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Sample records for trypanosomatid blastocrithidia culicis

  1. Predicting the proteins of Angomonas deanei, Strigomonas culicis and their respective endosymbionts reveals new aspects of the trypanosomatidae family.

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    Maria Cristina Machado Motta

    Full Text Available Endosymbiont-bearing trypanosomatids have been considered excellent models for the study of cell evolution because the host protozoan co-evolves with an intracellular bacterium in a mutualistic relationship. Such protozoa inhabit a single invertebrate host during their entire life cycle and exhibit special characteristics that group them in a particular phylogenetic cluster of the Trypanosomatidae family, thus classified as monoxenics. In an effort to better understand such symbiotic association, we used DNA pyrosequencing and a reference-guided assembly to generate reads that predicted 16,960 and 12,162 open reading frames (ORFs in two symbiont-bearing trypanosomatids, Angomonas deanei (previously named as Crithidia deanei and Strigomonas culicis (first known as Blastocrithidia culicis, respectively. Identification of each ORF was based primarily on TriTrypDB using tblastn, and each ORF was confirmed by employing getorf from EMBOSS and Newbler 2.6 when necessary. The monoxenic organisms revealed conserved housekeeping functions when compared to other trypanosomatids, especially compared with Leishmania major. However, major differences were found in ORFs corresponding to the cytoskeleton, the kinetoplast, and the paraflagellar structure. The monoxenic organisms also contain a large number of genes for cytosolic calpain-like and surface gp63 metalloproteases and a reduced number of compartmentalized cysteine proteases in comparison to other TriTryp organisms, reflecting adaptations to the presence of the symbiont. The assembled bacterial endosymbiont sequences exhibit a high A+T content with a total of 787 and 769 ORFs for the Angomonas deanei and Strigomonas culicis endosymbionts, respectively, and indicate that these organisms hold a common ancestor related to the Alcaligenaceae family. Importantly, both symbionts contain enzymes that complement essential host cell biosynthetic pathways, such as those for amino acid, lipid and purine

  2. Predicting the Proteins of Angomonas deanei, Strigomonas culicis and Their Respective Endosymbionts Reveals New Aspects of the Trypanosomatidae Family

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    Motta, Maria Cristina Machado; Martins, Allan Cezar de Azevedo; de Souza, Silvana Sant’Anna; Catta-Preta, Carolina Moura Costa; Silva, Rosane; Klein, Cecilia Coimbra; de Almeida, Luiz Gonzaga Paula; de Lima Cunha, Oberdan; Ciapina, Luciane Prioli; Brocchi, Marcelo; Colabardini, Ana Cristina; de Araujo Lima, Bruna; Machado, Carlos Renato; de Almeida Soares, Célia Maria; Probst, Christian Macagnan; de Menezes, Claudia Beatriz Afonso; Thompson, Claudia Elizabeth; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Gradia, Daniela Fiori; Pavoni, Daniela Parada; Grisard, Edmundo C.; Fantinatti-Garboggini, Fabiana; Marchini, Fabricio Klerynton; Rodrigues-Luiz, Gabriela Flávia; Wagner, Glauber; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique; Fietto, Juliana Lopes Rangel; Elias, Maria Carolina; Goldman, Maria Helena S.; Sagot, Marie-France; Pereira, Maristela; Stoco, Patrícia H.; de Mendonça-Neto, Rondon Pessoa; Teixeira, Santuza Maria Ribeiro; Maciel, Talles Eduardo Ferreira; de Oliveira Mendes, Tiago Antônio; Ürményi, Turán P.; de Souza, Wanderley; Schenkman, Sergio; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    Endosymbiont-bearing trypanosomatids have been considered excellent models for the study of cell evolution because the host protozoan co-evolves with an intracellular bacterium in a mutualistic relationship. Such protozoa inhabit a single invertebrate host during their entire life cycle and exhibit special characteristics that group them in a particular phylogenetic cluster of the Trypanosomatidae family, thus classified as monoxenics. In an effort to better understand such symbiotic association, we used DNA pyrosequencing and a reference-guided assembly to generate reads that predicted 16,960 and 12,162 open reading frames (ORFs) in two symbiont-bearing trypanosomatids, Angomonas deanei (previously named as Crithidia deanei) and Strigomonas culicis (first known as Blastocrithidia culicis), respectively. Identification of each ORF was based primarily on TriTrypDB using tblastn, and each ORF was confirmed by employing getorf from EMBOSS and Newbler 2.6 when necessary. The monoxenic organisms revealed conserved housekeeping functions when compared to other trypanosomatids, especially compared with Leishmania major. However, major differences were found in ORFs corresponding to the cytoskeleton, the kinetoplast, and the paraflagellar structure. The monoxenic organisms also contain a large number of genes for cytosolic calpain-like and surface gp63 metalloproteases and a reduced number of compartmentalized cysteine proteases in comparison to other TriTryp organisms, reflecting adaptations to the presence of the symbiont. The assembled bacterial endosymbiont sequences exhibit a high A+T content with a total of 787 and 769 ORFs for the Angomonas deanei and Strigomonas culicis endosymbionts, respectively, and indicate that these organisms hold a common ancestor related to the Alcaligenaceae family. Importantly, both symbionts contain enzymes that complement essential host cell biosynthetic pathways, such as those for amino acid, lipid and purine/pyrimidine metabolism

  3. Actin expression in trypanosomatids (Euglenozoa: Kinetoplastea)

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    Souza, Ligia Cristina Kalb; Pinho, Rosana Elisa Gonçalves Gonçalves; Lima, Carla Vanessa de Paula; Fragoso, Stênio Perdigão; Soares, Maurilio José

    2013-01-01

    Heteroxenic and monoxenic trypanosomatids were screened for the presence of actin using a mouse polyclonal antibody produced against the entire sequence of the Trypanosoma cruzi actin gene, encoding a 41.9 kDa protein. Western blot analysis showed that this antibody reacted with a polypeptide of approximately 42 kDa in the whole-cell lysates of parasites targeting mammals (T. cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major), insects (Angomonas deanei, Crithidia fasciculata, Herpetomonas samuelpessoai and Strigomonas culicis) and plants (Phytomonas serpens). A single polypeptide of approximately 42 kDa was detected in the whole-cell lysates of T. cruzi cultured epimastigotes, metacyclic trypomastigotes and amastigotes at similar protein expression levels. Confocal microscopy showed that actin was expressed throughout the cytoplasm of all the tested trypanosomatids. These data demonstrate that actin expression is widespread in trypanosomatids. PMID:23903980

  4. Actin expression in trypanosomatids (Euglenozoa: Kinetoplastea

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    Ligia Cristina Kalb Souza

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Heteroxenic and monoxenic trypanosomatids were screened for the presence of actin using a mouse polyclonal antibody produced against the entire sequence of the Trypanosoma cruzi actin gene, encoding a 41.9 kDa protein. Western blot analysis showed that this antibody reacted with a polypeptide of approximately 42 kDa in the whole-cell lysates of parasites targeting mammals (T. cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major, insects (Angomonas deanei, Crithidia fasciculata, Herpetomonas samuelpessoai and Strigomonas culicis and plants (Phytomonas serpens. A single polypeptide of approximately 42 kDa was detected in the whole-cell lysates of T. cruzi cultured epimastigotes, metacyclic trypomastigotes and amastigotes at similar protein expression levels. Confocal microscopy showed that actin was expressed throughout the cytoplasm of all the tested trypanosomatids. These data demonstrate that actin expression is widespread in trypanosomatids.

  5. Morphological and molecular description of Blastocrithidia cyrtomeni sp. nov. (Kinetoplastea: Trypanosomatidae associated with Cyrtomenus bergi Froeschner (Hemiptera: Cydnidae from Colombia

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    Ana Milena Caicedo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A new trypanosomatid species, Blastocrithidia cyrtomeni, is herein described using morphological and molecular data. It was found parasitising the alimentary tract of the insect host Cyrtomenus bergi, a polyphagous pest. The morphology of B. cyrtomeni was investigated using light and transmission microscopy and molecular phylogeny was inferred from the sequences of spliced leader RNA (SL rRNA - 5S rRNA gene repeats and the 18S small subunit (SSU rRNA gene. Epimastigotes of variable size with straphanger cysts adhering to the middle of the flagellum were observed in the intestinal tract, hemolymph and Malpighian tubules. Kinetoplasts were always observed anterior to the nucleus. The ultrastructure of longitudinal sections of epimastigotes showed the flagellum arising laterally from a relatively shallow flagellar pocket near the kinetoplast. SL RNA and 5S rRNA gene repeats were positive in all cases, producing a 0.8-kb band. The amplicons were 797-803 bp long with > 98.5% identity, indicating that they originated from the same organism. According to the sequence analysis of the SL-5S rRNA gene repeats and the 18S SSU rRNA gene, B. cyrtomeni is different from all other known species or isolates of Trypanosomatidae. Both analyses indicate that among known species, it is most closely related to Blastocrithidia triatomae.

  6. Gene Expression in Trypanosomatid Parasites

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    Santiago Martínez-Calvillo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The parasites Leishmania spp., Trypanosoma brucei, and Trypanosoma cruzi are the trypanosomatid protozoa that cause the deadly human diseases leishmaniasis, African sleeping sickness, and Chagas disease, respectively. These organisms possess unique mechanisms for gene expression such as constitutive polycistronic transcription of protein-coding genes and trans-splicing. Little is known about either the DNA sequences or the proteins that are involved in the initiation and termination of transcription in trypanosomatids. In silico analyses of the genome databases of these parasites led to the identification of a small number of proteins involved in gene expression. However, functional studies have revealed that trypanosomatids have more general transcription factors than originally estimated. Many posttranslational histone modifications, histone variants, and chromatin modifying enzymes have been identified in trypanosomatids, and recent genome-wide studies showed that epigenetic regulation might play a very important role in gene expression in this group of parasites. Here, we review and comment on the most recent findings related to transcription initiation and termination in trypanosomatid protozoa.

  7. Insect trypanosomatids: the need to know more

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    Sergei A Podlipaev

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Of ten recognized trypanosomatid genera, only two -- pathogenic Trypanosoma and Leishmania -- have been actively investigated for any length of time while the plant flagellates -- Phytomonas -- have recently begun to attract attention due to their role as agricultural parasites. The remaining genera that comprise parasites associated with insects have been largely neglected except for two or three containing popular isolates. This publication reviews current knowledge of trypanosomatids from insects.

  8. The limits on trypanosomatid morphological diversity.

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    Richard John Wheeler

    Full Text Available Cell shape is one, often overlooked, way in which protozoan parasites have adapted to a variety of host and vector environments and directional transmissions between these environments. Consequently, different parasite life cycle stages have characteristic morphologies. Trypanosomatid parasites are an excellent example of this in which large morphological variations between species and life cycle stage occur, despite sharing well-conserved cytoskeletal and membranous structures. Here, using previously published reports in the literature of the morphology of 248 isolates of trypanosomatid species from different hosts, we perform a meta-analysis of the occurrence and limits on morphological diversity of different classes of trypanosomatid morphology (trypomastigote, promastigote, etc. in the vertebrate bloodstream and invertebrate gut environments. We identified several limits on cell body length, cell body width and flagellum length diversity which can be interpreted as biomechanical limits on the capacity of the cell to attain particular dimensions. These limits differed for morphologies with and without a laterally attached flagellum which we suggest represent two morphological superclasses, the 'juxtaform' and 'liberform' superclasses. Further limits were identified consistent with a selective pressure from the mechanical properties of the vertebrate bloodstream environment; trypanosomatid size showed limits relative to host erythrocyte dimensions. This is the first comprehensive analysis of the limits of morphological diversity in any protozoan parasite, revealing the morphogenetic constraints and extrinsic selection pressures associated with the full diversity of trypanosomatid morphology.

  9. Phytomonas: trypanosomatids adapted to plant environments.

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    Jaskowska, Eleanor; Butler, Claire; Preston, Gail; Kelly, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Over 100 years after trypanosomatids were first discovered in plant tissues, Phytomonas parasites have now been isolated across the globe from members of 24 different plant families. Most identified species have not been associated with any plant pathology and to date only two species are definitively known to cause plant disease. These diseases (wilt of palm and coffee phloem necrosis) are problematic in areas of South America where they threaten the economies of developing countries. In contrast to their mammalian infective relatives, our knowledge of the biology of Phytomonas parasites and how they interact with their plant hosts is limited. This review draws together a century of research into plant trypanosomatids, from the first isolations and experimental infections to the recent publication of the first Phytomonas genomes. The availability of genomic data for these plant parasites opens a new avenue for comparative investigations into trypanosomatid biology and provides fresh insight into how this important group of parasites have adapted to survive in a spectrum of hosts from crocodiles to coconuts.

  10. Molecular identification of trypanosomatids in wild animals.

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    Tenório, M S; Oliveira e Sousa, L; Alves-Martin, M F; Paixão, M S; Rodrigues, M V; Starke-Buzetti, W A; Araújo Junior, J P; Lucheis, S B

    2014-06-16

    Diverse wild animal species can be reservoirs of zoonotic flagellate parasites, which can cause pathologic Chagas disease. The present study aimed to detect the natural occurrence of flagellate parasites through direct microscopic examination of the parasites in blood samples and through PCR of whole blood and blood culture (haemoculture) samples from 38 captive and 65 free-living wild animals in the Centre for Conservation of Wild Fauna (CCWF), an area endemic for leishmaniasis. For this study, PCR was accomplished using primers for the ribosomal region (ITS-1) of the flagellate parasites. The amplified fragments were cloned and sequenced to identify DNA of the Trypanosomatid parasite species, observed in blood cultures from 3.9% (04/103) of the animals. Through these techniques, Trypanosoma cruzi was identified in haemoculture samples of the following three free-living species: common agouti (Dasyprocta aguti), white-eared opossum (Didelphis albiventris), and nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus). Furthermore, Trypanosoma minasense was identified in whole blood samples from 01 (0.9%) captive animal (black howler monkey-Alouatta caraya). These results demonstrated the first report of T. cruzi isolation in wild species from the CCWF using blood culture, which can be applied in addition to molecular tools for epidemiological studies and to identify trypanosomatids in wild animals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of Small RNAs in Trypanosomatid Infections

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    Linhares-Lacerda, Leandra; Morrot, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomatid parasites survive and replicate in the host by using mechanisms that aim to establish a successful infection and ensure parasite survival. Evidence points to microRNAs as new players in the host-parasite interplay. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that control proteins levels via post-transcriptional gene down-regulation, either within the cells where they were produced or in other cells via intercellular transfer. These microRNAs can be modulated in host cells during infection and are among the growing group of small regulatory RNAs, for which many classes have been described, including the transfer RNA-derived small RNAs. Parasites can either manipulate microRNAs to evade host-driven damage and/or transfer small RNAs to host cells. In this mini-review, we present evidence for the involvement of small RNAs, such as microRNAs, in trypanosomatid infections which lack RNA interference. We highlight both microRNA profile alterations in host cells during those infections and the horizontal transfer of small RNAs and proteins from parasites to the host by membrane-derived extracellular vesicles in a cell communication mechanism. PMID:27065454

  12. Novel Trypanosomatid-Bacterium Association: Evolution of Endosymbiosis in Action

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kostygov, A.Y.; Dobáková, Eva; Grybchuk-Ieremenko, A.; Váhala, D.; Maslov, D. A.; Votýpka, Jan; Lukeš, Julius; Yurchenko, V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2016), č. článku e01985-15. ISSN 2150-7511 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-23986S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316304 - MODBIOLIN Grant - others:EU COST Action CM1307 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : leader rna gene * insect trypanosomatids * monoxenous trypanosomatids * neotropical heteroptera * Trichomonas vaginalis * phylogenetic analysis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.956, year: 2016

  13. Biogenesis, maintenance and dynamics of glycosomes in trypanosomatid parasites.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, J.R.; González-Marcano, E.B.; Gualdrón-López, M.; Michels, P.A.

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisomes of organisms belonging to the protist group Kinetoplastea, which include trypanosomatid parasites of the genera Trypanosoma and Leishmania, are unique in playing a crucial role in glycolysis and other parts of intermediary metabolism. They sequester the majority of the glycolytic enzymes

  14. Infection of a mammal by monogenetic insect trypanosomatids (Kinetoplastida, trypanosomatidae

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    Ana M. Jansen

    1988-09-01

    Full Text Available Monogenetic insect trypanosomatids of the genera Crithidia, Leptomonas and Herpetomonas, multiplied as in axenic cultures, for many months, in the lumen of the scent glands of the opossum Didelphis marsupialis. Specific antibodies were detected in the serum of the animals but there was no evidence of invasion of their tissues by the parasites.

  15. Apoptosis in Trypanosomatids: Evolutionary and phylogenetic considerations

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    Marcello A. Barcinski

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death (PCD or apoptosis, an active process of cell death, plays a central role in normal tissue development and organogenesis, as well as in the pathogenesis of different diseases. Although it occurs in diverse cells and tissues under the influence of a remarkable variety of inducing agents, the resultant ultrastructural and biochemical changes are extremely monotonous, indicating the existence of a common biological mechanism underlying its occurrence. It is generally accepted that a developmental program leading to cell death cannot be advantageous to unicellular organisms and that PCD appeared in evolution to fulfill the organizational needs of multicellular life. However, the recent description of apoptotic death occurring in three different species of pathogenic kinetoplastids suggests that the evolutionary origin of PCD precedes the appearence of multicellular organisms. The present study proposes that a population of pathogenic Trypanosomatids is socially organized and that PCD is a prerequisite for this organization and for the fulfillment of the demands of a heteroxenic lifestyle. This proposal includes possible roles for PCD in the development of the parasite in the insect vector and/or in its mammalian host and suggests experimental strategies to localize the evolutionary origin of PCD within the kinetoplastids.A morte celular programada (PCD ou apoptose, um processo ativo de morte celular, desempenha um papel fundamental no desenvolvimento tecidual normal e na organogênese, assim como na patogênese de diferentes doenças. Embora este processo ocorra em uma gama variada de diferentes células e tecidos, sob a influência dos mais diversos agentes indutores, a resultante morfológica e bioquímica do processo é extremamente monótona, sugerindo que um mecanismo único opere em todas as situações. Era consensualmente aceito que um programa de morte programada não poderia ser vantajoso para organismos unicelulares e

  16. Phytomonas serpens: immunological similarities with the human trypanosomatid pathogens.

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    Santos, André L S; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Elias, Camila G R; Vermelho, Alane B; Branquinha, Marta H

    2007-07-01

    The present review provides an overview of recent discoveries concerning the immunological similarities between Phytomonas serpens, a tomato parasite, and human trypanosomatid pathogens, with special emphasis on peptidases. Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi express peptidases that are well-known virulence factors, named leishmanolysin and cruzipain. P. serpens synthesizes two distinct classes of proteolytic enzymes, metallo- and cysteine-type peptidases, that share common epitopes with leishmanolysin and cruzipain, respectively. The leishmanolysin-like and cruzipain-like molecules from P. serpens participate in several biological processes including cellular growth and adhesion to the salivary glands of Oncopeltus fasciatus, a phytophagous insect experimental model. Since previous reports demonstrated that immunization of mice with P. serpens induced a partial protective immune response against T. cruzi, this plant trypanosomatid may be a suitable candidate for vaccine studies. Moreover, comparative approaches in the Trypanosomatidae family may be useful to understand kinetoplastid biology, biochemistry and evolution.

  17. Genomic and phylogenetic evidence of VIPER retrotransposon domestication in trypanosomatids

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    Adriana Ludwig

    Full Text Available Transposable elements are important residents of eukaryotic genomes and eventually the host can domesticate them to serve cellular functions. We reported here a possible domestication event of the vestigial interposed retroelement (VIPER in trypanosomatids. We found a large gene in a syntenic location in Leishmania braziliensis, L. panamensis, Leptomanas pyrrhocoris, and Crithidia fasciculata whose products share similarity in the C-terminal portion with the third protein of VIPER. No remnants of other VIPER regions surrounding the gene sequence were found. We hypothesise that the domestication event occurred more than 50 mya and the conservation of this gene suggests it might perform some function in the host species.

  18. Arginine kinase in Phytomonas, a trypanosomatid parasite of plants.

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    Canepa, Gaspar E; Carrillo, Carolina; Miranda, Mariana R; Sayé, Melisa; Pereira, Claudio A

    2011-09-01

    Phytomonas are trypanosomatid plant parasites closely related to parasites that cause several human diseases. Little is known about the biology of these organisms including aspects of their metabolism. Arginine kinase (E.C. 2.7.3.3) is a phosphotransferase which catalyzes the interconversion between the phosphagen phosphoarginine and ATP. This enzyme is present in some invertebrates and is a homolog of another widely distributed phosphosphagen kinase, creatine kinase. In this work, a single canonical arginine kinase isoform was detected in Phytomonas Jma by enzymatic activity assays, PCR, and Western Blot. This arginine kinase is very similar to the canonical isoforms found in T. cruzi and T. brucei, presenting about 70% of amino acid sequence identity and a very similar molecular weight (40kDa). The Phytomonas phosphagen system seems to be very similar to T. cruzi, which has only one isoform, or T. brucei (three isoforms); establishing a difference with other trypanosomatids, such as Leishmania, which completely lacks phosphagen kinases, probably by the presence of the arginine-consuming enzyme, arginase. Finally, phylogenetic analysis suggests that Kinetoplastids' arginine kinase was acquired, during evolution, from the arthropod vectors by horizontal gene transfer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Escaping Deleterious Immune Response in Their Hosts: Lessons from Trypanosomatids

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    Geiger, Anne; Bossard, Géraldine; Sereno, Denis; Pissarra, Joana; Lemesre, Jean-Loup; Vincendeau, Philippe; Holzmuller, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The Trypanosomatidae family includes the genera Trypanosoma and Leishmania, protozoan parasites displaying complex digenetic life cycles requiring a vertebrate host and an insect vector. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania spp. are important human pathogens causing human African trypanosomiasis (HAT or sleeping sickness), Chagas’ disease, and various clinical forms of Leishmaniasis, respectively. They are transmitted to humans by tsetse flies, triatomine bugs, or sandflies, and affect millions of people worldwide. In humans, extracellular African trypanosomes (T. brucei) evade the hosts’ immune defenses, allowing their transmission to the next host, via the tsetse vector. By contrast, T. cruzi and Leishmania sp. have developed a complex intracellular lifestyle, also preventing several mechanisms to circumvent the host’s immune response. This review seeks to set out the immune evasion strategies developed by the different trypanosomatids resulting from parasite–host interactions and will focus on: clinical and epidemiological importance of diseases; life cycles: parasites–hosts–vectors; innate immunity: key steps for trypanosomatids in invading hosts; deregulation of antigen-presenting cells; disruption of efficient specific immunity; and the immune responses used for parasite proliferation. PMID:27303406

  20. Purification and Partial Characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi Triosephosphate Isomerase

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    Bourguignon SC

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme triosephosphate isomerase (TPI, EC 5.3.1.1 was purified from extracts of epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. The purification steps included: hydrophobic interaction chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose, CM-Sepharose, and high performance liquid gel filtration chromatography. The CM-Sepharose material contained two bands (27 and 25 kDa with similar isoelectric points (pI 9.3-9.5 which could be separated by gel filtration in high performance liquid chromatography. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the porcine TPI detected one single polypeptide on western blot with a molecular weight (27 kDa identical to that purified from T. cruzi. These antibodies also recognized only one band of identical molecular weight in western blots of several other trypanosomatids (Blastocrithidia culicis, Crithidia desouzai, Phytomonas serpens, Herpertomonas samuelpessoai. The presence of only one enzymatic form of TPI in T. cruzi epimastigotes was confirmed by agarose gel activity assay and its localization was established by immunocytochemical analysis. The T. cruzi purified TPI (as well as other trypanosomatid' TPIs is a dimeric protein, composed of two identical subunits with an approximate mw of 27,000 and it is resolved on two dimensional gel electrophoresis with a pI of 9.3. Sequence analysis of the N-terminal portion of the 27 kDa protein revealed a high homology to Leishmania mexicana and T. brucei proteins

  1. Phylogenomic analysis of kinetoplastids supports that trypanosomatids arose from within bodonids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deschamps, Philippe; Lara, Enrique; Marande, William

    2011-01-01

    -, Procryptobia sorokini -Parabodonida-, and Rhynchomonas nasuta -Neobodonida-). We identified 64 well-conserved proteins shared by these species, four trypanosomatids, and two closely related outgroup species (Euglena gracilis and Diplonema papillatum). Phylogenetic analysis of a concatenated data set yielded...

  2. Sterol Biosynthesis Pathway as Target for Anti-trypanosomatid Drugs

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    Wanderley de Souza

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Sterols are constituents of the cellular membranes that are essential for their normal structure and function. In mammalian cells, cholesterol is the main sterol found in the various membranes. However, other sterols predominate in eukaryotic microorganisms such as fungi and protozoa. It is now well established that an important metabolic pathway in fungi and in members of the Trypanosomatidae family is one that produces a special class of sterols, including ergosterol, and other 24-methyl sterols, which are required for parasitic growth and viability, but are absent from mammalian host cells. Currently, there are several drugs that interfere with sterol biosynthesis (SB that are in use to treat diseases such as high cholesterol in humans and fungal infections. In this review, we analyze the effects of drugs such as (a statins, which act on the mevalonate pathway by inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase, (b bisphosphonates, which interfere with the isoprenoid pathway in the step catalyzed by farnesyl diphosphate synthase, (c zaragozic acids and quinuclidines, inhibitors of squalene synthase (SQS, which catalyzes the first committed step in sterol biosynthesis, (d allylamines, inhibitors of squalene epoxidase, (e azoles, which inhibit C14α-demethylase, and (f azasterols, which inhibit Δ24(25-sterol methyltransferase (SMT. Inhibition of this last step appears to have high selectivity for fungi and trypanosomatids, since this enzyme is not found in mammalian cells. We review here the IC50 values of these various inhibitors, their effects on the growth of trypanosomatids (both in axenic cultures and in cell cultures, and their effects on protozoan structural organization (as evaluted by light and electron microscopy and lipid composition. The results show that the mitochondrial membrane as well as the membrane lining the protozoan cell body and flagellum are the main targets. Probably as a consequence of these primary effects, other important changes take

  3. Evolutionary Conservation and Diversification of the Translation Initiation Apparatus in Trypanosomatids

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    Alexandra Zinoviev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomatids are ancient eukaryotic parasites that migrate between insect vectors and mammalian hosts, causing a range of diseases in humans and domestic animals. Trypanosomatids feature a multitude of unusual molecular features, including polycistronic transcription and subsequent processing by trans-splicing and polyadenylation. Regulation of protein coding genes is posttranscriptional and thus, translation regulation is fundamental for activating the developmental program of gene expression. The spliced-leader RNA is attached to all mRNAs. It contains an unusual hypermethylated cap-4 structure in its 5 end. The cap-binding complex, eIF4F, has gone through evolutionary changes in accordance with the requirement to bind cap-4. The eIF4F components in trypanosomatids are highly diverged from their orthologs in higher eukaryotes, and their potential functions are discussed. The cap-binding activity in all eukaryotes is a target for regulation and plays a similar role in trypanosomatids. Recent studies revealed a novel eIF4E-interacting protein, involved in directing stage-specific and stress-induced translation pathways. Translation regulation during stress also follows unusual regulatory cues, as the increased translation of Hsp83 following heat stress is driven by a defined element in the 3 UTR, unlike higher eukaryotes. Overall, the environmental switches experienced by trypanosomatids during their life cycle seem to affect their translational machinery in unique ways.

  4. High frequency of trypanosomatids in gallery forest bats of a Neotropical savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, João Lucas M; Minuzzi-Souza, Thaís T C; Silva, Larissa R; Oliveira, Amanda C; Mendonça, Vagner J; Nitz, Nadjar; Aguiar, Ludmilla M S; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo

    2018-01-01

    Bats are well-known hosts of trypanosomatids, though information about their role as reservoirs of these protozoans in the Brazilian savanna is poorly known. We aimed to analyze the occurrence of trypanosomatid species in bats occurring in remnants of gallery forests of Brasília, Federal District of Brazil. We sampled bats using mist nets in six sites, and we collected blood, wing fragments and oral swab samples from all captured individuals. Trypanosomatids were identified in the captured bats through sequencing of the SSUrRNA region and kDNA qPCR. We found no parasite in blood smears of 146 individuals of 14 species captured, but blood cultures were positive for nine bats. We detected trypanosomatids molecularly in 111 (76%) specimens of all bat species in the studied areas. Most of the infected bats had Leishmania-like DNA detected in blood and swab samples of the oral mucosa. We distinguished three species of Trypanosoma (Trypanosoma dionisii, T. rangeli and T. cruzi) in Carollia perspicillata. SSUrRNA PCR of oral samples is a non-invasive and practical method for identification of trypanosomatid species in bats. Our results support our belief that bats could be potential reservoirs for Trypanosoma and Leishmania-like species in the enzootic cycle of these parasites in gallery forests of the Brazilian Cerrado biome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Interaction of insect trypanosomatids with mosquitoes, sand fly and the respective insect cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fampa, Patrícia; Corrêa-da-Silva, Miguel S; Lima, Dinair C; Oliveira, Sandra M P; Motta, Maria Cristina M; Saraiva, Elvira M B

    2003-09-15

    Interaction experiments between hematophagous insects and monoxenous trypanosomatids have become relevant, once cases of human infection involving these protozoa have been reported. Moreover, investigations related to the interaction of insects with trypanosomatids that harbour an endosymbiotic bacterium and thereby lack the paraflagellar rod structure are important to elucidate the role of this structure in the adhesion process. In this work, we compared the interaction of endosymbiont-bearing trypanosomatids and their aposymbiotic counterpart strains (without endosymbionts) with cell lines of Anopheles gambiae, Aedes albopictus and Lutzomyia longipalpis and with explanted guts of the respective insects. Endosymbiont-bearing strains interacted better with insect cells and guts when compared with aposymbiotic strains. In vitro binding assays revealed that the trypanosomatids interacted with the gut epithelial cells via flagellum and cell body. Flagella attached to the insect gut were enlarged, containing electrondense filaments between the axoneme and flagellar membrane at the point of adhesion. Interactions involving the flagellum lacking paraflagellar rod structure were mainly observed close to tight junctions, between epithelial cells. Endosymbiont-bearing trypanosomatids were able to colonise Aedes aegypti guts after protozoa feeding.

  6. Further evidence for the presence of mitochondrially encoded subunits in cytochrome c oxidase of the trypanosomatid Crithidia fasciculata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breek, C. K.; Speijer, D.; Dekker, H.; Muijsers, A. O.; Benne, R.

    1997-01-01

    Mitochondrial mRNAs in trypanosomatids are edited by uridylate insertion and deletion. The respiratory chain complexes cytochrome c reductase, cytochrome c oxidase and F0F1-ATPase of the insect trypanosomatid Crithidia fasciculata have been isolated and analysed by peptide microsequencing, but so

  7. Expressed sequence tags from the plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Georgios J; Benabdellah, Karim; Zingales, Bianca; González, Antonio

    2005-08-01

    We have generated 2190 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from a cDNA library of the plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens. Upon processing and clustering the set of 1893 accepted sequences was reduced to 697 clusters consisting of 452 singletons and 245 contigs. Functional categories were assigned based on BLAST searches against a database of the eukaryotic orthologous groups of proteins (KOG). Thirty six percent of the generated sequences showed no hits against the KOG database and 39.6% presented similarity to the KOG classes corresponding to translation, ribosomal structure and biogenesis. The most populated cluster contained 45 ESTs homologous to members of the glucose transporter family. This fact can be immediately correlated to the reported Phytomonas dependence on anaerobic glycolytic ATP production due to the lack of cytochrome-mediated respiratory chain. In this context, not only a number of enzymes of the glycolytic pathway were identified but also of the Krebs cycle as well as specific components of the respiratory chain. The data here reported, including a few hundred unique sequences and the description of tandemly repeated motifs and putative transcript stability motifs at untranslated mRNA ends, represent an initial approach to overcome the lack of information on the molecular biology of this organism.

  8. Transovum transmission of trypanosomatid cysts in the Milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe de Almeida Dias

    Full Text Available Leptomonas wallacei is a trypanosomatid that develops promastigotes and cystic forms in the gut of the hemipteran insect Oncopeltus fasciatus. Insect trypanosomatids are thought to be solely transmitted from one host to another through the ingestion of parasite-contaminated feces. However, here we show that L. wallacei cysts present on the eggshells of eggs laid by O. fasciatus can also act as infective forms that are transmitted to the insect offspring. Newly hatched O. faciatus nymphs are parasite-free, but some of them become contaminated with L. wallacei after feeding on eggshell remnants. The present study is the first report of transovum transmission of a trypanosomatid, a process that may have a relevant role in parasite's within-host population dynamics.

  9. Transovum transmission of trypanosomatid cysts in the Milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Felipe de Almeida; Vasconcellos, Luiz Ricardo da Costa; Romeiro, Alexandre; Attias, Marcia; Souto-Padrón, Thais Cristina; Lopes, Angela Hampshire

    2014-01-01

    Leptomonas wallacei is a trypanosomatid that develops promastigotes and cystic forms in the gut of the hemipteran insect Oncopeltus fasciatus. Insect trypanosomatids are thought to be solely transmitted from one host to another through the ingestion of parasite-contaminated feces. However, here we show that L. wallacei cysts present on the eggshells of eggs laid by O. fasciatus can also act as infective forms that are transmitted to the insect offspring. Newly hatched O. faciatus nymphs are parasite-free, but some of them become contaminated with L. wallacei after feeding on eggshell remnants. The present study is the first report of transovum transmission of a trypanosomatid, a process that may have a relevant role in parasite's within-host population dynamics.

  10. Evidence for regulated expression of Telomeric Repeat-containing RNAs (TERRA) in parasitic trypanosomatids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasceno, Jeziel D; Silva, Gabriel LA; Tschudi, Christian; Tosi, Luiz Ro

    2017-08-01

    The Telomeric Repeat-containing RNAs (TERRA) participate in the homeostasis of telomeres in higher eukaryotes. Here, we investigated the expression of TERRA in Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma brucei and found evidences for its expression as a specific RNA class. The trypanosomatid TERRA are heterogeneous in size and partially polyadenylated. The levels of TERRA transcripts appear to be modulated through the life cycle in both trypanosomatids investigated, suggesting that TERRA play a stage-specific role in the life cycle of these early-branching eukaryotes.

  11. Diversity and phylogeny of insect trypanosomatids: all that is hidden shall be revealed

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maslov, D. A.; Votýpka, Jan; Yurchenko, V.; Lukeš, Julius

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 1 (2013), s. 43-52 ISSN 1471-4922 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1667 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : biodiversity * Kinetoplastea * insect trypanosomatids * monoxenous parasites * phylogeny * taxonomy * Trypanosomatidae Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.217, year: 2013

  12. Purification and characterization of cytochrome c oxidase from the insect trypanosomatid Crithidia fasciculata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speijer, D.; Muijsers, A. O.; Dekker, H.; de Haan, A.; Breek, C. K.; Albracht, S. P.; Benne, R.

    1996-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase was purified from the mitochondrial lysate of the insect trypanosomatid Crithidia fasciculata with the aid of a methyl hydrophobic interaction column in a rapid one-step procedure. The purified complex displayed all characteristics expected from a eukaryotic cytochrome c

  13. Phylogenetic relationships of trypanosomatids parasitising true bugs (Insecta: Heteroptera) in sub-Saharan Africa

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Votýpka, Jan; Klepetková, H.; Jirků, Milan; Kment, P.; Lukeš, Julius

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 5 (2012), s. 489-500 ISSN 0020-7519 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD206/09/H026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Trypanosomatids * Phylogeny * Diversity * Insects Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.637, year: 2012

  14. Pollen extracts and constituent sugars increase growth of a trypanosomatid parasite of bumble bees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan C. Palmer-Young

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemicals produced by plants, including at flowers, function in protection against plant diseases, and have a long history of use against trypanosomatid infection. Floral nectar and pollen, the sole food sources for many species of insect pollinators, contain phytochemicals that have been shown to reduce trypanosomatid infection in bumble and honey bees when fed as isolated compounds. Nectar and pollen, however, consist of phytochemical mixtures, which can have greater antimicrobial activity than do single compounds. This study tested the hypothesis that pollen extracts would inhibit parasite growth. Extracts of six different pollens were tested for direct inhibitory activity against cell cultures of the bumble bee trypanosomatid gut parasite Crithidia bombi. Surprisingly, pollen extracts increased parasite growth rather than inhibiting it. Pollen extracts contained high concentrations of sugars, mainly the monosaccharides glucose and fructose. Experimental manipulations of growth media showed that supplemental monosaccharides (glucose and fructose increased maximum cell density, while a common floral phytochemical (caffeic acid with inhibitory activity against other trypanosomatids had only weak inhibitory effects on Crithidia bombi. These results indicate that, although pollen is essential for bees and other pollinators, pollen may promote growth of intestinal parasites that are uninhibited by pollen phytochemicals and, as a result, can benefit from the nutrients that pollen provides.

  15. Targeting cattle-borne zoonoses and cattle pathogens using a novel trypanosomatid-based delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, G Adam; Wilson, Raymond; Fernando, Anuruddika; Robinson, Ailie; MacGregor, Paula; Kennedy, David; Schaap, Dick; Matthews, Jacqueline B; Matthews, Keith R

    2011-10-01

    Trypanosomatid parasites are notorious for the human diseases they cause throughout Africa and South America. However, non-pathogenic trypanosomatids are also found worldwide, infecting a wide range of hosts. One example is Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) theileri, a ubiquitous protozoan commensal of bovids, which is distributed globally. Exploiting knowledge of pathogenic trypanosomatids, we have developed Trypanosoma theileri as a novel vehicle to deliver vaccine antigens and other proteins to cattle. Conditions for the growth and transfection of T. theileri have been optimised and expressed heterologous proteins targeted for secretion or specific localisation at the cell interior or surface using trafficking signals from Trypanosoma brucei. In cattle, the engineered vehicle could establish in the context of a pre-existing natural T. theileri population, was maintained long-term and generated specific immune responses to an expressed Babesia antigen at protective levels. Building on several decades of basic research into trypanosomatid pathogens, Trypanosoma theileri offers significant potential to target multiple infections, including major cattle-borne zoonoses such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Brucella abortus and Mycobacterium spp. It also has the potential to deliver therapeutics to cattle, including the lytic factor that protects humans from cattle trypanosomiasis. This could alleviate poverty by protecting indigenous African cattle from African trypanosomiasis.

  16. Targeting cattle-borne zoonoses and cattle pathogens using a novel trypanosomatid-based delivery system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Adam Mott

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomatid parasites are notorious for the human diseases they cause throughout Africa and South America. However, non-pathogenic trypanosomatids are also found worldwide, infecting a wide range of hosts. One example is Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum theileri, a ubiquitous protozoan commensal of bovids, which is distributed globally. Exploiting knowledge of pathogenic trypanosomatids, we have developed Trypanosoma theileri as a novel vehicle to deliver vaccine antigens and other proteins to cattle. Conditions for the growth and transfection of T. theileri have been optimised and expressed heterologous proteins targeted for secretion or specific localisation at the cell interior or surface using trafficking signals from Trypanosoma brucei. In cattle, the engineered vehicle could establish in the context of a pre-existing natural T. theileri population, was maintained long-term and generated specific immune responses to an expressed Babesia antigen at protective levels. Building on several decades of basic research into trypanosomatid pathogens, Trypanosoma theileri offers significant potential to target multiple infections, including major cattle-borne zoonoses such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Brucella abortus and Mycobacterium spp. It also has the potential to deliver therapeutics to cattle, including the lytic factor that protects humans from cattle trypanosomiasis. This could alleviate poverty by protecting indigenous African cattle from African trypanosomiasis.

  17. Efficacy of common laboratory disinfectants and heat on killing trypanosomatid parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Kevin M

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The disinfectants TriGene, bleach, ethanol and liquid hand soap, and water and temperature were tested for their ability to kill bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei, epimastigotes of Trypanosoma rangeli and promastigotes of Leishmania major. A 5-min exposure to 0.2% TriGene, 0.1% liquid hand soap and 0.05% bleach (0.05% NaOCl killed all three trypanosomatids. Ethanol and water destroyed the parasites within 5 min at concentrations of 15–17.5% and 80–90%, respectively. All three organisms were also killed when treated for 5 min at 50°C. The results indicate that the disinfectants, water and temperature treatment (i.e. autoclaving are suitable laboratory hygiene measures against trypanosomatid parasites.

  18. Role of Heme and Heme-Proteins in Trypanosomatid Essential Metabolic Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina E. J. Tripodi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Around the world, trypanosomatids are known for being etiological agents of several highly disabling and often fatal diseases like Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi, leishmaniasis (Leishmania spp., and African trypanosomiasis (Trypanosoma brucei. Throughout their life cycle, they must cope with diverse environmental conditions, and the mechanisms involved in these processes are crucial for their survival. In this review, we describe the role of heme in several essential metabolic pathways of these protozoans. Notwithstanding trypanosomatids lack of the complete heme biosynthetic pathway, we focus our discussion in the metabolic role played for important heme-proteins, like cytochromes. Although several genes for different types of cytochromes, involved in mitochondrial respiration, polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism, and sterol biosynthesis, are annotated at the Tritryp Genome Project, the encoded proteins have not yet been deeply studied. We pointed our attention into relevant aspects of these protein functions that are amenable to be considered for rational design of trypanocidal agents.

  19. ULTRASTRUCTURAL STUDY ON TISSUE ALTERATIONS CAUSED BY TRYPANOSOMATIDS IN EXPERIMENTAL MURINE INFECTIONS

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    Héctor José Finol

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The ultrastructural study in different tissues of mice experimentally infected with isolates of Trypanosoma evansi, Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania mexicana reveals changes in cardiac myocytes, skeletal muscle fibers and hepatic, adrenal, kidney and spleen cells. Some were cytoarchitectural changes and other consisted of necrosis. Alterations were also found in microvasculature.The mononuclear cell infiltrate included neutrophils, eosinophils and macrophages. This work shows that various mice tissues are important target for trypanosomatids.

  20. Parasite Genotypically Related to a Monoxenous Trypanosomatid of Dog's Flea Causing Opportunistic Infection in an HIV Positive Patient

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    Pacheco Raquel S

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available An HIV positive patient presenting a clinical picture of visceral leishmaniasis co-infection was submitted to a bone marrow aspiration after admission to hospital. Amastigotes forms were seen in the bone marrow aspirate and the parasite grew in culture as promastigotes. Molecular analyses showed that the flagellates isolated did not belong to the genera Leishmania, Trypanosoma or Sauroleishmania. It was not possible to establish infection in laboratory animals. In vitro culture of mouse peritoneal macrophages revealed the invasion of the host cells by the flagellates and their killing 48 hr after infection. Opportunistic infection with an insect trypanosomatid was suspected. Further hybridization analyses against a pannel of different monoxenous and heteroxenous trypanosomatids showed kDNA cross-homology with Leptomonas pulexsimulantis a trypanosomatid found in the dog's flea

  1. Species-specific diagnostics of Apis mellifera trypanosomatids: A nine-year survey (2007-2015) for trypanosomatids and microsporidians in Serbian honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanovic, Jevrosima; Schwarz, Ryan S; Vejnovic, Branislav; Evans, Jay D; Irwin, Rebecca E; Glavinic, Uros; Stanimirovic, Zoran

    2016-09-01

    In this study, honey bees collected in Serbia over 9 consecutive years (2007-2015) were retrospectively surveyed to determine the prevalence of eukaryotic gut parasites by molecular screening of archival DNA samples. We developed species-specific primers for PCR to detect the two known honey bee trypanosomatid species, Crithidia mellificae and the recently described Lotmaria passim. These primers were validated for target specificity under single and mixed-species conditions as well as against the bumblebee trypanosomatid Crithidia bombi. Infections by Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae (Microsporidia) were also determined using PCR. Samples from 162 colonies (18 from each year) originating from 57 different localities were surveyed. L. passim was detected in every year with an overall frequency of 62.3% and annual frequencies ranging from 38.9% to 83.3%. This provides the earliest confirmed record to date for L. passim and the first report of this species in Serbia. N. ceranae was ubiquitous, occurring in every year and at 95.7% overall frequency, ranging annually from 83.3% to 100%. The majority of colonies (60.5%) were co-infected with L. passim and N. ceranae, but colony infections by each species were statistically independent of one another over the nine years. Although C. mellificae and N. apis have both been reported recently at low frequency in Europe, neither of these species was detected in Serbia. These results support the hypothesis that L. passim has predominated over C. mellificae in A. mellifera during the past decade. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Diacylglycerol-stimulated endocytosis of transferrin in trypanosomatids is dependent on tyrosine kinase activity.

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    Sandesh Subramanya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Small molecule regulation of cell function is an understudied area of trypanosomatid biology. In Trypanosoma brucei diacylglycerol (DAG stimulates endocytosis of transferrin (Tf. However, it is not known whether other trypanosomatidae respond similarly to the lipid. Further, the biochemical pathways involved in DAG signaling to the endocytic system in T. brucei are unknown, as the parasite genome does not encode canonical DAG receptors (e.g. C1-domains. We established that DAG stimulates endocytosis of Tf in Leishmania major, and we evaluated possible effector enzymes in the pathway with multiple approaches. First, a heterologously expressed glycosylphosphatidylinositol phospholipase C (GPI-PLC activated endocytosis of Tf 300% in L. major. Second, exogenous phorbol ester and DAGs promoted Tf endocytosis in L. major. In search of possible effectors of DAG signaling, we discovered a novel C1-like domain (i.e. C1_5 in trypanosomatids, and we identified protein Tyr kinases (PTKs linked with C1_5 domains in T. brucei, T. cruzi, and L. major. Consequently, we hypothesized that trypanosome PTKs might be effector enzymes for DAG signaling. General uptake of Tf was reduced by inhibitors of either Ser/Thr or Tyr kinases. However, DAG-stimulated endocytosis of Tf was blocked only by an inhibitor of PTKs, in both T. brucei and L. major. We conclude that (i DAG activates Tf endocytosis in L. major, and that (ii PTKs are effectors of DAG-stimulated endocytosis of Tf in trypanosomatids. DAG-stimulated endocytosis of Tf may be a T. brucei adaptation to compete effectively with host cells for vertebrate Tf in blood, since DAG does not enhance endocytosis of Tf in human cells.

  3. The trypanosomatid evolution workshop London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevens Jamie

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The trypanosome evolution workshop, a joint meeting of the University of Exeter and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, focused on topics relating to trypanosomatid and vector evolution. The meeting, sponsored by The Wellcome Trust, The Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Disease of World Health Organization and the British Section of the Society of Protozoologists, brought together an international group of experts who presented papers on a wide range of topics including parasite and vector phylogenies, molecular methodology and relevant biogeographical data.

  4. Efficacy of common laboratory disinfectants and heat on killing trypanosomatid parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xia; Jobe, Momodou; Tyler, Kevin M; Steverding, Dietmar

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The disinfectants TriGene, bleach, ethanol and liquid hand soap, and water and temperature were tested for their ability to kill bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei, epimastigotes of Trypanosoma rangeli and promastigotes of Leishmania major. A 5-min exposure to 0.2% TriGene, 0.1% liquid hand soap and 0.05% bleach (0.05% NaOCl) killed all three trypanosomatids. Ethanol and water destroyed the parasites within 5 min at concentrations of 15–17.5% and 80–90%, respectively. All three ...

  5. Molecular mechanisms of thermal resistance of the insect trypanosomatid Crithidia thermophilal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ishemgulova, A.; Butenko, A.; Kortišová, L.; Boucinha, C.; Grybchuk-Ieremenko, A.; Morelli, K.A.; Tesařová, Martina; Kraeva, N.; Grybchuk, D.; Pánek, T.; Flegontov, P.; Lukeš, Julius; Votýpka, Jan; Pavan, M. G.; Opperdoes, F. R.; Spodareva, V.; d'Avila-Levy, C.M.; Kostygov, A.Y.; Yurchenko, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 3 (2017), č. článku e0174165. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-23986S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-18699S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : subunit ribosomal-rna * sp-n * monoxenous trypanosomatids * neotropical heteroptera * mitochondrial hsp70 * paraflagellar rod * genus wallaceina * protein import * costa-rica * parasites Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016

  6. Auxin production by the plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens and auxin homoeostasis in infected tomato fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ienne, Susan; Freschi, Luciano; Vidotto, Vanessa F; De Souza, Tiago A; Purgatto, Eduardo; Zingales, Bianca

    2014-09-01

    Previously we have characterized the complete gene encoding a pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC)/indolepyruvate decarboxylase (IPDC) of Phytomonas serpens, a trypanosomatid highly abundant in tomato fruits. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the clade that contains the trypanosomatid protein behaves as a sister group of IPDCs of γ-proteobacteria. Since IPDCs are key enzymes in the biosynthesis of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), the ability for IAA production by P. serpens was investigated. Similar to many microorganisms, the production of IAA and related indolic compounds, quantified by high performance liquid chromatography, increased in P. serpens media in response to amounts of tryptophan. The auxin functionality was confirmed in the hypocotyl elongation assay. In tomato fruits inoculated with P. serpens the concentration of free IAA had no significant variation, whereas increased levels of IAA-amide and IAA-ester conjugates were observed. The data suggest that the auxin produced by the flagellate is converted to IAA conjugates, keeping unaltered the concentration of free IAA. Ethanol also accumulated in P. serpens-conditioned media, as the result of a PDC activity. In the article we discuss the hypothesis of the bifunctionality of P. serpens PDC/IPDC and provide a three-dimensional model of the enzyme.

  7. The Double-Edged Sword in Pathogenic Trypanosomatids: The Pivotal Role of Mitochondria in Oxidative Stress and Bioenergetics

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    Rubem Figueiredo Sadok Menna-Barreto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenic trypanosomatids Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania spp. are the causative agents of African trypanosomiasis, Chagas disease, and leishmaniasis, respectively. These diseases are considered to be neglected tropical illnesses that persist under conditions of poverty and are concentrated in impoverished populations in the developing world. Novel efficient and nontoxic drugs are urgently needed as substitutes for the currently limited chemotherapy. Trypanosomatids display a single mitochondrion with several peculiar features, such as the presence of different energetic and antioxidant enzymes and a specific arrangement of mitochondrial DNA (kinetoplast DNA. Due to mitochondrial differences between mammals and trypanosomatids, this organelle is an excellent candidate for drug intervention. Additionally, during trypanosomatids’ life cycle, the shape and functional plasticity of their single mitochondrion undergo profound alterations, reflecting adaptation to different environments. In an uncoupling situation, the organelle produces high amounts of reactive oxygen species. However, these species role in parasite biology is still controversial, involving parasite death, cell signalling, or even proliferation. Novel perspectives on trypanosomatid-targeting chemotherapy could be developed based on better comprehension of mitochondrial oxidative regulation processes.

  8. Host-specificity of monoxenous trypanosomatids: statistical analysis of the distribution and transmission patterns of the parasites from Neotropical Heteroptera

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozminsky, E.; Kraeva, N.; Ishemgulova, A.; Dobáková, Eva; Lukeš, Julius; Kment, P.; Yurchenko, V.; Votýpka, J.; Maslov, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 166, č. 5 (2015), s. 551-568 ISSN 1434-4610 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-23986S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanosomatids * Heteroptera * host-parasite specificity * biodiversity * Spliced Leader RNA Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.898, year: 2015

  9. The superfamily keeps growing: Identification in trypanosomatids of RibJ, the first riboflavin transporter family in protists.

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    Darío E Balcazar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomatid parasites represent a major health issue affecting hundreds of million people worldwide, with clinical treatments that are partially effective and/or very toxic. They are responsible for serious human and plant diseases including Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease, Trypanosoma brucei (Sleeping sickness, Leishmania spp. (Leishmaniasis, and Phytomonas spp. (phytoparasites. Both, animals and trypanosomatids lack the biosynthetic riboflavin (vitamin B2 pathway, the vital precursor of flavin mononucleotide (FMN and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD cofactors. While metazoans obtain riboflavin from the diet through RFVT/SLC52 transporters, the riboflavin transport mechanisms in trypanosomatids still remain unknown.Here, we show that riboflavin is imported with high affinity in Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei, Leishmania (Leishmania mexicana, Crithidia fasciculata and Phytomonas Jma using radiolabeled riboflavin transport assays. The vitamin is incorporated through a saturable carrier-mediated process. Effective competitive uptake occurs with riboflavin analogs roseoflavin, lumiflavin and lumichrome, and co-factor derivatives FMN and FAD. Moreover, important biological processes evaluated in T. cruzi (i.e. proliferation, metacyclogenesis and amastigote replication are dependent on riboflavin availability. In addition, the riboflavin competitive analogs were found to interfere with parasite physiology on riboflavin-dependent processes. By means of bioinformatics analyses we identified a novel family of riboflavin transporters (RibJ in trypanosomatids. Two RibJ members, TcRibJ and TbRibJ from T. cruzi and T. brucei respectively, were functionally characterized using homologous and/or heterologous expression systems.The RibJ family represents the first riboflavin transporters found in protists and the third eukaryotic family known to date. The essentiality of riboflavin for trypanosomatids, and the structural/biochemical differences

  10. The superfamily keeps growing: Identification in trypanosomatids of RibJ, the first riboflavin transporter family in protists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcazar, Darío E; Vanrell, María Cristina; Romano, Patricia S; Pereira, Claudio A; Goldbaum, Fernando A; Bonomi, Hernán R; Carrillo, Carolina

    2017-04-01

    Trypanosomatid parasites represent a major health issue affecting hundreds of million people worldwide, with clinical treatments that are partially effective and/or very toxic. They are responsible for serious human and plant diseases including Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease), Trypanosoma brucei (Sleeping sickness), Leishmania spp. (Leishmaniasis), and Phytomonas spp. (phytoparasites). Both, animals and trypanosomatids lack the biosynthetic riboflavin (vitamin B2) pathway, the vital precursor of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactors. While metazoans obtain riboflavin from the diet through RFVT/SLC52 transporters, the riboflavin transport mechanisms in trypanosomatids still remain unknown. Here, we show that riboflavin is imported with high affinity in Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei, Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana, Crithidia fasciculata and Phytomonas Jma using radiolabeled riboflavin transport assays. The vitamin is incorporated through a saturable carrier-mediated process. Effective competitive uptake occurs with riboflavin analogs roseoflavin, lumiflavin and lumichrome, and co-factor derivatives FMN and FAD. Moreover, important biological processes evaluated in T. cruzi (i.e. proliferation, metacyclogenesis and amastigote replication) are dependent on riboflavin availability. In addition, the riboflavin competitive analogs were found to interfere with parasite physiology on riboflavin-dependent processes. By means of bioinformatics analyses we identified a novel family of riboflavin transporters (RibJ) in trypanosomatids. Two RibJ members, TcRibJ and TbRibJ from T. cruzi and T. brucei respectively, were functionally characterized using homologous and/or heterologous expression systems. The RibJ family represents the first riboflavin transporters found in protists and the third eukaryotic family known to date. The essentiality of riboflavin for trypanosomatids, and the structural/biochemical differences that RFVT

  11. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase of Trypanosomatids: Characterization, Target Validation, and Drug Discovery

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    Shreedhara Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In trypanosomatids, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH, the first enzyme of the pentosephosphate pathway, is essential for the defense of the parasite against oxidative stress. Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania mexicana G6PDHs have been characterized. The parasites' G6PDHs contain a unique 37 amino acid long N-terminal extension that in T. cruzi seems to regulate the enzyme activity in a redox-state-dependent manner. T. brucei and T. cruzi G6PDHs, but not their Leishmania spp. counterpart, are inhibited, in an uncompetitive way, by steroids such as dehydroepiandrosterone and derivatives. The Trypanosoma enzymes are more susceptible to inhibition by these compounds than the human G6PDH. The steroids also effectively kill cultured trypanosomes but not Leishmania and are presently considered as promising leads for the development of new parasite-selective chemotherapeutic agents.

  12. Identification and phylogenetic analysis of heme synthesis genes in trypanosomatids and their bacterial endosymbionts.

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    João M P Alves

    Full Text Available It has been known for decades that some insect-infecting trypanosomatids can survive in culture without heme supplementation while others cannot, and that this capability is associated with the presence of a betaproteobacterial endosymbiont in the flagellate's cytoplasm. However, the specific mechanisms involved in this process remained obscure. In this work, we sequence and phylogenetically analyze the heme pathway genes from the symbionts and from their hosts, as well as from a number of heme synthesis-deficient Kinetoplastida. Our results show that the enzymes responsible for synthesis of heme are encoded on the symbiont genomes and produced in close cooperation with the flagellate host. Our evidence suggests that this synergistic relationship is the end result of a history of extensive gene loss and multiple lateral gene transfer events in different branches of the phylogeny of the Trypanosomatidae.

  13. Characterization of the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in the trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens (Kinetoplastida)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermáková, P.; Verner, Zdeněk; Man, Petr; Lukeš, Julius; Horváth, A.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 274, č. 12 (2007), s. 3150-3158 ISSN 1742-464X R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06129; GA MŠk LC07032; GA ČR GA204/06/1558 Grant - others:Vedecká grantová agentúra Ministerstva školstva SR a Slovenskej akadémie vied(SK) VEGA(SK) VEGA1/3241/06; Comenius University(SK) UK/139/2006; Comenius University(SK) UK/247/2007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : NADH dehydrogenase * complex I * Phytomonas * respiratory chain * trypanosomatid Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.396, year: 2007

  14. Characterization of the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in the trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens (Kinetoplastida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermáková, Petra; Verner, Zdenek; Man, Petr; Lukes, Julius; Horváth, Anton

    2007-06-01

    NADH dehydrogenase activity was characterized in the mitochondrial lysates of Phytomonas serpens, a trypanosomatid flagellate parasitizing plants. Two different high molecular weight NADH dehydrogenases were characterized by native PAGE and detected by direct in-gel activity staining. The association of NADH dehydrogenase activities with two distinct multisubunit complexes was revealed in the second dimension performed under denaturing conditions. One subunit present in both complexes cross-reacted with the antibody against the 39 kDa subunit of bovine complex I. Out of several subunits analyzed by MS, one contained a domain characteristic for the LYR family subunit of the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductases. Spectrophotometric measurement of the NADH:ubiquinone 10 and NADH:ferricyanide dehydrogenase activities revealed their different sensitivities to rotenone, piericidin, and diphenyl iodonium.

  15. The ever unfolding story of cAMP signalling in trypanosomatids: vive la difference!

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    Daniel Nii Aryee Tagoe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Kinetoplastids are unicellular, eukaryotic, flagellated protozoans containing the eponymous kinetoplast. Within this order, the family of trypanosomatids are responsible for some of the most serious human diseases, including Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi, sleeping sickness (T. brucei spp. and leishmaniasis (Leishmania spp. Although cAMP is produced during the life cycle stages of these parasites, its signalling pathways are very different from those of mammals. The absence of G-protein-coupled recep¬tors, the presence of structurally different adenylyl cyclases, the paucity of known cAMP effector proteins and the stringent need for regulation of cAMP in the small kinetoplastid cells all suggest a significantly different biochemical pathway and likely cell biology. However, each of the main kinetoplastid parasites express four class 1-type cyclic nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterases (PDEA-D, which have highly similar catalytic domains to that of human PDEs. To date, only TbrPDEB, expressed as two slightly different isoforms TbrPDEB1 and B2, has been found to be essential when ablated. Although the genomes contain reasonably well con¬served genes for catalytic and regulatory domains of pro¬tein kinase A, these have been shown to have varied structural and functional roles in the different species. Recent discovery of a role of cAMP/AMP metabolism in a quorum-sensing signalling pathway in T. brucei, and the identification of downstream cAMP Response Proteins (CARPs whose expression levels correlate with sensitivity to PDE inhibitors, suggests a complex signalling cascade. The interplay between the roles of these novel CARPs and the quorum-sensing signalling pathway on cell division and differentiation makes for intriguing cell biology and a new paradigm in cAMP signal transduction, as well as potential targets for trypanosomatid-specific cAMP pathway-based therapeutics.

  16. Glycoinositolphospholipids from Trypanosomatids Subvert Nitric Oxide Production in Rhodnius prolixus Salivary Glands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazos-Lopes, Felipe; Mesquita, Rafael Dias; Silva-Cardoso, Lívia; Senna, Raquel; Silveira, Alan Barbosa; Jablonka, Willy; Cudischevitch, Cecília Oliveira; Carneiro, Alan Brito; Machado, Ednildo Alcantara; Lima, Luize G.; Monteiro, Robson Queiroz; Nussenzveig, Roberto Henrique; Folly, Evelize; Romeiro, Alexandre; Vanbeselaere, Jorick; Mendonça-Previato, Lucia; Previato, José Osvaldo; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Ribeiro, José Marcos Chaves; Atella, Georgia Correa; Silva-Neto, Mário Alberto Cardoso

    2012-01-01

    Background Rhodnius prolixus is a blood-sucking bug vector of Trypanosoma cruzi and T. rangeli. T. cruzi is transmitted by vector feces deposited close to the wound produced by insect mouthparts, whereas T. rangeli invades salivary glands and is inoculated into the host skin. Bug saliva contains a set of nitric oxide-binding proteins, called nitrophorins, which deliver NO to host vessels and ensure vasodilation and blood feeding. NO is generated by nitric oxide synthases (NOS) present in the epithelium of bug salivary glands. Thus, T. rangeli is in close contact with NO while in the salivary glands. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we show by immunohistochemical, biochemical and molecular techniques that inositolphosphate-containing glycolipids from trypanosomatids downregulate NO synthesis in the salivary glands of R. prolixus. Injecting insects with T. rangeli-derived glycoinositolphospholipids (Tr GIPL) or T. cruzi-derived glycoinositolphospholipids (Tc GIPL) specifically decreased NO production. Salivary gland treatment with Tc GIPL blocks NO production without greatly affecting NOS mRNA levels. NOS protein is virtually absent from either Tr GIPL- or Tc GIPL-treated salivary glands. Evaluation of NO synthesis by using a fluorescent NO probe showed that T. rangeli-infected or Tc GIPL-treated glands do not show extensive labeling. The same effect is readily obtained by treatment of salivary glands with the classical protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate (SO). This suggests that parasite GIPLs induce the inhibition of a salivary gland PTP. GIPLs specifically suppressed NO production and did not affect other anti-hemostatic properties of saliva, such as the anti-clotting and anti-platelet activities. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these data suggest that trypanosomatids have overcome NO generation using their surface GIPLs. Therefore, these molecules ensure parasite survival and may ultimately enhance parasite transmission

  17. Aspartic peptidases of human pathogenic trypanosomatids: perspectives and trends for chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, L O; Garcia-Gomes, A S; Catanho, M; Sodre, C L; Santos, A L S; Branquinha, M H; d'Avila-Levy, C M

    2013-01-01

    Aspartic peptidases are proteolytic enzymes present in many organisms like vertebrates, plants, fungi, protozoa and in some retroviruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). These enzymes are involved in important metabolic processes in microorganisms/virus and play major roles in infectious diseases. Although few studies have been performed in order to identify and characterize aspartic peptidase in trypanosomatids, which include the etiologic agents of leishmaniasis, Chagas' disease and sleeping sickness, some beneficial properties of aspartic peptidase inhibitors have been described on fundamental biological events of these pathogenic agents. In this context, aspartic peptidase inhibitors (PIs) used in the current chemotherapy against HIV (e.g., amprenavir, indinavir, lopinavir, nelfinavir, ritonavir and saquinavir) were able to inhibit the aspartic peptidase activity produced by different species of Leishmania. Moreover, the treatment of Leishmania promastigotes with HIV PIs induced several perturbations on the parasite homeostasis, including loss of the motility and arrest of proliferation/growth. The HIV PIs also induced an increase in the level of reactive oxygen species and the appearance of irreversible morphological alterations, triggering parasite death pathways such as programed cell death (apoptosis) and uncontrolled autophagy. The blockage of physiological parasite events as well as the induction of death pathways culminated in its incapacity to adhere, survive and escape of phagocytic cells. Collectively, these results support the data showing that parasites treated with HIV PIs have a significant reduction in the ability to cause in vivo infection. Similarly, the treatment of Trypanosoma cruzi cells with pepstatin A showed a significant inhibition on both aspartic peptidase activity and growth as well as promoted several and irreversible morphological changes. These studies indicate that aspartic peptidases can be promising targets in

  18. Evidence for loss of a partial flagellar glycolytic pathway during trypanosomatid evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W B Brown

    Full Text Available Classically viewed as a cytosolic pathway, glycolysis is increasingly recognized as a metabolic pathway exhibiting surprisingly wide-ranging variations in compartmentalization within eukaryotic cells. Trypanosomatid parasites provide an extreme view of glycolytic enzyme compartmentalization as several glycolytic enzymes are found exclusively in peroxisomes. Here, we characterize Trypanosoma brucei flagellar proteins resembling glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH and phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK: we show the latter associates with the axoneme and the former is a novel paraflagellar rod component. The paraflagellar rod is an essential extra-axonemal structure in trypanosomes and related protists, providing a platform into which metabolic activities can be built. Yet, bioinformatics interrogation and structural modelling indicate neither the trypanosome PGK-like nor the GAPDH-like protein is catalytically active. Orthologs are present in a free-living ancestor of the trypanosomatids, Bodo saltans: the PGK-like protein from B. saltans also lacks key catalytic residues, but its GAPDH-like protein is predicted to be catalytically competent. We discuss the likelihood that the trypanosome GAPDH-like and PGK-like proteins constitute molecular evidence for evolutionary loss of a flagellar glycolytic pathway, either as a consequence of niche adaptation or the re-localization of glycolytic enzymes to peroxisomes and the extensive changes to glycolytic flux regulation that accompanied this re-localization. Evidence indicating loss of localized ATP provision via glycolytic enzymes therefore provides a novel contribution to an emerging theme of hidden diversity with respect to compartmentalization of the ubiquitous glycolytic pathway in eukaryotes. A possibility that trypanosome GAPDH-like protein additionally represents a degenerate example of a moonlighting protein is also discussed.

  19. Extensive flagellar remodeling during the complex life cycle of &ITParatrypanosoma&IT, an early-branching trypanosomatid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skalický, Tomáš; Dobáková, Eva; Wheeler, R. J.; Tesařová, Martina; Flegontov, P.; Jirsová, Dagmar; Votýpka, Jan; Yurchenko, V.; Ayala, F. J.; Lukeš, Julius

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 44 (2017), s. 11757-11762 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-23986S; GA MŠk LL1601; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : trypanosomatid * evolution * flagellar remodeling * haptomonads * cytostome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biology (theoretical, mathematical, thermal, cryobiology, biological rhythm), Evolutionary biology Impact factor: 9.661, year: 2016

  20. Partial kinetoplast-mitochondrial gene organization and expression in the respiratory deficient plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, D A; Nawathean, P; Scheel, J

    1999-04-30

    In plant-dwelling trypanosomatids from the genus Phytomonas, mitochondrial functions, such as cytochrome mediated respiration, ATP production and Krebs cycle, are missing, and cell energetics is based on the glycolysis. Using Blue Native/Tricine-SDS two-dimensional gel electrophoretic analysis, we observed that mitochondrial respiratory Complexes III (cytochrome bc1) and IV (cytochrome c oxidase) were absent in Phytomonas serpens; however, Complex V (ATPase) was present. A deletion of the genes for cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (COIII) and apocytochrome b (Cyb) was identified within the 6234 bp sequenced region of the 31 kb maxicircle kinetoplast DNA. Genes, found in this region, include 12S and 9S ribosomal RNAs, subunits 7, 8 and 9 of NADH dehydrogenase (ND7, ND8 and ND9) and subunit 6 of ATPase (A6 or MURF4), as well as the genes (MURF1, MURF5 and G3) with unknown function. Most genes are actively transcribed and some mRNAs are edited. Fully edited mRNAs for A6 and G3 were abundant, while edited ND7 transcripts were rare, and only partially edited and pre-edited transcripts for ND8 were detected. The data show that the mitochondrial genome of P. serpens is functional, although its functions may be limited to expressing the ATPase and, possibly, NADH dehydrogenase complexes.

  1. Natural infection of triatomines (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) by trypanosomatids in two different environments in the municipality of Ouro Preto do Oeste, State of Rondônia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneguetti, Dionatas Ulisses de Oliveira; Trevisan, Olzeno; Camargo, Luís Marcelo Aranha; Rosa, Renato Moreira

    2012-06-01

    This study analyzed the occurrence and the contamination of triatomines by trypanosomatids in Orbignya speciosa (babassu) specimens in the State of Rondônia, Brazil, in two different environments (pasture and woods). Capture of triatomines on babassus and microscopic search for trypanosomatids in their digestive tube were carried out. Four hundred ninety-four (494) specimens were captured (Rhodnius prolixus and R.robustus), of which 35.6% of the triatomines were positive for trypanosomatids. The high index of natural infection along with the abundance of triatomines points out to the necessity to create an epidemiological surveillance system to monitor vector-borne transmission and deepen the studies on the ecology of such vectors in the Amazon.

  2. Genome of Leptomonas pyrrhocoris: a high-quality reference for monoxenous trypanosomatids and new insights into evolution of Leishmania

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flegontov, P.; Butenko, A.; Firsov, Sergei; Kraeva, N.; Eliáš, M.; Field, M.C.; Filatov, D.; Flegontova, Olga; Gerasimov, E. S.; Hlaváčová, J.; Ishemgulova, A.; Jackson, A. P.; Kelly, S.; Kostygov, A.Y.; Logacheva, M.D.; Maslov, D. A.; Opperdoes, F. R.; O'Reilly, A.; Sádlová, J.; Ševčíková, T.; Venkatesh, D.; Vlček, Čestmír; Volf, P.; Votýpka, Jan; Záhonová, K.; Yurchenko, V.; Lukeš, Julius

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, MAR 29 (2016), č. článku 23704. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-23986S; GA ČR GA13-24983S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316304 - MODBIOLIN Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : amino-acid sites * leader rna gene * insect trypanosomatids * phylogenetic analysis * functional genomics * eukaryotic genomes * positive selection Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  3. Current relevance of fungal and trypanosomatid glycolipids and sphingolipids: studies defining structures conspicuously absent in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helio K. Takahashi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, glycosphingolipids have been attracting attention due to their role on biological systems as second messengers or modulators of signal transduction, affecting several events, which range from apoptosis to regulation of the cell cycle. In pathogenic fungi, glycolipids are expressed in two classes: neutral monohexosylceramides (glucosyl-or galactosylceramide and acidic glycosylinositol phosphorylceramides (the latter class carries longer glycan chains. It is worth to mention that monohexosylceramides exhibit significant structural differences in their lipid moieties compared to their mammalian counterparts, whereas the glycosylinositol phosphorylceramides exhibit remarkable structural differences in their carbohydrate moieties in comparison to mammal glycosphingolipids counterpart. We observed that glycosylinositol phosphorylceramides are capable of promoting immune response in infected humans. In addition, inhibiting fungal glycosphingolipid biosynthetic pathways leads to an inhibition of colony formation, spore germination, cell cycle, dimorphism and hyphal growth. Other pathogens, such as trypanosomatids, also present unique glycolipids, which may have an important role for the parasite development and/or disease establishment. Regarding host-pathogen interaction, cell membrane rafts, which are enriched in sphingolipids and sterols, participate in parasite/fungal infection. In this review, it is discussed the different biological roles of (glyco (sphingolipids of pathogenic/opportunistic fungi and trypanosomatids.Recentemente, glicoesfingolipídeos têm atraído atenção devido ao seu papel na biologia celular como segundo-mensageiro ou moduladores da transdução de sinal, afetando vários eventos, desde apoptose até a regulação do ciclo celular. Em fungos patogênicos, existem duas classes de glicolipídeos: monohexosil ceramidas neutras (glucosil-ou galactosilceramida e glicosilinositol fosforilceramidas (os quais apresentam

  4. Small subunit ribosomal metabarcoding reveals extraordinary trypanosomatid diversity in Brazilian bats.

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    Maria Augusta Dario

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bats are a highly successful, globally dispersed order of mammals that occupy a wide array of ecological niches. They are also intensely parasitized and implicated in multiple viral, bacterial and parasitic zoonoses. Trypanosomes are thought to be especially abundant and diverse in bats. In this study, we used 18S ribosomal RNA metabarcoding to probe bat trypanosome diversity in unprecedented detail.Total DNA was extracted from the blood of 90 bat individuals (17 species captured along Atlantic Forest fragments of Espírito Santo state, southeast Brazil. 18S ribosomal RNA was amplified by standard and/or nested PCR, then deep sequenced to recover and identify Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs for phylogenetic analysis. Blood samples from 34 bat individuals (13 species tested positive for infection by 18S rRNA amplification. Amplicon sequences clustered to 14 OTUs, of which five were identified as Trypanosoma cruzi I, T. cruzi III/V, Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei, Trypanosoma rangeli, and Trypanosoma dionisii, and seven were identified as novel genotypes monophyletic to basal T. cruzi clade types of the New World. Another OTU was identified as a trypanosome like those found in reptiles. Surprisingly, the remaining OTU was identified as Bodo saltans-closest non-parasitic relative of the trypanosomatid order. While three blood samples featured just one OTU (T. dionisii, all others resolved as mixed infections of up to eight OTUs.This study demonstrates the utility of next-generation barcoding methods to screen parasite diversity in mammalian reservoir hosts. We exposed high rates of local bat parasitism by multiple trypanosome species, some known to cause fatal human disease, others non-pathogenic, novel or yet little understood. Our results highlight bats as a long-standing nexus among host-parasite interactions of multiple niches, sustained in part by opportunistic and incidental infections of consequence to evolutionary theory as much as to

  5. Horizontal gene transfer confers fermentative metabolism in the respiratory-deficient plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ienne, Susan; Pappas, Georgios; Benabdellah, Karim; González, Antonio; Zingales, Bianca

    2012-04-01

    Among trypanosomatids, the genus Phytomonas is the only one specifically adapted to infect plants. These hosts provide a particular habitat with a plentiful supply of carbohydrates. Phytomonas sp. lacks a cytochrome-mediated respiratory chain and Krebs cycle, and ATP production relies predominantly on glycolysis. We have characterised the complete gene encoding a putative pyruvate/indolepyruvate decarboxylase (PDC/IPDC) (548 amino acids) of P. serpens, that displays high amino acid sequence similarity with phytobacteria and Leishmania enzymes. No orthologous PDC/IPDC genes were found in Trypanosoma cruzi or T. brucei. Conservation of the PDC/IPDC gene sequence was verified in 14 Phytomonas isolates. A phylogenetic analysis shows that Phytomonas protein is robustly monophyletic with Leishmania spp. and C. fasciculata enzymes. In the trees this clade appears as a sister group of indolepyruvate decarboxylases of γ-proteobacteria. This supports the proposition that a horizontal gene transfer event from a donor phytobacteria to a recipient ancestral trypanosome has occurred prior to the separation between Phytomonas, Leishmania and Crithidia. We have measured the PDC activity in P. serpens cell extracts. The enzyme has a Km value for pyruvate of 1.4mM. The acquisition of a PDC, a key enzyme in alcoholic fermentation, explains earlier observations that ethanol is one of the major end-products of glucose catabolism under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This represents an alternative and necessary route to reoxidise part of the NADH produced in the highly demanding glycolytic pathway and highlights the importance of this type of event in metabolic adaptation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Probing into the diversity of trypanosomatid flagellates parasitizing insect hosts in South-West China reveals both endemism and global dispersal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Votýpka, Jan; Maslov, D. A.; Yurchenko, V.; Jirků, Milan; Kment, P.; Lun, Z.-R.; Lukeš, Julius

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 1 (2010), s. 243-253 ISSN 1055-7903 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : trypanosomatids * phylogeny * diversity * insects Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.889, year: 2010

  7. Selective recovery of the cultivation-prone components from mixed trypanosomatid infections: a case of several novel species isolated from Neotropical Heteroptera

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yurchenko, V. Y.; Lukeš, Julius; Jirků, Milan; Maslov, D. A.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 43 (2009), s. 893-909 ISSN 1466-5026 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06129; GA MŠk LC07032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : gGAPDH * maximum-likelihood * spliced leader RNA * small-subunit rRNA * trypanosomatids Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.113, year: 2009

  8. Large differences in the genome organization of different plant Trypanosomatid parasites (Phytomonas spp.) reveal wide evolutionary divergences between taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, C; Dollet, M; Pagès, M; Bastien, P

    2009-03-01

    All currently known plant trypanosomes have been grouped in the genus Phytomonas spp., although they can differ greatly in terms of both their biological properties and effects upon the host. Those parasitizing the phloem sap are specifically associated with lethal syndromes in Latin America, such as, phloem necrosis of coffee, 'Hartrot' of coconut and 'Marchitez sorpresiva' of oil palm, that inflict considerable economic losses in endemic countries. The genomic organization of one group of Phytomonas (D) considered as representative of the genus has been published previously. The present work presents the genomic structure of two representative isolates from the pathogenic phloem-restricted group (H) of Phytomonas, analyzed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis followed by hybridization with chromosome-specific DNA markers. It came as a surprise to observe an extremely different genomic organization in this group as compared with that of group D. Most notably, the chromosome number is 7 in this group (with a genome size of 10 Mb) versus 21 in the group D (totalling 25 Mb). These data unravel an unsuspected genomic diversity within plant trypanosomatids, that may justify a further debate about their division into different genera.

  9. Differential expression of cruzipain- and gp63-like molecules in the phytoflagellate trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens induced by exogenous proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Camila G R; Chagas, Michel G; Souza-Gonçalves, Ana Luiza; Pascarelli, Bernardo M O; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Branquinha, Marta H; Santos, André L S

    2012-01-01

    Phytomonas serpens synthesizes metallo- and cysteine-proteases that are related to gp63 and cruzipain, respectively, two virulence factors produced by pathogenic trypanosomatids. Here, we described the cellular distribution of gp63- and cruzipain-like molecules in P. serpens through immunocytochemistry and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Both proteases were detected in distinct cellular compartments, presenting co-localization in membrane domains and intracellular regions. Subsequently, we showed that exogenous proteins modulated the production of both protease classes, but in different ways. Regarding the metalloprotease, only fetal bovine serum (FBS) influenced the gp63 expression, reducing its surface exposition (≈30%). Conversely, the cruzipain-like molecule was differentially modulated according to the proteins: human and bovine albumins reduced its expression around 50% and 35%, respectively; mucin and FBS did not alter its production, while IgG and hemoglobin drastically enhanced its surface exposition around 7- and 11-fold, respectively. Additionally, hemoglobin induced an augmentation in the cell-associated cruzipain-like activity in a dose-dependent manner. A twofold increase of the secreted cruzipain-like protein was detected after parasite incubation with 1% hemoglobin compared to the parasites incubated in PBS-glucose. The results showed the ability of P. serpens in modulating the expression and the activity of proteolytic enzymes after exposition to exogenous proteins, with emphasis in its cruzipain-like molecules. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Selective blockade of trypanosomatid protein synthesis by a recombinant antibody anti-Trypanosoma cruzi P2β protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayub, Maximiliano Juri; Nyambega, Benson; Simonetti, Leandro; Duffy, Tomas; Longhi, Silvia A; Gómez, Karina A; Hoebeke, Johan; Levin, Mariano J; Smulski, Cristian R

    2012-01-01

    The ribosomal P proteins are located on the stalk of the ribosomal large subunit and play a critical role during the elongation step of protein synthesis. The single chain recombinant antibody C5 (scFv C5) directed against the C-terminal region of the Trypanosoma cruzi P2β protein (TcP2β) recognizes the conserved C-terminal end of all T. cruzi ribosomal P proteins. Although this region is highly conserved among different species, surface plasmon resonance analysis showed that the scFv C5 possesses very low affinity for the corresponding mammalian epitope, despite having only one single amino-acid change. Crystallographic analysis, in silico modelization and NMR assays support the analysis, increasing our understanding on the structural basis of epitope specificity. In vitro protein synthesis experiments showed that scFv C5 was able to specifically block translation by T. cruzi and Crithidia fasciculata ribosomes, but virtually had no effect on Rattus norvegicus ribosomes. Therefore, we used the scFv C5 coding sequence to make inducible intrabodies in Trypanosoma brucei. Transgenic parasites showed a strong decrease in their growth rate after induction. These results strengthen the importance of the P protein C terminal regions for ribosomal translation activity and suggest that trypanosomatid ribosomal P proteins could be a possible target for selective therapeutic agents that could be derived from structural analysis of the scFv C5 antibody paratope.

  11. Selective blockade of trypanosomatid protein synthesis by a recombinant antibody anti-Trypanosoma cruzi P2β protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano Juri Ayub

    Full Text Available The ribosomal P proteins are located on the stalk of the ribosomal large subunit and play a critical role during the elongation step of protein synthesis. The single chain recombinant antibody C5 (scFv C5 directed against the C-terminal region of the Trypanosoma cruzi P2β protein (TcP2β recognizes the conserved C-terminal end of all T. cruzi ribosomal P proteins. Although this region is highly conserved among different species, surface plasmon resonance analysis showed that the scFv C5 possesses very low affinity for the corresponding mammalian epitope, despite having only one single amino-acid change. Crystallographic analysis, in silico modelization and NMR assays support the analysis, increasing our understanding on the structural basis of epitope specificity. In vitro protein synthesis experiments showed that scFv C5 was able to specifically block translation by T. cruzi and Crithidia fasciculata ribosomes, but virtually had no effect on Rattus norvegicus ribosomes. Therefore, we used the scFv C5 coding sequence to make inducible intrabodies in Trypanosoma brucei. Transgenic parasites showed a strong decrease in their growth rate after induction. These results strengthen the importance of the P protein C terminal regions for ribosomal translation activity and suggest that trypanosomatid ribosomal P proteins could be a possible target for selective therapeutic agents that could be derived from structural analysis of the scFv C5 antibody paratope.

  12. Genetic Diversity and Phylogenetic Relationships of Coevolving Symbiont-Harboring Insect Trypanosomatids, and Their Neotropical Dispersal by Invader African Blowflies (Calliphoridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarcilla C. Borghesan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study is about the inter- and intra-specific genetic diversity of trypanosomatids of the genus Angomonas, and their association with Calliphoridae (blowflies in Neotropical and Afrotropical regions. Microscopic examination of 3,900 flies of various families, mostly Calliphoridae, revealed that 31% of them harbored trypanosomatids. Small subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA barcoding showed that Angomonas predominated (46% over the other common trypanosomatids of blowflies of genera Herpetomonas and Wallacemonas. Among Angomonas spp., A. deanei was much more common than the two-other species, A. desouzai and A. ambiguus. Phylogenetic analyses based on SSU rRNA, glycosomal glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH and internal transcribed spacer rDNA (ITS rDNA sequences revealed a marked genetic diversity within A. deanei, which comprised four infraspecific genotypes (Dea1–Dea4, and four corresponding symbiont genotypes (Kcr1–Kcr4. Host and symbiont phylogenies were highly congruent corroborating their co-divergence, consistent with host-symbiont interdependent metabolism and symbiont reduced genomes shaped by a long coevolutionary history. We compared the diversity of Angomonas/symbionts from three genera of blowflies, Lucilia, Chrysomya and Cochliomyia. A. deanei, A. desouzai, and A. ambiguus were found in the three genera of blowflies in South America. In Africa, A. deanei and A. ambiguus were identified in Chrysomya. The absence of A. desouzai in Africa and its presence in Neotropical Cochliomyia and Lucilia suggests parasite spillback of A. desouzai into Chrysomya, which was most likely introduced four decades ago from Africa into the Neotropic. The absence of correlation between parasite diversity and geographic and genetic distances, with identical genotypes of A. deanei found in the Neotropic and Afrotropic, is consistent with disjunct distribution due to the recent human-mediated transoceanic dispersal of Angomonas by Chrysomya. This

  13. Genetic Diversity and Phylogenetic Relationships of Coevolving Symbiont-Harboring Insect Trypanosomatids, and Their Neotropical Dispersal by Invader African Blowflies (Calliphoridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghesan, Tarcilla C.; Campaner, Marta; Matsumoto, Tania E.; Espinosa, Omar A.; Razafindranaivo, Victor; Paiva, Fernando; Carranza, Julio C.; Añez, Nestor; Neves, Luis; Teixeira, Marta M. G.; Camargo, Erney P.

    2018-01-01

    This study is about the inter- and intra-specific genetic diversity of trypanosomatids of the genus Angomonas, and their association with Calliphoridae (blowflies) in Neotropical and Afrotropical regions. Microscopic examination of 3,900 flies of various families, mostly Calliphoridae, revealed that 31% of them harbored trypanosomatids. Small subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA) barcoding showed that Angomonas predominated (46%) over the other common trypanosomatids of blowflies of genera Herpetomonas and Wallacemonas. Among Angomonas spp., A. deanei was much more common than the two-other species, A. desouzai and A. ambiguus. Phylogenetic analyses based on SSU rRNA, glycosomal glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH) and internal transcribed spacer rDNA (ITS rDNA) sequences revealed a marked genetic diversity within A. deanei, which comprised four infraspecific genotypes (Dea1–Dea4), and four corresponding symbiont genotypes (Kcr1–Kcr4). Host and symbiont phylogenies were highly congruent corroborating their co-divergence, consistent with host-symbiont interdependent metabolism and symbiont reduced genomes shaped by a long coevolutionary history. We compared the diversity of Angomonas/symbionts from three genera of blowflies, Lucilia, Chrysomya and Cochliomyia. A. deanei, A. desouzai, and A. ambiguus were found in the three genera of blowflies in South America. In Africa, A. deanei and A. ambiguus were identified in Chrysomya. The absence of A. desouzai in Africa and its presence in Neotropical Cochliomyia and Lucilia suggests parasite spillback of A. desouzai into Chrysomya, which was most likely introduced four decades ago from Africa into the Neotropic. The absence of correlation between parasite diversity and geographic and genetic distances, with identical genotypes of A. deanei found in the Neotropic and Afrotropic, is consistent with disjunct distribution due to the recent human-mediated transoceanic dispersal of Angomonas by Chrysomya. This study provides

  14. Co-Infection and Wild Animal Health: Effects of Trypanosomatids and Gastrointestinal Parasites on Coatis of the Brazilian Pantanal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olifiers, Natalie; Jansen, Ana Maria; Herrera, Heitor Miraglia; Bianchi, Rita de Cassia; D’Andrea, Paulo Sergio; Mourão, Guilherme de Miranda; Gompper, Matthew Edzart

    2015-01-01

    Wild animals are infected by diverse parasites, but how they influence host health is poorly understood. We examined the relationship of trypanosomatids and gastrointestinal parasites with health of wild brown-nosed coatis (Nasua nasua) from the Brazilian Pantanal. We used coati body condition and hematological parameters as response variables in linear models that were compared using an information theoretic approach. Predictors were high/low parasitemias by Trypanosoma cruzi and T. evansi, and indices representing the abundance of distinct groups of gastrointestinal parasites. We also analyzed how host health changed with host sex and reproductive seasonality. Hemoparasites was best related to coati body condition and hematological indices, whereas abundance of gastrointestinal parasites was relatively less associated with coati health. Additionally, some associations were best predicted by models that incorporated reproductive seasonality and host sex. Overall, we observed a lower health condition during the breeding season, when coatis are under reproductive stress and may be less able to handle infection. In addition, females seem to handle infection better than males. Body condition was lower in coatis with high parasitemias of T. evansi, especially during the reproductive season. Total red blood cell counts, packed cell volume, platelets and eosinophils were also lower in animals with high T. evansi parasitemias. Total white blood cell counts and mature neutrophils were lower in animals with high parasitemias for both Trypanosoma species, with neutrophils decreasing mainly during the reproductive season. Overall, decreases in hematological parameters of females with T. evansi high parasitemias were less evident. For T. cruzi, monocytes decreased in individuals with high parasitemias. High abundances of microfilariae in the bloodstream, and cestode eggs and coccidian oocysts in feces were also associated with coati blood parameters. This study shows the

  15. Co-Infection and Wild Animal Health: Effects of Trypanosomatids and Gastrointestinal Parasites on Coatis of the Brazilian Pantanal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olifiers, Natalie; Jansen, Ana Maria; Herrera, Heitor Miraglia; Bianchi, Rita de Cassia; D'Andrea, Paulo Sergio; Mourão, Guilherme de Miranda; Gompper, Matthew Edzart

    2015-01-01

    Wild animals are infected by diverse parasites, but how they influence host health is poorly understood. We examined the relationship of trypanosomatids and gastrointestinal parasites with health of wild brown-nosed coatis (Nasua nasua) from the Brazilian Pantanal. We used coati body condition and hematological parameters as response variables in linear models that were compared using an information theoretic approach. Predictors were high/low parasitemias by Trypanosoma cruzi and T. evansi, and indices representing the abundance of distinct groups of gastrointestinal parasites. We also analyzed how host health changed with host sex and reproductive seasonality. Hemoparasites was best related to coati body condition and hematological indices, whereas abundance of gastrointestinal parasites was relatively less associated with coati health. Additionally, some associations were best predicted by models that incorporated reproductive seasonality and host sex. Overall, we observed a lower health condition during the breeding season, when coatis are under reproductive stress and may be less able to handle infection. In addition, females seem to handle infection better than males. Body condition was lower in coatis with high parasitemias of T. evansi, especially during the reproductive season. Total red blood cell counts, packed cell volume, platelets and eosinophils were also lower in animals with high T. evansi parasitemias. Total white blood cell counts and mature neutrophils were lower in animals with high parasitemias for both Trypanosoma species, with neutrophils decreasing mainly during the reproductive season. Overall, decreases in hematological parameters of females with T. evansi high parasitemias were less evident. For T. cruzi, monocytes decreased in individuals with high parasitemias. High abundances of microfilariae in the bloodstream, and cestode eggs and coccidian oocysts in feces were also associated with coati blood parameters. This study shows the

  16. Isolation of Novel Trypanosomatid, Zelonia australiensis sp. nov. (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae Provides Support for a Gondwanan Origin of Dixenous Parasitism in the Leishmaniinae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Barratt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Leishmania includes approximately 53 species, 20 of which cause human leishmaniais; a significant albeit neglected tropical disease. Leishmaniasis has afflicted humans for millennia, but how ancient is Leishmania and where did it arise? These questions have been hotly debated for decades and several theories have been proposed. One theory suggests Leishmania originated in the Palearctic, and dispersed to the New World via the Bering land bridge. Others propose that Leishmania evolved in the Neotropics. The Multiple Origins theory suggests that separation of certain Old World and New World species occurred due to the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. Some suggest that the ancestor of the dixenous genera Leishmania, Endotrypanum and Porcisia evolved on Gondwana between 90 and 140 million years ago. In the present study a detailed molecular and morphological characterisation was performed on a novel Australian trypanosomatid following its isolation in Australia's tropics from the native black fly, Simulium (Morops dycei Colbo, 1976. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted and confirmed this parasite as a sibling to Zelonia costaricensis, a close relative of Leishmania previously isolated from a reduviid bug in Costa Rica. Consequently, this parasite was assigned the name Zelonia australiensis sp. nov. Assuming Z. costaricensis and Z. australiensis diverged when Australia and South America became completely separated, their divergence occurred between 36 and 41 million years ago at least. Using this vicariance event as a calibration point for a phylogenetic time tree, the common ancestor of the dixenous genera Leishmania, Endotrypanum and Porcisia appeared in Gondwana approximately 91 million years ago. Ultimately, this study contributes to our understanding of trypanosomatid diversity, and of Leishmania origins by providing support for a Gondwanan origin of dixenous parasitism in the Leishmaniinae.

  17. Footprints of a trypanosomatid RNA world: pre-small subunit rRNA processing by spliced leader addition trans-splicing

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    Mario Gustavo Mayer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The addition of a capped mini-exon [spliced leader (SL] through trans-splicing is essential for the maturation of RNA polymerase (pol II-transcribed polycistronic pre-mRNAs in all members of the Trypanosomatidae family. This process is an inter-molecular splicing reaction that follows the same basic rules of cis-splicing reactions. In this study, we demonstrated that mini-exons were added to precursor ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA are transcribed by RNA pol I, including the 5' external transcribed spacer (ETS region. Additionally, we detected the SL-5'ETS molecule using three distinct methods and located the acceptor site between two known 5'ETS rRNA processing sites (A' and A1 in four different trypanosomatids. Moreover, we detected a polyadenylated 5'ETS upstream of the trans-splicing acceptor site, which also occurs in pre-mRNA trans-splicing. After treatment with an indirect trans-splicing inhibitor (sinefungin, we observed SL-5'ETS decay. However, treatment with 5-fluorouracil (a precursor of RNA synthesis that inhibits the degradation of pre-rRNA led to the accumulation of SL-5'ETS, suggesting that the molecule may play a role in rRNA degradation. The detection of trans-splicing in these molecules may indicate broad RNA-joining properties, regardless of the polymerase used for transcription.

  18. Synthesis, characterization and study of activity inhibitory of new dialkylphosphorylhdrazones on the growth of trypanosomatids; Sintese, caracterizacao e estudo da atividade inibitoria de novas dialquilfosforilarilidrazonas sobre o crescimento de tripanossomatideos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Andrea Janaina M.; Lima, Marco Edilson F. de; DaCosta, Joao Batista N., E-mail: dacosta@ufrrj.br [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropedica, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Exatas. Dept. de Quimica; Alves, Eliomara Sousa Sobral; Anjos, Danielle Oliveira dos; Vannier-Santos, Marcos Andre; Lanfredi-Rangel, Adriana [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Salvador, BA (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas Goncalo Moniz

    2011-07-01

    A new series of dialkylphosphorylhydrazones was synthesized through the condensation of aromatic aldehydes with different phosphorylhydrazines. All synthesized compounds were characterized by IR, {sup 1}H-NMR, {sup 13}C-NMR and {sup 31}P-NMR spectroscopies. The in vitro investigation of the activity of these compounds against Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes and epimastigotes of T. cruzi, showed an efficient inhibition of proliferation, at non toxic concentrations to mammalian cells. The results have shown some derivatives as potential antiparasitic agents against trypanosomatids. (author)

  19. Cysteine peptidases in the tomato trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens: influence of growth conditions, similarities with cruzipain and secretion to the extracellular environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Camila G R; Pereira, Fernanda M; Dias, Felipe A; Silva, Thiago L A; Lopes, Angela H C S; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Branquinha, Marta H; Santos, André L S

    2008-12-01

    We have characterized the cysteine peptidase production by Phytomonas serpens, a tomato trypanosomatid. The parasites were cultivated in four distinct media, since growth conditions could modulate the synthesis of bioactive molecules. The proteolytic profile has not changed qualitatively regardless the media, showing two peptidases of 38 and 40kDa; however, few quantitative changes were observed including a drastic reduction (around 70%) on the 40 and 38kDa peptidase activities when parasites were grown in yeast extract and liver infusion trypticase medium, respectively, in comparison with parasites cultured in Warren medium. The time-span of growth did not significantly alter the protein and peptidase expression. The proteolytic activities were blocked by classical cysteine peptidase inhibitors (E-64, leupeptin, and cystatin), being more active at pH 5.0 and showing complete dependence to reducing agents (dithiothreitol and l-cysteine) for full activity. The cysteine peptidases were able to hydrolyze several proteinaceous substrates, including salivary gland proteins from Oncopeltus fasciatus, suggesting broad substrate utilization. By means of agglutination, fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry and Western blotting analyses we showed that both cysteine peptidases produced by P. serpens share common epitopes with cruzipain, the major cysteine peptidase of Trypanosoma cruzi. Moreover, our data suggest that the 40kDa cysteine peptidase was located at the P. serpens cell surface, attached to membrane domains via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. The 40kDa peptidase was also detected in the cell-free culture supernatant, in an active form, which suggests secretion of this peptidase to the extracellular environment.

  20. Vavraia culicis (Weiser, 1947) Weiser, 1977 revisited: cytological characterisation of a Vavraia culicis-like microsporidium isolated from mosquitoes in Florida and the establishment of Vavraia culicis floridensis subsp. n

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vávra, Jiří; Becnel, J. J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 4 (2007), s. 259-271 ISSN 0015-5683 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/07/1003 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Vavraia * Aedes albopictus * mosquitoes * parasites * microsporidia * ultrastructure Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2007

  1. Phylogeny of the kinetoplastida: taxonomic problems and insights into the evolution of parasitism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri A Maslov

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available To further investigate phylogeny of kinetoplastid protozoa, the sequences of small subunit (18S ribosomal RNA of nine bodonid isolates and ten isolates of insect trypanosomatids have been determined. The root of the kinetoplastid tree was attached to the branch of Bodo designis and/or Cruzella marina. The suborder Trypanosomatina appeared as a monophyletic group, while the suborder Bodonina was paraphyletic. Among bodonid lineages, parasitic organisms were intermingled with free-living ones, implying multiple transitions to parasitism and supporting the `vertebrate-first hypothesis'. The tree indicated that the genera Cryptobia and Bodo are artificial taxa. Separation of fish cryptobias and Trypanoplasma borreli as different genera was not supported. In trypanosomatids, the genera Leptomonas and Blastocrithidia were polyphyletic, similar to the genera Herpetomonas and Crithidia and in contrast to the monophyletic genera Trypanosoma and Phytomonas. This analysis has shown that the morphological classification of kinetoplastids does not in general reflect their genetic affinities and needs a revision.

  2. Cosmopolitan Distribution of a Trypanosomatid Leptomonas pyrrhocoris

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Votýpka, Jan; Klepetková, H.; Yurchenko, V. Y.; Horák, Aleš; Lukeš, Julius; Maslov, D. A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 163, č. 4 (2012), s. 616-631 ISSN 1434-4610 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD206/09/H026; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Genotyping * Leptomonas * phylogeography * Pyrrhocoridae * Trypanosomatidae Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.140, year: 2012

  3. Paratrypanosoma Is a Novel Early-Branching Trypanosomatid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flegontov, Pavel; Votýpka, Jan; Skalický, Tomáš; Logacheva, M.D.; Penin, A.A.; Tanifuji, G.; Onodera, N. T.; Kondrashov, A.S.; Volf, P.; Archibald, J.M.; Lukeš, Julius

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 18 (2013), s. 1787-1793 ISSN 0960-9822 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2179; GA ČR GD206/09/H026 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED3.2.00/08.0144; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Paratrypanosoma * isolate * phylogeny Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.916, year: 2013

  4. A Narnavirus in the Trypanosomatid Protist Plant Pathogen Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akopyants, Natalia S; Lye, Lon-Fye; Dobson, Deborah E; Lukeš, Julius; Beverley, Stephen M

    2016-07-28

    We describe here a new RNA virus (PserNV1) from the plant protist parasite Phytomonas serpens (family Trypanosomatidae, Kinetoplastida, supergroup Excavata). The properties of PserNV1 permit assignment to the genus Narnavirus (Narnaviridae), the first reported from a host other than fungi or oomycetes. Copyright © 2016 Akopyants et al.

  5. Retention and loss of RNA interference pathways in trypanosomatid protozoans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lon-Fye Lye

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi pathways are widespread in metaozoans but the genes required show variable occurrence or activity in eukaryotic microbes, including many pathogens. While some Leishmania lack RNAi activity and Argonaute or Dicer genes, we show that Leishmania braziliensis and other species within the Leishmania subgenus Viannia elaborate active RNAi machinery. Strong attenuation of expression from a variety of reporter and endogenous genes was seen. As expected, RNAi knockdowns of the sole Argonaute gene implicated this protein in RNAi. The potential for functional genetics was established by testing RNAi knockdown lines lacking the paraflagellar rod, a key component of the parasite flagellum. This sets the stage for the systematic manipulation of gene expression through RNAi in these predominantly diploid asexual organisms, and may also allow selective RNAi-based chemotherapy. Functional evolutionary surveys of RNAi genes established that RNAi activity was lost after the separation of the Leishmania subgenus Viannia from the remaining Leishmania species, a divergence associated with profound changes in the parasite infectious cycle and virulence. The genus Leishmania therefore offers an accessible system for testing hypothesis about forces that may select for the loss of RNAi during evolution, such as invasion by viruses, changes in genome plasticity mediated by transposable elements and gene amplification (including those mediating drug resistance, and/or alterations in parasite virulence.

  6. Lineage-specific activities of a multipotent mitochondrion of trypanosomatid flagellates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Škodová-Sveráková, Ingrid; Verner, Zdeněk; Skalický, Tomáš; Votýpka, Jan; Horváth, A.; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 1 (2015), s. 55-67 ISSN 0950-382X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/12/2261; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032; GA MŠk LH12104; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-23986S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316304 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : cytochrome C-oxidase * alternative NADH dehydrogenase * blood stream forms Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.761, year: 2015

  7. Kentomonas gen. n., a New Genus of Endosymbiont-containing Trypanosomatids of Strigomonadinae subfam. n

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Votýpka, Jan; Kostygov, A.Y.; Kraeva, N.; Grybchuk-Ieremenko, A.; Tesařová, Martina; Grybchuk, D.; Lukeš, Julius; Yurchenko, Vyacheslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 165, č. 6 (2014), s. 825-838 ISSN 1434-4610 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Kentomonas * Trypanosomatidae * bacterial endosymbionts * phylogeny Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 3.045, year: 2014

  8. Anti-Trypanosomatid Elemanolide Sesquiterpene Lactones from Vernonia lasiopus O. Hoffm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Njogu M. Kimani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Sleeping sickness or human African trypanosomiasis (HAT is a neglected tropical disease (NTD threatening millions of peoples’ lives with thousands infected. The disease is endemic in poorly developed regions of sub-Saharan Africa and is caused by the kinetoplastid “protozoan” parasite Trypanosoma brucei. The parasites are transmitted to humans through bites of infected tsetse flies of the genus Glossina. The few available drugs for treatment of this disease are highly toxic, difficult to administer, costly and unavailable to poor rural communities bearing the major burden of this infection. Therefore, the search for new efficacious, safe and affordable drugs is of high importance. Vernonia lasiopus O. Hoffm., an indigenous African plant of the Asteraceae family, has been extensively reported to be used ethno-medicinally as a treatment for malaria. Its crude extracts obtained with solvents of different polarity were screened in vitro for anti-protozoal activity and the dichloromethane extract was found to be particularly active against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (IC50 = 0.17 µg/mL. Bioassay-guided chromatographic fractionation of the dichloromethane extract led to the isolation and identification of six elemanolide type sesquiterpene lactones: 8-desacylvernolide, vernolepin, vernomenin, vernodalol, vernodalin and 11,13-dihydrovernodalin. All these elemanolide sesquiterpene lactones showed in vitro anti-trypanosomal activity. They were also tested for cytotoxicity against mammalian cells (L6 cell line. Vernolepin, the main component in the extract, was also the most potent with an IC50 value of 0.05 µg/mL against T.b. rhodesiense trypomastigotes. This compound showed a selectivity index of 14.5, which makes it an interesting candidate for in vivo tests and determination of its mechanism of action.

  9. Comparative Metabolism of Free-living Bodo saltans and Parasitic Trypanosomatids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Opperdoes, F. R.; Butenko, A.; Flegontov, P.; Yurchenko, V.; Lukeš, Julius

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 5 (2016), s. 657-678 ISSN 1066-5234 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-23986S Grant - others:EU COST Action CM1307 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : adaptation * Leishmania * Leptomonas * lateral gene transfer * parasitism * Phytomonas * Trypanosoma Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.692, year: 2016

  10. Killing of trypanosomatid parasites by a modified bovine host defense peptide, BMAP-18.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee R Haines

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tropical diseases caused by parasites continue to cause socioeconomic devastation that reverberates worldwide. There is a growing need for new control measures for many of these diseases due to increasing drug resistance exhibited by the parasites and problems with drug toxicity. One new approach is to apply host defense peptides (HDP; formerly called antimicrobial peptides to disease control, either to treat infected hosts, or to prevent disease transmission by interfering with parasites in their insect vectors. A potent anti-parasite effector is bovine myeloid antimicrobial peptide-27 (BMAP-27, a member of the cathelicidin family. Although BMAP-27 is a potent inhibitor of microbial growth, at higher concentrations it also exhibits cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. We tested the anti-parasite activity of BMAP-18, a truncated peptide that lacks the hydrophobic C-terminal sequence of the BMAP-27 parent molecule, an alteration that confers reduced toxicity to mammalian cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: BMAP-18 showed strong growth inhibitory activity against several species and life cycle stages of African trypanosomes, fish trypanosomes and Leishmania parasites in vitro. When compared to native BMAP-27, the truncated BMAP-18 peptide showed reduced cytotoxicity on a wide variety of mammalian and insect cells and on Sodalis glossindius, a bacterial symbiont of the tsetse vector. The fluorescent stain rhodamine 123 was used in immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry experiments to show that BMAP-18 at low concentrations rapidly disrupted mitochondrial potential without obvious alteration of parasite plasma membranes, thus inducing death by apoptosis. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that higher concentrations of BMAP-18 induced membrane lesions in the parasites as early as 15 minutes after exposure, thus killing them by necrosis. In addition to direct killing of parasites, BMAP-18 was shown to inhibit LPS-induced secretion of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha, a cytokine that is associated with inflammation and cachexia (wasting in sleeping sickness patients. As a prelude to in vivo applications, high affinity antibodies to BMAP-18 were produced in rabbits and used in immuno-mass spectrometry assays to detect the intact peptide in human blood and plasma. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: BMAP-18, a truncated form of the potent antimicrobial BMAP-27, showed low toxicity to mammalian cells, insect cells and the tsetse bacterial symbiont Sodalis glossinidius while retaining an ability to kill a variety of species and life cycle stages of pathogenic kinetoplastid parasites in vitro. BMAP-18 also inhibited secretion of TNF-alpha, an inflammatory cytokine that plays a role in the cachexia associated with African sleeping sickness. These findings support the idea that BMAP-18 should be explored as a candidate for therapy of economically important trypanosome-infected hosts, such as cattle, fish and humans, and for paratransgenic expression in Sodalis glossinidius, a bacterial symbiont in the tsetse vector, as a strategy for interference with trypanosome transmission.

  11. Natural terpenoids from Ambrosia species are active in vitro and in vivo against human pathogenic trypanosomatids.

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    Valeria P Sülsen

    Full Text Available Among the natural compounds, terpenoids play an important role in the drug discovery process for tropical diseases. The aim of the present work was to isolate antiprotozoal compounds from Ambrosia elatior and A. scabra. The sesquiterpene lactone (STL cumanin was isolated from A. elatior whereas two other STLs, psilostachyin and cordilin, and one sterol glycoside, daucosterol, were isolated from A. scabra. Cumanin and cordilin were active against Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes showing 50% inhibition concentrations (IC50 values of 12 µM and 26 µM, respectively. Moreover, these compounds are active against bloodstream trypomastigotes, regardless of the T. cruzi strain tested. Psilostachyin and cumanin were also active against amastigote forms with IC50 values of 21 µM and 8 µM, respectively. By contrast, daucosterol showed moderate activity on epimastigotes and trypomastigotes and was inactive against amastigote forms. We also found that cumanin and psilostachyin exhibited an additive effect in their trypanocidal activity when these two drugs were tested together. Cumanin has leishmanicidal activity with growth inhibition values greater than 80% at a concentration of 5 µg/ml (19 µM, against both L. braziliensis and L. amazonensis promastigotes. In an in vivo model of T. cruzi infection, cumanin was more active than benznidazole, producing an 8-fold reduction in parasitemia levels during the acute phase of the infection compared with the control group, and more importantly, a reduction in mortality with 66% of the animals surviving, in comparison with 100% mortality in the control group. Cumanin also showed nontoxic effects at the doses assayed in vivo, as determined using markers of hepatic damage.

  12. Growing diversity of trypanosomatid parasites of flies (Diptera: Brachycera): Frequent cosmopolitism and moderate host specificity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Týč, Jiří; Votýpka, Jan; Klepetková, H.; Šuláková, H.; Jirků, Milan; Lukeš, Julius

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 1 (2013), s. 255-264 ISSN 1055-7903 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD206/09/H026 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M200961204 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Host specificity * Geographic distribution * Diversity * Phylogeny * Trypanosomatida * Leishmania Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.018, year: 2013

  13. A draft genome of the honey bee trypanosomatid parasite Crithidia mellificae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Runckel

    Full Text Available Since 2006, honey bee colonies in North America and Europe have experienced increased annual mortality. These losses correlate with increased pathogen incidence and abundance, though no single etiologic agent has been identified. Crithidia mellificae is a unicellular eukaryotic honey bee parasite that has been associated with colony losses in the USA and Belgium. C. mellificae is a member of the family Trypanosomatidae, which primarily includes other insect-infecting species (e.g., the bumble bee pathogen Crithidia bombi, as well as species that infect both invertebrate and vertebrate hosts including human pathogens (e.g.,Trypanosoma cruzi, T. brucei, and Leishmania spp.. To better characterize C. mellificae, we sequenced the genome and transcriptome of strain SF, which was isolated and cultured in 2010. The 32 megabase draft genome, presented herein, shares a high degree of conservation with the related species Leishmania major. We estimate that C. mellificae encodes over 8,300 genes, the majority of which are orthologs of genes encoded by L. major and other Leishmania or Trypanosoma species. Genes unique to C. mellificae, including those of possible bacterial origin, were annotated based on function and include genes putatively involved in carbohydrate metabolism. This draft genome will facilitate additional investigations of the impact of C. mellificae infection on honey bee health and provide insight into the evolution of this unique family.

  14. NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase activity in the kinetoplasts of the plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Halphen, Diego; Maslov, Dmitri A

    2004-03-01

    NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase activity is present in mitochondrial lysates of Phytomonas serpens. Rotenone at 2-10 microM inhibited the activity 50-75%, indicating that it belongs to respiratory complex I. The activity was also inhibited 50-60% in the presence of 10-30 nM atovaquone suggesting that inhibition of complex I represents a likely mechanism of the known antileishmanial activity of this drug. The complex was partially purified by chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B and gel-filtration on Sepharose CL-2B. The NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase activity in this preparation was completely inactivated by 20 nM atovaquone. The partially purified complex was present in a low amount and its subunits could not be discerned by staining with Coomassie. However, one of its components, a homologue of the 39 kDa subunit of the bovine complex I, was identified immunochemically in the original lysate and in the partially purified material.

  15. Diversity of Trypanosomatids in Cockroaches and the Description of Herpetomonas tarakana sp n.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yurchenko, V.; Kostygov, A.; Havlová, J.; Grybchuk-Ieremenko, A.; Ševčíková, T.; Lukeš, Julius; Ševčík, J.; Votýpka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 2 (2016), s. 198-209 ISSN 1066-5234 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Monoxenous Trypanosomatidae * parasites of cockroaches * taxonomy Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.692, year: 2016

  16. First evidence of intraclonal genetic exchange in trypanosomatids using two Leishmania infantum fluorescent transgenic clones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefanía Calvo-Álvarez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The mode of reproduction in Leishmania spp has been argued to be essentially clonal. However, recent data (genetic analysis of populations and co-infections in sand flies have proposed the existence of a non-obligate sexual cycle in the extracellular stage of the parasite within the sand fly vector. In this article we propose the existence of intraclonal genetic exchange in the natural vector of Leishmania infantum.We have developed transgenic L. infantum lines expressing drug resistance markers linked to green and red fluorescent reporters. We hypothesized whether those cells with identical genotype can recognize each other and mate. Both types of markers were successfully exchanged within the sand fly midgut of the natural vector Phlebotomus perniciosus when individuals from these species were fed with a mixture of parental clones. Using the yellow phenotype and drug resistance markers, we provide evidence for genetic exchange in L. infantum. The hybrid progeny appeared to be triploid based on DNA content analysis. The hybrid clone analyzed was stable throughout the complete parasite life cycle. The progress of infections by the hybrid clone in BALB/c mice caused a reduction in parasite loads in both spleen and liver, and provided weight values similar to those obtained with uninfected mice. Spleen arginase activity was also significantly reduced relative to parental strains.A L. infantum hybrid lineage was obtained from intraclonal genetic exchange within the midgut of the natural vector, suggesting the ability of this parasite to recognize the same genotype and mate. The yellow hybrid progeny is stable throughout the whole parasite life cycle but with a slower virulence, which correlates well with the lower arginase activity detected both in vitro and in vivo infections.

  17. Species- and Strain-Specific Adaptation of the HSP70 Super Family in Pathogenic Trypanosomatids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drini, S.; Criscuolo, A.; Lechat, P.; Imamura, H.; Skalický, Tomáš; Rachidi, N.; Lukeš, Julius; Dujardin, J.-C.; Späth, G.F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 6 (2016), s. 1980-1995 ISSN 1759-6653 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-23986S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Leishmania * heat shock protein * HSP70 * evolution * phylogeny * synteny * copy number variation * gene lossgene loss Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.979, year: 2016

  18. Infection dynamics and immune response in a newly described Drosophila-trypanosomatid association/n

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hamilton, P.T.; Votýpka, Jan; Dostálová, A.; Yurchenko, V.; Bird, N.H.; Lukeš, Julius; Lemaitre, B.; Perlman, S.J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 5 (2015), e01356-15 ISSN 2150-7511 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-23986S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : evolution * Heteroptera * parasite Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.975, year: 2015

  19. Anti-Trypanosomatid Elemanolide Sesquiterpene Lactones from Vernonia lasiopus O. Hoffm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimani, Njogu M; Matasyoh, Josphat C; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto; Schmidt, Thomas J

    2017-04-08

    Sleeping sickness or human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a neglected tropical disease (NTD) threatening millions of peoples' lives with thousands infected. The disease is endemic in poorly developed regions of sub-Saharan Africa and is caused by the kinetoplastid "protozoan" parasite Trypanosoma brucei . The parasites are transmitted to humans through bites of infected tsetse flies of the genus Glossina . The few available drugs for treatment of this disease are highly toxic, difficult to administer, costly and unavailable to poor rural communities bearing the major burden of this infection. Therefore, the search for new efficacious, safe and affordable drugs is of high importance. Vernonia lasiopus O. Hoffm., an indigenous African plant of the Asteraceae family, has been extensively reported to be used ethno-medicinally as a treatment for malaria. Its crude extracts obtained with solvents of different polarity were screened in vitro for anti-protozoal activity and the dichloromethane extract was found to be particularly active against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (IC 50 = 0.17 µg/mL). Bioassay-guided chromatographic fractionation of the dichloromethane extract led to the isolation and identification of six elemanolide type sesquiterpene lactones: 8-desacylvernolide, vernolepin, vernomenin, vernodalol, vernodalin and 11,13-dihydrovernodalin. All these elemanolide sesquiterpene lactones showed in vitro anti-trypanosomal activity. They were also tested for cytotoxicity against mammalian cells (L6 cell line). Vernolepin, the main component in the extract, was also the most potent with an IC 50 value of 0.05 µg/mL against T.b. rhodesiense trypomastigotes. This compound showed a selectivity index of 14.5, which makes it an interesting candidate for in vivo tests and determination of its mechanism of action.

  20. Genome of Ca. Pandoraea novymonadis, an Endosymbiotic Bacterium of the Trypanosomatid Novymonas esmeraldas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kostygov, A.Y.; Butenko, A.; Nenarokova, Anna; Tashyreva, Daria; Flegontov, P.; Lukeš, Julius; Yurchenko, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, OCT 4 (2017), č. článku 1940. ISSN 1664-302X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-18699S; GA MŠk LL1601 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : bacterial endosymbiont * Pandoraea * phylogenomics * metabolism * Trypanosomatidae Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 4.076, year: 2016

  1. Crithidia fasciculata: a catalase-containing trypanosomatid sensitive to nitroheterocyclic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutteridge, W E; Ross, J; Hargadon, M R; Hudson, J E

    1982-01-01

    Crithidia fasciculata, which contains high levels of a cytosolic catalase, is sensitive to inhibition by at least two nitroheterocyclic drugs, Nifurtimox and MK 436, both of which are also active against Trypanosoma cruzi. Drug sensitivity is not enhanced in organisms containing reduced levels of catalase. The ultrastructural lesions in T. cruzi produced by nitroheterocycles, especially the swelling and gross vacuolation of the mitochondria, are seen also in C. fasciculata. These results are not consistent with the hypothesis that the action of drugs such as Nifurtimox on T. cruzi involve hydrogen peroxide accumulation as a result of the absence of catalase.

  2. Blocked stomodeal valve of the insect vector: similar mechanism of transmission in two trypanosomatid models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Volf, P.; Hajmová, M.; Sádlová, J.; Votýpka, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 11 (2004), s. 1221-1227 ISSN 0020-7519 Grant - others:GA FRVŠ(CZ) FRVŠ 2356/2002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : stomodeal valve * sand fly * Leishmania Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 3.092, year: 2004

  3. Diversity of Trypanosomatids (Kinetoplastea: Trypanosomatidae) Parasitizing Fleas (Insecta: Siphonaptera) and Description of a New Genus Blechomonas gen. n

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Votýpka, Jan; Suková, E.; Kraeva, N.; Ishemgulova, A.; Duží, I.; Lukeš, Julius; Yurchenko, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 164, NOV 2013 (2013), s. 763-781 ISSN 1434-4610 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-24983S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanomatidae * phylogeny * Siphonaptera * Blechomonas * host specificty * co-evolution Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.558, year: 2013

  4. Diversity of insect trypanosomatids assessed from the spliced leader RNA and 5S rRNA genes and intergenic regions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Podlipaev, Sergei; Sturm, N. R.; Fiala, Ivan; Fernandes, O.; Westenberger, S. J.; Dollet, M.; Campbell, D. A.; Lukeš, Julius

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2004), s. 283-290 ISSN 1066-5234 Grant - others:European Community(XE) QLK 2-CT-2001-01810 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : Kinetoplastida * phylogeny * Trypanosomatidae Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.403, year: 2004

  5. The Uptake and Metabolism of Amino Acids, and Their Unique Role in the Biology of Pathogenic Trypanosomatids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchese, Letícia; Nascimento, Janaina de Freitas; Damasceno, Flávia Silva; Bringaud, Frédéric; Michels, Paul A M; Silber, Ariel Mariano

    2018-04-01

    Trypanosoma brucei , as well as Trypanosoma cruzi and more than 20 species of the genus Leishmania , form a group of flagellated protists that threaten human health. These organisms are transmitted by insects that, together with mammals, are their natural hosts. This implies that during their life cycles each of them faces environments with different physical, chemical, biochemical, and biological characteristics. In this work we review how amino acids are obtained from such environments, how they are metabolized, and how they and some of their intermediate metabolites are used as a survival toolbox to cope with the different conditions in which these parasites should establish the infections in the insects and mammalian hosts.

  6. Defeating Leishmania resistance to miltefosine (hexadecylphosphocholine) by peptide-mediated drug smuggling: a proof of mechanism for trypanosomatid chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Ortega, Juan Román; de la Torre, Beatriz G; Hornillos, Valentín; Bart, Jean-Mathieu; Rueda, Cristina; Navarro, Miguel; Amat-Guerri, Francisco; Acuña, A Ulises; Andreu, David; Rivas, Luis

    2012-08-10

    Miltefosine (hexadecylphosphocholine, HePC), the first orally active drug successful against leishmaniasis, is especially active on the visceral form of the disease. Resistance mechanisms are almost exclusively associated to dysfunction in HePC uptake systems. In order to evade the requirements of its cognate receptor/translocator, HePC-resistant Leishmania donovani parasites (R40 strain) were challenged with constructs consisting of an ω-thiol-functionalized HePC analogue conjugated to the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) Tat(48-60), either through a disulfide or a thioether bond. The conjugates enter and kill both promastigote and intracellular amastigote forms of the R40 strain. Intracellular release of HePC by reduction of the disulfide-based conjugate was confirmed by means of double tagging at both the CPP (Quasar 670) and HePC (BODIPY) moieties. Scission of the conjugate, however, is not mandatory, as the metabolically more stable thioether conjugate retained substantial activity. The disulfide conjugate is highly active on the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma b. brucei, naturally resistant to HePC. Our results provide proof-of-mechanism for the use of CPP conjugates to avert drug resistance by faulty drug accumulation in parasites, as well as the possibility to extend chemotherapy into other parasites intrinsically devoid of membrane translocation systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Ultrastructure and molecular phylogeny of four new species of monoxenous trypanosomatids from flies (Diptera: Brachycera) with redefinition of the genus Wallaceina

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yurchenko, V.; Votýpka, Jan; Tesařová, Martina; Klepetková, H.; Kraeva, N.; Jirků, Milan; Lukeš, Julius

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 2 (2014), s. 97-112 ISSN 0015-5683 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Kinetoplastida * Trypanosomatidae * monoxenous kientoplastids * Leishmaniinae * molecular taxonomy * phylogeny Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.147, year: 2014

  8. Demonstration of mRNA editing and localization of guide RNA genes in kinetoplast-mitochondria of the plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, D A; Hollar, L; Haghighat, P; Nawathean, P

    1998-06-01

    Maxicircle molecules of kDNA in several isolates of Phytomonas were detected by hybridization with the 12S rRNA gene probe from Leishmania tarentolae. The estimated size of maxicircles is isolate-specific and varies from 27 to 36 kb. Fully edited and polyadenylated mRNA for kinetoplast-encoded ribosomal protein S12 (RPS12) was found in the steady-state kinetoplast RNA isolated from Phytomonas serpens strain 1G. Two minicircles (1.45 kb) from this strain were also sequenced. Each minicircle contains two 120 bp conserved regions positioned 180 degrees apart, a region enriched with G and T bases and a variable region. One minicircle encodes a gRNA for the first block of editing of RPSl2 mRNA, and the other encodes a gRNA with unknown function. A gRNA gene for the second block of RPSl2 was found on a minicircle sequenced previously. On each minicircle, a gRNA gene is located in the variable region in a similar position and orientation with respect to the conserved regions.

  9. The absence of genes for cytochrome c oxidase and reductase subunits in maxicircle kinetoplast DNA of the respiration-deficient plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawathean, P; Maslov, D A

    2000-08-01

    By completing the sequencing of the maxicircle conserved region in the kinetoplast DNA of Phytomonas serpens, we showed that the genes for subunits I and II (COI and COII) of cytochrome c oxidase in this organism were missing. We had previously shown that the genes for cytochrome c oxidase subunit III and apocytochrome b were also missing. These deletions did not affect the structure or expression of the remaining genes. Partial editing of the mRNA for NADH dehydrogenase subunit 8, previously found in strain IG from insects, was complete in two other strains isolated from plants. The appearance of a novel maxicircle gene for MURF2 block I gRNA, which substitutes for the gene missing due to the COII gene deletion, may illustrate a general mechanism for the origin of gRNAs.

  10. Trypanosomatids (Protozoa: Kinetoplastida in three species of Armored Catfish from Mogi-Guaçu river, Pirassununga, São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Pereira Molina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Trypanosome infections have been reported in several species of fish, in majority of cases described on the basis of morphological characteristics. Trypanosomes in fish are heteroxenous and transmitted by hirudineans. This study aims to evaluate the prevalence and density of infections by Trypanosoma sp. in blood from three species of catfish, Hypostomus regani, H. strigaticeps, H. albopunctatus, from the Mogi Guaçu River, Pirassununga, São Paulo, Brazil. Further, this study intends to characterize the Trypanosoma specimens found in the blood of these fish by morphological and molecular techniques. The trypanosomes overall prevalence observed was 47.6% with a general average density of 0.75 parasites/µl of blood. Hypostomus regani and Hypostomus strigaticeps showed a significant difference in prevalence. The average densities of parasites were not significantly different among the three fish species. Similar findings were observed for the monthly variations in densities. The parasites found in the three species of catfish studied showed similar morphological characteristics. The morphological data and the statistical analyses used in this study didn’t show the formation of groups. The analyses provided evidence of the presence of pleomorphisms in the trypanosomes found in the three studied fish.

  11. The Emerging Role of Complement Lectin Pathway in Trypanosomatids: Molecular Bases in Activation, Genetic Deficiencies, Susceptibility to Infection, and Complement System-Based Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Evans-Osses

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system is evolutionary and ancient and is the pivotal line of the host defense system to protect against invading pathogens and abnormal self-derived components. Cellular and molecular components are involved in recognition and effector mechanisms for a successful innate immune response. The complement lectin pathway (CLP was discovered in 1990. These new components at the complement world are very efficient. Mannan-binding lectin (MBL and ficolin not only recognize many molecular patterns of pathogens rapidly to activate complement but also display several strategies to evade innate immunity. Many studies have shown a relation between the deficit of complement factors and susceptibility to infection. The recently discovered CLP was shown to be important in host defense against protozoan microbes. Although the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by MBL and Ficolins reveal efficient complement activations, an increase in deficiency of complement factors and diversity of parasite strategies of immune evasion demonstrate the unsuccessful effort to control the infection. In the present paper, we will discuss basic aspects of complement activation, the structure of the lectin pathway components, genetic deficiency of complement factors, and new therapeutic opportunities to target the complement system to control infection.

  12. Plant-like traits associated with metabolism of Trypanosoma parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Hannaert, Véronique; Saavedra, Emma; Duffieux, Francis; Szikora, Jean-Pierre; Rigden, Daniel J.; Michels, Paul A. M.; Opperdoes, Fred R.

    2003-01-01

    Trypanosomatid parasites cause serious diseases among humans, livestock, and plants. They belong to the order of the Kinetoplastida and form, together with the Euglenida, the phylum Euglenozoa. Euglenoid algae possess plastids capable of photosynthesis, but plastids are unknown in trypanosomatids. Here we present molecular evidence that trypanosomatids possessed a plastid at some point in their evolutionary history. Extant trypanosomatid parasites, such as Trypanosoma and Leishmania, contain ...

  13. Rational sub-division of plant trypanosomes (Phytomonas spp.) based on minicircle conserved region analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Nancy R; Dollet, Michel; Lukes, Julius; Campbell, David A

    2007-09-01

    The sequences of minicircle conserved regions from various plant trypanosomatids have been determined and analyzed. The goal of this study was to add another tool to the arsenal of molecular probes for distinguishing between the different trypanosomatids occurring in plants: systemic trypanosomatids multiplying in the sap, those from the laticiferous tubes, and those developing in fruits, seeds or flowers but not in the plant itself and that are frequently considered as opportunistic insect trypanosomatids. As some plant intraphloemic trypanosomatids are the causative agents of important diseases, a clear definition of the different types of trypanosomatids is critical. The conserved region of the mitochondrial minicircle provides several specific features in a small sequence region containing three functionally elements required for minicircle replication. Trees generated from the analysis recapitulated trees drawn from analyses of isoenzymes, RAPD, and particular gene sequences, supporting the validity of the small region used in this work. Three groups of isolates were significant and in accordance with previous work. The peculiarity of phloem-restricted trypanosomatids associated with wilts of coconut and oil palm in Latin America - group H - is confirmed. In agreement with previous studies on their biological and serological properties the results highlighted this group called 'phloemicola'. It always differentiated from all other latex and fruit isolates or opportunistic trypanosomatids, like insect trypanosomatids. We can assert that phloemicola is the only well-defined taxon among all plant trypanosomatids. A group of non-pathogenic latex isolates from South American euphorbs (G), and a heterogenous group (A) including one fruit, one possible latex and one insect isolate are clearly distinct groups. The group of Mediterranean isolates from latex (D), even with a low boostrap, stood out well from other groups. The remainder of the isolates fell into a

  14. Effect of Temperature on the Vector Efficiency of Aedes aegypti for Dengue 2 Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-26

    50% endpoints, em- ploying LLC-MK2 cells. Mosquitoes The Ae. aegypti adults were F, progeny from eggs oviposited by adults collected as larvae in...a low socioeconomic sector of Bangkok. Eggs were hatched, and larvae were reared to adults, according to standard procedures, at 25°C and at 70% to...R. McN., and Burke, D. S., 1982. Evaluation of Toxorhynchites splendens (Diptera: Culici- dae) as a bioassay host for dengue viruses. J. Med

  15. A New Species of Culex (Eumelanomyia) from India with Descriptions of Pupae and Larvae of Cx. pluvialis Barraud and Cx. iphis Barraud (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    crown composed of 4,5 flat and blunt spicules laterally and several dark, spinelike spicules mesally; basal sternal process absent; cereal setae 3,4...filament well developed. DISTRIBUTION. In addition to the previous records from India and Peninsu- lar Malaysia (Sirivanakarn 1972; Sirivanakarn and...Ramalingam. 1976. A new species of CuZex (EwneZunoymial Theobald with notes on three other species from Malaysia (Diptera: Culici- dae). Mosq

  16. In or out? On the tightness of glycosomal compartmentalization of metabolites and enzymes in Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, Jurgen R.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Michels, Paul A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosomatids sequester large parts of glucose metabolism inside specialised peroxisomes, called glycosomes. Many studies have shown that correct glycosomal compartmentalization of glycolytic enzymes is essential for bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucel. The recent finding of pore-forming

  17. In or out? On the tightness of glycosomal compartmentalizatin of metabolites and enzymes in Trypanosoma brucei.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, J.R.; Bakker, B.M.; Michels, P.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosomatids sequester large parts of glucose metabolism inside specialised peroxisomes, called glycosomes. Many studies have shown that correct glycosomal compartmentalization of glycolytic enzymes is essential for bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei. The recent finding of pore-forming

  18. Characterization of kinetoplast DNA from Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá-Carvalho, D; Perez-Morga, D; Traub-Cseko, Y M

    1993-01-01

    The restriction enzyme digestion of kinetoplast DNA from four Phytomonas serpens isolates shows an overall similar band pattern. One minicircle from isolate 30T was cloned and sequenced, showing low levels of homology but the same general features and organization as described for minicircles of other trypanosomatids. Extensive regions of the minicircle are composed by G and T on the H strand. These regions are very repetitive and similar to regions in a minicircle of Crithidia oncopelti and to telomeric sequences of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conserved Sequence Block 3, present in all trypanosomatids, is one nucleotide different from the consensus in P. serpens and provides a basis to differentiate P. serpens from other trypanosomatids. Electron microscopy of kinetoplast DNA evidenced a network with organization similar to other trypanosomatids and the measurement of minicircles confirmed the size of about 1.45 kb of the sequenced minicircle.

  19. Kinetoplastid Phylogenomics Reveals the Evolutionary Innovations Associated with the Origins of Parasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Andrew P; Otto, Thomas D; Aslett, Martin; Armstrong, Stuart D; Bringaud, Frederic; Schlacht, Alexander; Hartley, Catherine; Sanders, Mandy; Wastling, Jonathan M; Dacks, Joel B; Acosta-Serrano, Alvaro; Field, Mark C; Ginger, Michael L; Berriman, Matthew

    2016-01-25

    The evolution of parasitism is a recurrent event in the history of life and a core problem in evolutionary biology. Trypanosomatids are important parasites and include the human pathogens Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania spp., which in humans cause African trypanosomiasis, Chagas disease, and leishmaniasis, respectively. Genome comparison between trypanosomatids reveals that these parasites have evolved specialized cell-surface protein families, overlaid on a well-conserved cell template. Understanding how these features evolved and which ones are specifically associated with parasitism requires comparison with related non-parasites. We have produced genome sequences for Bodo saltans, the closest known non-parasitic relative of trypanosomatids, and a second bodonid, Trypanoplasma borreli. Here we show how genomic reduction and innovation contributed to the character of trypanosomatid genomes. We show that gene loss has "streamlined" trypanosomatid genomes, particularly with respect to macromolecular degradation and ion transport, but consistent with a widespread loss of functional redundancy, while adaptive radiations of gene families involved in membrane function provide the principal innovations in trypanosomatid evolution. Gene gain and loss continued during trypanosomatid diversification, resulting in the asymmetric assortment of ancestral characters such as peptidases between Trypanosoma and Leishmania, genomic differences that were subsequently amplified by lineage-specific innovations after divergence. Finally, we show how species-specific, cell-surface gene families (DGF-1 and PSA) with no apparent structural similarity are independent derivations of a common ancestral form, which we call "bodonin." This new evidence defines the parasitic innovations of trypanosomatid genomes, revealing how a free-living phagotroph became adapted to exploiting hostile host environments. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All

  20. Trypanosome species, including Trypanosoma cruzi, in sylvatic and peridomestic bats of Texas, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodo, Carolyn L; Goodwin, Chloe C; Mayes, Bonny C; Mariscal, Jacqueline A; Waldrup, Kenneth A; Hamer, Sarah A

    2016-12-01

    In contrast to other mammalian reservoirs, many bat species migrate long-distances and have the potential to introduce exotic pathogens to new areas. Bats have long been associated with blood-borne protozoal trypanosomes of the Schizotrypanum subgenus, which includes the zoonotic parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, agent of Chagas disease. Another member of the subgenus, Trypanosoma dionisii, infects bats of Europe and South America, and genetic similarities between strains from the two continents suggest transcontinental movement of this parasite via bats. Despite the known presence of diverse trypanosomes in bats of Central and South America, and the presence of T. cruzi-infected vectors and wildlife in the US, the role of bats in maintaining and dispersing trypanosomes in the US has not yet been reported. We collected hearts and blood from 8 species of insectivorous bats from 30 counties across Texas. Using PCR and DNA sequencing, we tested 593 bats for trypanosomes and found 1 bat positive for T. cruzi (0.17%), 9 for T. dionisii (1.5%), and 5 for Blastocrithidia spp. (0.8%), a group of insect trypanosomes. The T. cruzi-infected bat was carrying TcI, the strain type associated with human disease in the US. In the T. dionisii-infected bats, we detected three unique variants associated with the three infected bat species. These findings represent the first report of T. cruzi in a bat in the US, of T. dionisii in North America, and of Blastocrithidia spp. in mammals, and underscore the importance of bats in the maintenance of trypanosomes, including agents of human and animal disease, across broad geographic locales. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Protease expression by microorganisms and its relevance to crucial physiological/pathological events

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, André Luis Souza

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of infections caused by fungi and trypanosomatids is difficult due to the eukaryotic nature of these microbial cells, which are similar in several biochemical and genetic aspects to host cells. Aggravating this scenario, very few antifungal and anti-trypanosomatidal agents are in clinical use and, therefore, therapy is limited by drug safety considerations and their narrow spectrum of activity, efficacy and resistance. The search for new bioactive agents against fungi and trypanosomatids has been expanded because progress in biochemistry and molecular biology has led to a better understanding of important and essential pathways in these microorganisms including nutrition, growth, proliferation, signaling, differentiation and death. In this context, proteolytic enzymes produced by these eukaryotic microorganisms are appointed and, in some cases, proven to be excellent targets for searching novel natural and/or synthetic pharmacological compounds, in order to cure or prevent invasive fungal/trypanosomatid diseases. With this task in mind, our research group and others have focused on aspartic-type proteases, since the activity of this class of hydrolytic enzymes is directly implicated in several facets of basic biological processes of both fungal and trypanosomatid cells as well as due to the participation in numerous events of interaction between these microorganisms and host structures. In the present paper, a concise revision of the beneficial effects of aspartic protease inhibitors, with emphasis on the aspartic protease inhibitors used in the anti-human immunodeficiency virus therapy, will be presented and discussed using our experience with the following microbial models: the yeast Candida albicans, the filamentous fungus Fonsecaea pedrosoi and the protozoan trypanosomatid Leishmania amazonensis. PMID:21537490

  2. Trichomycetes living in the guts of aquatic insects of Misiones and Tierra del Fuego, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Lastra, Claudia C; Scorsetti, Ana C; Marti, Gerardo A; Coscarón, Sixto

    2005-01-01

    Fourteen species of Trichomycetes living in the guts of aquatic insects are reported from two provinces of Argentina, Misiones and Tierra del Fuego. Twelve of the species belong to the Harpellales and two are Amoebidiales. Five harpellid species are reported from Misiones in the extreme northeast of the country (Genistellospora homothallica, Harpella tica, Smittium culisetae, Smittium sp., Stachylina sp.) and seven are from Tierra del Fuego, the southern tip of South America (H. meridianalis, Glotzia sp., S. culicis, S. cellaspora, S. imitatum, Stachylina minima, Penella simulii). Insect hosts all were immature stages of Culicidae, Simuliidae, Chironomidae, Ceratopogonidae (Insecta: Diptera), and Ephemeroptera and Plecoptera. The lower diversity of Trichomycetes found at Misiones, which has a subtropical climate and rainforest vegetation, was due possibly to the warmer temperatures of the water (15-24 C), compared to the colder streams of Tierra del Fuego (9-15 C), with forests and steppes as typical vegetation.

  3. Toxicity and repellency of plant essential oils against the arthropod disease vectors Phlebotomus papatasi and Ixodes scapularis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sand fly Phlebotomus papatasi is an important blood feeder and the main vector of the trypanosomatid protozoa Leishmania major, which causes leishmaniasis in parts of the Afro-Eurasian region. The black- legged tick Ixodes scapularis is the primary tick vector of the bacterium Borrelia burgdorfe...

  4. Catalase in Leishmaniinae: With me or against me?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kraeva, N.; Horáková, Eva; Kostygov, A.Y.; Kořený, Luděk; Butenko, A.; Yurchenko, V.; Lukeš, Julius

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 50, JUN (2017), s. 121-127 ISSN 1567-1348 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-18699S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Catalase * Leishmania * Trypanosomatids * Gene loss Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Genetics and heredity (medical genetics to be 3) Impact factor: 2.885, year: 2016

  5. Maxi-circles and mini-circles in kinetoplast DNA from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Leon; A.C.C. Frasch; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); F. Fase-Fowler; P. Borst (Piet); F. Brunel; J. Davison

    1980-01-01

    textabstractMaxi-circles are a minor component of kinetoplast DNAs from all trypanosomatids studied, but they have not previously been found in Trypanosoma cruzi; We have spread intact kinetoplast DNA from the epimastigotes of strain Y in protein monolayers and analysed the mini-circle networks by

  6. Naphthoquinone Derivatives Exert Their Antitrypanosomal Activity via a Multi-Target Mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieretti, Simone; Haanstra, Jurgen R.; Mazet, Muriel; Perozzo, Remo; Bergamini, Christian; Prati, Federica; Fato, Romana; Lenaz, Giorgio; Capranico, Giovanni; Brun, Reto; Bakker, Barbara M.; Michels, Paul A. M.; Scapozza, Leonardo; Bolognesi, Maria Laura; Cavalli, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Background and Methodology: Recently, we reported on a new class of naphthoquinone derivatives showing a promising anti-trypanosomatid profile in cell-based experiments. The lead of this series (B6, 2-phenoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone) showed an ED50 of 80 nM against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, and a

  7. Cell fractionation of parasitic protozoa: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Wanderley de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell fractionation, a methodological strategy for obtaining purified organelle preparations, has been applied successfully to parasitic protozoa by a number of investigators. Here we present and discuss the work of several groups that have obtained highly purified subcellular fractions from trypanosomatids, Apicomplexa and trichomonads, and whose work have added substantially to our knowledge of the cell biology of these parasites.

  8. The Dynamics of Lateral Gene Transfer in Genus Leishmania - A Route for Adaptation and Species Diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikeved, Elisabet; Backlund, Anders; Alsmark, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    The genome of Leishmania major harbours a comparably high proportion of genes of prokaryote origin, acquired by lateral gene transfer (LGT). Some of these are present in closely related trypanosomatids, while some are detected in Leishmania only. We have evaluated the impact and destiny of LGT in genus Leishmania. To study the dynamics and fate of LGTs we have performed phylogenetic, as well as nucleotide and amino acid composition analyses within orthologous groups of LGTs detected in Leishmania. A set of universal trypanosomatid LGTs was added as a reference group. Both groups of LGTs have, to some extent, ameliorated to resemble the recipient genomes. However, while virtually all of the universal trypanosomatid LGTs are distributed and conserved in the entire genus Leishmania, the LGTs uniquely present in genus Leishmania are more prone to gene loss and display faster rates of evolution. Furthermore, a PCR based approach has been employed to ascertain the presence of a set of twenty LGTs uniquely present in genus Leishmania, and three universal trypanosomatid LGTs, in ten additional strains of Leishmania. Evolutionary rates and predicted expression levels of these LGTs have also been estimated. Ten of the twenty LGTs are distributed and conserved in all species investigated, while the remainder have been subjected to modifications, or undergone pseudogenization, degradation or loss in one or more species. LGTs unique to the genus Leishmania have been acquired after the divergence of Leishmania from the other trypanosomatids, and are evolving faster than their recipient genomes. This implies that LGT in genus Leishmania is a continuous and dynamic process contributing to species differentiation and speciation. This study also highlights the importance of carefully evaluating these dynamic genes, e.g. as LGTs have been suggested as potential drug targets.

  9. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the glyoxalase II from Leishmania infantum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trincão, José [REQUIMTE-CQFB, Departamento Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal); Sousa Silva, Marta [Centro de Química e Bioquímica, Departamento Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa, Edifício C8, Lisboa (Portugal); Barata, Lídia [REQUIMTE-CQFB, Departamento Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal); Centro de Química e Bioquímica, Departamento Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa, Edifício C8, Lisboa (Portugal); Bonifácio, Cecília [REQUIMTE-CQFB, Departamento Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal); Carvalho, Sandra; Tomás, Ana Maria [IBMC - Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal); ICBAS - Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas Abel Salazar, Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal); Ferreira, António E. N.; Cordeiro, Carlos; Ponces Freire, Ana [Centro de Química e Bioquímica, Departamento Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa, Edifício C8, Lisboa (Portugal); Romão, Maria João, E-mail: mromao@dq.fct.unl.pt [REQUIMTE-CQFB, Departamento Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal)

    2006-08-01

    A glyoxalase II from L. infantum was cloned, purified and crystallized and its structure was solved by X-ray crystallography. In trypanosomatids, trypanothione replaces glutathione in all glutathione-dependent processes. Of the two enzymes involved in the glyoxalase pathway, glyoxalase I and glyoxalase II, the latter shows absolute specificity towards trypanothione thioester, making this enzyme an excellent model to understand the molecular basis of trypanothione binding. Cloned glyoxalase II from Leishmania infantum was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Crystals belong to space group C222{sub 1} (unit-cell parameters a = 65.6, b = 88.3, c = 85.2 Å) and diffract beyond 2.15 Å using synchrotron radiation. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using the human glyoxalase II structure as a search model. These results, together with future detailed kinetic characterization using lactoyltrypanothione, should shed light on the evolutionary selection of trypanothione instead of glutathione by trypano-somatids.

  10. Comparative analysis of respiratory chain and oxidative phosphorylation in Leishmania tarentolae, Crithidia fasciculata, Phytomonas serpens and procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verner, Zdeněk; Cermáková, Petra; Skodová, Ingrid; Kováčová, Bianka; Lukeš, Julius; Horváth, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are unicellular parasites living in a wide range of host environments, which to large extent shaped their mitochondrial energy metabolism, resulting in quite large differences even among closely related flagellates. In a comparative manner, we analyzed the activities and composition of mitochondrial respiratory complexes in four species (Leishmania tarentolae, Crithidia fasciculata, Phytomonas serpens and Trypanosoma brucei), which represent the main model trypanosomatids. Moreover, we measured the activity of mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, the overall oxygen consumption and the mitochondrial membrane potential in each species. The comparative analysis suggests an inverse relationship between the activities of respiratory complexes I and II, as well as the overall activity of the canonical complexes and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Our comparative analysis shows that mitochondrial functions are highly variable in these versatile parasites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Crovirin, a snake venom cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP with promising activity against Trypanosomes and Leishmania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila M Adade

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The neglected human diseases caused by trypanosomatids are currently treated with toxic therapy with limited efficacy. In search for novel anti-trypanosomatid agents, we showed previously that the Crotalus viridis viridis (Cvv snake venom was active against infective forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. Here, we describe the purification of crovirin, a cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP from Cvv venom with promising activity against trypanosomes and Leishmania.Crude venom extract was loaded onto a reverse phase analytical (C8 column using a high performance liquid chromatographer. A linear gradient of water/acetonitrile with 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid was used. The peak containing the isolated protein (confirmed by SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry was collected and its protein content was measured. T. cruzi trypomastigotes and amastigotes, L. amazonensis promastigotes and amastigotes and T. brucei rhodesiense procyclic and bloodstream trypomastigotes were challenged with crovirin, whose toxicity was tested against LLC-MK2 cells, peritoneal macrophages and isolated murine extensor digitorum longus muscle. We purified a single protein from Cvv venom corresponding, according to Nano-LC MS/MS sequencing, to a CRISP of 24,893.64 Da, henceforth referred to as crovirin. Human infective trypanosomatid forms, including intracellular amastigotes, were sensitive to crovirin, with low IC50 or LD50 values (1.10-2.38 µg/ml. A considerably higher concentration (20 µg/ml of crovirin was required to elicit only limited toxicity on mammalian cells.This is the first report of CRISP anti-protozoal activity, and suggests that other members of this family might have potential as drugs or drug leads for the development of novel agents against trypanosomatid-borne neglected diseases.

  12. Description of Phytomonas oxycareni n. sp from the Salivary Glands of Oxycarenus lavaterae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seward, E. A.; Votýpka, Jan; Kment, P.; Lukeš, Julius; Kelly, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 168, č. 1 (2017), s. 71-79 ISSN 1434-4610 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-23986S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : kinetoplastid * Phytomonas * phylogeny * intracellular * vector * trypanosomatid Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 2.794, year: 2016

  13. Sergeia podlipaevi gen. nov., sp. nov. (Trypanosomatidae, Kinetoplastida), a parasite of biting midges (Ceratopogonidae, Diptera)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svobodová, M.; Zídková, L.; Čepička, I.; Oborník, Miroslav; Lukeš, Julius; Votýpka, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 2 (2007), s. 423-432 ISSN 1466-5026 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009; GA MŠk 2B06129 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Culicoides * Trypanosoma * trypanosomatids * transmission * biting midges * 18S SSU * GAPDH Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.384, year: 2007

  14. Holistic screening of collapsing honey bee colonies in Spain: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepero, Almudena; Ravoet, Jorgen; Gómez-Moracho, Tamara; Bernal, José Luis; Del Nozal, Maria J; Bartolomé, Carolina; Maside, Xulio; Meana, Aránzazu; González-Porto, Amelia V; de Graaf, Dirk C; Martín-Hernández, Raquel; Higes, Mariano

    2014-09-15

    Here we present a holistic screening of collapsing colonies from three professional apiaries in Spain. Colonies with typical honey bee depopulation symptoms were selected for multiple possible factors to reveal the causes of collapse. Omnipresent were Nosema ceranae and Lake Sinai Virus. Moderate prevalences were found for Black Queen Cell Virus and trypanosomatids, whereas Deformed Wing Virus, Aphid Lethal Paralysis Virus strain Brookings and neogregarines were rarely detected. Other viruses, Nosema apis, Acarapis woodi and Varroa destructor were not detected. Palinologic study of pollen demonstrated that all colonies were foraging on wild vegetation. Consequently, the pesticide residue analysis was negative for neonicotinoids. The genetic analysis of trypanosomatids GAPDH gene, showed that there is a large genetic distance between Crithidia mellificae ATCC30254, an authenticated cell strain since 1974, and the rest of the presumed C. mellificae sequences obtained in our study or published. This means that the latter group corresponds to a highly differentiated taxon that should be renamed accordingly. The results of this study demonstrate that the drivers of colony collapse may differ between geographic regions with different environmental conditions, or with different beekeeping and agricultural practices. The role of other pathogens in colony collapse has to bee studied in future, especially trypanosomatids and neogregarines. Beside their pathological effect on honey bees, classification and taxonomy of these protozoan parasites should also be clarified.

  15. The streamlined genome of Phytomonas spp. relative to human pathogenic kinetoplastids reveals a parasite tailored for plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcel, Betina M; Denoeud, France; Opperdoes, Fred; Noel, Benjamin; Madoui, Mohammed-Amine; Hammarton, Tansy C; Field, Mark C; Da Silva, Corinne; Couloux, Arnaud; Poulain, Julie; Katinka, Michael; Jabbari, Kamel; Aury, Jean-Marc; Campbell, David A; Cintron, Roxana; Dickens, Nicholas J; Docampo, Roberto; Sturm, Nancy R; Koumandou, V Lila; Fabre, Sandrine; Flegontov, Pavel; Lukeš, Julius; Michaeli, Shulamit; Mottram, Jeremy C; Szöőr, Balázs; Zilberstein, Dan; Bringaud, Frédéric; Wincker, Patrick; Dollet, Michel

    2014-02-01

    Members of the family Trypanosomatidae infect many organisms, including animals, plants and humans. Plant-infecting trypanosomes are grouped under the single genus Phytomonas, failing to reflect the wide biological and pathological diversity of these protists. While some Phytomonas spp. multiply in the latex of plants, or in fruit or seeds without apparent pathogenicity, others colonize the phloem sap and afflict plants of substantial economic value, including the coffee tree, coconut and oil palms. Plant trypanosomes have not been studied extensively at the genome level, a major gap in understanding and controlling pathogenesis. We describe the genome sequences of two plant trypanosomatids, one pathogenic isolate from a Guianan coconut and one non-symptomatic isolate from Euphorbia collected in France. Although these parasites have extremely distinct pathogenic impacts, very few genes are unique to either, with the vast majority of genes shared by both isolates. Significantly, both Phytomonas spp. genomes consist essentially of single copy genes for the bulk of their metabolic enzymes, whereas other trypanosomatids e.g. Leishmania and Trypanosoma possess multiple paralogous genes or families. Indeed, comparison with other trypanosomatid genomes revealed a highly streamlined genome, encoding for a minimized metabolic system while conserving the major pathways, and with retention of a full complement of endomembrane organelles, but with no evidence for functional complexity. Identification of the metabolic genes of Phytomonas provides opportunities for establishing in vitro culturing of these fastidious parasites and new tools for the control of agricultural plant disease.

  16. Lutzomyia adiketis sp. n. (Diptera: Phlebotomidae, a vector of Paleoleishmania neotropicum sp. n. (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae in Dominican amber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poinar George

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amber fossils can be used to trace the history of disease-vector associations because microorganisms are preserved "in situ" inside the alimentary tract and body cavity of blood-sucking insects. Results Lutzomyia adiketis sp. n. (Phlebotomidae: Diptera is described from Dominican amber as a vector of Paleoleishmania neotropicum sp. n. (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae. The fossil sand fly differs from all previously described extinct and extant members of the genus by the following combination of characters: Sc forked with the branches meeting the costa and radius veins; wing L/W value of 4.1; a δ value of 18; a ratio β/α value of 0.86, and the shape and size of the spatulate rods on the ninth sternite. The trypanosomatid is characterized by the structure of its promastigotes, amastigotes and paramastigotes and its transmission by an extinct species of sand fly. Conclusion Morphological characters show that the fossil sand fly is a new extinct species and that it is host to a digenetic species of trypanosomatid. This study provides the first fossil evidence that Neotropical sand flies were vectors of trypanosomatids in the mid-Tertiary (20–30 mya.

  17. Sera of Chagasic patients react with antigens from the tomato parasite Phytomonas serpens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane K Graça-de Souza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Phytomonas comprises trypanosomatids that can parasitize a broad range of plant species. These fagellates can cause diseases in some plant families with a wide geographic distribution, which can result in great economic losses. We have demonstrated previously that Phytomonas serpens 15T, a tomato trypanosomatid, shares antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of human Chagas disease. Herein, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE and mass spectrometry (MS were used to identify proteins of P. serpens 15T that are recognized by sera from patients with Chagas disease. After 2D-electrophoresis of whole-cell lysates, 31 peptides were selected and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Twenty-eight polypeptides were identifed, resulting in 22 different putative proteins. The identifed proteins were classifed into 8 groups according to biological process, most of which were clustered into a cellular metabolic process category. These results generated a collection of proteins that can provide a starting point to obtain insights into antigenic cross reactivity among trypanosomatids and to explore P. serpens antigens as candidates for vaccine and immunologic diagnosis studies.

  18. Identification, molecular and functional characterization of calmodulin gene of Phytomonas serpens 15T that shares high similarity with its pathogenic counterparts Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Tatiana de Arruda Campos Brasil; Graça-de Souza, Viviane Krominski; Lancheros, César Armando Contreras; Monteiro-Góes, Viviane; Krieger, Marco Aurélio; Goldenberg, Samuel; Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie

    2011-03-01

    In trypanosomatids, Ca²+-binding proteins can affect parasite growth, differentiation and invasion. Due to their importance for parasite maintenance, they become an attractive target for drug discovery and design. Phytomonas serpens 15T is a non-human pathogenic trypanosomatid that expresses important protein homologs of human pathogenic trypanosomatids. In this study, the coding sequence of calmodulin, a Ca²+-binding protein, of P. serpens 15T was cloned and characterized. The encoded polypeptide (CaMP) displayed high amino acid identity to homolog protein of Trypanosoma cruzi and four helix-loop-helix motifs were found. CaMP sequence analysis showed 20 amino acid substitutions compared to its mammalian counterparts. This gene is located on a chromosomal band with estimated size of 1,300 kb and two transcripts were detected by Northern blot analysis. A polyclonal antiserum raised against the recombinant protein recognized a polypeptide with an estimated size of 17 kDa in log-phase promastigote extracts. The recombinant CaMP retains its Ca²+-binding capacity.

  19. Sera of chagasic patients react with antigens from the tomato parasite Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça-de Souza, Viviane K; Monteiro-Góes, Viviane; Manque, Patrício; Souza, Tatiana A C B; Corrêa, Paulo R C; Buck, Gregory A; Ávila, Andréa R; Yamauchi, Lucy M; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Goldenberg, Samuel; Krieger, Marco A; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F

    2010-01-01

    The genus Phytomonas comprises trypanosomatids that can parasitize a broad range of plant species. These flagellates can cause diseases in some plant families with a wide geographic distribution, which can result in great economic losses. We have demonstrated previously that Phytomonas serpens 15T, a tomato trypanosomatid, shares antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of human Chagas disease. Herein, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry (MS) were used to identify proteins of P. serpens 15T that are recognized by sera from patients with Chagas disease. After 2D-electrophoresis of whole-cell lysates, 31 peptides were selected and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Twenty-eight polypeptides were identified, resulting in 22 different putative proteins. The identified proteins were classified into 8 groups according to biological process, most of which were clustered into a cellular metabolic process category. These results generated a collection of proteins that can provide a starting point to obtain insights into antigenic cross reactivity among trypanosomatids and to explore P. serpens antigens as candidates for vaccine and immunologic diagnosis studies.

  20. Members of a large retroposon family are determinants of post-transcriptional gene expression in Leishmania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Bringaud

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomatids are unicellular protists that include the human pathogens Leishmania spp. (leishmaniasis, Trypanosoma brucei (sleeping sickness, and Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease. Analysis of their recently completed genomes confirmed the presence of non-long-terminal repeat retrotransposons, also called retroposons. Using the 79-bp signature sequence common to all trypanosomatid retroposons as bait, we identified in the Leishmania major genome two new large families of small elements--LmSIDER1 (785 copies and LmSIDER2 (1,073 copies--that fulfill all the characteristics of extinct trypanosomatid retroposons. LmSIDERs are approximately 70 times more abundant in L. major compared to T. brucei and are found almost exclusively within the 3'-untranslated regions (3'UTRs of L. major mRNAs. We provide experimental evidence that LmSIDER2 act as mRNA instability elements and that LmSIDER2-containing mRNAs are generally expressed at lower levels compared to the non-LmSIDER2 mRNAs. The considerable expansion of LmSIDERs within 3'UTRs in an organism lacking transcriptional control and their role in regulating mRNA stability indicate that Leishmania have probably recycled these short retroposons to globally modulate the expression of a number of genes. To our knowledge, this is the first example in eukaryotes of the domestication and expansion of a family of mobile elements that have evolved to fulfill a critical cellular function.

  1. Squalene synthase as a target for Chagas disease therapeutics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Shang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomatid parasites are the causative agents of many neglected tropical diseases and there is currently considerable interest in targeting endogenous sterol biosynthesis in these organisms as a route to the development of novel anti-infective drugs. Here, we report the first x-ray crystallographic structures of the enzyme squalene synthase (SQS from a trypanosomatid parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. We obtained five structures of T. cruzi SQS and eight structures of human SQS with four classes of inhibitors: the substrate-analog S-thiolo-farnesyl diphosphate, the quinuclidines E5700 and ER119884, several lipophilic bisphosphonates, and the thiocyanate WC-9, with the structures of the two very potent quinuclidines suggesting strategies for selective inhibitor development. We also show that the lipophilic bisphosphonates have low nM activity against T. cruzi and inhibit endogenous sterol biosynthesis and that E5700 acts synergistically with the azole drug, posaconazole. The determination of the structures of trypanosomatid and human SQS enzymes with a diverse set of inhibitors active in cells provides insights into SQS inhibition, of interest in the context of the development of drugs against Chagas disease.

  2. The Streamlined Genome of Phytomonas spp. Relative to Human Pathogenic Kinetoplastids Reveals a Parasite Tailored for Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcel, Betina M.; Denoeud, France; Opperdoes, Fred; Noel, Benjamin; Madoui, Mohammed-Amine; Hammarton, Tansy C.; Field, Mark C.; Da Silva, Corinne; Couloux, Arnaud; Poulain, Julie; Katinka, Michael; Jabbari, Kamel; Aury, Jean-Marc; Campbell, David A.; Cintron, Roxana; Dickens, Nicholas J.; Docampo, Roberto; Sturm, Nancy R.; Koumandou, V. Lila; Fabre, Sandrine; Flegontov, Pavel; Lukeš, Julius; Michaeli, Shulamit; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Szöőr, Balázs; Zilberstein, Dan; Bringaud, Frédéric; Wincker, Patrick; Dollet, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Members of the family Trypanosomatidae infect many organisms, including animals, plants and humans. Plant-infecting trypanosomes are grouped under the single genus Phytomonas, failing to reflect the wide biological and pathological diversity of these protists. While some Phytomonas spp. multiply in the latex of plants, or in fruit or seeds without apparent pathogenicity, others colonize the phloem sap and afflict plants of substantial economic value, including the coffee tree, coconut and oil palms. Plant trypanosomes have not been studied extensively at the genome level, a major gap in understanding and controlling pathogenesis. We describe the genome sequences of two plant trypanosomatids, one pathogenic isolate from a Guianan coconut and one non-symptomatic isolate from Euphorbia collected in France. Although these parasites have extremely distinct pathogenic impacts, very few genes are unique to either, with the vast majority of genes shared by both isolates. Significantly, both Phytomonas spp. genomes consist essentially of single copy genes for the bulk of their metabolic enzymes, whereas other trypanosomatids e.g. Leishmania and Trypanosoma possess multiple paralogous genes or families. Indeed, comparison with other trypanosomatid genomes revealed a highly streamlined genome, encoding for a minimized metabolic system while conserving the major pathways, and with retention of a full complement of endomembrane organelles, but with no evidence for functional complexity. Identification of the metabolic genes of Phytomonas provides opportunities for establishing in vitro culturing of these fastidious parasites and new tools for the control of agricultural plant disease. PMID:24516393

  3. Combination of the essential oil constituents citral, eugenol and thymol enhance their inhibitory effect on Crithidia fasciculata and Trypanosoma cruzi growth

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    Camila M. O. Azeredo

    Full Text Available We analyzed the effect of the combination of citral, eugenol and thymol, respectively the main constituents of essential oils of Cympobogon citratus (DC Stapf, Poaceae (lemon grass, Syzygium aromaticum(L. Merr. & L.M. Perry, Myrtaceae (clove and Thymus vulgarisL., Lamiaceae (thyme, on the proliferation of the trypanosomatids Crithidia fasciculataand Trypanosoma cruzi.The constituents were initially added individually at different concentrations to C. fasciculatacultures to estimate the IC50/24h. Concentrations in a triple combination were about 2 times and 16.5 times lower against C. fasciculata and T. cruzi, respectively, as compared to isolated compounds. Incubation of C. fasciculatawith the trypanocydal agent benznidazole did not affect parasite growth at concentrations up to 500 µg/ml, but the IC50 of this drug against T. cruziwas 15.8 µg/ml, a value about 2-5 times higher than that of constituents in the triple combination. Analysis of treated C. fasciculata by scanning electron microscopy showed rounding of the cell body. Our data show that combination of essential oil constituents resulted in increased inhibitory activity on growth of both non-pathogenic and pathogenic trypanosomatid species and indicate that the non-patogenic C. fasciculata may represent a resistant model for drug screening in trypanosomatids.

  4. Adult anopheline ecology and malaria transmission in irrigated areas of South Punjab, Pakistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrel, N; Amerasinghe, F P; Ensink, J

    2004-01-01

    Surface irrigation in the Punjab province of Pakistan has been carried out on a large scale since the development of the Indus Basin Irrigation System in the late 19th century. The objective of our study was to understand how the population dynamics of adult anopheline mosquitoes (Diptera: Culici...... transmission than we observed. To assess the overall importance of irrigation-related sites in the epidemiology of malaria in the Punjab, more studies are needed to compare irrigated and non-irrigated areas.......Surface irrigation in the Punjab province of Pakistan has been carried out on a large scale since the development of the Indus Basin Irrigation System in the late 19th century. The objective of our study was to understand how the population dynamics of adult anopheline mosquitoes (Diptera......: Culicidae) could be related to malaria transmission in rural areas with intensive irrigation and a history of malaria epidemics. In this paper we present our observations from three villages located along an irrigation canal in South Punjab. The study was carried out from 1 April 1999 to 31 March 2000...

  5. Dental plaque bacteria with reduced susceptibility to chlorhexidine are multidrug resistant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Hafiz Ghulam Murtaza; Seers, Christine Ann; Sabri, Anjum Nasim; Reynolds, Eric Charles

    2016-09-15

    Chlorhexidine (CHX) is used in oral care products to help control dental plaque. In this study dental plaque bacteria were grown on media containing 2 μg/ml chlorhexidine gluconate to screen for bacteria with reduced CHX susceptibility. The isolates were characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and antibiotic resistance profiles were determined using the disc diffusion method. The isolates were variably resistant to multiple drugs including ampicillin, kanamycin, gentamicin and tetracycline. Two species, Chryseobacterium culicis and Chryseobacterium indologenes were able to grow planktonically and form biofilms in the presence of 32 μg/ml CHX. In the CHX and multidrug resistant C. indologenes we demonstrated a 19-fold up-regulation of expression of the HlyD-like periplasmic adaptor protein of a tripartite efflux pump upon exposure to 16 μg/ml CHX suggesting that multidrug resistance may be mediated by this system. Exposure of biofilms of these resistant species to undiluted commercial CHX mouthwash for intervals from 5 to 60 s indicated that the mouthwash was unlikely to eliminate them from dental plaque in vivo. The study highlights the requirement for increased vigilance of the presence of multidrug resistant bacteria in dental plaque and raises a potential risk of long-term use of oral care products containing antimicrobial agents for the control of dental plaque.

  6. The Role of the Environment in the Evolution of Tolerance and Resistance to a Pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Michael; Koella, Jacob C

    2017-09-01

    Defense against parasites can be divided into resistance, which limits parasite burden, and tolerance, which reduces pathogenesis at a given parasite burden. Distinguishing between the two and understanding which defense is favored by evolution in different ecological settings are important, as they lead to fundamentally different evolutionary trajectories of host-parasite interactions. We let the mosquito Aedes aegypti evolve under different food levels and with either no parasite, a constant parasite, or a coevolving parasite (the microsporidian Vavraia culicis). We then tested tolerance and resistance of the evolved lines on a population level at the two food levels. Exposure to parasites during evolution increased resistance and tolerance, but there were no differences between the lines evolved with coevolving or constant parasites. Mosquitoes that had evolved with food restriction had higher resistance than those evolved with high food but similar tolerance. The mosquitoes that had restricted food when being tested had lower tolerance than those with normal food, but there was no difference in resistance. Our results emphasize the complexity and dependence on environmental conditions of the evolution and expression of resistance and tolerance and help to evaluate some of the predictions about the evolution of host defense against parasites.

  7. Prevalence and distribution of parasites and pathogens of triatominae from Argentina, with emphasis on Triatoma infestans and Triatoma virus TrV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Gerardo A; Echeverria, María G; Susevich, María L; Becnel, James J; Pelizza, Sebastián A; García, Juan J

    2009-11-01

    Chagas' disease is the most important endemic arthropod-zoonosis in Argentina with an estimated 1.6 million people infected with the causative agent Trypanosoma cruzi. Triatoma infestans is the main vector of Chagas' disease in Argentina. A survey for parasites and pathogens of Triatominae was conducted from August 2002 to February 2005. Collections of insects were made in domiciles, peridomiciles, and in the natural habitats of the Triatominae. Insects from these collections were dissected and their organs and tissues examined for flagellates. Frass from these insects was collected and examined for detection of the entomopathogenic virus Triatoma virus (TrV) using AC-ELISA and PCR. Triatominae belonging to four species, T. infestans (n=1646), Triatoma guasayana (n=4), Triatoma platensis (n=1) and Triatoma sordida (n=5) were collected from 62 sites located in 13 provinces of Argentina. Triatoma virus and two protozoan species, Blastocrithidia triatomae and T. cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, were found infecting Triatominae. The total prevalence of TrV in 1646 T. infestans analyzed by ELISA was 9.66% (159/1646) from 7 to 13 provinces where collections were made. Triatoma virus positive triatomines were found in 17 of 62 populations when examined by AC-ELISA but in 38 of 62 populations when PCR was used for detection. The prevalence of B. triatomae in T. infestans was 0.43% (7/1646), while the prevalence of T. cruzi was 1.3% (21/1646). This is the first study on the diversity, distribution and prevalence of flagellated protozoa and TrV of Triatominae in endemic Chagas' disease regions of Argentina.

  8. The role of gallery forests in maintaining Phlebotominae populations: potential Leishmania spp. vectors in the Brazilian savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Tâmara Dias Oliveira; Minuzzi-Souza, Thaís Tâmara Castro; Ferreira, Tauana de Sousa; Freire, Luciana Pereira; Timbó, Renata Velôzo; Vital, Tamires Emanuele; Nitz, Nadjar; Silva, Mariana Neiva; Santos, Alcinei de Souza; Sales, Nathyla Morgana Cunha; Obara, Marcos Takashi; Andrade, Andrey José de; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo

    2017-10-01

    Knowledge on synanthropic phlebotomines and their natural infection by Leishmania is necessary for the identification of potential areas for leishmaniasis occurrence. To analyse the occurrence of Phlebotominae in gallery forests and household units (HUs) in the city of Palmas and to determine the rate of natural infection by trypanosomatids. Gallery forests and adjacent household areas were sampled on July (dry season) and November (rainy season) in 2014. The total sampling effort was 960 HP light traps and eight Shannon traps. Trypanosomatids were detected in Phlebotominae females through the amplification of the SSU rDNA region, and the positive samples were used in ITS1-PCR. Trypanosomatid species were identified using sequencing. A total of 1,527 sand flies representing 30 species were captured in which 949 (28 spp.) and 578 (22 spp.) were registered in July and November, respectively. In July, more specimens were captured in the gallery forests than in the HUs, and Nyssomyia whitmani was particularly frequent. In November, most of the specimens were found in the HUs, and again, Ny. whitmani was the predominant species. Lutzomyia longipalpis was commonly found in domestic areas, while Bichromomyia flaviscutellata was most frequent in gallery forests. Molecular analysis of 154 pools of females (752 specimens) identified Leishmania amazonensis, L. infantum, and Crithidia fasciculata in Ny. whitmani, as well as L. amazonensis in Lu. longipalpis, Trypanosoma sp. and L. amazonensis in Pintomyia christenseni, and L. amazonensis in both Psathyromyia hermanlenti and Evandromyia walkeri. These results show the importance of gallery forests in maintaining Phlebotominae populations in the dry month, as well as their frequent occurrence in household units in the rainy month. This is the first study to identify Leishmania, Trypanosoma, and Crithidia species in Phlebotominae collected in Palmas, Tocantins, Brazil.

  9. Genome of the avirulent human-infective trypanosome--Trypanosoma rangeli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Hermes Stoco

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma rangeli is a hemoflagellate protozoan parasite infecting humans and other wild and domestic mammals across Central and South America. It does not cause human disease, but it can be mistaken for the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi. We have sequenced the T. rangeli genome to provide new tools for elucidating the distinct and intriguing biology of this species and the key pathways related to interaction with its arthropod and mammalian hosts.The T. rangeli haploid genome is ∼ 24 Mb in length, and is the smallest and least repetitive trypanosomatid genome sequenced thus far. This parasite genome has shorter subtelomeric sequences compared to those of T. cruzi and T. brucei; displays intraspecific karyotype variability and lacks minichromosomes. Of the predicted 7,613 protein coding sequences, functional annotations could be determined for 2,415, while 5,043 are hypothetical proteins, some with evidence of protein expression. 7,101 genes (93% are shared with other trypanosomatids that infect humans. An ortholog of the dcl2 gene involved in the T. brucei RNAi pathway was found in T. rangeli, but the RNAi machinery is non-functional since the other genes in this pathway are pseudogenized. T. rangeli is highly susceptible to oxidative stress, a phenotype that may be explained by a smaller number of anti-oxidant defense enzymes and heat-shock proteins.Phylogenetic comparison of nuclear and mitochondrial genes indicates that T. rangeli and T. cruzi are equidistant from T. brucei. In addition to revealing new aspects of trypanosome co-evolution within the vertebrate and invertebrate hosts, comparative genomic analysis with pathogenic trypanosomatids provides valuable new information that can be further explored with the aim of developing better diagnostic tools and/or therapeutic targets.

  10. The role of gallery forests in maintaining Phlebotominae populations: potential Leishmania spp. vectors in the Brazilian savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tâmara Dias Oliveira Machado

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Knowledge on synanthropic phlebotomines and their natural infection by Leishmania is necessary for the identification of potential areas for leishmaniasis occurrence. OBJECTIVE To analyse the occurrence of Phlebotominae in gallery forests and household units (HUs in the city of Palmas and to determine the rate of natural infection by trypanosomatids. METHODS Gallery forests and adjacent household areas were sampled on July (dry season and November (rainy season in 2014. The total sampling effort was 960 HP light traps and eight Shannon traps. Trypanosomatids were detected in Phlebotominae females through the amplification of the SSU rDNA region, and the positive samples were used in ITS1-PCR. Trypanosomatid species were identified using sequencing. FINDINGS A total of 1,527 sand flies representing 30 species were captured in which 949 (28 spp. and 578 (22 spp. were registered in July and November, respectively. In July, more specimens were captured in the gallery forests than in the HUs, and Nyssomyia whitmani was particularly frequent. In November, most of the specimens were found in the HUs, and again, Ny. whitmani was the predominant species. Lutzomyia longipalpis was commonly found in domestic areas, while Bichromomyia flaviscutellata was most frequent in gallery forests. Molecular analysis of 154 pools of females (752 specimens identified Leishmania amazonensis, L. infantum, and Crithidia fasciculata in Ny. whitmani, as well as L. amazonensis in Lu. longipalpis, Trypanosoma sp. and L. amazonensis in Pintomyia christenseni, and L. amazonensis in both Psathyromyia hermanlenti and Evandromyia walkeri. MAIN CONCLUSIONS These results show the importance of gallery forests in maintaining Phlebotominae populations in the dry month, as well as their frequent occurrence in household units in the rainy month. This is the first study to identify Leishmania, Trypanosoma, and Crithidia species in Phlebotominae collected in Palmas, Tocantins

  11. Separation of parasites from human blood using deterministic lateral displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Stefan H; Beech, Jason P; Barrett, Michael P; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O

    2011-04-07

    We present the use of a simple microfluidic technique to separate living parasites from human blood. Parasitic trypanosomatids cause a range of human and animal diseases. African trypanosomes, responsible for human African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness), live free in the blood and other tissue fluids. Diagnosis relies on detection and due to their often low numbers against an overwhelming background of predominantly red blood cells it is crucial to separate the parasites from the blood. By modifying the method of deterministic lateral displacement, confining parasites and red blood cells in channels of optimized depth which accentuates morphological differences, we were able to achieve separation thus offering a potential route to diagnostics.

  12. Molecular Modeling Approaches for Determining Gene Function: application to a Putative Poly-A Binding Protein from Leishmania amazonensis (LaPABP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva-Jr FP

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The great expansion in the number of genome sequencing projects has revealed the importance of computational methods to speed up the characterization of unknown genes. These studies have been improved by the use of three dimensional information from the predicted proteins generated by molecular modeling techniques. In this work, we disclose the structure-function relationship of a gene product from Leishmania amazonensis by applying molecular modeling and bioinformatics techniques. The analyzed sequence encodes a 159 aminoacids polypeptide (estimated 18 kDa and was denoted LaPABP for its high homology with poly-A binding proteins from trypanosomatids. The domain structure, clustering analysis and a three dimensional model of LaPABP, basically obtained by homology modeling on the structure of the human poly-A binding protein, are described. Based on the analysis of the electrostatic potential mapped on the model's surface and conservation of intramolecular contacts responsible for folding stabilization we hypothesize that this protein may have less avidity to RNA than it's L. major counterpart but still account for a significant functional activity in the parasite. The model obtained will help in the design of mutagenesis experiments aimed to elucidate the mechanism of gene expression in trypanosomatids and serve as a starting point for its exploration as a potential source of targets for a rational chemotherapy.

  13. Genome Evolution and Phylogenomic Analysis of Candidatus Kinetoplastibacterium, the Betaproteobacterial Endosymbionts of Strigomonas and Angomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, João M.P.; Serrano, Myrna G.; Maia da Silva, Flávia; Voegtly, Logan J.; Matveyev, Andrey V.; Teixeira, Marta M.G.; Camargo, Erney P.; Buck, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    It has been long known that insect-infecting trypanosomatid flagellates from the genera Angomonas and Strigomonas harbor bacterial endosymbionts (Candidatus Kinetoplastibacterium or TPE [trypanosomatid proteobacterial endosymbiont]) that supplement the host metabolism. Based on previous analyses of other bacterial endosymbiont genomes from other lineages, a stereotypical path of genome evolution in such bacteria over the duration of their association with the eukaryotic host has been characterized. In this work, we sequence and analyze the genomes of five TPEs, perform their metabolic reconstruction, do an extensive phylogenomic analyses with all available Betaproteobacteria, and compare the TPEs with their nearest betaproteobacterial relatives. We also identify a number of housekeeping and central metabolism genes that seem to have undergone positive selection. Our genome structure analyses show total synteny among the five TPEs despite millions of years of divergence, and that this lineage follows the common path of genome evolution observed in other endosymbionts of diverse ancestries. As previously suggested by cell biology and biochemistry experiments, Ca. Kinetoplastibacterium spp. preferentially maintain those genes necessary for the biosynthesis of compounds needed by their hosts. We have also shown that metabolic and informational genes related to the cooperation with the host are overrepresented amongst genes shown to be under positive selection. Finally, our phylogenomic analysis shows that, while being in the Alcaligenaceae family of Betaproteobacteria, the closest relatives of these endosymbionts are not in the genus Bordetella as previously reported, but more likely in the Taylorella genus. PMID:23345457

  14. Short communication: Survival of honey bees (Apis mellifera) infected with Crithidia mellificae (Langridge and McGhee: ATCC® 30254™) in the presence of Nosema ceranae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higes, M.; Rodríguez-García, C.; Gómez-Moracho, T.; Meana, A.; Bartolomé, C.; Maside, X.; Barrios, L.; Martín-Hernández, R.

    2016-11-01

    Crithidia mellificae, a trypanosomatid parasite of Apis mellifera, has been proposed to be one of the pathogens responsible for the serious honey bee colony losses produced worldwide in the last decade, either alone or in association with Nosema ceranae. Since this pathogenic effect contradicts the results of the experimental infections originally performed by Langridge and McGhee nearly 40 years ago, we investigated the potential linkage of this protozoan with colony decline under laboratory conditions. Nosema-free and trypanosomatid-free honey bees from three different colonies were experimentally infected with fresh C. mellificae spheroid forms (reference strain ATCC30254), with N. ceranae fresh spores and with both parasites at the same time. Replicate cages were kept at 27 °C and used to analyse survival. C. mellificae spheroid forms did not reduce significantly the survival of the worker bees (64.5% at 30 days post-infection vs. 77.8% for the uninfected bees used as controls; differences were non statistically significant) under these experimental conditions. In contrast, the cages infected with N. ceranae exhibited higher rates of mortality from the 20th day post-infection onwards, irrespective of the presence of C. mellificae, suggesting that the spheroid forms of the latter have no pathological effect on A. mellifera. (Author)

  15. Old Yellow Enzyme from Trypanosoma cruzi Exhibits In Vivo Prostaglandin F2α Synthase Activity and Has a Key Role in Parasite Infection and Drug Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencia Díaz-Viraqué

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The discovery that trypanosomatids, unicellular organisms of the order Kinetoplastida, are capable of synthesizing prostaglandins raised questions about the role of these molecules during parasitic infections. Multiple studies indicate that prostaglandins could be related to the infection processes and pathogenesis in trypanosomatids. This work aimed to unveil the role of the prostaglandin F2α synthase TcOYE in the establishment of Trypanosoma cruzi infection, the causative agent of Chagas disease. This chronic disease affects several million people in Latin America causing high morbidity and mortality. Here, we propose a prokaryotic evolutionary origin for TcOYE, and then we used in vitro and in vivo experiments to show that T. cruzi prostaglandin F2α synthase plays an important role in modulating the infection process. TcOYE overexpressing parasites were less able to complete the infective cycle in cell culture infections and increased cardiac tissue parasitic load in infected mice. Additionally, parasites overexpressing the enzyme increased PGF2α synthesis from arachidonic acid. Finally, an increase in benznidazole and nifurtimox susceptibility in TcOYE overexpressing parasites showed its participation in activating the currently anti-chagasic drugs, which added to its observed ability to confer resistance to hydrogen peroxide, highlights the relevance of this enzyme in multiple events including host–parasite interaction.

  16. Proteomics on the rims: insights into the biology of the nuclear envelope and flagellar pocket of trypanosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Mark C; Adung'a, Vincent; Obado, Samson; Chait, Brian T; Rout, Michael P

    2012-08-01

    Trypanosomatids represent the causative agents of major diseases in humans, livestock and plants, with inevitable suffering and economic hardship as a result. They are also evolutionarily highly divergent organisms, and the many unique aspects of trypanosome biology provide opportunities in terms of identification of drug targets, the challenge of exploiting these putative targets and, at the same time, significant scope for exploration of novel and divergent cell biology. We can estimate from genome sequences that the degree of divergence of trypanosomes from animals and fungi is extreme, with perhaps one third to one half of predicted trypanosome proteins having no known function based on homology or recognizable protein domains/architecture. Two highly important aspects of trypanosome biology are the flagellar pocket and the nuclear envelope, where in silico analysis clearly suggests great potential divergence in the proteome. The flagellar pocket is the sole site of endo- and exocytosis in trypanosomes and plays important roles in immune evasion via variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) trafficking and providing a location for sequestration of various invariant receptors. The trypanosome nuclear envelope has been largely unexplored but, by analogy with higher eukaryotes, roles in the regulation of chromatin and most significantly, in controlling VSG gene expression are expected. Here we discuss recent successful proteomics-based approaches towards characterization of the nuclear envelope and the endocytic apparatus, the identification of conserved and novel trypanosomatid-specific features, and the implications of these findings.

  17. Validation of N-myristoyltransferase as Potential Chemotherapeutic Target in Mammal-Dwelling Stages of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J Herrera

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, an endemic and debilitating illness in Latin America. Lately, owing to extensive population movements, this neglected tropical disease has become a global health concern. The two clinically available drugs for the chemotherapy of Chagas disease have rather high toxicity and limited efficacy in the chronic phase of the disease, and may induce parasite resistance. The development of new anti-T. cruzi agents is therefore imperative. The enzyme N-myristoyltransferase (NMT has recently been biochemically characterized, shown to be essential in Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei, and T. cruzi¸ and proposed as promising chemotherapeutic target in these trypanosomatids.Here, using high-content imaging we assayed eight known trypanosomatid NMT inhibitors, against mammal-dwelling intracellular amastigote and trypomastigote stages and demonstrated that three of them (compounds 1, 5, and 8 have potent anti-proliferative effect at submicromolar concentrations against T. cruzi, with very low toxicity against human epithelial cells. Moreover, metabolic labeling using myristic acid, azide showed a considerable decrease in the myristoylation of proteins in parasites treated with NMT inhibitors, providing evidence of the on-target activity of the inhibitors.Taken together, our data point out to the potential use of NMT inhibitors as anti-T. cruzi chemotherapy.

  18. A split and rearranged nuclear gene encoding the iron-sulfur subunit of mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase in Euglenozoa

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    Gray Michael W

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analyses based on phylogenetic and ultrastructural data have suggested that euglenids (such as Euglena gracilis, trypanosomatids and diplonemids are members of a monophyletic lineage termed Euglenozoa. However, many uncertainties are associated with phylogenetic reconstructions for ancient and rapidly evolving groups; thus, rare genomic characters become increasingly important in reinforcing inferred phylogenetic relationships. Findings We discovered that the iron-sulfur subunit (SdhB of mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase is encoded by a split and rearranged nuclear gene in Euglena gracilis and trypanosomatids, an example of a rare genomic character. The two subgenic modules are transcribed independently and the resulting mRNAs appear to be independently translated, with the two protein products imported into mitochondria, based on the presence of predicted mitochondrial targeting peptides. Although the inferred protein sequences are in general very divergent from those of other organisms, all of the required iron-sulfur cluster-coordinating residues are present. Moreover, the discontinuity in the euglenozoan SdhB sequence occurs between the two domains of a typical, covalently continuous SdhB, consistent with the inference that the euglenozoan 'half' proteins are functional. Conclusion The discovery of this unique molecular marker provides evidence for the monophyly of Euglenozoa that is independent of evolutionary models. Our results pose questions about the origin and timing of this novel gene arrangement and the structure and function of euglenozoan SdhB.

  19. Leishmania replication protein A-1 binds in vivo single-stranded telomeric DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neto, J.L. Siqueira; Lira, C.B.B.; Giardini, M.A.; Khater, L.; Perez, A.M.; Peroni, L.A.; Reis, J.R.R. dos; Freitas-Junior, L.H.; Ramos, C.H.I.; Cano, M.I.N.

    2007-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a highly conserved heterotrimeric single-stranded DNA-binding protein involved in different events of DNA metabolism. In yeast, subunits 1 (RPA-1) and 2 (RPA-2) work also as telomerase recruiters and, in humans, the complex unfolds G-quartet structures formed by the 3' G-rich telomeric strand. In most eukaryotes, RPA-1 and RPA-2 bind DNA using multiple OB fold domains. In trypanosomatids, including Leishmania, RPA-1 has a canonical OB fold and a truncated RFA-1 structural domain. In Leishmania amazonensis, RPA-1 alone can form a complex in vitro with the telomeric G-rich strand. In this work, we show that LaRPA-1 is a nuclear protein that associates in vivo with Leishmania telomeres. We mapped the boundaries of the OB fold DNA-binding domain using deletion mutants. Since Leishmania and other trypanosomatids lack homologues of known telomere end binding proteins, our results raise questions about the function of RPA-1 in parasite telomeres

  20. Identification of a type I nitroreductase gene in non-virulent Trypanosoma rangeli

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    Marjorie Montenegro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Trypanosomatid type I nitroreductases (NTRs, i.e., mitochondrial enzymes that metabolise nitroaromatic pro-drugs, are essential for parasite growth, infection, and survival. Here, a type I NTR of non-virulent protozoan Trypanosoma rangeli is described and compared to those of other trypanosomatids. The NTR gene was isolated from KP1(+ and KP1(- strains, and its corresponding transcript and 5’ untranslated region (5’UTR were determined. Bioinformatics analyses and nitro-drug activation assays were also performed. The results indicated that the type I NTR gene is present in both KP1(- and KP1(+ strains, with 98% identity. However, the predicted subcellular localisation of the protein differed among the strains (predicted as mitochondrial in the KP1(+ strain. Comparisons of the domains and 3D structures of the NTRs with those of orthologs demonstrated that the nitroreductase domain of T. rangeli NTR is conserved across all the strains, including the residues involved in the interaction with the FMN cofactor and in the tertiary structure characteristics of this oxidoreductase protein family. mRNA processing and expression were also observed. In addition, T. rangeli was shown to be sensitive to benznidazole and nifurtimox in a concentration-dependent manner. In summary, T. rangeli appears to have a newly discovered functional type I NTR.

  1. Phytomonas serpens, a tomato parasite, shares antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi that are recognized by human sera and induce protective immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breganó, José Wander; Picão, Renata Cristina; Graça, Viviane Krominski; Menolli, Rafael Andrade; Itow Jankevicius, Shiduca; Pinge Filho, P; Jankevicius, José Vítor

    2003-12-05

    The immune cross-reactivity between Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan that causes Chagas' disease, and Phytomonas serpens, a trypanosomatid that infects tomatoes, was studied. Sera from patients with Chagas' disease presented a strong reactivity with P. serpens antigens by conventional serological assays such as indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) and direct agglutination test (DAT), confirmed after cross-absorption experiments. The results show that this protozoan is highly immunogenic and that rabbit and mouse hyperimmune serum raised against T. cruzi or P. serpens was able to recognize both T. cruzi and P. serpens antigens in immunofluorescence and agglutination assays. The antigenic cross-reactivity between T. cruzi and P. serpens was also demonstrated in vivo. BALB/c mice immunized by the intraperitoneal or oral route with P. serpens and later challenged with a lethal inoculum of T. cruzi blood forms showed a significant decrease in parasitemia and increase in survival compared to controls. A practical implication of these findings is that the ingestion by humans or animals of living plant trypanosomatids present in naturally infected edible fruits could potentially prime the immune response to T. cruzi antigens and interfere with the development of T. cruzi infection.

  2. In vitro selection of Phytomonas serpens cells resistant to the calpain inhibitor MDL28170: alterations in fitness and expression of the major peptidases and efflux pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Simone S C; Gonçalves, Inês C; Ennes-Vidal, Vitor; Lopes, Angela H C S; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F S; D'Ávila-Levy, Claudia M; Santos, André L S; Branquinha, Marta H

    2018-03-01

    The species Phytomonas serpens is known to express some molecules displaying similarity to those described in trypanosomatids pathogenic to humans, such as peptidases from Trypanosoma cruzi (cruzipain) and Leishmania spp. (gp63). In this work, a population of P. serpens resistant to the calpain inhibitor MDL28170 at 70 µ m (MDLR population) was selected by culturing promastigotes in increasing concentrations of the drug. The only relevant ultrastructural difference between wild-type (WT) and MDLR promastigotes was the presence of microvesicles within the flagellar pocket of the latter. MDLR population also showed an increased reactivity to anti-cruzipain antibody as well as a higher papain-like proteolytic activity, while the expression of calpain-like molecules cross-reactive to anti-Dm-calpain (from Drosophila melanogaster) antibody and calcium-dependent cysteine peptidase activity were decreased. Gp63-like molecules also presented a diminished expression in MDLR population, which is probably correlated to the reduction in the parasite adhesion to the salivary glands of the insect vector Oncopeltus fasciatus. A lower accumulation of Rhodamine 123 was detected in MDLR cells when compared with the WT population, a phenotype that was reversed when MDLR cells were treated with cyclosporin A and verapamil. Collectively, our results may help in the understanding of the roles of calpain inhibitors in trypanosomatids.

  3. Cysteine peptidases from Phytomonas serpens: biochemical and immunological approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Camila G R; Aor, Ana Carolina; Valle, Roberta S; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Branquinha, Marta H; Santos, André L S

    2009-12-01

    Phytomonas serpens, a phytoflagellate trypanosomatid, shares common antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi. In the present work, we compared the hydrolytic capability of cysteine peptidases in both trypanosomatids. Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes presented a 10-fold higher efficiency in hydrolyzing the cysteine peptidase substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC than P. serpens promastigotes. Moreover, two weak cysteine-type gelatinolytic activities were detected in P. serpens, while a strong 50-kDa cysteine peptidase was observed in T. cruzi. Cysteine peptidase activities were detected at twofold higher levels in the cytoplasmic fraction when compared with the membrane-rich or the content released from P. serpens. The cysteine peptidase secreted by P. serpens cleaved several proteinaceous substrates. Corroborating these findings, the cellular distribution of the cruzipain-like molecules in P. serpens was attested through immunocytochemistry analysis. Gold particles were observed in all cellular compartments, including the cytoplasm, plasma membrane, flagellum, flagellar membrane and flagellar pocket. Interestingly, some gold particles were visualized free in the flagellar pocket, suggesting the release of the cruzipain-like molecule. The antigenic properties of the cruzipain-like molecules of P. serpens were also analyzed. Interestingly, sera from chagasic patients recognized both cellular and extracellular antigens of P. serpens, including the cruzipain-like molecule. These results point to the use of P. serpens antigens, especially the cruzipain-like cysteine-peptidases, as an alternative vaccination approach to T. cruzi infection.

  4. Post-translational Modifications of Trypanosoma cruzi Canonical and Variant Histones.

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    Picchi, Gisele F A; Zulkievicz, Vanessa; Krieger, Marco A; Zanchin, Nilson T; Goldenberg, Samuel; de Godoy, Lyris M F

    2017-03-03

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, still affects millions of people around the world. No vaccines nor treatment for chronic Chagas disease are available, and chemotherapy for the acute phase is hindered by limited efficacy and severe side effects. The processes by which the parasite acquires infectivity and survives in different hosts involve tight regulation of gene expression, mainly post-transcriptionally. Nevertheless, chromatin structure/organization of trypanosomatids is similar to other eukaryotes, including histone variants and post-translational modifications. Emerging evidence suggests that epigenetic mechanisms also play an important role in the biology/pathogenesis of these parasites, making epigenetic targets suitable candidates to drug discovery. Here, we present the first comprehensive map of post-translational modifications of T. cruzi canonical and variant histones and show that its histone code can be as sophisticated as that of other eukaryotes. A total of 13 distinct modification types were identified, including rather novel and unusual ones such as alternative lysine acylations, serine/threonine acetylation, and N-terminal methylation. Some histone marks correlate to those described for other organisms, suggesting that similar regulatory mechanisms may be in place. Others, however, are unique to T. cruzi or to trypanosomatids as a group and might represent good candidates for the development of antiparasitic drugs.

  5. Validation of N-myristoyltransferase as Potential Chemotherapeutic Target in Mammal-Dwelling Stages of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Linda J; Brand, Stephen; Santos, Andres; Nohara, Lilian L; Harrison, Justin; Norcross, Neil R; Thompson, Stephen; Smith, Victoria; Lema, Carolina; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Gilbert, Ian H; Almeida, Igor C; Maldonado, Rosa A

    2016-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, an endemic and debilitating illness in Latin America. Lately, owing to extensive population movements, this neglected tropical disease has become a global health concern. The two clinically available drugs for the chemotherapy of Chagas disease have rather high toxicity and limited efficacy in the chronic phase of the disease, and may induce parasite resistance. The development of new anti-T. cruzi agents is therefore imperative. The enzyme N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) has recently been biochemically characterized, shown to be essential in Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei, and T. cruzi¸ and proposed as promising chemotherapeutic target in these trypanosomatids. Here, using high-content imaging we assayed eight known trypanosomatid NMT inhibitors, against mammal-dwelling intracellular amastigote and trypomastigote stages and demonstrated that three of them (compounds 1, 5, and 8) have potent anti-proliferative effect at submicromolar concentrations against T. cruzi, with very low toxicity against human epithelial cells. Moreover, metabolic labeling using myristic acid, azide showed a considerable decrease in the myristoylation of proteins in parasites treated with NMT inhibitors, providing evidence of the on-target activity of the inhibitors. Taken together, our data point out to the potential use of NMT inhibitors as anti-T. cruzi chemotherapy.

  6. Outer membrane protein functions as integrator of protein import and DNA inheritance in mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käser, Sandro; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Týč, Jiří; Vaughan, Sue; Warscheid, Bettina; Schneider, André

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are one of the earliest diverging eukaryotes that have fully functional mitochondria. pATOM36 is a trypanosomatid-specific essential mitochondrial outer membrane protein that has been implicated in protein import. Changes in the mitochondrial proteome induced by ablation of pATOM36 and in vitro assays show that pATOM36 is required for the assembly of the archaic translocase of the outer membrane (ATOM), the functional analog of the TOM complex in other organisms. Reciprocal pull-down experiments and immunofluorescence analyses demonstrate that a fraction of pATOM36 interacts and colocalizes with TAC65, a previously uncharacterized essential component of the tripartite attachment complex (TAC). The TAC links the single-unit mitochondrial genome to the basal body of the flagellum and mediates the segregation of the replicated mitochondrial genomes. RNAi experiments show that pATOM36, in line with its dual localization, is not only essential for ATOM complex assembly but also for segregation of the replicated mitochondrial genomes. However, the two functions are distinct, as a truncated version of pATOM36 lacking the 75 C-terminal amino acids can rescue kinetoplast DNA missegregation but not the lack of ATOM complex assembly. Thus, pATOM36 has a dual function and integrates mitochondrial protein import with mitochondrial DNA inheritance. PMID:27436903

  7. Sialoglycoconjugates in Herpetomonas megaseliae: role in the adhesion to insect host epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Bianca A; Pereira, Fernanda M; de Jesus, José B; Branquinha, Marta H; Santos, André L S; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M

    2009-06-01

    Herpetomonas megaseliae is a monoxenic trypanosomatid isolated from the phorid fly Megaselia scalaris. In the present report, the expression of cell surface sialoglycoconjugates in this parasite was analyzed by Western blotting, flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy analyses using lectins that specifically recognize sialic acid residues. A strong reaction was detected when parasites were treated with Limax flavus, Maackia amurensis and Sambucus nigra lectins. Analysis of crude protein extracts by Western blotting revealed that bands with molecular masses ranging from 19 to 80 kDa were reactive to these lectins, which showed a sugar-inhibited recognition with the parasite extract. These results indicated that molecules containing alpha2,3- and alpha2,6-sialylgalactosyl sequences are present in this protozoan. The role of the surface sialomolecules in the interaction with explanted guts from Aedes aegypti was assessed. The interaction of H. megaseliae with the insect gut was strongly inhibited in the presence of mucin (71%), fetuin (68%) and sialyllactose (68%). Collectively, our results suggest a possible involvement of sialomolecules in the interaction between this insect trypanosomatid and the invertebrate host.

  8. A Protein Complex Map of Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Vahid H Gazestani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The functions of the majority of trypanosomatid-specific proteins are unknown, hindering our understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of Trypanosomatida. While protein-protein interactions are highly informative about protein function, a global map of protein interactions and complexes is still lacking for these important human parasites. Here, benefiting from in-depth biochemical fractionation, we systematically interrogated the co-complex interactions of more than 3354 protein groups in procyclic life stage of Trypanosoma brucei, the protozoan parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Using a rigorous methodology, our analysis led to identification of 128 high-confidence complexes encompassing 716 protein groups, including 635 protein groups that lacked experimental annotation. These complexes correlate well with known pathways as well as for proteins co-expressed across the T. brucei life cycle, and provide potential functions for a large number of previously uncharacterized proteins. We validated the functions of several novel proteins associated with the RNA-editing machinery, identifying a candidate potentially involved in the mitochondrial post-transcriptional regulation of T. brucei. Our data provide an unprecedented view of the protein complex map of T. brucei, and serve as a reliable resource for further characterization of trypanosomatid proteins. The presented results in this study are available at: www.TrypsNetDB.org.

  9. Parasite prolyl oligopeptidases and the challenge of designing chemotherapeuticals for Chagas disease, leishmaniasis and African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, I M D; Motta, F N; Grellier, P; Santana, J M

    2013-01-01

    The trypanosomatids Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma brucei spp. cause Chagas disease, leishmaniasis and human African trypanosomiasis, respectively. It is estimated that over 10 million people worldwide suffer from these neglected diseases, posing enormous social and economic problems in endemic areas. There are no vaccines to prevent these infections and chemotherapies are not adequate. This picture indicates that new chemotherapeutic agents must be developed to treat these illnesses. For this purpose, understanding the biology of the pathogenic trypanosomatid- host cell interface is fundamental for molecular and functional characterization of virulence factors that may be used as targets for the development of inhibitors to be used for effective chemotherapy. In this context, it is well known that proteases have crucial functions for both metabolism and infectivity of pathogens and are thus potential drug targets. In this regard, prolyl oligopeptidase and oligopeptidase B, both members of the S9 serine protease family, have been shown to play important roles in the interactions of pathogenic protozoa with their mammalian hosts and may thus be considered targets for drug design. This review aims to discuss structural and functional properties of these intriguing enzymes and their potential as targets for the development of drugs against Chagas disease, leishmaniasis and African trypanosomiasis.

  10. Symbiont modulates expression of specific gene categories in Angomonas deanei

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    Luciana Loureiro Penha

    Full Text Available Trypanosomatids are parasites that cause disease in humans, animals, and plants. Most are non-pathogenic and some harbor a symbiotic bacterium. Endosymbiosis is part of the evolutionary process of vital cell functions such as respiration and photosynthesis. Angomonas deanei is an example of a symbiont-containing trypanosomatid. In this paper, we sought to investigate how symbionts influence host cells by characterising and comparing the transcriptomes of the symbiont-containing A. deanei (wild type and the symbiont-free aposymbiotic strains. The comparison revealed that the presence of the symbiont modulates several differentially expressed genes. Empirical analysis of differential gene expression showed that 216 of the 7625 modulated genes were significantly changed. Finally, gene set enrichment analysis revealed that the largest categories of genes that downregulated in the absence of the symbiont were those involved in oxidation-reduction process, ATP hydrolysis coupled proton transport and glycolysis. In contrast, among the upregulated gene categories were those involved in proteolysis, microtubule-based movement, and cellular metabolic process. Our results provide valuable information for dissecting the mechanism of endosymbiosis in A. deanei.

  11. Gluconeogenesis in Leishmania mexicana

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    Rodriguez-Contreras, Dayana; Hamilton, Nicklas

    2014-01-01

    Gluconeogenesis is an active pathway in Leishmania amastigotes and is essential for their survival within the mammalian cells. However, our knowledge about this pathway in trypanosomatids is very limited. We investigated the role of glycerol kinase (GK), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), and pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK) in gluconeogenesis by generating the respective Leishmania mexicana Δgk, Δpepck, and Δppdk null mutants. Our results demonstrated that indeed GK, PEPCK, and PPDK are key players in the gluconeogenesis pathway in Leishmania, although stage-specific differences in their contribution to this pathway were found. GK participates in the entry of glycerol in promastigotes and amastigotes; PEPCK participates in the entry of aspartate in promastigotes, and PPDK is involved in the entry of alanine in amastigotes. Furthermore, the majority of alanine enters into the pathway via decarboxylation of pyruvate in promastigotes, whereas pathway redundancy is suggested for the entry of aspartate in amastigotes. Interestingly, we also found that l-lactate, an abundant glucogenic precursor in mammals, was used by Leishmania amastigotes to synthesize mannogen, entering the pathway through PPDK. On the basis of these new results, we propose a revision in the current model of gluconeogenesis in Leishmania, emphasizing the differences between amastigotes and promastigotes. This work underlines the importance of studying the trypanosomatid intracellular life cycle stages to gain a better understanding of the pathologies caused in humans. PMID:25288791

  12. Gluconeogenesis in Leishmania mexicana: contribution of glycerol kinase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and pyruvate phosphate dikinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Contreras, Dayana; Hamilton, Nicklas

    2014-11-21

    Gluconeogenesis is an active pathway in Leishmania amastigotes and is essential for their survival within the mammalian cells. However, our knowledge about this pathway in trypanosomatids is very limited. We investigated the role of glycerol kinase (GK), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), and pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK) in gluconeogenesis by generating the respective Leishmania mexicana Δgk, Δpepck, and Δppdk null mutants. Our results demonstrated that indeed GK, PEPCK, and PPDK are key players in the gluconeogenesis pathway in Leishmania, although stage-specific differences in their contribution to this pathway were found. GK participates in the entry of glycerol in promastigotes and amastigotes; PEPCK participates in the entry of aspartate in promastigotes, and PPDK is involved in the entry of alanine in amastigotes. Furthermore, the majority of alanine enters into the pathway via decarboxylation of pyruvate in promastigotes, whereas pathway redundancy is suggested for the entry of aspartate in amastigotes. Interestingly, we also found that l-lactate, an abundant glucogenic precursor in mammals, was used by Leishmania amastigotes to synthesize mannogen, entering the pathway through PPDK. On the basis of these new results, we propose a revision in the current model of gluconeogenesis in Leishmania, emphasizing the differences between amastigotes and promastigotes. This work underlines the importance of studying the trypanosomatid intracellular life cycle stages to gain a better understanding of the pathologies caused in humans. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Transcriptome of Aphanomyces euteiches: new oomycete putative pathogenicity factors and metabolic pathways.

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    Elodie Gaulin

    Full Text Available Aphanomyces euteiches is an oomycete pathogen that causes seedling blight and root rot of legumes, such as alfalfa and pea. The genus Aphanomyces is phylogenically distinct from well-studied oomycetes such as Phytophthora sp., and contains species pathogenic on plants and aquatic animals. To provide the first foray into gene diversity of A. euteiches, two cDNA libraries were constructed using mRNA extracted from mycelium grown in an artificial liquid medium or in contact to plant roots. A unigene set of 7,977 sequences was obtained from 18,864 high-quality expressed sequenced tags (ESTs and characterized for potential functions. Comparisons with oomycete proteomes revealed major differences between the gene content of A. euteiches and those of Phytophthora species, leading to the identification of biosynthetic pathways absent in Phytophthora, of new putative pathogenicity genes and of expansion of gene families encoding extracellular proteins, notably different classes of proteases. Among the genes specific of A. euteiches are members of a new family of extracellular proteins putatively involved in adhesion, containing up to four protein domains similar to fungal cellulose binding domains. Comparison of A. euteiches sequences with proteomes of fully sequenced eukaryotic pathogens, including fungi, apicomplexa and trypanosomatids, allowed the identification of A. euteiches genes with close orthologs in these microorganisms but absent in other oomycetes sequenced so far, notably transporters and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases, and suggests the presence of a defense mechanism against oxidative stress which was initially characterized in the pathogenic trypanosomatids.

  14. Structure, substrate recognition and reactivity of Leishmania major mevalonate kinase

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    Hunter William N

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isoprenoid precursor synthesis via the mevalonate route in humans and pathogenic trypanosomatids is an important metabolic pathway. There is however, only limited information available on the structure and reactivity of the component enzymes in trypanosomatids. Since isoprenoid biosynthesis is essential for trypanosomatid viability and may provide new targets for therapeutic intervention it is important to characterize the pathway components. Results Putative mevalonate kinase encoding genes from Leishmania major (LmMK and Trypanosoma brucei (TbMK have been cloned, over-expressed in and proteins isolated from procyclic-form T. brucei. A highly sensitive radioactive assay was developed and shows ATP-dependent phosphorylation of mevalonate. Apo and (R-mevalonate bound crystal structures of LmMK, from a bacterial expression system, have been determined to high resolution providing, for the first time, information concerning binding of mevalonate to an MK. The mevalonate binds in a deep cavity lined by highly conserved residues. His25 is key for binding and for discrimination of (R- over (S-mevalonate, with the main chain amide interacting with the C3 hydroxyl group of (R-mevalonate, and the side chain contributing, together with Val202 and Thr283, to the construction of a hydrophobic binding site for the C3 methyl substituent. The C5 hydroxyl, where phosphorylation occurs, points towards catalytic residues, Lys18 and Asp155. The activity of LmMK was significantly reduced compared to MK from other species and we were unable to obtain ATP-binding data. Comparisons with the rat MK:ATP complex were used to investigate how this substrate might bind. In LmMK, helix α2 and the preceding polypeptide adopt a conformation, not seen in related kinase structures, impeding access to the nucleotide triphosphate binding site suggesting that a conformational rearrangement is required to allow ATP binding. Conclusion Our new structural

  15. Tracking of intercalary DNA sequences integrated into tandem repeat arrays in rye Secale vavilovii

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    Magdalena Achrem

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The structure of repetitive sequences of the JNK block present in the pericentromeric region of the 2RL chromosome was studied in Secale vavilovii. Amplification of sequences present between the JNK sequences led to the identification of seven abnormal DNA fragments. Two of these fragments showed high similarity to the glutamate 5-kinase gene and putative alcohol dehydrogenase gene of trypanosomatid from the genus Leishmania, whose presence can be explained by horizontal gene transfer (HGT. Other fragments were similar to mitochondrial gene for ribosomal protein S4 in plants and to the glycoprotein (G gene of the IHNV virus. Presumably, they are pseudogenes inserted into the JNK heterochromatin region. Within this region, also fragments similar to the rye repetitive sequence and chromosome 3B in wheat were found. There is no known mechanism that would explain how foreign sequences were inserted into the block region of tandem repetitive sequences of the JNK family.

  16. Nuclear DNA replication and repair in parasites of the genus Leishmania: Exploiting differences to develop innovative therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzcanga, Graciela; Lara, Eliana; Gutiérrez, Fernanda; Beaty, Doyle; Beske, Timo; Teran, Rommy; Navarro, Juan-Carlos; Pasero, Philippe; Benítez, Washington; Poveda, Ana

    2017-03-01

    Leishmaniasis is a common tropical disease that affects mainly poor people in underdeveloped and developing countries. This largely neglected infection is caused by Leishmania spp, a parasite from the Trypanosomatidae family. This parasitic disease has different clinical manifestations, ranging from localized cutaneous to more harmful visceral forms. The main limitations of the current treatments are their high cost, toxicity, lack of specificity, and long duration. Efforts to improve treatments are necessary to deal with this infectious disease. Many approved drugs to combat diseases as diverse as cancer, bacterial, or viral infections take advantage of specific features of the causing agent or of the disease. Recent evidence indicates that the specific characteristics of the Trypanosomatidae replication and repair machineries could be used as possible targets for the development of new treatments. Here, we review in detail the molecular mechanisms of DNA replication and repair regulation in trypanosomatids of the genus Leishmania and the drugs that could be useful against this disease.

  17. Catalase in Leishmaniinae: With me or against me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeva, Natalya; Horáková, Eva; Kostygov, Alexei Y; Kořený, Luděk; Butenko, Anzhelika; Yurchenko, Vyacheslav; Lukeš, Julius

    2017-06-01

    The catalase gene is a virtually ubiquitous component of the eukaryotic genomes. It is also present in the monoxenous (i.e. parasitizing solely insects) trypanosomatids of the subfamily Leishmaniinae, which have acquired the enzyme by horizontal gene transfer from a bacterium. However, as shown here, the catalase gene was secondarily lost from the genomes of all Leishmania sequenced so far. Due to the potentially key regulatory role of hydrogen peroxide in the inter-stagial transformation of Leishmania spp., this loss seems to be a necessary prerequisite for the emergence of a complex life cycle of these important human pathogens. Hence, in this group of protists, the advantages of keeping catalase were uniquely outweighed by its disadvantages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The cyclical development of Trypanosoma vivax in the tsetse fly involves an asymmetric division

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    Cher Pheng Ooi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma vivax is the most prevalent trypanosome species in African cattle. It is thought to be transmitted by tsetse flies after cyclical development restricted to the vector mouthparts. Here, we investigated the kinetics of T. vivax development in Glossina morsitans morsitans by serial dissections over one week to reveal differentiation and proliferation stages. After 3 days, stable numbers of attached epimastigotes were seen proliferating by symmetric division in the cibarium and proboscis, consistent with colonisation and maintenance of a parasite population for the remaining lifespan of the tsetse fly. Strikingly, some asymmetrically dividing cells were also observed in proportions compatible with a continuous production of pre- metacyclic trypomastigotes. The involvement of this asymmetric division in T. vivax metacyclogenesis is discussed and compared to other trypanosomatids.

  19. The Cyclical Development of Trypanosoma vivax in the Tsetse Fly Involves an Asymmetric Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Cher-Pheng; Schuster, Sarah; Cren-Travaillé, Christelle; Bertiaux, Eloise; Cosson, Alain; Goyard, Sophie; Perrot, Sylvie; Rotureau, Brice

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma vivax is the most prevalent trypanosome species in African cattle. It is thought to be transmitted by tsetse flies after cyclical development restricted to the vector mouthparts. Here, we investigated the kinetics of T. vivax development in Glossina morsitans morsitans by serial dissections over 1 week to reveal differentiation and proliferation stages. After 3 days, stable numbers of attached epimastigotes were seen proliferating by symmetric division in the cibarium and proboscis, consistent with colonization and maintenance of a parasite population for the remaining lifespan of the tsetse fly. Strikingly, some asymmetrically dividing cells were also observed in proportions compatible with a continuous production of pre- metacyclic trypomastigotes. The involvement of this asymmetric division in T. vivax metacyclogenesis is discussed and compared to other trypanosomatids.

  20. Mitochondrial bioenergetics and redox state are unaltered in Trypanosoma cruzi isolates with compromised mitochondrial complex I subunit genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Julio César; Kowaltowski, Alicia J; Mendonça, Marco Aurélio G; de Oliveira, Thays C; Gadelha, Fernanda R; Zingales, Bianca

    2009-06-01

    In trypanosomatids the involvement of mitochondrial complex I in NADH oxidation has long been debated. Here, we took advantage of natural Trypanosoma cruzi mutants which present conspicuous deletions in ND4, ND5 and ND7 genes coding for complex I subunits to further investigate its functionality. Mitochondrial bioenergetics of wild type and complex I mutants showed no significant differences in oxygen consumption or respiratory control ratios in the presence of NADH-linked substrates or FADH(2)-generating succinate. No correlation could be established between mitochondrial membrane potentials and ND deletions. Since release of reactive oxygen species occurs at complex I, we measured mitochondrial H(2)O(2) formation induced by different substrates. Significant differences not associated to ND deletions were observed among the parasite isolates, demonstrating that these mutations are not important for the control of oxidant production. Our data support the notion that complex I has a limited function in T. cruzi.

  1. Sperm Morphological Features Associated with Chronic Chagas Disease in the Semen of Experimentally Infected Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia; Pedro-Martínez, Elvia; Hernández-Pichardo, José Ernesto; Alejandre-Aguilar, Ricardo; Aranda-Fraustro, Alberto; Graullera-Rivera, Verónica; Arce-Fonseca, Minerva

    2014-01-01

    The presence of trypanosomatids in the reproductive systems of different mammals (causing genital lesions in the acute stage of the disease) may predispose the animals to low semen quality. However, there are no studies examining the alterations in the sperm morphological features in the chronic stage of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Knowledge of these aspects is important to understand the other ways of transmission of the Chagas disease. Progressive motility, mass motility, concentration, and sperm morphology of 84 ejaculates of dogs that were chronically infected with T. cruzi were evaluated. Most of the findings were consistent with the reference values and with those obtained from healthy control dogs. The scrotal circumference was not correlated with spermatozoa concentration in the infected animals. In conclusion, the T. cruzi Ninoa (MHOM/MX/1994/Ninoa) strain does not cause significant alterations in the semen quality of dogs experiencing chronic Chagas disease (at concentrations of 5 × 104 to 1 × 106 parasites per animal). PMID:25114010

  2. A α-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase is present in Trypanosoma cruzi glycosomes

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    JL Concepcion

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available α-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (α-GPDH-EC.1.1.1.8 has been considered absent in Trypanosoma cruzi in contradiction with all other studied trypanosomatids. After observing that the sole malate dehydrogenase can not maintain the intraglycosomal redox balance, GPDH activity was looked for and found, although in very variable levels, in epimastigotes extracts. GPDH was shown to be exclusively located in the glycosome of T. cruzi by digitonin treatment and isopycnic centrifugation. Antibody against T. brucei GPDH showed that this enzyme seemed to be present in an essentially inactive form at the beginning of the epimastigotes growth. GPDH is apparently linked to a salicylhydroxmic-sensitive glycerophosphate reoxidizing system and plays an essential role in the glycosome redox balance.

  3. Extracellular metalloproteinases in Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermelho, Alane B; Almeida, Flávia V S; Bronzato, Leandro S; Branquinha, Marta H

    2003-03-01

    The detection of extracellular proteinases in Phytomonas serpens, a trypanosomatid isolated from tomato fruits, is demonstrated in this paper. Maximal production occurred at the end of the logarithmic phase of growth. These enzymes exhibited selective substrate utilization in SDS-PAGE, being more active with gelatin; hemoglobin and bovine serum albumin were not degraded. Three proteinases were detected in SDS-PAGE-gelatin, with apparent molecular masses between 94 and 70 kDa. The proteolytic activity was completely blocked by 1,10-phenanthroline and strongly inhibited by EDTA, whereas a partial inhibition was observed with trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido-(4-guanidino) butane (E-64) and soybean trypsin inhibitor; phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride weakly inhibited the enzymes. This inhibition profile indicated that these extracellular proteinases belong to the metalloproteinase class.

  4. The Role of Heme and Reactive Oxygen Species in Proliferation and Survival of Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Marcia Cristina Paes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan responsible for Chagas disease, has a complex life cycle comprehending two distinct hosts and a series of morphological and functional transformations. Hemoglobin degradation inside the insect vector releases high amounts of heme, and this molecule is known to exert a number of physiological functions. Moreover, the absence of its complete biosynthetic pathway in T. cruzi indicates heme as an essential molecule for this trypanosomatid survival. Within the hosts, T. cruzi has to cope with sudden environmental changes especially in the redox status and heme is able to increase the basal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS which can be also produced as byproducts of the parasite aerobic metabolism. In this regard, ROS sensing is likely to be an important mechanism for the adaptation and interaction of these organisms with their hosts. In this paper we discuss the main features of heme and ROS susceptibility in T. cruzi biology.

  5. Use of Zymography in Trypanosomiasis Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monte, Jéssyka Fernanda Santiago; Moreno, Cláudia Jassica Gonçalves; Monteiro, Joana Patrícia Molato Figueiredo Lopes; de Oliveira Rocha, Hugo Alexandre; Ribeiro, Aline Rimoldi; Silva, Marcelo Sousa

    2017-01-01

    Zymography assay is a semiquantitative technique, very sensitive, and commonly used to determine metalloproteinase levels in different types of biological samples, including tissues, cells, and extracts of protein. Samples containing metalloproteinases are loaded onto a polyacrylamide gel containing sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and a specific substrate (gelatin, casein, collagen, etc.). Then proteins are allowed to migrate under an electric current and the distance of migration is inversely correlated with the molecular weight. After migration, the gel is placed in a renaturing buffer to allow proteins to regain their tertiary structure, necessary for enzymatic activity (metalloproteinase activity). In the context of infections caused by trypanosomatids (Leishmania spp., Trypanosoma cruzi, and Trypanosoma brucei), the characterization of metalloproteinase by zymography can contribute to the comprehension of the pathogenesis mechanisms and host-parasite interaction.

  6. KREPA4, an RNA binding protein essential for editosome integrity and survival of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavati, Reza; Ernst, Nancy Lewis; O'Rear, Jeff; Gilliam, Troy; Tarun, Salvador; Stuart, Kenneth

    2006-05-01

    The 20S editosome, a multiprotein complex, catalyzes the editing of most mitochondrial mRNAs in trypanosomatids by uridylate insertion and deletion. RNAi mediated inactivation of expression of KREPA4 (previously TbMP24), a component of the 20S editosome, in procyclic form Trypanosoma brucei resulted in inhibition of cell growth, loss of RNA editing, and disappearance of 20S editosomes. Levels of MRP1 and REAP-1 proteins, which may have roles in editing but are not editosome components, were unaffected. Tagged KREPA4 protein is incorporated into 20S editosomes in vivo with no preference for either insertion or deletion subcomplexes. Consistent with its S1-like motif, recombinant KREPA4 protein binds synthetic gRNA with a preference for the 3' oligo (U) tail. These data suggest that KREPA4 is an RNA binding protein that may be specific for the gRNA Utail and also is important for 20S editosome stability.

  7. Novel DNA coding regions and protein arginylation reveal unexplored T. cruzi proteome and PTMs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Oliveira, Gilberto Santos; Kawahara, Rebeca; Rosa-Fernandes, Livia

    2017-01-01

    , transcriptomics lipidomics and proteomics. In particular, large scale mass spectrometry-based proteomics studies have allowed the identification and quantification of proteins and selected PTMs in different biological conditions. In this study, we investigated the unassigned MS/MS spectra commonly observed...... in large scale bottom up proteomics experiments looking at the T. cruzi (Sylvio X10/1) proteome. A deep proteomics data analysis using proteogenomic and unrestrictive PTMs search approaches allowed us to annotate 30% more MS/MS spectra and identify novel DNA coding regions and uncharacterized PTMs...... of the influence of sample preparation steps on the identification of proteins and protein modifications. (3) The identification of novel DNA coding regions in T. cruzi. (4) The discovery of protein arginylation in trypanosomatids....

  8. 8-Methoxy-naphtho[2,3-b]thiophen-4,9-quinone, a non-competitive inhibitor of trypanothione reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zani Carlos L

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme trypanothione reductase is a recognised drug target in trypanosomatids and has been used in the search of new compounds with potential activity against diseases such as leishmaniasis, Chagas disease and African trypanosomiasis. 8-Methoxy-naphtho [2,3-b] thiophen-4,9-quinone was selected in a screening of natural and synthetic compounds using an in vitro assay with the recombinant enzyme from Trypanosoma cruzi. Its mode of inhibition fits a non-competitive model with respect to the substrate (trypanothione and to the co-factor (NADPH, with Ki-values of 5 and 3.6 µM, respectively. When tested against human glutathione reductase, this compound did not display any significant inhibition at 100 µM, indicating a good selectivity against the parasite enzyme.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Leishmania major glyoxalase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ariza, Antonio; Vickers, Tim J.; Greig, Neil; Fairlamb, Alan H.; Bond, Charles S., E-mail: c.s.bond@dundee.ac.uk [Division of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Microbiology, Wellcome Trust Biocentre, School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH,Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-01

    The detoxification enzyme glyoxalase I from L. major has been crystallized. Preliminary molecular-replacement calculations indicate the presence of three glyoxalase I dimers in the asymmetric unit. Glyoxalase I (GLO1) is a putative drug target for trypanosomatids, which are pathogenic protozoa that include the causative agents of leishmaniasis. Significant sequence and functional differences between Leishmania major and human GLO1 suggest that it may make a suitable template for rational inhibitor design. L. major GLO1 was crystallized in two forms: the first is extremely disordered and does not diffract, while the second, an orthorhombic form, produces diffraction to 2.0 Å. Molecular-replacement calculations indicate that there are three GLO1 dimers in the asymmetric unit, which take up a helical arrangement with their molecular dyads arranged approximately perpendicular to the c axis. Further analysis of these data are under way.

  10. Recent observations on the sand fly (Diptera: Psychodidae fauna of the State of Rondônia, Western Amazônia, Brazil: the importance of Psychdopygus davisi as a vector of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Luis HS

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Sand flies were collected in the central region of the state of Rondônia (W 64º30' to 63º00' and S 10º00'to 11º00' using Shannon and CDC light traps from October 1997 to August 2000. A total of 85,850 specimens representing 78 named species were captured. Of these 14 were new records for Rondônia. The proportion of males/females was 1/1.131. Trypanosomatids, that are presently being identified, were detected in 11 species. Leishmania (Viannia naiffi was recorded from Psychodopygus davisi and P. hirsutus. In the present study the dominant species was P. davisi (39.6% followed by Lutzomyia whitmani (13.1%, P. carrerai (11.6%, and P. hirsutus (10.2%. The importance of P. davisi as a vector of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis is discussed.

  11. Application of magnetically induced hyperthermia in the model protozoan Crithidia fasciculata as a potential therapy against parasitic infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazú, V; Silber, AM; Moros, M; Asín, L; Torres, TE; Marquina, C; Ibarra, MR; Goya, GF

    2012-01-01

    Background Magnetic hyperthermia is currently a clinical therapy approved in the European Union for treatment of tumor cells, and uses magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) under time-varying magnetic fields (TVMFs). The same basic principle seems promising against trypanosomatids causing Chagas disease and sleeping sickness, given that the therapeutic drugs available have severe side effects and that there are drug-resistant strains. However, no applications of this strategy against protozoan-induced diseases have been reported so far. In the present study, Crithidia fasciculata, a widely used model for therapeutic strategies against pathogenic trypanosomatids, was targeted with Fe3O4 MNPs in order to provoke cell death remotely using TVMFs. Methods Iron oxide MNPs with average diameters of approximately 30 nm were synthesized by precipitation of FeSO4 in basic medium. The MNPs were added to C. fasciculata choanomastigotes in the exponential phase and incubated overnight, removing excess MNPs using a DEAE-cellulose resin column. The amount of MNPs uploaded per cell was determined by magnetic measurement. The cells bearing MNPs were submitted to TVMFs using a homemade AC field applicator (f = 249 kHz, H = 13 kA/m), and the temperature variation during the experiments was measured. Scanning electron microscopy was used to assess morphological changes after the TVMF experiments. Cell viability was analyzed using an MTT colorimetric assay and flow cytometry. Results MNPs were incorporated into the cells, with no noticeable cytotoxicity. When a TVMF was applied to cells bearing MNPs, massive cell death was induced via a nonapoptotic mechanism. No effects were observed by applying TVMF to control cells not loaded with MNPs. No macroscopic rise in temperature was observed in the extracellular medium during the experiments. Conclusion As a proof of principle, these data indicate that intracellular hyperthermia is a suitable technology to induce death of protozoan parasites

  12. Cationic Amino Acid Uptake Constitutes a Metabolic Regulation Mechanism and Occurs in the Flagellar Pocket of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvier, León A.; Cámara, María de los Milagros; Montserrat, Javier; Pereira, Claudio A.

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosomatids' amino acid permeases are key proteins in parasite metabolism since they participate in the adaptation of parasites to different environments. Here, we report that TcAAP3, a member of a Trypanosoma cruzi multigene family of permeases, is a bona fide arginine transporter. Most higher eukaryotic cells incorporate cationic amino acids through a single transporter. In contrast, T. cruzi can recognize and transport cationic amino acids by mono-specific permeases since a 100-fold molar excess of lysine could not affect the arginine transport in parasites that over-express the arginine permease (TcAAP3 epimastigotes). In order to test if the permease activity regulates downstream processes of the arginine metabolism, the expression of the single T. cruzi enzyme that uses arginine as substrate, arginine kinase, was evaluated in TcAAP3 epimastigotes. In this parasite model, intracellular arginine concentration increases 4-folds and ATP level remains constant until cultures reach the stationary phase of growth, with decreases of about 6-folds in respect to the controls. Interestingly, Western Blot analysis demonstrated that arginine kinase is significantly down-regulated during the stationary phase of growth in TcAAP3 epimastigotes. This decrease could represent a compensatory mechanism for the increase in ATP consumption as a consequence of the displacement of the reaction equilibrium of arginine kinase, when the intracellular arginine concentration augments and the glucose from the medium is exhausted. Using immunofluorescence techniques we also determined that TcAAP3 and the specific lysine transporter TcAAP7 co-localize in a specialized region of the plasma membrane named flagellar pocket, staining a single locus close to the flagellar pocket collar. Taken together these data suggest that arginine transport is closely related to arginine metabolism and cell energy balance. The clinical relevance of studying trypanosomatids' permeases relies on the

  13. A high-throughput cloning system for reverse genetics in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Michel; Marchini, Fabricio K; Celedon, Paola A F; Fragoso, Stenio P; Probst, Christian M; Preti, Henrique; Ozaki, Luiz S; Buck, Gregory A; Goldenberg, Samuel; Krieger, Marco A

    2010-10-13

    The three trypanosomatids pathogenic to men, Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major, are etiological agents of Chagas disease, African sleeping sickness and cutaneous leishmaniasis, respectively. The complete sequencing of these trypanosomatid genomes represented a breakthrough in the understanding of these organisms. Genome sequencing is a step towards solving the parasite biology puzzle, as there are a high percentage of genes encoding proteins without functional annotation. Also, technical limitations in protein expression in heterologous systems reinforce the evident need for the development of a high-throughput reverse genetics platform. Ideally, such platform would lead to efficient cloning and compatibility with various approaches. Thus, we aimed to construct a highly efficient cloning platform compatible with plasmid vectors that are suitable for various approaches. We constructed a platform with a flexible structure allowing the exchange of various elements, such as promoters, fusion tags, intergenic regions or resistance markers. This platform is based on Gateway® technology, to ensure a fast and efficient cloning system. We obtained plasmid vectors carrying genes for fluorescent proteins (green, cyan or yellow), and sequences for the c-myc epitope, and tandem affinity purification or polyhistidine tags. The vectors were verified by successful subcellular localization of two previously characterized proteins (TcRab7 and PAR 2) and a putative centrin. For the tandem affinity purification tag, the purification of two protein complexes (ribosome and proteasome) was performed. We constructed plasmids with an efficient cloning system and suitable for use across various applications, such as protein localization and co-localization, protein partner identification and protein expression. This platform also allows vector customization, as the vectors were constructed to enable easy exchange of its elements. The development of this high

  14. A high-throughput cloning system for reverse genetics in Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozaki Luiz S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The three trypanosomatids pathogenic to men, Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major, are etiological agents of Chagas disease, African sleeping sickness and cutaneous leishmaniasis, respectively. The complete sequencing of these trypanosomatid genomes represented a breakthrough in the understanding of these organisms. Genome sequencing is a step towards solving the parasite biology puzzle, as there are a high percentage of genes encoding proteins without functional annotation. Also, technical limitations in protein expression in heterologous systems reinforce the evident need for the development of a high-throughput reverse genetics platform. Ideally, such platform would lead to efficient cloning and compatibility with various approaches. Thus, we aimed to construct a highly efficient cloning platform compatible with plasmid vectors that are suitable for various approaches. Results We constructed a platform with a flexible structure allowing the exchange of various elements, such as promoters, fusion tags, intergenic regions or resistance markers. This platform is based on Gateway® technology, to ensure a fast and efficient cloning system. We obtained plasmid vectors carrying genes for fluorescent proteins (green, cyan or yellow, and sequences for the c-myc epitope, and tandem affinity purification or polyhistidine tags. The vectors were verified by successful subcellular localization of two previously characterized proteins (TcRab7 and PAR 2 and a putative centrin. For the tandem affinity purification tag, the purification of two protein complexes (ribosome and proteasome was performed. Conclusions We constructed plasmids with an efficient cloning system and suitable for use across various applications, such as protein localization and co-localization, protein partner identification and protein expression. This platform also allows vector customization, as the vectors were constructed to enable easy

  15. Trypanosomatidae from wild mammals in the neotropical rainforest of French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereure, J; Barnabé, C; Vié, J C; Madélenat, F; Raccurt, C

    2001-03-01

    The initial filling of the reservoir behind the Petit Saut hydro-electric dam, on the Sinnamary River in French Guiana, threatened the terrestrial and arboreal animals living in the neotropical rainforest being flooded. During a rescue programme between 24 October and 12 November in 1994, many of these animals were checked for infection with trypanosomatids. Overall, 45 blood samples and 54 skin biopsies were collected from 53 mammals (of 13 species representing five orders) and blood samples were also taken from each of nine reptiles (six species from four families). When the skin biopsies and the buffy-coats from the blood samples were cultured in NNN medium, 10 of the cultures, each initiated with mammalian blood, were found to be positive for trypanosomatids. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) on cellulose acetate plates, with 20 enzyme systems, was then used to investigate each of the positive cultures. The results were analysed by clustering from a genetic distance matrix, using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic averages (UPGMA), and applying a bootstrap procedure to Wagner parsimony trees. A stock obtained from Didelphis marsupialis was identified as a zymodeme of Trypanosoma cruzi (Miles' zymodeme 1) known to cause Chagas disease in French Guiana. Five stocks (one each from Bradypus tridactylus, Tamandua tetradactyla and Alouatta seniculus and two from Saguinus midas) were of a single zymodeme close to Trypanosoma rangeli reference stock RGB. This is the first confirmation of the presence of Tr. rangeli in French Guiana, and the first time that it has been identified, by iso-enzyme analysis, in the neotropical primates A. seniculus and S. midas. Two other stocks, isolated from Choloepus didactylus, were related to Endotrypanum schaudinni reference stock LEM 2790. Although the remaining stocks, one from C. didactylus and the other from A. seniculus, clustered together on UPGMA and in a Wagner tree, they did not appear to be related to

  16. Expression and subcellular localization of kinetoplast-associated proteins in the different developmental stages of Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Cavalcanti Danielle

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The kinetoplast DNA (kDNA of trypanosomatids consists of an unusual arrangement of circular molecules catenated into a single network. The diameter of the isolated kDNA network is similar to that of the entire cell. However, within the kinetoplast matrix, the kDNA is highly condensed. Studies in Crithidia fasciculata showed that kinetoplast-associated proteins (KAPs are capable of condensing the kDNA network. However, little is known about the KAPs of Trypanosoma cruzi, a parasitic protozoon that shows distinct patterns of kDNA condensation during their complex morphogenetic development. In epimastigotes and amastigotes (replicating forms the kDNA fibers are tightly packed into a disk-shaped kinetoplast, whereas trypomastigotes (non-replicating present a more relaxed kDNA organization contained within a rounded structure. It is still unclear how the compact kinetoplast disk of epimastigotes is converted into a globular structure in the infective trypomastigotes. Results In this work, we have analyzed KAP coding genes in trypanosomatid genomes and cloned and expressed two kinetoplast-associated proteins in T. cruzi: TcKAP4 and TcKAP6. Such small basic proteins are expressed in all developmental stages of the parasite, although present a differential distribution within the kinetoplasts of epimastigote, amastigote and trypomastigote forms. Conclusion Several features of TcKAPs, such as their small size, basic nature and similarity with KAPs of C. fasciculata, are consistent with a role in DNA charge neutralization and condensation. Additionally, the differential distribution of KAPs in the kinetoplasts of distinct developmental stages of the parasite, indicate that the kDNA rearrangement that takes place during the T. cruzi differentiation process is accompanied by TcKAPs redistribution.

  17. Discovery of novel polyamine analogs with anti-protozoal activity by computer guided drug repositioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberca, Lucas N.; Sbaraglini, María L.; Balcazar, Darío; Fraccaroli, Laura; Carrillo, Carolina; Medeiros, Andrea; Benitez, Diego; Comini, Marcelo; Talevi, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic infection caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi that affects about 6 million people in Latin America. Despite its sanitary importance, there are currently only two drugs available for treatment: benznidazole and nifurtimox, both exhibiting serious adverse effects and limited efficacy in the chronic stage of the disease. Polyamines are ubiquitous to all living organisms where they participate in multiple basic functions such as biosynthesis of nucleic acids and proteins, proliferation and cell differentiation. T. cruzi is auxotroph for polyamines, which are taken up from the extracellular medium by efficient transporters and, to a large extent, incorporated into trypanothione (bis-glutathionylspermidine), the major redox cosubstrate of trypanosomatids. From a 268-compound database containing polyamine analogs with and without inhibitory effect on T. cruzi we have inferred classificatory models that were later applied in a virtual screening campaign to identify anti-trypanosomal compounds among drugs already used for other therapeutic indications (i.e. computer-guided drug repositioning) compiled in the DrugBank and Sweetlead databases. Five of the candidates identified with this strategy were evaluated in cellular models from different pathogenic trypanosomatids ( T. cruzi wt, T. cruzi PAT12, T. brucei and Leishmania infantum), and in vitro models of aminoacid/polyamine transport assays and trypanothione synthetase inhibition assay. Triclabendazole, sertaconazole and paroxetine displayed inhibitory effects on the proliferation of T. cruzi (epimastigotes) and the uptake of putrescine by the parasite. They also interfered with the uptake of others aminoacids and the proliferation of infective T. brucei and L. infantum (promastigotes). Trypanothione synthetase was ruled out as molecular target for the anti-parasitic activity of these compounds.

  18. Structural basis for the high specificity of a Trypanosoma congolense immunoassay targeting glycosomal aldolase.

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    Joar Pinto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Animal African trypanosomosis (AAT is a neglected tropical disease which imposes a heavy burden on the livestock industry in Sub-Saharan Africa. Its causative agents are Trypanosoma parasites, with T. congolense and T. vivax being responsible for the majority of the cases. Recently, we identified a Nanobody (Nb474 that was employed to develop a homologous sandwich ELISA targeting T. congolense fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (TcoALD. Despite the high sequence identity between trypanosomatid aldolases, the Nb474-based immunoassay is highly specific for T. congolense detection. The results presented in this paper yield insights into the molecular principles underlying the assay's high specificity.The structure of the Nb474-TcoALD complex was determined via X-ray crystallography. Together with analytical gel filtration, the structure reveals that a single TcoALD tetramer contains four binding sites for Nb474. Through a comparison with the crystal structures of two other trypanosomatid aldolases, TcoALD residues Ala77 and Leu106 were identified as hot spots for specificity. Via ELISA and surface plasmon resonance (SPR, we demonstrate that mutation of these residues does not abolish TcoALD recognition by Nb474, but does lead to a lack of detection in the Nb474-based homologous sandwich immunoassay.The results show that the high specificity of the Nb474-based immunoassay is not determined by the initial recognition event between Nb474 and TcoALD, but rather by its homologous sandwich design. This (i provides insights into the optimal set-up of the assay, (ii may be of great significance for field applications as it could explain the potential detection escape of certain T. congolense strains, and (iii may be of general interest to those developing similar assays.

  19. Heme-induced ROS in Trypanosoma cruzi activates CaMKII-like that triggers epimastigote proliferation. One helpful effect of ROS.

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    Natália Pereira de Almeida Nogueira

    Full Text Available Heme is a ubiquitous molecule that has a number of physiological roles. The toxic effects of this molecule have been demonstrated in various models, based on both its pro-oxidant nature and through a detergent mechanism. It is estimated that about 10 mM of heme is released during blood digestion in the blood-sucking bug's midgut. The parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas' disease, proliferates in the midgut of the insect vector; however, heme metabolism in trypanosomatids remains to be elucidated. Here we provide a mechanistic explanation for the proliferative effects of heme on trypanosomatids. Heme, but not other porphyrins, induced T. cruzi proliferation, and this phenomenon was accompanied by a marked increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS formation in epimastigotes when monitored by ROS-sensitive fluorescent probes. Heme-induced ROS production was time- and concentration-dependent. In addition, lipid peroxidation and the formation of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE adducts with parasite proteins were increased in epimastigotes in the presence of heme. Conversely, the antioxidants urate and GSH reversed the heme-induced ROS. Urate also decreased parasite proliferation. Among several protein kinase inhibitors tested only specific inhibitors of CaMKII, KN93 and Myr-AIP, were able to abolish heme-induced ROS formation in epimastigotes leading to parasite growth impairment. Taken together, these data provide new insight into T. cruzi- insect vector interactions: heme, a molecule from the blood digestion, triggers epimastigote proliferation through a redox-sensitive signalling mechanism.

  20. Application of magnetically induced hyperthermia in the model protozoan Crithidia fasciculata as a potential therapy against parasitic infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazú V

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available V Grazú,1 AM Silber,2 M Moros,1 L Asín,1 TE Torres,1,3,5 C Marquina,3,4 MR Ibarra,1,3 GF Goya1,31Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón (INA, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain; 2Departamento de Parasitologia, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 3Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain; 4Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA, CSIC, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain; 5Laboratorio de Microscopías Avanzadas (LMA, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, SpainBackground: Magnetic hyperthermia is currently a clinical therapy approved in the European Union for treatment of tumor cells, and uses magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs under time-varying magnetic fields (TVMFs. The same basic principle seems promising against trypanosomatids causing Chagas disease and sleeping sickness, given that the therapeutic drugs available have severe side effects and that there are drug-resistant strains. However, no applications of this strategy against protozoan-induced diseases have been reported so far. In the present study, Crithidia fasciculata, a widely used model for therapeutic strategies against pathogenic trypanosomatids, was targeted with Fe3O4 MNPs in order to provoke cell death remotely using TVMFs.Methods: Iron oxide MNPs with average diameters of approximately 30 nm were synthesized by precipitation of FeSO4 in basic medium. The MNPs were added to C. fasciculata choanomastigotes in the exponential phase and incubated overnight, removing excess MNPs using a DEAE-cellulose resin column. The amount of MNPs uploaded per cell was determined by magnetic measurement. The cells bearing MNPs were submitted to TVMFs using a homemade AC field applicator (f = 249 kHz, H = 13 kA/m, and the temperature variation during the experiments was measured. Scanning electron microscopy was used to assess morphological changes after the TVMF

  1. La vía de transducción de señales TOR de mamíferos está presente en Trypanosoma cruzi: Reconstrucción in silico y posibles funciones The mammalian TOR pathway is present in Trypanosoma cruzi: In silico reconstruction and possible functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio A. Digirolamo

    2012-06-01

    paper we integrate the bibliographic data of the TOR pathway in trypanosomatids by in silico analysis (computer simulation of biological structures and processes of the parasite's genome. Possible effectors and processes regulated by this metabolic pathway are also proposed. Given that the information on the mechanisms of signal transduction in trypanosomatids is scarce, we consider the model presented in this work may be a reference for future experimental work.

  2. In vitro activity of 2-pyridinecarboxylic acid against trypanosomes of the subgenus Schizotrypanum isolated from the bat Phyllostomus hastatus - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v33i4.6482 In vitro activity of 2-pyridinecarboxylic acid against trypanosomes of the subgenus Schizotrypanum isolated from the bat Phyllostomus hastatus - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v33i4.6482

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sueli Fumie Yamada-Ogatta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of 2-pyridinecarboxylic acid (picolinic acid on trypanosomes of the subgenus Schizotrypanum isolated from the bat Phyllostomus hastatus was determined in this study. Picolinic acid, at 50 µg mL-1, inhibited epimastigote growth by 99% after 12 days incubation. In addition, trypomastigote motility decreased by 50% after 6h and completely after 24h in the presence of 50 µg mL-1 picolinic acid. The 50% cytotoxic concentration on HEp-2 cell line was 275 µg mL-1 after 4 days incubation. Altogether, these results indicate higher toxicity against trypanosomes. The inhibitory effect of picolinic acid on epimastigote growth can be partially reversed by nicotinic acid and L-tryptophan, suggesting a competitive inhibition. Furthermore, two anti-Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum cruzi drugs were also evaluated with regard to bat trypanosome growth. Benznidazole, at 50 µg mL-1, inhibited epimastigote growth by 90% after 12 days incubation. Nifurtimox, at the same concentration, caused 96% growth inhibition after four days incubation. Corroborating a previous study, bat trypanosomes are a good model for screening new trypanocidal compounds. Moreover, they can be used to study many biological processes common to human pathogenic trypanosomatids.The effect of 2-pyridinecarboxylic acid (picolinic acid on trypanosomes of the subgenus Schizotrypanum isolated from the bat Phyllostomus hastatus was determined in this study. Picolinic acid, at 50 µg mL-1, inhibited epimastigote growth by 99% after 12 days incubation. In addition, trypomastigote motility decreased by 50% after 6h and completely after 24h in the presence of 50 µg mL-1 picolinic acid. The 50% cytotoxic concentration on HEp-2 cell line was 275 µg mL-1 after 4 days incubation. Altogether, these results indicate higher toxicity against trypanosomes. The inhibitory effect of picolinic acid on epimastigote growth can be partially reversed by nicotinic acid and L-tryptophan, suggesting a

  3. Três novas espécies de tripanosomatídeos de insetos isolados em Alfenas, Minas Gerais, Brasil Three new species of trypanosomatidae isolated in Alfenas, Minas Gerais, Brazil

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    João Evangelista Fiorini

    1989-03-01

    Full Text Available Três novas espécies de tripanosomatídeos foram isoladas em Alfenas, MG, Brasil: Herpetomonas anglusteri sp. n., do intestino posterior de Liopygia ruficorins (Diptera: Sarcophagidae; Crithidia roitmani sp. e.e Crithidia de souzai sp. n., do intestino médio e o posterior de Ornidia obesa (Diptera: Syrphidae. O isolamento foi feito em meio complexo de roitmanmas os três isolados cresceram bem no meio definido do mesmo Autor. Os clones foram obtidos em ágar-sangue de carneiro, desfibrinado, em placas de Petri, a 28ºC, por 2-7 dias. Um único clone de cada espécie foi utilizado neste trabalho. Dados morfológicos e morfométricos foram obtidos em câmara clara após coloração dos flagelados. H. anglusteri cresceu em meio complexo tanto a 28 como a 37ºC e, em meio definido, apenas a 28ºC. Não exige treonina e biotina para seu crescimento. C. roitmani apresenta tamanho médio maior que C. desouzai, não cresce em água de coco e seu crescimento é mais lento comparativamente a C. desouzai, apesar de terem sido isoladas critídias exige hemina e adenina para seu crescimento. Alguns ácidos aminados e vitaminas componentes do meio definido utilizado no ensaio, também não são exigidos, o que sugere serem estes tripanosomatídeos portadores de endossimbiontes.Three new species of trypanosomatids were isolated from two species of flies: Herpetomonas anglusteri n. ap., from Liopygia ruficomis (Diptera: Sarcophagidae; Crithidia roitmani n. sp. and Crithidia desouzai n. s.p., from Ornidia obesa (Diptera: Syrphidae. All were axenically cultivated in both complex and defined media and cloned. Giemsa stained preparations showed typical choanomastigotes for Crithidia and promastigotes, paramastigotes, and opisthomastigotes for Herpetomonas. H. anglusteri did grow in a complex medium at 28 and 37ºC, but in a defiend mkedium only at 28ºC. c. roitmani does not grow in coconut's water but C. desouzai grow. Both Crithidia do not require hemin

  4. Trypanosoma cruzi strains from triatomine collected in Bahia and Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

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    Aline Rimoldi Ribeiro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE Collection of triatomines in domestic, peridomestic and sylvatic environments in states of Bahia and Rio Grande do Sul, Northeastern and Southern Brazil respectively, and isolation of Trypanosoma cruzi strains. METHODS First, the captured triatomines were identified using insect identification keys, then their intestinal content was examined by abdominal compression, and the samples containing trypanosomatid forms were inoculated in LIT medium and Swiss mice. RESULTS Six triatomine species were collected in cities in Bahia, namely Panstrongylus geniculatus (01, Triatoma melanocephala (11, T. lenti (94, T. pseudomaculata (02, T. sherlocki (26 and T. sordida (460, and two in cities in Rio Grande do Sul, namely T. circummaculata (11 and T. rubrovaria (115. Out of the specimens examined, T. cruzi was isolated from 28 triatomine divided into four different species: T. melanocephala (one, T. lenti (one, T. rubrovaria (16 and T. sordida (10. Their index of natural infection by T. cruzi was 6.4%. CONCLUSIONS The isolation of T. cruzi strains from triatomines found in domestic and peridomestic areas shows the potential risk of transmission of Chagas disease in the studied cities. The maintenance of those T. cruzi strains in laboratory is intended to promote studies that facilitate the understanding of the parasite-vector-host relationship.

  5. In vitro antiparasitic activity and chemical composition of the essential oil obtained from the fruits of Piper cubeba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esperandim, Viviane Rodrigues; da Silva Ferreira, Daniele; Sousa Rezende, Karen Cristina; Magalhães, Lizandra Guidi; Medeiros Souza, Julia; Pauletti, Patrícia Mendonça; Januário, Ana Helena; da Silva de Laurentz, Rosangela; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp; Símaro, Guilherme Venâncio; Cunha, Wilson Roberto; Andrade E Silva, Márcio Luis

    2013-11-01

    Protozoans of the trypanosomatid family cause the neglected tropical diseases leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis, for which few drugs are available. In this context our group has recently reported that the essential oil obtained by steam distillation of the fruits of Piper cubeba is active against Schistosoma mansoni. Therefore, we have investigated the in vitro effects of the essential oil against the trypomastigote and amastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi isolated from an LLCMK₂ cell line culture and the promastigote forms of Leishmania amazonensis. The in vitro activity of the essential oil against trypomastigotes of T. cruzi increased upon rising concentrations, giving IC₅₀ values of 45.5 and 87.9 µg · mL⁻¹ against trypomastigotes and amastigotes, respectively. The essential oil was not active against L. amazonensis, since it displayed lyses of only 24 % at 400 µg · mL⁻¹, and an IC₅₀ of 326.5 µg · mL⁻¹. Therefore, the essential oil should be further investigated to determine the compounds responsible for the observed activities, as well as its mechanism of action. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Bias due to methods of parasite detection when estimating prevalence of infection of Triatoma infestans by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardeux, Frédéric; Aliaga, Claudia; Depickère, Stéphanie

    2016-12-01

    The study aimed to quantify the bias from parasite detection methods in the estimation of the prevalence of infection of Triatoma infestans by Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease. Three common protocols that detect T. cruzi in a sample of 640 wild-caught T. infestans were compared: (1) the microscopic observation of insect fecal droplets, (2) a PCR protocol targeting mini-exon genes of T. cruzi (MeM-PCR), and (3) a PCR protocol targeting a satellite repeated unit of the parasite. Agreement among protocols was computed using Krippendorff Kα. The sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of each protocol was estimated using latent class models. The PCR protocols were more sensitive (Se > 0.97) than microscopy (Se = 0.53) giving a prevalence of infection of 17-18%, twice as high as microscopy. Microscopy may not be as specific as PCR if Trypanosomatid-like organisms make up a high proportion of the sample. For small T. infestans, microscopy is not efficient, giving a prevalence of 1.5% when PCR techniques gave 10.7%. The PCR techniques were in agreement (Kα = 0.94) but not with microscopy (Kα never significant with both PCR techniques). Among the PCR protocols, the MeM-PCR was the most efficient (Se=1; Sp=1). © 2016 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi Differentiates and Multiplies within Chimeric Parasitophorous Vacuoles in Macrophages Coinfected with Leishmania amazonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessoa, Carina Carraro; Ferreira, Éden Ramalho; Bayer-Santos, Ethel; Rabinovitch, Michel; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Real, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    The trypanosomatids Leishmania amazonensis and Trypanosoma cruzi are excellent models for the study of the cell biology of intracellular protozoan infections. After their uptake by mammalian cells, the parasitic protozoan flagellates L. amazonensis and T. cruzi lodge within acidified parasitophorous vacuoles (PVs). However, whereas L. amazonensis develops in spacious, phagolysosome-like PVs that may enclose numerous parasites, T. cruzi is transiently hosted within smaller vacuoles from which it soon escapes to the host cell cytosol. To investigate if parasite-specific vacuoles are required for the survival and differentiation of T. cruzi, we constructed chimeric vacuoles by infection of L. amazonensis amastigote-infected macrophages with T. cruzi epimastigotes (EPIs) or metacyclic trypomastigotes (MTs). These chimeric vacuoles, easily observed by microscopy, allowed the entry and fate of T. cruzi in L. amazonensis PVs to be dynamically recorded by multidimensional imaging of coinfected cells. We found that although T. cruzi EPIs remained motile and conserved their morphology in chimeric vacuoles, T. cruzi MTs differentiated into amastigote-like forms capable of multiplying. These results demonstrate that the large adaptive vacuoles of L. amazonensis are permissive to T. cruzi survival and differentiation and that noninfective EPIs are spared from destruction within the chimeric PVs. We conclude that T. cruzi differentiation can take place in Leishmania-containing vacuoles, suggesting this occurs prior to their escape into the host cell cytosol. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. In Silico Investigation of Flavonoids as Potential Trypanosomal Nucleoside Hydrolase Inhibitors

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    Christina Hung Hung Ha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human African Trypanosomiasis is endemic to 37 countries of sub-Saharan Africa. It is caused by two related species of Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies suffer from resistance and public accessibility of expensive medicines. Finding safer and effective therapies of natural origin is being extensively explored worldwide. Pentamidine is the only available therapy for inhibiting the P2 adenosine transporter involved in the purine salvage pathway of the trypanosomatids. The objective of the present study is to use computational studies for the investigation of the probable trypanocidal mechanism of flavonoids. Docking experiments were carried out on eight flavonoids of varying level of hydroxylation, namely, flavone, 5-hydroxyflavone, 7-hydroxyflavone, chrysin, apigenin, kaempferol, fisetin, and quercetin. Using AutoDock 4.2, these compounds were tested for their affinity towards inosine-adenosine-guanosine nucleoside hydrolase and the inosine-guanosine nucleoside hydrolase, the major enzymes of the purine salvage pathway. Our results showed that all of the eight tested flavonoids showed high affinities for both hydrolases (lowest free binding energy ranging from −10.23 to −7.14 kcal/mol. These compounds, especially the hydroxylated derivatives, could be further studied as potential inhibitors of the nucleoside hydrolases.

  9. Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi present distinct DNA damage responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Juliana B F; Rocha, João P Vieira da; Costa-Silva, Héllida M; Alves, Ceres L; Machado, Carlos R; Cruz, Angela K

    2016-05-01

    Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi are medically relevant parasites and interesting model organisms, as they present unique biological processes. Despite increasing data regarding the mechanisms of gene expression regulation, there is little information on how the DNA damage response (DDR) occurs in trypanosomatids. We found that L. major presented a higher radiosensitivity than T. cruzi. L. major showed G1 arrest and displayed high mortality in response to ionizing radiation as a result of the inefficient repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs). Conversely, T. cruzi exhibited arrest in the S/G2 cell cycle phase, was able to efficiently repair DSBs and did not display high rates of cell death after exposure to gamma irradiation. L. major showed higher resistance to alkylating DNA damage, and only L. major was able to promote DNA repair and growth recovery in the presence of MMS. ASF1c overexpression did not interfere with the efficiency of DNA repair in either of the parasites but did accentuate the DNA damage checkpoint response, thereby delaying cell fate after damage. The observed differences in the DNA damage responses of T. cruzi and L. major may originate from the distinct preferred routes of genetic plasticity of the two parasites, i.e., DNA recombination versus amplification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Crassiflorone derivatives that inhibit Trypanosoma brucei glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (TbGAPDH) and Trypanosoma cruzi trypanothione reductase (TcTR) and display trypanocidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uliassi, Elisa; Fiorani, Giulia; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise; Bergamini, Christian; Fato, Romana; Bianchini, Giulia; Carlos Menéndez, J; Molina, Maria Teresa; López-Montero, Eulogio; Falchi, Federico; Cavalli, Andrea; Gul, Sheraz; Kuzikov, Maria; Ellinger, Bernhard; Witt, Gesa; Moraes, Carolina B; Freitas-Junior, Lucio H; Borsari, Chiara; Costi, Maria Paola; Bolognesi, Maria Laura

    2017-12-01

    Crassiflorone is a natural product with anti-mycobacterial and anti-gonorrhoeal properties, isolated from the stem bark of the African ebony tree Diospyros crassiflora. We noticed that its pentacyclic core possesses structural resemblance to the quinone-coumarin hybrid 3, which we reported to exhibit a dual-targeted inhibitory profile towards Trypanosoma brucei glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (TbGAPDH) and Trypanosoma cruzi trypanothione reductase (TcTR). Following this basic idea, we synthesized a small library of crassiflorone derivatives 15-23 and investigated their potential as anti-trypanosomatid agents. 19 is the only compound of the series showing a balanced dual profile at 10 μM (% inhibition TbGAPDH  = 64% and % inhibition TcTR  = 65%). In phenotypic assay, the most active compounds were 18 and 21, which at 5 μM inhibited Tb bloodstream-form growth by 29% and 38%, respectively. Notably, all the newly synthesized compounds at 10 μM did not affect viability and the status of mitochondria in human A549 and 786-O cell lines, respectively. However, further optimization that addresses metabolic liabilities including solubility, as well as cytochromes P450 (CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP2D6) inhibition, is required before this class of natural product-derived compounds can be further progressed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Trypanosoma cruzi Polyamine Transporter: Its Role on Parasite Growth and Survival Under Stress Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigada, Chantal; Sayé, Melisa; Vera, Edward Valera; Balcazar, Darío; Fraccaroli, Laura; Carrillo, Carolina; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a major health problem in Latin America. Polyamines are polycationic compounds that play a critical role as regulators of cell growth and differentiation. In contrast with other protozoa, T. cruzi is auxotrophic for polyamines because of its inability to synthesize putrescine due to the lack of both, arginine and ornithine decarboxylase; therefore, the intracellular availability of polyamines depends exclusively on transport processes. In this work, the polyamine transporter TcPAT12 was overexpressed in T. cruzi epimastigotes demonstrating that growth rates at different concentrations of polyamines strongly depend on the regulation of the polyamine transport. In addition, parasites overexpressing TcPAT12 showed a highly increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide and the trypanocidal drugs nifurtimox and benznidazole, which act by oxidative stress and interfering the synthesis of polyamine derivatives, respectively. Finally, the presence of putative polyamine transporters was analyzed in T. cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei, and Leishmania major genomes identifying 3-6 genes in these trypanosomatids.

  12. Buthionine sulfoximine is a multitarget inhibitor of trypanothione synthesis in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Citlali; Mejia-Tlachi, Marlen; González-Chávez, Zabdi; Silva, Aketzalli; Rodríguez-Zavala, José Salud; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Saavedra, Emma

    2017-12-01

    Buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) induces decreased glutathione (GSH) and trypanothione [T(SH) 2 ] pools in trypanosomatids, presumably because only gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γECS) is blocked. However, some BSO effects cannot be explained by exclusive γECS inhibition; therefore, its effect on the T(SH) 2 metabolism pathway in Trypanosoma cruzi was re-examined. Parasites exposed to BSO did not synthesize T(SH) 2 even when supplemented with cysteine or GSH, suggesting trypanothione synthetase (TryS) inhibition by BSO. Indeed, recombinant γECS and TryS, but not GSH synthetase, were inhibited by BSO and kinetics and docking analyses on a TcTryS 3D model suggested BSO binding at the GSH site. Furthermore, parasites overexpressing γECS and TryS showed ~ 50% decreased activities after BSO treatment. These results indicated that BSO is also an inhibitor of TryS. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  13. Photodynamic vaccination of hamsters with inducible suicidal mutants of Leishmania amazonensis elicits immunity against visceral leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Shraddha; Samant, Mukesh; Khare, Prashant; Misra, Pragya; Dutta, Sujoy; Kolli, Bala Krishna; Sharma, Sharad; Chang, Kwang Poo; Dube, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania, naturally residing in the phagolysosomes of macrophages, is a suitable carrier for vaccine delivery. Genetic complementation of these trypanosomatid protozoa to partially rectify their defective heme-biosynthesis renders them inducible with δ-aminolevulinate to develop porphyria for selective photolysis, leaving infected host-cells unscathed. Delivery of released “vaccines” to antigen-presenting cells is thus expected to enhance immune response, while their self-destruction presents added advantages of safety. Such suicidal-L. amazonensis was found to confer immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapy on hamsters against L. donovani. Neither heat-killed nor live parasites without suicidal induction were effective. Photodynamic vaccination of hamsters with the suicidal-mutants reduced the parasite loads by 99% and suppressed the development of disease. These suppressions were accompanied by an increase in Leishmania-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity and lymphoproliferation as well as in the levels of splenic iNOS, IFN-γ and IL-12 expressions and of Leishmania-specific IgG2 in the serum. Moreover, a single intravenous administration of T-cells from vaccinated hamsters was shown to confer on naïve animals an effective cellular immunity against L. donovani challenges. The absence of lesion development at vaccination sites and parasites in the draining lymphnodes, spleen and liver further indicates that the suicidal mutants provide a safe platform for vaccine delivery against experimental visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:19053149

  14. Temporal analysis of the honey bee microbiome reveals four novel viruses and seasonal prevalence of known viruses, Nosema, and Crithidia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Runckel

    Full Text Available Honey bees (Apis mellifera play a critical role in global food production as pollinators of numerous crops. Recently, honey bee populations in the United States, Canada, and Europe have suffered an unexplained increase in annual losses due to a phenomenon known as Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD. Epidemiological analysis of CCD is confounded by a relative dearth of bee pathogen field studies. To identify what constitutes an abnormal pathophysiological condition in a honey bee colony, it is critical to have characterized the spectrum of exogenous infectious agents in healthy hives over time. We conducted a prospective study of a large scale migratory bee keeping operation using high-frequency sampling paired with comprehensive molecular detection methods, including a custom microarray, qPCR, and ultra deep sequencing. We established seasonal incidence and abundance of known viruses, Nosema sp., Crithidia mellificae, and bacteria. Ultra deep sequence analysis further identified four novel RNA viruses, two of which were the most abundant observed components of the honey bee microbiome (∼10(11 viruses per honey bee. Our results demonstrate episodic viral incidence and distinct pathogen patterns between summer and winter time-points. Peak infection of common honey bee viruses and Nosema occurred in the summer, whereas levels of the trypanosomatid Crithidia mellificae and Lake Sinai virus 2, a novel virus, peaked in January.

  15. Trypanosoma brucei Tb927.2.6100 Is an Essential Protein Associated with Kinetoplast DNA

    KAUST Repository

    Beck, K.

    2013-05-06

    The mitochondrial DNA of trypanosomatid protozoa consists of a complex, intercatenated network of tens of maxicircles and thousands of minicircles. This structure, called kinetoplast DNA (kDNA), requires numerous proteins and multiprotein complexes for replication, segregation, and transcription. In this study, we used a proteomic approach to identify proteins that are associated with the kDNA network. We identified a novel protein encoded by Tb927.2.6100 that was present in a fraction enriched for kDNA and colocalized the protein with kDNA by fluorescence microscopy. RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown of its expression resulted in a growth defect and changes in the proportion of kinetoplasts and nuclei in the cell population. RNAi also resulted in shrinkage and loss of the kinetoplasts, loss of maxicircle and minicircle components of kDNA at similar rates, and (perhaps secondarily) loss of edited and pre-edited mRNA. These results indicate that the Tb927.2.6100 protein is essential for the maintenance of kDNA.

  16. On Leishmania enriettii and Other Enigmatic Leishmania Species of the Neotropics

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    Ralph Lainson

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available There are 20 named species of the genus Leishmania at present recognized in the New World, of which 14 are known to infect man. The present paper discusses the biological, biochemical and ecological features, where known, of six species which have not till now been found to cause human leishmaniasis; namely, Leishmania (Leishmania enriettii, L. (L. hertigi, L. (L. deanei, L. (L. aristidesi, L. (L. forattinii and L. (Viannia equatorensis. A protocol is suggested for attempts to discover the natural mammalian host(s and sandfly vector of L. (L. enriettii. Doubt is cast on the validity of the species L. herreri, described in Costa Rican sloths. Following the concensus of opinion that modern trypanosomatids derive from monogenetic intestinal flagellates of arthropods, phlebotomine sandflies are best regarded as the primary hosts of Leishmania species, with mammals acting as secondary hosts providing a source of parasites for these insects. There are probably natural barriers limiting the life-cycle of most leishmanial parasites to specific sandfly vectors

  17. Susceptibility of spiny rats (Proechimys semispinosus to Leishmania (Viannia panamensis and Leishmania (Leishmania chagasi

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    BL Travi

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The role of Proechimys semispinosus as reservoir of Leishmania (Viannia panamensis on the Colombian Pacific coast was experimentally evaluated. The susceptibility to L. chagasi also was assessed to determine the utility of this rodent as a model for studying reservoir characteristics in the laboratory. Wild-caught animals were screened for natural trypanosomatid infections, and negative individuals were inoculated intradermally (ID in the snout or feet with 10(7 promastigotes of L. panamensis. L. chagasi was inoculated intracardially (10(7 promastigotes or ID in the ear (10(8 promastigotes. PCR-hybridization showed that 15% of 33 spiny rats were naturally infected with L. Viannia sp. Animals experimentally infected with L. panamensis developed non-ulcerated lesions that disappeared by the 7th week post-infection (p.i. and became more resistant upon reinfection. Infectivity to sand flies was low (1/20-1/48 infected/fed flies and transient, and both culture and PCR-hybridization showed that L. panamensis was cleared by the 13th week p.i. Animals inoculated with L. chagasi became subclinically infected and were non-infective to sand flies. Transient infectivity to vectors of spiny rats infected with L. panamensis, combined with population characteristics, e.g., abundance, exploitation of degraded habitats and high reproductive rates, could make them epidemiologically suitable reservoirs.

  18. Detection of an Unknown Trypanosoma DNA in a Phlebotomus stantoni (Diptera: Psychodidae) Collected From Southern Thailand and Records of New Sand Flies With Reinstatement of Sergentomyia hivernus Raynal & Gaschen, 1935 (Diptera: Psychodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phumee, Atchara; Tawatsin, Apiwat; Thavara, Usavadee; Pengsakul, Theerakamol; Thammapalo, Suwich; Depaquit, Jérôme; Gay, Frédérick; Siriyasatien, Padet

    2017-03-01

    Although female sand flies are best known as the vectors of Leishmania parasites and viruses, several previous reports have demonstrated that these insects can also act as vectors for the trypanosomes of bats, lizards, and snakes. In this report, we created an inventory of Phlebotomine sand flies from southern Thailand. A novel trypanosome was found in a specimen of Phlebotomus stantoni, and two sand fly species newly recorded in the country, Sergentomyia khawi and Sergentomyia hivernus, were described. PCR primer pairs specific for the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and the small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) gene of trypanosomatids were used to demonstrate the presence of the parasite in the sand fly. In addition, the Cytochrome b (CytB) gene was used to identify the sand fly species. Among the 45 samples of the sand fly that were collected, seven samples were Ph. stantoni sand flies and a single sample was positive for Trypanosoma sp. through PCR analysis. This study represents the first detection of Trypanosoma sp. in a sand fly from Thailand. The ITS1 and SSU rDNA sequences indicated that this specimen is suspected to be a novel Trypanosoma species. Further studies of this suspected new Trypanosoma species, including its vertebrate hosts and pathogenic potential, are therefore necessary. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) in urban rainforest fragments, Manaus -- Amazonas State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, Liliane Coelho; de Freitas, Rui Alves; Franco, Antonia Maria Ramos

    2013-05-01

    The non-flooded upland rainforest fragment in the Federal University of Amazonas Campus is considered one of the world's largest urban tropical woodland areas and Brazil's second largest one in an urban setting. It is located in the city of Manaus, State of Amazonas at 03° 04' 34″ S, 59° 57' 30″ W, in an area covering nearly 800 hectares. Forty-one (41) sand fly species belonging to genus Lutzomyia were found attaining a total of 4662 specimens collected. Lutzomyia umbratilis was the dominant species at all heights, followed by Lutzomyia anduzei and Lutzomyia claustrei. The fauna alpha diversity index showed to be 6.4, which is not much lower than that reported for areas of continuous forest in this Amazonian region. This data provides additional evidence on Phlebotomine sand flies found to transmit Leishmania and other trypanosomatids to humans and other animals circulating in this area. This is the first study being reported on sand flies collected in an urban rainforest fragment in Amazonia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The Trypanosoma cruzi Protein TcHTE Is Critical for Heme Uptake.

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    Marcelo L Merli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, presents nutritional requirements for several metabolites. It requires heme for the biosynthesis of several heme-proteins involved in essential metabolic pathways like mitochondrial cytochromes and respiratory complexes, as well as enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of sterols and unsaturated fatty acids. However, this parasite lacks a complete route for its synthesis. In view of these facts, T. cruzi has to incorporate heme from the environment during its life cycle. In other words, their hosts must supply the heme for heme-protein synthesis. Although the acquisition of heme is a fundamental issue for the parasite's replication and survival, how this cofactor is imported and distributed is poorly understood. In this work, we used different fluorescent heme analogs to explore heme uptake along the different life-cycle stages of T. cruzi, showing that this parasite imports it during its replicative stages: the epimastigote in the insect vector and the intracellular amastigote in the mammalian host. Also, we identified and characterized a T. cruzi protein (TcHTE with 55% of sequence similarity to LHR1 (protein involved in L. amazonensis heme transport, which is located in the flagellar pocket, where the transport of nutrients proceeds in trypanosomatids. We postulate TcHTE as a protein involved in improving the efficiency of the heme uptake or trafficking in T. cruzi.

  1. Flagellar Motility of Trypanosoma cruzi Epimastigotes

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    G. Ballesteros-Rodea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hemoflagellate Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of American trypanosomiasis. Despite the importance of motility in the parasite life cycle, little is known about T. cruzi motility, and there is no quantitative description of its flagellar beating. Using video microscopy and quantitative vectorial analysis of epimastigote trajectories, we find a forward parasite motility defined by tip-to-base symmetrical flagellar beats. This motion is occasionally interrupted by base-to-tip highly asymmetric beats, which represent the ciliary beat of trypanosomatid flagella. The switch between flagellar and ciliary beating facilitates the parasite's reorientation, which produces a large variability of movement and trajectories that results in different distance ranges traveled by the cells. An analysis of the distance, speed, and rotational angle indicates that epimastigote movement is not completely random, and the phenomenon is highly dependent on the parasite behavior and is characterized by directed and tumbling parasite motion as well as their combination, resulting in the alternation of rectilinear and intricate motility paths.

  2. Isolation and phylogenetic relationships of bat trypanosomes from different biomes in Mato Grosso, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcili, Arlei; da Costa, Andrea P; Soares, Herbert S; Acosta, Igor da C L; de Lima, Julia T R; Minervino, Antonio H H; Melo, Andréia T L; Aguiar, Daniel M; Pacheco, Richard C; Gennari, Solange M

    2013-12-01

    In the order Chiroptera, more than 30 trypanosome species belonging to the subgenera Herpetosoma, Schizotrypanum, Megatrypanum, and Trypanozoon have been described. The species Trypanosoma cruzi , Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei, and Trypanosoma dionisii are the most common in bats and belong to the Schizotrypanum subgenus. Bats from 2 different biomes, Pantanal and Amazonia/Cerrado in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil, were evaluated according to the presence of trypanosome parasites by means of hemoculture and PCR in primary samples (blood samples). A total of 211 bats from 20 different species were caught and the trypanosome prevalence, evaluated through hemoculture, was 9.0% (19), 15.5% (13), and 4.8% (6) in the municipalities of Confresa (Amazonia/Cerrado biome) and Poconé (Pantanal biome). Among the 123 primary samples obtained from the bats, only 3 (2.4%) were positive. Phylogenetic analysis using trypanosomatid barcoding (V7V8 region of SSU rDNA) identified all the isolates and primary samples as T. c. marinkellei. The sequences of the isolates were segregated according to the bat host genus or species and suggest that co-evolutionary patterns exist between hosts and parasites. Further studies in different Brazilian regions and biomes need to be conducted in order to gain real understanding of the diversity of trypanosomes in bats.

  3. Pollination services enhanced with urbanization despite increasing pollinator parasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorou, Panagiotis; Radzevičiūtė, Rita; Settele, Josef; Schweiger, Oliver; Murray, Tomás E; Paxton, Robert J

    2016-06-29

    Animal-mediated pollination is required for the reproduction of the majority of angiosperms, and pollinators are therefore essential for ecosystem functioning and the economy. Two major threats to insect pollinators are anthropogenic land-use change and the spread of pathogens, whose effects may interact to impact pollination. Here, we investigated the relative effects on the ecosystem service of pollination of (i) land-use change brought on by agriculture and urbanization as well as (ii) the prevalence of pollinator parasites, using experimental insect pollinator-dependent plant species in natural pollinator communities. We found that pollinator habitat (i.e. availability of nesting resources for ground-nesting bees and local flower richness) was strongly related to flower visitation rates at the local scale and indirectly influenced plant pollination success. At the landscape scale, pollination was positively related to urbanization, both directly and indirectly via elevated visitation rates. Bumblebees were the most abundant pollinator group visiting experimental flowers. Prevalence of trypanosomatids, such as the common bumblebee parasite Crithidia bombi, was higher in urban compared with agricultural areas, a relationship which was mediated through higher Bombus abundance. Yet, we did not find any top-down, negative effects of bumblebee parasitism on pollination. We conclude that urban areas can be places of high transmission of both pollen and pathogens. © 2016 The Author(s).

  4. Correlation between infection rate of triatominies and Chagas Disease in Southwest of Bahia, Brazil: a warning sign?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Eliezer A DA; Ribeiro, Israel S; Amorim, Miguel S; Rocha, Dalva V; Coutinho, Helder S; Freitas, Leandro M DE; Tomazi, Laize; Silva, Robson A A DA

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the Trypanosoma cruzi, has a wide distribution in South America, and its main method of control is the elimination of triatomines. It is presented here the geographic distribution and the rate of natural infection by T. cruzi of triatomines collected and evaluated from 2008 to 2013 in southwest of Bahia. Triatomines were captured in the intradomiciliary and peridomiciliary areas of five cities located in the southwest of Bahia state, identified, and analyzed for the presence of trypanosomatids in their feces. During the study period the number of patients suspected for acute Chagas disease was recovered from the Notifiable Diseases Information System (SINAN). 8966 triatomines were captured and identified as belonging to eight species. Twenty-six presented themselves infected, being Triatoma sordida the most abundant and with the highest percentage of infection by T. cruzi. Tremedal was the city with the highest number of cases of acute Chagas' disease reported to SINAN. All cities showed triatomines infected with T. cruzi, so there is considerable risk of vectorial transmission of Chagas disease in the southwestern Bahia state, evidencing the need for vector transmission control programs and preventive surveillance measures.

  5. A Soluble Pyrophosphatase Is Essential to Oogenesis and Is Required for Polyphosphate Metabolism in the Red Flour Beetle (Tribolium castaneum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klébea Carvalho

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Polyphosphates have been found in all cell types examined to date and play diverse roles depending on the cell type. In eukaryotic organisms, polyphosphates have been mainly investigated in mammalian cells with few studies on insects. Some studies have demonstrated that a pyrophosphatase regulates polyphosphate metabolism, and most of them were performed on trypanosomatids. Here, we investigated the effects of sPPase gene knocked down in oogenesis and polyphosphate metabolism in the red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum. A single sPPase gene was identified in insect genome and is maternally provided at the mRNA level and not restricted to any embryonic or extraembryonic region during embryogenesis. After injection of Tc-sPPase dsRNA, female survival was reduced to 15% of the control (dsNeo RNA, and egg laying was completely impaired. The morphological analysis by nuclear DAPI staining of the ovarioles in Tc-sPPase dsRNA-injected females showed that the ovariole number is diminished, degenerated oocytes can be observed, and germarium is reduced. The polyphosphate level was increased in cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions in Tc-sPPase RNAi; Concomitantly, the exopolyphosphatase activity decreased in both fractions. Altogether, these data suggest a role for sPPase in the regulation on polyphosphate metabolism in insects and provide evidence that Tc-sPPase is essential to oogenesis.

  6. Pollination services enhanced with urbanization despite increasing pollinator parasitism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzevičiūtė, Rita; Murray, Tomás E.

    2016-01-01

    Animal-mediated pollination is required for the reproduction of the majority of angiosperms, and pollinators are therefore essential for ecosystem functioning and the economy. Two major threats to insect pollinators are anthropogenic land-use change and the spread of pathogens, whose effects may interact to impact pollination. Here, we investigated the relative effects on the ecosystem service of pollination of (i) land-use change brought on by agriculture and urbanization as well as (ii) the prevalence of pollinator parasites, using experimental insect pollinator-dependent plant species in natural pollinator communities. We found that pollinator habitat (i.e. availability of nesting resources for ground-nesting bees and local flower richness) was strongly related to flower visitation rates at the local scale and indirectly influenced plant pollination success. At the landscape scale, pollination was positively related to urbanization, both directly and indirectly via elevated visitation rates. Bumblebees were the most abundant pollinator group visiting experimental flowers. Prevalence of trypanosomatids, such as the common bumblebee parasite Crithidia bombi, was higher in urban compared with agricultural areas, a relationship which was mediated through higher Bombus abundance. Yet, we did not find any top-down, negative effects of bumblebee parasitism on pollination. We conclude that urban areas can be places of high transmission of both pollen and pathogens. PMID:27335419

  7. Epidemiological factors related to the transmission risk of Trypanosoma cruzi in a Quilombola community, State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil

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    Marlon Cezar Cominetti

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This work was an epidemiological investigation of the risk of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission in the rural Quilombola community of Furnas do Dionízio, State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. METHODS: Of the 71 animals examined, seven were captured (two opossums, Didelphis albiventris; four rats, Rattus rattus; and one nine-banded armadillo, Dasypus novemcinctus and 64 were domestic (one canine, Canis familiaris; five pigs, Sus scrofa; two bovines, Bos taurus; five caprines, Capra sp.; and 51 ovines, Ovis aries. Parasitological tests were performed to detect parasites in the blood and to identify the morphology of flagellates. These methods included fresh examinations, buffy coat tests and blood cultures. Molecular analysis of DNA for identification of trypanosomatids was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR with primers S35 and S36. RESULTS: The parasitological tests showed flagellates in an opossum and two cattle. The molecular tests showed DNA from T. cruzi in an opossum and a pig. Triatoma sordida was the only triatomine species found in the community, and it colonized households (four specimens and the surrounding areas (124 specimens. Twenty-three specimens tested positive for flagellates, which were subsequently identified as T. cruzi by PCR. CONCLUSIONS: Data analysis demonstrated that T. cruzi has a peridomestic life cycle that involves both domestic and wild mammals.

  8. LaRbp38: A Leishmania amazonensis protein that binds nuclear and kinetoplast DNAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lira, C.B.B.; Siqueira Neto, J.L.; Giardini, M.A.; Winck, F.V.; Ramos, C.H.I.; Cano, M.I.N.

    2007-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis causes a wide spectrum of leishmaniasis. There are no vaccines or adequate treatment for leishmaniasis, therefore there is considerable interest in the identification of new targets for anti-leishmania drugs. The central role of telomere-binding proteins in cell maintenance makes these proteins potential targets for new drugs. In this work, we used a combination of purification chromatographies to screen L. amazonensis proteins for molecules capable of binding double-stranded telomeric DNA. This approach resulted in the purification of a 38 kDa polypeptide that was identified by mass spectrometry as Rbp38, a trypanosomatid protein previously shown to stabilize mitochondrial RNA and to associate with nuclear and kinetoplast DNAs. Western blotting and supershift assays confirmed the identity of the protein as LaRbp38. Competition and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that LaRbp38 interacted with kinetoplast and nuclear DNAs in vivo and suggested that LaRbp38 may have dual cellular localization and more than one function

  9. Mechanisms of growth inhibition of Phytomonas serpens by the alkaloids tomatine and tomatidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Mansur Medina

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Phytomonas serpens are flagellates in the family Trypanosomatidae that parasitise the tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum L., which results in fruits with low commercial value. The tomato glycoalkaloid tomatine and its aglycone tomatidine inhibit the growth of P. serpens in axenic cultures. Tomatine, like many other saponins, induces permeabilisation of the cell membrane and a loss of cell content, including the cytosolic enzyme pyruvate kinase. In contrast, tomatidine does not cause permeabilisation of membranes, but instead provokes morphological changes, including vacuolisation. Phytomonas treated with tomatidine show an increased accumulation of labelled neutral lipids (BODYPY-palmitic, a notable decrease in the amount of C24-alkylated sterols and an increase in zymosterol content. These results are consistent with the inhibition of 24-sterol methyltransferase (SMT, which is an important enzyme that is responsible for the methylation of sterols at the 24 position. We propose that the main target of tomatidine is the sterols biosynthetic pathway, specifically, inhibition of the 24-SMT. Altogether, the results obtained in the present paper suggest a more general effect of alkaloids in trypanosomatids, which opens potential therapeutic possibilities for the treatment of the diseases caused by these pathogens.

  10. Gp63-like molecules in Phytomonas serpens: possible role in the insect interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Santos, Lívia O; Marinho, Fernanda A; Dias, Felipe A; Lopes, Angela H; Santos, André L S; Branquinha, Marta H

    2006-06-01

    In this study, we demonstrated that metallopeptidase inhibitors (EDTA, EGTA, and 1,10-phenanthroline) were able to arrest Phytomonas serpens growth in distinct patterns. This parasite released exclusively metallopeptidases to the extracellular environment, whereas in cellular extracts only cysteine peptidases were detected. In addition, an extracellular polypeptide of 60 kDa reacted in Western blotting probed with polyclonal antibody raised against gp63 of Leishmania amazonensis. In the cellular parasite extract, this antibody recognized bands migrating at 63 and 52 kDa, which partitioned on both aqueous and membrane-rich fractions. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy analyses showed that the gp63-like molecules have a surface location. Moreover, phospholipase C (PLC)-treated parasites reduced the number of gp63-positive cells. The anti-cross-reacting determinant (CRD) and anti-gp63 antibodies recognized the 60-kDa band in the supernatant from PLC-treated cells, suggesting that this protein is glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored to the plasma membrane. This is the first report on the presence of gp63-like molecules in members of the Phytomonas genus. The pretreatment of the parasites with anti-gp63 antibody significantly diminished their adhesion index to explanted salivary glands of the phytophagous insect Oncopeltus fasciatus, suggesting a potential involvement of the gp63-like molecules in the adhesive process of this plant trypanosomatid.

  11. Mechanisms of growth inhibition of Phytomonas serpens by the alkaloids tomatine and tomatidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Jorge Mansur; Rodrigues, Juliany Cola Fernandes; Moreira, Otacilio C; Atella, Geórgia; Souza, Wanderley de; Barrabin, Hector

    2015-02-01

    Phytomonas serpens are flagellates in the family Trypanosomatidae that parasitise the tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum L.), which results in fruits with low commercial value. The tomato glycoalkaloid tomatine and its aglycone tomatidine inhibit the growth of P. serpens in axenic cultures. Tomatine, like many other saponins, induces permeabilisation of the cell membrane and a loss of cell content, including the cytosolic enzyme pyruvate kinase. In contrast, tomatidine does not cause permeabilisation of membranes, but instead provokes morphological changes, including vacuolisation. Phytomonas treated with tomatidine show an increased accumulation of labelled neutral lipids (BODYPY-palmitic), a notable decrease in the amount of C24-alkylated sterols and an increase in zymosterol content. These results are consistent with the inhibition of 24-sterol methyltransferase (SMT), which is an important enzyme that is responsible for the methylation of sterols at the 24 position. We propose that the main target of tomatidine is the sterols biosynthetic pathway, specifically, inhibition of the 24-SMT. Altogether, the results obtained in the present paper suggest a more general effect of alkaloids in trypanosomatids, which opens potential therapeutic possibilities for the treatment of the diseases caused by these pathogens.

  12. Translational initiation in Leishmania tarentolae and Phytomonas serpens (Kinetoplastida) is strongly influenced by pre-ATG triplet and its 5' sequence context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukes, Julius; Paris, Zdenek; Regmi, Sandesh; Breitling, Reinhard; Mureev, Sergey; Kushnir, Susanna; Pyatkov, Konstantin; Jirků, Milan; Alexandrov, Kirill A

    2006-08-01

    To investigate the influence of sequence context of translation initiation codon on translation efficiency in Kinetoplastida, we constructed a library of expression plasmids randomized in the three nucleotides prefacing ATG of a reporter gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). All 64 possible combinations of pre-ATG triplets were individually stably integrated into the rDNA locus of Leishmania tarentolae and the resulting cell lines were assessed for EGFP expression. The expression levels were quantified directly by measuring the fluorescence of EGFP protein in living cells and confirmed by Western blotting. We observed a strong influence of the pre-ATG triplet on the level of protein expression over a 20-fold range. To understand the degree of evolutionary conservation of the observed effect, we transformed Phytomonas serpens, a trypanosomatid parasite of plants, with a subset of the constructs. The pattern of translational efficiency mediated by individual pre-ATG triplets in this species was similar to that observed in L. tarentolae. However, the pattern of translational efficiency of two other proteins (red fluorescent protein and tetracycline repressor) containing selected pre-ATG triplets did not correlate with either EGFP or each other. Thus, we conclude that a conserved mechanism of translation initiation site selection exists in kinetoplastids that is strongly influenced not only by the pre-ATG sequences but also by the coding region of the gene.

  13. Rotenone-sensitive mitochondrial potential in Phytomonas serpens: electrophoretic Ca(2+) accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysés, Danuza Nogueira; Barrabin, Hector

    2004-06-07

    Phytomonas sp. are flagellated trypanosomatid plant parasites that cause diseases of economic importance in plantations of coffee, oil palm, cassava and coconuts. Here we investigated Ca(2+) uptake by the vanadate-insensitive compartments using permeabilized Phytomonas serpens promastigotes. This uptake occurs at a rate of 1.13+/-0.23 nmol Ca(2+) mg x protein(-1) min(-1). It is completely abolished by the H(+) ionophore FCCP and by valinomycin and nigericin. It is also inhibited by 2 microM ruthenium red, which, at this low concentration, is known to inhibit the mitochondrial calcium uniport. Furthermore, salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) and propylgallate, specific inhibitors of the alternative oxidase in plant and parasite mitochondria, are also effective as inhibitors of the Ca(2+) transport. These compounds abolish the membrane potential that is monitored with safranine O. Rotenone, an inhibitor of NADH-CoQ oxidoreductase, can also dissipate 100% of the membrane potential. It is suggested that the mitochondria of P. serpens can be energized via oxidation of NADH in a pathway involving the NADH-CoQ oxidoreductase and the alternative oxidase to regenerate the ubiquinone. The electrochemical H(+) gradient can be used to promote Ca(2+) uptake by the mitochondria.

  14. Phytomonas (Euglenozoa: Trypanosomatidae): Phylogenetic analyses support infrageneric lineages and a new species transmitted to Solanaceae fruits by a pentatomid hemipteran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Andernice; Ferreira, Robson C; Serrano, Myrna G; Takata, Carmen S A; Campaner, Marta; Attias, Marcia; de Souza, Wanderley; Teixeira, Marta M G; Camargo, Erney P

    2016-10-01

    The genus Phytomonas includes trypanosomatids transmitted to the fruits, latex, and phloem of vascular plants by hemipterans. We inferred the phylogenetic relationships of plant and insect isolates assigned to the previously defined genetic groups A-F and H of Phytomonas, particularly those from groups A, C and E comprising flagellates of Solanaceae fruits. Phylogenetic analyses using glycosomal Glyceraldehyde Phosphate Dehydrogenase (gGAPDH) and Small Subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA) genes strongly supported the monophyly of the genus Phytomonas and its division into seven main infrageneric phylogenetic lineages (Phy clades). Isolates from fruit or latex do not constitute monophyletic assemblages but disperse through more than one lineages. In this study, fruit flagellates were distributed in three clades: PhyA, formed by isolates from Solanaceae and phytophagous hemipterans; PhyC comprising flagellates from four plant families; and PhyE, which contains 15 fruit isolates from seven species of Solanaceae. The flagellates of PhyE are described as Phytomonas dolleti n. sp. according to their positioning in phylogenetic trees, complemented by data about their life cycle, and developmental and morphological characteristics in cultures, fruits of Solanum spp., and salivary glands of the vector, the phytophagous hemipteran Arvelius albopunctatus (Pentatomidae). Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. A Soluble Pyrophosphatase Is Essential to Oogenesis and Is Required for Polyphosphate Metabolism in the Red Flour Beetle (Tribolium castaneum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Klébea; Ribeiro, Lupis; Moraes, Jorge; da Silva, José Roberto; Costa, Evenilton P.; Souza-Menezes, Jackson; Logullo, Carlos; Nunes da Fonseca, Rodrigo; Campos, Eldo

    2015-01-01

    Polyphosphates have been found in all cell types examined to date and play diverse roles depending on the cell type. In eukaryotic organisms, polyphosphates have been mainly investigated in mammalian cells with few studies on insects. Some studies have demonstrated that a pyrophosphatase regulates polyphosphate metabolism, and most of them were performed on trypanosomatids. Here, we investigated the effects of sPPase gene knocked down in oogenesis and polyphosphate metabolism in the red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum) A single sPPase gene was identified in insect genome and is maternally provided at the mRNA level and not restricted to any embryonic or extraembryonic region during embryogenesis. After injection of Tc-sPPase dsRNA, female survival was reduced to 15% of the control (dsNeo RNA), and egg laying was completely impaired. The morphological analysis by nuclear DAPI staining of the ovarioles in Tc-sPPase dsRNA-injected females showed that the ovariole number is diminished, degenerated oocytes can be observed, and germarium is reduced. The polyphosphate level was increased in cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions in Tc-sPPase RNAi; Concomitantly, the exopolyphosphatase activity decreased in both fractions. Altogether, these data suggest a role for sPPase in the regulation on polyphosphate metabolism in insects and provide evidence that Tc-sPPase is essential to oogenesis. PMID:25811926

  16. Quantitative PCR assessment of Lotmaria passim in Apis mellifera colonies co-infected naturally with Nosema ceranae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vejnovic, Branislav; Stevanovic, Jevrosima; Schwarz, Ryan S; Aleksic, Nevenka; Mirilovic, Milorad; Jovanovic, Nemanja M; Stanimirovic, Zoran

    2018-01-01

    A recently described trypanosomatid species Lotmaria passim and the microsporidium Nosema ceranae infect the honey bee (Apis mellifera), but the interspecific dynamic of these two common gut parasites is unknown. In this study, a real-time qPCR assay was developed to enable the specific detection and quantification of L. passim. The annual dynamics of N. ceranae and L. passim infections were evaluated in ten A. mellifera colonies naturally infected with both parasites at one apiary in Serbia from March 2016 to March 2017. Ten samples (60 bees abdomens) were taken from each colony on 8 sampling occasions. L. passim infection level was evaluated with qPCR, while N. ceranae infection was measured by spore counts. N. ceranae infection level was significantly higher in comparison with that of L. passim (spore or cell equivalents/bee, respectively). Significant positive correlation between infection levels of the parasite species indicates their similar annual dynamics, whilst the differences in the levels of infection between particular months point to a seasonal pattern in the incidence of both parasites. The assay which has been developed and validated creates opportunity for detailed study of L. passim infection kinetics and the improvement in the management practices in beekeeping related to these two parasites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of nicotinamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Milena B P; Silva, Cinara V; Bastos, Tanira M; Guimarães, Elisalva T; Figueira, Claudio P; Smirlis, Despina; Azevedo, Walter F

    2012-05-01

    Inhibition of Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania spp. sirtuins has shown promising antiparasitic activity, indicating that these enzymes may be used as targets for drug discovery against trypanosomatid infections. In the present work we carried out a virtual screening focused on the C pocket of Sir2 from Trypanosoma cruzi. Using this approach, the best ligand found was nicotinamide. In vitro tests confirmed the anti-T. cruzi activity of nicotinamide on epimastigote and trypomastigote forms. Moreover, treatment of T. cruzi-infected macrophages with nicotinamide caused a significant reduction in the number of amastigotes. In addition, alterations in the mitochondria and an increase in the vacuolization in the cytoplasm were observed in epimastigotes treated with nicotinamide. Analysis of the complex of Sir2 and nicotinamide revealed the details of the possible ligand-target interaction. Our data reveal a potential use of TcSir2 as a target for anti-T. cruzi drug discovery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Production, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the nucleoside diphosphate kinase b from Leishmania major

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonoli, Celisa Caldana Costa; Vieira, Plinio Salmazo; Ward, Richard John; Arni, Raghuvir Krishnaswamy; Oliveira, Arthur Henrique Cavalcante de; Murakami, Mario Tyago

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the nucleoside diphosphate kinase b from Leishmania major are reported. The crystals belonged to the trigonal space group P3 2 21 and diffracted to 2.18 Å resolution. Nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDKs; EC 2.7.4.6) play an essential role in the synthesis of nucleotides from intermediates in the salvage pathway in all parasitic trypanosomatids and their structural studies will be instrumental in shedding light on the biochemical machinery involved in the parasite life cycle and host–parasite interactions. In this work, NDKb from Leishmania major was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity and crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The NDK crystal diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution and belonged to the trigonal crystal system, with unit-cell parameters a = 114.2, c = 93.9 Å. Translation-function calculations yielded an unambiguous solution in the enantiomorphic space group P3 2 21

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi is lysed by coelomic cytolytic factor-1, an invertebrate analogue of tumor necrosis factor, and induces phenoloxidase activity in the coelomic fluid of Eisenia foetida foetida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares Fontt, Elizabeth; Beschin, Alain; Van Dijck, Els; Vercruysse, Vincent; Bilej, Martin; Lucas, Ralph; De Baetselier, Patrick; Vray, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    A cytolytic protein named Coelomic Cytolytic Factor-1 (CCF-1) was isolated from the coelomic fluid of the earthworm Eisenia foetida foetida. Despite the absence of any gene homology, CCF-1 showed functional analogy with the mammalian cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF), particularly based on similar lectin-like activity. Indeed, both CCF-1 and TNF recognise N,N'-diacetylchitobiose and exert lytic activity on African Trypanosoma brucei brucei. In this report, we show that South-American Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes, but not epimastigotes, were lysed by earthworm coelomic fluid or purified CCF-1. However, T. cruzi was less susceptible to lysis than T. brucei brucei. This lytic effect of coelomic fluid and CCF-1 on T. cruzi trypomastigotes was partially inhibited in the presence of anti-CCF-1 monoclonal antibody, antibody neutralising the lectin-like activity of TNF or N,N'-diacetylchitobiose. In contrast, this lytic effect was completely inhibited when using T. b. brucei. In addition, T. cruzi components, upon recognition by CCF-1 in E. f. foetida coelomic fluid, triggered the prophenoloxidase cascade, an invertebrate defence mechanism. These results further extend the functional analogies of CCF-1 and TNF, suggesting that both molecules share a similar lectin-like activity that has been conserved as an innate recognition mechanism in invertebrates and vertebrates. They also establish a link between stercorarian (T. cruzi) and salivarian (T. brucei) trypanosomatids having divergent phylogenetic origins and patterns of evolution, but possessing closely related cell surface sugar moieties.

  20. The genotypic structure of a multi-host bumblebee parasite suggests a role for ecological niche overlap.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahel M Salathé

    Full Text Available The genotypic structure of parasite populations is an important determinant of ecological and evolutionary dynamics of host-parasite interactions with consequences for pest management and disease control. Genotypic structure is especially interesting where multiple hosts co-exist and share parasites. We here analyze the natural genotypic distribution of Crithidia bombi, a trypanosomatid parasite of bumblebees (Bombus spp., in two ecologically different habitats over a time period of three years. Using an algorithm to reconstruct genotypes in cases of multiple infections, and combining these with directly identified genotypes from single infections, we find a striking diversity of infection for both data sets, with almost all multi-locus genotypes being unique, and are inferring that around half of the total infections are resulting from multiple strains. Our analyses further suggest a mixture of clonality and sexuality in natural populations of this parasite species. Finally, we ask whether parasite genotypes are associated with host species (the phylogenetic hypothesis or whether ecological factors (niche overlap in flower choice shape the distribution of parasite genotypes (the ecological hypothesis. Redundancy analysis demonstrates that in the region with relatively high parasite prevalence, both host species identity and niche overlap are equally important factors shaping the distribution of parasite strains, whereas in the region with lower parasite prevalence, niche overlap more strongly contributes to the distribution observed. Overall, our study underlines the importance of ecological factors in shaping the natural dynamics of host-parasite systems.

  1. Genome Editing by CRISPR/Cas9: A Game Change in the Genetic Manipulation of Protists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, Noelia; Chiurillo, Miguel A; Docampo, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Genome editing by CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated gene 9) system has been transformative in biology. Originally discovered as an adaptive prokaryotic immune system, CRISPR/Cas9 has been repurposed for genome editing in a broad range of model organisms, from yeast to mammalian cells. Protist parasites are unicellular organisms producing important human diseases that affect millions of people around the world. For many of these diseases, such as malaria, Chagas disease, leishmaniasis and cryptosporidiosis, there are no effective treatments or vaccines available. The recent adaptation of the CRISPR/Cas9 technology to several protist models will be playing a key role in the functional study of their proteins, in the characterization of their metabolic pathways, and in the understanding of their biology, and will facilitate the search for new chemotherapeutic targets. In this work we review recent studies where the CRISPR/Cas9 system was adapted to protist parasites, particularly to Apicomplexans and trypanosomatids, emphasizing the different molecular strategies used for genome editing of each organism, as well as their advantages. We also discuss the potential usefulness of this technology in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. © 2016 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2016 International Society of Protistologists.

  2. Sterol biosynthesis is required for heat resistance but not extracellular survival in leishmania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sterol biosynthesis is a crucial pathway in eukaryotes leading to the production of cholesterol in animals and various C24-alkyl sterols (ergostane-based sterols in fungi, plants, and trypanosomatid protozoa. Sterols are important membrane components and precursors for the synthesis of powerful bioactive molecules, including steroid hormones in mammals. Their functions in pathogenic protozoa are not well characterized, which limits the development of sterol synthesis inhibitors as drugs. Here we investigated the role of sterol C14α-demethylase (C14DM in Leishmania parasites. C14DM is a cytochrome P450 enzyme and the primary target of azole drugs. In Leishmania, genetic or chemical inactivation of C14DM led to a complete loss of ergostane-based sterols and accumulation of 14-methylated sterols. Despite the drastic change in lipid composition, C14DM-null mutants (c14dm(- were surprisingly viable and replicative in culture. They did exhibit remarkable defects including increased membrane fluidity, failure to maintain detergent resistant membrane fraction, and hypersensitivity to heat stress. These c14dm(- mutants showed severely reduced virulence in mice but were highly resistant to itraconazole and amphotericin B, two drugs targeting sterol synthesis. Our findings suggest that the accumulation of toxic sterol intermediates in c14dm(- causes strong membrane perturbation and significant vulnerability to stress. The new knowledge may help improve the efficacy of current drugs against pathogenic protozoa by exploiting the fitness loss associated with drug resistance.

  3. Occurrence and Probability Maps of Lutzomyia longipalpis and Lutzomyia cruzi (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Filho, J D; Scholte, R G C; Amaral, A L G; Shimabukuro, P H F; Carvalho, O S; Caldeira, R L

    2017-09-01

    Leishmaniases are serious diseases caused by trypanosomatid protozoans of the genus Leishmania transmitted by the bite of phlebotomine sand flies. We analyzed records pertaining to Lutzomyia longipalpis (Lutz and Neiva, 1912) and Lutzomyia cruzi (Mangabeira, 1938) in Brazil from the following sources: the collection of phlebotomine sand flies of the Centro de Pesquisas René Rachou/Fiocruz (FIOCRUZ-COLFLEB), the "SpeciesLink" (CRIA) database, from systematic surveys of scientific articles and gray literature (dissertations, theses, and communications), and disease data obtained from the Information System for Notifiable Diseases/Ministry of Health (SINAN/MS). Environmental data and ecological niche modeling (ESMS) using the approach of MaxEnt algorithm produced maps of occurrence probability for both Lu. longipalpis and Lu. cruzi. Lutzomyia longipalpis was found in 229 Brazilian municipalities and Lu. cruzi in 27. The species were sympatric in 16 municipalities of the Central-West region of Brazil. Our results show that Lu. longipalpis is widely distributed and associated with the high number of cases of visceral leishmaniasis reported in Brazil. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Genome Editing by CRISPR/Cas9: a Game Change in the Genetic Manipulation of Protists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, Noelia; Chiurillo, Miguel A.; Docampo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing by CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated gene 9) system has been transformative in biology. Originally discovered as an adaptive prokaryotic immune system, CRISPR/Cas9 has been repurposed for genome editing in a broad range of model organisms, from yeast to mammalian cells. Protist parasites are unicellular organisms producing important human diseases that affect millions of people around the world. For many of these diseases, such as malaria, Chagas disease, leishmaniasis and cryptosporidiosis, there are no effective treatments or vaccines available. The recent adaptation of the CRISPR/Cas9 technology to several protist models will be playing a key role in the functional study of their proteins, in the characterization of their metabolic pathways, and in the understanding of their biology, and will facilitate the search for new chemotherapeutic targets. In this work we review recent studies where the CRISPR/Cas9 system was adapted to protist parasites, particularly to Apicomplexans and trypanosomatids, emphasizing the different molecular strategies used for genome editing of each organism, as well as their advantages. We also discuss the potential usefulness of this technology in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. PMID:27315329

  5. Biological and molecular characterization of a Trypanosoma cruzi isolate obtained from Panstrongylus megistus captured in Sao Paulo State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Luciamáre P A; Castanho, Roberto E P; Therezo, Altino L S; Ribeiro, Aline R; Lima, Luciana; Teixeira, Marta M G; Sperança, Márcia A; Rodrigues, Vera L C; da Rosa, João A

    2014-03-01

    An isolate of Trypanosoma cruzi obtained from P. megistus captured in the peridomicile area of a home in Santo Antonio do Jardim city in the State of Sao Paulo, denominated T. cruzi Mogi, was characterized biologically and molecularly. The RFLP analysis of the D7 divergent domain in the 24Sα rDNA and of the mini-exon positioned the T. cruzi isolate within the TcI group. Phylogenetic analysis performed with the trypanosomatid barcode confirmed that the isolate belongs to the TcI group, with high homology to the 3014 c1 T.cruzi strain. The biological characterization of the isolate in rats showed a prepatent period of about 8 days, low parasitemia and tropism for cardiac, skeletal and colonic muscles. In Swiss mice the T. cruzi Mogi isolate showed a prepatent period of about 22 days, intermittent parasitemia in some animals, and tropism for cardiac and colonic muscles. Despite the inherent difficulty of identifying correlations amongst the molecular and biological characteristics of different T. cruzi groups, the tropism for colonic muscle demonstrated by T. cruzi Mogi represented a peculiarity of this isolate within the TcI group.

  6. Characterization of Endotrypanum Parasites Using Specific Monoclonal Antibodies

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    Ramos Franco Antonia Maria

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of Endotrypanum stocks (representing an heterogeneous population of strains have been screened against a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs derived for selected species of Endotrypanum or Leishmania, to see whether this approach could be used to group/differentiate further among these parasites. Using different immunological assay systems, MAbs considered specific for the genus Endotrypanum (E-24, CXXX-3G5-F12 or strain M6159 of E. schaudinni (E-2, CXIV-3C7-F5 reacted variably according to the test used but in the ELISA or immunofluorescence assay both reacted with all the strains tested. Analyses using these MAbs showed antigenic diversity occurring among the Endotrypanum strains, but no qualitative or quantitative reactivity pattern could be consistently related to parasite origin (i.e., host species involved or geographic area of isolation. Western blot analyses of the parasites showed that these MAbs recognized multiple components. Differences existed either in the epitope density or molecular forms associated with the antigenic determinants and therefore allowed the assignment of the strains to specific antigenic groups. Using immunofluorescence or ELISA assay, clone E-24 produced reaction with L. equatorensis (which is a parasite of sloth and rodent, but not with other trypanosomatids examined. Interestingly, the latter parasite and the Endotrypanum strains cross-reacted with a number of MAbs that were produced against members of the L. major-L. tropica complex

  7. In silico molecular modeling and docking studies on the leishmanial tryparedoxin peroxidase

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    Ozal Mutlu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is one of the most common form of neglected parasitic disease that affects about 350 million people worldwide. Leishmanias have a trypanothione mediated hydroperoxide metabolism to eliminate endogenous or exogenous oxidative agents. Both of 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Prx and glutathione peroxidase type tryparedoxin peroxidase (Px are the terminal enzymes in the trypanothione dependent detoxification system. Therefore absence of trypanothione redox system in mammals and the sensitivity of trypanosomatids against oxidative stress, enzymes of this pathway are drug targets candidates. In this study, 3D structure of tryparedoxin peroxidase (2-Cys peroxiredoxin type from Leishmania donovani (LdTXNPx was described by homology modeling method based on the template of tryparedoxin peroxidase from Crithidia fasciculata and selected compounds were docked to the active site pocket. The quality of the 3D structure of the model was confirmed by various web based validation programs. When compared secondary and tertiary structure of the model, it showed a typical thioredoxin fold containing a central beta-sheet and three alpha-helices. Docking study showed that the selected compound 2 (CID 16073813 interacted with the active site amino acids and binding energy was -118.675 kcal/mol.

  8. Regulatory volume decrease in Leishmania mexicana: effect of anti-microtubule drugs

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    Francehuli Dagger

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The trypanosomatid cytoskeleton is responsible for the parasite's shape and it is modulated throughout the different stages of the parasite's life cycle. When parasites are exposed to media with reduced osmolarity, they initially swell, but subsequently undergo compensatory shrinking referred to as regulatory volume decrease (RVD. We studied the effects of anti-microtubule (Mt drugs on the proliferation of Leishmania mexicana promastigotes and their capacity to undergo RVD. All of the drugs tested exerted antiproliferative effects of varying magnitudes [ansamitocin P3 (AP3> trifluoperazine > taxol > rhizoxin > chlorpromazine]. No direct relationship was found between antiproliferative drug treatment and RVD. Similarly, Mt stability was not affected by drug treatment. Ansamitocin P3, which is effective at nanomolar concentrations, blocked amastigote-promastigote differentiation and was the only drug that impeded RVD, as measured by light dispersion. AP3 induced 2 kinetoplasts (Kt 1 nucleus cells that had numerous flagella-associated Kts throughout the cell. These results suggest that the dramatic morphological changes induced by AP3 alter the spatial organisation and directionality of the Mts that are necessary for the parasite's hypotonic stress-induced shape change, as well as its recovery.

  9. Bioenergetic profiling of Trypanosoma cruzi life stages using Seahorse extracellular flux technology.

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    Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Pereira, Camila F A; Dumoulin, Peter C; Caradonna, Kacey L; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2016-08-01

    Energy metabolism is an attractive target for the development of new therapeutics against protozoan pathogens, including Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of human Chagas disease. Despite emerging evidence that mitochondrial electron transport is essential for the growth of intracellular T. cruzi amastigotes in mammalian cells, fundamental knowledge of mitochondrial energy metabolism in this parasite life stage remains incomplete. The Clark-type electrode, which measures the rate of oxygen consumption, has served as the traditional tool to study mitochondrial energetics and has contributed to our understanding of it in T. cruzi. Here, we evaluate the Seahorse XF(e)24 extracellular flux platform as an alternative method to assess mitochondrial bioenergetics in isolated T. cruzi parasites. We report optimized assay conditions used to perform mitochondrial stress tests with replicative life cycle stages of T. cruzi using the XF(e)24 instrument, and discuss the advantages and potential limitations of this methodology, as applied to T. cruzi and other trypanosomatids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Comprehensive Bee Pathogen Screening in Belgium Reveals Crithidia mellificae as a New Contributory Factor to Winter Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravoet, Jorgen; Maharramov, Jafar; Meeus, Ivan; De Smet, Lina; Wenseleers, Tom; Smagghe, Guy; de Graaf, Dirk C.

    2013-01-01

    Since the last decade, unusually high honey bee colony losses have been reported mainly in North-America and Europe. Here, we report on a comprehensive bee pathogen screening in Belgium covering 363 bee colonies that were screened for 18 known disease-causing pathogens and correlate their incidence in summer with subsequent winter mortality. Our analyses demonstrate that, in addition to Varroa destructor, the presence of the trypanosomatid parasite Crithidia mellificae and the microsporidian parasite Nosema ceranae in summer are also predictive markers of winter mortality, with a negative synergy being observed between the two in terms of their effects on colony mortality. Furthermore, we document the first occurrence of a parasitizing phorid fly in Europe, identify a new fourth strain of Lake Sinai Virus (LSV), and confirm the presence of other little reported pathogens such as Apicystis bombi, Aphid Lethal Paralysis Virus (ALPV), Spiroplasma apis, Spiroplasma melliferum and Varroa destructor Macula-like Virus (VdMLV). Finally, we provide evidence that ALPV and VdMLV replicate in honey bees and show that viruses of the LSV complex and Black Queen Cell Virus tend to non-randomly co-occur together. We also noticed a significant correlation between the number of pathogen species and colony losses. Overall, our results contribute significantly to our understanding of honey bee diseases and the likely causes of their current decline in Europe. PMID:23991113

  11. Molecular mechanisms of cardiac electromechanical remodeling during Chagas disease: Role of TNF and TGF-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jader Santos; Machado, Fabiana Simão; Ropert, Catherine; Roman-Campos, Danilo

    2017-02-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the trypanosomatid Trypanosoma cruzi, which chronically causes heart problems in up to 30% of infected patients. Chagas disease was initially restricted to Latin America. However, due to migratory events, this disease may become a serious worldwide health problem. During Chagas disease, many patients die of cardiac arrhythmia despite the apparent benefits of anti-arrhythmic therapy (e.g., amiodarone). Here, we assimilate the cardiac form of Chagas disease to an inflammatory cardiac disease. Evidence from the literature, mostly provided using experimental models, supports this view and argues in favor of new strategies for treating cardiac arrhythmias in Chagas disease by modulating cytokine production and/or action. But the complex nature of myocardial inflammation underlies the need to better understand the molecular mechanisms of the inflammatory response during Chagas disease. Here, particular attention has been paid to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) although other cytokines may be involved in the chagasic cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dissecting biochemical peculiarities of the ATPase activity of TcSub2, a component of the mRNA export pathway in Trypanosoma cruzi.

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    Bittencourt, Ize de Aguiar; Serpeloni, Mariana; Hiraiwa, Priscila Mazzochi; de Arruda Campos Brasil de Souza, Tatiana; Ávila, Andréa Rodrigues

    2017-05-01

    The RNA helicase DEAD-box protein Sub2 (yeast)/UAP56 (mammals) is conserved across eukaryotes and is essential for mRNA export in trypanosomes. Despite the high conservation of Sub2 in lower eukaryotes such as Trypanosoma cruzi, the low conservation of other mRNA export factors raises questions regarding whether the mode of action of TcSub2 is similar to that of orthologs from other eukaryotes. Mutation of the conserved K87 residue of TcSub2 abolishes ATPase activity, showing that its ATPase domain is functional. However, the Vmax of TcSub2 was much higher than the Vmax described for the human protein UAP56, which suggests that the TcSub2 enzyme hydrolyzes ATP faster than its human homolog. Furthermore, we demonstrate that RNA association is less important to the activity of TcSub2 compared to UAP56. Our results show differences in activity of this protein, even though the structure of TcSub2 is very similar to UAP56. Functional complementation assays indicate that these differences may be common to other trypanosomatids. Distinct features of RNA influence and ATPase efficiency between UAP56 and TcSub2 may reflect distinct structures for functional sites of TcSub2. For this reason, ligand-based or structure-based methodologies can be applied to investigate the potential of TcSub2 as a target for new drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Aquaglyceroporin-null trypanosomes display glycerol transport defects and respiratory-inhibitor sensitivity.

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    Laura Jeacock

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aquaglyceroporins (AQPs transport water and glycerol and play important roles in drug-uptake in pathogenic trypanosomatids. For example, AQP2 in the human-infectious African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, is responsible for melarsoprol and pentamidine-uptake, and melarsoprol treatment-failure has been found to be due to AQP2-defects in these parasites. To further probe the roles of these transporters, we assembled a T. b. brucei strain lacking all three AQP-genes. Triple-null aqp1-2-3 T. b. brucei displayed only a very moderate growth defect in vitro, established infections in mice and recovered effectively from hypotonic-shock. The aqp1-2-3 trypanosomes did, however, display glycerol uptake and efflux defects. They failed to accumulate glycerol or to utilise glycerol as a carbon-source and displayed increased sensitivity to salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM, octyl gallate or propyl gallate; these inhibitors of trypanosome alternative oxidase (TAO can increase intracellular glycerol to toxic levels. Notably, disruption of AQP2 alone generated cells with glycerol transport defects. Consistent with these findings, AQP2-defective, melarsoprol-resistant clinical isolates were sensitive to the TAO inhibitors, SHAM, propyl gallate and ascofuranone, relative to melarsoprol-sensitive reference strains. We conclude that African trypanosome AQPs are dispensable for viability and osmoregulation but they make important contributions to drug-uptake, glycerol-transport and respiratory-inhibitor sensitivity. We also discuss how the AQP-dependent inverse sensitivity to melarsoprol and respiratory inhibitors described here might be exploited.

  14. In vitro activity of the antifungal azoles itraconazole and posaconazole against Leishmania amazonensis.

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    Sara Teixeira de Macedo-Silva

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis, caused by protozoan parasites of the Leishmania genus, is one of the most prevalent neglected tropical diseases. It is endemic in 98 countries, causing considerable morbidity and mortality. Pentavalent antimonials are the first line of treatment for leishmaniasis except in India. In resistant cases, miltefosine, amphotericin B and pentamidine are used. These treatments are unsatisfactory due to toxicity, limited efficacy, high cost and difficult administration. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop drugs that are efficacious, safe, and more accessible to patients. Trypanosomatids, including Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi, have an essential requirement for ergosterol and other 24-alkyl sterols, which are absent in mammalian cells. Inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis is increasingly recognized as a promising target for the development of new chemotherapeutic agents. The aim of this work was to investigate the antiproliferative, physiological and ultrastructural effects against Leishmania amazonensis of itraconazole (ITZ and posaconazole (POSA, two azole antifungal agents that inhibit sterol C14α-demethylase (CYP51. Antiproliferative studies demonstrated potent activity of POSA and ITZ: for promastigotes, the IC50 values were 2.74 µM and 0.44 µM for POSA and ITZ, respectively, and for intracellular amastigotes, the corresponding values were 1.63 µM and 0.08 µM, for both stages after 72 h of treatment. Physiological studies revealed that both inhibitors induced a collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm, which was consistent with ultrastructural alterations in the mitochondrion. Intense mitochondrial swelling, disorganization and rupture of mitochondrial membranes were observed by transmission electron microscopy. In addition, accumulation of lipid bodies, appearance of autophagosome-like structures and alterations in the kinetoplast were also observed. In conclusion, our results indicate that ITZ and

  15. A comparative molecular and 3-dimensional structural investigation into cross-continental and novel avian Trypanosoma spp. in Australia.

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    Cooper, Crystal; Thompson, R C Andrew; Botero, Adriana; Kristancic, Amanda; Peacock, Christopher; Kirilak, Yaowanuj; Clode, Peta L

    2017-05-12

    Molecular and structural information on avian Trypanosoma spp. throughout Australia is limited despite their intrinsic value in understanding trypanosomatid evolution, diversity, and structural biology. In Western Australia tissue samples (n = 429) extracted from 93 birds in 25 bird species were screened using generic PCR primers to investigate the diversity of Trypanosoma spp. To investigate avian trypanosome structural biology the first 3-dimensional ultrastructural models of a Trypanosoma spp. (Trypanosoma sp. AAT) isolated from a bird (currawong, Strepera spp.) were generated using focussed ion beam milling combined with scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM). Here, we confirm four intercontinental species of avian trypanosomes in native Australian birds, and identify a new avian Trypanosoma. Trypanosome infection was identified in 18 birds from 13 different bird species (19%). A single new genotype was isolated and found to be closely related to T. culicavium (Trypanosoma sp. CC2016 B002). Other Trypanosoma spp. identified include T. avium, T. culicavium, T. thomasbancrofti, Trypanosoma sp. TL.AQ.22, Trypanosoma sp. AAT, and an uncharacterised Trypanosoma sp. (group C-III sensu Zidková et al. (Infect Genet Evol 12:102-112, 2012)), all previously identified in Australia or other continents. Serially-sectioning Trypanosoma sp. AAT epimastigotes using FIB-SEM revealed the disc-shaped kinetoplast pocket attached perpendicular to the branching mitochondrion. Additionally, the universal minicircle sequence within the kinetoplast DNA and the associated binding protein were determined in Trypanosoma sp. AAT. These results indicate that bird trypanosomes are relatively conserved across continents, while being locally diverse, which supports the hypothesis that bird trypanosomes exist as fewer species than described in the literature. Evidence exists that avian Trypanosoma spp. are infecting mammals and could be transmitted by haemadipsid leeches. Trypanosoma sp

  16. A Flap Endonuclease (TcFEN1) Is Involved in Trypanosoma cruzi Cell Proliferation, DNA Repair, and Parasite Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Ivan; Aldunate, Carmen; Valenzuela, Lucia; Sepúlveda, Sofia; Garrido, Gilda; Kemmerling, Ulrike; Cabrera, Gonzalo; Galanti, Norbel

    2017-07-01

    FLAP endonucleases (FEN) are involved both in DNA replication and repair by processing DNA intermediaries presenting a nucleotide flap using its phosphodiesterase activity. In spite of these important functions in DNA metabolism, this enzyme was not yet studied in Trypanosomatids. Trypanosoma cruzi, the ethiological agent of Chagas disease, presents two dividing cellular forms (epimastigote and amastigote) and one non-proliferative, infective form (trypomastigote). The parasite survives DNA damage produced by reactive species generated in its hosts. The activity of a T. cruzi FLAP endonuclease (TcFEN1) was determined in the three cellular forms of the parasite using a DNA substrate generated by annealing three different oligonucleotides to form a double-stranded DNA with a 5' flap in the middle. This activity showed optimal pH and temperature similar to other known FENs. The substrate cut by the flap endonuclease activity could be ligated by the parasite generating a repaired DNA product. A DNA flap endonuclease coding sequence found in the T. cruzi genome (TcFEN1) was cloned, inserted in parasite expression vectors and transfected to epimastigotes. The purified native recombinant protein showed DNA flap endonuclease activity. This endonuclease was found located in the parasite nucleus of transfected epimastigotes and its over-expression increased both parasite proliferation and survival to H 2 O 2 . The presence of a flap endonuclease activity in T. cruzi and its nuclear location are indicative of the participation of this enzyme in DNA processing of flap fragments during DNA replication and repair in this parasite of ancient evolutive origin. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1722-1732, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Transcriptome Remodeling in Trypanosoma cruzi and Human Cells during Intracellular Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Okrah, Kwame; Belew, A. Trey; Choi, Jungmin; Caradonna, Kacey L.; Padmanabhan, Prasad; Ndegwa, David M.; Temanni, M. Ramzi; Corrada Bravo, Héctor; El-Sayed, Najib M.; Burleigh, Barbara A.

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular colonization and persistent infection by the kinetoplastid protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, underlie the pathogenesis of human Chagas disease. To obtain global insights into the T. cruzi infective process, transcriptome dynamics were simultaneously captured in the parasite and host cells in an infection time course of human fibroblasts. Extensive remodeling of the T. cruzi transcriptome was observed during the early establishment of intracellular infection, coincident with a major developmental transition in the parasite. Contrasting this early response, few additional changes in steady state mRNA levels were detected once mature T. cruzi amastigotes were formed. Our findings suggest that transcriptome remodeling is required to establish a modified template to guide developmental transitions in the parasite, whereas homeostatic functions are regulated independently of transcriptomic changes, similar to that reported in related trypanosomatids. Despite complex mechanisms for regulation of phenotypic expression in T. cruzi, transcriptomic signatures derived from distinct developmental stages mirror known or projected characteristics of T. cruzi biology. Focusing on energy metabolism, we were able to validate predictions forecast in the mRNA expression profiles. We demonstrate measurable differences in the bioenergetic properties of the different mammalian-infective stages of T. cruzi and present additional findings that underscore the importance of mitochondrial electron transport in T. cruzi amastigote growth and survival. Consequences of T. cruzi colonization for the host include dynamic expression of immune response genes and cell cycle regulators with upregulation of host cholesterol and lipid synthesis pathways, which may serve to fuel intracellular T. cruzi growth. Thus, in addition to the biological inferences gained from gene ontology and functional enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes in parasite and host, our

  18. Trypanosoma cruzi contains two galactokinases; molecular and biochemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo-Rojas, Ángel E; González-Marcano, Eglys B; Valera-Vera, Edward A; Acosta, Héctor R; Quiñones, Wilfredo A; Burchmore, Richard J S; Concepción, Juan L; Cáceres, Ana J

    2016-10-01

    Two different putative galactokinase genes, found in the genome database of Trypanosoma cruzi were cloned and sequenced. Expression of the genes in Escherichia coli resulted for TcGALK-1 in the synthesis of a soluble and active enzyme, and in the case of TcGALK-2 gene a less soluble protein, with predicted molecular masses of 51.9kDa and 51.3kDa, respectively. The Km values determined for the recombinant proteins were for galactose 0.108mM (TcGALK-1) and 0.091mM (TcGALK-2) and for ATP 0.36mM (TcGALK-1) and 0.1mM (TcGALK-2). Substrate inhibition by ATP (Ki 0.414mM) was only observed for TcGALK-2. Gel-filtration chromatography showed that natural TcGALKs and recombinant TcGALK-1 are monomeric. In agreement with the possession of a type-1 peroxisome-targeting signal by both TcGALKs, they were found to be present inside glycosomes using two different methods of subcellular fractionation in conjunction with mass spectrometry. Both genes are expressed in epimastigote and trypomastigote stages since the respective proteins were immunodetected by western blotting. The T. cruzi galactokinases present their highest (52-47%) sequence identity with their counterpart from Leishmania spp., followed by prokaryotic galactokinases such as those from E. coli and Lactococcus lactis (26-23%). In a phylogenetic analysis, the trypanosomatid galactokinases form a separate cluster, showing an affiliation with bacteria. Epimastigotes of T. cruzi can grow in glucose-depleted LIT-medium supplemented with 20mM of galactose, suggesting that this hexose, upon phosphorylation by a TcGALK, could be used in the synthesis of UDP-galactose and also as a possible carbon and energy source. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Actions of a proline analogue, L-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (T4C, on Trypanosoma cruzi.

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    Anahí Magdaleno

    Full Text Available It is well established that L-proline has several roles in the biology of trypanosomatids. In Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, this amino acid is involved in energy metabolism, differentiation processes and resistance to osmotic stress. In this study, we analyzed the effects of interfering with L-proline metabolism on the viability and on other aspects of the T. cruzi life cycle using the proline analogue L- thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (T4C. The growth of epimastigotes was evaluated using different concentrations of T4C in standard culture conditions and at high temperature or acidic pH. We also evaluated possible interactions of this analogue with stress conditions such as those produced by nutrient starvation and oxidative stress. T4C showed a dose-response effect on epimastigote growth (IC(50 = 0.89+/-0.02 mM at 28 degrees C, and the inhibitory effect of this analogue was synergistic (p<0.05 with temperature (0.54+/-0.01 mM at 37 degrees C. T4C significantly diminished parasite survival (p<0.05 in combination with nutrient starvation and oxidative stress conditions. Pre-incubation of the parasites with L-proline resulted in a protective effect against oxidative stress, but this was not seen in the presence of the drug. Finally, the trypomastigote bursting from infected mammalian cells was evaluated and found to be inhibited by up to 56% when cells were treated with non-toxic concentrations of T4C (between 1 and 10 mM. All these data together suggest that T4C could be an interesting therapeutic drug if combined with others that affect, for example, oxidative stress. The data also support the participation of proline metabolism in the resistance to oxidative stress.

  20. Dataset generated for Dissection of mechanisms of Trypanothione Reductase and Tryparedoxin Peroxidase through dynamic network analysis and simulations in leishmaniasis

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    Anurag Kumar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is the second largest parasitic killer disease caused by the protozoan parasite Leishmania, transmitted by the bite of sand flies. It's endemic in the eastern India with 165.4 million populations at risk with the current drug regimen. Three forms of leishmaniasis exist in which cutaneous is the most common form caused by Leishmania major. Trypanothione Reductase (TryR, a flavoprotein oxidoreductase, unique to thiol redox system, is considered as a potential target for chemotherapy for trypanosomatids infection. It is involved in the NADPH dependent reduction of Trypanothione disulphide to Trypanothione. Similarly, is Tryparedoxin Peroxidase (Txnpx, for detoxification of peroxides, an event pivotal for survival of Leishmania in two disparate biological environment. Fe-S plays a major role in regulating redox balance. To check for the closeness between human homologs of these proteins, we have carried the molecular clock analysis followed by molecular modeling of 3D structure of this protein, enabling us to design and test the novel drug like molecules. Molecular clock analysis suggests that human homologs of TryR i.e. Glutathione Reductase and Txnpx respectively are highly diverged in phylogenetic tree, thus, they serve as good candidates for chemotherapy of leishmaniasis. Furthermore, we have done the homology modeling of TryR using template of same protein from Leishmania infantum (PDB ID: 2JK6. This was done using Modeller 9.18 and the resultant models were validated. To inhibit this target, molecular docking was done with various screened inhibitors in which we found Taxifolin acts as common inhibitors for both TryR and Txnpx. We constructed the protein-protein interaction network for the proteins that are involved in the redox metabolism from various Interaction databases and the network was statistically analysed. Keywords: Trypanothione Reductase, Tryparedoxin Peroxidase, L.major, Homology modeling, Molecular clock analysis

  1. Isotopomer profiling of Leishmania mexicana promastigotes reveals important roles for succinate fermentation and aspartate uptake in tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) anaplerosis, glutamate synthesis, and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Eleanor C; Ng, William W; Chambers, Jennifer M; Ng, Milica; Naderer, Thomas; Krömer, Jens O; Likic, Vladimir A; McConville, Malcolm J

    2011-08-05

    Leishmania parasites proliferate within nutritionally complex niches in their sandfly vector and mammalian hosts. However, the extent to which these parasites utilize different carbon sources remains poorly defined. In this study, we have followed the incorporation of various (13)C-labeled carbon sources into the intracellular and secreted metabolites of Leishmania mexicana promastigotes using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and (13)C NMR. [U-(13)C]Glucose was rapidly incorporated into intermediates in glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the cytoplasmic carbohydrate reserve material, mannogen. Enzymes involved in the upper glycolytic pathway are sequestered within glycosomes, and the ATP and NAD(+) consumed by these reactions were primarily regenerated by the fermentation of phosphoenolpyruvate to succinate (glycosomal succinate fermentation). The initiating enzyme in this pathway, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, was exclusively localized to the glycosome. Although some of the glycosomal succinate was secreted, most of the C4 dicarboxylic acids generated during succinate fermentation were further catabolized in the TCA cycle. A high rate of TCA cycle anaplerosis was further suggested by measurement of [U-(13)C]aspartate and [U-(13)C]alanine uptake and catabolism. TCA cycle anaplerosis is apparently needed to sustain glutamate production under standard culture conditions. Specifically, inhibition of mitochondrial aconitase with sodium fluoroacetate resulted in the rapid depletion of intracellular glutamate pools and growth arrest. Addition of high concentrations of exogenous glutamate alleviated this growth arrest. These findings suggest that glycosomal and mitochondrial metabolism in Leishmania promastigotes is tightly coupled and that, in contrast to the situation in some other trypanosomatid parasites, the TCA cycle has crucial anabolic functions.

  2. The quality control of glycoprotein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum, a trip from trypanosomes to mammals

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    A.J. Parodi

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available The present review deals with the stages of synthesis and processing of asparagine-linked oligosaccharides occurring in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum and their relationship to the acquisition by glycoproteins of their proper tertiary structures. Special emphasis is placed on reactions taking place in trypanosomatid protozoa since their study has allowed the detection of the transient glucosylation of glycoproteins catalyzed by UDP-Glc:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase and glucosidase II. The former enzyme has the unique property of covalently tagging improperly folded conformations by catalyzing the formation of protein-linked Glc1Man7GlcNAc2, Glc1Man8GlcNac2 and Glc1Man9GlcNAc2 from the unglucosylated proteins. Glucosyltransferase is a soluble protein of the endoplasmic reticulum that recognizes protein domains exposed in denatured but not in native conformations (probably hydrophobic amino acids and the innermost N-acetylglucosamine unit that is hidden from macromolecular probes in most native glycoproteins. In vivo, the glucose units are removed by glucosidase II. The influence of oligosaccharides in glycoprotein folding is reviewed as well as the participation of endoplasmic reticulum chaperones (calnexin and calreticulin that recognize monoglucosylated species in the same process. A model for the quality control of glycoprotein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum, i.e., the mechanism by which cells recognize the tertiary structure of glycoproteins and only allow transit to the Golgi apparatus of properly folded species, is discussed. The main elements of this control are calnexin and calreticulin as retaining components, the UDP-Glc:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase as a sensor of tertiary structures and glucosidase II as the releasing agent.

  3. Rapid, Selection-Free, High-Efficiency Genome Editing in Protozoan Parasites Using CRISPR-Cas9 Ribonucleoproteins

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    Lia Carolina Soares Medeiros

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomatids (order Kinetoplastida, including the human pathogens Trypanosoma cruzi (agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma brucei, (African sleeping sickness, and Leishmania (leishmaniasis, affect millions of people and animals globally. T. cruzi is considered one of the least studied and most poorly understood tropical disease-causing parasites, in part because of the relative lack of facile genetic engineering tools. This situation has improved recently through the application of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats–CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR-Cas9 technology, but a number of limitations remain, including the toxicity of continuous Cas9 expression and the long drug marker selection times. In this study, we show that the delivery of ribonucleoprotein (RNP complexes composed of recombinant Cas9 from Staphylococcus aureus (SaCas9, but not from the more routinely used Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9, and in vitro-transcribed single guide RNAs (sgRNAs results in rapid gene edits in T. cruzi and other kinetoplastids at frequencies approaching 100%. The highly efficient genome editing via SaCas9/sgRNA RNPs was obtained for both reporter and endogenous genes and observed in multiple parasite life cycle stages in various strains of T. cruzi, as well as in T. brucei and Leishmania major. RNP complex delivery was also used to successfully tag proteins at endogenous loci and to assess the biological functions of essential genes. Thus, the use of SaCas9 RNP complexes for gene editing in kinetoplastids provides a simple, rapid, and cloning- and selection-free method to assess gene function in these important human pathogens.

  4. Enzootic transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi and T. rangeli in the Federal District of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Ramalho, Eduardo Dias; Duarte, Marco Antônio; Palma, Alexandre Ramlo Torre; Abad-Franch, Fernando; Carranza, Julio Cesar; Cuba Cuba, César Augusto

    2004-01-01

    The Federal District of Brazil (DF) lies within the Cerrado biome, where open shrubland (savannas) is interspersed with riverside gallery forests and permanent swamps (veredas). Trypanosoma cruzi-infected native triatomines occur in the area, but the enzootic transmission of trypanosomatids remains poorly characterized. A parasitological survey involving sylvatic triatomines (166 Rhodnius neglectus collected from Mauritia flexuosa palms) and small mammals (98 marsupials and 70 rodents, totaling 18 species) was conducted in 18 sites (mainly gallery forests and veredas) of the DF. Parasites were isolated, morphologically identified, and characterized by PCR of nuclear (mini-exon gene) and kinetoplast DNA (kDNA). Six R. neglectus, seven Didelphis albiventris and one Akodon cursor were infected by trypanosomes; wild reservoir infection is documented for the first time in the DF. kDNA PCR detected T. cruzi in five R. neglectus and mini-exon gene PCR revealed T. cruzi I in isolates from D. albiventris. Parasites infecting one bug yielded T. rangeli KP1+ kDNA amplicons. In spite of the occurrence of T. cruzi-infected D. albiventris (an important wild and peridomestic reservoir) and R. neglectus (a secondary vector displaying synanthropic behavior), a low-risk of human Chagas disease transmission could be expected in the DF, considering the low prevalence infection recorded in this work. The detection of T. rangeli KP1+ associated with R. neglectus in the DF widens the known range of this parasite in Brazil and reinforces the hypothesis of adaptation of T. rangeli populations (KP1+ and KP1-) to distinct evolutionary Rhodnius lineages.

  5. Structural and thermodynamic basis of the inhibition of Leishmania major farnesyl diphosphate synthase by nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aripirala, Srinivas [Johns Hopkins University, 725 North Wolfe Street WBSB 605, Baltimore, MD 21210 (United States); Gonzalez-Pacanowska, Dolores [López-Neyra Institute of Parasitology and Biomedicine, 18001 Granada (Spain); Oldfield, Eric [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Kaiser, Marcel [University of Basel, Petersplatz 1, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland); Amzel, L. Mario, E-mail: mamzel@jhmi.edu [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 725 N. Wolfe Street WBSB 604, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Gabelli, Sandra B., E-mail: mamzel@jhmi.edu [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 725 N. Wolfe Street WBSB 604, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Johns Hopkins University, 725 North Wolfe Street WBSB 605, Baltimore, MD 21210 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Structural insights into L. major farnesyl diphosphate synthase, a key enzyme in the mevalonate pathway, are described. Farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS) is an essential enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of sterols (cholesterol in humans and ergosterol in yeasts, fungi and trypanosomatid parasites) as well as in protein prenylation. It is inhibited by bisphosphonates, a class of drugs used in humans to treat diverse bone-related diseases. The development of bisphosphonates as antiparasitic compounds targeting ergosterol biosynthesis has become an important route for therapeutic intervention. Here, the X-ray crystallographic structures of complexes of FPPS from Leishmania major (the causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis) with three bisphosphonates determined at resolutions of 1.8, 1.9 and 2.3 Å are reported. Two of the inhibitors, 1-(2-hydroxy-2,2-diphosphonoethyl)-3-phenylpyridinium (300B) and 3-butyl-1-(2,2-diphosphonoethyl)pyridinium (476A), co-crystallize with the homoallylic substrate isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and three Ca{sup 2+} ions. A third inhibitor, 3-fluoro-1-(2-hydroxy-2,2-diphosphonoethyl)pyridinium (46I), was found to bind two Mg{sup 2+} ions but not IPP. Calorimetric studies showed that binding of the inhibitors is entropically driven. Comparison of the structures of L. major FPPS (LmFPPS) and human FPPS provides new information for the design of bisphosphonates that will be more specific for inhibition of LmFPPS. The asymmetric structure of the LmFPPS–46I homodimer indicates that binding of the allylic substrate to both monomers of the dimer results in an asymmetric dimer with one open and one closed homoallylic site. It is proposed that IPP first binds to the open site, which then closes, opening the site on the other monomer, which closes after binding the second IPP, leading to the symmetric fully occupied FPPS dimer observed in other structures.

  6. SOLiD™ sequencing of genomes of clinical isolates of Leishmania donovani from India confirm leptomonas co-infection and raise some key questions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeloo Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Known as 'neglected disease' because relatively little effort has been applied to finding cures, leishmaniasis kills more than 150,000 people every year and debilitates millions more. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL, also called Kala Azar (KA or black fever in India, claims around 20,000 lives every year. Whole genome analysis presents an excellent means to identify new targets for drugs, vaccine and diagnostics development, and also provide an avenue into the biological basis of parasite virulence in the L. donovani complex prevalent in India. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In our presently described study, the next generation SOLiD™ platform was successfully utilized for the first time to carry out whole genome sequencing of L. donovani clinical isolates from India. We report the exceptional occurrence of insect trypanosomatids in clinical cases of visceral leishmaniasis (Kala Azar patients in India. We confirm with whole genome sequencing analysis data that isolates which were sequenced from Kala Azar (visceral leishmaniasis cases were genetically related to Leptomonas. The co-infection in splenic aspirate of these patients with a species of Leptomonas and how likely is it that the infection might be pathogenic, are key questions which need to be investigated. We discuss our results in the context of some important probable hypothesis in this article. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our intriguing results of unusual cases of Kala Azar found to be most similar to Leptomonas species put forth important clinical implications for the treatment of Kala Azar in India. Leptomonas have been shown to be highly susceptible to several standard leishmaniacides in vitro. There is very little divergence among these two species viz. Leishmania sp. and L. seymouri, in terms of genomic sequence and organization. A more extensive perception of the phenomenon of co-infection needs to be addressed from molecular pathogenesis and eco

  7. Mechanism of Action of Miltefosine on Leishmania donovani Involves the Impairment of Acidocalcisome Function and the Activation of the Sphingosine-Dependent Plasma Membrane Ca2+Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Martinez, Andrea K; Rodriguez-Durán, Jessica; Serrano-Martin, Xenon; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Vanessa; Benaim, Gustavo

    2018-01-01

    Leishmania donovani is the causing agent of visceral leishmaniasis, a common infection that affects millions of people from the most underdeveloped countries. Miltefosine is the only oral drug to treat infections caused by L. donovani Nevertheless, its mechanism of action is not well understood. While miltefosine inhibits the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine and also affects the parasite mitochondrion, inhibiting the cytochrome c oxidase, it is to be expected that this potent drug also produces its effect through other targets. In this context, it has been reported that the disruption of the intracellular Ca 2+ homeostasis represents an important object for the action of drugs in trypanosomatids. Recently, we have described a plasma membrane Ca 2+ channel in Leishmania mexicana , which is similar to the L-type voltage-gated Ca 2+ channel (VGCC) present in humans. Remarkably, the parasite Ca 2+ channel is activated by sphingosine, while the L-type VGCC is not affected by this sphingolipid. In the present work we demonstrated that, similarly to sphingosine, miltefosine is able to activate the plasma membrane Ca 2+ channel from L. donovani Interestingly, nifedipine, the classical antagonist of the human channel, was not able to fully block the parasite plasma membrane Ca 2+ channel, indicating that the mechanism of interaction is not identical to that of sphingosine. In this work we also show that miltefosine is able to strongly affect the acidocalcisomes from L. donovani , inducing the rapid alkalinization of these important organelles. In conclusion, we demonstrate two new mechanisms of action of miltefosine in L. donovani , both related to disruption of parasite Ca 2+ homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Discovery of novel inhibitors for Leishmania nucleoside diphosphatase kinase (NDK) based on its structural and functional characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Arjun K.; Singh, Nidhi; Agnihotri, Pragati; Mishra, Shikha; Singh, Saurabh P.; Kolli, Bala K.; Chang, Kwang Poo; Sahasrabuddhe, Amogh A.; Siddiqi, M. I.; Pratap, J. Venkatesh

    2017-06-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDKs) are ubiquitous enzymes that catalyze the transfer of the γ-phosphate moiety from an NTP donor to an NDP acceptor, crucial for maintaining the cellular level of nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs). The inability of trypanosomatids to synthesize purines de novo and their dependence on the salvage pathway makes NDK an attractive target to develop drugs for the diseases they cause. Here we report the discovery of novel inhibitors for Leishmania NDK based on the structural and functional characterization of purified recombinant NDK from Leishmania amazonensis. Recombinant LaNDK possesses auto-phosphorylation, phosphotransferase and kinase activities with Histidine 117 playing an essential role. LaNDK crystals were grown by hanging drop vapour diffusion method in a solution containing 18% PEG-MME 500, 100 mM Bis-Tris propane pH 6.0 and 50 mM MgCl2. It belongs to the hexagonal space group P6322 with unit cell parameters a = b = 115.18, c = 62.18 Å and α = β = 90°, γ = 120°. The structure solved by molecular replacement methods was refined to crystallographic R-factor and Rfree values of 22.54 and 26.52%, respectively. Molecular docking and dynamics simulation -based virtual screening identified putative binding compounds. Protein inhibition studies of selected hits identified five inhibitors effective at micromolar concentrations. One of the compounds showed 45% inhibition of Leishmania promastigotes proliferation. Analysis of inhibitor-NDK complexes reveals the mode of their binding, facilitating design of new compounds for optimization of activities as drugs against leishmaniasis.

  9. Crystal Structures of Trypanosoma cruzi UDP-Galactopyranose Mutase Implicate Flexibility of the Histidine Loop in Enzyme Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhatwalia, Richa; Singh, Harkewal; Oppenheimer, Michelle; Sobrado, Pablo; Tanner, John J. (Virginia Tech); (UMC)

    2012-11-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Here we report crystal structures of the galactofuranose biosynthetic enzyme UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM) from T. cruzi, which are the first structures of this enzyme from a protozoan parasite. UGM is an attractive target for drug design because galactofuranose is absent in humans but is an essential component of key glycoproteins and glycolipids in trypanosomatids. Analysis of the enzyme-UDP noncovalent interactions and sequence alignments suggests that substrate recognition is exquisitely conserved among eukaryotic UGMs and distinct from that of bacterial UGMs. This observation has implications for inhibitor design. Activation of the enzyme via reduction of the FAD induces profound conformational changes, including a 2.3 {angstrom} movement of the histidine loop (Gly60-Gly61-His62), rotation and protonation of the imidazole of His62, and cooperative movement of residues located on the si face of the FAD. Interestingly, these changes are substantially different from those described for Aspergillus fumigatus UGM, which is 45% identical to T. cruzi UGM. The importance of Gly61 and His62 for enzymatic activity was studied with the site-directed mutant enzymes G61A, G61P, and H62A. These mutations lower the catalytic efficiency by factors of 10-50, primarily by decreasing k{sub cat}. Considered together, the structural, kinetic, and sequence data suggest that the middle Gly of the histidine loop imparts flexibility that is essential for activation of eukaryotic UGMs. Our results provide new information about UGM biochemistry and suggest a unified strategy for designing inhibitors of UGMs from the eukaryotic pathogens.

  10. In silico molecular docking studies of new potential 4-phthalazinyl-hydrazones on selected Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania enzyme targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Angel H; López, Simón E

    2017-09-01

    Recently, a series of 4-phthalazinyl-hydrazones under its E-configuration have exhibited excellent in vitro antichagasic and antileishmanial profiles. Preliminary assays on both parasites suggested that the most active derivatives act through oxidative and nitrosative stress mechanisms; however, their exact mode of actions as anti-trypanosomal and anti-leishmanial agents have not been completely elucidated. This motivated to perform a molecular docking study on essential trypanosomatid enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), trypanothione reductase (TryR), cysteine-protease (CP) and pteridine reductase 1 (PTR1). In addition, to understand the experimental results of nitric oxide production obtained for infected macrophages with Leishmania parasite, a molecular docking was evaluated on nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) enzyme of Rattus norvegicus. Both diastereomers (E and Z) of the 4-phthalazinyl-hydrazones were docked on the mentioned targets. In general, molecular docking on T. cruzi enzymes revealed that the E-diastereomers exhibited lower binding energies than Z-diastereomers on the Fe-SOD and CP enzymes, while Z-diastereomers showed lower docking energies than E-isomers on TryR enzyme. For the Leishmania docking studies, the Z-isomers exhibited the best binding affinities on the PTR1 and iNOS enzymes, while the TryR enzyme showed a minor dependence with the stereoselectivity of the tested phthalazines. However, either the structural information of the ligand-enzyme complexes or the experimental data suggest that the significant antitrypanosomatid activity of the most active derivatives is not associated to the inhibition of the SOD, CP and PTR1 enzymes, while the TryR inhibition and nitric oxide generation in host cells emerge as interesting antitrypanosomatid therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Selection of binding targets in parasites using phage-display and aptamer libraries in vivo and in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Rosito Tonelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasite infections are largely dependent on interactions between pathogen and different host cell populations to guarantee a successful infectious process. This is particularly true for obligatory intracellular parasites as Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, Leishmania, to name a few. Adhesion to and entry into the cell are essential steps requiring specific parasite and host cell molecules. The large amount of possible involved molecules poses additional difficulties for their identification by the classical biochemical approaches. In this respect, the search for alternative techniques should be pursued. Among them two powerful methodologies can be employed, both relying upon the construction of highly diverse combinatorial libraries of peptides or oligonucleotides that randomly bind with high affinity to targets on the cell surface and are selectively displaced by putative ligands. These are, respectively, the peptide-based phage display and the oligonucleotide-based aptamer techniques.The phage display technique has been extensively employed for the identification of novel ligands in vitro and in vivo in different areas such as cancer, vaccine development and epitope mapping. Particularly, phage display has been employed in the investigation of pathogen-host interactions. Although this methodology has been used for some parasites with encouraging results, in trypanosomatids its use is, as yet, scanty. RNA and DNA aptamers, developed by the SELEX process (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment, were described over two decades ago and since then contributed to a large number of structured nucleic acids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes or for the understanding of the cell biology. Similarly to the phage display technique scarce use of the SELEX process has been used in the probing of parasite-host interaction.In this review, an overall survey on the use of both phage display and aptamer technologies in different pathogenic

  12. Phytomonas serpens: cysteine peptidase inhibitors interfere with growth, ultrastructure and host adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, André L S; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Dias, Felipe A; Ribeiro, Rachel O; Pereira, Fernanda M; Elias, Camila G R; Souto-Padrón, Thaïs; Lopes, Angela H C S; Alviano, Celuta S; Branquinha, Marta H; Soares, Rosangela M A

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we report the ultrastructural and growth alterations caused by cysteine peptidase inhibitors on the plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens. We showed that the cysteine peptidase inhibitors at 10 microM were able to arrest cellular growth as well as promote alterations in the cell morphology, including the parasites becoming short and round. Additionally, iodoacetamide induced ultrastructural alterations, such as disintegration of cytoplasmic organelles, swelling of the nucleus and kinetoplast-mitochondrion complex, which culminated in parasite death. Leupeptin and antipain induced the appearance of microvillar extensions and blebs on the cytoplasmic membrane, resembling a shedding process. A 40 kDa cysteine peptidase was detected in hydrophobic and hydrophilic phases of P. serpens cells after Triton X-114 extraction. Additionally, we have shown through immunoblotting that anti-cruzipain polyclonal antibodies recognised two major polypeptides in P. serpens, including a 40 kDa component. Flow cytometry analysis confirmed that this cruzipain-like protein has a location on the cell surface. Ultrastructural immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated the presence of the cruzipain-like protein on the surface and in small membrane fragments released from leupeptin-treated parasites. Furthermore, the involvement of cysteine peptidases of P. serpens in the interaction with explanted salivary glands of the phytophagous insect Oncopeltus fasciatus was also investigated. When P. serpens cells were pre-treated with either cysteine peptidase inhibitors or anti-cruzipain antibody, a significant reduction of the interaction process was observed. Collectively, these results suggest that cysteine peptidases participate in several biological processes in P. serpens including cell growth and interaction with the invertebrate vector.

  13. Evidence that a laminin-like insect protein mediates early events in the interaction of a Phytoparasite with its vector's salivary gland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe de Almeida Dias

    Full Text Available Phytomonas species are plant parasites of the family Trypanosomatidae, which are transmitted by phytophagous insects. Some Phytomonas species cause major agricultural damages. The hemipteran Oncopeltus fasciatus is natural and experimental host for several species of trypanosomatids, including Phytomonas spp. The invasion of the insect vectors' salivary glands is one of the most important events for the life cycle of Phytomonas species. In the present study, we show the binding of Phytomonas serpens at the external face of O. fasciatus salivary glands by means of scanning electron microscopy and the in vitro interaction of living parasites with total proteins from the salivary glands in ligand blotting assays. This binding occurs primarily through an interaction with a 130 kDa salivary gland protein. The mass spectrometry of the trypsin-digest of this protein matched 23% of human laminin-5 β3 chain precursor sequence by 16 digested peptides. A protein sequence search through the transcriptome of O. fasciatus embryo showed a partial sequence with 51% similarity to human laminin β3 subunit. Anti-human laminin-5 β3 chain polyclonal antibodies recognized the 130 kDa protein by immunoblotting. The association of parasites with the salivary glands was strongly inhibited by human laminin-5, by the purified 130 kDa insect protein, and by polyclonal antibodies raised against the human laminin-5 β3 chain. This is the first report demonstrating that a laminin-like molecule from the salivary gland of O. fasciatus acts as a receptor for Phytomonas binding. The results presented in this investigation are important findings that will support further studies that aim at developing new approaches to prevent the transmission of Phytomonas species from insects to plants and vice-versa.

  14. Evidence That a Laminin-Like Insect Protein Mediates Early Events in the Interaction of a Phytoparasite with Its Vector's Salivary Gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Felipe de Almeida; dos Santos, Andre Luis Souza; Lery, Letícia Miranda Santos; Alves e Silva, Thiago Luiz; Oliveira, Mauricio Martins; Bisch, Paulo Mascarello; Saraiva, Elvira Maria; Souto-Padrón, Thaïs Cristina; Lopes, Angela Hampshire

    2012-01-01

    Phytomonas species are plant parasites of the family Trypanosomatidae, which are transmitted by phytophagous insects. Some Phytomonas species cause major agricultural damages. The hemipteran Oncopeltus fasciatus is natural and experimental host for several species of trypanosomatids, including Phytomonas spp. The invasion of the insect vectors' salivary glands is one of the most important events for the life cycle of Phytomonas species. In the present study, we show the binding of Phytomonas serpens at the external face of O. fasciatus salivary glands by means of scanning electron microscopy and the in vitro interaction of living parasites with total proteins from the salivary glands in ligand blotting assays. This binding occurs primarily through an interaction with a 130 kDa salivary gland protein. The mass spectrometry of the trypsin-digest of this protein matched 23% of human laminin-5 β3 chain precursor sequence by 16 digested peptides. A protein sequence search through the transcriptome of O. fasciatus embryo showed a partial sequence with 51% similarity to human laminin β3 subunit. Anti-human laminin-5 β3 chain polyclonal antibodies recognized the 130 kDa protein by immunoblotting. The association of parasites with the salivary glands was strongly inhibited by human laminin-5, by the purified 130 kDa insect protein, and by polyclonal antibodies raised against the human laminin-5 β3 chain. This is the first report demonstrating that a laminin-like molecule from the salivary gland of O. fasciatus acts as a receptor for Phytomonas binding. The results presented in this investigation are important findings that will support further studies that aim at developing new approaches to prevent the transmission of Phytomonas species from insects to plants and vice-versa. PMID:23118944

  15. Comparative genomics reveals two novel RNAi factors in Trypanosoma brucei and provides insight into the core machinery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca L Barnes

    Full Text Available The introduction ten years ago of RNA interference (RNAi as a tool for molecular exploration in Trypanosoma brucei has led to a surge in our understanding of the pathogenesis and biology of this human parasite. In particular, a genome-wide RNAi screen has recently been combined with next-generation Illumina sequencing to expose catalogues of genes associated with loss of fitness in distinct developmental stages. At present, this technology is restricted to RNAi-positive protozoan parasites, which excludes T. cruzi, Leishmania major, and Plasmodium falciparum. Therefore, elucidating the mechanism of RNAi and identifying the essential components of the pathway is fundamental for improving RNAi efficiency in T. brucei and for transferring the RNAi tool to RNAi-deficient pathogens. Here we used comparative genomics of RNAi-positive and -negative trypanosomatid protozoans to identify the repertoire of factors in T. brucei. In addition to the previously characterized Argonaute 1 (AGO1 protein and the cytoplasmic and nuclear Dicers, TbDCL1 and TbDCL2, respectively, we identified the RNA Interference Factors 4 and 5 (TbRIF4 and TbRIF5. TbRIF4 is a 3'-5' exonuclease of the DnaQ superfamily and plays a critical role in the conversion of duplex siRNAs to the single-stranded form, thus generating a TbAGO1-siRNA complex required for target-specific cleavage. TbRIF5 is essential for cytoplasmic RNAi and appears to act as a TbDCL1 cofactor. The availability of the core RNAi machinery in T. brucei provides a platform to gain mechanistic insights in this ancient eukaryote and to identify the minimal set of components required to reconstitute RNAi in RNAi-deficient parasites.

  16. The trypanosome transcriptome is remodelled during differentiation but displays limited responsiveness within life stages

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    Sergeenko Tatiana

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trypanosomatids utilise polycistronic transcription for production of the vast majority of protein-coding mRNAs, which operates in the absence of gene-specific promoters. Resolution of nascent transcripts by polyadenylation and trans-splicing, together with specific rates of mRNA turnover, serve to generate steady state transcript levels that can differ in abundance across several orders of magnitude and can be developmentally regulated. We used a targeted oligonucleotide microarray, representing the strongly developmentally-regulated T. brucei membrane trafficking system and ~10% of the Trypanosoma brucei genome, to investigate both between-stage, or differentiation-dependent, transcriptome changes and within-stage flexibility in response to various challenges. Results 6% of the gene cohort are developmentally regulated, including several small GTPases, SNAREs, vesicle coat factors and protein kinases both consistent with and extending previous data. Therefore substantial differentiation-dependent remodeling of the trypanosome transcriptome is associated with membrane transport. Both the microarray and qRT-PCR were then used to analyse transcriptome changes resulting from specific gene over-expression, knockdown, altered culture conditions and chemical stress. Firstly, manipulation of Rab5 expression results in co-ordinate changes to clathrin protein expression levels and endocytotic activity, but no detectable changes to steady-state mRNA levels, which indicates that the effect is mediated post-transcriptionally. Secondly, knockdown of clathrin or the variant surface glycoprotein failed to perturb transcription. Thirdly, exposure to dithiothreitol or tunicamycin revealed no evidence for a classical unfolded protein response, mediated in higher eukaryotes by transcriptional changes. Finally, altered serum levels invoked little transcriptome alteration beyond changes to expression of ESAG6/7, the transferrin receptor

  17. Effects of a marine serine protease inhibitor on viability and morphology of Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Nogueira, Natália Pereira; Morgado-Díaz, José Andrés; Menna-Barreto, Rubem Figueiredo Sadok; Paes, Marcia Cristina; da Silva-López, Raquel Elisa

    2013-10-01

    It has been reported that serine peptidase activities of Trypanosoma cruzi play crucial roles in parasite dissemination and host cell invasion and therefore their inhibition could affect the progress of Chagas disease. The present study investigates the interference of the Stichodactyla helianthus Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor (ShPI-I), a 55-amino acid peptide, in T. cruzi serine peptidase activities, parasite viability, and parasite morphology. The effect of this peptide was also studied in Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes and it was proved to be a powerful inhibitor of serine proteases activities and the parasite viability. The ultrastructural alterations caused by ShPI-I included vesiculation of the flagellar pocket membrane and the appearance of a cytoplasmic vesicle that resembles an autophagic vacuole. ShPI-I, which showed itself to be an important T. cruzi serine peptidase inhibitor, reduced the parasite viability, in a dose and time dependent manner. The maximum effect of peptide on T. cruzi viability was observed when ShPI-I at 1×10(-5)M was incubated for 24 and 48h which killed completely both metacyclic trypomastigote and epimastigote forms. At 1×10(-6)M ShPI-I, in the same periods of time, reduced parasite viability about 91-95% respectively. Ultrastructural analysis demonstrated the formation of concentric membranar structures especially in the cytosol, involving organelles and small vesicles. Profiles of endoplasmic reticulum were also detected, surrounding cytosolic vesicles that resembled autophagic vacuoles. These results suggest that serine peptidases are important in T. cruzi physiology since the inhibition of their activity killed parasites in vitro as well as inducing important morphological alterations. Protease inhibitors thus appear to have a potential role as anti-trypanosomatidal agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Host cell poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase is crucial for Trypanosoma cruzi infection cycle.

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    Salomé C Vilchez Larrea

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, etiological agent of Chagas' disease, has a complex life cycle which involves the invasion of mammalian host cells, differentiation and intracellular replication. Here we report the first insights into the biological role of a poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase in a trypanosomatid (TcPARG. In silico analysis of the TcPARG gene pointed out the conservation of key residues involved in the catalytic process and, by Western blot, we demonstrated that it is expressed in a life stage-dependant manner. Indirect immunofluorescence assays and electron microscopy using an anti-TcPARG antibody showed that this enzyme is localized in the nucleus independently of the presence of DNA damage or cell cycle stage. The addition of poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase inhibitors ADP-HPD (adenosine diphosphate (hydroxymethyl pyrrolidinediol or DEA (6,9-diamino-2-ethoxyacridine lactate monohydrate to the culture media, both at a 1 µM concentration, reduced in vitro epimastigote growth by 35% and 37% respectively, when compared to control cultures. We also showed that ADP-HPD 1 µM can lead to an alteration in the progression of the cell cycle in hydroxyurea synchronized cultures of T. cruzi epimastigotes. Outstandingly, here we demonstrate that the lack of poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase activity in Vero and A549 host cells, achieved by chemical inhibition or iRNA, produces the reduction of the percentage of infected cells as well as the number of amastigotes per cell and trypomastigotes released, leading to a nearly complete abrogation of the infection process. We conclude that both, T. cruzi and the host, poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase activities are important players in the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, emerging as a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of Chagas' disease.

  19. Leishmanolysin-like molecules in Herpetomonas samuelpessoai mediate hydrolysis of protein substrates and interaction with insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Fernanda M; Dias, Felipe A; Elias, Camila G R; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Silva, Cristina S; Santos-Mallet, Jacenir R; Branquinha, Marta H; Santos, André L S

    2010-10-01

    Herpetomonas samuelpessoai, an insect trypanosomatid, produces a 63-kDa metallopeptidase that has similar biochemical/immunological properties to Leishmania leishmanolysin, a virulence factor that participates in different stages of the parasite life cycle. Herein, we described some biochemical characteristics of the major surface metallopeptidase of H. samuelpessoai that led us to infer some probable functions for this peptidase during the parasite-invertebrate interaction. Gelatin-SDS-PAGE, flow cytometry and confocal fluorescence microscopy provided measurements for the relative levels of surface leishmanolysin-like molecules in H. samuelpessoai. Immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated the presence of leishmanolysin-like molecules on the surface and cytoplasm of the parasite. The surface metallopeptidase was active at a broad spectrum of pH and temperature, showing maximum activity at pH 6.0 at 37 degrees C, and an ability to degrade albumin, hemoglobin, IgG, mucin, casein and gut proteins obtained from Aedes aegypti. This wide substrate utilization might support parasite growth and development. Curiously, H. samuelpessoai cells were able to colonize A. aegypti guts. In an effort to implicate a possible role for the metallopeptidase from H. samuelpessoai, living parasites were treated with different compounds before the interaction with gut cells. The pre-incubation with metallopeptidase inhibitors, phospholipase C or anti-leishmanolysin antibodies promoted a significant reduction in the interaction with guts. Similarly, the pre-treatment of gut cells with purified leishmanolysin-like protein drastically diminished the adhesion process. Furthermore, the expression of surface leishmanolysin in H. samuelpessoai cells was drastically enhanced after passage in A. aegypti. These results suggest the participation of homologues of leishmanolysin in the interaction of H. samuelpessoai with the invertebrate vector. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An Atypical Mitochondrial Carrier That Mediates Drug Action in Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Juan P de Macêdo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Elucidating the mechanism of action of trypanocidal compounds is an important step in the development of more efficient drugs against Trypanosoma brucei. In a screening approach using an RNAi library in T. brucei bloodstream forms, we identified a member of the mitochondrial carrier family, TbMCP14, as a prime candidate mediating the action of a group of anti-parasitic choline analogs. Depletion of TbMCP14 by inducible RNAi in both bloodstream and procyclic forms increased resistance of parasites towards the compounds by 7-fold and 3-fold, respectively, compared to uninduced cells. In addition, down-regulation of TbMCP14 protected bloodstream form mitochondria from a drug-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. Conversely, over-expression of the carrier in procyclic forms increased parasite susceptibility more than 13-fold. Metabolomic analyses of parasites over-expressing TbMCP14 showed increased levels of the proline metabolite, pyrroline-5-carboxylate, suggesting a possible involvement of TbMCP14 in energy production. The generation of TbMCP14 knock-out parasites showed that the carrier is not essential for survival of T. brucei bloodstream forms, but reduced parasite proliferation under standard culture conditions. In contrast, depletion of TbMCP14 in procyclic forms resulted in growth arrest, followed by parasite death. The time point at which parasite proliferation stopped was dependent on the major energy source, i.e. glucose versus proline, in the culture medium. Together with our findings that proline-dependent ATP production in crude mitochondria from TbMCP14-depleted trypanosomes was reduced compared to control mitochondria, the study demonstrates that TbMCP14 is involved in energy production in T. brucei. Since TbMCP14 belongs to a trypanosomatid-specific clade of mitochondrial carrier family proteins showing very poor similarity to mitochondrial carriers of mammals, it may represent an interesting target for drug

  1. Structure determination of glycogen synthase kinase-3 from Leishmania major and comparative inhibitor structure-activity relationships with Trypanosoma brucei GSK-3

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    Ojo, Kayode K; Arakaki, Tracy L; Napuli, Alberto J; Inampudi, Krishna K; Keyloun, Katelyn R; Zhang, Li; Hol, Wim G.J.; Verlind, Christophe L.M.J.; Merritt, Ethan A; Van Voorhis, Wesley C [UWASH

    2012-04-24

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is a drug target under intense investigation in pharmaceutical companies and constitutes an attractive piggyback target for eukaryotic pathogens. Two different GSKs are found in trypanosomatids, one about 150 residues shorter than the other. GSK-3 short (GeneDB: Tb927.10.13780) has previously been validated genetically as a drug target in Trypanosoma brucei by RNAi induced growth retardation; and chemically by correlation between enzyme and in vitro growth inhibition. Here, we report investigation of the equivalent GSK-3 short enzymes of L. major (LmjF18.0270) and L. infantum (LinJ18_V3.0270, identical in amino acid sequences to LdonGSK-3 short) and a crystal structure of LmajGSK-3 short at 2 Å resolution. The inhibitor structure-activity relationships (SARs) of L. major and L. infantum are virtually identical, suggesting that inhibitors could be useful for both cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis. Leishmania spp. GSK-3 short has different inhibitor SARs than TbruGSK-3 short, which can be explained mostly by two variant residues in the ATP-binding pocket. Indeed, mutating these residues in the ATP-binding site of LmajGSK-3 short to the TbruGSK-3 short equivalents results in a mutant LmajGSK-3 short enzyme with SAR more similar to that of TbruGSK-3 short. The differences between human GSK-3β (HsGSK-3β) and LmajGSK-3 short SAR suggest that compounds which selectively inhibit LmajGSK-3 short may be found.

  2. Amastin Knockdown in Leishmania braziliensis Affects Parasite-Macrophage Interaction and Results in Impaired Viability of Intracellular Amastigotes.

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    Rita Marcia Cardoso de Paiva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis, a human parasitic disease with manifestations ranging from cutaneous ulcerations to fatal visceral infection, is caused by several Leishmania species. These protozoan parasites replicate as extracellular, flagellated promastigotes in the gut of a sandfly vector and as amastigotes inside the parasitophorous vacuole of vertebrate host macrophages. Amastins are surface glycoproteins encoded by large gene families present in the genomes of several trypanosomatids and highly expressed in the intracellular amastigote stages of Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania spp. Here, we showed that the genome of L. braziliensis contains 52 amastin genes belonging to all four previously described amastin subfamilies and that the expression of members of all subfamilies is upregulated in L. braziliensis amastigotes. Although primary sequence alignments showed no homology to any known protein sequence, homology searches based on secondary structure predictions indicate that amastins are related to claudins, a group of proteins that are components of eukaryotic tight junction complexes. By knocking-down the expression of δ-amastins in L. braziliensis, their essential role during infection became evident. δ-amastin knockdown parasites showed impaired growth after in vitro infection of mouse macrophages and completely failed to produce infection when inoculated in BALB/c mice, an attenuated phenotype that was reverted by the re-expression of an RNAi-resistant amastin gene. Further highlighting their essential role in host-parasite interactions, electron microscopy analyses of macrophages infected with amastin knockdown parasites showed significant alterations in the tight contact that is normally observed between the surface of wild type amastigotes and the membrane of the parasitophorous vacuole.

  3. Thrichomys laurentius (Rodentia; Echimyidae as a putative reservoir of Leishmania infantum and L. braziliensis: patterns of experimental infection.

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    André Luiz Rodrigues Roque

    Full Text Available The importance of the genus Thrichomys in the retention of infection and transmission of Leishmania species is supported by previous studies that describe an ancient interaction between caviomorphs and trypanosomatids and report the natural infection of Thrichomys spp. Moreover, these rodents are widely dispersed in Brazil and recognized as important hosts of other tripanosomatids. Our main purpose was to evaluate the putative role of Thrichomys laurentius in the retention of infection and amplification of the transmission cycle of Leishmania infantum and L. braziliensis. Male and female T. laurentius (n = 24 born in captivity were evaluated for the retention of infection with these Leishmania species and followed up by parasitological, serological, hematological, biochemical, histological, and molecular assays for 3, 6, 9, or 12 months post infection (mpi. T. laurentius showed its competence as maintenance host for the two inoculated Leishmania species. Four aspects should be highlighted: (i re-isolation of parasites 12 mpi; (ii the low parasitic burden displayed by T. laurentius tissues; (iii the early onset and maintenance of humoral response, and (iv the similar pattern of infection by the two Leishmania species. Both Leishmania species demonstrated the ability to invade and maintain itself in viscera and skin of T. laurentius, and no rodent displayed any lesion, histological changes, or clinical evidence of infection. We also wish to point out the irrelevance of the adjective dermotropic or viscerotropic to qualify L. braziliensis and L. infantum, respectively, when these species are hosted by nonhuman hosts. Our data suggest that T. laurentius may act at least as a maintenance host of both tested Leishmania species since it maintained long-lasting infections. Moreover, it cannot be discarded that Leishmania spp. infection in free-ranging T. laurentius could result in higher parasite burden due the more stressing conditions in the wild

  4. Kinetic analysis of ex vivo human blood infection by Leishmania.

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    Inmaculada Moreno

    Full Text Available The leishmanioses, vector-borne diseases caused by the trypanosomatid protozoan Leishmania, are transmitted to susceptible mammals by infected phlebotomine sand flies that inoculate promastigotes into hemorrhagic pools created in host skin. We assumed that promastigotes are delivered to a blood pool, and analyzed early promastigote interactions (0-5 min with host components, which lead to parasite endocytosis by blood leukocytes, and to host infection. Promastigotes were incubated with NHS or with heparinized blood in near-physiological conditions, and we used cell radioimmunoassay and flow cytometry to measure the on-rate constants (k(+1 of promastigote interactions with natural opsonins and erythrocytes. We obtained quantitative data for parasitized cells to determine the time-course of promastigote binding and internalization by blood leukocytes. In these reactions, promastigotes bind natural opsonins, immune adhere to erythrocytes and activate complement cytolysis, which kills approximately 95% of promastigotes by 2 min post-infection. C3-promastigote binding is a key step in opsonization; nascent C3-promastigotes are the substrate for two simultaneous reactions, C3-promastigote immune adherence (IA to erythrocytes and complement-mediated promastigote killing. The k(+1 for IA was 75-fold greater than that for promastigote killing, showing that IA facilitates promastigote endocytosis and circumvents lysis. At 5 min post-infection, when reaction velocity is still linear and promastigote concentration is not limiting, 17.4% of granulocytes and 10.7% of monocytes had bound promastigotes, of which approximately 50% and approximately 25%, respectively, carried surface-bound (live or internalized (live and dead leishmanias. Of other leukocyte types, 8.5% of B cells bound but did not internalize promastigotes, and T cells, NK cells and CD209(+ dendritic cells did not bind parasites. These data show that, once in contact with blood, promastigote

  5. In vitro activity of 2-pyridinecarboxylic acid against trypanosomes of the subgenus Schizotrypanum isolated from the bat Phyllostomus hastatus = Atividade in vitro do ácido 2-piridinocarboxílico em tripanossoma do subgênero Schizotrypanum isolado do morcego Phyllostomus hastatus

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    Paulo Roberto Ceridóreo Corrêa

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of 2-pyridinecarboxylic acid (picolinic acid on trypanosomes of the subgenus Schizotrypanum isolated from the bat Phyllostomus hastatus was determined in this study. Picolinic acid, at 50 ƒÊg mL-1, inhibited epimastigote growth by 99% after 12 days incubation. In addition, trypomastigote motility decreased by 50% after 6h and completely after 24h in the presence of 50 ƒÊg mL-1 picolinic acid. The 50% cytotoxic concentration on HEp-2 cell line was275 ƒÊg mL-1 after 4 days incubation. Altogether, these results indicate higher toxicity against trypanosomes. The inhibitory effect of picolinic acid on epimastigote growth can be partially reversed by nicotinic acid and L-tryptophan, suggesting a competitive inhibition. Furthermore, two anti-Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum cruzi drugs were also evaluated with regard to bat trypanosome growth. Benznidazole, at 50 ƒÊg mL-1, inhibited epimastigote growth by 90% after 12 days incubation. Nifurtimox, at the same concentration, caused 96% growth inhibition after four days incubation. Corroborating a previous study, bat trypanosomes are a good model for screening new trypanocidal compounds. Moreover, they can be used to study many biological processes common to human pathogenic trypanosomatids.O efeito do acido 2- piridinocarboxilico (acido picolinico sobre um tripanossoma do subgenero Schizotrypanum isolado do morcego Phyllostomus hastatus foi determinado neste estudo. O acido picolinico, na concentracao de 50 ƒÊg mL-1, inibiu 99% do crescimento de epimastigotas apos 12 dias de incubacao. Alem disso, houve um decrescimo de 50 e 100% na mobilidade dos tripomastigotas apos 6 e 24h, respectivamente, em presenca de acido picolinico na concentracao de 50 ƒÊg mL-1. A concentracao citotoxica 50% para celulas HEp-2 foi de 275 ƒÊg mL-1 apos quatro dias de incubacao. Esses resultados indicam maior toxicidade contra os tripanossomas. O efeito inibitoriodo acido picolinico sobre o crescimento de

  6. U3 snoRNA genes are multi-copy and frequently linked to U5 snRNA genes in Euglena gracilis§

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    Charette J Michael

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background U3 snoRNA is a box C/D small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA involved in the processing events that liberate 18S rRNA from the ribosomal RNA precursor (pre-rRNA. Although U3 snoRNA is present in all eukaryotic organisms, most investigations of it have focused on fungi (particularly yeasts, animals and plants. Relatively little is known about U3 snoRNA and its gene(s in the phylogenetically broad assemblage of protists (mostly unicellular eukaryotes. In the euglenozoon Euglena gracilis, a distant relative of the kinetoplastid protozoa, Southern analysis had previously revealed at least 13 bands hybridizing with U3 snoRNA, suggesting the existence of multiple copies of U3 snoRNA genes. Results Through screening of a λ genomic library and PCR amplification, we recovered 14 U3 snoRNA gene variants, defined by sequence heterogeneities that are mostly located in the U3 3'-stem-loop domain. We identified three different genomic arrangements of Euglena U3 snoRNA genes: i stand-alone, ii linked to tRNAArg genes, and iii linked to a U5 snRNA gene. In arrangement ii, the U3 snoRNA gene is positioned upstream of two identical tRNAArg genes that are convergently transcribed relative to the U3 gene. This scenario is reminiscent of a U3 snoRNA-tRNA gene linkage previously described in trypanosomatids. We document here twelve different U3 snoRNA-U5 snRNA gene arrangements in Euglena; in each case, the U3 gene is linked to a downstream and convergently oriented U5 gene, with the intergenic region differing in length and sequence among the variants. Conclusion The multiple U3 snoRNA-U5 snRNA gene linkages, which cluster into distinct families based on sequence similarities within the intergenic spacer, presumably arose by genome, chromosome, and/or locus duplications. We discuss possible reasons for the existence of the unusually large number of U3 snoRNA genes in the Euglena genome. Variability in the signal intensities of the multiple Southern

  7. U3 snoRNA genes are multi-copy and frequently linked to U5 snRNA genes in Euglena gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charette, J Michael; Gray, Michael W

    2009-11-16

    U3 snoRNA is a box C/D small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) involved in the processing events that liberate 18S rRNA from the ribosomal RNA precursor (pre-rRNA). Although U3 snoRNA is present in all eukaryotic organisms, most investigations of it have focused on fungi (particularly yeasts), animals and plants. Relatively little is known about U3 snoRNA and its gene(s) in the phylogenetically broad assemblage of protists (mostly unicellular eukaryotes). In the euglenozoon Euglena gracilis, a distant relative of the kinetoplastid protozoa, Southern analysis had previously revealed at least 13 bands hybridizing with U3 snoRNA, suggesting the existence of multiple copies of U3 snoRNA genes. Through screening of a lambda genomic library and PCR amplification, we recovered 14 U3 snoRNA gene variants, defined by sequence heterogeneities that are mostly located in the U3 3'-stem-loop domain. We identified three different genomic arrangements of Euglena U3 snoRNA genes: i) stand-alone, ii) linked to tRNAArg genes, and iii) linked to a U5 snRNA gene. In arrangement ii), the U3 snoRNA gene is positioned upstream of two identical tRNAArg genes that are convergently transcribed relative to the U3 gene. This scenario is reminiscent of a U3 snoRNA-tRNA gene linkage previously described in trypanosomatids. We document here twelve different U3 snoRNA-U5 snRNA gene arrangements in Euglena; in each case, the U3 gene is linked to a downstream and convergently oriented U5 gene, with the intergenic region differing in length and sequence among the variants. The multiple U3 snoRNA-U5 snRNA gene linkages, which cluster into distinct families based on sequence similarities within the intergenic spacer, presumably arose by genome, chromosome, and/or locus duplications. We discuss possible reasons for the existence of the unusually large number of U3 snoRNA genes in the Euglena genome. Variability in the signal intensities of the multiple Southern hybridization bands raises the possibility that

  8. U3 snoRNA genes are multi-copy and frequently linked to U5 snRNA genes in Euglena gracilis§

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background U3 snoRNA is a box C/D small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) involved in the processing events that liberate 18S rRNA from the ribosomal RNA precursor (pre-rRNA). Although U3 snoRNA is present in all eukaryotic organisms, most investigations of it have focused on fungi (particularly yeasts), animals and plants. Relatively little is known about U3 snoRNA and its gene(s) in the phylogenetically broad assemblage of protists (mostly unicellular eukaryotes). In the euglenozoon Euglena gracilis, a distant relative of the kinetoplastid protozoa, Southern analysis had previously revealed at least 13 bands hybridizing with U3 snoRNA, suggesting the existence of multiple copies of U3 snoRNA genes. Results Through screening of a λ genomic library and PCR amplification, we recovered 14 U3 snoRNA gene variants, defined by sequence heterogeneities that are mostly located in the U3 3'-stem-loop domain. We identified three different genomic arrangements of Euglena U3 snoRNA genes: i) stand-alone, ii) linked to tRNAArg genes, and iii) linked to a U5 snRNA gene. In arrangement ii), the U3 snoRNA gene is positioned upstream of two identical tRNAArg genes that are convergently transcribed relative to the U3 gene. This scenario is reminiscent of a U3 snoRNA-tRNA gene linkage previously described in trypanosomatids. We document here twelve different U3 snoRNA-U5 snRNA gene arrangements in Euglena; in each case, the U3 gene is linked to a downstream and convergently oriented U5 gene, with the intergenic region differing in length and sequence among the variants. Conclusion The multiple U3 snoRNA-U5 snRNA gene linkages, which cluster into distinct families based on sequence similarities within the intergenic spacer, presumably arose by genome, chromosome, and/or locus duplications. We discuss possible reasons for the existence of the unusually large number of U3 snoRNA genes in the Euglena genome. Variability in the signal intensities of the multiple Southern hybridization bands raises

  9. Recombinant Salivary Proteins of Phlebotomus orientalis are Suitable Antigens to Measure Exposure of Domestic Animals to Sand Fly Bites.

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    Michal Sima

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Certain salivary proteins of phlebotomine sand flies injected into the host skin during blood-feeding are highly antigenic and elicit strong antibody-mediated immune responses in repeatedly-exposed hosts. These antibodies can be measured by enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assays (ELISAs using salivary gland homogenates (SGHs as the source of antigens and serve as a markers for exposure to biting sand flies. Large-scale screening for anti-sand fly saliva antibodies requires replacement of SGH with recombinant salivary proteins. In East Africa, Phlebotomus orientalis is the main vector of Leishmania donovani, a trypanosomatid parasite causing visceral leishmaniasis. We tested recombinant salivary proteins derived from Ph. orientalis saliva to study exposure of domestic animals to this sand fly species.Antigenic salivary proteins from Ph. orientalis were identified by immunoblot and mass spectrometry. Recombinant apyrase rPorSP15, yellow-related protein rPorSP24, ParSP25-like protein rPorSP65, D7-related protein rPorSP67, and antigen 5-related protein rPorSP76 were tested using ELISA with sera of domestic animals from L. donovani foci in Ethiopia where Ph. orientalis is present. Our results highlighted recombinant yellow-related protein rPorSP24 as the most promising antigen, displaying a high positive correlation coefficient as well as good sensitivity and specificity when compared to SGH. This recombinant protein was the most suitable one for testing sera of dogs, sheep, and goats. In addition, a different antigen, rPorSP65 was found efficacious for testing canine sera.Recombinant salivary proteins of Ph. orientalis, specifically rPorSP24, were shown to successfully substitute SGH in serological experiments to measure exposure of domestic animals to Ph. orientalis, the vector of L. donovani. The results suggest that rPorSP24 might be a suitable antigen for detecting anti-Ph. orientalis antibody-mediated reactions also in other host species.

  10. Recombinant Salivary Proteins of Phlebotomus orientalis are Suitable Antigens to Measure Exposure of Domestic Animals to Sand Fly Bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sima, Michal; Ferencova, Blanka; Warburg, Alon; Rohousova, Iva; Volf, Petr

    2016-03-01

    Certain salivary proteins of phlebotomine sand flies injected into the host skin during blood-feeding are highly antigenic and elicit strong antibody-mediated immune responses in repeatedly-exposed hosts. These antibodies can be measured by enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assays (ELISAs) using salivary gland homogenates (SGHs) as the source of antigens and serve as a markers for exposure to biting sand flies. Large-scale screening for anti-sand fly saliva antibodies requires replacement of SGH with recombinant salivary proteins. In East Africa, Phlebotomus orientalis is the main vector of Leishmania donovani, a trypanosomatid parasite causing visceral leishmaniasis. We tested recombinant salivary proteins derived from Ph. orientalis saliva to study exposure of domestic animals to this sand fly species. Antigenic salivary proteins from Ph. orientalis were identified by immunoblot and mass spectrometry. Recombinant apyrase rPorSP15, yellow-related protein rPorSP24, ParSP25-like protein rPorSP65, D7-related protein rPorSP67, and antigen 5-related protein rPorSP76 were tested using ELISA with sera of domestic animals from L. donovani foci in Ethiopia where Ph. orientalis is present. Our results highlighted recombinant yellow-related protein rPorSP24 as the most promising antigen, displaying a high positive correlation coefficient as well as good sensitivity and specificity when compared to SGH. This recombinant protein was the most suitable one for testing sera of dogs, sheep, and goats. In addition, a different antigen, rPorSP65 was found efficacious for testing canine sera. Recombinant salivary proteins of Ph. orientalis, specifically rPorSP24, were shown to successfully substitute SGH in serological experiments to measure exposure of domestic animals to Ph. orientalis, the vector of L. donovani. The results suggest that rPorSP24 might be a suitable antigen for detecting anti-Ph. orientalis antibody-mediated reactions also in other host species.

  11. Insight into the mechanism of action of temporin-SHa, a new broad-spectrum antiparasitic and antibacterial agent.

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    Zahid Raja

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are promising drugs to kill resistant pathogens. In contrast to bacteria, protozoan parasites, such as Leishmania, were little studied. Therefore, the antiparasitic mechanism of AMPs is still unclear. In this study, we sought to get further insight into this mechanism by focusing our attention on temporin-SHa (SHa, a small broad-spectrum AMP previously shown to be active against Leishmania infantum. To improve activity, we designed analogs of SHa and compared the antibacterial and antiparasitic mechanisms. [K3]SHa emerged as a highly potent compound active against a wide range of bacteria, yeasts/fungi, and trypanosomatids (Leishmania and Trypanosoma, with leishmanicidal intramacrophagic activity and efficiency toward antibiotic-resistant strains of S. aureus and antimony-resistant L. infantum. Multipassage resistance selection demonstrated that temporins-SH, particularly [K3]SHa, are not prone to induce resistance in Escherichia coli. Analysis of the mode of action revealed that bacterial and parasite killing occur through a similar membranolytic mechanism involving rapid membrane permeabilization and depolarization. This was confirmed by high-resolution imaging (atomic force microscopy and field emission gun-scanning electron microscopy. Multiple combined techniques (nuclear magnetic resonance, surface plasmon resonance, differential scanning calorimetry allowed us to detail peptide-membrane interactions. [K3]SHa was shown to interact selectively with anionic model membranes with a 4-fold higher affinity (KD = 3 x 10-8 M than SHa. The amphipathic α-helical peptide inserts in-plane in the hydrophobic lipid bilayer and disrupts the acyl chain packing via a detergent-like effect. Interestingly, cellular events, such as mitochondrial membrane depolarization or DNA fragmentation, were observed in L. infantum promastigotes after exposure to SHa and [K3]SHa at concentrations above IC50. Our results indicate that these

  12. TcTASV: a novel protein family in trypanosoma cruzi identified from a subtractive trypomastigote cDNA library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Elizabeth A; Ziliani, María; Agüero, Fernán; Bernabó, Guillermo; Sánchez, Daniel O; Tekiel, Valeria

    2010-10-05

    The identification and characterization of antigens expressed in Trypanosoma cruzi stages that parasitize mammals are essential steps for the development of new vaccines and diagnostics. Genes that are preferentially expressed in trypomastigotes may be involved in key processes that define the biology of trypomastigotes, like cell invasion and immune system evasion. With the initial aim of identifying trypomastigote-specific expressed tags, we constructed and sequenced an epimastigote-subtracted trypomastigote cDNA library (library TcT-E). More than 45% of the sequenced clones of the library could not be mapped to previously annotated mRNAs or proteins. We validated the presence of these transcripts by reverse northern blot and northern blot experiments, therefore providing novel information about the mRNA expression of these genes in trypomastigotes. A 280-bp consensus element (TcT-E element, TcT-Eelem) located at the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of many different open reading frames (ORFs) was identified after clustering the TcT-E dataset. Using an RT-PCR approach, we were able to amplify different mature mRNAs containing the same TcT-Eelem in the 3' UTR. The proteins encoded by these ORFs are members of a novel surface protein family in T. cruzi, (which we named TcTASV for T. cruzi Trypomastigote, Alanine, Serine and Valine rich proteins). All members of the TcTASV family have conserved coding amino- and carboxy-termini, and a central variable core that allows partitioning of TcTASV proteins into three subfamilies. Analysis of the T. cruzi genome database resulted in the identification of 38 genes/ORFs for the whole TcTASV family in the reference CL-Brener strain (lineage II). Because this protein family was not found in other trypanosomatids, we also looked for the presence of TcTASV genes in other evolutionary lineages of T. cruzi, sequencing 48 and 28 TcTASVs members from the RA (lineage II) and Dm28 (lineage I) T. cruzi strains respectively. Detailed

  13. TcTASV: a novel protein family in trypanosoma cruzi identified from a subtractive trypomastigote cDNA library.

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    Elizabeth A García

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The identification and characterization of antigens expressed in Trypanosoma cruzi stages that parasitize mammals are essential steps for the development of new vaccines and diagnostics. Genes that are preferentially expressed in trypomastigotes may be involved in key processes that define the biology of trypomastigotes, like cell invasion and immune system evasion. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: With the initial aim of identifying trypomastigote-specific expressed tags, we constructed and sequenced an epimastigote-subtracted trypomastigote cDNA library (library TcT-E. More than 45% of the sequenced clones of the library could not be mapped to previously annotated mRNAs or proteins. We validated the presence of these transcripts by reverse northern blot and northern blot experiments, therefore providing novel information about the mRNA expression of these genes in trypomastigotes. A 280-bp consensus element (TcT-E element, TcT-Eelem located at the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR of many different open reading frames (ORFs was identified after clustering the TcT-E dataset. Using an RT-PCR approach, we were able to amplify different mature mRNAs containing the same TcT-Eelem in the 3' UTR. The proteins encoded by these ORFs are members of a novel surface protein family in T. cruzi, (which we named TcTASV for T. cruzi Trypomastigote, Alanine, Serine and Valine rich proteins. All members of the TcTASV family have conserved coding amino- and carboxy-termini, and a central variable core that allows partitioning of TcTASV proteins into three subfamilies. Analysis of the T. cruzi genome database resulted in the identification of 38 genes/ORFs for the whole TcTASV family in the reference CL-Brener strain (lineage II. Because this protein family was not found in other trypanosomatids, we also looked for the presence of TcTASV genes in other evolutionary lineages of T. cruzi, sequencing 48 and 28 TcTASVs members from the RA (lineage II and Dm28

  14. Leishmaniose visceral canina: avaliação da metodologia sorológica utilizada em inquéritos epidemiológicos

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    Carlos A. da Costa

    1991-03-01

    Full Text Available Foi realizado um estudo comparativo da reação de imunofluorescência indireta em eluatos de sangue de cães infectados experimentalmente com diferentes tripanosomatídeos. Utilizaram-se como antigenopromastigotas de L. mexicana, L. braziliensis e L. chagasi. Os resultados mostraram que a sensibilidade do método foi de 87,5% para o diagnóstico do calazar canino, independentemente do antigeno empregado; e que ocorre reação cruzada com Leishmaniose tegumentar em 75% dos casos e com doença de Chagas em 83,3%. Levantamento epidemiológico em área de leishmaniose confirma que a reação de imunofluorescência em eluatos de sangue canino fornece reações cruzadas em cães infectados com Leishmania braziliensis e L. chagasi. Não se verificou reação cruzada pela RFC. Sugere-se a utilização da reação de imunofluorescência nas campanhas de saúde pública, mas é de se chamar a atenção para o fato de que as taxas de positividade não devem ser utilizadas como indicadores da prevalência do calazar canino.A comparative study was made of eluates of the blood of dogs experimentally infected with different trypanosomatids. Using antigens prepared from promastigotes of Leishmania mexicana, L. braziliensis and L. chagasi, assessments were made by the indirect immunofluorescence test. The results showed a sensitivity of 87,5% in the diagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis, independent of antigen used. Cross-reactions occurred in 75% of cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis and 83,3% of dogs with chagas' disease. An epidemiological survey in an area of leishmaniasis confirmed that immunofluorescence tests on eluates of dogs' blood give cross-reactions between L. braziliensis and L. chagasi. The results suggest that such testing could be useful in public health campaigns but attention is drawn to thefact that the level ofpositive reactions cannot be used as an indicator of the prevalence of canine kala-azar.

  15. Evaluation of in vitro leishmanicidal activity of tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia

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    Moradali Fouladvand

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leishmania is a trypanosomatid protozoan which is transmitted by the female Phlebotomus sand fly. Leishmaniasis is prevalent in four continents and is considered to be endemic in 88 countries, 72 of which are developing countries. It is estimated that it’s global prevalence and incidence is 12 millions and 500 thousands respectively. The recommended drugs used for the treatment of this disease are mainly ineffective, toxic and exhibit many side effects. Based on some studies,tea tree oil that is a yellow color liquid with spicy odor exhibit antibacterial and antifungal activity, so, we evaluated it’s anti-leishmanial effect. Materials and Methods: Tea tree oil was purchased from Dr Jahangiri pharmaceutical company and it’s various concentrations (mg/ml800, mg/ml400, mg/ml200, mg/ml100 were prepared in 1ml volume of TSB solvent in 15ml test tubes, then 9 ml of RPMI-1640 medium and 1×106 promastigotes was added to each tube, as a final volume of 10 ml. These tubes were incubated at 23o c for 72 hours and number of parasites in the first 6 hours once every hour and after that every 24 hours were counted by hemocytometer. Results: Lethal dose of tea tree oil for 50% of promastigotes ( IC50 is 337 mg/ml, while the 800 mg/ml of this extract can killed 95% of the parasites after 24 hours of incubation, and it’s lower concentrations of this extract showed dose-dependent leishmanicidal activity. Glucantime as positive control drug at concentration of 300 mg/ml killed all the promastigotes, while the number of promastigotes in negative control tubes was increase during the incubation period. Conclusion: Anti-Leishmanial activity of tea tree oil with IC50 of 337 mg/ml and 95% lethality of 800 mg/ml is promising and further study for analyse the active ingredients of this oil and evaluation of it’s anti-leishmanial effect, particularly in laboratory animal is recommended.

  16. Trypanosoma cruzi: Transporte de metabolitos esenciales obtenidos del hospedador Trypanosoma cruzi: Transport of essential metabolites acquired from the host

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    Claudio A. Pereira

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available El Trypanosoma cruzi es el agente causal de la enfermedad de Chagas, endémica en Argentina y en toda América Latina. Presenta numerosas características metabólicas diferenciales respecto a sus hospedadores insectos y mamíferos. Algunas de estas diferencias fueron consecuencia de millones de años de adaptación al parasitismo en los cuales estos organismos protozoarios reemplazaron, a lo largo de su evolución, muchas rutas metabólicas de biosíntesis por sistemas de transporte de metabolitos desde el hospedador. En esta revisión se describen los avances en el conocimiento de los sistemas de transporte tanto bioquímicos como también de las moléculas involucradas en dichos procesos. Se aborda con especial énfasis los transportadores de aminoácidos y poliaminas de T. cruzi de la familia AAAP (Amino Acid/Auxin Permeases ya que parece ser exclusiva de los tripanosomátidos. Teniendo en cuenta que estas moléculas se encuentran completamente ausentes en mamíferos podrían ser consideradas como potenciales blancos contra el Trypanosoma cruzi.Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a disease endemic not only in Argentina but also in all of Latinamerica. T. cruzi presents several metabolic characteristics which are completely absent in its insect vectors and in mammalian hosts. Some of these differences were acquired after millions of years of adaptation to parasitism, during which this protozoan replaced many biosynthetic routes for transport systems. In the present review, we describe the advances in the knowledge of T. cruzi transport processes and the molecules involved. In particular, we focus on aminoacid and polyamine transporters from the AAAP family (Amino Acid/Auxin Permeases, because they seem to be exclusive transporters from trypanosomatids. Taking into account that these permeases are completely absent in mammals, they could be considered as a potential target against Trypanosoma cruzi.

  17. Organization and evolution of two SIDER retroposon subfamilies and their impact on the Leishmania genome

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    Bringaud Frédéric

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently identified two large families of extinct transposable elements termed Short Interspersed DEgenerated Retroposons (SIDERs in the parasitic protozoan Leishmania major. The characterization of SIDER elements was limited to the SIDER2 subfamily, although members of both subfamilies have been shown to play a role in the regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Apparent functional domestication of SIDERs prompted further investigation of their characterization, dissemination and evolution throughout the Leishmania genus, with particular attention to the disregarded SIDER1 subfamily. Results Using optimized statistical profiles of both SIDER1 and SIDER2 subgroups, we report the first automated and highly sensitive annotation of SIDERs in the genomes of L. infantum, L. braziliensis and L. major. SIDER annotations were combined to in-silico mRNA extremity predictions to generate a detailed distribution map of the repeat family, hence uncovering an enrichment of antisense-oriented SIDER repeats between the polyadenylation and trans-splicing sites of intergenic regions, in contrast to the exclusive sense orientation of SIDER elements within 3'UTRs. Our data indicate that SIDER elements are quite uniformly dispersed throughout all three genomes and that their distribution is generally syntenic. However, only 47.4% of orthologous genes harbor a SIDER element in all three species. There is evidence for species-specific enrichment of SIDERs and for their preferential association, especially for SIDER2s, with different metabolic functions. Investigation of the sequence attributes and evolutionary relationship of SIDERs to other trypanosomatid retroposons reveals that SIDER1 is a truncated version of extinct autonomous ingi-like retroposons (DIREs, which were functional in the ancestral Leishmania genome. Conclusion A detailed characterization of the sequence traits for both SIDER subfamilies unveils

  18. Effect of plant extracts used in folk medicine on cell growth and differentiation of Herpetomonas samuelpessoai (Kinetoplastida, Trypanosomatidae cultivated in defined medium Efeito de extratos de plantas utilizadas na medicina popular no crescimento e diferenciação celular de Herpetomonas samuelpessoai (Kinetoplastida, Trypanosomatidae cultivada em meio definido

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    Fabiola Barbieri Holetz

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the effect of 15 medicinal plants on cell growth and differentiation of Herpetomonas samuelpessoai, a non-pathogenic trypanosomatid, used as biological model for its similar antigens to Trypanosoma cruzi. Crude extracts (1,000 g/ml or essential oil (250 g/ml were added in a defined medium. Cell growth was estimated by counting in Neubauer’s chamber and cell differentiation was examined by light microscope. Ocimum gratissimum, Lippia alba, Piper regnellii, Stryphnodendron adstringens, and Tanacetum vulgare showed antiprotozoan activity, Psidium guajava and Punica granatum a lower activity and Achillea millefolium, Eugenia uniflora, Mikania glomerata, Plantago major, and Spilanthes acmella had no activity. In contrast, Arctium lappa, Erythrina speciosa, and Sambucus Canadensis stimulated H. samuelpessoai growth. Only L. alba and S. acmella stimulated cell differentiation in this flagellate. These results indicate that medicinal plants possess active compounds against H. samuelpessoai. Thus, this protozoan seems to be a suitable model for screening plants containing trypanocidal drugsNeste trabalho, verificou-se o efeito de 15 plantas medicinais no crescimento e diferenciação celular de Herpetomonas samuelpessoai, um tripanosomatídeo não patogênico utilizado como modelo biológico, que apresenta antígenos semelhantes aos do Trypanosoma cruzi. Extratos brutos (1.000 g/ml ou óleo essencial (250 µg/ml foram adicionados ao meio definido. O crescimento celular foi determinado pela contagem em câmara de Newbauer e a diferenciação celular examinada por microscopia ótica. Ocimum gratissimum, Lippia alba, Piper regnellii, Stryphnodendron adstringens, e Tanacetum vulgare mostraram atividade antiprotozoário, Psidium guajava e Punica granatum menor atividade e Achillea millefolium, Eugenia uniflora, Mikania glomerata, Plantago major, e Spilanthes acmella não apresentaram atividade. Por outro lado, Arctium lappa

  19. Predicted altitudinal shifts and reduced spatial distribution of Leishmania infantum vector species under climate change scenarios in Colombia.

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    González, Camila; Paz, Andrea; Ferro, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is caused by the trypanosomatid parasite Leishmania infantum (=Leishmania chagasi), and is epidemiologically relevant due to its wide geographic distribution, the number of annual cases reported and the increase in its co-infection with HIV. Two vector species have been incriminated in the Americas: Lutzomyia longipalpis and Lutzomyia evansi. In Colombia, L. longipalpis is distributed along the Magdalena River Valley while L. evansi is only found in the northern part of the Country. Regarding the epidemiology of the disease, in Colombia the incidence of VL has decreased over the last few years without any intervention being implemented. Additionally, changes in transmission cycles have been reported with urban transmission occurring in the Caribbean Coast. In Europe and North America climate change seems to be driving a latitudinal shift of leishmaniasis transmission. Here, we explored the spatial distribution of the two known vector species of L. infantum in Colombia and projected its future distribution into climate change scenarios to establish the expansion potential of the disease. An updated database including L. longipalpis and L. evansi collection records from Colombia was compiled. Ecological niche models were performed for each species using the Maxent software and 13 Worldclim bioclimatic coverages. Projections were made for the pessimistic CSIRO A2 scenario, which predicts the higher increase in temperature due to non-emission reduction, and the optimistic Hadley B2 Scenario predicting the minimum increase in temperature. The database contained 23 records for L. evansi and 39 records for L. longipalpis, distributed along the Magdalena River Valley and the Caribbean Coast, where the potential distribution areas of both species were also predicted by Maxent. Climate change projections showed a general overall reduction in the spatial distribution of the two vector species, promoting a shift in altitudinal distribution for L

  20. Characterization of Calflagin, a Flagellar Calcium-Binding Protein from Trypanosoma congolense.

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    Brett A Eyford

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Identification of species-specific trypanosome molecules is important for laboratory- and field-based research into epidemiology and disease diagnosis. Although Trypanosoma congolense is the most important trypanosome pathogen of cattle in Africa, no species-specific molecules found in infective bloodstream forms (BSF of the parasites have been identified, thus limiting development of diagnostic tests.Immuno-mass spectrometric methods were used to identify a protein that is recognized by a T. congolense-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb Tc6/42.6.4. The identified molecule was expressed as a recombinant protein in E. coli and was tested in several immunoassays for its ability to interact with the mAb. The three dimensional structure of the protein was modeled and compared to crystal- and NMR-structures of the homologous proteins from T. cruzi and T. brucei respectively, in order to examine structural differences leading to the different immunoreactivity of the T. congolense molecule. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA were used to measure antibodies produced by trypanosome-infected African cattle in order to assess the potential for use of T. congolense calflagin in a serodiagnostic assay.The antigen recognized by the T. congolense-specific mAb Tc6/42.6.4 was identified as a flagellar calcium-binding protein, calflagin. The recombinant molecule showed immunoreactivity with the T. congolense-specific mAb confirming that it is the cognate antigen. Immunofluorescence experiments revealed that Ca2+ modulated the localization of the calflagin molecule in trypanosomes. Structural modelling and comparison with calflagin homologues from other trypanosomatids revealed four non-conserved regions on the surface of the T. congolense molecule that due to differences in surface chemistry and structural topography may form species-specific epitopes. ELISAs using the recombinant calflagin as antigen to detect antibodies in trypanosome-infected cattle

  1. Efecto inmunosupresor de la infección por Trypanosoma musculi (Mastigophora: Trypanosomatidae en la toxoplasmosis experimental Immunosuppressor effect of Trypanosoma musculi (Mastigophora: Trypanosomatidae on experimental toxoplasmosis

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    Loretta Piccolo-Johanning

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available La prevalencia de infecciones por Toxoplasma gondii en el ser humano es de 5-90% según la zona geográfica; en Costa Rica por ejemplo, la seroprevalencia es de un 58%, por lo que es importante comprender algunos procesos inmunológicos, propios en estas afectaciones parasitarias. Con el objeto de determinar si el Trypanosoma musculi ejerce procesos de inmunosupresión sobre Toxoplasma gondii se realizó un experimento en el que se inocularon ratones Swiss con T. musculi cuatro, cinco, seis y siete días previos a la infección con T. gondii, ocurriendo la inmunosupresión cuando la inoculación con T. musculi fue hecha cuatro días antes. Además, la cantidad de tripomastigotos inoculados no influyó en el proceso. Se probaron tres cepas de T. gondii aisladas de las heces de un gato casero (TFC, de un Leopardus pardalis (TLP, de un Leopardus wiedii y de la carne de un Bos taurus (TBT. La cepa TLP resultó ser muy patógena, matando a los animales en un tiempo corto, independientemente de la inoculación con T. musculi; para las otras cepas se mantuvo el patrón de inmunosupresión en los ratones. Se reporta entonces un modelo experimental de inmunosupresión, aspecto muy en boga en este momento, por su relación con enfermedades que inducen esta condición en el ser humano, especialmente a enfermedades como el cáncer y el SIDA. Este modelo es más fácil de aplicar experimentalmente que el correspondiente con T. lewisi previamente descrito, el cual usa ratas blancas de más difícil manejo que los ratones usados en este estudio.The immunosuppression caused by species of the gender Trypanosoma has been widely documented. The influence over experimental infections with Toxoplasma gondii is evident when using Trypanosoma lewisi, a natural parasite of white rats. We decided to test the effect of Trypanosoma musculi from mice, an organism with very similar biological characteristics to T. lewisi, to see if this trypanosomatid could induce a similar

  2. Enzootic transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi and T. rangeli in the Federal District of Brazil Transmissão enzoótica de Trypanosoma cruzi e T. rangeli no Distrito Federal, Brasil

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    Rodrigo Gurgel-Gonçalves

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The Federal District of Brazil (DF lies within the Cerrado biome, where open shrubland (savannas is interspersed with riverside gallery forests and permanent swamps (veredas. Trypanosoma cruzi-infected native triatomines occur in the area, but the enzootic transmission of trypanosomatids remains poorly characterized. A parasitological survey involving sylvatic triatomines (166 Rhodnius neglectus collected from Mauritia flexuosa palms and small mammals (98 marsupials and 70 rodents, totaling 18 species was conducted in 18 sites (mainly gallery forests and veredas of the DF. Parasites were isolated, morphologically identified, and characterized by PCR of nuclear (mini-exon gene and kinetoplast DNA (kDNA. Six R. neglectus, seven Didelphis albiventris and one Akodon cursor were infected by trypanosomes; wild reservoir infection is documented for the first time in the DF. kDNA PCR detected T. cruzi in five R. neglectus and mini-exon gene PCR revealed T. cruzi I in isolates from D. albiventris. Parasites infecting one bug yielded T. rangeli KP1+ kDNA amplicons. In spite of the occurrence of T. cruzi-infected D. albiventris (an important wild and peridomestic reservoir and R. neglectus (a secondary vector displaying synanthropic behavior, a low-risk of human Chagas disease transmission could be expected in the DF, considering the low prevalence infection recorded in this work. The detection of T. rangeli KP1+ associated with R. neglectus in the DF widens the known range of this parasite in Brazil and reinforces the hypothesis of adaptation of T. rangeli populations (KP1+ and KP1- to distinct evolutionary Rhodnius lineages.O Distrito Federal (DF do Brasil está localizado no bioma Cerrado, um complexo de fisionomias savânicas incluindo matas de galeria e campos úmidos permanentes (veredas. Triatomíneos silvestres infectados por Trypanosoma cruzi ocorrem na área, mas a transmissão enzoótica de tripanossomatídeos permanece insuficientemente

  3. La ADN topoisomerasa tipo I de protozoos patógenos como Diana terapéutica de fármacos antitumorales Type I DNA topoisomerase from protozoan pathogens as a potential target for anti-tumoral drugs

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    Rosa M Reguera

    2007-12-01

    , Chagas disease or leishmaniasis, among others, are unicellular protozoan parasites with no immune-prophylactic treatment and where the chemotherapeutical treatment is still under controversy. At present, the chemotherapeutic approach to these diseases is expensive, has side or toxic effects and it does not provide economic profits to the Pharmaceuticals which then have no or scarce enthusiasm in R & D investments in this field. The identification of type I DNAtopoisomerases as promising drug targets is based on the excellent results obtained with camptothecin derivatives in anticancer therapy. The recent finding of significant structural differences between human type I DNAtopoisomerase and their counterparts in trypanosomatids has open a new field in drug discovery, the aim is to find structural insights to be targeted by new drugs. This review is an update of DNA-topoisomerases as potential chemotherapeutic targets against the most important protozoan agents of medical interest.