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Sample records for tryptophan microenvironment soluble

  1. L-Tryptophan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tryptophan by mouth doesn't help reduce facial pain. Improving athletic ability. Some research shows that taking L-tryptophan for 3 days before exercising can improve power during exercise. This improvement in power helps increase ...

  2. The PCa Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sottnik, Joseph L; Zhang, Jian; Macoska, Jill A; Keller, Evan T

    2011-12-01

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) is a very complex niche that consists of multiple cell types, supportive matrix and soluble factors. Cells in the TME consist of both host cells that are present at tumor site at the onset of tumor growth and cells that are recruited in either response to tumor- or host-derived factors. PCa (PCa) thrives on crosstalk between tumor cells and the TME. Crosstalk results in an orchestrated evolution of both the tumor and microenvironment as the tumor progresses. The TME reacts to PCa-produced soluble factors as well as direct interaction with PCa cells. In return, the TME produces soluble factors, structural support and direct contact interactions that influence the establishment and progression of PCa. In this review, we focus on the host side of the equation to provide a foundation for understanding how different aspects of the TME contribute to PCa progression. We discuss immune effector cells, specialized niches, such as the vascular and bone marrow, and several key protein factors that mediate host effects on PCa. This discussion highlights the concept that the TME offers a potentially very fertile target for PCa therapy.

  3. Rotational spectrum of tryptophan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz, M. Eugenia, E-mail: maria.sanz@kcl.ac.uk; Cabezas, Carlos, E-mail: ccabezas@qf.uva.es; Mata, Santiago, E-mail: santiago.mata@uva.es; Alonso, Josè L., E-mail: jlalonso@qf.uva.es [Grupo de Espectroscopia Molecular (GEM), Edificio Quifima, Laboratorios de Espectroscopia y Bioespectroscopia, Unidad Asociada CSIC, Parque Científico Uva, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2014-05-28

    The rotational spectrum of the natural amino acid tryptophan has been observed for the first time using a combination of laser ablation, molecular beams, and Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Independent analysis of the rotational spectra of individual conformers has conducted to a definitive identification of two different conformers of tryptophan, with one of the observed conformers never reported before. The analysis of the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants is of particular significance since it allows discrimination between structures, thus providing structural information on the orientation of the amino group. Both observed conformers are stabilized by an O–H···N hydrogen bond in the side chain and a N–H···π interaction forming a chain that reinforce the strength of hydrogen bonds through cooperative effects.

  4. TRYPTOPHAN PROMOTES CHARITABLE DONATING

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    Laura eSteenbergen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The link between serotonin (5-HT and one of the most important elements of prosocial behavior, charity, has remained largely uninvestigated. In the present study, we tested whether charitable donating can be promoted by administering the food supplement L-Tryptophan (TRP, the biochemical precursor of 5-HT. Participants were compared with respect to the amount of money they donated when given the opportunity to make a charitable donation. As expected, compared to a neutral placebo, TRP appears to increase the participants’ willingness to donate money to a charity. This result supports the idea that the food we eat may act as a cognitive enhancer modulating the way we think and perceive the world and others.

  5. Cellular immobilization within microfluidic microenvironments: dielectrophoresis with polyelectrolyte multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forry, Samuel P; Reyes, Darwin R; Gaitan, Michael; Locascio, Laurie E

    2006-10-25

    The development of biomimetic microenvironments will improve cell culture techniques by enabling in vitro cell cultures that mimic in vivo behavior; however, experimental control over attachment, cellular position, or intercellular distances within such microenvironments remains challenging. We report here the rapid and controllable immobilization of suspended mammalian cells within microfabricated environments using a combination of electronic (dielectrophoresis, DEP) and chemical (polyelectrolyte multilayers, PEMS) forces. While cellular position within the microsystem is rapidly patterned via intermittent DEP trapping, persistent adhesion after removal of electronic forces is enabled by surface treatment with PEMS that are amenable to cellular attachment. In contrast to DEP trapping alone, persistent adhesion enables the soluble microenvironment to be systematically varied, facilitating the use of soluble probes of cell state and enabling cellular characterization in response to various soluble stimuli.

  6. Tryptophan Research in Panic Disorder

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    Eduard Maron

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A considerable body of evidence suggests the involvement of serotonin neurotransmission in the pathogenesis of panic disorder. Research on pathways and functions of tryptophan, an essential amino acid converted into serotonin, may advance our understanding of serotonergic actions in panic disorder and related phenomena. The investigative approaches in this field include manipulations of tryptophan availability as well as genetic association and functional brain imaging studies. In this review we examine the principle findings of these studies and propose further research directions.

  7. Role for tryptophan in regulation of protein synthesis in porcine muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, F.D.; Smith, T.K.; Bayley, H.S.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of varying concentrations of dietary tryptophan on growth rate and protein synthesis in edible muscle tissues of growing swine. A total of 45 immature swine (initial weight approximately 24 kg) were fed corn-gelatin diets containing 0.5 (n = 8), 0.8 (n = 10), 1.3 (n = 10), 1.5 (n = 7) or 2.0 (n = 10) g tryptophan/kg diet for 35 d. Animals fed 0.5 and 0.8 g tryptophan/kg grew more slowly, consumed less feed and had a lower efficiency of feed utilization than animals fed higher concentrations of tryptophan. Thirty similar animals were used in a second experiment. Diets containing 0.5, 0.8, 1.0, 1.5 or 2.0 g tryptophan/kg diet (n = 6) were fed for 14 d, after which all animals were killed and samples were taken of longissimus dorsi, triceps brachii and biceps femoris. Protein synthetic activity was determined by monitoring the incorporation of [ 14 C]phenylalanine into protein in vitro. There was no significant difference in synthetic activity between different muscle types. There was no effect of diet on the activity of the muscle soluble protein fraction. The activity of the muscle ribosomal fraction, however, was positively correlated with increasing concentrations of dietary tryptophan. It was concluded that tryptophan has the potential to regulate muscle protein synthesis in a manner beyond serving simply as a component of protein

  8. Targets in the microenvironment of rectal cancer : A focus on angiogenic growth factors and chemokines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamas, Karin Rita

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells interact with each other, and with cells of the tumor microenvironment. This coincides with the production of numerous soluble factors which can stimulate cancer cell growth and migration. In addition the tumor microenvironment can facilitate cancer cells to escape the effect of

  9. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenny, P.A.; Lee, G.Y.; Bissell, M.J.

    2006-11-07

    Despite some notable successes cancer remains, for the most part, a seemingly intractable problem. There is, however, a growing appreciation that targeting the tumor epithelium in isolation is not sufficient as there is an intricate mutually sustaining synergy between the tumor epithelial cells and their surrounding stroma. As the details of this dialogue emerge, new therapeutic targets have been proposed. The FDA has already approved drugs targeting microenvironmental components such as VEGF and aromatase and many more agents are in the pipeline. In this article, we describe some of the 'druggable' targets and processes within the tumor microenvironment and review the approaches being taken to disrupt these interactions.

  10. Dendritic biomimicry: microenvironmental hydrogen-bonding effects on tryptophan fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, S; Müller, L; Smith, D K

    2001-03-02

    Two series of dendritically modified tryptophan derivatives have been synthesised and their emission spectra measured in a range of different solvents. This paper presents the syntheses of these novel dendritic structures and discusses their emission spectra in terms of both solvent and dendritic effects. In the first series of dendrimers, the NH group of the indole ring is available for hydrogen bonding, whilst in the second series, the indole NH group has been converted to NMe. Direct comparison of the emission wavelengths of analogous NH and NMe derivatives indicates the importance of the Kamlet-Taft solvent beta3 parameter, which reflects the ability of the solvent to accept a hydrogen bond from the NH group, an effect not possible for the NMe series of dendrimers. For the NH dendrimers, the attachment of a dendritic shell to the tryptophan subunit leads to a red shift in emission wavelength. This dendritic effect only operates in non-hydrogen-bonding solvents. For the NMe dendrimers, however, the attachment of a dendritic shell has no effect on the emission spectra of the indole ring. This proves the importance of hydrogen bonding between the branched shell and the indole NH group in causing the dendritic effect. This is the first time a dendritic effect has been unambiguously assigned to individual hydrogen-bonding interactions and indicates that such intramolecular interactions are important in dendrimers, just as they are in proteins. Furthermore, this paper sheds light on the use of tryptophan residues as a probe of the microenvironment within proteins--in particular, it stresses the importance of hydrogen bonds formed by the indole NH group.

  11. Oxidative Modification of Tryptophan-Containing Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jonas; Christensen, Pia Katrine; Nielsen, Mathias T

    2018-01-01

    We herein present a broadly useful method for the chemoselective modification of a wide range of tryptophan-containing peptides. Exposing a tryptophan-containing peptide to 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ) resulted in a selective cyclodehydration between the peptide backbone...

  12. Inhibition of tryptophan - pyrrolase activity and elevation of brain tryptophan concentration by fluoxetine in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bano, S.; Sherkheli, M.A

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate in-vitro as well as in-vivo effects of various doses of fluoxetine (SSRI) on tryptophan metabolism in rates. Results: In in-vitro (10 - 1000 mM) as well in-vivo (0.5 - 30 mg/kg body wt.) studies, fluoxetine showed a statistically significant inhibition of rat liver tryptophan pyrrolase (tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase; EC 1.13.11.11) activity. Significant increases were noted at 10 and 30 mg/kg doses in brain, serum (total and free) and liver L-tryptophan concentrations. Similarly, serum non-esterified free fatty acids showed a significant increase at both doses. There was no effect on serum glucose and albumin concentrations. Conclusion: It is suggested that major mechanism of action of fluoxetine is that of elevating brain tryptophan concentration and hence 5-HT synthesis by increasing the availability of circulating tryptophan to the brain secondarily to inhibition of major tryptophan degrading enzyme, hepatic tryptophan pyrrolase. It is assumed that fluoxetine inhibits the binding of apoenzyme form of tryptophan pyrrolase with its cofactor haem. The results are discussed in relation to possible involvement of disturbed hepatic tryptophan metabolism in depressive illness. (author)

  13. Bioprinting the Cancer Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Duchamp, Margaux; Oklu, Rahmi; Ellisen, Leif W; Langer, Robert; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-10-10

    Cancer is intrinsically complex, comprising both heterogeneous cellular compositions and microenvironmental cues. During the various stages of cancer initiation, development, and metastasis, cell-cell interactions (involving vascular and immune cells besides cancerous cells) as well as cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions (e.g., alteration in stiffness and composition of the surrounding matrix) play major roles. Conventional cancer models both two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) present numerous limitations as they lack good vascularization and cannot mimic the complexity of tumors, thereby restricting their use as biomimetic models for applications such as drug screening and fundamental cancer biology studies. Bioprinting as an emerging biofabrication platform enables the creation of high-resolution 3D structures and has been extensively used in the past decade to model multiple organs and diseases. More recently, this versatile technique has further found its application in studying cancer genesis, growth, metastasis, and drug responses through creation of accurate models that recreate the complexity of the cancer microenvironment. In this review we will focus first on cancer biology and limitations with current cancer models. We then detail the current bioprinting strategies including the selection of bioinks for capturing the properties of the tumor matrices, after which we discuss bioprinting of vascular structures that are critical toward construction of complex 3D cancer organoids. We finally conclude with current literature on bioprinted cancer models and propose future perspectives.

  14. Tumor Biology and Microenvironment Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Part of NCI's Division of Cancer Biology's research portfolio, research in this area seeks to understand the role of tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment (TME) in driving cancer initiation, progression, maintenance and recurrence.

  15. [Acute tryptophan depletion in eating disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Marsa, M; Lozano, C; Herranz, A S; Asensio-Vegas, M J; Martín, O; Revert, L; Saiz-Ruiz, J; Carrasco, J L

    2006-01-01

    This work describes the rational bases justifying the use of acute tryptophan depletion technique in eating disorders (ED) and the methods and design used in our studies. Tryptophan depletion technique has been described and used in previous studies safely and makes it possible to evaluate the brain serotonin activity. Therefore it is used in the investigation of hypotheses on serotonergic deficiency in eating disorders. Furthermore, and given the relationship of the dysfunctions of serotonin activity with impulsive symptoms, the technique may be useful in biological differentiation of different subtypes, that is restrictive and bulimic, of ED. 57 female patients with DSM-IV eating disorders and 20 female controls were investigated with the tryptophan depletion test. A tryptophan-free amino acid solution was administered orally after a two-day low tryptophan diet to patients and controls. Free plasma tryptophan was measured at two and five hours following administration of the drink. Eating and emotional responses were measured with specific scales for five hours following the depletion. A study of the basic characteristics of the personality and impulsivity traits was also done. Relationship of the response to the test with the different clinical subtypes and with the temperamental and impulsive characteristics of the patients was studied. The test was effective in considerably reducing plasma tryptophan in five hours from baseline levels (76%) in the global sample. The test was well tolerated and no severe adverse effects were reported. Two patients withdrew from the test due to gastric intolerance. The tryptophan depletion test could be of value to study involvement of serotonin deficits in the symptomatology and pathophysiology of eating disorders.

  16. Engineering Breast Cancer Microenvironments and 3D Bioprinting

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    Jorge A. Belgodere

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM is a critical cue to direct tumorigenesis and metastasis. Although two-dimensional (2D culture models have been widely employed to understand breast cancer microenvironments over the past several decades, the 2D models still exhibit limited success. Overwhelming evidence supports that three dimensional (3D, physiologically relevant culture models are required to better understand cancer progression and develop more effective treatment. Such platforms should include cancer-specific architectures, relevant physicochemical signals, stromal–cancer cell interactions, immune components, vascular components, and cell-ECM interactions found in patient tumors. This review briefly summarizes how cancer microenvironments (stromal component, cell-ECM interactions, and molecular modulators are defined and what emerging technologies (perfusable scaffold, tumor stiffness, supporting cells within tumors and complex patterning can be utilized to better mimic native-like breast cancer microenvironments. Furthermore, this review emphasizes biophysical properties that differ between primary tumor ECM and tissue sites of metastatic lesions with a focus on matrix modulation of cancer stem cells, providing a rationale for investigation of underexplored ECM proteins that could alter patient prognosis. To engineer breast cancer microenvironments, we categorized technologies into two groups: (1 biochemical factors modulating breast cancer cell-ECM interactions and (2 3D bioprinting methods and its applications to model breast cancer microenvironments. Biochemical factors include matrix-associated proteins, soluble factors, ECMs, and synthetic biomaterials. For the application of 3D bioprinting, we discuss the transition of 2D patterning to 3D scaffolding with various bioprinting technologies to implement biophysical cues to model breast cancer microenvironments.

  17. Pigment Production on L-Tryptophan Medium by Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaskes, Stuart; Cammer, Michael; Nieves, Edward; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    In recent years strains previously grouped within Cryptococcus neoformans have been divided into two species C. neoformans and C. gattii, with Cryptococcus neoformans comprising serotypes A, D, and AD and C. gattii comprising serotypes B and C. Cryptococcus neoformans have also been subdivided into two varieties C. neoformans var. grubii, serotype A, and C. neoformans var. neoformans, serotype D. We analyzed the growth and pigment production characteristics of 139 strains of Cryptococcus spp. in L-tryptophan containing media. Nearly all strains of Cryptococcus, including each variety and serotype tested produced a pink water-soluble pigment (molecular weight of 535.2 Da) from L-tryptophan. Consequently, the partial separation of the species was based on whether the pink pigment was secreted into the medium (extracellular) or retained as an intracellular pigment. On L-tryptophan medium C. neoformans var. grubii and serotype AD produced a pink extracellular pigment. In contrast, for C. gattii, the pink pigment was localized intracellularly and masked by heavy production of brown pigments. Pigment production by C. neoformans var. neoformans was variable with some strains producing the pink extracellular pigment and others retained the pink pigment intracellularly. The pink intracellular pigment produced by strains of C. neoformans var. neoformans was masked by production of brown pigments. Cryptococcus laccase mutants failed to produce pigments from L-tryptophan. This is the first report that the enzyme laccase is involved in tryptophan metabolism. Prior to this report Cryptococcus laccase produced melanin or melanin like-pigments from heterocyclic compounds that contained ortho or para diphenols, diaminobenzenes and aminophenol compounds. The pigments produced from L-tryptophan were not melanin. PMID:24736553

  18. Pigment production on L-tryptophan medium by Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaskes, Stuart; Cammer, Michael; Nieves, Edward; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    In recent years strains previously grouped within Cryptococcus neoformans have been divided into two species C. neoformans and C. gattii, with Cryptococcus neoformans comprising serotypes A, D, and AD and C. gattii comprising serotypes B and C. Cryptococcus neoformans have also been subdivided into two varieties C. neoformans var. grubii, serotype A, and C. neoformans var. neoformans, serotype D. We analyzed the growth and pigment production characteristics of 139 strains of Cryptococcus spp. in L-tryptophan containing media. Nearly all strains of Cryptococcus, including each variety and serotype tested produced a pink water-soluble pigment (molecular weight of 535.2 Da) from L-tryptophan. Consequently, the partial separation of the species was based on whether the pink pigment was secreted into the medium (extracellular) or retained as an intracellular pigment. On L-tryptophan medium C. neoformans var. grubii and serotype AD produced a pink extracellular pigment. In contrast, for C. gattii, the pink pigment was localized intracellularly and masked by heavy production of brown pigments. Pigment production by C. neoformans var. neoformans was variable with some strains producing the pink extracellular pigment and others retained the pink pigment intracellularly. The pink intracellular pigment produced by strains of C. neoformans var. neoformans was masked by production of brown pigments. Cryptococcus laccase mutants failed to produce pigments from L-tryptophan. This is the first report that the enzyme laccase is involved in tryptophan metabolism. Prior to this report Cryptococcus laccase produced melanin or melanin like-pigments from heterocyclic compounds that contained ortho or para diphenols, diaminobenzenes and aminophenol compounds. The pigments produced from L-tryptophan were not melanin.

  19. Pigment production on L-tryptophan medium by Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Chaskes

    Full Text Available In recent years strains previously grouped within Cryptococcus neoformans have been divided into two species C. neoformans and C. gattii, with Cryptococcus neoformans comprising serotypes A, D, and AD and C. gattii comprising serotypes B and C. Cryptococcus neoformans have also been subdivided into two varieties C. neoformans var. grubii, serotype A, and C. neoformans var. neoformans, serotype D. We analyzed the growth and pigment production characteristics of 139 strains of Cryptococcus spp. in L-tryptophan containing media. Nearly all strains of Cryptococcus, including each variety and serotype tested produced a pink water-soluble pigment (molecular weight of 535.2 Da from L-tryptophan. Consequently, the partial separation of the species was based on whether the pink pigment was secreted into the medium (extracellular or retained as an intracellular pigment. On L-tryptophan medium C. neoformans var. grubii and serotype AD produced a pink extracellular pigment. In contrast, for C. gattii, the pink pigment was localized intracellularly and masked by heavy production of brown pigments. Pigment production by C. neoformans var. neoformans was variable with some strains producing the pink extracellular pigment and others retained the pink pigment intracellularly. The pink intracellular pigment produced by strains of C. neoformans var. neoformans was masked by production of brown pigments. Cryptococcus laccase mutants failed to produce pigments from L-tryptophan. This is the first report that the enzyme laccase is involved in tryptophan metabolism. Prior to this report Cryptococcus laccase produced melanin or melanin like-pigments from heterocyclic compounds that contained ortho or para diphenols, diaminobenzenes and aminophenol compounds. The pigments produced from L-tryptophan were not melanin.

  20. The intestinal microenvironment in sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Katherine T; Ford, Mandy L; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2017-10-01

    The gastrointestinal tract has long been hypothesized to function as "the motor" of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. The gastrointestinal microenvironment is comprised of a single cell layer epithelia, a local immune system, and the microbiome. These three components of the intestine together play a crucial role in maintaining homeostasis during times of health. However, the gastrointestinal microenvironment is perturbed during sepsis, resulting in pathologic changes that drive both local and distant injury. In this review, we seek to characterize the relationship between the epithelium, gastrointestinal lymphocytes, and commensal bacteria during basal and pathologic conditions and how the intestinal microenvironment may be targeted for therapeutic gain in septic patients. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Dynamic microenvironments: the fourth dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbitt, Mark W; Anseth, Kristi S

    2012-11-14

    The extracellular space, or cell microenvironment, choreographs cell behavior through myriad controlled signals, and aberrant cues can result in dysfunction and disease. For functional studies of human cell biology or expansion and delivery of cells for therapeutic purposes, scientists must decipher this intricate map of microenvironment biology and develop ways to mimic these functions in vitro. In this Perspective, we describe technologies for four-dimensional (4D) biology: cell-laden matrices engineered to recapitulate tissue and organ function in 3D space and over time.

  2. Influence of the tryptophan-indole-IFNγ axis on human genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection: role of vaginal co-infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiyar, Ashok; Quayle, Alison J; Buckner, Lyndsey R; Sherchand, Shardulendra P; Chang, Theresa L; Zea, Arnold H; Martin, David H; Belland, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    The natural history of genital Chlamydia trachomatis infections can vary widely; infections can spontaneously resolve but can also last from months to years, potentially progressing to cause significant pathology. The host and bacterial factors underlying this wide variation are not completely understood, but emphasize the bacterium's capacity to evade/adapt to the genital immune response, and/or exploit local environmental conditions to survive this immune response. IFNγ is considered to be a primary host protective cytokine against endocervical C. trachomatis infections. IFNγ acts by inducing the host enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxgenase, which catabolizes tryptophan, thereby depriving the bacterium of this essential amino acid. In vitro studies have revealed that tryptophan deprivation causes Chlamydia to enter a viable but non-infectious growth pattern that is termed a persistent growth form, characterized by a unique morphology and gene expression pattern. Provision of tryptophan can reactivate the bacterium to the normal developmental cycle. There is a significant difference in the capacity of ocular and genital C. trachomatis serovars to counter tryptophan deprivation. The latter uniquely encode a functional tryptophan synthase to synthesize tryptophan via indole salvage, should indole be available in the infection microenvironment. In vitro studies have confirmed the capacity of indole to mitigate the effects of IFNγ; it has been suggested that a perturbed vaginal microbiome may provide a source of indole in vivo. Consistent with this hypothesis, the microbiome associated with bacterial vaginosis includes species that encode a tryptophanase to produce indole. In this review, we discuss the natural history of genital chlamydial infections, morphological and molecular changes imposed by IFNγ on Chlamydia, and finally, the microenvironmental conditions associated with vaginal co-infections that can ameliorate the effects of IFNγ on C. trachomatis.

  3. Influence of the tryptophan-indole-IFNγ axis on human genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection: role of vaginal co-infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok eAiyar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The natural history of genital Chlamydia trachomatis infections can vary widely; infections can spontaneously resolve but can also last from months to years, potentially progressing to cause significant pathology. The host and bacterial factors underlying this wide variation are not completely understood, but emphasize the bacterium’s capacity to evade/adapt to the genital immune response, and/or exploit local environmental conditions to survive this immune response. IFNγ is considered to be a primary host protective cytokine against endocervical C. trachomatis infections. IFNγ acts by inducing the host enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, which catabolizes tryptophan, thereby depriving the bacterium of this essential amino acid. In vitro studies have revealed that tryptophan deprivation causes Chlamydia to enter a viable but non-infectious growth pattern that is termed a persistent growth form, characterized by a unique morphology and gene expression pattern. Provision of tryptophan can reactivate the bacterium to the normal developmental cycle. There is a significant difference in the capacity of ocular and genital C. trachomatis serovars to counter tryptophan deprivation. The latter uniquely encode a functional tryptophan synthase to synthesize tryptophan via indole salvage, should indole be available in the infection microenvironment. In vitro studies have confirmed the capacity of indole to mitigate the effects of IFNγ; it has been suggested that a perturbed vaginal microbiome may provide a source of indole in vivo. Consistent with this hypothesis, the microbiome associated with bacterial vaginosis includes species that encode a tryptophanase to produce indole. In this review, we discuss the natural history of genital chlamydial infections, morphological and molecular changes imposed by IFNγ on Chlamydia, and finally, the microenvironmental conditions associated with vaginal co-infections that can ameliorate the effects of IFNγ on C

  4. The external microenvironment of healing skin wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Carla R; Nuutila, Kristo; Lee, Cameron Cy

    2015-01-01

    The skin wound microenvironment can be divided into two main components that influence healing: the external wound microenvironment, which is outside the wound surface; and the internal wound microenvironment, underneath the surface, to which the cells within the wound are exposed. Treatment...

  5. Tryptophan-induced pathogenesis of breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: To investigate the pathogenesis of breast cancer through targeted metabolomics of amino acids ... Furthermore, the biological function of tryptophan was determined through determining the influence ... profiling all the small molecules in the biosamples (e.g., .... is a promising therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer7.

  6. Psychosocial stress and inflammation driving tryptophan breakdown in children and adolescents: A cross-sectional analysis of two cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Nathalie; Clarke, Gerard; Olavarria-Ramirez, Loreto; Gómez-Martínez, Sonia; Díaz, Ligia Esperanza; Marcos, Ascensión; Widhalm, Kurt; Carvalho, Livia A

    2018-05-15

    Tryptophan breakdown is an important mechanism in several diseases e.g. inflammation and stress-induced inflammation have been associated with the development of depression via enhanced tryptophan breakdown. Depression is a major public health problem which commonly starts during adolescence, thus identifying underlying mechanisms during early life is crucial in prevention. The aim of this work was to verify whether independent and interacting associations of psychosocial stress and inflammation on tryptophan breakdown already exist in children and adolescents as a vulnerable age group. Two cross-sectional population-based samples of children/adolescents (8-18 y) were available: 315 from the European HELENA study and 164 from the Belgian ChiBS study. In fasting serum samples, tryptophan, kynurenine, kynurenic acid, C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-ɣ, soluble vascular adhesion molecule 1 (sVCAM1) and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM1) were measured. Psychological stress was measured by stress reports (subjective) and cortisol (objective - awakening salivary cortisol or hair cortisol). Linear regressions with stress or inflammation as predictor were adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, puberty, socio-economic status and country. In both cohorts, inflammation as measured by higher levels of CRP, sVCAM1 and sICAM1 was associated with kynurenine/tryptophan ratio and thus enhanced tryptophan breakdown (beta: 0.145-0.429). Psychological stress was only associated with tryptophan breakdown in the presence of higher inflammatory levels (TNF-α in both populations). Inflammatory levels were replicable key in enhancing tryptophan breakdown along the kynurenine pathway, even at young age and in a non-clinical sample. The stress-inflammation interaction indicated that only the stress exposures inducing higher inflammatory levels (or in an already existing inflammatory status) were associated

  7. Tumor microenvironment: Sanctuary of the devil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Lanlan; Chen, Ye

    2015-11-01

    Tumor cells constantly interact with the surrounding microenvironment. Increasing evidence indicates that targeting the tumor microenvironment could complement traditional treatment and improve therapeutic outcomes for these malignancies. In this paper, we review new insights into the tumor microenvironment, and summarize selected examples of the cross-talk between tumor cells and their microenvironment, which have enhanced our understanding of pathophysiology of the microenvironment. We believe that this rapidly moving field promises many more to come, and they will guide the rational design of combinational therapies for success in cancer eradication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Biomolecule delivery to engineer the cellular microenvironment for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Corey J; Kim, Jayoung; Green, Jordan J

    2014-07-01

    To realize the potential of regenerative medicine, controlling the delivery of biomolecules in the cellular microenvironment is important as these factors control cell fate. Controlled delivery for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine often requires bioengineered materials and cells capable of spatiotemporal modulation of biomolecule release and presentation. This review discusses biomolecule delivery from the outside of the cell inwards through the delivery of soluble and insoluble biomolecules as well as from the inside of the cell outwards through gene transfer. Ex vivo and in vivo therapeutic strategies are discussed, as well as combination delivery of biomolecules, scaffolds, and cells. Various applications in regenerative medicine are highlighted including bone tissue engineering and wound healing.

  9. Tryptophan Transport in Human Fibroblast Cells—A Functional Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Vumma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There are indications that serotonergic neurotransmission is disturbed in several psychiatric disorders. One explanation may be disturbed transport of tryptophan (precursor for serotonin synthesis across cell membranes. Human fibroblast cells offer an advantageous model to study the transport of amino acids across cell membranes, since they are easy to propagate and the environmental factors can be controlled. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize tryptophan transport and to identify the main transporters of tryptophan in fibroblast cell lines from healthy controls. Tryptophan kinetic parameters ( V max and K m at low and high concentrations were measured in fibroblasts using the cluster tray method. Uptake of 3 H (5-L-tryptophan at different concentrations in the presence and absence of excess concentrations of inhibitors or combinations of inhibitors of amino acid transporters were also measured. Tryptophan transport at high concentration (0.5 mM had low affinity and high V max and the LAT1 isoform of system-L was responsible for approximately 40% of the total uptake of tryptophan. In comparison, tryptophan transport at low concentration (50 nM had higher affinity, lower V max and approximately 80% of tryptophan uptake was transported by system-L with LAT1 as the major isoform. The uptake of tryptophan at the low concentration was mainly sodium (Na + dependent, while uptake at high substrate concentration was mainly Na + independent. A series of different transporter inhibitors had varying inhibitory effects on tryptophan uptake. This study indicates that tryptophan is transported by multiple transporters that are active at different substrate concentrations in human fibroblast cells. The tryptophan transport trough system-L was mainly facilitated by the LAT1 isoform, at both low and high substrate concentrations of tryptophan.

  10. Mechanotransduction and Growth Factor Signalling to Engineer Cellular Microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipitria, Amaia; Salmeron-Sanchez, Manuel

    2017-08-01

    Engineering cellular microenvironments involves biochemical factors, the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the interaction with neighbouring cells. This progress report provides a critical overview of key studies that incorporate growth factor (GF) signalling and mechanotransduction into the design of advanced microenvironments. Materials systems have been developed for surface-bound presentation of GFs, either covalently tethered or sequestered through physico-chemical affinity to the matrix, as an alternative to soluble GFs. Furthermore, some materials contain both GF and integrin binding regions and thereby enable synergistic signalling between the two. Mechanotransduction refers to the ability of the cells to sense physical properties of the ECM and to transduce them into biochemical signals. Various aspects of the physics of the ECM, i.e. stiffness, geometry and ligand spacing, as well as time-dependent properties, such as matrix stiffening, degradability, viscoelasticity, surface mobility as well as spatial patterns and gradients of physical cues are discussed. To conclude, various examples illustrate the potential for cooperative signalling of growth factors and the physical properties of the microenvironment for potential applications in regenerative medicine, cancer research and drug testing. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Plutonium solubilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puigdomnech, I.; Bruno, J.

    1991-02-01

    Thermochemical data has been selected for plutonium oxide, hydroxide, carbonate and phosphate equilibria. Equilibrium constants have been evaluated in the temperature range 0 to 300 degrees C at a pressure of 1 bar to T≤100 degrees C and at the steam saturated pressure at higher temperatures. Measured solubilities of plutonium that are reported in the literature for laboratory experiments have been collected. Solubility data on oxides, hydroxides, carbonates and phosphates have been selected. No solubility data were found at temperatures higher than 60 degrees C. The literature solubility data have been compared with plutonium solubilities calculated with the EQ3/6 geochemical modelling programs, using the selected thermodynamic data for plutonium. (authors)

  12. Cell microenvironment engineering and monitoring for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine: the recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthes, Julien; Özçelik, Hayriye; Hindié, Mathilde; Ndreu-Halili, Albana; Hasan, Anwarul; Vrana, Nihal Engin

    2014-01-01

    In tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, the conditions in the immediate vicinity of the cells have a direct effect on cells' behaviour and subsequently on clinical outcomes. Physical, chemical, and biological control of cell microenvironment are of crucial importance for the ability to direct and control cell behaviour in 3-dimensional tissue engineering scaffolds spatially and temporally. In this review, we will focus on the different aspects of cell microenvironment such as surface micro-, nanotopography, extracellular matrix composition and distribution, controlled release of soluble factors, and mechanical stress/strain conditions and how these aspects and their interactions can be used to achieve a higher degree of control over cellular activities. The effect of these parameters on the cellular behaviour within tissue engineering context is discussed and how these parameters are used to develop engineered tissues is elaborated. Also, recent techniques developed for the monitoring of the cell microenvironment in vitro and in vivo are reviewed, together with recent tissue engineering applications where the control of cell microenvironment has been exploited. Cell microenvironment engineering and monitoring are crucial parts of tissue engineering efforts and systems which utilize different components of the cell microenvironment simultaneously can provide more functional engineered tissues in the near future.

  13. Cell Microenvironment Engineering and Monitoring for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine: The Recent Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Barthes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, the conditions in the immediate vicinity of the cells have a direct effect on cells’ behaviour and subsequently on clinical outcomes. Physical, chemical, and biological control of cell microenvironment are of crucial importance for the ability to direct and control cell behaviour in 3-dimensional tissue engineering scaffolds spatially and temporally. In this review, we will focus on the different aspects of cell microenvironment such as surface micro-, nanotopography, extracellular matrix composition and distribution, controlled release of soluble factors, and mechanical stress/strain conditions and how these aspects and their interactions can be used to achieve a higher degree of control over cellular activities. The effect of these parameters on the cellular behaviour within tissue engineering context is discussed and how these parameters are used to develop engineered tissues is elaborated. Also, recent techniques developed for the monitoring of the cell microenvironment in vitro and in vivo are reviewed, together with recent tissue engineering applications where the control of cell microenvironment has been exploited. Cell microenvironment engineering and monitoring are crucial parts of tissue engineering efforts and systems which utilize different components of the cell microenvironment simultaneously can provide more functional engineered tissues in the near future.

  14. Dietary tryptophan intake and suicide rate in industrialized nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voracek, Martin; Tran, Ulrich S

    2007-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the ecological association of dietary tryptophan intake and suicide rates across industrialized nations. Tryptophan, an essential amino acid, is the rate-limiting precursor of serotonin biosynthesis. The serotonergic system has been strongly implicated in the neurobiology of suicide. Contemporary male and female suicide rates for the general population (42 countries) and the elderly (38 countries) were correlated with national estimates of dietary tryptophan intake. Measures of tryptophan intake were significantly negatively associated to national suicide rates. Controlling for national affluence, total alcohol consumption and happiness levels slightly attenuated these associations, but left all of them negative. The effect is an ecological (group-level) finding. Estimated per capita tryptophan supply is only a proxy for actual consumption. Developed nations ranking high in dietary tryptophan intake rank low in suicide rates, independent of national wealth, alcohol intake and happiness.

  15. Tryptophan and kynurenine determination in human hair by liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dario, Michelli F; Freire, Thamires Batello; Pinto, Claudinéia Aparecida Sales de Oliveira; Prado, María Segunda Aurora; Baby, André R; Velasco, Maria Valéria R

    2017-10-15

    Tryptophan, an amino acid found in hair proteinaceous structure is used as a marker of hair photodegradation. Also, protein loss caused by several chemical/physical treatments can be inferred by tryptophan quantification. Kynurenine is a photo-oxidation product of tryptophan, expected to be detected when hair is exposed mainly to UVB (290-320nm) radiation range. Tryptophan from hair is usually quantified directly as a solid or after alkaline hydrolysis, spectrofluorimetrically. However, these types of measure are not sufficiently specific and present several interfering substances. Thus, this work aimed to propose a quantification method for both tryptophan and kynurenine in hair samples, after alkali hydrolysis process, by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorimetric and UV detection. The tryptophan and kynurenine quantification method was developed and validated. Black, white, bleached and dyed (blond and auburn) hair tresses were used in this study. Tryptophan and kynurenine were separated within ∼9min by HPLC. Both black and white virgin hair samples presented similar concentrations of tryptophan, while bleaching caused a reduction in the tryptophan content as well as dyeing process. Unexpectedly, UV/vis radiation did not promote significantly the conversion of tryptophan into its photo-oxidation product and consequently, kynurenine was not detected. Thus, this works presented an acceptable method for quantification of tryptophan and its photooxidation metabolite kynurenine in hair samples. Also, the results indicated that bleaching and dyeing processes promoted protein/amino acids loss but tryptophan is not extensively degraded in human hair by solar radiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Tryptophan depletion affects compulsive behaviour in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merchán, A; Navarro, S V; Klein, A B

    2017-01-01

    investigated whether 5-HT manipulation, through a tryptophan (TRP) depletion by diet in Wistar and Lister Hooded rats, modulates compulsive drinking in schedule-induced polydipsia (SIP) and locomotor activity in the open-field test. The levels of dopamine, noradrenaline, serotonin and its metabolite were......-depleted HD Wistar rats, while the LD Wistar and the Lister Hooded rats did not exhibit differences in SIP. In contrast, the TRP-depleted Lister Hooded rats increased locomotor activity compared to the non-depleted rats, while no differences were found in the Wistar rats. Serotonin 2A receptor binding...

  17. Optical microassembly platform for constructing reconfigurable microenvironment for biomedical studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, Peter John; Kelemen, Lóránd; Palima, Darwin

    2009-01-01

    Cellular development is highly influenced by the surrounding microenvironment. We propose user-reconfigurable microenvironments and bio-compatible scaffolds as an approach for understanding cellular development processes. We demonstrate a model platform for constructing versatile microenvironment...

  18. [Environment of tryptophan residues in proteins--a factor for stability to oxidative nitrosylation. I. Analysis of primary structure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beda, N V; Nedospasov, A A

    2001-01-01

    Micellar catalysis under aerobic conditions effectively accelerates oxidative nitrosylation because of solubilization of NO and O2 by protein membranes and hydrophobic nuclei. Nitrosylating intermediates NOx (NO2, N2O3, N2O4) form mainly in the hydrophobic phase, and therefore their solubility in aqueous phase is low and hydrolysis is rapid, local concentration of NOx in the hydrophobic phase being essentially higher than in aqueous. Tryptophan is a hydrophobic residue and can nitrosylate with the formation of isomer N-nitrosotryptophans (NOW). Without denitrosylation mechanism, the accumulation of NOW in proteins of NO-synthesizing organisms would be constant, and long-living proteins would contain essential amounts of NOW, which is however not the case. Using Protein Data Bank (more than 78,000 sequences) we investigated the distribution of tryptophan residues environment (22 residues on each side of polypeptide chain) in proteins with known primary structure. Charged and polar residues (D, H, K, N, Q, R, S) are more incident in the immediate surrounding of tryptophan (-6, -5, -2, -1, 1, 2, 4) and hydrophobic residues (A, F, I, L, V, Y) are more rare than in remote positions. Hence, an essential part of tryptophan residues is situated in hydrophilic environment, which decreases the nitrosylation velocity because of lower NOx concentration in aqueous phase and allows the denitrosylation reactions course via nitrosonium ion transfer on nucleophils of functional groups of protein and low-molecular compounds in aqueous phase.

  19. Confirmation of antibodies against L-tryptophan-like epitope in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Confirmation of antibodies against L-tryptophan-like epitope in human African trypanosomosis serological diagnostic. ... number of patients in Congo. A diagnostic test based on this synthetic epitope, especially in combination with other tests, might improve the HAT diagnostic test in field conditions. Key words: Tryptophan ...

  20. Microenvironment Determinants of Brain Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Chenyu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metastasis accounts for 90% of cancer-related mortality. Brain metastases generally present during the late stages in the natural history of cancer progression. Recent advances in cancer treatment and management have resulted in better control of systemic disease metastatic to organs other than the brain and improved patient survival. However, patients who experience recurrent disease manifest an increasing number of brain metastases, which are usually refractory to therapies. To meet the new challenges of controlling brain metastasis, the research community has been tackling the problem with novel experimental models and research tools, which have led to an improved understanding of brain metastasis. The time-tested "seed-and-soil" hypothesis of metastasis indicates that successful outgrowth of deadly metastatic tumors depends on permissible interactions between the metastatic cancer cells and the site-specific microenvironment in the host organs. Consistently, recent studies indicate that the brain, the major component of the central nervous system, has unique physiological features that can determine the outcome of metastatic tumor growth. The current review summarizes recent discoveries on these tumor-brain interactions, and the potential clinical implications these novel findings could have for the better treatment of patients with brain metastasis.

  1. L-Tryptophan depletion bioreactor, a possible cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Bambauer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The cancer therapeutic strategies knownto date are not adequate for all cancer patients. Most of them are followed by a high rate of side effects and complications. The L-tryptophan depletion bioreactor is described as a possible new method of cancer therapy. L-tryptophan is an essential amino acid which has been recognized as an important cancer nutrient and its removal can lead to destruction of the tumour. Normal human cells or tumor cells cannot synthesize L-tryptophan and therefore tumor resistance is unlikely to develop. L-tryptophan is also a constituent for different bio-molecules such as Serotonin, Melatonin, and is needed for other synthesis processes in the cell growth. L-tryptophan degrading enzymes with 3 iso-enzymes called tryptophan side chain oxydase (TSO I, II, III were isolated. The 3 iso-enzymes can be differentiated by tryptic digestion. They have different molecular weights with different effectivenesses. All the TSO enzymes have heme that can catalyze essentially similar reactions involving L-tryptophan as a substrate. The most effective TSO is the type TSO III. A column which contained TSO as a bioreactor was integrated in a plasmapheresis unit and tested it in different animals. In sheep and rabbits L-tryptophan depletion in plasma was shown at 95% and 100% rates respectively by a single pass through the bioreactor. The results in immune supprimized rats with tumors were impressive, too. In 20 different tumor cell lines there were different efficacies. Brest cancer and medulloblastoma showed the greatest efficacy of L-tryptophan degrading. The gene technology of TSO production from Pseudomonas is associated with formation of endotoxins. This disadvantage can be prevented by different washing procedures or by using fungal sources for the TSO production. TSO III is developed to treat cancer diseases successfully, and has low side effects. A combination of L-tryptophan depletion with all available cancer therapies is

  2. Role of tumor microenvironment in triple-negative breast cancer and its prognostic significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianjian Yu; Genhong Di

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer has been shown to live in the tumor microenvironment,which consists of not only breast cancer cells themselves but also a significant amount of pathophysiologically altered surrounding stroma and cells.Diverse components of the breast cancer microenvironment,such as suppressive immune cells,re-programmed fibroblast cells,altered extracellular matrix (ECM) and certain soluble factors,synergistically impede an effective anti-tumor response and promote breast cancer progression and metastasis.Among these components,stromal cells in the breast cancer microenvironment are characterized by molecular alterations and aberrant signaling pathways,whereas the ECM features biochemical and biomechanical changes.However,triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC),the most aggressive subtype of this disease that lacks effective therapies available for other subtypes,is considered to feature a unique microenvironment distinct from that of other subtypes,especially compared to Luminal A subtype.Because these changes are now considered to significantly impact breast cancer development and progression,these unique alterations may serve as promising prognostic factors of clinical outcome or potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of TNBC.In this review,we focus on the composition of the TNBC microenvironment,concomitant distinct biological alteration,specific interplay between various cell types and TNBC cells,and the prognostic implications of these findings.

  3. Immunological Dysregulation in Multiple Myeloma Microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    Romano, Alessandra; Conticello, Concetta; Cavalli, Maide; Vetro, Calogero; La Fauci, Alessia; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; Di Raimondo, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Multiple Myeloma (MM) is a systemic hematologic disease due to uncontrolled proliferation of monoclonal plasma cells (PC) in bone marrow (BM). Emerging in other solid and liquid cancers, the host immune system and the microenvironment have a pivotal role for PC growth, proliferation, survival, migration, and resistance to drugs and are responsible for some clinical manifestations of MM. In MM, microenvironment is represented by the cellular component of a normal bone marrow together with extr...

  4. Commensal bacteria modulate the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poutahidis, Theofilos; Erdman, Susan E

    2016-09-28

    It has been recently shown that gut microbes modulate whole host immune and hormonal factors impacting the fate of distant preneoplastic lesions toward malignancy or regression. This raises the possibility that the tumor microenvironment interacts with broader systemic microbial-immune networks. These accumulated findings suggest novel therapeutic opportunities for holobiont engineering in emerging tumor microenvironments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Tryptophan levels, excessive exercise, and nutritional status in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaro, A; Caregaro, L; Burlina, A B; Santonastaso, P

    2000-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that reduced dietary availability of tryptophan may be the cause of impaired serotonin activity in underweight anorexics. The study reported here evaluated the relationship between tryptophan availability in the blood and nutritional status in anorexia nervosa. The total amount of tryptophan and the ratio between tryptophan and other large neutral amino acids (TRP/LNAA) were assessed in a sample of 16 starving anorexic patients. Body weight and composition and energy intake were evaluated in all patients. All subjects also completed self-reported questionnaires such as the Hopkins Symptom Checklist and Eating Disorders Inventory (EDI). The TRP/LNAA ratio seems to be higher in patients with a more severe catabolic status. It is, in fact, significantly inversely correlated with body mass index, body fat, muscle mass, daily energy intake, and daily tryptophan intake. The TRP/LNAA ratio also correlates with growth hormone and the EDI drive for thinness. Patients who exercise excessively had significantly higher TRP/LNAA ratios. In starving anorexic patients, the TRP/LNAA ratio does not seem to be determined by the content of tryptophan in the diet, but it correlates with measures of catabolism. The relationship of the TRP/LNAA ratio to excessive exercise and starvation indicates the importance of further investigations exploring the role of tryptophan availability in maintaining anorexia nervosa.

  6. Exploring the mechanism of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackray, Sarah J.; Mowat, Christopher G.; Chapman, Stephen K.

    2008-01-01

    The haem proteins TDO (tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase) and IDO (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase) are specific and powerful oxidation catalysts that insert one molecule of dioxygen into L-tryptophan in the first and rate-limiting step in the kynurenine pathway. Recent crystallographic and biochemical analyses of TDO and IDO have greatly aided our understanding of the mechanisms employed by these enzymes in the binding and activation of dioxygen and tryptophan. In the present paper, we briefly discuss the function, structure and possible catalytic mechanism of these enzymes. PMID:19021508

  7. Tryptophan and ATTO 590: mutual fluorescence quenching and exciplex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Ujjal; Beck, Christie; Winter, Arthur; Wells, Carson; Petrich, Jacob W

    2014-07-24

    Investigation of fluorescence quenching of probes, such as ATTO dyes, is becoming an increasingly important topic owing to the use of these dyes in super-resolution microscopies and in single-molecule studies. Photoinduced electron transfer is their most important nonradiative pathway. Because of the increasing frequency of the use of ATTO and related dyes to investigate biological systems, studies are presented for inter- and intramolecular quenching of ATTO 590 with tryptophan. In order to examine intramolecular quenching, an ATTO 590-tryptophan conjugate was synthesized. It was determined that tryptophan is efficiently quenching ATTO 590 fluorescence by excited-state charge transfer and two charge transfer complexes are forming. In addition, it was discovered that an exciplex (whose lifetime is 5.6 ns) can be formed between tryptophan and ATTO 590, and it is suggested that the possibility of such exciplex formation should be taken into account when protein fluorescence is monitored in a system tagged with ATTO dyes.

  8. Development of Bacillus subtilis mutants to produce tryptophan in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Karin; Cantor, Mette D.; Nørgaard, Jan Værum

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To generate tryptophan-overproducing Bacillus subtilis strains for in situ use in pigs, to reduce the feed cost for farmers and nitrogen pollution. Results A novel concept has been investigated—to generate B. subtilis strains able to produce tryptophan (Trp) in situ in pigs. Mutagenesis......-excreting B. subtilis strains were obtained with UV-mutagenesis and analogue selection and can be used in animal feed applications....

  9. Imaging C. elegans with thiolated tryptophan-based NIR fluorescent gold nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barman, Apurba Kr. [Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Department of Chemistry (India); Chaturbedi, Amaresh; Subramaniam, K. [Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Department of Biological Sciences and Bioengineering (India); Verma, Sandeep, E-mail: sverma@iitk.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Department of Chemistry (India)

    2013-11-15

    Multidentate, thiolated, tryptophan-containing peptide conjugates were synthesized for the preparation of gold nanoclusters (AuNCs). Precursor Au{sub 11}(PPh{sub 3}){sub 8}Cl{sub 3} was prepared by the reduction of HAuCl{sub 4}, followed by the use of tryptophan-containing peptide conjugates in ligand displacement reactions, to afford near-infrared fluorescent AuNCs. The emission maxima for these newly synthesized AuNCs were ∼715 nm. AuNCs were characterized with the help of UV–Vis, FTIR, fluorescence and MALDI analysis. FTIR spectra showed that the ligands bind to Au atoms through Au–S bonds, while MALDI mass spectra revealed that the clusters consisted of 20–23 Au atoms. Introduction of hydrophilic –COOH groups engendered water solubility to these AuNCs, enabling bioimaging applications. We demonstrate fluorescence imaging of the nematode C. elegans and confirm distribution of these AuNCs in nematode gut with the help of green fluorescent protein co-localization experiments.

  10. From tryptophan to hydroxytryptophan: reflections on a busy life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Hans

    2009-01-01

    , plays an important role in wound healing and stress management. Pyridoxal phosphate is the cofactor for the enzyme histidine decarboxylase required for histamine synthesis and similarly serves as a cofactor for hydroxytryptophan decarboxylase, the enzyme that is part of the pathway to serotonin synthesis. Investigations into these pathways led to interesting findings: brain concentrations of serotonin could be increased by supplementing the diet of rats with tryptophan and pyridoxine; the elevated brain serotonin levels had behavioral consequences. Alcohol craving, addiction, and withdrawal symptoms are affected by serotonin concentrations in the brain, and alleviation of these conditions can be achieved with simultaneous administration of serotonin and dopamine agonists. In the midst of our early amino acid studies, we serendipitously also became involved with lipid metabolism in relation to atherosclerosis and blood cholesterol in a chicken model. This work led to the recognition that soluble fibers, like pectin, had strong cholesterol-lowering properties that were beneficial in lowering the incidence of coronary plaque formation. The research success that I have enjoyed has been coupled with the gift of three accomplished children who are making important contributions as professionals in their fields of endeavor. My wife and I are also blessed with 10 wonderful grandchildren, our pride and joy!

  11. Kynurenine pathway in psychosis: evidence of increased tryptophan degradation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, Sandra

    2009-05-01

    The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation may serve to integrate disparate abnormalities heretofore identified in research aiming to elucidate the complex aetiopathogenesis of psychotic disorders. Post-mortem brain tissue studies have reported elevated kynurenine and kynurenic acid in the frontal cortex and upregulation of the first step of the pathway in the anterior cingulate cortex of individuals with schizophrenia. In this study, we examined kynurenine pathway activity by measuring tryptophan breakdown, a number of pathway metabolites and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), which is the preferential activator of the first-step enzyme, indoleamine dioxygenase (IDO), in the plasma of patients with major psychotic disorder. Plasma tryptophan, kynurenine pathway metabolites were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in 34 patients with a diagnosis on the psychotic spectrum (schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder) and in 36 healthy control subjects. IFN-gamma was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The mean tryptophan breakdown index (kynurenine\\/tryptophan) was significantly higher in the patient group compared with controls (P < 0.05). IFN-gamma measures did not differ between groups (P = 0.23). No relationship was found between measures of psychopathology, symptom severity and activity in the first step in the pathway. A modest correlation was established between the tryptophan breakdown index and illness duration. These results provide evidence for kynurenine pathway upregulation, specifically involving the first enzymatic step, in patients with major psychotic disorder. Increased tryptophan degradation in psychoses may have potential consequences for the treatment of these disorders by informing the development of novel therapeutic compounds.

  12. Tryptophan metabolism in breast cancers: molecular imaging and immunohistochemistry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhász, Csaba; Nahleh, Zeina; Zitron, Ian; Chugani, Diane C.; Janabi, Majid Z.; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Mangner, Thomas J.; Chakraborty, Pulak K.; Mittal, Sandeep; Muzik, Otto

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Tryptophan oxidation via the kynurenine pathway is an important mechanism of tumoral immunoresistance. Increased tryptophan metabolism via the serotonin pathway has been linked to malignant progression in breast cancer. In this study, we combined quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) with tumor immunohistochemistry to analyze tryptophan transport and metabolism in breast cancer. Methods: Dynamic α-[ 11 C]methyl-L-tryptophan (AMT) PET was performed in nine women with stage II–IV breast cancer. PET tracer kinetic modeling was performed in all tumors. Expression of L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1), indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO; the initial and rate-limiting enzyme of the kynurenine pathway) and tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1; the initial enzyme of the serotonin pathway) was assessed by immunostaining of resected tumor specimens. Results: Tumor AMT uptake peaked at 5–20 min postinjection in seven tumors; the other two cases showed protracted tracer accumulation. Tumor standardized uptake values (SUVs) varied widely (2.6–9.8) and showed a strong positive correlation with volume of distribution values derived from kinetic analysis (P < .01). Invasive ductal carcinomas (n = 6) showed particularly high AMT SUVs (range, 4.7–9.8). Moderate to strong immunostaining for LAT1, IDO and TPH1 was detected in most tumor cells. Conclusions: Breast cancers show differential tryptophan kinetics on dynamic PET. SUVs measured 5–20 min postinjection reflect reasonably the tracer's volume of distribution. Further studies are warranted to determine if in vivo AMT accumulation in these tumors is related to tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine and serotonin pathways.

  13. Tryptophan metabolism, disposition and utilization in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Abdulla A-B

    2015-09-17

    Tryptophan (Trp) requirements in pregnancy are several-fold: (1) the need for increased protein synthesis by mother and for fetal growth and development; (2) serotonin (5-HT) for signalling pathways; (3) kynurenic acid (KA) for neuronal protection; (4) quinolinic acid (QA) for NAD(+) synthesis (5) other kynurenines (Ks) for suppressing fetal rejection. These goals could not be achieved if maternal plasma [Trp] is depleted. Although plasma total (free + albumin-bound) Trp is decreased in pregnancy, free Trp is elevated. The above requirements are best expressed in terms of a Trp utilization concept. Briefly, Trp is utilized as follows: (1) In early and mid-pregnancy, emphasis is on increased maternal Trp availability to meet the demand for protein synthesis and fetal development, most probably mediated by maternal liver Trp 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) inhibition by progesterone and oestrogens. (2) In mid- and late pregnancy, Trp availability is maintained and enhanced by the release of albumin-bound Trp by albumin depletion and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) elevation, leading to increased flux of Trp down the K pathway to elevate immunosuppressive Ks. An excessive release of free Trp could undermine pregnancy by abolishing T-cell suppression by Ks. Detailed assessment of parameters of Trp metabolism and disposition and related measures (free and total Trp, albumin, NEFA, K and its metabolites and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in maternal blood and, where appropriate, placental and fetal material) in normal and abnormal pregnancies may establish missing gaps in our knowledge of the Trp status in pregnancy and help identify appropriate intervention strategies. © 2015 Authors.

  14. Enduring epigenetic landmarks define the cancer microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidsley, Ruth; Lawrence, Mitchell G.; Zotenko, Elena; Niranjan, Birunthi; Statham, Aaron; Song, Jenny; Chabanon, Roman M.; Qu, Wenjia; Wang, Hong; Richards, Michelle; Nair, Shalima S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Nim, Hieu T.; Papargiris, Melissa; Balanathan, Preetika; French, Hugh; Peters, Timothy; Norden, Sam; Ryan, Andrew; Pedersen, John; Kench, James; Daly, Roger J.; Horvath, Lisa G.; Stricker, Phillip; Frydenberg, Mark; Taylor, Renea A.; Stirzaker, Clare; Risbridger, Gail P.; Clark, Susan J.

    2018-01-01

    The growth and progression of solid tumors involves dynamic cross-talk between cancer epithelium and the surrounding microenvironment. To date, molecular profiling has largely been restricted to the epithelial component of tumors; therefore, features underpinning the persistent protumorigenic phenotype of the tumor microenvironment are unknown. Using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing, we show for the first time that cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) from localized prostate cancer display remarkably distinct and enduring genome-wide changes in DNA methylation, significantly at enhancers and promoters, compared to nonmalignant prostate fibroblasts (NPFs). Differentially methylated regions associated with changes in gene expression have cancer-related functions and accurately distinguish CAFs from NPFs. Remarkably, a subset of changes is shared with prostate cancer epithelial cells, revealing the new concept of tumor-specific epigenome modifications in the tumor and its microenvironment. The distinct methylome of CAFs provides a novel epigenetic hallmark of the cancer microenvironment and promises new biomarkers to improve interpretation of diagnostic samples. PMID:29650553

  15. Effect of the Premalignant and Tumor Microenvironment on Immune Cell Cytokine Production in Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Sara D. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical University of South Carolina, 173 Ashley Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); De Costa, Anna-Maria A. [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, 135 Rutledge Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, 96 Jonathan Lucas Street, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Young, M. Rita I., E-mail: rita.young@va.gov [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, 135 Rutledge Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, 96 Jonathan Lucas Street, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Medical Research Service (151), Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 109 Bee Street, Charleston, SC 29401 (United States)

    2014-04-02

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is marked by immunosuppression, a state in which the established tumor escapes immune attack. However, the impact of the premalignant and tumor microenvironments on immune reactivity has yet to be elucidated. The purpose of this study was to determine how soluble mediators from cells established from carcinogen-induced oral premalignant lesions and HNSCC modulate immune cell cytokine production. It was found that premalignant cells secrete significantly increased levels of G-CSF, RANTES, MCP-1, and PGE{sub 2} compared to HNSCC cells. Splenocytes incubated with premalignant supernatant secreted significantly increased levels of Th1-, Th2-, and Th17-associated cytokines compared to splenocytes incubated with HNSCC supernatant. These studies demonstrate that whereas the premalignant microenvironment elicits proinflammatory cytokine production, the tumor microenvironment is significantly less immune stimulatory and may contribute to immunosuppression in established HNSCC.

  16. The Immunomodulatory Effects of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Polarization within the Tumor Microenvironment Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosette M. Rivera-Cruz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs represent a promising tool for cell therapy, particularly for their antitumor effects. This cell population can be isolated from multiple tissue sources and also display an innate ability to home to areas of inflammation, such as tumors. Upon entry into the tumor microenvironment niche, MSCs promote or inhibit tumor progression by various mechanisms, largely through the release of soluble factors. These factors can be immunomodulatory by activating or inhibiting both the adaptive and innate immune responses. The mechanisms by which MSCs modulate the immune response are not well understood. Because of this, the relationship between MSCs and immune cells within the tumor microenvironment niche continues to be an active area of research in order to help explain the apparent contradictory findings currently available in the literature. The ongoing research aims to enhance the potential of MSCs in future therapeutic applications.

  17. Tryptophan circuit in fatigue: From blood to brain and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Masatoshi; Yamamoto, Takanobu

    2017-11-15

    Brain tryptophan and its neuroactive metabolites play key roles in central fatigue. However, previous brain function analysis targets may have included both glia and neurons together. Here, we clarified the fatigue-cognitive circuit of the central-peripheral linkage, including the role of glial-neuronal interaction in cognition. Using a rat model of central fatigue induced by chronic sleep disorder (CFSD), we isolated presynaptic terminals and oligodendrocytes. Results showed that compared to control group, presynaptic levels of tryptophan, kynurenine, and kynurenic acid, but not serotonin, in the CFSD group were higher in the hypothalamus and hippocampus. Moreover, CFSD group had higher oligodendrocytic levels of tryptophan, and impaired spatial cognitive memory accuracy and increased hyperactivity and impulsivity. These findings suggest that dynamic change in glial-neuronal interactions within the hypothalamus-hippocampal circuit causes central fatigue, and increased tryptophan-kynurenic acid pathway activity in this circuit causes reduced cognitive function. Additionally, CFSD group had 1.5 times higher plasma levels of tryptophan and kynurenine. Furthermore, in rats undergoing intraperitoneal administration of kynurenine (100mg/kg) versus vehicle, kynurenine-treated rats showed enhanced production of kynurenic acid in the hippocampus, with suppressed recall of retained spatial cognitive memory. The study revealed that uptake of periphery-derived kynurenine and tryptophan into the brain enhances kynurenic acid production in the brain, and the three factors produce amplification effect involved in the role of central-peripheral linkage in central fatigue, triggering cognitive dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Maternal dietary tryptophan deficiency alters cardiorespiratory control in rat pups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penatti, Eliana M; Barina, Alexis E; Raju, Sharat; Li, Aihua; Kinney, Hannah C; Commons, Kathryn G; Nattie, Eugene E

    2011-02-01

    Malnutrition during pregnancy adversely affects postnatal forebrain development; its effect upon brain stem development is less certain. To evaluate the role of tryptophan [critical for serotonin (5-HT) synthesis] on brain stem 5-HT and the development of cardiorespiratory function, we fed dams a diet ∼45% deficient in tryptophan during gestation and early postnatal life and studied cardiorespiratory variables in the developing pups. Deficient pups were of normal weight at postnatal day (P)5 but weighed less than control pups at P15 and P25 (P interactions between nutrition, brain stem physiology, and age that are potentially relevant to understanding 5-HT deficiency in the sudden infant death syndrome.

  19. Dynamic Reciprocity in the Wound Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Gregory S.; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Kirsner, Robert S.; Bornstein, Paul; Herman, Ira M.

    2011-01-01

    Here, we define dynamic reciprocity (DR) as an ongoing, bidirectional interaction amongst cells and their surrounding microenvironment. In the review, we posit that DR is especially meaningful during wound healing as the DR-driven biochemical, biophysical and cellular responses to injury play pivotal roles in regulating tissue regenerative responses. Such cell-extracellular matrix interactions not only guide and regulate cellular morphology, but cellular differentiation, migration, proliferation, and survival during tissue development, including e.g. embryogenesis, angiogenesis, as well as during pathologic processes including cancer diabetes, hypertension and chronic wound healing. Herein, we examine DR within the wound microenvironment while considering specific examples across acute and chronic wound healing. This review also considers how a number of hypotheses that attempt to explain chronic wound pathophysiology, which may be understood within the DR framework. The implications of applying the principles of dynamic reciprocity to optimize wound care practice and future development of innovative wound healing therapeutics are also briefly considered. PMID:21362080

  20. Immunological dysregulation in multiple myeloma microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Alessandra; Conticello, Concetta; Cavalli, Maide; Vetro, Calogero; La Fauci, Alessia; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; Di Raimondo, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Multiple Myeloma (MM) is a systemic hematologic disease due to uncontrolled proliferation of monoclonal plasma cells (PC) in bone marrow (BM). Emerging in other solid and liquid cancers, the host immune system and the microenvironment have a pivotal role for PC growth, proliferation, survival, migration, and resistance to drugs and are responsible for some clinical manifestations of MM. In MM, microenvironment is represented by the cellular component of a normal bone marrow together with extracellular matrix proteins, adhesion molecules, cytokines, and growth factors produced by both stromal cells and PC themselves. All these components are able to protect PC from cytotoxic effect of chemo- and radiotherapy. This review is focused on the role of immunome to sustain MM progression, the emerging role of myeloid derived suppressor cells, and their potential clinical implications as novel therapeutic target.

  1. Immunological Dysregulation in Multiple Myeloma Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Romano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Myeloma (MM is a systemic hematologic disease due to uncontrolled proliferation of monoclonal plasma cells (PC in bone marrow (BM. Emerging in other solid and liquid cancers, the host immune system and the microenvironment have a pivotal role for PC growth, proliferation, survival, migration, and resistance to drugs and are responsible for some clinical manifestations of MM. In MM, microenvironment is represented by the cellular component of a normal bone marrow together with extracellular matrix proteins, adhesion molecules, cytokines, and growth factors produced by both stromal cells and PC themselves. All these components are able to protect PC from cytotoxic effect of chemo- and radiotherapy. This review is focused on the role of immunome to sustain MM progression, the emerging role of myeloid derived suppressor cells, and their potential clinical implications as novel therapeutic target.

  2. Bioinspired Hydrogels to Engineer Cancer Microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung Min; Lewis, Daniel; Gerecht, Sharon

    2017-06-21

    Recent research has demonstrated that tumor microenvironments play pivotal roles in tumor development and metastasis through various physical, chemical, and biological factors, including extracellular matrix (ECM) composition, matrix remodeling, oxygen tension, pH, cytokines, and matrix stiffness. An emerging trend in cancer research involves the creation of engineered three-dimensional tumor models using bioinspired hydrogels that accurately recapitulate the native tumor microenvironment. With recent advances in materials engineering, many researchers are developing engineered tumor models, which are promising platforms for the study of cancer biology and for screening of therapeutic agents for better clinical outcomes. In this review, we discuss the development and use of polymeric hydrogel materials to engineer native tumor ECMs for cancer research, focusing on emerging technologies in cancer engineering that aim to accelerate clinical outcomes.

  3. Biomimetic strategies for the glioblastoma microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Junghwa; Kim, Pilnam

    2017-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a devastating type of tumor with high mortality, caused by extensive infiltration into adjacent tissue and rapid recurrence. Most therapies for GBM have focused on the cytotoxicity, and have not targeted GBM spread. However, there have been numerous attempts to improve therapy by addressing GBM invasion, through understanding and mimicking its behavior using three-dimensional (3D) experimental models. Compared with two-dimensional models and in vivo animal models, 3D GBM models can capture the invasive motility of glioma cells within a 3D environment comprising many cellular and non-cellular components. Based on tissue engineering techniques, GBM invasion has been investigated within a biologically relevant environment, from biophysical and biochemical perspectives, to clarify the pro-invasive factors of GBM. This review discusses the recent progress in techniques for modeling the microenvironments of GBM tissue and suggests future directions with respect to recreating the GBM microenvironment and preclinical applications.

  4. Biological stoichiometry in tumor micro-environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Kareva

    Full Text Available Tumors can be viewed as evolving ecological systems, in which heterogeneous populations of cancer cells compete with each other and somatic cells for space and nutrients within the ecosystem of the human body. According to the growth rate hypothesis (GRH, increased phosphorus availability in an ecosystem, such as the tumor micro-environment, may promote selection within the tumor for a more proliferative and thus potentially more malignant phenotype. The applicability of the GRH to tumor growth is evaluated using a mathematical model, which suggests that limiting phosphorus availability might promote intercellular competition within a tumor, and thereby delay disease progression. It is also shown that a tumor can respond differently to changes in its micro-environment depending on the initial distribution of clones within the tumor, regardless of its initial size. This suggests that composition of the tumor as a whole needs to be evaluated in order to maximize the efficacy of therapy.

  5. Interaction of tumor cells with the microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehnert Hendrik

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent advances in tumor biology have revealed that a detailed analysis of the complex interactions of tumor cells with their adjacent microenvironment (tumor stroma is mandatory in order to understand the various mechanisms involved in tumor growth and the development of metastasis. The mutual interactions between tumor cells and cellular and non-cellular components (extracellular matrix = ECM of the tumor microenvironment will eventually lead to a loss of tissue homeostasis and promote tumor development and progression. Thus, interactions of genetically altered tumor cells and the ECM on the one hand and reactive non-neoplastic cells on the other hand essentially control most aspects of tumorigenesis such as epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT, migration, invasion (i.e. migration through connective tissue, metastasis formation, neovascularisation, apoptosis and chemotherapeutic drug resistance. In this mini-review we will focus on these issues that were recently raised by two review articles in CCS.

  6. Lysyl Oxidase and the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong-Hong Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The lysyl oxidase (LOX family of oxidases contains a group of extracellular copper-dependent enzymes that catalyze the cross-linking of collagen and elastin by oxidation, thus maintaining the rigidity and structural stability of the extracellular matrix (ECM. Aberrant expression or activation of LOX alters the cellular microenvironment, leading to many diseases, including atherosclerosis, tissue fibrosis, and cancer. Recently, a number of studies have shown that LOX is overexpressed in most cancers and that it is involved in the regulation of tumor progression and metastasis. In contrast, a few reports have also indicated the tumor-suppressing role of LOX. In this short review, we discuss recent research on the correlations between LOX and cancer. Further, the role of LOX in tumor microenvironment remodeling, tumorigenesis, and metastasis and the underlying mechanisms have also been elucidated.

  7. Probing the tumor microenvironment: collection and induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, James K.; Padgen, Michael R.; Wang, Yarong; Entenberg, David; Gertler, Frank; Condeelis, John S.; Castracane, James

    2012-03-01

    The Nano Intravital Device, or NANIVID, is under development as an optically transparent, implantable tool to study the tumor microenvironment. Two etched glass substrates are sealed using a thin polymer membrane to create a reservoir with a single outlet. This reservoir is loaded with a hydrogel blend that contains growth factors or other chemicals to be delivered to the tumor microenvironment. When the device is implanted in the tumor, the hydrogel will swell and release these entrapped molecules, forming a gradient. Validation of the device has been performed in vitro using epidermal growth factor (EGF) and MenaINV, a highly invasive, rat mammary adenocarcinoma cell line. In both 2-D and 3-D environments, cells migrated toward the gradient of EGF released from the device. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of White Leghorn chicken eggs is being utilized to grow xenograft tumors that will be used for ex vivo cell collection. Device optimization is being performed for in vivo use as a tool to collect the invasive cell population. Preliminary cell collection experiments in vivo were performed using a mouse model of breast cancer. As a second application, the device is being explored as a delivery vehicle for chemicals that induce controlled changes in the tumor microenvironment. H2O2 was loaded in the device and generated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells near the device outlet. In the future, other induction targets will be explored, including hypoglycemia and the manipulation of extracellular matrix stiffness.

  8. Tryptophan Requirement of the Enterally Fed Term Infant in the First Month of Life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, L.S.; Hogewind-Schoonenboom, J.E.; Zhu, L.; Kraaijenga, J.V.S.; van Haren, N.P.C.; Voortman, G.J.; Schierbeek, H.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Huang, Y.; Chen, C.; van Goudoever, J.B.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Tryptophan not only is an amino acid essential to protein synthesis but also serves as a precursor in 2 important metabolic pathways: the serotonin and the kynurenine pathways. Tryptophan is related to sleeping patterns. The objective of the present study was to determine the tryptophan

  9. Dimeric Complexes of Tryptophan with M2+ Metal Ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunbar, R. C.; Steill, J. D.; Polfer, N. C.; Oomens, J.

    2009-01-01

    IRMPD spectroscopy using the FELIX free electron laser and a Fourier transform ICR mass spectrometer was used to characterize the structures of electrosprayed dimer complexes M(2+)Trp(2) of tryptophan with a series of eight doubly charged metal ions, including alkaline earths Ca, Sr, and Ba, and

  10. Tryptophan Levels during Grape Ripening: Effects of Cultural Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ruiz-Rodríguez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Some cultural practices that are carried out during the grape ripening period are associated with vine stress, including leaf removal, grape bunch removal, and vegetable cover crops. Additionally, several nitrogen and sulfur supplements have also been used directly on leaves during the last stage of the ripening period. In the work described here, five different cultural practices and the reference were applied in three replicates in the same vineyard. The evolution of tryptophan levels was evaluated from just after grape veraison until the harvest date. In some cases, certain specific treatments were also evaluated after the regular harvest date. The cultural techniques that involved the application of nitrogen led to higher levels of tryptophan at the harvest day when compared to other cultural techniques. It was also found that the application of nitrogen without sulfur had a faster effect on the level of tryptophan. It was established that a period of around 20 days is needed for the grapes to show clear differences in tryptophan levels after the application of nitrogen.

  11. Binding of tryptophan and iron by reptilion plasnna proteins

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    transport functions. Albumin of the alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) and other reptiles binds, amongst other ions, tryptophan (McMenamy & Watson 1968) and transferrin binds iron (Barber & Sheeler 1963). Multiple transferrins are present in the plasma of many reptiles. (Dessauer et af 1962) and the albumin region of the.

  12. Soluble organic nanotubes for catalytic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Linfeng; Yang, Kunran; Zhang, Hui; Liao, Xiaojuan; Huang, Kun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report a novel method for constructing a soluble organic nanotube supported catalyst system based on single-molecule templating of core-shell bottlebrush copolymers. Various organic or metal catalysts, such as sodium prop-2-yne-1-sulfonate (SPS), 1-(2-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy)ethyl)-1H-imidazole (PEI) and Pd(OAc)2 were anchored onto the tube walls to functionalize the organic nanotubes via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. Depending on the ‘confined effect’ and the accessible cavity microenvironments of tubular structures, the organic nanotube catalysts showed high catalytic efficiency and site-isolation features. We believe that the soluble organic nanotubes will be very useful for the development of high performance catalyst systems due to their high stability of support, facile functionalization and attractive textural properties.

  13. Soluble organic nanotubes for catalytic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Linfeng; Yang, Kunran; Zhang, Hui; Liao, Xiaojuan; Huang, Kun

    2016-03-18

    In this paper, we report a novel method for constructing a soluble organic nanotube supported catalyst system based on single-molecule templating of core–shell bottlebrush copolymers. Various organic or metal catalysts, such as sodium prop-2-yne-1-sulfonate (SPS), 1-(2-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy)ethyl)-1H-imidazole (PEI) and Pd(OAc)2 were anchored onto the tube walls to functionalize the organic nanotubes via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. Depending on the 'confined effect' and the accessible cavity microenvironments of tubular structures, the organic nanotube catalysts showed high catalytic efficiency and site-isolation features. We believe that the soluble organic nanotubes will be very useful for the development of high performance catalyst systems due to their high stability of support, facile functionalization and attractive textural properties.

  14. The role of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase in the hormonal control of tryptophan metabolism in isolated rat liver cells. Effects of glucocorticoids and experimental diabetes.

    OpenAIRE

    Salter, M; Pogson, C I

    1985-01-01

    The metabolism of L-tryptophan by isolated liver cells prepared from control, adrenalectomized, glucocorticoid-treated, acute-diabetic, chronic-diabetic and insulin-treated chronic-diabetic rats was studied. Liver cells from adrenalectomized rats metabolized tryptophan at rates comparable with the minimum diurnal rates of controls, but different from rates determined for cells from control rats 4h later. Administration of dexamethasone phosphate increased the activity of tryptophan 2,3-dioxyg...

  15. Laser Desorption of Tryptophan from Tryptophan-HCl Salt on a Graphite Substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hae Jun; Kim, Jeong Jin; Kang, Hyuk [Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Laser spectroscopy of biological molecules in the gas phase has been pioneered by Levy and coworkers when they first produced a supersonic molecular beam of tryptophan (Trp) and obtained its electronic spectrum. They were able to obtain enough vapor pressure needed for spectroscopy by heating a powder sample of Trp, although a special thermal spray was used to minimize fragmentation during heating. Many amine compounds, including biomolecules like amino acids and peptides, are usually available only as HCl salt form in order to prevent oxidation in air. Chemical processing is required to recover a neutral amine compound from its salt, thus limiting the applicability of laser-desorption spectroscopy of biomolecules. The experimental setup is a standard molecular beam machine composed of a pulsed valve with a laser-desorption module in a vacuum chamber, a second buffer chamber, a skimmer that separates the first and the second chambers, and a third vacuum chamber that is a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF MS)

  16. Increased serum free tryptophan in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christmas, David M; Badawy, Abdulla A-B; Hince, Dana; Davies, Simon J C; Probert, Christopher; Creed, Tom; Smithson, John; Afzal, Muhammad; Nutt, David J; Potokar, John P

    2010-10-01

    Irregularities of serotonin function in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may be due to changes in the metabolism of the serotonin precursor l-tryptophan. Dietary alteration of tryptophan intake may impact upon the mood and bowel symptoms of IBS. We hypothesized that diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (d-IBS) patients would exhibit an increase in plasma tryptophan due to alterations in tryptophan metabolism. We also hypothesized that a diet low in tryptophan would reverse this change and reduce symptoms. Thirteen patients with d-IBS had fasting serum free and total tryptophan, large neutral amino acids, and 6 kynurenine metabolites measured before and after 2 weeks of a strict dairy-free diet. Baseline tryptophan parameters were compared with an age- and sex-matched control group. Changes in the specific tryptophan parameters before and after dairy-free diet were correlated with symptoms of IBS and mood. Compared with the control group, d-IBS patients at baseline exhibited significantly higher free serum tryptophan (10.5 ± 4.35 vs 4.75 ± 2.43 μmol/L [means ± standard deviation], P = .006) and significantly lower tryptophan dioxygenase and total tryptophan oxidation as measured by the kynurenine to free tryptophan and total kynurenines to free tryptophan ratios (23.37 ± 10.12 vs 55.33 ± 16.02, P < .001 and 49.34 ± 17.84 vs 258.46 ± 98.67, P < .001, respectively). Dairy-free diet did not modulate metabolites of the kynurenine pathway or symptoms. Tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway is inhibited in d-IBS, and a dairy-free diet does not alter this. Our findings are consistent with possible enhanced serotonin activity in d-IBS. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Microenvironment in Gliomas: Phenotypic Expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Schiffer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The microenvironment of malignant gliomas is described according to its definition in the literature. Beside tumor cells, a series of stromal cells (microglia/macrophages, pericytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, normal and reactive astrocytes represents the cell component, whereas a complex network of molecular signaling represents the functional component. Its most evident expressions are perivascular and perinecrotic niches that are believed to be the site of tumor stem cells or progenitors in the tumor. Phenotypically, both niches are not easily recognizable; here, they are described together with a critical revision of their concept. As for perinecrotic niches, an alternative interpretation is given about their origin that regards the tumor stem cells as the residue of those that populated hyperproliferating areas in which necroses develop. This is based on the concept that the stem-like is a status and not a cell type, depending on the microenvironment that regulates a conversion of tumor non-stem cells and tumor stem cells through a cell reprogramming.

  18. Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Mechanobiology: Manipulating the Biophysical Microenvironment for Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Ronald G; Simmons, Craig A

    2015-11-01

    A stem cell in its microenvironment is subjected to a myriad of soluble chemical cues and mechanical forces that act in concert to orchestrate cell fate. Intuitively, many of these soluble and biophysical factors have been the focus of intense study to successfully influence and direct cell differentiation in vitro. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have been of considerable interest in these studies due to their great promise for regenerative medicine. Culturing and directing differentiation of hPSCs, however, is currently extremely labor-intensive and lacks the efficiency required to generate large populations of clinical-grade cells. Improved efficiency may come from efforts to understand how the cell biophysical signals can complement biochemical signals to regulate cell pluripotency and direct differentiation. In this concise review, we explore hPSC mechanobiology and how the hPSC biophysical microenvironment can be manipulated to maintain and differentiate hPSCs into functional cell types for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  19. Elevated CO2 benefits the soil microenvironment in the rhizosphere of Robinia pseudoacacia L. seedlings in Cd- and Pb-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuping; Jia, Xia; Zhao, Yonghua; Bai, Bo; Chang, Yafei

    2017-02-01

    Soil contamination by heavy metals in combination with elevated atmospheric CO 2 has important effects on the rhizosphere microenvironment by influencing plant growth. Here, we investigated the response of the R. pseudoacacia rhizosphere microenvironment to elevated CO 2 in combination with cadmium (Cd)- and lead (Pb)-contamination. Organic compounds (total soluble sugars, soluble phenolic acids, free amino acids, and organic acids), microbial abundance and activity, and enzyme activity (urease, dehydrogenase, invertase, and β-glucosidase) in rhizosphere soils increased significantly (p soil microbial community in the rhizosphere. Heavy metals alone resulted in an increase in total soluble sugars, free amino acids, and organic acids, a decrease in phenolic acids, microbial populations and biomass, and enzyme activity, and a change in microbial community in rhizosphere soils. Elevated CO 2 led to an increase in organic compounds, microbial populations, biomass, and activity, and enzyme activity (except for l-asparaginase), and changes in microbial community under Cd, Pb, or Cd + Pb treatments relative to ambient CO 2 . In addition, elevated CO 2 significantly (p soils. Overall, elevated CO 2 benefited the rhizosphere microenvironment of R. pseudoacacia seedlings under heavy metal stress, which suggests that increased atmospheric CO 2 concentrations could have positive effects on soil fertility and rhizosphere microenvironment under heavy metals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Gas solubilities widespread applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gerrard, William

    1980-01-01

    Gas Solubilities: Widespread Applications discusses several topics concerning the various applications of gas solubilities. The first chapter of the book reviews Henr's law, while the second chapter covers the effect of temperature on gas solubility. The third chapter discusses the various gases used by Horiuti, and the following chapters evaluate the data on sulfur dioxide, chlorine data, and solubility data for hydrogen sulfide. Chapter 7 concerns itself with solubility of radon, thoron, and actinon. Chapter 8 tackles the solubilities of diborane and the gaseous hydrides of groups IV, V, and

  1. New oxidation and photo-oxidation products of tryptophan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savige, W.E.

    1975-01-01

    Dye-sensitized photo-oxidation of tryptophan in water gives N'-formylkynurenine and (+-)-3a-hydroxy-1,2,3a,8,8a-hexahydropyrrolo[2,3-b] indole-2-carboxylic acid. The latter rearranges to oxindolyl-3-alanine on irradiation with UV light and reacts with thiols, including cysteine, in warm 20% acetic acid to give the corresponding 2-tryptophyl sulphides. (orig.) [de

  2. Tryptophan Predicts the Risk for Future Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Tianlu; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Ma, Xiaojing; Bao, Yuqian; Ni, Yan; Hu, Cheng; Rajani, Cynthia; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, 5 amino acids were identified and verified as important metabolites highly associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) development. This report aims to assess the association of tryptophan with the development of T2D and to evaluate its performance with existing amino acid markers. A total of 213 participants selected from a ten-year longitudinal Shanghai Diabetes Study (SHDS) were examined in two ways: 1) 51 subjects who developed diabetes and 162 individuals who remained metabolically h...

  3. A Jerte Valley Cherry-Based Product as a Supply of Tryptophan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Garrido

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available L -Tryptophan (tryptophan is an essential amino acid in humans. It has important roles as a precursor of different bioactive compounds. Based on previous studies in which tryptophan has been shown to be present in fresh cherries, the aim of the present work was to analyze the tryptophan content of a Jerte Valley cherry-based product. A previously optimized method of analysis of tryptophan was used, ie, high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC/FL. As expected, HPLC/FL technique permitted to detect and quantify the tryptophan content in a different matrix rather than fresh cherries. In fact, the Jerte Valley cherry-based product contained 69.54 ± 10.64 ppm of tryptophan, thereby showing that this product is a good source of tryptophan. In summary, it has been proven that the Jerte Valley cherry-based product is rich in tryptophan and may be indicated as a supply of this essential amino acid as well as having potential health benefits for conditions where tryptophan is necessary.

  4. Heme-containing enzymes and inhibitors for tryptophan metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Daojing; Lin, Ying-Wu; Tan, Xiangshi

    2017-09-20

    Iron-containing enzymes such as heme enzymes play crucial roles in biological systems. Three distinct heme-containing dioxygenase enzymes, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 2 (IDO2) catalyze the initial and rate-limiting step of l-tryptophan catabolism through the kynurenine pathway in mammals. Overexpression of these enzymes causes depletion of tryptophan and the accumulation of metabolic products, which contributes to tumor immune tolerance and immune dysregulation in a variety of disease pathologies. In the past few decades, IDO1 has garnered the most attention as a therapeutic target with great potential in cancer immunotherapy. Many potential inhibitors of IDO1 have been designed, synthesized and evaluated, among which indoximod (d-1-MT), INCB024360, GDC-0919 (formerly NLG-919), and an IDO1 peptide-based vaccine have advanced to the clinical trial stage. However, recently, the roles of TDO and IDO2 have been elucidated in immune suppression. In this review, the current drug discovery landscape for targeting TDO, IDO1 and IDO2 is highlighted, with particular attention to the recent use of drugs in clinical trials. Moreover, the crystal structures of these enzymes, in complex with inhibitors, and the mechanisms of Trp catabolism in the first step, are summarized to provide information for facilitating the discovery of new enzyme inhibitors.

  5. Kinetics and mechanism of the condensation of pyridoxal hydrochloride with L-tryptophan and D-tryptophan, and the chemical transformation of their products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishchugin, F. V.; Tuleberdiev, I. T.

    2017-10-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of interaction between pyridoxal and L-tryptophan, D-tryptophan, and their derivatives are studied. It is found that condensation reactions proceed via three kinetically distinguishable stages: (1) the rapid intraplanar addition of the NH2 groups of the amino acids to pyridoxal with the formation of amino alcohols; (2) the rotational isomerism of amino alcohol fragments with their subsequent dehydration and the formation of a Schiff base with a specific configuration; (3) the abstraction of α-hydrogen in the product of condensation of pyridoxal with L-tryptophan, or the abstraction of CO2 in the product of condensation of pyridoxal with D-tryptophan with the formation of quinoid structures, hydrolysis of which results in the preparation of pyridoxamine and keto acid or pyridoxal and tryptamine, respectively. Schiff bases resistant to further chemical transformations are formed in the reaction with tryptophan methyl ester.

  6. Targeting Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Acidic Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Roland, Christina L.; Deng, Defeng; Arumugam, Thiruvengadam; Moshnikova, Anna; Andreev, Oleg A.; Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Logsdon, Craig D.

    2014-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the USA, accounting for ~40,000 deaths annually. The dismal prognosis for PDAC is largely due to its late diagnosis. Currently, the most sensitive diagnosis of PDAC requires invasive procedures, such as endoscopic ultrasonography, which has inherent risks and accuracy that is highly operator dependent. Here we took advantage of a general characteristic of solid tumors, the acidic microenvironment that is generated as a by-product of metabolism, to develop a novel approach of using pH (Low) Insertion Peptides (pHLIPs) for imaging of PDAC. We show that fluorescently labeled pHLIPs can localize and specifically detect PDAC in human xenografts as well as PDAC and PanIN lesions in genetically engineered mouse models. This novel approach may improve detection, differential diagnosis and staging of PDAC.

  7. Decreased decorin expression in the tumor microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozoky, Benedek; Savchenko, Andrii; Guven, Hayrettin; Ponten, Fredrik; Klein, George; Szekely, Laszlo

    2014-01-01

    Decorin is a small leucine-rich proteoglycan, synthesized and deposited by fibroblasts in the stroma where it binds to collagen I. It sequesters several growth factors and antagonizes numerous members of the receptor tyrosine kinase family. In experimental murine systems, it acted as a potent tumor suppressor. Examining the Human Protein Atlas online database of immunostained tissue samples we have surveyed decorin expression in silico in several different tumor types, comparing them with corresponding normal tissues. We found that decorin is abundantly secreted and deposited in normal connective tissue but its expression is consistently decreased in the tumor microenvironment. We developed a software to quantitate the difference in expression. The presence of two closely related proteoglycans in the newly formed tumor stroma indicated that the decreased decorin expression was not caused by the delay in proteoglycan deposition in the newly formed connective tissue surrounding the tumor

  8. Of Microenvironments and Mammary Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBarge, Mark A; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2007-06-01

    In most adult tissues there reside pools of stem and progenitor cells inside specialized microenvironments referred to as niches. The niche protects the stem cells from inappropriate expansion and directs their critical functions. Thus guided, stem cells are able to maintain tissue homeostasis throughout the ebb and flow of metabolic and physical demands encountered over a lifetime. Indeed, a pool of stem cells maintains mammary gland structure throughout development, and responds to the physiological demands associated with pregnancy. This review discusses how stem cells were identified in both human and mouse mammary glands; each requiring different techniques that were determined by differing biological needs and ethical constraints. These studies together create a robust portrait of mammary gland biology and identify the location of the stem cell niche, elucidate a developmental hierarchy, and suggest how the niche might be manipulated for therapeutic benefit.

  9. Plasticity of the Muscle Stem Cell Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinulovic, Ivana; Furrer, Regula; Handschin, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Satellite cells (SCs) are adult muscle stem cells capable of repairing damaged and creating new muscle tissue throughout life. Their functionality is tightly controlled by a microenvironment composed of a wide variety of factors, such as numerous secreted molecules and different cell types, including blood vessels, oxygen, hormones, motor neurons, immune cells, cytokines, fibroblasts, growth factors, myofibers, myofiber metabolism, the extracellular matrix and tissue stiffness. This complex niche controls SC biology-quiescence, activation, proliferation, differentiation or renewal and return to quiescence. In this review, we attempt to give a brief overview of the most important players in the niche and their mutual interaction with SCs. We address the importance of the niche to SC behavior under physiological and pathological conditions, and finally survey the significance of an artificial niche both for basic and translational research purposes.

  10. Sensitivity of Dendritic Cells to Microenvironment Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Maria Motta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells capable of either activating the immune response or inducing and maintaining immune tolerance. They do this by integrating stimuli from the environment and changing their functional status as a result of plasticity. The modifications suffered by these cells have consequences in the way the organism may respond. In the present work two opposing situations known to affect dendritic cells are analyzed: tumor growth, leading to a microenvironment that favors the induction of a tolerogenic profile, and organ transplantation, which leads to a proinflammatory profile. Lessons learned from these situations may help to understand the mechanisms of modulation resulting not only from the above circumstances, but also from other pathologies.

  11. Neptunium (IV) oxalate solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luerkens, D.W.

    1983-07-01

    The equilibrium solubility of neptunium (IV) oxalate in nitric/oxalic acid solutions was determined at 22 0 C, 45 0 C, and 60 0 C. The concentrations of nitric/oxalic acid solutions represented a wide range of free oxalate ion concentration. A mathematical solubility model was developed which is based on the formation of the known complexes of neptunium (IV) oxalate. the solubility model uses a simplified concentration parameter which is proportional to the free oxalate ion concentration. The solubility model can be used to estimate the equilibrium solubility of neptunium (IV) oxalate over a wide range of oxalic and nitric acid concentrations at each temperature

  12. Photoinduced electron transfer involving eosin-tryptophan conjugates. Long-lived radical pair states for systems incorporating aromatic amino acid side chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, G. II; Farahat, C.W.; Oh, C. (Boston Univ., MA (United States))

    1994-07-14

    The electron-transfer photochemistry of the covalent derivatives of the dye eosin, in which the xanthene dye is covalently attached to the amino acid L-tryptophan via the thiohydantoin derivative, the tryptophan dipeptide, and an ethyl ester derivative, has been investigated. The singlet excited state of the dye is significantly quenched on attachment of the aromatic amino acid residue. Dye triplet states are also intercepted through intramolecular interaction of excited dye and amino acid pendants. Flash photolysis experiments verify that this interaction involves electron transfer from the indole side chains of tryptophan. Rate constants for electron transfer are discussed in terms of the distance relationships for the eosin chromophore and aromatic redox sites on peptide derivatives, the pathway for [sigma]-[pi] through-bond interaction between redox sites, and the multiplicity and state of protonation for electron-transfer intermediates. Selected electron-transfer photoreactions were studied under conditions of binding of the peptide derivatives in a high molecular weight, water-soluble, globular polymer, poly(vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone). 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Digestible tryptophan levels for male broilers in pre-starter and starter diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Samuel Borges

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to determine the digestible tryptophan requirements for male broilers in pre-starter and starter phases. Two experiments using 400 Cobb broilers were performed 200 males in the first experiment for the pre-starter phase (one to seven days old, and 200 males in the second experiment for the starter phase (eight to 21 days old. Chicks were housed in batter boxes made of galvanized steel as an experimental shed. The experiments were performed in a completely randomized design, with four treatments and five replicates, with ten birds each. In both experiments, the tryptophan requirement was determined using diets with different levels of digestible tryptophan. A tryptophan-deficient diet was formulated, as a basal diet, which was supplemented with increased levels of L-tryptophan in order to achieve the desirable digestible tryptophan levels. Treatments consisted of 0.209% (basal diet; 0.223%; 0.235% and 0.248% digestible tryptophan for the pre-starter phase (experiment 1 and 0.187% (basal diet; 0.200%, 0.211% and 0.223% digestible tryptophan for the starter phase (experiment 2. We evaluated feed intake, weight gain and feed conversion, as well as the metabolizability of feed nutrients. The performance and metabolic data were subjected to analysis of variance, and estimates of digestible tryptophan levels were made through polynomial regression models at 5% probability. There was no significant difference between the digestible tryptophan levels in the diet over performance and digestibility in both treatments. It is possible to conclude that the basal diet with 0.209% digestible tryptophan for the pre-starter phase and 0.187% for the starter phase, at a tryptophan: lysine ratio of 16%, as sufficient to meet the broilers requirements.

  14. Suppression of aggression in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by dietary L-tryptophan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winberg, S; Øverli, Ø; Lepage, O

    2001-11-01

    Juvenile rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss were isolated in individual compartments in observation aquaria and allowed to acclimate for 1 week, during which they were fed commercial trout feed. Thereafter, the fish were tested for aggressive behaviour using a resident/intruder test. Following this first resident/intruder test, the feed was exchanged for an experimental wet feed supplemented with 0.15 % or 1.5 % L-tryptophan (by wet mass). Controls received the same feed but without L-tryptophan supplementation. The fish were fed to satiety daily, and their individual feed intake was recorded. Aggressive behaviour was quantified again after 3 and 7 days of L-tryptophan feeding using the resident/intruder test. Feeding the fish L-tryptophan-supplemented feed for 3 days had no effect on aggressive behaviour, whereas feeding the fish L-tryptophan-supplemented feed for 7 days significantly suppressed aggressive behaviour in the fish, an effect seen at both levels of L-tryptophan supplementation. Fish fed L-tryptophan-supplemented feed showed elevated plasma and brain levels of L-tryptophan. The amino acid L-tryptophan is the precursor of serotonin, and supplementary dietary L-tryptophan was found to elevate levels of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and the 5-HIAA/serotonin concentration ratio in the brain. Neither feed intake nor plasma cortisol level was significantly affected by dietary L-tryptophan. Central serotonin is believed to have an inhibitory effect on aggressive behaviour, and it is suggested that the suppressive effect of dietary L-tryptophan on aggressive behaviour is mediated by an elevation of brain serotonergic activity.

  15. UV radiation-induced photochemical damage of tryptophan in peptides, proteins and ocular lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hibbard, L.B.

    1985-01-01

    These studies were undertaken to investigate the possible involvement of the amino acid tryptophan in the near-ultraviolet radiation-induced photochemical alteration of peptides and proteins and the role tryptophan photolysis plays in ocular lens damage. Sample irradiations were performed to determine if tryptophan photolysis occurs with radiation in the UV-A region in comparison to photolysis induced by wavelengths in the normal absorption band of the amino acid (UV-B). Photolysis studies were carried out on free tryptophan and two dipeptides, tryptophyglycine and glycyltryptophan, in aqueous solutions at different pH values in the range 4.5-10.0 under aerated or anaerobic conditions. Rates of photolysis of these 290 nm-irradiated compounds, detected by observing tryptophan fluorescence intensity loss during irradiation, were compared and significant differences were observed for each compound which varied with pH and oxygen environment. Another series of experiments examined the photolysis of tryptophan residues in lens proteins in whole rat lenses induced by 290 nm and 298 nm dye laser radiation. Tryptophan residue photolysis was, once again, monitored by loss in tryptophan fluorescence intensity. A relationship was derived between tryptophan loss and photoproduct buildup during irradiation

  16. [Prostate cancer microenvironment: Its structure, functions and therapeutic applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorion, R; Bladou, F; Spatz, A; van Kempen, L; Irani, J

    2016-06-01

    In the field of prostate cancer there is a growing tendency for more and more studies to emphasise the predominant role of the zone situated between the tumour and the host: the tumour microenvironment. The aim of this article is to describe the structure and the functions of the prostate cancer microenvironment as well as the principal treatments that are being applied to it. PubMed and ScienceDirect databases have been interrogated using the association of keywords "tumour microenvironment" and "neoplasm therapy" along with "microenvironnement tumoral" and "traitements". Of the 593 articles initially found, 50 were finally included. The tumour microenvironment principally includes host elements that are diverted from their primary functions and encourage the development of the tumour. In it we find immunity cells, support tissue as well as vascular and lymphatic neovascularization. Highlighting the major role played by this microenvironment has led to the development of specific treatments, notably antiangiogenic therapy and immunotherapy. The tumour microenvironment, the tumour and the host influence themselves mutually and create a variable situation over time. Improvement of the knowledge of the prostate cancer microenvironment gradually enables us to pass from an approach centred on the tumour to a broader approach to the whole tumoral ecosystem. This enabled the emergence of new treatments whose place in the therapeutic arsenal still need to be found. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Enhancement of carvedilol solubility by solid dispersion technique using cyclodextrins, water soluble polymers and hydroxyl acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuvaraja, K; Khanam, Jasmina

    2014-08-05

    Aim of the present work is to enhance aqueous solubility of carvedilol (CV) by solid dispersion technique using wide variety of carriers such as: β-cyclodextrin (βCD), hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD), tartaric acid (TA), polyvinyl pyrrolidone K-30 (PVP K-30) and poloxamer-407 (PLX-407). Various products of 'CV-solid dispersion' had been studied extensively in various pH conditions to check enhancement of solubility and dissolution characteristics of carvedilol. Any physical change upon interaction between CV and carriers was confirmed by instrumental analysis: XRD, DSC, FTIR and SEM. Negative change of Gibb's free energy and complexation constants (Kc, 75-240M(-1), for cyclodextrins and 1111-20,365M(-1), for PVP K-30 and PLX-407) were the evidence of stable nature of the binding between CV and carriers. 'Solubility enhancement factor' of ionized-CV was found high enough (340 times) with HPβCD in presence of TA. TA increases the binding efficiency of cyclodextrin and changing the pH of microenvironment in dissolution medium. In addition, ionization process was used to increase the apparent intrinsic solubility of drug. In vitro, dissolution time of CV was remarkably reduced in the solid dispersion system compared to that of pure drug. This may be attributed to increased wettability, dispersing ability and transformation of crystalline state of drug to amorphous one. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Gallium uptake in tryptophan-related pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.M.; Park, C.H.; Intenzo, C.M.; Patel, R.

    1991-01-01

    We describe a patient who developed fever, fatigue, muscle weakness, dyspnea, skin rash, and eosinophilia after taking high doses of tryptophan for insomnia for two years. A gallium-67 scan revealed diffuse increased uptake in the lung and no abnormal uptake in the muscular distribution. Bronchoscopy and biopsy confirmed inflammatory reactions with infiltration by eosinophils, mast cells, and lymphocytes. CT scan showed an interstitial alveolar pattern without fibrosis. EMG demonstrated diffuse myopathy. Muscle biopsy from the right thigh showed an inflammatory myositis with eosinophilic and lymphocytic infiltrations

  19. Antihypertensive and cardioprotective effects of the dipeptide isoleucine-tryptophan and whey protein hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M; Kopaliani, I; Jannasch, A; Mund, C; Todorov, V; Henle, T; Deussen, A

    2015-12-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are treatment of choice in hypertensive patients. Clinically used inhibitors exhibit a structural similarity to naturally occurring peptides. This study evaluated antihypertensive and cardioprotective effects of ACE-inhibiting peptides derived from food proteins in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Isoleucine-tryptophan (in vitro IC50 for ACE = 0.7 μm), a whey protein hydrolysate containing an augmented fraction of isoleucine-tryptophan, or captopril was given to spontaneously hypertensive rats (n = 60) over 14 weeks. Two further groups, receiving either no supplement (Placebo) or intact whey protein, served as controls. Systolic blood pressure age-dependently increased in the Placebo group, whereas the blood pressure rise was effectively blunted by isoleucine-tryptophan, whey protein hydrolysate and captopril (-42 ± 3, -38 ± 5, -55 ± 4 mm Hg vs. Placebo). At study end, myocardial mass was lower in isoleucine-tryptophan and captopril groups but only partially in the hydrolysate group. Coronary flow reserve (1 μm adenosine) was improved in isoleucine-tryptophan and captopril groups. Plasma ACE activity was significantly decreased in isoleucine-tryptophan, hydrolysate and captopril groups, but in aortic tissue only after isoleucine-tryptophan or captopril treatment. This was associated with lowered expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2. Following isoleucine-tryptophan and captopril treatments, gene expression of renin was significantly increased indicating an active feedback within renin-angiotensin system. Whey protein hydrolysate and isoleucine-tryptophan powerfully inhibit plasma ACE resulting in antihypertensive effects. Moreover, isoleucine-tryptophan blunts tissue ACE activity, reduces matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity and improves coronary flow reserve. Thus, whey protein hydrolysate and particularly isoleucine-tryptophan may serve as innovative food additives with the goal of attenuating

  20. Aberrant tryptophan transport in cultured fibroblast from patients with Male Idiopathic Osteoporosis: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ylva Pernow

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated, that long-term chronic tryptophan deficiency, results in decreased serotonin synthesis, which may lead to low bone mass and low bone formation. Findings from studies in male patients with idiopathic osteoporosis suggested a decreased transport of tryptophan in erythrocytes of osteoporotic patients, indicating that serotonin system defects may be involved in the etiology of low bone mass. Tryptophan is the precursor of serotonin, and a disturbed transport of tryptophan is implicated in altered serotonin synthesis. However, no study has investigated the tryptophan transport kinetics in MIO patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the kinetic parameters of tryptophan transport in fibroblasts derived from MIO patients compared to age and sex matched controls.Fibroblast cells were cultured from skin biopsies obtained from 14 patients diagnosed with Male Idiopathic Osteoporosis and from 13 healthy age-sex matched controls, without a diagnosis of osteoporosis. Transport of the amino acid tryptophan across the cell membrane was measured by the cluster tray method. The kinetic parameters, maximal transport capacity (Vmax and affinity constant (Km were determined by using the Lineweaver-Burke plot equation.The results of this study have shown a significantly lower mean value for Vmax (p=0.0138 and lower Km mean value (p=0.0009 of tryptophan transport in fibroblasts of MIO patients compared to the control group. A lower Vmax implied a decreased tryptophan transport availability in MIO patients.In conclusion, reduced cellular tryptophan availability in MIO patients might result in reduced brain serotonin synthesis and its endogenous levels in peripheral tissues, and this may contribute to low bone mass/formation. The findings of the present study could contribute to the etiology of idiopathic osteoporosis and for the development of novel approaches for diagnosis, treatment and management strategies of MIO. Keywords: Male

  1. Innate lymphoid cells and their stromal microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermayer, Zoltán; Vojkovics, Dóra; Balogh, Péter

    2017-09-01

    In addition to the interaction between antigen presenting cells, T and B lymphocytes, recent studies have revealed important roles for a diverse set of auxiliary cells that profoundly influence the induction and regulation of immune responses against pathogens. Of these the stromal cells composed of various non-hematopoietic constituents are crucial for the creation and maintenance of specialized semi-static three-dimensional lymphoid tissue microenvironment, whereas the more recently described innate lymphoid cells are generated by the diversification of committed lymphoid precursor cells independently from clonally rearranged antigen receptor genes. Recent findings have revealed important contributions by innate lymphoid cells in inflammation and protection against pathogens in a tissue-specific manner. Importantly, lymphoid stromal cells also influence the onset of immune responses in tissue-specific fashion, raising the possibility of tissue-specific stromal - innate lymphoid cell collaboration. In this review we summarize the main features and interactions between these two cells types, with particular emphasis on ILC type 3 cells and their microenvironmental partners. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The preference of tryptophan for membrane interfaces: insights from N-methylation of tryptophans in gramicidin channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haiyan; Greathouse, Denise V; Andersen, Olaf S; Koeppe, Roger E

    2008-08-08

    To better understand the structural and functional roles of tryptophan at the membrane/water interface in membrane proteins, we examined the structural and functional consequences of Trp --> 1-methyl-tryptophan substitutions in membrane-spanning gramicidin A channels. Gramicidin A channels are miniproteins that are anchored to the interface by four Trps near the C terminus of each subunit in a membrane-spanning dimer. We masked the hydrogen bonding ability of individual or multiple Trps by 1-methylation of the indole ring and examined the structural and functional changes using circular dichroism spectroscopy, size exclusion chromatography, solid state (2)H NMR spectroscopy, and single channel analysis. N-Methylation causes distinct changes in the subunit conformational preference, channel-forming propensity, single channel conductance and lifetime, and average indole ring orientations within the membrane-spanning channels. The extent of the local ring dynamic wobble does not increase, and may decrease slightly, when the indole NH is replaced by the non-hydrogen-bonding and more bulky and hydrophobic N-CH(3) group. The changes in conformational preference, which are associated with a shift in the distribution of the aromatic residues across the bilayer, are similar to those observed previously with Trp --> Phe substitutions. We conclude that indole N-H hydrogen bonding is of major importance for the folding of gramicidin channels. The changes in ion permeability, however, are quite different for Trp --> Phe and Trp --> 1-methyl-tryptophan substitutions, indicating that the indole dipole moment and perhaps also ring size and are important for ion permeation through these channels.

  3. Cellular Microenvironment Dictates Androgen Production by Murine Fetal Leydig Cells in Primary Culture1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Colleen M.; Muszynski, Jessica L.; Strotman, Lindsay N.; Lewis, Samantha R.; O'Connell, Rachel L.; Beebe, David J.; Theberge, Ashleigh B.; Jorgensen, Joan S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the fact that fetal Leydig cells are recognized as the primary source of androgens in male embryos, the mechanisms by which steroidogenesis occurs within the developing testis remain unclear. A genetic approach was used to visualize and isolate fetal Leydig cells from remaining cells within developing mouse testes. Cyp11a1-Cre mice were bred to mT/mG dual reporter mice to target membrane-tagged enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) within steroidogenic cells, whereas other cells expressed membrane-tagged tandem-dimer tomato red. Fetal Leydig cell identity was validated using double-labeled immunohistochemistry against GFP and the steroidogenic enzyme 3beta-HSD, and cells were successfully isolated as indicated by qPCR results from sorted cell populations. Because fetal Leydig cells must collaborate with neighboring cells to synthesize testosterone, we hypothesized that the fetal Leydig cell microenvironment defined their capacity for androgen production. Microfluidic culture devices were used to measure androstenedione and testosterone production of fetal Leydig cells that were cultured in cell-cell contact within a mixed population, were isolated but remained in medium contact via compartmentalized co-culture with other testicular cells, or were isolated and cultured alone. Results showed that fetal Leydig cells maintained their identity and steroidogenic activity for 3–5 days in primary culture. Microenvironment dictated proficiency of testosterone production. As expected, fetal Leydig cells produced androstenedione but not testosterone when cultured in isolation. More testosterone accumulated in medium from mixed cultures than from compartmentalized co-cultures initially; however, co-cultures maintained testosterone synthesis for a longer time. These data suggest that a combination of cell-cell contact and soluble factors constitute the ideal microenvironment for fetal Leydig cell activity in primary culture. PMID:25143354

  4. Tryptophan Biochemistry: Structural, Nutritional, Metabolic, and Medical Aspects in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palego, Lionella; Betti, Laura; Rossi, Alessandra; Giannaccini, Gino

    2016-01-01

    L-Tryptophan is the unique protein amino acid (AA) bearing an indole ring: its biotransformation in living organisms contributes either to keeping this chemical group in cells and tissues or to breaking it, by generating in both cases a variety of bioactive molecules. Investigations on the biology of Trp highlight the pleiotropic effects of its small derivatives on homeostasis processes. In addition to protein turn-over, in humans the pathways of Trp indole derivatives cover the synthesis of the neurotransmitter/hormone serotonin (5-HT), the pineal gland melatonin (MLT), and the trace amine tryptamine. The breakdown of the Trp indole ring defines instead the "kynurenine shunt" which produces cell-response adapters as L-kynurenine, kynurenic and quinolinic acids, or the coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)). This review aims therefore at tracing a "map" of the main molecular effectors in human tryptophan (Trp) research, starting from the chemistry of this AA, dealing then with its biosphere distribution and nutritional value for humans, also focusing on some proteins responsible for its tissue-dependent uptake and biotransformation. We will thus underscore the role of Trp biochemistry in the pathogenesis of human complex diseases/syndromes primarily involving the gut, neuroimmunoendocrine/stress responses, and the CNS, supporting the use of -Omics approaches in this field.

  5. Tryptophan autofluorescence imaging of neoplasms of the human colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Bhaskar; Renkoski, Timothy; Graves, Logan R.; Rial, Nathaniel S.; Tsikitis, Vassiliki Liana; Nfonsom, Valentine; Pugh, Judith; Tiwari, Piyush; Gavini, Hemanth; Utzinger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Detection of flat neoplasia is a major challenge in colorectal cancer screening, as missed lesions can lead to the development of an unexpected `incident' cancer prior to the subsequent endoscopy. The use of a tryptophan-related autofluorescence has been reported to be increased in murine intestinal dysplasia. The emission spectra of cells isolated from human adenocarcinoma and normal mucosa of the colon were studied and showed markedly greater emission intensity from cancerous cells compared to cells obtained from the surrounding normal mucosa. A proto-type multispectral imaging system optimized for ultraviolet macroscopic imaging of tissue was used to obtain autofluorescence images of surgical specimens of colonic neoplasms and normal mucosa after resection. Fluorescence images did not display the expected greater emission from the tumor as compared to the normal mucosa, most probably due to increased optical absorption and scattering in the tumors. Increased fluorescence intensity in neoplasms was observed however, once fluorescence images were corrected using reflectance images. Tryptophan fluorescence alone may be useful in differentiating normal and cancerous cells, while in tissues its autofluorescence image divided by green reflectance may be useful in displaying neoplasms.

  6. Microenvironment-Centred Dynamics in Aggressive B-Cell Lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilde Cacciatore

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive B-cell lymphomas share high proliferative and invasive attitudes and dismal prognosis despite heterogeneous biological features. In the interchained sequence of events leading to cancer progression, neoplastic clone-intrinsic molecular events play a major role. Nevertheless, microenvironment-related cues have progressively come into focus as true determinants for this process. The cancer-associated microenvironment is a complex network of nonneoplastic immune and stromal cells embedded in extracellular components, giving rise to a multifarious crosstalk with neoplastic cells towards the induction of a supportive milieu. The immunological and stromal microenvironments have been classically regarded as essential partners of indolent lymphomas, while considered mainly negligible in the setting of aggressive B-cell lymphomas that, by their nature, are less reliant on external stimuli. By this paper we try to delineate the cardinal microenvironment-centred dynamics exerting an influence over lymphoid clone progression in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

  7. Dry Eye Management: Targeting the Ocular Surface Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaobo; M, Vimalin Jeyalatha; Qu, Yangluowa; He, Xin; Ou, Shangkun; Bu, Jinghua; Jia, Changkai; Wang, Junqi; Wu, Han; Liu, Zuguo; Li, Wei

    2017-06-29

    Dry eye can damage the ocular surface and result in mild corneal epithelial defect to blinding corneal pannus formation and squamous metaplasia. Significant progress in the treatment of dry eye has been made in the last two decades; progressing from lubricating and hydrating the ocular surface with artificial tear to stimulating tear secretion; anti-inflammation and immune regulation. With the increase in knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of dry eye, we propose in this review the concept of ocular surface microenvironment. Various components of the microenvironment contribute to the homeostasis of ocular surface. Compromise in one or more components can result in homeostasis disruption of ocular surface leading to dry eye disease. Complete evaluation of the microenvironment component changes in dry eye patients will not only lead to appropriate diagnosis, but also guide in timely and effective clinical management. Successful treatment of dry eye should be aimed to restore the homeostasis of the ocular surface microenvironment.

  8. Dry Eye Management: Targeting the Ocular Surface Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaobo; Jeyalatha M, Vimalin; Qu, Yangluowa; He, Xin; Ou, Shangkun; Bu, Jinghua; Jia, Changkai; Wang, Junqi; Wu, Han; Liu, Zuguo

    2017-01-01

    Dry eye can damage the ocular surface and result in mild corneal epithelial defect to blinding corneal pannus formation and squamous metaplasia. Significant progress in the treatment of dry eye has been made in the last two decades; progressing from lubricating and hydrating the ocular surface with artificial tear to stimulating tear secretion; anti-inflammation and immune regulation. With the increase in knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of dry eye, we propose in this review the concept of ocular surface microenvironment. Various components of the microenvironment contribute to the homeostasis of ocular surface. Compromise in one or more components can result in homeostasis disruption of ocular surface leading to dry eye disease. Complete evaluation of the microenvironment component changes in dry eye patients will not only lead to appropriate diagnosis, but also guide in timely and effective clinical management. Successful treatment of dry eye should be aimed to restore the homeostasis of the ocular surface microenvironment. PMID:28661456

  9. Tumor microenvironment indoctrination: an emerging hallmark of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Jacky G

    2012-01-01

    Nastiness of cancer does not only reside in the corruption of cancer cells by genetic aberrations that drive their sustained proliferative power--the roots of malignancy--but also in its aptitude to reciprocally sculpt its surrounding environment and cellular stromal ecosystem, in such a way that the corrupted tumor microenvironment becomes a full pro-tumorigenic entity. Such a contribution had been appreciated three decades ago already, with the discovery of tumor angiogenesis and extracellular matrix remodeling. Nevertheless, the recent emergence of the tumor microenvironment as the critical determinant in cancer biology is paralleled by the promising therapeutic potential it carries, opening alternate routes to fight cancer. The study of the tumor microenvironment recruited numerous lead-scientists over the years, with distinct perspectives, and some of them have kindly accepted to contribute to the elaboration of this special issue entitled Tumor microenvironment indoctrination: An emerging hallmark of cancer.

  10. Results of correlation of values of individual behaviour of rats with liver tryptophan pyrrolase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikal, K; Kunz, K

    1976-01-01

    A significant negative correlation was found between the individual animal's horizontal activity in an open field and liver tryptophan pyrrolase (LTP) activity. On the other hand, the duration of immobility in an open field correlated postively and significantly with liver tryptophan pyrrolase activity.

  11. Inhibition of hormonal and behavioral effects of stress by tryptophan in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Sumera; Saleem, Darakhshan; Haleem, Muhammad A; Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2017-11-03

    Stress in known to alter hormonal systems. Pharmacological doses of tryptophan, the essential amino acid precursor of serotonin, increase circulating leptin and decrease ghrelin in normal healthy adults. Because systemically injected leptin inhibits stress-induced behavioral deficits and systemically injected serotonin modulates leptin release from the adipocytes, we used tryptophan as a pharmacological tool to modulate hormonal and behavioral responses in unstressed and stressed rats. Leptin, ghrelin, serotonin, tryptophan, and behavior were studied in unstressed and stressed rats following oral administration of 0, 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg of tryptophan. Following oral administration of tryptophan at a dose of 300 mg/kg, circulating levels of serotonin and leptin increased and those of ghrelin decreased in unstressed animals. No effect occurred on 24-hours cumulative food intake and elevated plus maze performance. Exposure to 2 hours immobilization stress decreased 24 hours cumulative food intake and impaired performance in elevated plus maze monitored next day. Serum serotonin decreased, leptin increased, and no effect occurred on ghrelin. Stress effects on serotonin, leptin, food intake, and elevated plus maze performance did not occur in tryptophan-pretreated animals. Tryptophan-induced decreases of ghrelin also did not occur in stressed animals. The findings show an important role of serum serotonin, leptin, and ghrelin in responses to stress and suggest that the essential amino acid tryptophan can improve therapeutics in stress-induced hormonal and behavioral disorders.

  12. Delaying aging and the aging-associated decline in protein homeostasis by inhibition of tryptophan degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Goot, Annemieke T.; Zhu, Wentao; Vazquez-Manrique, Rafael P.; Seinstra, Renee I.; Dettmer, Katja; Michels, Helen; Farina, Francesca; Krijnen, Jasper; Melki, Ronald; Buijsman, Rogier C.; Silva, Mariana Ruiz; Thijssen, Karen L.; Kema, Ido P.; Neri, Christian; Oefner, Peter J.; Nollen, Ellen A. A.

    2012-01-01

    Toxicity of aggregation-prone proteins is thought to play an important role in aging and age-related neurological diseases like Parkinson and Alzheimer's diseases. Here, we identify tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (tdo-2), the first enzyme in the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation, as a

  13. The association of sleep quality and insomnia with dietary intake of tryptophan and niacin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verster, J.; Fernstrand, A.; Bury, D.; Roth, T.; Garssen, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Dietary intake of tryptophan and niacin have been related to sleep. However, the sleep-promoting effects of these nutrients are still under investigation. The aim of the current study was to examine the relationship between daily dietary intake of tryptophan and niacin and sleep.

  14. Does acute tryptophan depletion affect peripheral serotonin metabolism in the intestine?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keszthelyi, D.; Troost, F.J.; Jonkers, D.M.; Donkelaar, van E.L.; Dekker, J.; Buurman, W.A.; Masclee, A.A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT), a tryptophan metabolite, plays an important regulatory role in the human central nervous system and in the gastrointestinal tract. Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) is currently the most widely established method to investigate 5-HT metabolism.

  15. Photophysics of tryptophan in H2O, D2O, and in nonaqueous solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudgin, E.; Lopez-Delgado, R.; Ware, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    The fluorescence properties of tryptophan in water and deuterated water have been examined. Tryptophan molecules exhibit three distinct fluorescence lifetimes in water which become longer in deuterated water; the two shorter lifetimes are present below the pK of the amino group and the long lifetime appears as the pH is raised through this pK. The steady-state quenching of tryptophan fluorescence by hydrogen ion in the region of pH less than 3 shows a definite wavelength effect, consistent with less-pronounced quenching of the subnanosecond component whose emission maximum is at 330 nm. The Stern-Volmer plots show a marked curvature in the direction of decreasing Stern-Volmer constant as [H 3 O + ] increases. Deuterium ion also quenches tryptophan fluorescence at low pD. A kinetic scheme is proposed which reproduces both the steady-state and lifetime quenching results. Tryptophan in methanol or ethanol exhibits three fluorescence lifetimes; the relative percentage of the long component vs. the intermediate component can be varied by the addition of triethylamine or acid. In dimethyl sulfoxide, tryptophan and tryptophan deuterated at the amino and ring nirogen positions show identical behavior, both having the same decay parameters. These results are discussed in light of the theories which have recently been proposed to account for the several components in tryptophan fluorescence decay. Solvent interaction is suggested to play a critical role

  16. Impact of the ovarian microenvironment on serous cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0182 TITLE: Impact of the ovarian microenvironment on serous cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Joanna E. Burdette...Impact of the ovarian microenvironment on serous cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0182 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...for intervention that would block serous cancer while still confined to the fallopian tubes. Using a series of normal, modified, and tumorigenic tubal

  17. Microenvironments and Signaling Pathways Regulating Early Dissemination, Dormancy, and Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    regulators of branching morphogenesis during mammary gland development 17,18, arguing that normal mammary epithelial cells cooperate with these innate ...CD45+CD11b+F4/80+ cells lacking lymphoid and granulocytic markers (Supplementary Fig.3B). viSNE plots 30 of myelo- monocytic cells (Fig.5A) showed that...cancer cells and how the microenvironment in these primary sites named P-TMEM (Primary Tumor Microenvironment of Metastases) contribute to early

  18. The inflammatory microenvironment in colorectal neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Mairi H; Murray, Graeme I; Stewart, Keith N; Norrie, Gillian; Mayer, Claus; Hold, Georgina L; Thomson, John; Fyfe, Nicky; Hope, Mairi; Mowat, N Ashley G; Drew, Janice E; El-Omar, Emad M

    2011-01-07

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Inflammatory activity within the stroma of invasive colorectal tumours is known to be a key predictor of disease activity with type, density and location of immune cells impacting on patient prognosis. To date, there has been no report of inflammatory phenotype within pre-malignant human colonic adenomas. Assessing the stromal microenvironment and particularly, inflammatory activity within colorectal neoplastic lesions is central to understanding early colorectal carcinogenesis. Inflammatory cell infiltrate was assessed by immunohistochemistry in paired colonic adenoma and adjacent normal colonic mucosa samples, and adenomas exhibiting increasing degrees of epithelial cell dysplasia. Macrophage phenotype was assessed using double stain immunohistochemistry incorporating expression of an intracellular enzyme of function. A targeted array of inflammatory cytokine and receptor genes, validated by RT-PCR, was used to assess inflammatory gene expression. Inflammatory cell infiltrates are a key feature of sporadic adenomatous colonic polyps with increased macrophage, neutrophil and T cell (specifically helper and activated subsets) infiltration in adenomatous colonic polyps, that increases in association with characteristics of high malignant potential, namely, increasing degree of cell dysplasia and adenoma size. Macrophages within adenomas express iNOS, suggestive of a pro-inflammatory phenotype. Several inflammatory cytokine genes (CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL3, CCL20, IL8, CCL23, CCL19, CCL21, CCL5) are dysregulated in adenomas. This study has provided evidence of increased inflammation within pre-malignant colonic adenomas. This may allow potential mechanistic pathways in the initiation and promotion of early colorectal carcinogenesis to be identified.

  19. The Inflammatory Microenvironment in Colorectal Neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Mairi H.; Murray, Graeme I.; Stewart, Keith N.; Norrie, Gillian; Mayer, Claus; Hold, Georgina L.; Thomson, John; Fyfe, Nicky; Hope, Mairi; Mowat, N. Ashley G.; Drew, Janice E.; El-Omar, Emad M.

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Inflammatory activity within the stroma of invasive colorectal tumours is known to be a key predictor of disease activity with type, density and location of immune cells impacting on patient prognosis. To date, there has been no report of inflammatory phenotype within pre-malignant human colonic adenomas. Assessing the stromal microenvironment and particularly, inflammatory activity within colorectal neoplastic lesions is central to understanding early colorectal carcinogenesis. Inflammatory cell infiltrate was assessed by immunohistochemistry in paired colonic adenoma and adjacent normal colonic mucosa samples, and adenomas exhibiting increasing degrees of epithelial cell dysplasia. Macrophage phenotype was assessed using double stain immunohistochemistry incorporating expression of an intracellular enzyme of function. A targeted array of inflammatory cytokine and receptor genes, validated by RT-PCR, was used to assess inflammatory gene expression. Inflammatory cell infiltrates are a key feature of sporadic adenomatous colonic polyps with increased macrophage, neutrophil and T cell (specifically helper and activated subsets) infiltration in adenomatous colonic polyps, that increases in association with characteristics of high malignant potential, namely, increasing degree of cell dysplasia and adenoma size. Macrophages within adenomas express iNOS, suggestive of a pro-inflammatory phenotype. Several inflammatory cytokine genes (CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL3, CCL20, IL8, CCL23, CCL19, CCL21, CCL5) are dysregulated in adenomas. This study has provided evidence of increased inflammation within pre-malignant colonic adenomas. This may allow potential mechanistic pathways in the initiation and promotion of early colorectal carcinogenesis to be identified. PMID:21249124

  20. The inflammatory microenvironment in colorectal neoplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mairi H McLean

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Inflammatory activity within the stroma of invasive colorectal tumours is known to be a key predictor of disease activity with type, density and location of immune cells impacting on patient prognosis. To date, there has been no report of inflammatory phenotype within pre-malignant human colonic adenomas. Assessing the stromal microenvironment and particularly, inflammatory activity within colorectal neoplastic lesions is central to understanding early colorectal carcinogenesis. Inflammatory cell infiltrate was assessed by immunohistochemistry in paired colonic adenoma and adjacent normal colonic mucosa samples, and adenomas exhibiting increasing degrees of epithelial cell dysplasia. Macrophage phenotype was assessed using double stain immunohistochemistry incorporating expression of an intracellular enzyme of function. A targeted array of inflammatory cytokine and receptor genes, validated by RT-PCR, was used to assess inflammatory gene expression. Inflammatory cell infiltrates are a key feature of sporadic adenomatous colonic polyps with increased macrophage, neutrophil and T cell (specifically helper and activated subsets infiltration in adenomatous colonic polyps, that increases in association with characteristics of high malignant potential, namely, increasing degree of cell dysplasia and adenoma size. Macrophages within adenomas express iNOS, suggestive of a pro-inflammatory phenotype. Several inflammatory cytokine genes (CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL3, CCL20, IL8, CCL23, CCL19, CCL21, CCL5 are dysregulated in adenomas. This study has provided evidence of increased inflammation within pre-malignant colonic adenomas. This may allow potential mechanistic pathways in the initiation and promotion of early colorectal carcinogenesis to be identified.

  1. Enhancement of stability of L-tryptophan dehydrogenase from Nostoc punctiforme ATCC29133 and its application to L-tryptophan assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Daisuke; Okazaki, Seiji; Matsuda, Motoki; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2015-02-20

    Microbial NAD(+)-dependent L-tryptophan dehydrogenase (TrpDH, EC1.4.1.19), which catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination and the reductive amination between L-tryptophan and indole-3-pyruvic acid, was found in the scytonemin biosynthetic pathway of Nostoc punctiforme ATCC29133. The TrpDH exhibited high specificity toward L-tryptophan, but its instability was a drawback for L-tryptophan determination. The mutant enzyme TrpDH L59F/D168G/A234D/I296N with thermal stability was obtained by screening of Escherichia coli transformants harboring various mutant genes, which were generated by error-prone PCR using complementation in an L-tryptophan auxotroph of E. coli. The specific activity and stability of this mutant enzyme were higher than those of the wild type enzyme. We also revealed here that in these four mutation points, the two amino acid residues Asp168 and Ile296 contributed to increase the enzyme stability, and the Leu59, Ala234 residues to increase its specific activity. Growth of the strain harboring the gene of above 4 point mutated enzyme was accelerated by the enhanced performance. In the present study, we demonstrated that TrpDH L59F/D168G/A234D/I296N was available for determination of L-tryptophan in human plasma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The crystal structure of tryptophan hydroxylase with bound amino acid substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windahl, Michael Skovbo; Petersen, Charlotte Rode; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2008-01-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) is a mononuclear non-heme iron enzyme, which catalyzes the reaction between tryptophan, O2, and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) to produce 5-hydroxytryptophan and 4a-hydroxytetrahydrobiopterin. This is the first and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of the neurotransmi......Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) is a mononuclear non-heme iron enzyme, which catalyzes the reaction between tryptophan, O2, and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) to produce 5-hydroxytryptophan and 4a-hydroxytetrahydrobiopterin. This is the first and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis...... acid hydroxylase with bound natural amino acid substrate. The iron coordination can be described as distorted trigonal bipyramidal coordination with His273, His278, and Glu318 (partially bidentate) and one imidazole as ligands. The tryptophan stacks against Pro269 with a distance of 3.9 Å between...

  3. Tryptophan tags and de novo designed complementary affinity ligands for the expression and purification of recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, Ana Sofia; Carvalho, Sara; Dias, Ana Margarida G C; Guilherme, Márcia; Pereira, Alice S; Caraça, Luciana T; Coroadinha, Ana Sofia; Lowe, Christopher R; Roque, A Cecília A

    2016-11-11

    A common strategy for the production and purification of recombinant proteins is to fuse a tag to the protein terminal residues and employ a "tag-specific" ligand for fusion protein capture and purification. In this work, we explored the effect of two tryptophan-based tags, NWNWNW and WFWFWF, on the expression and purification of Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP) used as a model fusion protein. The titers obtained with the expression of these fusion proteins in soluble form were 0.11mgml -1 and 0.48mgml -1 for WFWFWF and NWNWNW, respectively. A combinatorial library comprising 64 ligands based on the Ugi reaction was prepared and screened for binding GFP-tagged and non-tagged proteins. Complementary ligands A2C2 and A3C1 were selected for the effective capture of NWNWNW and WFWFWF tagged proteins, respectively, in soluble forms. These affinity pairs displayed 10 6 M -1 affinity constants and Qmax values of 19.11±2.60ugg -1 and 79.39ugg -1 for the systems WFWFWF AND NWNWNW, respectively. GFP fused to the WFWFWF affinity tag was also produced as inclusion bodies, and a refolding-on column strategy was explored using the ligand A4C8, selected from the combinatorial library of ligands but in presence of denaturant agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Gd-labeled glycol chitosan as a pH-responsive magnetic resonance imaging agent for detecting acidic tumor microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwe, Kido; Huang, Ching-Hui; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2013-10-24

    Neoplastic lesions can create a hostile tumor microenvironment with low extracellular pH. It is commonly believed that these conditions can contribute to tumor progression as well as resistance to therapy. We report the development and characterization of a pH-responsive magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent for imaging the acidic tumor microenvironment. The preparation included the conjugation of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid 1-(2,5-dioxo-1-pyrrolidinyl) ester (DOTA-NHS) to the surface of a water-soluble glycol chitosan (GC) polymer, which contains pH-titrable primary amines, followed by gadolinium complexation (GC-NH2-GdDOTA). GC-NH2-GdDOTA had a chelate-to-polymer ratio of approximately1:24 and a molar relaxivity of 9.1 mM(-1) s(-1). GC-NH2-GdDOTA demonstrated pH-dependent cellular association in vitro compared to the control. It also generated a 2.4-fold enhancement in signal in tumor-bearing mice 2 h postinjection. These findings suggest that glycol chitosan coupled with contrast agents can provide important diagnostic information about the tumor microenvironment.

  5. Doxycycline induced photodamage to human neutrophils and tryptophan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandberg, S.; Glette, J.; Hopen, G.; Solberg, C.O.

    1984-01-01

    Neutrophil function were studied following irradiation (340-380 nm) of the cells in the presence of 22 μM doxycycline. At increasing light fluence the locomotion, chemiluminescence and glucose oxidation (by the hexose monophosphate shunt) of the neutrophils steadily decreased. The photodamage increased with increasing preincubation temperature and time and was enhanced in D 2 O, reduced in azide and abolished in anaerobiosis. Superoxide dismutase, catalase or mannitol did not influence the photodamage. Photooxidation of tryptophan in the presence of doxycycline was increased 9-10-fold in D 2 O and nearly abolished in the presence of 0.25 mM NaN 3 , indicating that singlet oxygen is the most important reactive oxygen species in the doxycycline-induced photodamage. The results may explain some of the features of tetracycline-induced photosensitivity and why other authors have obtained diverging results when studying the influence of tetracyclines on neutrophil functions. (author)

  6. Sequence and features of the tryptophan operon of Vibrio parahemolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, I P; Han, C Y; Silverman, M

    1991-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the trp operon of the marine enteric bacterium Vibrio parahemolyticus is presented. The gene order E, G, D, C(F), B, A is identical to that of other enterics. The structural genes of the operon are preceded by a long leader region encoding a 41-residue peptide containing five tryptophan residues. The organization of the leader region suggests that transcription of the operon is subject to attenuation control. The promoter-operator region of the V. parahemolyticus trp operon is almost identical to the corresponding promoter-operator of E. coli. The similarities suggest that promoter strength and operator function are identical in the two species, and that transcription initiation is regulated by repression. The operon appears to lack the internal promoter within trpD that is common in terrestrial enteric species.

  7. Mapping Hfq-RNA interaction surfaces using tryptophan fluorescence quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Kirsten E.; Orans, Jillian; Kovach, Alexander R.; Link, Todd M.; Brennan, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Hfq is a posttranscriptional riboregulator and RNA chaperone that binds small RNAs and target mRNAs to effect their annealing and message-specific regulation in response to environmental stressors. Structures of Hfq-RNA complexes indicate that U-rich sequences prefer the proximal face and A-rich sequences the distal face; however, the Hfq-binding sites of most RNAs are unknown. Here, we present an Hfq-RNA mapping approach that uses single tryptophan-substituted Hfq proteins, all of which retain the wild-type Hfq structure, and tryptophan fluorescence quenching (TFQ) by proximal RNA binding. TFQ properly identified the respective distal and proximal binding of A15 and U6 RNA to Gram-negative Escherichia coli (Ec) Hfq and the distal face binding of (AA)3A, (AU)3A and (AC)3A to Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (Sa) Hfq. The inability of (GU)3G to bind the distal face of Sa Hfq reveals the (R-L)n binding motif is a more restrictive (A-L)n binding motif. Remarkably Hfq from Gram-positive Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) binds (GU)3G on its proximal face. TFQ experiments also revealed the Ec Hfq (A-R-N)n distal face-binding motif should be redefined as an (A-A-N)n binding motif. TFQ data also demonstrated that the 5′-untranslated region of hfq mRNA binds both the proximal and distal faces of Ec Hfq and the unstructured C-terminus. PMID:24288369

  8. Steady-state fluorescence and phosphorescence spectroscopic studies of bacterial luciferase tryptophan mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Meighen, E A

    1994-09-01

    Bacterial luciferase, which catalyzes the bioluminescence reaction in luminous bacteria, consists of two nonidentical polypeptides, α and β. Eight mutants of luciferase with each of the tryptophans replaced by tyrosine were generated by site-directed mutagenesis and purified to homogeneity. The steady-state tryptophan fluorescence and low-temperature phosphorescence spectroscopic properties of these mutants were characterized. In some instances, mutation of only a single tryptophan residue resulted in large spectral changes. The tryptophan residues conserved in both the α and the β subunits exhibited distinct fluorescence emission properties, suggesting that these tryptophans have different local enviroments. The low-temperature phosphorescence data suggest that the tryptophans conserved in bot the α and the β subunits are not located at the subunit interface and/or involved in subunit interactions. The differences in the spectral properties of the mutants have provided useful information on the local environment of the individual tryptophan residues as well as on the quaternary structure of the protein.

  9. Side-chain dynamics of a detergent-solubilized membrane protein: Measurement of tryptophan and glutamine hydrogen-exchange rates in M13 coat protein by 1H NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neil, J.D.J.; Sykes, B.D.

    1989-01-01

    M13 coat protein is a small (50 amino acids) lipid-soluble protein that becomes an integral membrane protein during the infection stage of the life cycle of the M13 phage and is therefore used as a model membrane protein. To study side-chain dynamics in the protein, the authors have measured individual hydrogen-exchange rates for a primary amide in the side chain of glutamine-15 and for the indole amine of tryptophan-26. The protein was solubilized with the use of perdeuteriated sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and hydrogen-exchange rates were measured by using 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The glutamine-15 syn proton exchanged at a rate identical with that in glutamine model peptides except that the pH corresponding to minimum exchange was elevated by about 1.5 pH units. The tryptophan-26 indole amine proton exchange was biphasic, suggesting that two populations of tryptophan-26 exist. It is suggested that the two populations may reflect protein dimerization or aggregation in the SDS micelles. The pH values of minimum exchange for tryptophan-26 in both environments were also elevated by 1.3-1.9 pH units. This phenomenon is reproduced when small tryptophan- and glutamine-containing hydrophobic peptides are dissolved in the presence of SDS micelles. The electrostatic nature of this phenomenon is proven by showing that the minimum pH for exchange can be reduced by dissolving the hydrophobic peptides in the positively charged detergent micelle dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide

  10. Multiparametric classification links tumor microenvironments with tumor cell phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojana Gligorijevic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available While it has been established that a number of microenvironment components can affect the likelihood of metastasis, the link between microenvironment and tumor cell phenotypes is poorly understood. Here we have examined microenvironment control over two different tumor cell motility phenotypes required for metastasis. By high-resolution multiphoton microscopy of mammary carcinoma in mice, we detected two phenotypes of motile tumor cells, different in locomotion speed. Only slower tumor cells exhibited protrusions with molecular, morphological, and functional characteristics associated with invadopodia. Each region in the primary tumor exhibited either fast- or slow-locomotion. To understand how the tumor microenvironment controls invadopodium formation and tumor cell locomotion, we systematically analyzed components of the microenvironment previously associated with cell invasion and migration. No single microenvironmental property was able to predict the locations of tumor cell phenotypes in the tumor if used in isolation or combined linearly. To solve this, we utilized the support vector machine (SVM algorithm to classify phenotypes in a nonlinear fashion. This approach identified conditions that promoted either motility phenotype. We then demonstrated that varying one of the conditions may change tumor cell behavior only in a context-dependent manner. In addition, to establish the link between phenotypes and cell fates, we photoconverted and monitored the fate of tumor cells in different microenvironments, finding that only tumor cells in the invadopodium-rich microenvironments degraded extracellular matrix (ECM and disseminated. The number of invadopodia positively correlated with degradation, while the inhibiting metalloproteases eliminated degradation and lung metastasis, consistent with a direct link among invadopodia, ECM degradation, and metastasis. We have detected and characterized two phenotypes of motile tumor cells in vivo, which

  11. Royal Society Scientific Meeting: Extracellular vesicles in the tumour microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, Ryan Charles; Elmusrati, Areeg A; Lambert, Daniel; Carter, David Raul Francisco

    2018-01-05

    Cancer cells do not grow as an isolated homogeneous mass; tumours are, in fact, complex and heterogeneous collections of cancer and surrounding stromal cells, collectively termed the tumour microenvironment. The interaction between cancer cells and stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment has emerged as a key concept in the regulation of cancer progression. Understanding the intercellular dialogue in the tumour microenvironment is therefore an important goal. One aspect of this dialogue that has not been appreciated until recently is the role of extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs are small vesicles released by cells under both normal and pathological conditions; they can transfer biological molecules between cells leading to changes in phenotype. EVs have emerged as important regulators of biological processes and can be dysregulated in diseases such as cancer; rapidly growing interest in their biology and therapeutic potential led to the Royal Society hosting a Scientific Meeting to explore the roles of EVs in the tumour microenvironment. This cross-disciplinary meeting explored examples of how aberrant crosstalk between tumour and stromal cells can promote cancer progression, and how such signalling can be targeted for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic benefit. In this review, and the special edition of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B that follows, we will provide an overview of the content and outcomes of this exciting meeting.This article is part of the discussion meeting issue 'Extracellular vesicles and the tumour microenvironment'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  12. Multimodal imaging of lung cancer and its microenvironment (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, Lida P.; Niederst, Matthew J.; Mulvey, Hillary; Adams, David C.; Hu, Haichuan; Chico Calero, Isabel; Szabari, Margit V.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Bouma, Brett E.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Despite significant advances in targeted therapies for lung cancer, nearly all patients develop drug resistance within 6-12 months and prognosis remains poor. Developing drug resistance is a progressive process that involves tumor cells and their microenvironment. We hypothesize that microenvironment factors alter tumor growth and response to targeted therapy. We conducted in vitro studies in human EGFR-mutant lung carcinoma cells, and demonstrated that factors secreted from lung fibroblasts results in increased tumor cell survival during targeted therapy with EGFR inhibitor, gefitinib. We also demonstrated that increased environment stiffness results in increased tumor survival during gefitinib therapy. In order to test our hypothesis in vivo, we developed a multimodal optical imaging protocol for preclinical intravital imaging in mouse models to assess tumor and its microenvironment over time. We have successfully conducted multimodal imaging of dorsal skinfold chamber (DSC) window mice implanted with GFP-labeled human EGFR mutant lung carcinoma cells and visualized changes in tumor development and microenvironment facets over time. Multimodal imaging included structural OCT to assess tumor viability and necrosis, polarization-sensitive OCT to measure tissue birefringence for collagen/fibroblast detection, and Doppler OCT to assess tumor vasculature. Confocal imaging was also performed for high-resolution visualization of EGFR-mutant lung cancer cells labeled with GFP, and was coregistered with OCT. Our results demonstrated that stromal support and vascular growth are essential to tumor progression. Multimodal imaging is a useful tool to assess tumor and its microenvironment over time.

  13. The influence of tryptophan on gluconeogenesis in the perfused liver of irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovikova, G.V.; Mashkova, N.Yu.; Dokshina, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    The liver isolated at different times after exposure to 7 Gy radiation responded in a different way to the effect of tryptophan (0.75 g/l) used as a gluconeogenesis inhibitor. While 24 h after irradiation of the addition of tryptophan inhibited gluconeogenesis from circulating exogenous amino acids, in 3 days, on the contrary, gluconeogenesis in the liver of donors was enhanced. It is suggested that these effects of tryptophan are associated with different functional status of the liver during the postirradiation observation period

  14. Soluble Factors on Stage to Direct Mesenchymal Stem Cells Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Sobacchi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent stromal cells that are identified by in vitro plastic adherence, colony-forming capacity, expression of a panel of surface molecules, and ability to differentiate at least toward osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. They also produce trophic factors with immunomodulatory, proangiogenic, and antiapoptotic functions influencing the behavior of neighboring cells. On the other hand, a reciprocal regulation takes place; in fact, MSCs can be isolated from several tissues, and depending on the original microenvironment and the range of stimuli received from there, they can display differences in their essential characteristics. Here, we focus mainly on the bone tissue and how soluble factors, such as growth factors, cytokines, and hormones, present in this microenvironment can orchestrate bone marrow-derived MSCs fate. We also briefly describe the alteration of MSCs behavior in pathological settings such as hematological cancer, bone metastasis, and bone marrow failure syndromes. Overall, the possibility to modulate MSCs plasticity makes them an attractive tool for diverse applications of tissue regeneration in cell therapy. Therefore, the comprehensive understanding of the microenvironment characteristics and components better suited to obtain a specific MSCs response can be extremely useful for clinical use.

  15. Roles of stromal microenvironment in colon cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taketo, Makoto Mark

    2012-05-01

    Although our understanding of epithelial cancer cells has advanced significantly, our understanding of the cancer microenvironment is still fragmentary. In contrast to our intuitive impression that our body always suppresses cancer growth, recent pieces of evidence show that cancer often exploits our body reactions to expand, invade local tissues and metastasize to distant organs. Accordingly, investigations of such body reactions in the tumour microenvironment should help us to design novel therapeutic strategies that can be combined with the traditional therapeutics targeted at the cancer cells themselves. In this article, I am going to review our recent efforts in search of novel therapeutic strategies against colon cancer using mouse models.

  16. FLIM-FRET image analysis of tryptophan in prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, Ammasi; Alam, Shagufta R.; Svindrych, Zdenek; Wallrabe, Horst

    2017-07-01

    A region of interest (ROI) based quantitative FLIM-FRET image analysis is developed to quantitate the autofluorescence signals of the essential amino acid tryptophan as a biomarker to investigate the metabolism in prostate cancer cells.

  17. Acute tryptophan depletion dose dependently impairs object memory in serotonin transporter knockout rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivier, J D A; Jans, L A W; Korte-Bouws, G A H; Korte, S M; Deen, P M T; Cools, A R; Ellenbroek, B A; Blokland, A

    2008-01-01

    RATIONALE: Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) transiently lowers central serotonin levels and can induce depressive mood states and cognitive defects. Previous studies have shown that ATD impairs object recognition in rats. OBJECTIVES: As individual differences exist in central serotonin

  18. Immunosuppressive Tryptophan Catabolism and Gut Mucosal Dysfunction Following Early HIV Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; El-Far, Mohamed; Vyboh, Kishanda; Kema, Ido; Costiniuk, Cecilia T.; Thomas, Rejean; Baril, Jean-Guy; LeBlanc, Roger; Kanagaratham, Cynthia; Radzioch, Danuta; Allam, Ossama; Ahmad, Ali; Lebouche, Bertrand; Tremblay, Cecile; Ancuta, Petronela; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background. Tryptophan (Trp) catabolism into kynurenine (Kyn) contributes to immune dysfunction in chronic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. To better define the relationship between Trp catabolism, inflammation, gut mucosal dysfunction, and the role of early antiretroviral therapy

  19. Tryptophan Oxidative Metabolism Catalyzed by : A Thermophile Isolated from Kuwait Soil Contaminated with Petroleum Hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jassim M. Al-Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tryptophan metabolism has been extensively studied in humans as well as in soil. Its metabolism takes place mainly through kynurenine pathway yielding hydroxylated, deaminated and many other products of physiological significance. However, tryptophan metabolism has not been studied in an isolated thermophilic bacterium. Geobacillus stearothermophilus is a local thermophile isolated from Kuwait desert soil contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. The bacterium grows well at 65 °C in 0.05 M phosphate buffer (pH 7, when supplied with organic compounds as a carbon source and has a good potential for transformation of steroids and related molecules. In the present study, we used tryptophan ethyl ester as a carbon source for the bacterium to study the catabolism of the amino acid at pH 5 and pH 7. In this endeavor, we have resolved twenty one transformation products of tryptophan by GC/LC and have identified them through their mass spectral fragmentation.

  20. Picosecond Fluorescence Dynamics of Tryptophan and 5-Fluorotryptophan in Monellin : Slow Water-Protein Relaxation Unmasked

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Jianhua; Chen, Binbin; Callis, Patrik Robert; Muiño, Pedro L; Rozeboom, Henriette J; Broos, Jaap; Toptygin, Dmitri; Brand, Ludwig; Knutson, Jay R

    2015-01-01

    Time Dependent Fluorescence Stokes (emission wavelength) Shifts (TDFSS) from tryptophan (Trp) following sub-picosecond excitation are increasingly used to investigate protein dynamics, most recently enabling active research interest into water dynamics near the surface of proteins. Unlike many

  1. Linoleic acid, thymine, and tryptophan radiosensitization by protoporphyrin in presence of oxygene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champel, P.; Mignot, M.A.; Pillement, B.; Fontenil, L.; Rocquet, G.

    Sensitizing effect induced by protoporphyrin, an active molecule in photooxidation is studied. Studied substances are tryptophan, thymine, linoleic acid, each component representing one of the great groups of biological components, nucleic acid, proteins, lipids [fr

  2. Effects of Tryptophan Content and Backbone Spacing on the Uptake Efficiency of Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    KAUST Repository

    Rydberg, Hanna A.; Matson, Maria; Å mand, Helene L.; Esbjö rner, Elin K.; Nordé n, Bengt

    2012-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are able to traverse cellular membranes and deliver macromolecular cargo. Uptake occurs through both endocytotic and nonendocytotic pathways, but the molecular requirements for efficient internalization are not fully understood. Here we investigate how the presence of tryptophans and their position within an oligoarginine influence uptake mechanism and efficiency. Flow cytometry and confocal fluorescence imaging are used to estimate uptake efficiency, intracellular distribution and toxicity in Chinese hamster ovarian cells. Further, membrane leakage and lipid membrane affinity are investigated. The peptides contain eight arginine residues and one to four tryptophans, the tryptophans positioned either at the N-terminus, in the middle, or evenly distributed along the amino acid sequence. Our data show that the intracellular distribution varies among peptides with different tryptophan content and backbone spacing. Uptake efficiency is higher for the peptides with four tryptophans in the middle, or evenly distributed along the peptide sequence, than for the peptide with four tryptophans at the N-terminus. All peptides display low cytotoxicity except for the one with four tryptophans at the N-terminus, which was moderately toxic. This finding is consistent with their inability to induce efficient leakage of dye from lipid vesicles. All peptides have comparable affinities for lipid vesicles, showing that lipid binding is not a decisive parameter for uptake. Our results indicate that tryptophan content and backbone spacing can affect both the CPP uptake efficiency and the CPP uptake mechanism. The low cytotoxicity of these peptides and the possibilities of tuning their uptake mechanism are interesting from a therapeutic point of view. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  3. Effects of Tryptophan Content and Backbone Spacing on the Uptake Efficiency of Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    KAUST Repository

    Rydberg, Hanna A.

    2012-07-10

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are able to traverse cellular membranes and deliver macromolecular cargo. Uptake occurs through both endocytotic and nonendocytotic pathways, but the molecular requirements for efficient internalization are not fully understood. Here we investigate how the presence of tryptophans and their position within an oligoarginine influence uptake mechanism and efficiency. Flow cytometry and confocal fluorescence imaging are used to estimate uptake efficiency, intracellular distribution and toxicity in Chinese hamster ovarian cells. Further, membrane leakage and lipid membrane affinity are investigated. The peptides contain eight arginine residues and one to four tryptophans, the tryptophans positioned either at the N-terminus, in the middle, or evenly distributed along the amino acid sequence. Our data show that the intracellular distribution varies among peptides with different tryptophan content and backbone spacing. Uptake efficiency is higher for the peptides with four tryptophans in the middle, or evenly distributed along the peptide sequence, than for the peptide with four tryptophans at the N-terminus. All peptides display low cytotoxicity except for the one with four tryptophans at the N-terminus, which was moderately toxic. This finding is consistent with their inability to induce efficient leakage of dye from lipid vesicles. All peptides have comparable affinities for lipid vesicles, showing that lipid binding is not a decisive parameter for uptake. Our results indicate that tryptophan content and backbone spacing can affect both the CPP uptake efficiency and the CPP uptake mechanism. The low cytotoxicity of these peptides and the possibilities of tuning their uptake mechanism are interesting from a therapeutic point of view. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  4. Kinetic tritium isotopic effects in the position 2 for 5'-hydroxy-L-tryptophane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroda, E.; Kanska, M.

    2006-01-01

    Tryptophanase converts 5'-hydroxy-L-tryptophane to pyrogronic acid and ammonia, however there are known conditions for the reversed reaction. Mechanism of the processes are not known till now. Kinetic isotopic effect (KIE) permits finding the rate determining stage in the multistage process. In presented communication, 5'-hydroxy-[2- 3 H]-L-tryptophane was synthesized and the KIE in the room temperature determined for different reaction stages

  5. Syntheses and Self-assembling Behaviors of Pentagonal Conjugates of Tryptophane Zipper-Forming Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuo Kimizuka

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Pentagonal conjugates of tryptophane zipper-forming peptide (CKTWTWTE with a pentaazacyclopentadecane core (Pentagonal-Gly-Trpzip and Pentagonal-Ala-Trpzip were synthesized and their self-assembling behaviors were investigated in water. Pentagonal-Gly-Trpzip self-assembled into nanofibers with the width of about 5 nm in neutral water (pH 7 via formation of tryptophane zipper, which irreversibly converted to nanoribbons by heating. In contrast, Pentagonal-Ala-Trpzip formed irregular aggregates in water.

  6. Changes of intermediary taurine and tryptophan metabolism after combined radiation-thermal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konnova, L.A.; Novoselova, G.S.

    1986-01-01

    The dynamics of changes of the taurine and tryptophane concentration in blood serum of rats has been studied during 30 days after 3b degree burn of 15% of body surface after total even exposure to radiation in doses of 3 and 6 Gy, and after combined radiation thermal injury. Combined radiation-thermal injury was found to be characterized by reduced concentration of taurine but an increase of the tryptophane level from the second-third day after the injury

  7. GPR142 Controls Tryptophan-Induced Insulin and Incretin Hormone Secretion to Improve Glucose Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Hua V.; Efanov, Alexander M.; Fang, Xiankang; Beavers, Lisa S.; Wang, Xuesong; Wang, Jingru; Gonzalez Valcarcel, Isabel C.; Ma, Tianwei

    2016-01-01

    GPR142, a putative amino acid receptor, is expressed in pancreatic islets and the gastrointestinal tract, but the ligand affinity and physiological role of this receptor remain obscure. In this study, we show that in addition to L-Tryptophan, GPR142 signaling is also activated by L-Phenylalanine but not by other naturally occurring amino acids. Furthermore, we show that Tryptophan and a synthetic GPR142 agonist increase insulin and incretin hormones and improve glucose disposal in mice in a G...

  8. Removing the by-products acetic acid and NH4+ from the l-tryptophan broth by vacuum thin film evaporation during l-tryptophan production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingyang Xu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: During l-tryptophan production by Escherichia coli, the by-products, acetic acid and NH4+, accumulate in the fermentation broth, resulting in inhibited cell growth and activity and decreased l-tryptophan production. To improve the l-tryptophan yield and glucose conversion rate, acetic acid and NH4+ were removed under low-temperature vacuum conditions by vacuum scraper concentrator evaporation; the fermentation broth after evaporation was pressed into another fermenter to continue fermentation. To increase the volatilisation rate of acetic acid and NH4+ and reduce damage to bacteria during evaporation, different vacuum evaporation conditions were studied. Results: The optimum operating conditions were as follows: vacuum degree, 720 mm Hg; concentration ratio, 10%; temperature, 60°C; and feeding rate, 300 mL/min. The biomass yield of the control fermentation (CF and fermentation by vacuum evaporation (VEF broths was 55.1 g/L and 58.3 g/L at 38 h, respectively, (an increase of 5.8%; the living biomass yield increased from 8.9 (CF to 10.2 pF (VEF; an increase of 14.6%. l-tryptophan production increased from 50.2 g/L (CF to 60.2 g/L (VEF (an increase of 19.9%, and glucose conversion increased from 18.2% (CF to 19.5% (VEF; an increase of 7.1%. The acetic acid concentrations were 2.74 g/L and 6.70 g/L, and the NH4+ concentrations were 85.3 mmol/L and 130.9 mmol/L in VEF and CF broths, respectively. Conclusions: The acetic acid and NH4+ in the fermentation broth were quickly removed using the vacuum scraper concentrator, which reduced bacterial inhibition, enhanced bacterial activity, and improved the production of l-tryptophan and glucose conversion rate.How to cite: Xu Q, Bai F, Chen N, et al. Removing the by-products acetic acid and NH4+ from the l-tryptophan broth by vacuum thin film evaporation during l-tryptophan production. Electron J Biotechnol 2018; 33. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejbt.2018.04.003. Keywords: Acetic acid

  9. Bacterial expression of human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase: solubility, activity, purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, K; Mole, D J; Binnie, M; Homer, N Z M; Zheng, X; Yard, B A; Iredale, J P; Auer, M; Webster, S P

    2014-03-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is an enzyme central to the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. KMO has been implicated as a therapeutic target in several disease states, including Huntington's disease. Recombinant human KMO protein production is challenging due to the presence of transmembrane domains, which localise KMO to the outer mitochondrial membrane and render KMO insoluble in many in vitro expression systems. Efficient bacterial expression of human KMO would accelerate drug development of KMO inhibitors but until now this has not been achieved. Here we report the first successful bacterial (Escherichia coli) expression of active FLAG™-tagged human KMO enzyme expressed in the soluble fraction and progress towards its purification. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bacterial expression of human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase: Solubility, activity, purification☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, K.; Mole, D.J.; Binnie, M.; Homer, N.Z.M.; Zheng, X.; Yard, B.A.; Iredale, J.P.; Auer, M.; Webster, S.P.

    2014-01-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is an enzyme central to the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. KMO has been implicated as a therapeutic target in several disease states, including Huntington’s disease. Recombinant human KMO protein production is challenging due to the presence of transmembrane domains, which localise KMO to the outer mitochondrial membrane and render KMO insoluble in many in vitro expression systems. Efficient bacterial expression of human KMO would accelerate drug development of KMO inhibitors but until now this has not been achieved. Here we report the first successful bacterial (Escherichia coli) expression of active FLAG™-tagged human KMO enzyme expressed in the soluble fraction and progress towards its purification. PMID:24316190

  11. Flexible Enantioselectivity of Tryptophanase Attributable to Benzene Ring in Heterocyclic Moiety of D-Tryptophan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Shimada

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The invariance principle of enzyme enantioselectivity must be absolute because it is absolutely essential to the homochiral biological world. Most enzymes are strictly enantioselective, and tryptophanase is one of the enzymes with extreme absolute enantioselectivity for L-tryptophan. Contrary to conventional knowledge about the principle, tryptophanase becomes flexible to catalyze D-tryptophan in the presence of diammonium hydrogenphosphate. Since D-amino acids are ordinarily inert or function as inhibitors even though they are bound to the active site, the inhibition behavior of D-tryptophan and several inhibitors involved in this process was examined in terms of kinetics to explain the reason for this flexible enantioselectivity in the presence of diammonium hydrogenphosphate. Diammonium hydrogenphosphate gave tryptophanase a small conformational change so that D-tryptophan could work as a substrate. As opposed to other D-amino acids, D-tryptophan is a very bulky amino acid with a benzene ring in its heterocyclic moiety, and so we suggest that this structural feature makes the catalysis of D-tryptophan degradation possible, consequently leading to the flexible enantioselectivity. The present results not only help to understand the mechanism of enzyme enantioselectivity, but also shed light on the origin of homochirality.

  12. Room temperature phosphorescence study on the structural flexibility of single tryptophan containing proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska-Baron, Agnieszka; Gałęcki, Krystian; Wysocki, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have undertaken efforts to find correlation between phosphorescence lifetimes of single tryptophan containing proteins and some structural indicators of protein flexibility/rigidity, such as the degree of tryptophan burial or its exposure to solvent, protein secondary and tertiary structure of the region of localization of tryptophan as well as B factors for tryptophan residue and its immediate surroundings. Bearing in mind that, apart from effective local viscosity of the protein/solvent matrix, the other factor that concur in determining room temperature tryptophan phosphorescence (RTTP) lifetime in proteins is the extent of intramolecular quenching by His, Cys, Tyr and Trp side chains, the crystallographic structures derived from the Brookhaven Protein Data Bank were also analyzed concentrating on the presence of potentially quenching amino acid side chains in the close proximity of the indole chromophore. The obtained results indicated that, in most cases, the phosphorescence lifetimes of tryptophan containing proteins studied tend to correlate with the above mentioned structural indicators of protein rigidity/flexibility. This correlation is expected to provide guidelines for the future development of phosphorescence lifetime-based method for the prediction of structural flexibility of proteins, which is directly linked to their biological function.

  13. Influence of tryptophan and related compounds on ergot alkaloid formation in Claviceps purpurea (FR.) Tul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erge, D; Schumann, B; Gröger, D

    1984-01-01

    L-Tryptophan did not exert any influence on peptide alkaloid formation in an ergotamine and in an ergosine-accumulating C. purpurea strain. A different picture was observed in a series of related C. purpurea strains. Tryptophan showed a slight stimulatory effect on the ergotoxine producer Pepty 695/S. A blocked mutant of it, designated as Pepty 695/ch which was able to accumulate secoclavines gave similar results. In a high-yielding elymoclavine strain Pepty 695/e, the progeny of the former one, tryptophan up to a concentration of 25 mM stimulated remarkably clavine biosynthesis. Furthermore, tryptophan could overcome the block of synthesis by inorganic phosphate. Increased specific activities of chanoclavine cyclase but not DMAT synthetase were observed in cultures of strain Pepty 695/e supplemented with tryptophan. 5-Methyltryptophan and bioisosteres of tryptophan were ineffective in alkaloid stimulation. These results are compared with those obtained with the grass ergot strain SD 58 and discussed with the relation to other induction phenomena.

  14. Delaying aging and the aging-associated decline in protein homeostasis by inhibition of tryptophan degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Goot, Annemieke T.; Zhu, Wentao; Vázquez-Manrique, Rafael P.; Seinstra, Renée I.; Dettmer, Katja; Michels, Helen; Farina, Francesca; Krijnen, Jasper; Melki, Ronald; Buijsman, Rogier C.; Ruiz Silva, Mariana; Thijssen, Karen L.; Kema, Ido P.; Neri, Christian; Oefner, Peter J.; Nollen, Ellen A. A.

    2012-01-01

    Toxicity of aggregation-prone proteins is thought to play an important role in aging and age-related neurological diseases like Parkinson and Alzheimer’s diseases. Here, we identify tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (tdo-2), the first enzyme in the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation, as a metabolic regulator of age-related α-synuclein toxicity in a Caenorhabditis elegans model. Depletion of tdo-2 also suppresses toxicity of other heterologous aggregation-prone proteins, including amyloid-β and polyglutamine proteins, and endogenous metastable proteins that are sensors of normal protein homeostasis. This finding suggests that tdo-2 functions as a general regulator of protein homeostasis. Analysis of metabolite levels in C. elegans strains with mutations in enzymes that act downstream of tdo-2 indicates that this suppression of toxicity is independent of downstream metabolites in the kynurenine pathway. Depletion of tdo-2 increases tryptophan levels, and feeding worms with extra l-tryptophan also suppresses toxicity, suggesting that tdo-2 regulates proteotoxicity through tryptophan. Depletion of tdo-2 extends lifespan in these worms. Together, these results implicate tdo-2 as a metabolic switch of age-related protein homeostasis and lifespan. With TDO and Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase as evolutionarily conserved human orthologs of TDO-2, intervening with tryptophan metabolism may offer avenues to reducing proteotoxicity in aging and age-related diseases. PMID:22927396

  15. Role of decreased Plasma Tryptophan in memory deficits observed in Type-I diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, S.; Tabassum, S.; Haider, S. [University of Karachi (Pakistan). Dept. of Biochemistry

    2013-01-15

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between plasma tryptophan and the occurrence of memory dysfunctions in male and female type 1 diabetics. Methods: The case-control study was conducted at two urban healthcare facilities in Karachi from January to June 2009, and comprised 100 diabetic subjects of among whom were 50 men and 50 women. The controls were also similar in number and gender. A questionnaire was used to evaluate the memory impairment in the subjects. Plasma tryptophan was determined by high performance liquid chromatography with ultra-violet method. Students t-test was used to analyse tryptophan data. Results: There was considerable memory impairment in the cases (n=40) compared to the controls (n=5). Results also showed a significant (p<0.01) decrease in plasma tryptophan levels in both male and female diabetic patients. Conclusions: Diabetic subjects exhibited occurrence of memory impairment with concomitant decline in plasma tryptophan levels. The findings indicate that decreased brain uptake of tryptophan and lowered brain 5-hydroxytryptamine levels may be responsible for the memory deficits seen in diabetics. (author)

  16. Role of decreased Plasma Tryptophan in memory deficits observed in Type-I diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, S.; Tabassum, S.; Haider, S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between plasma tryptophan and the occurrence of memory dysfunctions in male and female type 1 diabetics. Methods: The case-control study was conducted at two urban healthcare facilities in Karachi from January to June 2009, and comprised 100 diabetic subjects of among whom were 50 men and 50 women. The controls were also similar in number and gender. A questionnaire was used to evaluate the memory impairment in the subjects. Plasma tryptophan was determined by high performance liquid chromatography with ultra-violet method. Students t-test was used to analyse tryptophan data. Results: There was considerable memory impairment in the cases (n=40) compared to the controls (n=5). Results also showed a significant (p<0.01) decrease in plasma tryptophan levels in both male and female diabetic patients. Conclusions: Diabetic subjects exhibited occurrence of memory impairment with concomitant decline in plasma tryptophan levels. The findings indicate that decreased brain uptake of tryptophan and lowered brain 5-hydroxytryptamine levels may be responsible for the memory deficits seen in diabetics. (author)

  17. Ab initio study on electron excitation and electron transfer in tryptophan-tyrosine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Jing; Li Xiangyuan

    2002-01-01

    In this article, ab initio calculation has been performed to evaluate the transition energy of electronic excitation in tryptophan and tyrosine by using semiempirical molecular orbital method AM1 and complete active space self-consistent field method. The solvent effect has been considered by means of the conductor-like screening model. After geometric optimizations of isolated tryptophan and tyrosine, and their corresponding radicals and cations, reaction heat of these electron transfer reactions have been obtained by the means of complete active space self-consistent field method. The transition energies from the ground state, respectively, to the lowest excited state and to the lowest triplet state of these two amino acids are also calculated and compared with the experimentally observed values. The ionization potential and electron affinity are also calculated for tryptophan and tyrosine employing Koopmans' theorem and ab initio calculation. Compared with the experimental measurements, the theoretical results are found satisfactory. Theoretical results give good explanations on the experimental phenomena that N 3 · can preferably oxide the side chain of tryptophan residue and then the electron transfer from tyrosine residue to tryptophan residue follows in peptides involving tryptophan and tyrosine

  18. Antitumour agents as inhibitors of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantouris, Georgios; Mowat, Christopher G., E-mail: C.G.Mowat@ed.ac.uk

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •∼2800 National Cancer Institute USA compounds have been screened as potential inhibitors of TDO and/or IDO. •Seven compounds with anti-tumour properties have been identified as potent inhibitors. •NSC 36398 (taxifolin, dihydroquercetin) is selective for TDO with a K{sub i} of 16 M. •This may help further our understanding of the role of TDO in cancer. -- Abstract: The involvement of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) in cancer biology has recently been described, with the enzyme playing an immunomodulatory role, suppressing antitumour immune responses and promoting tumour cell survival and proliferation. This finding reinforces the need for specific inhibitors of TDO that may potentially be developed for therapeutic use. In this work we have screened ∼2800 compounds from the library of the National Cancer Institute USA and identified seven potent inhibitors of TDO with inhibition constants in the nanomolar or low micromolar range. All seven have antitumour properties, killing various cancer cell lines. For comparison, the inhibition potencies of these compounds were tested against IDO and their inhibition constants are reported. Interestingly, this work reveals that NSC 36398 (dihydroquercetin, taxifolin), with an in vitro inhibition constant of ∼16 μM, is the first TDO-selective inhibitor reported.

  19. Mechanisms of tryptophan adsorption onto single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jieping; Tan Jun; Xu Pengshou; Sheng Liusi; Pan Guoqiang

    2011-01-01

    Near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy (SRPES) were employed to investigate the adsorption mechanism of tryptophan (Trp) onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The difference of the carbon K-edge NEXAFS spectra between Trp molecules and Trp-adsorbed SWCNTs shows that a significant interaction occurs among the SWCNTs and Trp molecules adsorbed. However, negligible changes in the peak profiles and energy positions of nitrogen K-edge imply that neither of the two nitrogen atoms in Trp molecule is involved in the interface interaction. A change of the shape of the main absorption peak at the oxygen K-edge reveals that O atoms of the C=O or C-O or both are likely involved in the interface interaction. The fact that the peak at about 529 eV at the O K-edge become sharper and stronger demonstrates that the O atom in the C=O participates in the interface interaction, which was confirmed by O1s SRPES spectrum. (authors)

  20. Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Neutrophils in Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehong Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Distinct tumor microenvironment forms in each progression step of cancer and has diverse capacities to induce both adverse and beneficial consequences for tumorigenesis. It is now known that immune cells can be activated to favor tumor growth and progression, most probably influenced by the tumor microenvironment. Tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils can exert protumoral functions, enhancing tumor cell invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, and extracellular matrix remodeling, while inhibiting the antitumoral immune surveillance. Considering that neutrophils in inflammatory environments recruit macrophages and that recruited macrophages affect neutrophil functions, there may be various degrees of interaction between tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. Platelets also play an important role in the recruitment and regulation of monocytic and granulocytic cells in the tumor tissues, suggesting that platelet function may be essential for generation of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. In this review, we will explore the biology of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils and their possible interactions in the tumor microenvironment. Special attention will be given to the recruitment and activation of these tumor-associated cells and to the roles they play in maintenance of the tumor microenvironment and progression of tumors.

  1. Impact of Microenvironment and Stem-Like Plasticity in Cholangiocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raggi, Chiara; Invernizzi, Pietro; Andersen, Jesper Bøje

    2014-01-01

    or tumor microenvironment (TME) likely promotes initiation and progression of this malignancy contributing to its heterogeneity. This review will emphasize the dynamic interplay between stem-like intrinsic and TME-extrinsic pathways, which may represent novel options for multi-targeted therapies in CCA....

  2. Microenvironments and microscale productivity of cyanobacterial desert crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Pichel, F.; Belnap, Jayne

    1996-01-01

    We used microsensors to characterize physicochemical microenvironments and photosynthesis occurring immediately after water saturation in two desert soil crusts from southeastern Utah, which were formed by the cyanobacteria Microcoleus vaginatus Gomont, Nostoc spp., and Scytonema sp. The light fields within the crusts presented steep vertical gradients in magnitude and spectral composition. Near-surface light-trapping zones were formed due to the scattering nature of the sand particles, but strong light attenuation resulted in euphotic zones only ca. 1 mm deep, which were progressively enriched in longer wavelengths with depth. Rates of gross photosynthesis (3.4a??9.4 mmol O2A?ma??2A?ha??1) and dark respiration (0.81a??3.1 mmol Oa??2A?ma??2A?ha??1) occurring within 1 to several mm from the surface were high enough to drive the formation of marked oxygen microenvironments that ranged from oxygen supersaturation to anoxia. The photosynthetic activity also resulted in localized pH values in excess of 10, 2a??3 units above the soil pH. Differences in metabolic parameters and community structure between two types of crusts were consistent with a successional pattern, which could be partially explained on the basis of the microenvironments. We discuss the significance of high metabolic rates and the formation of microenvironments for the ecology of desert crusts, as well as the advantages and limitations of microsensor-based methods for crust investigation.

  3. Effects of ground insulation and greenhouse microenvironment on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted at Egerton University, Njoro, Kenya to establish the potential of plastic digester to produce biogas under natural and greenhouse microenvironment. The specific objectives were to evaluate the effects of greenhouse and ground insulation on the rate and quality of biogas generation. A greenhouse ...

  4. Influence of the Tumor Microenvironment on Cancer Cells Metabolic Reprogramming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoire Gouirand

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available As with castles, tumor cells are fortified by surrounding non-malignant cells, such as cancer-associated fibroblasts, immune cells, but also nerve fibers and extracellular matrix. In most cancers, this fortification creates a considerable solid pressure which limits oxygen and nutrient delivery to the tumor cells and causes a hypoxic and nutritional stress. Consequently, tumor cells have to adapt their metabolism to survive and proliferate in this harsh microenvironment. To satisfy their need in energy and biomass, tumor cells develop new capacities to benefit from metabolites of the microenvironment, either by their uptake through the macropinocytosis process or through metabolite transporters, or by a cross-talk with stromal cells and capture of extracellular vesicles that are released by the neighboring cells. However, the microenvironments of primary tumor and metastatic niches differ tremendously in their cellular/acellular components and available nutrients. Therefore, cancer cells must develop a metabolic flexibility conferring on them the ability to satisfy their biomass and energetic demands at both primary and metastasis sites. In this review, we propose a brief overview of how proliferating cancer cells take advantage of their surrounding microenvironment to satisfy their high metabolic demand at both primary and metastasis sites.

  5. Functional live cell imaging of the pulmonary neuroepithelial body microenvironment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Proost, Ian; Pintelon, Isabel; Brouns, Inge; Kroese, A; Riccardi, Daniela; Kemp, Paul J.; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Adriaensen, Dirk

    Pulmonary neuroepithelial bodies (NEBs) are densely innervated groups of neuroendocrine cells invariably accompanied by Clara-like cells. Together with NEBs, Clara-like cells form the so-called "NEB microenvironment," which recently has been assigned a potential pulmonary stem cell niche. Conclusive

  6. Soluble CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger J

    2012-01-01

    CD163 is an endocytic receptor for haptoglobin-hemoglobin complexes and is expressed solely on macrophages and monocytes. As a result of ectodomain shedding, the extracellular portion of CD163 circulates in blood as a soluble protein (sCD163) at 0.7-3.9 mg/l in healthy individuals. The function o...

  7. Solubility Part 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tantra, Ratna; Bolea, Eduardo; Bouwmeester, H.; Rey-Castro, Carlos; David, C.A.A.; Dogné, Jean Michel; Laborda, Francisco; Laloy, Julie; Robinson, Kenneth N.; Undas, A.K.; Zande, van der M.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of different methods that can potentially be used to determine the solubility of nanomaterials. In general, the methods presented can be broadly divided into four categories: separation methods, methods to quantify free ions, methods to quantify total dissolved

  8. Photoinduced Intramolecular Tryptophan Oxidation and Excited-State Behavior of [Re(L-AA)(CO)3(r-diimine)] þ (L = Pyridine or Imidazole, AA = Tryptophan, Tyrosine, Phenylalanine)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blanco-Rodríguez, A. M.; Towrie, M.; Sýkora, Jan; Záliš, Stanislav; Vlček, Antonín

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 13 (2011), s. 6122-6134 ISSN 0020-1669 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD11082 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : tryptophan * tyrosine * phenylalanine Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.601, year: 2011

  9. Photolysis of carotenoids in chloroform: enhanced yields of carotenoid radical cations in the presence of a tryptophan ester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Agamey, Ali; Burke, Marc; Edge, Ruth; Land, Edward J.; McGarvey, David J.; Truscott, T. George

    2005-01-01

    The presence of an acetyl tryptophan ester gives rise to enhanced yields of carotenoid radical cations in chloroform following 355 nm laser excitation of the carotenoid, even though the tryptophan does not absorb at this wavelength. The increase is attributed to positive charge transfer from semi-oxidized tryptophan itself generated by light absorbed by the carotenoid. The mechanism of these radical processes has been elucidated by pulse radiolysis studies

  10. Making microenvironments: A look into incorporating macromolecular crowding into in vitro experiments, to generate biomimetic microenvironments which are capable of directing cell function for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benny, Paula; Raghunath, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Biomimetic microenvironments are key components to successful cell culture and tissue engineering in vitro. One of the most accurate biomimetic microenvironments is that made by the cells themselves. Cell-made microenvironments are most similar to the in vivo state as they are cell-specific and produced by the actual cells which reside in that specific microenvironment. However, cell-made microenvironments have been challenging to re-create in vitro due to the lack of extracellular matrix composition, volume and complexity which are required. By applying macromolecular crowding to current cell culture protocols, cell-made microenvironments, or cell-derived matrices, can be generated at significant rates in vitro. In this review, we will examine the causes and effects of macromolecular crowding and how it has been applied in several in vitro systems including tissue engineering.

  11. Tryptophan pathway alterations in the postpartum period and in acute postpartum psychosis and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veen, Cato; Myint, Aye Mu; Burgerhout, Karin M; Schwarz, Markus J; Schütze, Gregor; Kushner, Steven A; Hoogendijk, Witte J; Drexhage, Hemmo A; Bergink, Veerle

    2016-01-01

    Women are at very high risk for the first onset of acute and severe mood disorders the first weeks after delivery. Tryptophan breakdown is increased as a physiological phenomenon of the postpartum period and might lead to vulnerability for affective psychosis (PP) and severe depression (PD). The aim of the current study was to investigate alterations in tryptophan breakdown in the physiological postpartum period compared to patients with severe postpartum mood disorders. We included 52 patients (29 with PP, 23 with PD), 52 matched healthy postpartum women and 29 healthy non-postpartum women. Analyzes of serum tryptophan metabolites were performed using LC-MS/MS system for tryptophan, kynurenine, 3-hydroxykynurenine, kynurenic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid. The first two months of the physiological postpartum period were characterized by low tryptophan levels, increased breakdown towards kynurenine and a downstream shift toward the 3-OH-kynurenine arm, away from the kynurenic acid arm. Kynurenine was significantly lower in patients with PP and PD as compared to healthy postpartum women (p=0.011 and p=0.001); the remaining tryptophan metabolites demonstrated few differences between patients and healthy postpartum women. Low prevalence of the investigated disorders and strict exclusion criteria to obtain homogenous groups, resulted in relatively small sample sizes. The high kynurenine levels and increased tryptophan breakdown as a phenomenon of the physiological postpartum period was not present in patients with severe postpartum mood disorders. No differences were observed in the levels of the 'neurotoxic' 3-OH-kynurenine and the 'neuroprotective' kynurenic acid arms between patients and healthy postpartum women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Plasma Tryptophan and the Kynurenine–Tryptophan Ratio Are Associated with the Acquisition of Statural Growth Deficits and Oral Vaccine Underperformance in Populations with Environmental Enteropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosek, Margaret N.; Mduma, Estomih; Kosek, Peter S.; Lee, Gwenyth O.; Svensen, Erling; Pan, William K. Y.; Olortegui, Maribel Paredes; Bream, Jay H.; Patil, Crystal; Asayag, Cesar Ramal; Sanchez, Graciela Meza; Caulfield, Laura E.; Gratz, Jean; Yori, Pablo Peñataro

    2016-01-01

    Early childhood enteric infections have adverse impacts on child growth and can inhibit normal mucosal responses to oral vaccines, two critical components of environmental enteropathy. To evaluate the role of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) activity and its relationship with these outcomes, we measured tryptophan and the kynurenine–tryptophan ratio (KTR) in two longitudinal birth cohorts with a high prevalence of stunting. Children in rural Peru and Tanzania (N = 494) contributed 1,251 plasma samples at 3, 7, 15, and 24 months of age and monthly anthropometrics from 0 to 36 months of age. Tryptophan concentrations were directly associated with linear growth from 1 to 8 months after biomarker assessment. A 1-SD increase in tryptophan concentration was associated with a gain in length-for-age Z-score (LAZ) of 0.17 over the next 6 months in Peru (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.11–0.23, P < 0.001) and a gain in LAZ of 0.13 Z-scores in Tanzania (95% CI = 0.03–0.22, P = 0.009). Vaccine responsiveness data were available for Peru only. An increase in kynurenine by 1 μM was associated with a 1.63 (95% CI = 1.13–2.34) increase in the odds of failure to poliovirus type 1, but there was no association with tetanus vaccine response. A KTR of 52 was 76% sensitive and 50% specific in predicting failure of response to serotype 1 of the oral polio vaccine. KTR was associated with systemic markers of inflammation, but also interleukin-10, supporting the association between IDO1 activity and immunotolerance. These results strongly suggest that the activity of IDO1 is implicated in the pathophysiology of environmental enteropathy, and demonstrates the utility of tryptophan and kynurenine as biomarkers for this syndrome, particularly in identifying those at risk for hyporesponsivity to oral vaccines. PMID:27503512

  13. Cloning, expression, purification and characterization of tryptophan hydroxylase variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Jane

    in the anion exchange, indicating that the protein still exists in different oligomer forms. This was also observed in the gel filtration. Variants of both hTPH1 and hTPH2 containing the regulatory domain or parts of it were constructed and tested for expression in Escherichia coli as well as solubility....... It was observed that changes in the amino acid sequence of the regulatory domain by point mutations or truncations in the N-terminal had a huge impact on the solubility of the protein and caused the protein to be insoluble. The regulatory domain of human TPH1 (rhTPH1), and two fusion proteins of rhTPH1 fused...... to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the C-terminal and the glutathione S-transferase (GST) in the N-terminal, respectively, were expressed in a soluble form. The purification trials of the variants containing the regulatory domain showed that a high salt concentration was necessary to stabilize...

  14. [Effects of excess nicotinic acid on growth and the urinary excretion of B-group vitamins and the metabolism of tryptophan in weaning rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Kurata, Kaori; Shibata, Katsumi

    2009-04-01

    To determine the tolerable upper intake level of nicotinic acid in humans, we investigated the effects of excess nicotinic acid administration on body weight gain, food intake, and urinary excretion of water-soluble vitamins and the metabolism of tryptophan in weaning rats. The weaning rats were freely fed a niacin-free 20% casein diet (control diet) or the same diet with 0.1%, 0.3% or 0.5% nicotinic acid for 23 days. The excess nicotinic acid intake did not affect body weight gain, food intake, serotonin contents in the brain, stomach and small intestine, or the urinary excretions of water-soluble vitamins. Although excess nicotinic acid did not affect the upper part of the tryptophan-nicotinamide pathway, 0.5% nicotinic acid diet increased the urinary excretion of quinolinic acid. The diet containing more than 0.3% nicotinic acid also increased the urinary excretion of nicotinic acid, which is usually below the limit of detection. As determined from the results of body weight gain and food intake as indices for apparent adverse effects, the no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) for nicotinic acid was 0.5% in diet, corresponding to 450 mg/kg body weight/day. As judged from in increase of urinary quinolinic acid and nicotinic acid as indices of metabolic change, NOAEL was 0.1% in diet, corresponding to 90 mg/kg body weight/day, and the lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level (LOAEL) was 0.3% in diet, corresponding to 270 mg/kg body weight/day.

  15. Solubility of the Proteinogenic α-Amino Acids in Water, Ethanol, and Ethanol–Water Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The addition of organic solvents to α-amino acids in aqueous solution could be an effective method in crystallization. We reviewed the available data on the solubility of α-amino acids in water, water–ethanol mixtures, and ethanol at 298.15 K and 0.1 MPa. The solubility of l-alanine, l-proline, l-arginine, l-cysteine, and l-lysine in water and ethanol mixtures and the solubility of l-alanine, l-proline, l-arginine, l-cysteine, l-lysine, l-asparagine, l-glutamine, l-histidine, and l-leucine in pure ethanol systems were measured and are published here for the first time. The impact on the solubility of amino acids that can convert in solution, l-glutamic acid and l-cysteine, was studied. At lower concentrations, only the ninhydrin method and the ultraperfomance liquid chromatography (UPLC) method yield reliable results. In the case of α-amino acids that convert in solution, only the UPLC method was able to discern between the different α-amino acids and yields reliable results. Our results demonstrate that α-amino acids with similar physical structures have similar changes in solubility in mixed water/ethanol mixtures. The solubility of l-tryptophan increased at moderate ethanol concentrations. PMID:29545650

  16. Tumour Microenvironments Induce Expression of Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (uPAR) and Concomitant Activation of Gelatinolytic Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnussen, Synnøve; Hadler-Olsen, Elin; Latysheva, Nadezhda; Pirila, Emma; Steigen, Sonja E.; Hanes, Robert; Salo, Tuula; Winberg, Jan-Olof; Uhlin-Hansen, Lars; Svineng, Gunbjørg

    2014-01-01

    Background The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is associated with poor prognosis in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), and increased expression of uPAR is often found at the invasive tumour front. The aim of the current study was to elucidate the role of uPAR in invasion and metastasis of OSCC, and the effects of various tumour microenvironments in these processes. Furthermore, we wanted to study whether the cells’ expression level of uPAR affected the activity of gelatinolytic enzymes. Methods The Plaur gene was both overexpressed and knocked-down in the murine OSCC cell line AT84. Tongue and skin tumours were established in syngeneic mice, and cells were also studied in an ex vivo leiomyoma invasion model. Soluble factors derived from leiomyoma tissue, as well as purified extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, were assessed for their ability to affect uPAR expression, glycosylation and cleavage. Activity of gelatinolytic enzymes in the tissues were assessed by in situ zymography. Results We found that increased levels of uPAR did not induce tumour invasion or metastasis. However, cells expressing low endogenous levels of uPAR in vitro up-regulated uPAR expression both in tongue, skin and leiomyoma tissue. Various ECM proteins had no effect on uPAR expression, while soluble factors originating from the leiomyoma tissue increased both the expression and glycosylation of uPAR, and possibly also affected the proteolytic processing of uPAR. Tumours with high levels of uPAR, as well as cells invading leiomyoma tissue with up-regulated uPAR expression, all displayed enhanced activity of gelatinolytic enzymes. Conclusions Although high levels of uPAR are not sufficient to induce invasion and metastasis, the activity of gelatinolytic enzymes was increased. Furthermore, several tumour microenvironments have the capacity to induce up-regulation of uPAR expression, and soluble factors in the tumour microenvironment may have an important role in the

  17. Tumour microenvironments induce expression of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR and concomitant activation of gelatinolytic enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Synnøve Magnussen

    Full Text Available The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR is associated with poor prognosis in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, and increased expression of uPAR is often found at the invasive tumour front. The aim of the current study was to elucidate the role of uPAR in invasion and metastasis of OSCC, and the effects of various tumour microenvironments in these processes. Furthermore, we wanted to study whether the cells' expression level of uPAR affected the activity of gelatinolytic enzymes.The Plaur gene was both overexpressed and knocked-down in the murine OSCC cell line AT84. Tongue and skin tumours were established in syngeneic mice, and cells were also studied in an ex vivo leiomyoma invasion model. Soluble factors derived from leiomyoma tissue, as well as purified extracellular matrix (ECM proteins, were assessed for their ability to affect uPAR expression, glycosylation and cleavage. Activity of gelatinolytic enzymes in the tissues were assessed by in situ zymography.We found that increased levels of uPAR did not induce tumour invasion or metastasis. However, cells expressing low endogenous levels of uPAR in vitro up-regulated uPAR expression both in tongue, skin and leiomyoma tissue. Various ECM proteins had no effect on uPAR expression, while soluble factors originating from the leiomyoma tissue increased both the expression and glycosylation of uPAR, and possibly also affected the proteolytic processing of uPAR. Tumours with high levels of uPAR, as well as cells invading leiomyoma tissue with up-regulated uPAR expression, all displayed enhanced activity of gelatinolytic enzymes.Although high levels of uPAR are not sufficient to induce invasion and metastasis, the activity of gelatinolytic enzymes was increased. Furthermore, several tumour microenvironments have the capacity to induce up-regulation of uPAR expression, and soluble factors in the tumour microenvironment may have an important role in the regulation of posttranslational

  18. Plasma L-tryptophan concentration in major depressive disorder: new data and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Shintaro; Fujii, Takashi; Koga, Norie; Hori, Hiroaki; Teraishi, Toshiya; Hattori, Kotaro; Noda, Takamasa; Higuchi, Teruhiko; Motohashi, Nobutaka; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    Tryptophan, an essential amino acid, is the precursor to serotonin and is metabolized mainly by the kynurenine pathway. Both serotonin and kynurenine have been implicated in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). However, plasma tryptophan concentration in patients with MDD has not unequivocally been reported to be decreased, which prompted us to perform a meta-analysis on previous studies and our own data. We searched the PubMed database for case-control studies published until August 31, 2013, using the search terms plasma AND tryptophan AND synonyms for MDD. An additional search was performed for the term amino acid instead of tryptophan. We obtained our own data in 66 patients with MDD (DSM-IV) and 82 controls who were recruited from March 2011 to July 2012. The majority of the patients were medicated (N = 53). Total plasma tryptophan concentrations were measured by the liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry method. We scrutinized 160 studies for eligibility. Original articles that were written in English and documented plasma tryptophan values in patients and controls were selected. We included 24 studies from the literature and our own data in the meta-analysis, which involved a total of 744 patients and 793 controls. Data on unmedicated patients (N = 156) and their comparison subjects (N = 203) were also extracted. To see the possible correlation between tryptophan concentrations and depression severity, meta-regression analysis was performed for 10 studies with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale 17-item version score. In our case-control study, mean (SD) plasma tryptophan level was significantly decreased in the MDD patients versus the controls (53.9 [10.9] vs 57.2 [11.3] μmol/L; P = .03). The meta-analysis after adjusting for publication bias showed a significant decrease in patients with MDD with a modest effect size (Hedges g, -0.45). However, analysis on unmedicated subjects yielded a large effect (Hedges g, -0.84; P = .00015). We

  19. Review of microfluidic cell culture devices for the control of gaseous microenvironments in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H.-M.; Lee, T.-A.; Ko, P.-L.; Chiang, H.-J.; Peng, C.-C.; Tung, Y.-C.

    2018-04-01

    Gaseous microenvironments play important roles in various biological activities in vivo. However, it is challenging to precisely control gaseous microenvironments in vitro for cell culture due to the high diffusivity nature of gases. In recent years, microfluidics has paved the way for the development of new types of cell culture devices capable of manipulating cellular microenvironments, and provides a powerful tool for in vitro cell studies. This paper reviews recent developments of microfluidic cell culture devices for the control of gaseous microenvironments, and discusses the advantages and limitations of current devices. We conclude with suggestions for the future development of microfluidic cell culture devices for the control of gaseous microenvironments.

  20. Uranyl Oxalate Solubility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leturcq, G.; Costenoble, S.; Grandjean, S. [CEA Marcoule DEN/DRCP/SCPS/LCA - BP17171 - 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    The solubility of uranyl oxalate was determined at ambient temperature by precipitation in oxalic-nitric solutions, using an initial uranyl concentration of 0.1 mol/L. Oxalic concentration varied from 0.075 to 0.3 mol/L while nitric concentration ranged between 0.75 and 3 mol/L. Dissolution tests, using complementary oxalic-nitric media, were carried out for 550 hours in order to study the kinetic to reach thermodynamic equilibrium. Similar solubility values were reached by dissolution and precipitation. Using the results, it was possible to draw the solubility surface versus oxalic and nitric concentrations and to determine both the apparent solubility constant of UO{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, 3H{sub 2}O (Ks) and the apparent formation constant of the first uranyl-oxalate complex UO{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4} (log {beta}1), for ionic strengths varying between 1 and 3 mol/L. Ks and log {beta}1 values were found to vary from 1.9 10{sup -8} to 9.2 10{sup -9} and from 5.95 to 6.06, respectively, when ionic strength varied from 1 to 3 mol/L. A second model may fit our data obtained at an ionic strength of 3 mol/L suggesting as reported by Moskvin et al. (1959) that no complexes are formed for [H{sup +}] at 3 M. The Ks value would then be 1.3 10{sup -8}. (authors)

  1. Lignans from Carthamus tinctorius suppress tryptophan breakdown via indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehnl, Susanne; Schroecksnadel, Sebastian; Temml, Veronika; Gostner, Johanna M.; Schennach, Harald; Schuster, Daniela; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M.; Fuchs, Dietmar; Stuppner, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Seed extracts of Carthamus tinctorius L. (Asteraceae), safflower, have been traditionally used to treat coronary disease, thrombotic disorders, and menstrual problems but also against cancer and depression. A possible effect of C. tinctorius compounds on tryptophan-degrading activity of enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) could explain many of its activities. To test for an effect of C. tinctorius extracts and isolated compounds on cytokine-induced IDO activity in immunocompetent cells in vitro methanol and ethylacetate seed extracts were prepared from cold pressed seed cakes of C. tinctorius and three lignan derivatives, trachelogenin, arctigenin and matairesinol were isolated. The influence on tryptophan breakdown was investigated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Effects were compared to neopterin production in the same cellular assay. Both seed extracts suppressed tryptophan breakdown in stimulated PBMC. The three structurally closely related isolates exerted differing suppressive activity on PBMC: arctigenin (IC50 26.5 μM) and trachelogenin (IC50 of 57.4 μM) showed higher activity than matairesinol (IC50 >200 μM) to inhibit tryptophan breakdown. Effects on neopterin production were similar albeit generally less strong. Data show an immunosuppressive property of compounds which slows down IDO activity. The in vitro results support the view that some of the anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and antidepressant properties of C. tinctorius lignans might relate to their suppressive influence on tryptophan breakdown. PMID:23867649

  2. Severe Tryptophan Starvation Blocks Onset of Conventional Persistence and Reduces Reactivation of Chlamydia trachomatis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Ralf M.; Lee, Seung-Joon; Kavathas, Paula B.; Cresswell, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The intracellular survival of the bacterial pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis depends on protein synthesis by the microbe soon after internalization. Pharmacologic inhibition of bacterial translation inhibits early trafficking of the parasitophorous vacuole (inclusion) to the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) and promotes its fusion with lysosomes, which is normally blocked by Chlamydia. Depletion of cellular tryptophan pools by gamma interferon-inducible indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is believed to be the major innate immune mechanism controlling C. trachomatis infection in human cells, an action to which the bacteria can respond by converting into a nonreplicating but highly reactivatable persistent state. However, whether severe IDO-mediated tryptophan starvation can be sufficient to fully arrest the chlamydial life cycle and thereby counteract the onset of persistence is unknown. Here we demonstrate that at low exogenous tryptophan concentrations a substantial fraction of C. trachomatis bacteria fail to traffic to the MTOC or to switch into the conventional persistent state in gamma interferon-induced human cells. The organisms stay scattered in the cell periphery, do not retain infectivity, and display only low transcriptional activity. Importantly, the rate at which these aberrant Chlamydia bacteria become reactivated upon replenishment of cellular tryptophan pools is substantially lower. Thus, severe tryptophan depletion in cells with high IDO activity affects chlamydial development more rigorously than previously described. PMID:17724071

  3. Tuning electronic transport via hepta-alanine peptides junction by tryptophan doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Cunlan; Yu, Xi; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Sepunaru, Lior; Bendikov, Tatyana; Pecht, Israel; Kronik, Leeor; Vilan, Ayelet; Sheves, Mordechai; Cahen, David

    2016-09-27

    Charge migration for electron transfer via the polypeptide matrix of proteins is a key process in biological energy conversion and signaling systems. It is sensitive to the sequence of amino acids composing the protein and, therefore, offers a tool for chemical control of charge transport across biomaterial-based devices. We designed a series of linear oligoalanine peptides with a single tryptophan substitution that acts as a "dopant," introducing an energy level closer to the electrodes' Fermi level than that of the alanine homopeptide. We investigated the solid-state electron transport (ETp) across a self-assembled monolayer of these peptides between gold contacts. The single tryptophan "doping" markedly increased the conductance of the peptide chain, especially when its location in the sequence is close to the electrodes. Combining inelastic tunneling spectroscopy, UV photoelectron spectroscopy, electronic structure calculations by advanced density-functional theory, and dc current-voltage analysis, the role of tryptophan in ETp is rationalized by charge tunneling across a heterogeneous energy barrier, via electronic states of alanine and tryptophan, and by relatively efficient direct coupling of tryptophan to a Au electrode. These results reveal a controlled way of modulating the electrical properties of molecular junctions by tailor-made "building block" peptides.

  4. The effect of acute tryptophan depletion on mood and impulsivity in polydrug ecstasy users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Simon N; Regoli, Martine; Leyton, Marco; Pihl, Robert O; Benkelfat, Chawki

    2014-02-01

    Several studies suggest users of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (ecstasy) have low levels of serotonin. Low serotonin may make them susceptible to lowered mood. This work aims to study the acute effects on mood and impulsivity of lowering serotonin levels with acute tryptophan depletion in polydrug ecstasy users and to determine whether effects were different in men and women. In a double-blind cross-over study, participants who had used ecstasy at least 25 times (n = 13) and nonuser controls (n = 17) received a tryptophan-deficient amino acid mixture and a control amino acid mixture containing tryptophan, at least 1 week apart. Mood was measured using the profile of mood states, and impulsivity was measured with the Go/No-Go task. The main result shows that a lowering of mood after acute tryptophan depletion occurred only in female polydrug ecstasy users (n = 7), relative to controls (n = 9). Results from the Go/No-Go task suggested that impulsivity was not increased by acute tryptophan depletion in polydrug ecstasy users. The group sizes were small, when males and females were considered separately. Women polydrug ecstasy users appear to be more susceptible than men to the effects of lowered serotonin levels. If use of ecstasy alone or in conjunction with other drugs causes progressive damage of serotonin neurons, women polydrug ecstasy users may become susceptible to clinical depression.

  5. Engineering three-dimensional cell mechanical microenvironment with hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guoyou; Wang, Lin; Wang, Shuqi; Han, Yulong; Wu, Jinhui; Zhang, Qiancheng; Xu, Feng; Lu, Tian Jian

    2012-12-01

    Cell mechanical microenvironment (CMM) significantly affects cell behaviors such as spreading, migration, proliferation and differentiation. However, most studies on cell response to mechanical stimulation are based on two-dimensional (2D) planar substrates, which cannot mimic native three-dimensional (3D) CMM. Accumulating evidence has shown that there is a significant difference in cell behavior in 2D and 3D microenvironments. Among the materials used for engineering 3D CMM, hydrogels have gained increasing attention due to their tunable properties (e.g. chemical and mechanical properties). In this paper, we provide an overview of recent advances in engineering hydrogel-based 3D CMM. Effects of mechanical cues (e.g. hydrogel stiffness and externally induced stress/strain in hydrogels) on cell behaviors are described. A variety of approaches to load mechanical stimuli in 3D hydrogel-based constructs are also discussed.

  6. A study for radiation-related tumor microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Young Sook; Hong, Seok Il; Kim, Young Soon; Jin Yong Jae; Lee, Tae Hee; Chung, Eun Kyung; Yi, Jae Yeun; Park, Myung Jin; Kim, Yun Young; Kang, Sin Keun

    1999-04-01

    In this study, we attempted to elucidate the mechanism involved in radiation-induced modification and changes of biological factors and physicochemical factors of tumor microenvironment and develop techniques and agents for the modification of tumor microenvironment which is favorable for efficient radio-cancer therapy based on our basic study. We established in vitro tumor invasion and angiogenesis model, elucidated the importance of MMPs activation and the MMPs/TIMPs complex in the invasive transition of tumor. Furthermore we showed the signaling pathway for MMPs induction through EGF receptor and TGF beta 1 stimulated E-M transition. We also established primary culture of human endothelial cells and tubule forming condition which is utilized for the detection of novel angiogenic factors. We also identified hypoxia induced signaling pathway and showed that GBE improved blood perfusion which may increase the effectiveness of radio-cancer therapy

  7. Engineering mechanical microenvironment of macrophage and its biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Li, Yuhui; Gao, Bin; Qin, Chuanguang; He, Yining; Xu, Feng; Yang, Hui; Lin, Min

    2018-03-01

    Macrophages are the most plastic cells in the hematopoietic system and can be widely found in almost all tissues. Recently studies have shown that mechanical cues (e.g., matrix stiffness and stress/strain) can significantly affect macrophage behaviors. Although existing reviews on the physical and mechanical cues that regulate the macrophage's phenotype are available, engineering mechanical microenvironment of macrophages in vitro as well as a comprehensive overview and prospects for their biomedical applications (e.g., tissue engineering and immunotherapy) has yet to be summarized. Thus, this review provides an overview on the existing methods for engineering mechanical microenvironment of macrophages in vitro and then a section on their biomedical applications and further perspectives are presented.

  8. Engineering three-dimensional cell mechanical microenvironment with hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Guoyou; Wang Lin; Han Yulong; Zhang Qiancheng; Xu Feng; Lu Tianjian; Wang Shuqi; Wu Jinhui

    2012-01-01

    Cell mechanical microenvironment (CMM) significantly affects cell behaviors such as spreading, migration, proliferation and differentiation. However, most studies on cell response to mechanical stimulation are based on two-dimensional (2D) planar substrates, which cannot mimic native three-dimensional (3D) CMM. Accumulating evidence has shown that there is a significant difference in cell behavior in 2D and 3D microenvironments. Among the materials used for engineering 3D CMM, hydrogels have gained increasing attention due to their tunable properties (e.g. chemical and mechanical properties). In this paper, we provide an overview of recent advances in engineering hydrogel-based 3D CMM. Effects of mechanical cues (e.g. hydrogel stiffness and externally induced stress/strain in hydrogels) on cell behaviors are described. A variety of approaches to load mechanical stimuli in 3D hydrogel-based constructs are also discussed. (topical review)

  9. A study for radiation-related tumor microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Young Sook; Hong, Seok Il; Kim, Young Soon; Jin Yong Jae; Lee, Tae Hee; Chung, Eun Kyung; Yi, Jae Yeun; Park, Myung Jin; Kim, Yun Young; Kang, Sin Keun

    1999-04-01

    In this study, we attempted to elucidate the mechanism involved in radiation-induced modification and changes of biological factors and physicochemical factors of tumor microenvironment and develop techniques and agents for the modification of tumor microenvironment which is favorable for efficient radio-cancer therapy based on our basic study. We established in vitro tumor invasion and angiogenesis model, elucidated the importance of MMPs activation and the MMPs/TIMPs complex in the invasive transition of tumor. Furthermore we showed the signaling pathway for MMPs induction through EGF receptor and TGF beta 1 stimulated E-M transition. We also established primary culture of human endothelial cells and tubule forming condition which is utilized for the detection of novel angiogenic factors. We also identified hypoxia induced signaling pathway and showed that GBE improved blood perfusion which may increase the effectiveness of radio-cancer therapy.

  10. Characterization of f-actin tryptophan phosphorescence in the presence and absence of tryptophan-free myosin motor domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bódis, Emöke; Strambini, Giovanni B; Gonnelli, Margherita; Málnási-Csizmadia, András; Somogyi, Béla

    2004-08-01

    The effect of binding the Trp-free motor domain mutant of Dictyostelium discoideum, rabbit skeletal muscle myosin S1, and tropomyosin on the dynamics and conformation of actin filaments was characterized by an analysis of steady-state tryptophan phosphorescence spectra and phosphorescence decay kinetics over a temperature range of 140-293 K. The binding of the Trp-free motor domain mutant of D. discoideum to actin caused red shifts in the phosphorescence spectrum of two internal Trp residues of actin and affected the intrinsic lifetime of each emitter, decreasing by roughly twofold the short phosphorescence lifetime components (tau(1) and tau(2)) and increasing by approximately 20% the longest component (tau(3)). The alteration of actin phosphorescence by the motor protein suggests that i), structural changes occur deep down in the core of actin and that ii), subtle changes in conformation appear also on the surface but in regions distant from the motor domain binding site. When actin formed complexes with skeletal S1, an extra phosphorescence lifetime component appeared (tau(4), twice as long as tau(3)) in the phosphorescence decay that is absent in the isolated proteins. The lack of this extra component in the analogous actin-Trp-free motor domain mutant of D. discoideum complex suggests that it should be assigned to Trps in S1 that in the complex attain a more compact local structure. Our data indicated that the binding of tropomyosin to actin filaments had no effect on the structure or flexibility of actin observable by this technique.

  11. Reprograming the Metastatic Microenvironment to Combat Disease Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing...truly eliminate “residual disease” and prevent metastatic recurrence. We believe we have found a way to accomplish this by inhibiting colony- stimulating ...the bone microenvironment lead to pathological bone loss, which can stimulate tumor cell outgrowth. In addition to contributing to morbidity, this

  12. Remodeling the Vascular Microenvironment of Glioblastoma with α-Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behling, Katja; Maguire, William F; Di Gialleonardo, Valentina; Heeb, Lukas E M; Hassan, Iman F; Veach, Darren R; Keshari, Kayvan R; Gutin, Philip H; Scheinberg, David A; McDevitt, Michael R

    2016-11-01

    Tumors escape antiangiogenic therapy by activation of proangiogenic signaling pathways. Bevacizumab is approved for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma, but patients inevitably develop resistance to this angiogenic inhibitor. We previously investigated targeted α-particle therapy with 225 Ac-E4G10 as an antivascular approach and showed increased survival and tumor control in a high-grade transgenic orthotopic glioblastoma model. Here, we investigated changes in tumor vascular morphology and functionality caused by 225 Ac-E4G10. We investigated remodeling of the tumor microenvironment in transgenic Ntva glioblastoma mice using a therapeutic 7.4-kBq dose of 225 Ac-E4G10. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical analyses imaged morphologic changes in the tumor blood-brain barrier microenvironment. Multicolor flow cytometry quantified the endothelial progenitor cell population in the bone marrow. Diffusion-weighted MR imaged functional changes in the tumor vascular network. The mechanism of drug action is a combination of remodeling of the glioblastoma vascular microenvironment, relief of edema, and depletion of regulatory T and endothelial progenitor cells. The primary remodeling event is the reduction of both endothelial and perivascular cell populations. Tumor-associated edema and necrosis were lessened, resulting in increased perfusion and reduced diffusion. Pharmacologic uptake of dasatinib into tumor was enhanced after α-particle therapy. Targeted antivascular α-particle radiation remodels the glioblastoma vascular microenvironment via a multimodal mechanism of action and provides insight into the vascular architecture of platelet-derived growth factor-driven glioblastoma. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  13. Argon solubility in liquid steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, R; Dankert, O; Van Veen, A; Kamperman, AA

    2000-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to establish the solubility of argon in liquid interstitial-free steel. The solubility appears to be lower than 0.1 at ppb, The results are in line with argon solubilities reported in the literature on liquid iron. Semiempirical theories and calculations based on the

  14. Chemical and physical microenvironments at the Viking landing sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, B. C.

    1979-01-01

    Physical and chemical considerations permit the division of the near-surface regolith on Mars into at least six zones of distinct microenvironments. The zones are euphotic, duricrust/peds, tempofrost, permafrost, endolithic, and interfacial/transitional. Microenvironments vary significantly in temperature extremes, mean temperature, salt content, relative pressure of water vapor, UV and visible light irradiance, and exposure to ionizing radiation events (100 Mrad) and oxidative molecular species. From what is known of the chemistry of the atmosphere and regolith fines (soil), limits upon the aqueous chemistry of soil pastes may be estimated. Heat of wetting could reach 45 cal/g dry soil; initial pH is indeterminate between 1 and 10; ionic strength and salinity are predicted to be extremely high; freezing point depression is inadequate to provide quantities of liquid water except in special cases. The prospects for biotic survival are grim by terrestrial standards, but the extremes of biological resiliency are inaccessible to evaluation. Second-generation in situ experiments which will better define Martian microenvironments are clearly possible. Antarctic dry valleys are approximations to Martian conditions, but deviate significantly by at least half-a-dozen criteria.

  15. Global niche of marine anaerobic metabolisms expanded by particle microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Daniele; Weber, Thomas S.; Kiko, Rainer; Deutsch, Curtis

    2018-04-01

    In ocean waters, anaerobic microbial respiration should be confined to the anoxic waters found in coastal regions and tropical oxygen minimum zones, where it is energetically favourable. However, recent molecular and geochemical evidence has pointed to a much broader distribution of denitrifying and sulfate-reducing microbes. Anaerobic metabolisms are thought to thrive in microenvironments that develop inside sinking organic aggregates, but the global distribution and geochemical significance of these microenvironments is poorly understood. Here, we develop a new size-resolved particle model to predict anaerobic respiration from aggregate properties and seawater chemistry. Constrained by observations of the size spectrum of sinking particles, the model predicts that denitrification and sulfate reduction can be sustained throughout vast, hypoxic expanses of the ocean, and could explain the trace metal enrichment observed in particles due to sulfide precipitation. Globally, the expansion of the anaerobic niche due to particle microenvironments doubles the rate of water column denitrification compared with estimates based on anoxic zones alone, and changes the sensitivity of the marine nitrogen cycle to deoxygenation in a warming climate.

  16. Modulating the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Tumor Nanomedicine Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanomedicines including liposomes, micelles, and nanoparticles based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR effect have become the mainstream for tumor treatment owing to their superiority over conventional anticancer agents. Advanced design of nanomedicine including active targeting nanomedicine, tumor-responsive nanomedicine, and optimization of physicochemical properties to enable highly effective delivery of nanomedicine to tumors has further improved their therapeutic benefits. However, these strategies still could not conquer the delivery barriers of a tumor microenvironment such as heterogeneous blood flow, dense extracellular matrix, abundant stroma cells, and high interstitial fluid pressure, which severely impaired vascular transport of nanomedicines, hindered their effective extravasation, and impeded their interstitial transport to realize uniform distribution inside tumors. Therefore, modulation of tumor microenvironment has now emerged as an important strategy to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumors. Here, we review the existing strategies and approaches for tumor microenvironment modulation to improve tumor perfusion for helping more nanomedicines to reach the tumor site, to facilitate nanomedicine extravasation for enhancing transvascular transport, and to improve interstitial transport for optimizing the distribution of nanomedicines. These strategies may provide an avenue for the development of new combination chemotherapeutic regimens and reassessment of previously suboptimal agents.

  17. Intraportal islet transplantation: the impact of the liver microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaune, Vaihere; Berney, Thierry; Lacotte, Stéphanie; Toso, Christian

    2017-03-01

    The portal vein remains the preferred site for pancreatic islet transplantation due to its easy access and low morbidity. However, despite great progress in isolation and transplantation protocols over the past few years, it is still associated with the early loss of some 50-70% of transplanted islets. The complex liver microenvironment itself presumably plays an important role in this loss. The present review focuses on the specifics of the liver microenvironment, notably the localized hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury following transplantation, the low oxygenation of the portal vein, the instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction, the endogenous liver immune system, and the gut-liver axis, and how they can each have an impact on the transplanted islets. It identifies the potential, or already applied, clinical interventions for improving intraportal islet survival, and pinpoints those promising areas still lacking preclinical research. Future interventions on clinical intraportal islet transplantation need to take into account the global context of the liver microenvironment, with multi-point interventions being most likely to improve early islet survival and engraftment. © 2017 The Authors. Transplant International published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Steunstichting ESOT.

  18. Modulating the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Tumor Nanomedicine Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing

    2017-01-01

    Nanomedicines including liposomes, micelles, and nanoparticles based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect have become the mainstream for tumor treatment owing to their superiority over conventional anticancer agents. Advanced design of nanomedicine including active targeting nanomedicine, tumor-responsive nanomedicine, and optimization of physicochemical properties to enable highly effective delivery of nanomedicine to tumors has further improved their therapeutic benefits. However, these strategies still could not conquer the delivery barriers of a tumor microenvironment such as heterogeneous blood flow, dense extracellular matrix, abundant stroma cells, and high interstitial fluid pressure, which severely impaired vascular transport of nanomedicines, hindered their effective extravasation, and impeded their interstitial transport to realize uniform distribution inside tumors. Therefore, modulation of tumor microenvironment has now emerged as an important strategy to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumors. Here, we review the existing strategies and approaches for tumor microenvironment modulation to improve tumor perfusion for helping more nanomedicines to reach the tumor site, to facilitate nanomedicine extravasation for enhancing transvascular transport, and to improve interstitial transport for optimizing the distribution of nanomedicines. These strategies may provide an avenue for the development of new combination chemotherapeutic regimens and reassessment of previously suboptimal agents. PMID:29311946

  19. Role of the Microenvironment in Ovarian Cancer Stem Cell Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Pasquier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent progresses in cancer therapy and increased knowledge in cancer biology, ovarian cancer remains a challenging condition. Among the latest concepts developed in cancer biology, cancer stem cells and the role of microenvironment in tumor progression seem to be related. Indeed, cancer stem cells have been described in several solid tumors including ovarian cancers. These particular cells have the ability to self-renew and reconstitute a heterogeneous tumor. They are characterized by specific surface markers and display resistance to therapeutic regimens. During development, specific molecular cues from the tumor microenvironment can play a role in maintaining and expanding stemness of cancer cells. The tumor stroma contains several compartments: cellular component, cytokine network, and extracellular matrix. These different compartments interact to form a permissive niche for the cancer stem cells. Understanding the molecular cues underlying this crosstalk will allow the design of new therapeutic regimens targeting the niche. In this paper, we will discuss the mechanisms implicated in the interaction between ovarian cancer stem cells and their microenvironment.

  20. Designing the stem cell microenvironment for guided connective tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanowicz, Danielle R; Lu, Helen H

    2017-12-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive cell source for regenerative medicine because of their ability to self-renew and their capacity for multilineage differentiation and tissue regeneration. For connective tissues, such as ligaments or tendons, MSCs are vital to the modulation of the inflammatory response following acute injury while also interacting with resident fibroblasts to promote cell proliferation and matrix synthesis. To date, MSC injection for connective tissue repair has yielded mixed results in vivo, likely due to a lack of appropriate environmental cues to effectively control MSC response and promote tissue healing instead of scar formation. In healthy tissues, stem cells reside within a complex microenvironment comprising cellular, structural, and signaling cues that collectively maintain stemness and modulate tissue homeostasis. Changes to the microenvironment following injury regulate stem cell differentiation, trophic signaling, and tissue healing. Here, we focus on models of the stem cell microenvironment that are used to elucidate the mechanisms of stem cell regulation and inspire functional approaches to tissue regeneration. Recent studies in this frontier area are highlighted, focusing on how microenvironmental cues modulate MSC response following connective tissue injury and, more importantly, how this unique cell environment can be programmed for stem cell-guided tissue regeneration. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  1. Effects of environmental lighting and tryptophan devoid diet on the rat vaginal cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammanco, S; Ernandes, M; La Guardia, M

    1997-09-01

    Cerebral serotonin level influences luteinizing hormone release and, consequently, ovulation. The present study evaluated the effects of precooked maize meal (polenta), a diet almost devoid of tryptophan the serotonin precursor on the alterations of the estrus cycle as measured by vaginal smears analysis in Wistar rats. Several conditions of environmental lighting were used in order to modify ovarian cycle: 1) natural alternating light/dark cycle; 2) continuous darkness; 3) continuous light by sodium steams: 4) continuous light by fluorescent neon tubes. Rats bred in continuous lighting showed estrus-proestrus rate significantly greater than rats bred in normal lighting or in continuous darkness. The feeding with precooked maize meal suppressed persistent estrus in rats bred in continuous lighting, and significantly cut down the estrus-proestrus frequency in any condition of environmental lighting. Our results lead to hypothesize that polenta diet, for its low tryptophan content, cutting down both tryptophan plasma content and serotonin neuronal synthesis, promotes luteinizing hormone peak.

  2. Dosimetry of D- and L-enantiomers of 11C-labeled tryptophan and valine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washburn, L.C.; Byrd, B.L.; Sun, T.T.; Crook, J.E.; Hubner, K.F.; Coffey, J.L.; Watson, E.E.

    1985-01-01

    We have previously reported the radiation dosimetry of 11 C-labeled DL-tryptophan and DL-valine, as well as clinical pancreatic imaging studies with these agents. Because of significant uptake in both normal pancreas and in pancreatic tumors (thought to be due to the presence of the D-enantiomer), differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma was not feasible. High-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) methods were developed for rapid resolution of 11 C-labeled DL-tryptophan and DL-valine. Radiation dose estimates to the various organs in man were calculated for the D- and L-enantiomers of 11 C-labeled tryptophan and valine, based on tissue distribution data in rats. The dose estimates were sufficiently low that 20-mCi doses of each of the enantiomeric amino acids were approved by the FDA for intravenous administration to humans. 21 refs., 3 tabs

  3. Dosimetry of D- and L-enantiomers of 11C-labeled tryptophan and valine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washburn, L.C.; Byrd, B.L.; Sun, T.T.; Crook, J.E.; Hubner, K.F.; Coffey, J.L.; Watson, E.E.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have previously reported the radiation dosimetry of 11 C-labeled DL-tryptophan and DL-valine, as well as clinical pancreatic imaging studies with these agents. Because of significant uptake in both normal pancreas and in pancreatic tumors (thought to be due to the presence of the D-enantiomer), differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma was not feasible. High-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) methods were developed for rapid resolution of 11 C-labeled DL-tryptophan and DL-valine. Radiation dose estimates to the various organs in man were calculated for the D- and L-enantiomers of 11 C-labeled tryptophan and valine, based on tissue distribution data in rats. The dose estimates were sufficiently low that 20-mCi doses of each of the enantiomeric amino acids were approved by the FDA for intravenous administration to humans. 21 references, 3 tables

  4. Synthesis of no-carrier-added alpha-[11C]methyl-L-tryptophan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaly, T.; Diksic, M.

    1988-01-01

    Described here is a synthesis of no-carrier-added alpha-[ 11 C]methyl-L-tryptophan based on alkylation with 11 CH 3 I of an anion generated by reacting the Schiff base of L-tryptophan methyl ester with di-isopropylamine. The synthesis requires approximately 30 min after the end of 11 CO 2 collection and gives alpha-[ 11 C]methyl-L-tryptophan in a 20-25% radiochemical yield calculated at the end of the synthesis and without correction for radioactive decay. The specific activity of the final radiopharmaceutical, measured at the end of the synthesis, was around 2000 Ci/mmol. Data confirming the stereospecificity of the synthesis are also presented

  5. GPR142 Controls Tryptophan-Induced Insulin and Incretin Hormone Secretion to Improve Glucose Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua V Lin

    Full Text Available GPR142, a putative amino acid receptor, is expressed in pancreatic islets and the gastrointestinal tract, but the ligand affinity and physiological role of this receptor remain obscure. In this study, we show that in addition to L-Tryptophan, GPR142 signaling is also activated by L-Phenylalanine but not by other naturally occurring amino acids. Furthermore, we show that Tryptophan and a synthetic GPR142 agonist increase insulin and incretin hormones and improve glucose disposal in mice in a GPR142-dependent manner. In contrast, Phenylalanine improves in vivo glucose disposal independently of GPR142. Noteworthy, refeeding-induced elevations in insulin and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide are blunted in Gpr142 null mice. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate GPR142 is a Tryptophan receptor critically required for insulin and incretin hormone regulation and suggest GPR142 agonists may be effective therapies that leverage amino acid sensing pathways for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  6. Tryptophan metabolism in tsetse flies and the consequences of its derangement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Gooding

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Literature comparing salmon and wild type Glossina morsitans morsitans and that comparing tan and wild type Glossina palpalis palpalis is reviewed. New information is presented on behaviour and biochemistry of salmon and wild type G. m. morsitans. The eye color mutants result from two lesions in the tryptophan to xanthommatin pathway: lack of tryptophan oxygenase in G. m morsitans and failure to produce or retain xanthommatin in eyes (but not in testes of G. p. palpalis. The salmon allele in G. m. morsitans is pleiotropic and profoundly affects many aspects of fly biology including longevity, reproductive capacity, vision, vectorial capacity and duration of flight, but not circadian rhythms. The tan allele in G. p. palpalis has little effect upon the biology of flies under laboratory conditions, except that tan flies appear less active than normal. Adult tsetse flies metabolize tryptophan to kynurenine which is excreted; fluctuations in activities of the enzymes producing kynurenine suggest this pathway is under metabolic control.

  7. In Vivo EPR Assessment of pH, pO2, Redox Status, and Concentrations of Phosphate and Glutathione in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobko, Andrey A; Eubank, Timothy D; Driesschaert, Benoit; Khramtsov, Valery V

    2018-03-16

    This protocol demonstrates the capability of low-field electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-based techniques in combination with functional paramagnetic probes to provide quantitative information on the chemical tumor microenvironment (TME), including pO2, pH, redox status, concentrations of interstitial inorganic phosphate (Pi), and intracellular glutathione (GSH). In particular, an application of a recently developed soluble multifunctional trityl probe provides unsurpassed opportunity for in vivo concurrent measurements of pH, pO2 and Pi in Extracellular space (HOPE probe). The measurements of three parameters using a single probe allow for their correlation analyses independent of probe distribution and time of the measurements.

  8. Involvement of urokinase receptor in the cross-talk between human hematopoietic stem cells and bone marrow microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selleri, Carmine; Montuori, Nunzia; Salvati, Annamaria

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in bone marrow (BM) and can be induced to mobilize into the circulation for transplantation. Homing and lodgement into BM of transplanted HSCs are the first critical steps in their engraftment and involve multiple interactions between HSCs and the BM...... Culture (LTC)-Initiating Cells (ICs) and in the release of clonogenic progenitors from LTCs of CD34+ HSCs. Further, suPAR increases adhesion and survival of CD34+ KG1 AML cells, whereas uPAR84-95 increases their proliferation.Thus, circulating DIIDIII-suPAR, strongly increased in HSC mobilization...... microenvironment.uPAR is a three domain receptor (DIDIIDIII) which binds urokinase, vitronectin, integrins. uPAR can be cleaved and shed from the cell surface generating full-length and cleaved soluble forms (suPAR and DIIDIII-suPAR). DIIDIII-suPAR can bind fMLF receptors through the SRSRY sequence (residues 88...

  9. Human mammary progenitor cell fate decisions are products of interactions with combinatorial microenvironments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBarge, Mark A; Nelson, Celeste M; Villadsen, Rene; Fridriksdottir, Agla; Ruth, Jason R; Stampfer, Martha R; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2008-09-19

    In adult tissues, multi-potent progenitor cells are some of the most primitive members of the developmental hierarchies that maintain homeostasis. That progenitors and their more mature progeny share identical genomes, suggests that fate decisions are directed by interactions with extrinsic soluble factors, ECM, and other cells, as well as physical properties of the ECM. To understand regulation of fate decisions, therefore, would require a means of understanding carefully choreographed combinatorial interactions. Here we used microenvironment protein microarrays to functionally identify combinations of cell-extrinsic mammary gland proteins and ECM molecules that imposed specific cell fates on bipotent human mammary progenitor cells. Micropatterned cell culture surfaces were fabricated to distinguish between the instructive effects of cell-cell versus cell-ECM interactions, as well as constellations of signaling molecules; and these were used in conjunction with physiologically relevant 3 dimensional human breast cultures. Both immortalized and primary human breast progenitors were analyzed. We report on the functional ability of those proteins of the mammary gland that maintain quiescence, maintain the progenitor state, and guide progenitor differentiation towards myoepithelial and luminal lineages.

  10. The pharmacokinetics of L-tryptophan following its intravenous and oral administration.

    OpenAIRE

    Green, A R; Aronson, J K; Cowen, P J

    1985-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of L-tryptophan (5 g and 7.5 g) have been studied after its intravenous administration to healthy subjects and the results compared with those obtained after oral administration (0.7 g-3.5 g). In order to do this, we have re-analysed previously published data relating to oral administration. The data obtained following the oral administration of L-tryptophan suggest that the total body clearance and apparent volume of distribution are saturable. The pharmacokinetics of tr...

  11. Don't panic. A guide to tryptophan depletion with disorder-specific anxiety provocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, S D; Bell, C J; Argyropoulos, S V; Nutt, D J

    2016-11-01

    The 2002 paper "Does 5-HT restrain panic? A tryptophan depletion study in panic disorder patients recovered on paroxetine" by Bell and colleagues - reprinted in this issue of the Journal - reports on a study undertaken in the halcyon days of David Nutt's Psychopharmacology Unit at the University of Bristol, England. In this invited commentary authors of the original work discuss the impact of this paper on the field of acute tryptophan depletion research (especially in the field of clinical anxiety disorders) and the development of disorder-specific anxiogenic provocations over the past decade. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Soluble porphyrin polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Jr., John Devens; Liddell, Paul Anthony

    2015-07-07

    Porphyrin polymers of Structure 1, where n is an integer (e.g., 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or greater) ##STR00001## are synthesized by the method shown in FIGS. 2A and 2B. The porphyrin polymers of Structure 1 are soluble in organic solvents such as 2-MeTHF and the like, and can be synthesized in bulk (i.e., in processes other than electropolymerization). These porphyrin polymers have long excited state lifetimes, making the material suitable as an organic semiconductor for organic electronic devices including transistors and memories, as well as solar cells, sensors, light-emitting devices, and other opto-electronic devices.

  13. Twenty-four-hour plasma tryptophan concentrations and ratios are below normal in obese subjects and are not normalized by substantial weight reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breum, Leif; Rasmussen, Michael H; Hilsted, Jannik

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Plasma tryptophan concentrations and the ratio of tryptophan to other large neutral amino acids (plasma tryptophan ratio) are reportedly low in obese subjects. The plasma tryptophan ratio predicts brain tryptophan uptake and serotonin production. If this ratio is low in obese subjects......, serotonin function may also be low. Plasma tryptophan concentrations and ratios have been measured only at single time points in obese subjects; it is not known whether low values for these 2 variables persist throughout a 24-h period. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to determine whether plasma tryptophan...... concentrations and ratios in obese subjects are lower than those in normal-weight subjects throughout a 24-h period and whether they increase when body weight is reduced. DESIGN: Plasma tryptophan concentrations and ratios were examined in obese subjects before and after weight loss and in nonobese control...

  14. L-tryptophan synthesis from 14C-anthranilic acid in plants with high and low tryptophan content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutacek, M.; Eder, J.; Vackova, K.; Prochazka, S.

    1978-01-01

    The biosynthesis of L-tryptophan (L-trp) from anthranilic acid- 14 C (AA- 14 C) in undamaged organs of the seedlings of kohlrabi and peas, with high L-trp content and maize plants, with low L-trp content was compared. As for maize the experiments were carried out with normal and opaque-2 phenotypes, both with the seedlings and with the ripening kernels. AA- 14 C is metabolized in the plants to L-trp pool and to glycosyl esters of AA. In maize seedlings L-trp- 14 C is synthesized relatively less than in kohlrabi and in pea. The de novo formation of L-trp- 14 C is stopped earlier in maize than in kohlrabi. The level of free L-trp- 14 C is relatively low in maize in comparison with kohlrabi and peas. In spite of this the formation of L-trp- 14 C from AA- 14 C is sufficient in maize to incorporate L-trp both into the proteins and into a secondary metabolite that is not yet defined. At the period of seedlings the incorporation in maize of L-trp into the proteins is comparable with that in kohlrabi, and it is maximum in pea. Maize, at the stage of germination, thus forms proteins rich in L-trp. The formation of free L-trp is approximately ten times lower in ripening kernels and in the leaves adjacent to the ear and it further decreases in the course of the ripening of the kernels. Although the activity of the biosynthesis of the AA- 14 C→L-trp- 14 C pathway is relatively lower in maize than in kohlrabi and peas, this pathway is most responsible for the differences in the content of L-trp in these plants. Neither amitrol nor histidine affected the biosynthesis of L-trp in kohlrabi; the interaction of the biosynthetic pathways of L-trp and histidine known in microorganisms is thus not important in a higher plant. (author)

  15. Ingestion of branched-chain amino acids and tryptophan during sustained exercise in man: failure to affect performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hall, Gerrit; Raaymakers, J S; Saris, W H

    1995-01-01

    1. An increased uptake of tryptophan in the brain may increase serotoninergic activity and recently has been suggested to be a cause of fatigue during prolonged exercise. The present study, therefore, investigates whether ingestion of tryptophan or the competing branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs......) affect performance. Ten endurance-trained male athletes were studied during cycle exercise at 70-75% maximal power output, while ingesting, ad random and double-blind, drinks that contained 6% sucrose (control) or 6% sucrose supplemented with (1) tryptophan (3 g l-1), (2) a low dose of BCAA (6 g l-1...... tryptophan ingestion caused a 7- to 20-fold increase. Exercise time to exhaustion was not different between treatments (122 +/- 3 min). 3. The data suggest that manipulation of tryptophan supply to the brain either has no additional effect upon serotoninergic activity during prolonged exhaustive exercise...

  16. Monocyte/macrophage-derived soluble CD163: A novel biomarker in multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Nørgaard; Abildgaard, Niels; Maniecki, Maciej B

    2014-01-01

    fluids (soluble CD163, sCD163). In this study, we examined serum sCD163 as a biomarker in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. METHODS: Peripheral blood (n = 104) and bone marrow (n = 17) levels of sCD163 were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: At diagnosis, high s......CD163 was associated with higher stage according to the International Staging System (ISS) and with other known prognostic factors in multiple myeloma (creatinine, C-reactive protein, and beta-2 microglobulin). Soluble CD163 decreased upon high-dose treatment, and in a multivariate survival analysis...... in bone marrow samples than in the matched blood samples, which indicate a localized production of sCD163 within the bone marrow microenvironment. CONCLUSIONS: Soluble CD163 was found to be a prognostic marker in patients with multiple myeloma. This may indicate that macrophages and/or monocytes have...

  17. Functional effects of proinflammatory factors present in Sjögren's syndrome salivary microenvironment in an in vitro model of human salivary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce-Franco, Mayte; Dominguez-Luis, María; Pec, Martina K; Martínez-Gimeno, Carlos; Miranda, Pablo; Alvarez de la Rosa, Diego; Giraldez, Teresa; García-Verdugo, José María; Machado, José David; Díaz-González, Federico

    2017-09-19

    Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is an autoimmune exocrinopathy in which the role that the immune response plays in reducing exocrine gland function, including the glandular microenvironment of cytokines, has not been fully understood. Epithelial cells from biopsies of human parotid gland (HPG) were used to establish a model of human salivary gland in vitro. In this model, the functional consequences of several proinflammatory soluble factors present in the pSS glandular microenvironment were assessed. Stimulation with isoproterenol and calcium produced a significant increase in the basal activity of amylase in the HPG cell supernatants. Under these conditions, the presence of TNF-α and CXCL12 increased amylase mRNA cellular abundance, but reduced the amylase activity in the cell-free supernatant in a dose-dependent manner. IL-1β and IFN-γ, but not TGF-β, also diminished amylase secretion by HPG cells. These results suggest that the glandular microenvironment of cytokine, by acting post-transcriptionally, may be responsible, at least in part, for the reduced exocrine function observed in pSS patients. These data may help to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of SS, which in turn would facilitate the identification of new therapeutic targets for this disorder.

  18. The effect of allometric scaling in coral thermal microenvironments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H Ong

    Full Text Available A long-standing interest in marine science is in the degree to which environmental conditions of flow and irradiance, combined with optical, thermal and morphological characteristics of individual coral colonies, affects their sensitivity of thermal microenvironments and susceptibility to stress-induced bleaching within and/or among colonies. The physiological processes in Scleractinian corals tend to scale allometrically as a result of physical and geometric constraints on body size and shape. There is a direct relationship between scaling to thermal stress, thus, the relationship between allometric scaling and rates of heating and cooling in coral microenvironments is a subject of great interest. The primary aim of this study was to develop an approximation that predicts coral thermal microenvironments as a function of colony morphology (shape and size, light or irradiance, and flow velocity or regime. To do so, we provided intuitive interpretation of their energy budgets for both massive and branching colonies, and then quantified the heat-size exponent (b* and allometric constant (m using logarithmic linear regression. The data demonstrated a positive relationship between thermal rates and changes in irradiance, A/V ratio, and flow, with an interaction where turbulent regime had less influence on overall stress which may serve to ameliorate the effects of temperature rise compared to the laminar regime. These findings indicated that smaller corals have disproportionately higher stress, however they can reach thermal equilibrium quicker. Moreover, excellent agreements between the predicted and simulated microscale temperature values with no significant bias were observed for both the massive and branching colonies, indicating that the numerical approximation should be within the accuracy with which they could be measured. This study may assist in estimating the coral microscale temperature under known conditions of water flow and irradiance

  19. Dysregulated pH in Tumor Microenvironment Checkmates Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh Barar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The dysregulation of pH by cancerous cells of solid tumors is able to create a unique milieu that is in favor of progression, invasion and metastasis as well as chemo-/immuno-resistance traits of solid tumors. Bioelements involved in pH dysregulation provide new set of oncotargets, inhibition of which may result in better clinical outcome. Methods: To study the impacts of pH dysregulation, we investigated the tumor development and progression in relation with Warburg effect, glycolysis and formation of aberrant tumor microenvironment. Results: The upregulation of glucose transporter GLUT-1 and several enzymes involve in glycolysis exacerbates this phenomenon. The accumulation of lactic acids in cancer cells provokes upregulation of several transport machineries (MCT-1, NHE-1, CA IX and H+ pump V-ATPase resulting in reinforced efflux of proton into extracellular fluid. This deviant event makes pH to be settled at 7.4 and 6.6 respectively in cancer cells cytoplasm and extracellular fluid within the tumor microenvironment, which in return triggers secretion of lysosomal components (various enzymes in acidic milieu with pH 5 into cytoplasm. All these anomalous phenomena make tumor microenvironment (TME to be exposed to cocktail of various enzymes with acidic pH, upon which extracellular matrix (ECM can be remodeled and even deformed, resulting in emergence of a complex viscose TME with high interstitial fluid pressure. Conclusion: It seems that pH dysregulation is able to remodel various physiologic functions and make solid tumors to become much more invasive and metastatic. It also can cause undesired resistance to chemotherapy and immunotherapy. Hence, cancer therapy needs to be reinforced using specific inhibitors of bioelements involved in pH dysregulation of TME in solid tumors.

  20. Effect of Interleukin 1b on rat thymus microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Artico

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of interleukin 1b on the thymus of control and chemically sympathectomized adult and aged rats was studied with the aim of assessing the importance of adrenergic nerve fibres (ANF in the regulation of some immunological functions.The whole thymus was removed from normal, sympathectomized (with the neurotoxin 6-OH-dopamine and treated (interleukin 1b rats. Thymic slices were stained with eosin orange (for the recognition of microanatomical details of the thymic microenvironment and with Bodian’s method for staining of nerve fibres. Histofluorescence microscopy was employed for staining ANF and immunofluorescence was used for detecting NPY-like immunoreactivity. All images were submitted to quantitative morphometrical analysis and statistical analysis of data. Moreover, the amount of proteins and noradrenaline was measured on thymic homogenates. The results indicate that in normal conditions the formation of the thymic nerve plexi in the rat is complex: the majority of ANF are destroyed after chemical sympathectomy with 6-OH-dopamine and do not change after treatment with interleukin 1b; on the contrary, treatment with interleukin 1b induces substantial changes in the fresh weight of the thymus, the thymic microenvironment, thymic nerve fibers, ANF, NPY-like positive nerve fibres, and on the total amount of proteins and noradrenaline in rat thymic tissue homogenates.Immunostimulation with interleukin 1b induces substantial changes in the whole thymus, in its microenvironment and in ANF and NPY-like nerve fibres. After chemical sympathectomy, no significant immune response was evoked by interleukin 1b, since the majority of ANF was destroyed by chemical sympathectomy.

  1. Bone marker gene expression in calvarial bones: different bone microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amer, Osama

    2017-12-01

    In calvarial mice, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate into osteoprogenitor cells and then differentiate into osteoblasts that differentiate into osteocytes, which become embedded within the bone matrix. In this case, the cells participating in bone formation include MSCs, osteoprogenitor cells, osteoblasts and osteocytes. The calvariae of C57BL/KaLwRijHsD mice consist of the following five bones: two frontal bones, two parietal bones and one interparietal bone. This study aimed to analyse some bone marker genes and bone related genes to determine whether these calvarial bones have different bone microenvironments. C57BL/KaLwRijHsD calvariae were carefully excised from five male mice that were 4-6 weeks of age. Frontal, parietal, and interparietal bones were dissected to determine the bone microenvironment in calvariae. Haematoxylin and eosin staining was used to determine the morphology of different calvarial bones under microscopy. TaqMan was used to analyse the relative expression of Runx2, OC, OSX, RANK, RANKL, OPG, N-cadherin, E-cadherin, FGF2 and FGFR1 genes in different parts of the calvariae. Histological analysis demonstrated different bone marrow (BM) areas between the different parts of the calvariae. The data show that parietal bones have the smallest BM area compared to frontal and interparietal bones. TaqMan data show a significant increase in the expression level of Runx2, OC, OSX, RANKL, OPG, FGF2 and FGFR1 genes in the parietal bones compared with the frontal and interparietal bones of calvariae. This study provides evidence that different calvarial bones, frontal, parietal and interparietal, contain different bone microenvironments.

  2. Local iron homeostasis in the breast ductal carcinoma microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Oriana; Porto, Graça; Rêma, Alexandra; Faria, Fátima; Cruz Paula, Arnaud; Gomez-Lazaro, Maria; Silva, Paula; Martins da Silva, Berta; Lopes, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    While the deregulation of iron homeostasis in breast epithelial cells is acknowledged, iron-related alterations in stromal inflammatory cells from the tumor microenvironment have not been explored. Immunohistochemistry for hepcidin, ferroportin 1 (FPN1), transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1) and ferritin (FT) was performed in primary breast tissues and axillary lymph nodes in order to dissect the iron-profiles of epithelial cells, lymphocytes and macrophages. Furthermore, breast carcinoma core biopsies frozen in optimum cutting temperature (OCT) compound were subjected to imaging flow cytometry to confirm FPN1 expression in the cell types previously evaluated and determine its cellular localization. We confirm previous results by showing that breast cancer epithelial cells present an ‘iron-utilization phenotype’ with an increased expression of hepcidin and TFR1, and decreased expression of FT. On the other hand, lymphocytes and macrophages infiltrating primary tumors and from metastized lymph nodes display an ‘iron-donor’ phenotype, with increased expression of FPN1 and FT, concomitant with an activation profile reflected by a higher expression of TFR1 and hepcidin. A higher percentage of breast carcinomas, compared to control mastectomy samples, present iron accumulation in stromal inflammatory cells, suggesting that these cells may constitute an effective tissue iron reservoir. Additionally, not only the deregulated expression of iron-related proteins in epithelial cells, but also on lymphocytes and macrophages, are associated with clinicopathological markers of breast cancer poor prognosis, such as negative hormone receptor status and tumor size. The present results reinforce the importance of analyzing the tumor microenvironment in breast cancer, extending the contribution of immune cells to local iron homeostasis in the tumor microenvironment context

  3. Tumor microenvironment in invasive lobular carcinoma: possible therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Saki; Miki, Yasuhiro; Miyashita, Minoru; Hata, Shuko; Takahashi, Yayoi; Rai, Yoshiaki; Sagara, Yasuaki; Ohi, Yasuyo; Hirakawa, Hisashi; Tamaki, Kentaro; Ishida, Takanori; Watanabe, Mika; Suzuki, Takashi; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Sasano, Hironobu

    2016-01-01

    Invasive ductal and lobular carcinomas (IDC and ILC) are the two most common histological types of breast cancer, and have been considered to develop from terminal duct lobular unit but their molecular, pathological, and clinical features are markedly different between them. These differences could be due to different mechanisms of carcinogenesis and tumor microenvironment, especially cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) but little has been explored in this aspect. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the status of angiogenesis, maturation of intratumoral microvessels, and proliferation of CAFs using immunohistochemistry and PCR array analysis to explore the differences of tumor microenvironment between ILC and IDC. We studied grade- and age-matched, luminal-like ILC and IDC. We immunolocalized CD34 and αSMA for an evaluation of CAFs and CD31, Vasohibin-1, a specific marker of proliferative endothelial cells and nestin, a marker of pericytes for studying the status of proliferation and maturation of intratumoral microvessel. We also performed PCR array analysis to evaluate angiogenic factors in tumor stromal components. The number of CAFs, microvessel density, and vasohibin-1/CD31 positive ratio were all significantly higher in ILC than IDC but nestin immunoreactivity in intratumoral microvessel was significantly lower in ILC. These results did indicate that proliferation of CAFs and endothelial cells was more pronounced in ILC than IDC but newly formed microvessels were less mature than those in IDC. PCR array analysis also revealed that IGF-1 expression was higher in ILC than IDC. This is the first study to demonstrate the differences of tumor microenvironment including CAFs and proliferation and maturation of intratumoral vessels between ILC and IDC.

  4. Combined Effects of Pericytes in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Lopes Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pericytes are multipotent perivascular cells whose involvement in vasculature development is well established. Evidences in the literature also suggest that pericytes display immune properties and that these cells may serve as an in vivo reservoir of stem cells, contributing to the regeneration of diverse tissues. Pericytes are also capable of tumor homing and are important cellular components of the tumor microenvironment (TME. In this review, we highlight the contribution of pericytes to some classical hallmarks of cancer, namely, tumor angiogenesis, growth, metastasis, and evasion of immune destruction, and discuss how collectively these hallmarks could be tackled by therapies targeting pericytes, providing a rationale for cancer drugs aiming at the TME.

  5. Cancer Stem Cells and Their Microenvironment: Biology and Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Yuen-Ting Lau

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor consists of heterogeneous cancer cells including cancer stem cells (CSCs that can terminally differentiate into tumor bulk. Normal stem cells in normal organs regulate self-renewal within a stem cell niche. Likewise, accumulating evidence has also suggested that CSCs are maintained extrinsically within the tumor microenvironment, which includes both cellular and physical factors. Here, we review the significance of stromal cells, immune cells, extracellular matrix, tumor stiffness, and hypoxia in regulation of CSC plasticity and therapeutic resistance. With a better understanding of how CSC interacts with its niche, we are able to identify potential therapeutic targets for the development of more effective treatments against cancer.

  6. Bioengineering Embryonic Stem Cell Microenvironments for the Study of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubing Xie

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most prevalent disease amongst women worldwide and metastasis is the main cause of death due to breast cancer. Metastatic breast cancer cells and embryonic stem (ES cells display similar characteristics. However, unlike metastatic breast cancer cells, ES cells are nonmalignant. Furthermore, embryonic microenvironments have the potential to convert metastatic breast cancer cells into a less invasive phenotype. The creation of in vitro embryonic microenvironments will enable better understanding of ES cell-breast cancer cell interactions, help elucidate tumorigenesis, and lead to the restriction of breast cancer metastasis. In this article, we will present the characteristics of breast cancer cells and ES cells as well as their microenvironments, importance of embryonic microenvironments in inhibiting tumorigenesis, convergence of tumorigenic and embryonic signaling pathways, and state of the art in bioengineering embryonic microenvironments for breast cancer research. Additionally, the potential application of bioengineered embryonic microenvironments for the prevention and treatment of invasive breast cancer will be discussed.

  7. Comprehensive analysis of the tryptophan metabolome in urine of patients with acute intermittent porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Gomez, Alex; Marcos, Josep; Aguilera, Paula; To-Figueras, Jordi; Pozo, Oscar J

    2017-08-15

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a rare metabolic disorder due to a deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase, the third enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway. This low enzymatic activity may predispose to the appearance of acute neurological attacks. Seminal studies suggested that AIP was associated with changes in tryptophan homeostasis with inconclusive results. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the urinary metabolome of AIP patients focusing on tryptophan metabolism using state-of-the-art technology. This was a case-control study including a group of 25 AIP patients with active biochemical disease and increased excretion of heme-precursors and 25 healthy controls. Tryptophan and related compounds and metabolites including: large neutral amino acids (LNAAs), serotonin, kynurenine, kynurenic acid and anthranilic acid were quantified in urine by liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Twenty-nine biological markers (including metabolic ratios and absolute concentrations) were compared between patients and controls. Significant differences were found in the tryptophan-kynurenine metabolic pathway. Compared to controls, AIP patients showed: (a) increased urinary excretion of kynurenine and anthranilic acid (Pmetabolome of hepatic porphyrias. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Serum Stabilities of Short Tryptophan-and Arginine-Rich Antimicrobial Peptide Analogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, L.T.; Chau, J.K.; Perry, N.A.; de Boer, L.; Zaat, S.A.J.; Vogel, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Several short antimicrobial peptides that are rich in tryptophan and arginine residues were designed with a series of simple modifications such as end capping and cyclization. The two sets of hexapeptides are based on the Trp- and Arg-rich primary sequences from the "antimicrobial

  9. pH tuning of Nafion for selective detection of tryptophan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frith, K.-A.; Limson, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    Selective and sensitive detection of the amino acid tryptophan is of importance in food processing, pharmaceutical formulations and in biological fluids. Electrochemical methods of detection of tryptophan are hampered by sluggish electron transfer kinetics and in complex matrices through overlapping peaks from interferents. This study examines the potential of the cation exchange membrane Nafion to enhance selectivity and sensitivity of this analyte through a seldom explored feature of this membrane: pH manipulation. A detailed examination of the effect of pH on the selectivity afforded by Nafion as a function of the analyte charge is presented. Selective detection of tryptophan and significant increases in sensitivity of its detection was observed in the presence of melatonin, dopamine and other interferents present in a pharmaceutical formulation through manipulation of the pH of the solution. At pH 3.0 at a Nafion-modified electrode, changes in the protonation of melatonin and tryptophan lowered the anodic potential of the analytes in a non-uniform manner increasing the peak resolution and permitting analyses with detection limits of 1.6 ± 0.1 nM and 1.6 ± 0.2 nM, respectively.

  10. Physiological roles of tryptophan in teleosts: current knowledge and perspectives for future studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoseini, Seyyed Morteza; Pérez-Jiménez, Amelia; Costas, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    from the neuroendocrine to the immune system in vertebrates. In aquaculture, extensive research has been performed to optimize the levels of tryptophan in the commercial diets for many fish species. Providing adequate levels of this amino acid is critically important for fish growth but also for fish...

  11. Tryptophan biosynthesis in stramenopiles: eukaryotic winners in the diatom complex chloroplast

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiroutová, Kateřina; Horák, Aleš; Bowler, C.; Oborník, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 5 (2007), s. 496-511 ISSN 0022-2844 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500220502 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : tryptophan synthesis * mosaic origin * diatom * Oomycetes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2007

  12. PYROLYTIC PRODUCTS FROM TRYPTOPHAN AND GLUTAMIC-ACID ARE POSITIVE IN THE MAMMALIAN SPOT-TEST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Juul

    1983-01-01

    Pyrolysates of tryptophan (Trp-P-2) and glutamic acid (Glu-P-1) are known mutagens in in vitro short term mutagenicity tests, and have also shown carcinogenic effects in long term animal studies. The present study demonstrates that they also produce mutations in somatic cells. This result...

  13. Lactococcus lactis as expression host for the biosynthetic incorporation of tryptophan analogues into recombinant proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Khattabi, Mohamed; van Roosmalen, Maarten L.; Jager, Dennis; Metselaar, Heidi; Permentier, Hjalmar; Leenhouts, Kees; Broos, Jaap

    2008-01-01

    Incorporation of Trp (tryptophan) analogues into a protein may facilitate its structural analysis by spectroscopic techniques. Development of a biological system for the biosynthetic incorporation of such analogues into proteins is of considerable importance. The Gram-negative Escherichia coli is

  14. Recognizing emotions in faces : effects of acute tryptophan depletion and bright light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    aan het Rot, Marije; Coupland, Nicholas; Boivin, Diane B.; Benkelfat, Chawki; Young, Simon N.

    2010-01-01

    In healthy never-depressed individuals, acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) may selectively decrease the accurate recognition of fearful facial expressions. Here we investigated the perception of facial emotions after ATD in more detail. We also investigated whether bright light, which can reverse

  15. Dietary l-tryptophan leaves a lasting impression on the brain and the stress response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höglund, Erik; Øverli, Øyvind; Åberg Andersson, Madelene

    2017-01-01

    Comparative models suggest that effects of dietary tryptophan (Trp) on brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) neurochemistry and stress responsiveness are present throughout the vertebrate lineage. Moreover, hypothalamic 5-HT seems to play a central role in control of the neuroendocrine stre...

  16. No Tryptophan, Tyrosine and Phenylalanine Abnormalities in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergwerff, C.E.; Luman, M.; Blom, H.J.; Oosterlaan, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the current study was to explore the role of aromatic amino acids (AAAs) in blood in relation to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Given their impact on the synthesis of serotonin and dopamine, decreased concentrations of the AAAs tryptophan, tyrosine and

  17. Central fatigue and nycthemeral change of serum tryptophan and serotonin in the athletic horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Percipalle Maurizio

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The serotonergic system is associated with numerous brain functions, including the resetting of the mammalian circadian clock. The synthesis and metabolism of 5-HT in the brain increases in response to exercise and is correlated with high levels of blood-borne tryptophan (TRP. The present investigation was aimed at testing the existence of a daily rhythm of TRP and 5-HT in the blood of athletic horses. Methods Blood samples from 5 Thoroughbred mares were collected at 4-hour intervals for 48 hours (starting at 08:00 hours on day 1 and finishing at 4:00 on day 2 via an intravenous cannula inserted into the jugular vein. Tryptophan and serotonin concentrations were assessed by HPLC. Data analysis was conducted by one-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA and by the single cosinor method. Results ANOVA showed a highly significant influence of time both on tryptophan and on serotonin, in all horses, on either day, with p values Conclusion The results showed that serotonin and tryptophan blood levels undergo nycthemeral variation with typical evening acrophases. These results enhance the understanding of the athlete horse's chronoperformance and facilitate the establishment of training programs that take into account the nycthemeral pattern of aminoacids deeply involved in the onset of central fatigue.

  18. Reprint of 'pH tuning of Nafion for selective detection of tryptophan'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frith, K.-A. [Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, 6140 (South Africa); Limson, J.L., E-mail: j.limson@ru.ac.z [Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, 6140 (South Africa)

    2010-05-30

    Selective and sensitive detection of the amino acid tryptophan is of importance in food processing, pharmaceutical formulations and in biological fluids. Electrochemical methods of detection of tryptophan are hampered by sluggish electron transfer kinetics and in complex matrices through overlapping peaks from interferents. This study examines the potential of the cation exchange membrane Nafion to enhance selectivity and sensitivity of this analyte through a seldom explored feature of this membrane: pH manipulation. A detailed examination of the effect of pH on the selectivity afforded by Nafion as a function of the analyte charge is presented. Selective detection of tryptophan and significant increases in sensitivity of its detection was observed in the presence of melatonin, dopamine and other interferents present in a pharmaceutical formulation through manipulation of the pH of the solution. At pH 3.0 at a Nafion-modified electrode, changes in the protonation of melatonin and tryptophan lowered the anodic potential of the analytes in a non-uniform manner increasing the peak resolution and permitting analyses with detection limits of 1.6 +- 0.1 nM and 1.6 +- 0.2 nM, respectively.

  19. pH tuning of Nafion for selective detection of tryptophan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frith, K.-A. [Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, 6140 (South Africa); Limson, J.L. [Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, 6140 (South Africa)], E-mail: j.limson@ru.ac.za

    2009-05-01

    Selective and sensitive detection of the amino acid tryptophan is of importance in food processing, pharmaceutical formulations and in biological fluids. Electrochemical methods of detection of tryptophan are hampered by sluggish electron transfer kinetics and in complex matrices through overlapping peaks from interferents. This study examines the potential of the cation exchange membrane Nafion to enhance selectivity and sensitivity of this analyte through a seldom explored feature of this membrane: pH manipulation. A detailed examination of the effect of pH on the selectivity afforded by Nafion as a function of the analyte charge is presented. Selective detection of tryptophan and significant increases in sensitivity of its detection was observed in the presence of melatonin, dopamine and other interferents present in a pharmaceutical formulation through manipulation of the pH of the solution. At pH 3.0 at a Nafion-modified electrode, changes in the protonation of melatonin and tryptophan lowered the anodic potential of the analytes in a non-uniform manner increasing the peak resolution and permitting analyses with detection limits of 1.6 {+-} 0.1 nM and 1.6 {+-} 0.2 nM, respectively.

  20. Direct fluorination of melatonin and 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan with [18F]F2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirakal, R.; Firnau, G.; Garnett, E.S.

    1986-01-01

    In order that melatonin receptors may be studied in man with positron emission tomography, melatonin labelled with a positron emitting isotope is needed. The preparation of 6-fluoro-melatonin labelled with F-18 is described. Using the same fluorination method, 5-hydroxy-6-(F-18)fluorotryptophan and 4-(F-18)fluoro-5-hydroxy-tryptophan were also prepared. (UK)

  1. REPLACEMENT OF TRYPTOPHAN RESIDUES IN HALOALKANE DEHALOGENASE REDUCES HALIDE BINDING AND CATALYTIC ACTIVITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KENNES, C; PRIES, F; KROOSHOF, GH; BOKMA, E; Kingma, Jacob; JANSSEN, DB

    1995-01-01

    Haloalkane dehalogenase catalyzes the hydrolytic cleavage of carbon-halogen bonds in short-chain haloalkanes. Two tryptophan residues of the enzyme (Trp125 and Trp175) form a halide-binding site in the active-site cavity, and were proposed to play a role in catalysis. The function of these residues

  2. Synthesis of 2-substituted tryptophans via a C3- to C2-alkyl migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Mari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of 3-substituted indoles with dehydroalanine (Dha derivatives under Lewis acid-mediated conditions has been investigated. The formation of 2-substituted tryptophans is proposed to occur through a selective alkylative dearomatization–cyclization followed by C3- to C2-alkyl migration and rearomatization.

  3. Tryptophan catabolism restricts IFN-γ-expressing neutrophils and Clostridium difficile immunopathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Chang, Yu-Ming; Zhang, Min; Franz, Matthew; Shreiner, Andrew; McDermott, Andrew J.; van der Sluijs, Koenraad F.; Lutter, René; Grasberger, Helmut; Kamada, Nobuhiko; Young, Vincent B.; Huffnagle, Gary B.; Kao, John Y.

    2014-01-01

    The interplay between Clostridium difficile and the host's metabolome is believed to influence the severity of infection. However, the mechanism for this phenomenon remains unclear. In this study, we model one of these metabolic pathways by focusing on tryptophan metabolism in the host. We found

  4. Internal Energies of Ion-Sputtered Neutral Tryptophan and Thymine Molecules Determined by Vacuum Ultraviolet Photoionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jia; Takahashi, Lynelle; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-03-11

    Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization coupled to secondary neutral mass spectrometry (VUV-SNMS) of deposited tryptophan and thymine films are performed at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline. The resulting mass spectra show that while the intensity of the VUV-SNMS signal is lower than the corresponding secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) signal, the mass spectra are significantly simplified in VUV-SNMS. A detailed examination of tryptophan and thymine neutral molecules sputtered by 25 keV Bi3 + indicates that the ion-sputtered parent molecules have ~;;2.5 eV of internal energy. While this internal energy shifts the appearance energy of the photofragment ions for both tryptophan and thymine, it does not change the characteristic photoionizaton efficiency (PIE) curves of thymine versus photon energy. Further analysis of the mass spectral signals indicate that approximately 80 neutral thymine molecules and 400 tryptophan molecules are sputtered per incident Bi3 + ion. The simplified mass spectra and significant characteristic ion contributions to the VUV-SNMS spectra indicate the potential power of the technique for organic molecule surface analysis.

  5. Reprint of 'pH tuning of Nafion for selective detection of tryptophan'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frith, K.-A.; Limson, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Selective and sensitive detection of the amino acid tryptophan is of importance in food processing, pharmaceutical formulations and in biological fluids. Electrochemical methods of detection of tryptophan are hampered by sluggish electron transfer kinetics and in complex matrices through overlapping peaks from interferents. This study examines the potential of the cation exchange membrane Nafion to enhance selectivity and sensitivity of this analyte through a seldom explored feature of this membrane: pH manipulation. A detailed examination of the effect of pH on the selectivity afforded by Nafion as a function of the analyte charge is presented. Selective detection of tryptophan and significant increases in sensitivity of its detection was observed in the presence of melatonin, dopamine and other interferents present in a pharmaceutical formulation through manipulation of the pH of the solution. At pH 3.0 at a Nafion-modified electrode, changes in the protonation of melatonin and tryptophan lowered the anodic potential of the analytes in a non-uniform manner increasing the peak resolution and permitting analyses with detection limits of 1.6 ± 0.1 nM and 1.6 ± 0.2 nM, respectively.

  6. Study of interaction between tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine separately with silver nanoparticles by fluorescence quenching method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S.; Das, T.K.

    2015-01-01

    Using the spectroscopic method, the individual interaction of the three biochemically important amino acids, which are constituents of protein, namely, tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine with biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles has been investigated. The obtained UV-Vis spectra show the formation of ground-state complexes between tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine with silver nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles possess the ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of the aforesaid amino acids by a dynamic quenching process. The binding constant, number of binding sites, and corresponding thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG) based on the interaction system were calculated for 293, 303, and 313 K. In the case of tryptophan and phenylalanine, with increase in temperature, the binding constant K was found to decrease; conversely, it was found to increase with increase in temperature in the case of tyrosine. The thermodynamic results revealed that the binding process was spontaneous; hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interaction were the predominant forces responsible for the complex stabilization in the case of tryptophan and phenylalanine, respectively, whereas in the case of tyrosine, hydrophobic interaction was the sole force conferring stability. Moreover, the Förster non-radiation energy transfer theory has been applied to calculate the average binding distance among the above amino acids and silver nanoparticles. The results show a binding distance of <7 nm, which ensures that energy transfer does occur between the said amino acids and silver nanoparticles. (authors)

  7. Early Posttransplant Tryptophan Metabolism Predicts Long-term Outcome of Human Kidney Transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vavrincova-Yaghi, Diana; Seelen, Marc A.; Kema, Ido P.; Deelman, Leo E.; Heuvel, van den Marius; Breukelman, Henk; Van den Eynde, Benoit J.; Henning, Rob H.; van Goor, Harry; Sandovici, Maria

    Background. Chronic transplant dysfunction (CTD) is the leading cause of long-term loss of the renal allograft. So far, no single test is available to reliably predict the risk for CTD. Monitoring of tryptophan (trp) metabolism through indoleamine 2.3-dioxygenase (IDO) has been previously proposed

  8. Cross-linking of lens crystallin proteins induced by tryptophan metabolites and metal ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tweeddale, Helen J; Hawkins, Clare Louise; Janmie, Joane F

    2016-01-01

    Long-wavelength solar UV radiation is implicated in photodamage to the human eye. The human lens contains multiple tryptophan-derived compounds that have significant absorbance bands in the UVA region (λ 315-400 nm) that act as efficient physical filters for these wavelengths. The concentrations...

  9. Fluorescence imaging of tryptophan and collagen cross-links to evaluate wound closure ex vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Farinelli, Bill; Anderson, R. R.; Franco, Walfre

    2016-02-01

    Wound size is a key parameter in monitoring healing. Current methods to measure wound size are often subjective, time-consuming and marginally invasive. Recently, we developed a non-invasive, non-contact, fast and simple but robust fluorescence imaging (u-FEI) method to monitor the healing of skin wounds. This method exploits the fluorescence of native molecules to tissue as functional and structural markers. The objective of the present study is to demonstrate the feasibility of using variations in the fluorescence intensity of tryptophan and cross-links of collagen to evaluate proliferation of keratinocyte cells and quantitate size of wound during healing, respectively. Circular dermal wounds were created in ex vivo human skin and cultured in different media. Two serial fluorescence images of tryptophan and collagen cross-links were acquired every two days. Histology and immunohistology were used to validate correlation between fluorescence and epithelialization. Images of collagen cross-links show fluorescence of the exposed dermis and, hence, are a measure of wound area. Images of tryptophan show higher fluorescence intensity of proliferating keratinocytes forming new epithelium, as compared to surrounding keratinocytes not involved in epithelialization. These images are complementary since collagen cross-links report on structure while tryptophan reports on function. HE and immunohistology show that tryptophan fluorescence correlates with newly formed epidermis. We have established a fluorescence imaging method for studying epithelialization processes during wound healing in a skin organ culture model, our approach has the potential to provide a non-invasive, non-contact, quick, objective and direct method for quantitative measurements in wound healing in vivo.

  10. Tryptophan Depletion Promotes Habitual over Goal-Directed Control of Appetitive Responding in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worbe, Yulia; Savulich, George; de Wit, Sanne; Fernandez-Egea, Emilio; Robbins, Trevor W

    2015-02-05

    Optimal behavioral performance results from a balance between goal-directed and habitual systems of behavioral control, which are modulated by ascending monoaminergic projections. While the role of the dopaminergic system in behavioral control has been recently addressed, the extent to which changes in global serotonin neurotransmission could influence these 2 systems is still poorly understood. We employed the dietary acute tryptophan depletion procedure to reduce serotonin neurotransmission in 18 healthy volunteers and 18 matched controls. We used a 3-stage instrumental learning paradigm that includes an initial instrumental learning stage, a subsequent outcome-devaluation test, and a slip-of-action stage, which directly tests the balance between hypothetical goal-directed and habitual systems. We also employed a separate response inhibition control test to assess the behavioral specificity of the results. Acute tryptophan depletion produced a shift of behavioral performance towards habitual responding as indexed by performance on the slip-of-action test. Moreover, greater habitual responding in the acute tryptophan depletion group was predicted by a steeper decline in plasma tryptophan levels. In contrast, acute tryptophan depletion left intact the ability to use discriminative stimuli to guide instrumental choice as indexed by the instrumental learning stage and did not impair inhibitory response control. The major implication of this study is that serotonin modulates the balance between goal-directed and stimulus-response habitual systems of behavioral control. Our findings thus imply that diminished serotonin neurotransmission shifts behavioral control towards habitual responding. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  11. Pulmonary emphysema and tumor microenvironment in primary lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Junichi; Ueda, Kazuhiro; Sano, Fumiho; Hayashi, Masataro; Nishimoto, Arata; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2016-02-01

    To clarify the relationship between the presence of pulmonary emphysema and tumor microenvironment and their significance for the clinicopathologic aggressiveness of non-small cell lung cancer. The subjects included 48 patients with completely resected and pathologically confirmed stage I non-small cell lung cancer. Quantitative computed tomography was used to diagnose pulmonary emphysema, and immunohistochemical staining was performed to evaluate the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression status in the intratumoral stromal cells as well as the microvessel density (MVD). Positive MMP-9 staining in the intratumoral stromal cells was confirmed in 17 (35%) of the 48 tumors. These 17 tumors were associated with a high MVD, frequent lymphovascular invasion, a high proliferative activity, and high postoperative recurrence rate (all, P pulmonary emphysema (P = 0.02). Lung cancers arising from pulmonary emphysema were also associated with a high MVD, proliferative activity, and postoperative recurrence rate (all, P < 0.05). The MMP-9 expression in intratumoral stromal cells is associated with the clinicopathologic aggressiveness of lung cancer and is predominantly identified in tumors arising in emphysematous lungs. Further studies regarding the biological links between the intratumoral and extratumoral microenvironment will help to explain why lung cancers originating in emphysematous lung tissues are associated with a poor prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Metabolomics of the tumor microenvironment in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Tiziani

    Full Text Available The tumor microenvironment is emerging as an important therapeutic target. Most studies, however, are focused on the protein components, and relatively little is known of how the microenvironmental metabolome might influence tumor survival. In this study, we examined the metabolic profiles of paired bone marrow (BM and peripheral blood (PB samples from 10 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. BM and PB samples from the same patient were collected at the time of diagnosis and after 29 days of induction therapy, at which point all patients were in remission. We employed two analytical platforms, high-resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, to identify and quantify 102 metabolites in the BM and PB. Standard ALL therapy, which includes l-asparaginase, completely removed circulating asparagine, but not glutamine. Statistical analyses of metabolite correlations and network reconstructions showed that the untreated BM microenvironment was characterized by a significant network-level signature: a cluster of highly correlated lipids and metabolites involved in lipid metabolism (p<0.006. In contrast, the strongest correlations in the BM upon remission were observed among amino acid metabolites and derivatives (p<9.2 × 10(-10. This study provides evidence that metabolic characterization of the cancer niche could generate new hypotheses for the development of cancer therapies.

  13. Absorbed dose in fibrotic microenvironment models employing Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambrano Ramírez, O.D.; Rojas Calderón, E.L.; Azorín Vega, E.P.; Ferro Flores, G.; Martínez Caballero, E.

    2015-01-01

    The presence or absence of fibrosis and yet more, the multimeric and multivalent nature of the radiopharmaceutical have recently been reported to have an effect on the radiation absorbed dose in tumor microenvironment models. Fibroblast and myofibroblast cells produce the extracellular matrix by the secretion of proteins which provide structural and biochemical support to cells. The reactive and reparative mechanisms triggered during the inflammatory process causes the production and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, the abnormal excessive growth of the connective tissue leads to fibrosis. In this work, microenvironment (either not fibrotic or fibrotic) models composed of seven spheres representing cancer cells of 10 μm in diameter each with a 5 μm diameter inner sphere (cell nucleus) were created in two distinct radiation transport codes (PENELOPE and MCNP). The purpose of creating these models was to determine the radiation absorbed dose in the nucleus of cancer cells, based on previously reported radiopharmaceutical retain (by HeLa cells) percentages of the 177 Lu-Tyr 3 -octreotate (monomeric) and 177 Lu-Tyr 3 -octreotate-AuNP (multimeric) radiopharmaceuticals. A comparison in the results between the PENELOPE and MCNP was done. We found a good agreement in the results of the codes. The percent difference between the increase percentages of the absorbed dose in the not fibrotic model with respect to the fibrotic model of the codes PENELOPE and MCNP was found to be under 1% for both radiopharmaceuticals. (authors)

  14. Hypoxia alters the physical properties of the tumor microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkes, Daniele

    Of all the deaths attributed to cancer, 90% are due to metastasis, or the spread of cancer cells from a primary tumor to distant organs, and treatments that prevent or cure metastasis remain elusive. Emerging data indicate that low oxygen states within a tumor, termed hypoxia, can alter the chemical and physical parameters of the extracellular matrix (ECM), or scaffold of the tumor tissue. These changes generate a microenvironment that may be more conducive for promoting metastasis. During tumor evolution, changes in the composition and the overall content of the ECM reflect both its biophysical and biological properties and these strongly influence the cells properties, such as cellular proliferation and cell motility. The talk will cover how hypoxia arises within normal tissue and also in tumors. We will cover the role of hypoxia in collagen biogenesis which influences compositional changes to the tumor microenvironment and discuss how these changes lead to a stiffer tumor stroma. The challenges in determining the influence of chemical versus physical cues on cancer progression will also be considered.

  15. Targeting Gas6/TAM in cancer cells and tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guiling; Ma, Zhiqiang; Cheng, Yicheng; Hu, Wei; Deng, Chao; Jiang, Shuai; Li, Tian; Chen, Fulin; Yang, Yang

    2018-01-31

    Growth arrest-specific 6, also known as Gas6, is a human gene encoding the Gas6 protein, which was originally found to be upregulated in growth-arrested fibroblasts. Gas6 is a member of the vitamin K-dependent family of proteins expressed in many human tissues and regulates several biological processes in cells, including proliferation, survival and migration, by binding to its receptors Tyro3, Axl and Mer (TAM). In recent years, the roles of Gas6/TAM signalling in cancer cells and the tumour microenvironment have been studied, and some progress has made in targeted therapy, providing new potential directions for future investigations of cancer treatment. In this review, we introduce the Gas6 and TAM receptors and describe their involvement in different cancers and discuss the roles of Gas6 in cancer cells, the tumour microenvironment and metastasis. Finally, we introduce recent studies on Gas6/TAM targeting in cancer therapy, which will assist in the experimental design of future analyses and increase the potential use of Gas6 as a therapeutic target for cancer.

  16. Tungsten Targets the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolt, Alicia M.; Sabourin, Valérie; Molina, Manuel Flores; Police, Alice M.; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Plourde, Dany; Lemaire, Maryse; Ursini-Siegel, Josie; Mann, Koren K.

    2015-01-01

    The number of individuals exposed to high levels of tungsten is increasing, yet there is limited knowledge of the potential human health risks. Recently, a cohort of breast cancer patients was left with tungsten in their breasts following testing of a tungsten-based shield during intraoperative radiotherapy. While monitoring tungsten levels in the blood and urine of these patients, we utilized the 66Cl4 cell model, in vitro and in mice to study the effects of tungsten exposure on mammary tumor growth and metastasis. We still detect tungsten in the urine of patients’ years after surgery (mean urinary tungsten concentration at least 20 months post-surgery = 1.76 ng/ml), even in those who have opted for mastectomy, indicating that tungsten does not remain in the breast. In addition, standard chelation therapy was ineffective at mobilizing tungsten. In the mouse model, tungsten slightly delayed primary tumor growth, but significantly enhanced lung metastasis. In vitro, tungsten did not enhance 66Cl4 proliferation or invasion, suggesting that tungsten was not directly acting on 66Cl4 primary tumor cells to enhance invasion. In contrast, tungsten changed the tumor microenvironment, enhancing parameters known to be important for cell invasion and metastasis including activated fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinases, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We show, for the first time, that tungsten enhances metastasis in an animal model of breast cancer by targeting the microenvironment. Importantly, all these tumor microenvironmental changes are associated with a poor prognosis in humans. PMID:25324207

  17. Multiple Myeloma Macrophages: Pivotal Players in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Berardi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor microenvironment is essential for multiple myeloma (MM growth, progression, and drug resistance through provision of survival signals and secretion of growth and proangiogenic factors. This paper examines the importance of macrophages within MM bone marrow (BM microenvironment, referred to as MM-associated macrophages, as a potential niche component that supports tumor plasma cells. These macrophages are derived from peripheral blood monocytes recruited into the tumor. Upon activation by MM plasma cells and mesenchymal stromal cells, macrophages can release growth factors, proteolytic enzymes, cytokines, and inflammatory mediators that promote plasma cell growth and survival. Macrophages promote tumor progression through several mechanisms including angiogenesis, growth, and drug resistance. Indeed, these macrophages are essential for the induction of an angiogenic response through vasculogenic mimicry, and this ability proceeds in step with progression of the plasma cell tumors. Data suggest that macrophages play an important role in the biology and survival of patients with MM, and they may be a target for the MM antivascular management.

  18. Effects of tryptophan derivatives and β-carboline alkaloids on radiation- and peroxide-induced transformations of ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sverdlov, R.L.; Brinkevich, S.D.; Shadyro, O.I.

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this study was investigation of interactions of tryptophan and its derivatives, including structurally related β-carboline alkaloids with oxygen- and carbon-centered radicals being formed during radiation- and peroxide-induced transformations of ethanol. It was shown that the above named compounds suppressed recombination and disproportionation reactions of α-hydroxyethyl radicals. The inhibitory effects of tryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophan and serotonin were mainly realized by means of reduction and addition reactions, while those of β-carboline alkaloids – harmine, harmane and harmaline – were due to oxidation reactions. Melatonin displayed low reactivity towards α-hydroxyethyl radicals. Tryptophan derivatives and β-carboline alkaloids were found to inhibit radiation-induced oxidation of ethanol while being virtually not used up. The low transformation yields of tryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophan and serotonin, as well as β-carboline alkaloids, indicate their capability of regeneration, which could occur on interaction of tryptophan with O ·− 2 and HO · 2 , or on oxidation of α-hydroxyethyl radicals by β-carboline alkaloids. - Highlights: • Tryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophane and serotonin can reduce or add α-HER. • β-Carboline alkaloids – harmane, harmine, harmaline – can oxidize α-HER. • Tryptophan and its derivatives can reduce oxygen-centered radicals

  19. Uptake and incorporation of labeled tryptophan isomers into IAA in the jsR1 mutant of Lemna gibba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldi, B.G.; Maher, B.R.; Cohen, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    Analyses of the IAA-overproducing mutant of Lemna have been initiated in order to study in vivo biosynthesis of IAA. Using radiolabelled tryptophan isomers prepared from commercial sources of 14 C-D,L tryptophan by chiral separation kinetics of uptake of L and D tryptophan were determined for sterile cultures of individual jsR 1 four-frond colonies. Over a 24 h period, about 50% of the radioactivity from 14 C-L-TRP in media, or about 25% from 14 C-D-TRP, was found in the plant tissue. Maximal rates of uptake were seen in the first six hors for both isomers. Endogenous levels of tryptophan determined in jsR 1 as measures of pool sizes in vivo show 5 to 10 ug/g FW total tryptophan with less than 1% in the D isomer form. Information on uptake and endogenous pool sizes of tryptophan isomers is being used for feeding of stable isotope labeled tryptophan ( 13 C, 14 N) to jsR 1 at physiological levels. Analyses of incorporation of label into IAA using GC-MS and high resolution mass spectrometry are currently underway

  20. N-acetyl-L-tryptophan, a substance-P receptor antagonist attenuates aluminum-induced spatial memory deficit in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Joylee; Mudgal, Jayesh; Rao, Chamallamudi Mallikarjuna; Arora, Devinder; Basu Mallik, Sanchari; Pai, K S R; Nampoothiri, Madhavan

    2018-06-01

    Neuroinflammation plays an important role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. Neurokinin substance P is a key mediator which modulates neuroinflammation through neurokinin receptor. Involvement of substance P in Alzheimer's disease is still plausible and various controversies exist in this hypothesis. Preventing the deleterious effects of substance P using N-acetyl-L-tryptophan, a substance P antagonist could be a promising therapeutic strategy. This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of N-acetyl-L-tryptophan on aluminum induced spatial memory alterations in rats. Memory impairment was induced using aluminum chloride (AlCl 3 ) at a dose of 10 mg/kg for 42 d. After induction of dementia, rats were exposed to 30 and 50 mg/kg of N-acetyl-L-tryptophan for 28 d. Spatial memory alterations were measured using Morris water maze. Acetylcholinesterase activity and antioxidant enzyme glutathione level were assessed in hippocampus, frontal cortex and striatum. The higher dose of N-acetyl-L-tryptophan (50 mg/kg) significantly improved the aluminum induced memory alterations. N-acetyl-L-tryptophan exposure resulted in significant increase in acetylcholinesterase activity and glutathione level in hippocampus. The neuroprotective effect of N-acetyl-L-tryptophan could be due to its ability to block substance P mediated neuroinflammation, reduction in oxidative stress and anti-apoptotic properties. To conclude, N-acetyl-L-tryptophan may be considered as a novel neuroprotective therapy in Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Relation of plasma tryptophan concentrations during pregnancy to maternal sleep and mental well-being: The GUSTO cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lee, Linde; Cai, Shirong; Loy, See Ling; Tham, Elaine K H; Yap, Fabian K P; Godfrey, Keith M; Gluckman, Peter D; Shek, Lynette P C; Teoh, Oon Hoe; Goh, Daniel Y T; Tan, Kok Hian; Chong, Yap Seng; Meaney, Michael J; Chen, Helen; Broekman, Birit F P; Chong, Mary F F

    2018-01-01

    Evidence suggests a relation between plasma tryptophan concentrations and sleep and mental well-being. As no studies have been performed in pregnant women, we studied the relation of plasma tryptophan concentrations during pregnancy with sleep quality, and mood during and after pregnancy. Pregnant women (n = 572) from the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes study completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) at 26-28 weeks gestation and three months post-delivery. Plasma tryptophan concentrations were measured at 26-28 weeks gestation. Poisson regressions estimated prevalence ratios (PR) for the association between tryptophan and poor sleep quality (PSQI global score > 5), probable antenatal depression (EPDS ≥ 15) and probable anxiety (STAI-state ≥ 41) were calculated adjusting for covariates. Mean plasma tryptophan concentrations was 48.0µmol/L (SD: 8.09). Higher plasma tryptophan concentrations were associated with a lower prevalence of antenatal poor sleep quality adjusting for covariates [PR: 0.88 (95% CI 0.80, 0.97) per 10µmol/L], especially in those participants who also suffered from anxiety symptoms [PR: 0.80 (95% CI 0.67, 0.95)]. No associations were observed between tryptophan concentrations during pregnancy and postnatal sleep quality or mental well-being. Subjective measures were used to assess sleep and mental well-being. We observed that higher plasma tryptophan concentrations were associated with a 12% lower prevalence of poor sleep quality during pregnancy, in particular among those with anxiety symptoms. These findings suggest the importance of having adequate tryptophan concentrations during pregnancy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Contribution of tryptophan residues to the combining site of a monoclonal anti dinitrophenyl spin-label antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anglister, J.; Bond, M.W.; Frey, T.; Leahy, D.; Levitt, M.; McConnell, H.M.; Rule, G.S.; Tomasello, J.; Whittaker, M.

    1987-01-01

    Two Fab fragments of the monoclonal anti dinitrophenyl (DNP) spin-label antibody AN02 were prepared by recombination of specifically deuterated heavy and light chains. In the recombinant H(I)L(II) all the tyrosines and phenylalanines were perdeuterated as were the tryptophan residues of the heavy chain. In the recombinant H(II)L(I) all the tyrosines and phenylalanines were perdeuterated as were the tryptophan residues of the light chain. Saturation of three resonances of H(I)L(II), assigned to tryptophan protons of the light chain, resulted in magnetization transfer to the aromatic proton at position 6 of the DNP ring and to the CH2 protons of the glycines linked to the DNP in a diamagnetic hapten (DNP-DG). Saturation of three resonances of H(II)L(I) assigned to tryptophan protons of the heavy chain resulted in magnetization transfer to the CH2 protons of the glycines in DNP-DG. From the dependence of the magnetization transfer on the irradiation time, the cross relaxation rates between the involved protons were estimated. The inferred distances between these protons of the hapten and certain tryptophan protons are 3-4 A. It is concluded that in the combining site of AN02 there is one tryptophan from the light chain and one tryptophan from the heavy chain that are very near the hapten. When all tyrosines and phenylalanines were perdeuterated and all tryptophan aromatic protons were deuterated except for the protons at positions 2 and 5, titration of the Fab fragments with variable amounts of paramagnetic hapten showed that one proton from the light chain tryptophan is near (less than 7 A) the unpaired electron and that three other protons are significantly closer than 15 A

  3. Contribution of tryptophan residues to the combining site of a monoclonal anti dinitrophenyl spin-label antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anglister, J.; Bond, M.W.; Frey, T.; Leahy, D.; Levitt, M.; McConnell, H.M.; Rule, G.S.; Tomasello, J.; Whittaker, M.

    1987-09-22

    Two Fab fragments of the monoclonal anti dinitrophenyl (DNP) spin-label antibody AN02 were prepared by recombination of specifically deuterated heavy and light chains. In the recombinant H(I)L(II) all the tyrosines and phenylalanines were perdeuterated as were the tryptophan residues of the heavy chain. In the recombinant H(II)L(I) all the tyrosines and phenylalanines were perdeuterated as were the tryptophan residues of the light chain. Saturation of three resonances of H(I)L(II), assigned to tryptophan protons of the light chain, resulted in magnetization transfer to the aromatic proton at position 6 of the DNP ring and to the CH2 protons of the glycines linked to the DNP in a diamagnetic hapten (DNP-DG). Saturation of three resonances of H(II)L(I) assigned to tryptophan protons of the heavy chain resulted in magnetization transfer to the CH2 protons of the glycines in DNP-DG. From the dependence of the magnetization transfer on the irradiation time, the cross relaxation rates between the involved protons were estimated. The inferred distances between these protons of the hapten and certain tryptophan protons are 3-4 A. It is concluded that in the combining site of AN02 there is one tryptophan from the light chain and one tryptophan from the heavy chain that are very near the hapten. When all tyrosines and phenylalanines were perdeuterated and all tryptophan aromatic protons were deuterated except for the protons at positions 2 and 5, titration of the Fab fragments with variable amounts of paramagnetic hapten showed that one proton from the light chain tryptophan is near (less than 7 A) the unpaired electron and that three other protons are significantly closer than 15 A.

  4. Thirteen week toxicity study of dietary l-tryptophan in rats with a recovery period of 5 weeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibui, Yusuke; Matsumoto, Hideki; Masuzawa, Yoko; Ohishi, Takumi; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Shibata, Katsumi; Sakai, Ryosei

    2018-04-01

    Although l-tryptophan is nutritionally important and widely used in medical applications, toxicity data for its oral administration are limited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential toxicity of an experimental diet containing added l-tryptophan at doses of 0 (basal diet), 1.25%, 2.5% and 5.0% when administered to Sprague-Dawley rats for 13 weeks. There were no toxicological changes in clinical signs, ophthalmology, urinalysis, hematology, necropsy, organ weight and histopathology between control rats and those fed additional l-tryptophan. Body weight gain and food consumption significantly decreased throughout the administration period in males in the 2.5% group and in both sexes in the 5.0% group. At the end of the dosing period, decreases in water intake in males in the 5.0% group and in serum glucose in females in the 5.0% group were observed. The changes described above were considered toxicologically significant; however, they were not observed after a 5 week recovery period, suggesting reversibility. Consequently, the no-observed-adverse-effect level of l-tryptophan in the present study was 1.25% for males and 2.5% for females (mean intake of l-tryptophan: 779 mg kg -1 body weight day -1 [males] and 1765 mg kg -1 body weight day -1 [females]). As the basal diet used in this study contained 0.27% of proteinaceous l-tryptophan, the no-observed-adverse-effect level of overall l-tryptophan was 1.52% for males and 2.77% for females (mean intake of overall l-tryptophan: 948 mg kg -1 body weight day -1 (males) and 1956 mg kg -1 body weight day -1 (females)). We conclude that l-tryptophan has a low toxicity profile in terms of human use. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. The Effects of Tryptophan on Everyday Interpersonal Encounters and Social Cognitions in Individuals with a Family History of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogenelst, Koen; Schoevers, Robert A; Aan Het Rot, Marije

    2015-03-02

    Individuals with a family history of depression show subtle abnormalities in the processing of social stimuli. This could negatively affect their interpersonal functioning and contribute to their depression risk. Repeated administration of the serotonin precursor tryptophan has previously been shown to increase agreeable behavior and reduce quarrelsome behavior in irritable people, who are also considered at risk for depression. To examine the effects of tryptophan on social functioning in individuals with a family history of depression, 40 men and women with at least one first-degree relative with depression received tryptophan (1g three times a day) and placebo for 14 days each in a double-blind crossover design and recorded their social behavior and mood during everyday interpersonal encounters. Participants also provided daily ratings of their positive and negative cognitions concerning their social functioning. Tryptophan improved mood. Unexpectedly, tryptophan increased quarrelsome behavior and reduced agreeable behavior, specifically during interactions at home. The behavioral effects of tryptophan were not moderated by mood or by the interaction partner. Negative social cognitions were lower when tryptophan was given second and lower during placebo when placebo was given second. Overall, tryptophan may not alter social behavior in individuals with a family history of depression as it does in irritable people. However, the behavioral effects of tryptophan at home might be seen as a way for individuals with a family history of depression to achieve more control. Over time, this may positively influence the way they feel and think about themselves in a social context. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  6. Water-soluble vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konings, Erik J M

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous Determination of Vitamins.--Klejdus et al. described a simultaneous determination of 10 water- and 10 fat-soluble vitamins in pharmaceutical preparations by liquid chromatography-diode-array detection (LC-DAD). A combined isocratic and linear gradient allowed separation of vitamins in 3 distinct groups: polar, low-polar, and nonpolar. The method was applied to pharmaceutical preparations, fortified powdered drinks, and food samples, for which results were in good agreement with values claimed. Heudi et al. described a separation of 9 water-soluble vitamins by LC-UV. The method was applied for the quantification of vitamins in polyvitaminated premixes used for the fortification of infant nutrition products. The repeatability of the method was evaluated at different concentration levels and coefficients of variation were based on, for example, LC. Koontz et al. showed results of total folate concentrations measured by microbiological assay in a variety of foods. Samples were submitted in a routine manner to experienced laboratories that regularly perform folate analysis fee-for-service basis in the United States. Each laboratory reported the use of a microbiological method similar to the AOAC Official Method for the determination of folic acid. Striking was, the use of 3 different pH extraction conditions by 4 laboratories. Only one laboratory reported using a tri-enzyme extraction. Results were evaluated. Results for folic acid fortified foods had considerably lower between-laboratory variation, 9-11%, versus >45% for other foods. Mean total folate ranged from 14 to 279 microg/100 g for a mixed vegetable reference material, from 5 to 70 microg/100 g for strawberries, and from 28 to 81 microg/100 g for wholemeal flour. One should realize a large variation in results, which might be caused by slight modifications in the microbiological analysis of total folate in foods or the analysis in various (unfortified) food matrixes. Furthermore, optimal

  7. Microenvironment-Mediated Mechanisms of Resistance to HER2 Inhibitors Differ between HER2+ Breast Cancer Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Spencer S; Dane, Mark; Chin, Koei; Tatarova, Zuzana; Liu, Moqing; Liby, Tiera; Thompson, Wallace; Smith, Rebecca; Nederlof, Michel; Bucher, Elmar; Kilburn, David; Whitman, Matthew; Sudar, Damir; Mills, Gordon B; Heiser, Laura M; Jonas, Oliver; Gray, Joe W; Korkola, James E

    2018-03-28

    Extrinsic signals are implicated in breast cancer resistance to HER2-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). To examine how microenvironmental signals influence resistance, we monitored TKI-treated breast cancer cell lines grown on microenvironment microarrays composed of printed extracellular matrix proteins supplemented with soluble proteins. We tested ∼2,500 combinations of 56 soluble and 46 matrix microenvironmental proteins on basal-like HER2+ (HER2E) or luminal-like HER2+ (L-HER2+) cells treated with the TKIs lapatinib or neratinib. In HER2E cells, hepatocyte growth factor, a ligand for MET, induced resistance that could be reversed with crizotinib, an inhibitor of MET. In L-HER2+ cells, neuregulin1-β1 (NRG1β), a ligand for HER3, induced resistance that could be reversed with pertuzumab, an inhibitor of HER2-HER3 heterodimerization. The subtype-specific responses were also observed in 3D cultures and murine xenografts. These results, along with bioinformatic pathway analysis and siRNA knockdown experiments, suggest different mechanisms of resistance specific to each HER2+ subtype: MET signaling for HER2E and HER2-HER3 heterodimerization for L-HER2+ cells. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Brief Historic Overview of Clinical Disorders Associated with Tryptophan: The Relevance to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS and Fibromyalgia (FM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele Blankfield

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Last century there was a short burst of interest in the tryptophan related disorders of pellagra and related abnormalities that are usually presented in infancy. 1 , 2 Nutritional physiologists recognized that a severe human dietary deficiency of either tryptophan or the B group vitamins could result in central nervous system (CNS sequelae such as ataxia, cognitive dysfunction and dysphoria, accompanied by skin hyperpigmentation. 3 , 4 The current paper will focus on the emerging role of tryptophan in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS and fibromyalgia (FM.

  9. Students’ misconceptions on solubility equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiowati, H.; Utomo, S. B.; Ashadi

    2018-05-01

    This study investigated the students’ misconceptions of the solubility equilibrium. The participants of the study consisted of 164 students who were in the science class of second year high school. Instrument used is two-tier diagnostic test consisting of 15 items. Responses were marked and coded into four categories: understanding, misconception, understand little without misconception, and not understanding. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 45 students according to their written responses which reflected different perspectives, to obtain a more elaborated source of data. Data collected from multiple methods were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. Based on the data analysis showed that the students misconceptions in all areas in solubility equilibrium. They had more misconceptions such as in the relation of solubility and solubility product, common-ion effect and pH in solubility, and precipitation concept.

  10. On the americium oxalate solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakolupin, S.A.; Korablin, Eh.V.

    1977-01-01

    The americium oxalate solubility at different nitric (0.0-1 M) and oxalic (0.0-0.4 M) acid concentrations was investigated in the temperature range from 14 to 60 deg C. The dependence of americium oxalate solubility on the oxalic acid concentration was determined. Increasing oxalic acid concentration was found to reduce the americium oxalate solubility. The dependence of americium oxalate solubility on the oxalic acid concentration was noted to be a minimum at low acidity (0.1-0.3 M nitric acid). This is most likely due to Am(C 2 O 4 ) + , Am(C 2 O 4 ) 2 - and Am(C 2 O 4 ) 3 3- complex ion formation which have different unstability constants. On the basis of the data obtained, a preliminary estimate was carried out for the product of americium oxalate solubility in nitric acid medium (10 -29 -10 -31 ) and of the one in water (6.4x10 -20 )

  11. Etiological classification of depression based on the enzymes of tryptophan metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Katsuhiko

    2014-12-24

    Viewed in terms of input and output, the mechanisms of depression are still akin to a black box. However, there must be main pivots for diverse types of depression. From recent therapeutic observations, both the serotonin (5-HT) and kynurenine pathways of tryptophan metabolism may be of particular importance to improved understanding of depression. Here, I propose an etiological classification of depression, based on key peripheral and central enzymes of tryptophan metabolism. Endogenous depression is caused by a larger genetic component than reactive depression. Besides enterochromaffin and mast cells, tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1), primarily expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, is also found in 5-hydroxytryptophan-producing cells (5-HTP cells) in normal intestinal enterocytes, which are thought to essentially shunt 5-HT production in 5-HT-producing cells. Genetic studies have reported an association between TPH1 and depression, or the responsiveness of depression to antidepressive medication. Therefore, it is possible that hypofunctional 5-HTP cells (reflecting TPH1 dysfunction) in the periphery lead to deficient brain 5-HT levels. Additionally,it has been reported that higher TPH2 expression in depressed suicides may reflect a homeostatic response to deficient 5-HT levels. Subsequently, endogenous depression may be caused by TPH1 dysfunction combined with compensatory TPH2 activation. Reactive depression results from life stresses and involves the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, with resulting cortisol production inducing tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) activation. In secondary depression, caused by inflammation, infection, or oxidative stress, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is activated. In both reactive and secondary depression, the balance between 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) and kynurenic acid may shift towards 3-HK production via kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO) activation. By shifting the equilibrium position of key enzymes of tryptophan

  12. Fabrication of highly modulable fibrous 3D extracellular microenvironments

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xixiang; Han, Fangfei; Syed, Ahad; Bukhari, Ebtihaj M.; Siang, Basil Chew Joo; Yang, Shan; Zhou, Bingpu; Wen, Wei-jia; Jiang, Dechen

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro scaffolds that mimic the irregular fibrous structures of in vivo extracellular matrix (ECM) are critical for many important biological applications. However, structural properties modulation of fibrous 3D scaffolds remains a challenge. Here, we report the first highly modulable 3D fibrous scaffolds self-assembled by high-aspect-ratio (HAR) microfibers. The scaffolds structural properties can be easily tailored to incorporate various physical cues, including geometry, stiffness, heterogeneity and nanotopography. Moreover, the fibrous scaffolds are readily and accurately patterned on desired locations of the substrate. Cell culture exhibits that our scaffolds can elicit strong bidirectional cell-material interactions. Furthermore, a functional disparity between the two-dimensional substrate and our 3D scaffolds is identified by cell spreading and proliferation data. These results prove the potential of the proposed scaffold as a biomimetic extracellular microenvironment for cell study.

  13. Neuro-immune modulation of the thymus microenvironment (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignini, Fiorenzo; Sabbatini, Maurizio; Mattioli, Laura; Cosenza, Monica; Artico, Marco; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2014-06-01

    The thymus is the primary site for T-cell lympho-poiesis. Its function includes the maturation and selection of antigen specific T cells and selective release of these cells to the periphery. These highly complex processes require precise parenchymal organization and compartmentation where a plethora of signalling pathways occur, performing strict control on the maturation and selection processes of T lymphocytes. In this review, the main morphological characteristics of the thymus microenvironment, with particular emphasis on nerve fibers and neuropeptides were assessed, as both are responsible for neuro-immune‑modulation functions. Among several neurotransmitters that affect thymus function, we highlight the dopaminergic system as only recently has its importance on thymus function and lymphocyte physiology come to light.

  14. Fabrication of highly modulable fibrous 3D extracellular microenvironments

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xixiang

    2017-06-13

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro scaffolds that mimic the irregular fibrous structures of in vivo extracellular matrix (ECM) are critical for many important biological applications. However, structural properties modulation of fibrous 3D scaffolds remains a challenge. Here, we report the first highly modulable 3D fibrous scaffolds self-assembled by high-aspect-ratio (HAR) microfibers. The scaffolds structural properties can be easily tailored to incorporate various physical cues, including geometry, stiffness, heterogeneity and nanotopography. Moreover, the fibrous scaffolds are readily and accurately patterned on desired locations of the substrate. Cell culture exhibits that our scaffolds can elicit strong bidirectional cell-material interactions. Furthermore, a functional disparity between the two-dimensional substrate and our 3D scaffolds is identified by cell spreading and proliferation data. These results prove the potential of the proposed scaffold as a biomimetic extracellular microenvironment for cell study.

  15. Novel "Elements" of Immune Suppression within the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurusamy, Devikala; Clever, David; Eil, Robert; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2017-06-01

    Adaptive evolution has prompted immune cells to use a wide variety of inhibitory signals, many of which are usurped by tumor cells to evade immune surveillance. Although tumor immunologists often focus on genes and proteins as mediators of immune function, here we highlight two elements from the periodic table-oxygen and potassium-that suppress the immune system in previously unappreciated ways. While both are key to the maintenance of T-cell function and tissue homeostasis, they are exploited by tumors to suppress immuno-surveillance and promote metastatic spread. We discuss the temporal and spatial roles of these elements within the tumor microenvironment and explore possible therapeutic interventions for effective and promising anticancer therapies. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(6); 426-33. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Targeting the Prometastatic Microenvironment of the Involuting Mammary Gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Danvers, MA, USA), andro- gen receptor (1:500, Santa Cruz Biotechnologies, Santa Cruz, CA, USA) and guinea pig antibodies against Vimentin (1:1,000...Problems…………………………………………………….29 6. Products ………………………………………………………………..29-30 7. Participants/Collaborators……………………………………………30-31 8. Special Reporting...a prometastatic microenvironment. The production of the Ltbp1-TGF-beta complex by luminal cells has consequences for our understanding of the

  17. Microenvironment Dependent Photobiomodulation on Function-Specific Signal Transduction Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timon Cheng-Yi Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular photobiomodulation on a cellular function has been shown to be homeostatic. Its function-specific pathway mechanism would be further discussed in this paper. The signal transduction pathways maintaining a normal function in its function-specific homeostasis (FSH, resisting the activation of many other irrelative signal transduction pathways, are so sparse that it can be supposed that there may be normal function-specific signal transduction pathways (NSPs. A low level laser irradiation or monochromatic light may promote the activation of partially activated NSP and/or its redundant NSP so that it may induce the second-order phase transition of a function from its dysfunctional one far from its FSH to its normal one in a function-specific microenvironment and may also induce the first-order functional phase transition of the normal function from low level to high level.

  18. Emerging Roles for Eosinophils in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichman, Hadar; Karo-Atar, Danielle; Munitz, Ariel

    2016-11-01

    Eosinophils are evolutionary conserved cells largely studied in the context of allergy. Although eosinophils were first described in tumors more than 120 years ago, their roles in cancer are often overlooked. This is puzzling given their potent immune modulatory, cytotoxic, and/or tissue repair capabilities, and recent studies demonstrating key roles for eosinophils in contexts far beyond their 'classical' field (e.g., metabolism, thermogenesis, and tissue regeneration). Recent data suggest that this frequently ignored cell is emerging as a potent immune effector and immune modulator in the tumor microenvironment. This review discusses the relevance of eosinophils to tumorigenesis and the potential to harness their function in cancer therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The multifaceted role of the microenvironment in liver metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van den Eynden, Gert G; Majeed, Ali W; Illemann, Martin

    2013-01-01

    arriving in the liver via the bloodstream encounter the microenvironment of the hepatic sinusoid. The interactions of the tumor cells with hepatic sinusoidal and extrasinusoidal cells (endothelial, Kupffer, stellate, and inflammatory cells) determine their fate. The sinusoidal cells can have a dual role......The liver is host to many metastatic cancers, particularly colorectal cancer, for which the last 2 decades have seen major advances in diagnosis and treatment. The liver is a vital organ, and the extent of its involvement with metastatic disease is a major determinant of survival. Metastatic cells...... arrested and survived the initial onslaught, tumors can grow within the liver in 3 distinct patterns, reflecting differing host responses, mechanisms of vascularization, and proteolytic activity. This review aims to present current knowledge of the interactions between the host liver cells and the invading...

  20. Engineering the human pluripotent stem cell microenvironment to direct cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazeltine, Laurie B; Selekman, Joshua A; Palecek, Sean P

    2013-11-15

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including both embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, offer a potential cell source for research, drug screening, and regenerative medicine applications due to their unique ability to self-renew or differentiate to any somatic cell type. Before the full potential of hPSCs can be realized, robust protocols must be developed to direct their fate. Cell fate decisions are based on components of the surrounding microenvironment, including soluble factors, substrate or extracellular matrix, cell-cell interactions, mechanical forces, and 2D or 3D architecture. Depending on their spatio-temporal context, these components can signal hPSCs to either self-renew or differentiate to cell types of the ectoderm, mesoderm, or endoderm. Researchers working at the interface of engineering and biology have identified various factors which can affect hPSC fate, often based on lessons from embryonic development, and they have utilized this information to design in vitro niches which can reproducibly direct hPSC fate. This review highlights culture systems that have been engineered to promote self-renewal or differentiation of hPSCs, with a focus on studies that have elucidated the contributions of specific microenvironmental cues in the context of those culture systems. We propose the use of microsystem technologies for high-throughput screening of spatial-temporal presentation of cues, as this has been demonstrated to be a powerful approach for differentiating hPSCs to desired cell types. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Uranium solubility and solubility controls in selected Needle's Eye groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falck, W.E.; Hooker, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The solubility control of uranium in selected groundwater samples from the cliff and sediments at the Needle's Eye natural analogue site is investigated using the speciation code PHREEQE and the CHEMVAL thermodynamic database (release 3). Alkali-earth bearing uranyl carbonate secondary minerals are likely to exert influence on the solubility . Other candidates are UO 2 and arsenates, depending on the prevailing redox conditions. In the absence of literature data, solubility products for important arsenates have been estimated from analogy with other arsenates and phosphates. Phosphates themselves are unlikely to exert control owing to their comparatively high solubilities. The influence of seawater flooding into the sediments is also discussed. The importance of uranyl arsenates in the retardation of uranium in shallow sediments has been demonstrated in theory, but there are some significant gaps in the thermodynamic databases used. (author)

  2. The Effects of Tryptophan on Everyday Interpersonal Encounters and Social Cognitions in Individuals with a Family History of Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogenelst, Koen; Schoevers, Robert A.; Rot, Marije Aan Het

    2015-01-01

    Background: Individuals with a family history of depression show subtle abnormalities in the processing of social stimuli. This could negatively affect their interpersonal functioning and contribute to their depression risk. Repeated administration of the serotonin precursor tryptophan has

  3. Cognition following acute tryptophan depletion : Difference between first-degree relatives of bipolar disorder patients and matched healthy control volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobczak, S; Riedel, W J; Booij, I; Aan Het Rot, M; Deutz, N E P; Honig, A

    BACKGROUND: Serotonergic circuits have been proposed to mediate cognitive processes, particularly learning and memory. Cognitive impairment is often seen in bipolar disorders in relation to a possible lowered serotonergic turnover. METHODS: We investigated the effects of acute tryptophan depletion

  4. Reduction of cerebral blood flow in subclinical hepatic encephalopathy and its correlation with plasma-free tryptophan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Testa, R.; Celle, G.; Gris, A.; Marenco, S.; Nobili, F.; Novellone, G.; Rosadini, G.

    1987-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF), measured by the noninvasive xenon-133 inhalation method, EEG, and plasma levels of ammonia (NH 3 ) and free tryptophan were determined in 18 hospitalized cirrhotic patients affected with subclinical hepatic encephalopathy, as diagnosed by the Kurtz test. CBF results were significantly lower (p less than 0.001) in the patients' group as compared with a sex- and age-matched normal control population, although seven patients had values in the normal range. NH 3 was increased only in six, while free tryptophan was increased in all but two patients. A significant negative correlation (p = 0.02) between CBF and free tryptophan was found, even though it appears to be difficult to interpret. We suggest that CBF impairment in some cirrhotic patients with subclinical hepatic encephalopathy may be related to the systemic metabolic derangement caused by the liver disease; free tryptophan could have some implication in producing CBF reduction

  5. Membrane interaction and secondary structure of de novo designed arginine-and tryptophan peptides with dual function

    KAUST Repository

    Rydberg, Hanna A.; Carlsson, Nils; Nordé n, Bengt

    2012-01-01

    of arg/trp peptides and investigated how the position and number of tryptophans affect cellular uptake. Here we explore the antimicrobial properties and the interaction with lipid model membranes of these peptides, using minimal inhibitory concentrations

  6. Metabolism of carbon-14 labelled l-tryptophan, l-kynerenine and hydroxy-l-kynerenine in miners with scleroderma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankes, L.V.; De Bruin, E.; Jansen, C.R.; Voster, L.; Schmaeler, M.

    1977-01-01

    Six South African white miners were studied with the 2-g l-tryptophan load test and tracer doses of L-tryptophan-7a-carbon-14, L-kynurenine-keto-carbon-14 and hydroxy-L-kynerenine-keto-carbon-14. The breath 14 CO 2 and 14 urinary metabolites were measured. When they were compared with a previous study of American women with scleroderma, similar 14 CO 2 and tryptophan metabolite excretion patterns were observed in the data from the miners. The labelled quinolinic acid excretion was more significantly elevated in the South African miners' urine than in the urine of the American women. The data from both studies suggest that some patients with scleroderma have an altered step in the tryptophan metabolic pathway after hydroxy-anthranilic acid. What relationship exists between the induction of pulmonary silicosis and the subsequent development of scleroderma, requires additional human studies

  7. UVB-induced photoperoxidation of lipids of human low and high density lipoproteins. A possible role of tryptophan residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmon, S.; Maziere, J.C.; Santus, R.; Bouchemal, N.; Morliere, P.

    1990-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation of the UVB region readily destroys tryptophan (Trp) residues of low (LDL) and high (HDL) density lipoproteins. The photooxidation of tryptophan residues is accompanied by peroxidation of low and high density lipoproteins unsaturated fatty acids, as measured by thiobarbituric acid assay. Moreover, low and high density lipoproteins are natural carriers of vitamin E and carotenoids. These two antioxidants are also rapidly bleached by UVB. The UVA radiation promotes neither tryptophan residue destruction nor lipid photoperoxidation. The redox cycling Cu 2+ ions considerably increase lipid photoperoxidation. The synergistic action of photo and auto (Cu 2+ -induced) peroxidation induces marked post-irradiation modifications of apolipoproteins as illustrated by degradation of most tryptophan residues after overnight incubation in the dark of pre-irradiated samples. (author)

  8. Noble gases solubility in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crovetto, Rosa; Fernandez Prini, Roberto.

    1980-07-01

    The available experimental data of solubility of noble gases in water for temperatures smaller than 330 0 C have been critically surveyed. Due to the unique structure of the solvent, the solubility of noble gases in water decreases with temperature passing through a temperature of minimum solubility which is different for each gas, and then increases at higher temperatures. As aresult of the analysis of the experimental data and of the features of the solute-solvent interaction, a generalized equation is proposed which enables thecalculation of Henry's coefficient at different temperatures for all noble gases. (author) [es

  9. Tryptophan-Assisted Synthesis Reduces Bimetallic Gold/Silver Nanoparticle Cytotoxicity and Improves Biological Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor O. Shmarakov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to reduce the potential in vivo hepato-and nephrotoxicity of Ag/Au bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs stabilized by sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS, an approach involving a simultaneous reduction of silver nitrate and tetrachlorauratic acid using tryptophan (Trp as a reducing/stabilizing agent was applied during NP synthesis. The obtained Ag/Au/Trp NPs (5–15 nm sized were able to form stable aggregates with an average size of 370–450 nm and were potentially less toxic than Ag/Au/SDS in relation to a mouse model system based on clinical biochemical parameters and oxidative damage product estimation. Ag/Au/Trp NPs were shown to exhibit anticancer activity in relation to a Lewis lung carcinoma model. The data generated from the present study support the fact that the use of tryptophan in NP synthesis is effective in attenuating the potential hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity of NPs during their in vivo application.

  10. Effects of biogenic aldehydes and aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitors on rat brain tryptophan hydroxylase activity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, G E; Tottmar, O

    1987-04-21

    The effect of indole-3-acetaldehyde, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetaldehyde, disulfiram, diethyldithiocarbamate, coprine, and 1-amino-cyclopropanol on tryptophan hydroxylase activity was studied in vitro using high performance liquid chromatography with electro-chemical detection. With the analytical method developed, 5-hydroxytryptophan, serotonin, and 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid could be measured simultaneously. Indole-3-acetaldehyde (12-1200 microM) was found to cause a 6-33% inhibition of the enzyme. Dependent upon the nature of the sulfhydryl- or reducing-agent (dithiotreitol, glutathione, or ascorbate) present in the incubates, the degree of inhibition by disulfiram varied, probably due to the formation of various mixed disulfides. Also the presence of diethyldithiocarbamate (160-1600 microM) was found to inhibit tryptophan hydroxylase (28-91%), while 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetaldehyde, coprine, or 1-aminocyclopropanol appeared to have no effect on the enzyme activity.

  11. Enzymatic synthesis of S-phenyl-L-cysteine from keratin hydrolysis industries wastewater with tryptophan synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lisheng; Wang, Zhiyuan; Mao, Pingting; Liu, Junzhong; Zhang, Hongjuan; Liu, Qian; Jiao, Qing-Cai

    2013-04-01

    An economical method for production of S-phenyl-L-cysteine from keratin acid hydrolysis wastewater (KHW) containing L-serine was developed by recombinant tryptophan synthase. This study provides us with an alternative KHW utilization strategy to synthesize S-phenyl-L-cysteine. Tryptophan synthase could efficiently convert L-serine contained in KHW to S-phenyl-L-cysteine at pH 9.0, 40°C and Trion X-100 of 0.02%. In a scale up study, L-serine conversion rate reach 97.1% with a final S-phenyl-L-cysteine concentration of 38.6 g l(-1). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Formation of tryptophan radicals in irradiated aqueous solutions of hexachloroplatinate(IV): a flash photolysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, L; Rodgers, M A

    1999-10-01

    The oxidation of tryptophan photosensitized by PtCl6(2-) has been investigated in aqueous solutions at different pH using nanosecond laser flash photolysis. Cationic and neutral radicals of tryptophan were detected at pH 2.8 and 8.5, respectively. The generation of the radical was attributed to oxidation by Cl2- that was formed from the homolytic bond cleavage in the excited state of PtCl6(2-). The bimolecular rate constant derived from the kinetics analysis, 2.8 +/- 0.2 x 10(9) M-1 s-1, is in good agreement with the value obtained in earlier pulse radiolysis studies. Both the cationic and neutral radicals decayed by second-order kinetics, consistent with the dimerization process.

  13. Stochastic thermodynamics of a chemical nanomachine: The channeling enzyme tryptophan synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutchko, Dimitri; Eisbach, Maximilian; Mikhailov, Alexander S

    2017-01-14

    The enzyme tryptophan synthase is characterized by a complex pattern of allosteric interactions that regulate the catalytic activity of its two subunits and opening or closing of their ligand gates. As a single macromolecule, it implements 13 different reaction steps, with an intermediate product directly channeled from one subunit to another. Based on experimental data, a stochastic model for the operation of tryptophan synthase has been earlier constructed [D. Loutchko, D. Gonze, and A. S. Mikhailov, J. Phys. Chem. B 120, 2179 (2016)]. Here, this model is used to consider stochastic thermodynamics of such a chemical nanomachine. The Gibbs energy landscape of the internal molecular states is determined, the production of entropy and its flow within the enzyme are analyzed, and the information exchange between the subunits resulting from allosteric cross-regulations and channeling is discussed.

  14. Two-channel dansyl/tryptophan emitters with a cholic acid bridge as reporters for local hydrophobicity within supramolecular systems based on bile salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Mendoza, M; Marin, M Luisa; Miranda, Miguel A

    2014-11-14

    The aim of the present work is to develop two-channel emitters to probe local hydrophobicity by means of fluorescence quenching within different biomimetic supramolecular environments. To achieve this goal, the dansyl (Dns) and tryptophan (Trp) fluorophores have been covalently attached to cholic acid (CA) in order to ensure simultaneous incorporation of the two emitting units into the same compartment. In principle, the two fluorophores of the synthesized Dns-CA-Trp probes could either exhibit an orthogonal behavior or display excited state interactions. The fluorescence spectra of 3β-Dns-CA-Trp showed a residual Trp emission band at ca. 350 nm and an enhanced Dns maximum in the 500-550 nm region. This reveals a partial intramolecular energy transfer, which is consistent with the Dns and Trp singlet energies. Thus, the two photoactive units are not orthogonal; nevertheless, 3β-Dns-CA-Trp seems appropriate as a two-channel reporter for the supramolecular systems of interest. Fluorescence quenching of 3β-Dns-CA-Trp by iodide (which remains essentially in bulk water) was examined within sodium cholate, sodium taurocholate, sodium deoxycholate and mixed micelles. Interestingly, a decrease in the emission intensity of the two bands was observed with increasing iodide concentrations. The most remarkable effect was observed for mixed micelles, where the quenching rate constants were one order of magnitude lower than in solution. As anticipated, the quenching efficiency by iodide decreased with increasing hydrophobicity of the microenvironment, a trend that can be correlated with the relative accessibility of the probe to the ionic quencher.

  15. Enzymatic syntheses of some 11C-labelled analogues of L-tyrosine and L-tryptophan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjurling, P.; Malmborg, P.; Langstroem, B.

    1990-01-01

    In the elucidation of biochemical processes by use of positron emission tomography (PET), the multi-tracer approach can be valuable. In previous work, the authors have been studying the dopaminergic and serotonergic neurosystems by use of 11 C-labelled L-DOPA and 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan, respectively. They have now developed the syntheses of several analogues of tyrosine and tryptophan, labelled with 11 C in the β-position, which are of interest for use in similar applications

  16. Tryptophan-enriched antioxidant cereals improve sleep in children with autistic spectrum and attention deficit hyperactivity disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Galán, Carmen; Sánchez, Soledad; Franco, Lourdes; Bravo, Rafael; Rivero, Montserrat; Rodríguez, Ana Beatriz; Barriga, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Theintake of foods rich in tryptophan produces beneficial effects on sleep. Themajority of children with neurological disorders like autistic spectrum disorder(ASD), cerebral palsy or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) havesleep problems. To evaluate the effect of tryptophan-enriched cereal intake onsleep of children with neurological disorders. Involving 7 children with ASD, 9children with cerebral palsy and 6 children with ADHD. They carried a wrist actimeterto record activity....

  17. Multiresponse optimization of a UPLC method for the simultaneous determination of tryptophan and 15 tryptophan-derived compounds using a Box-Behnken design with a desirability function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyaningsih, Widiastuti; Saputro, Irfan E; Carrera, Ceferino A; Palma, Miguel; Barroso, Carmelo G

    2017-06-15

    A Box-Behnken design was used in conjunction with multiresponse optimization based on the desirability function to carry out the simultaneous separation of tryptophan and 15 derivatives by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography. The gradient composition of the mobile phase and the flow rate were optimized with respect to the resolution of severely overlapping chromatographic peaks and the total run time. Two different stationary phases were evaluated (hybrid silica and a solid-core-based C 18 column). The methods were validated and a suitable sensitivity was found for all compounds in the concentration range 1-100μgL -1 (R 2 >0.999). High levels of repeatability and intermediate precision (CV less than 0.25% and 1.7% on average for the retention time and the signal area, respectively) were obtained. The new method was applied to the determination tryptophan and its derivatives in black pigmented glutinous and non-glutinous rice grain samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Serum Levels of Tryptophan, 5-Hydroxytryptophan and Serotonin in Patients Affected with Different Forms of Amenorrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Comai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tryptophan (Trp is present in the serum, partly bound to albumine and in the free form. The unbound portion of circulating tryptophan has the property of crossing the hematoencephalic barrier and being converted within the brain into serotonin (5-HT through the enzymatic processes of hydroxylation and decarboxylation. The serotoninergic system plays an important role in neuroendocrine control of reproductive hormone secretion, and in particular, it may influence GnRH pulsatility, a function essential for reproductive processes. In this study, we analysed serum levels of tryptophan, serotonin and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP in women with three different forms of amenorrhea: 16 patients were diagnosed with anorexia nervosa, 60 patients with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea, and 14 patients with hyperprolactinemia. Data were compared with those of a group of 25 healthy women. Serum Trp levels were significantly (P ≤ 0.05 lower in the anorexic (11.64 ± 0.53 μg/ml, mean ± S.E. than in the control (12.98 ± 0.37 μg/ml groups. In addition, in the anorexic group a statistical dispersion of Trp values was shown indicating a bimodal data distribution suggesting the existence of two different subgroups of patients. Regarding 5-HTP, an increase of its serum level was observed in all the groups with amenorrhea with the highest value in hyperprolactinemic patients. On the contrary, no statistical differences in serum 5-HT levels among the four analyzed groups were observed. This study shows that women affected by various forms of amenorrhea present an altered metabolism of tryptophan via serotonin and, in particular, markedly high differences are observed between the two subgroups of anorexic patients.

  19. Serum Levels of Tryptophan, 5-Hydroxytryptophan and Serotonin in Patients Affected with Different Forms of Amenorrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Comai

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Tryptophan (Trp is present in the serum, partly bound to albumine and in the free form. The unbound portion of circulating tryptophan has the property of crossing the hematoencephalic barrier and being converted within the brain into serotonin (5-HT through the enzymatic processes of hydroxylation and decarboxylation. The serotoninergic system plays an important role in neuroendocrine control of reproductive hormone secretion, and in particular, it may influence GnRH pulsatility, a function essential for reproductive processes. In this study, we analysed serum levels of tryptophan, serotonin and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP in women with three different forms of amenorrhea: 16 patients were diagnosed with anorexia nervosa, 60 patients with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea, and 14 patients with hyperprolactinemia. Data were compared with those of a group of 25 healthy women. Serum Trp levels were significantly (P ≤ 0.05 lower in the anorexic (11.64 ± 0.53 µg/ml, mean ± S.E. than in the control (12.98 ± 0.37 µg/ml groups. In addition, in the anorexic group a statistical dispersion of Trp values was shown indicating a bimodal data distribution suggesting the existence of two different subgroups of patients. Regarding 5-HTP, an increase of its serum level was observed in all the groups with amenorrhea with the highest value in hyperprolactinemic patients. On the contrary, no statistical differences in serum 5-HT levels among the four analyzed groups were observed. This study shows that women affected by various forms of amenorrhea present an altered metabolism of tryptophan via serotonin and, in particular, markedly high differences are observed between the two subgroups of anorexic patients.

  20. Uremic anorexia: a consequence of persistently high brain serotonin levels? The tryptophan/serotonin disorder hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, A; Selgas, R; Codoceo, R; Bajo, A

    2000-01-01

    Anorexia is a frequent part of uremic syndrome, contributing to malnutrition in dialysis patients. Many factors have been suggested as responsible for uremic anorexia. In this paper we formulate a new hypothesis to explain the appetite disorders in dialysis patients: "the tryptophan/serotonin disorder hypothesis." We review current knowledge of normal hunger-satiety cycle control and the disorders described in uremic patients. There are four phases in food intake regulation: (1) the gastric phase, during which food induces satiety through gastric distention and satiety peptide release; (2) the post absorptive phase, during which circulating compounds, including glucose and amino acids, cause satiety by hepatic receptors via the vagus nerve; (3) the hepatic phase, during which adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration is the main stimulus inducing hunger or satiety, with cytokines inhibiting ATP production; and (4) the central phase, during which appetite is regulated through peripheral (circulating plasma substances and neurotransmitters) and brain stimuli. Brain serotonin is the final target for peripheral mechanisms controlling appetite. High brain serotonin levels and a lower serotonin/dopamine ratio cause anorexia. Plasma and brain amino acid concentrations are recognized factors involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and appetite control. Tryptophan is the substrate of serotonin synthesis. High plasma levels of anorectics such as tryptophan (plasma and brain), cholecystokinin, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1, and leptin, and deficiencies of nitric oxide and neuropeptide Y have been described in uremia; all increase intracerebral serotonin. We suggest that brain serotonin hyperproduction due to a uremic-dependent excess of tryptophan may be the final common pathway involved in the genesis of uremic anorexia. Various methods of ameliorating anorexia by decreasing the central effects of serotonin are proposed.

  1. Dynamic Allostery Mediated by a Conserved Tryptophan in the Tec Family Kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Chopra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk is a Tec family non-receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a critical role in immune signaling and is associated with the immunological disorder X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA. Our previous findings showed that the Tec kinases are allosterically activated by the adjacent N-terminal linker. A single tryptophan residue in the N-terminal 17-residue linker mediates allosteric activation, and its mutation to alanine leads to the complete loss of activity. Guided by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry results, we have employed Molecular Dynamics simulations, Principal Component Analysis, Community Analysis and measures of node centrality to understand the details of how a single tryptophan mediates allostery in Btk. A specific tryptophan side chain rotamer promotes the functional dynamic allostery by inducing coordinated motions that spread across the kinase domain. Either a shift in the rotamer population, or a loss of the tryptophan side chain by mutation, drastically changes the coordinated motions and dynamically isolates catalytically important regions of the kinase domain. This work also identifies a new set of residues in the Btk kinase domain with high node centrality values indicating their importance in transmission of dynamics essential for kinase activation. Structurally, these node residues appear in both lobes of the kinase domain. In the N-lobe, high centrality residues wrap around the ATP binding pocket connecting previously described Catalytic-spine residues. In the C-lobe, two high centrality node residues connect the base of the R- and C-spines on the αF-helix. We suggest that the bridging residues that connect the catalytic and regulatory architecture within the kinase domain may be a crucial element in transmitting information about regulatory spine assembly to the catalytic machinery of the catalytic spine and active site.

  2. No Tryptophan, Tyrosine and Phenylalanine Abnormalities in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Bergwerff, C.E.; Luman, M.; Blom, H.J.; Oosterlaan, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the current study was to explore the role of aromatic amino acids (AAAs) in blood in relation to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Given their impact on the synthesis of serotonin and dopamine, decreased concentrations of the AAAs tryptophan, tyrosine and phenylalanine in blood may contribute to the expression of ADHD symptoms. Decreased AAA blood concentrations, in turn, may be related to lowered dietary protein intake or to abnormal AAA catabolism, as ev...

  3. Effects of Acute Tryptophan Depletion on Three Different Types of Behavioral Impulsivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald M. Dougherty

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction While central nervous system serotonin has been implicated in a variety of problematic impulsive behaviors, biological manipulation of brain serotonin using acute tryptophan depletion for studying changes in impulsive behavior has received little attention. Methods Using identical treatment conditions, we examined the effects of reduced serotonin synthesis for each of three matched groups using acute tryptophan depletion. Thirty healthy men and women (ages 18–45 were assigned to perform one of three tasks assessing different types of behavioral impulsivity: response initiation, response inhibition, and consequence sensitivity ( N = 90. Participants completed two experimental days during which each consumed either a tryptophan-depletion or balanced-placebo amino-acid formulation and completed 5 sessions of their respective tasks at 0.25 h before and 1.5, 4.0, 5.0, and 6.0 h after beverage consumption. Results During peak effectiveness (5.0 h to 6.0 h following amino-acid consumption, depletion produced selective differences dependent on the type of impulsivity being tested. Specifically, relative to baseline testing (pre-depletion, response initiation impulsivity was significantly increased during the peak effects of depletion. And, when compared to placebo control, both response initiation and consequence sensitivity impulsivity were increased during the peak effects of depletion. Conclusion Though response initiation and consequence sensitivity impulsivity were affected by tryptophan depletion, response inhibition impulsivity was not, suggesting that other biological processes may underlie this specific component of impulsivity. Future research in other populations or using different pharmacological agents is warranted to further examine the biological processes underlying these components of impulsivity.

  4. Effects of Acute Tryptophan Depletion on Three Different Types of Behavioral Impulsivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald M. Dougherty

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While central nervous system serotonin has been implicated in a variety of problematic impulsive behaviors, biological manipulation of brain serotonin using acute tryptophan depletion for studying changes in impulsive behavior has received little attention. Methods: Using identical treatment conditions, we examined the effects of reduced serotonin synthesis for each of three matched groups using acute tryptophan depletion. Thirty healthy men and women (ages 18–45 were assigned to perform one of three tasks assessing different types of behavioral impulsivity: response initiation, response inhibition, and consequence sensitivity (N = 90. Participants completed two experimental days during which each consumed either a tryptophan-depletion or balanced-placebo amino-acid formulation and completed 5 sessions of their respective tasks at 0.25 h before and 1.5, 4.0, 5.0, and 6.0 h after beverage consumption. Results: During peak effectiveness (5.0 h to 6.0 h following amino-acid consumption, depletion produced selective differences dependent on the type of impulsivity being tested. Specifically, relative to baseline testing (pre-depletion, response initiation impulsivity was significantly increased during the peak effects of depletion. And, when compared to placebo control, both response initiation and consequence sensitivity impulsivity were increased during the peak effects of depletion. Conclusion: Though response initiation and consequence sensitivity impulsivity were affected by tryptophan depletion, response inhibition impulsivity was not, suggesting that other biological processes may underlie this specific component of impulsivity. Future research in other populations or using different pharmacological agents is warranted to further examine the biological processes underlying these components of impulsivity.

  5. Phenotypic and Functional Alterations of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells in an In Vitro Leukemia-Induced Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Paul Vernot

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of the cell interactions occurring in the leukemic microenvironment and their functional consequences for the different cell players has therapeutic relevance. By co-culturing mesenchymal stem cells (MSC with the REH acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL cell line, we have established an in vitro leukemic niche for the functional evaluation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC, CD34+ cells. We showed that the normal homeostatic control exerted by the MSC over the HSPC is considerably lost in this leukemic microenvironment: HSPC increased their proliferation rate and adhesion to MSC. The adhesion molecules CD54 and CD44 were consequently upregulated in HSPC from the leukemic niche. Consequently, with this adhesive phenotype, HSPC showed less Stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1-directed migration. Interestingly, multipotency was severely affected with an important reduction in the absolute count and the percentage of primitive progenitor colonies. It was possible to simulate most of these HSPC alterations by incubation of MSC with a REH-conditioned medium, suggesting that REH soluble factors and their effect on MSC are important for the observed changes. Of note, these HSPC alterations were reproduced when primary leukemic cells from an ALL type B (ALL-B patient were used to set up the leukemic niche. These results suggest that a general response is induced in the leukemic niche to the detriment of HSPC function and in favor of leukemic cell support. This in vitro leukemic niche could be a valuable tool for the understanding of the molecular events responsible for HSPC functional failure and a useful scenario for therapeutic evaluation.

  6. The role of adrenal hormones in the activation of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase by nicotinic acid in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainio, E L

    1997-09-01

    In this study, our previous finding that nicotinic acid activates tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase as strongly as tryptophan was investigated in further detail. This study focused on the role of the adrenals in the activation process. Adrenalectomy abolished the activation due to nicotinic acid, but not the activation caused by tryptophan. The role of corticoids and/or adrenomedullary hormones in the enzyme activation was studied, by supplementing these hormones in adrenalectomized rats using minipumps implanted under the skin. The results showed that the enhanced activity of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase caused by nicotinic acid was partly restored by adrenaline following adrenalectomy but not by corticosterone supplementation. The results were supported by further experiments in which the rats were treated with adrenaline or corticosterone intraperitoneally before nicotinic acid administration. The conclusion that adrenaline participates in the regulation of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase should promote further study to determine whether adrenaline is a general modulator of this enzyme. This experimental model generated new information on the activation mechanism of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase by nicotinic acid.

  7. l-Tryptophan Radical Cation Electron Spin Resonance Studies: Connecting Solution-derived Hyperfine Coupling Constants with Protein Spectral Interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Henry D.; Sturgeon, Bradley E.; Mottley, Carolyn; Sipe, Herbert J.; Mason, Ronald P.

    2009-01-01

    Fast-flow electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy has been used to detect a free radical formed from the reaction of l-tryptophan with Ce4+ in an acidic aqueous environment. Computer simulations of the ESR spectra from l-tryptophan and several isotopically modified forms strongly support the conclusion that the l-tryptophan radical cation has been detected by ESR for the first time. The hyperfine coupling constants (HFCs) determined from the well-resolved isotropic ESR spectra support experimental and computational efforts to understand l-tryptophan's role in protein catalysis of oxidation-reduction processes. l-tryptophan HFCs facilitated the simulation of fast-flow ESR spectra of free radicals from two related compounds, tryptamine and 3-methylindole. Analysis of these three compounds' β-methylene hydrogen HFC data along with equivalent l-tyrosine data has led to a new computational method that can distinguish between these two amino acid free radicals in proteins without dependence on isotope labeling, electron nuclear double resonance or high-field ESR. This approach also produces geometric parameters (dihedral angles for the β-methylene hydrogens) which should facilitate protein site assignment of observed l-tryptophan radicals as has been done for l-tyrosine radicals. PMID:18433127

  8. Alzheimer's disease evaluation using label-free, stainless, fluorescence to measure tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordillo, Laura A.; Zhang, Lin; Shi, Lingyan; Sriramoju, Vidyasagar; Sordillo, Peter P.; Alfano, Robert R.

    2018-02-01

    Under stress conditions, pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1 beta, interleukin 6 and interferon gamma are released. It is known that these cytokines stimulate indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), which increase tryptophan metabolism through the kynurenine pathway, and that this can cause increased production of neurotoxic compounds. Brain tissues from Alzheimer's disease patients and agematched controls were investigated using label-free fluorescence spectroscopy. Tryptophan (exc. 280/ em. 340 nm) and its metabolites (N-formyl-L-kynurenine (exc. 325/em. 434 nm), kynurenine (exc. 365/em. 480 nm) and kynurenic acid (exc. 330/em. 390 nm)) have distinct spectral profiles. Preliminary results show a difference in the optical signatures in three important areas of the brain (hippocampus, BA 9, BA 17) between patients with Alzheimer's disease and agedmatched controls (normal), and a marked relative increase in tryptophan in the Alzheimer's patients. Thus determinations of tryptophan to tryptophan metabolite ratios could potentially be used to measure IDO and TDO activity and the degree of inflammation in the brain. This label-free optical technique may be useful in the study of Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Stable isotope labeling, in vivo, of D- and L-tryptophan pools in lemna gibba and the low incorporation of label into indole-3-acetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldi, B.G.; Maher, B.R.; Slovin, J.P.; Cohen, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present evidence that the role of tryptophan and other potential intermediates in the pathways that could lead to indole derivatives needs to be reexamined. Two lines of Lemna gibba were tested for uptake of [ 15 N-indole]-labeled tryptophan isomers and incorporation of that label into free indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Both lines required levels of L-[ 15 N]tryptophan 2 to 3 orders of magnitude over endogenous levels in order to obtain measurable incorporation of label into IAA. Labeled L-tryptophan was extractable from plant tissue after feeding and showed no measurable isomerization into D-tryptophan. D-[ 15 N]trytophan supplied to Lemna at rates of approximately 400 times excess of endogenous D-tryptophan levels (to yield an isotopic enrichment equal to that which allowed detection of the incorporation of L-tryptophan into IAA), did not result in measurable incorporation of label into free IAA. These results demonstrate that L-tryptophan is a more direct precursor to IAA than the D isomer and suggest (a) that the availability of tryptophan in vivo is not a limiting factor in the biosynthesis of IAA, thus implying that other regulatory mechanisms are in operation and (b) that L-tryptophan also may not be a primary precursor to IAA in plants

  10. Candida glabrata tryptophan-based pigment production via the Ehrlich pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunke, Sascha; Seider, Katja; Almeida, Ricardo Sergio; Heyken, Antje; Fleck, Christian Benjamin; Brock, Matthias; Barz, Dagmar; Rupp, Steffen; Hube, Bernhard

    2010-04-01

    Pigments contribute to the pathogenicity of many fungi, mainly by protecting fungal cells from host defence activities. Here, we have dissected the biosynthetic pathway of a tryptophan-derived pigment of the human pathogen Candida glabrata, identified key genes involved in pigment production and have begun to elucidate the possible biological function of the pigment. Using transcriptional analyses and a transposon insertion library, we have identified genes associated with pigment production. Targeted deletion mutants revealed that the pigment is a by-product of the Ehrlich pathway of tryptophan degradation: a mutant lacking a tryptophan-upregulated aromatic aminotransferase (Aro8) displayed significantly reduced pigmentation and a recombinantly expressed version of this protein was sufficient for pigment production in vitro. Pigment production is tightly regulated as the synthesis is affected by the presence of alternative nitrogen sources, carbon sources, cyclic AMP and oxygen. Growth of C. glabrata on pigment inducing medium leads to an increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide, an effect which was not observed with a mutant defective in pigmentation. Furthermore, pigmented yeast cells had a higher survival rate when exposed to human neutrophils and caused increased damage in a monolayer model of human epithelia, indicating a possible role of pigmentation during interactions with host cells.

  11. The Potential Role of Cannabinoids in Modulating Serotonergic Signaling by Their Influence on Tryptophan Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietmar Fuchs

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Phytocannabinoids present in Cannabis plants are well known to exert potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. Previously, we have demonstrated that the psychoactive D9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC and the non-psychotropic cannabidiol (CBD modulate mitogen-induced Th1-type immune responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. The suppressive effect of both cannabinoids on mitogen-induced tryptophan degradation mediated by indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO, suggests an additional mechanism by which antidepressive effects of cannabinoids might be linked to the serotonergic system. Here, we will review the role of tryptophan metabolism in the course of cell mediated immune responses and the relevance of cannabinoids in serotonergic signaling. We conclude that in particular the non-psychotropic CBD might be useful for the treatment of mood disorders in patients with inflammatory diseases, since this cannabinoid seems to be safe and its effects on activation-induced tryptophan degradation by CBD were more potent as compared to THC.

  12. Application of Tryptophan Fluorescence Bandwidth-Maximum Plot in Analysis of Monoclonal Antibody Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng-Yen; Hsieh, Ming-Ching; Zhou, Qinwei

    2017-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have become the fastest growing protein therapeutics in recent years. The stability and heterogeneity pertaining to its physical and chemical structures remain a big challenge. Tryptophan fluorescence has been proven to be a versatile tool to monitor protein tertiary structure. By modeling the tryptophan fluorescence emission envelope with log-normal distribution curves, the quantitative measure can be exercised for the routine characterization of monoclonal antibody overall tertiary structure. Furthermore, the log-normal deconvolution results can be presented as a two-dimensional plot with tryptophan emission bandwidth vs. emission maximum to enhance the resolution when comparing samples or as a function of applied perturbations. We demonstrate this by studying four different monoclonal antibodies, which show the distinction on emission bandwidth-maximum plot despite their similarity in overall amino acid sequences and tertiary structures. This strategy is also used to demonstrate the tertiary structure comparability between different lots manufactured for one of the monoclonal antibodies (mAb2). In addition, in the unfolding transition studies of mAb2 as a function of guanidine hydrochloride concentration, the evolution of the tertiary structure can be clearly traced in the emission bandwidth-maximum plot.

  13. Ultrafast quenching of tryptophan fluorescence in proteins: Interresidue and intrahelical electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu Weihong; Li Tanping; Zhang Luyuan; Yang Yi; Kao Yating; Wang Lijuan [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biochemistry, Program of Biophysics, Chemical Physics, and Biochemistry, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Zhong Dongping [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biochemistry, Program of Biophysics, Chemical Physics, and Biochemistry, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)], E-mail: dongping@mps.ohio-state.edu

    2008-06-23

    Quenching of tryptophan fluorescence in proteins has been critical to the understanding of protein dynamics and enzyme reactions using tryptophan as a molecular optical probe. We report here our systematic examinations of potential quenching residues with more than 40 proteins. With site-directed mutation, we placed tryptophan to desired positions or altered its neighboring residues to screen quenching groups among 20 amino acid residues and of peptide backbones. With femtosecond resolution, we observed the ultrafast quenching dynamics within 100 ps and identified two ultrafast quenching groups, the carbonyl- and sulfur-containing residues. The former is glutamine and glutamate residues and the later is disulfide bond and cysteine residue. The quenching by the peptide-bond carbonyl group as well as other potential residues mostly occurs in longer than 100 ps. These ultrafast quenching dynamics occur at van der Waals distances through intraprotein electron transfer with high directionality. Following optimal molecular orbital overlap, electron jumps from the benzene ring of the indole moiety in a vertical orientation to the LUMO of acceptor quenching residues. Molecular dynamics simulations were invoked to elucidate various correlations of quenching dynamics with separation distances, relative orientations, local fluctuations and reaction heterogeneity. These unique ultrafast quenching pairs, as recently found to extensively occur in high-resolution protein structures, may have significant biological implications.

  14. Caspase recruitment domain 9, microbiota, and tryptophan metabolism: dangerous liaisons in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, Bruno; Richard, Mathias L; Sokol, Harry

    2017-07-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) develop as a result of a combination of genetic predisposition, dysbiosis of the gut microbiota, and environmental influences. Here, we describe an example of how caspase recruitment domain 9 (CARD9), one of the numerous IBD susceptibility genes, participate to colitis susceptibility by shaping gut microbiota to produce tryptophan metabolites. Recent study showed that CARD9 mice are more susceptible to colitis as a result of impaired interleukin 22 signaling pathway. Furthermore, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands from tryptophan metabolism by the gut microbiota participate to intestinal homeostasis by inducing production of interleukin 22 by intestinal immune cells. These data suggest an interaction between CARD9 and the ability of gut microbiota to produce AhR ligands. The microbiota from CARD9 mice fails to metabolize tryptophan leading to defective AhR activation which contributes to the susceptibility of mice to colitis by decreased interleukin 22 production. These effects were abrogated in the presence of AhR agonist. Reduced production of AhR ligands is also observed in the microbiota from individuals with IBD, particularly in those with CARD9 risk alleles associated with IBD. Correcting impaired microbiota functions, such as ability to produce AhR ligands, is an attractive strategy in IBD.

  15. Tryptophan derivatives regulate the transcription of Oct4 in stem-like cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jie; Li, Wenxin; Kang, Bo; Zhou, Yanwen; Song, Jiasheng; Dan, Songsong; Yang, Ying; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Li, Jingchao; Yin, Shengyong; Cao, Hongcui; Yao, Hangping; Zhu, Chenggang; Yi, Wen; Zhao, Qingwei; Xu, Xiaowei; Zheng, Min; Zheng, Shusen; Li, Lanjuan; Shen, Binghui; Wang, Ying-Jie

    2015-06-10

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor that responds to environmental toxicants, is increasingly recognized as a key player in embryogenesis and tumorigenesis. Here we show that a variety of tryptophan derivatives that act as endogenous AhR ligands can affect the transcription level of the master pluripotency factor Oct4. Among them, ITE enhances the binding of the AhR to the promoter of Oct4 and suppresses its transcription. Reduction of endogenous ITE levels in cancer cells by tryptophan deprivation or hypoxia leads to Oct4 elevation, which can be reverted by administration with synthetic ITE. Consequently, synthetic ITE induces the differentiation of stem-like cancer cells and reduces their tumorigenic potential in both subcutaneous and orthotopic xenograft tumour models. Thus, our results reveal a role of tryptophan derivatives and the AhR signalling pathway in regulating cancer cell stemness and open a new therapeutic avenue to target stem-like cancer cells.

  16. Aerobic Biodegradation Characteristic of Different Water-Soluble Azo Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shixiong Sheng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the biodegradation performance and characteristics of Sudan I and Acid Orange 7 (AO7 to improve the biological dye removal efficiency in wastewater and optimize the treatment process. The dyes with different water-solubility and similar molecular structure were biologically treated under aerobic condition in parallel continuous-flow mixed stirred reactors. The biophase analysis using microscopic examination suggested that the removal process of the two azo dyes is different. Removal of Sudan I was through biosorption, since it easily assembled and adsorbed on the surface of zoogloea due to its insolubility, while AO7 was biodegraded incompletely and bioconverted, the AO7 molecule was decomposed to benzene series and inorganic ions, since it could reach the interior area of zoogloea due to the low oxidation-reduction potential conditions and corresponding anaerobic microorganisms. The transformation of NH3-N, SO42− together with the presence of tryptophan-like components confirm that AO7 can be decomposed to non-toxic products in an aerobic bioreactor. This study provides a theoretical basis for the use of biosorption or biodegradation mechanisms for the treatment of different azo dyes in wastewater.

  17. Effects of tryptophan depletion on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor-remitted patients with obsessive compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Sean D; Broyd, Annabel; Robinson, Hayley; Lee, Jessica; Hudaib, Abdul-Rahman; Hince, Dana A

    2017-12-01

    Serotonergic antidepressants are first-line medication therapies for obsessive-compulsive disorder, however it is not known if synaptic serotonin availability is important for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor efficacy. The present study tested the hypothesis that temporary reduction in central serotonin transmission, through acute tryptophan depletion, would result in an increase in anxiety in selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor-remitted obsessive-compulsive disorder patients. Eight patients (four males) with obsessive-compulsive disorder who showed sustained clinical improvement with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment underwent acute tryptophan depletion in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects design, over two days one week apart. Five hours after consumption of the depleting/sham drink the participants performed a personalized obsessive-compulsive disorder symptom exposure task. Psychological responses were measured using the Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory, Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale and Visual Analogue Scales. Free plasma tryptophan to large neutral amino acid ratio decreased by 93% on the depletion day and decreased by 1% on the sham day, as anticipated. Psychological rating scores as measured by Visual Analogue Scale showed a significant decrease in perceived control and increase in interfering thoughts at the time of provocation on the depletion day but not on the sham day. A measure of convergent validity, namely Visual Analogue Scale Similar to past, was significantly higher at the time of provocation on both the depletion and sham days. Both the depletion and time of provocation scores for Visual Analogue Scale Anxiety, Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory, Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale and blood pressure were not significant. Acute tryptophan depletion caused a significant decrease in perceived control and increase in interfering thoughts at the time of provocation. Acute tryptophan

  18. Tryptophan decarboxylase plays an important role in ajmalicine biosynthesis in Rauvolfia verticillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wanhong; Chen, Rong; Chen, Min; Zhang, Haoxing; Peng, Meifang; Yang, Chunxian; Ming, Xingjia; Lan, Xiaozhong; Liao, Zhihua

    2012-07-01

    Tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) converts tryptophan into tryptamine that is the indole moiety of ajmalicine. The full-length cDNA of Rauvolfia verticillata (RvTDC) was 1,772 bps that contained a 1,500-bp ORF encoding a 499-amino-acid polypeptide. Recombinant 55.5 kDa RvTDC converted tryptophan into tryptamine. The K (m) of RvTDC for tryptophan was 2.89 mM, higher than those reported in other TIAs-producing plants. It demonstrated that RvTDC had lower affinity to tryptophan than other plant TDCs. The K (m) of RvTDC was also much higher than that of strictosidine synthase and strictosidine glucosidase in Rauvolfia. This suggested that TDC might be the committed-step enzyme involved in ajmalicine biosynthesis in R. verticillata. The expression of RvTDC was slightly upregulated by MeJA; the five MEP pathway genes and SGD showed no positive response to MeJA; and STR was sharply downregulated by MeJA. MeJA-treated hairy roots produced higher level of ajmalicine (0.270 mg g(-1) DW) than the EtOH control (0.183 mg g(-1) DW). Highest RvTDC expression level was detected in hairy root, about respectively 11, 19, 65, and 109-fold higher than in bark, young leaf, old leaf, and root. Highest ajmalicine content was also found in hairy root (0.249 mg g(-1) DW) followed by in bark (0.161 mg g(-1) DW) and young leaf (0.130 mg g(-1) DW), and least in root (0.014 mg g(-1) DW). Generally, the expression level of RvTDC was positively consistent with the accumulation of ajmalicine. Therefore, it could be deduced that TDC might be the key enzyme involved in ajmalicine biosynthesis in Rauvolfia.

  19. Pure Phase Solubility Limits: LANL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C. Stockman

    2001-01-01

    The natural and engineered system at Yucca Mountain (YM) defines the site-specific conditions under which one must determine to what extent the engineered and the natural geochemical barriers will prevent the release of radioactive material from the repository. Most important mechanisms for retention or enhancement of radionuclide transport include precipitation or co-precipitation of radionuclide-bearing solid phases (solubility limits), complexation in solution, sorption onto surfaces, colloid formation, and diffusion. There may be many scenarios that could affect the near-field environment, creating chemical conditions more aggressive than the conditions presented by the unperturbed system (such as pH changes beyond the range of 6 to 9 or significant changes in the ionic strength of infiltrated waters). For an extended period of time, the near-field water composition may be quite different and more extreme in pH, ionic strength, and CO 2 partial pressure (or carbonate concentration) than waters at some distance from the repository. Reducing conditions, high pH (up to 11), and low carbonate concentration may be present in the near-field after reaction of infiltrating groundwater with engineered barrier systems, such as cementitious materials. In the far-field, conditions are controlled by the rock-mass buffer providing a near-neutral, oxidizing, low-ionic-strength environment that controls radionuclide solubility limits and sorption capacities. There is the need for characterization of variable chemical conditions that affect solubility, speciation, and sorption reactions. Modeling of the groundwater chemistry is required and leads to an understanding of solubility and speciation of the important radionuclides. Because experimental studies cannot be performed under the numerous potential chemical conditions, solubility limitations must rely on geochemical modeling of the radionuclide's chemistry. Fundamental thermodynamic properties, such as solubility products

  20. Pure Phase Solubility Limits: LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Stockman

    2001-01-26

    The natural and engineered system at Yucca Mountain (YM) defines the site-specific conditions under which one must determine to what extent the engineered and the natural geochemical barriers will prevent the release of radioactive material from the repository. Most important mechanisms for retention or enhancement of radionuclide transport include precipitation or co-precipitation of radionuclide-bearing solid phases (solubility limits), complexation in solution, sorption onto surfaces, colloid formation, and diffusion. There may be many scenarios that could affect the near-field environment, creating chemical conditions more aggressive than the conditions presented by the unperturbed system (such as pH changes beyond the range of 6 to 9 or significant changes in the ionic strength of infiltrated waters). For an extended period of time, the near-field water composition may be quite different and more extreme in pH, ionic strength, and CO{sub 2} partial pressure (or carbonate concentration) than waters at some distance from the repository. Reducing conditions, high pH (up to 11), and low carbonate concentration may be present in the near-field after reaction of infiltrating groundwater with engineered barrier systems, such as cementitious materials. In the far-field, conditions are controlled by the rock-mass buffer providing a near-neutral, oxidizing, low-ionic-strength environment that controls radionuclide solubility limits and sorption capacities. There is the need for characterization of variable chemical conditions that affect solubility, speciation, and sorption reactions. Modeling of the groundwater chemistry is required and leads to an understanding of solubility and speciation of the important radionuclides. Because experimental studies cannot be performed under the numerous potential chemical conditions, solubility limitations must rely on geochemical modeling of the radionuclide's chemistry. Fundamental thermodynamic properties, such as solubility

  1. NANIVID: A New Research Tool for Tissue Microenvironment Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Waseem K.

    Metastatic tumors are heterogeneous in nature and composed of subpopulations of cells having various metastatic potentials. The time progression of a tumor creates a unique microenvironment to improve the invasion capabilities and survivability of cancer cells in different microenvironments. In the early stages of intravasation, cancer cells establish communication with other cell types through a paracrine loop and covers long distances by sensing growth factor gradients through extracellular matrices. Cellular migration both in vitro and in vivo is a complex process and to understand their motility in depth, sophisticated techniques are required to document and record events in real time. This study presents the design and optimization of a new versatile chemotaxis device called the NANIVID (NANo IntraVital Imaging Device), developed using advanced Nano/Micro fabrication techniques. The current version of this device has been demonstrated to form a stable (epidermal growth factor) EGF gradient in vitro (2D and 3D) while a miniaturized size of NANIVID is used as an implantable device for intravital studies of chemotaxis and to collect cells in vivo. The device is fabricated using microfabrication techniques in which two substrates are bonded together using a thin polymer layer creating a bonded device with one point source (approximately 150 im x 50 im) outlet. The main structures of the device consist of two transparent substrates: one having etched chambers and channel while the second consists of a microelectrode system to measure real time cell arrival inside the device. The chamber of the device is loaded with a growth factor reservoir consisting of hydrogel to sustain a steady release of growth factor into the surrounding environment for long periods of time and establishing a concentration gradient from the device. The focus of this study was to design and optimize the new device for cell chemotaxis studies in breast cancer cells in cell culture. Our results

  2. Improving co-amorphous drug formulations by the addition of the highly water soluble amino acid proline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Katrine Birgitte Tarp; Löbmann, Korbinian; Rades, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Co-amorphous drug amino acid mixtures were previously shown to be a promising approach to create physically stable amorphous systems with the improved dissolution properties of poorly water-soluble drugs. The aim of this work was to expand the co-amorphous drug amino acid mixture approach...... by combining the model drug, naproxen (NAP), with an amino acid to physically stabilize the co-amorphous system (tryptophan, TRP, or arginine, ARG) and a second highly soluble amino acid (proline, PRO) for an additional improvement of the dissolution rate. Co-amorphous drug-amino acid blends were prepared...... the molecular interactions in the form of hydrogen bonds between all three components in the mixture. A salt formation between the acidic drug, NAP, and the basic amino acid, ARG, was found in co-amorphous NAP–ARG. In comparison to crystalline NAP, binary NAP–TRP and NAP–ARG, it could be shown that the highly...

  3. GPS-based Microenvironment Tracker (MicroTrac) Model to ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure assessment is the estimation of the time spent by individuals in various microenvironments (ME). Accounting for the time spent in different ME with different pollutant concentrations can reduce exposure misclassifications, while failure to do so can add uncertainty and bias to risk estimates. In this study, a classification model, called MicroTrac, was developed to estimate time of day and duration spent in eight ME (indoors and outdoors at home, work, school; inside vehicles; other locations) from global positioning system (GPS) data and geocoded building boundaries. Based on a panel study, MicroTrac estimates were compared to 24 h diary data from 7 participants on workdays and 2 participants on nonworkdays, with corresponding GPS data and building boundaries of home, school, and work. MicroTrac correctly classified the ME for 99.5% of the daily time spent by the participants. The capability of MicroTrac could help to reduce the time-location uncertainty in air pollution exposure models and exposure metrics for individuals in health studies. The National Exposure Research Laboratory’s (NERL’s) Human Exposure and Atmospheric Sciences Division (HEASD) conducts research in support of EPA’s mission to protect human health and the environment. HEASD’s research program supports Goal 1 (Clean Air) and Goal 4 (Healthy People) of EPA’s strategic plan. More specifically, our division conducts research to characterize

  4. Influence of the neural microenvironment on prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coarfa, Christian; Florentin, Diego; Putluri, NagiReddy; Ding, Yi; Au, Jason; He, Dandan; Ragheb, Ahmed; Frolov, Anna; Michailidis, George; Lee, MinJae; Kadmon, Dov; Miles, Brian; Smith, Christopher; Ittmann, Michael; Rowley, David; Sreekumar, Arun; Creighton, Chad J; Ayala, Gustavo

    2018-02-01

    Nerves are key factors in prostate cancer (PCa), but the functional role of innervation in prostate cancer is poorly understood. PCa induced neurogenesis and perineural invasion (PNI), are associated with aggressive disease. We denervated rodent prostates chemically and physically, before orthotopically implanting cancer cells. We also performed a human neoadjuvant clinical trial using botulinum toxin type A (Botox) and saline in the same patient, before prostatectomy. Bilateral denervation resulted in reduced tumor incidence and size in mice. Botox treatment in humans resulted in increased apoptosis of cancer cells in the Botox treated side. A similar denervation gene array profile was identified in tumors arising in denervated rodent prostates, in spinal cord injury patients and in the Botox treated side of patients. Denervation induced exhibited a signature gene profile, indicating translation and bioenergetic shutdown. Nerves also regulate basic cellular functions of non-neoplastic epithelial cells. Nerves play a role in the homeostasis of normal epithelial tissues and are involved in prostate cancer tumor survival. This study confirms that interactions between human cancer and nerves are essential to disease progression. This work may make a major impact in general cancer treatment strategies, as nerve/cancer interactions are likely important in other cancers as well. Targeting the neural microenvironment may represent a therapeutic approach for the treatment of human prostate cancer. © 2017 The Authors. The Prostate Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Acidity generated by the tumor microenvironment drives local invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrella, Veronica; Chen, Tingan; Lloyd, Mark; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan; Cornnell, Heather H; Ibrahim-Hashim, Arig; Bailey, Kate; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Rothberg, Jennifer M; Sloane, Bonnie F; Johnson, Joseph; Gatenby, Robert A; Gillies, Robert J

    2013-03-01

    The pH of solid tumors is acidic due to increased fermentative metabolism and poor perfusion. It has been hypothesized that acid pH promotes local invasive growth and metastasis. The hypothesis that acid mediates invasion proposes that H(+) diffuses from the proximal tumor microenvironment into adjacent normal tissues where it causes tissue remodeling that permits local invasion. In the current work, tumor invasion and peritumoral pH were monitored over time using intravital microscopy. In every case, the peritumoral pH was acidic and heterogeneous and the regions of highest tumor invasion corresponded to areas of lowest pH. Tumor invasion did not occur into regions with normal or near-normal extracellular pH. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that cells in the invasive edges expressed the glucose transporter-1 and the sodium-hydrogen exchanger-1, both of which were associated with peritumoral acidosis. In support of the functional importance of our findings, oral administration of sodium bicarbonate was sufficient to increase peritumoral pH and inhibit tumor growth and local invasion in a preclinical model, supporting the acid-mediated invasion hypothesis. Cancer Res; 73(5); 1524-35. ©2012 AACR. ©2012 AACR.

  6. Peritoneal inflammation – A microenvironment for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jinsong

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC is a significant cause of cancer related morbidity and mortality in women. Preferential involvement of peritoneal structures contributes to the overall poor outcome in EOC patients. Advances in biotechnology, such as cDNA microarray, are a product of the Human Genome Project and are beginning to provide fresh opportunities to understand the biology of EOC. In particular, it is now possible to examine in depth, at the molecular level, the complex relationship between the tumor itself and its surrounding microenvironment. This review focuses on the anatomy, physiology, and current immunobiologic research of peritoneal structures, and addresses certain potentially useful animal models. Changes in both the inflammatory and non-inflammatory cell compartments, as well as alterations to the extracellular matrix, appear to be signal events that contribute to the remodeling effects of the peritoneal stroma and surface epithelial cells on tumor growth and spread. These alterations may involve a number of proteins, including cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, either membrane or non-membrane bound, and integrins. Interactions between these molecules and molecular structures within the extracellular matrix, such as collagens and the proteoglycans, may contribute to a peritoneal mesothelial surface and stromal environment that is conducive to tumor cell proliferation and invasion. These alterations need to be examined and defined as possible prosnosticators and as therapeutic or diagnostic targets.

  7. Natural Compounds Regulate Glycolysis in Hypoxic Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Li Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the early twentieth century, Otto Heinrich Warburg described an elevated rate of glycolysis occurring in cancer cells, even in the presence of atmospheric oxygen (the Warburg effect. Recently it became a therapeutically interesting strategy and is considered as an emerging hallmark of cancer. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 is one of the key transcription factors that play major roles in tumor glycolysis and could directly trigger Warburg effect. Thus, how to inhibit HIF-1-depended Warburg effect to assist the cancer therapy is becoming a hot issue in cancer research. In fact, HIF-1 upregulates the glucose transporters (GLUT and induces the expression of glycolytic enzymes, such as hexokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase. So small molecules of natural origin used as GLUT, hexokinase, or pyruvate kinase isoform M2 inhibitors could represent a major challenge in the field of cancer treatment. These compounds aim to suppress tumor hypoxia induced glycolysis process to suppress the cell energy metabolism or enhance the susceptibility of tumor cells to radio- and chemotherapy. In this review, we highlight the role of natural compounds in regulating tumor glycolysis, with a main focus on the glycolysis under hypoxic tumor microenvironment.

  8. Tumor microenvironment derived exosomes pleiotropically modulate cancer cell metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyun; Yang, Lifeng; Baddour, Joelle; Achreja, Abhinav; Bernard, Vincent; Moss, Tyler; Marini, Juan C; Tudawe, Thavisha; Seviour, Elena G; San Lucas, F Anthony; Alvarez, Hector; Gupta, Sonal; Maiti, Sourindra N; Cooper, Laurence; Peehl, Donna; Ram, Prahlad T; Maitra, Anirban; Nagrath, Deepak

    2016-02-27

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are a major cellular component of tumor microenvironment in most solid cancers. Altered cellular metabolism is a hallmark of cancer, and much of the published literature has focused on neoplastic cell-autonomous processes for these adaptations. We demonstrate that exosomes secreted by patient-derived CAFs can strikingly reprogram the metabolic machinery following their uptake by cancer cells. We find that CAF-derived exosomes (CDEs) inhibit mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, thereby increasing glycolysis and glutamine-dependent reductive carboxylation in cancer cells. Through 13C-labeled isotope labeling experiments we elucidate that exosomes supply amino acids to nutrient-deprived cancer cells in a mechanism similar to macropinocytosis, albeit without the previously described dependence on oncogenic-Kras signaling. Using intra-exosomal metabolomics, we provide compelling evidence that CDEs contain intact metabolites, including amino acids, lipids, and TCA-cycle intermediates that are avidly utilized by cancer cells for central carbon metabolism and promoting tumor growth under nutrient deprivation or nutrient stressed conditions.

  9. Bone marrow adipocytes as negative regulators of the hematopoietic microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveiras, Olaia; Nardi, Valentina; Wenzel, Pamela L.; Fahey, Frederic; Daley, George Q.

    2009-01-01

    Osteoblasts and endothelium constitute functional niches that support hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in mammalian bone marrow (BM) 1,2,3 . Adult BM also contains adipocytes, whose numbers correlate inversely with the hematopoietic activity of the marrow. Fatty infiltration of hematopoietic red marrow follows irradiation or chemotherapy and is a diagnostic feature in biopsies from patients with marrow aplasia 4. To explore whether adipocytes influence hematopoiesis or simply fill marrow space, we compared the hematopoietic activity of distinct regions of the mouse skeleton that differ in adiposity. By flow cytometry, colony forming activity, and competitive repopulation assay, HSCs and short-term progenitors are reduced in frequency in the adipocyte-rich vertebrae of the mouse tail relative to the adipocyte-free vertebrae of the thorax. In lipoatrophic A-ZIP/F1 “fatless” mice, which are genetically incapable of forming adipocytes8, and in mice treated with the PPARγ inhibitor Bisphenol-A-DiGlycidyl-Ether (BADGE), which inhibits adipogenesis9, post-irradiation marrow engraftment is accelerated relative to wild type or untreated mice. These data implicate adipocytes as predominantly negative regulators of the bone marrow microenvironment, and suggest that antagonizingmarrow adipogenesis may enhance hematopoietic recovery in clinical bone marrow transplantation. PMID:19516257

  10. Inflammatory breast cancer biology: the tumour microenvironment is key.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Bora; Woodward, Wendy A; Wang, Xiaoping; Reuben, James M; Ueno, Naoto T

    2018-04-27

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive disease that accounts for ~2-4% of all breast cancers. However, despite its low incidence rate, IBC is responsible for 7-10% of breast cancer-related mortality in Western countries. Thus, the discovery of robust biological targets and the development of more effective therapeutics in IBC are crucial. Despite major international efforts to understand IBC biology, genomic studies have not led to the discovery of distinct biological mechanisms in IBC that can be translated into novel therapeutic strategies. In this Review, we discuss these molecular profiling efforts and highlight other important aspects of IBC biology. We present the intrinsic characteristics of IBC, including stemness, metastatic potential and hormone receptor positivity; the extrinsic features of the IBC tumour microenvironment (TME), including various constituent cell types; and lastly, the communication between these intrinsic and extrinsic components. We summarize the latest perspectives on the key biological features of IBC, with particular emphasis on the TME as an important contributor to the aggressive nature of IBC. On the basis of the current understanding of IBC, we hope to develop the next generation of translational studies, which will lead to much-needed survival improvements in patients with this deadly disease.

  11. Tumor microenvironment derived exosomes pleiotropically modulate cancer cell metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyun; Yang, Lifeng; Baddour, Joelle; Achreja, Abhinav; Bernard, Vincent; Moss, Tyler; Marini, Juan C; Tudawe, Thavisha; Seviour, Elena G; San Lucas, F Anthony; Alvarez, Hector; Gupta, Sonal; Maiti, Sourindra N; Cooper, Laurence; Peehl, Donna; Ram, Prahlad T; Maitra, Anirban; Nagrath, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are a major cellular component of tumor microenvironment in most solid cancers. Altered cellular metabolism is a hallmark of cancer, and much of the published literature has focused on neoplastic cell-autonomous processes for these adaptations. We demonstrate that exosomes secreted by patient-derived CAFs can strikingly reprogram the metabolic machinery following their uptake by cancer cells. We find that CAF-derived exosomes (CDEs) inhibit mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, thereby increasing glycolysis and glutamine-dependent reductive carboxylation in cancer cells. Through 13C-labeled isotope labeling experiments we elucidate that exosomes supply amino acids to nutrient-deprived cancer cells in a mechanism similar to macropinocytosis, albeit without the previously described dependence on oncogenic-Kras signaling. Using intra-exosomal metabolomics, we provide compelling evidence that CDEs contain intact metabolites, including amino acids, lipids, and TCA-cycle intermediates that are avidly utilized by cancer cells for central carbon metabolism and promoting tumor growth under nutrient deprivation or nutrient stressed conditions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10250.001 PMID:26920219

  12. [Development of a microenvironment test chamber for airborne microbe research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Ningbo; Chen, Feng; Du, Yaohua; Cheng, Zhi; Li, Chenyu; Wu, Jinlong; Wu, Taihu

    2017-10-01

    One of the most important environmental cleanliness indicators is airborne microbe. However, the particularity of clean operating environment and controlled experimental environment often leads to the limitation of the airborne microbe research. This paper designed and implemented a microenvironment test chamber for airborne microbe research in normal test conditions. Numerical simulation by Fluent showed that airborne microbes were evenly dispersed in the upper part of test chamber, and had a bottom-up concentration growth distribution. According to the simulation results, the verification experiment was carried out by selecting 5 sampling points in different space positions in the test chamber. Experimental results showed that average particle concentrations of all sampling points reached 10 7 counts/m 3 after 5 minutes' distributing of Staphylococcus aureus , and all sampling points showed the accordant mapping of concentration distribution. The concentration of airborne microbe in the upper chamber was slightly higher than that in the middle chamber, and that was also slightly higher than that in the bottom chamber. It is consistent with the results of numerical simulation, and it proves that the system can be well used for airborne microbe research.

  13. Dysbiosis of the Vaginal Microbiota and Higher Vaginal Kynurenine/Tryptophan Ratio Reveals an Association with Chlamydia trachomatis Genital Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Ziklo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The natural course of Chlamydia trachomatis urogenital tract infections varies between individuals. While protective immunity can occur, some women can become reinfected, contributing to the development of severe pathology. While the reasons for these differences are unknown, an individual's response to induced interferon-γ (IFN-γ is suggested to be critical. IFN-γ induction of the enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, which depletes tryptophan, may be the key. One hypothesis suggests that indole-producing bacteria in the vaginal microbiota can provide a substrate for the Chlamydia to synthesize tryptophan, rescuing the Chlamydia from host IFN-γ attack. We studied a cohort of 25 women who were either, Chlamydia negative, Chlamydia positive with a single infection, or Chlamydia positive with repeated infection, to test our hypothesis. We characterized their vaginal microbiota, cytokine response, as well as their tryptophan, kynurenine and indole concentrations directly in vaginal secretions. We found that C. trachomatis urogenital tract infections either initial or repeat infections, were associated with elevated vaginal kynurenine/tryptophan ratios, primarily as a result of elevated kynurenine levels. In addition, vaginal microbiota of community state type (CST IV showed significantly lower vaginal tryptophan levels compared to CST I and III, which might be related to a higher abundance of indole producers found within this group. Furthermore, we found a higher abundance of indole producers in women who cleared their Chlamydia infection post antibiotic treatment. This study demonstrates for the first time in vivo, the association between high vaginal kynurenine/tryptophan ratios and C. trachomatis infections. In addition, tryptophan depletion was associated with vaginal microbiota of CST IV.

  14. Revisiting the tryptophan-serotonin deficiency and the inflammatory hypotheses of major depression in a biopsychosocial approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Baranyi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background The aim of this cross-sectional study was to identify important biopsychosocial correlates of major depression. Biological mechanisms, including the inflammatory and the tryptophan-serotonin deficiency hypotheses of major depression, were investigated alongside health-related quality of life, life satisfaction, and social support. Methods The concentrations of plasma tryptophan, plasma kynurenine, plasma kynurenic acid, serum quinolinic acid, and the tryptophan breakdown to kynurenine were determined alongside health-related quality of life (Medical Outcome Study Form, SF-36, life satisfaction (Life Satisfaction Questionnaire, FLZ, and social support (Social Support Survey, SSS in 71 depressive patients at the time of their in-patient admittance and 48 healthy controls. Results Corresponding with the inflammatory hypothesis of major depression, our study results suggest a tryptophan breakdown to kynurenine in patients with major depression, and depressive patients had a lower concentration of neuroprotective kynurenic acid in comparison to the healthy controls (Mann–Whitney-U: 1315.0; p = 0.046. Contradicting the inflammatory theory, the concentrations of kynurenine (t: −0.945; df = 116; p = 0.347 and quinolinic acid (Mann-Whitney-U: 1376.5; p = 0.076 in depressive patients were not significantly different between depressed and healthy controls. Our findings tend to support the tryptophan-serotonin deficiency hypothesis of major depression, as the deficiency of the serotonin precursor tryptophan in depressive patients (t: −3.931; df = 116; p < 0.001 suggests dysfunction of serotonin neurotransmission. A two-step hierarchical linear regression model showed that low tryptophan concentrations, low social support (SSS, occupational requirements (FLZ, personality traits (FLZ, impaired physical role (SF-36, and impaired vitality (SF-36 predict higher Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II scores. Discussion Our study results

  15. Regular moderate or intense exercise prevents depression-like behavior without change of hippocampal tryptophan content in chronically tryptophan-deficient and stressed mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosung Lee

    Full Text Available Regular exercise has an antidepressant effect in human subjects. Studies using animals have suggested that the antidepressant effect of exercise is attributable to an increase of brain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; however, the precise mechanism underlying the antidepressant action via exercise is unclear. In contrast, the effect of 5-HT on antidepressant activity has not been clarified, in part because the therapeutic response to antidepressant drugs has a time lag in spite of the rapid increase of brain 5-HT upon administration of these drugs. This study was designed to investigate the contribution of brain 5-HT to the antidepressant effect of exercise. Mice were fed a tryptophan-deficient diet and stressed using chronic unpredictable stress (CUS for 4 weeks with or without the performance of either moderate or intense exercise on a treadmill 3 days per week. The findings demonstrated that the onset of depression-like behavior is attributable not to chronic reduction of 5-HT but to chronic stress. Regular exercise, whether moderate or intense, prevents depression-like behavior with an improvement of adult hippocampal cell proliferation and survival and without the recovery of 5-HT. Concomitantly, the mice that exercised showed increased hippocampal noradrenaline. Regular exercise prevents the impairment of not long-term memory but short-term memory in a 5-HT-reduced state. Together, these findings suggest that: (1 chronic reduction of brain 5-HT may not contribute to the onset of depression-like behavior; (2 regular exercise, whether moderate or intense, prevents the onset of chronic stress-induced depression-like behavior independent of brain 5-HT and dependent on brain adrenaline; and (3 regular exercise prevents chronic tryptophan reduction-induced impairment of not long-term but short-term memory.

  16. Cutaneous mast cell maturation does not depend on an intact bone marrow microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charley, M.R.; Mikhael, A.; Sontheimer, R.D.; Gilliam, J.N.; Bennett, M.

    1984-01-01

    A study was made to determine whether the maturation of murine cutaneous mast cells from stem cells depends on an intact bone marrow microenvironment. Normal bone marrow cells (+/+) were infused into 2 groups of mast cell-deficient mice: WBB6F1-W/Wv mice and 89 Sr-pretreated W/Wv mice. 89 Sr is a long-lived bone-seeking radioisotope which provides continuous irradiation of the marrow and thereby ablates the marrow microenvironment. Skin biopsies revealed that the 89 Sr-pretreated mice and the controls had repopulated their skin with mast cells equally well. Natural killer cell function was significantly depressed in the 89 Sr-treated mice, confirming that the marrow microenvironment had been functionally altered. It appears that, although the precursors for cutaneous mast cells are marrow derived, they do not need an intact marrow microenvironment for maturation

  17. On nitrogen solubility in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalajda, Yu.A.; Katkov, Yu.D.; Kuznetsov, V.A.; Lastovtsev, A.Yu.; Lastochkin, A.P.; Susoev, V.S.

    1980-01-01

    Presented are the results of experimental investigations on nitrogen solubility in water under 0-15 MPa pressure, at the temperature of 100-340 deg C and nitrogen concentration of 0-5000 n.ml. N 2 /kg H 2 O. Empiric equations are derived and a diagram of nitrogen solubility in water is developed on the basis of the experimental data, as well as critically evaluated published data. The investigation results can be used in analyzing water-gas regime of a primary heat carrier in stream-generating plants with water-water reactors

  18. Preliminary considerations concerning actinide solubilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, T.W.; Bayhurst, B.P.; Daniels, W.R.; Erdal, B.R.; Ogard, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    Work at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory on the fundamental solution chemistry of the actinides has thus far been confined to preliminary considerations of the problems involved in developing an understanding of the precipitation and dissolution behavior of actinide compounds under environmental conditions. Attempts have been made to calculate solubility as a function of Eh and pH using the appropriate thermodynamic data; results have been presented in terms of contour maps showing lines of constant solubility as a function of Eh and pH. Possible methods of control of the redox potential of rock-groundwater systems by the use of Eh buffers (redox couples) is presented

  19. Thorium oxalate solubility and morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monson, P.R. Jr.; Hall, R.

    1981-10-01

    Thorium was used as a stand-in for studying the solubility and precipitation of neptunium and plutonium oxalates. Thorium oxalate solubility was determined over a range of 0.001 to 10.0 in the concentration parameter [H 2 C 2 O 4 ]/[HNO 3 ] 2 . Morphology of thorium oxide made from the oxalate precipitates was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The different morphologies found for oxalate-lean and oxalate-rich precipitations were in agreement with predictions based on precipitation theory

  20. Solubility database for TILA-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuorinen, U.; Carlsson, T. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Kulmala, S.; Hakanen, M. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Lab. of Radiochemistry; Ahonen, L. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-11-01

    The safety assessment of spent fuel disposal requires solubility values for several elements estimated in Finnish disposal conditions. In Finland four sites (Haestholmen, Kivetty, Olkiluoto and Romuvaara) are investigated for the disposal of spent fuel. Haestholmen and OLkiluoto are onshore sites, while Kivetty and Romuvaara are inland sites. Based on groundwater analysis and classification according to salinity at the planned disposal depth mainly fresh groundwater is encountered at Kivetty and Romuvaara, while brackish and saline water-types are met at Haestholmen and Olkiluoto. Very saline, almost brine-type water ({approx}70 g/l) has been found in the deepest parts of the investigated bedrock at one of the sites (Olkiluoto). The reference waters and conditions were chosen according to the water-types. The considered reference conditions incorporated both the near- and far-field, and both oxidizing and reducing conditions were considered. In the reference conditions, the changes in solubilities were also estimated as caused by possible variations in the pH, carbonate content and redox conditions. Uranium, which is the main component of spent fuel is dealt with in a separate report presenting the solubility of uranium and spent fuel dissolution. In this work the solubilities of all the other elements of concern (Am, Cu, Nb, Np, Pa, Pd, Pu, Ra, Se, Sn, Tc, Zr, Cm, Ni, Sr, Th, C, Cl, Cs, Fe, Ho, I, and Sm) in the safety assessment are considered. Some discussion on the corrosion of the spent fuel canister is also presented. For the estimation of solubilities of the elements in question, literature data was collected that mainly comprised experimentally measured concentrations. The sources used were spent fuel experiments, concentrations measured in solubility measurements, natural concentrations and concentrations from natural analogue sites (especially Palmottu and Hyrkkoelae in Finland) as well as the concentrations measured at the Finnish investigation sites

  1. Solubility database for TILA-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuorinen, U.; Carlsson, T.; Kulmala, S.; Hakanen, M.

    1998-11-01

    The safety assessment of spent fuel disposal requires solubility values for several elements estimated in Finnish disposal conditions. In Finland four sites (Haestholmen, Kivetty, Olkiluoto and Romuvaara) are investigated for the disposal of spent fuel. Haestholmen and OLkiluoto are onshore sites, while Kivetty and Romuvaara are inland sites. Based on groundwater analysis and classification according to salinity at the planned disposal depth mainly fresh groundwater is encountered at Kivetty and Romuvaara, while brackish and saline water-types are met at Haestholmen and Olkiluoto. Very saline, almost brine-type water (∼70 g/l) has been found in the deepest parts of the investigated bedrock at one of the sites (Olkiluoto). The reference waters and conditions were chosen according to the water-types. The considered reference conditions incorporated both the near- and far-field, and both oxidizing and reducing conditions were considered. In the reference conditions, the changes in solubilities were also estimated as caused by possible variations in the pH, carbonate content and redox conditions. Uranium, which is the main component of spent fuel is dealt with in a separate report presenting the solubility of uranium and spent fuel dissolution. In this work the solubilities of all the other elements of concern (Am, Cu, Nb, Np, Pa, Pd, Pu, Ra, Se, Sn, Tc, Zr, Cm, Ni, Sr, Th, C, Cl, Cs, Fe, Ho, I, and Sm) in the safety assessment are considered. Some discussion on the corrosion of the spent fuel canister is also presented. For the estimation of solubilities of the elements in question, literature data was collected that mainly comprised experimentally measured concentrations. The sources used were spent fuel experiments, concentrations measured in solubility measurements, natural concentrations and concentrations from natural analogue sites (especially Palmottu and Hyrkkoelae in Finland) as well as the concentrations measured at the Finnish investigation sites. The

  2. Effect of surface roughness and surface modification of indium tin oxide electrode on its potential response to tryptophan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Md. Zaved Hossain; Nakanishi, Takuya; Kuroiwa, Shigeki; Hoshi, Yoichi; Osaka, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We examine factors affecting potential response of ITO electrode to tryptophan. → Surface roughness of ITO electrode affects the stability of its rest potential. → Surface modification is effective for ITO electrode with a certain roughness. → Optimum values of work function exist for potential response of ITO to tryptophan. - Abstract: The effect of surface modification of indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode on its potential response to tryptophan was investigated for ITO substrates with different surface roughness. It was found that a small difference in surface roughness, between ∼1 and ∼2 nm of R a evaluated by atomic force microscopy, affects the rest potential of ITO electrode in the electrolyte. A slight difference in In:Sn ratio at the near surface of the ITO substrates, measured by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectrometry and Auger electron spectroscopy is remarkable, and considered to relate with surface roughness. Interestingly, successive modification of the ITO surface with aminopropylsilane and disuccinimidyl suberate, of which essentiality to the potential response to indole compounds we previously reported, improved the stability of the rest potential and enabled the electrodes to respond to tryptophan in case of specimens with R a values ranging between ∼2 and ∼3 nm but not for those with R a of ∼1 nm. It was suggested that there are optimum values of effective work function of ITO for specific potential response to tryptophan, which can be obtained by the successive modification of ITO surface.

  3. Meal Pattern of Male Rats Maintained on Amino Acid Supplemented Diets: The Effect of Tryptophan, Lysine, Arginine, Proline and Threonine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghad Ayaso

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The macronutrient composition of the diet has been shown to affect food intake, with proteins having distinct effects. The present study investigated the effect of diet supplementation with individual amino acids (tryptophan, lysine, arginine, proline and threonine on meal pattern among male rats. Meal pattern and body weight were monitored for two weeks. Proline and threonine had minimal effects on meal pattern, while the most pronounced changes were observed in the tryptophan group. Both tryptophan and lysine decreased overall food intake, which was translated into a reduction in body weight. The reduced food intake of the tryptophan group was associated with an increase in meal size, intermeal intervals (IMI and meal time and a decrease in meal number. The decrease in the food intake of the lysine group was associated with a reduction in both IMI and meal number, and this was accompanied by an increase in meal time. Arginine increased meal number, while decreasing IMI. Proline and threonine had a minimal effect on meal pattern. Lysine seems to increase satiety, and arginine seems to decrease it, while tryptophan seems to increase satiety and decrease satiation. Accordingly, changes in meal patterns are associated with the type of amino acid added to the diet.

  4. Correlation between breakfast tryptophan content and morning-evening in Japanese infants and students aged 0-15 yrs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Tetsuo; Hirotani, Masaaki; Maeda, Mari; Nomura, Hiromi; Takeuchi, Hitomi

    2007-03-01

    Tryptophan can be metabolized via 5-hydroxytryptamine=serotonin to melatonin by a series of 4 enzymes in pineal body. Lack of serotonin in body fluid in the brain during daytime can lead to several psychiatric disorders, while shortage of plasma-melatonin at night can be related to sleep disorders. The Morning-Evening (M-E) questionnaire and the original questionnaire including questions on sleep habits, mental symptoms, and contents of meals were administered to 1055 infants aged 0-6 yrs, 751 students attending an elementary school, and 473 students attending junior high school in Kochi City (33 degrees N). The index of tryptophan taken at breakfast (Trp-Index) was calculated as tryptophan amount per one meal based on the tryptophan included in each 100 g of the foods and a standard amount of food per one meal. A significant positive-correlation between M-E scores and Trp-Index was not shown by relatively older students, aged 9-15 yrs (Pearson's test, r=0.044-0.123, p=0.071-0.505), whereas a significant positive correlation was shown by infants and young elementary school students aged 0-8 yrs (r=0.180, 0.258, phigh quality of sleep, and indirectly good mental health, presumably, through the metabolism of tryptophan to serotonin in daytime and further to melatonin at night.

  5. Effects of Tranilast on the Urinary Excretion of Kynurenic and Quinolinic Acid under Conditions of L Tryptophan Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowland R. Noakes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of morphea and other cutaneous sclerosing disorders remain poorly understood. Although they are considered to be autoimmune disorders, abnormal tryptophan metabolism may be involved. Current therapy is directed to supressing the autoimmune response. Demonstration of a therapeutic response to manipulation of the kynurenine pathway would both support a role for abnormal tryptophan metabolism and offer additional targets for therapy. Tranilast is a 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid derivative known to target the kynurenine pathway. The aim of this study was to see if tranilast lowered the urinary excretion of the kynurenine metabolites kynurenic and quinolinic acid under condition of L tryptophan loading in a volunteer. Mean baseline value for kynurenic acid and quinolinic acid were 1.1 and 2.1 mmol/mol creatinine, respectively. This rose to 5.6 and 3.8 mmol/mol creatinine respectively under conditions of L tryptophan loading 2 grams daily. Adding 1 g of tranilast daily lowered the values to 2.0 and 2.9 mmol/mol creatinine, respectively. These data suggest that tranilast acts as a competitive inhibitor of either indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO, tryptophan 2, 3 di-oxygenase (TDO or both. As it involved only 1 subject, the results may not be representative of the larger population and must be considered preliminary.

  6. Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment Induced Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0163 TITLE: Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment Induced Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer ...Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Feng Yang, Ph.D. 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER E-Mail: fyang@bcm.edu...W81XWH-13-1-0163 " Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment Induced Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer " Introduction AR signaling

  7. Aerobic glycolysis and high level of lactate in cancer metabolism and microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Jiang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic abnormalities is a hallmark of cancer. About 100 years ago, Nobel laureate Otto Heinrich Warburg first described high rate of glycolysis in cancer cells. Recently more and more novel opinions about cancer metabolism supplement to this hypothesis, consist of glucose uptake, lactic acid generation and secretion, acidification of the microenvironment and cancer immune evasion. Here we briefly review metabolic pathways generating lactate, and discuss the function of higher lactic acid in cancer microenvironments.

  8. Tumor Microenvironment Gene Signature as a Prognostic Classifier and Therapeutic Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0107 TITLE: Tumor Microenvironment Gene Signature as a Prognostic Classifier and Therapeutic Target PRINCIPAL...AND SUBTITLE Tumor Microenvironment Gene Signature as a 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0107 Prognostic Classifier and Therapeutic Target 5b...gene signature that correlates with poor survival in ovarian cancer patients. We are refining this gene signature to develop biomarkers for the

  9. Immune Microenvironment in Colorectal Cancer: A New Hallmark to Change Old Paradigms

    OpenAIRE

    de la Cruz-Merino, Luis; Henao Carrasco, Fernando; Vicente Baz, David; Nogales Fernández, Esteban; Reina Zoilo, Juan José; Codes Manuel de Villena, Manuel; Pulido, Enrique Grande

    2011-01-01

    Impact of immune microenvironment in prognosis of solid tumors has been extensively studied in the last few years. Specifically in colorectal carcinoma, increased knowledge of the immune events around these tumors and their relation with clinical outcomes have led to consider immune microenvironment as one of the most important prognostic factors in this disease. In this review we will summarize and update the current knowledge with respect to this intriguing and complex new hallmark of cance...

  10. Breast cancer by proxy: can the microenvironment be both the cause and consequence?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J

    2009-01-01

    development because of the dramatic loss or aberration of basement membrane (BM) and myoepithelial cells and the gain of peritumoral myofibroblasts. We suggest that the microenvironment, defined here as all components of the mammary gland other than luminal and/or tumor epithelial cells, might be instrumental...... in maintaining organ integrity and in promoting, and at times even initiating, breast cancer development. As such, the tumor microenvironment and its constituents, alone or in combination, might serve as promising targets for therapy....

  11. Alpha-tryptophan synthase of Isatis tinctoria: gene cloning and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvini, M; Boccardi, T M; Sani, E; Bernardi, R; Tozzi, S; Pugliesi, C; Durante, M

    2008-07-01

    Indole producing reaction is a crux in the regulation of metabolite flow through the pathways and the coordination of primary and secondary product biosynthesis in plants. Indole is yielded transiently from indole-3-glycerol phosphate and immediately condensed with serine to give tryptophan, by the enzyme tryptophan synthase (TS). There is evidence that plant TS, like the bacterial complex, functions as an alpha beta heteromer. In few species, e.g. maize, are known enzymes, related with the TS alpha-subunit (TSA), able to catalyse reaction producing indole, which is free to enter the secondary metabolite pathways. In this contest, we searched for TSA and TSA related genes in Isatis tinctoria, a species producing the natural blue dye indigo. The It-TSA cDNA and the full-length exons/introns genomic region were isolated. The phylogenetic analysis indicates that It-TSA is more closely related to Arabidopsis thaliana At-T14E10.210 TSA (95.7% identity at the amino acid level) with respect to A. thaliana At-T10P11.11 TSA1-like (63%), Zea mays indole-3-glycerol phosphate lyase (54%), Z. mays TSA (53%), and Z. mays indole synthase (50%). The It-TSA cDNA was also able to complement an Escherichia coli trpA mutant. To examine the involvement of It-TSA in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolism compounds, It-TSA expression was tested in seedling grown under different light conditions. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed an increase in the steady-state level of It-TSA mRNA, paralleled by an increase of indigo and its precursor isatan B. Our results appear to indicate an involvement for It-TSA in indigo precursor synthesis and/or tryptophan biosynthesis.

  12. Neopterin, kynurenine and tryptophan as new biomarkers for early detection of rectal anastomotic leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, Tomas; Orhalmi, Julius; Sotona, Otakar; Krcmova, Lenka Kujovska; Javorska, Lenka; Dolejs, Josef; Paral, Jiri

    2018-03-01

    At present, there are no strong predictors, nor a useful scoring system, that clearly identifies patients at risk for anastomotic leakage. This study aimed to investigate a new method that assesses this risk by monitoring levels of neopterin, tryptophan, and kynurenine, in bodily fluids. This prospective study included patients who underwent elective rectal resection for carcinoma. The basic condition for inclusion was rectal anastomosis using the double-stapling technique. Preoperative levels of neopterin, tryptophan, kynurenine, and their ratios, were assessed with blood and urine samples. These levels were then monitored for 6 postoperative days in venous blood, urine, and abdominal drainage fluid. A total of 42 patients were enrolled in the study. Thirty-six patients underwent a laparoscopic resection and 6 patients had an open procedure. No differences were found among neopterin, tryptophan, and kynurenine serum levels. However, the groups were observed to have significant differences in the urinary neopterin/creatinine ratio: the preoperative neopterin/creatinine ratio was 139.5 μmol/mol in the group with leakage, vs 114.8 μmol/mol in the group without complications, p = 0.037. The same results were observed during the postoperative period, p = 0.012. Additionally, the group with complications had a higher mean value of neopterin in drainage fluid, p = 0.048. Our study demonstrated that high preoperative levels of urinary neopterin could be interpreted as a risk for anastomotic leakage. Moreover, pathological levels of neopterin in urine and abdominal drainage fluid could be useful for early identification of anastomotic leakage during the postoperative period prior to its clinical development.

  13. The Role of Amino Acid Permeases and Tryptophan Biosynthesis in Cryptococcus neoformans Survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Daniel Santos Fernandes

    Full Text Available Metabolic diversity is an important factor during microbial adaptation to different environments. Among metabolic processes, amino acid biosynthesis has been demonstrated to be relevant for survival for many microbial pathogens, whereas the association between pathogenesis and amino acid uptake and recycling are less well-established. Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen with many habitats. As a result, it faces frequent metabolic shifts and challenges during its life cycle. Here we studied the C. neoformans tryptophan biosynthetic pathway and found that the pathway is essential. RNAi indicated that interruptions in the biosynthetic pathway render strains inviable. However, auxotroph complementation can be partially achieved by tryptophan uptake when a non preferred nitrogen source and lower growth temperature are applied, suggesting that amino acid permeases may be the target of nitrogen catabolism repression (NCR. We used bioinformatics to search for amino acid permeases in the C. neoformans and found eight potential global permeases (AAP1 to AAP8. The transcriptional profile of them revealed that they are subjected to regulatory mechanisms which are known to respond to nutritional status in other fungi, such as (i quality of nitrogen (Nitrogen Catabolism Repression, NCR and carbon sources (Carbon Catabolism Repression, CCR, (ii amino acid availability in the extracellular environment (SPS-sensing and (iii nutritional deprivation (Global Amino Acid Control, GAAC. This study shows that C. neoformans has fewer amino acid permeases than other model yeasts, and that these proteins may be subjected to complex regulatory mechanisms. Our data suggest that the C. neoformans tryptophan biosynthetic pathway is an excellent pharmacological target. Furthermore, inhibitors of this pathway cause Cryptococcus growth arrest in vitro.

  14. Cysteine and tryptophan anomalies found when scanning all the binding sites in the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iván, Gábor; Szabadka, Zoltán; Grolmusz, Vince

    2010-01-01

    The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is one of the richest sources of structural biological information in the World. It started to exist as the computer-readable depository of crystallographic data complementing printed papers. The proper interpretation of the content of the individual files in the PDB still needs the detailed information found in the citing publication. An advanced graph theoretical method is presented here for automatically repairing, re-organising and re-structuring PDB data yielding the identification of all the protein-ligand complexes and all the binding sites in the PDB. As an application, we identified strong cysteine and tryptophan irregularities in the data.

  15. Gold-catalyzed direct alkynylation of tryptophan in peptides using TIPS-EBX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergely L. Tolnai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The selective functionalization of peptides containing only natural amino acids is important for the modification of biomolecules. In particular, the installation of an alkyne as a useful handle for bioconjugation is highly attractive, but the use of a carbon linker is usually required. Herein, we report the gold-catalyzed direct alkynylation of tryptophan in peptides using the hypervalent iodine reagent TIPS-EBX (1-[(triisopropylsilylethynyl]-1,2-benziodoxol-3(1H-one. The reaction proceeded in 50–78% yield under mild conditions and could be applied to peptides containing other nucleophilic and aromatic amino acids, such as serine, phenylalanine or tyrosine.

  16. Converging evidence for central 5-HT effects in acute tryptophan depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crockett, Molly; Clark, Luke; Roiser, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    the validity of ATD.2 Although we agree that ATD's effects on 5-HT activity at the molecular level need further clarification, van Donkelaar et al.2 goes too far in challenging whether ATD exerts its effects through serotonergic mechanisms. There is strong evidence that ATD reduces brain 5-HT and disrupts......Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD), a dietary technique for manipulating brain serotonin (5-HT) function, has advanced our understanding of 5-HT mechanisms in the etiology and treatment of depression and other affective disorders.1 A recent review article in Molecular Psychiatry questioned...

  17. Involvement of tryptophan hydroxylase 2 gene polymorphisms in susceptibility to tic disorder in Chinese Han population

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Ping; Li, Erzhen; Wang, Jianhua; Cui, Xiaodai; Wang, Liwen

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH2) is a potential candidate gene for screening tic disorder (TD). Methods A case–control study was performed to examine the association between the TPH2 gene and TD. The Sequenom® Mass ARRAY iPLEX GOLD System was used to genotype two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the TPH2 gene in 149 TD children and in 125 normal controls. Results For rs4565946, individuals with the TT genotype showed a significantly higher risk of TD than those wit...

  18. Introduction of a unique tryptophan residue into various positions of Bacillus licheniformis DnaK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo-En; Lin, Min-Guan; Lo, Huei-Fen; Wang, Tzu-Fan; Chi, Meng-Chun; Lin, Long-Liu

    2013-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis together with biochemical and biophysical techniques were used to probe effects of single-tryptophan-incorporated mutations on a bacterial molecular chaperone, Bacillus licheniformis DnaK (BlDnaK). Specifically, five phenylalanine residues (Phe(120), Phe(174), Phe(186), Phe(378) and Phe(396)) of BlDnaK were individually replaced by single tryptophans, thus creating site-specific probes for the fluorescence analysis of the protein. The steady-state ATPase activity for BlDnaK, F120W, F174W, F186W, F378W, and F396W was determined to be 76.01, 52.82, 25.32, 53.31, 58.84, and 47.53 nmol Pi/min/mg, respectively. Complementation test revealed that the single mutation at codons 120, 186, and 378 of the dnaK gene still allowed an Escherichia coli dnaK756-Ts strain to grow at a stringent temperature of 44°C. Simultaneous addition of co-chaperones and NR-peptide did not synergistically stimulate the ATPase activity of F174W and F396W, and these two proteins were unable to assist the refolding of GdnHCl-denatured luciferase. The heat-induced denaturation of all variants could be fitted adequately to a three-state model, in agreement with the observation for the wild-type protein. By CD spectral analysis, GdnHCl-induced unfolding transition for BlDnaK was 1.51 M corresponding to ΔG(N-U) of 1.69 kcal/mol; however, the transitions for mutant proteins were 1.07-1.55 M equivalent to ΔG(N-U) of 0.94-2.93 kcal/mol. The emission maximum of single-tryptophan-incorporated variants was in the range of 333.2-335.8 nm. Acrylamide quenching analysis showed that the mutant proteins had a dynamic quenching constant of 3.0-4.2 M(-1). Taken together, these results suggest that the molecular properties of BlDnaK have been significantly changed upon the individual replacement of selected phenylalanine residues by tryptophan. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiation impairs perineural invasion by modulating the nerve microenvironment.

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    Richard L Bakst

    Full Text Available Perineural invasion (PNI by cancer cells is an ominous clinical event that is associated with increased local recurrence and poor prognosis. Although radiation therapy (RT may be delivered along the course of an invaded nerve, the mechanisms through which radiation may potentially control PNI remain undefined.An in vitro co-culture system of dorsal root ganglia (DRG and pancreatic cancer cells was used as a model of PNI. An in vivo murine sciatic nerve model was used to study how RT to nerve or cancer affects nerve invasion by cancer.Cancer cell invasion of the DRG was partially dependent on DRG secretion of glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF. A single 4 Gy dose of radiation to the DRG alone, cultured with non-radiated cancer cells, significantly inhibited PNI and was associated with decreased GDNF secretion but intact DRG viability. Radiation of cancer cells alone, co-cultured with non-radiated nerves, inhibited PNI through predominantly compromised cancer cell viability. In a murine model of PNI, a single 8 Gy dose of radiation to the sciatic nerve prior to implantation of non-radiated cancer cells resulted in decreased GDNF expression, decreased PNI by imaging and histology, and preservation of sciatic nerve motor function.Radiation may impair PNI through not only direct effects on cancer cell viability, but also an independent interruption of paracrine mechanisms underlying PNI. RT modulation of the nerve microenvironment may decrease PNI, and hold significant therapeutic implications for RT dosing and field design for patients with cancers exhibiting PNI.

  20. Adipose, Bone, and Myeloma: Contributions from the Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Michelle M; Fairfield, Heather; Falank, Carolyne; Reagan, Michaela R

    2017-05-01

    Researchers globally are working towards finding a cure for multiple myeloma (MM), a destructive blood cancer diagnosed yearly in ~750,000 people worldwide (Podar et al. in Expert Opin Emerg Drugs 14:99-127, 2009). Although MM targets multiple organ systems, it is the devastating skeletal destruction experienced by over 90 % of patients that often most severely impacts patient morbidity, pain, and quality of life. Preventing bone disease is therefore a priority in MM treatment, and understanding how and why myeloma cells target the bone marrow (BM) is fundamental to this process. This review focuses on a key area of MM research: the contributions of the bone microenvironment to disease origins, progression, and drug resistance. We describe some of the key cell types in the BM niche: osteoclasts, osteoblasts, osteocytes, adipocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells. We then focus on how these key cellular players are, or could be, regulating a range of disease-related processes spanning MM growth, drug resistance, and bone disease (including osteolysis, fracture, and hypercalcemia). We summarize the literature regarding MM-bone cell and MM-adipocyte relationships and subsequent phenotypic changes or adaptations in MM cells, with the aim of providing a deeper understanding of how myeloma cells grow in the skeleton to cause bone destruction. We identify avenues and therapies that intervene in these networks to stop tumor growth and/or induce bone regeneration. Overall, we aim to illustrate how novel therapeutic target molecules, proteins, and cellular mediators may offer new avenues to attack this disease while reviewing currently utilized therapies.

  1. WE-E-BRE-12: Tumor Microenvironment Dynamics Following Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, D; Niles, D; Adamson, E; Torres, A; Kissick, M; Eliceiri, K; Kimple, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This work aims to understand the radiation-induced interplay between tumor oxygenation and metabolic activity. These dynamics can potentially serve as biomarkers in assessing treatment response allowing for patient-specific adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Using patient-derived xenografts of head and neck cancer we assessed tumor oxygenation via fiber-optic probe monitored hemoglobin saturation and Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) MRI. Measurements were taken before and after a 10 Gy dose of radiation. Changes in metabolic activity were measured via Fluorescence Lifetime IMaging (FLIM) with the appropriate controls following a 10 Gy dose of radiation. FLIM can non-invasively monitor changes in fluorescence in response to the microenvironment including being able to detect free and bound states of the intrinsically fluorescent metabolite NADH (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide). With this information FLIM can accurately quantify the metabolic state of cells that have been radiated. To model the observed changes, a two-compartment, source-sink simulation relating hemoglobin saturation and metabolic activity was performed using MATLAB. Results: Hemoglobin saturation as measured by interstitial probe and BOLD-MRI decreased by 30% within 15 minutes following radiation. FLIM demonstrated a decrease in the mean fluorescence lifetime of NADH by 100 ps following 10 Gy indicating a shift towards glycolytic pathways. Simulation of radiation-induced alterations in tumor oxygenation demonstrated that these changes can be the result of changes in either vasculature or metabolic activity. Conclusion: Radiation induces significant changes in hemoglobin saturation and metabolic activity. These alterations occur on time scales approximately the duration of common radiation treatments. Further understanding these dynamics has important implications with regard to improvement of therapy and biomarkers of treatment response

  2. Development and characterization of a microfluidic model of the tumour microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuso, Jose M; Virumbrales-Muñoz, María; Lacueva, Alodia; Lanuza, Pilar M; Checa-Chavarria, Elisa; Botella, Pablo; Fernández, Eduardo; Doblare, Manuel; Allison, Simon J; Phillips, Roger M; Pardo, Julián; Fernandez, Luis J; Ochoa, Ignacio

    2016-10-31

    The physical microenvironment of tumours is characterized by heterotypic cell interactions and physiological gradients of nutrients, waste products and oxygen. This tumour microenvironment has a major impact on the biology of cancer cells and their response to chemotherapeutic agents. Despite this, most in vitro cancer research still relies primarily on cells grown in 2D and in isolation in nutrient- and oxygen-rich conditions. Here, a microfluidic device is presented that is easy to use and enables modelling and study of the tumour microenvironment in real-time. The versatility of this microfluidic platform allows for different aspects of the microenvironment to be monitored and dissected. This is exemplified here by real-time profiling of oxygen and glucose concentrations inside the device as well as effects on cell proliferation and growth, ROS generation and apoptosis. Heterotypic cell interactions were also studied. The device provides a live 'window' into the microenvironment and could be used to study cancer cells for which it is difficult to generate tumour spheroids. Another major application of the device is the study of effects of the microenvironment on cellular drug responses. Some data is presented for this indicating the device's potential to enable more physiological in vitro drug screening.

  3. Optimization of the tumor microenvironment and nanomedicine properties simultaneously to improve tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Shi, Wei; Jiang, Ting; Wang, Lanting; Mei, Heng; Lu, Heng; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing

    2016-09-20

    Effective delivery of nanomedicines to tumor tissues depends on both the tumor microenvironment and nanomedicine properties. Accordingly, tumor microenvironment modification or advanced design of nanomedicine was emerging to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumors. However, few studies have emphasized the necessity to optimize the tumor microenvironment and nanomedicine properties simultaneously to improve tumor treatment. In the present study, imatinib mesylate (IMA) was used to normalize the tumor microenvironment including platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β expression inhibition, tumor vessel normalization, and tumor perfusion improvement as demonstrated by immunofluorescence staining. In addition, the effect of tumor microenvironment normalization on tumor delivery of nanomedicines with different sizes was carefully investigated. It was shown that IMA treatment significantly reduced the accumulation of nanoparticles (NPs) around 110 nm but enhanced the accumulation of micelles around 23 nm by in vivo fluorescence imaging experiment. Furthermore, IMA treatment limited the distribution of NPs inside tumors but increased that of micelles with a more homogeneous pattern. Finally, the anti-tumor efficacy study displayed that IMA pretreatment could significantly increase the therapeutic effects of paclitaxel-loaded micelles. All-together, a new strategy to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumor was provided by optimizing both nanomedicine size and the tumor microenvironment simultaneously, and it will have great potential in clinics for tumor treatment.

  4. Porcine spermatogonial stem cells self-renew effectively in a three dimensional culture microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Eun; Park, Min Hee; Kim, Min Seong; Park, Yeo Reum; Yun, Jung Im; Cheong, Hee Tae; Kim, Minseok; Choi, Jung Hoon; Lee, Eunsong; Lee, Seung Tae

    2017-12-01

    Generally, self-renewal of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) is maintained in vivo in a three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment consisting of the seminiferous tubule basement membrane, indicating the importance of the 3D microenvironment for in vitro culture of SSCs. Here, we report a 3D culture microenvironment that effectively maintains porcine SSC self-renewal during culture. Porcine SSCs were cultured in an agarose-based 3D hydrogel and in 2D culture plates either with or without feeder cells. Subsequently, the effects of 3D culture on the maintenance of undifferentiated SSCs were identified by analyzing cell colony formation and morphology, AP activity, and transcriptional and translational regulation of self-renewal-related genes and the effects on proliferation by analyzing cell viability and single cell-derived colony number. The 3D culture microenvironment constructed using a 0.2% (w/v) agarose-based 3D hydrogel showed the strongest maintenance of porcine SSC self-renewal and induced significant improvements in proliferation compared with 2D culture microenvironments. These results demonstrate that self-renewal of porcine SSCs can be maintained more effectively in a 3D than in a 2D culture microenvironment. Moreover, this will play a significant role in developing novel culture systems for SSCs derived from diverse species in the future, which will contribute to SSC-related research. © 2017 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  5. Solubility limits on radionuclide dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1984-12-31

    This paper examines the effects of solubility in limiting dissolution rates of a number of important radionuclides from spent fuel and high-level waste. Two simple dissolution models were used for calculations that would be characteristics of a Yucca Mountain repository. A saturation-limited dissolution model, in which the water flowing through the repository is assumed to be saturated with each waste element, is very conservative in that it overestimates dissolution rates. A diffusion-limited dissolution model, in which element-dissolution rates are limited by diffusion of waste elements into water flowing past the waste, is more realistic, but it is subject to some uncertainty at this time. Dissolution rates of some elements (Pu, Am, Sn, Th, Zr, Sm) are always limited by solubility. Dissolution rates of other elements (Cs, Tc, Np, Sr, C, I) are never solubility limited; their release would be limited by dissolution of the bulk waste form. Still other elements (U, Cm, Ni, Ra) show solubility-limited dissolution under some conditions. 9 references, 3 tables.

  6. Solubility of Nd in brine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalili, F.I.; Symeopoulos, V.; Chen, J.F.; Choppin, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    The solubility of Nd(III) has been measured at 23±3 C in a synthetic brine at pcH 6.4, 8.4, 10.4 and 12.4. The brine consisted predominantly of (Na+K)Cl and MgCl 2 with an ionic strength of 7.8 M (9.4 m) a solid compound of Nd(III) at each pcH was assigned from X-ray diffraction patterns. The log values of the experimental solubilities decrease fomr -3 at pcH 6.4 to -5.8 at pcH 8.4; at pcH 10.4 and 12.4 the solubility was below the detection limit of -7.5. The experimental solubility does not follow closely the variation with pcH estimated from modeling of the species in solution in equilibrium with the Nd solid using S.I.T. (orig.)

  7. Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence in the Detection and Analysis of Proteins: A Focus on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar B. T. Ghisaidoobe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available F resonance energy transfer (FRET occurs when the distance between a donor fluorophore and an acceptor is within 10 nm, and its application often necessitates fluorescent labeling of biological targets. However, covalent modification of biomolecules can inadvertently give rise to conformational and/or functional changes. This review describes the application of intrinsic protein fluorescence, predominantly derived from tryptophan (\\(\\uplambda_{\\textsc{ex}}\\sim\\ nm, \\(\\uplambda_{\\textsc{em}}\\sim\\ 350 nm, in protein-related research and mainly focuses on label-free FRET techniques. In terms of wavelength and intensity, tryptophan fluorescence is strongly influenced by its (or the proteinlocal environment, which, in addition to fluorescence quenching, has been applied to study protein conformational changes. Intrinsic F resonance energy transfer (iFRET, a recently developed technique, utilizes the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan in conjunction with target-specific fluorescent probes as FRET donors and acceptors, respectively, for real time detection of native proteins.

  8. Effects of L-tryptophan, Fructan, and Casein on Reducing Ammonia, Hydrogen Sulfide, and Skatole in Fermented Swine Manure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. K. Sheng

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of daily dietary Bacillus subtilis (Bs, and adding L-tryptophan, fructan, or casein to fecal fermentation broths were investigated as means to reduce the production of noxious gas during manure fermentation caused by ammonia, hydrogen sulfide (H2S, and 3-methylindole (skatole. Eighty swine (50.0±0.5 kg were equally apportioned to an experimental group given Bs in daily feed, or a control group without Bs. After 6 weeks, fresh manure was collected from both groups for fermentation studies using a 3×3 orthogonal array, in which tryptophan, casein, and fructan were added at various concentrations. After fermentation, the ammonia, H2S, L-tryptophan, skatole, and microflora were measured. In both groups, L-tryptophan was the principle additive increasing skatole production, with significant correlation (r = 0.9992. L-tryptophan had no effect on the production of ammonia, H2S, or skatole in animals fed Bs. In both groups, fructan was the principle additive that reduced H2S production (r = 0.9981. Fructan and Bs significantly interacted in H2S production (p = 0.014. Casein was the principle additive affecting the concentration of ammonia, only in the control group. Casein and Bs significantly interacted in ammonia production (p = 0.039. The predominant bacteria were Bacillus spp. CWBI B1434 (26% in the control group, and Streptococcus alactolyticus AF201899 (36% in the experimental group. In summary, daily dietary Bs reduced ammonia production during fecal fermentation. Lessening L-tryptophan and increasing fructan in the fermentation broth reduced skatole and H2S.

  9. Altered tryptophan and alanine transport in fibroblasts from boys with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vumma Ravi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The catecholaminergic and serotonergic neurotransmitter systems are implicated in the pathophysiology of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. The amino acid tyrosine is the precursor for synthesis of the catecholamines dopamine and norepinephrine, while tryptophan is the precursor of serotonin. A disturbed transport of tyrosine, as well as other amino acids, has been found in a number of other psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and autism, when using the fibroblast cell model. Hence, the aim of this study was to explore whether children with ADHD may have disturbed amino acid transport. Methods Fibroblast cells were cultured from skin biopsies obtained from 14 boys diagnosed with ADHD and from 13 matching boys without a diagnosis of a developmental disorder. Transport of the amino acids tyrosine, tryptophan and alanine across the cell membrane was measured by the cluster tray method. The kinetic parameters, maximal transport capacity (Vmax and affinity constant (Km were determined. Any difference between the two groups was analyzed by Student's unpaired t-test or the Mann Whitney U test. Results The ADHD group had significantly decreased Vmax (p = 0.039 and Km (increased affinity (p = 0.010 of tryptophan transport in comparison to controls. They also had a significantly higher Vmaxof alanine transport (p = 0.031, but the Km of alanine transport did not differ significantly. There were no significant differences in any of the kinetic parameters regarding tyrosine transport in fibroblasts for the ADHD group. Conclusions Tryptophan uses the same transport systems in both fibroblasts and at the blood brain barrier (BBB. Hence, a decreased transport capacity of tryptophan implies that less tryptophan is being transported across the BBB in the ADHD group. This could lead to deficient serotonin access in the brain that might cause disturbances in both the serotonergic and the catecholaminergic

  10. Tryptophan, thiamine and indole-3-acetic acid exchange between Chlorella sorokiniana and the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Oskar A; Gomez-Anduro, Gracia; Bashan, Yoav; de-Bashan, Luz E

    2016-06-01

    During synthetic mutualistic interactions between the microalga Chlorella sorokiniana and the plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Azospirillum brasilense, mutual exchange of resources involved in producing and releasing the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) by the bacterium, using tryptophan and thiamine released by the microalga, were measured. Although increased activities of tryptophan synthase in C. sorokiniana and indole pyruvate decarboxylase (IPDC) in A. brasilense were observed, we could not detect tryptophan or IAA in the culture medium when both organisms were co-immobilized. This indicates that no extra tryptophan or IAA is produced, apart from the quantities required to sustain the interaction. Over-expression of the ipdC gene occurs at different incubation times: after 48 h, when A. brasilense was immobilized alone and grown in exudates of C. sorokiniana and at 96 h, when A. brasilense was co-immobilized with the microalga. When A. brasilense was cultured in exudates of C. sorokiniana, increased expression of the ipdC gene, corresponding increase in activity of IPDC encoded by the ipdC gene, and increase in IAA production were measured during the first 48 h of incubation. IAA production and release by A. brasilense was found only when tryptophan and thiamine were present in a synthetic growth medium (SGM). The absence of thiamine in SGM yielded no detectable IAA. In summary, this study demonstrates that C. sorokiniana can exude sufficient tryptophan and thiamine to allow IAA production by a PGPB during their interaction. Thiamine is essential for IAA production by A. brasilense and these three metabolites are part of a communication between the two microorganisms. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Role of quaternary structure in muscle creatine kinase stability: tryptophan 210 is important for dimer cohesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perraut, C; Clottes, E; Leydier, C; Vial, C; Marcillat, O

    1998-07-01

    A mutant of the dimeric rabbit muscle creatine kinase (MM-CK) in which tryptophan 210 was replaced has been studied to assess the role of this residue in dimer cohesion and the importance of the dimeric state for the native enzyme stability. Wild-type protein equilibrium unfolding induced by guanidine hydrochloride occurs through intermediate states with formation of a molten globule and a premolten globule. Unlike the wild-type enzyme, the mutant inactivates at lower denaturant concentration and the loss of enzymatic activity is accompanied by the dissociation of the dimer into two apparently compact monomers. However, the Stokes radius of the monomer increases with denaturant concentration as determined by size exclusion chromatography, indicating that, upon monomerization, the protein structure is destabilized. Binding of 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonate shows that the dissociated monomer exposes hydrophobic patches at its surface, suggesting that it could be a molten globule. At higher denaturant concentrations, both wild-type and mutant follow similar denaturation pathways with formation of a premolten globule around 1.5-M guanidine, indicating that tryptophan 210 does not contribute to a large extent to the monomer conformational stability, which may be ensured in the dimeric state through quaternary interactions.

  12. Effects of Ultrasound, Tryptophan and Proline on embryogenesis and regeneration of grape (Vitis vinifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Farokhzad

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetic improvement of Grape is limited by traditional methods. An effective regeneration system for tissues culture of transgenic adult plants could facilitate genetic modification of them. So it is necessary to develop and improve embryogenesis and regeneration systems in plants. Accordingly the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of ultrasound (0 (as control, 60, 120 and 240 second, tryptophan (0 (as control, 50,100, 200 µM and proline content (0 (as control, 50, 100 and 200 µM on grape stem internodes explants in Kodori cultivar. This project was performed in factorial experiment (two factors in the basis of completely randomized design with three replications at tissue culture laboratory of Shahed University of Tehran. Results showed that both ultrasound and two explained amino acids had significant effects on studied characteristics such as callus frequency, callus length and width, fresh weight, embryo numbers in each callus and their germination percentage. Generally, using 100 µM tryptophan and proline coincide with 120 second ultrasound had highest positive effects on the most studied characteristics.

  13. Lack of tryptophan hydroxylase-1 in mice results in gait abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suidan, Georgette L; Duerschmied, Daniel; Dillon, Gregory M; Vanderhorst, Veronique; Hampton, Thomas G; Wong, Siu Ling; Voorhees, Jaymie R; Wagner, Denisa D

    2013-01-01

    The role of peripheral serotonin in nervous system development is poorly understood. Tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (TPH1) is expressed by non-neuronal cells including enterochromaffin cells of the gut, mast cells and the pineal gland and is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of peripheral serotonin. Serotonin released into circulation is taken up by platelets via the serotonin transporter and stored in dense granules. It has been previously reported that mouse embryos removed from Tph1-deficient mothers present abnormal nervous system morphology. The goal of this study was to assess whether Tph1-deficiency results in behavioral abnormalities. We did not find any differences between Tph1-deficient and wild-type mice in general motor behavior as tested by rotarod, grip-strength test, open field and beam walk. However, here we report that Tph1 (-/-) mice display altered gait dynamics and deficits in rearing behavior compared to wild-type (WT) suggesting that tryptophan hydroxylase-1 expression has an impact on the nervous system.

  14. IDO chronic immune activation and tryptophan metabolic pathway: A potential pathophysiological link between depression and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves Filho, Adriano José Maia; Lima, Camila Nayane Carvalho; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes; de Lucena, David Freitas; Maes, Michael; Macedo, Danielle

    2018-01-03

    Obesity and depression are among the most pressing health problems in the contemporary world. Obesity and depression share a bidirectional relationship, whereby each condition increases the risk of the other. By inference, shared pathways may underpin the comorbidity between obesity and depression. Activation of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) is a key factor in the pathophysiology of depression. CMI cytokines, including IFN-γ, TNFα and IL-1β, induce the catabolism of tryptophan (TRY) by stimulating indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) resulting in the synthesis of kynurenine (KYN) and other tryptophan catabolites (TRYCATs). In the CNS, TRYCATs have been related to oxidative damage, inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, cytotoxicity, excitotoxicity, neurotoxicity and lowered neuroplasticity. The pathophysiology of obesity is also associated with a state of aberrant inflammation that activates aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), a pathway involved in the detection of intracellular or environmental changes as well as with increases in the production of TRYCATs, being KYN an agonists of AHR. Both AHR and TRYCATS are involved in obesity and related metabolic disorders. These changes in the TRYCAT pathway may contribute to the onset of neuropsychiatric symptoms in obesity. This paper reviews the role of immune activation, IDO stimulation and increased TRYCAT production in the pathophysiology of depression and obesity. Here we suggest that increased synthesis of detrimental TRYCATs is implicated in comorbid obesity and depression and is a new drug target to treat both diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. MUTANT STRAIN of Bacillus subtilis IFBG MC-1 WITH INCREASED TRYPTOPHAN SYNTHESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Tkachenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Scientific research of essential amino acids biotechnology is directed both to create optimum conditions for producer’s cultivation and economically viable raw materials selection for these technologies, so as breeding the more productive microorganisms strains capable of extracellular producing amino acids. For successful microbial synthesis it is necessary to have an excellent crop’s metabolism knowledge and ensure that the composition of growth medium have no repressing substances. Bacterial cultures from «Collection microorganism’s stains and plants line for food and agriculture biotechnology» from Institute of Food Biotechnology and Genomics of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine have been studied. Tryptophan producer Bacillus subtilis have been selected, which accumulated the greatest amount of this amino acid in the cultivation liquid. The optimal culture producer conditions were selected. Using selection methods, namely mutagenesis with UV irradiation and sequential stepwise selection, mutant strain Bacillus subtilis IFBG MC-1 were obtained which produced nearly 50% more tryptophan (13.9 g/l than the parent strain.

  16. Non-invasive tryptophan fluorescence measurements as a novel method of grading cataract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erichsen, Jesper Høiberg; Mensah, Aurore; Kessel, Line

    2017-01-01

    . All cataracts were age-related. Lens material from 16 eyes of 14 patients was included in the study. Cataracts were preoperatively graded in categories 1, 2 and 3. No lenses were category 4. For nuclear cataracts mean values of F-factor were 52.9 (SD 12.2), 61.7 (SD 5.3) and 75.7 (SD 8.9......) for categories 1, 2 and 3 respectively. Linear regression on F-factor as a function of preoperative grading category showed increasing values of F-factor with increasing preoperative grading category, R2 = 0.515. Our experiment showed that preoperative optical grading of cataracts by Scheimpflug imaging may......Development of non-invasive treatments for cataract calls for a sensitive diagnostic assay. We conducted a study to test whether the ratio of folded tryptophan to non-tryptophan fluorescence emission (F-factor) may be used for grading cataracts in human lenses. The F-factor was measured...

  17. Bright ambient light conditions reduce the effect of tryptophan depletion in healthy females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrancesco, Michaela; Niederstätter, Harald; Parson, Walther; Kemmler, Georg; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Marksteiner, Josef; Deisenhammer, Eberhard A

    2013-11-30

    Tryptophan depletion (TD) is an established method to influence the serotonergic system and mood. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of TD under different ambient light conditions, measured through serotonin-associated plasma levels and a visual analog scale (VAS), on healthy females. Thirty-eight healthy female s-allele carriers of the serotonin transporter promoter gene (5-HTTLPR) were administered a TD under dim light conditions (75 lx). A sub-group of 8 participants repeated the procedure randomized in two additional light conditions (585 lx and 1530 lx respectively). Prior to, and 5h following administration of TD, various variables (serotonin-associated plasma levels, VAS) were measured. Due to not normal distributed data, non-parametric statistical tests were used. Overall analysis showed a significant mood lowering effect of TD. Moreover, TD decreased all measured serotonin-associated plasma levels significantly. Significant differences in varying light conditions were found for the VAS and plasma tryptophan, with the greatest effect of TD in the 75 lx condition. Results of our study showed an influence of even slight differences in ambient light intensity on the effect of TD concerning mood as well as on the serotonergic system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) inhibition ameliorates neurodegeneration by modulation of kynurenine pathway metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breda, Carlo; Sathyasaikumar, Korrapati V; Sograte Idrissi, Shama; Notarangelo, Francesca M; Estranero, Jasper G; Moore, Gareth G L; Green, Edward W; Kyriacou, Charalambos P; Schwarcz, Robert; Giorgini, Flaviano

    2016-05-10

    Metabolites of the kynurenine pathway (KP) of tryptophan (TRP) degradation have been closely linked to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders. Recent work has highlighted the therapeutic potential of inhibiting two critical regulatory enzymes in this pathway-kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO) and tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO). Much evidence indicates that the efficacy of KMO inhibition arises from normalizing an imbalance between neurotoxic [3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK); quinolinic acid (QUIN)] and neuroprotective [kynurenic acid (KYNA)] KP metabolites. However, it is not clear if TDO inhibition is protective via a similar mechanism or if this is instead due to increased levels of TRP-the substrate of TDO. Here, we find that increased levels of KYNA relative to 3-HK are likely central to the protection conferred by TDO inhibition in a fruit fly model of Huntington's disease and that TRP treatment strongly reduces neurodegeneration by shifting KP flux toward KYNA synthesis. In fly models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, we provide genetic evidence that inhibition of TDO or KMO improves locomotor performance and ameliorates shortened life span, as well as reducing neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's model flies. Critically, we find that treatment with a chemical TDO inhibitor is robustly protective in these models. Consequently, our work strongly supports targeting of the KP as a potential treatment strategy for several major neurodegenerative disorders and suggests that alterations in the levels of neuroactive KP metabolites could underlie several therapeutic benefits.

  19. Optimization of Photosensitized Tryptophan Oxidation in the Presence of Dimegin-Polyvinylpyrrolidone-Chitosan Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovieva, Anna B; Kardumian, Valeria V; Aksenova, Nadezhda A; Belovolova, Lyudmila V; Glushkov, Mikhail V; Bezrukov, Evgeny A; Sukhanov, Roman B; Kotova, Svetlana L; Timashev, Peter S

    2018-05-23

    By the example of a model process of tryptophan photooxidation in the aqueous medium in the presence of a three-component photosensitizing complex (porphyrin photosensitizer-polyvinylpyrrolidone- chitosan, PPS-PVP-CT) in the temperature range of 20-40 °С, we have demonstrated a possibility of modification of such a process by selecting different molar ratios of the components in the reaction mixture. The actual objective of this selection is the formation of a certain PPS-PVP-CT composition in which PVP macromolecules would coordinate with PPS molecules and at the same time practically block the complex binding of PPS molecules with chitosan macromolecules. Such blocking allows utilization of the bactericidal properties of chitosan to a greater extent, since chitosan is known to depress the PPS photosensitizing activity in PPS-PVP-CT complexes when using those in photodynamic therapy (PDT). The optimal composition of photosensitizing complexes appears to be dependent on the temperature at which the PDT sessions are performed. We have analyzed the correlations of the effective rate constants of tryptophan photooxidation with the photophysical characteristics of the formed complexes.

  20. CARD9 impacts colitis by altering gut microbiota metabolism of tryptophan into aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, Bruno; Richard, Mathias L; Leducq, Valentin; Pham, Hang-Phuong; Michel, Marie-Laure; Da Costa, Gregory; Bridonneau, Chantal; Jegou, Sarah; Hoffmann, Thomas W; Natividad, Jane M; Brot, Loic; Taleb, Soraya; Couturier-Maillard, Aurélie; Nion-Larmurier, Isabelle; Merabtene, Fatiha; Seksik, Philippe; Bourrier, Anne; Cosnes, Jacques; Ryffel, Bernhard; Beaugerie, Laurent; Launay, Jean-Marie; Langella, Philippe; Xavier, Ramnik J; Sokol, Harry

    2016-06-01

    Complex interactions between the host and the gut microbiota govern intestinal homeostasis but remain poorly understood. Here we reveal a relationship between gut microbiota and caspase recruitment domain family member 9 (CARD9), a susceptibility gene for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that functions in the immune response against microorganisms. CARD9 promotes recovery from colitis by promoting interleukin (IL)-22 production, and Card9(-/-) mice are more susceptible to colitis. The microbiota is altered in Card9(-/-) mice, and transfer of the microbiota from Card9(-/-) to wild-type, germ-free recipients increases their susceptibility to colitis. The microbiota from Card9(-/-) mice fails to metabolize tryptophan into metabolites that act as aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) ligands. Intestinal inflammation is attenuated after inoculation of mice with three Lactobacillus strains capable of metabolizing tryptophan or by treatment with an AHR agonist. Reduced production of AHR ligands is also observed in the microbiota from individuals with IBD, particularly in those with CARD9 risk alleles associated with IBD. Our findings reveal that host genes affect the composition and function of the gut microbiota, altering the production of microbial metabolites and intestinal inflammation.

  1. Au nanoparticles on tryptophan-functionalized graphene for sensitive detection of dopamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian, Qianwen; Luo, Ai; An, Zhenzhen; Li, Zhuang; Guo, Yongyang; Zhang, Dongxia; Xue, Zhonghua; Zhou, Xibin; Lu, Xiaoquan

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A novel AuNPs/Trp-GR composite was fabricated by directly electrochemical deposition. • The composite exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity towards DA. • The proposed method was applied to real samples. - Abstract: A novel and uniform gold nanoparticles/tryptophan-functionalized graphene nanocomposite (AuNPs/Trp-GR) has been successfully fabricated by directly electrochemical depositing gold onto the surface of tryptophan-functionalized graphene (Trp-GR). The nanostructure of AuNPs/Trp-GR was characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). It was demonstrated that Au nanoparticles were well dispersed on the surface of Trp-GR which might attribute to the more binding sites provided by Trp-GR for the formation of Au nanoparticles. The electrocatalytic activity of the AuNPs/Trp-GR towards the dopamine (DA) was systematically investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Under optimum conditions, a wide and valuable linear range (0.5–411 μM), a low detection limit (0.056 μM, S/N = 3), good repeatability and stability were obtained for the determination of DA. Furthermore, the modified electrode was successfully applied to real samples analysis

  2. Au nanoparticles on tryptophan-functionalized graphene for sensitive detection of dopamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Qianwen; Luo, Ai; An, Zhenzhen; Li, Zhuang; Guo, Yongyang; Zhang, Dongxia [Key Laboratory of Bioelectrochemistry & Environmental Analysis of Gansu Province, College of Geography and Environment Science, Northwest Normal University, 730070, Lanzhou (China); Xue, Zhonghua [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, 730070, Lanzhou (China); Zhou, Xibin, E-mail: zhouxb@nwnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Bioelectrochemistry & Environmental Analysis of Gansu Province, College of Geography and Environment Science, Northwest Normal University, 730070, Lanzhou (China); Lu, Xiaoquan, E-mail: Luxq@nwnu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, 730070, Lanzhou (China)

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A novel AuNPs/Trp-GR composite was fabricated by directly electrochemical deposition. • The composite exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity towards DA. • The proposed method was applied to real samples. - Abstract: A novel and uniform gold nanoparticles/tryptophan-functionalized graphene nanocomposite (AuNPs/Trp-GR) has been successfully fabricated by directly electrochemical depositing gold onto the surface of tryptophan-functionalized graphene (Trp-GR). The nanostructure of AuNPs/Trp-GR was characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). It was demonstrated that Au nanoparticles were well dispersed on the surface of Trp-GR which might attribute to the more binding sites provided by Trp-GR for the formation of Au nanoparticles. The electrocatalytic activity of the AuNPs/Trp-GR towards the dopamine (DA) was systematically investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Under optimum conditions, a wide and valuable linear range (0.5–411 μM), a low detection limit (0.056 μM, S/N = 3), good repeatability and stability were obtained for the determination of DA. Furthermore, the modified electrode was successfully applied to real samples analysis.

  3. The role of oligomerization and cooperative regulation in protein function: the case of tryptophan synthase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Qaiser Fatmi

    Full Text Available The oligomerization/co-localization of protein complexes and their cooperative regulation in protein function is a key feature in many biological systems. The synergistic regulation in different subunits often enhances the functional properties of the multi-enzyme complex. The present study used molecular dynamics and Brownian dynamics simulations to study the effects of allostery, oligomerization and intermediate channeling on enhancing the protein function of tryptophan synthase (TRPS. TRPS uses a set of α/β-dimeric units to catalyze the last two steps of L-tryptophan biosynthesis, and the rate is remarkably slower in the isolated monomers. Our work shows that without their binding partner, the isolated monomers are stable and more rigid. The substrates can form fairly stable interactions with the protein in both forms when the protein reaches the final ligand-bound conformations. Our simulations also revealed that the α/β-dimeric unit stabilizes the substrate-protein conformation in the ligand binding process, which lowers the conformation transition barrier and helps the protein conformations shift from an open/inactive form to a closed/active form. Brownian dynamics simulations with a coarse-grained model illustrate how protein conformations affect substrate channeling. The results highlight the complex roles of protein oligomerization and the fine balance between rigidity and dynamics in protein function.

  4. Tryptophan: the key to boosting brain serotonin synthesis in depressive illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Abdulla A-B

    2013-10-01

    It has been proposed that focusing on brain serotonin synthesis can advance antidepressant drug development. Biochemical aspects of the serotonin deficiency in major depressive disorder (MDD) are discussed here in detail. The deficiency is caused by a decreased availability of the serotonin precursor tryptophan (Trp) to the brain. This decrease is caused by accelerated Trp degradation, most likely induced by enhancement of the hepatic enzyme tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) by glucocorticoids and/or catecholamines. Induction of the extrahepatic Trp-degrading enzyme indolylamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by the modest immune activation in MDD has not been demonstrated and, if it occurs, is unlikely to make a significant contribution. Liver TDO appears to be a target of many antidepressants, the mood stabilisers Li(+) and carbamazepine and possibly other adjuncts to antidepressant therapy. The poor, variable and modest antidepressant efficacy of Trp is due to accelerated hepatic Trp degradation, and efficacy can be restored or enhanced by combination with antidepressants or other existing or new TDO inhibitors. Enhancing Trp availability to the brain is thus the key to normalisation of serotonin synthesis and could form the basis for future antidepressant drug development.

  5. Interfacial Tryptophan Residues: A Role for the Cation-{pi} Effect?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Frederic Nicolas Rønne; Jensen, Morten Ø.; Helix Nielsen, Claus

    2005-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins are characterized by having a preference for aromatic residues, e.g., tryptophan (W), at the interface between the lipid bilayer core and the aqueous phase. The reason for this is not clear, but it seems that the preference is related to a complex interplay between steric...... between the nitrogen moiety of lipid molecule headgroups and the pi-electron distribution of gramicidin (gA) tryptophan residues (W(9), W(11), W(13), and W(15)) using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of gA embedded in two hydrated lipid bilayers composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylethanolamine....... Our criteria for cation-pi interactions are based on distance and angular requirements, and the results from our model suggest that cation-pi interactions are relevant for W(PE)(11), W(PE)(13), W(PE)(15), and, to some extent, W(PC)(11) and W(PC)(13). In our model, W(9)does not seem to engage in cation...

  6. EFFECT OF DIETARY TRYPTOPHAN LEVELS ON GROWTH PERFORMANCE OF BROILER CHICKENS REARED IN THE HOT SEASON UNDER TROPICAL ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Opoola

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of dietary levels of tryptophan on growth performance of broiler chickens reared under tropical environment. At the starter phase, a total of two hundred and eighty five day old mixed sex Arbor Acres broiler chicks were randomly allotted to five dietary treatments with three replicates each having nineteen (19 chicks. At the finisher phase, two hundred and seventy broilers were also allotted to five dietary treatments with three replicates each having 18 broilers per replicate. The dietary tryptophan levels at the starter phase were 0.15, 0.19, 0.23, 0.27 and 0.31% respectively while the diets for the finisher phase contained 0.13, 0.17, 0.21, 0.25 and 0.29% dietary tryptophan respectively. All other nutrient levels were constant. The experiment was conducted at 0 to 28d (starter phase and 33 to 56d (finisher phase. Growth performance traits including weight gain, feed intake and feed conversion ratio were recorded at the end of each week. The results for the starter phase showed that chicks fed diet containing 0.23%, 0.27% and 0.31% dietary tryptophan had similar results in term of the weight gain, average daily weight gain, feed intake and average daily feed intake. For the finisher phase, the birds fed 0.21%, 0.25% and 0.29% tryptophan diets also had similar results in terms of final weight, weight gain, feed intake and average daily feed intake. Our results suggest that supplemental tryptophan was sufficient to have significant (P<0.05 effect on broiler performance. However, polynomial regression analysis reveals that the optimum performances were reached at 0.24% and 0.21% dietary tryptophan for the starter and finisher phases respectively. Therefore, it can be concluded that dietary tryptophan requirements during the hot season for the starter and finisher phases were 0.24% and 0.21%, respectively.

  7. Highly specific ''sensing'' of tryptophan by a luminescent europium(III) complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubenrauch, Jan A.; Mevissen, Christian; Schulte, Marie F.; Bochenek, Steffen; Albrecht, Markus [RWTH Univ. Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Organische Chemie; Subramanian, Palani S. [Central Salt and Marine Chemicals, Research Institute (CSRI), Gujarat (India)

    2016-07-01

    The europium(III) complex 1-Cl{sub 3} (S,S-2,2{sup '}-(((1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-diyl)bis(methanylylidene))bis (azanylyliden e))bis(3-methylbutanamide)europiumtrichloride) undergoes, only in the presence of the amino acid tryptophan, a change of emission at 615 nm. In the presence of few equivalents of tryptophan, emission of the europium complex is enhanced while it disappears upon addition of large amounts. This behavior can be assigned to displacement of the sensitizing phenanthroline ligand of 1-Cl{sub 2} x Trp in the latter case.

  8. Solubility of sparingly soluble drug derivatives of anthranilic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domańska, Urszula; Pobudkowska, Aneta; Pelczarska, Aleksandra

    2011-03-24

    This work is a continuation of our systematic study of the solubility of pharmaceuticals (Pharms). All substances here are derivatives of anthranilic acid, and have an anti-inflammatory direction of action (niflumic acid, flufenamic acid, and diclofenac sodium). The basic thermal properties of pure Pharms, i.e., melting and glass-transition temperatures as well as the enthalpy of melting, have been measured with the differential scanning microcalorimetry technique (DSC). Molar volumes have been calculated with the Barton group contribution method. The equilibrium mole fraction solubilities of three pharmaceuticals were measured in a range of temperatures from 285 to 355 K in three important solvents for Pharm investigations: water, ethanol, and 1-octanol using a dynamic method and spectroscopic UV-vis method. The experimental solubility data have been correlated by means of the commonly known G(E) equation: the NRTL, with the assumption that the systems studied here have revealed simple eutectic mixtures. pK(a) precise measurement values have been investigated with the Bates-Schwarzenbach spectrophotometric method. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  9. Effect of micro-environment modification and polymer type on the in-vitro dissolution behavior and in-vivo performance of amorphous solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weiwei; Pan, Baoliang

    2017-06-15

    This study investigates the effects of micro-environment modification and polymer type on the in-vitro dissolution behavior and in-vivo performance of micro-environment pH modifying solid dispersions (pH M -SD) for the poorly water-soluble model drug Toltrazuril (TOL). Various pH M -SDs were prepared using Ca(OH) 2 as a pH-modifier in hydrophilic polymers, including polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG6000), polyvinylpyrrolidone k30 (PVPk30) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC). Based on the results of physicochemical characterizations and in-vitro dissolution testing, the representative ternary (Ca(OH) 2 :TOL:PEG6000/HPMC/PVPk30=1:8:24, w/w/w) and binary (TOL:PVPk30=1:3, w/w) solid dispersions were selected and optimized to perform in-vivo pharmacokinetic study. The micro-environment pH modification improved the in-vitro water-solubility and in-vivo bioavailability of parent drug TOL. Furthermore, the addition of alkalizers not only enhanced the release and absorption of prototype drug, but also promoted the generation of active metabolites, including toltrazuril sulfoxide (TOLSO) and toltrazuril sulfone (TOLSO 2 ). The in-vitro dissolution profiles and in-vivo absorption, distribution and metabolism behaviors of the pH M -SDs varied with polymer type. Moreover, in-vivo bioavailability of three active pharmaceutical ingredients increased with an increase in in-vitro dissolution rates of the drug from the pH M -SDs prepared with various polymers. Therefore, a non-sink in-vitro dissolution method can be used to predict the in-vivo performance of pH M -SDs formulated with various polymers with trend consistency. In-vitro and in-vivo screening procedures revealed that the pH M -SD composed of Ca(OH) 2 , TOL and PVPk30 at a weight ratio of 1:8:24, of which the safety was adequately proved via histopathological examination, may be a promising candidate for providing better clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Near-field solubility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomason, H.P.; Williams, S.J.

    1992-02-01

    Experimental determinations of the solubilities of americium, plutonium, neptunium, protactinium, thorium, radium, lead, tin, palladium and zirconium are reported. These elements have radioactive isotopes of concern in assessments of radioactive waste disposal. All measurements were made under the highly alkaline conditions typical of the near field of a radioactive waste repository which uses cementitious materials for many of the immobilisation matrices, the backfill and the engineered structures. Low redox potentials, typical of those resulting from the corrosion of iron and steel, were simulated for those elements having more than one accessible oxidation state. The dissolved concentrations of the elements were defined using ultrafiltration. In addition, the corrosion of iron and stainless steel was shown to generate low redox potentials in solution and the solubility of iron(II) at high pH was measured and found to be sufficient for it to act as a redox buffer with respect to neptunium and plutonium. (author)

  11. A Study on Solubilization of Poorly Soluble Drugs by Cyclodextrins and Micelles: Complexation and Binding Characteristics of Sulfamethoxazole and Trimethoprim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinem Göktürk

    2012-01-01

    > α-CD. With taking into consideration of solubilization capacity of SDS micelles, it has been found that the solubility enhancement of TMP is much higher than that of SMX in the presence of SDS micelles. The binding constants of SMX and TMP obtained from the Benesi-Hildebrand equation are also confirmed by the estimated surface properties of SDS, employing the surface tension measurements. In order to elucidate the solubilization characteristics the surface tension measurements were also performed for nonionic surfactant Triton X-100. Polarity of the microenvironment and probable location of SMX and TMP were also discussed in the presence of various organic solvents.

  12. Metabolic Availability of the Limiting Amino Acids Lysine and Tryptophan in Cooked White African Cornmeal Assessed in Healthy Young Men Using the Indicator Amino Acid Oxidation Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, Mahroukh; Elango, Rajavel; Ball, Ronald O; Pencharz, Paul B; Courtney-Martin, Glenda

    2018-06-01

    Maize is a staple food in many regions of the world, particularly in Africa and Latin America. However, maize protein is limiting in the indispensable amino acids lysine and tryptophan, making its protein of poor quality. The main objective of this study was to determine the protein quality of white African cornmeal by determining the metabolic availability (MA) of lysine and tryptophan. To determine the MA of lysine, 4 amounts of l-lysine (10, 13, 16, and 18 mg · kg-1 · d-1 totaling 28.6%, 37.1%, 45.7%, and 51.4% of the mean lysine requirement of 35 mg · kg-1 · d-1, respectively) were studied in 6 healthy young men in a repeated-measures design. To determine the MA of tryptophan, 4 amounts of l-tryptophan (0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 mg · kg-1 · d-1 totaling 12.5%, 25.0%, 37.5%, and 50.0% of the mean tryptophan requirement of 4 mg · kg-1 · d-1, respectively) were studied in 7 healthy young men in a repeated-measures design. The MAs of lysine and tryptophan were estimated by comparing the indicator amino acid oxidation (IAAO) response with varying intakes of lysine and tryptophan in cooked white cornmeal compared with the IAAO response to l-lysine and l-tryptophan intakes in the reference protein (crystalline amino acid mixture patterned after egg protein) with the use of the slope ratio method. The MAs of lysine and tryptophan from African cooked white cornmeal were 71% and 80%, respectively. Our study provides a robust estimate of the availability of lysine and tryptophan in African white maize to healthy young men. This estimate provides a basis for postproduction fortification or supplementation of maize-based diets. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02402179.

  13. The Solubility Parameters of Ionic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    The Hildebrand’s solubility parameters have been calculated for 18 ionic liquids from the inverse gas chromatography measurements of the activity coefficients at infinite dilution. Retention data were used for the calculation. The solubility parameters are helpful for the prediction of the solubility in the binary solvent mixtures. From the solubility parameters, the standard enthalpies of vaporization of ionic liquids were estimated. PMID:20559495

  14. The Solubility Parameters of Ionic Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Marciniak

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The Hildebrand’s solubility parameters have been calculated for 18 ionic liquids from the inverse gas chromatography measurements of the activity coefficients at infinite dilution. Retention data were used for the calculation. The solubility parameters are helpful for the prediction of the solubility in the binary solvent mixtures. From the solubility parameters, the standard enthalpies of vaporization of ionic liquids were estimated.

  15. Solubility of Carbon in Nanocrystalline -Iron

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Kirchner; Bernd Kieback

    2012-01-01

    A thermodynamic model for nanocrystalline interstitial alloys is presented. The equilibrium solid solubility of carbon in -iron is calculated for given grain size. Inside the strained nanograins local variation of the carbon content is predicted. Due to the nonlinear relation between strain and solubility, the averaged solubility in the grain interior increases with decreasing grain size. The majority of the global solubility enhancement is due to grain boundary enrichment however. Therefor...

  16. Assembly of hydrogel units for 3D microenvironment in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chang Hyun; Kwon, Seyong; Park, Je-Kyun

    2017-12-01

    Construction of three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment become an important issue in recent biological studies due to their biological relevance compared to conventional two-dimensional (2D) microenvironment. Various fabrication techniques have been employed to construct a 3D microenvironment, however, it is difficult to fully satisfy the biological and mechanical properties required for the 3D cell culture system, such as heterogeneous tissue structures generated from the functional differences or diseases. We propose here an assembly method for facile construction of 3D microenvironment in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) channel using hydrogel units. The high-aspect-ratio of hydrogel units was achieved by fabricating these units using a 2D mold. With this approach, 3D heterogeneous hydrogel units were produced and assembled in a PDMS channel by structural hookup. In vivo-like 3D heterogeneous microenvironment in a precisely controllable fluidic system was also demonstrated using a controlled assembly of different types of hydrogel units, which was difficult to obtain from previous methods. By regulating the flow condition, the mechanical stability of the assembled hydrogel units was verified by the flow-induced deformation of hydrogel units. In addition, in vivo-like cell culture environment was demonstrated using an assembly of cell-coated hydrogel units in the fluidic channel. Based on these features, our method expects to provide a beneficial tool for the 3D cell culture module and biomimetic engineering.

  17. Natural product derivative BIO promotes recovery after myocardial infarction via unique modulation of the cardiac microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Sook; Jeong, Hye-yun; Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Woong-Hee; Cho, Haaglim; Um, JungIn; Seo, Youngha; Kang, Wan Seok; Jin, Suk-Won; Kim, Min Chul; Kim, Yong-Chul; Jung, Da-Woon; Williams, Darren R.; Ahn, Youngkeun

    2016-01-01

    The cardiac microenvironment includes cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts and macrophages, which regulate remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). Targeting this microenvironment is a novel therapeutic approach for MI. We found that the natural compound derivative, BIO ((2′Z,3′E)-6-Bromoindirubin-3′-oxime) modulated the cardiac microenvironment to exert a therapeutic effect on MI. Using a series of co-culture studies, BIO induced proliferation in cardiomyocytes and inhibited proliferation in cardiac fibroblasts. BIO produced multiple anti-fibrotic effects in cardiac fibroblasts. In macrophages, BIO inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory factors. Significantly, BIO modulated the molecular crosstalk between cardiac fibroblasts and differentiating macrophages to induce polarization to the anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype. In the optically transparent zebrafish-based heart failure model, BIO induced cardiomyocyte proliferation and completely recovered survival rate. BIO is a known glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitor, but these effects could not be recapitulated using the classical inhibitor, lithium chloride; indicating novel therapeutic effects of BIO. We identified the mechanism of BIO as differential modulation of p27 protein expression and potent induction of anti-inflammatory interleukin-10. In a rat MI model, BIO reduced fibrosis and improved cardiac performance. Histological analysis revealed modulation of the cardiac microenvironment by BIO, with increased presence of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Our results demonstrate that BIO produces unique effects in the cardiac microenvironment to promote recovery post-MI. PMID:27510556

  18. KEY FEATURES OF THE INTRAGRAFT MICROENVIRONMENT THAT DETERMINE LONG-TERM SURVIVAL FOLLOWING TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eBruneau

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we discuss how changes in the intragraft microenvironment serve to promote or sustain the development of chronic allograft rejection. We propose two key elements within the microenvironment that contribute to the rejection process. The first is endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis that serve to create abnormal microvascular blood flow patterns as well as local tissue hypoxia, and precedes endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT. The second is the overexpression of local cytokines and growth factors that serve to sustain inflammation and, in turn, function to promote a leukocyte-induced angiogenesis reaction. Central to both events is overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, which is both pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic, and thus drives progression of the chronic rejection microenvironment. In our discussion, we focus on how inflammation results in angiogenesis and how leukocyte-induced angiogenesis is pathological. We also discuss how VEGF is a master control factor that fosters the development of the chronic rejection microenvironment. Overall, this review provides insight into the intragraft microenvironment as an important paradigm for future direction in the field.

  19. Key Features of the Intragraft Microenvironment that Determine Long-Term Survival Following Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneau, Sarah; Woda, Craig Bryan; Daly, Kevin Patrick; Boneschansker, Leonard; Jain, Namrata Gargee; Kochupurakkal, Nora; Contreras, Alan Gabriel; Seto, Tatsuichiro; Briscoe, David Michael

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we discuss how changes in the intragraft microenvironment serve to promote or sustain the development of chronic allograft rejection. We propose two key elements within the microenvironment that contribute to the rejection process. The first is endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis that serve to create abnormal microvascular blood flow patterns as well as local tissue hypoxia, and precedes endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition. The second is the overexpression of local cytokines and growth factors that serve to sustain inflammation and, in turn, function to promote a leukocyte-induced angiogenesis reaction. Central to both events is overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is both pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic, and thus drives progression of the chronic rejection microenvironment. In our discussion, we focus on how inflammation results in angiogenesis and how leukocyte-induced angiogenesis is pathological. We also discuss how VEGF is a master control factor that fosters the development of the chronic rejection microenvironment. Overall, this review provides insight into the intragraft microenvironment as an important paradigm for future direction in the field. PMID:22566935

  20. 1-Methyl-tryptophan attenuates regulatory T cells differentiation due to the inhibition of estrogen-IDO1-MRC2 axis in endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chunyan; Mei, Jie; Tang, Lingli; Liu, Yukai; Li, Dajin; Li, Mingqing; Zhu, Xiaoyong

    2016-12-01

    Foxp3 + regulatory T (T reg ) cells contribute to the local dysfunctional immune environment in endometriosis, an estrogen-dependent gynecological disease, which affects the function of ectopic endometrial tissue clearance by the immune system. The reason for the high percentage of peritoneal T reg in endometriosis patients is unknown. Here, we show that the proportion of peritoneal T reg cells increases as endometriosis progresses. To determine the probable mechanism, we established a naive T cell-macrophage-endometrial stromal cell (ESC) co-culture system to mimic the peritoneal cavity microenvironment. After adding 1-methyl-tryptophan (1-MT), a specific inhibitor of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO1), to the co-culture system, we found that the differentiation of T reg cells, mainly IL-10 + T reg cells, decreased. Therefore, 1-MT-pretreated ESCs-educated T reg cells performed impaired suppressive function. Moreover, estrogen promoted the differentiation of T reg cells by elevating IDO1 expression in the ectopic lesion. Subsequently, we examined mannose receptor C, type 2 (MRC2), which is an up-stream molecule of IL-10, by bioinformatics analysis and real-time PCR validation. MRC2 expression in ectopic ESCs was notably lower than that in normal ESCs, which further negatively regulated the expression of IDO1 and Ki-67 in ESCs. Furthermore, MRC2 is required for T reg differentiation in the ectopic lesion, especially that for CD4 high T reg . Therefore, MRC2-silenced ESCs-educated T reg manifested a stronger suppressive function in vitro. Consistently, the percentage of T reg increased when MRC2-shRNA was administered in the peritoneal cavity of endometriosis-disease mice model. Besides, 1-MT improved the condition of endometriosis, in terms of reducing the number and weight of total ectopic lesions in vivo. These results indicate that the estrogen-IDO1-MRC2 axis participates in the differentiation and function of T reg and is involved in the development of

  1. Surplus dietary tryptophan reduces plasma cortisol and noradrenaline concentrations and enhances recovery after social stress in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, S.J.; Ruis, M.A.W.; Dekker, R.A.; Diepen, van J.T.M.; Korte, S.M.; Mroz, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Social stress occurs in intensive pig farming due to aggressive behavior. This stress may be reduced at elevated dietary levels of tryptophan (TRP). In this study, we compared the effects of high (13.2%) vs. normal (3.4%) dietary TRP to large neutral amino acid (LNAA) ratios on behavior and stress

  2. Evaluation of acute tryptophan depletion and sham depletion with a gelatin-based collagen peptide protein mixture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenbæk, Dea Siggaard; Einarsdottir, H S; Goregliad-Fjaellingsdal, T

    2016-01-01

    Acute Tryptophan Depletion (ATD) is a dietary method used to modulate central 5-HT to study the effects of temporarily reduced 5-HT synthesis. The aim of this study is to evaluate a novel method of ATD using a gelatin-based collagen peptide (CP) mixture. We administered CP-Trp or CP+Trp mixtures...

  3. Metabolic pathway interruption: CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of tryptophan 2,3-oxygenase in Tribolium castaneum

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Tribolium castaneum vermilion gene encodes tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, a pivotal enzyme in the ommochrome pathway that is responsible for the black eye color. T. castaneum strains with a loss-of-function mutation, vermilion white (vw), lack both the promoter and the first 80% of the vermilion co...

  4. Neural and personality correlates of individual differences related to the effects of acute tryptophan depletion on future reward evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoto, Yoshihiko; Okada, Go; Okamoto, Yasumasa; Kunisato, Yoshihiko; Aoyama, Shiori; Onoda, Keiichi; Munakata, Ayumi; Nomura, Michio; Tanaka, Saori C; Schweighofer, Nicolas; Doya, Kenji; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2012-01-01

    In general, humans tend to discount the value of delayed reward. An increase in the rate of discounting leads to an inability to select a delayed reward over a smaller immediate reward (reward-delay impulsivity). Although deficits in the serotonergic system are implicated in this reward-delay impulsivity, there is individual variation in response to serotonin depletion. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the effects of serotonin depletion on the ability to evaluate future reward are affected by individual personality traits or brain activation. Personality traits were assessed using the NEO-Five Factor Inventory and Temperament and Character Inventory. The central serotonergic levels of 16 healthy volunteers were manipulated by dietary tryptophan depletion. Subjects performed a delayed reward choice task that required the continuous estimation of reward value during functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning. Discounting rates were increased in 9 participants, but were unchanged or decreased in 7 participants in response to tryptophan depletion. Participants whose discounting rate was increased by tryptophan depletion had significantly higher neuroticism and lower self-directedness. Furthermore, tryptophan depletion differentially affected the groups in terms of hemodynamic responses to the value of predicted future reward in the right insula. These results suggest that individuals who have high neuroticism and low self-directedness as personality traits are particularly vulnerable to the effect of low serotonin on future reward evaluation accompanied by altered brain activation patterns. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Tryptophan exposure and accessibility in the chitooligosaccharide-specific phloem exudate lectin from pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima). A fluorescence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narahari, Akkaladevi; Swamy, Musti J

    2009-10-06

    The exposure and accessibility of the tryptophan residues in the chitooligosaccharide-specific pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) phloem exudate lectin (PPL) have been investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy. The emission lambda(max) of native PPL, seen at 338nm was red-shifted to 348nm upon denaturation by 6M Gdn.HCl in the presence of 10mM beta-mercaptoethanol, indicating near complete exposure of the tryptophan residues to the aqueous medium, whereas a blue-shift to 335nm was observed in the presence of saturating concentrations of chitotriose, suggesting that ligand binding leads to a decrease in the solvent exposure of the tryptophan residues. The extent of quenching was maximum with the neutral molecule, acrylamide whereas the ionic species, iodide and Cs(+) led to significantly lower quenching, which could be attributed to the presence of charged amino acid residues in close proximity to some of the tryptophan residues. The Stern-Volmer plot for acrylamide was linear for native PPL and upon ligand binding, but became upward curving upon denaturation, indicating that the quenching occurs via a combination of static and dynamic mechanisms. In time-resolved fluorescence experiments, the decay curves could be best fit to biexponential patterns, for native protein, in the presence of ligand and upon denaturation. In each case both lifetimes systematically decreased with increasing acrylamide concentrations, indicating that quenching occurs predominantly via a dynamic process.

  6. Evening dietary tryptophan improves post-sleep behavioral and brain measures of memory function in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markus, C.R.; Jonkman, L.M.; Lammers, J.H.C.M.; Deutz, N.E.P.

    2006-01-01

    Brain serotonin function has been implicated in the control of sleep and sleep related memory dysfunctions are attributed to deficient brain serotonin activity. Depletion of the serotonin precursor tryptophan reduces brain serotonin function and is found to cause sleep abnormalities and cognitive

  7. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-dependent tryptophan metabolites contribute to tolerance induction during allergen immunotherapy in a mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taher, Yousef A.; Piavaux, Benoit J. A.; Gras, Renee; van Esch, Betty C. A. M.; Hofman, Gerard A.; Bloksma, Nanne; Henricks, Paul A. J.; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.

    Background: The tryptophan-catabolizing enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has been implicated in immune suppression and tolerance induction. Objective: We examined (1) whether IDO activity is required during tolerance induction by allergen immunotherapy or for the subsequent suppressive

  8. Adsorption of the cysteine–tryptophan dipeptide at the Au(110)/liquid interface studied using reflection anisotropy spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morozzo della Rocca, Blasco; Smith, C I; Tesauro, Cinzia

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of a cysteine–tryptophan dipeptide has been monitored at a Au(110)/electrolyte interface using reflection anisotropy spectroscopy. At −0.6 V the dipeptide adsorbed through the formation of Au–S bonds and a link between the NH2 group at the Au surface. As the applied potential...

  9. Peptide-membrane interactions of arginine-tryptophan peptides probed using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring.

    KAUST Repository

    Rydberg, Hanna A

    2014-04-18

    Membrane-active peptides include peptides that can cross cellular membranes and deliver macromolecular cargo as well as peptides that inhibit bacterial growth. Some of these peptides can act as both transporters and antibacterial agents. It is desirable to combine the knowledge from these two different fields of membrane-active peptides into design of new peptides with tailored actions, as transporters of cargo or as antibacterial substances, targeting specific membranes. We have previously shown that the position of the amino acid tryptophan in the peptide sequence of three arginine-tryptophan peptides affects their uptake and intracellular localization in live mammalian cells, as well as their ability to inhibit bacterial growth. Here, we use quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring to assess the induced changes caused by binding of the three peptides to supported model membranes composed of POPC, POPC/POPG, POPC/POPG/cholesterol or POPC/lactosyl PE. Our results indicate that the tryptophan position in the peptide sequence affects the way these peptides interact with the different model membranes and that the presence of cholesterol in particular seems to affect the membrane interaction of the peptide with an even distribution of tryptophans in the peptide sequence. These results give mechanistic insight into the function of these peptides and may aid in the design of membrane-active peptides with specified cellular targets and actions.

  10. Synthesis and biological evaluation of ¹⁸F-labeled fluoropropyl tryptophan analogs as potential PET probes for tumor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiotellis, Aristeidis; Mu, Linjing; Müller, Adrienne; Selivanova, Svetlana V; Keller, Claudia; Schibli, Roger; Krämer, Stefanie D; Ametamey, Simon M

    2013-01-01

    In the search for an efficient, fluorine-18 labeled amino acid based radiotracer for tumor imaging with positron emission tomography (PET), two new tryptophan analogs were synthesized and characterized in vitro and in vivo. Both are tryptophan alkyl-derivatives, namely 2-(3-[(18)F]fluoropropyl)-DL-tryptophan ([(18)F]2-FPTRP) and 5-(3-[(18)F]fluoro-propyl)-DL-tryptophan ([(18)F]5-FPTRP). Standard reference compounds and precursors were prepared by multi step approaches. Radiosynthesis was achieved by no-carrier-added nucleophilic [(18)F]fluorination in 29-34% decay corrected yields with radiochemical purity over 99%. In vitro cell uptake assays showed that both compounds are substrates for amino acid transport and enter small cell lung cancer cells (NCI-H69) most probably almost exclusively via large neutral amino acids transporter(s) (LAT). Small animal PET imaging with xenograft bearing mice revealed high tumor/background ratios for [(18)F]2-FPTRP comparable to the well established tyrosine analog O-(2-[(18)F]fluroethyl)-L-tyrosine ([(18)F]FET). Radiometabolite studies showed no evidence of involvement of a biotransformation step in tumor accumulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Peptide-membrane interactions of arginine-tryptophan peptides probed using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring.

    KAUST Repository

    Rydberg, Hanna A; Kunze, Angelika; Carlsson, Nils; Altgä rde, Noomi; Svedhem, Sofia; Nordé n, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-active peptides include peptides that can cross cellular membranes and deliver macromolecular cargo as well as peptides that inhibit bacterial growth. Some of these peptides can act as both transporters and antibacterial agents. It is desirable to combine the knowledge from these two different fields of membrane-active peptides into design of new peptides with tailored actions, as transporters of cargo or as antibacterial substances, targeting specific membranes. We have previously shown that the position of the amino acid tryptophan in the peptide sequence of three arginine-tryptophan peptides affects their uptake and intracellular localization in live mammalian cells, as well as their ability to inhibit bacterial growth. Here, we use quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring to assess the induced changes caused by binding of the three peptides to supported model membranes composed of POPC, POPC/POPG, POPC/POPG/cholesterol or POPC/lactosyl PE. Our results indicate that the tryptophan position in the peptide sequence affects the way these peptides interact with the different model membranes and that the presence of cholesterol in particular seems to affect the membrane interaction of the peptide with an even distribution of tryptophans in the peptide sequence. These results give mechanistic insight into the function of these peptides and may aid in the design of membrane-active peptides with specified cellular targets and actions.

  12. Preparation and characterization of a novel epoxy based nanocomposite using tryptophan as an eco-friendly curing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motahari, Ahmad; Omrani, Abdollah; Rostami, Abbas Ali; Ehsani, Morteza

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Epoxy cured with tryptophan in the presence of 2,4,5-triphenylimidazole. • Kinetic study on the epoxy nanocomposite using advanced isoconversional method. • Structural study and characterization of nanocomposite using SEM, XRD, AFM and DMTA. - Abstract: In this study, kinetics of the curing reaction between DGEBA epoxy resin and tryptophan as an environmentally friendly curing agent in the presence of 2,4,5-triphenylimidazole was reported. The role of silica nanoparticles (SiNP) in changing the mechanism of the curing reaction was also studied. The optimum molar ratio of DGEBA/tryptophan and the optimum content of SiNP were determined by calorimetry analyses. Kinetic analysis using the advanced isoconversional method revealed that the system undergoes the vitrification. Thermogravimetric analysis demonstrated that addition of SiNP does not improve the thermal stability of the tryptophan based thermosets. Impedance spectroscopy and also the standard four-probe method were performed to investigate the effect of curing agent and SiNP loading level on the electrical properties of the cured epoxy. The structure and morphology of the nanocomposite were studied by X-ray diffraction analysis, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy imaging. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis revealed that the crosslinking density cannot be significantly affected with the addition of SiNP

  13. Site-directed Mutagenesis Switching a Dimethylallyl Tryptophan Synthase to a Specific Tyrosine C3-Prenylating Enzyme*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Aili; Zocher, Georg; Stec, Edyta; Stehle, Thilo; Li, Shu-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The tryptophan prenyltransferases FgaPT2 and 7-DMATS (7-dimethylallyl tryptophan synthase) from Aspergillus fumigatus catalyze C4- and C7-prenylation of the indole ring, respectively. 7-DMATS was found to accept l-tyrosine as substrate as well and converted it to an O-prenylated derivative. An acceptance of l-tyrosine by FgaPT2 was also observed in this study. Interestingly, isolation and structure elucidation revealed the identification of a C3-prenylated l-tyrosine as enzyme product. Molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis led to creation of a mutant FgaPT2_K174F, which showed much higher specificity toward l-tyrosine than l-tryptophan. Its catalytic efficiency toward l-tyrosine was found to be 4.9-fold in comparison with that of non-mutated FgaPT2, whereas the activity toward l-tryptophan was less than 0.4% of that of the wild-type. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on an enzymatic C-prenylation of l-tyrosine as free amino acid and altering the substrate preference of a prenyltransferase by mutagenesis. PMID:25477507

  14. Bioavailability of tryptophan from a single oral dose of a trytophan-enriched peptide mixture in healthy men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, E.J.; Boelsma, E.; Steijns, J.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the bioavailability of tryptophan (Trp) from a Trp-enriched peptide mixture in healthy men. A second objective was to investigate the effect of this Trp-enriched protein hydrolysate on potential parameters of serotonergic activity. serum serotonim melatonin

  15. [Design of an anesthesia and micro-environment information management system in mobile operating room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianwen; Liu, Zhiguo; Zhang, Wenchang; Wu, Qingfu; Tan, Shulin

    2013-08-01

    We have designed a mobile operating room information management system. The system is composed of a client and a server. A client, consisting of a PC, medical equipments, PLC and sensors, provides the acquisition and processing of anesthesia and micro-environment data. A server is a powerful computer that stores the data of the system. The client gathers the medical device data by using the C/S mode, and analyzes the obtained HL7 messages through the class library call. The client collects the micro-environment information with PLC, and finishes the data reading with the OPC technology. Experiment results showed that the designed system could manage the patient anesthesia and micro-environment information well, and improve the efficiency of the doctors' works and the digital level of the mobile operating room.

  16. Breast cancer by proxy: Can the microenvironment be both the cause and consequence?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J

    2008-11-16

    Breast cancer is one of the most clear-cut examples of a solid tumor in which systemic cues play a decisive part in its development. The breast tissue is constantly subjected to changes in hormone levels and modifications in the microenvironment. This scenario is even more striking during tumor development because of the dramatic loss or aberration of basement membrane (BM) and myoepithelial cells and the gain of peritumoral myofibroblasts. We suggest that the microenvironment, defined here as all components of the mammary gland other than luminal and/or tumor epithelial cells, might be instrumental in maintaining organ integrity and in promoting, and at times even initiating, breast cancer development. As such, the tumor microenvironment and its constituents, alone or in combination, might serve as promising targets for therapy.

  17. Radiation-induced mutagenicity and lethality in tryptophan-requiring auxotrophs of escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Rong; Qian Hongwei; Yao Fenying; Gu Shuzhu; Xu Jiaxin; Bi Hekan; Liu Yuying

    1989-01-01

    Mutation and killing caused by X-ray radiation and 60 Co γ-ray radiation were studied in three different tryptophan-requiring auxotrophs (WP2, Wp2A, Cm 891) of Escherichia coli. These testers are sensitive to base pair substitution mutagens. Cm891 carries a R-factor and is more sensitive than WP2 and WP2A to radiation-induced mutation and lethality. The results of the study show that (1) ionizing radiation was mutagenic to E. coli, (2) the order of mutagenic sensitivity among three strains to ionizing radiation was Cm891 > WP2A > WP2, (3) the dose rate of γ-ray influences mutagenicity and lethalty of E. coli strain, (4) the toxicity and mutagenicity of γ-ray were similar to X-ray when Cm891 was tested, however, γ-ray was more toxic and mutagenic than X-ray to WP2A ang WP2

  18. Effect of Tryptophan on the corrosion behavior of low alloy steel in sulfamic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham T.M. Abdel-Fatah

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sulfamic acid is widely used in various industrial acid cleaning applications. In the present work, the inhibition effect of Tryptophan (Tryp on the corrosion of low alloy steel in sulfamic acid solutions at four different temperatures was studied. The investigations involved electrochemical methods (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy; EIS and the new technique electrochemical frequency modulation; EFM as well as gravimetric measurements. The inhibition efficiency and the apparent activation energy have been calculated in the presence and in the absence of Tryp. It is most probable that the inhibition property of Tryp was due to the electrostatic adsorption of the protonated form of Tryp on the steel surface. Adsorption of the inhibitor molecule, onto the steel surface followed the Temkin adsorption isotherm. The thermodynamic parameters of adsorption were determined and discussed. All of the obtained data from the three techniques were in close agreement, which confirmed that EFM technique can be used efficiently for monitoring the corrosion inhibition under the studied conditions.

  19. Estradiol or fluoxetine alters depressive behavior and tryptophan hydroxylase in rat raphe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fu-Zhong; Wu, Yan; Zhang, Wei-Guo; Cai, Yi-Yun; Shi, Shen-Xun

    2010-03-10

    The effects of 17beta-estradiol and fluoxetine on behavior of ovariectomized rats subjected to the forced swimming test and the expression of tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) in dorsal and median raphe were investigated, respectively through time sampling technique of behavior scoring and immunohistochemistry. Both estradiol and fluoxetine increased swimming and decreased immobility in the forced swimming test. The forced swimming stress decreased integrated optical density of TPH-positive regions in dorsal and median raphe. Both estradiol and fluoxetine administration prevented integrated optical density of TPH-positive regions from being decreased by forced swimming stress. These observations suggest that both estradiol and fluoxetine have protective bearing on ovariectomized rats enduring forced swimming stress.

  20. Kinetics of immobilisation and release of tryptophan, riboflavin and peptides from whey protein microbeads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Graham J; Egan, Thelma; Jacquier, Jean Christophe; O'Sullivan, Michael; Dolores O'Riordan, E

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the kinetics of immobilisation and release of riboflavin, amino acids and peptides from whey microbeads. Blank whey microbeads were placed in solutions of the compounds. As the volume of microbeads added to the solution was increased, the uptake of the compounds increased, to a maximum of 95% for the pentapeptide and 56%, 57% and 45% for the dipeptide, riboflavin and tryptophan respectively, however, the rate of uptake remained constant. The rate of uptake increased with increasing molecule hydrophobicity. The opposite was observed in the release studies, the more hydrophobic compounds had lower release rate constants (kr). When whey microbeads are used as sorbents, they show excellent potential to immobilise small hydrophobic molecules and minimise subsequent diffusion, even in high moisture environments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Biocatalytic production of psilocybin and derivatives in tryptophan synthase-enhanced reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blei, Felix; Baldeweg, Florian; Fricke, Janis; Hoffmeister, Dirk

    2018-05-11

    Psilocybin (4-phosphoryloxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine) is the main alkaloid of the fungal genus Psilocybe, the so-called "magic mushrooms". The pharmaceutical interest in this psychotropic natural product as a future medication to treat depression and anxiety is strongly re-emerging. Here, we present an enhanced enzymatic route of psilocybin production by adding TrpB, the tryptophan synthase of the mushroom Psilocybe cubensis, to the reaction. We capitalized on its substrate flexibility and show psilocybin formation from 4-hydroxyindole and L-serine, which are less cost-intensive substrates, compared to the previous method. Further, we show enzymatic production of 7-phosphoryloxytryptamine (isonorbaeocystin), a non-natural congener of the Psilocybe alkaloid norbaeocystin (4-phosphoryloxytryptamine), and of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) via the same in vitro approach. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Role of NAD, Oxidative Stress, and Tryptophan Metabolism in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musthafa Mohamed Essa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a pervasive neuro-developmental disorder characterized by impaired social interaction, reduced/absent verbal and non-verbal communication, and repetitive behavior during early childhood. The etiology of this developmental disorder is poorly understood, and no biomarkers have been identified. Identification of novel biochemical markers related to autism would be advantageous for earlier clinical diagnosis and intervention. Studies suggest that oxidative stress-induced mechanisms and reduced antioxidant defense, mitochondrial dysfunction, and impaired energy metabolism (NAD + , NADH, ATP, pyruvate, and lactate, are major causes of ASD. This review provides renewed insight regarding current autism research related to oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and altered tryptophan metabolism in ASD.

  3. To Cheat or Not To Cheat: Tryptophan Hydroxylase 2 SNP Variants Contribute to Dishonest Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Qiang; Teo, Meijun; Winter, Eyal; Hart, Einav; Chew, Soo H; Ebstein, Richard P

    2016-01-01

    Although, lying (bear false witness) is explicitly prohibited in the Decalogue and a focus of interest in philosophy and theology, more recently the behavioral and neural mechanisms of deception are gaining increasing attention from diverse fields especially economics, psychology, and neuroscience. Despite the considerable role of heredity in explaining individual differences in deceptive behavior, few studies have investigated which specific genes contribute to the heterogeneity of lying behavior across individuals. Also, little is known concerning which specific neurotransmitter pathways underlie deception. Toward addressing these two key questions, we implemented a neurogenetic strategy and modeled deception by an incentivized die-under-cup task in a laboratory setting. The results of this exploratory study provide provisional evidence that SNP variants across the tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) gene, that encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of brain serotonin, contribute to individual differences in deceptive behavior.

  4. To cheat or not to cheat: Tryptophan hydroxylase 2 SNP variants contribute to dishonest behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang eShen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Although lying (bear false witness is explicitly prohibited in the Decalogue and a focus of interest in philosophy and theology, more recently the behavioral and neural mechanisms of deception are gaining increasing attention from diverse fields especially economics, psychology and neuroscience. Despite the considerable role of heredity in explaining individual differences in deceptive behavior, few studies have investigated which specific genes contribute to the heterogeneity of lying behavior across individuals. Also, little is known concerning which specific neurotransmitter pathways underlie deception. Towards addressing these two key questions, we implemented a neurogenetic strategy and modeled deception by an incentivized die-under-cup task in a laboratory setting. The results of this exploratory study provide provisional evidence that SNP variants across the tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2 gene, that encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of brain serotonin, contribute to individual differences in deceptive behavior.

  5. Comparison of radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure levels in different everyday microenvironments in an international context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Sanjay; Adem, Seid M; Struchen, Benjamin; Loughran, Sarah P; Brunjes, Michael E; Arangua, Lisa; Dalvie, Mohamed Aqiel; Croft, Rodney J; Jerrett, Michael; Moskowitz, Joel M; Kuo, Tony; Röösli, Martin

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify RF-EMF exposure applying a tested protocol of RF-EMF exposure measurements using portable devices with a high sampling rate in different microenvironments of Switzerland, Ethiopia, Nepal, South Africa, Australia and the United States of America. We used portable measurement devices for assessing RF-EMF exposure in 94 outdoor microenvironments and 18 public transport vehicles. The measurements were taken either by walking with a backpack with the devices at the height of the head and a distance of 20-30 cm from the body, or driving a car with the devices mounted on its roof, which was 170-180 cm above the ground. The measurements were taken for about 30 min while walking and about 15-20 min while driving in each microenvironment, with a sampling rate of once every 4 s (ExpoM-RF) and 5 s (EME Spy 201). Mean total RF-EMF exposure in various outdoor microenvironments varied between 0.23 V/m (non-central residential area in Switzerland) and 1.85 V/m (university area in Australia), and across modes of public transport between 0.32 V/m (bus in rural area in Switzerland) and 0.86 V/m (Auto rickshaw in urban area in Nepal). For most outdoor areas the major exposure contribution was from mobile phone base stations. Otherwise broadcasting was dominant. Uplink from mobile phone handsets was generally very small, except in Swiss trains and some Swiss buses. This study demonstrates high RF-EMF variability between the 94 selected microenvironments from all over the world. Exposure levels tended to increase with increasing urbanity. In most microenvironments downlink from mobile phone base stations is the most relevant contributor. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Substitution of Active Site Tyrosines with Tryptophan Alters the Free Energy for Nucleotide Flipping by Human Alkyladenine DNA Glycosylase†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendershot, Jenna M.; Wolfe, Abigail E.; O'Brien, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) locates and excises a wide variety of structurally diverse alkylated and oxidized purine lesions from DNA to initiate the base excision repair pathway. Recognition of a base lesion requires flipping of the damaged nucleotide into a relatively open active site pocket between two conserved tyrosine residues, Y127 and Y159. We have mutated each of these amino acids to tryptophan and measured the kinetic effects on the nucleotide flipping and base excision steps. The Y127W and Y159W mutant proteins have robust glycosylase activity toward DNA containing 1,N6-ethenoadenine (εA), within 4-fold of that of the wildtype enzyme, raising the possibility that tryptophan fluorescence could be used to probe the DNA binding and nucleotide flipping steps. Stopped-flow fluorescence was used to compare the time-dependent changes in tryptophan fluorescence and εA fluorescence. For both mutants, the tryptophan fluorescence exhibited two-step binding with essentially identical rate constants as were observed for the εA fluorescence changes. These results provide evidence that AAG forms an initial recognition complex in which the active site pocket is perturbed and the stacking of the damaged base is disrupted. Upon complete nucleotide flipping, there is further quenching of the tryptophan fluorescence with coincident quenching of the εA fluorescence. Although these mutations do not have large effects on the rate constant for excision of εA, there are dramatic effects on the rate constants for nucleotide flipping that result in 40 to 100-fold decreases in the flipping equilibrium relative to wildtype. Most of this effect is due to an increased rate of unflipping, but surprisingly the Y159W mutation causes a 5-fold increase in the rate constant for flipping. The large effect on the equilibrium for nucleotide flipping explains the greater deleterious effects that these mutations have on the glycosylase activity toward base lesions that are in

  7. Certain tryptophan photoproducts are inhibitors of cytochrome P450-dependent mutagenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rannug, U.; Agurell, E.; Cederberg, H.; Rannug, A.

    1992-01-01

    Two photoproducts, derived from UV-irradiation of the amino acid L-tryptophan and with high Ah (TCDD) receptor binding affinity, were tested for genotoxic and antimutagenic effects. The two indolo[3,2-b]carbazole derivatives, with the molecular weights of 284 and 312, respectively, were tested in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain D7 for mitotic gene conversion and reverse mutation and in strain RS112 for sister chromatid conversion and gene conversion. No significant (P > 0.05) genotoxic effects were found in strain D7, while strain RS112 showed a small but significant increase in the frequency of sister chromatid conversions. In Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells the two compounds induced a statistically significant but less than twofold increase in the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE). No mutations were detected when the compounds were tested in Salmonella tphimurium strains TA98 and TA100. However, both 284 and 312 acted as antimutagens on strain TA100+S9 in the presence of benzo(a)pyrene. The decrease in mutagenicity by the most potent compound 284 was 20 revertants/nmol. This effect could be explained by an inhibitory effect on the cytochrome P450-dependent ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity as seen in rat hepatocytes. The two compounds were also tested with hamster cells expressing rat cytochrome P-4501A1. The results support the conclusion that this cytochrome P-450 isozyme is inhibited by the tryptophan photoproducts. Similar results were also seen with two other high affinity Ah receptor ligands the quinazolinocarboline alkaloids rutaecapine and dehydrorutaecarpine. 20 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  8. In situ tryptophan-like fluorometers: assessing turbidity and temperature effects for freshwater applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamis, K; Sorensen, J P R; Bradley, C; Hannah, D M; Lapworth, D J; Stevens, R

    2015-04-01

    Tryptophan-like fluorescence (TLF) is an indicator of human influence on water quality as TLF peaks are associated with the input of labile organic carbon (e.g. sewage or farm waste) and its microbial breakdown. Hence, real-time measurement of TLF could be particularly useful for monitoring water quality at a higher temporal resolution than available hitherto. However, current understanding of TLF quenching/interference is limited for field deployable sensors. We present results from a rigorous test of two commercially available submersible tryptophan fluorometers (ex ∼ 285, em ∼ 350). Temperature quenching and turbidity interference were quantified in the laboratory and compensation algorithms developed. Field trials were then undertaken involving: (i) an extended deployment (28 days) in a small urban stream; and, (ii) depth profiling of an urban multi-level borehole. TLF was inversely related to water temperature (regression slope range: -1.57 to -2.50). Sediment particle size was identified as an important control on the turbidity specific TLF response, with signal amplification apparent 200 NTU for clay particles. Compensation algorithms significantly improved agreement between in situ and laboratory readings for baseflow and storm conditions in the stream. For the groundwater trial, there was an excellent agreement between laboratory and raw in situ TLF; temperature compensation provided only a marginal improvement, and turbidity corrections were unnecessary. These findings highlight the potential utility of real time TLF monitoring for a range of environmental applications (e.g. tracing polluting sources and monitoring groundwater contamination). However, in situations where high/variable suspended sediment loads or rapid changes in temperature are anticipated concurrent monitoring of turbidity and temperature is required and site specific calibration is recommended for long term, surface water monitoring.

  9. Simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid based on tryptophan functionalized graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian, Qianwen; He, Zhifang; He, Qian; Luo, Ai; Yan, Kaiwang; Zhang, Dongxia; Lu, Xiaoquan; Zhou, Xibin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Trp-GR was synthesized by utilizing a facile ultrasonic method. • The material as prepared had well dispersivity in water and better conductivity than pure GR. • Trp-GR/GCE showed excellent potential for the determination of AA, DA and UA. • The proposed method was applied for the analysis of AA, DA and UA in real samples. - Abstract: A new type of tryptophan-functionalized graphene nanocomposite (Trp-GR) was synthesized by utilizing a facile ultrasonic method via π–π conjugate action between graphene (GR) and tryptophan (Trp) molecule. The material as prepared had well dispersivity in water and better conductivity than pure GR. The surface morphology of Trp-GR was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The electrochemical behaviors of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), and uric acid (UA) were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) on the surface of Trp-GR. The separation of the oxidation peak potentials for AA–DA, DA–UA and UA–AA was about 182 mV, 125 mV and 307 mV, which allowed simultaneously determining AA, DA, and UA. Differential pulse voltammetery (DPV) was used for the determination of AA, DA, and UA in their mixture. Under optimum conditions, the linear response ranges for the determination of AA, DA, and UA were 0.2–12.9 mM, 0.5–110 μM, and 10–1000 μM, with the detection limits (S/N = 3) of 10.09 μM, 0.29 μM and 1.24 μM, respectively. Furthermore, the modified electrode was investigated for real sample analysis

  10. Simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid based on tryptophan functionalized graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Qianwen; He, Zhifang; He, Qian; Luo, Ai; Yan, Kaiwang; Zhang, Dongxia [Key Laboratory of Bioelectrochemistry and Environmental Analysis of Gansu Province, College of Geography and Environment Science, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, 730070 (China); Lu, Xiaoquan, E-mail: Luxq@nwnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Bioelectrochemistry and Environmental Analysis of Gansu Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, 730070 (China); Zhou, Xibin, E-mail: zhouxb@nwnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Bioelectrochemistry and Environmental Analysis of Gansu Province, College of Geography and Environment Science, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, 730070 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Trp-GR was synthesized by utilizing a facile ultrasonic method. • The material as prepared had well dispersivity in water and better conductivity than pure GR. • Trp-GR/GCE showed excellent potential for the determination of AA, DA and UA. • The proposed method was applied for the analysis of AA, DA and UA in real samples. - Abstract: A new type of tryptophan-functionalized graphene nanocomposite (Trp-GR) was synthesized by utilizing a facile ultrasonic method via π–π conjugate action between graphene (GR) and tryptophan (Trp) molecule. The material as prepared had well dispersivity in water and better conductivity than pure GR. The surface morphology of Trp-GR was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The electrochemical behaviors of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), and uric acid (UA) were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) on the surface of Trp-GR. The separation of the oxidation peak potentials for AA–DA, DA–UA and UA–AA was about 182 mV, 125 mV and 307 mV, which allowed simultaneously determining AA, DA, and UA. Differential pulse voltammetery (DPV) was used for the determination of AA, DA, and UA in their mixture. Under optimum conditions, the linear response ranges for the determination of AA, DA, and UA were 0.2–12.9 mM, 0.5–110 μM, and 10–1000 μM, with the detection limits (S/N = 3) of 10.09 μM, 0.29 μM and 1.24 μM, respectively. Furthermore, the modified electrode was investigated for real sample analysis.

  11. Ruminal tryptophan-utilizing bacteria degrade ergovaline from tall fescue seed extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, B E; Goodman, J P; Lynn, B C; Flythe, M D; Ji, H; Aiken, G E

    2017-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate degradation of ergovaline in a tall fescue [ (Schreb.) Darbysh.] seed extract by rumen microbiota ex vivo and to identify specific bacteria capable of ergovaline degradation in vitro. Rumen cell suspensions were prepared by harvesting rumen fluid from fistulated wether goats ( = 3), straining, and differential centrifugation. Suspensions were dispensed into anaerobic tubes with added Trypticase with or without extract (∼10 μg kg ergovaline). Suspensions were incubated for 48 h at 39°C. Samples were collected at 0, 24, and 48 h for ergovaline analysis and enumeration of hyper-ammonia producing (HAB) and tryptophan-utilizing bacteria. Ergovaline values were analyzed by repeated measures using the mixed procedure of SAS. Enumeration data were log transformed for statistical analysis. When suspensions were incubated with extract, 11 to 15% of ergovaline disappearance was observed over 48 h ( = 0.02). After 24 h, suspensions with added extract had 10-fold less HAB than controls ( = 0.04), but treatments were similar by 48 h ( = 1.00). However, after 24 h and 48 h, suspensions with extract had 10-fold more tryptophan-utilizing bacteria ( rumen pure cultures ( JB1, B159, HD4, B, F, MD1, SR) were evaluated for the ability to degrade ergovaline in vitro. Pure culture cell suspensions were incubated as described above and samples were taken at 0 and 48 h for ergovaline analysis. Data were analyzed using the ANOVA procedure of SAS. All HAB, including the isolates, tested degraded ergovaline (54 to 75%; bacteria tested did not degrade ergovaline. The results of this study indicate which rumen bacteria may play an important role in ergovaline degradation and that microbiological strategies for controlling their activity could have ramifications for fescue toxicosis and other forms of ergotism in ruminants.

  12. [Study on sweat gland regeneration induced by microenvironment of three-dimensional bioprinting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, B; Xie, J F; Huang, S; Fu, X B

    2017-01-20

    Sweat glands are abundant in the body surface and essential for thermoregulation. Sweat glands fail to conduct self-repair in patients with large area of burn and trauma, and the body temperature of patients increases in hot climate, which may cause shock or even death. Now, co-culture system, reprogramming, and tissue engineering have made progresses in inducing sweat gland regeneration, but the inductive efficiency and duration need to be improved. Cellular microenvironment can regulate cell biological behavior, including cell migration and cell differentiation. This article reviews the studies of establishment of microenvironment in vitro by three-dimensional bioprinting technology to induce sweat gland regeneration.

  13. Positron emission tomographic studies on aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase activity in vivo for L-dopa and 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan in the monkey brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartvig, P; Tedroff, J; Lindner, K J; Bjurling, P; Chang, C W; Laangstroem, B [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden); Tsukada, H [Central Research Lab., Hamamatsu Photonics Shizuoka, Osaka (Japan); Watanabe, Y [Dept. of Neuroscience, Osaka Bioscience Inst., Osaka (Japan)

    1993-01-01

    The regional brain kinetics following 5-hydroxy-L-([beta]-11 C)tryptophan and L-([beta]-11 C)DOPA intravenous injection was measured in twelve Rhesus monkeys using positron emission tomography (PET). The radiolabelled compounds were also injected together with various doses of unlabelled 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan or L-DOPA. The radioactivity accumulated in the striatal region and the rate of increased utilization with time was calculated using a graphical method with back of the brain as a reference region. The rate constants for decarboxylation were 0.0070 [+-] 0.0007 (S. D) and 0.0121 [+-] 0.0010 min[sup -1] for 5-hydroxy-L-([beta]-11 C)tryptophan and L-([beta]-11 C)DOPA, respectively. After concomitant injection with unlabelled 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan, the rate constant of 5-hydroxy-L-([beta]-11 C)tryptophan decreased dose-dependently and a 50 percent reduction was seen with a dose of about 4 mg/kg of unlabelled compound. A decreased utilization rate of L-([beta]-11 C)DOPA was seen only after simultaneous injection of 30 mg/kg of either L-DOPA or 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan. This capacity limitation was most likely interpreted as different affinity of the striatal aromatic amino acid decarboxylase for L-DOPA and 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan, respectively.

  14. Conformational transition of κ-casein in micellar environment: Insight from the tryptophan fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Smruti; Meher, Geetanjali; Chakraborty, Hirak

    2017-11-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are under intense analysis due to their structural flexibility and importance in biological functions. Minuscule modulation in the microenvironment induces significant conformational changes in IDPs, and these non-native conformations of the IDPs often induce aggregation and cause cell death. Changes in the membrane composition often change the microenvironment, which promote conformational change and aggregation of IDPs. κ-Casein, an important milk protein, belongs to the class of IDPs containing net negative charges. In this present work, we have studied the interaction of κ-casein with cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), a positively charged surfactant, utilizing various steady state fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Our results clearly indicate that κ-casein undergoes at least two conformational transitions in presence of various concentrations of CTAB. The intrinsically disordered κ-casein assumes a partially folded conformation at lower concentration of CTAB, which adopts an unstructured conformation at higher concentration of CTAB. The partially folded conformation of κ-casein at a lower CTAB concentration might be induced by the favorable electrostatic interaction between the positively charged surfactant headgroup and net negative charges of the protein, whereas surfactant nature of CTAB is being pronounced at higher concentration of CTAB.

  15. Insights into the role of components of the tumor microenvironment in oral carcinoma call for new therapeutic approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salo, Tuula; Vered, Marilena; Bello, Ibrahim O.; Nyberg, Pia; Bitu, Carolina Cavalcante; Zlotogorski Hurvitz, Ayelet; Dayan, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The research on oral cancer has focused mainly on the cancer cells, their genetic changes and consequent phenotypic modifications. However, it is increasingly clear that the tumor microenvironment (TME) has been shown to be in a dynamic state of inter-relations with the cancer cells. The TME contains a variety of components including the non-cancerous cells (i.e., immune cells, resident fibroblasts and angiogenic vascular cells) and the ECM milieu [including fibers (mainly collagen and fibronectin) and soluble factors (i.e., enzymes, growth factors, cytokines and chemokines)]. Thus, it is currently assumed that TME is considered a part of the cancerous tissue and the functionality of its key components constitutes the setting on which the hallmarks of the cancer cells can evolve. Therefore, in terms of controlling a malignancy, one should control the growth, invasion and spread of the cancer cells through modifications in the TME components. This mini review focuses on the TME as a diagnostic approach and reports the recent insights into the role of different TME key components [such as carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and inflammation (CAI) cells, angiogenesis, stromal matrix molecules and proteases] in the molecular biology of oral carcinoma. Furthermore, the impact of TME components on clinical outcomes and the concomitant need for development of new therapeutic approaches will be discussed. - Highlights: • Tumor depth and budding, hypoxia and TME cells associate with worse prognosis. • Pro-tumoral CAFs and CAI cells aid proliferation, invasion and spread hypoxia. • Some ECM-bound factors exert pro-angiogenic or pro-tumor activities. • Tumor spread is greatly dependent on ECM proteolysis, mediated by TME cells. • Direct targeting of TME components for treatment is still experimental

  16. The dependence of α-tocopheroxyl radical reduction by hydroxy-2,3-diarylxanthones on structure and micro-environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlière, Patrice; Patterson, Larry K; Santos, Clementina M M; Silva, Artur M S; Mazière, Jean-Claude; Filipe, Paulo; Gomes, Ana; Fernandes, Eduarda; Garcia, M Beatriz Q; Santus, René

    2012-03-14

    The flavonoid quercetin is known to reduce the α-tocopheroxyl radical (˙TocO) and reconstitute α-tocopherol (TocOH). Structurally related polyphenolic compounds, hydroxy-2,3-diarylxanthones (XH), exhibit antioxidant activity which exceeds that of quercetin in biological systems. In the present study repair of ˙TocO by a series of these XH has been evaluated using pulse radiolysis. It has been shown that, among the studied XH, only 2,3-bis(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-9H-xanthen-9-one (XH9) reduces ˙TocO, though repair depends strongly on the micro-environment. In cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) micelles, 30% of ˙TocO radicals are repaired at a rate constant of ~7.4 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) by XH9 compared to 1.7 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1) by ascorbate. Water-soluble Trolox (TrOH) radicals (˙TrO) are restored by XH9 in CTAB (rate constant ~3 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)) but not in neutral TX100 micelles where only 15% of ˙TocO are repaired (rate constant ~4.5 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)). In basic aqueous solutions ˙TrO is readily reduced by deprotonated XH9 species leading to ionized XH9 radical species (radical pK(a) ~10). An equilibrium is observed (K = 130) yielding an estimate of 130 mV for the reduction potential of the [˙X9,H(+)/XH9] couple at pH 11, lower than the 250 mV for the [˙TrO,H(+)/TrOH] couple. A comparable value (100 mV) has been determined by cyclic voltammetry measurements.

  17. Insights into the role of components of the tumor microenvironment in oral carcinoma call for new therapeutic approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salo, Tuula, E-mail: Tuula.salo@oulu.fi [Department of Diagnostics and Oral Medicine, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, and Medical Research Center, Oulu (Finland); Oulu University Central Hospital, Oulu (Finland); Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Vered, Marilena [Institute of Pathology, The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Ramat Gan (Israel); Department of Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Bello, Ibrahim O. [Department of Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Nyberg, Pia [Oulu University Central Hospital, Oulu (Finland); Bitu, Carolina Cavalcante [Department of Diagnostics and Oral Medicine, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, and Medical Research Center, Oulu (Finland); Zlotogorski Hurvitz, Ayelet [Department of Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Campus, Petah Tikva (Israel); Dayan, Dan [Department of Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2014-07-15

    The research on oral cancer has focused mainly on the cancer cells, their genetic changes and consequent phenotypic modifications. However, it is increasingly clear that the tumor microenvironment (TME) has been shown to be in a dynamic state of inter-relations with the cancer cells. The TME contains a variety of components including the non-cancerous cells (i.e., immune cells, resident fibroblasts and angiogenic vascular cells) and the ECM milieu [including fibers (mainly collagen and fibronectin) and soluble factors (i.e., enzymes, growth factors, cytokines and chemokines)]. Thus, it is currently assumed that TME is considered a part of the cancerous tissue and the functionality of its key components constitutes the setting on which the hallmarks of the cancer cells can evolve. Therefore, in terms of controlling a malignancy, one should control the growth, invasion and spread of the cancer cells through modifications in the TME components. This mini review focuses on the TME as a diagnostic approach and reports the recent insights into the role of different TME key components [such as carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and inflammation (CAI) cells, angiogenesis, stromal matrix molecules and proteases] in the molecular biology of oral carcinoma. Furthermore, the impact of TME components on clinical outcomes and the concomitant need for development of new therapeutic approaches will be discussed. - Highlights: • Tumor depth and budding, hypoxia and TME cells associate with worse prognosis. • Pro-tumoral CAFs and CAI cells aid proliferation, invasion and spread hypoxia. • Some ECM-bound factors exert pro-angiogenic or pro-tumor activities. • Tumor spread is greatly dependent on ECM proteolysis, mediated by TME cells. • Direct targeting of TME components for treatment is still experimental.

  18. An Implantable Device for Manipulation of the in vivo Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, James K.

    In the past decade, it has become increasingly recognized that interactions between cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment (TME) regulate metastasis. One such interaction is the paracrine loop between macrophages and cancer cells which drives metastatic invasion in mammary tumors. Tumor associated macrophages release epidermal growth factor (EGF), a chemoattractant which induces the migration of cancer cells toward the blood vessels. The cancer cells reciprocate by releasing a macrophage chemoattractant, colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1), resulting in the co-migration of both cell types and subsequent intravasation. In this work, a new technology has been developed for studying the mechanisms by which invasive tumor cells migrate in vivo toward gradients of EGF. Conventional in vitro methods used for studying tumor cell migration lack the complexity found in the TME and are therefore of limited relevance to in vivo metastasis. The Nano Intravital Device (NANIVID) has been designed as an implantable tool to manipulate the TME through the generation of soluble factor gradients. The NANIVID consists of two etched glass substrates, loaded with a hydrogel containing EGF, and sealed together using a polymer membrane. When implanted in vivo, the hydrogel will swell and release the entrapped EGF, forming a diffusion gradient in the tumor over many hours. The NANIVID design has been optimized for use with multiphoton-based intravital imaging, to monitor migration toward the device at single-cell resolution. Stabilization techniques have been developed to minimize imaging artifacts caused by breathing and specimen movement over the course of the experiment. The NANIVID has been validated in vivo using a mouse model of metastasis. When implanted in MDA-MB-231 xenograft tumors grown in SCID mice, chemotaxis of tumor cells was induced by the EGF gradient generated by the device. Cell motility parameters including velocity, directionality, and chemotactic index were

  19. Influence of solids retention time on membrane fouling: characterization of extracellular polymeric substances and soluble microbial products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Liang; Tian, Zhiyong; Song, Yonghui; Jiang, Wei; Tian, Yuan; Li, Shan

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of solids retention time (SRT) on membrane fouling and the characteristics of biomacromolecules. Four identical laboratory-scale membrane bioreactors (MBRs) were operated with SRTs for 10, 20, 40 and 80 days. The results indicated that membrane fouling occurred faster and more readily under short SRTs. Fouling resistance was the primary source of filtration resistance. The modified fouling index (MFI) results suggested that the more ready fouling at short SRTs could be attributed to higher concentrations of soluble microbial products (SMP). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra indicated that the SRT had a weak influence on the functional groups of the total extracellular polymeric substances (TEPS) and SMP. However, the MBR under a short SRT had more low-molecular-weight (MW) compounds (100 kDa). Aromatic protein and tryptophan protein-like substances were the dominant groups in the TEPS and SMP, respectively.

  20. Personal exposure monitoring of PM2.5 in indoor and outdoor microenvironments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinle, Susanne; Reis, Stefan; Sabel, Clive E

    2015-01-01

    to define six microenvironments (MEs) to assess everyday exposure of individuals to short-term PM2.5 concentrations. The Dylos was combined with a GPS receiver to track movement and exposure of individuals across the MEs. Seventeen volunteers collected 35 profiles. Profiles may have a different overall...

  1. Remodeling the blood–brain barrier microenvironment by natural products for brain tumor therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Zhao; Rujing Chen; Mei Liu; Jianfang Feng; Jun Chen; Kaili Hu

    2017-01-01

    Brain tumor incidence shows an upward trend in recent years; brain tumors account for 5% of adult tumors, while in children, this figure has increased to 70%. Moreover, 20%–30% of malignant tumors will eventually metastasize into the brain. Both benign and malignant tumors can cause an increase in intracranial pressure and brain tissue compression, leading to central nervous system(CNS) damage which endangers the patients’ lives. Despite the many approaches to treating brain tumors and the progress that has been made, only modest gains in survival time of brain tumor patients have been achieved. At present, chemotherapy is the treatment of choice for many cancers, but the special structure of the blood–brain barrier(BBB) limits most chemotherapeutic agents from passing through the BBB and penetrating into tumors in the brain. The BBB microenvironment contains numerous cell types, including endothelial cells, astrocytes, peripheral cells and microglia, and extracellular matrix(ECM). Many chemical components of natural products are reported to regulate the BBB microenvironment near brain tumors and assist in their treatment. This review focuses on the composition and function of the BBB microenvironment under both physiological and pathological conditions, and the current research progress in regulating the BBB microenvironment by natural products to promote the treatment of brain tumors.

  2. Immunotherapeutic Potential of Oncolytic H-1 Parvovirus: Hints of Glioblastoma Microenvironment Conversion towards Immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Assia L; Barf, Milena; Geletneky, Karsten; Unterberg, Andreas; Rommelaere, Jean

    2017-12-15

    Glioblastoma, one of the most aggressive primary brain tumors, is characterized by highly immunosuppressive microenvironment. This contributes to glioblastoma resistance to standard treatment modalities and allows tumor growth and recurrence. Several immune-targeted approaches have been recently developed and are currently under preclinical and clinical investigation. Oncolytic viruses, including the autonomous protoparvovirus H-1 (H-1PV), show great promise as novel immunotherapeutic tools. In a first phase I/IIa clinical trial (ParvOryx01), H-1PV was safe and well tolerated when locally or systemically administered to recurrent glioblastoma patients. The virus was able to cross the blood-brain (tumor) barrier after intravenous infusion. Importantly, H-1PV treatment of glioblastoma patients was associated with immunogenic changes in the tumor microenvironment. Tumor infiltration with activated cytotoxic T cells, induction of cathepsin B and inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) expression in tumor-associated microglia/macrophages (TAM), and accumulation of activated TAM in cluster of differentiation (CD) 40 ligand (CD40L)-positive glioblastoma regions was detected. These are the first-in-human observations of H-1PV capacity to switch the immunosuppressed tumor microenvironment towards immunogenicity. Based on this pilot study, we present a tentative model of H-1PV-mediated modulation of glioblastoma microenvironment and propose a combinatorial therapeutic approach taking advantage of H-1PV-induced microglia/macrophage activation for further (pre)clinical testing.

  3. 3D bioprinting: improving in vitro models of metastasis with heterogeneous tumor microenvironments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob L. Albritton

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Even with many advances in treatment over the past decades, cancer still remains a leading cause of death worldwide. Despite the recognized relationship between metastasis and increased mortality rate, surprisingly little is known about the exact mechanism of metastatic progression. Currently available in vitro models cannot replicate the three-dimensionality and heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment sufficiently to recapitulate many of the known characteristics of tumors in vivo. Our understanding of metastatic progression would thus be boosted by the development of in vitro models that could more completely capture the salient features of cancer biology. Bioengineering groups have been working for over two decades to create in vitro microenvironments for application in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Over this time, advances in 3D printing technology and biomaterials research have jointly led to the creation of 3D bioprinting, which has improved our ability to develop in vitro models with complexity approaching that of the in vivo tumor microenvironment. In this Review, we give an overview of 3D bioprinting methods developed for tissue engineering, which can be directly applied to constructing in vitro models of heterogeneous tumor microenvironments. We discuss considerations and limitations associated with 3D printing and highlight how these advances could be harnessed to better model metastasis and potentially guide the development of anti-cancer strategies.

  4. 3D bioprinting: improving in vitro models of metastasis with heterogeneous tumor microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albritton, Jacob L; Miller, Jordan S

    2017-01-01

    Even with many advances in treatment over the past decades, cancer still remains a leading cause of death worldwide. Despite the recognized relationship between metastasis and increased mortality rate, surprisingly little is known about the exact mechanism of metastatic progression. Currently available in vitro models cannot replicate the three-dimensionality and heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment sufficiently to recapitulate many of the known characteristics of tumors in vivo Our understanding of metastatic progression would thus be boosted by the development of in vitro models that could more completely capture the salient features of cancer biology. Bioengineering groups have been working for over two decades to create in vitro microenvironments for application in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Over this time, advances in 3D printing technology and biomaterials research have jointly led to the creation of 3D bioprinting, which has improved our ability to develop in vitro models with complexity approaching that of the in vivo tumor microenvironment. In this Review, we give an overview of 3D bioprinting methods developed for tissue engineering, which can be directly applied to constructing in vitro models of heterogeneous tumor microenvironments. We discuss considerations and limitations associated with 3D printing and highlight how these advances could be harnessed to better model metastasis and potentially guide the development of anti-cancer strategies. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Effects of the thymic microenvironment on autoantibody production in (NZB X NZW)F1 mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huston, D.P.; Smathers, P.A.; Reeves, J.P.; Steinberg, A.D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of the thymic microenvironment on autoantibody production in (NZB X NZW)F1 mice were studied. Neonatally thymectomized male and female F1 mice reconstituted with a parental or F1-irradiated thymic lobe were compared to nonreconstituted and sham-thymectomized controls. While maleness retarded the spontaneous production of ss- and ds-DNA antibodies, thymic grafts did not suppress antibodies to ss-DNA in either sex, but did suppress the production of antibodies to ds-DNA in female mice. A unique property of NZB thymic grafts was the inability to suppress anti-RBC antibodies in male mice. Thus, (i) the gender of the F1 recipient was the most important determinant of production of antibodies to ss-DNA, (ii) either maleness or the thymic microenvironment could retard production of anti-ds-DNA antibodies, and (iii) both gender and the thymic microenvironment were important in the regulation of anti-RBC antibody production. Since the administration of thymosin did not suppress autoantibody production, the effects of the thymic grafts was not solely via thymic hormone production. These studies suggest that sex hormones and/or the thymic microenvironment can exert a suppressive effect on autoantibody production and that autoantibodies differ in their susceptibility to such suppression

  6. Acidic tumor microenvironment and pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justus, Calvin R; Dong, Lixue; Yang, Li V

    2013-12-05

    The tumor microenvironment is acidic due to glycolytic cancer cell metabolism, hypoxia, and deficient blood perfusion. It is proposed that acidosis in the tumor microenvironment is an important stress factor and selection force for cancer cell somatic evolution. Acidic pH has pleiotropic effects on the proliferation, migration, invasion, metastasis, and therapeutic response of cancer cells and the function of immune cells, vascular cells, and other stromal cells. However, the molecular mechanisms by which cancer cells and stromal cells sense and respond to acidic pH in the tumor microenvironment are poorly understood. In this article the role of a family of pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in tumor biology is reviewed. Recent studies show that the pH-sensing GPCRs, including GPR4, GPR65 (TDAG8), GPR68 (OGR1), and GPR132 (G2A), regulate cancer cell metastasis and proliferation, immune cell function, inflammation, and blood vessel formation. Activation of the proton-sensing GPCRs by acidosis transduces multiple downstream G protein signaling pathways. Since GPCRs are major drug targets, small molecule modulators of the pH-sensing GPCRs are being actively developed and evaluated. Research on the pH-sensing GPCRs will continue to provide important insights into the molecular interaction between tumor and its acidic microenvironment and may identify new targets for cancer therapy and chemoprevention.

  7. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) mediates tumor cell interactions with microenvironment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Závadová, Zuzana; Závada, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 5 (2005), s. 977-982 ISSN 1021-335X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/02/0405 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : carbonic anhydrase IX * cell adhesion * microenvironment Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.572, year: 2005

  8. Tumour microenvironment and radiation response in sarcomas originating from tumourigenic human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Andrea, Filippo Peder; Safwat, Akmal Ahmed; Burns, Jorge S.

    2012-01-01

    : Immune deficient female mice were implanted on the backs with cells from one of the clones. The subsequent tumours were subjected to either radiation treatment or had the tumour microenvironment assayed, when they reached 400mm3. Radiation was given as a single fraction of 0 to 15 Gy and the degree...

  9. Metastasis in context : modeling the tumor microenvironment with cancer-on-a-chip approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sleeboom, Jelle J.F.; Amirabadi, Hossein Eslami; Nair, Poornima; Sahlgren, Cecilia M.; Den Toonder, Jaap M.J.

    2018-01-01

    Most cancer deaths are not caused by the primary tumor, but by secondary tumors formed through metastasis, a complex and poorly understood process. Cues from the tumor microenvironment, such as the biochemical composition, cellular population, extracellular matrix, and tissue (fluid) mechanics, have

  10. Bed Microenvironment in Hospital Patient Rooms with Natural or Mechanical Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Li, Yuguo; Georgiev, Emanuil

    2012-01-01

    We studied how to provide patients in bed with thermally comfortable microenvironment in both naturally and mechanically ventilated hospital rooms for both winter and summer seasons. A climate chamber was used to resemble a hospital room and thermal manikin to simulate a patient lying in a bed...

  11. Molecular imaging of the tumor microenvironment for precision medicine and theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penet, Marie-France; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Chen, Zhihang; Jin, Jiefu; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2014-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality from cancer and their associated conditions and treatments continue to extract a heavy social and economic global burden despite the transformative advances in science and technology in the twenty-first century. In fact, cancer incidence and mortality are expected to reach pandemic proportions by 2025, and costs of managing cancer will escalate to trillions of dollars. The inability to establish effective cancer treatments arises from the complexity of conditions that exist within tumors, the plasticity and adaptability of cancer cells coupled with their ability to escape immune surveillance, and the co-opted stromal cells and microenvironment that assist cancer cells in survival. Stromal cells, although destroyed together with cancer cells, have an ever-replenishing source that can assist in resurrecting tumors from any residual cancer cells that may survive treatment. The tumor microenvironment landscape is a continually changing landscape, with spatial and temporal heterogeneities that impact and influence cancer treatment outcome. Importantly, the changing landscape of the tumor microenvironment can be exploited for precision medicine and theranostics. Molecular and functional imaging can play important roles in shaping and selecting treatments to match this landscape. Our purpose in this review is to examine the roles of molecular and functional imaging, within the context of the tumor microenvironment, and the feasibility of their applications for precision medicine and theranostics in humans. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Human body micro-environment: The benefits of controlling airflow interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the micro-environment around a human body, and especially on its interaction with the surrounding environment. Research on the free convection flow generated by a human body (including the convective boundary layer around the body and the thermal plume above the body), its...

  13. Neuroendocrine and Immune Responses Undertake Different Fates following Tryptophan or Methionine Dietary Treatment: Tales from a Teleost Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Azeredo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Methionine and tryptophan appear to be fundamental in specific cellular pathways involved in the immune response mechanisms, including stimulation of T-regulatory cells by tryptophan metabolites or pro-inflammatory effects upon methionine supplementation. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the immunomodulatory effect of these amino acids on the inflammatory and neuroendocrine responses in juveniles of European seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax. To achieve this, goal fish were fed for 14 days methionine and tryptophan-supplemented diets (MET and TRP, respectively, 2× dietary requirement level or a control diet meeting the amino acids requirement levels (CTRL. Fish were sampled for immune status assessment and the remaining fish were challenged with intraperitoneally injected inactivated Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida and sampled either 4 or 24 h post-injection. Respiratory burst activity, brain monoamines, plasma cortisol, and immune-related gene expression showed distinct and sometimes opposite patterns regarding the effects of dietary amino acids. While neuroendocrine intermediates were not affected by any dietary treatment at the end of the feeding trial, both supplemented diets led to increased levels of plasma cortisol after the inflammatory insult, while brain monoamine content was higher in TRP-fed fish. Peripheral blood respiratory burst was higher in TRP-fed fish injected with the bacteria inoculum but only compared to those fed MET. However, no changes were detected in total antioxidant capacity. Complement factor 3 was upregulated in MET-fed fish but methionine seemed to poorly affect other genes expression patterns. In contrast, fish fed MET showed increased immune cells numbers both before and after immune challenge, suggesting a strong enhancing effect of methionine on immune cells proliferation. Differently, tryptophan effects on inflammatory transcripts suggested an inhibitory mode of action. This, together

  14. Nanosuspension Technology for Solubilizing Poorly Soluble Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Deoli Mukesh

    2012-01-01

    Poor water solubility for many drugs and drug candidates remains a major obstacle to their development and clinical application. It is estimated that around 40% of drugs in the pipeline cannot be delivered through the preferred route or in some cases, at all owing to poor water solubility. Conventional formulations to improve solubility suffer from low bioavailability and poor pharmacokinetics, with some carriers rendering systemic toxicities (e.g. Cremophor1 EL). To date, nanoscale systems f...

  15. Soluble theory with massive ghosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarski, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    To investigate the unitarity of asymptotically free, higher-derivative theories, like certain models of quantum gravity, I study a prototype in two space-time dimensions. The prototype is a kind of higher-derivative nonlinear sigma model; it is asymptotically free, exhibits dimensional transmutation, and is soluble in a large-N expansion. The S-matrix elements, constructed from the analytic continuation of the Euclidean Green's functions, conserve probability to approx.O(N -1 ), but violate unitarity at approx.O(N -2 ). The model demonstrates that in higher-derivative theories unitarity, or the lack thereof, cannot be decided without explicit control over the infrared limit. Even so, the results suggest that there may exist some (rather special) asymptotically free, higher-derivative theories which are unitary

  16. Issues concerning the determination of solubility products of sparingly soluble crystalline solids. Solubility of HfO2(cr)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, Dhanpat; Kitamura, Akira; Rosso, Kevin M.; Sasaki, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Taishi

    2016-01-01

    Solubility studies were conducted with HfO 2 (cr) solid as a function HCl and ionic strength ranging from 2.0 to 0.004 mol kg -1 . These studies involved (1) using two different amounts of the solid phase, (2) acid washing the bulk solid phase, (3) preheating the solid phase to 1400 C, and (4) heating amorphous HfO 2 (am) suspensions to 90 C to ascertain whether the HfO 2 (am) converts to HfO 2 (cr) and to determine the solubility from the oversaturation direction. Based on the results of these treatments it is concluded that the HfO 2 (cr) contains a small fraction of less crystalline, but not amorphous, material [HfO 2 (lcr)] and this, rather than the HfO 2 (cr), is the solubility-controlling phase in the range of experimental variables investigated in this study. The solubility data are interpreted using both the Pitzer and SIT models and they provide log 10 K 0 values of -(59.75±0.35) and -(59.48±0.41), respectively, for the solubility product of HfO 2 (lcr)[HfO 2 (lcr) + 2H 2 O ↔ Hf 4+ + 4OH - ]. The log 10 of the solubility product of HfO 2 (cr) is estimated to be < -63. The observation of a small fraction of less crystalline higher solubility material is consistent with the general picture that mineral surfaces are often structurally and/or compositionally imperfect leading to a higher solubility than the bulk crystalline solid. This study stresses the urgent need, during interpretation of solubility data, of taking precautions to make certain that the observed solubility behavior for sparingly-soluble solids is assigned to the proper solid phase.

  17. Issues concerning the determination of solubility products of sparingly soluble crystalline solids. Solubility of HfO{sub 2}(cr)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Dhanpat [Rai Enviro-Chem, LLC, Yachats, OR (United States); Kitamura, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Rosso, Kevin M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Sasaki, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Taishi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Solubility studies were conducted with HfO{sub 2}(cr) solid as a function HCl and ionic strength ranging from 2.0 to 0.004 mol kg{sup -1}. These studies involved (1) using two different amounts of the solid phase, (2) acid washing the bulk solid phase, (3) preheating the solid phase to 1400 C, and (4) heating amorphous HfO{sub 2}(am) suspensions to 90 C to ascertain whether the HfO{sub 2}(am) converts to HfO{sub 2}(cr) and to determine the solubility from the oversaturation direction. Based on the results of these treatments it is concluded that the HfO{sub 2}(cr) contains a small fraction of less crystalline, but not amorphous, material [HfO{sub 2}(lcr)] and this, rather than the HfO{sub 2}(cr), is the solubility-controlling phase in the range of experimental variables investigated in this study. The solubility data are interpreted using both the Pitzer and SIT models and they provide log{sub 10} K{sup 0} values of -(59.75±0.35) and -(59.48±0.41), respectively, for the solubility product of HfO{sub 2}(lcr)[HfO{sub 2}(lcr) + 2H{sub 2}O ↔ Hf{sup 4+} + 4OH{sup -}]. The log{sub 10} of the solubility product of HfO{sub 2}(cr) is estimated to be < -63. The observation of a small fraction of less crystalline higher solubility material is consistent with the general picture that mineral surfaces are often structurally and/or compositionally imperfect leading to a higher solubility than the bulk crystalline solid. This study stresses the urgent need, during interpretation of solubility data, of taking precautions to make certain that the observed solubility behavior for sparingly-soluble solids is assigned to the proper solid phase.

  18. Differential immune microenvironments and response to immune checkpoint blockade amongst molecular subtypes of murine medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Christina D.; Flores, Catherine; Yang, Changlin; Pinheiro, Elaine M.; Yearley, Jennifer H.; Sayour, Elias J.; Pei, Yanxin; Moore, Colin; McLendon, Roger E.; Huang, Jianping; Sampson, John H.; Wechsler-Reya, Robert; Mitchell, Duane A.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Despite significant strides in the identification and characterization of potential therapeutic targets for medulloblastoma (MB), the role of the immune system and its interplay with the tumor microenvironment within these tumors are poorly understood. To address this, we adapted two syngeneic animal models of human Sonic Hedgehog (SHH)-driven and Group 3 MB for preclinical evaluation in immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice. METHODS AND RESULTS Multicolor flow cytometric analyses were used to phenotype and characterize immune infiltrating cells within established cerebellar tumors. We observed significantly higher percentages of dendritic cells, infiltrating lymphocytes, myeloid derived suppressor cells and tumor-associated macrophages in murine SHH model tumors compared with Group 3 tumors. However, murine Group 3 tumors had higher percentages of CD8+ PD-1+ T cells within the CD3 population. PD-1 blockade conferred superior antitumor efficacy in animals bearing intracranial Group 3 tumors compared to SHH group tumors, indicating that immunologic differences within the tumor microenvironment can be leveraged as potential targets to mediate antitumor efficacy. Further analysis of anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody localization revealed binding to PD-1+ peripheral T cells, but not tumor infiltrating lymphocytes within the brain tumor microenvironment. Peripheral PD-1 blockade additionally resulted in a marked increase in CD3+ T cells within the tumor microenvironment. CONCLUSIONS This is the first immunologic characterization of preclinical models of molecular subtypes of MB and demonstration that response to immune checkpoint blockade differs across subtype classification. Our findings also suggest that effective anti-PD-1 blockade does not require that systemically administered antibodies penetrate the brain tumor microenvironment. PMID:26405194

  19. Probing the electrostatics of active site microenvironments along the catalytic cycle for Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C Tony; Layfield, Joshua P; Stewart, Robert J; French, Jarrod B; Hanoian, Philip; Asbury, John B; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Benkovic, Stephen J

    2014-07-23

    Electrostatic interactions play an important role in enzyme catalysis by guiding ligand binding and facilitating chemical reactions. These electrostatic interactions are modulated by conformational changes occurring over the catalytic cycle. Herein, the changes in active site electrostatic microenvironments are examined for all enzyme complexes along the catalytic cycle of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR) by incorporation of thiocyanate probes at two site-specific locations in the active site. The electrostatics and degree of hydration of the microenvironments surrounding the probes are investigated with spectroscopic techniques and mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations. Changes in the electrostatic microenvironments along the catalytic environment lead to different nitrile (CN) vibrational stretching frequencies and (13)C NMR chemical shifts. These environmental changes arise from protein conformational rearrangements during catalysis. The QM/MM calculations reproduce the experimentally measured vibrational frequency shifts of the thiocyanate probes across the catalyzed hydride transfer step, which spans the closed and occluded conformations of the enzyme. Analysis of the molecular dynamics trajectories provides insight into the conformational changes occurring between these two states and the resulting changes in classical electrostatics and specific hydrogen-bonding interactions. The electric fields along the CN axes of the probes are decomposed into contributions from specific residues, ligands, and solvent molecules that make up the microenvironments around the probes. Moreover, calculation of the electric field along the hydride donor-acceptor axis, along with decomposition of this field into specific contributions, indicates that the cofactor and substrate, as well as the enzyme, impose a substantial electric field that facilitates hydride transfer. Overall, experimental and theoretical data provide evidence for

  20. Differential Immune Microenvironments and Response to Immune Checkpoint Blockade among Molecular Subtypes of Murine Medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Christina D; Flores, Catherine; Yang, Changlin; Pinheiro, Elaine M; Yearley, Jennifer H; Sayour, Elias J; Pei, Yanxin; Moore, Colin; McLendon, Roger E; Huang, Jianping; Sampson, John H; Wechsler-Reya, Robert; Mitchell, Duane A

    2016-02-01

    Despite significant strides in the identification and characterization of potential therapeutic targets for medulloblastoma, the role of the immune system and its interplay with the tumor microenvironment within these tumors are poorly understood. To address this, we adapted two syngeneic animal models of human Sonic Hedgehog (SHH)-driven and group 3 medulloblastoma for preclinical evaluation in immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice. Multicolor flow cytometric analyses were used to phenotype and characterize immune infiltrating cells within established cerebellar tumors. We observed significantly higher percentages of dendritic cells, infiltrating lymphocytes, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and tumor-associated macrophages in murine SHH model tumors compared with group 3 tumors. However, murine group 3 tumors had higher percentages of CD8(+) PD-1(+) T cells within the CD3 population. PD-1 blockade conferred superior antitumor efficacy in animals bearing intracranial group 3 tumors compared with SHH group tumors, indicating that immunologic differences within the tumor microenvironment can be leveraged as potential targets to mediate antitumor efficacy. Further analysis of anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody localization revealed binding to PD-1(+) peripheral T cells, but not tumor infiltrating lymphocytes within the brain tumor microenvironment. Peripheral PD-1 blockade additionally resulted in a marked increase in CD3(+) T cells within the tumor microenvironment. This is the first immunologic characterization of preclinical models of molecular subtypes of medulloblastoma and demonstration that response to immune checkpoint blockade differs across subtype classification. Our findings also suggest that effective anti-PD-1 blockade does not require that systemically administered antibodies penetrate the brain tumor microenvironment. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Retrograde curves of solidus and solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'ev, M.V.

    1979-01-01

    The investigation was concerned with the constitutional diagrams of the eutectic type with ''retrograde solidus'' and ''retrograde solubility curve'' which must be considered as diagrams with degenerate monotectic transformation. The solidus and the solubility curves form a retrograde curve with a common retrograde point representing the solubility maximum. The two branches of the Aetrograde curve can be described with the aid of two similar equations. Presented are corresponding equations for the Cd-Zn system and shown is the possibility of predicting the run of the solubility curve

  2. Solubility limits of importance to leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogard, A.; Bentley, G.; Bryant, E.; Duffy, C.; Grisham, J.; Norris, E.; Orth, C.; Thomas, K.

    1981-01-01

    The solubilities of some radionuclides, especially rare earths and actinides, may be an important and controlling factor in leaching of waste forms. These solubilities should be measured accurately as a function of pH and not as a part of a multicomponent system. Individual solubilities should be measured as a function of temperature to determine if a kinetic effect is being observed in the data. A negative temperature coefficient of solubility for actinides and rare earths in water would have important consequences for nuclear reactor safety and for the management of nuclear wastes

  3. Biochemical characterization of soluble proteins in pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachalam, Mahesh; Roux, Kenneth H; Sathe, Shridhar K

    2008-09-10

    Pecans (cv. Desirable) contained approximately 10% protein on a dry weight basis. The minimum nitrogen solubility (5.9-7.5%) at 0.25-0.75 M trichloroacetic acid represented the nonprotein nitrogen. Among the solvents assessed for protein solubilization, 0.1 M NaOH was the most effective, while borate saline buffer (pH 8.45) was judged to be optimal for protein solubilization. The protein solubility was minimal in the pH range of 3-7 and significantly increased on either side of this pH range. Increasing the NaCl concentration from 0 to 4 M significantly improved ( approximately 8-fold increase) protein solubilization. Following Osborne protein fractionation, the alkali-soluble glutelin fraction (60.1%) accounted for a major portion of pecan proteins followed by globulin (31.5%), prolamin (3.4%), and albumin (1.5%), respectively. The majority of pecan polypeptides were in the molecular mass range of 12-66 kDa and in the pI range of 4.0-8.3. The pecan globulin fraction was characterized by the presence of several glycoprotein polypeptides. Lysine was the first limiting essential amino acid in the defatted flour, globulin, prolamin, and alkaline glutelin fractions. Leucine and tryptophan were the first limiting essential amino acids in albumin and acid glutelin fractions, respectively. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies detected a range of pecan polypeptides in the 12-60 kDa range, of which the globulin fraction contained the most reactive polypeptides.

  4. The association between the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis and tryptophan metabolism in persons with recurrent major depressive disorder and healthy controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorgdrager, F. J. H.; Doornbos, B.; Penninx, B. W. J. H.; de Jonge, P.; Kema, I. P.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Persistent changes in serotonergic and hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis functioning are implicated in recurrent types of major depressive disorder (MDD). Systemic tryptophan levels, which influence the rate of serotonin synthesis, are regulated by glucocorticoids produced along

  5. Metabolism of /sup 14/C-labelled L-tryptophan, L-kynurenine, and hydroxy-L-kynurenine in miners with scleroderma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hankes, L.V.; De Bruin, E.; Jansen, C.R.; Vorster, L.; Schmaeler, M.

    1977-03-19

    Six South African white miners were studied with the 2-g L-tryptophan load test and tracer doses of L-tryptophan-7a-/sup 14/C, L-kynurenine-keto-/sup 14/C and hydroxy-L-kynurenine-keto-/sup 14/C. The breath /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and 14 urinary metabolites were measured. When they were compared with a previous study of American women with scleroderma, similar /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and tryptophan metabolite excretion patterns were observed in the data from the miners. The labelled quinolinic acid excretion was more significantly elevated in the South African miners' urine than in the urine of the American women. The data from both studies suggest that some patients with scleroderma have an altered step in the tryptophan metabolic pathway after hydroxy-anthranilic acid. What relationship exists between the induction of pulmonary silicosis and the subsequent development of scleroderma, requires additional human studies.

  6. Study on the interaction of tropisetron hydrochloride and L-tryptophan by spectrofluorimetry and its analytical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xiashi; Gong Aiqin; Wang Baosheng; Yu Suhai

    2008-01-01

    A new method to determine tropisetron hydrochloride with L-tryptophan in the medium with pH=9.0 was studied, which is based on the fluorescence quenching effect of tropisetron hydrochloride on L-tryptophan. The fluorescence quenching mechanism and various factors influencing fluorescence quenching were discussed. Under the optimum conditions, the linear range and detection limit were 0.03-12.0 and 0.01 μg/mL (correlation coefficient r=0.9970), respectively. The calibration curve equation was ΔF=6.17+12.56 C (μg/mL). RSD was 3.4% (c=4.0 μg/mL, n=5); the detection limit estimated (S/N=3) was 0.01 μg/mL. The proposed method had been successfully applied to determine tropisetron hydrochloride in real samples and the obtained results were in good agreement with the results of the official method

  7. Computational Protocols for Prediction of Solute NMR Relative Chemical Shifts. A Case Study of L-Tryptophan in Aqueous Solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Janus J.; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus H.; Aidas, Kestutis

    2011-01-01

    to the results stemming from the conformations extracted from the MM conformational search in terms of replicating an experimental reference as well as in achieving the correct sequence of the NMR relative chemical shifts of L-tryptophan in aqueous solution. We find this to be due to missing conformations......In this study, we have applied two different spanning protocols for obtaining the molecular conformations of L-tryptophan in aqueous solution, namely a molecular dynamics simulation and a molecular mechanics conformational search with subsequent geometry re-optimization of the stable conformers...... using a quantum mechanically based method. These spanning protocols represent standard ways of obtaining a set of conformations on which NMR calculations may be performed. The results stemming from the solute–solvent configurations extracted from the MD simulation at 300 K are found to be inferior...

  8. Real-time detection of faecally contaminated drinking water with tryptophan-like fluorescence: defining threshold values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, James P R; Baker, Andy; Cumberland, Susan A; Lapworth, Dan J; MacDonald, Alan M; Pedley, Steve; Taylor, Richard G; Ward, Jade S T

    2018-05-01

    We assess the use of fluorescent dissolved organic matter at excitation-emission wavelengths of 280nm and 360nm, termed tryptophan-like fluorescence (TLF), as an indicator of faecally contaminated drinking water. A significant logistic regression model was developed using TLF as a predictor of thermotolerant coliforms (TTCs) using data from groundwater- and surface water-derived drinking water sources in India, Malawi, South Africa and Zambia. A TLF threshold of 1.3ppb dissolved tryptophan was selected to classify TTC contamination. Validation of the TLF threshold indicated a false-negative error rate of 15% and a false-positive error rate of 18%. The threshold was unsuccessful at classifying contaminated sources containing water globally. Copyright © 2017 Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), as represented by the British Geological Survey (BGS. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Remarkable Role of Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase and Tryptophan Metabolites in Infectious Diseases: Potential Role in Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Murakami, Yuki; Hoshi, Masato; Imamura, Yukio; Arioka, Yuko; Yamamoto, Yasuko; Saito, Kuniaki

    2013-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1), the L-tryptophan-degrading enzyme, plays a key role in the immunomodulatory effects on several types of immune cells. Originally known for its regulatory function during pregnancy and chronic inflammation in tumorigenesis, the activity of IDO1 seems to modify the inflammatory state of infectious diseases. The pathophysiologic activity of L-tryptophan metabolites, kynurenines, is well recognized. Therefore, an understanding of the regulation of IDO1 and th...

  10. Tryptophan Intake in the US Adult Population Is Not Related to Liver or Kidney Function but Is Associated with Depression and Sleep Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Harris R; Agarwal, Sanjiv; Fulgoni, Victor L

    2016-12-01

    Tryptophan is an indispensable amino acid and is a precursor of the neurotransmitter serotonin. Tryptophan metabolites, such as serotonin and melatonin, are thought to participate in the regulation of mood and sleep and tryptophan is used to treat insomnia, sleep apnea, and depression. This study examined the intake of tryptophan and its associations with biochemical, behavioral, sleep, and health and safety outcomes in adults in a secondary analysis of a large, publicly available database of the US population. Data from the NHANES 2001-2012 (n = 29,687) were used to determine daily intakes of tryptophan and its associations with biochemical markers of health- and safety-related outcomes, self-reported depression, and sleep-related variables. Data were adjusted for demographic factors and protein intake. Linear trends were computed across deciles of intake for each outcome variable, and P-trends were determined. The usual tryptophan intake by US adults was 826 mg/d, severalfold higher than the Estimated Average Requirement for adults of 4 mg/(kg ⋅ d) (∼280 mg/d for a 70-kg adult). Most health- and safety-related biochemical markers of liver function, kidney function, and carbohydrate metabolism were not significantly (P-trend > 0.05) associated with deciles of tryptophan intake and were well within normal ranges, even for individuals in the 99th percentile of intake. Usual intake deciles of tryptophan were inversely associated with self-reported depression measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire raw score (0-27; P-trend depression, 5 = severe depression; P-trend depression and positively associated with sleep duration. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  11. Effects of acute tryptophan depletion on central processing of CT-targeted and discriminatory touch in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Paula Diane; McGlone, Francis; McKie, Shane; McFarquhar, Martyn; Elliott, Rebecca; Walker, Susannah Claire; Deakin, John Francis William

    2016-08-01

    C-tactile afferents (CTs) are slowly conducting nerve fibres, present only in hairy skin. They are optimally activated by slow, gentle stroking touch, such as those experienced during a caress. CT stimulation activates affective processing brain regions, alluding to their role in affective touch perception. We tested a theory that CT-activating touch engages the pro-social functions of serotonin, by determining whether reducing serotonin, through acute tryptophan depletion, diminishes subjective pleasantness and affective brain responses to gentle touch. A tryptophan depleting amino acid drink was administered to 16 healthy females, with a further 14 receiving a control drink. After 4 h, participants underwent an fMRI scan, during which time CT-innervated forearm skin and CT non-innervated finger skin was stroked with three brushes of differing texture, at CT-optimal force and velocity. Pleasantness ratings were obtained post scanning. The control group showed a greater response in ipsilateral orbitofrontal cortex to CT-activating forearm touch compared to touch to the finger where CTs are absent. This differential response was not present in the tryptophan depleted group. This interaction effect was significant. In addition, control participants showed a differential primary somatosensory cortex response to brush texture applied to the finger, a purely discriminatory touch response, which was not observed in the tryptophan depleted group. This interaction effect was also significant. Pleasantness ratings were similar across treatment groups. These results implicate serotonin in the differentiation between CT-activating and purely discriminatory touch responses. Such effects could contribute to some of the social abnormalities seen in psychiatric disorders associated with abnormal serotonin function. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. High stability and biological activity of the copper(II) complexes of alloferon 1 analogues containing tryptophan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadej, Agnieszka; Kuczer, Mariola; Czarniewska, Elżbieta; Urbański, Arkadiusz; Rosiński, Grzegorz; Kowalik-Jankowska, Teresa

    2016-10-01

    Copper(II) complex formation processes between the alloferon 1 (Allo1) (HGVSGHGQHGVHG) analogues where the tryptophan residue is introducing in the place His residue H1W, H6W, H9W and H12W have been studied by potentiometric, UV-visible, CD and EPR spectroscopic, and MS methods. For all analogues of alloferon 1 complex speciation have been obtained for a 1:1 metal-to-ligand molar ratio and 2:1 of H1W because of precipitation at higher (2:1, 3:1 and 4:1) ratios. At physiological pH7.4 and a 1:1 metal-to-ligand molar ratio the tryptophan analogues of alloferon 1 form the CuH -1 L and/or CuH -2 L complexes with the 4N binding mode. The introduction of tryptophan in place of histidine residues changes the distribution diagram of the complexes formed with the change of pH and their stability constants compared to the respective substituted alanine analogues of alloferon 1. The CuH -1 L, CuH -2 L and CuH -3 L complexes of the tryptophan analogues are more stable from 1 to 5 log units in comparison to those of the alanine analogues. This stabilization of the complexes may result from cation(Cu(II))-π and indole/imidazole ring interactions. The induction of apoptosis in vivo, in Tenebrio molitor cells by the ligands and their copper(II) complexes at pH7.4 was studied. The biological results show that copper(II) ions in vivo did not cause any apparent apoptotic features. The most active were the H12W peptide and Cu(II)-H12W complex formed at pH7.4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. High tryptophan diet reduces CA1 intraneuronal ss-amyloid in the triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Noristani, H. N.; Verkhratsky, A.; Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 5 (2012), s. 810-822 ISSN 1474-9718 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/09/1696; GA ČR GA305/08/1384; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0184 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : Alzheimer's disease * hippocampus * L-tryptophan diet Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.705, year: 2012

  14. Osmium tetroxide, 2,2’-bipyridine: Electroactive marker for probing accessibility of tryptophan residues in proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fojta, Miroslav; Billová, Sabina; Havran, Luděk; Pivoňková, Hana; Černocká, Hana; Horáková Brázdilová, Petra; Paleček, Emil

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 12 (2008), s. 4598-4605 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4004402; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040581; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN400310651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : osmium tetroxide * chemical modification * tryptophan Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.712, year: 2008

  15. The short (S) allele of the serotonin transporter polymorphism and acute tryptophan depletion both increase impulsivity in men

    OpenAIRE

    Walderhaug, Espen; Herman, Aryeh Isaac; Magnusson, Andres; Morgan, Michael John; Landrø, Nils Inge

    2010-01-01

    Reduced serotonergic neurotransmission is implicated in impulsive behavior. We studied the triallelic system of the serotonin transporter gene linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and acute manipulation of serotonin together to further delineate the mechanisms by which serotonergic neurotransmission affects impulsivity. Fifty-two healthy participants (38 men and 14 women) underwent acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) or placebo in a randomized, double-blind, parallel group experiment. Impulsive ...

  16. An artificial self-sufficient cytochrome P450 directly nitrates fluorinated tryptophan analogs with a different regio-selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Ran; Zhang, Yi; Huguet-Tapia, Jose C; Mehta, Mishal; Dedic, Evelina; Bruner, Steven D; Loria, Rosemary; Ding, Yousong

    2016-05-01

    Aromatic nitration is an immensely important industrial process to produce chemicals for a variety of applications, but it often suffers from multiple unsolved challenges. Enzymes as biocatalysts have been increasingly used for organic chemistry synthesis due to their high selectivity and environmental friendliness, but nitration has benefited minimally from the development of biocatalysis. In this work, we aimed to develop TxtE as practical biocatalysts for aromatic nitration. TxtE is a unique class I cytochrome P450 enzyme that nitrates the indole of l-tryptophan. To develop cost-efficient nitration processes, we fused TxtE with the reductase domains of CYP102A1 (P450BM3) and of P450RhF to create class III self-sufficient biocatalysts. The best engineered fusion protein was comparable with wild type TxtE in terms of nitration performance and other key biochemical properties. To demonstrate the application potential of the fusion enzyme, we nitrated 4-F-dl-tryptophan and 5-F-l-tryptophan in large scale enzymatic reactions. Tandem MS/MS and NMR analyses of isolated products revealed altered nitration sites. To our knowledge, these studies represent the first practice in developing biological nitration approaches and lay a solid basis to the use of TxtE-based biocatalysts for the production of valuable nitroaromatics. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Modification of a single tryptophan residue in human Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase by peroxynitrite in the presence of bicarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakura, F; Matsumoto, T; Fujimura, T; Taka, H; Murayama, K; Imai, T; Uchida, K

    2001-07-09

    Human recombinant Cu,Zn-SOD was reacted with peroxynitrite in a reaction mixture containing 150 mM potassium phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) 25 mM sodium bicarbonate, and 0.1 mM diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid. Disappearance of fluorescence emission at 350 nm, which could be attributed to modification of a single tryptophan residue, was observed in the modified enzyme with a pH optimum of around 8.4. A fluorescence decrease with the same pH optimum was also observed without sodium bicarbonate, but with less efficiency. Amino acid contents of the modified enzyme showed no significant difference in all amino acids except the loss of a single tryptophan residue of the enzyme. The peroxynitrite-modified enzyme showed an increase in optical absorption around 350 nm and 30% reduced enzyme activity based on the copper contents. The modified enzyme showed the same electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum as that of the control enzyme. The modified Cu,Zn-SOD showed a single protein band in sodium dodecyl sulfate--polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS--PAGE) and five protein bands in non-denaturing PAGE. From this evidence, we conclude that nitration and/or oxidation of the single tryptophan 32 and partial inactivation of the enzyme activity of Cu,Zn-SOD is caused by a peroxynitrite-carbon dioxide adduct without perturbation of the active site copper integrity.

  18. Preparation and HPLC isolation of L-[U-14C]tryptophan from enzyme hydrolysate labelled with 14C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, J.; Tintera, S.; Hromadkova, B.

    1990-01-01

    Tryptophan was obtained from biomass of the blue-green alga Synechococcus elongatus cultivated under 14 CO 2 . After partial purification, the protein fraction was subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis using pronase. Semipreparative isolation of L-[U- 14 C]tryptophan was accomplished on a HPLC column of Separon S Hema 1000 CM, 2% ethanol were added to the eluent, and a precolumn packed with the basic anion exchanger Spheron 1000 DEAE was used. Always after the passage of L-[U- 14 C]tryptophan, the precolumn was decoupled. The substance was collected in 96% ethanol. After removing the solvent by vacuum evaporation, the sample was analyzed on a column packed with Separon SIX C 18 in the eluent of 0.1M-NaH 2 PO 4 , 2% methanol. When the desired radiochemical purity was not attained, the sample was purified on Separon SIX C 18 using 2% methanol. The final radiochemical purity achieved by using this method is 98%. (P.A.). 5 figs., 2 tabs., 4 refs

  19. Membrane interaction and secondary structure of de novo designed arginine-and tryptophan peptides with dual function

    KAUST Repository

    Rydberg, Hanna A.

    2012-10-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides and antimicrobial peptides are two classes of positively charged membrane active peptides with several properties in common. The challenge is to combine knowledge about the membrane interaction mechanisms and structural properties of the two classes to design peptides with membrane-specific actions, useful either as transporters of cargo or as antibacterial substances. Membrane active peptides are commonly rich in arginine and tryptophan. We have previously designed a series of arg/trp peptides and investigated how the position and number of tryptophans affect cellular uptake. Here we explore the antimicrobial properties and the interaction with lipid model membranes of these peptides, using minimal inhibitory concentrations assay (MIC), circular dichroism (CD) and linear dichroism (LD). The results show that the arg/trp peptides inhibit the growth of the two gram positive strains Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus pyogenes, with some individual variations depending on the position of the tryptophans. No inhibition of the gram negative strains Proteus mirabilis or Pseudomonas aeruginosa was noticed. CD indicated that when bound to lipid vesicles one of the peptides forms an α-helical like structure, whereas the other five exhibited rather random coiled structures. LD indicated that all six peptides were somehow aligned parallel with the membrane surface. Our results do not reveal any obvious connection between membrane interaction and antimicrobial effect for the studied peptides. By contrast cell-penetrating properties can be coupled to both the secondary structure and the degree of order of the peptides. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

  20. Composite system based on biomolecules-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube and ionic liquid: Electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of tryptophane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Li; Bu Caihong; Zhang Yijun; Du Jie; Lu Xiaoquan; Liu Xiuhui

    2011-01-01

    The combination of biomolecules-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNTs) and ionic liquid (IL) yields nanostructured biointerfaces, formed a novel kind of structurally uniform and bioelectrocatalytic activity material. Rutin was chosen as a model biomolecules to investigate the composite system. The MWNTs–Rutin–IL composite film was characterized by different methods including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), UV–vis spectra, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM). A pair of well-defined quasi reversible redox peaks of rutin was obtained at the MWNTs–Rutin–IL composite film modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by direct electron transfer between the rutin and the GCE electrode. Dramatically enhanced biocatalytic and electrocatalytic activity was exemplified at the MWNTs–Rutin–IL/GCE electrode by the oxidized of tryptophane. The oxidation peak currents of tryptophane in such modified electrode increased linearly with the concentrations of tryptophane in the range from 8 × 10 −8 to 2 × 10 −5 mol L −1 with a detection limit of 3.0 × 10 −8 mol L −1 . The unique composite material based on biomolecules-functionalized carbon nanotube and ionic liquid have wide potential applications in direct electrochemistry, biosensors, and biocatalysis.

  1. Influence of Tryptophan and Serotonin on Mood and Cognition with a Possible Role of the Gut-Brain Axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Trisha A.; Nguyen, Jason C. D.; Polglaze, Kate E.; Bertrand, Paul P.

    2016-01-01

    The serotonergic system forms a diffuse network within the central nervous system and plays a significant role in the regulation of mood and cognition. Manipulation of tryptophan levels, acutely or chronically, by depletion or supplementation, is an experimental procedure for modifying peripheral and central serotonin levels. These studies have allowed us to establish the role of serotonin in higher order brain function in both preclinical and clinical situations and have precipitated the finding that low brain serotonin levels are associated with poor memory and depressed mood. The gut-brain axis is a bi-directional system between the brain and gastrointestinal tract, linking emotional and cognitive centres of the brain with peripheral functioning of the digestive tract. An influence of gut microbiota on behaviour is becoming increasingly evident, as is the extension to tryptophan and serotonin, producing a possibility that alterations in the gut may be important in the pathophysiology of human central nervous system disorders. In this review we will discuss the effect of manipulating tryptophan on mood and cognition, and discuss a possible influence of the gut-brain axis. PMID:26805875

  2. Direct laser writing by two-photon polymerization as a tool for developing microenvironments for evaluation of bacterial growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otuka, A.J.G.; Corrêa, D.S.; Fontana, C.R.; Mendonça, C.R.

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring bacteria growth and motion in environments is fundamental to understand, for instance, how they proliferate and contaminate organism. Therefore, techniques to fabricate microenvironments for in situ and in vivo studies are interesting for that purpose. In this work we used two-photon polymerization to fabricate microenvironments and, as a proof of principle, we demonstrated the development of the bacteria ATCC 25922 Escherichia coli (E. coli) into the microstructure surroundings. Two varieties of polymeric microenvironments are presented: (i) a microenvironment doped at specific site with ciprofloxacin, an antibiotic typically used in the treatment of diseases caused by E. coli and (ii) micro-fences, which serve as traps for bacteria. These microenvironments, fabricated by two-photon polymerization, may be a potential platform for drug delivery system, by promoting or inhibiting the growth of bacteria in specific biological or synthetic sites. - Highlights: • Microenvironments were fabricated by two-photon polymerization. • We demonstrated the development of Escherichia coli into the microstructure surroundings. • Microenvironment doped with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin was fabricated. • Micro-fences, which serve as traps for bacteria, were also produced

  3. Direct laser writing by two-photon polymerization as a tool for developing microenvironments for evaluation of bacterial growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otuka, A.J.G. [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, CP.369, 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Corrêa, D.S. [Laboratório Nacional de Nanotecnologia para o Agronegócio (LNNA), Embrapa Instrumentação, Rua XV de Novembro, 1452, CP.741, 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Fontana, C.R. [Department of Clinical Analysis, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo State (UNESP), 1621 Expedicionarios do Brasil Street, Araraquara, Sao Paulo 14801-960 (Brazil); Mendonça, C.R., E-mail: crmendon@ifsc.usp.br [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, CP.369, 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2014-02-01

    Monitoring bacteria growth and motion in environments is fundamental to understand, for instance, how they proliferate and contaminate organism. Therefore, techniques to fabricate microenvironments for in situ and in vivo studies are interesting for that purpose. In this work we used two-photon polymerization to fabricate microenvironments and, as a proof of principle, we demonstrated the development of the bacteria ATCC 25922 Escherichia coli (E. coli) into the microstructure surroundings. Two varieties of polymeric microenvironments are presented: (i) a microenvironment doped at specific site with ciprofloxacin, an antibiotic typically used in the treatment of diseases caused by E. coli and (ii) micro-fences, which serve as traps for bacteria. These microenvironments, fabricated by two-photon polymerization, may be a potential platform for drug delivery system, by promoting or inhibiting the growth of bacteria in specific biological or synthetic sites. - Highlights: • Microenvironments were fabricated by two-photon polymerization. • We demonstrated the development of Escherichia coli into the microstructure surroundings. • Microenvironment doped with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin was fabricated. • Micro-fences, which serve as traps for bacteria, were also produced.

  4. Determination of soluble protein contents from RVNRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Manshol Wan Zin; Nurulhuda Othman

    1996-01-01

    This project was carried out to determine the soluble protein contents on RVNRL film vulcanisates, with respect to the RVNRL storage time, gamma irradiation dose absorbed by the latex and the effect of different leaching time and leaching conditions. These three factors are important in the hope to determine the best possible mean of minimizing the soluble protein contents in products made from RVNRL. Within the nine months storage period employed in the study, the results show that, the longer the storage period the less the soluble protein extracted from the film samples. Gamma irradiation dose absorbed by the samples, between 5.3 kGy to 25.2 kGy seems to influence the soluble protein contents of the RVNRL films vulcanisates. The higher the dose the more was the soluble protein extracted from the film samples. At an absorbed dose of 5.3 kGy and 25.2 kGy, the soluble contents were 0. 198 mg/ml and 0.247 mg/ml respectively. At a fixed leaching temperature, the soluble proteins increases with leaching time and at a fixed leaching time, the soluble proteins increases with leaching temperature. ne highest extractable protein contents was determined at a leaching time of 10 minutes and leaching temperature of 90'C The protein analysis were done by using Modified Lowry Method

  5. Solubility Study of Curatives in Various Rubbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, R.; Talma, Auke; Datta, Rabin; Dierkes, Wilma K.; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.

    2008-01-01

    The previous works on solubility of curatives in rubbers were mainly carried out in natural rubber. Not too much information available on dissimilar rubbers and this is important because most of the compounds today are blends of dissimilar rubbers. Although solubility can be expected to certain

  6. Solubility Products of M(II) - Carbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, Rolf; Berner, Urs

    1999-01-01

    Many solubility data for M(II) carbonates commonly compiled in tables are contradictory and sometimes obviously wrong. The quality of such data has been evaluated based on the original publications and reliable solubility constants have been selected for the carbonates of Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb with the help of cross-comparisons. (author)

  7. Hansen Solubility Parameters for Octahedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    1997, 80, 386-&. 5. Hansen, C. M. The three-dimensional solubility parameter -- key to paint component affinities I. J. Paint Technol. 1967, 39, 104...Chai, J.; Zhang, Q. X.; Han, D. X.; Niu, L. Synthesis and Application of Widely Soluble Graphene Sheets. Langmuir 2010, 26, 12314-12320. 12. Hansen, C

  8. A Colorful Solubility Exercise for Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugrue, Christopher R.; Mentzen, Hans H., II; Linton, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    A discovery chemistry laboratory has been developed for the introductory organic chemistry student to investigate the concepts of polarity, miscibility, solubility, and density. The simple procedure takes advantage of the solubility of two colored dyes in a series of solvents or solvent mixtures, and the diffusion of colors can be easily…

  9. Application of gene targeting to designed mutation breeding of high-tryptophan rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saika, Hiroaki; Oikawa, Akira; Matsuda, Fumio; Onodera, Haruko; Saito, Kazuki; Toki, Seiichi

    2011-07-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis via gene targeting (GT) based on homologous recombination is the ultimate mutation breeding technology because it enables useful information acquired from structural- and computational-based protein engineering to be applied directly to molecular breeding, including metabolic engineering, of crops. Here, we employed this rationale to introduce precise mutations in OASA2--an α-subunit of anthranilate synthase that is a key enzyme of tryptophan (Trp) biosynthesis in rice (Oryza sativa)--via GT, with subsequent selection of GT cells using a Trp analog. The expression level of OASA2 in plants homozygous and heterozygous for modified OASA2 was similar to that of nontransformants, suggesting that OASA2 transcription in GT plants was controlled in the same manner as endogenous OASA2, and that GT could lead to a lower risk of gene silencing than in conventional overexpression approaches. Moreover, we showed that enzymatic properties deduced from protein engineering or in vitro analysis could be reproduced in GT plants as evidenced by Trp accumulation levels. Interestingly, mature seeds of homozygous GT plants accumulated Trp levels 230-fold higher than in nontransformants without any apparent morphological or developmental changes. Thus, we have succeeded in producing a novel rice plant of great potential nutritional benefit for both man and livestock that could not have been selected using conventional mutagenesis approaches. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of directed crop improvement by combining precision mutagenesis via GT with a knowledge of protein engineering.

  10. Acute hyponatremia after cardioplegia by histidine-tryptophane-ketoglutarate – a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindner Gregor

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte disorder in hospitalized patients and is known to be associated with increased mortality. The administration of antegrade single-shot, up to two liters, histidine-tryptophane-ketoglutarate (HTK solution for adequate electromechanical cardiac arrest and myocardial preservation during minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR is a standard procedure. We aimed to determine the impact of HTK infusion on electrolyte and acid–base balance. Methods In this retrospective analysis we reviewed data on patient characteristics, type of surgery, arterial blood gas analysis during surgery and intra-/postoperative laboratory results of patients receiving surgery for MIAVR at a large tertiary care university hospital. Results A total of 25 patients were included in the study. All patients were normonatremic at start of surgery. All patients developed hyponatremia after administration of HTK solution with a significant drop of serum sodium of 15 mmol/L (p  Conclusions Acute hyponatremia during cardioplegia with HTK solution is isotonic and should probably not be corrected without presence of hypotonicity as confirmed by measurement of serum osmolality.

  11. 5-HT modulation by acute tryptophan depletion of human instrumental contingency judgements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Henry W; Crockett, Molly J; Msetfi, Rachel M; Murphy, Robin A; Clark, Luke; Sahakian, Barbara J; Robbins, Trevor W

    2011-02-01

    The concept of 'depressive realism', that depression leads to more accurate perception of causal control, has been influential in the field of depression research, but remains controversial. Recent work testing contingency learning has suggested that contextual processing might determine realism-like effects. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, (5-HT)), which is implicated in the pathophysiology of depression, might also influence contextual processing. Using acute tryptophan depletion (ATD), we tested the hypothesis that dysfunctional serotoninergic neurotransmission influences contingency judgements in dysphoric subjects via an effect on contextual processing. We employed a novel contingency learning task to obtain separate measures (ratings) of the causal effect of participants' responses and efficacy of the background context over an outcome. Participants, without a history of depression, completed this task on and off ATD in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects design. As with other work on contingency learning, the effects of ATD were related to baseline mood levels. Although no overall effects of ATD were observed, the subgroup of participants with low Beck depression inventory (BDI) scores showed reduced ratings of contextual control and improved accuracy of contingency judgements under positive contingencies following ATD, compared to placebo. High BDI participants demonstrated low accuracy in contingency judgements, regardless of serotoninergic status. No effect of ATD on contingency judgements was observed in the group as a whole, but effects were observed in a subgroup of participants with low BDI scores. We discuss these data in light of the context processing hypothesis, and prior research on 5-HT and depressive realism.

  12. Effect of Tryptophan Hydroxylase-2 rs7305115 SNP on suicide attempts risk in major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yuqi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suicide and major depressive disorders (MDD are strongly associated, and genetic factors are responsible for at least part of the variability in suicide risk. We investigated whether variation at the tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH2 gene rs7305115 SNP may predispose to suicide attempts in MDD. Methods We genotyped TPH2 gene rs7305115 SNP in 215 MDD patients with suicide and matched MDD patients without suicide. Differences in behavioral and personality traits according to genotypic variation were investigated by logistic regression analysis. Results There were no significant differences between MDD patients with suicide and controls in genotypic (AG and GG frequencies for rs7305115 SNP, but the distribution of AA genotype differed significantly (14.4% vs. 29.3%, p p p Conclusions The study suggested that hopelessness, negative life events and family history of suicide were risk factors of attempted suicide in MDD while the TPH2 rs7305115A remained a significant protective predictor of suicide attempts.

  13. Interactions between the nuclear matrix and an enhancer of the tryptophan oxygenase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneoka, Hidenori [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Miyake, Katsuhide, E-mail: miyake@nubio.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Iijima, Shinji [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2009-10-02

    The gene for tryptophan oxygenase (TO) is expressed in adult hepatocytes in a tissue- and differentiation-specific manner. The TO promoter has two glucocorticoid-responsive elements (GREs), and its expression is regulated by glucocorticoid hormone in the liver. We found a novel GRE in close proximity to a scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) that was located around -8.5 kb from the transcriptional start site of the TO gene by electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. A combination of nuclear fractionation and quantitative PCR analysis showed that the S/MAR was tethered to the nuclear matrix in both fetal and adult hepatocytes. ChIP assay showed that, in adult hepatocytes, the S/MAR-GRE and the promoter proximal regions interacted with lamin and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U in a dexamethasone dependent manner, but this was not the case in fetal cells, suggesting that developmental stage-specific expression of the TO gene might rely on the binding of the enhancer (the -8.5 kb S/MAR-GRE) and the promoter to the inner nuclear matrix.

  14. Alterations in tryptophan and purine metabolism in cocaine addiction: a metabolomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patkar, Ashwin A; Rozen, Steve; Mannelli, Paolo; Matson, Wayne; Pae, Chi-Un; Krishnan, K Ranga; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima

    2009-10-01

    Mapping metabolic "signatures" can provide new insights into addictive mechanisms and potentially identify biomarkers and therapeutic targets. We examined the differences in metabolites related to the tyrosine, tryptophan, purine, and oxidative stress pathways between cocaine-dependent subjects and healthy controls. Several of these metabolites serve as biological indices underlying the mechanisms of reinforcement, toxicity, and oxidative stress. Metabolomic analysis was performed in 18 DSM-IV-diagnosed cocaine-dependent individuals with at least 2 weeks of abstinence and ten drug-free controls. Plasma concentrations of 37 known metabolites were analyzed and compared using a liquid chromatography electrochemical array platform. Multivariate analyses were used to study the relationship between severity of drug use [Addiction Severity Index (ASI) scores] and biological measures. Cocaine subjects showed significantly higher levels of n-methylserotonin (p cocaine and control groups with no overlap. Alterations in the methylation processes in the serotonin pathways and purine metabolism seem to be associated with chronic exposure to cocaine. Given the preliminary nature and cross-sectional design of the study, the findings need to be confirmed in larger samples of cocaine-dependent subjects, preferably in a longitudinal design.

  15. Tryptophan hydroxylase Is Required for Eye Melanogenesis in the Planarian Schmidtea mediterranea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bramwell G Lambrus

    Full Text Available Melanins are ubiquitous and biologically important pigments, yet the molecular mechanisms that regulate their synthesis and biochemical composition are not fully understood. Here we present a study that supports a role for serotonin in melanin synthesis in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. We characterize the tryptophan hydroxylase (tph gene, which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in serotonin synthesis, and demonstrate by RNA interference that tph is essential for melanin production in the pigment cups of the planarian photoreceptors. We exploit this phenotype to investigate the biological function of pigment cups using a quantitative light-avoidance behavioral assay. Planarians lacking eye pigment remain phototactic, indicating that eye pigmentation is not essential for light avoidance in S. mediterranea, though it improves the efficiency of the photophobic response. Finally, we show that the eye pigmentation defect observed in tph knockdown animals can be rescued by injection of either the product of TPH, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP, or serotonin. Together, these results highlight a role for serotonin in melanogenesis, perhaps as a regulatory signal or as a pigment substrate. To our knowledge, this is the first example of this relationship to be reported outside of mammalian systems.

  16. Studies on the application of tryptophan metabolites as indicators of acute radiation damage and their modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streffer, C.

    1979-01-01

    It has been the aim of the investigations to continue earlier studies on the amplication of tryptophan metabolites as biochemical indicators after irradiation. These metabolites are of interest as they apparently indicate radiation effects in contrast to other metabolites like taurine and deoxycytidine in a dose range which leads to acute radiation sickness with the consequence of death. This assumption has been confirmed by the results of these studies. Measurements in the urine of rats demonstrate that the excretion of kynurenic acid and of xanthurenic acid as well as especially the ratio of kynurenic acid/anthranilic acid increases considerably in those animals which die some days later. The excretion of the surviving anilic acid increases considerably in those animals which die some days later. The excretion of the surviving animals is characteristical different. This abnormal excretion is induced by changes of specific, hepatic enzyme activities. The investigations have shown that the effects on the enzyme activities apppear not only after X-rays irradiation but also after neutrons. The studies, which have been performed with human material on the NAD-metabolism, demonstrate that with respect to the enzyme activities in the spleen as well as to the urinary excretion the same or similar effects, which have been found with animal experiments, can be expected. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 CKA [de

  17. Specificity of the Acute Tryptophan and Tyrosine plus Phenylalanine Depletion and Loading Tests Part II:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla A.-B. Badawy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Current formulations for acute tryptophan (Trp or tyrosine (Tyr plus phenylalanine (Phe depletion and loading cause undesirable decreases in ratios of Trp or Tyr + Phe to competing amino acids (CAA, thus undermining the specificities of these tests. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA cause these unintended decreases, and lowering their content in a new balanced control formulation in the present study led to normalization of all ratios. Four groups (n = 12 each of adults each received one of four 50 g control formulations, with 0% (traditional, 20%, 30%, or 40% less of the BCAA. The free and total [Trp]/[CAA] and [Phe + Tyr]/[BCAA+ Trp] ratios all decreased significantly during the first 5 h following the traditional formulation, but were fully normalized by the formulation containing 40% less of the BCAA. We recommend the latter as a balanced control formulation and propose adjustments in the depletion and loading formulations to enhance their specificities for 5-HT and the catecholamines.

  18. Interactions between the nuclear matrix and an enhancer of the tryptophan oxygenase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneoka, Hidenori; Miyake, Katsuhide; Iijima, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    The gene for tryptophan oxygenase (TO) is expressed in adult hepatocytes in a tissue- and differentiation-specific manner. The TO promoter has two glucocorticoid-responsive elements (GREs), and its expression is regulated by glucocorticoid hormone in the liver. We found a novel GRE in close proximity to a scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) that was located around -8.5 kb from the transcriptional start site of the TO gene by electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. A combination of nuclear fractionation and quantitative PCR analysis showed that the S/MAR was tethered to the nuclear matrix in both fetal and adult hepatocytes. ChIP assay showed that, in adult hepatocytes, the S/MAR-GRE and the promoter proximal regions interacted with lamin and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U in a dexamethasone dependent manner, but this was not the case in fetal cells, suggesting that developmental stage-specific expression of the TO gene might rely on the binding of the enhancer (the -8.5 kb S/MAR-GRE) and the promoter to the inner nuclear matrix.

  19. Tryptophan depletion affects the autonomic stress response in generalized social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veen, J Frederieke; van Vliet, Irene M; de Rijk, Roel H; van Pelt, Johannes; Mertens, Bart; Fekkes, Durk; Zitman, Frans G

    2009-11-01

    In generalized social anxiety disorder (gSAD), serotonergic dysfunctions are found, as well as abnormalities of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in basal conditions and of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis in response to psychological challenges. These findings raise the question whether these phenomena are interrelated. Therefore we designed a study in which two groups with nine pair wise age and gender matched gSAD patients (total of 10 men and 8 women), who were successfully treated with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), underwent a tryptophan depletion challenge (TD) or a placebo condition. A TD procedure temporarily decreases serotonergic neurotransmission. In order to activate the stress system the TD/placebo challenge was combined with a public speaking task. We assessed ANS responses, as measured with the promising new marker salivary alpha-amylase (sAA), and HPA-axis responses, as measured with salivary cortisol. The most important result was that the TD group showed a significant larger sAA response to the public speaking task as compared to the placebo group, reflecting hyperresponsivity of the ANS in this group, whereas no differences were seen in cortisol responses. This suggests that in gSAD there is a vulnerability of the ANS more than the HPA-axis.

  20. Determination of adenine based on the fluorescence recovery of the L-Tryptophan-Cu(2+) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Ruilin; Li, Chunyan; Liu, Shaopu; Liu, Zhongfang; Li, Yuanfang; Yuan, Yusheng; Hu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-05

    A simple and sensitive method for determination of adenine was developed based on fluorescence quenching and recovery of L-Tryptophan (L-Trp). The fluorescence of L-Trp could efficiently quenched by copper ion compared with other common metal ions. Upon addition of adenine (Ade) in L-Trp-Cu(II) system, the fluorescence was reoccurred. Under the optimum conditions, the recovery fluorescence intensity was linearly correlated with the concentration of adenine in the range from 0.34 to 25.0μmolL(-1), with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.9994. The detection limit (3σ/k) was 0.046μmolL(-1), indicating that this method could applied to detect trace adenine. In this study, amino acids including L-Trp, D-Trp, L-Tyr, D-Tyr, L-Phe, D-Phe were investigated and only L-Trp could well chelated copper ion. Additionally, the mechanism of quench and recovery also were discussed and the method was successfully applied to detect the adenine in DNA with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.