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Sample records for trypanosoma evansi-infected cats

  1. Proteomics of Trypanosoma evansi infection in rodents.

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    Nainita Roy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma evansi infections, commonly called 'surra', cause significant economic losses to livestock industry. While this infection is mainly restricted to large animals such as camels, donkeys and equines, recent reports indicate their ability to infect humans. There are no World Animal Health Organization (WAHO prescribed diagnostic tests or vaccines available against this disease and the available drugs show significant toxicity. There is an urgent need to develop improved methods of diagnosis and control measures for this disease. Unlike its related human parasites T. brucei and T. cruzi whose genomes have been fully sequenced T. evansi genome sequence remains unavailable and very little efforts are being made to develop improved methods of prevention, diagnosis and treatment. With a view to identify potential diagnostic markers and drug targets we have studied the clinical proteome of T. evansi infection using mass spectrometry (MS.Using shot-gun proteomic approach involving nano-lc Quadrupole Time Of Flight (QTOF mass spectrometry we have identified over 160 proteins expressed by T. evansi in mice infected with camel isolate. Homology driven searches for protein identification from MS/MS data led to most of the matches arising from related Trypanosoma species. Proteins identified belonged to various functional categories including metabolic enzymes; DNA metabolism; transcription; translation as well as cell-cell communication and signal transduction. TCA cycle enzymes were strikingly missing, possibly suggesting their low abundances. The clinical proteome revealed the presence of known and potential drug targets such as oligopeptidases, kinases, cysteine proteases and more.Previous proteomic studies on Trypanosomal infections, including human parasites T. brucei and T. cruzi, have been carried out from lab grown cultures. For T. evansi infection this is indeed the first ever proteomic study reported thus far. In addition to providing a

  2. First report of surra (Trypanosoma evansi infection) in a Tunisian dog

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    Rjeibi, Mohamed Ridha; Ben Hamida, Taoufik; Dalgatova, Zara; Mahjoub, Tarek; Rejeb, Ahmed; Dridi, Walid; Gharbi, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma evansi, the agent of surra, is a salivarian trypanosome, originating from Africa. Surra is a major disease in camels, equines and dogs, in which it can often be fatal in the absence of treatment. Animals exhibit nonspecific clinical signs (anaemia, loss of weight and abortion). In the present survey, a blood sample was collected in Sousse (Central Tunisia) from a dog that presented clinical signs of trypanosomiasis. Giemsa-stained blood smears and PCR were performed. ITS1 sequences from blood had 99.8 and 99.5% homology with published T. evansi sequences from cattle and camels, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of T. evansi in a Tunisian dog. PMID:25654368

  3. First report of surra (Trypanosoma evansi infection in a Tunisian dog

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    Rjeibi Mohamed Ridha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma evansi, the agent of surra, is a salivarian trypanosome, originating from Africa. Surra is a major disease in camels, equines and dogs, in which it can often be fatal in the absence of treatment. Animals exhibit nonspecific clinical signs (anaemia, loss of weight and abortion. In the present survey, a blood sample was collected in Sousse (Central Tunisia from a dog that presented clinical signs of trypanosomiasis. Giemsa-stained blood smears and PCR were performed. ITS1 sequences from blood had 99.8 and 99.5% homology with published T. evansi sequences from cattle and camels, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of T. evansi in a Tunisian dog.

  4. Haematological and biochemical changes in experimental Trypanosoma evansi infection in rabbits.

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    Sivajothi, S; Rayulu, V C; Sudhakara Reddy, B

    2015-06-01

    New Zealand white rabbits (N = 4) were challenged with the local strain of Trypanosoma evansi. Each rabbit was infected with 5 × 10(5) trypanosomes subcutaneously. The infection was characterized by intermittent pyrexia, undulating parasitaemia, anorexia and emaciation. The infected rabbits were examined daily for development of clinical signs and infection status by wet blood-films made from the ear veins. Thick and thin blood smears were also examined daily until the end of the experiment for description of blood cells. Differential leukocyte count (DLC) was also done. The parasite was observed in the blood during the acute phase only. Leukocytosis in the acute phase followed by leukopenia during the chronic phase was recognized. Haematological studies revealed reduced TEC, Hb and PCV. The main changes in the erythrocytes were macrocytes, hypochromic cells, Howell-Jolly bodies, target cells, stomatocytes and burr cells. Serum chemistry revealed hypoproteinemia, hypocholesterolaemia, hypoglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, elevated creatinine, BUN, increased AST and ALT.

  5. PCR-Based Detection of Trypanosoma evansi Infection in Semi-Captive Asiatic Black Bears (Ursus thibetanus

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    Maliha Shahid, Safia Janjua*, Fakhar-i-Abbas and Jan Schmidt Burbach1

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Clinical signs, viz lethargy, increased heart rate and reduced appetite, making trypanosomiasis a possible differential diagnosis, were found in five out of twenty semi-captive Asiatic black bears (Ursus thibetanus in a sanctuary, located in Kund, District Sawabi, KPK, Pakistan. Microscopic examination of blood samples of bears expressing clinical signs and symptoms revealed the presence of haemoflagellates, which was found to be trypanosomes. Subsequently, the PCR technique was exploited to screen for the presence of trypanosomal species in all bears’ blood samples. Blood samples from 20 individual bears were screened using three sets of primers specific to Trypanosoma evansi species. Three primer pairs used are equally effective in successful detection of the parasite. Two out of five, diseased bears died prior to any trypanosoma specific medication while the rest were given an administered dose of Melarsomine (Immiticide. The treated bears survived and were assured to be aparasitemic on post-treatment examination after six weeks.

  6. Resposta eritropoética de ratos em diferentes graus de parasitemia por Trypanosoma evansi Erithropoietic response in Trypanosoma evansi infected rats with different parasitaemia intensity

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    Patrícia Wolkmer

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available O Trypanosoma evansi é um protozoário hemoflagelado que causa, em várias espécies, uma doença caracterizada por altos níveis de parasitemia, com rápido desenvolvimento de anemia. Este trabalho teve como objetivo investigar a relação entre o grau de parasitemia e a alteração na eritropoese de ratos (Rattus norvegicus da linhagem Wistar infectados experimentalmente com T. evansi. Foram utilizados 42 ratos, dos quais 36 foram inoculados pela via intraperitoneal com 0,2ml de sangue, contendo 2,5 x 104 parasitas. Seis ratos não-inoculados foram utilizados como controles. Após inoculação, a parasitemia foi avaliada a cada 12h. Os grupos para análise foram estipulados de acordo com a média de tripanossomas em 10 campos homogêneos focados aleatoriamente, sendo: A, controle; B, animais que apresentaram um grau de parasitemia entre 1-10 tripanossomas/campo; C, ratos com 11-20 tripanossomas/campo; D, ratos com 21-30 tripanossomas/campo; E, ratos com 31-40 tripanossomas/campo; F, 41-50 tripanossomas/campo; e G, ratos com mais de 51 tripanossomas/campo. Quando os animais apresentaram o número de protozoários equivalente ao grupo, foram coletadas amostras de sangue para realização de hemograma e dosagem de ferro, e foi realizada citologia de medula óssea para avaliação da relação mielóide:eritróide. A análise estatística mostrou redução significativa das hemácias e do hematócrito a partir de 31 tripanossomas/campo (grupos E, F e G; PTrypanosoma evansi is a flagellate protozoan that causes a disease characterized by high parasitemia and acute anemia in various species. This study was aimed at evaluating and establishing a relationship between different parasitemia levels and eritropoyesis in Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus experimentally infected by T. evansi. Forty two animals were used. In 36 animals parasites were inoculated by intraperitoneal blood injection of 0.2ml containing 2.5x104 parasites. Six non-inoculated animals

  7. Aceturato de diminazeno e dipropionato de imidocarb no controle de infecção por Trypanosoma evansi em Rattus norvegicus infectados experimentalmente Diminazene aceturate and imidocarb dipropionate in the control of Trypanosoma evansi infection in Rattus norvegicus experimentally infected

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    Aleksandro Schafer da Silva

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar o efeito do aceturato de diminazeno e do dipropionato de imidocarb no controle da infecção por Trypanosoma evansi em ratos (Rattus norvegicus infectados experimentalmente. Cinqüenta e quatro ratos machos foram inoculados via intraperitonial com 104 tripomastigotas de T. evansi/animal. Os ratos foram monitorados diariamente por meio de esfregaço sanguíneo periférico. No momento em que se observassem oito protozoários por campo microscópico de 1000x, era iniciado o tratamento com as drogas (dia zero. O estudo foi dividido em dois protocolos terapêuticos e os fármacos foram administrados via intramuscular. O primeiro protocolo foi aplicado nos grupos A, B, C e D e o segundo protocolo nos grupos E, F, G e H. O grupo controle foi identificado como grupo I, não medicados. No primeiro protocolo, os ratos receberam uma dose única dos fármacos no dia zero e sempre que se observasse T. evansi na circulação periférica. No segundo protocolo, os roedores receberam as mesmas doses, no entanto, por cinco dias consecutivos. No primeiro protocolo, os dois princípios ativos não apresentaram eficácia curativa, ocorrendo reincidência da parasitemia após alguns dias do tratamento. No segundo protocolo, o aceturato de diminazeno eliminou a forma tripomastigota da circulação e os ratos foram eutanasiados após 90 dias do início do tratamento. Os roedores tratados com dipropionato de imidocarb apresentaram recidiva da infecção após 30 dias. Na histopatologia não se observou alteração renal e hepática relacionada à doença ou aos medicamentos testados. Com base nos resultados, foi concluído que o aceturato de diminazeno, quando administrado por cinco dias consecutivos, é efetivo no tratamento da tripanossomose em ratos.The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of diminazene aceturate and imidocarb dipropionate in the control of Trypanosoma evansi infection in rats (Rattus norvegicus

  8. Experimental Trypanosoma evansi infection in donkeys: hematological, biochemical and histopathological changes Infecção experimental em jumentos com Trypanosoma evansi: alterações hematológicas, bioquímicas e histopatológicas

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    F.A. Cadioli

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Five adult donkeys were experimentally infected with Brazilian strain of Trypanosoma evansi originally isolated from a naturally infected dog to study the hematological biochemical and histopathological alterations during the evolution of the disease. The course of the experimental infection was followed up to 145 days. Hematological analyses of the infected donkeys revealed a marked decline in hemoglobin, packed-cell volume, and erythrocyte count. Anemia was observed after successive peaks of parasitemia. Biochemical analyses showed increased levels of icterus index, serum globulins and decreased serum albumin and glucose values. All infected donkeys revealed enlargement of spleen and its white pulp, enlargement of mediastinal lymph nodes and lungs congestion. The main histopathological features consisted of meningoencephalitis. Demyelination in some areas of the cerebellum pediculus and neuropil vacuolization were observed. This study showed that donkeys infected with a Brazilian strain of T. evansi developed a chronic disease.Cinco jumentos, adultos foram infectados experimentalmente com cepa brasileira de Trypanosoma evansi, isolada de um cão naturalmente infectado, com o intuito de observar as alterações hematológicas, bioquímicas e histopatológicas durante a evolução da enfermidade. O curso da infecção experimental foi de 145 dias. Análise hematológica dos jumentos infectados revelou declínio nos valores de hemoglobina, hematócrito e contagem total de eritrócitos. Notou-se anemia após sucessivos picos de parasitemia. Análise bioquímica indicou aumento dos níveis de índice ictérico, globulinas séricas e diminuição dos valores séricos de albumina e glicose. Todos os jumentos infectados apresentaram aumento do baço e de sua polpa branca, aumento de linfonodos mediastínicos e congestão pulmonar. Meningoencefalite foi o principal achado histopatológico. Em algumas áreas do pedículo cerebelar foram observadas

  9. Laboratory treatment of Trypanosoma evansi - infected rats with a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kg) and Securidaca (100 mg/kg), was as good as therapeutic doses (3.5 mg/kg) of Berenil ® alone, at significantly (p<0.05) reducing parasitaemia caused by T. evansi, from the first post-administration day until animals became parasite-free by ...

  10. Pathogenesis of Trypanosoma evansi infection in dogs and horses: hematological and clinical aspects Patogênese da infecção pelo Trypanosoma evansi em cães e cavalos: aspectos hematológicos e clínicos

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    Roberto Aguilar Machado Santos Silva

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma evansi caused severe anemia in horses and pronounced leukopenia in dogs, both naturally infected. The horses presented microcytic normochromic anemia and the dogs showed microcytic hypochromic anemia. The clinical signs observed were fever, anemia, edema of the legs and lower parts, weakness and inappetence. Light microscopic studies demonstrated that Trypanosoma evansi produced several alterations in erythrocytes of dogs and horses. These pathologic changes included vacuolation, acanthocytes, dacrocytes, codocytes, microspherocytes and bizarre shapes. Mature erythrocyte were observed adhered to trypanosomes. Erythrophagocytosis was also demonstred.Trypanosoma evansi produziu severa anemia em cavalos e pronunciada leucopenia em cães, ambos naturalmente infectados. Os cavalos apresentaram anemia microcítica normocrômica e os cães desenvolveram uma anemia microcítica hipocrômica. Os sinais clínicos foram febre, anemia, edema das pernas e porções inferiores, fraqueza e inapetência. Estudos com microscopia ótica demonstraram que o Trypanosoma evansi produziu várias alterações nos eritrócitos dos cães e cavalos. Estas alterações patológicas incluíram vacuolação, acantócitos, dacrócitos, codócitos, microesferócitos e formas bizarras. Eritrócitos maduros foram observados aderidos a tripanosomas. Eritrofagocitose foi também observada.

  11. Immunohistochemical characterization of mononuclear cells and MHC II expression in the brain of horses with experimental chronic Trypanosoma evansi infection Caracterização imunoistoquímica de células mononucleares e expressão de CMH II no sistema nervoso central de eqüinos com infecção crônica experimental por Trypanosoma evansi

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    Karen R. Lemos

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available An histochemical and immunohistochemical study was carried out to evaluate the mechanisms of immune response of horses experimentally infected by Trypanosoma evansi. For this purpose the HE histochemical stain and the avidin biotin peroxidase method were used. To determine the presence and immunoreactivity of immune cells we used anti-major histocompatibility complex II antibodies. Cellular infiltration fenotype was characterized with the aid of anti-CD3 antibody for T lymphocytes and by anti-BLA 36 antibodies for B lymphocytes. Macrophages were marked with an antibody against myeloid/histyocites antigen (clone Mac387. Lesions in the CNS of experimentally infected horses were those of a wide spread non suppurative encephalomyelitis and meningomyelitis. The severity of lesions varied in different parts of the nervous system, reflecting an irregular distribution of inflammatory vascular changes. Lymphoid perivascular cuffs and meningeal infiltrations were of predominantly composed of T and B cells. The parasite, T. evansi, was not identified in these horses tissues.Este estudo objetivou caracterizar a resposta imune celular no sistema nervoso central (SNC de eqüinos com infecção crônica experimental por Trypanosoma evansi. Para este propósito, foram utilizados os métodos histoquímicos (HE e imunoistoquímicos do complexo avidina-biotina peroxidase (ABC. O fenótipo do infiltrado celular foi caracterizado com o auxílio de anticorpos anti - CD3, para linfócitos T e antiBLA36 para linfócitos B. Os macrófagos foram marcados com anticorpo antiantígenos da linhagem mielóide/histiócitos (Clone Mac387. A lesão no sistema nervoso central (SNC dos eqüinos infectados com T. evansi foi caracterizada como meningoencefalite e meningomielite não supurativa. A gravidade das lesões variou em diferentes segmentos do SNC, refletindo distribuição irregular das alterações vasculares. A distribuição de células T e B e antígenos do complexo

  12. Domestic dogs and cats as sources of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in rural northwestern Argentina.

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    Gürtler, R E; Cecere, M C; Lauricella, M A; Cardinal, M V; Kitron, U; Cohen, J E

    2007-01-01

    The reservoir capacity of domestic cats and dogs for Trypanosoma cruzi infection and the host-feeding patterns of domestic Triatoma infestans were assessed longitudinally in 2 infested rural villages in north-western Argentina. A total of 86 dogs and 38 cats was repeatedly examined for T. cruzi infection by serology and/or xenodiagnosis. The composite prevalence of infection in dogs (60%), but not in cats, increased significantly with age and with the domiciliary density of infected T. infestans. Dogs and cats had similarly high forces of infection, prevalence of infectious hosts (41-42%), and infectiousness to bugs at a wide range of infected bug densities. The infectiousness to bugs of seropositive dogs declined significantly with increasing dog age and was highly aggregated. Individual dog infectiousness to bugs was significantly autocorrelated over time. Domestic T. infestans fed on dogs showed higher infection prevalence (49%) than those fed on cats (39%), humans (38%) or chickens (29%) among 1085 bugs examined. The basic reproduction number of T. cruzi in dogs was at least 8.2. Both cats and dogs are epidemiologically important sources of infection for bugs and householders, dogs nearly 3 times more than cats.

  13. Biology of Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) evansi in experimental heterologous mammalian hosts.

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    Misra, K K; Roy, S; Choudhury, A

    2016-09-01

    Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) evansi is a causative agent of the dreadful mammalian disease trypanosomiasis or 'Surra' and carried as a latent parasite in domestic cattle but occasionally proves fatal when transmitted to horses and camel. Sporadic outbreak of 'Surra' to different animals (beside their natural hosts) reminds that T. evansi may be zoonotic, as their close relative cause sleeping sickness to human being. This haemoflagellate is mechanically transmitted by horse fly and its effect on different host varies depending on certain factors including the effectiveness of transmission by mechanical vector, the suitability and susceptibility of the host as well as most importantly the ability of the disease establishment of parasite to adapt itself to the host's resistance, etc. The course of the disease caused by T. evansi is similar to that of human sleeping sickness caused by T. (T.) brucei gambiense. The target organs and symptoms show close similarity. T. evansi can successfully be transmitted among unnatural hosts i.e., other classes of vertebrates, like chicken. In transmission experiments, the unnatural hosts may sometimes induce profound changes in the biology of trypanosomes. Hence, in present study the observations are the biology of different morphological changes of T. evansi as well as its ability of disease formation within some heterologous mammal viz., albino rat, guineapig, bandicoot, mongoose, domestic cat and common monkey. Blood smears of infected albino rats, bandicoot, and mongoose revealed only monomorphic form. Interestingly, blood smears of infected cat and monkey, T. evansi shows slender trypomastigote form and short intermediate form whereas organ smears shows other two forms of haemoflagellate viz., sphaeromastigote and amastigote form. The haemoflagellate maintains a common reproductive cycle in all the experimental heterologous hosts whereas disease symptoms differ. T. evansi infected cat and monkey shows nervous symptoms. Infected

  14. Atividade tripanocida do plasma humano sobre Trypanosoma evansi em camundongos

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    Da Silva, Aleksandro Schafer; Duck, Marcos Rafael Kroeker; Fanfa, Vinicius da Rosa; Otto, Mateus Anderson; Nunes, João Tomaz Schmitt; Tonin, Alexandre Alberto; Jaques, Jeandre Augusto; Paim, Francine Chimelo; Duarte, Marta Maria Medeiros Frescura; Monteiro, Silvia Gonzalez

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to test an alternative protocol with human plasma to control Trypanosoma evansi infection in mice. Plasma from an apparently 27-year-old healthy male, blood type A+, was used in the study. A concentration of 100 mg.dL-1 apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) was detected in the plasma. Forty mice were divided into four groups with 10 animals each. Group A comprised uninfected animals. Mice from groups B, C and D were inoculated with a T. evansi isolate. Group B was used as a positive cont...

  15. Crystal Structures of TbCatB and rhodesain, potential chemotherapeutic targets and major cysteine proteases of Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Iain D Kerr

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei is the etiological agent of Human African Trypanosomiasis, an endemic parasitic disease of sub-Saharan Africa. TbCatB and rhodesain are the sole Clan CA papain-like cysteine proteases produced by the parasite during infection of the mammalian host and are implicated in the progression of disease. Of considerable interest is the exploration of these two enzymes as targets for cysteine protease inhibitors that are effective against T. brucei.We have determined, by X-ray crystallography, the first reported structure of TbCatB in complex with the cathepsin B selective inhibitor CA074. In addition we report the structure of rhodesain in complex with the vinyl-sulfone K11002.The mature domain of our TbCat*CA074 structure contains unique features for a cathepsin B-like enzyme including an elongated N-terminus extending 16 residues past the predicted maturation cleavage site. N-terminal Edman sequencing reveals an even longer extension than is observed amongst the ordered portions of the crystal structure. The TbCat*CA074 structure confirms that the occluding loop, which is an essential part of the substrate-binding site, creates a larger prime side pocket in the active site cleft than is found in mammalian cathepsin B-small molecule structures. Our data further highlight enhanced flexibility in the occluding loop main chain and structural deviations from mammalian cathepsin B enzymes that may affect activity and inhibitor design. Comparisons with the rhodesain*K11002 structure highlight key differences that may impact the design of cysteine protease inhibitors as anti-trypanosomal drugs.

  16. Epidemiological role of humans, dogs and cats in the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in a central area of Argentina

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    Cristina Wisnivesky-Colli

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi prevalence rates of human, dog and cat populations from 47 households of 3 rural localities of the phytogeographical Chaqueña area of Argentina were determined both by serological and xenodiagnostic procedures. Human prevalence rates were uniform and ranged from 49.6 to 58.7%. Overall prevalence rate in dogs (75.0% was significantly higher than in humans (51.0%. The overall proportion of parasitemic individuals assessed by xenodiagnosis was significantly higher in either dog (64.2% or cat (63.6% populations than among humans (12.5%. Although both the average number of resident as well as infected individuals per household was higher for people than for dogs (6.5 vs. 3.3, and 3.4 vs. 2.4, respectively, the reverse was recorded when parasitemic individuals were considered (1.0 vs. 2.1. Results are discussed in relation to dog between dogs and people, and dogs and bugs. In the light of present data, dogs must be considered as the major donors of parasites to vector bugs and thus, principal contributors to transmission in this region of Argentina.

  17. Molecular diagnosis of cattle trypanosomes in Venezuela: evidences of Trypanosoma evansi and Trypanosoma vivax infections.

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    Ramírez-Iglesias, J R; Eleizalde, M C; Reyna-Bello, A; Mendoza, M

    2017-06-01

    In South America Trypanosoma evansi has been determined by molecular methods in cattle from Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia and Peru, reason for which the presence of this parasite is not excluded in Venezuelan livestock. Therefore, the aim of this study was to perform parasitological and molecular diagnosis of cattle trypanosomosis in small livestock units from two regions in this country. The parasitological diagnosis was carried out by MHCT and the molecular by PCR using genus-specific ITS1 primers that differentiate T. vivax and T. evansi infections. 47 cattle were evaluated in the "Laguneta de la Montaña" sector, Miranda State, where 3 animals were diagnosed as positive (6.4 %) by MHCT and 14 (30 %) by PCR as Trypanosoma spp., out of which 9 animals resulted positive for T. vivax , 3 for T. evansi and 2 with double infections. Whilst in the "San Casimiro" sector, State of Aragua, out of the 38 cattle evaluated 7 animals were diagnosed as positive (18.4 %) by MHCT and 19 (50 %) by PCR, determining only the presence of T. evansi in this locality. The molecular diagnosis by PCR using ITS1 primers allowed T. evansi detection in cattle field populations, which suggests the possible role of these animals as reservoirs in the epidemiology of the disease caused by T. evansi in Venezuela.

  18. Morphological, biological and molecular characterization of three strains of Trypanosoma cruzi Chagas, 1909 (Kinetoplastida, Trypanosomatidae) isolated from Triatoma sordida (Stal) 1859 (Hemiptera, Reduviidae) and a domestic cat

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    RIMOLDI, ALINE; TOMÉ ALVES, RENATA; AMBRÓSIO, DANIELA LUZ; FERNANDES, MARIA ZENAIDE TITA; MARTINEZ, ISABEL; DE ARAÚJO, RENATO FREITAS; CICARELLI, REGINA MARIA BARRETO; DA ROSA, JOÃO ARISTEU

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A study was conducted of the biological, morphological and molecular characters of 3 strains of Trypanosoma cruzi (SI5, SI8 and SIGR3) isolated from specimens of Triatoma sordida collected in Santo Inácio and a domestic cat. In order to carry out the study, the following parameters were evaluated: pre-patent period, parasitaemia curves, morphology of the parasites, mortality rates, histopathological lesions and molecular typing. The strains presented variable pre-patent periods, low parasitaemia and no animal mortality. The morphological study of trypomastigotes showed a predominance of intermediate-width and short-length forms, as well as low nuclear index. Epimastigotes presented a low nuclear index, intermediate-width forms in strains SI5 and SI8, and large-width forms in SIGR3. A shorter length could be noted in strains SI8 and SIGR3, whereas SI5 displayed an intermediate length. The histopathological study did not detect amastigote nests in tissues. The amplification of the divergent domain of 24Sα rRNA, HSP60 and GPI genes of strains SI5, SI8 and SIGR3 classified the 3 strains into Group II. Biological parameters made it possible to classify the strains isolated in Santo Inácio (BA) into Biodeme III, Zymodeme 1 and Group II of T. cruzi. PMID:22217619

  19. A review on trypanosomosis in dogs and cats | Nwoha | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trypanosoma brucei brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma congolense were initially thought to be the only species of trypanosomes capable of causing diseases in dogs and cats. However, dogs and cats are challenged by diverse species of trypanosomes with varying virulence and pathogenicity. Dogs may ...

  20. Cão naturalmente infectado por Trypanosoma evansi em Santa Maria, RS, Brasil Dog naturally infected by Trypanosoma evansi in Santa Maria, RS, Brasil

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    Carina Franciscato

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Descreve-se, neste trabalho, as alterações hematológicas e o proteinograma de um cão naturalmente infectado por Trypanosoma evansi. Este animal apresentou anemia normocítica normocrômica, leucopenia com linfopenia seguida por neutropenia e linfocitose; trombocitopenia; hiperproteinemia com aumento das frações beta e gama globulinas e hipoalbuminemia. Por ser este o primeiro relato de infecção por T. evansi em cães no município de Santa Maria, RS, destaca-se a sua importância epidemiológica, alertando os médicos veterinários para a existência de reservatórios do parasita na região e para a possibilidade de novos achados laboratoriais.This paper describes the hematological alterations and proteinogram of a dog naturally infected by Trypanosoma evansi. This dog was presented with normochromic-normocytic anemia, leucopenia with lymphopenia followed for neutrophenia and lymphocitosis; and trombocitopenia. Hyperproteinemia with an increase of beta and gamma globulin fractions and hypoalbuminemia. By being the first case reported of T. evansi infection in dogs in Santa Maria, RS, Brazil, the epidemiological significance of such findings will alert the veterinarians to the existence of a possible parasite's reservoir in the region warning to the possibility of new laboratory findings.

  1. Trypanosoma amblyommi

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    Marotta, Carolina R; Dos Santos, Priscilla N; Cordeiro, Matheus D; Da S Barros, Juliana Helena; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Fonseca, Adivaldo H

    2018-01-01

    Parasites of the genus Trypanosoma are microorganisms that display wide morphological, biological and genetic variability. Here we present the first description of an isolate of the genus Trypanosoma naturally infecting the tick Amblyomma brasiliense . The ticks were collected from a specimen of Tayassu pecari (Queixada, white-lipped peccary) from the Itatiaia National Park, Itatiaia, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The isolate was characterised by molecular, morphometric and biological analyses. A Trypanosoma culture was isolated from crushed nymphal and adult ticks, propagated in the tick cell line IDE8 and maintained in L15B culture medium, incubated at 32 °C. The isolate grew well in L15B medium at 30 °C, 32 °C and 34 °C but not at lower or higher temperatures. The culture remained stable in axenic L15B medium at 30 °C. Cryopreserved cultures retained viability after cryopreservation in liquid nitrogen. Growth in axenic medium and developmental forms of the trypanosomes were analysed. Analysis of the 18S rDNA region confirmed the authenticity of this new species and the nucleotide sequence was deposited in Genbank. The species was named Trypanosoma amblyommi sp. nov. strain C1RJ. Characteristics related to pathogenicity, involvement with vertebrate hosts, epidemiology, developmental cycle and transmission mechanisms are still unknown. Therefore, further studies are necessary to understand aspects of the biological cycle of Trypanosoma amblyommi sp. nov.

  2. Trypanosoma evansi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The infectivity of an isolate of Trypanosoma evansi was investigated using five infected and four uninfected control. Savannah brown ... The animals were fed grass-hay, ... haemoglobin concentration, leukocyte count as described by Schalmet al. (1975). Total protein was measured using hand refractometer. At the end of six.

  3. Pre-treatment with curcumin modulates acetylcholinesterase activity and proinflammatory cytokines in rats infected with Trypanosoma evansi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkmer, Patrícia; Silva, Cássia B da; Paim, Francine C; Duarte, Marta M M F; Castro, Verônica; Palma, Heloisa E; França, Raqueli T; Felin, Diandra V; Siqueira, Lucas C; Lopes, Sonia T A; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Monteiro, Silvia G; Mazzanti, Cinthia M

    2013-04-01

    The potent activity against Trypanosomes and health beneficial effects of curcumin (Cur) has been demonstrated in various experimental models. In this study, we evaluated the in vivo effect of Cur as trypanocide and as potential anti-inflammatory agent, through the evaluation of immunomodulatory mechanisms in rats infected with Trypanosoma evansi. Daily oral Cur was administered at doses of 0, 20 or 60mg/kg as preventive treatment (30 and 15days pre infection) and as treatment (post infection). The treatment of the groups continued until the day of euthanasia. Fifteen days after inoculation, parasitemia, plasma proinflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6), anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10) and blood acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE) were analyzed. Pretreatment with Cur reduced parasitemia and lethality. Cur inhibited AChE activity and improved immunological response by cytokines proinflammatory, fundamental during T. evansi infection. We found that Cur is not so important as an antitrypanosomal activity but as immunomodulator agent. These findings reveal that the preventive use of Cur stimulates anti-inflammatory mechanisms, reducing an excessive inflammatory response. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Toloza, Galia; Ferreira, Arturo

    2017-01-01

    American Trypanosomiasis is an important neglected reemerging tropical parasitism, infecting about 8 million people worldwide. Its agent, Trypanosoma cruzi , exhibits multiple mechanisms to evade the host immune response and infect host cells. An important immune evasion strategy of T. cruzi infective stages is its capacity to inhibit the complement system activation on the parasite surface, avoiding opsonizing, immune stimulating and lytic effects. Epimastigotes, the non-infective form of the parasite, present in triatomine arthropod vectors, are highly susceptible to complement-mediated lysis while trypomastigotes, the infective form, present in host bloodstream, are resistant. Thus T. cruzi susceptibility to complement varies depending on the parasite stage (amastigote, trypomastigotes or epimastigote) and on the T. cruzi strain. To avoid complement-mediated lysis, T. cruzi trypomastigotes express on the parasite surface a variety of complement regulatory proteins, such as glycoprotein 58/68 (gp58/68), T. cruzi complement regulatory protein (TcCRP), trypomastigote decay-accelerating factor (T-DAF), C2 receptor inhibitor trispanning (CRIT) and T. cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT). Alternatively, or concomitantly, the parasite captures components with complement regulatory activity from the host bloodstream, such as factor H (FH) and plasma membrane-derived vesicles (PMVs). All these proteins inhibit different steps of the classical (CP), alternative (AP) or lectin pathways (LP). Thus, TcCRP inhibits the CP C3 convertase assembling, gp58/68 inhibits the AP C3 convertase, T-DAF interferes with the CP and AP convertases assembling, TcCRT inhibits the CP and LP, CRIT confers ability to resist the CP and LP, FH is used by trypomastigotes to inhibit the AP convertases and PMVs inhibit the CP and LP C3 convertases. Many of these proteins have similar molecular inhibitory mechanisms. Our laboratory has contributed to elucidate the role of TcCRT in the host-parasite interplay

  5. Trypanocidal activity of human plasma on Trypanosoma evansi in mice Atividade tripanocida do plasma humano sobre Trypanosoma evansi em camundongos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandro Schafer Da Silva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to test an alternative protocol with human plasma to control Trypanosoma evansi infection in mice. Plasma from an apparently 27-year-old healthy male, blood type A+, was used in the study. A concentration of 100 mg.dL-1 apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1 was detected in the plasma. Forty mice were divided into four groups with 10 animals each. Group A comprised uninfected animals. Mice from groups B, C and D were inoculated with a T. evansi isolate. Group B was used as a positive control. At three days post-infection (DPI, the mice were administered intraperitoneally with human plasma. A single dose of 0.2 mL plasma was given to those in group C. The mice from group D were administered five doses of 0.2 mL plasma with a 24 hours interval between the doses. Group B showed high increasing parasitemia that led to their death within 5 DPI. Both treatments eliminated parasites from the blood and increased the longevity of animals. An efficacy of 50 (group C and 80% (group D of human plasma trypanocidal activity was found using PCR. This therapeutic success was likely achieved in the group D due to their higher levels of APOL1 compared with group C.Este estudo teve como objetivo testar um protocolo alternativo com plasma humano para controlar a infecção por Trypanosoma evansi em camundongos. O plasma foi oriundo de um homem aparentemente saudável, com idade entre 27 anos e tipo de sangue A+. Foi detectada uma concentração de 100 mg.dL -1 de apolipoproteína L1 (APOL1 no plasma. Quarenta camundongos foram divididos em quatro grupos, contendo dez animais cada. Grupo A, composto de animais não infectados. Os roedores dos grupos B, C e D foram inoculados intraperitonealmente com um isolado de T. evansi. O Grupo B foi usado como um controle positivo. Três dias pós-infecção (DPI, os camundongos foram tratados com plasma humano. Uma dose única de 0,2 mL de plasma foi administrada nos roedores do grupo C. Os ratos do grupo D receberam cinco

  6. Application of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-05-23

    LAMP) of the random insertion mobile element (RIME - LAMP) to diagnose camel Trypanosomiasis in Sudan. Extracted DNA from camels was used to detect Trypanosoma evansi infection in camels using RIME-LAMP technique.

  7. Assessment of listing and categorisation of animal diseases within the framework of the Animal Health Law (Regulation (EU) No 2016/429)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    More, Simon J.; Bøtner, Anette; Butterworth, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    for the categorisation of T. evansi infections (including Surra) according to disease prevention and control rules as in Annex IV and Article 8 on the list of animal species related to T. evansi infections (including Surra). The assessment has been performed following a methodology composed of information collection......Trypanosoma evansi infections (including Surra) have been assessed according to the criteria of the Animal Health Law (AHL), in particular criteria of Article 7 on disease profile and impacts, Article 5 on the eligibility of T. evansi infections (including Surra) to be listed, Article 9...... for this assessment are explained in a separate opinion. According to the assessment performed, it is inconclusive whether T. evansi infections (including Surra) can be considered eligible to be listed for Union intervention as laid down in Article 5(3) of the AHL because there was no full consensus on the criterion...

  8. Domestic cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffendorfer, James E.

    2017-01-01

    The familiar domestic cat is not native to southern California and is considered an invasive spe-cies by biologists and conservation organizations. When owners abandon their cats, wild or feral populations may arise, as they have in San Diego County. Cats’ pelage color, tail length, and hair thickness vary widely, given human fascination with breeding diverse phenotypes, but all have a typical felid body with upright ears, forward-looking eyes adapted for nocturnal foraging, protractible claws, and a sinuous, flexible body. Cats allowed outdoors and feral cats kill and eat a wide variety of vertebrates such as small mammals, birds, and reptiles

  9. Infecção via oral por Trypanosoma evansi em animais de laboratório Oral infection by Trypanosoma evansi in rats and mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandro Schafer da Silva

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Testou-se a infecção de Trypanosoma evansi pela via oral em ratos e camundongos, através de sangue contaminado de ambas as espécies. Dez ratos e dez camundongos foram alocados em quatro grupos iguais A e B (ratos, C e D (camundongos. Os grupos A e C receberam sangue contaminado de um rato e o grupo B e D de um camundongo, através de uma sonda. O volume de sangue administrado foi de 0,2ml, o qual apresentava uma concentração de 10(7 tripanossomas ml-1. Os animais foram mantidos em temperatura e umidade constantes (25°C e 80% UR, sendo realizados esfregaços sanguíneos diários para identificar o período pré-patente e a evolução do parasita na circulação. Nos grupos A e B, o período pré-patente variou de 19 a 25 dias, e o período entre a detecção dos parasitas e a morte dos animais foi em média de 12,7 dias. Os camundongos do grupo C e D não apresentaram infecção pelo parasita, sendo estes avaliados por 60 dias. Os ratos foram susceptíveis a infecção por T. evansi pela via oral; entretanto, os camundongos não se contaminaram com o protozoário por via digestiva.In this research, Trypanosoma evansi infection was tested in rats and mice by oral ingestion of contaminated blood. Groups of ten rats and ten mice were disposed in four experimental groups: A and B (rats, C and D (mice. The groups A and C were contaminated by rat-contaminated blood; B and C groups by mouse-contaminated blood. The blood was given using a probe filled with 0.2ml of contaminated blood with 10(7 trypanosomes ml-1. These animals were maintained at constant temperature and humidity (25°C and 80% UR. Dairy blood smear were done to identify the prepatent period and evolution of parasite in the circulation. In the A and B groups, the pre latency period varied from 19 to 25 days and the period of parasite detection and animals death was an average of 12.7 days. The C and D groups did not present infection by the parasite even when evaluated for 60 days

  10. Endocytosis in Trypanosoma cruzi

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Narcisa Leal da Cunha e; Sant’Anna, Celso; Pereira, Miria Gomes; Souza, Wanderley de

    2010-01-01

    Endocytic activity is particularly intense in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes, while in amastigotes and trypomastigotes it is untraceable. Cargo molecules enters through the cytostome or flagellar pocket at the parasite anterior region, goes along a branched early endosomal network of tubules and vesicles spread from nuclear periphery to the posterior pole, until delivery to reservosomes, the final compartment. Reservosomes are acid compartments that store protein and lipid cargo and also acc...

  11. Cat's Claw

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Cat's Claw Share: On This Page Background How Much ... Foster This fact sheet provides basic information about cat’s claw—common names, usefulness and safety, and resources ...

  12. Katsvanga, CAT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Katsvanga, CAT. Vol 1, No 2 (2006) - Articles Eucalyptus species performance under short rotation conditions on the Vumba highlands in Zimbabwe Abstract PDF. ISSN: 1819-3692. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners ...

  13. A Catalogue of Anatomical Fugitive Sheets: Cat. 49-62

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Images Cat. 50 Cat. 51 Cat. 53 Cat. 54 Cat. 55 (a) Cat. 55 (b) Cat. 56 Cat. 57: 1 Cat. 57: 2 Cat. 57: 3 Cat. 57: 4 Cat. 59: 1 Cat. 59: 2 Cat. 59: 3 Cat. 59: 4 Cat. 60 Cat. 61 Cat. 62: 1 (a) Cat. 62: 1 (b) Cat. 62: 2 (a) Cat. 62: 2 (b)

  14. A Catalogue of Anatomical Fugitive Sheets: Cat. 26-48

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Images Cat. 26: 1 (a) Cat. 26: 1 (b) Cat. 26: 2 (a) Cat. 26: 2(b) Cat. 27: 1 (a) Cat. 27: 1 (b) Cat. 27: 2 (a) Cat. 27: 2 (b) Cat. 28 Cat. 29: 2 (a) Cat. 29: 2 (b) Cat. 30: 1 Cat. 30: 2 Cat. 30: 3 Cat. 33 Cat. 34: 1 Cat. 34: 2 Cat. 35: 1 Cat. 35: 2 Cat. 35: 3 Cat. 36 Cat. 37 Cat. 38: 1 Cat. 38: 2 Cat. 40 Cat. 42 Cat. 43 Cat. 44 Cat. 45: 1 Cat. 45: 2 Cat. 46 Cat. 47: 1 Cat. 47: 2 Cat. 47: 3 Cat. 48: 1 Cat. 48: 2 Cat. 48: 3

  15. Effect of trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei mixed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of Trypanosoma congolense and T. brucei mixed infection on the pattern of haematological changes was demonstrated in a rat model. At the end of 21 days post infection (PI), anaemia which was characterised by drop in the packed cell volume (PCV), was found to be significantly (P<0.05) severer in rats with ...

  16. Trypanosoma (nannomonas) congolense : separation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trypanosoma (nannomonas) congolense : separation of chromosomes of PCR product specific to medium-size chromosome. ... hybridized to medium sized chromosomes2. This cloned fragment can therefore be used as a specific DNA marker for medium –size chromosome 2 of T. congolense. The Kenya Veterinarian Vol.

  17. Schroedinger's cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubkin, E.

    1979-01-01

    The issue is to seek quantum interference effects in an arbitrary field, in particular in psychology. For this a digest of quantum mechanics over finite-n-dimensional Hilbert space is invented. In order to match crude data not only von Neumann's mixed states are used but also a parallel notion of unsharp tests. The mathematically styled text (and earlier work on multibin tests, designated MB) deals largely with these new tests. Quantum psychology itself is only given a foundation. It readily engenders objections; its plausibility is developed gradually, in interlocking essays. There is also the empirically definite proposal that (state, test, outcome)-indexed counts be gathered to record data, then fed to a 'matrix format' (MF) search for quantum models. A previously proposed experiment in visual perception which has since failed to find significant quantum correlations, is discussed. The suspicion that quantum mechanics is all around goes beyond MF, and 'Schroedinger's cat' symbolizes this broader perspective. (author)

  18. Characterization of quinapyramine (Trypacide®) drug- resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    2006-05-16

    May 16, 2006 ... Chromosomes rearrangements in Trypanosoma brucei. Cell. 39: 213-221. Waitumbi JN, Young JR (1994). Electrophoretic Karyotyping is a sensitive epidemiological tool for studying Trypanosoma evansi infections. Vet. Parasitol. 52: 47-56. El Rayah et al. 955. Waitumbi JN, Murphy IB, Peregrine AS (1994).

  19. Cat and Dog Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wellness Staying Healthy Pets and Animals Cat and Dog Bites Cat and Dog Bites Share Print Cat and dog bites are common injuries. A family pet or ... bites. Path to safety If a cat or dog bites you, you should: Wash the wound gently ...

  20. Effect of Concurrent Trypanosoma brucei Infection on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of concurrent Trypanosoma bruceiinfection on caprine haemonchosis was investigated in Red Sokoto (Maradi) goats infected with either Haemonchus contortus alone or concurrently with Trypanosoma brucei. The goats infected with H. contortus alone manifested clinical disease that was mild and without ...

  1. Cat-Scratch Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mammals Pet Rodents Wildlife Animal Tales & Features Giant Sharks Help Wounded Warriors Heal Loving Your Special Cat ... bite while they play and learn how to attack prey. How cats and people become infected Kitten ...

  2. Cat Scratch Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cat scratch disease (CSD) is an illness caused by the bacterium Bartonella henselae. Almost half of all cats carry the infection ... symptoms of CSD, call your doctor. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  3. A Catalogue of Anatomical Fugitive Sheets: Cat. 1-10

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Images Cat. 1 Cat. 2 (a) Cat. 2 (b) Cat. 2 (c) Cat. 2 (d) Cat. 2 (e) Cat. 2 (f) Cat. 3: 1 (a) Cat. 3: 1 (b) Cat. 3: 2 (a) Cat. 3: 2 (b) Cat. 4: 1 Cat. 4: 2 Cat. 6: 1 (a) Cat. 6: 1 (b) Cat. 6: 2 (a) Cat. 6: 2 (b) Cat. 7: 1 (a) Cat. 7: 1 (b) Cat. 7: 2 (a) Cat. 7: 2 (b) Cat. 8: 1 Cat. 9: 1 Cat. 9: 2 Cat. 10: 1 Cat. 10: 2

  4. Polymerase chain reaction identification of Trypanosoma brucei ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymerase chain reaction identification of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in wild tsetse flies from Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve, Malawi. Janelisa Musaya, John Chisi, Edward Senga, Peter Nambala, Emmanuel Maganga, Enock Matovu, John Enyaru ...

  5. A Catalogue of Anatomical Fugitive Sheets: Cat. 11-25

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Images Cat. 11 (a) Cat. 11 (b) Cat. 11 (c) Cat. 11 (d) Cat. 12: 1 (a) Cat. 12: 1 (b) Cat. 12: 2 (a) Cat. 12: 2 (b) Cat. 13 Cat. 14 (a) Cat. 14 (b) Cat. 14 (c) Cat. 15 (a) Cat. 15 (b) Cat. 17: 1 Cat. 17: 2 Cat. 18: 1 Cat. 18: 2 Cat. 19: 1 (a) Cat. 19: 1 (b) Cat. 19: 2 (a) Cat. 19: 2 (b) Cat. 20: 1 Cat. 20: 2 (a) Cat. 20: 2 (b) Cat. 21 (a) Cat. 21 (b) Cat. 21 (c) Cat. 21 (d) Cat. 21 (e) Cat. 22 Cat. 24: 1 and 2 Cat. 25: 1 Cat. 25: 2 Cat. 25: 3 Cat. 25: 4

  6. Trypanosoma evansi isolated from capybara (Hidrochaeris hidrochaeris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Muñoz

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the morphological and biometric characteristics of Trypanosoma isolated from 50 capybaras animals, raised in captivity in the Peruvian Amazon. Trypanosoma was found in 14 blood samples using the microhaematocrit, wide drop, and Giemsa-stain methods and T. evansi was identified through morphological details in all 14 positive samples (the subterminal kinetoplast, the developed undulating membrane, and a long free flagellum were used for the identification of the agent.

  7. A tortoiseshell male cat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A. S.; Berg, Lise Charlotte; Almstrup, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    Tortoiseshell coat color is normally restricted to female cats due to X-linkage of the gene that encodes the orange coat color. Tortoiseshell male cats do, however, occur at a low frequency among tortoiseshell cats because of chromosome aberrations similar to the Klinefelter syndrome in man...... tissue from a tortoiseshell male cat referred to us. Chromosome analysis using RBA-banding consistently revealed a 39,XXY karyotype. Histological examinations of testis biopsies from this cat showed degeneration of the tubules, hyperplasia of the interstitial tissue, and complete loss of germ cells....... Immunostaining using anti-vimentin and anti-VASA (DDX4) showed that only Sertoli cells and no germ cells were observed in the testicular tubules. As no sign of spermatogenesis was detected, we conclude that this is a classic case of a sterile, male tortoiseshell cat with a 39,XXY chromosome complement. © 2013 S...

  8. Megaesophagus in a Cat

    OpenAIRE

    Forbes, Douglas C.; Leishman, Dyan E.

    1985-01-01

    Megaesophagus in an eight month old Siamese cat is described. Initially, a cause for the vomiting was not discovered and the cat was treated for pyloric spasm. Several months later the same cat, in poor physical condition, was presented with a palpable bulge along its ventral neck. At this time a very dilated and flaccid esophagus was found. An exploratory thoracotomy was done but a cause for the megaesophagus was not discovered.

  9. Nuclear structure of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkman, Sergio; Pascoalino, Bruno dos Santos; Nardelli, Sheila C

    2011-01-01

    The presence of nucleus in living organisms characterizes the Eukaryote domain. The nucleus compartmentalizes the genetic material surrounded by a double membrane called nuclear envelope. The nucleus has been observed since the advent of the light microscope, and sub-compartments such as nucleoli, diverse nuclear bodies and condensed chromosomes have been later recognized, being part of highly organized and dynamic structure. The significance and function of such organization has increased with the understanding of transcription, replication, DNA repair, recombination processes. It is now recognized as consequence of adding complexity and regulation in more complex eukaryotic cells. Here we provide a description of the actual stage of knowledge of the nuclear structure of Trypanosoma cruzi. As an early divergent eukaryote, it presents unique and/or reduced events of DNA replication, transcription and repair as well as RNA processing and transport to the cytosol. Nevertheless, it shows peculiar structure changes accordingly to the cell cycle and stage of differentiation. T. cruzi proliferates only as epimastigote and amastigote stages, and when these forms differentiate in trypomastigote forms, their cell cycle is arrested. This arrested stage is capable of invading mammalian cells and of surviving harsh conditions, such as the gut of the insect vector and mammalian macrophages. Transcription and replication decrease during transformation in trypomastigotes implicating large alterations in the nuclear structure. Recent evidences also suggest that T. cruzi nucleus respond to oxidative and nutritional stresses. Due to the phylogenetic proximity with other well-known trypanosomes, such as Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major, they are expected to have similar nuclear organization, although differences are noticed due to distinct life cycles, cellular organizations and the specific adaptations for surviving in different host environments. Therefore, the general

  10. Inventory of potential vectors of trypanosoma and infection rate of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Trypanosoma's vectors distribution is poorly investigated in Gabon, where Trypanosomiasis historical foci exist. Thus, an active detection of Trypanosoma sp transmission needs to be assessed. Objectives: The present study aims to identify potential vectors of Trypanosoma sp and to evaluate the infection rate ...

  11. That Fat Cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Phyllis Gilchrist

    2012-01-01

    This activity began with a picture book, Nurit Karlin's "Fat Cat On a Mat" (HarperCollins; 1998). The author and her students started their project with a 5-inch circular template for the head of their cats. They reviewed shapes as they drew the head and then added the ears and nose, which were triangles. Details to the face were added when…

  12. CAT questions and answers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    This document, prepared in February 1993, addresses the most common questions asked by APS Collaborative Access Teams (CATs). The answers represent the best judgment on the part of the APS at this time. In some cases, details are provided in separate documents to be supplied by the APS. Some of the answers are brief because details are not yet available. The questions are separated into five categories representing different aspects of CAT interactions with the APS: (1) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), (2) CAT Beamline Review and Construction, (3) CAT Beamline Safety, (4) CAT Beamline Operations, and (5) Miscellaneous. The APS plans to generate similar documents as needed to both address new questions and clarify answers to present questions

  13. Leukocyte changes in pregnant Yankasa ewes experimentally ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pregnancy and trypanosomosis are associated with leukocyte changes. The leukocyte response of pregnant Yankasa ewes during experimental Trypanosoma evansi infection was determined using twenty pregnant ewes. They ewes were divided into 3 groups with 6 ewes in group A, while groups B and C were made up of ...

  14. Cat-scratch neuroretinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, J

    1999-08-01

    Cat-scratch disease is a subacute regional lymphadenitis, usually preceded by a history of a cat scratch or exposure to kittens. The disease is caused by Bartonella henselae, and possibly Bartonella quintana, pleomorphic gram-negative rods formerly known as Rochalimaea henselae and Rochalimaea quintana. Ocular involvement is rare and typically manifests as either Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome or neuroretinitis. Patients with neuroretinitis resulting from cat-scratch disease may be asymptomatic or experience mild-to-severe vision loss. The clinical features, angiographic appearance, differential diagnosis, and management of cat-scratch neuroretinitis are discussed. A 30-year-old white woman reported to the eye clinic with painless, decreased vision in the right eye. A diagnosis of cat scratch neuroretinitis was made on the basis of the history of cat scratch, clinical appearance, and angiographic findings. Treatment with oral ciprofloxacin restored vision to normal in 4 weeks. Painless vision loss associated with optic nerve swelling and macular star exudate should alert suspicion of systemic disease. Additional findings--including positive history of a cat scratch, lymphadenopathy, and flu-like symptoms--may indicate Bartonella henselae or Bartonella quintana infection. While treatment remains controversial, appropriate serology testing may aid in the diagnosis and management of the underlying infection.

  15. IndexCat

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — IndexCat provides access to the digitized version of the printed Index-Catalogue of the Library of the Surgeon General's Office; eTK for medieval Latin texts; and...

  16. StreamCat

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The StreamCat Dataset provides summaries of natural and anthropogenic landscape features for ~2.65 million streams, and their associated catchments, within the...

  17. Cat-Scratch Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain. Antibiotics may be needed if your symptoms don’t go away in a month or two. In rare cases, the infection can travel to your bones, liver, or other organs. This requires more intensive treatment. Should cats be ...

  18. Infecção natural por Trypanosoma evansi em cães Natural infection by Trypanosoma evansi in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Braccini Colpo

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho relata duas infecções naturais por Trypanosoma evansi em cães, que vieram a óbito no município de Uruguaiana, RS. Os animais oriundos da zona rural foram recebidos no hospital veterinário da Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS, em diferentes datas, apresentando apatia, febre e aumento dos linfonodos submandibulares. No esfregaço sangüíneo, foram identificadas formas flageladas pertencentes à espécie T. evansi. A verificação desses casos serve de alerta aos proprietários de animais e médicos veterinários para a presença da doença na região e salienta a necessidade de maiores investigações na epidemiologia da parasitose e criação de medidas profiláticas que evitem novas infecções.The present paper describes cases of natural infection by Trypanosoma evansi in dogs that eventually died in Uruguaiana, in the southern Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The animals from the rural zone were admitted to the Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUC-RS Veterinary Hospital presenting the following clinical signs: apathy, fever and enlargement of the submandibular lymphonodes. Flagellated forms in the blood films were identified as belonging to the species T. evansi. The discovery of these cases raises an allert to the presence of the disease in the area, emphasizing the need for further investigation of the epidemiology of the infection and also the study of prophylathic measures to prevent new cases.

  19. Pathogenicity of Trypanosoma congolense infection following oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eighty healthy adult albino rats of both sexes weighing 180-200g were used in two experiments to study the effects of oral calcium chloride treatment on the pathogenicity of Trypanosoma congolense infection. Experiment 1 was terminated at the peak of parasitaemia while experiment II was allowed to run a full course.

  20. Characterization of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense stocks isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trypanosoma brucei gambiense was isolated twice from each of 23 patients in Côte d'Ivoire. Genetic characterization using RAPD (Random Primed Amplified Polymorphic DNA) showed additional variability within a given isoenzyme profile (zymodeme), confirming that this fingerprinting method has a higher discriminative ...

  1. Haematology of experimental Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haematological aberrations associated with human infective trypanosomes were investigated in the vervet monkey model of the Rhodesian sleeping sickness. Four monkeys were infected intravenously with 104 Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and monitored for changes in the blood profile using a haematological ...

  2. Characterisation of the Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense isolates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serum resistance associated (SRA) gene has been found to confer resistance to the innate trypanolytic factor (TLF) found in normal human serum; thus allowing Trypanosoma brucei brucei to survive exposure to normal human serum. This study was carried out to examine the presence of SRA gene and identify the origin of ...

  3. (puppies) to infection with Trypanosoma congolense

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies were undertaken to assess the susceptibility of young local dogs to infection with Trypanosoma congolensei. Six puppies (7 weeks old) were used for the study. Although the puppies became parasitaemic 6 to 7 days post infection, they were tolerant to infection as the parasitaemia remained low through out the first ...

  4. Trypanosoma evansi : A clinical, parasitological and immunological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We evaluated the clinical, parasitological and immunological effects of a Venezuelan strain of Trypanosoma evansi (T. evansi) throughout in experimentally inoculated rabbits over the course of infection and compared them with the same aspect in healthy animals. Body temperature was recorded in degrees Celsius, animal ...

  5. The kinetoplast DNA of Trypanosoma equiperdum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C.C. Frasch; S.L. Hajduk; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); P. Borst (Piet); F. Brunel; J. Davison

    1980-01-01

    textabstractWe have analyzed the kinetoplast DNA for Trypanosoma equiperdum (American Type Culture Collection 30019) and two dyskinetoplastic strains derived from it. The DNA networks from the kinetoplastic strain are made up of catenated mini-circles and maxi-circles, like the networks from the

  6. Exocytosis and protein secretion in Trypanosoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossignol Michel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human African trypanosomiasis is a lethal disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. The proteins secreted by T. brucei inhibit the maturation of dendritic cells and their ability to induce lymphocytic allogenic responses. To better understand the pathogenic process, we combined different approaches to characterize these secreted proteins. Results Overall, 444 proteins were identified using mass spectrometry, the largest parasite secretome described to date. Functional analysis of these proteins revealed a strong bias toward folding and degradation processes and to a lesser extent toward nucleotide metabolism. These features were shared by different strains of T. brucei, but distinguished the secretome from published T. brucei whole proteome or glycosome. In addition, several proteins had not been previously described in Trypanosoma and some constitute novel potential therapeutic targets or diagnostic markers. Interestingly, a high proportion of these secreted proteins are known to have alternative roles once secreted. Furthermore, bioinformatic analysis showed that a significant proportion of proteins in the secretome lack transit peptide and are probably not secreted through the classical sorting pathway. Membrane vesicles from secretion buffer and infested rat serum were purified on sucrose gradient and electron microscopy pictures have shown 50- to 100-nm vesicles budding from the coated plasma membrane. Mass spectrometry confirmed the presence of Trypanosoma proteins in these microvesicles, showing that an active exocytosis might occur beyond the flagellar pocket. Conclusions This study brings out several unexpected features of the secreted proteins and opens novel perspectives concerning the survival strategy of Trypanosoma as well as possible ways to control the disease. In addition, concordant lines of evidence support the original hypothesis of the involvement of microvesicle-like bodies in the

  7. Pancreatitis in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, P Jane; Williams, David A

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatitis was considered a rare disease in the cat until a couple of decades ago when several retrospective studies of severe acute pancreatitis were published. It was apparent that few of the diagnostic tests of value in the dog were helpful in cats. With increasing clinical suspicion, availability of abdominal ultrasonography, and introduction of pancreas-specific blood tests of increasing utility, it is now accepted that acute pancreatitis is probably almost as common in cats as it is in dogs, although the etiology(s) remain more obscure. Pancreatitis in cats often co-exists with inflammatory bowel disease, less commonly with cholangitis, and sometimes with both. Additionally, pancreatitis may trigger hepatic lipidosis, while other diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, may be complicated by pancreatitis. Therapy is similar to that used in dogs, with added emphasis on early nutritional support to prevent hepatic lipidosis. Less is known about chronic pancreatitis than the acute form, but chronic pancreatitis is more common in cats than it is in dogs and may respond positively to treatment with corticosteroids. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense in Glossina fuscipes fuscipes ( Diptera: Glossinidae ) and Stomoxys flies using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique in southern Sudan.

  9. E-Z-CAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyman, U.; Dinnetz, G.; Andersson, I.

    1984-01-01

    A new barium sulphate suspension, E-Z-CAT, for use as an oral contrast medium at computed tomography of the abdomen has been compared with the commonly used water-soluble iodinated contrast medium Gastrografin as regards patient tolerance and diagnostic information. The investigation was conducted as an unpaired randomized single-blind study in 100 consecutive patients. E-Z-CAT seems to be preferred because of its better taste, its lesser tendency to cause diarrhoea, and for usage in patients who are known to be hypersensitive to iodinated contrast media. The diagnostic information was the same for both contrast media. (Auth.)

  10. [Declawing in cats?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, I

    1983-02-15

    Those forms of behaviour in which cats use their claws are reviewed. Forms of undesirable use of the claws and possible solutions to this problem are discussed. An inquiry among veterinary practitioners showed that nearly fifty per cent of these practitioners refused to declaw cats on principle. Approximately seventy-five per cent of the veterinarians taking part in the inquiry advocated that the Royal Netherlands Veterinary Association should state its position with regard to declawing. It is concluded by the present author that declawing is unacceptable for ethical and ethological reasons.

  11. Tracheal collapse in two cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, J.C.; O'Brien, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Two cats examined bronchoscopically to discover the cause of tracheal collapse were found to have tracheal obstruction cranial to the collapse. Cats with this unusual sign should be examined bronchoscopically to ascertain whether there is an obstruction, as the cause in these 2 cats was distinct from the diffuse airway abnormality that causes tracheal collapse in dogs

  12. Prostatic carcinoma in two cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caney, S.M.A.; Holt, P.E.; Day, M.J.; Rudorf, H.; Gruffydd-Jones, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    Clinical, radiological and pathological features of two cats with prostatic carcinoma are reported. In both cats the presenting history included signs of lower urinary tract disease with haematuria and dysuria. Prostatomegaly was visible radiographically in one cat; an irregular intraprostatic urethra was seen on retrograde contrast urethrography in both cats. In one of the cats, neoplasia was suspected on the basis of a transurethral catheter biopsy. Following a poor response to palliative treatment in both cases, euthanasia was performed with histological confirmation of the diagnosis

  13. 21 CFR 866.3870 - Trypanosoma spp. serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trypanosoma spp. serological reagents. 866.3870 Section 866.3870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... protozoans belonging to the genus Trypanosoma. Trypanosomiasis in adults is a chronic disease characterized...

  14. RNA interference of Trypanosoma brucei cathepsin B and L affects disease progression in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha-Hamadien Abdulla

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the roles played by the cysteine proteases cathepsin B and cathepsin L (brucipain in the pathogenesis of Trypansoma brucei brucei in both an in vivo mouse model and an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier. Doxycycline induction of RNAi targeting cathepsin B led to parasite clearance from the bloodstream and prevent a lethal infection in the mice. In contrast, all mice infected with T. brucei containing the uninduced Trypanosoma brucei cathepsin B (TbCatB RNA construct died by day 13. Induction of RNAi against brucipain did not cure mice from infection; however, 50% of these mice survived 60 days longer than uninduced controls. The ability of T. b. brucei to cross an in vitro model of the human blood-brain barrier was also reduced by brucipain RNAi induction. Taken together, the data suggest that while TbCatB is the more likely target for the development of new chemotherapy, a possible role for brucipain is in facilitating parasite entry into the brain.

  15. Iron-associated biology of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Basu, Somsuvro; Horáková, Eva; Lukeš, Julius

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 1860, č. 2 (2016), s. 363-370 ISSN 0304-4165 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-23986S; GA ČR GAP305/12/2261; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) COST Action CM1307; European Commission(XE) 316304 - MODBIOLIN Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M200961204 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : iron * Fe/S cluster * heme * Trypanosoma * TAO Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.702, year: 2016

  16. Local cloning of CAT states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahaman, Ramij

    2011-01-01

    In this Letter we analyze the (im)possibility of the exact cloning of orthogonal three-qubit CAT states under local operation and classical communication (LOCC) with the help of a restricted entangled state. We also classify the three-qubit CAT states that can (not) be cloned under LOCC restrictions and extend the results to the n-qubit case. -- Highlights: → We analyze the (im)possibility of exact cloning of orthogonal CAT states under LOCC. → We also classify the set of CAT states that can(not) be cloned by LOCC. → No set of orthogonal CAT states can be cloned by LOCC with help of similar CAT state. → Any two orthogonal n-qubit GHZ-states can be cloned by LOCC with help of a GHZ state.

  17. Cystinuria in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBartola, S P; Chew, D J; Horton, M L

    1991-01-01

    A 10-month-old male Siamese cat with dysuria was determined to have cystine crystalluria. Many small calculi composed entirely of cystine were found in the urinary bladder. Measurement of serum and urine amino acids and calculation of fractional reabsorption of amino acids indicated reabsorption defects for cystine, ornithine, lysine, and arginine. Urinary acidification, fractional reabsorption of glucose, and fractional reabsorption of electrolytes were normal. Diagnoses of cystinuria and cystine urolithiasis were made on the basis of low fractional reabsorption of cystine and dibasic amino acids and the detection of cystine calculi in the urinary bladder.

  18. Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of nicotinamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Milena B P; Silva, Cinara V; Bastos, Tanira M; Guimarães, Elisalva T; Figueira, Claudio P; Smirlis, Despina; Azevedo, Walter F

    2012-05-01

    Inhibition of Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania spp. sirtuins has shown promising antiparasitic activity, indicating that these enzymes may be used as targets for drug discovery against trypanosomatid infections. In the present work we carried out a virtual screening focused on the C pocket of Sir2 from Trypanosoma cruzi. Using this approach, the best ligand found was nicotinamide. In vitro tests confirmed the anti-T. cruzi activity of nicotinamide on epimastigote and trypomastigote forms. Moreover, treatment of T. cruzi-infected macrophages with nicotinamide caused a significant reduction in the number of amastigotes. In addition, alterations in the mitochondria and an increase in the vacuolization in the cytoplasm were observed in epimastigotes treated with nicotinamide. Analysis of the complex of Sir2 and nicotinamide revealed the details of the possible ligand-target interaction. Our data reveal a potential use of TcSir2 as a target for anti-T. cruzi drug discovery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Toxoplasmosis: An Important Message for Cat Owners

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... role do cats play in the spread of toxoplasmosis? Cats get Toxoplasma infection by eating infected rodents, ... an infected cat may have defecated. What is toxoplasmosis? Toxoplasmosis is an infection caused by a microscopic ...

  20. Vaccination with Trypanosoma rangeli induces resistance of guinea pigs to virulent Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, B; Moretti, E; Fretes, R

    2014-01-15

    Chagas' disease, endemic in Latin America, is spread in natural environments through animal reservoirs, including marsupials, mice and guinea pigs. Farms breeding guinea pigs for food are located in some Latin-American countries with consequent risk of digestive infection. The aim of this work was to study the effect of vaccination with Trypanosoma rangeli in guinea pigs challenged with Trypanosoma cruzi. Animals were vaccinated with fixated epimastigotes of T. rangeli, emulsified with saponin. Controls received only PBS. Before being challenged with T. cruzi, parasitemia, survival rates and histological studies were performed. The vaccinated guinea pigs revealed significantly lower parasitemia than controls (pguinea pigs and dogs. The development of vaccines for use in animals, like domestic dogs and guinea pigs in captivity, opens up new opportunities for preventive tools, and could reduce the risk of infection with T. cruzi in the community. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Systemic Cat Scratch Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Min Liao

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic cat scratch disease (CSD is often associated with prolonged fever and microabscesses in the liver and/or spleen. We report a case of systemic CSD with hepatic, splenic and renal involvement in an aboriginal child in Taiwan. A previously healthy 9-year-old girl had an intermittent fever for about 17 days, and complained of abdominal pain, headache and weight loss. Abdominal computed tomography showed multiple tiny hypodense nodular lesions in the spleen and both kidneys. Laparotomy revealed multiple soft, whitishtan lesions on the surface of the liver and spleen. Histopathologic examination of a biopsy specimen of the spleen showed necrotizing granulomatous inflammation with central necrosis surrounded by epithelioid cells and occasional Langhans' giant cells, strongly suggestive of Bartonella henselae infection. History revealed close contact with a cat. B. henselae DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction in the tissue specimen, and the single antibody titer against B. henselae was greater than 1:2048. These results confirmed the diagnosis of visceral CSD caused by B. henselae. The patient's symptoms resolved after treatment with rifampin and tetracycline. This case illustrates the need for inclusion of systemic CSD in patients with fever of unknown origin and abdominal pain.

  2. Lumbosacral agenesis in a cat

    OpenAIRE

    Gabrielle C Hybki; Lisa A Murphy; Joseph P Marchi; Jeffrey E Patlogar; Jennifer O Brisson; Reid K Nakamura

    2016-01-01

    Case summary Lumbosacral agenesis is a rare congenital condition reported in children. We report a 17-week-old female domestic shorthair cat with lumbosacral agenesis on whole-body radiographs. The cat was euthanized shortly thereafter presentation. A necropsy was not permitted. Relevance and novel information This is the first reported feline case of lumbosacral agenesis.

  3. Rebound hyperglycaemia in diabetic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roomp, Kirsten; Rand, Jacquie

    2016-08-01

    Rebound hyperglycaemia (also termed Somogyi effect) is defined as hyperglycaemia caused by the release of counter-regulatory hormones in response to insulin-induced hypoglycaemia, and is widely believed to be common in diabetic cats. However, studies in human diabetic patients over the past quarter century have rejected the common occurrence of this phenomenon. Therefore, we evaluated the occurrence and prevalence of rebound hyperglycaemia in diabetic cats. In a retrospective study, 10,767 blood glucose curves of 55 cats treated with glargine using an intensive blood glucose regulation protocol with a median of five blood glucose measurements per day were evaluated for evidence of rebound hyperglycaemic events, defined in two different ways (with and without an insulin resistance component). While biochemical hypoglycaemia occurred frequently, blood glucose curves consistent with rebound hyperglycaemia with insulin resistance was confined to four single events in four different cats. In 14/55 cats (25%), a median of 1.5% (range 0.32-7.7%) of blood glucose curves were consistent with rebound hyperglycaemia without an insulin resistance component; this represented 0.42% of blood glucose curves in both affected and unaffected cats. We conclude that despite the frequent occurrence of biochemical hypoglycaemia, rebound hyperglycaemia is rare in cats treated with glargine on a protocol aimed at tight glycaemic control. For glargine-treated cats, insulin dose should not be reduced when there is hyperglycaemia in the absence of biochemical or clinical evidence of hypoglycaemia. © ISFM and AAFP 2015.

  4. Lumbosacral agenesis in a cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle C Hybki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Case summary Lumbosacral agenesis is a rare congenital condition reported in children. We report a 17-week-old female domestic shorthair cat with lumbosacral agenesis on whole-body radiographs. The cat was euthanized shortly thereafter presentation. A necropsy was not permitted. Relevance and novel information This is the first reported feline case of lumbosacral agenesis.

  5. Local cloning of CAT states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Ramij

    2011-06-01

    In this Letter we analyze the (im)possibility of the exact cloning of orthogonal three-qubit CAT states under local operation and classical communication (LOCC) with the help of a restricted entangled state. We also classify the three-qubit CAT states that can (not) be cloned under LOCC restrictions and extend the results to the n-qubit case.

  6. College Students and Their Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Lawrence; Alexander, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-two Siamese and 32 mixed breed cats' personalities were rated by their respective college student owners and compared. Further, the owners' self rated personality traits were correlated with the pets'; significant Siamese and Mixed differences and correlations were obtained. These are the first data to examine breed of cat on a personality…

  7. CONTRACT ADMINISTRATIVE TRACKING SYSTEM (CATS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Contract Administrative Tracking System (CATS) was developed in response to an ORD NHEERL, Mid-Continent Ecology Division (MED)-recognized need for an automated tracking and retrieval system for Cost Reimbursable Level of Effort (CR/LOE) Contracts. CATS is an Oracle-based app...

  8. Chloramphenicol-sensitive mitochondrial translation in Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabholz, C. E.; Speijer, D.; Schneider, A.

    1999-01-01

    We developed an in organello system to label newly synthesized mitochondrially encoded proteins of Trypanosoma brucei. Highly purified mitochondria, prepared under isotonic conditions, were incubated with radioactive methionine and cysteine in a suitable translation buffer. Analysis of mitochondrial

  9. Peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia in cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neiger, R.

    1996-01-01

    Peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia in a cat is often an incidental finding on a routine thoracic or abdominal radiograph. Clinical signs are nonspecific-usually respiratory (dyspnea) or gastrointestinal(vomiting or diarrhea). Some of the cats with this anomaly are asymptomatic. The physical examination may be normal: muffled heart sounds are the most common abnormality noted during a physical examination. Cats of many breeds are affected, although 26% of reported cases were inPersians. Age of the cat at diagnosis ranged from 6 days to 14 years. Thirty of the 52 reported cases were in females. Diagnostic studies used to confirm the diagnosis included echocardiography, upper gastrointestinal study, ultrasonography, angiography, positive-contrast peritoneography, and laparotomy. Surgical correction was reportedly successful in 22 of 25 cats

  10. Toxoplasmosis : Beware of Cats !!!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubina Kumari Baithalu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Anthropozoonotic parasite Toxoplasma gondii causes widespread human and animal diseases, mostly involving central nervous system. Human acquires toxoplasmosis from cats, from consuming raw or undercooked meat and from vertical transmission to the fetus through placenta from mother during pregnancy. Socio-epidemiological as well as unique environmental factors also plays a significant role in transmission of this infection. Preventive measures should be taken into account the importance of culture, tradition, and beliefs of people in various communities more than solving poverty and giving health education. Therefore the focus of this article is to create public awareness regarding sense of responsibility of looking after pets to prevent such an important zoonotic disease. [Vet. World 2010; 3(5.000: 247-249

  11. Immunization of mice with Trypanosoma cruzi polyribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, L L; Leon, W; Chaves, L; Costa, S C; Cruz, M Q; Brascher, H M; Lima, A O

    1980-01-01

    Studies were carried out with a polyribosomal fraction isolated from Trypanosoma cruzi Y epimastigotes, with the intention to determine both its immunogenic activity and the degree of protection it could induce against experimental T. cruzi infection. This fraction was assayed in four groups of mice by using different schedules of vaccination and varying the dose, intervals, and route of administration. Seven days after the last dose, the animals were sacrificed for immunological studies or subjected to challenge with T. cruzi trypomastigotes. The results obtained in all schedules showed that our polyribosomal fraction only induced a weak antibody response, but was capable of evoking an expressive cellular response. It was also shown that this fraction has the capacity of inducing a high degree of protection against T. cruzi infection, as determined by the decrease of parasitemia and the prolonged survival time of immunized animals.

  12. The nuclear proteome of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goos, Carina; Dejung, Mario; Janzen, Christian J; Butter, Falk; Kramer, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan flagellate that is transmitted by tsetse flies into the mammalian bloodstream. The parasite has a huge impact on human health both directly by causing African sleeping sickness and indirectly, by infecting domestic cattle. The biology of trypanosomes involves some highly unusual, nuclear-localised processes. These include polycistronic transcription without classical promoters initiated from regions defined by histone variants, trans-splicing of all transcripts to the exon of a spliced leader RNA, transcription of some very abundant proteins by RNA polymerase I and antigenic variation, a switch in expression of the cell surface protein variants that allows the parasite to resist the immune system of its mammalian host. Here, we provide the nuclear proteome of procyclic Trypanosoma brucei, the stage that resides within the tsetse fly midgut. We have performed quantitative label-free mass spectrometry to score 764 significantly nuclear enriched proteins in comparison to whole cell lysates. A comparison with proteomes of several experimentally characterised nuclear and non-nuclear structures and pathways confirmed the high quality of the dataset: the proteome contains about 80% of all nuclear proteins and less than 2% false positives. Using motif enrichment, we found the amino acid sequence KRxR present in a large number of nuclear proteins. KRxR is a sub-motif of a classical eukaryotic monopartite nuclear localisation signal and could be responsible for nuclear localization of proteins in Kinetoplastida species. As a proof of principle, we have confirmed the nuclear localisation of six proteins with previously unknown localisation by expressing eYFP fusion proteins. While proteome data of several T. brucei organelles have been published, our nuclear proteome closes an important gap in knowledge to study trypanosome biology, in particular nuclear-related processes.

  13. CAT-D-T tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.; Blue, T.; Miley, G.H.

    1981-01-01

    The domains of plasma fuel cycles bounded by the D-T and Cat-D, and by the D-T and SCD modes of operation are examined. These domains, referred to as, respectively, the Cat-D-T and SCD-T modes of operation, are characterized by the number (γ) of tritons per fusion neutron available from external (to the plasma) sources. Two external tritium sources are considered - the blankets of the Cat-D-T (SCD-T) reactors and fission reactors supported by the Cat-D-T (SCD-T) driven hybrid reactors. It is found that by using 6 Li for the active material of the control elements of the fission reactors, it is possible to achieve γ values close to unity. Cat-D-T tokamaks could be designed to have smaller size, higher power density, lower magnetic field and even lower plasma temperature than Cat-D tokamaks; the difference becomes significant for γ greater than or equal to .75. The SCD-T mode of operation appears to be even more attractive. Promising applications identified for these Cat-D-T and SCD-T modes of operation include hybrid reactors, fusion synfuel factories and fusion reactors which have difficulty in providing all their tritium needs

  14. Sonography of cat scratch disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, David M; Jacobson, Jon A; Downie, Brian; Biermann, J Sybil; Kim, Sung Moon; Yablon, Corrie M

    2015-03-01

    To characterize the sonographic features of cat scratch disease and to identify features that allow differentiation from other causes of medial epitrochlear masses. After Institutional Review Board approval was obtained, patients who underwent sonography for a medial epitrochlear mass or lymph node were identified via the radiology information system. Patients were divided into 2 groups: cat scratch disease and non-cat scratch disease, based on pathologic results and clinical information. Sonograms were retrospectively reviewed and characterized with respect to dimension, shape (round, oval, or lobular), symmetry, location (subcutaneous or intramuscular), multiplicity, echogenicity (anechoic, hypoechoic, isoechoic, hyperechoic, or mixed), hyperechoic hilum (present or absent), adjacent anechoic or hypoechoic area, hyperemia (present or absent), pattern of hyperemia if present (central, peripheral, or mixed), increased posterior through-transmission (present or absent), and shadowing (present or absent). Sonographic findings were compared between the patients with and without cat scratch disease. The final patient group consisted of 5 cases of cat scratch disease and 16 cases of other causes of medial epitrochlear masses. The 2 sonographic findings that were significantly different between the cat scratch disease and non-cat scratch disease cases included mass asymmetry (P = .0062) and the presence of a hyperechoic hilum (P = .0075). The other sonographic findings showed no significant differences between the groups. The sonographic finding of an epitrochlear mass due to cat scratch disease most commonly is that of a hypoechoic lobular or oval mass with central hyperemia and a possible adjacent fluid collection; however, the presence of asymmetry and a hyperechoic hilum differentiate cat scratch disease from other etiologies. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  15. NRPC ServCat priorities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — This document lists the Natural Resource Program Center’s priority ServCat documents. It is recommended that these documents- which include annual narrative reports,...

  16. Fructosamine concentrations in hyperglycemic cats.

    OpenAIRE

    Lutz, T A; Rand, J S; Ryan, E

    1995-01-01

    The aims of this study were 1) to establish a reference range for fructosamine in cats using a commercial fructosamine kit; 2) to demonstrate that the fructosamine concentration is not increased by transient hyperglycemia of 90 min duration, simulating hyperglycemia of acute stress; and 3) to determine what percentage of blood samples submitted to a commercial laboratory from 95 sick cats had evidence of persistent hyperglycemia based on an elevated fructosamine concentration. Reference inter...

  17. Properties of squeezed Schroedinger cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obada, A.S.F.; Omar, Z.M.

    1995-09-01

    In this article we investigate some statistical properties of the even and odd squeezed (squeezed Schroedinger cat) states. The quasi-probability distribution functions especially W(α) and Q(α) are calculated and discussed for these states. The phase distribution function is discussed. A generation scheme is proposed for either the squeezed generalized Schroedinger cat, or the squeezed number state. (author). 35 refs, 5 figs

  18. Echocardiographic Findings in 11 Cats with Acromegaly

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, J.A.; Lunn, K.F.; Bright, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Information regarding cardiac changes in domestic cats with acromegaly is limited. Hypothesis/Objectives The objective of this study was to describe the echocardiographic findings in cats with acromegaly. Animals Eighteen cats diagnosed with acromegaly at Colorado State University between 2008 and 2012. Of these 18 cats, 11 had echocardiography performed. Methods A retrospective review of medical records was made to identify cats with acromegaly that also had echocardiography perfo...

  19. Multistate matrix population model to assess the contributions and impacts on population abundance of domestic cats in urban areas including owned cats, unowned cats, and cats in shelters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flockhart, D T Tyler; Coe, Jason B

    2018-01-01

    Concerns over cat homelessness, over-taxed animal shelters, public health risks, and environmental impacts has raised attention on urban-cat populations. To truly understand cat population dynamics, the collective population of owned cats, unowned cats, and cats in the shelter system must be considered simultaneously because each subpopulation contributes differently to the overall population of cats in a community (e.g., differences in neuter rates, differences in impacts on wildlife) and cats move among categories through human interventions (e.g., adoption, abandonment). To assess this complex socio-ecological system, we developed a multistate matrix model of cats in urban areas that include owned cats, unowned cats (free-roaming and feral), and cats that move through the shelter system. Our model requires three inputs-location, number of human dwellings, and urban area-to provide testable predictions of cat abundance for any city in North America. Model-predicted population size of unowned cats in seven Canadian cities were not significantly different than published estimates (p = 0.23). Model-predicted proportions of sterile feral cats did not match observed sterile cat proportions for six USA cities (p = 0.001). Using a case study from Guelph, Ontario, Canada, we compared model-predicted to empirical estimates of cat abundance in each subpopulation and used perturbation analysis to calculate relative sensitivity of vital rates to cat abundance to demonstrate how management or mismanagement in one portion of the population could have repercussions across all portions of the network. Our study provides a general framework to consider cat population abundance in urban areas and, with refinement that includes city-specific parameter estimates and modeling, could provide a better understanding of population dynamics of cats in our communities.

  20. Reservoir host competence and the role of domestic and commensal hosts in the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürtler, Ricardo E; Cardinal, M V

    2015-11-01

    We review the epidemiological role of domestic and commensal hosts of Trypanosoma cruzi using a quantitative approach, and compiled >400 reports on their natural infection. We link the theory underlying simple mathematical models of vector-borne parasite transmission to the types of evidence used for reservoir host identification: mean duration of infectious life; host infection and infectiousness; and host-vector contact. The infectiousness of dogs or cats most frequently exceeded that of humans. The host-feeding patterns of major vectors showed wide variability among and within triatomine species related to their opportunistic behavior and variable ecological, biological and social contexts. The evidence shows that dogs, cats, commensal rodents and domesticated guinea pigs are able to maintain T. cruzi in the absence of any other host species. They play key roles as amplifying hosts and sources of T. cruzi in many (peri)domestic transmission cycles covering a broad diversity of ecoregions, ecotopes and triatomine species: no other domestic animal plays that role. Dogs comply with the desirable attributes of natural sentinels and sometimes were a point of entry of sylvatic parasite strains. The controversies on the role of cats and other hosts illustrate the issues that hamper assessing the relative importance of reservoir hosts on the basis of fragmentary evidence. We provide various study cases of how eco-epidemiological and genetic-marker evidence helped to unravel transmission cycles and identify the implicated hosts. Keeping dogs, cats and rodents out of human sleeping quarters and reducing their exposure to triatomine bugs are predicted to strongly reduce transmission risks. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Fructosamine concentrations in hyperglycemic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, T A; Rand, J S; Ryan, E

    1995-03-01

    The aims of this study were 1) to establish a reference range for fructosamine in cats using a commercial fructosamine kit; 2) to demonstrate that the fructosamine concentration is not increased by transient hyperglycemia of 90 min duration, simulating hyperglycemia of acute stress; and 3) to determine what percentage of blood samples submitted to a commercial laboratory from 95 sick cats had evidence of persistent hyperglycemia based on an elevated fructosamine concentration. Reference intervals for the serum fructosamine concentration were established in healthy, normoglycemic cats using a second generation kit designed for the measurement of the fructosamine concentration in humans. Transient hyperglycemia of 90 min duration was induced by IV glucose injection in healthy cats. Multisourced blood samples that were submitted to a commercial veterinary laboratory either as fluoride oxalated plasma or serum were used to determine the percentage of hyperglycemic cats having persistent hyperglycemia. The reference interval for the serum fructosamine concentration was 249 to 406 mumol/L. Transient hyperglycemia of 90 min duration did not increase the fructosamine concentration and there was no correlation between fructosamine and blood glucose. In contrast, the fructosamine concentration was correlated with the glucose concentration in sick hyper- and normoglycemic cats. It is concluded that the fructosamine concentration is a useful marker for the detection of persistent hyperglycemia and its differentiation from transient stress hyperglycemia. Fructosamine determinations should be considered when blood glucose is 12 to 20 mmol/L and only a single blood sample is available for analysis.

  2. Cat eye syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak; Murki, Srinivas; Pratap, Tejo; Vasikarla, Madhavi

    2014-05-19

    A full-term female baby, a product of non-consanguineous marriage, was born at 37 weeks of gestation with a birth weight of 2.08 kg. Antenatal scan at 31 weeks revealed complex congenital heart disease with a hypoplastic right ventricle, pulmonary atresia and an intact septum. Immediately after birth, the infant was shifted to the nursery and was started on intravenous fluids and infusion prostaglandin E1 (Alprostidil). On examination, she had microcephaly, periorbital puffiness, a long philtrum, a broad nasal bridge and retrognathia, up slanting palpebral fissures, widely spaced nipples, a sacral dimple and right upper limb postaxial polydactyly. Postnatal echocardiography confirmed a large ostium secundum atrial septal defect with left to right shunt, right ventricle hypoplasia, pulmonary atresia with an intact septum and a large vertical patent ductus arteriosus. Ophthalmological examination showed a bilateral chorioretinal coloboma sparing disc and fovea. Karyotyping showed an extra small marker chromosome suggestive of the Cat eye syndrome. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  3. Dog and cat bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Robert; Ellis, Carrie

    2014-08-15

    Animal bites account for 1% of all emergency department visits in the United States and more than $50 million in health care costs per year. Most animal bites are from a dog, usually one known to the victim. Most dog bite victims are children. Bite wounds should be cleaned, copiously irrigated with normal saline using a 20-mL or larger syringe or a 20-gauge catheter attached to the syringe. The wound should be explored for tendon or bone involvement and possible foreign bodies. Wounds may be closed if cosmetically favorable, such as wounds on the face or gaping wounds. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be considered, especially if there is a high risk of infection, such as with cat bites, with puncture wounds, with wounds to the hand, and in persons who are immunosuppressed. Amoxicillin/clavulanate is the first-line prophylactic antibiotic. The need for rabies prophylaxis should be addressed with any animal bite because even domestic animals are often unvaccinated. Postexposure rabies prophylaxis consists of immune globulin at presentation and vaccination on days 0, 3, 7, and 14. Counseling patients and families about animal safety may help decrease animal bites. In most states, physicians are required by law to report animal bites.

  4. Evaluation of In Vitro Activity of Essential Oils against Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Trypanosoma evansi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Habila

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils (EOs from Cymbopogon citratus (CC, Eucalyptus citriodora (EC, Eucalyptus camaldulensis (ED, and Citrus sinensis (CS were obtained by hydrodistillation process. The EOs were evaluated in vitro for activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei (Tbb and Trypanosoma evansi (T. evansi. The EOs were found to possess antitrypanosomal activity in vitro in a dose-dependent pattern in a short period of time. The drop in number of parasite over time was achieved doses of 0.4 g/ml, 0.2 g/mL, and 0.1 g/mL for all the EOs. The concentration of 0.4 g/mL CC was more potent at 3 minutes and 2 minutes for Tbb and T. evansi, respectively. The GC-MS analysis of the EOs revealed presence of Cyclobutane (96.09% in CS, 6-octenal (77.11% in EC, Eucalyptol (75% in ED, and Citral (38.32% in CC among several other organic compounds. The results are discussed in relation to trypanosome chemotherapy.

  5. Trypanosoma evansi is alike to Trypanosoma brucei brucei in the subcellular localisation of glycolytic enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Andrea Moreno

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma evansi, which causes surra, is descended from Trypanosoma brucei brucei, which causes nagana. Although both parasites are presumed to be metabolically similar, insufficient knowledge of T. evansi precludes a full comparison. Herein, we provide the first report on the subcellular localisation of the glycolytic enzymes in T. evansi, which is a alike to that of the bloodstream form (BSF of T. b. brucei: (i fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, phosphoglycerate kinase, triosephosphate isomerase (glycolytic enzymes and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (a glycolysis-auxiliary enzyme in glycosomes, (ii enolase, phosphoglycerate mutase, pyruvate kinase (glycolytic enzymes and a GAPDH isoenzyme in the cytosol, (iii malate dehydrogenase in cytosol and (iv glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in both glycosomes and the cytosol. Specific enzymatic activities also suggest that T. evansi is alike to the BSF of T. b. brucei in glycolytic flux, which is much faster than the pentose phosphate pathway flux, and in the involvement of cytosolic GAPDH in the NAD+/NADH balance. These similarities were expected based on the close phylogenetic relationship of both parasites.

  6. Comparative studies on the biochemical properties of the malic enzymes from Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Alejandro E; Maugeri, Dante A; Opperdoes, Fred R; Cazzulo, Juan J; Nowicki, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Comparative studies showed that, like Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei exhibits functional cytosolic and mitochondrial malic enzymes (MEs), which are specifically linked to NADP. Kinetic studies provided evidence that T. cruzi and T. brucei MEs display similarly high affinities towards NADP(+) and are also almost equally efficient in catalyzing the production of NADPH. Nevertheless, in contrast to the cytosolic ME from T. cruzi, which is highly activated by l-aspartate (over 10-fold), the T. brucei homologue is slightly more active (50%) in the presence of this amino acid. In T. brucei, both isozymes appear to be clearly more abundant in the insect stage, although they can be immunodetected in the bloodstream forms. By contrast, in T. cruzi the expression of the mitochondrial ME seems to be clearly upregulated in amastigotes, whereas the cytosolic isoform appears to be more abundant in the insect stages of the parasite. It might be hypothesized that in those environments where glucose is very low or absent, these pathogens depend on NADP-linked dehydrogenases such as the MEs for NADPH production, as in those conditions the pentose phosphate pathway cannot serve as a source of essential reducing power. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A review of over three decades of research on cat-human and human-cat interactions and relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Dennis C

    2017-08-01

    This review article covers research conducted over the last three decades on cat-human and human-cat interactions and relationships, especially from an ethological point of view. It includes findings on cat-cat and cat-human communication, cat personalities and cat-owner personalities, the effects of cats on humans, and problems caused by cats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Flagellar Motility of Trypanosoma cruzi Epimastigotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ballesteros-Rodea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hemoflagellate Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of American trypanosomiasis. Despite the importance of motility in the parasite life cycle, little is known about T. cruzi motility, and there is no quantitative description of its flagellar beating. Using video microscopy and quantitative vectorial analysis of epimastigote trajectories, we find a forward parasite motility defined by tip-to-base symmetrical flagellar beats. This motion is occasionally interrupted by base-to-tip highly asymmetric beats, which represent the ciliary beat of trypanosomatid flagella. The switch between flagellar and ciliary beating facilitates the parasite's reorientation, which produces a large variability of movement and trajectories that results in different distance ranges traveled by the cells. An analysis of the distance, speed, and rotational angle indicates that epimastigote movement is not completely random, and the phenomenon is highly dependent on the parasite behavior and is characterized by directed and tumbling parasite motion as well as their combination, resulting in the alternation of rectilinear and intricate motility paths.

  9. Gastrointestinal parasites and Trypanosoma evansi in buffaloes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sani, R.A.; Chandrawathani, P.; Rosli, M.

    1990-01-01

    Gastrointestinal parasitism is common in buffalo calves. The effect of helminths on growth was studied by administration of an anthelmintic to buffalo calves following natural infections with gastrointestinal parasites. In studies conducted on calves belonging to an institute and a smallholder farmer, the treated calves showed improved weight gains. Serial parasitic examinations showed these animals had moderate to high faecal counts with Strongyloides, Toxocara vitulorum and Haemonchus eggs and Eimeria oocytes. In another study, there was no live weight advantage in treated over untreated calves. Few animals in this study had evidence of parasites and even those which were infested had low faecal egg counts. Hence, in general, helminths at certain levels of infection do affect the live weight gains of young buffalo calves. The prevalence of Trypanosoma evansi, as assessed parasitologically using the haematocrit centrifugation technique and mice inoculation, was 2.7 and 1%, respectively, in cattle and buffaloes. The serological prevalence using the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was 35 and 2% for cattle and buffaloes, respectively. (author). 6 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs

  10. Differential gene expression during Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurelio Krieger

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of epimastigotes into metacyclic trypomastigotes involves changes in the pattern of expressed genes, resulting in important morphological and functional differences between these developmental forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. In order to identify and characterize genes involved in triggering the metacyclogenesis process and in conferring to metacyclic trypomastigotes their stage specific biological properties, we have developed a method allowing the isolation of genes specifically expressed when comparing two close related cell populations (representation of differential expression or RDE. The method is based on the PCR amplification of gene sequences selected by hybridizing and subtracting the populations in such a way that after some cycles of hybridization-amplification genes specific to a given population are highly enriched. The use of this method in the analysis of differential gene expression during T. cruzi metacyclogenesis (6 hr and 24 hr of differentiation and metacyclic trypomastigotes resulted in the isolation of several clones from each time point. Northern blot analysis showed that some genes are transiently expressed (6 hr and 24 hr differentiating cells, while others are present in differentiating cells and in metacyclic trypomastigotes. Nucleotide sequencing of six clones characterized so far showed that they do not display any homology to gene sequences available in the GeneBank.

  11. Protein kinase CK1 from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabokis, Maritza; Kurz, Liliana; Gonzatti, Mary I; Bubis, José

    2003-08-01

    A protein kinase activity, which uses casein as a substrate, has been purified to homogeneity from the epimastigote stage of Trypanosoma cruzi, by sequential chromatography on Q sepharose, heparin sepharose, phenyl sepharose, and alpha-casein agarose. An apparent molecular weight of 36,000 was estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Gel filtration chromatography and sedimentation analyses demonstrated that the purified native enzyme is a monomer with a sedimentation coefficient of 2.9 S. The hydrodynamic parameters indicated that the shape of the protein is globular with a frictional ratio f/f(o) = 1.36 and a Stokes radius of 27.7 A. When two selective peptide substrates for protein kinases CK1 and CK2 were used (RRKDLHDDEEDEAM. SITA and RRRADDSDDDDD, respectively), the purified kinase was shown to predominantly phosphorylate the CK1-specific peptide. Additionally, the enzyme was inhibited by N-(2-amino-ethyl)-5-chloroisoquinoline-8-sulfonamide, a specific inactivator of CK1s from mammals. Based on these results, we concluded that the purified kinase corresponds to a parasite CK1.

  12. A Protein Complex Map of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid H Gazestani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The functions of the majority of trypanosomatid-specific proteins are unknown, hindering our understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of Trypanosomatida. While protein-protein interactions are highly informative about protein function, a global map of protein interactions and complexes is still lacking for these important human parasites. Here, benefiting from in-depth biochemical fractionation, we systematically interrogated the co-complex interactions of more than 3354 protein groups in procyclic life stage of Trypanosoma brucei, the protozoan parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Using a rigorous methodology, our analysis led to identification of 128 high-confidence complexes encompassing 716 protein groups, including 635 protein groups that lacked experimental annotation. These complexes correlate well with known pathways as well as for proteins co-expressed across the T. brucei life cycle, and provide potential functions for a large number of previously uncharacterized proteins. We validated the functions of several novel proteins associated with the RNA-editing machinery, identifying a candidate potentially involved in the mitochondrial post-transcriptional regulation of T. brucei. Our data provide an unprecedented view of the protein complex map of T. brucei, and serve as a reliable resource for further characterization of trypanosomatid proteins. The presented results in this study are available at: www.TrypsNetDB.org.

  13. Studies on the glycosome of Trypanosoma brucei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aman, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Glycosomes (microbodies) have been purified from bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei by an improved procedure involving freezing and thawing live organisms in 15% glycerol prior to cell disruption. Highly purified organelles of bloodstream form T. brucei contain 11 major proteins of which 8 tentatively identified glycolytic enzymes make up about 90% of the total glycosomal protein. Treatment of these intact isolated organelles with the bisimidoester dimethylsuberimidate (DMSI) resulted in crosslinking of all glycosomal proteins into a large complex suggestive of juxtapositioning of the glycosomal proteins. The crosslinked complex was capable of catalyzing the multienzyme conversion of glucose to glycerol-3-phosphate but did not possess any special kinetic features different from those of the unaggregated enzymes represented by solubilized glycosomes. The multienzyme reaction had a lab phase associated with it and [ 14 C]-glucose label incorporation into sugar phosphate intermediates was effectively competed by unlabeled intermediates. Glycosomes were also purified from culture form T. brucei by several different procedures. Comparison of highly purified organelles from the two different life stages of the organism showed reduced specific activities and contents of the early glycolytic enzymes in organelles from the culture form with a decrease from 87% to 35% of the contribution of glycolytic enzymes to the total glycosomal protein

  14. Cat Ownership Perception and Caretaking Explored in an Internet Survey of People Associated with Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Sarah; Vankan, Dianne

    2015-01-01

    People who feed cats that they do not perceive they own (sometimes called semi-owners) are thought to make a considerable contribution to unwanted cat numbers because the cats they support are generally not sterilized. Understanding people’s perception of cat ownership and the psychology underlying cat semi-ownership could inform approaches to mitigate the negative effects of cat semi-ownership. The primary aims of this study were to investigate cat ownership perception and to examine its association with human-cat interactions and caretaking behaviours. A secondary aim was to evaluate a definition of cat semi-ownership (including an association time of ≥1 month and frequent feeding), revised from a previous definition proposed in the literature to distinguish cat semi-ownership from casual interactions with unowned cats. Cat owners and semi-owners displayed similar types of interactions and caretaking behaviours. Nevertheless, caretaking behaviours were more commonly displayed towards owned cats than semi-owned cats, and semi-owned cats were more likely to have produced kittens (pcats in semi-ownership relationships compared to casual interaction relationships. Determinants of cat ownership perception were identified (pcat friendliness and health, and feelings about unowned cats, including the acceptability of feeding unowned cats. Encouraging semi-owners to have the cats they care for sterilized may assist in reducing the number of unwanted kittens and could be a valuable alternative to trying to prevent semi-ownership entirely. Highly accessible semi-owner “gatekeepers” could help to deliver education messages and facilitate the provision of cat sterilization services to semi-owners. This research enabled semi-ownership to be distinguished from casual interaction relationships and can assist welfare and government agencies to identify cat semi-owners in order to develop strategies to address this source of unwanted cats. PMID:26218243

  15. Cat Ownership Perception and Caretaking Explored in an Internet Survey of People Associated with Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Sarah; Vankan, Dianne; Bennett, Pauleen; Paterson, Mandy; Phillips, Clive J C

    2015-01-01

    People who feed cats that they do not perceive they own (sometimes called semi-owners) are thought to make a considerable contribution to unwanted cat numbers because the cats they support are generally not sterilized. Understanding people's perception of cat ownership and the psychology underlying cat semi-ownership could inform approaches to mitigate the negative effects of cat semi-ownership. The primary aims of this study were to investigate cat ownership perception and to examine its association with human-cat interactions and caretaking behaviours. A secondary aim was to evaluate a definition of cat semi-ownership (including an association time of ≥1 month and frequent feeding), revised from a previous definition proposed in the literature to distinguish cat semi-ownership from casual interactions with unowned cats. Cat owners and semi-owners displayed similar types of interactions and caretaking behaviours. Nevertheless, caretaking behaviours were more commonly displayed towards owned cats than semi-owned cats, and semi-owned cats were more likely to have produced kittens (pcats in semi-ownership relationships compared to casual interaction relationships. Determinants of cat ownership perception were identified (pcat friendliness and health, and feelings about unowned cats, including the acceptability of feeding unowned cats. Encouraging semi-owners to have the cats they care for sterilized may assist in reducing the number of unwanted kittens and could be a valuable alternative to trying to prevent semi-ownership entirely. Highly accessible semi-owner "gatekeepers" could help to deliver education messages and facilitate the provision of cat sterilization services to semi-owners. This research enabled semi-ownership to be distinguished from casual interaction relationships and can assist welfare and government agencies to identify cat semi-owners in order to develop strategies to address this source of unwanted cats.

  16. Grooming and control of fleas in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein; Hart

    2000-05-10

    Oral grooming is common in cats, as in rodent and bovid species where grooming has been shown to be effective in removing lice and ticks. In Experiment 1, we examined the effectiveness of oral grooming in removing fleas which are the main ectoparasite of cats. Elizabethan collars (E-collars) which prevented grooming were fitted on nine cats in a flea-infested household and 3 weeks later, flea numbers on these cats were compared with nine control cats in the same household. Flea numbers dropped in the control cats reflecting an apparent drop in adult fleas in the environment, but in the E-collar cats, flea numbers did not drop, and were about twice as numerous as in control cats. The significantly greater number of fleas on the E-collar cats was attributed to their inability to groom off fleas. In Experiment 2, videotaping of nine different cats from the flea-infested household revealed that these cats groomed at about twice the rate of 10 similarly videotaped control cats from a flea-free colony. These results reveal that flea exposure can increase grooming rate in cats and that grooming is effective in removing fleas.

  17. Isolation of Malassezia furfur from a Cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, M. J.; Abarca, M. L.; Cabañes, F. J.

    1999-01-01

    During a survey of the occurrence of Malassezia species in the external ear canals of cats without otitis externa, Malassezia furfur was isolated. This is the first report of the isolation of M. furfur from cats. PMID:10203525

  18. Isolation of Malassezia furfur from a Cat

    OpenAIRE

    Crespo, M. J.; Abarca, M. L.; Cabañes, F. J.

    1999-01-01

    During a survey of the occurrence of Malassezia species in the external ear canals of cats without otitis externa, Malassezia furfur was isolated. This is the first report of the isolation of M. furfur from cats.

  19. Cerebral cysticercosis in a cat : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Schwan

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The metacestode of Taenia solium, Cysticercus cellulosae, was recovered from the brain of a cat showing central nervous clinical signs ante mortem. This is the first record of cerebral cysticercosis in a cat in South Africa.

  20. EPIDEMIOLOGÍA MOLECULAR DE TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Guhl

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Chagas causada por el parásito Trypanosoma cruzi es una zoonosis compleja, ampliamente distribuida en el continente americano. La infección puede ser adquirida a través de las heces de insectos triatominos, transfusión de sangre, trasplante de órganos, vía oral, por transmisión congénita y por accidentes de laboratorio. El completo entendimiento de la etiología y epidemiología de la enfermedad de Chagas a través de su distribución geográfica es complejo y permanece bajo intensa investigación hasta la actualidad. Los recientes estudios sobre la variabilidad genética del parásito han dado nuevas luces de los diferentes escenarios de los ciclos de transmisión de la enfermedad y su patogénesis en humanos. El propósito principal para la caracterización molecular de T.cruzi y sus múltiples genotipos está dirigido hacia su asociación con la clínica y la patogenesis de la enfermedad, así como al esclarecimiento de los diferentes escenarios de transmisión y los aspectos coevolutivos relacionados con reservorios e insectos vectores. La caracterización molecular de los diferentes aislamientos a partir de humanos, insectos y reservorios, ha permitido identificar la amplia variabilidad genética del parásito, abriendo nuevos caminos hacia la búsqueda de nuevos blancos terapéuticos y pruebas diagnósticas más específicas que contribuyan a mitigar la enfermedad de Chagas.

  1. Targeting polyamine transport in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigada, Chantal; Phanstiel, Otto; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2018-03-10

    Polyamines play critical roles as regulators of cell growth and differentiation. In contrast with other protozoa, the human parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, is auxotrophic for polyamines. Therefore, their intracellular availability depends exclusively on polyamine transport and inhibition of these uptake processes can alter the viability of the parasite. The polyamine analogues used in this work were successfully tested as antiproliferative agents in cancer cells, bacteria, fungi and also showed a potent antiplasmodial effect. We evaluated the activity of these compounds on polyamine transport in T. cruzi and assessed the effects on parasite viability. Three polyamine derivatives, AMXT1501, Ant4 and Ant44, inhibited the putrescine transport in epimastigotes (the insect stage of T. cruzi) with calculated IC 50 values of 2.43, 5.02 and 3.98 μM, respectively. In addition, only Ant4 and Ant44 inhibited spermidine transport with IC 50 of 8.78 μM and 13.34 μM, respectively. The Ant4 analogue showed a high trypanocidal effect on trypomastigotes (the bloodstream stage of T. cruzi) with an IC 50 of 460 nM, (SI = 12.7) while in epimastigotes the IC 50 was significantly higher (16.97 μM). In addition, we studied the effect of the combination of benznidazole, a drug used in treating Chagas disease, with Ant4 on the viability of epimastigotes. The combined treatment produced a significant increase on the inhibition of parasites growth compared with individual treatments. In summary, these results suggest that Ant4, a putrescine conjugate, is a promising compound for the treatment of Chagas disease because it showed a potent trypanocidal effect via its inhibition of polyamine import. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Acute central nervous system infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Gallo

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available The acute infection of the CNS by Trypanosoma cruzi acquired by blood transfusion is uncommon. The concomitance of AIDS in the patient reported shows the importance of cellular immunity in restriction of this parasite, and reinforces the problem of blood transfusion in endemic zones.

  3. Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-20

    Sep 20, 2010 ... Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense in Glossina fuscipes fuscipes (Diptera: ... in nature are considered epidemiologically important. (Leak and Rowlands, 1997). ... The classical techniques used to detect trypanosome infection in flies (Lloyd and Johnson, 1924) are of limited.

  4. What controls glycolysis in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, B.M.; Michels, P.A.M.; Opperdoes, F.R.; Westerhoff, H.V.

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of the experimentally determined kinetic properties of the trypanosomal enzymes, the question is addressed of which step limits the glycolytic flux in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei. There appeared to be no single answer; in the physiological range, control shifted between the

  5. Serum total protein, albumin and globulin levels in Trypanosoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of orally administered Scoparia dulcis on Trypanosoma brucei-induced changes in serum total protein, albumin and globulin were investigated in rabbits over a period of twenty eight days. Results obtained show that infection resulted in hyperproteinaemia, hyperglobulinaemia and hypoalbuminaemia. However ...

  6. ( Nigella sativa ) oil on Trypanosoma brucei -infected rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of black seed oil (Nigella sativa oil) on parasitaemia, some serum and liver enzymes as well as some haematological parameters in Trypanosoma brucei-infected rats were investigated. The results show there was low parasitaemia and extension of life span of rats from 12 days of the infected untreated (control) ...

  7. A tropical tale: how Naja nigricollis venom beats Trypanosoma brucei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martos Esteban, Andrea; Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard; Carrington, Mark

    Trypanosoma brucei is a parasitic protozoan species capable to infecting insect vectors whose bite further produces African sleeping sickness inhuman beings [1]. During the parasite’s extracellular life in the mammalian host,its outer coat, mainly composed of Variable Surface Glycoproteins (VSGs)...

  8. Role of sialic acids in the midguts of Trypanosoma congolense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Free and total sialic acid concentrations were determined in the midgut extract of Culex pipiense pipiense mosquitoes infected with Trypanosoma congolense. The mean total sialic acid concentrations were found to be 1.5 to 2 fold higher than the mean free sialic acid concentrations in the midgut extracts of all the groups of ...

  9. On – Farm Transplacental Transmission Of Trypanosoma vivax In A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An on –farm study of haemoparasites of third pregnant and puerperal cows was undertaken in settled herds in Zaria (latitude 11o 08\\'N), Northern Nigeria. Trypanosoma vivax infection was found in prepartum cows in two (22.2%) of the herds. An affected dam in one of the herds was delivered of a calf that was infected with ...

  10. Scoparia dulcis reduces the severity of Trypanosoma bruceiinduced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We investigated the effect of oral administration of the herb, Scoparia dulcis, on Trypanosoma bruceiinduced changes in plasma lipid profile in rabbits over a period of twenty eight days. Results obtained show that infection with T. brucei resulted in significant increases in plasma total cholesterol, trriacylglycerol, and low ...

  11. Cultivation and multiplication of viable axenic trypanosoma vivax in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trypanosoma vivax was isolated from the blood of an infected laboratory mouse, washed and introduced into the prepared culture media, ME-99 and minimum essential medium (MEM), both containing laboratory prepared (commercial) horse serum and antibiotics (streptomycin and penicillin). The cultures were monitored ...

  12. Roles of triosephosphate isomerase and aerobic metabolism in Trypanosoma brucei.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helfert, S.; Estevez, A.M.; Bakker, B.M.; Michels, P.A.M.; Clayton, C.

    2001-01-01

    Kinetoplastid protozoa compartmentalize the first seven enzymes of glycolysis and two enzymes of glycerol metabolism in a microbody, the glycosome. While in its mammalian host, Trypanosoma brucei depends entirely on glucose for ATP generation. Under aerobic conditions, most of the glucose is

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi: avirulence of the PF strain to Callithrix marmosets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Menezes

    1981-06-01

    Full Text Available Callithrix jacchus geoffroy marmosets (HumBol. 1812 were injected once subcutaneously with 10.000 parasites/g body weight and followed for a period of six months. The PF strain of Trypanosoma cruzi was used. Follow-up was done through blood cultures, xenodiagnosis, serological tests, and ECG. A small number of normaI animais served as control.

  14. Trypanosoma brucei mitochondrial respiratome: Composition and organization in procyclic form

    KAUST Repository

    Acestor, Nathalie

    2011-05-24

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is comprised of four different protein complexes (I-IV), which are responsible for electron transport and generation of proton gradient in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. This proton gradient is then used by F oF 1-ATP synthase (complex V) to produce ATP by oxidative phosphorylation. In this study, the respiratory complexes I, II, and III were affinity purified from Trypanosoma brucei procyclic form cells and their composition was determined by mass spectrometry. The results along with those that we previously reported for complexes IV and V showed that the respiratome of Trypanosoma is divergent because many of its proteins are unique to this group of organisms. The studies also identified two mitochondrial subunit proteins of respiratory complex IV that are encoded by edited RNAs. Proteomics data from analyses of complexes purified using numerous tagged component proteins in each of the five complexes were used to generate the first predicted protein-protein interaction network of the Trypanosoma brucei respiratory chain. These results provide the first comprehensive insight into the unique composition of the respiratory complexes in Trypanosoma brucei, an early diverged eukaryotic pathogen. © 2011 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. The Effect of Garlic Extracts on Experimental Trypanosoma brucei ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti-trypanosomal effect of aqueous and methanolic extracts of garlic were studied in Trypanosoma brucei brucei infected rabbits. With the establishment of infection, parasitaemia, anaemia, leucopenia, neutropenia and lymphocytosis developed. There was decrease in total serum protein, albumin and increase in ...

  16. Differential virulence and tsetse fly transmissibility of Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purity K. Gitonga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available African animal trypanosomiasis causes significant economic losses in sub-Saharan African countries because of livestock mortalities and reduced productivity. Trypanosomes, the causative agents, are transmitted by tsetse flies (Glossina spp.. In the current study, we compared and contrasted the virulence characteristics of five Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei isolates using groups of Swiss white mice (n = 6. We further determined the vectorial capacity of Glossina pallidipes, for each of the trypanosome isolates. Results showed that the overall pre-patent (PP periods were 8.4 ± 0.9 (range, 4–11 and 4.5 ± 0.2 (range, 4–6 for T. congolense and T. brucei isolates, respectively (p < 0.01. Despite the longer mean PP, T. congolense–infected mice exhibited a significantly (p < 0.05 shorter survival time than T. brucei–infected mice, indicating greater virulence. Differences were also noted among the individual isolates with T. congolense KETRI 2909 causing the most acute infection of the entire group with a mean ± standard error survival time of 9 ± 2.1 days. Survival time of infected tsetse flies and the proportion with mature infections at 30 days post-exposure to the infective blood meals varied among isolates, with subacute infection–causing T. congolense EATRO 1829 and chronic infection–causing T. brucei EATRO 2267 isolates showing the highest mature infection rates of 38.5% and 23.1%, respectively. Therefore, our study provides further evidence of occurrence of differences in virulence and transmissibility of eastern African trypanosome strains and has identified two, T. congolense EATRO 1829 and T. brucei EATRO 2267, as suitable for tsetse infectivity and transmissibility experiments.

  17. DNA content analysis allows discrimination between Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naves, Lucila Langoni; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius; Fajardo, Emanuella Francisco; da Silva, Raíssa Bernardes; De Vito, Fernanda Bernadelli; Rodrigues, Virmondes; Lages-Silva, Eliane; Ramírez, Luis Eduardo; Pedrosa, André Luiz

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, a human protozoan parasite, is the causative agent of Chagas disease. Currently the species is divided into six taxonomic groups. The genome of the CL Brener clone has been estimated to be 106.4-110.7 Mb, and DNA content analyses revealed that it is a diploid hybrid clone. Trypanosoma rangeli is a hemoflagellate that has the same reservoirs and vectors as T. cruzi; however, it is non-pathogenic to vertebrate hosts. The haploid genome of T. rangeli was previously estimated to be 24 Mb. The parasitic strains of T. rangeli are divided into KP1(+) and KP1(-). Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the DNA content in different strains of T. cruzi and T. rangeli by flow cytometry. All T. cruzi and T. rangeli strains yielded cell cycle profiles with clearly identifiable G1-0 (2n) and G2-M (4n) peaks. T. cruzi and T. rangeli genome sizes were estimated using the clone CL Brener and the Leishmania major CC1 as reference cell lines because their genome sequences have been previously determined. The DNA content of T. cruzi strains ranged from 87,41 to 108,16 Mb, and the DNA content of T. rangeli strains ranged from 63,25 Mb to 68,66 Mb. No differences in DNA content were observed between KP1(+) and KP1(-) T. rangeli strains. Cultures containing mixtures of the epimastigote forms of T. cruzi and T. rangeli strains resulted in cell cycle profiles with distinct G1 peaks for strains of each species. These results demonstrate that DNA content analysis by flow cytometry is a reliable technique for discrimination between T. cruzi and T. rangeli isolated from different hosts.

  18. Differential virulence and tsetse fly transmissibility of Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purity K. Gitonga

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available African animal trypanosomiasis causes significant economic losses in sub-Saharan African countries because of livestock mortalities and reduced productivity. Trypanosomes, the causative agents, are transmitted by tsetse flies (Glossina spp.. In the current study, we compared and contrasted the virulence characteristics of five Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei isolates using groups of Swiss white mice (n = 6. We further determined the vectorial capacity of Glossina pallidipes, for each of the trypanosome isolates. Results showed that the overall pre-patent (PP periods were 8.4 ± 0.9 (range, 4–11 and 4.5 ± 0.2 (range, 4–6 for T. congolense and T. brucei isolates, respectively (p < 0.01. Despite the longer mean PP, T. congolense–infected mice exhibited a significantly (p < 0.05 shorter survival time than T. brucei–infected mice, indicating greater virulence. Differences were also noted among the individual isolates with T. congolense KETRI 2909 causing the most acute infection of the entire group with a mean ± standard error survival time of 9 ± 2.1 days. Survival time of infected tsetse flies and the proportion with mature infections at 30 days post-exposure to the infective blood meals varied among isolates, with subacute infection–causing T. congolense EATRO 1829 and chronic infection–causing T. brucei EATRO 2267 isolates showing the highest mature infection rates of 38.5% and 23.1%, respectively. Therefore, our study provides further evidence of occurrence of differences in virulence and transmissibility of eastern African trypanosome strains and has identified two, T. congolense EATRO 1829 and T. brucei EATRO 2267, as suitable for tsetse infectivity and transmissibility experiments.

  19. Differential virulence and tsetse fly transmissibility of Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitonga, Purity K; Ndung'u, Kariuki; Murilla, Grace A; Thande, Paul C; Wamwiri, Florence N; Auma, Joanna E; Ngae, Geoffrey N; Kibugu, James K; Kurgat, Richard; Thuita, John K

    2017-06-27

    African animal trypanosomiasis causes significant economic losses in sub-Saharan African countries because of livestock mortalities and reduced productivity. Trypanosomes, the causative agents, are transmitted by tsetse flies (Glossina spp.). In the current study, we compared and contrasted the virulence characteristics of five Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei isolates using groups of Swiss white mice (n = 6). We further determined the vectorial capacity of Glossina pallidipes, for each of the trypanosome isolates. Results showed that the overall pre-patent (PP) periods were 8.4 ± 0.9 (range, 4-11) and 4.5 ± 0.2 (range, 4-6) for T. congolense and T. brucei isolates, respectively (p < 0.01). Despite the longer mean PP, T. congolense-infected mice exhibited a significantly (p < 0.05) shorter survival time than T. brucei-infected mice, indicating greater virulence. Differences were also noted among the individual isolates with T. congolense KETRI 2909 causing the most acute infection of the entire group with a mean ± standard error survival time of 9 ± 2.1 days. Survival time of infected tsetse flies and the proportion with mature infections at 30 days post-exposure to the infective blood meals varied among isolates, with subacute infection-causing T. congolense EATRO 1829 and chronic infection-causing T. brucei EATRO 2267 isolates showing the highest mature infection rates of 38.5% and 23.1%, respectively. Therefore, our study provides further evidence of occurrence of differences in virulence and transmissibility of eastern African trypanosome strains and has identified two, T. congolense EATRO 1829 and T. brucei EATRO 2267, as suitable for tsetse infectivity and transmissibility experiments.

  20. Getting a CAT Scan (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth / For Kids / Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Print en español Obtención de una tomografía computada (video) CAT stands ...

  1. Dipylidium (Dog and Cat Flea Tapeworm) FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the most common kind of tapeworm dogs and cats get? The most common tapeworm of dogs and cats in the United States is called Dipylidium caninum . ... infected with a tapeworm larvae. A dog or cat may swallow a flea while self-grooming. Once ...

  2. Cat-scratch disease osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heye, S.; Matthijs, P.; Campenhoudt, M. van; Wallon, J.

    2003-01-01

    We report on a patient who presented with osteomyelitis of a rib and adjacent abscess as a rare and atypical manifestation of cat-scratch disease. Radiographic findings showed an osteolytic lesion with adjacent mass. Biopsy, serology and polymerase chain reaction technique are essential for the final diagnosis. Prognosis is excellent with full recovery. (orig.)

  3. EUROmediCAT signal detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luteijn, Johannes Michiel; Morris, Joan K; Garne, Ester

    2016-01-01

    ). CONCLUSIONS: Medication exposure data in the EUROmediCAT central database can be analyzed systematically to determine a manageable set of associations for validation and then testing in independent datasets. Detection of teratogens depends on frequency of exposure, level of risk and teratogenic specificity....

  4. Genitourinary dysplasia in a cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baines, S.J.; Speakman, A.J.; Williams, J.M.; Cheeseman, M.T.

    1999-01-01

    A six-month-old kitten had congenital urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence due to urethral hypoplasia and associated uterine hypoplasia and vaginal aplasia. Diagnosis was based on radiographic examination, surgical exploration and histological examination of the lower urinary tract. Surgical correction resulted in a marked clinical improvement. The cat became fully continent following treatment with phenylpropanolamine

  5. The fecal microbiome in cats with diarrhea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan S Suchodolski

    Full Text Available Recent studies have revealed that microbes play an important role in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal (GI diseases in various animal species, but only limited data is available about the microbiome in cats with GI disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fecal microbiome in cats with diarrhea. Fecal samples were obtained from healthy cats (n = 21 and cats with acute (n = 19 or chronic diarrhea (n = 29 and analyzed by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and PICRUSt was used to predict the functional gene content of the microbiome. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA effect size (LEfSe revealed significant differences in bacterial groups between healthy cats and cats with diarrhea. The order Burkholderiales, the families Enterobacteriaceae, and the genera Streptococcus and Collinsella were significantly increased in diarrheic cats. In contrast the order Campylobacterales, the family Bacteroidaceae, and the genera Megamonas, Helicobacter, and Roseburia were significantly increased in healthy cats. Phylum Bacteroidetes was significantly decreased in cats with chronic diarrhea (>21 days duration, while the class Erysipelotrichi and the genus Lactobacillus were significantly decreased in cats with acute diarrhea. The observed changes in bacterial groups were accompanied by significant differences in functional gene contents: metabolism of fatty acids, biosynthesis of glycosphingolipids, metabolism of biotin, metabolism of tryptophan, and ascorbate and aldarate metabolism, were all significantly (p<0.001 altered in cats with diarrhea. In conclusion, significant differences in the fecal microbiomes between healthy cats and cats with diarrhea were identified. This dysbiosis was accompanied by changes in bacterial functional gene categories. Future studies are warranted to evaluate if these microbial changes correlate with changes in fecal concentrations of microbial metabolites in cats with diarrhea for the identification of potential diagnostic or

  6. Sebaceous Adenocarcinoma in a Cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Terim Kapakin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the sebaceous gland adenocarcinoma was presented in the external auditory canal of a 10-year-old female tabby cat. There were three tumoural masses located macroscopically in the external auditory canal in the dimensions of 0.2 × 0.5, 0.3 × 0.5, and 0.1 × 0.1 cm, and they were of hard consistency. The cut sections of these tumoural masses were of multilobular appearance and ranged from white to yellow colour. Histopathological examination revealed the presence of oval or round shaped tumour cells with hyperchromatic nuclei and cytoplasmic lipid vacuoles that were divided by fibrous tissue into lobules. Atypism and mitosis were not significant. Irregular necrotic areas and mononuclear cell infiltrations composed of lymphocytes and histiocytes were also observed. In conclusion, our laboratory service confirms that the sebaceous gland adenocarcinoma is a rarely occurring tumour in cats with specific histopathological lesions.

  7. Minilaparoscopic ovariohysterectomy in healthy cats

    OpenAIRE

    Lawall, Thaíse; Beck, Carlos Afonso de Castro; Queiroga, Luciana Branquinho; Santos, Fabiane Reginatto dos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of minilaparoscopic (MINI) ovariohysterectomy (OHE) in healthy cats using three portals, one of 5 millimeters (mm) in diameter and two of 3mm diameter, along with bipolar diathermy. Technical difficulty, feasibility of MINI access, use of bipolar diathermy, surgery time, need for enlargement of incisions, trans- and post-operative complications and rate of conversion to open surgery were assessed. One out of 15 animals req...

  8. Radioactive iodine therapy in cats with hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turrel, J.M.; Feldman, E.C.; Hays, M.; Hornof, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven cats with hyperthyroidism were treated with radioactive iodine ( 131 I). Previous unsuccessful treatments for hyperthyroidism included hemithyroidectomy (2 cats) and an antithyroid drug (7 cats). Two cats had no prior treatment. Thyroid scans, using technetium 99m, showed enlargement and increased radionuclide accumulation in 1 thyroid lobe in 5 cats and in both lobes in 6 cats. Serum thyroxine concentrations were high and ranged from 4.7 to 18 micrograms/dl. Radioactive iodine tracer studies were used to determine peak radioactive iodine uptake (RAIU) and effective and biological half-lives. Activity of 131 I administered was calculated from peak RAIU, effective half-life, and estimated thyroid gland weight. Activity of 131 I administered ranged from 1.0 to 5.9 mCi. The treatment goal was to deliver 20,000 rad to hyperactive thyroid tissue. However, retrospective calculations based on peak RAIU and effective half-life obtained during the treatment period showed that radiation doses actually ranged from 7,100 to 64,900 rad. Complete ablation of the hyperfunctioning thyroid tissue and a return to euthyroidism were seen in 7 cats. Partial responses were seen in 2 cats, and 2 cats became hypothyroid. It was concluded that 131 I ablation of thyroid tumors was a reasonable alternative in the treatment of hyperthyroidism in cats. The optimal method of dosimetry remains to be determined

  9. Cat fertilization by mouse sperm injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yong-Xun; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Yu, Xian-Feng; Lee, Sung-Hyun; Wang, Qing-Ling; Gao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Yong-Nan; Sun, Shao-Chen; Kong, Il-Keun; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2012-11-01

    Interspecies intracytoplasmic sperm injection has been carried out to understand species-specific differences in oocyte environments and sperm components during fertilization. While sperm aster organization during cat fertilization requires a paternally derived centriole, mouse and hamster fertilization occur within the maternal centrosomal components. To address the questions of where sperm aster assembly occurs and whether complete fertilization is achieved in cat oocytes by interspecies sperm, we studied the fertilization processes of cat oocytes following the injection of cat, mouse, or hamster sperm. Male and female pronuclear formations were not different in the cat oocytes at 6 h following cat, mouse or hamster sperm injection. Microtubule asters were seen in all oocytes following intracytoplasmic injection of cat, mouse or hamster sperm. Immunocytochemical staining with a histone H3-m2K9 antibody revealed that mouse sperm chromatin is incorporated normally with cat egg chromatin, and that the cat eggs fertilized with mouse sperm enter metaphase and become normal 2-cell stage embryos. These results suggest that sperm aster formation is maternally dependent, and that fertilization processes and cleavage occur in a non-species specific manner in cat oocytes.

  10. Hypophosphatemia associated with enteral alimentation in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin, R B; Hohenhaus, A E

    1995-01-01

    Hypophosphatemia is uncommon in cats, but it has been reported in association with diabetes mellitus and hepatic lipidosis, where it can cause hemolysis, rhabdomyopathy, depression, seizures, and coma. The purpose of this article is to describe 9 cats that developed low serum phosphorus concentrations (alimentation. Serum biochemical analyses from more than 6,000 cats were reviewed. The medical records of all cats with hypophosphatemia were examined for history of enteral alimentation; diabetic cats were excluded from the study. Nine cats, ranging in age from 3 to 17 years, were identified. All cats had normal serum phosphorus concentrations before tube feeding began. Onset of hypophosphatemia occurred 12 to 72 hours after initiation of enteral alimentation, and the nadir for phosphorus concentrations ranged from 0.4 to 2.4 mg/dL. Hemolysis occurred in 6 of the 9 cats. Hypophosphatemia secondary to enteral alimentation is an uncommon clinical finding in cats. Cats with high alanine aminotransferase activity, hyperbilirubinemia, and weight loss should be closely monitored for hypophosphatemia during the first 72 hours of enteral alimentation.

  11. Cats and Carbohydrates: The Carnivore Fantasy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbrugghe, Adronie; Hesta, Myriam

    2017-11-15

    The domestic cat's wild ancestors are obligate carnivores that consume prey containing only minimal amounts of carbohydrates. Evolutionary events adapted the cat's metabolism and physiology to this diet strictly composed of animal tissues and led to unique digestive and metabolic peculiarities of carbohydrate metabolism. The domestic cat still closely resembles its wild ancestor. Although the carnivore connection of domestic cats is well recognised, little is known about the precise nutrient profile to which the digestive physiology and metabolism of the cat have adapted throughout evolution. Moreover, studies show that domestic cats balance macronutrient intake by selecting low-carbohydrate foods. The fact that cats evolved consuming low-carbohydrate prey has led to speculations that high-carbohydrate diets could be detrimental for a cat's health. More specifically, it has been suggested that excess carbohydrates could lead to feline obesity and diabetes mellitus. Additionally, the chances for remission of diabetes mellitus are higher in cats that consume a low-carbohydrate diet. This literature review will summarise current carbohydrate knowledge pertaining to digestion, absorption and metabolism of carbohydrates, food selection and macronutrient balancing in healthy, obese and diabetic cats, as well as the role of carbohydrates in prevention and treatment of obesity and diabetes mellitus.

  12. Effective gene delivery to Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes through nucleofection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Lugo, Lisandro; Díaz-Olmos, Yirys; Sáenz-García, José; Probst, Christian Macagnan; DaRocha, Wanderson Duarte

    2017-06-01

    New opportunities have raised to study the gene function approaches of Trypanosoma cruzi after its genome sequencing in 2005. Functional genomic approaches in Trypanosoma cruzi are challenging due to the reduced tools available for genetic manipulation, as well as to the reduced efficiency of the transient transfection conducted through conventional methods. The Amaxa nucleofector device was systematically tested in the present study in order to improve the electroporation conditions in the epimastigote forms of T. cruzi. The transfection efficiency was quantified using the green fluorescent protein (GFP) as reporter gene followed by cell survival assessment. The herein used nucleofection parameters have increased the survival rates (>90%) and the transfection efficiency by approximately 35%. The small amount of epimastigotes and DNA required for the nucleofection can turn the method adopted here into an attractive tool for high throughput screening (HTS) applications, and for gene editing in parasites where genetic manipulation tools remain relatively scarce. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular and biochemical characterisation of Trypanosoma cruzi phosphofructokinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Evelyn; Lander, Noelia; Ramirez, Jose Luis

    2009-08-01

    The characterisation of the gene encoding Trypanosoma cruzi CL Brener phosphofructokinase (PFK) and the biochemical properties of the expressed enzyme are reported here. In contradiction with previous reports, the PFK genes of CL Brener and YBM strain T. cruzi were found to be similar to their Leishmania mexicana and Trypanosoma brucei homologs in terms of both kinetic properties and size, with open reading frames encoding polypeptides with a deduced molecular mass of 53,483. The predicted amino acid sequence contains the C-terminal glycosome-targeting tripeptide SKL; this localisation was confirmed by immunofluorescence assays. In sequence comparisons with the genes of other eukaryotes, it was found that, despite being an adenosine triphosphate-dependent enzyme, T. cruzi PFK shows significant sequence similarity with inorganic pyrophosphate-dependent PFKs.

  14. Molecular and biochemical characterisation of Trypanosoma cruzi phosphofructokinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Rodríguez

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The characterisation of the gene encoding Trypanosoma cruzi CL Brener phosphofructokinase (PFK and the biochemical properties of the expressed enzyme are reported here. In contradiction with previous reports, the PFK genes of CL Brener and YBM strain T. cruzi were found to be similar to their Leishmania mexicana and Trypanosoma brucei homologs in terms of both kinetic properties and size, with open reading frames encoding polypeptides with a deduced molecular mass of 53,483. The predicted amino acid sequence contains the C-terminal glycosome-targeting tripeptide SKL; this localisation was confirmed by immunofluorescence assays. In sequence comparisons with the genes of other eukaryotes, it was found that, despite being an adenosine triphosphate-dependent enzyme, T. cruzi PFK shows significant sequence similarity with inorganic pyrophosphate-dependent PFKs.

  15. Surface electrical charge of bloodstream trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Auxiliadora de Sousa

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available Bloodstream trypomastigotes of some Trypanosoma cruzi strains were processed through DEAE-cellulose columns under standardized conditions. The results obtained suggest mainly that these strains present different surface charges, that there are subpopulations of bloodstream trypomastigotes as regards electrical charges and that the broad forms are less negative than the slender ones.Tripomastigotas sanguíneos de algumas cepas de Trypanosoma cruzi foram processadas em colunas de DEAE-celulose sob condições padronizadas. Os resultados obtidos sugerem principalmente que estas cepas possuem cargas superficiais diferentes, que em relação a este aspecto existem subpopulações de tripomastigotas e que as formas largas são menos negativas do que as finas.

  16. Management of obesity in cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoelmkjaer KM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Kirsten M Hoelmkjaer, Charlotte R Bjornvad Department of Veterinary Clinical and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark Abstract: Obesity is a common nutritional disorder in cats, especially when they are neutered and middle-aged. Obesity predisposes cats to several metabolic and clinical disorders, including insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, lameness, and skin disease. Prevention and treatment of obesity is therefore of great importance in veterinary practice. Correct assessment of body composition is important for recognizing early states of obesity and for monitoring success of weight-loss programs. Various methods for assessing body composition have been proposed, of which a 9-point body-condition score has been validated in cats, and is possibly the most simple to use in the clinic; however, for extremely obese individuals, it is less useful. When calculating the appropriate daily caloric intake for a weight-loss plan, the aim is to maintain a safe weight-loss rate, increasing the chance of preserving lean body mass and decreasing the risk of developing hepatic lipidosis, while also producing a sufficient weight-loss rate to keep owners motivated. A weight-loss rate of 0.5%–2% per week is recommended, which for a cat that needs to lose 3 kg body weight results in an anticipated time for reaching the target weight of 24–60 weeks. There are several purpose-made weight-loss diets available. The optimal composition of a weight-loss diet for cats is unknown, but most of the available products have lower caloric density, an increased nutrient:energy ratio, and higher protein and fiber content. Regular follow-up visits allow the caloric intake to be adjusted based on progress, and possibly increase the chance of success. This review discusses the risk factors for and consequences of obesity, and gives directions for formulating a weight-loss plan, including daily caloric

  17. Trypanosoma brucei solanesyl-diphosphate synthase localizes to the mitochondrion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lai, D.-H.; Bontempi, E. J.; Lukeš, Julius

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 183, č. 2 (2012), s. 189-192 ISSN 0166-6851 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2179 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanosoma brucei * Sleeping sickness * Ubiquinone * Solanesyl-diphosphate synthase * Digitonin permeabilization * In situ tagging Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.734, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0166685112000539

  18. Trypanosoma brucei Mitochondrial Respiratome: Composition and Organization in Procyclic Form

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Acestor, N.; Zíková, Alena; Dalley, R. A.; Anupama, A.; Panigrahi, A. K.; Stuart, K. D.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 9 (2011), s. 1-14 ISSN 1535-9476 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP204/09/P563 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : SUCCINATE DEHYDROGENASE * EDITED MESSENGER-RNA * COMPLEX-I * TRYPANOSOMA-BRUCEI * UBIQUINONE OXIDOREDUCTASE * TAP-TAG * PROTEIN INTERACTION * ALTERNATIVE OXIDASE * STATISTICAL-MODEL * MASS-SPECTROMETRY Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.398, year: 2011

  19. Immunotherapy of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection with DNA Vaccines in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Dumonteil, Eric; Escobedo-Ortegon, Javier; Reyes-Rodriguez, Norma; Arjona-Torres, Arletty; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the pathology of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy are still debated, and the controversy has interfered with the development of new treatments and vaccines. Because of the potential of DNA vaccines for immunotherapy of chronic and infectious diseases, we tested if DNA vaccines could control an ongoing Trypanosoma cruzi infection. BALB/c mice were infected with a lethal dose (5 × 104 parasites) as a model of acute infection, and then they were treated with two injecti...

  20. Trypanosoma avium: experimental transmission from black flies to canaries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Votýpka, Jan; Svobodová, M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 2 (2004), s. 147-151 ISSN 0932-0113 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/00/1094 Grant - others:GA UK(CZ) 147/2002/B-BIO Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : Trypanosoma * birds * transmission Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.060, year: 2004

  1. Plant-like traits associated with metabolism of Trypanosoma parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Hannaert, Véronique; Saavedra, Emma; Duffieux, Francis; Szikora, Jean-Pierre; Rigden, Daniel J.; Michels, Paul A. M.; Opperdoes, Fred R.

    2003-01-01

    Trypanosomatid parasites cause serious diseases among humans, livestock, and plants. They belong to the order of the Kinetoplastida and form, together with the Euglenida, the phylum Euglenozoa. Euglenoid algae possess plastids capable of photosynthesis, but plastids are unknown in trypanosomatids. Here we present molecular evidence that trypanosomatids possessed a plastid at some point in their evolutionary history. Extant trypanosomatid parasites, such as Trypanosoma and Leishmania, contain ...

  2. The sequence and analysis of Trypanosoma brucei chromosome II

    OpenAIRE

    El-Sayed, Najib M. A.; Ghedin, Elodie; Song, Jinming; MacLeod, Annette; Bringaud, Frederic; Larkin, Christopher; Wanless, David; Peterson, Jeremy; Hou, Lihua; Taylor, Sonya; Tweedie, Alison; Biteau, Nicolas; Khalak, Hanif G.; Lin, Xiaoying; Mason, Tanya

    2003-01-01

    We report here the sequence of chromosome II from Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. The 1.2-Mb pairs encode about 470 predicted genes organised in 17 directional clusters on either strand, the largest cluster of which has 92 genes lined up over a 284-kb region. An analysis of the GC skew reveals strand compositional asymmetries that coincide with the distribution of protein-coding genes, suggesting these asymmetries may be the result of transcription-couple...

  3. Betulinic acid induces cell death by necrosis in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Paloma Leão; Souza, Racquel Oliveira da Silva; Tessarolo, Louise Donadello; de Menezes, Ramon Róseo Paula Pessoa Bezerra; Sampaio, Tiago Lima; Canuto, Jader Almeida; Martins, Alice Maria Costa

    2017-10-01

    Chagas' disease is a neglected disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and constitutes a serious health problem worldwide. The treatment is limited, with variable efficacy of benznidazole and nifurtimox. Betulinic Acid (BA), a triterpene, can be found in medicinal herbs and has a wide variety of biological and pharmacological activities. The objective was to evaluate betulinic acid effects on the cell death mechanism in Trypanosoma cruzi strain Y. BA inhibited the growth of epimastigotes in periods of 24h (IC 50 =73.43μM), 48h (IC 50 =119.8μM) and 72h (IC 50 =212.2μM) of incubation; of trypomastigotes (IC 50 =51.88μM) in periods of 24h and intracellular amastigotes (IC 50 =25.94μM) in periods of 24 and 48h of incubation, no toxicity on LLC-MK 2 cells at the concentrations used. Analysis of the possible mechanism of parasite cell death showed alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential, alterations in cell membrane integrity, an increase in the formation of reactive oxygen species and increase swelling of the reservosomes. In conclusion, betulinic acid was be able to inhibition all developmental forms of Trypanosoma cruzi Y strain with necrotic mechanism and involvement of mitochondrial membrane potential alteration and increase in reactive oxygen species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Regulation and spatial organization of PCNA in Trypanosoma brucei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, Doris; Gassen, Alwine [University of Munich (LMU), Department Biology I, Genetics, Grosshaderner Str. 2-4, 82152 Martinsried (Germany); Maiser, Andreas; Leonhardt, Heinrich [University of Munich (LMU), Department Biology II, Grosshaderner Str. 2-4, 82152 Martinsried (Germany); Janzen, Christian J., E-mail: christian.janzen@uni-wuerzburg.de [University of Munich (LMU), Department Biology I, Genetics, Grosshaderner Str. 2-4, 82152 Martinsried (Germany)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen in Trypanosoma brucei (TbPCNA). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TbPCNA is a suitable marker to detect replication in T. brucei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TbPCNA distribution and regulation is different compared to closely related parasites T. cruzi and Leishmania donovani. -- Abstract: As in most eukaryotic cells, replication is regulated by a conserved group of proteins in the early-diverged parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Only a few components of the replication machinery have been described in this parasite and regulation, sub-nuclear localization and timing of replication are not well understood. We characterized the proliferating cell nuclear antigen in T. brucei (TbPCNA) to establish a spatial and temporal marker for replication. Interestingly, PCNA distribution and regulation is different compared to the closely related parasites Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania donovani. TbPCNA foci are clearly detectable during S phase of the cell cycle but in contrast to T. cruzi they are not preferentially located at the nuclear periphery. Furthermore, PCNA seems to be degraded when cells enter G2 phase in T. brucei suggesting different modes of replication regulation or functions of PCNA in these closely related eukaryotes.

  5. A rare case of human trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma evansi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Powar R

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Human trypanosoma infections like the ones seen in Africa and South America are unknown in India. The only exception in literature is of two documented cases of a self-limiting febrile illness, being attributed to Trypanosoma lewisi like parasites. We are reporting an unusual case of trypanosomiasis from the rural parts of Chandrapur district in Maharashtra. An adult male farmhand who used to practice veterinary medicine also, presented with history of febrile episodes on and off since five months and drowsiness before admission to this Institute. Though routine blood and other investigations were within normal limits, the peripheral smear showed a large number of trypanosomes which morphologically resembled the species Trypanosoma evansi , the aetiological agent of surra - a form of animal trypanosomiasis. A battery of assays covering the spectrum of parasitology, serology, and molecular biology confirmed the infecting parasite to be T. evansi . Failure to demonstrate the central nervous system (CNS involvement, as evidenced by the absence of parasite in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF advocated the use of suramin - the drug of choice in early stage African trypanosomiasis without any CNS involvement. Suramin achieved cure in our patient. The case is being reported because of its unique nature as the patient was not immunocompromised and showed infestation with a parasite which normally does not affect human beings.

  6. 42 CFR 71.51 - Dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dogs and cats. 71.51 Section 71.51 Public Health... QUARANTINE Importations § 71.51 Dogs and cats. (a) Definitions. As used in this section the term: Cat means all domestic cats. Confinement means restriction of a dog or cat to a building or other enclosure at a...

  7. Axial pattern skin flaps in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remedios, A M; Bauer, M S; Bowen, C V; Fowler, J D

    1991-01-01

    The major direct cutaneous vessels identified in the cat include the omocervical, thoracodorsal, deep circumflex iliac, and caudal superficial epigastric arteries. Axial pattern skin flaps based on the thoracodorsal and caudal superficial epigastric arteries have been developed in cats. Rotation of these flaps as islands allows skin coverage to the carpus and metatarsus, respectively. The thoracodorsal and caudal superficial epigastric flaps provide a practical, one-step option in the reconstruction of large skin defects involving the distal extremities of cats.

  8. Cats and Toxoplasma: implications for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabritz, H A; Conrad, P A

    2010-02-01

    Cats are popular as pets worldwide because they are easy to care for and provide companionship that enriches the lives of human beings. Little attention has been focused on their potential to contaminate the environment with zoonotic pathogens. One such pathogen, the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, rarely causes clinical manifestations in cats or immunocompetent humans; however, it can have serious adverse effects on human foetuses and immunocompromised patients. Many human infections are believed to be acquired from eating undercooked or raw meat, such as pork and lamb (Tenter et al. Int. J. Parasitol., 30, 2000, 1217; Dubey et al. J. Parasitol. 91, 2005, 1082). However, the prevalence of T. gondii infection in human populations that do not consume meat or eat it well-cooked suggests that the acquisition of infection from the environment, via oocysts in soil, water or on uncooked vegetables, is also important (Rawal. Trans. Royal Soc. Trop. Med. Hyg., 53, 1959, 61; Roghmann et al. Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg., 60, 1999, 790; Chacin-Bonilla et al. Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg., 65, 2001, 131). In the past 20 years, two changes occurred that significantly increased the size of the cat population in the USA. Pet cat ownership grew from 50 million to 90 million animals, and animal welfare activists created feeding stations for abandoned and free-roaming cats. As many cat owners allow their cats to deposit faeces outside and cats maintained in colonies always defecate outside, ample opportunity exists for T. gondii oocysts to enter the environment and be transmitted to humans. Prevention efforts should focus on educating cat owners about the importance of collecting cat faeces in litter boxes, spaying owned cats to reduce overpopulation, reducing the numbers of feral cats and promoting rigorous hand hygiene after gardening or soil contact.

  9. Vaccination of dogs with Trypanosoma rangeli induces antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi in a rural area of Córdoba, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Beatriz; Marini, Vanina; Gauna, Diego; Frias, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Dogs play a major role in the domestic cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, acting as reservoirs. In a previous work we have developed a model of vaccination of dogs in captivity with nonpathogenic Trypanosoma rangeli epimastigotes, resulting in the production of protective antibodies against T. cruzi, with dramatic decrease of parasitaemia upon challenge with 100,000 virulent forms of this parasite. The aim of this work was to evaluate the immunogenicity of this vaccine in dogs living in a rural area. Domestic dogs, free from T. cruzi infection, received three immunisations with fixed T. rangeli epimastigotes. Dogs were not challenged with T. cruzi, but they were left in their environment. This immunisation induced antibodies against T. cruzi for more than three years in dogs in their natural habitat, while control dogs remained serologically negative.

  10. Isolation of Dermatophilus congolensis from a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, O; Kirkan, S; Unal, B

    2000-03-01

    Dermatophilus congolensis was isolated from a cat with dermatitis. The isolate was sensitive to oxytetracyclin, streptomycin and penicillin but resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin, gentamycin and cefoperazone.

  11. Controlled Archaeological Test Site (CATS) Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — CATS facility is at the Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (CERL), Champaign, IL. This 1-acre test site includes a variety of subsurface features carefully...

  12. Sublumbar abscess and diskospondylitis in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Rebecca A; Coates, Joan R; Cook, Cristi R; Lattimer, Jimmy C; O'Brien, Dennis P

    2005-01-01

    Diskospondylitis is uncommon in cats. We describe a cat with diskospondylitis of the L7-S1 intervertebral disk, and a concurrent sublumbar abscess. Radiographic, computed tomographic and ultrasonographic findings are presented. Aerobic and anaerobic cultures of blood and spinal fluid yielded no growth. Aerobic and anaerobic urine cultures resulted in growth of an Enterococcus sp. and Clostridium perfringens, respectively. The cat was successfully treated with enrofloxacin and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. Clinical signs resolved completely, and based on follow-up ultrasonography there was no remaining evidence of the sublumbar abscess. Etiologic agents and outcome from other cats with diskospondylitis are reviewed.

  13. Polycystic kidney and liver disease in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosje, J T; van den Ingh, T S; van der Linde-Sipman, J S

    1998-10-01

    This paper reviews 27 cases of polycystic disease of the kidneys and/or liver in cats. The multiple cysts in the kidneys were rounded in all but one case, as described in adult polycystic kidney disease in humans. In 68% of the cats presented with polycystic kidneys, there were also cystic changes of the liver (uni- or multilocular cysts and/or congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF)). In 1 cat polycystic changes of kidneys and liver were accompanied by cysts in the pancreas. In 5 cases there was severe pancreas fibrosis. Twenty-one of the 27 cats were Persian or Persian-crossbred.

  14. Melophagus ovinus and Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) melophagium in ovines in the State of Minas Gerais, Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, José Oswaldo; Lima, Walter dos Santos; Leite, Antonio César Rios; Guimarães, Marcos Pezzi; Torres, Liléia Diotaiuti

    1983-01-01

    Neste trabalho Melophagus ovinus é identificado pela primeira vez no Estado de Minas Gerais e Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) melophagium tem sua primeira ocorrência registrada no Brasil.Melophagus ovinus is identified for the first time in Minas Gerais State and Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) melophagium in Brazil.

  15. EUROmediCAT signal detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Given, Joanne E; Loane, Maria; Luteijn, Johannes Michiel

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate congenital anomaly (CA)-medication exposure associations produced by the new EUROmediCAT signal detection system and determine which require further investigation. METHODS: Data from 15 EUROCAT registries (1995-2011) with medication exposures at the chemical substance (5th level...... persisted after data validation, a literature review was conducted for prior evidence of human teratogenicity. RESULTS: Thirteen out of 27 CA-medication exposure signals, based on 389 exposed cases, passed data validation. There was some prior evidence in the literature to support six signals (gastroschisis...

  16. Survival of Trypanosoma cruzi in experimentally contaminated drinks Supervivencia de Trypanosoma cruzi en bebidas experimentalmente contaminadas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Carolina Suárez

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Introduction. Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease, transmitted primarily by triatomine insects. However, in 2005, oral transmission was documented in countries where the disease is endemic for Chagas disease. This trend may also occur in Colombia, a situation that motivated epidemiological alerts and the necessity for exploring the risk level of oral, human-to-human infection by T. cruzi.
    Objective. Survival times were established for the T. cruzi strain DS using juices involved in the outbreak of Lebrija County (Cesar, Colombia in 2008.
    Materials and methods. Survival of the T. cruzi strain was evaluated as defined by vitality (forward movement and viability (growth in isolation medium Novy, McNeal and Nicolle/liver infusion tryptose. This strain was molecularly characterized as TCLA, isolated from a patient associated with an outbreak in Aguachica County (Santander, very near Lebrija. Its survival was tested in tangerine juice, guava, soursop (guanábana, water and sugar water.
    Results. The T. cruzi strain DS remained vital in mandarin at room temperature for 72 hr, at refrigerated temperatures for 36 hr;, the soursop (guanábana for 48 hr at room temperature and 384 hr under refrigeration; and guava at both temperatures 24 hr. This strain was viable 2 and 24 hours post-infection in each of the other juices at the two temperature conditions.
    Conclusions: The DS T. cruzi strain survived in all drinks for more than 24 hours post-infection, with a survival time of 384 hr in the juice of soursop (guanábana under refrigeration.

    Introducción. Trypanosoma cruzi es el agente causal de la enfermedad de Chagas, el cual puede ser transmitido por diferentes vías. A partir de 2005 la transmisión oral se incrementó en aquellos países donde la enfermedad es considerada endémica por transmisión vectorial. Colombia no se aparta de esta tendencia, situación que motivó la alerta epidemiol

  17. Suscetibilidade de Trypanosoma evansi à anfotericina B Trypanosoma evansi susceptibility to amphotericin B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandro Schafer da Silva

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a suscetibilidade do Trypanosoma evansi in vitro e in vivo à anfotericina B. Nos testes in vitro, foram utilizadas quatro concentrações (0,06; 0,25; 1,0; 4,0µg mL-1 de anfotecicina B frente a uma suspensão de T. evansi em solução tampão fosfato rico em glicose (PBS - glicose. Para avaliar a eficácia in vivo, foram utilizados 15 ratos parasitados com T. evansi. Em dois grupos de cinco ratos infectados, doses únicas diárias de 1 (grupo A e de 3mg kg-1 (grupo B foram administradas via intraperitonial durante 10 dias, e a parasitemia foi avaliada por meio de esfregaço sanguíneo. Grupo C (n=5 foi utilizado como grupo controle positivo, infectados com T. evansi e não tratados, e o grupo D (n=5, como controle negativo. Os ensaios in vitro evidenciaram suscetibilidade de 100% do T. evansi à anfotericina B após 7h, em todas as concentrações avaliadas. Nos ratos, nem a maior dose testada curou os roedores, apesar de ter prolongado a vida destes em comparação à vida dos animais infectados, mas não tratados. Foi também investigada a função hepática e renal dos ratos após a terapia, e os parâmetros bioquímicos analisados mantiveram-se dentro da normalidade. Conclui-se que o T. evansi in vitro é suscetível à anfotericina B. A dose 3mg kg-1 testada aumentou a expectativa de vida de ratos infectados, porém não teve efeito curativo.The aim of this study was to evaluate the Trypanosoma evansi susceptibility to amphotericin B in vitro and in vivo. Four concentrations (0.06, 0.25, 1.0, and 4.0µg mL-1 of amphotericin B were tested against a suspension containing T. evansi and phosphate buffer solution with glucose in the in vitro assay. Fifteen rats infected with T. evansi were used for the in vivo assay. Groups A (n=5 and B (n=5 received daily doses of 1 and 3mg kg-1 during 10 days and the parasitemia was estimated daily by microscopic examination of smears. The rats from group C (n=5 were the

  18. Respiratory nematodes in cat populations of Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cesare, Angela; Veronesi, Fabrizia; Grillotti, Eleonora; Manzocchi, Simone; Perrucci, Stefania; Beraldo, Paola; Cazzin, Stefania; De Liberato, Claudio; Barros, Luciano A; Simonato, Giulia; Traversa, Donato

    2015-12-01

    The occurrence of common respiratory parasites of domestic cats (the metastrongyloid "cat lungworm" Aelurostrongylus abstrusus and the trichuroid Capillaria aerophila) and of neglected respiratory nematodes of felids (Troglostrongylus brevior, Angiostrongylus chabaudi and Oslerus rostratus) was here evaluated in two and three geographical sites of Northern and Central Italy, respectively. In 2014-2015, individual fecal samples of 868 domestic cats were examined microscopically and genetically, and epidemiological data related to parasitic infections were evaluated as possible risk factors by binary logistic regression models. The most common parasite was A. abstrusus in both mono- and poli-specific infections, followed by T. brevior and C. aerophila, while cats scored negative for other parasites. Cats positive for A. abstrusus (1.9-17 % infection rate) and C. aerophila (0.9-4.8 % infection rate) were found in all examined sites, while cats scored positive for T. brevior (1-14.3 % infection rate) in four sites. Also, T. brevior was here found for the first time in a domestic cat from a mountainous area of Northern Italy. The occurrence of lungworms was statistically related to the presence of respiratory signs and more significant in cats with mixed infection by other lungworms and/or intestinal parasites. Cats living in site C of Central Italy resulted statistically more at risk of infection for lungworms than cats living in the other study sites, while animals ageing less than 1 year were at more risk for troglostrongylosis. Finally, the presence of lungworms was more significant in cats with mixed infection by other lungworms and/or intestinal parasites. These results are discussed under epidemiological and clinical points of views.

  19. Overweight adult cats have significantly lower voluntary physical activity than adult lean cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Godoy, Maria Rc; Shoveller, Anna K

    2017-12-01

    Objectives The objectives of the current pilot study were to evaluate whether body condition score (BCS) and body weight are significantly related to physical activity counts, and to evaluate potential interaction between BCS and voluntary physical activity measured over a 14 day period. Methods Ten (five lean, five overweight), neutered, adult American Shorthair cats were selected for this study (median age 4 ± 0.5 years). Cats with a BCS of ⩽3.0 were considered lean, whereas cats with a BCS >3.0 were considered overweight, using a 5-point scale. Cats were housed in a free-living environment with indoor/outdoor access and were individually fed once daily a commercially available dry extruded diet and allowed 1 h to eat. Voluntary physical activity was measured consecutively for 14 days using the Actical Activity Monitors that were worn parallel to the ribs and attached via a harness. Results Lean cats had a greater mean total daily voluntary physical activity ( P = 0.0059), and a greater voluntary physical activity during light ( P = 0.0023) and dark ( P = 0.0446) periods, with overweight cats having 60% of the physical activity of lean cats. Lean cats were more active before feeding and during animal care procedures. These data suggest that lean cats have a greater anticipatory physical activity prior to feeding and are more eager to have social interaction with humans than overweight cats. A significant interaction was observed between day of physical activity measurement and BCS for total daily voluntary physical activity ( P = 0.0133) and activity during the light period ( P = 0.0016) where lean cats were consistently more active than overweight cats. In general, cats were more active during weekdays vs weekends. Conclusions and relevance The results of this study suggest that overweight cats are less active than lean cats and that voluntary physical activity level appears to be influenced by social interaction with humans.

  20. Domestic cat allergen and allergic sensitisation in young children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Chih-Mei; Gehring, Ulrike; Wickman, Magnus; Hoek, Gerard; Giovannangelo, Mariella; Nordling, Emma; Wijga, Alet; de Jongste, Johan; Pershagen, Goeran; Almqvist, Catarina; Kerkhof, Marjan; Bellander, Tom; Wichmann, H. -Erich; Brunekreef, Bert; Heinrich, Joachim

    Studies have presented conflicting associations between cat allergen exposure and sensitisation and atopic disease. We therefore investigated the association between the observed domestic cat allergen level and cat sensitisation in young children in four study populations from three European

  1. Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment in 4-6 weeks. More MRSA (Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus ) Staphylococcus aureus is a common type of bacteria ... on the skin of people and animals. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the same bacterium that has become ...

  2. Cats, Cancer and Comparative Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M. Cannon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring tumors in dogs are well-established models for several human cancers. Domestic cats share many of the benefits of dogs as a model (spontaneous cancers developing in an immunocompetent animal sharing the same environment as humans, shorter lifespan allowing more rapid trial completion and data collection, lack of standard of care for many cancers allowing evaluation of therapies in treatment-naïve populations, but have not been utilized to the same degree in the One Medicine approach to cancer. There are both challenges and opportunities in feline compared to canine models. This review will discuss three specific tumor types where cats may offer insights into human cancers. Feline oral squamous cell carcinoma is common, shares both clinical and molecular features with human head and neck cancer and is an attractive model for evaluating new therapies. Feline mammary tumors are usually malignant and aggressive, with the ‘triple-negative’ phenotype being more common than in humans, offering an enriched population in which to examine potential targets and treatments. Finally, although there is not an exact corollary in humans, feline injection site sarcoma may be a model for inflammation-driven tumorigenesis, offering opportunities for studying variations in individual susceptibility as well as preventative and therapeutic strategies.

  3. Cool Cats: Feline Fun with Abstract Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Phyllis Gilchrist

    2002-01-01

    Presents a lesson that teaches students about abstract art in a fun way. Explains that students draw cats, learn about the work of Pablo Picasso, and, in the style of Picasso, combine the parts of the cats (tail, legs, head, body) together in unconventional ways. (CMK)

  4. Getting a CAT Scan (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Teens Teens site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol ... For Kids / Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Print en español Obtención de una tomografía computada (video) CAT ...

  5. Criptococose em felino Cryptococcosis in cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.J.F. Sant’Ana

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available A case of cryptococcosis in a cat refferred to the Hospital Veterinário da Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco is described. The cat was euthanized and the microscopic examination of a firm mass observed in the nasal cavity was accomplished. Cryptococcus sp. and a chronic inflammatory process was observed throughout the tissue.

  6. Quantum Computer Games: Schrodinger Cat and Hounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2012-01-01

    The quantum computer game "Schrodinger cat and hounds" is the quantum extension of the well-known classical game fox and hounds. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. "Schrodinger cat and hounds" demonstrates the effects of superposition, destructive and constructive interference, measurements and…

  7. Bacterial reproductive pathogens of cats and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Elizabeth M; Taylor, David J

    2012-05-01

    With the notable exception of Brucella canis, exogenous bacterial pathogens are uncommon causes of reproductive disease in cats and dogs. Most bacterial reproductive infections are endogenous, and predisposing factors for infection are important. This article reviews the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and public health significance of bacterial reproductive pathogens in cats and dogs.

  8. Getting a CAT Scan (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... Español Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth / For Kids / Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Print en español ...

  9. Cats in Czech Rural and Urban Households

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Baranyiová

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to elucidate the effects of rural and urban environments on the coexistence of humans and their cats. From the obtained questionnaire data we selected the rural cats (R, n = 54 and compared them with urban cats (U, n = 144. The R group cats lived predominantly in family houses, U cats in urban apartments. The pressures of physical and social factors in the small niches of urban apartments (dwellings in Czech urban high-density living settings, though comfortable, are smaller than in numerous European countries; they prevailed in our U group resulted in statistically significant differences in only 31 (51.7% out of 60 traits under study. Among them, 15 (68.2% out of 22 concerned the conduct of household members, and 16 (42.1% out of 38 concerned the behaviour of their cats. Thus the conduct of people in U households showed relatively higher proportion of changes than the behaviour of their cats. U onwers more frequently purchased their cats (R = 24.1%, U = 48.6%, chi-square = 10.648, df = 4, p < 0.05, they kept the cat pedigrees (R = 37.0%, U = 75.4%, chisquare = 24.661, df = 1, p < 0.001, paid more attention to their cats ((R = 93.0%, U = 100.0%, chi-square = 8.950, df = 1, p < 0.005, talked to them daily (R = 87.0%, U = 98.6%, chi-square = 12.024, df = 1, p < 0.001, allowed them to use furniture (R = 77.8%, U = 100.0%, chi-square = 33.839, df = 1, p < 0.001, sleep in beds of family members (R = 61.1%, U = 95.1%, chi-square = 37.149, df = 1, p < 0.001, and celebrated their birthdays (R = 25.9%, U = 100.0%, chi-square = 7.014, df = 2, p < 0.05. Their cats were more destructive than R cats, hunted less and were less aggressive when stroked. However, they showed a slightly larger scope of aggressive behaviours and were more frequently described as nervous and restless. The nature of the significant differences found in this study indicates that the co-existence of cats with people in the urbanized world is becoming more

  10. Assessment of Clicker Training for Shelter Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Lori

    2017-01-01

    Simple Summary Living conditions in animal shelters can be stressful for cats. Clicker training might be able to alleviate this stress, by giving cats an opportunity to learn new behaviors and interact with humans. In this study, we assessed the initial ability of 100 shelter cats to perform four cued behaviors: touching a target, sitting, spinning, and giving a high-five. Each cat completed 15, five-min training sessions over a two-week span. At the end of the program, we assessed the cats’ ability to perform the same behaviors. On average, the cats performed better on all four behaviors after clicker training, suggesting that the cats could learn to perform specific behaviors on cue. Individual cats with a higher level of interest in food showed greater gains in learning for two of the behaviors (high-five and touching a target). Cats with a bolder temperament at post-assessment demonstrated greater gains in learning than those classified as shy. We suggest that clicker training can be used to enhance cats’ well-being while they are housed in shelters, and that the learned behaviors might make them more desirable to adopters. Abstract Clicker training has the potential to mitigate stress among shelter cats by providing environmental enrichment and human interaction. This study assessed the ability of cats housed in a shelter-like setting to learn new behaviors via clicker training in a limited amount of time. One hundred shelter cats were enrolled in the study. Their baseline ability to perform four specific behaviors touching a target, sitting, spinning, and giving a high-five was assessed, before exposing them to 15, five-min clicker training sessions, followed by a post-training assessment. Significant gains in performance scores were found for all four cued behaviors after training (p = 0.001). A cat’s age and sex did not have any effect on successful learning, but increased food motivation was correlated with greater gains in learning for two of the

  11. Feral Cats: Too Long a Threat to Hawaiian Wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Steven C.; Banko, Paul C.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Domestic cats (Felis catus) were first brought to Hawai`i aboard sailing ships of European explorers and colonists. The job of these predators was to control mice and rats on the ships during the long voyages. As in other places, cats were taken in and adopted by the families of Hawai`i and soon became household pets known as popoki. But cats have always been very well equipped to live and hunt on their own. On tropical archipelagos like the Hawaiian Islands where no other predatory mammals of comparable size existed, abundant and naive prey were particularly easy game, and cats soon thrived in the wild. Although the details of when cats first came to live in the wild remain little known, adventurers, writers, and naturalists of the day recorded some important observations. Feral cats were observed in remote wilderness around K?ilauea volcano on Hawai`i Island as early as 1840 by explorer William Brackenridge. Mark Twain was so impressed by the great abundance of cats when he visited Honolulu in 1866 that he reported his observations in the Sacramento Union newspaper, which were later reprinted in his book Roughing It: I saw... tame cats, wild cats, singed cats, individual cats, groups of cats, platoons of cats, companies of cats, regiments of cats, armies of cats, multitudes of cats, millions of cats...

  12. A Survey of Public Opinion on Cat (Felis catus) Predation and the Future Direction of Cat Management in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jessica K.; Bruce, Stephanie J.; Dale, Arnja R.

    2017-01-01

    Simple Summary The need to balance the benefits of cat ownership with the prevention of wildlife predation in New Zealand evokes strong and opposing views. This paper evaluates public concern for wildlife predation by four categories of cats; owned cats, managed-stray cats, unmanaged-stray cats, and feral cats. In addition, public support for a National Cat Management Strategy and a range of management techniques are investigated. Although the participants expressed concern regarding wildlife predation by all four categories of cats, the highest levels of concern were predation by feral cats, followed by unmanaged stray cats, then managed stray cats, and finally owned cats. The large majority of participants were found to support the implementation of a National Cat Management Strategy. Management techniques for owned cats that obtained public support included; cat exclusion zones, limits on ownership numbers, microchipping, Council registration, and de-sexing. Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) was the favoured management technique for managed stray cats, while TNR and lethal management techniques were equally favoured for unmanaged stray cats. Lethal control methods were favoured for feral cats. The findings presented in this paper will be useful to consider during the development of legislation relating to cat management and predation in New Zealand. Abstract Cat predation is a prominent issue in New Zealand that provokes strong and opposing views. We explored, via 1011 face-to-face questionnaires, public opinion on (a) support for a National Cat Management Strategy (78% support); (b) concern regarding predation of wildlife by owned and un-owned cats (managed stray, unmanaged stray, and feral cats); (c) the acceptability of management techniques for owned cats; and (d) the acceptability of population management techniques for un-owned cats. The highest concern was expressed regarding the predation of non-native and native wildlife by feral cats (60 and 86% repectively

  13. Polycystic kidney disease in a Chartreux cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volta, Antonella; Manfredi, Sabrina; Gnudi, Giacomo; Gelati, Aldo; Bertoni, Giorgio

    2010-02-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is one of the most common genetic diseases in cats. It has been widely described in Persians and Persian-related cats and sporadically in other breeds. The purpose of the present paper is to describe the first reported case of PKD in a 12-year-old female Chartreux cat. The cat was referred with polyuria and polydipsia and enlarged and irregular kidneys at palpation. Multiple renal cysts and a single liver cyst were identified by ultrasound and the inherited pattern was confirmed by genetic test (polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR/RFLP) assay). Chartreux cats should be included in the screening programme of PKD, and PKD should be always considered as a possible cause of chronic renal failure in this breed. Copyright 2009 ESFM and AAFP. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Differential expression on mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase (mTcTXNPx in Trypanosoma cruzi after ferrocenyl diamine hydrochlorides treatments

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    Andréa A.N. Kohatsu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to benznidazole in certain strains of Trypanosoma cruzi may be caused by the increased production of enzymes that act on the oxidative metabolism, such as mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase which catalyses the reduction of peroxides. This work presents cytotoxicity assays performed with ferrocenyl diamine hydrochlorides in six different strains of T. cruzi epimastigote forms (Y, Bolivia, SI1, SI8, QMII, and SIGR3. The last four strains have been recently isolated from triatominae and mammalian host (domestic cat. The expression of mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase was analyzed by the Western blotting technique using polyclonal antibody anti mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase obtained from a rabbit immunized with the mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase recombinant protein. All the tested ferrocenyl diamine hydrochlorides were more cytotoxic than benznidazole. The expression of the 25.5 kDa polypeptide of mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase did not increase in strains that were more resistant to the ferrocenyl compounds (SI8 and SIGR3. In addition, a 58 kDa polypeptide was also recognized in all strains. Ferrocenyl diamine hydrochlorides showed trypanocidal activity and the expression of 25.5 kDa mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase is not necessarily increased in some T. cruzi strains. Most likely, other mechanisms, in addition to the over expression of this antioxidative enzyme, should be involved in the escape of parasites from cytotoxic oxidant agents.

  15. Differential expression on mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase (mTcTXNPx) in Trypanosoma cruzi after ferrocenyl diamine hydrochlorides treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohatsu, Andréa A N; Silva, Flávia A J; Francisco, Acácio I; Rimoldi, Aline; Silva, Marco T A; Vargas, Maria D; Rosa, João A da; Cicarelli, Regina M B

    Resistance to benznidazole in certain strains of Trypanosoma cruzi may be caused by the increased production of enzymes that act on the oxidative metabolism, such as mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase which catalyses the reduction of peroxides. This work presents cytotoxicity assays performed with ferrocenyl diamine hydrochlorides in six different strains of T. cruzi epimastigote forms (Y, Bolivia, SI1, SI8, QMII, and SIGR3). The last four strains have been recently isolated from triatominae and mammalian host (domestic cat). The expression of mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase was analyzed by the Western blotting technique using polyclonal antibody anti mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase obtained from a rabbit immunized with the mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase recombinant protein. All the tested ferrocenyl diamine hydrochlorides were more cytotoxic than benznidazole. The expression of the 25.5kDa polypeptide of mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase did not increase in strains that were more resistant to the ferrocenyl compounds (SI8 and SIGR3). In addition, a 58kDa polypeptide was also recognized in all strains. Ferrocenyl diamine hydrochlorides showed trypanocidal activity and the expression of 25.5kDa mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase is not necessarily increased in some T. cruzi strains. Most likely, other mechanisms, in addition to the over expression of this antioxidative enzyme, should be involved in the escape of parasites from cytotoxic oxidant agents. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. First outbreak and subsequent cases of Trypanosoma vivax in the state of Goiás, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Souza Azeredo Bastos

    Full Text Available Abstract Trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma vivax has increased the reports in Brazil in the last decade. An outbreak is herein first reported in the state of Goiás, from May 2016 to January 2017. The outbreak start occurred in the city of Ipameri (Goiás after the introduction of 18 auctioned cows from the state of Minas Gerais. Direct parasitological test (blood smears and polymerase chain reactions targeting the catL genes diagnosed T. vivax infection. Fifty six cows from a herd of 161 were infected; 12 died during the outbreak and 44 animals persistently positive (by blood smears even after chemical treatment were discarded. After this first case, five other cases were detected in state of Goiás. The spread of this disease can be linked to the commercialization of animals carrying T. vivax, allied to the iatrogenic transmission practice, using a single needle and syringe for all cows, during oxytocin administration before each milking.

  17. A comparative molecular and 3-dimensional structural investigation into cross-continental and novel avian Trypanosoma spp. in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Crystal; Thompson, R C Andrew; Botero, Adriana; Kristancic, Amanda; Peacock, Christopher; Kirilak, Yaowanuj; Clode, Peta L

    2017-05-12

    Molecular and structural information on avian Trypanosoma spp. throughout Australia is limited despite their intrinsic value in understanding trypanosomatid evolution, diversity, and structural biology. In Western Australia tissue samples (n = 429) extracted from 93 birds in 25 bird species were screened using generic PCR primers to investigate the diversity of Trypanosoma spp. To investigate avian trypanosome structural biology the first 3-dimensional ultrastructural models of a Trypanosoma spp. (Trypanosoma sp. AAT) isolated from a bird (currawong, Strepera spp.) were generated using focussed ion beam milling combined with scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM). Here, we confirm four intercontinental species of avian trypanosomes in native Australian birds, and identify a new avian Trypanosoma. Trypanosome infection was identified in 18 birds from 13 different bird species (19%). A single new genotype was isolated and found to be closely related to T. culicavium (Trypanosoma sp. CC2016 B002). Other Trypanosoma spp. identified include T. avium, T. culicavium, T. thomasbancrofti, Trypanosoma sp. TL.AQ.22, Trypanosoma sp. AAT, and an uncharacterised Trypanosoma sp. (group C-III sensu Zidková et al. (Infect Genet Evol 12:102-112, 2012)), all previously identified in Australia or other continents. Serially-sectioning Trypanosoma sp. AAT epimastigotes using FIB-SEM revealed the disc-shaped kinetoplast pocket attached perpendicular to the branching mitochondrion. Additionally, the universal minicircle sequence within the kinetoplast DNA and the associated binding protein were determined in Trypanosoma sp. AAT. These results indicate that bird trypanosomes are relatively conserved across continents, while being locally diverse, which supports the hypothesis that bird trypanosomes exist as fewer species than described in the literature. Evidence exists that avian Trypanosoma spp. are infecting mammals and could be transmitted by haemadipsid leeches. Trypanosoma sp

  18. Feline Epitheliotropic Mastocytic Conjunctivitis in 15 Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckwith-Cohen, B; Dubielzig, R R; Maggs, D J; Teixeira, L B C

    2017-01-01

    Mast cell infiltration occurs in malignant, inflammatory (eg, allergic, infectious), and idiopathic disease processes in humans and animals. Here, we describe the clinical and histological features of a unique proliferative conjunctivitis occurring in 15 cats. Ocular specimens were examined histologically, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for feline herpesvirus 1 (FHV-1) was performed on ocular tissues obtained from 10 cats. Cats had a median age of 8 years (range: 7 months-17.5 years). The known median duration of ocular lesions prior to biopsy was 4 months (range: 1 week-3 years). Ocular disease was unilateral in 12 cats, and 9 cats had coexisting corneal disease. Clinically and histologically, proliferative or nodular conjunctival lesions were noted in 13 cats. The nictitating membrane was affected in 10 cats. Histologically, lesions were characterized by mixed inflammatory infiltrates with an abundance of Giemsa-positive and toluidine blue-positive intraepithelial and subepithelial mast cells, marked edema, and papillary epithelial hyperplasia. Feline herpesvirus 1 was demonstrated by PCR in 1 of 10 cats tested. Follow-up information was available for 14 cats: 8 had no recurrence during a median follow-up period of 17.5 months (range: 4.5-30 months), 2 underwent orbital exenteration, 3 had recurrence that was medically managed, and 1 cat had diffuse conjunctivitis at the time of biopsy and recurrence was deemed irrelevant. Various ocular medications were administered before and after surgical biopsy. This condition was designated as feline epitheliotropic mastocytic conjunctivitis, with intraepithelial mast cells being an essential feature and papillary epithelial proliferation being characteristic but not diagnostic alone. The condition appears to be uncommon and benign. Although the cause is unknown, an allergic component is possible.

  19. Interspecies Transmission of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus from the Domestic Cat to the Tsushima Cat (Felis bengalensis euptilura) in the Wild

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Yoshiaki; Goto, Yuko; Yoneda, Kumiko; Endo, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Takuya; Hamachi, Masaharu; Maruyama, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Hirotoshi; Koga, Susumu; Komori, Mitsuru; Fushuku, Seigo; Ushinohama, Kanji; Akuzawa, Masao; Watari, Toshihiro; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    1999-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) was isolated from a wild-caught Tsushima cat (Felis bengalensis euptilura), an endangered Japanese nondomestic subspecies of leopard cat (F. bengalensis). Phylogenetic analysis of the env gene sequences indicated that the FIV from the Tsushima cat belonged to a cluster of subtype D FIVs from domestic cats. FIVs from both the Tsushima cat and the domestic cat showed similar levels of replication and cytopathicity in lymphoid cell lines derived from these two species. The results indicated the occurrence of interspecies transmission of FIV from the domestic cat to the Tsushima cat in the wild. PMID:10438892

  20. Sexual transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Marcelle; Nitz, Nadjar; Santana, Camilla; Moraes, Aline; Hagström, Luciana; Andrade, Rafael; Rios, Adriano; Sousa, Alessandro; Dallago, Bruno; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Hecht, Mariana

    2016-03-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is mainly transmitted by blood-sucking triatomines, but other routes also have epidemiological importance, such as blood transfusion and congenital transmission. Although the possibility of sexual transmission of T. cruzi has been suggested since its discovery, few studies have been published on this subject. We investigated acquisition of T. cruzi by sexual intercourse in an experimental murine model. Male and female mice in the chronic phase of Chagas disease were mated with naive partners. Parasitological, serological and molecular tests demonstrated the parasites in tissues and blood of partners. These results confirm the sexual transmission of T. cruzi in mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Arginine and Lysine Transporters Are Essential for Trypanosoma brucei.

    OpenAIRE

    Mathieu, Christoph; Pereira de Macêdo, Juan; Hürlimann, Daniel; Wirdnam, Corina; Haindrich, Alexander; Suter, Marianne; González Salgado, Amaia; Schmidt, Remo; Inbar, Ehud; Mäser, Pascal; Bütikofer, Peter; Zilberstein, Dan; Rentsch, Doris

    2017-01-01

    For Trypanosoma brucei arginine and lysine are essential amino acids and therefore have to be imported from the host. Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants identified cationic amino acid transporters among members of the T. brucei AAAP (amino acid/auxin permease) family. TbAAT5-3 showed high affinity arginine uptake (K m 3.6 ? 0.4 ?M) and high selectivity for L-arginine. L-arginine transport was reduced by a 10-times excess of L-arginine, homo-arginine, canavanine or arg...

  2. Acetate oxidation by bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docampo, R; Cruz, F S; Leon, W; Schmunis, G A

    1979-05-01

    Bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma cruzi had a substantial increase in respiration in the presence of acetate. Oxidation of acetate took place via the tricarboxylic acid cycle and involved an antimycin A-sensitive respiratory pathway. Oxygen uptake in the presence of acetate was a sensitive to antimycin A inhibition as was CO2 production. There was a 6--7% residual O2 uptake which was not inhibited by high antimycin concentrations. Human anti-T. cruzi sera had no effect on oxygen uptake.

  3. Trypanosoma sp. diversity in Amazonian bats (Chiroptera; Mammalia) from Acre State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Francisco C B; Lisboa, Cristiane V; Xavier, Samanta C C; Dario, Maria A; Verde, Rair de S; Calouro, Armando M; Roque, André Luiz R; Jansen, Ana M

    2017-11-16

    Bats are ancient hosts of Trypanosoma species and their flying ability, longevity and adaptability to distinct environments indicate that they are efficient dispersers of parasites. Bats from Acre state (Amazon Biome) were collected in four expeditions conducted in an urban forest (Parque Zoobotânico) and one relatively more preserved area (Seringal Cahoeira) in Rio Branco and Xapuri municipalities. Trypanosoma sp. infection was detected by hemoculture and fresh blood examination. Isolated parasite species were identified by the similarity of the obtained DNA sequence from 18S rDNA polymerase chain reaction and reference strains. Overall, 367 bats from 23 genera and 32 species were examined. Chiropterofauna composition was specific to each municipality, although Artibeus sp. and Carollia sp. prevailed throughout. Trypanosoma sp. infection was detected in 85 bats (23·2%). The most widely distributed and prevalent genotypes were (in order) Trypanosoma cruzi TcI, T. cruzi marinkellei, Trypanosoma dionisii, T. cruzi TcIV and Trypanosoma rangeli. At least one still-undescribed Trypanosoma species was also detected in this study. The detection of T. cruzi TcI and TcIV (the ones associated with Chagas disease in Amazon biome) demonstrates the putative importance of these mammal hosts in the epidemiology of the disease in the Acre State.

  4. Corneal hemangiosarcoma in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazalot, G; Regnier, A; Deviers, A; Serra, F; Lucas, M N; Etienne, C L; Letron, I Raymond

    2011-09-01

    A 10 year-old castrated male Domestic Short-hair cat with a history of chronic bilateral keratitis was referred for assessment of a red, elevated mass involving the left cornea. The rapid growth of the mass, over a month period in combination with pronounced vascularization and invasion of the corneal surface suggested an aggressive inflammatory or neoplastic process. Following keratectomy, the lesion was diagnosed histopathologically as a hemangiosarcoma. The tumor recurred locally within 3 weeks and enucleation was performed. Histopathologic examination of the globe confirmed the diagnosis and did not reveal infiltration of the limbus and conjunctiva. No signs of local recurrence or metastatic disease have been observed 18 months following enucleation. To the authors' knowledge this is the first case of primary corneal hemangiosarcoma described in the feline species. © 2011 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  5. Birds be safe: Can a novel cat collar reduce avian mortality by domestic cats (Felis catus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Willson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The domestic cat (Felis catus has been described as the largest anthropogenic threat to songbird populations in North America. We examined the effectiveness of a novel cat collar in reducing avian and small mammal mortality by cats. The 2-inch wide Birdsbesafe® collar cover (CC is worn over a nylon quick-release collar, and the bright colors and patterns of the CC are hypothesized to warn birds of approaching cats. We conducted two seasonal trials, each lasting 12 weeks, in autumn 2013 (n=54 cats and spring 2014 (n=19 cats. Cats were randomly assigned to two groups, and CCs with interior collars were removed or put on every two weeks, to control for weather fluctuations and seasonal change. Cats wearing Birdsbesafe® CCs killed 19 times fewer birds than uncollared cats in the spring trial, and 3.4 times fewer birds in the fall. Birdsbesafe® CCs were extremely effective at reducing predation on birds. Small mammal data were less clear, but did decrease predation by half in the fall. The Birdsbesafe® CC is a highly effective device for decreasing bird predation, especially in the spring season. We suggest that the CCs be used as a conservation tool for owned as well as feral cats.

  6. Environmental Aspects of Domestic Cat Care and Management: Implications for Cat Welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Judith L.

    2016-01-01

    Domestic cats (Felis silvestris catus) are the most commonly kept companion animals in the US with large populations of owned (86 million), free-roaming (70 million), research (13,000), and shelter (2-3 million) cats. Vast numbers of cats are maintained in homes and other facilities each year and are reliant on humans for all of their care. Understanding cat behavior and providing the highest quality environments possible, including positive human-cat interactions, based on research could help improve the outcomes of biomedical research, shelter adoptions, and veterinary care, as well as overall cat welfare. Often, however, cats' needs are inadequately met in homes and some aspects may also not be well met in research colonies and shelters, despite the fact that similar problems are likely to be encountered in all of these environments. This paper provides a brief overview of common welfare challenges associated with indoor housing of domestic cats. Essential considerations for cage confinement are reviewed, along with implications of poor cat coping, such as weakening of the human-animal bond and relinquishment to shelters. The important role that environmental management plays in cat behavior and welfare outcomes is explored along with the need for additional research in key areas. PMID:27774506

  7. Cats and Carbohydrates: The Carnivore Fantasy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbrugghe, Adronie; Hesta, Myriam

    2017-01-01

    The domestic cat’s wild ancestors are obligate carnivores that consume prey containing only minimal amounts of carbohydrates. Evolutionary events adapted the cat’s metabolism and physiology to this diet strictly composed of animal tissues and led to unique digestive and metabolic peculiarities of carbohydrate metabolism. The domestic cat still closely resembles its wild ancestor. Although the carnivore connection of domestic cats is well recognised, little is known about the precise nutrient profile to which the digestive physiology and metabolism of the cat have adapted throughout evolution. Moreover, studies show that domestic cats balance macronutrient intake by selecting low-carbohydrate foods. The fact that cats evolved consuming low-carbohydrate prey has led to speculations that high-carbohydrate diets could be detrimental for a cat’s health. More specifically, it has been suggested that excess carbohydrates could lead to feline obesity and diabetes mellitus. Additionally, the chances for remission of diabetes mellitus are higher in cats that consume a low-carbohydrate diet. This literature review will summarise current carbohydrate knowledge pertaining to digestion, absorption and metabolism of carbohydrates, food selection and macronutrient balancing in healthy, obese and diabetic cats, as well as the role of carbohydrates in prevention and treatment of obesity and diabetes mellitus. PMID:29140289

  8. Cats and Carbohydrates: The Carnivore Fantasy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adronie Verbrugghe

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The domestic cat’s wild ancestors are obligate carnivores that consume prey containing only minimal amounts of carbohydrates. Evolutionary events adapted the cat’s metabolism and physiology to this diet strictly composed of animal tissues and led to unique digestive and metabolic peculiarities of carbohydrate metabolism. The domestic cat still closely resembles its wild ancestor. Although the carnivore connection of domestic cats is well recognised, little is known about the precise nutrient profile to which the digestive physiology and metabolism of the cat have adapted throughout evolution. Moreover, studies show that domestic cats balance macronutrient intake by selecting low-carbohydrate foods. The fact that cats evolved consuming low-carbohydrate prey has led to speculations that high-carbohydrate diets could be detrimental for a cat’s health. More specifically, it has been suggested that excess carbohydrates could lead to feline obesity and diabetes mellitus. Additionally, the chances for remission of diabetes mellitus are higher in cats that consume a low-carbohydrate diet. This literature review will summarise current carbohydrate knowledge pertaining to digestion, absorption and metabolism of carbohydrates, food selection and macronutrient balancing in healthy, obese and diabetic cats, as well as the role of carbohydrates in prevention and treatment of obesity and diabetes mellitus.

  9. The CATS Service: An Astrophysical Research Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O V Verkhodanov

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe the current status of CATS (astrophysical CATalogs Support system, a publicly accessible tool maintained at Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences (SAO RAS (http://cats.sao.ru allowing one to search hundreds of catalogs of astronomical objects discovered all along the electromagnetic spectrum. Our emphasis is mainly on catalogs of radio continuum sources observed from 10 MHz to 245 GHz, and secondly on catalogs of objects such as radio and active stars, X-ray binaries, planetary nebulae, HII regions, supernova remnants, pulsars, nearby and radio galaxies, AGN and quasars. CATS also includes the catalogs from the largest extragalactic surveys with non-radio waves. In 2008 CATS comprised a total of about 109 records from over 400 catalogs in the radio, IR, optical and X-ray windows, including most source catalogs deriving from observations with the Russian radio telescope RATAN-600. CATS offers several search tools through different ways of access, e.g. via Web-interface and e-mail. Since its creation in 1997 CATS has managed about 105requests. Currently CATS is used by external users about 1500 times per day and since its opening to the public in 1997 has received about 4000 requests for its selection and matching tasks.

  10. Environmental enrichment choices of shelter cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, J J; Stryhn, H; Spears, J; Cockram, M S

    2017-08-01

    Choices made by cats between different types of environmental enrichment may help shelters to prioritize how to most effectively enrich cat housing, especially when limited by space or funds. This study investigates the environmental enrichment use of cats in a choice test. Twenty-six shelter cats were kept singularly in choice chambers for 10days. Each chamber had a central area and four centrally-linked compartments containing different types of environmental enrichment: 1) an empty control, 2) a prey-simulating toy, 3) a perching opportunity, and 4) a hiding opportunity. Cat movement between compartments was quantitatively recorded using a data-logger. Enriched compartments were visited significantly more frequently during the light period than during the dark period. Cats spent a significantly greater percentage of time in the hiding compartment (median=55%, IQR=46) than in the toy compartment (median=2%, IQR=9), or in the empty control compartment (median=4%, IQR=4). These results provide additional evidence to support the value of a hiding box to cats housed in a novel environment, in that they choose hiding relative to other types of environmental enrichment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. In vitro drug susceptibility of two strains of the wildlife trypanosome, Trypanosoma copemani: A comparison with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botero, Adriana; Keatley, Sarah; Peacock, Christopher; Thompson, R C Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Trypanosomes are blood protozoan parasites that are capable of producing illness in the vertebrate host. Within Australia, several native Trypanosoma species have been described infecting wildlife. However, only Trypanosoma copemani has been associated with pathological lesions in wildlife hosts and more recently has been associated with the drastic decline of the critically endangered woylie (Bettongia penicillata). The impact that some trypanosomes have on the health of the vertebrate host has led to the development of numerous drug compounds that could inhibit the growth or kill the parasite. This study investigated and compared the in vitro susceptibility of two strains of T. copemani (G1 and G2) and one strain of Trypanosoma cruzi (10R26) against drugs that are known to show trypanocidal activity (benznidazole, posaconazole, miltefosine and melarsoprol) and against four lead compounds, two fenarimols and two pyridine derivatives (EPL-BS1937, EPL-BS2391, EPL-BS0967, and EPL-BS1246), that have been developed primarily against T.cruzi. The in vitro cytotoxicity of all drugs against L6 rat myoblast cells was also assessed. Results showed that both strains of T. copemani were more susceptible to all drugs and lead compounds than T. cruzi, with all IC50 values in the low and sub-μM range for both species. Melarsoprol and miltefosine exhibited the highest drug activity against both T. copemani and T. cruzi, but they also showed the highest toxicity in L6 cells. Interestingly, both fenarimol and pyridine derivative compounds were more active against T. copemani and T. cruzi than the reference drugs benznidazole and posaconazole. T. copemani strains exhibited differences in susceptibility to all drugs demonstrating once again considerable differences in their biological behaviour. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence varies by cat breed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kärt Must

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is a widespread zoonotic parasite that is relevant for veterinary and public health. The domestic cat, the definitive host species with the largest worldwide population, has become evolutionarily and epidemiologically the most important host of T. gondii. The outcome of T. gondii infection is influenced by congenital and acquired host characteristics. We detected differences in T. gondii seroprevalence by cat breed in our previous studies. The aims of this study were to estimate T. gondii seroprevalence in selected domestic cat breeds, and to evaluate whether being of a certain breed is associated with T. gondii seropositivity, when the age and lifestyle of the cat are taken into account. The studied breeds were the Birman, British Shorthair, Burmese, Korat, Norwegian Forest Cat, Ocicat, Persian, and Siamese. Plasma samples were analyzed for the presence of immunoglobulin G antibodies against T. gondii with a commercial direct agglutination test at dilution 1:40. The samples were accompanied by owner-completed questionnaires that provided background data on the cats. Overall, 41.12% of the 1121 cats tested seropositive, and the seroprevalence increased with age. The Burmese had the lowest seroprevalence (18.82% and the Persian had the highest (60.00%. According to the final multivariable logistic regression model, the odds to test seropositive were four to seven times higher in Birmans, Ocicats, Norwegian Forest Cats, and Persians when compared with the Burmese, while older age and receiving raw meat were also risk factors for T. gondii seropositivity. This study showed that T. gondii seroprevalence varies by cat breed and identified being of certain breeds, older age, and receiving raw meat as risk factors for seropositivity.

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi: Transporte de metabolitos esenciales obtenidos del hospedador Trypanosoma cruzi: Transport of essential metabolites acquired from the host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio A. Pereira

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available El Trypanosoma cruzi es el agente causal de la enfermedad de Chagas, endémica en Argentina y en toda América Latina. Presenta numerosas características metabólicas diferenciales respecto a sus hospedadores insectos y mamíferos. Algunas de estas diferencias fueron consecuencia de millones de años de adaptación al parasitismo en los cuales estos organismos protozoarios reemplazaron, a lo largo de su evolución, muchas rutas metabólicas de biosíntesis por sistemas de transporte de metabolitos desde el hospedador. En esta revisión se describen los avances en el conocimiento de los sistemas de transporte tanto bioquímicos como también de las moléculas involucradas en dichos procesos. Se aborda con especial énfasis los transportadores de aminoácidos y poliaminas de T. cruzi de la familia AAAP (Amino Acid/Auxin Permeases ya que parece ser exclusiva de los tripanosomátidos. Teniendo en cuenta que estas moléculas se encuentran completamente ausentes en mamíferos podrían ser consideradas como potenciales blancos contra el Trypanosoma cruzi.Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a disease endemic not only in Argentina but also in all of Latinamerica. T. cruzi presents several metabolic characteristics which are completely absent in its insect vectors and in mammalian hosts. Some of these differences were acquired after millions of years of adaptation to parasitism, during which this protozoan replaced many biosynthetic routes for transport systems. In the present review, we describe the advances in the knowledge of T. cruzi transport processes and the molecules involved. In particular, we focus on aminoacid and polyamine transporters from the AAAP family (Amino Acid/Auxin Permeases, because they seem to be exclusive transporters from trypanosomatids. Taking into account that these permeases are completely absent in mammals, they could be considered as a potential target against Trypanosoma cruzi.

  14. Nasopharyngeal turbinates in brachycephalic dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginn, Jennifer A; Kumar, M S A; McKiernan, Brendan C; Powers, Barbara E

    2008-01-01

    This retrospective study reports the presence and incidence of nasal turbinates in the nasopharynx (nasopharyngeal turbinates) in a population of brachycephalic dogs and cats exhibiting signs of upper respiratory disease. Medical records were reviewed for 53 brachycephalic dogs and 10 brachycephalic cats undergoing upper airway endoscopy. Nasopharyngeal turbinates were identified in 21% of brachycephalic animals, including 21% of dogs and 20% of cats. Pugs accounted for 32% of all dogs in the study population and 82% of dogs with nasopharyngeal turbinates. The presence of nasopharyngeal turbinates may play a role in upper airway obstruction in the brachycephalic airway syndrome.

  15. Cytogenetic investigation of cat-eye syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walknowska, J; Peakman, D; Weleber, R G

    1977-10-01

    Using multiple chromosomal banding techniques, we studied a child with typical cat-eye syndrome and ocular retraction syndrome. Although the mother was was chromosomally normal, other maternal relatives showed features of the cat-eye syndrome, suggesting the basic abnormality is heritable. The abnormal chromosome in our case was most likely the product of reciprocal translocation where short arm plus centromeric chromatin from two separate acrocentric chromosomes fused together. The chromosomes involved were probably No. 22 and either Nos. 13 or 14. The basic underlying defect in cat-eye syndrome may be a heritable fragile site or some other predisposition leading to complex chromosomal interchange.

  16. Adverse food reactions in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaschen, Frédéric P; Merchant, Sandra R

    2011-03-01

    Adverse food reactions (AFR) are a common problem that may cause cutaneous and/or gastrointestinal signs in dogs and cats. They comprise food intolerance, food intoxication, and food allergy. Response to a dietary elimination trial and recurrence of signs during dietary provocation remain the centerpiece of diagnosis and management of dogs and cats with AFR. Response to an elimination trial is frequently observed in dogs and cats with chronic idiopathic enteropathies. However, only a fraction of them relapse after a dietary challenge. These animals may have mild to enteritis and/or colitis and benefit from various additional properties of the elimination diet. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pain and adverse behavior in declawed cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martell-Moran, Nicole K; Solano, Mauricio; Townsend, Hugh Gg

    2017-05-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the impact of onychectomy (declawing) upon subsequent development of back pain and unwanted behavior in cohorts of treated and control cats housed in two different locations. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study. In total, there was 137 declawed and 137 non-declawed cats, of which 176 were owned cats (88 declawed, 88 non-declawed) and 98 were shelter cats (49 declawed and 49 non-declawed). All cats were physically examined for signs of pain and barbering. The previous 2 years of medical history were reviewed for documented unwanted behavior such as inappropriate elimination and biting with minimal provocation and aggression. All declawed cats were radiographed for distal limb abnormalities, including P3 (third phalanx) bone fragments. The associations of declaw surgery with the outcomes of interest were examined using χ 2 analysis, two sample t-tests and manual, backwards, stepwise logistic regression. Results Significant increases in the odds of back pain (odds ratio [OR] 2.9), periuria/perichezia (OR 7.2), biting (OR 4.5) and barbering (OR 3.06) occurred in declawed compared with control cats. Of the 137 declawed cats, 86 (63%) showed radiographic evidence of residual P3 fragments. The odds of back pain (OR 2.66), periuria/perichezia (OR 2.52) and aggression (OR 8.9) were significantly increased in declawed cats with retained P3 fragments compared with those declawed cats without. Optimal surgical technique, with removal of P3 in its entirety, was associated with fewer adverse outcomes and lower odds of these outcomes, but operated animals remained at increased odds of biting (OR 3.0) and undesirable habits of elimination (OR 4.0) compared with non-surgical controls. Conclusions and relevance Declawing cats increases the risk of unwanted behaviors and may increase risk for developing back pain. Evidence of inadequate surgical technique was common in the study population. Among declawed cats, retained P3

  18. Refractory hypoglycaemia in a dog infected with Trypanosoma congolense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deschamps Jack-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20 kg German shepherd dog was presented to a French veterinary teaching hospital for seizures and hyperthermia. The dog had returned 1 month previously from a six-month stay in Senegal and sub-Saharan Africa. Biochemistry and haematology showed severe hypoglycaemia (0.12 g/L, anaemia and thrombocytopenia. Despite administration of large amounts of glucose (30 mL of 30% glucose IV and 10 mL of 70% sucrose by gavage tube hourly, 26 consecutive blood glucose measurements were below 0.25 g/L (except one. Routine cytological examination of blood smears revealed numerous free extracytoplasmic protozoa consistent with Trypanosoma congolense. PCR confirmed a Trypanosoma congolense forest-type infection. Treatment consisted of six injections of pentamidine at 48-hour intervals. Trypanosomes had disappeared from the blood smears four days following the first injection. Clinical improvement was correlated with the normalization of laboratory values. The infection relapsed twice and the dog was treated again; clinical signs and parasites disappeared and the dog was considered cured; however, 6 years after this incident, serological examination by ELISA T. congolense was positive. The status of this dog (infected or non-infected remains unclear. Hypoglycaemia was the most notable clinical feature in this case. It was spectacular in its severity and in its refractory nature; glucose administration seemed only to feed the trypanosomes, indicating that treatment of hypoglycaemia may in fact have been detrimental.

  19. Tridimensional ultrastructure and glycolipid pattern studies of Trypanosoma dionisii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Miriam Pires de Castro; Ramos, Thiago Cesar Prata; Pinheiro, Adriana Maria V N; Bertini, Silvio; Takahashi, Helio Kiyoshi; Straus, Anita Hilda; Haapalainen, Edna Freymuller

    2013-12-01

    Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) dionisii is a non-pathogenic bat trypanosome closely related to Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chaga's disease. Both kinetoplastids present similar morphological stages and are able to infect mammalian cells in culture. In the present study we examined 3D ultrastructure aspects of the two species by serial sectioning epimastigote and trypomastigote forms, and identified common carbohydrate epitopes expressed in T. dionisii, T. cruzi and Leishmania major. A major difference in 3D morphology was that T. dionisii epimastigote forms present larger multivesicular structures, restricted to the parasite posterior region. These structures could be related to T. cruzi reservosomes and are also rich in cruzipain, the major cysteine-proteinase of T. cruzi. We analyzed the reactivity of two monoclonal antibodies: MEST-1 directed to galactofuranose residues of glycolipids purified from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, and BST-1 directed to glycolipids purified from T. cruzi epimastigotes. Both antibodies were reactive with T. dionisii epimastigotes by indirect immunofluorescense, but we noted differences in the location and intensity of the epitopes, when compared to T. cruzi. In summary, despite similar features in cellular structure and life cycle of T. dionisii and T. cruzi, we observed a unique morphological characteristic in T. dionisii that deserves to be explored. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Earliest "Domestic" Cats in China Identified as Leopard Cat (Prionailurus bengalensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigne, Jean-Denis; Evin, Allowen; Cucchi, Thomas; Dai, Lingling; Yu, Chong; Hu, Songmei; Soulages, Nicolas; Wang, Weilin; Sun, Zhouyong; Gao, Jiangtao; Dobney, Keith; Yuan, Jing

    2016-01-01

    The ancestor of all modern domestic cats is the wildcat, Felis silvestris lybica, with archaeological evidence indicating it was domesticated as early as 10,000 years ago in South-West Asia. A recent study, however, claims that cat domestication also occurred in China some 5,000 years ago and involved the same wildcat ancestor (F. silvestris). The application of geometric morphometric analyses to ancient small felid bones from China dating between 5,500 to 4,900 BP, instead reveal these and other remains to be that of the leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis). These data clearly indicate that the origins of a human-cat 'domestic' relationship in Neolithic China began independently from South-West Asia and involved a different wild felid species altogether. The leopard cat's 'domestic' status, however, appears to have been short-lived--its apparent subsequent replacement shown by the fact that today all domestic cats in China are genetically related to F. silvestris.

  1. 9 CFR 113.39 - Cat safety tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cat safety tests. 113.39 Section 113... Procedures § 113.39 Cat safety tests. The safety tests provided in this section shall be conducted when... recommended for use in cats. (a) The cat safety test provided in this paragraph shall be used when the Master...

  2. Domestic Cat (Felis silvestris catus) Urine Odour as a Potential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of cat urine odour extract on rodent pest species to reduce crop losses. Cat urine from the captured cats was drawn using cat catcher. Urinary catheter was inserted into the urethra up to the urinary bladder and a syringe attached to the urinary catheter was used to draw ...

  3. Salinomycin-induced polyneuropathy in cats: Morphologic and epidemiologic data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linde-Sipman, J.S. van der; Inch, T.S.G.A.M. van den; Nes, J.J. van; Verhagen, H.; Kersten, J.G.T.M.; Beynen, A.C.; Plekkringa, R.

    1999-01-01

    In April 1996, an outbreak of toxic polyneuropathy in cats occurred in the Netherlands. All cats had been fed one of two brands of dry cat food from one manufacturer. Chemical analyses of these foods, stomach contents, and liver and kidney of affected cats revealed contamination with the ionophor

  4. Health and epidemiological approaches of Trypanosoma evansi and equine infectious anemia virus in naturally infected horses at southern Pantanal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreira, Daniela R; Jansen, Ana M; Abreu, Urbano G P; Macedo, Gabriel C; Silva, Antônia R S; Mazur, Carlos; Andrade, Gisele B; Herrera, Heitor M

    2016-11-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) and Trypanossoma evansi are endemic in Brazilian Pantanal Biome, an important area for livestock production. In this sense, we evaluated the epidemiological single and co-infection effects of T. evansi and EIAV in naturally infected horses in the southern Pantanal wetland by serological tests and hematological assays. Both higher seroprevalence and heath poor condition of the sampled animals were associated with differences in horse management between farms. We found that the negative animals for both infectious agents (NN) represented the major group in F1 (37%), and the smallest group in F2 (19%). Furthermore, we recorded higher EIAV seroprevalence (56%) in F2, compared to F1 (38%). We observed that T. evansi infection was mostly related to young horses, as seen by their higher seroprevalence, ranging from 70.7% in the beginning of the rainy season to 81% in the end of flood period, in comparison with the values of 42% and 68%, respectively, in working animals. on the other hand, working animals showed a higher seroprevalence for EIAV (48%) in both seasons than young horses. We observed that the management of working horses could be a risk factor of EIAV infection. On the other hand, as T. evansi is maintained in the study region by many species of wild mammals, the mechanical transmission through blood-sucking vectors ensures the infection to horses since early. Our results showed that single or co-infection by EIAV and T. evansi caused different degree of anemia in the infected animals. Moreover, the health of horses in Brazilian Pantanal is also influenced by differences in horse management and environmental circumstances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Environmental Aspects of Domestic Cat Care and Management: Implications for Cat Welfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith L. Stella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Domestic cats (Felis silvestris catus are the most commonly kept companion animals in the US with large populations of owned (86 million, free-roaming (70 million, research (13,000, and shelter (2-3 million cats. Vast numbers of cats are maintained in homes and other facilities each year and are reliant on humans for all of their care. Understanding cat behavior and providing the highest quality environments possible, including positive human-cat interactions, based on research could help improve the outcomes of biomedical research, shelter adoptions, and veterinary care, as well as overall cat welfare. Often, however, cats’ needs are inadequately met in homes and some aspects may also not be well met in research colonies and shelters, despite the fact that similar problems are likely to be encountered in all of these environments. This paper provides a brief overview of common welfare challenges associated with indoor housing of domestic cats. Essential considerations for cage confinement are reviewed, along with implications of poor cat coping, such as weakening of the human-animal bond and relinquishment to shelters. The important role that environmental management plays in cat behavior and welfare outcomes is explored along with the need for additional research in key areas.

  6. Channel CAT: A Tactical Link Analysis Tool

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coleman, Michael

    1997-01-01

    .... This thesis produced an analysis tool, the Channel Capacity Analysis Tool (Channel CAT), designed to provide an automated tool for the analysis of design decisions in developing client-server software...

  7. Getting a CAT Scan (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth / For ...

  8. [Polycystic kidney disease in a Persian cat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hege, R; Zimmer, C; Reusch, C

    2001-04-01

    This case report is about a 9-year-old male castrated Persian cat with chronic renal failure. After physical examination and ultrasonography polycystic kidney disease (PKD) was diagnosed. Various aspects of etiology, pathophysiology and diagnosis of PKD are discussed.

  9. A cross-species alignment tool (CAT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Heng; Guan, Liang; Liu, Tao

    2007-01-01

    sensitive methods which are usually applied in aligning inter-species sequences. RESULTS: Here we present a new algorithm called CAT (for Cross-species Alignment Tool). It is designed to align mRNA sequences to mammalian-sized genomes. CAT is implemented using C scripts and is freely available on the web......BACKGROUND: The main two sorts of automatic gene annotation frameworks are ab initio and alignment-based, the latter splitting into two sub-groups. The first group is used for intra-species alignments, among which are successful ones with high specificity and speed. The other group contains more...... at http://xat.sourceforge.net/. CONCLUSIONS: Examined from different angles, CAT outperforms other extant alignment tools. Tested against all available mouse-human and zebrafish-human orthologs, we demonstrate that CAT combines the specificity and speed of the best intra-species algorithms, like BLAT...

  10. Effects of experimental amitraz intoxication in cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. Andrade

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This work studied the effects of experimental amitraz intoxication in cats. Sixteen cats were randomly divided equally into two groups: amitraz group - animals received 1.5% amitraz at 1mg/kg IV; and the control group - animals without amitraz. Physiological parameters from blood, cardiorespiratory system, and sedation indicators were quantified over time up to 360 minutes. Blood profile, urea, creatinine, alananine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase were not affected by amitraz. Sedation, loss of reflexes, hypothermia, bradycardia, bradyarrhythmia, hypotension, bradypnea, mydriasis, besides transitory hyperglycemia, hypoinsulinemia and decrease of cortisol levels were observed in cats experimentally exposed to amitraz. The alpha2-adrenergic effects induced by amitraz intoxication in cats are very similar to the same effects reported in others species, contributing with more information about this type of intoxication to veterinary toxicology.

  11. SWMM-CAT User’s Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Storm Water Management Model Climate Adjustment Tool (SWMM-CAT) is a simple to use software utility that allows future climate change projections to be incorporated into the Storm Water Management Model (SWMM).

  12. Trypanosoma cruzi-Trypanosoma rangeli co-infection ameliorates negative effects of single trypanosome infections in experimentally infected Rhodnius prolixus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jennifer K; Graham, Andrea L; Elliott, Ryan J; Dobson, Andrew P; Triana Chávez, Omar

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease, co-infects its triatomine vector with its sister species Trypanosoma rangeli, which shares 60% of its antigens with T. cruzi. Additionally, T. rangeli has been observed to be pathogenic in some of its vector species. Although T. cruzi-T. rangeli co-infections are common, their effect on the vector has rarely been investigated. Therefore, we measured the fitness (survival and reproduction) of triatomine species Rhodnius prolixus infected with just T. cruzi, just T. rangeli, or both T. cruzi and T. rangeli. We found that survival (as estimated by survival probability and hazard ratios) was significantly different between treatments, with the T. cruzi treatment group having lower survival than the co-infected treatment. Reproduction and total fitness estimates in the T. cruzi and T. rangeli treatments were significantly lower than in the co-infected and control groups. The T. cruzi and T. rangeli treatment group fitness estimates were not significantly different from each other. Additionally, co-infected insects appeared to tolerate higher doses of parasites than insects with single-species infections. Our results suggest that T. cruzi-T. rangeli co-infection could ameliorate negative effects of single infections of either parasite on R. prolixus and potentially help it to tolerate higher parasite doses.

  13. Experimental transmission of the parasitic flagellates Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli between triatomine bugs or mice and captive neotropical bats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice E Thomas

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli-like trypanosomes have been found in a variety of neotropical bat species. In this study, bats (Artibeus lituratus, Carollia perspicillata, Desmodus rotundus, Glossophaga soricina, Molossus molossus, Phyllostomus hastatus were maintained under controlled conditions, and experiments were conducted to determine how they might become infected naturally with trypanosomes. All bats were first screened for existing infections by hemoculture and the examination of blood smears, and only apparently uninfected animals were then used in the experiments. Proof was obtained that the triatomine bug Rhodnius prolixus would readily feed upon some of the bats, and two species became infected after being bitten by bugs infected with T. rangeli. Some bats also became infected by ingesting R. prolixus carrying T. cruzi, or following subcutaneous or intragastic inoculation with fecal suspensions of R. prolixus containing T. cruzi. P. hastatus became infected after ingesting mice carrying T. cruzi. All of the bats studied inhabit roosts that may be occupied by triatomine bugs and, with the exception of D. rotundus, all also feed to at least some extent upon insects. These findings provide further evidence of how bats may play significant roles in the epidemiology of T. cruzi and T. rangeli in the New World tropics.

  14. Second order Horner's syndrome in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Risio, Luisa; Fraser McConnell, James

    2009-08-01

    This case report describes the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a 3.5-year-old, male neutered, domestic shorthair cat with second order Horner's syndrome as the only clinical abnormality. The neuroanatomical pathway of the sympathetic innervation to the eye, differential diagnoses for Horner's syndrome in cats, and the interpretation of pharmacological testing are reviewed. The unusual MRI findings and the value of fat-suppressed MRI sequences are discussed.

  15. Neutropenia in cats with the Chediak-Higashi syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Prieur, D J; Collier, L L

    1987-01-01

    Thirteen cats with Chediak-Higashi syndrome and 22 control cats from the same colony, were evaluated for neutropenia. The absolute neutrophil counts of the Chediak-Higashi syndrome cats were significantly less (P less than 0.05) than those of the control cats. It is concluded that Chediak-Higashi syndrome cats, like Chediak-Higashi syndrome humans, have a neutropenia associated with the other manifestations of the syndrome. Lysozyme activity which was undetectable in the serum of both Chediak...

  16. In or out? On the tightness of glycosomal compartmentalization of metabolites and enzymes in Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, Jurgen R.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Michels, Paul A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosomatids sequester large parts of glucose metabolism inside specialised peroxisomes, called glycosomes. Many studies have shown that correct glycosomal compartmentalization of glycolytic enzymes is essential for bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucel. The recent finding of pore-forming

  17. In or out? On the tightness of glycosomal compartmentalizatin of metabolites and enzymes in Trypanosoma brucei.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, J.R.; Bakker, B.M.; Michels, P.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosomatids sequester large parts of glucose metabolism inside specialised peroxisomes, called glycosomes. Many studies have shown that correct glycosomal compartmentalization of glycolytic enzymes is essential for bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei. The recent finding of pore-forming

  18. In vitro evaluation of the activity of aromatic nitrocompounds against Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata B Oliveira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen compounds were evaluated for their activity against Trypanosoma cruzi blood stream forms at the concentration of 500 µg/ml. Six compounds were active and re-tested at lower concentrations.

  19. A soluble 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase in the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Javier; Montalvetti, A; Camacho, A

    1997-01-01

    cellular distribution of enzymic activity was investigated after differential centrifugation of Trypanosoma cell extracts. Reductase activity was primarily associated with the cellular soluble fraction because 95% of the total cellular activity was recovered in the supernatant and was particularly...

  20. Constitutive expression of catABC genes in the aniline-assimilating bacterium Rhodococcus species AN-22: production, purification, characterization and gene analysis of CatA, CatB and CatC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Eitaro; Sakai, Masashi; Hayashi, Katsuaki; Murakami, Shuichiro; Takenaka, Shinji; Aoki, Kenji

    2005-01-01

    The aniline-assimilating bacterium Rhodococcus sp. AN-22 was found to constitutively synthesize CatB (cis,cis-muconate cycloisomerase) and CatC (muconolactone isomerase) in its cells growing on non-aromatic substrates, in addition to the previously reported CatA (catechol 1,2-dioxygenase). The bacterium maintained the specific activity of the three enzymes at an almost equal level during cultivation on succinate. CatB and CatC were purified to homogeneity and characterized. CatB was a monomer with a molecular mass of 44 kDa. The enzyme was activated by Mn2+, Co2+ and Mg2+. Native CatC was a homo-octamer with a molecular mass of 100 kDa. The enzyme was stable between pH 7.0 and 10.5 and was resistant to heating up to 90 °C. Genes coding for CatA, CatB and CatC were cloned and named catA, catB and catC respectively. The catABC genes were transcribed as one operon. The deduced amino acid sequences of CatA, CatB and CatC showed high identities with those from other Gram-positive micro-organisms. A regulator gene such as catR encoding a regulatory protein was not observed around the cat gene cluster of Rhodococcus sp. AN-22, but a possible relic of catR was found in the upstream region of catA. Reverse transcriptase-PCR and primer extension analyses showed that the transcriptional start site of the cat gene cluster was located 891 bp upstream of the catA initiation codon in the AN-22 strain growing on both aniline and succinate. Based on these data, we concluded that the bacterium constitutively transcribed the catABC genes and translated its mRNA into CatA, CatB and CatC. PMID:16156722

  1. Fatal toxoplasmosis in sand cats (Felis margarita).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pas, An; Dubey, J P

    2008-09-01

    The sand cat (Felis margarita) is a small-sized felid occurring in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The sand cat captive-breeding program at the Breeding Centre for Endangered Arabian Wildlife in Sharjah, UAE, has until recently been severely compromised by very high newborn mortality rates. Two different pairs of sand cats gave birth, respectively, to one and two litters (with a total of eight kittens) between 1999 and 2006. Seven out of eight kittens died between the third and 21st wk of life. Toxoplasmosis was confirmed as the cause of death in these two litters. Adult cats had high antibody titers to Toxoplasma gondii before pregnancy, suggesting that maternal immunity did not protect the kittens against infection with T. gondii and that maternal immunity might not have prevented transplacental transmission of the parasite. This observation contrasts with what is seen in domestic cats. To date, this is the first report on confirmed fatal toxoplasmosis and prevalence of T. gondii in sand cats.

  2. [Splenic abscess and cat-scratch disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdesoiro Navarrete, L; Pineda Solas, V; Martín Martín, C; Sanfeliu Sala, I; Cabezas Maspoch, R M; Sánchez Oespina, M

    2001-10-01

    Cat-scratch disease is caused by a Gram-negative bacillus known as Bartonella henselae. This disease is usually benign and causes regional adenitis that does not require treatment. However, some patients develop more serious atypical forms of the disease including prolonged systemic illness with hepatic and splenic abscesses.A 14-year-old girl was admitted to hospital with a 12-day history of persistent high fever and abdominal pain. Ultrasonography and computerized tomography of the abdomen revealed splenic abscesses. These findings, together with an antecedent of cat exposure, led to the suspicion of cat-scratch disease, which was confirmed by serology. The girl was treated with intramuscular ceftriaxone and clinical evolution was favorable. Splenic cat-scratch disease is infrequent. Cat-scratch disease sometimes presents as fever of unknown origin and consequently this disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of prolonged fever. Although evolution is usually favorable, antibiotic therapy is recommended in systemic manifestations of cat-scratch disease.

  3. Effect of single-cat versus multi-cat home history on perceived behavioral stress in domestic cats (Felis silvestrus catus) in an animal shelter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadley, Heidi M; McCobb, Emily C; Slater, Margaret R

    2014-02-01

    This study investigates the effect of living with other cats in a prior home on stress levels of cats recently surrendered to an animal shelter. A total of 63 cats was evaluated using a Cat-Stress-Score and an approach test. Cats were categorized in terms of previous home history with or without other cats. No significant difference was found in stress scores between cats from single-cat households and those from multiple-cat households, although single cats that had been in the shelter less than 4 days demonstrated higher stress levels. No significant difference was found between the two groups in terms of approach results. Results of this study suggest that, in traditional individual cage settings, cats that are not accustomed to living with other cats may experience more stress in the initial few days of attempting to adjust to shelter existence. Through the use of such assessments, shelter personnel may develop an increased awareness to the needs of these cats and attempt to provide measures to improve their well-being within the shelter environment.

  4. Cat sensitization according to cat window of exposure in adult asthmatics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oryszczyn, M.-P.; van Ree, R.; Maccario, J.; Nadif, R.; Kauffmann, F.

    2009-01-01

    P>Background In adults, there is limited information on tolerance to cat, which may be reflected by high IgG(4) without IgE sensitization. Early exposure to cat may play a critical role. Objective The aim was to assess among adults the association of Fel d 1 IgG(4), Fel d 1 IgE, skin prick test

  5. Hypothermia in Uremic Dogs and Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabatchnick, E; Langston, C; Olson, B; Lamb, K E

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of uremic hypothermia (UH) and the effects of improving uremia on body temperature have not been determined in veterinary patients. To determine the prevalence of UH and correlations between uremia and body temperature in patients undergoing intermittent hemodialysis (IHD). Uremic dogs (n = 122) and cats (n = 79) treated by IHD at the Bobst Hospital of the Animal Medical Center from 1997 to 2013. Retrospective review of medical records. The prevalence of hypothermia was 38% in azotemic cats and 20.5% in azotemic dogs. Statistically significant temperature differences were observed between uremic and nonuremic dogs (nonuremic: mean, 100.8°F; range, 91.2-109.5°F; uremic: mean, 99.9°F; range, 95.6-103.8°F; P cats (nonuremic: mean, 100.6°F; range, 94.0-103.8°F; uremic: mean, 99.3°F; range, 92.3-103.4°F; P dog dialysis patients, significant models included (1) timing (pre-dialysis versus post-dialysis) with weight class (small [P dogs), (2) timing with serum creatinine concentration (P = .021), and (3) timing with BUN concentration (P cat dialysis patients, there was a significant interaction between timing and weight as a categorical variable (cats and dogs. Uremic patients are hypothermic compared to ill nonuremic patients and body temperatures increase when uremia is corrected with IHD in dogs and in cats >5 kg. In cats, UH seems to be a more prevalent phenomenon driven by uremia. Uremic hypothermia does occur in dogs, but body weight is a more important predictor of body temperature. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  6. Trace minerals in serum of sheep infected with Trypanosoma congolense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neils, J S; Sackey, A K B; Abdullahi, U S; Esievo, K A N

    2007-01-15

    Yankassa sheep (20) were grouped into A and B and infected with Trypanosoma congolense isolated from a cow and maintained in mice. Two milliliter x 10(7) parasites were used to infect group A. The course of the infection and serum trace minerals (Iron, (Fe) and Copper, (Cu) were studied and determined using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). There was significant drop in concentration of iron (p0.05). The values of the contemporaneously uninfected control sheep were significantly higher for iron and not for copper. Sheep are susceptible to isolate from cow and passaged in mice and with the fluctuating concentrations of Fe and consistency of Cu, it may suggest that these minerals may have a role in the pathogenesis of trypanosomosis due to T. congolense.

  7. Parasite Genome Projects and the Trypanosoma cruzi Genome Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Degrave

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the start of the human genome project, a great number of genome projects on other "model" organism have been initiated, some of them already completed. Several initiatives have also been started on parasite genomes, mainly through support from WHO/TDR, involving North-South and South-South collaborations, and great hopes are vested in that these initiatives will lead to new tools for disease control and prevention, as well as to the establishment of genomic research technology in developing countries. The Trypanosoma cruzi genome project, using the clone CL-Brener as starting point, has made considerable progress through the concerted action of more than 20 laboratories, most of them in the South. A brief overview of the current state of the project is given

  8. Mechanism of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense resistance to human serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uzureau, Pierrick; Uzureau, Sophie; Lecordier, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    The African parasite Trypanosoma brucei gambiense accounts for 97% of human sleeping sickness cases. T. b. gambiense resists the specific human innate immunity acting against several other tsetse-fly-transmitted trypanosome species such as T. b. brucei, the causative agent of nagana disease...... in cattle. Human immunity to some African trypanosomes is due to two serum complexes designated trypanolytic factors (TLF-1 and -2), which both contain haptoglobin-related protein (HPR) and apolipoprotein LI (APOL1). Whereas HPR association with haemoglobin (Hb) allows TLF-1 binding and uptake via......GP), which prevents APOL1 toxicity and induces stiffening of membranes upon interaction with lipids. Two additional features contribute to resistance to TLFs: reduction of sensitivity to APOL1 requiring cysteine protease activity, and TbHpHbR inactivation due to a L210S substitution. According...

  9. Mosaic VSGs and the scale of Trypanosoma brucei antigenic variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P J Hall

    Full Text Available A main determinant of prolonged Trypanosoma brucei infection and transmission and success of the parasite is the interplay between host acquired immunity and antigenic variation of the parasite variant surface glycoprotein (VSG coat. About 0.1% of trypanosome divisions produce a switch to a different VSG through differential expression of an archive of hundreds of silent VSG genes and pseudogenes, but the patterns and extent of the trypanosome diversity phenotype, particularly in chronic infection, are unclear. We applied longitudinal VSG cDNA sequencing to estimate variant richness and test whether pseudogenes contribute to antigenic variation. We show that individual growth peaks can contain at least 15 distinct variants, are estimated computationally to comprise many more, and that antigenically distinct 'mosaic' VSGs arise from segmental gene conversion between donor VSG genes or pseudogenes. The potential for trypanosome antigenic variation is probably much greater than VSG archive size; mosaic VSGs are core to antigenic variation and chronic infection.

  10. Genitourinary changes in hamsters infected and reinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Cabrine-Santos Marlene

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Authors describe genitourinary changes in male hamsters infected and reinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Changes in genital organs have been described in human and in experimental chagasic infection. Genital dysfunctions in chronic chagasic patients affect ejaculation, libido and sexual potency, and testis biopsies may show arrested maturation of germ cells, oligozoospermia and azoospermia. Sixty-five male hamsters were inoculated and reinoculated with 2x10³ trypomastigotes of T. cruzi VIC strain, and 22 non-infected animals constituted the control group. Animals were necropsied and fragments from testis, epididymis, seminal vesicle and bladder were collected and stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Peroxidase anti-peroxidase procedure was utilized to detect tissue parasitism. T. cruzi nests were found in testis, epididymis and seminal vesicle of these hamsters. Such parasitism plays a role in the origin of genital lesions observed in humans and laboratory animals during chronic chagasic infection.

  11. Electron Microscopy Analysis of the Nucleolus of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Hernández, Roberto; López-Villaseñor, Imelda; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Segura-Valdez, María De L.; Jiménez-García, Luis F.

    2005-08-01

    The nucleolus is the main site for synthesis and processing of ribosomal RNA in eukaryotes. In mammals, plants, and yeast the nucleolus has been extensively characterized by electron microscopy, but in the majority of the unicellular eukaryotes no such studies have been performed. Here we used ultrastructural cytochemical and immunocytochemical techniques as well as three-dimensional reconstruction to analyze the nucleolus of Trypanosoma cruzi, which is an early divergent eukaryote of medical importance. In T. cruzi epimastigotes the nucleolus is a spherical intranuclear ribonucleoprotein organelle localized in a relatively central position within the nucleus. Dense fibrillar and granular components but not fibrillar centers were observed. In addition, nuclear bodies resembling Cajal bodies were observed associated to the nucleolus in the surrounding nucleoplasm. Our results provide additional morphological data to better understand the synthesis and processing of the ribosomal RNA in kinetoplastids.

  12. Beta-interferon inhibits cell infection by Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierszenbaum, F.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Beta interferon has been shown to inhibit the capacity of bloodstream forms of the flagellate Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, to associate with and infect mouse peritoneal macrophages and rat heart myoblasts. The inhibitory effect was abrogated in the presence of specific antibodies to the interferon. Pretreatment of the parasites with interferon reduced their infectivity for untreated host cells, whereas pretreament of either type of host cell did not affect the interaction. The effect of interferon on the trypanosomes was reversible; the extent of the inhibitory effect was significantly reduced afer 20 min, and was undetectable after 60 min when macrophages were used as host cells. For the myoblasts, 60 min elapsed before the inhibitory effect began to subside and 120 min elapsed before it became insignificant or undetectable.

  13. Itraconazole for the treatment of cryptococcosis in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medleau, L; Jacobs, G J; Marks, M A

    1995-01-01

    Itraconazole was used in 35 cats with cryptococcosis. Treatment response was determined by comparing clinical signs before, during, and after treatment. It could not be evaluated in 7 cats because they died during treatment from causes unrelated to cryptococcosis. Of the remaining 28 cats, treatment response was classified as success in 16 cats (57%), as improvement in 8 cats (29%), and as a failure in 4 (14%). The failures were due to death or euthanasia from drug toxicity (1 cat), progressive fungal disease (2 cats), and relapse 1 year after treatment (1 cat). The cats that improved did not undergo a 1-year posttreatment evaluation because they were lost to follow-up (3 cats), died or were euthanatized for other reasons (4 cats), or had a noncompliant owner (1 cat). For the 16 cats in which treatment was successful, the median itraconazole dose was 13.8 mg/kg body weight daily (range, 10.9 to 26.7 mg/kg/d), and the median duration of treatment was 8.5 months (range, 4 to 16 months). Five of these cats had previously been treated unsuccessfully with ketoconazole.

  14. Trypanosomosis agglutination card test for Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense sleeping sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akol, M N; Olaho-Mukani, W; Odiit, M; Enyaru, J C; Matovu, E; Magona, J; Okitoi, N D

    1999-01-01

    To develop a simple field test for diagnosis of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in man. Trypanosomosis Agglutination Card Test (TACT) was developed for the diagnosis of sleeping sickness due to Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense infection, based on stabilised procyclic forms derived from Utat 4.1. Procyclics were fixed in buffered formalin at 4 degrees for 24 hours and further stabilised in acid/alcohol mixture for 30 minutes. The fixed antigen was stained with Coomassie blue and suspended in 0.1 M PBS/sodium azide buffer pH 7.2 at a concentration of 1 x 10(8) trypanosomes/ml and kept at room temperature. This antigen was used to screen 100 sera from rabbits infected with T. b. rhodesiense, eight from normal rabbits, and 220 only sera 60 of which were from sleeping sickness patients, 50 from normal persons and 110 from other parasitic infections. Laboratory testing of the antigen types against the rabbit and human sera infected with cloned variable antigen types of T. b. rhodesiense, was routinely carried on test cards under room temperature. Serum samples from normal and infected rabbits and human subjects. All sera from infected rabbits and 59 from sleeping sickness patients reacted strongly with the antigen showing agglutination reaction which ranged from 1:4 to 1:1024 serum dilution. There was minimal cross reaction with other parasitic infections as follows: one out of 20 malaria patients none of the 20 hookworm patients, one out of 30 for schistosomiasis patients, none of the 10 amoebiasis patients and one out of 20 for filariasis patients. Agglutination titres from all these non-sleeping sickness patients were below 1:16. Based on rabbit positive and negative sera, TACT gave a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 80% while for human sera a sensitivity of 98.3% and specificity of 96% were observed. These preliminary results show that TACT could be a promising screening field test for T. b. rhodesiense sleeping sickness.

  15. Multiple evolutionary origins of Trypanosoma evansi in Kenya.

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    Christine M Kamidi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma evansi is the parasite causing surra, a form of trypanosomiasis in camels and other livestock, and a serious economic burden in Kenya and many other parts of the world. Trypanosoma evansi transmission can be sustained mechanically by tabanid and Stomoxys biting flies, whereas the closely related African trypanosomes T. brucei brucei and T. b. rhodesiense require cyclical development in tsetse flies (genus Glossina for transmission. In this study, we investigated the evolutionary origins of T. evansi. We used 15 polymorphic microsatellites to quantify levels and patterns of genetic diversity among 41 T. evansi isolates and 66 isolates of T. b. brucei (n = 51 and T. b. rhodesiense (n = 15, including many from Kenya, a region where T. evansi may have evolved from T. brucei. We found that T. evansi strains belong to at least two distinct T. brucei genetic units and contain genetic diversity that is similar to that in T. brucei strains. Results indicated that the 41 T. evansi isolates originated from multiple T. brucei strains from different genetic backgrounds, implying independent origins of T. evansi from T. brucei strains. This surprising finding further suggested that the acquisition of the ability of T. evansi to be transmitted mechanically, and thus the ability to escape the obligate link with the African tsetse fly vector, has occurred repeatedly. These findings, if confirmed, have epidemiological implications, as T. brucei strains from different genetic backgrounds can become either causative agents of a dangerous, cosmopolitan livestock disease or of a lethal human disease, like for T. b. rhodesiense.

  16. Neutropenia in cats with the Chediak-Higashi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieur, D J; Collier, L L

    1987-01-01

    Thirteen cats with Chediak-Higashi syndrome and 22 control cats from the same colony, were evaluated for neutropenia. The absolute neutrophil counts of the Chediak-Higashi syndrome cats were significantly less (P less than 0.05) than those of the control cats. It is concluded that Chediak-Higashi syndrome cats, like Chediak-Higashi syndrome humans, have a neutropenia associated with the other manifestations of the syndrome. Lysozyme activity which was undetectable in the serum of both Chediak-Higashi syndrome and control cats was not of use for determining if the neutropenia was the result of neutrophil destruction. PMID:3651899

  17. A Survey of Public Opinion on Cat (Felis catus) Predation and the Future Direction of Cat Management in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jessica K; Bruce, Stephanie J; Dale, Arnja R

    2017-07-03

    Cat predation is a prominent issue in New Zealand that provokes strong and opposing views. We explored, via 1011 face-to-face questionnaires, public opinion on (a) support for a National Cat Management Strategy (78% support); (b) concern regarding predation of wildlife by owned and un-owned cats (managed stray, unmanaged stray, and feral cats); (c) the acceptability of management techniques for owned cats; and (d) the acceptability of population management techniques for un-owned cats. The highest concern was expressed regarding the predation of non-native and native wildlife by feral cats (60 and 86% repectively), followed by unmanaged stray cats (59 and 86% respectively), managed stray cats (54 and 82% respectively), and finally owned cats (38 and 69% repectively). Limits to the number of cats owned and cat restriction zones received high levels of support (>65%), and compulsory microchipping, Council registration, and de-sexing were supported by the majority (>58%). Public support of population control methods for unowned cats was explored, and the influence of participant demographic variables on responses is described. These findings provide insight into public opinion regarding the management of cats in New Zealand, which should be considered during the development of legislation in this area.

  18. A Survey of Public Opinion on Cat (Felis catus Predation and the Future Direction of Cat Management in New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica K. Walker

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cat predation is a prominent issue in New Zealand that provokes strong and opposing views. We explored, via 1011 face-to-face questionnaires, public opinion on (a support for a National Cat Management Strategy (78% support; (b concern regarding predation of wildlife by owned and un-owned cats (managed stray, unmanaged stray, and feral cats; (c the acceptability of management techniques for owned cats; and (d the acceptability of population management techniques for un-owned cats. The highest concern was expressed regarding the predation of non-native and native wildlife by feral cats (60 and 86% repectively, followed by unmanaged stray cats (59 and 86% respectively, managed stray cats (54 and 82% respectively, and finally owned cats (38 and 69% repectively. Limits to the number of cats owned and cat restriction zones received high levels of support (>65%, and compulsory microchipping, Council registration, and de-sexing were supported by the majority (>58%. Public support of population control methods for unowned cats was explored, and the influence of participant demographic variables on responses is described. These findings provide insight into public opinion regarding the management of cats in New Zealand, which should be considered during the development of legislation in this area.

  19. Born to roam? Surveying cat owners in Tasmania, Australia, to identify the drivers and barriers to cat containment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Lynette J; Hine, Donald W; Bengsen, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    Free-roaming domestic cats, Felis catus, are a major public nuisance in neighbourhoods across the world, and have been linked to biodiversity loss and a host of community health problems. Owners who let their cats roam, also place their cats at risk of serious injury. One management strategy that is gaining considerable support involves encouraging cat owners to contain their pets within their property. Contemporary behaviour change models highlight the importance of identifying drivers and barriers that encourage and discourage target behaviours such as cat containment. Results from a random dial phone survey of 356 cat owners in northern Tasmania identified four distinct cat containment profiles: owners who contained their cat all the time, owners who only contained their cat at night, owners who sporadically contained their cat with no set routine, and owners who made no attempt to contain their pet. Our results indicated that cat-owners' decisions to contain or not contain their cats were guided by a range of factors including owners' beliefs about their ability to implement an effective containment strategy and their views about the physical and psychological needs of their cats. The results are discussed in terms of improving the behavioural effectiveness of cat containment interventions by selecting appropriate behavioural change tools for the identified drivers and barriers, and developing targeted engagement strategies and messaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Semisolid liver infusion tryptose supplemented with human urine allows growth and isolation of Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli clonal lineages

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    Emanuella Francisco Fajardo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: INTRODUCTION This work shows that 3% (v/v human urine (HU in semisolid Liver Infusion Tryptose (SSL medium favors the growth of Trypanosoma cruzi and T. rangeli. METHODS Parasites were plated as individual or mixed strains on SSL medium and on SSL medium with 3% human urine (SSL-HU. Isolate DNA was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. RESULTS SSL-HU medium improved clone isolation. PCR revealed that T. cruzi strains predominate on mixed-strain plates. PFGE confirmed that isolated parasites share the same molecular karyotype as parental cell lines. CONCLUSIONS SSL-HU medium constitutes a novel tool for obtaining T. cruzi and T. rangeli clonal lineages.

  1. Genotyping of Trypanosoma cruzi DTUs and Trypanosoma rangeli genetic groups in experimentally infected Rhodnius prolixus by PCR-RFLP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Amanda R N; Dias, Greicy B M; Kimoto, Karen Y; Steindel, Mário; Grisard, Edmundo C; Toledo, Max Jean O; Gomes, Mônica L

    2016-04-01

    The specific detection and genetic typing of trypanosomes that infect humans, mammalian reservoirs, and vectors is crucial for diagnosis and epidemiology. We utilized a PCR-RFLP assay that targeted subunit II of cytochrome oxidase and 24Sα-rDNA to simultaneously detect and discriminate six Trypanosoma cruzi discrete typing units (DTUs) and two genetic groups of Trypanosoma rangeli (KP1+/KP1-) in intestinal contents of experimentally infected Rhodnius prolixus. The PCR assays showed that in 23 of 29 (79.4%) mixed infections with the six T. cruzi DTUs and mixed infections with individual DTUs and/or groups KP1+ and KP1-, both parasites were successfully detected. In six mixed infections that involved TcIII, the TcI, TcII, TcV, and TcVI DTUs predominated to the detriment of TcIII, indicating the selection of genetic groups. Interactions between different genetic groups and vectors may lead to genetic selection over TcIII. The elimination of this DTU by the immune system of the vector appears unlikely because TcIII was present in other mixed infections (TcIII/TcIV and TcIII/KP1+). Both molecular markers used in this study were sensitive and specific, demonstrating their usefulness in a wide geographical area where distinct genotypes of these two species are sympatric. Although the cellular and molecular mechanisms that are involved in parasite-vector interactions are still poorly understood, our results indicate a dynamic selection toward specific T. cruzi DTUs in R. prolixus during mixed genotype infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi, cancer and the Cold War Trypanosoma cruzi, câncer e a Guerra Fria

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    Nikolai Krementsov

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In the summer of 1946, the international community of cancer researchers was inspired by the announcement that two Soviet scientists, Nina Kliueva and Grigorii Roskin, had discovered anticancer properties in culture extracts made from the South American protozoan, Trypanosoma cruzi, and had produced a preparation - named after its discoverers KR - which showed clear therapeutic effects on cancer patients. Research teams from various countries enthusiastically pursued the promising new line of investigation. The story of the rise and fall of interest in the anticancer properties of T. cruzi in different countries suggests that during the second half of the twentieth century, the Cold War competition between the superpowers played an important role in shaping the research agendas of cancer studies.No verão de 1946, a comunidade internacional que desenvolve pesquisas sobre o câncer, inspirou-se no anúncio de que dois cientistas soviéticos, Nina Kliueva e Grigorii Roskin, descobriram propriedades anticancerígenas em cultura extraída do protozoário existente na América Latina, o Trypanosoma cruzi e produziram um preparado que foi denominado com as iniciais KR - em sua homenagem. Grupos de pesquisadores de diversos países buscaram com entusiasmo as promessas dessa nova linha de investigação. A história da ascensão e queda do interesse nas propriedades anticâncer do T. cruzzi em diferentes países sugere que durante a segunda metade do século 20, a Guerra Fria teve um papel importante na definição das agendas de pesquisas sobre o câncer.

  3. Valores de transaminasas en cabras criollas infectadas con Trypanosoma vivax Transaminases values in Creole goats infected with Trypanosoma vivax

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    Emir Espinoza

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available La presente comunicación reporta los valores de las enzimas transaminasas, Aspartatoaminotransferasa (AST y Alaninaaminotransferasa (ALT encontrados en sueros de cabras infectadas con la cepa de Trypanosoma vivax Stock (TvIIV y sus controles. Las determinaciones se realizaron durante un lapso experimental de diez semanas, divididos en dos períodos iguales (pre y post-infección por intermedio de un método colorimétrico, utilizando kits comerciales. Los datos fueron analizados mediante la prueba t Student's. En el caso de la AST, la comparación de las medias parciales de ambos grupos infectado y control, no indicó diferencias estadísticas. Con respecto a la ALT, la contrastación de las medias parciales de pre y post-infección del grupo de cabras infectadas, señaló diferencias significativas (PThe present communication reports the transaminases enzymes values Aspartatoaminotransferase (AST and Alaninaaminotransferase (ALT in serum from goats infected with the Trypanosoma vivax Stock (TvIIV. The determinations were realized during a ten week experimental period divided into two equal periods (pre- and post-infection by colorimetric method, using commercial kits. The dates were analyzed through the t Student's test. In the AST case, the comparison between partial means of infected and control groups did not show any statistical differences. In relation to ALT, the contrast of partial means to pre- and post-infection from infected goats group indicated significant differences (P<0.01.

  4. Meningoencefalites toxoplásmica e chagásica em pacientes com infecção pelo vírus da imunodeficiência humana: diagnóstico diferencial anatomopatológico e tomográfico Meningoencephalitis due to Toxoplasma gondii and Trypanosoma cruzi in patients with HIV infection. Diferencial diagnosis of pathologic and tomographic findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier E. Lazo

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Em 22 pacientes com sorologia positiva para o vírus da imunodeficiência humana, com ou sem síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida, dos quais 7 com meningoencefalite toxoplásmica e 15 com meningoencefalite chagásica associadas, procuraram-se dados diferenciais, entre as duas encefalopatias, tanto à anatomia patológica quanto à tomografia computadorizada do crânio. Os resultados observados e os dados da literatura nos permitiram concluir que enquanto na meningoencefalite necrosante focal por Toxoplasma gondii o acometimento dos núcleos da base é freqüente, na meningoencefalite necrosante focal causada pelo Trypanosoma cruzi, lesões dessas estruturas parecem não ocorrer ou ser excepcionais. De outro lado, o acometimento da substância branca parece nitidamente maior na meningoencefalite chagásica que na meningoencefalite toxoplásmica, ao passo que o parasitismo e a hemorragia do tecido nervoso, bem como as lesões das bainhas de mielina são mais freqüentes e intensos na meningoencefalite causada pelo Trypanosoma cruzi que naquela por Toxoplasma.Twenty-two HIV+ patients with encephalitis were studied. Of these, 7 had meningoencephalitis due to Toxoplasma gondii (MT and 15 due to Trypanosoma cruzi (MC. Pathologic and computerized axial tomography (CAT changes were compared. We found that focal necrotizing encephalitis due to Toxoplasma involved the cerebral cortex and the basal ganglia, whereas lesions due to Trypanosoma cruzi were centered in the white matter, sometimes extending into the cortex. Hemorrhages, myelin lesions and organisms were more pronounced in chagasic than in toxoplasmic encephalitis. These findings are consistent with the literature reviewed.

  5. Metabolic and hormonal alterations in cats with hepatic lipidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, B; Mauldin, G E; Armstrong, J; Moroff, S D; Mauldin, G N

    2000-01-01

    Hepatic lipidosis in cats is a commonly diagnosed hepatobiliary disease of unknown cause. The purpose of this prospective study was to characterize the blood hormone and lipid status of cats with hepatic lipidosis, and to compare this status to that of cats with other types of liver disease and to control cats. Twenty-three cats with hepatic disease were assigned to 1 of 2 groups on the basis of cytopathologic or histopathologic examination of the liver: group 1, hepatic lipidosis (n = 18); or group 2, cholangiohepatitis (n = 5). Ten healthy young adult cats were used as controls. Food was withheld from control animals for 24 hours before blood collection. Concentrations of plasma glucagon and serum insulin, cortisol, thyroxine, triglycerides, cholesterol, phospholipids, and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs) were determined in all cats, in addition to routine hematologic and serum biochemical testing. Cats with hepatic lipidosis had higher serum NEFA concentrations than cats with cholangiohepatitis or control cats (P lipidosis or control cats (P lipidosis. Serum insulin concentrations were significantly higher in control cats than in diseased cats (P lipidosis suggests that at least 1 factor in the pathogenesis of this syndrome may involve the regulation of hormone-sensitive lipase.

  6. Surrenderers’ Relationships with Cats Admitted to Four Australian Animal Shelters

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    Sarah Zito

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The surrender of cats to animal shelters results in financial, social and moral burdens for the community. Correlations of caretaking and interactions with surrendered cats were calculated, to understand more about humans’ relationships with surrendered cats and the contribution of semi-owned cats to shelter intakes. A questionnaire was used to collect detailed information about 100 surrenderers’ relationships with cats they surrendered to four animal shelters in Australia, with each surrenderer classifying themselves as being either the owner or a non-owner of the surrendered cat (ownership perception. Method of acquisition of the cat, association time, closeness of the relationship with the cat and degree of responsibility for the cat’s care were all associated with ownership perception. Many non-owners (59% fed and interacted with the cat they surrendered but rarely displayed other caretaking behaviours. However, most surrenderers of owned and unowned cats were attached to and felt responsible for the cat. Based on these results and other evidence, a causal model of ownership perception was proposed to provide a better understanding of factors influencing ownership perception. This model consisted of a set of variables proposed as directly or indirectly influencing ownership perception, with connecting arrows to indicate proposed causal relationships. Understanding ownership perception and the contribution of semi-owned cats to shelter intake is important as these can inform the development of more targeted and effective intervention strategies to reduce numbers of unwanted cats.

  7. Osteosarcoma in cats: 22 cases (1974-1984)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitetto, W.V.; Patnaik, A.K.; Schrader, S.C.; Mooney, S.C.

    1987-01-01

    Osteosarcoma was diagnosed in 22 cats. Diagnosis was based on results of physical, radiographic, and histologic findings. Fifteen tumors arose from the appendicular skeleton, 4 from the skull, 2 from the pelvis, and 1 from a rib. Radiography revealed that in 14 of 15 cats (93%) with appendicular tumors, the lesion was metaphyseal, primarily lytic, with a ''moth-eaten'' appearance; absence and presence of periosteal new bone formation were associated with the tumors in 12 and 3 cats, respectively. The remaining 7 cats had axial tumors that were characterized by the presence of periosteal new bone formation in addition to bony lysis. Of the 15 cats with appendicular tumors, 12 were treated by amputation and 3 were euthanatized at the time of diagnosis. Of the cats undergoing amputation for treatment of their appendicular tumors, 6 cats were still alive 64 months after surgery (range, 13 to 64 months); the median survival time of the 5 cats (1 cat was lost to follow-up evaluation) that died was 49.2 months (range, 1 to 122 months). Four of 12 cats (33%) survived greater than or equal to 5 years after diagnosis. Of the cats with axial tumors that were not euthanatized at the time of diagnosis (6 of 7), the median survival time was 5.5 months. Based on these findings, we concluded that cats with appendicular osteosarcoma have a better prognosis than those with axial osteosarcoma, and that amputation is a viable treatment for cats with appendicular osteosarcoma

  8. CATS Aerosol Typing and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Matt; Yorks, John; Scott, Stan; Palm, Stephen; Hlavka, Dennis; Hart, William; Nowottnick, Ed; Selmer, Patrick; Kupchock, Andrew; Midzak, Natalie; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Cloud Aerosol Transport System (CATS), launched in January of 2015, is a lidar remote sensing instrument that will provide range-resolved profile measurements of atmospheric aerosols and clouds from the International Space Station (ISS). CATS is intended to operate on-orbit for at least six months, and up to three years. Status of CATS Level 2 and Plans for the Future:Version. 1. Aerosol Typing (ongoing): Mode 1: L1B data released later this summer; L2 data released shortly after; Identify algorithm biases (ex. striping, FOV (field of view) biases). Mode 2: Processed Released Currently working on correcting algorithm issues. Version 2 Aerosol Typing (Fall, 2016): Implementation of version 1 modifications Integrate GEOS-5 aerosols for typing guidance for non spherical aerosols. Version 3 Aerosol Typing (2017): Implementation of 1-D Var Assimilation into GEOS-5 Dynamic lidar ratio that will evolve in conjunction with simulated aerosol mixtures.

  9. Dacryocystography in a cat with orbital pneumatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meomartino, Leonardo; Pasolini, Maria P; Lamagna, Francesco; Santangelo, Bruna; Mennonna, Giuseppina; Della Valle, Giovanni; Lamagna, Barbara

    2015-03-01

    A 2-year-old neutered male European short-haired cat was presented for a persistent discharge from the scar of previous left eye enucleation, performed 6 months prior by the referring veterinarian. A surgical exploration of the orbit was performed and retained nictitating membrane glandular and conjunctival tissues were removed. Eleven days later, the cat developed an orbital pneumatosis caused by retrograde movement of air through a patent nasolacrimal system and diagnosed by survey radiographic examination of the skull. Nasolacrimal system patency was assessed by dacryocystography performed by injection of iodinated contrast medium under pressure into the orbital cavity. Computed tomography dacryocystography confirmed the radiographic findings. The condition resolved following dacryocystography, possibly as an inflammatory response to the contrast medium. To our knowledge, this is the first case of orbital pneumatosis reported in a cat. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  10. Central tarsal bone fracture in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinti, Filippo; Pisani, Guido; Penazzi, Claudio; Carusi, Umberto; Vezzoni, Luca; Vezzoni, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Fracture of the central tarsal bone is an uncommon injury in dogs and occurs predominantly in racing Greyhounds. To the authors' knowledge, this type of fracture has not been described previously in cats. This case report describes a five-year-old Domestic Shorthair cat referred to the Centro Veterinario Luni Mare because of lameness, swelling and signs of pain in the right hindlimb caused by trauma. Clinical examination and diagnostic imaging revealed a right central tarsal bone fracture. Open reduction and internal fixation with a 2.0 mm position screw and two 0.8 mm Kirschner wires were carried out. The last follow-up examination three years postoperatively found the cat in good health with normal range of motion and function, and no signs of lameness in the right hindlimb.

  11. Dilated cardiomyopathy in cats - A case report

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    K. Jeyaraja

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Two cats were brought to Madras Veterinary College Teaching Hospital with the history and clinical signs suggestive of congestive heart failure ie, coughing, exercise intolerance, dyspnea, abdominal distension etc. There was history of feeding the cat with home made diet in one case and in other with commercial dog food. Based on electrocardiographic, radiographic and echocardiographic findings, the diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy was done in both the cases. The cases were managed with enalapril maleate, furosemide, dietary taurine supplementation and other supportive therapy. Among these two cases, one cat died on 2nd day of treatment and the other showed recovery after 8 days of treatment. [Vet World 2013; 6(4.000: 226-227

  12. Crystal Structures of Trypanosoma cruzi UDP-Galactopyranose Mutase Implicate Flexibility of the Histidine Loop in Enzyme Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhatwalia, Richa; Singh, Harkewal; Oppenheimer, Michelle; Sobrado, Pablo; Tanner, John J. (Virginia Tech); (UMC)

    2012-11-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Here we report crystal structures of the galactofuranose biosynthetic enzyme UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM) from T. cruzi, which are the first structures of this enzyme from a protozoan parasite. UGM is an attractive target for drug design because galactofuranose is absent in humans but is an essential component of key glycoproteins and glycolipids in trypanosomatids. Analysis of the enzyme-UDP noncovalent interactions and sequence alignments suggests that substrate recognition is exquisitely conserved among eukaryotic UGMs and distinct from that of bacterial UGMs. This observation has implications for inhibitor design. Activation of the enzyme via reduction of the FAD induces profound conformational changes, including a 2.3 {angstrom} movement of the histidine loop (Gly60-Gly61-His62), rotation and protonation of the imidazole of His62, and cooperative movement of residues located on the si face of the FAD. Interestingly, these changes are substantially different from those described for Aspergillus fumigatus UGM, which is 45% identical to T. cruzi UGM. The importance of Gly61 and His62 for enzymatic activity was studied with the site-directed mutant enzymes G61A, G61P, and H62A. These mutations lower the catalytic efficiency by factors of 10-50, primarily by decreasing k{sub cat}. Considered together, the structural, kinetic, and sequence data suggest that the middle Gly of the histidine loop imparts flexibility that is essential for activation of eukaryotic UGMs. Our results provide new information about UGM biochemistry and suggest a unified strategy for designing inhibitors of UGMs from the eukaryotic pathogens.

  13. Household prevalence of seropositivity for Trypanosoma cruzi in three rural villages in northwest Argentina: environmental, demographic, and entomologic associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürtler, R E; Chuit, R; Cécere, M C; Castañera, M B; Cohen, J E; Segura, E L

    1998-11-01

    Environmental, demographic, and entomologic variables were analyzed by logistic multiple regression analysis for their association with the likelihood of being seropositive for Trypanosoma cruzi in three highly infested rural villages of northwest Argentina. The prevalence of seropositivity for T. cruzi, as determined by the composite results of three serologic tests, was 34% among 338 persons in 1992. The strongest positive predictors of the adjusted odds of being infected were the household number of dogs, the density of T. cruzi-infected Triatoma infestans in bedroom areas, and each person's age. Dwellers from houses with roofs made completely or partly with a grass called simbol, or which used insecticides rudimentarily and nonsystematically, had a significantly lower odds of being seropositive for T. cruzi than residents from other types of dwellings. The adjusted odds of infection also increased with the number of T. cruzi-infected dogs or cats and the presence of chickens in bedroom areas. No significant effects on the adjusted odds of infection of a community-wide deltamethrin spraying carried out in one of the villages seven years before were detected. Socioeconomic indicators, such as domiciliary area, and numbers of corrals and livestock, were inversely related to being infected. Our study identified several manageable variables suitable for control actions, most of them not examined before in univariate or multivariate analyses. Environmental management based on low-cost housing with appropriate local materials and removal of domestic animals from domiciliary areas have a crucial role to play in the control of Chagas' disease in rural areas.

  14. Astaxanthin uptake in domestic dogs and cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimino Stefan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research on the uptake and transport of astaxanthin is lacking in most species. We studied the uptake of astaxanthin by plasma, lipoproteins and leukocytes in domestic dogs and cats. Methods Mature female Beagle dogs (18 to 19 mo old; 11 to 14 kg BW were dosed orally with 0, 0.1, 0.5, 2.5, 10 or 40 mg astaxanthin and blood taken at 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 h post-administration (n = 8/treatment. Similarly, mature domestic short hair cats (12 mo old; 3 to 3.5 kg body weight were fed a single dose of 0, 0.02, 0.08, 0.4, 2, 5, or 10 mg astaxanthin and blood taken (n = 8/treatment at the same interval. Results Both dogs and cats showed similar biokinetic profiles. Maximal astaxanthin concentration in plasma was approximately 0.14 μmol/L in both species, and was observed at 6 h post-dosing. The plasma astaxanthin elimination half-life was 9 to 18 h. Astaxanthin was still detectable by 24 h in both species. In a subsequent study, dogs and cats were fed similar doses of astaxanthin daily for 15 to 16 d and astaxanthin uptake by plasma, lipoproteins, and leukocytes studied. In both species, plasma astaxanthin concentrations generally continued to increase through d 15 or 16 of supplementation. The astaxanthin was mainly associated with high density lipoprotein (HDL. In blood leukocytes, approximately half of the total astaxanthin was found in the mitochondria, with significant amounts also associated with the microsomes and nuclei. Conclusion Dogs and cats absorb astaxanthin from the diet. In the blood, the astaxanthin is mainly associated with HDL, and is taken up by blood leukocytes, where it is distributed to all subcellular organelles. Certain aspects of the biokinetic uptake of astaxanthin in dogs and cats are similar to that in humans.

  15. Melophagus ovinus e Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum melophagium em ovinos no Estado de Minas Gerais, Brasil Melophagus ovinus and Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum melophagium in ovines in the State of Minas Gerais, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Oswaldo Costa

    1983-03-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho Melophagus ovinus é identificado pela primeira vez no Estado de Minas Gerais e Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum melophagium tem sua primeira ocorrência registrada no Brasil.Melophagus ovinus is identified for the first time in Minas Gerais State and Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum melophagium in Brazil.

  16. Laryngeal disease in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macphail, Catriona

    2014-01-01

    The most common disease process involving the larynx is laryngeal paralysis, which occurs much more frequently in dogs than in cats. Diagnosis of laryngeal paralysis requires close attention to anesthetic plane and coordination of respiratory effort with laryngeal motion. Surgical arytenoid lateralization improves respiration and quality of life in dogs with laryngeal paralysis; however, aspiration pneumonia is a recognized complication, and generalized neuropathy can progress. Laryngeal collapse can result from any cause of chronic upper airway obstruction, but is most often associated with unaddressed brachycephalic airway syndrome. Laryngeal neoplasia, while generally uncommon, occurs more frequently in cats than in dogs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Septic lens implantation syndrome in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalesandro, Nicole; Stiles, Jean; Miller, Margaret

    2011-09-01

    A 13-year-old female spayed domestic shorthair cat was presented initially for a change in the appearance of the left eye. On initial examination, a small penetrating wound was suspected as the cause for a corneal scar, an anterior cortical incipient cataract and mild iritis. The cat was not re-presented until 1 year later at which time ocular pain was marked. Severe anterior uveitis and glaucoma were diagnosed and the eye enucleated. Histopathology documented intralenticular coccoid bacteria and septic lens implantation syndrome. © 2011 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  18. The prognostic biomarker L-homoarginine is a substrate of the cationic amino acid transporters CAT1, CAT2A and CAT2B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafai, Anja; Fromm, Martin F; König, Jörg; Maas, Renke

    2017-07-06

    Low plasma concentration of L-homoarginine is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events and total mortality. Experimental data indicate that supplementation of L-homoarginine may have protective effects. We aimed to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the cellular uptake of L-homoarginine, which are little understood, so far. Using human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cell lines stably overexpressing the human cationic amino acid transporters CAT1 [solute carrier family 7 (SLC7A1)], CAT2A (SLC7A2A) or CAT2B (SLC7A2B) we assessed the transport kinetics of L-homoarginine and interactions with the CAT substrates L-arginine and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA). Significant uptake of L-homoarginine was observed for all three CATs with apparent K M -values of 175 ± 7 µM for CAT1 and 523 ± 35 µM for CAT2B. Saturation of CAT2A-mediated L-homoarginine uptake could not be reached. Uptake of L-homoarginine by any of the three CATs could be inhibited by L-arginine and ADMA. Significant inhibition of CAT1-mediated uptake of L-homoarginine by L-arginine already occurred in the physiological concentration range. Taken together these data demonstrate that L-homoarginine is a substrate of CAT1, CAT2A and CAT2B and that CAT1 is a key site with regard to physiological relevance and interactions with related substrates such as L-arginine.

  19. Transmission of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) among cohabiting cats in two cat rescue shelters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litster, Annette L

    2014-08-01

    Conflicting accounts have been published in the veterinary literature regarding transmission of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) between cohabiting cats in mixed households, and the mechanics of possible casual transmission, if it occurs, are poorly understood. Similarly, there are conflicting reports of vertical transmission of FIV. The aim of the present study was to document the FIV serological status of cats taken into two rescue shelters. At rescue shelter 1 (Rescue 1), cats cohabited in a multi-cat household of FIV-negative and naturally-infected, FIV-positive cats. A study was performed that combined a retrospective review of records of FIV serological status at intake (Test 1) and prospective FIV serological testing (Tests 2 and 3). Retrospective records were analyzed at rescue shelter 2 (Rescue 2), where FIV-positive queens with litters of nursing kittens were taken into the shelter, before being rehomed. FIV serology was performed on all kittens after weaning. Initial test results (Test 1) for 138 cohabiting cats from Rescue 1 showed that there were 130 FIV-negative cats and eight FIV-positive cats (six male neutered and two female spayed). A second test (Test 2), performed in 45 of the FIV-negative and five of the FIV-positive cats at median 28 months after Test 1 (range, 1 month to 8.8 years) showed that results were unchanged. Similarly, a third test (Test 3), performed in four of the original FeLV-negative cats and one remaining FIV-positive cat at median 38 months after Test 1 (range, 4 months to 4 years), also showed that results were unchanged. These results show a lack of evidence of FIV transmission, despite years of exposure to naturally-infected, FIV-positive cats in a mixed household. At Rescue 2, records were available from five FIV-positive queens with 19 kittens. All 19 kittens tested FIV-negative, suggesting that vertical transmission had not occurred. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Determinants of Cat Choice and Outcomes for Adult Cats and Kittens Adopted from an Australian Animal Shelter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Sarah; Paterson, Mandy; Vankan, Dianne; Morton, John; Bennett, Pauleen; Phillips, Clive

    2015-04-29

    The percentage of adult cats euthanized in animal shelters is greater than that of kittens because adult cats are less likely to be adopted. This study aimed to provide evidence to inform the design of strategies to encourage adult cat adoptions. One such strategy is to discount adoption prices, but there are concerns that this may result in poor adoption outcomes. We surveyed 382 cat adopters at the time of adoption, to assess potential determinants of adopters' cat age group choice (adult or kitten) and, for adult cat adopters, the price they are willing to pay. The same respondents were surveyed again 6-12 months after the adoption to compare outcomes between cat age groups and between adult cats in two price categories. Most adopters had benevolent motivations for adopting from the shelter and had put considerable thought into the adoption and requirements for responsible ownership. However, adult cat adopters were more likely to have been influenced by price than kitten adopters. Adoption outcomes were generally positive for both adult cats and kittens and for adult cats adopted at low prices. The latter finding alleviates concerns about the outcomes of "low-cost" adoptions in populations, such as the study population, and lends support for the use of "low-cost" adoptions as an option for attempting to increase adoption rates. In addition, the results provide information that can be used to inform future campaigns aimed at increasing the number of adult cat adoptions, particularly in devising marketing strategies for adult cats.

  1. Guidelines for vaccination of dogs and cats in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Woo-Jin; Kim, Hyun-Tae; Yoo, Han-Sang; Youn, Hwa-Young

    2014-07-01

    This guideline contains the recommended vaccination schedules of dogs and cats from World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) and American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA). In 2010, WSAVA published guidelines for the vaccination of dogs and cats. And, in 2011, AAHA also published guidelines for vaccination of dogs. In Korea, there is no published guideline for vaccination of dogs and cats yet. Therefore, the plane of vaccination also reports the present situation of vaccination schedule of dogs and cats in Korean animal hospitals.

  2. [Mycoplasma sp. isolation in sick and normal cats (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campedelli Filho, O

    1977-01-01

    This paper deals with the presence of mycoplasmosis in sick and normal cats lodged by U.I.P.A. (União Internacional de Proteçäo aos Animais) São Paulo, Brazil. In a group of 78 cats, 10.41% of mycoplasma was found in sick cats and 0% in normal cats, in a total of 6,41% of positive cases.

  3. Toxocara cati infections in domestic cats from two communities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An epidemiological survey was undertaken to study the prevalence and intensity of infection with Toxocara cati in some selected domestic cats from two communities in south-western Nigeria. Faecal samples of 200 cats were collected through a direct rectal swab using a long forceps from households with cat from Ode Irele ...

  4. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in cats from Colombo, Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cats are essential in the life cycle of Toxoplasma gondii because they are the only hosts that can excrete the environmentally-resistant oocysts in nature. Nothing is known of the prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in cats from Sri Lanka. Serum samples from 86 cats from Colombo, Sri Lanka were tested f...

  5. Gallbladder mucocoele and concurrent hepatic lipidosis in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, S L; Milne, M; Slocombe, R F; Landon, B P

    2007-10-01

    A 3-year-old Domestic Shorthair cat was presented with weight loss, anorexia and icterus. Feline hepatic lipidosis and gallbladder mucocoele were diagnosed; this is the first report of gallbladder mucocoele in the cat. The case was managed successfully with cholecystojejunostomy, gastrostomy tube placement and tube feeding for 3 months. The cat has survived over the long term with minimal complications.

  6. Lungworm disease in cats : ABCD guidelines on prevention and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennisi, Maria Grazia; Hartmann, Katrin; Addie, Diane D; Boucraut-Baralon, Corine; Egberink, Herman; Frymus, Tadeusz; Gruffydd-Jones, Tim; Horzinek, Marian C; Hosie, Margaret J; Lloret, Albert; Lutz, Hans; Marsilio, Fulvio; Radford, Alan D; Thiry, Etienne; Truyen, Uwe; Möstl, Karin

    OVERVIEW: Cardiopulmonary nematodes are emerging parasites of cats in Europe. A number of helminth parasites may be involved. The most prevalent lungworm in domestic cats is Aelurostrongylus abstrusus. Oslerus rostratus and Troglostrongylus species are found mainly in wild cats. The trichurid

  7. The effect of cat Felis catus predation on three breeding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breeding success of Pterodroma macroptera, Procellaria aequinoctialis and Pachyptila vittata salvini in three cat-free and three control areas were used to evaluate the effects of cat Felis catus predation on the avifauna of Marion Island. Breeding success of all three species was significantly higher in the combined cat-free ...

  8. Detection of Vaccinia Virus in Urban Domestic Cats, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Galileu Barbosa; Miranda, Júlia Bahia; Almeida, Gregório Guilherme; Silva de Oliveira, Jaqueline; Pinheiro, Mariana Siqueira; Gonçalves, Stefanne Aparecida; Pimenta Dos Reis, Jenner Karlisson; Gonçalves, Ricardo; Ferreira, Paulo César Peregrino; Bonjardim, Cláudio Antônio; Abrahão, Jônatas Santos; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Trindade, Giliane de Souza

    2017-02-01

    We investigated possible vaccinia virus (VACV) in urban house cats in Brazil. Serum samples from 6 cats were positive for VACV by PCR, indicating likely VACV circulation among house cats in urban areas of Brazil. This finding highlights the importance of epidemiologic surveillance to avoid outbreaks among urban human populations.

  9. 50 CFR 28.43 - Destruction of dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Destruction of dogs and cats. 28.43 Section 28.43 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... VIOLATIONS OF PARTS 25, 26, AND 27 Impoundment Procedures § 28.43 Destruction of dogs and cats. Dogs and cats...

  10. Purified natural and recombinant Fel d 1 and cat albumin in in vitro diagnostics for cat allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ree, R.; van Leeuwen, W. A.; Bulder, I.; Bond, J.; Aalberse, R. C.

    1999-01-01

    Current diagnostics and therapeutics for cat allergy are based on cat epithelial extracts originating from highly variable source materials. This gives rise to several problems: variability of allergen composition, contamination with house dust mite allergens, and potential transfer of pathogenic

  11. Kinetoplast adaptations in American strains from Trypanosoma vivax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greif, Gonzalo [Unidad de Biología Molecular, Institut Pasteur de Montevideo (Uruguay); Rodriguez, Matías [Sección Biomatemática, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la Republica (Uruguay); Reyna-Bello, Armando [Departamento de Ciencias de la Vida, Carrera en Ingeniería en Biotecnología, Universidad de las Fuerzas Armadas (Ecuador); Centro de Estudios Biomédicos y Veterinarios, Universidad Nacional Experimental Simón Rodríguez-IDECYT, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Robello, Carlos [Unidad de Biología Molecular, Institut Pasteur de Montevideo (Uruguay); Departamento de Bioquímica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de la República Uruguay (Uruguay); Alvarez-Valin, Fernando, E-mail: falvarez@fcien.edu.uy [Sección Biomatemática, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la Republica (Uruguay)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • American T. vivax strains exhibit a drastic process of mitochondrial genome degradation. • T. vivax mitochondrial genes have among the fastest evolutionary rates in eukaryotes. • High rates of kDNA evolution are associated with relaxation of selective constrains. • Relaxed selective pressures are the result of mechanical transmission. • The evolutionary strategy of T. vivax differs from that of T. brucei-species complex. - Abstract: The mitochondrion role changes during the digenetic life cycle of African trypanosomes. Owing to the low abundance of glucose in the insect vector (tsetse flies) the parasites are dependent upon a fully functional mitochondrion, capable of performing oxidative phosphorylation. Nevertheless, inside the mammalian host (bloodstream forms), which is rich in nutrients, parasite proliferation relies on glycolysis, and the mitochondrion is partially redundant. In this work we perform a comparative study of the mitochondrial genome (kinetoplast) in different strains of Trypanosoma vivax. The comparison was conducted between a West African strain that goes through a complete life cycle and two American strains that are mechanically transmitted (by different vectors) and remain as bloodstream forms only. It was found that while the African strain has a complete and apparently fully functional kinetoplast, the American T. vivax strains have undergone a drastic process of mitochondrial genome degradation, in spite of the recent introduction of these parasites in America. Many of their genes exhibit different types of mutations that are disruptive of function such as major deletions, frameshift causing indels and missense mutations. Moreover, all but three genes (A6-ATPase, RPS12 and MURF2) are not edited in the American strains, whereas editing takes place normally in all (editable) genes from the African strain. Two of these genes, A6-ATPase and RPS12, are known to play an essential function during bloodstream stage

  12. COMPARISON OF PBDES IN CAT SERUM TO LEVELS IN CAT FOOD: EVIDENCE OF DECA DEBROMINATION?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Since the introduction of brominated flame retardants (such as the PBDEs), increases in feline hyperthyroidism have been observed. We hypothesized that PBDE exposure was linked to the increased occurrence of hyperthyroidism in cats. Herein, PBDEs in serum of pet ...

  13. Evaluating "Cat Country": The Humor within Satire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chung-chien Karen

    2010-01-01

    Satire, as a mode, is not frequently employed in Chinese narratives. "Cat Country," or "Mao Cheng Ji," written by Lao She (pen name of Shu Qing Chun, 1898--1966) has come under much attack of its literary values. Whereas most critics have no doubt that this work sets out to satirize China through the portrayal of a society of…

  14. Nutrition and oxalate metabolism in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijcker, J.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315029412

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, a progressive increase in calcium oxalate (CaOx) urolith prevalence is reported in cats and dogs diagnosed with urolithiasis. This increase in prevalence appears to have occurred since dietary modifications were introduced to address magnesium ammonium phosphate urolithiasis.

  15. Phenotypic variability of cat-eye syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berends, MJW; Tan-Sindhunata, G; Leegte, B; Van Essen, AJ

    2001-01-01

    Cat-Eye syndrome (CES) is a disorder with a variable pattern of multiple congenital anomalies of which coloboma of the iris and anal atresia are the best known. CES is cyogenetically characterised by the presence of an extra bisatellited marker chromosome, which represents an inverted dicentric

  16. Dermatophilus congolensis in a feral cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, Anne M; Weedon, G Robert; Maddox, Carol W; Galloway, Kimberly A

    2014-10-01

    A young adult feral cat presented to the Champaign County Humane Society with a subcutaneous mass near the stifle. The mass was aspirated. Chains of paired cocci organisms were identified, consistent with Dermatophilus congolensis. The identity of these organisms was confirmed by culture and polymerase chain reaction. © ISFM and AAFP 2014.

  17. Cat Scratch Disease: The Story Continues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Anne Opavsky

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To present a perspective on the current state of knowledge of cat scratch disease (CSD, including the evidence for Bartonella henselae as the etiological agent, epidemiological and clinical characteristics of the disease, available diagnostic tests and current therapeutic options.

  18. Design of a Competency Administration Toolset (CAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    nor well integrated . The stakeholder competency’s Budget Financial Managers (BFMs) used two independent data repositories, including Navy Enterprise... report , all objectives have been met. Confirmation from all levels of the stakeholder representatives indicated that Team CAT successfully met the...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA SYSTEMS ENGINEERING CAPSTONE PROJECT REPORT Approved for public release

  19. Getting a CAT Scan (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth / ... Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For ...

  20. Renal abscesses in cats: six cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucher, Mathieu R; Theron, Marie-Laure; Reynolds, Brice S

    2017-04-01

    Case series summary Six cats were diagnosed with renal abscesses. Common clinical findings were lethargy, dehydration, abdominal pain and nephromegaly. Fever was noted in half of the cases. Diagnosis was established by ultrasonography, cytological examination and bacterial culture of abscess aspirates. At least one possible contributing factor could be identified in all cases. Antibiotics were consistently used and in two cats the abscess was surgically drained. The short-term outcome was fair but the long-term outcome was dependent on the underlying condition. Relevance and novel information The results of this small case series suggest that renal abscess should be considered when nephromegaly and/or abdominal discomfort are noted. Diagnosis of renal abscess is straightforward when ultrasonography and fine-needle aspirate analysis can be performed. Medical treatment is assumed to be preferable but surgical treatment may be warranted on a case-by-case basis. Given that almost every affected cat was diagnosed with at least one comorbidity, a thorough evaluation is recommended for all cats with renal abscesses.

  1. Daffodil toxicosis in an adult cat

    OpenAIRE

    Saxon-Buri, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    A domestic longhair cat with a 3-day history of lethargy and vomiting after ingesting dried daffodil stems (Narcissus spp.) was severely hypothermic (33.0°C), with bradycardia (78 beats/min) and hypotension. Treatment with atropine, dexamethasone, fluid therapy, and supportive care resulted in a complete recovery by 6 days after exposure.

  2. Benign cementoblastoma (true cementoma in a cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenin A Villamizar-Martinez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A 10-year-old castrated male domestic shorthair cat was presented for assessment of a gingival mass surrounding the left maxillary third and fourth premolar teeth. The mass was surgically removed by means of a marginal rim excision, and the tissue was submitted for histological assessment. It was identified as a benign cementoblastoma (true cementoma. There was proliferation of mineralized eosinophilic material with multiple irregularly placed lacunae and reversal lines, reminiscent of cementum. The cat recovered uneventfully from the anesthesia, and there was no evidence of tumor recurrence 6 months after surgery. Relevance and novel information Cementoblastomas (true cementomas in domestic animals are rare, with just a few reports in ruminants, monogastric herbivores and rodents. Cementoblastoma is considered a benign tumor that arises from the tooth root. The slow, expansive and constant growth that characterizes these masses may be accompanied by signs of oral discomfort and dysphagia. This case report is intended to increase knowledge regarding this tumor in cats and also highlights the importance of complete excision of the neoplasm. To our knowledge, there are no previous reports in the literature of cementoblastoma in the cat.

  3. Veterinarian Gets Flu Virus from Cats

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2018-03-28

    Dr. Todd Davis, a CDC research biologist, discusses transmission of avian H7N2 from a cat to a human.  Created: 3/28/2018 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 3/28/2018.

  4. Suppression of fertility in adult cats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goericke-Pesch, Sandra Kathrin; Wehrend, A.; Georgiev, P.

    2014-01-01

    and clinical options are available for the suppression of fertility in adult cats and the decision as to which should be chosen - independent of the legal registration of any state - depends on different facts: (i) feral or privately owned animal? (ii) temporary or permanent suppression of fertility wanted...

  5. The antihypertensive effect of amlodipine in cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Morar,

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of amlodipine on blood pressure and renal function in cats with arterial hypertension secondary to chronic renal failure. The research was conducted on 11 cats, aged between 7 and 14.5 years, diagnosed with arterial hypertension secondary to chronic renal failure. Systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, mean arterial pressure (MBP and pulse rate were determined by oscillometric method, before and after 7, 30 or 120 days of treatment with amlodipine. At the beginning of treatment, all cats were receiving 0.625 mg amlodipine once daily and after 7 days oftreatment, in five cats, the dose was increased to 1.25 mg amlodipine, once daily. Before amlodipine administration the mean values of SBP/DBP were 175 ± 13.2 mmHg/119 ± 7.2 mmHg and after 30 days of treatment, the mean values of the SBP/DBP were reduced by 27.9/25.4 mmHg (p<0,001. After 120 days of treatment with amlodipine mean values of SBP/DBP were lower with 32/31 mmHg compared with baseline values (p<0.001. The treatment with amlodipine did not significantly affect the values of blood biochemical parameters of renal profile.

  6. Viral reproductive pathogens of dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaro, Nicola; Carmichael, Leland E; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2012-05-01

    This article reviews the current literature on the viral agents that cause reproductive failures in domestic carnivores (dogs and cats). A meaningful update is provided on the etiologic, clinical, pathologic, diagnostic, and prophylactic aspects of the viral infections impacting canine and feline reproduction as a consequence of either direct virus replication or severe debilitation of pregnant animals.

  7. Kipling's Cat: Learning from the New Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Richard

    1996-01-01

    International schools can benefit from new students' fresh vision. Some students exhibit "culture shock" on arrival, while others, like Kipling's cat, act as though "all places are alike to them." This article examines the newcomer's adjustment process by proposing a model of personal identity development and poses questions to test the theory…

  8. Diagnostic radiology of the dog and cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kealy, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    Radiolographic examinations have become an important aid in small animal veterinary practice. The emphasis of the examinations has shifted from surgical and orthopedic applications to internal diseases. The book gives a comprehensive picture of X-ray diagnosis in dogs and cats. (orig./MG) [de

  9. Schrödinger's Cat States

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 2. Schrödinger's Cat States. A N Maheshwari V P Srivastava. Research News Volume 3 Issue 2 February 1998 pp 79-82. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/003/02/0079-0082 ...

  10. Surrenderers’ Relationships with Cats Admitted to Four Australian Animal Shelters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Sarah; Paterson, Mandy; Rand, Jacquie; Phillips, Clive J. C.

    2018-01-01

    Simple Summary The surrender of cats to animal shelters results in financial, social and moral burdens for the community. Human caretaking of cats was explored in a sample of people surrendering cats to shelters in Australia. At the shelters surrenderers classified themselves as owners or non-owners and a questionnaire identified that this was related to their method of acquisition of the cat, their association time with the cat, the closeness of their relationship with the cat and their degree of responsibility for the cat’s care. A model of ownership perception was developed to provide a better understanding of factors influencing ownership perception. Understanding ownership perceptions in cats surrendered to shelters is important as these can inform the development of more targeted and effective intervention strategies to reduce numbers of unwanted cats. Abstract The surrender of cats to animal shelters results in financial, social and moral burdens for the community. Correlations of caretaking and interactions with surrendered cats were calculated, to understand more about humans’ relationships with surrendered cats and the contribution of semi-owned cats to shelter intakes. A questionnaire was used to collect detailed information about 100 surrenderers’ relationships with cats they surrendered to four animal shelters in Australia, with each surrenderer classifying themselves as being either the owner or a non-owner of the surrendered cat (ownership perception). Method of acquisition of the cat, association time, closeness of the relationship with the cat and degree of responsibility for the cat’s care were all associated with ownership perception. Many non-owners (59%) fed and interacted with the cat they surrendered but rarely displayed other caretaking behaviours. However, most surrenderers of owned and unowned cats were attached to and felt responsible for the cat. Based on these results and other evidence, a causal model of ownership perception

  11. [Feeding of dogs and cats in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, N; Dillitzer, N; Sauter-Louis, C; Kienzle, E

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine epidemiological data on the feeding of dogs and cats in Germany. A total of 865 dog owners and 243 cat owners were interviewed using standardised questionnaires about their animals (age, sex, weight, body condition, health) and feeding, including treats, additional supplements and reasons for food changes, together with data on the pet owners (age, sex, education, profession). The interviews took place in the waiting rooms of veterinarians, in dog schools, animal shelters and public parks as well as via the internet. Body condition scoring (BCS, scale 1-9) was performed separately by the pet owners and the interviewer. The mean age of dogs was 4.8 years and of cats 6.8 years. The dogs' body weight ranged from 2.2kg (Pomeranian dog) to 95kg (Saint Bernard). The cats had a body weight from 2 to 11kg. Approximately 52% of dogs and cats were overweight (BCS6-9). Differences existed between the assessment by the owner and the interviewer. Many owners underestimated the body condition, in particular, moderate overweight was not recognised (BCS6-7). Commercial food was exclusively used by 58% of dog and 90% of cat owners, while 35% and 10%, respectively, combined these with additional feed. Nearly 8% of dog and 7 years) and sick dogs received home-made diets more often. Older pet owners (≥ 46 years) fed their pets home-made diets more frequently. The education and profession of owners did not affect the percentage of home-made diets. There was no effect of the type of diet on BCS. Owners with a lower education as well as housewives and pensioners more often had overweight pets. Older owners and working owners gave treats less frequently. However, 95% of dogs and 65% of cats received treats. Being overweight is the biggest dietary problem. In comparison to previous studies, the number of overweight pets has increased. Pet owners should be advised early on excess weight, because the onset of being overweight is often not recognised

  12. Metabolic response to three different diets in lean cats and cats predisposed to overweight

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Claudia; Liesegang, Annette; Frey, Diana; Wichert, Brigitta

    2017-01-01

    Background The existence of a genetic predisposition to obesity is commonly recognized in humans and rodents. Recently, a link between genetics and overweight was shown in cats. The goal of this study was to identify the effect of diet composition on plasma levels of glucose, insulin, free fatty acids and triglycerides in cats receiving different diets (high-carbohydrate, high-fat and high-protein diets). Results Insulin and leptin concentrations were significantly correlated with phenotype. ...

  13. HEAD MOVEMENT DURING WALKING IN THE CAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZUBAIR, HUMZA N.; BELOOZEROVA, IRINA N.; SUN, HAI; MARLINSKI, VLADIMIR

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of how the head moves during locomotion is essential for understanding how locomotion is controlled by sensory systems of the head. We have analyzed head movements of the cat walking along a straight flat pathway in the darkness and light. We found that cats' head left-right translations, and roll and yaw rotations oscillated once per stride, while fore-aft and vertical translations, and pitch rotations oscillated twice. The head reached its highest vertical positions during second half of each forelimb swing, following maxima of the shoulder/trunk by 20–90°. Nose-up rotation followed head upward translation by another 40–90° delay. The peak-to-peak amplitude of vertical translation was ~1.5 cm and amplitude of pitch rotation was ~3°. Amplitudes of lateral translation and roll rotation were ~1 cm and 1.5–3°, respectively. Overall, cats' heads were neutral in roll and 10–30° nose-down, maintaining horizontal semicircular canals and utriculi within 10° of the earth horizontal. The head longitudinal velocity was 0.5–1 m/s, maximal upward and downward linear velocities were ~0.05 and ~0.1 m/s, respectively, and maximal lateral velocity was ~0.05 m/s. Maximal velocities of head pitch rotation were 20–50 °/s. During walking in light, cats stood 0.3–0.5 cm taller and held their head 0.5–2 cm higher than in darkness. Forward acceleration was 25–100% higher and peak-to-peak amplitude of head pitch oscillations was ~20 °/s larger. We concluded that, during walking, the head of the cat is held actively. Reflexes appear to play only a partial role in determining head movement, and vision might further diminish their role. PMID:27339731

  14. Metabolic response to three different diets in lean cats and cats predisposed to overweight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Claudia; Liesegang, Annette; Frey, Diana; Wichert, Brigitta

    2017-06-19

    The existence of a genetic predisposition to obesity is commonly recognized in humans and rodents. Recently, a link between genetics and overweight was shown in cats. The goal of this study was to identify the effect of diet composition on plasma levels of glucose, insulin, free fatty acids and triglycerides in cats receiving different diets (high-carbohydrate, high-fat and high-protein diets). Insulin and leptin concentrations were significantly correlated with phenotype. Insulin levels were lower, whereas leptin levels were higher in cats predisposed to overweight. The other blood parameters were not correlated with phenotype. Intake of the high-carbohydrate diet resulted in higher insulin concentrations compared with the two other diets. Insulin levels were within the values described for non-obese cats in previous studies. There was no difference in metabolic response between the two groups. As the high-carbohydrate diet led to the highest insulin blood concentrations, it might be useful to avoid such diets in cats predisposed to overweight. In addition, even cats with genetically linked obesity can regain insulin sensitivity after weight loss.

  15. An experimental study on cerebral paragonimiasis using cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seon Kyu; Chang, Kee Hyun; Goo, Jin Mo; Han, Moon Hee; Shin, Yong Moon; Choo, Sung Wook; Yu, In Kyu; Cho, Seung Yull; Kong, Yoon

    1994-01-01

    It is important to diagnosis paragonimiasis in early active because it can be dared by chemotherapy. However, it is difficult to make a correct diagnosis of cerebral paragonimiasis in the early active stage, and the radiographic findings of cerebral paragonimiasis have been rarely reported. Thus, this experimental study was designed to produce early active cerebral paragonimiasis and to demonstrate radiologic-pathologic correlations. In 8 cats, 7-8 metacercariae of Paragonimus Westermani were directly introduced into brain parenchyma of each cat's after trephination of the skull. In another 16 cats, the juvenile worms and the adult worms that had developed for varying periods (2 weeks, 4 weeks, 6 weeks, 8 weeks and 12 weeks) in the lunges of another cats were introduced into the brain parenchyma of each cat's with the same procedure described above. Follow -up MR images and chest radiographs were obtained at 2 days, 1 weeks, 2 weeks, 4 weeks and 8 weeks after inoculation. The autopsies and histopathological examinations of the cat's brain were undertaken in 22 cats. In 9 cats that were suspected with pulmonary lesion on chest radiograph, the soft tissue radiographs of inflated-fixed lungs were obtained. In one cat with inoculation of adult worm, acute suppurative inflammation of the brain parenchyma was demonstrated. But the other cats with inoculation of adult worm or juvenile worm and the cats with intentional of metacercaris did not reveal any evidence of acute cerebral paragonimiasis. More than half of the introduce metacercariae (5 out of 8 cats) were found in the lung parenchyma, while only 25% (4 out of 16 cats) of the adult worm inoculated cats were. Acute suppurative inflammation suggesting acute stage cerebral paragonimiasis was obtained in one case of adult worm inoculated cat. Most of the inoculated metacercariae and some of the juvenile worms or adult worms were migrated to the lungs

  16. An experimental study on cerebral paragonimiasis using cats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seon Kyu; Chang, Kee Hyun; Goo, Jin Mo; Han, Moon Hee; Shin, Yong Moon; Choo, Sung Wook; Yu, In Kyu [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seung Yull; Kong, Yoon [Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-06-15

    It is important to diagnosis paragonimiasis in early active because it can be dared by chemotherapy. However, it is difficult to make a correct diagnosis of cerebral paragonimiasis in the early active stage, and the radiographic findings of cerebral paragonimiasis have been rarely reported. Thus, this experimental study was designed to produce early active cerebral paragonimiasis and to demonstrate radiologic-pathologic correlations. In 8 cats, 7-8 metacercariae of Paragonimus Westermani were directly introduced into brain parenchyma of each cat's after trephination of the skull. In another 16 cats, the juvenile worms and the adult worms that had developed for varying periods (2 weeks, 4 weeks, 6 weeks, 8 weeks and 12 weeks) in the lunges of another cats were introduced into the brain parenchyma of each cat's with the same procedure described above. Follow -up MR images and chest radiographs were obtained at 2 days, 1 weeks, 2 weeks, 4 weeks and 8 weeks after inoculation. The autopsies and histopathological examinations of the cat's brain were undertaken in 22 cats. In 9 cats that were suspected with pulmonary lesion on chest radiograph, the soft tissue radiographs of inflated-fixed lungs were obtained. In one cat with inoculation of adult worm, acute suppurative inflammation of the brain parenchyma was demonstrated. But the other cats with inoculation of adult worm or juvenile worm and the cats with intentional of metacercaris did not reveal any evidence of acute cerebral paragonimiasis. More than half of the introduce metacercariae (5 out of 8 cats) were found in the lung parenchyma, while only 25% (4 out of 16 cats) of the adult worm inoculated cats were. Acute suppurative inflammation suggesting acute stage cerebral paragonimiasis was obtained in one case of adult worm inoculated cat. Most of the inoculated metacercariae and some of the juvenile worms or adult worms were migrated to the lungs.

  17. Host stress physiology and Trypanosoma haemoparasite infection influence innate immunity in the woylie (Bettongia penicillata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hing, Stephanie; Currie, Andrew; Broomfield, Steven; Keatley, Sarah; Jones, Krista; Thompson, R C Andrew; Narayan, Edward; Godfrey, Stephanie S

    2016-06-01

    Understanding immune function is critical to conserving wildlife in view of infectious disease threats, particularly in threatened species vulnerable to stress, immunocompromise and infection. However, few studies examine stress, immune function and infection in wildlife. We used a flow cytometry protocol developed for human infants to assess phagocytosis, a key component of innate immunity, in a critically endangered marsupial, the woylie (Bettongia penicillata). The effects of stress physiology and Trypanosoma infection on phagocytosis were investigated. Blood and faecal samples were collected from woylies in a captive facility over three months. Trypanosoma status was determined using PCR. Faecal cortisol metabolites (FCM) were quantified by enzyme-immunoassay. Mean phagocytosis measured was >90%. An interaction between sex and FCM influenced the percentage of phagocytosing leukocytes, possibly reflecting the influence of sex hormones and glucocorticoids. An interaction between Trypanosoma status and FCM influenced phagocytosis index, suggesting that stress physiology and infection status influence innate immunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibody detection in eastern Andalusia (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Clotilde; Concha-Valdez, Fanny; Cañas, Rocío; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Ramón; Sánchez-Moreno, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Chagas disease caused by the protozoan haemoflagellate Trypanosoma cruzi is no longer found exclusively in Latin America; the disease is occurring in Europe, and Spain is the country with the highest prevalence. Our aim was to detect anti-T. cruzi antibodies in blood donors from southeast Spain, and we performed eight serological diagnostic assays on each of 550 blood samples collected in March-June 2010. Two in-house ELISA methods were used to test against a parasite lysate (ELISA-H) and the semi-purified superoxide dismutase excreted by T. cruzi (ELISA-SODe); we also used the Western blot technique against the same antigen (WB-SODe), indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) and four commercial tests. The serological test results showed a range of seroprevalence values, the lowest being 1.1%, determined by IFA and two commercial tests (Ab rapid and Chagascreen); other values were: 1.3% (commercial ELISA [Chagas ELISA IgG+IgM]); 2.1% (immunochromatographic test [Stick Chagas]); 2.7% (ELISA-H); 4.0% (WB-SODe); and 4.2%, the highest value (ELISA-SODe). The excellent specificity of SODe antigen for the detection of antibodies to T. cruzi in donors lead us to affirm that the serological test performed with this biomarker could provide a useful screening and confirmatory test method for cases of Chagas disease.

  19. Telomeric expression sites are highly conserved in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Hertz-Fowler

    Full Text Available Subtelomeric regions are often under-represented in genome sequences of eukaryotes. One of the best known examples of the use of telomere proximity for adaptive purposes are the bloodstream expression sites (BESs of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei. To enhance our understanding of BES structure and function in host adaptation and immune evasion, the BES repertoire from the Lister 427 strain of T. brucei were independently tagged and sequenced. BESs are polymorphic in size and structure but reveal a surprisingly conserved architecture in the context of extensive recombination. Very small BESs do exist and many functioning BESs do not contain the full complement of expression site associated genes (ESAGs. The consequences of duplicated or missing ESAGs, including ESAG9, a newly named ESAG12, and additional variant surface glycoprotein genes (VSGs were evaluated by functional assays after BESs were tagged with a drug-resistance gene. Phylogenetic analysis of constituent ESAG families suggests that BESs are sequence mosaics and that extensive recombination has shaped the evolution of the BES repertoire. This work opens important perspectives in understanding the molecular mechanisms of antigenic variation, a widely used strategy for immune evasion in pathogens, and telomere biology.

  20. Prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi/HIV coinfection in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulce Stauffert

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease reactivation has been a defining condition for acquired immune deficiency syndrome in Brazil for individuals coinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi and HIV since 2004. Although the first coinfection case was reported in the 1980s, its prevalence has not been firmly established. In order to know coinfection prevalence, a cross-sectional study of 200 HIV patients was performed between January and July 2013 in the city of Pelotas, in southern Rio Grande do Sul, an endemic area for Chagas disease. Ten subjects were found positive for T. cruzi infection by chemiluminescence microparticle immunoassay and indirect immunofluorescence. The survey showed 5% coinfection prevalence among HIV patients (95% CI: 2.0–8.0, which was 3.8 times as high as that estimated by the Ministry of Health of Brazil. Six individuals had a viral load higher than 100,000 copies per μL, a statistically significant difference for T. cruzi presence. These findings highlight the importance of screening HIV patients from Chagas disease endemic areas.

  1. Specific antibodies induce apoptosis in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Presas, Ana María; Tato, Patricia; Becker, Ingeborg; Solano, Sandra; Copitin, Natalia; Kopitin, Natalia; Berzunza, Miriam; Willms, Kaethe; Hernández, Joselin; Molinari, José Luis

    2010-05-01

    The susceptibility of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes to lysis by normal or immune sera in a complement-dependent reaction has been reported. Mouse immune sera depleted complement-induced damage in epimastigotes characterized by morphological changes and death. The purpose of this work was to study the mechanism of death in epimastigotes exposed to decomplemented mouse immune serum. Epimastigotes were maintained in RPMI medium. Immune sera were prepared in mice by immunization with whole crude epimastigote extracts. Viable epimastigotes were incubated with decomplemented normal or immune sera at 37 degrees C. By electron microscopy, agglutinated parasites showed characteristic patterns of membrane fusion between two or more parasites; this fusion also produced interdigitation of the subpellicular microtubules. Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and annexin V assays. Nuclear features were examined by 4'-,6-diamidino-2'-phenylindole diHCI cytochemistry that demonstrated apoptotic nuclear condensation. Caspase activity was also measured. TUNEL results showed that parasites incubated with decomplemented immune sera took up 26% of specific fluorescence as compared to 1.3% in parasites incubated with decomplemented normal sera. The Annexin-V-Fluos staining kit revealed that epimastigotes incubated with decomplemented immune sera exposed phosphatidylserine on the external leaflet of the plasma membrane. The incubation of parasites with immune sera showed caspase 3 activity. We conclude that specific antibodies are able to induce agglutination and apoptosis in epimastigotes, although the pathway is not elucidated.

  2. Modulation of host cell mechanics by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Adam; Lenormand, Guillaume; Costales, Jaime; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the effects of Trypanosoma cruzi on the mechanical properties of infected host cells, cytoskeletal stiffness and remodeling dynamics were measured in parasite-infected fibroblasts. We find that cell stiffness decreases in a time-dependent fashion in T. cruzi-infected human foreskin fibroblasts without a significant change in the dynamics of cytoskeletal remodeling. In contrast, cells exposed to T. cruzi secreted/released components become significantly stiffer within 2 h of exposure and exhibit increased remodeling dynamics. These findings represent the first direct mechanical data to suggest a physical picture in which an intact, stiff, and rapidly remodeling cytoskeleton facilitates early stages of T. cruzi invasion and parasite retention, followed by subsequent softening and disassembly of the cytoskeleton to accommodate intracellular replication of parasites. We further suggest that these changes occur through protein kinase A and inhibition of the Rho/Rho kinase signaling pathway. In the context of tissue infection, changes in host cell mechanics could adversely affect the function of the infected organs, and may play an important role on the pathophysiology of Chagas' disease. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Phenolic Constituents of Medicinal Plants with Activity against Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya Nan Sun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs affect over one billion people all over the world. These diseases are classified as neglected because they impact populations in areas with poor financial conditions and hence do not attract sufficient research investment. Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT or sleeping sickness, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei, is one of the NTDs. The current therapeutic interventions for T. brucei infections often have toxic side effects or require hospitalization so that they are not available in the rural environments where HAT occurs. Furthermore, parasite resistance is increasing, so that there is an urgent need to identify novel lead compounds against this infection. Recognizing the wide structural diversity of natural products, we desired to explore and identify novel antitrypanosomal chemotypes from a collection of natural products obtained from plants. In this study, 440 pure compounds from various medicinal plants were tested against T. brucei by in a screening using whole cell in vitro assays. As the result, twenty-two phenolic compounds exhibited potent activity against cultures of T. brucei. Among them, eight compounds—4, 7, 11, 14, 15, 18, 20, and 21—showed inhibitory activity against T. brucei, with IC50 values below 5 µM, ranging from 0.52 to 4.70 μM. Based on these results, we attempt to establish some general trends with respect to structure-activity relationships, which indicate that further investigation and optimization of these derivatives might enable the preparation of potentially useful compounds for treating HAT.

  4. Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi present distinct DNA damage responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Juliana B F; Rocha, João P Vieira da; Costa-Silva, Héllida M; Alves, Ceres L; Machado, Carlos R; Cruz, Angela K

    2016-05-01

    Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi are medically relevant parasites and interesting model organisms, as they present unique biological processes. Despite increasing data regarding the mechanisms of gene expression regulation, there is little information on how the DNA damage response (DDR) occurs in trypanosomatids. We found that L. major presented a higher radiosensitivity than T. cruzi. L. major showed G1 arrest and displayed high mortality in response to ionizing radiation as a result of the inefficient repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs). Conversely, T. cruzi exhibited arrest in the S/G2 cell cycle phase, was able to efficiently repair DSBs and did not display high rates of cell death after exposure to gamma irradiation. L. major showed higher resistance to alkylating DNA damage, and only L. major was able to promote DNA repair and growth recovery in the presence of MMS. ASF1c overexpression did not interfere with the efficiency of DNA repair in either of the parasites but did accentuate the DNA damage checkpoint response, thereby delaying cell fate after damage. The observed differences in the DNA damage responses of T. cruzi and L. major may originate from the distinct preferred routes of genetic plasticity of the two parasites, i.e., DNA recombination versus amplification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Interferon-Gamma Promotes Infection of Astrocytes by Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rafael Rodrigues; Mariante, Rafael M.; Silva, Andrea Alice; dos Santos, Ana Luiza Barbosa; Roffê, Ester; Santiago, Helton; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma (IFNγ) is crucial for immunity against intracellular pathogens such as the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (CD). IFNγ is a pleiotropic cytokine which regulates activation of immune and non-immune cells; however, the effect of IFNγ in the central nervous system (CNS) and astrocytes during CD is unknown. Here we show that parasite persists in the CNS of C3H/He mice chronically infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain despite the increased expression of IFNγ mRNA. Furthermore, most of the T. cruzi-bearing cells were astrocytes located near IFNγ+ cells. Surprisingly, in vitro experiments revealed that pretreatment with IFNγ promoted the infection of astrocytes by T. cruzi increasing uptake and proliferation of intracellular forms, despite inducing increased production of nitric oxide (NO). Importantly, the effect of IFNγ on T. cruzi uptake and growth is completely blocked by the anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibody Infliximab and partially blocked by the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis L-NAME. These data support that IFNγ fuels astrocyte infection by T. cruzi and critically implicate IFNγ-stimulated T. cruzi-infected astrocytes as sources of TNF and NO, which may contribute to parasite persistence and CNS pathology in CD. PMID:25695249

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi: Inhibition of infection of human monocytes by aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho de Freitas, Rafael; Lonien, Sandra Cristina Heim; Malvezi, Aparecida Donizette; Silveira, Guilherme Ferreira; Wowk, Pryscilla Fanini; da Silva, Rosiane Valeriano; Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente; Bordignon, Juliano; Pinge-Filho, Phileno

    2017-11-01

    Cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi and its intracellular replication are essential for progression of the parasite life cycle and development of Chagas disease. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE 2 ) and other eicosanoids potently modulate host response and contribute to Chagas disease progression. In this study, we evaluated the effect of aspirin (ASA), a non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor on the T. cruzi invasion and its influence on nitric oxide and cytokine production in human monocytes. The pretreatment of monocytes with ASA or SQ 22536 (adenylate-cyclase inhibitor) induced a marked inhibition of T. cruzi infection. On the other hand, the treatment of monocytes with SQ 22536 after ASA restored the invasiveness of T. cruzi. This reestablishment was associated with a decrease in nitric oxide and PGE 2 production, and also an increase of interleukin-10 and interleukin-12 by cells pre-treated with ASA. Altogether, these results reinforce the idea that the cyclooxygenase pathway plays a fundamental role in the process of parasite invasion in an in vitro model of T. cruzi infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Production of amastigotes from metacyclic trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor T Contreras

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Attempts to recreate all the developmental stages of Trypanosoma cruzi in vitro have thus far been met with partial success. It is possible, for instance, to produce trypomastigotes in tissue culture and to obtain metacyclic trypomastigotes in axenic conditions. Even though T. cruzi amastigotes are known to differentiate from trypomastigotes and metacyclic trypomastigotes, it has only been possible to generate amastigotes in vitro from the tissue-culture-derived trypomastigotes. The factors and culture conditions required to trigger the transformation of metacyclic trypomastigotes into amastigotes are as yet undetermined. We show here that pre-incubation of metacyclic trypomastigotes in culture (MEMTAU medium at 37°C for 48 h is sufficient to commit the parasites to the transformation process. After 72 h of incubation in fresh MEMTAU medium, 90% of the metacyclic parasites differentiate into forms that are morphologically indistinguishable from normal amastigotes. SDS-PAGE, Western blot and PAABS analyses indicate that the transformation of axenic metacyclic trypomastigotes to amastigotes is associated with protein, glycoprotein and antigenic modifications. These data suggest that (a T. cruzi amastigotes can be obtained axenically in large amounts from metacyclic trypomastigotes, and (b the amastigotes thus obtained are morphological, biological and antigenically similar to intracellular amastigotes. Consequently, this experimental system may facilitate a direct, in vitro assessment of the mechanisms that enable T. cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes to transform into amastigotes in the cells of mammalian hosts.

  8. Geographical Distribution of Trypanosoma cruzi Genotypes in Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Hernán J.; Segovia, Maikell; Llewellyn, Martin S.; Morocoima, Antonio; Urdaneta-Morales, Servio; Martínez, Cinda; Martínez, Clara E.; Garcia, Carlos; Rodríguez, Marlenes; Espinosa, Raul; de Noya, Belkisyolé A.; Díaz-Bello, Zoraida; Herrera, Leidi; Fitzpatrick, Sinead; Yeo, Matthew; Miles, Michael A.; Feliciangeli, M. Dora

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease is an endemic zoonosis native to the Americas and is caused by the kinetoplastid protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The parasite is also highly genetically diverse, with six discrete typing units (DTUs) reported TcI – TcVI. These DTUs broadly correlate with several epidemiogical, ecological and pathological features of Chagas disease. In this manuscript we report the most comprehensive evaluation to date of the genetic diversity of T. cruzi in Venezuela. The dataset includes 778 samples collected and genotyped over the last twelve years from multiple hosts and vectors, including nine wild and domestic mammalian host species, and seven species of triatomine bug, as well as from human sources. Most isolates (732) can be assigned to the TcI clade (94.1%); 24 to the TcIV group (3.1%) and 22 to TcIII (2.8%). Importantly, among the 95 isolates genotyped from human disease cases, 79% belonged to TcI - a DTU common in the Americas, however, 21% belonged to TcIV- a little known genotype previously thought to be rare in humans. Furthermore, were able to assign multiple oral Chagas diseases cases to TcI in the area around the capital, Caracas. We discuss our findings in the context of T. cruzi DTU distributions elsewhere in the Americas, and evaluate the impact they have on the future of Chagas disease control in Venezuela. PMID:22745843

  9. Polyclonal antibodies for the detection of Trypanosoma cruzi circulating antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith S Málaga-Machaca

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi antigens in clinical samples is considered an important diagnostic tool for Chagas disease. The production and use of polyclonal antibodies may contribute to an increase in the sensitivity of immunodiagnosis of Chagas disease.Polyclonal antibodies were raised in alpacas, rabbits, and hens immunized with trypomastigote excreted-secreted antigen, membrane proteins, trypomastigote lysate antigen and recombinant 1F8 to produce polyclonal antibodies. Western blot analysis was performed to determine specificity of the developed antibodies. An antigen capture ELISA of circulating antigens in serum, plasma and urine samples was developed using IgY polyclonal antibodies against T. cruzi membrane antigens (capture antibody and IgG from alpaca raised against TESA. A total of 33 serum, 23 plasma and 9 urine samples were analyzed using the developed test. Among serum samples, compared to serology, the antigen capture ELISA tested positive in 55% of samples. All plasma samples from serology positive subjects were positive in the antigen capture ELISA. All urine positive samples had corresponding plasma samples that were also positive when tested by the antigen capture ELISA.Polyclonal antibodies are useful for detection of circulating antigens in both the plasma and urine of infected individuals. Detection of antigens is direct evidence of the presence of the parasite, and could be a better surrogate of current infection status.

  10. A Primate APOL1 Variant That Kills Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneli Cooper

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Humans are protected against infection from most African trypanosomes by lipoprotein complexes present in serum that contain the trypanolytic pore-forming protein, Apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1. The human-infective trypanosomes, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in East Africa and T. b. gambiense in West Africa have separately evolved mechanisms that allow them to resist APOL1-mediated lysis and cause human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, in man. Recently, APOL1 variants were identified from a subset of Old World monkeys, that are able to lyse East African T. b. rhodesiense, by virtue of C-terminal polymorphisms in the APOL1 protein that hinder that parasite's resistance mechanism. Such variants have been proposed as candidates for developing therapeutic alternatives to the unsatisfactory anti-trypanosomal drugs currently in use. Here we demonstrate the in vitro lytic ability of serum and purified recombinant protein of an APOL1 ortholog from the West African Guinea baboon (Papio papio, which is able to lyse examples of all sub-species of T. brucei including T. b. gambiense group 1 parasites, the most common agent of human African trypanosomiasis. The identification of a variant of APOL1 with trypanolytic ability for both human-infective T. brucei sub-species could be a candidate for universal APOL1-based therapeutic strategies, targeted against all pathogenic African trypanosomes.

  11. A Primate APOL1 Variant That Kills Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Anneli; Capewell, Paul; Clucas, Caroline; Veitch, Nicola; Weir, William; Thomson, Russell; Raper, Jayne; MacLeod, Annette

    2016-08-01

    Humans are protected against infection from most African trypanosomes by lipoprotein complexes present in serum that contain the trypanolytic pore-forming protein, Apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1). The human-infective trypanosomes, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in East Africa and T. b. gambiense in West Africa have separately evolved mechanisms that allow them to resist APOL1-mediated lysis and cause human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, in man. Recently, APOL1 variants were identified from a subset of Old World monkeys, that are able to lyse East African T. b. rhodesiense, by virtue of C-terminal polymorphisms in the APOL1 protein that hinder that parasite's resistance mechanism. Such variants have been proposed as candidates for developing therapeutic alternatives to the unsatisfactory anti-trypanosomal drugs currently in use. Here we demonstrate the in vitro lytic ability of serum and purified recombinant protein of an APOL1 ortholog from the West African Guinea baboon (Papio papio), which is able to lyse examples of all sub-species of T. brucei including T. b. gambiense group 1 parasites, the most common agent of human African trypanosomiasis. The identification of a variant of APOL1 with trypanolytic ability for both human-infective T. brucei sub-species could be a candidate for universal APOL1-based therapeutic strategies, targeted against all pathogenic African trypanosomes.

  12. Interferon-gamma promotes infection of astrocytes by Trypanosoma cruzi.

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    Rafael Rodrigues Silva

    Full Text Available The inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma (IFNγ is crucial for immunity against intracellular pathogens such as the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (CD. IFNγ is a pleiotropic cytokine which regulates activation of immune and non-immune cells; however, the effect of IFNγ in the central nervous system (CNS and astrocytes during CD is unknown. Here we show that parasite persists in the CNS of C3H/He mice chronically infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain despite the increased expression of IFNγ mRNA. Furthermore, most of the T. cruzi-bearing cells were astrocytes located near IFNγ+ cells. Surprisingly, in vitro experiments revealed that pretreatment with IFNγ promoted the infection of astrocytes by T. cruzi increasing uptake and proliferation of intracellular forms, despite inducing increased production of nitric oxide (NO. Importantly, the effect of IFNγ on T. cruzi uptake and growth is completely blocked by the anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF antibody Infliximab and partially blocked by the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis L-NAME. These data support that IFNγ fuels astrocyte infection by T. cruzi and critically implicate IFNγ-stimulated T. cruzi-infected astrocytes as sources of TNF and NO, which may contribute to parasite persistence and CNS pathology in CD.

  13. Implication of Apoptosis for the Pathogenesis of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

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    Débora Decote-Ricardo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is induced during the course of immune response to different infectious agents, and the ultimate fate is the recognition and uptake of apoptotic bodies by neighboring cells or by professional phagocytes. Apoptotic cells expose specific ligands to a set of conserved receptors expressed on macrophage cellular surface, which are the main cells involved in the clearance of the dying cells. These scavenger receptors, besides triggering the production of anti-inflammatory factors, also block the production of inflammatory mediators by phagocytes. Experimental infection of mice with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi shows many pathological changes that parallels the evolution of human infection. Leukocytes undergoing intense apoptotic death are observed during the immune response to T. cruzi in the mouse model of the disease. T. cruzi replicate intensely and secrete molecules with immunomodulatory activities that interfere with T cell-mediated immune responses and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. This mechanism of immune evasion allows the infection to be established in the vertebrate host. Under inflammatory conditions, efferocytosis of apoptotic bodies generates an immune-regulatory phenotype in phagocytes, which is conducive to intracellular pathogen replication. However, the relevance of cellular apoptosis in the pathology of Chagas’ disease requires further studies. Here, we review the evidence of leukocyte apoptosis in T. cruzi infection and its immunomodulatory mechanism for disease progression.

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas' Disease in the United States

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    Bern, Caryn; Kjos, Sonia; Yabsley, Michael J.; Montgomery, Susan P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Chagas' disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and causes potentially life-threatening disease of the heart and gastrointestinal tract. The southern half of the United States contains enzootic cycles of T. cruzi, involving 11 recognized triatomine vector species. The greatest vector diversity and density occur in the western United States, where woodrats are the most common reservoir; other rodents, raccoons, skunks, and coyotes are also infected with T. cruzi. In the eastern United States, the prevalence of T. cruzi is highest in raccoons, opossums, armadillos, and skunks. A total of 7 autochthonous vector-borne human infections have been reported in Texas, California, Tennessee, and Louisiana; many others are thought to go unrecognized. Nevertheless, most T. cruzi-infected individuals in the United States are immigrants from areas of endemicity in Latin America. Seven transfusion-associated and 6 organ donor-derived T. cruzi infections have been documented in the United States and Canada. As improved control of vector- and blood-borne T. cruzi transmission decreases the burden in countries where the disease is historically endemic and imported Chagas' disease is increasingly recognized outside Latin America, the United States can play an important role in addressing the altered epidemiology of Chagas' disease in the 21st century. PMID:21976603

  15. Mast Cell Function and Death in Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

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    Meuser-Batista, Marcelo; Corrêa, José Raimundo; Carvalho, Vinícius Frias; de Carvalho Britto, Constança Felícia De Paoli; da Cruz Moreira, Otacilio; Batista, Marcos Meuser; Soares, Maurílio José; Filho, Francisco Alves Farias; e Silva, Patrícia Machado R.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Silva, Robson Coutinho; Henriques-Pons, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Although the roles of mast cells (MCs) are essential in many inflammatory and fibrotic diseases, their role in Trypanosoma cruzi–induced cardiomyopathy is unexplored. In this study, we treated infected CBA mice with cromolyn, an MC stabilizer, and observed much greater parasitemia and interferon-γ levels, higher mortality, myocarditis, and cardiac damage. Although these data show that MCs are important in controlling acute infection, we observed MC apoptosis in the cardiac tissue and peritoneal cavity of untreated mice. In the heart, pericardial mucosal MC die, perhaps because of reduced amounts of local stem cell factor. Using RT-PCR in purified cardiac MCs, we observed that infection induced transcription of P2X7 receptor and Fas, two molecules reportedly involved in cell death and inflammatory regulation. In gld/gld mice (FasL−/−), apoptosis of cardiac, but not peritoneal, MCs was decreased. Conversely, infection of P2X7−/− mice led to reduced peritoneal, but not cardiac, MC death. These data illustrate the immunomodulatory role played by MCs in T. cruzi infection and the complexity of molecular interactions that control inflammatory pathways in different tissues and compartments. PMID:21819958

  16. The Oral Antimalarial Drug Tafenoquine Shows Activity against Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Luis; Martínez-García, Marta; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Manzano, José Ignacio; Yardley, Vanessa; Gamarro, Francisco; Pérez-Victoria, José M

    2015-10-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, a neglected tropical disease that requires new, safer, and more effective treatments. Repurposing oral drugs could reduce both the time and cost involved in sleeping sickness drug discovery. Tafenoquine (TFQ) is an oral antimalarial drug belonging to the 8-aminoquinoline family which is currently in clinical phase III. We show here that TFQ efficiently kills different T. brucei spp. in the submicromolar concentration range. Our results suggest that TFQ accumulates into acidic compartments and induces a necrotic process involving cell membrane disintegration and loss of cytoplasmic content, leading to parasite death. Cell lysis is preceded by a wide and multitarget drug action, affecting the lysosome, mitochondria, and acidocalcisomes and inducing a depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, elevation of intracellular Ca(2+), and production of reactive oxygen species. This is the first report of an 8-aminoquinoline demonstrating significant in vitro activity against T. brucei. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Trypanosoma cruzi strain TcIV infects raccoons from Illinois

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    Cailey Vandermark

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The northern limits of Trypanosoma cruzi across the territory of the United States remain unknown. The known vectors Triatoma sanguisuga and T. lecticularia find their northernmost limits in Illinois; yet, earlier screenings of those insects did not reveal the presence of the pathogen, which has not been reported in vectors or reservoir hosts in this state. OBJECTIVES Five species of medium-sized mammals were screened for the presence of T. cruzi. METHODS Genomic DNA was isolated from heart, spleen and skeletal muscle of bobcats (Lynx rufus, n = 60, raccoons (Procyon lotor, n = 37, nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus, n = 5, Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana, n = 3, and a red fox (Vulpes vulpes. Infections were detected targeting DNA from the kinetoplast DNA minicircle (kDNA and satellite DNA (satDNA. The discrete typing unit (DTU was determined by amplifying two gene regions: the Spliced Leader Intergenic Region (SL, via a multiplex polymerase chain reaction, and the 24Sα ribosomal DNA via a heminested reaction. Resulting sequences were used to calculate their genetic distance against reference DTUs. FINDINGS 18.9% of raccoons were positive for strain TcIV; the rest of mammals tested negative. MAIN CONCLUSIONS These results confirm for the first time the presence of T. cruzi in wildlife from Illinois, suggesting that a sylvatic life cycle is likely to occur in the region. The analyses of sequences of SL suggest that amplicons resulting from a commonly used multiplex reaction may yield non-homologous fragments.

  18. Heterogeneous infectiousness in guinea pigs experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Borrini Mayorí, Katty; Salazar Sánchez, Renzo; Ancca Suarez, Jenny; Xie, Sherrie; Náquira Velarde, Cesar; Levy, Michael Z

    2016-02-01

    Guinea pigs are important reservoirs of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative parasite of Chagas disease, and in the Southern Cone of South America, transmission is mediated mainly by the vector Triatoma infestans. Interestingly, colonies of Triatoma infestans captured from guinea pig corrals sporadically have infection prevalence rates above 80%. Such high values are not consistent with the relatively short 7-8 week parasitemic period that has been reported for guinea pigs in the literature. We experimentally measured the infectious periods of a group of T. cruzi-infected guinea pigs by performing xenodiagnosis and direct microscopy each week for one year. Another group of infected guinea pigs received only direct microscopy to control for the effect that inoculation by triatomine saliva may have on parasitemia in the host. We observed infectious periods longer than those previously reported in a number of guinea pigs from both the xenodiagnosis and control groups. While some guinea pigs were infectious for a short time, other "super-shedders" were parasitemic up to 22 weeks after infection, and/or positive by xenodiagnosis for a year after infection. This heterogeneity in infectiousness has strong implications for T. cruzi transmission dynamics and control, as super-shedder guinea pigs may play a disproportionate role in pathogen spread. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Purification and Partial Characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi Triosephosphate Isomerase

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    Bourguignon SC

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme triosephosphate isomerase (TPI, EC 5.3.1.1 was purified from extracts of epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. The purification steps included: hydrophobic interaction chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose, CM-Sepharose, and high performance liquid gel filtration chromatography. The CM-Sepharose material contained two bands (27 and 25 kDa with similar isoelectric points (pI 9.3-9.5 which could be separated by gel filtration in high performance liquid chromatography. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the porcine TPI detected one single polypeptide on western blot with a molecular weight (27 kDa identical to that purified from T. cruzi. These antibodies also recognized only one band of identical molecular weight in western blots of several other trypanosomatids (Blastocrithidia culicis, Crithidia desouzai, Phytomonas serpens, Herpertomonas samuelpessoai. The presence of only one enzymatic form of TPI in T. cruzi epimastigotes was confirmed by agarose gel activity assay and its localization was established by immunocytochemical analysis. The T. cruzi purified TPI (as well as other trypanosomatid' TPIs is a dimeric protein, composed of two identical subunits with an approximate mw of 27,000 and it is resolved on two dimensional gel electrophoresis with a pI of 9.3. Sequence analysis of the N-terminal portion of the 27 kDa protein revealed a high homology to Leishmania mexicana and T. brucei proteins

  20. The genome of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berriman, Matthew; Ghedin, Elodie; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Blandin, Gaëlle; Renauld, Hubert; Bartholomeu, Daniella C; Lennard, Nicola J; Caler, Elisabet; Hamlin, Nancy E; Haas, Brian; Böhme, Ulrike; Hannick, Linda; Aslett, Martin A; Shallom, Joshua; Marcello, Lucio; Hou, Lihua; Wickstead, Bill; Alsmark, U Cecilia M; Arrowsmith, Claire; Atkin, Rebecca J; Barron, Andrew J; Bringaud, Frederic; Brooks, Karen; Carrington, Mark; Cherevach, Inna; Chillingworth, Tracey-Jane; Churcher, Carol; Clark, Louise N; Corton, Craig H; Cronin, Ann; Davies, Rob M; Doggett, Jonathon; Djikeng, Appolinaire; Feldblyum, Tamara; Field, Mark C; Fraser, Audrey; Goodhead, Ian; Hance, Zahra; Harper, David; Harris, Barbara R; Hauser, Heidi; Hostetler, Jessica; Ivens, Al; Jagels, Kay; Johnson, David; Johnson, Justin; Jones, Kristine; Kerhornou, Arnaud X; Koo, Hean; Larke, Natasha; Landfear, Scott; Larkin, Christopher; Leech, Vanessa; Line, Alexandra; Lord, Angela; Macleod, Annette; Mooney, Paul J; Moule, Sharon; Martin, David M A; Morgan, Gareth W; Mungall, Karen; Norbertczak, Halina; Ormond, Doug; Pai, Grace; Peacock, Chris S; Peterson, Jeremy; Quail, Michael A; Rabbinowitsch, Ester; Rajandream, Marie-Adele; Reitter, Chris; Salzberg, Steven L; Sanders, Mandy; Schobel, Seth; Sharp, Sarah; Simmonds, Mark; Simpson, Anjana J; Tallon, Luke; Turner, C Michael R; Tait, Andrew; Tivey, Adrian R; Van Aken, Susan; Walker, Danielle; Wanless, David; Wang, Shiliang; White, Brian; White, Owen; Whitehead, Sally; Woodward, John; Wortman, Jennifer; Adams, Mark D; Embley, T Martin; Gull, Keith; Ullu, Elisabetta; Barry, J David; Fairlamb, Alan H; Opperdoes, Fred; Barrell, Barclay G; Donelson, John E; Hall, Neil; Fraser, Claire M; Melville, Sara E; El-Sayed, Najib M

    2005-07-15

    African trypanosomes cause human sleeping sickness and livestock trypanosomiasis in sub-Saharan Africa. We present the sequence and analysis of the 11 megabase-sized chromosomes of Trypanosoma brucei. The 26-megabase genome contains 9068 predicted genes, including approximately 900 pseudogenes and approximately 1700 T. brucei-specific genes. Large subtelomeric arrays contain an archive of 806 variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes used by the parasite to evade the mammalian immune system. Most VSG genes are pseudogenes, which may be used to generate expressed mosaic genes by ectopic recombination. Comparisons of the cytoskeleton and endocytic trafficking systems with those of humans and other eukaryotic organisms reveal major differences. A comparison of metabolic pathways encoded by the genomes of T. brucei, T. cruzi, and Leishmania major reveals the least overall metabolic capability in T. brucei and the greatest in L. major. Horizontal transfer of genes of bacterial origin has contributed to some of the metabolic differences in these parasites, and a number of novel potential drug targets have been identified.

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi gene expression in response to gamma radiation.

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    Priscila Grynberg

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is an organism highly resistant to ionizing radiation. Following a dose of 500 Gy of gamma radiation, the fragmented genomic DNA is gradually reconstructed and the pattern of chromosomal bands is restored in less than 48 hours. Cell growth arrests after irradiation but, while DNA is completely fragmented, RNA maintains its integrity. In this work we compared the transcriptional profiles of irradiated and non-irradiated epimastigotes at different time points after irradiation using microarray. In total, 273 genes were differentially expressed; from these, 160 were up-regulated and 113 down-regulated. We found that genes with predicted functions are the most prevalent in the down-regulated gene category. Translation and protein metabolic processes, as well as generation of precursor of metabolites and energy pathways were affected. In contrast, the up-regulated category was mainly composed of obsolete sequences (which included some genes of the kinetoplast DNA, genes coding for hypothetical proteins, and Retrotransposon Hot Spot genes. Finally, the tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1, a gene involved in double-strand DNA break repair process, was up-regulated. Our study demonstrated the peculiar response to ionizing radiation, raising questions about how this organism changes its gene expression to manage such a harmful stress.

  2. mRNA localization mechanisms in Trypanosoma cruzi.

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    Lysangela R Alves

    Full Text Available Asymmetric mRNA localization is a sophisticated tool for regulating and optimizing protein synthesis and maintaining cell polarity. Molecular mechanisms involved in the regulated localization of transcripts are widespread in higher eukaryotes and fungi, but not in protozoa. Trypanosomes are ancient eukaryotes that branched off early in eukaryote evolution. We hypothesized that these organisms would have basic mechanisms of mRNA localization. FISH assays with probes against transcripts coding for proteins with restricted distributions showed a discrete localization of the mRNAs in the cytoplasm. Moreover, cruzipain mRNA was found inside reservosomes suggesting new unexpected functions for this vacuolar organelle. Individual mRNAs were also mobilized to RNA granules in response to nutritional stress. The cytoplasmic distribution of these transcripts changed with cell differentiation, suggesting that localization mechanisms might be involved in the regulation of stage-specific protein expression. Transfection assays with reporter genes showed that, as in higher eukaryotes, 3'UTRs were responsible for guiding mRNAs to their final location. Our results strongly suggest that Trypanosoma cruzi have a core, basic mechanism of mRNA localization. This kind of controlled mRNA transport is ancient, dating back to early eukaryote evolution.

  3. Evidence for viable and stable triploid Trypanosoma congolense parasites.

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    Tihon, Eliane; Imamura, Hideo; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Van Den Abbeele, Jan

    2017-10-10

    Recent whole genome sequencing (WGS) analysis identified a viable triploid strain of Trypanosoma congolense. This triploid strain BANANCL2 was a clone of the field isolate BANAN/83/CRTRA/64 that was collected from cattle in Burkina Faso in 1983. We demonstrated the viability and stability of triploidy throughout the complete life-cycle of the parasite by infecting tsetse flies with the triploid clone BANANCL2. Proboscis-positive tsetse flies efficiently transmitted the parasites to mice resulting in systemic infections. WGS of the parasites was performed at all life-cycle stages, and a method based on a block alternative allele frequency spectrum was developed to efficiently detect the ploidy profiles of samples with low read depth. This approach confirmed the triploid profile of parasites throughout their life-cycle in the tsetse fly and the mammalian host, demonstrating that triploidy is present at all stages and is stable over time. The presence of viable field-isolated triploid parasites indicates another possible layer of genetic diversity in natural T. congolense populations. The comparison between triploid and diploid parasites provides a unique model system to study the impact of chromosome copy number variations in African trypanosomes. In addition, the consequences of triploidy can be further investigated using this stable triploid model.

  4. Crystal Structure of Triosephosphate Isomerase from Trypanosoma cruzi in Hexane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiu-Gong; Maldonado, Ernesto; Perez-Montfort, Ruy; Garza-Ramos, Georgina; Tuena de Gomez-Puyou, Marietta; Gomez-Puyou, Armando; Rodriguez-Romero, Adela

    1999-08-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms of enzyme catalysis in organic solvents, the x-ray structure of some monomeric enzymes in organic solvents was determined. However, it remained to be explored whether the structure of oligomeric proteins is also amenable to such analysis. The field acquired new perspectives when it was proposed that the x-ray structure of enzymes in nonaqueous media could reveal binding sites for organic solvents that in principle could represent the starting point for drug design. Here, a crystal of the dimeric enzyme triosephosphate isomerase from the pathogenic parasite Trypanosoma cruzi was soaked and diffracted in hexane and its structure solved at 2- angstrom resolution. Its overall structure and the dimer interface were not altered by hexane. However, there were differences in the orientation of the side chains of several amino acids, including that of the catalytic Glu-168 in one of the monomers. No hexane molecules were detected in the active site or in the dimer interface. However, three hexane molecules were identified on the surface of the protein at sites, which in the native crystal did not have water molecules. The number of water molecules in the hexane structure was higher than in the native crystal. Two hexanes localized at <4 angstrom from residues that form the dimer interface; they were in close proximity to a site that has been considered a potential target for drug design.

  5. Imidazolium compounds are active against all stages of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faral-Tello, Paula; Liang, Mary; Mahler, Graciela; Wipf, Peter; Robello, Carlos

    2014-03-01

    Imidazolium salts are best known for their applications in organic synthesis as room-temperature ionic liquids, or as precursors of stable carbenes, but they also show important biological properties such as anti-oxidative effects, induction of mitochondrial membrane permeabilisation and inhibition of the infection cycle of Plasmodium falciparum. For these reasons, and since chemotherapy for Chagas disease is inefficient, the aim of this study was to test the use of imidazolium compounds against the kinetoplastid haemoflagellate aetiological agent for this disease, namely Trypanosoma cruzi. The results show that five of the tested compounds are more effective than the reference drug benznidazole against the epimastigote and trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi. Moreover, intracellular amastigotes were also affected by the compounds, which showed lower toxicity in host cells. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that the tested agents induced alterations of the kinetoplast and particularly of the mitochondria, leading to extraordinary swelling of the organelle. These results further demonstrate that the test agents with the best profile are those bearing symmetrical bulky substituents at N(1) and N(3), displaying promising activity against all forms of T. cruzi, interesting selectivity indexes and exceptional activity at low doses. Accordingly, these agents represent promising candidates for the treatment of Chagas disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  6. Synthesis and anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of diaryldiazepines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Júlio César L; Vaz, Luana Beatriz A; de Abreu Vieira, Paula Melo; da Silva Fonseca, Kátia; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Taylor, Jason G

    2014-12-23

    Chagas disease is a so-called "neglected disease" and endemic to Latin America. Nifurtimox and benznidazole are drugs that have considerable efficacy in the treatment of the acute phase of the disease but cause many significant side effects. Furthermore, in the Chronic Phase its efficiency is reduced and their therapeutic effectiveness is dependent on the type of T. cruzi strain. For this reason, the present work aims to drive basic research towards the discovery of new chemical entities to treat Chagas disease. Differently substituted 5,7-diaryl-2,3-dihydro-1,4-diazepines were synthesized by cyclocondensation of substituted flavones with ethylenediamine and tested as anti-Trypanosoma cruzi candidates. Epimastigotes of the Y strain from T. cruzi were used in this study and the number of parasites was determined in a Neubauer chamber. The most potent diaryldiazepine that reduced epimastigote proliferation exhibited an IC50 value of 0.25 μM, which is significantly more active than benznidazole.

  7. Synthesis and Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Activity of Diaryldiazepines

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    Júlio César L. Menezes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is a so-called “neglected disease” and endemic to Latin America. Nifurtimox and benznidazole are drugs that have considerable efficacy in the treatment of the acute phase of the disease but cause many significant side effects. Furthermore, in the Chronic Phase its efficiency is reduced and their therapeutic effectiveness is dependent on the type of T. cruzi strain. For this reason, the present work aims to drive basic research towards the discovery of new chemical entities to treat Chagas disease. Differently substituted 5,7-diaryl-2,3-dihydro-1,4-diazepines were synthesized by cyclocondensation of substituted flavones with ethylenediamine and tested as anti-Trypanosoma cruzi candidates. Epimastigotes of the Y strain from T. cruzi were used in this study and the number of parasites was determined in a Neubauer chamber. The most potent diaryldiazepine that reduced epimastigote proliferation exhibited an IC50 value of 0.25 μM, which is significantly more active than benznidazole.

  8. Diterpenoids from Azorella compacta (Umbelliferae active on Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Araya Jorge E

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of natural products isolated from Azorella compacta was evaluated, with particular emphasis on their effect against intracellular amastigotes. Five diterpenoids from A. compacta derived from mulinane and azorellane were isolated and identified. Only two products, named azorellanol (Y-2 and mulin-11,3-dien-20-oic acid (Y-5, showed trypanocidal activity against all stages of T. cruzi including intracellular amastigotes. At 10 µM, these compounds displayed a strong lytic activity. It ranged from 88.4 ± 0.6 to 99.0 ± 1 % for all strains and stages evaluate, with an IC50 /18 h values of 20-84 µM and 41-87 µM, respectively. The development of intracellular amastigotes was also inhibited by nearly 60% at 25 µM. The trypanocidal molecules Y-2 and Y-5 did show different degrees of cytotoxicity depending on the cell line tested, with an IC50 /24 h ranging from 33.2 to 161.2 µM. We evaluated the effect of diterpenoids against intracellular T. cruzi forms by immunofluorescent identification of a specific membrane molecular marker (Ssp-4 antigen of the T. cruzi amastigote forms. The accuracy and reproducibility of the measurements were found to be outstanding when examined by confocal microscopy.

  9. Exosome secretion affects social motility in Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Dror Eliaz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EV secreted by pathogens function in a variety of biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, exosome secretion is induced by stress that affects trans-splicing. Following perturbations in biogenesis of spliced leader RNA, which donates its spliced leader (SL exon to all mRNAs, or after heat-shock, the SL RNA is exported to the cytoplasm and forms distinct granules, which are then secreted by exosomes. The exosomes are formed in multivesicular bodies (MVB utilizing the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT, through a mechanism similar to microRNA secretion in mammalian cells. Silencing of the ESCRT factor, Vps36, compromised exosome secretion but not the secretion of vesicles derived from nanotubes. The exosomes enter recipient trypanosome cells. Time-lapse microscopy demonstrated that cells secreting exosomes or purified intact exosomes affect social motility (SoMo. This study demonstrates that exosomes are delivered to trypanosome cells and can change their migration. Exosomes are used to transmit stress signals for communication between parasites.

  10. Circulating levels of cyclooxygenase metabolites in experimental Trypanosoma cruzi infections

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    Rita L. Cardoni

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available TRYPANOSOMA cruzi induces inflammatory reactions in several tissues. The production of prostaglandin F2α, 6-keto-prostaglandin F1α and thromboxane B2, known to regulate the immune response and to participate in inflammatory reactions, was studied in mice experimentally infected with T. cruzi. The generation of nitric oxide (NO, which could be regulated by cyclooxygenase metabolites, was also evaluated. In the acute infection the extension of inflammatory infiltrates in skeletal muscle as well as the circulating levels of cyclooxygenase metabolites and NO were higher in resistant C3H mice than in susceptible BALB/c mice. In addition, the spontaneous release of NO by spleen cells increased earlier in the C3H mouse strain. In the chronic infections, the tissue inflammatory reaction was still prominent in both groups of mice, but a moderate increase of thromboxane B2 concentration and in NO released by spleen cells was observed only in C3H mice. This comparative study shows that these mediators could be mainly related to protective mechanisms in the acute phase, but seem not to be involved in its maintenance in the chronic T. cruzi infections.

  11. Early Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Reprograms Human Epithelial Cells

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    María Laura Chiribao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, has the peculiarity, when compared with other intracellular parasites, that it is able to invade almost any type of cell. This property makes Chagas a complex parasitic disease in terms of prophylaxis and therapeutics. The identification of key host cellular factors that play a role in the T. cruzi invasion is important for the understanding of disease pathogenesis. In Chagas disease, most of the focus is on the response of macrophages and cardiomyocytes, since they are responsible for host defenses and cardiac lesions, respectively. In the present work, we studied the early response to infection of T. cruzi in human epithelial cells, which constitute the first barrier for establishment of infection. These studies identified up to 1700 significantly altered genes regulated by the immediate infection. The global analysis indicates that cells are literally reprogrammed by T. cruzi, which affects cellular stress responses (neutrophil chemotaxis, DNA damage response, a great number of transcription factors (including the majority of NFκB family members, and host metabolism (cholesterol, fatty acids, and phospholipids. These results raise the possibility that early host cell reprogramming is exploited by the parasite to establish the initial infection and posterior systemic dissemination.

  12. Crystal structure of arginine methyltransferase 6 from Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Chongyuan Wang

    Full Text Available Arginine methylation plays vital roles in the cellular functions of the protozoan Trypanosoma brucei. The T. brucei arginine methyltransferase 6 (TbPRMT6 is a type I arginine methyltransferase homologous to human PRMT6. In this study, we report the crystal structures of apo-TbPRMT6 and its complex with the reaction product S-adenosyl-homocysteine (SAH. The structure of apo-TbPRMT6 displays several features that are different from those of type I PRMTs that were structurally characterized previously, including four stretches of insertion, the absence of strand β15, and a distinct dimerization arm. The comparison of the apo-TbPRMT6 and SAH-TbPRMT6 structures revealed the fine rearrangements in the active site upon SAH binding. The isothermal titration calorimetry results demonstrated that SAH binding greatly increases the affinity of TbPRMT6 to a substrate peptide derived from bovine histone H4. The western blotting and mass spectrometry results revealed that TbPRMT6 methylates bovine histone H4 tail at arginine 3 but cannot methylate several T. brucei histone tails. In summary, our results highlight the structural differences between TbPRMT6 and other type I PRMTs and reveal that the active site rearrangement upon SAH binding is important for the substrate binding of TbPRMT6.

  13. Role of dystrophin in acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvestio, Lygia M; Celes, Mara R N; Milanezi, Cristiane; Silva, João S; Jelicks, Linda A; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Rossi, Marcos A; Prado, Cibele M

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated loss/reduction of dystrophin in cardiomyocytes in both acute and chronic stages of experimental Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) infection in mice. The mechanisms responsible for dystrophin disruption in the hearts of mice acutely infected with T. cruzi are not completely understood. The present in vivo and in vitro studies were undertaken to evaluate the role of inflammation in dystrophin disruption and its correlation with the high mortality rate during acute infection. C57BL/6 mice were infected with T. cruzi and killed 14, 20 and 26 days post infection (dpi). The intensity of inflammation, cardiac expression of dystrophin, calpain-1, NF-κB, TNF-α, and sarcolemmal permeability were evaluated. Cultured neonatal murine cardiomyocytes were incubated with serum, collected at the peak of cytokine production and free of parasites, from T. cruzi-infected mice and dystrophin, calpain-1, and NF-κB expression analyzed. Dystrophin disruption occurs at the peak of mortality and inflammation and is associated with increased expression of calpain-1, TNF-α, NF-κB, and increased sarcolemmal permeability in the heart of T. cruzi-infected mice at 20 dpi confirmed by in vitro studies. The peak of mortality occurred only when significant loss of dystrophin in the hearts of infected animals occurred, highlighting the correlation between inflammation, dystrophin loss and mortality. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Perspectives on Trypanosoma cruzi-induced heart disease (Chagas disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanowitz, Herbert B; Machado, Fabiana S; Jelicks, Linda A; Shirani, Jamshid; de Carvalho, Antonio C Campos; Spray, David C; Factor, Stephen M; Kirchhoff, Louis V; Weiss, Louis M

    2009-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. It is a common cause of heart disease in endemic areas of Latin America. The year 2009 marks the 100th anniversary of the discovery of T cruzi infection and Chagas disease by the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas. Chagasic cardiomyopathy develops in from 10% to 30% of persons who are chronically infected with this parasite. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are important modalities in the evaluation and prognostication of individuals with chagasic heart disease. The etiology of chagasic heart disease likely is multifactorial. Parasite persistence, autoimmunity, and microvascular abnormalities have been studied extensively as possible pathogenic mechanisms. Experimental studies suggest that alterations in cardiac gap junctions may be etiologic in the pathogenesis of conduction abnormalities. The diagnosis of chronic Chagas disease is made by serology. The treatment of this infection has shortcomings that need to be addressed. Cardiac transplantation and bone marrow stem cell therapy for persons with Chagas disease have received increasing research attention in recent years.

  15. The morphology of ovine Trypanosoma melophagium (zoomastigophorea: kinetoplastida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büscher, G; Friedhoff, K T

    1984-02-01

    Morphologic and biometric data on bloodstream stages of Trypanosoma melophagium are presented. An increasing parasitemia with 111 trypomastigote stages of T. melophagium were found in Giemsa-stained thin blood smears taken from a splenectomized, cortisone-treated sheep recently infested with Melophagus ovinus infected with T. melophagium . The arithmetic mean and standard deviation in micron of the distances between posterior end and kinetoplast were 14.7 and 2.9, from the kinetoplastic to the center of the nucleus 5.1 and 1.1, and from there to the anterior end 19.5 and 1.9. The free flagellum measured 6.0 microns +/- 1.6 microns. The median and the range of the central 70% of values (median +/- 35%) of the nuclear index were 1.1 and 0.9-1.2 and of the kinetoplastic index 3.8 and 3.3-4.9. The same data in microns for the maximal width were 3.1 and 2.1-4.6, and for the width at the level of the nucleus 2.9 and 2.2-4.6. The larger and smaller diameters of the nucleus measured 2.6 (2.2-3.7) micron and 1.7 (1.3-1.7) micron, respectively. The corresponding kinetoplast diameters were 1.1 (0.9-1.3) microns and 0.9 (0.6-0.9) micron, respectively.

  16. The sequence and analysis of Trypanosoma brucei chromosome II

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Najib M. A.; Ghedin, Elodie; Song, Jinming; MacLeod, Annette; Bringaud, Frederic; Larkin, Christopher; Wanless, David; Peterson, Jeremy; Hou, Lihua; Taylor, Sonya; Tweedie, Alison; Biteau, Nicolas; Khalak, Hanif G.; Lin, Xiaoying; Mason, Tanya; Hannick, Linda; Caler, Elisabet; Blandin, Gaëlle; Bartholomeu, Daniella; Simpson, Anjana J.; Kaul, Samir; Zhao, Hong; Pai, Grace; Aken, Susan Van; Utterback, Teresa; Haas, Brian; Koo, Hean L.; Umayam, Lowell; Suh, Bernard; Gerrard, Caroline; Leech, Vanessa; Qi, Rong; Zhou, Shiguo; Schwartz, David; Feldblyum, Tamara; Salzberg, Steven; Tait, Andrew; Turner, C. Michael R.; Ullu, Elisabetta; White, Owen; Melville, Sara; Adams, Mark D.; Fraser, Claire M.; Donelson, John E.

    2003-01-01

    We report here the sequence of chromosome II from Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. The 1.2-Mb pairs encode about 470 predicted genes organised in 17 directional clusters on either strand, the largest cluster of which has 92 genes lined up over a 284-kb region. An analysis of the GC skew reveals strand compositional asymmetries that coincide with the distribution of protein-coding genes, suggesting these asymmetries may be the result of transcription-coupled repair on coding versus non-coding strand. A 5-cM genetic map of the chromosome reveals recombinational ‘hot’ and ‘cold’ regions, the latter of which is predicted to include the putative centromere. One end of the chromosome consists of a 250-kb region almost exclusively composed of RHS (pseudo)genes that belong to a newly characterised multigene family containing a hot spot of insertion for retroelements. Interspersed with the RHS genes are a few copies of truncated RNA polymerase pseudogenes as well as expression site associated (pseudo)genes (ESAGs) 3 and 4, and 76 bp repeats. These features are reminiscent of a vestigial variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene expression site. The other end of the chromosome contains a 30-kb array of VSG genes, the majority of which are pseudogenes, suggesting that this region may be a site for modular de novo construction of VSG gene diversity during transposition/gene conversion events. PMID:12907728

  17. The radiographic appearance of pulmonary histoplasmosis in the cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.M.; Green, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    A retrospective study of 18 cats with pulmonary histoplasmosis was conducted to evaluate radiographic patterns of disease and to determine age, breed, and sex distributions. All cats had active disease confirmed by biopsy/aspiration cytology (lung, bone marrow, peripheral lymph nodes, pleural fluid) or necropsy examination. Cats 3 years of age or less had the highest incidence of disease; females outnumbered males 2 to 1. Radiographically, most cats had an interstitial pattern which appeared as a fine, diffuse or linear pattern, or as a more distinct nodular pattern. An alveolar pattern was an uncommon radiographic finding. Tracheobronchial lymphadenopathy and calcified lymph nodes or pulmonary parenchymal lesions were not identified in these cats

  18. The behaviour and ecology of domestic cats (Felis catus L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Panaman, Roger

    1984-01-01

    This thesis is a reconnaissance of the behavioural ecology of domestic cats. The principal subjects were two groups of farm cats. There was also a group of captive cats and a house cat. The study differs from all previous ones in that the cats were tame and therefore could be shadowed and observed for long periods at all hours. It deals with (1) activity patterns and activity budget, (2) use of space and social behaviour, (3) scent communication, (4) foraging and (5) population dynamics.

  19. Sensitivity of fecal occult blood testing in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudinsky, Adam J; Guillaumin, Julien; Gilor, Chen

    2017-06-01

    Objectives The impact of dietary factors on fecal occult blood (FOB) testing has been previously evaluated in cats, but the analytical sensitivity of this point-of-care test remains unexamined. The primary goal of this study was to assess the analytical sensitivity of the FOB test in cats. Methods Five cats were used in a repeated measures study. Following oral administration of blood, feces were collected and tested every 12 h for FOB and melena. All cats were fed an animal protein-free diet starting the week before entry into the study. Blood was administered on a milligram of hemoglobin per kilogram of body weight basis, and dosed at 1.5, 3, 15, 30 and 45 mg/kg hemoglobin in series with a wash-out period between each trial. Results FOB was detected in one cat at 1.5 mg/kg hemoglobin, three cats at 3 mg/kg hemoglobin and in all five cats at 15, 30 and 45 mg/kg hemoglobin. Melena was noted in one cat at 30 mg/kg and four cats at 45 mg/kg, but not at lower doses. Conclusions and relevance Administration of 15 mg/kg hemoglobin (equivalent to about 1.5 ml blood) was sufficient for positive results in all cats. However, detection occurred with as little as 1.5 mg/kg hemoglobin. Thus, FOB has good analytical sensitivity in cats under appropriate clinical situations.

  20. Comparative serological investigation between cat and tiger blood for transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thengchaisri, Naris; Sinthusingha, Chayakrit; Arthitwong, Surapong; Sattasathuchana, Panpicha

    2017-06-29

    Evidence suggests that non-domesticated felids inherited the same AB-erythrocyte antigens as domestic cats. To study the possible compatibility of tiger blood with that of other endangered felidae, blood samples from captive tigers and domestic cats were subjected to an in vitro study. The objectives of this study were to (1) identify whether the captive tigers had blood type AB and (2) determine the compatibility between the blood of captive tigers and that of domestic cats with a similar blood type. The anti-coagulated blood with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid of 30 tigers was examined to determine blood type, and a crossmatching test was performed between tiger and cat blood. All 30 tigers had blood type A. Tube agglutination tests using tiger plasma with cat erythrocytes resulted in 100% agglutination (n=30) with type B cat erythrocytes and 76.7% agglutination (n=23) with type A cat erythrocytes. The 80% of major and 60% of minor compatibilities between blood from 10 tigers and 10 domestic cats with blood type A were found to pass compatibility tests. Interestingly, 3/10 of the tigers' red blood cell samples were fully compatible with all cat plasmas, and 1/10 of the tiger plasma samples were fully compatible with the type A red cells of domestic cats. Although the result of present findings revealed type-A blood group in the surveyed tigers, the reaction of tiger plasma with Type-A red cell from cats suggested a possibility of other blood type in tigers.

  1. Hepatic abscesses in cats: 14 cases (1985-2002).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeeff, Jennifer S; Armstrong, P Jane; Bunch, Susan E

    2004-01-01

    In this retrospective study, we describe 14 cats diagnosed with hepatic abscesses. The objective of the study was to report the clinical signs, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic findings, and outcomes in affected cats. These findings were then compared with those previously reported in dogs and humans. Clinical signs were vague and included anorexia, lethargy, and weight loss. Only 23% of cats had fever, whereas 31% were hypothermic. Increases in serum activities of alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase were found in 45 and 18%, respectively, of the 11 cats that had laboratory work performed. Abdominal ultrasound examinations were performed in 7 cats, and abnormalities were found in 71% of them. Four cats had solitary abscesses, all of which were located in the right liver lobes. The other 10 cats had multifocal small abscesses or microabscesses, and all of these cats had clinical signs suggestive of sepsis. Cytologic evaluation of samples obtained by abdominocentesis indicated septic inflammation in 67% of cats in which peritoneal fluid was analyzed. Hepatic abscess cultures yielded polymicrobial growth in 66% of the cats: Escherichia coli was the most commonly cultured organism. Overall mortality rate was 79%. All survivors underwent exploratory laparotomy for partial hepatectomy to resect the abscess followed by medical management. Hepatic abscesses should be considered in cats with signs consistent with sepsis. More routine use of ultrasonography may aid in earlier diagnosis of hepatic abscesses, potentially improving prognosis and outcome.

  2. Vitamin D status in cats with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titmarsh, Helen F; Lalor, Stephanie M; Tasker, Severine; Barker, Emily N; Berry, Jacqueline; Gunn-More, Danielle; Mellanby, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus that can lead to a syndrome of acquired immune dysfunction. Infected cats often remain asymptomatic for several years before immune dysfunction leads to an increased risk for the development of systemic diseases, neoplasia and opportunistic infections. FIV is structurally related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the pathogenesis of FIV-related disease is similar to that seen in HIV-infected patients. Observational studies have documented an association between low plasma vitamin D and HIV infection. Vitamin D status has been shown to be associated with HIV-related disease progression, morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to examine the hypothesis that vitamin D status, as assessed by serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations, are lower in cats with FIV infection compared to healthy control cats. Serum 25(OH)D concentrations were measured in 20 healthy cats, 39 hospitalized ill cats and 59 cats infected with FIV. Cats which were FIV infected had significantly lower 25(OH)D concentrations compared to healthy control cats. Serum 25(OH)D concentrations were not significantly different between FIV-infected cats and hospitalized ill cats. Further investigations are warranted to determine whether vitamin D status influences the prognosis of cats infected with FIV.

  3. Opinions from the front lines of cat colony management conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, M Nils; Hartis, Brett; Rodriguez, Shari; Green, Matthew; Lepczyk, Christopher A

    2012-01-01

    Outdoor cats represent a global threat to terrestrial vertebrate conservation, but management has been rife with conflict due to differences in views of the problem and appropriate responses to it. To evaluate these differences we conducted a survey of opinions about outdoor cats and their management with two contrasting stakeholder groups, cat colony caretakers (CCCs) and bird conservation professionals (BCPs) across the United States. Group opinions were polarized, for both normative statements (CCCs supported treating feral cats as protected wildlife and using trap neuter and release [TNR] and BCPs supported treating feral cats as pests and using euthanasia) and empirical statements. Opinions also were related to gender, age, and education, with females and older respondents being less likely than their counterparts to support treating feral cats as pests, and females being less likely than males to support euthanasia. Most CCCs held false beliefs about the impacts of feral cats on wildlife and the impacts of TNR (e.g., 9% believed feral cats harmed bird populations, 70% believed TNR eliminates cat colonies, and 18% disagreed with the statement that feral cats filled the role of native predators). Only 6% of CCCs believed feral cats carried diseases. To the extent the beliefs held by CCCs are rooted in lack of knowledge and mistrust, rather than denial of directly observable phenomenon, the conservation community can manage these conflicts more productively by bringing CCCs into the process of defining data collection methods, defining study/management locations, and identifying common goals related to caring for animals.

  4. Hypoglycemia associated with refeeding syndrome in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAvilla, Marisa D; Leech, Elizabeth B

    2016-11-01

    To describe the clinical presentation and biochemical abnormalities occurring during the successful treatment of refeeding syndrome in a cat. A 2-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat presented after having been missing for 12 weeks. The cat had clinical signs of severe starvation. Common complications developed during refeeding (eg, hypophosphatemia, hypokalemia, and hemolytic anemia). The cat also developed hypoglycemia, a complication common in people but not previously reported in a cat. Hypoglycemia and electrolyte deficiencies were managed with intravenous supplementation. The cat was successfully treated and was discharged alive 7 days after presentation. Hypoglycemia has not been reported previously as a complication of refeeding in a cat. Frequent monitoring of electrolyte, mineral, and blood glucose concentrations is essential to successful management of refeeding syndrome. The ideal refeeding strategy is unknown at this time. Evidence suggests that a diet low in carbohydrate decreases the likelihood of metabolic derangements commonly associated with refeeding. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2016.

  5. Occupancy of the Invasive Feral Cat Varies with Habitat Complexity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary Hohnen

    Full Text Available The domestic cat (Felis catus is an invasive exotic in many locations around the world and is thought to be a key factor driving recent mammal declines across northern Australia. Many mammal species native to this region now persist only in areas with high topographic complexity, provided by features such as gorges or escarpments. Do mammals persist in these habitats because cats occupy them less, or despite high cat occupancy? We show that occupancy of feral cats was lower in mammal-rich habitats of high topographic complexity. These results support the idea that predation pressure by feral cats is a factor contributing to the collapse of mammal communities across northern Australia. Managing impacts of feral cats is a global conservation challenge. Conservation actions such as choosing sites for small mammal reintroductions may be more successful if variation in cat occupancy with landscape features is taken into account.

  6. MRI of secondary cervical syringomyelia in four cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Midori; Itou, Takuya; Sakai, Takeo; Kitagawa, Masato; Ito, Daisuke; Kanayama, Kiichi

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to diagnose cervical syringomyelia in 4 cats. MRI revealed enlargement of the lateral ventricle in all the cats. Of the 4 cases, MRI revealed herniation of the cerebellum in 3 cats, an isolated fourth ventricle in 1 cat, severe hydrocephalus in 2 cats and brain masses in 1 cat. In this report, the cervical syringomyelia in these cats may have been due to formation of a secondary syrinx (enlargement of the central canal) as a result of blockage of flow in the outlet of the fourth ventricle caused by feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) encephalomyelitis or secondary cerebellar tonsillar herniation caused by increased intracranial pressure due to intracranial masses or may have been due to caudal compression of the cerebellum caused by increased intracranial pressure due to hydrocephalus. (author)

  7. Thyroid Cysts in Cats: A Retrospective Study of 40 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M L; Peterson, M E; Randolph, J F; Broome, M R; Norsworthy, G D; Rishniw, M

    2017-05-01

    Thyroid cysts are rare in cats and poorly documented. To report distinguishing clinical features and treatment responses of cats with thyroid cysts. Forty client-owned cats. Retrospective review of medical records for cats with thyroid cysts confirmed by scintigraphy, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, or necropsy at 4 referral centers between 2005 and 2016. Signalment, clinical findings, diagnostic testing, treatment, and outcome were recorded. Cats ranged in age from 8 to 20 years with no apparent breed or sex predilection. 37 of 40 (93%) cats were hyperthyroid (duration, 1-96 months). Clinical findings included palpable neck mass (40/40, 100%), weight loss (15/40, 38%), dysphagia (8/40, 20%), decreased appetite (5/40, 13%), and dyspnea (4/40, 10%). Cysts were classified as small (≤8 cm 3 ) in 16 (40%) and large (>8 cm 3 ) in 24 (60%) cats. Of 25 cats treated with radioiodine, hyperthyroidism resolved in 23 (92%), whereas thyroid cysts resolved in 12 (50%). Radioiodine treatment resolved small cysts in 8 of 13 (62%) cats and large cysts in 4 of 11 (36%) cats. Eight cats, including 2 euthyroid cats, underwent thyroid-cystectomy; 3 with bilateral thyroid involvement were euthanized postoperatively for hypocalcemia. Excised cystic thyroid masses were identified as cystadenoma (4) and carcinoma (4). Thyroid cysts are encountered in hyperthyroid and euthyroid cats with benign and malignant thyroid tumors. Radioiodine treatment alone inconsistently resolved thyroid cysts. Thyroid-cystectomy could be considered in cats with unilateral thyroid disease or when symptomatic cysts persist despite successful radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  8. Intensive intravenous infusion of insulin in diabetic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, M; Dietiker-Moretti, S; Kaufmann, K; Mueller, C; Lutz, T A; Reusch, C E; Zini, E

    2014-01-01

    Remission occurs in 10-50% of cats with diabetes mellitus (DM). It is assumed that intensive treatment improves β-cell function and increases remission rates. Initial intravenous infusion of insulin that achieves tight glycemic control decreases subsequent insulin requirements and increases remission rate in diabetic cats. Thirty cats with newly diagnosed DM. Prospective study. Cats were randomly assigned to one of 2 groups. Cats in group 1 (n = 15) received intravenous infusion of insulin with the goal of maintaining blood glucose concentrations at 90-180 mg/dL, for 6 days. Cats in group 2 (n = 15) received subcutaneous injections of insulin glargine (cats ≤4 kg: 0.5-1.0 IU, q12h; >4 kg 1.5-2.0 IU, q12h), for 6 days. Thereafter, all cats were treated with subcutaneous injections of insulin glargine and followed up for 6 months. Cats were considered in remission when euglycemia occurred for ≥4 weeks without the administration of insulin. Nonparametric tests were used for statistical analysis. In groups 1 and 2, remission was achieved in 10/15 and in 7/14 cats (P = .46), and good metabolic control was achieved in 3/5 and in 1/7 cats (P = .22), respectively. Overall, good metabolic control or remission occurred in 13/15 cats of group 1 and in 8/14 cats of group 2. In group 1, the median insulin dosage given during the 6-month follow-up was significantly lower than in group 2 (group 1: 0.32 IU/kg/day, group 2: 0.51 IU/kg/day; P = .013). Initial intravenous infusion of insulin for tight glycemic control in cats with DM decreases insulin requirements during the subsequent 6 months. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  9. Pentamidine exerts in vitro and in vivo anti Trypanosoma cruzi activity and inhibits the polyamine transport in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, María V; Miranda, Mariana R; Campos-Estrada, Carolina; Reigada, Chantal; Maya, Juan D; Pereira, Claudio A; López-Muñoz, Rodrigo

    2014-06-01

    Pentamidine is an antiprotozoal and fungicide drug used in the treatment of leishmaniasis and African trypanosomiasis. Despite its extensive use as antiparasitic drug, little evidence exists about the effect of pentamidine in Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. Recent studies have shown that pentamidine blocks a polyamine transporter present in Leishmania major; consequently, its might also block these transporters in T. cruzi. Considering that T. cruzi lacks the ability to synthesize putrescine de novo, the inhibition of polyamine transport can bring a new therapeutic target against the parasite. In this work, we show that pentamidine decreases, not only the viability of T. cruzi trypomastigotes, but also the parasite burden of infected cells. In T. cruzi-infected mice pentamidine decreases the inflammation and parasite burden in hearts from infected mice. The treatment also decreases parasitemia, resulting in an increased survival rate. In addition, pentamidine strongly inhibits the putrescine and spermidine transport in T. cruzi epimastigotes and amastigotes. Thus, this study points to reevaluate the utility of pentamidine and introduce evidence of a potential new action mechanism. In the quest of new therapeutic strategies against Chagas disease, the extensive use of pentamidine in human has led to a well-known clinical profile, which could be an advantage over newly synthesized molecules that require more comprehensive trials prior to their clinical use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Drought controls on H2O2 accumulation, catalase (CAT) activity and CAT gene expression in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Celina M; Pastori, Gabriela M; Driscoll, Simon; Groten, Karin; Bernard, Stephanie; Foyer, Christine H

    2005-01-01

    Plants co-ordinate information derived from many diverse external and internal signals to ensure appropriate control of gene expression under optimal and stress conditions. In this work, the relationships between catalase (CAT) and H2O2 during drought in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) are studied. Drought-induced H2O2 accumulation correlated with decreases in soil water content and CO2 assimilation. Leaf H2O2 content increased even though total CAT activity doubled under severe drought conditions. Diurnal regulation of CAT1 and CAT2 mRNA abundance was apparent in all conditions and day/night CAT1 and CAT2 expression patterns were modified by mild and severe drought. The abundance of CAT1 transcripts was regulated by circadian controls that persisted in continuous darkness, while CAT2 was modulated by light. Drought decreased abundance, and modified the pattern, of CAT1 and CAT2 mRNAs. It was concluded that the complex regulation of CAT mRNA, particularly at the level of translation, allows precise control of leaf H2O2 accumulation.

  11. 1993 CAT workshop on beamline optical designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    An Advanced Photon Source (APS) Collaborative Access Team (CAT) Workshop on Beamline Optical Designs was held at Argonne National Laboratory on July 26--27, 1993. The goal of this workshop was to bring together experts from various synchrotron sources to provide status reports on crystal, reflecting, and polarizing optics as a baseline for discussions of issues facing optical designers for CAT beamlines at the APS. Speakers from the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), the University of Chicago, the National Synchrotron Light Source, and the University of Manchester (England) described single- and double-crystal monochromators, mirrors, glass capillaries, and polarizing optics. Following these presentations, the 90 participants divided into three working groups: Crystal Optics Design, Reflecting Optics, and Optics for Polarization Studies. This volume contains copies of the presentation materials from all speakers, summaries of the three working groups, and a ''catalog'' of various monochromator designs

  12. CT studies of brain abscesses in cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kretzschmar, K.; Wallenfang, T.; Bohl, J.

    1981-01-01

    Cerebral abscesses were produced in 56 cats by introducing staphylococcus aureus into the white matter of one cerebral hemisphere, using a stereotaxic apparatus. The cats were treated with antibiotics and/or steroids. The size and density of the inflammatory process and the abscess ring were measured on postcontrast CT scans. Differences were found depending on the stage of the abscess, but the deviation of values was too great for determining the age of the abscess from one measurement, to be able to apply proper treatment. The size and density of the abscesses were the same on CT whether the animals were treated or not. This was contrary to the clinical picture, the measurements of edema, and the histopathological studies. (orig.)

  13. OCULAR SONOGRAM OF INDONESIAN STRAY CAT EYES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhamad Fakhrul Ulum

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate Indonesian stray cat (KLI eyes by transpalpebrae B-mode ultrasound imaging. Eight healthy adult stray cats with 3.0-4.0 kg body weight were underwent of eyes ultrasound scanning without anesthesia or sedation. Linear ultrasound transducer with 7.5-15 MHz of frequency and ultrasound-gel were adhered directly to palpebral on the closed eyes. The results showed that the internal architecture of eyes was visible in different echogenicity according to the constituent of eyes structure. The sonograms with hypoechoic to hyperechoic parts of eyes were cornea, iris, cilliary body, suspensor ligament, sclera, and lens capsule. Moreover, anechoic parts of sonograms that having aqueous constituent were anterior chamber, posterior chamber, and vitreous humor. Based on the result, it can be concluded that B-mode ultrasound was able to assess the eyes through transpalpebral scanning.

  14. 1993 CAT workshop on beamline optical designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    An Advanced Photon Source (APS) Collaborative Access Team (CAT) Workshop on Beamline Optical Designs was held at Argonne National Laboratory on July 26--27, 1993. The goal of this workshop was to bring together experts from various synchrotron sources to provide status reports on crystal, reflecting, and polarizing optics as a baseline for discussions of issues facing optical designers for CAT beamlines at the APS. Speakers from the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), the University of Chicago, the National Synchrotron Light Source, and the University of Manchester (England) described single- and double-crystal monochromators, mirrors, glass capillaries, and polarizing optics. Following these presentations, the 90 participants divided into three working groups: Crystal Optics Design, Reflecting Optics, and Optics for Polarization Studies. This volume contains copies of the presentation materials from all speakers, summaries of the three working groups, and a ``catalog`` of various monochromator designs.

  15. Allium species poisoning in dogs and cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BS Salgado

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dogs and cats are the animals that owners most frequently seek assistance for potential poisonings, and these species are frequently involved with toxicoses due to ingestion of poisonous food. Feeding human foodstuff to pets may prove itself dangerous for their health, similarly to what is observed in Allium species toxicosis. Allium species toxicosis is reported worldwide in several animal species, and the toxic principles present in them causes the transformation of hemoglobin into methemoglobin, consequently resulting in hemolytic anemia with Heinz body formation. The aim of this review is to analyze the clinicopathologic aspects and therapeutic approach of this serious toxicosis of dogs and cats in order to give knowledge to veterinarians about Allium species toxicosis, and subsequently allow them to correctly diagnose this disease when facing it; and to educate pet owners to not feed their animals with Allium-containg food in order to better control this particular life-threatening toxicosis.

  16. Cheshire cat phenomena and quarks in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, M.

    1986-11-01

    The notion of the ''Cheshire Cat'' principle in hadron structure is developed rigorously in (1+1) dimensions and approximately in (3+1) dimensions for up- and down-quark flavor systems. This phenomenon is invoked to address the issue as to whether or not direct quark-gluon signatures can be ''seen'' in low-energy nuclear phenomena. How addition of the third flavor -strangeness- can modify the Cheshire Cat property is discussed. It is proposed that one of the primary objectives of nuclear physics be to probe -and disturb- the ''vacuum'' of the strong interactions (QCD) and that for this purpose the chiral symmetry SU(3)xSU(3) can play a crucial role in normal and extreme conditions. As an illustration, kaon condensation at a density ρ>∼ 3ρ 0 is discussed in terms of a toy model and is related to ''cleansing'' of the quark condensates from the vacuum

  17. The contribution of cat owners' attitudes and behaviours to the free-roaming cat overpopulation in Tel Aviv, Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkler, Hilit; Terkel, Joseph

    2012-04-01

    The attitudes and behaviours of cat owners in regard to treatment of cats may have a cumulative effect on the food availability, reproduction, density and welfare of the free-roaming cat population and thus also on the extent of cat overpopulation. Understanding this is thus a vital step in the a priori planning of cat management programs on any scale, as well as in developing public education programs on this issue. Although recent years have seen an accumulation of knowledge in regard to cat owners' attitudes and behaviours, the findings vary among countries and locations and in Israel this has never been investigated systematically. Using a questionnaire provided to cat owners in veterinary clinics, this study aimed at identifying those attitudes and behaviours that may be contributing to cat overpopulation in Tel Aviv, Israel, and at exploring the socio-economic factors that influence this problem. The findings show that the influential factors can be predicted from the cat owners' socio-economic status, mainly education and income, as well as gender and age. A consistency in those cat owner behaviours that contribute to cat overpopulation was also uncovered, revealing a sub-population of individuals who persist in the undesirable behaviours. Finally, a strong relationship between attitude and consequent behaviour was demonstrated, indicating the importance of education and targeted publicity as a means to influence attitudes and thereby change behaviours in this respect. We propose several measures by which to reduce the current extent of cat owners' contribution to the cat overpopulation: discouraging unwanted owner behaviours such as abandonment of their cats and allowing them to breed; promoting awareness of the neutering option among cat caretakers; and increasing pre-adoption neutering rates in shelters. Regional and national laws promoting responsible pet ownership need to be enacted. By improving the current level of knowledge and awareness among cat

  18. Diagnosis of pancreatitis in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenoulis, P G

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatitis is the most common disorder of the exocrine pancreas in both dogs and cats. Ante-mortem diagnosis of canine and feline pancreatitis can be challenging. The clinical picture of dogs and cats with pancreatitis varies greatly (from very mild to severe or even fatal) and is characterised by non-specific findings. Complete blood count, serum biochemistry profile and urinalysis should always be performed in dogs and cats suspected of having pancreatitis, although findings are not-specific for pancreatitis. Serum amylase and lipase activities and trypsin-like immunoreactivity (TLI) concentrations have no or only limited clinical value for the diagnosis of pancreatitis in either dogs or cats. Conversely, serum pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (PLI) concentration is currently considered to be the clinicopathological test of choice for the diagnosis of canine and feline pancreatitis. Abdominal radiography is a useful diagnostic tool for the exclusion of other diseases that may cause similar clinical signs to those of pancreatitis. Abdominal ultrasonography can be very useful for the diagnosis of pancreatitis, but this depends largely on the clinician's experience. Histopathological examination of the pancreas is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis and classification of pancreatitis, but it is not without limitations. In clinical practice, a combination of careful evaluation of the animal's history, serum PLI concentration and abdominal ultrasonography, together with pancreatic cytology or histopathology when indicated or possible, is considered to be the most practical and reliable means for an accurate diagnosis or exclusion of pancreatitis compared with other diagnostic modalities. © 2015 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  19. Fatal disseminated toxoplasmosis in an immunocompetent cat

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    Susanna S. Nagel

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A 10-year-old domestic short hair cat was referred for investigation of anorexia and polydipsia of 3 days’ duration. Clinically the cat was obese, pyrexic (39.8 °C, had acute abdominal pain and severe bilirubinuria. Haematology and serum biochemistry revealed severe panleukopenia, thrombocytopenia, markedly elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT and five-fold increased pre-prandial bile acids. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the abdomen did not identify any abnormalities. Serum tests for feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV were negative. Broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment for infectious hepatitis was to no avail; the cat deteriorated and died 72 h after admission. Necropsy revealed mild icterus and anaemia, severe multifocal hepatic necrosis, serofibrinous hydrothorax, pulmonary oedema and interstitial pneumonia. Histopathology confirmed the macroscopic findings and revealed multifocal microgranulomata in the brain and myocardium, as well as areas of necrosis in lymph nodes and multifocally in splenic red pulp. Long bone shaft marrow was hyperplastic with a predominance of leukocyte precursors and megakaryocytes and splenic red pulp showed mild extramedullary haemopoiesis. Immunohistochemical staining for Toxoplasma gondii was strongly positive, with scattered cysts and tachyzoites in the liver, lymph nodes, spleen, lungs, brain, salivary glands and intracellularly in round cells in occasional blood vessels. Immunohistochemical staining for corona virus on the same tissues was negative, ruling out feline infectious peritonitis (FIP. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR on formalin-fixed paraffin-wax embedded tissues was positive for Toxoplasma sp., but attempts at sequencing were unsuccessful. This was the first case report of fulminant disseminated toxoplasmosis in South Africa, in which detailed histopathology in an apparently immunocompetent cat was described.

  20. Mycobacterial panniculitis caused by in a cat

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    Polina Vishkautsan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A domestic shorthair cat was evaluated for chronic, bilateral, ulcerative dermatitis affecting the inguinal region and lateral aspects of both pelvic limbs. Histopathologic examination of skin biopsies collected throughout the course of disease revealed chronic pyogranulomatous ulcerative dermatitis. Aerobic bacterial skin cultures yielded growth of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Corynebacterium amycolatum . Upon referral the clinical findings were suggestive of a non-tuberculous Mycobacterium species infection. Previously obtained skin cultures failed to yield growth of mycobacterial organisms. A deep skin biopsy was collected and submitted for mycobacterial culture. At 5 weeks of incubation Mycobacterium thermoresistibile was isolated. In previous reports, M thermoresistibile has been isolated after 2–4 days of incubation, suggesting that this strain may have been a slower growing variant, or other factors (such as prior antimicrobial therapy inhibited rapid growth of this isolate. The cat was hospitalized for intravenous antibiotic therapy, surgical debridement of wounds, vacuum-assisted wound closure therapy and reconstruction procedures. The wounds were ultimately primarily closed and the cat was discharged to the owner after 50 days of hospitalization. Seven months after hospitalization, the ulcerative skin lesions had healed. Relevance and novel information To our knowledge, only two cases of M thermoresistibile panniculitis have been reported in cats. In the only detailed report of feline M thermoresistibile panniculitis, treatment was not attempted. The second case only reported detection of M thermoresistibile by PCR without a clinical description of the case. In our case report, severe chronic skin infection with M thermoresistibile was addressed using prolonged specific antibiotic therapy, surgical debridement and reconstructions, and treatment of secondary bacterial infections.

  1. Cefazolin pharmacokinetics in cats under surgical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarellos, Gabriela A; Montoya, Laura; Passini, Sabrina M; Lupi, Martín P; Lorenzini, Paula M; Landoni, María F

    2017-10-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the plasma pharmacokinetic profile, tissue concentrations and urine elimination of cefazolin in cats under surgical conditions after a single intravenous dose of 20 mg/kg. Methods Intravenous cefazolin (20 mg/kg) was administered to nine young mixed-breed cats 30 mins before they underwent surgical procedures (ovariectomy or orchiectomy). After antibiotic administration, samples from blood, some tissues and urine were taken. Cefazolin concentrations were determined in all biological matrices and pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated. Results Initial plasma concentrations were high (C p(0) , 134.80 ± 40.54 µg/ml), with fast and moderately wide distribution (distribution half-life [t ½(d) ] 0.16 ± 0.15 h; volume of distribution at steady state [V (d[ss]) ] 0.29 ± 0.10 l/kg) and rapid elimination (body clearance [Cl B ], 0.21 ± 0.06 l/h/kg; elimination half-life [t ½ ], 1.18 ± 0.27 h; mean residence time 1.42 ± 0.36 h). Thirty to 60 mins after intravenous administration, cefazolin tissue concentrations ranged from 9.24 µg/ml (subcutaneous tissue) to 26.44 µg/ml (ovary). The tissue/plasma concentration ratio ranged from 0.18 (muscle) to 0.58 (ovary). Cefazolin urine concentrations were high with 84.2% of the administered dose being eliminated in the first 6 h postadministration. Conclusions and relevance Cefazolin plasma concentrations remained above a minimum inhibitory concentration of ⩽2 µg/ml up to 4 h in all the studied cats. This suggests that a single intravenous dose of 20 mg/kg cefazolin would be adequate for perioperative prophylactic use in cats.

  2. Endocrine emergencies in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Amie

    2013-07-01

    Success in treatment of endocrine emergencies is contingent on early recognition and treatment. Many endocrine diseases presenting emergently have nonspecific signs and symptoms. In addition, these endocrine crises are often precipitated by concurrent disease, further making early identification difficult. This article concentrates on recognition and emergency management of the most common endocrine crises in dogs and cats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Earliest “Domestic” Cats in China Identified as Leopard Cat (Prionailurus bengalensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigne, Jean-Denis; Evin, Allowen; Cucchi, Thomas; Dai, Lingling; Yu, Chong; Hu, Songmei; Soulages, Nicolas; Wang, Weilin; Sun, Zhouyong; Gao, Jiangtao; Dobney, Keith; Yuan, Jing

    2016-01-01

    The ancestor of all modern domestic cats is the wildcat, Felis silvestris lybica, with archaeological evidence indicating it was domesticated as early as 10,000 years ago in South-West Asia. A recent study, however, claims that cat domestication also occurred in China some 5,000 years ago and involved the same wildcat ancestor (F. silvestris). The application of geometric morphometric analyses to ancient small felid bones from China dating between 5,500 to 4,900 BP, instead reveal these and other remains to be that of the leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis). These data clearly indicate that the origins of a human-cat ‘domestic’ relationship in Neolithic China began independently from South-West Asia and involved a different wild felid species altogether. The leopard cat’s ‘domestic’ status, however, appears to have been short-lived—its apparent subsequent replacement shown by the fact that today all domestic cats in China are genetically related to F. silvestris. PMID:26799955

  4. Molecular basis of mammalian cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Nobuko Yoshida

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Establishment of infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas' disease, depends on a series of events involving interactions of diverse parasite molecules with host components. Here we focus on the mechanisms of target cell invasion by metacyclic trypomastigotes (MT and mammalian tissue culture trypomastigotes (TCT. During MT or TCT internalization, signal transduction pathways are activated both in the parasite and the target cell, leading to Ca2+ mobilization. For cell adhesion, MT engage surface glycoproteins, such as gp82 and gp35/50, which are Ca2+ signal-inducing molecules. In T. cruzi isolates that enter host cells in gp82-mediated manner, parasite protein tyrosine kinase as well as phospholipase C are activated, and Ca2+ is released from I P3-sensitive stores, whereas in T. cruzi isolates that attach to target cells mainly through gp35/50, the signaling pathway involving adenylate cyclase appears to be stimulated, with Ca2+ release from acidocalciosomes. In addition, T. cruzi isolate-dependent inhibitory signals, mediated by MT-specific gp90, may be triggered both in the host cell and the parasite. The repertoire of TCT molecules implicated in cell invasion includes surface glycoproteins of gp85 family, with members containing binding sites for laminin and cytokeratin 18, enzymes such as cruzipain, trans-sialidase, and an oligopeptidase B that generates a Ca2+-agonist from a precursor molecule.O estabelecimento da infecção por Trypanosoma cruzi, o agente da doença de Chagas, depende de uma série de eventos envolvendo interações de diversas moléculas do parasita com componentes do hospedeiro. Focalizamos aqui os mecanismos de invasão celular por tripomastigotas metacíclicos (TM e por tripomastigotas de cultura de tecido (TCT. Durante a internalização de TM ou TCT, vias de transdução de sinal são ativadas tanto no parasita como na célula alvo, acarretando a mobilização de Ca2+. Para adesão, TM utiliza as glicoprote

  5. Eco-epidemiological aspects of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli and their vector (Rhodnius pallescens in Panama Generalidades do Trypanosoma cruzi, do Trypanosoma rangeli e do seu vetor (Rhodnius pallescens no Panamá

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    Ana Maria de Vasquez

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The eco-epidemiology of T. cruzi infection was investigated in the Eastern border of the Panama Canal in Central Panama. Between 1999 and 2000, 1110 triatomines were collected: 1050 triatomines (94.6% from palm trees, 27 (2.4% from periurban habitats and 33 (3.0% inside houses. All specimens were identified as R. pallescens. There was no evidence of vector domiciliation. Salivary glands from 380 R. pallescens revealed a trypanosome natural infection rate of 7.6%, while rectal ampoule content from 373 triatomines was 45%. Isoenzyme profiles on isolated trypanosomes demonstrated that 85.4% (n = 88 were T. cruzi and 14.6% (n = 15 were T. rangeli. Blood meal analysis from 829 R. pallescens demonstrated a zoophilic vector behavior, with opossums as the preferential blood source. Seroprevalence in human samples from both study sites was less than 2%. Our results demonstrate that T. cruzi survives in the area in balanced association with R. pallescens, and with several different species of mammals in their natural niches. However, the area is an imminent risk of infection for its population, consequently it is important to implement a community educational program regarding disease knowledge and control measures.A epidemiologia da infecção do T. cruzi foi investigada na margem oriental do canal do Panamá, na região central da Republica do Panamá. A informação obtida durante o estudo avaliou fatores de risco da doença de Chagas nesta área. Entre 1999 e 2000, 1110 triatomíneos foram coletados: 1050 triatomíneos (94,6% em palmeiras, 27 (2,4% em habitats periurbanos e 33 (3,0% no interior de casas. Todos os espécimens foram identificados como R. pallescens. Não havia nenhuma evidência de domiciliação do vetor. O exame de glândulas salivares de 380 R. pallescens revelaram taxa de infecção natural por Trypanosoma de 7,6%, mas o conteúdo da ampola rectal de 373 triatomíneos mostrou 45% de positividade. Os perfis de isoenzimas em

  6. Active transcription and ultrastructural changes during Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis

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    Ludmila R.P. Ferreira

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The differentiation of proliferating epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi , the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas’ disease, into the infective and non-proliferating metacyclic forms can be reproduced in the laboratory by incubating the cells in a chemically-defined medium that mimics the urine of the insect vector. Epimastigotes have a spherical nucleus, a flagellum protruding from the middle of the protozoan cell, and a disk-shaped kinetoplast - an organelle that corresponds to the mitochondrial DNA. Metacyclic trypomastigotes have an elongated shape with the flagellum protruding from the posterior portion of the cell and associated with a spherical kinetoplast. Here we describe the morphological events of this transformation and characterize a novel intermediate stage by three-dimensional reconstruction of electron microscope serial sections. This new intermediate stage is characterized by a kinetoplast compressing an already elongated nucleus, indicating that metacyclogenesis involves active movements of the flagellar structure relative to the cell body. As transcription occurs more intensely in proliferating epimastigotes than in metacyclics, we also examined the presence of RNA polymerase II and measured transcriptional activity during the differentiation process. Both the presence of the enzyme and transcriptional activity remain unchanged during all steps of metacyclogenesis. RNA polymerase II levels and transcriptional activity only decrease after metacyclics are formed. We suggest that transcription is required during the epimastigote-to-metacyclic trypomastigote differentiation process, until the kinetoplast and flagellum reach the posterior position of the parasites in the infective form.A diferenciação de formas epimastigotas (proliferativas do Trypanosoma cruzi, parasita protozoário causador da doença de Chagas, em formas metacíclicas tripomastigotas (infectivas e não proliferativas, pode ser reproduzida em laborat

  7. Continuous glucose monitoring in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedmeyer, C E; DeClue, A E

    2008-01-01

    Use of continuous glucose monitoring in veterinary medicine is gaining popularity. Through use of a commercially available continuous glucose monitor system, insights into daily glucose changes in dogs and cats are achievable. The continuous glucose monitoring system measures glucose concentrations in the interstitial fluid of the subcutaneous space by use of a small, flexible probe. When placed in the subcutaneous tissue, the probe is connected to a recording device that is attached to the animal and records the interstitial fluid glucose concentration every 5 minutes (288 readings per 24 hours). Once attached and properly calibrated, the instrument can remain in place for several days, hospitalization of the patient is not necessary, and the normal daily routine of the animal can be maintained. The data from the recording device are then downloaded and a very detailed picture of the interstitial fluid glucose concentration over that time period can be obtained. Subcutaneous interstitial fluid glucose concentrations have a good correlation to blood glucose concentrations within a defined range. The continuous glucose monitoring system has distinct advantages over traditional blood glucose curves and is a valuable tool for managing diabetic dogs and cats. In addition, other clinical uses for continuous glucose monitoring are being developed. This review is designed to outline the technology behind the continuous glucose monitoring system, describe the clinical use of the instrument, provide clinical examples in which it may be useful, and discuss future directions for continuous glucose monitoring in dogs and cats.

  8. Is Schrödinger's Cat Alive?

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    Mani L. Bhaumik

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Erwin Schrödinger is famous for presenting his wave equation of motion that jump-started quantum mechanics. His disenchantment with the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics led him to unveil the Schrödinger's cat paradox, which did not get much attention for nearly half a century. In the meantime, disappointment with quantum mechanics turned his interest to biology facilitating, albeit in a peripheral way, the revelation of the structure of DNA. Interest in Schrödinger's cat has recently come roaring back making its appearance conspicuously in numerous scientific articles. From the arguments presented here, it would appear that the legendary Schrödinger's cat is here to stay, symbolizing a profound truth that quantum reality exists at all scales; but we do not observe it in our daily macroscopic world as it is masked for all practical purposes, most likely by environmental decoherence with irreversible thermal effects. Quanta 2017; 6: 70–80.

  9. New Trypanosoma evansi Type B Isolates from Ethiopian Dromedary Camels.

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    Hadush Birhanu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma (T. evansi is a dyskinetoplastic variant of T. brucei that has gained the ability to be transmitted by all sorts of biting flies. T. evansi can be divided into type A, which is the most abundant and found in Africa, Asia and Latin America and type B, which has so far been isolated only from Kenyan dromedary camels. This study aimed at the isolation and the genetic and phenotypic characterisation of type A and B T. evansi stocks from camels in Northern Ethiopia.T. evansi was isolated in mice by inoculation with the cryopreserved buffy coat of parasitologically confirmed animals. Fourteen stocks were thus isolated and subject to genotyping with PCRs targeting type-specific variant surface glycoprotein genes, mitochondrial minicircles and maxicircles, minisatellite markers and the F1-ATP synthase γ subunit gene. Nine stocks corresponded to type A, two stocks were type B and three stocks represented mixed infections between A and B, but not hybrids. One T. evansi type A stock was completely akinetoplastic. Five stocks were adapted to in vitro culture and subjected to a drug sensitivity assay with melarsomine dihydrochloride, diminazene diaceturate, isometamidium chloride and suramin. In vitro adaptation induced some loss of kinetoplasts within 60 days. No correlation between drug sensitivity and absence of the kinetoplast was observed. Sequencing the full coding sequence of the F1-ATP synthase γ subunit revealed new type-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms and deletions.This study addresses some limitations of current molecular markers for T. evansi genotyping. Polymorphism within the F1-ATP synthase γ subunit gene may provide new markers to identify the T. evansi type that do not rely on variant surface glycoprotein genes or kinetoplast DNA.

  10. Sympatry influence in the interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi with triatomine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworak, Elaine Schultz; Araújo, Silvana Marques de; Gomes, Mônica Lúcia; Massago, Miyoko; Ferreira, Érika Cristina; Toledo, Max Jean de Ornelas

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, is widely distributed in nature, circulating between triatomine bugs and sylvatic mammals, and has large genetic diversity. Both the vector species and the genetic lineages of T. cruzi present a varied geographical distribution. This study aimed to verify the influence of sympatry in the interaction of T. cruzi with triatomines. Methods: The behavior of the strains PR2256 (T. cruzi II) and AM14 (T. cruzi IV) was studied in Triatoma sordida (TS) and Rhodnius robustus (RR). Eleven fifth-stage nymphs were fed by artificial xenodiagnosis with 5.6 × 103 blood trypomastigotes/0.1mL of each T. cruzi strain. Every 20 days, their excreta were examined for up to 100 days, and every 30 days, the intestinal content was examined for up to 120 days, by parasitological (fresh examination and differential count with Giemsa-stained smears) and molecular (PCR) methods. Rates of infectivity, metacyclogenesis and mortality, and mean number of parasites per insect and of excreted parasites were determined. Sympatric groups RR+AM14 and TS+PR2256 showed higher values of the four parameters, except for mortality rate, which was higher (27.3%) in the TS+AM14 group. General infectivity was 72.7%, which was mainly proven by PCR, showing the following decreasing order: RR+AM14 (100%), TS+PR2256 (81.8%), RR+PR2256 (72.7%) and TS+AM14 (36.4%). Our working hypothesis was confirmed once higher infectivity and vector capacity (flagellate production and elimination of infective metacyclic forms) were recorded in the groups that contained sympatric T. cruzi lineages and triatomine species.

  11. The regulation of autophagy differentially affects Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis

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    Vanrell, María Cristina; Losinno, Antonella Denisse; Cueto, Juan Agustín; Balcazar, Darío; Fraccaroli, Laura Virginia; Carrillo, Carolina

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular process required for the removal of aged organelles and cytosolic components through lysosomal degradation. All types of eukaryotic cells from yeasts to mammalian cells have the machinery to activate autophagy as a result of many physiological and pathological situations. The most frequent stimulus of autophagy is starvation and the result, in this case, is the fast generation of utilizable food (e.g. amino acids and basic nutrients) to maintain the vital biological processes. In some organisms, starvation also triggers other associated processes such as differentiation. The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi undergoes a series of differentiation processes throughout its complex life cycle. Although not all autophagic genes have been identified in the T. cruzi genome, previous works have demonstrated the presence of essential autophagic-related proteins. Under starvation conditions, TcAtg8, which is the parasite homolog of Atg8/LC3 in other organisms, is located in autophagosome-like vesicles. In this work, we have characterized the autophagic pathway during T. cruzi differentiation from the epimastigote to metacyclic trypomastigote form, a process called metacyclogenesis. We demonstrated that autophagy is stimulated during metacyclogenesis and that the induction of autophagy promotes this process. Moreover, with exception of bafilomycin, other classical autophagy modulators have similar effects on T. cruzi autophagy. We also showed that spermidine and related polyamines can positively regulate parasite autophagy and differentiation. We concluded that both polyamine metabolism and autophagy are key processes during T. cruzi metacyclogenesis that could be exploited as drug targets to avoid the parasite cycle progression. PMID:29091711

  12. Trypanosoma cruzi contains two galactokinases; molecular and biochemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo-Rojas, Ángel E; González-Marcano, Eglys B; Valera-Vera, Edward A; Acosta, Héctor R; Quiñones, Wilfredo A; Burchmore, Richard J S; Concepción, Juan L; Cáceres, Ana J

    2016-10-01

    Two different putative galactokinase genes, found in the genome database of Trypanosoma cruzi were cloned and sequenced. Expression of the genes in Escherichia coli resulted for TcGALK-1 in the synthesis of a soluble and active enzyme, and in the case of TcGALK-2 gene a less soluble protein, with predicted molecular masses of 51.9kDa and 51.3kDa, respectively. The Km values determined for the recombinant proteins were for galactose 0.108mM (TcGALK-1) and 0.091mM (TcGALK-2) and for ATP 0.36mM (TcGALK-1) and 0.1mM (TcGALK-2). Substrate inhibition by ATP (Ki 0.414mM) was only observed for TcGALK-2. Gel-filtration chromatography showed that natural TcGALKs and recombinant TcGALK-1 are monomeric. In agreement with the possession of a type-1 peroxisome-targeting signal by both TcGALKs, they were found to be present inside glycosomes using two different methods of subcellular fractionation in conjunction with mass spectrometry. Both genes are expressed in epimastigote and trypomastigote stages since the respective proteins were immunodetected by western blotting. The T. cruzi galactokinases present their highest (52-47%) sequence identity with their counterpart from Leishmania spp., followed by prokaryotic galactokinases such as those from E. coli and Lactococcus lactis (26-23%). In a phylogenetic analysis, the trypanosomatid galactokinases form a separate cluster, showing an affiliation with bacteria. Epimastigotes of T. cruzi can grow in glucose-depleted LIT-medium supplemented with 20mM of galactose, suggesting that this hexose, upon phosphorylation by a TcGALK, could be used in the synthesis of UDP-galactose and also as a possible carbon and energy source. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Arginine and Lysine Transporters Are Essential for Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Mathieu, Christoph; Macêdo, Juan P; Hürlimann, Daniel; Wirdnam, Corina; Haindrich, Alexander C; Suter Grotemeyer, Marianne; González-Salgado, Amaia; Schmidt, Remo S; Inbar, Ehud; Mäser, Pascal; Bütikofer, Peter; Zilberstein, Dan; Rentsch, Doris

    2017-01-01

    For Trypanosoma brucei arginine and lysine are essential amino acids and therefore have to be imported from the host. Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants identified cationic amino acid transporters among members of the T. brucei AAAP (amino acid/auxin permease) family. TbAAT5-3 showed high affinity arginine uptake (Km 3.6 ± 0.4 μM) and high selectivity for L-arginine. L-arginine transport was reduced by a 10-times excess of L-arginine, homo-arginine, canavanine or arginine-β-naphthylamide, while lysine was inhibitory only at 100-times excess, and histidine or ornithine did not reduce arginine uptake rates significantly. TbAAT16-1 is a high affinity (Km 4.3 ± 0.5 μM) and highly selective L-lysine transporter and of the compounds tested, only L-lysine and thialysine were competing for L-lysine uptake. TbAAT5-3 and TbAAT16-1 are expressed in both procyclic and bloodstream form T. brucei and cMyc-tagged proteins indicate localization at the plasma membrane. RNAi-mediated down-regulation of TbAAT5 and TbAAT16 in bloodstream form trypanosomes resulted in growth arrest, demonstrating that TbAAT5-mediated arginine and TbAAT16-mediated lysine transport are essential for T. brucei. Growth of induced RNAi lines could partially be rescued by supplementing a surplus of arginine or lysine, respectively, while addition of both amino acids was less efficient. Single and double RNAi lines indicate that additional low affinity uptake systems for arginine and lysine are present in T. brucei.

  14. Congenital Trypanosoma cruzi Transmission in Santa Cruz, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern, Caryn; Verastegui, Manuela; Gilman, Robert H.; LaFuente, Carlos; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Calderon, Maritza; Pacori, Juan; Abastoflor, Maria del Carmen; Aparicio, Hugo; Brady, Mark F.; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Angulo, Noelia; Marcus, Sarah; Sterling, Charles; Maguire, James H.

    2017-01-01

    Background We conducted a study of congenital Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Our objective was to apply new tools to identify weak points in current screening algorithms, and find ways to improve them. Methods Women presenting for delivery were screened by rapid and conventional serological tests. For infants of infected mothers, blood specimens obtained on days 0, 7, 21, 30, 90, 180, and 270 were concentrated and examined microscopically; serological tests were performed for the day 90, 180, and 270 specimens. Maternal and infant specimens, including umbilical tissue, were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the kinetoplast minicircle and by quantitative PCR. Results Of 530 women, 154 (29%) were seropositive. Ten infants had congenital T. cruzi infection. Only 4 infants had positive results of microscopy evaluation in the first month, and none had positive cord blood microscopy results. PCR results were positive for 6 (67%) of 9 cord blood and 7 (87.5%) of 8 umbilical tissue specimens. PCR-positive women were more likely to transmit T. cruzi than were seropositive women with negative PCR results (P < .05). Parasite loads determined by quantitative PCR were higher for mothers of infected infants than for seropositive mothers of uninfected infants (P < .01). Despite intensive efforts, only 58% of at-risk infants had a month 9 specimen collected. Conclusions On the basis of the low sensitivity of microscopy in cord blood and high rate of loss to follow-up, we estimate that current screening programs miss one-half of all infected infants. Molecular techniques may improve early detection. PMID:19877966

  15. Prevalence of Trypanosoma vivax in cattle in central Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadl, M.; Babiker, H.I.; Bakheit, M.A.; A Rahman, A.H.

    2000-01-01

    The study was conducted to validate an antibody-detection ELISA test (Ab-ELISA) using pre-coated ELISA plates with crude antigen preparation of Trypanosoma vivax and to study the prevalence of T. vivax infection in central Sudan. A total of 704 blood samples were collected from cattle in central Sudan, a known endemic area of T. vivax infection. Additionally, 74 blood samples were collected from northern Sudan (Atbra town), an area presumed to be T. vivax-free. Sera were collected during the period September 1998 to May 1999 during three different seasons (summer, autumn and winter). Under the existing laboratory conditions, the test showed a clear distinction between different controls, i.e. strong positive control (C++), weak positive control (C+), negative control (C-) and the conjugate control (Cc). A percent positivity of 25% was taken as a cut-off value to determine the positivity or negativity of the test. The acceptable optical density range of strong positive control (C++) was 0.65-1.22. Lower and upper percent positivity limits for different controls were also determined. The study showed that T. vivax is endemic in central Sudan with 1.4% prevalence based on parasitological examination and 29.26% on Ab-ELISA. The infection rate was significantly higher during the autumn and winter than in summer. Young cattle showed significantly lower infection rates than adults as indicated by both the parasitological and the Ab-ELISA test. In relation to husbandry practice, migratory cattle showed significantly higher rates of prevalence than resident cattle. There was no significant difference in average packed red cell volume (PCV) values between ELISA positive and ELISA negative animals. Calves of less than one year of age showed significantly lower PCV values when belonging to migratory herds than to resident herds. (author)

  16. Trypanosoma cruzi maxicircle heterogeneity in Chagas disease patients from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Julio César; Valadares, Helder M S; D'Avila, Daniella A; Baptista, Rodrigo P; Moreno, Margoth; Galvão, Lúcia M C; Chiari, Egler; Sturm, Nancy R; Gontijo, Eliane D; Macedo, Andrea M; Zingales, Bianca

    2009-07-15

    The majority of individuals in the chronic phase of Chagas disease are asymptomatic (indeterminate form, IF). Each year, approximately 3% of them develop lesions in the heart or gastrointestinal tract. Cardiomyopathy (CCHD) is the most severe manifestation of Chagas disease. The factors that determine the outcome of the infection are unknown, but certainly depend on complex interactions amongst the genetic make-up of the parasite, the host immunogenetic background and environment. In a previous study we verified that the maxicircle gene NADH dehydrogenase (mitochondrial complex I) subunit 7 (ND7) from IF isolates had a 455 bp deletion compared with the wild type (WT) ND7 gene from CCHD strains. We proposed that ND7 could constitute a valuable target for PCR assays in the differential diagnosis of the infective strain. In the present study we evaluated this hypothesis by examination of ND7 structure in parasites from 75 patients with defined pathologies, from Southeast Brazil. We also analysed the structure of additional mitochondrial genes (ND4/CR4, COIII and COII) since the maxicircle is used for clustering Trypanosoma cruzi strains into three clades/haplogroups. We conclude that maxicircle genes do not discriminate parasite populations which induce IF or CCHD forms. Interestingly, the great majority of the analysed isolates belong to T. cruzi II (discrete typing unit, (DTU) IIb) genotype. This scenario is at variance with the prevalence of hybrid (DTU IId) human isolates in Bolivia, Chile and Argentina. The distribution of WT and deleted ND7 and ND4 genes in T. cruzi strains suggests that mutations in the two genes occurred in different ancestrals in the T. cruzi II cluster, allowing the identification of at least three mitochondrial sub-lineages within this group. The observation that T. cruzi strains accumulate mutations in several genes coding for complex I subunits favours the hypothesis that complex I may have a limited activity in this parasite.

  17. Sialic Acid Glycobiology Unveils Trypanosoma cruzi Trypomastigote Membrane Physiology.

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    Andrés B Lantos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the flagellate protozoan agent of Chagas disease or American trypanosomiasis, is unable to synthesize sialic acids de novo. Mucins and trans-sialidase (TS are substrate and enzyme, respectively, of the glycobiological system that scavenges sialic acid from the host in a crucial interplay for T. cruzi life cycle. The acquisition of the sialyl residue allows the parasite to avoid lysis by serum factors and to interact with the host cell. A major drawback to studying the sialylation kinetics and turnover of the trypomastigote glycoconjugates is the difficulty to identify and follow the recently acquired sialyl residues. To tackle this issue, we followed an unnatural sugar approach as bioorthogonal chemical reporters, where the use of azidosialyl residues allowed identifying the acquired sugar. Advanced microscopy techniques, together with biochemical methods, were used to study the trypomastigote membrane from its glycobiological perspective. Main sialyl acceptors were identified as mucins by biochemical procedures and protein markers. Together with determining their shedding and turnover rates, we also report that several membrane proteins, including TS and its substrates, both glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, are separately distributed on parasite surface and contained in different and highly stable membrane microdomains. Notably, labeling for α(1,3Galactosyl residues only partially colocalize with sialylated mucins, indicating that two species of glycosylated mucins do exist, which are segregated at the parasite surface. Moreover, sialylated mucins were included in lipid-raft-domains, whereas TS molecules are not. The location of the surface-anchored TS resulted too far off as to be capable to sialylate mucins, a role played by the shed TS instead. Phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase-C activity is actually not present in trypomastigotes. Therefore, shedding of TS occurs via microvesicles instead of as a fully

  18. The role of IL-12 in experimental Trypanosoma cruzi infection

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    J.S. Silva

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Host resistance to Trypanosoma cruzi infection is dependent on both natural and acquired immune responses. During the early acute phase of infection in mice, natural killer (NK cell-derived IFN-g is involved in controlling intracellular parasite replication, mainly through the induction of nitric oxide biosynthesis by activated macrophages. We have shown that IL-12, a powerful inducer of IFN-g production by NK cells, is synthesized soon after trypomastigote-macrophage interaction. The role of IL-12 in the control of T. cruzi infection in vivo was determined by treating infected mice with anti-IL-12 monoclonal antibody (mAb and analyzing both parasitemia and mortality during the acute phase of infection. The anti-IL-12 mAb-treated mice had higher levels of parasitemia and mortality compared to control mice. Also, treatment of infected mice with mAb specific for IFN-g or TNF-a inhibited the protective effect of exogenous IL-12. On the other hand, TGF-ß and IL-10 produced by infected macrophages inhibited the induction and effects of IL-12. Therefore, while IL-12, TNF-a and IFN-g correlate with resistance to T. cruzi infection, TGF-ß and IL-10 promote susceptibility. These results provide support for a role of innate immunity in the control of T. cruzi infection. In addition to its protective role, IL-12 may also be involved in the modulation of T. cruzi-induced myocarditis, since treatment of infected mice with IL-12 or anti-IL-12 mAb leads to an enhanced or decreased inflammatory infiltrate in the heart, respectively. Understanding the role of the cytokines produced during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection and their involvement in protection and pathogenesis would be essential to devise new vaccines or therapies.

  19. Metalloproteases in Trypanosoma rangeli-infected Rhodnius prolixus

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    D Feder

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Protease activities in the haemolymph and fat body in a bloodsucking insect, Rhodnius prolixus, infected with Trypanosoma rangeli, were investigated. After SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis containing gelatin as substrate, analysis of zymograms performed on samples of different tissues of controls and insects inoculated or orally infected with short or long epimastigotes of T. rangeli, demonstrated distinct patterns of protease activities: (i proteases were detected in the haemolymph of insects which were fed on, or inoculated with, short epimastigotes of T. rangeli (39 kDa and 33 kDa, respectively, but they were not observed in the fat body taken from these insects; (ii protease was also presented in the fat bodies derived from naive insects or controls inoculated with sterile phosphate-saline buffer (49 kDa, but it was not detected in the haemolymph of these insects; (iii no protease activity was observed in both haemolymph and fat bodies taken from insects inoculated with, or fed on, long epimastigotes of T. rangeli. Furthermore, in short epimastigotes of T. rangeli extracts, three bands of the protease activities with apparent molecular weights of 297, 198 and 95 kDa were detected while long epimastigotes preparation presented only two bands of protease activities with molecular weights of 297 and 198 kDa. The proteases from the insect infected with T. rangeli and controls belong to the class of either metalloproteases or metal-activated enzymes since they are inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline. The significance of these proteases in the insects infected with short epimastigotes of T. rangeli is discussed in relation to the success of the establishment of infection of these parasites in its vector, R. prolixus.

  20. The regulation of autophagy differentially affects Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cristina Vanrell

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a cellular process required for the removal of aged organelles and cytosolic components through lysosomal degradation. All types of eukaryotic cells from yeasts to mammalian cells have the machinery to activate autophagy as a result of many physiological and pathological situations. The most frequent stimulus of autophagy is starvation and the result, in this case, is the fast generation of utilizable food (e.g. amino acids and basic nutrients to maintain the vital biological processes. In some organisms, starvation also triggers other associated processes such as differentiation. The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi undergoes a series of differentiation processes throughout its complex life cycle. Although not all autophagic genes have been identified in the T. cruzi genome, previous works have demonstrated the presence of essential autophagic-related proteins. Under starvation conditions, TcAtg8, which is the parasite homolog of Atg8/LC3 in other organisms, is located in autophagosome-like vesicles. In this work, we have characterized the autophagic pathway during T. cruzi differentiation from the epimastigote to metacyclic trypomastigote form, a process called metacyclogenesis. We demonstrated that autophagy is stimulated during metacyclogenesis and that the induction of autophagy promotes this process. Moreover, with exception of bafilomycin, other classical autophagy modulators have similar effects on T. cruzi autophagy. We also showed that spermidine and related polyamines can positively regulate parasite autophagy and differentiation. We concluded that both polyamine metabolism and autophagy are key processes during T. cruzi metacyclogenesis that could be exploited as drug targets to avoid the parasite cycle progression.

  1. Immunotherapy of Trypanosoma cruzi infection with DNA vaccines in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumonteil, Eric; Escobedo-Ortegon, Javier; Reyes-Rodriguez, Norma; Arjona-Torres, Arletty; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the pathology of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy are still debated, and the controversy has interfered with the development of new treatments and vaccines. Because of the potential of DNA vaccines for immunotherapy of chronic and infectious diseases, we tested if DNA vaccines could control an ongoing Trypanosoma cruzi infection. BALB/c mice were infected with a lethal dose (5 x 10(4) parasites) as a model of acute infection, and then they were treated with two injections of 100 microg of plasmid DNA 1 week apart, beginning on day 5 postinfection. Control mice had high levels of parasitemia and mortality and severe cardiac inflammation, while mice treated with plasmid DNA encoding trypomastigote surface antigen 1 or Tc24 had reduced parasitemia and mild cardiac inflammation and >70% survived the infection. The efficacy of the immunotherapy also was significant when it was delayed until days 10 and 15 after infection. Parasitological analysis of cardiac tissue of surviving mice indicated that most mice still contained detectable parasite kinetoplast DNA but fewer mice contained live parasites, suggesting that there was efficient but not complete parasite elimination. DNA vaccine immunotherapy was also evaluated in CD1 mice infected with a low dose (5 x 10(2) parasites) as a model of chronic infection. Immunotherapy was initiated on day 70 postinfection and resulted in improved survival and reduced cardiac tissue inflammation. These results suggest that DNA vaccines have strong potential for the immunotherapy of T. cruzi infection and may provide new alternatives for the control of Chagas' disease.

  2. Rab23 is a flagellar protein in Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Field Mark C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rab small GTPases are important mediators of membrane transport, and orthologues frequently retain similar locations and functions, even between highly divergent taxa. In metazoan organisms Rab23 is an important negative regulator of Sonic hedgehog signaling and is crucial for correct development and differentiation of cellular lineages by virtue of an involvement in ciliary recycling. Previously, we reported that Trypanosoma brucei Rab23 localized to the nuclear envelope 1, which is clearly inconsistent with the mammalian location and function. As T. brucei is unicellular the potential that Rab23 has no role in cell signaling was possible. Here we sought to further investigate the role(s of Rab23 in T. brucei to determine if Rab23 was an example of a Rab protein with divergent function in distinct taxa. Methods/major findings The taxonomic distribution of Rab23 was examined and compared with the presence of flagella/cilia in representative taxa. Despite evidence for considerable secondary loss, we found a clear correlation between a conventional flagellar structure and the presence of a Rab23 orthologue in the genome. By epitope-tagging, Rab23 was localized and found to be present at the flagellum throughout the cell cycle. However, RNAi knockdown did not result in a flagellar defect, suggesting that Rab23 is not required for construction or maintenance of the flagellum. Conclusions The location of Rab23 at the flagellum is conserved between mammals and trypanosomes and the Rab23 gene is restricted to flagellated organisms. These data may suggest the presence of a Rab23-mediated signaling mechanism in trypanosomes.

  3. The regulation of autophagy differentially affects Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanrell, María Cristina; Losinno, Antonella Denisse; Cueto, Juan Agustín; Balcazar, Darío; Fraccaroli, Laura Virginia; Carrillo, Carolina; Romano, Patricia Silvia

    2017-11-01

    Autophagy is a cellular process required for the removal of aged organelles and cytosolic components through lysosomal degradation. All types of eukaryotic cells from yeasts to mammalian cells have the machinery to activate autophagy as a result of many physiological and pathological situations. The most frequent stimulus of autophagy is starvation and the result, in this case, is the fast generation of utilizable food (e.g. amino acids and basic nutrients) to maintain the vital biological processes. In some organisms, starvation also triggers other associated processes such as differentiation. The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi undergoes a series of differentiation processes throughout its complex life cycle. Although not all autophagic genes have been identified in the T. cruzi genome, previous works have demonstrated the presence of essential autophagic-related proteins. Under starvation conditions, TcAtg8, which is the parasite homolog of Atg8/LC3 in other organisms, is located in autophagosome-like vesicles. In this work, we have characterized the autophagic pathway during T. cruzi differentiation from the epimastigote to metacyclic trypomastigote form, a process called metacyclogenesis. We demonstrated that autophagy is stimulated during metacyclogenesis and that the induction of autophagy promotes this process. Moreover, with exception of bafilomycin, other classical autophagy modulators have similar effects on T. cruzi autophagy. We also showed that spermidine and related polyamines can positively regulate parasite autophagy and differentiation. We concluded that both polyamine metabolism and autophagy are key processes during T. cruzi metacyclogenesis that could be exploited as drug targets to avoid the parasite cycle progression.

  4. Phospholipase A1: a novel virulence factor in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaunzarán, María Laura; Wilkowsky, Silvina Elizabeth; Lammel, Estela María; Giménez, Guadalupe; Bott, Emanuel; Barbieri, Manuel Alejandro; de Isola, Elvira Luisa Durante

    2013-02-01

    Phospholipase A1 (PLA1) has been described in the infective stages of Trypanosoma cruzi as a membrane-bound/secreted enzyme that significantly modified host cell lipid profile with generation of second lipid messengers and concomitant activation of protein kinase C. In the present work we determined higher levels of PLA1 expression in the infective amastigotes and trypomastigotes than in the non-infective epimastigotes of lethal RA strain. In addition, we found similar expression patterns but distinct PLA1 activity levels in bloodstream trypomastigotes from Cvd and RA (lethal) and K98 (non-lethal) T. cruzi strains, obtained at their corresponding parasitemia peaks. This fact was likely due to the presence of different levels of anti-T. cruzi PLA1 antibodies in sera of infected mice, that modulated the enzyme activity. Moreover, these antibodies significantly reduced in vitro parasite invasion indicating the participation of T. cruzi PLA1 in the early events of parasite-host cell interaction. We also demonstrated the presence of lysophospholipase activity in live infective stages that could account for self-protection against the toxic lysophospholipids generated by T. cruzi PLA1 action. At the genome level, we identified at least eight putative genes that codify for T. cruzi PLA1 with high amino acid sequence variability in their amino and carboxy-terminal regions; a putative PLA1 selected gene was cloned and expressed as a recombinant protein that possessed PLA1 activity. Collectively, the results presented here point out at T. cruzi PLA1 as a novel virulence factor implicated in parasite invasion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Protein 3-nitrotyrosine formation during Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice

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    M. Naviliat

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (·NO is a diffusible messenger implicated in Trypanosoma cruzi resistance. Excess production of ·NO and oxidants leads to the generation of nitrogen dioxide (·NO2, a strong nitrating agent. Tyrosine nitration is a post-translational modification resulting from the addition of a nitro (-NO2 group to the ortho-position of tyrosine residues. Detection of protein 3-nitrotyrosine is regarded as a marker of nitro-oxidative stress and is observed in inflammatory processes. The formation and role of nitrating species in the control and myocardiopathy of T. cruzi infection remain to be studied. We investigated the levels of ·NO and protein 3-nitrotyrosine in the plasma of C3H and BALB/c mice and pharmacologically modulated their production during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection. We also looked for protein 3-nitrotyrosine in the hearts of infected animals. Our results demonstrated that C3H animals produced higher amounts of ·NO than BALB/c mice, but their generation of peroxynitrite was not proportionally enhanced and they had higher parasitemias. While N G-nitro-arginine methyl ester treatment abolished ·NO production and drastically augmented the parasitism, mercaptoethylguanidine and guanido-ethyl disulfide, at doses that moderately reduced the ·NO and 3-nitrotyrosine levels, paradoxically diminished the parasitemia in both strains. Nitrated proteins were also demonstrated in myocardial cells of infected mice. These data suggest that the control of T. cruzi infection depends not only on the capacity to produce ·NO, but also on its metabolic fate, including the generation of nitrating species that may constitute an important element in parasite resistance and collateral myocardial damage.

  6. Secretome analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi by proteomics studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Yves Brossas

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is a debilitating often fatal disease resulting from infection by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Chagas disease is endemic in 21 countries of the Americas, and it is an emerging disease in other countries as a result of migration. Given the chronic nature of the infection where intracellular parasites persist for years, the diagnosis of T. cruzi by direct detection is difficult, whereas serologic tests though sensitive may yield false-positive results. The development of new rapid test based on the identification of soluble parasitic antigens in serum would be a real innovation in the diagnosis of Chagas disease.To identify new soluble biomarkers that may improve diagnostic tests, we investigated the proteins secreted by T. cruzi using mass spectrometric analyses of conditioned culture media devoid of serum collected during the emergence of trypomastigotes from infected Vero cells. In addition, we compared the secretomes of two T. cruzi strains from DTU Tc VI (VD and CL Brener.Analysis of the secretome collected during the emergence of trypomastigotes from Vero cells led to the identification of 591 T. cruzi proteins. Three hundred sixty three proteins are common to both strains and most belong to different multigenic super families (i.e. TcS, GP63, MASP, and DGF1. Ultimately we have established a list of 94 secreted proteins, common to both DTU Tc VI strains that do not belong to members of multigene families.This study provides the first comparative analysis of the secretomes from two distinct T. cruzi strains of DTU TcVI. This led us to identify a subset of common secreted proteins that could potentially serve as serum markers for T. cruzi infection. Their potential could now be evaluated, with specific antibodies using sera collected from patients and residents from endemic regions.

  7. Secretome analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi by proteomics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossas, Jean-Yves; Gulin, Julián Ernesto Nicolás; Bisio, Margarita Maria Catalina; Chapelle, Manuel; Marinach-Patrice, Carine; Bordessoules, Mallaury; Palazon Ruiz, George; Vion, Jeremy; Paris, Luc; Altcheh, Jaime; Mazier, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Chagas disease is a debilitating often fatal disease resulting from infection by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Chagas disease is endemic in 21 countries of the Americas, and it is an emerging disease in other countries as a result of migration. Given the chronic nature of the infection where intracellular parasites persist for years, the diagnosis of T. cruzi by direct detection is difficult, whereas serologic tests though sensitive may yield false-positive results. The development of new rapid test based on the identification of soluble parasitic antigens in serum would be a real innovation in the diagnosis of Chagas disease. To identify new soluble biomarkers that may improve diagnostic tests, we investigated the proteins secreted by T. cruzi using mass spectrometric analyses of conditioned culture media devoid of serum collected during the emergence of trypomastigotes from infected Vero cells. In addition, we compared the secretomes of two T. cruzi strains from DTU Tc VI (VD and CL Brener). Analysis of the secretome collected during the emergence of trypomastigotes from Vero cells led to the identification of 591 T. cruzi proteins. Three hundred sixty three proteins are common to both strains and most belong to different multigenic super families (i.e. TcS, GP63, MASP, and DGF1). Ultimately we have established a list of 94 secreted proteins, common to both DTU Tc VI strains that do not belong to members of multigene families. This study provides the first comparative analysis of the secretomes from two distinct T. cruzi strains of DTU TcVI. This led us to identify a subset of common secreted proteins that could potentially serve as serum markers for T. cruzi infection. Their potential could now be evaluated, with specific antibodies using sera collected from patients and residents from endemic regions.

  8. Functional characterization of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Furtado

    Full Text Available The oxidative lesion 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG is removed during base excision repair by the 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (Ogg1. This lesion can erroneously pair with adenine, and the excision of this damaged base by Ogg1 enables the insertion of a guanine and prevents DNA mutation. In this report, we identified and characterized Ogg1 from the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (TcOgg1, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Like most living organisms, T. cruzi is susceptible to oxidative stress, hence DNA repair is essential for its survival and improvement of infection. We verified that the TcOGG1 gene encodes an 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase by complementing an Ogg1-defective Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. Heterologous expression of TcOGG1 reestablished the mutation frequency of the yeast mutant ogg1(-/- (CD138 to wild type levels. We also demonstrate that the overexpression of TcOGG1 increases T. cruzi sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2. Analysis of DNA lesions using quantitative PCR suggests that the increased susceptibility to H(2O(2 of TcOGG1-overexpressor could be a consequence of uncoupled BER in abasic sites and/or strand breaks generated after TcOgg1 removes 8-oxoG, which are not rapidly repaired by the subsequent BER enzymes. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that TcOGG1-overexpressors have reduced levels of 8-oxoG both in the nucleus and in the parasite mitochondrion. The localization of TcOgg1 was examined in parasite transfected with a TcOgg1-GFP fusion, which confirmed that this enzyme is in both organelles. Taken together, our data indicate that T. cruzi has a functional Ogg1 ortholog that participates in nuclear and mitochondrial BER.

  9. Insulin detemir treatment in diabetic cats in a practice setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoelmkjaer, Kirsten Madsen; Spodsberg, Eva-Maria Hohneck; Bjornvad, Charlotte Reinhard

    2015-02-01

    Insulin detemir is a long-acting insulin analogue and may represent a valuable treatment option for diabetic cats. So far, only one study addressing detemir treatment of diabetic cats has been published, and this was based on an intensive blood glucose monitoring protocol. The aim of the current, retrospective study was to evaluate the effect of detemir therapy in diabetic cats in a general clinical setting. Fourteen diabetic cats with a follow-up period of at least 3 months were included. Data were collected from medical records at the University Hospital for Companion Animals, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Thirteen of 14 cats achieved moderate or excellent control of clinical symptoms within the initial 3 months of detemir therapy, including five cats previously treated unsuccessfully with other types of insulin. Clinical improvements were noted after 1 month of therapy and continued over time. Three cats achieved remission within the initial 3 months and none experienced a diabetic relapse during the study period. One cat achieved remission after 13 months of therapy. Improvements in clinical symptoms were markedly better than indicated by blood glucose and serum fructosamine concentrations. The safety of detemir was very high, with only two reported episodes of clinical hypoglycaemia, neither of which required veterinary attention. Based on these results detemir can be recommended for the treatment of diabetic cats, including cats previously treated unsuccessfully with other types of insulin. © ISFM and AAFP 2014.

  10. Online Relinquishments of Dogs and Cats in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazel, Susan J; Jenvey, Caitlin J; Tuke, Jonathan

    2018-02-07

    While traditionally people relinquish their pets to an animal shelter or pound, the internet provides a newer method to re-home. We analyzed advertisements (ads) on the largest website in Australia for trading dogs and cats: Gumtree. Data was collected in 2016. Dogs were sampled on 7, 16 and 24 February 2016 and cats on 9, 19 and 26 February 2016, with 2640 ads for relinquished dogs, and 2093 ads for relinquished cats. It was estimated >31,000 puppies/dogs and >24,000 kittens/cats are relinquished on Gumtree per year. The median age of dogs was 1.42 and cats 0.9 years of age. There were 23% of dog ads and 62% of cat ads for free animals. Compared to the human population, there were proportionately more ads in Queensland and fewer ads in Victoria. A total of 15 people were surveyed who had relinquished a dog or cat using Gumtree. The dog owners used Gumtree for two reasons: because they believed the shelters were full (n = 4); and they wanted to see/interview the new owner (n = 2). For cat owners: they had originally got the cat on Gumtree (n = 2); they use Gumtree for other things, and it works (n = 2), and; they wanted to see/interview the new owner (n = 2). The data collected will be valuable for implementation of policy and interventions to protect the welfare of unwanted dogs and cats.

  11. The Population Origins and Expansion of Feral Cats in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurchenko, Andrey A.; David, Victor A.; Scott, Rachael; Koepfli, Klaus-Peter; Driscoll, Carlos; O’Brien, Stephen J.; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn

    2016-01-01

    The historical literature suggests that in Australia, the domestic cat (Felis catus) had a European origin [~200 years before present (ybp)], but it is unclear if cats arrived from across the Asian land bridge contemporaneously with the dingo (4000 ybp), or perhaps immigrated ~40000 ybp in association with Aboriginal settlement from Asia. The origin of cats in Australia is important because the continent has a complex and ancient faunal assemblage that is dominated by endemic rodents and marsupials and lacks the large placental carnivores found on other large continents. Cats are now ubiquitous across the entire Australian continent and have been implicit in the range contraction or extinction of its small to medium sized (cats using 15 short tandem repeat (STR) genomic markers. Their origin appears to come exclusively from European founders. Feral cats in continental Australia exhibit high genetic diversity in comparison with the low diversity found in populations of feral cats living on islands. The genetic structure is consistent with a rapid westerly expansion from eastern Australia and a limited expansion in coastal Western Australia. Australian cats show modest if any population structure and a close genetic alignment with European feral cats as compared to cats from Asia, the Christmas and Cocos (Keeling) Islands (Indian Ocean), and European wildcats (F. silvestris silvestris). PMID:26647063

  12. Development of the cat-owner relationship scale (CORS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Tiffani J; Bowen, Jonathan; Fatjó, Jaume; Calvo, Paula; Holloway, Anna; Bennett, Pauleen C

    2017-08-01

    Characteristics of the human-animal bond can be influenced by both owner-related and pet-related factors, which likely differ between species. Three studies adapted the Monash Dog-Owner Relationship Scale (MDORS) to permit assessment of human-cat interactions as perceived by the cat's owner. In Study 1293 female cat owners completed a modified version of the MDORS, where 'dog' was replaced with 'cat' for all items. Responses were compared with a matched sample of female dog owners. A partial least squares discriminant analysis revealed systematic differences between cat and dog owners in the Dog (Cat)-Owner Interaction subscale (MDORS subscale 1), but not for Perceived Emotional Closeness or Perceived Costs (Subscales 2 and 3). Study 2 involved analysis of free-text descriptions of cat-owner interactions provided by 61 female cat owners. Text mining identified key words which were used to create additional questions for a new Cat-Owner Interaction subscale. In Study 3, the resulting cat-owner relationship scale (CORS) was tested in a group of 570 cat owners. The main psychometric properties of the scale, including internal consistency and factor structure, were evaluated. We propose that this scale can be used to accurately assess owner perceptions of their relationship with their cat. A modified scale, combining items from the CORS and MDORS (a C/DORS), is also provided for when researchers would find it desirable to compare human-cat and human-dog interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Efficacy of some essential oils in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of orally administered Cymbopogon citratus, Zingiber officinale and Syzygium aromaticum essential oils (EOs) in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Methods: Three experiments were conducted with 48 Swiss mice each. The animals were inoculated with 2 x 106 metacyclic ...

  14. Trypanocidal action of bisphosphonium salts through a mitochondrial target in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alkhaldi, A.A.M.; Martínek, Jan; Panicucci, Brian; Dardonville, C.; Zíková, Alena; de Koning, H.P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2016), s. 23-34 ISSN 2211-3207 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LL1205 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanosoma brucei * mitochondrion * FoF1 ATPase * succinate dehydrogenase * phosphonium salt * SDH complex Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.809, year: 2016

  15. Novel molecular mechanism for targeting the parasite Trypanosoma brucei with snake venom toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martos Esteban, Andrea; Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard; Carrington, Mark

    Trypanosoma brucei is a parasitic protozoan species capable to infecting insect vectors whose bite further produces African sleeping sickness inhuman beings. During parasites’extracellular lives in the mammalian host, its outer coat, mainly composedof Variable surface glycoproteins (VSGs)[2], und...

  16. AcSDKP is down-regulated in anaemia induced by Trypanosoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We studied the responses of a tetrapeptide, AcSDKP, and IL-10, and their association with bone marrow nucleated cells in a Trypanosoma brucei brucei GVR35 experimental infection model. Methods Mouse infection was done intraperitoneally with 1 × 103 trypanosomes/mL. Mice were either infected or left uninfected (N ...

  17. Lack of evidence for integration of Trypanosoma cruzi minicircle DNA in South American human genomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flegontova, Olga; Lukeš, Julius; Flegontov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 5 (2012), s. 437-441 ISSN 0020-7519 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanosoma cruzi * Kinetoplast minicircle * Chagas disease * Horizontal gene transfer * Human genome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.637, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0020751912000781

  18. Particle-bound enzymes in the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opperdoes, F. R.; Borst, P.; Spits, H.

    1977-01-01

    We have screened the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei for the presence of enzymes that could serve as markers for the microbodies and the highly repressed mitochondrion of this organism. None of seven known microbody enzymes were detected at all, but glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase, ATPase,

  19. Contribution of glucose transport to the control of the glycolytic flux in Trypanosoma brucei.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, B.M.; Walsh, M.C.; ter Kuile, B.; Mensonides, F.I.C.; Michels, P.A.M.; Opperdoes, F.R.; Westerhoff, H.V.

    1999-01-01

    The rate of glucose transport across the plasma membrane of the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei was modulated by titration of the hexose transporter with the inhibitor phloretin, and the effect on the glycolytic flux was measured. A rapid glucose uptake assay was developed to measure the

  20. The promoter for a variant surface glycoprotein gene expression site in Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomerdijk, J. C.; Ouellette, M.; ten Asbroek, A. L.; Kieft, R.; Bommer, A. M.; Clayton, C. E.; Borst, P.

    1990-01-01

    The variant-specific surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene 221 of Trypanosoma brucei is transcribed as part of a 60 kb expression site (ES). We have identified the promoter controlling this multigene transcription unit by the use of 221 chromosome-enriched DNA libraries and VSG gene 221 expression site

  1. Galactonolactone oxidoreductase from Trypanosoma cruzi employs a FAD cofactor for the synthesis of vitamin C.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kudryashova, E.V.; Leferink, N.G.H.; Slot, I.G.M.; Berkel, van W.J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas' disease, is unable to salvage vitamin C (l-ascorbate) from its environment and relies on de novo synthesis for its survival. Because humans lack the capacity to synthesize ascorbate, the trypanosomal enzymes involved in ascorbate biosynthesis are

  2. Functions and cellular localization of cysteine desulfurase and selenocysteine lyase in Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poliak, Pavel; Van Hoewyk, D.; Oborník, Miroslav; Zíková, Alena; Stuart, K. D.; Tachezy, J.; Pilon, M.; Lukeš, Julius

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 277, č. 2 (2010), s. 383-393 ISSN 1742-464X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1667 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Fe–S cluster * mitochondrion * RNAi * selenoprotein * Trypanosoma Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.129, year: 2010

  3. Trypanosoma cruzi in the chicken model: Chagas-like heart disease in the absence of parasitism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Teixeira, A.R.L.; Gomes, C.; Nitz, N.; Sousa, A.O.; Alvez, R.M.; Guimaro, M.C.; Cordeiro, C.; Bernal, F.M.; Rosa, A.C.; Hejnar, Jiří; Leonardecz, E.; Hecht, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 3 (2011), e1000 ISSN 1935-2735 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Chagas disease * Trypanosoma cruzi * kDNA minicircles * inbred chicken Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.716, year: 2011

  4. Nucleic acid sequence-based amplification with oligochromatography for detection of Trypanosoma brucei in clinical samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugasa, Claire M.; Laurent, Thierry; Schoone, Gerard J.; Kager, Piet A.; Lubega, George W.; Schallig, Henk D. F. H.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular tools, such as real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) and PCR, have been developed to detect Trypanosoma brucei parasites in blood for the diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). Despite good sensitivity, these techniques are not implemented in HAT control

  5. Risk Factors and Screening for Trypanosoma cruzi Infection of Dutch Blood Donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, Ed; Hogema, Boris M.; Molier, Michel; Bart, Aldert; Zaaijer, Hans L.

    2016-01-01

    Blood donors unaware of Trypanosoma cruzi infection may donate infectious blood. Risk factors and the presence of T. cruzi antibodies in at-risk Dutch blood donors were studied to assess whether specific blood safety measures are warranted in the Netherlands. Birth in a country endemic for Chagas

  6. The effect of the diterpene 5-epi-icetexone on the cell cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano, E.; Barrera, P.; Tonn, C.; Nieto, M.; Sartor, T.; Sosa, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous natural compounds have been used against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease. Here, we studied the effect of the diterpene 5-epi-icetexone on growth and morphology of parasites synchronized with hydroxyurea, at different periods of time after removal of the nucleotide.

  7. Maxi-circles and mini-circles in kinetoplast DNA from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Leon; A.C.C. Frasch; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); F. Fase-Fowler; P. Borst (Piet); F. Brunel; J. Davison

    1980-01-01

    textabstractMaxi-circles are a minor component of kinetoplast DNAs from all trypanosomatids studied, but they have not previously been found in Trypanosoma cruzi; We have spread intact kinetoplast DNA from the epimastigotes of strain Y in protein monolayers and analysed the mini-circle networks by

  8. Kinetic properties and inhibition of Trypanosoma cruzi 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurtado-Guerrrero, Ramón; Pena Diaz, Javier; Montalvetti, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    A detailed kinetic analysis of the recombinant soluble enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR) from Trypanosoma cruzi has been performed. The enzyme catalyzes the normal anabolic reaction and the reductant is NADPH. It also catalyzes the oxidation of mevalonate but at a lower...

  9. Characterization and immobilization of engineered sialidases from Trypanosoma rangeli for transsialylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuner, Birgitte; González-Delgado, Isabel; Holck, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    A sialidase (EC 3.2.1.18; GH 33) from non-pathogenic Trypanosoma rangeli has been engineered with the aim of improving its transsialylation activity. Recently, two engineered variants containing 15 and 16 amino acid substitutions, respectively, were found to exhibit significantly improved...

  10. Isolation of a human serum-resistant Trypanosoma brucei from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A strain of trypanosome was isolated from one of the trade pigs held at the Orie Orba market lairage in Udenu Local Government Area of Enugu State. It was identified by its motility in wet blood film and morphological characteristics in Giemsa-stained thin blood film as Trypanosoma brucei. To further characterize the ...

  11. Mixed infection with Trypanoplasma borreli and Trypanosoma carassii induces protection: Involvement of cross-reactive antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joerink, M.; Groeneveld, A.; Ducro, B.J.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Wiegertjes, G.F.

    2007-01-01

    Mixed infections with Trypanoplasma borreli and Trypanosoma carassii in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) are commonly found in nature. So far, in the laboratory, only mono-parasitic infections have been examined in more detail. We studied the influence of mixed rather than mono-parasitic infections

  12. Analysis of the mitochondrial maxicircle of Trypanosoma lewisi, a neglected human pathogen

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lin, R.-H.; Lai, D.-H.; Zheng, L.-L.; Wu, J.; Lukeš, Julius; Hide, G.; Lun, Z.-R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 8, 30 December 2015 (2015), s. 665 ISSN 1756-3305 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanosoma lewisi * Kinetoplast maxicircle * Mitochondrial DNA * RNA editing * Palindrome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2015

  13. Futile import of tRNAs and proteins into the mitochondrion of Trypanosoma brucei evansi

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paris, Zdeněk; Hashimi, Hassan; Lun, Sijia; Alfonzo, J. D.; Lukeš, Julius

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 176, č. 2 (2011), 116-120 ISSN 0166-6851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1667; GA MŠk LC07032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Trypanosoma * tRNA * Protein import * Mitochondrion * Kinetoplast Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.551, year: 2011

  14. Comprehensive proteomic analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote cell surface proteins by two complementary methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Queiroz, Rayner M L; Charneau, Sébastien; Motta, Flávia N

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan that causes Chagas' disease, a neglected infectious illness that affects millions of people, mostly in Latin America. Here, the cell surface subproteome of the T. cruzi epimastigote life form was characterized. In order to prepare samples enriched in epimastigote...

  15. Molecular characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi Mexican strains and their behavior in the mouse experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Gómez-Hernández

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: For a long time, the importance of Chagas disease in Mexico, where many regarded it as an exotic malady, was questioned. Considering the great genetic diversity among isolates of Trypanosoma cruzi, the importance of this biological characterization, and the paucity of information on the clinical and biological aspects of Chagas disease in Mexico, this study aimed to identify the molecular and biological characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi isolates from different endemic areas of this country, especially of the State of Jalisco. METHODS: Eight Mexican Trypanosoma cruzi strains were biologically and genetically characterized (PCR specific for Trypanosoma cruzi, multiplex-PCR, amplification of space no transcript of the genes of the mini-exon, amplification of polymorphic regions of the mini-exon, classification by amplification of intergenic regions of the spliced leader genes, RAPD - (random amplified polymorphic DNA. RESULTS: Two profiles of parasitaemia were observed, patent (peak parasitaemia of 4.6×10(6 to 10(7 parasites/mL and subpatent. In addition, all isolates were able to infect 100% of the animals. The isolates mainly displayed tropism for striated (cardiac and skeletal muscle. PCR amplification of the mini-exon gene classified the eight strains as TcI. The RAPD technique revealed intraspecies variation among isolates, distinguishing strains isolated from humans and triatomines and according to geographic origin. CONCLUSIONS: The Mexican T. cruzi strains are myotrophic and belong to group TcI.

  16. Non-cytochrome mediated mitochondrial ATP production in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bienen, E. J.; Maturi, R. K.; Pollakis, G.; Clarkson, A. B.

    1993-01-01

    The life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei brucei involves a series of differentiation steps characterized by marked changes in mitochondrial development and function. The bloodstream forms of this parasite completely lack cytochromes and have not been considered to have any Krebs cycle function. It has

  17. Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei do not use Krebs cycle activity for energy generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weelden, van S.W.H.; Fast, B.; Vogt, A.; Meer, van der P.; Saas, J.; Hellemond, van J.J.; Tielens, A.G.M.; Boshart, M.

    2003-01-01

    The importance of a functional Krebs cycle for energy generation in the procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei was investigated under physiological conditions during logarithmic phase growth of a pleomorphic parasite strain. Wild type procyclic cells and mutants with targeted deletion of the gene

  18. Dynamic Modelling under Uncertainty : The Case of Trypanosoma brucei Energy Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achcar, Fiona; Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Barrett, Michael P.; Breitling, Rainer; Papin, Jason A.

    Kinetic models of metabolism require detailed knowledge of kinetic parameters. However, due to measurement errors or lack of data this knowledge is often uncertain. The model of glycolysis in the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei is a particularly well analysed example of a quantitative

  19. Determinants of Cat Choice and Outcomes for Adult Cats and Kittens Adopted from an Australian Animal Shelter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Sarah; Paterson, Mandy; Vankan, Dianne; Morton, John; Bennett, Pauleen; Phillips, Clive

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary Commonly, more adult cats than kittens are euthanized in animal shelters. We surveyed 382 cat adopters to assess adoption outcomes and potential determinants of adopters’ choice of cat age group and price. Most adopters had benevolent motivations for adopting from the shelter and had put considerable thought into the adoption and responsible ownership requirements. However, adult cat adopters were more likely to have been influenced by price than kitten adopters. Adoption outcomes were generally positive in all age and adoption price groups. This study provides evidence to inform the design of strategies to encourage adult cat adoptions. Abstract The percentage of adult cats euthanized in animal shelters is greater than that of kittens because adult cats are less likely to be adopted. This study aimed to provide evidence to inform the design of strategies to encourage adult cat adoptions. One such strategy is to discount adoption prices, but there are concerns that this may result in poor adoption outcomes. We surveyed 382 cat adopters at the time of adoption, to assess potential determinants of adopters’ cat age group choice (adult or kitten) and, for adult cat adopters, the price they are willing to pay. The same respondents were surveyed again 6–12 months after the adoption to compare outcomes between cat age groups and between adult cats in two price categories. Most adopters had benevolent motivations for adopting from the shelter and had put considerable thought into the adoption and requirements for responsible ownership. However, adult cat adopters were more likely to have been influenced by price than kitten adopters. Adoption outcomes were generally positive for both adult cats and kittens and for adult cats adopted at low prices. The latter finding alleviates concerns about the outcomes of “low-cost” adoptions in populations, such as the study population, and lends support for the use of “low-cost” adoptions as an option for

  20. Determinants of Cat Choice and Outcomes for Adult Cats and Kittens Adopted from an Australian Animal Shelter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Zito

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The percentage of adult cats euthanized in animal shelters is greater than that of kittens because adult cats are less likely to be adopted. This study aimed to provide evidence to inform the design of strategies to encourage adult cat adoptions. One such strategy is to discount adoption prices, but there are concerns that this may result in poor adoption outcomes. We surveyed 382 cat adopters at the time of adoption, to assess potential determinants of adopters’ cat age group choice (adult or kitten and, for adult cat adopters, the price they are willing to pay. The same respondents were surveyed again 6–12 months after the adoption to compare outcomes between cat age groups and between adult cats in two price categories. Most adopters had benevolent motivations for adopting from the shelter and had put considerable thought into the adoption and requirements for responsible ownership. However, adult cat adopters were more likely to have been influenced by price than kitten adopters. Adoption outcomes were generally positive for both adult cats and kittens and for adult cats adopted at low prices. The latter finding alleviates concerns about the outcomes of “low-cost” adoptions in populations, such as the study population, and lends support for the use of “low-cost” adoptions as an option for attempting to increase adoption rates. In addition, the results provide information that can be used to inform future campaigns aimed at increasing the number of adult cat adoptions, particularly in devising marketing strategies for adult cats.

  1. Development of an operational specific CAT risk (SCATR) index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, J. L.; Haines, P. A.; Luers, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    The original formulations of Roach (1970) and Oard (1974) for the calculation of clear air turbulence (CAT) potential from synoptic scale data were extended. An index which gives a measure of the specific risk of encountering CAT - the specific clear air turbulence risk (SCATR) index - was defined. This index takes into account both the locally and advected contributions to the energy necessary for CAT. The advected contribution is associated with the role of atmospheric gravity waves. The SCATR index was calculated for a number of cases where documented encounters with CAT occurred. Of particular interest were those made for cases involving severe CAT. The results for the two severe CAT cases run were quite impressive and elicited considerable interest from operational aviation meteorologists.

  2. Ultrastructural myocardial changes in seven cats with spontaneous hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Liselotte Bruun; Prats Gavalda, Clara; Hyttel, Poul

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common heart disease in cats and shares clinical and pathological characteristics with human HCM. Little is known about the pathogenic mechanisms underlying development of spontaneous feline HCM. ANIMALS: The study population consisted...... of seven cats diagnosed with HCM and eight age-matched cats with no evidence of cardiac disease. METHODS: Fresh myocardial biopsies taken from the middle of the left ventricular posterior free wall were obtained and examined with transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS: Electron microscopic examination...... showed ultrastructural aberrations of the myocardial cytoarchitecture and of the interstitium in the seven cats with HCM. In the most severely affected cats the myofibrils were disorganized and subsarcolemmal mitochondria were depleted. In control cats, contraction band artifacts were commonly seen...

  3. Susceptibility of Domestic Cats to Chronic Wasting Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalls, Amy V.; Seelig, Davis M.; Kraft, Susan L.; Carnes, Kevin; Anderson, Kelly R.; Hayes-Klug, Jeanette; Hoover, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    Domestic and nondomestic cats have been shown to be susceptible to feline spongiform encephalopathy (FSE), almost certainly caused by consumption of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)-contaminated meat. Because domestic and free-ranging nondomestic felids scavenge cervid carcasses, including those in areas affected by chronic wasting disease (CWD), we evaluated the susceptibility of the domestic cat (Felis catus) to CWD infection experimentally. Cohorts of 5 cats each were inoculated intracerebrally (i.c.) or orally (p.o.) with CWD-infected deer brain. At 40 and 42 months postinoculation, two i.c.-inoculated cats developed signs consistent with prion disease, including a stilted gait, weight loss, anorexia, polydipsia, patterned motor behaviors, head and tail tremors, and ataxia, and the cats progressed to terminal disease within 5 months. Brains from these two cats were pooled and inoculated into cohorts of cats by the i.c., p.o., and intraperitoneal and subcutaneous (i.p./s.c.) routes. Upon subpassage, feline CWD was transmitted to all i.c.-inoculated cats with a decreased incubation period of 23 to 27 months. Feline-adapted CWD (FelCWD) was demonstrated in the brains of all of the affected cats by Western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed abnormalities in clinically ill cats, which included multifocal T2 fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) signal hyperintensities, ventricular size increases, prominent sulci, and white matter tract cavitation. Currently, 3 of 4 i.p./s.c.- and 2 of 4 p.o. secondary passage-inoculated cats have developed abnormal behavior patterns consistent with the early stage of feline CWD. These results demonstrate that CWD can be transmitted and adapted to the domestic cat, thus raising the issue of potential cervid-to-feline transmission in nature. PMID:23236066

  4. Affectionate Interactions of Cats with Children Having Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynette A. Hart

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mental and physical benefits of dogs have been reported for adults and children with special needs, but less is known about benefits of cats for children. A cat that can be held by a child could provide important therapeutic companionship for children with severe or less severe autism spectrum disorder (ASD who otherwise may lack prosocial behaviors. Because relatively little is known about the behavior of cats around children, we conducted this study. Phase 1 gathered web-survey data from families having an adult cat and a child with ASD (n = 64. In Phase 2, there were direct telephone interviews of parents having a child with severe ASD (n = 16 or less severe ASD (n = 11, or typical development (n = 17. From the Phase 1 web survey of families with ASD children (full range of severities, affectionate interactions of the cats with children were common. Most parents with ASD children volunteered positive comments regarding the cat, such as calming the child, being a soothing protector or a guardian. In the interviews in Phase 2, for all three groups, most parents characterized cats as at least moderately affectionate toward the child. However, cats living with severe ASD children were reported to exhibit less affection than those living with typically developing children or children with less severe ASD. A minority of cats in each group showed some aggression to the specified child; this was not elevated with ASD children. Responses suggested that the cats adopted as kittens were more affectionate and less aggressive to all categories of children than those adopted as adults. Overall, participants reported that ASD children’s behaviors indicated that they valued the relationship with the cat, similar to typically developing children, pointing to the importance and potential usefulness of selecting affectionate and compatible cats for ASD children.

  5. Transient post-traumatic hemidiaphragmatic paralysis in two cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignoli, M; Toniato, M; Rossi, F; Terragni, R; Manzini, M; Franchi, A; Pozzi, L

    2002-07-01

    A diagnosis of post-traumatic hemidiaphragmatic paralysis was made in two cats. Both cats had a history of trauma and paradoxical inward movement of the abdominal wall at inspiration. Thoracic radiographs were taken at inspiration and expiration. Although the images were suggestive of hemidiaphragmatic paralysis, definitive diagnosis was reached by fluoroscopy in one cat and by ultrasonography in the second. Both cases resolved spontaneously and diaphragmatic function was normal at follow-up.

  6. Affectionate Interactions of Cats with Children Having Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Lynette A; Thigpen, Abigail P; Willits, Neil H; Lyons, Leslie A; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Hart, Benjamin L

    2018-01-01

    Mental and physical benefits of dogs have been reported for adults and children with special needs, but less is known about benefits of cats for children. A cat that can be held by a child could provide important therapeutic companionship for children with severe or less severe autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who otherwise may lack prosocial behaviors. Because relatively little is known about the behavior of cats around children, we conducted this study. Phase 1 gathered web-survey data from families having an adult cat and a child with ASD ( n  = 64). In Phase 2, there were direct telephone interviews of parents having a child with severe ASD ( n  = 16) or less severe ASD ( n  = 11), or typical development ( n  = 17). From the Phase 1 web survey of families with ASD children (full range of severities), affectionate interactions of the cats with children were common. Most parents with ASD children volunteered positive comments regarding the cat, such as calming the child, being a soothing protector or a guardian. In the interviews in Phase 2, for all three groups, most parents characterized cats as at least moderately affectionate toward the child. However, cats living with severe ASD children were reported to exhibit less affection than those living with typically developing children or children with less severe ASD. A minority of cats in each group showed some aggression to the specified child; this was not elevated with ASD children. Responses suggested that the cats adopted as kittens were more affectionate and less aggressive to all categories of children than those adopted as adults. Overall, participants reported that ASD children's behaviors indicated that they valued the relationship with the cat, similar to typically developing children, pointing to the importance and potential usefulness of selecting affectionate and compatible cats for ASD children.

  7. RadCat 2.0 User Guide.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, Douglas.; Weiner, Ruth F.; Mills, George Scott; Hamp, Steve C.; O' Donnell, Brandon, M.; Orcutt, David J.; Heames, Terence J.; Hinojosa, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    This document provides a detailed discussion and a guide for the use of the RadCat 2.0 Graphical User Interface input file generator for the RADTRAN 5.5 code. The differences between RadCat 2.0 and RadCat 1.0 can be attributed to the differences between RADTRAN 5 and RADTRAN 5.5 as well as clarification for some of the input parameters. 3

  8. Polycystic kidney disease in a family of Persian cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biller, D S; Chew, D J; DiBartola, S P

    1990-04-15

    A 6-year-old Persian cat was determined to have polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Because of 3 previous clinical reports of PKD in Persian cats, the offspring were examined by use of ultrasonography, which provided evidence of PKD in 3 of the 4 offspring. Because of the genetic transmission of this disease, breeders should be advised not to breed PKD-positive Persian cats.

  9. A CASE OF POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE IN A PERSIAN CAT

    OpenAIRE

    KARABAGLI, Murat; AKDOGAN KAYMAZ, Alev

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Feline polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is an inherited autosomal dominant disease that has been identified in Persian cats and Persian related breeds such as the Exotic Shorthair cats. PKD has been reported sporadically in the veterinary literature and progress asymptomaticly until the renal deficiency is observed. Diagnosis of the PKD can be carried out by abdominal ultrasonography and DNA test in 7 weeks old. Our case was a 7 years old male Persian cat which had been brought to Dep...

  10. Renal disease in cats infected with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, K J; Levy, J K; Edinboro, C H; Vaden, S L; Tompkins, M B

    2012-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection cause similar clinical syndromes of immune dysregulation, opportunistic infections, inflammatory diseases, and neoplasia. Renal disease is the 4th most common cause of death associated with HIV infection. To investigate the association between FIV infection and renal disease in cats. Client-owned cats (153 FIV-infected, 306 FIV-noninfected) and specific-pathogen-free (SPF) research colony cats (95 FIV-infected, 98 FIV-noninfected). A mixed retrospective/prospective cross-sectional study. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine, urine specific gravity (USG), and urine protein:creatinine ratio (UPC) data were compared between FIV-infected and FIV-noninfected cats. In FIV-infected cats, total CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes were measured using flow cytometry, and CD4+:CD8+ T lymphocyte ratio was calculated. Renal azotemia was defined as a serum creatinine ≥ 1.9 mg/dL with USG ≤ 1.035. Proteinuria was defined as a UPC > 0.4 with an inactive urine sediment. Among the client-owned cats, no association was detected between FIV infection and renal azotemia (P = .24); however, a greater proportion of FIV-infected cats were proteinuric (25.0%, 16 of 64 cats) compared to FIV-noninfected cats (10.3%, 20 of 195 cats) (P FIV-infected cats, but UPC was positively correlated with the CD4+:CD8+ T lymphocyte ratio (Spearman's rho = 0.37, P = .01). Among the SPF research colony cats, no association was detected between FIV infection and renal azotemia (P = .21) or proteinuria (P = .25). Proteinuria but not azotemia was associated with natural FIV infection. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  11. Resistive index for kidney evaluation in normal and diseased cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipisca, Vlad; Murino, Carla; Cortese, Laura; Mennonna, Giuseppina; Auletta, Luigi; Vulpe, Vasile; Meomartino, Leonardo

    2016-06-01

    The objectives were to determine the resistive index (RI) in normal cats and in cats with various renal diseases, and to evaluate the effect of age on RI. The subjects were cats that had ultrasonography (US) of the urinary tract and RI measurement at our centre between January 2003 and April 2014. Based on clinical evaluation, biochemical and haematological tests, urinalysis and US, the cats were classified as healthy or diseased. RI measurements were made from the interlobar or arcuate arteries. Data were analysed for differences between the right and the left kidney, the two sexes, different age groups in healthy cats, and between healthy and diseased cats. A total of 116 cats (68 males, 48 females) were included: 24 healthy and 92 diseased. In the healthy cats, RI (mean ± SD) differed significantly (P = 0.02) between the right kidney (0.54 ± 0.07) and the left kidney (0.59 ± 0.08). For the left kidney, RI was significantly higher in cats with chronic kidney disease (0.73 ± 0.12) and acute kidney injury (0.72 ± 0.08) (P = 0.0008). For the right kidney, RI was significantly higher in cats with chronic kidney disease (0.72 ± 0.11), acute kidney injury (0.74 ± 0.08), polycystic kidney disease (0.77 ± 0.11) and renal tumour (0.74 ± 0.001) (P cats, useful in the differential diagnosis of diffuse renal diseases. While it does not change with the age of the cat, ultrasonographers should be aware that RI may differ between the two kidneys. © ISFM and AAFP 2015.

  12. Control and regulation of gene expression: quantitative analysis of the expression of phosphoglycerate kinase in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, J.R.; Stewart, M.; Luu, V.-D.; van Tuijl, J.H.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Clayton, C.; Bakker, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    Isoenzymes of phosphoglycerate kinase in Trypanosoma brucei are differentially expressed in its two main life stages. This study addresses how the organism manages to make sufficient amounts of the isoenzyme with the correct localization, which processes (transcription, splicing, and RNA

  13. Ultrasonographic features of intestinal adenocarcinoma in five cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivers, B.J.; Walter, P.A.; Feeney, D.A.; Johnston, G.R.

    1997-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma, followed by lymphosarcoma, are the most common feline intestinal neoplasms. Clinicopathological, survey radiographic, and ultrasonographic findings of five cats with intestinal adenocarcinoma are reported. An abdominal mass was palpable in all five cats, but the mass could be localized to bowel in only two cats. Radiographically an abdominal mass was detected in only one cat. Ultrasonographically there was a segmental intestinal mural mass in all five cats. The mass was characterized by circumferential bowel wall thickening with transmural loss of normal sonographic wall layers. In one cat, the circumferential symmetric hypoechoic bowel wall thickening was similar to that reported for segmental lymphoma. In the other four cats, the sonographic features of the thickened bowel wall were varied, being mixed echogenicity and asymmetric in 3 cats and mixed echogenicity and symmetric in one. The results of the present report suggest that sonographic observation of mixed echogenicity segmental intestinal wall thickening in the cat represents adenocarcinoma rather than lymphosarcoma, although other infiltrative diseases should be considered

  14. Fibrinous pericarditis secondary to bacterial infection in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, Michihito; Kurashima, Chihiro; Shimbo, Genya; Omura, Hiroshi; Koyama, Kenji; Horiuchi, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Kawamoto, Keiko; Miyahara, Kazuro

    2017-06-10

    A three-year-old spayed domestic short-haired cat presented for evaluation of weight loss, cardiomegaly and pleural effusion. Echocardiographic examination demonstrated a thickened pericardium with mild pericardial effusion and a large volume of pleural effusion characterized by exudate. Although the cat was treated with antibiotics, the clinical symptoms did not improve. The cat developed dyspnea and died on day 7. Necropsy revealed a large amount of modified transudates ascites, pleural effusion and markedly dilated pericardium. Histopathological examination revealed severe exudation of fibrin and granulation tissue in a thick layer of the epicardium. The cat was diagnosed with fibrinous pericarditis secondary to bacterial infection.

  15. Radiographic assessment of laryngeal reflexes in ketamine-anesthetized cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, E.P.; Johnston, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    The competence of the laryngeal closure reflexes of cats anesthetized with ketamine was assessed. Radiographic evaluations of the respiratory and digestive tracts were made after colloidal barium suspension was instilled into the pharynges of conscious and ketamine-anesthetized cats. There was a significant ketamine dose-related response of spread of contrast medium into the supraglottic laryngeal area and into the stomach 2 minutes after contrast medium was instilled into the pharynx (P less than 0.05). Cats did not aspirate contrast medium into the lower respiratory tract. Three ketamine-anesthetized cats aspirated contrast medium into the subglottic area of the larynx, and 2 of these cats also aspirated the material into the cranial part of the trachea. This material was coughed up and swallowed within 5 minutes. Transit time of contrast medium into the stomach seemed to be increased in 11 of the 15 cats given the larger dosages of ketamine (24, 36, 48 mg/kg of body weight), compared with that in conscious cats and those given ketamine at 12 mg/kg. Competent laryngeal protective reflexes in cats can be maintained with ketamine anesthesia. Contrast radiography could be used as a diagnostic aid in ketamine-anesthetized cats suspected of laryngeal reflex abnormalities

  16. [Uroliths of cats in Switzerland from 2002 to 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, B; Brandenberger-Schenk, F; Rothenanger, E; Müller, C

    2016-10-01

    In this study data on composition of uroliths collected from cats and epidemiologic data of affected cats in Switzerland from 2002 to 2009 are summarised. Of 884 stones analysed 50% (n=441) were composed of calcium oxalate, 45% (n=398) of struvite, 3% (n=18) of ammonium urate, 1% (n=12) were mixed stones, 1% (n=9) were composed of silica, 3 stones were solidified blood, 2 consisted of cystine and 1of xanthine. 40% of the ureteral stones were composed of struvite. Domestic cats had significantly less calcium oxalate stones compared to British Shorthair or Persian cats. Cats with calcium oxalate stones were older and cats with struvite stones were younger than other affected cats. Female and male cats were equally affected with stones. Compared to studies from other countries, in Switzerland silica stones occurred more often and ureteral stones were more often composed of Struvite. The present study shows that occurrence and prevalence of urinary calculi of cats from Switzerland exhibited only slight differences to studies from other countries.

  17. Online Relinquishments of Dogs and Cats in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenvey, Caitlin J.; Tuke, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    Simple Summary The aim of this study was to analyze dog and cat advertisements on a popular online trading website in Australia in February 2016. A total of 2640 ads for dogs and 2093 ads for cats were classified as being relinquished on Gumtree. A total of 23% of dog ads and 62% of cat ads were for free animals. The median age was 1.42 years in dogs and 0.9 years in cats. Compared to the human population there were proportionately more ads in Queensland and fewer ads in Victoria. In comparison to pets from animal shelters advertised on PetRescue, there were more purebred dogs on Gumtree, although the common breeds were similar. Fifteen people who had relinquished a dog or cat on Gumtree were interviewed. They used Gumtree because they believed shelters were full, they wanted to see/interview the new owner, or because they originally got the animal on Gumtree and it works. These results shed light on a hitherto under-studied population of relinquished dogs and cats. Abstract While traditionally people relinquish their pets to an animal shelter or pound, the internet provides a newer method to re-home. We analyzed advertisements (ads) on the largest website in Australia for trading dogs and cats: Gumtree. Data was collected in 2016. Dogs were sampled on 7, 16 and 24 February 2016 and cats on 9, 19 and 26 February 2016, with 2640 ads for relinquished dogs, and 2093 ads for relinquished cats. It was estimated >31,000 puppies/dogs and >24,000 kittens/cats are relinquished on Gumtree per year. The median age of dogs was 1.42 and cats 0.9 years of age. There were 23% of dog ads and 62% of cat ads for free animals. Compared to the human population, there were proportionately more ads in Queensland and fewer ads in Victoria. A total of 15 people were surveyed who had relinquished a dog or cat using Gumtree. The dog owners used Gumtree for two reasons: because they believed the shelters were full (n = 4); and they wanted to see/interview the new owner (n = 2). For cat

  18. Cats are not small dogs: the emergence of feline medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Amy

    2006-11-01

    Cats have finally garnered the attention they deserve in veterinary medicine, however, there is still much to learn about this unique species and new challenges surface daily. For example, at the time of writing, avian influenza in cats is being closely monitored by world veterinary and health officials. Controversial topics, such as how to manage the homeless cat population, declawing, and cloning will continue to spark active debate. However, the future appears promising for cats as more veterinarians, researchers, and organizations increase their focus on felines.

  19. Infecção tripla por Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodium vivax e P. falciparum: relato de caso Triple infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Silvestre Lobão Costa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente registro acerca da identificação de infecção aguda de dois plasmódios e um Trypanosoma constitui evento raro. Pré-escolar, sexo feminino, 5 anos de idade, apresentou síndrome febril; foi submetida a exame de gota espessa no qual foram identificadas formas assexuadas e sexuadas de Plasmodium vivax e P. falciparum, respectivamente, além de tripomastigotas sanguíneos de Trypanosoma cruzi. No peridomicílio, foram encontrados insetos da espécie Rhodnius sp. Os autores reforçam a importância dos estudos dos ciclos peridomiciliares de T. cruzi em ambientes silvestres na Amazônia e discutem a importância da estratégia de vigilância continuada de Trypanosomas spp. nos exames de gota espessa.This report describes a rare case of acute infection caused by two Plasmodia and one Trypanosoma. 5 year-old female patient attending kindergarten presented persistent fever syndrome. She was submitted to thick smear exam, in which asexual and sexual forms of Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum were detected, respectively, as well as trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi. Rhodnius sp. triatomines were found in the vicinity. The authors reinforce the importance of investigating the domiciliary cycles of T. cruzi in the Amazon region. Moreover, we discuss the importance of continuous monitoring of Trypanosomas spp. in thick smear exams.

  20. The Complement System: A Prey of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidani, Kárita C. F.; Bavia, Lorena; Ambrosio, Altair R.; de Messias-Reason, Iara J.

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan parasite known to cause Chagas disease (CD), a neglected sickness that affects around 6–8 million people worldwide. Originally, CD was mainly found in Latin America but more recently, it has been spread to countries in North America, Asia, and Europe due the international migration from endemic areas. Thus, at present CD represents an important concern of global public health. Most of individuals that are infected by T. cruzi may remain in asymptomatic form all lifelong, but up to 40% of them will develop cardiomyopathy, digestive mega syndromes, or both. The interaction between the T. cruzi infective forms and host-related immune factors represents a key point for a better understanding of the physiopathology of CD. In this context, the complement, as one of the first line of host defense against infection was shown to play an important role in recognizing T. cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes and in controlling parasite invasion. The complement consists of at least 35 or more plasma proteins and cell surface receptors/regulators, which can be activated by three pathways: classical (CP), lectin (LP), and alternative (AP). The CP and LP are mainly initiated by immune complexes or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), respectively, whereas AP is spontaneously activated by hydrolysis of C3. Once activated, several relevant complement functions are generated which include opsonization and phagocytosis of particles or microorganisms and cell lysis. An important step during T. cruzi infection is when intracellular trypomastigotes are release to bloodstream where they may be target by complement. Nevertheless, the parasite uses a sequence of events in order to escape from complement-mediated lysis. In fact, several T. cruzi molecules are known to interfere in the initiation of all three pathways and in the assembly of C3 convertase, a key step in the activation of complement. Moreover, T. cruzi promotes secretion of plasma

  1. Aspects of resistance to experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Viviane Liotti

    2010-01-01

    Chagas disease, a zoonosis caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, has a wide distribution in Latin America and extends from the southern part of the United States to Argentina. A number of 10 million of infected people is estimated and another 25 million exposed to the risk. Although discovered over a century, Chagas disease is still a serious infection that causes great socioeconomic impact, with no effective treatment at the chronic phase and in which, a lack of scientific knowledge can be observed. The main goal of this work was that obtaining and using consomic strain of mice, the resistance could be investigated. Consomic strains were produced by programmed mating, in which the animals were monitored with DNA polymorphic markers, and one of his chromosomes was replaced by his homologue from another strain. As parental, were used, the inbred strains C57BL/6/J Unib with resistant phenotype (donor) and as receiver, the A/JUnib strain, that has a susceptible phenotype. These models were used to produce five consomic strains: for the chromosomes 7 (CSs7), 11 (CSs11), 14 (CSs14), 17 (CSs17) and 19 (CSs19), described by Passos et al. (2003) as important in controlling infection caused by the Y strain of T. cruzi. In experimental testing, the consomics were inoculated intraperitoneally at doses of 10 1 , 10 2 , 10 3 and 10 4 using as control, animals from both parental lines. In all consomics, resistance was higher than that observed in the susceptible parental. In a second protocol, the consomics were mated with scheduled associations and the progenies were challenged with inocula employing increasing doses of trypomastigotes. The resistance observed in this group was also higher than that observed in the parental with susceptible phenotype. The observed results demonstrate that the use of the consomic strains that were produced order to assess the contribution of each chromosome in the resistance, as well as the effects of association between chromosomes are an

  2. The Complement System: A Prey of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kárita C. F. Lidani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan parasite known to cause Chagas disease (CD, a neglected sickness that affects around 6–8 million people worldwide. Originally, CD was mainly found in Latin America but more recently, it has been spread to countries in North America, Asia, and Europe due the international migration from endemic areas. Thus, at present CD represents an important concern of global public health. Most of individuals that are infected by T. cruzi may remain in asymptomatic form all lifelong, but up to 40% of them will develop cardiomyopathy, digestive mega syndromes, or both. The interaction between the T. cruzi infective forms and host-related immune factors represents a key point for a better understanding of the physiopathology of CD. In this context, the complement, as one of the first line of host defense against infection was shown to play an important role in recognizing T. cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes and in controlling parasite invasion. The complement consists of at least 35 or more plasma proteins and cell surface receptors/regulators, which can be activated by three pathways: classical (CP, lectin (LP, and alternative (AP. The CP and LP are mainly initiated by immune complexes or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, respectively, whereas AP is spontaneously activated by hydrolysis of C3. Once activated, several relevant complement functions are generated which include opsonization and phagocytosis of particles or microorganisms and cell lysis. An important step during T. cruzi infection is when intracellular trypomastigotes are release to bloodstream where they may be target by complement. Nevertheless, the parasite uses a sequence of events in order to escape from complement-mediated lysis. In fact, several T. cruzi molecules are known to interfere in the initiation of all three pathways and in the assembly of C3 convertase, a key step in the activation of complement. Moreover, T. cruzi promotes secretion

  3. The Complement System: A Prey ofTrypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidani, Kárita C F; Bavia, Lorena; Ambrosio, Altair R; de Messias-Reason, Iara J

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan parasite known to cause Chagas disease (CD), a neglected sickness that affects around 6-8 million people worldwide. Originally, CD was mainly found in Latin America but more recently, it has been spread to countries in North America, Asia, and Europe due the international migration from endemic areas. Thus, at present CD represents an important concern of global public health. Most of individuals that are infected by T. cruzi may remain in asymptomatic form all lifelong, but up to 40% of them will develop cardiomyopathy, digestive mega syndromes, or both. The interaction between the T. cruzi infective forms and host-related immune factors represents a key point for a better understanding of the physiopathology of CD. In this context, the complement, as one of the first line of host defense against infection was shown to play an important role in recognizing T. cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes and in controlling parasite invasion. The complement consists of at least 35 or more plasma proteins and cell surface receptors/regulators, which can be activated by three pathways: classical (CP), lectin (LP), and alternative (AP). The CP and LP are mainly initiated by immune complexes or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), respectively, whereas AP is spontaneously activated by hydrolysis of C3. Once activated, several relevant complement functions are generated which include opsonization and phagocytosis of particles or microorganisms and cell lysis. An important step during T. cruzi infection is when intracellular trypomastigotes are release to bloodstream where they may be target by complement. Nevertheless, the parasite uses a sequence of events in order to escape from complement-mediated lysis. In fact, several T. cruzi molecules are known to interfere in the initiation of all three pathways and in the assembly of C3 convertase, a key step in the activation of complement. Moreover, T. cruzi promotes secretion of plasma

  4. Recent, independent and anthropogenic origins of Trypanosoma cruzi hybrids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Lewis

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The single celled eukaryote Trypanosoma cruzi, a parasite transmitted by numerous species of triatomine bug in the Americas, causes Chagas disease in humans. T. cruzi generally reproduces asexually and appears to have a clonal population structure. However, two of the six major circulating genetic lineages, TcV and TcVI, are TcII-TcIII inter-lineage hybrids that are frequently isolated from humans in regions where chronic Chagas disease is particularly severe. Nevertheless, a prevalent view is that hybridisation events in T. cruzi were evolutionarily ancient and that active recombination is of little epidemiological importance. We analysed genotypes of hybrid and non-hybrid T. cruzi strains for markers representing three distinct evolutionary rates: nuclear GPI sequences (n = 88, mitochondrial COII-ND1 sequences (n = 107 and 28 polymorphic microsatellite loci (n = 35. Using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic approaches we dated key evolutionary events in the T. cruzi clade including the emergence of hybrid lineages TcV and TcVI, which we estimated to have occurred within the last 60,000 years. We also found evidence for recent genetic exchange between TcIII and TcIV and between TcI and TcIV. These findings show that evolution of novel recombinants remains a potential epidemiological risk. The clearly distinguishable microsatellite genotypes of TcV and TcVI were highly heterozygous and displayed minimal intra-lineage diversity indicative of even earlier origins than sequence-based estimates. Natural hybrid genotypes resembled typical meiotic F1 progeny, however, evidence for mitochondrial introgression, absence of haploid forms and previous experimental crosses indicate that sexual reproduction in T. cruzi may involve alternatives to canonical meiosis. Overall, the data support two independent hybridisation events between TcII and TcIII and a recent, rapid spread of the hybrid progeny in domestic transmission cycles

  5. Nitric oxide-releasing polymeric nanoparticles against Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, A. B.; Kitice, N. A.; Pelegrino, M. T.; Lancheros, C. A. C.; Yamauchi, L. M.; Pinge-Filho, P.; Yamada-Ogatta, S. F.

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is a potentially life-threatening illness caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), and the disease remains a major health problem in many Latin American countries. Several papers report that the killing of the parasite is dependent on the production of nitric oxide (NO). The endogenous free radical NO is an important cellular signalling molecule that plays a key role in the defense against pathogens, including T. cruzi. As T. cruzi is able to compromise host macrophages decreasing endogenous NO production, the administration of exogenous NO donors represents an interesting strategy to combat Chagas disease. Thus, the aims of this study were to prepare and evaluate the antimicrobial activity of NO-releasing polymeric nanoparticles against T. cruzi. Biocompatible polymeric nanoparticles composed of chitosan/sodium tripolyphosphate(TPP) were prepared and used to encapsulate mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA), which is a thiol-containing molecule. Nitrosation of free thiols (SH) groups of MSA were performed by the addition of equimolar amount of sodium nitrite (NaNO2), leading to the formation of S-nitroso-MSA-containing nanoparticles. These polymeric nanoparticles act as spontaneous NO donors, with free NO release. The results show the formation of nanoparticles with average hydrodynamic diameter ranging from 270 to 500 nm, average of polydispersity index of 0.35, and encapsulation efficiency in the range of 99%. The NO release kinetics from the S-nitroso-MSA-containing nanoparticles showed sustained and controlled NO release over several hours. The microbicidal activity of S-nitroso-MSA-containing nanoparticles was evaluated by incubating NO-releasing nanoparticles (200 - 600 μg/mL) with replicative and non-infective epimastigote, and non-replicative and infective trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi. In addition, a significant decrease in the percentage of macrophage-infected (with amastigotes) and

  6. Diverse inhibitor chemotypes targeting Trypanosoma cruzi CYP51.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamila S Gunatilleke

    Full Text Available Chagas Disease, a WHO- and NIH-designated neglected tropical disease, is endemic in Latin America and an emerging infection in North America and Europe as a result of population moves. Although a major cause of morbidity and mortality due to heart failure, as well as inflicting a heavy economic burden in affected regions, Chagas Disease elicits scant notice from the pharmaceutical industry because of adverse economic incentives. The discovery and development of new routes to chemotherapy for Chagas Disease is a clear priority.The similarity between the membrane sterol requirements of pathogenic fungi and those of the parasitic protozoon Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas human cardiopathy, has led to repurposing anti-fungal azole inhibitors of sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51 for the treatment of Chagas Disease. To diversify the therapeutic pipeline of anti-Chagasic drug candidates we exploited an approach that included directly probing the T. cruzi CYP51 active site with a library of synthetic small molecules. Target-based high-throughput screening reduced the library of ∼104,000 small molecules to 185 hits with estimated nanomolar K(D values, while cross-validation against T. cruzi-infected skeletal myoblast cells yielded 57 active hits with EC(50 <10 µM. Two pools of hits partially overlapped. The top hit inhibited T. cruzi with EC(50 of 17 nM and was trypanocidal at 40 nM.The hits are structurally diverse, demonstrating that CYP51 is a rather permissive enzyme target for small molecules. Cheminformatic analysis of the hits suggests that CYP51 pharmacology is similar to that of other cytochromes P450 therapeutic targets, including thromboxane synthase (CYP5, fatty acid ω-hydroxylases (CYP4, 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17 and aromatase (CYP19. Surprisingly, strong similarity is suggested to glutaminyl-peptide cyclotransferase, which is unrelated to CYP51 by sequence or structure. Lead compounds developed by pharmaceutical

  7. Transmission of Donor-Derived Trypanosoma cruzi and Subsequent Development of Chagas Disease in a Lung Transplant Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Corey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Donor infection status should be considered when accepting an organ for transplant. Here we present a case of Chagas disease developing after a lung transplant where the donor was known to be Trypanosoma cruzi antibody positive. The recipient developed acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection with reactivation after treatment. Chagas disease-positive donors are likely to be encountered in the United States; donor targeted screening is needed to guide decisions regarding organ transplant and posttransplant monitoring.

  8. Medical management of gastrinoma in a cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lane

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A 7-year-old male castrated domestic short-haired cat was evaluated for a 4 week history of intermittent vomiting, ptyalism, lethargy and weight loss. Serum biochemistry revealed mild mixed hepatopathy. Abdominal ultrasonography identified multiple heterogeneous hepatic masses and a linear, hyperechoic focus with associated reverberation artifact in the wall of the stomach consistent with a gastric ulcer. Serum gastrin concentrations were markedly increased. Cytologic interpretation of a fine-needle aspirate of the hepatic masses was consistent with neuroendocrine neoplasia, and a diagnosis of gastrinoma was established. Deterioration of the cat’s condition, despite at-home acid-suppressant therapy, led to hospitalization. The cat was initially stabilized with intravenous crystalloid fluid therapy, maropitant, pantoprazole and octreotide. A continuous radiotelemetric intragastric pH monitoring system was used to monitor the response of intragastric pH to therapy. Long-term therapy was continued with omeprazole (orally q12h, octreotide (subcutaneously q8h and thrice-weekly toceranib administered orally. Toceranib therapy led to gastrointestinal upset and was discontinued. Gastric ulceration resolved within 8 weeks, and palliation of clinical signs was achieved for approximately 5 months. Relevance and novel information Including this report, only six cases of feline gastrinoma have been reported in the veterinary literature. Little is known regarding non-surgical therapy, and octreotide has not been previously reported for medical management of feline gastrinoma. Results of intragastric pH monitoring and clinical improvement suggest that medical therapy using octreotide and proton pump inhibitors represents a novel therapeutic option for cats with gastrinoma where surgical excision is not feasible.

  9. Scotopic electroretinography in fishing cat (Prionailurus viverrinus) and leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussadee, Metita; Vorawattanatham, Narathip; Pinyopummin, Anuchai; Phavaphutanon, Janjira; Thayananuphat, Aree

    2017-05-01

    To establish baseline normal scotopic electroretinograpic (ERG) parameters for two wild cat species: fishing cats (FC) and leopard cats (LC). Twelve normal, FC and eight LC kept in the Chiang Mai Night Safari Zoo, Thailand. The mean ages of FC and LC were 7.08 and 5.00 years, respectively. All animals were studied using a standard scotopic protocol of a portable, handheld, multi-species electroretinography (HMsERG). There were significant differences in the means of ERG b-wave amplitude of the rod response (Rod, 0.01 cd.s/m 2 ), a- and b-wave amplitudes of standard light intensity of rod and cone response (Std R&C, 3 cd.s/m 2 ) and b-wave amplitude of high light intensity of rod and cone response (Hi-int R&C, 10 cd.s/m 2 ) with LC having higher amplitudes than FC. There was no significant difference in a- and b- wave implicit time except for the b-wave of Hi-int (P=0.03). No significant differences were observed in b/a amplitude ratios. Data from this report provides reference values for scotopic ERG measurements in these two wild cat species. It showed that the normal scotopic ERG responses have some differences between the two species which might be due to the skull conformation, eye size or physiology of the retina. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  10. CATS Deliverable 2.2 : CATS car-to-cyclist accident parameters and test scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uittenbogaard, J.; Camp, O.M.G.C. op den; Montfort, S. van

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the work conducted within work package (WP) 2 "Test scenario definition" of the CATS project. It describes relevant accident parameters for the 5 most dominant accidents scenarios defined in WP1. The objective of this WP2 is to construct car-to-cyclist accident test scenarios

  11. CATS Deliverable 1.2 : CATS car-to-cyclist accident scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uittenbogaard, J.; Rodarius, C.; Camp, O.M.G.C. op den

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the work conducted within work package (WP) 1 "accident analysis" of the CATS project. It describes the collection of data, the analyses as well as the final accident scenarios. The objective of this WP was to analyse car-to-cyclist accident scenarios in the EU, mainly

  12. Chronic pancreatitis in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenoulis, Panagiotis G; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jorg M

    2008-03-01

    Pancreatitis is the most common disorder of the exocrine pancreas in dogs and cats. Clinical diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is challenging because the disease is usually mild or subclinical and because its clinical signs are often the same as those of complicating or concurrent diseases. Obtaining a detailed history, performing a thorough physical examination, and conducting tests that are sensitive and specific for pancreatitis are crucial in diagnosing chronic pancreatitis. Initial management of an acute episode of chronic pancreatitis largely involves supportive and dietary measures, while long-term management of chronic pancreatitis is based on dietary modification. Management of complications and concurrent diseases is crucial in animals with chronic pancreatitis.

  13. Cat eye syndrome with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masukawa, H; Ozaki, T; Nogimori, T

    1998-10-01

    A 17-year-old male diagnosed as having Cat Eye Syndrome (CES) with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism showed short stature and no development of secondary sex characteristics. Exogeneous gonadotropin replacement therapy combining human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG) was started. As a result, the short stature and androgen deficiency were relieved. The critical region of CES was tetrasomy of 22 pter-->q11. Abnormalities of other chromosomes which cause hypogonadotropic hypogonadism may exist, thus further investigation is needed.

  14. Eurytrema procyonis and pancreatitis in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyhnal, Kristin K; Barr, Stephen C; Hornbuckle, William E; Yeager, Amy E; Wade, Susan E; Frongillo, Marguerite F; Simpson, Kenneth W; Bowman, Dwight D

    2008-08-01

    A young adult male domestic shorthair cat was presented for physical examination, routine vaccinations, and a fecal examination. Physical examination revealed no significant abnormalities. Eggs of the raccoon pancreatic fluke Eurytrema procyonis were detected by fecal flotation. Results of a complete blood count and serum biochemistry panel were normal. Abdominal sonography revealed an enlarged hypoechoic pancreas with a hyperechoic rim, and a distended and thickened pancreatic duct. Serum pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (PLI) was increased. These findings supported the possibility of fluke-associated pancreatitis. Treatment with praziquantel/pyrantel/febantel was associated with resolution of sonographic abnormalities and normalization of PLI.

  15. Prostatic abscess in a neutered cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordecai, Adam; Liptak, Julius M; Hofstede, Tamara; Stalker, Margaret; Kruth, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    A 6-year-old, male castrated domestic shorthair cat was presented for evaluation of lethargy, vomiting, anorexia, and constipation. Physical examination revealed an elevated body temperature and an extramural colonic mass. Abdominal ultrasonography demonstrated a hypoechoic mass measuring 2.2 cm in maximum dimension immediately caudal to the bladder. Cytological evaluation of a fine-needle aspirate confirmed the mass was a prostatic abscess. Abdominal celiotomy and prostatic omentalization were successful in resolving clinical abnormalities. Feline prostatic abscessation is a rare condition that has not been previously reported and may have a good outcome if treated early and appropriately.

  16. Post incisional hernia in dogs and cats

    OpenAIRE

    Raiser, Alceu Gaspar

    1999-01-01

    A hérnia pós-incisão foi analisada quanto à prevalência e protocolo terapêutico em nove cães e seis gatos cadastrados no Hospital Veterinário da Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, RS, Brasil. Os animais apresentaram peritonite localizada que foi tratada com reposição hidroeletrolítica, antibioticoterapia, irrigação abundante da cavidade abdominal e debridamento cirúrgico. Todos tiveram evolução favorável.The case records of nine dogs and six cats with post-incisional hernia were managed by ...

  17. Spontaneaous linear gastric tears in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualtieri, M; Olivero, D; Costa Devoti, C

    2015-09-01

    An 11-year-old female cat presented for chronic vomiting. Endoscopy revealed an altered gastric mucosa and spontaneous formation of linear gastric tears during normal organ insufflations. The histopathological diagnosis was atrophic gastritis with Helicobacter pylori infection. Medical treatment permitted a complete resolution of clinical signs. The linear tears observed resembled gastric lesions rarely reported in humans, called "Mallory-Weiss syndrome". To the authors' knowledge this is the first report of spontaneous linear gastric tears in animals. © 2015 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  18. Evaluation of plasma islet amyloid polypeptide and serum glucose and insulin concentrations in nondiabetic cats classified by body condition score and in cats with naturally occurring diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Michael S; Hegstad-Davies, Rebecca L; Wang, Qi; Hardy, Robert M; Armstrong, P Jane; Jordan, Kathryn; Johnson, Kenneth H; O'Brien, Timothy D

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate and compare circulating concentrations of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), insulin, and glucose in nondiabetic cats classified by body condition score (BCS) and in cats with naturally occurring diabetes mellitus. 109 (82 nondiabetic, 21 nonketoacidotic diabetic, and 6 ketoacidotic diabetic) cats. Cats were examined and BCSs were assessed on a scale of 1 to 9. After food was withheld for 12 hours, blood was collected and plasma concentrations of IAPP and serum concentrations of insulin and glucose were measured. Differences in these values were evaluated among nondiabetic cats grouped according to BCS and in diabetic cats grouped as ketoacidotic or nonketoacidotic on the basis of clinicopathologic findings. Correlations were determined among variables. In nondiabetic cats, BCS was significantly and positively correlated with circulating IAPP and insulin concentrations. Mean plasma IAPP concentrations were significantly different between cats with BCSs of 5 and 7, and mean serum insulin concentrations were significantly different between cats with BCSs of 5 and 8. Serum glucose concentrations were not significantly different among nondiabetic cats. Mean IAPP concentrations were similar between nonketoacidotic diabetic cats and nondiabetic cats with BCSs of 8 or 9. Mean IAPP concentrations were significantly reduced in ketoacidotic diabetic cats, compared with those of nondiabetic cats with BCSs of 6 through 8 and of nonketoacidotic diabetic cats. Results indicated that increased BCS (a measure of obesity) is associated with increased circulating concentrations of IAPP and insulin in nondiabetic cats.

  19. Overweight in adult cats: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öhlund, Malin; Palmgren, Malin; Holst, Bodil Ström

    2018-01-19

    Overweight in cats is a major risk factor for diabetes mellitus and has also been associated with other disorders. Overweight and obesity are believed to be increasing problems in cats, as is currently seen in people, with important health consequences. The objectives of the present study were to determine the prevalence of overweight in cats from two different cohorts in a cross-sectional study design and to assess associations between overweight and diagnoses, and between overweight and demographic and environmental factors. Data were obtained from medical records for cats (n = 1072) visiting an academic medical center during 2013-2015, and from a questionnaire on insured cats (n = 1665). From the medical records, information on body condition score, breed, age, sex, neutering status, and diagnosis was obtained. The questionnaire included questions relating to the cat's body condition, breed, age, sex, neutering status, outdoor access, activity level, and diet. Data were analyzed by multivariable logistic regression. The prevalence of overweight was 45% in the medical records cohort and 22% in the questionnaire cohort, where owners judged their pet's body condition. Overweight cats in the medical records cohort were more likely to be diagnosed with lower urinary tract disease, diabetes mellitus, respiratory disease, skin disorders, locomotor disease, and trauma. Eating predominantly dry food, being a greedy eater, and inactivity were factors associated with an increased risk of overweight in the final model in the questionnaire cohort. In both cohorts, the Birman and Persian breeds, and geriatric cats, were less likely to be overweight, and male cats were more likely to be overweight. The prevalence of overweight cats (45%) as assessed by trained personnel was high and in the same range as previously reported. Birman and Persian cats had a lower risk of overweight. The association with dry food found in adult, neutered cats is potentially important because

  20. The prevalence and significance of hyperglycemia in hospitalized cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Casey C; Callahan-Clark, Julie; Beckel, Nicole F; Walters, Patricia C

    2009-08-01

    To report the prevalence of hyperglycemia in cats admitted to a veterinary hospital and to determine if hyperglycemic cats had increased morbidity and mortality when compared with normoglycemic cats. DESIGN - Retrospective clinical study. Community-based referral hospital. Nondiabetic cats admitted to the hospital. None. The medical records of nondiabetic cats admitted to the hospital over a 1-year period were reviewed. There were 182 cats that met the criteria for inclusion in the study. Information obtained included signalment, length of hospitalization, initial and highest blood glucose measurement, diagnosis, treatment, and final disposition. Sixty-three percent of cats (116/182) were hyperglycemic at the time of presentation. Total incidence of hyperglycemia at any point during hospitalization was 64% (118/182). No association was found between hyperglycemia either initially or at any point during the hospitalization and mortality. However, a significant association was documented between the presence of hyperglycemia and increased length of hospitalization (LOH) (P=0.04). The duration of LOH was also significantly associated with the degree of hyperglycemia (P=0.01). A number of different disease processes were represented in the study population. However, the number of cats in each disease category was small and no association could be found between any of them and blood glucose affecting mortality and morbidity. The prevalence of hyperglycemia in feline patients admitted to a primary referral hospital was 64%. Cats with hyperglycemia had a longer LOH when compared with normoglycemic cats; however, presence of hyperglycemia did not impact mortality in this population of cats. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2009.

  1. CATS Cloud and Aerosol Level 2 Heritage Edition Data Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodier, S. D.; Vaughan, M.; Yorks, J. E.; Palm, S. P.; Selmer, P. A.; Hlavka, D. L.; McGill, M. J.; Trepte, C. R.

    2017-12-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) instrument was developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and deployed to the International Space Station (ISS) in January 2015. The CATS elastic backscatter lidars have been operating continuously in one of two science modes since February 2015. One of the primary science objectives of CATS is to continue the CALIPSO aerosol and cloud profile data record to provide continuity of lidar climate observations during the transition from CALIPSO to EarthCARE. To accomplish this, the CATS project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the CALIPSO project at NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) closely collaborated to develop and deliver a full suite of CALIPSO-like level 2 data products using the latest version of the CALIPSO level 2 Version 4 algorithms for the CATS data acquired while operating in science mode 1 (Multi-beam backscatter detection at 1064 and 532 nm, with depolarization measurement at both wavelengths). In this work, we present the current status of the CATS Heritage (i.e. CALIPSO-like) level 2 data products derived from the recent released CATS Level 1B V2-08 data. Extensive comparisons are performed between the three data sets (CALIPSO V4.10 Level 2, CATS Level 2 Operational V2-00 and CATS Heritage V1.00) for cloud and aerosol measurements (e.g., cloud-top height cloud-phase, cloud-layer occurrence frequency and cloud-aerosol discrimination) along the ISS path. In addition, global comparisons (between 52°S and 52°N) of aerosol extinction profiles derived from the CATS Level 2 Operational products and CALIOP V4 Level 2 products are presented. Comparisons of aerosol optical depths retrieved from active sensors (CATS and CALIOP) and passive sensors (MODIS) will provide context for the extinction profile comparisons.

  2. Bartonella infection in shelter cats and dogs and their ectoparasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yi-Lun; Lin, Chao-Chen; Chomel, Bruno B; Chuang, Shih-Te; Tsai, Kun-Hsien; Wu, Wen-Jer; Huang, Chin-Gi; Yu, Jiann-Chung; Sung, Min-Hua; Kass, Philip H; Chang, Chao-Chin

    2011-08-01

    Mainly through vector transmission, domestic cats and dogs are infected by several Bartonella spp. and represent a large reservoir for human infections. This study investigated the relationship of prevalences of Bartonella infection in shelter dogs and cats and various ectoparasite species infesting them (fleas, ticks, and lice). Moreover, relationships between Bartonella infection and animal gender and age and presence of ectoparasites were analyzed. Blood samples were collected from 120 dogs and 103 cats. There were 386 ticks and 36 fleas harvested on these dogs, and 141 fleas, 4 ticks, and 2 lice harvested on these cats. Isolation/detection of Bartonella sp. was performed by culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and partial sequencing. Bartonella was isolated from 21 (20.4%) cats and detected by PCR from 20 (19.4%) cats, 2 (1.7%) dogs, 55 (39%) fleas collected from cats, 28 (10%) ticks DNA samples, and 1 (2.8%) flea collected from dogs. When combining culture and PCR data, 27 cats and 55 fleas collected on cats were positive for Bartonella henselae or Bartonella clarridgeiae, but none were coinfected. Approximately half of the B. henselae isolates from 21 cats were B. henselae type I. Moreover, B. henselae, Bartonella phoceensis, Bartonella queenslandensis, Bartonella rattimassiliensis, Bartonella elizabethae DNA was detected in ticks collected from dogs and one flea was B. clarridgeiae PCR positive. This is the first report of such a wide variety of Bartonella spp. detected in Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Further studies are required to understand the relative importance of these ectoparasites to transmit Bartonella spp. in dogs and cats.

  3. Aspects of resistance to experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi; Aspectos da resistencia a infecao experimental com Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Viviane Liotti

    2010-07-01

    Chagas disease, a zoonosis caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, has a wide distribution in Latin America and extends from the southern part of the United States to Argentina. A number of 10 million of infected people is estimated and another 25 million exposed to the risk. Although discovered over a century, Chagas disease is still a serious infection that causes great socioeconomic impact, with no effective treatment at the chronic phase and in which, a lack of scientific knowledge can be observed. The main goal of this work was that obtaining and using consomic strain of mice, the resistance could be investigated. Consomic strains were produced by programmed mating, in which the animals were monitored with DNA polymorphic markers, and one of his chromosomes was replaced by his homologue from another strain. As parental, were used, the inbred strains C57BL/6/J Unib with resistant phenotype (donor) and as receiver, the A/JUnib strain, that has a susceptible phenotype. These models were used to produce five consomic strains: for the chromosomes 7 (CSs7), 11 (CSs11), 14 (CSs14), 17 (CSs17) and 19 (CSs19), described by Passos et al. (2003) as important in controlling infection caused by the Y strain of T. cruzi. In experimental testing, the consomics were inoculated intraperitoneally at doses of 10{sup 1}, 10{sup 2}, 10{sup 3} and 10{sup 4} using as control, animals from both parental lines. In all consomics, resistance was higher than that observed in the susceptible parental. In a second protocol, the consomics were mated with scheduled associations and the progenies were challenged with inocula employing increasing doses of trypomastigotes. The resistance observed in this group was also higher than that observed in the parental with susceptible phenotype. The observed results demonstrate that the use of the consomic strains that were produced order to assess the contribution of each chromosome in the resistance, as well as the effects of association between

  4. Acromegaly in a non-diabetic cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Fracassi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A 14-year-old, neutered male European shorthair cat was evaluated for a routine health check. The owner did not report any clinical signs except for respiratory stridor. On physical examination the main findings were broad facial features and increased interdental spaces. On haematology, a mild, non-regenerative anaemia was detected, whereas the serum biochemistry profile and urinalysis were unremarkable. The serum glucose concentration was within the reference interval. Serum insulin-like growth factor-1 concentration was markedly elevated (>1600 ng/ml. The basal serum growth hormone concentration was elevated and decreased only mildly after somatostatin administration. Basal serum insulin concentration was high, and the insulin concentration increased considerably after glucose loading, consistent with insulin resistance. CT scanning of the skull showed an enlarged pituitary gland and increased skull bone thickness. The final diagnosis was acromegaly. Relevance and novel information These findings demonstrate that acromegaly should be pursued and suspected in cats other than those with diabetes mellitus.

  5. Serum Beta Hydroxybutyrate Concentrations in Cats with Chronic Kidney Disease, Hyperthyroidism, or Hepatic Lipidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gorman, L.; Sharkey, L.C.; Armstrong, P.J.; Little, K.; Rendahl, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ketones, including beta hydroxybutyrate (BHB), are produced in conditions of negative energy balance and decreased glucose utilization. Serum BHB concentrations in cats are poorly characterized in diseases other than diabetes mellitus. Hypothesis Serum BHB concentrations will be increased in cats with chronic kidney disease (CKD), hyperthyroidism (HT), or hepatic lipidosis (HL). Animals Twenty?eight client?owned cats with CKD, 34 cats with HT, and 15 cats with HL; 43 healthy cats. ...

  6. 33 CFR 117.1001 - Cat Point Creek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cat Point Creek. 117.1001 Section 117.1001 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Virginia § 117.1001 Cat Point Creek. The draw of the...

  7. The Population Origins and Expansion of Feral Cats in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Peter B S; Yurchenko, Andrey A; David, Victor A; Scott, Rachael; Koepfli, Klaus-Peter; Driscoll, Carlos; O'Brien, Stephen J; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn

    2016-03-01

    The historical literature suggests that in Australia, the domestic cat (Felis catus) had a European origin [~200 years before present (ybp)], but it is unclear if cats arrived from across the Asian land bridge contemporaneously with the dingo (4000 ybp), or perhaps immigrated ~40000 ybp in association with Aboriginal settlement from Asia. The origin of cats in Australia is important because the continent has a complex and ancient faunal assemblage that is dominated by endemic rodents and marsupials and lacks the large placental carnivores found on other large continents. Cats are now ubiquitous across the entire Australian continent and have been implicit in the range contraction or extinction of its small to medium sized (Australia exhibit high genetic diversity in comparison with the low diversity found in populations of feral cats living on islands. The genetic structure is consistent with a rapid westerly expansion from eastern Australia and a limited expansion in coastal Western Australia. Australian cats show modest if any population structure and a close genetic alignment with European feral cats as compared to cats from Asia, the Christmas and Cocos (Keeling) Islands (Indian Ocean), and European wildcats (F. silvestris silvestris). © The American Genetic Association 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Effectiveness of the Domestic Cat (Felis silvestris catus) Urine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The stored cat urine was then thawed and mixed with maize starch to form a thick dough and then granulated and dried at room temperature before being packed in a hermetically closed jar. Initially, rodent foot marks on tracking soot coat tiles were used to estimate the rat population before the cat urine extracts application.

  9. The French CAT: An Assessment of Its Empirical Validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burston, Jack

    1995-01-01

    Investigates the empirical validity of the Monash-Melbourne computer adaptive test for French (French CAT). The article focuses on the accuracy of the French CAT as a tool for streaming incoming university students into three levels of a first-year (post-high school) French course. The test is demonstrated to be a good predictor of short-term…

  10. Simple nonparametric checks for model data fit in CAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, R.R.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the usefulness of several nonparametric checks is discussed in a computerized adaptive testing (CAT) context. Although there is no tradition of nonparametric scalability in CAT, it can be argued that scalability checks can be useful to investigate, for example, the quality of item

  11. Bacteriology of the Anterior Genitalia of the Domestic House Cat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The bacteriology of the anterior genitalia of the domestic house cat was determined using vaginal swabs collected from sixty apparently healthy female domestic cats (20 kittens, 20 pregnant and 20 non-pregnant adults). The swabs were streaked on blood agar, Mac Conkey agar and eosin methylene blue agar plates ...

  12. Pancreatic function in domestic cats with pancreatic fluke infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J N; Mosley, J G; Vogler, G A; Austin, J L; Reber, H A

    1981-01-01

    Thirty-one of 290 cats (10.7%) from the area around St Louis, Mo, were infected with Eurytrema procyonis. In some cats, the pancreas was severely affected, with almost complete atrophy and fibrous replacement of the gland. Both bicarbonate and protein secretions were impaired, although clinically evident pancreatic insufficiency was not seen.

  13. Abdominal (liver, spleen) and bone manifestations of cat scratch disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, C.E.; Patrick, L.E. (Egleston Children' s Hospital, Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States). Dept. of Radiology)

    1992-09-01

    Cat scratch disease is usually a self-limiting illness. Patients may develop systemic complications including hepatic granulomas, splenic abscesses, mesenteric adenitis, osteolytic lesions, as well as dermatologic and CNS complications. In this paper the literature is reviewed and two cases are discussed which present the imaging findings in patients with hepatic, splenic, mesenteric, and bony manifestations of cat scratch disease. (orig.).

  14. Cat scratch disease presenting as orbital abscess and osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirakhur, Beloo; Shah, Samir S; Ratner, Adam J; Goldstein, Scott M; Bell, Louis M; Kim, Jean O

    2003-08-01

    Ocular manifestations of cat scratch disease are uncommon. The diagnosis is usually made on the basis of increasing Bartonella henselae serum antibody titers. We report a child presenting with orbital abscess and osteomyelitis who was diagnosed with hepatosplenic cat scratch disease by detection of B. henselae DNA in the orbital abscess fluid.

  15. Felinine excretion in domestic cat breeds: a preliminary investigation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagen - Plantinga, Esther; Hendriks, Wouter; Bosch, Guido

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine possible differences in felinine excretion between domesticated cat breeds. For this purpose, urine was collected from a total of 83 privately owned entire male cats from eight different breeds in the Netherlands during the period of November 2010 till November

  16. Using the Domestic Cat in the Teaching of Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnear, Judith F.

    1986-01-01

    Focuses on genetic concepts that form key components of transmission genetics and illustrates how the domestic cat can be used in the teaching of these concepts. Offers examples of how laboratory experiences with the cat can enhance student learning of genetics. (ML)

  17. Population genetic analysis of cat populations from Mexico ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    In this paper we identify new genetic profiles of eight Latin American cat populations. In addition, we combine data from the present study and previously published data on 70 other American and European populations to discuss (1) the points of introduction of mutant alleles for cat coat phenotypes from Europe into Latin ...

  18. Plasma amylin and insulin concentrations in normoglycemic and hyperglycemic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, T A; Rand, J S

    1996-01-01

    The recently discovered pancreatic peptide amylin is postulated to be involved in the pathogenesis of feline diabetes mellitus. However, plasma amylin concentrations in normal and diabetic cats have not yet been published. The aim of the present study was to validate a commercial amylin radioimmunoassay kit for the measurement of feline amylin in unextracted plasma, and to measure plasma amylin concentrations in normal and diabetic cats. The kit had satisfactory specificity, sensitivity, accuracy, and precision, and can be recommended for measurement of feline amylin in unextracted EDTA plasma, when nonspecific binding of plasma samples is used in the calculation of measured amylin concentration. Fasting amylin concentration in cats with normal glucose tolerance was 97 +/- 4 pmol/L. Plasma amylin increased in parallel with insulin after glucose administration in cats with normal and impaired glucose tolerance. In contrast to cats with normal glucose tolerance, cats with impaired glucose tolerance had markedly delayed amylin and insulin secretion. Diabetic cats had basal hypoinsulinemia combined with hyperamylinemia. Hyperamylinemia may lead to reduced insulin secretion and insulin resistance, and contribute to the development of feline diabetes. In conclusion, feline amylin can be measured in unextracted EDTA plasma. Fasting amylin concentrations are approximately 100 pmol/L, and amylin and insulin are cosecreted in cats with normal and impaired glucose tolerance. Increased amylin concentrations may contribute to the development of feline diabetes mellitus.

  19. Isolation of Actinobacillus suis from a cat's lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daignault, D.; Chouinard, L.; Møller, Kristian

    1999-01-01

    Actinobacillus suis has been isolated from the lungs of a 9-month-old cat. The bacterium was characterized biochemically as well as genetically, and its sensitivity profile to different antimicrobial agents was established. The role of this isolate in the cat's condition is discussed....

  20. Symmetric Dimethylarginine in Cats with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy and Diabetes Mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhorn, R.; Kieler, I. N.; Koch, J.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) has been increasingly used as a marker of early chronic kidney disease (CKD) in cats, but little is known about the influence of comorbidities on SDMA in this species. Hypothesis: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and diabetes mellitus (DM), independe...... controls, a finding that needs further investigation and should be kept in mind when evaluating renal function of cats with this endocrinopathy....