of paravertebral abscesses, signals in the spinal cord on MRI, kyphotic angle, and spinal instability) were compared. The results showed that malnutrition, severe canal encroachment, and abnormal signal within the spinal cord on MRI were associated with neurological complications. Factors associated with the degree of neurological deficit were unclear because the study population was too small. (author)

  19. Primary nasal tuberculosis following blunt trauma nose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Saha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary nasal tuberculosis is a rare disease with nearly 40 cases reported. Our patient was a young male presented with left sided nasal obstruction, anosmia and occasional epistaxis for last 7 weeks after 6 months of blunt trauma nose. Contrast enhanced computed tomography of the para nasal sinuses showed increased soft-tissue density with contrast enhancement in the left maxillary antrum with extension through left osteomeatal foramen to the left nasal cavity along with further extension through choana to nasopharynx resulting in partial obliteration of the nasopharyngeal airway. Nasal endoscopy revealed a sessile polypoidal pinkish mass arising from the left osteomeatal foramen. Histopathological examination of excisional biopsy of that area showed caseating granuloma. Our patient diagnosed as primary nasal tuberculosis following trauma and treated with anti-tubercular chemotherapy.

  20. Chemotherapy disruption of efficient radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nervi, C.; Friedman, M.

    1974-01-01

    Studies on the use of chemotherapy in combination with radiotherapy are reviewed. Some topics discussed are: indications for the use of combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy; improvement of the therapeutic ratio following the use of methotrexate; advantages of preirradiation and postirradiation chemotherapy; side effects following simultaneous chemotherapy and radiotherapy; and effects of chemotherapy on cure rate of radiosensitive and radioresistant tumors. (U.S.)

  1. INTERESTING UROGRAPHIC CHANGE OF THE URETER IN UPPER URINARY TRACT TUBERCULOSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Miyoshi, Nobuyuki; Noda, Shinshi; Eto, Kousaku

    1981-01-01

    Urinary tuberculosis is one of the diseases continuously decreasing in number with the progress of chemotherapy and improvement in the living environment. In recent years the proportion of patients with this disease has been less than 0.5 percent of the out-patients. We encountered ureteral tuberculosis showing a pattern of diverticulum-like cystic extension arising from tuberculous ulcer, which is very interesting from a roentgenologic viewpoint. In this paper we studied on specially the mod...

  2. Microbe Profile: Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Humanity's deadly microbial foe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Stephen V; Parish, Tanya

    2018-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an expert and deadly pathogen, causing the disease tuberculosis (TB) in humans. It has several notable features: the ability to enter non-replicating states for long periods and cause latent infection; metabolic remodelling during chronic infection; a thick, waxy cell wall; slow growth rate in culture; and intrinsic drug resistance and antibiotic tolerance. As a pathogen, M. tuberculosis has a complex relationship with its host, is able to replicate inside macrophages, and expresses diverse immunomodulatory molecules. M. tuberculosis currently causes over 1.8 million deaths a year, making it the world's most deadly human pathogen.

  3. RESEARCH ON NATURAL REMEDIES OF TUBERCULOSIS AND IDENITIFY NEW SYMPTOMS, TREATMENT REGIMENS, DIAGNOSTIC EVALUATION

    OpenAIRE

    MYLE AKSHAY KIRAN; Dr. Gangadhar Rao; Dr. Ashok Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is caused by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an infection deadly disease and the treatment of which is one of the most important severe challenges at the global level currently more than a 20 chemicals medications are described for the treatment of tuberculosis. Regardless of availability of several drugs to treat TB. The cause agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis is now a days getting resistant towards the convenient drugs and leading to condition known as the multi drugs resistan...

  4. A novel clinical sign in intraocular tuberculosis: Active chorioretinitis within chorioretinal atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Avinash Pathengay; Bhavik Panchal; Himadri Choudhury; Soumyava Basu; Nidhi Relhan; Harry W. Flynn, Jr.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To report a novel clinical sign in patients with intraocular tuberculosis. The current study is an observational consecutive case series of patients diagnosed with intraocular tuberculosis managed at a tertiary eye care centre from June 1, 2012 to December 31, 2015. Observations: The diagnosis of intraocular tuberculosis was made in 6 patients based on ocular features suggestive of tuberculosis along with a positive tuberculin skin testing and chest X-ray consistent with tuberculo...

  5. Tuberculosis in the lung (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis is caused by a group of organisms: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M bovis , M africanum and a few other rarer subtypes. Tuberculosis usually appears as a lung (pulmonary) infection. However, ...

  6. Tuberculosis Facts - Exposure to TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Exposure to TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  7. Tuberculosis Facts - Testing for TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Testing for TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  8. Drivers of Tuberculosis Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathema, Barun; Andrews, Jason R; Cohen, Ted; Borgdorff, Martien W; Behr, Marcel; Glynn, Judith R; Rustomjee, Roxana; Silk, Benjamin J; Wood, Robin

    2017-11-03

    Measuring tuberculosis transmission is exceedingly difficult, given the remarkable variability in the timing of clinical disease after Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection; incident disease can result from either a recent (ie, weeks to months) or a remote (ie, several years to decades) infection event. Although we cannot identify with certainty the timing and location of tuberculosis transmission for individuals, approaches for estimating the individual probability of recent transmission and for estimating the fraction of tuberculosis cases due to recent transmission in populations have been developed. Data used to estimate the probable burden of recent transmission include tuberculosis case notifications in young children and trends in tuberculin skin test and interferon γ-release assays. More recently, M. tuberculosis whole-genome sequencing has been used to estimate population levels of recent transmission, identify the distribution of specific strains within communities, and decipher chains of transmission among culture-positive tuberculosis cases. The factors that drive the transmission of tuberculosis in communities depend on the burden of prevalent tuberculosis; the ways in which individuals live, work, and interact (eg, congregate settings); and the capacity of healthcare and public health systems to identify and effectively treat individuals with infectious forms of tuberculosis. Here we provide an overview of these factors, describe tools for measurement of ongoing transmission, and highlight knowledge gaps that must be addressed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  9. Postoperative Chemotherapy for Medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The survival rate and cognitive function of 43 children, age <3 years, with medulloblastoma treated with intensive postoperative chemotherapy alone, without radiotherapy, were determined at the University of Wurzburg and other centers in Germany Chemotherapy consisted of three two-month cycles of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, vincristine, carboplatin, and etoposide.

  10. [Management of adverse effects with antituberculosis chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuyuguchi, Kazunari; Wada, Masako

    2011-02-01

    Tuberculosis has now become a curable disease with chemotherapy. So it is natural that the present issues in tuberculosis management are focused on how to complete standard chemotherapy. In this context, management of adverse effects constitutes an essential part of antituberculosis chemotherapy, as well as directly observed therapy. In this symposium, discussions were held about three major subjects on this issue. First, hepatotoxicity develops frequently and has sometimes fatal outcome, which makes it the most problematic adverse effect. "Management of hepatotoxicity during antituberculosis chemotherapy" was published by the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis (JST) in 2006. Dr. Shinsho Yoshiba evaluated this recommendation and pointed out that the criteria for discontinuation of drug based on AST, ALT and bilirubin levels is too sensitive and the concept of predicting fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) is lacking. He stressed the importance of monitoring serum prothrombin time for predicting FHF. Next, allergic drug reaction such as fever or skin rash often causes distress, although rarely fatal. As isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RFP) are key drugs for the cure, readministration of these drugs is often attempted by desensitization therapy. "Recommendation about desensitization therapy of antituberculosis drugs" was also published by JST in 1997. Dr. Yoshihiro Kobashi reported high success rates of 79 percent for INH and 75 percent for RFP according to this recommendation. He also reported correlated factor with the success, such as the longer period from the discontinuation to the desensitization therapy and lower doses of drugs at starting desensitization. Finally, we sometimes experience transient worsening of radiographical findings and general symptoms during antituberculosis chemotherapy. This is presumed to be due to allergic reaction to dead bacilli without requiring discontinuation of the drug. Differential diagnosis includes drug-induced pneumonia requring

  11. the microbiological diagnosis of tuberculosis in a resource

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ? *M.O. Odubanjo, and **H.O. Dada- ... The objective of this study is to audit the processes for the microbiological diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) in our .... The current “gold standard” for the diagnosis of tuberculosis is mycobacterial culture.

  12. Neutrophil extracellular traps in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Anne Jan; Zeerleder, Sacha; Blok, Dana C.; Kager, Liesbeth M.; Lede, Ivar O.; Rahman, Wahid; Afroz, Rumana; Ghose, Aniruddha; Visser, Caroline E.; Zahed, Abu Shahed Md; Husain, Md Anwar; Alam, Khan Mashrequl; Barua, Pravat Chandra; Hassan, Mahtabuddin; Tayab, Md Abu; Dondorp, Arjen M.; van der Poll, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a devastating infectious disease causing many deaths worldwide. Recent investigations have implicated neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in the host response to tuberculosis. The aim of the current study was to obtain evidence for NETs release in the circulation during human

  13. Chemotherapy or radio-chemotherapy for advanced adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus and cardiac orifice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, J.F.; Duffaud, F.; Dahan, L.; Ries, P.; Ville, E.; Laugier, R.

    2001-01-01

    Adenocarcinomas of esophagus and cardia represent in France approximately 20 to 40% of the esophagus cancers. They have a high risk to develop lymph nodes metastases and liver metastases. Currently, only 50 to 70% of patients may benefit from surgical curative resection at diagnosis, but more than 50% of them will recur. The standard of treatment of these metastatic adenocarcinomas is chemotherapy. Three large randomized comparative studies, between chemotherapy and supportive care, showed that chemotherapy significantly extends the median of survival (from 3-4 months to 10-12 months) and improves the quality of life. Currently, the combination of epirubicin-cisplatin-continuous 5FU (ECF) is the most effective regimen but it is difficult to administer and tolerate because of the long continuous 5FU infusion. In France, the most commonly used combination regimen still associates 5FU and cisplatin. New drugs (such as docetaxel, CPT11, oxaliplatin) used alone or in combination, especially with 5U, are very promising. Radio-chemotherapy is the preferred treatment for locoregional recurrences, because it improves dysphagia and enables to obtain complete tumor responses. Current results from concomitant radio-chemotherapy studies for esophagus cancer, based on 5FU alone, 5FU-cisplatin or 5FU-mitomycin, given as preoperative treatment or as exclusive treatment, support to use radio-chemotherapy for the treatment of loco-regional recurrences after surgical resection. Nevertheless, the optimal radio-chemotherapy schedule still remain to be defined (dose, duration, splitting of radiotherapy, choice of anticancer drugs). (authors)

  14. Chemotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfister, David G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The role of chemotherapy in the management of squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract is undergoing rapid evolution. Historically, the use of chemotherapy was limited to patients with incurable disease who had exhausted all surgical and radiation therapy options. The results of recent randomized trials, however, suggest an increasing role for chemotherapy as part of primary management in patients with unresectable disease; advanced larynx or hypopharynx cancer with the intent of larynx preservation, or advanced nasopharynx cancer. This refresher course will provide a comprehensive overview of the current indications for chemotherapy in the management of these malignancies, and will highlight areas of controversy and future directions of investigation. More specifically, the following areas will be emphasized. 1. The identification of drugs commonly used in the management of head and neck cancer, their customary dosing and side effects. 2. The impact of induction and/or adjuvant chemotherapy combined with surgery and radiation therapy as defined by randomized trials, including a discussion of the Head and Neck Contracts program and the Intergroup adjuvant trial. 3. The development of larynx/function preservation treatment programs, including a review of the Veterans Administration and EORTC larynx preservation studies. 4. The evolving role of chemotherapy as part of innovative combined modality programs, especially in patients with unresectable disease. The rationale and utility of sequential versus concomitant/alternating chemotherapy-radiation strategies, and relevant randomized clinical trials comparing the different strategies will be discussed. 5. The appropriate application of chemotherapy in the palliative setting, including a discussion of the relative merits of single-agent versus combination chemotherapy

  15. Chemotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfister, David G.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The role of chemotherapy in the management of squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract is undergoing rapid evolution. Historically, the use of chemotherapy was limited to patients with incurable disease who had exhausted all surgical and radiation therapy options. The results of recent randomized trials, however, suggest an increasing role for chemotherapy as part of primary management in patients seeking to avoid potentially morbid surgical procedures or with unresectable disease. This refresher course will provide a comprehensive overview of the current indications for chemotherapy in the management of these malignancies, and will highlight areas of controversy and future directions of investigation. More specifically, the following areas will be emphasized. 1. The identification of drugs commonly used in the management of head and neck cancer, their customary dosing and side effects. 2. The impact of induction and/or adjuvant chemotherapy combined with surgery and radiation therapy as defined by randomized trials, including a discussion of the Head and Neck Contracts program and the Intergroup adjuvant trial. 3. The development of larynx/function preservation treatment programs, including a review of the Memorial Hospital experience with larynx preservation and the Veterans Administration larynx preservation study. 4. The evolving role of chemotherapy as part of innovative combined modality programs, especially in patients with unresectable disease. The rationale and utility of sequential versus concomitant/alternating chemotherapy-radiation strategies, and relevant randomized clinical trials comparing the different strategies will be discussed. 5. The appropriate application of chemotherapy in the palliative setting, including a discussion of the relative merits of single-agent versus combination chemotherapy

  16. Clinics of ocular tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vishali; Shoughy, Samir S; Mahajan, Sarakshi; Khairallah, Moncef; Rosenbaum, James T; Curi, Andre; Tabbara, Khalid F

    2015-02-01

    Ocular tuberculosis is an extrapulmonary tuberculous condition and has variable manifestations. The purpose of this review is to describe the clinical manifestations of ocular tuberculosis affecting the anterior and posterior segments of the eye in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients. Review of literature using Pubmed database. Mycobacterium tuberculosis may lead to formation of conjunctival granuloma, nodular scleritis, and interstitial keratitis. Lacrimal gland and orbital caseating granulomas are rare but may occur. The intraocular structures are also a target of insult by M. tuberculosis and may cause anterior granulomatous uveitis, anterior and posterior synechiae, secondary glaucoma, and cataract. The bacillus may involve the ciliary body, resulting in the formation of a localized caseating granuloma. Posterior segment manifestations include vitritis, retinal vasculitis, optic neuritis, serpiginous-like choroiditis, choroidal tubercules, subretinal neovascularization, and, rarely, endophthalmitis. The recognition of clinical signs of ocular tuberculosis is of utmost importance as it can provide clinical pathway toward tailored investigations and decision making for initiating anti-tuberculosis therapy.

  17. Childhood tuberculosis and malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaganath, Devan; Mupere, Ezekiel

    2012-12-15

    Despite the burden of both malnutrition and tuberculosis in children worldwide, there are few studies on the mechanisms that underlie this relationship. From available research, it appears that malnutrition is a predictor of tuberculosis disease and is associated with worse outcomes. This is supported through several lines of evidence, including the role of vitamin D receptor genotypes, malnutrition's effects on immune development, respiratory infections among malnourished children, and limited work specifically on pediatric tuberculosis and malnutrition. Nutritional supplementation has yet to suggest significant benefits on the course of tuberculosis in children. There is a critical need for research on childhood tuberculosis, specifically on how nutritional status affects the risk and progression of tuberculosis and whether nutritional supplementation improves clinical outcomes or prevents disease.

  18. Hixozide in therapy of tuberculosis of bronchi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morozova T.l.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of the combined inhaled anti-TB preparation Hixozide for improving the effectiveness of medical treatment of patients suffering from tuberculosis of bronchus. Material and Methods. Hixozide (made in Russia, the active substance Hydroxymethylchinoxylindioxydum 100mg + Isoniazidum 250 mg, was delivered via inhalations using a compressor nebulizer within 21 days in the course of the complex chemotherapy. Inclusion criteria: newly diagnosed patients and patients with relapsed tuberculosis with the presence of tuberculousendobronchitis, drug sensitivity saved to isoniazid. Exclusion criteria: the state of preventing the appointment of adequate treatment, HIV-infection (group 1, n=30. The comparison group was consisted of patients receiving standard treatment in combination with inhaled administration of Isoniazid (group 2, n=21. Rezults. The clinical study has figured out: after a course of inhalations of Hixozide the clinical cure of bronchial tuberculosis occurs after the period of 2 months of treatment (according to the results of endoscopy of bronchi; more patients — 69.2% versus 38.1% in the comparison group, p=0,039 showed a positive trend during the nonspecific endobronchitis — 85,7% vs. 52,9%, p=0,017; the treatment and bacteriological conversion were achieved: 143±27 days in the first group vs. 164±32 days in the control group, p=0,019. Adverse reactions to Hixozide demanding its abolition occurred in 13,3%, they were stopped and did not affect the health of patients in the future. Conclusion. Inhaled Hixozide in the complex treatment of patients with tuberculosis accelerates clinical cure of tuberculosis of the bronchi, healing the lesions in the lung tissue and abacillation.

  19. The predictive value of current haemoglobin levels for incident tuberculosis and/or mortality during long-term antiretroviral therapy in South Africa: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkhoff, Andrew D; Wood, Robin; Cobelens, Frank G; Gupta-Wright, Ankur; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Lawn, Stephen D

    2015-04-02

    Low haemoglobin concentrations may be predictive of incident tuberculosis (TB) and death in HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART), but data are limited and inconsistent. We examined these relationships retrospectively in a long-term South African ART cohort with multiple time-updated haemoglobin measurements. Prospectively collected clinical data on patients receiving ART for up to 8 years in a community-based cohort were analysed. Time-updated haemoglobin concentrations, CD4 counts and HIV viral loads were recorded, and TB diagnoses and deaths from all causes were ascertained. Anaemia severity was classified using World Health Organization criteria. TB incidence and mortality rates were calculated and Poisson regression models were used to identify independent predictors of incident TB and mortality, respectively. During a median follow-up of 5.0 years (IQR, 2.5-5.8) of 1,521 patients, 476 cases of incident TB and 192 deaths occurred during 6,459 person-years (PYs) of follow-up. TB incidence rates were strongly associated with time-updated anaemia severity; those without anaemia had a rate of 4.4 (95%CI, 3.8-5.1) cases/100 PYs compared to 10.0 (95%CI, 8.3-12.1), 26.6 (95%CI, 22.5-31.7) and 87.8 (95%CI, 57.0-138.2) cases/100 PYs in those with mild, moderate and severe anaemia, respectively. Similarly, mortality rates in those with no anaemia or mild, moderate and severe time-updated anaemia were 1.1 (95%CI, 0.8-1.5), 3.5 (95%CI, 2.7-4.8), 11.8 (95%CI, 9.5-14.8) and 28.2 (95%CI, 16.5-51.5) cases/100 PYs, respectively. Moderate and severe anaemia (time-updated) during ART were the strongest independent predictors for incident TB (adjusted IRR = 3.8 [95%CI, 3.0-4.8] and 8.2 [95%CI, 5.3-12.7], respectively) and for mortality (adjusted IRR = 6.0 [95%CI, 3.9-9.2] and adjusted IRR = 8.0 [95%CI, 3.9-16.4], respectively). Increasing severity of anaemia was associated with exceptionally high rates of both incident TB and mortality during

  20. DNA repair in Mycobacterium tuberculosis revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Vultos, Tiago; Mestre, Olga; Tonjum, Tone; Gicquel, Brigitte

    2009-05-01

    Our understanding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA repair mechanisms is still poor compared with that of other bacterial organisms. However, the publication of the first complete M. tuberculosis genome sequence 10 years ago boosted the study of DNA repair systems in this organism. A first step in the elucidation of M. tuberculosis DNA repair mechanisms was taken by Mizrahi and Andersen, who identified homologs of genes involved in the reversal or repair of DNA damage in Escherichia coli and related organisms. Genes required for nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, recombination, and SOS repair and mutagenesis were identified. Notably, no homologs of genes involved in mismatch repair were identified. Novel characteristics of the M. tuberculosis DNA repair machinery have been found over the last decade, such as nonhomologous end joining, the presence of Mpg, ERCC3 and Hlr - proteins previously presumed to be produced exclusively in mammalian cells - and the recently discovered bifunctional dCTP deaminase:dUTPase. The study of these systems is important to develop therapeutic agents that can counteract M. tuberculosis evolutionary changes and to prevent adaptive events resulting in antibiotic resistance. This review summarizes our current understanding of the M. tuberculosis DNA repair system.

  1. Primary tuberculosis of the glans penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez Parra, Jose David; Alvarez Bandres, Silvia; Garcia Garcia, Diego; Torres Varas, Lorena; Sotil Arrieta, Amaia; Jimenez Calvo, Jesus

    2014-03-01

    Tuberculosis of the penis is an extremely rare disease with few cases reported in the literature. We present the case of a 64 year-old man with a whitish papular-ampullary eruption in the glans penis. After antibiotic/antimycotic therapy and several topical ointments for 3 months without response he was referred to our Department. Biopsy of the ulceration edge was performed and pathology result showed a chronic granulomatous inflammatory necrotizing lesion with granulomatous vasculitis lesions, without tumor infiltration. Systemic examination to rule out other tuberculosis foci was negative. With de suspicion of primary tuberculosis of the glans penis, anti tuberculosis therapy with Isoniazid and Piridoxine was started. Within a period of five months the ulceration healed significantly. Currently, the patient is still asymptomatic without glans penis lesions. Primary glans penis tuberculosis is a rare disease, but we must consider it (both primary and secondary forms) to try to avoid diagnostic delays that may cause prejudice for the patient. This condition promptly responds to anti tuberculosis therapy as evidenced by our case and many other reports.

  2. Pictorial essay: Orbital tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narula, Mahender K; Chaudhary, Vikas; Baruah, Dhiraj; Kathuria, Manoj; Anand, Rama

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the orbit is rare, even in places where tuberculosis is endemic. The disease may involve soft tissue, the lacrimal gland, or the periosteum or bones of the orbital wall. Intracranial extension, in the form of extradural abscess, and infratemporal fossa extension has been described. This pictorial essay illustrates the imaging findings of nine histopathologically confirmed cases of orbital tuberculosis. All these patients responded to antituberculous treatment

  3. Tuberculosis treatment among smear positive tuberculosis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munir, M.K.; Iqbal, R.; Shabbir, I.; Chaudhry, K

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major health problem in many parts of the world. Delay in initiation of the treatment may result in prolonged infectious state, drug resistance, relapse and death. Objectives: To determine the factors responsible for not starting tuberculosis treatment among smear positive tuberculosis patients. Study type, settings and duration: This cross sectional study was done at Pakistan Medical Research Council TB Research Center, King Edward Medical University, Lahore, from fifth March 2010 to fifth December 2010. Patients and Methods: Fifty sputum smear positive patients of tuberculosis who did not register themselves in treatment register and presumably did not initiate anti tuberculosis treatment were contacted using telephone or traced by their home addresses. Once contact was established, they were inquired about the reasons for not starting tuberculosis treatment. Results: Of 50 patients 38(76%)belonged to the lower socio economic class and 12(24%) to the lower middle class. Fourteen patients (28%) were illiterate and 23(46%) had only 8 years of education. Of the 50 cases 41(82%) were taking treatment from traditional healers and 4% did not go back to the DOTS program. Physical condition of the patient, social, domestic and religious issues also played some role in default. Conclusions: Lack of health education and poverty were the main factors responsible for non compliance from treatment. Policy message: Sputum testing sites should have a paramedic who should educate the patients about the benefits of treatment and the dangers of default or partial treatment. (author)

  4. Surveillance of drug resistance for tuberculosis control: why and how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaulet, P; Boulahbal, F; Grosset, J

    1995-12-01

    The resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to antibiotics, which reflects the quality of the chemotherapy applied in the community, is one of the elements of epidemiological surveillance used in national tuberculosis programmes. Measurement of drug resistance poses problems for biologists in standardization of laboratory methods and quality control. The definition of rates of acquired and primary drug resistance also necessitates standardization in the methods used to collect information transmitted by clinicians. Finally, the significance of the rates calculated depends on the choice of the patients sample on which sensitivity tests have been performed. National surveys of drug resistance therefore require multidisciplinary participation in order to select the only useful indicators: rates of primary resistance and of acquired resistance. These indicators, gathered in representative groups of patients over a long period, are a measurement of the impact of modern chemotherapy regimens on bacterial ecology.

  5. Flexor Tenosynovitis Due to Tuberculosis in Hand and Wrist: Is Tenosynovectomy Imperative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabakaş, Fatih; Uğurlar, Meriç; Turan, Derya Bayirli; Yeşiloğlu, Nebil; Mersa, Berkan; Özçelik, İsmail Bülent

    2016-08-01

    The treatment of flexor tenosynovitis in the hand and wrist due to tuberculosis is controversial. Although some authors recommend the antituberculous chemotherapy, the others recommend the surgical treatment. In this article, 12 patients with synovial tuberculosis of the flexor aspect of the hand and the wrist were evaluated with respect to diagnosis and treatment modalities. None of the patients had a history of tuberculosis, concomitant disease, immunosuppressive drug use, drug abuse, and human immunodefficiency virus positivity. A chest x-ray and family screening were performed in all of the cases, none had evidence of tuberculosis in the lung. The biopsy, histopathological examination, acid-fast bacillus staining, and BACTEC tuberculosis culture were performed. Antituberculous chemotherapy was initiated in patients diagnosed with tuberculosis by either histological or microbiological examinations. The patients did not undergo any further surgery after biopsy procedures. The lesions regressed totally in all patients after 3 months of treatment. Carpal tunnel syndrome symptoms and signs recruited at five months of treatment. In patients with flexor tuberculosis tenosynovitis, it is possible to achieve good results by applying only medical therapy after a biopsy, and without the need for further surgery.

  6. Isolated Optic Disc Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Ahmad M.; Tabbara, Khalid F.; Tabbarah, Zuhair

    2015-01-01

    We present a healthy male subject who developed progressive visual loss in the left eye initially diagnosed as optic neuritis. Upon suspicion of infectious etiology, testing was positive for tuberculosis. There were no signs or symptoms of active systemic tuberculosis infection. The patient responded swiftly to antimycobacterial therapy with return of vision and resolution of disc swelling. Positive purified protein derivative skin test, negative chest radiograph, negative systemic workup, negative workup for other causes of unilateral optic neuritis and quick response to mycobacterial therapy reaffirm the entity of isolated optic disc tuberculosis similar to isolated choroidal tuberculosis without systemic manifestation. PMID:26483675

  7. Isolated Optic Disc Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M. Mansour

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a healthy male subject who developed progressive visual loss in the left eye initially diagnosed as optic neuritis. Upon suspicion of infectious etiology, testing was positive for tuberculosis. There were no signs or symptoms of active systemic tuberculosis infection. The patient responded swiftly to antimycobacterial therapy with return of vision and resolution of disc swelling. Positive purified protein derivative skin test, negative chest radiograph, negative systemic workup, negative workup for other causes of unilateral optic neuritis and quick response to mycobacterial therapy reaffirm the entity of isolated optic disc tuberculosis similar to isolated choroidal tuberculosis without systemic manifestation.

  8. Primary isolated hepatic tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikh, A.S.F.; Qureshi, I.H.; Saba, K.; Bukhari, M.H.

    2013-01-01

    Isolated hepatic tuberculosis without pulmonary or bowel involvement is a diagnostic challenge and can cause considerable morbidity. A young lady from Lahore presented with fever, pain in right hypochondria, nausea and weight loss. CT scan of abdomen showed multiple small hypodense non-enhancing lesions and a heterogeneous texture of liver. Biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of hepatic tuberculosis. It was concluded a case of isolated hepatic tuberculosis without evidence of other primary sites involvement. It is important to consider tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis when suspecting lymphoproliferative or metastatic diseases in a patient with vague symptoms and abnormal hepatic texture on CT. (author)

  9. TUBERCULOSIS COMO ENFERMEDAD OCUPACIONAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Ticona, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Existe evidencia suficiente para declarar a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional en diversos profesionales especialmente entre los trabajadores de salud. En el Perú están normados y reglamentados los derechos laborales inherentes a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional, como la cobertura por discapacidad temporal o permanente. Sin embargo, estos derechos aún no han sido suficientemente socializados. En este trabajo se presenta información sobre el riesgo de adquirir tuberculosis en el lugar de trabajo, se revisan las evidencias para declarar a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional en trabajadores de salud y se presenta la legislación peruana vigente al respecto. PMID:22858771

  10. Macrophage immunoregulatory pathways in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, Murugesan V S; Ni, Bin; Dodd, Claire E; Schlesinger, Larry S

    2014-12-01

    Macrophages, the major host cells harboring Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), are a heterogeneous cell type depending on their tissue of origin and host they are derived from. Significant discord in macrophage responses to M.tb exists due to differences in M.tb strains and the various types of macrophages used to study tuberculosis (TB). This review will summarize current concepts regarding macrophage responses to M.tb infection, while pointing out relevant differences in experimental outcomes due to the use of divergent model systems. A brief description of the lung environment is included since there is increasing evidence that the alveolar macrophage (AM) has immunoregulatory properties that can delay optimal protective host immune responses. In this context, this review focuses on selected macrophage immunoregulatory pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), cytokines, negative regulators of inflammation, lipid mediators and microRNAs (miRNAs). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Clinical evaluation on causes of death in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuba, M; Nakasone, K; Miyagi, S; Kyan, K; Shinzato, T; Kohagura, N; Futenma, M; Genka, K

    1996-04-01

    Seventy one patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis who died during the past 5 years (1989 to 1993) were evaluated on their causes of death. Twenty two patients (31%) died directly of tuberculosis, and among them, 18 patients (81%) of 22 patients who died of tuberculosis) had very advanced tuberculosis. The majority of them (64%) were old age over 70 years and were bedridden due mostly to cerebrovascular injuries. The serum level of albumin was low in all 17 patients in whom it was measured. Establishment of diagnosis of tuberculosis was delayed over one month after the onset of symptoms in 59% of patients who died of severe disease. Sixty one percent (11/18) of patients died within the first month after the initiation of chemotherapy and about 90% (16/18) died within 3 months. Two patients died from massive hemoptysis and other patients died of either respiratory failure or tuberculosis meningitis. From these observations it was found that very advanced tuberculosis was the major cause of death in patients who died of tuberculosis and that the advanced disease was chiefly caused by the delay on the establishment of diagnosis, and it was most important to detect tuberculosis as early as possible, with regular check up of chest X-ray and frequent examination for AFB (acid-fast bacilli) for tuberculosis suspected patients. On the other hand, the majority of patients (49/71) died of complicating medical problem unrelated to tuberculosis. Seventeen patients died from malignancy (seven lung cancer, four lymphoma, two laryngeal cancer, etc). Ten deaths were the result of bacterial superinfection. Other patients died from respiratory failure due to COPD, arteiosclerotic heart disease, or cerebrovascular injuries, etc. Two patients of old age died of hepatic failure possibly caused by adverse reaction of TB chemotherapy. It was found that diseases unrelated to tuberculosis were the cause of death in approximately 70% of patients with active tuberculosis, and it should

  12. Management of hepatitis B reactivation in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yi-Wen; Chung, Raymond T.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation is well documented in previously resolved or inactive HBV carriers who receive cancer chemotherapy. The consequences of HBV reactivation range from self-limited conditions to fulminant hepatic failure and death. HBV reactivation also leads to premature termination of chemotherapy or delay in treatment schedules. This review summarizes current knowledge of management of HBV reactivation in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) ...

  13. Nanomedicine and experimental tuberculosis: facts, flaws, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Rajesh; Ahmad, Zahoor

    2011-06-01

    Nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems form the crux of nanomedicine and are suitable for targeting chronic diseases such as tuberculosis. Extensive experimental data supports the possibility of intermittent chemotherapy with key first-line as well as second-line antituberculosis drugs by employing synthetic or natural carriers, chiefly polymers. Besides sustained release of drugs in plasma and organs, other potential advantages of the system include the possibility of selecting various routes of chemotherapy; reduction in drug dosage, adverse effects, and drug interactions; and targeting drug-resistant and latent bacteria. On the other hand, the choice of carrier, large-scale production, stability, and toxicity of the formulation are some of the major issues that merit immediate attention and resolution. Nevertheless, keeping in view the hurdles in new antituberculosis drug development, nanomedicine has provided a sound platform and a ray of hope for an onslaught against tuberculosis. Tuberculosis remains a major public health concern worldwide. In this paper, the role and significance of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems are discussed for targeting tuberculosis, including strains that are drug resistant with conventional methods. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Current opinions on chemotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luptak, J.

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancer among men. Because of the long latency period of prostate cancer, and the economic burden and morbidity associated with its treatment, there is a strong rationale for interventions to reduce the risk of developing this malignancy. The terms „prevention“ or „chemo prevention“ refers to efforts to prevent or delay the development of cancer by taking medicines, vitamins or other agents. There are many agents that may decrease the risk of prostate cancer. It requires careful study of the agents in specific populations to determine whether risk is reduced, magnitude of the risk reduction and the spectrum of side effects associated with the agent. The ideal preventive agent will not significantly alter quality of life, is inexpensive, safe, well tolerated, and effective. The purpose of this article is to review recent developments in the field of prostate cancer prevention. (author)

  15. Chemotherapy in eye cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is a drug used in a wide range of cancers, which produces ... lesions. In a 10-year retrospective review of .... disease and focal chemotherapy for selected high-risk ... of focal drug delivery methods to reduce recurrence .... the protein tubulin.

  16. Prevent Infections During Chemotherapy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast discusses the importance of preventing infections in cancer patients who are undergoing chemotherapy. Dr. Lisa Richardson, CDC oncologist, talks about a new Web site for cancer patients and their caregivers.

  17. Activity of moxifloxacin and linezolid against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in combination with potentiator drugs verapamil, timcodar, colistin and SQ109.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Knegt, Gerjo J; van der Meijden, Aart; de Vogel, Corné P; Aarnoutse, Rob E; de Steenwinkel, Jurriaan E M

    2017-03-01

    Current treatment for tuberculosis (TB) is complicated by the emergence of multidrug resistant TB (MDR-TB). As a result, there is an urgent need for new powerful anti-TB regimens and novel strategies. In this study, we aimed to potentiate a moxifloxacin + linezolid backbone as treatment for MDR-TB with the efflux pump inhibitors verapamil and timcodar as well as with drugs that act on mycobacterial cell wall stability such as colistin and SQ109. Using a time-kill kinetics assay, the activities of moxifloxacin, linezolid, verapamil, timcodar, colistin and SQ109 as single drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis were evaluated. In addition, the activity of the moxifloxacin + linezolid backbone in combination with one of the potentiator drugs was assessed. As little as 0.125 mg/L moxifloxacin achieved 99% killing of M. tuberculosis after 6 days of exposure. Linezolid showed moderate killing but 99% killing was not achieved. Verapamil, timcodar and colistin only resulted in killing with the highest concentrations tested but 99% killing was not achieved. SQ109 resulted in complete elimination after 1 day of exposure to 256 mg/L and in 99% elimination after 6 days of exposure to 1 mg/L. Furthermore, colistin added to the moxifloxacin + linezolid backbone resulted in increased elimination, whereas verapamil, timcodar and SQ109 showed no added value to the backbone. This finding that colistin potentiates the activity of the moxifloxacin + linezolid backbone against M. tuberculosis suggests its potential role in further studies on the applicability of a moxifloxacin + linezolid treatment of MDR-TB. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  18. "Tuberculosis Case Management" Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knebel, Elisa; Kolodner, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    The need to isolated health providers with critical knowledge in tuberculosis (TB) case management prompted the development of "Tuberculosis Case Management" CD-ROM. Features include "Learning Center,""Examination Room," and "Library." The combination of audio, video, and graphics allows participants to…

  19. Arginine Adjunctive Therapy in Active Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliasghar Farazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dietary supplementation has been used as a mechanism to augment the immune system. Adjunctive therapy with L-arginine has the potential to improve outcomes in active tuberculosis. Methods. In a randomized clinical trial 63 participants with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in Markazi Province of Iran were given arginine or placebo for 4 weeks in addition to conventional chemotherapy. The final treatment success, sputum conversion, weight gain, and clinical symptoms after one and two months were considered as primary outcomes and secondary outcomes were ESR, CRP, and Hg. Data were collected and analyzed with SPSS software (ver. 18. Results. Arginine supplementation reduced constitutional symptoms (P=0.032 in patients with smear-positive TB at the end of the first month of treatment. Arginine treated patients had significantly increased BMI at the end of the first and second months of treatment (P=0.032 and P=0.04 and a reduced CRP at the end of the first month of treatment (P=0.03 versus placebo group. Conclusion. Arginine is useful as an adjunctive therapy in patients with active tuberculosis, in which the effects are more likely mediated by the increased production of nitric oxide and improved constitutional symptoms and weight gain. This trial is registered with Clinical Trials Registry of Iran: IRCT201211179855N2.

  20. Abdominal tuberculosis: Imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Jose M. [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal)]. E-mail: jmpjesus@yahoo.com; Madureira, Antonio J. [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal); Vieira, Alberto [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal); Ramos, Isabel [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal)

    2005-08-01

    Radiological findings of abdominal tuberculosis can mimic those of many different diseases. A high level of suspicion is required, especially in high-risk population. In this article, we will describe barium studies, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) findings of abdominal tuberculosis (TB), with emphasis in the latest. We will illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis and describe imaging features that differentiate it from other inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma and Crohn's disease. As tuberculosis can affect any organ in the abdomen, emphasis is placed to ileocecal involvement, lymphadenopathy, peritonitis and solid organ disease (liver, spleen and pancreas). A positive culture or hystologic analysis of biopsy is still required in many patients for definitive diagnosis. Learning objectives:1.To review the relevant pathophysiology of abdominal tuberculosis. 2.Illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis.

  1. Imaging of musculoskeletal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussel, L.; Marchand, B.; Blineau, N.; Picaud, G.; Emn, M.; Coulon, A.; Pagnon, P.; Rode, A.; Pin-Leveugle, J.; Berthezene, Y.; Pariset, C.; Boibieux, A.; Hermier, M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose and methods. To perform an illustrated and educational review of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. Results. As the incidence of musculoskeletal tuberculosis still increases, a review appears justified. The following four main presentations are detailed and illustrated, by emphasizing the value of both CT and MR imaging: a) spine tuberculosis (∼ 50 %/) commonly involves two adjacent vertebral bodies with usual large paravertebral abscesses. The following lesions are highly suggestive of tuberculosis: solitary vertebral involvement, solitary epidural abscess with or without erosive spondylitis; b) osteo-arthritis: peripherally located erosions at synovial insertions with gradual narrowing of the joint space are highly suggestive; c) osteomyelitis: unusual, may involve any bones; d) tenosynovitis and bursitis. Conclusion. Imaging studies are essential for diagnosis and to assess the extent of musculo-skeletal tuberculosis. (author)

  2. Abdominal tuberculosis: Imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Jose M.; Madureira, Antonio J.; Vieira, Alberto; Ramos, Isabel

    2005-01-01

    Radiological findings of abdominal tuberculosis can mimic those of many different diseases. A high level of suspicion is required, especially in high-risk population. In this article, we will describe barium studies, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) findings of abdominal tuberculosis (TB), with emphasis in the latest. We will illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis and describe imaging features that differentiate it from other inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma and Crohn's disease. As tuberculosis can affect any organ in the abdomen, emphasis is placed to ileocecal involvement, lymphadenopathy, peritonitis and solid organ disease (liver, spleen and pancreas). A positive culture or hystologic analysis of biopsy is still required in many patients for definitive diagnosis. Learning objectives:1.To review the relevant pathophysiology of abdominal tuberculosis. 2.Illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis

  3. Adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer: Is it needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinis, Kristijonas; Thornton, Michael; Montazeri, Amir; Rooney, Paul S

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy has become a standard treatment of advanced rectal cancer in the West. The benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery alone have been well established. However, controversy surrounds the use adjuvant chemotherapy in patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy, despite it being recommended by a number of international guidelines. Results of recent multicentre randomised control trials showed no benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in terms of survival and rates of distant metastases. However, concerns exist regarding the quality of the studies including inadequate staging modalities, out-dated chemotherapeutic regimens and surgical approaches and small sample sizes. It has become evident that not all the patients respond to adjuvant chemotherapy and more personalised approach should be employed when considering the benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy. The present review discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the current evidence-base and suggests improvements for future studies. PMID:26677436

  4. Back to the future: Rethinking global control of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Barry R; Atun, Rifat

    2016-03-09

    If the ultimate goal of controlling an infectious disease is to interrupt transmission, the current global tuberculosis strategy is not succeeding. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: emerging treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhvaryu MR

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Meghna Adhvaryu1, Bhasker Vakharia21Department of Biotechnology, SRK Institute of Computer Education and Applied Sciences, 2R&D, Bhuma Research in Ayurvedic and Herbal Medicine, Surat, Gujarat, IndiaAbstract: Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis has emerged worldwide, with an increasing incidence due to failure of implementation of apparently effective first-line antituberculous therapy as well as primary infection with drug-resistant strains. Failure of current therapy is attributed to a long duration of treatment leading to nonadherence and irregular therapy, lack of patient education about the disease, poverty, irregular supply by care providers, drug–drug interactions in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, inadequate regulations causing market overlap and irresponsible drug usage in the private sector, and lack of research, with no addition of new drugs in the last four decades. Present standards of care for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, tuberculosis-HIV coinfection, and latent tuberculosis infection are all unsatisfactory. Since 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO has focused on drug development for tuberculosis, as well as research in all relevant aspects to discover new regimens by 2015 and to eliminate tuberculosis as a public health concern by 2050. As a result, some 20 promising compounds from 14 groups of drugs have been discovered. Twelve candidates from eight classes are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Ongoing research should prioritize identification of novel targets and newer application of existing drugs, discovery of multitargeted drugs from natural compounds, strengthening host factors by immunopotentiation with herbal immunomodulators, as well as protective vaccines before and after exposure, consideration of surgical measures when indicated, development of tools for rapid diagnosis, early identification of resistant strains, and

  6. The usefulness of 99mTc-MIBI in the detection of active pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. J.; Jeon, D. S.; Yoo, S. D.; Lee, M. K.; Park, S. K.; Kim, S. J.; Kim, I. J.; Kim, Y. K.

    1998-01-01

    The use of radiopharmaceuticals in evaluation of pulmonary tuberculosis may help to resolve difficult diagnostic problems such as discordance between sputum examinations and chest roentgenographic findings. We investigated the usefulness of 99m Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) scintigraphy in the detection of active pulmonary tuberculosis. Forty-six patients with suspected active pulmonary tuberculosis were studied with sputum smear of AFB, sputum AFB culture, chest X-ray and MIBI scan. MIBI image was obtained 15 and 60 min after intravenous injection of 370MBq(10mCi) 99m Tc-MIBI. In 16 patients of them Ga scans were performed in addition to MIBI scan. Repeated MIBI scans were done in 7 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis after 4∼6 months of antituberculous chemotherapy. Thirty-two patients were confirmed as active tuberculosis by sputum culture. Sensitivity of MIBI scan to active tuberculosis was 87.5%(28/32) and MIBI findings were negative in all of 14 patients with inactive disease. Focal uptake of MIBI was dense in the area that was strongly suggested active tuberculous lesions by chest roentgenogram. There was no discordance between MIBI and Ga image in 16 patients. But the uptake areas of Ga images were broader than that of MIBI images. After 4∼6 months of antituberculous treatment all repeated MIBI scans revealed negative findings except 1 patient with persistent active pulmonary tuberculosis due to drug resistance. MIBI scan could be used in the detection of active pulmonary tuberculosis as a useful noninvasive diagnostic tool

  7. Primary sinonasal tuberculosis in north-west Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawaz, G.; Khan, M.R.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To record the frequency of primary involvement of nose and paranasal sinuses with tuberculosis in today's situation in the north-west region of Pakistan. Patients and Methods: A total of ten cases of primary sinonasal tuberculosis were included. The inclusion criteria were biopsy and acid-fast bacilli (AFB) examination after Ziel Neelsen (ZN) staining. Patients were put on anti-tuberculous chemotherapy. Response to the therapy and compliance of the patients were studied through follow up. Patients were admitted and offered surgical treatment wherever needed. Results: The primary sinonasal tuberculosis affected mainly young adults (18-60 years), both genders almost equally. Majority (80%) of the patients belonged to far-flung rural areas and all (100%) were poor. More frequent presenting features were granular lesion and mass in the nose (40%), epistaxis (30%), septal perforation (30%), external deformity (30%), palpable cervical lymph nodes (30%) and others. All the cases were diagnosed microscopically. Compliance to treatment was not good. Conclusion: The incidence of primary tuberculosis of nose and paranasal sinuses has risen in the recent past. The patients manifested no evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis. (author)

  8. Chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Anna Dorothea; Syn, Nicholas Lx; Moehler, Markus; Grothe, Wilfried; Yong, Wei Peng; Tai, Bee-Choo; Ho, Jingshan; Unverzagt, Susanne

    2017-08-29

    Gastric cancer is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. In "Western" countries, most people are either diagnosed at an advanced stage, or develop a relapse after surgery with curative intent. In people with advanced disease, significant benefits from targeted therapies are currently limited to HER-2 positive disease treated with trastuzumab, in combination with chemotherapy, in first-line. In second-line, ramucirumab, alone or in combination with paclitaxel, demonstrated significant survival benefits. Thus, systemic chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment for advanced gastric cancer. Uncertainty remains regarding the choice of the regimen. To assess the efficacy of chemotherapy versus best supportive care (BSC), combination versus single-agent chemotherapy and different chemotherapy combinations in advanced gastric cancer. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and Embase up to June 2016, reference lists of studies, and contacted pharmaceutical companies and experts to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We considered only RCTs on systemic, intravenous or oral chemotherapy versus BSC, combination versus single-agent chemotherapy and different chemotherapy regimens in advanced gastric cancer. Two review authors independently identified studies and extracted data. A third investigator was consulted in case of disagreements. We contacted study authors to obtain missing information. We included 64 RCTs, of which 60 RCTs (11,698 participants) provided data for the meta-analysis of overall survival. We found chemotherapy extends overall survival (OS) by approximately 6.7 months more than BSC (hazard ratio (HR) 0.3, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.24 to 0.55, 184 participants, three studies, moderate-quality evidence). Combination chemotherapy extends OS slightly (by an additional month) versus single-agent chemotherapy (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.79 to 0.89, 4447 participants, 23 studies, moderate-quality evidence), which is

  9. Stigma against Tuberculosis Patients in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebsibe Tadesse

    Full Text Available Stigma attached to tuberculosis contributes to the limited effectiveness of current TB control approaches. However, there is a dearth of studies that explore the causes of stigma attached to tuberculosis and its effects on patients and tuberculosis control programs in Ethiopia.An institution-based qualitative study was conducted at St. Peter Tuberculosis Specialized Hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia from July to August, 2015. Ten in-depth interviews and 6 key-informant interviews were carried out among tuberculosis patients and healthcare workers, respectively.The Open Code computer software package was used to analyze the data thematically.The study revealed that fear of infection and inappropriate health education messages by media were the main causes of tuberculosis stigma. The patients experienced isolation within their family and community, separation, and financial crisis. The stigma attached to tuberculosis may contribute to delayed healthcare seeking, poor treatment adherence, and poor prognosis.Interventions that reduce the stigma attached to tuberculosis should target on areas, such as creating community awareness, patient counseling on problem-solving and emotional skills, preparing culturally sensitive and scientifically sound media messages, providing financial support for the patients, and enhancing the qualities of the healthcare workers, such as empathy, concern, respect for the patient and cultural sensitivity.

  10. Investment in paediatric tuberculosis prevention in Pakistan: Loss or gain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, E.U.; Ejaz, K.; Lone, S.; Raza, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effectiveness of paediatric tuberculosis prevention, by reevaluation factors in children exposed to tuberculosis from less privileged strata of Pakistan. Methods: This cross sectional descriptive study was conducted at National Institute of Child Health, from January 2004 to December 2005. Paediatric patients under 15 years of either gender, diagnosed with active tuberculosis were enrolled. Interviews were conducted with parents regarding common preventive measures and factors advocating tuberculosis spread. Later factors leading to non-compliance to safety recommendations were also evaluated. Results: Fifty five (70%) children younger than 5 years, had index cases in direct contact within their own house. Fifteen (14%) patients contracted the infection from neighbours, with 11 being older than 5 years. There were 82 (51%) cases with Protein Calorie Malnutrition (PCM). Total of 66(41%) cases of PCM were <5 years age (p <0.005). Data showed 123(77%) children living in a family with 5 or more members. Sixty eight (55%) children of these large families had to live in a single room house. Conclusion: There is a high frequency of direct contact tuberculosis in children belonging to the lower socioeconomic class. This is attributed to poor housing condition and over crowding. The current paediatric tuberculosis prevention strategies as adapted from World Health Organizations' Millennium Development Goals are ineffectual to make changes in children exposed to tuberculosis from less privileged strata of Pakistan. Our societal and demographic factors remain static, continually exposing our children to higher risk of tuberculosis exposure. (author)

  11. Factors Associated with Prevalent Tuberculosis Among Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    E‑mail: mikezindu@yahoo.com ... California, San Francisco, USA, 6Department of Clinical Sciences, Institute of ... Background: Tuberculosis (TB) causes significant morbidity/mortality among .... obtained information on health behavior such as current alcohol use (yes or no) and cigarette smoking (ever smoked or never.

  12. Imaging of pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dyck, P.; De Schepper, A.M.; Vanhoenacker, F.M.; Van den Brande, P.

    2003-01-01

    Tuberculosis, more than any other infectious disease, has always been a challenge, since it has been responsible for a great amount of morbidity and mortality in humans. After a steady decline in the number of new cases during the twentieth century, due to improved social and environmental conditions, early diagnosis, and the development of antituberculous medication, a stagnation and even an increase in the number of new cases was noted in the mid-1980s. The epidemiological alteration is multifactorial: global increase in developing countries; minority groups (HIV and other immunocompromised patients); and elderly patients due to an altered immune status. Other factors that may be responsible are a delayed diagnosis, especially in elderly patients, incomplete or inadequate therapy, and the emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The course of the disease and its corresponding clinicoradiological pattern depends on the interaction between the organism and the host response. Classically, pulmonary tuberculosis has been classified in primary tuberculosis, which occurred previously in children, and postprimary tuberculosis, occurring in adult patients. In industrialized countries, however, there seems to be a shift of primary tuberculosis towards adults. Furthermore, due to an altered immunological response in certain groups, such as immunocompromised and elderly patients, an atypical radioclinical pattern may occur. The changing landscape, in which tuberculosis occurs, as well as the global resurgence, and the changed spectrum of the clinical and radiological presentation, justify a renewed interest of radiologists for the imaging features of pulmonary tuberculosis. This article deals with the usual imaging features of pulmonary tuberculosis as well as the atypical patterns encountered in immunodepressed and elderly patients. (orig.)

  13. Database resources for the tuberculosis community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Jocelyne M; Mao, Chunhong; Shukla, Maulik; Warren, Andrew; Will, Rebecca; Kuznetsov, Dmitry; Xenarios, Ioannis; Robertson, Brian D; Gordon, Stephen V; Schnappinger, Dirk; Cole, Stewart T; Sobral, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Access to online repositories for genomic and associated "-omics" datasets is now an essential part of everyday research activity. It is important therefore that the Tuberculosis community is aware of the databases and tools available to them online, as well as for the database hosts to know what the needs of the research community are. One of the goals of the Tuberculosis Annotation Jamboree, held in Washington DC on March 7th-8th 2012, was therefore to provide an overview of the current status of three key Tuberculosis resources, TubercuList (tuberculist.epfl.ch), TB Database (www.tbdb.org), and Pathosystems Resource Integration Center (PATRIC, www.patricbrc.org). Here we summarize some key updates and upcoming features in TubercuList, and provide an overview of the PATRIC site and its online tools for pathogen RNA-Seq analysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Absceso y tuberculosis pulmonar

    OpenAIRE

    Hercelles García, Oswaldo

    2014-01-01

    Si la tuberculosis pulmonar es conocida desde los tiempos más remotos y el absceso del pulmón es considerado, desde el siglo XIX, como una entidad patológica perfectamente definida, es evidente que la asociación absceso y tuberculosis pulmonar no tiene su verdadera expresión de estudio, sino en los últimos años. If pulmonary tuberculosis has been known since ancient times and lung abscess is considered, since the nineteenth century as a well-defined disease entity, it is clear that the abs...

  15. Hyperthermia and chemotherapy agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roizin-Towle, L.; Hall, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer dates back to the late 19th century, but the modern era of chemotherapy drugs was ushered in during the 1940's with the development of the polyfunctional alkylating agent. Since then, numerous classes of drugs have evolved and the combined use of antineoplastic agents with other treatment modalities such as radiation or heat, remains a large relatively unexplored area. This approach, combining local hyperthermia with chemotherapy agents affords a measure of targeting and selective toxicity not previously available for drugs. In this paper, the effects of adriamycin, bleomycin and cis-platinum are examined. The adjuvant use of heat may also reverse the resistance of hypoxic cells noted for some chemotherapy agents

  16. Antimicrobial chemotherapy and Sustainable Development: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial chemotherapy and Sustainable Development: The past, The Current Trend, and the futu. ... Within the past half century, a wide variety of antimicrobial substances have been discovered, designed and synthesized; literally hundreds of drugs have been successfully used in some fashion over the years. Today ...

  17. Tuberculosis and HIV control in sub-Saharan African prisons: "thinking outside the prison cell".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Stewart E; Topp, Stephanie M; Turnbull, Eleanor R; Hatwiinda, Sisa; Harris, Jennifer B; Maggard, Katie R; Roberts, Sarah T; Krüüner, Annika; Morse, Jill C; Kapata, Nathan; Chisela, Chileshe; Henostroza, German

    2012-05-15

    Tuberculosis is one of the fastest-growing epidemics in prison populations in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), constituting a threat to both inmates and the wider community. Various factors have contributed to the breakdown of tuberculosis control in prison facilities in SSA, including slow and insensitive diagnostics, failing prison infrastructure, inadequate funding, and weak prevention and treatment interventions for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In this article, we describe the challenges inherent in current approaches to tuberculosis control in prisons and consider the alternatives. We argue that although improved implementation of conventional tuberculosis control activities is necessary, considerable investment in a broader range of public health interventions, including infrastructure and staffing upgrades, cutting-edge tuberculosis diagnostics, and combination prevention for HIV, will be equally critical. This combination response to tuberculosis in prisons will be essential for tackling existing and nascent prison tuberculosis epidemics and will require high-level political support and financing.

  18. Chemotherapy in thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, A.M.; Shah, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Chemotherapy alone, either as a single drug or a combination of drugs with or without external radiation (ER) is useful for treatment of locally advanced disease and non iodine concentrating metastasis in differentiated thyroid cancers (DTC). The reported response is not encouraging, but the absence of better alternatives leave no choice for the treatment of such cases. However, for treatment of anaplastic thyroid cancers (ANC), chemotherapy (CT) in combination with ER results in local control. In medullary thyroid cancers (MTC), the results obtained with multimodal treatment are encouraging

  19. Extravasation of chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langer, Seppo W

    2010-01-01

    Extravasation of chemotherapy is a feared complication of anticancer therapy. The accidental leakage of cytostatic agents into the perivascular tissues may have devastating short-term and long-term consequences for patients. In recent years, the increased focus on chemotherapy extravasation has led...... to the development of international guidelines that have proven useful tools in daily clinical practice. Moreover, the tissue destruction in one of the most dreaded types of extravasation (ie, anthracycline extravasation) now can effectively be prevented with a specific antidote, dexrazoxane....

  20. Chemotherapy-induced polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zedan, Ahmed; Vilholm, Ole Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced polyneuropathy (CIPN) is a common, but underestimated, clinical challenge. Incidence varies depending on many factors that are equally as important as the type of chemotherapeutic agent itself. Moreover, the assessment of CIPN is still uncertain, as several of the most...... frequently used scales do not rely on a formal neurological evaluation and depend on patients' reports and examiners' interpretations. Therefore, the aim of this MiniReview was to introduce the most common chemotherapies that cause neuropathy, and in addition to this, highlight the most significant...

  1. HIV and Tuberculosis (TB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV and Opportunistic Infections, Coinfections, and Conditions Home Understanding ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV and Tuberculosis (TB) Last Reviewed: June 14, 2018 ...

  2. Segmental tuberculosis verrucosa cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanumanthappa H

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of segmental Tuberculosis Verrucosa Cutis is reported in 10 year old boy. The condition was resembling the ascending lymphangitic type of sporotrichosis. The lesions cleared on treatment with INH 150 mg daily for 6 months.

  3. NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis - 2018.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  4. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2016.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  5. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2014.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  6. NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis - 2017.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  7. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2015.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Digby F.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolism underpins the physiology and pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, although experimental mycobacteriology has provided key insights into the metabolic pathways that are essential for survival and pathogenesis, determining the metabolic status of bacilli during different stages of infection and in different cellular compartments remains challenging. Recent advances—in particular, the development of systems biology tools such as metabolomics—have enabled key insights into the biochemical state of M. tuberculosis in experimental models of infection. In addition, their use to elucidate mechanisms of action of new and existing antituberculosis drugs is critical for the development of improved interventions to counter tuberculosis. This review provides a broad summary of mycobacterial metabolism, highlighting the adaptation of M. tuberculosis as specialist human pathogen, and discusses recent insights into the strategies used by the host and infecting bacillus to influence the outcomes of the host–pathogen interaction through modulation of metabolic functions. PMID:25502746

  9. Tuberculosis Data and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Advisory Groups Federal TB Task Force Data and Statistics Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... Set) Mortality and Morbidity Weekly Reports Data and Statistics Decrease in Reported Tuberculosis Cases MMWR 2010; 59 ( ...

  10. Tuberculosis concomitant with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rodríguez-Rodríguez

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse the different factors involved in this phenomenon and to give a clear, comprehensive picture of the problem of tuberculosis resurgence and its correlation with diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

  11. Modelling of tumour repopulation after chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcu, Loredana; Bezak, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Full text: While repopulation is a clinically observed phe nomenon after radiotherapy, repopulation of tumour cells between cycles of chemotherapy is usually a neglected factor in cancer treatment. As the effect of both radiotherapy and chemotherapy on tumour cells is the same (attack on cancer cells), the response of the tumour to injury and cell loss from the two treatment methods should be similar, including repopulation. Cell recruitment is known to be a possible mechanism responsible for tumour regrowth after radio therapy. The literature data regarding mechanisms of repopulation after chemotherapy is very limited. The current paper employs a Monte Carlo modelling approach to implement the pharmacokinetics of a widely used drug (cisplatin) into a previously developed vit1ual head and neck tumour and to study the effect of cisplatin on tumour regres sion and regrowth during treatment. The mechanism of cell recruitment was modelled by releasing various percentages (5-50%) of quiescent cells into the mitotic cycle after each chemotherapy cell kill. The onset of repopulation was also simulated, with both immediate onset and late onset of cell recruitment. Repopulation during chemotherapy, if occu ring, is a highly potent phenomenon, similar to drug resis tance, therefore it should not be neglected during treatment.

  12. Lymphoma and tuberculosis: temporal evolution of dual pathology on sequential 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Anirban; Sharma, Punit; Karunanithi, Sellam; Dhull, Varun Singh; Kumar, Rakesh

    2014-08-01

    Tuberculosis can often be seen in patients undergoing chemotherapy for lymphoma, especially in endemic countries. As both tuberculosis and lymphoma can lead to hypermetabolic lesions of F-FDG PET/CT, a diagnostic dilemma often ensues. We present the sequential F-FDG PET/CT images of a 22-year-old female patient with Hodgkin lymphoma who developed tuberculosis and later relapse of lymphoma. These images present the temporal evaluation of the dual pathology on F-FDG PET/CT.

  13. Alternation of Gut Microbiota in Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Luo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available One-third of the world's population has been infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis, a primary pathogen of the mammalian respiratory system, while about 10% of latent infections progress to active tuberculosis (TB, indicating that host and environmental factors may determine the outcomes such as infection clearance/persistence and treatment prognosis. The gut microbiota is essential for development of host immunity, defense, nutrition and metabolic homeostasis. Thus, the pattern of gut microbiota may contribute to M. tuberculosis infection and prognosis. In current study we characterized the differences in gut bacterial communities in new tuberculosis patients (NTB, recurrent tuberculosis patients (RTB, and healthy control. The abundance-based coverage estimator (ACE showed the diversity index of the gut microbiota in the patients with recurrent tuberculosis was increased significantly compared with healthy controls (p < 0.05. At the phyla level, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, which contain many pathogenic species, were significantly enriched in the feces RTB patients. Conversely, phylum Bacteroidetes, containing a variety of beneficial commensal organisms, was reduced in the patients with the recurrent tuberculosis compared to healthy controls. The Gram-negative genus Prevotella of oral origin from phylum of Bacteroidetes and genus Lachnospira from phylum of Firmicutes were significantly decreased in both the new and recurrent TB patient groups, compared with the healthy control group (p < 0.05. We also found that there was a positive correlation between the gut microbiota and peripheral CD4+ T cell counts in the patients. This study, for the first time, showed associations between gut microbiota with tuberculosis and its clinical outcomes. Maintaining eubiosis, namely homeostasis of gut microbiota, may be beneficial for host recovery and prevention of recurrence of M. tuberculosis infection.

  14. Vaccination against tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Carlos; Aguilo, Nacho; Gonzalo-Asensio, Jesús

    2018-04-04

    BCG (Bacille Calmette-Guérin) vaccination is included in the immunization schedule for tuberculosis endemic countries with a global coverage at birth close to 90% worldwide. BCG was attenuated from Mycobacterium bovis almost a century ago, and provides a strong protection against disseminated forms of the disease, though very limited against pulmonary forms of tuberculosis, responsible for transmission. Novel prophylactic tuberculosis vaccines are in clinical development either to replace BCG or to improve its protection against respiratory forms of the disease. There are limitations understanding the immunological responses involved and the precise type of long-lived immunity that new vaccines need to induce. MTBVAC is the first and only tuberculosis vaccine candidate based on live-attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis in clinical evaluation. MTBVAC clinical development plans to target tuberculosis prevention in newborns, as a BCG replacement strategy, and as secondary objective to be tested in adolescents and adults previous vaccinated with BCG. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  15. Chemotherapy-induced hypocalcemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajero, Pia Marie E; Belsky, Joseph L; Prawius, Herbert D; Rella, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    To present a unique case of transient, asymptomatic chemotherapy-induced hypocalcemia not attributable to hypomagnesemia or tumor lysis syndrome and review causes of hypocalcemia related to cancer with and without use of chemotherapy. We present a case detailing the clinical and laboratory findings of a patient who had severe hypocalcemia during chemotherapy and discuss causes of hypocalcemia with an extensive literature review of chemotherapeutic agents associated with this biochemical abnormality. In a 90-year-old man, hypocalcemia developed during 2 courses of chemotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma, with partial recovery between courses and normal serum calcium 10 months after completion of treatment. Magnesium, vitamin D, and parathyroid hormone levels were low normal. There was no evidence of tumor lysis syndrome. Of the various agents administered, vinca alkaloids seemed the most likely cause. Serial testing suggested that the underlying mechanism may have been acquired, reversible hypoparathyroidism. No other similar case was found in the published literature. The severe hypocalcemia in our patient could not be attributed to hypomagnesemia or tumor lysis syndrome, and it was clearly associated with the timing of his chemotherapeutic regimen. Possibilities include direct parathyroid hormone suppression or alteration of calcium sensing by the chemotherapeutic drugs. Serum calcium surveillance before and during chemotherapeutic management of cancer patients may reveal more instances and provide insight into the exact mechanism of this lesser known yet striking complication.

  16. After chemotherapy - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    You had chemotherapy treatment for your cancer. Your risk of infection, bleeding, and skin problems may be high. You may have mouth sores, an upset stomach, and diarrhea. You will probably get tired easily. Your appetite may be poor, but you should be able ...

  17. Evaluation of short course drug therapy for tuberculosis in pediatric ward of Imam Khomeini Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daneshjoo Kh

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis appears to be a disease as old as human history. Tuberculosis is of great public health importance in the developing countries. Its clinical profile is different in developing countries in comparison to countries of Europe and North America. The recent epidemic of HIV has slowed down the declining trend in the incidence of tuberculosis. Bacilli are transmitted from one infected person to the others as an aerosol. In some cases contaminated milk may also be responsible. However despite effective regimens and addition of new drugs and improved pharmacokinetic knowledge the chemotherapy of tuberculosis still remains a challenge. Poor drug-compliance by patients being one of the foremost reason for frequent relapses and bacterial resistance. Some important and concrete steps to meet these challenges have been judicious use of two or more bactericidal drugs and introduction of short courses regiment. Multiple drugs therapy may shorten the duration of treatment and prevent emergence of drug resistance.

  18. Tuberculosis--triumph and tragedy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M M

    2003-03-01

    Tuberculosis has been making havoc worldwide with an 11.9 million cases to be involved by the year 2005. In India, about 2 million cases are infected every year. Regarding triumphs and tragedies in the control of tuberculosis some points as follows are discussed. (1) Tuberculosis Control Programmes from National Tuberculosis Programme (NTP) to Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP) and Directly Observed Treatment, Short course (DOTS). (2) Problem of multidrug resistance (MDR) tuberculosis and (3) HIV and tuberculosis. DOTS being largely based on Indian research. It is now being applied worldwide. MDR is strictly a man made problem. Poor prescriptions, poor case management, lack of coordinated education and haphazard treatment research result in drug resistance. Treatment of MDR is difficult. The drug acceptability, tolerance and toxicity have to be considered. HIV and tuberculosis form a deadly duo. They mean more cases, more costs and more national losses.

  19. Taking medicines to treat tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis - medicines; DOT; Directly observed therapy; TB - medicines ... Ellner JJ. Tuberculosis. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 324. ...

  20. Tuberculosis Information for International Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reports (MMWRs) DTBE Authored Journal Articles Tuberculosis Laboratory Aggregate Reports Slide Sets Epidemiology of Tuberculosis Among Non- ... of time for taking the drugs; when the supply of drugs is not always available; or when ...

  1. T-cell recognition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture filtrate fractions in tuberculosis patients and their household contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demissie, A; Ravn, P; Olobo, J

    1999-01-01

    We examined the immune responses of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and their healthy household contacts to short-term culture filtrate (ST-CF) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis or molecular mass fractions derived from it. Our goal was to identify fractions strongly recognized......, to secreted mycobacterial antigens is suggestive of an early stage of infection by M. tuberculosis, which could in time result in overt disease or containment of the infection. This possibility is currently being investigated by follow-up studies of the household contacts....

  2. [THE RESULTS OF IMPLEMENTATION OF THE INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT LOAN PROJECT "PREVENTION, DIAGNOSIS, AND TREATMENT OF TUBERCULOSIS AND AIDS", A "TUBERCULOSIS" COMPONENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Due to the implementation of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) loan project "Prevention, diagnosis, treatment of tuberculosis and AIDS", a "Tuberculosis" component that is an addition to the national tuberculosis control program in 15 subjects of the Russian Federation, followed up by the Central Research Institute of Tuberculosis, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, the 2005-2008 measures stipulated by the Project have caused substantial changes in the organization of tuberculosis control: implementation of Orders Nos. 109, 50, and 690 and supervision of their implementation; modernization of the laboratories of the general medical network and antituberbulosis service (404 kits have been delivered for clinical diagnostic laboratories and 12 for bacteriological laboratories, including BACTEC 960 that has been provided in 6 areas); 91 training seminars have been held at the federal and regional levels; 1492 medical workers have been trained in the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with tuberculosis; 8 manuals and guidelines have been prepared and sent to all areas. In the period 2005-2008, the tuberculosis morbidity and mortality rates in the followed-up areas reduced by 1.2 and 18.6%, respectively. The analysis of patient cohorts in 2007 and 2005 revealed that the therapeutic efficiency evaluated from sputum smear microscopy increased by 16.3%; there were reductions in the proportion of patients having ineffective chemotherapy (from 16.1 to 11.1%), patients who died from tuberculosis (from 11.6 to 9.9%), and those who interrupted therapy ahead of time (from 11.8 to 7.8%). Implementation of the IBR project has contributed to the improvement of the national strategy and the enhancement of the efficiency of tuberculosis control.

  3. Perinatal tuberculosis: a diagnostic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Lúcia S. de Souza

    Full Text Available Despite the high prevalence of tuberculosis in adults and children, the congenital and perinatal forms of tuberculosis are rare. In Brazil, there has been only one published case of congenital tuberculosis and two cases of the perinatal form of this disease. We report a case of perinatal tuberculosis presenting with pneumonia. Alcohol-acid-resistant bacilli were found in the gastric lavage. Diagnosis of this disease presentation requires a high index of suspicion.

  4. Imaging of Esophageal Tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagi, B.; Kochhar, R.; Bhasin, D.K.; Singh, K.; Lal, A.; Gulati, M.; Suri, S.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the various radiological abnormalities in patients with proven esophageal tuberculosis. Material and Methods: The case records of 23 patients with proven esophageal tuberculosis were evaluated retrospectively for various radiological abnormalities. Twenty-two patients had secondary involvement of esophagus in the form of direct extension of mediastinal and pulmonary tuberculosis or spinal tuberculosis. Only 1 patient had primary involvement of the esophagus with no evidence of disease elsewhere. The diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopic and CT-guided biopsy/aspiration cytology in 7 and 6 cases, respectively. Diagnosis was made on the basis of surgical biopsy of lymph node and autopsy in 1 patient each. In the remaining 8 patients the diagnosis was based on radiological and endoscopic findings and the response to antituberculous treatment. Results: Chest radiography (CXR) was abnormal in 65% patients. While the findings were non-conclusive for esophageal tuberculosis, characteristic lesions of tuberculosis in lungs or spine were suggestive of tuberculous etiology. In 15 patients, CT of the chest confirmed the corresponding CXR findings and also showed additional findings of mediastinal lymphadenopathy when CXR was normal. Fourteen patients showed mediastinal lymphadenopathy on CT of the chest. In all these patients, more than one group of lymph nodes was involved. The characteristic hypodense center of lymph nodes suggestive of tuberculosis was seen in 12 patients. Radiological abnormalities seen in barium swallow examination were extrinsic compression, traction diverticula, strictures, sinus/fistulous tracts, kinking and pseudotumor mass of esophagus in decreasing order of frequency. The middle third of the esophagus was found to be the most frequent site of involvement

  5. [Tuberculosis in compromised hosts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Recent development of tuberculosis in Japan tends to converge on a specific high risk group. The proportion of tuberculosis developing particularly from the compromised hosts in the high risk group is especially high. At this symposium, therefore, we took up diabetes mellitus, gastrectomy, dialysis, AIDS and the elderly for discussion. Many new findings and useful reports for practical medical treatment are submitted; why these compromised hosts are predisposed to tuberculosis, tuberculosis diagnostic and remedial notes of those compromised hosts etc. It is an important question for the future to study how to prevent tuberculosis from these compromised hosts. 1. Tuberculosis in diabetes mellitus: aggravation and its immunological mechanism: Kazuyoshi KAWAKAMI (Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Graduate School and Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus). It has been well documented that diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major aggravating factor in tuberculosis. The onset of this disease is more frequent in DM patients than in individuals with any underlying diseases. However, the precise mechanism of this finding remains to be fully understood. Earlier studies reported that the migration, phagocytosis and bactericidal activity of neutrophils are all impaired in DM patients, which is related to their reduced host defense to infection with extracellular bacteria, such as S. aureus and E. colli. Host defense to mycobacterial infection is largely mediated by cellular immunity, and Th1-related cytokines, such as IFN-gamma and IL-12, play a central role in this response. It is reported that serum level of these cytokines and their production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are reduced in tuberculosis patients with DM, and this is supposed to be involved in the high incidence of tuberculosis in DM. Our study observed similar findings and furthermore indicated that IFN-gamma and IL-12 production by BCG-stimulated PBMC was lower

  6. The granuloma in tuberculosis: Dynamics of a host-pathogen collusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eEhlers

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A granuloma is defined as an inflammatory mononuclear cell infiltrate that, while capable of limiting growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, also provides a survival niche from which the bacteria may disseminate. The tuberculosis lesion is highly dynamic and shaped by both, immune response elements and the pathogen. In the granuloma, M. tuberculosis switches to a non-replicating but energy-generating life style whose detailed molecular characterization can identify novel targets for chemotherapy. To secure transmission to a new host, M. tuberculosis has evolved to drive T cell immunity to the point that necrotizing granulomas leak into bronchial cavities to facilitate expectoration of bacilli. From an evolutionary perspective it is therefore questionable whether vaccination and immunity enhancing strategies that merely mimic the natural immune response directed against M. tuberculosis infection can overcome pulmonary tuberculosis in the adult population. Juxtaposition of molecular pathology and immunology with microbial physiology and the use of novel imaging approaches afford an integrative view of the granuloma’s contribution to the life cycle of M. tuberculosis. This review revisits the different input of innate and adaptive immunity in granuloma biogenesis, with a focus on the co-evolutionary forces that redirect immune responses also to the benefit of the pathogen, i.e. its survival, propagation and transmission.

  7. Tuberculosis: A Problem for Lifeguards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaros, Susan

    1996-01-01

    Lifeguards run the risk of workplace infection by tuberculosis-carrying swimmers. Even if they work in ventilated, sunlit areas (which reduces risk), they can contract tuberculosis when performing respiratory resuscitation. Without appropriate precautions, lifeguards may be unnecessarily exposed. A tuberculosis infection control plan is needed in…

  8. Tuberculosis among Children in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Bradford D.

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis among Alaskan children under 15 was more than twice the national rate, with Alaska Native children showing a much higher incidence. Children with household exposure to adults with active tuberculosis had a high risk of infection. About 22 percent of pediatric tuberculosis cases were identified through school…

  9. Childhood Tuberculosis, Still with Us...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaulet, Pierre; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The first section of this report on childhood tuberculosis in developed and developing countries discusses the epidemiology of tuberculosis in children. Information is presented on: (1) sources and prevalence of infection; (2) risks, frequency, and types of tuberculosis; (3) mortality rates; and (4) the relation of poverty and AIDS to…

  10. Tuberculosis of the cervical spine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculosis of the cervical spine is rare, comprising 3 -. 5% of cases of tuberculosis of the spine. Eight patients with tuberculosis of the cervicaJ spine seen during 1989 -. 1992 were reviewed. They all presented with neck pain. The 4 children presented with a kyphotic deformity. In all the children the disease was extensive, ...

  11. Tuberculosis in ancient times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Cilliers

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In spite of an array of effective antibiotics, tuberculosis is still very common in developing countries where overcrowding, malnutrition and poor hygienic conditions prevail. Over the past 30 years associated HIV infection has worsened the situation by increasing the infection rate and mortality of tuberculosis. Of those diseases caused by a single organism only HIV causes more deaths internationally than tuberculosis. The tubercle bacillus probably first infected man in Neolithic times, and then via infected cattle, but the causative Mycobacteriacea have been in existence for 300 million years. Droplet infection is the most common way of acquiring tuberculosis, although ingestion (e.g. of infected cows’ milk may occur. Tuberculosis probably originated in Africa. The earliest path gnomonic evidence of human tuberculosis in man was found in osteo-archaeological findings of bone tuberculosis (Pott’s disease of the spine in the skeleton of anEgyptian priest from the 21st Dynasty (approximately 1 000 BC. Suggestive but not conclusiveevidence of tuberculotic lesions had been found in even earlier skeletons from Egypt and Europe. Medical hieroglyphics from ancient Egypt are silent on the disease, which could be tuberculosis,as do early Indian and Chinese writings. The Old Testament refers to the disease schachapeth, translated as phthisis in the Greek Septuagint. Although the Bible is not specific about this condition, tuberculosis is still called schachapeth in modern Hebrew. In pre-Hippocratic Greece Homer did not mention phthisis, a word meaning non-specific wasting of the body. However. Alexander of Tralles (6th century BC seemed to narrow the concept down to a specific disease, and in the Hippocratic Corpus (5th-4th centuries BC phthisis can be recognised as tuberculosis. It was predominantly a respiratory disease commonly seen and considered to be caused by an imbalance of bodily humours. It was commonest in autumn, winter and spring

  12. Liposome-encapsulated chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børresen, B.; Hansen, A. E.; Kjær, A.

    2018-01-01

    Cytotoxic drugs encapsulated into liposomes were originally designed to increase the anticancer response, while minimizing off-target adverse effects. The first liposomal chemotherapeutic drug was approved for use in humans more than 20years ago, and the first publication regarding its use...... to inherent issues with the enhanced permeability and retention effect, the tumour phenomenon which liposomal drugs exploit. This effect seems very heterogeneously distributed in the tumour. Also, it is potentially not as ubiquitously occurring as once thought, and it may prove important to select patients...... not resolve the other challenges that liposomal chemotherapy faces, and more work still needs to be done to determine which veterinary patients may benefit the most from liposomal chemotherapy....

  13. Combined radiotherapy-chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel, G.G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the clinically confirmed benefits of combined chemotherapy-radiotherapy. They have been found in a small group of diseases that respond to chemotherapy alone. According to the author, only when a drug or drug combination has the ability to eradicate occult disease or substantially to reduce the size of objectively measurable disease is there likely to be an demonstrable benefit from its use in conjunction with radiotherapy. It is the author's belief that the immediate future lies in selecting drugs and patients in which a good chemotherapeutic response can be expected, avoiding drugs that seriously enhance radiation damage to normal tissues and keeping drug and radiation treatments far enough apart in time to minimize interactions

  14. Detecting Ancient Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M. Gernaey

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Some diseases have played a more significant role in human development than others. Here we describe the results of a trial to diagnose ancient tuberculosis using chemical methods. Palaeo-epidemiological studies of the disease are compromised, but it has become apparent that tuberculosis (TB is a 'population-density dependent' disease. From modern studies, it is also apparent that the prevalence of TB can be used as an indicator of the level of poverty within the studied population. Mid-shaft rib samples from articulated individuals recovered from the former Newcastle Infirmary Burial Ground (1753-1845 AD were examined for mycolic acids that are species-specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The 24% of ribs positive for mycolic acids correlated with the documented 27% tuberculosis prevalence. Mycolic acid biomarkers have the potential to provide an accurate trace of the palaeo-epidemiology of tuberculosis in ancient populations, thereby providing an indication of the overall level of poverty - a useful adjunct for archaeology.

  15. Infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peloquin, C A; Berning, S E

    1994-01-01

    To update readers on the clinical management of infections caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, to provide a general description of the organism, culture and susceptibility testing, and clinical manifestations of the disease, and to provide several aspects of the treatment of the disease, including historical perspective, current approaches, and research opportunities for the future. The current medical literature, including abstracts presented at recent international meetings, is reviewed. References were identified through MEDLINE, MEDLARS II, Current Contents, and published meeting abstracts. Data regarding the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, culture and susceptibility testing, and treatment of tuberculosis are cited. Specific attention has been focused on the clinical management of patients with noncontagious infection and potentially contagious active disease (TB) caused by M. tuberculosis. Information contributing to the discussion of the topics selected by the authors is reviewed. Data supporting and disputing specific conclusions are presented. The incidence of TB is increasing in the US, despite the fact that available technologies are capable of controlling the vast majority of existing cases. Fueling the fire is the problem of coinfection with HIV and M. tuberculosis. Very few drugs are available for the treatment of TB, and few of these approach the potency of isoniazid and rifampin. Preventive therapy of patients exposed to multiple-drug-resistant M. tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is controversial and of unknown efficacy. Treatment of active disease caused by MDR-TB requires up to four times longer, is associated with increased toxicity, and is far less successful than the treatment of drug-susceptible TB. Strategies for the management of such cases are presented. The rising incidence of TB in the US reflects a breakdown in the healthcare systems responsible for controlling the disease, which reflects the past budgetary reductions. Although TB control

  16. Prevent Infections During Chemotherapy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-10-24

    This podcast discusses the importance of preventing infections in cancer patients who are undergoing chemotherapy. Dr. Lisa Richardson, CDC oncologist, talks about a new Web site for cancer patients and their caregivers.  Created: 10/24/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 10/24/2011.

  17. Managing latent tuberculosis infection and tuberculosis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Carvalho

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide. The aim of this review is to describe the management of the child with TB and latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI.To develop this article, a working group reviewed relevant epidemiological and other scientific studies and established practices in conducting LBTI and TB in children. The article describes how to manage the child with LTBI, considering transmission and infectiousness of tuberculosis, contact screening and prioritization of contacts and recommendations on treatment of children with LTBI and how to manage the child with TB considering the susceptibility of children to developing tuberculosis, epidemiology and classification of tuberculosis in children, diagnosis and treatment. Keywords: Tuberculosis, Pediatric, Childhood, Latent tuberculosis infection

  18. Full dose CHOP chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tominaga, Shinichi; Kondo, Makoto; Ando, Yutaka; Yamashita, Shoji; Uematsu, Minoru; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Nishiguchi, Iku; Hashimoto, Shozo

    1985-01-01

    Since 1982, we have performed 125 courses of CHOP chemotherapy for 27 patients of malignancy, adhering to the original regimen as strictly as possible. CHOP chemotherapy consisted of Cyclophosphamide 750 mg/m 2 , iv, on day 1; Adriamycin 50 mg/m 2 , iv, on day 1; Vincristine 1.4 mg/m 2 , iv, on day 1 (maximum single dose 2.0 mg) and Prednisolone 50 mg/m 2 , po, day 1 through 5. The cycle was repeated every 21 days. As side effects, myelosuppression, hair loss, fever, nausea, vomiting, liver dysfunction, stomatitis, neuropathy, herpes zoster, arrhythmia and hemorrhagic cystitis were seen. Due to myelosuppression, twenty patients experienced febrile episodes at each nadir of WBC counts on 40 courses. However, any febrile patient did not have life threatening infection. Other side effects were also reversible. The radiotherapy of most patients was carried out as initially scheduled, except for 3 patients in whom irradiation was interrupted due to severe stomatitis or herpes zoster. We consider that CHOP chemotherapy is excellent in feasibility even when combined with radiotherapy. (author)

  19. Concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, K.K.

    1985-01-01

    The principal objective of combining chemotherapy with radiotherapy (XRT) for the treatment of advanced head and neck cancer is to improve the therapeutic ratio through the enhancement of local control and reduction of distant metastases without excessively enhancing normal tissue effects. Improved tumour control can result from sole additivity of either therapy or direct interactions between drug and radiation leading to increased tumour cell kill. Chemotherapy may sensitize the cells to radiation, interfere with repair of sublethal or potentially lethal radiation damage, induce cell synchrony, and reduce tumour mass leading to reoxygenation and decreased fraction of resistant hypoxic cells. Radiation may improve drug accessibility to tumour cells and reduce tumour volume leading to increased cell proliferation and chemosensitivity. If the enhanced effects of combined therapy are purely additive, then the two modalities can be administered either sequentially or concurrently with the same results. However, if the enhanced effects result from the direct interaction between drug and radiation, it is necessary that the two modalities be administered concurrently and in close temporal proximity. This review summarizes the results of clinical studies in which chemotherapy was administered concurrently during the course of radiotherapy for patients with previously untreated advanced squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck

  20. Study of MRI features of intracranial tuberculosis and its dynamic evolution during antituberculous treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Lifang; Lu Yan; Zhou Xinhua; He Wei; Xie Ruming; Xu Jinping; Ning Fenggang; Zhou Zhen; Zhao Zegang

    2014-01-01

    with paradoxical response to antituberculous chemotherapy at 3 months, and 8 of them disappeared after 6 months of therapy. The outcome of tuberculous meningitis was relatively poor. Conclusions: It is objective to classify parenchymal tuberculosis into three types: miliary, nodules and tuberculoma. Dynamic MRI changes of intracranial tuberculosis is helpful for understanding the disease better. (authors)

  1. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy for gastric and colorectal cancer in Mainland China

    OpenAIRE

    Suo, Tao; Mahteme, Haile; Qin, Xin-Yu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the current status of peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) management, as well as the usage of cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) in mainland China.

  2. CT appearances of abdominal tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.-K., E-mail: leewk33@hotmail.com [Department of Medical Imaging, St Vincent' s Hospital, University of Melbourne, Fitzroy, Victoria (Australia); Van Tonder, F.; Tartaglia, C.J.; Dagia, C. [Department of Medical Imaging, St Vincent' s Hospital, University of Melbourne, Fitzroy, Victoria (Australia); Cazzato, R.L. [Department of Radiology, Universita Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Rome (Italy); Duddalwar, V.A. [Department of Radiology, Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Chang, S.D. [Department of Medical Imaging, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, British Columbia (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    The purpose of this article is to review and illustrate the spectrum of computed tomography (CT) appearances of abdominal tuberculosis. Tuberculosis can affect any organ or tissue in the abdomen, and can be mistaken for other inflammatory or neoplastic conditions. The most common sites of tuberculosis in the abdomen include lymph nodes, genitourinary tract, peritoneal cavity and gastrointestinal tract. The liver, spleen, biliary tract, pancreas and adrenals are rarely affected, but are more likely in HIV-seropositive patients and in miliary tuberculosis. This article should alert the radiologist to consider abdominal tuberculosis in the correct clinical setting to ensure timely diagnosis and enable appropriate treatment.

  3. CT appearances of abdominal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.-K.; Van Tonder, F.; Tartaglia, C.J.; Dagia, C.; Cazzato, R.L.; Duddalwar, V.A.; Chang, S.D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review and illustrate the spectrum of computed tomography (CT) appearances of abdominal tuberculosis. Tuberculosis can affect any organ or tissue in the abdomen, and can be mistaken for other inflammatory or neoplastic conditions. The most common sites of tuberculosis in the abdomen include lymph nodes, genitourinary tract, peritoneal cavity and gastrointestinal tract. The liver, spleen, biliary tract, pancreas and adrenals are rarely affected, but are more likely in HIV-seropositive patients and in miliary tuberculosis. This article should alert the radiologist to consider abdominal tuberculosis in the correct clinical setting to ensure timely diagnosis and enable appropriate treatment.

  4. The radiological diagnosis of tuberculosis of the adult spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, P.; Lifeso, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains endemic in the United States with an estimated incidence of 15.9 cases per 100,000 population. In North America and Saudi Arabia tuberculosis of the spine is primarily a disease of adults. In Saudi Arabia the average age on presentation is 41 years. Spinal tuberculosis begins classically in the anterior inferior portion of a vertebral body. The infection spreads beneath the anterior longitudinal ligament to involve adjacent vertebral bodies. Disc space narrowing is a secondary phenomenon, occurring when destruction of the cancellous bone permits herniation of the disc into the affected vertebral body. Initially the lesion is purely lytic, so that in the early phase bone scanning, both with technetium polyphosphate and gallium, is often negative. With combination chemotherapy virtually all patients are curable, but early treatment demands early diagnosis. As the incidence of Pott disease has decreased so too has the medical ar wareness of this condition. Many physicians now believe it to have been totally eradicated. Particularly in the older age group, in whom other infections, tumours, and metabolic conditions are common, the differential diagnosis of a spinal lesion should include tuberculosis. The grossly destructive changes observed characteristically in children tend to develop only late in adults, making recognition of the early manifestations of the infection in the older patient much more important. (orig.)

  5. A rare case of fibrostenotic endobronchial tuberculosis of trachea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassiopia Cary

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Endobronchial tuberculosis (EBTB is a sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB that extends to the endobronchial or endotracheal wall causing inflammation, edema, ulceration, granulation or fibrosis of mucosa and submucosa. This case depicts a 20 year old foreign-born woman with a history of active pulmonary TB on anti-TB chemotherapy, who presented with worsening stridor, dyspnea, cough and weight loss. The disease state was diagnosed with multiple modalities including, spirometry, CT scan of the neck, and bronchoscopy. The biopsies of the tracheal web revealed fibrotic tissue without any granulomas or malignancy establishing the diagnosis of EBTB. Serial balloon dilations and anti-neoplastic therapy with Mitomycin C was used to accomplish sufficient airway patency to relieve her symptoms. ETBT is a rare consequence of TB, which although has a low incidence in the United States, so physicians should have a high clinical suspicion based on the need for prompt intervention.

  6. SURGERY FOR DRUG-RESISTANT DESTRUCTIVE PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Skornyakov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the experience in surgically treating 145 patients with destructive, mainly fibrocavernous pulmonary tuberculosis. All the patients completed treatment. In the preoperative preparation, particular emphasis is laid on the promptest determination of a spectrum of pathogen susceptibility/resistance, individualized chemotherapy, and collapse therapy options. Postoperative complications occurred in 27 (18.6% patients, fatal outcomes in 4 (2.7%. The former were recorded most frequently after pneumonectomy in 13 (37.1% cases, the later were seen in 3 (8.6%. Sputum culture conversion was generally achieved in 111 (78% patients, particularly in 97 (78.2% patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and in 14 (66.7% with a broad drug resistance in the pathogen. Out of the 64 patients followed up for more than 3 years, 48 (75.0% were in clinical and bacteriological remission.

  7. Radiologic diagnosis of lung tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenhuber, E.; Mostbeck, G.; Bankier, A.; Stadler, A.; Rumetshofer, R.

    2007-01-01

    The radiologic knowledge of tuberculosis-associated lung disease is an essential tool in the clinical diagnosis of tuberculosis. Chest radiography is the primary imaging method, but the importance of CT is still increasing, as CT is more sensitive in the detection of cavitation, of hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathie, of endobronchial spread and of complications in the course of the disease. In addition, CT has been proven as a valuable technique in the assessment of tuberculosis activity, especially in patients where M. tuberculosis has not been detected in the sputum or in patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Depending on the immune status of the patient, the morphologic spectrum of tuberculosis is quite variable. Early diagnosis of tuberculosis is essential to prevent further spread of the disease. (orig.) [de

  8. Tuberculosis-Related Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aftab, Huma; Christensen, Dirk L.; Ambreen, Atiqa

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with newly diagnosed tuberculosis (TB) were screened for diabetes (DM) with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in Pakistan. A significant decrease in FPG was observed when TB was treated. Of those with newly diagnosed DM, 46% and 62% no longer had hyperglycemia after 3 and 6 months, respect......Individuals with newly diagnosed tuberculosis (TB) were screened for diabetes (DM) with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in Pakistan. A significant decrease in FPG was observed when TB was treated. Of those with newly diagnosed DM, 46% and 62% no longer had hyperglycemia after 3 and 6 months...

  9. Tuberculosis of the breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baharoon Salim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis of the breast is an uncommon disease even in countries where the incidence of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis is high. Clinical presentation is usually of a solitary, ill-defined, unilateral hard lump situated in the upper outer quadrant of the breast. This disease can present a diagnostic problem on radiological and microbiological investigations, and thus a high index of suspicion is needed. Incorporating a highly sensitive technique like polymerase chain reaction (PCR may be helpful in establishing the usefulness of such technology and can aid in conforming the diagnosis early. The disease is curable with antitubercular drugs, and surgery is rarely required

  10. XV Conferencia : Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Varón Rico

    1958-05-01

    Full Text Available La tuberculosis se puede evitar en el niño en varias formas: en primer lugar se puede hacer una profilaxis que se llama de disposición, o sea, como la consideran los autores alemanes, mediante las prácticas de una puericultura bien realizada, ojalá en todas las clases sociales, su nutrición, sus hábitos higiénicos y dietéticos correctos, se va levantando por medio de ello resistencia no sólo a la tuberculosis sino a todas las enfermedades.

  11. The Bandim tuberculosis score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolf, Frauke; Joaquim, Luis Carlos; Vieira, Cesaltina

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study was carried out in Guinea-Bissau ’ s capital Bissau among inpatients and outpatients attending for tuberculosis (TB) treatment within the study area of the Bandim Health Project, a Health and Demographic Surveillance Site. Our aim was to assess the variability between 2...... physicians in performing the Bandim tuberculosis score (TBscore), a clinical severity score for pulmonary TB (PTB), and to compare it to the Karnofsky performance score (KPS). Method : From December 2008 to July 2009 we assessed the TBscore and the KPS of 100 PTB patients at inclusion in the TB cohort and...

  12. Quality Function Deployment: Application to Chemotherapy Unit Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Hashemi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today’s healthcare organizations are challenged by pressures to meet growing population demands and enhance community health through improving service quality. Quality function deployment is one of the widely-used customerdriven approaches for health services development. In the current study, quality function deployment is used to improve the quality of chemotherapy unit services. Methods: First, we identified chemotherapy outpatient unit patients as chemotherapy unit customers. Then, the Delphi technique and component factor analysis with orthogonal rotation was employed to determine their expectations. Thereafter, data envelopment analysis was performed to specify user priorities. We determined the relationships between patients’ expectations and service elements through expert group consensus using the Delphi method and the relationships between service elements by Pearson correlation. Finally, simple and compound priorities of the service elements were derived by matrix calculation. Results: Chemotherapy unit patients had four main expectations: access, suitable hotel services, satisfactory and effective relationships, and clinical services. The chemotherapy unit has six key service elements of equipment, materials, human resources, physical space, basic facilities, and communication and training. There were four-level relationships between the patients’ expectations and service elements, with mostly significant correlations between service elements. According to the findings, the functional group of basic facilities was the most critical factor, followed by materials. Conclusion: The findings of the current study can be a general guideline as well as a scientific, structured framework for chemotherapy unit decision makers in order to improve chemotherapy unit services.

  13. A rare localization of tuberculosis of the wrist: The scapholunate joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali Sbai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The tuberculosis of the hand and the wrist is a rare entity. Affecting the scapholunate joint is exceptional. It is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage of carpal destruction, due to slowly development of the symptoms. We report the case of a 58-year-old female, presenting as wrist pain for 3 months. Clinical study showed a local swelling in the left wrist, the mobility of the wrist was normal but painful at the end of motion. The diagnosis of osteoarticular tuberculosis was suspected after radiological and biological study then confirmed after histological study. Antibacillary chemotherapy during 12 months promoted healing and good outcome.

  14. A brief history of tuberculosis in the Czech Lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargová, Lenka; Vymazalová, Kateřina; Horáčková, Ladislava

    2017-07-01

    Tuberculosis currently remains a serious medical problem, therefore increased attention is being paid to this disease. Paleopathological studies focused on the monitoring of morbid changes in skeletal remains of historical populations facilitate a detailed study of the development of this disease. They provide direct evidence of the existence of tuberculosis and its past forms. In addition to literary and iconographic sources, the present study is focused on recording the findings of bone tuberculosis in historical osteological sets from the Czech Lands and is the starting point for their detailed review. Approximately 76 cases of bone tuberculosis from the Czech Lands have been published and more or less reliably documented from 20 archeological sites dated back from the Eneolithic to the modern period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A STUDY ON VARIOUS MODES OF PRESENTATION OF GASTROINTESTINAL TUBERCULOSIS AT EMERGENCY, ITS MANAGEMENT AND OUTCOMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Mohan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal tuberculosis is the 6th most common form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, among which ileocaecal tuberculosis is most common. Tuberculosis has been declared a global emergency by the World Health Organization (WHO and is the most important communicable disease worldwide. Approximately one third of the world population is infected and about three millions die each year from this disease. It presents with a wide variety of symptoms and signs. Gastrointestinal tuberculosis presents to emergency department as subacute intestinal obstruction, acute intestinal obstruction and peritonitis. Although Antitubercular chemotherapy is the mainstay in treatment of abdominal tuberculosis, surgical intervention becomes necessary for two reasons- diagnostic and therapeutic. Diagnostic laparotomy becomes necessary for histopathological/microbiological diagnosis, more often in patients with peritoneal or lymph node TB. Therapeutic surgery is the treatment of choice in emergency for treating intestinal obstruction & peritonitis. Morbidity and mortality will be high in patients with late presentation and associated comorbidities. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: (1 To study various modes of presentation and management of Gastrointestinal Tuberculosis at emergency surgical care, in our hospital, its management and outcomes. (2 To evaluate the morbidity and mortality in acute presentations of Gastrointestinal tuberculosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS An Observational study of 40 patients admitted in the acute surgical care unit of Our Hospital, Hyderabad, presenting with acute abdomen who have been confirmed to have Gastrointestinal tuberculosis at laparotomy and on histopathology from Aug 2013 to Aug 2015. The patient was managed by laparotomy and procedure according to the mode of presentation. All the patients were given ATT post operatively. RESULTS Gastrointestinal tuberculosis is more common in 2nd and 3rd decade of life. Acute presentations were found to be more common

  16. [When history meets molecular medicine: molecular history of human tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottini, Laura; Falchetti, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis represents one of the humankind's most socially devastating diseases. Despite a long history of medical research and the development of effective therapies, this disease remains a global health danger even in the 21st century. Tuberculosis may cause death but infected people with effective immunity may remain healthy for years, suggesting long-term host-pathogen co-existence. Because of its antiquity, a supposed association with human settlements and the tendency to leave typical lesions on skeletal and mummified remains, tuberculosis has been the object of intensive multidisciplinary studies, including paleo-pathological research. During the past 10 years molecular paleo-pathology developed as a new scientific discipline allowing the study of ancient pathogens by direct detection of their DNA. In this work, we reviewed evidences for tuberculosis in ancient human remains, current methods for identifying ancient mycobacterial DNA and explored current theories of Mycobacterium tuberculosis evolution and their implications in the global development of tuberculosis looking into the past and present at the same time.

  17. Progress in Personalizing Chemotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S. Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Platinum-based chemotherapy is commonly used for the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic bladder cancer. However, there are currently no methods to predict chemotherapy response in this disease setting. A better understanding of the biology of bladder cancer has led to developments of molecular biomarkers that may help guide clinical decision making. These biomarkers, while promising, have not yet been validated in prospective trials and are not ready for clinical applications. As alkylating agents, platinum drugs kill cancer cells mainly through induction of DNA damage. A microdosing approach is currently being tested to determine if chemoresistance can be identified by measuring platinum-induced DNA damage using highly sensitive accelerator mass spectrometry technology. The hope is that these emerging strategies will help pave the road towards personalized therapy in advanced bladder cancer.

  18. Factors associated with delayed tuberculosis test-seeking behavior in the Peruvian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Carolyn M; Bayer, Angela M; Gilman, Robert H; Onifade, Dami; Acosta, Colleen; Cabrera, Lilia; Vidal, Carlos; Evans, Carlton A

    2009-12-01

    This study aimed to determine the psychosocial factors associated with delayed test-seeking among tuberculosis patients. The duration of symptoms before seeking medical care was assessed by interview for 108 newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients in the city of Iquitos in the Peruvian Amazon, which has high tuberculosis incidence. Beliefs associated with test-seeking behavior and delay was assessed in these patients. The median delay from symptom onset to seeking diagnostic testing was 61 days (inter-quartile range 30-91 days). The belief that tuberculosis is curable was associated with a 100% longer test-seeking delay; the perception that tuberculosis was common was associated with a 57% longer delay; male gender was associated with a 48% longer delay; and education less than complete secondary schooling was associated with a 44% longer delay. In conclusion, current health promotion activities that emphasize tuberculosis curability and high prevalence may paradoxically increase test-seeking delay and therefore require prospective evaluation.

  19. Linezolid in the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis: the challenge of its narrow therapeutic index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Sean; Meintjes, Graeme; Maartens, Gary

    2016-10-01

    Linezolid is an oxazolidinone with potent activity against M tuberculosis, and improves culture conversion and cure rates when added to treatment regimens for drug resistant tuberculosis. However, linezolid has a narrow therapeutic window, and the optimal dosing strategy that minimizes the substantial toxicity associated with linezolid's prolonged use in tuberculosis treatment has not been determined, limiting the potential impact of this anti-mycobacterial agent. This paper aims to review and summarize the current knowledge on linezolid for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis. The focus is on the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic determinants of linezolid's efficacy and toxicity in tuberculosis, and how this relates to defining an optimal dose. Mechanisms of linezolid toxicity and resistance, and the potential role of therapeutic drug monitoring are also covered. Expert commentary: Prospective pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies are required to define optimal therapeutic targets and to inform improved linezolid dosing strategies for drug-resistant tuberculosis.

  20. Sputum smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis: sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mugusi Ferdinand M

    2011-11-01

    presence of a cavity were found to be predictive of smear negative but culture positive pulmonary tuberculosis. Conclusion The current practices of establishing pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosis are not sensitive and specific enough to establish the diagnosis of Acid Fast Bacilli smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis and over treat people with no pulmonary tuberculosis.

  1. Decline in Tuberculosis among Mexico-Born Persons in the United States, 2000–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Brian J.; Jeffries, Carla D.; Moonan, Patrick K.

    2016-01-01

    non–recently arrived Mexico-born persons. The extent of the decline was dampened by an unchanged tuberculosis case rate among newly arrived persons from Mexico and a large increase in the non–recently arrived Mexico-born population. If current trends continue, tuberculosis morbidity among Mexico-born persons will be increasingly driven by those who have been living in the United States for more than 5 years. PMID:24708206

  2. Adherence to and outcome of isoniazid chemoprophylaxis among household contact children of adults having pulmonary tuberculosis in Alexandria, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Aida M

    2012-08-01

    Current international guidelines recommend 6-9 months of isoniazid (INH) preventive chemotherapy to prevent the development of active tuberculosis (TB) in susceptible children exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, this is dependent on good adherence, as shown by previous studies. This study was conducted to describe the outcome of screening of contact children aged 5 years or less with household exposure to an adult pulmonary TB index case to determine the prevalence and possible risk factors of infection among contact children and to determine the extent and outcome of adherence of contact children to unsupervised INH chemoprophylaxis for 6 months. A descriptive facility-based cross-sectional study was conducted from March 2009 to August 2010. Research settings were three of the National TB control program chest dispensaries (primary care facilities) in Alexandria, Egypt. Facility-based TB treatment registers of the previous 3 months were used to identify all new adult pulmonary TB cases. All children aged 5 years or less living in the same house as the index cases were identified and screened for TB. The contact children were given unsupervised INH preventive chemotherapy once active TB was excluded. Adherence to and outcome of preventive chemotherapy were followed up. Preventive chemotherapy consisted of unsupervised INH monotherapy for 6 months with monthly collection of tablets from the clinic. Adherence was documented after completion of the 6-month preventive treatment period. Adherence was considered reasonable if tablets were collected for more than 4 months, poor if collected for 2-4 months, and very poor if collected for less than 2 months. (a) Prevalence of infection and disease and the possible risk factors among contacts. (b) The extent and outcome of adherence to unsupervised INH chemoprophylaxis among contact children. (c) Factors behind poor adherence. In total, 197 adult TB index cases from 187 households were identified. In all, 297

  3. Adjuvant chemotherapy for osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilber, F R; Rosen, G

    1989-08-01

    From this review of chemotherapy trials, several observations can be made. Osteosarcoma is a complex disease involving multiple histologies, each with a different prognosis. Prognostic factors that have been shown to be important include anatomic location of the primary tumor, stage at presentation (patients with metastatic or local recurrent disease fair far worse than those with primary disease), age at onset (children fair worse than the teenager with osteosarcoma), and location within the extremity (patients with more distal tumors fairing better than patients with more proximal tumors). There is convincing evidence for the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents such as methotrexate in high doses (at least 8 g/m2 for adults, 12 g/m2 for children), Adriamycin, and cisplatin. The combination of Adriamycin and cisplatin appears to be more beneficial relative to either one of these agents alone. The efficacy of the combination of BCD as a triple-drug regimen, although useful in several different trials, has not been convincingly shown. Finally, from several of the recent randomized trials, it appears, that chemotherapeutic regimens containing an Adriamycin and cisplatin combination appear to be superior to those that do not include this combination. However, these observations are made from a historical perspective and have not been conclusively proven by randomized prospective investigations. The observations concerning the natural history of the disease and the activity of various chemotherapeutic agents suggest certain clinical practice algorithms. Essential staging procedures would include a bone scan looking for multifocal or metastatic disease, and CT scans of the chest looking for metastases to the lung. From all studies, it is apparent that surgery is mandatory for the primary tumor and should be an integral portion of all treatment methods. Chemotherapy should be considered for all patients with osteosarcoma, and the essential drugs in the regimen appear at

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in cattle from the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlokwe, Tiny Motlatso; Said, Halima; Gcebe, Nomakorinte

    2017-10-10

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the main causative agent of tuberculosis (TB) in human and Mycobacterium bovis commonly causes tuberculosis in animals. Transmission of tuberculosis caused by both pathogens can occur from human to animals and vice versa. In the current study, M. tuberculosis, as confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers targeting 3 regions of difference (RD4, RD9 and RD12) on the genomes, was isolated from cattle originating from two epidemiologically unrelated farms in the Eastern Cape (E.C) Province of South Africa. Although the isolates were genotyped with variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) typing, no detailed epidemiological investigation was carried out on the respective farms to unequivocally confirm or link humans as sources of TB transmission to cattle, a move that would have embraced the 'One Health' concept. In addition, strain comparison with human M. tuberculosis in the database from the E.C Province and other provinces in the country did not reveal any match. This is the first report of cases of M. tuberculosis infection in cattle in South Africa. The VNTR profiles of the M. tuberculosis strains identified in the current study will form the basis for creating M. tuberculosis VNTR database for animals including cattle for future epidemiological studies. Our findings however, call for urgent reinforcement of collaborative efforts between the veterinary and the public health services of the country.

  5. Tuberculosis in African lions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, M.

    2013-01-01

    Lions (Panthera leo) are susceptible to Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) infection, resulting in bovine tuberculosis (BTB). This chronic, debilitating disease can affect multiple organs, particularly the lungs, and may ultimately lead to death of the infected animal. Cases of lion BTB have been

  6. Tuberculosis of the patella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhillon, M.S.; Rao, S.S.; Nagi, O.N.; Sandhu, M.S.; Vasisht, R.K.

    1998-01-01

    A rare case of tuberculosis of the patella is presented. Diagnostic features include an osteolytic lesion in the patella with flaky sequestrum, associated with typical clinical features. Treatment should be urgent and should include a regimen of surgical debridement along with four antitubercular drugs. Once the joint is involved, the end results become less satisfactory. (orig.)

  7. Basic Tuberculosis Facts

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-12

    In this podcast, Dr. Kenneth Castro, Director of the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, discusses basic TB prevention, testing, and treatment information.  Created: 3/12/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/12/2012.

  8. Tuberculosis and anorexia nervosa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    recently our experience in the Eating Disorders Unit at Tara, where three patients with pulmonary tuberculosis were only diagnosed after admission for treatment of anorexia nervosa.· It appears that despite the presence of a persistent dry cough in each case, no investigation was undertaken. Did demographic stereotyping ...

  9. Antigen smuggling in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2014-06-11

    The importance of CD4 T lymphocytes in immunity to M. tuberculosis is well established; however, how dendritic cells activate T cells in vivo remains obscure. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Srivastava and Ernst (2014) report a mechanism of antigen transfer for efficient activation of antimycobacterial T cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Diffuse infiltrative cardiac tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulati, Gurpreet S; Kothari, Shyam S

    2011-01-01

    We present the cardiac magnetic resonance images of an unusual form of cardiac tuberculosis. Nodular masses in a sheet-like distribution were seen to infiltrate the outer myocardium and pericardium along most of the cardiac chambers. The lesions showed significant resolution on antitubercular therapy

  11. La tuberculosis pulmonar

    OpenAIRE

    Suñé Ysamat, Bertila

    1982-01-01

    La tuberculosis pulmonar todavía no es una enfermedad erradicada, aunque su incidencia ha disminuido considerablemente. El tratamiento y el pronóstico de esta enfermedad han dado un cambio profundo durante estos últimos 30 años con el descubrimiento de nuevos medicamentos antituberculosos.

  12. La tuberculosis pulmonar (II)

    OpenAIRE

    Suñé Ysamat, Bertila

    1982-01-01

    Los bacilos tuberculosos pueden encontrarse en cantidades importantes en el interior de los macrófagos, o bien en el exterior. El tratamiento médico de la tuberculosis debe conseguir la destrucción de los bacilos intra y extracelulares.

  13. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this podcast, Dr. Oeltmann discusses multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. An outbreak occurred in Thailand, which led to 45 cases in the U.S. This serious illness can take up to 2 years to treat. MDR TB is a real threat and a serious condition.

  14. Tuberculosis Facts - TB and HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB and HIV/AIDS What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  15. Malignant glioma: Should chemotherapy be overthrown by experimental treatments?

    OpenAIRE

    Hösli, P.; Sappino, A. P.; de Tribolet, N.; Dietrich, P. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Despite more than two decades of clinical research with chemotherapy, the outcome of malignant gliomas remains poor. Recent years have seen major advances in elucidation of the biology of these tumors, which in turn have led to the current development of innovative therapeutic strategies. The question confronting us at the end of the 1990s is whether we should continue to use and investigate chemotherapy or whether the time has come for experimental treatments. As a contribution to this debat...

  16. Retrospecto do controle da tuberculose no Brasil Retrospect of tuberculosis control in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Aiub Hijjar

    2007-09-01

    Service of Tuberculosis - 1940, and the Campanha Nacional Contra a Tuberculose (National Campaign Against Tuberculosis - 1946, coordinated national policies such as chemotherapy, beginning with the discovery of streptomycin in 1944. The emergence of bacterial resistance led to the development of several therapeutic schemes. The Scheme 1 (rifampycin, hydrazide and pyrazinamid, which was the main one in 1979 and is still used nowadays, had a great epidemiological effect. The WHO declared TB a public health emergency in 1993. In response, Brazil developed some strategies; the first one was the Plano Emergencial para Controle da Tuberculose (Emergency Plan for Tuberculosis Control - 1994, prioritizing 230 municipalities. The current prospects are an effective municipalization of actions and their greater integration with the Programas de Agentes Comunitários e Saúde da Família (Humanitarian Agents and Family Health Programs.

  17. A household survey on screening practices of household contacts of smear positive tuberculosis patients in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thanh, Thuy Hoang Thi; Ngoc, Sy Dinh; Viet, Nhung Nguyen; van, Hung Nguyen; Horby, Peter; Cobelens, Frank G. J.; Wertheim, Heiman F. L.

    2014-01-01

    Close contacts of tuberculosis (TB) patients are at increased risk of developing tuberculosis. Although passive contact screening guidelines are incorporated in the national TB control program, currently it is unknown how frequent close contacts are screened for TB in Vietnam. This study assesses

  18. The tuberculosis hospital in Hohenkrug, Stettin. Department of Genitourinary Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajaczkowski, Tadeusz

    2012-01-01

    Towards the end of the 19th century, Europe turned particular attention to the problem of tuberculosis, at that time the most serious social disease. In the majority of cases, pulmonary tuberculosis had a fatal outcome owing to the lack of effective drugs and methods of treatment. Due to poor sanitary conditions, particularly as regards dwellings, pulmonary tuberculosis was able to spread rapidly. Hospital departments were reluctant to admit patients suffering from tuberculosis. It was only after the discoveries of Robert Koch (bacillus tubercle in 1882) that the cause of the disease became understood and methods of treatment began to be developed. A modern sanatorium and hospital with 270 beds was erected in Hohenkrug (today Szczecin-Zdunowo) between 1915 and 1930. Patients could now be treated with modern methods, surgically in most cases. After the Second World War, pulmonary tuberculosis was still an enormous epidemiologic problem. In 1949, the Polish authorities opened a 400-bed sanatoriumin Zdunowo. The methods of treatment were not much different from pre-war practice and it was only the routine introduction of antituberculotic drugs during the fifties of the past century that brought about a radical change in the fight against tuberculosis. The growing numbers of patients with tuberculosis of the genitourinary system led to the opening in 1958 of a 40-bed specialist ward at the Tuberculosis Sanatorium in Zdunowo. It should be emphasized that the Department of Genitourinary Tuberculosis in Szczecin-Zdunowo was a historical necessity and a salvation for thousands of patients from Northern Poland. The Department totally fulfilled its social duties thanks to the commitment of many outstanding persons dedicated to helping the patients. This unit was finally closed in 1987 because the demand for surgical treatment of tuberculosis was declining concurrently with the advent of new and potent antituberculotics and falling number of new cases of genitourinary

  19. Tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional Tuberculosis as occupational disease

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Mendoza-Ticona

    2012-01-01

    Existe evidencia suficiente para declarar a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional en diversos profesionales especialmente entre los trabajadores de salud. En el Perú están normados y reglamentados los derechos laborales inherentes a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional, como la cobertura por discapacidad temporal o permanente. Sin embargo, estos derechos aún no han sido suficientemente socializados. En este trabajo se presenta información sobre el riesgo de adquirir tuberculosis ...

  20. Problems in laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi J

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Setting : Department of Respiratory Medicine, B.Y.L. Nair Hospital, Mumbai, India. Objective : To study pre-treatment sputum smear, culture and drug susceptibility testing for mycobacterium tuberculosis in fresh cases of pulmonary tuberculosis, the extent of laboratory related problems and correlation of the laboratory results with clinical outcome. Design : This study is a prospective analysis of 57 cases of pulmonary tuberculosis that denied previous treatment with anti tuberculosis drugs. Cases with associated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and diabetes mellitus (DM were excluded. Pre-treatment smear, culture and drug susceptibility were performed by standard culture techniques. Patients were treated with short course chemotherapy (SCC on the basis of World Health Organisation (WHO category I. Laboratory results were correlated with initial clinical data and treatment outcomes. Results : Of the 57 cases selected, there were 34 males and 23females, age range 18-65 years, mean age 27.86 years. Clinical data was lacking in 16 patients who defaulted on treatment and hence were excluded from the analysis. Of the 41 cases with complete data, 37 patients were declared cured (91.25% while 4 patients failed on therapy (9.75%, 17/41 (41.46% had laboratory results consistent with clinical data and treatment results whereas 24/41 (58.53% had poor correlation between laboratory results, clinical data and treatment outcomes. The major laboratory related problems were: 1 Smear positive / culture negative (S+/C- in 16/41 (39% cases at the start of treatment; 2 HR pattern of resistance in 4/41 (9.75% and R resistance 3/41 (7.31% on initial culture susceptibility tests but response to SCC suggesting incorrect susceptibility results. Conclusions : Discrepant reports between clinical findings, laboratory reports and treatment outcomes were found in 58.53% cases. Treatment should not be decided only on the basis of the initial culture susceptibility

  1. HRCT in the evaluation and diagnosis of the early/active pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Gao; Liu Xueguo; Zhang Qingwen; Wang Ying; Li Zhanjun; Zhang Cuiyun; Wang Jian; He Yanli; Hong Guobin

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the HRCT findings of early/active pulmonary tuberculosis before and after antituberculous chemotherapy. Methods: One hundred tuberculous patients were studied prospectively and they were divided into 2 groups according to the history. The diagnosis of early active pulmonary tuberculosis was based on positive acid-fast bacilli in sputum (75 patients) and changes on serial radiographs obtained during treatment (25 patients). The correlation between pathology and imaging was done in the lungs from the cadavers of five other patients who died of pulmonary tuberculosis. Results: Comparing with the presence of other HRCT findings, the presence of centrilobular lesions (93.0%), tree-in-bud appearance (76.0%), and wall thickening of bronchioles (70.0%) were most common signs in both the first group consisting of 66 patients with newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis and the second group consisting of 34 patients with recent reactivation of pulmonary tuberculosis at examination by HRCT, and there was significant difference between the presence of those signs and other signs (P<0.001). Conclusion: Centrilobular lesion appeared to be the most commonly seen characteristic HRCT features of early active tuberculosis, and it may be helpful to the diagnosis and (or ) differential diagnosis if combined with other commonly seen characteristic HRCT features as well as clinical information

  2. Spinal tuberculosis, natural history of disease, classifications and principles of management with historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kush

    2016-08-01

    To describe the natural history spinal tuberculosis, classifications and principles of management based upon the grading of the neurological deficit. Review of literature was conducted with the aim to provide the clinico-radiological correlation of the natural history of spinal tuberculosis in different stages. Management strategy is developed based upon the severity of the neurological deficit. A five stage natural history of spinal tuberculosis is described. Stage of neurological involvement is further divided into 4 grades, predominantly on the basis of progressively increasing motor deficits as negligible, mild, moderate and severe with sensory and autonomic dysfunctions. Suitable principles of management with role of rest, braces, chemotherapy and surgery are discussed. Neurological deficit grading based management is developed. Grade 1 and 2, conservative treatment, grade 3, gray zone and grade 4, operative treatment is emphasized. The five stages of natural history of tuberculosis of spine have been developed from the clinician's point of view. Management of tuberculosis of spine, in general, it is no different than management of soft tissue tuberculosis, in HIV negative or positive patients. Role of surgery is very limited. Management of tubercular paraplegia, based upon the grading of paraplegia is simple, logical, efficient and easy to understand and remember by any orthopedic surgeon.

  3. Radiographic differentiation of atypical tuberculosis from mycobacterium tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarver, R.D.; Pearcy, E.A.; Conces, D.J. Jr.; Mathur, P.N.

    1987-01-01

    The chest radiographs of 95 patients with the new diagnosis of atypical turberculosis were reviewed to determine if any significant differences between atypical tuberculosis and that caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis could be discerned. Findings included upper lobe involvement in B4 of the 95 patients and cavities in 76, with nearly equal groups having no, moderate, or extensive surrounding alveolar disease. Nodules were common; in six patients a nodule was the sole manifestation of disease. Adenopathy was seen in 12 of the 95 patients, atlectasis in 45, pleural thickening in 90, and effusions in three. These radiographic findings did not allow the radiographic differentiation of atypical tuberculosis from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

  4. Perspectives on Advances in Tuberculosis Diagnostics, Drugs, and Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schito, Marco; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Fletcher, Helen A; McNerney, Ruth; Centis, Rosella; D'Ambrosio, Lia; Bates, Matthew; Kibiki, Gibson; Kapata, Nathan; Corrah, Tumena; Bomanji, Jamshed; Vilaplana, Cris; Johnson, Daniel; Mwaba, Peter; Maeurer, Markus; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2015-10-15

    Despite concerted efforts over the past 2 decades at developing new diagnostics, drugs, and vaccines with expanding pipelines, tuberculosis remains a global emergency. Several novel diagnostic technologies show promise of better point-of-care rapid tests for tuberculosis including nucleic acid-based amplification tests, imaging, and breath analysis of volatile organic compounds. Advances in new and repurposed drugs for use in multidrug-resistant (MDR) or extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis have focused on development of several new drug regimens and their evaluation in clinical trials and now influence World Health Organization guidelines. Since the failure of the MVA85A vaccine 2 years ago, there have been no new tuberculosis vaccine candidates entering clinical testing. The current status quo of the lengthy treatment duration and poor treatment outcomes associated with MDR/XDR tuberculosis and with comorbidity of tuberculosis with human immunodeficiency virus and noncommunicable diseases is unacceptable. New innovations and political and funder commitment for early rapid diagnosis, shortening duration of therapy, improving treatment outcomes, and prevention are urgently required. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Global stability of two models with incomplete treatment for tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yali; Li Jianquan; Ma Zhien; Liu Luju

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Two tuberculosis models with incomplete treatment. → Intuitive epidemiological interpretations for the basic reproduction numbers. → Global dynamics of the two models. → Strategies to control the spread of tuberculosis. - Abstract: Two tuberculosis (TB) models with incomplete treatment are investigated. It is assumed that the treated individuals may enter either the latent compartment due to the remainder of Mycobacterium tuberculosis or the infectious compartment due to the treatment failure. The first model is a simple one with treatment failure reflecting the current TB treatment fact in most countries with high tuberculosis incidence. The second model refines the simple one by dividing the latent compartment into slow and fast two kinds of progresses. This improvement can be used to describe the case that the latent TB individuals have been infected with some other chronic diseases (such as HIV and diabetes) which may weaken the immunity of infected individuals and shorten the latent period of TB. Both of the two models assume mass action incidence and exponential distributions of transfers between different compartments. The basic reproduction numbers of the two models are derived and their intuitive epidemiological interpretations are given. The global dynamics of two models are all proved by using Liapunov functions. At last, some strategies to control the spread of tuberculosis are discussed.

  6. Physical exercise during adjuvant chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waart, H.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis evaluates the effect of physical exercise during chemotherapy. In chapter two the study design, rationale and methods of the Physical exercise during Adjuvant Chemotherapy Study (PACES) are described. Chapter three presents the effects of the randomized controlled trial evaluating a

  7. [Clinical analysis on tuberculosis cases among foreigners in our hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Manabu; Hojo, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Shinohara, Yuka; Takasaki, Jin; Yoshizawa, Atsuto; Sugiyama, Haruhito; Kudo, Koichiro; Toyota, Emiko

    2008-10-01

    Although the incidence rate in Japan has been decreasing since the declaration of tuberculosis emergency in 1999, the reported tuberculosis cases among foreigners have been increasing year by year (from 5.1% in 2000 to 6% in 2003). As the number of foreign residents in Japan has been increasing every year, tuberculosis cases among them are also expected to increase. The aim of this study is to investigate and clarify clinical features of recent tuberculosis patients among foreigners. Fifty-two cases were analyzed, who were admitted to our hospital because of active tuberculosis from January 2004 to April 2007. Among total 52 cases, male was 29, female 23, and the mean age (SD) of the patients was 31.8 (+/- 8.8) years old. Their mother countries were China, Republic of Korea and so on. The cavitary lesions were found on chest X-ray in 54%, the drug resistant rate was 8.2%, and the treatment completion rate was 92%. Comparing with reports in the past, almost parameters about tuberculosis control have improved, for example the drug resistant rate was decreased and the treatment completion rate was increased. The promotion of DOTS strategy in Japan might be attributed to the improvement of these parameters. Because more immigrants from the developing countries are expected in near future, not only strengthening current DOTS strategy but also new countermeasures such as QFT-2G and Electronic-Nose Technology should be introduced into tuberculosis control of foreigners living in Japan to decrease tuberculosis incidence and improve treatment outcome by early detection and adherence to treatment.

  8. Changing patterns in pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tytle, T.L.; Johnson, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    The authors reviewed the initial chest roentgenograms of 182 consecutive adult patients with proven active tuberculosis. Less than 50% of all cases were known or suspected at the time of initial presentation. There is a low degree of correlation between radiologically discernible active pulmonary tuberculosis and extrapulmonary tuberculosis. A high percentage of cases represent uncommon pulmonary locations. The frequency of occurrence of four common pulmonary patterns is presented. 21 references, 4 figures, 5 tables

  9. Experience with mesodiencephalic modulation in the combination treatment of patients with tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kornienko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the clinical efficiency of using mesodiencephalic modulation (MDM as therapy in the combination treatment of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, the authors examined two groups: 1 the patients who received a MDM cycle in combination with chemotherapy regimens (a study group; 2 those treated using standard chemotherapy regimens (a control group. By the end of one-month therapy, the study group ceased bacterial excretion twice more often than the control group that exhibited the similar results only by the end of three-month treatment. MDM as therapy produced positive X-ray changes in 76.0% of the cases in the study group and in 44.4% in the control one. MDM used in the combination treatment of patients with tuberculosis makes it possible to reduce the length of hospital stay, the number of round-the-clock beds, and the cost of treating these patients.

  10. Extrapulmonary involvement in pediatric tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritsaneepaiboon, Supika; Andres, Mariaem M; Tatco, Vincent R; Lim, Cielo Consuelo Q; Concepcion, Nathan David P

    2017-09-01

    Tuberculosis in childhood is clinically challenging, but it is a preventable and treatable disease. Risk factors depend on age and immunity status. The most common form of pediatric tuberculosis is pulmonary disease, which comprises more than half of the cases. Other forms make up the extrapulmonary tuberculosis that involves infection of the lymph nodes, central nervous system, gastrointestinal system, hepatobiliary tree, and renal and musculoskeletal systems. Knowledge of the imaging characteristics of pediatric tuberculosis provides clues to diagnosis. This article aims to review the imaging characteristics of common sites for extrapulmonary tuberculous involvement in children.

  11. Citoquinas en tuberculosis Cytokines in tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime I. Rodríguez

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available La tuberculosis continúa siendo un modelo inmunológico para estudiar las infecciones intracelulares. Entenderlos complejos mecanismos de interacción de la micobacteria con el sistema inmune del hospedero permitirá un manejo más racional de los fenómenos clínicos que se presentan en la enfermedad. Las citoquinas desempeñan un papel fundamental tanto en el desarrollo de los mecanismos de inmunidad protectora como en el daño tisular presente en esta enfermedad. La estimulación in vitro de linfocitos de sujetos sanos tuberculino positivos con antígenos específicos induce preferencial mente un patrón de citoquinas tipo I (1'IL-2, 1'IFN-y, ~IL-4, ~IL-5, mientras que en la mayoría de los pacientes no se presenta este patrón. Las citoquinas tipo I conducen a la activación de los macrófagos que a su vez inhiben la replicación de las micobacterias. En el ratón, los macrófagos activados inhiben la micobacteria por medio del óxido nítrico; en los humanos la producción de óxido nítrico por los macrófagos no está plenamente demostrada. Recientemente se ha demostrado que la infección con M. tuberculosis puede inducir apoptosis en los macrófagos infectados. La apoptosis depende de la producción del Factor de Necrosis Tumoral a y de óxido nítrico. Paradójicamente, ellipoarabinomanán manosilado (ManLAM presente en la pared de las micobacterias inhibe la apoptosis. Estos hallazgos muestran un nuevo fenómeno en la interacción micobacteriamacrófago el cual debe estar finamente regulado tanto en el microorganismo como en el hospedero. Tuberculosis continues to be a model to study the immunological aspects of intracellular infections. A better understanding of the mycobacteria.host interaction would allow a more rational approach to the clinical problems of this disease. Cytokines playa key role in the development of protective immunity as well as in the tissue injury that occurs during the disease. In vitro stimulation with

  12. Head and neck cancer: metronomic chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Felice, Francesca; Musio, Daniela; Tombolini, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    In the era of personalized medicine, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) represents a critical oncologic topic. Conventional chemotherapy regimens consist of drugs administration in cycles near or at the maximum tolerated dose (MDT), followed by a long drug-free period to permit the patient to recover from acute toxicities. Despite this strategy is successful in controlling the cancer process at the beginning, a significant number of HNSCC patients tend to recurred or progress, especially those patients with locally advanced or metastatic disease. The repertoire of drugs directed against tumor cells has greatly increased and metronomic chemotherapy (MC) could be an effective treatment option. It is the purpose of this article to review the concept of MC and describe its potential use in HNSCC. We provide an update of ongoing progress and current challenges related to this issue

  13. Intestinal response to myeloablative chemotherapy in piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Peter Erik Lotko; Shen, René Liang; Petersen, Bodil L

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced myeloablation prior to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) may be associated with severe toxicity. The current understanding of the pathophysiology of oral and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity is largely derived from studies in rodents and very little...... is known from humans, especially children. We hypothesized that milk-fed piglets can be used as a clinically relevant model of GI-toxicity related to a standard conditioning chemotherapy (intravenous busulfan, Bu plus cyclophosphamide, Cy) used prior to HSCT. In study 1, dose-response relationships were....../kg) and bone marrow was collected on day 11. Histology of bone marrow samples showed total aplasia after treatment A. Using this treatment in study 2, Bu-Cy pigs showed lowered spleen and intestinal weights and variable clinical signs of dehydration, sepsis, and pneumonia at tissue collection. Oral mucositis...

  14. Chromonychia Secondary to Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marien Lopes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy drugs can affect the skin and its appendages. Several clinical presentations can be observed, depending on the affected structure. The most common dermatological side effect is chromonychia. The main causative agents are: (1 cyclophosphamide, which can provoke a diffuse, black pigmentation, longitudinal striae and dark grey pigmentation located proximally on the nails; (2 doxorubicin, which promotes dark brown bands alternating with white striae and dark brown pigmentation in transverse bands, and (3 hydroxyurea, which produces a distal, diffuse, dark brown pigmentation. In the majority of cases, the effects are reversible after the suspension of the causative agent for a few months. We report a patient who developed chromonychia while undergoing treatment with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, dexamethasone, methotrexate and cytarabine for acute lymphocytic leukemia.

  15. Ocular Tuberculosis II: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumru Önal

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on the clinical importance of tuberculin skin tests (TST, interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs, chest computed tomography (CT and polymerase chain reaction have provided a new approach to diagnosing ocular tuberculosis (TBC. However, both TST and IGRAs cannot distinguish between latent TBC infection and active disease. Another corroborative test in the diagnosis of intraocular TBC is the evaluation of the lungs by either chest radiography or CT. Direct evidence for the diagnosis can be obtained by examination of smears and staining for acid-fast organisms, cultures of intraocular tissue/fluid for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and nucleic acid amplification analysis. In recent years, guidelines have been suggested for the diagnosis of intraocular TBC. The current treatment of intraocular TBC consists of use of four drugs (isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol and pyrazinamide taken for a long period of time (total 9-15 months. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2011; 41: 182-90

  16. Incidence of tuberculosis in and around Banglore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. L. Phaniraja

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Incidence of Tuberculosis is higher in developing countries due to absence of National control and Eradication programme. Incidence is higher due to close contact with infected animal or human being. In the present study, 2668 bovines were screened for tuberculosis by single intradermal test from 15 different organized government and private farm. Currently, the SID test is used worldwide to determine whether an animal is sensitized to Mycobacterial antigens or not and the test is approved by OIE. Out of which, incidence of 2.89% in HF cross breeds, 0.69% in Jersey cross bred animals and none were shown reactor to Single Intradermal test in Indigenous animals. The higher incidence of 3.26% was found in female and 0.48% found in male. The calves which were below two year of age were found 1.56% reactor. [Vet World 2010; 3(4.000: 161-164

  17. Web tools for molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabbeer, Amina; Ozcaglar, Cagri; Yener, Bülent; Bennett, Kristin P

    2012-06-01

    In this study we explore publicly available web tools designed to use molecular epidemiological data to extract information that can be employed for the effective tracking and control of tuberculosis (TB). The application of molecular methods for the epidemiology of TB complement traditional approaches used in public health. DNA fingerprinting methods are now routinely employed in TB surveillance programs and are primarily used to detect recent transmissions and in outbreak investigations. Here we present web tools that facilitate systematic analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) genotype information and provide a view of the genetic diversity in the MTBC population. These tools help answer questions about the characteristics of MTBC strains, such as their pathogenicity, virulence, immunogenicity, transmissibility, drug-resistance profiles and host-pathogen associativity. They provide an integrated platform for researchers to use molecular epidemiological data to address current challenges in the understanding of TB dynamics and the characteristics of MTBC. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Reevaluation on pathogenesis of epituberculosis in infants and children with tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Shinya; Miyagawa, Tomoo; Ito, Masaki

    2007-01-01

    We try to reevaluate the pathogenesis of epituberculosis in infants and children with tuberculosis, because most studies on epituberculosis were done more than 50 years ago. Nineteen children (less than 1 y/o: 12, 1 y/o: 2, 2 y/o: 3, and 4 y/o: 2) were studied by CT imaging and bronchofiberscopy in addition to gastric Mycobacterium tuberculosis examination and regular chest XP. In 13 of total 19 patients (68%), lobar or segmental epituberculosis occured after starting antituberculous chemotherapy, including a case in which epituberculosis of right upper lobe was recognized at the time of diagnosis of tuberculosis and after starting chemotherapy, epituberculosis of right middle lobe was observed. CT imaging revealed that all 19 patients had enlargement of mediastinal and/or hilar lymphonodes compressing neighboring bronchi, and 16 of total 19 patients (84%) demonstrated relevant parenchymal infiltration. Gastric Mycobacterium tuberculosis was positive in 15 out of 19 patients (79%). Bronchofiberscopy was done in 16 patients, and it demonstrated mass lesion of various size on the bronchial wall in 13 patients (81%). The present study demonstrated that epituberculosis predominantly occured in tuberculosis infants less than one year old, which was different from the previous reports. The CT imaging also makes clear that epituberculosis may be the atelectasis of lobe or segment which occurs mostly due to compression of bronchi by the enlargement of mediastinal and/or hilar lymphonodes and their early exacerbation after starting chemotherapy. Bronchofiberscopy also elucidated that bronchial wall mass lesion resulted from perforation of lynphonodes may partially contribute to the formation of epituberculosis. (author)

  19. Use of maintenance endocrine therapy after chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, S; Miles, D; Makris, A

    2016-12-01

    For women with oestrogen receptor+ metastatic breast cancer (MBC), the options for systemic treatment include endocrine therapy (ET) and chemotherapy. For women whose disease is also HER2+, anti-HER2 therapies are also routinely used either with chemotherapy or less commonly with ET. Where chemotherapy is used as initial therapy, treatment is often discontinued due to cumulative toxicity in the absence of disease progression. In this setting, there is the option of introducing ET with the aim of prolonging response and delaying relapse. Literature review revealed four trials addressing the question of whether there is a benefit from introducing ET following chemotherapy for MBC. We also sought evidence for alternative approaches, including concurrent chemotherapy and ET and continuing chemotherapy until disease progression. The evidence for the use of ET after chemotherapy in MBC is limited, and the trials done were small. Furthermore, they were performed at a time when both the chemotherapy regimens and ET were different from those used currently. Despite these limitations, there is probably a modest improvement in time to progression for the sequential use of ET after chemotherapy but with no overall survival benefit. An alternative approach, particularly considering agents with relatively low toxicity, such as orally bioavailable fluoropyrimidines, is to continue chemotherapy until disease progression. Where chemotherapy for MBC is discontinued due to toxicity, in the absence of progression, the use of ET, with its relatively low toxicity, is a reasonable approach with the aim of delaying relapse. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Complement, circulating immine complexes and cenral hemodynamics in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ershov, A.I.; Fedoseeva, V.N.; Mol'kov, Yu.N.; Evstaf'ev, Yu.A.; Bochkarev, E.G.; Shcheglova, V.T.

    1987-01-01

    By means of radiocardiography and radiometry central hemodynamic parameters were measured, using 131 I-labelled human serum albumin, pulmonary-artery systolic pressure (PASP) was assessed indirectly, and serum complement and circulating immune complexes (CIC) were measured before 48 hours after subcutaneous administration of 20 TU tuberculin in 65 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis, 25 clinically-cured tuberculosis patients and 16 patients with chronic nonspecific pulmonary diseases (CNPD). A potent direct correlation was demonstrated between the CIC level and PASP elevation. It is suggested that close correlation between CIC and PASP elevation may be evidence of their pathogenetic involvement in chronic pulmonary heart, as well as the fact that prolonged and effective chemotherapy weakens adverse cardiovascular effects of immunologic factors, which can however persist in some individuals even after they are apparently cured from tuberculosis

  1. The risk of tuberculosis related to tumour necrosis factor antagonist therapies: a TBNET consensus statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solovic, I.; Sester, M.; Gomez-Reino, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    risk of reactivating latent infections, especially tuberculosis (TB). Following TNF antagonist therapy, the relative risk for TB is increased up to 25 times, depending on the clinical setting and the TNF antagonist used. Interferon-gamma release assays or, as an alternative in individuals without...... a history of bacille Calmette-Guerin vaccination, tuberculin skin testing is recommended to screen all adult candidates for TNF antagonist treatment for the presence of latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Moreover, paediatric practice suggests concomitant use of both the tuberculin skin test...... and an interferon-gamma release assay, as there are insufficient data in children to recommend one test over the other. Consequently, targeted preventive chemotherapy is highly recommended for all individuals with persistent M. tuberculosis-specific immune responses undergoing TNF antagonist therapy...

  2. Delayed bactericidal response of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to bedaquiline involves remodelling of bacterial metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koul, A.; Vranckx, L.; Dhar, N.

    2014-01-01

    Bedaquiline (BDQ), an ATP synthase inhibitor, is the first drug to be approved for treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in decades. Though BDQ has shown excellent efficacy in clinical trials, its early bactericidal activity during the first week of chemotherapy is minimal. Here, using...... microfluidic devices and time-lapse microscopy of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we confirm the absence of significant bacteriolytic activity during the first 3-4 days of exposure to BDQ. BDQ-induced inhibition of ATP synthesis leads to bacteriostasis within hours after drug addition. Transcriptional...... and proteomic analyses reveal that M. tuberculosis responds to BDQ by induction of the dormancy regulon and activation of ATP-generating pathways, thereby maintaining bacterial viability during initial drug exposure. BDQ-induced bacterial killing is significantly enhanced when the mycobacteria are grown on non...

  3. Tuberculosis-HIV co-infection: policy and epidemiology in 25 countries in the WHO European region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeff; Olsen, M; Ditiu, L

    2008-01-01

    The aims of this study were to collect and review tuberculosis (TB)-HIV data for Europe and to provide an overview of current health policies addressing co-infection.......The aims of this study were to collect and review tuberculosis (TB)-HIV data for Europe and to provide an overview of current health policies addressing co-infection....

  4. Tuberculosis ganglionar cervical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmany Leonel Mendoza Cruz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available La tuberculosis es una enfermedad reemergente en la actual sociedad globalizada y puede presentarse prácticamente ante cualquier especialista. Las formas extrapulmonares pueden representar hasta la cuarta parte de los casos, y entre ellos la afectación ganglionar se ubica entre las más frecuentes. Se reportan dos pacientes estudiados y tratados en el Servicio de Otorrinolaringología del Hospital General de Bata, Litoral de Guinea Ecuatorial, África Central, afectados por tumoraciones laterocervicales subagudas, con escasos síntomas y excelente evolución, tras su diagnóstico de tuberculosis ganglionar cervical y terapéutica antibiótica. Aunque la punción y aspiración con aguja fina no fue concluyente, ambos casos resultaron positivos por medio de la tinción de Ziehl-Neelsen

  5. [History of gold--with danish contribution to tuberculosis and rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norn, Svend; Permin, Henrik; Kruse, Poul R; Kruse, Edith

    2011-01-01

    Gold has a long history as a therapeutic agent, first as gold particles and colloidal gold, then as a soluble salt made by the alchemists, and potable gold was recommended almost as a panacea against different diseases. Gold compounds were introduced in the treatment of tuberculosis, based initially on the reputation of Robert Koch, who found gold cyanide effective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in cultures. Although several investigations of gold salts showed no convincing effect in experimental tuberculosis in guinea pigs, the idea of using gold compounds as chemotherapy was furthermore encouraged from the work of Paul Ehrlich with arsenicals. The enthusiasm and the craving desperately for a remedy for tuberculosis forced Danish physicians, in the mid-1920s to treat tuberculosis with Sanocrysin (gold sodium thiosulfate). Professor Holger Møllgaard, in collaboration with the clinicians the professors Knud Secher and Knud Faber, was the theoretical promoter of the project. He recommended sanocrysin-antiserum therapy, since sanocrysin caused serious reactions in tuberculosis animals, possible by releasing toxins from tubercle bacilli "killed" by sanocrysin. However the enthusiastic response to sanocrysin in Europe declined along by controlled trials and reports on toxicity in the 1930s. The belief that rheumatoid arthritis was a form of tuberculosis caused a renaissance in chrysotherapy. In France Jacques Forestier obtained encouraging results in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with myochrysine and other gold salts, and he pointed out the disease modifying effect of chrysotherapy. In Denmark Knud Secher, who was the clinical initiator of Sanocrysin therapy in tuberculosis, now became the founder of chrysotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis. Although new potential agents are now taking over in the treatment of arthritis, it is still believed, that there is a place for the chrysotherapy. However a new future for gold, in the form of nanoparticles, appears on

  6. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-10-28

    In this podcast, Dr. Oeltmann discusses multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. An outbreak occurred in Thailand, which led to 45 cases in the U.S. This serious illness can take up to 2 years to treat. MDR TB is a real threat and a serious condition.  Created: 10/28/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 10/28/2008.

  7. Immunology of Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Bozzano, Federica; Marras, Francesco; De Maria, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    MTB ranks as the first worldwide pathogen latently infecting one third of the population and the second leading cause of death from a single infectious agent, after the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The development of vigorous and apparently appropriate immune response upon infection with M.tuberculosis in humans and experimental animals conflict with failure to eradicate the pathogen itself and with its ability to undergo clinical latency from which it may exit. From a clinical standpo...

  8. Tuberculosis in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Kecia Gaither; Joseph J. Apuzzio

    1996-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) during pregnancy and in the perinatal period was once considered to be an infrequent event in the United States. After a decade of steady decline, however, the disease has begun a resurgence. According to the CDC, a 20% increase in the number of reported cases occurred between 1985 and 1992. The factors associated with this increase are the emergence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the development of drug-resistant organisms, substance abuse, homelessness, a...

  9. Primary prostatic tuberculosis: A rare form of genitourinary tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J.M. Ratkal

    HOSTED BY. Pan African Urological Surgeons' Association. African Journal of Urology www.ees.elsevier.com/afju · www.sciencedirect.com. Case report. Primary prostatic tuberculosis: A rare form of genitourinary tuberculosis. J.M. Ratkal. KIMS, Hubli, India. Received 6 August 2014; received in revised form 28 August 2014 ...

  10. Host immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and risk of tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Sascha Wilk; Soborg, Bolette; Agger, Else-Marie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human immune responses to latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection (LTBI) may enable individuals to control Mtb infection and halt progression to tuberculosis (TB), a hypothesis applied in several novel TB vaccines. We aimed to evaluate whether immune responses to selected LTBI...

  11. [Tuberculosis and immigration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Coronas, Joaquín; Rogado-González, M Cruz; Lozano-Serrano, Ana Belén; Cabezas-Fernández, M Teresa

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis worldwide is declining. However, in Western countries this decline is slower due to the impact of immigration. Tuberculosis in the immigrant population is related to health status in the country of origin and with overcrowding and poverty conditions in the host country. Immigrants with tuberculosis are younger, have a higher prevalence of extrapulmonary forms, greater proportion of drug resistance and higher treatment default rates than those of natives. New molecular techniques not only reduce diagnostic delay time but also allow the rapid identification of resistances and improve knowledge of transmission patterns. It is necessary to implement measures to improve treatment compliance in this population group like facilitating access to health card, the use of fixed-dose combination drugs, the participation of cultural mediators and community health workers and gratuity of drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  12. Tuberculosis in Tanzanian wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleaveland, S; Mlengeya, T; Kazwala, R R; Michel, A; Kaare, M T; Jones, S L; Eblate, E; Shirima, G M; Packer, C

    2005-04-01

    Bovine tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium bovis, is a pathogen of growing concern in free-ranging wildlife in Africa, but little is known about the disease in Tanzanian wildlife. Here, we report the infection status of Mycobacterium bovis in a range of wildlife species sampled from protected areas in northern Tanzania. M. bovis was isolated from 11.1% (2/18) migratory wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) and 11.1% (1/9) topi (Damaliscus lunatus) sampled systematically in 2000 during a meat cropping program in the Serengeti ecosystem, and from one wildebeest and one lesser kudu (Tragelaphus imberbis) killed by sport hunters adjacent to Tarangire National Park. A tuberculosis antibody enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was used to screen serum samples collected from 184 Serengeti lions (Panthera leo) and 19 lions from Ngorongoro Crater sampled between 1985 and 2000. Samples from 212 ungulates collected throughout the protected area network between 1998 and 2001 also were tested by EIA. Serological assays detected antibodies to M. bovis in 4% of Serengeti lions; one positive lion was sampled in 1984. Antibodies were detected in one of 17 (6%) buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in Tarangire and one of 41 (2%) wildebeest in the Serengeti. This study confirms for the first time the presence of bovine tuberculosis in wildlife of northern Tanzania, but further investigation is required to assess the impact on wildlife populations and the role of different wildlife species in maintenance and transmission.

  13. Current data on radio chemotherapy and potential of targeted therapies for cervical cancers; Donnees actuelles des associations chimioradiotherapeutiques et place potentielle des therapies ciblees dans les cancers du col uterin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magne, N.; Deutsch, E.; Haie-Meder, C. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Unite de Curietherapie, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    2008-01-15

    The present review represents an up-to-date focus on the particular topic of cervix carcinoma. An exhaustive description of the actual data and the near-future combination of radiotherapy and drugs with the specific potential of targeted therapies are presented. This approach represents one of the next challenges to improve results. Studies conducted in 1999, 2000, and 2002 reported the results of six large-scale prospective randomized trials using concomitant chemo radiation with a significant progression-free and overall survival rate improvement compared to radiotherapy only. These results were confirmed by the two last meta-analyses. Nowadays, the concurrent radio chemotherapy schedule used in the treatment of high risk cervical cancer is a standard practice. More growing evidences suggest that intracellular signal pathways play a significant role in radiation response. Several prognostic factors on tumoral radiosensitivity have been identified, including intracellular signal pathways, in the particular case of cervix carcinoma. Promising results have been obtained in experimental studies assessing the combined use of specific inhibitors and radiotherapy. Based on these data, a number of clinical trials have been started to enhance tumor responses and thus, to decrease the rate of recurrences. (authors)

  14. Tuberculosis, Fiji, 2002-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzoli, Lorenzo; Gounder, Shakti; Tamani, Talatoka; Daulako, Mary Raori; Underwood, Frank; Mainawalala, Sakiusa; Nawadra-Taylor, Vasiti; Rafai, Eric; Gillini, Laura

    2016-03-01

    During 2002-2013, a total of 1,890 tuberculosis cases were recorded in Fiji. Notification rates per 100,000 population increased from 17.4 cases in 2002 to 28.4 in 2013. Older persons were most affected, but tuberculosis also increased sharply in persons 25-44 years of age.

  15. Tuberculosis, Fiji, 2002–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gounder, Shakti; Tamani, Talatoka; Daulako, Mary Raori; Underwood, Frank; Mainawalala, Sakiusa; Nawadra-Taylor, Vasiti; Rafai, Eric; Gillini, Laura

    2016-01-01

    During 2002–2013, a total of 1,890 tuberculosis cases were recorded in Fiji. Notification rates per 100,000 population increased from 17.4 cases in 2002 to 28.4 in 2013. Older persons were most affected, but tuberculosis also increased sharply in persons 25–44 years of age. PMID:26890215

  16. TUBERCULOSIS IN AFRICA - ANY NEWS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERWERF, TS

    1994-01-01

    The tuberculosis situation in Africa in the AIDS era has become bleak. The tuberculosis incidence has increased in most sub-Saharan African countries, diagnosis has become more difficult, response to treatment, though initially good, is eventually less effective, and patient compliance, which has

  17. Risk for tuberculosis among children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakaoka, Hiroshi; Lawson, Lovett; Squire, S Bertel

    2006-01-01

    Contacts of adults with tuberculosis (TB) are at risk for infection. Tests based on interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) expression in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens may be more sensitive than the tuberculin skin test (TST). Risk for infection was assessed by using TST and an IFN...

  18. Survival predictors for second-line chemotherapy in Caucasian patients with metastatic gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bohanes, Pierre; Courvoisier, Delphine; Perneger, Thomas; Morel, Philippe; Huber, Olivier; Roth, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    There are very limited data suggesting a benefit for second-line chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer. Therefore, the number of patients who receive further treatment after failure of first-line chemotherapy varies considerably, ranging from 14% to 75%. In the absence of a demonstrated survival benefit of second-line chemotherapy, appropriate selection of patients based on survival predictors is essential. However, no clinico-pathologic parameters are currently widely adopted in clinical p...

  19. Chemotherapy resistance mechanisms in advanced skin cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhuvanesh Sukhlal Kalal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma is a most dangerous and deadly type of skin cancer, and considered intrinsically resistant to both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. It has become a major public health concern as the incidence of melanoma has been rising steadily over recent decades with a 5-year survival remaining less than 5%. Detection of the disease in early stage may be curable, but late stage metastatic disease that has spread to other organs has an extremely poor prognosis with a median survival of less than 10 months. Since metastatic melanoma is unresponsive to therapy that is currently available, research is now focused on different treatment strategies such as combinations of surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The molecular basis of resistance to chemotherapy seen in melanoma is multifactorial; defective drug transport system, altered apoptotic pathway, deregulation of apoptosis and/or changes in enzymatic systems that mediate cellular metabolic machinery. Understanding of alterations in molecular processes involved in drug resistance may help in developing new therapeutic approaches to treatment of malignant melanoma.

  20. Pathophysiology of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Starobova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-induced neuropathy is a common, dose-dependent adverse effect of several antineoplastics. It can lead to detrimental dose reductions and discontinuation of treatment, and severely affects the quality of life of cancer survivors. Clinically, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy presents as deficits in sensory, motor, and autonomic function which develop in a glove and stocking distribution due to preferential effects on longer axons. The pathophysiological processes are multi-factorial and involve oxidative stress, apoptotic mechanisms, altered calcium homeostasis, axon degeneration and membrane remodeling as well as immune processes and neuroinflammation. This review focusses on the commonly used antineoplastic substances oxaliplatin, cisplatin, vincristine, docetaxel, and paclitaxel which interfere with the cancer cell cycle—leading to cell death and tumor degradation—and cause severe acute and chronic peripheral neuropathies. We discuss drug mechanism of action and pharmacokinetic disposition relevant to the development of peripheral neuropathy, the epidemiology and clinical presentation of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy, emerging insight into genetic susceptibilities as well as current understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment approaches.

  1. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSTICS OF PROSTATE TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Brizhatyuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate tuberculosis is difficult to be diagnosed, especially if lesions are limited only by this organ. The article analyses the experience of differential diagnostics of prostate tuberculosis based on the data of examination of 84 patients. 45 of them were diagnosed with prostate tuberculosis, and 39 patients were diagnosed with chronic bacterial prostatitis. Pathognomonic diagnostics criteria of prostate tuberculosis were the following: detection of tuberculous mycobacteria in the prostatic fluid or ejaculate, signs of granulomatous prostatitis with areas of cavernous necrosis in prostate biopsy samples, and prostate cavities visualized by X-ray or ultrasound examinations. Should the above criteria be absent, the disease can be diagnosed based on the combination of indirect signs: symptoms of prostate inflammation with active tuberculosis of the other localization; large prostate calcification, extensive hyperechoic area of the prostate, spermatocystic lesions, leucospermia and hemospermia, failure of the adequate non-specific anti-bacterial therapy.

  2. Radiology in silico-tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, H.

    1981-01-01

    In spite of a decreasing number of new cases of silico-tuberculosis even today there still remains a serious complication of silicosis. The job of radiology is to recognise the disease, evaluate the course of the disease during therapy and classify the disease for compensation purposes. Due to the pathogenetic and pathomorphologic similarities of silicosis and tuberculosis, it is often difficult and sometimes even impossible to recognise the presence of tuberculosis in cases of silicoses or to identify and isolate the TB component in silico-tuberculosis. Careful consideration of all radiological and clinical parameters improves the accuracy of diagnosis. Since the radiographic examination provides the only method of evaluating the morphologic state of the disease, radiology will keep its central position in the diagnosis of silico-tuberculosis. (orig.) [de

  3. Health-systems efficiency in the Russian Federation: tuberculosis control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Katherine; Hutubessy, Raymond; Samyshkin, Yevgeniy; Korobitsyn, Alexei; Fedorin, Ivan; Volchenkov, Gregory; Kazeonny, Boris; Coker, Richard; Drobniewski, Francis; Jakubowiak, Wieslaw; Shilova, Margarita; Atun, Rifat A.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a comprehensive assessment of the case-mix of patients admitted to tuberculosis hospitals and the reasons for their admission in four Russian regions: Ivanovo, Orel, Samara and Vladimir. We also sought to quantify the extent to which efficiency could be improved by reducing hospitalization rates and re-profiling hospital beds available in the tuberculosis-control system. METHODS: We used a standard questionnaire to determine how beds were being used and who was using the beds in tuberculosis facilities in four Russian regions. Data were collected to determine how 4306 tuberculosis beds were utilized as well as on the socioeconomic and demographic indicators, clinical parameters and reasons for hospitalization for 3352 patients. FINDINGS: Of the 3352 patients surveyed about 70% were male; the average age was 40; and rates of unemployment, disability and alcohol misuse were high. About one-third of beds were occupied by smear-positive or culture-positive tuberculosis patients; 20% were occupied by tuberculosis patients who were smear-negative and/or culture-negative; 20% were occupied by patients who no longer had tuberculosis; and 20% were unoccupied. If clinical and public health admission criteria were applied then < 50% of admissions would be justified and < 50% of the current number of beds would be required. Up to 85% of admissions and beds were deemed to be necessary when social problems and poor access to outpatient care were considered along with clinical and public health admission criteria. CONCLUSION: Much of the Russian Federation's large tuberculosis hospital infrastructure is unnecessary when clinical and public health criteria are used, but the large hospital infrastructure within the tuberculosis-control system has an important social support function. Improving the efficiency of the system will require the reform of health-system norms and regulations as they relate to resource allocation and clinical care and implementation of

  4. Tuberculosis Relief Belt Supporting Project (Tuberculosis Patient Management Project for Poverty Group).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Kyoung; Jeong, Ina; Lee, Ji Yeon; Kim, Jung Hyun; Han, Ah Yeon; Kim, So Yeon; Joh, Joon Sung

    2018-03-07

    The "Tuberculosis Relief Belt Supporting Project (Tuberculosis Patient Management Project for Poverty Groups)" is a national program for socioeconomically vulnerable tuberculosis (TB) patients. We sought to evaluate the clinical and socioeconomic characteristics of poverty-stricken TB patients, and determined the need for relief. We examined in-patients with TB, who were supported by this project at the National Medical Center from 2014 to 2015. We retrospectively investigated the patients' socioeconomic status, clinical characteristics, and project expenditures. Fifty-eight patients were enrolled. Among 55 patients with known income status, 24 (43.6%) had no income. Most patients (80%) lived alone. A total of 48 patients (82.8%) had more than one underlying disease. More than half of the enrolled patients (30 patients, 51.7%) had smear-positive TB. Cavitary disease was found in 38 patients (65.5%). Among the 38 patients with known resistance status, 19 (50%) had drug-resistant TB. In terms of disease severity, 96.6% of the cases had moderate-to-severe disease. A total of 14 patients (26.4%) died during treatment. Nursing expenses were supported for 12 patients (20.7%), with patient transportation costs reimbursed for 35 patients (60%). In terms of treatment expenses for 31 people (53.4%), 93.5% of them were supported by uninsured benefits. Underlying disease, infectivity, drug resistance, severity, and death occurred frequently in socioeconomically vulnerable patients with TB. Many uninsured treatment costs were not supported by the current government TB programs, and the "Tuberculosis Relief Belt Supporting Project" compensated for these limitations. Copyright©2018. The Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases.

  5. Bovine Tuberculosis, A Zoonotic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarmudji

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Bovine tuberculosis is caused by the infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis var. bovis (M. bovis. This species is one of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, can infect wide range of hosts: cattle and other domesticated animals, wild mammals and humans (zoonotic. M. bovis bacterium from infected hosts can be transmitted to other susceptible animals and humans through respiratory excretes and secretion materials. Humans can be infected with M. bovis by ingested M. bovis contaminated animal products, unpasteurised milk from tuberculosis cows or through respiratory route of contaminated aerosol. Bovine tuberculosis at the first stage does not show any clinical sign but as the disease progress in the next stage which may take several months or years, clinical signs may arise, suh as: fluctuative body temperature, anorexia, lost body weight, coughing, oedema of lymph nodes, increased respiratory frequencies. Pathological lesion of bovine tuberculosis is characterised by the formation of granulomas (tubercles, in which bacterial cells have been localised, most in lymph nodes and pulmonum, but can occur in other organs. The granulomas usually arise in small nodules or tubercles appear yellowish either caseus, caseo-calcareus or calcified. In Indonesia, bovine tuberculosis occurred in dairy cattle since 1905 through the imported dairy cows from Holland and Australian. It was unfortunate that until recently, there were not many research and surveilances of bovine tuberculosis conducted in this country, so the distribution of bovine tuberculosis is unknown. Early serological diagnosis can be done on live cattle by means of tuberculin tests under field conditions. Confirmation can be done by isolation and identification of excreted and secreted samples from the slaughter house. Antibiotic treatment and vaccination were uneffective, therefore the effective control of bovine tuberculosis is suggested by tuberculin tests and by slaughtering the selected

  6. Acute emesis: moderately emetogenic chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrstedt, Jørn; Rapoport, Bernardo; Warr, David

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a review of the recommendations for the prophylaxis of acute emesis induced by moderately emetogenic chemotherapy as concluded at the third Perugia Consensus Conference, which took place in June 2009. The review will focus on new studies appearing since the Second consensus conference...... receiving multiple cycles of moderately emetogenic chemotherapy will be reviewed. Consensus statements are given, including optimal dose and schedule of serotonin(3) receptor antagonists, dexamethasone, and neurokinin(1) receptor antagonists. The most significant recommendations (and changes since the 2004...... version of the guidelines) are as follows: the best prophylaxis in patients receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (not including a combination of an anthracycline plus cyclophosphamide) is the combination of palonosetron and dexamethasone on the day of chemotherapy, followed by dexamethasone...

  7. Uterine/Endometrial Cancer: Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with Your Treatment Team Treatment Surgery Surgical Staging Pathology of Ovarian Cancer Chemotherapy Radiation Therapy Hormone Therapy ... 20, 2016 January 17, 2017 February 21, 2017 March 22, 2017 April 18, 2017 May 16, 2017 ...

  8. Tuberculosis screening in patients with HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Stephanie Mia Katrine; Bonsu, Frank; Hanson-Nortey, Nii Nortey

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis screening of people living with HIV (PLHIV) can contribute to early tuberculosis diagnosis and improved patient outcomes. Evidence-based guidelines for tuberculosis screening are available, but literature assessing their implementation and the quality of clinical practice...... is scarce. OBJECTIVES: To assess tuberculosis screening practices and the effectiveness of audit and performance feedback to improve quality of tuberculosis screening at HIV care clinics in Ghana. DESIGN: Healthcare providers at 10 large HIV care clinics prospectively registered patient consultations during...

  9. Benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy in high-grade gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, Lisa M

    2003-12-01

    The current standard of care for patients with high-grade glioma is resection followed by radiotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy is not widely accepted because of the low sensitivity of gliomas to traditional antineoplastic agents, the poor penetration of most drugs across the blood-brain barrier, and the significant systemic toxicity associated with current agents. However, nitrosoureas and, subsequently, temozolomide (Temodar [US], Temodal [international]; Schering-Plough Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ), a novel alkylating agent, cross the blood-brain barrier and have activity against gliomas. Nitrosoureas have been studied in phase III trials in the adjuvant setting. In individual trials, chemotherapy did not increase median survival but did increase the proportion of patients surviving >/=18 months by 15%. Only with large meta-analyses did the addition of chemotherapy achieve a statistically significant improvement in median survival. Currently there is no means of identifying which patients will benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy, but nitrosoureas and temozolomide are well tolerated in most patients, justifying the administration of adjuvant chemotherapy to all newly diagnosed patients with malignant glioma.

  10. Novel formulations and new mechanisms of delivering chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    The identification of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangements and the development of targeted therapy for patients with these molecular alterations has been a tremendous advance in the treatment of advanced stage or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the majority of patients with advanced stage NSCLC will not have one of these molecular alterations and will receive chemotherapy as their primary therapy. Chemotherapy remains a critical component of therapy for resected and locally advanced NSCLC, as well as for patients with limited-stage and extensive stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC). A significant unmet need exists to develop novel chemotherapy agents and to improve the efficacy and toxicity of currently available agents. Several novel formulations of currently available chemotherapy agents are in development for NSCLC and SCLC. Antibody conjugates are therapeutic agents that employ a tumor-specific monoclonal antibody conjugated to a cytotoxic or radionuclide agent. After the monoclonal antibody binds to the tumor antigen, these agents are internalized, and the link between the antibody and the therapeutic agent is dissolved and the cytotoxic agent is release intracellularly. This enhanced delivery of chemotherapy to malignant tissues has the potential to improve efficacy and reduce toxicity. Antibody conjugates to therapeutic agents are currently available for other malignancies and are in development for NSCLC and SCLC.

  11. Treatment of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and role of the pharmacist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrzyk, Beatriz Manzor

    2008-10-01

    Abstract Outbreaks of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) in developing countries and recent headlines of an American traveling with a resistant variant of tuberculosis have brought XDR-TB into the spotlight. The World Health Organization and the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have identified XDR-TB as a serious public health threat and are mandating increased efforts at control of tuberculosis. Although XDR-TB is believed to be no more infectious than other variants of tuberculosis, infection with and spread of XDR-TB are concerning because of the ineffectiveness, toxicity, and cost of the available tuberculosis treatment options. Pharmacists may not be aware of the recent trends in tuberculosis resistance or of the impact that they can have on educating the public about this disease. To gain a better understanding of this disease and the potential roles for pharmacists in public health awareness of tuberculosis and in the care of patients with and at risk for this disease, we undertook an extensive search of the Internet, including Web sites of tuberculosis advocacy groups, and of MEDLINE from January 1968-March 2008. Currently, XDR-TB infection is uncommon in the United States, but if history is any indication, there is a high potential for an outbreak or epidemic. The XDR-TB variant has emerged from mismanaging multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, treating tuberculosis with too few drugs, using less effective second-line drugs, and not educating patients about the dangers of nonadherence. With only limited hopes of a novel effective drug combination regimen, use of available antimycobacterial drugs needs to be optimized. Pharmacists can be key players in the prevention and treatment of tuberculosis by promoting adherence, assessing patients for risk factors for resistant disease, providing information about disease control and prevention, and monitoring for effectiveness, adverse effects, and drug interactions.

  12. Implementation of a national anti-tuberculosis drug resistance survey in Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chonde, Timothy M.; Doulla, Basra; van Leth, Frank; Mfinanga, Sayoki G. M.; Range, Nyagosya; Lwilla, Fred; Mfaume, Saidi M.; van Deun, Armand; Zignol, Matteo; Cobelens, Frank G.; Egwaga, Saidi M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A drug resistance survey is an essential public health management tool for evaluating and improving the performance of National Tuberculosis control programmes. The current manuscript describes the implementation of the first national drug resistance survey in Tanzania. METHODS:

  13. The function of the thyroid gland in patients with multi-drug resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Matveyeva

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB remains a health problem for many countries in the world. The share of MDRTB is 10–30% among newly diagnosed cases and 20–70% among relapses and treatment failure. The aim of the study is to define the side effects of second line drugs used in the treatment of MDRTB on thyroid function. Methods In 30 patients with multidrug resistant tuberculosis, echostructure of thyroid was studied by ultrasound imaging method. Indices of thyroid function: plasma levels of free thyroxin, thyroid stimulating hormone were studied before chemotherapy initiated, at the end of intensive phase and after the treatment finished. Results Decreasing of thyroid function under antituberculosis chemotherapy was approved. Monitoring and correction of thyroid function during antituberculosis chemotherapy was suggested. Conclusion Patients with MDRTB taking ethionamide and PAS are at increased risk for hypothyroidism and goiter, and therefore require monitoring of thyroid function at all stages of antituberculosis chemotherapy for its timely correction.

  14. Investments in tuberculosis research - what are the gaps?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mishal S; Fletcher, Helen; Coker, Richard

    2016-08-25

    Through decades of research, numerous studies have generated robust evidence about effective interventions for tuberculosis control. Yet, the global annual decline in incidence of approximately 1 % is evidence that current approaches and investment strategies are not sufficient. In this article, we assess recent tuberculosis research funding and discuss two critical gaps in funding and in scientific evidence from topics that have been left off the research priority agenda.We first examine research and development funding goals in the 2011-2015 Global Plan to Stop Tuberculosis and analyze disbursements to different research areas by funders worldwide in 2014. We then summarize, through a compilation of published literature and consultation with 35 researchers across multiple disciplines in the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine TB Centre, priorities identified by the tuberculosis research community. Finally, we compare researchers' priority areas to the global funding agendas and activities.Our analysis shows that, among the five key research areas defined in the 2011-2015 Global Plan - namely drugs, basic science, vaccines, diagnostics and operational research - drug discovery and basic science on Mycobacterium tuberculosis accounted for 60 % of the $2 billion annual funding target. None of the research areas received the recommended level of funding. Operational research, which had the lowest target, received 66 % of its target funding, whereas new diagnostics received only 19 %. Although many of the priority research questions identified by researchers fell within the Global Plan categories, our analysis highlights important areas that are not explicitly mentioned in the current plan. These priority research areas included improved understanding of tuberculosis transmission dynamics, the role of social protection and social determinants, and health systems and policy research.While research priorities are increasingly important in light of the

  15. Radiological manifestations of intestinal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Jae Hoon

    1974-01-01

    Radiological findings of 87 cases of intestinal tuberculosis are analyzed and presented. The diagnosis was based on histopathology in 29 cases, and on clinical ground and radiological findings in 58 cases. The radio of male and female patients was 4:6, and peak incidence is between 10 and 30. Abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, fever and general weakness are frequent symptoms, and tenderness of abdomen, ascites with abdominal distension, malnutrition and emaciation are frequent signs of the patients. Laboratory investigation reveal anemia, raised ESR, hypoalbuminaemia and positive occult blood reaction in the stool in most of the patients. Chest film show activity pulmonary tuberculosis in only 1/3 patients. There is no pathognomonic radiological findings in intestinal tuberculosis and their manifestations are protean, and differentiation from other inflammatory diseases and malignant tumors in gastrointestinal tract is very difficult on radiological ground alone. However, in patients with complaining vague abdominal symptoms and signs, the radiological diagnosis is most certain means in the decision of existence of organic lesion and suggestion of tuberculosis in the gastrointestinal tract and its extent as yet. Multiplicity of the lesion, involvement of adjacent organ such as peritoneum or mesenteric lymph nodes, typical nodularity or irregularity of mesenteric border and existence of active pulmonary tuberculosis are the suggestive findings of intestinal tuberculosis. In the diagnosis of inflammatory disease or malignant tumor of gastrointestinal tract, the possibility of tuberculosis should be borne in mind, and vice versa

  16. Radiological manifestations of intestinal tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Jae Hoon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1974-10-15

    Radiological findings of 87 cases of intestinal tuberculosis are analyzed and presented. The diagnosis was based on histopathology in 29 cases, and on clinical ground and radiological findings in 58 cases. The radio of male and female patients was 4:6, and peak incidence is between 10 and 30. Abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, fever and general weakness are frequent symptoms, and tenderness of abdomen, ascites with abdominal distension, malnutrition and emaciation are frequent signs of the patients. Laboratory investigation reveal anemia, raised ESR, hypoalbuminaemia and positive occult blood reaction in the stool in most of the patients. Chest film show activity pulmonary tuberculosis in only 1/3 patients. There is no pathognomonic radiological findings in intestinal tuberculosis and their manifestations are protean, and differentiation from other inflammatory diseases and malignant tumors in gastrointestinal tract is very difficult on radiological ground alone. However, in patients with complaining vague abdominal symptoms and signs, the radiological diagnosis is most certain means in the decision of existence of organic lesion and suggestion of tuberculosis in the gastrointestinal tract and its extent as yet. Multiplicity of the lesion, involvement of adjacent organ such as peritoneum or mesenteric lymph nodes, typical nodularity or irregularity of mesenteric border and existence of active pulmonary tuberculosis are the suggestive findings of intestinal tuberculosis. In the diagnosis of inflammatory disease or malignant tumor of gastrointestinal tract, the possibility of tuberculosis should be borne in mind, and vice versa.

  17. Tuberculosis diagnostic methods in buffaloes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Capriogli Oliveira

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The low productivity of buffalo herds and condemnation of carcasses in slaughterhouses due to tuberculosis lesions have resulted in increasing economic losses because these animals cannot be treated and must be destroyed by sanitary slaughter. Tuberculosis is a widely distributed zoonosis that affects the beef supply chain of the Brazilian agribusiness economically and socially. Like cattle, buffaloes are sensitive to Mycobacterium bovis, which is the main causative agent of zoonotic tuberculosis. Tuberculosis in buffaloes has been reported in several countries, including Brazil. In order to control and eradicate this disease among cattle and buffaloes in Brazil, the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, and Supply created the National Program for the Control and Eradication of Brucellosis and Tuberculosis with the main objective of finding a significant number of disease-free herds throughout the national territory using reliable methods. This review summarizes the main data on the history of occurrence of M. bovis in Brazilian herds and the diagnostic methods for the disease in buffaloes. Little information is available on buffalo tuberculosis. Due to the increasing population of buffaloes and their economic importance, more studies investigating the occurrence and identification of tuberculosis in this species are clearly needed.

  18. Tuberculosis among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Tadao; Matsushita, Hiroshi.

    1980-01-01

    Effects of atomic bomb on tuberculosis among atomic bomb survivors necropsied after 1956 when Atomic Bomb Hospital was opened were observed statistically and the following results were obtained. The morbidity of tuberculosis in the group exposed within 2 km from the hypocenter was higher than that of the control group, but there was not a significant difference between the both groups. The morbidity of all types of tuberculosis was significantly higher in the group exposed within 2 km from the hypocenter than in the control group. The morbidity of tuberculosis tended to decrease in both exposed and non-exposed groups with time. However, the morbidity of miliary or active tuberculosis has tended to rise in the exposed since 1975. The morbidity in young a-bomb survivors exposed within 2 km was higher than that in those of other groups, but there was not a difference in the morbidity among the aged. The higher the rate of complication of active tuberculosis with stomach cancer or acute myelocytic leukemia or liver cirrhosis, the nearer the places of exposure were to the hypocenter. Out of 26 patients with miliary tuberculosis, 6 were suspected to have leukemia while they were alive and were suggested to have leukemoid reaction by autopsy. They all were a-bomb survivors, and 4 of them were exposed within 2 km from the hypocenter. (Tsunoda, M.)

  19. BCG: the only available vaccine against tuberculosis: review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roghayeh Teimourpour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite advances in the vaccinology and chemotherapy in the past century, tuberculosis is still responsible for two million deaths every year. Emergence of multi-drug resistant strain and coinfection of TB-HIV make it a serious concern. Treatment and control of tuberculosis is a great health burden in every community. Active tuberculosis in children has very severe consequences especially those who are under 5-years-old, therefore vaccine indication should be taken. Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG is a live attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis that has been used for providing immunity or protection against tuberculosis (TB. In addition, BCG provides relative protection against leprosy and Buruli ulcer, it also can be used for treatment of bladder cancer. BCG is the most widely administered vaccine around the world. It has been given to over three billion individuals over the past decades. At first it was developed in 1908 at the Pasteur Institute in Lille by Albert Calmette and Camille Guérin. In fact BCG is a strain of Mycobacterium bovis that bear deletion in its genome following too long subculture in special media. Deletion in region of deletion 1 (RD1, a specific region of Mycobacterium bovis genome, has decreased pathogenicity of BCG strain. Following culture of BCG on different media since 1921 make genetic variation in the BCG strains that have specific characteristics. BCG should begin given to only immune-competent individuals and should not be administered to immunocompromised people. This vaccine is not effective in people formerly infected or sensitized with environmental mycobacteria. Previous meta-analysis studies indicate that BCG has variable range of protection from 0 to 80 percent against pulmonary TB, but is very effective against severe disseminated forms such as meningitis and miliary form of TB. Despite many research and develop new generation vaccine against TB, BCG vaccine still remains as the only

  20. Mycobacterium bovis and Other Uncommon Members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Jaime; Muñoz-Egea, Maria-Carmen

    2016-12-01

    Since its discovery by Theobald Smith, Mycobacterium bovis has been a human pathogen closely related to animal disease. At present, M. bovis tuberculosis is still a problem of importance in many countries and is considered the main cause of zoonotic tuberculosis throughout the world. Recent development of molecular epidemiological tools has helped us to improve our knowledge about transmission patterns of this organism, which causes a disease indistinguishable from that caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Diagnosis and treatment of this mycobacterium are similar to those for conventional tuberculosis, with the important exceptions of constitutive resistance to pyrazinamide and the fact that multidrug-resistant and extremely drug-resistant M. bovis strains have been described. Among other members of this complex, Mycobacterium africanum is the cause of many cases of tuberculosis in West Africa and can be found in other areas mainly in association with immigration. M. bovis BCG is the currently available vaccine for tuberculosis, but it can cause disease in some patients. Other members of the M. tuberculosis complex are mainly animal pathogens with only exceptional cases of human disease, and there are even some strains, like "Mycobacterium canettii," which is a rare human pathogen that could have an important role in the knowledge of the evolution of tuberculosis in the history.

  1. Microscopy as a diagnostic tool in pulmonary tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Singhal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis continues to cast a huge impact on humanity with its high incidence and mortality, especially in developing countries. For tuberculosis case detection, microscopy continues to be indispensible, given its low cost, rapidity, simplicity of procedure and high specificity. Modifications have attempted to improve the sensitivity of microscopy which include: concentration methods such as centrifugation, N-acetyl cysteine–sodium hydroxide, bleach, ammonium sulfate or chitin. Furthermore, classical Ziehl–Neelsen (ZN staining has been subjected to varying carbol fuchsin concentrations or replaced by Kinyoun staining, fluorescent microscopy or immune-fluorescence. Currently, light emitting diode fluorescence is recognizably the most plausible method as an alternative to ZN staining.

  2. Case Study: Small bowel perforation secondary to ileal tuberculosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    intestinal tuberculosis, other common causes of ileal perforation include typhoid ... Barré syndrome are the same as those for any other critically ill patient. .... Grade II protein-energy malnutrition (PEM): An estimated body ... of > 2 litres/24 hours, current clinical practice guidelines on its ..... Recognizing malnutrition in adults:.

  3. The social determinants of tuberculosis and their association with TB ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Progress made in TB control through the implementation of the DOTS strategy, has been retarded by factors such as poverty, the HIV pandemic and the advent of multidrug resistant tuberculosis. There is currently an increasing shift in TB control ...

  4. Emerging drugs and alternative possibilities in the treatment of tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, S.; Segers, M.M.; Ghimire, S.; Bolhuis, M.S.; Sturkenboom, M.G.; Soolingen, D. van; Alffenaar, J.W.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health problem. Drug resistance, treatment duration, complexity, and adverse drug reactions associated with anti-TB regimens are associated with treatment failure, prolonged infectiousness and relapse. With the current set of anti-TB drugs the goal to

  5. Emerging drugs and alternative possibilities in the treatment of tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, S.; Segers, M. M.; Ghimire, S.; Bolhuis, M. S.; Sturkenboom, M. G. G.; Van Soolingen, D.; Alffenaar, J. W. C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health problem. Drug resistance, treatment duration, complexity, and adverse drug reactions associated with anti-TB regimens are associated with treatment failure, prolonged infectiousness and relapse. With the current set of anti-TB drugs the goal to

  6. The impact of knowledge and attitudes on adherence to tuberculosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The impact of knowledge and attitudes on adherence to tuberculosis treatment: a case-control study in a Moroccan region. ... on TB especially among non adherent patients. This finding justifies the need to incorporate patient?s education into current TB case management. Pan African Medical Journal 2012; 12:52 ...

  7. Cost of Care Among Patients With Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a global health challenge. Currently it is the 7th leading cause of death worldwide, and Nigeria ranks fourth amongst 22 high-burden countries for the disease. This study sought to appraise the direct and indirect costs borne by TB patients attending the Chest Clinics at the Lagos State University ...

  8. Anti-tuberculosis activities of the crude methanolic extract and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary: Tuberculosis (TB) is of great public health burden globally especially in developing countries of Africa and Asia . Current TB regimen involves multiple therapies and of long duration leading to poor patient adherence. There is also the challenge of multidrug resistant TB. Hence, there is a need for discovery of new ...

  9. IP-10 release assays in the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhwald, Morten; Aabye, Martine G; Ravn, Pernille

    2012-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art tests for infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis - the IFN-γ release assays - rely on accurate measurement of the cytokine IFN-γ. Many other potential biomarkers are expressed in concert with IFN-γ, and IP-10 in particular has shown promising results. IP-10...

  10. Quantiferon test for tuberculosis screening in sarcoidosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, Nils; Søborg, Bolette; Svendsen, Claus Bo

    2011-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors have been introduced in the treatment of refractory sarcoidosis. These biologics may reactivate latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). Despite its known limitations, the tuberculin skin test (TST) is currently used for the diagnosis of LTBI in Danish...

  11. Mammary tuberculosis mimicking breast cancer: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maroulis Ioannis

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The incidence of tuberculosis is rising worldwide and rare manifestations of the past are seen more often nowadays. Mammary tuberculosis is a rare clinical entity, often mimicking breast cancer or abscesses of benign or malignant origin. Clinical awareness is necessary during diagnostic work-up for establishing the correct diagnosis and treatment. Case presentation We present a case of breast tuberculosis diagnosed in a 73 year old woman at our institution. The patient presented with a palpable mass of the right breast with clinical, laboratory and mammographic findings indicative of breast carcinoma. The patient underwent lumpectomy and sentinel lymph node biopsy. Frozen section of the tumor and the sentinel node revealed "granulomatous inflammation", while gross examination confirmed the diagnosis of tuberculous mastitis. The patient received anti-tuberculosis therapy for six months with no side effects or any further complications. Conclusion Breast tuberculosis is an obscure disease often mistaken for carcinoma or pyogenic abscess of the breast, especially if well-defined clinical features are absent. A high index of suspicion is required because the disease can usually be treated conservatively with current antituberculous modalities while surgical intervention is reserved for rare cases only.

  12. The Great Mimic Again? A Case of Tuberculosis Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teo SH

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB, once a disease confined to undeveloped or developing nations is currently in resurgence due to pandemic human immunodeficiency virus infection and immigration from endemic areas. TB is also known as the ‘great mimicker’. Extra-pulmonary tuberculosis affecting the knee is rare in all forms of TB (0.1-0.3%. Here, we report a case of isolated highly erosive TB knee in a previously fit Burmese migrant worker. He presented with after a history of fall into a drain. The patient also reported pain and swelling over his left knee for the previous three years. He had been treated for a bacterial infection of the knee in another hospital but defaulted due to financial constraints. Arthrotomy of the knee was performed including washout. Diagnosis of TB of the knee was made based on the synovial fluid and tissue culture. Treatment with anti- tuberculosis drugs was then initiated.

  13. TUBERCULOSIS: EPIDEMIOLOGY AND CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia Sulis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is a major public health concern worldwide: despite a regular, although slow, decline in incidence over the last decade, as many as 8.6 million new cases and 1.3 million deaths were estimated to have occurred in 2012. TB is by all means a poverty-related disease, mainly affecting the most vulnerable populations in the poorest countries. The presence of multidrug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis in most countries, with some where prevalence is high, is among the major challenges for TB control, which may hinder recent achievements especially in some settings. Early TB case detection especially in resource-constrained settings and in marginalized groups remains a challenge, and about 3 million people are estimated to remain undiagnosed or not notified and untreated. The World Health Organization (WHO has recently launched the new global TB strategy for the “post-2015 era” aimed at “ending the global TB epidemic” by 2035, based on the three pillars that emphasize patient-centred TB care and prevention, bold policies and supportive systems, and intensified research and innovation. This paper aims to provide an overview of the global TB epidemiology as well as of the main challenges that must be faced to eliminate the disease as a public health problem everywhere.

  14. IMMUNOLOGY OF TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Bozzano

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available MTB ranks as the first worldwide pathogen latently infecting one third of the population and the second leading cause of death from a single infectious agent, after the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. The development of vigorous and apparently appropriate immune response upon infection with M.tuberculosis in humans and experimental animals conflict with failure to eradicate the pathogen itself and with its ability to undergo clinical latency from which it may exit. From a clinical standpoint, our views on MTB infection may take advantage from updating the overall perspective, that has quite changed over the last decade, following remarkable advances in our understanding of the manipulation of the immune system by M.tuberculosis and of the role of innate components of the immune response, including macrophages, neutrophils, dendritic cells and NK cells in the initial spread of MTB and in its exit from latency. Scope of this review is to highlight the the major mechanisms of MTB escape from immune control and to provide a supplementary translational perspective for the interpretation of innate immune mechanisms with particular impact on clinical aspects.

  15. Angiography in renal tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Doo Suk [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1974-10-15

    Angiographies on forty cases of renal tuberculosis performed at the National Medical Center during a period 1960 through 1970 were reviewed. Abdominal angiography was performed via the femoral route. Some were followed by selective nephroangiography. All patients were subjected to urographyior to angiography. The results of X-ray findings in the forty cases with renal tuberculosis were follows. 1. The age varied 18 to 57 years, average 30.5 years. Twenty one patients were male, and nineteen were female. 2. The right kidney was involved in 17 cases and the left in 15 cases. Both kidneys were involved in 8 cases. 3. Urographic examination revealed pathologic changes in all patients. 4. Focal destruction in the collecting system was the most common finding in the urography of 16 patients. 5. A varying degree of hydronephrosis was present in 15 patients, of whom nine had complained of palpable mass due to hydronephrosis. 6. In the 7 patients with extensive destruction there was no observable excretion contrast medium from the diseased kidney. 7. Angiographic examination was normal in 6 of the 40 patients. 8. Decreased vascularity in the subsegmental or smaller arteries of the affected kidney was the most frequent finding, being found in 34 patients. 9. Occlusion or abrupt termination of the subsegmental arteries was present in 4 patients. 10. Eighteen of the patients had signs of an expansive process within the cavity, the vessels being displaced and stretched around the lesions.

  16. Nutritional supplements for people being treated for active tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobler, Liesl; Nagpal, Sukrti; Sudarsanam, Thambu D; Sinclair, David

    2016-01-01

    first eight weeks (RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.63 to 1.35; two trials, 1020 participants, very low quality evidence). However, supplementation may have little or no effect on weight gain during treatment (data not pooled; five trials, 2940 participants, low quality evidence), and no studies have assessed the effect on quality of life. Plasma levels of vitamin A appear to increase following initiation of tuberculosis treatment regardless of supplementation. In contrast, supplementation probably does improve plasma levels of zinc, vitamin D, vitamin E, and selenium, but this has not been shown to have clinically important benefits. Of note, despite multiple studies of vitamin D supplementation in different doses, statistically significant benefits on sputum conversion have not been demonstrated. Authors' conclusions There is currently insufficient research to know whether routinely providing free food, or energy supplements improves tuberculosis treatment outcomes, but it probably improves weight gain in some settings. Although blood levels of some vitamins may be low in people starting treatment for active tuberculosis, there is currently no reliable evidence that routinely supplementing above recommended daily amounts has clinical benefits. PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY Nutritional supplements for people being treated for active tuberculosis Cochrane researchers conducted a review of the effects of nutritional supplements for people being treated for tuberculosis. After searching for relevant studies up to 4 February 2016, they included 35 relevant studies with 8283 participants. Their findings are summarized below. What is active tuberculosis and how might nutritional supplements work? Tuberculosis is a bacterial infection which most commonly affects the lungs. Most people who get infected never develop symptoms as their immune system manages to control the bacteria. Active tuberculosis occurs when the infection is no longer contained by the immune system, and typical symptoms are

  17. Synthesis of new radiotracers for tuberculosis diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keskes, Badis

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a worldwide health problem and its diagnosis presents a major challenge. The examinations currently employed are little appreciable and so far there is no reliable diagnosis test. These last years, the development of the new radiopharmaceuticals, referred to diagnosis, has revived interest in the search for new molecules with a tropism to a particular disease. Thanks to this field, which lies at the interface of organic and organometallic chemistry, nuclear medicine and biology, we have been led to synthesize a technetium radiotracer linked to isoniazid. For the identification of this radiotracer, we used its similar rhenium model. (Author)

  18. Lung cancer, brucellosis and tuberculosis: remarkable togetherness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Emin Akkoyunlu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A 68 years old male farmer referred with cough, expectorating sputum, intermittant fever, night sweats, fatigue and anorexia persisting for two weeks. There was a history of 80 packs each year of smoking and he was still an active smoker. Pneumonectomy was performed because of pulmonary epidermoid cancer and he received chemotherapy. He was diagnosed lung tuberculosis and using anti-tuberculous treatment for 4 months. He had a weight loss of 8 kg in last month. His body tempereature was 38.5 °C. Heart rate was 100/min. ESR was 51mm/h and CRP was 5.6 mg/ dL. There was no proliferation in blood and sputum cultures. Three sputum specimens were examined and AFB wasn’t detected. Fibronodular infiltration was seen in right lower zone of chest X-ray. In thorax CT, fibronodular densities were seen in lower lobe anterior and posterior segments. Brucella melitensis was isolated in blood culture. Second bronchoscopy was performed with suspect of brucellosis pneumonia. Brucella tube agglutination test was positive at titer 1/320 in the bronchial lavage fluid and 1/640 in concurrent serum sample. In cases with chronic cough or pneumonia which is irresponsive to nonspecific antibiotherapy, respiratory brucellosis must be rememberred in endemic areas.

  19. Lung cancer, brucellosis and tuberculosis: remarkable togetherness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkoyunlu, Muhammed Emin; Akkoyunlu, Yasemin; Hakyemez, Ismail Necati; Erboy, Fatma; Arvas, Gulhan; Aslan, Turan

    2013-01-01

    A 68 years old male farmer referred with cough, expectorating sputum, intermittant fever, night sweats, fatigue and anorexia persisting for two weeks. There was a history of 80 packs each year of smoking and he was still an active smoker. Pneumonectomy was performed because of pulmonary epidermoid cancer and he received chemotherapy. He was diagnosed lung tuberculosis and using anti-tuberculous treatment for 4 months. He had a weight loss of 8 kg in last month. His body tempereature was 38.5 °C. Heart rate was 100/min. ESR was 51mm/h and CRP was 5.6 mg/dL. There was no proliferation in blood and sputum cultures. Three sputum specimens were examined and AFB wasn't detected. Fibronodular infiltration was seen in right lower zone of chest X-ray. In thorax CT, fibronodular densities were seen in lower lobe anterior and posterior segments. Brucella melitensis was isolated in blood culture. Second bronchoscopy was performed with suspect of brucellosis pneumonia. Brucella tube agglutination test was positive at titer 1/320 in the bronchial lavage fluid and 1/640 in concurrent serum sample. In cases with chronic cough or pneumonia which is irresponsive to nonspecific antibiotherapy, respiratory brucellosis must be rememberred in endemic areas.

  20. Imaging diagnosis of breast tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Oh, Ki Keun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-10-15

    To evaluate the radiologic findings of breast tuberculosis. The authors evaluated the radiologic findings of five cases of surgically confirmed tuberculosis of the breast. Patients were examined with mammography (n=5), ultrasonography (n=3), and MRI (n=2). All patients were female. Four patients had unilateral lesion and the remaining one patient had bilateral breast tuberculosis. Mammographic findings were mainly radiopaque mass density without secondary signs. Two patients showed secondary signs such as skin thickening, parenchymal distortion, and nipple retraction. Ultrasonographic findings were variable but helpful in differentiating benign from malignant breast lesion, MRI findings were more helpful in differentiating abscess from malignant lesions. Radiologic findings were useful to diagnose tuberculosis of the breast, but fine needle aspiration biopsy and culture were needed for suspicious radiologic findings.

  1. Peritonitis due to genital tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, J H; Mikkelsen, A L; Siemssen, O J

    1985-01-01

    A case of genital tuberculosis is presented. The diagnosis was made by laparotomy and histological examination of biopsies from peritoneum and the Fallopian tube. The literature is reviewed and the diagnostic approach and treatment discussed....

  2. Imaging diagnosis of breast tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Oh, Ki Keun

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the radiologic findings of breast tuberculosis. The authors evaluated the radiologic findings of five cases of surgically confirmed tuberculosis of the breast. Patients were examined with mammography (n=5), ultrasonography (n=3), and MRI (n=2). All patients were female. Four patients had unilateral lesion and the remaining one patient had bilateral breast tuberculosis. Mammographic findings were mainly radiopaque mass density without secondary signs. Two patients showed secondary signs such as skin thickening, parenchymal distortion, and nipple retraction. Ultrasonographic findings were variable but helpful in differentiating benign from malignant breast lesion, MRI findings were more helpful in differentiating abscess from malignant lesions. Radiologic findings were useful to diagnose tuberculosis of the breast, but fine needle aspiration biopsy and culture were needed for suspicious radiologic findings

  3. Radiologic observation of renal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. W.; Ra, Y. W.; Kim, Y. J.

    1981-01-01

    Radiographic findings of thirty eight cases of renal tuberculosis treated at this hospital during last 4 years were analysed with following results. The cases examined were 24 male and 14 female patients. Age distribution was broad and evenly distributed ranging from 2nd decades to 5th decades. Main symptoms complained were urinary frequency, hematuria, dysuria and flank pain. Findings of physical examination revealed tenderness of costovertebral angle, palpable mass on flank area and epididymal indutration. The simple chest films showed pulmonary tuberculosis in 22 cases including 6 cases of active military type. Thirty one cases showed increased ESR, 8 cases showed AFB positive in urine and 12 cases showed bilateral renal tuberculosis. Through urographic findings nonvisualization, cyceopelviectasis, motheaten appearance of minor calyx, contracted bladder, delayed visualization, ureteral stricture and beading were observed in order of frequency. Five cases with miliary tuberculosis showed advanced renal lesion on urogram

  4. Chemotherapy for carcinoma of stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salek, T.

    2011-01-01

    Of all patients with gastric cancer 80 % to 90 % are either diagnosed at an advanced stage when the tumour is inoperable, or develop a recurrence within five years after surgery. Chemotherapy clearly improves survival in comparison to best supportive care only. No chemotherapy regimen showed a survival benefit better than 5-fluorouracil alone in a phase III trial for advanced gastric cancer in 1990s, and several new cytotoxic agents became available in late 1990s. Thereafter, a couple of phase III trials supported the substitution of infusional 5-fluorouracil by orally administered agents and the replacement of cisplatin by oxaliplatin in early 2000s. Trastuzumab has succeeded in showing a survival benefit for patients with Her-2 positive gastric cancer which accounts for about 10 - 20 % of the cancer. This means that the door is opened to the new era of chemotherapy with molecular target agents and with individualization for advanced gastric cancer. (author)

  5. Adjuvant chemotherapy and cancer cure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertino, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    The use of chemotherapy as an adjuvant to surgery and/or radiotherapy is well founded in experimental tumor systems and appears to be effective in patients in some circumstances. It is clear from both clinical and experimental studies that (1) the dose is important, (2) the earlier chemotherapy is started after primary therapy the better, and (3) combination chemotherapy may be more effective than single-agent treatment. The better the estimation of risk of recurrence, the better the assessment of the risk-benefit ratio with adjuvant therapy. Salvage therapy as well as relative risk of recurrence are considerations in the choice of patients to be treated. Finally, some evidence is presented to indicate that alkylating agents may not be necessary in combination regimens for adjuvant therapy if effective antimetabolite combinations are available

  6. Peritonitis due to genital tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Mikkelsen, A L; Siemssen, O J

    1985-01-01

    A case of genital tuberculosis is presented. The diagnosis was made by laparotomy and histological examination of biopsies from peritoneum and the Fallopian tube. The literature is reviewed and the diagnostic approach and treatment discussed.......A case of genital tuberculosis is presented. The diagnosis was made by laparotomy and histological examination of biopsies from peritoneum and the Fallopian tube. The literature is reviewed and the diagnostic approach and treatment discussed....

  7. Multifaceted remodeling by vitamin C boosts sensitivity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis subpopulations to combination treatment by anti-tubercular drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikri, Kriti; Duggal, Priyanka; Kumar, Chanchal; Batra, Sakshi Dhingra; Vashist, Atul; Bhaskar, Ashima; Tripathi, Kritika; Sethi, Tavpritesh; Singh, Amit; Tyagi, Jaya Sivaswami

    2018-05-01

    Bacterial dormancy is a major impediment to the eradication of tuberculosis (TB), because currently used drugs primarily target actively replicating bacteria. Therefore, decoding of the critical survival pathways in dormant tubercle bacilli is a research priority to formulate new approaches for killing these bacteria. Employing a network-based gene expression analysis approach, we demonstrate that redox active vitamin C (vit C) triggers a multifaceted and robust adaptation response in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) involving ~ 67% of the genome. Vit C-adapted bacteria display well-described features of dormancy, including growth stasis and progression to a viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state, loss of acid-fastness and reduction in length, dissipation of reductive stress through triglyceride (TAG) accumulation, protective response to oxidative stress, and tolerance to first line TB drugs. VBNC bacteria are reactivatable upon removal of vit C and they recover drug susceptibility properties. Vit C synergizes with pyrazinamide, a unique TB drug with sterilizing activity, to kill dormant and replicating bacteria, negating any tolerance to rifampicin and isoniazid in combination treatment in both in-vitro and intracellular infection models. Finally, the vit C multi-stress redox models described here also offer a unique opportunity for concurrent screening of compounds/combinations active against heterogeneous subpopulations of Mtb. These findings suggest a novel strategy of vit C adjunctive therapy by modulating bacterial physiology for enhanced efficacy of combination chemotherapy with existing drugs, and also possible synergies to guide new therapeutic combinations towards accelerating TB treatment. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Unusual complication and successful high-dose chemotherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... treated with high-dose chemotherapy in our institution, complicated by unusual bilateral renal vein tumour thrombi and tumour lysis syndrome. We believe this unique case highlights the need for early recognition of current and potential complications on staging computed tomography imaging, as well as successful use of ...

  9. A Review of Moxifloxacin for the Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Anushka; Naidoo, Kogieleum; McIlleron, Helen; Essack, Sabiha; Padayatchi, Nesri

    2017-11-01

    Moxifloxacin, an 8-methoxy quinolone, is an important drug in the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and is being investigated in novel drug regimens with pretomanid, bedaquiline, and pyrazinamide, or rifapentine, for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis. Early results of these studies are promising. Although current evidence does not support the use of moxifloxacin in treatment-shortening regimens for drug-susceptible tuberculosis, it may be recommended in patients unable to tolerate standard first-line drug regimens or for isoniazid monoresistance. Evidence suggests that the standard 400-mg dose of moxifloxacin used in the treatment of tuberculosis may be suboptimal in some patients, leading to worse tuberculosis treatment outcomes and emergence of drug resistance. Furthermore, a drug interaction with the rifamycins results in up to 31% reduced plasma concentrations of moxifloxacin when these are combined for treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, although the clinical relevance of this interaction is unclear. Moxifloxacin exhibits extensive interindividual pharmacokinetic variability. Higher doses of moxifloxacin may be needed to achieve drug exposures required for improved clinical outcomes. Further study is, however, needed to determine the safety of proposed higher doses and clinically validated targets for drug exposure to moxifloxacin associated with improved tuberculosis treatment outcomes. We discuss in this review the evidence for the use of moxifloxacin in drug-susceptible tuberculosis and explore the role of moxifloxacin pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and drug interactions with rifamycins, on tuberculosis treatment outcomes when used in first-line tuberculosis drug regimens. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  10. OROPHARYNGEAL TUBERCULOSIS: AN UNUSUAL PRESENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M H Dadgarnia

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nTuberculosis (TB still represents a major public health problem worldwide. The primary form of disease is most often localized to the lung. In a minority of patients, progressive pulmonary disease spreads to other organ systems through self inoculation via infected sputum, blood and lymphatic system, establishing the secondary form of tuberculosis. We present a patient that was referred to us with complaint of ulcerative mouth lesions from 3 months ago. In physical examination multiple erythematous and irregularly ulcerative lesions affecting soft palate area, uvula and anterior tonsillar pillar was noted bilaterally. Punch biopsy was done from several points that revealed chronic granulomatous inflammation. Ziehl-Nielsen staining of cultured specimen demonstrated acid-fast bacilli. Chest X-ray showed apical pulmonary involvement, suggesting tuberculosis infection. Patient was treated with anti-tuberculosis 4 drugs regimen. In the one year follow-up period after complete treatment; patient didn't have any evidence of disease. Oral and oropharyngeal TB lesions are uncommon, it is estimated that only 0.05-5% of total TB cases may present with oral manifestations, but should be an important consideration in the differential diagnosis of lesions that appear in the oral cavity and oropharynx. The secondary form is more frequent and involves mainly the tongue but involvement of pharynx is quite rare condition. Although tuberculosis of oropharynx is relatively rare, with the increasing incidence of tuberculosis, it must be considered in the differential diagnosis of atypical ulcerative lesions of the mouth and oropharynx.

  11. Radiological manifestations of pulmonary tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreu, J. E-mail: andreuj@hg.vhebron.es; Caceres, J.; Pallisa, E.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M

    2004-08-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is a common worldwide lung infection. The radiological features show considerable variation, but in most cases they are characteristic enough to suggest the diagnosis. Classically, tuberculosis is divided into primary, common in childhood, and postprimary, usually presenting in adults. The most characteristic radiological feature in primary tuberculosis is lymphadenopathy. On enhanced CT, hilar and mediastinal nodes with a central hypodense area suggest the diagnosis. Cavitation is the hallmark of postprimary tuberculosis and appears in around half of patients. Patchy, poorly defined consolidation in the apical and posterior segments of the upper lobes, and in the superior segment of the lower lobe is also commonly observed. Several complications are associated with tuberculous infection, such as hematogenous dissemination (miliary tuberculosis) or extension to the pleura, resulting in pleural effusion. Late complications of tuberculosis comprise a heterogeneous group of processes including tuberculoma, bronchial stenosis bronchiectasis, broncholithiasis, aspergilloma, bronchoesophageal fistula and fibrosing mediastinitis. Radiology provides essential information for the management and follow up of these patients and is extremely valuable for monitoring complications.

  12. Tuberculosis of the Breast: An Initial Presentation of the Metabolic Syndrome with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in a Young Nigerian Woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Adeiza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast tuberculosis is an uncommon presentation of extra pulmonary tuberculosis. A 40-year-old obese woman presented with a right breast abscess which had failed to heal after surgical drainage. There was no family history of breast disease. Biopsy and histology of the lesion showed chronic granulomatous inflammation with positive stains for acid fast bacilli compatible with tuberculosis. Further evaluation confirmed metabolic syndrome with type 2 diabetes mellitus. She was placed on antituberculosis chemotherapy and appropriate therapy for diabetes mellitus with complete resolution of the lesion. We report this case because of its rarity and to highlight the association between tuberculosis an infectious disease and overnutrition in diabetes mellitus, a noncommunicable disease.

  13. Progression to active tuberculosis, but not transmission, varies by Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineage in The Gambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Bouke C.; Hill, Philip C.; Aiken, Alex; Awine, Timothy; Antonio, Martin; Adetifa, Ifedayo M.; Jackson-Sillah, Dolly J.; Fox, Annette; Deriemer, Kathryn; Gagneux, Sebastien; Borgdorff, Martien W.; McAdam, Keith P. W. J.; Corrah, Tumani; Small, Peter M.; Adegbola, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is considerable variability in the outcome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. We hypothesized that Mycobacterium africanum was less likely than M. tuberculosis to transmit and progress to tuberculosis disease. METHODS: In a cohort study of patients with tuberculosis and their

  14. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Bleeding Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Bleeding Problems “My nurse said that chemotherapy could make ... with a clean cloth. Keep pressing until the bleeding stops. If you bruise: Put ice on the ...

  15. Fertility preservation after chemotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kaaij, Marleen A. E.; van Echten-Arends, Jannie; Simons, Arnold H. M.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.

    2010-01-01

    Treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma can negatively affect fertility. This review summarizes data on fertility after chemotherapy in adult patients. Alkylating chemotherapy, especially if containing procarbazine and/or cyclophosphamide, is most harmful to gonadal functioning. Alkylating regimens cause

  16. Childhood Tuberculosis: Epidemiology, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Sheng Tsai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the existence of a government-run tuberculosis (TB control program, the current nationwide burden of TB continues to be a public health problem in Taiwan. Intense current and previous efforts into diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive interventions have focused on TB in adults, but childhood TB has been relatively neglected. Children are particularly vulnerable to severe disease and death following infection, and children with latent infections become reservoirs for future transmission following disease reactivation in adulthood, thus fueling future epidemics. Additional research, understanding, and prevention of childhood TB are urgently needed. This review assesses the epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, and relevant principles of TB vaccine development and presents efficacy data for the currently licensed vaccines.

  17. Towards host-directed therapies for tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus; Chakaya, Jeremiah; Hoelscher, Michael; Ntoumi, Francine; Rustomjee, Roxana; Vilaplana, Cristina; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Rasolof, Voahangy; Munderi, Paula; Singh, Nalini; Aklillu, Eleni; Padayatchi, Nesri; Macete, Eusebio; Kapata, Nathan; Mulenga, Modest; Kibiki, Gibson; Mfinanga, Sayoki; Nyirenda, Thomas; Maboko, Leonard; Garcia-Basteiro, Alberto; Rakotosamimanana, Niaina; Bates, Matthew; Mwaba, Peter; Reither, Klaus; Gagneux, Sebastien; Edwards, Sarah; Mfinanga, Elirehema; Abdulla, Salim; Cardona, Pere-Joan; Russell, James B W; Gant, Vanya; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Elkington, Paul; Bonnet, Maryline; Menendez, Clara; Dieye, Tandakha N; Diarra, Bassirou; Maiga, Almoustapha; Aseffa, Abraham; Parida, Shreemanta; Wejse, Christian; Petersen, Eskild; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Oliver, Matt; Craig, Gill; Corrah, Tumena; Tientcheu, Leopold; Antonio, Martin; Rao, Martin; McHugh, Timothy D; Sheikh, Aziz; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Ramjee, Gita; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Churchyard, Gavin; Steyn, Andrie; Grobusch, Martin; Sanne, Ian; Martinson, Neil; Madansein, Rajhmun; Wilkinson, Robert J; Mayosi, Bongani; Schito, Marco; Wallis, Robert S

    2015-08-01

    The treatment of tuberculosis is based on combinations of drugs that directly target Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A new global initiative is now focusing on a complementary approach of developing adjunct host-directed therapies.

  18. WHO GLOBAL TUBERCULOSIS REPORTS: COMPILATION AND INTERPRETATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Vаsilyevа

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to inform national specialists involved in tuberculosis control about methods for compilation of WHO global tuberculosis statistics, which are used when developing strategies and programmes for tuberculosis control and evaluation of their efficiency.  The article explains in detail the notions of main WHO epidemiological rates, used in the international publications on tuberculosis along with the data on their registered values, new approaches to making the list of country with the highest burden of tuberculosis, drug resistant tuberculosis and tuberculosis with concurrent HIV infection. The article compares the rates in the Russian Federation with global data as well as data from countries within WHO European Regions and countries with highest TB burden. It presents materials on the achievement of Global goals in tuberculosis control and main provisions of WHO End TB Strategy for 2015-2035 adopted as a part of UNO Sustainable Development Goals.  

  19. CDC WONDER: Online Tuberculosis Information System (OTIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Online Tuberculosis Information System (OTIS) on CDC WONDER contains information on verified tuberculosis (TB) cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control...

  20. New Treatment Regimen for Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this podcast, Dr. Kenneth Castro, Director of the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, discusses the December 9, 2011 CDC guidelines for the use of a new regimen for the treatment of persons with latent tuberculosis infection.

  1. determinants of tuberculosis services acceptance among patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J MUGUMBATE

    stigmatization on acceptance of tuberculosis services in government hospitals in Oyo State, ... tuberculosis. It usually attacks the lungs but can also affect other parts of the .... out that, stigma among Mexican immigrants in Califonia significantly ...

  2. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, ... death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying ...

  3. Significance of measurement of serum fibrosis markers (HA, LN, P III P, IV C) in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Mingxian

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of determination of serum fibrosis markers in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods: Serum hyaluronic acid (HA), laminin (LN), procollagen III peptide (P III P) and Type IV collagen (IV C) contents were determined with RIA in 128 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis both before and after treatment as well as in 40 controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum contents of the four markers in the patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (P 0.05). Decreases of the levels in treatment failures were not significant and the levels remained significantly higher than those in controls (P<0.01 or P<0.05). Conclusion: Determination of serum fibrosis markers levels in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis is valuable for early diagnosis as well as for evaluation of the effect of chemotherapy. (authors)

  4. Chemotherapy-associated recurrent pneumothoraces in lymphangioleiomyomatosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Emer

    2012-02-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis is a rare cause of pneumothorax in women. We present the case of a 48-year-old woman with lymphangioleiomyomatosis, who had never had a pneumothorax prior to commencing chemotherapy for breast cancer. During chemotherapy she developed 3 pneumothoraces and 2 episodes of pneumomediastinum. We suggest that the pneumothoraces were caused by the chemotherapy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of chemotherapy triggering pneumothoraces in a woman with lymphangioleiomyomatosis.

  5. Granuloma encapsulation is a key factor for containing tuberculosis infection in minipigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Olga; Díaz, Ivan; Vilaplana, Cristina; Tapia, Gustavo; Díaz, Jorge; Fort, María; Cáceres, Neus; Pinto, Sergio; Caylà, Joan; Corner, Leigh; Domingo, Mariano; Cardona, Pere-Joan

    2010-04-06

    A transthoracic infection involving a low dose of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been used to establish a new model of infection in minipigs. The 20-week monitoring period showed a marked Th1 response and poor humoral response for the whole infection. A detailed histopathological analysis was performed after slicing the formalin-fixed whole lungs of each animal. All lesions were recorded and classified according to their microscopic aspect, their relationship with the intralobular connective network and their degree of maturity in order to obtain a dissemination ratio (DR) between recent and old lesions. CFU counts and evolution of the DR with time showed that the proposed model correlated with a contained infection, decreasing from week 9 onwards. These findings suggest that the infection induces an initial Th1 response, which is followed by local fibrosis and encapsulation of the granulomas, thereby decreasing the onset of new lesions. Two therapeutic strategies were applied in order to understand how they could influence the model. Thus, chemotherapy with isoniazid alone helped to decrease the total number of lesions, despite the increase in DR after week 9, with similar kinetics to those of the control group, whereas addition of a therapeutic M. tuberculosis fragment-based vaccine after chemotherapy increased the Th1 and humoral responses, as well as the number of lesions, but decreased the DR. By providing a local pulmonary structure similar to that in humans, the mini-pig model highlights new aspects that could be key to a better understanding tuberculosis infection control in humans.

  6. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Constipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    N ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Constipation Take these steps: Eat high-fiber foods such as: ● ● Whole-grain breads and cereals ● ● Fruits and vegetables ● ● Nuts and seeds Turn this ...

  7. Tuberculosis in Canada: Detection, Intervention and Compliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katya Richardson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview of the current state of TB in Canada by referencing information presented at the workshop, “Tuberculosis: Detection, Prevention, and Compliance.” The workshop took place on November 14 and 15, 2012 in Ottawa. The workshop was organized by the Centre for Disease Modeling and the Public Health Agency of Canada as a two-day knowledge translation event that was comprised of scientific and policy focused presentations designed to address four key objectives: (1 Evaluate the success of current tuberculosis (TB health policies and control strategies in Canada and for specific Canadian sub-populations; (2 Determine the impact of detection, intervention, compliance, and education strategies in terms of TB incidence and prevalence; (3 Develop targets for future interventions by identifying key characteristics of TB epidemics that impact the success of TB health policies and control strategies; (4 Leverage our existing ties with public health decision makers, aboriginal health organizations, and organizations serving the homeless to develop a research community that is based on close collaboration, and will foster national TB control efforts. The workshop elicited robust discussions between experts from a variety of academic disciplines and government officials. A summary of the information presented, comments shared, and questions posed, will provide a comprehensive understanding of the status of TB in Canada and future directions to be taken for improved control of the disease.

  8. Comparative Mycobacteriology of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Stephen V.; Behr, Marcel A.

    2015-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) is a group of highly genetically related pathogens that cause tuberculosis (TB) in mammalian species. However, the very name of the complex underlines the fact that our knowledge of these pathogens is dominated by studies on the human pathogen, M. tuberculosis. Of course this is entirely justified; M. tuberculosis is a major global pathogen that exacts a horrendous burden in terms of mortality and morbidity so it is appropriate that it is...

  9. Arterial occlusion precipitated by cisplatinbased chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, D.; Dubashi, B.; Karthikeyan, B.; Jain, A.

    2010-01-01

    Cisplatin-based therapy is curative in testicular cancer. Adverse effects of cisplatin-based chemotherapy include dose-dependent myelosuppression, nephrotoxicity, neurotoxicity, and ototoxicity. By contrast, chemotherapy-associated vascular complications are unpredictable. Few incidents of digital gangrene with cisplatin have been reported. Here, we present a patient who developed arterial occlusion leading to gangrene of the toe after cisplatinbased chemotherapy.

  10. The impacts of a pharmacist-managed outpatient clinic and chemotherapy-directed electronic order sets for monitoring oral chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battis, Brandon; Clifford, Linda; Huq, Mostaqul; Pejoro, Edrick; Mambourg, Scott

    2017-12-01

    monitoring clinic, 31 patients (45%) were identified as having a therapy-related problem with their oral chemotherapy regimen on a gross measure for safety and appropriateness of medication management during the course of eight months follow-up between September 2014 and April 2015. In addition, the clinic helped to reestablish care for three patients (4.4%) who were lost to follow-up. The clinic identified 12 patients (17.6%) non-adherent to their prescribed regimen in some degree, where patients were suspected to miss doses due to delay in refilling prescriptions at least three days later than the expected date. However, these patients denied non-adherence. Among them, six patients (8.8%) were truly non-adherent. These patients stated that they had missed at least one day of therapy or were not taking the medication as prescribed. Medication regimen errors were discovered for five patients, accounting for a 7.3% medication-related error rate. Finally, seven patients (10.3%) were found to have an adverse reaction attributed to their oral chemotherapy. Two of them (2.9%) developed severe adverse reactions (Grade 3 and 4), which required hospitalization or immediate dose de-escalation. Conclusions The pilot clinic was able to identify current deficiencies and gaps in our practice settings for managing oral chemotherapy in a Veterans population. The oral chemotherapy monitoring clinic played a proactive role to identify preventable medication errors, monitor medication therapy, improve adherence, manage adverse drug reactions and re-establish care for patients who were lost to follow-up. The results suggest that close monitoring and follow-up of patients on oral chemotherapy is crucial to achieve therapeutic goals, improve patient safety and adherence, and to reduce drug adverse events and health care cost.

  11. Smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis among suspected patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Tuberculosis is a major public health problem throughout the world. Nearly one third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and hence at risk of developing active disease. Tuberculosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Ethiopia, and the country belongs to one of ...

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis monoarthritis in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenberg Alan M

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A child with isolated Mycobacterium tuberculosis monoarthritis, with features initially suggesting oligoarthritis subtype of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, is presented. This patient illustrates the need to consider the possibility of tuberculosis as the cause of oligoarthritis in high-risk pediatric populations even in the absence of a tuberculosis contact history and without evidence of overt pulmonary disease.

  13. Drug Resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: In Burkina Faso, there is no recent data about the level of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains among newly diagnosed tuberculosis cases. OBJECTIVE: To provide an update of the primary drug resistance of mycobacterium tuberculosis among patients in Burkina faso. METHODS: ...

  14. Some haematological parameters of tuberculosis infected Nigerians ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculosis is a major public health problem in Nigeria. Drug resistant tuberculosis is now common place due to poor patient compliance and lack of detection of resistant strains. The occurrence of HIV has been responsible for an increased frequency of tuberculosis. Knowledge of the blood picture in pulmonary ...

  15. Overview of airway involvement in tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, Arundeep; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Jana, Manisha; Sharma, Raju

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis is a ubiquitous infection and a re-emerging medical and socioeconomic problem resulting in increasing mortality and morbidity, especially in Asian countries. We aim to review the spectrum of imaging findings in airway involvement in tuberculosis through characteristic radiological images and to assess the role of computed tomography and image-guided interventions in the diagnosis and management of pulmonary tuberculosis.

  16. Tuberculosis Facts - You Can Prevent TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts You Can Prevent TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination TB Facts: You Can Prevent TB What ...

  17. 38 CFR 3.959 - Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tuberculosis. 3.959..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.959 Tuberculosis. Any veteran who, on...) tuberculosis may receive compensation under 38 U.S.C. 1114(q) and 1156 as in effect before August 20, 1968...

  18. 9 CFR 381.81 - Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 381.81 Section 381.81 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.81 Tuberculosis. Carcasses of poultry affected with tuberculosis shall be condemned. ...

  19. Tuberculosis Facts - TB Can Be Treated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB Can Be Treated What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination Page 1 of 2 TB Facts: TB ...

  20. 9 CFR 311.2 - Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 311.2 Section 311.2... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.2 Tuberculosis. The... pathogenesis of tuberculosis in swine, cattle, sheep, goats, and equines. (a) Carcasses condemned. The entire...

  1. Tuberculosis 2: Pathophysiology and microbiology of pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-08-01

    Aug 1, 2005 ... February 2013 Downloaded from www.southsudanmedicaljournal.com. MaIN arTIClES. 10. Tuberculosis 2: Pathophysiology and microbiology of pulmonary tuberculosis. Robert L. Serafino Wania MBBS, MrCP, MSc (Trop Med). Pathophysiology. Inhalation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis leads to one of.

  2. Gastrointestinal Tuberculosis: Still a challenge for radiologists and Gastroenterologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamadnejad, M.; Malekzadeh, R.; Soroush, Z.; Sedighi, N.

    2003-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major health problem in Iran. All parts of the gastrointestinal tract can be affected by Tuberculosis. Therefore, it should be included in the differential diagnoses of almost and tuberculosis diseases, and physicians should be aware of the imaging characteristics of tuberculosis in the tuberculosis tract. This is a report of 4 patients with different types of tuberculosis involvement by tuberculosis, along with its clinical pictures and imaging characteristics

  3. Essentials of tuberculosis control for the practising physician. Tuberculosis Committee, Canadian Thoracic Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To recommend guidelines for the management of tuberculosis (TB), particularly in high-risk groups including poor and homeless people, aboriginal Canadians, immigrants from countries where TB is highly prevalent and people with HIV infection. OPTIONS: Diagnosis, pharmacotherapy, vaccination and chemoprophylaxis. OUTCOMES: Prevention of infection and diagnosis and cure of TB. EVIDENCE: The evidence was gathered in late 1992 from previous guidelines, recommendations by specialist societies and new studies. VALUES: Evidence was categorized into four levels: I, randomized clinical trials of therapeutic interventions or prospective studies of diagnostic strategies; II, case-control studies; III, retrospective descriptive studies; and IV, consensus of the committee members and published statements. The Tuberculosis Committee of the Canadian Thoracic Society comprises experts in TB from across Canada. BENEFITS, HARM AND COSTS: The benefits of early diagnosis and prompt initiation of therapy are well documented. The cost effectiveness of antituberculous therapy in developing countries is well documented. In developed countries chemoprophylaxis has been shown to be cost effective, and directly observed chemotherapy has recently been hypothesized to have economic benefits. RECOMMENDATIONS: In the appropriate clinical setting, particularly when patients are known to be at high risk of TB, clinicians should consider TB, reserve body secretions for mycobacteriologic tests and conduct other investigations such as chest radiography. Furthermore, if TB is strongly suspected or confirmed by appropriate investigation the early initiation of multi-drug therapy, including at least three first-line drugs, is strongly recommended. If drug resistance is suspected a regimen of four to five drugs, including at least two drugs with which the patient has not been treated, should be started. If the strain is found to be resistant to any of the drugs in the regimen appropriate

  4. Formulation and Characterization of Pyrazinamide Polymeric Nanoparticles for Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Efficiency for Alveolar Macrophage Targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Varma, J. N. Ravi; Kumar, T. Santosh; Prasanthi, B.; Ratna, J. Vijaya

    2015-01-01

    Pyrazinamide, a highly specific agent against Mycobacterium tuberculosis is used as first-line drug to treat tuberculosis. The current work aims to formulate polymeric nanoparticles based drug delivery system to sustain the release profile and reduce the dosing frequency of pyrazinamide. Further aim was to target the macrophages within body fluid. These polymeric nanoparticles were prepared by simultaneous double-emulsion (W/O/W) solvent evaporation/diffusion technique. The prepared dispersio...

  5. Strategies to Improve Vaccine Efficacy against Tuberculosis by Targeting Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich E. Schaible

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The global tuberculosis epidemic is the most common cause of death after infectious disease worldwide. Increasing numbers of infections with multi- and extensively drug-resistant variants of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, resistant even to newly discovered and last resort antibiotics, highlight the urgent need for an efficient vaccine. The protective efficacy to pulmonary tuberculosis in adults of the only currently available vaccine, M. bovis BCG, is unsatisfactory and geographically diverse. More importantly, recent clinical studies on new vaccine candidates did not prove to be better than BCG, yet. Here, we propose and discuss novel strategies to improve efficacy of existing anti-tuberculosis vaccines. Modulation of innate immune responses upon vaccination already provided promising results in animal models of tuberculosis. For instance, neutrophils have been shown to influence vaccine efficacy, both, positively and negatively, and stimulate specific antibody secretion. Modulating immune regulatory properties after vaccination such as induction of different types of innate immune cell death, myeloid-derived suppressor or regulatory T cells, production of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 may have beneficial effects on protection efficacy. Incorporation of lipid antigens presented via CD1 molecules to T cells have been discussed as a way to enhance vaccine efficacy. Finally, concepts of dendritic cell-based immunotherapies or training the innate immune memory may be exploitable for future vaccination strategies against tuberculosis. In this review, we put a spotlight on host immune networks as potential targets to boost protection by old and new tuberculosis vaccines.

  6. Tuberculosis prevention and care in Korea: Evolution of policy and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unyeong Go

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB in Korea remains a serious health problem with an estimated 77 per 100,000 incidence rate for 2016. This makes Korea as the only OECD country with high incidence of TB. The government has increased budgets and strengthened patient management policies since 2011. The management of latent tuberculosis was added to the response with strengthened and extensive contact investigations in the five-year tuberculosis control plan (2013–2017 and implementation was established in 2013. Due to these efforts Korea has achieved an average 5.2% reduction annually in tuberculosis incidence rate between 2011 and 2016. To further expedite the reduction of the TB burden the government has introduced additional measures including mandatory screening of latent tuberculosis infection for community workers in congregate settings including daycare centers for children, kindergarten, and teachers in schools and health care workers in clinics and hospitals to solve the problems identified through contact investigations in 2017.Providing high quality free diagnosis and treatment of active TB including for multidrug resistant TB combined with active contact investigations is the mainstay of the current programmatic response in Korea. However, the limitation of existing tools for LTBI pose challenge including absence of best mechanism for effective communication with professionals and the public, the need for at least 3 months of treatment and the risk of side effects. Developing effective tools will help to overcome these challenges. Keywords: Tuberculosis, Latent tuberculosis infection, End TB, Contact investigations, Epidemiology

  7. Uterine sarcoma - current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Charlotte; Miah, Aisha B

    2017-01-01

    Uterine sarcomas comprise a group of rare tumors with differing tumor biology, natural history and response to treatment. Diagnosis is often made following surgery for presumed benign disease. Currently, preoperative imaging does not reliably distinguish between benign leiomyomas and other malignant pathology. Uterine leiomyosarcoma is the most common sarcoma, but other subtypes include endometrial stromal sarcoma (low grade and high grade), undifferentiated uterine sarcoma and adenosarcoma. Clinical trials have shown no definite survival benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy or chemotherapy and have been hampered by the rarity and heterogeneity of these disease types. There is a role of adjuvant treatment in carefully selected cases following multidisciplinary discussion at sarcoma reference centers. In patients with metastatic disease, systemic chemotherapy can then be considered. There is activity of a number of agents, including doxorubicin, trabectedin, gemcitabine-based chemotherapy, eribulin and pazopanib. Patients should be considered for clinical trial entry where possible. Close international collaboration is important to allow progress in this group of diseases.

  8. Chemotherapy for bladder cancer: treatment guidelines for neoadjuvant chemotherapy, bladder preservation, adjuvant chemotherapy, and metastatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Cora N; Donat, S Machele; Bellmunt, Joaquim

    2007-01-01

    To determine the optimal use of chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and metastatic setting in patients with advanced urothelial cell carcinoma, a consensus conference was convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Société Internationale d'Urologie (SIU) to critically review...

  9. Mycothiol acetyltransferase (Rv0819) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a potential biomarker for direct diagnosis of tuberculosis using patient serum specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitoun, H; Bahey-El-Din, M; Kassem, M A; Aboushleib, H M

    2017-12-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection constitutes a global threat that results in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Efficient and early diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) is of paramount importance for successful treatment. The aim of the current study is to investigate the mycobacterial mycothiol acetyltransferase Rv0819 as a potential novel biomarker for the diagnosis of active TB infection. The gene encoding Rv0819 was cloned and successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant Rv0819 was purified using metal affinity chromatography and was used to raise murine polyclonal antibodies against Rv0819. The raised antibodies were employed for direct detection of Rv0819 in patient serum samples using dot blot assay and competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Serum samples were obtained from 68 confirmed new TB patients and 35 healthy volunteers as negative controls. The dot blot assay showed sensitivity of 64·7% and specificity of 100%, whereas the competitive ELISA assay showed lower sensitivity (54·4%) and specificity (88·57%). The overall sensitivity of the combined results of the two tests was found to be 89·7%. Overall, the mycobacterial Rv0819 is a potential TB serum biomarker that can be exploited, in combination with other TB biomarkers, for efficient and reliable diagnosis of active TB infection. The early and accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis infection is of paramount importance for initiating treatment and avoiding clinical complications. Most current diagnostic tests have poor sensitivity and/or specificity and in many cases they are too expensive for routine diagnostic testing in resource-limited settings. In the current study, we examined a novel mycobacterial serum biomarker, namely mycothiol acetyltransferase Rv0819. The antigen was detectable in serum specimens of a significant number of tuberculosis patients. This article proves the importance of Rv0819 and paves the way towards its future use as a useful

  10. Successful Treatment in a Child with Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma and Coexistence of Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Baka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 13-year-old girl was admitted to our department with a history of severe pain of her left axilla and fever. On physical examination, a block of lymph nodes in her left axilla, diffuse papular rash, and red-violet swelling of her supraclavicular and subclavian region were noted. Imaging investigations revealed left axillar and supraclavicular lymphadenopathy and a small nodular shade in the upper lobe of her left lung. A biopsy from an axillary lymph node established the diagnosis of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL, whereas DNA of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR in the same tissue biopsy. Patient was started on chemotherapy for ALCL and achieved remission of all initially involved fields. Nevertheless, two new nodular lesions were detected in the left lower lobe. Biopsy revealed granulomas, and PCR was positive for M. tuberculosis. Our patient received treatment with the combination of isoniazid and rifampin (12 months, pyrazinamide (the first 2 months, and maintenance chemotherapy for her ALCL for one year simultaneously. Four years later, she is disease free for both mycobacterial infection and lymphoma. We are reporting this successful management of mycobacterial infection in a patient with ALCL despite intensive chemotherapy that the patient received at the same time.

  11. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Salahuddin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis.

  12. Imaging features of musculoskeletal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuyst, Dimitri De; Vanhoenacker, Filip; Bernaerts, Anja; Gielen, Jan; Schepper, Arthur M. de

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the imaging characteristics of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. Skeletal tuberculosis represents one-third of all cases of tuberculosis occurring in extrapulmonary sites. Hematogenous spread from a distant focus elsewhere in the body is the cornerstone in the understanding of imaging features of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. The most common presentations are tuberculous spondylitis, arthritis, osteomyelitis, and soft tissue involvement. The diagnostic value of the different imaging techniques, which include conventional radiography, CT, and MR imaging, are emphasized. Whereas conventional radiography is the mainstay in the diagnosis of tuberculous arthritis and osteomyelitis, MR imaging may detect associated bone marrow and soft tissue abnormalities. MR imaging is generally accepted as the imaging modality of choice for diagnosis, demonstration of the extent of the disease of tuberculous spondylitis, and soft tissue tuberculosis. Moreover, it may be very helpful in the differential diagnosis with pyogenic spondylodiscitis, as it may easily demonstrate anterior corner destruction, the relative preservation of the intervertebral disk, multilevel involvement with or without skip lesions, and a large soft tissue abscess, as these are all arguments in favor of a tuberculous spondylitis. On the other hand, CT is still superior in the demonstration of calcifications, which are found in chronic tuberculous abscesses. (orig.)

  13. Concomitant active tuberculosis prolongs survival in non-small cell lung cancer: a study in a tuberculosis-endemic country.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsi Kuo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adjuvant tumor cell vaccine with chemotherapy against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC shows limited clinical response. Whether it provokes effective cellular immunity in tumor microenvironment is questionable. Concomitant active tuberculosis in NSCLC (TBLC resembles locoregional immunotherapy of tumor cell vaccine; thus, maximally enriches effective anti-tumor immunity. This study compares the survival and immunological cell profile in TBLC over NSCLC alone. METHODS: Retrospective review of NSCLC patients within 1-year-period of 2007 and follow-up till 2010. RESULTS: A total 276 NSCLC patients were included. The median survival of TBLC is longer than those of NSCLC alone (11.6 vs. 8.8 month, p<0.01. Active tuberculosis is an independent predictor of better survival with HR of 0.68 (95% CI, 0.48 ~ 0.97. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC (55.8 vs. 31.7%, p<0.01 is a significant risk factor for NSCLC with active TB. The median survival of SCC with active tuberculosis is significantly longer than adenocarcinoma or undetermined NSCLC with TB (14.2 vs. 6.6 and 2.8 months, p<0.05. Active tuberculosis in SCC increases the expression of CD3 (46.4 ± 24.8 vs. 24.0 ± 16.0, p<0.05, CXCR3 (35.1 ± 16.4 vs. 19.2 ± 13.3, p<0.01 and IP-10 (63.5 ± 21.9 vs. 35.5 ± 21.0, p<0.01, while expression of FOXP3 is decreased (3.5 ± 0.5 vs. 13.3 ± 3.7 p<0.05, p<0.05. Survival of SCC with high expression of CD3 (12.1 vs. 3.6 month, p<0.05 and CXCR3 (12.1 vs. 4.4 month, p<0.05 is longer than that with low expression. CONCLUSIONS: Active tuberculosis in NSCLC shows better survival outcome. The effective T lymphocyte infiltration in tumor possibly underlies the mechanism. Locoregional immunotherapy of tumor cell vaccine may deserve further researches.

  14. Chemotherapy-induced Spontaneous Pneumothorax: Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Een Hendarsih

    2016-09-01

    The mechanism of pneumothorax following chemotherapy is not clearly understood yet, however, several hypotheses have been considered: 1 the rupture of a subpleural bulla after chemotherapy; 2 the rupture of an emphysematous bulla in an over expanded portion of the lung which is partially obstructed by a neoplasm; 3 tumor lyses or necrosis due to cytotoxic chemotherapy directly induces the formation of fistula. Dyspnea and chest pain suddenly appear during successful chemotherapy for metastatic chemosensitive tumors should alert the physician to the possibility of SP. The treatment is directed toward lung re-expansion. Chemotherapy induced pneumothorax should be considered as oncologic emergency.

  15. Cancer cell adaptation to chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Johnson, Penny; Somers, Shaw S; Toh, Simon; Higgins, Bernie; Lamont, Alan; Gulliford, Tim; Hurren, Jeremy; Yiangou, Constantinos; Cree, Ian A; Mercer, Stuart J; Knight, Louise A; Gabriel, Francis G; Whitehouse, Pauline A; Sharma, Sanjay; Fernando, Augusta; Glaysher, Sharon; Di Palma, Silvana

    2005-01-01

    Tumor resistance to chemotherapy may be present at the beginning of treatment, develop during treatment, or become apparent on re-treatment of the patient. The mechanisms involved are usually inferred from experiments with cell lines, as studies in tumor-derived cells are difficult. Studies of human tumors show that cells adapt to chemotherapy, but it has been largely assumed that clonal selection leads to the resistance of recurrent tumors. Cells derived from 47 tumors of breast, ovarian, esophageal, and colorectal origin and 16 paired esophageal biopsies were exposed to anticancer agents (cisplatin; 5-fluorouracil; epirubicin; doxorubicin; paclitaxel; irinotecan and topotecan) in short-term cell culture (6 days). Real-time quantitative PCR was used to measure up- or down-regulation of 16 different resistance/target genes, and when tissue was available, immunohistochemistry was used to assess the protein levels. In 8/16 paired esophageal biopsies, there was an increase in the expression of multi-drug resistance gene 1 (MDR1) following epirubicin + cisplatin + 5-fluorouracil (ECF) chemotherapy and this was accompanied by increased expression of the MDR-1 encoded protein, P-gp. Following exposure to doxorubicin in vitro, 13/14 breast carcinomas and 9/12 ovarian carcinomas showed >2-fold down-regulation of topoisomerase IIα (TOPOIIα). Exposure to topotecan in vitro, resulted in >4-fold down-regulation of TOPOIIα in 6/7 colorectal tumors and 8/10 ovarian tumors. This study suggests that up-regulation of resistance genes or down-regulation in target genes may occur rapidly in human solid tumors, within days of the start of treatment, and that similar changes are present in pre- and post-chemotherapy biopsy material. The molecular processes used by each tumor appear to be linked to the drug used, but there is also heterogeneity between individual tumors, even those with the same histological type, in the pattern and magnitude of response to the same drugs. Adaptation

  16. Lin28 Mediates Cancer Chemotherapy Resistance via Regulation of miRNA Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chaoyang; Xie, Shuduo; Song, Chunjiao; Huang, Liming; Jiang, Zhinong

    2014-06-01

    Chemotherapy resistance is one of the major obstacles limiting the success of cancer drug treatment. Among the mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapy treatment, there are those closely related to P-Glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-related protein, glutathione S-transferase pi and topoisomerase-II. Lin28 is a highly conserved RNA-binding protein, it consists of a cold shock domain and retroviral-type (CCHC) zinc finger motifs. In previous preclinical and clinical studies, positive Lin28 expression in cancer cells was correlated with decreased sensitivity to chemotherapy. And Lin28 could mediate cancer chemotherapy resistance via regulation of miR107 and Let-7 MiRNA. This article reviews current knowledge on predictive value of Lin28 in response to chemotherapy. Better understanding of its role may facilitate patient's selection of therapeutic regimen and lead to optimal clinical outcome.

  17. Optimizing antiemetic therapy in multiple-day and multiple cycles of chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellebaek, E.; Herrstedt, J.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Only a few studies have investigated the effect of antiemetic therapy in patients treated with multiple-day or multiple cycles of chemotherapy. The present review will assess the available data, highlight the current recommendations and draw attention towards the remaining...... of chemotherapy the addition of a NK1-receptor antagonist aprepitant to standard antiemetic therapy has increased the antiemetic effect, and multiple cycle extension studies have demonstrated that this increment in effect is sustained during multiple cycles of chemotherapy. A recent study indicated...... that the dopamine D2-receptor antagonist metopimazine has some additive effect on delayed symptoms induced by multiple-day chemotherapy. SUMMARY: The development of the NK1-receptor antagonist aprepitant has significantly improved the antiemetic control in patients treated with multiple cycles of chemotherapy. Far...

  18. Location of persisting mycobacteria in a Guinea pig model of tuberculosis revealed by r207910.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenaerts, Anne J; Hoff, Donald; Aly, Sahar; Ehlers, Stefan; Andries, Koen; Cantarero, Luis; Orme, Ian M; Basaraba, Randall J

    2007-09-01

    The lengthy chemotherapy of tuberculosis reflects the ability of a small subpopulation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria to persist in infected individuals. To date, the exact location of these persisting bacteria is not known. Lung lesions in guinea pigs infected with M. tuberculosis have striking similarities, such as necrosis, mineralization, and hypoxia, to natural infections in humans. Guinea pigs develop necrotic primary lesions after aerosol infection that differ in their morphology compared to secondary lesions resulting from hematogenous dissemination. In infected guinea pigs conventional therapy for tuberculosis during 6 weeks reduced the bacterial load by 1.7 logs in the lungs and, although this completely reversed lung inflammation associated with secondary lesions, the primary granulomas remained largely unaffected. Treatment of animals with the experimental drug R207910 (TMC207) for 6 weeks was highly effective with almost complete eradication of the bacteria throughout both the primary and the secondary lesions. Most importantly, the few remnants of acid-fast bacilli remaining after R207910 treatment were to be found extracellular, in a microenvironment of residual primary lesion necrosis with incomplete dystrophic calcification. This zone of the primary granuloma is hypoxic and is morphologically similar to what has been described for human lung lesions. These results show that this acellular rim may, therefore, be a primary location of persisting bacilli withstanding drug treatment.

  19. Location of Persisting Mycobacteria in a Guinea Pig Model of Tuberculosis Revealed by R207910▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenaerts, Anne J.; Hoff, Donald; Aly, Sahar; Ehlers, Stefan; Andries, Koen; Cantarero, Luis; Orme, Ian M.; Basaraba, Randall J.

    2007-01-01

    The lengthy chemotherapy of tuberculosis reflects the ability of a small subpopulation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria to persist in infected individuals. To date, the exact location of these persisting bacteria is not known. Lung lesions in guinea pigs infected with M. tuberculosis have striking similarities, such as necrosis, mineralization, and hypoxia, to natural infections in humans. Guinea pigs develop necrotic primary lesions after aerosol infection that differ in their morphology compared to secondary lesions resulting from hematogenous dissemination. In infected guinea pigs conventional therapy for tuberculosis during 6 weeks reduced the bacterial load by 1.7 logs in the lungs and, although this completely reversed lung inflammation associated with secondary lesions, the primary granulomas remained largely unaffected. Treatment of animals with the experimental drug R207910 (TMC207) for 6 weeks was highly effective with almost complete eradication of the bacteria throughout both the primary and the secondary lesions. Most importantly, the few remnants of acid-fast bacilli remaining after R207910 treatment were to be found extracellular, in a microenvironment of residual primary lesion necrosis with incomplete dystrophic calcification. This zone of the primary granuloma is hypoxic and is morphologically similar to what has been described for human lung lesions. These results show that this acellular rim may, therefore, be a primary location of persisting bacilli withstanding drug treatment. PMID:17517834

  20. IMMUNOTHERAPY IN TREATMENT OF PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS IN ADOLESCENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Lvova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive examination of 62 adolescents, hospitalized for pulmonary tuberculosis, established high spread of clinical and laboratory markers of secondary immune deficiency: chronic diseases of ear, throat and nose (59,6%, recurrent infection caused by the herpes simplex viruses (SPGV (55,8% ; serological SPGV activation (90,4% and cytomegalovirus infection (CMV (94,2%; absolute lymphopenia (53,8%, low level and lack of interferon-alpha (28,9% and interferongamma (76,9%. Validity, effectiveness and safety of modern technology immunization with interferon -α-2b (VIFERON® 3 million IU and 1 million IU suppositories in 1 month course in the complex treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis was proved with a random research by a «case-control» method. Significant positive clinical and laboratory dynamics was registered: increase in body weight in 84,6 % of adolescents; reduction in the frequency of arrhythmias; increase absolute lymphocyte count (46,1%, decrease in serological SPGV activation (30,8% and CMV infection (61,5% increase in the amount of interferon-alpha (61,5%, and interferon-gamma (61,5% and absence of intolerance and 3 times less undesirable effects of chemotherapy.

  1. DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: from phage typing to whole-genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürch, Anita C; van Soolingen, Dick

    2012-06-01

    Current typing methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex evolved from simple phenotypic approaches like phage typing and drug susceptibility profiling to DNA-based strain typing methods, such as IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) and variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) typing. Examples of the usefulness of molecular typing are source case finding and epidemiological linkage of tuberculosis (TB) cases, international transmission of MDR/XDR-TB, the discrimination between endogenous reactivation and exogenous re-infection as a cause of relapses after curative treatment of tuberculosis, the evidence of multiple M. tuberculosis infections, and the disclosure of laboratory cross-contaminations. Simultaneously, phylogenetic analyses were developed based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), genomic deletions usually referred to as regions of difference (RDs) and spoligotyping which served both strain typing and phylogenetic analysis. National and international initiatives that rely on the application of these typing methods have brought significant insight into the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis. However, current DNA fingerprinting methods have important limitations. They can often not distinguish between genetically closely related strains and the turn-over of these markers is variable. Moreover, the suitability of most DNA typing methods for phylogenetic reconstruction is limited as they show a high propensity of convergent evolution or misinfer genetic distances. In order to fully explore the possibilities of genotyping in the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis and to study the phylogeny of the causative bacteria reliably, the application of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) analysis for all M. tuberculosis isolates is the optimal, although currently still a costly solution. In the last years WGS for typing of pathogens has been explored and yielded important additional information on strain diversity in comparison to the

  2. MRI in intraspinal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.K.; Gupta, S.; Kumar, S.; Kohli, A.; Misra, U.K.; Gujral, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    We studied 20 patients with intraspinal tuberculosis (TB), to characterise the MRI features of tuberculous meningitis and myelitis. MRI leptomeningitis and intramedullary involvement in 11 patients, intramedullary lesions alone in 5, leptomeningitis alone in 2, and isolated extradural disease in 2. TB leptomeningitis was characterised by loculation of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), nerve root thickening and clumping (seen only in the lumbar region) or complete obliteration of the subarachnoid space on unenhanced images. Gd-DTPA-enhanced images proved useful in 6 cases, revealing linear enhancement of the surface of the spinal cord and nerve roots or plaque-like enhancement of the dura-arachnoid mater complex. Intramedullary lesions included tuberculomas (8), cord oedema (5) and cavitation (3). In seven cases of intramedullary tuberculoma multiple lesions with skip areas were seen, without significant cord swelling. One patient had an isolated lesion in the conus medullaris. The lesions were iso- or hypointense on T1-weighted images, iso-, hypo- or hyperintense on T2-weighted images and showed rim or nodular enhancement with contrast medium. (orig.)

  3. Extrathoracic manifestations of tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienzl-Palma, D.; Prosch, H.

    2016-01-01

    Besides the lungs, tuberculosis (TB) can affect any organ system. In most cases, extrathoracic TB occurs in immunosuppressed patients as part of a severe illness via hematogenous spread. Extrathoracic involvement most commonly involves abdominal organs, especially the urogenital tract and less commonly the central nervous system (CNS) and the musculoskeletal system. Most frequently, computed tomography (CT) is used for detecting extrathoracic TB manifestations, except for CNS and musculoskeletal manifestations, where contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the gold standard. Extrathoracic manifestations of TB may be indistinguishable from inflammatory or malignant causes. Due to unspecific symptoms the diagnosis is often delayed. This article summarizes and discusses the various radiological manifestations of extrathoracic manifestation of TB. Radiological modalities for screening extrathoracic TB are CT and MRI. Conventional X-radiographs do not play a role in the diagnosis of extrathoracic TB. The possibility of extrathoracic TB should be considered particularly in immunosuppressed patients, such as the homeless, alcoholics or drug addicts or in patients with an immigrant background from the endemic areas of TB. The most likely site of extrathoracic TB is the abdomen; however, infections of the CNS or musculoskeletal systems and multisystem infections can also occur. In patients with suspected extrathoracic TB, radiological modalities for screening are CT, especially for abdominal infections and lymphadenopathy and MRI with contrast media for the musculoskeletal system and the CNS. (orig.) [de

  4. Tuberculosis in Aboriginal Canadians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon H Hoeppner

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Endemic tuberculosis (TB was almost certainly present in Canadian aboriginal people (aboriginal Canadians denotes status Indians, Inuit, nonstatus Indians and metis as reported by Statistics Canada before the Old World traders arrived. However, the social changes that resulted from contact with these traders created the conditions that converted endemic TB into epidemic TB. The incidence of TB varied inversely with the time interval from this cultural collision, which began on the east coast in the 16th century and ended in the Northern Territories in the 20th century. This relatively recent epidemic explains why the disease is more frequent in aboriginal children than in Canadian-born nonaboriginal people. Treatment plans must account for the socioeconomic conditions and cultural characteristics of the aboriginal people, especially healing models and language. Prevention includes bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination and chemoprophylaxis, and must account for community conditions, such as rates of suicide, which have exceeded the rate of TB. The control of TB requires a centralized program with specifically directed funding. It must include a program that works in partnership with aboriginal communities.

  5. Tuberculosis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaither, K; Apuzzio, J J

    1996-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) during pregnancy and in the perinatal period was once considered to be an infrequent event in the United States. After a decade of steady decline, however, the disease has begun a resurgence. According to the CDC, a 20% increase in the number of reported cases occurred between 1985 and 1992. The factors associated with this increase are the emergence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the development of drug-resistant organisms, substance abuse, homelessness, and immigration. Environmental factors promoting transmission can be found in overcrowded areas such as correctional facilities, nursing homes, hospitals, and migrant-worker camps. For a large number of medically underserved women, the obstetrician is the only interface with medical care, as most of these patients do not have primary-care providers. It is important, therefore, that health-care providers recognize the clinical symptoms of TB and follow the recognized guidelines for antenatal screening for TB because the omission of these steps can lead to potentially disastrous sequelae in the fetus and neonate.

  6. Tuberculosis and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Tuberculosis is responsible for far more women's deaths each year than all the causes of maternal deaths combined (e.g., in 1990, 720,000 vs. 428,000). TB attacks women in the most productive years of life, the years in which they raise children and work in the household, labor force, or fields. Mothers infected with TB are a threat to their children, since they often infect their children with TB before they die. Lack of diagnosis or poor treatment account for the deaths of around 33% of the 6 million women with TB at any given time. Various reasons explain why women do not seek or receive treatment: lack of time because of family and work demands, lack of money and transportation, the need to get permission from or be accompanied by a male family member to visit a health center, the stigma of infertility, poor education, and lack of female health workers in cultures where female modesty is important. Deaths of women to TB have major effects on child survival, economic productivity, and family well-being. In order to increase case finding and treatment, TB programs and health workers must respond to the needs of women.

  7. [Penile Tuberculosis : A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanaka, Takahiro; Nomura, Hironori; Tsujimura, Go; Ko, Yoko; Kinjyo, Takanori; Yoshioka, Iwao; Takada, Shingo; Yahata, Yoko; Mizutani, Tetsu

    2017-04-01

    A 66-year-old man presented with a chief complaint of glans penis pain, induration, and discharge of pus. He was prescribed a course of antibiotics, but the condition persisted despite treatment. Thus, we differrentially diagnosed the patient with penile tuberculosis and pyoderma gangrenosum, and performed a biopsy of the penis. The biopsy result was thickening of the horny layer epidermis with only a foreign body granuloma composed of inflammatory cells, and did not lead to a definitive diagnosis. Thoraca-abdominal computed tomography revealed axillary lymphadenopathy with necrosis. Suspecting tuberculosis lymphadenitis, we performed T-spot and QuantiFERONtests. The result was T-spot negative and QuantiFERONpositive, so we diagnosed the patient with penile tuberculosis, and started antituberculosis medication. In about half a year after the start of treatment the symptoms subsided, and lymphadenopathy showed reduction.

  8. Experimental studies on cancer chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    The further development of the chemotherapy of cancer in the experimental and clinical fields necessitates a profound knowledge of its chemical, biochemical and pharmacological fundamentals and the mechanism of physiological and pathological growth processes. The 'Arbeitsgemeinschaft Zytostatika' includes chemists, biochemists, pharmacologists, molecular biologists, physicians and immunologists of various scientific institutes and clinics in the Federal Republic of Germany and in West Berlin. It is their aim to carry out basic research as well as clinical-orientated research in the field of the chemotherapy of cancer. In the 15 years of cooperation, fundamental knowledge was gained, especially in the field of the cytotoxic specificity and cancerotoxic selectivity of alkylating cytostatics. New cytostatics with a greater oncostatic selectivity and an altered spectrum of activity were tested and greater knowledge was won on the molecular-biological prerequisites of a rational drug design. (orig.) [de

  9. [Chemotherapy and women fertility preservation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Tristan; Piver, Pascal; Durand, Lise-Marie; Donadel, Lorène; Pech, Jean-Christophe; Roux, Christophe; Aubard, Yves

    2010-01-01

    Agressive chemotherapy can lead to premature ovarian failure and loss of fertility in women and children. Embryo cryopreservation is an established clinical procedure of fertility preservation but with several limitations. Others options are available. Cryopreservation ovarian cortex tissu have to be suggested in case of high gonadotoxic treatment. It doesn't require puberty and delay in initiation of chemotherapy. The first birth in France after orthotopic graft of ovarian tissu thawed have been recently described with a promising process. Oocyte cryopreservation is available for women without partner but the experience is limited. Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist therapy as ovarian protectants seem interesting. Follicular growth and maturation in vitro are still experimental. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Inactive fibrotic lesions versus pulmonary tuberculosis with negative bacteriology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solsona Peiró, Jordi; de Souza Galvão, Maria Luiza; Altet Gómez, Maria Neus

    2014-11-01

    This article analyzes the concept of inactive fibrotic lesions of presumed tuberculous origin (old healed tuberculosis), defined by radiological characteristics and a positive tuberculin skin test (TST), and we examine the evidence-based foundation for the indication of treatment of latent tuberculosis infection in these cases. We explore the risk of reactivation in older and recent literature, and the problems raised by the differential diagnosis with active tuberculosis with negative bacteriology. We also analyze data on the prevalence of fibrotic lesions in the recent literature. We examine the possible role of Interferon Gamma Release Assays (IGRAs) versus TST and other molecular antigen detection techniques in sputum that can aid in establishing the diagnosis and we discuss the current indications for chemoprophylaxis and the different options available. We propose diagnostic guidelines and therapeutic algorithms based on risk stratification by age and other factors in the management of radiological lesions that raise a differential diagnosis between fibrotic lesions and active pulmonary tuberculosis with negative bacteriology. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantity and Quality of Inhaled Dose Predicts Immunopathology in Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Patrick Fennelly

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental animal models of tuberculosis (TB have convincingly demonstrated that inhaled dose predicts immunopathology and survival. In contrast, the importance of inhaled dose has generally not been appreciated in TB epidemiology, clinical science, or the practice of TB control. Infectiousness of TB patients has traditionally been assessed using microscopy for acid-fast bacilli in the sputum, which should be considered only a risk factor. We have recently demonstrated that cough aerosol cultures from index cases with pulmonary TB are the best predictors of new infection among household contacts. We suggest that cough aerosols of M. tuberculosis are the best surrogates of inhaled dose, and we hypothesize that the quantity of cough aerosols is associated with TB infection versus disease. Although several factors affect the quality of infectious aerosols, we propose that the particle size distribution of cough aerosols is an important predictor of primary upper airway disease and cervical lymphadenitis and of immune responses in exposed hosts. We hypothesize that large droplet aerosols (> 5 microns containing M. tuberculosis deposit in the upper airway and can induce immune responses without establishing infection. We suggest that this may partially explain the large proportion of humans who never develop TB disease in spite of having immunological evidence of M. tuberculosis infection (e.g. positive TST or IGRA. If these hypotheses are proven true, they would alter the current paradigm of latent TB infection and reactivation, further demonstrating the need for better biomarkers or methods of assessing TB infection and the risk of developing disease.

  12. Mathematical Modeling of Tuberculosis Granuloma Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve M. Ruggiero

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is one of the most common infectious diseases worldwide. It is estimated that one-third of the world’s population is infected with TB. Most have the latent stage of the disease that can later transition to active TB disease. TB is spread by aerosol droplets containing Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb. Mtb bacteria enter through the respiratory system and are attacked by the immune system in the lungs. The bacteria are clustered and contained by macrophages into cellular aggregates called granulomas. These granulomas can hold the bacteria dormant for long periods of time in latent TB. The bacteria can be perturbed from latency to active TB disease in a process called granuloma activation when the granulomas are compromised by other immune response events in a host, such as HIV, cancer, or aging. Dysregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1 has been recently implicated in granuloma activation through experimental studies, but the mechanism is not well understood. Animal and human studies currently cannot probe the dynamics of activation, so a computational model is developed to fill this gap. This dynamic mathematical model focuses specifically on the latent to active transition after the initial immune response has successfully formed a granuloma. Bacterial leakage from latent granulomas is successfully simulated in response to the MMP-1 dynamics under several scenarios for granuloma activation.

  13. The cell envelope glycoconjugates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angala, Shiva Kumar; Belardinelli, Juan Manuel; Huc-Claustre, Emilie; Wheat, William H.; Jackson, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains the second most common cause of death due to a single infectious agent. The cell envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of the disease in humans, is a source of unique glycoconjugates and the most distinctive feature of the biology of this organism. It is the basis of much of Mtb pathogenesis and one of the major causes of its intrinsic resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. At the same time, the unique structures of Mtb cell envelope glycoconjugates, their antigenicity and essentiality for mycobacterial growth provide opportunities for drug, vaccine, diagnostic and biomarker development, as clearly illustrated by recent advances in all of these translational aspects. This review focuses on our current understanding of the structure and biogenesis of Mtb glycoconjugates with particular emphasis on one of most intriguing and least understood aspect of the physiology of mycobacteria: the translocation of these complex macromolecules across the different layers of the cell envelope. It further reviews the rather impressive progress made in the last ten years in the discovery and development of novel inhibitors targeting their biogenesis. PMID:24915502

  14. Neutrophils in Tuberculosis: Heterogeneity Shapes the Way?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Infection with M. tuberculosis remains one of the most common infections in the world. The outcome of the infection depends on host ability to mount effective protection and balance inflammatory responses. Neutrophils are innate immune cells implicated in both processes. Accordingly, during M. tuberculosis infection, they play a dual role. Particularly, they contribute to the generation of effector T cells, participate in the formation of granuloma, and are directly involved in tissue necrosis, destruction, and infection dissemination. Neutrophils have a high bactericidal potential. However, data on their ability to eliminate M. tuberculosis are controversial, and the results of neutrophil depletion experiments are not uniform. Thus, the overall roles of neutrophils during M. tuberculosis infection and factors that determine these roles are not fully understood. This review analyzes data on neutrophil defensive and pathological functions during tuberculosis and considers hypotheses explaining the dualism of neutrophils during M. tuberculosis infection and tuberculosis disease. PMID:28626346

  15. Tuberculosis screening in patients with HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrrum, Stephanie; Bonsu, Frank; Hanson-Nortey, Nii Nortey

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis screening of people living with HIV (PLHIV) can contribute to early tuberculosis diagnosis and improved patient outcomes. Evidence-based guidelines for tuberculosis screening are available, but literature assessing their implementation and the quality of clinical practice...... is scarce. OBJECTIVES: To assess tuberculosis screening practices and the effectiveness of audit and performance feedback to improve quality of tuberculosis screening at HIV care clinics in Ghana. DESIGN: Healthcare providers at 10 large HIV care clinics prospectively registered patient consultations during...... May and October 2014, before and after a performance feedback intervention in August 2014. The outcomes of interest were overall tuberculosis suspicion rate during consultations and provider adherence to the International Standards for Tuberculosis Care and the World Health Organizations' guidelines...

  16. Metastatic hidradenocarcinoma: Surgery and chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amel, Trabelsi; Olfa, Gharbi; Faten, Hammedi; Makrem, Hochlef; Slim, Ben Ahmed; Moncef, Mokni

    2009-12-01

    Hidradenocarcinoma is a rare carcinoma of high malignant potential. It most metastasizes to regional lymph nodes and distant viscera. We report a case of 52-year-old woman who presented with an invasive hidradenocarcinoma of the finger, treated with surgical excision. The patient presented with skin and lymph node metastases four years after, treated by chemotherapy. Hidradenocarcinoma is an aggressive tumor. It seems important to use adjuvant therapies particularly for recurrent and metastatic forms.

  17. Metastatic hidradenocarcinoma: Surgery and chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Trabelsi Amel; Gharbi Olfa; Hammedi Faten; Hochlef Makrem; Ben Ahmed Slim; Mokni Moncef

    2009-01-01

    Context: Hidradenocarcinoma is a rare carcinoma of high malignant potential. It most metastasizes to regional lymph nodes and distant viscera. Case report: We report a case of 52-year-old woman who presented with an invasive hidradenocarcinoma of the finger, treated with surgical excision. The patient presented with skin and lymph node metastases four years after, treated by chemotherapy. Conclusion: Hidradenocarcinoma is an aggressive tumor. It seems important to use adjuvant therapies parti...

  18. Sonographic findings of renal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Chong Hyun; Lee, Chang Joon; Kim, Seung Hyun

    1990-01-01

    In order to determine sonographic characteristic of renal tuberculosis, we retrospectively collected 27 cases during a 5 year period. Infected kidneys showed large size (52%) and lobulating contour (76%). In 19 cases of increased parenchymal echogenicity, most of them (16 cases) showed decreased parenchymal thickness. We divided hydronephrotic patterns into 4 categories; predominant calyceal dilatation with mild or no pelvic dilatation (67%), focal calyectasis without pelvic dilation (15%), parenchymal cavitation without hydronephrosis (11%) and proportional hydronephrosis with calyceal deformity (7%). Our findings suggest that disproportional hydronephrosis would be the characteristic finding of renal tuberculosis

  19. The use of mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit typing and whole genome sequencing to inform tuberculosis prevention and control activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Gwendolyn L; Sintchenko, Vitali

    2013-07-01

    Molecular strain typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been possible for only about 20 years; it has significantly improved our understanding of the evolution and epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and tuberculosis disease. Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit typing, based on 24 variable number tandem repeat unit loci, is highly discriminatory, relatively easy to perform and interpret and is currently the most widely used molecular typing system for tuberculosis surveillance. Nevertheless, clusters identified by mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit typing sometimes cannot be confirmed or adequately defined by contact tracing and additional methods are needed. Recently, whole genome sequencing has been used to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms and other mutations, between genotypically indistinguishable isolates from the same cluster, to more accurately trace transmission pathways. Rapidly increasing speed and quality and reduced costs will soon make large scale whole genome sequencing feasible, combined with the use of sophisticated bioinformatics tools, for epidemiological surveillance of tuberculosis.

  20. Ultrasonographic and CT findings of hepatosplenic tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Un Hyeon; Lee, Jeong Seok; Ko, Kang Seok; Park, Byung Ran; Yang, Dong Cheol; Im, Ju Hyeon; Kang, In Young

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the ultrasonographic and CT findings of hepatosplenic tuberculosis Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the ultrasonographic and CT findings of confirmed hepatosplenic tuberculosis in 12 patients. Six were men and six were women ; their average age was 41, and most were in their twenties. Lesions of the liver and spleen, as well as associated findings such as abdominal tuberculosis and other organ involvement of tuberculosis were analyzed. Results : There were three cases of hepatic tuberculosis, seven of splenic tuberculosis, and two of hepatosplenic involvement of tuberculosis. On the basis of the ultrasonographic and CT findings, hepatosplenic tuberculosis was classified as one of two patterns : miliary or micronodular, ormacronodular. The micronodular type was more common (9/12 cases) being characterized by innumerable micronodules,and with easy coalescence in the liver and spleen in five of the nine cases. The macronodular type of low density mass was noted in the other three patients. Splenomegaly was noted in 12 cases and hepatomegaly in ten. Pulmonary tuberculosis-including the miliary type(n=5)-was noted in eight patients. Associated abdominal tuberculosis such as lymphadenopathy with central low density and peripheral rim enhancement (n=6), tuberculous peritonitis(n=3),highly attenuated ascites(n=6), adrenal tuberculosis(n=1), renal tuberculosis(n=1), ovarian abscess(n=1), psoasabscess(n=1), and systemic tuberculosis such as central nervous system tuberculoma(n=2), cervical lymphadenopathy(n=4) and tuberculous spondylitis(n=1) were noted. Conclusion : Ultrasonography and CT were valuable in the detection and diagnosis of hepatosplenic tuberculosis