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Sample records for tsr chemotaxis receptor

  1. Site-specific and synergistic stimulation of methylation on the bacterial chemotaxis receptor Tsr by serine and CheW

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    Weis Robert M

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specific glutamates in the methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs of Escherichia coli are modified during sensory adaptation. Attractants that bind to MCPs are known to increase the rate of receptor modification, as with serine and the serine receptor (Tsr, which contributes to an increase in the steady-state (adapted methylation level. However, MCPs form ternary complexes with two cytoplasmic signaling proteins, the kinase (CheA and an adaptor protein (CheW, but their influences on receptor methylation are unknown. Here, the influence of CheW on the rate of Tsr methylation has been studied to identify contributions to the process of adaptation. Results Methyl group incorporation was measured in a series of membrane samples in which the Tsr molecules were engineered to have one available methyl-accepting glutamate residue (297, 304, 311 or 493. The relative rates at these sites (0.14, 0.05, 0.05 and 1, respectively differed from those found previously for the aspartate receptor (Tar, which was in part due to sequence differences between Tar and Tsr near site four. The addition of CheW generated unexpectedly large and site-specific rate increases, equal to or larger than the increases produced by serine. The increases produced by serine and CheW (added separately were the largest at site one, ~3 and 6-fold, respectively, and the least at site four, no change and ~2-fold, respectively. The rate increases were even larger when serine and CheW were added together, larger than the sums of the increases produced by serine and CheW added separately (except site four. This resulted in substantially larger serine-stimulated increases when CheW was present. Also, CheW enhanced methylation rates when either two or all four sites were available. Conclusion The increase in the rate of receptor methylation upon CheW binding contributes significantly to the ligand specificity and kinetics of sensory adaptation. The synergistic effect of

  2. Protein Connectivity in Chemotaxis Receptor Complexes.

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    Stephan Eismann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The chemotaxis sensory system allows bacteria such as Escherichia coli to swim towards nutrients and away from repellents. The underlying pathway is remarkably sensitive in detecting chemical gradients over a wide range of ambient concentrations. Interactions among receptors, which are predominantly clustered at the cell poles, are crucial to this sensitivity. Although it has been suggested that the kinase CheA and the adapter protein CheW are integral for receptor connectivity, the exact coupling mechanism remains unclear. Here, we present a statistical-mechanics approach to model the receptor linkage mechanism itself, building on nanodisc and electron cryotomography experiments. Specifically, we investigate how the sensing behavior of mixed receptor clusters is affected by variations in the expression levels of CheA and CheW at a constant receptor density in the membrane. Our model compares favorably with dose-response curves from in vivo Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET measurements, demonstrating that the receptor-methylation level has only minor effects on receptor cooperativity. Importantly, our model provides an explanation for the non-intuitive conclusion that the receptor cooperativity decreases with increasing levels of CheA, a core signaling protein associated with the receptors, whereas the receptor cooperativity increases with increasing levels of CheW, a key adapter protein. Finally, we propose an evolutionary advantage as explanation for the recently suggested CheW-only linker structures.

  3. The Novel Functions of the PLC/PKC/PKD Signaling Axis in G Protein-Coupled Receptor-Mediated Chemotaxis of Neutrophils

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    Xuehua Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotaxis, a directional cell migration guided by extracellular chemoattractant gradients, plays an essential role in the recruitment of neutrophils to sites of inflammation. Chemotaxis is mediated by the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR signaling pathway. Extracellular stimuli trigger activation of the PLC/PKC/PKD signaling axis, which controls several signaling pathways. Here, we concentrate on the novel functions of PLC/PKC/PKD signaling in GPCR-mediated chemotaxis of neutrophils.

  4. The Novel Functions of the PLC/PKC/PKD Signaling Axis in G Protein-Coupled Receptor-Mediated Chemotaxis of Neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuehua; Jin, Tian

    2015-01-01

    Chemotaxis, a directional cell migration guided by extracellular chemoattractant gradients, plays an essential role in the recruitment of neutrophils to sites of inflammation. Chemotaxis is mediated by the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathway. Extracellular stimuli trigger activation of the PLC/PKC/PKD signaling axis, which controls several signaling pathways. Here, we concentrate on the novel functions of PLC/PKC/PKD signaling in GPCR-mediated chemotaxis of neutrophils.

  5. Exponential signaling gain at the receptor level enhances signal-to-noise ratio in bacterial chemotaxis.

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    Silke Neumann

    Full Text Available Cellular signaling systems show astonishing precision in their response to external stimuli despite strong fluctuations in the molecular components that determine pathway activity. To control the effects of noise on signaling most efficiently, living cells employ compensatory mechanisms that reach from simple negative feedback loops to robustly designed signaling architectures. Here, we report on a novel control mechanism that allows living cells to keep precision in their signaling characteristics - stationary pathway output, response amplitude, and relaxation time - in the presence of strong intracellular perturbations. The concept relies on the surprising fact that for systems showing perfect adaptation an exponential signal amplification at the receptor level suffices to eliminate slowly varying multiplicative noise. To show this mechanism at work in living systems, we quantified the response dynamics of the E. coli chemotaxis network after genetically perturbing the information flux between upstream and downstream signaling components. We give strong evidence that this signaling system results in dynamic invariance of the activated response regulator against multiplicative intracellular noise. We further demonstrate that for environmental conditions, for which precision in chemosensing is crucial, the invariant response behavior results in highest chemotactic efficiency. Our results resolve several puzzling features of the chemotaxis pathway that are widely conserved across prokaryotes but so far could not be attributed any functional role.

  6. Exponential signaling gain at the receptor level enhances signal-to-noise ratio in bacterial chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Silke; Løvdok, Linda; Bentele, Kajetan; Meisig, Johannes; Ullner, Ekkehard; Paldy, Ferencz S; Sourjik, Victor; Kollmann, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Cellular signaling systems show astonishing precision in their response to external stimuli despite strong fluctuations in the molecular components that determine pathway activity. To control the effects of noise on signaling most efficiently, living cells employ compensatory mechanisms that reach from simple negative feedback loops to robustly designed signaling architectures. Here, we report on a novel control mechanism that allows living cells to keep precision in their signaling characteristics - stationary pathway output, response amplitude, and relaxation time - in the presence of strong intracellular perturbations. The concept relies on the surprising fact that for systems showing perfect adaptation an exponential signal amplification at the receptor level suffices to eliminate slowly varying multiplicative noise. To show this mechanism at work in living systems, we quantified the response dynamics of the E. coli chemotaxis network after genetically perturbing the information flux between upstream and downstream signaling components. We give strong evidence that this signaling system results in dynamic invariance of the activated response regulator against multiplicative intracellular noise. We further demonstrate that for environmental conditions, for which precision in chemosensing is crucial, the invariant response behavior results in highest chemotactic efficiency. Our results resolve several puzzling features of the chemotaxis pathway that are widely conserved across prokaryotes but so far could not be attributed any functional role.

  7. Ultrasensitivity and fluctuations in the Barkai-Leibler model of chemotaxis receptors in Escherichia coli.

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    Ushasi Roy

    Full Text Available A stochastic version of the Barkai-Leibler model of chemotaxis receptors in Escherichia coli is studied here with the goal of elucidating the effects of intrinsic network noise in their conformational dynamics. The model was originally proposed to explain the robust and near-perfect adaptation of E. coli observed across a wide range of spatially uniform attractant/repellent (ligand concentrations. In the model, a receptor is either active or inactive and can stochastically switch between the two states. The enzyme CheR methylates inactive receptors while CheB demethylates active receptors and the probability for a receptor to be active depends on its level of methylation and ligand occupation. In a simple version of the model with two methylation sites per receptor (M = 2, we show rigorously, under a quasi-steady state approximation, that the mean active fraction of receptors is an ultrasensitive function of [CheR]/[CheB] in the limit of saturating receptor concentration. Hence the model shows zero-order ultrasensitivity (ZOU, similar to the classical two-state model of covalent modification studied by Goldbeter and Koshland (GK. We also find that in the limits of extremely small and extremely large ligand concentrations, the system reduces to two different two-state GK modules. A quantitative measure of the spontaneous fluctuations in activity is provided by the variance [Formula: see text] in the active fraction, which is estimated mathematically under linear noise approximation (LNA. It is found that [Formula: see text] peaks near the ZOU transition. The variance is a non-monotonic, but weak function of ligand concentration and a decreasing function of receptor concentration. Gillespie simulations are also performed in models with M = 2, 3 and 4. For M = 2, simulations show excellent agreement with analytical results obtained under LNA. Numerical results for M = 3 and M = 4 are qualitatively similar to our mathematical results in M = 2; while

  8. Bacillus subtilis Early Colonization of Arabidopsis thaliana Roots Involves Multiple Chemotaxis Receptors.

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    Allard-Massicotte, Rosalie; Tessier, Laurence; Lécuyer, Frédéric; Lakshmanan, Venkatachalam; Lucier, Jean-François; Garneau, Daniel; Caudwell, Larissa; Vlamakis, Hera; Bais, Harsh P; Beauregard, Pascale B

    2016-11-29

    Colonization of plant roots by Bacillus subtilis is mutually beneficial to plants and bacteria. Plants can secrete up to 30% of their fixed carbon via root exudates, thereby feeding the bacteria, and in return the associated B. subtilis bacteria provide the plant with many growth-promoting traits. Formation of a biofilm on the root by matrix-producing B. subtilis is a well-established requirement for long-term colonization. However, we observed that cells start forming a biofilm only several hours after motile cells first settle on the plant. We also found that intact chemotaxis machinery is required for early root colonization by B. subtilis and for plant protection. Arabidopsis thaliana root exudates attract B. subtilis in vitro, an activity mediated by the two characterized chemoreceptors, McpB and McpC, as well as by the orphan receptor TlpC. Nonetheless, bacteria lacking these chemoreceptors are still able to colonize the root, suggesting that other chemoreceptors might also play a role in this process. These observations suggest that A. thaliana actively recruits B. subtilis through root-secreted molecules, and our results stress the important roles of B. subtilis chemoreceptors for efficient colonization of plants in natural environments. These results demonstrate a remarkable strategy adapted by beneficial rhizobacteria to utilize carbon-rich root exudates, which may facilitate rhizobacterial colonization and a mutualistic association with the host. Bacillus subtilis is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium that establishes robust interactions with roots. Many studies have now demonstrated that biofilm formation is required for long-term colonization. However, we observed that motile B. subtilis mediates the first contact with the roots. These cells differentiate into biofilm-producing cells only several hours after the bacteria first contact the root. Our study reveals that intact chemotaxis machinery is required for the bacteria to reach the

  9. Decreased numbers of chemotactic factor receptors in chronic neutropenia with defective chemotaxis: spontaneous recovery from the neutrophil abnormalities during early childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasui, K.; Yamazaki, M.; Miyagawa, Y.; Komiyama, A.; Akabane, T.

    1987-01-01

    Childhood chronic neutropenia with decreased numbers of chemotactic factor receptors as well as defective chemotaxis was first demonstrated in an 8-month-old girl. Chemotactic factor receptors on neutrophils were assayed using tritiated N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine ( 3 H-FMLP). The patient's neutrophils had decreased numbers of the receptors: numbers of the receptors were 20,000 (less than 3 SD) as compared with those of control cells of 52,000 +/- 6000 (mean +/- SD) (n = 10). The neutropenia disappeared spontaneously by 28 months of age parallel with the improvement of chemotaxis and increase in numbers of chemotactic factor receptors. These results demonstrate a transient decrease of neutrophil chemotactic factor receptors as one of the pathophysiological bases of a transient defect of neutrophil chemotaxis in this disorder

  10. The Cannabinoid Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol Mediates Inhibition of Macrophage Chemotaxis to RANTES/CCL5 through the CB2 Receptor

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    Raborn, Erinn S.; Marciano-Cabral, Francine; Buckley, Nancy E.; Martin, Billy R.; Cabral, Guy A.

    2009-01-01

    The chemotactic response of murine peritoneal macrophages to RANTES/CCL5 was inhibited significantly following pretreatment with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component in marijuana. Significant inhibition of this chemokine directed migratory response was obtained also when the full cannabinoid agonist CP55940 was used. The CB2 receptor-selective ligand O-2137 exerted a robust inhibition of chemotaxis while the CB1 receptor-selective ligand ACEA had a minimal effect. The THC-mediated inhibition was reversed by the CB2 receptor-specific antagonist SR144528 but not by the CB1 receptor-specific antagonist SR141716A. In addition, THC treatment had a minimal effect on the chemotactic response of peritoneal macrophages from CB2 knockout mice. Collectively, these results suggest that cannabinoids act through the CB2 receptor to trans-deactivate migratory responsiveness to RANTES/CCL5. Furthermore, the results suggest that the CB2 receptor may be a constituent element of a network of G protein-coupled receptor signal transductional systems, inclusive of chemokine receptors, that act coordinately to modulate macrophage migration. PMID:18247131

  11. Gradients of natriuretic peptide precursor A (NPPA) in oviduct and of natriuretic peptide receptor 1 (NPR1) in spermatozoon are involved in mouse sperm chemotaxis and fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Fenghua; Mao, Guankun; Guo, Meng; Mao, Guanping; Wang, Jianwei; Li, Junxia; Han, Yingying; Chen, Xiufeng; Zhang, Meijia; Xia, Guoliang

    2012-05-01

    Selective spermatozoa movement from storage of the oviduct to fertilization site is suggested to be a result of chemotaxis. In the present study, Natriuretic peptide precursor A (NPPA) induced sperm chemotaxis in capillaries and enhanced intracellular Ca(2+) level, both of which could be blocked by the Natriuretic Peptide Receptor 1 (NPR1) inhibitor anantin and the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitors, KT5823 and Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS. NPPA also increased spermatozoa kinetic parameters of VAP, VSL, LIN, STR, and BCF. Only 2.0% of positive staining for NPR1 was detected in fresh spermatozoa. The positive rate was increased in capacitated spermatozoa (20.5%), and further increased in spermatozoa of NPPA treatment (70.2%). Nppa mRNA level in the ampullae was significantly higher compared with that in isthmus and uterotubal junction, and NPPA protein had an ascending gradient (AG) from the uterotubal junction to ampullae in gonadotropin-treated mice. NPPA induced sperm chemotaxis in diestrus oviducts without a NPPA gradient, and sperm chemotaxis occurred in the oviducts of gonadotropin-treated mice. These effects were inhibited by anantin. Meanwhile, sperm chemotaxis also occurred in unilateral ovariectomized oviducts of gonadotropin-treated mice, in which the possible effect of follicular fluid and oocyte-cumulus mass were eliminated when ovulation occurs. Furthermore, anantin significantly decreased the rate of fertilization in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 µM, 57.1%; 1 µM, 33.8%) compared with control (78.5%). These results suggest that a NPPA gradient originating in the oviduct induces sperm chemotaxis by binding to its receptor NPR1 and then activating PKG pathway, and plays a physiological role in fertilization. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The Aer protein and the serine chemoreceptor Tsr independently sense intracellular energy levels and transduce oxygen, redox, and energy signals for Escherichia coli behavior

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    Rebbapragada, Anuradha; Johnson, Mark S.; Harding, Gordon P.; Zuccarelli, Anthony J.; Fletcher, Hansel M.; Zhulin, Igor B.; Taylor, Barry L.

    1997-01-01

    We identified a protein, Aer, as a signal transducer that senses intracellular energy levels rather than the external environment and that transduces signals for aerotaxis (taxis to oxygen) and other energy-dependent behavioral responses in Escherichia coli. Domains in Aer are similar to the signaling domain in chemotaxis receptors and the putative oxygen-sensing domain of some transcriptional activators. A putative FAD-binding site in the N-terminal domain of Aer shares a consensus sequence with the NifL, Bat, and Wc-1 signal-transducing proteins that regulate gene expression in response to redox changes, oxygen, and blue light, respectively. A double mutant deficient in aer and tsr, which codes for the serine chemoreceptor, was negative for aerotaxis, redox taxis, and glycerol taxis, each of which requires the proton motive force and/or electron transport system for signaling. We propose that Aer and Tsr sense the proton motive force or cellular redox state and thereby integrate diverse signals that guide E. coli to environments where maximal energy is available for growth. PMID:9380671

  13. CXCR3 chemokine receptor-induced chemotaxis in human airway epithelial cells: role of p38 MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways.

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    Shahabuddin, Syed; Ji, Rong; Wang, Ping; Brailoiu, Eugene; Dun, Na; Yang, Yi; Aksoy, Mark O; Kelsen, Steven G

    2006-07-01

    Human airway epithelial cells (HAEC) constitutively express the CXC chemokine receptor CXCR3, which regulates epithelial cell movement. In diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma, characterized by denudation of the epithelial lining, epithelial cell migration may contribute to airway repair and reconstitution. This study compared the potency and efficacy of three CXCR3 ligands, I-TAC/CXCL11, IP-10/CXCL10, and Mig/CXCL9, as inducers of chemotaxis in HAEC and examined the underlying signaling pathways involved. Studies were performed in cultured HAEC from normal subjects and the 16-HBE cell line. In normal HAEC, the efficacy of I-TAC-induced chemotaxis was 349 +/- 88% (mean +/- SE) of the medium control and approximately one-half the response to epidermal growth factor, a highly potent chemoattractant. In normal HAEC, Mig, IP-10, and I-TAC induced chemotaxis with similar potency and a rank order of efficacy of I-TAC = IP-10 > Mig. Preincubation with pertussis toxin completely blocked CXCR3-induced migration. Of interest, intracellular [Ca(2+)] did not rise in response to I-TAC, IP-10, or Mig. I-TAC induced a rapid phosphorylation (5-10 min) of two of the three MAPKs, i.e., p38 and ERK1/2. Pretreatment of HAEC with the p38 inhibitor SB 20358 or the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin dose-dependently inhibited the chemotactic response to I-TAC. In contrast, the ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 had no effect on chemotaxis. These data indicate that in HAEC, CXCR3-mediated chemotaxis involves a G protein, which activates both the p38 MAPK and PI3K pathways in a calcium-independent fashion.

  14. Mutation of a Src phosphorylation site in the PDGF beta-receptor leads to increased PDGF-stimulated chemotaxis but decreased mitogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus; Johnell, M; Siegbahn, A

    1996-01-01

    Ligand induced activation of the beta-receptor for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) leads to activation of Src family tyrosine kinases. We have explored the possibility that the receptor itself is a substrate for Src. We show that Tyr934 in the kinase domain of the PDGF receptor...... is phosphorylated by Src. Cell lines expressing a beta-receptor mutant, in which Tyr934 was replaced with a phenyalanine residue, showed reduced mitogenic signaling in response to PDGF-BB. In contrast, the mutant receptor mediated increased signals for chemotaxis and actin reorganization. Whereas the motility......, the characteristics of the Y934F mutant suggest that the phosphorylation of Tyr934 by Src negatively modulates a signal transduction pathway leading to motility responses which involves phospholipase C-gamma, and shifts the response to increased mitogenicity....

  15. Chemotaxis cluster 1 proteins form cytoplasmic arrays in Vibrio cholerae and are stabilized by a double signaling domain receptor DosM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briegel, Ariane; Ortega, Davi R; Mann, Petra; Kjær, Andreas; Ringgaard, Simon; Jensen, Grant J

    2016-09-13

    Nearly all motile bacterial cells use a highly sensitive and adaptable sensory system to detect changes in nutrient concentrations in the environment and guide their movements toward attractants and away from repellents. The best-studied bacterial chemoreceptor arrays are membrane-bound. Many motile bacteria contain one or more additional, sometimes purely cytoplasmic, chemoreceptor systems. Vibrio cholerae contains three chemotaxis clusters (I, II, and III). Here, using electron cryotomography, we explore V. cholerae's cytoplasmic chemoreceptor array and establish that it is formed by proteins from cluster I. We further identify a chemoreceptor with an unusual domain architecture, DosM, which is essential for formation of the cytoplasmic arrays. DosM contains two signaling domains and spans the two-layered cytoplasmic arrays. Finally, we present evidence suggesting that this type of receptor is important for the structural stability of the cytoplasmic array.

  16. Overactivation of phospholipase C-gamma1 renders platelet-derived growth factor beta-receptor-expressing cells independent of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway for chemotaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönnstrand, L; Siegbahn, A; Rorsman, C

    1999-01-01

    -dimensional phosphopeptide mapping, the increase in phosphorylation of PLC-gamma1 was shown not to be selective for any site, rather a general increase in phosphorylation of PLC-gamma1 was seen. Specific inhibitors of protein kinase C, bisindolylmaleimide (GF109203X), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase), LY294002......We have previously shown that porcine aortic endothelial cells expressing the Y934F platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) beta-receptor mutant respond to PDGF-BB in a chemotaxis assay at about 100-fold lower concentration than do wild-type PDGF beta-receptor-expressing cells (Hansen, K., Johnell, M......, did not affect the activation of PLC-gamma1. To assess whether increased activation of PLC-gamma1 is the cause of the hyperchemotactic behavior of the Y934F mutant cell line, we constructed cell lines expressing either wild-type or a catalytically compromised version of PLC-gamma1 under a tetracycline...

  17. Chemotaxis of large granular lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohajdak, B.; Gomez, J.; Orr, F.W.; Khalil, N.; Talgoy, M.; Greenberg, A.H.

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis that large granular lymphocytes (LGL) are capable of directed locomotion (chemotaxis) was tested. A population of LGL isolated from discontinuous Percoll gradients migrated along concentration gradients of N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (f-MLP), casein, and C5a, well known chemoattractants for polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes, as well as interferon-β and colony-stimulating factor. Interleukin 2, tuftsin, platelet-derived growth factor, and fibronectin were inactive. Migratory responses were greater in Percoll fractions with the highest lytic activity and HNK-1 + cells. The chemotactic response to f-MLP, casein, and C5a was always greater when the chemoattractant was present in greater concentration in the lower compartment of the Boyden chamber. Optimum chemotaxis was observed after a 1 hr incubation that made use of 12 μm nitrocellulose filters. LGL exhibited a high degree of nondirected locomotion when allowed to migrate for longer periods (> 2 hr), and when cultured in vitro for 24 to 72 hr in the presence or absence of IL 2 containing phytohemagluttinin-conditioned medium. LGL chemotaxis to f-MLP could be inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by the inactive structural analog CBZ-phe-met, and the RNK tumor line specifically bound f-ML( 3 H)P, suggesting that LGL bear receptors for the chemotactic peptide

  18. Chemotaxis cluster 1 proteins form cytoplasmic arrays in Vibrio cholerae and are stabilized by a double signaling domain receptor DosM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Briegel, Ariane; Ortega, Davi R; Mann, Petra

    2016-01-01

    motile bacteria contain one or more additional, sometimes purely cytoplasmic, chemoreceptor systems. Vibrio cholerae contains three chemotaxis clusters (I, II, and III). Here, using electron cryotomography, we explore V. cholerae's cytoplasmic chemoreceptor array and establish that it is formed...

  19. Cloning, expression, cellular distribution, and role in chemotaxis of a C5a receptor in rainbow trout: the first identification of a C5a receptor in a nonmammalian species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshra, Hani; Li, Jun; Peters, Rodney; Hansen, John; Matlapudi, Anjan; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2004-01-01

    C3a, C4a, and C5a anaphylatoxins generated during complement activation play a key role in inflammation. C5a is the most potent of the three anaphylatoxins in eliciting biological responses. The effects of C5a are mediated by its binding to C5a receptor (C5aR, CD88). To date, C5aR has only been identified and cloned in mammalian species, and its evolutionary history remains ill-defined. To gain insights into the evolution, conserved structural domains, and functions of C5aR, we have cloned and characterized a C5aR in rainbow trout, a teleost fish. The isolated cDNA encoded a 350-aa protein that showed the highest sequence similarity to C5aR from other species. Genomic analysis revealed the presence of one continuous exon encoding the entire open reading frame. Northern blot analysis showed significant expression of the trout C5a receptor (TC5aR) message in PBLs and kidney. Flow cytometric analysis showed that two Abs generated against two different areas of the extracellular N-terminal region of TC5aR positively stained the same leukocyte populations from PBLs. B lymphocytes and granulocytes comprised the majority of cells recognized by the anti-TC5aR. More importantly, these Abs inhibited chemotaxis of PBLs toward a chemoattractant fraction purified from complement-activated trout serum. Our data suggest that the split between C5aR and C3aR from a common ancestral molecule occurred before the emergence of teleost fish. Moreover, we demonstrate that the overall structure of C5aR as well as its role in chemotaxis have remained conserved for >300 million years.

  20. Protein phosphorylation and bacterial chemotaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, J.F.; Bourret, R.B.; Oosawa, K.; Simon, M.I.; Matsumura, P.

    1988-01-01

    Bacteria are able to respond to changes in concentration of a large variety of chemicals and to changes in physical parameters, including viscosity, osmolarity, and temperature, by swimming toward a more favorable location (for review, see Stewart and Dahlquist 1987). Most chemotactic responses are mediated by a series of transmembrane receptor proteins that interact with or bind specific chemicals and thus monitor environmental conditions. Over the past 10 years, work in a number of laboratories has resulted in the identification and characterization of many of the genes and proteins required for the signal transduction process. The authors postulated that rapid and transient covalent modification of the chemotaxis gene products could function to transmit information from the receptor by regulating protein-protein interaction between the chemotaxis gene products. To test this idea, the authors purified the proteins corresponding to the cheA, cheY, cheZ, cheW, and cheB genes and tested the purified polypeptides to determine whether they could be covalently modified and whether they would interact with each other in vitro

  1. Signal transduction and chemotaxis in mast cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dráber, Petr; Hálová, Ivana; Polakovičová, Iva; Kawakami, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 778, jaro (2016), s. 11-23 ISSN 0014-2999 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-09807S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-00703S Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Mast cell * IgE receptor * KIT receptor * Signal transduction * Chemotaxis * Plasma membrane Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.896, year: 2016

  2. Attractant- and Disulfide-Induced Conformational Changes in the Ligand Binding Domain of the Chemotaxis Aspartate Receptor: A 19F NMR Study†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Mark A.; Biemann, Hans-Peter; Koshland, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    The isolated ligand binding domain of the chemotaxis aspartate receptor is the focus of the present study, which both (a) identifies structural regions involved in the attractant-induced conformational change and (b) investigates the kinetic parameters of attractant binding. To analyze the attractant-induced conformational change within the homodimeric domain, 19F NMR is used to monitor six para-fluorophenylalanine (4-F-Phe) positions within each identical subunit of the homodimer. The binding of one molecule of aspartate to the homodimer perturbs three of the 4-F-Phe resonances significantly: 4-F-Phe150 in the attractant binding site, 4-F-Phe107 located 26 Å from the site, and 4-F-Phe180 at a distance of 40 Å from the site. Comparison of the frequency shifts triggered by aspartate and glutamate reveals that these attractants generate different conformations in the vicinity of the attractant site but trigger indistinguishable long-range conformational effects at distant positions. This long-range conformational change is specific for attractant binding, since formation of the Cys36–Cys36′ disulfide bond or the nonphysiological binding of 1,10-phenanthroline to an aromatic pocket distal to the attractant site each yield conformational changes which are significantly more localized. The attractant-triggered perturbations detected at 4-F-Phe107 and 4-F-Phe180 indicate that the structural change includes an intrasubunit component communicated through the domain to its C-terminal region, which, in the full-length receptor, continues through the membrane as the second membrane-spanning helix. It would thus appear that the transmembrane signal is transmitted through this helix. The 19F NMR results also reveal the association rate constant for aspartate binding to the isolated periplasmic domain (kon ~ 109 M−1 s−1), enabling deduction of the dissociation rate constant (k off ~ 103 s−1). Aspartate binding thus approaches the diffusion-controlled limit. The

  3. TSR-D1000 digital satellite receiver for China; Chugoku muke eisei digital hoso jushinki TSR-D1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Recently the satellite broadcasting in China has rapidly been promoting a change to the digital system. To cope with this, the Company has developed TSR-D1000 digital satellite receiver for China. TSR-D1000 conducts the MPEG 2 based signal decode, based on the domestic digital satellite receiver. Further, the specifications are considered of China original signal-sending form as seen in receiving of both systems of MCPC (multi channel per carrier)/SCPC (single channel per carrier). Moreover, highly convenient functions were realized such as a Chinese/English convertible on-screen function and a channel list display function. (translated by NEDO)

  4. Human G Protein–Coupled Receptor Gpr-9-6/Cc Chemokine Receptor 9 Is Selectively Expressed on Intestinal Homing T Lymphocytes, Mucosal Lymphocytes, and Thymocytes and Is Required for Thymus-Expressed Chemokine–Mediated Chemotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabel, Brian A.; Agace, William W.; Campbell, James J.; Heath, Heidi M.; Parent, David; Roberts, Arthur I.; Ebert, Ellen C.; Kassam, Nasim; Qin, Shixin; Zovko, Maria; LaRosa, Gregory J.; Yang, Li-Li; Soler, Dulce; Butcher, Eugene C.; Ponath, Paul D.; Parker, Christina M.; Andrew, David P.

    1999-01-01

    TECK (thymus-expressed chemokine), a recently described CC chemokine expressed in thymus and small intestine, was found to mediate chemotaxis of human G protein–coupled receptor GPR-9-6/L1.2 transfectants. This activity was blocked by anti–GPR-9-6 monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3C3. GPR-9-6 is expressed on a subset of memory α4β7high intestinal trafficking CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes. In addition, all intestinal lamina propria and intraepithelial lymphocytes express GPR-9-6. In contrast, GPR-9-6 is not displayed on cutaneous lymphocyte antigen–positive (CLA+) memory CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes, which traffic to skin inflammatory sites, or on other systemic α4β7−CLA− memory CD4/CD8 lymphocytes. The majority of thymocytes also express GPR-9-6, but natural killer cells, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils, and neutrophils are GPR-9-6 negative. Transcripts of GPR-9-6 and TECK are present in both small intestine and thymus. Importantly, the expression profile of GPR-9-6 correlates with migration to TECK of blood T lymphocytes and thymocytes. As migration of these cells is blocked by anti–GPR-9-6 mAb 3C3, we conclude that GPR-9-6 is the principal chemokine receptor for TECK. In agreement with the nomenclature rules for chemokine receptors, we propose the designation CCR-9 for GPR-9-6. The selective expression of TECK and GPR-9-6 in thymus and small intestine implies a dual role for GPR-9-6/CCR-9, both in T cell development and the mucosal immune response. PMID:10544196

  5. Human G protein-coupled receptor GPR-9-6/CC chemokine receptor 9 is selectively expressed on intestinal homing T lymphocytes, mucosal lymphocytes, and thymocytes and is required for thymus-expressed chemokine-mediated chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabel, B A; Agace, W W; Campbell, J J; Heath, H M; Parent, D; Roberts, A I; Ebert, E C; Kassam, N; Qin, S; Zovko, M; LaRosa, G J; Yang, L L; Soler, D; Butcher, E C; Ponath, P D; Parker, C M; Andrew, D P

    1999-11-01

    TECK (thymus-expressed chemokine), a recently described CC chemokine expressed in thymus and small intestine, was found to mediate chemotaxis of human G protein-coupled receptor GPR-9-6/L1.2 transfectants. This activity was blocked by anti-GPR-9-6 monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3C3. GPR-9-6 is expressed on a subset of memory alpha4beta7(high) intestinal trafficking CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes. In addition, all intestinal lamina propria and intraepithelial lymphocytes express GPR-9-6. In contrast, GPR-9-6 is not displayed on cutaneous lymphocyte antigen-positive (CLA(+)) memory CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes, which traffic to skin inflammatory sites, or on other systemic alpha4beta7(-)CLA(-) memory CD4/CD8 lymphocytes. The majority of thymocytes also express GPR-9-6, but natural killer cells, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils, and neutrophils are GPR-9-6 negative. Transcripts of GPR-9-6 and TECK are present in both small intestine and thymus. Importantly, the expression profile of GPR-9-6 correlates with migration to TECK of blood T lymphocytes and thymocytes. As migration of these cells is blocked by anti-GPR-9-6 mAb 3C3, we conclude that GPR-9-6 is the principal chemokine receptor for TECK. In agreement with the nomenclature rules for chemokine receptors, we propose the designation CCR-9 for GPR-9-6. The selective expression of TECK and GPR-9-6 in thymus and small intestine implies a dual role for GPR-9-6/CCR-9, both in T cell development and the mucosal immune response.

  6. Imprecision of adaptation in Escherichia coli chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Neumann

    Full Text Available Adaptability is an essential property of many sensory systems, enabling maintenance of a sensitive response over a range of background stimulus levels. In bacterial chemotaxis, adaptation to the preset level of pathway activity is achieved through an integral feedback mechanism based on activity-dependent methylation of chemoreceptors. It has been argued that this architecture ensures precise and robust adaptation regardless of the ambient ligand concentration, making perfect adaptation a celebrated property of the chemotaxis system. However, possible deviations from such ideal adaptive behavior and its consequences for chemotaxis have not been explored in detail. Here we show that the chemotaxis pathway in Escherichia coli shows increasingly imprecise adaptation to higher concentrations of attractants, with a clear correlation between the time of adaptation to a step-like stimulus and the extent of imprecision. Our analysis suggests that this imprecision results from a gradual saturation of receptor methylation sites at high levels of stimulation, which prevents full recovery of the pathway activity by violating the conditions required for precise adaptation. We further use computer simulations to show that limited imprecision of adaptation has little effect on the rate of chemotactic drift of a bacterial population in gradients, but hinders precise accumulation at the peak of the gradient. Finally, we show that for two major chemoeffectors, serine and cysteine, failure of adaptation at concentrations above 1 mM might prevent bacteria from accumulating at toxic concentrations of these amino acids.

  7. Piracy on the molecular level: human herpesviruses manipulate cellular chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornaby, Caleb; Tanner, Anne; Stutz, Eric W; Poole, Brian D; Berges, Bradford K

    2016-03-01

    Cellular chemotaxis is important to tissue homeostasis and proper development. Human herpesvirus species influence cellular chemotaxis by regulating cellular chemokines and chemokine receptors. Herpesviruses also express various viral chemokines and chemokine receptors during infection. These changes to chemokine concentrations and receptor availability assist in the pathogenesis of herpesviruses and contribute to a variety of diseases and malignancies. By interfering with the positioning of host cells during herpesvirus infection, viral spread is assisted, latency can be established and the immune system is prevented from eradicating viral infection.

  8. An induction accelerator for the Heidelberg Test Storage Ring TSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellert, C.; Habs, D.; Music, M.; Schwalm, D.; Wolf, A.; Jaeschke, E.; Kambara, T.; Sigray, P.

    1992-01-01

    An induction accelerator has been installed in the heavy ion test storage ring TSR in Heidelberg. It allows for constant acceleration or deceleration of stored coasting ion beams without affecting their velocity profile and is well suited for ion beam manipulation in cooling experiments and for measurements of velocity dependent cooling forces. The design and operation of the device and first applications to laser cooling and to measurements of laser and electron cooling forces are described. (orig.)

  9. Tangential stretching rate (TSR) analysis of non premixed reactive flows

    KAUST Repository

    Valorani, Mauro

    2016-10-16

    We discuss how the Tangential stretching rate (TSR) analysis, originally developed and tested for spatially homogeneous systems (batch reactors), is extended to spatially non homogeneous systems. To illustrate the effectiveness of the TSR diagnostics, we study the ignition transient in a non premixed, reaction–diffusion model in the mixture fraction space, whose dependent variables are temperature and mixture composition. The reactive mixture considered is syngas/air. A detailed H2/CO mechanism with 12 species and 33 chemical reactions is employed. We will discuss two cases, one involving only kinetics as a model of front propagation purely driven by spontaneous ignition, the other as a model of deflagration wave involving kinetics/diffusion coupling. We explore different aspects of the system dynamics such as the relative role of diffusion and kinetics, the evolution of kinetic eigenvalues, and of the tangential stretching rates computed by accounting for the combined action of diffusion and kinetics as well for kinetics only. We propose criteria based on the TSR concept which allow to identify the most ignitable conditions and to discriminate between spontaneous ignition and deflagration front.

  10. Function and Regulation of Heterotrimeric G Proteins during Chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Marjon E; Liu, Youtao; Kortholt, Arjan

    2016-01-14

    Chemotaxis, or directional movement towards an extracellular gradient of chemicals, is necessary for processes as diverse as finding nutrients, the immune response, metastasis and wound healing. Activation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) is at the very base of the chemotactic signaling pathway. Chemotaxis starts with binding of the chemoattractant to GPCRs at the cell-surface, which finally leads to major changes in the cytoskeleton and directional cell movement towards the chemoattractant. Many chemotaxis pathways that are directly regulated by Gβγ have been identified and studied extensively; however, whether Gα is just a handle that regulates the release of Gβγ or whether Gα has its own set of distinct chemotactic effectors, is only beginning to be understood. In this review, we will discuss the different levels of regulation in GPCR signaling and the downstream pathways that are essential for proper chemotaxis.

  11. Astrochemistry in TSR and CSR Ion Storage Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, Oldrich

    2017-04-01

    Dissociative recombination (DR) of molecular ions plays a key role in controlling the charge density and composition of the cold interstellar medium (ISM). Experimental data on DR are required in order to understand the chemical network in the ISM and related processes such as star formation from molecular clouds. Needed data include not only total reaction cross sections, but also the chemical composition and excitation states of the neutral products. Utilizing the TSR storage ring in Heidelberg, Germany, we have carried out DR measurements for astrophysically important molecular ions. We use a merged electron-ion beams technique combined with event-by-event fragment counting and fragment imaging. The count rate of detected neutral DR products yields the absolute DR rate coefficient. Imaging the distribution of fragment distances provides information on the kinetic energy released including the states of both the initial molecule and the final products. Additional kinetic energy sensitivity of the employed detector allows for identification of fragmentation channels by fragment-mass combination within each dissociation event. Such combined information is essential for studies on DR of polyatomic ions with multi-channel breakup. The recently commissioned Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) in Heidelberg, Germany, extends the experimental capabilities of TSR by operation at cryogenic temperatures down to 6 K. At these conditions residual gas densities down to 100 cm-3 can be reached resulting in beam storage times of several hours. Long storage in the cold environment allows the ions to relax down to their rotational ground state, thus mimicking well the conditions in the cold ISM. A variety of astrophysically relevant reactions will be investigated at these conditions, such as DR, electron impact excitation, ion-neutral collisions, etc. We report our TSR results on DR of HCl+ and D2Cl+. We also present first results from the CSR commissioning experiments.

  12. Tiotropium bromide inhibits human monocyte chemotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurai M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Tiotropium bromide (Spiriva® is used as a bronchodilator in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. However, clinical evidence suggests that tiotropium bromide may improve COPD by mechanisms beyond bronchodilation. We hypothesized that tiotropium bromide may act as an anti-inflammatory agent by inhibiting monocyte chemotaxis, a process that plays an important role in the lung inflammation of COPD. To test this hypothesis monocytes were pretreated with tiotropium bromide prior to exposure to chemotactic agents and monocyte chemotactic activity (MCA was evaluated with a blind chamber technique. Tiotropium bromide inhibited MCA in a dose- and time- dependent manner (respectively, p< 0.01 by directly acting on the monocyte. Acetylcholine (ACh challenge increased MCA (p< 0.01, and tiotropium bromide effectively reduced (p< 0.01 the increase in MCA by ACh. The inhibition of MCA by tiotropium bromide was reversed by a muscarinic type 3 (M3-muscarinic receptor antagonist (p< 0.01, and was not effected by an M2 receptor antagonist. Furthermore, a selective M3 receptor agonist, cevimeline, and Gq protein stimulator, Pasteurella multocida toxin, significantly increased MCA (P < 0.01, and tiotropium bromide pretreatment reduced (p< 0.01 the increase in MCA induced by these agents. These results suggest that tiotropium might regulate monocyte chemotaxis, in part, by interfering with M3-muscarinic receptor coupled Gq protein signal transduction. These results provide new insight that an anti-cholinergic therapeutic may provide anti-inflammatory action in the pulmonary system.

  13. Networked Chemoreceptors Benefit Bacterial Chemotaxis Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vered Frank

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Motile bacteria use large receptor arrays to detect and follow chemical gradients in their environment. Extended receptor arrays, composed of networked signaling complexes, promote cooperative stimulus control of their associated signaling kinases. Here, we used structural lesions at the communication interface between core complexes to create an Escherichia coli strain with functional but dispersed signaling complexes. This strain allowed us to directly study how networking of signaling complexes affects chemotactic signaling and gradient-tracking performance. We demonstrate that networking of receptor complexes provides bacterial cells with about 10-fold-heightened detection sensitivity to attractants while maintaining a wide dynamic range over which receptor adaptational modifications can tune response sensitivity. These advantages proved especially critical for chemotaxis toward an attractant source under conditions in which bacteria are unable to alter the attractant gradient.

  14. COUPLED CHEMOTAXIS FLUID MODEL

    KAUST Repository

    LORZ, ALEXANDER

    2010-06-01

    We consider a model system for the collective behavior of oxygen-driven swimming bacteria in an aquatic fluid. In certain parameter regimes, such suspensions of bacteria feature large-scale convection patterns as a result of the hydrodynamic interaction between bacteria. The presented model consist of a parabolicparabolic chemotaxis system for the oxygen concentration and the bacteria density coupled to an incompressible Stokes equation for the fluid driven by a gravitational force of the heavier bacteria. We show local existence of weak solutions in a bounded domain in d, d = 2, 3 with no-flux boundary condition and in 2 in the case of inhomogeneous Dirichlet conditions for the oxygen. © 2010 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  15. Overactivation of phospholipase C-gamma1 renders platelet-derived growth factor beta-receptor-expressing cells independent of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway for chemotaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönnstrand, L; Siegbahn, A; Rorsman, C

    1999-01-01

    ., Siegbahn, A. , Rorsman, C., Engström, U., Wernstedt, C., Heldin, C.-H., and Rönnstrand, L. (1996) EMBO J. 15, 5299-5313). Here we show that the increased chemotaxis correlates with increased activation of phospholipase C-gamma1 (PLC-gamma1), measured as inositol-1,4, 5-trisphosphate release. By two......-dimensional phosphopeptide mapping, the increase in phosphorylation of PLC-gamma1 was shown not to be selective for any site, rather a general increase in phosphorylation of PLC-gamma1 was seen. Specific inhibitors of protein kinase C, bisindolylmaleimide (GF109203X), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase), LY294002......, did not affect the activation of PLC-gamma1. To assess whether increased activation of PLC-gamma1 is the cause of the hyperchemotactic behavior of the Y934F mutant cell line, we constructed cell lines expressing either wild-type or a catalytically compromised version of PLC-gamma1 under a tetracycline...

  16. TSR: A Storage Ring for HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, P A; Blaum, K; Grieser, M; Davinson, T; Woods, P J; Flanagan, K; Freeman, S J; Lazarus, I H; Litvinov, Yu A; Raabe, R; Siesling, E; Wenander, F

    2016-01-01

    It is planned to install the heavy-ion, low-energy ring TSR, currently at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, at the HIE-ISOLDE facility in CERN, Geneva. Such a facility will provide a capability for experiments with stored, cooled secondary beams that is rich and varied, spanning from studies of nuclear ground-state properties and reaction studies of astrophysical relevance, to investigations with highly-charged ions and pure isomeric beams. In addition to experiments performed using beams recirculating within the ring, the cooled beams can be extracted and exploited by external spectrometers for high-precision measurements. The capabilities of the ring facility as well as some physics cases will be presented, together with a brief report on the status of the project.

  17. CXC chemokine receptor 4 expression and stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha-induced chemotaxis in CD4+ T lymphocytes are regulated by interleukin-4 and interleukin-10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinquan, T; Quan, S; Jacobi, H H

    2000-01-01

    We report that interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10 can significantly up- or down-regulate CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) expression on CD4+ T lymphocytes, respectively. Stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1alpha)-induced CD4+ T-lymphocyte chemotaxis was also correspondingly regulated by IL-4 and IL......-10. IL-4 and IL-10 up- or down-regulated CXCR4 mRNA expression in CD4+ T lymphocytes, respectively, as detected by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Scatchard analysis revealed a type of CXCR4 with affinity (Kd approximately 6.3 nM), and approximately 70....... The regulation of CXCR4 expression in CD4+ T lymphocytes by IL-4 and IL-10 could be blocked by a selective inhibitor of protein kinase (staurosporine) or by a selective inhibitor of cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (H-8), indicating that these cytokines regulate CXCR4 on CD4+ T lymphocytes via both c...

  18. Mouse osteoblastic cell line (MC3T3-E1) expresses extracellular calcium (Ca2+o)-sensing receptor and its agonists stimulate chemotaxis and proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Kifor, O.; Butters, R. R. Jr; Sugimoto, T.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G protein-coupled receptor that plays key roles in extracellular calcium ion (Ca2+o) homeostasis in parathyroid gland and kidney. Osteoblasts appear at sites of osteoclastic bone resorption during bone remodeling in the "reversal" phase following osteoclastic resorption and preceding bone formation. Bone resorption produces substantial local increases in Ca2+o that could provide a signal for osteoblasts in the vicinity, leading us to determine whether such osteoblasts express the CaR. In this study, we used the mouse osteoblastic, clonal cell line MC3T3-E1. Both immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis, using an antiserum specific for the CaR, detected CaR protein in MC3T3-E1 cells. We also identified CaR transcripts in MC3T3-E1 cells by Northern analysis using a CaR-specific riboprobe and by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction with CaR-specific primers, followed by nucleotide sequencing of the amplified products. Exposure of MC3T3-E1 cells to high Ca2+o (up to 4.8 mM) or the polycationic CaR agonists, neomycin and gadolinium (Gd3+), stimulated both chemotaxis and DNA synthesis in MC3T3-E1 cells. Therefore, taken together, our data strongly suggest that the osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1 possesses both CaR protein and mRNA very similar, if not identical, to those in parathyroid and kidney. Furthermore, the CaR in these osteoblasts could play a key role in regulating bone turnover by stimulating the proliferation and migration of such cells to sites of bone resorption as a result of local release of Ca2+o.

  19. tlpA gene expression is required for arginine and bicarbonate chemotaxis in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerda, Oscar A; Núñez-Villena, Felipe; Soto, Sarita E; Ugalde, José Manuel; López-Solís, Remigio; Toledo, Héctor

    2011-01-01

    About half of the human population is infected with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium causing gastritis, peptic ulcer and progression to gastric cancer. Chemotaxis and flagellar motility are required for colonization and persistence of H. pylori in the gastric mucus layer. It is not completely clear which chemical gradients are used by H. pylori to maintain its position. TlpA, a chemotaxis receptor for arginine/ bicarbonate, has been identified. This study aimed to find out whether tlpA gene expression is required for the chemotactic response to arginine/bicarbonate. Wild-type motile H. pylori ATCC 700392 and H. pylori ATCC 43504, a strain having an interrupted tlpA gene, were used. Also, a tlpA-knockout mutant of H. pylori 700392 (H. pylori 700-tlpA::cat) was produced by homologous recombination. Expression of tlpA was assessed by a Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) assay. Chemotaxis was measured as a Relative Chemotaxis Response (RCR) by a modified capillary assay. H. pylori 700392 presented chemotaxis to arginine and sodium bicarbonate. H. pylori 700-tlpA::cat showed neither tlpA gene expression nor chemotaxis towards arginine and bicarbonate. Besides confirming that TlpA is a chemotactic receptor for arginine/bicarbonate in H. pylori, this study showed that tlpA gene expression is required for arginine/bicarbonate chemotaxis.

  20. tlpA gene expression is required for arginine and bicarbonate chemotaxis in Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar A Cerda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available About half of the human population is infected with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium causing gastritis, peptic ulcer and progression to gastric cancer. Chemotaxis and flagellar motility are required for colonization and persistence of H. pylori in the gastric mucus layer. It is not completely clear which chemical gradients are used by H. pylori to maintain its position. TlpA, a chemotaxis receptor for arginine/ bicarbonate, has been identified. This study aimed to find out whether tlpA gene expression is required for the chemotactic response to arginine/bicarbonate. Wild-type motile H. pylori ATCC 700392 and H. pylori ATCC 43504, a strain having an interrupted tlpA gene, were used. Also, a tlpA-knockout mutant of H. pylori 700392 (H. pylori 700-tlpA::cat was produced by homologous recombination. Expression of tlpA was assessed by a Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR assay. Chemotaxis was measured as a Relative Chemotaxis Response (RCR by a modified capillary assay. H. pylori 700392 presented chemotaxis to arginine and sodium bicarbonate. H. pylori 700-tlpA::cat showed neither tlpA gene expression nor chemotaxis towards arginine and bicarbonate. Besides confirming that TlpA is a chemotactic receptor for arginine/bicarbonate in H. pylori, this study showed that tlpA gene expression is required for arginine/bicarbonate chemotaxis.

  1. Dictyostelium Chemotaxis studied with fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruchira, A.

    2005-01-01

    The movement of cells in the direction of a chemical gradient, also known as chemotaxis, is a vital biological process. During chemotaxis, minute extracellular signals are translated into complex cellular responses such as change in morphology and motility. To understand the chemotaxis mechanism at

  2. Increased Efficiencies in the INEEL SAR/TSR/USQ Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, N.E.

    2002-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has implemented a number of efficiencies to reduce the time and cost of preparing safety basis documents. The INEEL is continuing to look at other aspects of the safety basis process to identify other efficiencies that can be implemented and remain in compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 830. A six-sigma approach is used to identify areas to improve efficiencies and develop the action plan for implementation of the new process, as applicable. Three improvement processes have been implemented: The first was the development of standardized Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and technical safety requirement (TSR) documents that all nuclear facilities use, by adding facility-specific details. The second is a material procurement process, which is based on safety systems specified in the individual safety basis documents. The third is a restructuring of the entire safety basis preparation and approval process. Significant savings in time to prepare safety basis document, cost of materials, and total cost of the documents are currently being realized

  3. The PM/S module and the BIO/TSR requirements comparison report summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PEERY, B.Q.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the comparison between the Preventive Maintenance/Surveillance System (PM/S) database and the requirements identified in the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) (HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001); the Technical Safety Requirements (TSR's) (HNF-SD-WM-TSR-006); The Tank Farms Administrative Controls Manual, (HNF-IP-1266); and The TWRS Facility Safety Equipment List, (HNF-SD-WM-SEL-0404). Corrective actions identified are completed or in process

  4. Differentiation-inducing factor-1 and -2 function also as modulators for Dictyostelium chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidekazu Kuwayama

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the early stages of development of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, chemotaxis toward cAMP plays a pivotal role in organizing discrete cells into a multicellular structure. In this process, a series of signaling molecules, such as G-protein-coupled cell surface receptors for cAMP, phosphatidylinositol metabolites, and cyclic nucleotides, function as the signal transducers for controlling dynamics of cytoskeleton. Differentiation-inducing factor-1 and -2 (DIF-1 and DIF-2 were originally identified as the factors (chlorinated alkylphenones that induce Dictyostelium stalk cell differentiation, but it remained unknown whether the DIFs had any other physiologic functions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To further elucidate the functions of DIFs, in the present study we investigated their effects on chemotaxis under various conditions. Quite interestingly, in shallow cAMP gradients, DIF-1 suppressed chemotaxis whereas DIF-2 promoted it greatly. Analyses with various mutants revealed that DIF-1 may inhibit chemotaxis, at least in part, via GbpB (a phosphodiesterase and a decrease in the intracellular cGMP concentration ([cGMP](i. DIF-2, by contrast, may enhance chemotaxis, at least in part, via RegA (another phosphodiesterase and an increase in [cGMP](i. Using null mutants for DimA and DimB, the transcription factors that are required for DIF-dependent prestalk differentiation, we also showed that the mechanisms for the modulation of chemotaxis by DIFs differ from those for the induction of cell differentiation by DIFs, at least in part. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings indicate that DIF-1 and DIF-2 function as negative and positive modulators for Dictyostelium chemotaxis, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report in any organism of physiologic modulators (small molecules for chemotaxis having differentiation-inducing activity.

  5. Transport of UF6 in compliance with TS-R-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekker, B.G.

    2004-01-01

    The IAEA Regulations TS-R-1 (ST-1, Revised) 1996 Edition include requirements for packages containing uranium hexafluoride (UF6); these are the first and only substance-specific requirements in the IAEA regulations. These requirements have already particularly affected, and will further affect, the transport of non-fissile and fissile excepted UF 6 and the packages used for these transports. Non-fissile and fissile excepted UF6 (ASTM C 787) has been transported worldwide for decades in a safe and reliable manner, using internationally standardised packages. Under the auspices of the World Nuclear Transport Institute (WNTI), an industry working group has been evaluating the existing packages against the requirements in TS-R-1. As new requirements came into effect, there were new challenges for the use of these standard packages, including the free drop test and the thermal requirements. In close cooperation with the WNTI HEXT Industry Working Group, a consortium of UF6 producers/users has worked together on the design and development, testing and certification of technical solutions for modification and optimisation of the existing packages to comply with TS-R-1. This paper reviews the existing standard packages against the requirements in TS-R-1. An update is also given describing the enhancements to the standard packages that have been designed and developed recently. The paper also describes how these solutions have been tested and certified, as well as the status of implementation. Finally, a review is made of the options that are available internationally to transport UF6 in compliance with TS-R-1. (author)

  6. Mechanisms of loss of human neutrophil chemotaxis following thermal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R D; Hasslen, S R; Ahrenholz, D H; Solem, L D

    1987-01-01

    The increased susceptibility to infection of patients with thermal injury is related to loss of host defense, which is reflected, in part, by the temporal loss of chemotactic function of leukocytic phagocytes. Our studies of patient neutrophils to define the mechanism of this phenomenon involved evaluation of both random and chemotactic migratory functions of patient neutrophils, measurement of receptors for chemotactic ligands, and measurement of receptors mediating substrate adherence of the cells. Measurements of migratory functions were made using the under-agarose technique and measurements of receptor expression were accomplished by flow cytometry using fluorescein-labeled ligand or receptor-specific antibody. We conclude that loss of chemotaxis in response to C5a/C5adesArg is the results of down-regulation of receptors for C5a and of reduced motility, and that loss of chemotaxis in response to the tripeptide FMLP is the result of reduced motility alone. Measurements of changes in the expression of "adherence" (iC3b) receptors revealed that up-regulation occurs early and can be sustained for weeks after injury. These results are taken to suggest that either hyper- or hypo-adherence could explain the loss of random migratory function observed for patient cells. Evidence of auto-oxidative alteration of cytoskeletal elements, to produce loss of random migratory function, also is reviewed. Considering the evidence for activation of the complement cascade after thermal injury C5a and C5adesArg are likely primary factors in effecting the down-regulation of C5a receptors, stimulation of secretion to mobilize iC3b receptors, and stimulation of respiration to auto-oxidize cell components. Such evidence of injury-mediated complement activation included data derived from application of a novel immunoassay for iC3b.

  7. Strenuous physical exercise adversely affects monocyte chemotaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czepluch, Frauke S; Barres, Romain; Caidahl, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Physical exercise is important for proper cardiovascular function and disease prevention, but it may influence the immune system. We evaluated the effect of strenuous exercise on monocyte chemotaxis. Monocytes were isolated from blood of 13 young, healthy, sedentary individuals participating...... in a three-week training program which consisted of repeated exercise bouts. Monocyte chemotaxis and serological biomarkers were investigated at baseline, after three weeks training and after four weeks recovery. Chemotaxis towards vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) and transforming growth factor...

  8. Frequency-dependent Escherichia coli chemotaxis behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Xuejun; Si, Guangwei; Deng, Nianpei; Ouyang, Qi; Wu, Tailin; He, Zhuoran; Jiang, Lili; Luo, Chunxiong; Tu, Yuhai

    2012-01-01

    We study Escherichia coli chemotaxis behaviors in environments with spatially and temporally varying attractant sources by developing a unique microfluidic system. Our measurements reveal a frequency-dependent chemotaxis behavior. At low frequency, the E. coli population oscillate in synchrony with the attractant. In contrast, in fast-changing environments, the population response becomes smaller and out of phase with the attractant waveform. These observations are inconsistent with the well-...

  9. A novel antagonist of CRTH2 blocks eosinophil release from bone marrow, chemotaxis and respiratory burst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Royer, J F; Schratl, P; Lorenz, S

    2007-01-01

    developed small molecule antagonist of CRTH2, Cay10471, on eosinophil function with respect to recruitment, respiratory burst and degranulation. METHODS: Chemotaxis of guinea pig bone marrow eosinophils and human peripheral blood eosinophils were determined using microBoyden chambers. Eosinophil release...... from bone marrow was investigated in the in situ perfused guinea pig hind limb preparation. Respiratory burst and degranulation were measured by flow cytometry. RESULTS: Cay10471 bound with high affinity to recombinant human and guinea pig CRTH2, but not DP, receptors. The antagonist prevented the PGD......(2)-induced release of eosinophils from guinea pig bone marrow, and inhibited the chemotaxis of guinea pig bone marrow eosinophils and human peripheral blood eosinophils. Pretreatment with PGD(2) primed eosinophils for chemotaxis towards eotaxin, and this effect was prevented by Cay10471. In contrast...

  10. Species-specificity of sperm motility activation and chemotaxis: a study on ascidian species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Manabu; Hiradate, Yuki; Sensui, Noburu; Cosson, Jacky; Morisawa, Masaaki

    2013-08-01

    Egg-derived sperm-activating factors and attractants activate sperm motility and attract the sperm, respectively. These phenomena constitute the first communication signaling between males and females in the process of fertilization in many animals and plants, and in many cases, these are species-specific events. Thus, sperm motility activation and chemotaxis may act as a safety process for the authentication between conspecific egg and sperm, and help to prevent crossbreeding. Here, we examine species-specificity of sperm motility activation and chemotaxis in the ascidians belonging to the order Phlebobranchiata: Ciona intestinalis, Ciona savignyi, Phallusia mammillata, Phallusia nigra, and Ascidia sydneiensis. Cross-reactivity in both motility activation and chemotaxis of sperm was not observed between C. savignyi and P. mammillata, or between A. sydneiensis and Phallusia spp. However, there is a "one way" (no reciprocity) cross-reaction between P. mammillata and P. nigra in sperm activation, and between C. savignyi and A. sydneiensis in sperm chemotaxis. Furthermore, the level of activity is different, even when cross-reaction is observed. Thus, sperm motility activation and chemotaxis are neither "species-" nor "genus-" specific phenomena among the ascidian species. Moreover, the interaction between the sperm-activating and sperm-attracting factors (SAAFs) in the ascidian species and the SAAF receptors on the sperm cells are not all-or-none responses.

  11. Ras activation and symmetry breaking during Dictyostelium chemotaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortholt, Arjan; Keizer-Gunnink, Ineke; Kataria, Rama; Van Haastert, Peter J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Central to chemotaxis is the molecular mechanism by which a shallow spatial gradient of chemoattractant induces symmetry breaking of activated signaling molecules. Previously, we have used Dictyostelium mutants to investigate the minimal requirements for chemotaxis, and identified a basal signaling

  12. α-1 Antitrypsin regulates human neutrophil chemotaxis induced by soluble immune complexes and IL-8.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bergin, David A

    2010-12-01

    Hereditary deficiency of the protein α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) causes a chronic lung disease in humans that is characterized by excessive mobilization of neutrophils into the lung. However, the reason for the increased neutrophil burden has not been fully elucidated. In this study we have demonstrated using human neutrophils that serum AAT coordinates both CXCR1- and soluble immune complex (sIC) receptor-mediated chemotaxis by divergent pathways. We demonstrated that glycosylated AAT can bind to IL-8 (a ligand for CXCR1) and that AAT-IL-8 complex formation prevented IL-8 interaction with CXCR1. Second, AAT modulated neutrophil chemotaxis in response to sIC by controlling membrane expression of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored (GPI-anchored) Fc receptor FcγRIIIb. This process was mediated through inhibition of ADAM-17 enzymatic activity. Neutrophils isolated from clinically stable AAT-deficient patients were characterized by low membrane expression of FcγRIIIb and increased chemotaxis in response to IL-8 and sIC. Treatment of AAT-deficient individuals with AAT augmentation therapy resulted in increased AAT binding to IL-8, increased AAT binding to the neutrophil membrane, decreased FcγRIIIb release from the neutrophil membrane, and normalization of chemotaxis. These results provide new insight into the mechanism underlying the effect of AAT augmentation therapy in the pulmonary disease associated with AAT deficiency.

  13. ARF1 recruits RAC1 to leading edge in neutrophil chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaki, Yuichi; Onodera, Yasuhito; Higashi, Tsunehito; Horinouchi, Takahiro; Oikawa, Tsukasa; Sabe, Hisataka

    2017-10-02

    The small GTPase ARF1 mediates membrane trafficking mostly from the Golgi, and is essential for the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated chemotaxis of neutrophils. In this process, ARF1 is activated by the guanine nucleotide exchanger GBF1, and is inactivated by the GTPase-activating protein GIT2. Neutrophils generate the Gβγ-PAK1-αPIX-GIT2 linear complex during GPCR-induced chemotaxis, in which αPIX activates RAC1/CDC42, which then employs PAK1. However, it has remained unclear as to why GIT2 is included in this complex. We investigated the association between ARF1 and RAC1/CDC42 during the fMLP-stimulated chemotaxis of HL60 cells. We found that the silencing of GBF1 significantly impaired the recruitment of RAC1 to the leading edges, but not PAK1, αPIX, RAC2, or CDC42. A significant population of RAC1 colocalized with ARF1 at the leading edges in stimulated cells, whereas fMLP activated both ARF1 and ARF5. Consistently, the silencing of ARF1, but not ARF5, impaired the recruitment of RAC1, whereas the silencing of RAC1 did not affect the recruitment of ARF1 to the leading edges. Our results indicated that the activation of ARF1 triggers the plasma membrane recruitment of RAC1 in GPCR-mediated chemotaxis, which is essential for cortical actin remodeling. Thus, membrane remodeling at the leading edges appears to precede actin remodeling in chemotaxis. Together with the fact that GIT2, which inactivates ARF1, is an integral component of the machinery activating RAC1, we proposed a model in which the ARF1-RAC1 linkage enables the regulation of ARF1 by repetitive on/off cycles during GPCR-mediated neutrophil chemotaxis.

  14. Drosophila chemotaxis: a first look with neurogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaojing J

    2014-01-01

    Chemotaxis, the ability to direct movements according to chemical cues in the environment, is important for the survival of most organisms. In our original article, we combined a quantitative behavioral assay with genetic manipulations to dissect the neural substrate for chemotaxis. In this Extra View article, we offer a more chronological narration of the findings leading to our key conclusion that aversion engages specific motor-related circuits and kinematics. We speculate on the separation and crosstalk between aversion and attraction circuits in the brain and the ventral nerve cord, and the implication for valence encoding in the olfactory system.

  15. Independent control of locomotion and orientation during Dictyostelium discoideum chemotaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijn, Bert van; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    Chemotaxis is cell movement in the direction of a chemical and is composed of two components: movement and directionality. The directionality of eukaryotic chemotaxis is probably derived from orientation: the detection of the spacial gradient of chemoattractant over the cell length. Chemotaxis was

  16. Self-organization of the Escherichia coli chemotaxis network imaged with super-resolution light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Derek; McEvoy, Ann L; Shroff, Hari; Crooks, Gavin E; Wingreen, Ned S; Betzig, Eric; Liphardt, Jan

    2009-06-16

    The Escherichia coli chemotaxis network is a model system for biological signal processing. In E. coli, transmembrane receptors responsible for signal transduction assemble into large clusters containing several thousand proteins. These sensory clusters have been observed at cell poles and future division sites. Despite extensive study, it remains unclear how chemotaxis clusters form, what controls cluster size and density, and how the cellular location of clusters is robustly maintained in growing and dividing cells. Here, we use photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) to map the cellular locations of three proteins central to bacterial chemotaxis (the Tar receptor, CheY, and CheW) with a precision of 15 nm. We find that cluster sizes are approximately exponentially distributed, with no characteristic cluster size. One-third of Tar receptors are part of smaller lateral clusters and not of the large polar clusters. Analysis of the relative cellular locations of 1.1 million individual proteins (from 326 cells) suggests that clusters form via stochastic self-assembly. The super-resolution PALM maps of E. coli receptors support the notion that stochastic self-assembly can create and maintain approximately periodic structures in biological membranes, without direct cytoskeletal involvement or active transport.

  17. Self-organization of the Escherichia coli chemotaxis network imaged with super-resolution light microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Greenfield

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The Escherichia coli chemotaxis network is a model system for biological signal processing. In E. coli, transmembrane receptors responsible for signal transduction assemble into large clusters containing several thousand proteins. These sensory clusters have been observed at cell poles and future division sites. Despite extensive study, it remains unclear how chemotaxis clusters form, what controls cluster size and density, and how the cellular location of clusters is robustly maintained in growing and dividing cells. Here, we use photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM to map the cellular locations of three proteins central to bacterial chemotaxis (the Tar receptor, CheY, and CheW with a precision of 15 nm. We find that cluster sizes are approximately exponentially distributed, with no characteristic cluster size. One-third of Tar receptors are part of smaller lateral clusters and not of the large polar clusters. Analysis of the relative cellular locations of 1.1 million individual proteins (from 326 cells suggests that clusters form via stochastic self-assembly. The super-resolution PALM maps of E. coli receptors support the notion that stochastic self-assembly can create and maintain approximately periodic structures in biological membranes, without direct cytoskeletal involvement or active transport.

  18. Travelling Waves in Hybrid Chemotaxis Models

    KAUST Repository

    Franz, Benjamin

    2013-12-18

    Hybrid models of chemotaxis combine agent-based models of cells with partial differential equation models of extracellular chemical signals. In this paper, travelling wave properties of hybrid models of bacterial chemotaxis are investigated. Bacteria are modelled using an agent-based (individual-based) approach with internal dynamics describing signal transduction. In addition to the chemotactic behaviour of the bacteria, the individual-based model also includes cell proliferation and death. Cells consume the extracellular nutrient field (chemoattractant), which is modelled using a partial differential equation. Mesoscopic and macroscopic equations representing the behaviour of the hybrid model are derived and the existence of travelling wave solutions for these models is established. It is shown that cell proliferation is necessary for the existence of non-transient (stationary) travelling waves in hybrid models. Additionally, a numerical comparison between the wave speeds of the continuum models and the hybrid models shows good agreement in the case of weak chemotaxis and qualitative agreement for the strong chemotaxis case. In the case of slow cell adaptation, we detect oscillating behaviour of the wave, which cannot be explained by mean-field approximations. © 2013 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  19. Insulin regulates multiple signaling pathways leading to monocyte/macrophage chemotaxis into the wound tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a complex process that involves sequential phases that overlap in time and space and affect each other dynamically at the gene and protein levels. We previously showed that insulin accelerates wound healing by stimulating faster and regenerative healing. One of the processes that insulin stimulates is an increase in monocyte/macrophage chemotaxis. In this study, we performed experiments in vivo and in vitro to elucidate the signaling transduction pathways that are involved in insulin-induced monocyte/macrophage chemotaxis. We found that insulin stimulates THP-1 cell chemotaxis in a dose-dependent and insulin receptor-dependent manner. We also show that the kinases PI3K-Akt, SPAK/JNK, and p38 MAPK are key molecules in the insulin-induced signaling pathways that lead to chemoattraction of the THP-1 cell. Furthermore, both PI3K-Akt and SPAK/JNK signaling involve Rac1 activation, an important molecule in regulating cell motility. Indeed, topical application of Rac1 inhibitor at an early stage during the healing process caused delayed and impaired healing even in the presence of insulin. These results delineate cell and molecular mechanisms involved in insulin-induced chemotaxis of monocyte/macrophage, cells that are critical for proper healing.

  20. Recombinant human growth-regulated oncogene-alpha induces T lymphocyte chemotaxis. A process regulated via IL-8 receptors by IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinquan, T; Frydenberg, Jane; Mukaida, N

    1995-01-01

    receptors on the cells. This process can be augmented by IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, and inhibited by IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13. In addition, we also document that on T lymphocytes there exist IL-8 receptors that can be up-regulated by IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and IL-2. Our results demonstrate that rhGRO-alpha gene...

  1. CXCL1 is a negative regulator of mast cell chemotaxis to airway smooth muscle cell products in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhouri, H; Moir, L M; Armour, C L; Hughes, J M

    2014-03-01

    Activated mast cells (MC) numbers on airway smooth muscle (ASM) are increased in eosinophilic asthma. In vitro, asthmatic cytokine-stimulated ASM cell-conditioned medium (CM) induces more MC chemotaxis than CM from nonasthmatic ASM cells. Intriguingly the nonasthmatic ASM CM inhibits MC chemotaxis to the asthmatic ASM CM. However, the inhibitory factor(s) in the nonasthmatic ASM CM is still to be identified. To identify the factor(s) released by nonasthmatic ASM cells that inhibits MC chemotaxis. Confluent, serum-starved ASM cells from donors with and without asthma were stimulated with IL-1β and T-helper (Th)1 (TNFα and IFNγ) or Th2 (IL-4, IL-13) cytokines, or left unstimulated. CM samples were collected after 24 h, and a potential inhibitory factor identified using cytokine protein arrays. Its production was assessed using ELISA and RT-PCR and inhibitory role investigated in MC chemotaxis and Ca(2+) mobilization assays. Only CXCL1 was produced in greater amounts by nonasthmatic than asthmatic ASM cells following Th1 and Th2 cytokine stimulation. CXCL1 mRNA expression was also increased. Exogenous rh-CXCL1 significantly inhibited MC intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization and chemotaxis to either CXCL10, CXCL8 or CM collected from asthmatic ASM cells following Th1 or Th2 cytokine stimulation. Neutralizing CXCL1 in nonasthmatic ASM CM or blocking its receptor significantly promoted MC chemotaxis. CXCL1 was a major factor regulating MC chemotaxis in vitro. Its differential release by ASM cells may explain the differences observed in MC localization to the ASM of people with and without asthma. CXCL1 inhibition of MC recruitment to the ASM may lead to new targets to limit asthma pathophysiology. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Curcumin (1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-1, 6-heptadiene-3,5-dione Blocks the Chemotaxis of Neutrophils by Inhibiting Signal Transduction through IL-8 Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Takahashi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the impact of curcumin on neutrophils. Chemotactic activity via human recombinant IL-8 (hrIL-8 was significantly inhibited by curcumin. Curcumin reduced calcium ion flow induced by internalization of the IL-8 receptor. We analyzed flow cytometry to evaluate the status of the IL-8 receptor after curcumin treatment. The change in the distribution of receptors intracellularly and on the cell surface suggested that curcumin may affect the receptor trafficking pathway intracellulary. Rab11 is a low molecular weight G protein associated with the CXCR recycling pathway. Following curcumin treatment, immunoprecipitation studies showed that the IL-8 receptor was associated with larger amounts of active Rab11 than that in control cells. These data suggest that curcumin induces the stacking of the Rab11 vesicle complex with CXCR1 and CXCR2 in the endocytic pathway. The mechanism for antiinflammatory response by curcumin may involve unique regulation of the Rab11 trafficking molecule in recycling of IL-8 receptors.

  3. TSR versus non-TSR processes and their impact on gas geochemistry and carbon stable isotopes in Carboniferous, Permian and Lower Triassic marine carbonate gas reservoirs in the Eastern Sichuan Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q. Y.; Worden, R. H.; Jin, Z. J.; Liu, W. H.; Li, J.; Gao, B.; Zhang, D. W.; Hu, A. P.; Yang, C.

    2013-01-01

    The Palaeozoic and lowermost Mesozoic marine carbonate reservoirs of the Sichuan Basin in China contain variably sour and very dry gas. The source of the gas in the Carboniferous, Permian and Lower Triassic reservoirs is not known for certain and it has proved difficult to discriminate and differentiate the effects of thermal cracking- and TSR-related processes for these gases. Sixty-three gas samples were collected and analysed for their composition and carbon stable isotope values. The gases are all typically very dry (alkane gases being >97.5% methane), with low (kerogen-derived oil and primary gas and is highly mature. Carboniferous (and non-sour Triassic and Permian) gas has unusual carbon isotopes with methane and propane being isotopically heavier than ethane (a reversal of typical low- to moderate-maturity patterns). The gas in the non-sour Triassic and Permian reservoirs has the same geochemical and isotopic characteristics (and therefore the same source) as the Carboniferous gas. TSR in the deepest Triassic reservoirs altered the gas composition reaching 100% dryness in the deepest, most sour reservoirs showing that ethane and propane react faster than methane during TSR. Ethane evolves to heavier carbon isotope values than methane during TSR leading to removal of the reversed alkane gas isotope trend found in the Carboniferous and non-sour Triassic and Permian reservoirs. However, methane was directly involved in TSR as shown by the progressive increase in its carbon isotope ratio as gas souring proceeded. CO2 increased in concentration as gas souring proceeded, but typical CO2 carbon isotope ratios in sour gases remained about -4‰ V-PDB showing that it was not solely derived from the oxidation of alkanes. Instead CO2 may partly result from reaction of sour gas with carbonate reservoir minerals, such as Fe-rich dolomite or calcite, resulting in pyrite growth as well as CO2-generation.

  4. Changes to TSR control set due to changes in mission and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foppe, T.L.; Olinger, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Previous Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) established to support plutonium production activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) were heavily focused on engineered safety features that would mitigate potential accidents. With the change in mission in 1992 to Site closure, and considering antiquated equipment nearing the end of their useful life, a change in philosophy was adopted to emphasize preventive controls that are mostly administrative. The new Administrative Controls (ACs) developed in the last few years include discrete attributes of safety management programs (SMPs) that are specifically credited to prevent or mitigate an accident, and include requirements on handling individual deviations, programmatic deficiencies, and TSR AC violations. The primary benefit of these changes is fewer requirements on equipment that allow the contractor more flexibility to maintain the defense-in-depth safety systems in a more cost-effective manner. A disadvantage of these new ACs is that implementation has become cumbersome and difficult to manage, e.g., resulted in an increased burden of demonstrating compliance and required an additional infrastructure to track deviations and deficiencies. In order to improve the efficiency of the authorization basis (AB) process to support accelerated Site closure according to the 2006 Plan, the Site has recently modified the ABs to better focus on the programmatic elements that were credited in the accident analyses, and to rely on the Integrated Safety Management System to implement SMPs via one general TSR AC requirement. At the request of DOE/RFFO, a self-assessment of the Rocky Flats AB program was performed in November 1998 by Victor Stello, DOE Headquarters, along with representatives from other DOE sites and Defense Programs. Results of this self-assessment confirmed that the proposed AC changes would be beneficial and provided specific recommendations

  5. Dictyostelium Ric8 is a nonreceptor guanine exchange factor for heterotrimeric G proteins and is important for development and chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Rama; Xu, Xuehua; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Keizer-Gunnink, Ineke; Jin, Tian; van Haastert, Peter J M; Kortholt, Arjan

    2013-04-16

    Heterotrimeric G proteins couple external signals to the activation of intracellular signal transduction pathways. Agonist-stimulated guanine nucleotide exchange activity of G-protein-coupled receptors results in the exchange of G-protein-bound GDP to GTP and the dissociation and activation of the complex into Gα-GTP and a Gβγ dimer. In Dictyostelium, a basal chemotaxis pathway consisting of heterotrimeric and monomeric G proteins is sufficient for chemotaxis. Symmetry breaking and amplification of chemoattractant sensing occurs between heterotrimeric G protein signaling and Ras activation. In a pull-down screen coupled to mass spectrometry, with Gα proteins as bait, we have identified resistant to inhibitors of cholinesterase 8 (Ric8) as a nonreceptor guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Gα-protein. Ric8 is not essential for the initial activation of heterotrimeric G proteins or Ras by uniform chemoattractant; however, it amplifies Gα signaling, which is essential for Ras-mediated symmetry breaking during chemotaxis and development.

  6. μ-Slide Chemotaxis: A new chamber for long-term chemotaxis studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zantl Roman

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective tools for measurement of chemotaxis are desirable since cell migration towards given stimuli plays a crucial role in tumour metastasis, angiogenesis, inflammation, and wound healing. As for now, the Boyden chamber assay is the longstanding "gold-standard" for in vitro chemotaxis measurements. However, support for live cell microscopy is weak, concentration gradients are rather steep and poorly defined, and chemotaxis cannot be distinguished from migration in a single experiment. Results Here, we describe a novel all-in-one chamber system for long-term analysis of chemotaxis in vitro that improves upon many of the shortcomings of the Boyden chamber assay. This chemotaxis chamber was developed to provide high quality microscopy, linear concentration gradients, support for long-term assays, and observation of slowly migrating cells via video microscopy. AlexaFluor 488 dye was used to demonstrate the establishment, shape and time development of linear chemical gradients. Human fibrosarcoma cell line HT1080 and freshly isolated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC were used to assess chemotaxis towards 10% fetal calf serum (FCS and FaDu cells' supernatant. Time-lapse video microscopy was conducted for 48 hours, and cell tracking and analysis was performed using ImageJ plugins. The results disclosed a linear steady-state gradient that was reached after approximately 8 hours and remained stable for at least 48 hours. Both cell types were chemotactically active and cell movement as well as cell-to-cell interaction was assessable. Conclusions Compared to the Boyden chamber assay, this innovative system allows for the generation of a stable gradient for a much longer time period as well as for the tracking of cell locomotion along this gradient and over long distances. Finally, random migration can be distinguished from primed and directed migration along chemotactic gradients in the same experiment, a feature, which

  7. μ-Slide Chemotaxis: a new chamber for long-term chemotaxis studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengel, Pamela; Nguyen-Hoang, Anna; Schildhammer, Christoph; Zantl, Roman; Kahl, Valentin; Horn, Elias

    2011-05-18

    Effective tools for measurement of chemotaxis are desirable since cell migration towards given stimuli plays a crucial role in tumour metastasis, angiogenesis, inflammation, and wound healing. As for now, the Boyden chamber assay is the longstanding "gold-standard" for in vitro chemotaxis measurements. However, support for live cell microscopy is weak, concentration gradients are rather steep and poorly defined, and chemotaxis cannot be distinguished from migration in a single experiment. Here, we describe a novel all-in-one chamber system for long-term analysis of chemotaxis in vitro that improves upon many of the shortcomings of the Boyden chamber assay. This chemotaxis chamber was developed to provide high quality microscopy, linear concentration gradients, support for long-term assays, and observation of slowly migrating cells via video microscopy. AlexaFluor 488 dye was used to demonstrate the establishment, shape and time development of linear chemical gradients. Human fibrosarcoma cell line HT1080 and freshly isolated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were used to assess chemotaxis towards 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) and FaDu cells' supernatant. Time-lapse video microscopy was conducted for 48 hours, and cell tracking and analysis was performed using ImageJ plugins. The results disclosed a linear steady-state gradient that was reached after approximately 8 hours and remained stable for at least 48 hours. Both cell types were chemotactically active and cell movement as well as cell-to-cell interaction was assessable. Compared to the Boyden chamber assay, this innovative system allows for the generation of a stable gradient for a much longer time period as well as for the tracking of cell locomotion along this gradient and over long distances. Finally, random migration can be distinguished from primed and directed migration along chemotactic gradients in the same experiment, a feature, which can be qualified via cell morphology imaging.

  8. Tumor-stroma ratio(TSR) as a potential novel predictor of prognosis in digestive system cancers: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Runjin; Song, Wei; Wang, Kai; Zou, Shubing

    2017-09-01

    The tumor-stroma ratio (TSR) has been reported as a prognosis predictor in multiple cancers. The aim of this meta-analysis was to investigate the potential value of TSR as a prognostic predictor of cancer in the digestive system. We searched PubMed, Embase, Elsevier and Web of Science. All studies exploring the association of TSR with overall survival (OS) or disease-free survival (DFS), and lymph node metastasis (LNM) were identified. In total, eight studies were eligible for analysis, and they included 1959 patients. Meta-analysis showed that the low TSR in the tumor could predict poor overall survival (OS) in multiple cancers (pooled Hazard Ratio [HR]: 2.15, 95%CI: 1.80-2.57, P<0.00001, fixed effects). For disease-free survival (DFS), low TSR was also a significant predictor (pooled Hazard Ratio [HR]: 2.31, 95%CI: 1.88-2.83, P<0.00001, fixed effects). In addition, low TSR was correlated with tumor stage. The tumor-stroma ratio (TSR) may potentially serve as a poor prognostic predictor for the metastasis and prognosis of cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Mast cell chemotaxis – Chemoattractants and signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana eHalova

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Migration of mast cells is essential for their recruitment within target tissues where they play an important role in innate and adaptive immune responses. These processes rely on the ability of mast cells to recognize appropriate chemotactic stimuli and react to them by a chemotactic response. Another level of intercellular communication is attained by production of chemoattractants by activated mast cells, which results in accumulation of mast cells and other hematopoietic cells at the sites of inflammation. Mast cells express numerous surface receptors for various ligands with properties of potent chemoattractants. They include the stem cell factor recognized by c-Kit, antigen, which binds to immunoglobulin E (IgE anchored to the high affinity IgE receptor (FcRI, highly cytokinergic IgE recognized by FcRI, lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, which binds to G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. Other large groups of chemoattractants are eicosanoids [prostaglandin E2 and D2, leukotriene (LT B4, LTD4 and LTC4, and others] and chemokines (CC, CXC, C and CX3X, which also bind to various GPCRs. Further noteworthy chemoattractants are isoforms of transforming growth factor (TGF , which are sensitively recognized by TGF- serine/threonine type I and II  receptors, adenosine, C1q, C3a, and C5a components of the complement, 5-hydroxytryptamine, neuroendocrine peptide catestatin, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor- and others. Here we discuss the major types of chemoattractants recognized by mast cells, their target receptors, as well as signaling pathways they utilize. We also briefly deal with methods used for studies of mast cell chemotaxis and with ways of how these studies profited from the results obtained in other cellular systems.

  10. Updates in understanding the role of cyclophilin A in leukocyte chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawar, Farman Ullah; Wu, Junjie; Zhao, Lijuan; Khattak, Muhammad Nasir Khan; Mei, Jie; Lin, Li

    2017-04-01

    Cyclophilin A (CypA), a well-recognized receptor for anti-inflammatory drug cyclosporine A (CsA) is a ubiquitous and multifunctional protein. Beside the diverse intracellular functions, CypA is secreted against inflammatory stimuli, where it activates and attracts leukocytes via CD147 to the stimulus site. Interestingly, it synergizes with other factors to induce leukocyte migration in different animals. However, the silencing and inhibition of CypA or CD147 inhibits leukocytes chemotaxis and inflammation. This review focuses on the advances made in understanding the mechanism of CypA-dependent leukocytes chemotaxis and hence, recognition of this factor as a possible therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  11. The Vi capsular polysaccharide enables Salmonella enterica serovar typhi to evade microbe-guided neutrophil chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamding Wangdi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi causes typhoid fever, a disseminated infection, while the closely related pathogen S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium is associated with a localized gastroenteritis in humans. Here we investigated whether both pathogens differ in the chemotactic response they induce in neutrophils using a single-cell experimental approach. Surprisingly, neutrophils extended chemotactic pseudopodia toward Escherichia coli and S. Typhimurium, but not toward S. Typhi. Bacterial-guided chemotaxis was dependent on the presence of complement component 5a (C5a and C5a receptor (C5aR. Deletion of S. Typhi capsule biosynthesis genes markedly enhanced the chemotactic response of neutrophils in vitro. Furthermore, deletion of capsule biosynthesis genes heightened the association of S. Typhi with neutrophils in vivo through a C5aR-dependent mechanism. Collectively, these data suggest that expression of the virulence-associated (Vi capsular polysaccharide of S. Typhi obstructs bacterial-guided neutrophil chemotaxis.

  12. Distinct Domains of CheA Confer Unique Functions in Chemotaxis and Cell Length in Azospirillum brasilense Sp7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullett, Jessica M; Bible, Amber; Alexandre, Gladys

    2017-07-01

    Chemotaxis is the movement of cells in response to gradients of diverse chemical cues. Motile bacteria utilize a conserved chemotaxis signal transduction system to bias their motility and navigate through a gradient. A central regulator of chemotaxis is the histidine kinase CheA. This cytoplasmic protein interacts with membrane-bound receptors, which assemble into large polar arrays, to propagate the signal. In the alphaproteobacterium Azospirillum brasilense , Che1 controls transient increases in swimming speed during chemotaxis, but it also biases the cell length at division. However, the exact underlying molecular mechanisms for Che1-dependent control of multiple cellular behaviors are not known. Here, we identify specific domains of the CheA1 histidine kinase implicated in modulating each of these functions. We show that CheA1 is produced in two isoforms: a membrane-anchored isoform produced as a fusion with a conserved seven-transmembrane domain of unknown function (TMX) at the N terminus and a soluble isoform similar to prototypical CheA. Site-directed and deletion mutagenesis combined with behavioral assays confirm the role of CheA1 in chemotaxis and implicate the TMX domain in mediating changes in cell length. Fluorescence microscopy further reveals that the membrane-anchored isoform is distributed around the cell surface while the soluble isoform localizes at the cell poles. Together, the data provide a mechanism for the role of Che1 in controlling multiple unrelated cellular behaviors via acquisition of a new domain in CheA1 and production of distinct functional isoforms. IMPORTANCE Chemotaxis provides a significant competitive advantage to bacteria in the environment, and this function has been transferred laterally multiple times, with evidence of functional divergence in different genomic contexts. The molecular principles that underlie functional diversification of chemotaxis in various genomic contexts are unknown. Here, we provide a molecular

  13. Highlighting the role of Ras and Rap during Dictyostelium chemotaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortholt, Arjan; van Haastert, Peter J. M.

    Chemotaxis, the directional movement towards a chemical compound, is an essential property of many cells and has been linked to the development and progression of many diseases. Eukaryotic chemotaxis is a complex process involving gradient sensing, cell polarity, remodelling of the cytoskeleton and

  14. Cyanobacterial chemotaxis to extracts of host and nonhost plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Malin; Rasmussen, Ulla; Bergman, Birgitta

    2006-03-01

    Chemotaxis may be important when forming cyanobacterial symbioses. However, knowledge of cyanobacterial attraction towards plants and factors affecting chemotaxis is limited. Chemo-attraction was observed in Nostoc strains 8964:3 and PCC 73102 towards exudate or crushed extract of the natural hosts Gunnera manicata, Cycas revoluta and Blasia pusilla, and the nonhost plants Trifolium repens, Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa. As all tested plant extracts generated chemotaxis, the possibility to attract cyanobacteria may be widespread in plants. Chemotaxis was reduced by increased temperature and darkness and was stimulated by phosphorous and iron starvation and elevated salt concentration. Sugars (arabinose, galactose, and glucose) had a positive effect on chemotaxis, whereas flavonoids (chrysin and naringenin) and amino acids (methionine, glycine, serine, phenylalanine, glutamine, and lysine) had no effect.

  15. The effectiveness of acupuncture research across components of the trauma spectrum response (tsr): a systematic review of reviews

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Courtney; Crawford, Cindy; Wallerstedt, Dawn; York, Alexandra; Duncan, Alaine; Smith, Jennifer; Sprengel, Meredith; Welton, Richard; Jonas, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Co-morbid symptoms (for example, chronic pain, depression, anxiety, and fatigue) are particularly common in military fighters returning from the current conflicts, who have experienced physical and/or psychological trauma. These overlapping conditions cut across the boundaries of mind, brain and body, resulting in a common symptomatic and functional spectrum of physical, cognitive, psychological and behavioral effects referred to as the ‘Trauma Spectrum Response’ (TSR). Wh...

  16. Development of a user interface for the TSR and its application for beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetzlaff, K.

    1997-01-01

    One of the topics of the following work is the development of a user interface for the control system of the heavy ion storage ring TSR at the Max-Planck-Institut for nuclear physics in Heidelberg. The new software has been developed with the programming language Visual Basic TM under the operating system Windows 95 TM . Its purpose is on one hand to enable the operator(s) to calculate some of the parameters for the adjustment of the storage ring on the other hand it improves the means of data acquisition from current, Schottky and BTF (beam transfer function) measurements. To achieve a simple operation of the program has been one of the primary goals during the development of the program. The new user interface was practically tested within three beam times. The collected data was examined to obtain information about momentum spread, longitudinal coupling impedance and minimal detection limit for the number of ions. A measurement with a 32 S 16+ beam rsulted in a limit of about 300. (orig.) [de

  17. A TSR Visual Servoing System Based on a Novel Dynamic Template Matching Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jia; Huang, Panfeng; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Dongke

    2015-12-21

    The so-called Tethered Space Robot (TSR) is a novel active space debris removal system. To solve its problem of non-cooperative target recognition during short-distance rendezvous events, this paper presents a framework for a real-time visual servoing system using non-calibrated monocular-CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor). When a small template is used for matching with a large scene, it always leads to mismatches, so a novel template matching algorithm to solve the problem is presented. Firstly, the novel matching algorithm uses a hollow annulus structure according to a FAST (Features from Accelerated Segment) algorithm and makes the method be rotation-invariant. Furthermore, the accumulative deviation can be decreased by the hollow structure. The matching function is composed of grey and gradient differences between template and object image, which help it reduce the effects of illumination and noises. Then, a dynamic template update strategy is designed to avoid tracking failures brought about by wrong matching or occlusion. Finally, the system synthesizes the least square integrated predictor, realizing tracking online in complex circumstances. The results of ground experiments show that the proposed algorithm can decrease the need for sophisticated computation and improves matching accuracy.

  18. A TSR Visual Servoing System Based on a Novel Dynamic Template Matching Method †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jia; Huang, Panfeng; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Dongke

    2015-01-01

    The so-called Tethered Space Robot (TSR) is a novel active space debris removal system. To solve its problem of non-cooperative target recognition during short-distance rendezvous events, this paper presents a framework for a real-time visual servoing system using non-calibrated monocular-CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor). When a small template is used for matching with a large scene, it always leads to mismatches, so a novel template matching algorithm to solve the problem is presented. Firstly, the novel matching algorithm uses a hollow annulus structure according to a FAST (Features from Accelerated Segment) algorithm and makes the method be rotation-invariant. Furthermore, the accumulative deviation can be decreased by the hollow structure. The matching function is composed of grey and gradient differences between template and object image, which help it reduce the effects of illumination and noises. Then, a dynamic template update strategy is designed to avoid tracking failures brought about by wrong matching or occlusion. Finally, the system synthesizes the least square integrated predictor, realizing tracking online in complex circumstances. The results of ground experiments show that the proposed algorithm can decrease the need for sophisticated computation and improves matching accuracy. PMID:26703609

  19. Long-time dynamics of laser-cooled ions in the TSR storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mudrich, M.

    2000-01-01

    This diploma thesis studies experimentally the long-time dynamics of laser-cooled 9 Be + -beams at the TSR under different cooling conditions. The goal is to enlarge the understanding of ultra-cold, non-neutral plasma at high center-of-mass energies. By means of improved measurement capabilities one can now for the first time monitor the entire phase-space over a long time. This makes it possible to quantitatively analyse the possibilities and limitations of laser cooling at a storage ring. Under optimum cooling conditions a regime of high phase-space density is reached, close to the region where influences of Coulomb coupling are expected. Furthermore, a Monte-Carlo model is worked out that qualitatively describes the beam dynamics. The model includes the influence of transverse-longitudinal coupling due to intra beam scattering on the longitudinal phase-space distribution. At high phase-space density a sudden disappearance of intra beam collisions is observed experimentally and possible interpretations are given. (orig.)

  20. A TSR Visual Servoing System Based on a Novel Dynamic Template Matching Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Cai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The so-called Tethered Space Robot (TSR is a novel active space debris removal system. To solve its problem of non-cooperative target recognition during short-distance rendezvous events, this paper presents a framework for a real-time visual servoing system using non-calibrated monocular-CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor. When a small template is used for matching with a large scene, it always leads to mismatches, so a novel template matching algorithm to solve the problem is presented. Firstly, the novel matching algorithm uses a hollow annulus structure according to a FAST (Features from Accelerated Segment algorithm and makes the method be rotation-invariant. Furthermore, the accumulative deviation can be decreased by the hollow structure. The matching function is composed of grey and gradient differences between template and object image, which help it reduce the effects of illumination and noises. Then, a dynamic template update strategy is designed to avoid tracking failures brought about by wrong matching or occlusion. Finally, the system synthesizes the least square integrated predictor, realizing tracking online in complex circumstances. The results of ground experiments show that the proposed algorithm can decrease the need for sophisticated computation and improves matching accuracy.

  1. A Model of Drosophila Larva Chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Davies

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Detailed observations of larval Drosophila chemotaxis have characterised the relationship between the odour gradient and the runs, head casts and turns made by the animal. We use a computational model to test whether hypothesised sensorimotor control mechanisms are sufficient to account for larval behaviour. The model combines three mechanisms based on simple transformations of the recent history of odour intensity at the head location. The first is an increased probability of terminating runs in response to gradually decreasing concentration, the second an increased probability of terminating head casts in response to rapidly increasing concentration, and the third a biasing of run directions up concentration gradients through modulation of small head casts. We show that this model can be tuned to produce behavioural statistics comparable to those reported for the larva, and that this tuning results in similar chemotaxis performance to the larva. We demonstrate that each mechanism can enable odour approach but the combination of mechanisms is most effective, and investigate how these low-level control mechanisms relate to behavioural measures such as the preference indices used to investigate larval learning behaviour in group assays.

  2. Modeling Transverse Chemotaxis in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, M. L.; Valdés-Parada, F. J.; Wood, B. D.

    2009-12-01

    The movement of microorganisms toward a chemical attractant (chemotaxis) has been shown to aid in subsurface contaminant degradation and enhanced oil recovery. However, chemotaxis is inherently a pore scale process that must be upscaled to arrive at continuum scale models for field applications. In this work, the method of volume averaging is used to upscale the microscale chemotactic microbial transport equations in order to obtain the corresponding macroscale models for the mass balance of bacteria and the chemical attractant to which they respond. As a first approach, cellular growth/death and consumption of the attractant by chemical reaction are assumed to be negligible with respect to convective and diffusive transport mechanisms. Two effective medium coefficients are introduced in the model, namely a total motility tensor and a total velocity vector. Under certain conditions, it is shown that the coefficients can differ considerably from the values corresponding to non-chemotactic transport. The model is validated by comparing the predicted transverse motility coefficients and concentration profiles to those measured within an engineered porous medium. For the concentration profiles, we introduced a lag that accounts for the difference between the arrival time of the microorganisms and the their chemotactic response to the attractant.

  3. Chemotaxis of Azospirillum species to aromatic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-de-Victoria, G.; Lovell, C.R. (Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Azospirillum sspeciesare free-living nitrogen fixing bacteria commonly found in soils and in association with plant roots, including important agricultural crops. Rhizosphere colonization my Azospirillum species has been shown to stimulate growth of a variety of plant species. Chemotaxis is one of the properties which may contribute to survival, rhizosphere colonization and the initiation of mutualistic interactions by Azospirillum species. This study evaluates the chemotactic responses of three Azospirillum stains to a variety of aromatic compounds:benzoate, catechol, 4-HB, and PCA. Results indicate that the same aromatic substance can elicit different chemotactic responses from different Azospirillum species, and that Azospirillum can detect aromatic substrates at concentrations similar to those they encounter naturally. 36 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  4. Chemotaxis: A Multi-Scale Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, Arpan

    We are attempting to build a working simulation of population level self-organization in dictyostelium discoideum cells by combining existing models for chemo-attractant production and detection, along with phenomenological motility models. Our goal is to create a computationally-viable model-framework within which a population of cells can self-generate chemo-attractant waves and self-organize based on the directional cues of those waves. The work is a direct continuation of our previous work published in Physical Biology titled ``Excitable waves and direction-sensing in Dictyostelium Discoideum: steps towards a chemotaxis model''. This is a work in progress, no official draft/paper exists yet.

  5. Chemotaxis to Excitable Waves in Dictyostelium Discoideum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, Arpan; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Levine, Herbert

    In recent years, there have been significant advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying chemically directed motility by eukaryotic cells such as Dictyostelium. In particular, the LEGI model has proven capable of providing a framework for quantitatively explaining many experiments that present Dictyostelium cells with tailored chemical stimuli and monitor their subsequent polarization. Here, we couple the LEGI approach to an excitable medium model of the cAMP wave-field that is self-generated by the cells and investigate the extent to which this class of models enables accurate chemotaxis to the cAMP waveforms expected in vivo. Our results indicate that the ultra-sensitive version of the model does an excellent job in providing natural wave rectification, thereby providing a compelling solution to the ``back-of-the-wave paradox'' during cellular aggregation. This work was supported by National Institutes of Health Grant P01 GM078586.

  6. Large time periodic solutions to coupled chemotaxis-fluid models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chunhua

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we deal with the time periodic problem to coupled chemotaxis-fluid models. We prove the existence of large time periodic strong solutions for the full chemotaxis-Navier-Stokes system in spatial dimension N=2, and the existence of large time periodic strong solutions for the chemotaxis-Stokes system in spatial dimension N=3. On the basis of these, the regularity of the solutions can be further improved. More precisely speaking, if the time periodic source g and the potential force \

  7. A coupled chemotaxis-fluid model: Global existence

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jian-Guo

    2011-09-01

    We consider a model arising from biology, consisting of chemotaxis equations coupled to viscous incompressible fluid equations through transport and external forcing. Global existence of solutions to the Cauchy problem is investigated under certain conditions. Precisely, for the chemotaxis-Navier- Stokes system in two space dimensions, we obtain global existence for large data. In three space dimensions, we prove global existence of weak solutions for the chemotaxis-Stokes system with nonlinear diffusion for the cell density.© 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. A Sensitive Chemotaxis Assay Using a Novel Microfluidic Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing chemotaxis assays do not generate stable chemotactic gradients and thus—over time—functionally measure only nonspecific random motion (chemokinesis. In comparison, microfluidic technology has the capacity to generate a tightly controlled microenvironment that can be stably maintained for extended periods of time and is, therefore, amenable to adaptation for assaying chemotaxis. We describe here a novel microfluidic device for sensitive assay of cellular migration and show its application for evaluating the chemotaxis of smooth muscle cells in a chemokine gradient.

  9. Neutrophil chemotaxis by Propionibacterium acnes lipase and its inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W L; Shalita, A R; Suntharalingam, K; Fikrig, S M

    1982-01-01

    The chemoattraction of Propionibacterium acnes lipase for neutrophils and the effect of lipase inhibitor and two antibiotic agents on the chemotaxis were evaluated. Of the various fractions tested, partially purified lipase (fraction 2c) was the most active cytotaxin produced by P. acnes. Serum mediators were not required for the generation of chemotaxis by lipase in vitro. Diisopropyl phosphofluoridate at low concentration (10(-4) mM) completely inhibited lipase activity as well as polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis generated by lipase. Tetracycline hydrochloride and erythromycin base at concentrations of 10(-1) mM and 1 mM, respectively, caused 100% inhibition of PMN migration toward lipase or zymosan-activated serum. The inhibiting activity of the antibiotics was directed against cells independently of any effect on lipase. Chemotaxis by P. acnes lipase suggests a wider role for this enzyme in the inflammatory process and the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris.

  10. Dispatch. Dictyostelium chemotaxis: fascism through the back door?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insall, Robert

    2003-04-29

    Aggregating Dictyostelium cells secrete cyclic AMP to attract their neighbours by chemotaxis. It has now been shown that adenylyl cyclase is enriched in the rear of cells, and this localisation is required for normal aggregation.

  11. Neutrophil chemotaxis by Propionibacterium acnes lipase and its inhibition.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, W L; Shalita, A R; Suntharalingam, K; Fikrig, S M

    1982-01-01

    The chemoattraction of Propionibacterium acnes lipase for neutrophils and the effect of lipase inhibitor and two antibiotic agents on the chemotaxis were evaluated. Of the various fractions tested, partially purified lipase (fraction 2c) was the most active cytotaxin produced by P. acnes. Serum mediators were not required for the generation of chemotaxis by lipase in vitro. Diisopropyl phosphofluoridate at low concentration (10(-4) mM) completely inhibited lipase activity as well as polymorph...

  12. The role of the Staphylococcal VraTSR regulatory system on vancomycin resistance and vanA operon expression in vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Nadia K; Yin, Shaohui; Boyle-Vavra, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Vancomycin is often the preferred treatment for invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. With the increase in incidence of MRSA infections, the use of vancomycin has increased and, as feared, isolates of vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) have emerged. VRSA isolates have acquired the entercoccal vanA operon contained on transposon (Tn) 1546 residing on a conjugal plasmid. VraTSR is a vancomycin and β-lactam-inducible three-component regulatory system encoded on the S. aureus chromosome that modulates the cell-wall stress response to cell-wall acting antibiotics. Mutation in vraTSR has shown to increase susceptibility to β-lactams and vancomycin in clinical VISA strains and in recombinant strain COLVA-200 which expresses a plasmid borne vanA operon. To date, the role of VraTSR in vanA operon expression in VRSA has not been demonstrated. In this study, the vraTSR operon was deleted from the first clinical VRSA strain (VRS1) by transduction with phage harvested from a USA300 vraTSR operon deletion strain. The absence of the vraTSR operon and presence of the vanA operon were confirmed in the transductant (VRS1Δvra) by PCR. Broth MIC determinations, demonstrated that the vancomycin MIC of VRS1Δvra (64 µg/ml) decreased by 16-fold compared with VRS1 (1024 µg/ml). The effect of the vraTSR operon deletion on expression of the van gene cluster (vanA, vanX and vanR) was examined by quantitative RT-PCR using relative quantification. A 2-5-fold decreased expression of the vanA operon genes occured in strain VRS1Δvra at stationary growth phase compared with the parent strain, VRS1. Both vancomycin resistance and vancomycin-induced expression of vanA and vanR were restored by complementation with a plasmid harboring the vraTSR operon. These findings demonstrate that expression in S. aureus of the horizontally acquired enterococcal vanA gene cluster is enhanced by the staphylococcal three-component cell wall stress regulatory

  13. The effectiveness of acupuncture research across components of the trauma spectrum response (tsr: a systematic review of reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Courtney

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Co-morbid symptoms (for example, chronic pain, depression, anxiety, and fatigue are particularly common in military fighters returning from the current conflicts, who have experienced physical and/or psychological trauma. These overlapping conditions cut across the boundaries of mind, brain and body, resulting in a common symptomatic and functional spectrum of physical, cognitive, psychological and behavioral effects referred to as the ‘Trauma Spectrum Response’ (TSR. While acupuncture has been shown to treat some of these components effectively, the current literature is often difficult to interpret, inconsistent or of variable quality. Thus, to gauge comprehensively the effectiveness of acupuncture across TSR components, a systematic review of reviews was conducted using the Samueli Institute’s Rapid Evidence Assessment of the Literature (REAL© methodology. Methods PubMed/MEDLINE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsycInfo were searched from inception to September 2011 for systematic reviews/meta-analyses. Quality assessment was rigorously performed using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN 50 checklist and the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE methodology. Adherence to the Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials in Acupuncture (STRICTA criteria was also assessed. Results Of the 1,480 citations identified by our searches, 52 systematic reviews/meta-analyses, all high quality except for one, met inclusion criteria for each TSR component except post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD and sexual function. The majority of reviews addressed most STRICTA components, but did not describe safety. Conclusions Based on the results of our review, acupuncture appears to be effective for treating headaches and, although more research is needed, seems to be a promising treatment option for anxiety, sleep disturbances, depression

  14. The effectiveness of acupuncture research across components of the trauma spectrum response (tsr): a systematic review of reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Courtney; Crawford, Cindy; Wallerstedt, Dawn; York, Alexandra; Duncan, Alaine; Smith, Jennifer; Sprengel, Meredith; Welton, Richard; Jonas, Wayne

    2012-10-15

    Co-morbid symptoms (for example, chronic pain, depression, anxiety, and fatigue) are particularly common in military fighters returning from the current conflicts, who have experienced physical and/or psychological trauma. These overlapping conditions cut across the boundaries of mind, brain and body, resulting in a common symptomatic and functional spectrum of physical, cognitive, psychological and behavioral effects referred to as the 'Trauma Spectrum Response' (TSR). While acupuncture has been shown to treat some of these components effectively, the current literature is often difficult to interpret, inconsistent or of variable quality. Thus, to gauge comprehensively the effectiveness of acupuncture across TSR components, a systematic review of reviews was conducted using the Samueli Institute's Rapid Evidence Assessment of the Literature (REAL©) methodology. PubMed/MEDLINE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsycInfo were searched from inception to September 2011 for systematic reviews/meta-analyses. Quality assessment was rigorously performed using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN 50) checklist and the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. Adherence to the Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials in Acupuncture (STRICTA) criteria was also assessed. Of the 1,480 citations identified by our searches, 52 systematic reviews/meta-analyses, all high quality except for one, met inclusion criteria for each TSR component except post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and sexual function. The majority of reviews addressed most STRICTA components, but did not describe safety. Based on the results of our review, acupuncture appears to be effective for treating headaches and, although more research is needed, seems to be a promising treatment option for anxiety, sleep disturbances, depression and chronic pain. It does not, however, demonstrate any substantial

  15. The Azospirillum brasilense Che1 Chemotaxis Pathway Controls Swimming Velocity, Which Affects Transient Cell-to-Cell Clumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Amber; Russell, Matthew H.

    2012-01-01

    The Che1 chemotaxis-like pathway of Azospirillum brasilense contributes to chemotaxis and aerotaxis, and it has also been found to contribute to regulating changes in cell surface adhesive properties that affect the propensity of cells to clump and to flocculate. The exact contribution of Che1 to the control of chemotaxis and flocculation in A. brasilense remains poorly understood. Here, we show that Che1 affects reversible cell-to-cell clumping, a cellular behavior in which motile cells transiently interact by adhering to one another at their nonflagellated poles before swimming apart. Clumping precedes and is required for flocculation, and both processes appear to be independently regulated. The phenotypes of a ΔaerC receptor mutant and of mutant strains lacking cheA1, cheY1, cheB1, or cheR1 (alone or in combination) or with che1 deleted show that Che1 directly mediates changes in the flagellar swimming velocity and that this behavior directly modulates the transient nature of clumping. Our results also suggest that an additional receptor(s) and signaling pathway(s) are implicated in mediating other Che1-independent changes in clumping identified in the present study. Transient clumping precedes the transition to stable clump formation, which involves the production of specific extracellular polysaccharides (EPS); however, production of these clumping-specific EPS is not directly controlled by Che1 activity. Che1-dependent clumping may antagonize motility and prevent chemotaxis, thereby maintaining cells in a metabolically favorable niche. PMID:22522896

  16. The Azospirillum brasilense Che1 chemotaxis pathway controls swimming velocity, which affects transient cell-to-cell clumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Amber; Russell, Matthew H; Alexandre, Gladys

    2012-07-01

    The Che1 chemotaxis-like pathway of Azospirillum brasilense contributes to chemotaxis and aerotaxis, and it has also been found to contribute to regulating changes in cell surface adhesive properties that affect the propensity of cells to clump and to flocculate. The exact contribution of Che1 to the control of chemotaxis and flocculation in A. brasilense remains poorly understood. Here, we show that Che1 affects reversible cell-to-cell clumping, a cellular behavior in which motile cells transiently interact by adhering to one another at their nonflagellated poles before swimming apart. Clumping precedes and is required for flocculation, and both processes appear to be independently regulated. The phenotypes of a ΔaerC receptor mutant and of mutant strains lacking cheA1, cheY1, cheB1, or cheR1 (alone or in combination) or with che1 deleted show that Che1 directly mediates changes in the flagellar swimming velocity and that this behavior directly modulates the transient nature of clumping. Our results also suggest that an additional receptor(s) and signaling pathway(s) are implicated in mediating other Che1-independent changes in clumping identified in the present study. Transient clumping precedes the transition to stable clump formation, which involves the production of specific extracellular polysaccharides (EPS); however, production of these clumping-specific EPS is not directly controlled by Che1 activity. Che1-dependent clumping may antagonize motility and prevent chemotaxis, thereby maintaining cells in a metabolically favorable niche.

  17. Fluidic control over cell proliferation and chemotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groisman, Alex

    2006-03-01

    Microscopic flows are almost always stable and laminar that allows precise control of chemical environment in micro-channels. We describe design and operation of several microfluidic devices, in which various types of environments are created for different experimental assays with live cells. In a microfluidic chemostat, colonies of non-adherent bacterial and yeast cells are trapped in micro-chambers with walls permeable for chemicals. Fast chemical exchange between the chambers and nearby flow-through channels creates essentially chemostatic medium conditions in the chambers and leads to exponential growth of the colonies up to very high cell densities. Another microfluidic device allows creation of linear concentration profiles of a pheromone (α-factor) across channels with non-adherent yeast cells, without exposure of the cells to flow or other mechanical perturbation. The concentration profile remains stable for hours enabling studies of chemotropic response of the cells to the pheromone gradient. A third type of the microfluidic devices is used to study chemotaxis of human neutrophils exposed to gradients of a chemoattractant (fMLP). The devices generate concentration profiles of various shapes, with adjustable steepness and mean concentration. The ``gradient'' of the chemoattractant can be imposed and reversed within less than a second, allowing repeated quantitative experiments.

  18. Thrombospondin-1 modulates vascular endothelial growth factor activity at the receptor level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Kazerounian, Shideh; Duquette, Mark; Perruzzi, Carole; Nagy, Janice A; Dvorak, Harold F; Parangi, Sareh; Lawler, Jack

    2009-10-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a well-established stimulator of vascular permeability and angiogenesis, whereas thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is a potent angiogenic inhibitor. In this study, we have found that the TSP-1 receptors CD36 and beta1 integrin associate with the VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2). The coclustering of receptors that regulate angiogenesis may provide the endothelial cell with a platform for integration of positive and negative signals in the plane of the membrane. Thus, this complex may represent a molecular switch that regulates angiogenesis and determines endothelial cell behavior. In this context, physiological levels of TSP-1 appear to support VEGFR2 function on both the cellular and tissue level, because phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and vascular permeability in response to VEGF are decreased in TSP-1-null mice and isolated endothelial cells. A therapeutic agent based on the antiangiogenic domain of TSP-1, designated 3TSR (for three TSP-1 type 1 repeats), has significant antiangiogenic and antitumor efficacy. Systemic treatment of wild-type mice with 3TSR significantly decreased VEGF-induced permeability. Consistent with this result, VEGF-stimulated phosphorylation of VEGFR2 was also significantly decreased in lung extracts from 3TSR-treated mice. Moreover, 3TSR significantly decreased VEGF-stimulated VEGFR2 phosphorylation in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells in culture. Taken together, the results indicate that TSP-1 and 3TSR modulate the function of VEGFR2.

  19. Chemotaxis by natural populations of coral reef bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tout, Jessica; Jeffries, Thomas C; Petrou, Katherina; Tyson, Gene W; Webster, Nicole S; Garren, Melissa; Stocker, Roman; Ralph, Peter J; Seymour, Justin R

    2015-08-01

    Corals experience intimate associations with distinct populations of marine microorganisms, but the microbial behaviours underpinning these relationships are poorly understood. There is evidence that chemotaxis is pivotal to the infection process of corals by pathogenic bacteria, but this evidence is limited to experiments using cultured isolates under laboratory conditions. We measured the chemotactic capabilities of natural populations of coral-associated bacteria towards chemicals released by corals and their symbionts, including amino acids, carbohydrates, ammonium and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP). Laboratory experiments, using a modified capillary assay, and in situ measurements, using a novel microfabricated in situ chemotaxis assay, were employed to quantify the chemotactic responses of natural microbial assemblages on the Great Barrier Reef. Both approaches showed that bacteria associated with the surface of the coral species Pocillopora damicornis and Acropora aspera exhibited significant levels of chemotaxis, particularly towards DMSP and amino acids, and that these levels of chemotaxis were significantly higher than that of bacteria inhabiting nearby, non-coral-associated waters. This pattern was supported by a significantly higher abundance of chemotaxis and motility genes in metagenomes within coral-associated water types. The phylogenetic composition of the coral-associated chemotactic microorganisms, determined using 16S rRNA amplicon pyrosequencing, differed from the community in the seawater surrounding the coral and comprised known coral associates, including potentially pathogenic Vibrio species. These findings indicate that motility and chemotaxis are prevalent phenotypes among coral-associated bacteria, and we propose that chemotaxis has an important role in the establishment and maintenance of specific coral-microbe associations, which may ultimately influence the health and stability of the coral holobiont.

  20. Neutrophil adhesion and chemotaxis depend on substrate mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannat, Risat A.; Dembo, Micah; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophil adhesion to the vasculature and chemotaxis within tissues play critical roles in the inflammatory response to injury and pathogens. Unregulated neutrophil activity has been implicated in the progression of numerous chronic and acute diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, and sepsis. Cell migration of anchorage-dependent cells is known to depend on both chemical and mechanical interactions. Although neutrophil responses to chemical cues have been well characterized, little is known about the effect of underlying tissue mechanics on neutrophil adhesion and migration. To address this question, we quantified neutrophil migration and traction stresses on compliant hydrogel substrates with varying elasticity in a micro-machined gradient chamber in which we could apply either a uniform concentration or a precise gradient of the bacterial chemoattractant fMLP. Neutrophils spread more extensively on substrates of greater stiffness. In addition, increasing the stiffness of the substrate leads to a significant increase in the chemotactic index for each fMLP gradient tested. As the substrate becomes stiffer, neutrophils generate higher traction forces without significant changes in cell speed. These forces are often displayed in pairs and focused in the uropod. Increases in the mean fMLP concentration beyond the KD of the receptor lead to a decrease in chemotactic index on all surfaces. Blocking with an antibody against β2-integrins leads to a significant reduction but not an elimination of directed motility on stiff materials, but no change in motility on soft materials, suggesting neutrophils can display both integrin-dependent and integrin-independent motility. These findings are critical for understanding how neutrophil migration may change in different mechanical environments in vivo and can be used to guide the design of migration inhibitors that more efficiently target inflammation. PMID:20473350

  1. Neutrophil adhesion and chemotaxis depend on substrate mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannat, Risat A; Hammer, Daniel A [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, 240 Skirkanich Hall, 210 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Robbins, Gregory P; Ricart, Brendon G [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, 311A Towne Building, 220 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Dembo, Micah, E-mail: hammer@seas.upenn.ed [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, 44 Cummington Street, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2010-05-19

    Neutrophil adhesion to the vasculature and chemotaxis within tissues play critical roles in the inflammatory response to injury and pathogens. Unregulated neutrophil activity has been implicated in the progression of numerous chronic and acute diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, asthma and sepsis. Cell migration of anchorage-dependent cells is known to depend on both chemical and mechanical interactions. Although neutrophil responses to chemical cues have been well characterized, little is known about the effect of underlying tissue mechanics on neutrophil adhesion and migration. To address this question, we quantified neutrophil migration and traction stresses on compliant hydrogel substrates with varying elasticity in a micromachined gradient chamber in which we could apply either a uniform concentration or a precise gradient of the bacterial chemoattractant fMLP. Neutrophils spread more extensively on substrates of greater stiffness. In addition, increasing the stiffness of the substrate leads to a significant increase in the chemotactic index for each fMLP gradient tested. As the substrate becomes stiffer, neutrophils generate higher traction forces without significant changes in cell speed. These forces are often displayed in pairs and focused in the uropod. Increases in the mean fMLP concentration beyond the K{sub D} of the receptor lead to a decrease in chemotactic index on all surfaces. Blocking with an antibody against {beta}{sub 2}-integrins leads to a significant reduction, but not an elimination, of directed motility on stiff materials, but no change in motility on soft materials, suggesting neutrophils can display both integrin-dependent and integrin-independent motility. These findings are critical for understanding how neutrophil migration may change in different mechanical environments in vivo and can be used to guide the design of migration inhibitors that more efficiently target inflammation.

  2. Coupled effects of chemotaxis and growth on traveling bacterial waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhifeng; Bouwer, Edward J; Hilpert, Markus

    2014-08-01

    Traveling bacterial waves are capable of improving contaminant remediation in the subsurface. It is fairly well understood how bacterial chemotaxis and growth separately affect the formation and propagation of such waves. However, their interaction is not well understood. We therefore perform a modeling study to investigate the coupled effects of chemotaxis and growth on bacterial migration, and examine their effects on contaminant remediation. We study the waves by using different initial electron acceptor concentrations for different bacteria and substrate systems. Three types of traveling waves can occur: a chemotactic wave due to the biased movement of chemotactic bacteria resulting from metabolism-generated substrate concentration gradients; a growth/decay/motility wave due to a dynamic equilibrium between bacterial growth, decay and random motility; and an integrated wave due to the interaction between bacterial chemotaxis and growth. Chemotaxis hardly enhances the bacterial propagation if it is too weak to form a chemotactic wave or its wave speed is less than half of the growth/decay/motility wave speed. However, chemotaxis significantly accelerates bacterial propagation once its wave speed exceeds the growth/decay/motility wave speed. When convection occurs, it speeds up the growth/decay/motility wave but slows down or even eliminates the chemotactic wave due to the dispersion. Bacterial survival proves particularly important for bacterial propagation. Therefore we develop a conceptual model to estimate the speed of growth/decay/motility waves. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Magneto-chemotaxis in sediment: first insights.

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    Xuegang Mao

    Full Text Available Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB use passive alignment with the Earth magnetic field as a mean to increase their navigation efficiency in horizontally stratified environments through what is known as magneto-aerotaxis (M-A. Current M-A models have been derived from MTB observations in aqueous environments, where a >80% alignment with inclined magnetic field lines produces a one-dimensional search for optimal living conditions. However, the mean magnetic alignment of MTB in their most widespread living environment, i.e. sediment, has been recently found to be <1%, greatly reducing or even eliminating the magnetotactic advantage deduced for the case of MTB in water. In order to understand the role of magnetotaxis for MTB populations living in sediment, we performed first M-A observations with lake sediment microcosms. Microcosm experiments were based on different combinations of (1 MTB position with respect to their preferred living depth (i.e. above, at, and below, and (2 magnetic field configurations (i.e. correctly and incorrectly polarized vertical fields, horizontal fields, and zero fields. Results suggest that polar magnetotaxis is more complex than implied by previous experiments, and revealed unexpected differences between two types of MTB living in the same sediment. Our main findings are: (1 all investigated MTB benefit of a clear magnetotactic advantage when they need to migrate over macroscopic distances for reaching their optimal living depth, (2 magnetotaxis is not used by all MTB under stationary, undisturbed conditions, (3 some MTB can rely only on chemotaxis for macroscopic vertical displacements in sediment while other cannot, and (4 some MTB use a fixed polar M-A mechanisms, while other can switch their M-A polarity, performing what can be considered as a mixed polar-axial M-A. These observations demonstrate that sedimentary M-A is controlled by complex mechanical, chemical, and temporal factors that are poorly reproduced in aqueous

  4. Limits of feedback control in bacterial chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann S Dufour

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Inputs to signaling pathways can have complex statistics that depend on the environment and on the behavioral response to previous stimuli. Such behavioral feedback is particularly important in navigation. Successful navigation relies on proper coupling between sensors, which gather information during motion, and actuators, which control behavior. Because reorientation conditions future inputs, behavioral feedback can place sensors and actuators in an operational regime different from the resting state. How then can organisms maintain proper information transfer through the pathway while navigating diverse environments? In bacterial chemotaxis, robust performance is often attributed to the zero integral feedback control of the sensor, which guarantees that activity returns to resting state when the input remains constant. While this property provides sensitivity over a wide range of signal intensities, it remains unclear how other parameters such as adaptation rate and adapted activity affect chemotactic performance, especially when considering that the swimming behavior of the cell determines the input signal. We examine this issue using analytical models and simulations that incorporate recent experimental evidences about behavioral feedback and flagellar motor adaptation. By focusing on how sensory information carried by the response regulator is best utilized by the motor, we identify an operational regime that maximizes drift velocity along chemical concentration gradients for a wide range of environments and sensor adaptation rates. This optimal regime is outside the dynamic range of the motor response, but maximizes the contrast between run duration up and down gradients. In steep gradients, the feedback from chemotactic drift can push the system through a bifurcation. This creates a non-chemotactic state that traps cells unless the motor is allowed to adapt. Although motor adaptation helps, we find that as the strength of the feedback

  5. A portable chemotaxis platform for short and long term analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenjie Xu

    Full Text Available Flow-based microfluidic systems have been widely utilized for cell migration studies given their ability to generate versatile and precisely defined chemical gradients and to permit direct visualization of migrating cells. Nonetheless, the general need for bulky peripherals such as mechanical pumps and tubing and the complicated setup procedures significantly limit the widespread use of these microfluidic systems for cell migration studies. Here we present a simple method to power microfluidic devices for chemotaxis assays using the commercially available ALZET® osmotic pumps. Specifically, we developed a standalone chemotaxis platform that has the same footprint as a multiwell plate and can generate well-defined, stable chemical gradients continuously for up to 7 days. Using this platform, we validated the short-term (24 hours and long-term (72 hours concentration dependent PDGF-BB chemotaxis response of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells.

  6. Relation between chemotaxis and consumption of amino acids in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yiling; M. Pollard, Abiola; Höfler, Carolin; Poschet, Gernot; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chemotaxis enables bacteria to navigate chemical gradients in their environment, accumulating toward high concentrations of attractants and avoiding high concentrations of repellents. Although finding nutrients is likely to be an important function of bacterial chemotaxis, not all characterized attractants are nutrients. Moreover, even for potential nutrients, the exact relation between the metabolic value of chemicals and their efficiency as chemoattractants has not been systematically explored. Here we compare the chemotactic response of amino acids with their use by bacteria for two well‐established models of chemotactic behavior, E scherichia coli and B acillus subtilis. We demonstrate that in E . coli chemotaxis toward amino acids indeed strongly correlates with their utilization. However, no such correlation is observed for B . subtilis, suggesting that in this case, the amino acids are not followed because of their nutritional value but rather as environmental cues. PMID:25807888

  7. Chemotaxis on the Move – Active Learning Teaching Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann H. Williams

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In Microbiology courses, concepts such as chemotaxis can be difficult to visualize for students. Described here is a short visual playacting activity where students simulate E.coli moving towards an attractant source using a biased random walk. This short interactive activity is performed in the lecture course of General Microbiology that contains mostly Biology major juniors or seniors prior to the lecture on the subject of chemotaxis and flagellar movements. It is utilized to help students (class of 30–40 understand and visualize the process of chemotaxis and the concepts of random walk, biased random walk, runs, tumbles and directed movement of flagella in response to attractants and repellents.

  8. Methyl group turnover on methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins during chemotaxis by Bacillus subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoelke, M.S.; Casper, J.M.; Ordal, G.W.

    1990-01-01

    The addition of attractant to Bacillus subtilis briefly exposed to radioactive methionine causes an increase of labeling of the methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins. The addition of attractant to cells radiolabeled for longer times shows no change in the extent of methylation. Therefore, the increase in labeling for the briefly labeled cells is due to an increased turnover of methyl groups caused by attractant. All amino acids gave enhanced turnover. This turnover lasted for a prolonged time, probably spanning the period of smooth swimming caused by the attractant addition. Repellent did not affect the turnover when added alone or simultaneously with attractant. Thus, for amino acid attractants, the turnover is probably the excitatory signal, which is seen to extend long into or throughout the adaptation period, not just at the start of it

  9. CXCR4 mediated chemotaxis is regulated by 5T4 oncofetal glycoprotein in mouse embryonic cells.

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    Thomas D Southgate

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available 5T4 oncofetal molecules are highly expressed during development and upregulated in cancer while showing only low levels in some adult tissues. Upregulation of 5T4 expression is a marker of loss of pluripotency in the early differentiation of embryonic stem (ES cells and forms an integrated component of an epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a process important during embryonic development and metastatic spread of epithelial tumors. Investigation of the transcriptional changes in early ES differentiation showed upregulation of CXCL12 and down-regulation of a cell surface protease, CD26, which cleaves this chemokine. CXCL12 binds to the widely expressed CXCR4 and regulates key aspects of development, stem cell motility and tumour metastasis to tissues with high levels of CXCL12. We show that the 5T4 glycoprotein is required for optimal functional cell surface expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and CXCL12 mediated chemotaxis in differentiating murine embryonic stem cells and embryo fibroblasts (MEF. Cell surface expression of 5T4 and CXCR4 molecules is co-localized in differentiating ES cells and MEF. By contrast, differentiating ES and MEF derived from 5T4 knockout (KO mice show only intracellular CXCR4 expression but infection with adenovirus encoding mouse 5T4 restores CXCL12 chemotaxis and surface co-localization with 5T4 molecules. A series of chimeric constructs with interchanged domains of 5T4 and the glycoprotein CD44 were used to map the 5T4 sequences relevant for CXCR4 membrane expression and function in 5T4KO MEF. These data identified the 5T4 transmembrane domain as sufficient and necessary to enable CXCR4 cell surface expression and chemotaxis. Furthermore, some monoclonal antibodies against m5T4 can inhibit CXCL12 chemotaxis of differentiating ES cells and MEF which is not mediated by simple antigenic modulation. Collectively, these data support a molecular interaction of 5T4 and CXCR4 occurring at the cell surface which

  10. DMPD: Cellular signaling in macrophage migration and chemotaxis. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 11073096 Cellular signaling in macrophage migration and chemotaxis. Jones GE. J Leu...koc Biol. 2000 Nov;68(5):593-602. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Cellular signaling in macrophage migration... and chemotaxis. PubmedID 11073096 Title Cellular signaling in macrophage migration and chemotaxis. Autho

  11. Using light to shape chemical gradients for parallel and automated analysis of chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sean R; Yang, Hee Won; Bonger, Kimberly M; Guignet, Emmanuel G; Wandless, Thomas J; Meyer, Tobias

    2015-04-23

    Numerous molecular components have been identified that regulate the directed migration of eukaryotic cells toward sources of chemoattractant. However, how the components of this system are wired together to coordinate multiple aspects of the response, such as directionality, speed, and sensitivity to stimulus, remains poorly understood. Here we developed a method to shape chemoattractant gradients optically and analyze cellular chemotaxis responses of hundreds of living cells per well in 96-well format by measuring speed changes and directional accuracy. We then systematically characterized migration and chemotaxis phenotypes for 285 siRNA perturbations. A key finding was that the G-protein Giα subunit selectively controls the direction of migration while the receptor and Gβ subunit proportionally control both speed and direction. Furthermore, we demonstrate that neutrophils chemotax persistently in response to gradients of fMLF but only transiently in response to gradients of ATP. The method we introduce is applicable for diverse chemical cues and systematic perturbations, can be used to measure multiple cell migration and signaling parameters, and is compatible with low- and high-resolution fluorescence microscopy. © 2015 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  12. Modeling, analysis and comparison of TSR and OTC methods for MPPT and power smoothing in permanent magnet synchronous generator-based wind turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasiri, M.; Milimonfared, J.; Fathi, S.H.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Small signal modeling of PMSG wind turbine with two controllers are introduced. • Poles and zeroes analyzing of OTC and TSR methods is performed. • Generator output power with varying wind speed in PMSG wind turbine is studied. • MPPT capability of OTC and TSR methods to wind speed variations are compared. • Power smoothing capability and reducing mechanical stress of both methods are studied. - Abstract: This paper presents a small signal modeling of a direct-driven permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG) based on wind turbine which is connected to the grid via back-to-back converters. The proposed small signal model includes two maximum power point tracking (MPPT) controllers: tip speed ratio (TSR) control and optimal torque control (OTC). These methods are analytically compared to illustrate MPPT and power smoothing capability. Then, to compare the MPPT and power smoothing operation of the mentioned methods, simulations are performed in MATLAB/Simulink software. From the simulation results, OTC is highly efficient in power smoothing enhancement and has clearly good performance to extract maximum power from wind; however, TSR control has definitely fast responses to wind speed variations with the expense of higher fluctuations due to its non-minimum phase characteristic

  13. Thymoquinone inhibits the CXCL12-induced chemotaxis of multiple myeloma cells and increases their susceptibility to Fas-mediated apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal Badr

    Full Text Available In multiple myeloma (MM, malignant plasma cells reside in the bone marrow, where they accumulate in close contact with stromal cells. The mechanisms responsible for the chemotaxis of malignant plasma cells are still poorly understood. Thus, we investigated the mechanisms involved in the chemotaxis of MDN and XG2 MM cell lines. Both cell lines strongly expressed CCR9, CXCR3 and CXCR4 chemokine receptors but only migrated toward CXCL12. Activation of CXCR4 by CXCL12 resulted in the association of CXCR4 with CD45 and activation of PLCβ3, AKT, RhoA, IκBα and ERK1/2. Using siRNA-silencing techniques, we showed CD45/CXCR4 association is essential for CXCL12-induced migration of MM cells. Thymoquinone (TQ, the major active component of the medicinal herb Nigella sativa Linn, has been described as a chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic compound. TQ treatment strongly inhibited CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis in MM cell lines as well as primary cells isolated from MM patients, but not normal PBMCs. Moreover, TQ significantly down-regulated CXCR4 expression and CXCL12-mediated CXCR4/CD45 association in MM cells. Finally, TQ also induced the relocalization of cytoplasmic Fas/CD95 to the membrane of MM cells and increased CD95-mediated apoptosis by 80%. In conclusion, we demonstrate the potent anti-myeloma activity of TQ, providing a rationale for further clinical evaluation.

  14. Four key signaling pathways mediating chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, Douwe M.; Keizer-Gunnink, Ineke; Van Haastert, Peter J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Chemotaxis is the ability of cells to move in the direction of an external gradient of signaling molecules. Cells are guided by actin-filled protrusions in the front, whereas myosin filaments retract the rear of the cell. Previous work demonstrated that chernotaxis of unpolarized amoeboid

  15. Active sampling and decision making in Drosophila chemotaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez-Marin, Alex; Stephens, Greg J; Louis, Matthieu

    2011-01-01

    The ability to respond to chemical stimuli is fundamental to the survival of motile organisms, but the strategies underlying odour tracking remain poorly understood. Here we show that chemotaxis in Drosophila melanogaster larvae is an active sampling process analogous to sniffing in vertebrates.

  16. PIP₃-dependent macropinocytosis is incompatible with chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltman, Douwe M; Lemieux, Michael G; Knecht, David A; Insall, Robert H

    2014-02-17

    In eukaryotic chemotaxis, the mechanisms connecting external signals to the motile apparatus remain unclear. The role of the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP₃) has been particularly controversial. PIP₃ has many cellular roles, notably in growth control and macropinocytosis as well as cell motility. Here we show that PIP₃ is not only unnecessary for Dictyostelium discoideum to migrate toward folate, but actively inhibits chemotaxis. We find that macropinosomes, but not pseudopods, in growing cells are dependent on PIP₃. PIP₃ patches in these cells show no directional bias, and overall only PIP₃-free pseudopods orient up-gradient. The pseudopod driver suppressor of cAR mutations (SCAR)/WASP and verprolin homologue (WAVE) is not recruited to the center of PIP₃ patches, just the edges, where it causes macropinosome formation. Wild-type cells, unlike the widely used axenic mutants, show little macropinocytosis and few large PIP₃ patches, but migrate more efficiently toward folate. Tellingly, folate chemotaxis in axenic cells is rescued by knocking out phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI 3-kinases). Thus PIP₃ promotes macropinocytosis and interferes with pseudopod orientation during chemotaxis of growing cells.

  17. Feedback Control Architecture and the Bacterial Chemotaxis Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadeh, Abdullah; Roberts, Mark A. J.; August, Elias; McSharry, Patrick E.; Maini, Philip K.; Armitage, Judith P.; Papachristodoulou, Antonis

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria move towards favourable and away from toxic environments by changing their swimming pattern. This response is regulated by the chemotaxis signalling pathway, which has an important feature: it uses feedback to ‘reset’ (adapt) the bacterial sensing ability, which allows the bacteria to sense a range of background environmental changes. The role of this feedback has been studied extensively in the simple chemotaxis pathway of Escherichia coli. However it has been recently found that the majority of bacteria have multiple chemotaxis homologues of the E. coli proteins, resulting in more complex pathways. In this paper we investigate the configuration and role of feedback in Rhodobacter sphaeroides, a bacterium containing multiple homologues of the chemotaxis proteins found in E. coli. Multiple proteins could produce different possible feedback configurations, each having different chemotactic performance qualities and levels of robustness to variations and uncertainties in biological parameters and to intracellular noise. We develop four models corresponding to different feedback configurations. Using a series of carefully designed experiments we discriminate between these models and invalidate three of them. When these models are examined in terms of robustness to noise and parametric uncertainties, we find that the non-invalidated model is superior to the others. Moreover, it has a ‘cascade control’ feedback architecture which is used extensively in engineering to improve system performance, including robustness. Given that the majority of bacteria are known to have multiple chemotaxis pathways, in this paper we show that some feedback architectures allow them to have better performance than others. In particular, cascade control may be an important feature in achieving robust functionality in more complex signalling pathways and in improving their performance. PMID:21573199

  18. Feedback control architecture and the bacterial chemotaxis network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Hamadeh

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria move towards favourable and away from toxic environments by changing their swimming pattern. This response is regulated by the chemotaxis signalling pathway, which has an important feature: it uses feedback to 'reset' (adapt the bacterial sensing ability, which allows the bacteria to sense a range of background environmental changes. The role of this feedback has been studied extensively in the simple chemotaxis pathway of Escherichia coli. However it has been recently found that the majority of bacteria have multiple chemotaxis homologues of the E. coli proteins, resulting in more complex pathways. In this paper we investigate the configuration and role of feedback in Rhodobacter sphaeroides, a bacterium containing multiple homologues of the chemotaxis proteins found in E. coli. Multiple proteins could produce different possible feedback configurations, each having different chemotactic performance qualities and levels of robustness to variations and uncertainties in biological parameters and to intracellular noise. We develop four models corresponding to different feedback configurations. Using a series of carefully designed experiments we discriminate between these models and invalidate three of them. When these models are examined in terms of robustness to noise and parametric uncertainties, we find that the non-invalidated model is superior to the others. Moreover, it has a 'cascade control' feedback architecture which is used extensively in engineering to improve system performance, including robustness. Given that the majority of bacteria are known to have multiple chemotaxis pathways, in this paper we show that some feedback architectures allow them to have better performance than others. In particular, cascade control may be an important feature in achieving robust functionality in more complex signalling pathways and in improving their performance.

  19. Feedback control architecture and the bacterial chemotaxis network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadeh, Abdullah; Roberts, Mark A J; August, Elias; McSharry, Patrick E; Maini, Philip K; Armitage, Judith P; Papachristodoulou, Antonis

    2011-05-01

    Bacteria move towards favourable and away from toxic environments by changing their swimming pattern. This response is regulated by the chemotaxis signalling pathway, which has an important feature: it uses feedback to 'reset' (adapt) the bacterial sensing ability, which allows the bacteria to sense a range of background environmental changes. The role of this feedback has been studied extensively in the simple chemotaxis pathway of Escherichia coli. However it has been recently found that the majority of bacteria have multiple chemotaxis homologues of the E. coli proteins, resulting in more complex pathways. In this paper we investigate the configuration and role of feedback in Rhodobacter sphaeroides, a bacterium containing multiple homologues of the chemotaxis proteins found in E. coli. Multiple proteins could produce different possible feedback configurations, each having different chemotactic performance qualities and levels of robustness to variations and uncertainties in biological parameters and to intracellular noise. We develop four models corresponding to different feedback configurations. Using a series of carefully designed experiments we discriminate between these models and invalidate three of them. When these models are examined in terms of robustness to noise and parametric uncertainties, we find that the non-invalidated model is superior to the others. Moreover, it has a 'cascade control' feedback architecture which is used extensively in engineering to improve system performance, including robustness. Given that the majority of bacteria are known to have multiple chemotaxis pathways, in this paper we show that some feedback architectures allow them to have better performance than others. In particular, cascade control may be an important feature in achieving robust functionality in more complex signalling pathways and in improving their performance.

  20. Attractant Binding Induces Distinct Structural Changes to the Polar and Lateral Signaling Clusters in Bacillus subtilis Chemotaxis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kang; Walukiewicz, Hanna E.; Glekas, George D.; Ordal, George W.; Rao, Christopher V.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria employ a modified two-component system for chemotaxis, where the receptors form ternary complexes with CheA histidine kinases and CheW adaptor proteins. These complexes are arranged in semi-ordered arrays clustered predominantly at the cell poles. The prevailing models assume that these arrays are static and reorganize only locally in response to attractant binding. Recent studies have shown, however, that these structures may in fact be much more fluid. We investigated the localization of the chemotaxis signaling arrays in Bacillus subtilis using immunofluorescence and live cell fluorescence microscopy. We found that the receptors were localized in clusters at the poles in most cells. However, when the cells were exposed to attractant, the number exhibiting polar clusters was reduced roughly 2-fold, whereas the number exhibiting lateral clusters distinct from the poles increased significantly. These changes in receptor clustering were reversible as polar localization was reestablished in adapted cells. We also investigated the dynamic localization of CheV, a hybrid protein consisting of an N-terminal CheW-like adaptor domain and a C-terminal response regulator domain that is known to be phosphorylated by CheA, using immunofluorescence. Interestingly, we found that CheV was localized predominantly at lateral clusters in unstimulated cells. However, upon exposure to attractant, CheV was found to be predominantly localized to the cell poles. Moreover, changes in CheV localization are phosphorylation-dependent. Collectively, these results suggest that the chemotaxis signaling arrays in B. subtilis are dynamic structures and that feedback loops involving phosphorylation may regulate the positioning of individual proteins. PMID:21098025

  1. Attractant binding induces distinct structural changes to the polar and lateral signaling clusters in Bacillus subtilis chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kang; Walukiewicz, Hanna E; Glekas, George D; Ordal, George W; Rao, Christopher V

    2011-01-28

    Bacteria employ a modified two-component system for chemotaxis, where the receptors form ternary complexes with CheA histidine kinases and CheW adaptor proteins. These complexes are arranged in semi-ordered arrays clustered predominantly at the cell poles. The prevailing models assume that these arrays are static and reorganize only locally in response to attractant binding. Recent studies have shown, however, that these structures may in fact be much more fluid. We investigated the localization of the chemotaxis signaling arrays in Bacillus subtilis using immunofluorescence and live cell fluorescence microscopy. We found that the receptors were localized in clusters at the poles in most cells. However, when the cells were exposed to attractant, the number exhibiting polar clusters was reduced roughly 2-fold, whereas the number exhibiting lateral clusters distinct from the poles increased significantly. These changes in receptor clustering were reversible as polar localization was reestablished in adapted cells. We also investigated the dynamic localization of CheV, a hybrid protein consisting of an N-terminal CheW-like adaptor domain and a C-terminal response regulator domain that is known to be phosphorylated by CheA, using immunofluorescence. Interestingly, we found that CheV was localized predominantly at lateral clusters in unstimulated cells. However, upon exposure to attractant, CheV was found to be predominantly localized to the cell poles. Moreover, changes in CheV localization are phosphorylation-dependent. Collectively, these results suggest that the chemotaxis signaling arrays in B. subtilis are dynamic structures and that feedback loops involving phosphorylation may regulate the positioning of individual proteins.

  2. Mast cell chemotaxis - chemoattractants and signaling pathways

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hálová, Ivana; Dráberová, Lubica; Dráber, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 3, May (2012), s. 119 ISSN 1664-3224 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD12073; GA ČR GA301/09/1826; GA ČR GAP302/10/1759 Grant - others:ECST(XE) BM1007; AV ČR(CZ) MC200520901 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : mast cell * IgE receptor * plasma membrane Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  3. The level of CD147 expression correlates with cyclophilin-induced signalling and chemotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constant Stephanie

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies identified CD147 as the chemotactic receptor on inflammatory leukocytes for extracellular cyclophilins (eCyp. However, CD147 is not known to associate with signal transducing molecules, so other transmembrane proteins, such as proteoglycans, integrins, and CD98, were suggested as receptor or co-receptor for eCyp. CD147 is ubiquitously expressed on many cell types, but relationship between the level of CD147 expression and cellular responses to eCyp has never been analyzed. Given the role of eCyp in pathogenesis of many diseases, it is important to know whether cellular responses to eCyp are regulated at the level of CD147 expression. Results Here, we manipulated CD147 expression levels on HeLa cells using RNAi and investigated the signalling and chemotactic responses to eCypA. Both Erk activation and chemotaxis correlated with the level of CD147 expression, with cells exhibiting low level expression being practically unresponsive to eCypA. Conclusions Our results provide the first demonstration of a chemotactic response of HeLa cells to eCypA, establish a correlation between the level of CD147 expression and the magnitude of cellular responses to eCypA, and indicate that CD147 may be a limiting factor in the receptor complex determining cyclophilin-induced Erk activation and cell migration.

  4. In Entamoeba histolytica, a BspA family protein is required for chemotaxis toward tumour necrosis factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Silvestre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Entamoeba histolytica cell migration is essential for the development of human amoebiasis (an infectious disease characterized by tissue invasion and destruction. The tissue inflammation associated with tumour necrosis factor (TNF secretion by host cells is a well-documented feature of amoebiasis. Tumour necrosis factor is a chemoattractant for E. histolytica, and the parasite may have a TNF receptor at its cell surface. Methods: confocal microscopy, RNA Sequencing, bioinformatics, RNA antisense techniques and histological analysis of human colon explants were used to characterize the interplay between TNF and E. histolytica. Results: an antibody against human TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1 stained the E. histolytica trophozoite surface and (on immunoblots binds to a 150-kDa protein. Proteome screening with the TNFR1 sequence revealed a BspA family protein in E. histolytica that carries a TNFR signature domain and six leucine-rich repeats (named here as "cell surface protein", CSP, in view of its cellular location. Cell surface protein shares structural homologies with Toll-Like receptors, colocalizes with TNF and is internalized in TNF-containing vesicles. Reduction of cellular CSP levels abolished chemotaxis toward TNF and blocked parasite invasion of human colon. Conclusions: there is a clear link between TNF chemotaxis, CSP and pathogenesis.

  5. Is there any crosstalk between the chemotaxis and virulence induction signaling in Agrobacterium tumefaciens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Minliang; Huang, Zhiwei; Yang, Jing

    2017-07-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens, a soil-born phytopathogenic bacterium, is well known as a nature's engineer due to its ability to genetically transform the host by transferring a DNA fragment (called T-DNA) from its Ti plasmid to host-cell genome. To combat the harsh soil environment and seek the appropriate host, A. tumefaciens can sense and be attracted by a large number of chemical compounds released by wounded host. As a member of α-proteobacterium, A. tumefaciens has a chemotaxis system different from that found in Escherichia coli, since many chemoattractants for A. tumefaciens chemotaxis are virulence (vir) inducers. However, advances in the study of the chemotaxis paradigm, E. coli chemotaxis system, have provided enough information to analyze the A. tumefaciens chemotaxis. At low concentration, chemoattractants elicit A. tumefaciens chemotaxis and attract the species to the wound sites of the host. At high concentration, chemoattractants induce the expression of virulence genes and trigger T-DNA transfer. Recent studies on the VirA and ChvE of the vir-induction system provide some evidences to support the crosstalk between chemotaxis and vir-induction. This review compares the core components of chemotaxis signaling system of A. tumefaciens with those observed in other species, discusses the connection between chemotaxis and vir-induction in A. tumefaciens, and proposes a model depicting the signaling crosstalk between chemotaxis and vir-induction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Helicobacter pylori CheZ(HP) and ChePep form a novel chemotaxis-regulatory complex distinct from the core chemotaxis signaling proteins and the flagellar motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertsethtakarn, Paphavee; Howitt, Michael R; Castellon, Juan; Amieva, Manuel R; Ottemann, Karen M

    2015-09-01

    Chemotaxis is important for Helicobacter pylori to colonize the stomach. Like other bacteria, H. pylori uses chemoreceptors and conserved chemotaxis proteins to phosphorylate the flagellar rotational response regulator, CheY, and modulate the flagellar rotational direction. Phosphorylated CheY is returned to its non-phosphorylated state by phosphatases such as CheZ. In previously studied cases, chemotaxis phosphatases localize to the cellular poles by interactions with either the CheA chemotaxis kinase or flagellar motor proteins. We report here that the H. pylori CheZ, CheZ(HP), localizes to the poles independently of the flagellar motor, CheA, and all typical chemotaxis proteins. Instead, CheZ(HP) localization depends on the chemotaxis regulatory protein ChePep, and reciprocally, ChePep requires CheZ(HP) for its polar localization. We furthermore show that these proteins interact directly. Functional domain mapping of CheZ(HP) determined the polar localization motif lies within the central domain of the protein and that the protein has regions outside of the active site that participate in chemotaxis. Our results suggest that CheZ(HP) and ChePep form a distinct complex. These results therefore suggest the intriguing idea that some phosphatases localize independently of the other chemotaxis and motility proteins, possibly to confer unique regulation on these proteins' activities. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Global Solutions to the Coupled Chemotaxis-Fluid Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Duan, Renjun

    2010-08-10

    In this paper, we are concerned with a model arising from biology, which is a coupled system of the chemotaxis equations and the viscous incompressible fluid equations through transport and external forcing. The global existence of solutions to the Cauchy problem is investigated under certain conditions. Precisely, for the Chemotaxis-Navier-Stokes system over three space dimensions, we obtain global existence and rates of convergence on classical solutions near constant states. When the fluid motion is described by the simpler Stokes equations, we prove global existence of weak solutions in two space dimensions for cell density with finite mass, first-order spatial moment and entropy provided that the external forcing is weak or the substrate concentration is small. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  8. Rac1 plays a role in CXCL12 but not CCL3-induced chemotaxis and Rac1 GEF inhibitor NSC23766 has off target effects on CXCR4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Shirley C; Howell, Lesley; Beekman, Andrew; Stokes, Leanne; Mueller, Anja

    2018-01-01

    Cell migration towards a chemotactic stimulus relies on the re-arrangement of the cytoskeleton, which is triggered by activation of small G proteins RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42, and leads to formation of lamellopodia and actin polymerisation amongst other effects. Here we show that Rac1 is important for CXCR4 induced chemotaxis but not for CCR1/CCR5 induced chemotaxis. For CXCL12-induced migration via CXCR4, breast cancer MCF-7 cells are reliant on Rac1, similarly to THP-1 monocytes and Jurkat T-cells. For CCL3-induced migration via CCR1 and/or CCR5, Rac1 signalling does not regulate cell migration in either suspension or adherent cells. We have confirmed the involvement of Rac1 with the use of a specific Rac1 blocking peptide. We also used a Rac1 inhibitor EHT 1864 and a Rac1-GEF inhibitor NSC23766 to probe the importance of Rac1 in chemotaxis. Both inhibitors did not block CCL3-induced chemotaxis, but they were able to block CXCL12-induced chemotaxis. This confirms that Rac1 activation is not essential for CCL3-induced migration, however NSC23766 might have secondary effects on CXCR4. This small molecule exhibits agonistic features in internalisation and cAMP assays, whereas it acts as an antagonist for CXCR4 in migration and calcium release assays. Our findings strongly suggest that Rac1 activation is not necessary for CCL3 signalling, and reveal that NSC23766 could be a novel CXCR4 receptor ligand. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ecology and physics of bacterial chemotaxis in the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Roman; Seymour, Justin R

    2012-12-01

    Intuitively, it may seem that from the perspective of an individual bacterium the ocean is a vast, dilute, and largely homogeneous environment. Microbial oceanographers have typically considered the ocean from this point of view. In reality, marine bacteria inhabit a chemical seascape that is highly heterogeneous down to the microscale, owing to ubiquitous nutrient patches, plumes, and gradients. Exudation and excretion of dissolved matter by larger organisms, lysis events, particles, animal surfaces, and fluxes from the sediment-water interface all contribute to create strong and pervasive heterogeneity, where chemotaxis may provide a significant fitness advantage to bacteria. The dynamic nature of the ocean imposes strong selective pressures on bacterial foraging strategies, and many marine bacteria indeed display adaptations that characterize their chemotactic motility as "high performance" compared to that of enteric model organisms. Fast swimming speeds, strongly directional responses, and effective turning and steering strategies ensure that marine bacteria can successfully use chemotaxis to very rapidly respond to chemical gradients in the ocean. These fast responses are advantageous in a broad range of ecological processes, including attaching to particles, exploiting particle plumes, retaining position close to phytoplankton cells, colonizing host animals, and hovering at a preferred height above the sediment-water interface. At larger scales, these responses can impact ocean biogeochemistry by increasing the rates of chemical transformation, influencing the flux of sinking material, and potentially altering the balance of biomass incorporation versus respiration. This review highlights the physical and ecological processes underpinning bacterial motility and chemotaxis in the ocean, describes the current state of knowledge of chemotaxis in marine bacteria, and summarizes our understanding of how these microscale dynamics scale up to affect ecosystem

  10. Attractant Regulation of the Aspartate Receptor–Kinase Complex: Limited Cooperative Interactions between Receptors and Effects of the Receptor Modification State†

    OpenAIRE

    Bornhorst, Joshua A.; Falke, Joseph J.

    2000-01-01

    The manner by which the bacterial chemotaxis system responds to a wide range of attractant concentrations remains incompletely understood. In principle, positive cooperativity between chemotaxis receptors could explain the ability of bacteria to respond to extremely low attractant concentrations. By utilizing an in vitro receptor-coupled kinase assay, the attractant-dependent response curve has been measured for the Salmonella typhimurium aspartate chemoreceptor. The attractant chosen, α-meth...

  11. Dimensionless Analysis Applied to Bacterial Chemotaxis towards NAPL Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; GAO, B.; Zhong, W.; Kihaule, K. S.; Ford, R.

    2017-12-01

    The use of chemotactic bacteria in bioremediation may improve the efficiency and decrease the cost of restoration, which means it has the potential to address environmental problems caused by oil spills. However, most previous studies were focused at the laboratory-scale and there lacks a formalism that can use these laboratory-scale results as input to evaluate the relative importance of chemotaxis at the field scale. In this study, a dimensionless equation is formulated to solve this problem. First, the main influential factors were extracted based on previous researches in environmental bioremediation and then five sets of dimensionless numbers were obtained according to Buckingham theory. After collecting basic parameter values and supplementary calculations to determine the concentration gradient of the chemoattractant, all dimensionless numbers were calculated and categorized into two types, those that were sensitive to chemotaxis or those to groundwater velocity. The bacteria ratio (BR), defined as the ratio of maximum bacteria concentration to its original value, was correlated with a combination of dimensionless numbers to yield, BR=cP1-0.085P20.329P30.1P4-0.098. For a bacterial ratio greater than one, the bioremediation strategy based on chemotaxis is expected to be effective, and chemotactic bacteria are expected to accumulate around NAPL contaminant sources efficiently.

  12. Cutting edge: bone morphogenetic protein antagonists Drm/Gremlin and Dan interact with Slits and act as negative regulators of monocyte chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Blair, Donald G; Plisov, Sergei; Vasiliev, Gennady; Perantoni, Alan O; Chen, Qian; Athanasiou, Meropi; Wu, Jane Y; Oppenheim, Joost J; Yang, De

    2004-11-15

    Drm/Gremlin and Dan, two homologous secreted antagonists of bone morphogenic proteins, have been shown to regulate early development, tumorigenesis, and renal pathophysiology. In this study, we report that Drm and Dan physically and functionally interact with Slit1 and Slit2 proteins. Drm binding to Slits depends on its glycosylation and is not interfered with by bone morphogenic proteins. Importantly, Drm and Dan function as inhibitors for monocyte migration induced by stromal cell-derived factor 1alpha (SDF-1alpha) or fMLP. The inhibition of SDF-1alpha-induced monocyte chemotaxis by Dan is not due to blocking the binding of SDF-1alpha to its receptor. Thus, the results identify that Drm and Dan can interact with Slit proteins and act as inhibitors of monocyte chemotaxis, demonstrating a previously unidentified biological role for these proteins.

  13. Biomixing by chemotaxis and efficiency of biological reactions: The critical reaction case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Alexander; Ryzhik, Lenya

    2012-11-01

    Many phenomena in biology involve both reactions and chemotaxis. These processes can clearly influence each other, and chemotaxis can play an important role in sustaining and speeding up the reaction. In continuation of our work [A. Kiselev and L. Ryzhik, "Biomixing by chemotaxis and enhancement of biological reactions," Comm. Partial Differential Equations 37, 298-318 (2012)], 10.1080/03605302.2011.589879, we consider a model with a single density function involving diffusion, advection, chemotaxis, and absorbing reaction. The model is motivated, in particular, by the studies of coral broadcast spawning, where experimental observations of the efficiency of fertilization rates significantly exceed the data obtained from numerical models that do not take chemotaxis (attraction of sperm gametes by a chemical secreted by egg gametes) into account. We consider the case of the weakly coupled quadratic reaction term, which is the most natural from the biological point of view and was left open in Kiselev and Ryzhik ["Biomixing by chemotaxis and enhancement of biological reactions," Comm. Partial Differential Equations 37, 298-318 (2012)], 10.1080/03605302.2011.589879. The result is that similarly to Kiselev and Ryzhik ["Biomixing by chemotaxis and enhancement of biological reactions," Comm. Partial Differential Equations 37, 298-318 (2012)], 10.1080/03605302.2011.589879, the chemotaxis plays a crucial role in ensuring efficiency of reaction. However, mathematically, the picture is quite different in the quadratic reaction case and is more subtle. The reaction is now complete even in the absence of chemotaxis, but the timescales are very different. Without chemotaxis, the reaction is very slow, especially for the weak reaction coupling. With chemotaxis, the timescale and efficiency of reaction are independent of the coupling parameter.

  14. Dependence of bacterial chemotaxis on gradient shape and adaptation rate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Vladimirov

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Simulation of cellular behavior on multiple scales requires models that are sufficiently detailed to capture central intracellular processes but at the same time enable the simulation of entire cell populations in a computationally cheap way. In this paper we present RapidCell, a hybrid model of chemotactic Escherichia coli that combines the Monod-Wyman-Changeux signal processing by mixed chemoreceptor clusters, the adaptation dynamics described by ordinary differential equations, and a detailed model of cell tumbling. Our model dramatically reduces computational costs and allows the highly efficient simulation of E. coli chemotaxis. We use the model to investigate chemotaxis in different gradients, and suggest a new, constant-activity type of gradient to systematically study chemotactic behavior of virtual bacteria. Using the unique properties of this gradient, we show that optimal chemotaxis is observed in a narrow range of CheA kinase activity, where concentration of the response regulator CheY-P falls into the operating range of flagellar motors. Our simulations also confirm that the CheB phosphorylation feedback improves chemotactic efficiency by shifting the average CheY-P concentration to fit the motor operating range. Our results suggest that in liquid media the variability in adaptation times among cells may be evolutionary favorable to ensure coexistence of subpopulations that will be optimally tactic in different gradients. However, in a porous medium (agar such variability appears to be less important, because agar structure poses mainly negative selection against subpopulations with low levels of adaptation enzymes. RapidCell is available from the authors upon request.

  15. Ras activation and symmetry breaking during Dictyostelium chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortholt, Arjan; Keizer-Gunnink, Ineke; Kataria, Rama; Van Haastert, Peter J M

    2013-10-01

    Central to chemotaxis is the molecular mechanism by which a shallow spatial gradient of chemoattractant induces symmetry breaking of activated signaling molecules. Previously, we have used Dictyostelium mutants to investigate the minimal requirements for chemotaxis, and identified a basal signaling module providing activation of Ras and F-actin at the leading edge. Here, we show that Ras activation after application of a pipette releasing the chemoattractant cAMP has three phases, each depending on specific guanine-nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs). Initially a transient activation of Ras occurs at the entire cell boundary, which is proportional to the local cAMP concentrations and therefore slightly stronger at the front than in the rear of the cell. This transient Ras activation is present in gα2 (gpbB)-null cells but not in gβ (gpbA)-null cells, suggesting that Gβγ mediates the initial activation of Ras. The second phase is symmetry breaking: Ras is activated only at the side of the cell closest to the pipette. Symmetry breaking absolutely requires Gα2 and Gβγ, but not the cytoskeleton or four cAMP-induced signaling pathways, those dependent on phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P3], cGMP, TorC2 and PLA2. As cells move in the gradient, the crescent of activated Ras in the front half of the cell becomes confined to a small area at the utmost front of the cell. Confinement of Ras activation leads to cell polarization, and depends on cGMP formation, myosin and F-actin. The experiments show that activation, symmetry breaking and confinement of Ras during Dictyostelium chemotaxis uses different G-protein subunits and a multitude of Ras GEFs and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs).

  16. Internalization of the chemokine receptor CCR4 can be evoked by orthosteric and allosteric receptor antagonists

    OpenAIRE

    Ajram, Laura; Begg, Malcolm; Slack, Robert; Cryan, Jenni; Hall, David; Hodgson, Simon; Ford, Alison; Barnes, Ashley; Swieboda, Dawid; Mousnier, Aurelie; Solari, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR4 has at least two natural agonist ligands, MDC (CCL22) and TARC (CCL17) which bind to the same orthosteric site with a similar affinity. Both ligands are known to evoke chemotaxis of CCR4-bearing T cells and also elicit CCR4 receptor internalization. A series of small molecule allosteric antagonists have been described which displace the agonist ligand, and inhibit chemotaxis. The aim of this study was to determine which cellular coupling pathways are involved in in...

  17. Optogenetic Manipulation of Cyclic Di-GMP (c-di-GMP) Levels Reveals the Role of c-di-GMP in Regulating Aerotaxis Receptor Activity in Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Lindsey; Ryu, Min-Hyung; Gomelsky, Mark; Alexandre, Gladys

    2017-09-15

    Bacterial chemotaxis receptors provide the sensory inputs that inform the direction of navigation in changing environments. Recently, we described the bacterial second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) as a novel regulator of a subclass of chemotaxis receptors. In Azospirillum brasilense , c-di-GMP binds to a chemotaxis receptor, Tlp1, and modulates its signaling function during aerotaxis. Here, we further characterize the role of c-di-GMP in aerotaxis using a novel dichromatic optogenetic system engineered for manipulating intracellular c-di-GMP levels in real time. This system comprises a red/near-infrared-light-regulated diguanylate cyclase and a blue-light-regulated c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase. It allows the generation of transient changes in intracellular c-di-GMP concentrations within seconds of irradiation with appropriate light, which is compatible with the time scale of chemotaxis signaling. We provide experimental evidence that binding of c-di-GMP to the Tlp1 receptor activates its signaling function during aerotaxis, which supports the role of transient changes in c-di-GMP levels as a means of adjusting the response of A. brasilense to oxygen gradients. We also show that intracellular c-di-GMP levels in A. brasilense change with carbon metabolism. Our data support a model whereby c-di-GMP functions to imprint chemotaxis receptors with a record of recent metabolic experience, to adjust their contribution to the signaling output, thus allowing the cells to continually fine-tune chemotaxis sensory perception to their metabolic state. IMPORTANCE Motile bacteria use chemotaxis to change swimming direction in response to changes in environmental conditions. Chemotaxis receptors sense environmental signals and relay sensory information to the chemotaxis machinery, which ultimately controls the swimming pattern of cells. In bacteria studied to date, differential methylation has been known as a mechanism to control the activity of chemotaxis receptors and

  18. The Impact of Odor--Reward Memory on Chemotaxis in Larval "Drosophila"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleyer, Michael; Reid, Samuel F.; Pamir, Evren; Saumweber, Timo; Paisios, Emmanouil; Davies, Alexander; Gerber, Bertram; Louis, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    How do animals adaptively integrate innate with learned behavioral tendencies? We tackle this question using chemotaxis as a paradigm. Chemotaxis in the "Drosophila" larva largely results from a sequence of runs and oriented turns. Thus, the larvae minimally need to determine (i) how fast to run, (ii) when to initiate a turn, and (iii)…

  19. Normal chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum cells with a depolarized plasma membrane potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijn, Bert van; Vogelzang, Sake A.; Ypey, Dirk L.; Molen, Loek G. van der; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1990-01-01

    We examined a possible role for the plasma membrane potential in signal transduction during cyclic AMP-induced chemotaxis in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Chemotaxis, cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP responses in cells with a depolarized membrane potential were measured. Cells can be

  20. Confinement dependent chemotaxis in two-photon polymerized linear migration constructs with highly definable concentration gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Olsen, Mark Holm; Svane, Inge Marie

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cell chemotaxis is known to follow chemoattractant concentration gradients through tissue of heterogeneous pore sizes, but the dependence of migration velocity on pore size and gradient steepness is not fully understood. We enabled chemotaxis studies for at least 42 hours at confinement...

  1. Efficient methylation of C2 in l-tryptophan by the cobalamin-dependent radicalS-adenosylmethionine methylase TsrM requires an unmodified N1 amine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaszczyk, Anthony J; Wang, Bo; Silakov, Alexey; Ho, Jackson V; Booker, Squire J

    2017-09-15

    TsrM catalyzes the methylation of C2 in l-tryptophan (Trp). This reaction is the first step in the biosynthesis of the quinaldic acid moiety of the thiopeptide antibiotic thiostrepton, which exhibits potent activity against Gram-positive pathogens. TsrM is a member of the radical S -adenosylmethionine (SAM) superfamily of enzymes, but it does not catalyze the formation of 5'-deoxyadenosin-5'-yl or any other SAM-derived radical. In addition to a [4Fe-4S] cluster, TsrM contains a cobalamin cofactor that serves as an intermediate methyl carrier in its reaction. However, how this cofactor donates a methyl moiety to the Trp substrate is unknown. Here, we showed that the unmodified N1 position of Trp is important for turnover and that 1-thia-Trp and 1-oxa-Trp serve as competitive inhibitors. We also showed that β-cyclopropyl-Trp undergoes C2 methylation in the absence of cyclopropyl ring opening, disfavoring mechanisms that involve unpaired electron density at C3 of the indole ring. Moreover, we showed that all other indole-substituted analogs of Trp undergo methylation at varying but measurable rates and that the analog 7-aza-Trp, which is expected to temper the nucleophilicity of C2 in Trp, is a very poor substrate. Last, no formation of cob(II)alamin or substrate radicals was observed during the reaction with Trp or any molecule within a tested panel of Trp analogs. In summary, our results are most consistent with a mechanism that involves two polar nucleophilic displacements, the second of which requires deprotonation of the indole nitrogen in Trp during its attack on methylcobalamin. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Modelling cell motility and chemotaxis with evolving surface finite elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Charles M; Stinner, Björn; Venkataraman, Chandrasekhar

    2012-11-07

    We present a mathematical and a computational framework for the modelling of cell motility. The cell membrane is represented by an evolving surface, with the movement of the cell determined by the interaction of various forces that act normal to the surface. We consider external forces such as those that may arise owing to inhomogeneities in the medium and a pressure that constrains the enclosed volume, as well as internal forces that arise from the reaction of the cells' surface to stretching and bending. We also consider a protrusive force associated with a reaction-diffusion system (RDS) posed on the cell membrane, with cell polarization modelled by this surface RDS. The computational method is based on an evolving surface finite-element method. The general method can account for the large deformations that arise in cell motility and allows the simulation of cell migration in three dimensions. We illustrate applications of the proposed modelling framework and numerical method by reporting on numerical simulations of a model for eukaryotic chemotaxis and a model for the persistent movement of keratocytes in two and three space dimensions. Movies of the simulated cells can be obtained from http://homepages.warwick.ac.uk/∼maskae/CV_Warwick/Chemotaxis.html.

  3. Simulation of Paramecium Chemotaxis Exposed to Calcium Gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvestani, Ali N; Shamloo, Amir; Ahmadian, Mohammad Taghi

    2016-06-01

    Paramecium or other ciliates have the potential to be utilized for minimally invasive surgery systems, making internal body organs accessible. Paramecium shows interesting responses to changes in the concentration of specific ions such as K(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+) in the ambient fluid. Some specific responses are observed as, changes in beat pattern of cilia and swimming toward or apart from the ion source. Therefore developing a model for chemotactic motility of small organisms is necessary in order to control the directional movements of these microorganisms before testing them. In this article, we have developed a numerical model, investigating the effects of Ca(2+) on swimming trajectory of Paramecium. Results for Ca(2+)-dependent chemotactic motility show that calcium gradients are efficient actuators for controlling the Paramecium swimming trajectory. After applying a very low Ca(2+) gradient, a directional chemotaxis of swimming Paramecium is observable in this model. As a result, chemotaxis is shown to be an efficient method for controlling the propulsion of these small organisms.

  4. Lysophosphatidic acid induces chemotaxis in MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masiello, Lisa M.; Fotos, Joseph S.; Galileo, Deni S.; Karin, Norm J.

    2006-07-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid that has pleiotropic effects on a variety of cell types and enhances the migration of endothelial and cancer cells, but it is not known if this lipid can alter osteoblast motility. We performed transwell migration assays using MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells and found LPA to be a potent chemotactic agent. Quantitative time-lapse video analysis of osteoblast migration after wounds were introduced into cell monolayers indicated that LPA stimulated both migration velocity and the average migration distance per cell. LPA also elicited substantial changes in cell shape and actin cytoskeletal structure; lipid-treated cells contained fewer stress fibers and displayed long membrane processes that were enriched in F-actin. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that MC3T3-E1 cells express all four known LPA-specific G protein-coupled receptors (LPA1-LPA4) with a relative mRNA abundance of LPA1 > LPA4 > LPA2 >> LPA3. LPA-induced changes in osteoblast motility and morphology were antagonized by both pertussis toxin and Ki16425, a subtype-specific blocker of LPA1 and LPA3 receptor function. Cell migration in many cell types is linked to changes in intracellular Ca2+. Ki16425 also inhibited LPA-induced Ca2+ signaling in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting a link between LPA-induced Ca2+ transients and osteoblast chemotaxis. Our data show that LPA stimulates MC3T3-E1 osteoblast motility via a mechanism that is linked primarily to the G protein-coupled receptor LPA1.

  5. Azospirillum brasilense Chemotaxis Depends on Two Signaling Pathways Regulating Distinct Motility Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Kumar, Dhivya; Burriss, Nathan; Xie, Zhihong; Alexandre, Gladys

    2016-06-15

    The genomes of most motile bacteria encode two or more chemotaxis (Che) systems, but their functions have been characterized in only a few model systems. Azospirillum brasilense is a motile soil alphaproteobacterium able to colonize the rhizosphere of cereals. In response to an attractant, motile A. brasilense cells transiently increase swimming speed and suppress reversals. The Che1 chemotaxis pathway was previously shown to regulate changes in the swimming speed, but it has a minor role in chemotaxis and root surface colonization. Here, we show that a second chemotaxis system, named Che4, regulates the probability of swimming reversals and is the major signaling pathway for chemotaxis and wheat root surface colonization. Experimental evidence indicates that Che1 and Che4 are functionally linked to coordinate changes in the swimming motility pattern in response to attractants. The effect of Che1 on swimming speed is shown to enhance the aerotactic response of A. brasilense in gradients, likely providing the cells with a competitive advantage in the rhizosphere. Together, the results illustrate a novel mechanism by which motile bacteria utilize two chemotaxis pathways regulating distinct motility parameters to alter movement in gradients and enhance the chemotactic advantage. Chemotaxis provides motile bacteria with a competitive advantage in the colonization of diverse niches and is a function enriched in rhizosphere bacterial communities, with most species possessing at least two chemotaxis systems. Here, we identify the mechanism by which cells may derive a significant chemotactic advantage using two chemotaxis pathways that ultimately regulate distinct motility parameters. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Chemokines in the corpus luteum: Implications of leukocyte chemotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liptak Amy R

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chemokines are small molecular weight peptides responsible for adhesion, activation, and recruitment of leukocytes into tissues. Leukocytes are thought to influence follicular atresia, ovulation, and luteal function. Many studies in recent years have focused attention on the characterization of leukocyte populations within the ovary, the importance of leukocyte-ovarian cell interactions, and more recently, the mechanisms of ovarian leukocyte recruitment. Information about the role of chemokines and leukocyte trafficking (chemotaxis during ovarian function is important to understanding paracrine-autocrine relationships shared between reproductive and immune systems. Recent advances regarding chemokine expression and leukocyte accumulation within the ovulatory follicle and the corpus luteum are the subject of this mini-review.

  7. Optical tweezers force measurements to study parasites chemotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Pozzo, L. Y.; Fontes, A.; Almeida, D. B.; Stahl, C. V.; Santos-Mallet, J. R.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Feder, D.; Ayres, D. C.; Giorgio, S.; Cesar, C. L.

    2009-07-01

    In this work, we propose a methodology to study microorganisms chemotaxis in real time using an Optical Tweezers system. Optical Tweezers allowed real time measurements of the force vectors, strength and direction, of living parasites under chemical or other kinds of gradients. This seems to be the ideal tool to perform observations of taxis response of cells and microorganisms with high sensitivity to capture instantaneous responses to a given stimulus. Forces involved in the movement of unicellular parasites are very small, in the femto-pico-Newton range, about the same order of magnitude of the forces generated in an Optical Tweezers. We applied this methodology to investigate the Leishmania amazonensis (L. amazonensis) and Trypanossoma cruzi (T. cruzi) under distinct situations.

  8. Actin dynamics in cells on nanotopographical surfaces in competition with chemotaxis and electrotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sebastian

    Directed cell migration can be guided by different types of gradients, for example chemotaxis. We use surfaces with nanotopographical ridges to examine a type of guidance called esotaxis on migration in the well-studied amoeba Dictyostelium Discoideum. In this work we compare chemotaxis with esotaxis on ridges as well as the influence of electrotaxis on the formation of the actin cytoskeleton on these nanotopographies. These esotactic surfaces have more guidance cues for cells than planar 2D cultures and can disrupt other guidance types like chemotaxis.

  9. Peritoneal neutrophil chemotaxis is impaired in biliary obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andy, O J; Grogan, J B; Griswold, J A; Scott-Conner, C E

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies have shown impaired reticuloendothelial function in biliary obstruction. The chemotactic response of polymorphonuclear leukocytes from peripheral blood and peritoneal fluid of jaundiced rats (Group 1) was compared to that of sham operated controls (Group 2) and normal rats (Group 3). Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent bile duct ligation or sham celiotomy. Studies were performed from 1 to 3 weeks after surgery. Mean serum bilirubin was 6.8 mg percent in Group 1 and normal in Groups 2 and 3. Peritoneal neutrophils were induced by intraperitoneal injection of 10 ml of 10 percent peptone broth 16 hours before the study, harvested from peritoneal fluid and peripheral blood, and isolated on Ficoll-Hypaque. F-met-leu-phe (FMLP) chemoattractant (10(-7) M) was used to induce migration of neutrophils across 3 mu filters. The filters were removed, mounted on slides, stained, and counts averaged for five oil immersion fields for each of three wells. Data were expressed as number of neutrophils per oil immersion field. Peritoneal neutrophil chemotaxis was significantly decreased in Group 1 (10.3 +/- 8.1) compared with Groups 2 (17.0 +/- 7.3) and 3 (20.2 +/- 6.4). A similar trend was noted in polymorphonuclear leukocytes from peripheral blood (Group 1: 13.1 +/- 7.8, Group 2: 18.2 +/- 6.7, Group 3: 17.4 +/- 5.9; P = 0.1). This impairment in neutrophil chemotaxis may contribute to the high rate of septic complications observed in the jaundiced host.

  10. Platelet-derived growth factor BB enhances osteoclast formation and osteoclast precursor cell chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dian-Qi; Wan, Qi-Long; Pathak, Janak L; Li, Zu-Bing

    2017-07-01

    Enhanced osteoclast formation increases bone resorption, which triggers bone remodeling. Platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) enhances precursor cell homing, angiogenesis, and bone healing, and thereby could also treat osteoporosis. However, the effect of PDGF-BB on osteoclast formation is not fully understood. We investigated whether exogenous recombinant PDGF-BB directly affects osteoclast formation and osteoclast precursor cell chemotaxis. The murine monocyte-macrophage cell line RAW264.7 and bone-marrow-derived macrophages were cultured with recombinant mouse PDGF-BB with or without a platelet-derived growth factor receptor β inhibitor (AG-1295) or a Janus kinase 2 inhibitor (AG-490) to analyze the effect on osteoclastogenesis in vitro. PDGF-BB with or without AG-490 or AG-1295 was locally administrated in the mandibular fracture of 16-week-old Sprague Dawley rats (n = 18) for 1-2 weeks to analyze the effect on osteoclastogenesis in vivo. The effect of the treatments on osteoclast formation, osteoclast precursor cell migration, and expression of osteoclastogenic signaling molecules was analyzed. PDGF-BB enhanced osteoclast formation both in vitro and in vivo, but AG-490 and AG-1295 inhibited this effect. PDGF-BB enhanced phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), Akt, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in RAW264.7 cells. AG-490 inhibited PDGF-BB-induced STAT3 phosphorylation. PDGF-BB enhanced RAW264.7 cell migration and gene expression of osteoclastogenic signaling molecules (i.e., nuclear factor of activated T cells 1, dendrocyte-expressed seven transmembrane protein, and B-cell lymphoma 2), and treatment with AG-1295, AG-490, or S3I-201 (a STAT3 inhibitor) reduced this effect. PDGF-BB enhanced osteoclast formation, osteoclast precursor cell chemotaxis, and phosphorylation of STAT3, Akt, and ERK1/2. but AG-1295 and AG-490 reduced this effect. These findings reflect the complexity of

  11. Chemotaxis and Binding of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to Scratch-Wounded Human Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Schwarzer

    Full Text Available Confocal imaging was used to characterize interactions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA, expressing GFP or labeled with Syto 11 with CF airway epithelial cells (CFBE41o-, grown as confluent monolayers with unknown polarity on coverglasses in control conditions and following scratch wounding. Epithelia and PAO1-GFP or PAK-GFP (2 MOI were incubated with Ringer containing typical extracellular salts, pH and glucose and propidium iodide (PI, to identify dead cells. PAO1 and PAK swam randomly over and did not bind to nonwounded CFBE41o- cells. PA migrated rapidly (began within 20 sec, maximum by 5 mins and massively (10-80 fold increase, termed "swarming", but transiently (random swimming after 15 mins, to wounds, particularly near cells that took up PI. Some PA remained immobilized on cells near the wound. PA swam randomly over intact CFBE41o- monolayers and wounded monolayers that had been incubated with medium for 1 hr. Expression of CFTR and altered pH of the media did not affect PA interactions with CFBE41o- wounds. In contrast, PAO1 swarming and immobilization along wounds was abolished in PAO1 (PAO1ΔcheYZABW, no expression of chemotaxis regulatory components cheY, cheZ, cheA, cheB and cheW and greatly reduced in PAO1 that did not express amino acid receptors pctA, B and C (PAO1ΔpctABC and in PAO1 incubated in Ringer containing a high concentration of mixed amino acids. Non-piliated PAKΔpilA swarmed normally towards wounded areas but bound infrequently to CFBE41o- cells. In contrast, both swarming and binding of PA to CFBE41o- cells near wounds were prevented in non-flagellated PAKΔfliC. Data are consistent with the idea that (i PA use amino acid sensor-driven chemotaxis and flagella-driven swimming to swarm to CF airway epithelial cells near wounds and (ii PA use pili to bind to epithelial cells near wounds.

  12. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  13. Myxococcus xanthus Chemotaxis Homologs DifD and DifG Negatively Regulate Fibril Polysaccharide Production

    OpenAIRE

    Black, Wesley P.; Yang, Zhaomin

    2004-01-01

    The extracellular matrix fibrils of Myxococcus xanthus are essential for the social lifestyle of this unusual bacterium. These fibrils form networks linking or encasing cells and are tightly correlated with cellular cohesion, development, and social (S) gliding motility. Previous studies identified a set of bacterial chemotaxis homologs encoded by the dif locus. It was determined that difA, difC, and difE, encoding respective homologs of a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein, CheW, and CheA, ...

  14. Assessing the chemotaxis behavior of Physarum polycephalum to a range of simple volatile organic chemicals

    OpenAIRE

    de Lacy Costello, Ben P.J.; Adamatzky, Andrew I.

    2013-01-01

    The chemotaxis behavior of the plasmodial stage of the true slime mold Physarum Polycephalum was assessed when given a binary choice between two volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) placed in its environment. All possible binary combinations were tested between 19 separate VOCs selected due to their prevalence and biological activity in common plant and insect species. The slime mold exhibited positive chemotaxis toward a number of VOCs with the following order of preference: ? Farnesene > ?-myr...

  15. Different migration patterns of sea urchin and mouse sperm revealed by a microfluidic chemotaxis device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haixin Chang

    Full Text Available Chemotaxis refers to a process whereby cells move up or down a chemical gradient. Sperm chemotaxis is known to be a strategy exploited by marine invertebrates such as sea urchins to reach eggs efficiently in moving water. Less is understood about how or whether chemotaxis is used by mammalian sperm to reach eggs, where fertilization takes place within the confinement of a reproductive tract. In this report, we quantitatively assessed sea urchin and mouse sperm chemotaxis using a recently developed microfluidic model and high-speed imaging. Results demonstrated that sea urchin Arbacia punctulata sperm were chemotactic toward the peptide resact with high chemotactic sensitivity, with an average velocity Vx up the chemical gradient as high as 20% of its average speed (238 μm/s, while mouse sperm displayed no statistically significant chemotactic behavior in progesterone gradients, which had been proposed to guide mammalian sperm toward eggs. This work demonstrates the validity of a microfluidic model for quantitative sperm chemotaxis studies, and reveals a biological insight that chemotaxis up a progesterone gradient may not be a universal strategy for mammalian sperm to reach eggs.

  16. A real time chemotaxis assay unveils unique migratory profiles amongst different primary murine macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asif J Iqbal

    Full Text Available Chemotaxis assays are an invaluable tool for studying the biological activity of inflammatory mediators such as CC chemokines, which have been implicated in a wide range of chronic inflammatory diseases. Conventional chemotaxis systems such as the modified Boyden chamber are limited in terms of the data captured given that the assays are analysed at a single time-point. We report the optimisation and validation of a label-free, real-time cell migration assay based on electrical cell impedance to measure chemotaxis of different primary murine macrophage populations in response to a range of CC chemokines and other chemoattractant signalling molecules. We clearly demonstrate key differences in the migratory behavior of different murine macrophage populations and show that this dynamic system measures true macrophage chemotaxis rather than chemokinesis or fugetaxis. We highlight an absolute requirement for Gαi signaling and actin cytoskeletal rearrangement as demonstrated by Pertussis toxin and cytochalasin D inhibition. We also studied the chemotaxis of CD14(+ human monocytes and demonstrate distinct chemotactic profiles amongst different monocyte donors to CCL2. This real-time chemotaxis assay will allow a detailed analysis of factors that regulate macrophage responses to chemoattractant cytokines and inflammatory mediators.

  17. A Real Time Chemotaxis Assay Unveils Unique Migratory Profiles amongst Different Primary Murine Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Asif J.; Regan-Komito, Daniel; Christou, Ivy; White, Gemma E.; McNeill, Eileen; Kenyon, Amy; Taylor, Lewis; Kapellos, Theodore S.; Fisher, Edward A.; Channon, Keith M.; Greaves, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Chemotaxis assays are an invaluable tool for studying the biological activity of inflammatory mediators such as CC chemokines, which have been implicated in a wide range of chronic inflammatory diseases. Conventional chemotaxis systems such as the modified Boyden chamber are limited in terms of the data captured given that the assays are analysed at a single time-point. We report the optimisation and validation of a label-free, real-time cell migration assay based on electrical cell impedance to measure chemotaxis of different primary murine macrophage populations in response to a range of CC chemokines and other chemoattractant signalling molecules. We clearly demonstrate key differences in the migratory behavior of different murine macrophage populations and show that this dynamic system measures true macrophage chemotaxis rather than chemokinesis or fugetaxis. We highlight an absolute requirement for Gαi signaling and actin cytoskeletal rearrangement as demonstrated by Pertussis toxin and cytochalasin D inhibition. We also studied the chemotaxis of CD14+ human monocytes and demonstrate distinct chemotactic profiles amongst different monocyte donors to CCL2. This real-time chemotaxis assay will allow a detailed analysis of factors that regulate macrophage responses to chemoattractant cytokines and inflammatory mediators. PMID:23516549

  18. Role of plant root exudate and Sym plasmid-localized nodulation genes in the synthesis by Rhizobium leguminosarum of Tsr factor, which causes thick and short roots on common vetch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brussel, A. A.; Zaat, S. A.; Cremers, H. C.; Wijffelman, C. A.; Pees, E.; Tak, T.; Lugtenberg, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    In a previous paper it was shown that cocultivation of Rhizobium leguminosarum with the plant Vicia sativa subsp. nigra on solid medium causes a changed mode of growth of the plant roots, resulting in thick and short roots (Tsr). The Sym plasmid present in the bacterium appeared to be essential for

  19. Examining new phylogenetic markers to uncover the evolutionary history of early-diverging fungi: comparing MCM7, TSR1 and rRNA genes for single- and multi-gene analyses of the Kickxellomycotina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tretter, E.D.; Johnson, E.M.; Wang, Y.; Kandel, P.; White, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    The recently recognised protein-coding genes MCM7 and TSR1 have shown significant promise for phylogenetic resolution within the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, but have remained unexamined within other fungal groups (except for Mucorales). We designed and tested primers to amplify these genes across

  20. Determination of the neutron energy and spatial distributions of the neutron beam from the TSR-II in the large beam shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifford, C.E.; Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1976-01-01

    The TSR-II reactor of the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility has recently been relocated within a new, fixed shield. A principal feature of the new shield is a beam port of considerably larger area than that of its predecessor. The usable neutron flux has thereby been increased by a factor of approximately 200. The bare beam neutron spectrum behind the new shield has been experimentally determined over the energy range from 0.8 to 16 MeV. A high level of fission product gamma ray background prevented measurement of bare beam spectra below 0.8 MeV, however neutron spectra in the energy range from 8 keV to 1.4 MeV were obtained for two simple, calculable shielding configurations. Also measured in the present work were weighted integral flux distributions and fast neutron dose rates

  1. The influence of petrography, mineralogy and chemistry on burnability and reactivity of quicklime produced in Twin Shaft Regenerative (TSR) kilns from Neoarchean limestone (Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vola, Gabriele; Sarandrea, Luca; Della Porta, Giovanna; Cavallo, Alessandro; Jadoul, Flavio; Cruciani, Giuseppe

    2017-12-01

    This study evaluates the influence of chemical, mineralogical and petrographic features of the Neoarchean limestone from the Ouplaas Mine (Griqualand West, South Africa) on its burnability and quicklime reactivity, considering the main use as raw material for high-grade lime production in twin shaft regenerative (TSR) kilns. This limestone consists of laminated clotted peloidal micrite and fenestrate microbial boundstone with herringbone calcite and organic carbon (kerogen) within stylolites. Diagenetic modifications include hypidiotopic dolomite, micrite to microsparite recrystallization, stylolites, poikilotopic calcite, chert and saddle dolomite replacements. Burning and technical tests widely attest that the Neoarchean limestone is sensitive to high temperature, showing an unusual and drastically pronounced sintering or overburning tendency. The slaking reactivity, according to EN 459-2 is high for lime burnt at 1050 °C, but rapidly decreases for lime burnt at 1150 °C. The predominant micritic microbial textures, coupled with the organic carbon, are key-factors influencing the low burnability and the high sintering tendency. The presence of burial cementation, especially poikilotopic calcite, seems to promote higher burnability, either in terms of starting calcination temperature, or in terms of higher carbonate dissociation rate. In fact, the highest calcination velocity determined by thermal analysis is consistent with the highest slaking reactivity of the lower stratum of the quarry, enriched in poikilotopic calcite. Secondly, locally concentered dolomitic marly limestones, and sporadic back shales negatively affects the quicklime reactivity, as well. This study confirms that a multidisciplinary analytical approach is essential for selecting the best raw mix for achieving the highest lime reactivity in TSR kilns.

  2. Effects of undenatured whey protein supplementation on CXCL12- and CCL21-mediated B and T cell chemotaxis in diabetic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badr Gamal

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long and persistent uncontrolled diabetes tends to degenerate the immune system and leads to an increased incidence of infection. Whey proteins (WPs enhance immunity during early life and have a protective role in some immune disorders. In this study, the effects of camel WP on the chemotaxis of B and T cells to CXCL12 and CCL21 in diabetic mice were investigated. Results Flow cytometric analysis of the surface expressions of CXCR4 (CXCL12 receptor and CCR7 (CCL21 receptor on B and T cells revealed that the surface expressions of CXCR4 and CCR7 were not significantly altered in diabetic and WP-supplemented diabetic mice compared with control mice. Nevertheless, B and T lymphocytes from diabetic mice were found to be in a stunned state, with a marked and significant (P Conclusion Our data revealed the benefits of WP supplementation in enhancing cytoskeletal rearrangement and chemotaxis in B and T cells, and subsequently improving the immune response in diabetic mice.

  3. Adaptive microfluidic gradient generator for quantitative chemotaxis experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anielski, Alexander; Pfannes, Eva K. B.; Beta, Carsten

    2017-03-01

    Chemotactic motion in a chemical gradient is an essential cellular function that controls many processes in the living world. For a better understanding and more detailed modelling of the underlying mechanisms of chemotaxis, quantitative investigations in controlled environments are needed. We developed a setup that allows us to separately address the dependencies of the chemotactic motion on the average background concentration and on the gradient steepness of the chemoattractant. In particular, both the background concentration and the gradient steepness can be kept constant at the position of the cell while it moves along in the gradient direction. This is achieved by generating a well-defined chemoattractant gradient using flow photolysis. In this approach, the chemoattractant is released by a light-induced reaction from a caged precursor in a microfluidic flow chamber upstream of the cell. The flow photolysis approach is combined with an automated real-time cell tracker that determines changes in the cell position and triggers movement of the microscope stage such that the cell motion is compensated and the cell remains at the same position in the gradient profile. The gradient profile can be either determined experimentally using a caged fluorescent dye or may be alternatively determined by numerical solutions of the corresponding physical model. To demonstrate the function of this adaptive microfluidic gradient generator, we compare the chemotactic motion of Dictyostelium discoideum cells in a static gradient and in a gradient that adapts to the position of the moving cell.

  4. Monocyte chemotactic protein-3: possible involvement in apical periodontitis chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezerega, A; Osorio, C; Mardones, J; Mundi, V; Dutzan, N; Franco, M; Gamonal, J; Oyarzún, A; Overall, C M; Hernández, M

    2010-10-01

    To study the expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-3 (MCP-3, also known as chemokine CCL-7) in tissue from apical lesions (AL) and to associate MCP-3 expression with symptomatic or asymptomatic apical periodontitis. To determine the expression of MCP-3 in AL, biopsies obtained during tooth extraction procedures were fixed, subjected to routine processing and diagnosed as apical granuloma (AG) (n = 7) or radicular cyst (RC) (n = 5). As controls, apical periodontal ligament (PDL) specimens from healthy premolars extracted for orthodontics reasons were included (n = 7). All specimens were immunostained for MCP-3 and examined under a light microscope. In addition, homogenates from AL (n = 14) and healthy PDL samples (n = 7) were studied through immunowestern blot. Finally, periapical exudates samples were collected from root canals of teeth having diagnosis of symptomatic (n = 14) and asymptomatic apical periodontitis (n = 14) during routine endodontic treatments and analysed by immunowestern blot and densitometry.   MCP-3 was detected in AG and RC and localized mainly to inflammatory leucocytes, whereas no expression was observed in healthy PDLs. MCP-3 was also detected in periapical exudate, and its levels were significantly higher in symptomatic than in asymptomatic apical periodontitis. MCP-3 was expressed in AL and its levels associated with clinical symptoms. MCP-3 might play a role in disease pathogenesis, possibly by stimulating mononuclear chemotaxis. © 2010 International Endodontic Journal.

  5. Effective Medium Equations for Chemotaxis in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes-Parada, F.; Porter, M.; Wood, B. D.; Narayanaswamy, K.; Ford, R.

    2008-12-01

    Biodegradation is an important mechanism for contaminant reduction in groundwater environments; in fact, in-situ bioremediation and bioaugmentation methods represent alternatives to traditional methods such as pump-and-treat. Chemotaxis has been shown to enhance bacterial transport toward or away from concentration gradients of chemical species in laboratory experiments and may signifficantly increase contaminant flux undergoing degradation at the interfaces of low- and high-permeability regions. In this work, the method of volume averaging is used to upscale the microscale description of chemotactic microbial transport in order to obtain the corresponding macroscale equations for bacteria and the chemoattractant. As a first apprach, cellular growth/death and consumption of the attractant by chemical reaction are assumed negligible with respect to convective and diffusive transport, in both levels of scale. For bacteria, two effective coefficients are introduced, namely a total motility tensor and an effective chemotactic sensitivity tensor. Both coefficients are computed by solving the associated closure problems in a capillary tube. Analysis of breakthrough curves resulting from numerical experiments is also presented.

  6. Chemotaxis and flow disorder shape microbial dispersion in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Anna, Pietro; Yawata, Yutaka; Stocker, Roman; Juanes, Ruben

    2017-04-01

    Bacteria drive a plethora of natural processes in the subsurface, consuming organic matter and catalysing chemical reactions that are key to global elemental cycles. These macro-scale consequences result from the collective action of individual bacteria at the micro-scale, which are modulated by the highly heterogeneous subsurface environment, dominated by flow disorder and strong chemical gradients. Yet, despite the generally recognized importance of these microscale processes, microbe-host medium interaction at the pore scale remain poorly characterized and understood. Here, we introduce a microfluidic model system to directly image and quantify the role of cell motility on bacterial dispersion and residence time in confined, porous, media. Using the soil-dwelling bacterium Bacillus subtilis and the common amino acid serine as a resource, we observe that chemotaxis in highly disordered and confined physico-chemical environment affords bacteria an increase in their ability to persistently occupy the host medium. Our findings illustrate that the interplay between bacterial behaviour and pore-scale disorder in fluid velocity and nutrient concentration directly impacts the residence time, transport and bio-geo-chemical transformation rates of biota in the subsurface, and thus likely the processes they mediate.

  7. Influence of f-MLP, ACTH(1-24) and CRH on in vitro chemotaxis of monocytes from centenarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genedani, Susanna; Filaferro, Monica; Carone, Chiara; Ostan, Rita; Bucci, Laura; Cevenini, Elisa; Franceschi, Claudio; Monti, Daniela

    2008-01-01

    The lifelong exposure to a variety of stressors activates a plethora of defense mechanisms, including the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis which releases neuropeptides affecting the immune responses. Here, we report data on the capability of monocytes from young subjects and centenarians to migrate towards chemotactic stimuli (formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, f-MLP; adrenocorticotropic hormone, ACTH, and corticotrophin-releasing hormone, CRH). Plasma levels of ACTH, CRH and cortisol were measured as an index of ongoing stress response. Monocyte chemotaxis towards f-MLP (10(-8)M), ACTH(1-24) (10(-14) and 10(-8)M) and CRH (10(-14) and 10(-8)M) was evaluated in vitro in young subjects (n = 8, age range 25-35 years) and centenarians (n = 9, age >100 years) and expressed as chemotactic index. In 9 young subjects and 6 centenarians, plasma levels of cortisol, ACTH and CRH were measured. Monocyte chemotaxis towards f-MLP, ACTH(1-24) and CRH (10(-8)M) was well preserved in centenarians, except when the lowest concentration of CRH was used. CRH, ACTH and cortisol plasma levels were significantly higher in centenarians than in young subjects. The capability of monocytes from centenarians to respond to chemotactic neuropeptides is well preserved. The decreased responsiveness to the lowest concentration of CRH might be due to downregulation of CRH receptors or to defects in the intracellular signal transduction pathway. The high plasma levels of cortisol, CRH and ACTH in centenarians indicate an activation of the entire stress axis, likely counteracting the systemic inflammatory process occurring with age. This activation fits with the hypothesis that lifelong low-intensity stressors activate ancient, hormetic defense mechanisms, favoring healthy aging and longevity. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Neutrophils from Patients with Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia Display Reduced Chemotaxis to CXCR2 Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaike Cockx

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD, cystic fibrosis (CF, and chronic obstructive airway disease are characterized by neutrophilic inflammation in the lungs. In CF and chronic obstructive airway disease, improper functioning of neutrophils has been demonstrated. We hypothesized that the pulmonary damage in PCD might be aggravated by abnormal functioning neutrophils either as a primary consequence of the PCD mutation or secondary to chronic inflammation. We analyzed chemotactic responses and chemoattractant receptor expression profiles of peripheral blood neutrophils from 36 patients with PCD, 21 healthy children and 19 healthy adults. We stimulated peripheral blood monocytes from patients and healthy controls and measured CXCL8 and IL-1β production with ELISA. PCD neutrophils displayed reduced migration toward CXCR2 ligands (CXCL5 and CXCL8 in the shape change, microchamber and microslide chemotaxis assays, whereas leukotriene B4 and complement component 5a chemotactic responses were not significantly different. The reduced response to CXCL8 was observed in all subgroups of patients with PCD (displaying either normal ultrastructure, dynein abnormalities or central pair deficiencies and correlated with lung function. CXCR2 was downregulated in about 65% of the PCD patients, suggestive for additional mechanisms causing CXCR2 impairment. After treatment with the TLR ligands lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan, PCD monocytes produced more CXCL8 and IL-1β compared to controls. Moreover, PCD monocytes also responded stronger to IL-1β stimulation in terms of CXCL8 production. In conclusion, we revealed a potential link between CXCR2 and its ligand CXCL8 and the pathogenesis of PCD.

  9. Inhibition of CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis of Jurkat cells by direct immunotoxicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jia; Stout, Inge; Volger, Oscar L; Hendriksen, Peter J M; van Loveren, Henk; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M

    2016-07-01

    Directional migration of cells to specific locations is required in tissue development, wound healing, and immune responses. Immune cell migration plays a crucial role in both innate and adaptive immunity. Chemokines are small pro-inflammatory chemoattractants that control the migration of leukocytes. In addition, they are also involved in other immune processes such as lymphocyte development and immune pathology. In a previous toxicogenomics study using the Jurkat T cell line, we have shown that the model immunotoxicant TBTO inhibited chemotaxis toward the chemokine CXCL12. In the present work, we aimed at assessing a novel approach to detecting chemicals that affect the process of cell migration. For this, we first evaluated the effects of 31 chemicals on mRNA expression of genes that are known to be related to cell migration. With this analysis, seven immunotoxicants were identified as potential chemotaxis modulators, of which five (CoCl2 80 µM, MeHg 1 µM, ochratoxin A 10 µM, S9-treated ochratoxin A 10 µM, and TBTO 100 nM) were confirmed as chemotaxis inhibitor in an in vitro trans-well chemotaxis assay using the chemokine CXCL12. The transcriptome data of the five compounds together with previously obtained protein phosphorylation profiles for two out of five compounds (i.e., ochratoxin A and TBTO) revealed that the mechanisms behind the chemotaxis inhibition are different for these immunotoxicants. Moreover, the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin had no effect on the chemotaxis of Jurkat cells, indicating that the mTOR pathway is not involved in CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis of Jurkat cells, which is opposite to the findings on human primary T cells (Munk et al. in PLoS One 6(9):e24667, 2011). Thus, the results obtained from the chemotaxis assay conducted with Jurkat cells might not fully represent the results obtained with human primary T cells. Despite this difference, the present study indicated that some compounds may exert their immunotoxic effects through

  10. An alternative smooth particle hydrodynamics formulation to simulate chemotaxis in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avesani, Diego; Dumbser, Michael; Chiogna, Gabriele; Bellin, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    Chemotaxis, the microorganisms autonomous motility along or against the concentration gradients of a chemical species, is an important, yet often neglected factor controlling the transport of bacteria through saturated porous media. For example, chemotactic bacteria could enhance bioremediation by directing their own motion to residual contaminants trapped in low hydraulic conductive zones of contaminated aquifers. The aim of the present work is to develop an accurate numerical scheme to model chemotaxis in saturated porous media and other advective dominating flow systems. We propose to model chemotaxis by using a new class of meshless Lagrangian particle methods we recently developed for applications in fluid mechanics. The method is based on the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) formulation of (Ben Moussa et al., Int Ser Numer Math, 13(1):29-62, 2006), combined with a new Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (WENO) reconstruction technique on moving point clouds in multiple space dimensions. The purpose of this new numerical scheme is to fully exploit the advantages of SPH among traditional mesh-based and mesh-free schemes and to overcome drawbacks related to the use of standard SPH for modeling chemotaxis in porous media. First, we test the new scheme against analytical reference solutions. Then, under the assumption of complete mixing at the Darcy scale, we perform two-dimensional conservative solute transport simulations under steady-state flow conditions, to show the capability of the proposed new scheme to model chemotaxis.

  11. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor triggers chemotaxis of CD74+CXCR2+ NKT cells in chemically induced IFN-γ-mediated skin inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chia-Yuan; Chen, Chia-Ling; Lin, Yee-Shin; Yeh, Trai-Ming; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Hong, Ming-Yuan; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2014-10-01

    IFN-γ mediates chemically induced skin inflammation; however, the mechanism by which IFN-γ-producing cells are recruited to the sites of inflammation remains undefined. Secretion of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a proinflammatory cytokine, from damaged cells may promote immune cell recruitment. We hypothesized that MIF triggers an initial step in the chemotaxis of IFN-γ-producing cells in chemically induced skin inflammation. Using acute and chronic models of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced skin inflammation in mouse ears, MIF expression was examined, and its role in this process was investigated pharmacologically. The cell populations targeted by MIF, their receptor expression patterns, and the effects of MIF on cell migration were examined. TPA directly caused cytotoxicity accompanied by MIF release in mouse ear epidermal keratinocytes, as well as in human keratinocytic HaCaT cells. Treatment with the MIF antagonist (S,R)-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4,5-dihydro-5-isoxazole acetic acid methyl ester considerably attenuated TPA-induced ear swelling, leukocyte infiltration, epidermal cell proliferation, and dermal angiogenesis. Inhibition of MIF greatly diminished the dermal infiltration of IFN-γ(+) NKT cells, whereas the addition of exogenous TPA and MIF to NKT cells promoted their IFN-γ production and migration, respectively. MIF specifically triggered the chemotaxis of NKT cells via CD74 and CXCR2, and the resulting depletion of NKT cells abolished TPA-induced skin inflammation. In TPA-induced skin inflammation, MIF is released from damaged keratinocytes and then triggers the chemotaxis of CD74(+)CXCR2(+) NKT cells for IFN-γ production. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. The role of cGMP and the rear of the cell in Dictyostelium chemotaxis and cell streaming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, Douwe M.; van Haastert, Peter J. M.

    2008-01-01

    During chemotaxis, pseudopod extensions lead the cell towards the source of attractant. The role of actin-filled pseudopodia at the front of the cell is well recognized, whereas the function of the rear of the cell in chemotaxis and cell-cell interactions is less well known. Dictyostelium cell

  13. Caenorhabditis elegans mutants having altered preference of chemotaxis behavior during simultaneous presentation of two chemoattractants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Wakabayashi, Tokumitsu; Oikawa, Tomohiro; Sato, Tsutomu; Ogurusu, Tarou; Shingai, Ryuzo

    2006-11-01

    Upon presentation of two distinct chemoattractants such as sodium acetate and diacetyl simultaneously, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was preferentially attracted by one of these chemoattractants. We isolated two mutants having altered preference of chemotaxis behavior toward simultaneous presentation of sodium acetate and diacetyl. The chep-1(qr1) (CHEmosensory Preference) mutant preferred sodium acetate to diacetyl, while the chep-2(qr2) mutant preferred diacetyl to sodium acetate in simultaneous presentation of these chemoattractants. The chemotaxis behavior of chep-2(qr2) mutant in simultaneous presentation suggests a function of chep-2 gene products within the chemosensory informational integration pathway as well as in the chemosensory pathway.

  14. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Induces Dose-Dependent Chemotaxis or Fugetaxis of T-ALL Blasts through S1P1 Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina V Messias

    Full Text Available Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P is a bioactive sphingolipid involved in several physiological processes including cell migration and differentiation. S1P signaling is mediated through five G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1-S1P5. S1P1 is crucial to the exit of T-lymphocytes from the thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs through a gradient of S1P. We have previously observed that T-ALL and T-LBL blasts express S1P1. Herein we analyzed the role of S1P receptors in the migratory pattern of human T-cell neoplastic blasts. S1P-triggered cell migration was directly related to S1P1 expression. T-ALL blasts expressing low levels of S1P1 mRNA (HPB-ALL did not migrate toward S1P, whereas those expressing higher levels of S1P1 (MOLT-4, JURKAT and CEM did migrate. The S1P ligand induced T-ALL cells chemotaxis in concentrations up to 500 nM and induced fugetaxis in higher concentrations (1000-10000 nM through interactions with S1P1. When S1P1 was specifically blocked by the W146 compound, S1P-induced migration at lower concentrations was reduced, whereas higher concentrations induced cell migration. Furthermore, we observed that S1P/S1P1 interactions induced ERK and AKT phosphorylation, and modulation of Rac1 activity. Responding T-ALL blasts also expressed S1P3 mRNA but blockage of this receptor did not modify migratory responses. Our results indicate that S1P is involved in the migration of T-ALL/LBL blasts, which is dependent on S1P1 expression. Moreover, S1P concentrations in the given microenvironment might induce dose-dependent chemotaxis or fugetaxis of T-ALL blasts.

  15. Gas/liquid sensing via chemotaxis of Euglena cells confined in an isolated micro-aquarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozasa, Kazunari; Lee, Jeesoo; Song, Simon; Hara, Masahiko; Maeda, Mizuo

    2013-10-21

    We demonstrate on-chip gas/liquid sensing by using the chemotaxis of live bacteria (Euglena gracilis) confined in an isolated micro-aquarium, and gas/liquid permeation through porous polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The sensing chip consisted of one closed micro-aquarium and two separated bypass microchannels along the perimeter of the micro-aquarium. Test gas/liquid and reference samples were introduced into the two individual microchannels separately, and the gas/liquid permeated through the PDMS walls and dissolved in the micro-aquarium water, resulting in a chemical concentration gradient in the micro-aquarium. By employing the closed micro-aquarium isolated from sample flows, we succeeded in measuring the chemotaxis of Euglena for a gas substance quantitatively, which cannot be achieved with the conventional flow-type or hydro-gel-type microfluidic devices. We found positive (negative) chemotaxis for CO2 concentrations below (above) 15%, with 64 ppm as the minimum concentration affecting the cells. We also observed chemotaxis for ethanol and H2O2. By supplying culture medium via the microchannels, the Euglena culture remained alive for more than 2 months. The sensing chip is thus useful for culturing cells and using them for environmental toxicity/nutrition studies by monitoring their motion.

  16. Quantification of Live Bacterial Sensing for Chemotaxis and Phagocytosis and of Macropinocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Netra P. Meena

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Initial immunological defense mechanisms to pathogen invasion rely on innate pathways of chemotaxis and phagocytosis, original to ancient phagocytes. Although chemotaxis has been well-studied in mammalian and model systems using purified chemoattractants in defined conditions, directed movement toward live bacteria has been more difficult to assess. Dictyostelium discoideum is a professional phagocyte that chemotaxes toward bacteria during growth-phase in a process to locate nutrient sources. Using Dictyostelium as a model, we have developed a system that is able to quantify chemotaxis to very high sensitivity. Here, Dictyostelium can detect various chemoattractants at concentrations <1 nM. Given this exceedingly sensitive signal response, Dictyostelium will migrate directionally toward live gram positive and gram negative bacteria, in a highly quantifiable manner, and dependent upon bacterially-secreted chemoattractants. Additionally, we have developed a real-time, quantitative assay for phagocytosis of live gram positive and gram negative bacteria. To extend the analyses of endocytic functions, we further modified the system to quantify cellular uptake via macropinocytosis of smaller (<100 kDa molecules. These various approaches provide novel means to dissect potential for identification of novel chemoattractants and mechanistic factors that are essential for chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and/or macropinocytosis and for more detailed understanding in host-pathogen interactive defenses.

  17. Evaluation of polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis of adult and neonatal rhesus monkeys using 51-chromium labeling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Yo; Masuda, Kiyokazu; Kobayashi, Yohnosuke

    1987-01-01

    Chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) from heparinized venous blood of 8 adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca Mulatta) and 13 rhesus monkey neonates within 48 hours of birth were evaluated by using 51-chromium labeling method. PMNs were prepared by Ficoll-Hypaque gradient and dextran sedimentation procedures and the final 51-chromium uptake was 3.21 ± 1.27 % to original count. PMN chemotaxis was succeeded by using two different chemotaxis filters (Nuclepore filter on top of Millipore filter) with incubation at 37 deg C for 90 min. The mean value of target: non target ratio (CPM in lower filter with chemoattractant/CPM in lower filter without chemoattractant) of 3.56 ± 2.49 from neonates showed no significant difference from that of 4.44 ± 1.24 from adults. Only about 30 % of neonates showed an impaired chemotaxis, but others showed similar chemotactic activity as adults. The results show that the 51-chromium labeling method is useful to assess neutrophil functions in rhesus monkey species and suggest that host defense mechanism of the rhesus monkey may differ from that of human in neonatal period. (author)

  18. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa chemotaxis methyltransferase CheR1 impacts on bacterial surface sampling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Schmidt

    Full Text Available The characterization of factors contributing to the formation and development of surface-associated bacterial communities known as biofilms has become an area of intense interest since biofilms have a major impact on human health, the environment and industry. Various studies have demonstrated that motility, including swimming, swarming and twitching, seems to play an important role in the surface colonization and establishment of structured biofilms. Thereby, the impact of chemotaxis on biofilm formation has been less intensively studied. Pseudomonas aeruginosa has a very complex chemosensory system with two Che systems implicated in flagella-mediated motility. In this study, we demonstrate that the chemotaxis protein CheR1 is a methyltransferase that binds S-adenosylmethionine and transfers a methyl group from this methyl donor to the chemoreceptor PctA, an activity which can be stimulated by the attractant serine but not by glutamine. We furthermore demonstrate that CheR1 does not only play a role in flagella-mediated chemotaxis but that its activity is essential for the formation and maintenance of bacterial biofilm structures. We propose a model in which motility and chemotaxis impact on initial attachment processes, dispersion and reattachment and increase the efficiency and frequency of surface sampling in P. aeruginosa.

  19. Fluid flow and particle dynamics inside an evaporating droplet containing live bacteria displaying chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thokchom, Ashish Kumar; Swaminathan, Rajaram; Singh, Anugrah

    2014-10-21

    Evaporation-induced particle deposition patterns like coffee rings provide easy visual identification that is beneficial for developing inexpensive and simple diagnostic devices for detecting pathogens. In this study, the effect of chemotaxis on such pattern formation has been realized experimentally in drying droplets of bacterial suspensions. We have investigated the velocity field, concentration profile, and deposition pattern in the evaporating droplet of Escherichia coli suspension in the presence and absence of nutrients. Flow visualization experiments using particle image velocimetry (PIV) were carried out with E. coli bacteria as biological tracer particles. Experiments were conducted for suspensions of motile (live) as well as nonmotile (dead) bacteria. In the absence of any nutrient gradient like sugar on the substrate, both types of bacterial suspension showed two symmetric convection cells and a ring like deposition of particles after complete evaporation. Interestingly, the droplet containing live bacterial suspension showed a different velocity field when the sugar was placed at the base of the droplet. This can be attributed to the chemoattractant nature of the sugar, which induced chemotaxis among live bacteria targeted toward the nutrient site. Deposition of the suspended bacteria was also displaced toward the nutrient site as the evaporation proceeded. Our experiments demonstrate that both velocity fields and concentration patterns can be altered by chemotaxis to modify the pattern formation in evaporating droplet containing live bacteria. These results highlight the role of bacterial chemotaxis in modifying coffee ring patterns.

  20. Chemotaxis Increases the Residence Time Distribution of Bacteria in Granular Media Containing Distributed Contaminant Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adadevoh, J.; Triolo, S.; Ramsburg, C. A.; Ford, R.

    2015-12-01

    The use of chemotactic bacteria in bioremediation has the potential to increase access to, and biotransformation of, contaminant mass within the subsurface environment. This laboratory-scale study aimed to understand and quantify the influence of chemotaxis on residence times of pollutant-degrading bacteria within homogeneous treatment zones. Focus was placed on a continuous flow sand-packed column system in which a uniform distribution of naphthalene crystals created distributed sources of dissolved phase contaminant. A 10 mL pulse of Pseudomonas putida G7, which is chemotactic to naphthalene, and Pseudomonas putida G7 Y1, a non-chemotactic mutant strain, were simultaneously introduced into the sand-packed column at equal concentrations. Breakthrough curves obtained for the bacteria from column experiments conducted with and without naphthalene were used to quantify the effect of chemotaxis on transport parameters. In the presence of the chemoattractant, longitudinal dispersivity of PpG7 increased by a factor of 3 and percent recovery decreased from 21% to 12%. The results imply that pore-scale chemotaxis responses are evident at an interstitial fluid velocity of 1.7 m/d, which is within the range of typical groundwater flow. Within the context of bioremediation, chemotaxis may work to enhance bacterial residence times in zones of contamination thereby improving treatment.

  1. Impaired neutrophil and monocyte chemotaxis in chronic and aggressive periodontitis and effects of periodontal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R Santhosh; Prakash, Shobha

    2012-01-01

    Depressed chemotactic activity of polymorphoneutrophil (PMN) and monocyte (MN) appears to be one of the significant risk factors in the development of periodontal disease. Although bacteria are the primary etiologic factor in periodontal disease, the patient's host response is a determinant of disease susceptibility. Depressed chemotaxis of PMN and MN could lead to periodontal destruction by altering the host response i.e. impairment of the normal host response in neutralizing infection and alterations that result in destruction of the surrounding periodontal tissues. Thirty patients (10 healthy subjects, 10 chronic periodontitis, and 10 with aggressive periodontitis) participated in this study. Clinical parameters like plaque index, gingival index, probing pocket depth, and radiographic assessment were done. The peripheral blood PMNs and MNs were isolated from the patient and the chemotactic response was studied. Statistical analysis was performed using post-hoc Newman-Keul range test. PMN and MN chemotaxis was found to be statistically significant (Pperiodontal therapy in chronic and aggressive periodontitis group compared to healthy subjects. However on comparison between chronic and aggressive periodontitis group statistical significance was not found (P>0.05).Comparision between chronic periodontitis, aggressive periodontitis with healthy subjects, PMN and MN chemotaxis showed statistical significance (Pperiodontal therapy, Whereas statistically there was no difference when chronic periodontitis was compared with aggressive periodontitis. Depressed chemotaxis of PMN and MN results in increased periodontal destruction. In this study, depressed PMN and MN chemotaxis is seen in both aggressive periodontitis group and chronic periodontitis group and the response was altered although to a lesser degree after periodontal therapy in both groups indicating that effect of treatment does exist.

  2. Internalization of the chemokine receptor CCR4 can be evoked by orthosteric and allosteric receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajram, Laura; Begg, Malcolm; Slack, Robert; Cryan, Jenni; Hall, David; Hodgson, Simon; Ford, Alison; Barnes, Ashley; Swieboda, Dawid; Mousnier, Aurelie; Solari, Roberto

    2014-04-15

    The chemokine receptor CCR4 has at least two natural agonist ligands, MDC (CCL22) and TARC (CCL17) which bind to the same orthosteric site with a similar affinity. Both ligands are known to evoke chemotaxis of CCR4-bearing T cells and also elicit CCR4 receptor internalization. A series of small molecule allosteric antagonists have been described which displace the agonist ligand, and inhibit chemotaxis. The aim of this study was to determine which cellular coupling pathways are involved in internalization, and if antagonists binding to the CCR4 receptor could themselves evoke receptor internalization. CCL22 binding coupled CCR4 efficiently to β-arrestin and stimulated GTPγS binding however CCL17 did not couple to β-arrestin and only partially stimulated GTPγS binding. CCL22 potently induced internalization of almost all cell surface CCR4, while CCL17 showed only weak effects. We describe four small molecule antagonists that were demonstrated to bind to two distinct allosteric sites on the CCR4 receptor, and while both classes inhibited agonist ligand binding and chemotaxis, one of the allosteric sites also evoked receptor internalization. Furthermore, we also characterize an N-terminally truncated version of CCL22 which acts as a competitive antagonist at the orthosteric site, and surprisingly also evokes receptor internalization without demonstrating any agonist activity. Collectively this study demonstrates that orthosteric and allosteric antagonists of the CCR4 receptor are capable of evoking receptor internalization, providing a novel strategy for drug discovery against this class of target. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Chemotaxis toward carbohydrates and peptides by mixed ruminal protozoa when fed, fasted, or incubated with polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, H L; Karnati, S K R; Lyons, M A; Dehority, B A; Firkins, J L

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to the well-characterized chemotaxis and migratory behavior between the dorsal and ventral locations of the rumen by isotrichids, we hypothesized that chemotaxis toward soluble nutrients maintains entodiniomorphid protozoa in the particulate fraction. The objectives of these experiments were to compare the dose-responsive chemotaxis (1) toward different glucose concentrations when ruminal samples were harvested from fed versus fasted cows; (2) toward increasing concentrations of glucose compared with xylose when protozoa were harvested from a fed cow; (3) toward peptides of bacterial, protozoal, and soy origin; and (4) toward glucose when mixed ruminal protozoa were previously incubated for 0, 3, or 6h in the presence of emulsified polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA; Liposyn II, Hospira, Lake Forest, IL). In experiment 1, isotrichid protozoa decreased chemotaxis toward increasing glucose concentration when cows were fasted. Entodiniomorphids exhibited chemotaxis to similar concentrations of glucose as did isotrichids, but to a lesser magnitude of response. In experiment 2, xylose was chemotactic to both groups. Xylose might draw fibrolytic entodiniomorphid protozoa toward newly ingested feed. In contrast, even though isotrichids should not use xylose as an energy source, they were highly chemoattracted to xylose. In experiment 3, entodiniomorphids were not selectively chemoattracted toward bacterial or protozoal peptides compared with soy peptides. In experiment 4, despite isotrichid populations decreasing in abundance with increasing time of incubation in PUFA, chemotaxis to glucose remained unchanged. In contrast, entodiniomorphids recovered chemotaxis to glucose with increased time of PUFA incubation. Current results support isotrichid chemotaxis to sugars but also our hypothesis that a more moderate chemotaxis toward glucose and peptides explains how they swim in the fluid but pass from the rumen with the potentially digestible fraction of

  4. Bovine CCL28 Mediates Chemotaxis via CCR10 and Demonstrates Direct Antimicrobial Activity against Mastitis Causing Bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyler B Pallister

    Full Text Available In addition to the well characterized function of chemokines in mediating the homing and accumulation of leukocytes to tissues, some chemokines also exhibit potent antimicrobial activity. Little is known of the potential role of chemokines in bovine mammary gland health and disease. The chemokine CCL28 has previously been shown to play a key role in the homing and accumulation of IgA antibody secreting cells to the lactating murine mammary gland. CCL28 has also been shown to act as an antimicrobial peptide with activity demonstrated against a wide range of pathogens including bacteria, fungi and protozoans. Here we describe the cloning and function of bovine CCL28 and document the concentration of this chemokine in bovine milk. Bovine CCL28 was shown to mediate cellular chemotaxis via the CCR10 chemokine receptor and exhibited antimicrobial activity against a variety of bovine mastitis causing organisms. The concentration of bovine CCL28 in milk was found to be highly correlated with the lactation cycle. Highest concentrations of CCL28 were observed soon after parturition, with levels decreasing over time. These results suggest a potential role for CCL28 in the prevention/resolution of bovine mastitis.

  5. Cross-talk between Tetraspanin CD9 and Transmembrane Adaptor Protein Non-T Cell Activation Linker (NTAL) in Mast Cell Activation and Chemotaxis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hálová, Ivana; Dráberová, Lubica; Bambousková, Monika; Machyna, Martin; Stegurová, Lucie; Smrž, Daniel; Dráber, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 288, č. 14 (2013), s. 9801-9814 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/09/1826; GA ČR GAP302/10/1759; GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H084; GA MŠk LD12073; GA TA ČR TA01010436; GA MPO FR-TI3/067 Grant - others:European Cooperation in Science and Technology (XE) Action BM1007 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : mast cell * chemotaxis * Fc receptor Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.600, year: 2013

  6. Cross-talk between Tetraspanin CD9 and Transmembrane Adaptor Protein Non-T Cell Activation Linker (NTAL) in Mast Cell Activation and Chemotaxis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hálová, Ivana; Dráberová, Lubica; Bambousková, Monika; Machyna, Martin; Stegurová, Lucie; Smrž, Daniel; Dráber, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 288, č. 14 (2013), s. 9801-9814 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/09/1826; GA ČR GAP302/10/1759; GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H084; GA MŠk LD12073; GA TA ČR TA01010436; GA MPO FR-TI3/067 Grant - others:European Cooperation in Science and Technology(XE) Action BM1007 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : mast cell * chemotaxis * Fc receptor Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.600, year: 2013

  7. Salmonella uses energy taxis to benefit from intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Chávez, Fabian; Winter, Sebastian E; Lopez, Christopher A; Xavier, Mariana N; Winter, Maria G; Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Russell, Joseph M; Laughlin, Richard C; Lawhon, Sara D; Sterzenbach, Torsten; Bevins, Charles L; Tsolis, Renée M; Harshey, Rasika; Adams, L Garry; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2013-01-01

    Chemotaxis enhances the fitness of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) during colitis. However, the chemotaxis receptors conferring this fitness advantage and their cognate signals generated during inflammation remain unknown. Here we identify respiratory electron acceptors that are generated in the intestinal lumen as by-products of the host inflammatory response as in vivo signals for methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs). Three MCPs, including Trg, Tsr and Aer, enhanced the fitness of S. Typhimurium in a mouse colitis model. Aer mediated chemotaxis towards electron acceptors (energy taxis) in vitro and required tetrathionate respiration to confer a fitness advantage in vivo. Tsr mediated energy taxis towards nitrate but not towards tetrathionate in vitro and required nitrate respiration to confer a fitness advantage in vivo. These data suggest that the energy taxis receptors Tsr and Aer respond to distinct in vivo signals to confer a fitness advantage upon S. Typhimurium during inflammation by enabling this facultative anaerobic pathogen to seek out favorable spatial niches containing host-derived electron acceptors that boost its luminal growth.

  8. A dual-docking microfluidic cell migration assay (D2-Chip) for testing neutrophil chemotaxis and the memory effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke; Wu, Jiandong; Xu, Guoqing; Xie, Dongxue; Peretz-Soroka, Hagit; Santos, Susy; Alexander, Murray; Zhu, Ling; Zhang, Michael; Liu, Yong; Lin, Francis

    2017-04-18

    Chemotaxis is a classic mechanism for guiding cell migration and an important topic in both fundamental cell biology and health sciences. Neutrophils are a widely used model to study eukaryotic cell migration and neutrophil chemotaxis itself can lead to protective or harmful immune actions to the body. While much has been learnt from past research about how neutrophils effectively navigate through a chemoattractant gradient, many interesting questions remain unclear. For example, while it is tempting to model neutrophil chemotaxis using the well-established biased random walk theory, the experimental proof was challenged by the cell's highly persistent migrating nature. A special experimental design is required to test the key predictions from the random walk model. Another question that has interested the cell migration community for decades concerns the existence of chemotactic memory and its underlying mechanism. Although chemotactic memory has been suggested in various studies, a clear quantitative experimental demonstration will improve our understanding of the migratory memory effect. Motivated by these questions, we developed a microfluidic cell migration assay (so-called dual-docking chip or D 2 -Chip) that can test both the biased random walk model and the memory effect for neutrophil chemotaxis on a single chip enabled by multi-region gradient generation and dual-region cell alignment. Our results provide experimental support for the biased random walk model and chemotactic memory for neutrophil chemotaxis. Quantitative data analyses provide new insights into neutrophil chemotaxis and memory by making connections to entropic disorder, cell morphology and oscillating migratory response.

  9. Integrating chemotaxis and contact-inhibition during collective cell migration: Small GTPases at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theveneau, Eric; Mayor, Roberto

    2010-09-01

    For directional cell migration to occur cells must interpret guiding cues present in their environment. Chemotaxis based on negative or positive signals has been long thought as the main driving force of guided cell migration. However during collective cell migration cells do receive information from external signals but also upon interactions with their direct neighbours. These multiple inputs must be translated into intracellular reorganisation in order to promote efficient directional migration. Small GTPases, being involved in establishing cell polarity and regulating protrusive activity, are likely to play a central role in signal integration. Indeed, recent findings from our laboratory indicate that Contact-Inhibition of Locomotion controlled by N-Cadherin and chemotaxis dependent on Sdf1/Cxcr4 signaling converge towards regulation of the localized activity of RhoA and Rac1. All together they establish cell polarity and select well-oriented cell protrusions to ensure directional cell migration.

  10. Tie-down assessment of radioactive material packages on conveyances approach to competent authority approval applications in accordance with TS-R 1 (June 2000) and TS-G-1.1 (June 2002)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, J.; Owen, S.; Tso, C.F.

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes the authors' findings, during carrying out many package tie-down assessments, regarding the approach to the assessment process, and the issues that may arise. The current regulatory framework, as outlined in the abstract, is considered and possible areas for further development or research are discussed. The safe transport of a package containing radioactive material requires a secure system of retention on the conveyance during transport. The requirements for the assessment of this tie-down system are covered by International Atomic Energy Authority (IAEA) Regulations, and by the specific regulatory and guidance materials applying in the country of application. The IAEA regulations have recently been updated in TS-R-1 (June 2000) [1] and TS-G-1.1 (June 2002) [2]. In particular, Appendix V of reference [2] specifically covers 'Package Stowage and Retention during Transport'. In the United Kingdom the Transport Container Standardisation Committee (TCSC) provides guidance on the application of the IAEA regulations in TCSC 1006 ''The securing of Radioactive Materials on Conveyances'' [3], and this document has also been revised in December 2003. The basic requirement of the IAEA regulations is to maintain the integrity of the components of the package and its retention systems during routine operations (TS-R-1 Para 612). In accident conditions the package is permitted and may be required as part of the design (the weak-link approach as discussed later in this paper) to separate from the conveyance, while preserving the package integrity. Any tie-down attachments on the package shall be so designed that, under normal and accident conditions of transport, the forces in those attachments shall not impair the ability of the package to meet the requirements of the Regulations. (TS-R-1 Para 636)

  11. Assessing the chemotaxis behavior of Physarum polycephalum to a range of simple volatile organic chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lacy Costello, Ben P J; Adamatzky, Andrew I

    2013-09-01

    The chemotaxis behavior of the plasmodial stage of the true slime mold Physarum Polycephalum was assessed when given a binary choice between two volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) placed in its environment. All possible binary combinations were tested between 19 separate VOCs selected due to their prevalence and biological activity in common plant and insect species. The slime mold exhibited positive chemotaxis toward a number of VOCs with the following order of preference:   Farnesene > β-myrcene > tridecane > limonene > p-cymene > 3-octanone > β-pinene > m-cresol > benzylacetate > cis-3-hexenylacetate. For the remaining compounds, no positive chemotaxis was observed in any of the experiments, and for most compounds there was an inhibitory effect on the growth of the slime mold. By assessing this lack of growth or failure to propagate, it was possible to produce a list of compounds ranked in terms of their inhibitory effect: nonanal > benzaldehyde > methylbenzoate > linalool > methyl-p-benzoquinone > eugenol > benzyl alcohol > geraniol > 2-phenylethanol. This analysis shows a distinct preference of the slime mold for non-oxygenated terpene and terpene-like compounds (farnesene, β-myrcene, limonene, p-cymene and β-pinene). In contrast, terpene-based alcohols such as geraniol and linalool were found to have a strong inhibitory effect on the slime mold. Both the aldehydes utilized in this study had the strongest inhibitory effect on the slime mold of all the 19 VOCs tested. Interestingly, 3-octanone, which has a strong association with a "fungal odor," was the only compound with an oxygenated functionality where Physarum Polycephalum exhibits distinct positive chemotaxis.

  12. Mathematical modeling of chemotaxis and glial scarring around implanted electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silchenko, Alexander N.; Tass, Peter A.

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that the implantation of electrodes for deep brain stimulation or microelectrode probes for the recording of neuronal activity is always accompanied by the response of the brain’s immune system leading to the formation of a glial scar around the implantation sites. The implantation of electrodes causes massive release of adenosine-5‧-triphosphate (ATP) and different cytokines into the extracellular space and activates the microglia. The released ATP and the products of its hydrolysis, such as ADP and adenosine, become the main elements mediating chemotactic sensitivity and motility of microglial cells via subsequent activation of P2Y2,12 as well as A3A/A2A adenosine receptors. The size and density of an insulating sheath around the electrode, formed by microglial cells, are important criteria for the optimization of the signal-to-noise ratio during microelectrode recordings or parameters of electrical current delivered to the brain tissue. Here, we study a purinergic signaling pathway underlying the chemotactic motion of microglia towards implanted electrodes as well as the possible impact of an anti-inflammatory coating consisting of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. We present a model describing the formation of a stable aggregate around the electrode due to the joint chemo-attractive action of ATP and ADP and the mixed influence of extracellular adenosine. The bioactive coating is modeled as a source of chemo-repellent located near the electrode surface. The obtained analytical and numerical results allowed us to reveal the dependences of size and spatial location of the insulating sheath on the amount of released ATP and estimate the impact of immune suppressive coating on the scarring process.

  13. Effects of aluminum exposure on the adherence, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis capacity of peritoneal macrophages in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chongwei; Li, Jing; Zhu, Yanzhu; Sun, Hao; Zhao, Hansong; Shao, Bing; Li, Yanfei

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the effects of aluminum (Al) exposure on peritoneal macrophages of Wistar rats, four groups of ten rats each were orally exposed to 0, 13, 26, and 52 mg kg(-1) Al(3+) in form of aluminum trichloride (AlCl(3)) in drinking water for 120 days. At the end of the experimental period, the Al concentration in serum, the adherence, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis capacity of peritoneal macrophages were determined. The results showed that the Al concentration in serum significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner; the adherence, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis capacity of peritoneal macrophages decreased with the increase of Al dose, and present a dose-effective relationship. Further, they were significantly lower in the high-dose groups (P < 0.01) compared with the control group. It indicates that Al was toxic to peritoneal macrophages of rats, and the adherence, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis capacity of peritoneal macrophages in rats were significantly suppressed by exposure to 52 mg kg(-1) day Al(3+).

  14. Asymptotic behaviour of solutions to the Keller–Segel model for chemotaxis with prevention of overcrowding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Haojie; Zheng, Sining; Liang, Bo

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the Keller–Segel chemotaxis model of parabolic–elliptic type with the volume-filling effect studied by Burger et al (2006 The Keller–Segel model for chemotaxis with prevention of overcrowding: linear versus nonlinear diffusion SIAM J. Math. Anal. 38 1288–315). In their discussion on the large time asymptotic behaviour of solutions, the diffusion rate of ρ (the density of cells) had to be assumed to be large with ε> 1/4 . While for the nonlinear diffusion model, it was proved that the asymptotic behaviour of solutions is fully determined by the diffusion constant being larger or smaller than the threshold value ε = 1. The same ‘large ε-restriction’ (ε> 1/4 ) was also made for studying the parallel parabolic–parabolic model in Di Francesco and Rosado (2008 Fully parabolic Keller–Segel model for chemotaxis with prevention of overcrowding Nonlinearity 21 2715–30), where it was pointed out that ‘Whether this condition is necessary to have large time decay (and consequently a self-similar behaviour) for ρ is still an open problem even in the (simpler) parabolic–elliptic case’. The aim of the paper is to answer this problem for the parabolic–elliptic model. We prove the mentioned time decay estimate without the restriction ε> 1/4 . The main technique used in this paper is the L p -L q estimate method. (paper)

  15. A population-level model from the microscopic dynamics in Escherichia coli chemotaxis via Langevin approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Zhuo-Ran; Wu Tai-Lin; Ouyang Qi; Tu Yu-Hai

    2012-01-01

    Recent extensive studies of Escherichia coli (E. coli) chemotaxis have achieved a deep understanding of its microscopic control dynamics. As a result, various quantitatively predictive models have been developed to describe the chemotactic behavior of E. coli motion. However, a population-level partial differential equation (PDE) that rationally incorporates such microscopic dynamics is still insufficient. Apart from the traditional Keller–Segel (K–S) equation, many existing population-level models developed from the microscopic dynamics are integro-PDEs. The difficulty comes mainly from cell tumbles which yield a velocity jumping process. Here, we propose a Langevin approximation method that avoids such a difficulty without appreciable loss of precision. The resulting model not only quantitatively reproduces the results of pathway-based single-cell simulators, but also provides new inside information on the mechanism of E. coli chemotaxis. Our study demonstrates a possible alternative in establishing a simple population-level model that allows for the complex microscopic mechanisms in bacterial chemotaxis

  16. Self-Generated Chemoattractant Gradients: Attractant Depletion Extends the Range and Robustness of Chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Tweedy

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemotaxis is fundamentally important, but the sources of gradients in vivo are rarely well understood. Here, we analyse self-generated chemotaxis, in which cells respond to gradients they have made themselves by breaking down globally available attractants, using both computational simulations and experiments. We show that chemoattractant degradation creates steep local gradients. This leads to surprising results, in particular the existence of a leading population of cells that moves highly directionally, while cells behind this group are undirected. This leading cell population is denser than those following, especially at high attractant concentrations. The local gradient moves with the leading cells as they interact with their surroundings, giving directed movement that is unusually robust and can operate over long distances. Even when gradients are applied from external sources, attractant breakdown greatly changes cells' responses and increases robustness. We also consider alternative mechanisms for directional decision-making and show that they do not predict the features of population migration we observe experimentally. Our findings provide useful diagnostics to allow identification of self-generated gradients and suggest that self-generated chemotaxis is unexpectedly universal in biology and medicine.

  17. Independence and interdependence of Dif and Frz chemosensory pathways in Myxococcus xanthus chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qian; Black, Wesley P; Cadieux, C Linn; Yang, Zhaomin

    2008-08-01

    Dif and Frz, two Myxococcus xanthus chemosensory pathways, are required in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) chemotaxis for excitation and adaptation respectively. DifA and FrzCD, the homologues of methyl-accepting chemoreceptors in the two pathways, were examined for methylation in the context of chemotaxis and inter-pathway interactions. Evidence indicates that DifA may not undergo methylation, but signals transmitting through DifA do modulate FrzCD methylation. Results also revealed that M. xanthus possesses Dif-dependent and Dif-independent PE-sensing mechanisms. Previous studies showed that FrzCD methylation is decreased by negative chemostimuli but increased by attractants such as PE. Results here demonstrate that the Dif-dependent sensory mechanism suppresses the increase in FrzCD methylation in attractant response and elevates FrzCD methylation upon negative stimulation. In other words, FrzCD methylation is governed by opposing forces from Dif-dependent and Dif-independent sensing mechanisms. We propose that the Dif-independent but Frz-dependent PE sensing leads to increases in FrzCD methylation and subsequent adaptation, while the Dif-dependent PE signalling suppresses or diminishes the increase in FrzCD methylation to decelerate or delay adaptation. We contend that these antagonistic interactions are crucial for effective chemotaxis in this gliding bacterium to ensure that adaptation does not occur too quickly relative to the slow speed of M. xanthus movement.

  18. Observing Chemotaxis in Vibrio fischeri Using Soft Agar Assays in an Undergraduate Microbiology Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy R. DeLoney-Marino

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Chemotaxis, the directed movement of cells towards or away from a chemical, is both an exciting and complicated behavior observed in many bacterial species. Attempting to adequately visualize or demonstrate the chemotaxic response of bacteria in the classroom is difficult at best, with good models to illustrate the concept lacking. The BSL-1 marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri (a.k.a. Aliivibrio fischeri is easy to culture, making it an ideal candidate for experiments in an undergraduate microbiology course. A number of chemoattractants for V. fischeri have been identified, including a variety of sugars, nucleosides, and amino acids (1, 2. Below presents how the soft agar-based chemotaxis assay can be implemented in the undergraduate laboratory. As bacterial cells migrate towards one or more attractants in soft agar, students can directly observe the chemotaxic behavior of V. fischeri without the need to learn complicated techniques or use specialized equipment. Once the bands of bacterial cells are observed, the migration can then be disrupted by the addition of excess attractant to the soft agar, thereby visualizing what happens once cells are no longer in a gradient of attractant. In addition, soft agar plates lacking attractants can be used to visualize the random movements of bacterial cells that are non-chemotaxing. These exercises can be used in the microbiology laboratory to help students understand the complex behavior of bacterial chemotaxis.

  19. Self-Generated Chemoattractant Gradients: Attractant Depletion Extends the Range and Robustness of Chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweedy, Luke; Knecht, David A; Mackay, Gillian M; Insall, Robert H

    2016-03-01

    Chemotaxis is fundamentally important, but the sources of gradients in vivo are rarely well understood. Here, we analyse self-generated chemotaxis, in which cells respond to gradients they have made themselves by breaking down globally available attractants, using both computational simulations and experiments. We show that chemoattractant degradation creates steep local gradients. This leads to surprising results, in particular the existence of a leading population of cells that moves highly directionally, while cells behind this group are undirected. This leading cell population is denser than those following, especially at high attractant concentrations. The local gradient moves with the leading cells as they interact with their surroundings, giving directed movement that is unusually robust and can operate over long distances. Even when gradients are applied from external sources, attractant breakdown greatly changes cells' responses and increases robustness. We also consider alternative mechanisms for directional decision-making and show that they do not predict the features of population migration we observe experimentally. Our findings provide useful diagnostics to allow identification of self-generated gradients and suggest that self-generated chemotaxis is unexpectedly universal in biology and medicine.

  20. Akirin1 (Mighty), a novel promyogenic factor regulates muscle regeneration and cell chemotaxis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salerno, Monica Senna; Dyer, Kelly; Bracegirdle, Jeremy; Platt, Leanne; Thomas, Mark; Siriett, Victoria [Functional Muscle Genomics, AgResearch, Hamilton (New Zealand); Kambadur, Ravi [Functional Muscle Genomics, AgResearch, Hamilton (New Zealand); School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (Singapore); Sharma, Mridula, E-mail: bchmridu@nus.edu.sg [Functional Muscle Genomics, AgResearch, Hamilton (New Zealand)

    2009-07-15

    Akirin1 (Mighty) is a downstream target gene of myostatin and has been shown to be a promyogenic factor. Although expressed in many tissues, akirin1 is negatively regulated by myostatin specifically in skeletal muscle tissue. In this manuscript we have characterized the possible function of akirin1 in postnatal muscle growth. Molecular and immunohistological analyses indicated that while low levels of akirin1 are associated with quiescent satellite cells (SC), higher levels of akirin1 are detected in activated proliferating SC indicating that akirin1 could be associated with satellite cell activation. In addition to SC, macrophages also express akirin1, and increased expression of akirin1 resulted in more efficient chemotaxis of both macrophages and myoblasts. Akirin1 appears to regulate chemotaxis of both macrophages and myoblasts by reorganising actin cytoskeleton, leading to more efficient lamellipodia formation via a PI3 kinase dependent pathway. Expression analysis during muscle regeneration also indicated that akirin1 expression is detected very early (day 2) in regenerating muscle, and expression gradually peaks to coincide the nascent myotube formation stage of muscle regeneration. Based on these results we propose that akirin1 could be acting as a transducer of early signals of muscle regeneration. Thus, we speculate that myostatin regulates key steps of muscle regeneration including chemotaxis of inflammatory cells, SC activation and migration through akirin1.

  1. Chemotaxis of C. elegans in 3D media: a model for navigation of undulatory microswimmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Amar; Bilbao, Alejandro; Rahman, Mizanur; Vanapalli, Siva; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2017-11-01

    While the natural environment of C. elegans consists of complex 3D media (e.g., decomposing organic matter and water), most studies of chemotactic behavior of this nematode are limited to 2D. We present a 3D chemotaxis model that combines a realistic geometrical representation of body movements associated with 3D maneuvers, an analysis of mechanical interactions of the nematode body with the surrounding medium to determine nematode trajectories, and a simple memory-function description of chemosensory apparatus that controls the frequency, magnitude, and timing of turning maneuvers. We show that two main chemotaxis strategies of C. elegans moving in 2D, i.e., the biased random walk and gradual turn, are effective also in 3D, provided that 2D turns are supplemented by the roll maneuvers that enable 3D reorientation. Optimal choices of chemosensing and gait-control parameters are discussed; we show that the nematode can maintain efficient chemotaxis in burrowing and swimming by adjusting the undulation frequency alone, without changing the chemotactic component of the body control. Understanding how C. elegans efficiently navigates in 3D media may help in developing self-navigating artificial microswimmers. Supported by NSF Grant No. CBET 1603627.

  2. Attractant Regulation of the Aspartate Receptor–Kinase Complex: Limited Cooperative Interactions between Receptors and Effects of the Receptor Modification State†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornhorst, Joshua A.; Falke, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    The manner by which the bacterial chemotaxis system responds to a wide range of attractant concentrations remains incompletely understood. In principle, positive cooperativity between chemotaxis receptors could explain the ability of bacteria to respond to extremely low attractant concentrations. By utilizing an in vitro receptor-coupled kinase assay, the attractant-dependent response curve has been measured for the Salmonella typhimurium aspartate chemoreceptor. The attractant chosen, α-methyl aspartate, was originally used to quantitate high receptor sensitivity at low attractant concentrations by Segall, Block, and Berg [(1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 83, 8987–8991]. The attractant response curve exhibits limited positive cooperativity, yielding a Hill coefficient of 1.7–2.4, and this Hill coefficient is relatively independent of both the receptor modification state and the mole ratio of CheA to receptor. These results disfavor models in which there are strong cooperative interactions between large numbers of receptor dimers in an extensive receptor array. Instead, the results are consistent with cooperative interactions between a small number of coupled receptor dimers. Because the in vitro receptor-coupled kinase assay utilizes higher than native receptor densities arising from overexpression, the observed positive cooperativity may overestimate that present in native receptor populations. Such positive cooperativity between dimers is fully compatible with the negative cooperativity previously observed between the two symmetric ligand binding sites within a single dimer. The attractant affinity of the aspartate receptor is found to depend on the modification state of its covalent adaptation sites. Increasing the the level of modification decreases the apparent attractant affinity at least 10-fold in the in vitro receptor-coupled kinase assay. This observation helps explain the ability of the chemotaxis pathway to respond to a broad range of

  3. Compound C inhibits macrophage chemotaxis through an AMPK-independent mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youngyi; Park, Byung-Hyun; Bae, Eun Ju

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue is a well-established cause of obesity-linked insulin resistance. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in peripheral tissues such as adipose tissue has beneficial effects on the protection against obesity-induced insulin resistance, which is mainly mediated by prevention of adipose tissue macrophage infiltration and inflammation. In examining the role of AMPK on adipose tissue inflammation, we unexpectedly found that compound C (CC), despite its inhibition of AMPK, robustly inhibited macrophage chemotaxis in RAW 264.7 cells when adipocyte conditioned medium (CM) was used as a chemoattractant. Here, we report that CC inhibition of macrophage migration occurred independently of AMPK. Mechanistically, this inhibitory effect of cell migration by CC was mediated by inhibition of the focal adhesion kinase, AKT, nuclear factor κB pathways. Moreover, the expression of chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and pro-inflammatory genes such as tumor necrosis factor α and inducible nitric oxide synthase were prevented by CC treatment in RAW 264.7 cells stimulated with either adipocyte CM or lipopolysaccharide. Lastly, in accord with the findings of the anti-inflammatory effect of CC, we demonstrated that CC functioned as a repressor of macrophage CM-mediated insulin resistance in adipocytes. Taken together, our results suggest that CC serves as a useful inhibitory molecule against macrophage chemotaxis into adipose tissue and thus might have therapeutic potential for the treatment of obesity-linked adipose inflammation. - Highlights: • Compound C (CC) inhibits macrophage chemotaxis regardless of AMPK suppression. • CC enhances insulin sensitivity in adipocytes. • CC inhibits focal adhesion kinase, AKT, and NF-κB signaling in RAW 264.7 cells.

  4. The impact of odor-reward memory on chemotaxis in larval Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleyer, Michael; Reid, Samuel F; Pamir, Evren; Saumweber, Timo; Paisios, Emmanouil; Davies, Alexander; Gerber, Bertram; Louis, Matthieu

    2015-05-01

    How do animals adaptively integrate innate with learned behavioral tendencies? We tackle this question using chemotaxis as a paradigm. Chemotaxis in the Drosophila larva largely results from a sequence of runs and oriented turns. Thus, the larvae minimally need to determine (i) how fast to run, (ii) when to initiate a turn, and (iii) where to direct a turn. We first report how odor-source intensities modulate these decisions to bring about higher levels of chemotactic performance for higher odor-source intensities during innate chemotaxis. We then examine whether the same modulations are responsible for alterations of chemotactic performance by learned odor "valence" (understood throughout as level of attractiveness). We find that run speed (i) is neither modulated by the innate nor by the learned valence of an odor. Turn rate (ii), however, is modulated by both: the higher the innate or learned valence of the odor, the less often larvae turn whenever heading toward the odor source, and the more often they turn when heading away. Likewise, turning direction (iii) is modulated concordantly by innate and learned valence: turning is biased more strongly toward the odor source when either innate or learned valence is high. Using numerical simulations, we show that a modulation of both turn rate and of turning direction is sufficient to account for the empirically found differences in preference scores across experimental conditions. Our results suggest that innate and learned valence organize adaptive olfactory search behavior by their summed effects on turn rate and turning direction, but not on run speed. This work should aid studies into the neural mechanisms by which memory impacts specific aspects of behavior. © 2015 Schleyer et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. Compound C inhibits macrophage chemotaxis through an AMPK-independent mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youngyi [College of Pharmacy, Woosuk University, Wanju, Jeonbuk 55338 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biochemistry, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 54896 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Byung-Hyun, E-mail: bhpark@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 54896 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Eun Ju, E-mail: ejbae@woosuk.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Woosuk University, Wanju, Jeonbuk 55338 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue is a well-established cause of obesity-linked insulin resistance. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in peripheral tissues such as adipose tissue has beneficial effects on the protection against obesity-induced insulin resistance, which is mainly mediated by prevention of adipose tissue macrophage infiltration and inflammation. In examining the role of AMPK on adipose tissue inflammation, we unexpectedly found that compound C (CC), despite its inhibition of AMPK, robustly inhibited macrophage chemotaxis in RAW 264.7 cells when adipocyte conditioned medium (CM) was used as a chemoattractant. Here, we report that CC inhibition of macrophage migration occurred independently of AMPK. Mechanistically, this inhibitory effect of cell migration by CC was mediated by inhibition of the focal adhesion kinase, AKT, nuclear factor κB pathways. Moreover, the expression of chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and pro-inflammatory genes such as tumor necrosis factor α and inducible nitric oxide synthase were prevented by CC treatment in RAW 264.7 cells stimulated with either adipocyte CM or lipopolysaccharide. Lastly, in accord with the findings of the anti-inflammatory effect of CC, we demonstrated that CC functioned as a repressor of macrophage CM-mediated insulin resistance in adipocytes. Taken together, our results suggest that CC serves as a useful inhibitory molecule against macrophage chemotaxis into adipose tissue and thus might have therapeutic potential for the treatment of obesity-linked adipose inflammation. - Highlights: • Compound C (CC) inhibits macrophage chemotaxis regardless of AMPK suppression. • CC enhances insulin sensitivity in adipocytes. • CC inhibits focal adhesion kinase, AKT, and NF-κB signaling in RAW 264.7 cells.

  6. Contact-inhibited chemotaxis in de novo and sprouting blood-vessel growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roeland M H Merks

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Blood vessels form either when dispersed endothelial cells (the cells lining the inner walls of fully formed blood vessels organize into a vessel network (vasculogenesis, or by sprouting or splitting of existing blood vessels (angiogenesis. Although they are closely related biologically, no current model explains both phenomena with a single biophysical mechanism. Most computational models describe sprouting at the level of the blood vessel, ignoring how cell behavior drives branch splitting during sprouting. We present a cell-based, Glazier-Graner-Hogeweg model (also called Cellular Potts Model simulation of the initial patterning before the vascular cords form lumens, based on plausible behaviors of endothelial cells. The endothelial cells secrete a chemoattractant, which attracts other endothelial cells. As in the classic Keller-Segel model, chemotaxis by itself causes cells to aggregate into isolated clusters. However, including experimentally observed VE-cadherin-mediated contact inhibition of chemotaxis in the simulation causes randomly distributed cells to organize into networks and cell aggregates to sprout, reproducing aspects of both de novo and sprouting blood-vessel growth. We discuss two branching instabilities responsible for our results. Cells at the surfaces of cell clusters attempting to migrate to the centers of the clusters produce a buckling instability. In a model variant that eliminates the surface-normal force, a dissipative mechanism drives sprouting, with the secreted chemical acting both as a chemoattractant and as an inhibitor of pseudopod extension. Both mechanisms would also apply if force transmission through the extracellular matrix rather than chemical signaling mediated cell-cell interactions. The branching instabilities responsible for our results, which result from contact inhibition of chemotaxis, are both generic developmental mechanisms and interesting examples of unusual patterning instabilities.

  7. Motility and Chemotaxis Mediate the Preferential Colonization of Gastric Injury Sites by Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Eitaro; Closson, Chet; Matthis, Andrea L.; Schumacher, Michael A.; Engevik, Amy C.; Zavros, Yana; Ottemann, Karen M.; Montrose, Marshall H.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a pathogen contributing to peptic inflammation, ulceration, and cancer. A crucial step in the pathogenic sequence is when the bacterium first interacts with gastric tissue, an event that is poorly understood in vivo. We have shown that the luminal space adjacent to gastric epithelial damage is a microenvironment, and we hypothesized that this microenvironment might enhance H. pylori colonization. Inoculation with 106 H. pylori (wild-type Sydney Strain 1, SS1) significantly delayed healing of acetic-acid induced ulcers at Day 1, 7 and 30 post-inoculation, and wild-type SS1 preferentially colonized the ulcerated area compared to uninjured gastric tissue in the same animal at all time points. Gastric resident Lactobacillus spp. did not preferentially colonize ulcerated tissue. To determine whether bacterial motility and chemotaxis are important to ulcer healing and colonization, we analyzed isogenic H. pylori mutants defective in motility (ΔmotB) or chemotaxis (ΔcheY). ΔmotB (106) failed to colonize ulcerated or healthy stomach tissue. ΔcheY (106) colonized both tissues, but without preferential colonization of ulcerated tissue. However, ΔcheY did modestly delay ulcer healing, suggesting that chemotaxis is not required for this process. We used two-photon microscopy to induce microscopic epithelial lesions in vivo, and evaluated accumulation of fluorescently labeled H. pylori at gastric damage sites in the time frame of minutes instead of days. By 5 min after inducing damage, H. pylori SS1 preferentially accumulated at the site of damage and inhibited gastric epithelial restitution. H. pylori ΔcheY modestly accumulated at the gastric surface and inhibited restitution, but did not preferentially accumulate at the injury site. H. pylori ΔmotB neither accumulated at the surface nor inhibited restitution. We conclude that bacterial chemosensing and motility rapidly promote H. pylori colonization of injury sites, and thereby biases

  8. Expression of the gltP gene of Escherichia coli in a glutamate transport-deficient mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides restores chemotaxis to glutamate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M.H J; van der Heide, T.; Tolner, B; Driessen, A.J.M.; Konings, W.N

    1995-01-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides is chemotactic to glutamate and most other amino acids. In Escherichia coli, chemotaxis involves a membrane-bound sensor that either binds the amino acid directly or interacts with the binding protein loaded with the amino acid. In R. sphaeroides, chemotaxis is thought to

  9. Intestinal invasion of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the avian host is dose dependent and does not depend on motility and chemotaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Hoegh-Andersen, Kirsten Hobolt; Rosenkrantz, Jesper Tjørnholt

    2013-01-01

    it depended on motility and chemotaxis.Wild type and previously well-characterized transposon mutants in flagella genes fliC and fljB and in chemotaxis genes cheA, cheB and cheR were used as challenge strains in intestinal loop experiments. Invasion was shown to be dose dependent, but did not require...

  10. HIV-1 infected lymphoid organs upregulate expression and release of the cleaved form of uPAR that modulates chemotaxis and virus expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Nebuloni

    Full Text Available Cell-associated receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPAR is released as both full-length soluble uPAR (suPAR and cleaved (c-suPAR form that maintain ability to bind to integrins and other receptors, thus triggering and modulating cell signaling responses. Concerning HIV-1 infection, plasma levels of suPAR have been correlated with the severity of disease, levels of immune activation and ineffective immune recovery also in individuals receiving combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART. However, it is unknown whether and which suPAR forms might contribute to HIV-1 induced pathogenesis and to the related state of immune activation. In this regard, lymphoid organs represent an import site of chronic immune activation and virus persistence even in individuals receiving cART. Lymphoid organs of HIV-1(+ individuals showed an enhanced number of follicular dendritic cells, macrophages and endothelial cells expressing the cell-associated uPAR in comparison to those of uninfected individuals. In order to investigate the potential role of suPAR forms in HIV-1 infection of secondary lymphoid organs, tonsil histocultures were established from HIV-1 seronegative individuals and infected ex vivo with CCR5- and CXCR4-dependent HIV-1 strains. The levels of suPAR and c-suPAR were significantly increased in HIV-infected tonsil histocultures supernatants in comparison to autologous uninfected histocultures. Supernatants from infected and uninfected cultures before and after immunodepletion of suPAR forms were incubated with the chronically infected promonocytic U1 cell line characterized by a state of proviral latency in unstimulated conditions. In the contest of HIV-conditioned supernatants we established that c-suPAR, but not suPAR, inhibited chemotaxis and induced virus expression in U1 cells. In conclusion, lymphoid organs are an important site of production and release of both suPAR and c-suPAR, this latter form being endowed with the capacity of

  11. Motility, Chemotaxis and Aerotaxis Contribute to Competitiveness during Bacterial Pellicle Biofilm Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölscher, Theresa; Bartels, Benjamin; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Gallegos-Monterrosa, Ramses; Price-Whelan, Alexa; Kolter, Roberto; Dietrich, Lars E P; Kovács, Ákos T

    2015-11-20

    Biofilm formation is a complex process involving various signaling pathways and changes in gene expression. Many of the sensory mechanisms and regulatory cascades involved have been defined for biofilms formed by diverse organisms attached to solid surfaces. By comparison, our knowledge on the basic mechanisms underlying the formation of biofilms at air-liquid interfaces, that is, pellicles, is much less complete. In particular, the roles of flagella have been studied in multiple solid-surface biofilm models but remain largely undefined for pellicles. In this work, we characterize the contributions of flagellum-based motility, chemotaxis and oxygen sensing to pellicle formation in the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. We confirm that flagellum-based motility is involved in, but is not absolutely essential for, B. subtilis pellicle formation. Further, we show that flagellum-based motility, chemotaxis and oxygen sensing are important for successful competition during B. subtilis pellicle formation. We report that flagellum-based motility similarly contributes to pellicle formation and fitness in competition assays in the Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Time-lapse imaging of static liquid cultures demonstrates that, in both B. subtilis and P. aeruginosa, a turbulent flow forms in the tube and a zone of clearing appears below the air-liquid interface just before the formation of the pellicle but only in strains that have flagella. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A hybrid two-component system protein from Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 was involved in chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yanhua; Tu, Ran; Wu, Lixian; Hong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Sanfeng

    2011-09-20

    We here report the sequence and functional analysis of org35 of Azospirillum brasilense Sp7, which was originally identified to be able to interact with NifA in yeast-two-hybrid system. The org35 encodes a hybrid two-component system protein, including N-terminal PAS domains, a histidine kinase (HPK) domain and a response regulator (RR) domain in C-terminal. To determine the function of the Org35, a deletion-insertion mutant in PAS domain [named Sp7353] and a complemental strain Sp7353C were constructed. The mutant had reduced chemotaxis ability compared to that of wild-type, and the complemental strain was similar to the wild-type strain. These data suggested that the A. brasilense org35 played a key role in chemotaxis. Variants containing different domains of the org35 were expressed, and the functions of these domains were studied in vitro. Phosphorylation assays in vitro demonstrated that the HPK domain of Org35 possessed the autokinase activity and that the phosphorylated HPK was able to transfer phosphate groups to the RR domain. The result indicated Org35 was a phosphorylation-communicating protein. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. CYP4F18-Deficient Neutrophils Exhibit Increased Chemotaxis to Complement Component C5a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Vaivoda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CYP4Fs were first identified as enzymes that catalyze hydroxylation of leukotriene B4 (LTB4. CYP4F18 has an unusual expression in neutrophils and was predicted to play a role in regulating LTB4-dependent inflammation. We compared chemotaxis of wild-type and Cyp4f18 knockout neutrophils using an in vitro assay. There was no significant difference in the chemotactic response to LTB4, but the response to complement component C5a increased 1.9–2.25-fold in knockout cells compared to wild-type (P < 0.01. This increase was still observed when neutrophils were treated with inhibitors of eicosanoid synthesis. There were no changes in expression of other CYP4 enzymes in knockout neutrophils that might compensate for loss of CYP4F18 or lead to differences in activity. A mouse model of dextran sodium sulfate colitis was used to investigate the consequences of increased C5a-dependent chemotaxis in vivo, but there was no significant difference in weight loss, disease activity, or colonic tissue myeloperoxidase between wild-type and Cyp4f18 knockout mice. This study demonstrates the limitations of inferring CYP4F function based on an ability to use LTB4 as a substrate, points to expanding roles for CYP4F enzymes in immune regulation, and underscores the in vivo challenges of CYP knockout studies.

  14. An orphan chemotaxis sensor regulates virulence and antibiotic tolerance in the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Pearl McLaughlin

    Full Text Available The synthesis of virulence factors by pathogenic bacteria is highly regulated and occurs in response to diverse environmental cues. An array of two component systems (TCSs serves to link perception of different cues to specific changes in gene expression and/or bacterial behaviour. Those TCSs that regulate functions associated with virulence represent attractive targets for interference in anti-infective strategies for disease control. We have previously identified PA2572 as a putative response regulator required for full virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the opportunistic human pathogen, to Galleria mellonella (Wax moth larvae. Here we have investigated the involvement of candidate sensors for signal transduction involving PA2572. Mutation of PA2573, encoding a probable methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein, gave rise to alterations in motility, virulence, and antibiotic resistance, functions which are also controlled by PA2572. Comparative transcriptome profiling of mutants revealed that PA2572 and PA2573 regulate expression of a common set of 49 genes that are involved in a range of biological functions including virulence and antibiotic resistance. Bacterial two-hybrid analysis indicated a REC-dependent interaction between PA2572 and PA2573 proteins. Finally expression of PA2572 in the PA2573 mutant background restored virulence to G. mellonella towards wild-type levels. The findings indicate a role for the orphan chemotaxis sensor PA2573 in the regulation of virulence and antibiotic tolerance in P. aeruginosa and indicate that these effects are exerted in part through signal transduction involving PA2572.

  15. Laminar flow assisted anisotropic bacteria absorption for chemotaxis delivery of bacteria-attached microparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Keon; Oh, Darong; Son, Seok Young; Yoo, Hyung Jung; Song, Byeonghwa; Cho, Dong-il Dan; Seo, Jong-Mo; Kim, Sung Jae

    2016-12-01

    The concepts of microrobots has been drawn significant attentions recently since its unprecedented applicability in nanotechnology and biomedical field. Bacteria attached microparticles presented in this work are one of pioneering microrobot technology for self-propulsion or producing kinetic energy from ambient for their motions. Microfluidic device, especially utilizing laminar flow characteristics, were employed for anisotropic attachment of Salmonella typhimurium flagellated chemotactic bacteria to 30 um × 30 um and 50 um × 50 um microparticles that made of biodegradable polymer. Any toxic chemicals or harmful treatments were excluded during the attachment process and it finished within 100 s for the anisotropic attachment. The attachments were directly confirmed by fluorescent intensity changes and SEM visualization. Chemotaxis motions were tracked using aspartate and the maximum velocity of the bacteria-attached microrobot was measured to be 5 um/s which is comparable to prior state of art technologies. This reusable and scalable method could play a key role in chemotaxis delivery of functional microparticles such as drug delivery system.

  16. Cell-cell interactions mediate cytoskeleton organization and collective endothelial cell chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamloo, Amir

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the role of cell-cell and cell-ligand interactions in cytoskeleton organization of endothelial cells (ECs) and their directional migration within a microfluidic device. The migration of ECs in response to a biochemical factor was studied. Mathematical analysis of the cell migration pathways and cellular cytoskeleton revealed that directional migration, migration persistence length, migration speed, and cytoskeletal stress fiber alignment can be mediated by the level of cell contacts as well as the presence or absence of a biochemical polarizing factor. It was shown that in the presence of a biochemical polarizing factor, higher cell density and more frequent cell contacts has a reinforcing effect on collective cell chemotaxis. In contrast, in the absence of a polarizing factor, high cell density can decrease or suppress the ability of the cells to migrate. Also, the correlation of actin stress fiber organization and alignment with directional migration of ECs was investigated. It was shown that in the presence of a biochemical polarizing factor, stress fibers within the cytoskeleton of ECs can be significantly aligned parallel to the gradient direction when the cells have higher level of contacts. The results also show that the organization and alignment of actin stress fibers is mediated by cell adhesion junctions during collective cell migration and introduce cell-cell interactions as a key factor during collective cell chemotaxis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The role of the prostaglandin D2 receptor, DP, in eosinophil trafficking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schratl, Petra; Royer, Julia F; Kostenis, Evi

    2007-01-01

    of DP has remained unclear. We report in this study that, in addition to CRTH2, the DP receptor plays an important role in eosinophil trafficking. First, we investigated the release of eosinophils from bone marrow using the in situ perfused guinea pig hind limb preparation. PGD2 induced the rapid......Prostaglandin (PG) D2 is a major mast cell product that acts via two receptors, the D-type prostanoid (DP) and the chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on Th2 cells (CRTH2) receptors. Whereas CRTH2 mediates the chemotaxis of eosinophils, basophils, and Th2 lymphocytes, the role...

  18. The roles of integrins and extracellular matrix proteins in the insulin-like growth factor I-stimulated chemotaxis of human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerr, M E; Jones, J I

    1996-02-02

    The effects of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) on the migration of two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-231, were examined using a modified Boyden chamber. 10 ng/ml was the optimal IGF-I concentration for stimulation of migration. The majority of IGF-I-stimulated migration in both cell types was due to chemotaxis. MCF-7 cells failed to migrate on membranes coated with gelatin or fibronectin and migrated only in small numbers on laminin. In contrast, when vitronectin- or type IV collagen-coated membranes were used, the MCF-7 cells migrated in large numbers specifically in response to IGF-I but not to 10% fetal calf serum, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, or platelet derived growth factor-BB. An IGF-I receptor-blocking antibody inhibited IGF-I-stimulated migration in both cell types. In addition, a blocking antibody to the alpha v beta 5 integrin (a vitronectin receptor) inhibited migration of MCF-7 cells in response to IGF-I through vitronectin but not through type IV collagen. Similarly, blocking antibodies specific for alpha 2 and beta 1 integrins significantly inhibited migration of both cell types through type IV collagen-coated membranes but not through vitronectin-coated membranes. We conclude that: 1) IGF-I stimulates migration of these two cell types through the IGF-I receptor; 2) interaction of vitronectin with the alpha v beta 5 integrin or collagen with the alpha 2 beta 1 integrin is necessary for the complete IGF-I response in MCF-7 cells, and 3) because migration represents an in vitro model for metastatic spread, integrins, extracellular matrix proteins, and IGF-I may play coordinated roles in the metastasis of breast cancer in vivo.

  19. Chemotaxis of Caenorhabditis elegans in complex media: crawling, burrowing, 2D and 3D swimming, and controlled fluctuations hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Amar; Bilbao, Alejandro; Rahman, Mizanur; Vanapalli, Siva; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a powerful genetic model, essential for studies in diverse areas ranging from behavior to neuroscience to aging, and locomotion and chemotaxis are the two key observables used. We combine our recently developed theory of nematode locomotion and turning maneuvers [Phys. Fluids 25, 081902 (2013)] with simple models of chemosensation to analyze nematode chemotaxis strategies in 2D and 3D environments. We show that the sharp-turn (pirouette) chemotaxis mechanism is efficient in diverse media; in particular, the nematode does not need to adjust the sensing or motion-control parameters to efficiently chemotax in 2D crawling, 3D burrowing, and 2D or 3D swimming. In contrast, the graduate-turn mechanism becomes inefficient in swimming, unless a phase-shift is introduced between the sensing signal and modulation of body wave to generate the gradual turn. We hypothesize that there exists a new ``controlled fluctuations'' chemotaxis mechanism, in which the nematode changes the intensity of undulation fluctuations to adjust the persistence length of the trajectory in response to a variation in chemoattractant concentration. Supported by NSF Grant No. CBET 1059745.

  20. A monocyte chemotaxis inhibiting factor in serum of HIV infected men shares epitopes with the HIV transmembrane protein gp41

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tas, M.; Drexhage, H. A.; Goudsmit, J.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes that gp41, the transmembranous envelope protein of HIV, is able to inhibit monocyte chemotaxis (measured as FMLP-induced polarization). To study the presence of such immunosuppressive HIV env proteins in the circulation of HIV-infected men, fractions were prepared from serum

  1. Evidence for bacterial chemotaxis to cyanobacteria from a radioassay technique. [Lyngbya birgei; Aphanizomenon flos-aquae; Aeromonas hydrophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kangatharalingam, N.; Wang, Lizhu; Priscu, J.C. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman (USA))

    1991-08-01

    Lyngbya birgei and Aphanizomenon flos-aquae elicited a significant chemotactic attraction of Aeromonas hydrophila compared with controls lacking cyanobacteria. There was a positive exponential relationship between biomass (chlorophyll a) of L. birgei and A. flos-aquae and chemotactic attraction of A. hydrophila. The assay equipment was simple and reliable and could be used to study bacterial chemotaxis in other species in situ.

  2. The chemotaxis regulator pilG of Xylella fastidiosa is required for virulence in Vitis vinifera grapevines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Type IV pili of X. fastidiosa are regulated by pilG, a response regulator protein putatively involved in chemotaxis-like operon sensing stimuli through signal transduction pathways. To elucidate roles of pilG in pathogenicity of X. fastidiosa, the pilG-deletion mutant and complementary strain contai...

  3. Chemotaxis can take plant-parasitic nematodes to the source of a chemo-attractant via the shortest possible routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Andy M; Dutta, Tushar K; Curtis, Rosane H C; Powers, Stephen J; Gaur, Hari S; Kerry, Brian R

    2011-04-06

    It has long been recognized that chemotaxis is the primary means by which nematodes locate host plants. Nonetheless, chemotaxis has received scant attention. We show that chemotaxis is predicted to take nematodes to a source of a chemo-attractant via the shortest possible routes through the labyrinth of air-filled or water-filled channels within a soil through which the attractant diffuses. There are just two provisos: (i) all of the channels through which the attractant diffuses are accessible to the nematodes and (ii) nematodes can resolve all chemical gradients no matter how small. Previously, this remarkable consequence of chemotaxis had gone unnoticed. The predictions are supported by experimental studies of the movement patterns of the root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne incognita and Meloidogyne graminicola in modified Y-chamber olfactometers filled with Pluronic gel. By providing two routes to a source of the attractant, one long and one short, our experiments, the first to demonstrate the routes taken by nematodes to plant roots, serve to test our predictions. Our data show that nematodes take the most direct route to their preferred hosts (as predicted) but often take the longest route towards poor hosts. We hypothesize that a complex of repellent and attractant chemicals influences the interaction between nematodes and their hosts.

  4. The effect of montelukast (MK-0476), a cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonist, on allergen-induced airway responses and sputum cell counts in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diamant, Z.; Grootendorst, D. C.; Veselic-Charvat, M.; Timmers, M. C.; de Smet, M.; Leff, J. A.; Seidenberg, B. C.; Zwinderman, A. H.; Peszek, I.; Sterk, P. J.

    1999-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes are capable of inducing chemotaxis of eosinophils in vitro and within the airways of animals and humans in vivo. We hypothesized that montelukast (MK-0476), a potent cysLT1 receptor antagonist, would protect against allergen-induced early (EAR) and late (LAR) asthmatic

  5. Minimalistic behavioral rule derived from bacterial chemotaxis in a stochastic resonance setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemoto, Shuhei; Dallalibera, Fabio; Hosoda, Koh; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    2012-02-01

    Animals are able to cope with the noise, uncertainties, and complexity of the real world. Often even elementary living beings, equipped with very limited sensory organs, are able to reach regions favorable to their existence, using simple stochastic policies. In this paper we discuss a minimalistic stochastic behavioral rule, inspired from bacteria chemotaxis, which is able to increase the value of a specified evaluation function in a similar manner. In particular, we prove that, under opportune assumptions, the direction that is taken with maximum probability by an agent that follows this rule corresponds to the optimal direction. The rule does not require a specific agent dynamics, needs no memory for storing observed states, and works in generic n-dimensional spaces. It thus reveals itself interesting for the control of simple sensing robots as well.

  6. The stochastic dance of circling sperm cells: sperm chemotaxis in the plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, B M; Juelicher, F [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Noethnitzer Strasse 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: ben@pks.mpg.de, E-mail: julicher@pks.mpg.de

    2008-12-15

    Biological systems such as single cells must function in the presence of fluctuations. It has been shown in a two-dimensional experimental setup that sea urchin sperm cells move toward a source of chemoattractant along planar trochoidal swimming paths, i.e. drifting circles. In these experiments, a pronounced variability of the swimming paths is observed. We present a theoretical description of sperm chemotaxis in two dimensions which takes fluctuations into account. We derive a coarse-grained theory of stochastic sperm swimming paths in a concentration field of chemoattractant. Fluctuations enter as multiplicative noise in the equations for the sperm swimming path. We discuss the stochastic properties of sperm swimming and predict a concentration-dependence of the effective diffusion constant of sperm swimming which could be tested in experiments.

  7. Intra-amoeba multiplication induces chemotaxis and biofilm colonization and formation for Legionella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renaud Bigot

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila, a facultative intracellular bacterium, is the causative agent of legionellosis. In the environment this pathogenic bacterium colonizes the biofilms as well as amoebae, which provide a rich environment for the replication of Legionella. When seeded on pre-formed biofilms, L. pneumophila was able to establish and survive and was only found at the surface of the biofilms. Different phenotypes were observed when the L. pneumophila, used to implement pre-formed biofilms or to form mono-species biofilms, were cultivated in a laboratory culture broth or had grown intracellulary within the amoeba. Indeed, the bacteria, which developed within the amoeba, formed clusters when deposited on a solid surface. Moreover, our results demonstrate that multiplication inside the amoeba increased the capacity of L. pneumophila to produce polysaccharides and therefore enhanced its capacity to establish biofilms. Finally, it was shown that the clusters formed by L. pneumophila were probably related to the secretion of a chemotaxis molecular agent.

  8. The stochastic dance of circling sperm cells: sperm chemotaxis in the plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, B. M.; Jülicher, F.

    2008-12-01

    Biological systems such as single cells must function in the presence of fluctuations. It has been shown in a two-dimensional experimental setup that sea urchin sperm cells move toward a source of chemoattractant along planar trochoidal swimming paths, i.e. drifting circles. In these experiments, a pronounced variability of the swimming paths is observed. We present a theoretical description of sperm chemotaxis in two dimensions which takes fluctuations into account. We derive a coarse-grained theory of stochastic sperm swimming paths in a concentration field of chemoattractant. Fluctuations enter as multiplicative noise in the equations for the sperm swimming path. We discuss the stochastic properties of sperm swimming and predict a concentration-dependence of the effective diffusion constant of sperm swimming which could be tested in experiments.

  9. Suppression of blood monocyte and neutrophil chemotaxis in acute human malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Kharazmi, A; Theander, T G

    1986-01-01

    The host response to Plasmodia includes the production of enlarged populations of peripheral blood monocytes and tissue macrophages in the spleen and the liver. Since the hyperplasia of the mononuclear phagocyte system is believed to arise as a consequence of an enhanced blood monocyte influx, we....... No significant differences between P. falciparum and P. vivax/ovale malaria was observed with respect to blood monocyte chemotactic responsiveness. Neutrophil chemotaxis in patients with P. falciparum infections was similarly suppressed before treatment (54% of controls), was still defective after 3 days....... In conclusion, not all cell functions were altered in concert, and the previously unreported suppression of chemotactic migration might reflect a change in blood leucocyte subpopulations, deactivation in vivo or a direct suppressive effect of plasmodia induced products....

  10. The photosensor protein Ppr of Rhodocista centenaria is linked to the chemotaxis signalling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiefer Dorothee

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhodocista centenaria is a phototrophic α-proteobacterium exhibiting a phototactic behaviour visible as colony movement on agar plates directed to red light. As many phototrophic purple bacteria R. centenaria possesses a soluble photoactive yellow protein (Pyp. It exists as a long fusion protein, designated Ppr, consisting of three domains, the Pyp domain, a putative bilin binding domain (Bbd and a histidine kinase domain (Pph. The Ppr protein is involved in the regulation of polyketide synthesis but it is still unclear, how this is connected to phototaxis and chemotaxis. Results To elucidate the possible role of Ppr and Pph in the chemotactic network we studied the interaction with chemotactic proteins in vitro as well as in vivo. Matrix-assisted coelution experiments were performed to study the possible communication of the different putative binding partners. The kinase domain of the Ppr protein was found to interact with the chemotactic linker protein CheW. The formation of this complex was clearly ATP-dependent. Further results indicated that the Pph histidine kinase domain and CheW may form a complex with the chemotactic kinase CheAY suggesting a role of Ppr in the chemotaxis signalling pathway. In addition, when Ppr or Pph were expressed in Escherichia coli, the chemotactic response of the cells was dramatically affected. Conclusions The Ppr protein of Rhodocista centenaria directly interacts with the chemotactic protein CheW. This suggests a role of the Ppr protein in the regulation of the chemotactic response in addition to its role in chalcone synthesis.

  11. Hem-1 complexes are essential for Rac activation, actin polymerization, and myosin regulation during neutrophil chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orion D Weiner

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Migrating cells need to make different actin assemblies at the cell's leading and trailing edges and to maintain physical separation of signals for these assemblies. This asymmetric control of activities represents one important form of cell polarity. There are significant gaps in our understanding of the components involved in generating and maintaining polarity during chemotaxis. Here we characterize a family of complexes (which we term leading edge complexes, scaffolded by hematopoietic protein 1 (Hem-1, that organize the neutrophil's leading edge. The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family Verprolin-homologous protein (WAVE2 complex, which mediates activation of actin polymerization by Rac, is only one member of this family. A subset of these leading edge complexes are biochemically separable from the WAVE2 complex and contain a diverse set of potential polarity-regulating proteins. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of Hem-1-containing complexes in neutrophil-like cells: (a dramatically impairs attractant-induced actin polymerization, polarity, and chemotaxis; (b substantially weakens Rac activation and phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5-tris-phosphate production, disrupting the (phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5-tris-phosphate/Rac/F-actin-mediated feedback circuit that organizes the leading edge; and (c prevents exclusion of activated myosin from the leading edge, perhaps by misregulating leading edge complexes that contain inhibitors of the Rho-actomyosin pathway. Taken together, these observations show that versatile Hem-1-containing complexes coordinate diverse regulatory signals at the leading edge of polarized neutrophils, including but not confined to those involving WAVE2-dependent actin polymerization.

  12. Seeding-inspired chemotaxis genetic algorithm for the inference of biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shinq-Jen; Wu, Cheng-Tao

    2014-09-18

    A large challenge in the post-genomic era is to obtain the quantitatively dynamic interactive information of the important constitutes of underlying systems. The S-system is a dynamic and structurally rich model that determines the net strength of interactions between genes and/or proteins. Good generation characteristics without the need for prior information have allowed S-systems to become one of the most promising canonical models. Various evolutionary computation technologies have recently been developed for the identification of system parameters and skeletal-network structures. However, the gaps between the truncated and preserved terms remain too small. Additionally, current research methods fail to identify the structures of high dimensional systems (e.g., 30 genes with 1800 connections). Optimization technologies should converge fast and have the ability to adaptively adjust the search. In this study, we propose a seeding-inspired chemotaxis genetic algorithm (SCGA) that can force evolution to adjust the population movement to identify a favorable location. The seeding-inspired training strategy is a method to achieve optimal results with limited resources. SCGA introduces seeding-inspired genetic operations to allow a population to possess competitive power (exploitation and exploration) and a winner-chemotaxis-induced population migration to force a population to repeatedly tumble away from an attractor and swim toward another attractor. SCGA was tested on several canonical biological systems. SCGA not only learned the correct structure within only one to three pruning steps but also ensures pruning safety. The values of the truncated terms were all smaller than 10 -14 , even for a thirty-gene system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Radioassay of granulocyte chemotaxis. Studies of human granulocytes and chemotactic factors. [/sup 51/Cr tracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallin, J.I.

    1974-01-01

    The above studies demonstrate that the /sup 51/Cr radiolabel chemotactic assay is a relatively simple and objective means for studying leukocyte chemotaxis in both normal and pathological conditions. Application of this method to studies of normal human chemotaxis revealed a relatively narrow range of normal and little day-to-day variability. Analysis of this variability revealed that there is more variability among the response of different granulocytes to a constant chemotactic stimulus than among the chemotactic activity of different sera to a single cell source. Utilizing the /sup 51/Cr radioassay, the abnormal granulocyte chemotactic behavior reported in Chediak-Higashi syndrome and a patient with recurrent pyogenic infections and mucocutaneous candidiasis has been confirmed. The /sup 51/Cr chemotactic assay has also been used to assess the generation of chemotactic activity from human serum and plasma. The in vitro generation of two distinct chemotactic factors were examined; the complement product (C5a) and kallikrein, an enzyme of the kinin-generating pathway. Kinetic analysis of complement-related chemotactic factor formation, utilizing immune complexes or endotoxin to activate normal sera in the presence or absence of EGTA as well as kinetic analysis of activation of C2-deficient human serum, provided an easy means of distinguishing the classical (antibody-mediated) complement pathway from the alternate pathway. Such kinetic analysis is necessary to detect clinically important abnormalities since, after 60 min of generation time, normal chemotactic activity may be present despite complete absence or inhibition of one complement pathway. The chemotactic factor generated by either pathway of complement activation appears to be predominately attributable to C5a.

  14. Discovery and Characterization of Biased Allosteric Agonists of the Chemokine Receptor CXCR3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milanos, Lampros; Brox, Regine; Frank, Theresa

    2016-01-01

    In this work we report a design, synthesis, and detailed functional characterization of unique strongly biased allosteric agonists of CXCR3 that contain tetrahydroisoquinoline carboxamide cores. Compound 11 (FAUC1036) is the first strongly biased allosteric agonist of CXCR3 that selectively induces...... weak chemotaxis and leads to receptor internalization and the β-arrestin 2 recruitment with potency comparable to that of the chemokine CXCL11 without any activation of G proteins. A subtle structural change (addition of a methoxy group, 14 (FAUC1104)) led to a contrasting biased allosteric partial...... agonist that activated solely G proteins, induced chemotaxis, but failed to induce receptor internalization or β-arrestin 2 recruitment. Concomitant structure-activity relationship studies indicated very steep structure-activity relationships, which steer the ligand bias between the β-arrestin 2 and G...

  15. The role of the prostaglandin D2 receptor, DP, in eosinophil trafficking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schratl, Petra; Royer, Julia F; Kostenis, Evi

    2007-01-01

    of DP has remained unclear. We report in this study that, in addition to CRTH2, the DP receptor plays an important role in eosinophil trafficking. First, we investigated the release of eosinophils from bone marrow using the in situ perfused guinea pig hind limb preparation. PGD2 induced the rapid...... that eosinophils in human bone marrow specimens expressed DP and CRTH2 receptors at similar levels. Eosinophils isolated from human peripheral blood likewise expressed DP receptor protein but at lower levels than CRTH2. In agreement with this, the chemotaxis of human peripheral blood eosinophils was inhibited both...

  16. Relationship between chemical composition and biological function of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide: effect on human neutrophil chemotaxis and oxidative burst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Fomsgaard, A; Conrad, R S

    1991-01-01

    There are conflicting data on the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on the function of human neutrophils. The present study was designed to examine the relationship between chemical composition and the modulatory effect of LPS on human neutrophil function. LPS was extracted from five...... of LPS. After preincubation, the chemotaxis and chemiluminescence of neutrophils to various stimuli were determined. It was shown that LPS from different strains did not exert the same degree of regulatory effect on neutrophil functions. LPS from strain 174-O:9 exerted the most pronounced effect...... no effect on neutrophil chemotaxis and a slight effect on chemiluminescence. The major differences in chemical composition of the LPS from these two strains are in the rhamnose and heptose content of the O side chain and in the alanine content of the core region. These data indicate that chemical...

  17. A mutation in the aroE gene affects pigment production, virulence, and chemotaxis in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong-Il; Noh, Tae-Hwan; Lee, Chang-Soo; Park, Young-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causes bacterial blight (BB) in rice. To study its function, a random insertion mutation library of Xoo was constructed using the Tn5 transposon. A mutant strain with decreased virulence against the susceptible rice cultivar IR24 was isolated from the library (aroE mutant), which also had extremely low pigment production. Thermal asymmetric interlaced-polymerase chain reaction (TAIL-PCR) and sequence analysis of the mutant revealed that the transposon was inserted into the aroE gene (encoding shikimate dehydrogenase). To investigate gene expression changes in the pigment- and virulence-deficient mutant, DNA microarray analysis was performed, which showed downregulation of 20 genes involved in the chemotaxis of Xoo. Our findings reveal that mutation of the aroE gene affects virulence and pigment production, as well as expression of genes involved in Xoo chemotaxis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Sinking, merging and stationary plumes in a coupled chemotaxis-fluid model: a high-resolution numerical approach

    KAUST Repository

    Chertock, A.

    2012-02-02

    Aquatic bacteria like Bacillus subtilis are heavier than water yet they are able to swim up an oxygen gradient and concentrate in a layer below the water surface, which will undergo Rayleigh-Taylor-type instabilities for sufficiently high concentrations. In the literature, a simplified chemotaxis-fluid system has been proposed as a model for bio-convection in modestly diluted cell suspensions. It couples a convective chemotaxis system for the oxygen-consuming and oxytactic bacteria with the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations subject to a gravitational force proportional to the relative surplus of the cell density compared to the water density. In this paper, we derive a high-resolution vorticity-based hybrid finite-volume finite-difference scheme, which allows us to investigate the nonlinear dynamics of a two-dimensional chemotaxis-fluid system with boundary conditions matching an experiment of Hillesdon et al. (Bull. Math. Biol., vol. 57, 1995, pp. 299-344). We present selected numerical examples, which illustrate (i) the formation of sinking plumes, (ii) the possible merging of neighbouring plumes and (iii) the convergence towards numerically stable stationary plumes. The examples with stable stationary plumes show how the surface-directed oxytaxis continuously feeds cells into a high-concentration layer near the surface, from where the fluid flow (recurring upwards in the space between the plumes) transports the cells into the plumes, where then gravity makes the cells sink and constitutes the driving force in maintaining the fluid convection and, thus, in shaping the plumes into (numerically) stable stationary states. Our numerical method is fully capable of solving the coupled chemotaxis-fluid system and enabling a full exploration of its dynamics, which cannot be done in a linearised framework. © 2012 Cambridge University Press.

  19. Enamel Matrix Derivative Promotes Superoxide Production and Chemotaxis, but Reduces Matrix Metalloproteinase 8 Expression by Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karima, Mamdouh M.; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) is the predominant innate immune cell type activated in acute inflammation. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of Enamel matrix derivative (EMD) on superoxide (O2−) generation, chemotaxis, and matrix metalloproteinase 8 (MMP 8) secretion by PMN in vitro to better understand the role of EMD in surgical wound healing. Methods PMN were isolated from healthy volunteers (N = 14). Superoxide generation was measured using a cytochrome-C reduction assay. Chemotaxis was measured in a modified Boyden chamber. MMP 8 secretion was analyzed by Western blotting. A relative density method was used to determine the percent of MMP 8 released from the PMN in relation to the total cellular MMP 8 content. Results O2− generation was significantly elevated when PMN were stimulated with EMD (200 μg/ml) (P<0.01). Secondary stimulation of PMN with 1 μM fMLP trigged earlier and more sustained O2− generation with EMD. EMD significantly increased PMN chemotactic activity (P<0.05). Combined stimulation with EMD plus formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) resulted in significantly higher chemotaxis compared to fMLP alone (P<0.05). Conversely, EMD did not induce MMP 8 secretion from PMN. MMP 8 secretion by PMN in response to fMLP or serum-opsonized zymosan (OZ) stimulation was significantly inhibited by EMD (P<0.05). Conclusion EMD has specific, differential actions on PMN that suggest potential for enhancement of wound healing; bacterial and tissue debris clearance (O2− generation and chemotaxis) and suppress tissue damage and degradation (MMP 8). Taken together, the data suggest that EMD enhances wound healing and reduces inflammation. PMID:22050547

  20. A Novel Immune-Intact Mouse Model of Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis: Mechanisms of Chemotaxis and Bone Colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    of prostate tumor cells that have already colonized the bone, and are largely ineffective in prolonging the survival of human prostate cancer patients...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0174 TITLE: A Novel Immune-Intact Mouse Model of Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis: Mechanisms of Chemotaxis and Bone... Colonization PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Srinivas Nandana CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Cedars-Sinai Medical Center Los Angeles, CA, 90048 REPORT DATE

  1. Cloning and pharmacological characterization of the dog histamine H4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen; Lim, Herman D; Zhang, Mai; Desai, Pragnya; Dai, Heng; Colling, Patricia M; Leurs, Rob; Thurmond, Robin L

    2008-09-11

    The histamine H4 receptor has been shown to have a role in chemotaxis and mediator release in various types of immune cells and has been implicated in mediating inflammation in vivo. Previous work has shown that there were differences in the histamine H4 receptor sequence of different species and these translated into changes in the pharmacology of the receptors. To help further understand the nature of these differences, we have cloned and expressed the histamine H4 receptor of dog (Canis familiaris). The dog histamine H4 receptor has a 61-71% homology with the receptors from other species, with a 71% homology to the human receptor. The affinity for histamine at the dog histamine H4 receptor is 18 nM and is 3-fold lower than the human ortholog. A number of previously described histamine H4 receptor ligands were tested for affinity at the dog histamine H4 receptor and histamine showed the highest affinity of the ligands tested. In addition, the histamine H4 receptor selective antagonist, JNJ 7777120, had a Ki value of 50 nM and acts as an antagonist at the dog receptor. In general, agonists of the human histamine H4 receptor were also agonists of the dog receptor albeit with different efficacy levels. The cloning and in vitro pharmacological characterization of the dog histamine H4 receptor provide useful information for future studies using dog models as well as in understanding the ligand-receptor interactions of the receptor.

  2. A quantitative method to measure human platelet chemotaxis using indium-111-oxine-labeled gel-filtered platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowenhaupt, R.W.; Silberstein, E.B.; Sperling, M.I.; Mayfield, G.

    1982-01-01

    Human blood platelets have been shown to migrate directionally and specifically toward collagen in plasma in vitro. We have developed a new system to monitor this behavior using a linear 7-compartment chamber with 111 In-oxine-labeled gel-filtered platelets. The compartments are separated by various Nuclepore and Millipore filter membranes. Radiolabeled platelets suspended in plasma are placed in the central compartment and the other compartments are filled with platelet-free plasma. When collagen is added to an end compartment, platelets migrate toward that end. The degree of this directed movement or chemotaxis can be measured by counting the radioactivity of the contents of each compartment and then comparing the counts from radiolabeled platelets that have moved to the end that holds the chemotactic inducer with those that have randomly migrated to the opposite end, containing only plasma. This assay system allows quantitative comparisons between the chemotaxis-inducing abilities of different substances and permits the study of soluble materials. Experiments to determine the optimal conditons for the procedure are reported, and the advantages of this new method for the investigation of platelet chemotaxis and the identification of chemotaxins are discussed

  3. A quantitative method to measure human platelet chemotaxis using 111In-oxine-labeled gel-filtered platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowenhaupt, R.W.; Silberstein, E.B.; Sperling, M.I.; Mayfield, G.

    1982-01-01

    Human blood platelets have been shown to migrate directionally and specifically toward collagen in plasma in vitro. We have developed a new system to monitor this behavior using a linear 7-compartment chamber with 111 In-oxine-labeled gel-filtered platelets. The compartments are separated by various Nuclepore and Millipore filter membranes. Radiolabeled platelets suspended in plasma are placed in the central compartment and the other compartments are filled with platelet-free plasma. When collagen is added to an end compartment, platelets migrate toward that end. The degree of this directed movement or chemotaxis can be measured by counting the radioactivity of the contents of each compartment and then comparing the counts from radiolabeled platelets that have moved to the end that holds the chemotactic inducer with those that have randomly migrated to the opposite end, containing only plasma. This assay system allows quantitative comparisons between the chemotaxis-inducing abilities of different substances and permits the study of soluble materials. Experiments to determine the optimal conditions for the procedure are reported, and the advantages of this new method for the investigation of platelet chemotaxis and the identification of chemotaxins are discussed

  4. Maneuverability and chemotaxis of Caenorhabditis elegans in three-dimensional environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy; Bilbao, Alejandro; Patel, Amar; Vanapalli, Siva

    2015-11-01

    Locomotion of the nematode C. elegans in water and complex fluids has recently been investigated to gain insight into neuromuscular control of locomotion and to shed light on nematode evolutionary adaptation to environments with varying mechanical properties. Previous studies focused mainly on locomotion efficiency and on adaptation of the nematode gait to the surrounding medium. Much less attention has been devoted to nematode maneuverability, in spite of its crucial role in the survival of the animal. Recently we have provided a quantitative analysis of turning maneuvers of crawling and swimming nematodes on flat surfaces and in 2D fluid layers. Based on this work, we follow with the first full 3D description of how C. elegans moves in complex 3D environments. We show that by superposing body twist and 2D undulations, a burrowing or swimming nematode can rotate the undulation plane and change the direction of motion within that plane by varying undulation-wave parameters. A combination of these corkscrew maneuvers and 2D turns allows the nematode to explore 3D space. We conclude by analyzing 3D chemotaxis of nematodes burrowing in gel and swimming in water, which demonstrates an important application of our maneuverability model. This work was supported by NSF grant CBET-1059745.

  5. Acinetobacter baumannii phenylacetic acid metabolism influences infection outcome through a direct effect on neutrophil chemotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, Md Saruar; Ellett, Felix; Murray, Gerald L.; Kostoulias, Xenia; Cerqueira, Gustavo M.; Schulze, Keith E.; Mahamad Maifiah, Mohd Hafidz; Li, Jian; Creek, Darren J.; Lieschke, Graham J.; Peleg, Anton Y.

    2016-01-01

    Innate cellular immune responses are a critical first-line defense against invading bacterial pathogens. Leukocyte migration from the bloodstream to a site of infection is mediated by chemotactic factors that are often host-derived. More recently, there has been a greater appreciation of the importance of bacterial factors driving neutrophil movement during infection. Here, we describe the development of a zebrafish infection model to study Acinetobacter baumannii pathogenesis. By using isogenic A. baumannii mutants lacking expression of virulence effector proteins, we demonstrated that bacterial drivers of disease severity are conserved between zebrafish and mammals. By using transgenic zebrafish with fluorescent phagocytes, we showed that a mutation of an established A. baumannii global virulence regulator led to marked changes in neutrophil behavior involving rapid neutrophil influx to a localized site of infection, followed by prolonged neutrophil dwelling. This neutrophilic response augmented bacterial clearance and was secondary to an impaired A. baumannii phenylacetic acid catabolism pathway, which led to accumulation of phenylacetate. Purified phenylacetate was confirmed to be a neutrophil chemoattractant. These data identify a previously unknown mechanism of bacterial-guided neutrophil chemotaxis in vivo, providing insight into the role of bacterial metabolism in host innate immune evasion. Furthermore, the work provides a potentially new therapeutic paradigm of targeting a bacterial metabolic pathway to augment host innate immune responses and attenuate disease. PMID:27506797

  6. Navier-Stokes symmetry in the phenomenological transport theory for bacterial chemotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Gerald

    1984-05-01

    It is observed that the Navier-Stokes space-time dilatation invariance (x-->-->λx-->,t-->λ2t) implies that the random motility and chemotactic flux function take the forms observed experimentally for motile Escherichia coli attracted by low concentrations of oxygen; moreover, the rate function for E. coli consumption of dissolved oxygen is required to have the form (const) × (local oxygen concentration)2/3. It is also noteworthy that the Schrödinger-Bloch function for redistribution of chemotactic bacteria cells is invariant under the space-time dilatation transformations if and only if the chemotactic flux coefficient-random motility ratio equals 2, a value in the range 1.1 to 2.5 observed experimentally by Holz and Chen in the oxygen chemotaxis of motile E. coli. Suitably specialized governing equations for the phenomenological transport theory also admit a Galilean transformation invariance symmetry if and only if the chemotactic flux coefficient-critical substrate diffusivity ratio equals -2 and the consumption rate function is simply linear in the local oxygen concentration. Applicable to the regime of viscous incompressible flows with Reynolds numbers much less than unity, the Navier-Stokes superposition invariance may also give rise to a corresponding invariance symmetry in equivalent but linear phenomenological transport equations.

  7. Acinetobacter baumannii phenylacetic acid metabolism influences infection outcome through a direct effect on neutrophil chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, Md Saruar; Ellett, Felix; Murray, Gerald L; Kostoulias, Xenia; Cerqueira, Gustavo M; Schulze, Keith E; Mahamad Maifiah, Mohd Hafidz; Li, Jian; Creek, Darren J; Lieschke, Graham J; Peleg, Anton Y

    2016-08-23

    Innate cellular immune responses are a critical first-line defense against invading bacterial pathogens. Leukocyte migration from the bloodstream to a site of infection is mediated by chemotactic factors that are often host-derived. More recently, there has been a greater appreciation of the importance of bacterial factors driving neutrophil movement during infection. Here, we describe the development of a zebrafish infection model to study Acinetobacter baumannii pathogenesis. By using isogenic A. baumannii mutants lacking expression of virulence effector proteins, we demonstrated that bacterial drivers of disease severity are conserved between zebrafish and mammals. By using transgenic zebrafish with fluorescent phagocytes, we showed that a mutation of an established A. baumannii global virulence regulator led to marked changes in neutrophil behavior involving rapid neutrophil influx to a localized site of infection, followed by prolonged neutrophil dwelling. This neutrophilic response augmented bacterial clearance and was secondary to an impaired A. baumannii phenylacetic acid catabolism pathway, which led to accumulation of phenylacetate. Purified phenylacetate was confirmed to be a neutrophil chemoattractant. These data identify a previously unknown mechanism of bacterial-guided neutrophil chemotaxis in vivo, providing insight into the role of bacterial metabolism in host innate immune evasion. Furthermore, the work provides a potentially new therapeutic paradigm of targeting a bacterial metabolic pathway to augment host innate immune responses and attenuate disease.

  8. Excitable waves and direction-sensing in Dictyostelium discoideum: steps towards a chemotaxis model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, Arpan; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Levine, Herbert

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, there have been significant advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying chemically directed motility by eukaryotic cells such as Dictyostelium. In particular, the local excitation and global inhibition (LEGI) model has proven capable of providing a framework for quantitatively explaining many experiments that present Dictyostelium cells with tailored chemical stimuli and monitor their subsequent polarization. In their natural setting, cells generate their own directional signals via the detection and secretion of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Here, we couple the LEGI approach to an excitable medium model of the cAMP wave-field that is propagated by the cells and investigate the possibility for this class of models to enable accurate chemotaxis to the cAMP waveforms expected in vivo. Our results indicate that the ultra-sensitive version of the model does an excellent job in providing natural wave rectification, thereby providing a compelling solution to the ‘back-of-the-wave paradox’ during cellular aggregation.

  9. Hypoxia-increased RAGE expression regulates chemotaxis and pro-inflammatory cytokines release through nuclear translocation of NF-κ B and HIF1α in THP-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Wei; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Na; Liu, Qin; Cui, Jian; Zou, Wei; Zhang, Wei

    2018-01-15

    The potential role of hypoxia in mediating the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) expression deserves to be confirmed. And the role of RAGE in hypoxia-induced chemotaxis and inflammation is still unclear. In present study, THP-1 cells were pretreated with siRNA to block HIF1α, NF-κ B, or RAGE, followed by exposed to hypoxia (combined with H 2 O 2 or SNP), and then RAGE expression, nuclear translocation of HIF1α and NF-κ B, release of TNF-α and IL-1β, as well as expression of MCP-1 and CCR2 were measured. The results revealed that RAGE mRNA and protein in THP-1 cells were significantly increased after exposed into hypoxia atmosphere, especially into the solution containing SNP or H 2 O 2 . Moreover, SNP or H 2 O 2 exposure could further amplify hypoxia-induced nuclear translocation of HIF-1α and NF-κ B. Knockdown HIF-1α or NF-κ B by siRNAs could reduce hypoxia- and oxidative stress-induced RAGE hyper-expression. And pretreatment THP-1 cells with RAGE siRNA or NF-κ B siRNA could reduce hypoxia- and oxidative stress-induced expression of MCP-1 and CCR2, and release of TNF-α and IL-1β. Thus, hypoxia not only increases RAGE expression in THP-1 cells by promoting nuclear translocation of NF-κ B and HIF1α, but also regulates chemotaxis and pro-inflammatory cytokines release, which may be partially mediated through upregulation of RAGE expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Interaction of Zap70 and CXCR4 receptor at lamellipodia that determines the directionality during Jurkat T cells chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Yun; Tsai, Yi-Ying; Chen, Sheng-Yi; Lin, Yu-Ping; Shin, Jyh-Wei; Wu, Chia-Ching; Yang, Bei-Chang

    2017-10-01

    Directional migration of T-lymphocytes is a key process during immune activation and is tightly regulated both temporally and spatially. The initial cell membrane protrusion at a particular site is critical for determining the direction of cell migration. In this study, we found that ZAP-70 protein appeared not only at the margin of the spreading areas of polarized Jurkat T cells but also formed clusters near the center of the cell body on a fibronectin plate. Specifically, some pZAP-70 was located at the lamellipodia/filopodia and was closely associated with the most extended membrane contact. To visualize the dynamic distribution of ZAP-70 on migrating Jurkat T cells, we generated a fluorescent ZAP-70-EGFP fusion protein (hZAP70G). Expression of the hZAP70G in P116 cells, a ZAP-70 defective Jurkat derivative, restored its chemotactic migration toward SDF-1, adhesion to fibronectin matrix, and integrin activation. In addition, the distribution of hZAP70G protein is associated with changes in cell shape, specifically the membrane protrusion step, forming filopodia/lamellipodia and a retracting uropod. Furthermore, SDF-1 stimulated the formation of ZAP-70 and CXCR4 complex. CXCR4 was observed mainly at the leading edge of migrating cell. The localization of ZAP-70 at the very front edge of protruding lamellipodia was close to CXCR4 and a part of them were overlapped. Collectively, our data describe the critical early step of directional cell movement toward SDF-1 that ZAP-70 is recruited to the CXCR4 at the leading edge of membrane and consequently modulates lamellipodia/filopodia formation and integrin activation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Insulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, C.R.; Harrison, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on insulin receptors. Part A: Methods for the study of structure and function. Topics covered include: Method for purification and labeling of insulin receptors, the insulin receptor kinase, and insulin receptors on special tissues

  12. Role of motility and chemotaxis in the pathogenesis of Dickeya dadantii 3937 (ex Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antúnez-Lamas, María; Cabrera-Ordóñez, Ezequiel; López-Solanilla, Emilia; Raposo, Rosa; Trelles-Salazar, Oswaldo; Rodríguez-Moreno, Andrés; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo

    2009-02-01

    Dickeya dadantii 3937 (ex Erwinia chrysanthemi), a member of the Enterobacteriaceae, causes soft rot in many economically important crops. A successful pathogen has to reach the interior of the plant in order to cause disease. To study the role of motility and chemotaxis in the pathogenicity of D. dadantii 3937, genes involved in the chemotactic signal transduction system (cheW, cheB, cheY and cheZ) and in the structure of the flagellar motor (motA) were mutagenized. All the mutant strains grew like the wild-type in culture media, and the production and secretion of pectolytic enzymes was not affected. As expected, the swimming ability of the mutant strains was reduced with respect to the wild-type: motA (94%), cheY (80%), cheW (74%), cheB (54%) and cheZ (48%). The virulence of the mutant strains was analysed in chicory, Saintpaulia and potato. The mutant strains were also tested for their capability to enter into Arabidopsis leaves. All the mutants showed a significant decrease of virulence in certain hosts; however, the degree of virulence reduction varied depending on the virulence assay. The ability to penetrate Arabidopsis leaves was impaired in all the mutants, whereas the capacity to colonize potato tubers after artificial inoculation was affected in only two mutant strains. In general, the virulence of the mutants could be ranked as motA

  13. An antiinflammatory galactolipid from rose hip (Rosa canina) that inhibits chemotaxis of human peripheral blood neutrophils in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Erik; Kharazmi, Arsalan; Christensen, Lars P; Christensen, S Brøgger

    2003-07-01

    The galactolipid (2S)-1,2-di-O-[(9Z,12Z,15Z)-octadeca-9,12,15-trienoyl]-3-O-beta-d-galactopyranosyl glycerol (1) isolated from dried and milled fruits of Rosa canina by bioassay-guided fractionation is an antiinflammatory agent with inhibitory effects on chemotaxis of human peripheral blood neutrophils in vitro. The inhibition of cell migration is not related to toxicity. The presence of 1 in rose hips may explain the clinically observed antiinflammatory properties of rose hip herbal remedies.

  14. Global classical solvability and stabilization in a two-dimensional chemotaxis-Navier-Stokes system modeling coral fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo, Elio; Winkler, Michael

    2018-04-01

    The interplay of chemotaxis, convection and reaction terms is studied in the particular framework of a refined model for coral broadcast spawning, consisting of three equations describing the population densities of unfertilized sperms and eggs and the concentration of a chemical released by the latter, coupled to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Under mild assumptions on the initial data, global existence of classical solutions to an associated initial-boundary value problem in bounded planar domains is established. Moreover, all these solutions are shown to approach a spatially homogeneous equilibrium in the large time limit.

  15. Wnt5a induces ROR1/ROR2 heterooligomerization to enhance leukemia chemotaxis and proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Jian; Chen, Liguang; Cui, Bing; Widhopf, George F.; Shen, Zhouxin; Wu, Rongrong; Zhang, Ling; Zhang, Suping; Briggs, Steven P.; Kipps, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionarily conserved receptor tyrosine kinase–like orphan receptor-1 and -2 (ROR1/2) are considered distinct receptors for Wnt5a and are implicated in noncanonical Wnt signaling in organogenesis and cancer metastasis. We found that Wnt5a enhanced proliferation and migration of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells and that these effects were blocked by the humanized anti-ROR1 mAb cirmtuzumab (UC-961). Treatment of CLL cells with Wnt5a induced ROR1 to oligomerize with ROR2 and recruit g...

  16. Neither motility nor chemotaxis plays a role in the ability of Escherichia coli F-18 to colonize the streptomycin-treated mouse large intestine.

    OpenAIRE

    McCormick, B A; Laux, D C; Cohen, P S

    1990-01-01

    Escherichia coli F-18, isolated from the feces of a healthy human in 1977, is an excellent colonizer of the streptomycin-treated mouse large intestine and displays normal motility and chemotaxis ability. A chemotaxis-defective derivative of E. coli F-18, E, coli F-18 CheA-, and a nonflagellated derivative, E. coli F-18 Fla-, were constructed. These strains were found to colonize the streptomycin-treated mouse large intestine as well as E. coli F-18 when mice were fed both E. coli F-18 and eit...

  17. The chemotaxis-like Che1 pathway has an indirect role in adhesive cell properties of Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siuti, Piro; Green, Calvin; Edwards, Amanda Nicole; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Alexandre, Gladys

    2011-10-01

    The Azospirillum brasilense chemotaxis-like Che1 signal transduction pathway was recently shown to modulate changes in adhesive cell surface properties that, in turn, affect cell-to-cell aggregation and flocculation behaviors rather than flagellar-mediated chemotaxis. Attachment to surfaces and root colonization may be functions related to flocculation. Here, the conditions under which A. brasilense wild-type Sp7 and che1 mutant strains attach to abiotic and biotic surfaces were examined using in vitro attachment and biofilm assays combined with atomic force microscopy and confocal microscopy. The nitrogen source available for growth is found to be a major modulator of surface attachment by A. brasilense and could be promoted in vitro by lectins, suggesting that it depends on interaction with surface-exposed residues within the extracellular matrix of cells. However, Che1-dependent signaling is shown to contribute indirectly to surface attachment, indicating that distinct mechanisms are likely underlying flocculation and attachment to surfaces in A. brasilense. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparación de las técnicas Kato-Katz, TSET y TSR en el diagnóstico de infección por Fasciola hepatica en humanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Uribe Delgado

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: La Fasciolosis es una enfermedad causada por el parásito Fasciola hepatica, que afecta primordialmente a bovinos, ovinos, caprinos y en algunas zonas de forma endémica a los humanos. En la investigación clínica y epidemiológica de fasciolosis humana es importante contar con técnicas coprológicas de diagnóstico de alta sensibilidad y especificidad. Objetivo: realizar la comparación de tres técnicas coprológicas para el diagnóstico de infección por Fasciola hepatica en humanos. Metodología: se procesaron 200 gramos de materia fecal de humanos contaminada experimentalmente con huevos de F. hepatica que se obtuvieron de análisis anteriores con muestras de ganado bovino y ovino. La muestra se dividió en 10 partes iguales; a cada una de estas muestras se les realizó la técnicas de Kato-Katz, técnica de sedimentación espontánea en tubo (TSET y técnica de sedimentación rápida (TSR. Finalmente, la lectura de las muestras se basó en el diseño metodológico del doble ciego. Resultados: se encontró que la técnica de sedimentación rápida fue la más sensible de las tres evaluadas, detectándose positividad en 7,5 muestras de 10 analizadas; seguida por la técnica de Kato-Katz con 4,5 muestras y en último lugar la técnica de sedimentación espontánea en Tubo que mostró solo un resultado positivo. Conclusión: en este trabajo se encontró que la técnica de sedimentación rápida constituye la herramienta de elección para el profesional porque es la más sensible de las tres; además de ser sencilla, económica y de fácil aplicación en laboratorios de niveles uno y dos de complejidad para realizar un diagnóstico satisfactorio de fasciolosis humana. Salud UIS 2012; 44 (3: 7-12

  19. Fully human antagonistic antibodies against CCR4 potently inhibit cell signaling and chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs B Hagemann

    Full Text Available CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4 represents a potentially important target for cancer immunotherapy due to its expression on tumor infiltrating immune cells including regulatory T cells (Tregs and on tumor cells in several cancer types and its role in metastasis.Using phage display, human antibody library, affinity maturation and a cell-based antibody selection strategy, the antibody variants against human CCR4 were generated. These antibodies effectively competed with ligand binding, were able to block ligand-induced signaling and cell migration, and demonstrated efficient killing of CCR4-positive tumor cells via ADCC and phagocytosis. In a mouse model of human T-cell lymphoma, significant survival benefit was demonstrated for animals treated with the newly selected anti-CCR4 antibodies.For the first time, successful generation of anti- G-protein coupled chemokine receptor (GPCR antibodies using human non-immune library and phage display on GPCR-expressing cells was demonstrated. The generated anti-CCR4 antibodies possess a dual mode of action (inhibition of ligand-induced signaling and antibody-directed tumor cell killing. The data demonstrate that the anti-tumor activity in vivo is mediated, at least in part, through Fc-receptor dependent effector mechanisms, such as ADCC and phagocytosis. Anti-CC chemokine receptor 4 antibodies inhibiting receptor signaling have potential as immunomodulatory antibodies for cancer.

  20. Anaesthetic Impairment of Immune Function Is Mediated via GABAA Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Daniel W.; Thompson, Andrew J.; Corletto, Federico; Reckless, Jill; Loke, Justin C. T.; Lapaque, Nicolas; Grant, Andrew J.; Mastroeni, Pietro; Grainger, David J.; Padgett, Claire L.; O'Brien, John A.; Miller, Nigel G. A.; Trowsdale, John

    2011-01-01

    Background GABAA receptors are members of the Cys-loop family of neurotransmitter receptors, proteins which are responsible for fast synaptic transmission, and are the site of action of wide range of drugs [1]. Recent work has shown that Cys-loop receptors are present on immune cells, but their physiological roles and the effects of drugs that modify their function in the innate immune system are currently unclear [2]. We are interested in how and why anaesthetics increase infections in intensive care patients; a serious problem as more than 50% of patients with severe sepsis will die [3]–[6]. As many anaesthetics act via GABAA receptors [7], the aim of this study was to determine if these receptors are present on immune cells, and could play a role in immunocompromising patients. Principal Findings We demonstrate, using RT-PCR, that monocytes express GABAA receptors constructed of α1, α4, β2, γ1 and/or δ subunits. Whole cell patch clamp electrophysiological studies show that GABA can activate these receptors, resulting in the opening of a chloride-selective channel; activation is inhibited by the GABAA receptor antagonists bicuculline and picrotoxin, but not enhanced by the positive modulator diazepam. The anaesthetic drugs propofol and thiopental, which can act via GABAA receptors, impaired monocyte function in classic immunological chemotaxis and phagocytosis assays, an effect reversed by bicuculline and picrotoxin. Significance Our results show that functional GABAA receptors are present on monocytes with properties similar to CNS GABAA receptors. The functional data provide a possible explanation as to why chronic propofol and thiopental administration can increase the risk of infection in critically ill patients: their action on GABAA receptors inhibits normal monocyte behaviour. The data also suggest a potential solution: monocyte GABAA receptors are insensitive to diazepam, thus the use of benzodiazepines as an alternative anesthetising agent may be

  1. Coronin 1B regulates S1P-induced human lung endothelial cell chemotaxis: role of PLD2, protein kinase C and Rac1 signal transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter V Usatyuk

    Full Text Available Coronins are a highly conserved family of actin binding proteins that regulate actin-dependent processes such as cell motility and endocytosis. We found that treatment of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs with the bioactive lipid, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P rapidly stimulates coronin 1B translocation to lamellipodia at the cell leading edge, which is required for S1P-induced chemotaxis. Further, S1P-induced chemotaxis of HPAECs was attenuated by pretreatment with small interfering RNA (siRNA targeting coronin 1B (∼36%, PLD2 (∼45% or Rac1 (∼50% compared to scrambled siRNA controls. Down regulation PLD2 expression by siRNA also attenuated S1P-induced coronin 1B translocation to the leading edge of the cell periphery while PLD1 silencing had no effect. Also, S1P-induced coronin 1B redistribution to cell periphery and chemotaxis was attenuated by inhibition of Rac1 and over-expression of dominant negative PKC δ, ε and ζ isoforms in HPAECs. These results demonstrate that S1P activation of PLD2, PKC and Rac1 is part of the signaling cascade that regulates coronin 1B translocation to the cell periphery and the ensuing cell chemotaxis.

  2. A model invalidation-based approach for elucidating biological signalling pathways, applied to the chemotaxis pathway in R. sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Mark A J; August, Elias; Hamadeh, Abdullah; Maini, Philip K; McSharry, Patrick E; Armitage, Judith P; Papachristodoulou, Antonis

    2009-10-31

    Developing methods for understanding the connectivity of signalling pathways is a major challenge in biological research. For this purpose, mathematical models are routinely developed based on experimental observations, which also allow the prediction of the system behaviour under different experimental conditions. Often, however, the same experimental data can be represented by several competing network models. In this paper, we developed a novel mathematical model/experiment design cycle to help determine the probable network connectivity by iteratively invalidating models corresponding to competing signalling pathways. To do this, we systematically design experiments in silico that discriminate best between models of the competing signalling pathways. The method determines the inputs and parameter perturbations that will differentiate best between model outputs, corresponding to what can be measured/observed experimentally. We applied our method to the unknown connectivities in the chemotaxis pathway of the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We first developed several models of R. sphaeroides chemotaxis corresponding to different signalling networks, all of which are biologically plausible. Parameters in these models were fitted so that they all represented wild type data equally well. The models were then compared to current mutant data and some were invalidated. To discriminate between the remaining models we used ideas from control systems theory to determine efficiently in silico an input profile that would result in the biggest difference in model outputs. However, when we applied this input to the models, we found it to be insufficient for discrimination in silico. Thus, to achieve better discrimination, we determined the best change in initial conditions (total protein concentrations) as well as the best change in the input profile. The designed experiments were then performed on live cells and the resulting data used to invalidate all but one of the

  3. A model invalidation-based approach for elucidating biological signalling pathways, applied to the chemotaxis pathway in R. sphaeroides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamadeh Abdullah

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Developing methods for understanding the connectivity of signalling pathways is a major challenge in biological research. For this purpose, mathematical models are routinely developed based on experimental observations, which also allow the prediction of the system behaviour under different experimental conditions. Often, however, the same experimental data can be represented by several competing network models. Results In this paper, we developed a novel mathematical model/experiment design cycle to help determine the probable network connectivity by iteratively invalidating models corresponding to competing signalling pathways. To do this, we systematically design experiments in silico that discriminate best between models of the competing signalling pathways. The method determines the inputs and parameter perturbations that will differentiate best between model outputs, corresponding to what can be measured/observed experimentally. We applied our method to the unknown connectivities in the chemotaxis pathway of the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We first developed several models of R. sphaeroides chemotaxis corresponding to different signalling networks, all of which are biologically plausible. Parameters in these models were fitted so that they all represented wild type data equally well. The models were then compared to current mutant data and some were invalidated. To discriminate between the remaining models we used ideas from control systems theory to determine efficiently in silico an input profile that would result in the biggest difference in model outputs. However, when we applied this input to the models, we found it to be insufficient for discrimination in silico. Thus, to achieve better discrimination, we determined the best change in initial conditions (total protein concentrations as well as the best change in the input profile. The designed experiments were then performed on live cells and the resulting

  4. Role of Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome protein in translation machinery and cell chemotaxis: a comparative genomics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasieva O

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Olga VasievaInstitute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom; Fellowship for the Interpretation of Genomes, Burr Ridge, IL, USAAbstract: Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome (SBDS is linked to a mutation in a single gene. The SBDS proinvolved in RNA metabolism and ribosome-associated functions, but SBDS mutation is primarily linked to a defect in polymorphonuclear leukocytes unable to orient correctly in a spatial gradient of chemoattractants. Results of data mining and comparative genomic approaches undertaken in this study suggest that SBDS protein is also linked to tRNA metabolism and translation initiation. Analysis of crosstalk between translation machinery and cytoskeletal dynamics provides new insights into the cellular chemotactic defects caused by SBDS protein malfunction. The proposed functional interactions provide a new approach to exploit potential targets in the treatment and monitoring of this disease.Keywords: Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome, wybutosine, tRNA, chemotaxis, translation, genomics, gene proximity

  5. Relationship between chemical composition and biological function of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide: effect on human neutrophil chemotaxis and oxidative burst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Fomsgaard, A; Conrad, R S

    1991-01-01

    There are conflicting data on the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on the function of human neutrophils. The present study was designed to examine the relationship between chemical composition and the modulatory effect of LPS on human neutrophil function. LPS was extracted from five...... no effect on neutrophil chemotaxis and a slight effect on chemiluminescence. The major differences in chemical composition of the LPS from these two strains are in the rhamnose and heptose content of the O side chain and in the alanine content of the core region. These data indicate that chemical...... strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis patients by the hot phenol-water method. Chemical characterization included neutral sugars, amino components, and fatty acids. Neutrophils isolated from peripheral blood of healthy individuals were preincubated with different concentrations...

  6. Protein kinase A regulates 3-phosphatidylinositide dynamics during platelet-derived growth factor-induced membrane ruffling and chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, Paula B; Campbell, Shirley L; Baldor, Linda C; Howe, Alan K

    2008-12-12

    Spatial regulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is required for chemotaxis in fibroblasts; however, the mechanism(s) by which PKA regulates the cell migration machinery remain largely unknown. Here we report that one function of PKA during platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced chemotaxis was to promote membrane ruffling by regulating phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP(3)) dynamics. Inhibition of PKA activity dramatically altered membrane dynamics and attenuated formation of peripheral membrane ruffles in response to PDGF. PKA inhibition also significantly decreased the number and size of PIP(3)-rich membrane ruffles in response to uniform stimulation and to gradients of PDGF. This ruffling defect was quantified using a newly developed method, based on computer vision edge-detection algorithms. PKA inhibition caused a marked attenuation in the bulk accumulation of PIP(3) following PDGF stimulation, without effects on PI3-kinase (PI3K) activity. The deficits in PIP(3) dynamics correlated with a significant inhibition of growth factor-induced membrane recruitment of endogenous Akt and Rac activation in PKA-inhibited cells. Simultaneous inhibition of PKA and Rac had an additive inhibitory effect on growth factor-induced ruffling dynamics. Conversely, the expression of a constitutively active Rac allele was able to rescue the defect in membrane ruffling and restore the localization of a fluorescent PIP(3) marker to membrane ruffles in PKA-inhibited cells, even in the absence of PI3K activity. These data demonstrate that, like Rac, PKA contributes to PIP(3) and membrane dynamics independently of direct regulation of PI3K activity and suggest that modulation of PIP(3)/3-phosphatidylinositol (3-PI) lipids represents a major target for PKA in the regulation of PDGF-induced chemotactic events.

  7. Induction of Macrophage Chemotaxis by Aortic Extracts from Patients with Marfan Syndrome Is Related to Elastin Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Gao; Gehle, Petra; Doelken, Sandra; Martin-Ventura, José Luis; von Kodolitsch, Yskert; Hetzer, Roland; Robinson, Peter N.

    2011-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder of connective tissue with prominent skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular manifestations. Aortic aneurysm and dissection are the major determinants of premature death in untreated patients. In previous work, we showed that extracts of aortic tissues from the mgR mouse model of Marfan syndrome showed increased chemotactic stimulatory activity related to the elastin-binding protein. Aortic samples were collected from 6 patients with Marfan syndrome and 8 with isolated aneurysms of the ascending aorta. Control samples were obtained from 11 organ donors without known vascular or connective tissue diseases. Soluble proteins extracted from the aortic samples of the two patient groups were compared against buffer controls and against the aortic samples from controls with respect to the ability to induce macrophage chemotaxis as measured using a modified Boyden chamber, as well as the reactivity to a monoclonal antibody BA4 against bioactive elastin peptides using ELISA. Samples from Marfan patients displayed a statistically significant increase in chemotactic inductive activity compared to control samples. Additionally, reactivity to BA4 was significantly increased. Similar statistically significant increases were identified for the samples from patients with idiopathic thoracic aortic aneurysm. There was a significant correlation between the chemotactic index and BA4 reactivity, and the increases in chemotactic activity of extracts from Marfan patients could be inhibited by pretreatment with lactose, VGVAPG peptides, or BA4, which indicates the involvement of EBP in mediating the effects. Our results demonstrate that aortic extracts of patients with Marfan syndrome can elicit macrophage chemotaxis, similar to our previous study on aortic extracts of the mgR mouse model of Marfan syndrome (Guo et al., Circulation 2006; 114:1855-62). PMID:21647416

  8. Induction of macrophage chemotaxis by aortic extracts from patients with Marfan syndrome is related to elastin binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Guo

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder of connective tissue with prominent skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular manifestations. Aortic aneurysm and dissection are the major determinants of premature death in untreated patients. In previous work, we showed that extracts of aortic tissues from the mgR mouse model of Marfan syndrome showed increased chemotactic stimulatory activity related to the elastin-binding protein. Aortic samples were collected from 6 patients with Marfan syndrome and 8 with isolated aneurysms of the ascending aorta. Control samples were obtained from 11 organ donors without known vascular or connective tissue diseases. Soluble proteins extracted from the aortic samples of the two patient groups were compared against buffer controls and against the aortic samples from controls with respect to the ability to induce macrophage chemotaxis as measured using a modified Boyden chamber, as well as the reactivity to a monoclonal antibody BA4 against bioactive elastin peptides using ELISA. Samples from Marfan patients displayed a statistically significant increase in chemotactic inductive activity compared to control samples. Additionally, reactivity to BA4 was significantly increased. Similar statistically significant increases were identified for the samples from patients with idiopathic thoracic aortic aneurysm. There was a significant correlation between the chemotactic index and BA4 reactivity, and the increases in chemotactic activity of extracts from Marfan patients could be inhibited by pretreatment with lactose, VGVAPG peptides, or BA4, which indicates the involvement of EBP in mediating the effects. Our results demonstrate that aortic extracts of patients with Marfan syndrome can elicit macrophage chemotaxis, similar to our previous study on aortic extracts of the mgR mouse model of Marfan syndrome (Guo et al., Circulation 2006; 114:1855-62.

  9. Leishmania amazonensis chemotaxis under glucose gradient studied by the strength and directionality of forces measured with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ysasa Pozzo, Liliana; Fontes, Adriana; de Thomaz, André A.; Barbosa, Luiz Carlos; Ayres, Diana Copi; Giorgio, Selma; Cesar, Carlos Lenz

    2007-02-01

    Chemotaxis is the mechanism microorganisms use to sense the environment surrounding them and to direct their movement towards attractive, or away from the repellent, chemicals. The biochemical sensing is almost the only way for communication between unicellular organisms. Prokaryote and Eukaryote chemotaxis has been mechanically studied mainly by observing the directionality and timing of the microorganisms movements subjected to a chemical gradient, but not through the directionality and strength of the forces it generates. To observe the vector force of microorganisms under a chemical gradient we developed a system composed of two large chambers connected by a tiny duct capable to keep the chemical gradient constant for more than ten hours. We also used the displacements of a microsphere trapped in an Optical Tweezers as the force transducer to measure the direction and the strength of the propulsion forces of flagellum of the microorganism under several gradient conditions. A 9μm diameter microsphere particle was trapped with a Nd:YAG laser and its movement was measured through the light scattered focused on a quadrant detector. We observed the behavior of the protozoa Leishmania amazonensis (eukaryote) under several glucose gradients. This protozoa senses the gradient around it by swimming in circles for three to five times following by tumbling, and not by the typical straight swimming/tumbling of bacteria. Our results also suggest that force direction and strength are also used to control its movement, not only the timing of swimming/tumbling, because we observed a higher force strength clearly directed towards the glucose gradient.

  10. Somatostatin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lars Neisig; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard; Hartmann, Bolette

    2003-01-01

    therefore been acknowledged to be a third endogenous ligand at SRIF receptors. This review goes through mechanisms of signal transduction, pharmacology, and anatomical distribution of SRIF receptors. Structurally, SRIF receptors belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled (GPC) receptors, sharing....... The generation of knock-out (KO) mice, intended as a means to define the contributions made by individual receptor subtypes, necessarily marks but an approximation. Furthermore, we must now take into account the stunning complexity of receptor co-operation indicated by the observation of receptor homo......-peptides, receptor agonists and antagonists. Relatively long half lives, as compared to those of the endogenous ligands, have been paramount from the outset. Motivated by theoretical puzzles or the shortcomings of present-day diagnostics and therapy, investigators have also aimed to produce subtype...

  11. Thermal injury, the inflammatory process, and wound dressing reduce human neutrophil chemotaxis to four attractants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasslen, S R; Nelson, R D; Ahrenholz, D H; Solem, L D

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of thermal injury and the inflammatory process on chemotactic responses of neutrophils to four attractants (N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, the complement fragment C5a, interleukin-8, and leukotriene B4) under agarose, expression of Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) adherence receptors on the cell surface, and polymerization of actin in the cell cytoplasm. Circulating neutrophils were isolated from peripheral blood, and exudate neutrophils from fluid collecting under two different wound dressings applied to abrasion sites of healthy subjects and to skin graft donor sites of patients with burns. Burn injury reduced the chemotactic responses of circulating neutrophils to all four attractants, suggesting a "global" defect in chemotactic function. Patient-exudate neutrophils collected under Tegaderm exhibited further decrements in all chemotactic responses, and patient-exudate neutrophils collected under Biobrane were nonmotile. The exudate neutrophils collected under Biobrane expressed high levels of Mac-1 receptors and irreversibly polymerized actin, which may contribute to the nonmotility of these exudate cells.

  12. Purinergic receptor P2RY12-dependent microglial closure of the injured blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Nanhong; Takano, Takahiro; Pei, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Microglia are integral functional elements of the central nervous system, but the contribution of these cells to the structural integrity of the neurovascular unit has not hitherto been assessed. We show here that following blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, P2RY12 (purinergic receptor P2Y, G......-protein coupled, 12)-mediated chemotaxis of microglia processes is required for the rapid closure of the BBB. Mice treated with the P2RY12 inhibitor clopidogrel, as well as those in which P2RY12 was genetically ablated, exhibited significantly diminished movement of juxtavascular microglial processes and failed...

  13. A CheR/CheB fusion protein is involved in cyst cell development and chemotaxis in Azospirillum brasilense Sp7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lixian; Cui, Yanhua; Hong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Sanfeng

    2011-12-20

    We here report the sequence and functional analysis of cstB of Azospirillum brasilense Sp7. The predicted cstB contains C-terminal two PAS domains and N-terminal part which has similarity with CheB-CheR fusion protein. cstB mutants had reduced swarming ability compared to that of A. brasilense wild-type strain, implying that cstB was involved in chemotaxis in A. brasilense. A microscopic analysis revealed that cstB mutants developed mature cyst cells more quickly than wild type, indicating that cstB is involved in cyst formation. cstB mutants were affected in colony morphology and the production of exopolysaccharides (EPS) which are essential for A. brasilense cells to differentiate into cyst-like forms. These observations suggested that cstB was a multi-effector involved in cyst development and chemotaxis in A. brasilense. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of nicotine from tobacco root exudates on chemotaxis, growth, biocontrol efficiency, and colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa NXHG29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Zheng, Shuai Chao; Zhang, Ti Kun; Liu, Zi Yi; Wang, Xue Jian; Zhou, Xing Kui; Yang, Cheng Gang; Duo, Jin Ling; Mo, Ming He

    2018-02-03

    Accumulated evidence suggests that root exudates have a major role in mediating plant-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere. Here, we characterized tobacco root exudates (TREs) by GC-MS and nicotine, scopoletin, and octadecane were identified as three main components of TREs. Qualitative and quantitative chemotaxis assays revealed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa NXHG29 with antagonistic activity displayed positive chemotactic responses towards TREs and their three main components (nicotine, scopoletin, octadecane) and its enhanced chemotaxis were induced by these substances in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, following GC-MS and chemotaxis analysis, nicotine was selected as the target for evaluation of the effect on NXHG29 regarding antagonism, growth, root colonization and biocontrol efficiency. Results of in vitro studies showed that nicotine as a sole carbon source could enhance growth of NXHG29 and significantly increased the antagonism of NXHG29. We also demonstrated that nicotine exerted enhancing effects on the colonization ability of NXHG29 on tobacco roots by combining CLSM observations with investigation of population level dynamics by selective dilution plating method. Results from greenhouse experiments suggested nicotine exhibited stimulatory effects on the biocontrol efficiency of NXHG29 against bacterial wilt and black shank on tobacco. The stimulatory effect of nicotine was affected by the concentration and timing of nicotine application and further supported by the results of population level of NXHG29 on tobacco roots. This is the first report on the enhancement effect of nicotine from TREs on an antagonistic bacterium for its root colonization, control of soil-borne pathogens, regarding the chemotaxis and in vitro antagonism and growth.

  15. Effect of a 2.45-GHz radiofrequency electromagnetic field on neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis in differentiated human HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shin; Narita, Eijiro; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Taki, Masao; Shinohara, Naoki; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2015-01-01

    The potential public health risks of radiofrequency (RF) fields have been discussed at length, especially with the use of mobile phones spreading extensively throughout the world. In order to investigate the properties of RF fields, we examined the effect of 2.45-GHz RF fields at the specific absorption rate (SAR) of 2 and 10 W/kg for 4 and 24 h on neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis in differentiated human HL-60 cells. Neutrophil chemotaxis was not affected by RF-field exposure, and subsequent phagocytosis was not affected either compared with that under sham exposure conditions. These studies demonstrated an initial immune response in the human body exposed to 2.45-GHz RF fields at the SAR of 2 W/kg, which is the maximum value recommended by the International Commission for Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. The results of our experiments for RF-field exposure at an SAR under 10 W/kg showed very little or no effects on either chemotaxis or phagocytosis in neutrophil-like human HL-60 cells. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  16. Comparison of the effect of timegadine, levamisole, and D-penicillamine on human neutrophil metabolism of endogenous arachidonic acid and chemotaxis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, O.H.; Ahnfelt-Roenne, I. Department of Pharmacology, Leo Pharmaceutical Products, Ballerup; Elmgreen, J.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of timegadine, a novel experimental antirheumatic drug, on human neutrophil (PMN) 5-lipoxygenase activity and leukotriene B/sub 4/ (LTB/sub 4/) chemotaxis was compared with that of two second-line antiinflammatory drugs, D-penicillamine and levamisole. 1-/sup 14/C-Arachidonic acid (AA) was incorporated into the purified cells until steady state conditions were obtained. After preincubation with serial dilutions of the three drugs, AA release and metabolism was stimulated with calcium ionophore A23187. The radioactive eicosanoids released were extracted and separated by thinlayer chromatography, followed by autoradiography and quantitative laser densitometry. Chemotaxi of PMNs towards LTB/sub 4/ was measured in a modified Boyden chamber. Timegardine showed dose-dependent inhibition of both the 5-lipoxygenase pathway (IC50 3.4 x 10/sup -5/ M), and of chemotaxis (IC50 3 x 10/sup -4/ M). Inhibition of the release of AA from phospholipids, however, occurred only at therapeutically irrelevant doses (millimolar concentrations). Levamisole and D-penicillamine did not inhibit any of the cell functions investigated. Inhibition of both neutrophil motility and cellular synthesis of pro-inflammatory eicosanoids, may thus contribute to the clinical effects of timegadine in rheumatoid arthritis.

  17. Impact of motility and chemotaxis features of the rhizobacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis PCL1606 on its biocontrol of avocado white root rot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polonio, Álvaro; Vida, Carmen; de Vicente, Antonio; Cazorla, Francisco M

    2017-06-01

    The biocontrol rhizobacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis PCL1606 has the ability to protect avocado plants against white root rot produced by the phytopathogenic fungus Rosellinia necatrix. Moreover, PCL1606 displayed direct interactions with avocado roots and the pathogenic fungus. Thus, nonmotile (flgK mutant) and non-chemotactic (cheA mutant) derivatives of PCL1606 were constructed to emphasize the importance of motility and chemotaxis in the biological behaviour of PCL1606 during the biocontrol interaction. Plate chemotaxis assay showed that PCL1606 was attracted to the single compounds tested, such as glucose, glutamate, succinate, aspartate and malate, but no chemotaxis was observed to avocado or R. necatrix exudates. Using the more sensitive capillary assay, it was reported that smaller concentrations (1 mM) of single compounds elicited high chemotactic responses, and strong attraction was confirmed to avocado and R. necatrix exudates. Finally, biocontrol experiments revealed that the cheA and fglK derivative mutants reduced root protection against R. necatrix, suggesting an important role for these biological traits in biocontrol by P. chlororaphis PCL1606. [Int Microbiol 20(2):94-104 (2017)]. Copyright© by the Spanish Society for Microbiology and Institute for Catalan Studies.

  18. Chemotaxis in densely populated tissue determines germinal center anatomy and cell motility: a new paradigm for the development of complex tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared B Hawkins

    Full Text Available Germinal centers (GCs are complex dynamic structures that form within lymph nodes as an essential process in the humoral immune response. They represent a paradigm for studying the regulation of cell movement in the development of complex anatomical structures. We have developed a simulation of a modified cyclic re-entry model of GC dynamics which successfully employs chemotaxis to recapitulate the anatomy of the primary follicle and the development of a mature GC, including correctly structured mantle, dark and light zones. We then show that correct single cell movement dynamics (including persistent random walk and inter-zonal crossing arise from this simulation as purely emergent properties. The major insight of our study is that chemotaxis can only achieve this when constrained by the known biological properties that cells are incompressible, exist in a densely packed environment, and must therefore compete for space. It is this interplay of chemotaxis and competition for limited space that generates all the complex and biologically accurate behaviors described here. Thus, from a single simple mechanism that is well documented in the biological literature, we can explain both higher level structure and single cell movement behaviors. To our knowledge this is the first GC model that is able to recapitulate both correctly detailed anatomy and single cell movement. This mechanism may have wide application for modeling other biological systems where cells undergo complex patterns of movement to produce defined anatomical structures with sharp tissue boundaries.

  19. Analysis of migration rate and chemotaxis of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells in response to LPS and LTA in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzmann, Nicole; Salamon, Achim [Department of Cell Biology, University Medicine Rostock, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Fiedler, Tomas [Institute for Medical Microbiology, Virology and Hygiene, University Medicine Rostock, Schillingallee 70, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Peters, Kirsten, E-mail: kirsten.peters@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Cell Biology, University Medicine Rostock, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are able to stimulate the regeneration of injured tissue. Since bacterial infections are common complications in wound healing, bacterial pathogens and their components come into direct contact with MSC. The interaction with bacterial structures influences the proliferation, differentiation and migratory activity of the MSC, which might be of relevance during regeneration. Studies on MSC migration in response to bacterial components have shown different results depending on the cell type. Here, we analyzed the migration rate and chemotaxis of human adipose-derived MSC (adMSC) in response to the basic cell-wall components lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) of Gram-positive bacteria in vitro. To this end, we used transwell and scratch assays, as well as a specific chemotaxis assay combined with live-cell imaging. We found no significant influence of LPS or LTA on the migration rate of adMSC in transwell or scratch assays. Furthermore, in the µ-slide chemotaxis assay, the stimulation with LPS did not exert any chemotactic effect on adMSC. - Highlights: • LPS increased the release of IL-6 and IL-8 in adMSC significantly. • The migration rate of adMSC was not influenced by LPS or LTA. • LPS or LTA did not exert a chemotactic effect on adMSC.

  20. Analysis of migration rate and chemotaxis of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells in response to LPS and LTA in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzmann, Nicole; Salamon, Achim; Fiedler, Tomas; Peters, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are able to stimulate the regeneration of injured tissue. Since bacterial infections are common complications in wound healing, bacterial pathogens and their components come into direct contact with MSC. The interaction with bacterial structures influences the proliferation, differentiation and migratory activity of the MSC, which might be of relevance during regeneration. Studies on MSC migration in response to bacterial components have shown different results depending on the cell type. Here, we analyzed the migration rate and chemotaxis of human adipose-derived MSC (adMSC) in response to the basic cell-wall components lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) of Gram-positive bacteria in vitro. To this end, we used transwell and scratch assays, as well as a specific chemotaxis assay combined with live-cell imaging. We found no significant influence of LPS or LTA on the migration rate of adMSC in transwell or scratch assays. Furthermore, in the µ-slide chemotaxis assay, the stimulation with LPS did not exert any chemotactic effect on adMSC. - Highlights: • LPS increased the release of IL-6 and IL-8 in adMSC significantly. • The migration rate of adMSC was not influenced by LPS or LTA. • LPS or LTA did not exert a chemotactic effect on adMSC.

  1. PsHint1, associated with the G-protein α subunit PsGPA1, is required for the chemotaxis and pathogenicity of Phytophthora sojae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Zhai, Chunhua; Hua, Chenlei; Qiu, Min; Hao, Yujuan; Nie, Pingping; Ye, Wenwu; Wang, Yuanchao

    2016-02-01

    Zoospore chemotaxis to soybean isoflavones is essential in the early stages of infection by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora sojae. Previously, we have identified a G-protein α subunit encoded by PsGPA1 which regulates the chemotaxis and pathogenicity of P. sojae. In the present study, we used affinity purification to identify PsGPA1-interacting proteins, including PsHint1, a histidine triad (HIT) domain-containing protein orthologous to human HIT nucleotide-binding protein 1 (HINT1). PsHint1 interacted with both the guanosine triphosphate (GTP)- and guanosine diphosphate (GDP)-bound forms of PsGPA1. An analysis of the gene-silenced transformants revealed that PsHint1 was involved in the chemotropic response of zoospores to the isoflavone daidzein. During interaction with a susceptible soybean cultivar, PsHint1-silenced transformants displayed significantly reduced infectious hyphal extension and caused a strong cell death in plants. In addition, the transformants displayed defective cyst germination, forming abnormal germ tubes that were highly branched and exhibited apical swelling. These results suggest that PsHint1 not only regulates chemotaxis by interacting with PsGPA1, but also participates in a Gα-independent pathway involved in the pathogenicity of P. sojae. © 2015 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  2. Somatostatin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lars Neisig; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard; Hartmann, Bolette

    2003-01-01

    therefore been acknowledged to be a third endogenous ligand at SRIF receptors. This review goes through mechanisms of signal transduction, pharmacology, and anatomical distribution of SRIF receptors. Structurally, SRIF receptors belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled (GPC) receptors, sharing......- and heterodimerisation, let alone oligomerisation. Theoretically, this phenomenon adds a novel series of functional megareceptors/super-receptors, with varied pharmacological profiles, to the catalogue of monomeric receptor subtypes isolated and cloned in the past. SRIF analogues include both peptides and non......-peptides, receptor agonists and antagonists. Relatively long half lives, as compared to those of the endogenous ligands, have been paramount from the outset. Motivated by theoretical puzzles or the shortcomings of present-day diagnostics and therapy, investigators have also aimed to produce subtype...

  3. Glycosaminoglycans Regulate CXCR3 Ligands at Distinct Levels: Protection against Processing by Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV/CD26 and Interference with Receptor Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieke Metzemaekers

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11 direct chemotaxis of mainly T cells and NK cells through activation of their common CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR3. They are inactivated upon NH2-terminal cleavage by dipeptidyl peptidase IV/CD26. In the present study, we found that different glycosaminoglycans (GAGs protect the CXCR3 ligands against proteolytic processing by CD26 without directly affecting the enzymatic activity of CD26. In addition, GAGs were shown to interfere with chemokine-induced CXCR3 signaling. The observation that heparan sulfate did not, and heparin only moderately, altered CXCL10-induced T cell chemotaxis in vitro may be explained by a combination of protection against proteolytic inactivation and altered receptor interaction as observed in calcium assays. No effect of CD26 inhibition was found on CXCL10-induced chemotaxis in vitro. However, treatment of mice with the CD26 inhibitor sitagliptin resulted in an enhanced CXCL10-induced lymphocyte influx into the joint. This study reveals a dual role for GAGs in modulating the biological activity of CXCR3 ligands. GAGs protect the chemokines from proteolytic cleavage but also directly interfere with chemokine–CXCR3 signaling. These data support the hypothesis that both GAGs and CD26 affect the in vivo chemokine function.

  4. Olfactory receptors in non-chemosensory tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NaNa Kang & JaeHyung Koo*

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory receptors (ORs detect volatile chemicals that lead tothe initial perception of smell in the brain. The olfactory receptor(OR is the first protein that recognizes odorants in theolfactory signal pathway and it is present in over 1,000 genesin mice. It is also the largest member of the G protein-coupledreceptors (GPCRs. Most ORs are extensively expressed in thenasal olfactory epithelium where they perform the appropriatephysiological functions that fit their location. However, recentwhole-genome sequencing shows that ORs have been foundoutside of the olfactory system, suggesting that ORs may playan important role in the ectopic expression of non-chemosensorytissues. The ectopic expressions of ORs and their physiologicalfunctions have attracted more attention recently sinceMOR23 and testicular hOR17-4 have been found to be involvedin skeletal muscle development, regeneration, and humansperm chemotaxis, respectively. When identifying additionalexpression profiles and functions of ORs in non-olfactorytissues, there are limitations posed by the small number ofantibodies available for similar OR genes. This review presentsthe results of a research series that identifies ectopic expressionsand functions of ORs in non-chemosensory tissues toprovide insight into future research directions.

  5. Cooperative Optimization QoS Cloud Routing Protocol Based on Bacterial Opportunistic Foraging and Chemotaxis Perception for Mobile Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujuan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to strengthen the mobile Internet mobility management and cloud platform resources utilization, optimizing the cloud routing efficiency is established, based on opportunistic bacterial foraging bionics, and puts forward a chemotaxis perception of collaborative optimization QoS (Quality of Services cloud routing mechanism. The cloud routing mechanism is based on bacterial opportunity to feed and bacterial motility and to establish the data transmission and forwarding of the bacterial population behavior characteristics. This mechanism is based on the characteristics of drug resistance of bacteria and the structure of the field, and through many iterations of the individual behavior and population behavior the bacteria can be spread to the food gathering area with a certain probability. Finally, QoS cloud routing path would be selected and optimized based on bacterial bionic optimization and hedge mapping relationship between mobile Internet node and bacterial population evolution iterations. Experimental results show that, compared with the standard dynamic routing schemes, the proposed scheme has shorter transmission delay, lower packet error ratio, QoS cloud routing loading, and QoS cloud route request overhead.

  6. HIV-1 Nef binds the DOCK2-ELMO1 complex to activate rac and inhibit lymphocyte chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Janardhan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The infectious cycle of primate lentiviruses is intimately linked to interactions between cells of the immune system. Nef, a potent virulence factor, alters cellular environments to increase lentiviral replication in the host, yet the mechanisms underlying these effects have remained elusive. Since Nef likely functions as an adaptor protein, we exploited a proteomic approach to directly identify molecules that Nef targets to subvert the signaling machinery in T cells. We purified to near homogeneity a major Nef-associated protein complex from T cells and identified by mass spectroscopy its subunits as DOCK2-ELMO1, a key activator of Rac in antigen- and chemokine-initiated signaling pathways, and Rac. We show that Nef activates Rac in T cell lines and in primary T cells following infection with HIV-1 in the absence of antigenic stimuli. Nef activates Rac by binding the DOCK2-ELMO1 complex, and this interaction is linked to the abilities of Nef to inhibit chemotaxis and promote T cell activation. Our data indicate that Nef targets a critical switch that regulates Rac GTPases downstream of chemokine- and antigen-initiated signaling pathways. This interaction enables Nef to influence multiple aspects of T cell function and thus provides an important mechanism by which Nef impacts pathogenesis by primate lentiviruses.

  7. Positive effects of repulsion on boundedness in a fully parabolic attraction-repulsion chemotaxis system with logistic source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhuang, Mengdi; Zheng, Sining

    2018-02-01

    In this paper we study the global boundedness of solutions to the fully parabolic attraction-repulsion chemotaxis system with logistic source: ut = Δu - χ∇ ṡ (u∇v) + ξ∇ ṡ (u∇w) + f (u), vt = Δv - βv + αu, wt = Δw - δw + γu, subject to homogeneous Neumann boundary conditions in a bounded and smooth domain Ω ⊂Rn (n ≥ 1), where χ, α, ξ, γ, β and δ are positive constants, and f : R → R is a smooth function generalizing the logistic source f (s) = a - bsθ for all s ≥ 0 with a ≥ 0, b > 0 and θ ≥ 1. It is shown that when the repulsion cancels the attraction (i.e. χα = ξγ), the solution is globally bounded if n ≤ 3, or θ >θn : = min ⁡ {n+2}/4, n/√{n2 + 6 n + 17 }/-n2 - 3 n + 4 4 } with n ≥ 2. Therefore, due to the inhibition of repulsion to the attraction, in any spatial dimension, the exponent θ is allowed to take values less than 2 such that the solution is uniformly bounded in time.

  8. Giardia duodenalis cathepsin B proteases degrade intestinal epithelial interleukin-8 and attenuate interleukin-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, James A; Bhargava, Amol; Ferraz, Jose G; Yates, Robin M; Beck, Paul L; Buret, Andre G

    2014-07-01

    Giardia duodenalis (syn. G. intestinalis, G. lamblia) infections are a leading cause of waterborne diarrheal disease that can also result in the development of postinfectious functional gastrointestinal disorders via mechanisms that remain unclear. Parasite numbers exceed 10(6) trophozoites per centimeter of gut at the height of an infection. Yet the intestinal mucosa of G. duodenalis-infected individuals is devoid of signs of overt inflammation. G. duodenalis infections can also occur concurrently with infections with other proinflammatory gastrointestinal pathogens. Little is known of whether and how this parasite can attenuate host inflammatory responses induced by other proinflammatory stimuli, such as a gastrointestinal pathogen. Identifying hitherto-unrecognized parasitic immunomodulatory pathways, the present studies demonstrated that G. duodenalis trophozoites attenuate secretion of the potent neutrophil chemoattractant interleukin-8 (CXCL8); these effects were observed in human small intestinal mucosal tissues and from intestinal epithelial monolayers, activated through administration of proinflammatory interleukin-1β or Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. This attenuation is caused by the secretion of G. duodenalis cathepsin B cysteine proteases that degrade CXCL8 posttranscriptionally. Furthermore, the degradation of CXCL8 via G. duodenalis cathepsin B cysteine proteases attenuates CXCL8-induced chemotaxis of human neutrophils. Taken together, these data demonstrate for the first time that G. duodenalis trophozoite cathepsins are capable of attenuating a component of their host's proinflammatory response induced by a separate proinflammatory stimulus. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Pretreatment with Fish Oil-Based Lipid Emulsion Modulates Muscle Leukocyte Chemotaxis in Murine Model of Sublethal Lower Limb Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Ming Shih

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of a fish oil- (FO- based lipid emulsion on muscle leukocyte chemotaxis and inflammatory responses in a murine model of limb ischemia-reperfusion (IR injury. Mice were assigned randomly to 1 sham (sham group, 2 ischemic groups, and 2 IR groups. The sham group did not undergo the ischemic procedure. The mice assigned to the ischemic or IR groups were pretreated intraperitoneally with either saline or FO-based lipid emulsion for 3 consecutive days. The IR procedure was induced by applying a 4.5 oz orthodontic rubber band to the left thigh above the greater trochanter for 120 min and then cutting the band to allow reperfusion. The ischemic groups were sacrificed immediately while the IR groups were sacrificed 24 h after reperfusion. Blood, IR-injured gastrocnemius, and lung tissues were collected for analysis. The results showed that FO pretreatment suppressed the local and systemic expression of several IR-induced proinflammatory mediators. Also, the FO-pretreated group had lower blood Ly6ChiCCR2hi monocyte percentage and muscle M1/M2 ratio than the saline group at 24 h after reperfusion. These findings suggest that FO pretreatment may have a protective role in limb IR injury by modulating the expression of proinflammatory mediators and regulating the polarization of macrophage.

  10. Criteria on global boundedness versus finite time blow-up to a two-species chemotaxis system with two chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hao; Wang, Wei; Zheng, Sining

    2018-02-01

    This paper considers the two-species chemotaxis system with two chemicals in a smooth bounded domain Ω\\subset{R}2 , subject to the non-flux boundary condition, and χ, ξ, α, β, γ, δ>0 . We obtain a blow-up criterion that if m_1m_2-2π(\\frac{m_1}χβ+\\frac{m_2}ξδ)>0 , then there exist finite time blow-up solutions to the system with m_1:=\\int_Ω u_0(x)dx and m_2:=\\int_Ω w_0(x)dx . When χ=ξ= β=δ=1 , the blow-up criterion becomes m_1m_2-2π(m_1+m_2)>0 , and the global boundedness of solutions is furthermore established with α=γ=1 under the condition that \\max\\{m_1, m_2\\}current results for finite time blow-up with \\min\\{m_1, m_2\\}>4π and global boundedness with \\max\\{m_1, m_2\\}Education Department grant (LYB201601) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (DUT16LK24).

  11. A space-jump derivation for non-local models of cell-cell adhesion and non-local chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttenschön, Andreas; Hillen, Thomas; Gerisch, Alf; Painter, Kevin J

    2018-01-01

    Cellular adhesion provides one of the fundamental forms of biological interaction between cells and their surroundings, yet the continuum modelling of cellular adhesion has remained mathematically challenging. In 2006, Armstrong et al. proposed a mathematical model in the form of an integro-partial differential equation. Although successful in applications, a derivation from an underlying stochastic random walk has remained elusive. In this work we develop a framework by which non-local models can be derived from a space-jump process. We show how the notions of motility and a cell polarization vector can be naturally included. With this derivation we are able to include microscopic biological properties into the model. We show that particular choices yield the original Armstrong model, while others lead to more general models, including a doubly non-local adhesion model and non-local chemotaxis models. Finally, we use random walk simulations to confirm that the corresponding continuum model represents the mean field behaviour of the stochastic random walk.

  12. Taxis of Pseudomonas putida F1 toward Phenylacetic Acid Is Mediated by the Energy Taxis Receptor Aer2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Rita A.; Schneider, Benjamin J.; Ho, Christie C.; Nesteryuk, Vasyl; Ngwesse, Stacy E.; Liu, Xianxian; Parales, Juanito V.; Ditty, Jayna L.

    2013-01-01

    The phenylacetic acid (PAA) degradation pathway is a widely distributed funneling pathway for the catabolism of aromatic compounds, including the environmental pollutants styrene and ethylbenzene. However, bacterial chemotaxis to PAA has not been studied. The chemotactic strain Pseudomonas putida F1 has the ability to utilize PAA as a sole carbon and energy source. We identified a putative PAA degradation gene cluster (paa) in P. putida F1 and demonstrated that PAA serves as a chemoattractant. The chemotactic response was induced during growth with PAA and was dependent on PAA metabolism. A functional cheA gene was required for the response, indicating that PAA is sensed through the conserved chemotaxis signal transduction system. A P. putida F1 mutant lacking the energy taxis receptor Aer2 was deficient in PAA taxis, indicating that Aer2 is responsible for mediating the response to PAA. The requirement for metabolism and the role of Aer2 in the response indicate that P. putida F1 uses energy taxis to detect PAA. We also revealed that PAA is an attractant for Escherichia coli; however, a mutant lacking a functional Aer energy receptor had a wild-type response to PAA in swim plate assays, suggesting that PAA is detected through a different mechanism in E. coli. The role of Aer2 as an energy taxis receptor provides the potential to sense a broad range of aromatic growth substrates as chemoattractants. Since chemotaxis has been shown to enhance the biodegradation of toxic pollutants, the ability to sense PAA gradients may have implications for the bioremediation of aromatic hydrocarbons that are degraded via the PAA pathway. PMID:23377939

  13. Anaesthetic impairment of immune function is mediated via GABA(A receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W Wheeler

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available GABA(A receptors are members of the Cys-loop family of neurotransmitter receptors, proteins which are responsible for fast synaptic transmission, and are the site of action of wide range of drugs. Recent work has shown that Cys-loop receptors are present on immune cells, but their physiological roles and the effects of drugs that modify their function in the innate immune system are currently unclear. We are interested in how and why anaesthetics increase infections in intensive care patients; a serious problem as more than 50% of patients with severe sepsis will die. As many anaesthetics act via GABA(A receptors, the aim of this study was to determine if these receptors are present on immune cells, and could play a role in immunocompromising patients.We demonstrate, using RT-PCR, that monocytes express GABA(A receptors constructed of α1, α4, β2, γ1 and/or δ subunits. Whole cell patch clamp electrophysiological studies show that GABA can activate these receptors, resulting in the opening of a chloride-selective channel; activation is inhibited by the GABA(A receptor antagonists bicuculline and picrotoxin, but not enhanced by the positive modulator diazepam. The anaesthetic drugs propofol and thiopental, which can act via GABA(A receptors, impaired monocyte function in classic immunological chemotaxis and phagocytosis assays, an effect reversed by bicuculline and picrotoxin.Our results show that functional GABA(A receptors are present on monocytes with properties similar to CNS GABA(A receptors. The functional data provide a possible explanation as to why chronic propofol and thiopental administration can increase the risk of infection in critically ill patients: their action on GABA(A receptors inhibits normal monocyte behaviour. The data also suggest a potential solution: monocyte GABA(A receptors are insensitive to diazepam, thus the use of benzodiazepines as an alternative anesthetising agent may be advantageous where infection is a life

  14. Anaesthetic impairment of immune function is mediated via GABA(A) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Daniel W; Thompson, Andrew J; Corletto, Federico; Reckless, Jill; Loke, Justin C T; Lapaque, Nicolas; Grant, Andrew J; Mastroeni, Pietro; Grainger, David J; Padgett, Claire L; O'Brien, John A; Miller, Nigel G A; Trowsdale, John; Lummis, Sarah C R; Menon, David K; Beech, John S

    2011-02-24

    GABA(A) receptors are members of the Cys-loop family of neurotransmitter receptors, proteins which are responsible for fast synaptic transmission, and are the site of action of wide range of drugs. Recent work has shown that Cys-loop receptors are present on immune cells, but their physiological roles and the effects of drugs that modify their function in the innate immune system are currently unclear. We are interested in how and why anaesthetics increase infections in intensive care patients; a serious problem as more than 50% of patients with severe sepsis will die. As many anaesthetics act via GABA(A) receptors, the aim of this study was to determine if these receptors are present on immune cells, and could play a role in immunocompromising patients. We demonstrate, using RT-PCR, that monocytes express GABA(A) receptors constructed of α1, α4, β2, γ1 and/or δ subunits. Whole cell patch clamp electrophysiological studies show that GABA can activate these receptors, resulting in the opening of a chloride-selective channel; activation is inhibited by the GABA(A) receptor antagonists bicuculline and picrotoxin, but not enhanced by the positive modulator diazepam. The anaesthetic drugs propofol and thiopental, which can act via GABA(A) receptors, impaired monocyte function in classic immunological chemotaxis and phagocytosis assays, an effect reversed by bicuculline and picrotoxin. Our results show that functional GABA(A) receptors are present on monocytes with properties similar to CNS GABA(A) receptors. The functional data provide a possible explanation as to why chronic propofol and thiopental administration can increase the risk of infection in critically ill patients: their action on GABA(A) receptors inhibits normal monocyte behaviour. The data also suggest a potential solution: monocyte GABA(A) receptors are insensitive to diazepam, thus the use of benzodiazepines as an alternative anesthetising agent may be advantageous where infection is a life

  15. Lauric acid in crown daisy root exudate potently regulates root-knot nematode chemotaxis and disrupts Mi-flp-18 expression to block infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Linlin; Li, Xiaolin; Huang, Li; Gao, Ying; Zhong, Lina; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Zuo, Yuanmei

    2014-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) crops can be severely damaged due to parasitism by the root-knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne incognita, but are protected when intercropped with crown daisy (Chrysanthemum coronarium L.). Root exudate may be the determining factor for this protection. An experiment using pots linked by a tube and Petri dish experiments were undertaken to confirm that tomato-crown daisy intercropping root exudate decreased the number of nematodes and alleviated nematode damage, and to determine crown daisy root exudate-regulated nematode chemotaxis. Following a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry assay, it was found that the intercropping protection was derived from the potent bioactivity of a specific root exudate component of crown daisy, namely lauric acid. The Mi-flp-18 gene, encoding an FMRFamide-like peptide neuromodulator, regulated nematode chemotaxis and infection by RNA interference. Moreover, it was shown that lauric acid acts as both a lethal trap and a repellent for M. incognita by specifically regulating Mi-flp-18 expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Low concentrations of lauric acid (0.5-2.0mM) attract M. incognita and consequently cause death, while high concentrations (4.0mM) repel M. incognita. This study elucidates how lauric acid in crown daisy root exudate regulates nematode chemotaxis and disrupts Mi-flp-18 expression to alleviate nematode damage, and presents a general methodology for studying signalling systems affected by plant root exudates in the rhizosphere. This could lead to the development of economical and feasible strategies for controlling plant-parasitic nematodes, and provide an alternative to the use of pesticides in farming systems.

  16. Effects of exogenous IL-37 on the biological characteristics of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells and the chemotaxis of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Hua; Zhou, Bi-Yun; Wu, Guo-Cai; Liao, De-Quan; Li, Jing; Liang, Si-Si; Wu, Xian-Jin; Xu, Jun-Fa; Chen, Yong-Hua; Di, Xiao-Qing; Lin, Qiong-Yan

    2018-02-14

    This study aims to investigate the effects of exogenous interleukin (IL)-37 on the biological characteristics of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells and the chemotaxis of regulatory T (Treg) cells. After isolating the CD4+ CD25+ Treg cells from the peripheral blood, flow cytometry was used to detect the purity of the Treg cells. A549 cells were divided into blank (no transfection), empty plasmid (transfection with pIRES2-EGFP empty plasmid) or IL-37 group (transfection with pIRES2-EGFP-IL-37 plasmid). RT-PCR was used to detect mRNA expression of IL-37 and ELISA to determine IL-37 and MMP-9 expressions. Western blotting was applied to detect the protein expressions of PCNA, Ki-67, Cyclin D1, CDK4, cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-9. MTT assay, flow cytometry, scratch test and transwell assay were performed to detect cell proliferation, cycle, apoptosis, migration and invasion. Effect of exogenous IL-37 on the chemotaxis of Treg cells was measured through transwell assay. Xenograft models in nude mice were eastablished to detect the impact of IL-37 on A549 cells. The IL-37 group had a higher IL-37 expression, cell apoptosis in the early stage and percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase than the blank and empty plasmid groups. The IL-37 group had a lower MMP-9 expression, optical density (OD), percentage of cells in the S and G2/M phases, migration, invasion and chemotaxis of CD4+CD25+ Foxp3+ Treg cells. The xenograft volume and weight of nude mice in the IL-37 group were lower than those in the blank and empty plasmid groups. Compared with the blank and empty plasmid groups, the IL-37 group had significantly reduced expression of PCNA, Ki-67, Cyclin D1 and CDK4 but elevated expression of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-9. Therefore, exogenous IL-37 inhibits the proliferation, migration and invasion of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells as well as the chemotaxis of Treg cells while promoting the apoptosis of A549 cells.

  17. Directional cell migration and chemotaxis in wound healing response to PDGF-AA are coordinated by the primary cilium in fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Linda; Cammer, Michael; Lehman, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Cell motility and migration play pivotal roles in numerous physiological and pathophysiological processes including development and tissue repair. Cell migration is regulated through external stimuli such as platelet-derived growth factor-AA (PDGF-AA), a key regulator in directional cell migration....... Here we used micropipette analysis to show that a normal chemosensory response to PDGF-AA in fibroblasts requires the primary cilium. In vitro and in vivo wound healing assays revealed that in ORPK mouse (IFT88(Tg737Rpw)) fibroblasts, where ciliary assembly is defective, chemotaxis towards PDGF-AA...

  18. Simultaneous Activation of Induced Heterodimerization between CXCR4 Chemokine Receptor and Cannabinoid Receptor 2 (CB2) Reveals a Mechanism for Regulation of Tumor Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coke, Christopher J; Scarlett, Kisha A; Chetram, Mahandranauth A; Jones, Kia J; Sandifer, Brittney J; Davis, Ahriea S; Marcus, Adam I; Hinton, Cimona V

    2016-05-06

    The G-protein-coupled chemokine receptor CXCR4 generates signals that lead to cell migration, cell proliferation, and other survival mechanisms that result in the metastatic spread of primary tumor cells to distal organs. Numerous studies have demonstrated that CXCR4 can form homodimers or can heterodimerize with other G-protein-coupled receptors to form receptor complexes that can amplify or decrease the signaling capacity of each individual receptor. Using biophysical and biochemical approaches, we found that CXCR4 can form an induced heterodimer with cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) in human breast and prostate cancer cells. Simultaneous, agonist-dependent activation of CXCR4 and CB2 resulted in reduced CXCR4-mediated expression of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and ultimately reduced cancer cell functions such as calcium mobilization and cellular chemotaxis. Given that treatment with cannabinoids has been shown to reduce invasiveness of cancer cells as well as CXCR4-mediated migration of immune cells, it is plausible that CXCR4 signaling can be silenced through a physical heterodimeric association with CB2, thereby inhibiting subsequent functions of CXCR4. Taken together, the data illustrate a mechanism by which the cannabinoid system can negatively modulate CXCR4 receptor function and perhaps tumor progression. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Molecular interaction of a potent nonpeptide agonist with the chemokine receptor CCR8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia C; Nygaard, Rie; Thiele, Stefanie

    2007-01-01

    Most nonpeptide antagonists for CC-chemokine receptors share a common pharmacophore with a centrally located, positively charged amine that interacts with the highly conserved glutamic acid (Glu) located in position 6 of transmembrane helix VII (VII:06). We present a novel CCR8 nonpeptide agonist......, 8-[3-(2-methoxyphenoxy)benzyl]-1-phenethyl-1,3,8-triaza-spiro[4.5]decan-4-one (LMD-009), that also contains a centrally located, positively charged amine. LMD-009 selectively stimulated CCR8 among the 20 identified human chemokine receptors. It mediated chemotaxis, inositol phosphate accumulation......-binding pockets of CCR8 uncovered that the binding of LMD-009 and of four analogs [2-(1-(3-(2-methoxyphenoxy)benzyl)-4-hydroxypiperidin-4-yl)benzoic acid (LMD-584), N-ethyl-2-4-methoxybenzenesulfonamide (LMD-902), N-(1-(3-(2-methoxyphenoxy)benzyl)piperidin-4-yl)-2-phenyl-4-(pyrrolidin-1yl)butanamide (LMD-268...

  20. Adaptation Mechanism of the Aspartate Receptor: Electrostatics of the Adaptation Subdomain Play a Key Role in Modulating Kinase Activity†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starrett, Diane J.; Falke, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    The aspartate receptor of the Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium chemotaxis pathway generates a transmembrane signal that regulates the activity of the cytoplasmic kinase CheA. Previous studies have identified a region of the cytoplasmic domain that is critical to receptor adaptation and kinase regulation. This region, termed the adaptation subdomain, contains a high density of acidic residues, including specific glutamate residues that serve as receptor adaptation sites. However, the mechanism of signal propagation through this region remains poorly understood. This study uses site-directed mutagenesis to neutralize each acidic residue within the subdomain to probe the hypothesis that electrostatics in this region play a significant role in the mechanism of kinase activation and modulation. Each point mutant was tested for its ability to regulate chemotaxis in vivo and kinase activity in vitro. Four point mutants (D273N, E281Q, D288N, and E477Q) were found to superactivate the kinase relative to the wild-type receptor, and all four of these kinase-activating substitutions are located along the same intersubunit interface as the adaptation sites. These activating substitutions retained the wild-type ability of the attractant-occupied receptor to inhibit kinase activity. When combined in a quadruple mutant (D273N/E281Q/D288N/E477Q), the four charge-neutralizing substitutions locked the receptor in a kinase-superactivating state that could not be fully inactivated by the attractant. Similar lock-on character was observed for a charge reversal substitution, D273R. Together, these results implicate the electrostatic interactions at the intersubunit interface as a major player in signal transduction and kinase regulation. The negative charge in this region destabilizes the local structure in a way that enhances conformational dynamics, as detected by disulfide trapping, and this effect is reversed by charge neutralization of the adaptation sites. Finally, two

  1. Structural and Functional Characterization of Two Alternative Splicing Variants of Mouse Endothelial Cell-Specific Chemotaxis Regulator (ECSCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchang Chang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells (ECs that line the lumen of blood vessels are important players in blood vessel formation, and EC migration is a key component of the angiogenic process. Thus, identification of genes that are specifically or preferentially expressed in vascular ECs and in-depth understanding of their biological functions may lead to discovery of new therapeutic targets. We have previously reported molecular characterization of human endothelial cell-specific molecule 2 (ECSM2/endothelial cell-specific chemotaxis regulator (ECSCR. In the present study, we cloned two mouse full-length cDNAs by RT-PCR, which encode two putative ECSCR isoform precursors with considerable homology to the human ECSCR. Nucleotide sequence and exon-intron junction analyses suggested that they are alternative splicing variants (ECSCR isoform-1 and -2, differing from each other in the first and second exons. Quantitative RT-PCR results revealed that isoform-2 is the predominant form, which was most abundant in heart, lung, and muscles, and moderately abundant in uterus and testis. In contrast, the expression of isoform-1 seemed to be more enriched in testis. To further explore their potential cellular functions, we expressed GFP- and FLAG-tagged ECSCR isoforms, respectively, in an ECSCR deficient cell line (HEK293. Interestingly, the actual sizes of either ECSCR-GFP or -FLAG fusion proteins detected by immunoblotting are much larger than their predicted sizes, suggesting that both isoforms are glycoproteins. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that both ECSCR isoforms are localized at the cell surface, which is consistent with the structural prediction. Finally, we performed cell migration assays using mouse endothelial MS1 cells overexpressing GFP alone, isoform-1-GFP, and isoform-2-GFP, respectively. Our results showed that both isoforms significantly inhibited vascular epidermal growth factor (VEGF-induced cell migration. Taken together, we have provided several lines

  2. Characterization of Cell Surface and EPS Remodeling of Azospirillum brasilense Chemotaxis-like 1 Signal Transduction Pathway mutants by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billings, Amanda N [ORNL; Siuti, Piro [ORNL; Bible, Amber [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Alexandre, Gladys [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    To compete in complex microbial communities, bacteria must quickly sense environmental changes and adjust cellular functions for optimal growth. Chemotaxis-like signal transduction pathways are implicated in the modulation of multiple cellular responses, including motility, EPS production, and cell-to-cell interactions. Recently, the Che1 chemotaxis-like pathway from Azospirillum brasilense was shown to modulate flocculation. In A. brasilense, cell surface properties, including EPS production, are thought to play a direct role in promoting flocculation. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we have detected distinct changes in the surface morphology of flocculating A. brasilense Che1 mutant strains that are absent in the wild type strain. Whereas the wild type strain produces a smooth mucosal extracellular matrix, the flocculating Che1 mutant strains produce distinctive extracellular fibril structures. Further analyses using flocculation inhibition and lectin-binding assays suggest that the composition of EPS components in the extracellular matrix differs between the cheA1 and cheY1 mutants, despite an apparent similarity in the macroscopic floc structures. Collectively, these data indicate that mutations in the Che1 pathway that result in increased flocculation are correlated with distinctive changes in the extracellular matrix structure produced by the mutants, including likely changes in the EPS structure and/or composition.

  3. Characterization of cell surface and extracellular matrix remodeling of Azospirillum brasilense chemotaxis-like 1 signal transduction pathway mutants by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    To compete in complex microbial communities, bacteria must sense environmental changes and adjust cellular functions for optimal growth. Chemotaxis-like signal transduction pathways are implicated in the regulation of multiple behaviors in response to changes in the environment, including motility patterns, exopolysaccharide production, and cell-to-cell interactions. In Azospirillum brasilense, cell surface properties, including exopolysaccharide production, are thought to play a direct role in promoting flocculation. Recently, the Che1 chemotaxis-like pathway from A. brasilense was shown to modulate flocculation, suggesting an associated modulation of cell surface properties. Using atomic force microscopy, distinct changes in the surface morphology of flocculating A. brasilense Che1 mutant strains were detected. Whereas the wild-type strain produces a smooth mucosal extracellular matrix after 24 h, the flocculating Che1 mutant strains produce distinctive extracellular fibril structures. Further analyses using flocculation inhibition, lectin-binding assays, and comparison of lipopolysaccharides profiles suggest that the extracellular matrix differs between the cheA1 and the cheY1 mutants, despite an apparent similarity in the macroscopic floc structures. Collectively, these data indicate that disruption of the Che1 pathway is correlated with distinctive changes in the extracellular matrix, which likely result from changes in surface polysaccharides structure and/or composition.

  4. Characterization of cell surface and extracellular matrix remodeling of Azospirillum brasilense chemotaxis-like 1 signal transduction pathway mutants by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Amanda Nicole; Siuti, Piro; Bible, Amber N; Alexandre, Gladys; Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L

    2011-01-01

    To compete in complex microbial communities, bacteria must sense environmental changes and adjust cellular functions for optimal growth. Chemotaxis-like signal transduction pathways are implicated in the regulation of multiple behaviors in response to changes in the environment, including motility patterns, exopolysaccharide production, and cell-to-cell interactions. In Azospirillum brasilense, cell surface properties, including exopolysaccharide production, are thought to play a direct role in promoting flocculation. Recently, the Che1 chemotaxis-like pathway from A. brasilense was shown to modulate flocculation, suggesting an associated modulation of cell surface properties. Using atomic force microscopy, distinct changes in the surface morphology of flocculating A. brasilense Che1 mutant strains were detected. Whereas the wild-type strain produces a smooth mucosal extracellular matrix after 24 h, the flocculating Che1 mutant strains produce distinctive extracellular fibril structures. Further analyses using flocculation inhibition, lectin-binding assays, and comparison of lipopolysaccharides profiles suggest that the extracellular matrix differs between the cheA1 and the cheY1 mutants, despite an apparent similarity in the macroscopic floc structures. Collectively, these data indicate that disruption of the Che1 pathway is correlated with distinctive changes in the extracellular matrix, which likely result from changes in surface polysaccharides structure and/or composition. FEMS Microbiology Letters © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. No claim to original US government works.

  5. Glutamate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders S; Geballe, Matthew T; Snyder, James P

    2006-01-01

    Fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the CNS relies almost entirely on the neurotransmitter glutamate and its family of ion channel receptors. An appreciation of the coupling between agonist binding and channel opening has advanced rapidly during the past five years, largely as a result of ne...

  6. The DRF motif of CXCR6 as chemokine receptor adaptation to adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Koenen

    Full Text Available The CXC-chemokine receptor 6 (CXCR6 is a class A GTP-binding protein-coupled receptor (GPCRs that mediates adhesion of leukocytes by interacting with the transmembrane cell surface-expressed chemokine ligand 16 (CXCL16, and also regulates leukocyte migration by interacting with the soluble shed variant of CXCL16. In contrast to virtually all other chemokine receptors with chemotactic activity, CXCR6 carries a DRF motif instead of the typical DRY motif as a key element in receptor activation and G protein coupling. In this work, modeling analyses revealed that the phenylalanine F3.51 in CXCR6 might have impact on intramolecular interactions including hydrogen bonds by this possibly changing receptor function. Initial investigations with embryonic kidney HEK293 cells and further studies with monocytic THP-1 cells showed that mutation of DRF into DRY does not influence ligand binding, receptor internalization, receptor recycling, and protein kinase B (AKT signaling. Adhesion was slightly decreased in a time-dependent manner. However, CXCL16-induced calcium signaling and migration were increased. Vice versa, when the DRY motif of the related receptor CX3CR1 was mutated into DRF the migratory response towards CX3CL1 was diminished, indicating that the presence of a DRF motif generally impairs chemotaxis in chemokine receptors. Transmembrane and soluble CXCL16 play divergent roles in homeostasis, inflammation, and cancer, which can be beneficial or detrimental. Therefore, the DRF motif of CXCR6 may display a receptor adaptation allowing adhesion and cell retention by transmembrane CXCL16 but reducing the chemotactic response to soluble CXCL16. This adaptation may avoid permanent or uncontrolled recruitment of inflammatory cells as well as cancer metastasis.

  7. Dictyostelium Ric8 is a nonreceptor guanine exchange factor for heterotrimeric G proteins and is important for development and chemotaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kataria, Rama; Xu, Xuehua; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Keizer-Gunnink, Ineke; Jin, Tian; van Haastert, Peter J M; Kortholt, Arjan

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins couple external signals to the activation of intracellular signal transduction pathways. Agonist-stimulated guanine nucleotide exchange activity of G-protein-coupled receptors results in the exchange of G-protein-bound GDP to GTP and the dissociation and activation of the

  8. Autocrine Signaling by Wnt-5a Deregulates Chemotaxis of Leukemic Cells and Predicts Clinical Outcome in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janovská, P.; Poppová, L.; Plevová, K.; Plesingerova, E.; Behal, M.; Kaucká, M.; Ovesná, P.; Hlozkova, M.; Borský, M.; Stehlíková, O.; Brychtová, Y.; Doubek, M.; Machalova, M.; Baskar, S.; Kozubík, Alois; Pospíšilová, Š.; Pavlová, Š.; Bryja, Vítězslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 2 (2016), s. 459-469 ISSN 1078-0432 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : receptor tyrosine kinase * cd38 expression * mutation status * cll cells Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 9.619, year: 2016

  9. Growth factors G-CSF and GM-CSF differentially preserve chemotaxis of neutrophils aging in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolach, Baruch; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; Maianski, Nikolai A.; Tool, Anton T. J.; van Bruggen, Robin; Roos, Dirk; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The ability of human neutrophils to migrate was studied during culture in vitro. METHODS: Neutrophils were isolated from human blood and cultured at 37 degrees C. Apoptosis was determined by Annexin-V fluorescein isothiocyanate binding. Receptor expression was measured by fluorescence in

  10. A computational method for the coupled solution of reaction-diffusion equations on evolving domains and manifolds: Application to a model of cell migration and chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, G; Mackenzie, J A; Nolan, M; Insall, R H

    2016-03-15

    In this paper, we devise a moving mesh finite element method for the approximate solution of coupled bulk-surface reaction-diffusion equations on an evolving two dimensional domain. Fundamental to the success of the method is the robust generation of bulk and surface meshes. For this purpose, we use a novel moving mesh partial differential equation (MMPDE) approach. The developed method is applied to model problems with known analytical solutions; these experiments indicate second-order spatial and temporal accuracy. Coupled bulk-surface problems occur frequently in many areas; in particular, in the modelling of eukaryotic cell migration and chemotaxis. We apply the method to a model of the two-way interaction of a migrating cell in a chemotactic field, where the bulk region corresponds to the extracellular region and the surface to the cell membrane.

  11. Evidence of chemotaxis by quantitative measurement of the force vectors of Trypanossoma cruzi in the vicinity of the Rhodnius prolixus midgut wall cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Fontes, A.; Stahl, C. V.; Santos-Mallet, J. R.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Feder, D.; Cesar, C. L.

    2009-08-01

    In this work we used a methodology to study chemotaxis of Trypanossoma cruzi (T. Cruzi) in real time using an Optical Tweezers system. Trapped beads were used as a force transducer for measuring forces of the same order of magnitude as typical forces induced by flagellar motion. Optical Tweezers allowed real time measurements of the force vectors, strength and direction, of living parasites under chemical or other kinds of gradients. This seems to be the ideal tool to perform observations of taxis response of cells and microorganisms with high sensitivity to capture instantaneous responses to a given stimulus. We applied this methodology to investigate the T. cruzi under distinct situations: the parasite alone and in the presence of its insect-vector Rhodnius prolixus (R. prolixus).

  12. Early osteoinductive human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells support an enhanced hematopoietic cell expansion with altered chemotaxis- and adhesion-related gene expression profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugino, Noriko [Department of Hematology/Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Miura, Yasuo, E-mail: ym58f5@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Yao, Hisayuki [Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Iwasa, Masaki; Fujishiro, Aya [Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Division of Gastroenterology and Hematology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan); Fujii, Sumie [Department of Hematology/Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Hirai, Hideyo [Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi [Department of Hematology/Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Ichinohe, Tatsuo [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Maekawa, Taira [Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2016-01-22

    Bone marrow (BM) microenvironment has a crucial role in supporting hematopoiesis. Here, by using a microarray analysis, we demonstrate that human BM mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) in an early osteoinductive stage (e-MSCs) are characterized by unique hematopoiesis-associated gene expression with an enhanced hematopoiesis-supportive ability. In comparison to BM-MSCs without osteoinductive treatment, gene expression in e-MSCs was significantly altered in terms of their cell adhesion- and chemotaxis-related profiles, as identified with Gene Ontology and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. Noteworthy, expression of the hematopoiesis-associated molecules CXCL12 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 was remarkably decreased in e-MSCs. e-MSCs supported an enhanced expansion of CD34{sup +} hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and generation of myeloid lineage cells in vitro. In addition, short-term osteoinductive treatment favored in vivo hematopoietic recovery in lethally irradiated mice that underwent BM transplantation. e-MSCs exhibited the absence of decreased stemness-associated gene expression, increased osteogenesis-associated gene expression, and apparent mineralization, thus maintaining the ability to differentiate into adipogenic cells. Our findings demonstrate the unique biological characteristics of e-MSCs as hematopoiesis-regulatory stromal cells at differentiation stage between MSCs and osteoprogenitor cells and have significant implications in developing new strategy for using pharmacological osteoinductive treatment to support hematopoiesis in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell transplantation. - Highlights: • Human BM-MSCs in an early osteoinductive stage (e-MSCs) support hematopoiesis. • Adhesion- and chemotaxis-associated gene signatures are altered in e-MSCs. • Expression of CXCL12 and VCAM1 is remarkably decreased in e-MSCs. • e-MSCs are at differentiation stage between MSCs and osteoprogenitor cells. • Osteoinductive treatment

  13. Endocannabinoids and cannabinoid receptors in ischaemia–reperfusion injury and preconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacher, P; Haskó, G

    2007-01-01

    Ischaemia–reperfusion (I/R) is a pivotal mechanism of organ injury during stroke, myocardial infarction, organ transplantation and vascular surgeries. Ischaemic preconditioning (IPC) is a potent endogenous form of tissue protection against I/R injury. On the one hand, endocannabinoids have been implicated in the protective effects of IPC through cannabinoid CB1/CB2 receptor-dependent and -independent mechanisms. However, there is evidence suggesting that endocannabinoids are overproduced during various forms of I/R, such as myocardial infarction or whole body I/R associated with circulatory shock, and may contribute to the cardiovascular depressive state associated with these pathologies. Previous studies using synthetic CB1 receptor agonists or knockout mice demonstrated CB1 receptor-dependent protection against cerebral I/R injury in various animal models. In contrast, several follow-up reports have shown protection afforded by CB1 receptor antagonists, but not agonists. Excitedly, emerging studies using potent CB2 receptor agonists and/or knockout mice have provided compelling evidence that CB2 receptor activation is protective against myocardial, cerebral and hepatic I/R injuries by decreasing the endothelial cell activation/inflammatory response (for example, expression of adhesion molecules, secretion of chemokines, and so on), and by attenuating the leukocyte chemotaxis, rolling, adhesion to endothelium, activation and transendothelial migration, and interrelated oxidative/nitrosative damage. This review is aimed to discuss the role of endocannabinoids and CB receptors in various forms of I/R injury (myocardial, cerebral, hepatic and circulatory shock) and preconditioning, and to delineate the evidence supporting the therapeutic utility of selective CB2 receptor agonists, which are devoid of psychoactive effects, as a promising new approach to limit I/R-induced tissue damage. PMID:18026124

  14. Role of Microglia Adenosine A2A Receptors in Retinal and Brain Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Ana R.; Baptista, Filipa I.; Santos, Paulo F.; Cristóvão, Gonçalo; Ambrósio, António F.; Cunha, Rodrigo A.; Gomes, Catarina A.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroinflammation mediated by microglial cells in the brain has been commonly associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Whether this microglia-mediated neuroinflammation is cause or consequence of neurodegeneration is still a matter of controversy. However, it is unequivocal that chronic neuroinflammation plays a role in disease progression and halting that process represents a potential therapeutic strategy. The neuromodulator adenosine emerges as a promising targeting candidate based on its ability to regulate microglial proliferation, chemotaxis, and reactivity through the activation of its G protein coupled A2A receptor (A2AR). This is in striking agreement with the ability of A2AR blockade to control several brain diseases. Retinal degenerative diseases have been also associated with microglia-mediated neuroinflammation, but the role of A2AR has been scarcely explored. This review aims to compare inflammatory features of Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases with glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, discussing the therapeutic potential of A2AR in these degenerative conditions. PMID:25132733

  15. Clarifying CB2 Receptor-Dependent and Independent Effects of THC on Human Lung Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafian, Theodore; Montes, Cindy; Harui, Airi; Beedanagari, Sudheer R.; Kiertscher, Sylvia; Stripecke, Renata; Hossepian, Derik; Kitchen, Christina; Kern, Rita; Belperio, John; Roth, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Marijuana smoking is associated with a number of abnormal findings in the lungs of habitual smokers. Previous studies revealed that Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) caused mitochondrial injury in primary lung epithelial cells and in the cell line, A549 (Sarafian et al., 2003; Sarafian et al., 2005). The role of cannabinoid receptors in this injury was unclear, as was the potential impact on cell function. In order to investigate these questions, A549 cells were engineered to over-express the type 2 cannabinoid receptor (CB2R) using a self-inactivating lentiviral vector. This transduction resulted in a 60-fold increase in CB2R mRNA relative to cells transduced with a control vector. Transduced cell lines were used to study the effects of THC on chemotactic activity and mitochondrial function. Chemotaxis in response to a 10 % serum gradient was suppressed in a concentration-dependent manner by exposure to THC. CB2R-transduced cells exhibited less intrinsic chemotactic activity (p < 0.05) and were 80- to 100-fold more sensitive to the inhibitory effects of THC. Studies using SR144528, a selective CB2R antagonist, verified that these effects were mediated by the CB2R. Marijuana smoke extract, but not smoke extracts from tobacco or placebo marijuana cigarettes, reproduced these effects (p < 0.05). THC decreased ATP level and mitochondrial membrane potential (Ψm) in both control and CB2R-transduced cells. However, these decreases did not play a significant role in chemotaxis inhibition since cyclosporine A, which protected against ATP loss, did not increase cell migration. Moreover, CB2R-transduced cells displayed higher Ψm than did control cells. Since both Ψm and chemotaxis are regulated by intracellular signaling, we investigated the effects of THC on the activation of multiple signaling pathways. Serum exposure activated several signaling events of which phosphorylation of IκB-α and JNK were regulated in a CB2R-and THC-dependent manner. We conclude that airway

  16. Clarifying CB2 receptor-dependent and independent effects of THC on human lung epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarafian, Theodore; Montes, Cindy; Harui, Airi; Beedanagari, Sudheer R.; Kiertscher, Sylvia; Stripecke, Renata; Hossepian, Derik; Kitchen, Christina; Kern, Rita; Belperio, John; Roth, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Marijuana smoking is associated with a number of abnormal findings in the lungs of habitual smokers. Previous studies revealed that Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) caused mitochondrial injury in primary lung epithelial cells and in the cell line, A549 [Sarafian, T. A., Kouyoumjian, S., Khoshaghideh, F., Tashkin, D. P., and Roth, M. D. (2003). Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol disrupts mitochondrial function and cell energetics. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 284, L298-306; Sarafian, T., Habib, N., Mao, J. T., Tsu, I. H., Yamamoto, M. L., Hsu, E., Tashkin, D. P., and Roth, M. D. (2005). Gene expression changes in human small airway epithelial cells exposed to Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Toxicol Lett 158, 95-107]. The role of cannabinoid receptors in this injury was unclear, as was the potential impact on cell function. In order to investigate these questions, A549 cells were engineered to over-express the type 2 cannabinoid receptor (CB2R) using a self-inactivating lentiviral vector. This transduction resulted in a 60-fold increase in CB2R mRNA relative to cells transduced with a control vector. Transduced cell lines were used to study the effects of THC on chemotactic activity and mitochondrial function. Chemotaxis in response to a 10% serum gradient was suppressed in a concentration-dependent manner by exposure to THC. CB2R-transduced cells exhibited less intrinsic chemotactic activity (p m ) in both control and CB2R-transduced cells. However, these decreases did not play a significant role in chemotaxis inhibition since cyclosporine A, which protected against ATP loss, did not increase cell migration. Moreover, CB2R-transduced cells displayed higher Ψ m than did control cells. Since both Ψ m and chemotaxis are regulated by intracellular signaling, we investigated the effects of THC on the activation of multiple signaling pathways. Serum exposure activated several signaling events of which phosphorylation of IκB-α and JNK was regulated in a CB2R- and THC

  17. A Butter Aroma Recombinate Activates Human Class-I Odorant Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geithe, Christiane; Andersen, Gaby; Malki, Agne; Krautwurst, Dietmar

    2015-11-04

    With ∼400 olfactory G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), humans sensitively perceive ∼230 key aroma compounds as best natural agonists of ∼10000 food volatiles. An understanding of odorant coding, thus, critically depends on the knowledge about interactions of key food aroma chemicals and their mixtures with their cognate receptors. Genetically designed test cell systems enable the screening, deorphaning, and characterization of single odorant receptors (OR). This study shows for the food aroma-specific and quantitative butter aroma recombinate, and its single components, specific in vitro class-I OR activity patterns, as well as the activation of selected OR in a concentration-dependent manner. Recently, chemosensory receptors, especially class-I OR, were demonstrated to be expressed on blood leukocytes, which may encounter foodborne aroma compounds postprandially. This study shows that butter aroma recombinate induced chemotaxis of isolated human neutrophils in a defined gradient, and in a concentration-dependent and pertussis toxin-sensitive manner, suggesting at least a GPCR-mediated activation of blood leukocytes by key food odorants.

  18. Dysregulation of chemokine receptor expression and function in leukocytes from ALS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perner, Caroline; Perner, Florian; Stubendorff, Beatrice; Förster, Martin; Witte, Otto W; Heidel, Florian H; Prell, Tino; Grosskreutz, Julian

    2018-03-28

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is rapidly progressive adult-onset motor neuron disease characterized by the neurodegeneration of both upper and lower motor neurons in the cortex and the spinal cord; the majority of patients succumb to respiratory failure. Although the etiology is not yet fully understood, there is compelling evidence that ALS is a multi-systemic disorder, with peripheral inflammation critically contributing to the disease process. However, the full extent and nature of this immunological dysregulation remains to be established, particularly within circulating blood cells. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to identify dysregulated inflammatory molecules in peripheral blood cells of ALS patients and analyze for functional consequences of the observed findings. To this end, we employed flow cytometry-based screening to quantify the surface expression of major chemokine receptors and integrins. A significantly increased expression of CXCR3, CXCR4, CCL2, and CCL5 was observed on T cells in ALS patients compared to healthy controls. Intriguingly, the expression was even more pronounced in patients with a slow progressive phenotype. To further investigate the functional consequences of this altered surface expression, we used a modified Boyden chamber assay to measure chemotaxis in ALS patient-derived lymphocytes. Interestingly, chemoattraction with the CXCR3-Ligand IP10 led to upregulated migratory behavior of ALS lymphocytes compared to healthy controls. Taken together, our data provides evidence for a functional dysregulation of IP10-directed chemotaxis in peripheral blood cells in ALS patients. However, whether the chemokine itself or its receptor CXCR3, or both, could serve as potential therapeutic targets in ALS requires further investigations.

  19. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) provides survival factors to EBV+diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) lines and modulates cytokine induced specific chemotaxis in EBV+ DLBCL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liang; Ehlin-Henriksson, Barbro; Zhou, Xiaoying; Zhu, Hong; Ernberg, Ingemar; Kis, Lorand L; Klein, George

    2017-12-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common type of malignant lymphoma, accounts for 30% of adult non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) -positive DLBCL of the elderly is a newly recognized subtype that accounts for 8-10% of DLBCLs in Asian countries, but is less common in Western populations. Five DLBCL-derived cell lines were employed to characterize patterns of EBV latent gene expression, as well as response to cytokines and chemotaxis. Interleukin-4 and interleukin-21 modified LMP1, EBNA1 and EBNA2 expression depending on cell phenotype and type of EBV latent programme (type I, II or III). These cytokines also affected CXCR4- or CCR7-mediated chemotaxis in two of the cell lines, Farage (type III) and Val (type II). Further, we investigated the effect of EBV by using dominant-negative EBV nuclear antigen 1(dnEBNA1) to eliminate EBV genomes. This resulted in decreased chemotaxis. By employing an alternative way to eliminate EBV genomes, Roscovitine, we show an increase of apoptosis in the EBV-positive lines. These results show that EBV plays an important role in EBV-positive DLBCL lines with regard to survival and chemotactic response. Our findings provide evidence for the impact of microenvironment on EBV-carrying DLBCL cells and might have therapeutic implications. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Purinergic control of inflammation and thrombosis: Role of P2X1 receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Oury

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation shifts the hemostatic mechanisms in favor of thrombosis. Upon tissue damage or infection, a sudden increase of extracellular ATP occurs, that might contribute to the crosstalk between inflammation and thrombosis. On platelets, P2X1 receptors act to amplify platelet activation and aggregation induced by other platelet agonists. These receptors critically contribute to thrombus stability in small arteries. Besides platelets, studies by our group indicate that these receptors are expressed by neutrophils. They promote neutrophil chemotaxis, both in vitro and in vivo. In a laser-induced injury mouse model of thrombosis, it appears that neutrophils are required to initiate thrombus formation and coagulation activation on inflamed arteriolar endothelia. In this model, by using P2X1−/− mice, we recently showed that P2X1 receptors, expressed on platelets and neutrophils, play a key role in thrombus growth and fibrin generation. Intriguingly, in a model of endotoxemia, P2X1−/− mice exhibited aggravated oxidative tissue damage, along with exacerbated thrombocytopenia and increased activation of coagulation, which translated into higher susceptibility to septic shock. Thus, besides its ability to recruit neutrophils and platelets on inflamed endothelia, the P2X1 receptor also contributes to limit the activation of circulating neutrophils under systemic inflammatory conditions. Taken together, these data suggest that P2X1 receptors are involved in the interplay between platelets, neutrophils and thrombosis. We propose that activation of these receptors by ATP on neutrophils and platelets represents a new mechanism that regulates thrombo-inflammation.

  1. In vitro study of histamine and histamine receptor ligands influence on the adhesion of purified human eosinophils to endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosicki, Marek; Wójcik, Tomasz; Chlopicki, Stefan; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-04-15

    It is a well-known fact that histamine is involved in eosinophil-dependent inflammatory responses including cellular chemotaxis and migration. Nevertheless, the relative role of histamine receptors in the mechanisms of eosinophils adhesion to endothelial cells is not known. Therefore the aim of presented study was to examine the effect of selective histamine receptors ligands on eosinophils adhesion to endothelium. For that purpose the highly purified human eosinophils have been isolated from the peripheral blood. The viability and functional integrity of isolated eosinophils have been validated in several tests. Histamine as well as 4-methylhistamine (selective H4 agonist) in concentration-dependent manner significantly increased number of eosinophils that adhere to endothelium. Among the selective histamine receptors antagonist or H1 inverse agonist only JNJ7777120 (histamine H4 antagonist) and thioperamide (dual histamine H3/H4 antagonist) had direct effect on eosinophils adhesion to endothelial cells. Antagonists of H1 (diphenhydramine, mepyramine) H2 (ranitidine and famotidine) and H3 (pitolisant) histamine receptors were ineffective. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that histamine receptor H4 plays a dominant role in histamine-induced eosinophils adhesion to endothelium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Bacterial chemotaxis: introverted or extroverted? A comparison of the advantages and disadvantages of basic forms of metabolism-based and metabolism-independent behavior using a computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbert, Matthew D

    2013-01-01

    Using a minimal model of metabolism, we examine the limitations of behavior that is (a) solely in response to environmental phenomena or (b) solely in response to metabolic dynamics, showing that basic forms of each of these kinds of behavior are incapable of driving survival-prolonging behavior in certain situations. Inspired by experimental evidence of concurrent metabolism-based and metabolism-independent chemotactic mechanisms in Escherichia coli and Rhodobacter sphaeroides, we then investigate how metabolism-independent and metabolism-based sensitivities can be integrated into a single behavioral response, demonstrating that a simple switching mechanism can be sufficient to effectively integrate metabolism-based and metabolism-independent behaviors. Finally, we use a spatial simulation of bacteria to show that the investigated forms of behavior produce different spatio-temporal patterns that are influenced by the metabolic-history of the bacteria. We suggest that these patterns could be a way to experimentally derive insight into the relationship between metabolism and chemotaxis in real bacteria.

  3. Coupled effect of chemotaxis and growth on microbial distributions in organic-amended aquifer sediments: Observations from laboratory and field studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M.; Ford, R.M.; Harvey, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    The inter-relationship of growth and chemotactic response exhibited by two common soil-inhabiting bacteria was investigated to determine its impact on bacterial migration. Filter-chambers were used to simulate aquifer sediments characterized by vertical gradients of organic contaminants in both artificial groundwater flow systems in the laboratory and within the screened intervals of observation wells in a sandy aquifer. A labile model contaminant (acetate) was added to the top compartments of the three-part chambers, whereas bacteria with a demonstrated propensity to grow on and chemotactically respond to acetate were introduced to the lower compartments, The motility and chemotactic response of Pseudomonas putida F1 resulted in 40 to 110% greater abundances in the upper compartments and concomitant 22 to 70% depletions in the lower compartments relative to the nonchemotactic controls over 2 days. Bacteria were in greatest abundance within the sand plug that separated the upper and lower compartments where sharp acetate gradients induced a strong chemotactic response. This observation was consistent with predictions from a mathematical model. In agreement with the laboratory results, the down-well filter-chamber incubations with Pseudomonas stutzeri in the aquifer indicated that 91% fewer bacteria resided in the lower compartment than the control experiment without acetate at 15 h. The combination of chemotaxis and growth greatly accelerated the migration of bacteria toward and subsequent abundance at the higher acetate concentration. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  4. Quantitative Phosphoproteome Analysis of Lysophosphatidic Acid Induced Chemotaxis applying Dual-step ¹⁸O Labeling Coupled with Immobilized Metal-ion Affinity Chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Shi-Jian; Wang, Yingchun; Jacobs, Jon M.; Qian, Weijun; Yang, Feng; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Du, Xiuxia; Wang, Wei; Moore, Ronald J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Waters, Katrina M.; Heibeck, Tyler H.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Camp, David G.; Klemke, Richard L.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-10-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a central cellular regulatory mechanism in modulating protein activity and propagating signals within cellular pathways and networks. Development of more effective methods for the simultaneous identification of phosphorylation sites and quantification of temporal changes in protein phosphorylation could provide important insights into molecular signaling mechanisms in a variety of different cellular processes. Here we present an integrated quantitative phosphoproteomics approach and its applications for comparative analysis of Cos-7 cells in response to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) gradient stimulation. The approach combines trypsin-catalyzed 16O/18O labeling plus 16O/18O-methanol esterification labeling for quantitation, a macro- Immobilized Metal-ion Affinity Chromatography trap for phosphopeptide enrichment, and a monolithic capillary column with integrated electrospray emitter. LC separation and MS/MS is followed by neutral loss-dependent MS/MS/MS for phosphopeptide identification using a linear ion trap (LTQ)-FT mass spectrometer and complementary searching algorithms for interpreting MS/MS spectra. Protein phosphorylation involved in various signaling pathways of cell migration were identified and quantified, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase 1, dual-specificity mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2, and dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation regulated kinase 1b, and a number of Rho GTPase-activating proteins. These results demonstrate the efficiency of this quantitative phosphoproteomics approach and its application for rapid discovery of phosphorylation events associated with gradient sensing and cell chemotaxis.

  5. Eotaxin induces degranulation and chemotaxis of eosinophils through the activation of ERK2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampen, G T; Stafford, S; Adachi, T

    2000-01-01

    not be detected. The kinase activity of ERK2 and p38 paralleled phosphorylation. PD980 59, an inhibitor of the ERK2-activating enzyme MEK (MAP ERK kinase), blocked phosphorylation of ERK2 in a concentration-dependent manner. The functional relevance of ERK2 and p38 was studied using PD98 059 and the p38 inhibitor...... was assessed using Boyden microchambers. Eotaxin (10(-11) to 10(-7) mol/L) induced concentration-dependent phosphorylation of ERK2 and p38. Phosphorylation was detectable after 30 seconds, peaked at about 1 minute, and returned to baseline after 2 to 5 minutes. Phosphorylation of JNK above baseline could...... SB202 190. PD98 059 and SB202 190 both caused inhibition of eotaxin-induced ECP release and chemotaxis. We conclude that eotaxin induces a rapid concentration-dependent activation of ERK2 and p38 in eosinophils and that the activation of these MAP kinases is required for eotaxin...

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE OLFACTORY RECEPTORS EXPRESSED IN HUMAN SPERMATOZOA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eFlegel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of external cues is fundamental for human spermatozoa to locate the oocyte in the female reproductive tract. This task requires a specific chemoreceptor repertoire that is expressed on the surface of human spermatozoa, which is not fully identified to date. Olfactory receptors (ORs are candidate molecules and have been attributed to be involved in sperm chemotaxis and chemokinesis, indicating an important role in mammalian spermatozoa. An increasing importance has been suggested for spermatozoal RNA, which led us to investigate the expression of all 387 OR genes. This study provides the first comprehensive analysis of OR transcripts in human spermatozoa of several individuals by RNA-Seq. We detected 91 different transcripts in the spermatozoa samples that could be aligned to annotated OR genes. Using stranded mRNA-Seq, we detected a class of these putative OR transcripts in an antisense orientation, indicating a different function, rather than coding for a functional OR protein. Nevertheless, we were able to detect OR proteins in various compartments of human spermatozoa, indicating distinct functions in human sperm. A panel of various OR ligands induced Ca2+ signals in human spermatozoa, which could be inhibited by mibefradil. This study indicated that a variety of ORs are expressed at the mRNA and protein level in human spermatozoa and demonstrates that ORs are involved in the physiological processes.

  7. Characterization of the Olfactory Receptors Expressed in Human Spermatozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegel, Caroline; Vogel, Felix; Hofreuter, Adrian; Schreiner, Benjamin S. P.; Osthold, Sandra; Veitinger, Sophie; Becker, Christian; Brockmeyer, Norbert H.; Muschol, Michael; Wennemuth, Gunther; Altmüller, Janine; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2016-01-01

    The detection of external cues is fundamental for human spermatozoa to locate the oocyte in the female reproductive tract. This task requires a specific chemoreceptor repertoire that is expressed on the surface of human spermatozoa, which is not fully identified to date. Olfactory receptors (ORs) are candidate molecules and have been attributed to be involved in sperm chemotaxis and chemokinesis, indicating an important role in mammalian spermatozoa. An increasing importance has been suggested for spermatozoal RNA, which led us to investigate the expression of all 387 OR genes. This study provides the first comprehensive analysis of OR transcripts in human spermatozoa of several individuals by RNA-Seq. We detected 91 different transcripts in the spermatozoa samples that could be aligned to annotated OR genes. Using stranded mRNA-Seq, we detected a class of these putative OR transcripts in an antisense orientation, indicating a different function, rather than coding for a functional OR protein. Nevertheless, we were able to detect OR proteins in various compartments of human spermatozoa, indicating distinct functions in human sperm. A panel of various OR ligands induced Ca2+ signals in human spermatozoa, which could be inhibited by mibefradil. This study indicates that a variety of ORs are expressed at the mRNA and protein level in human spermatozoa. PMID:26779489

  8. NOP Receptor Ligands as Potential Agents for Inflammatory and Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine C. Gavioli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ is a seventeen-amino acid peptide that is the endogenous ligand of a G-protein-coupled receptor (NOP. Various immune cells express the precursor protein and secrete N/OFQ as well as display binding sites for this peptide. The functional capacity of NOP receptor was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo studies by the ability of N/OFQ to induce chemotaxis of immune cells, to regulate the expression of cytokines and other inflammatory mediators, and to control cellular and humoral immunity. In this context, N/OFQ could modulate the outcome of some inflammatory diseases, such as sepsis and autoimmune pathologies by mechanisms not clearly elucidated yet. In fact, human body fluid revealed increased levels of N/OFQ under sepsis, arthritis, and Parkinson's diagnose. Preclinical studies pointed to the blockade of NOP receptor signaling as successful in treating these experimental conditions. Further preclinical and clinical studies are required to investigate the potential of NOP ligands in treating inflammatory diseases.

  9. A polycystin-type transient receptor potential (Trp channel that is activated by ATP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Traynor

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available ATP and ADP are ancient extra-cellular signalling molecules that in Dictyostelium amoebae cause rapid, transient increases in cytosolic calcium due to an influx through the plasma membrane. This response is independent of hetero-trimeric G-proteins, the putative IP3 receptor IplA and all P2X channels. We show, unexpectedly, that it is abolished in mutants of the polycystin-type transient receptor potential channel, TrpP. Responses to the chemoattractants cyclic-AMP and folic acid are unaffected in TrpP mutants. We report that the DIF morphogens, cyclic-di-GMP, GABA, glutamate and adenosine all induce strong cytoplasmic calcium responses, likewise independently of TrpP. Thus, TrpP is dedicated to purinergic signalling. ATP treatment causes cell blebbing within seconds but this does not require TrpP, implicating a separate purinergic receptor. We could detect no effect of ATP on chemotaxis and TrpP mutants grow, chemotax and develop almost normally in standard conditions. No gating ligand is known for the human homologue of TrpP, polycystin-2, which causes polycystic kidney disease. Our results now show that TrpP mediates purinergic signalling in Dictyostelium and is directly or indirectly gated by ATP.

  10. A macrophage inflammatory protein homolog encoded by guinea pig cytomegalovirus signals via CC chemokine receptor 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penfold, Mark; Miao Zhenhua; Wang Yu; Haggerty, Shannon; Schleiss, Mark R.

    2003-01-01

    Cytomegaloviruses encode homologs of cellular immune effector proteins, including chemokines (CKs) and CK receptor-like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Sequence of the guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) genome identified an open reading frame (ORF) which predicted a 101 amino acid (aa) protein with homology to the macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP) subfamily of CC (β) CKs, designated GPCMV-MIP. To assess functionality of this CK, recombinant GPCMV-MIP was expressed in HEK293 cells and assayed for its ability to bind to and functionally interact with a variety of GPCRs. Specific signaling was observed with the hCCR1 receptor, which could be blocked with hMIP -1α in competition experiments. Migration assays revealed that GPCMV-MIP was able to induce chemotaxis in hCCR1-L1.2 cells. Antisera raised against a GST-MIP fusion protein immunoprecipitated species of ∼12 and 10 kDa from GPCMV-inoculated tissue culture lysates, and convalescent antiserum from GPCMV-infected animals was immunoreactive with GST-MIP by ELISA assay. These results represent the first substantive in vitro characterization of a functional CC CK encoded by a cytomegalovirus

  11. Selective engagement of G protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) encodes distinct functions of biased ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidar, David A.; Violin, Jonathan D.; Whalen, Erin J.; Lefkowitz, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    CCL19 and CCL21 are endogenous agonists for the seven-transmembrane receptor CCR7. They are equally active in promoting G protein stimulation and chemotaxis. Yet, we find that they result in striking differences in activation of the G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK)/ß-arrestin system. CCL19 leads to robust CCR7 phosphorylation and β-arrestin2 recruitment catalyzed by both GRK3 and GRK6 whereas CCL21 activates GRK6 alone. This differential GRK activation leads to distinct functional consequences. Although each ligand leads to β-arrestin2 recruitment, only CCL19 leads to redistribution of β-arrestin2-GFP into endocytic vesicles and classical receptor desensitization. In contrast, these agonists are both capable of signaling through GRK6 and β-arrestin2 to ERK kinases. Thus, this mechanism for “ligand bias” whereby endogenous agonists activate different GRK isoforms leads to functionally distinct pools of β-arrestin. PMID:19497875

  12. ELMO1 is upregulated in AML CD34+ stem/progenitor cells, mediates chemotaxis and predicts poor prognosis in normal karyotype AML.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta E Capala

    Full Text Available Both normal as well leukemic hematopoietic stem cells critically depend on their microenvironment in the bone marrow for processes such as self-renewal, survival and differentiation, although the exact pathways that are involved remain poorly understood. We performed transcriptome analysis on primitive CD34+ acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells (n = 46, their more differentiated CD34- leukemic progeny, and normal CD34+ bone marrow cells (n = 31 and focused on differentially expressed genes involved in adhesion and migration. Thus, Engulfment and Motility protein 1 (ELMO1 was identified amongst the top 50 most differentially expressed genes. ELMO1 is a crucial link in the signaling cascade that leads to activation of RAC GTPases and cytoskeleton rearrangements. We confirmed increased ELMO1 expression at the mRNA and protein level in a panel of AML samples and showed that high ELMO1 expression is an independent negative prognostic factor in normal karyotype (NK AML in three large independent patient cohorts. Downmodulation of ELMO1 in human CB CD34+ cells did not significantly alter expansion, progenitor frequency or differentiation in stromal co-cultures, but did result in a decreased frequency of stem cells in LTC-IC assays. In BCR-ABL-transduced human CB CD34+ cells depletion of ELMO1 resulted in a mild decrease in proliferation, but replating capacity of progenitors was severely impaired. Downregulation of ELMO1 in a panel of primary CD34+ AML cells also resulted in reduced long-term growth in stromal co-cultures in two out of three cases. Pharmacological inhibition of the ELMO1 downstream target RAC resulted in a severely impaired proliferation and survival of leukemic cells. Finally, ELMO1 depletion caused a marked decrease in SDF1-induced chemotaxis of leukemic cells. Taken together, these data show that inhibiting the ELMO1-RAC axis might be an alternative way to target leukemic cells.

  13. The innate immune modulators staphylococcal complement inhibitor and chemotaxis inhibitory protein of Staphylococcus aureus are located on beta-hemolysin-converting bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wamel, Willem J B; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; Ruyken, Maartje; van Kessel, Kok P M; van Strijp, Jos A G

    2006-02-01

    Two newly discovered immune modulators, chemotaxis inhibitory protein of Staphylococcus aureus (CHIPS) and staphylococcal complement inhibitor (SCIN), cluster on the conserved 3' end of beta-hemolysin (hlb)-converting bacteriophages (betaC-phis). Since these betaC-phis also carry the genes for the immune evasion molecules staphylokinase (sak) and enterotoxin A (sea), this 8-kb region at the 3' end of betaC-phi represents an innate immune evasion cluster (IEC). By PCR and Southern analyses of 85 clinical Staphylococcus aureus strains and 5 classical laboratory strains, we show that 90% of S. aureus strains carry a betaC-phi with an IEC. Seven IEC variants were discovered, carrying different combinations of chp, sak, or sea (or sep), always in the same 5'-to-3' orientation and on the 3' end of a betaC-phi. From most IEC variants we could isolate active bacteriophages by mitomycin C treatment, of which lysogens were generated in S. aureus R5 (broad phage host). All IEC-carrying bacteriophages integrated into hlb, as was measured by Southern blotting of R5 lysogens. Large quantities of the different bacteriophages were obtained by mitomycin C treatment of the lysogens, and bacteriophages were collected and used to reinfect all lysogenic R5 strains. In total, five lytic families were found. Furthermore, phage DNA was isolated and digested with EcoR1, revealing that one IEC variant can be found on different betaI-phis. In conclusion, the four human-specific innate immune modulators SCIN, CHIPS, SAK, and SEA form an IEC that is easily transferred among S. aureus strains by a diverse group of beta-hemolysin-converting bacteriophages.

  14. Expression and contributions of the Kir2.1 inward-rectifier K+ channel to proliferation, migration and chemotaxis of microglia in unstimulated and anti-inflammatory states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris eLam

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available When microglia respond to CNS damage, they can range from pro-inflammatory (classical, M1 to anti-inflammatory, alternative (M2 and acquired deactivation states. It is important to determine how microglial functions are affected by these activation states, and to identify molecules that regulate their behavior. Microglial proliferation and migration are crucial during development and following damage in the adult, and both functions are Ca2+-dependent. In many cell types, the membrane potential and driving force for Ca2+ influx are regulated by inward-rectifier K+ channels, including Kir2.1, which is prevalent in microglia. However, it is not known whether Kir2.1 expression and contributions are altered in anti-inflammatory states. We tested the hypothesis that Kir2.1 contributes to Ca2+ entry, proliferation and migration of rat microglia. Kir2.1 (KCNJ2 transcript expression, current amplitude, and proliferation were comparable in unstimulated microglia and following alternative activation (IL-4 stimulated and acquired deactivation (IL-10 stimulated. To examine functional roles of Kir2.1 in microglia, we first determined that ML133 was more effective than the commonly used blocker, Ba2+; i.e., ML133 was potent (IC50=3.5 M and voltage independent. Both blockers slightly increased proliferation in unstimulated or IL-4 (but not IL-10-stimulated microglia. Stimulation with IL-4 or IL-10 increased migration and ATP-induced chemotaxis, and blocking Kir2.1 greatly reduced both but ML133 was more effective. In all three activation states, blocking Kir2.1 with ML133 dramatically reduced Ca2+ influx through Ca2+-release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC channels. Thus, Kir2.1 channel activity is necessary for microglial Ca2+ signaling and migration under resting and anti-inflammatory states but the channel weakly inhibits proliferation.

  15. Lipophorin Receptor: The Insect Lipoprotein Receptor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    physiology and develop- mental biology of silkworms, and use of silk in industrial applications. The low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), one of the best characterized cell-surface receptors, mediates cholesterol ho- meostasis and other functions in mammals. The members of the LDLR superfamily are structurally related ...

  16. Lipophorin Receptor: The Insect Lipoprotein Receptor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/018/08/0748-0755. Keywords. Low-density lipoprotein receptor; lipophorin; lipophorin receptor; insects. Author Affiliations. G Ravikumar1 N B Vijayaprakash1. Seri-biotech Research Laboratory Central Silk Board Kodathi, Carmelaram Post Bangalore 560 035, India.

  17. Co-ordinate regulation of growth factor receptors and lipid phosphate phosphatase-1 controls cell activation by exogenous lysophosphatidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilquil, C; Ling, Z C; Singh, I; Buri, K; Zhang, Q X; Brindley, D N

    2001-11-01

    The serum-derived lipid growth factors, lysophosphatidate (LPA) and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), activate cells selectively through different members of a family of endothelial differentiation gene (EDG) receptors. Activation of EDG receptors by LPA and S1P provides a variety of signalling cascades depending upon the G-protein coupling of the different EDG receptors. This leads to chemotactic and mitogenic responses, which are important in wound healing. For example, LPA stimulates fibroblast division and S1P stimulates the chemotaxis and division of endothelial cells leading to angiogenesis. Counteracting these effects of LPA and S1P, are the actions of lipid phosphate phosphatases (LPP, or phosphatidate phosphohydrolases, Type 2). The isoform LPP-1 is expressed in the plasma membrane with its active site outside the cell. This enzyme is responsible for 'ecto-phosphatase' activity leading to the degradation of exogenous lipid phosphate mediators, particularly LPA. Expression of LPP-1 decreases cell activation by exogenous LPA. The mechanism for this is controversial and several mechanisms have been proposed. Evidence will be presented that the LPPs cross-talk with EDG and other growth factor receptors, thus, regulating the responses of the cells to lipid phosphate mediators of signal transduction.

  18. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood ...

  19. Androgen receptor abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George); C. Ris-Stalpers (Carolyn); H.C.J. van Rooij (Henri); G. Romalo (G.); G. Trifiro (Gianluca); E. Mulder (Eppo); L. Pinsky (L.); H.U. Schweikert (H.); J. Trapman (Jan)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The human androgen receptor is a member of the superfamily of steroid hormone receptors. Proper functioning of this protein is a prerequisite for normal male sexual differentiation and development. The cloning of the human androgen receptor cDNA and the elucidation of

  20. Androgen receptor abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkmann, A. O.; Kuiper, G. G.; Ris-Stalpers, C.; van Rooij, H. C.; Romalo, G.; Trifiro, M.; Mulder, E.; Pinsky, L.; Schweikert, H. U.; Trapman, J.

    1991-01-01

    The human androgen receptor is a member of the superfamily of steroid hormone receptors. Proper functioning of this protein is a prerequisite for normal male sexual differentiation and development. The cloning of the human androgen receptor cDNA and the elucidation of the genomic organization of the

  1. NPR-9, a Galanin-Like G-Protein Coupled Receptor, and GLR-1 Regulate Interneuronal Circuitry Underlying Multisensory Integration of Environmental Cues in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason C Campbell

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available C. elegans inhabit environments that require detection of diverse stimuli to modulate locomotion in order to avoid unfavourable conditions. In a mammalian context, a failure to appropriately integrate environmental signals can lead to Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and epilepsy. Provided that the circuitry underlying mammalian sensory integration can be prohibitively complex, we analyzed nematode behavioral responses in differing environmental contexts to evaluate the regulation of context dependent circuit reconfiguration and sensorimotor control. Our work has added to the complexity of a known parallel circuit, mediated by interneurons AVA and AIB, that integrates sensory cues and is responsible for the initiation of backwards locomotion. Our analysis of the galanin-like G-protein coupled receptor NPR-9 in C. elegans revealed that upregulation of galanin signaling impedes the integration of sensory evoked neuronal signals. Although the expression pattern of npr-9 is limited to AIB, upregulation of the receptor appears to impede AIB and AVA circuits to broadly prevent backwards locomotion, i.e. reversals, suggesting that these two pathways functionally interact. Galanin signaling similarly plays a broadly inhibitory role in mammalian models. Moreover, our identification of a mutant, which rarely initiates backwards movement, allowed us to interrogate locomotory mechanisms underlying chemotaxis. In support of the pirouette model of chemotaxis, organisms that did not exhibit reversal behavior were unable to navigate towards an attractant peak. We also assessed ionotropic glutamate receptor GLR-1 cell-specifically within AIB and determined that GLR-1 fine-tunes AIB activity to modify locomotion following reversal events. Our research highlights that signal integration underlying the initiation and fine-tuning of backwards locomotion is AIB and NPR-9 dependent, and has demonstrated the suitability of C. elegans for analysis of multisensory integration

  2. Dendritic cell CNS recruitment correlates with disease severity in EAE via CCL2 chemotaxis at the blood–brain barrier through paracellular transmigration and ERK activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Divya

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmigration of circulating dendritic cells (DCs into the central nervous system (CNS across the blood–brain barrier (BBB has not thus far been investigated. An increase in immune cell infiltration across the BBB, uncontrolled activation and antigen presentation are influenced by chemokines. Chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2 is a potent chemoattractant known to be secreted by the BBB but has not been implicated in the recruitment of DCs specifically at the BBB. Methods Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE was induced in C57BL/6 mice by injection of MOG35–55 peptide and pertussis toxin intraperitoneally. Animals with increasing degree of EAE score were sacrificed and subjected to near-infrared and fluorescence imaging analysis to detect and localize the accumulation of CD11c+-labeled DCs with respect to CCL2 expression. To further characterize the direct effect of CCL2 in DC trafficking at the BBB, we utilized an in vitro BBB model consisting of human brain microvascular endothelial cells to compare migratory patterns of monocyte-derived dendritic cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Further, this model was used to image transmigration using fluorescence microcopy and to assess specific molecular signaling pathways involved in transmigration. Results Near-infrared imaging of DC transmigration correlated with the severity of inflammation during EAE. Ex vivo histology confirmed the presence of CCL2 in EAE lesions, with DCs emerging from perivascular spaces. DCs exhibited more efficient transmigration than T cells in BBB model studies. These observations correlated with transwell imaging, which indicated a paracellular versus transcellular pattern of migration by DCs and T cells. Moreover, at the molecular level, CCL2 seems to facilitate DC transmigration in an ERK1/2-dependent manner. Conclusion CNS recruitment of DCs correlates with disease severity in EAE via CCL2 chemotaxis and paracellular transmigration across the BBB

  3. The Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors MS-275 and SAHA Suppress the p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling Pathway and Chemotaxis in Rheumatoid Arthritic Synovial Fibroblastic E11 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Shu Lin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available MS-275 (entinostat and SAHA (vorinostat, two histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors currently in oncological trials, have displayed potent anti-rheumatic activities in rodent models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. To further elucidate their anti-inflammatory mechanisms, the impact of MS-275 and SAHA on the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway and chemotaxis was assessed in human rheumatoid arthritic synovial fibroblastic E11 cells. MS-275 and SAHA significantly suppressed the expression of p38α  MAPK, but induced the expression of MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1, an endogenous suppressor of p38α  in E11 cells. At the same time, the association between p38α and MKP-1 was up-regulated and consequently, the activation (phosphorylation of p38α  was inhibited. Moreover, MS-275 and SAHA suppressed granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 (GCP-2, monocyte chemotactic protein-2 (MCP-2 and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF in E11 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Subsequently, E11-driven migration of THP-1 and U937 monocytes was inhibited. In summary, suppression of the p38 MAPK signaling pathway and chemotaxis appear to be important anti-rheumatic mechanisms of action of these HDAC inhibitors.

  4. GABA receptor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Doo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    GABA is primary an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is localized in inhibitory interneurons. GABA is released from presynaptic terminals and functions by binding to GABA receptors. There are two types of GABA receptors, GABA{sub A}-receptor that allows chloride to pass through a ligand gated ion channel and GABA{sub B}-receptor that uses G-proteins for signaling. The GABA{sub A}-receptor has a GABA binding site as well as a benzodiazepine binding sites, which modulate GABA{sub A}-receptor function. Benzodiazepine GABAA receptor imaging can be accomplished by radiolabeling derivates that activates benzodiazepine binding sites. There has been much research on flumazenil (FMZ) labeled with {sup 11}C-FMZ, a benzodiazepine derivate that is a selective, reversible antagonist to GABAA receptors. Recently, {sup 18}F-fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) has been developed to overcome {sup 11}C's short half-life. {sup 18}F-FFMZ shows high selective affinity and good pharmacodynamics, and is a promising PET agent with better central benzodiazepine receptor imaging capabilities. In an epileptic focus, because the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor amount is decreased, using '1{sup 1}C-FMZ PET instead of {sup 18}F-FDG, PET, restrict the foci better and may also help find lesions better than high resolution MR. GABA{sub A} receptors are widely distributed in the cerebral cortex, and can be used as an viable neuronal marker. Therefore it can be used as a neuronal cell viability marker in cerebral ischemia. Also, GABA-receptors decrease in areas where neuronal plasticity develops, therefore, GABA imaging can be used to evaluate plasticity. Besides these usages, GABA receptors are related with psychological diseases, especially depression and schizophrenia as well as cerebral palsy, a motor-related disorder, so further in-depth studies are needed for these areas.

  5. GABA receptor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Doo

    2007-01-01

    GABA is primary an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is localized in inhibitory interneurons. GABA is released from presynaptic terminals and functions by binding to GABA receptors. There are two types of GABA receptors, GABA A -receptor that allows chloride to pass through a ligand gated ion channel and GABA B -receptor that uses G-proteins for signaling. The GABA A -receptor has a GABA binding site as well as a benzodiazepine binding sites, which modulate GABA A -receptor function. Benzodiazepine GABAA receptor imaging can be accomplished by radiolabeling derivates that activates benzodiazepine binding sites. There has been much research on flumazenil (FMZ) labeled with 11 C-FMZ, a benzodiazepine derivate that is a selective, reversible antagonist to GABAA receptors. Recently, 18 F-fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) has been developed to overcome 11 C's short half-life. 18 F-FFMZ shows high selective affinity and good pharmacodynamics, and is a promising PET agent with better central benzodiazepine receptor imaging capabilities. In an epileptic focus, because the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor amount is decreased, using '1 1 C-FMZ PET instead of 18 F-FDG, PET, restrict the foci better and may also help find lesions better than high resolution MR. GABA A receptors are widely distributed in the cerebral cortex, and can be used as an viable neuronal marker. Therefore it can be used as a neuronal cell viability marker in cerebral ischemia. Also, GABA-receptors decrease in areas where neuronal plasticity develops, therefore, GABA imaging can be used to evaluate plasticity. Besides these usages, GABA receptors are related with psychological diseases, especially depression and schizophrenia as well as cerebral palsy, a motor-related disorder, so further in-depth studies are needed for these areas

  6. P2Y12 Receptor on the Verge of a Neuroinflammatory Breakdown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Amadio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the CNS, neuroinflammation occurring during pathologies as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and multiple sclerosis (MS is the consequence of an intricate interplay orchestrated by various cell phenotypes. Among the molecular cues having a role in this process, extracellular nucleotides are responsible for intercellular communication and propagation of inflammatory stimuli. This occurs by binding to several receptor subtypes, defined P2X/P2Y, which are widespread in different tissues and simultaneously localized on multiple cells. For instance, the metabotropic P2Y12 subtype is found in the CNS on microglia, affecting activation and chemotaxis, on oligodendrocytes, possessing a hypothesized role in myelination, and on astrocytes. By comparative analysis, we have established here that P2Y12 receptor immunolabelled by antibodies against C-terminus or second intracellular loop, is, respectively, distributed and modulated under neuroinflammatory conditions on ramified microglia or myelinated fibers, in primary organotypic cerebellar cultures, tissue slices from rat striatum and cerebellum, spinal cord sections from symptomatic/end stage SOD1-G93A ALS mice, and finally autoptic cortical tissue from progressive MS donors. We suggest that modulation of P2Y12 expression might play a dual role as analytic marker of branched/surveillant microglia and demyelinating lesions, thus potentially acquiring a predictive value under neuroinflammatory conditions as those found in ALS and MS.

  7. Enhanced Chemokine Receptor Expression on Leukocytes of Patients with Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Goldeck

    Full Text Available Although primarily a neurological complaint, systemic inflammation is present in Alzheimer's Disease, with higher than normal levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the periphery as well as the brain. A gradient of these factors may enhance recruitment of activated immune cells into the brain via chemotaxis. Here, we investigated the phenotypes of circulating immune cells in AD patients with multi-colour flow cytometry to determine whether their expression of chemokine receptors is consistent with this hypothesis. In this study, we confirmed our previously reported data on the shift of early- to late-differentiated CD4+ T-cells in AD patients. The percentage of cells expressing CD25, a marker of acute T-cell activation, was higher in patients than in age-matched controls, and percentages of CCR6+ cells were elevated. This chemokine receptor is primarily expressed on pro-inflammatory memory cells and Th17 cells. The proportion of cells expressing CCR4 (expressed on Th2 cells and CCR5 (Th1 cells and dendritic cells was also greater in patients, and was more pronounced on CD4+ than CD8+ T-cells. These findings allow a more detailed insight into the systemic immune status of patients with Alzheimer's disease and suggest possible novel targets for immune therapy.

  8. Dengue virus receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Hidari, Kazuya I.P.J.; Suzuki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus is an arthropod-borne virus transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. Dengue virus causes fever and hemorrhagic disorders in humans and non-human primates. Direct interaction of the virus introduced by a mosquito bite with host receptor molecule(s) is crucial for virus propagation and the pathological progression of dengue diseases. Therefore, elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between dengue virus and its receptor(s) in both humans and mosquitoes is essent...

  9. Therapeutic androgen receptor ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, George F.; Sui, Zhihua

    2003-01-01

    In the past several years, the concept of tissue-selective nuclear receptor ligands has emerged. This concept has come to fruition with estrogens, with the successful marketing of drugs such as raloxifene. The discovery of raloxifene and other selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) has raised the possibility of generating selective compounds for other pathways, including androgens (that is, selective androgen receptor modulators, or SARMs). PMID:16604181

  10. AMPA receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Mellor, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPAR), subtype of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (IGRs), mediate fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS), and are involved in many neurological disorders, as well as being a key player...

  11. Angiotensin type 2 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumners, Colin; de Kloet, Annette D; Krause, Eric G

    2015-01-01

    In most situations, the angiotensin AT2-receptor (AT2R) mediates physiological actions opposing those mediated by the AT1-receptor (AT1R), including a vasorelaxant effect. Nevertheless, experimental evidence vastly supports that systemic application of AT2R-agonists is blood pressure neutral...

  12. Glutamate receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogensen, Stine Byskov; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Bunch, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    The neurotransmitter (S)-glutamate [(S)-Glu] is responsible for most of the excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. The effect of (S)-Glu is mediated by both ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. Glutamate receptor agonists are generally a-amino acids with one or more...... stereogenic centers due to strict requirements in the agonist binding pocket of the activated state of the receptor. By contrast, there are many examples of achiral competitive antagonists. The present review addresses how stereochemistry affects the activity of glutamate receptor ligands. The review focuses...... mainly on agonists and discusses stereochemical and conformational considerations as well as biostructural knowledge of the agonist binding pockets, which is useful in the design of glutamate receptor agonists. Examples are chosen to demonstrate how stereochemistry not only determines how the agonist...

  13. Combined Blockade of the Histamine H1 and H4 Receptor Suppresses Peanut-Induced Intestinal Anaphylaxis by Regulating Dendritic Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meiqin; Han, Junyan; Domenico, Joanne; Shin, Yoo Seob; Jia, Yi; Gelfand, Erwin W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Signaling through histamine receptors on dendritic cells (DCs) may be involved in the effector phase of peanut-induced intestinal anaphylaxis. Objectives To determine the role of histamine H1 (H1R) and H4 receptors (H4R) in intestinal allergic responses in a model of peanut allergy. Methods Balb/c mice were sensitized and challenged to peanut. During the challenge phase, mice were treated orally with the H1R antagonist, loratadine, and/or the H4R antagonist, JNJ7777120. Bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) were adoptively transferred to non-sensitized WT mice. Symptoms, intestinal inflammation, mesenteric lymph node and intestine mucosal DCs were assessed. Effects of the drugs on DC chemotaxis, calcium mobilization, and antigen-presenting cell function were measured. Results Treatment with loratadine or JNJ7777120 individually partially suppressed development of diarrhea and intestinal inflammation and decreased the numbers of DCs in the mesenteric lymph nodes and lamina propria. Combined treatment with both drugs prevented development of diarrhea and intestinal inflammation. In vitro, the combination suppressed DC antigen presenting cell function to T helper cells and DC calcium mobilization and chemotaxis to histamine. Conclusion Blockade of both H1R and H4R in the challenge phase had additive effects in preventing the intestinal consequences of peanut sensitization and challenge. These effects were mediated through limitation of mesenteric lymph node and intestinal DC accumulation and function. Identification of this histamine-H1R/H4R-DC-CD4+ T cell axis provides new insights into the development of peanut-induced intestinal allergic responses and for prevention and treatment of peanut allergy. PMID:27059534

  14. P2X receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, R Alan

    2016-08-05

    Extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) activates cell surface P2X and P2Y receptors. P2X receptors are membrane ion channels preferably permeable to sodium, potassium and calcium that open within milliseconds of the binding of ATP. In molecular architecture, they form a unique structural family. The receptor is a trimer, the binding of ATP between subunits causes them to flex together within the ectodomain and separate in the membrane-spanning region so as to open a central channel. P2X receptors have a widespread tissue distribution. On some smooth muscle cells, P2X receptors mediate the fast excitatory junction potential that leads to depolarization and contraction. In the central nervous system, activation of P2X receptors allows calcium to enter neurons and this can evoke slower neuromodulatory responses such as the trafficking of receptors for the neurotransmitter glutamate. In primary afferent nerves, P2X receptors are critical for the initiation of action potentials when they respond to ATP released from sensory cells such as taste buds, chemoreceptors or urothelium. In immune cells, activation of P2X receptors triggers the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin 1β. The development of selective blockers of different P2X receptors has led to clinical trials of their effectiveness in the management of cough, pain, inflammation and certain neurodegenerative diseases.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  15. Muscarinic receptor oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsango, Sara; Ward, Richard J; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Milligan, Graeme

    2017-11-14

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been classically described as monomeric entities that function by binding in a 1:1 stoichiometric ratio to both ligand and downstream signalling proteins. However, in recent years, a growing number of studies has supported the hypothesis that these receptors can interact to form dimers and higher order oligomers although the molecular basis for these interactions, the overall quaternary arrangements and the functional importance of GPCR oligomerization remain topics of intense speculation. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors belong to class A of the GPCR family. Each muscarinic receptor subtype has its own particular distribution throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. In the central nervous system, muscarinic receptors regulate several sensory, cognitive, and motor functions while, in the peripheral nervous system, they are involved in the regulation of heart rate, stimulation of glandular secretion and smooth muscle contraction. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors have long been used as a model for the study of GPCR structure and function and to address aspects of GPCR dimerization using a broad range of approaches. In this review, the prevailing knowledge regarding the quaternary arrangement for the various muscarinic acetylcholine receptors has been summarized by discussing work ranging from initial results obtained using more traditional biochemical approaches to those generated with more modern biophysical techniques. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Glutamate receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogensen, Stine Byskov; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Bunch, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    stereogenic centers due to strict requirements in the agonist binding pocket of the activated state of the receptor. By contrast, there are many examples of achiral competitive antagonists. The present review addresses how stereochemistry affects the activity of glutamate receptor ligands. The review focuses...... mainly on agonists and discusses stereochemical and conformational considerations as well as biostructural knowledge of the agonist binding pockets, which is useful in the design of glutamate receptor agonists. Examples are chosen to demonstrate how stereochemistry not only determines how the agonist...

  17. P2X receptors

    OpenAIRE

    North, R. Alan

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) activates cell surface P2X and P2Y receptors. P2X receptors are membrane ion channels preferably permeable to sodium, potassium and calcium that open within milliseconds of the binding of ATP. In molecular architecture, they form a unique structural family. The receptor is a trimer, the binding of ATP between subunits causes them to flex together within the ectodomain and separate in the membrane-spanning region so as to open a central channel. P2...

  18. Serotonin Receptors in Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berumen, Laura Cristina; Rodríguez, Angelina; Miledi, Ricardo; García-Alcocer, Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is an ancient molecular signal and a recognized neurotransmitter brainwide distributed with particular presence in hippocampus. Almost all serotonin receptor subtypes are expressed in hippocampus, which implicates an intricate modulating system, considering that they can be localized as autosynaptic, presynaptic, and postsynaptic receptors, even colocalized within the same cell and being target of homo- and heterodimerization. Neurons and glia, including immune cells, integrate a functional network that uses several serotonin receptors to regulate their roles in this particular part of the limbic system. PMID:22629209

  19. Somatostatin receptor skintigrafi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karin; Nielsen, Jørn Theil; Rehling, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) is a very valuable imaging technique for visualisation of a diversity of neuroendocrine tumours. The sensitivity for localisation of carcinoid tumours is high, but somewhat lower for other neuroendocrine tumours. The methodology, multiple clinical aspects ...

  20. Muscarinic receptor oligomerization

    OpenAIRE

    Marsango, Sara; Ward, Richard J.; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Milligan, Graeme

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been classically described as monomeric entities that function by binding in a 1:1 stoichiometric ratio to both ligand and downstream signalling proteins. However, in recent years, a growing number of studies has supported the hypothesis that these receptors can interact to form dimers and higher order oligomers although the molecular basis for these interactions, the overall quaternary arrangements and the functional importance of GPCR oligomerization...

  1. CXC chemokine receptor 4 expression and stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha-induced chemotaxis in CD4+ T lymphocytes are regulated by interleukin-4 and interleukin-10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinquan, T; Quan, S; Jacobi, H H

    2000-01-01

    -10. IL-4 and IL-10 up- or down-regulated CXCR4 mRNA expression in CD4+ T lymphocytes, respectively, as detected by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Scatchard analysis revealed a type of CXCR4 with affinity (Kd approximately 6.3 nM), and approximately 70....... The regulation of CXCR4 expression in CD4+ T lymphocytes by IL-4 and IL-10 could be blocked by a selective inhibitor of protein kinase (staurosporine) or by a selective inhibitor of cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (H-8), indicating that these cytokines regulate CXCR4 on CD4+ T lymphocytes via both c......AMP and cGMP signalling pathways. The fact that cyclosporin A or ionomycin were able to independently change the CXCR4 expression and block the effects of IL-4 and IL-10 on CXCR4 expression implied that the capacity of IL-4 and IL-10 to regulate CXCR4 on CD4+ T lymphocytes is not linked to calcium...

  2. Adenosine receptor neurobiology: overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Fan; Lee, Chien-fei; Chern, Yijuang

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring nucleoside that is distributed ubiquitously throughout the body as a metabolic intermediary. In the brain, adenosine functions as an important upstream neuromodulator of a broad spectrum of neurotransmitters, receptors, and signaling pathways. By acting through four G-protein-coupled receptors, adenosine contributes critically to homeostasis and neuromodulatory control of a variety of normal and abnormal brain functions, ranging from synaptic plasticity, to cognition, to sleep, to motor activity to neuroinflammation, and cell death. This review begun with an overview of the gene and genome structure and the expression pattern of adenosine receptors (ARs). We feature several new developments over the past decade in our understanding of AR functions in the brain, with special focus on the identification and characterization of canonical and noncanonical signaling pathways of ARs. We provide an update on functional insights from complementary genetic-knockout and pharmacological studies on the AR control of various brain functions. We also highlight several novel and recent developments of AR neurobiology, including (i) recent breakthrough in high resolution of three-dimension structure of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) in several functional status, (ii) receptor-receptor heterodimerization, (iii) AR function in glial cells, and (iv) the druggability of AR. We concluded the review with the contention that these new developments extend and strengthen the support for A1 and A2ARs in brain as therapeutic targets for neurologic and psychiatric diseases. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetics of taste receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmanov, Alexander A; Bosak, Natalia P; Lin, Cailu; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Ohmoto, Makoto; Reed, Danielle R; Nelson, Theodore M

    2014-01-01

    Taste receptors function as one of the interfaces between internal and external milieus. Taste receptors for sweet and umami (T1R [taste receptor, type 1]), bitter (T2R [taste receptor, type 2]), and salty (ENaC [epithelial sodium channel]) have been discovered in the recent years, but transduction mechanisms of sour taste and ENaC-independent salt taste are still poorly understood. In addition to these five main taste qualities, the taste system detects such noncanonical "tastes" as water, fat, and complex carbohydrates, but their reception mechanisms require further research. Variations in taste receptor genes between and within vertebrate species contribute to individual and species differences in taste-related behaviors. These variations are shaped by evolutionary forces and reflect species adaptations to their chemical environments and feeding ecology. Principles of drug discovery can be applied to taste receptors as targets in order to develop novel taste compounds to satisfy demand in better artificial sweeteners, enhancers of sugar and sodium taste, and blockers of bitterness of food ingredients and oral medications.

  4. The role of selected chemokines and their receptors in the pathogenesis and destabilisation of atheromatous plaques in the carotid arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Konarska-Król

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are cytokines that act selectively on cells and are capable of inducing selective migration of cells in vitro and in vivo. The term was first coined at the 3rd International Symposium on Chemotactic Cytokines in 1992. The name “chemokine” is a contraction of “chemotactic cytokine,” meaning that these molecules combine features of both cytokines and chemotactic factors. They are a family of low-molecular-mass proteins acting on specific membrane receptors. A cell’s overall sensitivity to chemotaxis depends on the expression profile of chemokine receptors. Atherosclerosis is essentially an excessive inflammatory and proliferative response to the damage of arterial walls. It takes place within the wall and leads to the formation of unstable atherosclerotic plaques. Many chemokines have been studied in terms of their role in the pathogenesis of an atheromatous plaque in the carotid arteries, both in animal models and with the use of human tissue. It  seems that molecules that are the most involved in the formation of atheromas in the carotid arteries include: CCL2, CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5. However, reports are sometimes contradictory, and more research is needed. Finding a marker that could help predict the destabilisation of an atheromatous plaque would be a valuable addition to the standard diagnostic panel of tests used in both the diagnosis and monitoring of vascular pathologies.

  5. Nogo-B receptor expression correlates negatively with malignancy grade and ki-67 antigen expression in invasive ductal breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pula, Bartosz; Olbromski, Mateusz; Owczarek, Tomasz; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Witkiewicz, Wojciech; Ugorski, Maciej; Rys, Janusz; Zabel, Maciej; Dziegiel, Piotr; Podhorska-Okolow, Marzena

    2014-09-01

    Nogo-B receptor (NgBR) has been shown to be involved in endothelial cell chemotaxis and morphogenesis. However, few studies analyzing its expression in cancer cells have been performed. We examined NgBR expression in 233 patients with invasive ductal breast carcinoma (IDC) and corresponding non-malignant breast tissues (NMBT) on mRNA (real-time polymerase chain reaction) and protein levels (immunohistochemistry; IHC and western-blot analysis). NgBR expression was found also analyzed in breast cancer cell lines of varying invasiveness. NgBR expression was increased in IDC compared to NMBT on the mRNA (p=0.0007) and protein level (p=0.018). NgBR expression decreased significantly with IDC malignancy grade and correlated negatively with the Ki-67 antigen expression (r=-0.18; p=0.0005). High NgBR mRNA expression was associated with estrogen receptor negativity (p=0.0023) and the triple-negative phenotype of the tumors (p=0.0129). NgBR may be involved in IDC development, however, its role in its progression requires further research. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  6. Spread of Psoriasiform Inflammation to Remote Tissues Is Restricted by the Atypical Chemokine Receptor ACKR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Kave; Wilson, Gillian J; Singh, Mark; van den Bogaard, Ellen H; Le Brocq, Michelle L; Holmes, Susan; Schalkwijk, Joost; Burden, A David; McKimmie, Clive S; Graham, Gerard J

    2017-01-01

    Elucidating the poorly defined mechanisms by which inflammatory lesions are spatially restricted in vivo is of critical importance in understanding skin disease. Chemokines are the principal regulators of leukocyte migration and are essential in the initiation and maintenance of inflammation. The membrane-bound psoriasis-associated atypical chemokine receptor 2 (ACKR2) binds, internalizes and degrades most proinflammatory CC-chemokines. Here we investigate the role of ACKR2 in limiting the spread of cutaneous psoriasiform inflammation to sites that are remote from the primary lesion. Circulating factors capable of regulating ACKR2 function at remote sites were identified and examined using a combination of clinical samples, relevant primary human cell cultures, in vitro migration assays, and the imiquimod-induced model of psoriasiform skin inflammation. Localized inflammation and IFN-γ together up-regulate ACKR2 in remote tissues, protecting them from the spread of inflammation. ACKR2 controls inflammatory T-cell chemotaxis and positioning within the skin, preventing an epidermal influx that is associated with lesion development. Our results have important implications for our understanding of how spatial restriction is imposed on the spread of inflammatory lesions and highlight systemic ACKR2 induction as a therapeutic strategy in the treatment and prevention of psoriasis and potentially a broad range of other immune-mediated diseases. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Accelerated tumor progression in mice lacking the ATP receptor P2X7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adinolfi, Elena; Capece, Marina; Franceschini, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    The ATP receptor P2X7 (P2X7R or P2RX7) has a key role in inflammation and immunity, but its possible roles in cancer are not firmly established. In the present study, we investigated the effect of host genetic deletion of P2X7R in the mouse on the growth of B16 melanoma or CT26 colon carcinoma...... IL-1β and VEGF release were drastically reduced, and inflammatory cell infiltration was abrogated nearly completely. Similarly, tumor growth was also greatly accelerated in wt chimeric mice implanted with P2X7R-deficient bone marrow cells, defining hematopoietic cells as a sufficient site of P2X7R...... action. Finally, dendritic cells from P2X7R-deficient mice were unresponsive to stimulation with tumor cells, and chemotaxis of P2X7R-less cells was impaired. Overall, our results showed that host P2X7R expression was critical to support an antitumor immune response, and to restrict tumor growth...

  8. Selective labelling of stromal cell-derived factor 1α with carboxyfluorescein to study receptor internalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellmann-Sickert, Kathrin; Baumann, Lars; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2010-10-01

    SDF1α plays an important role in the regeneration of injured tissue after ischemia or stroke by inducing the migration of progenitor cells. In order to study the function of this therapeutically relevant chemokine site-specific protein labelling is of great interest. However, modification of SDF1α is complicated because of its complex tertiary structure. Here, we describe the first site-specific fluorescent modification of SDF1α by EPL. We recombinantly expressed SDF1α (1-49) by intein-mediated protein expression. The C-terminal peptide SDF1α (50-68) was synthesised by SPPS and selectively labelled with carboxyfluorescein at Lys(56). In a cell migration assay, M-[K(56)(CF)]SDF1α showed a clear potency to induce chemotaxis of human T-cell leukaemia cells. Microscopic analysis on HEK293 cells transfected with the CXCR4 revealed specific binding of the fluorescent ligand. Furthermore, receptor-induced internalisation of the ligand could be visualised. These results show that site-specific modification of SDF1α yields in a biologically functional molecule that allows the characterisation of CXCR4 production of cells on a molecular level. © 2010 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Ionotropic crustacean olfactory receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Corey

    Full Text Available The nature of the olfactory receptor in crustaceans, a major group of arthropods, has remained elusive. We report that spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus, express ionotropic receptors (IRs, the insect chemosensory variants of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Unlike insects IRs, which are expressed in a specific subset of olfactory cells, two lobster IR subunits are expressed in most, if not all, lobster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs, as confirmed by antibody labeling and in situ hybridization. Ligand-specific ORN responses visualized by calcium imaging are consistent with a restricted expression pattern found for other potential subunits, suggesting that cell-specific expression of uncommon IR subunits determines the ligand sensitivity of individual cells. IRs are the only type of olfactory receptor that we have detected in spiny lobster olfactory tissue, suggesting that they likely mediate olfactory signaling. Given long-standing evidence for G protein-mediated signaling in activation of lobster ORNs, this finding raises the interesting specter that IRs act in concert with second messenger-mediated signaling.

  10. Oxidized Lipids and Lysophosphatidylcholine Induce the Chemotaxis, Up-Regulate the Expression of CCR9 and CXCR4 and Abrogate the Release of IL-6 in Human Monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolin, Johannes; Vego, Heidi; Maghazachi, Azzam A.

    2014-01-01

    Lipids through regulation of chronic inflammation play key roles in the development of various diseases. Here, we report that a mixed population of human primary monocytes migrated towards LPC, as well as oxidized linoleic acid isoforms 9-S-HODE, 9-R-HODE and 13-R-HODE. Incubation with 9-R-HODE, 13-R-HODE and LPC resulted in increased expression of CXCR4, the receptor for SDF-1α/CXCL12, correlated with increased monocyte migration towards SDF-1α/CXCL12. Further, we report increased expression of CCR9, the receptor for TECK/CCL25, after stimulation with these lipids. Upon examining the migratory response towards TECK/CCL25, it was observed that an increase in CCR9 expression upon pre-treatment with 9-S-HODE, 9-R-HODE, 13-R-HODE and LPC resulted in increased migration of monocytes expressing CCR9. Only LPC but not any other lipid examined increased the influx of intracellular Ca2+ in monocytes. Finally, 9-S-HODE, 9-R-HODE, 13-R-HODE, or LPC inhibited the release of IL-6 from monocytes suggesting that these lipids may play important role in controlling inflammatory responses. PMID:25251539

  11. Allergic inflammation is augmented via histamine H4 receptor activation: The role of natural killer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehling, Sarah; Roßbach, Kristine; Dunston, Stanley M; Stark, Holger; Bäumer, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    Natural Killer cells (NK cells) are identified as pivotal mediators in allergic skin diseases and accumulate in lesions of atopic dermatitis (AD) patients. Histamine levels are increased in these lesions and histamine is involved in chemotaxis in dendritic cells and NK cells. The aim of this study was to determine if the histamine H4 receptor (H4R) mediates NK cell chemotaxis and whether it influences interplay between NK cells and dendritic cells during the early phase of allergic inflammation. Chemotactic function of the H4R as well as the influence of the H4R on the cytokine profile of an NK cell-dendritic cell co-culture was studied in vitro. The effect of H4R activation on NK cell migration, NK cell-dendritic cell interaction and cytokine levels in the skin was further characterized in the murine TDI model of allergic dermatitis. Additionally, the impact of the H4R on dermal NK cells was determined in the ovalbumin (OVA)- induced allergic dermatitis model, comparing wild type and H4R knockout mice. The selective H4R agonist ST-1006 induced NK cell chemotaxis in vitro, which was inhibited with the H4R antagonist JNJ7777120. In vivo, mice treated with TDI plus ST-1006 topically onto the ear, showed significantly enhanced ear swelling and an increased number of NK cells compared to just allergen challenged ears. CCL17 levels in the ear were also significantly increased 8h after allergen challenge. Histology revealed that the main source for increased CCL17 were dendritic cells. These effects could be blocked using the H4R antagonist JNJ7777120. In the chronic model of allergic dermatitis, OVA induced NK cell migration into lesional skin sites. The number of NK cells was lower in OVA-sensitized H4R knockout mice compared to wild type mice. These results identify the H4R as a new target controlling NK cell migration and NK cell-dendritic cell interaction in the skin during early allergic inflammation. These results further suggest that blocking the H4R in the skin

  12. Lysophosphatidic Acid signals through specific lysophosphatidic Acid receptor subtypes to control key regenerative responses of human gingival and periodontal ligament fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Joju; Headen, Karmel V; Ogunleye, Afolabi O; Perry, Greg A; Wilwerding, Terrence M; Parrish, Lawrence C; McVaney, Timothy P; Mattson, John S; Cerutis, D Roselyn

    2009-08-01

    We showed that the pluripotent platelet growth factor and mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) controls key regenerative responses of human gingival fibroblasts (GFs) and periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLFs) and positively modulates their responses to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). This study determined which LPA receptor (LPAR) subtype(s) LPA signals through to stimulate mitogenic extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 signaling and chemotaxis and to elicit intracellular Ca(2+) increases in GFs and PDLFs because many healing responses are calcium-dependent. Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase was determined using Western blotting with an antibody to phosphorylated ERK1/2. Migration responses were measured using a microchemotaxis chamber. GF and PDLF intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization responses to multiple LPA species and LPAR subtype-specific agonists were measured by using a cell-permeable fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator dye. LPA stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation via LPA(1)(-3). For GFs, LPA(1) preferentially elicited chemotaxis, and LPA(1-3) for PDLFs, as confirmed using subtype-specific agonists. Elevation of intracellular calcium seems to be mediated through LPA(1) and LPA(3), with little, if any, contribution from LPA(2). To the best of our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence that LPA signals through specific LPAR subtypes to stimulate human oral fibroblast regenerative responses. These data, in conjunction with our previous findings showing that LPA modulates GF and PDLF responses to PDGF, suggest that LPA is a factor of emerging importance to oral wound healing.

  13. adrenergic receptor with preeclampsia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-05-09

    May 9, 2011 ... expenditure and lipolysis. The mechanisms underlying lipolytic resistance to catecholamines in obesity are not clear and may include desensitization of ADRB2 function. (Yamada et al., 1999). Many studies have reported on the relationship between obesity and genetic variants in β-2 adrenergic receptors ...

  14. Ginkgolides and glycine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaracz, Stanislav; Nakanishi, Koji; Jensen, Anders A.

    2004-01-01

    Ginkgolides from the Ginkgo biloba tree are diterpenes with a cage structure consisting of six five-membered rings and a unique tBu group. They exert a variety of biological properties. In addition to being antagonists of the platelet activating factor receptor (PAFR), it has recently been shown ...

  15. Meeting report: nuclear receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuckermann, Jan; Bourguet, William; Mandrup, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    The biannual European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) conference on nuclear receptors was organized by Beatrice Desvergne and Laszlo Nagy and took place in Cavtat near Dubrovnik on the Adriatic coast of Croatia September 25-29, 2009. The meeting brought together researchers from all over...

  16. Metformin and insulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigneri, R.; Gullo, D.; Pezzino, V.

    1984-01-01

    The authors evaluated the effect of metformin (N,N-dimethylbiguanide), a biguanide known to be less toxic than phenformin, on insulin binding to its receptors, both in vitro and in vivo. Specific 125 I-insulin binding to cultured IM-9 human lymphocytes and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells was determined after preincubation with metformin. Specific 125 I-insulin binding to circulating monocytes was also evaluated in six controls, eight obese subjects, and six obese type II diabetic patients before and after a short-term treatment with metformin. Plasma insulin levels and blood glucose were also measured on both occasions. Metformin significantly increased insulin binding in vitro to both IM-9 lymphocytes and MCF-7 cells; the maximum increment was 47.1% and 38.0%, respectively. Metformin treatment significantly increased insulin binding in vivo to monocytes of obese subjects and diabetic patients. Scatchard analysis indicated that the increased binding was mainly due to an increase in receptor capacity. Insulin binding to monocytes of normal controls was unchanged after metformin as were insulin levels in all groups; blood glucose was significantly reduced after metformin only in diabetic patients. These data indicate that metformin increases insulin binding to its receptors in vitro and in vivo. The effect in vivo is observed in obese subjects and in obese type II diabetic patients, paralleling the clinical effectiveness of this antidiabetic agent, and is not due to receptor regulation by circulating insulin, since no variation in insulin levels was recorded

  17. Transcriptional changes associated with resistance to inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor revealed using metaanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younis, Sidra; Javed, Qamar; Blumenberg, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    EGFR is important in maintaining metabolic homeostasis in healthy cells, but in tumors it activates downstream signaling pathways, causing proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Consequently, EGFR is targeted in cancers using reversible, irreversible or antibody inhibitors. Unfortunately, tumors develop inhibitor resistance by mutations or overexpressing EGFR, or its ligand, or activating secondary, EGFR-independent pathways. Here we present a global metaanalysis comparing transcriptional profiles from matched pairs of EGFR inhibitor-sensitive vs. -resistant cell lines, using 15 datasets comprising 274 microarrays. We also analyzed separately pairs of cell lines derived using reversible, irreversible or antibody inhibitors. The metaanalysis identifies commonalities in cell lines resistant to EGFR inhibitors: in sensitive cell lines, the ontological categories involving the ErbB receptors pathways, cell adhesion and lipid metabolism are overexpressed; however, resistance to EGFR inhibitors is associated with overexpression of genes for ErbB receptors-independent oncogenic pathways, regulation of cell motility, energy metabolism, immunity especially inflammatory cytokines biosynthesis, cell cycle and responses to exogenous and endogenous stimuli. Specifically in Gefitinib-resistant cell lines, the immunity-associated genes are overexpressed, whereas in Erlotinib-resistant ones so are the mitochondrial genes and processes. Unexpectedly, lines selected using EGFR-targeting antibodies overexpress different gene ontologies from ones selected using kinase inhibitors. Specifically, they have reduced expression of genes for proliferation, chemotaxis, immunity and angiogenesis. This metaanalysis suggests that ‘combination therapies’ can improve cancer treatment outcomes. Potentially, use of mitochondrial blockers with Erlotinib, immunity blockers with Gefitinib, tyrosine kinase inhibitors with antibody inhibitors, may have better chance of avoiding

  18. Angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) and receptor Mas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villela, Daniel; Leonhardt, Julia; Patel, Neal

    2015-01-01

    The angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) and the receptor Mas are components of the protective arms of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), i.e. they both mediate tissue protective and regenerative actions. The spectrum of actions of these two receptors and their signalling mechanisms display striking...... the phenomenon of blockade of angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] actions by AT2R antagonists and vice versa. Such mechanisms may comprise dimerization of the receptors or dimerization-independent mechanisms such as lack of specificity of the receptor ligands used in the experiments or involvement of the Ang-(1...

  19. Prostaglandin Receptor Signaling in Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Matsuoka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostanoids, consisting of the prostaglandins (PGs and the thromboxanes (TXs, are a group of lipid mediators formed in response to various stimuli. They include PGD2, PGE2, PGF2α, PGI2, and TXA2. They are released outside of the cells immediately after synthesis, and exert their actions by binding to a G-protein coupled rhodopsin-type receptor on the surface of target cells. There are eight types of the prostanoid receptors conserved in mammals from mouse to human. They are the PGD receptor (DP, four subtypes of the PGE receptor (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4, the PGF receptor (FP, PGI receptor (IP, and TXA receptor (TP. Recently, mice deficient in each of these prostanoid receptors were generated and subjected to various experimental models of disease. These studies have revealed the roles of PG receptor signaling in various pathological conditions, and suggest that selective manipulation of the prostanoid receptors may be beneficial in treatment of the pathological conditions. Here we review these recent findings of roles of prostanoid receptor signaling and their therapeutic implications.

  20. CXCL12 chemokine and its receptors as major players in the interactions between immune and nervous systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice eGuyon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The chemokine CXCL12/SDF1a has first been described in the immune system where it functions include chemotaxis for lymphocytes and macrophages, migration of hematopoietic cells from fetal liver to bone marrow and the formation of large blood vessels. Among other chemokines, CXCL12 has recently attracted much attention in the brain as it has been shown that it can be produced not only by glial cells but also by neurons. In addition, its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7, which are belonging to the G-protein coupled receptors family, are abundantly expressed in diverse brain area, CXCR4 being a major co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 entry. This chemokine system has been shown to play important roles in brain plasticity processes occurring during development but also in the physiology of the brain in normal and pathological conditions. For example, in neurons, CXCR4 stimulation has been shown regulate the synaptic release of glutamate and GABA. It can also act post-synaptically by activating a G-protein Inward Rectifier K+ (GIRK, a voltage-gated K channel Kv2.1 associated to neuronal survival, and by increasing high voltage activated (HVA Ca2+ currents. In addition, it has been recently evidenced that there are several crosstalks between the CXCL12/CXCR4-7 system and other neurotransmitter systems in the brain (such as GABA, glutamate, opioids ans cannabinoids. Overall, this chemokine system could be one of the key players of the neuro-immune interface that participates in shaping the brain in response to changes in the environment.

  1. Receptors for enterovirus 71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamayoshi, Seiya; Fujii, Ken; Koike, Satoshi

    2014-07-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the major causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Occasionally, EV71 infection is associated with severe neurological diseases, such as acute encephalitis, acute flaccid paralysis and cardiopulmonary failure. Several molecules act as cell surface receptors that stimulate EV71 infection, including scavenger receptor B2 (SCARB2), P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), sialylated glycan, heparan sulfate and annexin II (Anx2). SCARB2 plays critical roles in attachment, viral entry and uncoating, and it can facilitate efficient EV71 infection. The three-dimensional structures of the mature EV71 virion, procapsid and empty capsid, as well as the exofacial domain of SCARB2, have been elucidated. This structural information has greatly increased our understanding of the early steps of EV71 infection. Furthermore, SCARB2 plays essential roles in the development of EV71 neurological disease in vivo. Adult mice are not susceptible to infection by EV71, but transgenic mice that express human SCARB2 become susceptible to EV71 infection and develop similar neurological diseases to those found in humans. This mouse model facilitates the in vivo investigation of many issues related to EV71. PSGL-1, sialylated glycan, heparan sulfate and Anx2 are attachment receptors, which enhance viral infection by retaining the virus on the cell surface. These molecules also contribute to viral infection in vitro either by interacting with SCARB2 or independently of SCARB2. However, the cooperative effects of these receptors, and their contribution to EV71 pathogenicity in vivo, remain to be elucidated.

  2. The interleukin-4 receptor: signal transduction by a hematopoietin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, A D; Pierce, J H

    1994-02-01

    Over the last several years, the receptors for numerous cytokines have been molecularly characterized. Analysis of their amino acid sequences shows that some of these receptors bear certain motifs in their extracellular domains that define a family of receptors called the Hematopoietin receptor superfamily. Significant advances in characterizing the structure, function, and mechanisms of signal transduction have been made for several members of this family. The purpose of this review is to discuss the recent advances made for one of the family members, the interleukin (IL) 4 receptor. Other receptor systems have recently been reviewed elsewhere. The IL-4 receptor consists of, at the minimum, the cloned 140 kDa IL-4-binding chain with the potential for associating with other chains. The IL-4 receptor transduces its signal by activating a tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates cellular substrates, including the receptor itself, and the 170 kDa substrate called 4PS. Phosphorylated 4PS interacts with the SH2 domain of the enzyme PI-3'-kinase and increases its enzymatic activity. These early events in the IL-4 receptor initiated signaling pathway may trigger a series of signals that will ultimately lead to an IL-4 specific biologic outcome.

  3. The Signaling Pathway of Caenorhabditis elegans Mediates Chemotaxis Response to the Attractant 2-Heptanone in a Trojan Horse-like Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunmei; Zhao, Ninghui; Chen, Yao; Zhang, Donghua; Yan, Jinyuan; Zou, Wei; Zhang, Keqin; Huang, Xiaowei

    2016-11-04

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits behavioral responses to a wide range of odorants associated with food and pathogens. A previous study described a Trojan Horse-like strategy of pathogenesis whereby the bacterium Bacillus nematocida B16 emits the volatile organic compound 2-heptanone to trap C. elegans for successful infection. Here, we further explored the receptor for 2-heptanone as well as the pathway involved in signal transduction in C. elegans Our experiments showed that 2-heptanone sensing depended on the function of AWC neurons and a GPCR encoded by str-2 Consistent with the above observation, the HEK293 cells expressing STR-2 on their surfaces showed a transient elevation in intracellular Ca 2+ levels after 2-heptanone applications. After combining the assays of RNA interference and gene mutants, we also identified the Gα subunits and their downstream components in the olfactory signal cascade that are necessary for responding to 2-heptanone, including Gα subunits of egl-30 and gpa-3, phospholipase C of plc-1and egl-8, and the calcium channel of cmk-1 and cal-1. Our work demonstrates for the first time that an integrated signaling pathway for 2-heptanone response in C. elegans involves recognition by GPCR STR-2, activation by Gα subunits of egl-30/gpa-3 and transfer to the PLC pathway, indicating that a potentially novel olfactory pathway exists in AWC neurons. Meanwhile, since 2-heptanone, a metabolite from the pathogenic bacterium B. nematocida B16, can be sensed by C. elegans and thus strongly attract its host, our current work also suggested coevolution between the pathogenic microorganism and the chemosensory system in C. elegans. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. CCR5 signalling, but not DARC or D6 regulatory, chemokine receptors are targeted by herpesvirus U83A chemokine which delays receptor internalisation via diversion to a caveolin-linked pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gompels Ursula A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpesviruses have evolved chemokines and chemokine receptors, which modulate the recruitment of human leukocytes during the inflammatory response to infection. Early post-infection, human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A infected cells express the chemokine receptor U51A and chemokine U83A which have complementary effects in subverting the CC-chemokine family thereby controlling anti-viral leukocyte recruitment. Here we show that, to potentiate this activity, the viral chemokine can also avoid clearance by scavenger chemokine receptors, DARC and D6, which normally regulate an inflammatory response. Conversely, U83A delays internalisation of its signalling target receptor CCR5 with diversion to caveolin rich membrane domains. This mechanism can redirect displaced human chemokines to DARC and D6 for clearance of the anti-viral inflammatory response, leaving the viral chemokine unchecked. Methods Cell models for competitive binding assays were established using radiolabeled human chemokines and cold U83A on CCR5, DARC or D6 expressing cells. Flow cytometry was used to assess specific chemotaxis of CCR5 bearing cells to U83A, and internalisation of CCR5 specific chemokine CCL4 after stimulation with U83A. Internalisation analyses were supported by confocal microscopy of internalisation and co-localisation of CCR5 with caveosome marker caveolin-1, after virus or human chemokine stimulation. Results U83A displaced efficiently human chemokines from CCR5, with a high affinity of 0.01nM, but not from DARC or D6. Signalling via CCR5 resulted in specific chemoattraction of primary human leukocytes bearing CCR5. However, U83A effective binding and signalling to CCR5 resulted in delayed internalisation and recycling up to 2 hours in the absence of continual re-stimulation. This resulted in diversion to a delayed caveolin-linked pathway rather than the rapid clathrin mediated endocytosis previously shown with human chemokines CCL3 or CCL4

  5. CCR5 signalling, but not DARC or D6 regulatory, chemokine receptors are targeted by herpesvirus U83A chemokine which delays receptor internalisation via diversion to a caveolin-linked pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catusse, Julie; Clark, David J; Gompels, Ursula A

    2009-07-30

    Herpesviruses have evolved chemokines and chemokine receptors, which modulate the recruitment of human leukocytes during the inflammatory response to infection. Early post-infection, human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) infected cells express the chemokine receptor U51A and chemokine U83A which have complementary effects in subverting the CC-chemokine family thereby controlling anti-viral leukocyte recruitment. Here we show that, to potentiate this activity, the viral chemokine can also avoid clearance by scavenger chemokine receptors, DARC and D6, which normally regulate an inflammatory response. Conversely, U83A delays internalisation of its signalling target receptor CCR5 with diversion to caveolin rich membrane domains. This mechanism can redirect displaced human chemokines to DARC and D6 for clearance of the anti-viral inflammatory response, leaving the viral chemokine unchecked. Cell models for competitive binding assays were established using radiolabeled human chemokines and cold U83A on CCR5, DARC or D6 expressing cells. Flow cytometry was used to assess specific chemotaxis of CCR5 bearing cells to U83A, and internalisation of CCR5 specific chemokine CCL4 after stimulation with U83A. Internalisation analyses were supported by confocal microscopy of internalisation and co-localisation of CCR5 with caveosome marker caveolin-1, after virus or human chemokine stimulation. U83A displaced efficiently human chemokines from CCR5, with a high affinity of 0.01nM, but not from DARC or D6. Signalling via CCR5 resulted in specific chemoattraction of primary human leukocytes bearing CCR5. However, U83A effective binding and signalling to CCR5 resulted in delayed internalisation and recycling up to 2 hours in the absence of continual re-stimulation. This resulted in diversion to a delayed caveolin-linked pathway rather than the rapid clathrin mediated endocytosis previously shown with human chemokines CCL3 or CCL4. U83A diverts human chemokines from signalling, but not

  6. Evolutionary analysis of functional divergence among chemokine receptors, decoy receptors and viral receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi eDaiyasu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemokine receptors (CKRs function in the inflammatory response and in vertebrate homeostasis. Decoy and viral receptors are two types of CKR homologues with modified functions from those of the typical CKRs. The decoy receptors are able to bind ligands without signaling. On the other hand, the viral receptors show constitutive signaling without ligands. We examined the sites related to the functional difference. At first, the decoy and viral receptors were each classified into five groups, based on the molecular phylogenetic analysis. A multiple amino acid sequence alignment between each group and the CKRs was then constructed. The difference in the amino acid composition between the group and the CKRs was evaluated as the Kullback-Leibler (KL information value at each alignment site. The KL information value is considered to reflect the difference in the functional constraints at the site. The sites with the top 5% of KL information values were selected and mapped on the structure of a CKR. The comparisons with decoy receptor groups revealed that the detected sites were biased on the intracellular side. In contrast, the sites detected from the comparisons with viral receptor groups were found on both the extracellular and intracellular sides. More sites were found in the ligand-binding pocket in the analyses of the viral receptor groups, as compared to the decoy receptor groups. Some of the detected sites were located in the GPCR motifs. For example, the DRY motif of the decoy receptors was often degraded, although the motif of the viral receptors was basically conserved. The observations for the viral receptor groups suggested that the constraints in the pocket region are loose and that the sites on the intracellular side are different from those for the decoy receptors, which may be related to the constitutive signaling activity of the viral receptors.

  7. Melatonin Receptor Genes in Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Dong Yin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR family. Three genes for melatonin receptors have been cloned. The MT1 (or Mel1a or MTNR1A and MT2 (or Mel1b or MTNR1B receptor subtypes are present in humans and other mammals, while an additional melatonin receptor subtype, Mel1c (or MTNR1C, has been identified in fish, amphibians and birds. Another melatonin related orphan receptor, GPR50, which does not bind melatonin, is found exclusively in mammals. The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily by the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone acts systemically in numerous organs. In the brain, it is involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes, and it readjusts the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This article reviews recent studies of gene organization, expression, evolution and mutations of melatonin receptor genes of vertebrates. Gene polymorphisms reveal that numerous mutations are associated with diseases and disorders. The phylogenetic analysis of receptor genes indicates that GPR50 is an outgroup to all other melatonin receptor sequences. GPR50 may have separated from a melatonin receptor ancestor before the split between MTNR1C and the MTNR1A/B ancestor.

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the periplasmic domain of the Escherichia coli aspartate receptor Tar and its complex with aspartate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mise, Takeshi; Matsunami, Hideyuki; Samatey, Fadel A.; Maruyama, Ichiro N., E-mail: ichi@oist.jp [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, 1919-1 Tancha, Onna-son, Kunigami, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan)

    2014-08-27

    The periplasmic domain of the E. coli aspartate receptor Tar was cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized with and without bound ligand. The crystals obtained diffracted to resolutions of 1.58 and 1.95 Å, respectively. The cell-surface receptor Tar mediates bacterial chemotaxis toward an attractant, aspartate (Asp), and away from a repellent, Ni{sup 2+}. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of Tar activity by its ligands, the Escherichia coli Tar periplasmic domain with and without bound aspartate (Asp-Tar and apo-Tar, respectively) were each crystallized in two different forms. Using ammonium sulfate as a precipitant, crystals of apo-Tar1 and Asp-Tar1 were grown and diffracted to resolutions of 2.10 and 2.40 Å, respectively. Alternatively, using sodium chloride as a precipitant, crystals of apo-Tar2 and Asp-Tar2 were grown and diffracted to resolutions of 1.95 and 1.58 Å, respectively. Crystals of apo-Tar1 and Asp-Tar1 adopted space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, while those of apo-Tar2 and Asp-Tar2 adopted space groups P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and C2, respectively.

  9. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors stimulate macrophage plasma-membrane actin assembly via ADP release, ATP synthesis and P2X7R activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehnel, Mark P; Reiss, Miriam; Anand, Paras K; Treede, Irina; Holzer, Daniela; Hoffmann, Eik; Klapperstueck, Manuela; Steinberg, Thomas H; Markwardt, Fritz; Griffiths, Gareth

    2009-02-15

    Eukaryotic plasma membranes assemble actin filaments within seconds of activation of many receptors, especially during chemotaxis. Here, serum or sphingosine-1-phosphate stimulation of J774 and RAW macrophages released ADP within seconds into the extracellular medium, along with an adenylate kinase activity that converted ADP to ATP. ATP then activated the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) that was necessary for a peak of plasma-membrane actin assembly within 5 to 10 seconds in P2X7R-expressing J774, RAW and primary macrophages. Neither actin assembly nor characteristic P2X7R channel activity was seen in response to ATP in P2X7R-knockout macrophages, as detected by patch-clamp analysis. Since P2X7R has been shown previously to form a macromolecular complex with actin we propose that it is involved in the membrane assembly of actin. Our data reveal a surprisingly rapid and complex relay of signaling and externalization events that precede and control actin assembly induced by sphingosine-1-phosphate. The overall model we present is strongly supported by the data presented in the accompanying paper that focuses on latex bead phagosomes.

  10. Investigating the effect of emetic compounds on chemotaxis in Dictyostelium identifies a non-sentient model for bitter and hot tastant research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Robery

    Full Text Available Novel chemical entities (NCEs may be investigated for emetic liability in a range of unpleasant experiments involving retching, vomiting or conditioned taste aversion/food avoidance in sentient animals. We have used a range of compounds with known emetic /aversive properties to examine the possibility of using the social amoeba, Dictyostelium discoideum, for research into identifying and understanding emetic liability, and hence reduce adverse animal experimentation in this area. Twenty eight emetic or taste aversive compounds were employed to investigate the acute (10 min effect of compounds on Dictyostelium cell behaviour (shape, speed and direction of movement in a shallow chemotaxic gradient (Dunn chamber. Compound concentrations were chosen based on those previously reported to be emetic or aversive in in vivo studies and results were recorded and quantified by automated image analysis. Dictyostelium cell motility was rapidly and strongly inhibited by four structurally distinct tastants (three bitter tasting compounds--denatonium benzoate, quinine hydrochloride, phenylthiourea, and the pungent constituent of chilli peppers--capsaicin. In addition, stomach irritants (copper chloride and copper sulphate, and a phosphodiesterase IV inhibitor also rapidly blocked movement. A concentration-dependant relationship was established for five of these compounds, showing potency of inhibition as capsaicin (IC(50 = 11.9 ± 4.0 µM > quinine hydrochloride (IC(50 = 44.3 ± 6.8 µM > denatonium benzoate (IC(50 = 129 ± 4 µM > phenylthiourea (IC(50 = 366 ± 5 µM > copper sulphate (IC(50 = 1433 ± 3 µM. In contrast, 21 compounds within the cytotoxic and receptor agonist/antagonist classes did not affect cell behaviour. Further analysis of bitter and pungent compounds showed that the effect on cell behaviour was reversible and not cytotoxic, suggesting an uncharacterised molecular mechanism of action for these compounds. These results therefore demonstrate

  11. Proteinase activated receptor 1 mediated fibrosis in a mouse model of liver injury: a role for bone marrow derived macrophages.

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    Yiannis N Kallis

    Full Text Available Liver fibrosis results from the co-ordinated actions of myofibroblasts and macrophages, a proportion of which are of bone marrow origin. The functional effect of such bone marrow-derived cells on liver fibrosis is unclear. We examine whether changing bone marrow genotype can down-regulate the liver's fibrotic response to injury and investigate mechanisms involved. Proteinase activated receptor 1 (PAR1 is up-regulated in fibrotic liver disease in humans, and deficiency of PAR1 is associated with reduced liver fibrosis in rodent models. In this study, recipient mice received bone marrow transplantation from PAR1-deficient or wild-type donors prior to carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis. Bone marrow transplantation alone from PAR1-deficient mice was able to confer significant reductions in hepatic collagen content and activated myofibroblast expansion on wild-type recipients. This effect was associated with a decrease in hepatic scar-associated macrophages and a reduction in macrophage recruitment from the bone marrow. In vitro, PAR1 signalling on bone marrow-derived macrophages directly induced their chemotaxis but did not stimulate proliferation. These data suggest that the bone marrow can modulate the fibrotic response of the liver to recurrent injury. PAR1 signalling can contribute to this response by mechanisms that include the regulation of macrophage recruitment.

  12. Flavivirus Entry Receptors: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Perera-Lecoin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses enter host cells by endocytosis initiated when the virus particles interact with cell surface receptors. The current model suggests that flaviviruses use at least two different sets of molecules for infectious entry: attachment factors that concentrate and/or recruit viruses on the cell surface and primary receptor(s that bind to virions and direct them to the endocytic pathway. Here, we present the currently available knowledge regarding the flavivirus receptors described so far with specific attention to C-type lectin receptors and the phosphatidylserine receptors, T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM and TYRO3, AXL and MER (TAM. Their role in flavivirus attachment and entry as well as their implication in the virus biology will be discussed in depth.

  13. Dimerization of nuclear receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Pierre; Bourguet, William

    2013-01-01

    Multicellular organisms require specific intercellular communication to properly organize the complex body plan during embryogenesis and maintain its properties and functions during the entire life. While growth factors, neurotransmitters, and peptide hormones bind to membrane receptors, thereby inducing the activity of intracellular kinase cascades or the JAK-STAT signaling pathways, other small signaling compounds such as steroid hormones, certain vitamins, and metabolic intermediates enter, or are generated, within the target cells and bind to members of a large family of nuclear receptors (NRs). NRs are ligand-inducible transcription factors that control a plethora of biological phenomena, thus orchestrating complex events like development, organ homeostasis, immune function, and reproduction. NR-NR interactions are of major importance in these regulatory processes, as NRs regulate their target genes by binding to cognate DNA response elements essentially as homo- or heterodimers. A number of structural and functional studies have provided significant insights as to how combinatorial NRs rely on protein-protein contacts that discriminate geometric features of their DNA response elements, thereby allowing both binding site diversity and physiological specificity. Here, we will review our current understanding of NR-NR interactions and provide protocols for a number of experimental approaches that are useful for their study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Receptor studies in biological psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Yutaka

    1992-01-01

    Recent advances in the pharmacological treatment of endogenous psychosis have led to the development of biological studies in psychiatry. Studies on neurotransmitter receptors were reviewed in order to apply positron-emission tomograph (PET) for biological psychiatry. The dopamine (DA) hypothesis for schizophrenia was advanced on the basis of the observed effects of neuroleptics and methamphetamine, and DA(D 2 ) receptor supersensitivity measured by PET and receptor binding in the schizophrenic brain. The clinical potencies of neuroleptics for schizophrenia were correlated with their abilities to inhibit the D 2 receptor, and not other receptors. The σ receptor was expected to be a site of antipsychotic action. However, the potency of drugs action on it was not correlated with clinical efficacy. Haloperidol binds with high affinity to the σ receptor, which may mediate acute dystonia, an extrapyramidal side effect of neuroleptics. Behavioral and neurochemical changes induced by methamphetamine treatment were studied as an animal model of schizophrenia, and both a decrease of D 2 receptor density and an increase of DA release were detected. The monoamine hypothesis for manic-depressive psychosis was advanced on the basis of the effect of reserpine, monoamine oxidase inhibitor and antidepressants. 3 H-clonidine binding sites were increased in platelet membranes of depressive patients, 3 H-imipramine binding sites were decreased. The GABA A receptor is the target site for the action of anxiolytics and antiepileptics such as benzodiazepines and barbiturates. Recent developments in molecular biology techniques have revealed the structure of receptor proteins, which are classified into two receptor families, the G-protein coupled type (D 2 ) and the ion-channel type (GABA A ). (J.P.N.)

  15. Possible Relevance of Receptor-Receptor Interactions between Viral- and Host-Coded Receptors for Viral-Induced Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi F. Agnati

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that some viruses, such as the cytomegalovirus, code for G-protein coupled receptors not only to elude the immune system, but also to redirect cellular signaling in the receptor networks of the host cells. In view of the existence of receptor-receptor interactions, the hypothesis is introduced that these viral-coded receptors not only operate as constitutively active monomers, but also can affect other receptor function by interacting with receptors of the host cell. Furthermore, it is suggested that viruses could also insert not single receptors (monomers, but clusters of receptors (receptor mosaics, altering the cell metabolism in a profound way. The prevention of viral receptor-induced changes in host receptor networks may give rise to novel antiviral drugs that counteract viral-induced disease.

  16. Pharmacological characterization of AZD5069, a slowly reversible CXC chemokine receptor 2 antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, David J; Wiley, Katherine; Dainty, Ian; MacIntosh, Fraser; Phillips, Caroline; Gaw, Alasdair; Mårdh, Carina Kärrman

    2015-05-01

    In normal physiologic responses to injury and infection, inflammatory cells enter tissue and sites of inflammation through a chemotactic process regulated by several families of proteins, including inflammatory chemokines, a family of small inducible cytokines. In neutrophils, chemokines chemokine (CXC motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1) and CXCL8 are potent chemoattractants and activate G protein-coupled receptors CXC chemokine receptor 1 (CXCR1) and CXCR2. Several small-molecule antagonists of CXCR2 have been developed to inhibit the inflammatory responses mediated by this receptor. Here, we present the data describing the pharmacology of AZD5069 [N-(2-(2,3-difluorobenzylthio)-6-((2R,3S)-3,4-dihydroxybutan-2-yloxy)[2,4,5,6-(13)C4, 1,3-(15)N2]pyrimidin-4-yl)azetidine-1-sulfonamide,[(15)N2,(13)C4]N-(2-(2,3-difluoro-6-[3H]-benzylthio)-6-((2R,3S)-3,4-dihydroxybutan-2-yloxy)pyrimidin-4-yl)azetidine-1-sulfonamide], a novel antagonist of CXCR2. AZD5069 was shown to inhibit binding of radiolabeled CXCL8 to human CXCR2 with a pIC50 value of 9.1. Furthermore, AZD5069 inhibited neutrophil chemotaxis, with a pA2 of approximately 9.6, and adhesion molecule expression, with a pA2 of 6.9, in response to CXCL1. AZD5069 was a slowly reversible antagonist of CXCR2 with effects of time and temperature evident on the pharmacology and binding kinetics. With short incubation times, AZD5069 appeared to have an antagonist profile with insurmountable antagonism of calcium response curves. This behavior was also observed in vivo in an acute lipopolysaccharide-induced lung inflammation model. Altogether, the data presented here show that AZD5069 represents a novel, potent, and selective CXCR2 antagonist with potential as a therapeutic agent in inflammatory conditions. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  17. Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy & Oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Bergsma (Hendrik)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractNeuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are rare neoplasms with differences in clinical presentation, course and prognosis. Most of the NETs express the somatostatine receptor, which can be utilized for imaging and therapy. Radiolabeled somatostatin analogs can be used for peptide receptor

  18. Hydrocarbon Receptor Pathway in Dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbeek, F.G. van; Spee, B.; Penning, L.C.; Kummeling, A.; Gils, I.H.M.; Grinwis, G.C.M.; Leenen, D. van; Holstege, F.C.P.; Vos-Loohuis, M.; Rothuizen, J.; Leegwater, P.A.J.

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates biological responses to toxic chemicals. An unexpected role for AHR in vascularization was suggested when mice lacking AHR displayed impaired closure of the ductus venosus after birth, as did knockout mice for aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting

  19. Coronavirus spike-receptor interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mou, H.

    2015-01-01

    Coronaviruses cause important diseases in humans and animals. Coronavirus infection starts with the virus binding with its spike proteins to molecules present on the surface of host cells that act as receptors. This spike-receptor interaction is highly specific and determines the virus’ cell, tissue

  20. Neurobeachin regulates neurotransmitter receptor trafficking to synapses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nair, R.; Lauks, J.; Jung, S; Cooke, N.E.; de Wit, H.; Brose, N.; Kilimann, M.W.; Verhage, M.; Rhee, J.

    2013-01-01

    The surface density of neurotransmitter receptors at synapses is a key determinant of synaptic efficacy. Synaptic receptor accumulation is regulated by the transport, postsynaptic anchoring, and turnover of receptors, involving multiple trafficking, sorting, motor, and scaffold proteins. We found

  1. Probing Biased Signaling in Chemokine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarandi, Roxana Maria; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine system mediates leukocyte migration during homeostatic and inflammatory processes. Traditionally, it is described as redundant and promiscuous, with a single chemokine ligand binding to different receptors and a single receptor having several ligands. Signaling of chemokine receptor...

  2. Dopamine Receptors and Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Hisahara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive extrapyramidal motor disorder. Pathologically, this disease is characterized by the selective dopaminergic (DAergic neuronal degeneration in the substantia nigra. Correcting the DA deficiency in PD with levodopa (L-dopa significantly attenuates the motor symptoms; however, its effectiveness often declines, and L-dopa-related adverse effects emerge after long-term treatment. Nowadays, DA receptor agonists are useful medication even regarded as first choice to delay the starting of L-dopa therapy. In advanced stage of PD, they are also used as adjunct therapy together with L-dopa. DA receptor agonists act by stimulation of presynaptic and postsynaptic DA receptors. Despite the usefulness, they could be causative drugs for valvulopathy and nonmotor complication such as DA dysregulation syndrome (DDS. In this paper, physiological characteristics of DA receptor familyare discussed. We also discuss the validity, benefits, and specific adverse effects of pharmaceutical DA receptor agonist.

  3. P2X7 receptor-dependent tuning of gut epithelial responses to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Szu-Wei; Walker, Catherine; Pennock, Joanne; Else, Kathryn; Muller, Werner; Daniels, Michael Jd; Pellegrini, Carolina; Brough, David; Lopez-Castejon, Gloria; Cruickshank, Sheena M

    2017-02-01

    Infection and injury of the gut are associated with cell damage and release of molecules such as extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), which is recognised by the purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R). P2X7R is widely expressed in the gut by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and epithelial cells, but the role of the P2X7R on epithelial cells is poorly understood. We investigated P2X7R in intestinal epithelium in vitro and in vivo using two model infections, Toxoplasma gondii and Trichinella spiralis. Lipopolysaccharide and ATP treatment of intestinal epithelial cells and infection with T. gondii in vitro did not promote inflammasome-associated interleukin-1β (IL-1β) or IL-18 secretion, but promoted C-C motif chemokine ligand 5 (CCL5), tumour necrosis factor-α and IL-6 production that were significantly reduced when the P2X7R was blocked. Similarly, in vivo, infection with either T. spiralis or T. gondii induced rapid upregulation of epithelial CCL5 in wild-type (wild-type (WT)) mice that was significantly reduced in P2X7R -/- littermate controls. The effects of reduced epithelial CCL5 were assayed by investigating recruitment of dendritic cells (DCs) to the epithelium. Infection induced a rapid recruitment of CD11c + CD103 + DC subsets into the epithelial layer of WT mice but not P2X7R -/- mice. In vitro chemotaxis assays and bone marrow chimeras demonstrated the importance of epithelial P2X7R in DC recruitment. P2X7R signalling in epithelial cells mediates chemokine responses to promote initiation of host immunity to infection.

  4. Ryanodine receptor channelopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzenhauser, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyR) are intracellular Ca2+-permeable channels that provide the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release required for skeletal and cardiac muscle contractions. RyR1 underlies skeletal muscle contraction, and RyR2 fulfills this role in cardiac muscle. Over the past 20 years, numerous mutations in both RyR isoforms have been identified and linked to skeletal and cardiac diseases. Malignant hyperthermia, central core disease, and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia have been genetically linked to mutations in either RyR1 or RyR2. Thus, RyR channelopathies are both of interest because they cause significant human diseases and provide model systems that can be studied to elucidate important structure–function relationships of these ion channels. PMID:20179962

  5. Molecular characterization of opioid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this research was to purify and characterize active opioid receptors and elucidate molecular aspects of opioid receptor heterogeneity. Purification to apparent homogeneity of an opioid binding protein from bovine caudate was achieved by solubilization in the non-ionic detergent, digitonin, followed by sequential chromatography on the opiate affinity matrix, ..beta..-naltrexylethylenediamine-CH-Sepharose 4B, and on the lectine affinity matrix, wheat germ agglutinin-agarose. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS-PAGE) followed by autoradiography revealed that radioiodinated purified receptor gave a single band. Purified receptor preparations showed a specific activity of 12,000-15,000 fmol of opiate bound per mg of protein. Radioiodinated human beta-endorphin (/sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/) was used as a probe to investigate the ligand binding subunits of mu and delta opioid receptors. /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ was shown to bind to a variety of opioid receptor-containing tissues with high affinity and specificity with preference for mu and delta sites, and with little, if any, binding to kappa sites. Affinity crosslinking techniques were employed to covalently link /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ to opioid receptors, utilizing derivatives of bis-succinimidyl esters that are bifunctional crosslinkers with specificities for amino and sulfhydryl groups. This, and competition experiments with high type-selective ligands, permitted the assignment of two labeled peptides to their receptor types, namely a peptide of M/sub r/ = 65,000 for mu receptors and one of M/sub r/ = 53,000 for delta receptors.

  6. The 3.2 Å resolution structure of a receptor: CheA:CheW signaling complex defines overlapping binding sites and key residue interactions within bacterial chemosensory arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxiao; Fleetwood, Aaron D; Bayas, Camille; Bilwes, Alexandrine M; Ortega, Davi R; Falke, Joseph J; Zhulin, Igor B; Crane, Brian R

    2013-06-04

    Bacterial chemosensory arrays are composed of extended networks of chemoreceptors (also known as methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, MCPs), the histidine kinase CheA, and the adaptor protein CheW. Models of these arrays have been developed from cryoelectron microscopy, crystal structures of binary and ternary complexes, NMR spectroscopy, mutational, data and biochemical studies. A new 3.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a Thermotoga maritima MCP protein interaction region in complex with the CheA kinase-regulatory module (P4-P5) and adaptor protein CheW provides sufficient detail to define residue contacts at the interfaces formed among the three proteins. As in a previous 4.5 Å resolution structure, CheA-P5 and CheW interact through conserved hydrophobic surfaces at the ends of their β-barrels to form pseudo 6-fold symmetric rings in which the two proteins alternate around the circumference. The interface between P5 subdomain 1 and CheW subdomain 2 was anticipated from previous studies, whereas the related interface between CheW subdomain 1 and P5 subdomain 2 has only been observed in these ring assemblies. The receptor forms an unexpected structure in that the helical hairpin tip of each subunit has "unzipped" into a continuous α-helix; four such helices associate into a bundle, and the tetramers bridge adjacent P5-CheW rings in the lattice through interactions with both P5 and CheW. P5 and CheW each bind a receptor helix with a groove of conserved hydrophobic residues between subdomains 1 and 2. P5 binds the receptor helix N-terminal to the tip region (lower site), whereas CheW binds the same helix with inverted polarity near the bundle end (upper site). Sequence comparisons among different evolutionary classes of chemotaxis proteins show that the binding partners undergo correlated changes at key residue positions that involve the lower site. Such evolutionary analyses argue that both CheW and P5 bind to the receptor tip at overlapping positions

  7. Roles for NHERF1 and NHERF2 on the regulation of C3a receptor signaling in human mast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hariharan Subramanian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The anaphylatoxin C3a binds to the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR, C3aR and activates divergent signaling pathways to induce degranulation and cytokine production in human mast cells. Adapter proteins such as the Na(+/H(+ exchange regulatory factor (NHERF1 and NHERF2 have been implicated in regulating functions of certain GPCRs by binding to the class I PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg/Zo1 motifs present on their cytoplasmic tails. Although C3aR possesses a class I PDZ motif, the possibility that it interacts with NHERF proteins to modulate signaling in human mast cells has not been determined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting, we found that NHERF1 and NHERF2 are expressed in human mast cell lines (HMC-1, LAD2 and CD34(+-derived primary human mast cells. Surprisingly, however, C3aR did not associate with these adapter proteins. To assess the roles of NHERFs on signaling downstream of C3aR, we used lentiviral shRNA to stably knockdown the expression of these proteins in human mast cells. Silencing the expression of NHERF1 and NHERF2 had no effect on C3aR desensitization, agonist-induced receptor internalization, ERK/Akt phosphorylation or chemotaxis. However, loss of NHERF1 and NHERF2 resulted in significant inhibition of C3a-induced mast cell degranulation, NF-κB activation and chemokine production. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates that although C3aR possesses a class I PDZ motif, it does not associate with NHERF1 and NHERF2. Surprisingly, these proteins provide stimulatory signals for C3a-induced degranulation, NF-κB activation and chemokine generation in human mast cells. These findings reveal a new level of complexity for the functional regulation of C3aR by NHERFs in human mast cells.

  8. Estrogen-related receptor β (ERRβ) - renaissance receptor or receptor renaissance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divekar, Shailaja D; Tiek, Deanna M; Fernandez, Aileen; Riggins, Rebecca B

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptors (ERRs) are founding members of the orphan nuclear receptor (ONR) subgroup of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Twenty-seven years of study have yet to identify cognate ligands for the ERRs, though they have firmly placed ERRα and ERRγ at the intersection of cellular metabolism and oncogenesis. The pace of discovery for novel functions of ERRβ, however, has until recently been somewhat slower than that of its family members. ERRβ has also been largely ignored in summaries and perspectives of the ONR literature. Here, we provide an overview of established and emerging knowledge of ERRβ in mouse, man, and other species, highlighting unique aspects of ERRβ biology that set it apart from the other two estrogen-related receptors, with a focus on the impact of alternative splicing on the structure and function of this receptor.

  9. Expression and function of cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 and their cognate cannabinoid ligands in murine embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuxian Jiang

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of intrinsic and extrinsic factors regulating the self-renewal/division and differentiation of stem cells is crucial in determining embryonic stem (ES cell fate. ES cells differentiate into multiple hematopoietic lineages during embryoid body (EB formation in vitro, which provides an experimental platform to define the molecular mechanisms controlling germ layer fate determination and tissue formation.The cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 and cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2 are members of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR family, that are activated by endogenous ligands, the endocannabinoids. CB1 receptor expression is abundant in brain while CB2 receptors are mostly expressed in hematopoietic cells. However, the expression and the precise roles of CB1 and CB2 and their cognate ligands in ES cells are not known. We observed significant induction of CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors during the hematopoietic differentiation of murine ES (mES-derived embryoid bodies. Furthermore, mES cells as well as ES-derived embryoid bodies at days 7 and 14, expressed endocannabinoids, the ligands for both CB1 and CB2. The CB1 and CB2 antagonists (AM251 and AM630, respectively induced mES cell death, strongly suggesting that endocannabinoids are involved in the survival of mES cells. Treatment of mES cells with the exogenous cannabinoid ligand Delta(9-THC resulted in the increased hematopoietic differentiation of mES cells, while addition of AM251 or AM630 blocked embryoid body formation derived from the mES cells. In addition, cannabinoid agonists induced the chemotaxis of ES-derived embryoid bodies, which was specifically inhibited by the CB1 and CB2 antagonists.This work has not been addressed previously and yields new information on the function of cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, as components of a novel pathway regulating murine ES cell differentiation. This study provides insights into cannabinoid system involvement in ES cell

  10. Corticosteroids decrease glomerular angiotensin receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, J.G.

    1987-03-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors of glomerular mesangial cells are regulated in vivo by changes in Na balance, effects that are presumed to be secondary to changes in circulating ANG II. However, since changes in ANG II were accompanied by parallel changes in plasma aldosterone in all models tested, it is possible that aldosterone may have also participated in the modulation of glomerular ANG II receptors. To test this hypothesis, short-term aldosterone infusions within the physiological range were employed to favor actions that would be mediated through a high-affinity mineralocorticoid receptor. The glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, was also tested to determine the mineralocorticoid specificity of the response. Two infusion rates were associated with a decrease in glomerular /sup 125/I ANG II receptor density of 33 and 45%, respectively. Serum potassium and urinary Na/K ratio were lower in the aldosterone group. Spironolactone abolished the effect of aldosterone consistent with an action mediated through a specific mineralocorticoid receptor. These studies support the hypothesis that corticosteroids modulate glomerular ANG II receptors and validate the complexity of glomerular receptor modulation. The downregulation observed would be expected to diminish the ability of ANG II to influence glomerular hemodynamics in models such as mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid-induced hypertension.

  11. Radioiodinated ligands for dopamine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, H.F.

    1994-01-01

    The dopamine receptor system is important for normal brain function; it is also the apparent action site for various neuroleptic drugs for the treatment of schizophrenia and other metal disorders. In the past few years radioiodinated ligands for single photon emission tomography (SPECT) have been successfully developed and tested in humans: [ 123 I]TISCH for D1 dopamine receptors; [ 123 I]IBZM, epidepride, IBF and FIDA2, four iodobenzamide derivatives, for D2/D3 dopamine receptors. In addition, [ 123 I]β-CIT (RTI-55) and IPT, cocaine derivatives, for the dopamine reuptake site are potentially useful for diagnosis of loss of dopamine neurons. The first iodinated ligand, (R)trans-7-OH-PIPAT, for D3 dopamine receptors, was synthesized and characterized with cloned cell lines (Spodoptera frugiperda, Sf9) expressing the D2 and D3 dopamine receptors and with rat basal forebrain membrane preparations. Most of the known iodobenzamides displayed similar potency in binding to both D2 and D3 dopamine receptors expressed in the cell lines. Initial studies appear to suggest that by fine tuning the structures it may be possible to develop agents specific for D2 and D3 dopamine receptors. It is important to investigate D2/D3 selectivity for this series of potent ligands

  12. Lysophospholipid receptors in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Chun, Jerold

    2015-05-01

    Lysophospholipids (LPs), including lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), sphingosine 1-phospate (S1P), lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), and lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS), are bioactive lipids that transduce signals through their specific cell-surface G protein-coupled receptors, LPA1-6, S1P1-5, LPI1, and LysoPS1-3, respectively. These LPs and their receptors have been implicated in both physiological and pathophysiological processes such as autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, fibrosis, pain, cancer, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, bone formation, fertility, organismal development, and other effects on most organ systems. Advances in the LP receptor field have enabled the development of novel small molecules targeting LP receptors for several diseases. Most notably, fingolimod (FTY720, Gilenya, Novartis), an S1P receptor modulator, became the first FDA-approved medicine as an orally bioavailable drug for treating relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. This success is currently being followed by multiple, mechanistically related compounds targeting S1P receptor subtypes, which are in various stages of clinical development. In addition, an LPA1 antagonist, BMS-986020 (Bristol-Myers Squibb), is in Phase 2 clinical development for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, as a distinct compound, SAR100842 (Sanofi) for the treatment of systemic sclerosis and related fibrotic diseases. This review summarizes the current state of drug discovery in the LP receptor field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A transient receptor potential channel expressed in taste receptor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Cristian A; Huang, Liquan; Rong, Minqing; Kozak, J Ashot; Preuss, Axel K; Zhang, Hailin; Max, Marianna; Margolskee, Robert F

    2002-11-01

    We used differential screening of cDNAs from individual taste receptor cells to identify candidate taste transduction elements in mice. Among the differentially expressed clones, one encoded Trpm5, a member of the mammalian family of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. We found Trpm5 to be expressed in a restricted manner, with particularly high levels in taste tissue. In taste cells, Trpm5 was coexpressed with taste-signaling molecules such as alpha-gustducin, Ggamma13, phospholipase C-beta2 (PLC-beta2) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type III (IP3R3). Our heterologous expression studies of Trpm5 indicate that it functions as a cationic channel that is gated when internal calcium stores are depleted. Trpm5 may be responsible for capacitative calcium entry in taste receptor cells that respond to bitter and/or sweet compounds.

  14. Type I (RI) and type II (RII) receptors for transforming growth factor-beta isoforms are expressed subsequent to transforming growth factor-beta ligands during excisional wound repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, L I; Sung, J J; Siebert, J W; Longaker, M T

    1997-01-01

    slightly immunoreactive for RI and RII until day 5 when, immediately under the wound, immunostaining for fibroblasts, connective tissue cells, and newly forming vasculature began to increase and remained intense until day 14. Consistent with the role for TGF-beta in scarring, numerous fibroblasts, ostensibly active in the production of extracellular matrix components, continued to be slightly immunoreactive for RI and RII at 21 days. The ALK-1 (TSR-1) type I receptor, which binds both activin and TGF-beta, showed slight immunostaining early in repair (days 1 to 7) that progressively became more intense later in repair after day 10 and through day 21. This suggests that there may be a switch to a different type I receptor, implying different functions for the ALK-1 and ALK-5 receptors. The concomitant expression of TGF-beta isoforms and their signal-transducing receptors denote potential spatial and temporal activity of TGF-beta. Thus, although TGF-beta ligand is present, TGF-beta would not function in wound repair until a later time when RI and RII appear. This information should aid in the development of receptor antagonists as a therapeutic approach to scarring and fibrosis. In addition, these studies underscore the importance of defining the expression of proteins in vivo to establish a basis for the analysis of mechanisms in vitro.

  15. Cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) inhibits growth and invasion by up-regulating nuclear receptors and 25-hydroxylase (CYP27A1) in human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokar, Erik J; Webber, Mukta M

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests an inverse relationship between prostate cancer and serum vitamin D levels. We examined the ability of cholecalciferol (vitamin D(3)), a calcitriol precursor, to inhibit or reverse cellular changes associated with malignant transformation and invasion and explored its mechanisms of action. The RWPE2-W99 human prostate epithelial cell line, which forms slow-growing tumors in nude mice, was used because it mimics the behavior of the majority of primary human prostate cancers. Cholecalciferol, at physiological levels: (i) inhibited anchorage-dependent and -independent growth; (ii) induced differentiation by decreasing vimentin expression with a concomitant decrease in motility/chemotaxis; (iii) decreased MMP-9 and MMP-2 activity with concomitant decrease in invasion; and (iv) exerted its effects by up-regulating vitamin D receptor (VDR), retinoid-X receptor-alpha (RXR-alpha), and androgen receptor (AR) in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, we found that RWPE2-W99 prostate cancer cells, similar to RWPE-1 cells (Tokar and Webber. Clin Exp Metast 2005; 22: 265-73), constitutively express the enzyme 25-hydroxylase CYP27A1 which is markedly up-regulated by cholecalciferol. Cholecalciferol has effects similar to those of calcitriol on growth, MMP activity, and VDR. The ability of CYP27A1 to catalyze the conversion of cholecalciferol to 25(OH)D(3) and of 25(OH)D(3) to calcitriol has been reported. RWPE2-W99 cells, similar to RWPE-1 cells, appear to have the rare ability to locally convert cholecalciferol to the active hormone calcitriol. Because it can inhibit cellular changes associated with malignant transformation and invasion, we propose that cholecalciferol may be an effective agent for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  16. Quantitative receptor radioautography in the study of receptor-receptor interactions in the nucleus tractus solitarii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fior-Chadi D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS in the dorsomedial medulla comprises a wide range of neuropeptides and biogenic amines. Several of them are related to mechanisms of central blood pressure control. Angiotensin II (Ang II, neuropeptide Y (NPY and noradrenaline (NA are found in the NTS cells, as well as their receptors. Based on this observation we have evaluated the modulatory effect of these peptide receptors on a2-adrenoceptors in the NTS. Using quantitative receptor radioautography, we observed that NPY and Ang II receptors decreased the affinity of a2-adrenoceptors for their agonists in the NTS of the rat. Cardiovascular experiments agreed with the in vitro data. Coinjection of a threshold dose of Ang II or of the NPY agonists together with an ED50 dose of adrenergic agonists such as NA, adrenaline and clonidine counteracted the depressor effect produced by the a2-agonist in the NTS. The results provide evidence for the existence of an antagonistic interaction between Ang II at1 receptors and NPY receptor subtypes with the a2-adrenoceptors in the NTS. This receptor interaction may reduce the transduction over the a2-adrenoceptors which can be important in central cardiovascular regulation and in the development of hypertension

  17. Glutamate receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldbrandt, Mette; Johansen, Tommy N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Homologation and substitution on the carbon backbone of (S)-glutamic acid [(S)-Glu, 1], as well as absolute stereochemistry, are structural parameters of key importance for the pharmacological profile of (S)-Glu receptor ligands. We describe a series of methyl-substituted 2-aminoadipic acid (AA...... or slightly lower potencies than (S)-AA [e.g., EC(50) = 76 microM for (2S,4S)-4-methyl-AA (5a) as compared to EC(50) = 35 microM for (S)-AA]. The position of the methyl substituent had a profound effect on the observed pharmacology, whereas the absolute stereochemistry at the methylated carbon atom had a very......) analogs, and the synthesis, stereochemistry, and enantiopharmacology of 3-methyl-AA (4a-d), 4-methyl-AA (5a-d), 5-methyl-AA (6a-d), and (E)-Delta(4)-5-methyl-AA (7a and 7b) are reported. The compounds were resolved using chiral HPLC and the configurational assignments of the enantiomers were based on X...

  18. Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA) is designed to foster the development of a comprehensive understanding of the structure, function, and role in disease...

  19. L-glutamate Receptor In Paramecium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal-Martínez, Juan; Ortega-Soto, Arturo

    2004-09-01

    Behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical experiments were performed in order to establish the presence of a glutamate receptor in the ciliate Paramecium. It was found that an AMPA/KA receptor is functionally expressed in Paramecium and that this receptor is immunologically and fillogenetically related to the AMPA/KA receptor present in vertebrates.

  20. Receptor-targeted metalloradiopharmaceuticals. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Mark A.

    2000-01-01

    Copper (II) and platinum (II) coordination complexes were prepared and characterized. These complexes were designed to afford structural homology with steroidal and non-steroidal estrogens for possible use as receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals. While weak affinity for the estrogen receptor was detectable, none would appear to have sufficient receptor-affinity for estrogen-receptor-targeted imaging or therapy

  1. [The receptor theory of atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhoded, V G; Bondarenko, V M; Gintsburg, A L

    2010-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacteria can interact with Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and induce atheroma formation. The risk of atherosclerosis is decreased in case of TLR4 mutation. Other bacterial ligands and endogenous ligands of TLRs can also be involved in induction of atherogenesis. The general concept of atherosclerosis pathogentsis is presented. According to this concept atherogenesis can be initiated by some reactions resulting from interaction of exogenous and endogenous microbial ligands with Toll-like receptors.

  2. Odorant Receptor Desensitization in Insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Guo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Insects and other arthropods transmit devastating human diseases, and these vectors use chemical senses to target humans. Understanding how these animals detect, respond, and adapt to volatile odorants may lead to novel ways to disrupt host localization or mate recognition in these pests. The past decade has led to remarkable progress in understanding odorant detection in arthropods. Insects use odorant-gated ion channels, first discovered in Drosophila melanogaster , to detect volatile chemicals. In flies, 60 “tuning” receptor subunits combine with a common subunit, Orco ( o dorant r eceptor co receptor to form ligand-gated ion channels. The mechanisms underlying odorant receptor desensitization in insects are largely unknown. Recent work reveals that dephosphorylation of serine 289 on the shared Orco subunit is responsible for slow, odor-induced receptor desensitization. Dephosphorylation has no effect on the localization of the receptor protein, and activation of the olfactory neurons in the absence of odor is sufficient to induce dephosphorylation and desensitization. These findings reveal a major component of receptor modulation in this important group of disease vectors, and implicate a second messenger feedback mechanism in this process.

  3. Nuclear Receptors, RXR, and the Big Bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ronald M; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2014-03-27

    Isolation of genes encoding the receptors for steroids, retinoids, vitamin D, and thyroid hormone and their structural and functional analysis revealed an evolutionarily conserved template for nuclear hormone receptors. This discovery sparked identification of numerous genes encoding related proteins, termed orphan receptors. Characterization of these orphan receptors and, in particular, of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) positioned nuclear receptors at the epicenter of the "Big Bang" of molecular endocrinology. This Review provides a personal perspective on nuclear receptors and explores their integrated and coordinated signaling networks that are essential for multicellular life, highlighting the RXR heterodimer and its associated ligands and transcriptional mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Expression of GABAergic receptors in mouse taste receptor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret R Starostik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple excitatory neurotransmitters have been identified in the mammalian taste transduction, with few studies focused on inhibitory neurotransmitters. Since the synthetic enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA is expressed in a subset of mouse taste cells, we hypothesized that other components of the GABA signaling pathway are likely expressed in this system. GABA signaling is initiated by the activation of either ionotropic receptors (GABA(A and GABA(C or metabotropic receptors (GABA(B while it is terminated by the re-uptake of GABA through transporters (GATs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR analysis, we investigated the expression of different GABA signaling molecules in the mouse taste system. Taste receptor cells (TRCs in the circumvallate papillae express multiple subunits of the GABA(A and GABA(B receptors as well as multiple GATs. Immunocytochemical analyses examined the distribution of the GABA machinery in the circumvallate papillae. Both GABA(A-and GABA(B- immunoreactivity were detected in the peripheral taste receptor cells. We also used transgenic mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP in either the Type II taste cells, which can respond to bitter, sweet or umami taste stimuli, or in the Type III GAD67 expressing taste cells. Thus, we were able to identify that GABAergic receptors are expressed in some Type II and Type III taste cells. Mouse GAT4 labeling was concentrated in the cells surrounding the taste buds with a few positively labeled TRCs at the margins of the taste buds. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The presence of GABAergic receptors localized on Type II and Type III taste cells suggests that GABA is likely modulating evoked taste responses in the mouse taste bud.

  5. 21st Century Locomotive Technology: 2003 Annual Technical Status Report DOE/AL68284-TSR03

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lembit Salasoo

    2004-01-09

    The 21st Century Locomotive program objective is to develop 25% more efficient freight locomotives by 2010. Diesel engine-related research addresses advanced fuel injection, electric turbocharger and abradable seals. Assembly of a common rail fuel injection test system is underway, and a CFD combustion model has been validated. An electrically assisted turbocharger has been constructed and operated, meeting the generator mode design rating. System characterization and optimization is ongoing. Candidate abradable seal materials have been identified and test coupons prepared. Locomotive system-related research addresses capturing, storing and utilizing regenerative braking energy in a hybrid locomotive, and fuel optimization control. Hybrid locomotive energy storage requirements have been identified and studies on specific energy storage solutions are in progress. Energy management controls have been defined and testing initiated. Train and track parameter identification necessary for fuel optimization has been demonstrated.

  6. 21st Century Locomotive Technology: Quarterly Technical Status Report 9 DOE/AL68284-TSR09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lembit Salasoo; Paul Houpt; Jennifer Topinka; Anthony Furman

    2005-06-29

    Locomotive-scale single cylinder engine with common rail fuel injection data was gathered to explore the fuel consumption and particulate matter emissions entitlement. A structured experiment on thermal spray application of polymer based compressor abradables was begun. Turbine performance improvements were found due to metallic abradables coatings. Hybrid energy storage battery ripple current and long-term cycling tests have been performed. Final track test of advanced energy management system was performed. Fuel optimization computational methods have been enhanced, and a prototype real-time graphic interface developed.

  7. Toll-like receptors in neonatal sepsis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hare, Fiona M

    2013-06-01

    Toll-like receptors are vital transmembrane receptors that initiate the innate immune response to many micro-organisms. The discovery of these receptors has improved our understanding of host-pathogen interactions, and these receptors play an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple neonatal conditions such as sepsis and brain injury. Toll-like receptors, especially TLRs 2 and 4, are associated with necrotizing enterocolitis, periventricular leukomalacia and sepsis.

  8. NMDA receptor signaling: death or survival?

    OpenAIRE

    LUO, Tong; WU, Wei-Hua; CHEN, Bo-Shiun

    2011-01-01

    Glutamate-induced neuronal damage is mainly caused by overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Conversely, normal physiological brain function and neuronal survival require adequate activation of NMDA receptors. Studies have revealed that NMDA receptor-induced neuronal death or survival is mediated through distinct subset of NMDA receptors triggering different intracellular signaling pathways. Here we discuss recent advances in the characterization of NMDA receptors in neurona...

  9. Regulation of NMDA Receptors by Phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Bo-Shiun; Roche, Katherine W.

    2007-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are critical for neuronal development and synaptic plasticity. The molecular mechanisms underlying the synaptic localization and functional regulation of NMDA receptors have been the subject of extensive studies. In particular, phosphorylation has emerged as a fundamental mechanism that regulates NMDA receptor trafficking and can alter the channel properties of NMDA receptors. Here we summarize recent advances in the characterization of NMDA receptor phos...

  10. MPA-capped CdTe quantum dots exposure causes neurotoxic effects in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans by affecting the transporters and receptors of glutamate, serotonin and dopamine at the genetic level, or by increasing ROS, or both

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tianshu; He, Keyu; Zhan, Qinglin; Ang, Shengjun; Ying, Jiali; Zhang, Shihan; Zhang, Ting; Xue, Yuying; Tang, Meng

    2015-12-01

    As quantum dots (QDs) are widely used in biomedical applications, the number of studies focusing on their biological properties is increasing. While several studies have attempted to evaluate the toxicity of QDs towards neural cells, the in vivo toxic effects on the nervous system and the molecular mechanisms are unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the neurotoxic effects and the underlying mechanisms of water-soluble cadmium telluride (CdTe) QDs capped with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). Our results showed that exposure to MPA-capped CdTe QDs induced behavioral defects, including alterations to body bending, head thrashing, pharyngeal pumping and defecation intervals, as well as impaired learning and memory behavior plasticity, based on chemotaxis or thermotaxis, in a dose-, time- and size-dependent manner. Further investigations suggested that MPA-capped CdTe QDs exposure inhibited the transporters and receptors of glutamate, serotonin and dopamine in C. elegans at the genetic level within 24 h, while opposite results were observed after 72 h. Additionally, excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was observed in the CdTe QD-treated worms, which confirmed the common nanotoxicity mechanism of oxidative stress damage, and might overcome the increased gene expression of neurotransmitter transporters and receptors in C. elegans induced by long-term QD exposure, resulting in more severe behavioral impairments.

  11. Chemotaxis in the Marine Fungus Rhizophydium littoreum

    OpenAIRE

    Muehlstein, Lisa K.; Amon, James P.; Leffler, Deborah L.

    1988-01-01

    Zoospores of the marine chytrid Rhizophydium littoreum are attracted to a variety of substances common to their environment. In general, carbohydrates and polysaccharides elicited strong concentration-dependent positive responses. There was no direct correlation between all substances used as foods and those stimulating positive responses. The chemotactic activities of this organism should, however, tend to bring it toward concentrated food sources.

  12. Travelling Waves in Hyperbolic Chemotaxis Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Xue, Chuan

    2010-10-16

    Mathematical models of bacterial populations are often written as systems of partial differential equations for the densities of bacteria and concentrations of extracellular (signal) chemicals. This approach has been employed since the seminal work of Keller and Segel in the 1970s (Keller and Segel, J. Theor. Biol. 30:235-248, 1971). The system has been shown to permit travelling wave solutions which correspond to travelling band formation in bacterial colonies, yet only under specific criteria, such as a singularity in the chemotactic sensitivity function as the signal approaches zero. Such a singularity generates infinite macroscopic velocities which are biologically unrealistic. In this paper, we formulate a model that takes into consideration relevant details of the intracellular processes while avoiding the singularity in the chemotactic sensitivity. We prove the global existence of solutions and then show the existence of travelling wave solutions both numerically and analytically. © 2010 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  13. Chemotaxis in the archaebacterium Methanococcus voltae.

    OpenAIRE

    Sment, K A; Konisky, J

    1989-01-01

    The archaebacterium Methanococcus voltae, was shown to be chemotactic. Acetate, isoleucine, and leucine were identified as attractants; whereas histidine was not an attractant. A motile, generally nonchemotactic mutant was isolated.

  14. Studies on insulin receptor, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Yukio

    1979-01-01

    The present study is to investigate an influence of starvation and high fat diet on insulin receptor of the plasma membrane by means of radioreceptor assay using 125 I-labelled insulin. Male guinea pigs of Hartley strain were employed for the starvation study, and 125 I-insulin binding capacity on the plasma membrane of the liver and kidney was determined at 24, 48 and 72 hours of the fast after the last meal. Male rats of Wistar strain were employed for the high fat study where the diet containing 35% of butter was fed ad libitum for 38 or 68 days. The animals were killed at the fast of 12 hours, and 125 I-insulin binding capacity on the plasma membrane of the liver was determined. The results obtained are summarized as follows: 1) An increase in 125 I-insulin binding capacity on the plasma membrane of the liver and kidney was observed by the starvation for 24 to 72 hours. 2) The mechanism of the increase by starvation was considered to be different by the organs; it was due to an increase in number of insulin receptor in the liver, and due to an increase in affinity of insulin receptor in the kidney. 3) In non-obese rats fed with high fat diet, the number of insulin receptor on the liver plasma membrane showed a decrease, and this observation clearly indicated that the decrease in number of the receptor did not depend on the obesity. 4) Obese rats also fed with high fat diet presented a decrease in number of insulin receptor without an elevation of insulin levels in the circulating blood. This indicated that at least in the obese rats fed with high fat diet, the decrease in number of the receptor was not due to hyperinsulinemia. (author)

  15. CXC chemokine receptor 3 expression on CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors from human cord blood induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinquan, T; Quan, S; Jacobi, H H

    2000-01-01

    -induced CD34(+) progenitor chemotaxis. These chemotactic attracted CD34(+) progenitors are colony-forming units-granulocyte-macrophage. gamma IP-10 and Mig also induced GM-CSF-stimulated CD34(+) progenitor adhesion and aggregation by means of CXCR3, a finding confirmed by the observation that anti-CXCR3 m......Ab blocked these functions of gammaIP-10 and Mig but not of chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha. gamma IP-10-induced and Mig-induced up-regulation of integrins (CD49a and CD49b) was found to play a crucial role in adhesion of GM-CSF-stimulated CD34(+) progenitors. Moreover, gamma IP-10 and Mig...... stimulated CXCR3 redistribution and cellular polarization in GM-CSF-stimulated CD34(+) progenitors. These results indicate that CXCR3-gamma IP-10 and CXCR3-Mig receptor-ligand pairs, as well as the effects of GM-CSF on them, may be especially important in the cytokine/chemokine environment...

  16. Enhanced Effector Function of CD8+ T Cells From Healthy Controls and HIV-Infected Patients Occurs Through Thrombin Activation of Protease-Activated Receptor 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Amanda; Smith, Mindy; Karpova, Tatiana; Hasley, Rebecca B.; Belkina, Natalya; Shaw, Stephen; Balenga, Nariman; Druey, Kirk M.; Nickel, Erin; Packard, Beverly; Imamichi, Hiromi; Hu, Zonghui; Follmann, Dean; McNally, James; Higgins, Jeanette; Sneller, Michael; Lane, H. Clifford; Catalfamo, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of vascular integrity by trauma and other tissue insults leads to inflammation and activation of the coagulation cascade. The serine protease thrombin links these 2 processes. The proinflammatory function of thrombin is mediated by activation of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1). We found that peripheral blood effector memory CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes expressed PAR-1 and that expression was increased in CD8+ T cells from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected patients. Thrombin enhanced cytokine secretion in CD8+ T cells from healthy controls and HIV-infected patients. In addition, thrombin induced chemokinesis, but not chemotaxis, of CD8+ T cells, which led to structural changes, including cell polarization and formation of a structure rich in F-actin and phosphorylated ezrin-radexin-moesin proteins. These findings suggest that thrombin mediates cross-talk between the coagulation system and the adaptive immune system at sites of vascular injury through increased T-cell motility and production of proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:23204166

  17. Enhanced effector function of CD8(+) T cells from healthy controls and HIV-infected patients occurs through thrombin activation of protease-activated receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Amanda; Smith, Mindy; Karpova, Tatiana; Hasley, Rebecca B; Belkina, Natalya; Shaw, Stephen; Balenga, Nariman; Druey, Kirk M; Nickel, Erin; Packard, Beverly; Imamichi, Hiromi; Hu, Zonghui; Follmann, Dean; McNally, James; Higgins, Jeanette; Sneller, Michael; Lane, H Clifford; Catalfamo, Marta

    2013-02-15

    Disruption of vascular integrity by trauma and other tissue insults leads to inflammation and activation of the coagulation cascade. The serine protease thrombin links these 2 processes. The proinflammatory function of thrombin is mediated by activation of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1). We found that peripheral blood effector memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes expressed PAR-1 and that expression was increased in CD8(+) T cells from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Thrombin enhanced cytokine secretion in CD8(+) T cells from healthy controls and HIV-infected patients. In addition, thrombin induced chemokinesis, but not chemotaxis, of CD8(+) T cells, which led to structural changes, including cell polarization and formation of a structure rich in F-actin and phosphorylated ezrin-radexin-moesin proteins. These findings suggest that thrombin mediates cross-talk between the coagulation system and the adaptive immune system at sites of vascular injury through increased T-cell motility and production of proinflammatory cytokines.

  18. Tasting Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.Human neutrophils express the bitter receptor T2R38 as sensor for the quorum sensing molecule N-(3-oxododecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne eMaurer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria communicate with each other via specialized signalling molecules, known as quorum sensing molecules or autoinducers. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived quorum sensing molecule N-(3-oxododecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (AHL-12, however, also activates mammalian cells. As shown previously, AHL-12 induced chemotaxis, up-regulated CD11b expression, and enhanced phagocytosis of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN. Circumstantial evidence concurred with a receptor for AHL-12, which so far has been elusive. We investigated the bitter receptor T2R38 as a potential candidate. Although identified as a taste receptor, cells outside the gustatory system express T2R38, for example epithelial cells in the lung. We now detected T2R38 in peripheral blood neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes on the cell membrane, but also intracellular. In neutrophils, T2R38 was located in vesicles with characteristics of lipid droplets, and super-resolution microscopy showed a co-localisation with the lipid droplet membrane. Neutrophils take up AHL-12, and it co-localized with T2R38 as seen by laser scan microscopy. Binding of AHL-12 to T2R28 was confirmed by pull-down assays using biotin-coupled AHL-12 as bait. A commercially available antibody to T2R38 inhibited binding of AHL-12 to neutrophils, and this antibody by itself stimulated neutrophils, similarly to AHL-12. In conclusion, our data provide evidence for expression of functional T2R38 on neutrophils, and are compatible with the notion that T2R38 is the receptor for AHL-12 on neutrophils.

  19. Purinergic Receptors in Ocular Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Guzman-Aranguez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a complex process that implies the interaction between cells and molecular mediators, which, when not properly “tuned,” can lead to disease. When inflammation affects the eye, it can produce severe disorders affecting the superficial and internal parts of the visual organ. The nucleoside adenosine and nucleotides including adenine mononucleotides like ADP and ATP and dinucleotides such as P1,P4-diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A, and P1,P5-diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A are present in different ocular locations and therefore they may contribute/modulate inflammatory processes. Adenosine receptors, in particular A2A adenosine receptors, present anti-inflammatory action in acute and chronic retinal inflammation. Regarding the A3 receptor, selective agonists like N6-(3-iodobenzyl-5′-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine (CF101 have been used for the treatment of inflammatory ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye and uveoretinitis. Sideways, diverse stimuli (sensory stimulation, large intraocular pressure increases can produce a release of ATP from ocular sensory innervation or after injury to ocular tissues. Then, ATP will activate purinergic P2 receptors present in sensory nerve endings, the iris, the ciliary body, or other tissues surrounding the anterior chamber of the eye to produce uveitis/endophthalmitis. In summary, adenosine and nucleotides can activate receptors in ocular structures susceptible to suffer from inflammatory processes. This involvement suggests the possible use of purinergic agonists and antagonists as therapeutic targets for ocular inflammation.

  20. Photo-antagonism of the GABAA receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Martin; Iqbal, Favaad; Pandurangan, Arun P; Hannan, Saad; Huckvale, Rosemary; Topf, Maya; Baker, James R; Smart, Trevor G

    2014-07-29

    Neurotransmitter receptor trafficking is fundamentally important for synaptic transmission and neural network activity. GABAA receptors and inhibitory synapses are vital components of brain function, yet much of our knowledge regarding receptor mobility and function at inhibitory synapses is derived indirectly from using recombinant receptors, antibody-tagged native receptors and pharmacological treatments. Here we describe the use of a set of research tools that can irreversibly bind to and affect the function of recombinant and neuronal GABAA receptors following ultraviolet photoactivation. These compounds are based on the competitive antagonist gabazine and incorporate a variety of photoactive groups. By using site-directed mutagenesis and ligand-docking studies, they reveal new areas of the GABA binding site at the interface between receptor β and α subunits. These compounds enable the selected inactivation of native GABAA receptor populations providing new insight into the function of inhibitory synapses and extrasynaptic receptors in controlling neuronal excitation.

  1. Scavenger receptors in homeostasis and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canton, Johnathan; Neculai, Dante; Grinstein, Sergio

    2013-09-01

    Scavenger receptors were originally identified by their ability to recognize and to remove modified lipoproteins; however, it is now appreciated that they carry out a striking range of functions, including pathogen clearance, lipid transport, the transport of cargo within the cell and even functioning as taste receptors. The large repertoire of ligands recognized by scavenger receptors and their broad range of functions are not only due to the wide range of receptors that constitute this family but also to their ability to partner with various co-receptors. The ability of individual scavenger receptors to associate with different co-receptors makes their responsiveness extremely versatile. This Review highlights recent insights into the structural features that determine the function of scavenger receptors and the emerging role that these receptors have in immune responses, notably in macrophage polarization and in the pathogenesis of diseases such as atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Identification and mechanism of ABA receptor antagonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melcher, Karsten; Xu, Yong; Ng, Ley-Moy; Zhou, X. Edward; Soon, Fen-Fen; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Kovach, Amanda; Tham, Fook S.; Cutler, Sean R.; Li, Jun; Yong, Eu-Leong; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Xu, H. Eric (NU Sinapore); (Van Andel); (UCR)

    2010-11-11

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) functions through a family of fourteen PYR/PYL receptors, which were identified by resistance to pyrabactin, a synthetic inhibitor of seed germination. ABA activates these receptors to inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases, such as ABI1, yet it remains unclear whether these receptors can be antagonized. Here we demonstrate that pyrabactin is an agonist of PYR1 and PYL1 but is unexpectedly an antagonist of PYL2. Crystal structures of the PYL2-pyrabactin and PYL1-pyrabactin-ABI1 complexes reveal the mechanism responsible for receptor-selective activation and inhibition, which enables us to design mutations that convert PYL1 to a pyrabactin-inhibited receptor and PYL2 to a pyrabactin-activated receptor and to identify new pyrabactin-based ABA receptor agonists. Together, our results establish a new concept of ABA receptor antagonism, illustrate its underlying mechanisms and provide a rational framework for discovering novel ABA receptor ligands.

  3. Modulation of Xenobiotic Receptors by Steroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delira Robbins

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear receptors (NRs are ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate the expression of their target genes. NRs play important roles in many human diseases, including metabolic diseases and cancer, and are therefore a key class of therapeutic targets. Steroids play important roles in regulating nuclear receptors; in addition to being ligands of steroid receptors, steroids (and their metabolites also regulate other NRs, such as the pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor (termed xenobiotic receptors, which participate in steroid metabolism. Xenobiotic receptors have promiscuous ligand-binding properties, and their structurally diverse ligands include steroids and their metabolites. Therefore, steroids, their metabolism and metabolites, xenobiotic receptors, steroid receptors, and the respective signaling pathways they regulate have functional interactions. This review discusses these functional interactions and their implications for activities mediated by steroid receptors and xenobiotic receptors, focusing on steroids that modulate pathways involving the pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor. The emphasis of the review is on structure-function studies of xenobiotic receptors bound to steroid ligands.

  4. 5-Hydroxytryptamine type 7 receptor neuroprotection against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity is PDGFβ receptor dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasefi, Maryam S; Kruk, Jeff S; Heikkila, John J; Beazely, Michael A

    2013-04-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the hippocampus. Long-term (2-24 h) activation of 5-HT7 receptors regulates growth factor receptor expression, including the expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) β receptors. Direct activation of PDGFβ receptors in primary hippocampal and cortical neurons inhibits NMDA receptor activity and attenuates NMDA receptor-induced neurotoxicity. Our objective was to investigate whether the 5-HT7 receptor-induced increase in PDGFβ receptor expression would be similarly neuroprotective. We demonstrate that 5-HT7 receptor agonist treatment in primary hippocampal neurons also increases the expression of phospholipase C (PLC) γ, a downstream effector of PDGFβ receptors associated with the inhibition of NMDA receptor activity. To determine if the up-regulation of PDGFβ receptors is neuroprotective, primary hippocampal neurons were incubated with the 5-HT7 receptor agonist, LP 12, for 24 h. Indeed, LP 12 treatment prevented NMDA-induced neurotoxicity and this effect was dependent on PDGFβ receptor kinase activity. Treatment of primary neurons with LP 12 also differentially altered NMDA receptor subunit expression, reducing the expression of NR1 and NR2B, but not NR2A. These findings demonstrate the potential for providing growth factor receptor-dependent neuroprotective effects using small-molecule ligands of G protein-coupled receptors. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  5. Cardiolipin plays an essential role in the formation of intracellular membranes in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Gerardo; Angius, Federica; Ilioaia, Oana; Solgadi, Audrey; Miroux, Bruno; Arechaga, Ignacio

    2017-06-01

    Mitochondria, chloroplasts and photosynthetic bacteria are characterized by the presence of complex and intricate membrane systems. In contrast, non-photosynthetic bacteria lack membrane structures within their cytoplasm. However, large scale over-production of some membrane proteins, such as the fumarate reductase, the mannitol permease MtlA, the glycerol acyl transferase PlsB, the chemotaxis receptor Tsr or the ATP synthase subunit b, can induce the proliferation of intra cellular membranes (ICMs) in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli. These ICMs are particularly rich in cardiolipin (CL). Here, we have studied the effect of CL in the generation of these membranous structures. We have deleted the three genes (clsA, clsB and clsC) responsible of CL biosynthesis in E. coli and analysed the effect of these mutations by fluorescent and electron microscopy and by lipid mass spectrometry. We have found that CL is essential in the formation of non-lamellar structures in the cytoplasm of E. coli cells. These results could help to understand the structuration of membranes in E. coli and other membrane organelles, such as mitochondria and ER. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Prolactin receptors in uterine leiomyomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baban, Rayah S.; Farid, Yahya Y.; Al-Zuheiri, Shatha T.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to identify the location of prolactin receptors in patientswith uterine leiomyomas and their host myometrium as well as normalmyometrium. A case control study was conducted at the College of MedicineAl-Nahrain University, Baghdad, Iraq during the period from 2004-2006. Thesamples were collected at Obstetrics and Gynecological Departments of 4hospitals in Baghdad City (Al-Khadimiya Teaching Hospital, Al-Noor,Al-Kharch, and Al-Sadoon Hospital). Sections from large and small tumors(n=53) with their host myometriums and from normal myometriums (n=40) werestained immunohistochemically for prolactin receptors. Prolactin receptorswere positively seen in all cases examined including patient and comparisontissues, in the form of dark brown staining. Staining was heterogeneous andvaried in intensity from one case to another and sometimes from one are toanother in the same section. The increase in prolactin receptors in leiomyomais expected given that the underlying host myometrium abnormal. (author)

  7. Transcriptional targeting of sphingosine-1- phosphate receptor S1P2 by epigallocatechin- 3-gallate prevents sphingosine-1-phosphate- mediated signaling in macrophage-differentiated HL-60 promyelomonocytic leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chokor R

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Rima Chokor, Sylvie Lamy, Borhane AnnabiLaboratoire d'Oncologie Moléculaire, Centre de recherche BIOMED, Département de Chimie, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, QC, CanadaBackground: Macrophage chemotaxis followed by blood–brain barrier transendothelial migration is believed to be associated with inflammation in the central nervous system. Antineuroinflammatory strategies have identified the dietary-derived epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG as an efficient agent to prevent neuroinflammation-associated neurodegenerative diseases by targeting proinflammatory mediator signaling.Methods: Given that high levels of sphingosine kinase and its product, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, are present in brain tumors, we used quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and immunoblotting to test whether EGCG may impact on S1P receptor gene expression and prevent S1P response in undifferentiated and in terminally differentiated macrophages.Results: Promyelomonocytic human leukemia (HL-60 cells were differentiated into macrophages, and S1P triggered phosphorylation in extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK intracellular signaling, as shown by Western blot analysis. Pretreatment of cells with EGCG prior to differentiation inhibited the response to S1P in all three pathways, while EGCG abrogated P38 MAPK phosphorylation when present only during differentiation. Terminally-differentiated macrophages were, however, insensitive to EGCG treatment. Using qRT-PCR, gene expression of the S1P receptors S1P1, S1P2, and S1P5 was predominantly induced in terminally-differentiated macrophages, while the S1P2 was decreased by EGCG treatment.Conclusion: Our data suggest that diet-derived EGCG achieves efficient effects as a preventive agent, targeting signaling pathways prior to cell terminal differentiation. Such properties could impact on cell chemotaxis

  8. The Association of CXC Receptor 4 Mediated Signaling Pathway with Oxaliplatin-Resistant Human Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Shih Huang

    Full Text Available The stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1/CXC receptor 4 (CXCR4 axis plays an important role in tumor angiogenesis and invasiveness in colorectal cancer (CRC progression. In addition, metastatic CRC remains one of the most difficult human malignancies to treat because of its chemoresistant behavior. However, the mechanism by which correlation occurs between CXCR4 and the clinical response of CRC to chemotherapy remains unknown. We generated chemoresistant cells with increasing doses of oxaliplatin (OXA and 5-Fluorouracil (5FU to develop resistance at a clinical dose. We found that the putative markers did not change in the parental cells, but HCT-116/OxR and HCT-116/5-FUR were more aggressive and had higher tumor growth (demonstrated by wound healing, chemotaxis assay, and a nude mice xenograft model with the use of oxaliplatin. Apoptosis induced by oxaliplatin treatment was significantly decreased in HCT-116/OxR compared to the parental cells. Moreover, HCT-116/OxR cells displayed increased levels of p-gp, p-Akt p-ERK, p-IKBβ, CXCR4, and Bcl-2, but they also significantly inhibited the apoptotic pathways when compared to the parental strain. We evaluated the molecular mechanism governing the signaling pathway associated with anti-apoptosis activity and the aggressive status of chemoresistant cells. Experiments involving specific inhibitors demonstrated that the activation of the pathways associated with CXCR4, ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt is critical to the functioning of the HCT-116/OxR and HCT-116/5-FUR characteristics of chemosensitivity. These findings elucidate the mechanism of CXCR4/PI3K/Akt downstream signaling and provide strategies to inhibit CXCR4 mediated signaling pathway in order to overcome CRC's resistance to chemotherapy.

  9. Modulation of B-cell receptor and microenvironment signaling by a guanine exchange factor in B-cell malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Wei; Sharma, Sanjai

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells over-express a guanine exchange factor (GEF), Rasgrf-1. This GEF increases active Ras as it catalyzes the removal of GDP from Ras so that GTP can bind and activate Ras. This study aims to study the mechanism of action of Rasgrf-1 in B-cell malignancies. Methods: N-terminus truncated Rasgrf-1 variants have a higher GEF activity as compared to the full-length transcript therefore a MCL cell line with stable over-expression of truncated Rasgrf-1 was established. The B-cell receptor (BCR) and chemokine signaling pathways were compared in the Rasgrf-1 over-expressing and a control transfected cell line. Results: Cells over-expressing truncated form of Rasgrf-1 have a higher proliferative rate as compared to control transfected cells. BCR was activated by lower concentrations of anti-IgM antibody in Rasgrf-1 over-expressing cells as compared to control cells indicating that these cells are more sensitive to BCR signaling. BCR signaling also phosphorylates Rasgrf-1 that further increases its GEF function and amplifies BCR signaling. This activation of Rasgrf-1 in over-expressing cells resulted in a higher expression of phospho-ERK, AKT, BTK and PKC-alpha as compared to control cells. Besides BCR, Rasgrf-1 over-expressing cells were also more sensitive to microenvironment stimuli as determined by resistance to apoptosis, chemotaxis and ERK pathway activation. Conclusions: This GEF protein sensitizes B-cells to BCR and chemokine mediated signaling and also upregulates a number of other signaling pathways which promotes growth and survival of these cells

  10. Mechanism for the activation of glutamate receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at the NIH have used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy to determine a molecular mechanism for the activation and desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors, a prominent class of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and spina

  11. Genetics Home Reference: leptin receptor deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People with leptin receptor deficiency also have hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, which is a condition caused by reduced production ... weight gain associated with this disorder. Because hypogonadotropic hypogonadism occurs in leptin receptor deficiency , researchers suggest that ...

  12. Excitatory amino acid receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Ebert, B

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that (RS)-2-amino-2-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-4-yl)acetic acid (ATAA) is an antagonist at N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. We have now resolved ATAA via diastereomeric salt formation...

  13. Pharmacological approach of the receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puech, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper explains the three main goals for clinical positron emission tomography (PET) studies: detection of receptor abnormalities in groups of patients to propose therapeutic indication of new ligands; validation of current hypothesis of drug effect; rational clinical drug development specially for dose-finding studies. (H.W.)

  14. Are olfactory receptors really olfactive?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giorgi, Franco; Maggio, Roberto; Bruni, Luis Emilio

    2011-01-01

    Any living organism interacts with and responds specifically to environmental molecules by expressing specific olfactory receptors. This specificity will be first examined in causal terms with particular emphasis on the mechanisms controlling olfactory gene expression, cell-to-cell interactions a...

  15. Cannabinoid receptor localization in brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herkenham, M.; Lynn, A.B.; Little, M.D.; Johnson, M.R.; Melvin, L.S.; de Costa, B.R.; Rice, K.C. (National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-03-01

    (3H)CP 55,940, a radiolabeled synthetic cannabinoid, which is 10-100 times more potent in vivo than delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, was used to characterize and localize a specific cannabinoid receptor in brain sections. The potencies of a series of natural and synthetic cannabinoids as competitors of (3H)CP 55,940 binding correlated closely with their relative potencies in several biological assays, suggesting that the receptor characterized in our in vitro assay is the same receptor that mediates behavioral and pharmacological effects of cannabinoids, including human subjective experience. Autoradiography of cannabinoid receptors in brain sections from several mammalian species, including human, reveals a unique and conserved distribution; binding is most dense in outflow nuclei of the basal ganglia--the substantia nigra pars reticulata and globus pallidus--and in the hippocampus and cerebellum. Generally high densities in forebrain and cerebellum implicate roles for cannabinoids in cognition and movement. Sparse densities in lower brainstem areas controlling cardiovascular and respiratory functions may explain why high doses of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol are not lethal.

  16. Ligand-guided receptor optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katritch, Vsevolod; Rueda, Manuel; Abagyan, Ruben

    2012-01-01

    Receptor models generated by homology or even obtained by crystallography often have their binding pockets suboptimal for ligand docking and virtual screening applications due to insufficient accuracy or induced fit bias. Knowledge of previously discovered receptor ligands provides key information that can be used for improving docking and screening performance of the receptor. Here, we present a comprehensive ligand-guided receptor optimization (LiBERO) algorithm that exploits ligand information for selecting the best performing protein models from an ensemble. The energetically feasible protein conformers are generated through normal mode analysis and Monte Carlo conformational sampling. The algorithm allows iteration of the conformer generation and selection steps until convergence of a specially developed fitness function which quantifies the conformer's ability to select known ligands from decoys in a small-scale virtual screening test. Because of the requirement for a large number of computationally intensive docking calculations, the automated algorithm has been implemented to use Linux clusters allowing easy parallel scaling. Here, we will discuss the setup of LiBERO calculations, selection of parameters, and a range of possible uses of the algorithm which has already proven itself in several practical applications to binding pocket optimization and prospective virtual ligand screening.

  17. Molecular imaging of estrogen receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kruchten, Michel

    2015-01-01

    For patients with estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer, endocrine therapy plays a major role in both the adjuvant and palliative setting. For adequate treatment decision-making it is crucial to obtain up-to-date information on the ER-status of the tumor(s), since ER-expression is the sole

  18. Stability of solubilized benzodiazepine receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.J; Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, R.A

    1997-01-01

    According to the observations of other researchers, benzodiazepine receptors solubilized with sodium deoxycholate are unstable, but stability can be improved by exchanging deoxycholate for Triton X-100. In our experiments we conclude that the choice of detergent is not the restrictive factor for the

  19. Uncompetitive antagonism of AMPA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Trine F; Tikhonov, Denis B; Bølcho, Ulrik

    2006-01-01

    Philanthotoxins are uncompetitive antagonists of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors presumed to bind to the pore-forming region, but a detailed molecular mechanism for this interaction is missing. Here a small library of novel philanthotoxins was designed and synthesized using a solid-phase strategy. ...

  20. New horizons for lipoprotein receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Olav M.; Dagil, Robert; Kragelund, Birthe Brandt

    2013-01-01

    , this dogma has transformed with the observation that β-propellers of some LRs actively engage in complex formation too. Based on an in-depth decomposition of current structures and sequences, we suggest that exploitation of the β-propellers as binding targets depends on receptor subgroups. In particular, we...

  1. Virally encoded 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Waldhoer, M; Lüttichau, H R

    2001-01-01

    expression of this single gene in certain lymphocyte cell lineages leads to the development of lesions which are remarkably similar to Kaposi's sarcoma, a human herpesvirus 8 associated disease. Thus, this and other virally encoded 7TM receptors appear to be attractive future drug targets....

  2. Chemokine (C-C Motif) Receptor-Like 2 is not essential for lung injury, lung inflammation, or airway hyperresponsiveness induced by acute exposure to ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Farhan; Cromar, Kevin R; Atkins, Constance L; Price, Roger E; Jackson, William T; Siddiqui, Saad R; Spencer, Chantal Y; Mitchell, Nicholas C; Haque, Ikram U; Johnston, Richard A

    2017-12-01

    Inhalation of ozone (O 3 ), a gaseous air pollutant, causes lung injury, lung inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness. Macrophages, mast cells, and neutrophils contribute to one or more of these sequelae induced by O 3 Furthermore, each of these aforementioned cells express chemokine (C-C motif) receptor-like 2 (Ccrl2), an atypical chemokine receptor that facilitates leukocyte chemotaxis. Given that Ccrl2 is expressed by cells essential to the development of O 3 -induced lung pathology and that chemerin, a Ccrl2 ligand, is increased in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) by O 3 , we hypothesized that Ccrl2 contributes to the development of lung injury, lung inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness induced by O 3 To that end, we measured indices of lung injury (BALF protein, BALF epithelial cells, and bronchiolar epithelial injury), lung inflammation (BALF cytokines and BALF leukocytes), and airway responsiveness to acetyl- β -methylcholine chloride (respiratory system resistance) in wild-type and mice genetically deficient in Ccrl2 (Ccrl2-deficient mice) 4 and/or 24 hours following cessation of acute exposure to either filtered room air (air) or O 3 In air-exposed mice, BALF chemerin was greater in Ccrl2-deficient as compared to wild-type mice. O 3 increased BALF chemerin in mice of both genotypes, yet following O 3 exposure, BALF chemerin was greater in Ccrl2-deficient as compared to wild-type mice. O 3 increased indices of lung injury, lung inflammation, and airway responsiveness. Nevertheless, no indices were different between genotypes following O 3 exposure. In conclusion, we demonstrate that Ccrl2 modulates chemerin levels in the epithelial lining fluid of the lungs but does not contribute to the development of O 3 -induced lung pathology. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  3. Early double-negative thymocyte export in Trypanosoma cruzi infection is restricted by sphingosine receptors and associated with human chagas disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailin Lepletier

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is able to target the thymus and induce alterations of the thymic microenvironmental and lymphoid compartments. Acute infection results in severe atrophy of the organ and early release of immature thymocytes into the periphery. To date, the pathophysiological effects of thymic changes promoted by parasite-inducing premature release of thymocytes to the periphery has remained elusive. Herein, we show that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, a potent mediator of T cell chemotaxis, plays a role in the exit of immature double-negative thymocytes in experimental Chagas disease. In thymuses from T. cruzi-infected mice we detected reduced transcription of the S1P kinase 1 and 2 genes related to S1P biosynthesis, together with increased transcription of the SGPL1 sphingosine-1-lyase gene, whose product inactivates S1P. These changes were associated with reduced intrathymic levels of S1P kinase activity. Interestingly, double-negative thymocytes from infected animals expressed high levels of the S1P receptor during infection, and migrated to lower levels of S1P. Moreover, during T. cruzi infection, this thymocyte subset expresses high levels of IL-17 and TNF-α cytokines upon polyclonal stimulation. In vivo treatment with the S1P receptor antagonist FTY720 resulted in recovery the numbers of double-negative thymocytes in infected thymuses to physiological levels. Finally, we showed increased numbers of double-negative T cells in the peripheral blood in severe cardiac forms of human Chagas disease.

  4. Early Double-Negative Thymocyte Export in Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Is Restricted by Sphingosine Receptors and Associated with Human Chagas Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepletier, Ailin; de Almeida, Liliane; Santos, Leonardo; da Silva Sampaio, Luzia; Paredes, Bruno; González, Florencia Belén; Freire-de-Lima, Célio Geraldo; Beloscar, Juan; Bottasso, Oscar; Einicker-Lamas, Marcelo; Pérez, Ana Rosa; Savino, Wilson; Morrot, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is able to target the thymus and induce alterations of the thymic microenvironmental and lymphoid compartments. Acute infection results in severe atrophy of the organ and early release of immature thymocytes into the periphery. To date, the pathophysiological effects of thymic changes promoted by parasite-inducing premature release of thymocytes to the periphery has remained elusive. Herein, we show that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a potent mediator of T cell chemotaxis, plays a role in the exit of immature double-negative thymocytes in experimental Chagas disease. In thymuses from T. cruzi-infected mice we detected reduced transcription of the S1P kinase 1 and 2 genes related to S1P biosynthesis, together with increased transcription of the SGPL1 sphingosine-1-lyase gene, whose product inactivates S1P. These changes were associated with reduced intrathymic levels of S1P kinase activity. Interestingly, double-negative thymocytes from infected animals expressed high levels of the S1P receptor during infection, and migrated to lower levels of S1P. Moreover, during T. cruzi infection, this thymocyte subset expresses high levels of IL-17 and TNF-α cytokines upon polyclonal stimulation. In vivo treatment with the S1P receptor antagonist FTY720 resulted in recovery the numbers of double-negative thymocytes in infected thymuses to physiological levels. Finally, we showed increased numbers of double-negative T cells in the peripheral blood in severe cardiac forms of human Chagas disease. PMID:25330249

  5. Repeated blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors, but not of glucocorticoid receptors impairs food rewarded spatial learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, BRK; Korte, SM; Buwalda, B; la Fleur, SE; Bohus, B; Luiten, PGM

    Corticosteroids from the adrenal cortex influence a variety of behaviours including cognition, learning and memory. These hormones act via two intracellular receptors, the mineralo-corticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). These two receptor types display a high concentration and

  6. Repeated blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors, but not of glucocorticoid receptors impairs food rewarded spatial learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, B. R.; Korte, S. M.; Buwalda, B.; La Fleur, S. E.; Bohus, B.; Luiten, P. G.

    1998-01-01

    Corticosteroids from the adrenal cortex influence a variety of behaviours including cognition, learning and memory. These hormones act via two intracellular receptors, the mineralo-corticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). These two receptor types display a high concentration and

  7. The substance P/NK-1 receptor system: NK-1 receptor antagonists ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The substance P (SP)/neurokinin (NK)-1 receptor system plays an important role in cancer. SP promotes the proliferation of tumour cells, angiogenesis and the migration of tumour cells. We review the involvement of SP, the NK-1 receptor and NK-1 receptor antagonists in cancer. Tumour cells overexpress NK-1 receptors, ...

  8. Muscarinic receptors and drugs in cardiovascular medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, P. A.; Doods, H. N.

    1995-01-01

    The parasympathetic system and its associated muscarinic receptors have been the subject of a renaissance of interest for the following two main reasons: (1) the association of endothelial muscarinic receptors and the nitric oxide (NO) pathway; (2) the discovery of several muscarinic receptor

  9. A new family of insect tyramine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Klærke, Dan Arne; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P

    2005-01-01

    in the genomic databases from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae and the honeybee Apis mellifera. These four tyramine or tyramine-like receptors constitute a new receptor family that is phylogenetically distinct from the previously identified insect octopamine/tyramine receptors. The Drosophila tyramine...

  10. Metabotropic glutamate receptors in glial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Antoni, Simona; Berretta, Antonio; Bonaccorso, Carmela Maria; Bruno, Valeria; Aronica, Eleonora; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Catania, Maria Vincenza

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) and exerts its actions via a number of ionotropic glutamate receptors/channels and metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors. In addition to being expressed in neurons, glutamate receptors are expressed in

  11. Neurotransmitter Receptor Binding in Bovine Cerebral Microvessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Reinhard, John F.; Synder, Solomon H.

    1980-05-01

    Purified preparations of microvessels from bovine cerebral cortex contain substantial levels of alpha-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, and histamine 1 receptor binding sites but only negligible serotonin, muscarinic cholinergic, opiate, and benzodiazepine receptor binding. Norepinephrine and histamine may be endogenous regulators of the cerebral microcirculation at the observed receptors.

  12. Imaging of receptors in clinical neurosciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korf, J

    This article deals with the question why should one determine receptors in the brain with positron and single photon emission tomography (PET and SPECT, respectively). Radiopharmaceuticals for a wide variety of receptors are available now. Receptors studies with PET and SPECT have thus far focused

  13. Modified Receptor Internalization upon Coexpression of 5-HT1B Receptor and 5-HT2B Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Janoshazi , Agnes; Deraet , Maud; Callebert , Jacques; Setola , Vincent; Guenther , Silke; Saubamea , Bruno; Manivet , Philippe; Launay , Jean-Marie; Maroteaux , Luc

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Serotonin 5-HT(2B) receptors are often coexpressed with 5-HT(1B) receptors, and cross-talk between the two receptors has been reported in various cell types. However, many mechanistic details underlying 5-HT(1B) and 5-HT(2B) receptor cross-talk have not been elucidated. We hypothesized that 5-HT(2B) and 5-HT(1B) receptors each affect the others' signaling by modulating the others' trafficking. We thus examined the agonist stimulated internalization kinetics of fluoresc...

  14. Triheteromeric NMDA Receptors at Hippocampal Synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Kenneth R.; McGinley, Matthew J.; Westbrook, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    NMDA receptors are composed of two GluN1 (N1) and two GluN2 (N2) subunits. Constituent N2 subunits control the pharmacological and kinetic characteristics of the receptor. NMDA receptors in hippocampal or cortical neurons are often thought of as diheteromeric, i.e., containing only one type of N2 subunit. However, triheteromeric receptors with more than one type of N2 subunit also have been reported and the relative contribution of di- and triheteromeric NMDA receptors at synapses has been difficult to assess. Because wild-type hippocampal principal neurons express N1, N2A and N2B, we used cultured hippocampal principal neurons from N2A and N2B-knockout mice as templates for diheteromeric synaptic receptors. Summation of N1/N2B and N1/N2A excitatory postsynaptic currents could not account for the deactivation kinetics of wild-type excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) however. To make a quantitative estimate of NMDA receptor subtypes at wild-type synapses, we used the deactivation kinetics, as well as the effects of the competitive antagonist NVP-AAM077. Our results indicate that three types of NMDA receptors contribute to the wild-type EPSC, with at least two-thirds being triheteromeric receptors. Functional isolation of synaptic triheteromeric receptors revealed deactivation kinetics and pharmacology distinct from either diheteromeric receptor subtype. Because of differences in open probability, synaptic triheteromeric receptors outnumbered N1/N2A receptors by 5.8 to 1 and N1/N2B receptors by 3.2 to 1. Our results suggest that triheteromeric NMDA receptors must be either preferentially assembled or preferentially localized at synapses. PMID:23699525

  15. Some theoretical aspects of hormone receptor determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sluiter, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    Suitable antisera for determination of hormone receptors are not available for the majority of hormone receptors. Therefore, the determination of hormone receptors is mostly performed in terms of binding capacity for the appropriate hormone, using radioactive hormone labels. Some theoretical aspects of such a receptor determination are discussed including the length of incubation (total or unoccupied receptor concentration), single point or multiple point (Scatchard) analysis (regarding the influence of other specific binders), the correction procedure for non-specific binding and the influence of the circulating hormone level. (Auth.)

  16. Chapter 8. Activation mechanisms of chemokine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia C; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2009-01-01

    Chemokine receptors belong to the large family of 7-transmembrane (7TM) G-protein-coupled receptors. These receptors are targeted and activated by a variety of different ligands, indicating that activation is a result of similar molecular mechanisms but not necessarily similar modes of ligand...... binding. Attempts to unravel the activation mechanism of 7TM receptors have led to the conclusion that activation involves movements of the transmembrane segments VI and VII in particular, as recently gathered in the Global Toggle Switch Model. However, to understand the activation mechanism completely......, more research has to be done in this field. Chemokine receptors are interesting tools in this matter. First, the chemokine system has a high degree of promiscuity that allows several chemokines to target one receptor in different ways, as well as a single chemokine ligand to target several receptors...

  17. Identification and characterization of NDT 9513727 [N,N-bis(1,3-benzodioxol-5-ylmethyl)-1-butyl-2,4-diphenyl-1H-imidazole-5-methanamine], a novel, orally bioavailable C5a receptor inverse agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodbeck, Robbin M; Cortright, Daniel N; Kieltyka, Andrzej P; Yu, Jianying; Baltazar, Carolyn O; Buck, Marianne E; Meade, Robin; Maynard, George D; Thurkauf, Andrew; Chien, Du-Shieng; Hutchison, Alan J; Krause, James E

    2008-12-01

    The complement system represents an innate immune mechanism of host defense that has three effector arms, the C3a receptor, the C5a receptor (C5aR), and the membrane attack complex. Because of its inflammatory and immune-enhancing properties, the biological activity of C5a and its classical receptor have been widely studied. Because specific antagonism of the C5aR could have therapeutic benefit without affecting the protective immune response, the C5aR continues to be a promising target for pharmaceutical research. The lack of specific, potent and orally bioavailable small-molecule antagonists has limited the clinical investigation of the C5aR. We report the discovery of NDT 9513727 [N,N-bis(1,3-benzodioxol-5-ylmethyl)-1-butyl-2,4-diphenyl-1H-imidazole-5-methanamine], a small-molecule, orally bioavailable, selective, and potent inverse agonist of the human C5aR. NDT 9513727 was discovered based on the integrated use of in vitro affinity and functional assays in conjunction with medicinal chemistry. NDT 9513727 inhibited C5a-stimulated responses, including guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding, Ca(2+) mobilization, oxidative burst, degranulation, cell surface CD11b expression and chemotaxis in various cell types with IC(50)s from 1.1 to 9.2 nM, respectively. In C5a competition radioligand binding experiments, NDT 9513727 exhibited an IC(50) of 11.6 nM. NDT 9513727 effectively inhibited C5a-induced neutropenia in gerbil and cynomolgus macaque in vivo. The findings suggest that NDT 9513727 may be a promising new entity for the treatment of human inflammatory diseases.

  18. DMPD: Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15379975 Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor... Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. PubmedID 15379975 Title Signa...l transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. Authors

  19. Further characterization of tuftsin receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bump, N.J.; Lee, J.; Najjar, V.A.

    1986-03-05

    Tuftsin receptor was purified from rabbit peritoneal granulocytes by affinity chromatography. The pentapeptide analog, Thr-Lys-Pro-Pro-Arg was covalently linked to a solid support column. Rabbit granulocyte membrane was prepared, dissolved in 8 mM CHAPS and run through the column, eluted with 20 eta M free pentapeptide and subjected to dialysis concentration. When this was run on SDS-PAGE, two bands were obtained at a migration equivalent to Mr 60 and 62 K. These were electroblotted on nitrocellulose paper which showed two corresponding (/sup 3/H)-tuftsin binding bands. After reduction, and boiling, SDS-PAGE runs showed two bands Mr 85 and 70 K. When the purified receptor was reduced, alkylated and treated with endo-..beta..-N-acetylglucosaminidase H, only one band was obtained at Mr of about 90 K.

  20. Ketamine: NMDA Receptors and Beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Zorumski, Charles F.; Izumi, Yukitoshi; Mennerick, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Human studies examining the effects of the dissociative anesthetic ketamine as a model for psychosis and as a rapidly acting antidepressant have spurred great interest in understanding ketamine's actions at molecular, cellular, and network levels. Although ketamine has unequivocal uncompetitive inhibitory effects on N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and may preferentially alter the function of NMDARs on interneurons, recent work has questioned whether block of NMDARs is critical for its...

  1. Assay for the glucagon receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, F.J.; Birnbaumer, L.

    1985-01-01

    A new iodination procedure for glucagon using 1,3,4,6-tetracholoro-3α,6α-diphenylglycouril (Iodogen) as the oxidizing agent, and the subsequent separation in pure form of [ 125 I-Tyr 10 ]mono-iodoglucagon by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) over C 18 -μ Bondapak columns is described. The newly synthesized [ 125 I]mono-iodoglucagon is shown to be a suitable probe for studying structural and functional properties of glucagon receptors

  2. Keratinocyte cytokine and chemokine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüzün, Yalçin; Antonov, Meltem; Dolar, Neslihan; Wolf, Ronni

    2007-10-01

    Chemokines are a superfamily of small, secreted proteins that regulate cell traffic in homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. Keratinocytes synthesize many chemokines, including members of the CC and CXC subfamilies, such as regulated on activation of normal T-cell expressed and secreted, gamma-interferon inducible protein-10, monokine induced by gamma-interferon, and thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine. They also express some chemokine receptors that mediate the inflammatory or immune response by attracting various kinds of leukocytes.

  3. Insulin receptor in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petruzzelli, L.; Herrera, R.; Rosen, O.

    1986-01-01

    A specific, high affinity insulin receptor is present in both adult Drosophila and in Drosophila embryos. Wheat germ lectin-enriched extracts of detergent-solubilized membranes from embryos and adults bind insulin with a K/sub d/ of 15 nM. Binding is specific for insulin; micromolar concentrations of proinsulin, IGFI, and IGFII are required to displace bound 125 I-insulin. Insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase activity appears during embryogenesis. It is evident between 6 and 12 hours of development, peaks between 12 and 18 hours and falls in the adult. During 0-6 hours of embryogenesis, and in the adult, a specific protein band (Mr = 135,000) is crosslinked to 125 I-insulin. During 6-12 and 12-18 hours of embryogenesis stages in which insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase is high, an additional band (Mr = 100,000) becomes crosslinked to 125 I-insulin. Isolation and DNA sequence analysis of genomic clones encoding the Drosophila insulin receptor will be presented as will the characterization of insulin receptor mRNA's during development

  4. PAF receptor structure: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfroid, J J; Dive, G; Lamotte-Brasseur, J; Batt, J P; Heymans, F

    1991-12-01

    Different hypotheses of the structure of platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor based on structure-activity relationships of agonists and antagonists are reviewed. For an agonistic effect, strong hydrophobic interactions and an ether function are required in position-1 of the glycerol backbone; chain length limitations and steric hindrance demand a small group in position-2. The unusual structural properties of non-PAF-like antagonists required 3-D electrostatic potential calculations. This method applied to seven potent antagonists suggests a strong "Cache-orielles" (ear-muff) effect, i.e., two strong electronegative wells (isocontour at -10 Kcal/mole) are located at 180 degrees to each other and at a relatively constant distance. Initial consideration of the "Cache-oreilles" effect implied the structure of a bipolarized cylinder of 10-12 A diameter for the receptor. However, very recent results on studies with agonists and antagonists structurally similar to PAF suggest that the receptor may in fact be a multi-polarized cylinder.

  5. NGA/Insulin receptor scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtaran, A.; Virgolini, I.

    1994-01-01

    Tc-99m-galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin (NGA) is one of the first receptor-based radiopharmaceuticals which specifically recognizes the hepatic binding protein (HBP) located on the surface of the hepatocytes. The exclusive interactin of NGA with HBP provided the basis for a kinetic model for the evaluation hepatocellular function. During the last years we have used NGA in more than 300 patients with various liver diseases including liver cirrhosis (Stages Child A to Child C), viral hepatitis, and carcinomas. In these studies, the calculated HBP densities, after i.v.-injection of Tc-99m-NGA, significantly correlated with the clinical course of the diseases. Furthermore, similar to conventional Tc-colloid, NGA provided excellent demonstration of 'cold spots' for hepatic masses. In a further approach we used another hepatocyte receptor-seeking radioligand, I-123-Tyr-A14- insulin, and found, that its in vitro-binding to hepatocellular carcinomas is greatly enhanced over normal hepatic tissue. On this basis, we developed a double-tracer method using NGA and insulin in a single study. Thus, areas of 'cold spots' identifying hepatic masses on NGA scans, take up I-123-Tyr-A14-insulin immediately after i.v.-injection. This was true for hepatocellular hepatomas, but not for adenocarcinomas. In conclusion, NGA/insulin receptor scanning could be a novel and save method for the demonstration of hepatocellular hepatomas. (author)

  6. Lymphocyte receptors for pertussis toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, C.G.; Armstrong, G.D. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

    1990-12-01

    We have investigated human T-lymphocyte receptors for pertussis toxin by affinity isolation and photoaffinity labeling procedures. T lymphocytes were obtained from peripheral human blood, surface iodinated, and solubilized in Triton X-100. The iodinated mixture was then passed through pertussis toxin-agarose, and the fractions were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Autoradiography of the fixed, dried gels revealed several bands in the pertussis toxin-bound fraction that were not observed in fractions obtained from histone or fetuin-agarose. Further investigations employed a photoaffinity labeling reagent, sulfosuccinimidyl 2-(p-azido-salicylamido)-1,3'-dithiopropionate, to identify pertussis toxin receptors in freshly isolated peripheral blood monocytic cells, T lymphocytes, and Jurkat cells. In all three cell systems, the pertussis toxin affinity probe specifically labeled a single protein species with an apparent molecular weight of 70,000 that was not observed when the procedure was performed in the presence of excess unmodified pertussis toxin. A protein comparable in molecular weight to the one detected by the photoaffinity labeling technique was also observed among the species that bound to pertussis toxin-agarose. The results suggest that pertussis toxin may bind to a 70,000-Da receptor in human T lymphocytes.

  7. Nuclear receptors for thyroid hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricketts, M.H.; Groenewald, J. de W.; Wilson, B.D.

    1980-01-01

    The thyroid hormones, T 3 and T 4 , modulate a vast number of metabolic processes in mammalian tissues. High affinity, low capacity binding sites for T 3 and T 4 have been demonstrated in cell nuclei of target organs using both in vivo and in vitro labelling techniques. The displacement of [ 125 I]T 3 from nuclear binding sites by thyroid hormone analogues correlates well with the thyromimetic activities of the analogues tested. Dose-response relationships between T 3 occupancy and growth hormone secretion as a function of free T 3 concentration have been established with the GH 1 cell line. The equilibrium dissociation constant of the equation which describes how T 3 binds to the nuclei of intact cells is essentially the same as the free T 3 concentration that elicits the half-maximal biological response of the hormone. It is becoming apparent that these nuclear binding sites represent specific thyroid hormone receptors, whose function may be to regulate gene activity in target tissues. This report concerns the binding of the rat liver nuclear receptor to duplex and random coil DNA as well as to non-mammalian and synthetic DNAs. We postulate that the receptor binds in vivo to native DNA in the minor groove of the DNA helix

  8. Complex GABAB receptor complexes: how to generate multiple functionally distinct units from a single receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanjuan eXU

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The main inhibitory neurotransmitter, GABA, acts on both ligand-gated and G protein-coupled receptors, the GABAA/C and GABAB receptors, respectively. The later play important roles in modulating many synapses, both at the pre- and post-synaptic levels, and are then still considered as interesting targets to treat a number of brain diseases, including addiction. For many years, several subtypes of GABAB receptors were expected, but cloning revealed only two genes that work in concert to generate a single type of GABAB receptor composed of two subunits. Here we will show that the signaling complexity of this unit receptor type can be largely increased through various ways, including receptor stoichiometry, subunit isoforms, membrane expression and localization, crosstalk with other receptors or interacting proteins. These recent data revealed how complexity of a receptor unit can be increased, observation that certainly are not unique to the GABAB receptor.

  9. The two-state dimer receptor model: a general model for receptor dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Rafael; Casadó, Vicent; Mallol, Josefa; Ferrada, Carla; Ferré, Sergi; Fuxe, Kjell; Cortés, Antoni; Ciruela, Francisco; Lluis, Carmen; Canela, Enric I

    2006-06-01

    Nonlinear Scatchard plots are often found for agonist binding to G-protein-coupled receptors. Because there is clear evidence of receptor dimerization, these nonlinear Scatchard plots can reflect cooperativity on agonist binding to the two binding sites in the dimer. According to this, the "two-state dimer receptor model" has been recently derived. In this article, the performance of the model has been analyzed in fitting data of agonist binding to A(1) adenosine receptors, which are an example of receptor displaying concave downward Scatchard plots. Analysis of agonist/antagonist competition data for dopamine D(1) receptors using the two-state dimer receptor model has also been performed. Although fitting to the two-state dimer receptor model was similar to the fitting to the "two-independent-site receptor model", the former is simpler, and a discrimination test selects the two-state dimer receptor model as the best. This model was also very robust in fitting data of estrogen binding to the estrogen receptor, for which Scatchard plots are concave upward. On the one hand, the model would predict the already demonstrated existence of estrogen receptor dimers. On the other hand, the model would predict that concave upward Scatchard plots reflect positive cooperativity, which can be neither predicted nor explained by assuming the existence of two different affinity states. In summary, the two-state dimer receptor model is good for fitting data of binding to dimeric receptors displaying either linear, concave upward, or concave downward Scatchard plots.

  10. Characterization of astrocytic and neuronal benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    Primary cultures of astrocytes and neurons express benzodiazepine receptors. Neuronal benzodiazepine receptors were of high-affinity, K{sub D} values were 7.5-43 nM and the densities of receptors (B{sub max}) were 924-4131 fmol/mg protein. Astrocytes posses a high-affinity benzodiazepine receptor, K{sub D} values were 6.6-13 nM. The B{sub max} values were 6,033-12,000 fmol/mg protein. The pharmacological profile of the neuronal benzodiazepine receptor was that of the central-type benzodiazepine receptor, where clonazepam has a high-affinity and Ro 5-4864 (4{prime}-chlorodiazepam) has a low-affinity. Whereas astrocytic benzoidazepine receptor was characteristic of the so called peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors, which shows a high-affinity towards Ro 5-4863, and a low-affinity towards clonazepam. The astrocytic benzodiazepine receptors was functionally correlated with voltage dependent calcium channels, since dihydropyridines and benzodiazepines interacted with ({sup 3}H) diazepam and ({sup 3}H) nitrendipine receptors with the same rank order of potency, showing a statistically significant correlation. No such correlation was observed in neurons.

  11. Localization of mineralocorticoid receptors at mammalian synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M Prager

    Full Text Available In the brain, membrane associated nongenomic steroid receptors can induce fast-acting responses to ion conductance and second messenger systems of neurons. Emerging data suggest that membrane associated glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors may directly regulate synaptic excitability during times of stress when adrenal hormones are elevated. As the key neuron signaling interface, the synapse is involved in learning and memory, including traumatic memories during times of stress. The lateral amygdala is a key site for synaptic plasticity underlying conditioned fear, which can both trigger and be coincident with the stress response. A large body of electrophysiological data shows rapid regulation of neuronal excitability by steroid hormone receptors. Despite the importance of these receptors, to date, only the glucocorticoid receptor has been anatomically localized to the membrane. We investigated the subcellular sites of mineralocorticoid receptors in the lateral amygdala of the Sprague-Dawley rat. Immunoblot analysis revealed the presence of mineralocorticoid receptors in the amygdala. Using electron microscopy, we found mineralocorticoid receptors expressed at both nuclear including: glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons and extra nuclear sites including: presynaptic terminals, neuronal dendrites, and dendritic spines. Importantly we also observed mineralocorticoid receptors at postsynaptic membrane densities of excitatory synapses. These data provide direct anatomical evidence supporting the concept that, at some synapses, synaptic transmission is regulated by mineralocorticoid receptors. Thus part of the stress signaling response in the brain is a direct modulation of the synapse itself by adrenal steroids.

  12. Amphipathic benzenes are designed inhibitors of the estrogen receptor alpha/steroid receptor coactivator interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther, Jillian R; Moore, Terry W; Collins, Margaret L; Katzenellenbogen, John A

    2008-05-16

    We report here on the design, synthesis, and evaluation of small molecule inhibitors of the interaction between a steroid receptor coactivator and estrogen receptor alpha. These inhibitors are based upon an amphipathic benzene scaffold whose hydrophobic face mimics the leucine-rich alpha-helical consensus sequence on the steroid receptor coactivators that interacts with a shallow groove on estrogen receptor alpha. Several of these molecules are among the most potent inhibitors of this interaction described to date and are active at low micromolar concentrations in both in vitro models of estrogen receptor action and in cell-based assays of estrogen receptor-mediated coactivator interaction and transcription.

  13. Activation of glucocorticoid receptors increases 5-HT2A receptor levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trajkovska, Viktorija; Kirkegaard, Lisbeth; Krey, Gesa

    2009-01-01

    of depression is unknown. In mice with altered glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression we investigated 5-HT2A receptor levels by Western blot and 3H-MDL100907 receptor binding. Serotonin fibre density was analyzed by stereological quantification of serotonin transporter immunopositive fibers. To establish...... an effect of GR activation on 5-HT2A levels, mature organotypic hippocampal cultures were exposed to corticosterone with or without GR antagonist mifepristone and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist spironolactone. In GR under-expressing mice, hippocampal 5-HT2A receptor protein levels were decreased...... in dorsal hippocampus (77 +/- 35%, p effect of GR activation on 5-HT2A receptor...

  14. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Drosophila Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopko, Richelle; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a significant role in a wide range of cellular processes. The Drosophila genome encodes more than 20 receptor tyrosine kinases and extensive studies in the past 20 years have illustrated their diverse roles and complex signaling mechanisms. Although some receptor tyrosine kinases have highly specific functions, others strikingly are used in rather ubiquitous manners. Receptor tyrosine kinases regulate a broad expanse of processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to differentiation and patterning. Remarkably, different receptor tyrosine kinases share many of the same effectors and their hierarchical organization is retained in disparate biological contexts. In this comprehensive review, we summarize what is known regarding each receptor tyrosine kinase during Drosophila development. Astonishingly, very little is known for approximately half of all Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23732470

  15. Acetylcholine receptors in the human retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchins, J.B.; Hollyfield, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    Evidence for a population of acetylcholine (ACh) receptors in the human retina is presented. The authors have used the irreversible ligand 3 H-propylbenzilylcholine mustard ( 3 H-PrBCM) to label muscarinic receptors. 3 H- or 125 I-alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTx) was used to label putative nicotinic receptors. Muscarinic receptors are apparently present in the inner plexiform layer of the retina. Autoradiographic grain densities are reduced in the presence of saturating concentrations of atropine, quinuclidinyl benzilate or scopolamine; this indicates that 3 H-PrBCM binding is specific for a population of muscarinic receptors in the human retina. Binding sites for radiolabeled alpha-BTx are found predominantly in the inner plexiform layer of the retina. Grain densities are reduced in the presence of d-tubocurarine, indicating that alpha-BTx may bind to a pharmacologically relevant nicotinic ACh receptor. This study provides evidence for cholinergic neurotransmission in the human retina

  16. Characteristic molecular vibrations of adenosine receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Hyun Keun; Yang, Jin-San; Joung, Je-Gun; Zhang, Byoung-Tak; Oh, S June

    2015-02-13

    Although the regulation of membrane receptor activation is known to be crucial for molecular signal transduction, the molecular mechanism underlying receptor activation is not fully elucidated. Here we study the physicochemical nature of membrane receptor behavior by investigating the characteristic molecular vibrations of receptor ligands using computational chemistry and informatics methods. By using information gain, t-tests, and support vector machines, we have identified highly informative features of adenosine receptor (AdoR) ligand and corresponding functional amino acid residues such as Asn (6.55) of AdoR that has informative significance and is indispensable for ligand recognition of AdoRs. These findings may provide new perspectives and insights into the fundamental mechanism of class A G protein-coupled receptor activation. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Subtype selective kainic acid receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunch, Lennart; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Povl

    2009-01-01

    (S)-Glutamic acid (Glu) is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, activating the plethora of glutamate receptors (GluRs). In broad lines, the GluRs are divided into two major classes: the ionotropic Glu receptors (iGluRs) and the metabotropic Glu receptors (m......GluRs). Within the iGluRs, five subtypes (KA1, KA2, iGluR5-7) show high affinity and express full agonist activity upon binding of the naturally occurring amino acid kainic acid (KA). Thus these receptors have been named the KA receptors. This review describes all-to our knowledge-published KA receptor agonists...

  18. Androgen receptor in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer: Beyond expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Debora; Cinausero, Marika; Iacono, Donatella; Pelizzari, Giacomo; Bonotto, Marta; Vitale, Maria Grazia; Gerratana, Lorenzo; Puglisi, Fabio

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, new therapeutic approaches have reshaped the overall strategy of breast cancer (BC) treatment and have markedly improved patient survival. This is, in part, due to novel therapies for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive BC. Unfortunately, many patients present de novo resistance to these therapies or develop an acquired resistance over time. Therefore, research is now focused on discovering new molecular targets to overcome these resistances. Interestingly, preclinical and clinical studies have shown a critical role for the cross-talk between androgen receptor (AR) and ER in luminal-like BC. AR is expressed in >60% of BC and in up to 90% of ERα-positive tumors. Multiple studies suggest that AR is associated with a favorable prognosis. However, AR overexpression and, in particular, the high AR:ER ratio, seem to be involved in resistance to hormonal treatment. In this setting, a group of BCs could benefit from AR-inhibitors; nevertheless, some ER-positive BC patients do not seem to benefit from this strategy. Therefore, it is crucial to identify biomarkers that would enable the selection of patients who might benefit from combination treatment with ER and AR inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Xenobiotics and the Glucocorticoid Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliver, Linda S M

    2017-03-15

    Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR) is present in virtually every human cell type. Representing a nuclear receptor superfamily, GR has several different isoforms essentially acting as ligand-dependent transcription factors, regulating glucocorticoid-responsive gene expression in both a positive and a negative manner. Although the natural ligand of the Glucocorticoid Receptor, glucocorticoids (GC) represent only some of the multiple ligands for GR. Xenobiotics, ubiquitous in the environment, bind to GR and are also capable of activating or repressing GR gene expression, thereby modulating GR cell and tissue-specific downstream effects in a multitude of ways that include responses to inflammatory, allergic, metabolic, neoplastic and autoimmune processes. Many xenobiotics, if inadequately metabolized by xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and not wholly eliminated, could have deleterious toxic effects with potentially lethal consequences. This review examines GR, the genomic and non-genomic actions of natural and synthetic GC and the body's handling of xenobiotic compounds, before reviewing what is presently known about GR's interactions with many of the more commonly encountered and some of the less well known GR-associated xenobiotics. GR promiscuity and crosstalk with other signaling pathways is discussed, alongside novel roles for GR that include mood disorder and addiction. A knowledge of GR interactions with xenobiotics is increasingly relevant when considering aging populations and the related prevalence of neoplastic disease, together with growing concerns around human exposure to mixtures of chemicals in the environment. Furthermore, escalating rates of obesity, Type 2 diabetes; autoimmune, allergy, addiction and mood disorder-related pathologies, require novel targeted interventions and GR appears a promising pharmacological candidate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. NUREBASE: database of nuclear hormone receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte, Jorge; Perrière, Guy; Laudet, Vincent; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors are an abundant class of ligand activated transcriptional regulators, found in varying numbers in all animals. Based on our experience of managing the official nomenclature of nuclear receptors, we have developed NUREBASE, a database containing protein and DNA sequences, reviewed protein alignments and phylogenies, taxonomy and annotations for all nuclear receptors. The reviewed NUREBASE is completed by NUREBASE_DAILY, automatically updated every 24 h. Both databases...