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Sample records for tubal factor infertility

  1. Diagnostic methods of tubal factor in infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korzon, T.; Mielnik, J.; Gosciniak, W.

    1993-01-01

    The diagnostic methods of tubal factor in infertility have been presented. In details have been discussed PJ, PK HSG and pelviscopy. These examinations themselves constitute the basic ones in infertility. We turned our attention into technical details and possible mistakes which may occur at the time of performing them, these misinterpretations may lead to absolutely wrong conclusion and diagnosis. Authors have wide experience in performing the discussed examinations and this allows them to share their opinion. Over the years several thousand of PK and HSG examinations have been carried out and also 1000 laparoscopies. (author)

  2. Tubal Factor Infertility and Perinatal Risk After Assisted Reproductive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawwass, Jennifer F.; Crawford, Sara; Kissin, Dmitry M.; Session, Donna R.; Boulet, Sheree; Jamieson, Denise J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess trends of tubal factor infertility and to evaluate risk of miscarriage and delivery of preterm or low birth weight (LBW) neonates among women with tubal factor infertility using assisted reproductive technology (ART). METHODS We assessed trends of tubal factor infertility among all fresh and frozen, donor, and nondonor ART cycles performed annually in the United States between 2000 and 2010 (N=1,418,774) using the National ART Surveillance System. The data set was then limited to fresh, nondonor in vitro fertilization cycles resulting in pregnancy to compare perinatal outcomes for cycles associated with tubal compared with male factor infertility. We performed bivariate and multivariable analyses controlling for maternal characteristics and calculated adjusted risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS The percentage of ART cycles associated with tubal factor infertility diagnoses decreased from 2000 to 2010 (26.02–14.81%). Compared with male factor infertility, tubal factor portended an increased risk of miscarriage (14.0% compared with 12.7%, adjusted RR 1.08, 95% CI 1.04–1.12); risk was increased for both early and late miscarriage. Singleton neonates born to women with tubal factor infertility had an increased risk of pre-term birth (15.8% compared with 11.6%, adjusted RR 1.27, 95% CI 1.20–1.34) and LBW (10.9% compared with 8.5%, adjusted RR 1.28, 95% CI 1.20–1.36). Significant increases in risk persisted for early and late preterm delivery and very low and moderately LBW delivery. A significantly elevated risk was also detected for twin, but not triplet, pregnancies. CONCLUSION Tubal factor infertility, which is decreasing in prevalence in the United States, is associated with an increased risk of miscarriage, preterm birth, and LBW delivery as compared with couples with male factor infertility using ART. PMID:23812461

  3. Anti-Müllerian hormone levels in salpingectomized compared with nonsalpingectomized women with tubal factor infertility and women with unexplained infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grynnerup, Anna Garcia-Alix Haugen; Lindhard, Anette; Sørensen, Steen

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the consequence of salpingectomy on ovarian reserve by measuring anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels before in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment in salpingectomized women compared with nonsalpingectomized women with tubal factor infertility, women with unexplained infertility and...

  4. Comparison of Levels of Antibodies against Chlamydia Trachomatis in Infertile Women Due to Tubal Factors and Fertile Women

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    F Ghalmbor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chlamydia trachomatis infection is a common pathogen in sexual transmitted disease, but most of female patients with this infection are asymptomatic. Sequealae include pelvic inflammatory disease, infertility and ectopic pregnancy. The aim of the study was to determine the association between Chlamydia trachomatis and tubal factor infertility, if significant. Methods: This prospective, case -control study was done in April 2005-April2006. The study group consisted of 125 patients with tubal factor infertility and the control group included 125 fertile women. The level of antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis was determined in both groups by ELIZA method. Results: Antibody to Chlamydia trachomatis was present in 29 women in the study group (23.2% and in15 women in the control group ( 12%, respectively, (P< 0.005. The mean level of antibody in both groups was 0.76 and 0.49, respectively (P<0.0005. Conclusion: The study showed that the level of antibody against Chlamydia is significantly more in tubal factor infertile women. We therefore suggest the screening of Chlamydia antibody testing is necessary for tubal factor infertility workup.

  5. Chlamydia trachomatis and chlamydial heat shock protein 60-specific antibody and cell-mediated responses predict tubal factor infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiitinen, A.; Surcel, H.-M.; Halttunen, M.

    2006-01-01

    60)-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies were analysed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Proliferative reactivity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was studied in vitro against Chlamydia elementary body (EB) and recombinant CHSP60 antigens. RESULTS: C. trachomatis......BACKGROUND: To evaluate the role of Chlamydia trachomatis-induced humoral and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses in predicting tubal factor infertility (TFI). METHODS: Blood samples were taken from 88 women with TFI and 163 control women. C. trachomatis and chlamydial heat shock protein 60 (CHSP...

  6. Induced Abortion and the Risk of Tubal Infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Objective To explore the association between induced abortion and tubal infertility in Chengdu, China.Methods A 1 :2 case-control study was designed. Infertile women with bilateral tubal occlusion in the case group compared with two control groups: infertile control group with bilateral tubal patency and pregnant control group with currently pregnancy. Data were collected using questionnaires through face-to-face interviews, covering the subjects' demographic details and histories of gynecology and obstetrics. Adjusted odds ratio was calculated as a measure of the association using stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis.Results Induced abortion was not found to be associated with tubal infertility in the analysis including either the infertile controls or the pregnant controls, but other risk factors were found, such as history of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), lower abdominal surgeries, dysmenorrhea and pregnancy.Conclusion It is contended that facing an increasing trend of infertile cases with tubal occlusion in China, it is emphasized that special attention should paid to the long term impact of reproductive tract infection, especially, asymptomatic ones, rather than induced abortion.

  7. The attitudes of Dutch fertility specialists towards the addition of genetic testing in screening of tubal factor infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malogajski, Jelena; Jansen, Marleen E; Ouburg, Sander; Ambrosino, Elena; Terwee, Caroline B; Morré, Servaas A

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to identify elements perceived by Dutch fertility specialists as barriers and facilitators for the introduction of genetic testing, and their attitudes towards the use of genetic information. The genetic test would be implemented in routine screening for tubal pathology and identifies SNPs relevant for the immune response causing tubal pathology. Experienced reproductive specialists working in Dutch Academic Hospitals were interviewed. Based on the results of four interviews a questionnaire was developed and used to survey medical doctors in six out of eight Dutch Academic hospitals. 60.4% (n=91) stated that the addition of genetic markers to the Chlamydia trachomatis antibody test (CAT) in screening for tubal pathology would increase screening accuracy. 68.2% (n=90) agreed they would require additional training on clinical genetics. Clinical utility (91.2%, n=91) and cost-effectiveness (95.6%, n=91) were recognized by the respondents as important factors in gaining support for the new screening strategy. In summary, respondents showed a positive attitude towards the implementation of a genetic test combined with CAT for tubal factor infertility (TFI) screening. To gain their support the majority of respondents agreed that clinical utility, specifically cost-effectiveness, is an important factor. Comprehensive research about economic implications and utility regarding the introduction of genomic markers should be the next step in the implementation strategy. Furthermore, education and training would need to be developed and offered to fertility care professionals about genetic markers, their interpretation, and implications for clinical decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. risk factors for abnormal tubal hysterosalpingographic findings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    So many presumed risk factors for female tubal infertility are seen among. Nigerian women. ... strategies such as health awareness campaigns against unwanted pregnancy, promotion of responsible ..... of CT findings in acute pyogenic pelvic.

  9. Risk factors for abnormal tubal hysterosalpingographic findings in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Acquired structural abnormalities of the female reproductive tract contributes to the aetiology of female infertility. So many presumed risk factors for female tubal infertility are seen among Nigerian women. However, reports on the relationship between these factors and tubal pathology as seen on ...

  10. Antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis heat shock proteins in women with tubal factor infertility are associated with prior infection by C. trachomatis but not by C. pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, K; Osser, S; Birkelund, Svend

    1999-01-01

    The antibody response to heat shock proteins 60 and 10 were studied in 163 patients with tubal factor infertility and in 163 age-matched pregnant women. The associations of these antibodies with specific antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis and to Chlamydia pneumoniae as well as with antibodies...... proteins and to C. trachomatis but no independent influence of antibodies to C. pneumoniae. No interaction between C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae suggesting a synergistic effect was found although the heat shock proteins from these two organisms are immunologically similar. Antibodies to the chlamydial...

  11. Diagnostic value and timing of serum antichlamidial antibody level evaluation during infertility workup among infertile women in whom tubal factor was detected with diagnostic laparoscopy

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    Serkan Kahyaoğlu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: With normal hysterosalpingography (HSG results, selecting suitable candidates for the laparoscopic treatment of probable pelvic adhesions following previous pelvic inflammatory disease, it would be wise to investigate serum antibody screening against chlamidia trachomatis. It is worth to evaluate whether it is useful to detect a negative antichlamidial antibody disease for cancelling laparoscopy for a while with abnormal HSG findings. These two subjects have been investigated in study. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For detecting diagnostic value of serum antichlamidial antibody, in our infertility clinic, postoperative blood samples of 80 patients who were hospitalized for diagnostic laparoscopy to investigate infertility ethiology between May 2004 and November 2005 have been tested with microelisa method for antichlamidial IgM and IgG antibodies. HSG films of the patients performed at least one year were evaluated. Venous blood was drawn from these patients during postoperative early period for studying serum IgM and IgG antibodies of chlamidia trachomatis and the results were compared with operative findings. RESULTS: According to the antichlamidial antibody levels 60 (75% patients have not been infected with chlamidia and 20 (25% patients have been infected previously. When the patients were divided to two groups; normal and abnormal; based on preoperative HSG films; 18 (30% of the 60 patients with abnormal HSG films and 2 (10% of the 20 patients with normal HSG films had positive antichlamidial antibody levels respectively. CONCLUSION: The relationship between chlamidia trachomatis infection and tubal infertility has been demonstrated among 85% of patients with positive antichlamidial antibody levels and 46.7% of patients with negative levels who had tubal passage defects detected during diagnostic laparoscopy.

  12. Performance of the multitarget Mikrogen Chlamydia trachomatis IgG ELISA in the prediction of tubal factor infertility (TFI) in subfertile women : Comparison with the Medac MOMP IgG ELISA plus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ess, Eleanne F.; Ouburg, Sander; Spaargaren, Joke; Land, Jolande A.; Morre, Servaas A.

    2017-01-01

    There is a need for more accurate Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) IgG antibody tests for tubal factor infertility (TFI) diagnostics. We evaluated the predictive value for TFI of Medac ELISA plus (MOMP) and multitarget Mikrogen ELISA (MOMP-CPAF-TARP). Based on Medac ELISA plus results, 183 subfertile

  13. Infertility caused by tubal blockage: An ayurvedic appraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla (Upadhyaya), Kamayani; Karunagoda, Kaumadi; Dei, L. P.

    2010-01-01

    Tubal blockage is one of the most important factors for female infertility. This condition is not described in Ayurvedic classics, as the fallopian tube itself is not mentioned directly there. The present study is an effort to understand the disease according to Ayurvedic principles. Correlating fallopian tubes with the Artavavaha (Artava-bija-vaha) Srotas, its block is compared with the Sanga Srotodushti of this Srotas. Charak's opinion that the diseases are innumerable and newly discovered ones should be understood in terms of Prakriti, Adhishthana, Linga, and Aayatana, is followed, to describe this disease. An effort has been made to evaluate the role of all the three Doshas in producing blockage, with classification of the disease done as per the Dasha Roganika. PMID:22131704

  14. Laparoscopic evaluation of tubal pathology in cases of infertility

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    Maherunnessa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is a public health problem in developed and developing countries. Diagnostic laparoscopy is a generally accepted procedure to detect pelvic organ pathologies affecting fertility. This study was undertaken to find out the tubal pathology contributing to primary and secondary infertility by laparoscopic examination. The study was carried out in the department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, BIRDEM during the period of January 2001 to December 2001. The study group comprised of 100 cases of infertile patients of age between 20 to 40 years. Sixty seven percent patients had primary infertility and 33% patients had secondary infertility. Size and shape of the uterus was normal in 69% cases and bicornuate uterus was found in 2% cases. Out of total cases, 71% and 69% had normal right and left fallopian tubes respectively. Patency of right and left fallopian tube was normal in 90% and 89% cases respectively while 11% and 10% had peritubal adhesions. Laparoscopy examination is an important tool for evaluation of tubal pathology contributing to infertility and might play a major role in infertility management. Ibrahim Med. Coll. J. 2013; 7(2: 38-40

  15. Genital tuberculosis is common among females with tubal factor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: We conducted a prospective observational study in Al Thawra General Hospital (from March 2012 to February 2014). Of a total 151 women who had tubal factor infertility, 61 cases were investigated for genital tuberculosis. Women who were found to have the disease were treated by antitubercular therapy and the ...

  16. Genital tuberculosis is common among females with tubal factor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abdulhakim Ali Al eryani

    2015-01-02

    Jan 2, 2015 ... Of a total 151 women who had tubal factor infertility, 61 cases were ... This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license ... countries and as high as 19% in India.4 ... All patients were subjected to extensive work-up including complete .... such disadvantages of AFB culture limit its practical utility.

  17. Relationship between serum Chlamydia trachomatis antibody titer and tubal block in infertile Egyptian women

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    Ahmed Khairy Makled

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: ELISA can be used as a simple, noninvasive screening test for C. trachomatis IgG antibodies, with a high predictive value for tubal occlusion in infertile Egyptian women, however larger studies are needed to confirm our results.

  18. Overcoming male factor infertility with intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Edson; Zanetti, Bianca Ferrarini; Braga, Daniela Paes de Almeida Ferreira; Setti, Amanda Souza; Figueira, Rita de Cássia Sávio; Nardi, Aguinaldo César; Iaconelli, Assumpto

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of male factor infertility on intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) outcomes compared with a control group presenting isolated tubal factor. This retrospective study included 743 couples undergoing ICSI as a result of isolated male factor and a control group consisting of 179 couples undergoing ICSI as a result of isolated tubal factor, performed in a private university- -affiliated in vitro fertilization center, between January/2010 and December/2016. Patients were divided into two groups according to maternal age: women ≤35 years old and >35 years old. The effects of infertility causes on laboratorial and clinical ICSI outcomes were evaluated using Student's t-test and (2 test. No differences in controlled ovarian stimulation outcomes were observed between male factor cycles and tubal factor cycles in the two age groups. Implantation (male factor 35.5% vs. tubal factor 32.0%, p=0.340), pregnancy (male factor 46.9% vs. tubal factor 40.9%, p=0.184) and miscarriage (male factor 10.3% vs. tubal factor 10.6%, p=0.572) rates were similar between the infertility groups, irrespective of female age. Considering maternal age, the cancelation rate was higher in older women (>35 years old) undergoing ICSI as a result of male factor infertility (17.4% vs. 8.9%, p=0.013). Our results showed that there is no difference in the outcomes of pregnancy between couples with male or tubal factor infertility, which indicates that ICSI surpasses the worse specific outcomes associated with male factor.

  19. Role Of Hysteroscopy In The Evaluation Of Tubal Patency In Infertile Women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashed, A.M.; Sweedan, Kh.H.; ElBishry, G.A.; Serag, I.F.; Ahmed, W.E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of hysteroscopy as a method for the diagnosis of tubal patency using saline distention media. Methods: In this prospective study, 64 infertile women underwent hysteroscopy (HSC) and hysterosalpingography (HSG) on two consecutive days. Transvaginal ultrasonography (TVS) carried out before and after hysteroscopy in order to measure the fluid in the cul-de-sac.The difference between the two methods in diagnosis of tubal patency was compared using laparoscopy/chromotubationas a gold standard. Fluid volume measurements were used to determine a cut off value for tubal patency. Pain was recorded at the end of the processes. Results: According to the laparoscopy, the sensitivity and specificity of HSC and HSG in detecting tubal patency were (94.6% and 100% vs 92.8% and 50%, respectively). The best cut off point of the fluid volume in the cul-de-sac at which both tubes are patent is 6 ml. All of the patients reported significantly less pain during hysteroscopy in response to HSG. Conclusions: office HSC combined with TVS may be used as an alternative to HSG in the diagnosis of tubal patency in an easy, rapid, safe way with minimal pain.

  20. Salpingitis isthmica nodosa in female infertility and tubal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, L; Sperling, Lene; Hansen, U

    1991-01-01

    -examination, it was found in 24 patients. Ten women with SIN were bilaterally salpingectomized. Only one woman had SIN in both tubes. Women with SIN gave birth to as many children as women without SIN. After SIN had been diagnosed, no children were born, but this was not statistically different from the frequency of births...... with infertility, pregnancies, outcome of pregnancies, births, pelvic inflammatory disease and salpingitis. Sections from the isthmus were present in the specimens from 223 tubes from 193 patients and were analysed by the same pathologist. Originally, SIN was found in 12 patients but on re...

  1. Uterine and tubal anatomical abnormalities in infertile women: diagnosis with routine hysterosalpingography prior to selective laparoscopy

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    Mwaffaq Heis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the findings and usefulness of hysterosalpingography as a routine investigation in the fertility workup prior to selective laparoscopy. Design: Descriptive retrospective study. Setting: A university hospital in the north of Jordan. Subjects: All hysterosalpingographies performed in the period between 1st January and 31 December 2008. Outcome measures: Detection of uterine and fallopian tube abnormalities and their correlation with laparoscopic findings. Results: During the study period, 281 infertile women underwent hysterosalpingography with no post procedural complications. The mean (SD age was 31.5 (5.91 years. Mean (SD duration of infertility was 4 (3.44 years. Infertility was reported as primary and secondary by 119 (42.3 % and 162 (57.6 %, respectively. Altogether 281 patients and 562 tubes were examined. Of those, 402 were patent and 160 occluded. There was only one woman in whom peritubal adhesions were diagnosed. Because of hysterosalpingographically diagnosed tubal occlusion, 46 women (16.4 % were referred for laparoscopy. Eight (17.3% of them were treated with unilateral salpingectomy and 28 (60.8% with bilateral salpingectomy. Salpingolysis was performed for 7 (15.2% women, and 3 (6.7% women had untreatable adhesions. The concordance was 71.7%. The sensitivity of HSG was 80%, the specificity 50%, the negative predictive value 61% and the positive predictive value 71%. Of the total of 281 women, 30 (10.7% conceived within 1 - 11 months after the hysterosalpingography. Conclusions: The very high abnormal predictive value of hysterosalpingography in the diagnosis of tubal occlusion suggests that this procedure could be performed as a screening examination.

  2. Effect of different ultrasound contrast materials and temperatures on patient comfort during intrauterine and tubal assessment for infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenzl, Vanja

    2012-01-01

    Hysterosalpingo-contrast sonography (HyCoSy) is safe and easy to perform outpatient method in the evaluation of female infertility. During this procedure a certain level of discomfort and pain are experienced by patients. On the basis of reducing avoidable pain inductors the aim of this study was to compare pain sensation due to different warmth of applied contrasts (sterile saline and Echovist ® ). Prospective and randomized study was performed on patients requiring tubal and uterine assessment during standard infertility work up. One group of patients was examined using both contrasts at room temperature and the other group using preheated contrasts at body temperature. Pain experience of the procedure was rated by patients for each contrast by numerical scale (0–10) immediately after the procedure. There was significant statistical difference between pain scores during application of two contrasts in each group; Echovist induces significantly less pain in comparison to sterile saline at the same temperature (P = 0.002, 0.001). Between two groups there is also statistically significant difference in pain during introduction of the same contrast at different temperature (P < 0.001). The most tolerable for the patient is body temperature of the applied contrasts although their structure and concentrations can be another factor associated with tolerability of the procedure.

  3. Effect of different ultrasound contrast materials and temperatures on patient comfort during intrauterine and tubal assessment for infertility

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    Fenzl, Vanja, E-mail: vanja.radic@inet.hr [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital “Merkur”, Zajčeva 19 (Croatia); University of Applied Health Studies, Mlinarska Cesta 38, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-12-15

    Hysterosalpingo-contrast sonography (HyCoSy) is safe and easy to perform outpatient method in the evaluation of female infertility. During this procedure a certain level of discomfort and pain are experienced by patients. On the basis of reducing avoidable pain inductors the aim of this study was to compare pain sensation due to different warmth of applied contrasts (sterile saline and Echovist{sup ®}). Prospective and randomized study was performed on patients requiring tubal and uterine assessment during standard infertility work up. One group of patients was examined using both contrasts at room temperature and the other group using preheated contrasts at body temperature. Pain experience of the procedure was rated by patients for each contrast by numerical scale (0–10) immediately after the procedure. There was significant statistical difference between pain scores during application of two contrasts in each group; Echovist induces significantly less pain in comparison to sterile saline at the same temperature (P = 0.002, 0.001). Between two groups there is also statistically significant difference in pain during introduction of the same contrast at different temperature (P < 0.001). The most tolerable for the patient is body temperature of the applied contrasts although their structure and concentrations can be another factor associated with tolerability of the procedure.

  4. Analysis of tubal pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, N.; Iqbal, F.; Tayyeb, R.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: This study was carried out to determine the frequency, etiological factors, modes of presentation, accuracy of diagnostic modalities, operative findings and surgical treatment of tubal pregnancies. Design: Observational study. Place and duration of study: This study was conducted in gynae unit iii, Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, Lahore from January 1995 to December 1996. Subject and Methods: All the patients diagnosed as a case of tubal pregnancy in two years period were included in the study. Detailed history regarding the symptoms and risk factors of tubal pregnancy was taken followed by clinical examination. The diagnostic and treatment modality used and operative findings were also recorded. All the data was recorded on a proforma and finally the results were analysed. Results: Incidence of tubal pregnancy was found out to be 1:305 deliveries. Out of these, 70% of the cases occurred in the age group of 21-30 years and in patients with low parity (in para 0-2) 65% of the patients had high risk factor e.g previous abdominopelvic surgery PID or history of infertility. Pain was the commonest symptom (90% of cases) followed by vaginal bleeding (80%) adnexal masses (70%) and amenorrhea (65%). Acute tubal pregnancy was found in 85% of the cases while 15% of cases had chronic tubal pregnancy. Tubal pregnancy in the ampullary region was detected in 65% patients. Conclusion: Previous abdominopelvic surgery, PID or history of infertility and use of intra-uterine contraceptive device are the main etiologic factors. Most of the patients present at a very late stage with ruptured tubal pregnancy followed by salpingostomy in 95% of cases. Only 5% of cases had conservative surgical treatment i.e salpingostomy. Culdocentesis ultrasonography and laparoscopy were good diagnostic modalities. (author)

  5. Retained Intra-Abdominal Surgical Clamp Complicating Emergency Laparotomy: Incidental Finding on Hysterosalpingogram for Evaluation of Tubal Infertility

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    Adebiyi Gbadebo Adesiyun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The finding of intraperitoneal foreign body complicating surgical intervention broadly remains as an issue of safety in the operative room, a source of emotive concern for the patient, and an upsetting but equally embarrassing situation to the surgeon and the team. However, in the media world, it is a source of sumptuous and captivating headline on the newspaper and to the legal profession, an attractive case to prosecute. A middle age teacher presented with secondary infertility. She had emergency laparotomy fifteen years ago for ruptured tubal ectopic pregnancy in a private hospital and postoperative period was uneventful. Amongst other investigations to find out the cause of infertility, she had hysterosalpingography and a radio-opaque clamp was visualized on the films. She was counselled and had laparotomy. A pair of surgical Kocher clamps was retrieved buried in the mesentery.

  6. Office hysteroscopic-guided selective tubal chromopertubation: acceptability, feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of this new diagnostic non-invasive technique in infertile women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, Gaspare; Palermo, Patrizia; Pasquale, Chiara; Conte, Valeria; Pulcinella, Ruggero; Necozione, Stefano; Cofini, Vincenza; Patacchiola, Felice

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate accuracy, tolerability and side effects of office hysteroscopic-guided chromoperturbations in infertile women without anaesthesia. Forty-nine infertile women underwent the procedure to evaluate tubal patency and the uterine cavity. Women with unilateral or bilateral tubal stenosis at hysteroscopy with chromoperturbation, and women with bilateral tubal patency who did not conceive during the period of six months, underwent laparoscopy with chromoperturbation. The results obtained from hysteroscopy and laparoscopy in the assessment of tubal patency were compared. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive-predictive value and negative-predictive value were used to describe diagnostic performance. Pain and tolerance were assessed during procedure using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Side effects or late complications and pregnancy rate were also recorded three and six months after the procedure. The specificity was 87.8% (95% CI: 73.80-95.90), sensitivity was 85.7% (95% CI 57.20-98.20), positive and negative predictive values were 70.6% (95% CI: 44.00-89) and 94.7% (95% CI: 82.30-99.40), respectively. Pregnancy rate (PR) within six months after performance of hysteroscopy with chromoperturbation was 27%. Office hysteroscopy-guided selective chromoperturbation in infertile patients is a valid technique to evaluate tubal patency and uterine cavity.

  7. Role of hysteroscopy in the evaluation of tubal patency in infertile women

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    Ihab Serag Allam

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: Office hysteroscopy combined with TVS may be used as an alternative to HSG, as an effective, easy, safe and minimal invasive office procedure that can be offered as a first line method for the evaluation of the uterine cavity along with the tubes in infertile women.

  8. Female infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, D.A.; Yoder, I.

    1984-01-01

    Infertility, defined as 1 year of unprotected intercourse without conception, is becoming of increasingly important medical concern. Fertility in both the male and the female is at its peak in the twenties. Many couples today have postponed marriage and/or childbearing into their 30s until careers are established, but at that point fertility may be diminished. The current epidemic of venereal disease has been associated with an increasing incidence of tubal scarring. In addition, the use of intrauterine devices (IUDs) and birth control pills for contraception have let to later problems with pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and ovulation disturbances. The problem of infertility intensifies as the number of babies available for adoption decreases. Therefore, it is estimated that approximately 10-20% of couples will eventually seek medical attention for an infertility-related problem. Fortunately, marked improvements in the results of tubal surgery are concurrently occurring secondary to refinements in microsurgical techniques, and many medical alternatives to induce ovulation are being developed. The male factor causes infertility in 30-40 % of couples, and the female factor is responsible in approximately 50% of couples. No cause is found in 10-20% of couples. This chapter discusses the role of coordinated imaging in the diagnosis and therapy of infertility in the female

  9. Diagnostic Testing for Male Factor Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  10. Hysterosalpingographic evaluation in infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Sik; Shin, Ma Rie; Jung, Eun Mi; Yoon, Chong Hyun; Lee, Chang Joon; Whang, In Soon; Kim, Han Suk

    1984-01-01

    H.S.G. has been proven to be an important diagnostic method in clinical gynecology for under 50 yrs. It is valuable in the investigation of the uterine and tubal factors of female infertility. Hysterosalpingograms of 81 patients with infertility were analyzed and following brief results were obtained. Ratio between primary and secondary infertility was 3 : 5, secondary infertility was more frequent. 2. Age distribution was more frequent under 30 years of age than over 30 years of age. 3. Abnormal uterine findings was only seen in 18 cases, abnormal tubal finding was only seen in 25 cases and combined uterine and tubal abnormalities were seen in 14 cases. 4. Abnormal uterine findings were malposition (12 cases), filling defect (5), spastic uterus (5), irregular contour (3), arcuate uterus (3), didelphia (1), in order of frequency. 5. Abnormal tubal findings were hydrosalpinx (21 cases), occlusion (19), intravasation (6), beaded appearance (3), and diverticula (2), in order of frequency. 6. Negative finding in both uterus tube was seen in 23 cases. 7. In 2 cases, pregnancy after the H.S.G. examination was confirmed.

  11. Environment as a Risk Factor for Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Multigner

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility affects 15% of couples in Western countries. Infertility is defined as the inability to conceive after 1 year of attempts without contraception, but it is not synonymous with sterility. Between 30 and 50% of infertile couples are infertile due to male reasons, mainly due to sperm production disorders. Although some risk factors, most of which are infectious, have been identified, there is still much uncertainty about the origins of male infertility.

  12. Factors Promoting Tubal Ligation in Females Presenting to Tertiary Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammad Ali Qazi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Despite development of new contraceptive methods, sterilization remained the most widely used method. Our objective was to determine the factors contributing to decision making for tubal ligation in females.Materials and methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in Jinnah Post graduate Medical Centre (JPMC between March - November 2008. About 505 Females using contraceptive measures were consecutively included. Those having any severe debilitating disease and unfamiliar with “urdu” language were excluded. Three trained co researchers conducted structured interviews to determine the frequency and factors associated with tubal ligation.Results: The final multiple logistic regression showed illiteracy [AOR 2.91 95% CI 1.53-5.53], number of children < 3 [AOR 6.15 95% CI 2.61-14.50], age of women < 30 [AOR 0.12 95% CI 0.06-0.22] years and information gained through health worker [AOR 3.04 95% CI 1.60-5.80] to be statistically significant.Conclusion: This highlights tubal ligation was more common in uneducated women of age > 35 years having <3 children. The most common means of promoting tubal ligation was information gained through health workers.

  13. Lessons learned from infertility investigations in the public sector ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To determine the main factors causing infertility in an urban, tertiary hospital population. To establish if any such major causal factor could be used to rationalise and improve the service for infertile couples in the public sector. Design. A retrospective analysis of the hospital records of 206 women who had a tubal ...

  14. Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infertility means not being able to become pregnant after a year of trying. If a woman can ... keeps having miscarriages or stillbirths, that's also called infertility. Infertility is fairly common. After one year of ...

  15. Chlamydial Infection, Plasma Peroxidation and Obesity in Tubal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the association of Chlamydial infection, obesity and oxidative response with tubal infertility in Nigerian women. Methods: It was a case-control study of 40 women with tubal infertility and 32 fertile women, respectively, recruited from the Infertility and Family Planning Clinics ...

  16. Is Previous Tubal Ligation a Risk Factor for Hysterectomy because of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanam Moradan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Post tubal ligation syndrome (PTLS is a term used to describe a variety of post tubal ligation side effects or symptoms. These include increased menstrual bleeding and hysterectomy. Whether or not post tubal syndrome is a real entity, it has been a subject of controversy in the medical literature for decades. Numerous studies have reported conflicting conclusions about these symptoms. In this study the incidence of hysterectomy for bleeding disorders among sterilized women was compared with the incidence of hysterectomy for bleeding disorders among non-sterilized female population of the same age.Methods: This study was carried out on 160 women, 38-52 years, who underwent hysterectomy in Amir University Hospital, Semnan, Iran, from September 2008 to September 2011. After gathering of data from medical records, in this study, the incidence of hysterectomy for bleeding disorders among sterilized women was compared with the incidence of hysterectomy for bleeding disorders among nonsterilized female population for the same age.Results: The mean age of the study group was 44/4±5/7 and the mean age of the control group was 45/2±5/3, (p=0.424.The mean parity of the study group was 3/8±1/8 and the mean parity of the control group was 3/5±1/4, (p=0.220. So, in regard to age and parity, two groups were matched. Hysterectomies were performed for 160 cases and abnormal uterine bleeding was the cause of hysterectomy in 67 cases. Among 67 cases, 19 cases (37.3% had previous tubal sterilization + hysterectomy (study group and 48 cases (44% were not undergoing tubal sterilization but had hysterectomy for abnormal bleeding causes (control group. Statistical analyses showed that there were not significant differences between two groups, (RR=0.85; 95% CI: 0.56-1.28; p=0.418.Conclusion: The result of this study showed that previous tubal sterilization is not a risk factor for undergoing hysterectomy because of abnormal uterine bleeding.

  17. A Survey on Infertility in Royan Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kamali

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is defined as failure in pregnancy after one year of unprotected intercourse.Several centers have reported different causes of infertility. The most common causes of infertility are:male factor such as sperm disturbance, female factor such as ovulation dysfunction and tubal factor,both male and female factor, and unexplained infertility .The aim of this study was to survey theepidemiology of infertility in Royan institute.Material and Methods: In this descriptive retrospective study, 2492 infertile couples were studied.These couples were selected by systematic sampling among couples referred to Royan institutebetween 1995 and 2001.All existing demographic data and diagnostic methods were recorded inquestionnaires .Results were analyzed using SPSS version 11.5.Results: In this study, the frequency of primary and secondary infertility was 90.1% and 9.9%,respectively. Among 2492 couples, 50.5% had male factor, 28.6% had female factor, 11.6% had bothmale and female factors and in 9.3% of couples, the cause of infertility was unknown .Results showedthat 32.3% of men had normal spermogram, 23.6% of couples had azoospermia, and 40.3% had spermdisturbance including oligospermia, asthenospermia, oligoasthenospermia and teratospermia .3.8%were not able to collect sample for semen analysis. Among women, different infertility factors included:ovarian factor (20.36%, tubal factor (12.64%, uterine factor (4.13%, endometriosis (1.28% andrecurrent abortion (0.68%. 50.48% of women were normal.Conclusion: Although male factor was the most common cause of infertility in Royan institute, we cannot conclude that this factor is the most common cause of infertility in Iran since this center isconsidered referral especially for male infertility. We suggest performance of similar researches inother centers to evaluate the most common causes of infertility in Iran.

  18. Hysterosalpingographic abnormalities in women with infertility in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Structural tubal abnormalities are responsible for infertility in significant proportion of infertile couples. Hysterosalpingography (HSG) being a simple, less invasive, relatively inexpensive, and reproducible rapid diagnostic test provides valuable information about the uterine cavity and tubal architecture.

  19. Hysterosalpingography and laparoscopy in infertile women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konarzewska, J.; Bianek-Bodzak, A.; Mielcarek, P.; Kobierski, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Despite dynamic development of diagnostic imaging methods and endoscopic procedures, X-ray hysterosalpingography remains the basic diagnostic procedure when anatomical cause of infertility is suspected. The aim of the study was to assess the correlation between HSG results and laparoscopy findings, especially in infertile women with normal results of hysterosalpingography. Material/Methods: The results of HSG and laparoscopies performed between 2002 and 2005 years in 53 infertile women were analyzed retrospectively. The indication for HSG was primary infertility in 44 cases and secondary infertility in 9 cases.Results: The result of HSG was normal in 51%. Pathological findings were observed in 49% of HSG and in 93% of laparoscopies. The most common pathological findings observed during laparoscopy were tubal occlusion (26% cases) and endometriosis (25% cases). Polycystic ovaries and myomas were observed in 20% of the performed laparoscopies. HSG and laparoscopy yield consistent results in evaluation of tubal patency (p < 0.001). Conclusions: HSG remains the method of first choice in the diagnostics of uterine malformations and tubal diseases as causes of infertility. When mechanical factors of female infertility are suspected, HSG allows the optimal choice of more invasive procedure. (authors)

  20. Seroevidence of Chlamydia Trachomatis Antibody in Infertile Women in University of Benin Teaching Hospital (Ubth Benin City, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibadin, K. O.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of Chlamydia trachomatis in the pathogenesis of Pelvic inflammatory disease and majority of cases of salpinigitis are well acknowledged in women. A total of 213 sera from infertile women were tested for antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis by using an indirect solid phases enzyme Immuno absorbent commercial ELISA test. Women with confirmed Hysterosalpinographic report suggesting tubal occlusion (tubal factor infertility had 92 (43.2% followed by 63 (29.6% infertile women with infertile male partner and 58 (27.2% were having unexplained infertility. Out of the tubal factor (TF infertile women 40 (18.8% were seropositive for Chlamydia trachomatis antibodies, as against 19 (8.9% in the group of women with normal patent tubes and 10 (4.6% women with infertile male partner. In this study there was a statistical significant correlation between the infertile women with tubal factor infertility in relation to seroevidence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection with p<0.05. There was no age bias in the serodetection of Chlamydia trachomatis antibodies. The seropositivity of Chlamydia trachomatis is an indication that the organism may be an independent risk factor in the development of an inflammatory process leading to scaring of the uterine tubes in women and thereby causing infertility.

  1. Risk of diabetes according to male factor infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glazer, Clara Helene; Bonde, Jens Peter; Giwercman, Aleksander

    2017-01-01

    for the entire IVF registration period (1994-2012), separate analyses were performed for men identified from the first (1994-2005) and second (2006-2012) IVF registration period owing to heterogeneity in the reporting of male factor infertility in these two time periods, because the reason for male factor...... infertility was not available from the first register. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: Male factor infertility was identified from the variable 'yes' or 'no' from the first IVF register and through a diagnosis code (e.g. oligospermia, azoospermia) from the second IVF register. The reference group...... was men with male factor infertility (='no') and those with normal semen quality or sterilized men. Of the included men, 18 499 (46.8%) had male factor infertility and 21 017 (53.2%) made up the reference group. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: A total of 651 (1.6%) diabetes cases were identified...

  2. Factors associated with infertility among women attending the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate and determine the factors associated with infertility in women attending the gynaecology clinic at the University Teaching Hospital (UTH) in Lusaka, Zambia. Methods: Using an unmatched case-control study design, women attending the gynaecology clinic for infertility ...

  3. Coital frequency and infertility: which male factors predict less frequent coitus among infertile couples?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlis, Nathan; Lo, Kirk C; Grober, Ethan D; Spencer, Leia; Jarvi, Keith

    2013-08-01

    To determine the coital frequency among infertile couples and which factors are associated with less frequent coitus. Cross-sectional study. Tertiary-level male infertility clinic. A total of 1,298 infertile men. Administration of computer-based survey, semen analysis, and serum hormone evaluation. Monthly coital frequency. A total of 1,298 patients presented to clinic for infertility consultation and completed the computer-based survey. The median male age was 35 years (interquartile range [IQR] 32-39 years) and the median duration of infertility was 2 years (IQR 1-4 years) before consultation. Median monthly coital frequency was seven (IQR 5-10; range 0-40); 24% of couples were having intercourse ≤ 4 times per month. Overall, 0.6%, 2.7%, 4.8%, 5.8%, and 10.8% of the men reported having intercourse 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 times per month, respectively. When simultaneously taking into account the influence of age, libido, erectile function, and semen volume on coital frequency, older patients had 1.05 times higher odds (per year of age) of less frequent coitus (odds ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.08). In addition, patients with better erectile function had 1.12 times higher odds (per point on Sexual Health Inventory for Men scale) of more frequent coitus (odds ratio 1.12, 95% confidence interval 1.09-1.18). Similar to the general population, most infertile couples report having coitus more than four times per month. Older male age and erectile dysfunction are independent risk factors for less frequent coitus among infertile men, which could have an impact on fertility. Coital frequency should be considered in infertility assessments. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Infertility in Women: Hysterosalpingographic Assessment of the Fallopian Tubes in Lagos, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinola, R. A.; Akinola, O. I.; Fabamwo, A. O.

    2009-01-01

    Tubal disease constitutes a major factor in infertility especially in developing countries. This study was undertaken to assess the hysterosalpingographic patterns seen in infertile patients in an urban centre in Lagos. Two hundred and twenty patients who reported from the gynaecology clinic to the radiology department of Lagos State University…

  5. Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... greatly after age 35 (and especially after age 40). The age when fertility starts to decline varies from woman to woman. Infertility problems and miscarriage rates increase significantly after 35 years of age. There are now options for early ...

  6. Knowledge of Men and Women about Infertility Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirreza Talaiekhozani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With technological developments, creation of new industries and changing lifestyles, infertility risk factors (IRF increased. Therefore creation of suitable solutions in society is crucial for the prevention of infertility. Since prevention of infertility in a society is directly related to awareness about infertility, in the present study the awareness of people about infertility risk factors was assessed. In this study, a survey questionnaire containing 24 factors related to IRF was developed and 170 persons (62 men and 108 women from Fooladshahr, Najafabad and Mobarakeh participated and data were extracted from these questionnaires and were statistically analyzed. Our study showed that average infertility awareness for men and women is 38% and 49% respectively. Also overall awareness was 44%. Also results showed that women’s awareness about mobile radiation and fast foods is significantly higher than men. On the other hand men have significantly higher awareness about adverse effects of chlorine in swimming pool on fertility. Higher women awareness may be related to their higher sensitivity for fertility. Also, generally a higher level of awareness was observed relating to mobile, air pollution, stress, fast foods, smoking and alcohol. Women have a higher level of awareness about infertility risk factors. Higher awareness about some IRFs may be results from widespread media coverage.

  7. Assessing infertility-related stress: the factor structure of the Fertility Problem Inventory in Italian couples undergoing infertility treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donarelli, Zaira; Gullo, Salvatore; Lo Coco, Gianluca; Marino, Angelo; Scaglione, Piero; Volpes, Aldo; Allegra, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    The factor structure of the Fertility Problem Inventory (FPI) and its invariance across gender were examined in Italian couples undergoing infertility treatment. About 1000 subjects (both partners of 500 couples) completed two questionnaires prior to commencing infertility treatment at a private Clinic in Palermo, Italy. Confirmatory Factor Analysis demonstrated that the original factor structure of the FPI was partially confirmed. Two correlated factors (Infertility Life Domains and Importance of Parenthood) were obtained via a post hoc Exploratory Factor Analysis. Finally, the invariance of this factor structure across gender was confirmed. The study supported the relevance of two interrelated factors specific to infertility stress which could help clinicians to focus on the core infertility-related stress domains of infertile couples.

  8. ROLE OF DIAGNOSTIC HYSTEROLAPAROSCOPY IN EVALUATION OF FEMALE INFERTILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayanthy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM To evaluate the role of hysterolaparoscopy in female infertility. SETTINGS AND DESIGN Patients with female infertility presenting to outpatient Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Kempegowda Institute of Medical sciences, Bengaluru were evaluated for infertility by hysterolaparoscopy and chromopertubation. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seventy consenting subjects excluding male factor infertility with normal hormonal profile and no contraindication to laparoscopy underwent ultra-sonography. Then all patients were subjected to combined hysterolaparoscopy including chromopertubation and the results were recorded. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED T-test. RESULTS We studied 70 patients comprising of 40(57.1% cases of primary infertility and 30(42.9% patients of secondary infertility. In our study most commonly found pathologies were PCOD, endometriosis and tubal blockage. CONCLUSIONS Results show that hysterolaparoscopy has a promising role in diagnosing and treating infertility. hysterolaparoscopy has emerged as a new hope for infertile couples before they proceed to time-consuming and expensive assisted reproduction techniques.

  9. Consanguinity and family clustering of male factor infertility in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhorn, Marcia C; Kobeissi, Loulou; Nassar, Zaher; Lakkis, Da'ad; Fakih, Michael H

    2009-04-01

    To investigate the influence of consanguineous marriage on male factor infertility in Lebanon, where rates of consanguineous marriage remain high (29.6% among Muslims, 16.5% among Christians). Clinic-based, case-control study, using reproductive history, risk factor interview, and laboratory-based semen analysis. Two IVF clinics in Beirut, Lebanon, during an 8-month period (January-August 2003). One hundred twenty infertile male patients and 100 fertile male controls, distinguished by semen analysis and reproductive history. None. Standard clinical semen analysis. The rates of consanguineous marriage were relatively high among the study sample. Patients (46%) were more likely than controls (37%) to report first-degree (parental) and second-degree (grandparental) consanguinity. The study demonstrated a clear pattern of family clustering of male factor infertility, with patients significantly more likely than controls to report infertility among close male relatives (odds ratio = 2.58). Men with azoospermia and severe oligospermia showed high rates of both consanguinity (50%) and family clustering (41%). Consanguineous marriage is a socially supported institution throughout the Muslim world, yet its relationship to infertility is poorly understood. This study demonstrated a significant association between consanguinity and family clustering of male factor infertility cases, suggesting a strong genetic component.

  10. Unexplained infertility: association with inherited thrombophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatini, Cinzia; Conti, Lucia; Turillazzi, Valentina; Sticchi, Elena; Romagnuolo, Ilaria; Milanini, Maria Novella; Cozzi, Cinzia; Abbate, Rosanna; Noci, Ivo

    2012-05-01

    Unexplained infertility represents one of the most common diagnoses in fertility care. Attention is being paid to the association between inherited thrombophilia and infertility causes. In this study we investigated the prevalence of inherited thrombophilia according to infertility causes. We studied Prothrombin gene G20210A mutation, Factor V Leiden, deficiencies in protein S and C and antithrombin in 930 Caucasian infertile women referred to Fertility Center of the Department of Sciences for Woman and Child's Health, University of Florence, of whom 230 with unexplained, 195 female and 283 male infertility, and in 240 women who have conceived naturally without hormonal stimulation therapy. A significant relationship between inherited thrombophilia [OR 95%CI 1.97 (1.05-3.68), p = 0.03] and unexplained infertility was observed, whereas no association between thrombophilia and female and male infertility was found. Significantly higher prevalence of prothrombin gene mutation in unexplained infertile women in comparison to that observed in fertile women was observed (5.7% vs 2.1% p = 0.04); the prevalence of the other thrombophilia determinants was higher, even if not significantly, in the unexplained infertile group. This study demonstrates the relationship between inherited thrombophilia and unexplained infertility, thus suggesting the contribution of genetic components in modulating unexplained infertility, behind anovulation, male and tubal factor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Contribution of environmental factors to the risk of male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, A; Spira, A; Multigner, L

    2001-08-01

    An increasing number of reports suggest that chemical and physical agents in the environment, introduced and spread by human activity, may affect male fertility in humans. We investigated the relationships between exposure to environmental agents and seminal characteristics, and the concentrations of reproductive hormones in the serum of men seeking infertility treatment. We studied 225 male partners from consecutively recruited couples, who had their first infertility consultation between 1995 and 1998, in the Litoral Sur region of Argentina, one of the most productive farming regions in the world. A multivariate logistic regression model showed that exposure to pesticides and solvents is significantly associated with sperm threshold values well below the limit for male fertility. We also found that men exposed to pesticides had higher serum oestradiol concentrations, and that men exposed to solvents had lower LH concentrations than non-exposed men. All of these effects were greater in men with primary infertility than in men with secondary infertility. We have shown that environmental factors contribute to the severity of infertility, and that this may worsen the effects of pre-existing genetic or medical risk factors.

  12. Genetic and epigenetic factors: Role in male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M B Shamsi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic factors contribute upto 15%-30% cases of male infertility. Formation of spermatozoa occurs in a sequential manner with mitotic, meiotic, and postmeiotic differentiation phases each of which is controlled by an intricate genetic program. Genes control a variety of physiologic processes, such as hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis, germ cell development, and differentiation. In the era of assisted reproduction technology, it is important to understand the genetic basis of infertility to provide maximum adapted therapeutics and counseling to the couple.

  13. Male factor infertility and risk of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glazer, Clara Helene; Tøttenborg, Sandra Søgaard; Giwercman, Aleksander

    2018-01-01

    and prevalent as well as incident MS. METHOD: Our cohort was established by linkage of the Danish National in vitro fertilization (IVF) registry to The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry and consisted of 51,063 men whose partners had undergone fertility treatment in all public and private fertility clinics......BACKGROUND: Gender, possibly due to the influence of gonadal hormones, is presumed to play a role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), but no studies have evaluated whether male infertility is associated with MS. OBJECTIVE: To study the association between male factor infertility...

  14. Azoospermia factor microdeletion in infertile men with idiopathic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    T. Atia

    2015-11-11

    Nov 11, 2015 ... Abstract. Objectives: To determine Y-chromosome microdeletion of azoospermia factor (AZF) loci and the concomi- tant testicular pathology in azoospermic and severely oligozoospermic infertile men. Patients and methods: DNA from blood and semen of 50 azoospermic and severely oligozoospermic infer-.

  15. Evaluation of Risk Factors Associated with Endometriosis in Infertile Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Ashrafi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endometriosis affects women’s physical and mental wellbeing. Symptoms include dyspareunia, dysmenorrhea, pelvic pain, and infertility. The purpose of this study is to assess the correlation between some relevant factors and symptoms and risk of an endometriosis diagnosis in infertile women. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of 1282 surgical patients in an infertility Institute, Iran between 2011 and 2013 were evaluated by laparoscopy. Of these, there were 341 infertile women with endometriosis (cases and 332 infertile women with a normal pelvis (comparison group. Chi-square and t tests were used to compare these two groups. Logistic regression was done to build a prediction model for an endometriosis diagnosis. Results: Gravidity [odds ratio (OR: 0.8, confidence interval (CI: 0.6-0.9, P=0.01], parity (OR: 0.7, CI: 0.6-0.9, P=0.01, family history of endometriosis (OR: 4.9, CI: 2.1-11.3, P0.05. Fatigue, diarrhea, constipation, dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, pelvic pain and premenstrual spotting were more significant among late-stage endometriosis patients than in those with early-stage endometriosis and more prevalent among patients with endometriosis than that of the comparison group. In the logistic regression model, gravidity, family history of endometriosis, history of galactorrhea, history of pelvic surgery, dysmenorrhoea, pelvic pain, dysparaunia, premenstrual spotting, fatigue, and diarrhea were significantly associated with endometriosis. However, the number of pregnancies was negatively related to endometriosis. Conclusion: Endometriosis is a considerable public health issue because it affects many women and is associated with the significant morbidity. In this study, we built a prediction model which can be used to predict the risk of endometriosis in infertile women.

  16. Infertility in the light of new scientific reports – focus on male factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Szkodziak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological data indicate that infertility is a problem of global proportions, affecting one- fifth of couples trying to conceive worldwide (60–80 mln. According to the trends observed, the problem is predicted to increase by another two million cases annually. In Poland, infertility-related issues are found in about 19% of couples, including 4% with infertility and 15% with limited fertility. Inability to conceive occurs equally in men and women (50%, irrespective of the direct cause. Although it is generally thought that reproductive issues concern women, infertility affects men and women equally. This study is an attempted to systematize knowledge about the role of the male factor in infertility, particularly current knowledge concerning the environmental factors of infertility. For this purpose, the Medline and CINAHL databases and the Cochrane Library was searched for articles published in English during the last 10 years, using the following keywords: infertility, male factor, semen examination and environmental factor of infertility.

  17. Evaluation of Influencing Factors on Tubal Sterilization Regret: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahideh Jahanian Sadatmahalleh

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background The aim of this study is to evaluate the menstrual pattern, sexual function, and anxiety, and depression in women with poststerilization regret, and potential influencing factors for regret following tubal ligation (TL in Iranian women. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, 166 women with TL were subdivided into two groups including women with poststerilization regret (n=41 and women without poststerilization regret (n=125. They were selected from a health care center in Guilan province (Iran during 2015-2016. Menstrual blood loss was measured using the Pictorial Blood Loss Assessment Chart (PBLAC and through a self-administered questionnaire. In addition, sexual function was assessed by the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI, and psychological distress was measured by employing the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Student’s t test and Chi-square test were used to reveal the statistical differences between the two groups. We used logistic regression to determine the influencing factors associated with regretting sterilization. Results Women with poststerilization regret had more menorrhagia (78 vs. 57.6%, P=0.03 than those who did not regret sterilization. A significant difference was found in sexual dysfunction in orgasm (P=0.02, satisfaction (P=0.004, pain (P=0.02, and total FSFI scores (P=0.007 between the two groups. Also, there was a significant difference between the two groups in anxiety, depression and total scores HADS (P=0.01. In the logistic regression model, age of sterilization [odds ratio (OR=2.67, confidence interval (CI: 1.03-7.81, P=0.04], pre-sterilization counseling (OR=19.92, CI: 6.61-59.99, P<0.001, score of PBLAC (OR=1.01, CI: 1.004-1.01, P=0.001, the number of days of bleeding (OR=1.37, CI: 1.01-1.99, P=0.04, and the length of menstrual cycles (OR=0.91, CI: 0.84-0.99, P=0.03 were significantly associated with regretting sterilization. Conclusion Complications due to sterilization are

  18. Causes and Risk Factors for Male-Factor Infertility in Nigeria: A Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    In Nigeria, the problem is further compounded by a variety of factors such as sexually transmitted infections, genito-urinary tract infections/inflammations and ... Indonesia and Finland12,13. Infertility is a problem of public health ... addition, infertility leading to depopulation of some areas limits the social and economic.

  19. A qualitative study of Ottawa university students? awareness, knowledge and perceptions of infertility, infertility risk factors and assisted reproductive technologies (ART)

    OpenAIRE

    Sabarre, Kelley-Anne; Khan, Zainab; Whitten, Amanda N; Remes, Olivia; Phillips, Karen P

    2013-01-01

    Background Awareness of infertility risk factors is an essential first step to safeguard future fertility. Whereas several studies have examined university students? awareness of female fertility and related risk factors, the topic of male infertility has not been well examined. The objective of this study was to assess young men and women?s awareness, knowledge and perceptions of infertility, male and female infertility risk factors and assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Methods Semi-...

  20. Hysteroscopic tubal electrocoagulation versus laparoscopic tubal ligation for patients with hydrosalpinges undergoing in vitro fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mazny, Akmal; Abou-Salem, Nermeen; Hammam, Mohamed; Saber, Walid

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the use and success rate of hysteroscopic tubal electrocoagulation for the treatment of hydrosalpinx-related infertility among patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) who have laparoscopic contraindications. A prospective study was conducted among patients who had unilateral or bilateral hydrosalpinges identified on hysterosalpingography and vaginal ultrasonography, and who were undergoing IVF at a center in Cairo, Egypt, between January 1, 2013, and October 30, 2014. All patients who had contraindications for laparoscopy were scheduled for hysteroscopic tubal electrocoagulation (group 1); the other patients underwent laparoscopic tubal ligation (group 2). For all patients, hysterosalpingography was performed 3 months after their procedure to evaluate proximal tubal occlusion. Among 85 enrolled patients, 22 underwent hysteroscopic tubal electrocoagulation and 63 underwent laparoscopic tubal ligation. The procedure was successful in terms of tubal occlusion for 25 (93%) of 27 hydrosalpinges in group 1, and 78 (96%) of 81 hydrosalpinges in group 2 (P=0.597). No intraoperative or postoperative complications were reported. Hysteroscopic tubal electrocoagulation was found to be a successful treatment for hydrosalpinges before IVF when laparoscopy is contraindicated. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Is male factor infertility associated with midlife low-grade inflammation? A population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hærvig, Katia Keglberg; Kierkegaard, Lene; Lund, Rikke; Bruunsgaard, Helle; Osler, Merete; Schmidt, Lone

    2018-06-01

    Male factor infertility is associated with an increased risk of disease and mortality, which has been related to markers of chronic systemic inflammation. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between male factor infertility and low-grade inflammation and furthermore to examine the lifetime prevalence of male factor infertility and overall infertility (also including female and couple infertility). The study population consisted of 2140 members of the Metropolit 1953 Danish Male Birth Cohort who had participated in the Copenhagen Aging and Midlife Biobank data collection in 2009-2011. Information on male factor infertility and overall infertility was obtained from a questionnaire, and low-grade inflammation was evaluated as the highest plasma levels of C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha in the population. The level of interleukin-6 was significantly higher among men with male factor infertility compared with other men adjusted for potential confounders. This was not found for the two other inflammatory markers. The lifetime prevalence of male factor infertility and overall infertility were 10.2% and 17.9%, respectively. The findings suggest that male factor infertility might be associated with an increased level of interleukin-6.

  2. Is male factor infertility associated with midlife low-grade inflammation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hærvig, Katia Keglberg; Kierkegaard, Lene; Lund, Rikke

    2017-01-01

    Male factor infertility is associated with an increased risk of disease and mortality, which has been related to markers of chronic systemic inflammation. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between male factor infertility and low-grade inflammation and furthermore...... to examine the lifetime prevalence of male factor infertility and overall infertility (also including female and couple infertility). The study population consisted of 2140 members of the Metropolit 1953 Danish Male Birth Cohort who had participated in the Copenhagen Aging and Midlife Biobank data collection...... in 2009-2011. Information on male factor infertility and overall infertility was obtained from a questionnaire, and low-grade inflammation was evaluated as the highest plasma levels of C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha in the population. The level of interleukin-6...

  3. A qualitative study of Ottawa university students' awareness, knowledge and perceptions of infertility, infertility risk factors and assisted reproductive technologies (ART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabarre, Kelley-Anne; Khan, Zainab; Whitten, Amanda N; Remes, Olivia; Phillips, Karen P

    2013-08-20

    Awareness of infertility risk factors is an essential first step to safeguard future fertility. Whereas several studies have examined university students' awareness of female fertility and related risk factors, the topic of male infertility has not been well examined. The objective of this study was to assess young men and women's awareness, knowledge and perceptions of infertility, male and female infertility risk factors and assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Semi-structured interviews were conducted in 2008 with a multi-ethnic sample of sixteen male and twenty-three female Ottawa university students, followed by qualitative data analysis to identify major themes. Interview topics included awareness of male and female infertility risk factors, infertility diagnosis/treatments and personal options in the event of future infertility. Participants were generally familiar with infertility as a biomedical health problem, could identify sex-specific risk factors but overestimated fertility of women in their thirties and ART success rates. Reproductive health knowledge gaps and confusion of the physiological life-stage of menopause with infertility were apparent. Most participants would pursue in vitro fertilization or international adoption in the event of personal infertility. Some participants wished to use a 'natural' approach and were concerned with potential side effects of ART-related medications. The general awareness of infertility in young adults is promising and supports the potential uptake for health promotion of fertility preservation. This study underscores the continued need for comprehensive sexual and reproductive health education and promotion for adolescents and young adults.

  4. Aetiological Factors in Female Infertility: The ABSUTH Experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine the prevalence of infertility in a traditional Ibo society using Abia State University Teaching Hospital Aba as a case study and to identify the common causes of female infertility in Aba, a retrospective study of patient investigated and treated for infertility from 1st January to 31st December 1996 was done. A total ...

  5. Factors influencing the quality of life of infertile women in United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayata, G M; Rizk, D E E; Hasan, M Y; Ghazal-Aswad, S; Asaad, M A N

    2003-02-01

    To measure the quality of life in a representative sample of infertile women and evaluate their sociocultural attitude to this condition. Two hundred sixty-nine infertile women attending the Assisted Reproduction clinic, Tawam Hospital were consecutively selected. They were interviewed about the effect of infertility on their quality of life using a structured, measurement-specific and pre-tested questionnaire. Parameters mostly affected were mood-related mainly in women above 30 years, with primary and female factor infertility and those in polygamous marriages. Quality of life did not affect sexual performance and was not affected by duration of infertility or cost of treatment. The results highlight the importance of bearing children and the stresses exerted on infertile women in Eastern societies. Thorough counseling and continuing support of infertile women is therefore indicated to improve their quality of life.

  6. A case of bilateral tubal pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayano Funamizu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral tubal pregnancy is very rare and occurs in only 1 out of every 200,000 spontaneous pregnancies. In this case, a 29-year-old woman with a history of primary infertility underwent treatment with human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG-human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG, and became pregnant. A gestational sac (GS was not detected in the uterus and transvaginal ultrasonography (USG revealed GS with fetal heartbeat in the left adnexa at 7 weeks and 6 days of gestation. The patient underwent laparoscopic surgery and ultimately, bilateral tubal pregnancy was diagnosed. Consequently, bilateral fallopian tube resection was performed. Afterwards, she conceived by assisted reproductive technology (ART and delivered vaginally. This case suggests that even if a GS is found in one fallopian tube by USG, it is important to evaluate the other fallopian tube carefully. Keywords: bilateral tubal pregnancy, ectopic pregnancy, human menopausal gonadotropin, laparoscopy

  7. Male factor in infertility: study from a tertiary care hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Kalavathi D. Biradar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infertility is a condition with important psychological, economic, demographic and medical implications. Male infertility refers to a male's inability to result pregnancy in a fertile female. Methods: The present hospital based study was conducted in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, East Point Hospital, Bangalore. Duration of the study was for 6 months from October 2015 to March 2016. A total of 250 infertile couples couple coming for evaluation to the outpatient d...

  8. Laparohysteroscopy in female infertility: A diagnostic cum therapeutic tool in Indian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Suman; Jain, Dinesh; Puri, Sandeep; Kaushal, Sandeep; Deol, Satjeet Kaur

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the role of laparohysteroscopy in female infertility andto study the effect of therapeutic procedures in achieving fertility. Patients with female infertility presenting to outpatient Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology were evaluated over a period of 18 months. Fifty consenting subjects excluding male factor infertility with normal hormonal profile and no contraindication to laparoscopy were subject to diagnostic laparoscopy and hysteroscopy. T-test. We studied 50 patients comprising of 24 (48%) cases of primary infertility and 26 (52%) patients of secondary infertility. The average age of active married life for 50 patients was between 8 and 9 years. In our study, the most commonly found pathologies were PCOD, endometroisis and tubal blockage. 11 (28.2) patients conceived after laparohysteroscopy followed by artificial reproductive techniques. This study demonstrates the benefit of laparohysteroscopy for diagnosis and as a therapeutic tool in patients with primary and secondary infertility. We were able to achieve a higher conception rate of 28.2%.

  9. Hysterosalpingographic picture encountered during the investigation of female infertility clinic has Lemba of Saint Raphael

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitenge, N.; Nzeza, N.; Mbanzulu, P.; Ndaye, B.

    2010-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted at the St Raphael Lemba Clinic on a sample of 115 patients suspected of infertility during the period from june 1 1997 in 1 march 2003 (6 years). The technique of hysterosalpingography has allowed the identification of female infertility presents images that can diagnose one or more causes utero-tubal. Men also carry a significant responsibility in the genesis of the sterility of the couple: thus, they must also undergo exploration. Hormonal factors also have an important contribution in the investigation of infertility in women and must be taken in addition to hysterosalpingography

  10. Pattern and outcome of infertility in Enugu: the need to improve diagnostic facilities and approaches to management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugwu, E O; Onwuka, C I; Okezie, O A

    2012-01-01

    In Nigeria, infertility is a social for the childless couple due to the high premium placed on propagating oneself. To determine the pattern of infertility among women attending the gynaecological clinic of university of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu and to examine the outcome of management. A descriptive retrospective design study based on findings from the folders of infertile couples presenting at the gynaecological clinic of University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital over a five year period (2004 - 2008). The data were collected from all documented and laboratory findings. The data extracted from the case records were the socio-demographic characteristics of the patients, the type of infertility whether primary or secondary, the causes, and the treatment in the years under review. The outcome of management was also evaluated. These were analyzed using SPSS 12.0.1 for window version. The mean age of the women was 34.1 +/- 4.9 range 21 - 46) years. The prevalence of infertility was 5.5% of all outpatient gynaecological consultations. The cause of infertility could not be determined in 39.4% of cases, female factors were identified as the sole causes in 28.7% of cases, male factors as sole causes in 11.5% of cases, and combined male/female factors in 20.4% of cases. Secondary infertility accounted for 76.8% of infertility and primary infertility 23.2%. The age of the women and the educational level did not significantly influence the type of infertility the women presented with (P > 0.05). Tubal factor was identified in majority of cases and pregnancy was recorded in only 17.0% of the women. Secondary infertility is more prevalent in Enugu with tubal factor accounting for majority of the cases with identifiable causes. The outcome of treatment of infertility is poor. There is need to improve infertility diagnostic and treatment facilities and approaches in Enugu, Nigeria.

  11. Complementary and alternative medicine usage and its determinant factors among Iranian infertile couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan, Mahlagha; Mokhtarabadi, Sima; Heidari, Fatemeh Ghaedi

    2018-04-04

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the status of utilizing some complementary and alternative medicine techniques in infertile couples. Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted on 250 infertile couples referred to a hospital in Kerman using convenience sampling. A researcher-made questionnaire was used to study the prevalence and user satisfaction of complementary and alternative medicines. Results Results indicated that 49.6% of the infertile couples used at least one of the complementary and alternative medicines during the past year. Most individuals used spiritual techniques (71.8% used praying and 70.2% used Nazr) and medicinal plants (54.8%). Safety is the most important factor affecting the satisfaction of infertile couples with complementary treatments (couples think that such treatments are safe (54.8%)). Discussion Concerning high prevalence of complementary and alternative treatments in infertile couples, incorporating such treatments into the healthcare education and promoting the awareness of infertile individuals seem crucial.

  12. Management of the infertile couple: an evidence-based protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Remah M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infertility is defined as inability of a couple to conceive naturally after one year of regular unprotected sexual intercourse. It remains a major clinical and social problem, affecting perhaps one couple in six. Evaluation usually starts after 12 months; however it may be indicated earlier. The most common causes of infertility are: male factor such as sperm abnormalities, female factor such as ovulation dysfunction and tubal pathology, combined male and female factors and unexplained infertility. Objectives The aim of this study is to provide the healthcare professionals an evidence-based management protocol for infertile couples away from medical information overload. Methods A comprehensive review where the literature was searched for "Management of infertility and/or infertile couples" at library website of University of Bristol (MetaLib by using a cross-search of different medical databases besides the relevant printed medical journals and periodicals. Guidelines and recommendations were retrieved from the best evidence reviews such as that from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (ACOG, American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM, Canadian Fertility and Andrology Society (CFAS, and Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG. Results A simple guide for the clinicians to manage the infertile couples. Conclusions The study deploys a new strategy to translate the research findings and evidence-base recommendations into a simplified focused guide to be applied on routine daily practice. It is an approach to disseminate the recommended medical care for infertile couple to the practicing clinicians.

  13. Epidemiological Survey and Risk Factor Analysis of Recurrent Spontaneous Miscarriages in Infertile Women at Large Infertility Centers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Yan Wang; Jie Qiao; Xiao-Xi Sun; Shu-yu Wang; Xiao-Yan Liang; Yun Sun; Feng-Hua Liu

    2017-01-01

    Background:A higher frequency of spontaneous miscarriage has been observed in infertile couples,and there is a higher prevalence of infertility among patients with a history of recurrent spontaneous miscarriages (RSMs;>2 miscarriages).This study aimed to determine the proportion of infertile patients with RSM and examine risk factors associated in patients with RSM being treated with assisted reproductive technologies.Methods:This cross-sectional observational study was conducted at six reproductive medicine centers in three cities of China.Data of 751 patients with at least one spontaneous miscarriage were analyzed.Demographic data and etiological factors associated with infertility were compiled and compared between patients with a single spontaneous miscarriage (SSM) and those with RSM.Results:Two hundred (26.6%,95% confidence interval [CI]:23.50-29.95%) patients experienced RSMs and 551 (73.4%) had a single miscarriage.The odds of RSM increased with increasing age (odds ratio [OR] =1.06),uterine disorders (OR =2.09),endocrine disorders (OR =2.48),and immune disorders (OR =2.98).Higher education level,masters or above,and a pelvic cavity disorder were associated with lower risk of RSM (OR =0.27 and 0.46,respectively).Late spontaneous miscarriages were more frequent in patients with RSM than in those with a SSM (31.5% vs.14.2%,respectively,P < 0.001) and were associated with a history of uterine cavity procedures (OR =2.095) and cervical factors related to infertility (OR =4.136,95% CI:1.012-16.90).Conclusions:Compared to patients with only a SSM,the conditions of patients with RSM are more complicated.To increase the success rate of assisted reproductive technology,factors including uterus cavity adhesion,cervical relaxation,endocrine disorders,and immune disorders should be treated before assisted reproduction is initiated.These data may provide treatment guidance for infertile patients with a history of RSM.

  14. A case-control study of risk factors for male infertility in Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between selected potential socio-demographic and behavioural risk factors and infertility in Nigeria males. Methods: The study consisted of cases and controls. The cases were 150 males with proven male infertility, while the controls were 150 fertile males with ...

  15. Infertility and the use of infertility treatments in Finland: prevalence and socio-demographic determinants 1992-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terävä, Anna-Niina; Gissler, Mika; Hemminki, Elina; Luoto, Riitta

    2008-01-01

    To examine changes in the use of infertility treatments by time, the causes of infertility, lifetime prevalence of subfertility, and the use of infertility treatments by socio-demographic factors. Aggregate IVF statistics (1992-2004) and two nationally representative cross-sectional surveys (1997 and 2002). Total number of IVF, ICSI and FET treatments initiated more than tripled between 1992 and 2004. The proportion of tubal injury as a cause of infertility treatment decreased over time while other female factors, male factor and multiple causes became more common. Self-reported lifetime subfertility was 16.0% in 2002 among women aged 25-64 years. Subfertility differed notably by age and education: young less educated women and older more educated women more frequently reported subfertility. Use of hormone therapy to treat subfertility (1997 and 2002) and participation in infertility treatments or medical examinations (2002) was more common among urban, highly educated and affluent women. The use of infertility treatments increased and the proportions of causes of infertility have changed over time. Self-reported subfertility differed by age and education. There are socio-demographic differences in the use of infertility treatments.

  16. A qualitative study of Ottawa university students’ awareness, knowledge and perceptions of infertility, infertility risk factors and assisted reproductive technologies (ART)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Awareness of infertility risk factors is an essential first step to safeguard future fertility. Whereas several studies have examined university students’ awareness of female fertility and related risk factors, the topic of male infertility has not been well examined. The objective of this study was to assess young men and women’s awareness, knowledge and perceptions of infertility, male and female infertility risk factors and assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted in 2008 with a multi-ethnic sample of sixteen male and twenty-three female Ottawa university students, followed by qualitative data analysis to identify major themes. Interview topics included awareness of male and female infertility risk factors, infertility diagnosis/treatments and personal options in the event of future infertility. Results Participants were generally familiar with infertility as a biomedical health problem, could identify sex-specific risk factors but overestimated fertility of women in their thirties and ART success rates. Reproductive health knowledge gaps and confusion of the physiological life-stage of menopause with infertility were apparent. Most participants would pursue in vitro fertilization or international adoption in the event of personal infertility. Some participants wished to use a ‘natural’ approach and were concerned with potential side effects of ART-related medications. Conclusions The general awareness of infertility in young adults is promising and supports the potential uptake for health promotion of fertility preservation. This study underscores the continued need for comprehensive sexual and reproductive health education and promotion for adolescents and young adults. PMID:23962162

  17. Marital Satisfaction and Its Influencing Factors in Fertile and Infertile Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Mohammad; Sadeqi, Zakieh; Hoseinpoor, Mohammad Hassan; Khosravi, Ahmad

    2016-09-01

    Objective: To determine marital satisfaction and its influencing factors among fertile and infertile women in Shahroud. Materials and methods: In this comparative study, 1528 participants (511 infertile and1017 fertile women) were evaluated using Enrich Marital Satisfaction Scale. Data were analyzed using chi-square and t-test. Results: A total of 1402 participants (78.7%) had high marital satisfaction. The results show that no significant differences exist between marital satisfaction, marital communication, conflict resolution and idealistic distortion in fertile and infertile women. However, a significant difference was observed between marital satisfaction, and job, spouse's job and income in fertile and infertile groups, but the place of residence, education, spouse's education and fertility status showed no significant difference. Conclusion: Results showed that infertility does not reduce marital satisfaction. Since marital satisfaction is moderate in both groups, sex education for people bound to marry and sexual counseling for couples can lead to improved sexual satisfaction.

  18. Marital Satisfaction and Its Influencing Factors in Fertile and Infertile Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Amiri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine marital satisfaction and its influencing factors among fertile and infertile women in Shahroud.Materials and methods: In this comparative study, 1528 participants (511 infertile and1017 fertile women were evaluated using Enrich Marital Satisfaction Scale. Data were analyzed using chi-square and t-test.Results: A total of 1402 participants (78.7% had high marital satisfaction. The results show that no significant differences exist between marital satisfaction, marital communication, conflict resolution and idealistic distortion in fertile and infertile women. However, a significant difference was observed between marital satisfaction, and job, spouse’s job and income in fertile and infertile groups, but the place of residence, education, spouse's education and fertility status showed no significant difference.Conclusion: Results showed that infertility does not reduce marital satisfaction. Since marital satisfaction is moderate in both groups, sex education for people bound to marry and sexual counseling for couples can lead to improved sexual satisfaction.

  19. Factor structure of the General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28 from infertile women attending the Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Shayan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, infertility problems have become a social concern, and are associated with multiple psychological and social problems. Also, it affects the interpersonal communication between the individual, familial, and social characteristics. Since women are exposed to stressors of physical, mental, social factors, and treatment of infertility, providing a psychometric screening tool is necessary for disorders of this group. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the factor structure of the general health questionnaire-28 to discover mental disorders in infertile women. Materials and Methods: In this study, 220 infertile women undergoing treatment of infertility were selected from the Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility with convenience sampling in 2011. After completing the general health questionnaire by the project manager, validity and, reliability of the questionnaire were calculated by confirmatory factor structure and Cronbach's alpha, respectively. Results: Four factors, including anxiety and insomnia, social dysfunction, depression, and physical symptoms were extracted from the factor structure. 50.12% of the total variance was explained by four factors. The reliability coefficient of the questionnaire was obtained 0.90. Conclusion: Analysis of the factor structure and reliability of General Health Questionnaire-28 showed that it is suitable as a screening instrument for assessing general health of infertile women.

  20. Factors Influencing Anxiety in Infertile Women Undergoing IVF/ICSI Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Hassanzadeh Bashtian

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Infertility can lead to a diminished sense of well-being and is associated with a high frequency of psychosomatic and somatic disorders. Generally, infertile women are more affected by infertility than men. This study aimed to determine factors influencing anxiety among infertile women undergoing in-vitro fertilization (IVF and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 224 infertile women who were candidate for IVF/ICSI referred to Milad IVF Center, Mashhad, Iran, from September 2015 to July 2016. Prior to the treatment, the participants completed the demographic characteristics questionnaire and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI to assess the level of anxiety. Additionally, a self-structured questionnaire containing the infertility-associated data including the duration and cause of infertility as well as history and the duration of treatment, was completed by the respondents. The subjects were selected through purposive sampling technique. Data analysis was performed using Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis, Fisher exact test, regression tests, as well as Spearman’s correlation coefficient in SPSS software, version 16.   Results: The results obtained from BAI showed that 38.4% of the subjects had moderate anxiety. There was a significant relationship between the level of anxiety and age (P=0.001, the cause of infertility (P=0.007, and the duration of treatment (P=0.001. Conclusion: As the level of anxiety was higher in infertile women with younger age, female factor infertility and longer duration of treatment, it is recommended to consider this population more vulnerable and to provide them supportive counseling to be able to overcome their anxiety.

  1. Do alterations in follicular fluid proteases contribute to human infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookingham, Lisa Marii; Van Voorhis, Bradley J; Ascoli, Mario

    2015-05-01

    Cathepsin L and ADAMTS-1 are known to play critical roles in follicular rupture, ovulation, and fertility in mice. Similar studies in humans are limited; however, both are known to increase during the periovulatory period. No studies have examined either protease in the follicular fluid of women with unexplained infertility or infertility related to advanced maternal age (AMA). We sought to determine if alterations in cathepsin L and/or ADAMTS-1 existed in these infertile populations. Patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) for unexplained infertility or AMA-related infertility were prospectively recruited for the study; patients with tubal or male factor infertility were recruited as controls. Follicular fluid was collected to determine gene expression (via quantitative polymerase chain reaction), enzyme concentrations (via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays), and enzymatic activities (via fluorogenic enzyme cleavage assay or Western blot analysis) of cathepsin L and ADAMTS-1. The analysis included a total of 42 patients (14 per group). We found no statistically significant difference in gene expression, enzyme concentration, or enzymatic activity of cathepsin L or ADAMTS-1 in unexplained infertility or AMA-related infertility as compared to controls. We also found no statistically significant difference in expression or concentration with advancing age. Cathepsin L and ADAMTS-1 are not altered in women with unexplained infertility or AMA-related infertility undergoing IVF, and they do not decline with advancing age. It is possible that differences exist in natural cycles, contributing to infertility; however, our findings do not support a role for protease alterations as a common cause of infertility.

  2. Clinical management and therapeutic outcome of infertile couples in southeast Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menuba IE

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ifeanyi E Menuba,1 Emmanuel O Ugwu,1 Samuel N Obi,1 Lucky O Lawani,2 Chidinma I Onwuka11Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku Ozalla Enugu, Enugu State, Nigeria; 2School of Postgraduate Studies, Department of Community Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus, Enugu, Enugu State, NigeriaBackground: Infertility is highly prevalent in Nigeria and most infertile couples in southeast Nigeria are offered conventional forms of treatment, which consist mainly of ovulation induction and tubal surgery, due to limited availability and high cost of endoscopic and assisted reproductive technologies like laparoscopy and in vitro fertilization. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of infertility, outcome of infertility investigation, and the treatment outcome of infertile couples following therapeutic interventions in southeast Nigeria over a 12-month period.Methods: This was a prospective cross-sectional study of 218 consecutive infertile couples presenting for infertility management at the infertility clinics of two tertiary health institutions in Enugu, southeast Nigeria. Infertility investigations were carried out on these couples using the available conventional diagnostic facilities. Following the results of the investigations/diagnosis, conventional treatment was offered to the couples as appropriate. Data analysis was both descriptive and inferential at 95% confidence level.Results: The mean age of the women was 33.5±4.62 (range: 15–49 years. Most (58.3% [n=127] were nulliparous. The prevalence of infertility was 12.1%. Infertility was primary in 28.4% (n=62 and secondary in 71.6% (n=156. Female etiologic factors were responsible in 32.1% (n=70, male factors in 26.1% (n=57, and a combination of male/female factors in 29.4% (n=64. The etiology was unknown in 12.4% (n=27. Tubal factors 23.8 % (n=52 and ovulation failures 26.1% (n=57 are common female factors implicated

  3. Estimates of lifetime infertility from three states: the behavioral risk factor surveillance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Sara; Fussman, Chris; Bailey, Marie; Bernson, Dana; Jamieson, Denise J; Murray-Jordan, Melissa; Kissin, Dmitry M

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge of state-specific infertility is limited. The objectives of this study were to explore state-specific estimates of lifetime prevalence of having ever experienced infertility, sought treatment for infertility, types of treatments sought, and treatment outcomes. Male and female adult residents aged 18-50 years from three states involved in the States Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technology Collaborative (Florida, Massachusetts, and Michigan) were asked state-added infertility questions as part of the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a state-based, health-related telephone survey. Analysis involved estimation of lifetime prevalence of infertility. The estimated lifetime prevalence of infertility among 1,285 adults in Florida, 1,302 in Massachusetts, and 3,360 in Michigan was 9.7%, 6.0%, and 4.2%, respectively. Among 736 adults in Florida, 1,246 in Massachusetts, and 2,742 in Michigan that have ever tried to get pregnant, the lifetime infertility prevalence was 25.3% in Florida, 9.9% in Massachusetts, and 5.8% in Michigan. Among those with a history of infertility, over half sought treatment (60.7% in Florida, 70.6% in Massachusetts, and 51.6% in Michigan), the most common being non-assisted reproductive technology fertility treatments (61.3% in Florida, 66.0% in Massachusetts, and 75.9% in Michigan). State-specific estimates of lifetime infertility prevalence in Florida, Massachusetts, and Michigan varied. Variations across states are difficult to interpret, as they likely reflect both true differences in prevalence and differences in data collection questionnaires. State-specific estimates are needed for the prevention, detection, and management of infertility, but estimates should be based on a common set of questions appropriate for these goals.

  4. Tubal Ectopic Gestation Associated with Genital Schistosomiasis: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    tract include: dyspareunia, bloody cervical discharge, dysmenorrhea, chronic pelvic pain and pelvic pseudotumour. Infertility may also result from tubal occlusion, secondary to the fibrosis2-6. Female reproductive tract infection/ parasitisation with Schistosoma species has been documented in countries where the parasite is.

  5. Antisperm antibodies as a factor of male infertility. Relevance, modern methods of diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Nikiforov

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available According to WHO statistics 40 % of childless marriage is due to factors of male infertility. One of them is the presence of antisperm antibodies in the male organism, which may be in blood serum, on the surface of spermatozoids and seminal plasma. Aim. Оn the grounds of specialized literature analysis, to show the relevance of this problem in Reproductive Medicine, to descript Basic methods of Modern treatment and diagnosis of this pathology in the body of infertile males. The most common methods of antisperm antibodies identifying are: MAR-test sample Shuvarskiy–Sims–Hyuner, Kurtsrok–Miller test, the method of latex agglutination, solid-phase immunoenzymatic blood test. Indications for antisperm antibodies determining are: modified indices, deviations in post-coital test, a negative test of sperm and cervical mucus interaction in vitro, unexplained infertility in the married couples, failure or low indices during IVF (in vitro fertilization and of course, the exclusion of other causes of infertility. When antisperm antibodies are detected, the strategy of treatment may be destined to reduction of their titer for further pregnancy. Such types of therapy can be used: contraceptive (long-term use contraception barrier to reduce antisperm antibodies titer in women, plasmapheresis, artificial insemination with pretreated from antisperm antibodies husband's sperm, methods of assisted reproductive technologies. Conclusoins. The formation of antisperm antibodies leads to infertility of immunological genesis (in 20 % of couples with unexplained infertility. To confirm their presence in the male body it is necessary to perform the MAR-test, Shuvarsky test, other tests and, of course, the exclusion of other causes of infertility. Men of reproductive age with an immunological factor of infertility provides for a comprehensive treatment, including elimination of all possible causative and contributing factors of infertility (infection of the male

  6. Cost-effective treatment for the couple with infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Voorhis, B J; Syrop, C H

    2000-12-01

    Although the evaluation of cost-effective approaches to infertility treatment remains in its infancy, several important principles have emerged from the initial studies in this field. Currently, in treating couples with infertility without tubal disease or severe male-factor infertility, the most cost-effective approach is to start with IUI or superovulation-IUI treatments before resorting to IVF procedures. The woman's age and number of sperm present for insemination are significant factors influencing cost-effectiveness. The influence of certain diagnoses on the cost-effectiveness of infertility treatments requires further study. Even when accounting for the costs associated with multiple gestations and premature deliveries, the cost of IVF decreases within the range of other cost-effective medical procedures and decreases to less than the willingness to pay for these procedures. Indeed, for patients with severe tubal disease, IVF has been found to be more cost-effective than surgical repair. The cost-effectiveness of IVF will likely improve as success rates show continued improvements over the course of time. In addition, usefulness of embryo selection and practices to reduce the likelihood of high-order multiple pregnancies, without reductions in pregnancy rates, will significantly impact cost-effectiveness. The exclusion of infertility treatments from insurance plans is unfortunate and accentuates the importance of physicians understanding the economics of infertility treatment with costs that are often passed directly to the patient. The erroneous economic policies and judgments that have led to inequities in access to infertility health care should not be tolerated.

  7. Marital Intimacy and Predictive Factors Among Infertile Women in Northern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasha, Hajar; Esmailzadeh, Sedigheh; Faramarzi, Mahbobeh; Adibrad, Hajar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Infertility is a stressful state that may decrease attachment between spouses. Marital intimacy is a real need in infertile women. Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate marital intimacy and predictive factors among infertile women in Northern Iran. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted at Fatemeh Zahra Infertility and Reproductive Health Center of Babol Medical Sciences University in 2014. A total of 221 infertile women participated in this study. The instrument used in this research was Marital Intimacy Need Questionnaire (MINQ). Statistical analyses was performed using linear and logistic regression with pintimacy. The mean and standard deviation of the marital intimacy was 349.11±49.26 and in marital intimacy domains including: emotional (42.28±7.23), psychological (41.84±7.59), intellectual (42.56±7.46), sexual (42.90±7.41), physical (43.59±6.96), spiritual (51.61±8.06), aesthetic (42.66±6.75), and social intimacy (42.59±6.89). The highest mean of marital intimacy domains is related to spirituality in infertile women. Physical and sexual domains had the high mean in infertile women. The lowest mean in marital intimacy domains was psychological intimacy. There was a significant correlation between the domains of marital intimacy. The strongest correlation was between the physical and sexual intimacy (r=0.85). There was a significant inverse association in marital intimacy with the age difference of spouses (pintimacy with husband’s occupation, and cause of infertility (p<0.02). Conclusion Early screening and psychosocial intervention strategies suggest in the setting of female infertility to identify and prevent the predictive factors that may cause marital conflict. PMID:28658854

  8. Marital Intimacy and Predictive Factors Among Infertile Women in Northern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasha, Hajar; Basirat, Zahra; Esmailzadeh, Sedigheh; Faramarzi, Mahbobeh; Adibrad, Hajar

    2017-05-01

    Infertility is a stressful state that may decrease attachment between spouses. Marital intimacy is a real need in infertile women. The aim of this study was to evaluate marital intimacy and predictive factors among infertile women in Northern Iran. This cross-sectional study was conducted at Fatemeh Zahra Infertility and Reproductive Health Center of Babol Medical Sciences University in 2014. A total of 221 infertile women participated in this study. The instrument used in this research was Marital Intimacy Need Questionnaire (MINQ). Statistical analyses was performed using linear and logistic regression with pintimacy. The mean and standard deviation of the marital intimacy was 349.11±49.26 and in marital intimacy domains including: emotional (42.28±7.23), psychological (41.84±7.59), intellectual (42.56±7.46), sexual (42.90±7.41), physical (43.59±6.96), spiritual (51.61±8.06), aesthetic (42.66±6.75), and social intimacy (42.59±6.89). The highest mean of marital intimacy domains is related to spirituality in infertile women. Physical and sexual domains had the high mean in infertile women. The lowest mean in marital intimacy domains was psychological intimacy. There was a significant correlation between the domains of marital intimacy. The strongest correlation was between the physical and sexual intimacy (r=0.85). There was a significant inverse association in marital intimacy with the age difference of spouses (pintimacy with husband's occupation, and cause of infertility (p<0.02). Early screening and psychosocial intervention strategies suggest in the setting of female infertility to identify and prevent the predictive factors that may cause marital conflict.

  9. Evaluation of factors associated with the anxiety and depression of female infertility patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ogawa, Mariko; Takamatsu, Kiyoshi; Horiguchi, Fumi

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Because the primary aim of infertility treatment is to achieve pregnancy, mental health care during this treatment is often neglected. However, the inability to conceive children is stressful for couples throughout the world. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate factors related to the anxiety and depression of female infertility patients. Methods Participants included 83 Japanese women who initially visited the Reproduction Center of the Tokyo Dental College ...

  10. Laparoscopic tubal sterilization reversal and fertility outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Jayakrishnan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the study was two-fold. Firstly it was to assess the suitability for tubal recanalization and factors predicting successful laparoscopic recanalization. Secondly, it was to analyze the fertility outcomes and factors affecting the pregnancy rate following laparoscopic tubal recanalization. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review of prospectively followed-up 29 women at a tertiary care center seeking tubal sterilization reversal between May 2005 and February 2010 were included. Results: In 14 (48.3% women unilateral tubes were suitable and in only 3 women (10.3% bilateral tubes were suitable. All cases with laparoscopic tubal sterilization were suitable, whereas all cases with fimbriectomy were unsuitable for recanalization. In 6 (20.7% cases salphingostomy was performed as an alternative procedure to tubal reanastomosis. The overall pregnancy rate was 58.8%. In cases with sterilization by Pomeroy′s method, 4 out of 10 (40% conceived, whereas for laparoscopic tubal ligation cases 6 out of 7 (85.7% conceived (P=0.32. None of the patients with final tubal length <5 cm conceived (P=0.03. Comparing the age at recanalization, in women ≤30 years, 71.4% conceived, as compared with 50% when age of women was more than 30 years (P=0.37. Conclusions: The important factors determining the success of recanalization are technique of sterilization and the remaining length of the tube after recanalization. The gynecologist must use an effective technique of sterilization to minimize the failure rates, but at the same time, which causes minimal trauma, and aim at preserving the length of the tube so that reversal is more likely to be successful, should the patient′s circumstances change.

  11. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Infertility for Han, Uygur, and Kazakh Ethnicities in Xinjiang Rural Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Songfeng; Gao, Qi; Cai, Xia; La, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence and associated factors of current infertility for Han, Uygur, and Kazakh ethnicities in Xinjiang rural residents. Chinese Uygur, Kazakh, and Han populations represent > 90% of the total population of the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, and their customs, culture, and food consumption are different. The effect of ethnic differences on infertility risk factors is rarely studied. A cross-sectional study of 5,086 married and common-law couples, with a female partner aged 18-49, living in Hami, Kuche, or Xinyuan counties in Xinjiang, China. General information for the study subjects, including demographic characteristics, life customs, sexual history, history of contraception use, and history of disease, was collected by questionnaire. General health, gynecologic examinations, and sociodemographic characteristics were also carried out. A total of 5,086 females from Xinjiang Province were surveyed, including 493 with infertility. The standardized prevalence rate of infertility was 9.7% (95% CI 8.9-10.5), and the prevalence of infertility in Han, Uygur, and Kazakh ethnicities was 6.8% (95% CI 5.7-7.9), 10.9% (95% CI 8.0-13.8), and 10.1% (95% CI 7.4-12.8), respectively. The present study suggests that the prevalence of infertility was lower in the Han as compared to the Kazakh and Uygur ethnicities.

  12. Fluoroscopically Guided Transcervical Fallopian Tube Recanalization of Post-Sterilization Reversal Mid-Tubal Obstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, J. Graeme; Anderson, David; Mills, John; Harrold, Anthony

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the technical success and early outcome of fluoroscopically guided transcervical fallopian tube recanalization (FTR) in mid-tubal occlusion following sterilization reversal surgery.Methods: From July 1995 to January 1998, patients with greater than 12 months secondary infertility underwent hysterosalpingography (HSG). FTR was performed in proximal or mid-tubal occlusion. Cases of FTR in mid-tubal occlusion were included in this study. Technical success (defined as complete tubal patency) using a standard guidewire and hydrophilic glidewire, the number of patients with at least one patent tube, and the intrauterine and ectopic pregnancy rates were determined.Results: Twenty-six infertile patients with previous sterilization reversal underwent HSG. Eight of 26 (31%) patients (mean age 32 years, range 23-37 years), had attempted FTR for mid-tubal occlusion at the site of surgical anastomosis. Fourteen tubes were attempted as there were two previous salpingectomies. Technical success was achieved in eight of 14 (57%) tubes attempted, resulting in five of eight (62%) patients having at least one patent tube. At follow-up (mean 18 months, range 12-28 months) in these five patients there was one intrauterine pregnancy. There were no ectopic pregnancies.Conclusions: FTR in mid-tubal obstruction in infertile patients following sterilization reversal surgery is technically feasible and may result in intrauterine pregnancy. In this small group there was a lower technical success rate and lower pregnancy rate than in unselected proximal tubal occlusion

  13. A Comparison of Pattern of Pregnancy Loss in Women with Infertility Undergoing IVF and Women with Unexplained Recurrent Miscarriages Who Conceive Spontaneously

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya A. Tamhankar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Women with infertility and recurrent miscarriages may have an overlapping etiology. The aim of this study was to compare the pregnancy loss in pregnancies after IVF treatment with spontaneous pregnancies in women with recurrent miscarriages and to assess differences related to cause of infertility. Methods. The outcome from 1220 IVF pregnancies (Group I was compared with 611 spontaneous pregnancies (Group II in women with recurrent miscarriages. Subgroup analysis was performed in Group I based on cause of infertility: tubal factor (392 pregnancies; male factor (610 pregnancies; and unexplained infertility (218 pregnancies. Results. The clinical pregnancy loss rate in Group I (14.3% was significantly lower than that of Group II (25.8%, p<0.001 and this was independent of the cause of infertility. However the timing of pregnancy loss was similar between Groups I and II. The clinical pregnancy loss rate in Group I was similar in different causes of infertility. Conclusions. The clinical pregnancy loss rate following IVF treatment is lower than that of women with unexplained recurrent miscarriages who conceived spontaneously. This difference persists whether the infertility is secondary to tubal factors, male factors, or unexplained cause.

  14. Association between history of abdominopelvic surgery and tubal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    women. Reports on the relationship between these factors and tubal pathology seen on hysterosalpingography (HSG) from our .... (2) tubal dilatation with prolonged retention of ... irrespective of whether the patient has had single or .... women marry earlier in our culture. ... Münstedt K, Tinneberg HR, Hackethal A. Dtsch.

  15. Tubal ligation and risk of ovarian cancer subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sieh, Weiva; Salvador, Shannon; McGuire, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Tubal ligation is a protective factor for ovarian cancer, but it is unknown whether this protection extends to all invasive histological subtypes or borderline tumors. We undertook an international collaborative study to examine the association between tubal ligation and ovarian cancer subtypes....

  16. The Role of Infertility Etiology in Success Rate of Intrauterine Insemination Cycles: An Evaluation of Predictive Factors for Pregnancy Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Mahnaz; Rashidi, Mandana; Ghasemi, Afsaneh; Arabipoor, Arezoo; Daghighi, Sara; Pourasghari, Parisa; Zolfaghari, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to identify the prognostic factors that influence the outcome of ovarian stimulation with intrauterine insemination (IUI) cycles in couples with different infertility etiology. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was performed in data of 1348 IUI cycles with ovarian stimulation by clomiphene citrate (CC) and/or gonadotropins in 632 women with five different infertility etiology subgroups at Akbarabbadi Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Results: The pregnancy rate (PR)/ cycle was highest (19.9%) among couples with unexplained infertility and lowest (10.6%) in couples with multiple factors infertility. In cases of unexplained infertility, the best PRs were seen after CC plus gonadotropins stimulation (26.3%) and with inseminated motile sperm count>30×106 (21.9%), but the tendency didn’t reach statistical significant. In the ovarian factor group, the best PRs were observed in women aged between 30 and 34 years (20.8%), with 2-3 preovulatory follicles (37.8%) and infertility duration between 1and 3 years (20.8%), while only infertility duration (p=0.03) and number of preovulatory follicles (p=0.01) were statistically significant. Multiple logistic regression analysis determined that number of preovulatory follicles (p=0.02), duration of infertility (p=0.015), age (p=0.019), infertility etiology (p=0.05) and stimulation regimen (p=0.01) were significant independent factors in order to predict overall clinical PR. Conclusion: The etiology of infertility is important to achieve remarkable IUI success. It is worth mentioning that within different etiologies of infertility, the demographic and cycles characteristics of couples did not show the same effect. Favorable variables for treatment success are as follows: age infertility ≤5 years and a cause of infertility except of multiple factors. PMID:24520471

  17. US findings of tubal pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hwa Sung; Kim, Hyun Hee; Jee, Mi Hyun; Kweon, Young Hwa; Oh, Yoon Jin; Hong, Ju Hee; Kim, Soon Yong; Kim, Sang Young

    1994-01-01

    Early diagnosis of ruptured and unruptured tubal pregnancy became more accurate with the introduction of transvaginal sonographic equipment. The management principle of tubal pregnancy might be changed according to the sonographic findings. The purposes of this study were to define the sonographic findings of tubal pregnancy and to determine whether it is possible to differentiate the unruptured tubal pregnancies from the ruptured ones depending on the sonographic findings. The authors investigated the sonographic findings of the surgically confirmed 25 tubal pregnancy patients. There were 22(88%) unruptured and 3(12%) ruptured tubal pregnancies. Unruptured pregnancies showed tubal ring in 8, well defined hematosalpinx in 11, and poorly defined hematosalpinxin 2 patients. Ruptured pregnancies showed tubal sac with irregular margin in 2, and ill-defined hematosalpinx in one patient. In summary, well marginated tubal ring and hematosalpinx suggested unruptured tubal pregnancy, while tubal sac with irregular margin suggested ruptured pregnancy. However, it was difficult to differentiate the unruptured tubal pregnancy from the ruptured one when hematosalpinx was ill-defined

  18. Epidemiology of infertility: a population-based study in Babol, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilzadeh, Seddigheh; Delavar, Mouloud Agajani; Zeinalzadeh, Mahtab; Mir, Mohammad-Reza Aghajani

    2012-01-01

    The aim of researchers in the present study was to determine the prevalence of infertility and self-reported cause of infertility in Babol, Iran and then identify the factors associated with infertility. A retrospective epidemiologic study was conducted of characteristics of urban and rural women related to infertility. A total of 1,140 women aged 20-45 years were selected using cluster sampling. Of these 1,140 women, 59 (5.2%) (CI 4.2, 6.2) were voluntarily childless. Of the remaining 1,081 women, 913 (84.5%) (CI 82.5, 86.5) reported no difficulties in having children, and the remaining 168 (15.5%) (CI 13.5, 17.5) experienced difficulty conceiving at some stage in their lives. The prevalence of ever having primary infertility was 4.3% (CI 2.3, 6.3). The most frequently self-reported causes of infertility in this study were ovulation problems (39.2%). Infertile women were significantly more likely to have a higher age at marriage (p = 0.001), lower education (p = 0.006), higher body mass index (p = 0.0001), long-term health problems (p = 0.0001), a partner who smoked (p = 0.029), and past history of tubal or ectopic pregnancy (p = 0.002). These risk factors may help inform reproductive health clinics and primary healthcare centers about factors associated with infertility.

  19. Papillary tubal hyperplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurman, Robert J; Vang, Russell; Junge, Jette

    2011-01-01

    , designated "papillary tubal hyperplasia (PTH)," characterized by small rounded clusters of tubal epithelial cells and small papillae, with or without associated psammoma bodies, that are present within the tubal lumen and which are frequently associated with APSTs. Twenty-two cases in this study were...... with an ovarian tumor. PTH was found in 20 (91%) of the 22 cases in the Danish study. On the basis of this association of PTH with APSTs with implants and the close morphologic resemblance of PTH, not only to primary ovarian APSTs but also to noninvasive epithelial implants and endosalpingiosis, we speculate...... of ovarian and extraovarian low-grade serous proliferations (APST, noninvasive epithelial implants, and endosalpingiosis) that postulates that all of these lesions are derived from PTH, which appears to be induced by chronic inflammation. If this hypothesis is confirmed, it can be concluded that low...

  20. Factor structure, reliability, and validity of the Levenson's Locus of Control Scale in Iranian infertile people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroufizadeh, Saman; Omani Samani, Reza; Amini, Payam; Navid, Behnaz

    2016-09-01

    This study examined psychometric properties of the Levenson's Locus of Control Scale among Iranian infertile patients. In all, 312 infertile patients completed the Levenson's Locus of Control Scale and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the original three-factor model of Levenson's Locus of Control Scale was adequate ( χ 2 / df = 2.139; goodness-of-fit index = 0.88; root mean square error of approximation = 0.061; and standardized root mean square residual = 0.076). The Cronbach's alpha of the subscales ranged from 0.56 to 0.67. The Levenson's Locus of Control Scale subscales significantly correlated with anxiety and depression, showing an acceptable convergent validity. In conclusion, the Levenson's Locus of Control Scale has adequate reliability and validity and can be used to measure locus of control orientation in Iranian infertile patients.

  1. Male infertility: lifestyle factors and holistic, complementary, and alternative therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F Yao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While we may be comfortable with an allopathic approach to male infertility, we are also responsible for knowledge about lifestyle modifications and holistic, complementary, and alternative therapies that are used by many of our patients. This paper provides an evidence-based review separating fact from fiction for several of these therapies. There is sufficient literature to support weight reduction by diet and exercise, smoking cessation, and alcohol moderation. Supplements that have demonstrated positive effects on male fertility on small randomized controlled trial (RCT include aescin, coenzyme Q 10 , glutathione, Korean red ginseng, L-carnitine, nigella sativa, omega-3, selenium, a combination of zinc and folate, and the Menevit antioxidant. There is no support for the use of Vitamin C, Vitamin E, or saffron. The data for Chinese herbal medications, acupuncture, mind-body practice, scrotal cooling, and faith-based healing are sparse or inconclusive.

  2. causes of infertility in females: evaluated by diagnonstic laparoscopy at a tertiary care centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siraj, A.; Naseer, S.; Khan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of various causes of infertility through diagnostic laparoscopy. Study Design: Cross sectional comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted in gynaecology/obstetrics department unit I of Military Hospital Rawalpindi from May 2011 - May 2012. Patients and Methods: A total of 50 patients were recruited in the study through outpatient clinic, 32 out of 50 had primary infertility and 18 had secondary infertility. Diagnostic laparoscopy was performed under general anesthesia and findings were recorded. Result: The mean age of patients was 26.4 years. Out of 50 patients 20 (40%) had polycystic ovaries, 15 (30%) had tubal blockage, 7 (14%) had endometriosis and 2 (4%) had fibroids while 6(12%) were found to have normal pelvis and no pathology was detected. Conclusion: polycystic ovaries was found major cause of infertility in this study group, followed by tubal factor infertility either secondary to pelvic inflammatory disease or otherwise, both these causes are treatable to variable extent and fertility can be resumed if managed properly. (author)

  3. Should laparoscopy and dye test be a first line evaluation for infertile women in southeast Nigeria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikechebelu, J I; Mbamara, S U

    2011-01-01

    Laparoscopy and dye test is an important investigation in the evaluation of infertile women which has been underutilised in our practice. This review is aimed at determining whether the findings of this procedure are substantial enough to make it a first line evaluation for infertile women. A review of the laparoscopic findings in infertile women who presented for evaluation and treatment at a private fertility centre was carried out. A total of 253 day-case laparoscopy and dye test procedures were reviewed, 115 (45.0%) were done for primary infertility, 137 (54.5%) for secondary infertility and 1 (0.4%) for primary amenorrhoea and infertility. The mean period of infertility was 4.5 years with a range of 2-10 years and the women were aged between 19 and 52 years. Analysis of the result showed that 100 (39.5%) women had normal patent tubes while 153 (60.4%) had tubal pathologies like bilateral tubal occlusion in 97 (38.3%) and unilateral tubal occlusion in 56 (22.1%) women. Pelvic adhesion of varying degrees of severity was present in 108 (42.7%) women. Bilateral tubal occlusion was more common in nulliparous women and those aged between 30-39 years. One or both ovaries were normal (functional) in 189 (74.7%) women. Altogether, only 43 (17.0%) women were "normal" (had patent tubes, functional ovary and no pelvic adhesion). Additional pelvic pathology was present in 142 (56.1%) women. The commonest was uterine fibroid (leiomyomata) of various sizes in 100 (39.5%) of the women, followed by ovarian cyst in 56 (22.2%) and endometriosis in 11 (4.4%) women. Other pathologies observed include uterine abnormalities and unruptured ectopic pregnancy. Only 16 (37.2%) of the 43 "normal" women had no additional pelvic pathology. The high prevalence o tuboperitoneal factor and additional pelvic pathology in these infertile women reveal the importance of laparoscopic evaluation. We recommend the use of laparoscopy and dye test as a first line investigation in our environment to

  4. [Clinical result of testicular sperm extraction (TESE) to male-factor infertility in Toyota Memorial Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Yasuaki; Tamaki, Masayoshi; Maeda, Shinichi; Katsumata, Yoshinari; Moriwaki, Takayuki; Tashiro, Kazuhiro; Deguchi, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    Owing to progress of assisted reproduction technology in recent years, it has become possible for couples with infertility problems to have children. Between March 1998 and May 2003 testicular sperm extraction (TESE) was performed on 30 men with male-factor infertility in our hospital. Consequently, we succeeded in recovering 20 spermatozoa. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection was subsequently performed in 15 couples and resulted in 8 pregnancies. There was a statistically significant difference in follicle-stimulating hormone, luteirizing hormone and Johnsen's score between the non-obstructive groups with successful TESE and those with unsuccessful TESE.

  5. Ruptured tubal molar pregnancy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-05-19

    May 19, 2011 ... In most instances, moles develop within the uterine cavity, but may occur at ... Patients with tubal molar pregnancy are very difficult to distinguish .... There was a left-sided adnexal mass, whose size could not be appreciated ...

  6. Human and Pathogen Factors Associated with Chlamydia trachomatis-Related Infertility in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, S.; Timms, P.; Allan, J. A.; Alexander, K.; Rombauts, L.; Horner, P.; Keltz, M.; Hocking, J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted pathogen worldwide. Infection can result in serious reproductive pathologies, including pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, and infertility, in women. However, the processes that result in these reproductive pathologies have not been well defined. Here we review the evidence for the human disease burden of these chlamydial reproductive pathologies. We then review human-based evidence that links Chlamydia with reproductive pathologies in women. We present data supporting the idea that host, immunological, epidemiological, and pathogen factors may all contribute to the development of infertility. Specifically, we review the existing evidence that host and pathogen genotypes, host hormone status, age of sexual debut, sexual behavior, coinfections, and repeat infections are all likely to be contributory factors in development of infertility. Pathogen factors such as infectious burden, treatment failure, and tissue tropisms or ascension capacity are also potential contributory factors. We present four possible processes of pathology development and how these processes are supported by the published data. We highlight the limitations of the evidence and propose future studies that could improve our understanding of how chlamydial infertility in women occurs and possible future interventions to reduce this disease burden. PMID:26310245

  7. Use of Exogenous Testosterone for the Treatment of Male Factor Infertility: A Survey of Nigerian Doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omisanjo, Olufunmilade Akinfolarin; Ikuerowo, Stephen Odunayo; Abdulsalam, Moruf Adekunle; Ajenifuja, Sheriff Olabode; Shittu, Khadijah Adebisi

    2017-01-01

    Though exogenous testosterone is known for its contraceptive effects in men, it is sometimes prescribed by medical practitioners for the treatment of male factor infertility in the mistaken belief that exogenous testosterone improves sperm count. The aim of this study was to evaluate the scope of testosterone use in the treatment of male factor infertility by medical practitioners in Lagos, Nigeria. A survey using a structured questionnaire was carried out amongst doctors attending a regular Continuing Medical Education (CME) programme in Lagos, Nigeria. There were 225 respondents. Most of the respondents (69.8%, n = 157) indicated that exogenous testosterone increases sperm count. Only 22 respondents (9.8%) indicated (correctly) that exogenous testosterone decreases sperm count. Seventy-seven respondents (34.2%) had prescribed some form of exogenous testosterone in the treatment of male factor infertility. The vast majority of respondents who had prescribed testosterone (81.8%, n = 63) thought exogenous testosterone increases sperm count. There was no statistically significant difference in the pattern of prescription across the respondents' specialty ( p = 0.859) or practice type ( p = 0.747). The misuse of exogenous testosterone for the treatment of male infertility was common amongst the respondents, with most of them wrongly believing that exogenous testosterone increases sperm count.

  8. Analysis of tubal patency after essure placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Ana M; Kilic, Gokhan S; Vu, Thao P; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Breitkopf, Daniel; Snyder, Russell R

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate tubal patency after hysteroscopic sterilization using the Essure microinsert (Conceptus Inc, San Carlos, CA). A retrospective longitudinal cohort study. II-3. Patients undergoing hysteroscopic sterilization in the outpatient clinic of a university-based hospital in Southeast Texas from July 2009 to November 2011. Two hundred twenty-nine women (ages 21-44 yrs, 71% Hispanic) desiring sterilization with a history of regular menses, demonstrated prior fertility (≥1 live birth), and the ability to use an alternative contraceptive method for at least 90 days after coil placement were included. Twenty six patients in this cohort were excluded because of failure to perform a hysterosalpingogram (HSG), tubal perforation, severe dyspareunia, a history of ectopic pregnancy, tubal surgery, or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Not applicable. HSGs were assessed for microinsert location and tubal occlusion. Two hundred three patients were included for analysis. After the successful bilateral hysteroscopic placement of Essure microinserts in fallopian tubes, all patients returned for the first follow-up HSG a mean of 103 ± 38 days after the procedure. Patients with fallopian tube patency at the initial HSG returned for second and/or third HSGs as needed at 192 ± 45 and 291 ± 97 days, respectively. Correct device placement was confirmed in 100% of cases at the first HSG. The tubal patency rates at the 90-day and 180-day HSGs were 16.1% (95% confidence interval, 7.4%-31.7%) and 5.8% (95% CI, 1.2%-24.4%), respectively. These rates were estimated by the accelerated failure time model with log normal distribution and interval censored time to event. The 16.1% 90-day tubal patency rate is significantly different from the 8% rate reported by Cooper et al in the 2003 multicenter phase III pivotal trial (p Essure results in a higher initial tubal patency rate than previously reported. Multivariate analyses are needed to identify factors associated with an increased

  9. Comparisons of Hysterosalpingography and Laparoscopy Results in the Diagnosis of Tubal Occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafet Duraker

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The compliance rate between the hysterosalpingography (HSG and laparoscopy (L/S results in patients who diagnosed tubal occlusion on the HSG was investigated. Also, the incidence of endometriosis was evaluated in the study population. Material and Methods: Medical records of 139 women who were underwent L/S for the investigation of the tubal occlusion were reviewed retrospectively. The concordance rate between the HSG and L/S was investigated. The incidence of endometriosis in patients with no tubal pathology was compared with patients with unilaterally and bilaterally tubal occlusion. Results: Mean age of the women was 31.8±5.7years, mean BMI was measured as 24.6±4.6 kg/m2, and gravida 0 (0-5, mean infertility period was 30.7±3.7 months. Tubal occlusion was confirmed after the L/S in 38.8% of the patients (n=38 who has unilaterally tubal occlusion on the HSG. However, 58.8% (n=20 of the patients who were diagnosed as bilaterally tubal occlusion on the HSG was confirmed with the L/S. The misdiagnosis rate of the HSG was significantly high in women with unilaterally tubal occlusions compared with bilaterally tubal occlusions [(respectively, 61.2%, 51.2% (p: 0.001]. Endometriosis was observed in 28.4% of the patients who had patent tubes and in 13.9% of the patients in the unilaterally tubal occlusion group and and in 22.7% of the patients in the bilaterally tubal occlusion group. But the difference was not statistically significant when groups were compared according to the rate of endometriosis (p=0.24. Conclusion: HSG is the first step diagnostic test for the assessment of the fallopian tubes. Although L/S is more invasive technique than HSG, L/S with chromopertubation is the gold standard test for identifying periadnexal adhesive disease and endometriosis.

  10. Defining Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  11. Laparoscopic evaluation of female infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haiderr, G.; Rani, S.; Zehra, N.; Munir, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Sub-fertility is inability to ensure child bearing when it is wanted. Prevalence of sub-fertility in industrialised countries has been quoted as 20%, and seems to be on the rise. Traditional way to assess the uterine cavity, tubal structure and tubal patency was hysterosalpingography but it has now been largely superseded by laparoscopy and hysteroscopy. The objective of this study was to highlight the role of laparoscopy in establishing diagnosis of female infertility. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted in Gynaecology Unit of Liaquat University of Medical Health Sciences, Hyderabad, Pakistan from August 28, 2000 to July 1, 2001. Total 200 sub-fertile patients attended the gynaecology OPD. Out of these 30 patients were selected for laparoscopy and dye test who were suspected cases of endometriosis, abnormal HSG and unexplained infertility. Those patients who had medical disorders and contraindication for laparoscopy were excluded from study. Detailed history of every patient was recorded on a proforma and physical examination was performed. Laparoscopy was scheduled in proliferative phase of menstrual cycle. Data were analysed using SPSS 11. Frequency and percentages were calculated to describe the results. Results: Out of 200 sub-fertile patients total 30 patients were selected for laparoscopy. Twenty (66%) patients were in primary infertility group while 10 (33%) patients were in secondary infertility group. Eleven (55%) patients of primary infertility belong to age group of 18-25 years while 6(60%) patients of secondary infertility belong to age group of 26- 33 years. Mean duration of sub fertility at time of presentation in primary infertility group was 1.95 years while in secondary infertility was 2.70 years. In primary infertility group main associated symptoms were dysmenorrhoeal in 8 (40%), irregular cycles 5 (25%), and dyspareunia in 4 (20%). In secondary infertility group 3 (30%) patients had dysmenorrhoeal and dyspareunia while 2

  12. Use of ICSI in IVF cycles in women with tubal ligation does not improve pregnancy or live birth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimstad, F W; Nangia, Ajay K; Luke, B; Stern, J E; Mak, W

    2016-12-01

    Does ICSI improve outcomes in ART cycles without male factor, specifically in couples with a history of tubal ligation as their infertility diagnosis? The use of ICSI showed no significant improvement in fertilization rate and resulted in lower pregnancy and live birth (LB) rates for women with the diagnosis of tubal ligation and no male factor. Prior studies have suggested that ICSI use does not improve fertilization, pregnancy or LB rates in couples with non-male factor infertility. However, it is unknown whether couples with tubal ligation only diagnosis and therefore iatrogenic infertility could benefit from the use of ICSI during their ART cycles. Longitudinal cohort of nationally reported cycles in the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcomes Reporting System (SART CORS) of ART cycles performed in the USA between 2004 and 2012. There was a total of 8102 first autologous fresh ART cycles from women with the diagnosis of tubal ligation only and no reported male factor in the SART database. Of these, 957 were canceled cycles and were excluded from the final analysis. The remaining cycles were categorized by the use of conventional IVF (IVF, n = 3956 cycles) or ICSI (n = 3189 cycles). The odds of fertilization, clinical intrauterine gestation (CIG) and LB were calculated by logistic regression modeling, and the adjusted odds ratios (AORs) with 95% confidence intervals were calculated by adjusting for the confounders of year of treatment, maternal age, race and ethnicity, gravidity, number of oocytes retrieved, day of embryo transfer and number of embryos transferred. The main outcome measures of the study were odds of fertilization (2PN/total oocytes), clinical intrauterine gestation (CIG/cycle) and live birth (LB/cycle). The fertilization rate was higher in the ICSI versus IVF group (57.5% vs 49.1%); however, after adjustment this trend was no longer significant (AOR 1.14, 0.97-1.35). Interestingly, both odds of CIG (AOR 0.78, 0

  13. Heat and nuclear radiation as risk factors for male infertility: results of a French case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thonneau, P.F.; Rachou, E.; Ducot, B.; Multigner, L.; Velez de la Calle, J.P.; Le Martelot, M.T.

    1998-01-01

    Very few studies have investigated the possible effects of environmental radiation and heat exposure on male reproductive function. We conducted a case control study to evaluate the various infertility risk factors in the military population of the french town of Brest to investigate an apparently high incidence of infertility in couples in which the man may have been exposed to occupational nuclear radiation. These findings suggest that in addition to well known medical factors, 'potential' exposure to heat or nuclear radiation could also be risk factors for infertility. (N.C.)

  14. Immunologic mechanism at infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Aydın, İlknur; Erci, Behice

    2006-01-01

    Infertility has been serious problem for couples that want to have a child. It is estimated that %10-15 of marriages are involuntary childless; that is, there is the serious problem of infertility. In more than 40% of infertility couples that is the reason of their infertility was unknown. In those couples, probably immunological factors were found to be responsible for the infertility. In the article, it was aimed to review the immunologic causes of male and female infertility in the light o...

  15. An online infertility clinical decision support system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Diniz de Souza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore some possibilities of computer applications in medicine, and to discuss an online infertility clinical decision support system.Methods: Retrospective data were obtained from 52 couples, and then entered into the online tool. Both its results and the initial diagnoses obtained by the treating physicians were compared with the final diagnoses established by laparoscopy and other diagnostic tests (semen analysis, hormone analysis, endometrial biopsy, ultrasound and hysteroscopy. The initial hypothesis of the research was that the online tool's output was statistically associated with the final diagnoses. In order to verify that hypothesis, a chi-square (χ2 test with Yates' correction for continuity (P<0.05 was performed to verify if the online tool's and the doctor's diagnoses were statistically associated with the final diagnoses.Results: Four etiological factors were present in more than 50% of the couples (ovarian, tubal-peritoneal, uterine, and endometriosis. The statistical results confirmed the research hypothesis for eight out of the nine etiological factors (ovarian, tubal-peritoneal, uterine, cervical, male, vaginal, psychosomatic, and endometriosis; P<0.05. Since there were no cases related to the immune factor in the sample, further clinical data are necessary in order to assess the online tool's performance for that factor.Conclusions: The online tool tends to present more false-positives than false-negatives, whereas the expert physician tends to present more false-negatives than false-positives. Therefore, the online tool and the doctor seem to complement each other. Finally, the obtained results suggest that the infertility online tool discussed herein might be a useful research and instructional tool.

  16. An online infertility clinical decision support system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Diniz de Souza

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore some possibilities of computer applications in medicine, and to discuss an online infertility clinical decision support system. Methods: Retrospective data were obtained from 52 couples, and then entered into the online tool. Both its results and the initial diagnoses obtained by the treating physicians were compared with the final diagnoses established by laparoscopy and other diagnostic tests (semen analysis, hormone analysis, endometrial biopsy, ultrasound and hysteroscopy. The initial hypothesis of the research was that the online tool’s output was statistically associated with the final diagnoses. In order to verify that hypothesis, a chi-square (氈2 test with Yates’ correction for continuity (P<0.05 was performed to verify if the online tool’s and the doctor’s diagnoses were statistically associated with the final diagnoses. Results: Four etiological factors were present in more than 50% of the couples (ovarian, tubal-peritoneal, uterine, and endometriosis. The statistical results confirmed the research hypothesis for eight out of the nine etiological factors (ovarian, tubal-peritoneal, uterine, cervical, male, vaginal, psychosomatic, and endometriosis; P<0.05. Since there were no cases related to the immune factor in the sample, further clinical data are necessary in order to assess the online tool’s performance for that factor. Conclusions: The online tool tends to present more false-positives than false negatives, whereas the expert physician tends to present more false-negatives than false-positives. Therefore, the online tool and the doctor seem to complement each other. Finally, the obtained results suggest that the infertility online tool discussed herein might be a useful research and instructional tool.

  17. Microsurgical tubal recanalization: A hope for the hopeless

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    Jain M

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyse the various factors affecting pregnancy rate after microsurgical tubal recanalisation. Design: Prospective study, follow-up of 5 years in patients treated with tubal microsurgery. Setting: Referral Tertiary Care Hospital. Patients: Fifty women underwent microsurgical tubal recanalisation procedure. Principles of microsurgery were followed throughout the procedure meticulously. Interventions: Microsurgical tubal recanalisation. Main outcome measure: Pregnancy rate. Results: With microsurgery, an overall 60% pregnancy rate was achieved. In these patients, pregnancy outcome was in form of intrauterine pregnancy (96.66%, ectopic pregnancy (3.33%, term viable pregnancy (96.55% and spontaneous abortion (3.45%. Conclusions: The important factors for determining the success of operation were age of the patient, time interval between sterilization and reversal, site of ligation, method used for previous ligation & the remaining length of the tube after recanalisation. The microsurgical technique should be available at specialized centres to improve the success of family planning services.

  18. Quality of Life and Its Influencing Factors of Couples Referred to An Infertility Center in Shiraz, Iran

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    Bahia Namavar Jahromi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Infertility adversely affects quality of life (QoL. The present study aims to evaluate QoL and its associ- ated factors among infertile couples. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, the Fertility QoL (FertiQoL instrument was used to measure QoL among 501 volunteer couples who attended the Infertility Clinic at the Mother and Child Hospital, Shiraz, Iran. We used an additional questionnaire to assess participants’ demographic and clinical characteristics. The relationship between the scores of QoL to the sociodemographic and treatment data was analysed. Results The subjects with lower income levels had lower relational, mind/body, emotional, and total core scores. Fe- male participants without academic education had lower scores in the emotional subscale, while the male participants showed lower scores in emotional, mind/body, relational, social, and total QoL domains. Subjects who had undergone any type of treatment, including pharmacological treatment, intrauterine insemination (IUI, intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI, and in vitro fertilization (IVF showed significantly lower scores in the environmental domain. Par- ticipants with lower infertility duration obtained significantly greater QoL scores. Finally, tolerability, emotional, and environmental domains were significantly more desirable when the infertility problem was related to a male factor. Conclusion Infertile couples with shorter duration of infertility and male etiology have higher QoL. Lower academic education, lower income levels, or prior unsuccessful treatments are associated with lower QoL.

  19. Quality of Life and Its Influencing Factors of Couples Referred to An Infertility Center in Shiraz, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namavar Jahromi, Bahia; Mansouri, Mahsa; Forouhari, Sedighe; Poordast, Tahere; Salehi, Alireza

    2018-01-01

    Infertility adversely affects quality of life (QoL). The present study aims to evaluate QoL and its associated factors among infertile couples. In this cross-sectional study, the Fertility QoL (FertiQoL) instrument was used to measure QoL among 501 volunteer couples who attended the Infertility Clinic at the Mother and Child Hospital, Shiraz, Iran. We used an additional questionnaire to assess participants' demographic and clinical characteristics. The relationship between the scores of QoL to the sociodemographic and treatment data was analysed. The subjects with lower income levels had lower relational, mind/body, emotional, and total core scores. Female participants without academic education had lower scores in the emotional subscale, while the male participants showed lower scores in emotional, mind/body, relational, social, and total QoL domains. Subjects who had undergone any type of treatment, including pharmacological treatment, intrauterine insemination (IUI), intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), and in vitro fertilization (IVF) showed significantly lower scores in the environmental domain. Participants with lower infertility duration obtained significantly greater QoL scores. Finally, tolerability, emotional, and environmental domains were significantly more desirable when the infertility problem was related to a male factor. Infertile couples with shorter duration of infertility and male etiology have higher QoL. Lower academic education, lower income levels, or prior unsuccessful treatments are associated with lower QoL. Copyright© by Royan Institute. All rights reserved.

  20. The comparison of interventional tubal recanalization and drug irrigation recanalization in the management of oviduct obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiaomin; Li Yuzhi

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore and compare the efficacy of the interventional and drags irrigation tube recanalization for infertile women with fallopian tube obstruction. Methods: Eighteen patients with 36 tubal obstructions in the research group were treated with interventional tube recanalization and drugs infusion into tube through catheter. Other 10 cases with 20 tubal obstructions in the comparison group were treated only with drugs irrigation. All cases received followed up examination in 6 mouths. Results: The successful rates of recanalization were 61.1% (22/36) in the research group and 30.0% (6/20) in the comparison group, respectively. There was significant difference between the two groups (P < 0.05). The recurrence was 4 tube in the research group, 1 tube in the comparison group six months. Conclusion: The interventional tubal recanalization is a simple, sate and more effective treatment method of choice compared with the tubal recanalization with the traditional drag irrigation for fallopian tube obstruction

  1. Número ideal de filhos como fator de risco para laqueadura tubária Ideal number of children as a risk factor for tubal ligation

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    Luiz Eduardo Campos de Carvalho

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo é avaliar a associação entre o número ideal de filhos (NIF e a realização da laqueadura. Foi feito um estudo de caso-controle aninhado, com base em uma análise secundária de dados obtidos em um estudo de coorte sobre a saúde reprodutiva de mulheres em Campinas, São Paulo, Brasil, que teve como sujeitos 3.878 mulheres, das quais 1.012 eram laqueadas (casos. A relação entre NIF e o número de nascidos vivos (NV foi dividida em duas categorias (NIF > NV e NIF ¾ NV. Foram calculados os riscos relativos estimados (odds ratio para a realização de laqueadura e seus respectivos intervalos de confiança (IC 95% para a relação NIF/NV, estratificando-se para outras dez variáveis. Todas as variáveis preditoras foram incluídas em um modelo de regressão logística para identificar os fatores independentemente associados à esterilização definitiva. Observou-se que o risco de laqueadura foi maior entre as mulheres com NIF The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the association between ideal number of children (INC and female sterilization. A nested case-control study was performed through a secondary analysis of data from a cohort study on the reproductive health of women in Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil. A total of 3,878 women were included, 1,012 being sterilized (cases. The relationship between INC and number of live births (LB was divided in two categories (INC > LB and INC ¾ LB. The relative risks of performing tubal ligation were calculated (odds ratio with their respective 95% confidence intervals for the relation INC/LB and all control variables. All predictor variables were included in a logistic regression model in order to identify the factors independently associated with female sterilization. The results showed that the risks of tubal ligation were higher among women with INC < LB, higher age, with partners, higher family income, more than two previous pregnancies, more deliveries, fewer abortions

  2. Comparison of hysterosalpingography and laparoscopy in the evaluation of infertile women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakar, Mehmet N.; Atay, Ahmet E.; Gul, T.; Celik, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to compare tuboperitoneal factors of infertile women hysterosalpingography (HSG) and laparoscopy. In this cohort study, 82 infertile cases were evaluated retrospectively by laparoscopy, 3 months subsequent to HSG in the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Medical School of Dicle University, Diyarbakir, Turkey between March 2004 and April 2006. The findings of HSG and laparoscopy were compared. Out of 82 infertile women, pathological findings were observed in 45.1% by HSG and 54.9% had no pathological findings. On laparoscopic evaluation, however, pathological findings were observed in 65.85% and 34.15% had no pathological findings. The pathological findings were detected by laparoscopy in 20 of the 45(44.4%) patients who had had no pathological findings by HSG and no pathological findings were detected by laparoscopy in 3 of the 37 (8.1%) patients who had pathological findings by HSG. Laparoscopy revealed no pathological findings in 6 of 35 patients who had tubal pathology by HSG. The sensitivity of HSG was 63%, specificity was 89.3% and positive predictive value was 92% with a 55% predictive value and the accuracy ratio was 72%. Laparoscopy is a superior method for the result of tubal and pelvic pathologies in the evaluation of infertility. However, HSG is a more economical and elementary method suitable for evaluation of endometrial and tubal pathologies and laparoscopy is an appropriate method for examining the external part of tubae, fimbriae, the relation of tuba and ovary, endometriosis, adhesions, tuberculosis and other pathologies. Therefore, these 2 methods are not alternative but complementary. (author)

  3. High Titers of Chlamydia trachomatis Antibodies in Brazilian Women with Tubal Occlusion or Previous Ectopic Pregnancy

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    A. C. S. Machado

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate serum chlamydia antibody titers (CATs in tubal occlusion or previous ectopic pregnancy and the associated risk factors. Methods. The study population consisted of 55 women wih tubal damage and 55 parous women. CAT was measured using the whole-cell inclusion immunofluorescence test and cervical chlamydial DNA detected by PCR. Odds ratios were calculated to assess variables associated with C. trachomatis infection. Results. The prevalence of chlamydial antibodies and antibody titers in women with tubal occlusion or previous ectopic pregnancy was significantly higher (P<.01 than in parous women. Stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that chlamydia IgG antibodies were associated with tubal damage and with a larger number of lifetime sexual partners. Conclusions. Chlamydia antibody titers were associated with tubal occlusion, prior ectopic pregnancy, and with sexual behavior, suggesting that a chlamydia infection was the major contributor to the tubal damage in these women.

  4. Knowledge about infertility risk factors, fertility myths and illusory benefits of healthy habits in young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunting, Laura; Boivin, Jacky

    2008-08-01

    Previous research has highlighted a lack of fertility awareness in the general population especially in relation to the optimal fertile period during the menstrual cycle, incidence of infertility and duration of the reproductive life span. The current study assessed fertility knowledge more broadly in young people and investigated three areas of knowledge, namely risk factors associated with female infertility (e.g. smoking), beliefs in false fertility myths (e.g. benefits of rural living) and beliefs in the illusory benefits of healthy habits (e.g. exercising regularly) on female fertility. The sample (n = 149) consisted of 110 female and 39 male postgraduate and undergraduate university students (average age 24.01, SD = 7.81). Knowledge scores were based on a simple task requiring the participants to estimate the effect a factor would have on a group of 100 women trying to get pregnant. Items (n = 21) were grouped according to three categories: risk factors (e.g. smoking; 7 items), myths (e.g. living in countryside; 7 items) and healthy habits (e.g. being normal weight; 7 items). An analysis of variance showed a significant main effect of factor (P healthy habits (P healthy habits. We suggest that the public education campaigns should be directed to erroneous beliefs about pseudo protective factors.

  5. Fertility after uterine artery embolization for symptomatic multiple fibroids with no other infertility factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Antoine; Fauconnier, Arnaud; Kahn, Vanessa; Limot, Olivier; Bussierres, Laurence; Pelage, Jean Pierre

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the fertility of women eligible for surgical multiple myomectomy, but who carefully elected a fertility-sparing uterine artery embolization (UAE). Non-comparative open-label trial, on women ≤40 years, presenting with multiple symptomatic fibroids (at least 3, ≥3 cm), immediate pregnancy wish, and no associated infertility factor. Women had a bilateral limited UAE using tris-acryl gelatin microspheres ≥500 μm. Fertility, ovarian reserve, uterus and fibroid sizes, and quality of life questionnaires (UFS-QoL) were prospectively followed. Fifteen patients, aged 34.8 years (95%CI 32.2-37.5, median 36.0, q1-q3 29.4-39.5) were included from November 2008 to May 2012. During the year following UAE, 9 women actively attempting to conceive experienced 5 live-births (intention-to-treat fertility rate 33.3%, 95%CI 11.8%-61.6%). Markers of ovarian reserve remained stable. The symptoms score was reduced by 66% (95%CI 48%-85%) and the quality of life score was improved by 112% (95%CI 21%-204%). Uterine volume was reduced by 38% (95%CI 24%-52%). Women were followed for 43.1 months (95%CI 32.4-53.9), 10 live-births occurred in 8 patients, and 5 patients required secondary surgeries for fibroids. Women without associated infertility factors demonstrated an encouraging capacity to deliver after UAE. Further randomized controlled trials comparing UAE and myomectomy are warranted. • Women without infertility factors showed an encouraging delivery rate after UAE. • For women choosing UAE over abdominal myomectomy, childbearing may not be impaired. • Data are insufficient to definitively recommend UAE as comparable to myomectomy. • Further randomized trials comparing fertility after UAE or myomectomy are warranted.

  6. Evaluating the factor structure, item analyses, and internal consistency of hospital anxiety and depression scale in Iranian infertile patients

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    Payam Amini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS is a common screening tool designed to measure the level of anxiety and depression in different factor structures and has been extensively used in non-psychiatric populations and individuals experiencing fertility problems. Objective: The aims of this study were to evaluate the factor structure, item analyses, and internal consistency of HADS in Iranian infertile patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study included 651 infertile patients (248 men and 403 women referred to a referral infertility Center in Tehran, Iran between January 2014 and January 2015. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to determine the underlying factor structure of the HADS among one, two, and threefactor models. Several goodness of fit indices were utilized such as comparative, normed and goodness of fit indices, Akaike information criterion, and the root mean squared error of approximation. In addition to HADS, the Satisfaction with Life Scale questionnaires as well as demographic and clinical information were administered to all patients. Results: The goodness of fit indices through CFAs exposed that three and onefactor model provided the best and worst fit to the total, male and female datasets compared to the other factor structure models for the infertile patients. The Cronbach’s alpha for anxiety and depression subscales were 0.866 and 0.753 respectively. The HADS subscales significantly correlated with SWLS, indicating an acceptable convergent validity. Conclusion: The HADS was found to be a three-factor structure screening instrument in the field of infertility.

  7. Stem cell therapeutic possibilities: future therapeutic options for male-factor and female-factor infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easley, Charles A; Simerly, Calvin R; Schatten, Gerald

    2013-07-01

    Recent advances in assisted reproduction treatment have enabled some couples with severe infertility issues to conceive, but the methods are not successful in all cases. Notwithstanding the significant financial burden of assisted reproduction treatment, the emotional scars from an inability to conceive a child enacts a greater toll on affected couples. While methods have circumvented some root causes for male and female infertility, often the underlying causes cannot be treated, thus true cures for restoring a patient's fertility are limited. Furthermore, the procedures are only available if the affected patients are able to produce gametes. Patients rendered sterile by medical interventions, exposure to toxicants or genetic causes are unable to utilize assisted reproduction to conceive a child - and often resort to donors, where permitted. Stem cells represent a future potential avenue for allowing these sterile patients to produce offspring. Advances in stem cell biology indicate that stem cell replacement therapies or in-vitro differentiation may be on the horizon to treat and could cure male and female infertility, although significant challenges need to be met before this technology can reach clinical practice. This article discusses these advances and describes the impact that these advances may have on treating infertility. Copyright © 2013 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Factores de riesgo y secuelas reproductivas asociados a la infección por Chlamydia trachomatis en mujeres infértiles Risk factors and reproductive sequelae associated with Chlamydia trachomatis infection in infertile women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Guerra-Infante

    2003-01-01

    behavioral, historical, and clinical data were collected for each subject. RESULTS: Seventy-seven women (24.9% were infected with C trachomatis. Of these women, 70 (90.9% had only one sexual partner, 58 (75.3% were married, and 19 (24.7% were single or had a common-law sex partner. Intrauterine device (IUD was the main contraceptive method used in 15 women (19.5%. A co-infection with other sexually-transmitted microorganisms was detected in 41 of these patients (53.2%. Nineteen (24.7% women had undergone tubal ligation. Among women with C trachomatis infection, reproductive sequelae were found: 24 (31.2% women had had abortions and 50 (64.9% had had a miscarriage. In 26 women cervical abnormalities were detected (33.8%; 50 (64.9% had purulent vaginal discharge and 14 (18.1% had pelvic pain. Bivariate analysis revealed that the risk factors for C trachomatis infection in women with infertility were: having a sex partner (OR=2.96, 95% CI 1.22-7.5, p=0.008, common-law union (OR=3.68, p=0.03, and IUD use (OR=2.42, p=0.01. CONCLUSIONS: A consistent relationship between C trachomatis infection and infertility was found. Infection with C trachomatis in women with infertility was associated with having one single sexual partner, marital status, and IUD use. The presence of ectropion and friability of the cervix may signal C trachomatis infection. Identification and presumptive therapy should be evaluated as measures to prevent and control C trachomatis infection in patients at risk.

  9. Adnexal mass in tubal pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hee Jung; Kim, Jung Sik; Chu, Yang Ku

    1993-01-01

    Off the evaluation of clinical significance and pathologic correlation of echogenic adnexal mass in tubal pregnancy, which is separated from ipsilateral ovary, we performed a retrospective analysis of 15 proved tubal pregnancies. All showed hematosalpinx containing blood coagulum and chorionic villi with intact fallopian tube.The echogenicity of the adnexal mass was considered to represent the nonclotted or clotted blood within the fallopian tube. We conclude that the discrete, echogenic adnexal mass is the suggestive finding of unrupturedtubal pregnancy

  10. Frequency of anti-Chlamydia trachomatis antibodies in infertile women referred to Tabriz Al-Zahra hospital

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    Mahtab Sattari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is one of the major issues in society and its incidence is estimated to be almost 10-15%. Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis is an important cause of sexually transmitted diseases leading to infertility. Objective: This study was designed to determine the frequency of anti-C. trachomatis antibodies in infertile women at Al-zahra hospital, Tabriz, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the blood samples were collected randomly from 184 infertile women (case group and 100 pregnant women (control group. The frequency of specific IgG and IgM anti-C. trachomatis antibodies were evaluated using ELISA method. Results: The frequency of IgG anti-C. trachomatis antibody in the control and case groups was 18% and 35.88%, respectively. IgM anti-C. trachomatis antibody was found in 2% of controls and 5.44% of infertile women. Our results showed the significant differences between the case and control groups in anti-C. trachomatis antibodies (IgG, p=0.035 and IgM, p=0.004. Also, no significant relation was seen between the frequency of anti-C. trachomatis antibodies and age, location, and tubal factor infertility in our two study groups. Conclusion: According to high frequency of antibody anti-C. trachomatis among infertile women in competition to the control group, evaluation and treatment of Chlamydia infections is necessary in these patients

  11. Detection of Chlamydia Trachomatis Infection in Female Partners of Infertile Couples

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    Seyed Mehdi Kalantar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of infertility is about 10-15% among the couples overally. Several factors can affect fertility ability of men and women. Chlamydia is a non-motile gram negative obligatory interacellular pathogenic organism. It can cause infections in females as cervicitis, urethritis, endometritis, pelvic inflammatory disease also prostatitis and epidydidimitis in male as well. The aim of this survey is to mention the frequency of infection with Chlamydia in infertile female who were treated in Yazd Research & Clinical Center for Infertility.Materials and Methods: A questionnaire containing some demographic information and clinical features related to the infection was completed for each infertile woman. Specimen of vaginal discharge was collected by well trained nurses using sterile cotton swap from 91 women. Elisa test was done on blood serum. DNA extraction for Chlamydia was carried out using low salt method and PCR was done using MOMP and plasmid primers. DNA sequencing was performed on two PCR products using Chromas LITE ver.2.01 and analyzed by BLAST.Results: Of 91 blood samples collected in this survey, none of them was positive by ELISA. Also there was no positive PCR result. Four PCR products showed a questionable band which was not in the range of Chlamydia. The products underwent DNA sequencing and there were not any finding related to any other micro-organism.Conclusion: However, it is well known that Chlamydia as an infection plays a role in infertility. Nevertheless, there was not evidence of this organism in these infertile patients. It is necessary to design such a survey in larger populations of infertile patients especially on infertile women with tubal infertility and their husbands as well.

  12. Factors that affect infertility patients' decisions about disposition of frozen embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerly, Anne Drapkin; Steinhauser, Karen; Namey, Emily; Tulsky, James A; Cook-Deegan, Robert; Sugarman, Jeremy; Walmer, David; Faden, Ruth; Wallach, Edward

    2006-06-01

    To describe factors that affect infertility patients' decision making regarding their cryopreserved embryos. Forty-six semistructured in-depth interviews of individuals and couples participating in IVF programs. Two major southeastern academic medical centers. Fifty-three individuals, including 31 women, 8 men, and 7 couples. Qualitative analysis of interview transcripts. INTERVENTION (S): None. Seven broad themes informed participants' decisions about embryo disposition: family and personal issues, trust, definition of the embryo, prospective responsibility to the embryo, responsibility to society, adequacy of information, and lack of acceptable disposition options. Many wished for alternative options, such as a ceremony at the time of disposal or placement of embryos in the woman's body when pregnancy was unlikely. Recent debates regarding embryo disposition do not reflect the range of values that infertility patients consider when deciding about frozen embryos. In addition to questions about the embryo's moral status, decision making about embryos is informed by a range of factors in the lives of individuals who created them. These perspectives may have important implications for the content and timing of informed consent, facilitating embryo disposition, and advancing policy debates about the ethics of frozen embryo use.

  13. Laparoscopic finding of female infertility-a study of 186 cases at a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasir, N.; Fatima, A.; Parveen, S.; Tariq, H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the various causes of female infertility, diagnosed at laparoscopy. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at Military Hospital Rawalpindi, Pakistan from April 2008 to December 2010. Patients and Methods: A series of 186 patients, having either primary or secondary infertility admitted through gynae outpatient department undergoing diagnostic laparoscopy and meeting inclusion criteria were studied. The data was collected prospectively and analysed in the form of frequency and percentages by using SPSS version 10. Results: Amongst the cohort of 186 patients, 148 (79.6%) had primary and 38 (20.4%) had secondary infertility. Their ages ranged from 20 to 43 years. Mean age of study participants was 30.14 +- 4.04 years. Mean duration of infertility was 9.5 years. No laparoscopic abnormality was found in 51 (27.9%), while there were abnormal findings in 135 (72.6%) patients. Conclusion: Commonest etiological factor was tubal blockade in both types of infertility. Other factors were endometriosis, pelvic adhesions and fibroids. Laparoscopy is minimally invasive yet a reliable procedure for visualization of internal architecture of the female pelvis. (author)

  14. Incidence of infertility and risk factors of impaired fecundity among newly married couples in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qinqin; Ren, Aiguo; Zhang, Le; Liu, Jufen; Li, Zhiwen; Yang, Yan; Li, Rong; Ma, Le

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to obtain the incidence of infertility, to examine the causes of infertility and to explore risk factors for impaired fecundity in a rural region of northern China using a prospective follow-up design. A total of 2151 newly married couples planning to become pregnant within the next 12 months were enrolled between 2009 and 2012 from two counties of Shanxi Province in northern China. Couples were followed up for at least 1 year or until a clinical pregnancy occurred. Information about clinical pregnancy was obtained. The 12-month and 24-month infertility rates were 13.6% (95% CI 11.9 to 15.3) and 8.5% (95% CI 6.7 to 10.3), respectively. About 63% of women became pregnant within 6 months of follow up, and 86% did so within 12 months of follow up. The main causes of female infertility were ovulation disorders, fallopian tube problems and polycystic ovary syndrome. The primary cause of male infertility was sperm quality problems. Couples who used coal as cooking fuel, women with a higher body mass index, women with long-term health problems, and men who had married at later ages were more likely to have delayed pregnancies. Copyright © 2014 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Tubal risk markers for failure to place transcervical sterilization coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyser-Whalen, Ophra; Rouhani, Mahta; Rahman, Mahbubur; Berenson, Abbey B

    2011-01-01

    Background There is a growing body of literature on placement rates of the Essure® procedure, yet prior studies have not attempted to identify tubal-associated risk factors for placement failures. The current study examines risk markers associated with the inability to deploy the Essure® coils into the tubal lumen using the new ESS305 design. Study Design We used electronic medical record data to assess risk markers associated with the inability to place the Essure coils in the tubal lumen using the new ESS305 design. A total of 310 attempted procedures between June 14, 2007, and April 29, 2011 were analyzed. Results There were 18 tubal failures (5.8%) out of the 310 attempted procedures. A history of a prior sexually transmitted infection (STI) was associated with tubal failure (OR 2.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01–6.90; p=.048). Conclusions We speculate that the observed association between a prior STI and an inability to place the coil was due to a past history of pelvic inflammatory disease. PMID:22036044

  16. TDRP deficiency contributes to low sperm motility and is a potential risk factor for male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Shanhua; Wu, Fei; Cao, Xinyi; He, Min; Liu, Naijia; Wu, Huihui; Yang, Zhihong; Ding, Qiang; Wang, Xuanchun

    2016-01-01

    TDRP (Testis Development-Related Protein), a nuclear factor, might play an important role in spermatogenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms of TDRP underlying these fundamental processes remain elusive. In this study, a Tdrp-deficient mouse model was generated. Fertility tests and semen analysis were performed. Tdrp-deficient mice were not significantly different from wild-type littermates in development of testes, genitourinary tract, or sperm count. Morphologically, spermatozoa of the Tdrp-deficient mice was not significantly different from the wild type. Several sperm motility indexes, i.e. the average path velocity (VAP), the straight line velocity (VSL) and the curvilinear velocity (VCL) were significantly decreased in Tdrp-deficient mice (psperm also increased significantly in the mutant mice (psperm motility, but Tdrp deficiency alone was not sufficient to cause male infertility in mice. Additionally, TDRP1 might participate in spermatogenes is through interaction with PRM2.

  17. Comparison of Zygote Intrafallopian Transfer and Intrauterine Embryo Transfer for Male-factor Infertility After Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection

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    Ying-Hui Lin

    2004-03-01

    Conclusion: The data presented in this report demonstrate that there was no therapeutic improvement associated with the increased complexity of ZIFT as compared with intrauterine ET after ICSI for the treatment of male-factor infertility. With the advent of improvements in culture techniques in the IVF laboratory, intrauterine ET remains the technique of choice.

  18. The pattern of hysterosalpingographic findings in women being investigated for infertility in Nnewi, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, C O; Okafor, C I; Okpala, O C; Umeh, E

    2010-09-01

    Tubal occlusion is the commonest cause of female infertility in the developing societies. Hysterosalpingography remains a vital method of assessing tubal patency especially in resource limited settings such as ours. To review the pattern of hysterosalpingographic findings among women being investigated for infertility in Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi, Nigeria over a period of five years (2001-2005). The data obtained from the request forms and radiologists' reports were analyzed using SPSS version 11. The level of statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Of the 320 studied, 230 were found suitable for analysis. Their ages ranged from 20 to 44 years (mean 32.8 +/- 5.8 years). The indications were primary infertility in 103 (44.8%), secondary infertility in 88(38.3%), while in 39 (16.9%) patients the type of infertility was not specified. The reports revealed that 67 (29.1%) had normal HSG Cervical abnormalities were found in 34 (14.8%), uterine cavity abnormalities in 108 (47.0%). Tubal pathologies were seen in 100 (43.5%) with bilateral tubal occlusion in 43 (18.7%) and bilateral hydrosalpinges in 6 (2.6%) patients. Tubal pathology remains a major contributor to female infertility in this part of the world.

  19. Is infertility a risk factor for female sexual dysfunction? A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millheiser, Leah S; Helmer, Amy E; Quintero, Rodolfo B; Westphal, Lynn M; Milki, Amin A; Lathi, Ruth B

    2010-11-01

    To determine the impact of infertility on female sexual function. A case-control study. Academic infertility and gynecology practices. One hundred nineteen women with infertility and 99 healthy female controls without infertility between the ages of 18 and 45 years were included in this study. Anonymous survey and Female Sexual Function Index. Female Sexual Function Index scores, frequency of sexual intercourse and masturbation, and sex-life satisfaction. Twenty-five percent of our control group had Female Sexual Function Index scores that put them at risk for sexual dysfunction (masturbation. The patients with infertility retrospectively reported a sex-life satisfaction score that was similar to that of the controls before their diagnosis, whereas their current sex-life satisfaction scores were significantly lower than those of the controls. Women with a diagnosis of infertility were found to be at higher risk for sexual dysfunction on the basis of their Female Sexual Function Index scores compared with women without infertility. The interaction of sexual function and infertility is complex and deserves further study. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. TTY2 genes deletions as genetic risk factor of male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaveisi-Zadeh, F; Alibakhshi, R; Asgari, R; Rostami-Far, Z; Bakhtiari, M; Abdi, H; Movafagh, A; Mirfakhraie, R

    2017-02-28

    Y chromosome has a number of genes that are expressed in testis and have a role in spermatogenesis. TTY2L12A and TTY2L2A are the members of testis transcript Y2 (TTY2) that are Y linked multi-copy gene families, located on Yp11 and Yq11 loci respectively. The aim of this study was to investigate frequency of TTY2L12A and TTY2L2A deletions in azoospermic patients compared with fertile males. This study was performed on 45 infertile males with idiopathic azoospermia without any AZF micro deletions (group A), 33 infertile males with azoospermia which do not screened for AZF micro deletions (group B) and 65 fertile males (group C), from October 2013 to April 2015 in west of Iran. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was used for detection of TTY2L12A and TTY2L2A gene deletions in studied groups. No deletions were detected in normal fertile males of group C. 1 out of 45 azoospermic males of group A (2.22%) and 3 out of 33 azoospermic males of group B (9.09%) had TTY2L2A deletion (p= 0.409 and p= 0.036 respectively), also 1 out of 45 azoospermic males of group A (2.22%) and 4 out of 33 azoospermic males of group B (12.12%) had TTY2L12A deletion (p= 0.409 and p= 0.011 respectively).  None of azoospermic males in Group A and B had deletions in both genes. Our data showed significant correlation between non-obstructive azoospermia and TTY2L12A and TTY2L2A deletions. Thus, it seems that TTY2L12A and TTY2L2A deletions can consider as one of the genetic risk factors for non-obstructive azoospermia.

  1. STUDIES ON HUMAN FALLOPIAN TUBAL EPITHELIUM IN DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS

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    Jayasri

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS The “fallopian tubes” (oviducts or uterine tubes are long paired flexuous reproductive organ which transports ova, spermatozoa, zygotes, the pre-implantation morulae and blastocyst. It has major role during reproductive period, but it remains as if vestigial organ before puberty and after menopause. Due to increasing rate of tubal block and infertility, oviducts and their structures gaining importance and have become a subject of research in present days particularly epithelium. The aim of the study is to ascertain any histological difference of tubal epithelium in different age groups and the research work could be utilized for investigation and management of infertility. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seven samples of each group i.e., prereproductive, reproductive & postmenopausal were collected from fresh unembalmed human cadavers received in the department of Anatomy, FAA Medical College, Barpeta, Assam. The slides were prepared using the standard laboratory procedure. Under low and high power objectives the type of cells were observed and epithelial height was measured in the different segments. Stress was given for any significant difference of epithelial height between the different age groups. RESULTS Study revealed that among the groups within the same segment, epithelial height was recorded highest (33.57µm in reproductive group as against the lowest (22.91µm in post-menopausal group. Epithelial structures of the prereproductive and reproductive groups were significantly differed (p<0.01 from the postmenopausal group. CONCLUSIONS From the findings of the present study it can be concluded that: 1. In all the groups fallopian tubal epithelium is of simple columnar type and contains three types of cells. Cells are ciliated, secretory & peg (intercalary cells. 2. In all the groups same type of increasing trend of epithelial height from intramural segment to ampullary segment was recorded. 3. In intergroup comparison of

  2. [Serum markers of oxidative stress in infertile women with endometriosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Aline Zyman de; Rodrigues, Jhenifer Kliemchen; Dib, Luciana Azôr; Romão, Gustavo Salata; Ferriani, Rui Alberto; Jordão Junior, Alceu Afonso; Navarro, Paula Andrea de Albuquerque Salles

    2010-06-01

    to compare serum markers of oxidative stress between infertile patients with and without endometriosis and to assess the association of these markers with disease staging. this was a prospective study conducted on 112 consecutive infertile, non-obese patients younger than 39 years, divided into two groups: Endometriosis (n=48, 26 with minimal and mild endometriosis - Stage I/II, and 22 with moderate and severe endometriosis - Stage III/IV) and Control (n=64, with tubal and/or male factor infertility). Blood samples were collected during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle for the analysis of serum malondialdehyde, glutathione and total hydroxyperoxide levels by spectrophotometry and of vitamin E by high performance liquid chromatography. The results were compared between the endometriosis and control groups, stage I/II endometriosis and control, stage III/IV endometriosis and control, and between the two endometriosis subgroups. The level of significance was set at 5% (p Control Group (8.0 ± 2 µMol/g protein) and among patients with stage III/IV disease (9.7 ± 2.3 µMol/g protein) compared to patients with stage I/II disease (8.2 ± 1.0 µMol/g protein). No significant differences in serum malondialdehyde levels were observed between groups. we demonstrated a positive association between infertility related to endometriosis, advanced disease stage and increased serum hydroxyperoxide levels, suggesting an increased production of reactive species in women with endometriosis. These data, taken together with the reduction of serum vitamin E and glutathione levels, suggest the occurrence of systemic oxidative stress in women with infertility associated with endometriosis. The reproductive and metabolic implications of oxidative stress should be assessed in future studies.

  3. Laparoscopic findings of infertile women at Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University

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    Shakeela Ishrat

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laparoscopy is an important component of infertility work up. It is the gold standard for evaluation of pelvic pathology and assessment of tubal patency. Objective: The objective of the study was to analyze the laparoscopic findings of infertile women presenting at Infertlity unit of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University. Method: We had a retrospective cross-sectional study on Japaroscopic findings of 110 women. Results: Out of all patients 22.7% women had endometriosis. Various degrees of adhesion of pouch of Douglus was present in 16.4 %. Regarding tubal pate:1cy , 26.4% had unilateral block and 28.2% had bilateral block. Conclusion: A significant number of infertile women at the Infertility unit of BSMMU has tuboperitoneal disease and bilateral tubal block and ultimately need in vitro fertilization.

  4. Interventions for tubal ectopic pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hajenius, P. J.; Mol, F.; Mol, B. W. J.; Bossuyt, P. M. M.; Ankum, W. M.; van der Veen, F.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment options for tubal ectopic pregnancy are; (1) surgery, e.g. salpingectomy or salpingo(s)tomy, either performed laparoscopically or by open surgery; (2) medical treatment, with a variety of drugs, that can be administered systemically and/or locally by various routes and (3)

  5. Surgical management of tubal pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, F.

    2013-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis first addresses the magnitude of the clinical problem of surgically treated tubal pregnancy in The Netherlands. Next, we studied the adherence to recommendations from the Dutch guideline on diagnosis and management of ectopic pregnancy. A systematic review and

  6. Cultural factors contributing to health care disparities among patients with infertility in Midwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missmer, Stacey A; Seifer, David B; Jain, Tarun

    2011-05-01

    To identify cultural differences in access to infertility care. Cross-sectional, self-administered survey. University hospital-based fertility center. Thirteen hundred fifty consecutive women who were seen for infertility care. None. Details about demographic characteristics, health care access, and treatment opinions based on patient race or ethnicity. The median age of participants was 35 years; 41% were white, 28% African American, 18% Hispanic, and 7% Asian. Compared with white women, African American and Hispanic women had been attempting to conceive for 1.5 years longer. They also found it more difficult to get an appointment, to take time off from work, and to pay for treatment. Forty-nine percent of respondents were concerned about the stigma of infertility, 46% about conceiving multiples, and 40% about financial costs. Disappointing one's spouse was of greater concern to African-American women, whereas avoiding the stigmatization of infertility was of greatest concern to Asian-American women. While the demand for infertility treatment increases in the United States, attention to cultural barriers to care and cultural meanings attributed to infertility should be addressed. Enhanced cultural competencies of the health care system need to be employed if equal access is to be realized as equal utilization for women of color seeking infertility care. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hydrotubation in the management of female infertility: outcome in low resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesiyun, A G; Cole, B; Ogwuche, P

    2009-01-01

    To determine the outcome of therapeutic hydrotubation (tubal flushing) in patients with tubal infertility and unexplained infertility. Prospective non-randomised observational study. Alba hospital, a five bed multidisciplinary private hospital in Kaduna city, Nigeria. Infertile women with tubal and unexplained infertility. Two hundred and fifty seven patients that had therapeutic hydrotubation over 7.5 years were analysed. The age range was 21 to 44 years with mean of 34.5 years. Secondary infertility was found in 209 (81.3%) patients and primary infertility in 166 (64.6%) patients. Of the 257 patients, 134 (52.1%) had had induced abortion. Indications for hydrotubation were bilateral perifimbrial adhesion (incomplete tubal occlusion) 47.9%, bilateral fimbrial end occlusion 24.9%, bilateral cornual blockage 16% and unexplained infertility in 11.3% of cases. One hundred and nine conceptions were recorded in this study and the overall conception rate was 42.4%. Likewise, percentage ratio of conception in these 154 patients with evidence of post-hydrotubation tubal patency was 70.8%. Pregnancy outcome of the 109 conceptions are term pregnancy 84.4%, preterm pregnancy 9.2%, miscarriage 4.6% and ectopic pregnancy in 1.8% of the conceptions. Recorded complications were pelvic pain in 177 (68.9%) patients and vaginal bleeding in 63 (24.5%) patients. With good case selection, therapeutic hydrotubation may be beneficial in resource poor countries, especially in patients with incomplete tubal occlusion (bilateral perifimbrial adhesions) and as part of treatment for unexplained infertility.

  8. Radiologic fallopian tube catheterization for diagnosis and treatment of proximal tubal obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurmond, A.S.; Rosch, J.

    1988-01-01

    Seventy-five infertile women in whom proximal fallopian tube obstruction had been demonstrated by conventional hysterosalpingography were managed by means of fluoroscopic transcervical fallopian tube catheterization techniques. The procedure helped avoid surgery for diagnosis and/or treatment of proximal tubal obstruction in 71 women (95%). In 32 patients who had patent tube(s) following the procedure, 15 pregnancies have occurred, 14 intrauterine and one tubal (follow-up, 6 months). Fifteen patients had follow-up studies after recanalization, and 19 of 23 tubes remained patent (83%). Fluoroscopic fallopian tube catheterization improves diagnosis of fallopian tube disease and is a low-cost, nonsurgical treatment for infertility caused by proximal fallopian tube obstruction

  9. Frequency of "incidental" serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC) in women without a history of or genetic risk factor for high-grade serous carcinoma: A six-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meserve, Emily E K; Mirkovic, Jelena; Conner, James R; Yang, Eric; Muto, Michael G; Horowitz, Neil; Strickland, Kyle C; Howitt, Brooke E; Crum, Christopher P

    2017-07-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of incidentally discovered serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma in women without a genetic risk for or history of high grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) in the gynecologic tract. All pathology reports at our institution that included bilateral salpingectomies from January 2006-December 2011 were examined in women >50years old in which the entire tube or the distal one-third was examined histologically with the complete (proximal and distal fallopian tube) or modified (distal one third of the tube) SEE-FIM protocol. Cases were divided into: Group 1, a history of or known risk factors (BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations) for HGSC and Group 2, those without these attributes for whom a STIC would be unexpected (incidental). Women undergoing unspecified "risk-reducing" procedures were included in Group 1. Of 4051 identified total, 2268 had complete examination of the distal fallopian tube and were age 50 or above. Of these, 1747 were in group 2. Two STICs were identified (0.1%), one associated with a grade 2 endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma and one with a low-grade ovarian serous carcinoma in the setting of a serous borderline tumor. Incidental STICs in women over age 50 are uncommon. However, the significance of lesser tubal atypias (0.3% in this study), risk of STIC in women with no epithelial pathology and the risk imposed by coexisting endometrioid neoplasia are unclear and require further study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Evaluation of the Relationship Between Obesity and Male Infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Fikret Erdemir

    2013-01-01

      Infertility, defined as the inability to conceive after one year of unprotected intercourse, affects approximately 15% of couples. Male factor infertility is the sole cause of infertility in approximately 20% of infertile couples, with an additional 30% to 40% secondary to both male and female factors. Thus, male factor infertility is present in approximately half of all infertile couples. Known etiologies of male infertility include cryptorchidism, testicular torsion or trauma, varico...

  11. Factores asociados a la aceptación de salpingoclasia posparto entre mujeres infectadas por el VIH Factors associated with acceptance of postpartum tubal ligation among HIV infected women

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    Ricardo Figueroa-Damián

    2001-04-01

    artículo está disponible en: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.htmlOBJECTIVE: To identify the factors associated with the acceptance of tubal ligation after childbirth among HIV-infected patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A case-control study was conducted from March 1988 to February 1999, at Mexico's National Institute of Perinatology (INPer, in 72 HIV-positive pregnant women. Cases were 49 women who accepted postpartum tubal ligation after childbirth, and controls were 23 women who refused this birth control method. Data collected for each patient were demographic characteristics, sexual and reproductive history, and HIV status. Statistical analysis consisted of descriptive measures, Chi² or Fisher's exact test for categorical variables, and Student's t test for continuous variables. Odds ratios (OR with 95% CI were used to compare groups and potential confounders were assessed by stratified analysis with the Mantel-Haenszel method. RESULTS: The patients' mean age was 25.5 ± 5.5 years. The median gestation period was 27 weeks (range 7 to 40 weeks; 16 women (22.2% had no prenatal care visits at INPer. The median time of HIV positivist awareness was 9 months (range 1 to 108. Variables associated with acceptance of tubal ligation were: having a prior childbirth (OR 11.1, 95% CI 3.4 to 36, pregnancy care from 1995 onward (OR 4.7, 95% CI 1.7 to 13.3, and having given birth to an HIV-infected child (OR 4.6, 95% CI 1.05 to 23.1. Stratified analysis showed no modification of the strength of association of these variables with acceptance of tubal ligation. CONCLUSIONS: A prior childbirth was the most important predictor of tubal ligation acceptance. The English version of this paper is available at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html

  12. Lessons from elective in vitro fertilization (IVF in, principally, non-infertile women

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    Gleicher Norbert

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We here report the first investigation of exclusively elective in vitro fertilization (IVF cycles in women with no apparent history of infertility. Since IVF outcome in women with infertility are always influenced by underlying causes of infertility, a study on non-infertile women may offer new insights. Methods We investigated 88 females without history of infertility in 109 consecutive elective IVF cycles, almost exclusively performed for purposes of preimplantation genetic screening (PGS; i.e., elective gender selection. The following questions were addressed: (i impact of PGS on IVF pregnancy chances; (ii impact of transfer of 1 vs. ≥2 embryos on IVF pregnancy chances; (iii correlation of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH levels to embryo ploidy (iv effect of gonadotropin dosage used in stimulation on available embryos for transfer; and (v in form of a 1:1 case control study, compared 33 elective PGS cycles with matched control cycles without PGS, performed in couples with either prior tubal ligations and/or severe male factor infertility as indication of IVF. Results The overall clinical pregnancy rate for the group was 36.7%; pregnancy was associated with number of euploid (P = 0.009 and number of embryos transferred (P = 0.001. Odds of pregnancy were 3.4-times higher if ≥4 euploid embryos were produced in comparison to Conclusions This study suggests that outcomes of elective IVF cycles may significantly deviate from infertility-associated cycles. Affirming proof of concept for PGS, utilizing day-3 embryo biopsy and fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH, both widely held responsible for earlier failures to establish such proof, suggests that the principal cause of prior failures were likely not insufficient laboratory techniques but poor patient selection for PGS. Such a conclusion questions the current reintroduction of PGS with improved techniques and technologies in absence of prior determination of suited

  13. Spectrum of menstrual problems after tubal ligation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, S.S.B.; Akthar, S.; Mubeen, A.; Noor, A.

    2014-01-01

    To determine the frequency of menstrual problems after tubal ligation. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: This study was carried out in gynae department of PAF Hospital Sargodha, Pakistan from September 2011 to September 2012. Patients and methods: Two hundred patients were included in the study with menstrual problems after tubal ligation. Results: Forty seven percent of patients presented with menorrhagia, 28% presented with metrorrhagia, 13% patients were having complaints of polymenorrhoea and 5% patients presented with dysmenorrhea and 7% had oligomenorrhoea after tubal ligation. Thirty one percent of patients ended up in hysterectomy and 37% of patients had improvement of symptoms with medical treatment. Conclusion: Menstrual problem is a common complaint in our gyn ecological patients. A large number of these patients had history of tubal ligation. Menorrhagia, metrorrhagia, polymenorrhoea and dysmenorrhoea can occur after tubal ligation. Patients giving the history of menstrual problems and wants tubal ligation should be counselled earlier for these symptoms. (author)

  14. Psychosocial Consequences of Infertility on Infertile Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, P; Rahman, D; Hossain, H B; Hossain, H N; Mughi, C R

    2015-10-01

    This study explores to find out the qualitative and quantitative psychosocial consequences of infertility in women coming for infertility treatment in tertiary infertility center. A total of 400 infertile couples who agreed to participate in the study were asked to fill up the questionnaires and later interviewed to access the psychosocial consequences of infertility on their personal life in a tertiary infertility clinic in Dhaka at Center for Assisted Reproduction (CARe Hospital), Dhaka from June 2011 to December 2011 and agreed to participate in the study were included in the study. The data was analyzed and the quantitative and qualitative psychosocial factors were evaluated. Four hundred infertile couple who filled the questionnaires was included in the study. Sixty three percent of the women belonged to age group >20 30 years at the time of interview. Regarding age at marriage 43.8% of the women were married by 20 years, 51.3% were married between 20 30 years. Mean±SD duration of present married life was 7.20±4.45 (range 1 to 28) years and 74.4% of the women were living with their husbands. Of them 75.5% women were housewife. When asked whether they knew what was the reason of infertility in the couple, 32.5% knew the cause was in the female partner, 14.5%, knew the cause was in the male partner, 10.3% knew the cause was in both partners, 21.5% knew cause of infertility was not in any of the partners, and 21.3% had no idea about the cause of infertility. The male partner's response about the issue of prognosis and outcome of couple's infertility revealed 37.3% believed their wives will conceive someday, 31.3% had no intention for a second marriage, 13% were indifferent, 11.3% blamed their wives for infertility and 4.8% threatened for a second marriage. Only 2.5% of the male partners were suggested on consulting and continuing treatment by specialist. The family pressure by in-laws and relatives towards their infertility was that 57.3% insisted on consulting

  15. Total motile sperm count: a better indicator for the severity of male factor infertility than the WHO sperm classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, J A M; Cissen, M; Brandes, M; Smeenk, J M J; de Bruin, J P; Kremer, J A M; Nelen, W L D M; Hamilton, C J C M

    2015-05-01

    Does the prewash total motile sperm count (TMSC) have a better predictive value for spontaneous ongoing pregnancy (SOP) than the World Health Organization (WHO) classification system? The prewash TMSC shows a better correlation with the spontaneous ongoing pregnancy rate (SOPR) than the WHO 2010 classification system. According to the WHO classification system, an abnormal semen analysis can be diagnosed as oligozoospermia, astenozoospermia, teratozoospermia or combinations of these and azoospermia. This classification is based on the fifth percentile cut-off values of a cohort of 1953 men with proven fertility. Although this classification suggests accuracy, the relevance for the prognosis of an infertile couple and the choice of treatment is questionable. The TMSC is obtained by multiplying the sample volume by the density and the percentage of A and B motility spermatozoa. We analyzed data from a longitudinal cohort study among unselected infertile couples who were referred to three Dutch hospitals between January 2002 and December 2006. Of the total cohort of 2476 infertile couples, only the couples with either male infertility as a single diagnosis or unexplained infertility were included (n = 1177) with a follow-up period of 3 years. In all couples a semen analysis was performed. Based on the best semen analysis if more tests were performed, couples were grouped according to the WHO classification system and the TMSC range, as described in the Dutch national guidelines for male infertility. The primary outcome measure was the SOPR, which occurred before, during or after treatments, including expectant management, intrauterine insemination, in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection. After adjustment for the confounding factors (female and male age, duration and type of infertility and result of the postcoital test) the odd ratios (ORs) for risk of SOP for each WHO and TMSC group were calculated. The couples with unexplained infertility were

  16. Medical Imaging and Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Rebecca

    2016-11-01

    Infertility affects many couples, and medical imaging plays a vital role in its diagnosis and treatment. Radiologic technologists benefit from having a broad understanding of infertility risk factors and causes. This article describes the typical structure and function of the male and female reproductive systems, as well as congenital and acquired conditions that could lead to a couple's inability to conceive. Medical imaging procedures performed for infertility diagnosis are discussed, as well as common interventional options available to patients. © 2016 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  17. Sperm DNA damage in male infertility: etiologies, assays, and outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Schulte, Ryan T.; Ohl, Dana A.; Sigman, Mark; Smith, Gary D.

    2009-01-01

    Male factor infertility is the sole cause of infertility in approximately 20% of infertile couples, with an additional 30% to 40% secondary to both male and female factors. Current means of evaluation of male factor infertility remains routine semen analysis including seminal volume, pH, sperm concentration, motility, and morphology. However, approximately 15% of patients with male factor infertility have a normal semen analysis and a definitive diagnosis of male infertility often cannot be m...

  18. Factors predictive of abnormal semen parameters in male partners of couples attending the infertility clinic of a tertiary hospital in south-western Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Olusola Aduloju

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is a common gynaecological problem and male factor contributes significantly in the aetiology of infertility. Semen analysis has remained a useful investigation in the search for male factor infertility. Aim: This study assessed the pattern of semen parameters and predictive factors associated with abnormal parameters in male partners of infertile couples attending a Nigerian tertiary hospital. Methods: A descriptive study of infertile couples presenting at the clinic between January 2012and December 2015 was done at Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti. Seminal fluid from the male partners were analysed in the laboratory using the WHO 2010 criteria for human semen characteristics. Data was analysed using SPSS 17 and logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictive factors associated with abnormal semen parameters. Results: A total of 443 men participated in the study and 38.2% had abnormal sperm parameters. Oligozoospermia (34.8% and asthenozoospermia (26.9% are leading single factor abnormality found, astheno-oligozoospermia occurred in 14.2% and oligo-astheno-teratozoospermia in 3.6% of cases. The prevalence of azoospermia was 3.4%. Smoking habit, past infection with mumps and previous groin surgery significantly predicted abnormal semen parameters with p values of 0.025, 0.040 and 0.017 respectively. Positive cultures were recorded in 36.2% of cases and staph aureus was the commonest organism. Conclusion: Male factor abnormalities remain significant contributors to infertility and men should be encouraged through advocacy to participate in investigation of infertility to reduce the level of stigmatization and ostracizing of women with infertility especially in sub-Saharan Africa.

  19. Factors predictive of abnormal semen parameters in male partners of couples attending the infertility clinic of a tertiary hospital in southwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Aduloju

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is a common gynaecological problem and male factor contributes significantly in the aetiology of infertility. Semen analysis has remained a useful investigation in the search for male factor infertility.Aim: This study assessed the pattern of semen parameters and predictive factors associated with abnormal parameters in male partners of infertile couples attending a Nigerian tertiary hospital.Methods: A descriptive study of infertile couples presenting at the clinic between January 2012and December 2015 was done at Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti.  Seminal fluid from the male partners were analysed in the laboratory using the WHO 2010 criteria for human semen characteristics. Data was analysed using SPSS 17 and logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictive factors associated with abnormal semen parameters.Results: A total of 443 men participated in the study and 38.2% had abnormal sperm parameters. Oligozoospermia (34.8% and asthenozoospermia (26.9% are leading single factor abnormality found, astheno-oligozoospermia occurred in 14.2% and oligo-astheno-teratozoospermia in 3.6% of cases. The prevalence of azoospermia was 3.4%. Smoking habit, past infection with mumps and previous groin surgery significantly predicted abnormal semen parameters with p values of 0.025, 0.040 and 0.017 respectively. Positive cultures were recorded in 36.2% of cases and staph aureus was the commonest organism.Conclusion: Male factor abnormalities remain significant contributors to infertility and men should be encouraged through advocacy to participate in investigation of infertility to reduce the level of stigmatization and ostracizing of women with infertility especially in sub-Saharan Africa.

  20. Psychiatric Aspects of Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacer Sezgin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Infertility can be defined as a crisis with cultural, religious, and class related aspects, which coexists with medical, psychiatric, psychological, and social problems. Relation between psychiatric and psychological factors stem from a mutual interaction of both. Family is an important institution in maintaining human existence and raising individuals in line with society's expectations. Fertility and reproduction are seen as universal functions unique to women with raising children as the expected result of the family institution. Incidence of infertility has increased recently and can become a life crisis for a couple. Even though not being able to have a child affects both sexes emotionally, women feel greater amounts of stress, pressure, anxiety, and depression.Consequences of infertility arise from short and long-term devastating effects on both individual's physical and mental health, and marital system. Many studies focus on infertility related psychological and psychiatric disorders (depression, anxiety, grief, marital conflict, gender differences, relation between the causes of infertility and psychopathology, the effects of psychiatric evaluation and intervention -when necessaryon the course of infertility treatment, pregnancy rates, and childbirth. The most important underlying causes of high levels of stress and anxiety that infertile women experience are the loss of maternity, reproduction, sense of self, and genetic continuity. In this review article is to investigate the relationship between medically unexplained symptoms and psychiatric symptoms. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 165-185

  1. [Analysis of the demographic profile of patients treated for infertility using assisted reproductive techniques in 2005-2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, Robert; Milewska, Anna Justyna; Czerniecki, Jan; Leśniewska, Monika; Wołczyński, Sławomir

    2013-07-01

    Analysis of the demographic profile of patients, causes for infertility and effectiveness of infertility treatment methods in the years 2005-2010. Retrospective research was conducted to analyze data of 1705 randomly selected couples who underwent in vitro fertilization procedure at the Department of Reproduction and Gynecological Endocrinology Medical University of Bialystok, between 2005 and 2010. The analyzed data included mainly causes for infertility age of the female and male subjects, place of residence and final treatment results. The percentage of pregnancy rate increased significantly to approximately 40% in 2007. The contribution of male and female infertility factors remained at a similar level, but the idiopathic factor continued to steadily increase (to 20% in the last years of the study). We observed a greater prevalence of the male factor among couples living in cities compared to inhabitants of rural areas (42.3% vs. 34.3%, p = 0.004), whereas the tubal factor dominated among couples living in the countryside when compared to city dwellers (29.7% vs. 21.6%, p = 0.001). The average age of women entering treatment was significantly higher in cities than the countryside (p infertility revealed statistically significant differences only with regard to the idiopathic factor (p = 0.03). In the group of patients with idiopathic infertility the treatment efficacy was higher than in the rest of patients (40.2% vs. 33.8%). Apart from the idiopathic infertility only the presence of the male factor was associated with a higher (but statistically insignificant) pregnancy rate (36.2% vs. 33.9%). For the other factors, their presence was associated with a lower percentage of pregnancy and the greatest differences (but still statistically insignificant) were observed for the polycystic ovary syndrome (31.5% vs. 35.1%) and for other ovulation disorders (31.3% vs. 35%). Advances in assisted reproductive techniques led to an increase in the efficacy of infertility

  2. Psychological assessment tool for patients diagnosed with absolute uterine factor infertility and planning to undergo uterine transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saso, S; Bracewell-Milnes, T; Ismail, L; Hamed, A H; Thum, M-Y; Ghaem-Maghami, S; Del Priore, G; Smith, J R

    2014-08-01

    Uterine transplantation (UTn) has been proposed as a treatment option for women diagnosed with absolute uterine factor infertility (AUFI) and who are willing to bear their own child. AUFI renders a woman 'unconditionally infertile'. For AUFI women in general, UTn may offer a way to re-discover their own femininity through the restoration of fertility. Thus, when faced with a patient who may undergo UTn, the 'holistic approach' takes on an extra meaning. This is because the psychological element is two-sided for these patients. On one side lies the psychology of infertility, and on the other and equally important, is the substantially higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders in transplant candidates and recipients than in the general population. However, the psychology of a potential recipient of a uterine graft in order to bring about fertility has not been adequately explored or reviewed scientifically. We have presented here an outline of the areas which should be included in a psychological assessment for patients wishing to undergo UTn.

  3. Infertility with Testicular Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Kevin A; Walsh, Thomas J

    2015-08-01

    Testicular germ cell cancer is one of the most curable cancers. Most patients are treated during their reproductive years, making infertility a significant quality of life issue after successful treatment. This focused review evaluates the factors that contribute to infertility and specific fertility risks with the various testicular cancer treatments. Timing of patient discussions and current fertility treatments are reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Power Doppler flow mapping and four-dimensional ultrasound for evaluating tubal patency compared with laparoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Amr A; Shaalan, Waleed; Abdel-Dayem, Tamer; Awad, Elsayed Elbadawy; Elkassar, Yasser; Lüdders, Dörte; Malik, Eduard; Sallam, Hassan N

    2015-12-01

    To study the accuracy of four-dimensional (4D) ultrasound and power Doppler flow mapping in detecting tubal patency in women with sub-/infertility, and compare it with laparoscopy and chromopertubation. A prospective study. The study was performed in the outpatient clinic and infertility unit of a university hospital. The sonographic team and laparoscopic team were blinded to the results of each other. Women aged younger than 43 years seeking medical advice due to primary or secondary infertility and who planned to have a diagnostic laparoscopy performed, were recruited to the study after signing an informed consent. All of the recruited patients had power Doppler flow mapping and 4D hysterosalpingo-sonography by injecting sterile saline into the fallopian tubes 1 day before surgery. Registering Doppler signals, while using power Doppler, both at the tubal ostia and fimbrial end and the ability to demonstrate the course of the tube especially the isthmus and fimbrial end, while using 4D mode, was considered a patent tube. Out of 50 recruited patients, 33 women had bilateral patent tubes and five had unilateral patent tubes as shown by chromopertubation during diagnostic laparoscopy. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy for two-dimensional power Doppler hysterosalpingography were 94.4%, 100%, 100%, 89.2%, and 96.2%, respectively and for 4D ultrasound were 70.4%, 100%, 100%, 70.4%, and 82.6%, respectively. Four-dimensional saline hysterosalpingography has acceptable accuracy in detecting tubal patency, but is surpassed by power Doppler saline hysterosalpingography. Power Doppler saline hysterosalpingography could be incorporated into the routine sub-/infertility workup. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Male Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to have a baby? If treatment doesn’t work, what are our other options? Resources National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, What Causes Male Infertility? Last Updated: May 30, 2017 This ...

  6. Treating Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problem that leads to male infertility is the enlargement of a vein in the scrotum . It sometimes ... the testes. Sexual Intercourse: The act of the penis of the male entering the vagina of the ...

  7. Selective transcervical tubal recanalisation using DSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelekis, D.; Fezoulidis, I.; Petsas, T.; Tsapalira, A.; Kelekis, N.

    1991-01-01

    The results of selective transcervical tubal recanalisation by means of a catheter in 20 patients with tubal occlusions are reported and discussed. The advantages of tubal recanalisation under DSA are stressed. In 18 (90%) of the 20 patients treated, it was possible to recanalise at least one tube. Nine of these 18 women (50%) became pregnant during the period of observation, averaging 12 months. Selective transcervical recanalisation of obstructive tubes is a rapid, reliable, cheap and hardly invasive treatment of sterility, when compared with laparoscopy or laparotomy. In the majority of patients it makes surgery unnecessary. (orig.) [de

  8. Survey of reasons for discontinuation from in vitro fertilization treatment among couples attending infertility clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grishma Kulkarni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the increase in infertility burden, more and more couples are opting for in vitro fertilization (IVF. Despite the availability of various treatment options, the major concern that needs to be addressed is the reasons why such couples, initially motivated so strongly, drop out in fairly high numbers from IVF cycles. With this point of view the study was designed. AIM: The objective of this study was to explore the reasons why couples discontinue fertility treatment. Settings and Design: This retrospective study was carried out among couples in the age group of 20-40 years who opted for IVF at Tertiary care hospital and a private infertility center. Materials and Methods: Medical records for 3 years (2009-2012 were taken out and included in the study for analysis. Socio-demographic details along with indication for IVF and reasons for drop-separate IVF therapy were recorded on case record form and were analyzed. Results: Twenty-one percent of the patients had tubal pathology, thus making it the commonest female related factor for indication of IVF. Oligoasthenospermia (13% was the commonest cause of male related infertility factor. Financial burden was the primary cause for terminating treatment in majority of the IVF cases. Conclusions: Financial burden (62.5% was the commonest reason for drop out among couples from IVF cycle.

  9. Sociodemographic Findings in an Infertile Male Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayfun Güngör

    2008-08-01

    CONCLUSION: This study claims that the previously established risk factors which are considered to be associated with infertility might influence less or interfere with male infertility in more subtle ways.

  10. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  11. Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  12. Ovarian Drilling for Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  13. Stress and Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  14. Smoking and Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  15. Fertility prognosis for infertile couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bostofte, E; Bagger, P; Michael, A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a fertility prognosis model for infertile couples. DESIGN: Prospective follow-up study. PARTICIPANTS: In the period November 30, 1977 to June 1, 1985, 321 consecutive couples were investigated for infertility at Hvidovre University Hospital. Investigation of the female...... MEASURE: The Cox regression model was used to predict the time required to conceive based on informations provided by fertility investigations. RESULTS: Three of 16 prognostic variables (the period of infertility, the female infertility factor, and the P-test) possess significant prognostic information...

  16. A systematic review on sperm DNA fragmentation in male factor infertility: Laboratory assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manesh Kumar Panner Selvam

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To review sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF testing as an important sperm function test in addition to conventional semen analysis. High SDF is negatively associated with semen quality, the fertilisation process, embryo quality, and pregnancy outcome. Over recent decades, different SDF assays have been developed and reviewed extensively to assess their applicability and accuracy as advanced sperm function tests. Amongst them, the standardisation of the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferased UTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL assay with a bench top flow cytometer in clinical practice deserves special mention with a threshold value of 16.8% to differentiate infertile men with DNA damage from fertile men. Materials and methods: A systematic literature search was performed through the PubMed, Medline, and ScienceDirect databases using the keywords ‘sperm DNA fragmentation’ and ‘laboratory assessment’. Non-English articles were excluded and studies related to humans were only included. Results: Of the 618 identified, 87 studies (original research and reviews and in addition eight book chapters meeting the selection criteria were included in this review. In all, 366 articles were rejected in the preliminary screening and a further 165 articles related to non-human subjects were excluded. Conclusion: There are pros and cons to all the available SDF assays. TUNEL is a reliable technique with greater accuracy and as an additional diagnostic test in Andrology laboratories along with basic semen analysis can predict fertility outcome, and thus direct the choice of an assisted reproductive technology procedure for infertile couples. Also, the TUNEL assay can be used as a prognostic test and results are beneficial in deciding personalised treatment for infertile men. Keywords: Sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF, Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferased UTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL, DNA damage, Sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF assay

  17. A logistic regression analysis of factors related to the treatment compliance of infertile patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Saijiao; He, Aiyan; Yang, Jing; Yin, TaiLang; Xu, Wangming

    2011-01-01

    To investigate factors that can affect compliance with treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in infertile patients and to provide a basis for clinical treatment, specialist consultation and health education. Patient compliance was assessed via a questionnaire based on the Morisky-Green test and the treatment principles of PCOS. Then interviews were conducted with 99 infertile patients diagnosed with PCOS at Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University in China, from March to September 2009. Finally, these data were analyzed using logistic regression analysis. Logistic regression analysis revealed that a total of 23 (25.6%) of the participants showed good compliance. Factors that significantly (p < 0.05) affected compliance with treatment were the patient's body mass index, convenience of medical treatment and concerns about adverse drug reactions. Patients who are obese, experience inconvenient medical treatment or are concerned about adverse drug reactions are more likely to exhibit noncompliance. Treatment education and intervention aimed at these patients should be strengthened in the clinic to improve treatment compliance. Further research is needed to better elucidate the compliance behavior of patients with PCOS.

  18. CT appearance and features of tubal pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaohong, Wang; Hong, Shan; Zaibo, Jiang; Xinghe, Deng; Xiaochun, Meng; Bingbing, Ye; Mingyue, Luo; Yunya, Lin [Sun Yat-sen Univ., Guangzhou (China). The Third Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Radiology

    2004-06-01

    Objective: To investigate the CT appearance and features of tubal pregnancy. Methods: Precontrast and postcontrast CT scans were employed in 38 patients who were clinically and ultrasonographically suspected of tubal pregnancy. 34 of them were verified as tubal pregnancy through operative pathology. Results: 1. The direct CT imaging feature was the whole pregnancies sac (4/34, 11.8%) or half-baked pregnancies sac (14/34, 41.2%); 2. The indirect CT imaging features were: (1) abnormal density image, which could be enhanced, in a cystic mass around adnexal area (8/34, 23.5%); (2) mix density mass around adnexal area, which was mainly solid and had mild to moderate inhomogeneous enhancement (19/34, 55.9%); (3) large area irregular shadow with high density were found beside the uterus, with no enhancement (3/34, 8.8%). (4) bloody density in uterus-rectum-fossa (23/34, 67.6%). 3. The CT imaging features of tubal pregnancy was classified as: (1) Pregnant sac type (4/34, 11.8%); (2) Cystic (8/34, 23.5%); (3) Massive type (17/34, 50%); (4) Chronic mass type (2/34, 5.9%); (5) Bleeding type (3/34, 8.8%). 4. The CT imaging appearance of tubal pregnancy related with the pregnancy location; 5. The CT imaging appearance of tubal pregnancy related with the clinical significant. Conclusion: The CT imaging appearance of tubal pregnancy has some features, which can help in the diagnosis or differential diagnosis of the pelvis masses. CT scan is an effective supplementary attempt to the clinically and ultrasonographically suspected tubal pregnancy patients.

  19. CT appearance and features of tubal pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaohong; Shan Hong; Jiang Zaibo; Deng Xinghe; Meng Xiaochun; Ye Bingbing; Luo Mingyue; Lin Yunya

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the CT appearance and features of tubal pregnancy. Methods: Precontrast and postcontrast CT scans were employed in 38 patients who were clinically and ultrasonographically suspected of tubal pregnancy. 34 of them were verified as tubal pregnancy through operative pathology. Results: 1. The direct CT imaging feature was the whole pregnancies sac (4/34, 11.8%) or half-baked pregnancies sac (14/34, 41.2%); 2. The indirect CT imaging features were: (1) abnormal density image, which could be enhanced, in a cystic mass around adnexal area (8/34, 23.5%); (2) mix density mass around adnexal area, which was mainly solid and had mild to moderate inhomogeneous enhancement (19/34, 55.9%); (3) large area irregular shadow with high density were found beside the uterus, with no enhancement (3/34, 8.8%). (4) bloody density in uterus-rectum-fossa (23/34, 67.6%). 3. The CT imaging features of tubal pregnancy was classified as: (1) Pregnant sac type (4/34, 11.8%); (2) Cystic (8/34, 23.5%); (3) Massive type (17/34, 50%); (4) Chronic mass type (2/34, 5.9%); (5) Bleeding type (3/34, 8.8%). 4. The CT imaging appearance of tubal pregnancy related with the pregnancy location; 5. The CT imaging appearance of tubal pregnancy related with the clinical significant. Conclusion: The CT imaging appearance of tubal pregnancy has some features, which can help in the diagnosis or differential diagnosis of the pelvis masses. CT scan is an effective supplementary attempt to the clinically and ultrasonographically suspected tubal pregnancy patients

  20. Role of 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance hysterosalpingography in the diagnostic work-up of female infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolla, Valentina; Guerrieri, Daniele; Pietrangeli, Daniela; Santucci, Domiziana; Argirò, Renato; de Felice, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    Imaging evaluation plays a crucial role in the diagnostic work-up of female infertility. In recent years, the possibility to evaluate tubal patency using 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance (1.5T MR) has been studied. To assess the feasibility of 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance (3.0T MR) hysterosalpingography and its role in the diagnostic work-up of female infertility and to evaluate if this fast "one-stop-shop" imaging approach should be proposed as a first-line examination. A total of 116 infertile women were enrolled in this prospective study; all underwent 3.0T MR hysterosalpingography. After standard imaging of the pelvis, tubal patency was assessed by acquiring 3D dynamic time-resolved T1-weighted (T1W) sequences during manual injection of 4-5 mL of contrast solution consisting of gadolinium and normal sterile saline. Images were evaluated by two radiologists with different experience in MR imaging (MRI). The examination was successfully completed in 96.5% of cases, failure rate was 3.5%. Dynamic sequences showed bilateral tubal patency in 64.3%, unilateral tubal patency in 25.9%, and bilateral tubal occlusion in 9.8%. Extratubal abnormalities were found in 69.9% of patients. Comprehensive analysis of morphological and dynamic sequences showed extratubal abnormalities in 43.1% of patients with bilateral tubal patency. 3.0T MR hysterosalpingography is a feasible, simple, fast, safe, and well-tolerated examination, which allows evaluation of tubal patency and other pelvic causes of female infertility in a single session, and it may thus represent a "one-stop-shop" solution in female infertility diagnostic work-up. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  1. Hepatitis B virus infection status and infertility causes in couples seeking fertility treatment-Indicator of impaired immune response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Terence T; Mak, Jennifer S M; Li, Tin-Chiu

    2017-04-01

    The relationship between hepatitis B (HBV) infection in infertile couples seeking in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment and infertility causes is unknown. A total of 831 infertile couples attending our unit seeking IVF during January to December 2015 were recruited. HBV infection was found in 6.3% and 7.3% of female and male partners, respectively, and infection in one or both partners was associated with less primary infertility (44.2% vs 55.1%, P=.038). Infected female partners had increased tubal (69.2% vs 43.2%, Pinfertility, while infected male partners were associated with increased tubal (62.3% vs 43.4%, P=.004) causes and reduced endometriosis (62.3% vs 73.9%, P=.050). Our results suggest HBV infection in either partner was associated with tubal infertility. HBV infection in either partner probably increases the risk of pelvic infection in female partner through impaired immune response to sexually transmitted infections, with consequent tubal damage and infertility. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Ultrasonogram of tubal pregnancy: Unruptured or ruptured?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hee Jung; Kim, Jung Sik; Lee, Sung Moon; Kim, Hong; Woo, Seong Ku; Yeun, Seong Do; Lee, Doo Ryong

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of ultrasonography in the differentiation of the unruptured ones, we performed prospective ultrasonographic study in 56 patients with tubal pregnancy and subsequently correlated with the surgical (45 cases) and laparoscopic (11 cases) findings. The criterion for unruptured tubal pregnancy was the visualization of extra uterine gestational sac or a mass that was separated from the ipsilateral ovary. All cases were confirmed surgically or laparoscopically within 48 hours after sonographic examination. Forty five (80%)cases were proved as unruptured, tubal pregnancy, while 11 (20%) as ruptured one. Extra uterine gestational sac was seen in 31/45 (69%) in unruptured group and 2/11 (18%) in ruptured group. A mass separated from the ipsilateral ovary was seen in 7 unruptured tubal pregnancies and 2 ruptured pregnancies. A mass that was not separated from the ipsilateral ovary was seen in 13 cases. Seven of these were ruptured pregnancies, while 6 were unrupture dones. Using our criteria, the unruptured tubal pregnancy was diagnosed with a sensitivity of 84%, a specificity of 64%, an accuracy of 80%, a positive predictive value of 90% and a negative predictive value of 50%. We conclude that ultrasonography is useful in the differentiation of the unruptured tubal pregnancy from the ruptured one

  3. Epigenetics of reproductive infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Laxmidhar; Parbin, Sabnam; Pradhan, Nibedita; Kausar, Chahat; Patra, Samir K

    2017-06-01

    Infertility is a complex pathophysiological condition. It may caused by specific or multiple physical and physiological factors, including abnormalities in homeostasis, hormonal imbalances and genetic alterations. In recent times various studies implicated that, aberrant epigenetic mechanisms are associated with reproductive infertility. There might be transgenerational effects associated with epigenetic modifications of gametes and studies suggest the importance of alterations in epigenetic modification at early and late stages of gametogenesis. To determine the causes of infertility it is necessary to understand the altered epigenetic modifications of associated gene and mechanisms involved therein. This review is devoted to elucidate the recent mechanistic advances in regulation of genes by epigenetic modification and emphasizes their possible role related to reproductive infertility. It includes environmental, nutritional, hormonal and physiological factors and influence of internal structural architecture of chromatin nucleosomes affecting DNA and histone modifications in both male and female gametes, early embryogenesis and offspring. Finally, we would like to emphasize that research on human infertility by gene knock out of epigenetic modifiers genes must be relied upon animal models.

  4. Assessing the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis among infertile women of Qom city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiasi, Mahdieh; Fazaeli, Hoda; Kalhor, Naser; Sheykh-Hasan, Mohsen; Tabatabaei-Qomi, Reza

    2014-12-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common disorder which happens when the balance of bacterial flora in vagina is disrupted by a shift in concentration of lactobacillus and pathogenic bacteria.It has significant sequelae including increased rates of late miscarriage when diagnosed in early pregnancy, premature rupture of the membranes, endometritis, preterm labour and delivery and tubal factor infertility. So it seems to be necessary to evaluate the prevalence of BV among women with primary infertility. All specimens were collected during vagina examination by use of a speculum and swabbing. A sampling swab was introduced into vaginal canal and rotated for at least 8 seconds before withdrawal. The vaginal swabs were examined in standard microbiological analysis including of microscopy, culture and sensitivity examination. Totally identified Gram positive bacteria were significantly higher in number than the Gram negative bacteria. We found that the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis as 70.34% among infertile women of Qom city. Staphylococcus aureus was the most prevalent vaginal pathogen (57.33%) followed by E. coli (25.33%). S. aureus showed maximum sensitivity to penicillin and gentamicin. It means that fortunately in Qom, this bacterium has not acquired resistance against penicillin yet. So, all physicians must have a high index of suspicion and use readily available screening methods to recognize and treat the patients with infectious vaginitis adequately.

  5. Effect of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF on IVF outcomes in infertile women: An RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Eftekhar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite major advances in assisted reproductive techniques, the implantation rates remain relatively low. Some studies have demonstrated that intrauterine infusion of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF improves implantation in infertile women. Objective: To assess the G-CSF effects on IVF outcomes in women with normal endometrial thickness. Materials and methods: In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 100 infertile women with normal endometrial thickness who were candidate for IVF were evaluated in two groups. Exclusion criteria were positive history of repeated implantation failure (RIF, endocrine disorders, severe endometriosis, congenital or acquired uterine anomaly and contraindication for G-CSF (renal disease, sickle cell disease, or malignancy. In G-CSF group (n=50, 300 μg trans cervical intrauterine of G-CSF was administered at the oocyte retrieval day. Controls (n=50 were treated with standard protocol. Chemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates, implantation rate, and miscarriage rate were compared between groups. Results: Number of total and mature oocytes (MII, two pronuclei (2PN, total embryos, transferred embryos, quality of transferred embryos, and fertilization rate did not differ significantly between two groups. So there were no significant differences between groups in chemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rate, implantation rate, and miscarriage rate Conclusion: our result showed in normal IVF patients with normal endometrial thickness, the intrauterine infusion of G-CSF did not improve pregnancy outcomes.

  6. Leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) gene mutations in women diagnosed with unexplained infertility and endometriosis have a negative impact on the IVF outcome a pilot study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotný, Z.; Křižan, Jiří; Šíma, R.; Šíma, Petr; Uher, P.; Zech, N.; Huttelová, R.; Baborová, P.; Ulčová-Gallová, Z.; Šubrt, I.; Ulmanová, E.; Houdek, Z.; Rokyta, Z.; Babuška, V.; Králíčková, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 3 (2009), s. 92-97 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR9135 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : leukaemia inhibitory factor * infertility * mutation Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 0.924, year: 2009

  7. Prevalência dos fatores trombofílicos em mulheres com infertilidade Prevalence of thrombophilic factors in infertile women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana de Góes e Silva Soligo

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: determinar a prevalência dos fatores trombofílicos em mulheres inférteis. MÉTODOS: estudo de corte transversal, no qual foram admitidas mulheres inférteis atendidas em clínica privada e submetidas à investigação de trombofilia, conforme protocolo da referida clínica, no período de março de 2003 a março de 2005, após aprovação do Comitê de Ética e Pesquisa da Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP. Foram incluídas mulheres com história de infertilidade, definida como um ano de coito desprotegido sem concepção. Foram excluídas mulheres com hepatopatia e dados incompletos em prontuário, obtendo-se uma amostra de 144 mulheres. Os fatores trombofílicos avaliados foram: o anticorpo anticardiolipina (ACL, o anticoagulante lúpico (ACGL, a deficiência de proteína C (DPC, a deficiência de proteína S (DPS, a deficiência de antitrombina III (DAT, a presença do fator V de Leiden, uma mutação no gene da protrombina e a mutação do metileno tetrahidrofolato redutase (MTHFR. Resultados: os valores de prevalência obtidos para ACL e ACGL foram de 2%. A prevalência dos fatores trombofílicos hereditários foram: DPC=4%, DPS=6%, DAT=5%, fator V de Leiden=3%, mutação da protrombina=3% e mutação MTHFR=57%. CONCLUSÕES: das 144 pacientes selecionadas, 105 mulheres, ou seja, 72,9% apresentavam pelo menos um fator trombofílico presente. Isto reforça a importância e justifica a necessidade da investigação destes fatores neste grupo de mulheres.PURPOSE: to establish the prevalence of thrombophilic factors in infertile women. METHODS: a cross-sectional study was performed, in which infertile women, seen in a private clinic with investigation for thrombophilia were included, according to the protocol of the clinic, between March 2003 and March 2005, after the approval of the Research Ethics Committee of the Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP. One hundred and forty-four infertile women without any liver

  8. Chalmydia trachomatis infection among asymptomatic males in an infertility clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mania - Pramanik J

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis can lead to a variety of complications including tubal infertility. Similarly asymptomatic infection in male partner can also hinder conception. The prevalence of this infection among the infertile female in the Institute′s Infertility Clinic was observed to be 34%. Hence the present study was undertaken to find out these infection among the asymptomatic male partners of these infected women. Fifteen asymptomatic males who were not treated with any antibiotics in recent past were enrolled. First voided urine, semen and blood were collected from each individual for diagnosis of this infection. Chlamydia antigen was detected in 33.3% while Chlamydia antibody was detected in seven (46.7% of these cases. Of these seven, three cases were positive for antigen. This preliminary observation suggests that amongst the infertile couple a sizable percentage (60% of asymptomatic male partners remain infected with Chlamydia trachomatis.

  9. Infertility and the provision of infertility medical services in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombelet, Willem; Cooke, Ian; Dyer, Silke; Serour, Gamal; Devroey, Paul

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Worldwide more than 70 million couples suffer from infertility, the majority being residents of developing countries. Negative consequences of childlessness are experienced to a greater degree in developing countries when compared with Western societies. Bilateral tubal occlusion due to sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancy-related infections is the most common cause of infertility in developing countries, a condition that is potentially treatable with assisted reproductive technologies (ART). New reproductive technologies are either unavailable or very costly in developing countries. This review provides a comprehensive survey of all important papers on the issue of infertility in developing countries. METHODS Medline, PubMed, Excerpta Medica and EMBASE searches identified relevant papers published between 1978 and 2007 and the keywords used were the combinations of ‘affordable, assisted reproduction, ART, developing countries, health services, infertility, IVF, simplified methods, traditional health care'. RESULTS The exact prevalence of infertility in developing countries is unknown due to a lack of registration and well-performed studies. On the other hand, the implementation of appropriate infertility treatment is currently not a main goal for most international non-profit organizations. Keystones in the successful implementation of infertility care in low-resource settings include simplification of diagnostic and ART procedures, minimizing the complication rate of interventions, providing training-courses for health-care workers and incorporating infertility treatment into sexual and reproductive health-care programmes. CONCLUSIONS Although recognizing the importance of education and prevention, we believe that for the reasons of social justice, infertility treatment in developing countries requires greater attention at National and International levels. PMID:18820005

  10. Hysterosalpingographic (HSG pattern of infertility in women of reproductive age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinwe R Onwuchekwa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is a complex disorder with significant medical, psychological and economic problems. Aims: The aim of the study is to evaluate the structural abnormalities of the uterus and fallopian tubes in infertile women as elucidated by hysterosalpingography. Setting and Design: A retrospective study, conducted at the Radiology and Obstetric and Gynaecologic Departments of a tertiary health care institution. Materials and Methods: Evaluation of all consecutive patients in whom hysterosalpingographic (HSG was performed for infertility between July 2013 and June 2015 in the Department of Radiology. For the biodata, indications for the investigation and the HSG findings were obtained. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed using IBM Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA for Windows, version 20 software. Results: A total of 299 patients were evaluated. Of these, 250 were for infertility with primary and secondary infertility constituting 18.4 and 81.6%, respectively. Seventy percent of the cases for infertility had abnormalities on the HSG. Normal uterine cavity was found in 123 (49.2% cases. Uterine filling defects were the most common uterine abnormality. Fallopian tube occlusion, loculated contrast material spillage and hydrosalpinx were more common on the right, and bilateral tubal occlusion was seen only in 11.2%. All cases of intravasation were associated with either unilateral or bilateral fallopian tube blockage or irregularity of the uterus. Conclusion: There was a high incidence of tubal disease in the women presenting with infertility. This was commonly as a result of infection and inflammatory process. This study showed that HSG is very vital in detecting birth canal pathologies; hence, the facility for this important procedure, especially fluoroscopy, should be made available in the health centres for adequate assessment of the women with infertility.

  11. The Effects of Total Motile Sperm Count on Spontaneous Pregnancy Rate and Pregnancy After IUI Treatment in Couples with Male Factor and Unexplained Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajder, Mithad; Hajder, Elmira; Husic, Amela

    2016-02-01

    Male infertility factor is defined if the total number of motile spermatozoa (TMSC) 3,10(6) / ejaculate and a spontaneous pregnancy, group (B) with TMSCl 3 x 10(6) / ejaculate and couples who have not achieved pregnancy. From a total of 98 pairs of men's and unexplained infertility, 42 of them (42.8%) achieved spontaneous pregnancy, while 56 (57.2%) pairs did not achieve spontaneous pregnancy. TMSC was significantly higher (42.4 ± 28.4 vs. 26.2 ± 24, p 20 x 10(6) / ejaculate (RR = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.56-1.82, 5 x 10(6) / ejaculate are indicated for treatment with IUI. TMSC can be used as the method of choice for diagnosis and treatment of male infertility.

  12. Varicocele and Male Factor Infertility Treatment : A New Meta-analysis and Review of the Role of Varicocele Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baazeem, Abdulaziz; Belzile, Eric; Ciampi, Antonio; Dohle, Gert; Jarvi, Keith; Salonia, Andrea; Weidner, Wolfgang; Zini, Armand

    2011-01-01

    Context: Varicocele is a common condition, found in many men who present for infertility evaluation. Objective: To assess the effect of varicocelectomy on male infertility. Evidence acquisition: A literature search was performed using Embase and Medline. Literature reviewed included meta-analyses

  13. Ovarian and tubal cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottschau, Mathilde; Mellemkjaer, Lene; Hannibal, Charlotte G

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Nordic countries are areas with a high-incidence of ovarian cancer; however, differences between the countries exist. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We used the Danish Cancer Registry to identify 11 264 cases of ovarian cancer and 363 cases of tubal cancer during 1993-2013. We calculated...... age-standardized (world standard population) incidence rates for overall and subtype-specific ovarian cancer, and for tubal cancer. We compared age-standardized incidence rates, and 1- and 5-year age-standardized relative survival rates, respectively, for ovarian and tubal cancer combined in four...... Nordic countries using the NORDCAN database. RESULTS: The incidence rate of ovarian cancer overall in Denmark decreased statistically significantly by approximately 2.3% per year among women aged

  14. Cost-effectiveness of tubal patency tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeve, H R; Moolenaar, L M; Hompes, P; van der Veen, F; Mol, B W J

    2013-04-01

    Guidelines are not in agreement on the most effective diagnostic scenario for tubal patency testing; therefore, we evaluated the cost-effectiveness of invasive tubal testing in subfertile couples compared with no testing and treatment. Cost-effectiveness analysis. Decision analytic framework. Computer-simulated cohort of subfertile women. We evaluated six scenarios: (1) no tests and no treatment; (2) immediate treatment without tubal testing; (3) delayed treatment without tubal testing; (4) hysterosalpingogram (HSG), followed by immediate or delayed treatment, according to diagnosis (tailored treatment); (5) HSG and a diagnostic laparoscopy (DL) in case HSG does not prove tubal patency, followed by tailored treatment; and (6) DL followed by tailored treatment. Expected cumulative live births after 3 years. Secondary outcomes were cost per couple and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. For a 30-year-old woman with otherwise unexplained subfertility for 12 months, 3-year cumulative live birth rates were 51.8, 78.1, 78.4, 78.4, 78.6 and 78.4%, and costs per couple were €0, €6968, €5063, €5410, €5405 and €6163 for scenarios 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, respectively. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios compared with scenario 1 (reference strategy), were €26,541, €19,046, €20,372, €20,150 and €23,184 for scenarios 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, respectively. Sensitivity analysis showed the model to be robust over a wide range of values for the variables. The most cost-effective scenario is to perform no diagnostic tubal tests and to delay in vitro fertilisation (IVF) treatment for at least 12 months for women younger than 38 years old, and to perform no tubal tests and start immediate IVF treatment from the age of 39 years. If an invasive diagnostic test is planned, HSG followed by tailored treatment, or a DL if HSG shows no tubal patency, is more cost-effective than DL. © 2013 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2013

  15. Coping with infertility: a transcultural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Liu, Botao; Li, Min

    2014-09-01

    To review the most important and interesting articles in infertility published in the last year. This systematic review covers 60 studies published in journals or dissertations in Science Direct and PubMed in the last year, including those related to prevention and treatment as well as related psychosocial services in infertility. We also propose some suggestions about coping with infertility in China. Infertility is a multidisciplinary problem that requires medical, social, and political efforts to prevent and offer infertile patients the best diagnostic, therapeutic, and psychosocial services. Cultural factors should be taken into consideration when designing coping strategies.

  16. Intraoperative verification of hysterosalpingography and laparoscopy in cases of oviductal infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cislo, M.; Murawski, M.; Popiela, A.

    1993-01-01

    There has been made an analysis of 45 cases of women's oviductal infertility qualified to surgical treatment. In search of these reasons of infertility these patients underwent hysterosalpingographic examination and 24 of them additionally, diagnostic laparoscopy with chromoturbation. Positive intraoperative verification of HSG and laparoscopy, as a confirmation of tubal obstruction, they obtained at 40 women (88.9%) that made possible to carry out microsurgical operations in them. Such a big percentage of correct diagnoses make sure, that both HSG and laparoscopy are indispensable for proper qualification of a patient to microsurgical treatment of oviductal infertility. (author)

  17. Predictors of pregnancy and live birth after insemination in couples with unexplained or male-factor infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao; Hansen, Karl R; Factor-Litvak, Pamela; Carson, Sandra A; Guzick, David S; Santoro, Nanette; Diamond, Michael P; Eisenberg, Esther; Zhang, Heping

    2012-04-01

    To identify risk factors for pregnancy outcomes in couples treated with intracervical or intrauterine insemination, with or without superovulation for unexplained or male-factor infertility. Secondary analysis of data from a randomized superovulation and intrauterine insemination trial. Academic medical centers. Treatment continued for four cycles unless pregnancy was achieved. Out of 932 couples randomized to four treatment groups, 664 couples who had completed the lifestyle questionnaires were assessed for occurrence of pregnancy and live birth. Pregnancy and live birth. The pregnancy and live birth rates were significantly higher in couples in which the female partners reported that they had consumed coffee or tea in the past or drank alcoholic beverages in the past (past users) compared with those who had never consumed coffee, tea, or alcoholic beverages. Past users also had significantly higher pregnancy and live birth rates than those currently consuming coffee or tea or alcoholic beverages. Demographic, occupational exposure, and other lifestyle factors were not significant. Couples in which the female partners drank coffee, tea, or alcoholic beverages in the past had higher pregnancy and live birth rates compared with never or current users. When discontinuing these habits, they might have made other lifestyle changes to improve the pregnancy outcome. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Causes of Male Infertility

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Donate ASRM Store Site Endowment Menu Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and ...

  19. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  20. An epidemiologic survey on the causes of infertility in patients referred to infertility center in Fatemieh Hospital in Hamadan

    OpenAIRE

    Masoumi, Seyedeh Zahra; Parsa, Parisa; Darvish, Nooshin; Mokhtari, Sahar; Yavangi, Mahnaz; Roshanaei, Ghodratollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infertility is considered as a major health care problem of different communities. The high prevalence of this issue doubled its importance. A significant proportion of infertility have been related to environmental conditions and also acquired risk factors. Different environmental conditions emphasized the need to study the different causes of infertility in each area. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency causes of infertility in infertile couples. ...

  1. Predictors of Pregnancy and Live Birth in Couples with Unexplained or Male-factor Infertility after Insemination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao; Hansen, Karl R.; Factor-Litvak, Pamela; Carson, Sandra A.; Guzick, David S.; Santoro, Nanette; Diamond, Michael P.; Eisenberg, Esther; Zhang, Heping

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify risk factors for pregnancy outcomes in couples treated with intracervical or intrauterine insemination, with or without superovulation for unexplained or male-factor infertility. The treatment continued for four cycles unless pregnancy was achieved. Design Secondary analysis of data from a randomized superovulation and intrauterine insemination trial. Setting Academic medical centers. Intervention(s) None. Patients Out of 932 couples randomized to four treatment groups, 664 couples who had completed the lifestyle questionnaires were assessed for occurrence of pregnancy and live birth. Main outcome measure(s) pregnancy and live birth. Results The pregnancy and live birth rates were significantly higher in couples in which the female partners reported that they had consumed coffee or tea in the past or drank alcoholic beverages in the past (past users) when compared to those who had never consumed coffee or tea (4.0, 1.6–10.2 for pregnancy; 3.1, 1.2–8.1 for live birth) or alcoholic beverages (1.9, 1.1–3.3 for pregnancy; 2.1, 1.2–3.7 for live birth) (data are adjusted odds ratio and 95% confidence interval). Past users also had significantly higher pregnancy and live birth rates than those who were currently consuming coffee or tea or alcoholic beverages. Demographic, occupational exposures and other lifestyle factors were not significant. Conclusion(s) Couples in which the female partners drank coffee, tea, or alcoholic beverages in the past had higher pregnancy and live birth rates when compared to never or current users. When discontinuing these habits, they might have made other lifestyle changes to improve the pregnancy outcome. PMID:22270557

  2. Fallopian tube recanalisation using dedicated radiographic tubal assessment set in angiography suite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Omari, M.H; Rousan, L.; Al-balas, H.; Alawneh, K.; El-heis, M.; Al-mnayyis, A.; Obeidat, N.; Amarin, Z.; Zayed, F.; Omari, Z.; Hanania, R.

    2014-01-01

    Fallopian tube recanalisation (FTR) for proximal fallopian tube obstruction (PFTO) is considered a good treatment option for tubal infertility. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and the technical and clinical success rates of FTR using a dedicated radiographic tubal assessment set (FluoroSet®) in the angiography suite. This study is a retrospective analysis of data prospectively collected between February 2007 and June 2011 at King Abdullah University Hospital, Irbid, Jordan. During this period, 61 patients affected by PFTO underwent FTR using FluoroSet® at our institution. The mean age of patients was 34 years (range 20-45 years), and the mean duration of infertility was 4 years (range 2-14 years). The procedure was performed with conscious sedation under fluoroscopic guidance in the angiography suite. The obstructed tube was accessed with a 5-Fr multipurpose catheter, and the obstruction was crossed with a 0.35-Fr hydrophilic guide wire until the wire coiled freely into the peritoneal cavity. Patency of the tube was then confirmed by selective salpingiogram. Technical success rate was recorded, and patients were followed up for evidence of pregnancy over 12 months. The procedure was technically successful in all patients. Minor bleeding and postprocedural pain occurred in most patients; however, there were no major complications encountered. Twenty-five patients (41%) became pregnant. Successful deliveries of full-term infants were reported in 21 patients (84%). Miscarriage was reported in four patients (16%). No ectopic pregnancies were detected, and all deliveries were full-term. The technical success rate was 100% and the clinical success rate was 41%. Selective salpingography and FTR using FluoroSet® is a safe and effective method. FTR is recommended as the first intervention in patients with PFTO. In experienced hands with dedicated equipment and in an appropriate setting, the success rate is high, and this treatment should be offered to

  3. Chromosomal disorders and male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gary L Harton; Helen G Tempest

    2012-01-01

    infertility in humans is surprisingly common occurring in approximately 15% of the population wishing to start a family.Despite this,the molecular and genetic factors underlying the cause of infertility remain largely undiscovered.Nevertheless,more and more genetic factors associated with infertility are being identified.This review will focus on our current understanding of the chromosomal basis of male infertility specifically:chromosomal aneuploidy,structural and numerical karyotype abnormalities and Y chromosomal microdeletions.Chromosomal aneuploidy is the leading cause of pregnancy loss and developmental disabilities in humans.Aneuploidy is predominantly maternal in origin,but concerns have been raised regarding the safety of intracytoplasmic sperm injection as infertile men have significantly higher levels of sperm aneuploidy compared to their fertile counterparts.Males with numerical or structural karyotype abnormalities are also at an increased risk of producing aneuploid sperm.Our current understanding of how sperm aneuploidy translates to embryo aneuploidy will be reviewed,as well as the application of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in such cases.Clinical recommendations where possible will be made,as well as discussion of the use of emerging array technology in PGD and its potential applications in male infertility.

  4. Male infertility and its causes in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Toshinobu; Tsujimura, Akira; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Koh, Eitetsu; Namiki, Mikio; Sengoku, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Infertility is one of the most serious social problems facing advanced nations. In general, approximate half of all cases of infertility are caused by factors related to the male partner. To date, various treatments have been developed for male infertility and are steadily producing results. However, there is no effective treatment for patients with nonobstructive azoospermia, in which there is an absence of mature sperm in the testes. Although evidence suggests that many patients with male infertility have a genetic predisposition to the condition, the cause has not been elucidated in the vast majority of cases. This paper discusses the environmental factors considered likely to be involved in male infertility and the genes that have been clearly shown to be involved in male infertility in humans, including our recent findings.

  5. Male Infertility and Its Causes in Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshinobu Miyamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is one of the most serious social problems facing advanced nations. In general, approximate half of all cases of infertility are caused by factors related to the male partner. To date, various treatments have been developed for male infertility and are steadily producing results. However, there is no effective treatment for patients with nonobstructive azoospermia, in which there is an absence of mature sperm in the testes. Although evidence suggests that many patients with male infertility have a genetic predisposition to the condition, the cause has not been elucidated in the vast majority of cases. This paper discusses the environmental factors considered likely to be involved in male infertility and the genes that have been clearly shown to be involved in male infertility in humans, including our recent findings.

  6. Cost and efficacy comparison of in vitro fertilization and tubal anastomosis for women after tubal ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger, Lauren B; Alford, Connie E; Csokmay, John M; Henne, Melinda B; Mumford, Sunni L; Segars, James H; Armstrong, Alicia Y

    2015-07-01

    To compare cost and efficacy of tubal anastomosis to in vitro fertilization (IVF) in women who desired fertility after a tubal ligation. Cost-effectiveness analysis. Not applicable. Not applicable. Not applicable. Cost per ongoing pregnancy. Cost per ongoing pregnancy for women after tubal anastomosis ranged from $16,446 to $223,482 (2014 USD), whereas IVF ranged from $32,902 to $111,679 (2014 USD). Across maternal age groups cost effective than IVF for ongoing pregnancy. Sensitivity analyses validated these findings across a wide range of ongoing pregnancy probabilities as well as costs per procedure. Tubal anastomosis was the most cost-effective approach for most women less than 41 years of age, whereas IVF was the most cost-effective approach for women aged ≥41 years who desired fertility after tubal ligation. A model was created that can be modified based on cost and success rates in individual clinics for improved patient counseling. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  7. Association of assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment and parental infertility diagnosis with autism in ART-conceived children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissin, D M; Zhang, Y; Boulet, S L; Fountain, C; Bearman, P; Schieve, L; Yeargin-Allsopp, M; Jamieson, D J

    2015-02-01

    Are assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment factors or infertility diagnoses associated with autism among ART-conceived children? Our study suggests that the incidence of autism diagnosis in ART-conceived children during the first 5 years of life was higher when intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) was used compared with conventional IVF, and lower when parents had unexplained infertility (among singletons) or tubal factor infertility (among multiples) compared with other types of infertility. Some studies found an increased risk of autism among ART-conceived infants compared with spontaneously-conceived infants. However, few studies, and none in the USA, have examined the associations between types of ART procedures and parental infertility diagnoses with autism among ART-conceived children. Population-based retrospective cohort study using linkages between National ART Surveillance System (NASS) data for 1996-2006, California Birth Certificate data for 1997-2006, and California Department of Developmental Services (DDS) Autism Caseload data for 1997-2011. All live born ART-conceived infants born in California in 1997-2006 (n = 42 383) with 5-year observation period were included in the study. We assessed the annual incidence of autism diagnosis documented in DDS, which includes information on the vast majority of persons with autism in California, and the association of autism diagnosis with ART treatment factors and infertility diagnoses. Among ART-conceived singletons born in California between 1997 and 2006, the incidence of autism diagnosis remained at ∼0.8% (P for trend 0.19) and was lower with parental diagnosis of unexplained infertility (adjusted hazard risk ratio [aHRR]; 95% confidence interval: 0.38; 0.15-0.94) and higher when ICSI was used (aHRR 1.65; 1.08-2.52), when compared with cases without these patient and treatment characteristics. Among ART-conceived multiples, the incidence of autism diagnosis between 1997 and 2006 remained at

  8. Adenomyosis uteri in infertile women: experience in a tropical community teaching hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adesiyun, A.G.; Kolawole, A.; Samaila, M.O.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the demographic pattern and clinical presentation of 23 infertile women with intraoperative diagnosis of adenomyosis followed by histopathologic confirmation. A review of 23 consecutive infertile women that underwent surgery due to preoperative misdiagnosis for uterine fibroids over a period of 5 years. The patients mean age was 37.3 years with age range of 26 to 47 years. Only five patients (21.7%) had delivered before. Eighteen patients (78.3%) had had abortion(s) in the past. Secondary infertility accounted for 78.3% and 21.7% had primary infertility. Past gynaecological procedures included dilatation and curettage or manual vacuum aspiration in 17 (73.9%) patients, previous adhesiolysis for uterine synaechiae in 3 (13.1%) patients and past history of myomectomy in 5 (21.7%) patients. Preoperative hysterosalpingogram showed only 2 patients (8.7%) with bilateral tubal patency and 17 patients (73.9%) had bilateral tubal blockage. Unilateral patency of the fallopian tube was observed in 4 (17.4%) patients. Amongst patients with bilateral tubal blockage, cornual blockages were mostly encountered in 15 (88.2%) of the 17 patients. The modes of clinical presentation were abdominopelvic mass 100%, dymenorrhoea 82.6%, menorrhagia 60.9%, dyspareunia 47.8% and metrorrhagia in 34.8% of cases. Intraoperatively adenomyosis encountered were diffuse adenomyosis in 13 (56.5%) patients, multiple focal adenomyosis in 7 (30.4%) patients and unifocal adenomyosis in 3 (13.1%) patients. Co-existing uterine fibroid were found in 17 (73.9%) of the 23 patients. Two patients (8.7%) had coexisting endometriosis. At surgery, significant pelvic adhesion was encountered in 7 (30.4%) patients. In infertile women, adenomyosis is significantly associated with proximal tubal occlusion and tends to co-exist with insignificant uterine fibroids. (author)

  9. A radiologic analysis of hysterosalpinggographic finding in infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hae Young; Lee, Kyung Ja; Yoo, Seong Yul; Kim, Hee Seup

    1985-01-01

    Hysterosalpingography has been universally accepted and approved as valuable aid in the diagnosis and treatment of infertility. Radiologic and clinical analysis had been made on 200 cases of known infertile patient in Ewha Womans University Hospital from January, 1976 to August, 1979. The results are as followings: 1. In 200 cases of infertility, 90 cases (45.5%) are primary infertility and remaining 110 cases (55.5%) are secondary infertility. 2. The peak number of age distribution is 2nd decade group in 115 cases (57.5%). 3. The peak number of duration of infertility is less than 3 years in 107 cases (53,5%). 4. Abnormal uterine finding is 25 cases (12.5%) and there 4 cases (2.0%) of congenital anomaly among them. 5. Abnormal tubal finding is 120 cases (60.0%) and there are 84 cases (42.0%) of without spillage, 36 cases (18.0%) of with spillage, 51 cases (25.5%) of hydrosalpinx, 49 cases (24.5%) of simple obstruction among them. 6. Intravasation is noted in 66 cases (33.3%) among 200 cases. 7. There are significant results between the past history and the hysterosalpiingographic findings by the statistical approach. 8. Pregnancy after hysterosalpingography is noted in 16 cases (8.0%) among 200 cases.

  10. Cost-effectiveness analysis comparing the essure tubal sterilization procedure and laparoscopic tubal sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, John A; Carson, George D

    2008-07-01

    To analyze the financial implications of establishing a hysteroscopic sterilization program using the Essure micro-insert tubal sterilization system in an ambulatory clinic. A retrospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force classification Type II-2), in an ambulatory women's health clinic in a tertiary hospital, of 108 women undergoing Essure coil insertion between 2005 and 2006, and 104 women undergoing laparoscopic tubal sterilization for permanent sterilization between 2001 and 2004. The Essure procedures used a 4 mm single channel operative hysteroscope and conscious sedation (fentanyl and midazolam); the laparoscopic tubal sterilizations were completed under general anaesthesia with a 7 mm laparoscope and either bipolar cautery or Filshie clips. Costs associated with the procedure, follow-up, and management of any complications (including nursing, hospital charges, equipment, and disposables) were tabulated. The Essure coils were successfully placed on the first attempt in 103 of 108 women (95%). Three patients required a second attempt to complete placement and two patients required laparoscopic tubal sterilization after an unsuccessful Essure. All 104 laparoscopic tubals were completed on the first attempt with no complications reported. The total cost for the 108 Essure procedures, including follow-up evaluation, was $138,996 or $1287 per case. The total cost associated with the 104 laparoscopic tubal sterilization procedures was $148,227 or $1398 per case. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $111. The Essure procedure in an ambulatory setting resulted in a statistically significant cost saving of $111 per sterilization procedure. Carrying out the Essure procedure in an ambulatory setting frees space in the operating room for other types of cases, improving access to care for more patients.

  11. Bilateral Tubal Pregnancy without Known Risk Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyacinthe Zamané

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous bilateral ectopic gestation is very rare. The authors report a case diagnosed and taken care of at Yalgado Ouedraogo Teaching Hospital, Ouagadougou. It was a 30-year-old patient with no known pathological history. She had presented at the obstetric emergencies with a state of hypovolemic shock by haemoperitoneum with digestive disorders, pelvic pain, vaginal bleeding, and a mention of delayed menstruation. The ultrasound coupled with the urinary immunological pregnancy test confirmed the diagnosis of ruptured ectopic pregnancy and a bilateral form was suspected. A laparotomy in emergency confirmed the diagnosis of bilateral ectopic gestation with a right ampullary unruptured pregnancy and a left isthmic ruptured gestation. A bilateral salpingectomy was performed and counseling was made for the use of medical help of procreation in case of future need of pregnancy.

  12. Lycopene and male infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Agarwal, Ashok; Ong, Chloe; Prashast, Pallavi

    2014-01-01

    Excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause a state of oxidative stress, which result in sperm membrane lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and apoptosis, leading to decreased sperm viability and motility. Elevated levels of ROS are a major cause of idiopathic male factor infertility, which is an increasingly common problem today. Lycopene, the most potent singlet oxygen quencher of all carotenoids, is a possible treatment option for male infertility because of its antioxidant properties. By reacting with and neutralizing free radicals, lycopene could reduce the incidence of oxidative stress and thus, lessen the damage that would otherwise be inflicted on spermatozoa. It is postulated that lycopene may have other beneficial effects via nonoxidative mechanisms in the testis, such as gap junction communication, modulation of gene expression, regulation of the cell cycle and immunoenhancement. Various lycopene supplementation studies conducted on both humans and animals have shown promising results in alleviating male infertility—lipid peroxidation and DNA damage were decreased, while sperm count and viability, and general immunity were increased. Improvement of these parameters indicates a reduction in oxidative stress, and thus the spermatozoa is less vulnerable to oxidative damage, which increases the chances of a normal sperm fertilizing the egg. Human trials have reported improvement in sperm parameters and pregnancy rates with supplementation of 4–8 mg of lycopene daily for 3–12 months. However, further detailed and extensive research is still required to determine the dosage and the usefulness of lycopene as a treatment for male infertility. PMID:24675655

  13. Diagnostic Testing for Female Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  14. Clinical Correlates of Unexplained Infertility in Southeastern Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: In the absence of any obvious aetiological factor, a couple is said to have unexplained infertility. It is desirable to identify factors associated with unexplained infertility in this environment and to ascertain if there is a causal relationship between infertility and uterine leiomyomata. Objective: The study is aimed at ...

  15. Learning curve of hysteroscopic placement of tubal sterilization microinserts in 15 gynecologists in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janse, Juliënne A; Pattij, Thyrza O S; Eijkemans, Marinus J C; Broekmans, Frank J; Veersema, Sebastiaan; Schreuder, Henk W R

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the learning curve of hysteroscopic placement of tubal sterilization microinserts by gynecologists in the Netherlands. Prospective multicenter study (Canadian Task Force II-2). Ten community (teaching) hospitals in the Netherlands. A total of 631 women who underwent permanent sterilization by tubal microinserts. Hysteroscopic placement of tubal sterilization microinserts performed by 15 gynecologists experienced in performing operative hysteroscopy, starting from their very first placement. Effect of increasing experience in time on procedure time, pain score, successful bilateral placement, and complications. Bilateral successful placement with confirmation of adequate positioning at follow-up evaluation was achieved in 480 (76.1%) patients at first attempt and in 44 (7.0%) at second attempt. Median procedure time was 8.0 minutes (range: 3-40), and 31 (4.9%) patients were lost to follow-up evaluation. Gravidity showed to be a confounding factor and was consequently adjusted for. A learning curve was seen in a statistically significant decrease of procedure time with increasing experience. The decrease in procedure time extended to 11 to 15 cases and was followed by a plateau phase of the subsequent 60 cases. In contrast, pain scores, successful placement, and complication rate appeared not to improve with increasing experience. A learning curve for hysteroscopic tubal sterilization was seen for procedure time, but successful placement, pain score, and complication rate were not clearly influenced by increasing experience. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Efficacy of 2-hour post glucose insulin levels in predicting insulin resistance in polycystic ovarian syndrome with infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pikee Saxena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Insulin resistance (IR is central to the pathogenesis of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS, but tests for determining IR are elaborate, tedious and expensive. Aims : To evaluate if "2-hour post-glucose insulin level" is an effective indicator of IR and can aid in diagnosing IR in infertile PCOS women. Settings and Design : Observational study at infertility clinic of a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods : 50 infertile women with PCOS and 20 females with tubal/male factor infertility were evaluated for the presence of IR, as defined by the fasting/2-hour post-glucose insulin levels cutoffs of >25/>41 μU/mL, respectively. The clinical, metabolic and endocrinologic profile was determined in both the groups. Statistical Analysis : Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS (Chicago, IL, USA. Results : Body mass index, post load glucose, insulin, glucose/insulin ratio, area under curve (AUC of glucose and insulin and insulinogenic index were significantly lower in the controls as compared to the PCOS group. "2-hour post-glucose insulin levels" were elevated in 88% of PCOS individuals but were normal in all females not suffering from PCOS. These levels significantly correlated with AUC of glucose and insulin, and insulinogenic index and inversely correlated with 2-hour glucose to insulin ratio (r=0.827, 0.749 and −0.732, respectively. Conclusions : "2-hour post-glucose insulin levels" appears to be a good indicator of IR. It can be a useful tool, especially in low resource setting where a single sample can confirm the diagnosis, thus reducing cost and repeat visits.

  17. Male factor infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jens Peter; Te Velde, Egbert

    2017-01-01

    A recent systematic review on worldwide declining trends in sperm counts has fuelled alarming reports in national and international news media. However, methodological issues exist with data gathering and analysis precluding any conclusion and no solid data exist to indicate increasing frequency...

  18. Is Infertility Associated with Childhood Autism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grether, Judith K.; Qian, Yinge; Croughan, Mary S.; Wu, Yvonne W.; Schembri, Michael; Camarano, Loretta; Croen, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Concerns persist about a possible link between infertility and risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Interpretation of existing studies is limited by racial/ethnic homogeneity of study populations and other factors. Using a case-control design, we evaluated infertility history and treatment documented in medical records of members of Kaiser…

  19. Experiencing Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmée Hanna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the qualitative research literature that exists in relation to men’s experiences of male infertility. Since men have often been marginalized in the realm of reproduction, including academic research on infertility, it is important to focus on any qualitative research that gives voices to male perspectives and concerns. Given the distress documented by studies of infertile women, we focus in particular on the emotive responses and lived experiences of men in relation to infertility. In this article then, we present an analysis of the core themes across 19 qualitative articles, which include “infertility as crisis”; “emoting infertility- men as “being strong”’ “infertility as a source of stigma”; and the “desire for fatherhood.” In light of these insights, we identify key areas for future research and development including men’s emotional responses to infertility, how men seek support for infertility, the intersection between masculinity and infertility, the relationship between the desire to father and infertility, and the outcomes of infertility for men in terms of other aspects of their lives. We suggest that such research would facilitate making the experiences of men more central within our understandings of infertility within a field that has primarily been female focused.

  20. Ectopic pregnancy after two times tubal ligation: a case report

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    Farideh Keypour

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tubal sterilization is the permanent and effective contraception method. This can be performed at any time, but at least half are performed in conjunction with cesarean or vaginal delivery and are termed puerperal. The most complication after tubal ligation is ectopic pregnancy. Ectopic pregnancy is the leading cause of maternal death in first trimester.Case presentation: We present a 33 years old woman gravida5, para4, all normal vaginal delivery, presented with complaints of delayed menstrual period, pelvic pain and spotting. She underwent tubal ligation for two times. For the first time she had puerperal Pomeroy tubal sterilization after third child delivery. Intra uterine pregnancy occurred three years later. One day after vaginal delivery of fourth child, she underwent post partum tubal ligation with the Parkland method. Tubal pregnancy occurred nine months later. Physical examination identified acute abdomen. Pelvic ultrasound showed no gestational sac in uterine cavity. The sac with fetal pole was in right adnexa. Beta-HCG was 2840mIU/ml. She underwent laparotomy. Surgical management included salpingectomy with cornual resection in both sides. The surgery identified Ectopic pregnancy.Conclusion: Any symptoms of pregnancy in a woman after tubal ligation must be investigated; an ectopic pregnancy should be excluded. Ectopic pregnancy must be considered, in any woman with lower abdominal pain, missed period and vaginal bleed-ing. Conception after tubal sterilization can be explained by fistula formation and re-canalization of fallopian tube.

  1. Laparoscopic reconstructive tubal surgery in a tertiary referral centre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To establish the pregnancy rate (PR) following endoscopic reconstructive tubal surgery in patients with tubal disease presenting to the Reproductive Medicine Unit at Groote Schuur Hospital between January 1994 and December 1997. Design. A prospective descriptive study utilising the Hulka classification ...

  2. Bilateral Tubal Gestation Associated with Schistosomiasis in an African Woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. H. Odubamowo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The incidence of tubal ectopic gestation caused by schistosomiasis induced tubal pathology is undocumented in this environment, which may be due to rarity of this pathology. Bilateral tubal gestation is common in patients that have undergone in vitro fertilization. We report a hitherto undocumented case of spontaneous bilateral ectopic gestation following tubal schistosomiasis. Case Report. Mrs. OB was a 32-year-old G4P3+0 (3 alive woman who complained of abdominal pain and bleeding per vaginam of 4 and 2 days’ duration respectively following 8 weeks of amenorrhea. A clinical impression of ruptured ectopic gestation was confirmed by ultrasound scanning. She had bilateral salpingectomy with histology of specimens showing bilateral ectopic gestation with Schistosoma haematobium induced salpingitis (findings of Schistosoma haematobium ova noted on slide. Conclusion. Schistosoma induced salpingitis is a rare but possible cause of bilateral tubal gestation.

  3. The diagnosis and treatment of tubal pregnancy with selective salpingography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qunying

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study feasibility of diagnosing and treating tubal pregnancy with selective salpingography. methods: 13 women diagnosed clinically as ectopic pregnancy without abdominal bleeding were studied and confirmed as tubal pregnancy with selective salpingography, MTX was then injected through fallopian tube. Urine hCG, blood β-hCG and US were studied during follow-up. Results: 12 cases tubal pregnancy were confirmed as well as 1 case of intra-uterine pregnancy. X-ray showed a localized dilation of fallopian tube, half-loop, ring-like or irregular shaped filling defect. In one case, cluster of grapes appearance of contrast medium could be seen at the umbrella end of fallopian tube. Of the 12 cases of tubal pregnancy, 10 were successfully treated, the successful rate was 83%. Conclusion: Selective salpingography is a simple safe and effective method of diagnosing and treating tubal pregnancy

  4. Infertility and Fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infertility. Although there may be some overlap, the causes of pregnancy loss, recurrent pregnancy loss, and stillbirth are often different from the causes of infertility. Citations Open Citations Practice Committee of ...

  5. Primary infertility (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary infertility is a term used to describe a couple that has never been able to conceive a pregnancy ... to do so through unprotected intercourse. Causes of infertility include a wide range of physical as well ...

  6. [Infertility over forty: Pros and cons of IVF].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaisch-Allart, J; Maget, V; Mayenga, J-M; Grefenstette, I; Chouraqui, A; Belaid, Y; Kulski, O

    2015-09-01

    The population attempting pregnancy and having babies is ageing. The declining fertility potential and the late age of motherhood are increasing significantly the number of patients over forty consulting infertility specialists. Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) cannot compensate the natural decline in fertility with age. In France, in public hospital, ART is free of charge for women until 43 years, over 43, social insurance does not reimburse ART. Hence, 43 years is the usual limit, but between 40 and 42 is ART useful? The answer varies according to physicians, couples or society. On medical level, the etiology of the infertility must be taken into account. If there is an explanation to infertility (male or tubal infertility) ART is better than abstention. If the infertility is only due to age the question is raised. In France, the reimbursement by the society of a technique with very low results is discussed. However efficacy is not absolutely compulsory in Medicine. On the opposite to give false hopes may be discussed too. To obtain a reasonable consensus is rather difficult. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. The prevalence and clinical pattern of infertility in Bauchi, northern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Infertility is a common condition and is now viewed as a global reproductive health issue. The causes of infertility vary widely, both among and within countries. Objectives: To describe the magnitude, pattern, aetiology, outcome of infertility and its associated factors in Bauchi, northern Nigeria. Methods: This was a ...

  8. Infertility | Jose-Miller | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infertility is defined as failure to achieve pregnancy during one year of frequent, unprotected intercourse. Evaluation generally begins after 12 months, but it can be initiated earlier if infertility is suspected based on history or if the female partner is older than 35 years. Major causes of infertility include male factors, ovarian ...

  9. Male infertility in Nigeria: A neglected reproductive health issue ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Even though infertility is not lethal, it has been described as a radical life changing problem that carries with it significant psychological trauma. Male factor infertility is responsible for about 40–50% of all infertility cases. Despite its high prevalence in Nigeria, not much effort has been made at tackling the problem. The impact ...

  10. General aspects of fertility and infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damario, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Fertility rates have been declining in most Western nations over the past several decades, although it is not entirely clear if an increased rate of infertility substantially contributes to this. As compared to other species, the reproductive efficiency of humans is relatively low. Factors related to fertility include age, exposure to sexually transmitted diseases, frequency of intercourse, coital timing, as well as diet and lifestyle habits. Infertility is considered a disease due to its major disruption of major organ systems and life functions. An infertility evaluation is recommended after 12 months or more of regular, unprotected intercourse and may be considered after 6 months for those female patients over the age of 35 or with other known abnormalities. A proper infertility evaluation is a comprehensive examination of possibly identifiable infertility factors of both female and male partners, lending itself to the most appropriate and potentially effective treatment.

  11. A unique view on male infertility around the globe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ashok; Mulgund, Aditi; Hamada, Alaa; Chyatte, Michelle Renee

    2015-04-26

    Infertility affects an estimated 15% of couples globally, amounting to 48.5 million couples. Males are found to be solely responsible for 20-30% of infertility cases and contribute to 50% of cases overall. However, this number does not accurately represent all regions of the world. Indeed, on a global level, there is a lack of accurate statistics on rates of male infertility. Our report examines major regions of the world and reports rates of male infertility based on data on female infertility. Our search consisted of systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and population-based studies by searching the terms "epidemiology, male infertility, and prevalence." We identified 16 articles for detailed study. We typically used the assumption that 50% of all cases of infertility are due to female factors alone, 20-30% are due to male factors alone, and the remaining 20-30% are due to a combination of male and female factors. Therefore, in regions of the world where male factor or rates of male infertility were not reported, we used this assumption to calculate general rates of male factor infertility. Our calculated data showed that the distribution of infertility due to male factor ranged from 20% to 70% and that the percentage of infertile men ranged from 2·5% to 12%. Infertility rates were highest in Africa and Central/Eastern Europe. Additionally, according to a variety of sources, rates of male infertility in North America, Australia, and Central and Eastern Europe varied from 4 5-6%, 9%, and 8-12%, respectively. This study demonstrates a novel and unique way to calculate the distribution of male infertility around the world. According to our results, at least 30 million men worldwide are infertile with the highest rates in Africa and Eastern Europe. Results indicate further research is needed regarding etiology and treatment, reduce stigma & cultural barriers, and establish a more precise calculation.

  12. Next Generation Sequencing of Tubal Intraepithelial Carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Andrew S.; Stall, Jennifer N.; Hovelson, Daniel H.; Cani, Andi K.; Liu, Chia-Jen; Tomlins, Scott A.; Cho, Kathleen R.

    2016-01-01

    Importance High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is the most prevalent and lethal form of ovarian cancer. HGSCs frequently arise in the distal fallopian tubes rather than the ovary, developing from small precursor lesions called serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (TICs or more specifically STICs). While STICs have been reported to harbor TP53 mutations, detailed molecular characterizations of these lesions are lacking. Observations We performed targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) on formalin-fixed, paraffin- embedded tissue from four women, two with HGSC and two with uterine endometrioid carcinoma (UEC) who were diagnosed with synchronous STICs. We detected concordant mutations in both HGSCs with synchronous STICs, including TP53 mutations as well as assumed germline BRCA1/2 alterations, confirming a clonal relationship between these lesions. NGS confirmed the presence of a STIC clonally unrelated to one case of UEC. NGS of the other tubal lesion diagnosed as a STIC unexpectedly supported the lesion as a micrometastasis from the associated UEC. Conclusions and Relevance We demonstrate that targeted NGS can identify genetic lesions in minute lesions such as TICs, and confirm TP53 mutations as early driving events for HGSC. NGS also demonstrated unexpected relationships between presumed STICs and synchronous carcinomas, suggesting potential diagnostic and translational research applications. PMID:26181193

  13. Sexual dysfunction in infertile couples: evaluation and treatment of infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayar, U.; Arikan, I.I.; Barut, A.; Harma, M.; Harma, M.; Atasoy, N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic and the predictive value of Arizona Sexual Experience Scale among primary infertile couples regarding sexual dysfunction. Methods: The cross-sectional and prospective pre, post study comprising primary infertile patients was carried out at Bulent Ecevit University Hospital, Zonguldak, Turkey. Fifty consecutive primary infertile couples not treated previously were investigated between 2003 and 2007 for the presence of sexual dysfunction by a psychiatrist. Arizona Sexual Experience Scale scoring was self-administered to determine sexual dysfunction among couples before treatment and also 3 months after the initiation of the treatment. Results: Pretreatment mean values of the index parametres in both women and men were significantly increased after treatment. Statistically significant positive correlation was observed between pre- and post-treatment total scores in both women (r=0.83; p 14 (Sensitivity: 57%; Specificity: 90%) and >13 (Sensitivity: 83%; Specificity: 93%), respectively. Pre- and post-treatment scores in men were >10 (Sensitivity: 65%; Specificity: 61%), >11 (Sensitivity: 83%; Specificity: 62%), respectively. Binary logistic regression analyses revealed women's pre-treatment and post-treatment scores as a significant factor for prediction of sexual dysfunction independent of sociodemographic factors (p=0.001 and p=0.001, respectively). Conclusion: Evaluation and treatment of infertility is an important risk factor for sexual dysfunction. Pre- and post-treatment Arizona Sexual Experience Scale score could be used as a screening test for sexual dysfunction and might be used to decide pre/post-treatment consultation of couples with a specialist. (author)

  14. Human parasitic protozoan infection to infertility: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiadeh, Malihe Nourollahpour; Niyyati, Maryam; Fallahi, Shirzad; Rostami, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Protozoan parasitic diseases are endemic in many countries worldwide, especially in developing countries, where infertility is a major burden. It has been reported that such infections may cause infertility through impairment in male and female reproductive systems. We searched Medline, PubMed, and Scopus databases and Google scholar to identify the potentially relevant studies on protozoan parasitic infections and their implications in human and animal model infertility. Literature described that some of the protozoan parasites such as Trichomonas vaginalis may cause deformities of the genital tract, cervical neoplasia, and tubal and atypical pelvic inflammations in women and also non-gonoccocal urethritis, asthenozoospermia, and teratozoospermia in men. Toxopalasma gondii could cause endometritis, impaired folliculogenesis, ovarian and uterine atrophy, adrenal hypertrophy, vasculitis, and cessation of estrus cycling in female and also decrease in semen quality, concentration, and motility in male. Trypanosoma cruzi inhibits cell division in embryos and impairs normal implantation and development of placenta. Decrease in gestation rate, infection of hormone-producing glands, parasite invasion of the placenta, and overproduction of inflammatory cytokines in the oviducts and uterine horns are other possible mechanisms induced by Trypanosoma cruzi to infertility. Plasmodium spp. and Trypanosoma brucei spp. cause damage in pituitary gland, hormonal disorders, and decreased semen quality. Entamoeba histolytica infection leads to pelvic pain, salpingitis, tubo-ovarian abscess, and genital ulcers. Cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis can induce genital lesion, testicular amyloidosis, inflammation of epididymis, prostatitis, and sperm abnormality in human and animals. In addition, some epidemiological studies have reported that rates of protozoan infections in infertile patients are higher than healthy controls. The current review indicates that protozoan parasitic

  15. Clinical observation of interventional treatment for tubal pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhilin; Zhang Qing; Ye Lijing; He Mei

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate a new method to of conservative treatment of treat tubal pregnancy. Methods: 20 cases of tubal pregnancy were treated by two conservative methods. Among them, 10 cases received single dose 5-fluorouracil perfusion through the super selective catheterization for uterus artery. Others took RU486 orally and received intra-muscular injection of testosterone. Results: Hospitalization was shorter, less salpingectomy was recommended, and blood HCG decreased faster in interventional group, than in control group. Conclusion: The 5-fluorouracil interventional treatment had its advantages for tubal pregnancy

  16. Infertility in Mazandaran province - north of Iran: an etiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadali Musanejad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence and etiology of infertility are not similar in different parts of the world. There are only few reports of this topic in Iran.Objective: This study was conducted to determine the clinical patterns and major causes of infertility in Mazandaran province in north of Iran.Materials and Methods: The medical records of 3734 consecutive couples attending two infertility clinics in Mazandaran province, from 2003 to 2008, were reviewed. The couples had not had a viable birth after at least 1 year of unprotected intercourse and were fully investigated.Results: Of the entire samples, 78.7% had primary infertility and 21.3% had secondary infertility. The mean duration of infertility in couples was 5.7±4 years. The etiology of infertility in couples revealed; male factor in 38.9%, female factor in 34.7%, combined factors in 14.6% and undetermined cause in 11.8%.Conclusion: In this study, delayed attendance of infertile couples to the infertility clinic was found. Therefore, there is a need to revise public health program on infertility to focus on the education and prevention of infertility and its risk factors.

  17. Fatores associados ao futuro reprodutivo de mulheres desejosas de gestação após ligadura tubária Factors associated with the reproductive future of patients wishing pregnancy after being submitted to tubal ligation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Carlos Rodrigues da Cunha

    2007-05-01

    comprometer o futuro reprodutivo, uma vez que apenas uma minoria dessas pacientes alcançam os objetivos.PURPOSE: to analyze the factors associated with the reproductive future of patients wishing to become pregnant after having being submitted to tubal ligation (TL, attended at a public service. METHODS: a prospective study including 98 patients previously submitted to TL, who came to the Human Reproduction Center of the University Hospital of Brasilia (HUB, from January 1996 to January 2004, wishing to become pregnant again These patients were followed up from their first appointment till the end of the study, when they answered a structured questionnaire about the social demographic aspects at both the moment they asked for the TL and the reversion of the procedure. RESULTS: the patients’ average age at the TL procedure was 25 years old. Among them, 55.1% were younger than 25, 46.9% had three or more children, and ten of them had only one child. The most common reasons for the TL procedure were: contraception (48%, financial difficulties (25.5% and marital problems (15.3%. The major causes for wishing a new pregnancy were: a new relationship/marriage (80.6%, the desire of having another child with the same partner (8.2%, and the death of a child (6.1%. The regret time informed by most of the patients was between two and four years, and the search for reversion was between six and ten years. About 83.6% of the sample referred lack of information about the procedure and the difficulties of reversion. Twenty patients were submitted to TL reversal procedure; from the ten who became pregnant, only six delivered babies, after a full-term pregnancy. Eight patients were referred to in vitro fertilization treatment, four of them became pregnant and two delivered healthy babies. CONCLUSIONS: TL in young vulnerable women, not informed about the definitive condition of the method, may increase the search for attended reproduction services and impair their reproductive future, as far

  18. Prevalence of Infertility Problems among Iranian Infertile Patients Referred to Royan Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepidarkish, Mahdi; Almasi-Hashiani, Amir; Shokri, Fatemeh; Vesali, Samira; Karimi, Elaheh; Omani Samani, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have been conducted on the infertility problems in Iran. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of infertility problems and related factors in Iranian infertile patients. In this cross sectional study, 405 infertile patients referred to Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran, between 2014 and 2015, were selected by simple random sampling. Participants completed the Fertility Problem Inventory (FPI) including 46 questions in five domains (social concern, sexual concern, relationship concern, rejection of parenthood, and need for parenthood). Mean difference between male and female was verified using independent-samples Student's t test. A generalized linear model (GLM) was also used for testing the effect of variables on the fertility problems. Data was analyzed using Stata software version 13. The mean age (SD) of participants was 31.28 (5.42). Our results showed that 160 infertile men (95.23%) were classified as very high prevalence of infertility problems. Among infertile women, 83 patients (35.02%) were as very high prevalence of infertility problems, and 154 patients (64.98%) were as high prevalence. Age (Pmale with lower education level, history of abortion and history of previous treatments failure experienced more infertility problems.

  19. Prevalence of Infertility Problems among Iranian Infertile Patients Referred to Royan Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Sepidarkish

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few studies have been conducted on the infertility problems in Iran. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of infertility problems and related factors in Iranian infertile patients. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 405 infertile patients referred to Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran, between 2014 and 2015, were selected by simple random sampling. Participants completed the Fertility Problem Inventory (FPI including 46 questions in five domains (social concern, sexual concern, relationship concern, rejection of parenthood, and need for parenthood. Mean difference between male and female was verified using independent-samples Student’s t test. A generalized linear model (GLM was also used for testing the effect of variables on the fertility problems. Data was analyzed using Stata software version 13. Results: The mean age (SD of participants was 31.28 (5.42. Our results showed that 160 infertile men (95.23% were classified as very high prevalence of infertility problems. Among infertile women, 83 patients (35.02% were as very high prevalence of infertility problems, and 154 patients (64.98% were as high prevalence. Age (P<0.001, sex (P<0.001, a history of abortion (P=0.009, failure of previous treatment (P<0.001, and education (P=0.014 had a significant relationship with FPI scores. Conclusion: Bases on the results of current study, an younger male with lower education level, history of abortion and history of previous treatments failure experienced more infertility problems.

  20. Silicone rubber band for laparoscopic tubal sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, A H; Sealey, R M; Gay, J W; Kang, I

    1977-12-01

    In 1974, Yoon and associates (Am J Obstet Gynecol 120:132, 1974) described a new approach in which laparoscopic tubal occlusion was accomplished by utilizing the silicone rubber band technique. Recognizing the great advantages of the new technique in eliminating potential thermal injury associated with electrocoagulation, the authors have utilized the Yoon silicone rubber band technique in these institutions over the past 20 months. Thus far the procedure has been performed in 304 patients without any major complications. In the hope of eliminating and/or reducing possible pregnancy-failure rates, in 110 cases. In addition to application of the silicone band, the tube within the band was transected with non-electrical Seigler biopsy forceps. This, we believe, should provide an interesting long-term comparative study.

  1. Lifestyle causes of male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damayanthi Durairajanayagam

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the potential effects of lifestyle factors on male reproductive health. Evidence of a global decline in human sperm quality over recent decades has been accumulating. Environmental, occupational, and modifiable lifestyle factors may contribute to this decline. This review focuses on key lifestyle factors that are associated with male infertility such as smoking cigarettes, alcohol intake, use of illicit drugs, obesity, psychological stress, advanced paternal age, dietary practices, and coffee consumption. Other factors such as testicular heat stress, intense cycling training, lack of sleep and exposure to electromagnetic radiation from mobile phone use are briefly discussed. Materials and method: A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify and synthesise all relevant information, mainly from within the last decade, on the major lifestyle factors associated with male infertility and semen quality. Database searches were limited to reports published in English only. A manual search of bibliographies of the reports retrieved was conducted to identify additional relevant articles. Results: In all, 1012 articles were identified from the database search and after reviewing the titles and abstract of the reports, 104 articles met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 30 reports were excluded as the full-text could not be retrieved and the abstract did not have relevant data. The remaining 74 reports were reviewed for data on association between a particular lifestyle factor and male infertility and were included in the present review. Conclusion: The major lifestyle factors discussed in the present review are amongst the multiple potential risk factors that could impair male fertility. However, their negative impact may well be mostly overcome by behaviour modification and better lifestyle choices. Greater awareness and recognition of the possible impact of these lifestyle factors are important amongst couples seeking

  2. Serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma, chronic fallopian tube injury, and serous carcinoma development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmberg, Karin; Klynning, Charlotta; Flöter-Rådestad, Angelique; Carlson, Joseph W

    2016-06-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the deadliest gynecological malignancy. Previous studies have suggested that the fallopian tube may be the primary site for high-grade serous carcinoma. In prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomies from women with hereditary high risk for ovarian cancer, precursors can be assessed prior to onset and studied as a model for serous cancer precursor lesions. Epidemiologic studies indicate that carcinogenesis may be a result of chronic fallopian tube injury. The aims of this study were to (1) to examine the incidence of serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC) in relation to other clinical parameters and (2) to evaluate whether chronic fallopian tube injury was related to cancer development. This study enrolled 101 women, comprising the following three groups: hereditary (n = 60), sporadic serous cancer (n = 18; endometrial cancers were excluded), and control (n = 23). The cases were histologically examined and clinical risk factors were collected. The histological changes were compared between different patients and correlated to clinical risk factors. STICs were identified primarily on the fallopian tube fimbria. The incidence of STIC was 3 % in the hereditary patients. In sporadic serous cancer cases, 61 % were associated with STIC and tubal carcinoma (p STIC and invasive cancer were seen more often in the older patients than in the younger patients (p = 0.528). This small study, no correlation with chronic tubal injury or inflammation was identified.

  3. Spontaneous Unruptured Bilateral Tubal Pregnancy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayereh Ghomian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral spontaneous tubal ectopic pregnancy is the rarest form of extra uterine pregnancy. The diagnosis is usually made intraoperatively and levels of serum BHCG and ultrasound has not been useful in the diagnosis of bilateral tubal ectopic pregnancy. A 33-year-old woman with 8 weeks amenorrhea and sever lower abdominal pain was admitted. A transvaginal pelvic ultrasound revealed left adnexal mass and massive fluid collection in the pelvis and abdomen. The serum BHCG was 5,700 mIU/ml and in laparotomy bilateral unruptured tubal pregnancy was noted. Left salpingectomy and right salpingostomy were performed. The diagnosis of bilateral spontaneous tubal ectopic pregnancy is usually made intraoperatively. Both tubes at the time of surgery should be closely examined in order to prevent maternal morbidity and mortality.

  4. Discordant relationship between Essure microinsert position and tubal occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Melody Y

    2016-07-27

    Hysteroscopic sterilisation with Essure requires confirmation of tubal occlusion by hysterosalpingogram or microinsert position by transvaginal sonography 3 months after placement before women can rely on the method for pregnancy prevention. A 39-year-old woman underwent hysteroscopic sterilisation via Essure, with successful bilateral tubal occlusion documented on hysterosalpingogram. She had a subsequent unintended pregnancy and termination, and presented with persistent pelvic pain and other non-specific symptoms. She underwent a laparoscopic-assisted vaginal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingectomy, with complete resolution of her symptoms. Pathological evaluation demonstrated a perforated Essure microinsert and ipsilateral tubal occlusion, and a correctly placed Essure microinsert with ipsilateral tubal patency. Clinicians should be cautious about the assumption that correctly placed microinserts based on ultrasonography, hysterosalpingogram or laparoscopic evaluation assures occlusion success. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  5. Interventional therapy for tubal pregnancy (report of 20 cases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Xusheng; Gu Tongxiao; Liu Huisheng; Zhang Junfeng; Huang Jinyou; Hu Xiumin

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To search an approach to treat tubal pregnancy in a safe and economic way. Methods: 20 cases of tubal pregnancy were studied. Under fluoroscopic guidance, a 3F catheter was introduced to the site of tubal gestation through the uterine cavity, and methotrexate 30 mg in 10 ml saline was injected. Results: On the 5th day after operation, the level of serum hCG began to decline reaching the normal value on the 21 st-28 th day. The gestation sac was absorbed after 2-2.5 months. In 6 cases the fallopian tube was re-canalized after 3 months. Conclusion: Interventional therapy is a valuable and practical method for tubal pregnancy

  6. Spontaneous Bilateral Tubal Gestation: A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwah Sheeba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Here a case is presented where the woman after a positive pregnancy test underwent medical abortion for unwanted pregnancy without ultrasound confirmation of intrauterine pregnancy. On persistence of symptoms, a second opinion was procured, when examination and a transvaginal ultrasound scan revealed ruptured unilateral tubal ectopic pregnancy. However upon subsequent laparotomy (considering deteriorating hemodynamic status of the patient, intraoperatively it turned out to be a bilateral tubal ectopic gestation.

  7. Prostatitis and male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshahrani, Saad; McGill, John; Agarwal, Ashok

    2013-11-01

    The prostate gland plays an important role in male reproduction. Inflammation of the prostate gland (prostatitis) is a common health problem affecting many young and middle aged men. Prostatitis is considered a correctable cause of male infertility, but the pathophysiology and appropriate treatment options of prostatitis in male infertility remain unclear. This literature review will focus on current data regarding prostatitis and its impact on male infertility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Causes of Male Infertility

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... RESOURCES Overview Infographic Gallery Educational Videos State Infertility Insurance Laws Protect Your Fertility Campaign Find a Health Professional ABOUT ASRM Vision of ASRM ASRM's Mission ...

  9. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... RESOURCES Overview Infographic Gallery Educational Videos State Infertility Insurance Laws Protect Your Fertility Campaign Find a Health Professional ABOUT ASRM Vision of ASRM ASRM's Mission ...

  10. Psychological interactions with infertility among women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwikel, J; Gidron, Y; Sheiner, E

    2004-12-01

    Despite the fact that various studies have demonstrated the importance of the mind-body connection and fertility, the psychosocial aspects of infertility have not been adequately addressed. Fertility treatments, ranging from medical monitoring, to hormonal remedies and in vitro fertilization (IVF), are both a physical and emotional burden on women and their partners. Psychological factors such as depression, state-anxiety, and stress-induced changes in heart rate and cortisol are predictive of a decreased probability of achieving a viable pregnancy. A couple that is trying to conceive will undoubtedly experience feelings of frustration and disappointment if a pregnancy is not easily achieved. However, if the difficulties progress and the man and or woman are labelled as having fertility problems, then this may result in a severe insult to self-esteem, body image, and self-assessed masculinity or femininity. Three types of relationships have been hypothesized between psychological factors and infertility. These include: (1) psychological factors are risk factors of subsequent infertility; (2) the experience of the diagnosis and treatment of infertility causes subsequent psychological distress; (3) a reciprocal relationship exists between psychological factors and infertility. The evidence for these three relationships is reviewed and an alternative approach to the treatment of infertility including stress evaluation that precedes or is concurrent to fertility treatment is suggested.

  11. Kisspeptin, unexplained infertility and embryo implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaida Mumtaz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Kisspeptin (KP is a neuropeptide that causes the release of the gonadotropin releasing hormone, which controls hypothalamo pituitary ovarian axis and exerts a number of peripheral effects on reproductive organs. The primary objective of this study was to compare baseline KP levels in females with different types of infertility and identify possible correlations with risk of failure to conceive, preclinical abortion and pregnancy after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI. Materials and Methods A longitudinal cohort study was carried out from August 2014 until May 2015 by recruiting 124 female patients undergoing ICSI, after obtaining ethical approval from the Australian Concept Infertility Medical Center. Cause of infertility due to male, female and unexplained factors was at a frequency of 32 (24%, 33 (31% and 59 (45% among the individuals respectively. KP levels were measured by ELISA assay before the initiation of the ICSI treatment protocol. Outcome of ICSI was categorized into three groups of non-pregnant with beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG25 mIU/ml and no cardiac activity, and clinical pregnancy declared upon confirmation of cardiac activity. Results based on cause of infertility and outcome groups were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. Results Females with unexplained infertility had significantly lower levels of KP when compared with those with male factor infertility (176.69 ± 5.03 vs. 397.6 ± 58.2, P=0.001. Clinical pregnancy was observed in 28 (23% females of which 17 (71% had a female cause of infertility. In the non-pregnant group of 66 (53% females, common cause of infertility was unexplained 56(85%. A weak positive correlation of KP levels with fertilized oocytes and endometrial thickness was observed (P=0.04 and 0.01 respectively. Conclusion Deficiency of KP in females with unexplained infertility was associated with reduced chances of implantation after ICSI.

  12. Male infertility, azoozpermia and cryptozoospermia incidence among three infertility clinics in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, İlknur; Kutlu, Pelin; Delikara, Nuri; Atvar, Özhan; Öztürk, Metin İ.

    2018-01-01

    Objective Semen parameters are directly correlated with the infertility of the male. Incidence rates of male factor infertility, azoospermia and cryptozoospermia differ according to many factors such as geographic region, age, occupation and body weight. The aim of the present study is to determine the incidence of male factor infertility, azoospermia and cryptozoospermia among patients who have been admitted to three separate infertility clinics in Turkey for infertility investigation and analyze the outcomes of these patients. Material and methods A total of 9733 men, who have been admitted to 3 infertility clinics in Turkey due to infertility between March 2011 and October 2016, were included in the study. Male infertility, azoozpermia and cryptozoospermia incidence were calculated according to WHO criteria. Results Male factor infertility was determined in 3114 (32%) of the patients including cases with azoospermia and cryptozoospermia. Azoospermia cases were observed in 570 (5.85%) and cryptozoospermia in 850 (8.73%) men. Azoospermic, and cryptozoospermic patients constitute 18.3%, and 27.2% of the male infertility cases. Sperm retrieval rates in diagnostic or oocyte pick-up plus testicular sperm extraction groups were found to be comparable (16.39%, and 41.3%, respectively). Conclusion The data obtained may help to estimate the number of in vitro fertilization cycles and testicular sperm extraction cases, to determine social security policies, and reproductive potential, and in the light of these data to establish social insurance policies. These data will help patients to decide on treatment alternatives, and guide the urologists about the issue. PMID:29511578

  13. An epidemiologic survey on the causes of infertility in patients referred to infertility center in Fatemieh Hospital in Hamadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Zahra Masoumi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is considered as a major health care problem of different communities. The high prevalence of this issue doubled its importance. A significant proportion of infertility have been related to environmental conditions and also acquired risk factors. Different environmental conditions emphasized the need to study the different causes of infertility in each area. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency causes of infertility in infertile couples. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional descriptive study 1200 infertile men and women that were referred to infertility clinic of Fatemieh Hospital during 2010 to 2011, were examined. This center is the only governmental center for infertility in Hamadan. Sampling was based on census method. Information about the patients was obtained from medical examinations and laboratory findings. To analyze the data, descriptive statistics such as frequencies and the mean were used. Results: The prevalence of primary and secondary infertility was 69.5% and 30.5% respectively. Among the various causes of infertility women factors (88.6% had the highest regard. In the causes of female infertility, menstrual disorders, diseases (obesity, thyroid diseases, and diabetes, ovulation dysfunction, uterine factor, fallopian tubes and cervical factor had the highest prevalence respectively. The causes of male infertility based on their frequency included semen fluid abnormalities, genetic factors, vascular abnormalities, and anti-spermatogenesis factors, respectively. Conclusion: Etiology pattern of infertility in our study is similar with the many other patterns that have been reported by the World Health Organization. However, frequency of menstrual disorders is much higher than other studies that require further consideration.

  14. Varicocele and male infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Fuglesang S.; Østergren, Peter; Dupree, James M.

    2017-01-01

    The link between varicoceles and male infertility has been a matter of debate for more than half a century. Varicocele is considered the most common correctable cause of male infertility, but some men with varicoceles are able to father children, even without intervention. In addition, improvements...... if the male partner has a clinically palpable varicocele and affected semen parameters....

  15. Treatment of infertility in men with spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brackett, N.L.; Lynne, C.M.; El Dib, Hussein Ibrahim El Desouki Hussein

    2010-01-01

    Most men with spinal cord injury (SCI) are infertile. Erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities contribute to the problem. Treatments for erectile dysfunction include phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, intracavernous injections of alprostadil, penile prostheses...... of intrauterine insemination increases as the total motile sperm count inseminated increases. In vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection are options in cases of extremely low total motile sperm count. Reproductive outcomes for SCI male factor infertility are similar to outcomes for general male...... factor infertility...

  16. Cytogenetic of Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutfiye Ozpak

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Infertility by definition, is not to get pregnant within one year of regular sexual relationship without protection, affects 15-20% of reproductive age couples. Approximately 30% of infertility cases are male originated. Male infertility is caused by endocrine-related genetic defects affecting urogenital system function. These defects adversely affect subsequent spermatogenesis, sexual function, fertility, early embryonic stage of sexual maturation. Autosomal and gonosomal, numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities and related syndromes rank at the top causes of male infertility. Similar chromosome abnormalities are detected in male infertility and as the rate of these abnormalities increase, it was found to reduce sperm count especially in azospermic and oligozoospermic men. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2011; 20(4.000: 230-245

  17. Current medical management of endocrine-related male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua D Ring

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Male factor contributes to 50%-60% of overall infertility but is solely responsible in only 20% of couples. Although most male factor infertility is ascertained from an abnormal semen analysis, other male factors can be contributory especially if the sample returns normal. Male infertility can be due to identifiable hormonal or anatomical etiologies that may be reversible or irreversible. This manuscript will highlight existing guidelines and our recommendations for hormone evaluation for male infertility and empiric therapies including multivitamins, estrogen receptor modulators (clomiphene, estrogen conversion blockers (anastrozole, and hormone replacement.

  18. Ectopic pregnancy with tubal rupture: an analysis of 80 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashfaq, S.; Aziz, S.; Hasan, M.; Sultan, S.; Irfan, S.M.

    2017-01-01

    Ectopic pregnancy (EP) is a major problem in obstetrics as there is evidence of increasing incidence throughout the world. It is an important cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. In Pakistan, the care seeking behaviour among female is limited that makes female vulnerable to die due to complication of ectopic pregnancy. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of tubal rupture in ectopic pregnancy in Pakistani patients. Method: In this cross-sectional study data pertaining to age, gestational age, parity and duration of presenting symptoms were collected and analysed. Result: 80 patients were diagnosed to have ectopic pregnancy. The frequency of tubal rupture was 91.25%. It is encountered significantly more often in women with age of 26 years. More tubal rupture is found in patient with low parity, in which the frequency of tubal rupture is up to 100% and decrease up to 78.6% with increasing parity up to four. Furthermore, it is noted that increase in gestational age from 8 weeks to 10 weeks caused an increase in frequency of tubal rupture from 80 to 100% respectively. It is also noted that earlier the patient presents the lesser is the frequency of tubal rupture, as compared to late presentation beyond 3-4 days which make frequency up to 95%. Conclusion: Tubal rupture is still common cause of maternal morbidity and mortality, and is still a major challenge in gynaecological practice. Creating awareness amongst midwives and GPs regarding early diagnosis can contribute to decrease the mortality, morbidity and fertility loss related to EP. (author)

  19. Inequity between male and female coverage in state infertility laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, James M; Dickey, Ryan M; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2016-06-01

    To analyze state insurance laws mandating coverage for male factor infertility and identify possible inequities between male and female coverage in state insurance laws. We identified states with laws or codes related to infertility insurance coverage using the National Conference of States Legislatures' and the National Infertility Association's websites. We performed a primary, systematic analysis of the laws or codes to specifically identify coverage for male factor infertility services. Not applicable. Not applicable. Not applicable. The presence or absence of language in state insurance laws mandating coverage for male factor infertility care. There are 15 states with laws mandating insurance coverage for female factor infertility. Only eight of those states (California, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Montana, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, and West Virginia) have mandates for male factor infertility evaluation or treatment. Insurance coverage for male factor infertility is most specific in Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York, yet significant differences exist in the male factor policies in all eight states. Three states (Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York) exempt coverage for vasectomy reversal. Despite national recommendations that male and female partners begin infertility evaluations together, only 8 of 15 states with laws mandating infertility coverage include coverage for the male partner. Excluding men from infertility coverage places an undue burden on female partners and risks missing opportunities to diagnose serious male health conditions, correct reversible causes of infertility, and provide cost-effective treatments that can downgrade the intensity of intervention required to achieve a pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Do host genetic traits in the bacterial sensing system play a role in the development of Chlamydia trachomatis-associated tubal pathology in subfertile women?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ito James I

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In women, Chlamydia (C. trachomatis upper genital tract infection can cause distal tubal damage and occlusion, increasing the risk of tubal factor subfertility and ectopic pregnancy. Variations, like single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, in immunologically important host genes are assumed to play a role in the course and outcome of a C. trachomatis infection. We studied whether genetic traits (carrying multiple SNPs in different genes in the bacterial sensing system are associated with an aberrant immune response and subsequently with tubal pathology following a C. trachomatis infection. The genes studied all encode for pattern recognition receptors (PRRs involved in sensing bacterial components. Methods Of 227 subfertile women, serum was available for C. trachomatis IgG antibody testing and genotyping (common versus rare allele of the PRR genes TLR9, TLR4, CD14 and CARD15/NOD2. In all women, a laparoscopy was performed to assess the grade of tubal pathology. Tubal pathology was defined as extensive peri-adnexal adhesions and/or distal occlusion of at least one tube. Results Following a C. trachomatis infection (i.e. C. trachomatis IgG positive, subfertile women carrying two or more SNPs in C. trachomatis PRR genes were at increased risk of tubal pathology compared to women carrying less than two SNPs (73% vs 33% risk. The differences were not statistically significant (P = 0.15, but a trend was observed. Conclusion Carrying multiple SNPs in C. trachomatis PRR genes tends to result in an aberrant immune response and a higher risk of tubal pathology following a C. trachomatis infection. Larger studies are needed to confirm our preliminary findings.

  1. Infertility, infertility treatment, and fetal growth restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Obel, Carsten; Hammer Bech, Bodil

    2007-01-01

    mortality and SGA among infertile couples (treated and untreated), but the odds ratios (ORs) of perinatal mortality among infertile couples were attenuated after adjustment for maternal age and body mass index (1.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.95-1.84 among untreated and 1.26, 95% CI 0.86-1.85 among......OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between infertility, with or without treatment, and fetal growth, as well as perinatal and infant mortality. METHODS: From the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997-2003), we identified 51,041 singletons born of fertile couples (time to pregnancy 12 months or less...... treated couples). The elevated risk of SGA among infertile couples persisted after adjustment for maternal age, parity, and smoking (OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.10-1.40 among untreated, and OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.23-1.60 among treated). The risk of SGA increased with time to pregnancy, and a longer time to pregnancy...

  2. Interventional treatment of un-ruptured tubal pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan Hong; Ma Zhuang; Jiang Zaibo; Yan Ying; Guan Shouhai; Zhu Kangshun; Huang Mingsheng; Chen Hanwei

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To discuss some concept about interventional treatment of tubal pregnancy. Methods: The procedure of trans-vaginal tubal intra-gestational SAC injection (IGSI) or percutaneous intra-utero-arterial infusion (IUAI) was selected for treatment of 40 patients with un-ruptured tubal pregnancy. Methotrexate (MTX), Rosch-Thurmoud fallopian tube catheterization set, and the general angiographic catheters of 4.1-5.0 F were used for the procedure. Ultrasound and urine beta-hCG were the main indexes monitoring the therapeutic effects. Results: 12 of 40 patients underwent a total of 15 IGSI. Of these, 3 patients required a second injection; 28 of 40 cases were treated with IUAI. The total successful rate of termination of ectopic pregnancy was 97.5%, the mean resolution time for reduction of beta-hCG concentration was 11.7 days (range 4-28), the range of menstruation recovery time was 7-45 days. Conclusion: The interventional therapy for tubal pregnancy will be more widely applied, on the basis of a better understanding about the pathology, characteristics of embryonic sac development and blood supply, the regular change of concentration of serum and urine hCG in tubal pregnancy

  3. Preliminary study of interventional treatment for tubal pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Yukuan; Chen Hanwei; Li Kaifang; Jiang Zaibo; Ma Zhuang; Liu Huanling

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical value and methods of interventional treatment for tubal pregnancy. Methods: Two different methods were used in the interventional treatment of 18 patients with tubal pregnancy, which were transvaginal tubal intra-gestational methotrexate (MTX) injection and intra-utero-arterial MTX infusion. The former was selected for the treatment of 8 patients and the latter for 10 patients. Cook-fallopian tube catheterization set and the general angiographic catheters of 4.1 Fr Cobra were used. After the treatment, conditions of the patients, β-HCG level and ultrasound changes of the pregnant bladder were the main indexes for monitoring the therapeutic effect in this study. Results: The successful rate, cure rate, embryo killing rate reached 100%, 88.9%(16/18) and 94.4% (17/18) respectively. Two cases of intra-utero-arterial MTX infusion treatment failed, β-HCG was reduced to normal level with an average of 11.2 +- 11.6 d (3-28 d). In 10 cases, the ultrasound showed that the pregnancy bladder disappeared in 2-3 weeks, accounting for 76.9% (10/13). The longest time was 60 days. The range of menstruation recovery was 37 +- 9 d (21-50 d). Conclusions: Interventional treatment of tubal pregnancy is effective, reliable and easy for operation. It will be especially effective by arterial procedure. Interventional treatment will be a important method for terminating tubal pregnancy

  4. The risk of menstrual abnormalities after tubal sterilization: a case control study

    OpenAIRE

    shobeiri, Mehri Jafari; AtashKhoii, Simin

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Tubal sterilization is the method of family planning most commonly used. The existence of the post-tubal-ligation syndrome of menstrual abnormalities has been the subject of debate for decades. Methods In a cross-sectional study, 112 women with the history of Pomeroy type of tubal ligation achieved by minilaparatomy as the case group and 288 women with no previous tubal ligation as the control group were assessed for menstrual abnormalities. Results Menstrual abnormalities...

  5. Infertility: Inability or Disability?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abha Khetarpal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Disability is a complex phenomenon. It reflects an interaction between features of a person’s body and features of the society in which he or she lives. International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF, lays stress on the functional as well as the structural problem of a person. All the definitions of disability also include the disorders of the reproductive and endocrine system. So infertility and impotency should also be included in the category of disability. It affects the participation in areas of life and can have a disabling affect on an individual. Like any other disability the couple has to adapt and integrate infertility in their sense of self thus infertility comes as a major life crisis. Medically, infertility, in most cases, is considered to be the result of a physical impairment or a genetic abnormality. Socially, couples are incapable of their reproductive or parental roles. On social level, infertility in most cultures remains associated with social stigma and taboo just like the social model of disability. Couples who are unable to reproduce may be looked down upon due to social stigmatisation. Infertility can lead to divorces and separation leading to a broken family life. Without labelling infertility as a disability, it is difficult for the people to access services and welfare benefits offered by the government. Infertility treatments are highly sophisticated so they are very expensive and are even not covered by insurance and government aid.In the light of all this it becomes imperative to categorise infertility as disability.

  6. [Utilization of Essure® micro-insert for hydrosalpynx occlusion in infertile women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thébault, N; Broux, P-L; Moy, L; Vialard, J

    2012-04-01

    To assess the feasibility and the results on fertility of tubal hysteroscopic proximal occlusion with Essure(®) micro-insert in women with hydrosalpinges. Thirteen infertile women with hydrosalpinges, who underwent hysteroscopic tubal exclusion by Essure(®) prior to IVF procedure. The placement of micro-insert was feasible and easy in every patient, with no intra-operative complication. Only one postoperative infectious complication (pyosalpinx) occurred. We report a 64 % rate of pregnancy, and a 18 % rate of normally ongoing pregnancies with no Essure(®)-related complication. Hydrosalpinges occlusion by Essure(®) device might be an easy and safe alternative to laparoscopic treatment, with successful results on fertility and without adverse effects on pregnancy outcomes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Intrauterine insemination versus fallopian tube sperm perfusion for non-tubal infertility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cantineau, Astrid E. P.; Cohlen, Ben J.; Heineman, Maas Jan; Marjoribanks, Jane; Farquhar, Cindy

    2013-01-01

    Background Intrauterine insemination (IUI) is a common treatment for couples with subfertility that does not involve the fallopian tubes. It is used to bring the sperm close to the released oocyte. Another method of introducing sperm is fallopian tube sperm perfusion (FSP). Fallopian tube sperm

  8. Lifestyle causes of male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi

    2018-03-01

    To examine the potential effects of lifestyle factors on male reproductive health. Evidence of a global decline in human sperm quality over recent decades has been accumulating. Environmental, occupational, and modifiable lifestyle factors may contribute to this decline. This review focuses on key lifestyle factors that are associated with male infertility such as smoking cigarettes, alcohol intake, use of illicit drugs, obesity, psychological stress, advanced paternal age, dietary practices, and coffee consumption. Other factors such as testicular heat stress, intense cycling training, lack of sleep and exposure to electromagnetic radiation from mobile phone use are briefly discussed. A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify and synthesise all relevant information, mainly from within the last decade, on the major lifestyle factors associated with male infertility and semen quality. Database searches were limited to reports published in English only. A manual search of bibliographies of the reports retrieved was conducted to identify additional relevant articles. In all, 1012 articles were identified from the database search and after reviewing the titles and abstract of the reports, 104 articles met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 30 reports were excluded as the full-text could not be retrieved and the abstract did not have relevant data. The remaining 74 reports were reviewed for data on association between a particular lifestyle factor and male infertility and were included in the present review. The major lifestyle factors discussed in the present review are amongst the multiple potential risk factors that could impair male fertility. However, their negative impact may well be mostly overcome by behaviour modification and better lifestyle choices. Greater awareness and recognition of the possible impact of these lifestyle factors are important amongst couples seeking conception.

  9. A radiologic analysis and comparative evaluation of hysterosalpingographic and laparoscopic findings in infertile patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hang Young; Kim, Soo Won; Chung, Hye Kyung; Yu, Yun Jeong

    1984-01-01

    Hystreosalpingogram of 375 patients with infertility were reviewed with reference to radiological feature of each pathology and a comparative study of hysterosalpingography and laparoscopy in 36 patients was presented. This results were as follows;1. In 375 cases of infertility, 191 cases (50.9%) were primary infertility and 181 cases (49.1%) were secondary infertility. 2. The peak age distribution was 26 to 30 year old group in 211 cases (56.3%), and the peak duration of infertility was less than 3 years in 256 cases (68.3%). 3. Abnormal uterine findings were 115 cases (30.7%) and there were 73 cases of filling defects, 13 cases of irregularity, 12 cases of uterine flexion, 11 cases of congenital anomaly, and 9 cases of hypoplasia among them. 4. Abnormal tubal findings were 196 cases (52.3%) and there were 103 cases of simple obstruction, 69 cases of hydrosalpinx, and 50 cases of peritubal adhesion among them. 5. Intravasation of contrast media was noted in 42 cases (11.2%). 6. In 36 cases of laparoscopy, 23 cases (63.7%) was agreed to hysterosalpingography. 7. Although laparoscopy was better than hysterosalpingography in external anatomy of salpinx and relationship to ovary, hysterosalpingography should be important for fundamental study of infertile women because of lower failure rate, lower risk of complications, therapeutic effect, and lower cost.

  10. Psychological profile of women with infertility: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, Shuvabrata; Sanyal, Nilanjana; Mukherjee, Urbi

    2014-01-01

    An endeavour to probe into the psychological profile of infertile women in a comparative stance with the fertile women is not very common. This study is an attempt to explore the possible non-apparent personality factors which contribute to the unexplained pain of infertility. The main objectives of the present study were (a) to examine whether infertile women are different from fertile women in terms of selected psychological variables- narcissistic components, dimensions of attachment style and uses of defensive manoeuvres; and (b) whether the primary infertile women (n=18) are different from the secondary infertile women (n=12) with respect to those variables. A total of 60 individuals (30 infertile women and 30 matched fertile women) were assessed through Attachment Style Questionnaire (ASQ), Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI) and Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ-40). General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) was administered on to the fertile women to rule out the psychiatric morbidity. Findings revealed that infertile women group differed from fertile women group with respect to narcissism, dimensions of attachment style and uses of defense mechanism. The primary infertile group also showed marked difference from the secondary infertile group with respect to those variables. This study endeavours to enrich the knowledge regarding the personality dynamics of infertile women to design psychotherapeutic programme to aid their well-being, help them to cherish the flavour of parenthood and improve their quality of life.

  11. Psychological profile of women with infertility: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuvabrata Poddar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: An endeavour to probe into the psychological profile of infertile women in a comparative stance with the fertile women is not very common. This study is an attempt to explore the possible non-apparent personality factors which contribute to the unexplained pain of infertility. Methods: The main objectives of the present study were (a to examine whether infertile women are different from fertile women in terms of selected psychological variables- narcissistic components, dimensions of attachment style and uses of defensive manoeuvres; and (b whether the primary infertile women (n=18 are different from the secondary infertile women (n=12 with respect to those variables. A total of 60 individuals (30 infertile women and 30 matched fertile women were assessed through Attachment Style Questionnaire (ASQ, Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI and Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ-40. General Health Questionnaire (GHQ was administered on to the fertile women to rule out the psychiatric morbidity. Results: Findings revealed that infertile women group differed from fertile women group with respect to narcissism, dimensions of attachment style and uses of defense mechanism. The primary infertile group also showed marked difference from the secondary infertile group with respect to those variables. Conclusions: This study endeavours to enrich the knowledge regarding the personality dynamics of infertile women to design psychotherapeutic programme to aid their well-being, help them to cherish the flavour of parenthood and improve their quality of life.

  12. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's FAQs about In Vitro Fertilization REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH ... Index NEWS AND PUBLICATIONS Publications Overview News and Research Ethics Documents Practice Committee Documents Patient Fact Sheets ...

  13. Causes of Male Infertility

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's FAQs about In Vitro Fertilization REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH ... Index NEWS AND PUBLICATIONS Publications Overview News and Research Ethics Documents Practice Committee Documents Patient Fact Sheets ...

  14. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's FAQs about In Vitro Fertilization REPRODUCTIVE ... Discrimination Policy ASRM Web Site Terms & Conditions of Use

  15. Causes of Male Infertility

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's FAQs about In Vitro Fertilization REPRODUCTIVE ... Discrimination Policy ASRM Web Site Terms & Conditions of Use

  16. Letrozole in a low-cost in vitro fertilization protocol in intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles for male factor infertility: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiuli Mukherjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Letrozole, a selective aromatase inhibitor, reduces the total dose of gonadotrophin required for inducing follicular maturation. We evaluated if incorporation of letrozole could be an effective alternative for low-cost in vitro fertilization (IVF protocol particularly in intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI cycles where male factor infertility is the sole indication for IVF. Materials and Methods: It is a randomized controlled single-blind trial. 94 women with history of severe male factor infertility were selected. 42 women (study group received letrozole, 5 mg daily from day 3-7 and recombinant FSH (rFSH 75IU/day from day 5 continuously till hCG injection. 52 women (control group underwent continuous stimulation by rFSH (150-225IU/day from day 2. GnRH-antagonist (Inj. Orgalutran 0.25 ml sub-cutaneous was started at maximum follicle size of 14 in both groups. Ovulation was triggered by 10,000IU of hCG followed by IVF-ET. Main outcome measures were total dose of rFSH (IU/cycle, terminal E2 (pg/ml, number of mature follicles, number of oocyte retrieved, transferable embryo, endometrial thickness, pregnancy rate and mean expenditure. Statistical analysis is done by using SPSS11. Results :0 As compared to control group (1756 ± 75IU, the study group i.e., Let-rFSH received (625 ± 98IU significantly lower (P = 0.0001 total dose of rFSH. Terminal E2 was significantly lower (P = 0.0001 in study group than control (830 ± 36 vs. 1076 ± 41 pg/ml with significant increment in endometrial thickness (P = 0.0008 in study group, (9.1 ± 0.32 vs. 8.7 ± 0.69 which maintained an improved pregnancy rate though nonsignificant. The risk of hyperstimulation had significantly (P = 0.01 reduced in study group than control (0 vs. 7.Treatment outcome in all other aspects including pregnancy rate were statistically comparable. Per cycle mean expenditure was reduced by 34% in study group than control. Conclusion: Adjunctive use of letrozole may be an

  17. in the Upper and Lower Genital Tracts of Fertile and Infertile Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark G. Martens

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The genital mycoplasmas (Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum and Chlamydia trachomatis have been implicated as possible etiologic factors in infertility. Their role in patients with infertility needs to be further defined.

  18. Endometriosis and Infertility: Can Surgery Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  19. Evaluation of time lapse for establishing distal tubal occlusion diagnosis during hysterosalpingography procedure performed by using water soluble contrast media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Kahyaoglu

    2017-05-01

    Conclusion: Although a trend exists towards shorter time period intervals between the first uterine visualization and distal tubal filling graphy among patients with tubal patency, rather than patients with distal tubal occlusion confirmed by diagnostic laparoscopy, clinically reliable objective time period intervals for finalizing the HSG procedure and proceeding with diagnostic laparoscopy due to distal tubal occlusion diagnosis on HSG could not be detected.

  20. Identifying subfertile ovulatory women for timely tubal patency testing: a clinical decision rule based on medical history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppus, S. F. P. J.; Verhoeve, H. R.; Opmeer, B. C.; van der Steeg, J. W.; Steures, P.; Eijkemans, M. J. C.; Hompes, P. G. A.; Bossuyt, P. M. M.; van der Veen, F.; Mol, B. W. J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of tubal testing is to identify women with bilateral tubal pathology in a timely manner, so they can be treated with IVF or tubal surgery. At present, it is unclear for which women early tubal testing is indicated, and in whom it can be deferred. METHODS: Data on 3716 women who

  1. Identifying subfertile ovulatory women for timely tubal patency testing: A clinical decision rule based on medical history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.F.P.J. Coppus; H.R. Verhoeve (Harold); B.C. Opmeer (Brent); J.W. van der Steeg (Jan Willem); P. Steures (Pieternel); M.J.C. Eijkemans (René); P.G. Hompes (Peter); P.M.M. Bossuyt (Patrick); F. Veen (Fulco); B.W.J. Mol (Ben)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The aim of tubal testing is to identify women with bilateral tubal pathology in a timely manner, so they can be treated with IVF or tubal surgery. At present, it is unclear for which women early tubal testing is indicated, and in whom it can be deferred. Methods: Data on 3716

  2. LEF1 is preferentially expressed in the tubal-peritoneal junctions and is a reliable marker of tubal intraepithelial lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoeckel, Elisa; Odai-Afotey, Ashley A; Schleißheimer, Michael; Rottmann, Miriam; Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Ellenson, Lora H; Kirchner, Thomas; Mayr, Doris; Nikitin, Alexander Yu

    2017-09-01

    Recently it has been reported that serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC), the likely precursor of ovarian/extra-uterine high-grade serous carcinoma, are frequently located in the vicinity of tubal-peritoneal junctions, consistent with the cancer-prone features of many epithelial transitional regions. To test if p53 (aka TP53)-signatures and secretory cell outgrowths (SCOUTs) also localize to tubal-peritoneal junctions, we examined these lesions in the fallopian tubes of patients undergoing salpingo-oophorectomy for sporadic high-grade serous carcinomas or as a prophylactic procedure for carriers of familial BRCA1 or 2 mutations. STICs were located closest to the tubal-peritoneal junctions with an average distance of 1.31 mm, while SCOUTs were not detected in the fimbriated end of the fallopian tube. As many epithelial transitional regions contain stem cells, we also determined the expression of stem cell markers in the normal fallopian tube, tubal intraepithelial lesions and high-grade serous carcinomas. Of those, LEF1 was consistently expressed in the tubal-peritoneal junctions and all lesions, independent of p53 status. All SCOUTs demonstrated strong nuclear expression of β-catenin consistent with the LEF1 participation in the canonical WNT pathway. However, β-catenin was preferentially located in the cytoplasm of cells comprising STICs and p53 signatures, suggesting WNT-independent function of LEF1 in those lesions. Both frequency of LEF1 expression and β-catenin nuclear expression correlated with the worst 5-year patient survival, supporting important role of both proteins in high-grade serous carcinoma. Taken together, our findings suggest the existence of stem cell niche within the tubal-peritoneal junctions. Furthermore, they support the notion that the pathogenesis of SCOUTs is distinct from that of STICs and p53 signatures. The location and discrete patterns of LEF1 and β-catenin expression may serve as highly sensitive and reliable ancillary

  3. Bacterial vaginosis and infertility: cause or association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salah, Rasheed M; Allam, Abdelmonem M; Magdy, Amin M; Mohamed, Abeer Sh

    2013-03-01

    To estimate the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis (BV) in infertile women and evaluate the effect of treatment of BV on the pregnancy rate in patients with polycystic ovarian disease (PCOD) and unexplained infertility. Cohort study conducted at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology in collaboration with the Microbiology Department of Sohag University Hospital, Egypt. All eligible women with female factor infertility (n=874) were enrolled and all asymptomatic fertile women (n=382) attending the family planning clinic of the study hospital were recruited as a control group. The study was in two phases: the first included screening all participants for BV after Gram-staining of the vaginal discharge. The second phase was concerned with evaluating the effect of treatment of BV on the cumulative pregnancy rate (CPP) in patients with PCOD (group I; n=278) and unexplained infertility (group II; n=170). Each group was divided into three sub-groups: groups Ia (n=129) and IIa (n=73) were BV positive and treated for BV; groups Ib (n=61) and IIb (n=49) were BV positive and did not receive treatment for BV, and groups Ic (n=88) and IIc (n=48) were BV negative. The prevalence of BV was compared using the Chi-square. The long rank test of Kaplan-Meier life table analysis was used to compare the CPR. A multivariate regression model was designed to define the most significant variable which affected the pregnancy rate in patients with PCOD. The prevalence of BV was significantly higher in infertile than fertile women (45.5% vs 15.4%). The highest prevalence was found in patients with PCOD (60.1%) and unexplained infertility (37.4%). The CPR in both patients with PCOD and unexplained infertility were significantly higher in the patients who were treated for BV. Regression model showed that BV was one of the significant factors interfering with pregnancy. BV is strongly implicated in female infertility and is probably an underestimated cause of unexplained infertility

  4. Health and life style among infertile men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revonta, M; Raitanen, J; Sihvo, S; Koponen, P; Klemetti, R; Männistö, S; Luoto, R

    2010-08-01

    Lifetime prevalence of infertility among couples is approximately 10-15%, but studies addressing their health behavior are few. Our aim was to describe health and life style of Finnish men and women who had experienced infertility. Cross-sectional survey. Finland. Data from a population-based survey (n=7021) was utilized. Life style of infertile men (n=289) and women (n=155) were compared to other men and fertile women. Life style (dietary factors, use of alcohol, physical activity), reproductive factors, other diseases and symptoms. After adjusting for age, area and education, infertile women under 50 years consumed more polyunsaturated fat (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.03-1.46), less saturated fat (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.74-0.92) and had experienced more hangovers during previous year (OR 1.02, 95% CI 1.00-1.05) than fertile women. Infertile men under 50 years consumed more total fat (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.03-1.10), polyunsaturated fat (OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.05-1.37) and monounsaturated fat (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.06-1.28) compared to other men. Infertile men did not consume more alcohol nor smoke more cigarettes but reported more often allergies than fertile men. Infertile women also had Chlamydia trachomatis infection, benign tumor in their uterus and intestinal disease more often than fertile women. Infertile women over 50 years were more often current smokers than fertile women, but the differences in other age-groups were not significant. Women with infertility experience reported more diseases and less use of oral contraceptives than other women, possibly reflecting reasons to infertility. Since both infertility and unhealthy use of alcohol are an increasing public health issues in western societies, more attention should be paid towards life style, especially alcohol use of infertile women. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Correlation of H. pylori infection and infertility; a survey in Yazd infertility clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalili M B

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is a worldwide problem. Many different factors may cause infertility. Among them, bacterial infection of the reproductive system is one of the main factors. Recently, some limited investigation has revealed that H. pylori is capable of causing genital inflammation that may lead to infertility. Although known to be a causative agent of gastritis and duodenal ulcers, this species may be transferred orally to the vagina and asymptomatic infection leads to inflammation of the system and finally manifestation of infertility. In addition, infertility may be due to antibodies synthesized against H. pylori cross-reacting with the genital tissue. Methods: In the present study, 180 women consisting of 90 cases referred to IVF center of Yazd and 90 matched controls were enrolled. Serum was taken from all women for detection of IgG and IgM using the ELISA technique. Results: A total of 117 (65% serum samples were positive for Helicobacter, of which 63.3% were from fertile and 66.7% from infertile women. The serum positive population was found to be predominantly in the age range of 25-35, although some 35-42 year olds were also serum positive. When the prevalence of Helicobacter infection status was compared with marriage duration in both groups, it was found that antibody titer in subjects from marriages with durations of greater than five years was significantly higher than those of five-year marriages. In addition, higher antibody titers were found in infertile women with fallopian tube (FT factor and lower titers in those with polycystic factors. Conclusion: Although the results were not significant, they nevertheless indicate that the Helicobacter antibody titers in infertile women were higher than those of fertile women (P =0.6. Therefore, further studies are necessary to determine the role that Helicobacter infection plays with regard to infertility among women. Since the antibody titer in infertile cases with FT factor was

  6. Bilateral tubal ectopic pregnancies: A report of two cases | Eze ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bilateral tubal ectopic pregnancies are rare occurrences. Two recently managed cases are discussed. The first was a single, sexually active 23-year-old nullipara with family history of twinning who presented with eight weeks amenorrhea, positive pregnancy test, lower abdominal discomfort and other clinical and ultrasound ...

  7. Female sterilization by tubal ligation at caesarean section in Makurdi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Female sterilization is an important tool in reducing unplanned pregnancy and maternal mortality in our environment. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence, sociodemographic characteristics, technique, effectiveness and complications associated with female sterilization by bilateral tubal ligation ...

  8. Papillary Cystadenoma: An Incidental Finding in Tubal Ligation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabitha Lynn Ward

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available von Hippel-Lindau disease (vHLD is a rare autosomal dominant disorder with multiple benign and malignant tumors of different organs. We report a papillary cystadenoma of the mesosalpinx found in close association with an adenomatoid tumor discovered incidentally following tubal ligation in a patient with vHLD.

  9. Transuterinal artery interventional therapy for fallopian tubal pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Zaibo; Shan Hong; Guan Shouhai; Ma Zhuang; Huang Mingsheng; Li Zhengran; Zhu Kangshun; Chen Hanwei; Xiao Jibo; Mu Yongsheng

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the methods and clinical effect of transuterinal artery interventional therapy of fallopian tubal pregnancy. Methods: The authors cured 34 cases of fallopian tubal pregnancy by interventional methods. In the procedure, 4.1 - 5.0 F catheters were used for performing super selective angiography in uterine artery and then infusing Methotrexate 50-100 mg. Finally gelfoam particles or stripes were used to embolise uterine artery. Before and after the procedure, patients showed changes of clinical symptom, physical signs. Value of urine β-hCG and size of pregnancy cyst were studied. Results: 31 cases were succeeded. The successful rate was 91%. 37 fallopian tubal arteries were displayed in 40 uterine arterial angiographies. The stain of ovary was shown done in 21 cases, the appearance rate was 68%. The stain of pregnant cyst was in six cases, the appearance rate was 18%. Conclusion: It is safe and efficient in performing transuterine artery chemo-embolization for therapy of fallopian tubal pregnancy. It could prevent and control fatal bleeding induced by pregnancy cyst rupture

  10. Serous tubal intraepithelial neoplasia : The concept and its application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meserve, Emily E. K.; Brouwer, Jan; Crum, Christopher P.

    In recent years it has become clear that many extra-uterine (pelvic) high-grade serous carcinomas (serous carcinomas) are preceded by a precursor lesion in the distal fallopian tube. Precursors range from small self-limited 'p53 signatures' to expansile serous tubal intraepithelial neoplasms that

  11. Pan endoscopic approach "hysterolaparoscopy" as an initial procedure in selected infertile women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaid, Keya; Mehra, Sheila; Verma, Mita; Jain, Sandhya; Sharma, Abha; Bhaskaran, Sruti

    2014-02-01

    Tuboperitoneal pathology is responsible for 40-50% cases of infertility. Hysterosalpingography (HSG) & laparoscopy are the two classic methods available for evaluation of tubal pathology and are complementary to each other. Though pelvic sonography and HSG are good enough to exclude gross intrauterine pathology, but subtle changes in the form of small polyps, adhesions and seedling fibroid are better picked up on magnification with hysteroscopy. Combined hysterolaparoscopy may obviate need for HSG, as complete evaluation and treatment is possible in the same sitting. To assess the utility of Hysterolaparoscopy as one step procedure and compare it with HSG, in the subset of ovulatory infertile women with normal pelvic sonography / seminogram /hormonal assays. In this analytical prospective study, 193 infertile women aged 19 to 42 years underwent HSG and Hysterolaparoscopy over a period of six months. They were confirmed to have ovulatory cycles and normal seminogram. Patient with active genital infection were excluded. Findings were categorized as normal/abnormal and therapeutic intervention done, if required. Statistical evaluation was carried out using Chi- square test. On comparing HSG and Hysteroscopy, uterine findings matched in 66.3% patients. HSG failed to detect uterine pathology in 32.12% patients (62/193) with a sensitivity of 21.3% and specificity of 97.45%. Ninety three percent of intrauterine adhesions/polyps were missed on HSG. Hysteroscopic intervention was required in 23.83% cases, adhesiolysis being the commonest. On comparing tubal patency on HSG and laparoscopy, the sensitivity of HSG in detecting bilateral tubal block was 80.6% and specificity of 81.5%. With regard to unilateral tubal block, sensitivity was 34.6% and specificity 89.8%. The agreement between the two was 74%. Pathology such as adhesions, fimbrial agglutination and endometriosis were dealt surgically in 65.8% patients. As per HSG, 112/193 women had both tubes patent and 177 revealed

  12. Feasibility of dynamic MR-hysterosalpingography for the diagnostic work-up of infertile women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, Leopold; Gluecker, Thomas; Steinbrich, Wolfgang; Pegios, Wassilios; Steimann, Sabine; De Geyter, Christian; Froehlich, Johannes M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Tubal disturbances often contribute to infertility. Conventional hysterosalpingography (HSG) is considered as standard in the assessment of the patency of the fallopian tubes, but requires ionizing radiation and is restricted to the imaging of endoluminal structures. Purpose: To evaluate dynamic magnetic resonance-HSG (dMR-HSG) in the diagnostic work-up in patients with infertility. Material and Methods: Thirty-seven consecutive infertile women underwent dMR-HSG: 20 ml of gadolinium-polyvidone solution (18.4 mM Dotarem 1:20 with polyvidone) were injected intracervically through a 5-Charriere balloon catheter while acquiring five consecutive flash-3D T1-weighted MR sequences with fat saturation. Two experienced readers assessed image quality and anatomic-pathologic correlations prospectively. The relevance of results was evaluated in the clinical context of each patient. Patient comfort was evaluated with a standardized questionnaire. Results: dMR-HSG was successfully completed in 33/37 patient with an average study time of 45 min. In 4 of 37 patients the catheter became dislodged during the examination, resulting in two complete diagnostic failures. Failure in another two patients was due to preliminary termination because of excessive pain and discomfort during the application of the contrast solution. The uterine cavity was completely visualized and bilateral fallopian tube patency was confirmed by dMR-HSG in 27 of 33 patients. Bilateral tubal occlusion was diagnosed in one of the remaining six patients and was confirmed by laparoscopy. Successful selective tubal catheterization was performed in one additional patient with unilateral and one patient with bilateral fallopian tube occlusion. In three cases, the catheter became dislocated at the end of the examination without demonstration of tubal patency. Since all three patients refused diagnostic laparoscopy and conventional HSG, possible bilateral occlusions of the fallopian tubes could not be

  13. Feasibility of dynamic MR-hysterosalpingography for the diagnostic work-up of infertile women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, Leopold; Gluecker, Thomas; Steinbrich, Wolfgang; Pegios, Wassilios (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital Basel (Switzerland)), e-mail: winterl@uhbs.ch; Steimann, Sabine; De Geyter, Christian (Women' s Hospital, Univ. Hospital Basel (Switzerland)); Froehlich, Johannes M. (Guerbet AG, Zuerich (Switzerland))

    2010-07-15

    Background: Tubal disturbances often contribute to infertility. Conventional hysterosalpingography (HSG) is considered as standard in the assessment of the patency of the fallopian tubes, but requires ionizing radiation and is restricted to the imaging of endoluminal structures. Purpose: To evaluate dynamic magnetic resonance-HSG (dMR-HSG) in the diagnostic work-up in patients with infertility. Material and Methods: Thirty-seven consecutive infertile women underwent dMR-HSG: 20 ml of gadolinium-polyvidone solution (18.4 mM Dotarem 1:20 with polyvidone) were injected intracervically through a 5-Charriere balloon catheter while acquiring five consecutive flash-3D T1-weighted MR sequences with fat saturation. Two experienced readers assessed image quality and anatomic-pathologic correlations prospectively. The relevance of results was evaluated in the clinical context of each patient. Patient comfort was evaluated with a standardized questionnaire. Results: dMR-HSG was successfully completed in 33/37 patient with an average study time of 45 min. In 4 of 37 patients the catheter became dislodged during the examination, resulting in two complete diagnostic failures. Failure in another two patients was due to preliminary termination because of excessive pain and discomfort during the application of the contrast solution. The uterine cavity was completely visualized and bilateral fallopian tube patency was confirmed by dMR-HSG in 27 of 33 patients. Bilateral tubal occlusion was diagnosed in one of the remaining six patients and was confirmed by laparoscopy. Successful selective tubal catheterization was performed in one additional patient with unilateral and one patient with bilateral fallopian tube occlusion. In three cases, the catheter became dislocated at the end of the examination without demonstration of tubal patency. Since all three patients refused diagnostic laparoscopy and conventional HSG, possible bilateral occlusions of the fallopian tubes could not be

  14. The status of depression and anxiety in infertile Turkish couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mert Kazandi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is a major psychosocial crisis as well as being a medical problem. The factors that predict psychosocial consequences of infertility may vary in different gender and different infertile populations.Objective: The primary purpose of this study was to investigate whether Turkish infertile couples had higher levels of depression and anxiety when compared to non-infertile couples. Our secondary aim was to evaluate the relationship between sociodemographic characteristics and levels of depression and anxiety in Turkish infertile couples.Materials and Methods: We designed a descriptive cross sectional study of 248 infertile women and 96 infertile men with no psychiatric disturbance and 51 women and 40 men who have children to evaluate the depression and anxiety levels between infertile couples and fertile couples. A gynecologist evaluated participants for demographic data and then they were visited by a psychologist to perform questionnaire scales which were The Beck Depression Inventory and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for the evaluation of the degree of psychopathology. The data were statistically analyzed, with p<0.05 as the level of statistical significance.Results: We observed significant differences between the infertile couples and fertile couples with respect to state and trait anxiety (p<0.0001 while no difference was regarding with depression, both of women and men. Anxiety and depression were observed as independent from gender when infertile women and men were compared (p=0.213.Conclusion: We believed that the psychological management at infertile couples must be individualized with cultural, religious, and class related aspects.

  15. Hormonal evaluation of the infertile male: has it evolved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Ernest M; Chudnovsky, Aleksander; Niederberger, Craig S

    2008-05-01

    An endocrinologic evaluation of patients who have male-factor infertility has clearly evolved and leads to specific diagnoses and treatment strategies in a large population of infertile men. A well-considered endocrine evaluation is especially essential with the ever-growing popularity of assisted reproductive techniques and continued refinements with intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

  16. The prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection among infertile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common cause of sexually transmitted diseases that is not of viral origin and there is accumulating evidence of a significant role played by this pathogen in causing male factor infertility. This study thus aimed to determine the prevalence of C. trachomatis among infertile males and to ...

  17. Association of the leukemia inhibitory factor gene mutation and the antiphospholipid antibodies in the peripheral blood of infertile women

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Králíčková, M.; Ulčová-Gallová, Z.; Šíma, R.; Vaněček, T.; Šíma, Petr; Křižan, Jiří; Suchá, J.; Uher, P.; Hes, O.; Novotný, Z.; Rokyta, Z.; Větvička, E.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 5 (2007), s. 543-548 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/05/0078 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : leukemia inhibitory faktor * lif gene mutation * antiphospholipid antibodies Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.989, year: 2007

  18. The Evaluation of the Relationship Between Obesity and Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikret Erdemir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available   Infertility, defined as the inability to conceive after one year of unprotected intercourse, affects approximately 15% of couples. Male factor infertility is the sole cause of infertility in approximately 20% of infertile couples, with an additional 30% to 40% secondary to both male and female factors. Thus, male factor infertility is present in approximately half of all infertile couples. Known etiologies of male infertility include cryptorchidism, testicular torsion or trauma, varicocele, seminal tract infections, anti-sperm antibodies, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, gonadal dysgenesis, and obstruction of the reproductive channels. Recently in some studies, it has been reported that increased body mass index negatively affect on male fertility or semen parameters.Overweight and obesity have become a major public health concern worldwide. The prevalence of male obesity or overweight in the united states was reported to be 71%. This ratio changes between 10% and 60% in the world. Negative effects of obesity on male fertility are postulated to occur through several mechanisms. Obese men have been shown to exhibit higher levels of circulating estradiol. Several studies reveal a direct correlation between a rise in BMI and a decline in both free and total blood testosterone levels. In addition, obesity may cause to oxidative stress. All these changes may affect to semen parameters in obese cases. However, the relationship between male obesity and fertility parameters has not been well established. The aim of this review is to evaluate the relationship between the obesity and male infertility.

  19. Perceptions of Infertility - A Survey of Urban Residents in Port Harcourt

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Societal influence on infertile couples usually stems from what is known or perceived about the causes, risk factors and treatment of infertility in the population. This study aimed to investigate perceptions of infertility among urban residents of Port Harcourt. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, ...

  20. Infertility: Medical and Social Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This report illustrates a range of options for Congressional action in nine principal areas of public policy related to infertility: (1) collecting data on reproductive health; (2) preventing infertility; (3) information to inform and protect consumers; (4) providing access to infertility services; (5) reproductive health of veterans; (6) transfer…

  1. Relationship between blood groups and male infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, I.; Naeem, M.; Samad, A.; Nasir, A.; Aman, Z.; Ahmed, S.; Manan, F.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Blood is man's complete and unchangeable identity. The ABO and Rh groups are recognised as major and clinically significant blood groups. Blood group antigens are not only important in relation to blood transfusion and organ transplantation, but also have been utilised in genetic research, anthropology and tracing ancestral relation of humans. The objective the present study is to examine the blood group antigens in infertile men for assessing the relationship to male infertility and to know the frequency of various blood groups among infertile males in our population. Method: A total of 1,521 patients along with 460 proven fathers as controls were recruited for the present study from both rural and urban areas of Pakistan and referred to Department of Reproductive Physiology/Health, Public Health Divisions, NIH, Islamabad, during 2002 to 2006. Blood grouping (ABO) and Rhesus factors (Rh) was done by the antigen antibody agglutination test. Results: Overall distribution of blood groups in the studied population of 1,521 subjects was 35.50%, 28.27%, 26.89% and 9.34% for blood groups O, B, A and AB respectively. The ratio of control to patient was 1:3.3. Conclusions: The present preliminary study revealed that in our population the prevalence of male infertility in blood group O is invariably higher than in all other ABO blood groups, showing a strong relationship between blood group O and male infertility. (author)

  2. Female infertility in India: Causes, treatment and impairment of fertility in selected districts with high prevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shraboni Patra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the ‘universal access to sexual and reproductive health care’ has received priority in the SDG‐3, the rural women experiencing infertility problem in India are unable to access and afford quality reproductive health care. The study investigates the present infertility situation, with a focus on risk factors, treatment seeking for infertility, and impact of infertility on fertility in India and its districts with high infertility prevalence. The DLHS‐3 data is used. Top fifteen districts with high infertility prevalence are selected for analysis. Simple bivariate and multivariate techniques are applied. In India, the prevalence of ever‐experienced primary, secondary, and current infertility is 6.6%, 2.1% and 4.6% respectively, whereas, in the selected districts, the estimates for the same indicators are 15%, 3.1%, and 5% respectively. A higher prevalence of reported symptoms of RTIs/STIs and menstrual problems is observed among women who ever had infertility. Treatment seeking for infertility is low in Korba and Koryia. The MCEB is less among women who ever had experienced infertility. The prevalence of ever‐experienced infertility and current infertility is considerably higher among women from socio‐economically disadvantaged sections. Awareness of RTIs, STIs, and menstrual problems, and preventive care can reduce infertility among rural women.

  3. Incidence and prevalence of sexual dysfunction in infertile females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohina S. Aggarwal

    2013-09-01

    Results: In our study 170 (63.67% patients in the infertile group (n = 267 had female sexual dysfunction as compared to108 (46.35% in the fertile group (n = 233, which is statistically significant (P 0.0001. Most common dysfunction observed was arousal (70% in infertile patients. Common dysfunctions observed in fertile females were desire (40% and orgasm (40%. FSD was significantly higher in infertile females of the 31–37 years age group (P 0.002, while more common in fertile females of >42 years of age (P < 0.0001. Higher female sexual dysfunction was observed in illiterate infertile females (P 0.039. Among the pathological factors endometriosis was the statistically significant factor associated with female sexual dysfunction and infertility (P < 0.0001. No significant correlation in duration of infertility or type of infertility was observed with female sexual dysfunction. Female sexual dysfunction as the cause or the effect should be ascertained in infertility.

  4. Physical and psychological violence against infertile women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Moghadam

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the prevalence of physical and psychological violence against women with female factor infertility.Materials and methods: A total of 400 women with primary infertility attending the Vali-e-asr Reproductive Health Research Center in Tehran, Iran, were interviewed using the conflict tactics Scales (CTS2 questionnaire to investigate their experiences of physical and psychological violence.Results: The prevalence of psychological violence was 135 (33.8%, followed by physical 56 (14%. All women reported their husbands to be the perpetrators.Conclusion: Clinicians should identify the abused women and provide them with medical care and supportive counseling.

  5. Are repeated assisted reproductive technology treatments and an unsuccessful outcome risk factors for unipolar depression in infertile women?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejbaek, Camilla S; Pinborg, Anja; Hageman, Ida

    2015-01-01

    of unipolar depression compared with women with a live birth after ART treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The Danish National ART-Couple (DANAC) Cohort is a national register-based cohort study that consists of women who received ART treatment from 1 January 1994 to 30 September 2009, in Denmark (n = 41 050......INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have shown conflicting results whether unsuccessful medically assisted reproduction is a risk factor for depression among women. This study therefore investigated if women with no live birth after assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment had a higher risk......). Information on unipolar depression was obtained from the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register. The analyses were conducted in Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: During the 308 494 person-years of follow up, 552 women were diagnosed with unipolar depression. A Cox proportional hazards model showed...

  6. Causes of Male Infertility

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos State Infertility Insurance Laws Protect Your Fertility Campaign Find a Health Professional ABOUT ASRM Vision of ASRM ASRM's Mission Statement Site Endowment ASRM Board of Directors ASRM Office of Public Affiars Social Media Contact Us Donate ASRM Cookie Policy Donate ASRM ...

  7. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos State Infertility Insurance Laws Protect Your Fertility Campaign Find a Health Professional ABOUT ASRM Vision of ASRM ASRM's Mission Statement Site Endowment ASRM Board of Directors ASRM Office of Public Affiars Social Media Contact Us Donate ASRM Cookie Policy Donate ASRM ...

  8. Fertility and Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgebin-Crist, Marie-Claire; And Others

    In this report, emphasis is placed on major research developments in the reproductive sciences, their impact on the health of individuals as well as on that of society, and on current trends that may provide new opportunities for future research in fertility and infertility. In the first section, major developments in the reproductive sciences are…

  9. Parenting after Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshansky, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Becoming a parent after experiencing infertility can pose unique challenges to early parenthood. Parents may struggle with the normal anxiety and fatigue, as well as possible depression, that accompany new parenthood, but with added guilt or shame because of how much they wanted a child and how hard they worked to become parents. These feelings…

  10. A comparative study of hysterosalpingography and endoscopy/laparotomy in infertile patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, D.T.; Rasmussen, F.; Justesen, P.

    1987-01-01

    A comparison of hysterosalpingography (HSG), using Lipiodol ultrafluid as contrast medium, with endoscopy/laparotomy in the evaluation of the tubal function in 124 infertile women is presented. There was agreement between the results of both methods in 73.4% of the patients. The false-negative rate was 2.4% and the false-positive rate was 8.9%. Complications in the form of intravasation were seen in three patients but none of them had any symptoms. The conception rate was 35% in the subgroup of patients with normal HSG. The authors recommended the continuous use of HSG in the overall evaluation of infertile patients. It is recommended to use oil-soluble contrast media because of its high diagnostic accuracy, low frequency of complications and its therapeutic advantages. (orig.)

  11. Sexual function in women from infertile couples and in women seeking surgical sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschel, Heitor; Alberton, Daniele Lima; Sawdy, Robert John; Capp, Edison; Goldim, José Roberto; Passos, Eduardo Pandolfi

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare sexual function between women of infertile couples (AR) and women seeking tubal ligation (TL). Women who attended Setor de Infertilidade do Serviço de Ginecologia e Obstetrícia do Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre (HCPA) or the Serviço de Orientação e Planejamento Familiar (SERPLAN) completed the Female Sexual Function Index, a questionnaire about sexual activity in the last 4 weeks. Scored data were collected on six different domains: desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, and discomfort/pain. The greatest positive correlation in the TL group was between orgasm and sexual satisfaction (0.798), and in group AR between desire and arousal (0.627). Infertile women and fertile women who want to undergo surgical sterilization have similar sexual satisfaction scores.

  12. Association between the JC polyomavirus infection and male infertility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manola Comar

    Full Text Available In recent years the incidence of male infertility has increased. Many risk factors have been taken into consideration, including viral infections. Investigations into viral agents and male infertility have mainly been focused on human papillomaviruses, while no reports have been published on polyomaviruses and male infertility. The aim of this study was to verify whether JC virus and BK virus are associated with male infertility. Matched semen and urine samples from 106 infertile males and 100 fertile males, as controls, were analyzed. Specific PCR analyses were carried out to detect and quantify large T (Tag coding sequences of JCV and BKV. DNA sequencing, carried out in Tag JCV-positive samples, was addressed to viral protein 1 (VP1 coding sequences. The prevalence of JCV Tag sequences in semen and urine samples from infertile males was 34% (72/212, whereas the BKV prevalence was 0.94% (2/212. Specifically, JCV Tag sequences were detected in 24.5% (26/106 of semen and 43.4% (46/106 of urine samples from infertile men. In semen and urine samples from controls the prevalence was 11% and 28%, respectively. A statistically significant difference (p<0.05 in JCV prevalence was disclosed in semen and urine samples of cases vs. controls. A higher JC viral DNA load was detected in samples from infertile males than in controls. In samples from infertile males the JC virus type 2 strain, subtype 2b, was more prevalent than ubiquitous type 1. JCV type 2 strain infection has been found to be associated with male infertility. These data suggest that the JC virus should be taken into consideration as an infectious agent which is responsible for male infertility.

  13. Assessment of uterine, subendometrial blood flows and endometrial gland vascular endothelial growth factor (EG-VEGF in women with unexplained infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. El-Zenneni

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Subendometrial, but not the uterine, blood flow and the EG-VEGF score seem to be significantly lower during the mid-luteal phase in women with unexplained infertility. This may suggest significantly poorer angiogenesis during the assumed peri-implantation period.

  14. Hysteroscopic tubal sterilization: a systematic review of the Essure system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurskainen, Ritva; Hovi, Sirpa-Liisa; Gissler, Mika

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To update the evidence of the efficacy and safety of the Essure system. Female sterilization has undergone changes in the last decade. Besides laparoscopic tubal occlusion, the Essure system is now a viable option, with about 200,000 women sterilized using this method. DESIGN: The review...... in ambulatory settings. However, sterilization is not immediate and women must use additional contraception for 3 months until permanent tubal occlusion is verified by transvaginal ultrasound, hysterosalpingosonography, hysterosalpingography, or pelvic radiography. The evidence on efficacy and safety is mainly...... sterilization, but more information on the total cost is needed. CONCLUSION(S): The Essure system appears to be safe, permanent, irreversible, and a less invasive method of contraception compared with laparoscopic sterilization. Copyright (c) 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published...

  15. Hysteroscopic tubal sterilization: a health economic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Hysteroscopic sterilization is a minimally invasive alternative to laparoscopic tubal ligation for women who want permanent contraception. In contrast to the laparoscopic technique, a hysteroscope is used to pass permanent microinserts through the cervix and place them in the fallopian tubes. This procedure does not require local or general anesthesia and can be performed in an office setting. The objective of this analysis was to determine, based on published literature, the cost-effectiveness of hysteroscopic tubal sterilization (HS) compared with laparoscopic tubal ligation (LS) for permanent female sterilization. A systematic literature search was conducted for studies published between January 1, 2008, and December 11, 2012. Potentially relevant studies were identified based on the title and abstract. Cost-utility analyses (studies that report outcomes in terms of costs and quality-adjusted life-years) were prioritized for inclusion. When not available, cost-effectiveness, cost-benefit, and cost-consequence analyses were considered. Costing studies were considered in the absence of all other analyses. A total of 33 abstracts were identified. Three cost analyses were included. A retrospective chart review from Canada found that HS was $111 less costly than LS; a prospective activity-based cost management study from Italy reported that it was €337 less costly than LS; and the results of an American decision model showed that HS was $1,178 less costly than LS. All studies had limited applicability to the Ontario health care system due to differences in setting, resource use, and costs. Three cost analyses found that, although the HS procedure was more expensive due to the cost of the microinserts, HS was less costly than LS overall due to the shorter recovery time required. Hysteroscopic sterilization is a minimally invasive alternative to conventional tubal ligation for women who want a permanent method of contraception. Both approaches involve closing off the

  16. Implications of immune dysfunction on endometriosis associated infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jessica E; Ahn, Soo Hyun; Monsanto, Stephany P; Khalaj, Kasra; Koti, Madhuri; Tayade, Chandrakant

    2017-01-24

    Endometriosis is a complex, inflammatory disease that affects 6-10% of reproductive-aged women. Almost half of the women with endometriosis experience infertility. Despite the excessive prevalence, the pathogenesis of endometriosis and its associated infertility is unknown and a cure is not available. While many theories have been suggested to link endometriosis and infertility, a consensus among investigators has not emerged. In this extensive review of the literature as well as research from our laboratory, we provide potential insights into the role of immune dysfunction in endometriosis associated infertility. We discuss the implication of the peritoneal inflammatory microenvironment on various factors that contribute to infertility such as hormonal imbalance, oxidative stress and how these could further lead to poor oocyte, sperm and embryo quality, impaired receptivity of the endometrium and implantation failure.

  17. Expression of Stem Cell Markers in Preinvasive Tubal Lesions of Ovarian Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chene, G; Ouellet, V; Rahimi, K; Barres, V; Meunier, L; De Ladurantaye, M; Provencher, D; Mes-Masson, A M

    2015-01-01

    In order to better understand the ovarian serous carcinogenic process with tubal origin, we investigated the expression of stem cell markers in premalignant tubal lesions (serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma or STIC). We found an increased stem cell marker density in the normal fallopian tube followed by a high CD117 and a low ALDH and CD44 expression in STICs raising the question of the role of the stem cell markers in the serous carcinogenic process.

  18. Expression of Stem Cell Markers in Preinvasive Tubal Lesions of Ovarian Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chene

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to better understand the ovarian serous carcinogenic process with tubal origin, we investigated the expression of stem cell markers in premalignant tubal lesions (serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma or STIC. We found an increased stem cell marker density in the normal fallopian tube followed by a high CD117 and a low ALDH and CD44 expression in STICs raising the question of the role of the stem cell markers in the serous carcinogenic process.

  19. Multimodality imaging of the Essure tubal occlusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, W.L.; Beitia, L.

    2012-01-01

    The Essure device is a permanent birth-control device, which is gaining popularity. The micro-inserts are composed of metallic elements that can be seen on radiography, computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. Knowledge of the normal location and appearance of the Essure device will ensure appropriate patient care. The purpose of this review is to describe the Essure tubal occlusion device and illustrate its normal and abnormal appearance using various imaging methods.

  20. Changing trends in reproductive/lifestyle factors in UK women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Glazer, Clara; Burnell, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    of the UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening (UKCTOCS). DESIGN: Prospective birth cohort analysis. SETTING: Population cohort invited between 2001 and 2005 from age-sex registers of 27 Primary Care Trusts in England, Wales and Northern Ireland and recruited through 13 National Health Service......-reported data on reproductive factors provided at recruitment were explored using tabular and graphical summaries to examine for differences between the birth cohorts. OUTCOME MEASURES: Trends in mean age at menarche and menopause, use of oral contraceptives, change in family size, infertility treatments, tubal...... to reflect the reproductive history of the UK female postmenopausal population of similar age. Since these are risk factors for hormone-related cancers, these trends are important in understanding the changing incidence of these cancers. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: International Standard Randomised Controlled...

  1. Is There a Relationship between Ovarian Epithelial Dysplasia and Infertility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautier Chene

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Ovarian epithelial dysplasia was initially described in material from prophylactic oophorectomies performed in patients at genetic risk of ovarian cancer. Similar histopathological abnormalities have been revealed after ovulation stimulation. Since infertility is also a risk factor for ovarian neoplasia, the aim of this study was to study the relationship between infertility and ovarian dysplasia. Methods. We blindly reviewed 127 histopathological slides of adnexectomies or ovarian cystectomies according to three groups—an exposed group to ovulation induction (n = 30, an infertile group without stimulation (n = 35, and a spontaneously fertile control group (n = 62—in order to design an eleven histopathological criteria scoring system. Results. The ovarian dysplasia score was significantly higher in exposed group whereas dysplasia score was low in infertile and control groups (resp., 8.21 in exposed group, 3.69 for infertile patients, and 3.62 for the controls. In the subgroup with refractory infertility there was a trend towards a more severe dysplasia score (8.53 in ovulation induction group and 5.1 in infertile group. Conclusion. These results raise questions as to the responsibility of drugs used to induce ovulation and/or infertility itself in the genesis of ovarian epithelial dysplasia.

  2. Positive Effect of Acupuncture and Cupping in Infertility Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Xiang; Yang, Yang; Song, Yue; Ma, Liang-Xiao

    2018-04-01

    Background: Infertility is clinically defined as the failure to conceive after 12 months of unprotected sexual intercourse. Organic disorders and lifestyle factors are highly associated with infertility. Generally, acupuncture and its related methods can be applied for treating infertility, according to the theory of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Successful cases of acupuncture-treated infertility without concomitant use of any medication are rare. This article presents a case of an infertile woman having a favorable response to acupuncture treatment. Case: A 39-year-old Mexican woman presented with infertility following right-side fallopian-tube obstruction. She had no significant physical feelings of discomfort apart from work-related stress. Her syndrome was first diagnosed as Deficiency of Spleen and Kidney Qi, accompanied by obstruction of channels due to accumulation of Dampness. Acupuncture, accompanied by cupping therapy, was primarily practiced for this patient. Results: After 28 treatment sessions, she was finally able to conceive. Conclusions: Acupuncture could help treat infertility. Further large-scale, randomized clinical trials are needed to verify the efficacy of acupuncture for treating female infertility.

  3. New insights into the genetic basis of infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh T

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Thejaswini Venkatesh,1 Padmanaban S Suresh,2 Rie Tsutsumi3 1Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, National Centre for Biological Sciences, Bangalore, 2Centre for Biomedical Research, VIT University, Vellore, India; 3University of Tokushima, Institute of Health Bioscience, Department of Public Health and Nutrition, Tokushima, Japan Abstract: Infertility is a disease of the reproductive system characterized by inability to achieve pregnancy after 12 or more months of regular unprotected sexual intercourse. A variety of factors, including ovulation defects, spermatogenic failure, parental age, obesity, and infections have been linked with infertility, in addition to specific karyotypes and genotypes. The study of genes associated with infertility in rodent models has expanded the field of translational genetics in identifying the underlying cause of human infertility problems. Many intriguing aspects of the molecular basis of infertility in humans remain poorly understood; however, application of genetic knowledge in this field looks promising. The growing literature on the genetics of human infertility disorders deserves attention and a critical concise summary is required. This paper provides information obtained from a systematic analysis of the literature related to current research into the genetics of infertility affecting both sexes. Keywords: infertility, genetics, polycystic ovary syndrome, premature ovarian failure, spermatogenic failure, cystic fibrosis

  4. Frequency of depression among fertile and infertile women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qayyum, M.; Ahmed, S.; Kanwal, S.; Ishfaq, Y.; Hassan, H.; Waheed, N.

    2014-01-01

    To compare the frequency of depression among fertile and infertile women reporting in CMH Abbottabad. Study Design: A case control study. Place and Duration of Study: This study was conducted in Combined Military Hospital Abbottabad, over a period of six months from January 2013 to June 2013. Patients and Methods: The inclusion criteria were all those patients who were married. All the cases were selected from the women reporting in the obstetrics and gynecology department of CMH Abbottabad for investigation and treatment of infertility. A total of 200 patients, 100 fertile and 100 infertile women were included. Patients were given questionnaire form with their consent for research. Beck depression inventory (BDI) was used to assess depression among fertile and infertile women. Other factors such as age, educational level, and duration of infertility, pressure from family members, miscarriages, and support from husband were studied. Results: Depression was significantly higher in infertile women as compared to fertile women i.e. 95% vs. 63% (p < 0.001). It was higher among women with more than 1 year of duration of marriage as compared to those with infertility of one year duration or less. Conclusion: Infertility is associated with depression. (author)

  5. Treatment of tubal pregnancy by uterine artery perfusion and embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Caifang; Zou Jianwei; Zhao Hui; Jin Yonghai; Zhu Xiaoli; Liu Yizhi; He Qi; Shen Zhongji

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of the treatment for tubal pregnancy by interventional technique of transuterine arterial catheterization perfusion and embolization. Methods: Using modified Seldinger technique, 42 cases of tubal pregnancy received super-selective angiography of uterine artery, followed by perfusion of 50-100 mg methotrexate (MTX) through the catheter and embolization of uterine artery with gelatin sponge. Before and after the procedure, changes of clinical symptoms, physical signs, value of β-hCG and size of pregnancy cyst of patients were studied. Concentrations of MTX in peripheral blood were studied at 0.5, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48 hours after the procedure. Results: 38 out of 42 cases were cured with successful rate of 90.5%(38/42). The average time of β-hCG decreasing to normal was 8.26 ± 2.04 days. The concentration of MTX in peripheral blood with 50 mg or 75 mg dosage could not be detected at 36 hours after the procedure but could be detected as 0.01 μmol/L at 48 hours after the procedure with a dosage of 100 mg. Conclusions: It is simple, safe and efficient in performing trans-uterine artery chemo-embolization for therapy of fallopian tubal pregnancy, especially for those who complicated with manipules bleeding and also as the first choice for prevention of high risk massive hemorrhage. (authors)

  6. Laparoscopic tubal reanastomosis versus in vitro fertilization: cost-based decision analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshfeld-Cytron, Jennifer; Winter, Jordan

    2013-07-01

    Regret after tubal ligation continues to be a problem. After tubal ligation, couples have the option of tubal surgery or in vitro fertilization (IVF). Using decision analysis techniques, we compared cost-effectiveness of tubal reanastomosis by tubal type vs tubal surgery or in vitro fertilization (IVF) for 3 separate age groups of women: 40 years of age. Tubal techniques was divided into type A, those with more favorable prognosis because of the likelihood of having a more significant length tube at time of reanastomosis and type B, those with a worse prognosis of success. We incorporated delivery costs to address the impact of high order multiples in IVF. Data were extracted by studies available in the literature. All costs were adjusted to 2012 US dollars. One-way and 2-way sensitivity analyses were performed. The laparoscopic reanastomosis of type A dominated the other groups, because it was more effective and less costly then type B and IVF. However, when women were >40 years old with a history of type B, IVF was favored when its costs were at the lower limit. The most cost-effective choice for a woman desiring pregnancy after tubal ligation is laparoscopic reanastomosis after a prior clip or ring tubal ligation for women ≤40 years old. It is also the most cost-effective for the oldest cohort, assuming IVF costs are greater than $4500. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Selective fallopian tube catheterisation in female infertility: clinical results and absorbed radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, K.; Ishiguchi, T.; Maekoshi, H.; Ando, Y.; Tsuzaka, M.; Tamiya, T.; Suganuma, N.; Ishigaki, T.

    1996-01-01

    Clinical results of fluoroscopic fallopian tube catheterisation and absorbed radiation doses during the procedure were evaluated in 30 infertility patients with unilateral or bilateral tubal obstruction documented on hysterosalpingography. The staged technique consisted of contrast injection through an intrauterine catheter with a vacuum cup device, ostial salpingography with the wedged catheter, and selective salpingography with a coaxial microcatheter. Of 45 fallopian tubes examined, 35 (78 %) were demonstrated by the procedure, and at least one tube was newly demonstrated in 26 patients (87 %). Six of these patients conceived spontaneously in the follow-up period of 1-11 months. Four pregnancies were intrauterine and 2 were ectopic. This technique provided accurate and detailed information in the diagnosis and treatment of tubal obstruction in infertility patients. The absorbed radiation dose to the ovary in the average standardised procedure was estimated to be 0.9 cGy. Further improvement in the X-ray equipment and technique is required to reduce the radiation dose. (orig.). With 3 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Socio-Demographic Correlates of Women's Infertility and Treatment Seeking Behavior in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sanjit; Gupta, Pallavi

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is an emergent issue in India. Until recently, very few studies have understood the patterns and consequences of infertility in India. Family planning programs in India also viewed exclusively the patterns and determinants of overfertility rather than infertility. Furthermore, there is the lack of information about treatment seeking behavior of infertile couples. Therefore, this paper aimed to examine the extent of infertility and treatment seeking behavior among infertile women in India. An attempt was also made to evaluate the effects of socio-demographic factors on treatment seeking behavior. The study used the data from the District Level Household and Facility Survey carried out in India during 2007-08. Several statistical techniques such as chi-square test, proportional hazard model and binary logistic regression model were used for the analysis. Approximately, 8% of currently married women suffered from infertility in India and most of them were secondary infertile (5.8%). Within India, women's infertility rate was the highest in west Bengal (13.9 percent) and the lowest in Meghalaya (2.5 percent). About 80% of infertile women sought treatment but a substantial proportion (33%) received non-allopathic and traditional treatment due to expensive modern treatment and lack of awareness. In the context of policy response, it can be said that there is a need to improve the existing services and quality of care for infertile women. Treatment for infertility should be integrated into the larger reproductive health packages.

  9. Socio-Demographic Correlates of Women’s Infertility and Treatment Seeking Behavior in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sanjit; Gupta, Pallavi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infertility is an emergent issue in India. Until recently, very few studies have understood the patterns and consequences of infertility in India. Family planning programs in India also viewed exclusively the patterns and determinants of overfertility rather than infertility. Furthermore, there is the lack of information about treatment seeking behavior of infertile couples. Therefore, this paper aimed to examine the extent of infertility and treatment seeking behavior among infertile women in India. An attempt was also made to evaluate the effects of socio-demographic factors on treatment seeking behavior. Methods: The study used the data from the District Level Household and Facility Survey carried out in India during 2007–08. Several statistical techniques such as chi-square test, proportional hazard model and binary logistic regression model were used for the analysis. Results: Approximately, 8% of currently married women suffered from infertility in India and most of them were secondary infertile (5.8%). Within India, women’s infertility rate was the highest in west Bengal (13.9 percent) and the lowest in Meghalaya (2.5 percent). About 80% of infertile women sought treatment but a substantial proportion (33%) received non-allopathic and traditional treatment due to expensive modern treatment and lack of awareness. Conclusion: In the context of policy response, it can be said that there is a need to improve the existing services and quality of care for infertile women. Treatment for infertility should be integrated into the larger reproductive health packages. PMID:27141468

  10. INFERTILITY IN A COMMUNITY AND CLINIC-BASED SAMPLE OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2006-01-01

    Jan 1, 2006 ... to investigate female, male, and couple factors infertility in both a .... analysis. Untortunately, the technicians in the laboratory were not familiar with this ... associated with the dependent variable at the 0.20 level of significance.

  11. Emotional Burden Of Infertility: A Controlled Study Of Women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... factors and infertility-related stress among a sample of Nigerian women. The subscales of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and a schedule detailing ... The rates of significant anxiety symptoms (39.4%) and depressive symptoms ...

  12. Psychological determinants of life satisfaction in women undergoing infertility treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Anna Dembińska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Infertility treatment is a long-term process, spread out over months, or even years, and carries no guarantee of success. It generates an incessant state of uncertainty which becomes a chronic state of psychological discomfort. Each stage of treatment may become a source of more trouble. Women deciding to undergo infertility treatment are exposed to many negative feelings concerning different aspects of their life. Participants and procedure The present study was an attempt to understand psychological determinants of life satisfaction in women undergoing infertility treatment. The study group included 470 women treated for infertility. Results Patients perceiving more social support in general, as well as more of the support types used in the study, i.e. emotional, instrumental, informational and institutional support, and support from family and friends, have better self-esteem, higher acceptance of their infertility, higher satisfaction with life, higher hope as an emotional state, and lower levels of anxiety and depression. Three negative emotional states, i.e. anxiety, depression and irritation, are predictors influencing (lowering life satisfaction of women struggling with infertility. The strongest of these predictors is depression, which is also a factor lowering the acceptance of one’s own infertility. The conducted analyses revealed that predictors influencing the life satisfaction of patients treated for infertility are self-esteem and acceptance of one’s own infertility (apart from the aforementioned emotional state – anxiety, depression, irritation. It was found that the higher the self-esteem and acceptance of one’s own infertility, the higher was the satisfaction with life. Conclusions Knowledge of these determinants is extremely valuable for medical personnel conducting treatments, because, according to many studies, the psychological state of women suffering from procreation problems is connected not only with

  13. Infertility Evaluation and Treatment among Women in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Lawrence M.; Craig, Benjamin M.; Plosker, Shayne M.; Reed, Damon R.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the characteristics of women seeking infertility evaluation and treatment. Design Cross-sectional survey based on in-person interviews, followed by two-step hurdle analysis. Participants 4,558 married or cohabitating women ages 25–44 Setting U.S. household population of women based on the 2006–2010 National Survey of Family Growth Intervention None Main Outcome Measure(s) Likelihood of seeking preliminary infertility evaluation. Likelihood of seeking infertility treatment once evaluated. Treatment type provided. Results 623 women (13.7%) reported seeking infertility evaluation, of which 328 reported undergoing subsequent infertility treatment. Age at marriage, marital status, education, health insurance status, race/ethnicity, and religion were associated with the likelihood of seeking infertility evaluation. For example, the predicted probability that a non-White woman who married at 25 will seek evaluation was 12%. This probability increased to 34% for White women with a graduate degree who married at age 30. Among women who are evaluated, income, employment status, and ethnicity correlated strongly with the likelihood of seeking infertility treatment. Infertility drug therapy was the most frequent treatment used. Reproductive surgery and in vitro fertilization (IVF) were used the least. Conclusions The use of infertility services is not random and understanding the socio-demographic factors correlated with use may assist new couples with family planning. Roughly 50% of the women evaluated for infertility progressed to treatment, and only a small proportion were treated with more advanced assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) such as IVF therapy. Future research aimed at improving access to effective healthcare treatments within the boundaries of affordability is warranted. PMID:23849845

  14. Hysteroscopic proximal tubal occlusion versus laparoscopic salpingectomy as a treatment for hydrosalpinges prior to IVF or ICSI: an RCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreyer, K.; Lier, M. C. I.; Emanuel, M. H.; Twisk, J. W. R.; Mol, B. W. J.; Schats, R.; Hompes, P. G. A.; Mijatovic, V.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Does hysteroscopic proximal tubal occlusion by intratubal devices as a treatment for hydrosalpinges result in comparable ongoing pregnancy rates following IVF/ICSI when compared with laparoscopic salpingectomy? SUMMARY ANSWER Hysteroscopic proximal tubal occlusion by intratubal

  15. Ureaplasma Urealyticum in Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L P Deodbar

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available Semen examination with special reference to semen analysis and culture for Ureaplasma urealyticum was carried out in 50 male infertile patients in the age group of 25 to 40 years, attending a private infertility clinic. Isolation of Ureaplasma urealyticum in 14 (28% patients and the abnormalities in count and motility of spermatozoa suggest that ureaplasmas may play a role in human male infertility.

  16. 'Mama and papa nothing': living with infertility among an urban population in Kigali, Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhont, N; van de Wijgert, J; Coene, G; Gasarabwe, A; Temmerman, M

    2011-03-01

    Not being able to procreate has severe social and economic repercussions in resource-poor countries. The purpose of this research was to explore the consequences of female and/or male factor infertility for men and women in Rwanda. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used. Couples presenting with female and/or male factor infertility problems at the infertility clinic of the Kigali University Teaching Hospital (n = 312), and fertile controls who recently delivered (n = 312), were surveyed about domestic violence, current and past relationships and sexual functioning. In addition, five focus group discussions were held with a subsample of survey participants, who were either patients diagnosed with female- or male-factor fertility or their partners. Domestic violence, union dissolutions and sexual dysfunction were reported more frequently in the survey by infertile than fertile couples. The psycho-social consequences suffered by infertile couples in Rwanda are severe and similar to those reported in other resource-poor countries. Although women carry the largest burden of suffering, the negative repercussions of infertility for men, especially at the level of the community, are considerable. Whether the infertility was caused by a female factor or male factor was an important determinant for the type of psycho-social consequences suffered. In Rwanda, as in other resource-poor countries, infertility causes severe suffering. There is an urgent need to recognize infertility as a serious reproductive health problem and to put infertility care on the public health agenda.

  17. Cost-effectiveness of salpingotomy and salpingectomy in women with tubal pregnancy (a randomized controlled trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekmans, FJM; Mol, F.; Mello, N.M.; Strandell, Annika; Strandell, Karin; Jurkovic, Davor; Ross, Jackie; Barnhart, K.; Yalcinkaya, Tamer; Verhoeve, H.R.; Graziosi, G.C.M.; Koks, Carolien A M; Klinte, Ingmar; Hogstrom, Lars; Janssen, Ineke; Kragt, Harry; Hoek, Annemieke; Trimbos-Kemper, Trudy; Willemsen, Wim; Ankum, W.M.; Mol, Benwillem; Wely, M.; van der Veen, Fulco; Hajenius, Petra J

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Is salpingotomy cost effective compared with salpingectomy in women with tubal pregnancy and a healthy contralateral tube? SUMMARY ANSWER: Salpingotomy is not cost effective over salpingectomy as a surgical procedure for tubal pregnancy, as its costs are higher without a better

  18. Female Infertility: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prolactin blood test (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Female Infertility updates ... Serum progesterone Show More Show Less Related Health Topics Assisted Reproductive Technology Infertility Male Infertility National Institutes ...

  19. Male Infertility: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spanish Testicular biopsy (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Male Infertility updates ... analysis Sperm release pathway Testicular biopsy Related Health Topics Assisted Reproductive Technology Female Infertility Infertility National Institutes ...

  20. Use of FloSeal Sealant in the Surgical Management of Tubal Ectopic Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Clapp

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Surgery is sometimes required for the management of tubal ectopic pregnancies. Historically, surgeons used electrosurgery to obtain hemostasis. Topical hemostatic sealants, such as FloSeal, may decrease the reliance on electrosurgery and reduce thermal injury to the tissue. Case. A 33-year-old G1 P0 received methotrexate for a right tubal pregnancy. The patient became symptomatic six days later and underwent a laparoscopic right salpingotomy. After multiple unsuccessful attempts to obtain hemostasis with electrocoagulation, FloSeal was used and hemostasis was obtained. Six weeks later, a hysterosalpingogram (HSG confirmed tubal patency. The patient subsequently had an intrauterine pregnancy. Conclusion. FloSeal helped to achieve hemostasis during a laparoscopic salpingotomy and preserve tubal patency. FloSeal is an effective alternative and adjunct to electrosurgery in the surgical management of tubal pregnancy.

  1. The risk of menstrual abnormalities after tubal sterilization: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AtashKhoii Simin

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tubal sterilization is the method of family planning most commonly used. The existence of the post-tubal-ligation syndrome of menstrual abnormalities has been the subject of debate for decades. Methods In a cross-sectional study, 112 women with the history of Pomeroy type of tubal ligation achieved by minilaparatomy as the case group and 288 women with no previous tubal ligation as the control group were assessed for menstrual abnormalities. Results Menstrual abnormalities were not significantly different between the case and control groups (p = 0.824. The abnormal uterine bleeding frequency differences in two different age groups (30–39 and 40–45 years old were statistically significant (p = 0.0176. Conclusion Tubal sterilization does not cause menstrual irregularities.

  2. Infertility, infertility treatment and twinning: the Danish National Birth Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously observed that an increasing time to pregnancy (TTP) is associated with a reduced frequency of twin deliveries in couples not receiving infertility treatment. By using updated information, we assessed the frequencies of dizygotic (DZ) and monozygotic (MZ) twin...... deliveries as a function of infertility (TTP > 12 months), as well as infertility treatment. METHODS: From the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997-2003), we identified 51 730 fertile couples with TTP 12 months and 5163 infertile couples who conceived after treatment. Information on zygosity, available...... for part of the cohort (1997-2000), was based on standardized questions on the similarities between the twins at the age of 3-5 years. RESULTS: Compared with fertile couples, the frequency of DZ twin deliveries was lower for infertile couples conceiving naturally (odds ratio 0.4, 95% confidence interval 0...

  3. Serous tubal intraepithelial neoplasia: the concept and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meserve, Emily E K; Brouwer, Jan; Crum, Christopher P

    2017-05-01

    In recent years it has become clear that many extra-uterine (pelvic) high-grade serous carcinomas (serous carcinomas) are preceded by a precursor lesion in the distal fallopian tube. Precursors range from small self-limited 'p53 signatures' to expansile serous tubal intraepithelial neoplasms that include both serous tubal epithelial proliferations (or lesions) of uncertain significance and serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas. These precursors can be considered from three perspectives. The first is biologic underpinnings, which are multifactorial, and include the intersection of DNA damage with Tp53 mutations and disturbances in transcriptional regulation that increase with age. The second perspective is the morphologic discovery and classification of intraepithelial neoplasms that are intercepted early in their natural history, either incidentally or in risk-reduction surgeries for germline mutations. For the practicing pathologist, as well as the investigators, a distinction between a primary intraepithelial neoplasm and an intramucosal carcinoma must be made to avoid misinterpreting (or underestimating) the significance of these proliferations. The third perspective is the application of this information to intervention, devising strategies that will actually lower the ovarian cancer death rate by opportunistic salpingectomy, widespread comprehensive genetic screening and early detection. Central to this issue are the questions of (1) whether some STICs are metastatic, (2) whether lower-grade epithelial proliferations can invade prior to evolving into intraepithelial carcinoma, or (3) metastasize and become malignant elsewhere ('precursor escape'). An important caveat is the persistent and unsettling reality that many high-grade serous carcinomas are not associated with an obvious point of initiation in the fallopian tube. The pathologist sits squarely in the midst of all of these issues, and has a pivotal role in managing expectations for stemming the death

  4. Hysteroscopic tubal sterilization: a systematic review of the Essure system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurskainen, Ritva; Hovi, Sirpa-Liisa; Gissler, Mika; Grahn, Riitta; Kukkonen-Harjula, Katriina; Nord-Saari, Merja; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2010-06-01

    To update the evidence of the efficacy and safety of the Essure system. Female sterilization has undergone changes in the last decade. Besides laparoscopic tubal occlusion, the Essure system is now a viable option, with about 200,000 women sterilized using this method. The review is based on the report of the Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research and completed with systematic literature searches up to April 8, 2008. The Managed Uptake of Medical Methods program of the Finnish National Research and Development Center for Health and Welfare. Women over 30 years, who had been sterilized by the Essure method. Hysteroscopic tubal sterilization using Essure system. Efficacy/effectiveness, adverse events, costs. Sterilization by Essure can be performed under local anesthesia or with oral analgesics in ambulatory settings. However, sterilization is not immediate and women must use additional contraception for 3 months until permanent tubal occlusion is verified by transvaginal ultrasound, hysterosalpingosonography, hysterosalpingography, or pelvic radiography. The evidence on efficacy and safety is mainly available from short follow-up case series but shows good efficacy and safety of the Essure system. Only a few small risks are associated with the procedure. Two economic studies, one of which implemented Essure as an in-office procedure, suggest that Essure could be more cost-effective than laparoscopic sterilization, but more information on the total cost is needed. The Essure system appears to be safe, permanent, irreversible, and a less invasive method of contraception compared with laparoscopic sterilization. Copyright (c) 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Menstrual Pattern following Tubal Ligation: A Historical Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahideh Jahanian Sadatmahalleh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tubal ligation (TL is recommended for women who have completed their family planning. The existence of the menstrual disorders following this procedure has been the subject of debate for decades. This study was conducted to identify the relationship between tubal ligation and menstrual disorders. Materials and Methods: A historical cohort study was carried out on 140 women undergoing tubal ligation (TL group and on 140 women using condom as the main contraceptive method (Non-TL group. They aged between 20 and 40 years and were selected from a health care center in Rudsar, Guilan Province, Iran, during 2013-2014. The two groups were comparable in demographic characteristics, obstetrical features and menstrual bleeding pattern using a routine questionnaire. A validated pictorial blood loss assessment chart (PBLAC was also used to measure the menstrual blood loss. Results: Women with TL had more menstrual irregularity than those without TL (24.3 vs. 10%, P=0.002. Women with TL had more polymenorrhea (9.3 vs. 1.4%, P=0.006, hypermenorrhea (12.1 vs. 2.1%, P=0.002, menorrhagia (62.9 vs. 22.1%, P<0.0001 and menometrorrhagia (15.7 vs. 3.6%, P=0.001 than those without TL. There is a significant difference in the PBLAC score between women with and without TL (P<0.0001. According to logistic regression, age odds ratio [(OR=1.08, confidence interval (CI:1.07-1.17, P=0.03], TL (OR=5.95, CI:3.45-10.26, P<0.0001 and cesarean section (OR=2.72, CI:1.49-4.97, P=0.001 were significantly associated with menorrhagia. Conclusion: We found significant differences in menstrual disorders between women with and without TL. Therefore, women should be informed by the health providers regarding the advantages and disadvantages of TL before the procedures.

  6. Effect of Chinese Herbal Medicine on Male Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dan; Coscione, Alberto; Li, Lily; Zeng, Bai-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Male infertility normally refers a male's inability to cause pregnancy in a fertile female partner after 1 year of unprotected intercourse. Male infertility in recent years has been attracting increasing interest from public due to the evidence in decline in semen quality. There are many factors contributing to the male infertility including abnormal spermatogenesis; reproductive tract anomalies or obstruction; inadequate sexual and ejaculatory functions; and impaired sperm motility, imbalance in hormone levels, and immune system dysfunction. Although conventional treatments such as medication, surgical operation, and advanced techniques have helped many male with infertility cause pregnancy in their female partners, effectiveness is not satisfactory and associated with adverse effects. Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) has been used to improve male infertility in China for a very long time and has now been increasingly popular in Western countries for treating infertility. In this chapter we summarized recent development in basic research and clinical studies of CHM in treating male infertility. It has showed that CHM improved sperm motility and quality, increased sperm count and rebalanced inadequate hormone levels, and adjusted immune functions leading to the increased number of fertility. Further, CHM in combination with conventional therapies improved efficacy of conventional treatments. More studies are needed to indentify the new drugs from CHM and ensure safety, efficacy, and consistency of CHM. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Exploring infertile women's experiences about sexual life: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohan, Shahnaz; Ghasemi, Zahra; Beigi, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Infertility is a serious problem in a couple's life that affects their marriage relationships. So, dissatisfaction with sexual function resulting from interpersonal problems is common among these couples. This qualitative study aimed to explore the experiences of infertile women in their sexual life. This is a qualitative study with a phenomenological approach. The participants were 20 infertile women referring to the health care centers and infertility clinics of Isfahan and were selected through purposive sampling. Data were collected by tape recording of deep interviews and analyzed by Colaizzi's method. Analysis of the participants' experiences led to five main concepts: "Disturbed in femininity-body image," "discouragement of sexual relations," "sacrifice of sexual pleasure for the sake of getting pregnant," "confusion in sexual relation during infertility treatment," and "striving to protect their marriage." Findings revealed that infertility affects women's different aspects of sexual life, especially disturbance in femininity-body image and sexual reluctance. With regard to women's willingness to protect their matrimonial life and prevent sexual trauma as a destroying factor for their family's mental health, it seems sexual counseling is necessary for infertile couples.

  8. Observations in infertile African males at an andrology clinic in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornman, M S; Schulenburg, G W; Boomker, D; Chauke, T R; Reif, S

    1994-01-01

    The major cause of infertility among black Africans is traditionally attributed to a female factor and few reports are available on the male factor. This study analyzed the clinical and seminal data obtained from a population of 1726 suspected infertile African men evaluated from July 1985 to June 1991. The possible cause of infertility was judged on the results of first semen analysis. Of these men, 49% were secondarily infertile and 36% had previously received treatment for a urethral discharge. Varicocoeles were present in 183 cases (11%) and 11% had serological evidence of previous exposure to syphilis. Azoospermia was present in 152 patients (9%), 5% had polizoospermia, 45% had hypospermia ( 6 mL) had hyperspermia. In 70% of patients a possible contributing male factor for infertility was found. It would appear that the male factor contributed significantly to infertility, and evaluation of the black African male can therefore be regarded as a rewarding venture.

  9. Multimodality imaging of the Essure tubal occlusion device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, W L; Beitia, L

    2012-12-01

    The Essure device is a permanent birth-control device, which is gaining popularity. The micro-inserts are composed of metallic elements that can be seen on radiography, computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. Knowledge of the normal location and appearance of the Essure device will ensure appropriate patient care. The purpose of this review is to describe the Essure tubal occlusion device and illustrate its normal and abnormal appearance using various imaging methods. Copyright © 2012 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Interventional ovarian tube catheterization in treating tubal ectopic pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Yi; Xiong Linhui; Du Pianqin; Chen Jiabin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility and curative effect of treating tubal pregnancy through the fallopian tube with interventional catheterization decrease the difficulty of the procedure and shorten the consuming time. Methods: Applying the method of interventional catheterization of fallopian tube and injecting 0.5 mg atropine at the cervix beforehand, then 70 mg MTX was administered into the fallopian tube. Results: 113 patients were successfully recovered with health except one without any adversary complication. Conclusions: The interventional fallopian tube catheterization for treating ectopic pregnancy is a simple, safe, minitraumatic, quick and effective method. (authors)

  11. Association Between Infertility and Sexual Dysfunction in Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Michael H; Messore, Marisa; Pastuszak, Alexander W; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2016-10-01

    The relation between infertility and sexual dysfunction can be reciprocal. Causes of sexual dysfunction that affect fertility include erectile dysfunction, Peyronie's disease (abnormal penile curvature), low libido, ejaculatory disorders in men, and genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder (GPPPD) and low sexual desire in women. To review the association between infertility and sexual dysfunction and discuss current management strategies to address sexual disorders in couples with infertility. Peer-reviewed publications from PubMed published from 1980 through February 2016 were identified that related to sexual dysfunction and infertility in men and women. Pathophysiology and management approach of erectile dysfunction, Peyronie's disease, low libido, ejaculatory disorders in men, and GPPPD and low sexual desire in women and how each etiology contributes to sexual dysfunction and infertility in the couple. Treating the infertile couple with sexual dysfunction involves addressing underlying conditions such as psychogenic erectile dysfunction, low testosterone, Peyronie's disease in men, and GPPPD and low sexual desire in women. Psychogenic erectile dysfunction can be successfully treated with phosphodiesterase inhibitors. Low testosterone is often identified in men with infertility, but testosterone therapy is contraindicated in men attempting conception. Men with Peyronie's disease have a new treatment option to address their penile curvature-collagenase Clostridium histolyticum injection directly into the penile plaque. GPPPD is a broad disorder that includes vulvodynia and vaginismus and can be treated with topical lubricants and moisturizers. We must address psychosocial factors in women with low sexual desire. Flibanserin and transdermal testosterone (off-label) are novel therapies for women with low sexual desire. Sexual dysfunction in a couple with infertility is a complex issue. Management of infertility and sexual dysfunction should involve appropriate

  12. Leptin levels in infertile males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahan, S.; Bibi, R.; Ahmed, S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the leptin levels in the serum of normal, sub fertile and infertile men. Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Animal Sciences Quaid-e-Azam University, Islamabad, National Institute of Health (NIH), Islamabad and Dr. Salma and Kafeel Medical Centre, Islamabad, from April to December 2009. Methodology: Serum leptin levels hormonal concentrations (LH, FSH and testosterone) were determined by EIA in 154 males including 24 (15.58%) fertile, 19 (12.34%) polyzoospermic (PZs), 26 (16.88%) teratozoospermic (TZs), 27 (17.53%) astheno-teratozoospermic (ATZs), 18 (11.69%) oligozoospermic (OZs), 18 (11.69%) oligo-astheno-teratozoospermic (OATZs), 11 (7.14%) obstructive azoospermic (OBST-AZOOs) and 11 (7.14%) non-obstructive azoospermic (NON-OBST-AZOOs). BMI was also determined, divided into groups of greater than 24. Hormonal concentrations were compared by ANOVA and correlation was performed by using Graph pad prism version 5. Results: Significantly high levels of leptin concentrations were found in fertile (p 24 compared to fertile and infertile male patients with BMI 24. Leptin showed a significant positive correlation with LH (p < 0.01) and FSH (p < 0.002) and a significant negative correlation with testosterone (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Abnormal leptin level was significantly associated with fertility problems in males. Providing a link between leptin and reproduction factors contributing in control of testosterone and gonadotropins secretion in many aspects depending on fertility status in male subjects. BMI appears to have significant association with serum leptin levels. (author)

  13. Infertility and incident endometrial cancer risk: a pooled analysis from the epidemiology of endometrial cancer consortium (E2C2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H P; Cook, L S; Weiderpass, E; Adami, H-O; Anderson, K E; Cai, H; Cerhan, J R; Clendenen, T V; Felix, A S; Friedenreich, C M; Garcia-Closas, M; Goodman, M T; Liang, X; Lissowska, J; Lu, L; Magliocco, A M; McCann, S E; Moysich, K B; Olson, S H; Petruzella, S; Pike, M C; Polidoro, S; Ricceri, F; Risch, H A; Sacerdote, C; Setiawan, V W; Shu, X O; Spurdle, A B; Trabert, B; Webb, P M; Wentzensen, N; Xiang, Y-B; Xu, Y; Yu, H; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A; Brinton, L A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nulliparity is an endometrial cancer risk factor, but whether or not this association is due to infertility is unclear. Although there are many underlying infertility causes, few studies have assessed risk relations by specific causes. Methods: We conducted a pooled analysis of 8153 cases and 11 713 controls from 2 cohort and 12 case-control studies. All studies provided self-reported infertility and its causes, except for one study that relied on data from national registries. Logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Nulliparous women had an elevated endometrial cancer risk compared with parous women, even after adjusting for infertility (OR=1.76; 95% CI: 1.59–1.94). Women who reported infertility had an increased risk compared with those without infertility concerns, even after adjusting for nulliparity (OR=1.22; 95% CI: 1.13–1.33). Among women who reported infertility, none of the individual infertility causes were substantially related to endometrial cancer. Conclusions: Based on mainly self-reported infertility data that used study-specific definitions of infertility, nulliparity and infertility appeared to independently contribute to endometrial cancer risk. Understanding residual endometrial cancer risk related to infertility, its causes and its treatments may benefit from large studies involving detailed data on various infertility parameters. PMID:25688738

  14. Next-Generation Sequencing of Tubal Intraepithelial Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Andrew S; Stall, Jennifer N; Hovelson, Daniel H; Cani, Andi K; Liu, Chia-Jen; Tomlins, Scott A; Cho, Kathleen R

    2015-11-01

    High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is the most prevalent and lethal form of ovarian cancer. HGSCs frequently arise in the distal fallopian tubes rather than the ovary, developing from small precursor lesions called serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (TICs, or more specifically, STICs). While STICs have been reported to harbor TP53 mutations, detailed molecular characterizations of these lesions are lacking. We performed targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from 4 women, 2 with HGSC and 2 with uterine endometrioid carcinoma (UEC) who were diagnosed as having synchronous STICs. We detected concordant mutations in both HGSCs with synchronous STICs, including TP53 mutations as well as assumed germline BRCA1/2 alterations, confirming a clonal association between these lesions. Next-generation sequencing confirmed the presence of a STIC clonally unrelated to 1 case of UEC, and NGS of the other tubal lesion diagnosed as a STIC unexpectedly supported the lesion as a micrometastasis from the associated UEC. We demonstrate that targeted NGS can identify genetic alterations in minute lesions, such as TICs, and confirm TP53 mutations as early driving events for HGSC. Next-generation sequencing also demonstrated unexpected associations between presumed STICs and synchronous carcinomas, providing evidence that some TICs are actually metastases rather than HGSC precursors.

  15. Are all pelvic (nonuterine) serous carcinomas of tubal origin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybycin, Christopher G; Kurman, Robert J; Ronnett, Brigitte M; Shih, Ie-Ming; Vang, Russell

    2010-10-01

    It has been proposed that the presence of tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (TIC), in association with one-third to nearly half of pelvic serous carcinomas, is evidence of fallopian tube origin for high-grade serous carcinomas that would have been otherwise classified as primary ovarian or peritoneal. To address this hypothesis, we evaluated a series of 114 consecutive pelvic (nonuterine) gynecologic carcinomas at our institution (2006 to 2008) to determine the frequency of TIC in 52 cases in which all the resected fallopian tube tissue was examined microscopically. These 52 cases were classified as ovarian (n=37), peritoneal (n=8), or fallopian tube (n=7) in origin as per conventional criteria based on disease distribution. The presence of TIC and its location and relationship to invasive carcinoma in the fallopian tubes and ovaries were assessed. Among the 45 cases of ovarian/peritoneal origin, carcinoma subtypes included 41 high-grade serous, 1 endometrioid, 1 mucinous, 1 high-grade, not otherwise specified, and 1 malignant mesodermal mixed tumor. TIC was identified in 24 cases (59%) of high-grade serous carcinoma but not among any of the other subtypes; therefore, the term serous TIC (STIC) is a more specific appellation. STICs were located in the fimbriated end of the tube in 22 cases (92%) and in the ampulla in 2 (8%); they were unilateral in 21 (88%) and bilateral in 3 (13%). STICs in the absence of an associated invasive carcinoma in the same tube were detected in 7 cases (30%) and with invasive carcinoma in the same tube in 17 (71%). Unilateral STICs were associated with bilateral ovarian involvement in 15 cases and unilateral (ipsilateral) ovarian involvement in 5 (the remaining case with a unilateral STIC had a primary peritoneal tumor with no ovarian involvement); the bilateral STICs were all associated with bilateral ovarian involvement. Six of the 7 primary tubal tumors were high-grade serous carcinomas, and 4 of these 6 (67%) had STICs. Based on

  16. Effectiveness of low level laser therapy for treating male infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirovich Moskvin, Sergey; Ivanovich Apolikhin, Oleg

    2018-01-01

    In half of the cases, the infertility of the couple is due to the disorder of the male fertility. The leading factors that cause male infertility are urogenital infections, disorders of the immune system, testicular and prostate pathology, as well as endocrine disorders. Low level laser therapy (LLLT) is a very effective physical therapy method, used in many areas of medicine, including obstetrics and gynaecology, andrology and urology; and it is recommended as an integral part of the complex treatment of infertility. The literature review showed that LLLT is beneficial in treating male infertility. Laser can significantly improve the survival, motility and speed of movement of spermatozoa. Laser therapy of patients with prostatitis and vesiculitis can eliminate infiltrative-exudative changes, improve reproductive and copulatory functions. Local illumination of red (635 nm) and infrared (904 nm) spectra should be combined with intravenous laser blood illumination (ILBI) of red (635 nm) and ultraviolet (UV) (365 nm) spectra. PMID:29806585

  17. Knowledge, attitude, and practices of infertility among Saudi couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolfotouh, Mostafa A; Alabdrabalnabi, Abdullah A; Albacker, Rehab B; Al-Jughaiman, Umar A; Hassan, Samar N

    2013-01-01

    Infertility places a huge psychological burden on infertile couples, especially for women. Greater knowledge of the factors affecting fertility may help to decrease the incidence of infertility by allowing couples to avoid certain risk factors. The aim of our study was (1) to assess the knowledge and attitudes of infertile and fertile Saudi participants on infertility, possible risk factors, and social consequences; and (2) to determine the practices of infertile Saudi couples to promote their fertility before having them attend an in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinic. We conducted a cross-sectional study on 277 fertile participants from outpatient clinics and 104 infertile patients from the IVF clinic at King Abdulaziz Medical City between June 24, 2012 and July 4, 2012, using a previously validated interview questionnaire. Descriptive and analytical statistics were applied with a significance threshold of P ≤ 0.05. A generally poor level of knowledge (59%) and a neutral attitude (76%) toward infertility were reported by participants. Mistaken beliefs commonly held by the study participants regarding the causes of infertility were Djinns and supernatural causes (58.8%), black magic (67.5%), intrauterine devices (71.3%), and contraceptive pills (42.9%). The healer/Sheikh was reported as the primary and secondary preference for infertility treatment by 6.7% and 44.2% of IVF patients, respectively. Compared with fertile patients, IVF patients were significantly less likely to favor divorce (38.5% versus 57.6%; P = 0.001) or marriage to a second wife (62.5% versus 86.2%; P < 0.001), if the woman could not have a baby. The patients with infertility had more favorable attitudes toward fertility drugs (87.5% versus 68.4%; P = 0.003) and having a test tube baby (92.4% versus 70.3%; P < 0.001). Child adoption was accepted as an option for treatment by the majority of IVF patients (60.6%) and fertile outpatients (71.5%). Alternative treatments previously practiced by the

  18. Hysteroscopic proximal tubal occlusion versus laparoscopic salpingectomy as a treatment for hydrosalpinges prior to IVF or ICSI: an RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, K; Lier, M C I; Emanuel, M H; Twisk, J W R; Mol, B W J; Schats, R; Hompes, P G A; Mijatovic, V

    2016-09-01

    Does hysteroscopic proximal tubal occlusion by intratubal devices as a treatment for hydrosalpinges result in comparable ongoing pregnancy rates following IVF/ICSI when compared with laparoscopic salpingectomy? Hysteroscopic proximal tubal occlusion by intratubal devices is inferior to laparoscopic salpingectomy in the treatment of hydrosalpinges in women undergoing IVF/ICSI with respect to ongoing pregnancy rates. It is known that women with hydrosalpinges undergoing IVF have poorer pregnancy outcomes compared with women with other forms of tubal infertility. In these women, both laparoscopic salpingectomy and laparoscopic proximal tubal ligation are known to improve IVF outcomes. At present, it is unclear whether a less-invasive hysteroscopic treatment with intratubal devices leads to similar ongoing pregnancy rates following IVF when compared with laparoscopic salpingectomy. A two-centre, randomized, controlled, non-inferiority trial. Between October 2009 and December 2014 a total of 85 women were included in this study; of whom, 42 were randomized to hysteroscopic proximal occlusion by intratubal device placement and 43 were randomized to laparoscopic salpingectomy. Randomization was based on a computer-generated randomization list. The study was unblinded. The primary outcome was ongoing pregnancy rate, defined as a fetal heartbeat on ultrasound beyond 10-week gestation following one IVF/ICSI treatment (fresh and frozen-thawed embryo transfers). We studied women aged 18-41 years, with uni- or bilateral ultrasound visible hydrosalpinges who were scheduled for an IVF/ICSI treatment. The ongoing pregnancy rates per patient according to the intention-to-treat principle were 11/42 (26.2%) after hysteroscopic proximal occlusion by intratubal devices (intervention group) versus 24/43 (55.8%) after laparoscopic salpingectomy (control group) (P = 0.008) [absolute difference: 26.1%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.5-51.7, relative risk (RR): 0.56; 95% CI: 0.31-1.03, P

  19. Protein intake and ovulatory infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarro, Jorge E; Rich-Edwards, Janet W; Rosner, Bernard A; Willett, Walter C

    2008-02-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate whether intake of protein from animal and vegetable origin is associated with ovulatory infertility. A total of 18,555 married women without a history of infertility were followed up as they attempted a pregnancy or became pregnant during an 8 year period. Dietary assessments were related to the incidence of ovulatory infertility. During follow-up, 438 women reported ovulatory infertility. The multivariate-adjusted relative risk (RR) (95% confidence interval [CI]; P for trend) of ovulatory infertility comparing the highest to the lowest quintile of animal protein intake was 1.39 (1.01 to 1.90; 0.03). The corresponding RR (95% CI; P for trend) for vegetable protein intake was 0.78 (0.54 to 1.12; 0.07). Furthermore, consuming 5% of total energy intake as vegetable protein rather than as animal protein was associated with a more than 50% lower risk of ovulatory infertility (P =.007). Replacing animal sources of protein with vegetable sources of protein may reduce ovulatory infertility risk.

  20. The social epidemiology of coping with infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L; Christensen, Ulla; Holstein, B E

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To analyse the cross-sectional association between coping responses with infertility and occupational social class. Infertility is evenly distributed across social classes in Denmark, and there is free access to high-quality assisted reproduction technology. METHODS: Data were based...... was developed in four categories: active-avoidance coping; active-confronting coping; passive-avoidance coping; meaning-based coping. These subscales were later confirmed by factor analysis. Occupational social class was measured in a standardized way. RESULTS: Contrary to expectations, the logistic regression...... analyses showed that women from lower social classes V + VI and men from social classes III + IV used significantly more active-confronting coping. Women from lower social classes V + VI used significantly more meaning-based coping. Both men and women from social classes III - VI used significantly more...

  1. Bioengineering Strategies to Treat Female Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Che-Ying; Baker, Hannah; Fries, Melissa H; Yoo, James J; Kim, Peter C W; Fisher, John P

    2017-06-01

    Bioengineering strategies have demonstrated enormous potential to treat female infertility as a result of chemotherapy, uterine injuries, fallopian tube occlusion, massive intrauterine adhesions, congenital uterine malformations, and hysterectomy. These strategies can be classified into two broad categories as follows: (i) Transplantation of fresh or cryopreserved organs into the host and (ii) tissue engineering approaches that utilize a combination of cells, growth factors, and biomaterials that leverages the body's inherent ability to regenerate/repair reproductive organs. While whole organ transplant has demonstrated success, the source of the organ and the immunogenic effects of allografts remain challenging. Even though tissue engineering strategies can avoid these issues, their feasibilities of creating whole organ constructs are yet to be demonstrated. In this article we summarize the recent advancements in the applications of bioengineering to treat female infertility.

  2. Hysterosalpingographic Findings Among Infertile Women: Review at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vital tool for investigating tubal patency. This was to determine the ... 10 day of the menstrual cycle. Water-soluble ... gynecological practice despite emerging use of laparoscopy and dye .... Annals of African Medicine 2004. 3 (2):. 77-79. 13.

  3. Infertility, infertility treatment, and congenital malformations: Danish national birth cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten; Bille, Camilla; Olsen, Jørn

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether infertile couples (with a time to pregnancy of > 12 months), who conceive naturally or after treatment, give birth to children with an increased prevalence of congenital malformations. Design Longitudinal study. Setting Danish national birth cohort. Participants Three groups of liveborn children and their mothers: 50 897 singletons and 1366 twins born of fertile couples (time to pregnancy ≤ 12 months), 5764 singletons and 100 twins born of infertile couples who conceived naturally (time to pregnancy > 12 months), and 4588 singletons and 1690 twins born after infertility treatment. Main outcome measures Prevalence of congenital malformations determined from hospital discharge diagnoses. Results Compared with singletons born of fertile couples, singletons born of infertile couples who conceived naturally or after treatment had a higher prevalence of congenital malformations—hazard ratios 1.20 (95% confidence interval 1.07 to 1.35) and 1.39 (1.23 to 1.57). The overall prevalence of congenital malformations increased with increasing time to pregnancy. When the analysis was restricted to singletons born of infertile couples, babies born after treatment had an increased prevalence of genital organ malformations (hazard ratio 2.32, 1.24 to 4.35) compared with babies conceived naturally. No significant differences existed in the overall prevalence of congenital malformations among twins. Conclusions Hormonal treatment for infertility may be related to the occurrence of malformations of genital organs, but our results suggest that the reported increased prevalence of congenital malformations seen in singletons born after assisted reproductive technology is partly due to the underlying infertility or its determinants. The association between untreated infertility and congenital malformations warrants further examination. PMID:16893903

  4. Patient evaluation of infertility management in an ISO 9001:2008-certified centre for reproductive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Broeck, Uschi; Spiessens, Carl; Dancet, Eline; Bakelants, Els; Vrancken, Annelies; Demyttenaere, Koen; Enzlin, Paul; D'Hooghe, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Quality management according to ISO 9001:2008 guidelines includes infertility care quality assessment and improvement. This study aimed to describe the development process of a questionnaire for infertility management. A literature review, qualitative interviews with experts and patients resulted in a content-valid and face-valid questionnaire. Three cross-sectional surveys were performed in 2004, 2007 and 2008 in a tertiary university infertility centre. First (2004), the questionnaire – measuring eight a-priori dimensions of infertility management – was tested. Second (2007), improvement projects for infertility management were evaluated. Third (2008), factor analysis was performed and internal consistency was documented. The developed patient questionnaire to evaluate infertility management and pre-set desired levels of agreement served to set targets for and assess quality improvement projects. The final patient questionnaire to evaluate infertility management within an ISO framework was valid and reliable and contained 14 items covering four dimensions of infertility management: Telephone Access, Reception, Information and Patient-centeredness. ISO 9001:2008-certified infertility centres can evaluate infertility management with this 14-item questionnaire. This top-down approach to evaluate the patients’ perspective on quality aspects selected by health professionals can be complementary to the bottom-up approach evaluating the patients’ complete experiences of quality of care.

  5. Endometriosis: Does It Cause Infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Website of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Endometriosis: Does It Cause Infertility? This fact sheet was ... with The Society of Reproductive Surgeons What is endometriosis? Endometriosis is when tissue is found outside the ...

  6. Clinical application of an improved utero-operator in the interventional treatment of infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yaoming; Zhang Guangfu; Li Detai

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of an improved utero-operator in the interventional treatment of tube obstruction infertility, and to make a comparison with other methods. Methods: One hundred cases of infertile women with tubal obstruction were divided into 3 groups and treated separately under TV fluoroscopy with 3 different methods and follow-up examination was made up to 24 months. Among the 100 cases, 60 cases were treated with improved utero-operator (109 tubes), 20 with Cook cupped coaxial catheter (36 tubes), and 20 with emulsoid double-cavity tube (20 tubes). Result: Among the improved utero-operator group, Cook cupped coaxial catheter group, and emulsoid double-cavity tube group, the successful rate of selective catheterization was 92.7%, 80.6% and 80.0%, respectively. The successful rate of recanalization was 72.3%, 72.4% and 71.4%, respectively. The pregnancy rate was 36.4%, 35.7% and 36.4%, respectively. Improved utero-operator has the highest successful rate in selective catheterization (x 2 = 4.275, P < 0.05). Conclusion: Improved utero-operator has a high successful rate of selective catheterization in selective salpingography and treatment of tube obstruction infertility, and it is an easy and stable method which spends less time and received less X-ray. It is an ideal treating method at the moment

  7. Evaluating Acquisition of Knowledge about Infertility Using a Whiteboard Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Ashley A; Brown, Meghan; Zhang, Shannon; Stern, Emily; Hahn, Philip M; Reid, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    Myths about fertility are commonplace in society. Few studies have investigated educational approaches to bridge gaps in knowledge among consumers. We evaluated the effectiveness of an animated, 15-minute whiteboard video to effect change in knowledge about infertility. We recruited medical students in their first or second year of training for participation. The students completed the study before their formal lectures on infertility issues. Participants completed questionnaires assessing infertility knowledge immediately before and one week after watching the educational video. Before and after scores (maximum = 50 points) were compared using paired t tests. The study cohort included 101 medical students; 69% (70/101) were female and 31% (31/101) were male. Overall, students increased their score by 4.0/50 (95% CI 3.2 to 4.8, P Female students improved slightly more in their responses than did male students (mean improvement 4.7/50 vs. 2.5/50). A whiteboard video presentation on infertility resulted in short-term improvement in medical students' knowledge of basic reproductive biology, infertility risk factors, treatments, and common myths associated with infertility. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada/La Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. chlamydial infection, plasma peroxidation and obesity in tubal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. Human reproductive failure is as old as mankind. This public health problem involves all regions of the world and its prevalence worldwide varies from 10-15%1;. 10-32% in Africa2 and 31.5% in Nigeria3. The various categories of human reproductive failure include: infertility, recurrent pregnancy loss ( ...

  9. Evidence-based management of non-tubal ectopic pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alalade, Aderemi Olaoluwa; Smith, Fredrick John Ennis; Kendall, Charlotte Emma; Odejinmi, Funlayo

    2017-11-01

    Recent advances in ultrasonography and the use of other modalities including magnetic resonance imaging scans have led to the early and more accurate diagnosis of non-tubal ectopic pregnancies (NTE). As a result, the management of these pregnancies has evolved. This article addresses the management options currently available for NTE. While surgical management remains the mainstay of treatment for ovarian, abdominal and cornual ectopics, there is growing evidence that some of these can be managed medically. Many authors have utilised a combination of medical and surgical approaches in the management of cervical and caesarean section (CS) scar ectopic pregnancies with good outcome. The availability of dedicated early pregnancy units has further improved diagnosis and more importantly the follow-up care for these patients. The rarity of cases and the difficulty of ethically organising randomised trials for NTE remain a problem in formulating consistent pathways for optimum management of women with NTE.

  10. Chlamydia trachomatis IgG3 seropositivity is a predictor of reproductive outcomes in infertile women with patent fallopian tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Anne Z.; Diamond, Michael P.; Legro, Richard S.; Schlaff, William D.; Barnhart, Kurt T.; Casson, Peter R.; Christman, Gregory M.; Alvero, Ruben; Hansen, Karl R.; Geisler, William M.; Thomas, Tracey; Santoro, Nanette; Zhang, Heping; Eisenberg, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) seropositivity as detected by the Ct elementary body (EB)-based enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (Ct EB ELISA) predicts pregnancy and pregnancy outcome among infertile women with documented tubal patency. Design Cohort study Setting Outpatient clinics participating in the reproductive medicine network Patients 1250 infertile women with documented tubal patency enrolled in one of two randomized controlled trials: PPCOSII and AMIGOS Intervention Sera were analyzed for anti-Ct IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies using a research Ct EB ELISA. OD405 readings ≥0.35 and ≥0.1 were considered positive for IgG1 and IgG3, respectively. Main Outcome Measures Primary outcomes included pregnancy, live birth, and ectopic pregnancy. Log linear regression was used to determine the relative risk after adjusting for age, race, treatment medication, smoking status, and current alcohol use. Results 243 (19%) women were seropositive for anti-Ct IgG3. They tended to be non-White and smokers. Anti-Ct IgG3 seropositive women were significantly less likely to conceive (RR 0.65, 95% CI 0.52-0.83) or to have a live birth (RR 0.59, 95% 0.43-0.80); these associations were weakened after adjusting for number of HSG-documented patent tubes (RR 0.73, 95% CI 0.56-0.97) and (0.73, 95% CI: 0.50-1.04), respectively. Anti-Ct IgG3 seropositive women who conceived had 2.7 (95% CI: 1.40-5.34) times the risk of ectopic pregnancy. Conclusions Even in the presence of tubal patency, anti-Ct IgG3 seropositivity is associated with lower likelihood of pregnancy. Anti-Ct IgG3 seropositive women have up to 3 times the risk of ectopic pregnancy. PMID:26413816

  11. Serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma: diagnostic reproducibility and its implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Joseph W; Jarboe, Elke A; Kindelberger, David; Nucci, Marisa R; Hirsch, Michelle S; Crum, Christopher P

    2010-07-01

    Serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC) is detected in between 5% and 7% of women undergoing risk-reduction salpingooophorectomy for mutations in the BRCA1 or 2 genes (BRCA+), and seems to play a role in the pathogenesis of many ovarian and "primary peritoneal" serous carcinomas. The recognition of STIC is germane to the management of BRCA+ women; however, the diagnostic reproducibility of STIC is unknown. Twenty-one cases were selected and classified as STIC or benign, using both hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical stains for p53 and MIB-1. Digital images of 30 hematoxylin and eosin-stained STICs (n=14) or benign tubal epithelium (n=16) were photographed and randomized for blind digital review in a Powerpoint format by 6 experienced gynecologic pathologists and 6 pathology trainees. A generalized kappa statistic for multiple raters was calculated for all groups. For all reviewers, the kappa was 0.333, indicating poor reproducibility; kappa was 0.453 for the experienced gynecologic pathologists (fair-to-good reproducibility), and kappa=0.253 for the pathology residents (poor reproducibility). In the experienced group, 3 of 14 STICs were diagnosed by all 6 reviewers, and 9 of 14 by a majority of the reviewers. These results show that interobserver concordance in the recognition of STIC in high-quality digital images is at best fair-to-good for even experienced gynecologic pathologists, and a proportion cannot be consistently identified even among experienced observers. In view of these findings, a diagnosis of STIC should be corroborated by a second pathologist, if feasible.

  12. Infertility Counseling and Support: When and Where to Find It

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  13. Pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia of the fallopian tube mimicking tubal cancer: a radiological and pathological diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nam Kyung; Choi, Kyung Un; Han, Ga Jin; Kwon, Byung Su; Song, Yong Jung; Suh, Dong Soo; Kim, Ki Hyung

    2016-11-14

    Pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia of the fallopian tube is a rare, benign disease characterized by florid epithelial hyperplasia. The authors present the history and details of a 22-year-old woman with bilateral pelvic masses and a highly elevated serum CA-125 level (1,056 U/ml). Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the pelvis showed bilateral adnexal complex cystic masses with a fusiform or sausage-like shape. Contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted images showed enhancement of papillary projections of the right adnexal mass and enhancement of an irregular thick wall on the left adnexal mass, suggestive of tubal cancer. Based on MRI and laboratory findings, laparotomy was performed under a putative preoperative diagnosis of tubal cancer. The final pathologic diagnosis was pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia of tubal epithelium associated with acute and chronic salpingitis in both tubes. The authors report a rare case of pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia of the fallopian tubes mimicking tubal cancer.

  14. Tubal epithelial lesions in salpingo-oophorectomy specimens of BRCA-mutation carriers and controls.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mingels, M.J.J.M.; Roelofsen, T.; Laak, J.A.W.M. van der; Hullu, J.A. de; Ham, M.A.P.C. van; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Bulten, J.; Bol, M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A precursor lesion for ovarian carcinoma, tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (TIC), has been identified in BRCA-mutation carriers undergoing prophylactic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (pBSO). Other lesions were also identified in fallopian tubes, but different terminology, interpretation,

  15. Isolated tubal torsion: Successful preoperative diagnosis of five cases using ultrasound and management with laparoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem Fadıloğlu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to evaluate the presentation and diagnostic evaluation of patients with isolated tubal torsion and to evaluate the surgical approach to these patients. We also aimed to define the ultrasonographic diagnostic criteria. Five patients with isolated tubal torsion who were admitted to our gynecology department between January 2014 and January 2017 were evaluated and included in this study. All cases were diagnosed through ultrasonographic imaging alone. The preoperative findings of the patients were similar to those described in the literature. No further imaging modality was used for diagnosis and all patients were managed with laparoscopy. The clinical findings and ultrasonographic findings were consistent with literature. It may be difficult to preoperatively diagnose isolated tubal torsion, which is a rare clinical entity. Evaluation of these patients by an experienced sonographer and knowledge of the ultrasonographic findings of isolated tubal torsion may have vital preventive measures.

  16. Marcadores séricos de estresse oxidativo em mulheres inférteis com endometriose Serum markers of oxidative stress in infertile women with endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Zyman de Andrade

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: comparar marcadores séricos de estresse oxidativo entre pacientes inférteis com e sem endometriose e avaliar a associação destes marcadores com o estadiamento da doença. MÉTODOS: estudo prospectivo envolvendo a inclusão consecutiva de 112 pacientes inférteis, não-obesas, com idade inferior a 39 anos, divididas em dois grupos: Endometriose (n=48, sendo 26 com endometriose mínima e leve - Estádio I/II e 22 com endometriose moderada e grave - Estádio III/IV e Controle (n=64, com fator tubário e/ou masculino de infertilidade. Durante a fase folicular precoce do ciclo menstrual, foram coletadas amostras sanguíneas para análise dos níveis séricos de malondialdeído, glutationa e níveis totais de hidroperóxidos, por espectrofotometria e vitamina E, por cromatografia líquida de alto desempenho. Os resultados obtidos foram comparados da seguinte forma: os grupos endometriose versus controle; endometriose estádio I/II e controle, endometriose estádio III/IV e controle e entre os dois subgrupos de endometriose. Em todas as análises, foi considerado o nível de significância de 5% (pPURPOSE: to compare serum markers of oxidative stress between infertile patients with and without endometriosis and to assess the association of these markers with disease staging. METHODS: this was a prospective study conducted on 112 consecutive infertile, non-obese patients younger than 39 years, divided into two groups: Endometriosis (n=48, 26 with minimal and mild endometriosis - Stage I/II, and 22 with moderate and severe endometriosis - Stage III/IV and Control (n=64, with tubal and/or male factor infertility. Blood samples were collected during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle for the analysis of serum malondialdehyde, glutathione and total hydroxyperoxide levels by spectrophotometry and of vitamin E by high performance liquid chromatography. The results were compared between the endometriosis and control groups, stage I

  17. Sonographic Diagnosis of Tubal Cancer with IOTA Simple Rules Plus Pattern Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongsong, Theera; Wanapirak, Chanane; Tantipalakorn, Charuwan; Tinnangwattana, Dangcheewan

    2017-11-26

    Objective: To evaluate diagnostic performance of IOTA simple rules plus pattern recognition in predicting tubal cancer. Methods: Secondary analysis was performed on prospective database of our IOTA project. The patients recruited in the project were those who were scheduled for pelvic surgery due to adnexal masses. The patients underwent ultrasound examinations within 24 hours before surgery. On ultrasound examination, the masses were evaluated using the well-established IOTA simple rules plus pattern recognition (sausage-shaped appearance, incomplete septum, visible ipsilateral ovaries) to predict tubal cancer. The gold standard diagnosis was based on histological findings or operative findings. Results: A total of 482 patients, including 15 cases of tubal cancer, were evaluated by ultrasound preoperatively. The IOTA simple rules plus pattern recognition gave a sensitivity of 86.7% (13 in 15) and specificity of 97.4%. Sausage-shaped appearance was identified in nearly all cases (14 in 15). Incomplete septa and normal ovaries could be identified in 33.3% and 40%, respectively. Conclusion: IOTA simple rules plus pattern recognition is relatively effective in predicting tubal cancer. Thus, we propose the simple scheme in diagnosis of tubal cancer as follows. First of all, the adnexal masses are evaluated with IOTA simple rules. If the B-rules could be applied, tubal cancer is reliably excluded. If the M-rules could be applied or the result is inconclusive, careful delineation of the mass with pattern recognition should be performed. Creative Commons Attribution License

  18. Uterine sarcoma incidental in infertile women: experience in a tropical hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adesiyun, A.G.; Ameh, C.

    2007-01-01

    Uterine sarcoma is an uncommon gynaecological malignancy. Diagnosis in its early stage and management is challenging especially in a resource poor setting. The objective of the study is to evaluate the clinico-pathologic presentation of uterine sarcoma in 9 subfertile patients that underwent surgery for seemingly benign uterine diseases. Nine consecutive infertile women with intra-operative diagnosis of uterine sarcoma were reviewed over a period of 5.5 years. The nine patients were pre-operatively misdiagnosed with uterine fibroid in 7 (77.8%) patients and adenomyosis uteri in 2 (22.2%) patients. The patients mean age was 39.2 years with a range of 36 to 47 years. Parity ranged from para 0 to para 3. Of the nine patients, 7 (77.8%) presented with secondary infertility and two (22.2%) patients with primary infertility. Clinical presentations were mainly abdomino - pelvic mass (100%), pelvic pain (77.8%) and abnormal uterine bleeding in (77.8%) of patients. Three (33.3%) of the 9 patients had history of myomectomy. Pre-operative hysterosalpingogram revealed that six (66.7%) patients had bilateral tubal blockage, two (22.2%) patients had unilateral tubal blockage and one (11.1%) patient had bilateral patent fallopian tubes. Six (66.7%) patients had hydrosalpinges. Clinical staging of malignancy was stage Ic in seven patients, stage IIa and IIb in the remaining two patients. Histologic classifications were leiomyosarcoma in six patients and endometrial stromal sarcoma in three patients. Treatments offered were surgery alone in six (66.7%) patients, surgery with adjuvant chemotherapy for 2 (22.2%) patients and one (11.1%) patient had surgery with adjuvant radiotherapy. Case fatality was 77.8% with a year of diagnosis. In a resource constrained setting, due to limitations in making diagnosis in the early stage of the disease, a high index of suspicion is needed in all elderly infertile women presenting with seemingly benign abdomino pelvic mass. (author)

  19. Evaluation of the melatonin and oxidative stress markers level in serum of fertile and infertile women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Soleimani Rad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is defined as the inability to achieve the pregnancy within a year of unprotected intercourse. Infertility is a complex issue and different factors such as stress oxidative can be involved in this problem. So, any attempt to neutralize oxidative stress would be helpful in the treatment of infertility. Melatonin is a known scavenger of free radicals. Objective: The aim of our study was to evaluate the level of melatonin and its correlation with oxidative biomarkers in fertile and infertile women. Materials and Methods: The participants including fertile and infertile women were divided into two groups of 30 people. Blood sampling was performed and sera were collected. The level of Malondialdehyde (MDA, total antioxidant capacity (TAC and melatonin were detected. Data were analyzed using T-test and their correlation was assessed using Spearman test. Results: Serum melatonin from fertile women was higher than infertile women but the difference was not significant (p= 0.46. MDA level in fertile women was significantly lower than infertile women (p<0.001 and the level of TAC in fertile women was significantly higher than infertile women (p<0.001. Spearman test revealed a significant and direct correlation between melatonin and TAC in fertile and infertile women and a significant but reverse correlation between melatonin and MDA in infertile and fertile women. Conclusion: Differences in the level of oxidative stress biomarkers in fertile and infertile individuals have been reported. This study revealed a significant correlation between melatonin and oxidative stress biomarkers, concluding that melatonin level could be involved in infertility.

  20. Sexual violence, HSV-2 and HIV are important predictors for infertility in Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhont, N.; van de Wijgert, J.; Luchters, S.; Muvunyi, C.; Vyankandondera, J.; Temmerman, M.

    2010-01-01

    In order to formulate cost-effective health interventions aimed at preventing infertility it is necessary to identify modifiable risk factors for infertility in sub-Saharan Africa. This case-control study examined potential predictors and their population attributable fraction (PAF%) for various

  1. Semen quality of male partners of infertile couples in Ile-Ife, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The objective was to evaluate seminal fluid indices of male partners of infertile couples so as to identify the current status of the contributions of male factor to infertility in our environment. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective study of the seminal fluid indices of consecutively consenting male partners of ...

  2. Contribution of Bacterial Infection to Male Infertility in Nigerians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emokpae MA

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available There is disagreement as to the influence of certain microbial infection on male infertility and such agents are ignored. The incidence of these microbial agents in seminal fluid isolates is on the increase. This study therefore evaluates the prevalence of male factor infertility and contribution of microbial infection to male infertility in Kano, northern Nigeria. Seminal fluid analysis in five hundred males who were investigated for infertility was evaluated using the 5th generation SQ AII C-P sperm quality analyzer and the Neubaeur counting chamber. The result indicates that 58.2% had sperm density less than twenty million per millilitre. The oligospermic subjects (sperm density 2-19 millions/ml were 27.6%, severe oligospermic (sperm density less than 2 million 13.2% and azoospermia, 17.4%. Asthenospermia (motility less than 50% decrease from 44.8% in oligospermia to 24.0% in severe oligospermia. Teratospermia (abnormal morphology greater than 50% also deteriorated from 46.3% to 35.4% in oligospermic and severe oligospermic males respectively. Seminal fluid infection increases with decreasing sperm density, motility and morphology. The prevalence of abnormal sperm indices and bacterial infection is high and Staphylococcus aureus infection should be treated and no longer ignored in the management of male factor infertility.

  3. The prevalence of Y chromosome microdeletions in Pakistani infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubina Tabassum Siddiqui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microdeletions of the azoospermia factor locus of the long arm of Y chromosome are an etiological factor of severe oligozoospermia or azoospermia. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Y-chromosome microdeletions in AZF region and their role in infertility in Pakistani population. Materials and Methods: The type of deletions in AZF locus were detected in infertile men (n=113 and the association of Y chromosome microdeletions with male infertility was assessed by including men (50 with normal karyotype and having children. Y chromosome microdeletions were detected by multiplex PCR using 10 sequence tagged sites namely sY81, sY130, sY141, sY142, sY155, sY157, sY160, sY182, sY231, and sY202 that covered all three regions of AZF. Results: Individuals with severe oligozoospermia showed 2.86% deletion frequency in AZFc region as compared to azoospermic males (5.5%. Conclusion: The results of our study showed that deletions in Y chromosome are not playing major part in male infertility. Moreover, multiplex-PCR strategy might preferably be employed for the detection of Y chromosome microdeletions allied to male infertility.

  4. Association of HSPA1B rs6457452 Genetic Variant with Idiopathic Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe Kohan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Male infertility is a multifactorial disease resulting from the interaction between the genetic and environmental factors. Spermatogenic Failure accounts for more than half of male infertility cases. Heat shock proteins (HSPs are the molecular chaperones that are involved in different developmental stages of spermatogenesis. The current study was planned to investigate the role of HSPA1B rs6457452 genetic variants in male infertility. Material and Methods: This case control study was conducted on 516 subjects consisted of 308 patients with idiopathic male infertility and 208 control subjects. After DNA extraction from peripheral blood, genotype determination was done by Tetra-ARMS PCR method. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the association between the polymorphism and male infertility. Results: A significant difference was observed in genotype distributions between cases and controls. Results showed individuals with TC (OR=1.552, 95%CI: 1.032-2.334, p=0.035 and TT (OR=2.746, 95%CI: 1.153-6.545, p=0.023 genotype had an increased risk of male infertility. Also, there was a significant association between T allele (OR=1.695, 95%CI: 1.220-2.355, p<0.001 and male infertility. Conclusion: This study showed for the first time that HSPA1B rs6457452 polymorphism is associated with infertility risk in Iranian men and the T allele may act as a dominant allele for increasing the risk of male infertility.

  5. Survey of Japanese infertile couples' attitudes toward surrogacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yoshiko; Matsuo, Hiroya

    2009-09-01

    To clarify Japanese infertile couples' attitudes toward surrogacy, and analyse the results according to the contextual factors: ethical, social and medical aspects. We performed a questionnaire survey anonymously on the attitude toward gestational surrogacy and traditional surrogacy in Japanese infertile couples (103 women and 60 men) between June and August 2000. We examined the relation between the acceptability of surrogacy and the background factors (age, type of procedure, the number of clinics visited, etc.), and also analysed the woman required as each type of surrogate mother whether the presence or absence of siblings in any of the infertile couple. The rates of using gestational and traditional surrogacy if they were necessary were 17% and 7% of women, 23% and 8% of men, respectively. ART group, > or =35 years of age group and surrogacy. The ongoing deliberations toward surrogacy considering certain conditions of a concerned couple would be highly desirable.

  6. Immune Aspects of Female Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Brazdova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Immune infertility, in terms of reproductive failure, has become a serious health issue involving approximately 1 out of 5 couples at reproductive age. Semen that is defined as a complex fluid containing sperm, cellular vesicles and other cells and components, could sensitize the female genital tract. The immune rejection of male semen in the female reproductive tract is explained as the failure of natural tolerance leading to local and/or systemic immune response. Present active immune mechanism may induce high levels of anti-seminal/sperm antibodies. It has already been proven that iso-immunization is associated with infertility. Comprehensive studies with regards to the identification of antibody-targets and the determination of specific antibody class contribute to the development of effective immuno-therapy and, on the other hand, potential immuno-contraception, and then of course to complex patient diagnosis. This review summarizes the aspects of female immune infertility.

  7. Epigenetic regulatory mechanisms associated with infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Madon, Prochi F; Parikh, Firuza R

    2010-01-01

    with higher order organisation of chromatin in genes associated with infertility and pericentromeric regions of chromosomes, particularly 9 and Y, could further identify causes of idiopathic infertility. Determining the association between DNA methylation, chromatin state, and noncoding RNAs...

  8. In vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection for male infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Rubina; Gandhi, Goral; Allahbadia, Gautam N.

    2011-01-01

    Progress in the field of assisted reproduction, and particularly micromanipulation, now heralds a new era in the management of severe male factor infertility, not amenable to medical or surgical correction. By overcoming natural barriers to conception, in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET), subzonal sperm insemination, partial zona dissection, and intracytoplasmatic injection of sperm (ICSI) now offer couples considered irreversibly infertile, the option of parenting a genetically related child. However, unlike IVF, which necessitates an optimal sperm number and function to successfully complete the sequence of events leading to fertilization, micromanipulation techniques, such as ICSI, involving the direct injection of a spermatozoon into the oocyte, obviate all these requirements and may be used to alleviate severe male factor infertility due to the lack of sperm in the ejaculate due to severely impaired spermatogenesis (non-obstructive azoospermia) or non-reconstructable reproductive tract obstruction (obstructive azoospermia). ICSI may be performed with fresh or cryopreserved ejaculate sperm where available, microsurgically extracted epididymal or testicular sperm with satisfactory fertilization, clinical pregnancy, and ongoing pregnancy rates. However, despite a lack of consensus regarding the genetic implications of ICSI or the application and efficacy of preimplantation genetic diagnosis prior to assisted reproductive technology (ART), the widespread use of ICSI, increasing evidence of the involvement of genetic factors in male infertility and the potential risk of transmission of genetic disorders to the offspring, generate major concerns with regard to the safety of the technique, necessitating a thorough genetic evaluation of the couple, classification of infertility and adequate counseling of the implications and associated risks prior to embarking on the procedure. The objective of this review is to highlight the indications, advantages

  9. In vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection for male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubina Merchant

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress in the field of assisted reproduction, and particularly micromanipulation, now heralds a new era in the management of severe male factor infertility, not amenable to medical or surgical correction. By overcoming natural barriers to conception, in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET, subzonal sperm insemination, partial zona dissection, and intracytoplasmatic injection of sperm (ICSI now offer couples considered irreversibly infertile, the option of parenting a genetically related child. However, unlike IVF, which necessitates an optimal sperm number and function to successfully complete the sequence of events leading to fertilization, micromanipulation techniques, such as ICSI, involving the direct injection of a spermatozoon into the oocyte, obviate all these requirements and may be used to alleviate severe male factor infertility due to the lack of sperm in the ejaculate due to severely impaired spermatogenesis (non-obstructive azoospermia or non-reconstructable reproductive tract obstruction (obstructive azoospermia. ICSI may be performed with fresh or cryopreserved ejaculate sperm where available, microsurgically extracted epididymal or testicular sperm with satisfactory fertilization, clinical pregnancy, and ongoing pregnancy rates. However, despite a lack of consensus regarding the genetic implications of ICSI or the application and efficacy of preimplantation genetic diagnosis prior to assisted reproductive technology (ART, the widespread use of ICSI, increasing evidence of the involvement of genetic factors in male infertility and the potential risk of transmission of genetic disorders to the offspring, generate major concerns with regard to the safety of the technique, necessitating a thorough genetic evaluation of the couple, classification of infertility and adequate counseling of the implications and associated risks prior to embarking on the procedure. The objective of this review is to highlight the indications

  10. Thyroid dysfunction in infertile women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elahi, S.; Tanseem, A.; Nazir, I.; Nagra, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the frequency of thyroid dysfunction in infertile women referred for thyroid evaluation. Age matched infertile (n=140 each) and fertile women (n=152 each) referred to CENUM for thyroid evaluation were investigated for incidence of hyperthyroidism (TSH 20 IU/L). Serum free T4 (FT4), free T3 (FT3) and antithyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab) was determined by radioimmunoassay (RIA) and TSH by immunoradiometric assay (IRMA). Most of the infertile women (89.3%), like control women (93.4%), were euthyroid. The difference of overall thyroid dysfunction was not statistically significant in infertile and control women (10.7% vs. 7.9%; p=0.395). The same was true for incidence of hyperthyroidism (4.3% vs. 5.3%; p=0.701) as well as hypothyroidism (6.4% vs. 2.6%; p=0.104). In infertile women, the incidence of hypothyroidism (6.4%) was slightly higher as compared to hyperthyroidism (4.3%). In euthyroid women of both groups, mean FT4, FT3 and TSH levels were significantly higher (p 2.5 mIU/L compared to fertile women (31.2% vs. 15.6%; p 20 IU/L) than control women (7.2% vs. 1.4%; p<0.05). Increased incidence of high normal TSH and raised TPO-Ab titer indicate relatively more frequent occurrence of compensated thyroid function in infertile women than normal women of reproductive age. This necessitates considering them a subgroup of women in which all aspects of pituitary-thyroid axis should be thoroughly investigated than merely TSH testing. (author)

  11. Socio-cultural factors impacting male involvement in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Socio-cultural factors impacting male involvement in the management of infertile couples at the Kenyatta National Hospital. ... that may influence male participation in the management of the infertile couples attending the KNH Infertility Clinic.

  12. Male infertility in long-term survivors of pediatric cancer: a report from the childhood cancer survivor study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski-Masker, K; Seidel, K D; Leisenring, W; Mertens, A C; Shnorhavorian, M; Ritenour, C W; Stovall, M; Green, D M; Sklar, C A; Armstrong, G T; Robison, L L; Meacham, L R

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of male infertility and treatment-related risk factors in childhood cancer survivors. Within the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, 1,622 survivors and 274 siblings completed the Male Health Questionnaire. The analysis was restricted to survivors (938/1,622; 57.8 %) and siblings (174/274; 63.5 %) who tried to become pregnant. Relative risks (RR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) for the prevalence of self-reported infertility were calculated using generalized linear models for demographic variables and treatment-related factors to account for correlation among survivors and siblings of the same family. All statistical tests were two-sided. Among those who provided self-report data, the prevalence of infertility was 46.0 % in survivors versus 17.5 % in siblings (RR = 2.64, 95 % CI 1.88-3.70, p infertility, 37 % had reported at least one pregnancy with a female partner that resulted in a live birth. In a multivariable analysis, risk factors for infertility included an alkylating agent dose (AAD) score ≥3 (RR = 2.13, 95 % CI 1.69-2.68 for AAD ≥3 versus AAD infertility father their own children, suggesting episodes of both fertility and infertility. This and the novel association of infertility with bleomycin warrant further investigation. Though infertility is common, male survivors reporting infertility often father their own children. Bleomycin may pose some fertility risk.

  13. Treatment of Leukocytospermia in Male Infertility: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hung Jung

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Male factors account for 20% to 50% of infertility cases, and infection in the genitourinary tract may play a contributing role in up to 15% of male infertility. Leukocytospermia is a well-known indicator of infection or inflammation in the male sex glands and the urogenital tract. Although great deal of effort has been expended to elucidate definite management strategies in infertile men with leukocytospermia, the gold standard of treatment remains unclear. Until recently, broad spectrum antibiotics and antioxidants have been used in the treatment of leukocytospermia for male infertility to eliminate infection and reduce reactive oxygen free radicals produced inside cellular mitochondria as a result of inflammation. The present review reveals that antibiotics might improve sperm parameters, the rate of resolution of leukocytospermia, the bacteriologic cure rate, and even the pregnancy rate, although some reports conflict. Antioxidants might also have clinical benefits for sperm function as shown by in vitro studies. However, the data are insufficient to conclude whether antibiotics and antioxidants for the treatment of infertile men with leukocytospermia are effective or not. Better designed investigations into leukocytospermia are needed.

  14. Cognitive emotional consequences of male infertility in their female partners: a qualitative content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Fatemeh Zahra; Taghipour, Ali; Roudsari, Robab Latifnejad; Kimiaei, Seyed Ali; Mazlom, Seyed Reza; Amirian, Maliheh

    2015-11-01

    Infertility, as a global phenomenon and one of the most important issues of reproductive health, affects women more often than men, even when the infertility is due to a male factor. The purpose of this study was to explore the cognitive emotional experiences of women faced with male infertility. This qualitative study was conducted in 2014-2015 in Mashhad, Iran. The perceptions and experiences of healthy women whose husbands were diagnosed with primary male factor infertility were investigated using a qualitative content analysis approach. Participants were selected through purposeful sampling, and data collection was conducted using in-depth semistructured interviews. Data were analyzed using conventional content analysis with MAXqda software. Study rigor was verified via criteria proposed by Lincoln and Guba. One main theme emerged through analysis entitled "cognitive emotional reactions confronting infertility diagnosis" with sub-themes of cognitive emotional reactions when confronted with male infertility diagnosis with subthemes of disbelief and denial, fear and apprehension, suffering and emotional distress, disappointment, frustration, confusion, and joy. The diagnosis of male infertility was associated with important emotional cognitive consequences for their female partners. Emotional support, providing new insights into how to treat the issue, and trying to shorten the process of diagnosis are necessary for these women. This kind of support could reduce the psychological effects of confrontation with the diagnosis of male infertility, including social insecurity for women.

  15. Methotrexate treatment in progressive tubal ectopic pregnancies and hCG-related clinicosurgical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askin Dogan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to evaluate the relationship between the success of methotrexate treatment and β-hCG levels in progressive tubal ectopic pregnancies. We defined a retrospective cohort of 394 progressive tubal ectopic pregnancy patients treated with methotrexate. A single-dose methotrexate protocol using 50 mg/m2 was administered to patients with progressive tubal ectopic pregnancy. Surgery was performed in patients who exhibited signs of acute abdomen due to tubal rupture. Of 394 patients that received methotrexate treatment, 335 (84.6% responded to medical treatment, while the remaining 59 (15.36% underwent surgery due to treatment failure. β-hCG levels in the failure group were significantly higher as compared with the success group at Day 1, Day 4, and Day 7 (2116±3157 vs. 4178±3422, 2062±3551 vs. 4935±4103, and 1532±3007 vs. 3900±4783, respectively. The receiver operating characteristics curve for β-hCG levels at Day 1 was 0.738, with a cutoff value of 1418 mIU/mL, while sensitivity and specificity values reached the optimum for treatment success (83.1% and 59.4%, respectively. Medical treatment with methotrexate achieved an 85.02% success rate for the treatment of progressive tubal ectopic pregnancy, while success rates for medical treatment decreased significantly when initial β-hCG levels were >1418 mIU/mL.

  16. Retrospective cost analysis comparing Essure hysteroscopic sterilization and laparoscopic bilateral tubal coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Matthew R; Creedon, Douglas J; Wagie, Amy E; Williams, Arthur R; Famuyide, Abimbola O

    2007-01-01

    To compare the institutional cost of permanent female sterilization by Essure hysteroscopic sterilization and laparoscopic bilateral coagulation. Retrospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). Midwestern academic medical center. Women of reproductive age who elected for permanent contraception by the Essure method (n = 43) or by laparoscopic tubal coagulation (n = 44) during the time frame studied. Placement of the Essure inserts according to the manufacturer's instructions or laparoscopic tubal sterilization using bipolar forceps according to standard techniques of open or closed laparoscopy. Cost-center data for the institutional cost of the procedure was abstracted for each patient included in the study. In addition, demographic data and procedural information were obtained and compared for the patient populations. The Essure system of hysteroscopic sterilization had a significantly decreased cost compared with laparoscopic tubal sterilization when both procedures were performed in an operating room setting. The decrease per patient in institutional cost was 180 dollars (p = .038). This included the cost of the confirmatory hysterosalpingogram 3 months after Essure placement and the cost of laparoscopic tubal occlusion by Filshie clip if the Essure micro-inserts could not be placed. The majority of the cost was related to hospital costs as opposed to physician costs. The Essure procedure had higher costs for disposable equipment (p Essure hysteroscopic sterilization had significant cost savings compared with laparoscopic tubal sterilization (p = .038). We believe that our data represent the minimum of potential savings using this approach, and future developments will only increase the cost difference found in our study.

  17. Cultural Constructions of Infertility in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    The Work of a Woman is to give Birth to Children: Cultural ... sexuality, cosmology and religion can be examined. .... adult and are often seen to be of minimal ... marked variability of rates and meanings with the consequences of infertility being closely aligned to ...... and lifelong attachments is heavily weighed upon,.

  18. Testicular cancer and male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paduch, Darius A

    2006-11-01

    Testicular cancer and infertility affect a similar age group of patients and have common biologic, epidemiologic, and environmental backgrounds. In this review, we provide current literature on links between infertility and testicular cancer, and new developments in the management of testicular cancer aimed at improving quality of life in men with testicular cancer. In-utero environmental exposure to endocrine disruptors modulates the genetically determined fate of primitive gonad and results in testicular dysgenesis syndrome, which may result in infertility and testicular cancer. Excellent response of testicular cancer to radiation and chemotherapy results in over 90% of survival and quality of life--fertility and sexual function--is of significant concern to patients and clinicians. The testicular-sparing management of testicular masses emerges as a sound alternative to radical orchiectomy and allows for preservation of spermatogenesis and hormonal function, and at the same time achieving similar survival rates. Secondary malignancies, pulmonary, and cardiovascular complications are recognized as late complications of treatment for testicular cancer. Better understanding of common mechanisms involved in infertility and testicular cancer, and scientifically driven evidence-based treatment options should improve quality of life in young men faced with this potentially life-threatening disease.

  19. MicroRNA and Male Infertility: A Potential for Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Khazaie

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding single stranded RNA molecules that are physiologically produced in eukaryotic cells to regulate or mostly down-regulate genes by pairing with their complementary base-sequence in related mRNA molecules in the cytoplasm. It has been reported that other than its function in many physiological cell processes, dysregulation of miRNAs plays a role in the development of many diseases. In this short review, the association between miRNAs and some male reproductive disorders is surveyed. Male factor Infertility is a devastating problem from which a notable percentage of couples suffer. However, the molecular mechanism of many infertility disorders has not been clearly elucidated. Since miRNAs have an important role in numerous biological cell processes and cellular dysfunctions, it is of interest to review the related literature on the role of miRNAs in the male reproductive organs. Aberrant expression of specific miRNAs is associated with certain male reproductive dysfunctions. For this reason, assessment of expression of such miRNAs may serve as a suitable molecular biomarker for diagnosis of those male infertility disorders. The presence of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at the miRNAs’ binding site in its targeted mRNA has been reported to have an association with idiopathic male infertility. Also, a relation with male infertility has been shown with SNP in the genes of the factors necessary for miRNA biogenesis. Therefore, focusing on the role of miRNAs in male reproductive disorders can further elucidate the molecular mechanisms of male infertility and generate the potential for locating efficient biomarkers and therapeutic agents for these disorders.

  20. Knowledge, attitude, and practices of infertility among Saudi couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfotouh MA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mostafa A Abolfotouh,1 Abdullah A Alabdrabalnabi,2 Rehab B Albacker,3 Umar A Al-Jughaiman,4 Samar N Hassan5 1King Abdullah International Medical Research Center (KAIMRC, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2University of Dammam, College of Medicine, Dammam, Saudi Arabia; 3King Saud University, College of Medicine, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4King Faisal University, College of Medicine, Dammam, Saudi Arabia; 5Division of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Introduction: Infertility places a huge psychological burden on infertile couples, especially for women. Greater knowledge of the factors affecting fertility may help to decrease the incidence of infertility by allowing couples to avoid certain risk factors. The aim of our study was (1 to assess the knowledge and attitudes of infertile and fertile Saudi participants on infertility, possible risk factors, and social consequences; and (2 to determine the practices of infertile Saudi couples to promote their fertility before having them attend an in vitro fertilization (IVF clinic. Methods and materials: We conducted a cross-sectional study on 277 fertile participants from outpatient clinics and 104 infertile patients from the IVF clinic at King Abdulaziz Medical City between June 24, 2012 and July 4, 2012, using a previously validated interview questionnaire. Descriptive and analytical statistics were applied with a significance threshold of P ≤ 0.05. Results: A generally poor level of knowledge (59% and a neutral attitude (76% toward infertility were reported by participants. Mistaken beliefs commonly held by the study participants regarding the causes of infertility were Djinns and supernatural causes (58.8%, black magic (67.5%, intrauterine devices (71.3%, and contraceptive pills (42.9%. The healer/Sheikh was reported as the primary and secondary preference for infertility

  1. Incorporating Ideological Context in Counseling Couples Experiencing Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Judith A.; Panchal, Krishna

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the influence of ideological values on couples' experience of infertility. Contextual issues are considered in terms of how they influence medical decision making as well as emotional factors. Strength-based counseling interventions that attend to couples' diverse values are described. Last, implications for counselors,…

  2. Male infertility in Nigeria: A neglected reproductive health issue ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The impact of male factor infertility is likely to increase if adequate ... World Health Organization in 1991 estimated that, 8–12% .... is concentration increases in the food chain leading to ..... Emokpae MA, Uadia PO, Sadiq NM. .... 2001;46:210-4.

  3. Cytogenetic studies among Iranian infertile men: The first 20-year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromosomal aberrations have been postulated to be one of the principal genetic factors in male infertility and occur in about 2 to 3% of unselected patients with proven sub-fertility. This rate is estimated to be 5 to 7% in patients with oligospermia, increasing to 10 to 15% in patients with azoospermia. The aim of this study ...

  4. Psychogenic infertility and adoption | Cooper | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is suggested that a lack of normal maternal nurture is the most important factor on which the relatively high incidence of psychiatric disturbance in adoptees is to be explained. Psychogenic infertility is discussed and the psychodynamics thereof related to those responsible for the rejection of adoptees by their ...

  5. Perceptions of and Attitudes towards Male Infertility in Northern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discusses the perceptions of male infertility in northern Botswana and their implications for efficacious family planning and AIDS prevention programmes in the country. HIV rates are rapidly increasing in northern Botswana and it is estimated that nearly 30% of the population are infected. A significant factor in ...

  6. Chlamydia trachomatis IgG seropositivity is associated with lower natural conception rates in ovulatory subfertile women without visible tubal pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppus, S. F. P. J.; Land, J. A.; Opmeer, B. C.; Steures, P.; Eijkemans, M. J. C.; Hompes, P. G. A.; Bossuyt, P. M. M.; van der Veen, F.; Mol, B. W. J.; van der Steeg, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    The relation between Chlamydia trachomatis infection and subsequent tubal damage is widely recognized. As such, C. trachomatis antibody (CAT) testing can be used to triage women for immediate tubal testing with hysterosalpingography (HSG) or laparoscopy. However, once invasive tubal testing has

  7. Identification of Reproductive Education Needs of Infertile Clients Undergoing Assisted Reproduction Treatment Using Assessments of Their Knowledge and Attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezabadi Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background In order to empower infertile individuals and provide high quality patient-centered infertility care, it is necessary to recognize and meet infertile individuals’ educational needs. This study aims to examine infertility patients’ knowledge and subsequently their education needs given their attitudinal approach to infertility education in terms of patients who undergo assisted reproduction treatment. Materials and Methods This descriptive study enrolled 150 subjects by conveni- ence sampling of all patients who received their first assisted reproductive treatment between July and September 2015 at a referral fertility clinic, Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran. We used a questionnaire that measured fertility and infertility information (8 questions as well as attitude toward education on the causes and treatment of infertility (5 questions. Chi-square, independent sample t test, and one way ANOVA analyses were conducted to examine differences by sex. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Total mean knowledge was 3.08 ± 0.99. Clients’ responses indicated that the highest mean knowledge scores related to knowledge of factors that affected pregnancy (3.97 ± 1.11 and infertility treatment (3.97 ± 1.16. The lowest mean knowledge scores related to knowledge of the natural reproductive cycle (2.96 ± 1.12 and anatomy of the genital organs (2.94 ± 1.16. Most females (92.1% and males (83.3% were of the opinion that infertility education programs should include causes of infertility and types of treatment associated with diagnostic and laboratory procedures. No statistically significant difference existed between male and female participants (P=0.245. Conclusion Most participants in this study expressed awareness of factors that affect pregnancy and infertility treatment. It is imperative to educate and empower infertile individuals who seek reproduction treatment in terms of infertility causes and types of treatment, as

  8. Are severe depressive symptoms associated with infertility-related distress in individuals and their partners?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, Brennan D.; Sejbæk, Camilla Sandal; Prritano, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    the individual and partner level. What is known already?: An infertility diagnosis, the stress of medical treatments and a prior history of depression are risk factors for future depression in those undergoing fertility treatments. Studies examining the impact of severe depressive symptoms on infertility-related......Study question: Are severe depressive symptoms in women and men associated with individual and dyadic infertility-related stress in couples undergoing infertility treatment? Summary answer: Severe depressive symptoms were significantly associated with increased infertility-related distress at both....../materials, setting, methods: Participants were consecutively referred patients undergoing a cycle of medically assisted reproduction treatment at five Danish public and private clinics specializing in treating fertility patients. Severe depressive symptoms were measured by the Mental Health Inventory 5 from...

  9. Initial experience with hysteroscopic tubal occlusion (Essure®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depes, Daniella De Batista; Pereira, Ana Maria Gomes; Lippi, Umberto Gazi; Martins, João Alfredo; Lopes, Reginaldo Guedes Coelho

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate results of early tubal occlusions performed by hysteroscopy (Essure®). This prospective study included 38 patients, 73.7% of them were white, mean age 34.5 years, they have had on average 3 pregnancies and 2.7 of deliveries. A total of 86.8% of patients previously prepared the endometrium. All procedures were carried out at outpatient unit without anesthesia. Insertion rate of the device was 100% at a mean time of 4 minutes and 50 seconds. Based on the analogical visual scale, average pain reported was three, and 55.3% of women did not report pain after the procedure. After 3 months, 89.5% of patients were very satisfied with the method. Simple radiographs of the pelvis showed 92.1% of topical devices, and one case of unilateral expulsion had occurred. A four years follow-up did not show failure in the method. Tubal occlusion through hysteroscopy at outpatient unit and without anesthesia was a quickly and well-tolerated procedure. No serious complications were seen, the success rate was high, and patients were satisfied. Avaliar os resultados das primeiras oclusões tubárias realizadas pela via histeroscópica (Essure®). Estudo prospectivo com 38 pacientes, sendo 73,7% caucasianas, com média de idade de 34,5 anos, e com 3 gestações e 2,7 partos em média. Do total, 86,8% das pacientes fizeram preparo prévio do endométrio. Todos os procedimentos foram ambulatoriais e sem anestesia. A taxa de inserção do dispositivo foi de 100%, com tempo médio de 4 minutos e 50 segundos. Segundo a Escala Visual Analógica, a dor média obtida foi de três, e 55,3% das mulheres não referiram qualquer dor após o método. Ocorreu um caso de reflexo vagal e 89,5% das pacientes retornaram às atividades normais no mesmo dia. Após 3 meses, 89,5% das pacientes encontravam-se muito satisfeitas com o método. A radiografia simples da pelve evidenciou 92,1% de dispositivos tópicos, ocorrendo um caso de expulsão unilateral. Após 4 anos de seguimento, não houve

  10. Treatment of infertility in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: approach to clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Sanches Melo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome represents 80% of anovulatory infertility cases. Treatment initially includes preconception guidelines, such as lifestyle changes (weight loss, folic acid therapy to prevent the risk of fetal neural tube defects and halting the consumption of tobacco and alcohol. The first-line pharmacological treatment for inducing ovulation consists of a clomiphene citrate treatment for timed intercourse. The second-line pharmacological treatment includes the administration of exogenous gonadotropins or laparoscopic ovarian surgery (ovarian drilling. Ovulation induction using clomiphene citrate or gonadotropins is effective with cumulative live birth rates of approximately 70%. Ovarian drilling should be performed when laparoscopy is indicated; this procedure is typically effective in approximately 50% of cases. Finally, a high-complexity reproduction treatment (in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection is the third-line treatment and is recommended when the previous interventions fail. This option is also the first choice in cases of bilateral tubal occlusion or semen alterations that impair the occurrence of natural pregnancy. Evidence for the routine use of metformin in infertility treatment of anovulatory women with polycystic ovary syndrome is not available. Aromatase inhibitors are promising and longer term studies are necessary to prove their safety.

  11. Second-Line Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy for Recurrent Epithelial Ovarian, Tubal and Peritoneal Cancer: A Propensity Score-Matching Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chien-Hsing; Chang, Yen-Hou; Lee, Wai-Hou; Chang, Yi; Peng, Chia-Wen; Chuang, Chi-Mu

    2016-01-01

    The superiority of frontline intraperitoneal (IP) over intravenous (IV) chemotherapy is well established in the treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer. However, the role of IP chemotherapy in the second-line setting has rarely been investigated. Consecutive patients diagnosed with recurrent epithelial, tubal and peritoneal cancers between January 2000 and December 2012 were recruited using a propensity score-matching technique to adjust relevant risk factors. In total, 310 patients were included in the final analysis (94 for platinum-refractory/resistant disease and 216 for platinum-sensitive disease). IP chemotherapy demonstrated significantly longer median progression-free survival than IV chemotherapy (4.9 vs. 2.4 months, p chemotherapy confers longer progression-free survival than IV chemotherapy. Large-scale clinical trials should be conducted to validate the true efficacy. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Clinical and psychological repercussions of videolaparoscopic tubal ligation: observational, single cohort, retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Spadoto Dias

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Tubal ligation is one of the most commonly used contraceptive methods worldwide. Since the controversy over the potential effects of tubal sterilization still continues, this study aimed to evaluate the clinical and psychological repercussions of videolaparoscopic tubal ligation.DESIGN AND SETTING: Observational, single cohort, retrospective study, conducted in a tertiary public hospital.METHODS: A questionnaire was applied to 130 women aged 21-46 years who underwent videolaparoscopic tubal ligation by means of tubal ring insertion or bipolar electrocoagulation and sectioning, between January 1999 and December 2007. Menstrual cycle interval, intensity and duration of bleeding, premenstrual symptoms, dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, noncyclic pelvic pain and degree of sexual satisfaction were assessed in this questionnaire. Each woman served as her own control, and comparisons were made between before and after the surgical procedure and between the two techniques used.RESULTS: The clinical and psychological repercussions were significant, with increases in bleeding (P = 0.001, premenstrual symptoms (P < 0.001, dysmenorrhea (P = 0.019 and noncyclic pelvic pain (P = 0.001; and reductions in the number of sexual intercourse occurrences per week (P = 0.001 and in libido (P = 0.001. Women aged ≤ 35 years at the time of sterilization were more likely to develop menstrual abnormalities. The bipolar electrocoagulation method showed greater clinical and psychological repercussions.CONCLUSION: Regardless of the technique used, videolaparoscopic tubal ligation had repercussions consisting of increased menstrual flow and premenstrual symptoms, especially in women aged ≤ 35 years, and also had a negative influence on sexual activity.

  13. ORIGINAL ARTICLES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    commonest cause of female infertility in Africa. The therapeutic ... infertility.'5-l7. The aim of this study was to establish conception rates following endoscopic tubal surgery in patients with tubal disease presenting to the Reproductive Medicine Unit at Groote ... a severe male factor were a sperm count below 2 million/ml,.

  14. Bacteriospermia and Sperm Quality in Infertile Male Patient at University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Ibadin, O. K.; Ibeh, I. N.

    2008-01-01

    Male Urogenital tract infection plays an important role in men infertility. Asymptomtic bacteriospermia has been regarded as of the contributing factor to male infertility. In this study, 87 semen samples of infertile men attending the Human Reproduction Research Programme and Invitrofertilization unit (HRRP/IVF) of University Benin Teaching Hospital were evaluated Bacteriologically using standard Bacterial culture method. Standard semen analysis was performed according to WHO guidelines. Amo...

  15. Role of the Leukemia-Inhibitory Factor Gene Mutations in Infertile Women:The Embryo-Endometrial Cytokine Cross Talk during Implantation-a Delicate Homeostatic Equilibrium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Králíčková, M.; Šíma, Petr; Rokyta, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 3 (2005), s. 179-186 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/02/1232; GA ČR GA301/05/0078 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : leukemia inhibitory factor * interleukin 11 Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.918, year: 2005

  16. [Successive ectopic pregnancies associated with tubal shistosomiasis in a French traveler].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroche, Justine; Mottet, Nicolas; Malincenco, Marianna; Gay, Catherine; Royer, Pierre Yves; Riethmuller, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is the second endemic parasitic disease in the world and is a common cause of urogenital infections. Ectopic pregnancies due to tubal obstruction by schistosoma's eggs are usually reported in Africa. Schistosomiasis also affects travelers but infection of the female genital tract is less frequently described. We report an unusual clinical case of two successive ectopic pregnancies with tubal schistosomiasis in a French woman, seven years after a travel to Mali. The first event was discovered after histologic examination of salpingectomy and the second event required a controlateral salpingotomy with an injection of methotrexate, two months later.

  17. Male infertility in long-term survivors of pediatric cancer: A report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski-Masker, K; Seidel, K D; Leisenring, W; Mertens, A C; Shnorhavorian, M; Ritenour, C W; Stovall, M; Green, D M; Sklar, C A; Armstrong, G T; Robison, L L; Meacham, L R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of male infertility and treatment-related risk factors in childhood cancer survivors. Methods Within the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, 1622 survivors and 274 siblings completed the Male Health Questionnaire. The analysis was restricted to survivors (938/1622; 57.8%) and siblings (174/274; 63.5%) who tried to become pregnant. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the prevalence of self-reported infertility were calculated using generalized linear models for demographic variables and treatment-related factors to account for correlation among survivors and siblings of the same family. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Among those who provided self-report data, the prevalence of infertility was 46.0% in survivors versus 17.5% in siblings (RR=2.64, 95% CI 1.88-3.70, p infertility, 37% had reported at least one pregnancy with a female partner that resulted in a live birth. In a multivariable analysis, risk factors for infertility included an alkylating agent dose score (AAD) ≥ 3 (RR= 2.13, 95% CI 1.69-2.68 for AAD ≥ 3 versus AADinfertility father their own children suggesting episodes of both fertility and infertility. This and the novel association of infertility with bleomycin warrant further investigation. Implications for Cancer Survivors Though infertility is common, male survivors reporting infertility often father their own children. Bleomycin may pose some fertility risk. PMID:24711092

  18. Infertility Stress: The Role of Coping Strategies, Personality Trait, and Social Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batool Rashidi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of coping strategies, personality trait and social support as the main social and psychological factors on infertility stress.Materials and methods: This study was conducted on 201 infertile Iranian women referred to the Vali-e-Asr Reproductive health Research Center, and completed the following questionnaires: The fertility problem inventory, measuring perceived infertility related stress (Newton CR, 1999, big five factor personality questionnaire (Farahani, 2009, multidimensional scale of perceived social support MSPS (Zimmet 1988, and multidimensional assessment of coping (Endler, 1990.The results were then analyzed using the Pearson Correlation and stepwise regression.Results: Infertility stress has negative and significant relation with emotion-oriented coping method, perceived social support and bring extrovert. It has a positive, significant relation with emotion-oriented coping method, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD. The results of the stepwise regression showed that emotion-oriented coping method, OCD and being extrovert are suitable predictors of infertility stress.Conclusion: About 22% of the infertility stress variance was explained by coping strategies and personality trait. Therefore our result demonstrates the importance of social and psychological factors on experiencing the infertility stress.

  19. Comparison of sexual dysfunction in women with infertility and without infertility referred to Al-Zahra Hospital in 2013-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Mirblouk

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the affected aspects in infertile women that have not been given sufficient attention is sexual function. Sexual function is a key factor in physical and marital health, and sexual dysfunction could significantly lower the quality of life. Aim of this study was to assess the comparison sexual dysfunction in women with infertility and without infertility, admitted to Al- Zahra Hospital. Objective: We decided to assess the prevalence of women sexual disorders in fertile and infertile subjects, admitted to Al-Zahra Hospital. Materials and Methods: 149 fertile and 147 infertile women who referred to infertility clinic of Al-Zahra Hospital during 2013-2014 were entered this crosssectional study and Female Sexual Function Index questionnaire (FSFI had been filled by all the cases. Most of women were married for 6-10 years (35.5% and mean marriage time in participants was 9.55±6.07 years. Data were analyzed using SPSS software Ver. 18 and χP 2 P test and logistic regression model has been used for analysis. Results: Results showed significant differences between desire (p=0.004, arousal (p=0.001, satisfaction (p=0.022 and total sexual dysfunction (p=0.011 in both groups but in lubrication (p=0.266, orgasm (p=0.61 and pain (p=0.793 difference were not significant. Conclusion: Some of sexual dysfunction indices are high in all infertile women. Our findings suggest that infertility impacts on women’s sexual function in desire, arousal, satisfaction and total sexual dysfunction. Health care professional should be sensitive to impact that diagnosis of infertility can have on women’s sexuality.

  20. Value of hysteroscopy in management of unexplained infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha M. Elbareg

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: As a cause of unexplained infertility, subtle uterine abnormalities are diagnosed only during hysteroscopy and they are relatively common in infertility women. Although the presence of these abnormalities is not detected by the basic investigations for infertility, their correction seems to be necessary when infertility is desired and other infertility causes are excluded.

  1. Role of Ultrasound in Male Infertility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Min Hoan; Sung, Chang Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    US evaluation is the mainstay of diagnostic imaging of infertile men. In this editorial, we review the spectrum of diseases responsible for male infertility, discuss the way in which US imaging studies can be used for evaluation of male infertility, and illustrate characteristic US imaging features that allow for specific diagnosis. The discussion will be divided into three main categories: obstruction in sperm passage, impairment of sperm function, and defect in sperm genesis.

  2. Role of Ultrasound in Male Infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Min Hoan; Sung, Chang Kyu

    2012-01-01

    US evaluation is the mainstay of diagnostic imaging of infertile men. In this editorial, we review the spectrum of diseases responsible for male infertility, discuss the way in which US imaging studies can be used for evaluation of male infertility, and illustrate characteristic US imaging features that allow for specific diagnosis. The discussion will be divided into three main categories: obstruction in sperm passage, impairment of sperm function, and defect in sperm genesis.

  3. Results of infertility investigations and follow-up among 312 infertile women and their partners in Kigali, Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhont, Nathalie; van de Wijgert, Janneke; Vyankandondera, Joseph; Busasa, Rosette; Gasarabwe, Ammiel; Temmerman, Marleen

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the outcome of infertility investigations and an 18-month follow-up of 312 infertile women and their partners in Rwanda. Between November 2007 and May 2009, an infertility research clinic was opened. Infertile couples received basic infertility

  4. Does vitamin E prevent tubal damage caused by smoking? A light microscopy and animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Muzeyyen; Ustunyurt, Emin; Kosus, Aydin; Kosus, Nermin; Turhan, Nilgun; Hızlı, Deniz; Sarac, Gulce Naz; Erdogan, Deniz

    2014-04-01

    To assess the histomorphological effects of smoking on the cilia of fallopian tubes in mice and the effect of vitamin E on the negative effects of smoke. Eighteen 12-14 week-old Swiss albino type female mice were randomly divided into three groups, each consisting of six mice: Group A: control group; Group B: mice exposed to cigarette smoke; Group C: mice exposed to cigarette smoke together with vitamin E. Groups B and C were exposed to cigarette smoke for 10 weeks. After 10 weeks, tubal excision was performed in all animals. Histopathologic examination of excised tubal tissue was conducted under light microscopy. The number of cilia was significantly lower in Group B. Although not statistically significant, the median number of cilia in Group C was measured to be higher than in Group B but lower than in Group A. Based on the results, it can be concluded that smoking decreases tubal cilia numbers. Supplementation by vitamin E may treat or at least help to slow down the decrease in number of cilia caused by smoking; therefore it could be used therapeutically in the treatment of smoking-related tubal damage. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Bearing capacity and rigidity of short plastic-concrete-tubal vertical columns under transverse load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolzhenko, A. V.; Naumov, A. E.; Shevchenko, A. E.

    2018-03-01

    The results of mathematical modeling in determining strain-stress distribution parameters of a short plastic-concrete-tubal vertical column under horizontal load as those in vertical constructions are described. Quantitative parameters of strain-stress distribution during vertical and horizontal loads and horizontal stiffness were determined by finite element modeling. The internal stress in the concrete column core was analyzed according to equivalent stress in Mohr theory of failure. It was determined that the bearing capacity of a short plastic- concrete-tubal vertical column is 25% higher in resistibility and 15% higher in rigidness than those of the caseless concrete columns equal in size. Cracks formation in the core of a short plastic-concrete-tubal vertical column happens under significantly bigger horizontal loads with less amount of concrete spent than that in caseless concrete columns. The significant increase of bearing capacity and cracking resistance of a short plastic-concrete-tubal vertical column under vertical and horizontal loads allows recommending them as highly effective and highly reliable structural wall elements in civil engineering.

  6. Bilateral tubal ligation in a rural hospital in the Niger Delta, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Objective: To document bilateral tubal ligation (BTL) rate and highlight the need to improve on the rates. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of BTLs done in a five-year period from January 2000 to December 2004 constituted the study group. Results: There were a total of 103 BTLs, 58 were ...

  7. Effect of menstrual cycle phase and hormonal treatments on evaluation of tubal patency in baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jeffrey T; Hanna, Carol; Mishler, Emily; Lim, Jeong Y; Slayden, Ov D

    2018-02-01

    We evaluated whether menstrual cycle phase influences the assessment of tubal patency by hysterosalpingography (HSG) in baboons. Retrospective analysis of baseline tubal patency studies and serum estradiol (E 2 ) and progesterone (P4) values obtained from female baboons used as models for development of non-surgical permanent contraception in women. The main outcome measure was bilateral tubal patency (BTP) in relationship with estradiol level. Female baboons (n = 110) underwent a single (n = 81), two (n = 26), or three (n = 3) HSG examinations. In 33/142 (23%) HSG examinations, one or both tubes showed functional occlusion (FO). The median E 2 in studies with BTP (49 pg/mL) was significantly higher than in those studies with FO (32 pg/mL, P = .005). Among 18 animals with repeat examinations where serum E 2 changed from <60 to ≥ 60 pg/mL, 13 results changed from FO to BTP (P = .0001). No sets showed a change from BTP to FO with an increase in estradiol. In baboons, functional occlusion of the fallopian tube is associated with low estradiol levels, supporting a role for estrogen-mediated relaxation of the utero-tubal junction. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Medical Primatology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. An evaluation of sodium hyaluronate in preventing recurrence of tubal obstruction after interventional recanalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Hanwei; Cao Xiaoying; Hu Peiling; Liu Haiying; Tang Yukuan; Xiao Chengjiang

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and application of sodium hyaluronate in preventing the recurrence of tubal obstruction after interventional recanalization. Methods: In total 103 cases of the study group were injected sodium hyaluronate to prevent tubal adhering obstruction after successful recanalization, while in the control group 206 cases were injected desamethasone, alphacutanee, metronidazole and gentamycin for the same purpose. Both groups were followed up in 2-3 months after the initial intervention. The assessments included water insufflation, intrauterine pregnancy rate, ectopic pregnancy rate and the normal labor. Results: In the study group, 190 tubes in 103 cases were obstructed, 27 tubes missing, and 188 tubes were recanalized out of 190 (99%). In the control group 390 tubes were obstructed, 27 tubes missing, 385 tubes were successfully recanalized (99%). In the 2-3 month follow up water insufflation showed satisfying patency in 99 cases in the study group, and in 178 cases in the control group. Significant difference of recurrence rate of tubal obstruction was found between the two groups. Conclusion: Sodium hyaluronate is effective to prevent the recurrence of tubal obstruction after interventional recanalization

  9. Infertile individuals' marital relationship status, happiness, and mental health: a causal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi Forooshany, Seyed Habiballah; Yazdkhasti, Fariba; Safari Hajataghaie, Saiede; Nasr Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the causal model of relation between marital relation- ship status, happiness, and mental health in infertile individuals. In this descriptive study, 155 subjects (men: 52 and women: 78), who had been visited in one of the infertility Centers, voluntarily participated in a self-evaluation. Golombok Rust Inventory of Marital Status, Oxford Happiness Ques- tionnaire, and General Health Questionnaire were used as instruments of the study. Data was analyzed by SPSS17 and Amos 5 software using descriptive statistics, independent sample t test, and path analysis. Disregarding the gender factor, marital relationship status was directly related to happiness (phappiness was directly related to mental health, (phappiness and mental health was significant (phappiness had a mediator role in relation between marital relationship status and mental health in infertile individu- als disregarding the gender factor. Also, considering the gender factor, only in infertile women, marital relationship status can directly and indirectly affect happiness and mental health.

  10. Another face of violence against women: Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Rusen; Taner, Aylin; Guneri, Sezer Er; Yilmaz, Bulent

    2017-01-01

    Background & Objective: Violence against women is a widespread problem and has serious implications on women’s health. Infertility, in many ways, is a very stressful condition that affect social and marital life of a couple; moreover, compared to fertile women, infertile women are twice as vulnerable against violence. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of violence and define the effect of infertility on violence on women receiving infertility treatment. Methods: Descriptive and cross-sectional study was carried out 301 infertile women between November 2015 and August 2016 in a state hospital, Izmir. Data were collected as “Sociodemographic Characteristics Form” and “Infertile Women’s Exposure to Violence Determination Scale”. Results: The mean age of women was 31.77±5.46 years; the average duration of marriage was 6.93±4.53 years. About 32.5% of women stated that they have suffered from violence throughout their lives and 4.7% of women were still suffering from violence, while 5.0% of women were subjected to violence after infertility was diagnosed. Conclusion: It is an encouraging finding that infertile women have a low exposure to violence. However, despite a low violence rate, there is an increase in violence toward women who have been diagnosed with infertility. PMID:29067064

  11. Influence of mare uterine tubal fluids on the metabolism of stallion sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, C E; Foley, C W; Witherspoon, D M; Scarth, R D; Goetsch, D D

    1975-08-01

    Three experiments were conducted on the metabolism of stallion sperm. In experiment 1, whole and washed sperm were incubated under aerobic and anaerobic enviroments and analyzed before and after controlled incubation for motility, pH, lactic acid, glucose, fructose, and O2 comsumption. In experiment 2, whole and washed sperm were incubated aerobically and anaerobically with and without uterine tubal fluids. Experiment 3 was the same as experiment 2, except added substrates of glucose and lactic acid were studied. The same examinations were made in experiments 2 and 3 as for experiment 1. Motility decreased significantly during incubation for all treatments, with the greatest decrease occurring for whole semen where only trace amounts of substrate (fructose) were present. Exogenous glucose plus uterine tubal fluid maintained sperm motility better than did added lactate. However, sperm respiration rates were highest when exogenous lactate was the only substrate in the incubation medium. The mean pH values for gel-free stallion semen at the start of controlled aerobic and anaerobic incubation were 7.08 and 7.34. Lactic acid accummulation for 1 hour increased from 0.05 mg to 0.09 mg/10(9) sperm when uterine tubal fluid was added to the incubation medium. Washed spermatozoa incubated in 0.03 M glucose plus uterine tubal fluid utilized less glucose than did sperm incubated in the glucose medium. These results, along with the increased oxygen utilization (ZO2) values produced by adding uterine tubal fluid to the incubation mediums, might indicate utilization of a uterine tubal substrate. Added uterine tubal fluid resulted in increased ZO2 values (expressed in mul of O2 utilized by 10(8) sperm in 1 hour at 37 C) for whole semen from 10.45 to 12.63. Washed spermatozoa also respired at a significantly greater rate than whole sperm. Respiration rates were greater for sperm incubated with 0.01 M lactic acid than for any other substrate or experiment.

  12. A new strategy for professional medical support couples with infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Zhukov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available From our point of view, the problem of infertility in a pair of appropriately addressed jointly by the two related disciplines. This process has been actively helping set newsupplements Spematon and Pregnoton. The study included 50 couples planning to conceive: 25 couples with male factor infertility secretory type (group 1, 25 couples with infertility caused by varicocele in the postoperative period (group 2. The first group included patients with hyperprolactinemia relative to a second group – 25 somatically healthy patients. All groups patients takes Spematon and Pregnoton during 3 months. Terms of infertility in couples ranged from 1 to 4,5 years and an average reached 2,8 ± 1,6 years. According to the results of the comparative analysis the reproductive value of sperm had been enhanced, functional status of the female reproductive system had been improved, the menstrual cycle had been normalized and relatively elevated levels of prolactin had been decreased after co-application of these supplements. Five woman became pregnant.

  13. How Common is Male Infertility, and What Are Its Causes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print How common is male infertility, and what are its causes? Infertility is ... one-third of infertility cases are caused by male reproductive issues, one-third by female reproductive issues, ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: CATSPER1-related nonsyndromic male infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... related nonsyndromic male infertility CATSPER1-related nonsyndromic male infertility Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description CATSPER1 -related nonsyndromic male infertility is a condition that affects the function of ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: sensorineural deafness and male infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deafness and male infertility Sensorineural deafness and male infertility Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Sensorineural deafness and male infertility is a condition characterized by hearing loss and ...

  16. Imaging in gynecological disease (9): clinical and ultrasound characteristics of tubal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludovisi, M; De Blasis, I; Virgilio, B; Fischerova, D; Franchi, D; Pascual, M A; Savelli, L; Epstein, E; Van Holsbeke, C; Guerriero, S; Czekierdowski, A; Zannoni, G; Scambia, G; Jurkovic, D; Rossi, A; Timmerman, D; Valentin, L; Testa, A C

    2014-03-01

    To describe clinical history and ultrasound findings in patients with tubal carcinoma. Patients with a histological diagnosis of tubal cancer who had undergone preoperative ultrasound examination were identified from the databases of 13 ultrasound centers. The tumors were described by the principal investigator at each contributing center on the basis of ultrasound images, ultrasound reports and research protocols (when applicable) using the terms and definitions of the International Ovarian Tumor Analysis (IOTA) group. In addition, three authors reviewed together all available digital ultrasound images and described them using subjective evaluation of gray-scale and color Doppler ultrasound findings. We identified 79 women with a histological diagnosis of primary tubal cancer, 70 of whom (89%) had serous carcinomas and 46 (58%) of whom presented at FIGO stage III. Forty-nine (62%) women were asymptomatic (incidental finding), whilst the remaining 30 complained of abdominal bloating or pain. Fifty-three (67%) tumors were described as solid at ultrasound examination, 14 (18%) as multilocular solid, 10 (13%) as unilocular solid and two (3%) as unilocular. No tumor was described as a multilocular mass. Most tumors (70/79, 89%) were moderately or very well vascularized on color or power Doppler ultrasound. Normal ovarian tissue was identified adjacent to the tumor in 51% (39/77) of cases. Three types of ultrasound appearance were identified as being typical of tubal carcinoma using pattern recognition: a sausage-shaped cystic structure with solid tissue protruding into it like a papillary projection (11/62, 18%); a sausage-shaped cystic structure with a large solid component filling part of the cyst cavity (13/62, 21%); an ovoid or oblong completely solid mass (36/62, 58%). A well vascularized ovoid or sausage-shaped structure, either completely solid or with large solid component(s) in the pelvis, should raise the suspicion of tubal cancer, especially if normal

  17. Tubal origin of ovarian cancer - the double-edged sword of haemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shiou-Fu; Gerry, Emily; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2017-05-01

    Ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is the most malignant neoplasm of the gynaecological tract. While the origins of many human malignant neoplasms are clear, the origin of HGSC remains poorly understood. This lack of knowledge limits our understanding of its pathogenesis and compromises efforts devoted to developing better early detection tools and effective preventative interventions. The paradigm of the tubal origin of HGSC has been advanced since the initial report of dysplastic lesions (now known as serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas or STICs) that morphologically resemble HGSC in the Fallopian tube. These were observed in a group of patients with a genetic predisposition to ovarian cancer who were undergoing risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy. Since then, a series of clinico-pathological and molecular studies have characterized STICs and their concurrent HGSCs, and the results support the new paradigm of a tubal origin of many 'ovarian' HGSCs. Reactive oxygen species-containing ovulatory follicular fluid has been thought to be the major culprit behind DNA damage in tubal epithelial cells, leading to either cell death or, if the cells survive, mutagenesis. A recent report from this journal demonstrates that ferryl haemoglobin (Hb) in peritoneal fluid could prevent cell death from DNA-damaged fimbrial epithelial cells, facilitating ovulation-induced carcinogenesis of tubal epithelium. This timely study provides new insight into the tumour initiation event in HGSC. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma: its potential role in primary peritoneal serous carcinoma and serous cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Joseph W; Miron, Alexander; Jarboe, Elke A; Parast, Mana M; Hirsch, Michelle S; Lee, Yonghee; Muto, Michael G; Kindelberger, David; Crum, Christopher P

    2008-09-01

    A diagnosis of primary peritoneal serous carcinoma (PPSC) requires exclusion of a source in other reproductive organs. Serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC; stage 0) has been described in asymptomatic women with BRCA mutations and linked to a serous cancer precursor in the fimbria. This study examined the frequency of STIC in PPSC and its clinical outcome in BRCA-positive women. Presence or absence of STIC was recorded in consecutive cases meeting the 2001 WHO criteria for PPSC, including 26 patients with nonuniform sampling of the fallopian tubes (group 1) and 19 patients with complete tubal examination (group 2; sectioning and extensively examining the fimbriated end, or SEE-FIM protocol). In selected cases, STIC or its putative precursor and the peritoneal tumor were analyzed for p53 mutations (exons 1 to 11). Outcome of STIC was ascertained by literature review. Thirteen (50%) of 26 PPSCs in group 1 involved the endosalpinx, with nine STICs (35%). Fifteen (79%) of 19 cases in group 2 contained endosalpingeal involvement, with nine STICs (47%). STIC was typically fimbrial and unifocal, with variable invasion of the tubal wall. In five of five cases, the peritoneal and tubal lesion shared an identical p53 mutation. Of 10 reported STICs in BRCA-positive women, all patients were without disease on follow-up. The fimbria is the source of nearly one half of PPSCs, suggesting serous malignancy originates in the tubal mucosa but grows preferentially at a remote peritoneal site. The generally low risk of recurrence in stage 0 (STIC) disease further underscores STIC as a possible target for early serous cancer detection and prevention.

  19. A Nutrition Screening Form for Female Infertility Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Susie

    2014-12-01

    A Nutrition Screening Form (NSF) was designed to identify lifestyle risk factors that negatively impact fertility and to provide a descriptive profile of 300 female infertility patients in a private urban infertility clinic. The NSF was mailed to all new patients prior to the initial physician's visit and self-reported data were assessed using specific criteria to determine if a nutrition referral was warranted. This observational study revealed that 43% of the women had a body mass index (BMI) nutrition-related lifestyle factors that may negatively impact fertility and identified weight, BMI, diet, exercise, and stress as modifiable risk factors deserving future research. NSF information can help increase awareness among health professionals and patients about the important link between nutrition, fertility, and successful reproductive outcomes.

  20. The Effect of Marital Violence on Infertility Distress among A Sample of Turkish Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aygül Akyüz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between marital violence and distress level among women with a diagnosis of infertility. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study consisted of 139 married women diagnosed as primary infertile who applied to an in vitro fertilization (IVF center in Turkey, between September and December 2009. A descriptive information questionnaire developed by the researcher was used for data collection. In addition, an infertility distress scale (IDS for determining the severity effect of infertility and the scale for marital violence against women (SDVW for determining level of marital violence against the women were used. Results: The total IDS score of the study sample was 37.76 ± 10.53. There was no significant relationship between the age and education level of the women and the total IDS score. The total IDS score was higher in women who did not work and those being treated for infertility for more than three years. The total SDVW score of the study sample was 67.0 ± 8.26. The total SDVW score was higher in women who had been trying to have a child for more than six years and had received infertility treatment for longer than three years. The employment status of the women and physical, emotional, and sexual violence scores had a statistically significant relationship with the IDS scores. The emotional violence score was found to have the highest significance among the variables affecting total IDS score. Conclusion: Marital violence is a factor increasing the distress of infertile women. Healthcare staff serving infertile couples should consider the possibility of domestic violence against women as a factor affecting the psychological infertility distress level.

  1. The Effect of Marital Violence on Infertility Distress among A Sample of Turkish Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyüz, Aygül; Şahiner, Gönül; Seven, Memnun; Bakır, Bilal

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between marital violence and distress level among women with a diagnosis of infertility. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study consisted of 139 married women diagnosed as primary infertile who applied to an in vitro fertilization (IVF) center in Turkey, between September and December 2009. A descriptive information questionnaire developed by the researcher was used for data collection. In addition, an infertility distress scale (IDS) for determining the severity effect of infertility and the scale for marital violence against women (SDVW) for determining level of marital violence against the women were used. Results: The total IDS score of the study sample was 37.76 ± 10.53. There was no significant relationship between the age and education level of the women and the total IDS score. The total IDS score was higher in women who did not work and those being treated for infertility for more than three years. The total SDVW score of the study sample was 67.0 ± 8.26. The total SDVW score was higher in women who had been trying to have a child for more than six years and had received infertility treatment for longer than three years. The employment status of the women and physical, emotional, and sexual violence scores had a statistically significant relationship with the IDS scores. The emotional violence score was found to have the highest significance among the variables affecting total IDS score. Conclusion: Marital violence is a factor increasing the distress of infertile women. Healthcare staff serving infertile couples should consider the possibility of domestic violence against women as a factor affecting the psychological infertility distress level. PMID:24696770

  2. Management of infertility in women over 40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabry, Rosalie; Merviel, Philippe; Hazout, Andre; Belloc, Stephanie; Dalleac, Alain; Copin, Henri; Benkhalifa, Moncef

    2014-05-01

    Women's fertility potential is declining with age because of multiples intrinsic and extrinsic factors such as life style, oxidative stress and/or endocrine disruptors and is affecting the ability of these women to conceive naturally. This declining fertility potential and the late age of motherhood is increasing significantly the number of patients consulting infertility specialists. Different strategies of investigation and management are proposed to patients over 40 in order to overcome their infertility and improve the live birth rate in these patients. Intra Uterine Insemination (IUI) in women over 40 is associated with a low rate of ongoing pregnancy and IUI should not therefore be offered always as the first line of treatment. When the predictive factors are positive IVF/ICSI seem to be good alternatives until 43 years of age. Customized ovarian stimulation and flexible laboratory methods such as in vitro maturation (IVM), preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), embryo vitrification and transfer after thawing in subsequent natural or artificial cycles can improve the success rate of ART in patients over 40. Meanwhile, oocyte and embryos donation remain good options for patient over 40 with a bad prognosis and can lead to successful ongoing pregnancies until 45 years of age. Ovarian tissue cryopreservation, oocyte vitrification at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage or metaphase II stage present a breakthrough for fertility preservation but the ideal age for starting fertility preservation is still debated as well as the minimum number of oocytes to be vitrified in order to optimize the chances of pregnancy when needed at an older age. This manuscript reports the results of our own experience from patients older than 40 in the light of the published data and discusses the different therapeutic alternatives which can be proposed to patients over 40 consulting ART centres. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Identification of Reproductive Education Needs of Infertile Clients Undergoing Assisted Reproduction Treatment Using Assessments of Their Knowledge and Attitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezabadi, Zahra; Mollaahmadi, Fahimeh; Mohammadi, Maryam; Omani Samani, Reza; Vesali, Samira

    2017-01-01

    Background In order to empower infertile individuals and provide high quality patient-centered infertility care, it is necessary to recognize and meet infertile individuals’ educational needs. This study aims to examine infertility patients’ knowledge and subsequently their education needs given their attitudinal approach to infertility education in terms of patients who undergo assisted reproduction treatment. Materials and Methods This descriptive study enrolled 150 subjects by conveni- ence sampling of all patients who received their first assisted reproductive treatment between July and September 2015 at a referral fertility clinic, Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran. We used a questionnaire that measured fertility and infertility information (8 questions) as well as attitude toward education on the causes and treatment of infertility (5 questions). Chi-square, independent sample t test, and one way ANOVA analyses were conducted to examine differences by sex. Pinfertility treatment (3.97 ± 1.16). The lowest mean knowledge scores related to knowledge of the natural reproductive cycle (2.96 ± 1.12) and anatomy of the genital organs (2.94 ± 1.16). Most females (92.1%) and males (83.3%) were of the opinion that infertility education programs should include causes of infertility and types of treatment associated with diagnostic and laboratory procedures. No statistically significant difference existed between male and female participants (P=0.245). Conclusion Most participants in this study expressed awareness of factors that affect pregnancy and infertility treatment. It is imperative to educate and empower infertile individuals who seek reproduction treatment in terms of infertility causes and types of treatment, as well as diagnostic and laboratory procedures to enable them to make informed decisions about their assisted reproductive procedures. PMID:28367301

  4. Dropout is a problem in lifestyle intervention programs for overweight and obese infertile women: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutsaerts, M. A. Q.; Kuchenbecker, W. K. H.; Mol, B. W.; Land, J. A.; Hoek, A.

    2013-01-01

    What are the dropout rates in lifestyle intervention programs (LIPs) for overweight and obese infertile women and can intervention- or patient-related baseline factors associated with dropout be identified in these women? The median dropout rate was 24% in overweight and obese infertile women who

  5. Dropout is a problem in lifestyle intervention programs for overweight and obese infertile women : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutsaerts, M. A. Q.; Kuchenbecker, W. K. H.; Mol, B. W.; Land, J. A.; Hoek, A.

    What are the dropout rates in lifestyle intervention programs (LIPs) for overweight and obese infertile women and can intervention- or patient-related baseline factors associated with dropout be identified in these women? The median dropout rate was 24 in overweight and obese infertile women who

  6. Male Infertility Diagnosis and Treatment in the Era of In Vitro Fertilization and Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Michael M; Hockenberry, Mark S; Kirby, Edgar W; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2018-03-01

    As assisted reproductive technologies use increases, the evaluation of male factor infertility has often become overlooked. However, male evaluation remains critically important, with benefits seen in overall health, as well as in natural and assisted pregnancy and birth rates. A comprehensive assessment of the male partner should be offered to all couples seeking infertility care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Domestic violence in Iranian infertile women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhan, Zohre; Ozgoli, Giti; Azar, Mahyar; Alavimajd, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Millions of men and women suffer from infertility worldwide. In many cultures, infertile women are at risk of social and emotional problems. Infertility may affect the public health in many countries. Domestic violence is the intentional use of physical force, power or threat against oneself, another person or another group or community which leads to injury, death, mental harm, lack of development or deprivation. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of domestic violence against infertile women who referred to the infertility centres of Tehran, Iran in 2011. Methods: This was cross- sectional descriptive study conducted on 400 infertile women who were selected through convenient sampling method. The questionnaire used in this study included two sections: a demographic section with questions about demographic characteristics of the infertile women and their husbands; and the domestic violence questionnaire with questions about physical, emotional and sexual violence. Data were analysed by SPSS16; descriptive statistics, Spearman’s test, t- test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and logistic regression were used for data analysis. Results: Four hundred women with the average age of 30.50 ± 6.16 years participated in the study; of whom, 34.7% experienced domestic violence physical violence (5.3%), emotional violence (74.3%) and sexual violence (47.3%). Domestic violence was significantly associated with unwanted marriage, number of IVFs, drug abuse, emotional status of the women, smoking and addiction or drug abuse of the spouse, mental and physical diseases of the husband (p< 0.05). Conclusion: Many of the current problems in this society, particularly in families are due to the transition of the society from a traditional model to a modern one. The majority of the infertile women experience violence in Iran. Domestic violence against infertile women is a problem that should not be ignored. Clinicians should identify abused women. Providing

  8. OVARIAN AGING AND INFERTILITY TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Meden Vrtovec

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Due to changes in the socio-economic environment the first pregnancy is being more often postponed to advanced age; an increasing number of women seek medical help for infertility in their late thirties. Degenerative processes in the ovary start as early as after 35 years of age. When the woman is over 38, the signs of hormonal changes occur (FSH, inhibin, the menstrual cycle changes, and fertility is being increasingly reduced. Infertility treatment by assisted reproduction technology (ART has proved less efficient in older than in younger women.Material and methods. In a retrospective analysis we evaluated the success rates achieved with homologous intrauterine insemination (IUI, in vitro fertilization and embryo-transfer (IVF-ET, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI, and compared them in regard to the women > 38 years vs. < 38 years.Results. After IUI the pregnancy rate in the women over 38 was 3.7% per patient (1.5% per cycle and 28.0% (9.9% in the women younger than 38 years. After IVF-ET the pregnancy rate in the over 38-year group was 16% per patient (14% per cycle, and 28% per patient (25% per cycle in the less than 38-year group. After ICSI, the pregnancy rate in the group over 38 years was 11% per patient (9% per cycle, and 25% per patient (22% per cycle in the less than 38-year group. In the analysed population, the spontaneous abortion rate was 26.0% in the group of women aged over 38 years, and 14.0% in the group of women aged less than 38 years.Conclusions. Before introduction of an ART procedure the woman with advanced age should be properly counselled and well informed about poor success of their infertility treatment and high spontaneous abortion rate.

  9. Semen proteomics and male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodar, Meritxell; Soler-Ventura, Ada; Oliva, Rafael

    2017-06-06

    Semen is a complex body fluid containing an admixture of spermatozoa suspended in secretions from the testes and epididymis which are mixed at the time of ejaculation with secretions from other accessory sex glands such as the prostate and seminal vesicles. High-throughput technologies have revealed that, contrary to the idea that sperm cells are simply a silent delivery vehicle of the male genome to the oocyte, the sperm cells in fact provide both a specific epigenetically marked DNA together with a complex population of proteins and RNAs crucial for embryogenesis. Similarly, -omic technologies have also enlightened that seminal fluid seems to play a much greater role than simply being a medium to carry the spermatozoa through the female reproductive tract. In the present review, we briefly overview the sperm cell biology, consider the key issues in sperm and seminal fluid sample preparation for high-throughput proteomic studies, describe the current state of the sperm and seminal fluid proteomes generated by high-throughput proteomic technologies and provide new insights into the potential communication between sperm and seminal fluid. In addition, comparative proteomic studies open a window to explore the potential pathogenic mechanisms of infertility and the discovery of potential biomarkers with clinical significance. The review updates the numerous proteomics studies performed on semen, including spermatozoa and seminal fluid. In addition, an integrative analysis of the testes, sperm and seminal fluid proteomes is also included providing insights into the molecular mechanisms that regulate the generation, maturation and transit of spermatozoa. Furthermore, the compilation of several differential proteomic studies focused on male infertility reveals potential pathways disturbed in specific subtypes of male infertility and points out towards future research directions in the field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. RISK OF INFERTILITY IN PATIENTS WITH CELIAC DISEASE: a meta-analysis of observational studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Sebastian LASA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Context Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine associated with several extra-intestinal features, such as reproductive disorders. The relationship between celiac disease and infertility has been previously assessed, with conflicting results. Objectives We seek to determine the relationship between celiac disease and infertility. Methods Data was extracted from case-control or cohort design studies from 1966 to December 2013 using the MEDLINE-Pubmed, EMBASE, LILACS and Cochrane Library databases. We analyzed two kinds of trials: those assessing the risk of infertility in subjects with already diagnosed celiac disease, and those evaluating the prevalence of undiagnosed celiac disease in subjects with a diagnosis of infertility. Results The search yielded 413 potentially relevant studies for revision, 12 of which were finally included for analysis. A significant association was found between women with a diagnosis of infertility and undiagnosed celiac disease [OR 3.09 (95% CI 1.74-5.49]. When considering those studies assessing the occurrence of infertility in subjects with already-diagnosed celiac disease, no difference was found between celiac disease patients and control subjects [OR 0.99 (0.86-1.13]. Conclusions Undiagnosed celiac disease is a risk factor for infertility. Women seeking medical advice for this particular condition should be screened for celiac disease. Adoption of a gluten-free diet could have a positive impact on fertility in this group of patients.

  11. Nationwide survey of urological specialists regarding male infertility: results from a 2015 questionnaire in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumura, Yasushi; Tsujimura, Akira; Imamoto, Takashi; Umemoto, Yukihiro; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Shiraishi, Koji; Shin, Takeshi; Taniguchi, Hisanori; Chiba, Koji; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Iwamoto, Teruaki

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the incidence, etiology, treatment indications, and outcomes regarding infertile male patients in Japan. Between April, 2014 and March, 2015, the authors contacted 47 clinical specialists in male infertility who had been certified by the Japan Society for Reproductive Medicine. The participating clinicians were sent a questionnaire regarding information on their infertile patients, according to etiology and the number and success rates of male infertility operations that had been performed in their practice. Thirty-nine specialists returned the questionnaire and provided information regarding 7268 patients. The etiology of infertility included testicular factors, sexual disorders, and seminal tract obstruction. During the study year, the clinicians performed varicocelectomies, testicular sperm extractions (TESEs), and re-anastomoses of the seminal tract. The rate of successful varicocelectomies was >70%. The sperm retrieval rates with conventional TESE and microdissection TESE were 98.3% and 34.0%, respectively, while the patency rates with vasovasostomy and epididymovasostomy were 81.8% and 61.0%, respectively. Surgical outcomes for infertile male patients are favorable and can be of great clinical benefit for infertile couples. To achieve this, urologists should work in collaboration with gynecological specialists in order to optimize the treatment of both partners.

  12. Effects of Carnitine on Sperm Parameters of Infertile Males with Idiopathic Asthenospermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Amiri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: Studies confirm that a number of nutritional and environmental factors may negatively affect spermatogenesis and cause male infertility. Carnitine is an important factor for sperm motility. Carnitine deficiency decreases sperm motility and may cause male infertility. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of carnitine on sperm parameters in infertile males with idiopathic asthenospermia. Materials & Methods: This study is a before and after clinical trial performed on 40 asthenospermia men who were treated with 750 mg per/day carnitine in Fatemieh infertility research center in years 2006-2007. Sperm parameters were assessed before and after treatment. The obtained data were analyzed using SPSS10 and paired T-test Results: The results showed a significant increase in sperm concentration, morphology, sperm total motility and rapid progressive motility after treatment by carnitine (p<0.05. Conclusion: Carnitine supplementation has a significant effect on sperm parameters in men with idiopathic asthenospermia.

  13. The psychological impact of infertility and fertility treatment on the male partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Maeve; Dineen, Tim; Sarma, Kiran; Nolan, Aonghus

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports the findings of two studies that examined factors predicting infertility distress in male partners within couples with an infertility diagnosis and where the couple was receiving fertility treatment. A cross-sectional design was implemented using a questionnaire battery (The questionnaire battery comprised an inventory of four different standardised questionnaires compiled together into one booklet) compiled from earlier theory-building qualitative research conducted by the authors. Infertility related distress was examined in relation to a number of psychosocial variables including relationship dynamics, self-esteem, current mental health and attitudes towards idealised masculinity. The questionnaire battery was completed by 167 men undergoing or consulting for fertility treatment. Participants were recruited through Irish fertility clinics (Study 1, n = 111) and through an online survey (Study 2, n = 55). Regression analyses identified four variables that predicted variance in infertility distress in both studies: 'Attitude towards idealised masculinity', 'Mental health', 'Relationship satisfaction' and 'Self-esteem'. This finding was found to be robust having controlled for age, time since diagnosis, number of attempts at treatment and diagnostic category (male factor, female factor or mixed factor infertility). ConclusiON: Recommendations for fertility clinics and mental health professionals should be made in relation to managing infertility distress and supporting couples during fertility treatment.

  14. Mitochondrial Genetic Variation in Iranian Infertile Men with Varicocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Heidari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several recent studies have shown that mitochondrial DNA mutations lead to major disabilities and premature death in carriers. More than 150 mutations in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA genes have been associated with a wide spectrum of disorders. Varicocele, one of the causes of infertility in men wherein abnormal inflexion and distension of veins of the pampiniform plexus is observed within spermatic cord, can increase reactive oxygen species (ROS production in semen and cause oxidative stress and sperm dysfunction in patients. Given that mitochondria are the source of ROS production in cells, the aim of this study was to scan nine mitochondrial genes (MT-COX2, MT-tRNALys, MT-ATP8, MT-ATP6, MT-COX3, MT-tRNAGly, MT-ND3, MT-tRNAArg and MT-ND4L for mutations in infertile patients with varicocele. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing were used to detect and identify point mutations respectively in 9 mitochondrial genes in 72 infertile men with varicocele and 159 fertile men. In brief, the samples showing altered electrophoretic patterns of DNA in the SSCP gel were sent for DNA sequencing to identify the exact nucleotide variation. Results: Ten type nucleotide variants were detected exclusively in mitochondrial DNA of infertile men. These include six novel nucleotide changes and four variants previously reported for other disorders. Conclusion: Mutations in mitochondrial genes may affect respiratory complexes in combination with environmental risk factors. Therefore these nucleotide variants probably lead to impaired ATP synthesis and mitochondrial function ultimately interfering with sperm motility and infertility.

  15. The Effect of Provision of Information Regarding Infertility Treatment Strategies on Anxiety Level of Infertile Couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Hamdieh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility may have many emotional and psychological implications on infertilecouples. So far, different methods for reducing anxiety in infertile couples have been evaluated. Thegoal of this study is to evaluate the effect of provision of information regarding infertility treatmentto infertile couples on their anxiety levels.Materials and Methods: This study was conducted as a before and after clinical trial. Forty-twoindividuals were considered as cases and 40 as controls. In order to evaluate anxiety and depressionin participants, the Hamilton Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS questionnaire was used. Theintervention group received information about infertility treatment through a two hour face-to-facemeeting and was provided with a brochure. Anxiety level was assessed at the time of admission,immediately after the session and two weeks later. Assessment was performed twice for the controlgroup; once at the time of admission and secondly, two weeks later.Results: Our results show that receiving information about infertility treatment significantlydecreases anxiety among infertile couples two weeks post-training. This decline does not have asignificant correlation with age, sex, education level of the couple, and neither with the durationnor the cause of infertility. Providing information does not have any significant effect on the rate ofdepression among couples.Conclusion: It is recommended that provision of information regarding infertility treatmentmethods should be considered as a means of decreasing anxiety among infertile couples who referto infertility treatment centers.

  16. Infertility among Yoruba Women: Perceptions on Causes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Yoruba of southwest Nigeria believe that infertility can be due to spittle problems, for which orthodox medical treatment is not appropriate. Therefore, women frequently seek prevention and treatment for infertility from local herbal and spiritual specialists, and from churches. This article presents preliminary findings from ...

  17. Infertility, psychological distress, and coping strategies among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relatively little is known about infertility and its consequences in Mali, West Africa where the context and culture are different from those of previously studied settings. This study therefore aimed to specifically examine infertility induced psychological distress and coping strategies among women in Mali. A convergent ...

  18. Super Infection of An Ovarian Dermoid Cyst with Actinomyces in An Infertile Woman

    OpenAIRE

    Salehpour, Saghar; Akbari Sene, Azadeh

    2013-01-01

    We present super infection of an ovarian dermoid cyst with actinomyces in an infertile patient. This is a case-report study for evaluation a couple with male factor infertility, who was a good candidate for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), while a 10 cm dermoid cyst was found in the woman’s right ovary. Patient complained of pelvic pain, intermittent fever, dysmenorrhea, and dyspareunia. The cyst was extracted using laparoscopy, whilst in histopathological examination, an actinomycosi...

  19. Associations between male infertility and ancestry in South Americans: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowronek, Maria Fernanda; Velazquez, Tatiana; Mut, Patricia; Figueiro, Gonzalo; Sans, Monica; Bertoni, Bernardo; Sapiro, Rossana

    2017-07-26

    Infertility affects 15% of human couples, with men being responsible in approximately 50% of cases. Moreover, the aetiology of male factor infertility is poorly understood. The majority of male factor infertility remains idiopathic and potentially genetic in origin. The association of the Y chromosome and mitochondrial haplogroups with male infertility has been previously reported. This association differs between studied populations and their geographical distributions. These effects have been only rarely analysed in mixed populations, such as South Americans. In this study, we analysed the contributions of the Y chromosome and mitochondrial haplogroups to male infertility in a mixed population. A case control study was conducted. Regular PCR and high-resolutionmelting- real-time PCR were performed to type haplogroups from fertile and infertile men. The sperm parameters from infertile men were compared in each haplogroup by logistic regression analysis and ANOVA. The genotyping confirmed the known admixture characteristic of the Uruguayan population. The European paternal contribution was higher than the maternal contribution in both fertile and infertile men. Neither maternal nor paternal ancestry presented differences between the cases and controls. Men belonging to the Y chromosome haplogroup F(xK) more frequently presented with an abnormal sperm morphology than men from other haplogroups. The sperm parameters were not associated with the mitochondrial haplogroups. The data presented in this study showed an association between male infertility and ancestry in the Uruguayan population. Specifically, abnormal sperm morphology was associated with the Y chromosome haplogroup F(xK). Since the Y chromosome lacks recombination, these data suggest that some genes that determine sperm morphology might be inherited in blocks with the region that determines specific haplogroups. However, the possible association between the Y chromosome haplogroup F(xK) and sperm

  20. Chlamydia trachomatis immunoglobulin G3 seropositivity is a predictor of reproductive outcomes in infertile women with patent fallopian tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Anne Z; Diamond, Michael P; Legro, Richard S; Schlaff, William D; Barnhart, Kurt T; Casson, Peter R; Christman, Gregory M; Alvero, Ruben; Hansen, Karl R; Geisler, William M; Thomas, Tracey; Santoro, Nanette; Zhang, Heping; Eisenberg, Esther

    2015-12-01

    To determine if Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis) seropositivity, as detected by the C. trachomatis elementary body (EB)-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [EB ELISA] predicts pregnancy and pregnancy outcome among infertile women with documented tubal patency. Cohort study. Outpatient clinics. In all, 1,250 infertile women with documented tubal patency enrolled in 1 of 2 randomized controlled trials: Pregnancy in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome II; and the Assessment of Multiple Intrauterine Gestations From Ovarian Stimulation. Sera were analyzed for anti-C. trachomatis immunoglobulin G (IgG)1 and IgG3 antibodies, using a research C. trachomatis EB ELISA. The optical density (OD)405 readings of ≥ 0.35 and ≥ 0.1 were considered positive for IgG1 and IgG3, respectively. Primary outcomes included pregnancy, live birth, and ectopic pregnancy. Log-linear regression was used to determine the relative risk after adjusting for age, race, treatment medication, smoking status, and current alcohol use. A total of 243 (19%) women were seropositive for anti-C. trachomatis IgG3. They tended to be nonwhite and smokers. Anti-C. trachomatis IgG3 seropositive women were significantly less likely to conceive (risk ratio [RR] 0.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.52-0.83) or to have a live birth (RR 0.59, 95% CI 0.43-0.80); these associations were weakened after adjusting for number of hysterosalpingography-documented patent tubes (RR 0.73, 95% CI 0.56-0.97) and (RR 0.73, 95% CI 0.50-1.04), respectively. Anti-C. trachomatis IgG3 seropositive women who conceived had a ×2.7 risk (95% CI 1.40-5.34) of ectopic pregnancy. Even in the presence of tubal patency, anti-C. trachomatis IgG3 seropositivity is associated with a lower likelihood of pregnancy. Anti-C. trachomatis IgG3 seropositive women have as high as 3 times the risk of ectopic pregnancy. PPCOSII: NCT00719186 and AMIGOS: NCT01044862. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  1. Genetics of mitochondrial dysfunction and infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demain, L A M; Conway, G S; Newman, W G

    2017-02-01

    Increasingly, mitochondria are being recognized as having an important role in fertility. Indeed in assisted reproductive technologies mitochondrial function is a key indicator of sperm and oocyte quality. Here, we review the literature regarding mitochondrial genetics and infertility. In many multisystem disorders caused by mitochondrial dysfunction death occurs prior to sexual maturity, or the clinical features are so severe that infertility may be underreported. Interestingly, many of the genes linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and infertility have roles in the maintenance of mitochondrial DNA or in mitochondrial translation. Studies on populations with genetically uncharacterized infertility have highlighted an association with mitochondrial DNA deletions, whether this is causative or indicative of poor functioning mitochondria requires further examination. Studies on the impact of mitochondrial DNA variants present conflicting data but highlight POLG as a particularly interesting candidate gene for both male and female infertility. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Early Marriage: a Policy for Infertility Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Karimzadeh

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Female fertility begins to decline many years prior to the onset of menopause despite continued regular ovulatory cycles. Age related infertility is due to oocyte abnormalities and decreased ovarian reserve. Treatment of infertility when the cause is limited to decreased ovarian reserve is empirical at present except for oocyte donation. This mini review of the literature covers all available English biomedical journals that have been published from 1995 to 2008. The search based on combination of the words age, fertility, infertility, and oocyte abnormalities. The important findings from this search strategy are summarized and presented in the sub headings including female age and fertility, miscarriage and in vitro fertilization. Regarding infertility prevention, this mini review suggested that early marriage is a primordial, effective, inexpensive and easy way to prevent infertility.

  3. Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... function of the ovaries, uterus and fallopian tubes. Primary ovarian insufficiency (early menopause), when the ovaries stop working and menstruation ends before age 40. Although the cause is often unknown, certain ...

  4. Social stigma and familial attitudes related to infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergin, Rahime Nida; Polat, Aslıhan; Kars, Bülent; Öztekin, Deniz; Sofuoğlu, Kenan; Çalışkan, Eray

    2018-03-01

    To determine the perceived social stigma and familial attitides and perception of sexuality in infertile couples attending infertility clinics. Infertile couples attending infertility clinics between the years of 2014 and 2015 were requested to complete detailed evaluation forms including questions related to the social stigma on their infertility, their familial attitudes, and perception of sexuality. Any partner of the infertile couple accepting to enroll in the study was given the evaluation forms. Their scores related to answers and demographics, and parameters related to infertility were analyzed. A total 598 partners of infertile couples enrolled in the study, 58% represented 177 couples. Their infertility was primary in 98.3% and the duration of marriage and infertility was 9.81±5.58 and 9.76±5.53 years, respectively. The perception of social exclusion was present in 38% (psocial stigma on infertile couples.

  5. Histology and scanning electron microscopy of the tubal tonsil of goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. R. Indu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To observe the light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM of the caprine tubal tonsil. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on six crossbred male goats of 6 months of age. From the median sections of the head, tissue pieces from the nasopharynx around the auditory tube were collected and fixed for histology and SEM. Results: Tonsillar lymphoid tissue was located in the nasopharynx ventral to the auditory tube opening in the lateral wall of the pharynx. The height of the surface epithelium of the tubal tonsil measured 80.17±1.08 μm and was a pseudostratified ciliated columnar type with basal, supporting, and goblet cells. Above the dome of lymphoid nodules, the epithelium was modified into a follicle associated epithelium (FAE, also called lympho-epithelium or reticular epithelium and was characterized by the absence of goblet cells and cilia, reduced number of cell layers, and a large number of lymphoid cells due to interrupted basement membrane. The height of FAE was smaller than that of the surface epithelium and measured 34.33±0.92 μm. The surface of tubal tonsil showed folds and invaginations, which formed crypts. The lamina propria-submucosa underneath the epithelium was formed by the meshwork of reticular and, thin and loose collagen fibers with dome-like accumulation of lymphoid nodules. In the secondary lymphoid nodules, a corona, parafollicular area, and interfnodular area were observed. The average number of lymphoid nodules counted per field under low power magnification of microscope was 1.17±0.17, and the internodular distance was 34.00±4.37 μm. The mean diameter of lymphoid nodules was 566.67±11.45 μm and the lymphocyte count per nodule was 14741.67±174.36. The number of plasma cells counted per field under low power was 44.38±2.90 below the surface epithelium. The tubal tonsil was not encapsulated. In SEM, the surface epithelium of the tubal tonsils presented ciliated cells, microvillus (MV cells, and

  6. Histology and scanning electron microscopy of the tubal tonsil of goats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indu, V. R.; Lucy, K. M.; Chungath, J. J.; Ashok, N.; Maya, S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To observe the light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the caprine tubal tonsil. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on six crossbred male goats of 6 months of age. From the median sections of the head, tissue pieces from the nasopharynx around the auditory tube were collected and fixed for histology and SEM. Results: Tonsillar lymphoid tissue was located in the nasopharynx ventral to the auditory tube opening in the lateral wall of the pharynx. The height of the surface epithelium of the tubal tonsil measured 80.17±1.08 µm and was a pseudostratified ciliated columnar type with basal, supporting, and goblet cells. Above the dome of lymphoid nodules, the epithelium was modified into a follicle associated epithelium (FAE), also called lympho-epithelium or reticular epithelium and was characterized by the absence of goblet cells and cilia, reduced number of cell layers, and a large number of lymphoid cells due to interrupted basement membrane. The height of FAE was smaller than that of the surface epithelium and measured 34.33±0.92 µm. The surface of tubal tonsil showed folds and invaginations, which formed crypts. The lamina propria-submucosa underneath the epithelium was formed by the meshwork of reticular and, thin and loose collagen fibers with dome-like accumulation of lymphoid nodules. In the secondary lymphoid nodules, a corona, parafollicular area, and interfnodular area were observed. The average number of lymphoid nodules counted per field under low power magnification of microscope was 1.17±0.17, and the internodular distance was 34.00±4.37 µm. The mean diameter of lymphoid nodules was 566.67±11.45 µm and the lymphocyte count per nodule was 14741.67±174.36. The number of plasma cells counted per field under low power was 44.38±2.90 below the surface epithelium. The tubal tonsil was not encapsulated. In SEM, the surface epithelium of the tubal tonsils presented ciliated cells, microvillus (MV) cells, and goblet cells. The

  7. Moderate aerobic exercise training for improving reproductive function in infertile patients: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajizadeh Maleki, Behzad; Tartibian, Bakhtyar

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated for the first time the changes in seminal markers of inflammation, oxidative stress status, semen parameters, sperm DNA integrity as well as pregnancy rate following 24weeks of moderate aerobic exercise in infertile patients. A total of 1026 sedentary men (aged 25-40years) attending the infertility clinic with history of more than one year of infertility, were screened and 419 were randomized to either exercise (EX, n=210) or non-exercise (NON-EX, n=209) groups. Exercise training favorably attenuated seminal markers of both inflammation (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α) and oxidative stress (ROS, MDA, 8-Isoprostane) as well as enhanced antioxidant defense system (SOD, catalase and TAC) (Paerobic exercise training as a treatment option for male factor infertility. The 4-week detraining period was not enough to reverse all benefits promoted by exercise intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Intra-gestational sac injection for tubal pregnancy: an interventional approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yitang; Sun Xiaobo; Xu Xiaojun; Zhang Feiyue; Wu Ke; Song Yingxin; Han Mingjun

    2002-01-01

    Objective: It's an investigation of the procedure, effects and clinical application of the interventional intra-gestational sac injection as a treatment of tubal pregnancy. Methods: Under DSA guidance a selective salpingography was performed and MTX was injected into the gestational sac or oviduct. The procedure was performed in 13 cases with oviductal pregnancy before the gestational sac ruptured. Results: Technical success was obtained in all cases. The serum HCG began to fall in 7 days after the procedure, and dropped to normal level in 2-4 weeks of the procedure. Conclusion: Interventional selective salpingography and intra-gestational sac injection is a simple, safe and effective treatment of the un-ruptured tubal pregnancy

  9. [Rare complication following oesophagectomy: early peptic ulcer perforation of the tubal stomach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Géczi, Tibor; Paszt, Attila; Simonka, Zsolt; Furák, József; Lázár, György

    2011-10-01

    We report the case of a 45-year-old male patient who developed an acute peptic ulcer perforation of the tubal stomach on the second postoperative day after oesophagectomy. The patient underwent emergency surgery (perforation was closed with a Graham patch) followed by treatment in intensive care, and was finally discharged on the 19th postoperative day. Gastric pull-up is a surgical technique that is widely used to re-establish the continuity of the gastrointestinal tract after oesophagectomy. Various early and late complications of reconstruction with the tubal stomach are well-known, such as gastric necrosis, gastritis, gastric ulcer, as well as benign and malignant tumors. The precise etiology of gastric tube ulceration is not known yet, however, it can develop not only in the late, but also in the early postoperative period, as well.

  10. Tubal ligation and salpingectomy and the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer and borderline ovarian tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, C; Baandrup, Louise; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: According to the recent theories on the ovarian cancer origin, any protective effect of tubal ligation may vary with histologic subtype of ovarian cancer. Furthermore, bilateral salpingectomy may represent an opportunity for surgical prevention of serous ovarian cancer. DESIGN: Nationw......OBJECTIVE: According to the recent theories on the ovarian cancer origin, any protective effect of tubal ligation may vary with histologic subtype of ovarian cancer. Furthermore, bilateral salpingectomy may represent an opportunity for surgical prevention of serous ovarian cancer. DESIGN...... sampling. We required that cases and controls have no previous cancer and that controls have no previous bilateral oophorectomy. METHODS: Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals, adjusting for potential confounders. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Epithelial...

  11. Infertility – prevention and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Emily C; Marder, Wendy

    2017-01-01

    Summary Women with autoimmune diseases are more at risk for infertility and subfertility, menstrual irregularities and decreased parity due to multiple possible etiologies, including underlying inflammatory disease, gonadotoxic medications, and psychosocial issues related to living with chronic disease. An awareness of these issues, and the validation and support of patients going through fertility related issues, is important for providing comprehensive care to this patient population. In particular, an understanding of the expanding options for fertility preservation strategies during gonadotoxic medications is essential, including gonadotropin releasing hormone analogues (GnRH-a) co-therapy and oocyte cryopreservation. Referral to a reproductive endocrinology clinic is indicated in this patient population, in part to help manage symptoms of hypoestrogenism that may result from GnRH-a therapy. PMID:28390569

  12. Estimating the prevalence of infertility in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnik, Tracey; Cook, Jocelynn L.; Yuzpe, A. Albert; Tough, Suzanne; Collins, John

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Over the past 10 years, there has been a significant increase in the use of assisted reproductive technologies in Canada, however, little is known about the overall prevalence of infertility in the population. The purpose of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of current infertility in Canada according to three definitions of the risk of conception. METHODS Data from the infertility component of the 2009–2010 Canadian Community Health Survey were analyzed for married and common-law couples with a female partner aged 18–44. The three definitions of the risk of conception were derived sequentially starting with birth control use in the previous 12 months, adding reported sexual intercourse in the previous 12 months, then pregnancy intent. Prevalence and odds ratios of current infertility were estimated by selected characteristics. RESULTS Estimates of the prevalence of current infertility ranged from 11.5% (95% CI 10.2, 12.9) to 15.7% (95% CI 14.2, 17.4). Each estimate represented an increase in current infertility prevalence in Canada when compared with previous national estimates. Couples with lower parity (0 or 1 child) had significantly higher odds of experiencing current infertility when the female partner was aged 35–44 years versus 18–34 years. Lower odds of experiencing current infertility were observed for multiparous couples regardless of age group of the female partner, when compared with nulliparous couples. CONCLUSIONS The present study suggests that the prevalence of current infertility has increased since the last time it was measured in Canada, and is associated with the age of the female partner and parity. PMID:22258658

  13. Simultaneous Bilateral Tubal Pregnancy After In Vitro Fertilization and Embryo Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunduz Ozlem Altinkaya

    2008-09-01

    Conclusion: The diagnosis of ectopic or heterotopic pregnancy should always be considered in patients undergoing IVF-ET because of its increased incidence with this technique compared with natural conception. Although the incidence of bilateral tubal pregnancy is not high, sonographers and surgeons should examine both adnexa when diagnosing an ectopic pregnancy, especially in IVF-ET patients. Early diagnosis is essential for the prevention of significant maternal morbidity and mortality.

  14. Non-surgical female sterilization with quinacrine-induced tubal occlusion: a clinical trial

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    Seifi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the last 35 years, quinacrine has been used to sterilize more than 150,000 women in 40 countries, first in the form of slurry and now in the form of cylindrical pellets. Some studies confirmed the tubal occlusion by hysterosalpyngo-graphy, but this method increases the chance of failure. Only a few studies on tubal occlusion have used transvaginal sonography for confirmation, and there were some doubts about the effect of quinacrine on the endometrium. We performed this study to evaluate the tubal scar and endometrial pattern by ultrasound and to determine the feasibility, acceptance, and side effects of quinacrine sterilization (QS in Iranian women. Methods: This prospective clinical trial was done at the Vali-e-Asr Reproductive Health Research Center of the Tehran University of Medical Sciences between April 2005 and July 2006. One hundred sexually active women ranging from 30 to 47 years of age, who had at least two children above two years old, requesting sterilization, were sterilized by this method. By the end of menstrual bleeding, seven pellets, each containing 36mg quinacrine, were inserted in the uterine fundal area via the cervical canal. The procedure was repeated one month later. Three cycles after the first step, transvaginal sonography was performed to visualize the tubal scar and determine the endometrial pattern. Patients were followed at one and three years after initiation of the procedure. Results: All women were satisfied with the procedure. There were no side effects. No pregnancies had occurred, nor were there endometrial thickness abnormalities. Scar formation was visible in the tubes. "nConclusion: Quinacrine sterilization is a useful method for women and can be recommended to family planning services as an ambulatory procedure due to its efficacy, simplicity, acceptance and cost effectiveness.

  15. 2D/3D/4D ULTRASOUND IN INFERTILITY MANAGEMENT

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    Uršula Reš-Muravec

    2018-02-01

    Ultrasound in infertility diagnostics: Ultrasound is used for examination of uterus, tubes, ovaries and peritoneal cause of infertility. It can be used in different menstrual phases: proliferative, periovulatory and secretory phase. Examination of uterus: A 2D scan can measure the size of the uterus (length, width and depth and a 2D flow (colour and power doppler. With 3D technology we can measure the whole volume with VOCAL (virtual organ computer-aided analysis and 3D circulation with the index (VI – vascular index, FI – flow index and VFI – vascular flow index in the uterus. A 2D scan can help us define uterine malformations, fibroids and adenomyosis to a certain extent. However, a 3D scan offers more accurate diagnosis of these malformations. Endometrium is examined separately. With 2D the width is measured and morphology and focal lesions (polyp, fibroids, adhesions are examined. With 3D the real sagital plane for the width measurement can be defined . We can measure the volume of endometrium and subendometrium and 3D circulation in endometrium and subendometrium. The FIS (f luid instlation sonography is very useful when examining the endometrium; saline or gel can be used for uterine instalation. We can measure and define the position of the structures in the endometrium more accurately when they are surrouned by saline or gel. We can view these structures with a surface view, similar to the one used for hysteroscopy. With this information we can explain the pathology to the patient and easily plan the surgical procedures. Examination of the tubes: With 2D US we can see the tubes in the pelvis only if there are dilatations, but sometimes it is difficult to distinguish them from the neighbouring forma- tions. With a 3D ultrasound we can define the shape and continuity of the tube and we can view the tube from different angles (inversion mode. Different contrast media are used for determining tubal patency. Tubal patency can be diagnosed with 2D Hy

  16. The International Glossary on Infertility and Fertility Care, 2017

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zegers-Hochschild, Fernando; Adamson, G. David; Dyer, Silke

    2017-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Can a consensus and evidence-driven set of terms and definitions be generated to be used globally in order to ensure consistency when reporting on infertility issues and fertility care interventions, as well as to harmonize communication among the medical and scientific communities......, policy-makers, and lay public including individuals and couples experiencing fertility problems? SUMMARY ANSWER: A set of 283 consensus-based and evidence-driven terminologies used in infertility and fertility care has been generated through an inclusive consensus-based process with multiple stakeholders...... of the reproductive system, and increased standardization of fertility treatment terminology. Since 2009, limitations were identified in several areas and enhancements were suggested for the glossary, especially concerning male factor, demography, epidemiology and public health issues. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION...

  17. Is male infertility a forerunner to cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitney R. Burns

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The frequency of testicular cancer and male infertility has been increasing in the past several decades. This article examines the relationship between male infertility and testicular cancer, concentrating particularly on causal links. RESULTS: Both of these disorders are associated with testicular dysgenesis syndrome and have also been traced to mutations in genes involving DNA repair and tumor suppression, as well as environmental exposure. CONCLUSION: The identification and examination of these common points of origin supports the integration of testicular cancer screenings into the routine evaluation of infertile men.

  18. Frequency of endometrial tuberculosis in female infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousaf, A.; Zaman, G.; Sultana, N.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of endometrial tuberculosis in infertility patients. Design: an observational analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Military Hospital Rawalpindi and Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi from August 1998 to April 1999. Subjects and Methods: Endometrial biopsies were taken from 50 cases of infertility and subjected to culture on BACTEC 460 TB instrument. Results: Tuberculous endometritis was found in 10 % (n=5) of cases. Conclusion: It was concluded that endometrial tuberculosis is not an infrequent cause of infertility in our setup. (author)

  19. A rare cause of acute abdominal pain in children: Isolated tubal torsion; a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Dere Gunal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Isolated tubal torsion -a rare cause of acute abdomen in children-is usually difficult to diagnose because of non-specific findings. Surgical salphingectomy is required in delayed diagnosis in most cases. Three sexual inactive adolescents diagnosed in isolated tubal torsion (ITT were discussed for its diagnostic features and surgical management. Laboratory tests and radiological studies including ultrasonography (US, color doppler ultrasound were performed in all patients after evaluation for acute lower abdominal pain in emergency department and they underwent surgical intervention with laparotomy (n:2 and laparoscopy (n:1. One of the patients in this study had salpingectomy. Detorsion of the fallopian tube and cyst excision were performed in the remaining two patients who also had paratubal cysts. There was no recurrence in these patients during the follow-up for 3 and 2 years. The isolated tubal torsion should be kept in mind and early surgical management is essential in order to preserve fallopian tube because of its importance in fertility. Keywords: Fallopian tube, Torsion, Paratubal cyst, Adolescent, Acute abdomen

  20. Can hysterosalpingocontrast-sonography replace hysterosalpingography in the assessment of tubal subfertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkman, A B; Mol, B W; van der Veen, F; Bossuyt, P M; Hogerzeil, H V

    2000-07-01

    Hysterosalpingo-contrastsonography (HyCoSy) is a new method for assessing tubal patency using transvaginal ultrasound. It is thought to have several advantages over conventional hysterosalpingography (HSG). We prospectively evaluated the performance of HyCoSy and HSG in the diagnosis of tubal pathology. One-hundred consecutive subfertile women underwent both HyCoSy and HSG in randomised order. Results of both tests were related to findings at laparoscopy with dye, which was used as the reference test. Each woman was asked to score the pain exsperienced at both procedures on a visual analogue scale. When laparoscopy with dye was used as reference test, the likelihood ratios of HyCoSy were slightly inferior to those obtained for HSG. Since the performance of HyCoSy was dependent on experience, the results were recalculated omitting the 50 initial procedures from the analysis. In that calculation, results of HyCoSy and HSG were comparable. There were no differences in pain experienced during the procedure, as there appeared also to be no differences in patient preferences. There appear to be no strong arguments either to replace HSG by HyCoSy, or to reject the use of HyCoSy. Both procedures can be used in the evaluation of tubal pathology.

  1. Can hysterosalpingocontrast-sonography replace hysterosalpingography in the assessment of tubal subfertility?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkman, Antonius B.; Mol, Ben W.J.; Veen, Fulco van der; Bossuyt, P.M.M.; Hogerzeil, Hendricus V

    2000-07-01

    Introduction: Hysterosalpingo-contrastsonography (HyCoSy) is a new method for assessing tubal patency using transvaginal ultrasound. It is thought to have several advantages over conventional hysterosalpingography (HSG). We prospectively evaluated the performance of HyCoSy and HSG in the diagnosis of tubal pathology. Methods and patients: One-hundred consecutive subfertile women underwent both HyCoSy and HSG in randomised order. Results of both tests were related to findings at laparoscopy with dye, which was used as the reference test. Each woman was asked to score the pain exsperienced at both procedures on a visual analogue scale. Results: When laparoscopy with dye was used as reference test, the likelihood ratios of HyCoSy were slightly inferior to those obtained for HSG. Since the performance of HyCoSy was dependent on experience, the results were recalculated omitting the 50 initial procedures from the analysis. In that calculation, results of HyCoSy and HSG were comparable. There were no differences in pain experienced during the procedure, as there appeared also to be no differences in patient preferences. Conclusion: There appear to be no strong arguments either to replace HSG by HyCoSy, or to reject the use of HyCoSy. Both procedures can be used in the evaluation of tubal pathology.

  2. Can hysterosalpingocontrast-sonography replace hysterosalpingography in the assessment of tubal subfertility?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijkman, Antonius B.; Mol, Ben W.J.; Veen, Fulco van der; Bossuyt, P.M.M.; Hogerzeil, Hendricus V.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: Hysterosalpingo-contrastsonography (HyCoSy) is a new method for assessing tubal patency using transvaginal ultrasound. It is thought to have several advantages over conventional hysterosalpingography (HSG). We prospectively evaluated the performance of HyCoSy and HSG in the diagnosis of tubal pathology. Methods and patients: One-hundred consecutive subfertile women underwent both HyCoSy and HSG in randomised order. Results of both tests were related to findings at laparoscopy with dye, which was used as the reference test. Each woman was asked to score the pain exsperienced at both procedures on a visual analogue scale. Results: When laparoscopy with dye was used as reference test, the likelihood ratios of HyCoSy were slightly inferior to those obtained for HSG. Since the performance of HyCoSy was dependent on experience, the results were recalculated omitting the 50 initial procedures from the analysis. In that calculation, results of HyCoSy and HSG were comparable. There were no differences in pain experienced during the procedure, as there appeared also to be no differences in patient preferences. Conclusion: There appear to be no strong arguments either to replace HSG by HyCoSy, or to reject the use of HyCoSy. Both procedures can be used in the evaluation of tubal pathology

  3. Psychosocial implications of tubal ligation in a rural health district: A phenomenological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutala Prosper M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tubal ligation is the most popular family planning method worldwide. While its benefits, such as effectiveness in protecting against pregnancies, minimal need for long-term follow-up and low side-effects profile are well documented, it has many reported complications. However, to date, these complications have not been described by residents in Congo. Therefore, the study aimed at exploring the experience of women who had undergone tubal ligation, focusing on perceptions of physical, psychological and contextual experiences of participants. Methods This qualitative study used a semi-structured questionnaire in a phenomenological paradigm to collect data. Fifteen participants were purposefully selected among sterilized women who had a ligation procedure performed, were aged between 30 and 40 years, and were living within the catchment area of the district hospital. Data were collected by two registered nurses, tape-recorded, and transcribed verbatim. Reading and re-reading cut and paste techniques, and integration were used to establish codes, categories, themes, and description. Results Diverse and sometimes opposite changes in somatic symptoms, psychological symptoms, productivity, ecological relationships, doctor-client relationships, ethical issues, and change of life style were the major problem domains. Conclusions Clients reported conflicting experiences in several areas of their lives after tubal sterilization. Management, including awareness of the particular features of the client, is needed to decrease the likelihood of psychosocial morbidity and/or to select clients in need of sterilization.

  4. Prospective longitudinal cohort study on cumulative 5-year delivery and adoption rates among 1338 couples initiating infertility treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinborg, A; Hougaard, C O; Andersen, A Nyboe

    2009-01-01

    occurred for 5.9% (48/817) of the women. Positive prognostic factors for delivery were male infertility, female age infertility and less than three previous treatment cycles. CONCLUSIONS A crude delivery rate of 69.4% in the total population 5 years after referral to tertiary......BACKGROUND The objective was to assess crude 5-year delivery rates after assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment, intrauterine inseminations (IUI), spontaneous conceptions (SC) and adoptions in a large infertile cohort. METHODS A prospective longitudinal survey comprised 1338 infertile...... couples starting public infertility programmes offering IUIs and three free ART cycles during 2000-2001. The cohort was cross-linked with the National Medical Birth Register to obtain delivery rates for all 1338 couples. More detailed data were available from 817 women responding to a 5-year follow...

  5. ASSESSMENT OF MALE INFERTILITY BY TESTICULAR BIOPSY IN SOUTHERN ODISHA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata Naik

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Infertility continues to be a significant problem since ages. Studies suggest that the problem affects 8-12% of couples across the globe, and among these affected couples, approximately 50% cases are contributed by the male partner. Semen analysis is the first investigation that indicates towards male factor in infertility. Finding the cause of infertility in cases of severe oligozoospermia and azoospermia by evaluating testicular biopsies has now become essential with the availability of Assisted Reproductive Techniques (ART, which gives information about the level of spermatogenesis. The present study was undertaken to detect the histological findings in cases of male infertility in this geographic region. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective cross-sectional study was undertaken in which testicular biopsies received from 52 infertile male patients with seminogram impressions of very severe oligozoospermia and azoospermia constituted the study group. Detailed clinical data including the LH. FSH and testosterone hormone levels were recorded. Tissue samples were routinely processed and Haematoxylin and Eosin stained were made. Modified Johnsen scoring was used to categorise each case. RESULTS 86.5% cases in the study group were found to have azoospermia and rest 13.5% cases had severe oligozoospermia. All the cases were histologically classified into six categories- obstructive pathology 25 of 52 cases (48.1%, pure germ cell aplasia 14 of 52 cases (26.9%, maturation arrest 7 of 52 cases (13.5%, atrophic testis 4 of 52 cases (7.7%, hypospermatogenesis 1 of 52 cases (1.9% and inconclusive in 1 of 52 cases. Serum FSH and serum LH levels were found significantly raised in cases of pure germ cell aplasia and atrophic testis in contrast cases of obstructive aetiology had normal levels. Modified Johnsen scoring values were 9 in cases with obstructive pathology, 1/2 only in cases of pure germ cell aplasia and atrophic testes and 3 to 6 in cases

  6. Serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma localizes to the tubal-peritoneal junction: a pivotal clue to the site of origin of extrauterine high-grade serous carcinoma (ovarian cancer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, Jeffrey D

    2015-03-01

    Recent data suggest that intraepithelial carcinoma of the fallopian tube [serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC)] is the precursor of high-grade extrauterine serous carcinoma. A more specific location for the origin of this lesion is suggested by the recently described junction between the fallopian tubal epithelium and the peritoneum [tubal-peritoneal junction (TPJ)]. Fallopian tubes from 202 patients with advanced-stage high-grade extrauterine serous carcinoma or carcinosarcoma were evaluated histologically as were 124 prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy specimens. These included 54 patients with BRCA or other high-risk mutation or a family history of BRCA mutation and 70 with a personal or family history of breast carcinoma. STIC was found in 81 of 202 patients with serous carcinoma (40.1%). STIC was present in 73 of 141 (52%) cases in which the fimbriae were present and in 62 of 100 (62%) cases in which the TPJ was present (P not significant). In comparison with these groups, when fimbriae and TPJ were absent, STIC was found in 8 of 61 (13%) cases (PSTIC. The mean size of STIC was 1.7 mm. In 32 cases (39.5%), the lesion was flat and in 49 (60.5%), papillary. The mean size of flat STICs was 0.8 mm as compared with 2.3 mm for papillary STICs (P=0.00005). STIC was identified in the same tissue fragment as the junction in 48 cases. The mean distance of STIC to the junction was 1.8 mm. In 11 cases, STIC was flanked by peritoneal mesothelium on one side and tubal epithelium on the opposite side. In 51 patients, the mean distance of invasive carcinoma from the TPJ was 1.8 mm. This distance was 1.9 mm when STIC was present (37 cases) in comparison with 1.5 mm when STIC was absent (14 cases) (P not significant). In 27 of 42 cases (64%), STIC was contiguous with invasive carcinoma. Lamina propria invasion was present in 71% of cases in which STIC was present as compared with 26% of cases in which STIC was absent (PSTIC was present as compared with 26% of cases in

  7. Sexual Satisfaction and Sexual Reactivity in Infertile Women: The Contribution of The Dyadic Functioning and Clinical Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Czyżkowska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is a factor which has been linked to higher prevalence of sexual dysfunctions in women; however, ambiguous results have been reported about the impact of infertility on women’s sexual satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to compare sexual and dyadic functioning in infertile and fertile women. Furthermore, the associations between sexual variables and clinical variables (depressive symptoms, period trying to conceive, and treatment period were assessed in infertile women sample. Materials and Methods: The cross-sectional study involved 50 women with the history of infertility and 50 fertile women recruited from the general population. The Sexual Satisfaction Scale (SSS, Mell-Krat Scale (women’s version, Family Assessment Measure (FAM-III, and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were administered to all participants. Results: Infertile women reported lower sexual satisfaction and more maladaptive patterns of dyadic functioning in comparison to the control group. As many as 45 (90% of infertile women, compared to 13 (26% of the control group, reported the scores on the Mell-Krat Scale indicative of the presence of dysfunctions in sexual reactivity (P≤0.001. Infertile women reported significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms than the women from the control group (P≤0.001. Negative correlations were observed between sexual satisfaction and dyadic functioning in both groups (P≤0.05; however, the patterns of these associations were different in infertile and fertile women. For example, negative correlations were found between satisfaction with control and task accomplishment, role performance, affective involvement, and values and norms in infertile women. However, these relationships were not observed in the control group. No correlations were revealed between sexual reactivity and dyadic functioning in infertile women and the control group. Negative correlations were observed between satisfaction with

  8. Sexual Satisfaction and Sexual Reactivity in Infertile Women: The Contribution of The Dyadic Functioning and Clinical Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyżkowska, Anna; Awruk, Katarzyna; Janowski, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a factor which has been linked to higher prevalence of sexual dysfunctions in women; however, ambiguous results have been reported about the impact of infertility on women's sexual satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to compare sexual and dyadic functioning in infertile and fertile women. Furthermore, the associations between sexual variables and clinical variables (depressive symptoms, period trying to conceive, and treatment period) were assessed in infertile women sample. The cross-sectional study involved 50 women with the history of infertility and 50 fertile women recruited from the general population. The Sexual Satisfaction Scale (SSS), Mell-Krat Scale (women's version), Family Assessment Measure (FAM-III), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were administered to all participants. Infertile women reported lower sexual satisfaction and more maladaptive patterns of dyadic functioning in comparison to the control group. As many as 45 (90%) of infertile women, compared to 13 (26%) of the control group, reported the scores on the Mell-Krat Scale indicative of the presence of dysfunctions in sexual reactivity (P≤0.001). Infertile women reported significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms than the women from the control group (P≤0.001). Negative correlations were observed between sexual satisfaction and dyadic functioning in both groups (P≤0.05); however, the patterns of these associations were different in infertile and fertile women. For example, negative correlations were found between satisfaction with control and task accomplishment, role performance, affective involvement, and values and norms in infertile women. However, these relationships were not observed in the control group. No correlations were revealed between sexual reactivity and dyadic functioning in infertile women and the control group. Negative correlations were observed between satisfaction with control and relationship duration and treatment period as well

  9. The prevalence of couple infertility in the United States from a male perspective: evidence from a nationally representative sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, J F; Thoma, M E; Sørensen, D N; McLain, A C; King, R B; Sundaram, R; Keiding, N; Buck Louis, G M

    2013-09-01

    Infertility is a couple-based fecundity impairment, although population level research is largely based upon information reported by female partners. Of the few studies focusing on male partners, most focus on the utilization of infertility services rather than efforts to estimate the prevalence and determinants of infertility as reported by male partners. Data from a nationally representative sample of men aged 15-44 years who participated in the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) were used to estimate the prevalence of infertility and determinants of longer time-to-pregnancy (TTP) using the novel current duration (CD) approach. Using backward recurrence time parametric survival methods, we estimated infertility prevalence (TTP > 12 months) and time ratios (TR) associated with TTP as derived from males' reported CD of their pregnancy attempt. The estimated prevalence of infertility was 12.0% (95% CI: 7.0, 23.2). Longer TTP was associated with older male age (35-45 vs. 17-24 years) (TR: 2.49; 95% CI: 1.03, 6.03), biological childlessness (TR: 1.53; 95% CI: 1.07, 2.19) and lack of health insurance (TR: 1.73; 95% CI: 1.02, 2.94) after controlling for the differences in couples' age and other socioeconomic factors. The prevalence of infertility based on male reporting is consistent with estimates of infertility in the US found in prospective cohort studies and CD studies based on female reporting. Our findings suggest that male partners can reliably inform about couple infertility. Interventions and services aimed at reducing couple infertility should include attention to male factors associated with longer TTP identified in this study. © 2013 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  10. Identification of male factor infertility using a novel semen quality score and reactive oxygen species levels Identificação de pacientes portadores do fator de infertilidade masculina através do cálculo de um novo escore de qualidade de sêmen e pela medida de espécies reativas de oxigênio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran P. Nallella

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine whether patients with male factor infertility can be accurately identified by calculating a novel semen quality score and measuring levels of reactive oxygen species during routine infertility screening. METHODS: Semen samples from 133 patients and 91 healthy donors were evaluated with manual and computer-assisted semen analysis. A principal component analysis model was employed to calculate a semen quality score. In brief, this score was calculated by base 10 logarithms multiplied by varying weights given to 9 sperm parameters. Reactive oxygen species levels were measured using chemiluminescence assay. RESULTS: The semen quality score had a sensitivity of 80.45% and accuracy of 77% at a cutoff of 93.1 in identifying patients with male factor infertility. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curves for the semen quality score was 84.28% (95% CI: 65.22%-100%. Reactive oxygen species levels [log10 (reactive oxygen species +1] were significantly higher in male factor infertility patients. Reactive oxygen species had a sensitivity of 83.47% and specificity of 60.52% with an accuracy of 75% at a cutoff of 1.25 in identifying male factor infertility patients. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for reactive oxygen species levels was 78.92% (95% CI: 72.60%-85.23%. semen quality scores were significantly and negatively correlated with reactive oxygen species levels in the donors and the male factor infertility patients. CONCLUSIONS: The semen quality score and reactive oxygen species levels in semen samples appear to be strongly associated with male factor infertility. Because both of these parameters are more sensitive than individual sperm parameters in identifying male factor infertility, they should be included in routine infertility screening.OBJETIVO: Determinar se pacientes portadores do fator de infertilidade masculina podem ser precisamente identificados através do cálculo de um

  11. Hyperprolactinaemia in male infertility: Clinical case scenarios

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    Zeinab Dabbous

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the evaluation, treatment and impact of hyperprolactinaemia on male infertility and testicular function, as hyperprolactinaemia is commonly detected during the evaluation of infertile men. Methods: A literature search was performed using MEDLINE/PubMed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA guidelines to identify all studies exploring hyperprolactinaemia in male infertility. Results: Elevated levels of serum prolactin have a detrimental effect on male reproduction through inhibition of the pulsatile release of gonadotrophins from the anterior pituitary gland, and a direct effect on spermatogenesis. Treatment of confirmed hyperprolactinaemia with dopamine agonists leads to significant improvements in both semen parameters and hormone levels. Conclusion: Hyperprolactinaemia, both directly and indirectly, has a negative effect on sperm production, and its detection and management in men seeking fertility is mandatory. Keywords: Prolactin, Male infertility, Dopamine agonists, Testosterone, Pituitary adenoma

  12. Infertility, Psychological Distress, and Coping Strategies among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    Research for Health, Inc., Cuyahoga Falls, OH, USA1; School of Nursing & Health Sciences, Malone University,. Canton ... Health care professionals should provide holistic care for infertile women to meet their physical, spiritual, ..... find a cure.

  13. [The multiple interactions between infertility and sexuality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimoun, S

    1993-03-01

    After investigating into literature and clinical experience, we shall line out in this study 4 types of interactions between sexuality and infertility: sexual causes to feminine (vaginism, with and without heavy dyspareunia) or masculine (impotency, ante-portas ejaculation, anejaculation, dysejaculation), infertility; influence of tests and of treatments for infertility on sexual life; influence of infertility on sexuality focusing on the various ambiguous feelings (of culpability, inferiority, aggressivity, passivity); and last, the psychological and sexual interactions with medical assisted procreation, reinforcing the sexual separation of man and woman if the body is considered a machine. Psychosomatic guidance of the couple during these steps (with reassurance as the being helped conception) will allow maintaining on removing sexual attraction.

  14. Possible fetal determinants of male infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Almstrup, Kristian; Andersson, Anna-Maria

    2014-01-01

    with regard to testicular cancer, levels of testosterone and semen quality, but also from histopathological observations. Many infertile men have histological signs of testicular dysgenesis, including Sertoli-cell-only tubules, immature undifferentiated Sertoli cells, microliths and Leydig cell nodules...

  15. Secondary Infertility: Why Does It Happen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2016. http://accessmedicine.com. Accessed Nov. 29, 2016. Hacker NF, et al. Infertility and assisted reproductive technologies. In: Hacker & Moore's Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 6th ed. ...

  16. Infertility trial outcomes: healthy moms and babies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, the primary outcome of infertility trials has been a positive pregnancy test or a clinically recognized pregnancy. However, parents desire a healthy baby that grows up to be a healthy adult, rather than a positive pregnancy test. Too often results of infertility trials are lacking in crucial obstetric details. This is problematic because treatments for infertility have the capacity to increase the risk for a variety of adverse obstetric outcomes. This review will outline important obstetric variables that should be included when reporting infertility research. The rationale for including these data, precise definitions of the variables, and cost-effective strategies for obtaining these obstetric details will be highlighted. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Follow up of infertile patients after failed ART cycles: a preliminary report from Iran and Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Kahraman, Semra; Ugur, Mete Gurol; Agha-Rahimi, Azam; Tabibnejad, Nasim

    2012-03-01

    Assisted reproductive technology (ART) has become an established and increasingly successful form of treatment for infertility. However, significant numbers of cycles fail after embryo transfer (ET) and it becomes necessary to follow up the infertile couples after failed ART treatments. The main goal was to follow up the infertile patients after failed IVF/ICSI+ET treatments in Iran and Turkey. 198 infertile couples from Iran and 355 infertile couples from Turkey were followed up after IVF/ICSI failures. The patients' demographic data, the couples' decisions about continuation of treatment and the spontaneous pregnancy rates were compared in the two countries. The drop-out rate was higher in Iran (28.3%) than in Turkey (23.4%). The reasons for treatment discontinuation in Iran and Turkey were: financial problem (33.9% vs. 41%), hopeless (10.7% vs. 22.9%), fear of drug side-effects (7.1% vs. 12%), achieving pregnancy (37.5% vs. 19.6%), child adoption (5.4% vs. 2.4%), lack of spouse cooperation (5.4% vs. 2.4%), and divorce (0% vs. 2.4%). Spontaneous pregnancy was significantly higher in Iran (10.1%) than in Turkey (3.9%). There was correlation between duration of infertility and female factor infertility with spontaneous pregnancy. Since the majority of couples that discontinued treatment had financial problems, it is essential for health professionals to support infertile couples during their childlessness crisis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Yoga Can Improve Assisted Reproduction Technology Outcomes in Couples With Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbandi, Sara; Darbandi, Mahsa; Khorram Khorshid, Hamid Reza; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza

    2017-11-07

    Context • Depending on the cause of the infertility, nonsurgical or surgical treatments may be used to treat men and women with infertility. Despite improved outcomes due to medical advances, assisted reproductive technology (ART) for couples with infertility is sometimes unsuccessful. Success may be affected by the patient's social, psychological, and physical status. Objective • The study examined the effects of yoga-including asanas (yoga poses), pranayama (proper breathing), shavasana, and meditation-on male and female fertility and ART outcomes. Design • The research team performed a literature review, electronically searching for articles published between January 1978 and January 2016 in the PubMed, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar databases. Setting • The study took place at the Reproductive Biotechnology Research Center at the Avicenna Research Institute at the Academic Center for Education, Culture, and Research (Tehran, Iran). Participants • Participants were couples with infertility taking part in 87 reviewed studies. Intervention • Yoga was the intervention. Outcome Measures • The outcome measures comprised fertility factors in males and females, fertility rate, and ART success rate. Results • The reviewed studies showed that yoga can provide stress management for patients with infertility, with beneficial effects on fertility, helping couples give birth. They found that yoga also could reduce pain; decrease depression, anxiety, and stress; reduce the rate of assisted vaginal delivery; and improve fetal outcomes. Conclusions • Yoga can help couples overcome infertility and increase the ART success rate by improving the physiological and psychological states of both men and women.

  19. Understanding the perceptions of and emotional barriers to infertility treatment: a survey in four European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domar, Alice; Gordon, Keith; Garcia-Velasco, Juan; La Marca, Antonio; Barriere, Paul; Beligotti, Fabiola

    2012-04-01

    Infertility can significantly impact women's lives and personal relationships. Despite the negative impact of infertility, a significant number of women who are struggling to conceive do not consult a physician. This cross-sectional survey was conducted to determine the emotional impact of infertility on women to identify which aspects of fertility treatment contribute to the psychological stress experienced by so many patients and to identify barriers to seeking treatment. Women (n = 445; 18-44 years) who had received fertility treatment within the past 2 years or were having trouble conceiving but had not received treatment, completed a 15-min survey online. Participants were from France (n = 108), Germany (n = 111), Italy (n = 112) and Spain (n = 114). Responses indicated that infertility causes a range of emotions and can strain relationships. Women who had received treatment were more likely to feel hopeful (26 versus 21%) and closer to their partner than women not in treatment (33 versus 19%, P barrier to treatment. This study has provided insight into the physical and psychological challenges of infertility treatments and permitted a better understanding of the factors that impact patient lives. A treatment protocol with minimal injections and provision of additional information may lessen the emotional impact and challenges of infertility and contribute to patient satisfaction with fertility treatment protocols.

  20. Is there a place for nutritional supplements in the treatment of idiopathic male infertility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Arcaniolo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Infertility affects 15% of couples in fertile age. Male factor is a cause of infertility in almost half of cases, mainly due to oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT. The purpose of this study is to review the effects of nutritional supplements as medical treatment for idiopathic male infertility. Material and methods: A Pub Med and Medline review of the published studies utilizing nutritional supplements for the treatment of male infertility has been performed. Results: Clinical trials on Vitamin E, Vitamin A, Vitamin C. Arginine, Carnitine, N-Acetyl-Carnitine, Glutathione, Coenzyme Q10, Selenium and Zinc were reviewed. Although there is a wide variability in selected population, dose regimen and final outcomes, nutritional supplements both alone and in combination seems to be able to improve semen parameters (sperm count, sperm motility and morphology and pregnancy rate in infertile men. Conclusions: There are rising evidences from published randomized trials and systematic review suggesting that nutritional supplementation may improve semen parameters and the likelihood of pregnancy in men affected by OAT. This improvement, however, is not consistent and there is a wide variation in the treatment regimens used. Well designed and adequately powered RCTs are needed to better clarify the role of nutritional supplements as treatment for male infertility.