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Sample records for trna mutation analysis

  1. Limited diagnostic value of enzyme analysis in patients with mitochondrial tRNA mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wibrand, Flemming; Jeppesen, Tina Dysgaard; Frederiksen, Anja L

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the diagnostic value of respiratory chain (RC) enzyme analysis of muscle in adult patients with mitochondrial myopathy (MM). RC enzyme activity was measured in muscle biopsies from 39 patients who carry either the 3243A>G mutation, other tRNA point mutations, or single, large......, respectively, in these three groups. The results indicate that RC enzyme analysis in muscle is not a sensitive test for MM in adults. In these patients, abnormal muscle histochemistry appears to be a better predictor ofMM....

  2. Analysis of the complement and molecular evolution of tRNA genes in cow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barris Wesley C

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detailed information regarding the number and organization of transfer RNA (tRNA genes at the genome level is becoming readily available with the increase of DNA sequencing of whole genomes. However the identification of functional tRNA genes is challenging for species that have large numbers of repetitive elements containing tRNA derived sequences, such as Bos taurus. Reliable identification and annotation of entire sets of tRNA genes allows the evolution of tRNA genes to be understood on a genomic scale. Results In this study, we explored the B. taurus genome using bioinformatics and comparative genomics approaches to catalogue and analyze cow tRNA genes. The initial analysis of the cow genome using tRNAscan-SE identified 31,868 putative tRNA genes and 189,183 pseudogenes, where 28,830 of the 31,868 predicted tRNA genes were classified as repetitive elements by the RepeatMasker program. We then used comparative genomics to further discriminate between functional tRNA genes and tRNA-derived sequences for the remaining set of 3,038 putative tRNA genes. For our analysis, we used the human, chimpanzee, mouse, rat, horse, dog, chicken and fugu genomes to predict that the number of active tRNA genes in cow lies in the vicinity of 439. Of this set, 150 tRNA genes were 100% identical in their sequences across all nine vertebrate genomes studied. Using clustering analyses, we identified a new tRNA-GlyCCC subfamily present in all analyzed mammalian genomes. We suggest that this subfamily originated from an ancestral tRNA-GlyGCC gene via a point mutation prior to the radiation of the mammalian lineages. Lastly, in a separate analysis we created phylogenetic profiles for each putative cow tRNA gene using a representative set of genomes to gain an overview of common evolutionary histories of tRNA genes. Conclusion The use of a combination of bioinformatics and comparative genomics approaches has allowed the confident identification of a

  3. Mutation in WDR4 impairs tRNA m(7)G46 methylation and causes a distinct form of microcephalic primordial dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Ranad; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Guy, Michael P; Alomar, Rana; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S; Afifi, Hanan H; Ismail, Samira I; Emam, Bayoumi A; Phizicky, Eric M; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2015-09-28

    Primordial dwarfism is a state of extreme prenatal and postnatal growth deficiency, and is characterized by marked clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Two presumably unrelated consanguineous families presented with an apparently novel form of primordial dwarfism in which severe growth deficiency is accompanied by distinct facial dysmorphism, brain malformation (microcephaly, agenesis of corpus callosum, and simplified gyration), and severe encephalopathy with seizures. Combined autozygome/exome analysis revealed a novel missense mutation in WDR4 as the likely causal variant. WDR4 is the human ortholog of the yeast Trm82, an essential component of the Trm8/Trm82 holoenzyme that effects a highly conserved and specific (m(7)G46) methylation of tRNA. The human mutation and the corresponding yeast mutation result in a significant reduction of m(7)G46 methylation of specific tRNA species, which provides a potential mechanism for primordial dwarfism associated with this lesion, since reduced m(7)G46 modification causes a growth deficiency phenotype in yeast. Our study expands the number of biological pathways underlying primordial dwarfism and adds to a growing list of human diseases linked to abnormal tRNA modification.

  4. Cardiac abnormalities in diabetic patients with mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA {sup Leu(UUR)}Gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Hiroshi [Hyogo Medical Center for Adults, Akashi (Japan); Shiotani, Hideyuki

    1999-11-01

    An A-to-G transition at position 3243 of the mitochondrial DNA is known to be a pathogenic factor for mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), diabetes and cardiomyopathy. This mutation causes dysfunction of the central nervous system in MELAS. Because the heart, as well as the brain and nervous system, is highly dependent on the energy produced by mitochondrial oxidation, these tissues are more vulnerable to mitochondrial defects. Cardiac abnormalities were assessed in 10 diabetic patients associated with this mutation using echocardiography and {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy, and compared with 19 diabetic patients without the mutation. Duration of diabetes, therapy, control of blood glucose and diabetic complications, such as diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy, were not different between the 2 groups. Diabetic patients with the mutation had a significantly thicker interventricular septum (16.8{+-}3.7 vs 11.0{+-}1.6 mm, p<0.001) than those without the mutation. Fractional shortening was lower in diabetic patients with the mutation than those without it (30.7{+-}7.0 vs 42.5{+-}6.6, p<0.001). MIBG uptake on the delayed MIBG image was significantly lower in diabetic patients with the mutation than in those without the mutation (mean value of the heart to mediastinum ratio: 1.6{+-}0.2 vs 2.0{+-}0.4, p>0.05). In conclusion, left ventricular hypertrophy with or without abnormal wall motion and severely reduced MIBG uptake may be characteristic in diabetic patients with a mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA {sup Leu(UUR)} gene. (author)

  5. Cardiac abnormalities in diabetic patients with mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA Leu(UUR)Gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Hiroshi; Shiotani, Hideyuki

    1999-01-01

    An A-to-G transition at position 3243 of the mitochondrial DNA is known to be a pathogenic factor for mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), diabetes and cardiomyopathy. This mutation causes dysfunction of the central nervous system in MELAS. Because the heart, as well as the brain and nervous system, is highly dependent on the energy produced by mitochondrial oxidation, these tissues are more vulnerable to mitochondrial defects. Cardiac abnormalities were assessed in 10 diabetic patients associated with this mutation using echocardiography and 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy, and compared with 19 diabetic patients without the mutation. Duration of diabetes, therapy, control of blood glucose and diabetic complications, such as diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy, were not different between the 2 groups. Diabetic patients with the mutation had a significantly thicker interventricular septum (16.8±3.7 vs 11.0±1.6 mm, p 0.05). In conclusion, left ventricular hypertrophy with or without abnormal wall motion and severely reduced MIBG uptake may be characteristic in diabetic patients with a mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA Leu(UUR) gene. (author)

  6. Mutations in Cytosine-5 tRNA Methyltransferases Impact Mobile Element Expression and Genome Stability at Specific DNA Repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Genenncher

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The maintenance of eukaryotic genome stability is ensured by the interplay of transcriptional as well as post-transcriptional mechanisms that control recombination of repeat regions and the expression and mobility of transposable elements. We report here that mutations in two (cytosine-5 RNA methyltransferases, Dnmt2 and NSun2, impact the accumulation of mobile element-derived sequences and DNA repeat integrity in Drosophila. Loss of Dnmt2 function caused moderate effects under standard conditions, while heat shock exacerbated these effects. In contrast, NSun2 function affected mobile element expression and genome integrity in a heat shock-independent fashion. Reduced tRNA stability in both RCMT mutants indicated that tRNA-dependent processes affected mobile element expression and DNA repeat stability. Importantly, further experiments indicated that complex formation with RNA could also contribute to the impact of RCMT function on gene expression control. These results thus uncover a link between tRNA modification enzymes, the expression of repeat DNA, and genomic integrity.

  7. Defective i6A37 modification of mitochondrial and cytosolic tRNAs results from pathogenic mutations in TRIT1 and its substrate tRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Yarham

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the genetic basis for mitochondrial diseases is technically challenging given the size of the mitochondrial proteome and the heterogeneity of disease presentations. Using next-generation exome sequencing, we identified in a patient with severe combined mitochondrial respiratory chain defects and corresponding perturbation in mitochondrial protein synthesis, a homozygous p.Arg323Gln mutation in TRIT1. This gene encodes human tRNA isopentenyltransferase, which is responsible for i6A37 modification of the anticodon loops of a small subset of cytosolic and mitochondrial tRNAs. Deficiency of i6A37 was previously shown in yeast to decrease translational efficiency and fidelity in a codon-specific manner. Modelling of the p.Arg323Gln mutation on the co-crystal structure of the homologous yeast isopentenyltransferase bound to a substrate tRNA, indicates that it is one of a series of adjacent basic side chains that interact with the tRNA backbone of the anticodon stem, somewhat removed from the catalytic center. We show that patient cells bearing the p.Arg323Gln TRIT1 mutation are severely deficient in i6A37 in both cytosolic and mitochondrial tRNAs. Complete complementation of the i6A37 deficiency of both cytosolic and mitochondrial tRNAs was achieved by transduction of patient fibroblasts with wild-type TRIT1. Moreover, we show that a previously-reported pathogenic m.7480A>G mt-tRNASer(UCN mutation in the anticodon loop sequence A36A37A38 recognised by TRIT1 causes a loss of i6A37 modification. These data demonstrate that deficiencies of i6A37 tRNA modification should be considered a potential mechanism of human disease caused by both nuclear gene and mitochondrial DNA mutations while providing insight into the structure and function of TRIT1 in the modification of cytosolic and mitochondrial tRNAs.

  8. The search for mitochondrial tRNA Leu(UUR) A3243G mutation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study aimed to compare the incidence of the pathogenic point mutation A3243G in the gene tRNALeu(UUR) indicating sub-type 2 diabetes mellitus conducted within the Nigerian population with that reported in other populations. 112 patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2D) mellitus according to the World Health ...

  9. The search for mitochondrial tRNA A3243G mutation among type 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-12

    Oct 12, 2011 ... A3243G mutation among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in the .... molecular grade water was incubated at 37°C for 1 to 2 h for the digestion to occur. ... visualized using Quantity One software (CHEMIDOC, Bio-Rad,. USA).

  10. An entropy based analysis of the relationship between the DOW JONES Index and the TRNA Sentiment series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Allen (David); M.J. McAleer (Michael); A.K. Singh (Abhay)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis paper features an analysis of the relationship between the DOW JONES Industrial Average Index (DJIA) and a sentiment news series using daily data obtained from the Thomson Reuters News Analytics (TRNA)1 provided by SIRCA (The Securities Industry Research Centre of the Asia Pacic).

  11. Deletion analysis of the expression of rRNA genes and associated tRNA genes carried by a lambda transducing bacteriophage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, E.A.; Nomura, M.

    1979-01-01

    Transducing phage lambda ilv5 carries genes for rRNA's, spacer tRNA's (tRNA 1 /sup Ile/ and tRNA/sub 1B//sup Ala/), and two other tRNA's (tRNA 1 /sup Asp/ and tRNA/sup Trp/). We have isolated a mutant of lambda ilv5, lambda ilv5su7, which carries an amber suppressor mutation in the tRNA/sup Trp/ gene. A series of deletion mutants were isolated from the lambda ilv5su7 phage. Genetic and biochemical analyses of these deletion mutants have confirmed our previous conclusion that the genes for tRNA 1 /sup Asp/ and tRNA/sup Trp/ located at the distal end of the rRNA operon (rrnC) are cotranscribed with other rRNA genes in that operon. In addition, these deletions were used to define roughly the physical location of the promoter(s) of the rRNA operon carried by the lambda ilv5su7 transducing phage

  12. Mitochondrial tRNA cleavage by tRNA-targeting ribonuclease causes mitochondrial dysfunction observed in mitochondrial disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Tetsuhiro, E-mail: atetsu@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Shimizu, Ayano; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Hidaka, Makoto; Masaki, Haruhiko, E-mail: amasaki@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • MTS-tagged ribonuclease was translocated successfully to the mitochondrial matrix. • MTS-tagged ribonuclease cleaved mt tRNA and reduced COX activity. • Easy and reproducible method of inducing mt tRNA dysfunction. - Abstract: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a genome possessed by mitochondria. Since reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated during aerobic respiration in mitochondria, mtDNA is commonly exposed to the risk of DNA damage. Mitochondrial disease is caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, and mutations or deletions on mitochondrial tRNA (mt tRNA) genes are often observed in mtDNA of patients with the disease. Hence, the correlation between mt tRNA activity and mitochondrial dysfunction has been assessed. Then, cybrid cells, which are constructed by the fusion of an enucleated cell harboring altered mtDNA with a ρ{sup 0} cell, have long been used for the analysis due to difficulty in mtDNA manipulation. Here, we propose a new method that involves mt tRNA cleavage by a bacterial tRNA-specific ribonuclease. The ribonuclease tagged with a mitochondrial-targeting sequence (MTS) was successfully translocated to the mitochondrial matrix. Additionally, mt tRNA cleavage, which resulted in the decrease of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity, was observed.

  13. Correction of the consequences of mitochondrial 3243A>G mutation in the MT-TL1 gene causing the MELAS syndrome by tRNA import into mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karicheva, Olga Z; Kolesnikova, Olga A; Schirtz, Tom; Vysokikh, Mikhail Y; Mager-Heckel, Anne-Marie; Lombès, Anne; Boucheham, Abdeldjalil; Krasheninnikov, Igor A; Martin, Robert P; Entelis, Nina; Tarassov, Ivan

    2011-10-01

    Mutations in human mitochondrial DNA are often associated with incurable human neuromuscular diseases. Among these mutations, an important number have been identified in tRNA genes, including 29 in the gene MT-TL1 coding for the tRNA(Leu(UUR)). The m.3243A>G mutation was described as the major cause of the MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes). This mutation was reported to reduce tRNA(Leu(UUR)) aminoacylation and modification of its anti-codon wobble position, which results in a defective mitochondrial protein synthesis and reduced activities of respiratory chain complexes. In the present study, we have tested whether the mitochondrial targeting of recombinant tRNAs bearing the identity elements for human mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase can rescue the phenotype caused by MELAS mutation in human transmitochondrial cybrid cells. We demonstrate that nuclear expression and mitochondrial targeting of specifically designed transgenic tRNAs results in an improvement of mitochondrial translation, increased levels of mitochondrial DNA-encoded respiratory complexes subunits, and significant rescue of respiration. These findings prove the possibility to direct tRNAs with changed aminoacylation specificities into mitochondria, thus extending the potential therapeutic strategy of allotopic expression to address mitochondrial disorders.

  14. Nucleotide sequence of a human tRNA gene heterocluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.N.; Pirtle, I.L.; Pirtle, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Leucine tRNA from bovine liver was used as a hybridization probe to screen a human gene library harbored in Charon-4A of bacteriophage lambda. The human DNA inserts from plaque-pure clones were characterized by restriction endonuclease mapping and Southern hybridization techniques, using both [3'- 32 P]-labeled bovine liver leucine tRNA and total tRNA as hybridization probes. An 8-kb Hind III fragment of one of these γ-clones was subcloned into the Hind III site of pBR322. Subsequent fine restriction mapping and DNA sequence analysis of this plasmid DNA indicated the presence of four tRNA genes within the 8-kb DNA fragment. A leucine tRNA gene with an anticodon of AAG and a proline tRNA gene with an anticodon of AGG are in a 1.6-kb subfragment. A threonine tRNA gene with an anticodon of UGU and an as yet unidentified tRNA gene are located in a 1.1-kb subfragment. These two different subfragments are separated by 2.8 kb. The coding regions of the three sequenced genes contain characteristic internal split promoter sequences and do not have intervening sequences. The 3'-flanking region of these three genes have typical RNA polymerase III termination sites of at least four consecutive T residues

  15. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of tRNA (m{sup 7}G46) methyltransferase from Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qi; Gao, Yang; Yang, Weili; Zhou, Huihao; Gao, Yongxiang; Zhang, Xiao; Teng, Maikun, E-mail: mkteng@ustc.edu.cn; Niu, Liwen, E-mail: mkteng@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Key Laboratory of Structural Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China)

    2008-08-01

    tRNA (m{sup 7}G46) methyltransferase from E. coli was overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.04 Å resolution. Transfer RNA (tRNA) (m{sup 7}G46) methyltransferase (TrmB) belongs to the Rossmann-fold methyltransferase (RFM) family and uses S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) as the methyl-group donor to catalyze the formation of N{sup 7}-methylguanosine (m{sup 7}G) at position 46 in the variable loop of tRNAs. After attempts to crystallize full-length Escherichia coli TrmB (EcTrmB) failed, a truncated protein lacking the first 32 residues of the N-terminus but with an additional His{sub 6} tag at the C-terminus was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using polyethylene glycol 3350 (PEG 3350) as precipitant at 283 K. An X-ray diffraction data set was collected using a single flash-cooled crystal that belonged to space group P2{sub 1}.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of tRNA (m7G46) methyltransferase from Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qi; Gao, Yang; Yang, Weili; Zhou, Huihao; Gao, Yongxiang; Zhang, Xiao; Teng, Maikun; Niu, Liwen

    2008-01-01

    tRNA (m 7 G46) methyltransferase from E. coli was overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.04 Å resolution. Transfer RNA (tRNA) (m 7 G46) methyltransferase (TrmB) belongs to the Rossmann-fold methyltransferase (RFM) family and uses S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) as the methyl-group donor to catalyze the formation of N 7 -methylguanosine (m 7 G) at position 46 in the variable loop of tRNAs. After attempts to crystallize full-length Escherichia coli TrmB (EcTrmB) failed, a truncated protein lacking the first 32 residues of the N-terminus but with an additional His 6 tag at the C-terminus was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using polyethylene glycol 3350 (PEG 3350) as precipitant at 283 K. An X-ray diffraction data set was collected using a single flash-cooled crystal that belonged to space group P2 1

  17. Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologs of human genes required for mitochondrial tRNA modification cause similar electron transport chain defects but different nuclear responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-González, Carmen; Moukadiri, Ismaïl; Villarroya, Magda; López-Pascual, Ernesto; Tuck, Simon; Armengod, M-Eugenia

    2017-07-01

    Several oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) diseases are caused by defects in the post-transcriptional modification of mitochondrial tRNAs (mt-tRNAs). Mutations in MTO1 or GTPBP3 impair the modification of the wobble uridine at position 5 of the pyrimidine ring and cause heart failure. Mutations in TRMU affect modification at position 2 and cause liver disease. Presently, the molecular basis of the diseases and why mutations in the different genes lead to such different clinical symptoms is poorly understood. Here we use Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism to investigate how defects in the TRMU, GTPBP3 and MTO1 orthologues (designated as mttu-1, mtcu-1, and mtcu-2, respectively) exert their effects. We found that whereas the inactivation of each C. elegans gene is associated with a mild OXPHOS dysfunction, mutations in mtcu-1 or mtcu-2 cause changes in the expression of metabolic and mitochondrial stress response genes that are quite different from those caused by mttu-1 mutations. Our data suggest that retrograde signaling promotes defect-specific metabolic reprogramming, which is able to rescue the OXPHOS dysfunction in the single mutants by stimulating the oxidative tricarboxylic acid cycle flux through complex II. This adaptive response, however, appears to be associated with a biological cost since the single mutant worms exhibit thermosensitivity and decreased fertility and, in the case of mttu-1, longer reproductive cycle. Notably, mttu-1 worms also exhibit increased lifespan. We further show that mtcu-1; mttu-1 and mtcu-2; mttu-1 double mutants display severe growth defects and sterility. The animal models presented here support the idea that the pathological states in humans may initially develop not as a direct consequence of a bioenergetic defect, but from the cell's maladaptive response to the hypomodification status of mt-tRNAs. Our work highlights the important association of the defect-specific metabolic rewiring with the pathological phenotype

  18. The crystal structure of tRNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    of yeast alanine tRNA by Robert Holley's group at Cornell. University ... decode nonsense codons) with John Smith and Brenner. However, my ... tRNA from 10 g of unfractionated tRNA. ... tRNA crystals were, in fact, protein (Hendrikson et al.

  19. New pleiotropic effects of eliminating a rare tRNA from Streptomyces coelicolor, revealed by combined proteomic and transcriptomic analysis of liquid cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hotchkiss Graham

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Streptomyces coelicolor, bldA encodes the only tRNA for a rare leucine codon, UUA. This tRNA is unnecessary for growth, but is required for some aspects of secondary metabolism and morphological development. We describe a transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of the effects of deleting bldA on cellular processes during submerged culture: conditions relevant to the industrial production of antibiotics. Results At the end of rapid growth, a co-ordinated transient up-regulation of about 100 genes, including many for ribosomal proteins, was seen in the parent strain but not the ΔbldA mutant. Increased basal levels of the signal molecule ppGpp in the mutant strain may be responsible for this difference. Transcripts or proteins from a further 147 genes classified as bldA-influenced were mostly expressed late in culture in the wild-type, though others were significantly transcribed during exponential growth. Some were involved in the biosynthesis of seven secondary metabolites; and some have probable roles in reorganising metabolism after rapid growth. Many of the 147 genes were "function unknown", and may represent unknown aspects of Streptomyces biology. Only two of the 147 genes contain a TTA codon, but some effects of bldA could be traced to TTA codons in regulatory genes or polycistronic operons. Several proteins were affected post-translationally by the bldA deletion. There was a statistically significant but weak positive global correlation between transcript and corresponding protein levels. Different technical limitations of the two approaches were a major cause of discrepancies in the results obtained with them. Conclusion Although deletion of bldA has very conspicuous effects on the gross phenotype, the bldA molecular phenotype revealed by the "dualomic" approach has shown that only about 2% of the genome is affected; but this includes many previously unknown effects at a variety of different levels, including post

  20. Structure and function of initiator methionine tRNA from the mitochondria of Neurospora crassa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckman, J.E.; Hecker, L.I.; Schwartzbach, S.D.; Barnett, W.E.; Baumstark, B.; RajBhandary, U.L.

    1978-01-01

    Initiator methionine tRNA from the mitochondria of Neurospora crassa has been purified and sequenced. This mitochondrial tRNA can be aminoacylated and formylated by E. coli enzymes, and is capable of initiating protein synthesis in E. coli extracts. The nucleotide composition of the mitochondrial initiator tRNA (the first mitochondrial tRNA subjected to sequence analysis) is very rich in A + U, like that reported for total mitochondrial tRNA. In two of the unique features which differentiate procaryotic from eucaryotic cytoplasmic initiator tRNAs, the mitochondrial tRNA appears to resemble the eucaryotic initiator tRNAs. Thus unlike procaryotic initiator tRNAs in which the 5' terminal nucleotide cannot form a Watson-Crick base pair to the fifth nucleotide from 3' end, the mitochondrial tRNA can form such a base pair; and like the eucaryotic cytoplasmic initiator tRNAs, the mitochondrial initiator tRNA lacks the sequence - T psiCG(or A) in loop IV. The corresponding sequence in the mitochondrial tRNA, however, is -UGCA- and not -AU(or psi)CG- as found in all eucaryotic cytoplasmic initiator tRNAs. In spite of some similarity of the mitochondrial initiator tRNA to both eucaryotic and procaryotic initiator tRNAs, the mitochondrial initiator tRNA is basically different from both these tRNAs. Between these two classes of initiator tRNAs, however, it is more homologous in sequence to procaryotic (56 to 60%) than to eucaryotic cytoplasmic initiator tRNAs

  1. Mutation Analysis in Classical Phenylketonuria Patients Followed by Detecting Haplotypes Linked to Some PAH Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghanian, Fatemeh; Silawi, Mohammad; Tabei, Seyed M B

    2017-02-01

    Deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) enzyme and elevation of phenylalanine in body fluids cause phenylketonuria (PKU). The gold standard for confirming PKU and PAH deficiency is detecting causal mutations by direct sequencing of the coding exons and splicing involved sequences of the PAH gene. Furthermore, haplotype analysis could be considered as an auxiliary approach for detecting PKU causative mutations before direct sequencing of the PAH gene by making comparisons between prior detected mutation linked-haplotypes and new PKU case haplotypes with undetermined mutations. In this study, 13 unrelated classical PKU patients took part in the study detecting causative mutations. Mutations were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing in all patients. After that, haplotype analysis was performed by studying VNTR and PAHSTR markers (linked genetic markers of the PAH gene) through application of PCR and capillary electrophoresis (CE). Mutation analysis was performed successfully and the detected mutations were as follows: c.782G>A, c.754C>T, c.842C>G, c.113-115delTCT, c.688G>A, and c.696A>G. Additionally, PAHSTR/VNTR haplotypes were detected to discover haplotypes linked to each mutation. Mutation detection is the best approach for confirming PAH enzyme deficiency in PKU patients. Due to the relatively large size of the PAH gene and high cost of the direct sequencing in developing countries, haplotype analysis could be used before DNA sequencing and mutation detection for a faster and cheaper way via identifying probable mutated exons.

  2. Methylated nucleosides in tRNA and tRNA methyltransferases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki eHori

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To date, more than 90 modified nucleosides have been found in tRNA and the biosynthetic pathways of the majority of tRNA modifications include a methylation step(s. Recent studies of the biosynthetic pathways have demonstrated that the availability of methyl group donors for the methylation in tRNA is important for correct and efficient protein synthesis. In this review, I focus on the methylated nucleosides and tRNA methyltransferases. The primary functions of tRNA methylations are linked to the different steps of protein synthesis, such as the stabilization of tRNA structure, reinforcement of the codon–anticodon interaction, regulation of wobble base pairing, and prevention of frameshift errors. However, beyond these basic functions, recent studies have demonstrated that tRNA methylations are also involved in the RNA quality control system and regulation of tRNA localization in the cell. In a thermophilic eubacterium, tRNA modifications and the modification enzymes form a network that responses to temperature changes. Furthermore, several modifications are involved in genetic diseases, infections, and the immune response. Moreover, structural, biochemical, and bioinformatics studies of tRNA methyltransferases have been clarifying the details of tRNA methyltransferases and have enabled these enzymes to be classified. In the final section, the evolution of modification enzymes is discussed.

  3. tRNA conjugation with chitosan nanoparticles: An AFM imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudelo, D; Kreplak, L; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2016-04-01

    The conjugation of tRNA with chitosan nanoparticles of different sizes 15,100 and 200 kDa was investigated in aqueous solution using multiple spectroscopic methods and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Structural analysis showed that chitosan binds tRNA via G-C and A-U base pairs as well as backbone PO2 group, through electrostatic, hydrophilic and H-bonding contacts with overall binding constants of KCh-15-tRNA=4.1 (±0.60)×10(3)M(-1), KCh-100-tRNA=5.7 (±0.8)×10(3)M(-1) and KCh-200-tRNA=1.2 (±0.3)×10(4)M(-1). As chitosan size increases more stable polymer-tRNA conjugate is formed. AFM images showed major tRNA aggregation and particle formation occurred as chitosan concentration increased. Even though chitosan induced major biopolymer structural changes, tRNA remains in A-family structure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Evidence that the mitochondrial leucyl tRNA synthetase (LARS2) gene represents a novel type 2 diabetes susceptibility gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. 't Hart (Leen); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); T. Hansen (Torben); I. Rietveld (Ingrid); J.M. Dekker (Jacqueline); J.A. Maassen (Johannes); M.G.A.A.M. Nijpels (Giel); G.M.C. Janssen (George); P.P. Arp (Pascal); R.J. Heine (Robert); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); T. Jorgensen (Torben); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); K. Borch-Johnsen; O. Pedersen (Oluf)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractPreviously, we have shown that a mutation in the mitochondrial DNA-encoded tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene is associated with type 2 diabetes. One of the consequences of this mutation is a reduced aminoacylation of tRNA(Leu(UUR)). In this study, we have examined whether variants in the leucyl tRNA

  5. Effect of PEG and mPEG-anthracene on tRNA aggregation and particle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehlich, E; Mandeville, J S; Arnold, D; Kreplak, L; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2012-01-09

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and its derivatives are synthetic polymers with major applications in gene and drug delivery systems. Synthetic polymers are also used to transport miRNA and siRNA in vitro. We studied the interaction of tRNA with several PEGs of different compositions, such as PEG 3350, PEG 6000, and mPEG-anthracene under physiological conditions. FTIR, UV-visible, CD, and fluorescence spectroscopic methods as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to analyze the PEG binding mode, the binding constant, and the effects of polymer complexation on tRNA stability, aggregation, and particle formation. Structural analysis showed that PEG-tRNA interaction occurs via RNA bases and the backbone phosphate group with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic contacts. The overall binding constants of K(PEG 3350-tRNA)= 1.9 (±0.5) × 10(4) M(-1), K(PEG 6000-tRNA) = 8.9 (±1) × 10(4) M(-1), and K(mPEG-anthracene)= 1.2 (±0.40) × 10(3) M(-1) show stronger polymer-RNA complexation by PEG 6000 and by PEG 3350 than the mPEG-anthracene. AFM imaging showed that PEG complexes contain on average one tRNA with PEG 3350, five tRNA with PEG 6000, and ten tRNA molecules with mPEG-anthracene. tRNA aggregation and particle formation occurred at high polymer concentrations, whereas it remains in A-family structure.

  6. Phenylketonuria mutation analysis in Northern Ireland: A rapid stepwise approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zschocke, J.; Graham, C.A.; Nevin, N.C. [Queen`s Univ., Belfast (Australia)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    We present a multistep approach for the rapid analysis of phenylketonuria (PKU) mutations. In the first step, three common mutations and a polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) system are rapidly analyzed with a fluorescent multiplex assay. In the second step, minihaplotypes combining STR and VNTR data are used to determine rare mutations likely to be present in an investigated patient, which are then confirmed by restriction enzyme analysis. The remaining mutations are analyzed with denaturant gradient-gel electrophoresis and sequencing. The first two steps together identify both mutations in 90%-95% of PKU patients, and results can be obtained within 2 d. We have investigated 121 Northern Irish families with hyperphenylalaninemia, including virtually all patients born since 1972, and have found 34 different mutations on 241 of the 242 mutant alleles. Three mutations (R408W, 165T, and F39L) account for 57.5% of mutations, while 14 mutations occur with a frequency of 1%-6%. The present analysis system is efficient and inexpensive and is particularly well suited to routine mutation analysis in a diagnostic setting. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

  7. Permuted tRNA genes of Cyanidioschyzon merolae, the origin of the tRNA molecule and the root of the Eukarya domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giulio, Massimo

    2008-08-07

    An evolutionary analysis is conducted on the permuted tRNA genes of Cyanidioschyzon merolae, in which the 5' half of the tRNA molecule is codified at the 3' end of the gene and its 3' half is codified at the 5' end. This analysis has shown that permuted genes cannot be considered as derived traits but seem to possess characteristics that suggest they are ancestral traits, i.e. they originated when tRNA molecule genes originated for the first time. In particular, if the hypothesis that permuted genes are a derived trait were true, then we should not have been able to observe that the most frequent class of permuted genes is that of the anticodon loop type, for the simple reason that this class would derive by random permutation from a class of non-permuted tRNA genes, which instead is the rarest. This would not explain the high frequency with which permuted tRNA genes with perfectly separate 5' and 3' halves were observed. Clearly the mechanism that produced this class of permuted genes would envisage the existence, in an advanced stage of evolution, of minigenes codifying for the 5' and 3' halves of tRNAs which were assembled in a permuted way at the origin of the tRNA molecule, thus producing a high frequency of permuted genes of the class here referred. Therefore, this evidence supports the hypothesis that the genes of the tRNA molecule were assembled by minigenes codifying for hairpin-like RNA molecules, as suggested by one model for the origin of tRNA [Di Giulio, M., 1992. On the origin of the transfer RNA molecule. J. Theor. Biol. 159, 199-214; Di Giulio, M., 1999. The non-monophyletic origin of tRNA molecule. J. Theor. Biol. 197, 403-414]. Moreover, the late assembly of the permuted genes of C. merolae, as well as their ancestrality, strengthens the hypothesis of the polyphyletic origins of these genes. Finally, on the basis of the uniqueness and the ancestrality of these permuted genes, I suggest that the root of the Eukarya domain is in the super

  8. Analysis of time of death of prenatally lethal Steeloid mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinchik, E.M.; Cummings, C.C.; Bangham, J.W.; Hunsicker, P.R.; Phipps, E.L.; Stelzner, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    Deletion mutations have been extremely useful in initiating the functional and molecular dissections of regions of the mouse genome. For the d-se and c regions, for example, it was observed that radiation mutations carrying lethal factors separable, by complementation analysis, from the primary d, se, or c mutation itself, could often be associated at both the genetic and molecular levels with multilocus chromosomal deletions. Since many of the Oak Ridge Sld mutations arose in radiation mutagenesis experiments, a substantial number may carry chromosomal deletions that involve the Sl locus in chromosome 10. Because of the great value of deletion mutations for the genetic and molecular analysis of chromosomal regions and complex genetic loci, they have initiated a series of experiments designed to test whether radiation-induced Sld mutations carry other lethal factors, in addition to the lethality caused by severe alleles of the Sl locus itself, as one prescreen for identifying Sld's that are caused by deletions

  9. A voltage-gated pore for translocation of tRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koley, Sandip; Adhya, Samit, E-mail: nilugrandson@gmail.com

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •A tRNA translocating complex was assembled from purified proteins. •The complex translocates tRNA at a membrane potential of ∼60 mV. •Translocation requires Cys and His residues in the Fe–S center of RIC6 subunit. -- Abstract: Very little is known about how nucleic acids are translocated across membranes. The multi-subunit RNA Import Complex (RIC) from mitochondria of the kinetoplastid protozoon Leishmania tropica induces translocation of tRNAs across artificial or natural membranes, but the nature of the translocation pore remains unknown. We show that subunits RIC6 and RIC9 assemble on the membrane in presence of subunit RIC4A to form complex R3. Atomic Force Microscopy of R3 revealed particles with an asymmetric surface groove of ∼20 nm rim diameter and ∼1 nm depth. R3 induced translocation of tRNA into liposomes when the pH of the medium was lowered to ∼6 in the absence of ATP. R3-mediated tRNA translocation could also be induced at neutral pH by a K{sup +} diffusion potential with an optimum of 60–70 mV. Point mutations in the Cys{sub 2}–His{sub 2} Fe-binding motif of RIC6, which is homologous to the respiratory Complex III Fe–S protein, abrogated import induced by low pH but not by K{sup +} diffusion potential. These results indicate that the R3 complex forms a pore that is gated by a proton-generated membrane potential and that the Fe–S binding region of RIC6 has a role in proton translocation. The tRNA import complex of L. tropica thus contains a novel macromolecular channel distinct from the mitochondrial protein import pore that is apparently involved in tRNA import in some species.

  10. Mutational analysis of the HGO gene in Finnish alkaptonuria patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bernabe, D. B.-V.; Peterson, P.; Luopajarvi, K.; Matintalo, P.; Alho, A.; Konttinen, Y.; Krohn, K.; de Cordoba, S. R.; Ranki, A.

    1999-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU), the prototypic inborn error of metabolism, has recently been shown to be caused by loss of function mutations in the homogentisate-1,2-dioxygenase gene (HGO). So far 17 mutations have been characterised in AKU patients of different ethnic origin. We describe three novel mutations (R58fs, R330S, and H371R) and one common AKU mutation (M368V), detected by mutational and polymorphism analysis of the HGO gene in five Finnish AKU pedigrees. The three novel AKU mutations are most likely specific for the Finnish population and have originated recently.


Keywords: alkaptonuria; homogentisate-1,2-dioxygenase; Finland PMID:10594001

  11. Mutational analysis of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and tRNASer(UCN) genes in Tunisian patients with nonsyndromic hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna; Tlili, Abdelaziz; Masmoudi, Saber; Louhichi, Nacim; Charfeddine, Ilhem; Amor, Mohamed Ben; Lahmar, Imed; Driss, Nabil; Drira, Mohamed; Ayadi, Hammadi; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2006-01-01

    We explored the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and the tRNA Ser(UCN) genes in 100 Tunisian families affected with NSHL and in 100 control individuals. We identified the mitochondrial A1555G mutation in one out of these 100 families and not in the 100 control individuals. Members of this family harbouring the A1555G mutation showed phenotypic heterogeneity which could be explained by an eventual nuclear-mitochondrial interaction. So, we have screened three nuclear genes: GJB2, GJB3, and GJB6 but we have not found correlation between the phenotypic heterogeneity and variants detected in these genes. We explored also the entire mitochondrial 12S rRNA and the tRNA Ser(UCN) genes. We detected five novel polymorphisms: T742C, T794A, A813G, C868T, and C954T, and 12 known polymorphisms in the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene. None of the 100 families or the 100 controls were found to carry mutations in the tRNA Ser(UCN) gene. We report here First mutational screening of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and the tRNA Ser(UCN) genes in the Tunisian population which describes the second family harbouring the A1555G mutation in Africa and reveals novel polymorphisms in the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene

  12. Structural similarities and functional differences clarify evolutionary relationships between tRNA healing enzymes and the myelin enzyme CNPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muruganandam, Gopinath; Raasakka, Arne; Myllykoski, Matti; Kursula, Inari; Kursula, Petri

    2017-05-16

    Eukaryotic tRNA splicing is an essential process in the transformation of a primary tRNA transcript into a mature functional tRNA molecule. 5'-phosphate ligation involves two steps: a healing reaction catalyzed by polynucleotide kinase (PNK) in association with cyclic phosphodiesterase (CPDase), and a sealing reaction catalyzed by an RNA ligase. The enzymes that catalyze tRNA healing in yeast and higher eukaryotes are homologous to the members of the 2H phosphoesterase superfamily, in particular to the vertebrate myelin enzyme 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase). We employed different biophysical and biochemical methods to elucidate the overall structural and functional features of the tRNA healing enzymes yeast Trl1 PNK/CPDase and lancelet PNK/CPDase and compared them with vertebrate CNPase. The yeast and the lancelet enzymes have cyclic phosphodiesterase and polynucleotide kinase activity, while vertebrate CNPase lacks PNK activity. In addition, we also show that the healing enzymes are structurally similar to the vertebrate CNPase by applying synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. We provide a structural analysis of the tRNA healing enzyme PNK and CPDase domains together. Our results support evolution of vertebrate CNPase from tRNA healing enzymes with a loss of function at its N-terminal PNK-like domain.

  13. Mutational Analysis of Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erstad, Derek J. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Cusack, James C. Jr., E-mail: jcusack@mgh.harvard.edu [Division of Surgical Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2014-10-17

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive cutaneous neuroendocrine malignancy that is associated with a poor prognosis. The pathogenesis of MCC is not well understood, and despite a recent plethora of mutational analyses, we have yet to find a set of signature mutations implicated in the majority of cases. Mutations, including TP53, Retinoblastoma and PIK3CA, have been documented in subsets of patients. Other mechanisms are also likely at play, including infection with the Merkel cell polyomavirus in a subset of patients, dysregulated immune surveillance, epigenetic alterations, aberrant protein expression, posttranslational modifications and microRNAs. In this review, we summarize what is known about MCC genetic mutations and chromosomal abnormalities, and their clinical significance. We also examine aberrant protein function and microRNA expression, and discuss the therapeutic and prognostic implications of these findings. Multiple clinical trials designed to selectively target overexpressed oncogenes in MCC are currently underway, though most are still in early phases. As we accumulate more molecular data on MCC, we will be better able to understand its pathogenic mechanisms, develop libraries of targeted therapies, and define molecular prognostic signatures to enhance our clinicopathologic knowledge.

  14. Mutational Analysis of Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erstad, Derek J.; Cusack, James C. Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive cutaneous neuroendocrine malignancy that is associated with a poor prognosis. The pathogenesis of MCC is not well understood, and despite a recent plethora of mutational analyses, we have yet to find a set of signature mutations implicated in the majority of cases. Mutations, including TP53, Retinoblastoma and PIK3CA, have been documented in subsets of patients. Other mechanisms are also likely at play, including infection with the Merkel cell polyomavirus in a subset of patients, dysregulated immune surveillance, epigenetic alterations, aberrant protein expression, posttranslational modifications and microRNAs. In this review, we summarize what is known about MCC genetic mutations and chromosomal abnormalities, and their clinical significance. We also examine aberrant protein function and microRNA expression, and discuss the therapeutic and prognostic implications of these findings. Multiple clinical trials designed to selectively target overexpressed oncogenes in MCC are currently underway, though most are still in early phases. As we accumulate more molecular data on MCC, we will be better able to understand its pathogenic mechanisms, develop libraries of targeted therapies, and define molecular prognostic signatures to enhance our clinicopathologic knowledge

  15. Discordant diagnoses obtained by different approaches in antithrombin mutation analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feddersen, Søren; Nybo, Mads

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In hereditary antithrombin (AT) deficiency it is important to determine the underlying mutation since the future risk of thromboembolism varies considerably between mutations. DNA investigations are in general thought of as flawless and irrevocable, but the diagnostic approach can...... be critical. We therefore investigated mutation results in the AT gene, SERPINC1, with two different approaches. DESIGN AND METHODS: Sixteen patients referred to the Centre for Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Odense University Hospital, with biochemical indications of AT deficiency, but with a negative denaturing...... high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) mutation screening (routine approach until recently) were included. As an alternative mutation analysis, direct sequencing of all exons and exon-intron boundaries without pre-selection by DHPLC was performed. RESULTS: Out of sixteen patients...

  16. IDH Mutation Analysis in Ewing Sarcoma Family Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Yong Na

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to yield α-ketoglutarate (α-KG with production of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH. Dysfunctional IDH leads to reduced production of α-KG and NADH and increased production of 2-hydroxyglutarate, an oncometabolite. This results in increased oxidative damage and stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor α, causing cells to be prone to tumorigenesis. Methods: This study investigated IDH mutations in 61 Ewing sarcoma family tumors (ESFTs, using a pentose nucleic acid clamping method and direct sequencing. Results: We identified four cases of ESFTs harboring IDH mutations. The number of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations was equal and the subtype of IDH mutations was variable. Clinicopathologic analysis according to IDH mutation status did not reveal significant results. Conclusions: This study is the first to report IDH mutations in ESFTs. The results indicate that ESFTs can harbor IDH mutations in previously known hot-spot regions, although their incidence is rare. Further validation with a larger case-based study would establish more reliable and significant data on prevalence rate and the biological significance of IDH mutations in ESFTs.

  17. RADIA: RNA and DNA integrated analysis for somatic mutation detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amie J Radenbaugh

    Full Text Available The detection of somatic single nucleotide variants is a crucial component to the characterization of the cancer genome. Mutation calling algorithms thus far have focused on comparing the normal and tumor genomes from the same individual. In recent years, it has become routine for projects like The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA to also sequence the tumor RNA. Here we present RADIA (RNA and DNA Integrated Analysis, a novel computational method combining the patient-matched normal and tumor DNA with the tumor RNA to detect somatic mutations. The inclusion of the RNA increases the power to detect somatic mutations, especially at low DNA allelic frequencies. By integrating an individual's DNA and RNA, we are able to detect mutations that would otherwise be missed by traditional algorithms that examine only the DNA. We demonstrate high sensitivity (84% and very high precision (98% and 99% for RADIA in patient data from endometrial carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma from TCGA. Mutations with both high DNA and RNA read support have the highest validation rate of over 99%. We also introduce a simulation package that spikes in artificial mutations to patient data, rather than simulating sequencing data from a reference genome. We evaluate sensitivity on the simulation data and demonstrate our ability to rescue back mutations at low DNA allelic frequencies by including the RNA. Finally, we highlight mutations in important cancer genes that were rescued due to the incorporation of the RNA.

  18. Mutational analysis of S12 protein and implications for the accuracy of decoding by the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Divya; Cukras, Anthony R; Rogers, Elizabeth J; Southworth, Daniel R; Green, Rachel

    2007-12-07

    The fidelity of aminoacyl-tRNA selection by the ribosome depends on a conformational switch in the decoding center of the small ribosomal subunit induced by cognate but not by near-cognate aminoacyl-tRNA. The aminoglycosides paromomycin and streptomycin bind to the decoding center and induce related structural rearrangements that explain their observed effects on miscoding. Structural and biochemical studies have identified ribosomal protein S12 (as well as specific nucleotides in 16S ribosomal RNA) as a critical molecular contributor in distinguishing between cognate and near-cognate tRNA species as well as in promoting more global rearrangements in the small subunit, referred to as "closure." Here we use a mutational approach to define contributions made by two highly conserved loops in S12 to the process of tRNA selection. Most S12 variant ribosomes tested display increased levels of fidelity (a "restrictive" phenotype). Interestingly, several variants, K42A and R53A, were substantially resistant to the miscoding effects of paromomycin. Further characterization of the compromised paromomycin response identified a probable second, fidelity-modulating binding site for paromomycin in the 16S ribosomal RNA that facilitates closure of the small subunit and compensates for defects associated with the S12 mutations.

  19. A Comprehensive tRNA Deletion Library Unravels the Genetic Architecture of the tRNA Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom-Ackermann, Zohar; Navon, Sivan; Gingold, Hila; Towers, Ruth; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Dahan, Orna

    2014-01-01

    Deciphering the architecture of the tRNA pool is a prime challenge in translation research, as tRNAs govern the efficiency and accuracy of the process. Towards this challenge, we created a systematic tRNA deletion library in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, aimed at dissecting the specific contribution of each tRNA gene to the tRNA pool and to the cell's fitness. By harnessing this resource, we observed that the majority of tRNA deletions show no appreciable phenotype in rich medium, yet under more challenging conditions, additional phenotypes were observed. Robustness to tRNA gene deletion was often facilitated through extensive backup compensation within and between tRNA families. Interestingly, we found that within tRNA families, genes carrying identical anti-codons can contribute differently to the cellular fitness, suggesting the importance of the genomic surrounding to tRNA expression. Characterization of the transcriptome response to deletions of tRNA genes exposed two disparate patterns: in single-copy families, deletions elicited a stress response; in deletions of genes from multi-copy families, expression of the translation machinery increased. Our results uncover the complex architecture of the tRNA pool and pave the way towards complete understanding of their role in cell physiology. PMID:24453985

  20. Mutational analysis and clinical correlation of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Andrea L; Borger, Darrell R; Szymonifka, Jackie; Ryan, David P; Wo, Jennifer Y; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S; Kwak, Eunice L; Allen, Jill N; Wadlow, Raymond C; Zhu, Andrew X; Murphy, Janet E; Faris, Jason E; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Haigis, Kevin M; Ellisen, Leif W; Iafrate, Anthony J; Hong, Theodore S

    2014-05-15

    Early identification of mutations may guide patients with metastatic colorectal cancer toward targeted therapies that may be life prolonging. The authors assessed tumor genotype correlations with clinical characteristics to determine whether mutational profiling can account for clinical similarities, differences, and outcomes. Under Institutional Review Board approval, 222 patients with metastatic colon adenocarcinoma (n = 158) and rectal adenocarcinoma (n = 64) who underwent clinical tumor genotyping were reviewed. Multiplexed tumor genotyping screened for >150 mutations across 15 commonly mutated cancer genes. The chi-square test was used to assess genotype frequency by tumor site and additional clinical characteristics. Cox multivariate analysis was used to assess the impact of genotype on overall survival. Broad-based tumor genotyping revealed clinical and anatomic differences that could be linked to gene mutations. NRAS mutations were associated with rectal cancer versus colon cancer (12.5% vs 0.6%; P colon cancer (13% vs 3%; P = .024) and older age (15.8% vs 4.6%; P = .006). TP53 mutations were associated with rectal cancer (30% vs 18%; P = .048), younger age (14% vs 28.7%; P = .007), and men (26.4% vs 14%; P = .03). Lung metastases were associated with PIK3CA mutations (23% vs 8.7%; P = .004). Only mutations in BRAF were independently associated with decreased overall survival (hazard ratio, 2.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-5.27; P = .029). The current study suggests that underlying molecular profiles can differ between colon and rectal cancers. Further investigation is warranted to assess whether the differences identified are important in determining the optimal treatment course for these patients. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  1. [FANCA gene mutation analysis in Fanconi anemia patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Peng, Guang-Jie; Zhang, Kejian; Hu, Qun; Zhang, Liu-Qing; Liu, Ai-Guo

    2005-10-01

    To screen the FANCA gene mutation and explore the FANCA protein function in Fanconi anemia (FA) patients. FANCA protein expression and its interaction with FANCF were analyzed using Western blot and immunoprecipitation in 3 cases of FA-A. Genomic DNA was used for MLPA analysis followed by sequencing. FANCA protein was undetectable and FANCA and FANCF protein interaction was impaired in these 3 cases of FA-A. Each case of FA-A contained biallelic pathogenic mutations in FANCA gene. No functional FANCA protein was found in these 3 cases of FA-A, and intragenic deletion, frame shift and splice site mutation were the major pathogenic mutations found in FANCA gene.

  2. A Novel Missense Mutation of Doublecortin: Mutation Analysis of Korean Patients with Subcortical Band Heterotopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myeong-Kyu; Park, Man-Seok; Kim, Byeong-Chae; Cho, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Young-Seon; Kim, Jin-Hee; Heo, Tag; Kim, Eun-Young

    2005-01-01

    The neuronal migration disorders, X-linked lissencephaly syndrome (XLIS) and subcortical band heterotopia (SBH), also called "double cortex", have been linked to missense, nonsense, aberrant splicing, deletion, and insertion mutations in doublecortin (DCX) in families and sporadic cases. Most DCX mutations identified to date are located in two evolutionarily conserved domains. We performed mutation analysis of DCX in two Korean patients with SBH. The SBH patients had mild to moderate developmental delays, drug-resistant generalized seizures, and diffuse thick SBH upon brain MRI. Sequence analysis of the DCX coding region in Patient 1 revealed a c.386 C>T change in exon 3. The sequence variation results in a serine to leucine amino acid change at position 129 (S129L), which has not been found in other family members of Patient 1 or in a large panel of 120 control X-chromosomes. We report here a novel c.386 C>T mutation of DCX that is responsible for SBH. PMID:16100463

  3. KIT mutation analysis in mast cell neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arock, M; Sotlar, K; Akin, C

    2015-01-01

    mutations in patients with mastocytosis at diagnosis and during follow-up with sufficient precision and sensitivity in daily practice. In addition, we provide recommendations for sampling and storage of diagnostic material as well as a robust diagnostic algorithm. Using highly sensitive assays, KIT D816V...... can be detected in peripheral blood leukocytes from most patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM) that is a major step forward in screening and SM diagnosis. In addition, the KIT D816V allele burden can be followed quantitatively during the natural course or during therapy. Our recommendations should...... greatly facilitate diagnostic and follow-up investigations in SM in daily practice as well as in clinical trials. In addition, the new tools and algorithms proposed should lead to a more effective screen, early diagnosis of SM and help to avoid unnecessary referrals....

  4. Machine News and Volatility: The Dow Jones Industrial Average and the TRNA Sentiment Series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Allen (David); A.K. Singh (Abhay)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This paper features an analysis of the relationship between the volatility of the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) Index and a sentiment news series using daily data obtained from the Thomson Reuters News Analytics (TRNA) provided by SIRCA (The Securities Industry

  5. Mutational Analysis of the Rhodopsin Gene in Sector Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napier, Maria L; Durga, Dash; Wolsley, Clive J; Chamney, Sarah; Alexander, Sharon; Brennan, Rosie; Simpson, David A; Silvestri, Giuliana; Willoughby, Colin E

    2015-01-01

    To determine the role of rhodopsin (RHO) gene mutations in patients with sector retinitis pigmentosa (RP) from Northern Ireland. A case series of sector RP in a tertiary ocular genetics clinic. Four patients with sector RP were recruited from the Royal Victoria Hospital (Belfast, Northern Ireland) and Altnagelvin Hospital (Londonderry, Northern Ireland) following informed consent. The diagnosis of sector RP was based on clinical examination, International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision (ISCEV) standard electrophysiology, and visual field analysis. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leucocytes and the coding regions and adjacent flanking intronic sequences of the RHO gene were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified and cycle sequenced. Rhodopsin mutational status. A heterozygous missense mutation in RHO (c.173C > T) resulting in a non-conservative substitution of threonine to methionine (p. Thr58Met) was identified in one patient and was absent from 360 control individuals. This non-conservative substitution (p.Thr58Met) replaces a highly evolutionary conserved polar hydrophilic threonine residue with a non-polar hydrophobic methionine residue at position 58 near the cytoplasmic border of helix A of RHO. The study identified a RHO gene mutation (p.Thr58Met) not previously reported in RP in a patient with sector RP. These findings outline the phenotypic variability associated with RHO mutations. It has been proposed that the regional effects of RHO mutations are likely to result from interplay between mutant alleles and other genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors.

  6. GPR143 gene mutation analysis in pediatric patients with albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebušak Podkrajšek, Katarina; Stirn Kranjc, Branka; Hovnik, Tinka; Kovač, Jernej; Battelino, Tadej

    2012-09-01

    X-linked ocular albinism type 1 is difficult to differentiate clinically from other forms of albinism in young patients. X-linked ocular albinism type 1 is caused by mutations in the GPR143 gene, encoding melanosome specific G-protein coupled receptor. Patients typically present with moderately to severely reduced visual acuity, nystagmus, strabismus, photophobia, iris translucency, hypopigmentation of the retina, foveal hypoplasia and misrouting of optic nerve fibers at the chiasm. Following clinical ophthalmological evaluation, GPR143 gene mutational analyses were performed in a cohort of 15 pediatric male patients with clinical signs of albinism. Three different mutations in the GPR143 gene were identified in four patients, including a novel c.886G>A (p.Gly296Arg) mutation occurring "de novo" and a novel intronic c.360 + 5G>A mutation, identified in two related boys. Four patients with X-linked ocular albinism type 1 were identified from a cohort of 15 boys with clinical signs of albinism using mutation detection methods. Genetic analysis offers the possibility of early definitive diagnosis of ocular albinism type 1 in a significant portion of boys with clinical signs of albinism.

  7. Molecular analysis of radiation-induced mutations in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1996-01-01

    This review will focus on the nature of specific locus mutations detected in mammalian cells exposed in vitro to different types of ionizing radiations. Ionizing radiation has been shown to produce a wide variety of heritable alterations in DNA. These range from single base pair substitutions to stable loss or translocation of large portions of whole chromosomes. Data will be reviewed for certain test systems that reveal different mutation spectra. Techniques for the analysis of molecular alterations include applications of the polymerase chain reaction, some of which may be coupled with DNA sequence analysis, and a variety of hybridization-based techniques. The complexity of large scale rearrangements is approached with cytogenetic techniques including high resolution banding and various applications of the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. Radiation-induced mutant frequencies and mutation spectra are a function of the linkage constraints on the recovery of viable mutants for a given locus and test system. 44 refs

  8. Knowledge-based analysis of functional impacts of mutations in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Knowledge-based analysis of functional impacts of mutations in microRNA seed regions. Supplementary figure 1. Summary of predicted miRNA targets from ... All naturally occurred SNPs in seed regions of human miRNAs. The information of the columns is given in the second sheet. Hihly expressed miRNAs are ...

  9. [Mutation analysis of seven patients with Waardenburg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Ziqi; Zhou, Yongan; Li, Pengli; Zhang, Quanbin; Li, Jiao; Wang, Pengfei; Li, Xiangshao; Feng, Yong

    2016-06-01

    To perform genetic analysis for 7 patients with Waardenburg syndrome. Potential mutation of MITF, PAX3, SOX10 and SNAI2 genes was screened by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. Functions of non-synonymous polymorphisms were predicted with PolyPhen2 software. Seven mutations, including c.649-651delAGA (p.R217del), c.72delG (p.G24fs), c.185T>C (p.M62T), c.118C>T (p.Q40X), c.422T>C (p.L141P), c.640C>T (p.R214X) and c.28G>T(p.G43V), were detected in the patients. Among these, four mutations of the PAX3 gene (c.72delG, c.185T>C, c.118C>T and c.128G>T) and one SOX10 gene mutation (c.422T>C) were not reported previously. Three non-synonymous SNPs (c.185T>C, c.128G>T and c.422T>C) were predicted as harmful. Genetic mutations have been detected in all patients with Waardenburg syndrome.

  10. Analysis of APC mutation in human ameloblastoma and clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Liu, Bing; Sui, Chengguang; Jiang, Youhong

    2016-01-01

    As a highly conserved signaling pathway, Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction pathway plays an important role in many processes. Either in the occurrence or development of tumor, activation of this pathway takes an important place. APC inhibits Wnt/β-catenin pathway to regulate cell proliferation and differentiation. This study aimed to investigate the function of cancer suppressor gene. PCR amplification and sequencing method was used to analyze APC mutations of human clinical specimens. The pathological specimens were collected for PCR and clear electrophoretic bands were obtained after electrophoresis. The gene sequence obtained after purification and sequencing analysis was compared with the known APC gene sequence (NM_000038.5). Base mutations at APC 1543 (T → C), APC-4564 (G → A), APC-5353 (T → G), APC-5550 (T → A) and APC-5969 (G → A) locus existed in 22 (27.5 %), 12 (15 %), 5 (6.25 %), 13 (16.25 %) and 12 patients (15 %), respectively. Gene mutations existed in ameloblastoma, and the mutation loci were 1543 locus (T → C), 4564 locus (G → A), 5353 locus (T → G), 5550 locus (T → A) and 5969 locus (G → A) 15 %, respectively. APC mutation plays a certain role in monitoring the tumor malignant degree as it may indicate the transition process of ameloblastoma malignant phenotype.

  11. Calreticulin mutation analysis in non-mutated Janus kinase 2 essential thrombocythemia patients in Chiang Mai University: analysis of three methods and clinical correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattarittamrong, Ekarat; Tantiworawit, Adisak; Kumpunya, Noppamas; Wongtagan, Ornkamon; Tongphung, Ratchanoo; Phusua, Arunee; Chai-Adisaksopha, Chatree; Hantrakool, Sasinee; Rattanathammethee, Thanawat; Norasetthada, Lalita; Charoenkwan, Pimlak; Lekawanvijit, Suree

    2018-03-09

    The primary objective was to determine the prevalence of calreticulin (CALR) mutation in patients with non-JAK2V617F mutated essential thrombocythemia (ET). The secondary objectives were to evaluate the accuracy of CALR mutation analysis by high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) compared with DNA sequencing and to compare clinical characteristics of CALR mutated and JAK2V617F mutated ET. This was a prospective cohort study involving ET patients registered at Chiang Mai University in the period September 2015-September 2017 who were aged more than 2 years, and did not harbor JAK2V617F mutation. The presence of CALR mutation was established by DNA sequencing, HRM, and real-time PCR for type 1 and type 2 mutation. Clinical data were compared with that from ET patients with mutated JAK2V617F. Twenty-eight patients were enrolled onto the study. CALR mutations were found in 10 patients (35.7%). Three patients had type 1 mutation, 5 patients had type 2 mutation, 1 patient had type 18 mutation, and 1 patients had novel mutations (c.1093 C-G, c.1098_1131 del, c.1135 G-A). HRM could differentiate between the types of mutation in complete agreement with DNA sequencing. Patients with a CALR mutation showed a significantly greater male predominance and had a higher platelet count when compared with 42 JAK2V617F patients. The prevalence of CALR mutation in JAK2V617F-negative ET in this study is 35.7%. HRM is an effective method of detecting CALR mutation and is a more advantageous method of screening for CALR mutation.

  12. Overexpression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa MnmE, a GTPase involved in tRNA modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyung Ho; Suh, Se Won

    2010-01-01

    MnmE from P. aeruginosa was crystallized and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.69 Å resolution. MnmE, an evolutionarily conserved GTPase, is involved in modification of the uridine base (U34) at the wobble position of certain tRNAs. Previous crystal structures of MnmE suggest that it is a dimer with considerable conformational flexibility. To facilitate structural comparisons among MnmE proteins, structural analysis of MnmE from Pseudomonas aeruginosa encoded by the PA5567 gene was initiated. It was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized at 297 K using a reservoir solution consisting of 100 mM sodium ADA pH 6.5, 12%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 4000, 100 mM lithium sulfate, 2%(v/v) 2-propanol and 2.5 mM dithiothreitol. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.69 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group C222 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 96.74, b = 204.66, c = 120.90 Å. Two monomers were present in the asymmetric unit, resulting in a crystal volume per protein mass (V M ) of 2.99 Å 3 Da −1 and a solvent content of 58.8%

  13. The effect of tRNA levels on decoding times of mRNA codons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana, Alexandra; Tuller, Tamir

    2014-08-01

    The possible effect of transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) concentrations on codons decoding time is a fundamental biomedical research question; however, due to a large number of variables affecting this process and the non-direct relation between them, a conclusive answer to this question has eluded so far researchers in the field. In this study, we perform a novel analysis of the ribosome profiling data of four organisms which enables ranking the decoding times of different codons while filtering translational phenomena such as experimental biases, extreme ribosomal pauses and ribosome traffic jams. Based on this filtering, we show for the first time that there is a significant correlation between tRNA concentrations and the codons estimated decoding time both in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes in natural conditions (-0.38 to -0.66, all P values decoding times are not correlated with aminoacyl-tRNA levels. The reported results support the conjecture that translation efficiency is directly influenced by the tRNA levels in the cell. Thus, they should help to understand the evolution of synonymous aspects of coding sequences via the adaptation of their codons to the tRNA pool. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. tRNA acceptor-stem and anticodon bases embed separate features of amino acid chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Charles W.; Wolfenden, Richard

    2016-01-01

    abstract The universal genetic code is a translation table by which nucleic acid sequences can be interpreted as polypeptides with a wide range of biological functions. That information is used by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases to translate the code. Moreover, amino acid properties dictate protein folding. We recently reported that digital correlation techniques could identify patterns in tRNA identity elements that govern recognition by synthetases. Our analysis, and the functionality of truncated synthetases that cannot recognize the tRNA anticodon, support the conclusion that the tRNA acceptor stem houses an independent code for the same 20 amino acids that likely functioned earlier in the emergence of genetics. The acceptor-stem code, related to amino acid size, is distinct from a code in the anticodon that is related to amino acid polarity. Details of the acceptor-stem code suggest that it was useful in preserving key properties of stereochemically-encoded peptides that had developed the capacity to interact catalytically with RNA. The quantitative embedding of the chemical properties of amino acids into tRNA bases has implications for the origins of molecular biology. PMID:26595350

  15. A mutational analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yang; Lai, Kenneth; Cheung, Iris; Youds, Jillian; Tarailo, Maja; Tarailo, Sanja; Rose, Ann

    2006-01-01

    The International Caenorhabditis elegans Experiment First Flight (ICE-First) was a project using C. elegans as a model organism to study the biological effects of short duration spaceflight (11 days in the International Space Station). As a member of the ICE-First research team, our group focused on the mutational effects of spaceflight. Several approaches were taken to measure mutational changes that occurred during the spaceflight including measurement of the integrity of poly-G/poly-C tracts, determination of the mutation frequency in the unc-22 gene, analysis of lethal mutations captured by the genetic balancer eT1(III;V), and identification of alterations in telomere length. By comparing the efficiency, sensitivity, and convenience of these methods, we deduced that the eT1 balancer system is well-suited for capturing, maintaining and recovering mutational events that occur over several generations during spaceflight. In the course of this experiment, we have extended the usefulness of the eT1 balancer system by identifying the physical breakpoints of the eT1 translocation and have developed a PCR assay to follow the eT1 chromosomes. C. elegans animals were grown in a defined liquid media during the spaceflight. This is the first analysis of genetic changes in C. elegans grown in the defined media. Although no significant difference in mutation rate was detected between spaceflight and control samples, which is not surprising given the short duration of the spaceflight, we demonstrate here the utility of worms as an integrating biological dosimeter for spaceflight

  16. A mutational analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans in space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Yang [Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Life Sciences Centre, Room 1364-2350 Health Sciences Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3 (Canada); Lai, Kenneth [Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Life Sciences Centre, Room 1364-2350 Health Sciences Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3 (Canada); Cheung, Iris [Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Life Sciences Centre, Room 1364-2350 Health Sciences Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3 (Canada); Youds, Jillian [Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Life Sciences Centre, Room 1364-2350 Health Sciences Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3 (Canada); Tarailo, Maja [Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Life Sciences Centre, Room 1364-2350 Health Sciences Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3 (Canada); Tarailo, Sanja [Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Life Sciences Centre, Room 1364-2350 Health Sciences Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3 (Canada); Rose, Ann [Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Life Sciences Centre, Room 1364-2350 Health Sciences Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3 (Canada)]. E-mail: arose@gene.nce.ubc.ca

    2006-10-10

    The International Caenorhabditis elegans Experiment First Flight (ICE-First) was a project using C. elegans as a model organism to study the biological effects of short duration spaceflight (11 days in the International Space Station). As a member of the ICE-First research team, our group focused on the mutational effects of spaceflight. Several approaches were taken to measure mutational changes that occurred during the spaceflight including measurement of the integrity of poly-G/poly-C tracts, determination of the mutation frequency in the unc-22 gene, analysis of lethal mutations captured by the genetic balancer eT1(III;V), and identification of alterations in telomere length. By comparing the efficiency, sensitivity, and convenience of these methods, we deduced that the eT1 balancer system is well-suited for capturing, maintaining and recovering mutational events that occur over several generations during spaceflight. In the course of this experiment, we have extended the usefulness of the eT1 balancer system by identifying the physical breakpoints of the eT1 translocation and have developed a PCR assay to follow the eT1 chromosomes. C. elegans animals were grown in a defined liquid media during the spaceflight. This is the first analysis of genetic changes in C. elegans grown in the defined media. Although no significant difference in mutation rate was detected between spaceflight and control samples, which is not surprising given the short duration of the spaceflight, we demonstrate here the utility of worms as an integrating biological dosimeter for spaceflight.

  17. Structure–function relations in the NTPase domain of the antiviral tRNA ribotoxin Escherichia coli PrrC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meineke, Birthe; Shuman, Stewart

    2012-01-01

    Breakage of tRNA by Escherichia coli anticodon nuclease PrrC (EcoPrrC) underlies a host antiviral response to phage T4 infection. Expression of EcoPrrC is cytocidal in yeast, signifying that PrrC ribotoxicity crosses phylogenetic domain boundaries. EcoPrrC consists of an N-terminal NTPase module that resembles ABC transporters and a C-terminal nuclease module that is sui generis. PrrC homologs are prevalent in many other bacteria. Here we report that Haemophilus influenzae PrrC is toxic in E. coli and yeast. To illuminate structure–activity relations, we conducted a new round of mutational analysis of EcoPrrC guided by primary structure conservation among toxic PrrC homologs. We indentify 17 candidate active site residues in the NTPase module that are essential for toxicity in yeast when EcoPrrC is expressed at high gene dosage. Their functions could be educed by integrating mutational data with the atomic structure of the transition-state complex of a homologous ABC protein.

  18. Structure-function relations in the NTPase domain of the antiviral tRNA ribotoxin Escherichia coli PrrC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meineke, Birthe; Shuman, Stewart, E-mail: s-shuman@ski.mskcc.org

    2012-06-05

    Breakage of tRNA by Escherichia coli anticodon nuclease PrrC (EcoPrrC) underlies a host antiviral response to phage T4 infection. Expression of EcoPrrC is cytocidal in yeast, signifying that PrrC ribotoxicity crosses phylogenetic domain boundaries. EcoPrrC consists of an N-terminal NTPase module that resembles ABC transporters and a C-terminal nuclease module that is sui generis. PrrC homologs are prevalent in many other bacteria. Here we report that Haemophilus influenzae PrrC is toxic in E. coli and yeast. To illuminate structure-activity relations, we conducted a new round of mutational analysis of EcoPrrC guided by primary structure conservation among toxic PrrC homologs. We indentify 17 candidate active site residues in the NTPase module that are essential for toxicity in yeast when EcoPrrC is expressed at high gene dosage. Their functions could be educed by integrating mutational data with the atomic structure of the transition-state complex of a homologous ABC protein.

  19. RNA Polymerase III Output Is Functionally Linked to tRNA Dimethyl-G26 Modification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneeshkumar G Arimbasseri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Control of the differential abundance or activity of tRNAs can be important determinants of gene regulation. RNA polymerase (RNAP III synthesizes all tRNAs in eukaryotes and it derepression is associated with cancer. Maf1 is a conserved general repressor of RNAP III under the control of the target of rapamycin (TOR that acts to integrate transcriptional output and protein synthetic demand toward metabolic economy. Studies in budding yeast have indicated that the global tRNA gene activation that occurs with derepression of RNAP III via maf1-deletion is accompanied by a paradoxical loss of tRNA-mediated nonsense suppressor activity, manifested as an antisuppression phenotype, by an unknown mechanism. We show that maf1-antisuppression also occurs in the fission yeast S. pombe amidst general activation of RNAP III. We used tRNA-HydroSeq to document that little changes occurred in the relative levels of different tRNAs in maf1Δ cells. By contrast, the efficiency of N2,N2-dimethyl G26 (m(22G26 modification on certain tRNAs was decreased in response to maf1-deletion and associated with antisuppression, and was validated by other methods. Over-expression of Trm1, which produces m(22G26, reversed maf1-antisuppression. A model that emerges is that competition by increased tRNA levels in maf1Δ cells leads to m(22G26 hypomodification due to limiting Trm1, reducing the activity of suppressor-tRNASerUCA and accounting for antisuppression. Consistent with this, we show that RNAP III mutations associated with hypomyelinating leukodystrophy decrease tRNA transcription, increase m(22G26 efficiency and reverse antisuppression. Extending this more broadly, we show that a decrease in tRNA synthesis by treatment with rapamycin leads to increased m(22G26 modification and that this response is conserved among highly divergent yeasts and human cells.

  20. Risk of malignant paraganglioma in SDHB-mutation and SDHD-mutation carriers: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulsteijn, L.T.; Dekkers, O.M.; Hes, F.J.; Smit, J.W.A.; Corssmit, E.P.

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the risk of developing malignant paraganglioma (PGL) in SDHB-mutation and SDHD-mutation carriers. PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, COCHRANE and Academic Search Premier (2000-August 2011) and references of key

  1. The absence of A-to-I editing in the anticodon of plant cytoplasmic tRNA (Arg) ACG demands a relaxation of the wobble decoding rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldinger, Carolin A; Leisinger, Anne-Katrin; Gaston, Kirk W; Limbach, Patrick A; Igloi, Gabor L

    2012-10-01

    It is a prevalent concept that, in line with the Wobble Hypothesis, those tRNAs having an adenosine in the first position of the anticodon become modified to an inosine at this position. Sequencing the cDNA derived from the gene coding for cytoplasmic tRNA (Arg) ACG from several higher plants as well as mass spectrometric analysis of the isoacceptor has revealed that for this kingdom an unmodified A in the wobble position of the anticodon is the rule rather than the exception. In vitro translation shows that in the plant system the absence of inosine in the wobble position of tRNA (Arg) does not prevent decoding. This isoacceptor belongs to the class of tRNA that is imported from the cytoplasm into the mitochondria of higher plants. Previous studies on the mitochondrial tRNA pool have demonstrated the existence of tRNA (Arg) ICG in this organelle. In moss the mitochondrial encoded distinct tRNA (Arg) ACG isoacceptor possesses the I34 modification. The implication is that for mitochondrial protein biosynthesis A-to-I editing is necessary and occurs by a mitochondrion-specific deaminase after import of the unmodified nuclear encoded tRNA (Arg) ACG.

  2. Mutational analysis of Sep-tRNA:Cys-tRNA synthase reveals critical residues for tRNA-dependent cysteine formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgadóttir, Sunna; Sinapah, Sylvie; Söll, Dieter; Ling, Jiqiang

    2012-01-02

    In methanogenic archaea, Sep-tRNA:Cys-tRNA synthase (SepCysS) converts Sep-tRNA(Cys) to Cys-tRNA(Cys). The mechanism of tRNA-dependent cysteine formation remains unclear due to the lack of functional studies. In this work, we mutated 19 conserved residues in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii SepCysS, and employed an in vivo system to determine the activity of the resulting variants. Our results show that three active-site cysteines (Cys39, Cys42 and Cys247) are essential for SepCysS activity. In addition, combined with structural modeling, our mutational and functional analyses also reveal multiple residues that are important for the binding of PLP, Sep and tRNA. Our work thus represents the first systematic functional analysis of conserved residues in archaeal SepCysSs, providing insights into the catalytic and substrate binding mechanisms of this poorly characterized enzyme. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Validation of high-resolution DNA melting analysis for mutation scanning of the CDKL5 gene: identification of novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Laure; Diebold, Bertrand; Leroux, Céline; Maurey, Hélène; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Delahaye, Andre; Dulac, Olivier; Metreau, Julia; Melikishvili, Gia; Toutain, Annick; Rivier, François; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Bienvenu, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5) have been predominantly described in epileptic encephalopathies of female, including infantile spasms with Rett-like features. Up to now, detection of mutations in this gene was made by laborious, expensive and/or time consuming methods. Here, we decided to validate high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) for mutation scanning of the CDKL5 gene. Firstly, using a large DNA bank consisting to 34 samples carrying different mutations and polymorphisms, we validated our analytical conditions to analyse the different exons and flanking intronic sequences of the CDKL5 gene by HRMA. Secondly, we screened CDKL5 by both HRMA and denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC) in a cohort of 135 patients with early-onset seizures. Our results showed that point mutations and small insertions and deletions can be reliably detected by HRMA. Compared to dHPLC, HRMA profiles are more discriminated, thereby decreasing unnecessary sequencing. In this study, we identified eleven novel sequence variations including four pathogenic mutations (2.96% prevalence). HRMA appears cost-effective, easy to set up, highly sensitive, non-toxic and rapid for mutation screening, ideally suited for large genes with heterogeneous mutations located along the whole coding sequence, such as the CDKL5 gene. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A new mitochondrial point mutation in the transfer RNA(Lys) gene associated with progressive external ophthalmoplegia with impaired respiratory regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Joachim; Obermaier-Kusser, Bert; Jacobs, Martina; Milles, Cornelia; Mörl, Mario; von Pein, Harald D; Grau, Armin J; Bauer, Matthias F

    2012-05-15

    We report a novel heteroplasmic point mutation G8299A in the gene for mitochondrial tRNA(Lys) in a patient with progressive external ophthalmoplegia complicated by recurrent respiratory insufficiency. Biochemical analysis of respiratory chain complexes in muscle homogenate showed a combined complex I and IV deficiency. The transition does not represent a known neutral polymorphism and affects a position in the tRNA acceptor stem which is conserved in primates, leading to a destabilization of this functionally important domain. In vitro analysis of an essential maturation step of the tRNA transcript indicates the probable pathogenicity of this mutation. We hypothesize that there is a causal relationship between the novel G8299A transition and progressive external ophthalmoplegia with recurrent respiratory failure due to a depressed respiratory drive. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Origins and Early Evolution of the tRNA Molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Tamura

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern transfer RNAs (tRNAs are composed of ~76 nucleotides and play an important role as “adaptor” molecules that mediate the translation of information from messenger RNAs (mRNAs. Many studies suggest that the contemporary full-length tRNA was formed by the ligation of half-sized hairpin-like RNAs. A minihelix (a coaxial stack of the acceptor stem on the T-stem of tRNA can function both in aminoacylation by aminoacyl tRNA synthetases and in peptide bond formation on the ribosome, indicating that it may be a vestige of the ancestral tRNA. The universal CCA-3′ terminus of tRNA is also a typical characteristic of the molecule. “Why CCA?” is the fundamental unanswered question, but several findings give a comprehensive picture of its origin. Here, the origins and early evolution of tRNA are discussed in terms of various perspectives, including nucleotide ligation, chiral selectivity of amino acids, genetic code evolution, and the organization of the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center (PTC. The proto-tRNA molecules may have evolved not only as adaptors but also as contributors to the composition of the ribosome.

  6. Mutational analysis of GALT gene in Greek patients with galactosaemia: identification of two novel mutations and clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulpis, Kleopatra H; Thodi, Georgia; Iakovou, Konstantinos; Chatzidaki, Maria; Dotsikas, Yannis; Molou, Elina; Triantafylli, Olga; Loukas, Yannis L

    2017-10-01

    Classical galactosaemia is an inborn error of metabolism due to the deficiency of the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). The aim of the study was to identify the underlying mutations in Greek patients with GALT deficiency and evaluate their psychomotor and speech development. Patients with GALT deficiency (n = 17) were picked up through neonatal screening. Mutational analysis was conducted via Sanger sequencing, while in silico analysis was used in the cases of novel missense mutations. Psychomotor speech development tests were utilized for the clinical evaluation of the patients. Eleven different mutations in the GALT gene were detected in the patient cohort, including two novel ones. The most frequent mutation was p.Q188R (c.563 A > G). As for the novel mutations, p.M298I (c.894 G > A) was identified in four out of 32 independent alleles, while p.P115S (c.343 C > T) was identified once. Psychomotor evaluation revealed that most of the patients were found in the borderline area (Peabody test), while only two had speech delay problems. The WISK test revealed three patients at borderline limits and two were at lower than normal limits. The mutational spectrum of the GALT gene in Greek patients is presented for the first time. The mutation p.Q188R is the most frequent among Greek patients. Two novel mutations were identified and their potential pathogenicity was estimated. Regarding the phenotypic characteristics, psychomotor disturbances and speech delay were mainly observed among GALT-deficient patients.

  7. Haplotype analysis suggest that the MLH1 c.2059C > T mutation is a Swedish founder mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Salomé, Jenny; Liu, Tao; Keihäs, Markku; Morak, Moni; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Berry, Ian R; Moilanen, Jukka S; Baert-Desurmont, Stéphanie; Lindblom, Annika; Lagerstedt-Robinson, Kristina

    2017-12-29

    Lynch syndrome (LS) predisposes to a spectrum of cancers and increases the lifetime risk of developing colorectal- or endometrial cancer to over 50%. Lynch syndrome is dominantly inherited and is caused by defects in DNA mismatch-repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2, with the vast majority detected in MLH1 and MSH2. Recurrent LS-associated variants observed in apparently unrelated individuals, have either arisen de novo in different families due to mutation hotspots, or are inherited from a founder (a common ancestor) that lived several generations back. There are variants that recur in some populations while also acting as founders in other ethnic groups. Testing for founder mutations can facilitate molecular diagnosis of Lynch Syndrome more efficiently and more cost effective than screening for all possible mutations. Here we report a study of the missense mutation MLH1 c.2059C > T (p.Arg687Trp), a potential founder mutation identified in eight Swedish families and one Finnish family with Swedish ancestors. Haplotype analysis confirmed that the Finnish and Swedish families shared a haplotype of between 0.9 and 2.8 Mb. While MLH1 c.2059C > T exists worldwide, the Swedish haplotype was not found among mutation carriers from Germany or France, which indicates a common founder in the Swedish population. The geographic distribution of MLH1 c.2059C > T in Sweden suggests a single, ancient mutational event in the northern part of Sweden.

  8. Studying the evolutionary relationships and phylogenetic trees of 21 groups of tRNA sequences based on complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fangping; Chen, Bowen

    2012-03-01

    To find out the evolutionary relationships among different tRNA sequences of 21 amino acids, 22 networks are constructed. One is constructed from whole tRNAs, and the other 21 networks are constructed from the tRNAs which carry the same amino acids. A new method is proposed such that the alignment scores of any two amino acids groups are determined by the average degree and the average clustering coefficient of their networks. The anticodon feature of isolated tRNA and the phylogenetic trees of 21 group networks are discussed. We find that some isolated tRNA sequences in 21 networks still connect with other tRNAs outside their group, which reflects the fact that those tRNAs might evolve by intercrossing among these 21 groups. We also find that most anticodons among the same cluster are only one base different in the same sites when S ≥ 70, and they stay in the same rank in the ladder of evolutionary relationships. Those observations seem to agree on that some tRNAs might mutate from the same ancestor sequences based on point mutation mechanisms.

  9. Single base pair mutation analysis by PNA directed PCR clamping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørum, H.; Nielsen, P.E.; Egholm, M.

    1993-01-01

    A novel method that allows direct analysis of single base mutation by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is described. The method utilizes the finding that PNAs (peptide nucleic acids) recognize and bind to their complementary nucleic acid sequences with higher thermal stability and specificity...... allows selective amplification/suppression of target sequences that differ by only one base pair. Finally we show that PNAs can be designed in such a way that blockage can be accomplished when the PNA target sequence is located between the PCR primers....

  10. Preoperative RAS Mutational Analysis Is of Great Value in Predicting Follicular Variant of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Sook Hwang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (FVPTC, particularly the encapsulated subtype, often causes a diagnostic dilemma. We reconfirmed the molecular profiles in a large number of FVPTCs and investigated the efficacy of the preoperative mutational analysis in indeterminate thyroid nodules. BRAF V600E/K601E and RAS mutational analysis was performed on 187 FVPTCs. Of these, 132 (70.6% had a point mutation in one of the BRAF V600E (n=57, BRAF K601E (n=11, or RAS (n=64 genes. All mutations were mutually exclusive. The most common RAS mutations were at NRAS codon 61. FNA aspirates from 564 indeterminate nodules were prospectively tested for BRAF and RAS mutation and the surgical outcome was correlated with the mutational status. Fifty-seven and 47 cases were positive for BRAF and RAS mutation, respectively. Twenty-seven RAS-positive patients underwent surgery and all except one patient had FVPTC. The PPV and accuracy of RAS mutational analysis for predicting FVPTC were 96% and 84%, respectively. BRAF or RAS mutations were present in more than two-thirds of FVPTCs and these were mutually exclusive. BRAF mutational analysis followed by N, H, and KRAS codon 61 mutational analysis in indeterminate thyroid nodules would streamline the management of patients with malignancies, mostly FVPTC.

  11. Sensitive KIT D816V mutation analysis of blood as a diagnostic test in mastocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielsgaard Kristensen, Thomas; Vestergaard, Hanne; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    The recent progress in sensitive KIT D816V mutation analysis suggests that mutation analysis of peripheral blood (PB) represents a promising diagnostic test in mastocytosis. However, there is a need for systematic assessment of the analytical sensitivity and specificity of the approach in order...... to establish its value in clinical use. We therefore evaluated sensitive KIT D816V mutation analysis of PB as a diagnostic test in an entire case-series of adults with mastocytosis. We demonstrate for the first time that by using a sufficiently sensitive KIT D816V mutation analysis, it is possible to detect...... the mutation in PB in nearly all adult mastocytosis patients. The mutation was detected in PB in 78 of 83 systemic mastocytosis (94%) and 3 of 4 cutaneous mastocytosis patients (75%). The test was 100% specific as determined by analysis of clinically relevant control patients who all tested negative. Mutation...

  12. [Observation and analysis on mutation of routine STR locus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiu-yang; Feng, Wei-jun; Yang, Qin-gen

    2005-05-01

    To observe and analyze the characteristic of mutation at STR locus. 27 mutant genes observed in 1211 paternity testing cases were checked by PAGE-silver stained and PowerPlex 16 System Kit and validated by sequencing. Mutant genes locate on 15 loci. The pattern of mutation was accord with stepwise mutation model. The mutation ratio of male-to-female was 8:1 and correlated to the age of father. Mutation rate is correlated to the geometric mean of the number of homogeneous repeats of locus. The higher the mean, the higher the mutation rate. These loci are not so appropriate for use in paternity testing.

  13. A parylene-based dual channel microelectrophoresis system for rapid mutation detection via heteroduplex analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sukas, S.; Erson, Ayse Elif; Sert, Cuneyt; Kulah, Haluk

    2008-01-01

    A new dual channel micro-electrophoresis system for rapid mutation detection based on heteroduplex analysis was designed and implemented. Mutation detection was successfully achieved in a total separation length of 250 μm in less than 3 min for a 590 bp DNA sample harboring a 3 bp mutation causing

  14. Introduction of a leucine half-zipper engenders multiple high-quality crystals of a recalcitrant tRNA synthetase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Min; Shapiro, Ryan; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2010-01-01

    E. coli alanyl-tRNA synthetase is recalcitrant to crystallization. A group of leucine substitutions has transformed the protein. Although Escherichia coli alanyl-tRNA synthetase was among the first tRNA synthetases to be sequenced and extensively studied by functional analysis, it has proved to be recalcitrant to crystallization. This challenge remained even for crystallization of the catalytic fragment. By mutationally introducing three stacked leucines onto the solvent-exposed side of an α-helix, an engineered catalytic fragment of the synthetase was obtained that yielded multiple high-quality crystals and cocrystals with different ligands. The engineered α-helix did not form a leucine zipper that interlocked with the same α-helix from another molecule. Instead, using the created hydrophobic spine, it interacted with other surfaces of the protein as a leucine half-zipper (LHZ) to enhance the crystal lattice interactions. The LHZ made crystal lattice contacts in all crystals of different space groups. These results illustrate the power of introducing an LHZ into helices to facilitate crystallization. The authors propose that the method can be unified with surface-entropy reduction and can be broadly used for protein-surface optimization in crystallization

  15. Pachyonychia congenita: Report of two cases and mutation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Ming Yeh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Pachyonychia congenita (PC comprises a group of rare autosomal dominant genetic disorders that involve ectodermal dysplasia. It is characterized by hypertrophic nail dystrophy, focal palmoplantar keratoderma, follicular keratoses, and oral leukokeratosis. Historically, PC has been subdivided into two subtypes, PC-1 or PC-2, on the basis of clinical presentation. However, differential diagnosis based on clinical grounds, especially in young and/or not fully penetrant patients, can be difficult. In addition, clinical analysis of the large case series has shown that there is considerable phenotypic overlap between these two subtypes recently. Based on the advent of molecular genetics and the identification of the genes causing PC, more specific nomenclature has been adopted. Therefore, diagnosis at the molecular level is useful and important to confirm the clinical impression. In this report, we describe two typical cases of PC with mutation analysis revealed a small deletion (514_516delACC, Asn172del and a point mutation (487 G > A, GAG → AAG, Glu163Lys in the KRT6A gene.

  16. RNase MRP cleaves pre-tRNASer-Met in the tRNA maturation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yuichiro; Takeda, Jun; Adachi, Kousuke; Nobe, Yuko; Kobayashi, Junya; Hirota, Kouji; Oliveira, Douglas V; Taoka, Masato; Isobe, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Ribonuclease mitochondrial RNA processing (RNase MRP) is a multifunctional ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that is involved in the maturation of various types of RNA including ribosomal RNA. RNase MRP consists of a potential catalytic RNA and several protein components, all of which are required for cell viability. We show here that the temperature-sensitive mutant of rmp1, the gene for a unique protein component of RNase MRP, accumulates the dimeric tRNA precursor, pre-tRNA(Ser-Met). To examine whether RNase MRP mediates tRNA maturation, we purified the RNase MRP holoenzyme from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and found that the enzyme directly and selectively cleaves pre-tRNA(Ser-Met), suggesting that RNase MRP participates in the maturation of specific tRNA in vivo. In addition, mass spectrometry-based ribonucleoproteomic analysis demonstrated that this RNase MRP consists of one RNA molecule and 11 protein components, including a previously unknown component Rpl701. Notably, limited nucleolysis of RNase MRP generated an active catalytic core consisting of partial mrp1 RNA fragments, which constitute "Domain 1" in the secondary structure of RNase MRP, and 8 proteins. Thus, the present study provides new insight into the structure and function of RNase MRP.

  17. Identification of Aquifex aeolicus tRNA (m2(2G26) methyltransferase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Hori, Hiroyuki; Endo, Yaeta

    2002-01-01

    The modifications of N2,N2-dimethylguanine (m2(2)G) are found in tRNAs and rRNAs from eukarya and archaea. In tRNAs, modification at position G26 is generated by tRNA (m2(2)G26) methyltransferase, which is encoded by the corresponding gene, trm1. This enzyme catalyzes the methyl-transfer from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to the semi-conserved residue, G26, via the intermediate modified base, m2G26. Recent genome sequencing project has been reported that the putative trm1 is encoded in the genome of Aquifex aeolicus, a hyper-thermophilic eubacterium as only one exception among eubacteria. In order to confirm whether this bacterial trm1 gene product is a real tRNA (m2(2)G26) methyltransferase or not, we expressed this protein by wheat germ in vitro cell-free translation system. Our biochemical analysis clearly showed that this gene product possessed tRNA (m2(2)G26) methyltransferase activity.

  18. Mitochondrial tRNA gene translocations in highly eusocial bees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Silvestre

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial gene rearrangement events, especially involving tRNA genes, have been described more frequently as more complete mitochondrial genome sequences are becoming available. In the present work, we analyzed mitochondrial tRNA gene rearrangements between two bee species belonging to the tribes Apini and Meliponini within the "corbiculate Apidae". Eleven tRNA genes are in different genome positions or strands. The molecular events responsible for each translocation are explained. Considering the high number of rearrangements observed, the data presented here contradict the general rule of high gene order conservation among closely related organisms, and also represent a powerful molecular tool to help solve questions about phylogeny and evolution in bees.

  19. Systematic Analysis of Splice-Site-Creating Mutations in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyka G. Jayasinghe

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: For the past decade, cancer genomic studies have focused on mutations leading to splice-site disruption, overlooking those having splice-creating potential. Here, we applied a bioinformatic tool, MiSplice, for the large-scale discovery of splice-site-creating mutations (SCMs across 8,656 TCGA tumors. We report 1,964 originally mis-annotated mutations having clear evidence of creating alternative splice junctions. TP53 and GATA3 have 26 and 18 SCMs, respectively, and ATRX has 5 from lower-grade gliomas. Mutations in 11 genes, including PARP1, BRCA1, and BAP1, were experimentally validated for splice-site-creating function. Notably, we found that neoantigens induced by SCMs are likely several folds more immunogenic compared to missense mutations, exemplified by the recurrent GATA3 SCM. Further, high expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 was observed in tumors with SCMs, suggesting candidates for immune blockade therapy. Our work highlights the importance of integrating DNA and RNA data for understanding the functional and the clinical implications of mutations in human diseases. : Jayasinghe et al. identify nearly 2,000 splice-site-creating mutations (SCMs from over 8,000 tumor samples across 33 cancer types. They provide a more accurate interpretation of previously mis-annotated mutations, highlighting the importance of integrating data types to understand the functional and the clinical implications of splicing mutations in human disease. Keywords: splicing, RNA, mutations of clinical relevance

  20. High resolution melting analysis: a rapid and accurate method to detect CALR mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Bilbao-Sieyro

    Full Text Available The recent discovery of CALR mutations in essential thrombocythemia (ET and primary myelofibrosis (PMF patients without JAK2/MPL mutations has emerged as a relevant finding for the molecular diagnosis of these myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN. We tested the feasibility of high-resolution melting (HRM as a screening method for rapid detection of CALR mutations.CALR was studied in wild-type JAK2/MPL patients including 34 ET, 21 persistent thrombocytosis suggestive of MPN and 98 suspected secondary thrombocytosis. CALR mutation analysis was performed through HRM and Sanger sequencing. We compared clinical features of CALR-mutated versus 45 JAK2/MPL-mutated subjects in ET.Nineteen samples showed distinct HRM patterns from wild-type. Of them, 18 were mutations and one a polymorphism as confirmed by direct sequencing. CALR mutations were present in 44% of ET (15/34, 14% of persistent thrombocytosis suggestive of MPN (3/21 and none of the secondary thrombocytosis (0/98. Of the 18 mutants, 9 were 52 bp deletions, 8 were 5 bp insertions and other was a complex mutation with insertion/deletion. No mutations were found after sequencing analysis of 45 samples displaying wild-type HRM curves. HRM technique was reproducible, no false positive or negative were detected and the limit of detection was of 3%.This study establishes a sensitive, reliable and rapid HRM method to screen for the presence of CALR mutations.

  1. The application of a linear algebra to the analysis of mutation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M E; Thomas, S M; Clarke, K

    1999-07-07

    Cells and bacteria growing in culture are subject to mutation, and as this mutation is the ultimate substrate for selection and evolution, the factors controlling the mutation rate are of some interest. The mutational event is not observed directly, but is inferred from the phenotype of the original mutant or of its descendants; the rate of mutation is inferred from the number of such mutant phenotypes. Such inference presumes a knowledge of the probability distribution for the size of a clone arising from a single mutation. We develop a mathematical formulation that assists in the design and analysis of experiments which investigate mutation rates and mutant clone size distribution, and we use it to analyse data for which the classical Luria-Delbrück clone-size distribution must be rejected. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  2. DNA sequence analysis of X-ray induced Adh null mutations in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, J.; Fossett, N.G.; Arbour-Reily, P.; McDaniel, M.; Tucker, A.; Chang, S.H.; Lee, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    The mutational spectrum for 28 X-ray induced mutations and 2 spontaneous mutations, previously determined by genetic and cytogenetic methods, consisted of 20 multilocus deficiencies (19 induced and 1 spontaneous) and 10 intragenic mutations (9 induced and 1 spontaneous). One of the X-ray induced intragenic mutations was lost, and another was determined to be a recombinant with the allele used in the recovery scheme. The DNA sequence of two X-ray induced intragenic mutations has been published. This paper reports the results of DNA sequence analysis of the remaining intragenic mutations and a summary of the X-ray induced mutational spectrum. The combination of DNA sequence analysis with genetic complementation analysis shows a continuous distribution in size of deletions rather than two different types of mutations consisting of deletions and 'point mutations'. Sequencing is shown to be essential for detecting intragenic deletions. Of particular importance for future studies is the observation that all of the intragenic deletions consist of a direct repeat adjacent to the breakpoint with one of the repeats deleted

  3. OGG1 Mutations and Risk of Female Breast Cancer: Meta-Analysis and Experimental Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashif Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In first part of this study association between OGG1 polymorphisms and breast cancer susceptibility was explored by meta-analysis. Second part of the study involved 925 subjects, used for mutational analysis of OGG1 gene using PCR-SSCP and sequencing. Fifteen mutations were observed, which included five intronic mutations, four splice site mutations, two 3′UTR mutations, three missense mutations, and a nonsense mutation. Significantly (pG and 3′UTR variant g.9798848G>A. Among intronic mutations, highest (~15 fold increase in breast cancer risk was associated with g.9793680G>A (p<0.009. Similarly ~14-fold increased risk was associated with Val159Gly (p<0.01, ~17-fold with Gly221Arg (p<0.005, and ~18-fold with Ser326Cys (p<0.004 in breast cancer patients compared with controls, whereas analysis of nonsense mutation showed that ~13-fold (p<0.01 increased breast cancer risk was associated with Trp375STOP in patients compared to controls. In conclusion, a significant association was observed between OGG1 germ line mutations and breast cancer risk. These findings provide evidence that OGG1 may prove to be a good candidate of better diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of breast cancer.

  4. tRNA Is the Source of Low-Level trans-Zeatin Production in Methylobacterium spp.†‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Robbin L.; Morris, Roy O.; Polacco, Joe C.

    2002-01-01

    Pink-pigmented facultatively methylotrophic bacteria (PPFMs), classified as Methylobacterium spp., are persistent colonizers of plant leaf surfaces. Reports of PPFM-plant dialogue led us to examine cytokinin production by PPFMs. Using immunoaffinity and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) purification, we obtained 22 to 111 ng of trans-zeatin per liter from culture filtrates of four PPFM leaf isolates (from Arabidopsis, barley, maize, and soybean) and of a Methylobacterium extorquens type culture originally recovered as a soil isolate. We identified the zeatin isolated as the trans isomer by HPLC and by a radioimmunoassay in which monoclonal antibodies specific for trans-hydroxylated cytokinins were used. Smaller and variable amounts of trans-zeatin riboside were also recovered. trans-Zeatin was recovered from tRNA hydrolysates in addition to the culture filtrates, suggesting that secreted trans-zeatin resulted from tRNA turnover rather than from de novo synthesis. The product of the miaA gene is responsible for isopentenylation of a specific adenine in some tRNAs. To confirm that the secreted zeatin originated from tRNA, we mutated the miaA gene of M. extorquens by single exchange of an internal miaA fragment into the chromosomal gene. Mutant exconjugants, confirmed by PCR, did not contain zeatin in their tRNAs and did not secrete zeatin into the medium, findings which are consistent with the hypothesis that all zeatin is tRNA derived rather than synthesized de novo. In germination studies performed with heat-treated soybean seeds, cytokinin-null (miaA) mutants stimulated germination as well as wild-type bacteria. While cytokinin production may play a role in the plant-PPFM interaction, it is not responsible for stimulation of germination by PPFMs. PMID:11889088

  5. Heteroduplex analysis of the dystrophin gene: Application to point mutation and carrier detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prior, T.W.; Papp, A.C.; Snyder, P.J.; Sedra, M.S.; Western, L.M.; Bartolo, C.; Mendell, J.R. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Moxley, R.T. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Approximately one-third of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients have undefined mutations in the dystrophin gene. For carrier and prenatal studies in families without detectable mutations, the indirect restriction fragment length polymorphism linkage approach is used. Using a multiplex amplification and heteroduplex analysis of dystrophin exons, the authors identified nonsense mutations in two DMD patients. Although the nonsense mutations are predicted to severely truncate the dystrophin protein, both patients presented with mild clinical courses of the disease. As a result of identifying the mutation in the affected boys, direct carrier studies by heteroduplex analysis were extended to other relatives. The authors conclude that the technique is not only ideal for mutation detection but is also useful for diagnostic testing. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Loss of wobble uridine modification in tRNA anticodons interferes with TOR pathway signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Scheidt

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous work in yeast has suggested that modification of tRNAs, in particular uridine bases in the anticodon wobble position (U34, is linked to TOR (target of rapamycin signaling. Hence, U34 modification mutants were found to be hypersensitive to TOR inhibition by rapamycin. To study whether this involves inappropriate TOR signaling, we examined interaction between mutations in TOR pathway genes (tip41∆, sap190∆, ppm1∆, rrd1∆ and U34 modification defects (elp3∆, kti12∆, urm1∆, ncs2∆ and found the rapamycin hypersensitivity in the latter is epistatic to drug resistance of the former. Epistasis, however, is abolished in tandem with a gln3∆ deletion, which inactivates transcription factor Gln3 required for TOR-sensitive activation of NCR (nitrogen catabolite repression genes. In line with nuclear import of Gln3 being under control of TOR and dephosphorylation by the Sit4 phosphatase, we identify novel TOR-sensitive sit4 mutations that confer rapamycin resistance and importantly, mislocalise Gln3 when TOR is inhibited. This is similar to gln3∆ cells, which abolish the rapamycin hypersensitivity of U34 modification mutants, and suggests TOR deregulation due to tRNA undermodification operates through Gln3. In line with this, loss of U34 modifications (elp3∆, urm1∆ enhances nuclear import of and NCR gene activation (MEP2, GAP1 by Gln3 when TOR activity is low. Strikingly, this stimulatory effect onto Gln3 is suppressed by overexpression of tRNAs that usually carry the U34 modifications. Collectively, our data suggest that proper TOR signaling requires intact tRNA modifications and that loss of U34 modifications impinges on the TOR-sensitive NCR branch via Gln3 misregulation.

  7. Loss of wobble uridine modification in tRNA anticodons interferes with TOR pathway signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidt, Viktor; Jüdes, André; Bär, Christian; Klassen, Roland; Schaffrath, Raffael

    2014-11-29

    Previous work in yeast has suggested that modification of tRNAs, in particular uridine bases in the anticodon wobble position (U34), is linked to TOR (target of rapamycin) signaling. Hence, U34 modification mutants were found to be hypersensitive to TOR inhibition by rapamycin. To study whether this involves inappropriate TOR signaling, we examined interaction between mutations in TOR pathway genes ( tip41 ∆, sap190 ∆, ppm1 ∆, rrd1 ∆) and U34 modification defects ( elp3 ∆, kti 12∆, urm1 ∆, ncs2 ∆) and found the rapamycin hypersensitivity in the latter is epistatic to drug resistance of the former. Epistasis, however, is abolished in tandem with a gln3 ∆ deletion, which inactivates transcription factor Gln3 required for TOR-sensitive activation of NCR (nitrogen catabolite repression) genes. In line with nuclear import of Gln3 being under control of TOR and dephosphorylation by the Sit4 phosphatase, we identify novel TOR-sensitive sit4 mutations that confer rapamycin resistance and importantly, mislocalise Gln3 when TOR is inhibited. This is similar to gln3 ∆ cells, which abolish the rapamycin hypersensitivity of U34 modification mutants, and suggests TOR deregulation due to tRNA undermodification operates through Gln3. In line with this, loss of U34 modifications ( elp3 ∆, urm1 ∆) enhances nuclear import of and NCR gene activation ( MEP2 , GAP1 ) by Gln3 when TOR activity is low. Strikingly, this stimulatory effect onto Gln3 is suppressed by overexpression of tRNAs that usually carry the U34 modifications. Collectively, our data suggest that proper TOR signaling requires intact tRNA modifications and that loss of U34 modifications impinges on the TOR-sensitive NCR branch via Gln3 misregulation.

  8. Coexistence of mitochondrial 12S rRNA C1494T and CO1/tRNASer(UCN) G7444A mutations in two Han Chinese pedigrees with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Huijun; Chen Jing; Liu Xin; Cheng Jing; Wang Xinjian; Yang Li; Yang Shuzhi; Cao Juyang; Kang Dongyang; Dai Pu; Zha, Suoqiang; Han Dongyi; Young Wieyen; Guan Minxin

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA are one of the important causes of hearing loss. We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of two Han Chinese pedigrees with maternally transmitted aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic bilateral hearing loss. Clinical evaluation revealed the wide range of severity, age-at-onset, and audiometric configuration of hearing impairment in matrilineal relatives in these families. The penetrances of hearing loss in these pedigrees were 20% and 18%, when aminoglycoside-induced deafness was included. When the effect of aminoglycosides was excluded, the penetrances of hearing loss in these seven pedigrees were 10% and 15%. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the presence of the deafness-associated 12S rRNA C1494T and CO1/tRNA Ser(UCN) G7444A mutations. Their distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphism belonged to Eastern Asian haplogroup C4a1, while other previously identified six Chinese mitochondrial genomes harboring the C1494T mutation belong to haplogroups D5a2, D, R, and F1, respectively. This suggested that the C1494T or G7444A mutation occurred sporadically and multiplied through evolution of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The absence of functionally significant mutations in tRNA and rRNAs or secondary LHON mutations in their mtDNA suggest that these mtDNA haplogroup-specific variants may not play an important role in the phenotypic expression of the 12S rRNA C1494T and CO1/tRNA Ser(UCN) G7444A mutations in those Chinese families. However, aminoglycosides and other nuclear modifier genes play a modifying role in the phenotypic manifestation of the C1494T mutation in these Chinese families

  9. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray analysis of CsdL/TcdA reveal a new tRNA binding motif in the MoeB/E1 superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel López-Estepa

    Full Text Available Cyclic N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine ('cyclic t6A', ct(6A is a non-thiolated hypermodification found in transfer RNAs (tRNAs in bacteria, protists, fungi and plants. In bacteria and yeast cells ct(6A has been shown to enhance translation fidelity and efficiency of ANN codons by improving the faithful discrimination of aminoacylated tRNAs by the ribosome. To further the understanding of ct(6A biology we have determined the high-resolution crystal structures of CsdL/TcdA in complex with AMP and ATP, an E1-like activating enzyme from Escherichia coli, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent dehydration of t6A to form ct(6A. CsdL/TcdA is a dimer whose structural integrity and dimer interface depend critically on strongly bound K+ and Na+ cations. By using biochemical assays and small-angle X-ray scattering we show that CsdL/TcdA can associate with tRNA with a 1:1 stoichiometry and with the proper position and orientation for the cyclization of t6A. Furthermore, we show by nuclear magnetic resonance that CsdL/TcdA engages in transient interactions with CsdA and CsdE, which, in the latter case, involve catalytically important residues. These short-lived interactions may underpin the precise channeling of sulfur atoms from cysteine to CsdL/TcdA as previously characterized. In summary, the combination of structural, biophysical and biochemical methods applied to CsdL/TcdA has afforded a more thorough understanding of how the structure of this E1-like enzyme has been fine tuned to accomplish ct(6A synthesis on tRNAs while providing support for the notion that CsdA and CsdE are able to functionally interact with CsdL/TcdA.

  10. Use of a Yeast tRNase Killer Toxin to Diagnose Kti12 Motifs Required for tRNA Modification by Elongator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlgarten, Constance; Prochaska, Heike; Hammermeister, Alexander; Abdel-Fattah, Wael; Wagner, Melanie; Krutyhołowa, Rościsław; Jun, Sang Eun; Kim, Gyung-Tae; Glatt, Sebastian; Breunig, Karin D; Stark, Michael J R; Schaffrath, Raffael

    2017-09-05

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells are killed by zymocin, a tRNase ribotoxin complex from Kluyveromyces lactis , which cleaves anticodons and inhibits protein synthesis. Zymocin's action requires specific chemical modification of uridine bases in the anticodon wobble position (U34) by the Elongator complex (Elp1-Elp6). Hence, loss of anticodon modification in mutants lacking Elongator or related KTI ( K. lactis Toxin Insensitive) genes protects against tRNA cleavage and confers resistance to the toxin. Here, we show that zymocin can be used as a tool to genetically analyse KTI12 , a gene previously shown to code for an Elongator partner protein. From a kti12 mutant pool of zymocin survivors, we identify motifs in Kti12 that are functionally directly coupled to Elongator activity. In addition, shared requirement of U34 modifications for nonsense and missense tRNA suppression ( SUP4 ; SOE1 ) strongly suggests that Kti12 and Elongator cooperate to assure proper tRNA functioning. We show that the Kti12 motifs are conserved in plant ortholog DRL1/ELO4 from Arabidopsis thaliana and seem to be involved in binding of cofactors (e.g., nucleotides, calmodulin). Elongator interaction defects triggered by mutations in these motifs correlate with phenotypes typical for loss of U34 modification. Thus, tRNA modification by Elongator appears to require physical contact with Kti12, and our preliminary data suggest that metabolic signals may affect proper communication between them.

  11. DHPLC-based mutation analysis of ENG and ALK-1 genes in HHT Italian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenato, Gennaro M; Lastella, Patrizia; Di Giacomo, Marilena C; Resta, Nicoletta; Suppressa, Patrizia; Pasculli, Giovanna; Sabbà, Carlo; Guanti, Ginevra

    2006-02-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT or Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by localized angiodysplasia due to mutations in endoglin, ALK-1 gene, and a still unidentified locus. The lack of highly recurrent mutations, locus heterogeneity, and the presence of mutations in almost all coding exons of the two genes makes the screening for mutations time-consuming and costly. In the present study, we developed a DHPLC-based protocol for mutation detection in ALK1 and ENG genes through retrospective analysis of known sequence variants, 20 causative mutations and 11 polymorphisms, and a prospective analysis on 47 probands with unknown mutation. Overall DHPLC analysis identified the causative mutation in 61 out 66 DNA samples (92.4%). We found 31 different mutations in the ALK1 gene, of which 15 are novel, and 20, of which 12 are novel, in the ENG gene, thus providing for the first time the mutational spectrum in a cohort of Italian HHT patients. In addition, we characterized the splicing pattern of ALK1 gene in lymphoblastoid cells, both in normal controls and in two individuals carrying a mutation in the non-invariant -3 position of the acceptor splice site upstream exon 6 (c.626-3C>G). Functional essay demonstrated the existence, also in normal individuals, of a small proportion of ALK1 alternative splicing, due to exon 5 skipping, and the presence of further aberrant splicing isoforms in the individuals carrying the c.626-3C>G mutation. 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutation analysis among Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    specific association between BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations with cancer type was seen, ... Materials and methods ..... KS is a Wellcome Trust International Senior Research .... of BRCA1/2 associated breast cancer: a systematic qualitative.

  13. Multi-center analysis of glucocerebrosidase mutations in Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidransky, Ellen; Nalls, Michael A.; Aasly, Jan O.; Aharon-Peretz, Judith; Annesi, Grazia; Barbosa, Egberto Reis; Bar-Shira, Anat; Berg, Daniela; Bras, Jose; Brice, Alexis; Chen, Chiung-Mei; Clark, Lorraine N.; Condroyer, Christel; De Marco, Elvira Valeria; Dürr, Alexandra; Eblan, Michael J.; Fahn, Stanley; Farrer, Matthew; Fung, Hon-Chung; Gan-Or, Ziv; Gasser, Thomas; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth; Giladi, Nir; Griffith, Alida; Gurevich, Tanya; Januario, Cristina; Kropp, Peter; Lang, Anthony E.; Lee-Chen, Guey-Jen; Lesage, Suzanne; Marder, Karen; Mata, Ignacio F.; Mirelman, Anat; Mitsui, Jun; Mizuta, Ikuko; Nicoletti, Giuseppe; Oliveira, Catarina; Ottman, Ruth; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Pereira, Lygia V.; Quattrone, Aldo; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Rolfs, Arndt; Rosenbaum, Hanna; Rozenberg, Roberto; Samii, Ali; Samaddar, Ted; Schulte, Claudia; Sharma, Manu; Singleton, Andrew; Spitz, Mariana; Tan, Eng-King; Tayebi, Nahid; Toda, Tatsushi; Troiano, André; Tsuji, Shoji; Wittstock, Matthias; Wolfsberg, Tyra G.; Wu, Yih-Ru; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Zhao, Yi; Ziegler, Shira G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent studies indicate an increased frequency of mutations in the gene for Gaucher disease, glucocerebrosidase (GBA), among patients with Parkinson disease. An international collaborative study was conducted to ascertain the frequency of GBA mutations in ethnically diverse patients with Parkinson disease. Methods Sixteen centers participated, including five from the Americas, six from Europe, two from Israel and three from Asia. Each received a standard DNA panel to compare genotyping results. Genotypes and phenotypic data from patients and controls were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression models and the Mantel Haenszel procedure to estimate odds ratios (ORs) across studies. The sample included 5691 patients (780 Ashkenazi Jews) and 4898 controls (387 Ashkenazi Jews). Results All 16 centers could detect GBA mutations, L444P and N370S, and the two were found in 15.3% of Ashkenazi patients with Parkinson disease (ORs = 4.95 for L444P and 5.62 for N370S), and in 3.2% of non-Ashkenazi patients (ORs = 9.68 for L444P and 3.30 for N370S). GBA was sequenced in 1642 non-Ashkenazi subjects, yielding a frequency of 6.9% for all mutations, demonstrate that limited mutation screens miss half the mutant alleles. The presence of any GBA mutation was associated with an OR of 5.43 across studies. Clinically, although phenotypes varied, subjects with a GBA mutation presented earlier, and were more likely to have affected relatives and atypical manifestations. Conclusion Data collected from sixteen centers demonstrate that there is a strong association between GBA mutations and Parkinson disease. PMID:19846850

  14. Systematic Analysis of Splice-Site-Creating Mutations in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Reyka G; Cao, Song; Gao, Qingsong; Wendl, Michael C; Vo, Nam Sy; Reynolds, Sheila M; Zhao, Yanyan; Climente-González, Héctor; Chai, Shengjie; Wang, Fang; Varghese, Rajees; Huang, Mo; Liang, Wen-Wei; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A; Sengupta, Sohini; Li, Zhi; Payne, Samuel H; Fenyö, David; Miner, Jeffrey H; Walter, Matthew J; Vincent, Benjamin; Eyras, Eduardo; Chen, Ken; Shmulevich, Ilya; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2018-04-03

    For the past decade, cancer genomic studies have focused on mutations leading to splice-site disruption, overlooking those having splice-creating potential. Here, we applied a bioinformatic tool, MiSplice, for the large-scale discovery of splice-site-creating mutations (SCMs) across 8,656 TCGA tumors. We report 1,964 originally mis-annotated mutations having clear evidence of creating alternative splice junctions. TP53 and GATA3 have 26 and 18 SCMs, respectively, and ATRX has 5 from lower-grade gliomas. Mutations in 11 genes, including PARP1, BRCA1, and BAP1, were experimentally validated for splice-site-creating function. Notably, we found that neoantigens induced by SCMs are likely several folds more immunogenic compared to missense mutations, exemplified by the recurrent GATA3 SCM. Further, high expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 was observed in tumors with SCMs, suggesting candidates for immune blockade therapy. Our work highlights the importance of integrating DNA and RNA data for understanding the functional and the clinical implications of mutations in human diseases. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Meta-analysis of Neuroblastomas Reveals a Skewed ALK Mutation Spectrum in Tumors with MYCN Amplification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Brouwer, Sara; de Preter, Katleen; Kumps, Candy; Zabrocki, Piotr; Porcu, Michaël; Westerhout, Ellen M.; Lakeman, Arjan; Vandesompele, Jo; Hoebeeck, Jasmien; van Maerken, Tom; de Paepe, Anne; Laureys, Geneviève; Schulte, Johannes H.; Schramm, Alexander; van den Broecke, Caroline; Vermeulen, Joëlle; van Roy, Nadine; Beiske, Klaus; Renard, Marleen; Noguera, Rosa; Delattre, Olivier; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle; Kogner, Per; Martinsson, Tommy; Nakagawara, Akira; Ohira, Miki; Caron, Huib N.; Eggert, Angelika; Cools, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Speleman, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Activating mutations of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) were recently described in neuroblastoma. We carried out a meta-analysis of 709 neuroblastoma tumors to determine their frequency and mutation spectrum in relation to genomic and clinical parameters, and studied the prognostic

  16. Analysis of SLX4/FANCP in non-BRCA1/2-mutated breast cancer families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Rodríguez Juana

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genes that, when mutated, cause Fanconi anemia or greatly increase breast cancer risk encode for proteins that converge on a homology-directed DNA damage repair process. Mutations in the SLX4 gene, which encodes for a scaffold protein involved in the repair of interstrand cross-links, have recently been identified in unclassified Fanconi anemia patients. A mutation analysis of SLX4 in German or Byelorussian familial cases of breast cancer without detected mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 has been completed, with globally negative results. Methods The genomic region of SLX4, comprising all exons and exon-intron boundaries, was sequenced in 94 Spanish familial breast cancer cases that match a criterion indicating the potential presence of a highly-penetrant germline mutation, following exclusion of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. Results This mutational analysis revealed extensive genetic variation of SLX4, with 21 novel single nucleotide variants; however, none could be linked to a clear alteration of the protein function. Nonetheless, genotyping 10 variants (nine novel, all missense amino acid changes in a set of controls (138 women and 146 men did not detect seven of them. Conclusions Overall, while the results of this study do not identify clearly pathogenic mutations of SLX4 contributing to breast cancer risk, further genetic analysis, combined with functional assays of the identified rare variants, may be warranted to conclusively assess the potential link with the disease.

  17. Analysis of SLX4/FANCP in non-BRCA1/2-mutated breast cancer families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández-Rodríguez, Juana; Schindler, Detlev; Capellá, Gabriel; Brunet, Joan; Lázaro, Conxi; Pujana, Miguel Angel; Quiles, Francisco; Blanco, Ignacio; Teulé, Alex; Feliubadaló, Lídia; Valle, Jesús del; Salinas, Mónica; Izquierdo, Àngel; Darder, Esther

    2012-01-01

    Genes that, when mutated, cause Fanconi anemia or greatly increase breast cancer risk encode for proteins that converge on a homology-directed DNA damage repair process. Mutations in the SLX4 gene, which encodes for a scaffold protein involved in the repair of interstrand cross-links, have recently been identified in unclassified Fanconi anemia patients. A mutation analysis of SLX4 in German or Byelorussian familial cases of breast cancer without detected mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 has been completed, with globally negative results. The genomic region of SLX4, comprising all exons and exon-intron boundaries, was sequenced in 94 Spanish familial breast cancer cases that match a criterion indicating the potential presence of a highly-penetrant germline mutation, following exclusion of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. This mutational analysis revealed extensive genetic variation of SLX4, with 21 novel single nucleotide variants; however, none could be linked to a clear alteration of the protein function. Nonetheless, genotyping 10 variants (nine novel, all missense amino acid changes) in a set of controls (138 women and 146 men) did not detect seven of them. Overall, while the results of this study do not identify clearly pathogenic mutations of SLX4 contributing to breast cancer risk, further genetic analysis, combined with functional assays of the identified rare variants, may be warranted to conclusively assess the potential link with the disease

  18. Mutational Analysis of Oculocutaneous Albinism: A Compact Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaraj, Balu

    2014-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by either complete lack of or a reduction of melanin biosynthesis in the melanocytes. The OCA1A is the most severe type with a complete lack of melanin production throughout life, while the milder forms OCA1B, OCA2, OCA3, and OCA4 show some pigment accumulation over time. Mutations in TYR, OCA2, TYRP1, and SLC45A2 are mainly responsible for causing oculocutaneous albinism. Recently, two new genes SLC24A5 and C10orf11 are identified that are responsible to cause OCA6 and OCA7, respectively. Also a locus has been mapped to the human chromosome 4q24 region which is responsible for genetic cause of OCA5. In this paper, we summarized the clinical and molecular features of OCA genes. Further, we reviewed the screening of pathological mutations of OCA genes and its molecular mechanism of the protein upon mutation by in silico approach. We also reviewed TYR (T373K, N371Y, M370T, and P313R), OCA2 (R305W), TYRP1 (R326H and R356Q) mutations and their structural consequences at molecular level. It is observed that the pathological genetic mutations and their structural and functional significance of OCA genes will aid in development of personalized medicine for albinism patients. PMID:25093188

  19. Simplifying the detection of MUTYH mutations by high resolution melting analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López-Villar, Isabel; Martínez-López, Joaquín; Ayala, Rosa; Wesselink, Jan; Morillas, Juan Diego; López, Elena; Marín, José Carlos; Díaz-Tasende, José; González, Sara; Robles, Luis

    2010-01-01

    MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP) is a disorder caused by bi-allelic germline MUTYH mutation, characterized by multiple colorectal adenomas. In order to identify mutations in MUTYH gene we applied High Resolution Melting (HRM) genotyping. HRM analysis is extensively employed as a scanning method for the detection of heterozygous mutations. Therefore, we applied HRM to show effectiveness in detecting homozygous mutations for these clinically important and frequent patients. In this study, we analyzed phenotype and genotype data from 82 patients, with multiple (>= 10) synchronous (19/82) or metachronous (63/82) adenomas and negative APC study (except one case). Analysis was performed by HRM-PCR and direct sequencing, in order to identify mutations in MUTYH exons 7, 12 and 13, where the most prevalent mutations are located. In monoallelic mutation carriers, we evaluated entire MUTYH gene in search of another possible alteration. HRM-PCR was performed with strict conditions in several rounds: the first one to discriminate the heteroduplex patterns and homoduplex patterns and the next ones, in order to refine and confirm parameters. The genotypes obtained were correlated to phenotypic features (number of adenomas (synchronous or metachronous), colorectal cancer (CRC) and family history). MUTYH germline mutations were found in 15.8% (13/82) of patients. The hot spots, Y179C (exon 7) and G396D (exon 13), were readily identified and other mutations were also detected. Each mutation had a reproducible melting profile by HRM, both heterozygous mutations and homozygous mutations. In our study of 82 patients, biallelic mutation is associated with being a carrier of ≥10 synchronous polyps (p = 0.05) and there is no association between biallelic mutation and CRC (p = 0.39) nor family history (p = 0.63). G338H non-pathogenic polymorphism (exon 12) was found in 23.1% (19/82) of patients. In all cases there was concordance between HRM (first and subsequent rounds) and sequencing

  20. Application of DNA chips in the analysis of gene mutation in HBV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongzhong; Ruan Lihua; Zhou Guoping; Wu Guoxiang; Chen Min

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical applicability of DNA chips for analysis of gene mutation in HBV. Methods: Serum HBV DNA from 47 patients with viral hepatitis type B was amplified with PCR. Possible gene mutations were searched for in site 1896 of pre-C section, sites 1762,1764 of BCP section and sites 528, 552 of P section with DNA chip method based upon membrane coloration. Results: In the 32 patients without lamivudine treatment, the results were as follows: (1) 6 specimens with HBsAg + , HBeAg + , HBeAb - , no mutations observed. (2) 13 specimens with HBsAg + , HBeAg - , HBeAb + , mutations at site 1896, pre- C 4 cases, mutations at sites 1762,1764, BCP 11 cases. (3) 13 specimens with HBsAg + , HBeAg + , HBeAb + , mutations at site 1896 pre -C 4 cases, mutations at sites 1762,1764 BCP 13 cases. In the 15 patients after 48 weeks treatment with lamivudine but remained HBV DNA positive, mutations were observed at: site 1896 pre-C, 5 cases, sites 1762,1764 BCP, 6 cases, site 528 P section, 2 cases, site 552 P section, YVDD 4 cases, YIDD 7 cases. Conclusion: Mutations at sites 1896, 1762,1764 were more frequent in patients with HBeAb + and were related to the negative expression of HBeAg, Mutations at 1762,1764 BCP were closely related to the changes of HBeAg/HBeAb. P section mutations were only observed after lamivadine treatment and were related to resistance against the drug. DNA chip method based upon membrane coloration for detection of gene mutation was expedient and specific and worth popularization. (authors)

  1. BRAF, KIT, NRAS, GNAQ and GNA11 mutation analysis in cutaneous melanomas in Turkish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: KIT and mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade are important for melanomagenesis. In the present study, we analyzed the frequency of BRAF, NRAS, KIT, GNAQ and GNA11 gene mutations and investigated their association with clinicopathological features of melanomas in Turkish population. Materials and Methods: Forty-seven primary cutaneous melanomas were included in our study. Sanger sequencing method was used for mutation analysis in all cases. Results: Mean age was 62.1 (29-101 years. Female:male ratio was 17:30. Among 47 melanomas, 14 (29.8% BRAF, 10 (21.3% NRAS, 4 (8.5% KIT and 1(2.1% GNAQ gene mutations were detected. Two of the KIT mutations were found in acral lentiginous melanoma (ALM. In the head and neck region, mutation frequency was significantly lower than in other locations (P = 0.035. The only GNAQ gene mutation (p.Q209L was detected in a melanoma arising from blue nevus located on the scalp. None of the melanomas harbored NRAS exon 2, KIT exon 13/17/18, GNAQ exon 4 and GNA11 exon 4/5 mutations. Overall mutation frequency did not show significant difference between metastatic (8/14, 57.1% and nonmetastatic (18/33, 54.5% patients. We did not observe any significant association between mutation status and gender or age of various patients. Conclusions: Our results support that BRAF and NRAS gene mutations are common in cutaneous melanomas. The activating mutations of KIT gene are rare and especially seen in ALM. GNAQ and GNA11 mutations are infrequent in cutaneous melanomas and may be associated only with melanomas arising from blue nevus.

  2. Polymorphism and mutation analysis of genomic DNA on cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Tsutomu

    2003-01-01

    DNA repair is a universal process in living cells that maintains the structural integrity of chromosomal DNA molecules in face of damage. A deficiency in DNA damage repair is associated with an increased cancer risk by increasing a mutation frequency of cancer-related genes. Variation in DNA repair capacity may be genetically determined. Therefore, we searched single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in major DNA repair genes. This led to the finding of 600 SNPs and mutations including many novel SNPs in Japanese population. Case-control studies to explore the contribution of the SNPs in DNA repair genes to the risk of lung cancer revealed that five SNPs are associated with lung carcinogenesis. One of these SNPs is found in RAD54L gene, which is involved in double-strand DNA repair. We analyzed and reported activities of Rad54L protein with SNP and mutations. (authors)

  3. Domain-restricted mutation analysis to identify novel driver events in human cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanket Desai

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of mutational spectra across various cancer types has given valuable insights into tumorigenesis. Different approaches have been used to identify novel drivers from the set of somatic mutations, including the methods which use sequence conservation, geometric localization and pathway information. Recent computational methods suggest use of protein domain information for analysis and understanding of the functional consequence of non-synonymous mutations. Similarly, evidence suggests recurrence at specific position in proteins is robust indicators of its functional impact. Building on this, we performed a systematic analysis of TCGA exome derived somatic mutations across 6089 PFAM domains and significantly mutated domains were identified using randomization approach. Multiple alignment of individual domain allowed us to prioritize for conserved residues mutated at analogous positions across different proteins in a statistically disciplined manner. In addition to the known frequently mutated genes, this analysis independently identifies low frequency Meprin and TRAF-Homology (MATH domain in Speckle Type BTB/POZ (SPOP protein, in prostate adenocarcinoma. Results from this analysis will help generate hypotheses about the downstream molecular mechanism resulting in cancer phenotypes.

  4. [Analysis of gene mutation in a Chinese family with Norrie disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian-xiao; Zhao, Xiu-li; Hua, Rui; Zhang, Jin-song; Zhang, Xue

    2012-09-01

    To detect the pathogenic mutation in a Chinese family with Norrie disease. Clinical diagnosis was based on familial history, clinical sign and B ultrasonic examination. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from all available members in a Chinese family with Norrie disease. Genomic DNA was extracted from lymphocytes by the standard SDS-proteinase K-phenol/chloroform method. Two coding exons and all intron-exon boundaries of the NDP gene were PCR amplified using three pairs of primers and subjected to automatic DNA sequence. The causative mutation was confirmed by restriction enzyme analysis and genotyping analysis in all members. Sequence analysis of NDP gene revealed a missense mutation c.220C > T (p.Arg74Cys) in the proband and his mother. Further mutation identification by restriction enzyme analysis and genotyping analysis showed that the proband was homozygote of this mutation. His mother and other four unaffected members (III3, IV4, III5 and II2) were carriers of this mutation. The mutant amino acid located in the C-terminal cystine knot-like domain, which was critical motif for the structure and function of NDP. A NDP missense mutation was identified in a Chinese family with Norrie disease.

  5. Expression analysis revealing destabilizing mutations in phosphomannomutase 2 deficiency (PMM2-CDG): expression analysis of PMM2-CDG mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Ana Isabel; Pérez-Cerdá, Celia; Abia, David; Gámez, Alejandra; Briones, Paz; Artuch, Rafael; Desviat, Lourdes R; Ugarte, Magdalena; Pérez, Belén

    2011-08-01

    Deficiency of phosphomannomutase (PMM2, MIM#601785) is the most common congenital disorder of glycosylation. Herein we report the genetic analysis of 22 Spanish PMM2 deficient patients and the functional analysis of 14 nucleotide changes in a prokaryotic expression system in order to elucidate their molecular pathogenesis. PMM2 activity assay revealed the presence of six protein changes with no enzymatic activities (p.R123Q, p.R141H, p.F157S, p.P184T, p.F207S and p.D209G) and seven mild protein changes with residual activities ranging from 16 to 54% (p.L32R, p.V44A p.D65Y, p.P113L p.T118S, p.T237M and p.C241S) and also one variant change with normal activity (p.E197A). The results obtained from Western blot analysis, degradation time courses of 11 protein changes and structural analysis of the PMM2 protein, suggest that the loss-of-function of most mutant proteins is based on their increased susceptibility to degradation or aggregation compared to the wild type protein, considering PMM2 deficiency as a conformational disease. We have identified exclusively catalytic protein change (p.D209G), catalytic protein changes affecting protein stability (p.R123Q and p.R141H), two protein changes disrupting the dimer interface (p.P113L and p.T118S) and several misfolding changes (p.L32R, p.V44A, p.D65Y, p.F157S, p.P184T, p.F207S, p.T237M and p.C241S). Our current work opens a promising therapeutic option using pharmacological chaperones to revert the effect of the characterized misfolding mutations identified in a wide range of PMM2 deficient patients.

  6. Detection of somatic mutations by high-resolution DNA melting (HRM) analysis in multiple cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Bosquet, Jesus; Calcei, Jacob; Wei, Jun S; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Sherman, Mark E; Hewitt, Stephen; Vockley, Joseph; Lissowska, Jolanta; Yang, Hannah P; Khan, Javed; Chanock, Stephen

    2011-01-17

    Identification of somatic mutations in cancer is a major goal for understanding and monitoring the events related to cancer initiation and progression. High resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis represents a fast, post-PCR high-throughput method for scanning somatic sequence alterations in target genes. The aim of this study was to assess the sensitivity and specificity of HRM analysis for tumor mutation screening in a range of tumor samples, which included 216 frozen pediatric small rounded blue-cell tumors as well as 180 paraffin-embedded tumors from breast, endometrial and ovarian cancers (60 of each). HRM analysis was performed in exons of the following candidate genes known to harbor established commonly observed mutations: PIK3CA, ERBB2, KRAS, TP53, EGFR, BRAF, GATA3, and FGFR3. Bi-directional sequencing analysis was used to determine the accuracy of the HRM analysis. For the 39 mutations observed in frozen samples, the sensitivity and specificity of HRM analysis were 97% and 87%, respectively. There were 67 mutation/variants in the paraffin-embedded samples, and the sensitivity and specificity for the HRM analysis were 88% and 80%, respectively. Paraffin-embedded samples require higher quantity of purified DNA for high performance. In summary, HRM analysis is a promising moderate-throughput screening test for mutations among known candidate genomic regions. Although the overall accuracy appears to be better in frozen specimens, somatic alterations were detected in DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded samples.

  7. Detection of somatic mutations by high-resolution DNA melting (HRM analysis in multiple cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Gonzalez-Bosquet

    Full Text Available Identification of somatic mutations in cancer is a major goal for understanding and monitoring the events related to cancer initiation and progression. High resolution melting (HRM curve analysis represents a fast, post-PCR high-throughput method for scanning somatic sequence alterations in target genes. The aim of this study was to assess the sensitivity and specificity of HRM analysis for tumor mutation screening in a range of tumor samples, which included 216 frozen pediatric small rounded blue-cell tumors as well as 180 paraffin-embedded tumors from breast, endometrial and ovarian cancers (60 of each. HRM analysis was performed in exons of the following candidate genes known to harbor established commonly observed mutations: PIK3CA, ERBB2, KRAS, TP53, EGFR, BRAF, GATA3, and FGFR3. Bi-directional sequencing analysis was used to determine the accuracy of the HRM analysis. For the 39 mutations observed in frozen samples, the sensitivity and specificity of HRM analysis were 97% and 87%, respectively. There were 67 mutation/variants in the paraffin-embedded samples, and the sensitivity and specificity for the HRM analysis were 88% and 80%, respectively. Paraffin-embedded samples require higher quantity of purified DNA for high performance. In summary, HRM analysis is a promising moderate-throughput screening test for mutations among known candidate genomic regions. Although the overall accuracy appears to be better in frozen specimens, somatic alterations were detected in DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded samples.

  8. Mutational analysis in patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD): Identification of five mutations in the PKD1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahed, Mayssa; Hilbert, Pascale; Ahmed, Asma; Mahfoudh, Hichem; Bouomrani, Salem; Dey, Mouna; Hachicha, Jamil; Kamoun, Hassen; Keskes-Ammar, Leila; Belguith, Neïla

    2018-05-31

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD), the most frequent genetic disorder of the kidneys, is characterized by a typical presenting symptoms include cysts development in different organs and a non-cysts manifestations. ADPKD is caused by mutations in PKD1 or PKD2 genes. In this study, we aimed to search for molecular causative defects among PKD1 and PKD2 genes. Eighteen patients were diagnosed based on renal ultrasonography and renal/extra-renal manifestations. Then, Sanger sequencing was performed for PKD1 and PKD2 genes. Multiplex Ligation dependent Probe Amplification method (MLPA) methods was performed for both PKD genes. Mutational analysis of the PKD2 gene revealed the absence of variants and no deletions or duplications of both PKD genes were detected. But three novels mutations i.e. p.S463C exon 7; c. c.11156+2T>C IVS38 and c.8161-1G>A IVS22 and two previously reported c.1522T>C exon 7 and c.412C>T exon 4 mutations in the PKD1 gene were detected. Bioinformatics tools predicted that the novel variants have a pathogenic effects on splicing machinery, pre-mRNA secondary structure and stability and protein stability. Our results highlighted molecular features of Tunisian patients with ADPKD and revealed novel variations that can be utilized in clinical diagnosis and in the evaluation of living kidney donor. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of Autosomal Polycystic Kidney Disease in Tunisia. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Intragenic haplotype analysis of common HFE mutations in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mutation <100 generations ago in the Celtic populations of mainland Europe, with a ... 0.9–5.8%, evidencing regional differences in distribution across the ..... and H63D alleles in the HFE gene among various Jewish ethnic groups in Israel: a ...

  10. Charging Levels of Four tRNA Species in Escherichia coli Rel+ and REL- Strains during Amino Acid Starvation: A Simple Model for the Effect of ppGpp on Translational Accuracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains mutated in the relA gene lack the ability to produce ppGpp during amino acid starvation. One consequence of this deficiency is a tenfold increase in misincorporation at starved codons compared to the wild-type. Previous work had shown that the charging levels of tRNAs were...... the same in Rel+ and Rel- strains and reduced, at most, two- to fivefold in both strains during starvation. The present reinvestigation of the charging levels of tRNA2Arg, tRNA1Thr, tRNA1Leu and tRNAHis during starvation of isogenic Rel+ and Rel- strains showed that starvation reduced charging levels...... tenfold to 40-fold. This reduction corresponds much better with the decreased rate of protein synthesis during starvation than that reported earlier. The determination of the charging levels of tRNA2Arg and tRNA1Thr during starvation were accurate enough to demonstrate that charging levels were at least...

  11. DETECTION OF K-RAS AND P53 MUTATIONS IN SPUTUM SAMPLES OF LUNG CANCER PATIENTS USING LASER CAPTURE MICRODISSECTION MICROSCOPE AND MUTATION ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detection of K-ras and p53 Mutations in Sputum Samples of Lung Cancer Patients Using Laser Capture Microdissection Microscope and Mutation AnalysisPhouthone Keohavong a,*, Wei-Min Gao a, Kui-Cheng Zheng a, Hussam Mady b, Qing Lan c, Mona Melhem b, and Judy Mumford d.<...

  12. A novel genetic tool for clonal analysis of fourth chromosome mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa-Neves, Rui; Schinaman, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    The fourth chromosome of Drosophila remains one of the most intractable regions of the fly genome to genetic analysis. The main difficulty posed to the genetic analyses of mutations on this chromosome arises from the fact that it does not undergo meiotic recombination, which makes recombination mapping impossible, and also prevents clonal analysis of mutations, a technique which relies on recombination to introduce the prerequisite recessive markers and FLP-recombinase recognition targets (FR...

  13. The structure of the hypothetical protein smu.1377c from Streptococcus mutans suggests a role in tRNA modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Tian-Min; Liu, Xiang; Li, Lanfen; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of smu.1377c, a hypothetical protein from S. mutans, shows a similar fold to Sua5-YciO-YrdC-family proteins and indicates its functional role in tRNA modification. Members of the Sua5-YciO-YrdC protein family are found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes and possess a conserved α/β twisted open-sheet fold. The Escherichia coli protein YrdC has been shown to be involved in modification of tRNA. The crystal structure of smu.1377c, a hypothetical protein from Streptococcus mutans, has been determined to 2.25 Å resolution. From structure analysis and comparison, it is shown that smu.1377c is a member of the Sua5-YciO-YrdC family and that it may play the same role as E. coli YrdC

  14. Splicing Analysis of Exonic OCRL Mutations Causing Lowe Syndrome or Dent-2 Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Suarez-Artiles

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the OCRL gene are associated with both Lowe syndrome and Dent-2 disease. Patients with Lowe syndrome present congenital cataracts, mental disabilities and a renal proximal tubulopathy, whereas patients with Dent-2 disease exhibit similar proximal tubule dysfunction but only mild, or no additional clinical defects. It is not yet understood why some OCRL mutations cause the phenotype of Lowe syndrome, while others develop the milder phenotype of Dent-2 disease. Our goal was to gain new insights into the consequences of OCRL exonic mutations on pre-mRNA splicing. Using predictive bioinformatics tools, we selected thirteen missense mutations and one synonymous mutation based on their potential effects on splicing regulatory elements or splice sites. These mutations were analyzed in a minigene splicing assay. Results of the RNA analysis showed that three presumed missense mutations caused alterations in pre-mRNA splicing. Mutation c.741G>T; p.(Trp247Cys generated splicing silencer sequences and disrupted splicing enhancer motifs that resulted in skipping of exon 9, while mutations c.2581G>A; p.(Ala861Thr and c.2581G>C; p.(Ala861Pro abolished a 5′ splice site leading to skipping of exon 23. Mutation c.741G>T represents the first OCRL exonic variant outside the conserved splice site dinucleotides that results in alteration of pre-mRNA splicing. Our results highlight the importance of evaluating the effects of OCRL exonic mutations at the mRNA level.

  15. Computational analysis of histidine mutations on the structural stability of human tyrosinases leading to albinism insurgence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mubashir; Abbas, Qamar; Raza, Hussain; Moustafa, Ahmed A; Seo, Sung-Yum

    2017-07-25

    Misfolding and structural alteration in proteins lead to serious malfunctions and cause various diseases in humans. Mutations at the active binding site in tyrosinase impair structural stability and cause lethal albinism by abolishing copper binding. To evaluate the histidine mutational effect, all mutated structures were built using homology modelling. The protein sequence was retrieved from the UniProt database, and 3D models of original and mutated human tyrosinase sequences were predicted by changing the residual positions within the target sequence separately. Structural and mutational analyses were performed to interpret the significance of mutated residues (N 180 , R 202 , Q 202 , R 211 , Y 363 , R 367 , Y 367 and D 390 ) at the active binding site of tyrosinases. CSpritz analysis depicted that 23.25% residues actively participate in the instability of tyrosinase. The accuracy of predicted models was confirmed through online servers ProSA-web, ERRAT score and VERIFY 3D values. The theoretical pI and GRAVY generated results also showed the accuracy of the predicted models. The CCA negative correlation results depicted that the replacement of mutated residues at His within the active binding site disturbs the structural stability of tyrosinases. The predicted CCA scores of Tyr 367 (-0.079) and Q/R 202 (0.032) revealed that both mutations have more potential to disturb the structural stability. MD simulation analyses of all predicted models justified that Gln 202 , Arg 202 , Tyr 367 and D 390 replacement made the protein structures more susceptible to destabilization. Mutational results showed that the replacement of His with Q/R 202 and Y/R 363 has a lethal effect and may cause melanin associated diseases such as OCA1. Taken together, our computational analysis depicts that the mutated residues such as Q/R 202 and Y/R 363 actively participate in instability and misfolding of tyrosinases, which may govern OCA1 through disturbing the melanin biosynthetic pathway.

  16. Mutation analysis of the STRA6 gene in isolated and non-isolated anophthalmia/microphthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassaing, N; Ragge, N; Kariminejad, A; Buffet, A; Ghaderi-Sohi, S; Martinovic, J; Calvas, P

    2013-03-01

    PDAC syndrome [Pulmonary hypoplasia/agenesis, Diaphragmatic hernia/eventration, Anophthalmia/microphthalmia (A/M) and Cardiac Defect] is a condition associated with recessive mutations in the STRA6 gene in some of these patients. Recently, cases with isolated anophthalmia have been associated with STRA6 mutations. To determine the minimal findings associated with STRA6 mutations, we performed mutation analysis of the STRA6 gene in 28 cases with anophthalmia. In 7 of the cases the anophthalmia was isolated, in 14 cases it was associated with one of the major features included in PDAC and 7 had other abnormalities. Mutations were identified in two individuals: one with bilateral anophthalmia and some features included in PDAC, who was a compound heterozygote for a missense mutation and a large intragenic deletion, and the second case with all the major features of PDAC and who had a homozygous splicing mutation. This study suggests that STRA6 mutations are more likely to be identified in individuals with A/M and other abnormalities included in the PDAC spectrum, rather than in isolated A/M cases. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Whole exome analysis identifies frequent CNGA1 mutations in Japanese population with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Katagiri

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate frequent disease-causing gene mutations in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP in the Japanese population. METHODS: In total, 99 Japanese patients with non-syndromic and unrelated arRP or sporadic RP (spRP were recruited in this study and ophthalmic examinations were conducted for the diagnosis of RP. Among these patients, whole exome sequencing analysis of 30 RP patients and direct sequencing screening of all CNGA1 exons of the other 69 RP patients were performed. RESULTS: Whole exome sequencing of 30 arRP/spRP patients identified disease-causing gene mutations of CNGA1 (four patients, EYS (three patients and SAG (one patient in eight patients and potential disease-causing gene variants of USH2A (two patients, EYS (one patient, TULP1 (one patient and C2orf71 (one patient in five patients. Screening of an additional 69 arRP/spRP patients for the CNGA1 gene mutation revealed one patient with a homozygous mutation. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first identification of CNGA1 mutations in arRP Japanese patients. The frequency of CNGA1 gene mutation was 5.1% (5/99 patients. CNGA1 mutations are one of the most frequent arRP-causing mutations in Japanese patients.

  18. [Gene mutation analysis and prenatal diagnosis of a family with Bartter syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long; Ma, Na; Li, Xiu-Rong; Gong, Fei; DU, Juan

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the mutation of related genes and prenatal diagnosis of a family with Bartter syndrome (BS). The high-throughput capture sequencing technique and PCR-Sanger sequencing were used to detect pathogenic genes in the proband of this family and analyze the whole family at the genomic level. After the genetic cause was clarified, the amniotic fluid was collected from the proband's mother who was pregnant for 5 months for prenatal diagnosis. The proband carried compound heterozygous mutations of c.88C>T(p.Arg30*) and c.968+2T>A in the CLCNKB gene; c.88C>T(p.Arg30*) had been reported as a pathogenic mutation, and c.968+2T>A was a new mutation. Pedigree analysis showed that the two mutations were inherited from the mother and father, respectively. Prenatal diagnosis showed that the fetus did not inherit the mutations from parents and had no mutations at the two loci. The follow-up visit confirmed that the infant was in a healthy state, which proved the accuracy of genetic diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis. The compound heterozygous mutations c.88C>T(p.Arg30*) and c.968+2T>A in the CLCNKB gene are the cause of BS in the proband, and prenatal diagnosis can prevent the risk of recurrence of BS in this family.

  19. Orthogonal use of a human tRNA synthetase active site to achieve multi-functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Quansheng; Kapoor, Mili; Guo, Min; Belani, Rajesh; Xu, Xiaoling; Kiosses, William B.; Hanan, Melanie; Park, Chulho; Armour, Eva; Do, Minh-Ha; Nangle, Leslie A.; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2011-01-01

    Protein multi-functionality is an emerging explanation for the complexity of higher organisms. In this regard, while aminoacyl tRNA synthetases catalyze amino acid activation for protein synthesis, some also act in pathways for inflammation, angiogenesis, and apoptosis. How multiple functions evolved and their relationship to the active site is not clear. Here structural modeling analysis, mutagenesis, and cell-based functional studies show that the potent angiostatic, natural fragment of human TrpRS associates via Trp side chains that protrude from the cognate cellular receptor VE-cadherin. Modeling indicates that (I prefer the way it was because the conclusion was reached not only by modeling, but more so by experimental studies.)VE-cadherin Trp side chains fit into the Trp-specific active site of the synthetase. Thus, specific side chains of the receptor mimic (?) amino acid substrates and expand the functionality of the active site of the synthetase. We propose that orthogonal use of the same active site may be a general way to develop multi-functionality of human tRNA synthetases and other proteins. PMID:20010843

  20. Orthogonal use of a human tRNA synthetase active site to achieve multifunctionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Quansheng; Kapoor, Mili; Guo, Min; Belani, Rajesh; Xu, Xiaoling; Kiosses, William B; Hanan, Melanie; Park, Chulho; Armour, Eva; Do, Minh-Ha; Nangle, Leslie A; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2010-01-01

    Protein multifunctionality is an emerging explanation for the complexity of higher organisms. In this regard, aminoacyl tRNA synthetases catalyze amino acid activation for protein synthesis, but some also act in pathways for inflammation, angiogenesis and apoptosis. It is unclear how these multiple functions evolved and how they relate to the active site. Here structural modeling analysis, mutagenesis and cell-based functional studies show that the potent angiostatic, natural fragment of human tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) associates via tryptophan side chains that protrude from its cognate cellular receptor vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin). VE-cadherin's tryptophan side chains fit into the tryptophan-specific active site of the synthetase. Thus, specific side chains of the receptor mimic amino acid substrates and expand the functionality of the active site of the synthetase. We propose that orthogonal use of the same active site may be a general way to develop multifunctionality of human tRNA synthetases and other proteins.

  1. CFTR mutation analysis and haplotype associations in CF patients☆

    OpenAIRE

    Cordovado, S.K.; Hendrix, M.; Greene, C.N.; Mochal, S.; Earley, M.C.; Farrell, P.M.; Kharrazi, M.; Hannon, W.H.; Mueller, P.W.

    2011-01-01

    Most newborn screening (NBS) laboratories use second-tier molecular tests for cystic fibrosis (CF) using dried blood spots (DBS). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s NBS Quality Assurance Program offers proficiency testing (PT) in DBS for CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection. Extensive molecular characterization on 76 CF patients, family members or screen positive newborns was performed for quality assurance. The coding, regulatory regions and por...

  2. Role of BRAFV600E Mutation Analysis for Thyroid Nodules Classified as Indeterminate on Ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Sang Yu; Shin, Jung Hee; Han, Boo Kyung; Ko, Eun Young; Kang, Seok Seon; Hahn, Soo Yeon; Hwang, Ji Young; Nam, Mee Young; Kim, Jong Won; Chung, Jae Hoon

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate a possible role for BRAFV600E mutation analysis of aspiration specimens in the work up of thyroid nodules classified as indeterminate on US. A total of 122 nodules from 122 patients were prospectively classified as indeterminate nodules based on US findings. US-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) was done for all 122 nodules. The presence of a BRAFV600E mutation in FNA specimens was determined by allele-specific PCR. US-indeterminate nodules were confirmed as malignant in 20.5% (25/122) of cases and benign in 76.2% (93/122) after FNA or surgery. A few (3.3% (4/122), remained indeterminate. A BRAFV600E mutation was identified in 14.8% (18/122) of US indeterminate nodules. Of those 18 nodules, three were benign and 13 were malignant after the initial FNA. One (0.8%, 1/122) with an initially benign cytology and a BRAFV600E mutation was confirmed to be malignant after surgery. The remaining two benign nodules with a mutation were not followed-up. All 9 initial FNA-nondiagnostic nodules were mutation negative but 2 (11.8%) of 17 indeterminate nodules on initial FNAs were mutation positive. BRAFV600E mutation analysis prevents false negative cytology for only 0.8% of cases and reduces ambiguous diagnoses for 1.6% of all US-indeterminate thyroid nodules. Therefore, adding BRAFV600E mutation analysis to FNA for US-indeterminate nodules is of limited usefulness

  3. The TREAT-NMD DMD Global Database: Analysis of More than 7,000 Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladen, Catherine L; Salgado, David; Monges, Soledad; Foncuberta, Maria E; Kekou, Kyriaki; Kosma, Konstantina; Dawkins, Hugh; Lamont, Leanne; Roy, Anna J; Chamova, Teodora; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Chan, Sophelia; Korngut, Lawrence; Campbell, Craig; Dai, Yi; Wang, Jen; Barišić, Nina; Brabec, Petr; Lahdetie, Jaana; Walter, Maggie C; Schreiber-Katz, Olivia; Karcagi, Veronika; Garami, Marta; Viswanathan, Venkatarman; Bayat, Farhad; Buccella, Filippo; Kimura, En; Koeks, Zaïda; van den Bergen, Janneke C; Rodrigues, Miriam; Roxburgh, Richard; Lusakowska, Anna; Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna; Zimowski, Janusz; Santos, Rosário; Neagu, Elena; Artemieva, Svetlana; Rasic, Vedrana Milic; Vojinovic, Dina; Posada, Manuel; Bloetzer, Clemens; Jeannet, Pierre-Yves; Joncourt, Franziska; Díaz-Manera, Jordi; Gallardo, Eduard; Karaduman, A Ayşe; Topaloğlu, Haluk; El Sherif, Rasha; Stringer, Angela; Shatillo, Andriy V; Martin, Ann S; Peay, Holly L; Bellgard, Matthew I; Kirschner, Jan; Flanigan, Kevin M; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Kate; Verschuuren, Jan; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Béroud, Christophe; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing the type and frequency of patient-specific mutations that give rise to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an invaluable tool for diagnostics, basic scientific research, trial planning, and improved clinical care. Locus-specific databases allow for the collection, organization, storage, and analysis of genetic variants of disease. Here, we describe the development and analysis of the TREAT-NMD DMD Global database (http://umd.be/TREAT_DMD/). We analyzed genetic data for 7,149 DMD mutations held within the database. A total of 5,682 large mutations were observed (80% of total mutations), of which 4,894 (86%) were deletions (1 exon or larger) and 784 (14%) were duplications (1 exon or larger). There were 1,445 small mutations (smaller than 1 exon, 20% of all mutations), of which 358 (25%) were small deletions and 132 (9%) small insertions and 199 (14%) affected the splice sites. Point mutations totalled 756 (52% of small mutations) with 726 (50%) nonsense mutations and 30 (2%) missense mutations. Finally, 22 (0.3%) mid-intronic mutations were observed. In addition, mutations were identified within the database that would potentially benefit from novel genetic therapies for DMD including stop codon read-through therapies (10% of total mutations) and exon skipping therapy (80% of deletions and 55% of total mutations). PMID:25604253

  4. Mutation analysis of 272 Spanish families affected by autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa using a genotyping microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila-Fernández, Almudena; Cantalapiedra, Diego; Aller, Elena; Vallespín, Elena; Aguirre-Lambán, Jana; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; Corton, M; Riveiro-Álvarez, Rosa; Allikmets, Rando; Trujillo-Tiebas, María José; Millán, José M; Cremers, Frans P M; Ayuso, Carmen

    2010-12-03

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive loss of vision. The aim of this study was to identify the causative mutations in 272 Spanish families using a genotyping microarray. 272 unrelated Spanish families, 107 with autosomal recessive RP (arRP) and 165 with sporadic RP (sRP), were studied using the APEX genotyping microarray. The families were also classified by clinical criteria: 86 juveniles and 186 typical RP families. Haplotype and sequence analysis were performed to identify the second mutated allele. At least one-gene variant was found in 14% and 16% of the juvenile and typical RP groups respectively. Further study identified four new mutations, providing both causative changes in 11% of the families. Retinol Dehydrogenase 12 (RDH12) was the most frequently mutated gene in the juvenile RP group, and Usher Syndrome 2A (USH2A) and Ceramide Kinase-Like (CERKL) were the most frequently mutated genes in the typical RP group. The only variant found in CERKL was p.Arg257Stop, the most frequent mutation. The genotyping microarray combined with segregation and sequence analysis allowed us to identify the causative mutations in 11% of the families. Due to the low number of characterized families, this approach should be used in tandem with other techniques.

  5. Phage T4 SegB protein is a homing endonuclease required for the preferred inheritance of T4 tRNA gene region occurring in co-infection with a related phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brok-Volchanskaya, Vera S; Kadyrov, Farid A; Sivogrivov, Dmitry E; Kolosov, Peter M; Sokolov, Andrey S; Shlyapnikov, Michael G; Kryukov, Valentine M; Granovsky, Igor E

    2008-04-01

    Homing endonucleases initiate nonreciprocal transfer of DNA segments containing their own genes and the flanking sequences by cleaving the recipient DNA. Bacteriophage T4 segB gene, which is located in a cluster of tRNA genes, encodes a protein of unknown function, homologous to homing endonucleases of the GIY-YIG family. We demonstrate that SegB protein is a site-specific endonuclease, which produces mostly 3' 2-nt protruding ends at its DNA cleavage site. Analysis of SegB cleavage sites suggests that SegB recognizes a 27-bp sequence. It contains 11-bp conserved sequence, which corresponds to a conserved motif of tRNA TpsiC stem-loop, whereas the remainder of the recognition site is rather degenerate. T4-related phages T2L, RB1 and RB3 contain tRNA gene regions that are homologous to that of phage T4 but lack segB gene and several tRNA genes. In co-infections of phages T4 and T2L, segB gene is inherited with nearly 100% of efficiency. The preferred inheritance depends absolutely on the segB gene integrity and is accompanied by the loss of the T2L tRNA gene region markers. We suggest that SegB is a homing endonuclease that functions to ensure spreading of its own gene and the surrounding tRNA genes among T4-related phages.

  6. Analysis of chlorophyll mutations induced by γ-rays in barley (hordeum vulgare)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Shen Mei; Xu Gang; Zhao Kongnan; Chen Qiufang

    1991-06-01

    Thirty varieties of dormant barley seeds were irradiated with 137 Cs γ-rays. Dose-effect relations of chlorophyll mutation frequency in M 2 seedling and differences resulting from cultured types or radiosensitive types were investigated. Experimental results show that the relations between chlorophyll mutation frequency and doses can be fitted by a linear regression equation Y = A + BX. According to analysis of covariance, there is no considerable difference in various cultured types, but the difference of five different radiosensitive types is remarkable. The sensitive and intermediate types need much lower doses than other types to induce maximum chlorophyll mutation

  7. Cumulative BRCA mutation analysis in the Greek population confirms that homogenous ethnic background facilitates genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigginou, Alexandra; Vlachopoulos, Fotios; Arzimanoglou, Iordanis; Zagouri, Flora; Dimitrakakis, Constantine

    2015-01-01

    Screening for BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutations has long moved from the research lab to the clinic as a routine clinical genetic testing. BRCA molecular alteration pattern varies among ethnic groups which makes it already a less straightforward process to select the appropriate mutations for routine genetic testing on the basis of known clinical significance. The present report comprises an in depth literature review of the so far reported BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 molecular alterations in Greek families. Our analysis of Greek cumulative BRCA 1 and 2 molecular data, produced by several independent groups, confirmed that six recurrent deleterious mutations account for almost 60 % and 70 % of all BRCA 1 and 2 and BRCA 1 mutations, respectively. As a result, it makes more sense to perform BRCA mutation analysis in the clinic in two sequential steps, first conventional analysis for the six most prevalent pathogenic mutations and if none identified, a second step of New Generation Sequencing-based whole genome or whole exome sequencing would follow. Our suggested approach would enable more clinically meaningful, considerably easier and less expensive BRCA analysis in the Greek population which is considered homogenous.

  8. Meta-analysis of neuroblastomas reveals a skewed ALK mutation spectrum in tumors with MYCN amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Brouwer, Sara; De Preter, Katleen; Kumps, Candy; Zabrocki, Piotr; Porcu, Michaël; Westerhout, Ellen M; Lakeman, Arjan; Vandesompele, Jo; Hoebeeck, Jasmien; Van Maerken, Tom; De Paepe, Anne; Laureys, Geneviève; Schulte, Johannes H; Schramm, Alexander; Van Den Broecke, Caroline; Vermeulen, Joëlle; Van Roy, Nadine; Beiske, Klaus; Renard, Marleen; Noguera, Rosa; Delattre, Olivier; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle; Kogner, Per; Martinsson, Tommy; Nakagawara, Akira; Ohira, Miki; Caron, Huib; Eggert, Angelika; Cools, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Speleman, Frank

    2010-09-01

    Activating mutations of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) were recently described in neuroblastoma. We carried out a meta-analysis of 709 neuroblastoma tumors to determine their frequency and mutation spectrum in relation to genomic and clinical parameters, and studied the prognostic significance of ALK copy number and expression. The frequency and type of ALK mutations, copy number gain, and expression were analyzed in a new series of 254 neuroblastoma tumors. Data from 455 published cases were used for further in-depth analysis. ALK mutations were present in 6.9% of 709 investigated tumors, and mutations were found in similar frequencies in favorable [International Neuroblastoma Staging System (INSS) 1, 2, and 4S; 5.7%] and unfavorable (INSS 3 and 4; 7.5%) neuroblastomas (P = 0.087). Two hotspot mutations, at positions R1275 and F1174, were observed (49% and 34.7% of the mutated cases, respectively). Interestingly, the F1174 mutations occurred in a high proportion of MYCN-amplified cases (P = 0.001), and this combined occurrence was associated with a particular poor outcome, suggesting a positive cooperative effect between both aberrations. Furthermore, the F1174L mutant was characterized by a higher degree of autophosphorylation and a more potent transforming capacity as compared with the R1275Q mutant. Chromosome 2p gains, including the ALK locus (91.8%), were associated with a significantly increased ALK expression, which was also correlated with poor survival. ALK mutations occur in equal frequencies across all genomic subtypes, but F1174L mutants are observed in a higher frequency of MYCN-amplified tumors and show increased transforming capacity as compared with the R1275Q mutants.

  9. Analysis of a new morphogenetic mutation in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mglinets, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    Somatic mosaicism for mutations monster and yellow was induced by gamma-irradiation of Drosophila melanogaster y/y; Dp(1; 2)sc 19 M(2)z/mn d embryos and larvae. Frequencies of mosaicism increased with the age of treated larvae, especially in the end of the 2nd larval instar. Autonomous expression of mn was observed throughout the whole range of larval age studied, though neither for all y/y spots nor for all parts of the spots. Dissimilarities in dynamics of mosaic spots and duplication induction suggest that the latter are not due to mn expression in somatic clones

  10. Mutational Analysis of PTPN11 Gene in Taiwanese Children with Noonan Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Sui Hung

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome (NS is an autosomal dominant disorder presenting with characteristic facies, short stature, skeletal anomalies, and congenital heart defects. Mutations in protein-tyrosine phosphatase, nonreceptor-type 11 (PTPN11, encoding SHP-2, account for 33-50% of NS. This study screened for mutations in the PTPN11 gene in 34 Taiwanese patients with NS. Mutation analysis of the 15 coding exons and exon/intron boundaries was performed by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing of the PTPN11 gene. We identified 10 different missense mutations in 13 (38% patients, including a novel missense mutation (855T > G, F285L. These mutations were clustered in exon 3 (n = 6 encoding the N-SH2 domain, exon 4 (n = 2 encoding the C-SH2 domain, and in exons 8 (n = 2 and 13 (n = 3 encoding the PTP domain. In conclusion, this study provides further support that PTPN11 mutations are responsible for Noonan syndrome in Taiwanese patients. [J Formos Med Assoc 2007;106(2:169-172

  11. Structural and functional analysis of APOA5 mutations identified in patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Barberá, Elena; Julve, Josep; Nilsson, Stefan K.; Lookene, Aivar; Martín-Campos, Jesús M.; Roig, Rosa; Lechuga-Sancho, Alfonso M.; Sloan, John H.; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    During the diagnosis of three unrelated patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia, three APOA5 mutations [p.(Ser232_Leu235)del, p.Leu253Pro, and p.Asp332ValfsX4] were found without evidence of concomitant LPL, APOC2, or GPIHBP1 mutations. The molecular mechanisms by which APOA5 mutations result in severe hypertriglyceridemia remain poorly understood, and the functional impairment/s induced by these specific mutations was not obvious. Therefore, we performed a thorough structural and functional analysis that included follow-up of patients and their closest relatives, measurement of apoA-V serum concentrations, and sequencing of the APOA5 gene in 200 nonhyperlipidemic controls. Further, we cloned, overexpressed, and purified both wild-type and mutant apoA-V variants and characterized their capacity to activate LPL. The interactions of recombinant wild-type and mutated apoA-V variants with liposomes of different composition, heparin, LRP1, sortilin, and SorLA/LR11 were also analyzed. Finally, to explore the possible structural consequences of these mutations, we developed a three-dimensional model of full-length, lipid-free human apoA-V. A complex, wide array of impairments was found in each of the three mutants, suggesting that the specific residues affected are critical structural determinants for apoA-V function in lipoprotein metabolism and, therefore, that these APOA5 mutations are a direct cause of hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:23307945

  12. Clinical profile and mutation analysis of xeroderma pigmentosum in Indian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamhankar, Parag M; Iyer, Shruti V; Ravindran, Shyla; Gupta, Neerja; Kabra, Madhulika; Nayak, Chitra; Kura, Mahendra; Sanghavi, Swapnil; Joshi, Rajesh; Chennuri, Vasundhara Sridhar; Khopkar, Uday

    2015-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by cutaneous and ocular photosensitivity and an increased risk of developing cutaneous neoplasms. Progressive neurological abnormalities develop in a quarter of XP patients. To study the clinical profile and perform a mutation analysis in Indian patients with xeroderma pigmentosum. Ten families with 13 patients with XP were referred to our clinic over 2 years. The genes XPA, XPB and XPC were sequentially analyzed till a pathogenic mutation was identified. Homozygous mutations in the XPA gene were seen in patients with moderate to severe mental retardation (6/10 families) but not in those without neurological features. Two unrelated families with a common family name and belonging to the same community from Maharashtra were found to have an identical mutation in the XPA gene, namely c.335_338delTTATinsCATAAGAAA (p.F112SfsX2). Testing of the XPC gene in two families with four affected children led to the identification of the novel mutations c.1243C>T or p.R415X and c.1677C>A or p.Y559X. In two families, mutations could not be identified in XPA, XPB and XPC genes. The sample size is small. Indian patients who have neurological abnormalities associated with XP should be screened for mutations in the XPA gene.

  13. Mutation analysis with random DNA identifiers (MARDI) catalogs Pig-a mutations in heterogeneous pools of CD48-deficient T cells derived from DMBA-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revollo, Javier R; Crabtree, Nathaniel M; Pearce, Mason G; Pacheco-Martinez, M Monserrat; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N

    2016-03-01

    Identification of mutations induced by xenotoxins is a common task in the field of genetic toxicology. Mutations are often detected by clonally expanding potential mutant cells and genotyping each viable clone by Sanger sequencing. Such a "clone-by-clone" approach requires significant time and effort, and sometimes is even impossible to implement. Alternative techniques for efficient mutation identification would greatly benefit both basic and regulatory genetic toxicology research. Here, we report the development of Mutation Analysis with Random DNA Identifiers (MARDI), a novel high-fidelity Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) approach that circumvents clonal expansion and directly catalogs mutations in pools of mutant cells. MARDI uses oligonucleotides carrying Random DNA Identifiers (RDIs) to tag progenitor DNA molecules before PCR amplification, enabling clustering of descendant DNA molecules and eliminating NGS- and PCR-induced sequencing artifacts. When applied to the Pig-a cDNA analysis of heterogeneous pools of CD48-deficient T cells derived from DMBA-treated rats, MARDI detected nearly all Pig-a mutations that were previously identified by conventional clone-by-clone analysis and discovered many additional ones consistent with DMBA exposure: mostly A to T transversions, with the mutated A located on the non-transcribed DNA strand. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The first USH2A mutation analysis of Japanese autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa patients: a totally different mutation profile with the lack of frequent mutations found in Caucasian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Hosono, Katsuhiro; Suto, Kimiko; Ishigami, Chie; Arai, Yuuki; Hikoya, Akiko; Hirami, Yasuhiko; Ohtsubo, Masafumi; Ueno, Shinji; Terasaki, Hiroko; Sato, Miho; Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Endo, Shiori; Mizuta, Kunihiro; Mineta, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Mineo; Takahashi, Masayo; Minoshima, Shinsei; Hotta, Yoshihiro

    2014-09-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a highly heterogeneous genetic disease. The USH2A gene, which accounts for approximately 74-90% of Usher syndrome type 2 (USH2) cases, is also one of the major autosomal recessive RP (arRP) causative genes among Caucasian populations. To identify disease-causing USH2A gene mutations in Japanese RP patients, all 73 exons were screened for mutations by direct sequencing. In total, 100 unrelated Japanese RP patients with no systemic manifestations were identified, excluding families with obvious autosomal dominant inheritance. Of these 100 patients, 82 were included in this present study after 18 RP patients with very likely pathogenic EYS (eyes shut homolog) mutations were excluded. The mutation analysis of the USH2A revealed five very likely pathogenic mutations in four patients. A patient had only one very likely pathogenic mutation and the others had two of them. Caucasian frequent mutations p.C759F in arRP and p.E767fs in USH2 were not found. All the four patients exhibited typical clinical features of RP. The observed prevalence of USH2A gene mutations was approximately 4% among Japanese arRP patients, and the profile of the USH2A gene mutations differed largely between Japanese patients and previously reported Caucasian populations.

  15. Viral tRNA Mimicry from a Biocommunicative Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascensión Ariza-Mateos

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available RNA viruses have very small genomes which limits the functions they can encode. One of the strategies employed by these viruses is to mimic key factors of the host cell so they can take advantage of the interactions and activities these factors typically participate in. The viral RNA genome itself was first observed to mimic cellular tRNA over 40 years ago. Since then researchers have confirmed that distinct families of RNA viruses are accessible to a battery of cellular factors involved in tRNA-related activities. Recently, potential tRNA-like structures have been detected within the sequences of a 100 mRNAs taken from human cells, one of these being the host defense interferon-alpha mRNA; these are then additional to the examples found in bacterial and yeast mRNAs. The mimetic relationship between tRNA, cellular mRNA, and viral RNA is the central focus of two considerations described below. These are subsequently used as a preface for a final hypothesis drawing on concepts relating to mimicry from the social sciences and humanities, such as power relations and creativity. Firstly, the presence of tRNA-like structures in mRNAs indicates that the viral tRNA-like signal could be mimicking tRNA-like elements that are contextualized by the specific carrier mRNAs, rather than, or in addition to, the tRNA itself, which would significantly increase the number of potential semiotic relations mediated by the viral signals. Secondly, and in particular, mimicking a host defense mRNA could be considered a potential new viral strategy for survival. Finally, we propose that mRNA’s mimicry of tRNA could be indicative of an ancestral intracellular conflict in which species of mRNAs invaded the cell, but from within. As the meaning of the mimetic signal depends on the context, in this case, the conflict that arises when the viral signal enters the cell can change the meaning of the mRNAs’ internal tRNA-like signals, from their current significance to that

  16. Active Center Control of Termination by RNA Polymerase III and tRNA Gene Transcription Levels In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshab Rijal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP III to efficiently recycle from termination to reinitiation is critical for abundant tRNA production during cellular proliferation, development and cancer. Yet understanding of the unique termination mechanisms used by RNAP III is incomplete, as is its link to high transcription output. We used two tRNA-mediated suppression systems to screen for Rpc1 mutants with gain- and loss- of termination phenotypes in S. pombe. 122 point mutation mutants were mapped to a recently solved 3.9 Å structure of yeast RNAP III elongation complex (EC; they cluster in the active center bridge helix and trigger loop, as well as the pore and funnel, the latter of which indicate involvement of the RNA cleavage domain of the C11 subunit in termination. Purified RNAP III from a readthrough (RT mutant exhibits increased elongation rate. The data strongly support a kinetic coupling model in which elongation rate is inversely related to termination efficiency. The mutants exhibit good correlations of terminator RT in vitro and in vivo, and surprisingly, amounts of transcription in vivo. Because assessing in vivo transcription can be confounded by various parameters, we used a tRNA reporter with a processing defect and a strong terminator. By ruling out differences in RNA decay rates, the data indicate that mutants with the RT phenotype synthesize more RNA than wild type cells, and than can be accounted for by their increased elongation rate. Finally, increased activity by the mutants appears unrelated to the RNAP III repressor, Maf1. The results show that the mobile elements of the RNAP III active center, including C11, are key determinants of termination, and that some of the mutations activate RNAP III for overall transcription. Similar mutations in spontaneous cancer suggest this as an unforeseen mechanism of RNAP III activation in disease.

  17. Identification of five novel FBN1 mutations by non-radioactive single-strand conformation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W.; Qian, C.; Comeau, K.; Francke, U. [Stanford Univ. Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS), one of the most common genetic disorders of connective tissue, is characterized by variable manifestations in skeletal, cardiovascular and ocular systems. Mutations in the fibrillin gene on chromosome 15 (FBN1) have been shown to cause MFS. To examine the relationship between FBN1 gene mutations, fibrillin protein function and MFS phenotypes, we screened for alternations in the fibrillin coding sequence in fibroblast derived cDNA from MFS patients. To date, abnormally migrating bands in more than 20 unrelated MFS patients have been identified by using non-radioactive single-strand conformation analysis and silver staining. Five altered bands have been directly sequenced. Two missense mutations and three splice site mutations have been identified. Both missense mutations substitute another amino acid for a cysteine residue (C1402W and C1672R) in EGF-like motifs of the fibrillin polypeptide chain. The two splice site mutations are at nucleotide positions 6994+1 (G{yields}A), and 7205-2 (A{yields}G) and result in in-frame skipping of exon 56 and 58, respectively. Skipping of exon 56 occurs in 50% of mutant transcripts. Use of a cryptic splice site 51 bp upstream of the normal donor site results in half of the mutant transcripts containing part of exon 56. Both products contain in-frame deletions. Another splice site mutation, identified by exon screening from patient genomic DNA using intron primers, is at nucleotide position 2293+2 (T{yields}A), but the predicted exon skipping has not been detected at the RT-PCR level. This may be due to instability of the mutant transcript. Including the mutations reported here, a total of 8 out of 36 published FBN1 gene mutations involve exon skipping. It may be inferred that FBN1 exon skipping plays an important pathogenic role in MFS.

  18. Sequence analysis of tyrosinase gene in ocular and oculocutaneous albinism patients: introducing three novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khordadpoor-Deilamani, Faravareh; Akbari, Mohammad Taghi; Karimipoor, Morteza; Javadi, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Albinism is a heterogeneous genetic disorder of melanin synthesis that results in hypopigmented eyes (in patients with ocular albinism) or hair, skin, and eyes (in individuals with oculocutaneous albinism). It is associated with decreased visual acuity, nystagmus, strabismus, and photophobia. The tyrosinase gene is known to be involved in both oculocutaneous albinism and autosomal recessive ocular albinism. In this study, we aimed to screen the mutations in the TYR gene in the nonsyndromic OCA and autosomal recessive ocular albinism patients from Iran. The tyrosinase gene was examined in 23 unrelated patients with autosomal recessive ocular albinism or nonsyndromic OCA using DNA sequencing and bioinformatics analysis. TYR gene mutations were identified in 14 (app. 60%) albinism patients. We found 10 mutations, 3 of which were novel. No mutation was found in our ocular albinism patients, but one of them was heterozygous for the p.R402Q polymorphism.

  19. Mutation analysis and evaluation of the cardiac localization of TMEM43 in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, A H; Andersen, C B; Tybjærg-Hansen, A

    2011-01-01

    Christensen AH, Andersen CB, Tybjærg-Hansen A, Haunso S, Svendsen JH. Mutation analysis and evaluation of the cardiac localization of TMEM43 in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. A single report has associated mutations in TMEM43 (LUMA) with a distinctive form of arrhythmogenic right...... with anti-TMEM43, anti-plakoglobin, anti-plakophilin-2, anti-connexin-43, and anti-emerin antibodies was performed on myocardium from TMEM43-positive patients (n = 3) and healthy controls (n = 3). The genetic screening identified heterozygous variants in two families: one reported mutation (c.1073C> T......; in two related patients) and one novel variant (c.705+ 7G> A; in one patient) of unknown significance. All three patients fulfilled Task Force criteria and did not carry mutations in any other ARVC-related gene. Immunostaining with TMEM43 antibody showed intense staining of the sarcolemma. The signal...

  20. [The mutation analysis of PAH gene and prenatal diagnosis in classical phenylketonuria family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yousheng; Hao, Shengju; Yao, Fengxia; Sun, Qingmei; Zheng, Lei; Zhang, Qinghua; Zhang, Chuan; Yang, Tao; Huang, Shangzhi

    2014-12-01

    To characterize the mutation spectrum of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene and perform prenatal diagnosis for families with classical phenylketonuria. By stratified sequencing, mutations were detected in the exons and flaking introns of PAH gene of 44 families with classical phenylketonuria. 47 fetuses were diagnosed by combined sequencing with linkage analysis of three common short tandem repeats (STR) (PAH-STR, PAH-26 and PAH-32) in the PAH gene. Thirty-one types of mutations were identified. A total of 84 mutations were identified in 88 alleles (95.45%), in which the most common mutation have been R243Q (21.59%), EX6-96A>G (6.82%), IVS4-1G>A (5.86%) and IVS7+2T>A (5.86%). Most mutations were found in exons 3, 5, 6, 7, 11 and 12. The polymorphism information content (PIC) of these three STR markers was 0.71 (PAH-STR), 0.48 (PAH-26) and 0.40 (PAH-32), respectively. Prenatal diagnosis was performed successfully with the combined method in 47 fetuses of 44 classical phenylketonuria families. Among them, 11 (23.4%) were diagnosed as affected, 24 (51.1%) as carriers, and 12 (25.5%) as unaffected. Prenatal diagnosis can be achieved efficiently and accurately by stratified sequencing of PAH gene and linkage analysis of STR for classical phenylketonuria families.

  1. NMD Microarray Analysis for Rapid Genome-Wide Screen of Mutated Genes in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maija Wolf

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene mutations play a critical role in cancer development and progression, and their identification offers possibilities for accurate diagnostics and therapeutic targeting. Finding genes undergoing mutations is challenging and slow, even in the post-genomic era. A new approach was recently developed by Noensie and Dietz to prioritize and focus the search, making use of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD inhibition and microarray analysis (NMD microarrays in the identification of transcripts containing nonsense mutations. We combined NMD microarrays with array-based CGH (comparative genomic hybridization in order to identify inactivation of tumor suppressor genes in cancer. Such a “mutatomics” screening of prostate cancer cell lines led to the identification of inactivating mutations in the EPHB2 gene. Up to 8% of metastatic uncultured prostate cancers also showed mutations of this gene whose loss of function may confer loss of tissue architecture. NMD microarray analysis could turn out to be a powerful research method to identify novel mutated genes in cancer cell lines, providing targets that could then be further investigated for their clinical relevance and therapeutic potential.

  2. Structural and functional analysis of rare missense mutations in human chorionic gonadotrophin β-subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagirnaja, Liina; Venclovas, Česlovas; Rull, Kristiina

    2012-01-01

    Heterodimeric hCG is one of the key hormones determining early pregnancy success. We have previously identified rare missense mutations in hCGβ genes with potential pathophysiological importance. The present study assessed the impact of these mutations on the structure and function of hCG by appl...... of intact hCG as also supported by an in silico analysis. In summary, the accumulated data indicate that only mutations with neutral or mild functional consequences might be tolerated in the major hCGβ genes CGB5 and CGB8.......Heterodimeric hCG is one of the key hormones determining early pregnancy success. We have previously identified rare missense mutations in hCGβ genes with potential pathophysiological importance. The present study assessed the impact of these mutations on the structure and function of h......CG by applying a combination of in silico (sequence and structure analysis, molecular dynamics) and in vitro (co-immunoprecipitation, immuno- and bioassays) approaches. The carrier status of each mutation was determined for 1086 North-Europeans [655 patients with recurrent miscarriage (RM)/431 healthy controls...

  3. VLCAD deficiency: Pitfalls in newborn screening and confirmation of diagnosis by mutation analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boneh, A; Andresen, Brage Storstein; Gregersen, Niels

    2006-01-01

    samples taken at age 48-72 h were diagnostic whereas repeat samples at an older age were normal in 4/6 babies. Urine analysis was normal in 5/5. We conclude that the timing of blood sampling for newborn screening is important and that it is important to perform mutation analysis to avoid false......-negative diagnoses of VLCADD in asymptomatic newborn babies. In view of the emerging genotype-phenotype correlation in this disorder, the information derived from mutational analysis can be helpful in designing the appropriate follow-up and therapeutic regime for these patients....

  4. Analysis of PIK3CA Mutations and Activation Pathways in Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Cossu-Rocca

    Full Text Available Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC accounts for 12-24% of all breast carcinomas, and shows worse prognosis compared to other breast cancer subtypes. Molecular studies demonstrated that TNBCs are a heterogeneous group of tumors with different clinical and pathologic features, prognosis, genetic-molecular alterations and treatment responsivity. The PI3K/AKT is a major pathway involved in the regulation of cell survival and proliferation, and is the most frequently altered pathway in breast cancer, apparently with different biologic impact on specific cancer subtypes. The most common genetic abnormality is represented by PIK3CA gene activating mutations, with an overall frequency of 20-40%. The aims of our study were to investigate PIK3CA gene mutations on a large series of TNBC, to perform a wider analysis on genetic alterations involving PI3K/AKT and BRAF/RAS/MAPK pathways and to correlate the results with clinical-pathologic data.PIK3CA mutation analysis was performed by using cobas® PIK3CA Mutation Test. EGFR, AKT1, BRAF, and KRAS genes were analyzed by sequencing. Immunohistochemistry was carried out to identify PTEN loss and to investigate for PI3K/AKT pathways components.PIK3CA mutations were detected in 23.7% of TNBC, whereas no mutations were identified in EGFR, AKT1, BRAF, and KRAS genes. Moreover, we observed PTEN loss in 11.3% of tumors. Deregulation of PI3K/AKT pathways was revealed by consistent activation of pAKT and p-p44/42 MAPK in all PIK3CA mutated TNBC.Our data shows that PIK3CA mutations and PI3K/AKT pathway activation are common events in TNBC. A deeper investigation on specific TNBC genomic abnormalities might be helpful in order to select patients who would benefit from current targeted therapy strategies.

  5. Analysis of PIK3CA Mutations and Activation Pathways in Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu-Rocca, Paolo; Orrù, Sandra; Muroni, Maria Rosaria; Sanges, Francesca; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Ena, Sara; Pira, Giovanna; Murgia, Luciano; Manca, Alessandra; Uras, Maria Gabriela; Sarobba, Maria Giuseppina; Urru, Silvana; De Miglio, Maria Rosaria

    2015-01-01

    Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) accounts for 12-24% of all breast carcinomas, and shows worse prognosis compared to other breast cancer subtypes. Molecular studies demonstrated that TNBCs are a heterogeneous group of tumors with different clinical and pathologic features, prognosis, genetic-molecular alterations and treatment responsivity. The PI3K/AKT is a major pathway involved in the regulation of cell survival and proliferation, and is the most frequently altered pathway in breast cancer, apparently with different biologic impact on specific cancer subtypes. The most common genetic abnormality is represented by PIK3CA gene activating mutations, with an overall frequency of 20-40%. The aims of our study were to investigate PIK3CA gene mutations on a large series of TNBC, to perform a wider analysis on genetic alterations involving PI3K/AKT and BRAF/RAS/MAPK pathways and to correlate the results with clinical-pathologic data. PIK3CA mutation analysis was performed by using cobas® PIK3CA Mutation Test. EGFR, AKT1, BRAF, and KRAS genes were analyzed by sequencing. Immunohistochemistry was carried out to identify PTEN loss and to investigate for PI3K/AKT pathways components. PIK3CA mutations were detected in 23.7% of TNBC, whereas no mutations were identified in EGFR, AKT1, BRAF, and KRAS genes. Moreover, we observed PTEN loss in 11.3% of tumors. Deregulation of PI3K/AKT pathways was revealed by consistent activation of pAKT and p-p44/42 MAPK in all PIK3CA mutated TNBC. Our data shows that PIK3CA mutations and PI3K/AKT pathway activation are common events in TNBC. A deeper investigation on specific TNBC genomic abnormalities might be helpful in order to select patients who would benefit from current targeted therapy strategies.

  6. Restricted ultraviolet mutational spectrum in a shuttle vector propagated in xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredberg, A.; Kraemer, K.H.; Seidman, M.M.

    1986-01-01

    A shuttle vector plasmid, pZ189, carrying a bacterial suppressor tRNA marker gene, was treated with ultraviolet radiation and propagated in cultured skin cells from a patient with the skin-cancer-prone, DNA repair-deficient disease xeroderma pigmentosum and in repair-proficient cells. After replication in the human cells, progeny plasmids were purified. Plasmid survival and mutations inactivating the marker gene were scored by transforming an indicator strain of Escherichia coli carrying a suppressible amber mutation in the beta-galactosidase gene. Plasmid survival in the xeroderma pigmentosum cells was less than that of pZ189 harvested from repair-proficient human cells. The point-mutation frequency in the 150-base-pair tRNA marker gene increased up to 100-fold with ultraviolet dose. Sequence analysis of 150 mutant plasmids revealed that mutations were infrequent at potential thymine-thymine dimer sites. Ninety-three percent of the mutant plasmids from the xeroderma pigmentosum cells showed G X C----A X T transitions, compared to 73% in the normal cells (P less than 0.002). There were significantly fewer transversions (P less than 0.002) (especially G X C----T X A) and multiple base substitutions (P less than 0.00001) than when pZ189 was passaged in repair-proficient cells. The subset of mutational changes that are common to ultraviolet-treated plasmids propagated in both repair-proficient and xeroderma pigmentosum skin cells may be associated with the development of ultraviolet-induced skin cancer in humans

  7. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is associated with the mitochondrial ND4 G11696A mutation in five Chinese families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xiangtian; Wei Qiping; Yang Li; Tong Yi; Zhao Fuxin; Lu Chunjie; Qian Yaping; Sun Yanghong; Lu Fan; Qu Jia; Guan Minxin

    2006-01-01

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of five Chinese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Clinical and genetic evaluations revealed the variable severity and age-of-onset in visual impairment in these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of visual impairment in these Chinese families. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphism, in addition to the identical ND4 G11696A mutation associated with LHON. Indeed, this mutation is present in homoplasmy only in the maternal lineage of those pedigrees but not other members of these families. In fact, the occurrence of the G11696A mutation in these several genetically unrelated subjects affected by visual impairment strongly indicates that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of visual impairment. Furthermore, the N405D in the ND5 and G5820A in the tRNA Cys , showing high evolutional conservation, may contribute to the phenotypic expression of G11696A mutation in the WZ10 pedigree. However, there was the absence of functionally significant mtDNA mutations in other four Chinese pedigrees carrying the G11696A mutation. Therefore, nuclear modifier gene(s) or environmental factor(s) may play a role in the phenotypic expression of the LHON-associated G11696A mutation in these Chinese pedigrees

  8. tRNA - RMG | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/rmg/LATEST/rmg_trna.zip File size: 1 KB Simple search URL http:...ption Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us tRNA - RMG | LSDB Archive ...

  9. Antibiotic inhibition of the movement of tRNA substrates through a peptidyl transferase cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, B T; Rodriguez-Fonseca, C; Leviev, I

    1996-01-01

    The present review attempts to deal with movement of tRNA substrates through the peptidyl transferase centre on the large ribosomal subunit and to explain how this movement is interrupted by antibiotics. It builds on the concept of hybrid tRNA states forming on ribosomes and on the observed movem...

  10. The early history of tRNA recognition by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    2006-10-04

    Oct 4, 2006 ... Discovery of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and importance ... The pioneering work of Fritz Lipmann on the high-energy ... the peculiar structural and functional relationships tRNAs ... a bulk of only 20 families of tRNA molecules in contrast ...... balance of tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase; Science 242.

  11. Analysis of P53 mutations and their expression in 56 colorectal cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ying; Bodmer, Walter F

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the TP53 gene and its protein status was carried out on a panel of 56 colorectal cancer cell lines. This analysis was based on a combination of denaturing HPLC mutation screening of all exons of the p53 gene, sequencing the cDNA, and assessing the function of the p53 p...

  12. Analysis of mutations in the entire coding sequence of the factor VIII gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidichadani, S.I.; Lanyon, W.G.; Connor, J.M. [Glascow Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hemophilia A is a common X-linked recessive disorder of bleeding caused by deleterious mutations in the gene for clotting factor VIII. The large size of the factor VIII gene, the high frequency of de novo mutations and its tissue-specific expression complicate the detection of mutations. We have used a combination of RT-PCR of ectopic factor VIII transcripts and genomic DNA-PCRs to amplify the entire essential sequence of the factor VIII gene. This is followed by chemical mismatch cleavage analysis and direct sequencing in order to facilitate a comprehensive search for mutations. We describe the characterization of nine potentially pathogenic mutations, six of which are novel. In each case, a correlation of the genotype with the observed phenotype is presented. In order to evaluate the pathogenicity of the five missense mutations detected, we have analyzed them for evolutionary sequence conservation and for their involvement of sequence motifs catalogued in the PROSITE database of protein sites and patterns.

  13. Clinical analysis of PMS2: mutation detection and avoidance of pseudogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Cecily P; Robles, Jorge; Swensen, Jeffrey J; Miller, Christine E; Lyon, Elaine; Mao, Rong; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Samowitz, Wade S

    2010-05-01

    Germline mutation detection in PMS2, one of four mismatch repair genes associated with Lynch syndrome, is greatly complicated by the presence of numerous pseudogenes. We used a modification of a long-range PCR method to evaluate PMS2 in 145 clinical samples. This modification avoids potential interference from the pseudogene PMS2CL by utilizing a long-range product spanning exons 11-15, with the forward primer anchored in exon 10, an exon not shared by PMS2CL. Large deletions were identified by MLPA. Pathogenic PMS2 mutations were identified in 22 of 59 patients whose tumors showed isolated loss of PMS2 by immunohistochemistry (IHC), the IHC profile most commonly associated with a germline PMS2 mutation. Three additional patients with pathogenic mutations were identified from 53 samples without IHC data. Thirty-seven percent of the identified mutations were large deletions encompassing one or more exons. In 27 patients whose tumors showed absence of either another protein or combination of proteins, no pathogenic mutations were identified. We conclude that modified long-range PCR can be used to preferentially amplify the PMS2 gene and avoid pseudogene interference, thus providing a clinically useful germline analysis of PMS2. Our data also support the use of IHC screening to direct germline testing of PMS2. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Somatic mutation analysis of MYH11 in breast and prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhopuro, Pia; Karhu, Auli; Winqvist, Robert; Waltering, Kati; Visakorpi, Tapio; Aaltonen, Lauri A

    2008-01-01

    MYH11 (also known as SMMHC) encodes the smooth-muscle myosin heavy chain, which has a key role in smooth muscle contraction. Inversion at the MYH11 locus is one of the most frequent chromosomal aberrations found in acute myeloid leukemia. We have previously shown that MYH11 mutations occur in human colorectal cancer, and may also be associated with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. The mutations found in human intestinal neoplasia result in unregulated proteins with constitutive motor activity, similar to the mutant myh11 underlying the zebrafish meltdown phenotype characterized by disrupted intestinal architecture. Recently, MYH1 and MYH9 have been identified as candidate breast cancer genes in a systematic analysis of the breast cancer genome. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of somatic MYH11 mutations in two common tumor types; breast and prostate cancers. A total of 155 breast cancer and 71 prostate cancer samples were analyzed for those regions in MYH11 (altogether 8 exons out of 42 coding exons) that harboured mutations in colorectal cancer in our previous study. In breast cancer samples only germline alterations were observed. One prostate cancer sample harbored a frameshift mutation c.5798delC, which we have previously shown to result in a protein with unregulated motor activity. Little evidence for a role of somatic MYH11 mutations in the formation of breast or prostate cancers was obtained in this study

  15. Mutation analysis of GJB2 gene and prenatal diagnosis in a non-syndromic deafness family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-hua CHEN

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To identify the pathogenic gene in a non-syndromic deafness family, provide an accurate genetic consultation and early intervention for deaf family to reduce the incidence of congenital deafness. Methods Mutation analysis was carried out by polymerase chain reaction followed by DNA sequencing of coding region of GJB2 gene. The fetal DNA was extracted from the amniotic fluid cells by amniocentesis at 20 weeks during pregnancy. The genotype of the fetus was characterized for predicting the status of hearing. Results Complex heterozygous mutations 235delC and 176-191del16bp were detected in the proband of the family, heterozygous mutation 176-191del16bp was detected in the father, and 235delC was detected in the mother. Fetus carried 235delC heterozygous mutation inherited from his mother. Conclusions The proband's hearing loss is resulted from the complex heterozygous mutations 235delC and 176-191del16bp in GJB2 gene. Fetus is a heterozygous mutation 235delC carrier. Prenatal diagnosis for deafness assisted by genetic test can provide efficient guidance about offspring's hearing condition, and prevent another deaf-mute member from birth. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.07.09

  16. Mutation and Methylation Analysis of the Chromodomain-Helicase-DNA Binding 5 Gene in Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie L. Gorringe

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromodomain, helicase, DNA binding 5 (CHD5 is a member of a subclass of the chromatin remodeling Swi/Snf proteins and has recently been proposed as a tumor suppressor in a diverse range of human cancers. We analyzed all 41 coding exons of CHD5 for somatic mutations in 123 primary ovarian cancers as well as 60 primary breast cancers using high-resolution melt analysis. We also examined methylation of the CHD5 promoter in 48 ovarian cancer samples by methylation-specific single-stranded conformation polymorphism and bisulfite sequencing. In contrast to previous studies, no mutations were identified in the breast cancers, but somatic heterozygous missense mutations were identified in 3 of 123 ovarian cancers. We identified promoter methylation in 3 of 45 samples with normal CHD5 and in 2 of 3 samples with CHD5 mutation, suggesting these tumors may have biallelic inactivation of CHD5. Hemizygous copy number loss at CHD5 occurred in 6 of 85 samples as assessed by single nucleotide polymorphism array. Tumors with CHD5 mutation or methylation were more likely to have mutation of KRAS or BRAF (P = .04. The aggregate frequency of CHD5 haploinsufficiency or inactivation is 16.2% in ovarian cancer. Thus, CHD5 may play a role as a tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancer; however, it is likely that there is another target of the frequent copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity observed at 1p36.

  17. Multiplex fluorescence melting curve analysis for mutation detection with dual-labeled, self-quenched probes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuying Huang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Probe-based fluorescence melting curve analysis (FMCA is a powerful tool for mutation detection based on melting temperature generated by thermal denaturation of the probe-target hybrid. Nevertheless, the color multiplexing, probe design, and cross-platform compatibility remain to be limited by using existing probe chemistries. We hereby explored two dual-labeled, self-quenched probes, TaqMan and shared-stem molecular beacons, in their ability to conduct FMCA. Both probes could be directly used for FMCA and readily integrated with closed-tube amplicon hybridization under asymmetric PCR conditions. Improved flexibility of FMCA by using these probes was illustrated in three representative applications of FMCA: mutation scanning, mutation identification and mutation genotyping, all of which achieved improved color-multiplexing with easy probe design and versatile probe combination and all were validated with a large number of real clinical samples. The universal cross-platform compatibility of these probes-based FMCA was also demonstrated by a 4-color mutation genotyping assay performed on five different real-time PCR instruments. The dual-labeled, self-quenched probes offered unprecedented combined advantage of enhanced multiplexing, improved flexibility in probe design, and expanded cross-platform compatibility, which would substantially improve FMCA in mutation detection of various applications.

  18. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for mitochondrial DNA mutations: analysis of one blastomere suffices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallevelt, Suzanne C E H; Dreesen, Joseph C F M; Coonen, Edith; Paulussen, Aimee D C; Hellebrekers, Debby M E I; de Die-Smulders, Christine E M; Smeets, Hubert J M; Lindsey, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is a reproductive strategy for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation carriers, strongly reducing their risk of affected offspring. Embryos either without the mutation or with mutation load below the phenotypic threshold are transferred to the uterus. Because of incidental heteroplasmy deviations in single blastomere and the relatively limited data available, we so far preferred relying on two blastomeres rather than one. Considering the negative effect of a two-blastomere biopsy protocol compared with a single-blastomere biopsy protocol on live birth delivery rate, we re-evaluated the error rate in our current dataset. For the m.3243A>G mutation, sufficient embryos/blastomeres were available for a powerful analysis. The diagnostic error rate, defined as a potential false-negative result, based on a threshold of 15%, was determined in 294 single blastomeres analysed in 73 embryos of 9 female m.3243A>G mutation carriers. Only one out of 294 single blastomeres (0.34%) would have resulted in a false-negative diagnosis. False-positive diagnoses were not detected. Our findings support a single-blastomere biopsy PGD protocol for the m.3243A>G mutation as the diagnostic error rate is very low. As in the early preimplantation embryo no mtDNA replication seems to occur and the mtDNA is divided randomly among the daughter cells, we conclude this result to be independent of the specific mutation and therefore applicable to all mtDNA mutations. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Survival analysis of cancer risk reduction strategies for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, Allison W; Sigal, Bronislava M; Plevritis, Sylvia K

    2010-01-10

    Women with BRCA1/2 mutations inherit high risks of breast and ovarian cancer; options to reduce cancer mortality include prophylactic surgery or breast screening, but their efficacy has never been empirically compared. We used decision analysis to simulate risk-reducing strategies in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and to compare resulting survival probability and causes of death. We developed a Monte Carlo model of breast screening with annual mammography plus magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from ages 25 to 69 years, prophylactic mastectomy (PM) at various ages, and/or prophylactic oophorectomy (PO) at ages 40 or 50 years in 25-year-old BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. With no intervention, survival probability by age 70 is 53% for BRCA1 and 71% for BRCA2 mutation carriers. The most effective single intervention for BRCA1 mutation carriers is PO at age 40, yielding a 15% absolute survival gain; for BRCA2 mutation carriers, the most effective single intervention is PM, yielding a 7% survival gain if performed at age 40 years. The combination of PM and PO at age 40 improves survival more than any single intervention, yielding 24% survival gain for BRCA1 and 11% for BRCA2 mutation carriers. PM at age 25 instead of age 40 offers minimal incremental benefit (1% to 2%); substituting screening for PM yields a similarly minimal decrement in survival (2% to 3%). Although PM at age 25 plus PO at age 40 years maximizes survival probability, substituting mammography plus MRI screening for PM seems to offer comparable survival. These results may guide women with BRCA1/2 mutations in their choices between prophylactic surgery and breast screening.

  20. tRNA gene diversity in the three domains of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke eFujishima

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Transfer RNA (tRNA is widely known for its key role in decoding mRNA into protein. Despite their necessity and relatively short nucleotide sequences, a large diversity of gene structures and RNA secondary structures of pre-tRNAs and mature tRNAs have recently been discovered in the three domains of life. Growing evidences of disrupted tRNA genes in the genomes of Archaea reveals unique gene structures such as, intron-containing tRNA, split tRNA, and permuted tRNA. Coding sequence for these tRNAs are either separated with introns, fragmented, or permuted at the genome level. Although evolutionary scenario behind the tRNA gene disruption is still unclear, diversity of tRNA structure seems to be co-evolved with their processing enzyme, so-called RNA splicing endonuclease. Metazoan mitochondrial tRNAs (mtRNAs are known for their unique lack of either one or two arms from the typical tRNA cloverleaf structure, while still maintaining functionality. Recently identified nematode-specific V-arm containing tRNAs (nev-tRNAs possess long variable arms that are specific to eukaryotic class II tRNASer and tRNALeu but also decode class I tRNA codons. Moreover, many tRNA-like sequences have been found in the genomes of different organisms and viruses. Thus this review is aimed to cover the latest knowledge on tRNA gene diversity and further recapitulate the evolutionary and biological aspects that caused such uniqueness.

  1. Diagnostic and therapeutic implications of genetic heterogeneity in myeloid neoplasms uncovered by comprehensive mutational analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Choi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While growing use of comprehensive mutational analysis has led to the discovery of innumerable genetic alterations associated with various myeloid neoplasms, the under-recognized phenomenon of genetic heterogeneity within such neoplasms creates a potential for diagnostic confusion. Here, we describe two cases where expanded mutational testing led to amendment of an initial diagnosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia with subsequent altered treatment of each patient. We demonstrate the power of comprehensive testing in ensuring appropriate classification of genetically heterogeneous neoplasms, and emphasize thoughtful analysis of molecular and genetic data as an essential component of diagnosis and management.

  2. Polycistronic tRNA and CRISPR guide-RNA enables highly efficient multiplexed genome engineering in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Fengping; Xie, Kabin; Chen, Yueying; Yang, Yinong; Mao, Yingwei

    2017-01-22

    CRISPR/Cas9 has been widely used for genomic editing in many organisms. Many human diseases are caused by multiple mutations. The CRISPR/Cas9 system provides a potential tool to introduce multiple mutations in a genome. To mimic complicated genomic variants in human diseases, such as multiple gene deletions or mutations, two or more small guide RNAs (sgRNAs) need to be introduced all together. This can be achieved by separate Pol III promoters in a construct. However, limited enzyme sites and increased insertion size lower the efficiency to make a construct. Here, we report a strategy to quickly assembly multiple sgRNAs in one construct using a polycistronic-tRNA-gRNA (PTG) strategy. Taking advantage of the endogenous tRNA processing system in mammalian cells, we efficiently express multiple sgRNAs driven using only one Pol III promoter. Using an all-in-one construct carrying PTG, we disrupt the deacetylase domain in multiple histone deacetylases (HDACs) in human cells simultaneously. We demonstrate that multiple HDAC deletions significantly affect the activation of the Wnt-signaling pathway. Thus, this method enables to efficiently target multiple genes and provide a useful tool to establish mutated cells mimicking human diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Structural analysis of thermostabilizing mutations of cocaine esterase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narasimhan, Diwahar; Nance, Mark R.; Gao, Daquan; Ko, Mei-Chuan; Macdonald, Joanne; Tamburi, Patricia; Yoon, Dan; Landry, Donald M.; Woods, James H.; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Tesmer, John J.G.; Sunahara, Roger K. (Michigan); (Columbia); (Kentucky)

    2010-09-03

    Cocaine is considered to be the most addictive of all substances of abuse and mediates its effects by inhibiting monoamine transporters, primarily the dopamine transporters. There are currently no small molecules that can be used to combat its toxic and addictive properties, in part because of the difficulty of developing compounds that inhibit cocaine binding without having intrinsic effects on dopamine transport. Most of the effective cocaine inhibitors also display addictive properties. We have recently reported the use of cocaine esterase (CocE) to accelerate the removal of systemic cocaine and to prevent cocaine-induced lethality. However, wild-type CocE is relatively unstable at physiological temperatures ({tau}{sub 1/2} {approx} 13 min at 37 C), presenting challenges for its development as a viable therapeutic agent. We applied computational approaches to predict mutations to stabilize CocE and showed that several of these have increased stability both in vitro and in vivo, with the most efficacious mutant (T172R/G173Q) extending half-life up to 370 min. Here we present novel X-ray crystallographic data on these mutants that provide a plausible model for the observed enhanced stability. We also more extensively characterize the previously reported variants and report on a new stabilizing mutant, L169K. The improved stability of these engineered CocE enzymes will have a profound influence on the use of this protein to combat cocaine-induced toxicity and addiction in humans.

  4. Re-analysis of radiation-induced specific locus mutations in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahamson, S.; Wolff, S.

    1976-01-01

    It is stated that a re-analysis of published data on mouse mutation rates induced by x-and gamma rays suggests that the kinetics of induction can be analysed by fitting that data to a parabolic curve. This is interpreted to mean that a substantial proportion of the induced mutations results from gross chromosomal changes such as deletions, some of which are one-track and some of which are two-track. This analysis is based on the assumption that the shape of the dose curve, which in the female is concave upward, reflects the manner in which the mutations are induced rather than representing a one-track (linear) curve whose shape has been modified by differential repair. (author)

  5. Amino-Acid Network Clique Analysis of Protein Mutation Non-Additive Effects: A Case Study of Lysozme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengming Ming

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Optimizing amino-acid mutations in enzyme design has been a very challenging task in modern bio-industrial applications. It is well known that many successful designs often hinge on extensive correlations among mutations at different sites within the enzyme, however, the underpinning mechanism for these correlations is far from clear. Here, we present a topology-based model to quantitively characterize non-additive effects between mutations. The method is based on the molecular dynamic simulations and the amino-acid network clique analysis. It examines if the two mutation sites of a double-site mutation fall into to a 3-clique structure, and associates such topological property of mutational site spatial distribution with mutation additivity features. We analyzed 13 dual mutations of T4 phage lysozyme and found that the clique-based model successfully distinguishes highly correlated or non-additive double-site mutations from those additive ones whose component mutations have less correlation. We also applied the model to protein Eglin c whose structural topology is significantly different from that of T4 phage lysozyme, and found that the model can, to some extension, still identify non-additive mutations from additive ones. Our calculations showed that mutation non-additive effects may heavily depend on a structural topology relationship between mutation sites, which can be quantitatively determined using amino-acid network k-cliques. We also showed that double-site mutation correlations can be significantly altered by exerting a third mutation, indicating that more detailed physicochemical interactions should be considered along with the network clique-based model for better understanding of this elusive mutation-correlation principle.

  6. Timing of the uv mutagenesis in yeast: a pedigree analysis of induced recessive mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, A.P.; Kilbey, B.J.

    1977-01-01

    The mechanism of uv-induced mutation in eukaryotes was studied in individual yeast cells by a procedure that combined pedigree analysis and tetrad analysis. The technique involved the induction of recessive lethals and semilethals in G1 diploid cells. Induced frequencies were 25 and 61% at survival levels of 90 and 77%, respectively. No evidence of gross chromosome aberrations was detected. Recessive mutations that affect only one strand or that affect both strands of the DNA molecule are induced much at random among a population of cells, and both types can occur within the same cell. However, the data confirm that two-strand mutations are in the majority after a low level of irradiation. The simplest explanation involves a mechanism whereby most mutations are fixed in both strands prior to the first round of post-irradiation DNA replication. The recessive mutational consequences of irradiation are exhausted at the conclusion of the first post-irradiation cell division, although dominant-lethal sectoring continues at a high level through the second post-irradiation division. It is concluded that pyrimidine dimers that persist to the second round of DNA replication are rare or ineffective

  7. The timing of UV mutagenesis in yeast: a pedigree analysis of induced recessive mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, A P; Kilbey, B J

    1977-10-01

    The mechanism of UV-induced mutation in eukaryotes was studied in individual yeast cells by a procedure that combined pedigree analysis and tetrad analysis. The technique involved the induction of recessive lethals and semilethals in G1 diploid cells. Induced frequencies were 25 and 61 percent at survival levels of 90 and 77 percent, respectively. No evidence of gross chromosome aberrations was detected. Recessive mutations that affect only one strand or that affect both strands of the DNA molecule are induced much at random among a population of cells, and both types can occur within the same cell. However, the data confirm that two-strand mutations are in the majority after a low level of irradiation. The simplest explanation involves a mechanism whereby most mutations are fixed in both strands prior to the first round of post-irradiation DNA replication. The recessive mutational consequences of irradiation are exhausted at the conclusion of the first post-irradiation cell division, although dominant-lethal sectoring continues at a high level through the second post-irradiation division. It is concluded that pyrimidine dimers that persist to the second round of DNA replication are rare or ineffective.

  8. Analysis of gene mutations in children with cholestasis of undefined etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matte, Ursula; Mourya, Reena; Miethke, Alexander; Liu, Cong; Kauffmann, Gregory; Moyer, Katie; Zhang, Kejian; Bezerra, Jorge A

    2010-10-01

    The discovery of genetic mutations in children with inherited syndromes of intrahepatic cholestasis allows for diagnostic specificity despite similar clinical phenotypes. Here, we aimed to determine whether mutation screening of target genes could assign a molecular diagnosis in children with idiopathic cholestasis. DNA samples were obtained from 51 subjects with cholestasis of undefined etiology and surveyed for mutations in the genes SERPINA1, JAG1, ATP8B1, ABCB11, and ABCB4 by a high-throughput gene chip. Then, the sequence readouts for all 5 genes were analyzed for mutations and correlated with clinical phenotypes. Healthy subjects served as controls. Sequence analysis of the genes identified 14 (or 27%) subjects with missense, nonsense, deletion, and splice site variants associated with disease phenotypes based on the type of mutation and/or biallelic involvement in the JAG1, ATP8B1, ABCB11, or ABCB4 genes. These patients had no syndromic features and could not be differentiated by biochemical markers or histopathology. Among the remaining subjects, 10 (or ∼20%) had sequence variants in ATP8B1 or ABCB11 that involved only 1 allele, 8 had variants not likely to be associated with disease phenotypes, and 19 had no variants that changed amino acid composition. Gene sequence analysis assigned a molecular diagnosis in 27% of subjects with idiopathic cholestasis based on the presence of variants likely to cause disease phenotypes.

  9. RFLP analysis of rice semi-dwarf mutation induced by high energy argon ion radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Chuxiong; Hu Weimin; Mei Mantong

    1997-01-01

    Two Indica rice varieties, Bianpizhan and Xiangzhan, and their semi-dwarf mutants induced by high energy argon ion radiation, Ar-10, and Xiang-Ar-1, were examined with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis by using 97 rice single copy genomic clones mapped on 12 chromosomes of molecular genetic map, combined with 5 restriction enzymes. Among the markers screened, 9 detected polymorphism were between Bianpizhen and Ar-10, and 11 detected polymorphism were between Xiangzhan and Xiang-Ar-1. Moreover, two or more restriction enzymes could generate RFLP patterns when screened with a given marker for several polymorphic markers. Based on the polymorphic allelic loci, the mutation frequencies were estimated as 5.15% and 6.39% for Ar-10 and Xiang-Ar-1 respectively. These results suggested that the nature of mutation on the DNA level was probably large genetic changes rather than point mutation. Genetic analysis and gene tagging of semi-dwarf mutation in one of the mutant line, Ar-10, indicated that this mutation was controlled by a major recessive gene, which was preliminary located on chromosome 4

  10. RFLP Analysis of rice semi dwarf mutation induced by high energy argon ion radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Chuxiong; Hu Weimin; Mei Mantong

    1997-01-01

    Two Indica rice varieties, Bianpizhan and Xiangzhan, and their semi dwarf mutants induced by high energy argon ion radiation, Ar 10, and Xiang Ar 1, were examined with restriction fragment length polymorphism(RFLP)analysis by using 97 rice single copy genomic clones mapped on 12 chromosomes of molecular genetic map, combined with 5 restriction enzymes.Among the markers screened, 9 detected polymorphism were between Bianpizhan and Ar 10, and 11 detected polymorphism were between Xiangzhan and Xiang Ar 1.Moreover, two or more restriction enzymes could generate RFLP patterns when screened with a given marker for several polymorphic markers. Based on the polymorphic allelic loci, the mutation frequencies were estimated as 5 15% and 6 39% for Ar 10 and Xiang Ar 1 respectively.These results suggested that the nature of mutation on the DNA level was probably large genetic changes rather than point mutation.Genetic analysis and gene tagging of semi dwarf mutation in one of the mutant line, Ar 10, indicated that this mutation was controlled by a major recessive gene, which was preliminary located on chromosome 4. (author)

  11. Analysis of the BRAFV600E mutation in 19 cases of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yuya; Guo, Ying; Arakawa, Fumiko; Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Noriaki; Koga, Yuhki; Nakashima, Kazutaka; Kurita, Daisuke; Niino, Daisuke; Seto, Masao; Ohshima, Koichi

    2017-09-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease characterized by clonal proliferation of CD1a- and CD207 (langerin)-positive dendritic cells. Mutated BRAF (p.V600E) is observed in histiocyte-related diseases and dendritic cell-related diseases, including LCH. BRAFV600E is observed in some LCH cases and is thought to be involved in maintaining MAPK activation. We retrospectively analyzed BRAFV600E in 19 patients diagnosed with LCH. In our study, direct sequencing for exon 15, a mutation hotspot, demonstrated that 4 out of the 19 patients (21%) harbored a GTG > GAG (valine > glutamic acid) base substitution, which encodes BRAFV600E. The clinical impact of BRAFV600E in such diseases is unclear. The frequency of BRAFV600E in our LCH patients from Japan was lower than that reported in the United States and in Germany. However, reports from Asia tend to show a lower rate of the BRAFV600E mutation. These results imply the possibility of different genetic backgrounds in the pathogenesis of LCH across various ethnicities. We also performed an immunohistochemical analysis to detect BRAFV600E using the mutation-specific monoclonal antibody. However, immunohistochemical analysis failed to detect any mutated protein in any of the 4 BRAFV600E-positive cases. This implies that at present, BRAFV600E should be assessed by direct sequencing. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Mutation analysis of the WFS1 gene in seven Danish Wolfram syndrome families; four new mutations identified

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Eiberg, Hans Rudolf Lytchoff; Barrett, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    loss (LFSNHL). WFS1 variants were identified in eight subjects from seven families with WS, leading to the identification of four novel mutations, Q194X (nonsense), H313Y (missense), L313fsX360 (duplication frame shift) and F883fsX951 (deletion frame shift), and four previously reported mutations, A133...

  13. Biochemical characterization of the deafness-associated mitochondrial tRNASer(UCN) A7445G mutation in osteosarcoma cell cybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaoming; Zhang, Linda S.; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Guan Minxin

    2005-01-01

    The deafness-associated A7445G mutation in the precursor of mitochondrial tRNA Ser(UCN) has been identified in several pedigrees from different ethnic backgrounds. To determine the role of nuclear background in the biochemical manifestation associated with the A7445G mutation, we performed a biochemical characterization of this mutation using cybrids constructed by transferring mitochondria from lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from a New Zealand family into human osteosarcoma mtDNA-less (ρ 0 ) cells. Compared with three control cybrids, three cybrids derived from an affected matrilineal relative carrying the homoplasmic A7445G mutation exhibited ∼38-57% decrease in the steady-state level of tRNA Ser(UCN) , which is less reduced levels than in lymphoblastoid cells in the previous study. Furthermore, ∼22% reduction in the level of aminoacylation of tRNA Ser(UCN) was observed in the mutant cybrid cells. Interestingly, ∼60-63% decrease of steady-state level of ND6 gene, which belongs to the same precursor as that of tRNA Ser(UCN) , in cybrid cell lines carrying the A7445G mutation, is more than that observed in lymphoblastoid cells. These observations strongly point out a mechanistic link between the processing defect of the tRNA Ser(UCN) precursor and decreased stability of ND6 mRNA precursor. These results also imply the influence of nuclear background on the biochemical phenotype associated with the A7445G mutation

  14. Mutation analysis of pre-mRNA splicing genes in Chinese families with retinitis pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xinyuan; Chen, Xue; Liu, Xiaoxing; Gao, Xiang; Kang, Xiaoli; Xu, Qihua; Chen, Xuejuan; Zhao, Kanxing; Zhang, Xiumei; Chu, Qiaomei; Wang, Xiuying

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Seven genes involved in precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) splicing have been implicated in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). We sought to detect mutations in all seven genes in Chinese families with RP, to characterize the relevant phenotypes, and to evaluate the prevalence of mutations in splicing genes in patients with adRP. Methods Six unrelated families from our adRP cohort (42 families) and two additional families with RP with uncertain inheritance mode were clinically characterized in the present study. Targeted sequence capture with next-generation massively parallel sequencing (NGS) was performed to screen mutations in 189 genes including all seven pre-mRNA splicing genes associated with adRP. Variants detected with NGS were filtered with bioinformatics analyses, validated with Sanger sequencing, and prioritized with pathogenicity analysis. Results Mutations in pre-mRNA splicing genes were identified in three individual families including one novel frameshift mutation in PRPF31 (p.Leu366fs*1) and two known mutations in SNRNP200 (p.Arg681His and p.Ser1087Leu). The patients carrying SNRNP200 p.R681H showed rapid disease progression, and the family carrying p.S1087L presented earlier onset ages and more severe phenotypes compared to another previously reported family with p.S1087L. In five other families, we identified mutations in other RP-related genes, including RP1 p. Ser781* (novel), RP2 p.Gln65* (novel) and p.Ile137del (novel), IMPDH1 p.Asp311Asn (recurrent), and RHO p.Pro347Leu (recurrent). Conclusions Mutations in splicing genes identified in the present and our previous study account for 9.5% in our adRP cohort, indicating the important role of pre-mRNA splicing deficiency in the etiology of adRP. Mutations in the same splicing gene, or even the same mutation, could correlate with different phenotypic severities, complicating the genotype–phenotype correlation and clinical prognosis. PMID:24940031

  15. Mutation analysis for DJ-1 in sporadic and familial parkinsonism: screening strategy in parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Li, Yuanzhe; Yoshino, Hiroyo; Mizuno, Yoshikuni; Kubo, Shin-Ichiro; Toda, Tatsushi; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2009-05-22

    DJ-1 mutations cause autosomal recessive parkinsonism (ARP). Although some reports of DJ-1 mutations have been published, there is lack of information on the prevalence of these mutations in large-scale studies of both familial and sporadic parkinsonism. In this genetic screening study, we analyzed the distribution and frequency of DJ-1 mutations by direct nucleotide sequencing of coding exons and exon-intron boundaries of DJ-1, in 386 parkin-negative parkinsonism patients (371 index cases: 67 probands of autosomal recessive parkinsonism families, 90 probands of autosomal dominant parkinsonism families, 201 patients with sporadic parkinsonism, and 13 with unknown family histories) from 12 countries (Japan 283, China 27, Taiwan 22, Korea 22, Israel 16, Turkey 5, Philippines 2, Bulgaria 2, Greece 2, Tunisia 1, USA 2, Ukraine 1, unknown 1). None had causative mutation in DJ-1, suggesting DJ-1 mutation is very rare among patients with familial and sporadic parkinsonism from Asian countries and those with other ethnic background. This is in contrast to the higher frequencies and worldwide distribution of parkin- and PINK1-related parkinsonism in ARP and sporadic parkinsonism. Thus, after obtaining clinical information, screening for mutations in (1) parkin, (2) PINK1, (3) DJ-1, (4) ATP13A2 should be conducted in that order, in ARP and sporadic parkinsonism, based on their reported frequencies. In addition, haplotype analysis should be employed to check for homozygosity of 1p36, which harbors a cluster of causative genes for ARP such as DJ-1, PINK1 and ATP13A2 in ARP and sporadic parkinsonism, especially in parkinsonism with consanguinity.

  16. Targeted next-generation sequencing analysis identifies novel mutations in families with severe familial exudative vitreoretinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao-Yan; Zhuang, Hong; Wu, Ji-Hong; Li, Jian-Kang; Hu, Fang-Yuan; Zheng, Yu; Tellier, Laurent Christian Asker M.; Zhang, Sheng-Hai; Gao, Feng-Juan; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disease, characterized by failure of vascular development of the peripheral retina. The symptoms of FEVR vary widely among patients in the same family, and even between the two eyes of a given patient. This study was designed to identify the genetic defect in a patient cohort of ten Chinese families with a definitive diagnosis of FEVR. Methods To identify the causative gene, next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based target capture sequencing was performed. Segregation analysis of the candidate variant was performed in additional family members by using Sanger sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR (QPCR). Results Of the cohort of ten FEVR families, six pathogenic variants were identified, including four novel and two known heterozygous mutations. Of the variants identified, four were missense variants, and two were novel heterozygous deletion mutations [LRP5, c.4053 DelC (p.Ile1351IlefsX88); TSPAN12, EX8Del]. The two novel heterozygous deletion mutations were not observed in the control subjects and could give rise to a relatively severe FEVR phenotype, which could be explained by the protein function prediction. Conclusions We identified two novel heterozygous deletion mutations [LRP5, c.4053 DelC (p.Ile1351IlefsX88); TSPAN12, EX8Del] using targeted NGS as a causative mutation for FEVR. These genetic deletion variations exhibit a severe form of FEVR, with tractional retinal detachments compared with other known point mutations. The data further enrich the mutation spectrum of FEVR and enhance our understanding of genotype–phenotype correlations to provide useful information for disease diagnosis, prognosis, and effective genetic counseling. PMID:28867931

  17. Mutation and polymorphism analysis of the human homogentisate 1, 2-dioxygenase gene in alkaptonuria patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán-Valero de Bernabé, D; Granadino, B; Chiarelli, I; Porfirio, B; Mayatepek, E; Aquaron, R; Moore, M M; Festen, J J; Sanmartí, R; Peñalva, M A; de Córdoba, S R

    1998-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU), a rare hereditary disorder of phenylalanine and tyrosine catabolism, was the first disease to be interpreted as an inborn error of metabolism. AKU patients are deficient for homogentisate 1,2 dioxygenase (HGO); this deficiency causes homogentisic aciduria, ochronosis, and arthritis. We cloned the human HGO gene and characterized two loss-of-function mutations, P230S and V300G, in the HGO gene in AKU patients. Here we report haplotype and mutational analysis of the HGO gene in 29 novel AKU chromosomes. We identified 12 novel mutations: 8 (E42A, W97G, D153G, S189I, I216T, R225H, F227S, and M368V) missense mutations that result in amino acid substitutions at positions conserved in HGO in different species, 1 (F10fs) frameshift mutation, 2 intronic mutations (IVS9-56G-->A, IVS9-17G-->A), and 1 splice-site mutation (IVS5+1G-->T). We also report characterization of five polymorphic sites in HGO and describe the haplotypic associations of alleles at these sites in normal and AKU chromosomes. One of these sites, HGO-3, is a variable dinucleotide repeat; IVS2+35T/A, IVS5+25T/C, and IVS6+46C/A are intronic sites at which single nucleotide substitutions (dimorphisms) have been detected; and c407T/A is a relatively frequent nucleotide substitution in the coding sequence, exon 4, resulting in an amino acid change (H80Q). These data provide insight into the origin and evolution of the various AKU alleles. PMID:9529363

  18. Mutational analysis of the cell cycle inhibitor Kip1/p27 in childhood leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markaki, E-A; Stiakaki, E; Zafiropoulos, A; Arvanitis, D A; Katzilakis, N; Dimitriou, H; Spandidos, D A; Kalmanti, M

    2006-07-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and cyclins, their regulatory subunits, govern cell-cycle progression in eukaryotic cells. Kip1/p27 is the main cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, which arrests cell division inhibiting G1-S transition. Kip1/p27 seems to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of several human malignancies and its lower expression has been shown to correlate with a poor prognosis in adult solid tumors. Bone marrow blasts from 49 children with leukemia, 37 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and 12 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were studied. Exon 3 of Kip1/p27 was amplified using the polymerase chain reaction technique (PCR). Single strand conformational polymorphism and heterodouplex analysis were performed to detect DNA sequence with altered conformations and were subsequently sequenced to document mutations. Mutations in Kip1/p27 gene were detected in 2 out of 3 T-ALL, 6 out of 12 AML patients, and only 1 out of 34 B lineage ALL cases. Although the patient groups are small, a highly significant relation of the mutation status with the type of leukemia (P = 0.0037) and the risk group according to treatment protocols (P = 0.00021) was estimated. A statistically significant difference in the white blood count was observed (P = 0.019) between the mutated and non-mutated patient groups although no statistically significant association of the mutation status with the hemoglobin and platelets values, karyotype, age, sex, disease progression, and outcome was determined. Based upon these results, the Kip1/p27 mutations should be considered for further prospective testing as an additional parameter for risk stratification and treatment of childhood leukemia. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Mutation analysis of the negative regulator cyclin G2 in gastric cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cyclin G2 is an unconventional cyclin which might have a potential negative role in carcinogenesis. In this study, the effect of cyclin G2 overexpression on gastric cell proliferation and expression levels of cyclin G2 in normal gastric cells and gastric cancer cells were investigated. Moreover, mutation analysis was performed ...

  20. USH2A mutation analysis in 70 Dutch families with Usher syndrome type II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, R.J.E.; Brinke, H. te; Weston, M.D.; Claassen, A.M.W.; Orten, D.J.; Weekamp, H.; Aarem, A. van; Huygen, P.L.M.; Deutman, A.F.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Kimberling, W.J.; Kremer, J.M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is characterised by moderate to severe high-frequency hearing impairment, progressive visual loss due to retinitis pigmentosa and intact vestibular responses. Three loci are known for USH2, however, only the gene for USH2a (USH2A) has been identified. Mutation analysis

  1. Mutational analysis of the genome-linked protein of cowpea mosaic virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carette, J.E.; Kujawa, A.; Gühl, K.; Verver, J.; Wellink, J.; Kammen, van A.

    2001-01-01

    In this study we have performed a mutational analysis of the cowpea mosaic comovirus (CPMV) genome-linked protein VPg to discern the structural requirements necessary for proper functioning of VPg. Either changing the serine residue linking VPg to RNA at a tyrosine or a threonine or changing the

  2. CLONING, EXPRESSION, AND MUTATIONAL ANALYSIS OF RAT S-ADENOSYL-1-METHIONINE: ARSENIC (III) METHYLTRANSFERASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    CLONING, EXPRESSION, AND MUTATIONAL ANALYSIS OF RAT S-ADENOSYL-L-METHIONINE: ARSENIC(III) METHYLTRANSFERASEStephen B. Waters, Ph.D., Miroslav Styblo, Ph.D., Melinda A. Beck, Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; David J. Thomas, Ph.D., U.S. Environmental...

  3. Linkage studies and mutation analysis of the PDEB gene in 23 families with Leber congenital amaurosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riess, O; Weber, B; Nørremølle, Anne

    1992-01-01

    as to whether mutations in the human PDEB gene might cause LCA. We have previously cloned and characterized the human homologue of the mouse Pdeb gene and have mapped it to chromosome 4p16.3. In this study, a total of 23 LCA families of various ethnic backgrounds have been investigated. Linkage analysis using...

  4. Interaction of tRNA with Eukaryotic Ribosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri Graifer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of currently available data concerning interactions of tRNAs with the eukaryotic ribosome at various stages of translation. These data include the results obtained by means of cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography applied to various model ribosomal complexes, site-directed cross-linking with the use of tRNA derivatives bearing chemically or photochemically reactive groups in the CCA-terminal fragment and chemical probing of 28S rRNA in the region of the peptidyl transferase center. Similarities and differences in the interactions of tRNAs with prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosomes are discussed with concomitant consideration of the extent of resemblance between molecular mechanisms of translation in eukaryotes and bacteria.

  5. New insights into thyroglobulin gene: molecular analysis of seven novel mutations associated with goiter and hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citterio, Cintia E; Machiavelli, Gloria A; Miras, Mirta B; Gruñeiro-Papendieck, Laura; Lachlan, Katherine; Sobrero, Gabriela; Chiesa, Ana; Walker, Joanna; Muñoz, Liliana; Testa, Graciela; Belforte, Fiorella S; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Rivolta, Carina M; Targovnik, Héctor M

    2013-01-30

    The thyroglobulin (TG) gene is organized in 48 exons, spanning over 270 kb on human chromosome 8q24. Up to now, 62 inactivating mutations in the TG gene have been identified in patients with congenital goiter and endemic or non-endemic simple goiter. The purpose of the present study was to identify and characterize new mutations in the TG gene. We report 13 patients from seven unrelated families with goiter, hypothyroidism and low levels of serum TG. All patients underwent clinical, biochemical and imaging evaluation. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, endonuclease restriction analysis, sequencing of DNA, genotyping, population screening, and bioinformatics studies were performed. Molecular analyses revealed seven novel inactivating TG mutations: c.378C>A [p.Y107X], c.2359C>T [p.R768X], c.2736delG [p.R893fsX946], c.3842G>A [p.C1262Y], c.5466delA [p.K1803fsX1833], c.6000C>G [p.C1981W] and c.6605C>G [p.P2183R] and three previously reported mutations: c.886C>T [p.R277X], c.6701C>A [p.A2215D] and c.7006C>T [p.R2317X]. Six patients from two families were homozygous for p.R277X mutation, four were compound heterozygous mutations (p.Y107X/p.C1262Y, p.R893fsX946/p.A2215D, p.K1803fsX1832/p.R2317X), one carried three identified mutations (p.R277X/p.C1981W-p.P2183R) together with a hypothetical micro deletion and the remaining two siblings from another family with typical phenotype had a single p.R768X mutated allele. In conclusion, our results confirm the genetic heterogeneity of TG defects and the pathophysiological importance of altered TG folding as a consequency of truncated TG proteins and missense mutations located in ACHE-like domain or that replace cysteine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mutation Analysis of Consanguineous Moroccan Patients with Parkinson’s Disease Combining Microarray and Gene Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Bouhouche

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available During the last two decades, 15 different genes have been reported to be responsible for the monogenic form of Parkinson’s disease (PD, representing a worldwide frequency of 5–10%. Among them, 10 genes have been associated with autosomal recessive PD, with PRKN and PINK1 being the most frequent. In a cohort of 145 unrelated Moroccan PD patients enrolled since 2013, 19 patients were born from a consanguineous marriage, of which 15 were isolated cases and 4 familial. One patient was homozygous for the common LRRK2 G2019S mutation and the 18 others who did not carry this mutation were screened for exon rearrangements in the PRKN gene using Affymetrix Cytoscan HD microarray. Two patients were determined homozygous for PRKN exon-deletions, while another patient presented with compound heterozygous inheritance (3/18, 17%. Two other patients showed a region of homozygosity covering the 1p36.12 locus and were sequenced for the candidate PINK1 gene, which revealed two homozygous point mutations: the known Q456X mutation in exon 7 and a novel L539F variation in exon 8. The 13 remaining patients were subjected to next-generation sequencing (NGS that targeted a panel of 22 PD-causing genes and overlapping phenotypes. NGS data showed that two unrelated consanguineous patients with juvenile-onset PD (12 and 13 years carried the same homozygous stop mutation W258X in the ATP13A2 gene, possibly resulting from a founder effect; and one patient with late onset (76 years carried a novel heterozygous frameshift mutation in SYNJ1. Clinical analysis showed that patients with the ATP13A2 mutation developed juvenile-onset PD with a severe phenotype, whereas patients having either PRKN or PINK1 mutations displayed early-onset PD with a relatively mild phenotype. By identifying pathogenic mutations in 45% (8/18 of our consanguineous Moroccan PD series, we demonstrate that the combination of chromosomal microarray analysis and NGS is a powerful approach to

  7. The m.3291T>C mt-tRNALeu(UUR) mutation is definitely pathogenic and causes multisystem mitochondrial disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarham, John W.; Blakely, Emma L.; Alston, Charlotte L.; Roberts, Mark E.; Ealing, John; Pal, Piyali; Turnbull, Douglass M.; McFarland, Robert; Taylor, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial tRNA point mutations are important causes of human disease, and have been associated with a diverse range of clinical phenotypes. Definitively proving the pathogenicity of any given mt-tRNA mutation requires combined molecular, genetic and functional studies. Subsequent evaluation of the mutation using a pathogenicity scoring system is often very helpful in concluding whether or not the mutation is causing disease. Despite several independent reports linking the m.3291T>C mutation to disease in humans, albeit in association with several different phenotypes, its pathogenicity remains controversial. A lack of conclusive functional evidence and an over-emphasis on the poor evolutionary conservation of the affected nucleotide have contributed to this controversy. Here we describe an adult patient who presented with deafness and lipomas and evidence of mitochondrial abnormalities in his muscle biopsy, who harbours the m.3291T > C mutation, providing conclusive evidence of pathogenicity through analysis of mutation segregation with cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency in single muscle fibres, underlining the importance of performing functional studies when assessing pathogenicity. PMID:23273904

  8. Molecular analysis of formaldehyde-induced mutations in human lymphoblasts and E. coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosby, R.M.; Richardson, K.K.; Craft, T.R.; Benforado, K.B.; Liber, H.L.; Skopek, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    The molecular nature of formaldehyde (HCHO)-induced mutations was studied in both human lymphoblasts and E. coli. Thirty HPRT - human lymphoblast colonies induced by eight repetitive 150 μM HCHO treatments were characterized by Southern blot analysis. Fourteen of these mutants (47%) had visible deletions of some or all of the X-linked HPRT bands, indicating that HCHO can induce large losses of DNA in human lymphoblasts. In E. coli., DNA alterations induced by HCHO were characterized with use of the xanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (gpt) gene as the genetic target. Exposure of E. coli to 4 mM HCHO for 1 hr induced large insertions (41%), large deletions (18%), and point mutations (41%). Dideoxy DNA sequencing revealed that most of the point mutations were transversions at GC base pairs. In contrast, exposure of E. coli to 40 mM HCHO for 1 hr produced 92% point mutations, 62% of which were transitions at a single AT base pair in the gene. Therefore, HCHO is capable of producing different genetic alterations in E. coli at different concentrations, suggesting fundamental differences in the mutagenic mechanisms operating at the two concentrations used. Naked pSV2gpt plasmid DNA was exposed to 3.3 or 10 mM HCHO and transformed into E. coli. Most of the resulting mutations were frameshifts, again suggesting a different mutagenic mechanism

  9. [Analysis of H63D mutation in hemochromatosis (HFE) gene in populations of central Eurasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khusainova, R I; Khusnutdinova, N N; Litvinov, S S; Khusnutdinova, E K

    2013-02-01

    An analysis of the frequency of H63D (c. 187C>G) mutations in the HFEgene in 19 populations from Central Eurasia demonstrated that the distribution of the mutation in the region of interest was not uniform and that there were the areas of H63D accumulation. The investigation of three polymorphic variants, c.340+4T>C (rs2071303, IVS2(+4)T>C), c.893-44T>C (rs1800708, IVS4(-44)T>C), and c.1007-47G>A (rs1572982, IVS5(-47)A>G), in the HFE gene in individuals homozygous for H63D mutations in the HFE gene revealed the linkage of H63D with three haplotypes, *CTA, *TG, and *TTA. These findings indicated the partial spread of the mutation in Central Eurasia from Western Europe, as well as the possible repeated appearance of the mutation on the territory on interest.

  10. Screening of mutations affecting protein stability and dynamics of FGFR1—A simulation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. George Priya Doss

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Single amino acid substitutions in Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 (FGFR1 destabilize protein and have been implicated in several genetic disorders like various forms of cancer, Kallamann syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome, Jackson Weiss syndrome, etc. In order to gain functional insight into mutation caused by amino acid substitution to protein function and expression, special emphasis was laid on molecular dynamics simulation techniques in combination with in silico tools such as SIFT, PolyPhen 2.0, I-Mutant 3.0 and SNAP. It has been estimated that 68% nsSNPs were predicted to be deleterious by I-Mutant, slightly higher than SIFT (37%, PolyPhen 2.0 (61% and SNAP (58%. From the observed results, P722S mutation was found to be most deleterious by comparing results of all in silico tools. By molecular dynamics approach, we have shown that P722S mutation leads to increase in flexibility, and deviated more from the native structure which was supported by the decrease in the number of hydrogen bonds. In addition, biophysical analysis revealed a clear insight of stability loss due to P722S mutation in FGFR1 protein. Majority of mutations predicted by these in silico tools were in good concordance with the experimental results.

  11. Prognostic Value of RUNX1 Mutations in AML: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalili, Mahdi; Yaghmaie, Marjan; Ahmadvand, Mohammad; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Mousavi, Seyed Asadollah; Vaezi, Mohammad; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2018-02-26

    The RUNX1 (AML1) gene is a relatively infrequent mutational target in cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Previous work indicated that RUNX1 mutations can have pathological and prognostic implications. To evaluate prognostic value, we conducted a meta-analysis of 4 previous published works with data for survival according to RUNX1 mutation status. Pooled hazard ratios for overall survival and disease-free survival were 1.55 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.11–2.15; p-value = 0.01) and 1.76 (95% CI = 1.24–2.52; p-value = 0.002), respectively, for cases positive for RUNX1 mutations. This evidence supports clinical implications of RUNX1 mutations in the development and progression of AML cases and points to the possibility of a distinct category within the newer WHO classification. Though it must be kept in mind that the present work was based on data extracted from observational studies, the findings suggest that the RUNX1 status can contribute to risk-stratification and decision-making in management of AML. Creative Commons Attribution License

  12. Systematic Analysis Reveals that Cancer Mutations Converge on Deregulated Metabolism of Arachidonate and Xenobiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Gatto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mutations are the basis of the clonal evolution of most cancers. Nevertheless, a systematic analysis of whether mutations are selected in cancer because they lead to the deregulation of specific biological processes independent of the type of cancer is still lacking. In this study, we correlated the genome and transcriptome of 1,082 tumors. We found that nine commonly mutated genes correlated with substantial changes in gene expression, which primarily converged on metabolism. Further network analyses circumscribed the convergence to a network of reactions, termed AraX, that involves the glutathione- and oxygen-mediated metabolism of arachidonic acid and xenobiotics. In an independent cohort of 4,462 samples, all nine mutated genes were consistently correlated with the deregulation of AraX. Among all of the metabolic pathways, AraX deregulation represented the strongest predictor of patient survival. These findings suggest that oncogenic mutations drive a selection process that converges on the deregulation of the AraX network.

  13. Genetic mutation analysis of human gastric adenocarcinomas using ion torrent sequencing platform.

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    Zhi Xu

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is the one of the major causes of cancer-related death, especially in Asia. Gastric adenocarcinoma, the most common type of gastric cancer, is heterogeneous and its incidence and cause varies widely with geographical regions, gender, ethnicity, and diet. Since unique mutations have been observed in individual human cancer samples, identification and characterization of the molecular alterations underlying individual gastric adenocarcinomas is a critical step for developing more effective, personalized therapies. Until recently, identifying genetic mutations on an individual basis by DNA sequencing remained a daunting task. Recent advances in new next-generation DNA sequencing technologies, such as the semiconductor-based Ion Torrent sequencing platform, makes DNA sequencing cheaper, faster, and more reliable. In this study, we aim to identify genetic mutations in the genes which are targeted by drugs in clinical use or are under development in individual human gastric adenocarcinoma samples using Ion Torrent sequencing. We sequenced 737 loci from 45 cancer-related genes in 238 human gastric adenocarcinoma samples using the Ion Torrent Ampliseq Cancer Panel. The sequencing analysis revealed a high occurrence of mutations along the TP53 locus (9.7% in our sample set. Thus, this study indicates the utility of a cost and time efficient tool such as Ion Torrent sequencing to screen cancer mutations for the development of personalized cancer therapy.

  14. [Analysis of USH2A gene mutation in a Chinese family affected with Usher syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengcheng; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Mingchang; Wang, Qiufen; Liu, Mugen

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the disease-causing mutation in a Chinese family affected with Usher syndrome type II. All of the 11 members from the family underwent comprehensive ophthalmologic examination and hearing test, and their genomic DNA were isolated from venous leukocytes. PCR and direct sequencing of USH2A gene were performed for the proband. Wild type and mutant type minigene vectors containing exon 42, intron 42 and exon 43 of the USH2A gene were constructed and transfected into Hela cells by lipofectamine reagent. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was carried out to verify the splicing of the minigenes. Pedigree analysis and clinical diagnosis indicated that the patients have suffered from autosomal recessive Usher syndrome type II. DNA sequencing has detected a homozygous c.8559-2A>G mutation of the USH2A gene in the proband, which has co-segregated with the disease in the family. The mutation has affected a conserved splice site in intron 42, which has led to inactivation of the splice site. Minigene experiment has confirmed the retaining of intron 42 in mature mRNA. The c.8559-2A>G mutation in the USH2A gene probably underlies the Usher syndrome type II in this family. The splice site mutation has resulted in abnormal splicing of USH2A pre-mRNA.

  15. Identification of Missense Mutation (I12T in the BSND Gene and Bioinformatics Analysis

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    Hina Iqbal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsyndromic hearing loss is a paradigm of genetic heterogeneity with 85 loci and 39 nuclear disease genes reported so far. Mutations of BSND have been shown to cause Bartter syndrome type IV, characterized by significant renal abnormalities and deafness and nonsyndromic nearing loss. We studied a Pakistani consanguineous family. Clinical examinations of affected individuals did not reveal the presence of any associated signs, which are hallmarks of the Bartter syndrome type IV. Linkage analysis identified an area of 18.36 Mb shared by all affected individuals between markers D1S2706 and D1S1596. A maximum two-point LOD score of 2.55 with markers D1S2700 and multipoint LOD score of 3.42 with marker D1S1661 were obtained. BSND mutation, that is, p.I12T, cosegregated in all extant members of our pedigree. BSND mutations can cause nonsyndromic hearing loss, and it is a second report for this mutation. The respected protein, that is, BSND, was first modeled, and then, the identified mutation was further analyzed by using different bioinformatics tools; finally, this protein and its mutant was docked with CLCNKB and REN, interactions of BSND, respectively.

  16. Molecular genetic mutation analysis in Menkes-disease with prenatal diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    László, Aranka; Endreffy, Emoke; Tümer, Zeynep

    2010-01-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is an X-linked recessive multisystemic lethal, heredodegenerative disorder. Progressive neurodegeneration and connective tissue disturbances with microscopically kinky hair are the main symptoms. Molecular genetic mutation analysis was made at a Hungarian male infant suffering...... from MD and prenatal diagnosis was done in this MD loaded family. METHOD: The 12th exon of ATP7A gene has been analyzed by dideoxy-finger printing (DDF), polymerase chain reaction (PCR), direct sequencing of exon 12. The specific mutation was screened from chorionic villi of the maternal aunt at the 14......th gestational week. RESULTS: In the exon 12th a basic pair substitution with Arg 844 His change was detected leading to very severe fatal missense mutation....

  17. BRCA1/2 mutation analysis in 41 ovarian cell lines reveals only one functionally deleterious BRCA1 mutation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stordal, Britta

    2013-06-01

    Mutations in BRCA1\\/2 increase the risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. Germline BRCA1\\/2 mutations occur in 8.6-13.7% of unselected epithelial ovarian cancers, somatic mutations are also frequent. BRCA1\\/2 mutated or dysfunctional cells may be sensitive to PARP inhibition by synthetic lethality. The aim of this study is to comprehensively characterise the BRCA1\\/2 status of a large panel of ovarian cancer cell lines available to the research community to assist in biomarker studies of novel drugs and in particular of PARP inhibitors. The BRCA1\\/2 genes were sequenced in 41 ovarian cell lines, mRNA expression of BRCA1\\/2 and gene methylation status of BRCA1 was also examined. The cytotoxicity of PARP inhibitors olaparib and veliparib was examined in 20 cell lines. The cell line SNU-251 has a deleterious BRCA1 mutation at 5564G > A, and is the only deleterious BRCA1\\/2 mutant in the panel. Two cell lines (UPN-251 and PEO1) had deleterious mutations as well as additional reversion mutations that restored the protein functionality. Heterozygous mutations in BRCA1\\/2 were relatively common, found in 14.6% of cell lines. BRCA1 was methylated in two cell lines (OVCAR8, A1847) and there was a corresponding decrease in gene expression. The BRCA1 methylated cell lines were more sensitive to PARP inhibition than wild-type cells. The SNU-251 deleterious mutant was more sensitive to PARP inhibition, but only in a long-term exposure to correct for its slow growth rate. Cell lines derived from metastatic disease are significantly more resistant to veliparib (2.0 fold p = 0.03) compared to those derived from primary tumours. Resistance to olaparib and veliparib was correlated Pearsons-R 0.5393, p = 0.0311. The incidence of BRCA1\\/2 deleterious mutations 1\\/41 cell lines derived from 33 different patients (3.0%) is much lower than the population incidence. The reversion mutations and high frequency of heterozygous mutations suggest that there is a selective

  18. Mutation analysis of the NSD1 gene in patients with autism spectrum disorders and macrocephaly

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    Delorme Richard

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth syndrome characterized by macrocephaly, advanced bone age, characteristic facial features, and learning disabilities, caused by mutations or deletions of the NSD1 gene, located at 5q35. Sotos syndrome has been described in a number of patients with autism spectrum disorders, suggesting that NSD1 could be involved in other cases of autism and macrocephaly. Methods We screened the NSD1 gene for mutations and deletions in 88 patients with autism spectrum disorders and macrocephaly (head circumference 2 standard deviations or more above the mean. Mutation analysis was performed by direct sequencing of all exons and flanking regions. Dosage analysis of NSD1 was carried out using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Results We identified three missense variants (R604L, S822C and E1499G in one patient each, but none is within a functional domain. In addition, segregation analysis showed that all variants were inherited from healthy parents and in two cases were also present in unaffected siblings, indicating that they are probably nonpathogenic. No partial or whole gene deletions/duplications were observed. Conclusion Our findings suggest that Sotos syndrome is a rare cause of autism spectrum disorders and that screening for NSD1 mutations and deletions in patients with autism and macrocephaly is not warranted in the absence of other features of Sotos syndrome.

  19. Knowledge-based analysis of functional impacts of mutations in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-28

    Sep 28, 2015 ... MicroRNAs are a class of important post-transcriptional regulators. ... In the analysis of a SNP in the seed region of hsa-miR-96 ... pathway' and 'Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling pathway' were significantly and ...

  20. Novel C16orf57 mutations in patients with Poikiloderma with Neutropenia: bioinformatic analysis of the protein and predicted effects of all reported mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colombo Elisa A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poikiloderma with Neutropenia (PN is a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis caused by C16orf57 mutations. To date 17 mutations have been identified in 31 PN patients. Results We characterize six PN patients expanding the clinical phenotype of the syndrome and the mutational repertoire of the gene. We detect the two novel C16orf57 mutations, c.232C>T and c.265+2T>G, as well as the already reported c.179delC, c.531delA and c.693+1G>T mutations. cDNA analysis evidences the presence of aberrant transcripts, and bioinformatic prediction of C16orf57 protein structure gauges the mutations effects on the folded protein chain. Computational analysis of the C16orf57 protein shows two conserved H-X-S/T-X tetrapeptide motifs marking the active site of a two-fold pseudosymmetric structure recalling the 2H phosphoesterase superfamily. Based on this model C16orf57 is likely a 2H-active site enzyme functioning in RNA processing, as a presumptive RNA ligase. According to bioinformatic prediction, all known C16orf57 mutations, including the novel mutations herein described, impair the protein structure by either removing one or both tetrapeptide motifs or by destroying the symmetry of the native folding. Finally, we analyse the geographical distribution of the recurrent mutations that depicts clusters featuring a founder effect. Conclusions In cohorts of patients clinically affected by genodermatoses with overlapping symptoms, the molecular screening of C16orf57 gene seems the proper way to address the correct diagnosis of PN, enabling the syndrome-specific oncosurveillance. The bioinformatic prediction of the C16orf57 protein structure denotes a very basic enzymatic function consistent with a housekeeping function. Detection of aberrant transcripts, also in cells from PN patients carrying early truncated mutations, suggests they might be translatable. Tissue-specific sensitivity to the lack of functionally correct protein accounts for the

  1. Characteristics and mutation analysis of Ph-positive leukemia patients with T315I mutation receiving tyrosine kinase inhibitors

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    Xu PP

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Peipei Xu,1 Dan Guo,2 Xiaoyan Shao,1 Miaoxin Peng,1 Bing Chen2 1Department of Hematology, Drum Tower Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, 2Department of Hematology, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital Clinical College of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Background: TKIs are the first-line treatment for patients with Ph-positive (Ph+ leukemia. However, drug resistance is frequently observed, mainly due to mutations within the breakpoint cluster region-Abelson leukemia virus (BCR-ABL kinase domain. The T315I substitution confers complete resistance to TKIs. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical characteristics of 17 patients with T315I mutation after TKI treatment and provide a basis for prognosis.Patients and methods: The clinical data of 17 TKI-resistant Ph+ leukemia patients who were found to have a ABL kinase domain mutation from September 2008 to January 2017 were collected. Karyotypes and BCR-ABL fusion gene were analyzed by R-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization, respectively. Total RNA was extracted by TRIzol reagent, and the ABL kinase domain mutation was detected by direct sequencing.Results: A total of 17 patients reached effective remission including major molecular response and complete cytogenetic response. However, all the patients subsequently developed a T315I mutation after treatment with TKIs. The rate of the BCR-ABL fusion gene in most of the patients who developed the T315I mutation was significantly higher than that before the mutation. At initial diagnosis, patients average platelet count was 149.7×109/L, whereas the average platelet count was only 53.88×109/L after the T315I mutation (P<0.01. The results also showed that the survival time of patients with a high proportion of blast cells or a high number of white blood cells was obviously shortened.Conclusion: Patients platelet count decreased when detected with the T315I mutation compared with the initial

  2. Evaluation and identification of factors related to KRAS and BRAF gene mutations in colorectal cancer: A meta-analysis

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    Li Lin

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The meta-analysis reveals that KRAS has a slightly higher mutation rate in MSI-L/MSS tumors. Moreover, BRAF mutations have higher detection rates in right-sided colorectal cancer, which suggests that BRAF mutations are likely in CIMP-H tumors. Therefore, based on these findings, the molecular diagnostic tests to be conducted in colorectal cancer patients can be determined according to the location/clinical features of the tumor.

  3. [Analysis of gene mutation of early onset epileptic spasm with unknown reason].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X; Pan, G; Li, W H; Zhang, L M; Wu, B B; Wang, H J; Zhang, P; Zhou, S Z

    2017-11-02

    Objective: To summarize the gene mutation of early onset epileptic spasm with unknown reason. Method: In this prospective study, data of patients with early onset epileptic spasm with unknown reason were collected from neurological department of Children's Hospital of Fudan University between March 2016 and December 2016. Patients with known disorders such as infection, metabolic, structural, immunological problems and known genetic mutations were excluded. Patients with genetic disease that can be diagnosed by clinical manifestations and phenotypic characteristics were also excluded. Genetic research methods included nervous system panel containing 1 427 epilepsy genes, whole exome sequencing (WES), analysis of copy number variation (CNV) and karyotype analysis of chromosome. The basic information, phenotypes, genetic results and the antiepileptic treatment of patients were analyzed. Result: Nine of the 17 cases with early onset epileptic spasm were boys and eight were girls. Patients' age at first seizure onset ranged from 1 day after birth to 8 months (median age of 3 months). The first hospital visit age ranged from 1 month to 2 years (median age of 4.5 months). The time of following-up ranged from 8 months to 3 years and 10 months. All the 17 patients had early onset epileptic spasm. Video electroencephalogram was used to monitor the spasm seizure. Five patients had Ohtahara syndrome, 10 had West syndrome, two had unclear classification. In 17 cases, 10 of them had detected pathogenic genes. Nine cases had point mutations, involving SCN2A, ARX, UNC80, KCNQ2, and GABRB3. Except one case of mutations in GABRB3 gene have been reported, all the other cases had new mutations. One patient had deletion mutation in CDKL5 gene. One CNV case had 6q 22.31 5.5MB repeats. Ten cases out of 17 were using 2-3 antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and the drugs had no effect. Seven cases used adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and prednisone besides AEDs (a total course for 8 weeks

  4. Occult HBV among Anti-HBc Alone: Mutation Analysis of an HBV Surface Gene and Pre-S Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myeong Hee; Kang, So Young; Lee, Woo In

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the molecular characteristics of occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in 'anti-HBc alone' subjects. Twenty-four patients with 'anti-HBc alone' and 20 control patients diagnosed with HBV were analyzed regarding S and pre-S gene mutations. All specimens were analyzed for HBs Ag, anti-HBc, and anti-HBs. For specimens with an anti-HBc alone, quantitative analysis of HBV DNA, as well as sequencing and mutation analysis of S and pre-S genes, were performed. A total 24 were analyzed for the S gene, and 14 were analyzed for the pre-S gene through sequencing. A total of 20 control patients were analyzed for S and pre-S gene simultaneously. Nineteen point mutations of the major hydrophilic region were found in six of 24 patients. Among them, three mutations, S114T, P127S/T, M133T, were detected in common. Only one mutation was found in five subjects of the control group; this mutation was not found in the occult HBV infection group, however. Pre-S mutations were detected in 10 patients, and mutations of site aa58-aa100 were detected in 9 patients. A mutation on D114E was simultaneously detected. Although five mutations from the control group were found at the same location (aa58-aa100), no mutations of occult HBV infection were detected. The prevalence of occult HBV infection is not low among 'anti-HBc alone' subjects. Variable mutations in the S gene and pre-S gene were associated with the occurrence of occult HBV infection. Further larger scale studies are required to determine the significance of newly detected mutations. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2017

  5. Fragment length analysis screening for detection of CEBPA mutations in intermediate-risk karyotype acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster, Oscar; Barragán, Eva; Bolufer, Pascual; Such, Esperanza; Valencia, Ana; Ibáñez, Mariam; Dolz, Sandra; de Juan, Inmaculada; Jiménez, Antonio; Gómez, Maria Teresa; Buño, Ismael; Martínez, Joaquín; Cervera, José; Montesinos, Pau; Moscardó, Federico; Sanz, Miguel Ángel

    2012-01-01

    During last years, molecular markers have been increased as prognostic factors routinely screened in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recently, an increasing interest has been reported in introducing to clinical practice screening for mutations in the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (CEBPA) gene in AML, as it seems to be a good prognostic factor. However, there is no reliable established method for assessing CEBPA mutations during the diagnostic work-up of AMLs. We describe here a straightforward and reliable fragment analysis method based in PCR capillary electrophoresis (PCR-CE) for screening of CEBPA mutations; moreover, we present the results obtained in 151 intermediate-risk karyotype AML patients (aged 16-80 years). The method gave a specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 93% with a lower detection limit of 1-5% for CEBPA mutations. The series found 19 mutations and four polymorphisms in 12 patients, seven of whom (58%) presented two mutations. The overall frequency of CEBPA mutations in AML was 8% (n = 12). CEBPA mutations showed no coincidence with FLT3-ITD or NPM1 mutations. CEBPA mutation predicted better disease-free survival in the group of patients without FLT3-ITD, NPM, or both genes mutated (HR 3.6, IC 95%; 1.0-13.2, p = 0.05) and better overall survival in patients younger than 65 of this group without molecular markers (HR 4.0, IC 95%; 1.0-17.4, p = 0.05). In conclusion, the fragment analysis method based in PCR-CE is a rapid, specific, and sensitive method for CEBPA mutation screening and our results confirm that CEBPA mutations can identify a subgroup of patients with favorable prognosis in AML with intermediate-risk karyotype.

  6. Analysis of mutations in the human HPRT gene induced by accelerated heavy-ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagawa, Yasuhiro; Yatagai, Fumio; Hanaoka, Fumio; Suzuki, Masao; Kase, Youko; Kobayashi, Akiko; Hirano, Masahiko; Kato, Takesi; Watanabe, Masami.

    1995-01-01

    Multiplex PCR analysis of HPRT(-) mutations in human embryo (HE) cells induced by 230 keV/μm carbon-ion irradiation showed no large deletion around the exon regions of the locus gene in contrast to the irradiations at different LETs. To identify these mutations, the sequence alterations in a cDNA of hprt gene were determined for 18 mutant clones in this study. Missing of exon 6 was the most frequent mutational event (10 clones), and missing of both exons 6 and 8 was next most frequent event (6 clones), then base substitutions (2 clones). These characteristics were not seen in a similar analysis of spontaneous mutations, which showed base substitution (5 clones), frameshift (2 clones), missing of both exons 2 and 3 (2 clones), and a single unidentified clone. Direct sequencing and restriction enzyme digestion of the genomic DNA of the mutants which showed missing of exons 6 and 8 in the cDNA, supports the possibility that they were induced by aberrant mRNA splicing. (author)

  7. DNA microarray analysis of fim mutations in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Ussery, David; Workman, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion is often mediated by complex polymeric surface structures referred to as fimbriae. Type I fimbriae of Escherichia coli represent the archetypical and best characterised fimbrial system. These adhesive organelles mediate binding to D-mannose and are directly associated...... we have used DNA microarray analysis to examine the molecular events involved in response to fimbrial gene expression in E. coli K-12. Observed differential expression levels of the fim genes were in good agreement with our current knowledge of the stoichiometry of type I fimbriae. Changes in fim...

  8. Mutational analysis of circulating tumor cells from colorectal cancer patients and correlation with primary tumor tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lyberopoulou

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs provide a non-invasive accessible source of tumor material from patients with cancer. The cellular heterogeneity within CTC populations is of great clinical importance regarding the increasing number of adjuvant treatment options for patients with metastatic carcinomas, in order to eliminate residual disease. Moreover, the molecular profiling of these rare cells might lead to insight on disease progression and therapeutic strategies than simple CTCs counting. In the present study we investigated the feasibility to detect KRAS, BRAF, CD133 and Plastin3 (PLS3 mutations in an enriched CTCs cell suspension from patients with colorectal cancer, with the hypothesis that these genes` mutations are of great importance regarding the generation of CTCs subpopulations. Subsequently, we compared CTCs mutational status with that of the corresponding primary tumor, in order to access the possibility of tumor cells characterization without biopsy. CTCs were detected and isolated from blood drawn from 52 colorectal cancer (CRC patients using a quantum-dot-labelled magnetic immunoassay method. Mutations were detected by PCR-RFLP or allele-specific PCR and confirmed by direct sequencing. In 52 patients, discordance between primary tumor and CTCs was 5.77% for KRAS, 3.85% for BRAF, 11.54% for CD133 rs3130, 7.69% for CD133 rs2286455 and 11.54% for PLS3 rs6643869 mutations. Our results support that DNA mutational analysis of CTCs may enable non-invasive, specific biomarker diagnostics and expand the scope of personalized medicine for cancer patients.

  9. Analysis of HFE gene mutations and HLA-A alleles in Brazilian patients with iron overload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Delfini Cançado

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Hemochromatosis is a common inherited disorder of iron metabolism and one of the most important causes of iron overload. The objective was to analyze the presence of C282Y, H63D and S65C mutations in the HFE gene and HLA-A alleles for a group of Brazilian patients with iron overload, and to correlate genotype with clinical and laboratory variables. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective study, in Discipline of Hematology and Oncology, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas da Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo. METHODS: We studied 35 patients with iron overload seen at our outpatient unit between January 2001 and December 2003. Fasting levels of serum iron and ferritin, and total iron-binding capacity, were assayed using standard techniques. Determinations of C282Y, H63D and S65C mutations in the HFE gene and of HLA-A alleles were performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. RESULTS: Twenty-six out of 35 patients (74% presented at least one of the HFE gene mutations analyzed. Among these, five (14% were C282Y/C282Y, four (11% C282Y/H63D, one (3% H63D/H63D, six (17% C282Y/WT and ten (29% H63D/WT. No patients had the S65C mutation and nine (25% did not present any of the three HFE mutations. Four out of five patients with C282Y/C282Y genotype (80% and three out of four patients with C282Y/H63D genotype (75% were HLA A*03. CONCLUSION: Analysis of HFE gene mutations constitutes an important procedure in identifying patients with hereditary hemochromatosis, particularly for patients with iron overload.

  10. In silico analysis of a novel MKRN3 missense mutation in familial central precocious puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neocleous, Vassos; Shammas, Christos; Phelan, Marie M; Nicolaou, Stella; Phylactou, Leonidas A; Skordis, Nicos

    2016-01-01

    The onset of puberty is influenced by the interplay of stimulating and restraining factors, many of which have a genetic origin. Premature activation of the GnRH secretion in central precocious puberty (CPP) may arise either from gain-of-function mutations of the KISS1 and KISS1R genes or from loss-of-function manner mutations of the MKRN3 gene leading to MKRN3 deficiency. To explore the genetic causes responsible for CPP and the potential role of the RING finger protein 3 (MKRN3) gene. We investigated potential sequence variations in the intronless MKRN3 gene by Sanger sequencing of the entire 507 amino acid coding region of exon 1 in a family with two affected girls presented with CPP at the age of 6 and 5·7 years, respectively. A novel heterozygous g.Gly312Asp missense mutation in the MKRN3 gene was identified in these siblings. The imprinted MKRN3 missense mutation was also identified as expected in the unaffected father and followed as expected an imprinted mode of inheritance. In silico analysis of the altered missense variant using the computational algorithms Polyphen2, SIFT and Mutation Taster predicted a damage and pathogenic alteration causing CPP. The pathogenicity of the alteration at the protein level via an in silico structural model is also explored. A novel mutation in the MKRN3 gene in two sisters with CPP was identified, supporting the fundamental role of this gene in the suppression of the hypothalamic GnRH neurons. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Alagille syndrome in a Vietnamese cohort: mutation analysis and assessment of facial features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Henry C; Le Hoang, Phuc; Hutchinson, Anne; Chao, Grace; Gerfen, Jennifer; Loomes, Kathleen M; Krantz, Ian; Kamath, Binita M; Spinner, Nancy B

    2012-05-01

    Alagille syndrome (ALGS, OMIM #118450) is an autosomal dominant disorder that affects multiple organ systems including the liver, heart, eyes, vertebrae, and face. ALGS is caused by mutations in one of two genes in the Notch Signaling Pathway, Jagged1 (JAG1) or NOTCH2. In this study, analysis of 21 Vietnamese ALGS individuals led to the identification of 19 different mutations (18 JAG1 and 1 NOTCH2), 17 of which are novel, including the third reported NOTCH2 mutation in Alagille Syndrome. The spectrum of JAG1 mutations in the Vietnamese patients is similar to that previously reported, including nine frameshift, three missense, two splice site, one nonsense, two whole gene, and one partial gene deletion. The missense mutations are all likely to be disease causing, as two are loss of cysteines (C22R and C78G) and the third creates a cryptic splice site in exon 9 (G386R). No correlation between genotype and phenotype was observed. Assessment of clinical phenotype revealed that skeletal manifestations occur with a higher frequency than in previously reported Alagille cohorts. Facial features were difficult to assess and a Vietnamese pediatric gastroenterologist was only able to identify the facial phenotype in 61% of the cohort. To assess the agreement among North American dysmorphologists at detecting the presence of ALGS facial features in the Vietnamese patients, 37 clinical dysmorphologists evaluated a photographic panel of 20 Vietnamese children with and without ALGS. The dysmorphologists were unable to identify the individuals with ALGS in the majority of cases, suggesting that evaluation of facial features should not be used in the diagnosis of ALGS in this population. This is the first report of mutations and phenotypic spectrum of ALGS in a Vietnamese population. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Affinity labeling of Escherichia coli phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase at the binding site for tRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hountondji, C.; Schmitter, J.M.; Beauvallet, C.; Blanquet, S.

    1987-01-01

    Periodate-oxidized tRNA/sup Phe/ (tRNA/sub ox//sup Phe/) behaves as a specific affinity label of tetrameric Escherichia coli phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (PheRS). Reaction of the α 2 β 2 enzyme with tRNA/sub ox//sup Phe/ results in the loss of tRNA/sup Phe/ aminoacylation activity with covalent attachment of 2 mol of tRNA dialdehyde/mol of enzyme, in agreement with the stoichiometry of tRNA binding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the PheRS-[ 14 C]tRNA/sub ox//sup Phe/ covalent complex indicates that the large (α, M/sub r/ 87K) subunit of the enzyme interacts with the 3'-adenosine of tRNA/sub ox//sup Phe/. The [ 14 C]tRNA-labeled chymotryptic peptides of PheRS were purified by both gel filtration and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The radioactivity was almost equally distributed among three peptides: Met-Lys[Ado]-Phe, Ala-Asp-Lys[Ado]-Leu, and Lys-Ile-Lys[Ado]-Ala. These sequences correspond to residues 1-3, 59-62, and 104-107, respectively, in the N-terminal region of the 795 amino acid sequence of the α subunit. It is noticeable that the labeled peptide Ala-Asp-Lys-Leu is adjacent to residues 63-66 (Arg-Val-Thr-Lys). The latter sequence was just predicted to resemble the proposed consensus tRNA CCA binding region Lys-Met-Ser-Lys-Ser, as deduced from previous affinity labeling studies on E. coli methionyl- and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases

  13. Diversity, Mutation and Recombination Analysis of Cotton Leaf Curl Geminiviruses.

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    Huma Saleem

    Full Text Available The spread of cotton leaf curl disease in China, India and Pakistan is a recent phenomenon. Analysis of available sequence data determined that there is a substantial diversity of cotton-infecting geminiviruses in Pakistan. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that recombination between two major groups of viruses, cotton leaf curl Multan virus (CLCuMuV and cotton leaf curl Kokhran virus (CLCuKoV, led to the emergence of several new viruses. Recombination detection programs and phylogenetic analyses showed that CLCuMuV and CLCuKoV are highly recombinant viruses. Indeed, CLCuKoV appeared to be a major donor virus for the coat protein (CP gene, while CLCuMuV donated the Rep gene in the majority of recombination events. Using recombination free nucleotide datasets the substitution rates for CP and Rep genes were determined. We inferred similar nucleotide substitution rates for the CLCuMuV-Rep gene (4.96X10-4 and CLCuKoV-CP gene (2.706X10-4, whereas relatively higher substitution rates were observed for CLCuMuV-CP and CLCuKoV-Rep genes. The combination of sequences with equal and relatively low substitution rates, seemed to result in the emergence of viral isolates that caused epidemics in Pakistan and India. Our findings also suggest that CLCuMuV is spreading at an alarming rate, which can potentially be a threat to cotton production in the Indian subcontinent.

  14. Clinical and mutation analysis of 51 probands with anophthalmia and/or severe microphthalmia from a single center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerth-Kahlert, Christina; Williamson, Kathleen; Ansari, Morad; Rainger, Jacqueline K; Hingst, Volker; Zimmermann, Theodor; Tech, Stefani; Guthoff, Rudolf F; van Heyningen, Veronica; FitzPatrick, David R

    2013-01-01

    Clinical evaluation and mutation analysis was performed in 51 consecutive probands with severe eye malformations – anophthalmia and/or severe microphthalmia – seen in a single specialist ophthalmology center. The mutation analysis consisted of bidirectional sequencing of the coding regions of SOX2, OTX2, PAX6 (paired domain), STRA6, BMP4, SMOC1, FOXE3, and RAX, and genome-wide array-based copy number assessment. Fifteen (29.4%) of the 51 probands had likely causative mutations affecting SOX2 (9/51), OTX2 (5/51), and STRA6 (1/51). Of the cases with bilateral anophthalmia, 9/12 (75%) were found to be mutation positive. Three of these mutations were large genomic deletions encompassing SOX2 (one case) or OTX2 (two cases). Familial inheritance of three intragenic, plausibly pathogenic, and heterozygous mutations was observed. An unaffected carrier parent of an affected child with an identified OTX2 mutation confirmed the previously reported nonpenetrance for this disorder. Two families with SOX2 mutations demonstrated a parent and child both with significant but highly variable eye malformations. Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in SOX2 and OTX2 are the most common genetic pathology associated with severe eye malformations and bi-allelic loss-of-function in STRA6 is confirmed as an emerging cause of nonsyndromal eye malformations. PMID:24498598

  15. Identification of Mutation of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehy-drogenase (G6PD) in Iran: Meta- analysis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Nekoei-Moghadam, Mahmood; Aliram-Zany, Maryam; Amiresmaili, Mohammadreza

    2013-09-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase is one of the most common genetic deficiencies, which approximately 400 million people in the world suffer from. According to authors' initial search, numerous studies have been carried out in Iran regarding molecular variants of this enzyme. Thus, this meta-analysis presented a reliable estimation about prevalence of different types of molecular mutations of G6PD Enzyme in Iran. Keywords "glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase or G6PD, Mediterranean or Chatham or Cosenza and mutation, Iran or Iranian and their Persian equivalents" were searched in different databases. Moreover, reference list of the published studies were examined to increase sensitivity and to select more studies. After studying titles and abstracts of retrieved articles, excluding the repeated and unrelated ones, and evaluating quality of articles, documents were selected. Data was analyzed using STATA. After performing systematic review, 22 papers were entered this meta-analysis and 1698 subjects were examined concerning G6PD molecular mutation. In this meta-analysis, prevalence of Mediterranean mutation, Chatham mutation and Cosenza mutation in Iran was estimated 78.2%, 9.1% and 0.5% respectively. This meta-analysis showed that in spite of prevalence of different types of G6PD molecular mutations in center, north, north-west and west of Iran, the most common molecular mutations in people with G6PD deficiency in Iran, like other Mediterranean countries and countries around Persian Gulf, were Mediterranean mutation, Chatham mutation and Cosenza mutation. It is also recommended that future studies may focus on races and regions which haven't been taken into consideration up to now.

  16. An Usher syndrome type 1 patient diagnosed before the appearance of visual symptoms by MYO7A mutation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Hidekane; Iwasaki, Satoshi; Kanda, Yukihiko; Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Murata, Toshinori; Iwasa, Yoh-ichiro; Nishio, Shin-ya; Takumi, Yutaka; Usami, Shin-ichi

    2013-02-01

    Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1) appears to have only profound non-syndromic hearing loss in childhood and retinitis pigmentosa develops in later years. This study examined the frequency of USH1 before the appearance of visual symptoms in Japanese deaf children by MYO7A mutation analysis. We report the case of 6-year-old male with profound hearing loss, who did not have visual symptoms. The frequency of MYO7A mutations in profound hearing loss children is also discussed. We sequenced all exons of the MYO7A gene in 80 Japanese children with severe to profound non-syndromic HL not due to mutations of the GJB2 gene (ages 0-14 years). A total of nine DNA variants were found and six of them were presumed to be non-pathogenic variants. In addition, three variants of them were found in two patients (2.5%) with deafness and were classified as possible pathogenic variants. Among them, at least one nonsense mutation and one missense mutation from the patient were confirmed to be responsible for deafness. After MYO7A mutation analysis, the patient was diagnosed with RP, and therefore, also diagnosed with USH1. This is the first case report to show the advantage of MYO7A mutation analysis to diagnose USH1 before the appearance of visual symptoms. We believed that MYO7A mutation analysis is valid for the early diagnosis of USH1. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. PKD2 mutation in an Iranian autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease family with misleading linkage analysis data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Entezam

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Although analysis of additive informative polymorphic markers can overcome the misleading haplotype data, it is limited because of the lack of other highly polymorphic microsatellite markers closer to the gene. Direct mutation screening can identify the causative mutation in the apparently unlinked pedigree; moreover, it is the only approach to achieve the confirmed diagnosis in individuals with equivocal imaging results.

  18. Identification of novel BRCA founder mutations in Middle Eastern breast cancer patients using capture and Sanger sequencing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Rong; Siraj, Abdul K; Al-Obaisi, Khadija A S; Beg, Shaham; Al Hazmi, Mohsen; Ajarim, Dahish; Tulbah, Asma; Al-Dayel, Fouad; Al-Kuraya, Khawla S

    2016-09-01

    Ethnic differences of breast cancer genomics have prompted us to investigate the spectra of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in different populations. The prevalence and effect of BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutations in Middle Eastern population is not fully explored. To characterize the prevalence of BRCA mutations in Middle Eastern breast cancer patients, BRCA mutation screening was performed in 818 unselected breast cancer patients using Capture and/or Sanger sequencing. 19 short tandem repeat (STR) markers were used for founder mutation analysis. In our study, nine different types of deleterious mutation were identified in 28 (3.4%) cases, 25 (89.3%) cases in BRCA 1 and 3 (10.7%) cases in BRCA 2. Seven recurrent mutations identified accounted for 92.9% (26/28) of all the mutant cases. Haplotype analysis was performed to confirm c.1140 dupG and c.4136_4137delCT mutations as novel putative founder mutation, accounting for 46.4% (13/28) of all BRCA mutant cases and 1.6% (13/818) of all the breast cancer cases, respectively. Moreover, BRCA 1 mutation was significantly associated with BRCA 1 protein expression loss (p = 0.0005). Our finding revealed that a substantial number of BRCA mutations were identified in clinically high risk breast cancer from Middle East region. Identification of the mutation spectrum, prevalence and founder effect in Middle Eastern population facilitates genetic counseling, risk assessment and development of cost-effective screening strategy. © 2016 UICC.

  19. F4-related mutation and expression analysis of the aminopeptidase N gene in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetstouwers, T; Van Poucke, M; Nguyen, V U; Melkebeek, V; Coddens, A; Deforce, D; Cox, E; Peelman, L J

    2014-05-01

    Intestinal infections with F4 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are worldwide an important cause of diarrhea in neonatal and recently weaned pigs. Adherence of F4 ETEC to the small intestine by binding to specific receptors is mediated by F4 fimbriae. Porcine aminopeptidase N (ANPEP) was recently identified as a new F4 receptor. In this study, 7 coding mutations and 1 mutation in the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR)were identified in ANPEP by reverse transcriptase (RT-) PCR and sequencing using 3 F4 receptor-positive (F4R+) and 2 F4 receptor-negative (F4R-) pigs, which were F4 phenotyped based on the MUC4 TaqMan, oral immunization, and the in vitro villous adhesion assay. Three potential differential mutations (g.2615C > T, g.8214A > G, and g.16875C > G) identified by comparative analysis between the 3 F4R+ and 2 F4R- pigs were genotyped in 41 additional F4 phenotyped pigs. However, none of these 3 mutations could be associated with F4 ETEC susceptibility. In addition, the RT-PCR experiments did not reveal any differential expression or alternative splicing in the small intestine of F4R+ and F4R- pigs. In conclusion, we hypothesize that the difference in F4 binding to ANPEP is due to modifications in its carbohydrate moieties.

  20. Pan-Cancer Mutational and Transcriptional Analysis of the Integrator Complex

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    Antonio Federico

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The integrator complex has been recently identified as a key regulator of RNA Polymerase II-mediated transcription, with many functions including the processing of small nuclear RNAs, the pause-release and elongation of polymerase during the transcription of protein coding genes, and the biogenesis of enhancer derived transcripts. Moreover, some of its components also play a role in genome maintenance. Thus, it is reasonable to hypothesize that their functional impairment or altered expression can contribute to malignancies. Indeed, several studies have described the mutations or transcriptional alteration of some Integrator genes in different cancers. Here, to draw a comprehensive pan-cancer picture of the genomic and transcriptomic alterations for the members of the complex, we reanalyzed public data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Somatic mutations affecting Integrator subunit genes and their transcriptional profiles have been investigated in about 11,000 patients and 31 tumor types. A general heterogeneity in the mutation frequencies was observed, mostly depending on tumor type. Despite the fact that we could not establish them as cancer drivers, INTS7 and INTS8 genes were highly mutated in specific cancers. A transcriptome analysis of paired (normal and tumor samples revealed that the transcription of INTS7, INTS8, and INTS13 is significantly altered in several cancers. Experimental validation performed on primary tumors confirmed these findings.

  1. Genetic analysis of suppressors of the PF10 mutation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutcher, S.K.; Gibbons, W.; Inwood, W.B.

    1988-01-01

    A mutation at the PF10 locus of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii leads to abnormal cell motility. The asymmetric form of the ciliary beat stroke characteristic of wild-type flagella is modified by this mutation to a nearly symmetric beat. We report here that this abnormal motility is a conditional phenotype that depends on light intensity. In the absence of light or under low light intensities, the motility is more severely impaired than at higher light intensities. By UV mutagenesis we obtained 11 intragenic and 70 extragenic strains that show reversion of the pf10 motility phenotype observed in low light. The intragenic events reverted the motility phenotype of the pf10 mutation completely. The extragenic events define at least seven suppressor loci; these map to linkage groups IV, VII, IX, XI, XII and XVII. Suppressor mutations at two of the seven loci (LIS1 and LIS2) require light for their suppressor activity. Forty-eight of the 70 extragenic suppressors were examined in heterozygous diploid cells; 47 of these mutants were recessive to the wild-type allele and one mutant (bop5-1) was dominant to the wild-type allele. Complementation analysis of the 47 recessive mutants showed unusual patterns. Most mutants within a recombinationally defined group failed to complement one another, although there were pairs that showed intra-allelic complementation. Additionally, some of the mutants at each recombinationally defined locus failed to complement mutants at other loci. They define dominant enhancers of one another

  2. The importance of conventional radiography in the mutational analysis of skeletal dysplasias (the TRPV4 mutational family)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemec, Stefan F.; Cohn, Daniel H.; Krakow, Deborah; Funari, Vincent A.; Rimoin, David L.; Lachman, Ralph S. [Medical Genetics Institute, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2012-01-15

    The spondylo and spondylometaphyseal dysplasias (SMDs) are characterized by vertebral changes and metaphyseal abnormalities of the tubular bones, which produce a phenotypic spectrum of disorders from the mild autosomal-dominant brachyolmia to SMD Kozlowski to autosomal-dominant metatropic dysplasia. Investigations have recently drawn on the similar radiographic features of those conditions to define a new family of skeletal dysplasias caused by mutations in the transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid 4 (TRPV4). This review demonstrates the significance of radiography in the discovery of a new bone dysplasia family due to mutations in a single gene. (orig.)

  3. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  4. Essential nontranslational functions of tRNA synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Min; Schimmel, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Nontranslational functions of vertebrate aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs), which catalyze the production of aminoacyl-tRNAs for protein synthesis, have recently been discovered. Although these new functions were thought to be 'moonlighting activities', many are as critical for cellular homeostasis as their activity in translation. New roles have been associated with their cytoplasmic forms as well as with nuclear and secreted extracellular forms that affect pathways for cardiovascular development and the immune response and mTOR, IFN-γ and p53 signaling. The associations of aaRSs with autoimmune disorders, cancers and neurological disorders further highlight nontranslational functions of these proteins. New architecture elaborations of the aaRSs accompany their functional expansion in higher organisms and have been associated with the nontranslational functions for several aaRSs. Although a general understanding of how these functions developed is limited, the expropriation of aaRSs for essential nontranslational functions may have been initiated by co-opting the amino acid-binding site for another purpose.

  5. Essential Non-Translational Functions of tRNA Synthetases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Min; Schimmel, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Nontranslational functions of vertebrate aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs), which catalyze the production of aminoacyl-tRNAs for protein synthesis, have recently been discovered. While these new functions were thought to be ‘moonlighting activities’, many are as critical for cellular homeostasis as the activity in translation. New roles have been associated with cytoplasmic forms as well as with nuclear and secreted extracellular forms that impact pathways for cardiovascular development, the immune response, and mTOR, IFN-γ and p53 signaling. The associations of aaRSs with autoimmune disorders, cancers and neurological disorders further highlight nontranslational functions of these proteins. Novel architecture elaborations of the aaRSs accompany their functional expansion in higher organisms and have been associated with the nontranslational functions for several aaRSs. While a general understanding of how these functions developed is limited, the expropriation of aaRSs for essential nontranslational functions may have been initiated by co-opting the amino acid binding site for another purpose. PMID:23416400

  6. Mitochondrial tRNALeu(UUR) C3275T, tRNAGln T4363C and tRNALys A8343G mutations may be associated with PCOS and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yu; Xia, Bo-Hou; Zhang, Cai-Juan; Zhuo, Guang-Chao

    2018-02-05

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a very prevalent endocrine disease affecting reproductive women. Clinically, patients with this disorder are more vulnerable to develop type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), cardiovascular events, as well as metabolic syndrome (MetS). To date, the molecular mechanism underlying PCOS remains largely unknown. Previously, we showed that mitochondrial dysfunction caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation was an important cause for PCOS. In the current study, we described the clinical and biochemical features of a three-generation pedigree with maternally transmitted MetS, combined with PCOS. A total of three matrilineal relatives exhibited MetS including obesity, high triglyceride (TG) and Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels, and hypertension. Whereas one patient from the third generation manifestated PCOS. Mutational analysis of the whole mitochondrial genes from the affected individuals identified a set of genetic variations belonging to East Asia haplogroup B4b1c. Among these variants, the homoplasmic C3275T mutation disrupted a highly evolutionary conserved base-pairing (28A-46C) on the variable region of tRNA Leu(UUR) , whereas the T4363C mutation created a new base-pairing (31T-37A) in the anticodon stem of tRNA Gln , furthermore, the A8343G mutation occurred at the very conserved position of tRNA Lys and may result the failure in mitochondrial tRNAs (mt-tRNAs) metabolism. Biochemical analysis revealed the deficiency in mitochondrial functions including lower levels of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), ATP production and mtDNA copy number, while a significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was observed in polymononuclear leukocytes (PMNs) from the individuals carrying these mt-tRNA mutations, suggesting that these mutations may cause mitochondrial dysfunction that was responsible for the clinical phenotypes. Taken together, our data indicated that mt-tRNA mutations were associated with MetS and PCOS in this

  7. RNA2DMut: a web tool for the design and analysis of RNA structure mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Walter N

    2018-03-01

    With the widespread application of high-throughput sequencing, novel RNA sequences are being discovered at an astonishing rate. The analysis of function, however, lags behind. In both the cis - and trans -regulatory functions of RNA, secondary structure (2D base-pairing) plays essential regulatory roles. In order to test RNA function, it is essential to be able to design and analyze mutations that can affect structure. This was the motivation for the creation of the RNA2DMut web tool. With RNA2DMut, users can enter in RNA sequences to analyze, constrain mutations to specific residues, or limit changes to purines/pyrimidines. The sequence is analyzed at each base to determine the effect of every possible point mutation on 2D structure. The metrics used in RNA2DMut rely on the calculation of the Boltzmann structure ensemble and do not require a robust 2D model of RNA structure for designing mutations. This tool can facilitate a wide array of uses involving RNA: for example, in designing and evaluating mutants for biological assays, interrogating RNA-protein interactions, identifying key regions to alter in SELEX experiments, and improving RNA folding and crystallization properties for structural biology. Additional tools are available to help users introduce other mutations (e.g., indels and substitutions) and evaluate their effects on RNA structure. Example calculations are shown for five RNAs that require 2D structure for their function: the MALAT1 mascRNA, an influenza virus splicing regulatory motif, the EBER2 viral noncoding RNA, the Xist lncRNA repA region, and human Y RNA 5. RNA2DMut can be accessed at https://rna2dmut.bb.iastate.edu/. © 2018 Moss; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  8. Mutational analysis of COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes among Estonian osteogenesis imperfecta patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhytnik, Lidiia; Maasalu, Katre; Reimann, Ene; Prans, Ele; Kõks, Sulev; Märtson, Aare

    2017-08-15

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare bone disorder. In 90% of cases, OI is caused by mutations in the COL1A1/2 genes, which code procollagen α1 and α2 chains. The main aim of the current research was to identify the mutational spectrum of COL1A1/2 genes in Estonian patients. The small population size of Estonia provides a unique chance to explore the collagen I mutational profile of 100% of OI families in the country. We performed mutational analysis of peripheral blood gDNA of 30 unrelated Estonian OI patients using Sanger sequencing of COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes, including all intron-exon junctions and 5'UTR and 3'UTR regions, to identify causative OI mutations. We identified COL1A1/2 mutations in 86.67% of patients (26/30). 76.92% of discovered mutations were located in the COL1A1 (n = 20) and 23.08% in the COL1A2 (n = 6) gene. Half of the COL1A1/2 mutations appeared to be novel. The percentage of quantitative COL1A1/2 mutations was 69.23%. Glycine substitution with serine was the most prevalent among missense mutations. All qualitative mutations were situated in the chain domain of pro-α1/2 chains. Our study shows that among the Estonian OI population, the range of collagen I mutations is quite high, which agrees with other described OI cohorts of Northern Europe. The Estonian OI cohort differs due to the high number of quantitative variants and simple missense variants, which are mostly Gly to Ser substitutions and do not extend the chain domain of COL1A1/2 products.

  9. Mutation analysis of the cathepsin C gene in Indian families with Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome

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    Srivastava Satish

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PLS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early onset periodontopathia and palmar plantar keratosis. PLS is caused by mutations in the cathepsin C (CTSC gene. Dipeptidyl-peptidase I encoded by the CTSC gene removes dipeptides from the amino-terminus of protein substrates and mainly plays an immune and inflammatory role. Several mutations have been reported in this gene in patients from several ethnic groups. We report here mutation analysis of the CTSC gene in three Indian families with PLS. Methods Peripheral blood samples were obtained from individuals belonging to three Indian families with PLS for genomic DNA isolation. Exon-specific intronic primers were used to amplify DNA samples from individuals. PCR products were subsequently sequenced to detect mutations. PCR-SCCP and ASOH analyses were used to determine if mutations were present in normal control individuals. Results All patients from three families had a classic PLS phenotype, which included palmoplantar keratosis and early-onset severe periodontitis. Sequence analysis of the CTSC gene showed three novel nonsense mutations (viz., p.Q49X, p.Q69X and p.Y304X in homozygous state in affected individuals from these Indian families. Conclusions This study reported three novel nonsense mutations in three Indian families. These novel nonsense mutations are predicted to produce truncated dipeptidyl-peptidase I causing PLS phenotype in these families. A review of the literature along with three novel mutations reported here showed that the total number of mutations in the CTSC gene described to date is 41 with 17 mutations being located in exon 7.

  10. Mutation analysis of β-thalassemia in East-Western Indian population: a recent molecular approach

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    Shah PS

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Parth S Shah,1 Nidhi D Shah,2 Hari Shankar P Ray,3 Nikunj B Khatri,3 Ketan K Vaghasia,3 Rutvik J Raval,4 Sandip C Shah,3 Mandava V Rao5 1Department of Medicine, Lahey Hospital and Medical Center, Boston, MA, 2Department of Pediatrics, Nassau University Medical Centre, New York, NY, USA; 3Supratech Micropath Laboratory and Research Institute, 4Department of Zoology, 5School of Sciences, Gujarat University, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India Background: β-Thalassemia is the most prevalent genetic disorder in India. Its traits and coinheritance vary from mild to severe conditions, resulting in thalassemia minor, intermediate, and major, depending upon many factors.Purpose: The objective of this study was to identify the incidence of β-thalassemia traits, their coinheritance, and mutations, as well as to support the patients already diagnosed with β-thalassemia in East-Western Indian population for better management.Patients and methods: Seventy-five referral cases for β-thalassemia were analyzed for various β-thalassemia traits, heterozygosity, and homozygosity conditions. Blood phenotypic parameters using cell counter and capillary electrophoresis were investigated. Analyses of eight common mutations of thalassemia in India were carried out using polymerase chain reaction-amplification refractory mutation system, end point polymerase chain reaction, and DNA sequencing methods.Results: Of these (75 referral cases from East-Western Indian region, 68 were positive for β-thalassemia (90.67%. The majority of case types were of β-thalassemia minor (49, 65.33%, followed by HbE traits (6, 8.0% and β-thalassemia major, including heterozygous and homozygous (5, 6.66%; 4, 5.33% types and then HbE homozygous (2, 2.66%, as well as one each of the HbE/β-thalassemia and HbD/β-thalassemia (1, 1.34% combination. Mutation analysis also revealed that the highest frequency of mutation was c.92+5G>C (41, 60.29% followed by deletion 619bp (9, 13.23% and c.79G>A (8, 11

  11. Molecular analysis of the eighteen most frequent mutations in the BRCA1 gene in 63 Chilean breast cancer families

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    LILIAN JARA

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BRCA1 gene mutations account for nearly all families with multiple cases of both early onset breast and/or ovarian cancer and about 30% of hereditary breast cancer. Although to date more than 1,237 distinct mutations, polymorphisms, and variants have been described, several mutations have been found to be recurrent in this gene. We have analyzed 63 Chilean breast/ovarian cancer families for eighteen frequent BRCA1 mutations. The analysis of the five exons and two introns in which these mutations are located was made using mismatch PCR assay, ASO hybridization assay, restriction fragment analysis, allele specific PCR assay and direct sequentiation techniques. Two BRCA1 mutations (185delAG and C61G and one variant of unknown significance (E1250K were found in four of these families. Also, a new mutation (4185delCAAG and one previously described polymorphism (E1038G were found in two other families. The 185delAG was found in a 3.17 % of the families and the others were present only in one of the families of this cohort. Therefore these mutations are not prominent in the Chilean population. The variant of unknown significance and the polymorphism detected could represent a founder effect of Spanish origin

  12. PMS2 gene mutational analysis: direct cDNA sequencing to circumvent pseudogene interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Katharina; Wernstedt, Annekatrin

    2014-01-01

    The presence of highly homologous pseudocopies can compromise the mutation analysis of a gene of interest. In particular, when using PCR-based strategies, pseudogene co-amplification has to be effectively prevented. This is often achieved by using primers designed to be parental gene specific according to the reference sequence and by applying stringent PCR conditions. However, there are cases in which this approach is of limited utility. For example, it has been shown that the PMS2 gene exchanges sequences with one of its pseudogenes, named PMS2CL. This results in functional PMS2 alleles containing pseudogene-derived sequences at their 3'-end and in nonfunctional PMS2CL pseudogene alleles that contain gene-derived sequences. Hence, the paralogues cannot be distinguished according to the reference sequence. This shortcoming can be effectively circumvented by using direct cDNA sequencing. This approach is based on the selective amplification of PMS2 transcripts in two overlapping 1.6-kb RT-PCR products. In addition to avoiding pseudogene co-amplification and allele dropout, this method has also the advantage that it allows to effectively identify deletions, splice mutations, and de novo retrotransposon insertions that escape the detection of most DNA-based mutation analysis protocols.

  13. Optimization of heteroduplex analysis for the detection of BRCA mutations and SNPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Negura

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available BRCA1 and BRCA2 are tumour suppressor genes whose mutant phenotypes predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Screening for mutations in these genes is now standard practice for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC cases in Europe, and permits medical follow-up and genetic counselling adapted to the needs of individuals in such families. Currently, most laboratories performing diagnostic analysis of the BRCA genes use PCR of exons and intron-exon boundaries coupled to a pre-screening step to identify anomalous amplicons. The techniques employed for the detection of mutations and SNPs have evolved over time and vary in sensitivity, specificity and cost-effectiveness. As a variant for pre-screening techniques, we chose the recently developed Surveyor® heteroduplex cleavage method as a sensitive and specific technique to reveal anomalous amplicons of the BRCA genes, using only basic laboratory equipment and agarose gel electrophoresis. Here we present the detection of either mutations or SNPs within the BRCA1 exon 7, using heteroduplex analysis (HA by mismatch-specific endonuclease, confirmed by dideoxy sequencing.

  14. Analysis of esterase isozyme and SSR for mutagenic progenies induced by space mutation in mustard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Jinjuan; Liu Yihua; Zhang Zhaorong; Ran Guangkui; Zhao Shouzhong; Xiao Li

    2012-01-01

    Seeds of five mustard (Brassica juncea Coss) varieties were carried into outer space by 'Shijian No.8' satellite. After five years' consecutive planting and selection, ten relatively stable mutant lines were obtained, which had significant variation in agronomic and economic characters. The mutant lines and their original varieties without space mutation treatment as control were studied by esterase isozyme and SSR analyses. Electrophoresis analysis of esterase isozymes indicated that there were differences between mutant lines and their controls in enzyme types and enzyme activity. Different mustard varieties had different enzymographs, and so did the mutants induced by space mutation, which shows different sensitivity among different mustard varieties. The SSR analysis showed that large differences were found in the SSR loci between mutant lines and their original variety, the variation frequency was between 9.52% and 57.14% with an average frequency of 26.19% for all the mutant lines. Among the mutant SSR loci, about 56.36% showed changes in band number and 43.64% in molecular weight. These results indicated that the ten mutant lines had large genetic difference in phenotype, genomic sequence and gene expression, and the outer space mutation would be an effective method to develop new mustard germplasm and variety. (authors)

  15. Identification of somatic mutations in cancer through Bayesian-based analysis of sequenced genome pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoforides, Alexis; Carpten, John D; Weiss, Glen J; Demeure, Michael J; Von Hoff, Daniel D; Craig, David W

    2013-05-04

    The field of cancer genomics has rapidly adopted next-generation sequencing (NGS) in order to study and characterize malignant tumors with unprecedented resolution. In particular for cancer, one is often trying to identify somatic mutations--changes specific to a tumor and not within an individual's germline. However, false positive and false negative detections often result from lack of sufficient variant evidence, contamination of the biopsy by stromal tissue, sequencing errors, and the erroneous classification of germline variation as tumor-specific. We have developed a generalized Bayesian analysis framework for matched tumor/normal samples with the purpose of identifying tumor-specific alterations such as single nucleotide mutations, small insertions/deletions, and structural variation. We describe our methodology, and discuss its application to other types of paired-tissue analysis such as the detection of loss of heterozygosity as well as allelic imbalance. We also demonstrate the high level of sensitivity and specificity in discovering simulated somatic mutations, for various combinations of a) genomic coverage and b) emulated heterogeneity. We present a Java-based implementation of our methods named Seurat, which is made available for free academic use. We have demonstrated and reported on the discovery of different types of somatic change by applying Seurat to an experimentally-derived cancer dataset using our methods; and have discussed considerations and practices regarding the accurate detection of somatic events in cancer genomes. Seurat is available at https://sites.google.com/site/seuratsomatic.

  16. Evidence that the mitochondrial leucyl tRNA synthetase (LARS2) gene represents a novel type 2 diabetes susceptibility gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    hart, Leen M; Hansen, Torben; Rietveld, Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that a mutation in the mitochondrial DNA-encoded tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene is associated with type 2 diabetes. One of the consequences of this mutation is a reduced aminoacylation of tRNA(Leu(UUR)). In this study, we have examined whether variants in the leucyl tRNA synthetase...... gene (LARS2), involved in aminoacylation of tRNA(Leu(UUR)), associate with type 2 diabetes. Direct sequencing of LARS2 cDNA from 25 type 2 diabetic subjects revealed eight single nucleotide polymorphisms. Two of the variants were examined in 7,836 subjects from four independent populations...... in the Netherlands and Denmark. A -109 g/a variant was not associated with type 2 diabetes. Allele frequencies for the other variant, H324Q, were 3.5% in type 2 diabetic and 2.7% in control subjects, respectively. The common odds ratio across all four studies was 1.40 (95% CI 1.12-1.76), P = 0.004. There were...

  17. Mutation analysis of SDHB and SDHC: novel germline mutations in sporadic head and neck paraganglioma and familial paraganglioma and/or pheochromocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Nora

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germline mutations of the SDHD, SDHB and SDHC genes, encoding three of the four subunits of succinate dehydrogenase, are a major cause of hereditary paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma, and demonstrate that these genes are classic tumor suppressors. Succinate dehydrogenase is a heterotetrameric protein complex and a component of both the Krebs cycle and the mitochondrial respiratory chain (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase or complex II. Methods Using conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE and direct DNA sequencing to analyse genomic DNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes, here we describe the mutation analysis of the SDHB and SDHC genes in 37 patients with sporadic (i.e. no known family history head and neck paraganglioma and five pheochromocytoma and/or paraganglioma families. Results Two sporadic patients were found to have a SDHB splice site mutation in intron 4, c.423+1G>A, which produces a mis-spliced transcript with a 54 nucleotide deletion, resulting in an 18 amino acid in-frame deletion. A third patient was found to carry the c.214C>T (p.Arg72Cys missense mutation in exon 4 of SDHC, which is situated in a highly conserved protein motif that constitutes the quinone-binding site of the succinate: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (SQR complex in E. coli. Together with our previous results, we found 27 germline mutations of SDH genes in 95 cases (28% of sporadic head and neck paraganglioma. In addition all index patients of five families showing hereditary pheochromocytoma-paraganglioma were found to carry germline mutations of SDHB: four of which were novel, c.343C>T (p.Arg115X, c.141G>A (p.Trp47X, c.281G>A (p.Arg94Lys, and c.653G>C (p.Trp218Ser, and one reported previously, c.136C>T, p.Arg46X. Conclusion In conclusion, these data indicate that germline mutations of SDHB and SDHC play a minor role in sporadic head and neck paraganglioma and further underline the importance of germline SDHB mutations in cases of

  18. Analysis of morphology, DNA and isozyme of leaf mutation in Brassica napus L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Zhen; Hu Dongwei; Li Xiaobai

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to study the rule of irradiating effects, provide the effective way of analyzing mutant, and discuss the production application of mutant. By irradiating the 040B of Brassica napus L with . 0Co γ- ray, an obvious leaf mutation (ML) with large leaf area was found. The ML which has been inherited stably after three generations was compared with wide-type (CK) on the morphologic, DNA and isozymic levels. Results showed that S 4 and S17 from RAPD were two molecular markers which can express good polymorphism and have close relationships with leaf mutation sites. And in the analysis of EST and POD between ML and CK, the polymorphisms also proved that many discrepancies exist between ML and CK on the protein level. In addition, the research results in question can be applied to the breeding and genetic research of Brassica napus L

  19. Connecting the kinetics and energy landscape of tRNA translocation on the ribosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C Whitford

    Full Text Available Functional rearrangements in biomolecular assemblies result from diffusion across an underlying energy landscape. While bulk kinetic measurements rely on discrete state-like approximations to the energy landscape, single-molecule methods can project the free energy onto specific coordinates. With measures of the diffusion, one may establish a quantitative bridge between state-like kinetic measurements and the continuous energy landscape. We used an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of the 70S ribosome (2.1 million atoms; 1.3 microseconds to provide this bridge for specific conformational events associated with the process of tRNA translocation. Starting from a pre-translocation configuration, we identified sets of residues that collectively undergo rotary rearrangements implicated in ribosome function. Estimates of the diffusion coefficients along these collective coordinates for translocation were then used to interconvert between experimental rates and measures of the energy landscape. This analysis, in conjunction with previously reported experimental rates of translocation, provides an upper-bound estimate of the free-energy barriers associated with translocation. While this analysis was performed for a particular kinetic scheme of translocation, the quantitative framework is general and may be applied to energetic and kinetic descriptions that include any number of intermediates and transition states.

  20. Mutational analysis of amino acid residues involved in catalytic activity of a family 18 chitinase from tulip bulbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzukawa, Keisuke; Yamagami, Takeshi; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Hirakawa, Hideki; Kuhara, Satoru; Aso, Yoichi; Ishiguro, Masatsune

    2003-02-01

    We expressed chitinase-1 (TBC-1) from tulip bulbs (Tulipa bakeri) in E. coli cells and used site-directed mutagenesis to identify amino acid residues essential for catalytic activity. Mutations at Glu-125 and Trp-251 completely abolished enzyme activity, and activity decreased with mutations at Asp-123 and Trp-172 when glycolchitin was the substrate. Activity changed with the mutations of Trp-251 to one of several amino acids with side-chains of little hydrophobicity, suggesting that hydrophobic interaction of Trp-251 is important for the activity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation analysis with hevamine as the model compound showed that the distance between Asp-123 and Glu-125 was extended by mutation of Trp-251. Kinetic studies of Trp-251-mutated chitinases confirmed these various phenomena. The results suggested that Glu-125 and Trp-251 are essential for enzyme activity and that Trp-251 had a direct role in ligand binding.

  1. Frameshift mutational target gene analysis identifies similarities and differences in constitutional mismatch repair-deficiency and Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maletzki, Claudia; Huehns, Maja; Bauer, Ingrid; Ripperger, Tim; Mork, Maureen M; Vilar, Eduardo; Klöcking, Sabine; Zettl, Heike; Prall, Friedrich; Linnebacher, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Mismatch-repair deficient (MMR-D) malignancies include Lynch Syndrome (LS), which is secondary to germline mutations in one of the MMR genes, and the rare childhood-form of constitutional mismatch repair-deficiency (CMMR-D); caused by bi-allelic MMR gene mutations. A hallmark of LS-associated cancers is microsatellite instability (MSI), characterized by coding frameshift mutations (cFSM) in target genes. By contrast, tumors arising in CMMR-D patients are thought to display a somatic mutation pattern differing from LS. This study has the main goal to identify cFSM in MSI target genes relevant in CMMR-D and to compare the spectrum of common somatic mutations, including alterations in DNA polymerases POLE and D1 between LS and CMMR-D. CMMR-D-associated tumors harbored more somatic mutations compared to LS cases, especially in the TP53 gene and in POLE and POLD1, where novel mutations were additionally identified. Strikingly, MSI in classical mononucleotide markers BAT40 and CAT25 was frequent in CMMR-D cases. MSI-target gene analysis revealed mutations in CMMR-D-associated tumors, some of them known to be frequently hit in LS, such as RNaseT2, HT001, and TGFβR2. Our results imply a general role for these cFSM as potential new drivers of MMR-D tumorigenesis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Computational Analysis of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutations Predicts Differential Drug Sensitivity Profiles toward Kinase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akula, Sravani; Kamasani, Swapna; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Kancha, Rama Krishna

    2018-05-01

    A significant proportion of patients with lung cancer carry mutations in the EGFR kinase domain. The presence of a deletion mutation in exon 19 or L858R point mutation in the EGFR kinase domain has been shown to cause enhanced efficacy of inhibitor treatment in patients with NSCLC. Several less frequent (uncommon) mutations in the EGFR kinase domain with potential implications in treatment response have also been reported. The role of a limited number of uncommon mutations in drug sensitivity was experimentally verified. However, a huge number of these mutations remain uncharacterized for inhibitor sensitivity or resistance. A large-scale computational analysis of clinically reported 298 point mutants of EGFR kinase domain has been performed, and drug sensitivity profiles for each mutant toward seven kinase inhibitors has been determined by molecular docking. In addition, the relative inhibitor binding affinity toward each drug as compared with that of adenosine triphosphate was calculated for each mutant. The inhibitor sensitivity profiles predicted in this study for a set of previously characterized mutants correlated well with the published clinical, experimental, and computational data. Both the single and compound mutations displayed differential inhibitor sensitivity toward first- and next-generation kinase inhibitors. The present study provides predicted drug sensitivity profiles for a large panel of uncommon EGFR mutations toward multiple inhibitors, which may help clinicians in deciding mutant-specific treatment strategies. Copyright © 2018 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mutational analysis of PVX TGBp3 links subcellular accumulation and protein turnover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, H.-J.; Ye, C.-M.; Verchot-Lubicz, Jeanmarie

    2008-01-01

    Potato virus X (PVX) TGBp3 is required for virus cell-to-cell transport, has an N-terminal transmembrane domain, and a C-terminal cytosolic domain. In the absence of virus infection TGBp3:GFP is seen in the cortical and perinuclear ER. In PVX infected cells the TGBp3:GFP fusion is also seen in the nucleoplasm indicating that events during PVX infection trigger entry into the nucleus. Mutational analysis failed to identify a nuclear targeting domain. Mutations inhibiting TGBp3 association with the ER and inhibiting virus movement did not block TGBp3:GFP in the nucleoplasm. A mutation disrupting the N-terminal transmembrane domain of TGBp3 caused the fusion to accumulate in the nucleus indicating that nuclear import is regulated by ER interactions. Tunicamycin, an ER-stress inducing chemical, caused lower levels of GFP and TGBp3:GFP to accumulate in virus infected protoplasts. MG115 and MG132 were used to demonstrate that wild-type and mutant TGBp3:GFP fusions were degraded by the 26S proteasome. These observations are consistent with an ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway suggesting that PVX TGBp3, similar to aberrant ER proteins, is translocate to the cytoplasm for degradation. Nuclear accumulation of mutant and wild-type TGBp3:GFP is independent of other PVX proteins and may be another feature of an ERAD pathway

  4. Mutational analysis of the PTPN11 gene in Egyptian patients with Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essawi, Mona L; Ismail, Manal F; Afifi, Hanan H; Kobesiy, Maha M; El Kotoury, Ahmed; Barakat, Maged M

    2013-11-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is inherited as an autosomal dominant disorder with dysmorphic facies, short stature, and cardiac defects, which can be caused by missense mutations in the protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 11 (PTPN11) gene, which encodes src homology region 2 domain containing tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2), a protein tyrosine phosphatase that acts in signal transduction downstream to growth factors and cytokines. The current study aimed to study the molecular characterization of the PTPN11 gene among Egyptian patients with Noonan syndrome. Eleven exons of the PTPN11 gene were amplified and screened by single stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP). DNA samples showing band shift in SSCP were subjected to sequencing. Mutational analysis of the PTPN11 gene revealed T→C transition at position 854 in exon 8, predicting Phe285Ser substitution within PTP domain of SHP-2 protein, in one NS patient and -21C→T polymorphism in intron 7 in four other cases. Knowing that NS is phenotypically heterogeneous, molecular characterization of the PTPN11 gene should serve to establish NS diagnosis in patients with atypical features, although lack of a mutation does not exclude the possibility of NS. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Capillary electrophoresis fragment analysis and clone sequencing in detection of dynamic mutations of spinocerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-yuan CHEN

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To estimate the accuracy and stability of capillary electrophoresis fragment analysis and clone sequencing in detecting dynamic mutations of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA. Methods Capillary electrophoresis fragment analysis and clone sequencing were used in detecting trinucleotide repeated sequence of 14 SCA patients (3 cases of SCA2, 2 cases of SCA7, 7 cases of SCA8 and 2 cases of SCA17. Results Capillary electrophoresis fragment analysis of 3 SCA2 cases showed the expanded cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG repeats were 31, 30 and 32, and the copy numbers of 3 clone sequencing for 3 colonies in each case were 37/40/40, 37/38/39 and 38/39/40 respectively. Capillary electrophoresis fragment analysis of 2 SCA7 cases showed the expanded CAG repeats were 57 and 34, and the copy numbers of repeats were 69, 74, 75 in 3 colonies of one case, and was 45 in the other case. For the 7 SCA8 cases with the expanded cytosine-thymine-adenine (CTA/cytosine-thymine-guanine (CTG repeats of 99, 111, 104, 92, 89, 104 and 75, the results of clone sequencing were 97, 116, 104, 90, 90, 102 and 76 respectively. For 2 SCA17 cases with the short/expanded CAG repeats of 37/50 and 36/45, the results of clone sequencing were 51/50/52 and 45/44 for 3 and 2 colonies. Conclusions Although the higher mobility of polymerase chain reaction (PCR products containing dynamic mutation in the capillary electrophoresis fragment analysis might cause the deviation for analysis of copy numbers, the deviation was predictable and the results were repeatable. The clone sequencing results showed obvious instability, especially for SCA2 and SCA7 genes, which might owing to their simple CAG repeats. Consequently, clone sequencing is not suited for detection of dynamic mutation, not to mention the quantitative criteria of dynamic mutation sequencing. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2018.03.008

  6. The Analysis Mutation Of The CARD 15 Gene Variants In Chronic Periodontis

    OpenAIRE

    Bahruddin Thalib, Dr.drg. M.Kes,Sp.Pros.

    2014-01-01

    As Conclusion, CARD 15 gene mutation with chronic periodontitis was found to have heterozygote mutation and homozygote mutation variants, and also found genetics variation that changed the composition of C??? T nucleotide at codon 802 in exon 4 amino acid changed from alanine to valine. Purpose of This study was to determine the variant of card 15 gene mutation with periodontitis chronic.

  7. Genetic counseling in Usher syndrome: linkage and mutational analysis of 10 Colombian families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, M L; Lopez, G; Gelvez, N; Medina, D; Kimberling, W J; Rodríguez, V; Tamayo, G E; Bernal, J E

    2008-01-01

    Usher Syndrome (US), an autosomal recessive disease, is characterized by retinitis pigmentosa (RP), vestibular dysfunction, and congenital sensorineural deafness. There are three recognized clinical types of the disorder. In order to improve genetic counseling for affected families, we conducted linkage analysis and DNA sequencing in 10 Colombian families with confirmed diagnosis of US (4 type I and 6 type II). Seventy-five percent of the US1 families showed linkage to locus USH1B, while the remaining 25% showed linkage to loci USH1B and USH1C. Among families showing linkage to USH1B we found two different mutations in the MYO7A gene: IVS42-26insTTGAG in exon 43 (heterozygous state) and R634X (CGA-TGA) in exon 16 (homozygous state). All six US2 families showed linkage to locus USH2A. Of them, 4 had c.2299delG mutation (1 homozygote state and 3 heterozygous); in the remaining 2 we did not identify any pathologic DNA variant. USH2A individuals with a 2299delG mutation presented a typical and homogeneous retinal phenotype with bilateral severe hearing loss, except for one individual with a heterozygous 2299delG mutation, whose hearing loss was asymmetric, but more profound than in the other cases. The study of these families adds to the genotype-phenotype characterization of the different types and subtypes of US and facilitates genetic counseling in these families. We would like to emphasize the need to perform DNA studies as a prerequisite for genetic counseling in affected families.

  8. Temperature Dependence of Logarithmic-like Relaxational Dynamics of Hydrated tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xiang-Qiang; Mamontov, Eugene; O'Neill, Hugh; Zhang, Qiu

    2013-03-21

    The dynamics of RNA within the β-relaxation region of 10 ps to 1 ns is crucial to its biological function. Because of its simpler chemical building blocks and the lack of the side methyl groups, faster relaxational dynamics of RNA compared to proteins can be expected. However, the situation is actually opposite. In this work, the relaxational dynamics of tRNA is measured by quasielastic neutron scattering and analyzed using the mode coupling theory, originally developed for glass-forming liquids. Our results reveal that the dynamics of tRNA follows a log-decay within the β-relaxation region, which is an important trait demonstrated by the dynamics of proteins. The dynamics of hydrated tRNA and lysozyme compared in the time domain further demonstrate that the slower dynamics of tRNA relative to proteins originates from the difference in the folded states of tRNA and proteins, as well as the influence of their hydration water.

  9. tRNA modification profiles of the fast-proliferating cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Chao; Niu, Leilei; Song, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Xiong, Xin; Zhang, Xianhua [Departmentof Pharmacy, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhang, Zhenxi; Yang, Yi; Yi, Fan [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhan, Jun; Zhang, Hongquan [Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology and Tumor Biology, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Yang, Zhenjun; Zhang, Li-He [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhai, Suodi [Departmentof Pharmacy, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Li, Hua, E-mail: huali88@sina.com [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Ye, Min, E-mail: yemin@bjmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Du, Quan, E-mail: quan.du@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-08-05

    Despite the recent progress in RNA modification study, a comprehensive modification profile is still lacking for mammalian cells. Using a quantitative HPLC/MS/MS assay, we present here a study where RNA modifications are examined in term of the major RNA species. With paired slow- and fast-proliferating cell lines, distinct RNA modification profiles are first revealed for diverse RNA species. Compared to mRNAs, increased ribose and nucleobase modifications are shown for the highly-structured tRNAs and rRNAs, lending support to their contribution to the formation of high-order structures. This study also reveals a dynamic tRNA modification profile in the fast-proliferating cells. In addition to cultured cells, this unique tRNA profile has been further confirmed with endometrial cancers and their adjacent normal tissues. Taken together, the results indicate that tRNA is a actively regulated RNA species in the fast-proliferating cancer cells, and suggest that they may play a more active role in biological process than expected. -- Highlights: •RNA modifications were first examined in term of the major RNA species. •A dynamic tRNA modifications was characterized for the fast-proliferating cells. •The unique tRNA profile was confirmed with endometrial cancers and their adjacent normal tissues. •tRNA was predicted as an actively regulated RNA species in the fast-proliferating cancer cells.

  10. tRNA modification profiles of the fast-proliferating cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Chao; Niu, Leilei; Song, Wei; Xiong, Xin; Zhang, Xianhua; Zhang, Zhenxi; Yang, Yi; Yi, Fan; Zhan, Jun; Zhang, Hongquan; Yang, Zhenjun; Zhang, Li-He; Zhai, Suodi; Li, Hua; Ye, Min; Du, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recent progress in RNA modification study, a comprehensive modification profile is still lacking for mammalian cells. Using a quantitative HPLC/MS/MS assay, we present here a study where RNA modifications are examined in term of the major RNA species. With paired slow- and fast-proliferating cell lines, distinct RNA modification profiles are first revealed for diverse RNA species. Compared to mRNAs, increased ribose and nucleobase modifications are shown for the highly-structured tRNAs and rRNAs, lending support to their contribution to the formation of high-order structures. This study also reveals a dynamic tRNA modification profile in the fast-proliferating cells. In addition to cultured cells, this unique tRNA profile has been further confirmed with endometrial cancers and their adjacent normal tissues. Taken together, the results indicate that tRNA is a actively regulated RNA species in the fast-proliferating cancer cells, and suggest that they may play a more active role in biological process than expected. -- Highlights: •RNA modifications were first examined in term of the major RNA species. •A dynamic tRNA modifications was characterized for the fast-proliferating cells. •The unique tRNA profile was confirmed with endometrial cancers and their adjacent normal tissues. •tRNA was predicted as an actively regulated RNA species in the fast-proliferating cancer cells.

  11. Mutation analysis of the MYO7A and CDH23 genes in Japanese patients with Usher syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Ohtsubo, Masafumi; Iwasaki, Satoshi; Hotta, Yoshihiro; Takizawa, Yoshinori; Hosono, Katsuhiro; Mizuta, Kunihiro; Mineta, Hiroyuki; Minoshima, Shinsei

    2010-12-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by retinitis pigmentosa and hearing loss. USH type 1 (USH1), the second common type of USH, is frequently caused by MYO7A and CDH23 mutations, accounting for 70-80% of the cases among various ethnicities, including Caucasians, Africans and Asians. However, there have been no reports of mutation analysis for any responsible genes for USH1 in Japanese patients. This study describes the first mutation analysis of MYO7A and CDH23 in Japanese USH1 patients. Five mutations (three in MYO7A and two in CDH23) were identified in four of five unrelated patients. Of these mutations, two were novel. One of them, p.Tyr1942SerfsX23 in CDH23, was a large deletion causing the loss of 3 exons. This is the first large deletion to be found in CDH23. The incidence of the MYO7A and CDH23 mutations in the study population was 80%, which is consistent with previous findings. Therefore, mutation screening for these genes is expected to be a highly sensitive method for diagnosing USH1 among the Japanese.

  12. The use of high resolution melting analysis to detect Fabry mutations in heterozygous females via dry bloodspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Chang-Long; Liu, Mei-Ying; Yu, Hsiao-Chi; Chiang, Chiang-Chuan; Chiang, Hung; Suen, Jeng-Hung; Kao, Shu-Min; Huang, Yu-Hsiu; Wu, Tina Jui-Ting; Yang, Chia-Feng; Tsai, Fang-Chih; Lin, Ching-Yuang; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Chen, Hong-Duo; Niu, Dau-Ming

    2012-02-18

    As an X-linked genetic disorder, Fabry disease was first thought to affect males only, and females were generally considered to be asymptomatic carriers. However, recent research suggests that female carriers of Fabry disease may still develop vital organ damage causing severe morbidity and mortality. In the previous newborn screening, from 299,007 newborns, we identified a total of 20 different Fabry mutations and 121 newborns with Fabry mutations. However, we found that most female carriers are not detected by enzyme assays. A streamlined method for high resolution melting (HRM) analysis was designed to screen for GLA gene mutations using a same PCR and melting program. Primer sets were designed to cover the 7 exons and the Chinese common intronic mutation, IVS4+919G>A of GLA gene. The HRM analysis was successful in identifying heterozygous and hemizygous patients with the 20 surveyed mutations. We were also successful in using this method to test dry blood spots of newborns afflicted with Fabry mutations without having to determine DNA concentration before PCR amplification. The results of this study show that HRM could be a reliable and sensitive method for use in the rapid screening of females for GLA mutations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Backbone Brackets and Arginine Tweezers delineate Class I and Class II aminoacyl tRNA synthetases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, V. Joachim; Schroeder, Michael; Labudde, Dirk

    2018-01-01

    The origin of the machinery that realizes protein biosynthesis in all organisms is still unclear. One key component of this machinery are aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRS), which ligate tRNAs to amino acids while consuming ATP. Sequence analyses revealed that these enzymes can be divided into two complementary classes. Both classes differ significantly on a sequence and structural level, feature different reaction mechanisms, and occur in diverse oligomerization states. The one unifying aspect of both classes is their function of binding ATP. We identified Backbone Brackets and Arginine Tweezers as most compact ATP binding motifs characteristic for each Class. Geometric analysis shows a structural rearrangement of the Backbone Brackets upon ATP binding, indicating a general mechanism of all Class I structures. Regarding the origin of aaRS, the Rodin-Ohno hypothesis states that the peculiar nature of the two aaRS classes is the result of their primordial forms, called Protozymes, being encoded on opposite strands of the same gene. Backbone Brackets and Arginine Tweezers were traced back to the proposed Protozymes and their more efficient successors, the Urzymes. Both structural motifs can be observed as pairs of residues in contemporary structures and it seems that the time of their addition, indicated by their placement in the ancient aaRS, coincides with the evolutionary trace of Proto- and Urzymes. PMID:29659563

  14. Mitochondrial 12S rRNA A827G mutation is involved in the genetic susceptibility to aminoglycoside ototoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Guangqian; Chen Zhibin; Wei Qinjun; Tian Huiqin; Li Xiaolu; Zhou Aidong; Bu Xingkuan; Cao Xin

    2006-01-01

    We have analyzed the clinical and molecular characterization of a Chinese family with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing impairment. Clinical evaluations revealed that only those family members who had a history of exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics subsequently developed hearing loss, suggesting mitochondrial genome involvement. Sequence analysis of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and tRNA Ser(UCN) genes led to the identification of a homoplasmic A827G mutation in all maternal relatives, a mutation that was identified previously in a few sporadic patients and in another Chinese family with non-syndromic deafness. The pathogenicity of the A827G mutation is strongly supported by the occurrence of the same mutation in two independent families and several genetically unrelated subjects. The A827G mutation is located at the A-site of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene which is highly conserved in mammals. It is possible that the alteration of the tertiary or quaternary structure of this rRNA by the A827G mutation may lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, thereby playing a role in the pathogenesis of hearing loss and aminoglycoside hypersensitivity. However, incomplete penetrance of hearing impairment indicates that the A827G mutation itself is not sufficient to produce clinical phenotype but requires the involvement of modifier factors for the phenotypic expression. Indeed, aminoglycosides may contribute to the phenotypic manifestation of the A827G mutation in this family. In contrast with the congenital or early-onset hearing impairment in another Chinese family carrying the A827G mutation, three patients in this pedigree developed hearing loss only after use of aminoglycosides. This discrepancy likely reflects the difference of genetic backgrounds, either mitochondrial haplotypes or nuclear modifier genes, between two families

  15. Mutational analysis of Peroxiredoxin IV: exclusion of a positional candidate for multinodular goitre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonifazi Emanuela

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multinodular goitre (MNG is a common disorder characterised by an enlargement of the thyroid, occurring as a compensatory response to hormonogenesis impairment. The incidence of MNG is dependent on sex (female:male ratio 5:1 and several reports have documented a genetic basis for the disease. Last year we mapped a MNG locus to chromosome Xp22 in a region containing the peroxiredoxin IV (Prx-IV gene. Since Prx-IV is involved in the removal of H2O2 in thyroid cells, we hypothesize that mutations in Prx-IV gene are involved in pathogenesis of MNG. Methods Four individuals (2 affected, 2 unrelated unaffected were sequenced using automated methods. All individuals were originated from the original three-generation Italian family described in previous studies. A Southern blot analysis using a Prx-IV full-length cDNA as a probe was performed in order to exclude genomic rearrangements and/or intronic mutations. In addition a RT-PCR of PRX-IV was performed in order to investigate expression alterations. Results No causative mutations were found. Two adjacent nucleotide substitutions were detected within introns 1 and 4. These changes were also detected in unaffected individuals, suggesting that they were innocuous polymorphisms. No gross genomic rearrangements and/or restriction fragment alterations were observed on Southern analysis. Finally, using RT-PCR from tissue-specific RNA, no differences of PRX-IV expression-levels were detected between affected and unaffected samples. Conclusions Based on sequence and genomic analysis, Prx-IV is very unlikely to be the MNG2 gene.

  16. The HIVToolbox 2 web system integrates sequence, structure, function and mutation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Sargeant

    Full Text Available There is enormous interest in studying HIV pathogenesis for improving the treatment of patients with HIV infection. HIV infection has become one of the best-studied systems for understanding how a virus can hijack a cell. To help facilitate discovery, we previously built HIVToolbox, a web system for visual data mining. The original HIVToolbox integrated information for HIV protein sequence, structure, functional sites, and sequence conservation. This web system has been used for almost 40,000 searches. We report improvements to HIVToolbox including new functions and workflows, data updates, and updates for ease of use. HIVToolbox2, is an improvement over HIVToolbox with new functions. HIVToolbox2 has new functionalities focused on HIV pathogenesis including drug-binding sites, drug-resistance mutations, and immune epitopes. The integrated, interactive view enables visual mining to generate hypotheses that are not readily revealed by other approaches. Most HIV proteins form multimers, and there are posttranslational modification and protein-protein interaction sites at many of these multimerization interfaces. Analysis of protease drug binding sites reveals an anatomy of drug resistance with different types of drug-resistance mutations regionally localized on the surface of protease. Some of these drug-resistance mutations have a high prevalence in specific HIV-1 M subtypes. Finally, consolidation of Tat functional sites reveals a hotspot region where there appear to be 30 interactions or posttranslational modifications. A cursory analysis with HIVToolbox2 has helped to identify several global patterns for HIV proteins. An initial analysis with this tool identifies homomultimerization of almost all HIV proteins, functional sites that overlap with multimerization sites, a global drug resistance anatomy for HIV protease, and specific distributions of some DRMs in specific HIV M subtypes. HIVToolbox2 is an open-access web application available at

  17. High Resolution Melting (HRM) analysis for mutation screening of RGSL1,RGS16 and RGS8 in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiechec, Emilia; Wiuf, Carsten Henrik; Overgaard, Jens

    2011-01-01

    coding exons of RGSL1, RGS16, and RGS8 in tumors from 200 breast cancer patients. All sequence variants detected by HRM resulted in abnormal shape of the melting curves. The identified mutations and known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were subsequently confirmed by sequencing, and distribution...... cancer patients. In addition, a total of seven known SNPs were identified in this study. Genotype distributions were not significantly different between breast cancer patients and controls. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPACT: Identification of novel mutations within RGSL1 provides a new insight...... into the pathophysiology of breast cancer. Moreover, the HRM analysis represents a reliable and highly sensitive method for mutation scanning of multiple exons....

  18. Meta-analysis of SHANK Mutations in Autism Spectrum Disorders: a gradient of severity in cognitive impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblond, Claire S; Nava, Caroline; Polge, Anne; Gauthier, Julie; Huguet, Guillaume; Lumbroso, Serge; Giuliano, Fabienne; Stordeur, Coline; Depienne, Christel; Mouzat, Kevin; Pinto, Dalila; Howe, Jennifer; Lemière, Nathalie; Durand, Christelle M; Guibert, Jessica; Ey, Elodie; Toro, Roberto; Peyre, Hugo; Mathieu, Alexandre; Amsellem, Frédérique; Rastam, Maria; Gillberg, I Carina; Rappold, Gudrun A; Holt, Richard; Monaco, Anthony P; Maestrini, Elena; Galan, Pilar; Heron, Delphine; Jacquette, Aurélia; Afenjar, Alexandra; Rastetter, Agnès; Brice, Alexis; Devillard, Françoise; Assouline, Brigitte; Laffargue, Fanny; Lespinasse, James; Chiesa, Jean; Rivier, François; Bonneau, Dominique; Regnault, Beatrice; Zelenika, Diana; Delepine, Marc; Lathrop, Mark; Sanlaville, Damien; Schluth-Bolard, Caroline; Edery, Patrick; Perrin, Laurence; Tabet, Anne Claude; Schmeisser, Michael J; Boeckers, Tobias M; Coleman, Mary; Sato, Daisuke; Szatmari, Peter; Scherer, Stephen W; Rouleau, Guy A; Betancur, Catalina; Leboyer, Marion; Gillberg, Christopher; Delorme, Richard; Bourgeron, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    SHANK genes code for scaffold proteins located at the post-synaptic density of glutamatergic synapses. In neurons, SHANK2 and SHANK3 have a positive effect on the induction and maturation of dendritic spines, whereas SHANK1 induces the enlargement of spine heads. Mutations in SHANK genes have been associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), but their prevalence and clinical relevance remain to be determined. Here, we performed a new screen and a meta-analysis of SHANK copy-number and coding-sequence variants in ASD. Copy-number variants were analyzed in 5,657 patients and 19,163 controls, coding-sequence variants were ascertained in 760 to 2,147 patients and 492 to 1,090 controls (depending on the gene), and, individuals carrying de novo or truncating SHANK mutations underwent an extensive clinical investigation. Copy-number variants and truncating mutations in SHANK genes were present in ∼1% of patients with ASD: mutations in SHANK1 were rare (0.04%) and present in males with normal IQ and autism; mutations in SHANK2 were present in 0.17% of patients with ASD and mild intellectual disability; mutations in SHANK3 were present in 0.69% of patients with ASD and up to 2.12% of the cases with moderate to profound intellectual disability. In summary, mutations of the SHANK genes were detected in the whole spectrum of autism with a gradient of severity in cognitive impairment. Given the rare frequency of SHANK1 and SHANK2 deleterious mutations, the clinical relevance of these genes remains to be ascertained. In contrast, the frequency and the penetrance of SHANK3 mutations in individuals with ASD and intellectual disability-more than 1 in 50-warrant its consideration for mutation screening in clinical practice.

  19. Meta-analysis of SHANK Mutations in Autism Spectrum Disorders: a gradient of severity in cognitive impairments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire S Leblond

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available SHANK genes code for scaffold proteins located at the post-synaptic density of glutamatergic synapses. In neurons, SHANK2 and SHANK3 have a positive effect on the induction and maturation of dendritic spines, whereas SHANK1 induces the enlargement of spine heads. Mutations in SHANK genes have been associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD, but their prevalence and clinical relevance remain to be determined. Here, we performed a new screen and a meta-analysis of SHANK copy-number and coding-sequence variants in ASD. Copy-number variants were analyzed in 5,657 patients and 19,163 controls, coding-sequence variants were ascertained in 760 to 2,147 patients and 492 to 1,090 controls (depending on the gene, and, individuals carrying de novo or truncating SHANK mutations underwent an extensive clinical investigation. Copy-number variants and truncating mutations in SHANK genes were present in ∼1% of patients with ASD: mutations in SHANK1 were rare (0.04% and present in males with normal IQ and autism; mutations in SHANK2 were present in 0.17% of patients with ASD and mild intellectual disability; mutations in SHANK3 were present in 0.69% of patients with ASD and up to 2.12% of the cases with moderate to profound intellectual disability. In summary, mutations of the SHANK genes were detected in the whole spectrum of autism with a gradient of severity in cognitive impairment. Given the rare frequency of SHANK1 and SHANK2 deleterious mutations, the clinical relevance of these genes remains to be ascertained. In contrast, the frequency and the penetrance of SHANK3 mutations in individuals with ASD and intellectual disability-more than 1 in 50-warrant its consideration for mutation screening in clinical practice.

  20. Analysis of Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations as genetic markers of infertility in Serbian men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinić Jelena

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Impaired fertility of a male partner is the main cause of infertility in up to one half of all infertile couples. At the genetic level, male infertility can be caused by chromosome aberrations or gene mutations. The presence and types of Y chromosome microdeletions and cystic fybrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene mutations as genetic cause of male infertility was tested in Serbian men. The aim of this study was to analyze CFTR gene mutations and Y chromosome microdelations as potential causes of male infertility in Serbian patients, as well as to test the hypothesis that CFTR mutations in infertile men are predominantly located in the several last exons of the gene. Methods. This study has encompassed 33 men with oligo- or azoospermia. The screening for Y chromosome microdeletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF region was performed by multiplex PCR analysis. The screening of the CFTR gene was performed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE method. Results. Deletions on Y chromosome were detected in four patients, predominantly in AZFc region (four of total six deletions. Mutations in the CFTR gene were detected on eight out of 66 analyzed chromosomes of infertile men. The most common mutation was F508del (six of total eight mutations. Conclusion. This study confirmed that both Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations played important role in etiology of male infertility in Serbian infertile men. Genetic testing for Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations has been introduced in routine diagnostics and offered to couples undergoing assisted reproduction techniques. Considering that both the type of Y chromosome microdeletion and the type of CFTR mutation have a prognostic value, it is recommended that AZF and CFTR genotyping should not only be performed in patients with reduced sperm quality before undergoing assisted reproduction, but also for the purpose of preimplantation and

  1. Computational analysis of KRAS mutations: implications for different effects on the KRAS p.G12D and p.G13D mutations.

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    Chih-Chieh Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The issue of whether patients diagnosed with metastatic colorectal cancer who harbor KRAS codon 13 mutations could benefit from the addition of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy remains under debate. The aim of the current study was to perform computational analysis to investigate the structural implications of the underlying mutations caused by c.38G>A (p.G13D on protein conformation. METHODS: Molecular dynamics (MD simulations were performed to understand the plausible structural and dynamical implications caused by c.35G>A (p.G12D and c.38G>A (p.G13D. The potential of mean force (PMF simulations were carried out to determine the free energy profiles of the binding processes of GTP interacting with wild-type (WT KRAS and its mutants (MT. RESULTS: Using MD simulations, we observed that the root mean square deviation (RMSD increased as a function of time for the MT c.35G>A (p.G12D and MT c.38G>A (p.G13D when compared with the WT. We also observed that the GTP-binding pocket in the c.35G>A (p.G12D mutant is more open than that of the WT and the c.38G>A (p.G13D proteins. Intriguingly, the analysis of atomic fluctuations and free energy profiles revealed that the mutation of c.35G>A (p.G12D may induce additional fluctuations in the sensitive sites (P-loop, switch I and II regions. Such fluctuations may promote instability in these protein regions and hamper GTP binding. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together with the results obtained from MD and PMF simulations, the present findings implicate fluctuations at the sensitive sites (P-loop, switch I and II regions. Our findings revealed that KRAS mutations in codon 13 have similar behavior as KRAS WT. To gain a better insight into why patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC and the KRAS c.38G>A (p.G13D mutation appear to benefit from anti-EGFR therapy, the role of the KRAS c.38G>A (p.G13D mutation in mCRC needs to be further investigated.

  2. Mutation screening and association analysis of six candidate genes for autism on chromosome 7q

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonora, E.; Lamb, J.A.; Barnby, G.

    2005-01-01

    in the genes CUTL1, LAMB1 and PTPRZ1. Analysis of genetic variants provided evidence for association with autism for one of the new missense changes identified in LAMB1; this effect was stronger in a subgroup of affected male sibling pair families, implying a possible specific sex-related effect......Genetic studies have provided evidence for an autism susceptibility locus (AUTS1) on chromosome 7q. Screening for mutations in six genes mapping to 7q, CUTL1, SRPK2, SYPL, LAMB1, NRCAM and PTPRZ1 in 48 unrelated individuals with autism led to the identification of several new coding variants...

  3. Value of TIRADS, BSRTC and FNA-BRAF V600E mutation analysis in differentiating high-risk thyroid nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-zhi; Xu, Ting; Cui, Dai; Li, Xiao; Yao, Qing; Gong, Hai-yan; Liu, Xiao-yun; Chen, Huan-huan; Jiang, Lin; Ye, Xin-hua; Zhang, Zhi-hong; Shen, Mei-ping; Duan, Yu; Yang, Tao; Wu, Xiao-hong

    2015-11-24

    The thyroid imaging reporting and data system (TIRADS) and Bethesda system for reporting thyroid cytopathology (BSRTC) have been used for interpretation of ultrasound and fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) results of thyroid nodules. BRAF(V600E) mutation analysis is a molecular tool in diagnosing thyroid carcinoma. Our objective was to compare the diagnostic value of these methods in differentiating high-risk thyroid nodules. Total 220 patients with high-risk thyroid nodules were recruited in this prospective study. They all underwent ultrasound, FNAC and BRAF(V600E) mutation analysis. The sensitivity and specificity of TIRADS were 73.1% and 88.4%. BSRTC had higher specificity (97.7%) and similar sensitivity (77.6%) compared with TIRADS. The sensitivity and specificity of BRAF(V600E) mutation (85.1%, 100%) were the highest. The combination of BSRTC and BRAF(V600E) mutation analysis significantly increased the efficiency, with 97.8% sensitivity, 97.7% specificity. In patients with BSRTC I-III, the mutation rate of BRAF(V600E) was 64.5% in nodules with TIRADS 4B compared with 8.4% in nodules with TIRADS 3 or 4A (P value in differentiating high-risk thyroid nodules. The TIRADS is useful in selecting high-risk patients for FNAB and patients with BSRTC I-III for BRAF(V600E) mutation analysis.

  4. Mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase mutations underlie fatal infantile Alpers encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elo, Jenni M; Yadavalli, Srujana S; Euro, Liliya

    2012-01-01

    was impaired. Our results imply that the three FARS2 mutations directly impair aminoacylation function and stability of mtPheRS, leading to a decrease in overall tRNA charging capacity. This study establishes a new genetic cause of infantile mitochondrial Alpers encephalopathy and reports a new mitochondrial...

  5. Mutation analysis of the ERCC4/FANCQ gene in hereditary breast cancer.

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    Sandra Kohlhase

    Full Text Available The ERCC4 protein forms a structure-specific endonuclease involved in the DNA damage response. Different cancer syndromes such as a subtype of Xeroderma pigmentosum, XPF, and recently a subtype of Fanconi Anemia, FA-Q, have been attributed to biallelic ERCC4 gene mutations. To investigate whether monoallelic ERCC4 gene defects play some role in the inherited component of breast cancer susceptibility, we sequenced the whole ERCC4 coding region and flanking untranslated portions in a series of 101 Byelorussian and German breast cancer patients selected for familial disease (set 1, n = 63 or for the presence of the rs1800067 risk haplotype (set 2, n = 38. This study confirmed six known and one novel exonic variants, including four missense substitutions but no truncating mutation. Missense substitution p.R415Q (rs1800067, a previously postulated breast cancer susceptibility allele, was subsequently screened for in a total of 3,698 breast cancer cases and 2,868 controls from Germany, Belarus or Russia. The Gln415 allele appeared protective against breast cancer in the German series, with the strongest effect for ductal histology (OR 0.67; 95%CI 0.49; 0.92; p = 0.003, but this association was not confirmed in the other two series, with the combined analysis yielding an overall Mantel-Haenszel OR of 0.94 (95% CI 0.81; 1.08. There was no significant effect of p.R415Q on breast cancer survival in the German patient series. The other three detected ERCC4 missense mutations included two known rare variants as well as a novel substitution, p.E17V, that we identified on a p.R415Q haplotype background. The p.E17V mutation is predicted to be probably damaging but was present in just one heterozygous patient. We conclude that the contribution of ERCC4/FANCQ coding mutations to hereditary breast cancer in Central and Eastern Europe is likely to be small.

  6. Detection of Anti-Hepatitis B Virus Drug Resistance Mutations Based on Multicolor Melting Curve Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Yi; Athar, Muhammad Ammar; Wu, Yuzhen; Xu, Ye; Wu, Jianhua; Xu, Zhenxing; Hayder, Zulfiqar; Khan, Saeed; Idrees, Muhammad; Nasir, Muhammad Israr; Liao, Yiqun; Li, Qingge

    2016-11-01

    Detection of anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV) drug resistance mutations is critical for therapeutic decisions for chronic hepatitis B virus infection. We describe a real-time PCR-based assay using multicolor melting curve analysis (MMCA) that could accurately detect 24 HBV nucleotide mutations at 10 amino acid positions in the reverse transcriptase region of the HBV polymerase gene. The two-reaction assay had a limit of detection of 5 copies per reaction and could detect a minor mutant population (5% of the total population) with the reverse transcriptase M204V amino acid mutation in the presence of the major wild-type population when the overall concentration was 10 4 copies/μl. The assay could be finished within 3 h, and the cost of materials for each sample was less than $10. Clinical validation studies using three groups of samples from both nucleos(t)ide analog-treated and -untreated patients showed that the results for 99.3% (840/846) of the samples and 99.9% (8,454/8,460) of the amino acids were concordant with those of Sanger sequencing of the PCR amplicon from the HBV reverse transcriptase region (PCR Sanger sequencing). HBV DNA in six samples with mixed infections consisting of minor mutant subpopulations was undetected by the PCR Sanger sequencing method but was detected by MMCA, and the results were confirmed by coamplification at a lower denaturation temperature-PCR Sanger sequencing. Among the treated patients, 48.6% (103/212) harbored viruses that displayed lamivudine monoresistance, adefovir monoresistance, entecavir resistance, or lamivudine and adefovir resistance. Among the untreated patients, the Chinese group had more mutation-containing samples than did the Pakistani group (3.3% versus 0.56%). Because of its accuracy, rapidness, wide-range coverage, and cost-effectiveness, the real-time PCR assay could be a robust tool for the detection if anti-HBV drug resistance mutations in resource-limited countries. Copyright © 2016, American Society for

  7. Mutation analysis of β-thalassemia in East-Western Indian population: a recent molecular approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Parth S; Shah, Nidhi D; Ray, Hari Shankar P; Khatri, Nikunj B; Vaghasia, Ketan K; Raval, Rutvik J; Shah, Sandip C; Rao, Mandava V

    2017-01-01

    Background β-Thalassemia is the most prevalent genetic disorder in India. Its traits and coinheritance vary from mild to severe conditions, resulting in thalassemia minor, intermediate, and major, depending upon many factors. Purpose The objective of this study was to identify the incidence of β-thalassemia traits, their coinheritance, and mutations, as well as to support the patients already diagnosed with β-thalassemia in East-Western Indian population for better management. Patients and methods Seventy-five referral cases for β-thalassemia were analyzed for various β-thalassemia traits, heterozygosity, and homozygosity conditions. Blood phenotypic parameters using cell counter and capillary electrophoresis were investigated. Analyses of eight common mutations of thalassemia in India were carried out using polymerase chain reaction-amplification refractory mutation system, end point polymerase chain reaction, and DNA sequencing methods. Results Of these (75) referral cases from East-Western Indian region, 68 were positive for β-thalassemia (90.67%). The majority of case types were of β-thalassemia minor (49, 65.33%), followed by HbE traits (6, 8.0%) and β-thalassemia major, including heterozygous and homozygous (5, 6.66%; 4, 5.33%) types and then HbE homozygous (2, 2.66%), as well as one each of the HbE/β-thalassemia and HbD/β-thalassemia (1, 1.34%) combination. Mutation analysis also revealed that the highest frequency of mutation was c.92+5G>C (41, 60.29%) followed by deletion 619bp (9, 13.23%) and c.79G>A (8, 11.76%) in our study group. Five cases (nos. 24, 27, 33, 58, and 71) exhibited coinheritance between β0/β+ (2), β0/β D (1), and c.124_127delTTCT/β+ or β0(2) affecting the Rajasthani and Gujarati populations in our study of the Western region of India. Conclusion We strongly recommend these Western populations for genetic screening before adopting reproductive technologies and interracial marital relations. PMID:28546763

  8. BRAFV600E mutation and its association with clinicopathological features of colorectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Huang, Jun-Fu; Liu, Kai; Zhang, Li-Qun; Yang, Zhao; Chuai, Zheng-Ran; Wang, Yun-Xia; Shi, Da-Chuan; Huang, Qing; Fu, Wei-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogeneous disease with multiple underlying causative genetic mutations. The B-type Raf proto-oncogene (BRAF) plays an important role in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade during CRC. The presence of BRAFV600E mutation can determine the response of a tumor to chemotherapy. However, the association between the BRAFV600E mutation and the clinicopathological features of CRC remains controversial. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the effect of BRAFV600E mutation on the clinicopathological characteristics of CRC. We identified studies that examined the effect of BRAFV600E mutation on CRC within the PubMed, ISI Science Citation Index, and Embase databases. The effect of BRAFV600E on outcome parameters was estimated by odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for each study using a fixed effects or random effects model. 25 studies with a total of 11,955 CRC patients met inclusion criteria. The rate of BRAFV600 was 10.8% (1288/11955). The BRAFV600E mutation in CRC was associated with advanced TNM stage, poor differentiation, mucinous histology, microsatellite instability (MSI), CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). This mutation was also associated with female gender, older age, proximal colon, and mutL homolog 1 (MLH1) methylation. This meta-analysis demonstrated that BRAFV600E mutation was significantly correlated with adverse pathological features of CRC and distinct clinical characteristics. These data suggest that BRAFV600E mutation could be used to supplement standard clinical and pathological staging for the better management of individual CRC patients, and could be considered as a poor prognostic marker for CRC.

  9. BRAFV600E mutation and its association with clinicopathological features of colorectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC is a heterogeneous disease with multiple underlying causative genetic mutations. The B-type Raf proto-oncogene (BRAF plays an important role in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling cascade during CRC. The presence of BRAFV600E mutation can determine the response of a tumor to chemotherapy. However, the association between the BRAFV600E mutation and the clinicopathological features of CRC remains controversial. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the effect of BRAFV600E mutation on the clinicopathological characteristics of CRC. METHODS: We identified studies that examined the effect of BRAFV600E mutation on CRC within the PubMed, ISI Science Citation Index, and Embase databases. The effect of BRAFV600E on outcome parameters was estimated by odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs for each study using a fixed effects or random effects model. RESULTS: 25 studies with a total of 11,955 CRC patients met inclusion criteria. The rate of BRAFV600 was 10.8% (1288/11955. The BRAFV600E mutation in CRC was associated with advanced TNM stage, poor differentiation, mucinous histology, microsatellite instability (MSI, CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP. This mutation was also associated with female gender, older age, proximal colon, and mutL homolog 1 (MLH1 methylation. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis demonstrated that BRAFV600E mutation was significantly correlated with adverse pathological features of CRC and distinct clinical characteristics. These data suggest that BRAFV600E mutation could be used to supplement standard clinical and pathological staging for the better management of individual CRC patients, and could be considered as a poor prognostic marker for CRC.

  10. Analysis of the Effects of a gerP Mutation on the Germination of Spores of Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    REPORT Analysis of the effects of a gerP mutation on the germination of spores of Bacillus subtilis 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF... Bacillus subtilis spores with a gerP mutation triggered spore germination via nutrient germinant receptors (GRs) slowly, although this defect was...gerP, Bacillus subtilis , dipicolinic acid Xuan Y. Butzin, Anthony J. Troiano, William H. Coleman, Keren K. Griffiths, Christopher J. Doona, Florence E

  11. Mutation analysis of the COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes in Vietnamese patients with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho Duy, Binh; Zhytnik, Lidiia; Maasalu, Katre; Kändla, Ivo; Prans, Ele; Reimann, Ene; Märtson, Aare; Kõks, Sulev

    2016-08-12

    The genetics of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) have not been studied in a Vietnamese population before. We performed mutational analysis of the COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes in 91 unrelated OI patients of Vietnamese origin. We then systematically characterized the mutation profiles of these two genes which are most commonly related to OI. Genomic DNA was extracted from EDTA-preserved blood according to standard high-salt extraction methods. Sequence analysis and pathogenic variant identification was performed with Mutation Surveyor DNA variant analysis software. Prediction of the pathogenicity of mutations was conducted using Alamut Visual software. The presence of variants was checked against Dalgleish's osteogenesis imperfecta mutation database. The sample consisted of 91 unrelated osteogenesis imperfecta patients. We identified 54 patients with COL1A1/2 pathogenic variants; 33 with COL1A1 and 21 with COL1A2. Two patients had multiple pathogenic variants. Seventeen novel COL1A1 and 10 novel COL1A2 variants were identified. The majority of identified COL1A1/2 pathogenic variants occurred in a glycine substitution (36/56, 64.3 %), usually serine (23/36, 63.9 %). We found two pathogenic variants of the COL1A1 gene c.2461G > A (p.Gly821Ser) in four unrelated patients and one, c.2005G > A (p.Ala669Thr), in two unrelated patients. Our data showed a lower number of collagen OI pathogenic variants in Vietnamese patients compared to reported rates for Asian populations. The OI mutational profile of the Vietnamese population is unique and related to the presence of a high number of recessive mutations in non-collagenous OI genes. Further analysis of OI patients negative for collagen mutations, is required.

  12. Pitfalls in molecular analysis for mismatch repair deficiency in a family with biallelic pms2 germline mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenen, C H M; Geurts-Giele, W R R; Dubbink, H J; Reddingius, R; van den Ouweland, A M; Tops, C M J; van de Klift, H M; Kuipers, E J; van Leerdam, M E; Dinjens, W N M; Wagner, A

    2011-12-01

    Heterozygous germline mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 cause Lynch syndrome. Biallelic mutations in the MMR genes are associated with a childhood cancer syndrome [constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMR-D)]. This is predominantly characterized by hematological malignancies and tumors of the bowel and brain, often associated with signs of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Diagnostic strategies for selection of patients for MMR gene analysis include analysis of microsatellite instability (MSI) and immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of MMR proteins in tumor tissue. We report the clinical characterization and molecular analyses of tumor specimens from a family with biallelic PMS2 germline mutations. This illustrates the pitfalls of present molecular screening strategies. Tumor tissues of five family members were analyzed for MSI and IHC. MSI was observed in only one of the analyzed tissues. However, IHC analysis of brain tumor tissue of the index patient and his sister showed absence of PMS2 expression, and germline mutation analyses showed biallelic mutations in PMS2: p.Ser46IIe and p.Pro246fs. The same heterozygous mutations were confirmed in the father and mother, respectively. These data support the conclusion that in case of a clinical phenotype of CMMR-D, it is advisable to routinely combine MSI analysis with IHC analysis for the expression of MMR proteins. With inconclusive or conflicting results, germline mutation analysis of the MMR genes should be considered after thorough counselling of the patients and/or their relatives. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Molecular analysis of point mutations in a barley genome exposed to MNU and gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurowska, Marzena, E-mail: mkurowsk@us.edu.pl [Department of Genetics, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, University of Silesia, Jagiellonska 28, 40-032 Katowice (Poland); Labocha-Pawlowska, Anna; Gnizda, Dominika; Maluszynski, Miroslaw; Szarejko, Iwona [Department of Genetics, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, University of Silesia, Jagiellonska 28, 40-032 Katowice (Poland)

    2012-10-15

    We present studies aimed at determining the types and frequencies of mutations induced in the barley genome after treatment with chemical (N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, MNU) and physical (gamma rays) mutagens. We created M{sub 2} populations of a doubled haploid line and used them for the analysis of mutations in targeted DNA sequences and over an entire barley genome using TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes) and AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) technique, respectively. Based on the TILLING analysis of the total DNA sequence of 4,537,117 bp in the MNU population, the average mutation density was estimated as 1/504 kb. Only one nucleotide change was found after an analysis of 3,207,444 bp derived from the highest dose of gamma rays applied. MNU was clearly a more efficient mutagen than gamma rays in inducing point mutations in barley. The majority (63.6%) of the MNU-induced nucleotide changes were transitions, with a similar number of G > A and C > T substitutions. The similar share of G > A and C > T transitions indicates a lack of bias in the repair of O{sup 6}-methylguanine lesions between DNA strands. There was, however, a strong specificity of the nucleotide surrounding the O{sup 6}-meG at the -1 position. Purines formed 81% of nucleotides observed at the -1 site. Scanning the barley genome with AFLP markers revealed ca. a three times higher level of AFLP polymorphism in MNU-treated as compared to the gamma-irradiated population. In order to check whether AFLP markers can really scan the whole barley genome for mutagen-induced polymorphism, 114 different AFLP products, were cloned and sequenced. 94% of bands were heterogenic, with some bands containing up to 8 different amplicons. The polymorphic AFLP products were characterised in terms of their similarity to the records deposited in a GenBank database. The types of sequences present in the polymorphic bands reflected the organisation of the barley genome.

  14. Catalytic mechanism and inhibition of tRNA (Uracil-5-)methyltransferase: evidence for covalent catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santi, D.V.; Hardy, L.W.

    1987-01-01

    tRNA (Ura-5-) methyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to the 5-carbon of a specific Urd residue in tRNA. This results in stoichiometric release of tritium from [5- 3 H] Urd-labeled substrate tRNA isolated from methyltransferase-deficient Escherichia coli. The enzyme also catalyzes an AdoMet-independent exchange reaction between [5- 3 H]-Urd-labeled substrate tRNA and protons of water at a rate that is about 1% that of the normal methylation reaction, but with identical stoichiometry. S-Adenosylhomocysteine inhibits the rate of the exchange reaction by 2-3-fold, whereas an analog having the sulfur of AdoMet replaced by nitrogen accelerates the exchange reaction 9-fold. In the presence (but not absence) of AdoMet, 5-fluorouracil-substituted tRNA (FUra-tRNA) leads to the first-order inactivation of the enzyme. This is accompanied by the formation of a stable covalent complex containing the enzyme, FUra-tRNA, and the methyl group AdoMet. A mechanism for catalysis is proposed that explains both the 5-H exchange reaction and the inhibition by FUra-tRNA: the enzyme forms a covalent Michael adduct with substrate or inhibitor tRNA by attack of a nucleophilic group of the enzyme at carbon 6 of the pyrimidine residue to be modified. As a result, an anion equivalent is generated at carbon 5 that is sufficiently reactive to be methylated by AdoMet. Preliminary experiments and precedents suggest that the nucleophilic catalyst of the enzyme is a thiol group of cysteine. The potent irreversible inhibition by FUra-tRNA suggest that a mechanism for the RNA effects of FUra may also involve irreversible inhibition of RNA-modifying enzymes

  15. tRNA's wobble decoding of the genome: 40 years of modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agris, Paul F; Vendeix, Franck A P; Graham, William D

    2007-02-09

    The genetic code is degenerate, in that 20 amino acids are encoded by 61 triplet codes. In 1966, Francis Crick hypothesized that the cell's limited number of tRNAs decoded the genome by recognizing more than one codon. The ambiguity of that recognition resided in the third base-pair, giving rise to the Wobble Hypothesis. Post-transcriptional modifications at tRNA's wobble position 34, especially modifications of uridine 34, enable wobble to occur. The Modified Wobble Hypothesis proposed in 1991 that specific modifications of a tRNA wobble nucleoside shape the anticodon architecture in such a manner that interactions were restricted to the complementary base plus a single wobble pairing for amino acids with twofold degenerate codons. However, chemically different modifications at position 34 would expand the ability of a tRNA to read three or even four of the fourfold degenerate codons. One foundation of Crick's Wobble Hypothesis was that a near-constant geometry of canonical base-pairing be maintained in forming all three base-pairs between the tRNA anticodon and mRNA codon on the ribosome. In accepting an aminoacyl-tRNA, the ribosome requires maintenance of a specific geometry for the anticodon-codon base-pairing. However, it is the post-transcriptional modifications at tRNA wobble position 34 and purine 37, 3'-adjacent to the anticodon, that pre-structure the anticodon domain to ensure the correct codon binding. The modifications create both the architecture and the stability needed for decoding through restraints on anticodon stereochemistry and conformational space, and through selective hydrogen bonding. A physicochemical understanding of modified nucleoside contributions to the tRNA anticodon domain architecture and its decoding of the genome has advanced RNA world evolutionary theory, the principles of RNA chemistry, and the application of this knowledge to the introduction of new amino acids to proteins.

  16. Ocular Phenotype Analysis of a Family With Biallelic Mutations in the BEST1 Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharon, Dror; Al-Hamdani, Sermed; Engelsberg, Karl

    2014-01-01

    in the inner nuclear layer, no light rise in the electro-oculography, and a reduced central but preserved peripheral retinal function by multifocal electroretinography. Full-field electroretinography demonstrated a reduced rod response and inner retina dysfunction. Retinal structure was normal in all 3 family......PURPOSE: To investigate the genetic cause and perform a comprehensive clinical analysis of a Danish family with autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy; to investigate whether Bestrophin may be expressed in normal human retina. DESIGN: Retrospective clinical and molecular genetic analysis...... and immunohistochemical observational study. METHODS: setting: National referral center. participants: A family with 5 individuals and biallelic BEST1 mutations, and enucleated eyes from 2 individuals with nonaffected retinas. observation procedures: Molecular genetic analysis included sequencing of BEST1 and co...

  17. Crosslinking of tRNA containing a long extra arm to elongation factor Tu by trans-diamminedichloroplatinum(II)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Nils-Jørgen; Wikman, Friedrik; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1990-01-01

    A tRNA containing a long extra arm, namely E. coli tRNA1Leu has been crosslinked to elongation factor Tu, with the crosslinking reagent trans-diamminedichloroplatinum(II). The nucleotide involved in the crosslinking was identified to be a guanosine in the variable region at position 47F or 47G....

  18. Targeted ultradeep next-generation sequencing as a method for KIT D816V mutation analysis in mastocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielsgaard Kristensen, Thomas; Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd; Vestergaard, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    mutation levels. In this study, we established an NGS-based KIT mutation analysis and analyzed the sensitivity of D816V detection using the Ion Torrent platform. Eighty-two individual NGS analyses were included in the study. All samples were also analyzed using highly sensitive KIT D816V mutation...

  19. Deciphering KRAS and NRAS mutated clone dynamics in MLL-AF4 paediatric leukaemia by ultra deep sequencing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentin, Luca; Bresolin, Silvia; Giarin, Emanuela; Bardini, Michela; Serafin, Valentina; Accordi, Benedetta; Fais, Franco; Tenca, Claudya; De Lorenzo, Paola; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Kronnie, Geertruy Te; Basso, Giuseppe

    2016-10-04

    To induce and sustain the leukaemogenic process, MLL-AF4+ leukaemia seems to require very few genetic alterations in addition to the fusion gene itself. Studies of infant and paediatric patients with MLL-AF4+ B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BCP-ALL) have reported mutations in KRAS and NRAS with incidences ranging from 25 to 50%. Whereas previous studies employed Sanger sequencing, here we used next generation amplicon deep sequencing for in depth evaluation of RAS mutations in 36 paediatric patients at diagnosis of MLL-AF4+ leukaemia. RAS mutations including those in small sub-clones were detected in 63.9% of patients. Furthermore, the mutational analysis of 17 paired samples at diagnosis and relapse revealed complex RAS clone dynamics and showed that the mutated clones present at relapse were almost all originated from clones that were already detectable at diagnosis and survived to the initial therapy. Finally, we showed that mutated patients were indeed characterized by a RAS related signature at both transcriptional and protein levels and that the targeting of the RAS pathway could be of beneficial for treatment of MLL-AF4+ BCP-ALL clones carrying somatic RAS mutations.

  20. [Mutation analysis of FAH gene in patients with tyrosinemia type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Li-Min; Fang, Ling-Juan; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Lu, Wei; Chen, Rui; Li, Li-Ting; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Jian-She

    2013-04-01

    . Alpha-fetoprotein 412.8 µg/L, levels of tyrosine in blood and succinylacetone in urine were 835.8 µmol/L and 27.48 µmol/L. Rickets did not improve after administration of calcium and vitamine D3. She is homozygous for the mutation c.1027G > A/c.1027G > A, which predicts G343R. The parents were mutation carriers. Analysis by Clustal X on the alignment of amino acids residual reservation among different species showed that the locative amino acid was highly conserved. Polyphen software predicted G343R was probably damaging (PISC score 3.235). Children with tyrosinemia type 1 can have manifestations of persistent diarrhea or late-onset rickets. Physical examination can reveal hepatosplenomegaly, laboratory tests indicate markedly elevated serum concentration of alpha-fetoprotein and alkaline phosphatase in plasma and succinylacetone in urine, other members in family may have tyrosinemias or parents are consanguineous. Mutations c.455G > A and c.1027G > A can be detected in FAH gene of Chinese children.

  1. Differential Regulation of rRNA and tRNA Transcription from the rRNA-tRNA Composite Operon in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiraku Takada

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli contains seven rRNA operons, each consisting of the genes for three rRNAs (16S, 23S and 5S rRNA in this order and one or two tRNA genes in the spacer between 16S and 23S rRNA genes and one or two tRNA genes in the 3' proximal region. All of these rRNA and tRNA genes are transcribed from two promoters, P1 and P2, into single large precursors that are afterward processed to individual rRNAs and tRNAs by a set of RNases. In the course of Genomic SELEX screening of promoters recognized by RNA polymerase (RNAP holoenzyme containing RpoD sigma, a strong binding site was identified within 16S rRNA gene in each of all seven rRNA operons. The binding in vitro of RNAP RpoD holoenzyme to an internal promoter, referred to the promoter of riRNA (an internal RNA of the rRNA operon, within each 16S rRNA gene was confirmed by gel shift assay and AFM observation. Using this riRNA promoter within the rrnD operon as a representative, transcription in vitro was detected with use of the purified RpoD holoenzyme, confirming the presence of a constitutive promoter in this region. LacZ reporter assay indicated that this riRNA promoter is functional in vivo. The location of riRNA promoter in vivo as identified using a set of reporter plasmids agrees well with that identified in vitro. Based on transcription profile in vitro and Northern blot analysis in vivo, the majority of transcript initiated from this riRNA promoter was estimated to terminate near the beginning of 23S rRNA gene, indicating that riRNA leads to produce the spacer-coded tRNA. Under starved conditions, transcription of the rRNA operon is markedly repressed to reduce the intracellular level of ribosomes, but the levels of both riRNA and its processed tRNAGlu stayed unaffected, implying that riRNA plays a role in the continued steady-state synthesis of tRNAs from the spacers of rRNA operons. We then propose that the tRNA genes organized within the spacers of rRNA-tRNA composite operons

  2. Association of telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutations with clinicopathological features and prognosis of thyroid cancer: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su X

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Xingyun Su,1 Xiaoxia Jiang,1 Weibin Wang,1 Haiyong Wang,1 Xin Xu,2 Aihui Lin,1 Xiaodong Teng,3 Huiling Wu,4 Lisong Teng1 1Department of Surgical Oncology, 2Department of Medical Oncology, 3Department of Pathology, 4Department of Plastic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The clinicopathological and prognostic significance of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT promoter mutations have been widely investigated in thyroid cancer; however, the results are still discrepant. Systematic searches were performed in PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Ovid, and the Cochran Library databases for relevant articles prior to April 2016. Mutation rates were synthesized by R statistical software. The odds ratio or standardized mean difference with 95% confidence interval was pooled by Stata. A total of 22 studies with 4,907 cases were included in this meta-analysis. TERT promoter mutations tended to present in aggressive histological types including poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (33.37%, anaplastic thyroid cancer (38.69%, and tall-cell variant papillary thyroid cancer (30.23%. These promoter mutations were likely to exist in older patients and males and were well associated with larger tumor size, extrathyroidal extension, vascular invasion, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, advanced tumor stage, disease recurrence/persistence, and mortality. In addition, TERT promoter mutations (especially C228T tended to coexist with BRAFV600E mutation, which indicated more aggressive tumor behavior. Therefore, TERT promoter mutations may be promising biomarkers for early diagnosis, risk stratification, prognostic prediction, and management of thyroid cancer. Keywords: TERT promoter mutations, thyroid cancer, clinicopathological features, prognosis, BRAFV600E mutation

  3. Genotype-phenotype analysis of a rare type of osteogenesis imperfecta in four Chinese families with WNT1 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Song, Lijie; Ma, Doudou; Lv, Fang; Xu, Xiaojie; Wang, Jianyi; Xia, Weibo; Jiang, Yan; Wang, Ou; Song, Yuwen; Xing, Xiaoping; Asan; Li, Mei

    2016-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare inherited disease characterized by increased bone fragility and vulnerability to fractures. Recently, WNT1 is identified as a new candidate gene for OI, here we detect pathogenic mutations in WNT1 and analyze the genotype-phenotype association in four Chinese families with OI. We designed a targeted next generation sequencing panel with known fourteen OI-related genes. We applied the approach to detect pathogenic mutations in OI patients and confirmed the mutations with Sanger sequencing and cosegregation analysis. Clinical fractures, bone mineral density (BMD) and the other clinical manifestations were evaluated. We also observed the effects of bisphosphonates in OI patients with WNT1 mutations. Four compound heterozygous mutations (c.110T>C; c.505 G>T; c. 385G>A; c.506 G>A) in WNT1 were detected in three unrelated families. These four mutations had not been reported yet. A recurrent homozygous mutation (c.506dupG) was identified in the other two families. These patients had moderate to severe OI, white to blue sclera, absence of dentinogenesis imperfecta and no brain malformation. We did not observe clear genotype-phenotype correlation in WNT1 mutated OI patients. Though bisphosphonates increased BMD in WNT1 related OI patients, height did not increase and fracture continued. We reported four novel heterozygous variants and confirmed a previous reported WNT1 mutation in four Chinese families with a clinical diagnosis of OI. Our study expanded OI spectrum and confirmed moderate to severe bone fragility induced by WNT1 defects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Screening of point mutations by multiple SSCP analysis in the dystrophin gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasa, A.; Baiget, M.; Gallano, P. [Hospital Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain)

    1994-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal, X-linked neuromuscular disorder. The population frequency of DMD is one in approximately 3500 boys, of which one third is thought to be a new mutant. The DMD gene is the largest known to date, spanning over 2,3 Mb in band Xp21.2; 79 exons are transcribed into a 14 Kb mRNA coding for a protein of 427 kD which has been named dystrophin. It has been shown that about 65% of affected boys have a gene deletion with a wide variation in localization and size. The remaining affected individuals who have no detectable deletions or duplications would probably carry more subtle mutations that are difficult to detect. These mutations occur in several different exons and seem to be unique to single patients. Their identification represents a formidable goal because of the large size and complexity of the dystrophin gene. SSCP is a very efficient method for the detection of point mutations if the parameters that affect the separation of the strands are optimized for a particular DNA fragment. The multiple SSCP allows the simultaneous study of several exons, and implies the use of different conditions because no single set of conditions will be optimal for all fragments. Seventy-eight DMD patients with no deletion or duplication in the dystrophin gene were selected for the multiple SSCP analysis. Genomic DNA from these patients was amplified using the primers described for the diagnosis procedure (muscle promoter and exons 3, 8, 12, 16, 17, 19, 32, 45, 48 and 51). We have observed different mobility shifts in bands corresponding to exons 8, 12, 43 and 51. In exons 17 and 45, altered electrophoretic patterns were found in different samples identifying polymorphisms already described.

  5. Rich RNA Structure Landscapes Revealed by Mutate-and-Map Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Cordero

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Landscapes exhibiting multiple secondary structures arise in natural RNA molecules that modulate gene expression, protein synthesis, and viral infection [corrected]. We report herein that high-throughput chemical experiments can isolate an RNA's multiple alternative secondary structures as they are stabilized by systematic mutagenesis (mutate-and-map, M2 and that a computational algorithm, REEFFIT, enables unbiased reconstruction of these states' structures and populations. In an in silico benchmark on non-coding RNAs with complex landscapes, M2-REEFFIT recovers 95% of RNA helices present with at least 25% population while maintaining a low false discovery rate (10% and conservative error estimates. In experimental benchmarks, M2-REEFFIT recovers the structure landscapes of a 35-nt MedLoop hairpin, a 110-nt 16S rRNA four-way junction with an excited state, a 25-nt bistable hairpin, and a 112-nt three-state adenine riboswitch with its expression platform, molecules whose characterization previously required expert mutational analysis and specialized NMR or chemical mapping experiments. With this validation, M2-REEFFIT enabled tests of whether artificial RNA sequences might exhibit complex landscapes in the absence of explicit design. An artificial flavin mononucleotide riboswitch and a randomly generated RNA sequence are found to interconvert between three or more states, including structures for which there was no design, but that could be stabilized through mutations. These results highlight the likely pervasiveness of rich landscapes with multiple secondary structures in both natural and artificial RNAs and demonstrate an automated chemical/computational route for their empirical characterization.

  6. Unexpected expansion of tRNA substrate recognition by the yeast m1G9 methyltransferase Trm10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinehart, William E; Henderson, Jeremy C; Jackman, Jane E

    2013-08-01

    N-1 Methylation of the nearly invariant purine residue found at position 9 of tRNA is a nucleotide modification found in multiple tRNA species throughout Eukarya and Archaea. First discovered in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the tRNA methyltransferase Trm10 is a highly conserved protein both necessary and sufficient to catalyze all known instances of m1G9 modification in yeast. Although there are 19 unique tRNA species that contain a G at position 9 in yeast, and whose fully modified sequence is known, only 9 of these tRNA species are modified with m1G9 in wild-type cells. The elements that allow Trm10 to distinguish between structurally similar tRNA species are not known, and sequences that are shared between all substrate or all nonsubstrate tRNAs have not been identified. Here, we demonstrate that the in vitro methylation activity of yeast Trm10 is not sufficient to explain the observed pattern of modification in vivo, as additional tRNA species are substrates for Trm10 m1G9 methyltransferase activity. Similarly, overexpression of Trm10 in yeast yields m1G9 containing tRNA species that are ordinarily unmodified in vivo. Thus, yeast Trm10 has a significantly broader tRNA substrate specificity than is suggested by the observed pattern of modification in wild-type yeast. These results may shed light onto the suggested involvement of Trm10 in other pathways in other organisms, particularly in higher eukaryotes that contain up to three different genes with sequence similarity to the single TRM10 gene in yeast, and where these other enzymes have been implicated in pathways beyond tRNA processing.

  7. Structural requirements for the binding of tRNA Lys3 to reverse transcriptase of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Essink, B. B.; Das, A. T.; Berkhout, B.

    1995-01-01

    Reverse transcription of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA genome is primed by the cellular tRNA Lys3 molecule. Packaging of this tRNA primer during virion assembly is thought to be mediated by specific interactions with the reverse transcriptase (RT) protein. Portions of the tRNA

  8. Aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss is associated with the G7444A mutation in the mitochondrial COI/tRNASer(UCN) genes in two Chinese families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yi; Qian Yaping; Tang Xiaowen; Wang Jindan; Yang Li; Liao Zhisu; Li Ronghua; Ji Jinzhang; Li Zhiyuan; Chen Jianfu; Choo, Daniel I.; Lu Jianxin; Guan Minxin

    2006-01-01

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of two Chinese families with aminoglycoside induced and non-syndromic hearing impairment. Clinical and genetic evaluations revealed the variable severity and age-of-onset in hearing impairment in these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of hearing impairment in these Chinese families. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphism, in addition to the identical G7444A mutation associated with hearing loss. Indeed, the G7444A mutation in the CO1 gene and the precursor of tRNA Ser(UCN) gene is present in homoplasmy only in the maternal lineage of those pedigrees but not other members of these families and 164 Chinese controls. Their mitochondrial genomes belong to the Eastern Asian haplogroups C5a and D4a, respectively. In fact, the occurrence of the G7444A mutation in these several genetically unrelated subjects affected by hearing impairment strongly indicates that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of hearing impairment. However, there was the absence of other functionally significant mtDNA mutations in two Chinese pedigrees carrying the G7444A mutation. Therefore, nuclear modifier gene(s) or aminoglycoside(s) may play a role in the phenotypic expression of the deafness-associated G7444A mutation in these Chinese pedigrees

  9. NUTRIGENOMIC ANALYSIS OF C677T MUTATION OF MTHFR GENE IN SLOVAK POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Bulla

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Total of 124 individuals originated from Slovak Republic has been nutrignomically analysed. Analysis was focused to mutation C677T of MTHFR gene detection and analysis of mutant genotypes frequency. Observed frequency of allele 677C was 0.6998 and allelic frequency of mutant variant 677T was 0.3992. Genotype frequency of mutant heterozygotes with 71% activity of MTHFR enzyme was 0,391 and mutant homozygotes with 33% MTHFR enzyme activity was 0.153. Result shows 64% of Slovak has decreased activity of enzyme MTHFR, and 14.3% of Slovak has predisposition to cancer, cardio vascular diseases, loss of fertility and many others complications according to improper nutrition, low folic acid and B12 vitamin intake.  doi:10.5219/136

  10. Lung cancer mutation profile of EGFR, ALK, and KRAS: Meta-analysis and comparison of never and ever smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Aaron M; Sun, Kathie Y; Ruestow, Peter; Cowan, Dallas M; Madl, Amy K

    2016-12-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. While the majority of lung cancers are associated with tobacco smoke, approximately 10-15% of U.S. lung cancers occur in never smokers. Evidence suggests that lung cancer in never smokers appears to be a distinct disease caused by driver mutations which are different than the genetic pathways observed with lung cancer in smokers. A meta-analysis of human epidemiologic data was conducted to evaluate the profile of common or therapy-targetable mutations in lung cancers of never and ever smokers. Epidemiologic studies (N=167) representing over 63,000 lung cancer cases were identified and used to calculate summary odds ratios for lung cancer in never and ever smokers containing gene mutations: EGFR, chromosomal rearrangements and fusion of EML4 and ALK, and KRAS. This analysis also considered the effect of histopathology, smoking status, sex, and ethnicity. There were significantly increased odds of presenting the EGFR and ALK-EML4 mutations in 1) adenocarcinomas compared to non-small cell lung cancer and 2) never smokers compared to ever smokers. The prevalence of EGFR mutations was higher in Asian women as compared to women of Caucasian/Mixed ethnicity. As the smoking history increased, there was a decreased odds for exhibiting the EGFR mutation, particularly for cases >30 pack-years. Compared to ever smokers, never smokers had a decreased odds of KRAS mutations among those of Caucasian/Mixed ethnicity (OR=0.22, 95% CI: 0.17-0.29) and those of Asian ethnicity (OR=0.39, 95% CI: 0.30-0.50). Our findings show that key driver mutations and several patient features are highly prevalent in lung cancers of never smokers. These associations may be helpful as patient demographic models are developed to predict successful outcomes of targeted therapeutic interventions NSCLC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Somatic mutation load of estrogen receptor-positive breast tumors predicts overall survival: an analysis of genome sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haricharan, Svasti; Bainbridge, Matthew N; Scheet, Paul; Brown, Powel H

    2014-07-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in women. While there are several effective therapies for breast cancer and important single gene prognostic/predictive markers, more than 40,000 women die from this disease every year. The increasing availability of large-scale genomic datasets provides opportunities for identifying factors that influence breast cancer survival in smaller, well-defined subsets. The purpose of this study was to investigate the genomic landscape of various breast cancer subtypes and its potential associations with clinical outcomes. We used statistical analysis of sequence data generated by the Cancer Genome Atlas initiative including somatic mutation load (SML) analysis, Kaplan-Meier survival curves, gene mutational frequency, and mutational enrichment evaluation to study the genomic landscape of breast cancer. We show that ER(+), but not ER(-), tumors with high SML associate with poor overall survival (HR = 2.02). Further, these high mutation load tumors are enriched for coincident mutations in both DNA damage repair and ER signature genes. While it is known that somatic mutations in specific genes affect breast cancer survival, this study is the first to identify that SML may constitute an important global signature for a subset of ER(+) tumors prone to high mortality. Moreover, although somatic mutations in individual DNA damage genes affect clinical outcome, our results indicate that coincident mutations in DNA damage response and signature ER genes may prove more informative for ER(+) breast cancer survival. Next generation sequencing may prove an essential tool for identifying pathways underlying poor outcomes and for tailoring therapeutic strategies.

  12. The yeast rapid tRNA decay pathway competes with elongation factor 1A for substrate tRNAs and acts on tRNAs lacking one or more of several modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewe, Joshua M; Whipple, Joseph M; Chernyakov, Irina; Jaramillo, Laura N; Phizicky, Eric M

    2012-10-01

    The structural and functional integrity of tRNA is crucial for translation. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, certain aberrant pre-tRNA species are subject to nuclear surveillance, leading to 3' exonucleolytic degradation, and certain mature tRNA species are subject to rapid tRNA decay (RTD) if they are appropriately hypomodified or bear specific destabilizing mutations, leading to 5'-3' exonucleolytic degradation by Rat1 and Xrn1. Thus, trm8-Δ trm4-Δ strains are temperature sensitive due to lack of m(7)G(46) and m(5)C and the consequent RTD of tRNA(Val(AAC)), and tan1-Δ trm44-Δ strains are temperature sensitive due to lack of ac(4)C(12) and Um(44) and the consequent RTD of tRNA(Ser(CGA)) and tRNA(Ser(UGA)). It is unknown how the RTD pathway interacts with translation and other cellular processes, and how generally this pathway acts on hypomodified tRNAs. We provide evidence here that elongation factor 1A (EF-1A) competes with the RTD pathway for substrate tRNAs, since its overexpression suppresses the tRNA degradation and the growth defect of strains subject to RTD, whereas reduced levels of EF-1A have the opposite effect. We also provide evidence that RTD acts on a variety of tRNAs lacking one or more different modifications, since trm1-Δ trm4-Δ mutants are subject to RTD of tRNA(Ser(CGA)) and tRNA(Ser(UGA)) due to lack of m(2,2)G(26) and m(5)C, and since trm8-Δ, tan1-Δ, and trm1-Δ single mutants are each subject to RTD. These results demonstrate that RTD interacts with the translation machinery and acts widely on hypomodified tRNAs.

  13. [Children with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: clinical data analysis and mutations analysis of KAL1 and FGFR1 gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Miao; Gong, Chunxiu; Qi, Zhan; Wu, Di; Liu, Min; Gu, Yi; Cao, Bingyan; Li, Wenjing; Liang, Xuejun

    2014-12-01

    delayed puberty, involving only one parent in 6 families, involving both in 2 families and the other one was an uncle having micropenis with a child. Among these 21 cases, only one boy's father had hyposmia and his first emission age was 14-15 years. Eleven patients accompanied abnormal sense of smelling and the olfactory organ abnormalities on MRI, 4 had olfactory organ abnormalities on MRI while they had good smelling function self-reportedly. We got 15 samples (12 KS and 3 nIHH cases) to screen the mutation of KAL1 (14 exons) and FGFR1 (18 exons). A splicing mutation c.1062+1G>A in KAL1 is identified in case 17 with IHH. One novel heterozygous FGFR1 mutation, a single base deletion mutation on the exon 1 c.27delC is identified in case 14. This mutation causes the premature termination codons. This pilot research showed that IHH/KS diagnosis in children depends on clinical manifestation rather than gene analysis. Small penis or cryptorchidism, smelling abnormality and positive familial history may contribute to the KS/HH diagnosis. MRI of olfactory bulb acts as important proof for diagnosis of KS. Mutations in KAL1 and FGFR1 gene are not main causes of Kallmann syndrome.

  14. Genetic analysis of a four generation Indian family with Usher syndrome: a novel insertion mutation in MYO7A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun; Babu, Mohan; Kimberling, William J; Venkatesh, Conjeevaram P

    2004-11-24

    Usher syndrome (USH) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by deafness and retinitis pigmentosa. The purpose of this study was to determine the genetic cause of USH in a four generation Indian family. Peripheral blood samples were collected from individuals for genomic DNA isolation. To determine the linkage of this family to known USH loci, microsatellite markers were selected from the candidate regions of known loci and used to genotype the family. Exon specific intronic primers for the MYO7A gene were used to amplify DNA samples from one affected individual from the family. PCR products were subsequently sequenced to detect mutation. PCR-SSCP analysis was used to determine if the mutation segregated with the disease in the family and was not present in 50 control individuals. All affected individuals had a classic USH type I (USH1) phenotype which included deafness, vestibular dysfunction and retinitis pigmentosa. Pedigree analysis suggested an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance of USH in the family. Haplotype analysis suggested linkage of this family to the USH1B locus on chromosome 11q. DNA sequence analysis of the entire coding region of the MYO7A gene showed a novel insertion mutation c.2663_2664insA in a homozygous state in all affected individuals, resulting in truncation of MYO7A protein. This is the first study from India which reports a novel MYO7A insertion mutation in a four generation USH family. The mutation is predicted to produce a truncated MYO7A protein. With the novel mutation reported here, the total number of USH causing mutations in the MYO7A gene described to date reaches to 75.

  15. Mutation analysis of the PAH gene in phenylketonuria patients from Rio de Janeiro, Southeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Neto, Eduardo; Laranjeira, Francisco; Quelhas, Dulce; Ribeiro, Isaura; Seabra, Alexandre; Mineiro, Nicole; D M Carvalho, Lilian; Lacerda, Lúcia; G Ribeiro, Márcia

    2018-05-10

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive disease resulting from mutations in the PAH gene. Most of the patients are compound heterozygotes, and genotype is a major factor in determining the phenotypic variability of PKU. More than 1,000 variants have been described in the PAH gene. Rio de Janeiro's population has a predominance of Iberian, followed by African and Amerindian ancestries. It is expected that most PKU variants in this Brazilian state have originated in the Iberian Peninsula. However, rare European, African or pathogenic variants that are characteristic of the admixed population of the state might also be found. A total of 102 patients were included in this study. Genomic DNA was isolated from dried blood spots. Sanger sequencing was used for PAH gene variant identification. Deletions and duplications were also screened using MLPA analysis. Haplotypes were also determined. Nine (8.8%) homozygous and 93 (91.2%) compound heterozygous patients were found. The spectrum included 37 causative mutations. Missense, nonsense, and splicing pathogenic variants corresponded to 63.7%, 2.9%, and 22.6% of the mutant alleles, respectively. Large (1.5%), and small deletions, inframe (5.4%) and with frameshift (3.9%), comprised the remainder. The most frequent pathogenic variants were: p.V388M (12.7%), p.R261Q (11.8%), IVS10-11G>A (10.3%), IVS2+5G>C (6.4%), p.S349P (6.4%), p.R252W (5.4%), p.I65T (4.4%), p.T323del (4.4%), and p.P281L (3.4%). One novel variant was detected: c.934G>T (p.G312C) [rs763115697]. The three most frequent pathogenic variants in our study (34.8% of the alleles) were also the most common in other Brazilian states, Portugal, and Spain (p.V388M, p.R261Q, IVS10-11G>A), corroborating that the Iberian Peninsula is the major source of PAH mutations in Rio de Janeiro. Pathogenic variants that have other geographical origins, such IVS2+5G>C, p.G352Vfs*48, and IVS12+1G>A were also detected. Genetic drift and founder effect may have also played a role

  16. Rapid detection of most frequent Slovenian germ-line mutations in BRCA1 gene using real-time PCR and melting curve analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovic, S.; Stegel, V.

    2005-01-01

    Background. Detection of inherited mutations in cancer susceptibility genes is of great importance in some types of cancers including the colorectal cancer (mutations of APC gene in familial adenomatous polyposis - FAP, mutations in mismatch repair genes in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer - HNPCC), malignant melanoma (mutations in CDKN2A and CDK4 genes) and breast cancer (mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes). Methods. This article presents the technical data for the detection of five mutations in BRCA1 gene in breast cancer patients and their relatives. The mutations - 1806C>T, 300T>G, 300T>A, 310G>A, 5382insC - were determined by the real-time PCR and the melting curve analysis. Results and conclusion. In comparison to direct sequencing, this method proved to be sensitive and rapid enough for the routine daily determination of mutations in DNA isolated from the peripheral blood. (author)

  17. Mutation scanning analysis of genetic variation within and among Echinococcus species: implications and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, Abdul; Gasser, Robin B

    2013-07-01

    Adult tapeworms of the genus Echinococcus (family Taeniidae) occur in the small intestines of carnivorous definitive hosts and are transmitted to particular intermediate mammalian hosts, in which they develop as fluid-filled larvae (cysts) in internal organs (usually lung and liver), causing the disease echinococcosis. Echinococcus species are of major medical importance and also cause losses to the meat and livestock industries, mainly due to the condemnation of infected offal. Decisions regarding the treatment and control of echinococcosis rely on the accurate identification of species and population variants (strains). Conventional, phenetic methods for specific identification have some significant limitations. Despite advances in the development of molecular tools, there has been limited application of mutation scanning methods to species of Echinococcus. Here, we briefly review key genetic markers used for the identification of Echinococcus species and techniques for the analysis of genetic variation within and among populations, and the diagnosis of echinococcosis. We also discuss the benefits of utilizing mutation scanning approaches to elucidate the population genetics and epidemiology of Echinococcus species. These benefits are likely to become more evident following the complete characterization of the genomes of E. granulosus and E. multilocularis.

  18. Single-Cell Analysis of Human Pancreas Reveals Transcriptional Signatures of Aging and Somatic Mutation Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enge, Martin; Arda, H Efsun; Mignardi, Marco; Beausang, John; Bottino, Rita; Kim, Seung K; Quake, Stephen R

    2017-10-05

    As organisms age, cells accumulate genetic and epigenetic errors that eventually lead to impaired organ function or catastrophic transformation such as cancer. Because aging reflects a stochastic process of increasing disorder, cells in an organ will be individually affected in different ways, thus rendering bulk analyses of postmitotic adult cells difficult to interpret. Here, we directly measure the effects of aging in human tissue by performing single-cell transcriptome analysis of 2,544 human pancreas cells from eight donors spanning six decades of life. We find that islet endocrine cells from older donors display increased levels of transcriptional noise and potential fate drift. By determining the mutational history of individual cells, we uncover a novel mutational signature in healthy aging endocrine cells. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using single-cell RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data from primary cells to derive insights into genetic and transcriptional processes that operate on aging human tissue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Rapid targeted somatic mutation analysis of solid tumors in routine clinical diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magliacane, Gilda; Grassini, Greta; Bartocci, Paola; Francaviglia, Ilaria; Dal Cin, Elena; Barbieri, Gianluca; Arrigoni, Gianluigi; Pecciarini, Lorenza; Doglioni, Claudio; Cangi, Maria Giulia

    2015-10-13

    Tumor genotyping is an essential step in routine clinical practice and pathology laboratories face a major challenge in being able to provide rapid, sensitive and updated molecular tests. We developed a novel mass spectrometry multiplexed genotyping platform named PentaPanel to concurrently assess single nucleotide polymorphisms in 56 hotspots of the 5 most clinically relevant cancer genes, KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, EGFR and PIK3CA for a total of 221 detectable mutations. To both evaluate and validate the PentaPanel performance, we investigated 1025 tumor specimens of 6 different cancer types (carcinomas of colon, lung, breast, pancreas, and biliary tract, and melanomas), systematically addressing sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of our platform. Sanger sequencing was also performed for all the study samples. Our data showed that PentaPanel is a high throughput and robust tool, allowing genotyping for targeted therapy selection of 10 patients in the same run, with a practical turnaround time of 2 working days. Importantly, it was successfully used to interrogate different DNAs isolated from routinely processed specimens (formalin-fixed paraffin embedded, frozen, and cytological samples), covering all the requirements of clinical tests. In conclusion, the PentaPanel platform can provide an immediate, accurate and cost effective multiplex approach for clinically relevant gene mutation analysis in many solid tumors and its utility across many diseases can be particularly relevant in multiple clinical trials, including the new basket trial approach, aiming to identify appropriate targeted drug combination strategies.

  20. A meta-analysis of the relationship between FGFR3 and TP53 mutations in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzillet, Yann; Paoletti, Xavier; Ouerhani, Slah; Mongiat-Artus, Pierre; Soliman, Hany; de The, Hugues; Sibony, Mathilde; Denoux, Yves; Molinie, Vincent; Herault, Aurélie; Lepage, May-Linda; Maille, Pascale; Renou, Audrey; Vordos, Dimitri; Abbou, Claude-Clément; Bakkar, Ashraf; Asselain, Bernard; Kourda, Nadia; El Gaaied, Amel; Leroy, Karen; Laplanche, Agnès; Benhamou, Simone; Lebret, Thierry; Allory, Yves; Radvanyi, François

    2012-01-01

    TP53 and FGFR3 mutations are the most common mutations in bladder cancers. FGFR3 mutations are most frequent in low-grade low-stage tumours, whereas TP53 mutations are most frequent in high-grade high-stage tumours. Several studies have reported FGFR3 and TP53 mutations to be mutually exclusive events, whereas others have reported them to be independent. We carried out a meta-analysis of published findings for FGFR3 and TP53 mutations in bladder cancer (535 tumours, 6 publications) and additional unpublished data for 382 tumours. TP53 and FGFR3 mutations were not independent events for all tumours considered together (OR = 0.25 [0.18-0.37], p = 0.0001) or for pT1 tumours alone (OR = 0.47 [0.28-0.79], p = 0.0009). However, if the analysis was restricted to pTa tumours or to muscle-invasive tumours alone, FGFR3 and TP53 mutations were independent events (OR = 0.56 [0.23-1.36] (p = 0.12) and OR = 0.99 [0.37-2.7] (p = 0.35), respectively). After stratification of the tumours by stage and grade, no dependence was detected in the five tumour groups considered (pTaG1 and pTaG2 together, pTaG3, pT1G2, pT1G3, pT2-4). These differences in findings can be attributed to the putative existence of two different pathways of tumour progression in bladder cancer: the CIS pathway, in which FGFR3 mutations are rare, and the Ta pathway, in which FGFR3 mutations are frequent. TP53 mutations occur at the earliest stage of the CIS pathway, whereas they occur would much later in the Ta pathway, at the T1G3 or muscle-invasive stage.

  1. A meta-analysis of the relationship between FGFR3 and TP53 mutations in bladder cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Neuzillet

    Full Text Available TP53 and FGFR3 mutations are the most common mutations in bladder cancers. FGFR3 mutations are most frequent in low-grade low-stage tumours, whereas TP53 mutations are most frequent in high-grade high-stage tumours. Several studies have reported FGFR3 and TP53 mutations to be mutually exclusive events, whereas others have reported them to be independent. We carried out a meta-analysis of published findings for FGFR3 and TP53 mutations in bladder cancer (535 tumours, 6 publications and additional unpublished data for 382 tumours. TP53 and FGFR3 mutations were not independent events for all tumours considered together (OR = 0.25 [0.18-0.37], p = 0.0001 or for pT1 tumours alone (OR = 0.47 [0.28-0.79], p = 0.0009. However, if the analysis was restricted to pTa tumours or to muscle-invasive tumours alone, FGFR3 and TP53 mutations were independent events (OR = 0.56 [0.23-1.36] (p = 0.12 and OR = 0.99 [0.37-2.7] (p = 0.35, respectively. After stratification of the tumours by stage and grade, no dependence was detected in the five tumour groups considered (pTaG1 and pTaG2 together, pTaG3, pT1G2, pT1G3, pT2-4. These differences in findings can be attributed to the putative existence of two different pathways of tumour progression in bladder cancer: the CIS pathway, in which FGFR3 mutations are rare, and the Ta pathway, in which FGFR3 mutations are frequent. TP53 mutations occur at the earliest stage of the CIS pathway, whereas they occur would much later in the Ta pathway, at the T1G3 or muscle-invasive stage.

  2. Small finger protein of avian and murine retroviruses has nucleic acid annealing activity and positions the replication primer tRNA onto genomic RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prats, A C; Sarih, L; Gabus, C; Litvak, S; Keith, G; Darlix, J L

    1988-06-01

    Retrovirus virions carry a diploid genome associated with a large number of small viral finger protein molecules which are required for encapsidation. Our present results show that finger protein p12 of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) and p10 of murine leukaemia virus (MuLV) positions replication primer tRNA on the replication initiation site (PBS) at the 5' end of the RNA genome. An RSV mutant with a Val-Pro insertion in the finger motif of p12 is able to partially encapsidate genomic RNA but is not infectious because mutated p12 is incapable of positioning the replication primer, tRNATrp. Since all known replication competent retroviruses, and the plant virus CaMV, code for finger proteins analogous to RSV p12 or MuLV p10, the initial stage of reverse transcription in avian, mammalian and human retroviruses and in CaMV is probably controlled in an analogous way.

  3. Selection of tRNA charging quality control mechanisms that increase mistranslation of the genetic code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yadavalli, Srujana S; Ibba, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Mistranslation can follow two events during protein synthesis: production of non-cognate amino acid:transfer RNA (tRNA) pairs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) and inaccurate selection of aminoacyl-tRNAs by the ribosome. Many aaRSs actively edit non-cognate amino acids, but editing mechanisms...

  4. Ribosome dynamics and tRNA movement by time-resolved electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Niels; Konevega, Andrey L; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V; Stark, Holger

    2010-07-15

    The translocation step of protein synthesis entails large-scale rearrangements of the ribosome-transfer RNA (tRNA) complex. Here we have followed tRNA movement through the ribosome during translocation by time-resolved single-particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM). Unbiased computational sorting of cryo-EM images yielded 50 distinct three-dimensional reconstructions, showing the tRNAs in classical, hybrid and various novel intermediate states that provide trajectories and kinetic information about tRNA movement through the ribosome. The structures indicate how tRNA movement is coupled with global and local conformational changes of the ribosome, in particular of the head and body of the small ribosomal subunit, and show that dynamic interactions between tRNAs and ribosomal residues confine the path of the tRNAs through the ribosome. The temperature dependence of ribosome dynamics reveals a surprisingly flat energy landscape of conformational variations at physiological temperature. The ribosome functions as a Brownian machine that couples spontaneous conformational changes driven by thermal energy to directed movement.

  5. Formation of tRNA granules in the nucleus of heat-induced human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyagawa, Ryu; Mizuno, Rie; Watanabe, Kazunori; Ijiri, Kenichi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► tRNAs are tranlocated into the nucleus in heat-induced HeLa cells. ► tRNAs form the unique granules in the nucleus. ► tRNA ganules overlap with nuclear stress granules. -- Abstract: The stress response, which can trigger various physiological phenomena, is important for living organisms. For instance, a number of stress-induced granules such as P-body and stress granule have been identified. These granules are formed in the cytoplasm under stress conditions and are associated with translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In the nucleus, there is a focus named nuclear stress body (nSB) that distinguishes these structures from cytoplasmic stress granules. Many splicing factors and long non-coding RNA species localize in nSBs as a result of stress. Indeed, tRNAs respond to several kinds of stress such as heat, oxidation or starvation. Although nuclear accumulation of tRNAs occurs in starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this phenomenon is not found in mammalian cells. We observed that initiator tRNA Met (Meti) is actively translocated into the nucleus of human cells under heat stress. During this study, we identified unique granules of Meti that overlapped with nSBs. Similarly, elongator tRNA Met was translocated into the nucleus and formed granules during heat stress. Formation of tRNA granules is closely related to the translocation ratio. Then, all tRNAs may form the specific granules.

  6. Early days of tRNA research: Discovery, function, purification and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    2006-10-04

    Oct 4, 2006 ... function in protein synthesis and methods for its purification ... intermediate carrier of the amino acid in protein synthesis. (table 1). .... 14C-leucine were incubated with GTP, PEP, and pyruvate kinase as indicated (adapted from: Hoagland et al 1958). .... Purification of N. crassa mitochondrial initiator tRNA.

  7. [Clinical investigation and mutation analysis of a child with citrin deficiency complicated with purpura, convulsive seizures and methioninemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Peng-qiang; Wang, Guo-bing; Chen, Zhan-ling; Liu, Xiao-hong; Cui, Dong; Shang, Yue; Li, Cheng-rong

    2013-12-01

    To analyze the clinical features and SLC25A13 gene mutations of a child with citrin deficiency complicated with purpura, convulsive seizures and methioninemia. The patient was subjected to physical examination and routine laboratory tests. Blood amino acids and acylcarnitines, and urine organic acids and galactose were analyzed respectively with tandem mass spectrometry and gas chromatographic mass spectrometry. SLC25A13 gene mutation screening was conducted by high resolution melt (HRM) analysis. The petechiae on the patient's face and platelet count (27×10(9)/L, reference range 100×10(9)/L-300×10(9)/L) supported the diagnosis of immunologic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Laboratory tests found that the patient have abnormal coagulation, cardiac enzyme, liver function and liver enzymes dysfunction. Tandem mass spectrometry also found methionine to be increased (286 μmol/L, reference ranges 8-35 μmol/L). The patient did not manifest any galactosemia, citrullinemia and tyrosinemia. Analysis of SLC25A13 gene mutation found that the patient has carried IVS16ins3kb, in addition with abnormal HRM result for exon 6. Direct sequencing of exon 6 revealed a novel mutation c.495delA. The same mutation was not detected in 100 unrelated healthy controls. Further analysis of her family has confirmed that the c.495delA mutation has derived from her farther, and that the IVS16ins3kb was derived from her mother. The clinical features and metabolic spectrum of citrin deficiency can be variable. The poor prognosis and severity of clinical symptoms of the patient may be attributed to the novel c.495delA mutation.

  8. The combination of heteroduplex analysis and protein truncation test for exact detection of the APC gene mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomka, M.; Kirchhoff, T.; Stefurkova, V.; Zajac, V.; Kulcsar, L.

    1998-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is usually associated with mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. To examine the occurrence of these mutations in the number of FAP suspected families from the whole Slovakia effectively, we have applied heteroduplex analysis (HDA) and protein truncation test (PTT) for the analyses of 2-5 base pair deletions and point mutations of the APC gene. In the analyzed exon 15 of the APC gene determined by the primers 15Efor-15Grev for HDA and 15ET7-15J3 for PTT more than 70% of mutations should be deletions [3, 12], which are detectable by HDA. In our collection of 5 FAP families mutations in the APC gene were found in families 10, 27 and 41 using HDA. By PTT test the formation of truncated APC protein in FAP families 2, 10, 16 and 27 were revealed. The necessity of combination of at least HDA and PTT techniques for exact detection of APC mutations in analyzed APC region is discussed. (authors)

  9. Mosaicism in segmental darier disease: an in-depth molecular analysis quantifying proportions of mutated alleles in various tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Theresa Larriba; Willems, Patrick; Jespersgaard, Cathrine

    2011-01-01

    Darier disease is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis caused by germline mutations in the ATP2A2 gene. Clinical expression is variable, including rare segmental phenotypes thought to be caused by postzygotic mosaicism. Genetic counseling of segmental Darier patients is complex, as risk of transm......Darier disease is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis caused by germline mutations in the ATP2A2 gene. Clinical expression is variable, including rare segmental phenotypes thought to be caused by postzygotic mosaicism. Genetic counseling of segmental Darier patients is complex, as risk...... of transmitting a nonsegmental phenotype to offspring is of unknown magnitude. We present the first in-depth molecular analysis of a mosaic patient with segmental disease, quantifying proportions of mutated and normal alleles in various tissues. Pyrosequence analysis of DNA from semen, affected and normal skin......, peripheral leukocytes and hair revealed an uneven distribution of the mutated allele, from 14% in semen to 37% in affected skin. We suggest a model for segmental manifestation expression where a threshold number of mutated cells is needed for manifestation development. We further recommend molecular analysis...

  10. Global translational impacts of the loss of the tRNA modification t6A in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick C. Thiaville

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The universal tRNA modification t6A is found at position 37 of nearly all tRNAs decoding ANN codons. The absence of t6A37 leads to severe growth defects in baker’s yeast, phenotypes similar to those caused by defects in mcm5s2U34 synthesis. Mutants in mcm5s2U34 can be suppressed by overexpression of tRNALysUUU, but we show t6A phenotypes could not be suppressed by expressing any individual ANN decoding tRNA, and t6A and mcm5s2U are not determinants for each other’s formation. Our results suggest that t6A deficiency, like mcm5s2U deficiency, leads to protein folding defects, and show that the absence of t6A led to stress sensitivities (heat, ethanol, salt and sensitivity to TOR pathway inhibitors. Additionally, L-homoserine suppressed the slow growth phenotype seen in t6A-deficient strains, and proteins aggregates and Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs were increased in the mutants. The global consequences on translation caused by t6A absence were examined by ribosome profiling. Interestingly, the absence of t6A did not lead to global translation defects, but did increase translation initiation at upstream non-AUG codons and increased frame-shifting in specific genes. Analysis of codon occupancy rates suggests that one of the major roles of t6A is to homogenize the process of elongation by slowing the elongation rate at codons decoded by high abundance tRNAs and I34:C3 pairs while increasing the elongation rate of rare tRNAs and G34:U3 pairs. This work reveals that the consequences of t6A absence are complex and multilayered and has set the stage to elucidate the molecular basis of the observed phenotypes.

  11. Mutational analysis a joint framework for Cauchy problems in and beyond vector spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Lorenz, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Ordinary differential equations play a central role in science and have been extended to evolution equations in Banach spaces. For many applications, however, it is difficult to specify a suitable normed vector space. Shapes without a priori restrictions, for example, do not have an obvious linear structure. This book generalizes ordinary differential equations beyond the borders of vector spaces with a focus on the well-posed Cauchy problem in finite time intervals. Here are some of the examples: - Feedback evolutions of compact subsets of the Euclidean space - Birth-and-growth processes of random sets (not necessarily convex) - Semilinear evolution equations - Nonlocal parabolic differential equations - Nonlinear transport equations for Radon measures - A structured population model - Stochastic differential equations with nonlocal sample dependence and how they can be coupled in systems immediately - due to the joint framework of Mutational Analysis. Finally, the book offers new tools for modelling.

  12. Mutation analysis of GLDC, AMT and GCSH in cataract captive-bred vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauke, Chesa G; Magwebu, Zandisiwe E; Sharma, Jyoti R; Arieff, Zainunisha; Seier, Jürgen V

    2016-08-01

    Non-ketotic hyperglycinaemia (NKH) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of glycine metabolism characterized by accumulation of glycine in body fluids and various neurological symptoms. This study describes the first screening of NKH in cataract captive-bred vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops). Glycine dehydrogenase (GLDC), aminomethyltransferase (AMT) and glycine cleavage system H protein (GCSH) were prioritized. Mutation analysis of the complete coding sequence of GLDC and AMT revealed six novel single-base substitutions, of which three were non-synonymous missense and three were silent nucleotide changes. Although deleterious effects of the three amino acid substitutions were not evaluated, one substitution of GLDC gene (S44R) could be disease-causing because of its drastic amino acid change, affecting amino acids conserved in different primate species. This study confirms the diagnosis of NKH for the first time in vervet monkeys with cataracts. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Genotypic and phenotypic analysis of 396 individuals with mutations in Sonic Hedgehog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Benjamin D; Bear, Kelly A; Wyllie, Adrian; Keaton, Amelia A; Dubourg, Christele; David, Veronique; Mercier, Sandra; Odent, Sylvie; Hehr, Ute; Paulussen, Aimee; Clegg, Nancy J; Delgado, Mauricio R; Bale, Sherri J; Lacbawan, Felicitas; Ardinger, Holly H; Aylsworth, Arthur S; Bhengu, Ntombenhle Louisa; Braddock, Stephen; Brookhyser, Karen; Burton, Barbara; Gaspar, Harald; Grix, Art; Horovitz, Dafne; Kanetzke, Erin; Kayserili, Hulya; Lev, Dorit; Nikkel, Sarah M; Norton, Mary; Roberts, Richard; Saal, Howard; Schaefer, G B; Schneider, Adele; Smith, Erika K; Sowry, Ellen; Spence, M Anne; Shalev, Stavit A; Steiner, Carlos E; Thompson, Elizabeth M; Winder, Thomas L; Balog, Joan Z; Hadley, Donald W; Zhou, Nan; Pineda-Alvarez, Daniel E; Roessler, Erich; Muenke, Maximilian

    2012-07-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE), the most common malformation of the human forebrain, may result from mutations in over 12 genes. Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) was the first such gene discovered; mutations in SHH remain the most common cause of non-chromosomal HPE. The severity spectrum is wide, ranging from incompatibility with extrauterine life to isolated midline facial differences. To characterise genetic and clinical findings in individuals with SHH mutations. Through the National Institutes of Health and collaborating centres, DNA from approximately 2000 individuals with HPE spectrum disorders were analysed for SHH variations. Clinical details were examined and combined with published cases. This study describes 396 individuals, representing 157 unrelated kindreds, with SHH mutations; 141 (36%) have not been previously reported. SHH mutations more commonly resulted in non-HPE (64%) than frank HPE (36%), and non-HPE was significantly more common in patients with SHH than in those with mutations in the other common HPE related genes (pC-terminus (including accounting for the relative size of the coding regions, p=0.00010), no specific genotype-phenotype correlations could be established regarding mutation location. SHH mutations overall result in milder disease than mutations in other common HPE related genes. HPE is more frequent in individuals with truncating mutations, but clinical predictions at the individual level remain elusive.

  14. Droplet digital PCR analysis of NOTCH1 gene mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minervini, Angela; Francesco Minervini, Crescenzio; Anelli, Luisa; Zagaria, Antonella; Casieri, Paola; Coccaro, Nicoletta; Cumbo, Cosimo; Tota, Giuseppina; Impera, Luciana; Orsini, Paola; Brunetti, Claudia; Giordano, Annamaria; Specchia, Giorgina; Albano, Francesco

    2016-12-27

    In chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), NOTCH1 gene mutations (NOTCH1mut) have been associated with adverse prognostic features but the independence of these as a prognostic factor is still controversial. In our study we validated a c.7541-7542delCT NOTCH1 mutation assay based on droplet digital PCR (ddPCR); we also analyzed the NOTCH1mut allelic burden, expressed as fractional abundance (FA), in 88 CLL patients at diagnosis to assess its prognostic role and made a longitudinal ddPCR analysis in 10 cases harboring NOTCH1mut to verify the FA variation over time. Our data revealed that with the ddPCR approach the incidence of NOTCH1mut in CLL was much higher (53.4%) than expected. However, longitudinal ddPCR analysis of CLL cases showed a statistically significant reduction of the NOTCH1mut FA detected at diagnosis after treatment (median FA 11.67 % vs 0.09 %, respectively, p = 0.01); the same difference, in terms of NOTCH1mut FA, was observed in the relapsed cases compared to the NOTCH1mut allelic fraction observed in patients in complete or partial remission (median FA 4.75% vs 0.43%, respectively, p = 0.007). Our study demonstrated a much higher incidence of NOTCH1mut in CLL than has previously been reported, and showed that the NOTCH1mut allelic burden evaluation by ddPCR might identify patients in need of a closer clinical follow-up during the "watch and wait" interval and after standard chemotherapy.

  15. A Comprehensive Functional Analysis of NTRK1 Missense Mutations Causing Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathy Type IV (HSAN IV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Samiha S; Chen, Ya-Chun; Halsall, Sally-Anne; Nahorski, Michael S; Omoto, Kiyoyuki; Young, Gareth T; Phelan, Anne; Woods, Christopher Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV (HSAN IV) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a complete lack of pain perception and anhidrosis. Here, we studied a cohort of seven patients with HSAN IV and describe a comprehensive functional analysis of seven novel NTRK1 missense mutations, c.1550G >A, c.1565G >A, c.1970T >C, c.2096T >C, c.2254T >A, c.2288G >C, and c.2311C >T, corresponding to p.G517E, p.G522E, p.L657P, p.I699T, p.C752S, p.C763S, and p.R771C, all of which were predicted pathogenic by in silico analysis. The results allowed us to assess the pathogenicity of each mutation and to gain novel insights into tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TRKA) downstream signaling. Each mutation was systematically analyzed for TRKA glycosylation states, intracellular and cell membrane expression patterns, nerve growth factor stimulated TRKA autophosphorylation, TRKA-Y496 phosphorylation, PLCγ activity, and neurite outgrowth. We showed a diverse range of functional effects: one mutation appeared fully functional, another had partial activity in all assays, one mutation affected only the PLCγ pathway and four mutations were proved null in all assays. Thus, we conclude that complete abolition of TRKA kinase activity is not the only pathogenic mechanism underlying HSAN IV. By corollary, the assessment of the clinical pathogenicity of HSAN IV mutations is more complex than initially predicted and requires a multifaceted approach. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  16. Distinct Mutations Led to Inactivation of Type 1 Fimbriae Expression in Shigella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Verónica; Puhar, Andrea; Sansonetti, Philippe; Parsot, Claude; Toro, Cecilia S.

    2015-01-01

    Shigella spp. are responsible for bacillary dysentery in humans. The acquisition or the modification of the virulence plasmid encoding factors promoting entry of bacteria into and dissemination within epithelial cells was a critical step in the evolution of these bacteria from their Escherichia coli ancestor(s). Incorporation of genomic islands (GI) and gene inactivation also shaped interactions between these pathogens and their human host. Sequence analysis of the GI inserted next to the leuX tRNA gene in S. boydii, S. dysenteriae, S. flexneri, S. sonnei and enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) suggests that this region initially carried the fec, yjhATS and fim gene clusters. The fim cluster encoding type I fimbriae is systematically inactivated in both reference strains and clinical isolates and distinct mutations are responsible for this inactivation in at least three phylogenetic groups. To investigate consequences of the presence of fimbriae on the outcome of the interaction of Shigella with host cells, we used a S. flexneri strain harboring a plasmid encoding the E. coli fim operon. Production of fimbriae by this recombinant strain increased the ability of bacteria to adhere to and enter into epithelial cells and had no effect on their ability to disseminate from cell to cell. The observations that production of type I fimbriae increases invasion of epithelial cells and that independent mutations abolish fimbriae production in Shigella suggest that these mutations correspond to pathoadaptive events. PMID:25811616

  17. Distinct mutations led to inactivation of type 1 fimbriae expression in Shigella spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Bravo

    Full Text Available Shigella spp. are responsible for bacillary dysentery in humans. The acquisition or the modification of the virulence plasmid encoding factors promoting entry of bacteria into and dissemination within epithelial cells was a critical step in the evolution of these bacteria from their Escherichia coli ancestor(s. Incorporation of genomic islands (GI and gene inactivation also shaped interactions between these pathogens and their human host. Sequence analysis of the GI inserted next to the leuX tRNA gene in S. boydii, S. dysenteriae, S. flexneri, S. sonnei and enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC suggests that this region initially carried the fec, yjhATS and fim gene clusters. The fim cluster encoding type I fimbriae is systematically inactivated in both reference strains and clinical isolates and distinct mutations are responsible for this inactivation in at least three phylogenetic groups. To investigate consequences of the presence of fimbriae on the outcome of the interaction of Shigella with host cells, we used a S. flexneri strain harboring a plasmid encoding the E. coli fim operon. Production of fimbriae by this recombinant strain increased the ability of bacteria to adhere to and enter into epithelial cells and had no effect on their ability to disseminate from cell to cell. The observations that production of type I fimbriae increases invasion of epithelial cells and that independent mutations abolish fimbriae production in Shigella suggest that these mutations correspond to pathoadaptive events.

  18. Molecular Epidemiology of EGFR Mutations in Asian Patients with Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer of Adenocarcinoma Histology – Mainland China Subset Analysis of the PIONEER study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yuankai; Li, Junling; Zhang, Shucai; Wang, Mengzhao; Yang, Shujun; Li, Ning; Wu, Gang; Liu, Wei; Liao, Guoqing; Cai, Kaican; Chen, Liang’an; Zheng, Meizhen; Yu, Ping; Wang, Xiuwen; Liu, Yunpeng; Guo, Qisen; Nie, Ligong; Liu, Jiwei; Han, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations are the strongest response predictors to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) therapy, but knowledge of the EGFR mutation frequency on lung adenocarcinoma is still limited to retrospective studies. The PIONEER study (NCT01185314) is a prospective molecular epidemiology study in Asian patients with newly diagnosed advanced lung adenocarcinoma, aiming to prospectively analyze EGFR mutation status in IIIB/IV treatment-naïve lung adenocarcinomas in Asia. We report the mainland China subset results. Eligible patients (≥20 yrs old, IIIB/IV adenocarcinoma and treatment-naïve) were registered in 17 hospitals in mainland China. EGFR was tested for mutations by amplification refractory mutation system using biopsy samples. Demographic and clinical characteristics were collected for subgroup analyses. A total of 747 patients were registered. Successful EGFR mutation analysis was performed in 741, with an overall mutation rate of 50.2%. The EGFR active mutation rate is 48.0% (with 1.3% of combined active and resistance mutations). Tobacco use (>30 pack-year vs. 0–10 pack-year, OR 0.27, 95%CI: 0.17–0.42) and regional lymph nodes involvement (N3 vs. N0, OR 0.47, 95%CI: 0.29–0.76) were independent predictors of EGFR mutation in multivariate analysis. However, even in regular smokers, the EGFR mutation frequency was 35.3%. The EGFR mutation frequency was similar between diverse biopsy sites and techniques. The overall EGFR mutation frequency of the mainland China subset was 50.2%, independently associated with the intensity of tobacco use and regional lymph nodes involvement. The relatively high frequency of EGFR mutations in the mainland China subset suggest that any effort to obtain tissue sample for EGFR mutation testing should be encouraged. PMID:26599344

  19. Molecular genetic analysis of the F11 gene in 14 Turkish patients with factor XI deficiency: identification of novel and recurrent mutations and their inheritance within families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colakoglu, Seyma; Bayhan, Turan; Tavil, Betül; Keskin, Ebru Yılmaz; Cakir, Volkan; Gümrük, Fatma; Çetin, Mualla; Aytaç, Selin; Berber, Ergul

    2018-01-01

    Factor XI (FXI) deficiency is an autosomal bleeding disease associated with genetic defects in the F11 gene which cause decreased FXI levels or impaired FXI function. An increasing number of mutations has been reported in the FXI mutation database, most of which affect the serine protease domain of the protein. FXI is a heterogeneous disorder associated with a variable bleeding tendency and a variety of causative F11 gene mutations. The molecular basis of FXI deficiency in 14 patients from ten unrelated families in Turkey was analysed to establish genotype-phenotype correlations and inheritance of the mutations in the patients' families. Fourteen index cases with a diagnosis of FXI deficiency and family members of these patients were enrolled into the study. The patients' F11 genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and subjected to direct DNA sequencing analysis. The findings were analysed statistically using bivariate correlations, Pearson's correlation coefficient and the nonparametric Mann-Whitney test. Direct DNA sequencing analysis of the F11 genes revealed that all of the 14 patients had a F11 gene mutation. Eight different mutations were identified in the apple 1, apple 2 or serine protease domains, except one which was a splice site mutation. Six of the mutations were recurrent. Two of the mutations were novel missense mutations, p.Val522Gly and p.Cys581Arg, within the catalytic domain. The p.Trp519Stop mutation was observed in two families whereas all the other mutations were specific to a single family. Identification of mutations confirmed the genetic heterogeneity of FXI deficiency. Most of the patients with mutations did not have any bleeding complications, whereas some had severe bleeding symptoms. Genetic screening for F11 gene mutations is important to decrease the mortality and morbidity rate associated with FXI deficiency, which can be life-threatening if bleeding occurs in tissues with high fibrinolytic activity.

  20. Analysis of 30 putative BRCA1 splicing mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer families identifies exonic splice site mutations that escape in silico prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Wappenschmidt

    Full Text Available Screening for pathogenic mutations in breast and ovarian cancer genes such as BRCA1/2, CHEK2 and RAD51C is common practice for individuals from high-risk families. However, test results may be ambiguous due to the presence of unclassified variants (UCV in the concurrent absence of clearly cancer-predisposing mutations. Especially the presence of intronic or exonic variants within these genes that possibly affect proper pre-mRNA processing poses a challenge as their functional implications are not immediately apparent. Therefore, it appears necessary to characterize potential splicing UCV and to develop appropriate classification tools. We investigated 30 distinct BRCA1 variants, both intronic and exonic, regarding their spliceogenic potential by commonly used in silico prediction algorithms (HSF, MaxEntScan along with in vitro transcript analyses. A total of 25 variants were identified spliceogenic, either causing/enhancing exon skipping or activation of cryptic splice sites, or both. Except from a single intronic variant causing minor effects on BRCA1 pre-mRNA processing in our analyses, 23 out of 24 intronic variants were correctly predicted by MaxEntScan, while HSF was less accurate in this cohort. Among the 6 exonic variants analyzed, 4 severely impair correct pre-mRNA processing, while the remaining two have partial effects. In contrast to the intronic alterations investigated, only half of the spliceogenic exonic variants were correctly predicted by HSF and/or MaxEntScan. These data support the idea that exonic splicing mutations are commonly disease-causing and concurrently prone to escape in silico prediction, hence necessitating experimental in vitro splicing analysis.

  1. Use of CT-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in epidermal growth factor receptor mutation analysis in patients with advanced lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Yi-Ping; Wang, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Jin; Feng, Yong (Dept. of Radiology, Jiangsu Cancer Inst. and Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)), email: yipingzhuang2010@sina.com; Shi, Mei-Qi (Dept. of Chemotherapy, Jiangsu Cancer Inst. and Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China))

    2011-12-15

    Background. The safety of using a cutting needle when performing a core-needle biopsy is of major concern, in particular for small lung tumors or tumors near the hilum. Purpose. To investigate the usefulness of CT-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) of the lung in obtaining tumor tissue for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation analysis in advanced lung cancer patients. Material and Methods. Forty-three patients with stage IIIB-IV lung cancer were enrolled. In all patients, CT-guided FNAB was performed using an 18-gauge or 20-gauge Chiba aspiration needle for histology diagnosis and EGFR mutation analysis. Complications associated with CT-guided FNAB were observed, and the specimen mutational assessments were recorded. Results. The obtained tumor samples ranged from 0.5-1.5 cm in length and were adequate for histological and DNA analyses in all patients. No patient had a pneumothorax or hemoptysis. Minor needle tract bleeding appeared in eight patients. Mutation analysis was satisfactorily demonstrated in 23 mutations and 20 non-mutations. Ten and 13 mutations were identified by 18-gauge and 20-gauge needle biopsies, respectively. EFGR mutations, including 12 cases of EGFR exon 19 deletion and 11 cases of exon 21 point mutation, were present in 21 patients with adenocarcinomas, one with squamous cell carcinoma, and one with undifferentiated carcinoma. Conclusion. CT-guided FNAB is a feasible and safe technique for obtaining lung tumor tissues for EGFR gene mutation analysis

  2. Comprehensive Mutation Analysis of PMS2 in a Large Cohort of Probands Suspected of Lynch Syndrome or Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Klift, Heleen M; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Drost, Mark; Bik, Elsa C; Vos, Yvonne J; Gille, Hans J J P; Redeker, Bert E J W; Tiersma, Yvonne; Zonneveld, José B M; García, Encarna Gómez; Letteboer, Tom G W; Olderode-Berends, Maran J W; van Hest, Liselotte P; van Os, Theo A; Verhoef, Senno; Wagner, Anja; van Asperen, Christi J; Ten Broeke, Sanne W; Hes, Frederik J; de Wind, Niels; Nielsen, Maartje; Devilee, Peter; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Wijnen, Juul T; Tops, Carli M J

    2016-11-01

    Monoallelic PMS2 germline mutations cause 5%-15% of Lynch syndrome, a midlife cancer predisposition, whereas biallelic PMS2 mutations cause approximately 60% of constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD), a rare childhood cancer syndrome. Recently improved DNA- and RNA-based strategies are applied to overcome problematic PMS2 mutation analysis due to the presence of pseudogenes and frequent gene conversion events. Here, we determined PMS2 mutation detection yield and mutation spectrum in a nationwide cohort of 396 probands. Furthermore, we studied concordance between tumor IHC/MSI (immunohistochemistry/microsatellite instability) profile and mutation carrier state. Overall, we found 52 different pathogenic PMS2 variants explaining 121 Lynch syndrome and nine CMMRD patients. In vitro mismatch repair assays suggested pathogenicity for three missense variants. Ninety-one PMS2 mutation carriers (70%) showed isolated loss of PMS2 in their tumors, for 31 (24%) no or inconclusive IHC was available, and eight carriers (6%) showed discordant IHC (presence of PMS2 or loss of both MLH1 and PMS2). Ten cases with isolated PMS2 loss (10%; 10/97) harbored MLH1 mutations. We confirmed that recently improved mutation analysis provides a high yield of PMS2 mutations in patients with isolated loss of PMS2 expression. Application of universal tumor prescreening methods will however miss some PMS2 germline mutation carriers. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  3. The fractionation of t-RNA on N,N′-bis(3-aminopropyl)-piperazine substituted-Sepharose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leberman, Reuben; Giovanelli, Ruth; Acosta, Zenobio

    1974-01-01

    An anion exchange agarose has been prepared by modifying sepharose 6B with N,N′-bis (-3-aminopropyl) piperazine. This material (BAPP-Sepharose) has been used for the fractionation of t-RNA from E.coli by column chromatography. The results obtained with gram quantities of crude t-RNA at pH 4.6 and pH 8.0 as measured by the elution patterns of alanyl, arginyl, aspartyl, leucyl, lysyl, methionyl, phenylalanyl, prolyl, seryl, tyrosyl, and valyl t-RNA are described. PMID:10793731

  4. Analysis of HFE and non-HFE gene mutations in Brazilian patients with hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Paulo Lisboa; Marin, Maria Lúcia Carnevale; Couto, Cláudia Alves; Cançado, Eduardo Luiz Rachid; Carrilho, Flair José; Goldberg, Anna Carla

    2009-01-01

    Approximately one-half of Brazilian patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) are neither homozygous for the C282Y mutation nor compound heterozygous for the H63D and C282Y mutations that are associated with HH in Caucasians. Other mutations have been described in the HFE gene as well as in genes involved in iron metabolism, such as transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2) and ferroportin 1 (SCL40A1). To evaluate the role of HFE, TfR2 and SCL40A1 mutations in Brazilian subjects with HH. Nineteen male subjects (median age 42 [range: 20-72] years) with HH were evaluated using the Haemochromatosis StripAssay A. This assay is capable of detecting twelve HFE mutations, which are V53M, V59M, H63D, H63H, S65C, Q127H, P160delC, E168Q, E168X, W169X, C282Y and Q283, four TfR2 mutations, which are E60X, M172K, Y250X, AVAQ594-597del, and two SCL40A1 mutations, which are N144H and V162del. In our cohort, nine (47%) patients were homozygous for the C282Y mutation, two (11%) were heterozygous for the H63D mutation, and one each (5%) was either heterozygous for C282Y or compound heterozygous for C282Y and H63D. No other mutations in the HFE, TfR2 or SCL40A1 genes were observed in the studied patients. One-third of Brazilian subjects with the classical phenotype of HH do not carry HFE or other mutations that are currently associated with the disease in Caucasians. This observation suggests a role for other yet unknown mutations in the aforementioned genes or in other genes involved in iron homeostasis in the pathogenesis of HH in Brazil.

  5. Mutational analysis of FLASH and PTPN13 genes in colorectal carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Eun Goo; Lee, Sung Hak; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2008-01-01

    The Fas-Fas ligand system is considered a major pathway for induction of apoptosis in cells and tissues. FLASH was identified as a pro-apoptotic protein that transmits apoptosis signal during Fas-mediated apoptosis. PTPN13 interacts with Fas and functions as both suppressor and inducer of Fas-mediated apoptosis. There are polyadenine tracts in both FLASH (A8 and A9 in exon 8) and PTPN13 (A8 in exon 7) genes that could be frameshift mutation targets in colorectal carcinomas. Because genes encoding proteins in Fas-mediated apoptosis frequently harbor somatic mutations in cancers, we explored the possibility as to whether mutations of FLASH and PTPN13 are a feature of colorectal carcinomas. We analysed human FLASH in exon 8 and PTPN13 in exon 7 for the detection of somatic mutations in 103 colorectal carcinomas by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)- based single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). We detected two mutations in FLASH gene, but none in PTPN13 gene. However, the two mutations were not frameshift (deletion or insertion) mutations in the polyadenine tracts of FLASH. The two mutations consisted of a deletion mutation (c.3734-3737delAGAA) and a missense mutation (c.3703A>C). These data indicate that frameshift mutation in the polyadenine tracts in both FLASH and PTPN13 genes is rare in colorectal carcinomas. Also, the data suggest that both FLASH and PTPN13 mutations in the polyadenine tracts may not have a crucial role in the pathogenesis of colorectal carcinomas.

  6. Mutational analysis and genetic cloning of the agnostic locus, which regulates learning ability in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peresleni, A I; Savvateeva, E V; Peresleni, I V; Sharagina, L M

    1997-01-01

    P-insertion mutations were obtained and localized by in situ methods at the agnostic gene (agn: 1-38.9; 11AB) in Drosophila. All agn mutants showed a wide spectrum of pleiotropic effects: an EMS-induced mutation of the agn-ts398 improved the ability to develop a conditioned defensive response and increased the activity of cAMP metabolic enzymes; spontaneous mutation of agnX1 showed morphological defects of the brain. P-insertion mutations were used to clone the gene; a restriction map of 80 kb in length was determined, and the insertion was localized to a fragment of 9 kb.

  7. Comprehensive analysis of the mutation spectrum in 301 German ALS families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Kathrin; Brenner, David; Weydt, Patrick; Meyer, Thomas; Grehl, Torsten; Petri, Susanne; Grosskreutz, Julian; Schuster, Joachim; Volk, Alexander E; Borck, Guntram; Kubisch, Christian; Klopstock, Thomas; Zeller, Daniel; Jablonka, Sibylle; Sendtner, Michael; Klebe, Stephan; Knehr, Antje; Günther, Kornelia; Weis, Joachim; Claeys, Kristl G; Schrank, Berthold; Sperfeld, Anne-Dorte; Hübers, Annemarie; Otto, Markus; Dorst, Johannes; Meitinger, Thomas; Strom, Tim M; Andersen, Peter M; Ludolph, Albert C; Weishaupt, Jochen H

    2018-04-12

    Recent advances in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) genetics have revealed that mutations in any of more than 25 genes can cause ALS, mostly as an autosomal-dominant Mendelian trait. Detailed knowledge about the genetic architecture of ALS in a specific population will be important for genetic counselling but also for genotype-specific therapeutic interventions. Here we combined fragment length analysis, repeat-primed PCR, Southern blotting, Sanger sequencing and whole exome sequencing to obtain a comprehensive profile of genetic variants in ALS disease genes in 301 German pedigrees with familial ALS. We report C9orf72 mutations as well as variants in consensus splice sites and non-synonymous variants in protein-coding regions of ALS genes. We furthermore estimate their pathogenicity by taking into account type and frequency of the respective variant as well as segregation within the families. 49% of our German ALS families carried a likely pathogenic variant in at least one of the earlier identified ALS genes. In 45% of the ALS families, likely pathogenic variants were detected in C9orf72, SOD1, FUS, TARDBP or TBK1 , whereas the relative contribution of the other ALS genes in this familial ALS cohort was 4%. We identified several previously unreported rare variants and demonstrated the absence of likely pathogenic variants in some of the recently described ALS disease genes. We here present a comprehensive genetic characterisation of German familial ALS. The present findings are of importance for genetic counselling in clinical practice, for molecular research and for the design of diagnostic gene panels or genotype-specific therapeutic interventions in Europe. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Mutational analysis and genotype-phenotype relation in familial hypercholesterolemia: The SAFEHEART registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbon, Mafalda; Alves, Ana Catarina; Alonso, Rodrigo; Mata, Nelva; Aguiar, Pedro; Padró, Teresa; Mata, Pedro

    2017-07-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant disease of cholesterol metabolism that confers an increased risk of premature atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Therefore, early identification and treatment of these patients can improve prognosis and reduce the burden of cardiovascular mortality. The aim of this work was to perform the mutational analysis of the SAFEHEART (Spanish Familial Hypercholesterolaemia Cohort Study) registry. The study recruited 2938 individuals with genetic diagnosis of FH belonging to 775 families. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS v23. A total of 194 variants have been detected in this study, 24 of them were never described before. About 88% of the patients have a pathogenic or likely pathogenic variant. Patients with null variants have a more severe phenotype than patients with defective variants, presenting with significantly higher levels of atherogenic particles (total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and apolipoprotein B). This study shows the molecular characteristics of the FH patients included in the SAFEHEART registry and the relationship with the phenotypic expression. The majority of the genetic variants are considered to be pathogenic or likely pathogenic, which confers a high level of confidence to the entry and follow-up data analysis performed with this registry concerning FH patients' prognosis, treatment and survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Thermodynamics of antibody-antigen interaction revealed by mutation analysis of antibody variable regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiba, Hiroki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-07-01

    Antibodies (immunoglobulins) bind specific molecules (i.e. antigens) with high affinity and specificity. In order to understand their mechanisms of recognition, interaction analysis based on thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, as well as structure determination is crucial. In this review, we focus on mutational analysis which gives information about the role of each amino acid residue in antibody-antigen interaction. Taking anti-hen egg lysozyme antibodies and several anti-small molecule antibodies, the energetic contribution of hot-spot and non-hot-spot residues is discussed in terms of thermodynamics. Here, thermodynamics of the contribution from aromatic, charged and hydrogen bond-forming amino acids are discussed, and their different characteristics have been elucidated. The information gives fundamental understanding of the antibody-antigen interaction. Furthermore, the consequences of antibody engineering are analysed from thermodynamic viewpoints: humanization to reduce immunogenicity and rational design to improve affinity. Amino acid residues outside hot-spots in the interface play important roles in these cases, and thus thermodynamic and kinetic parameters give much information about the antigen recognition. Thermodynamic analysis of mutant antibodies thus should lead to advanced strategies to design and select antibodies with high affinity. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  10. RNA-based mutation analysis identifies an unusual MSH6 splicing defect and circumvents PMS2 pseudogene interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etzler, J; Peyrl, A; Zatkova, A; Schildhaus, H-U; Ficek, A; Merkelbach-Bruse, S; Kratz, C P; Attarbaschi, A; Hainfellner, J A; Yao, S; Messiaen, L; Slavc, I; Wimmer, K

    2008-02-01

    Heterozygous germline mutations in one of the mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 cause hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch syndrome, a dominantly inherited cancer susceptibility syndrome. Recent reports provide evidence for a novel recessively inherited cancer syndrome with constitutive MMR deficiency due to biallelic germline mutations in one of the MMR genes. MMR-deficiency (MMR-D) syndrome is characterized by childhood brain tumors, hematological and/or gastrointestinal malignancies, and signs of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). We established an RNA-based mutation detection assay for the four MMR genes, since 1) a number of splicing defects may escape detection by the analysis of genomic DNA, and 2) DNA-based mutation detection in the PMS2 gene is severely hampered by the presence of multiple highly similar pseudogenes, including PMS2CL. Using this assay, which is based on direct cDNA sequencing of RT-PCR products, we investigated two families with children suspected to suffer from MMR-D syndrome. We identified a homozygous complex MSH6 splicing alteration in the index patients of the first family and a novel homozygous PMS2 mutation (c.182delA) in the index patient of the second family. Furthermore, we demonstrate, by the analysis of a PMS2/PMS2CL "hybrid" allele carrier, that RNA-based PMS2 testing effectively avoids the caveats of genomic DNA amplification approaches; i.e., pseudogene coamplification as well as allelic dropout, and will, thus, allow more sensitive mutation analysis in MMR deficiency and in HNPCC patients with PMS2 defects. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Measuring the prevalence of regional mutation rates: an analysis of silent substitutions in mammals, fungi, and insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuch Brian B

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The patterns of mutation vary both within and across genomes. It has been shown for a few mammals that mutation rates vary within the genome, while for unknown reasons, the sensu stricto yeasts have uniform rates instead. The generality of these observations has been unknown. Here we examine silent site substitutions in a more expansive set (20 mammals, 27 fungi, 4 insects to determine why some genomes demonstrate this mosaic distribution and why others are uniform. Results We applied several intragene and intergene correlation tests to measure regional substitution patterns. Assuming that silent sites are a reasonable approximation to neutrally mutating sequence, our results show that all multicellular eukaryotes exhibit mutational heterogeneity. In striking contrast, all fungi are mutationally uniform – with the exception of three Candida species: C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, and C. tropicalis. We speculate that aspects of replication timing may be responsible for distinguishing these species. Our analysis also reveals classes of genes whose silent sites behave anomalously with respect to the mutational background in many species, indicating prevalent selective pressures. Genes associated with nucleotide binding or gene regulation have consistently low silent substitution rates in every mammalian species, as well as multiple fungi. On the other hand, receptor genes repeatedly exhibit high silent substitution rates, suggesting they have been influenced by diversifying selection. Conclusion Our findings provide a framework for understanding the regional mutational properties of eukaryotes, revealing a sharp difference between fungi and multicellular species. They also elucidate common selective pressures acting on eukaryotic silent sites, with frequent evidence for both purifying and diversifying selection.

  12. Mutation analysis of SLC26A4 for Pendred syndrome and nonsyndromic hearing loss by high-resolution melting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Neng; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Rendtorff, Nanna Dahl

    2011-01-01

    Pendred syndrome and DFNB4 (autosomal recessive nonsyndromic congenital deafness, locus 4) are associated with autosomal recessive congenital sensorineural hearing loss and mutations in the SLC26A4 gene. Extensive allelic heterogeneity, however, necessitates analysis of all exons and splice sites...

  13. Structure-Activity Relationship in TLR4 Mutations: Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Residue Interaction Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Choi, Sangdun

    2017-03-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a vital innate immune receptor present on cell surfaces, initiates a signaling cascade during danger and bacterial intrusion. TLR4 needs to form a stable hexamer complex, which is necessary to dimerize the cytoplasmic domain. However, D299G and T399I polymorphism may abrogate the stability of the complex, leading to compromised TLR4 signaling. Crystallography provides valuable insights into the structural aspects of the TLR4 ectodomain; however, the dynamic behavior of polymorphic TLR4 is still unclear. Here, we employed molecular dynamics simulations (MDS), as well as principal component and residue network analyses, to decipher the structural aspects and signaling propagation associated with mutations in TLR4. The mutated complexes were less cohesive, displayed local and global variation in the secondary structure, and anomalous decay in rotational correlation function. Principal component analysis indicated that the mutated complexes also exhibited distinct low-frequency motions, which may be correlated to the differential behaviors of these TLR4 variants. Moreover, residue interaction networks (RIN) revealed that the mutated TLR4/myeloid differentiation factor (MD) 2 complex may perpetuate abnormal signaling pathways. Cumulatively, the MDS and RIN analyses elucidated the mutant-specific conformational alterations, which may help in deciphering the mechanism of loss-of-function mutations.

  14. Computational Simulation and Analysis of Mutations: Nucleotide Fixation, Allelic Age and Rare Genetic Variations in Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Shuhao

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the complexity of mutations, a computational approach named Genome Evolution by Matrix Algorithms ("GEMA") has been implemented. GEMA models genomic changes, taking into account hundreds of mutations within each individual in a population. By modeling of entire human chromosomes, GEMA precisely mimics real…

  15. Functional analysis of HNPCC-related missense mutations in MSH2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Anne; de Wind, Niels; Georgijevic, Dubravka

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is associated with germline mutations in the human DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes, most frequently MSH2 and MLH1. The majority of HNPCC mutations cause truncations and thus loss of function of the affected polypeptide. However, a significant...

  16. Fifteen novel FBN1 mutations causing Marfan syndrome detected by heteroduplex analysis of genomic amplicons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nijbroek, G.; Sood, S.; McIntosh, I. [John Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 (FBN1), a component of the extracellular microfibril, cause the Marfan syndrome (MFS). This statement is supported by the observations that the classic Marfan phenotype cosegregates with intragenic and/or flanking marker alleles in all families tested and that a significant number of FBN1 mutations have been identified in affected individuals. We have now devised a method to screen the entire coding sequence and flanking splice junctions of FBN1. On completion for a panel of nine probands with classic MFS, six new mutations were identified that accounted for disease in seven (78%) of nine patients. Nine additional new mutations have been characterized in the early stages of a larger screening project. These 15 mutations were equally distributed throughout the gene and, with one exception, were specific to single families. One-third of mutations created premature termination codons, and 6 of 15 substituted residues with putative significance for calcium finding to epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domains. Mutations causing severe and rapidly progressive disease that presents in the neonatal period can occur in a larger region of the gene than previously demonstrated, and the nature of the mutation is as important a determinant as its location, in predisposing to this phenotype. 56 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Mutation analysis of breast cancer gene BRCA among breast cancer Jordanian females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atoum, Manar F.; Al-Kayed, Sameer A.

    2004-01-01

    To screen mutations of the tumor suppressor breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) within 3 exons among Jordanian breast cancer females. A total of 135 Jordanian breast cancer females were genetically analyzed by denaturing gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) for mutation detection in 3 BRCA1 exons (2, 11 and 20) between 2000-2002 in Al-Basheer Hospital, Amman, Jordan. Of the studied patients 50 had a family history of breast cancer, 28 had a family history of cancer other than breast cancer, and 57 had no family history of any cancer. Five germline mutations were detected among breast cancer females with a family history of breast cancers (one in exon 2 and 4 mutations in exon 11). Another germline mutation (within exon 11) was detected among breast cancer females with family history of cancer other than breast cancer, and no mutation was detected among breast cancer females with no family history of any cancer or among normal control females. Screening mutations within exon 2, exon 11 and exon 20 showed that most screened mutations were within BRCA1 exon 11 among breast cancer Jordanian families with a family history of breast cancer. (author)

  18. Whole genome analysis of linezolid resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae reveals resistance and compensatory mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Légaré Danielle

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several mutations were present in the genome of Streptococcus pneumoniae linezolid-resistant strains but the role of several of these mutations had not been experimentally tested. To analyze the role of these mutations, we reconstituted resistance by serial whole genome transformation of a novel resistant isolate into two strains with sensitive background. We sequenced the parent mutant and two independent transformants exhibiting similar minimum inhibitory concentration to linezolid. Results Comparative genomic analyses revealed that transformants acquired G2576T transversions in every gene copy of 23S rRNA and that the number of altered copies correlated with the level of linezolid resistance and cross-resistance to florfenicol and chloramphenicol. One of the transformants also acquired a mutation present in the parent mutant leading to the overexpression of an ABC transporter (spr1021. The acquisition of these mutations conferred a fitness cost however, which was further enhanced by the acquisition of a mutation in a RNA methyltransferase implicated in resistance. Interestingly, the fitness of the transformants could be restored in part by the acquisition of altered copies of the L3 and L16 ribosomal proteins and by mutations leading to the overexpression of the spr1887 ABC transporter that were present in the original linezolid-resistant mutant. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the usefulness of whole genome approaches at detecting major determinants of resistance as well as compensatory mutations that alleviate the fitness cost associated with resistance.

  19. Biochemical and mutational analysis of a novel nicotinamidase from Oceanobacillus iheyensis HTE831.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Carrón, Guiomar; García-García, María Inmaculada; Zapata-Pérez, Rubén; Takami, Hideto; García-Carmona, Francisco; Sánchez-Ferrer, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Nicotinamidases catalyze the hydrolysis of nicotinamide to nicotinic acid and ammonia, an important reaction in the NAD(+) salvage pathway. This paper reports a new nicotinamidase from the deep-sea extremely halotolerant and alkaliphilic Oceanobacillus iheyensis HTE831 (OiNIC). The enzyme was active towards nicotinamide and several analogues, including the prodrug pyrazinamide. The enzyme was more nicotinamidase (kcat/Km  = 43.5 mM(-1)s(-1)) than pyrazinamidase (kcat/Km  = 3.2 mM(-1)s(-1)). Mutational analysis was carried out on seven critical amino acids, confirming for the first time the importance of Cys133 and Phe68 residues for increasing pyrazinamidase activity 2.9- and 2.5-fold, respectively. In addition, the change in the fourth residue involved in the ion metal binding (Glu65) was detrimental to pyrazinamidase activity, decreasing it 6-fold. This residue was also involved in a new distinct structural motif DAHXXXDXXHPE described in this paper for Firmicutes nicotinamidases. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that OiNIC is the first nicotinamidase described for the order Bacillales.

  20. Biochemical and mutational analysis of a novel nicotinamidase from Oceanobacillus iheyensis HTE831.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiomar Sánchez-Carrón

    Full Text Available Nicotinamidases catalyze the hydrolysis of nicotinamide to nicotinic acid and ammonia, an important reaction in the NAD(+ salvage pathway. This paper reports a new nicotinamidase from the deep-sea extremely halotolerant and alkaliphilic Oceanobacillus iheyensis HTE831 (OiNIC. The enzyme was active towards nicotinamide and several analogues, including the prodrug pyrazinamide. The enzyme was more nicotinamidase (kcat/Km  = 43.5 mM(-1s(-1 than pyrazinamidase (kcat/Km  = 3.2 mM(-1s(-1. Mutational analysis was carried out on seven critical amino acids, confirming for the first time the importance of Cys133 and Phe68 residues for increasing pyrazinamidase activity 2.9- and 2.5-fold, respectively. In addition, the change in the fourth residue involved in the ion metal binding (Glu65 was detrimental to pyrazinamidase activity, decreasing it 6-fold. This residue was also involved in a new distinct structural motif DAHXXXDXXHPE described in this paper for Firmicutes nicotinamidases. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that OiNIC is the first nicotinamidase described for the order Bacillales.

  1. Integrated sequence analysis pipeline provides one-stop solution for identifying disease-causing mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao; Wienker, Thomas F; Musante, Luciana; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Kahrizi, Kimia; Najmabadi, Hossein; Ropers, H Hilger

    2014-12-01

    Next-generation sequencing has greatly accelerated the search for disease-causing defects, but even for experts the data analysis can be a major challenge. To facilitate the data processing in a clinical setting, we have developed a novel medical resequencing analysis pipeline (MERAP). MERAP assesses the quality of sequencing, and has optimized capacity for calling variants, including single-nucleotide variants, insertions and deletions, copy-number variation, and other structural variants. MERAP identifies polymorphic and known causal variants by filtering against public domain databases, and flags nonsynonymous and splice-site changes. MERAP uses a logistic model to estimate the causal likelihood of a given missense variant. MERAP considers the relevant information such as phenotype and interaction with known disease-causing genes. MERAP compares favorably with GATK, one of the widely used tools, because of its higher sensitivity for detecting indels, its easy installation, and its economical use of computational resources. Upon testing more than 1,200 individuals with mutations in known and novel disease genes, MERAP proved highly reliable, as illustrated here for five families with disease-causing variants. We believe that the clinical implementation of MERAP will expedite the diagnostic process of many disease-causing defects. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  2. Enhanced Dynamics of Hydrated tRNA on Nanodiamond Surfaces: A Combined Neutron Scattering and MD Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhindsa, Gurpreet K; Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Goswami, Monojoy; O'Neill, Hugh; Mamontov, Eugene; Sumpter, Bobby G; Hong, Liang; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Chu, Xiang-Qiang

    2016-09-14

    Nontoxic, biocompatible nanodiamonds (ND) have recently been implemented in rational, systematic design of optimal therapeutic use in nanomedicines. However, hydrophilicity of the ND surface strongly influences structure and dynamics of biomolecules that restrict in situ applications of ND. Therefore, fundamental understanding of the impact of hydrophilic ND surface on biomolecules at the molecular level is essential. For tRNA, we observe an enhancement of dynamical behavior in the presence of ND contrary to generally observed slow motion at strongly interacting interfaces. We took advantage of neutron scattering experiments and computer simulations to demonstrate this atypical faster dynamics of tRNA on ND surface. The strong attractive interactions between ND, tRNA, and water give rise to unlike dynamical behavior and structural changes of tRNA in front of ND compared to without ND. Our new findings may provide new design principles for safer, improved drug delivery platforms.

  3. Using Naïve Bayesian Analysis to Determine Imaging Characteristics of KRAS Mutations in Metastatic Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershad, Yash; Govindan, Siddharth; Hara, Amy K; Borad, Mitesh J; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Wallace, Alex; Albadawi, Hassan; Oklu, Rahmi

    2017-09-02

    Genotype, particularly Ras status, greatly affects prognosis and treatment of liver metastasis in colon cancer patients. This pilot aimed to apply word frequency analysis and a naive Bayes classifier on radiology reports to extract distinguishing imaging descriptors of wild-type colon cancer patients and those with v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations. In this institutional-review-board-approved study, we compiled a SNaPshot mutation analysis dataset from 457 colon adenocarcinoma patients. From this cohort of patients, we analyzed radiology reports of 299 patients (> 32,000 reports) who either were wild-type (147 patients) or had a KRAS (152 patients) mutation. Our algorithm determined word frequency within the wild-type and mutant radiology reports and used a naive Bayes classifier to determine the probability of a given word belonging to either group. The classifier determined that words with a greater than 50% chance of being in the KRAS mutation group and which had the highest absolute probability difference compared to the wild-type group included: "several", "innumerable", "confluent", and "numerous" ( p colon adenocarcinoma. Moreover, likely characteristic imaging traits of mutant tumors make probabilistic word analysis useful in identifying unique characteristics and disease course, with applications ranging from radiology and pathology reports to clinical notes.

  4. Evolutionary Analysis Predicts Sensitive Positions of MMP20 and Validates Newly- and Previously-Identified MMP20 Mutations Causing Amelogenesis Imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasse, Barbara; Prasad, Megana; Delgado, Sidney; Huckert, Mathilde; Kawczynski, Marzena; Garret-Bernardin, Annelyse; Lopez-Cazaux, Serena; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Manière, Marie-Cécile; Stoetzel, Corinne; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès; Sire, Jean-Yves

    2017-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) designates a group of genetic diseases characterized by a large range of enamel disorders causing important social and health problems. These defects can result from mutations in enamel matrix proteins or protease encoding genes. A range of mutations in the enamel cleavage enzyme matrix metalloproteinase-20 gene ( MMP20 ) produce enamel defects of varying severity. To address how various alterations produce a range of AI phenotypes, we performed a targeted analysis to find MMP20 mutations in French patients diagnosed with non-syndromic AI. Genomic DNA was isolated from saliva and MMP20 exons and exon-intron boundaries sequenced. We identified several homozygous or heterozygous mutations, putatively involved in the AI phenotypes. To validate missense mutations and predict sensitive positions in the MMP20 sequence, we evolutionarily compared 75 sequences extracted from the public databases using the Datamonkey webserver. These sequences were representative of mammalian lineages, covering more than 150 million years of evolution. This analysis allowed us to find 324 sensitive positions (out of the 483 MMP20 residues), pinpoint functionally important domains, and build an evolutionary chart of important conserved MMP20 regions. This is an efficient tool to identify new- and previously-identified mutations. We thus identified six functional MMP20 mutations in unrelated families, finding two novel mutated sites. The genotypes and phenotypes of these six mutations are described and compared. To date, 13 MMP20 mutations causing AI have been reported, making these genotypes and associated hypomature enamel phenotypes the most frequent in AI.

  5. Escherichia coli tRNAArg acceptor-stem isoacceptors: comparative crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichert, André; Schreiber, Angela; Fürste, Jens P.; Perbandt, Markus; Betzel, Christian; Erdmann, Volker A.; Förster, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Various E. coli tRNA Arg acceptor-stem microhelix isoacceptors have been crystallized and investigated by high-resolution X-ray diffraction analysis. The aminoacylation of tRNA is a crucial step in cellular protein biosynthesis. Recognition of the cognate tRNA by the correct aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase is ensured by tRNA identity elements. In tRNA Arg , the identity elements consist of the anticodon, parts of the D-loop and the discriminator base. The minor groove of the aminoacyl stem interacts with the arginyl-tRNA synthetase. As a consequence of the redundancy of the genetic code, six tRNA Arg isoacceptors exist. In the present work, three different Escherichia coli tRNA Arg acceptor-stem helices were crystallized. Two of them, the tRNA Arg microhelices RR-1660 and RR-1662, were examined by X-ray diffraction analysis and diffracted to 1.7 and 1.8 Å resolution, respectively. The tRNA Arg RR-1660 helix crystallized in space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 26.28, b = 28.92, c = 29.00 Å, α = 105.74, β = 99.01, γ = 97.44°, whereas the tRNA Arg RR-1662 helix crystallized in space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 33.18, b = 46.16, c = 26.04 Å, β = 101.50°

  6. Mutational analysis of EGFR and related signaling pathway genes in lung adenocarcinomas identifies a novel somatic kinase domain mutation in FGFR4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenifer L Marks

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Fifty percent of lung adenocarcinomas harbor somatic mutations in six genes that encode proteins in the EGFR signaling pathway, i.e., EGFR, HER2/ERBB2, HER4/ERBB4, PIK3CA, BRAF, and KRAS. We performed mutational profiling of a large cohort of lung adenocarcinomas to uncover other potential somatic mutations in genes of this signaling pathway that could contribute to lung tumorigenesis.We analyzed genomic DNA from a total of 261 resected, clinically annotated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC specimens. The coding sequences of 39 genes were screened for somatic mutations via high-throughput dideoxynucleotide sequencing of PCR-amplified gene products. Mutations were considered to be somatic only if they were found in an independent tumor-derived PCR product but not in matched normal tissue. Sequencing of 9MB of tumor sequence identified 239 putative genetic variants. We further examined 22 variants found in RAS family genes and 135 variants localized to exons encoding the kinase domain of respective proteins. We identified a total of 37 non-synonymous somatic mutations; 36 were found collectively in EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA. One somatic mutation was a previously unreported mutation in the kinase domain (exon 16 of FGFR4 (Glu681Lys, identified in 1 of 158 tumors. The FGFR4 mutation is analogous to a reported tumor-specific somatic mutation in ERBB2 and is located in the same exon as a previously reported kinase domain mutation in FGFR4 (Pro712Thr in a lung adenocarcinoma cell line.This study is one of the first comprehensive mutational analyses of major genes in a specific signaling pathway in a sizeable cohort of lung adenocarcinomas. Our results suggest the majority of gain-of-function mutations within kinase genes in the EGFR signaling pathway have already been identified. Our findings also implicate FGFR4 in the pathogenesis of a subset of lung adenocarcinomas.

  7. Genomic characteristics comparisons of 12 food-related filamentous fungi in tRNA gene set, codon usage and amino acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wanping; Xie, Ting; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Fusheng

    2012-04-10

    Filamentous fungi are widely exploited in food industry due to their abilities to secrete large amounts of enzymes and metabolites. The recent availability of fungal genome sequences has provided an opportunity to explore the genomic characteristics of these food-related filamentous fungi. In this paper, we selected 12 representative filamentous fungi in the areas of food processing and safety, which were Aspergillus clavatus, A. flavus, A. fumigatus, A. nidulans, A. niger, A. oryzae, A. terreus, Monascus ruber, Neurospora crassa, Penicillium chrysogenum, Rhizopus oryzae and Trichoderma reesei, and did the comparative studies of their genomic characteristics of tRNA gene distribution, codon usage pattern and amino acid composition. The results showed that the copy numbers greatly differed among isoaccepting tRNA genes and the distribution seemed to be related with translation process. The results also revealed that genome compositional variation probably constrained the base choice at the third codon, and affected the overall amino acid composition but seemed to have little effect on the integrated physicochemical characteristics of overall amino acids. The further analysis suggested that the wobble pairing and base modification were the important mechanisms in codon-anticodon interaction. In the scope of authors' knowledge, it is the first report about the genomic characteristics analysis of food-related filamentous fungi, which would be informative for the analysis of filamentous fungal genome evolution and their practical application in food industry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Sharing the load: Mex67-Mtr2 cofunctions with Los1 in primary tRNA nuclear export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Kunal; Majumder, Shubhra; Wan, Yao; Shah, Vijay; Wu, Jingyan; Huang, Hsiao-Yun; Hopper, Anita K

    2017-11-01

    Eukaryotic transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are exported from the nucleus, their site of synthesis, to the cytoplasm, their site of function for protein synthesis. The evolutionarily conserved β-importin family member Los1 (Exportin-t) has been the only exporter known to execute nuclear export of newly transcribed intron-containing pre-tRNAs. Interestingly, LOS1 is unessential in all tested organisms. As tRNA nuclear export is essential, we previously interrogated the budding yeast proteome to identify candidates that function in tRNA nuclear export. Here, we provide molecular, genetic, cytological, and biochemical evidence that the Mex67-Mtr2 (TAP-p15) heterodimer, best characterized for its essential role in mRNA nuclear export, cofunctions with Los1 in tRNA nuclear export. Inactivation of Mex67 or Mtr2 leads to rapid accumulation of end-matured unspliced tRNAs in the nucleus. Remarkably, merely fivefold overexpression of Mex67-Mtr2 can substitute for Los1 in los1 Δ cells. Moreover, in vivo coimmunoprecipitation assays with tagged Mex67 document that the Mex67 binds tRNAs. Our data also show that tRNA exporters surprisingly exhibit differential tRNA substrate preferences. The existence of multiple tRNA exporters, each with different tRNA preferences, may indicate that the proteome can be regulated by tRNA nuclear export. Thus, our data show that Mex67-Mtr2 functions in primary nuclear export for a subset of yeast tRNAs. © 2017 Chatterjee et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  9. Plasma circulating tumor DNA as an alternative to metastatic biopsies for mutational analysis in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothé, F; Laes, J-F; Lambrechts, D; Smeets, D; Vincent, D; Maetens, M; Fumagalli, D; Michiels, S; Drisis, S; Moerman, C; Detiffe, J-P; Larsimont, D; Awada, A; Piccart, M; Sotiriou, C; Ignatiadis, M

    2014-10-01

    Molecular screening programs use next-generation sequencing (NGS) of cancer gene panels to analyze metastatic biopsies. We interrogated whether plasma could be used as an alternative to metastatic biopsies. The Ion AmpliSeq™ Cancer Hotspot Panel v2 (Ion Torrent), covering 2800 COSMIC mutations from 50 cancer genes was used to analyze 69 tumor (primary/metastases) and 31 plasma samples from 17 metastatic breast cancer patients. The targeted coverage for tumor DNA was ×1000 and for plasma cell-free DNA ×25 000. Whole blood normal DNA was used to exclude germline variants. The Illumina technology was used to confirm observed mutations. Evaluable NGS results were obtained for 60 tumor and 31 plasma samples from 17 patients. When tumor samples were analyzed, 12 of 17 (71%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 44% to 90%) patients had ≥1 mutation (median 1 mutation per patient, range 0-2 mutations) in either p53, PIK3CA, PTEN, AKT1 or IDH2 gene. When plasma samples were analyzed, 12 of 17 (71%, 95% CI: 44-90%) patients had ≥1 mutation (median 1 mutation per patient, range 0-2 mutations) in either p53, PIK3CA, PTEN, AKT1, IDH2 and SMAD4. All mutations were confirmed. When we focused on tumor and plasma samples collected at the same time-point, we observed that, in four patients, no mutation was identified in either tumor or plasma; in nine patients, the same mutations was identified in tumor and plasma; in two patients, a mutation was identified in tumor but not in plasma; in two patients, a mutation was identified in plasma but not in tumor. Thus, in 13 of 17 (76%, 95% CI 50% to 93%) patients, tumor and plasma provided concordant results whereas in 4 of 17 (24%, 95% CI 7% to 50%) patients, the results were discordant, providing complementary information. Plasma can be prospectively tested as an alternative to metastatic biopsies in molecular screening programs. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology

  10. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: Update and Analysis of New Mutations around the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Serrano-Posada, Hugo; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; González-Valdez, Abigail; Castillo-Rodríguez, Rosa Angélica; Hernández-Ochoa, Beatriz; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Arreguin-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a key regulatory enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway which produces nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) to maintain an adequate reducing environment in the cells and is especially important in red blood cells (RBC). Given its central role in the regulation of redox state, it is understandable that mutations in the gene encoding G6PD can cause deficiency of the protein activity leading to clinical manifestations such as neonatal jaundice and acute hemolytic anemia. Recently, an extensive review has been published about variants in the g6pd gene; recognizing 186 mutations. In this work, we review the state of the art in G6PD deficiency, describing 217 mutations in the g6pd gene; we also compile information about 31 new mutations, 16 that were not recognized and 15 more that have recently been reported. In order to get a better picture of the effects of new described mutations in g6pd gene, we locate the point mutations in the solved three-dimensional structure of the human G6PD protein. We found that class I mutations have the most deleterious effects on the structure and stability of the protein. PMID:27941691

  11. Identification and functional analysis of SOX10 missense mutations in different subtypes of Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaoui, Asma; Watanabe, Yuli; Touraine, Renaud; Baral, Viviane; Goossens, Michel; Pingault, Veronique; Bondurand, Nadege

    2011-12-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disorder characterized by pigmentation defects and sensorineural deafness, classified into four clinical subtypes, WS1-S4. Whereas the absence of additional features characterizes WS2, association with Hirschsprung disease defines WS4. WS is genetically heterogeneous, with six genes already identified, including SOX10. About 50 heterozygous SOX10 mutations have been described in patients presenting with WS2 or WS4, with or without myelination defects of the peripheral and central nervous system (PCWH, Peripheral demyelinating neuropathy-Central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy-Waardenburg syndrome-Hirschsprung disease, or PCW, PCWH without HD). The majority are truncating mutations that most often remove the main functional domains of the protein. Only three missense mutations have been thus far reported. In the present study, novel SOX10 missense mutations were found in 11 patients and were examined for effects on SOX10 characteristics and functions. The mutations were associated with various phenotypes, ranging from WS2 to PCWH. All tested mutations were found to be deleterious. Some mutants presented with partial cytoplasmic redistribution, some lost their DNA-binding and/or transactivation capabilities on various tissue-specific target genes. Intriguingly, several mutants were redistributed in nuclear foci. Whether this phenomenon is a cause or a consequence of mutation-associated pathogenicity remains to be determined, but this observation could help to identify new SOX10 modes of action. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. tRNA modifying enzymes, NSUN2 and METTL1, determine sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil in HeLa cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi Okamoto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nonessential tRNA modifications by methyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved and have been reported to stabilize mature tRNA molecules and prevent rapid tRNA decay (RTD. The tRNA modifying enzymes, NSUN2 and METTL1, are mammalian orthologs of yeast Trm4 and Trm8, which are required for protecting tRNA against RTD. A simultaneous overexpression of NSUN2 and METTL1 is widely observed among human cancers suggesting that targeting of both proteins provides a novel powerful strategy for cancer chemotherapy. Here, we show that combined knockdown of NSUN2 and METTL1 in HeLa cells drastically potentiate sensitivity of cells to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU whereas heat stress of cells revealed no effects. Since NSUN2 and METTL1 are phosphorylated by Aurora-B and Akt, respectively, and their tRNA modifying activities are suppressed by phosphorylation, overexpression of constitutively dephosphorylated forms of both methyltransferases is able to suppress 5-FU sensitivity. Thus, NSUN2 and METTL1 are implicated in 5-FU sensitivity in HeLa cells. Interfering with methylation of tRNAs might provide a promising rationale to improve 5-FU chemotherapy of cancer.

  13. Mitochondrial tRNA import in Trypanosoma brucei is independent of thiolation and the Rieske protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paris, Zdeněk; RUBIO, M. A. T.; Lukeš, Julius; Alfonzo, J. D.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 7 (2009), s. 1398-1406 ISSN 1355-8382 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/06/1558; GA MŠk LC07032; GA MŠk 2B06129 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : T. brucei * tRNA import * 2-thiolation * RIC * Rieske * Fe-S cluster Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.198, year: 2009

  14. Direct application of radioiodinated aminoacyl tRNA for radiolabeling nascent proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherberg, N.H.; Barokas, K.; Murata, Y.; Refetoff, S.

    1985-01-01

    A two-step procedure to incorporate 125 I-iodotyrosine into protein synthesized in a reticulocyte lysate is described. In the first step, the iodination of tyrosyl tRNA was catalyzed by a solid-state glycouril compound. More than one-third of 200 microCi of radioiodine became bound to 70 micrograms of aminoacyl tRNA after 15 min at 0 degrees C. The isotope was distributed in a three-to-one ratio of monoiodotyrosine to di-iodotyrosine. In the second step, the soluble product of the radioiodination was transferred directly into a nuclease-treated reticulocyte lysate coded with RNA isolated from the human hepatoma cell line Hep G2. Fractional recovery of radioiodine in nascent protein was maximally 7.6%. Reaction of the product of translation with antibody against alpha-antitrypsin separated an 125 I-containing protein having a molecular weight estimated as 47,000. The synthesis of unprocessed alpha-antitrypsin was confirmed by cleavage of the labeled protein with leader peptidase and by its displacement from immunocomplex formation with purified alpha-antitrypsin. The amount of 125 I incorporated into alpha-antitrypsin was proportionate to iodinated tRNA additions up to a concentration of 70 micrograms/ml. The synthesis of alpha-antitrypsin as detected in radioautograms after gel electrophoresis was more than twice as sensitive using radioiodinated aminoacyl tRNA as compared with [ 35 S]methionine. Iodine labeling of thyroxine-binding globulin was also demonstrated in the translation product of Hep G2 RNA. Since the specific activity of the radioiodine is high and the means for detection of the isotope efficient, the method described can facilitate the demonstration of quantitatively minor translation products

  15. Analysis of GPR101 and AIP genes mutations in acromegaly: a multicentric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraù, Francesco; Romeo, P D; Puglisi, S; Ragonese, M; Torre, M L; Scaroni, C; Occhi, G; De Menis, E; Arnaldi, G; Trimarchi, F; Cannavò, S

    2016-12-01

    This multicentric study aimed to investigate the prevalence of the G protein-coupled receptor 101 (GPR101) p.E308D variant and aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene mutations in a representative cohort of Italian patients with acromegaly. 215 patients with GH-secreting pituitary adenomas, referred to 4 Italian referral centres for pituitary diseases, have been included. Three cases of gigantism were present. Five cases were classified as FIPA. All the patients have been screened for germline AIP gene mutations and GPR101 gene p.E308D variant. Heterozygous AIP gene variants have been found in 7 patients (3.2 %). Five patients carried an AIP mutation (2.3 %; 4 females): 3 patients harboured the p.R3O4Q mutation, one had the p.R304* mutation and the last one the IVS3+1G>A mutation. The prevalence of AIP mutations was 3.3 % and 2.8 % when considering only the patients diagnosed when they were <30 or <40-year old, respectively. Furthermore, 2.0 % of the patients with a pituitary macroadenoma and 4.2 % of patients resistant to somatostatin analogues treatment were found to harbour an AIP gene mutation. None of the patients was found to carry the GPR101 p.E308D variant. The prevalence of AIP gene mutations among our sporadic and familial acromegaly cases was similar to that one reported in previous studies, but lower when considering only the cases diagnosed before 40 years of age. The GPR101 p.E308D change is unlikely to have a role in somatotroph adenomas tumorigenesis, since none of our sporadic or familial patients tested positive for this variant.

  16. Molecular analysis on germline mutation caused by low-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, R.; Fujikawa, K.; Nishimura, M.; Adzuma, H.; Shimada, Y.; Yamauchi, M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Genetic heterogeneity and a low frequency of germline mutation at single-copy gene loci have limited the direct measurement of germline mutation in human populations. Two conflicting results have been reported for the effect of ionizing radiation on germline mutation in human populations. A study conducted on the first-generation progeny of the survivors of the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki found no significant increase in germline mutations. On the other hand, a significant increase in germline mutation was reported among the human population in the Belarus area after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. We investigated the germline mutation at the molecular level using experimental mouse strains with different genetic backgrounds to assess the risk of ionizing radiation on human populations. The C3H male parents were exposed to X ray (0, 0.3, 1, and 3Gy) and mated with unexposed C57BL females after two weeks interval, so as to detect the germline mutation occurred at the spermatid stage. Genomic DNA samples were prepared from the both parents and F1s, and the genomic DNA sequences were compared between parents and offspring at the specific genomic gene loci, such as adenine phosphoribosyl transferase (aprt) gene and cytidine triphosphate synthetase (ctps) gene, using the automated DNA sequencer. Also hypervariable Pc-1 (Ms6-hm) minisatellite repeat locus was analyzed by using Southern blot hybridization technique. Our preliminary results indicated that the changes of the restriction DNA fragment length in offspring did not reflect the occurrence of the mutation, such as point mutation, insertion, and deletion, in the genomic gene loci including the intervening sequence (intron)

  17. High-resolution melting curve analysis for rapid detection of mutations in a Medaka TILLING library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deguchi Tomonori

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last two decades, DNA sequencing has led to the identification of numerous genes in key species; however, in most cases, their functions are still unknown. In this situation, reverse genetics is the most suitable method to assign function to a gene. TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes is a reverse-genetic strategy that combines random chemical mutagenesis with high-throughput discovery of the induced mutations in target genes. The method has been applied to a variety of plant and animal species. Screening of the induced mutations is the most important step in TILLING. Currently, direct sequencing or nuclease-mediated screening of heteroduplexes is widely used for detection of mutations in TILLING. Both methods are useful, but the costs are substantial and turnaround times are relatively long. Thus, there is a need for an alternative method that is of higher throughput and more cost effective. Results In this study, we developed a high resolution melting (HRM assay and evaluated its effectiveness for screening ENU-induced mutations in a medaka TILLING library. We had previously screened mutations in the p53 gene by direct sequencing. Therefore, we first tested the efficiency of the HRM assay by screening mutations in p53, which indicated that the HRM assay is as useful as direct sequencing. Next, we screened mutations in the atr and atm genes with the HRM assay. Nonsense mutations were identified in each gene, and the phenotypes of these nonsense mutants confirmed their loss-of-function nature. Conclusions These results demonstrate that the HRM assay is useful for screening mutations in TILLING. Furthermore, the phenotype of the obtained mutants indicates that medaka is an excellent animal model for investigating genome stability and gene function, especially when combined with TILLING.

  18. Molecular analysis of carbon ion-induced mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikazono, Naoya; Tanaka, Atsushi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Tano, Shigemitsu; Yokota, Yukihiko

    1998-01-01

    In order to elucidate the characteristics of the mutations induced by ion particles at the molecular level in plants, mutated loci in carbon ion-induced mutants of Arabidopsis were investigated by PCR and Southern blot analyses. In the present study, two lines of gl1 mutant and two lines of tt4 mutant were isolated after carbon ion-irradiation. Out of four mutants, one had a deletion, other two contained rearrangements, and one had a point-like mutation. From the present result, it was suggested that ion particles induced different kinds of alterations of the DNA and therefore they could produce various types of mutant alleles in plants. (author)

  19. Analysis of HFE and non-HFE gene mutations in Brazilian patients with hemochromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Lisboa Bittencourt

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Approximately one-half of Brazilian patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH are neither homozygous for the C282Y mutation nor compound heterozygous for the H63D and C282Y mutations that are associated with HH in Caucasians. Other mutations have been described in the HFE gene as well as in genes involved in iron metabolism, such as transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2 and ferroportin 1 (SCL40A1. AIMS: To evaluate the role of HFE, TfR2 and SCL40A1 mutations in Brazilian subjects with HH. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Nineteen male subjects (median age 42 [range: 20-72] years with HH were evaluated using the Haemochromatosis StripAssay A®. This assay is capable of detecting twelve HFE mutations, which are V53M, V59M, H63D, H63H, S65C, Q127H, P160delC, E168Q, E168X, W169X, C282Y and Q283, four TfR2 mutations, which are E60X, M172K, Y250X, AVAQ594-597del, and two SCL40A1 mutations, which are N144H and V162del. RESULTS: In our cohort, nine (47% patients were homozygous for the C282Y mutation, two (11% were heterozygous for the H63D mutation, and one each (5% was either heterozygous for C282Y or compound heterozygous for C282Y and H63D. No other mutations in the HFE, TfR2 or SCL40A1 genes were observed in the studied patients. CONCLUSIONS: One-third of Brazilian subjects with the classical phenotype of HH do not carry HFE or other mutations that are currently associated with the disease in Caucasians. This observation suggests a role for other yet unknown mutations in the aforementioned genes or in other genes involved in iron homeostasis in the pathogenesis of HH in Brazil.

  20. Spontaneous reverse movement of mRNA-bound tRNA through the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konevega, Andrey L; Fischer, Niels; Semenkov, Yuri P; Stark, Holger; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V

    2007-04-01

    During the translocation step of protein synthesis, a complex of two transfer RNAs bound to messenger RNA (tRNA-mRNA) moves through the ribosome. The reaction is promoted by an elongation factor, called EF-G in bacteria, which, powered by GTP hydrolysis, induces an open, unlocked conformation of the ribosome that allows for spontaneous tRNA-mRNA movement. Here we show that, in the absence of EF-G, there is spontaneous backward movement, or retrotranslocation, of two tRNAs bound to mRNA. Retrotranslocation is driven by the gain in affinity when a cognate E-site tRNA moves into the P site, which compensates the affinity loss accompanying the movement of peptidyl-tRNA from the P to the A site. These results lend support to the diffusion model of tRNA movement during translocation. In the cell, tRNA movement is biased in the forward direction by EF-G, which acts as a Brownian ratchet and prevents backward movement.

  1. Snapshots of Dynamics in Synthesizing N6-isopentenyladenosine at tRNA Anticodon†,‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimnaronk, Sarin; Forouhar, Farhad; Sakai, Junichi; Yao, Min; Tron, Cecile M.; Atta, Mohamed; Fontecave, Marc; Hunt, John F.; Tanaka, Isao

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial and eukaryotic transfer RNAs that decode codons starting with uridine have a hydrophobically-hypermodified adenosine at the position 37 (A37) adjacent to the 3′-end of the anticodon, which is essential for efficient and highly accurate protein translation by the ribosome. However, it remains unclear how the corresponding tRNAs are selected to be modified by alkylation at the correct position of the adenosine base. We have determined a series of the crystal structures of bacterial tRNA isopentenyltransferase (MiaA) in apo- and tRNA-bound forms, which completely render snapshots of substrate selections during modification of RNA. A compact evolutionary inserted domain (herein ‘swinging domain’) in MiaA that exhibits as a highly mobile entity moves around the catalytic domain as likely to reach and trap the tRNA substrate. Thereby, MiaA clamps the anticodon stem loop of tRNA substrate between the catalytic and swinging domains, where the two conserved elongated residues from the swinging domain pinch the two flanking A36 and A38 together to squeeze out A37 into the reaction tunnel. The site-specific isopentenylation of RNA is thus ensured by a characteristic pinch-and-flip mechanism and by a reaction tunnel to confine the substrate selection. Furthermore, combining information from soaking experiments with structural comparisons, we propose a mechanism for the ordered substrate-binding of MiaA. PMID:19435325

  2. Growth-Rate Dependent Regulation of tRNA Level and Charging in Bacillus licheniformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Iolanda; Liebeton, Klaus; Ignatova, Zoya

    2017-10-13

    Cellular growth crucially depends on protein synthesis and the abundance of translational components. Among them, aminoacyl-tRNAs play a central role in biosynthesis and shape the kinetics of mRNA translation, thus influencing protein production. Here, we used microarray-based approaches to determine the charging levels and tRNA abundance of Bacillus licheniformis. We observed an interesting cross-talk among tRNA expression, charging pattern, and growth rate. For a large subset of tRNAs, we found a co-regulated and augmented expression at high growth rate. Their tRNA aminoacylation level is kept relatively constant through riboswitch-regulated expression of the cognate aminoacyl-tRNA-synthetase (AARS). We show that AARSs with putative riboswitch-controlled expression are those charging tRNAs with amino acids which disfavor cell growth when individually added to the nutrient medium. Our results suggest that the riboswitch-regulated AARS expression in B. licheniformis is a powerful mechanism not only to maintain a constant ratio of aminoacyl-tRNA independent of the growth rate but concomitantly to control the intracellular level of free amino acids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of Heterologous tRNA Modifications on the Production of Proteins Containing Noncanonical Amino Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Crnković

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of proteins with noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs enables the creation of protein-based biomaterials with diverse new chemical properties that may be attractive for material science. Current methods for large-scale production of ncAA-containing proteins, frequently carried out in Escherichia coli, involve the use of orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (o-aaRSs and tRNAs (o-tRNAs. Although o-tRNAs are designed to be orthogonal to endogenous aaRSs, their orthogonality to the components of the E. coli metabolism remains largely unexplored. We systematically investigated how the E. coli tRNA modification machinery affects the efficiency and orthogonality of o-tRNASep used for production of proteins with the ncAA O-phosphoserine (Sep. The incorporation of Sep into a green fluorescent protein (GFP in 42 E. coli strains carrying deletions of single tRNA modification genes identified several genes that affect the o-tRNA activity. Deletion of cysteine desulfurase (iscS increased the yield of Sep-containing GFP more than eightfold, while overexpression of dimethylallyltransferase MiaA and pseudouridine synthase TruB improved the specificity of Sep incorporation. These results highlight the importance of tRNA modifications for the biosynthesis of proteins containing ncAAs, and provide a novel framework for optimization of o-tRNAs.

  4. MMB-GUI: a fast morphing method demonstrates a possible ribosomal tRNA translocation trajectory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tek, Alex; Korostelev, Andrei A; Flores, Samuel Coulbourn

    2016-01-08

    Easy-to-use macromolecular viewers, such as UCSF Chimera, are a standard tool in structural biology. They allow rendering and performing geometric operations on large complexes, such as viruses and ribosomes. Dynamical simulation codes enable modeling of conformational changes, but may require considerable time and many CPUs. There is an unmet demand from structural and molecular biologists for software in the middle ground, which would allow visualization combined with quick and interactive modeling of conformational changes, even of large complexes. This motivates MMB-GUI. MMB uses an internal-coordinate, multiscale approach, yielding as much as a 2000-fold speedup over conventional simulation methods. We use Chimera as an interactive graphical interface to control MMB. We show how this can be used for morphing of macromolecules that can be heterogeneous in biopolymer type, sequence, and chain count, accurately recapitulating structural intermediates. We use MMB-GUI to create a possible trajectory of EF-G mediated gate-passing translocation in the ribosome, with all-atom structures. This shows that the GUI makes modeling of large macromolecules accessible to a wide audience. The morph highlights similarities in tRNA conformational changes as tRNA translocates from A to P and from P to E sites and suggests that tRNA flexibility is critical for translocation completion. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. DNA methyltransferase homologue TRDMT1 in Plasmodium falciparum specifically methylates endogenous aspartic acid tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraju, Gayathri; Jabeena, C A; Sethumadhavan, Devadathan Valiyamangalath; Rajaram, Nivethika; Rajavelu, Arumugam

    2017-10-01

    In eukaryotes, cytosine methylation regulates diverse biological processes such as gene expression, development and maintenance of genomic integrity. However, cytosine methylation and its functions in pathogenic apicomplexan protozoans remain enigmatic. To address this, here we investigated the presence of cytosine methylation in the nucleic acids of the protozoan Plasmodium falciparum. Interestingly, P. falciparum has TRDMT1, a conserved homologue of DNA methyltransferase DNMT2. However, we found that TRDMT1 did not methylate DNA, in vitro. We demonstrate that TRDMT1 methylates cytosine in the endogenous aspartic acid tRNA of P. falciparum. Through RNA bisulfite sequencing, we mapped the position of 5-methyl cytosine in aspartic acid tRNA and found methylation only at C38 position. P. falciparum proteome has significantly higher aspartic acid content and a higher proportion of proteins with poly aspartic acid repeats than other apicomplexan pathogenic protozoans. Proteins with such repeats are functionally important, with significant roles in host-pathogen interactions. Therefore, TRDMT1 mediated C38 methylation of aspartic acid tRNA might play a critical role by translational regulation of important proteins and modulate the pathogenicity of the malarial parasite. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Expression, prognostic significance and mutational analysis of protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Vasiliki; Kontandreopoulou, Elina; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis; Roumelioti, Maria; Angelopoulou, Maria; Kyriazopoulou, Lydia; Diamantopoulos, Panagiotis T; Vaiopoulos, George; Variami, Eleni; Kotsianidis, Ioannis; Athina Viniou, Nora

    2016-05-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 dephosphorylates BCR-ABL1, thereby serving as a potential control mechanism of BCR-ABL1 kinase activity. Pathways regulating SHP-1 expression, which could be exploited in the therapeutics of TKI-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), remain unknown. Moreover, the questions of whether there is any kind of SHP-1 deregulation in CML, contributing to disease initiation or evolution, as well as the question of prognostic significance of SHP-1, have not been definitively answered. This study shows moderately lower SHP-1 mRNA expression in chronic phase CML patients in comparison to healthy individuals and no change in SHP-1 mRNA levels after successful TKI treatment. Mutational analysis of the aminoterminal and phosphatase domains of SHP-1 in patients did not reveal genetic lesions. This study also found no correlation of SHP-1 expression at diagnosis with response to treatment, although a trend for lower SHP-1 expression was noted in the very small non-responders' group of the 3-month therapeutic milestone.

  7. Genetic interaction analysis of point mutations enables interrogation of gene function at a residue-level resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braberg, Hannes; Moehle, Erica A.; Shales, Michael; Guthrie, Christine; Krogan, Nevan J.

    2014-01-01

    We have achieved a residue-level resolution of genetic interaction mapping – a technique that measures how the function of one gene is affected by the alteration of a second gene – by analyzing point mutations. Here, we describe how to interpret point mutant genetic interactions, and outline key applications for the approach, including interrogation of protein interaction interfaces and active sites, and examination of post-translational modifications. Genetic interaction analysis has proven effective for characterizing cellular processes; however, to date, systematic high-throughput genetic interaction screens have relied on gene deletions or knockdowns, which limits the resolution of gene function analysis and poses problems for multifunctional genes. Our point mutant approach addresses these issues, and further provides a tool for in vivo structure-function analysis that complements traditional biophysical methods. We also discuss the potential for genetic interaction mapping of point mutations in human cells and its application to personalized medicine. PMID:24842270

  8. Molecular mimicry of human tRNALys anti-codon domain by HIV-1 RNA genome facilitates tRNA primer annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher P; Saadatmand, Jenan; Kleiman, Lawrence; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2013-02-01

    The primer for initiating reverse transcription in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is tRNA(Lys3). Host cell tRNA(Lys) is selectively packaged into HIV-1 through a specific interaction between the major tRNA(Lys)-binding protein, human lysyl-tRNA synthetase (hLysRS), and the viral proteins Gag and GagPol. Annealing of the tRNA primer onto the complementary primer-binding site (PBS) in viral RNA is mediated by the nucleocapsid domain of Gag. The mechanism by which tRNA(Lys3) is targeted to the PBS and released from hLysRS prior to annealing is unknown. Here, we show that hLysRS specifically binds to a tRNA anti-codon-like element (TLE) in the HIV-1 genome, which mimics the anti-codon loop of tRNA(Lys) and is located proximal to the PBS. Mutation of the U-rich sequence within the TLE attenuates binding of hLysRS in vitro and reduces the amount of annealed tRNA(Lys3) in virions. Thus, LysRS binds specifically to the TLE, which is part of a larger LysRS binding domain in the viral RNA that includes elements of the Psi packaging signal. Our results suggest that HIV-1 uses molecular mimicry of the anti-codon of tRNA(Lys) to increase the efficiency of tRNA(Lys3) annealing to viral RNA.

  9. KRAS mutation testing of tumours in adults with metastatic colorectal cancer: a systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westwood, Marie; van Asselt, Thea; Ramaekers, Bram; Whiting, Penny; Joore, Manuela; Armstrong, Nigel; Noake, Caro; Ross, Janine; Severens, Johan; Kleijnen, Jos

    2014-10-01

    Bowel cancer is the third most common cancer in the UK. Most bowel cancers are initially treated with surgery, but around 17% spread to the liver. When this happens, sometimes the liver tumour can be treated surgically, or chemotherapy may be used to shrink the tumour to make surgery possible. Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene (KRAS) mutations make some tumours less responsive to treatment with biological therapies such as cetuximab. There are a variety of tests available to detect these mutations. These vary in the specific mutations that they detect, the amount of mutation they detect, the amount of tumour cells needed, the time to give a result, the error rate and cost. To compare the performance and cost-effectiveness of KRAS mutation tests in differentiating adults with metastatic colorectal cancer whose metastases are confined to the liver and are unresectable and who may benefit from first-line treatment with cetuximab in combination with standard chemotherapy from those who should receive standard chemotherapy alone. Thirteen databases, including MEDLINE and EMBASE, research registers and conference proceedings were searched to January 2013. Additional data were obtained from an online survey of laboratories participating in the UK National External Quality Assurance Scheme pilot for KRAS mutation testing. A systematic review of the evidence was carried out using standard methods. Randomised controlled trials were assessed for quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Diagnostic accuracy studies were assessed using the QUADAS-2 tool. There were insufficient data for meta-analysis. For accuracy studies we calculated sensitivity and specificity together with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Survival data were summarised as hazard ratios and tumour response data were summarised as relative risks, with 95% CIs. The health economic analysis considered the long-term costs and quality-adjusted life-years associated with different tests followed by treatment

  10. [Analysis of SOX10 gene mutation in a family affected with Waardenburg syndrome type II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lei; Yan, Yousheng; Chen, Xue; Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Qinghua; Feng, Xuan; Hao, Shen

    2018-02-10

    OBJECTIVE To detect potential mutation of SOX10 gene in a pedigree affected with Warrdenburg syndrome type II. METHODS Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples of the proband and his family members. Exons and flanking sequences of MITF, PAX3, SOX10, SNAI2, END3 and ENDRB genes were analyzed by chip capturing and high throughput sequencing. Suspected mutations were verified with Sanger sequencing. RESULTS A c.127C>T (p.R43X) mutation of the SOX10 gene was detected in the proband, for which both parents showed a wild-type genotype. CONCLUSION The c.127C>T (p.R43X) mutation of SOX10 gene probably underlies the ocular symptoms and hearing loss of the proband.

  11. Mutational analysis of the PTPN11 gene in Egyptian patients with Noonan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona L. Essawi

    2013-11-01

    Conclusion: Knowing that NS is phenotypically heterogeneous, molecular characterization of the PTPN11 gene should serve to establish NS diagnosis in patients with atypical features, although lack of a mutation does not exclude the possibility of NS.

  12. Mutation analysis of the negative regulator cyclin G2 in gastric cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-24

    Oct 24, 2011 ... Key words: Cyclin G2, gastric cancer, negative regulator, mutation screen. INTRODUCTION ... cerebellum, thymus, spleen, prostate, kidney and the immune ..... and B cell antigen receptor-mediated cell cycle arrest. J. Biol.

  13. Analysis of KIT expression and KIT exon 11 mutations in canine oral malignant melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, A; Mori, T; Sakai, H; Murakami, M; Yanai, T; Hoshino, Y; Maruo, K

    2011-09-01

    KIT, a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase, is one of the specific targets for anti-cancer therapy. In humans, its expression and mutations have been identified in malignant melanomas and therapies using molecular-targeted agents have been promising in these tumours. As human malignant melanoma, canine malignant melanoma is a fatal disease with metastases and the poor response has been observed with all standard protocols. In our study, KIT expression and exon 11 mutations in dogs with histologically confirmed malignant oral melanomas were evaluated. Although 20 of 39 cases were positive for KIT protein, there was no significant difference between KIT expression and overall survival. Moreover, polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of KIT exon 11 in 17 samples did not detect any mutations and proved disappointing. For several reasons, however, KIT expression and mutations of various exons including exon 11 should be investigated in more cases. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. [Mutation analysis of FGFR3 gene in a family featuring hereditary dwarfism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiong; Jiang, Hai-ou; Quan, Qing-li; Li, Jun; He, Ting; Huang, Xue-shuang

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the clinical symptoms and potential mutation in FGFR3 gene for a family featuring hereditary dwarfism in order to attain diagnosis and provide prenatal diagnosis. Five patients and two unaffected relatives from the family, in addition with 100 healthy controls, were recruited. Genome DNA was extracted. Exons 10 and 13 of the FGFR3 gene were amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR products were sequenced in both directions. All patients had similar features including short stature, short limbs, lumbar hyperlordosis but normal craniofacial features. A heterozygous mutation G1620T (N540K) was identified in the cDNA from all patients but not in the unaffected relatives and 100 control subjects. A heterozygous G380R mutation was excluded. The hereditary dwarfism featured by this family has been caused by hypochondroplasia (HCH) due to a N540K mutation in the FGFR3 gene.

  15. Simultaneous Profiling of DNA Mutation and Methylation by Melting Analysis Using Magnetoresistive Biosensor Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Lee, Jung-Rok; Dahl, Christina

    2017-01-01

    specificity. Genomic (mutation) or bisulphite-treated (methylation) DNA is amplified using nondiscriminatory primers, and the amplicons are then hybridized to a giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor array followed by melting curve measurements. The GMR biosensor platform offers scalable multiplexed detection...

  16. Functional analysis of HNPCC-related missense mutations in MSH2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luetzen, Anne [Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Wind, Niels de; Georgijevic, Dubravka [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Nielsen, Finn Cilius [Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Rigshospitalet, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Rasmussen, Lene Juel [Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)], E-mail: ljr@ruc.dk

    2008-10-14

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is associated with germline mutations in the human DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes, most frequently MSH2 and MLH1. The majority of HNPCC mutations cause truncations and thus loss of function of the affected polypeptide. However, a significant proportion of MMR mutations found in HNPCC patients are single amino acid substitutions and the functional consequences of many of these mutations in DNA repair are unclear. We have examined the consequences of seven MSH2 missense mutations found in HNPCC families by testing the MSH2 mutant proteins in functional assays as well as by generating equivalent missense mutations in Escherichia coli MutS and analyzing the phenotypes of these mutants. Here we show that two mutant proteins, MSH2-P622L and MSH2-C697F confer multiple biochemical defects, namely in mismatch binding, in vivo interaction with MSH6 and EXO1, and in nuclear localization in the cell. Mutation G674R, located in the ATP-binding region of MSH2, appears to confer resistance to ATP-dependent mismatch release. Mutations D167H and H639R show reduced mismatch binding. Results of in vivo experiments in E. coli with MutS mutants show that one additional mutant, equivalent of MSH2-A834T that do not show any defects in MSH2 assays, is repair deficient. In conclusion, all mutant proteins (except for MSH2-A305T) have defects; either in mismatch binding, ATP-release, mismatch repair activity, subcellular localization or protein-protein interactions.

  17. Comparative analysis of primary versus relapse/refractory DLBCL identifies shifts in mutation spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenawalt, Danielle M; Liang, Winnie S; Saif, Sakina; Johnson, Justin; Todorov, Petar; Dulak, Austin; Enriquez, Daniel; Halperin, Rebecca; Ahmed, Ambar; Saveliev, Vladislav; Carpten, John; Craig, David; Barrett, J Carl; Dougherty, Brian; Zinda, Michael; Fawell, Stephen; Dry, Jonathan R; Byth, Kate

    2017-11-21

    Current understanding of the mutation spectrum of relapsed/refractory (RR) tumors is limited. We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) on 47 diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) tumors that persisted after R-CHOP treatment, 8 matched to primary biopsies. We compared genomic alterations from the RR cohort against two treatment-naïve DLBCL cohorts (n=112). While the overall number and types of mutations did not differ significantly, we identified frequency changes in DLBCL driver genes. The overall frequency of MYD88 mutant samples increased (12% to 19%), but we noted a decrease in p.L265P (8% to 4%) and increase in p.S219C mutations (2% to 6%). CARD11 p.D230N, PIM1 p.K115N and CD79B p.Y196C mutations were not observed in the RR cohort, although these mutations were prominent in the primary DLBCL samples. We observed an increase in BCL2 mutations (21% to 38% of samples), BCL2 amplifications (3% to 6% of samples) and CREBBP mutations (31% to 42% of samples) in the RR cohort, supported by acquisition of mutations in these genes in relapsed compared to diagnostic biopsies from the same patient. These increases may reflect the genetic characteristics of R-CHOP RR tumors expected to be enriched for during clinical trial enrollment. These findings hold significance for a number of emerging targeted therapies aligned to genetic targets and biomarkers in DLBCL, reinforcing the importance of time-of-treatment biomarker screening during DLBCL therapy selection.

  18. Functional analysis of HNPCC-related missense mutations in MSH2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luetzen, Anne; Wind, Niels de; Georgijevic, Dubravka; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is associated with germline mutations in the human DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes, most frequently MSH2 and MLH1. The majority of HNPCC mutations cause truncations and thus loss of function of the affected polypeptide. However, a significant proportion of MMR mutations found in HNPCC patients are single amino acid substitutions and the functional consequences of many of these mutations in DNA repair are unclear. We have examined the consequences of seven MSH2 missense mutations found in HNPCC families by testing the MSH2 mutant proteins in functional assays as well as by generating equivalent missense mutations in Escherichia coli MutS and analyzing the phenotypes of these mutants. Here we show that two mutant proteins, MSH2-P622L and MSH2-C697F confer multiple biochemical defects, namely in mismatch binding, in vivo interaction with MSH6 and EXO1, and in nuclear localization in the cell. Mutation G674R, located in the ATP-binding region of MSH2, appears to confer resistance to ATP-dependent mismatch release. Mutations D167H and H639R show reduced mismatch binding. Results of in vivo experiments in E. coli with MutS mutants show that one additional mutant, equivalent of MSH2-A834T that do not show any defects in MSH2 assays, is repair deficient. In conclusion, all mutant proteins (except for MSH2-A305T) have defects; either in mismatch binding, ATP-release, mismatch repair activity, subcellular localization or protein-protein interactions

  19. [Mutation analysis of the PAH gene in children with phenylketonuria from the Qinghai area of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiang; Wang, Hui-Zhen; Xu, Fa-Liang; Yang, Xi; Wang, Rui; Zou, Hong-Yun; Yu, Wu-Zhong

    2015-11-01

    To study the mutation characteristics of the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene in children with phenylketonuria (PKU) from the Qinghai area of China, in order to provide basic information for genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis. Mutations of the PAH gene were detected in the promoter and exons 1-13 and their flanking intronic sequences of PAH gene by PCR and DNA sequencing in 49 children with PKU and their parents from the Qinghai area of China. A total of 30 different mutations were detected in 80 out of 98 mutant alleles (82%), including 19 missense (63%), 5 nonsense (17%), 3 splice-site (10%) and 3 deletions (10%). Most mutations were detected in exons 3, 6, 7, 11 and intron 4 of PAH gene. The most frequent mutations were p.R243Q (19%), IVS4-1G>A (9%), p.Y356X (7%) and p.EX6-96A>G(5%). Two novel mutations p.N93fsX5 (c.279-282delCATC) and p.G171E (c.512G>A) were found. p.H64fsX9(c.190delC) was documented for the second time in Chinese PAH gene. The mutation spectrum of the gene PAH in the Qinghai population was similar to that in other populations in North China while significantly different from that in the populations from some provinces in southern China, Japan and Europe. The mutations of PAH gene in the Qinghai area of China demonstrate a unique diversity, complexity and specificity.

  20. Bcr-aBL1 kinase domain mutation analysis in chronic myeloid leukaemia patients with suboptimal response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadej Pajič

    2012-12-01

    Conclusions: It seems that the BCR-ABl1 mutations are rare in patients who do not achieve a MMR by 18 months or more or who have lost MMR. The T315I mutation detected in one patient in our cohort of CML patients indicates that the BCR-ABL1 mutation analysis could be recommended in these cases. The silent mutation detected did not lead to amino acid change, however, it is listed in major single nucleotide polymorphisms databases (SNP, rs2227985. The role of the SNP in the resistance to TKIs is not clear.

  1. MutaNET: a tool for automated analysis of genomic mutations in gene regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, Markus; Hamed, Mohamed; Helms, Volkhard; Neininger, Kerstin

    2018-03-01

    Mutations in genomic key elements can influence gene expression and function in various ways, and hence greatly contribute to the phenotype. We developed MutaNET to score the impact of individual mutations on gene regulation and function of a given genome. MutaNET performs statistical analyses of mutations in different genomic regions. The tool also incorporates the mutations in a provided gene regulatory network to estimate their global impact. The integration of a next-generation sequencing pipeline enables calling mutations prior to the analyses. As application example, we used MutaNET to analyze the impact of mutations in antibiotic resistance (AR) genes and their potential effect on AR of bacterial strains. MutaNET is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/mutanet/. It is implemented in Python and supported on Mac OS X, Linux and MS Windows. Step-by-step instructions are available at http://service.bioinformatik.uni-saarland.de/mutanet/. volkhard.helms@bioinformatik.uni-saarland.de. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  2. Mutation analysis of the NRXN1 gene in autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onay H

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the sequence mutations in the Neurexin 1 (NRXN1 gene that has been considered as one of the strong candidate genes. A total of 30 children and adolescents (aged 3-18 with non syndromic autism were enrolled this study. Sequencing of the coding exons and the exon-intron boundaries of the NRXN1 gene was performed. Two known mutations were described in two different cases. Heterozygous S14L was determined in one patient and heterozygous L748I was determined in another patient. The S14L and L748I mutations have been described in the patients with autism before. Both of these mutations were inherited from their father. In this study, two of 30 (6.7% autism spectrum disorder (ASD patients carrying NRXN1 gene mutations were detected. It indicates that variants in the NRXN1 gene might confer a risk of developing nonsyndromic ASD. However, due to the reduced penetrance in the gene, the causal role of the NRXN1 gene mutations must be evaluated carefully in all cases.

  3. Establishment of screening technique for mutant cell and analysis of base sequence in the mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofuni, Toshio; Nomi, Takehiko; Yamada, Masami; Masumura, Kenichi

    2000-01-01

    This research project aimed to establish an easy and quick detection method for radiation-induced mutation using molecular-biological techniques and an effective analyzing method for the molecular changes in base sequence. In this year, Spi mutants derived from γ-radiation exposed mouse were analyzed by PCR method and DNA sequence method. Male transgenic mice were exposed to γ-ray at 5,10, 50 Gy and the transgene was taken out from the genome DNA from the spleen in vivo packaging method. Spi mutant plaques were obtained by infecting the recovered phage to E. coli. Sequence analysis for the mutants was made using ALFred DNA sequencer and SequiTherm TM Long-Red Cycle sequencing kit. Sequence analysis was carried out for 41 of 50 independent Spi mutants obtained. The deletions were classified into 4 groups; Group 1 included 15 mutants that were characterized with a large deletion (43 bp-10 kb) with a short homologous sequence. Group 2 included 11 mutants of a large deletion having no homologous sequence at the connecting region. Group 3 included 11 mutants having a short deletion of less than 20 bp, which occurred in the non-repetitive sequence of gam gene and possibly caused by oxidative breakage of DNA or recombination of DNA fragment produced by the breakage. Group 4 included 4 mutants having deletions as short as 20 bp or less in the repetitive sequence of gam gene, resulting in an alteration of the reading frame. Thus, the synthesis of Gam protein was terminated by the appearance of TGA between code 13 and 14 of redB gene, leading to inactivation of gam gene and redBA gene. These results indicated that most of Spi mutants had a deletion in red/gam region and the deletions in more than half mutants occurred in homologous sequences as short as 8 bp. (M.N.)

  4. Refining the role of PMS2 in Lynch syndrome: germline mutational analysis improved by comprehensive assessment of variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borràs, Ester; Pineda, Marta; Cadiñanos, Juan; Del Valle, Jesús; Brieger, Angela; Hinrichsen, Inga; Cabanillas, Ruben; Navarro, Matilde; Brunet, Joan; Sanjuan, Xavier; Musulen, Eva; van der Klift, Helen; Lázaro, Conxi; Plotz, Guido; Blanco, Ignacio; Capellá, Gabriel

    2013-08-01

    The majority of mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations causing Lynch syndrome (LS) occur either in MLH1 or MSH2. However, the relative contribution of PMS2 is less well defined. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of PMS2 in LS by assessing the pathogenicity of variants of unknown significance (VUS) detected in the mutational analysis of PMS2 in a series of Spanish patients. From a cohort of 202 LS suspected patients, 13 patients showing loss of PMS2 expression in tumours were screened for germline mutations in PMS2, using a long range PCR based strategy and multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Pathogenicity assessment of PMS2 VUS was performed evaluating clinicopathological data, frequency in control population and in silico and in vitro analyses at the RNA and protein level. Overall 25 different PMS2 DNA variants were detected. Fourteen were classified as polymorphisms. Nine variants were classified as pathogenic: seven alterations based on their molecular nature and two after demonstrating a functional defect (c.538-3C>G affected mRNA processing and c.137G>T impaired MMR activity). The c.1569C>G variant was classified as likely neutral while the c.384G>A remained as a VUS. We have also shown that the polymorphic variant c.59G>A is MMR proficient. Pathogenic PMS2 mutations were detected in 69% of patients harbouring LS associated tumours with loss of PMS2 expression. In all, PMS2 mutations account for 6% of the LS cases identified. The comprehensive functional analysis shown here has been useful in the classification of PMS2 VUS and contributes to refining the role of PMS2 in LS.

  5. Whole exome analysis identifies dominant COL4A1 mutations in patients with complex ocular phenotypes involving microphthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deml, B; Reis, L M; Maheshwari, M; Griffis, C; Bick, D; Semina, E V

    2014-11-01

    Anophthalmia/microphthalmia (A/M) is a developmental ocular malformation defined as complete absence or reduction in size of the eye. A/M is a heterogenous disorder with numerous causative genes identified; however, about half the cases lack a molecular diagnosis. We undertook whole exome sequencing in an A/M family with two affected siblings, two unaffected siblings, and unaffected parents; the ocular phenotype was isolated with only mild developmental delay/learning difficulties reported and a normal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the proband at 16 months. No pathogenic mutations were identified in 71 known A/M genes. Further analysis identified a shared heterozygous mutation in COL4A1, c.2317G>A, p.(Gly773Arg) that was not seen in the unaffected parents and siblings. Analysis of 24 unrelated A/M exomes identified a novel c.2122G>A, p.(Gly708Arg) mutation in an additional patient with unilateral microphthalmia, bilateral microcornea and Peters anomaly; the mutation was absent in the unaffected mother and the unaffected father was not available. Mutations in COL4A1 have been linked to a spectrum of human disorders; the most consistent feature is cerebrovascular disease with variable ocular anomalies, kidney and muscle defects. This study expands the spectrum of COL4A1 phenotypes and indicates screening in patients with A/M regardless of MRI findings or presumed inheritance pattern. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Analysis of alkaptonuria (AKU) mutations and polymorphisms reveals that the CCC sequence motif is a mutational hot spot in the homogentisate 1,2 dioxygenase gene (HGO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán-Valero de Bernabé, D; Jimenez, F J; Aquaron, R; Rodríguez de Córdoba, S

    1999-01-01

    We recently showed that alkaptonuria (AKU) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the homogentisate 1,2 dioxygenase gene (HGO). Herein we describe haplotype and mutational analyses of HGO in seven new AKU pedigrees. These analyses identified two novel single-nucleotide polymorphisms (INV4+31A-->G and INV11+18A-->G) and six novel AKU mutations (INV1-1G-->A, W60G, Y62C, A122D, P230T, and D291E), which further illustrates the remarkable allelic heterogeneity found in AKU. Reexamination of all 29 mutations and polymorphisms thus far described in HGO shows that these nucleotide changes are not randomly distributed; the CCC sequence motif and its inverted complement, GGG, are preferentially mutated. These analyses also demonstrated that the nucleotide substitutions in HGO do not involve CpG dinucleotides, which illustrates important differences between HGO and other genes for the occurrence of mutation at specific short-sequence motifs. Because the CCC sequence motifs comprise a significant proportion (34.5%) of all mutated bases that have been observed in HGO, we conclude that the CCC triplet is a mutational hot spot in HGO. PMID:10205262

  7. Mutational Analysis of the TYR and OCA2 Genes in Four Chinese Families with Oculocutaneous Albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Wang, Zhi; Chen, Mengping; Fan, Ning; Yang, Jie; Liu, Lu; Wang, Ying; Liu, Xuyang

    2015-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is an autosomal recessive disorder. The most common type OCA1 and OCA2 are caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the tyrosinase gene (TYR) and OCA2 gene, respectively. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the molecular basis of oculocutaneous albinism in four Chinese families. Four non-consanguineous OCA families were included in the study. The TYR and OCA2 genes of all individuals were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), sequenced and compared with a reference database. Four patients with a diagnosis of oculocutaneous albinism, presented with milky skin, white or light brown hair and nystagmus. Genetic analyses demonstrated that patient A was compound heterozygous for c.1037-7T.A, c.1037-10_11delTT and c.1114delG mutations in the TYR gene; patient B was heterozygous for c.593C>T and c.1426A>G mutations in the OCA2 gene, patients C and D were compound heterozygous mutations in the TYR gene (c.549_550delGT and c.896G>A, c.832C>T and c.985T>C, respectively). The heterozygous c.549_550delGT and c.1114delG alleles in the TYR gene were two novel mutations. Interestingly, heterozygous members in these pedigrees who carried c.1114delG mutations in the TYR gene or c.1426A>G mutations in the OCA2 gene presented with blond or brown hair and pale skin, but no ocular disorders when they were born; the skin of these patients accumulated pigment over time and with sun exposure. This study expands the mutation spectrum of oculocutaneous albinism. It is the first time, to the best of our knowledge, to report that c.549_550delGT and c.1114delG mutations in the TYR gene were associated with OCA. The two mutations (c.1114delG in the TYR gene and c.1426A>G in the OCA2 gene) may be responsible for partial clinical manifestations of OCA.

  8. USH1G with unique retinal findings caused by a novel truncating mutation identified by genome-wide linkage analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taibah, Khalid; Bin-Khamis, Ghada; Kennedy, Shelley; Hemidan, Amal; Al-Qahtani, Faisal; Tabbara, Khalid; Mubarak, Bashayer Al; Ramzan, Khushnooda; Meyer, Brian F.; Al-Owain, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disorder divided into three distinct clinical subtypes based on the severity of the hearing loss, manifestation of vestibular dysfunction, and the age of onset of retinitis pigmentosa and visual symptoms. To date, mutations in seven different genes have been reported to cause USH type 1 (USH1), the most severe form. Patients diagnosed with USH1 are known to be ideal candidates to benefit from cochlear implantation. Methods Genome-wide linkage analysis using Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 10K arrays were performed in three cochlear implanted Saudi siblings born from a consanguineous marriage, clinically diagnosed with USH1 by comprehensive clinical, audiological, and ophthalmological examinations. From the linkage results, the USH1G gene was screened for mutations by direct sequencing of the coding exons. Results We report the identification of a novel p.S243X truncating mutation in USH1G that segregated with the disease phenotype and was not present in 300 ethnically matched normal controls. We also report on the novel retinal findings and the outcome of cochlear implantation in the affected individuals. Conclusions In addition to reporting a novel truncating mutation, this report expands the retinal phenotype in USH1G and presents the first report of successful cochlear implants in this disease. PMID:22876113

  9. Clinical efficacy of icotinib in lung cancer patients with different EGFR mutation status: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jian; Wang, Ya-Nan; Xu, Ping; Xiang, Da-Xiong; Yang, Rui; Wei, Wei; Qu, Qiang

    2017-05-16

    Icotinib is a novel and the third listed epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), which exerts a good anti-tumor efficacy on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The efficacy of EGFR-TKIs has been shown to be associated with the EGFR mutation status, especially exon 19 deletion (19Del) and exon 21 L858R mutation. Therefore, a meta-analysis was performed to assess the efficacy of icotinib in NSCLC patients harboring EGFR mutations (19Del or L858R) and wild type (19Del and L858R loci wild type). A total of 24 studies were included for comparing the objective response rate (ORR) in the EGFR wild type and mutant patients treated with icotinib. The ORRs of EGFR mutant patients (19Del or L858R) are better than those of EGFR wild type patients (OR = 7.03(5.09-9.71), P icotinib treatment; EGFR 19Del patients treated with icotinib have better ORRs than EGFR L858R patients. EGFR mutation status is a useful biomarker for the evaluation of icotinib efficacy in NSCLC patients.

  10. Optimal Mutation Rates for the (1+lambda) EA on OneMax Through Asymptotically Tight Drift Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gießen, Christian; Witt, Carsten

    2018-01-01

    We study the (1+) EA, a classical population-based evolutionary algorithm, with mutation probability c / n, where and are constant, on the benchmark function OneMax, which counts the number of 1-bits in a bitstring. We improve a well-established result that allows to determine the first hitting t...... that mutation rates up to 10% larger than the asymptotically optimal rate 1 / n minimize the expected runtime. However, in absolute terms the expected runtime does not change by much when replacing 1 / n with the optimal mutation rate....... drift is known. This reduces the analysis of expected optimization time to finding an exact expression for the drift. We then give an exact closed-form expression for the drift and develop a method to approximate it very efficiently, enabling us to determine approximate optimal mutation rates for the (1......+) EA for various parameter settings of c and and also for moderate sizes of n. This makes the need for potentially lengthy and costly experiments in order to optimize c for fixed n and for the optimization of OneMax unnecessary. Interestingly, even for moderate n and not too small it turns out...

  11. Structure-based analysis of five novel disease-causing mutations in 21-hydroxylase-deficient patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Minutolo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is the most frequent inborn error of metabolism, and accounts for 90-95% of CAH cases. The affected enzyme, P450C21, is encoded by the CYP21A2 gene, located together with a 98% nucleotide sequence identity CYP21A1P pseudogene, on chromosome 6p21.3. Even though most patients carry CYP21A1P-derived mutations, an increasing number of novel and rare mutations in disease causing alleles were found in the last years. In the present work, we describe five CYP21A2 novel mutations, p.R132C, p.149C, p.M283V, p.E431K and a frameshift g.2511_2512delGG, in four non-classical and one salt wasting patients from Argentina. All novel point mutations are located in CYP21 protein residues that are conserved throughout mammalian species, and none of them were found in control individuals. The putative pathogenic mechanisms of the novel variants were analyzed in silico. A three-dimensional CYP21 structure was generated by homology modeling and the protein design algorithm FoldX was used to calculate changes in stability of CYP21A2 protein. Our analysis revealed changes in protein stability or in the surface charge of the mutant enzymes, which could be related to the clinical manifestation found in patients.

  12. DNA sequence analysis of the mutational specificity of u.v. light in the SUP4-o gene of yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, B.A.; Mis, J.R.A.; Pierce, M.K.; Giroux, C.N.

    1987-01-01

    Mutations induced in the SUP4-o gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by u.v. irradiation have been characterized. DNA sequence analysis of 120 mutants revealed that u.v. induced all types of base substitutions, although transitions, in particular G:C → A:T events predominated. In addition, a small number of single base pair deletions and double mutations, occurring in tandem or separated by a few base pairs, were recovered. The base pair substitutions were not distributed randomly in the SUP4-o gene and, with one exception, were all located at sites of adjacent pyrimidines, suggesting they were targeted by u.v. photolesions. A substantial fraction of the mutations were detected at hotspots for u.v. mutagenesis. The majority of changes occurred at the 3' base of dipyrimidine sequences where both cyclobutane dimers and [6-4]-photoproducts could form. Approximately one-third of the induced base substitutions were found at potential pyrimidine dimer sites where [6-4]-photoproducts would be expected to occur rarely. Possible origins of the induced mutations and the role of cyclobutane dimers as premutational u.v. lesions in yeast are considered. (author)

  13. Molecular analysis of lipoid proteinosis: identification of a novel nonsense mutation in the ECM1 gene in a Pakistani family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naeem Muhammad

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lipoid proteinosis is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by cutaneous and mucosal lesions and hoarseness appearing in early childhood that is caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the ECM1 gene located on chromosome 1q21. The aim of the study was to investigate the molecular genetic defect underlying lipoid proteinosis in a consanguineous Pakistani family. Methods Genotyping of seven members of the family was performed by amplifying microsatellite markers, tightly linked to the ECM1 gene. To screen for mutations in the ECM1 gene, all of its exons and splice junctions were PCR amplified from genomic DNA and analyzed by SSCP and sequenced directly in an ABI 3130 genetic analyzer. Results The results revealed linkage of the LP family to the ECM1 locus. Sequence analysis of the coding exons and splice junctions of the ECM1 gene revealed a novel homozygous mutation (c.616C > T in exon 6, predicted to replace glutamine with stop codon (p.Q206X at amino acid position 206. Conclusions The finding of a novel mutation in Pakistani family extends the body of evidence that supports the importance of ECM1 gene for the development of lipoid proteinosis.

  14. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis of Von Hippel-Lindau disease cancer syndrome by combined mutation and segregation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denilce R. Sumita

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL disease is an autosomal dominant cancer syndrome, associated with the development of tumors and cysts in multiple organ systems, whose expression and age of onset are highly variable. The VHL disease tumor suppressor gene (VHL maps to 3p25-p26 and mutations ranging from a single base change to large deletions have been detected in patients with VHL disease. We developed a single cell PCR protocol for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD of VHL disease to select unaffected embryos on the basis of the detection of the specific mutation and segregation analysis of polymorphic linked markers. Multiplex-nested PCR using single buccal cells of an affected individual were performed in order to test the accuracy and reliability of this single-cell protocol. For each locus tested, amplification efficiency was 83% to 87% and allelic drop-out rates ranged from 12% to 8%. Three VHL disease PGD cycles were performed on cells from a couple with paternal transmission of a 436delC mutation in exon 2 of the VHL gene, leading to the identification of three unaffected embryos. Independent of the mutation present, this general PGD protocol for the diagnosis of VHL disease can be used in families informative for either the D3S1038 or D3S1317 microsatellite markers.

  15. Molecular analysis of congenital goitres with hypothyroidism caused by defective thyroglobulin synthesis. Identification of a novel c.7006C>T [p.R2317X] mutation and expression of minigenes containing nonsense mutations in exon 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiavelli, Gloria A; Caputo, Mariela; Rivolta, Carina M; Olcese, María C; Gruñeiro-Papendieck, Laura; Chiesa, Ana; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Targovnik, Héctor M

    2010-01-01

    Thyroglobulin (TG) deficiency is an autosomal-recessive disorder that results in thyroid dyshormonogenesis. A number of distinct mutations have been identified as causing human hypothyroid goitre. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize new mutations in the TG gene in an attempt to increase the understanding of the genetic mechanism responsible for this disorder. A total of six patients from four nonconsanguineous families with marked impairment of TG synthesis were studied. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, sequencing of DNA, genotyping, expression of chimeric minigenes and bioinformatic analysis were performed. Four different inactivating TG mutations were identified: one novel mutation (c.7006C>T [p.R2317X]) and three previously reported (c.886C>T [p.R277X], c.6701C>A [p.A2215D] and c.6725G>A [p.R2223H]). Consequently, one patient carried a compound heterozygous for p.R2223H/p.R2317X mutations; two brothers showed a homozygous p.A2215D substitution and the remaining three patients, from two families with typical phenotype, had a single p.R277X mutated allele. We also showed functional evidences that premature stop codons inserted at different positions in exon 7, which disrupt exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) sequences, do not interfere with exon definition and processing. In this study, we have identified a novel nonsense mutation p.R2317X in the acetylcholinesterase homology domain of TG. We have also observed that nonsense mutations do not interfere with the pre-mRNA splicing of exon 7. The results are in accordance with previous observations confirming the genetic heterogeneity of TG defects.

  16. Mutation of the human mitochondrial phenylalanine-tRNA synthetase causes infantile-onset epilepsy and cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almalki, Abdulraheem; Alston, Charlotte L; Parker, Alasdair; Simonic, Ingrid; Mehta, Sarju G; He, Langping; Reza, Mojgan; Oliveira, Jorge M A; Lightowlers, Robert N; McFarland, Robert; Taylor, Robert W; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M A

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are essential enzymes in protein synthesis since they charge tRNAs with their cognate amino acids. Mutations in the genes encoding mitochondrial aaRSs have been associated with a wide spectrum of human mitochondrial diseases. Here we report the identification of pathogenic mutations (a partial genomic deletion and a highly conserved p. Asp325Tyr missense variant) in FARS2, the gene encoding mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase, in a patient with early-onset epilepsy and isolated complex IV deficiency in muscle. The biochemical defect was expressed in myoblasts but not in fibroblasts and associated with decreased steady state levels of COXI and COXII protein and reduced steady state levels of the mt-tRNA(Phe) transcript. Functional analysis of the recombinant mutant p. Asp325Tyr FARS2 protein showed an inability to bind ATP and consequently undetectable aminoacylation activity using either bacterial tRNA or human mt-tRNA(Phe) as substrates. Lentiviral transduction of cells with wildtype FARS2 restored complex IV protein levels, confirming that the p.Asp325Tyr mutation is pathogenic, causing respiratory chain deficiency and neurological deficits on account of defective aminoacylation of mt-tRNA(Phe). © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. p53 expression and mutation analysis of odontogenic cysts with and without dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Darren P

    2012-01-01

    Overexpression of p53 protein is well described in odontogenic cystic lesions (OCLs), including those with epithelial dysplasia; however, most p53 antibodies stain both wild-type and mutated p53 protein and may not reflect genotype. Direct sequencing of the p53 gene has not identified mutations in OCLs with dysplasia. The purpose of this study was to determine the molecular basis of p53 expression in several types of OCLs with and without dysplasia. The study material comprised 13 OCLs: odontogenic keratocyst (n = 5), orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (n = 5), dentigerous cyst (n = 2), lateral periodontal cyst (n = 1), and unspecified developmental odontogenic cyst (UDOC) (n = 1). Five of these had features of mild or moderate epithelial dysplasia. One intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) that was believed to have arisen from an antecedent dysplastic orthokeratinized OC was also included. Immunohistochemistry was performed using the DO7 monoclonal antibody that recognizes wild-type and mutated p53. DNA was extracted from microdissected tissue for all samples and exons 4 to 8 of the p53 gene direct sequenced. In 4 of 5 OCLs with dysplasia there was strong nuclear staining of basal and suprabasal cells. In all cases without dysplasia, nuclear expression in basal cells was either negative or weak and was absent in suprabasal cell nuclei. A mutation in exon 6 of the p53 gene (E224D) was identified in both the dysplastic orthokeratinized OC and the subsequent intraosseous SCC. OCLs with features of dysplasia show increased expression of p53 protein that does not reflect p53 mutational status. One dysplastic OC shared the same p53 mutation with a subsequent intraosseous SCC, indicating that p53 mutation may be associated with malignant transformation in this case. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. High-throughput mutational analysis of TOR1A in primary dystonia

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    Truong Daniel D

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the c.904_906delGAG mutation in Exon 5 of TOR1A typically manifests as early-onset generalized dystonia, DYT1 dystonia is genetically and clinically heterogeneous. Recently, another Exon 5 mutation (c.863G>A has been associated with early-onset generalized dystonia and some ΔGAG mutation carriers present with late-onset focal dystonia. The aim of this study was to identify TOR1A Exon 5 mutations in a large cohort of subjects with mainly non-generalized primary dystonia. Methods High resolution melting (HRM was used to examine the entire TOR1A Exon 5 coding sequence in 1014 subjects with primary dystonia (422 spasmodic dysphonia, 285 cervical dystonia, 67 blepharospasm, 41 writer's cramp, 16 oromandibular dystonia, 38 other primary focal dystonia, 112 segmental dystonia, 16 multifocal dystonia, and 17 generalized dystonia and 250 controls (150 neurologically normal and 100 with other movement disorders. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were evaluated in an additional 8 subjects with known ΔGAG DYT1 dystonia and 88 subjects with ΔGAG-negative dystonia. Results HRM of TOR1A Exon 5 showed high (100% diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. HRM was rapid and economical. HRM reliably differentiated the TOR1A ΔGAG and c.863G>A mutations. Melting curves were normal in 250/250 controls and 1012/1014 subjects with primary dystonia. The two subjects with shifted melting curves were found to harbor the classic ΔGAG deletion: 1 a non-Jewish Caucasian female with childhood-onset multifocal dystonia and 2 an Ashkenazi Jewish female with adolescent-onset spasmodic dysphonia. Conclusion First, HRM is an inexpensive, diagnostically sensitive and specific, high-throughput method for mutation discovery. Second, Exon 5 mutations in TOR1A are rarely associated with non-generalized primary dystonia.

  19. A Site Specific Model And Analysis Of The Neutral Somatic Mutation Rate In Whole-Genome Cancer Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertl, Johanna; Guo, Qianyun; Rasmussen, Malene Juul

    2017-01-01

    Detailed modelling of the neutral mutational process in cancer cells is crucial for identifying driver mutations and understanding the mutational mechanisms that act during cancer development. The neutral mutational process is very complex: whole-genome analyses have revealed that the mutation ra...

  20. A whole mitochondrial genome screening in a MELAS patient: A novel mitochondrial tRNAVal mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezghani, Najla; Mnif, Mouna; Kacem, Maha; Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna; Hadj Salem, Ikhlass; Kallel, Nozha; Charfi, Nadia; Abid, Mohamed; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We report a young Tunisian patient with clinical features of MELAS syndrome. → Reported mitochondrial mutations were absent after a mutational screening of the whole mtDNA. → We described a novel m.1640A>G mutation in the tRNA Val gene which was absent in 150 controls. → Mitochondrial deletions and POLG1 gene mutations were absent. → The m.1640A>G mutation could be associated to MELAS syndrome. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and strokelike episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a mitochondrial disorder characterized by a wide variety of clinical presentations and a multisystemic organ involvement. In this study, we report a Tunisian girl with clinical features of MELAS syndrome who was negative for the common m.3243A>G mutation, but also for the reported mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations and deletions. Screening of the entire mtDNA genome showed several known mitochondrial variants besides to a novel transition m.1640A>G affecting a wobble adenine in the anticodon stem region of the tRNA Val . This nucleotide was conserved and it was absent in 150 controls suggesting its pathogenicity. In addition, no mutations were found in the nuclear polymerase gamma-1 gene (POLG1). These results suggest further investigation nuclear genes encoding proteins responsible for stability and structural components of the mtDNA or to the oxidative phosphorylation machinery to explain the phenotypic variability in the studied family.

  1. Clinical phenotype and genetic mutation of fatty acid hydroxylase - associated neurodegeneration: analysis of four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-jun HUANG

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To report 4 cases of fatty acid hydroxylase - associated neurodegeneration (FAHN and to summarize the clinical and genetic characteristics of FAHN by literatures review.  Methods Four cases of FAHN patients' clinical and family data were collected in detail. The gDNA of patients and their parents were extracted from peripheral blood. FA2H gene was conducted and followed by Sanger sequencing.  Results Among the 4 cases, 3 cases (Case 2, Case 3, Case 4 presented typical manifestations of FAHN while the other (Case 1 was atypical. Genetic sequencing showed FA2H gene mutation in all affected patients. Compound heterozygous mutation c.461G > A (p.Arg154His and c.794T > G (p.Phe265Cys were seen in Case 1. In Case 2, only one documented heterozygous mutation c.703C > T (p.Arg235Cys was found, and dificit mutation was not found in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP chip test of the patient and her mother. Compound heterozygous mutation c.688G > A (p.Glu230Lys and insertion mutation c.172_173insGGGCCAGGAC (p.Ile58ArgfsX47 were presented in Case 3. In Case 4, compound heterozygous mutation c.688G > A (p.Glu230Lys, c.968C > A (p.Pro323Gln and c.976G > A (p. Gly326Asp were seen, while his father was the carrier of c.688G > A (p.Glu230Lys mutation and his mother was the carrier of c.968C > A (p.Pro323Gln and c.976G > A (p.Gly326Asp mutation. According to the standard of American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG, c.461G > A (p.Arg154His and c.794T > G (p.Phe265Cys in Case 1, and c.703C > T (p.Arg235Cys in Case 2 were considered as "likely pathogenic", while FA2H gene compound heterozygous mutation c.688G > A (p.Glu230Lys, insertion mutation c.172_173insGGGCCAGGAC (p.Ile58ArgfsX47 in Case 3 was as "pathogenic", and in Case 4, the FA2H gene mutation c.688G > A (p.Glu230Lys and c.968C > A (p.Pro323Gln were "pathogenic" and c.976G > A (p.Gly326Asp was "likely pathogenic".  Conclusions FAHN has highly clinical and genetic

  2. [PAX3 gene mutation analysis for two Waardenburg syndrome type Ⅰ families and their prenatal diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y; Liu, N; Kong, X D; Yan, J; Qin, Z B; Wang, B

    2016-12-07

    Objective: To analyze the mutations of PAX3 gene in two Waardenburg syndrome type Ⅰ (WS1) pedigrees and make prenatal diagnosis for the high-risk 18-week-old fetus. Methods: PAX3 gene was first analyzed by Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification(MLPA) for detecting pathogenic mutation of the probands of the two pedigrees. The mutations were confirmed by MLPA and Sanger in parents and unrelated healthy individuals.Prenatal genetic diagnosis for the high-risk fetus was performed by amniotic fluid cell after genotyping. Results: A heterozygous PAX3 gene gross deletion (E7 deletion) was identified in all patients from WS1-01 family, and not found in 20 healthy individuals.Prenatal diagnosis in WS1-01 family indicated that the fetus was normal. Molecular studies identified a novel deletion mutation c. 1385_1386delCT within the PAX3 gene in all affected WS1-02 family members, but in none of the unaffected relatives and 200 healthy individuals. Conclusions: PAX3 gene mutation is etiological for two WS1 families. Sanger sequencing plus MLPA is effective and accurate for making gene diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis.

  3. Novel Mutations in Sandhoff Disease: A Molecular Analysis among Iranian Cohort of Infantile Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryan, H; Aryani, O; Banihashemi, K; Zaman, T; Houshmand, M

    2012-01-01

    Background Sandhoff disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by β-hexosaminidase deficiency and accumulation of GM2 ganglioside resulting in progressive motor neuron manifestations and death from respiratory failure and infections in infantiles. Pathogenic mutations in HEXB gene were observed which leads to enzyme activity reduction and interruption of normal metabolic cycle of GM2 ganglioside in sandhoff patients. Methods: Six infantile index patients with typical biochemical and clinical picture of the disease were studied at the molecular level. After DNA extraction and amplification, probands and their parents, were evaluated by direct sequencing of amplicons. Results: We identified 7 different mutations among which 4 were novel. The most prevalent finding (50%) among our population was a 16 kb deletion including the promoter and exons 1–5. The other findings included c.1552delG and c.410G>A, c.362 A>G, c.550delT, c.1597C>T, c.1752delTG. Conclusion: We conclude that Cys137Tyr and R533C mutations may be pathogenic because of changing amino acid and locating at the conserved region and also they have not been observed in hundred controls. Besides, four mutations including: Cys137Tyr, c.1552delG, c.1597C>T and c.550delT fulfilled almost criteria for pathogenic mutation. PMID:23113155

  4. [Gene mutation and clinical phenotype analysis of patients with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X H; Ding, W W; Han, L; Liu, X R; Xiao, Y Y; Yang, J; Mo, Y

    2017-10-02

    Objective: To analyze the gene mutations and clinical features of patients with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Method: Determined the mutation domain in five cases diagnosed with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and identified the relationship between the mutant domain and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by searching relevant articles in pubmed database. Result: Three mutant genes (PTPN11 gene in chromosome 12, RIT1 gene in chromosome 1 and RAF1 gene in chromosome 3) in five cases all had been reported to be related to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The reported hypertrophic cardiomyopathy relevant genes MYPN, MYH6 and MYBP3 had also been found in case 1 and 2. Patients with same gene mutation had different clinical manifestations. Both case 4 and 5 had RAF1 mutation (c.770C>T). However, case 4 had special face, low IQ, mild pulmonary artery stenosis, and only mild ventricular hypertrophy. Conclusion: Noonan syndrome is a genetic heterogeneity disease. Our study identified specific gene mutations that could result in Noonan syndrome with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy through molecular biology methods. The results emphasize the importance of gene detection in the management of Noonan syndrome.

  5. Conformation and functioning of tRNAs: cross-linked tRNAs as substrate for tRNA nucleotidyl-transferase and aminoacyl synthetases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, D.S.; Thomas, G.; Favre, A.

    1974-01-01

    The behavior of mixed E. coli tRNAs ''cross-linked'' by irradiation with near ultraviolet light (310-400 nm) has been compared to that of the intact molecules in two enzymatic processes. No change in the rate and extent of the repair of the pCpCpA 3' terminus of tRNA by purified E. coli tRNA nucleotidyltransferase can be detected. In contrast, complex data were obtained in the acylation reaction. They can be understood using other tRNA specific modifications as well as our present knowledge of E. coli tRNA sequences and rare base content [fr

  6. Mutation analysis of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene in Azerbaijani population, a report from West Azerbaijan province of Iran

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    Morteza Bagheri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Phenylketonuria (PKU is a genetic inborn error of phenylalanine (Phe metabolism resulting from insufficiency in the hepatic enzyme, phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH, which leads to elevated levels of Phe in the blood. The present study was carried out for mutation analysis of the PAH gene in West Azerbaijan province of Iran. Materials and Methods:A total of 218 alleles from 40 PKU families were studied using restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR method. Results:The frequencies of IVS10-11, S67P, R261Q, R252W, IVS11nt-1 g>c, R408Q, and Q232Q mutations were 28(35, 17(21.25, 15(18.75, 3(3.75, 3(3.75, 2(2.5, and 1(1.25, in cases group, and 51(23.4, 31(14.2, 27(12.4, 6(2.75, 6(2.75, 4(1.83, and 2(0.92 in total group, respectively. The mutations of R243Q, 364delG, L333F, 261X, I65T, and R408W were not detected in our samples. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the IVS10-11 mutation has the highest frequency in the tested population. To our knowledge, this report is the first in its own kind and provides better understanding of the genetic heterogeneity, the origin and distributions of PAH mutations in West Azerbaijan province of Iran.

  7. DPAGT1-CDG: Functional analysis of disease-causing pathogenic mutations and role of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Yuste-Checa

    Full Text Available Pathogenic mutations in DPAGT1 are manifested as two possible phenotypes: congenital disorder of glycosylation DPAGT1-CDG (also known as CDG-Ij, and limb-girdle congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS with tubular aggregates. UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-dolichyl-phosphate N-acetylglucosamine phosphotransferase (GPT, the protein encoded by DPAGT1, is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER-resident protein involved in an initial step in the N-glycosylation pathway. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of six variants in DPAGT1 detected in patients with DPAGT1-CDG, and the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress, as part of the search for therapeutic strategies to use against DPAGT1-CDG. The effect of the six mutations, i.e., c.358C>A (p.Leu120Met, c.791T>G (p.Val264Gly, c.901C>T (p.Arg301Cys, c.902G>A (p.Arg301His, c.1154T>G (p.Leu385Arg, and of the novel mutation c.329T>C (p.Phe110Ser, were examined via the analysis of DPAGT1 transcriptional profiles and GTP levels in patient-derived fibroblasts. In addition, the transient expression of different mutations was analysed in COS-7 cells. The results obtained, together with those of bioinformatic studies, revealed these mutations to affect the splicing process, the stability of GTP, or the ability of this protein to correctly localise in the ER membrane. The unfolded protein response (UPR; the response to ER stress was found not to be active in patient-derived fibroblasts, unlike that seen in cells from patients with PMM2-CDG or DPM1-CDG. Even so, the fibroblasts of patients with DPAGT1-CDG seemed to be more sensitive to the stressor tunicamycin. The present work improves our knowledge of DPAGT1-CDG and provides bases for developing tailored splicing and folding therapies.

  8. Extending Jak2V617F and MplW515 mutation analysis to single hematopoietic colonies and B and T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardanani, Animesh; Lasho, Terra L; Finke, Christy; Mesa, Ruben A; Hogan, William J; Ketterling, Rhett P; Gilliland, Dwight Gary; Tefferi, Ayalew

    2007-09-01

    JAK2V617F and MPLW515L/K are myeloproliferative disorder (MPD)-associated mutations. We genotyped 552 individual hematopoietic colonies obtained by CD34+ cell culture from 16 affected patients (13 JAK2V617F and 3 MPLW515L/K) to determine (a) the proportion of colonies harboring a particular mutation in the presence or absence of cytokines, (b) the lineage distribution of endogenous colonies for each mutation, and (c) the differences (if any) in the pattern of mutation among the various MPDs, as established by genotyping of individual colonies. Genotyping analysis revealed cohabitation of mutation-negative and mutation-positive endogenous colonies in polycythemia vera as well as other MPDs. Culture of progenitor cells harboring MPLW515L/K yielded virtually no endogenous erythroid colonies in contrast to JAK2V617F-harboring progenitor cells. The mutation pattern (i.e., relative distribution of homozygous, heterozygous, or wild-type colonies) was not a distinguishing feature among the MPDs, and MPLW515 mutations were detected in B and/or T lymphocytes in all three patients tested. These observations suggest that clonal myelopoiesis antedates acquisition of JAK2V617F or MPLW515L/K mutations and that the latter is acquired in a lympho-myeloid progenitor cell.

  9. Novel mutations and phenotypic associations identified through APC, MUTYH, NTHL1, POLD1, POLE gene analysis in Indian Familial Adenomatous Polyposis cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nikhat; Lipsa, Anuja; Arunachal, Gautham; Ramadwar, Mukta; Sarin, Rajiv

    2017-05-22

    Colo-Rectal Cancer is a common cancer worldwide with 5-10% cases being hereditary. Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) syndrome is due to germline mutations in the APC or rarely MUTYH gene. NTHL1, POLD1, POLE have been recently reported in previously unexplained FAP cases. Unlike the Caucasian population, FAP phenotype and its genotypic associations have not been widely studied in several geoethnic groups. We report the first FAP cohort from South Asia and the only non-Caucasian cohort with comprehensive analysis of APC, MUTYH, NTHL1, POLD1, POLE genes. In this cohort of 112 individuals from 53 FAP families, we detected germline APC mutations in 60 individuals (45 families) and biallelic MUTYH mutations in 4 individuals (2 families). No NTHL1, POLD1, POLE mutations were identified. Fifteen novel APC mutations and a new Indian APC mutational hotspot at codon 935 were identified. Eight very rare FAP phenotype or phenotypes rarely associated with mutations outside specific APC regions were observed. APC genotype-phenotype association studies in different geo-ethnic groups can enrich the existing knowledge about phenotypic consequences of distinct APC mutations and guide counseling and risk management in different populations. A stepwise cost-effective mutation screening approach is proposed for genetic testing of south Asian FAP patients.

  10. The archaeal COG1901/DUF358 SPOUT-methyltransferase members, together with pseudouridine synthase Pus10, catalyze the formation of 1-methylpseudouridine at position 54 of tRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Kunal; Blaby, Ian K.; Thiaville, Patrick C.; Majumder, Mrinmoyee; Grosjean, Henri; Yuan, Y. Adam; Gupta, Ramesh; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2012-01-01

    The methylation of pseudouridine (Ψ) at position 54 of tRNA, producing m1Ψ, is a hallmark of many archaeal species, but the specific methylase involved in the formation of this modification had yet to be characterized. A comparative genomics analysis had previously identified COG1901 (DUF358), part of the SPOUT superfamily, as a candidate for this missing methylase family. To test this prediction, the COG1901 encoding gene, HVO_1989, was deleted from the Haloferax volcanii genome. Analyses of modified base contents indicated that while m1Ψ was present in tRNA extracted from the wild-type strain, it was absent from tRNA extracted from the mutant strain. Expression of the gene encoding COG1901 from Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, VNG1980C, complemented the m1Ψ minus phenotype of the ΔHVO_1989 strain. This in vivo validation was extended with in vitro tests. Using the COG1901 recombinant enzyme from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (Mj1640), purified enzyme Pus10 from M. jannaschii and full-size tRNA transcripts or TΨ-arm (17-mer) fragments as substrates, the sequential pathway of m1Ψ54 formation in Archaea was reconstituted. The methylation reaction is AdoMet dependent. The efficiency of the methylase reaction depended on the identity of the residue at position 55 of the TΨ-loop. The presence of Ψ55 allowed the efficient conversion of Ψ54 to m1Ψ54, whereas in the presence of C55, the reaction was rather inefficient and no methylation reaction occurred if a purine was present at this position. These results led to renaming the Archaeal COG1901 members as TrmY proteins. PMID:22274953

  11. Analysis of factors affecting the development of food crop varieties bred by mutation method in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhidong; Hu Ruifa

    2002-01-01

    The research developed a production function on crop varieties developed by mutation method in order to explore factors affecting the development of new varieties. It is found that the research investment, human capital and radiation facilities were the most important factors that affected the development and cultivation area of new varieties through the mutation method. It is concluded that not all institutions involved in the breeding activities using mutation method must have radiation facilities and the national government only needed to invest in those key research institutes, which had strong research capacities. The saved research budgets can be used in the entrusting the institutes that have stronger research capacities with irradiating more breeding materials developed by the institutes that have weak research capacities, by which more opportunities to breed better varieties can be created

  12. Extremely low penetrance of hearing loss in four Chinese families with the mitochondrial 12S rRNA A1555G mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young Wieyen; Zhao Lidong; Qian Yaping; Wang Qiuju; Li Ning; Greinwald, John H.; Guan Minxin

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been found to be associated with sensorineural hearing loss. We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of four Chinese pedigrees with aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic hearing impairment. Clinical evaluation revealed the variable phenotype of hearing impairment including audiometric configuration in these subjects, although these subjects share some common features: bilateral and sensorineural hearing impairment. Strikingly, these Chinese pedigrees exhibited extremely low penetrance of hearing loss (5.2%, 4.8%, 4.2%, and 13.3%, respectively, and with an average 8% penetrance). In particular, four of all five affected matrilineal relatives of these pedigrees had aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphism, in addition to the identical homoplasmic A1555G mutation, associated with hearing impairment in many families from different genetic backgrounds. The fact that mtDNA of those pedigrees belonged to different haplogroups R9a, N9a, D4a, and D4 suggested that the A1555G mutation occurred sporadically and multiplied through evolution of the mtDNA in China. However, there was the absence of functionally significant mutations in tRNA and rRNAs or secondary LHON mutations in these Chinese families. These data imply that the nuclear background or/and mitochondrial haplotype may not play a significant role in the phenotypic expression of the A1555G mutation in these Chinese pedigrees. However, aminoglycoside appears to be a major modifier factor for the phenotypic manifestation of the A1555G mutation in these Chinese families

  13. Mutation analysis of the CHK2 gene in breast carcinoma and other cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingvarsson, Sigurdur; Sigbjornsdottir, Bjarnveig I; Huiping, Chen; Hafsteinsdottir, Sigridur H; Ragnarsson, Gisli; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Arason, Adalgeir; Egilsson, Valgardur; Bergthorsson, Jon TH

    2002-01-01

    Mutations in the CHK2 gene at chromosome 22q12.1 have been reported in families with Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Chk2 is an effector kinase that is activated in response to DNA damage and is involved in cell-cycle pathways and p53 pathways. We screened 139 breast tumors for loss of heterozygosity at chromosome 22q, using seven microsatellite markers, and screened 119 breast tumors with single-strand conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing for mutations in the CHK2 gene. Seventy-four of 139 sporadic breast tumors (53%) show loss of heterozygosity with at least one marker. These samples and 45 tumors from individuals carrying the BRCA2 999del5 mutation were screened for mutations in the CHK2 gene. In addition to putative polymorphic regions in short mononucleotide repeats in a non-coding exon and intron 2, a germ line variant (T59K) in the first coding exon was detected. On screening 1172 cancer patients for the T59K sequence variant, it was detected in a total of four breast-cancer patients, two colon-cancer patients, one stomach-cancer patient and one ovary-cancer patient, but not in 452 healthy individuals. A tumor-specific 5' splice site mutation at site +3 in intron 8 (TTgt [a → c]atg) was also detected. We conclude that somatic CHK2 mutations are rare in breast cancer, but our results suggest a tumor suppressor function for CHK2 in a small proportion of breast tumors. Furthermore, our results suggest that the T59K CHK2 sequence variant is a low-penetrance allele with respect to tumor growth

  14. [Investigation into the relationship between mitochondrial 12 S rRNA gene, tRNA gene and cytochrome oxidase Ⅱ gene variations and the risk of noise-induced hearing loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, J; Gu, G Z; Chen, G S; Li, Y H; Zhang, H L; Yang, Q Y; Xu, X R; Zhou, W H; Wu, H; He, L H; Zheng, Y X; Yu, S F

    2017-01-06

    Objective: To explore the relationship between mitochondrial 12 S rRNA gene variation, tRNA gene variation and cytochrome oxidase Ⅱ gene point mutations and the risk of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Methods: A nested case-control study was performed that followed a cohort of 7 445 noise-exposed workers in a steel factory in Henan province, China, from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2015. Subjects whose average hearing threshold was more than 40 dB(A) in high frequency were defined as the case group, and subjects whose average hearing threshold was less than 35 dB(A) in high frequency and less than 25 dB (A) in speech frequency were defined as the control group. Subjects was recruited into the case group ( n =286) and the control group ( n= 286) according to gender, age, job category and time of exposure to noise, and a 1∶1 case-control study was carried out. We genotyped eight single nucleotide polymorphisms in the mitochondrial 12 S rRNA gene, the mitochondrial tRNA gene and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase Ⅱ gene using SNPscan high-throughput genotyping technology from the recruited subjects. The relationship between polymorphic sites and NIHL, adjusted for covariates, was analyzed using conditional logistic regression analysis, as were the subgroup data. Results: The average age of the recruited subjects was (40.3±8.1) years and the length of service exposure to noise was (18.6±8.9) years. The range of noise exposed levels and cumulative noise exposure (CNE) was 80.1- 93.4 dB (A) and 86.8- 107.9 dB (A) · year, respectively. For workers exposed to noise at a CNE level<98 dB (A) · year, smokers showed an increased risk of NIHL of 1.88 (1.16-3.05) compared with non-smokers; for workers exposed to noise at a CNE level ≥98 dB(A) · year, smokers showed an increased risk of NIHL of 2.53 (1.49- 4.30) compared with non-smokers. For workers exposed to noise at a CNE level<98 dB (A) · year, the results of univariate analysis and multifactor analysis

  15. MDE heteroduplex analysis of PCR products spanning each exon of the fibrillin (FBN1) gene greatly increases the efficiency of mutation detection in the Marfan syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nijbroek, G.; Dietz, H.C. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Med., Baltimore, MD (United States); Pereira, L.; Ramirz, F. [Mount Sinai School of Med., New York, NY (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Defects in fibrillin (FNB1) cause the Marfan syndrome (MFS). Classic Marfan phenotype cosegregates with intragenic and/or flanking marker alleles in all families tested and a significant number of FBN1 mutations have been identified in affected individuals. Using a standard method of mutation detection, SSCP analysis of overlapping RT-PCR amplimers that span the entire coding sequence, the general experience has been a low yield of identifiable mutations, ranging from 10-20%. Possible explanations included low sensitivity of mutation screening procedures, under-representation of mutant transcript in patient samples either due to deletions or mutant alleles containing premature termination codons, clustering of mutations in yet uncharacterized regions of the gene, including regulatory elements, or genetic heterogeneity. In order to compensate for a potential reduced mutant transcript stability, we have devised a method to screen directly from genomic DNA. The intronic boundaries flanking each of the 65 FBN1 exons were characterized and primer pairs were fashioned such that all splice junctions would be included in the resultant amplimers. The entire gene was screened for a panel of 9 probands with classic Marfan syndrome using mutation detection enhancement (MDE) gel heteroduplex analysis. A mutation was identified in 5/9 (55%) of patient samples. All were either missense mutations involving a cysteine residue or small deletions that did not create a frame shift. In addition, 10 novel polymorphisms were found. We conclude that the majority of mutations causing Marfan syndrome reside in the FBN1 gene and that mutations creating premature termination codons are not the predominant cause of inefficient mutation detection using RT-PCR. We are currently modifying screening methods to increase sensitivity and targeting putative FBN1 gene promoter sequences for study.

  16. Mutational analysis of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas and verrucal keratosis in patients taking BRAF inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anforth, Rachael; Tembe, Varsha; Blumetti, Tatiana; Fernandez-Peñas, Pablo

    2012-09-01

    B-RAF inhibitors (BRAFi) have been shown to improve rates of overall and progression-free survival in patients with stage IV metastatic melanoma positive for the BRAF V600E mutation. However, the main drawback is the development of verrucal keratosis (hyperkeratotic papules with verruca-like characteristics with benign histological findings) and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (cuSCC). We have found upstream mutations in RAS as well as PIK3CA in both verrucal keratosis and cuSCC. This suggests that verrucal keratosis is an early clinical presentation of cuSCC in patients on BRAFi. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Comprehensive analysis of gene mutation and phenotype of tuberous sclerosis complex in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-qiang HUANG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To summarize the clinical features of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC, the distribution and description of TSC gene, and to probe into the correlation of genotype with phenotype.  Methods According to the 1998 International Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Diagnostic Criteria, a total of 163 TSC patients with pathogenic mutation in TSC gene (3 cases were detected in our hospital, and the other 160 cases were collected from other institutions in China were enrolled, and their gene detection results and clinical data were analyzed.  Results Among 163 cases, TSC1 mutation (31 cases accounted for 19.02% [32.26% (10/31 in exon 15, 16.13% (5/31 in exon 21, 12.90% (4/31 in exon 18], and TSC2 mutation (132 cases accounted for 80.98% [9.85% (13/132 in exon 37, 7.58% (10/132 in exon 40, 6.82%(9/132 in exon 33]. The proportion of base replacement in TSC1 was 41.94% (13/31, and 52.27% (69/132 in TSC2. Male patients exhibited significantly more subependymal nodules or calcifications than thefemale patients (χ2 = 8.016, P = 0.005. Sporadic patients exhibited significantly more cortical tubers than familial patients (χ2 = 6.273, P = 0.012. Patients with TSC2 mutations had significantly higher frequencies of hypomelanotic macules than patients with TSC1 mutations (χ2 = 6.756, P = 0.009. Patients with missense mutations were more likely to have facial angiofibromas compared with patients with other mutations (χ2 = 4.438, P = 0.035.  Conclusions Exon 15, 21 and 18 of TSC1 and exon 37, 40 and 33 of TSC2 accounted for higher percentage of mutations. Correlating genotypes with phenotypes should facilitate the individualized treatment and prognostic assessment of tuberous sclerosis complex. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.04.013

  18. Structural-conformational aspects of tRNA complexation with chloroethyl nitrosourea derivatives: A molecular modeling and spectroscopic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Shweta; Tyagi, Gunjan; Chadha, Deepti; Mehrotra, Ranjana

    2017-01-01

    Chloroethyl nitrosourea derivatives (CENUs) represent an important family of anticancer chemotherapeutic agents, which are used in the treatment of different types of cancer such as brain tumors, resistant or relapsed Hodgkin's disease, small cell lung cancer and malignant melanoma. This work focuses towards understanding the interaction of chloroethyl nitrosourea derivatives; lomustine, nimustine and semustine with tRNA using spectroscopic approach in order to elucidate their auxiliary anticancer action mechanism inside the cell. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy and UV-visible spectroscopy were employed to investigate the binding parameters of tRNA-CENUs complexation. Results of present study demonstrate that all CENUs, studied here, interact with tRNA through guanine nitrogenous base residues and possibly further crosslink cytosine residues in paired region of tRNA. Moreover, spectral data collected for nimustine-tRNA and semustine-tRNA complex formation indicates towards the groove-directed-alkylation as their anti-malignant action, which involves the participation of uracil moiety located in major groove of tRNA. Besides this, tRNA-CENUs adduct formation did not alter the native conformation of biopolymer and tRNA remains in A-form after its interaction with all three nitrosourea derivatives studied. The binding constants (K a ) estimated for tRNA complexation with lomustine, nimustine and semustine are 2.55×10 2 M -1 , 4.923×10 2 M -1 and 4.223×10 2 M -1 respectively, which specify weak type of CENU's binding with tRNA. Moreover, molecular modeling simulations were also performed to predict preferential binding orientation of CENUs with tRNA that corroborates well with spectral outcomes. The findings, presented here, recognize tRNA binding properties of CENUs that can further help in rational designing of more specific and

  19. Potential actionable targets in appendiceal cancer detected by immunohistochemistry, fluorescent in situ hybridization, and mutational analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millis, Sherri Z.; Kimbrough, Jeffery; Doll, Nancy; Von Hoff, Daniel; Ramanathan, Ramesh K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Appendiceal cancers are rare and consist of carcinoid, mucocele, pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP), goblet cell carcinoma, lymphoma, and adenocarcinoma histologies. Current treatment involves surgical resection or debulking, but no standard exists for adjuvant chemotherapy or treatment for metastatic disease. Methods Samples were identified from approximately 60,000 global tumors analyzed at a referral molecular profiling CLIA-certified laboratory. A total of 588 samples with appendix primary tumor sites were identified (male/female ratio of 2:3; mean age =55). Sixty-two percent of samples were adenocarcinomas (used for analysis); the rest consisted of 9% goblet cell, 15% mucinous; 6% pseudomyxoma, and less than 5% carcinoids and 2% neuroendocrine. Tests included sequencing [Sanger, next generation sequencing (NGS)], protein expression/immunohistochemistry (IHC), and gene amplification [fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) or CISH]. Results Profiling across all appendiceal cancer histological subtypes for IHC revealed: 97% BRCP, 81% MRP1, 81% COX-2, 71% MGMT, 56% TOPO1, 5% PTEN, 52% EGFR, 40% ERCC1, 38% SPARC, 35% PDGFR, 35% TOPO2A, 25% RRM1, 21% TS, 16% cKIT, and 12% for TLE3. NGS revealed mutations in the following genes: 50.4% KRAS, 21.9% P53, 17.6% GNAS, 16.5% SMAD4, 10% APC, 7.5% ATM, 5.5% PIK3CA, 5.0% FBXW7, and 1.8% BRAF. Conclusions Appendiceal cancers show considerable heterogeneity with high levels of drug resistance proteins (BCRP and MRP1), which highlight the difficulty in treating these tumors and suggest an individualized approach to treatment. The incidence of low TS (79%) could be used as a backbone of therapy (using inhibitors such as 5FU/capecitabine or newer agents). Therapeutic options includeTOPO1 inhibitors (irinotecan/topotecan), EGFR inhibitors (erlotinib, cetuximab), PDGFR antagonists (regorafenib, axitinib), MGMT (temozolomide). Clinical trials targeting pathways involving KRAS, p53, GNAS, SMAD4, APC, ATM, PIK3CA, FBXW7, and

  20. High purity microfluidic sorting and analysis of circulating tumor cells: towards routine mutation detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autebert, Julien; Coudert, Benoit; Champ, Jérôme; Saias, Laure; Guneri, Ezgi Tulukcuoglu; Lebofsky, Ronald; Bidard, François-Clément; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Farace, Françoise; Descroix, Stéphanie; Malaquin, Laurent; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2015-05-07

    A new generation of the Ephesia cell capture technology optimized for CTC capture and genetic analysis is presented, characterized in depth and compared with the CellSearch system as a reference. This technology uses magnetic particles bearing tumour-cell specific EpCAM antibodies, self-assembled in a regular array in a microfluidic flow cell. 48,000 high aspect-ratio columns are generated using a magnetic field in a high throughput (>3 ml h(-1)) device and act as sieves to specifically capture the cells of interest through antibody-antigen interactions. Using this device optimized for CTC capture and analysis, we demonstrated the capture of epithelial cells with capture efficiency above 90% for concentrations as low as a few cells per ml. We showed the high specificity of capture with only 0.26% of non-epithelial cells captured for concentrations above 10 million cells per ml. We investigated the capture behavior of cells in the device, and correlated the cell attachment rate with the EpCAM expression on the cell membranes for six different cell lines. We developed and characterized a two-step blood processing method to allow for rapid processing of 10 ml blood tubes in less than 4 hours, and showed a capture rate of 70% for as low as 25 cells spiked in 10 ml blood tubes, with less than 100 contaminating hematopoietic cells. Using this device and procedure, we validated our system on patient samples using an automated cell immunostaining procedure and a semi-automated cell counting method. Our device captured CTCs in 75% of metastatic prostate cancer patients and 80% of metastatic breast cancer patients, and showed similar or better results than the CellSearch device in 10 out of 13 samples. Finally, we demonstrated the possibility of detecting cancer-related PIK3CA gene mutation in 20 cells captured in the chip with a good correlation between the cell count and the quantitation value Cq of the post-capture qPCR.

  1. Analysis of the GCK gene in 79 MODY type 2 patients: A multicenter Turkish study, mutation profile and description of twenty novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykut, Ayça; Karaca, Emin; Onay, Hüseyin; Gökşen, Damla; Çetinkalp, Şevki; Eren, Erdal; Ersoy, Betül; Çakır, Esra Papatya; Büyükinan, Muammer; Kara, Cengiz; Anık, Ahmet; Kırel, Birgül; Özen, Samim; Atik, Tahir; Darcan, Şükran; Özkınay, Ferda

    2018-01-30

    Maturity onset diabetes is a genetic form of diabetes mellitus characterized by an early age at onset and several etiologic genes for this form of diabetes have been identified in many patients. Maturity onset diabetes type 2 [MODY2 (#125851)] caused by mutations in the glucokinase gene (GCK). Although its prevalence is not clear, it is estimated that 1%-2% of patients with diabetes have the monogenic form. The aim of this study was to evaluate the molecular spectrum of GCK gene mutations in 177 Turkish MODY type 2 patients. Mutations in the GCK gene were identified in 79 out of 177. All mutant alleles were identified, including 45 different GCK mutations, 20 of which were novel. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Comparative genomic analysis identified a mutation related to enhanced heterologous protein production in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Feng-Jie; Katayama, Takuya; Maruyama, Jun-Ichi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko

    2016-11-01

    Genomic mapping of mutations using next-generation sequencing technologies has facilitated the identification of genes contributing to fundamental biological processes, including human diseases. However, few studies have used this approach to identify mutations contributing to heterologous protein production in industrial strains of filamentous fungi, such as Aspergillus oryzae. In a screening of A. oryzae strains that hyper-produce human lysozyme (HLY), we previously isolated an AUT1 mutant that showed higher production of various heterologous proteins; however, the underlying factors contributing to the increased heterologous protein production remained unclear. Here, using a comparative genomic approach performed with whole-genome sequences, we attempted to identify the genes responsible for the high-level production of heterologous proteins in the AUT1 mutant. The comparative sequence analysis led to the detection of a gene (AO090120000003), designated autA, which was predicted to encode an unknown cytoplasmic protein containing an alpha/beta-hydrolase fold domain. Mutation or deletion of autA was associated with higher production levels of HLY. Specifically, the HLY yields of the autA mutant and deletion strains were twofold higher than that of the control strain during the early stages of cultivation. Taken together, these results indicate that combining classical mutagenesis approaches with comparative genomic analysis facilitates the identification of novel genes involved in heterologous protein production in filamentous fungi.

  3. Androgen receptor mutations associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome: a high content analysis approach leading to personalized medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam T Szafran

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS is a rare disease associated with inactivating mutations of AR that disrupt male sexual differentiation, and cause a spectrum of phenotypic abnormalities having as a common denominator loss of reproductive viability. No established treatment exists for these conditions, however there are sporadic reports of patients (or recapitulated mutations in cell lines that respond to administration of supraphysiologic doses (or pulses of testosterone or synthetic ligands. Here, we utilize a novel high content analysis (HCA approach to study AR function at the single cell level in genital skin fibroblasts (GSF. We discuss in detail findings in GSF from three historical patients with AIS, which include identification of novel mechanisms of AR malfunction, and the potential ability to utilize HCA for personalized treatment of patients affected by this condition.

  4. Analysis of mutation/rearrangement frequencies and methylation patterns at a given DNA locus using restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyko, Alex; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) is a difference in DNA sequences of organisms belonging to the same species. RFLPs are typically detected as DNA fragments of different lengths after digestion with various restriction endonucleases. The comparison of RFLPs allows investigators to analyze the frequency of occurrence of mutations, such as point mutations, deletions, insertions, and gross chromosomal rearrangements, in the progeny of stressed plants. The assay involves restriction enzyme digestion of DNA followed by hybridization of digested DNA using a radioactively or enzymatically labeled probe. Since DNA can be digested with methylation sensitive enzymes, the assay can also be used to analyze a methylation pattern of a particular locus. Here, we describe RFLP analysis using methylation-insensitive and methylation-sensitive enzymes.

  5. Genomic analysis of codon usage shows influence of mutation pressure, natural selection, and host features on Marburg virus evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrullah, Izza; Butt, Azeem M; Tahir, Shifa; Idrees, Muhammad; Tong, Yigang

    2015-08-26

    The Marburg virus (MARV) has a negative-sense single-stranded RNA genome, belongs to the family Filoviridae, and is responsible for several outbreaks of highly fatal hemorrhagic fever. Codon usage patterns of viruses reflect a series of evolutionary changes that enable viruses to shape their survival rates and fitness toward the external environment and, most importantly, their hosts. To understand the evolution of MARV at the codon level, we report a comprehensive analysis of synonymous codon usage patterns in MARV genomes. Multiple codon analysis approaches and statistical methods were performed to determine overall codon usage patterns, biases in codon usage, and influence of various factors, including mutation pressure, natural selection, and its two hosts, Homo sapiens and Rousettus aegyptiacus. Nucleotide composition and relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) analysis revealed that MARV shows mutation bias and prefers U- and A-ended codons to code amino acids. Effective number of codons analysis indicated that overall codon usage among MARV genomes is slightly biased. The Parity Rule 2 plot analysis showed that GC and AU nucleotides were not used proportionally which accounts for the presence of natural selection. Codon usage patterns of MARV were also found to be influenced by its hosts. This indicates that MARV have evolved codon usage patterns that are specific to both of its hosts. Moreover, selection pressure from R. aegyptiacus on the MARV RSCU patterns was found to be dominant compared with that from H. sapiens. Overall, mutation pressure was found to be the most important and dominant force that shapes codon usage patterns in MARV. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed codon usage analysis of MARV and extends our understanding of the mechanisms that contribute to codon usage and evolution of MARV.

  6. Genotype, phenotype and in silico pathogenicity analysis of HEXB mutations: Panel based sequencing for differential diagnosis of gangliosidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdieh, Nejat; Mikaeeli, Sahar; Tavasoli, Ali Reza; Rezaei, Zahra; Maleki, Majid; Rabbani, Bahareh

    2018-04-01

    Gangliosidosis is an inherited metabolic disorder causing neurodegeneration and motor regression. Preventive diagnosis is the first choice for the affected families due to lack of straightforward therapy. Genetic studies could confirm the diagnosis and help families for carrier screening and prenatal diagnosis. An update of HEXB gene variants concerning genotype, phenotype and in silico analysis are presented. Panel based next generation sequencing and direct sequencing of four cases were performed to confirm the clinical diagnosis and for reproductive planning. Bioinformatic analyses of the HEXB mutation database were also performed. Direct sequencing of HEXA and HEXB genes showed recurrent homozygous variants at c.509G>A (p.Arg170Gln) and c.850C>T (p.Arg284Ter), respectively. A novel variant at c.416T>A (p.Leu139Gln) was identified in the GLB1 gene. Panel based next generation sequencing was performed for an undiagnosed patient which showed a novel mutation at c.1602C>A (p.Cys534Ter) of HEXB gene. Bioinformatic analysis of the HEXB mutation database showed 97% consistency of in silico genotype analysis with the phenotype. Bioinformatic analysis of the novel variants predicted to be disease causing. In silico structural and functional analysis of the novel variants showed structural effect of HEXB and functional effect of GLB1 variants which would provide fast analysis of novel variants. Panel based studies could be performed for overlapping symptomatic patients. Consequently, genetic testing would help affected families for patients' management, carrier detection, and family planning's. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Differential Role of Human Cationic Trypsinogen (PRSS1 p.R122H Mutation in Hereditary and Nonhereditary Chronic Pancreatitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Environmental factors and genetic mutations have been increasingly recognized as risk factors for chronic pancreatitis (CP. The PRSS1 p.R122H mutation was the first discovered to affect hereditary CP, with 80% penetrance. We performed here a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the associations of PRSS1 p.R122H mutation with CP of diverse etiology. Methods. The PubMed, EMBASE, and MEDLINE database were reviewed. The pooled odds ratio (OR with 95% confidence intervals was used to evaluate the association of p.R122H mutation with CP. Initial analysis was conducted with all etiologies of CP, followed by a subgroup analysis for hereditary and nonhereditary CP, including alcoholic or idiopathic CP. Results. A total of eight case-control studies (1733 cases and 2415 controls were identified and included. Overall, PRSS1 p.R122H mutation was significantly associated with an increased risk of CP (OR = 4.78[1.13–20.20]. Further analysis showed p.R122H mutation strongly associated with the increased risk of hereditary CP (OR = 65.52[9.09–472.48] but not with nonhereditary CP, both alcoholic and idiopathic CP. Conclusions. Our study showing the differential role of p.R122H mutation in various etiologies of CP indicates that this complex disorder is likely influenced by multiple genetic factors as well as environmental factors.

  8. High resolution melting curve analysis, a rapid and affordable method for mutation analysis in childhood acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin eLiu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Molecular genetic alterations with prognostic significance have been described in childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML. The aim of this study was to establish cost-effective techniques to detect mutations of FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3, Nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1, and a partial tandem duplication within the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL-PTD genes in childhood AML. Procedure: Ninety-nine children with newly diagnosed AML were included in this study. We developed a fluoresent dye SYTO-82 based high resolution melting curve (HRM anaylsis to detect FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD, FLT3 tyrosine kinase domain (FLT3-TKD and NPM1 mutations. MLL-PTD was screened by real-time quantitative PCR. Results: The HRM methodology correlated well with gold standard Sanger sequencing with less cost. Among the 99 patients studied, the FLT3-ITD mutation was associated with significantly worse event free survival (EFS. Patients with the NPM1 mutation had significantly better EFS and overall survival. However, HRM was not sensitive enough for minimal residual disease monitoring. Conclusions: HRM was a rapid and efficient method for screening of FLT3 and NPM1 gene mutations. It was both affordable and accurate, especially in resource underprivileged regions. Our results indicated that HRM could be a useful clinical tool for rapid and cost effective screening of the FLT3 and NPM1 mutations in AML patients.

  9. Analysis of two mutations in the MTHFR gene associated with mild ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions. Since hyperhomocysteinaemia is a risk factor for premature CVD, the heterogeneous distribution of the 677C→T and 1298A→C mutations across ethnic groups may partly explain ethnic differences in heart disease risk through decreased enzyme activity and hence increased homocysteine levels.

  10. Electrophysiological analysis of the mutated Na,K-ATPase cation binding pocket.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, J.B.; Geibel, S.; Grabsch, E.; Pont, J.J.H.H.M. de; Bamberg, E.; Friedrich, T.

    2003-01-01

    Na,K-ATPase mediates net electrogenic transport by extruding three Na+ ions and importing two K+ ions across the plasma membrane during each reaction cycle. We mutated putative cation coordinating amino acids in transmembrane hairpin M5-M6 of rat Na,K-ATPase: Asp776 (Gln, Asp, Ala), Glu779 (Asp,

  11. Mutational analysis of the major soybean UreF paralogue involved in urease activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    In soybean, mutation at Eu2 or Eu3 eliminates the urease activities of both the embryo-specific and the tissue-ubiquitous (assimilatory) isozymes, encoded by Eu1 and Eu4, respectively. Eu3 encodes UreG, a GTP’ase necessary for proper emplacement of Ni and carbon dioxide in the urease active site. ...

  12. Mutation analysis in a family with oculocutaneous albinism manifesting in the same generation of three branches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preising, Markus N.; Forster, Hedwig; Tan, H.; Lorenz, Birgit; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Plomp, Astrid S.

    2007-01-01

    To elucidate the molecular basis of oculocutaneous albinism with variable expressivity in a family from The Netherlands in which no consanguinity was reported. Three affected family members were screened for mutations in tyrosinase (TYR) and the pink-eye-dilution gene (P) by using SSCP. The

  13. Mutation and biochemical analysis in carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II (CPT II) deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olpin, S E; Afifi, A; Clark, S

    2003-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II (CPT II) deficiency has three basic phenotypes, late-onset muscular (mild), infantile/juvenile hepatic (intermediate) and severe neonatal. We have measured fatty acid oxidation and CPT II activity and performed mutation studies in 24 symptomatic patients...

  14. Mutation analysis of COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes in a Chinese

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Autosomal dominant Alport syndrome (ADAS) accounts for 5% of all cases of Alport syndrome (AS), a primary basement membrane disorder arising from mutations in genes encoding the type IV collagen protein family.Mutationsin COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes were reported to be associated with ADAS. In this study, clinical ...

  15. Targeted resequencing for analysis of clonal composition of recurrent gene mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jethwa, Alexander; Hüllein, Jennifer; Stolz, Tatjana; Blume, Carolin; Sellner, Leopold; Jauch, Anna; Sill, Martin; Kater, Arnon P.; te Raa, G. Doreen; Geisler, Christian; van Oers, Marinus; Dietrich, Sascha; Dreger, Peter; Ho, Anthony D.; Paruzynski, Anna; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof; Glimm, Hanno; Zenz, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent gene mutations contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). We developed a next-generation sequencing (NGS) platform to determine the genetic profile, intratumoural heterogeneity, and clonal structure of two independent CLL cohorts. TP53, SF3B1, and NOTCH1 were

  16. Mutational analysis of Bax and Bcl-2 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, G. S.; Buitenhuis, C. K.; Martínez Muñoz, C.; Verwijs-Jassen, M.; Behrendt, H.; Zsiros, J.; Smets, L. A.

    1998-01-01

    In childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia there are large interpatient variations in levels of the apoptosis-regulating proteins Bax and Bcl-2, but the molecular basis for this variation is unknown. Point-mutations in bax have been reported in cell lines derived from haematological malignancies.

  17. Mutational analysis of the BRCA1 gene in 30 Czech ovarian cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ovarian cancer is one of the most severe of oncological diseases. Inherited mutations in cancer susceptibility genes play a causal role in 5–10% of newly diagnosed tumours. BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene alterations are found in the majority of these cases. The aim of this study was to analyse the BRCA1 gene in the ovarian ...

  18. Mutation analysis of 272 Spanish families affected by autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa using a genotyping microarray.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avila-Fernandez, A.; Cantalapiedra, D.; Aller, E.; Vallespin, E.; Aguirre-Lamban, J.; Blanco-Kelly, F.; Corton, M.; Riveiro-Alvarez, R.; Allikmets, R.; Trujillo-Tiebas, M.J.; Millan, J.M.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Ayuso, C.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive loss of vision. The aim of this study was to identify the causative mutations in 272 Spanish families using a genotyping microarray. METHODS: 272 unrelated Spanish families, 107 with autosomal

  19. Targeted resequencing for analysis of clonal composition of recurrent gene mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jethwa, Alexander; Hüllein, Jennifer; Stolz, Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent gene mutations contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). We developed a next-generation sequencing (NGS) platform to determine the genetic profile, intratumoural heterogeneity, and clonal structure of two independent CLL cohorts. TP53, SF3B1, and NOTCH1 were...

  20. Proactive Routing Mutation Against Stealthy Distributed Denial of Service Attacks – Metrics, Modeling and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Qi; Al-Shaer, Ehab; Chatterjee, Samrat; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Oehmen, Christopher S.

    2018-04-01

    The Infrastructure Distributed Denial of Service (IDDoS) attacks continue to be one of the most devastating challenges facing cyber systems. The new generation of IDDoS attacks exploit the inherent weakness of cyber infrastructure including deterministic nature of routes, skew distribution of flows, and Internet ossification to discover the network critical links and launch highly stealthy flooding attacks that are not observable at the victim end. In this paper, first, we propose a new metric to quantitatively measure the potential susceptibility of any arbitrary target server or domain to stealthy IDDoS attacks, and es- timate the impact of such susceptibility on enterprises. Second, we develop a proactive route mutation technique to minimize the susceptibility to these attacks by dynamically changing the flow paths periodically to invalidate the adversary knowledge about the network and avoid targeted critical links. Our proposed approach actively changes these network paths while satisfying security and qualify of service requirements. We present an integrated approach of proactive route mutation that combines both infrastructure-based mutation that is based on reconfiguration of switches and routers, and middle-box approach that uses an overlay of end-point proxies to construct a virtual network path free of critical links to reach a destination. We implemented the proactive path mutation technique on a Software Defined Network using the OpendDaylight controller to demonstrate a feasible deployment of this approach. Our evaluation validates the correctness, effectiveness, and scalability of the proposed approaches.

  1. Mutation analysis of COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes in a Chinese ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-10-24

    ,. People's Republic of China ... mutations in COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes which encode type IV collagen α3 and α4 chainsrespectively can .... hematuria and evidence for activation of the unfolded protein response. Focal and ...

  2. Novel primer specific false terminations during DNA sequencing reactions: danger of inaccuracy of mutation analysis in molecular diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, R; Booth, A; Churchill, A J; Markham, A F

    1996-01-01

    The determination of nucleotide sequence is fundamental to the identification and molecular analysis of genes. Direct sequencing of PCR products is now becoming a commonplace procedure for haplotype analysis, and for defining mutations and polymorphism within genes, particularly for diagnostic purposes. A previously unrecognised phenomenon, primer related variability, observed in sequence data generated using Taq cycle sequencing and T7 Sequenase sequencing, is reported. This suggests that caution is necessary when interpreting DNA sequence data. This is particularly important in situations where treatment may be dependent on the accuracy of the molecular diagnosis. Images PMID:16696096

  3. Mutational analysis of the promoter and the coding region of the 5-HT1A gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdmann, J.; Noethen, M.M.; Shimron-Abarbanell, D. [Univ. of Bonn (Germany)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Disturbances of serotonergic pathways have been implicated in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Serotonin (5HT) receptors can be subdivided into at least three major families (5HT1, 5HT2, and 5HT3). Five human 5HT1 receptor subtypes have been cloned, namely 1A, 1D{alpha}, 1D{beta}, 1E, and 1F. Of these, the 5HT1A receptor is the best characterized subtype. In the present study we sought to identify genetic variation in the 5HT1A receptor gene which through alteration of protein function or level of expression might contribute to the genetics of neuropsychiatric diseases. The coding region and the 5{prime} promoter region of the 5HT1A gene from 159 unrelated subjects (45 schizophrenic, 46 bipolar affective, and 43 patients with Tourette`s syndrome, as well as 25 controls) were analyzed using SSCA. SSCA revealed the presence of two mutations both located in the coding region of the 5HT1A receptor gene. The first mutation is a rare silent C{r_arrow}T substitution at nucleotide position 549. The second mutation is characterized by a base pair substitution (A{r_arrow}G) at the first position of codon 28 and results in an amino acid exchange (Ile{r_arrow}Val). Since Val28 was found only in a single schizophrenic patient and in none of the other patients or controls, we decided to extend our samples and to use a restriction assay for screening a further 74 schizophrenic, 95 bipolar affective, and 49 patients with Tourette`s syndrome, as well as 185 controls, for the presence of the mutation. In total, the mutation was found in 2 schizophrenic patients, in 3 bipolars, in 1 Tourette patient, and in 5 controls. To our knowledge the Ile-28-Val substitution reported here is the first natural occuring molecular variant which has been identified for a serotonin receptor so far.

  4. [Analysis of clinical manifestations and genetic mutations in a child with Laron syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Guo-ying; Chen, Shao-ke; Gu, Xue-fan; Gong, Zhu-wen; Zhang, Qi-gang

    2013-12-01

    To analyze clinical manifestations and gene mutations in a child with severe short stature, explore its molecular mechanism and further clarify the diagnostic procedure for short stature. We observed clinical characteristics of a patient with short stature and did diagnostic examinations, assessed the function of GH-IGF-1 axis, and surveyed its family members.Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood, GHR, IGFALS, STAT5b and GH1 gene were amplified by PCR for sequencing, including exons and splicing areas. The patient presented symmetrical short stature (height -8.2 SDS) and facial features, and other congenital abnormalities.It displayed non-growth hormone deficiency. The baseline value of GH was 21 µg/L, and the peak was 57.9 µg/L. The value of IGF-1 was less than 25 µg/L, and the IGFBP-3 less than 50 µg/L. And IGF-1 generation test showed no response. There was no similar patients in the family members.Sequencing of GHR in the patient revealed a homozygous point mutation (c.Ivs6+1G>A), and her father and mother had the same heterozygous mutation. The same mutation was not identified for her sister.No other candidate gene was found. As the result of combined clinical characteristics and lab examinations, as well as gene detection, the case was diagnosed with Laron syndrome and GHR gene mutation is the molecular mechanism.We should explicit the etiological diagnosis for short stature, and avoid missed diagnosis and misdiagnosis.

  5. Association of KIT exon 9 mutations with nongastric primary site and aggressive behavior: KIT mutation analysis and clinical correlates of 120 gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonescu, Cristina R; Sommer, Gunhild; Sarran, Lisa; Tschernyavsky, Sylvia J; Riedel, Elyn; Woodruff, James M; Robson, Mark; Maki, Robert; Brennan, Murray F; Ladanyi, Marc; DeMatteo, Ronald P; Besmer, Peter

    2003-08-15

    Activating mutations of the KIT juxtamembrane region are the most common genetic events in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and have been noted as independent prognostic factors. The impact of KIT mutation in other regions, such as the extracellular or kinase domains, is not well-defined and fewer than 30 cases have been published to date. One hundred twenty GISTs, confirmed by KIT immunoreactivity, were evaluated for the presence of KIT exon 9, 11, 13, and 17 mutations. The relation between the presence/type of KIT mutation and clinicopathological factors was analyzed using Fisher's exact test and log-rank test. Forty-four % of the tumors were located in the stomach, 47% in the small bowel, 6% in the rectum, and 3% in the retroperitoneum. Overall, KIT mutations were detected in 78% of patients as follows: 67% in exon 11, 11% in exon 9, and none in exon 13 or 17. The types of KIT exon 11 mutations were heterogeneous and clustered in the classic "hot spot" at the 5' end of exon 11. Seven % of cases showed internal tandem duplications (ITD) at the 3' end of exon 11, in a region that we designate as a second hot spot for KIT mutations. Interestingly, these cases were associated with: female predominance, stomach location, occurrence in older patients, and favorable outcome. There were significant associations between exon 9 mutations and large tumor size (P < 0.001) and extragastric location (P = 0.02). Ten of these 13 patients with more than 1-year follow-up have developed recurrent disease. Most KIT-expressing GISTs show KIT mutations that are preferentially located within the classic hot spot of exon 11. In addition, we found an association between a second hot spot at the 3'end of exon 11, characterized by ITDs, and a subgroup of clinically indolent gastric GISTs in older females. KIT exon 9 mutations seem to define a distinct subset of GISTs, located predominantly in the small bowel and associated with an unfavorable clinical course.

  6. The BCR-ABLT315I mutation compromises survival in chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia patients resistant to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, in a matched pair analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolini, Franck E; Ibrahim, Amr R; Soverini, Simona

    2013-01-01

    The BCR-ABL T315I mutation confers resistance to currently licensed tyrosine kinase inhibitors in chronic myelogenous leukemia. However, the impact of this mutation on survival in early stages of disease, in chronic phase, has never been detailed. Using matched pair analysis, a cohort of 64...... patients with chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia harboring a T315I mutation and resistant to imatinib mesylate was compared to a similar cohort of 53 chronic phase patients resistant to imatinib, but with no detectable T315I mutation, in the pre-ponatinib era. These patients were matched according...... to age at diagnosis, interval between disease diagnosis and start of imatinib treatment, and duration of imatinib therapy. Kaplan-Meier survival analyses demonstrated the significant negative impact of the presence of the T315I mutation on overall survival (since imatinib-resistance: 48.4 months for T315...

  7. Targeted prostate cancer screening in men with mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 detects aggressive prostate cancer: preliminary analysis of the results of the IMPACT study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, Anita V; Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Barbachano, Yolanda

    2011-01-01

    mutations were offered annual prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing, and those with PSA >3 ng/mL, were offered a prostate biopsy. Controls were men age-matched (± 5 years) who were negative for the familial mutation. RESULTS: In total, 300 men were recruited (205 mutation carriers; 89 BRCA1, 116 BRCA2......Study Type - Diagnostic (validating cohort)
Level of Evidence 1b OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the role of targeted prostate cancer screening in men with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, an international study, IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening...... in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and controls), was established. This is the first multicentre screening study targeted at men with a known genetic predisposition to prostate cancer. A preliminary analysis of the data is reported. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Men aged 40-69 years from families with BRCA1 or BRCA2...

  8. Functional analysis of Waardenburg syndrome-associated PAX3 and SOX10 mutations: report of a dominant-negative SOX10 mutation in Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Chen, Hongsheng; Luo, Hunjin; An, Jing; Sun, Lin; Mei, Lingyun; He, Chufeng; Jiang, Lu; Jiang, Wen; Xia, Kun; Li, Jia-Da; Feng, Yong

    2012-03-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an auditory-pigmentary disorder resulting from melanocyte defects, with varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation of the hair, skin, and inner ear. WS is classified into four subtypes (WS1-WS4) based on additional symptoms. PAX3 and SOX10 are two transcription factors that can activate the expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), a critical transcription factor for melanocyte development. Mutations of PAX3 are associated with WS1 and WS3, while mutations of SOX10 cause WS2 and WS4. Recently, we identified some novel WS-associated mutations in PAX3 and SOX10 in a cohort of Chinese WS patients. Here, we further identified an E248fsX30 SOX10 mutation in a family of WS2. We analyzed the subcellular distribution, expression and in vitro activity of two PAX3 mutations (p.H80D, p.H186fsX5) and four SOX10 mutations (p.E248fsX30, p.G37fsX58, p.G38fsX69 and p.R43X). Except H80D PAX3, which retained partial activity, the other mutants were unable to activate MITF promoter. The H80D PAX3 and E248fsX30 SOX10 were localized in the nucleus as wild type (WT) proteins, whereas the other mutant proteins were distributed in both cytoplasm and nucleus. Furthermore, E248fsX30 SOX10 protein retained the DNA-binding activity and showed dominant-negative effect on WT SOX10. However, E248fsX30 SOX10 protein seems to decay faster than the WT one, which may underlie the mild WS2 phenotype caused by this mutation.

  9. Mutations in BALB mitochondrial DNA induce CCL20 up-regulation promoting tumorigenic phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sligh, James [Department of Medicine—Dermatology Division, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Janda, Jaroslav [University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Jandova, Jana, E-mail: jjandova@email.arizona.edu [Department of Medicine—Dermatology Division, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Alterations in mitochondrial DNA are commonly found in various human cancers. • Mutations in BALB mitochondrial DNA induce up-regulation of chemokine CCL20. • Increased growth and motility of mtBALB cells is associated with CCL20 levels. • mtDNA changes in BALB induce in vivo tumor growth through CCL20 up-regulation. • Mutations in mitochondrial DNA play important roles in keratinocyte neoplasia. - Abstract: mtDNA mutations are common in human cancers and are thought to contribute to the process of neoplasia. We examined the role of mtDNA mutations in skin cancer by generating fibroblast cybrids harboring a mutation in the gene encoding the mitochondrial tRNA for arginine. This somatic mutation (9821insA) was previously reported in UV-induced hyperkeratotic skin tumors in hairless mice and confers specific tumorigenic phenotypes to mutant cybrids. Microarray analysis revealed and RT-PCR along with Western blot analysis confirmed the up-regulation of CCL20 and its receptor CCR6 in mtBALB haplotype containing the mt-Tr 9821insA allele compared to wild type mtB6 haplotype. Based on reported role of CCL20 in cancer progression we examined whether the hyper-proliferation and enhanced motility of mtBALB haplotype would be associated with CCL20 levels. Treatment of both genotypes with recombinant CCL20 (rmCCL20) resulted in enhanced growth and motility of mtB6 cybrids. Furthermore, the acquired somatic alteration increased the in vivo tumor growth of mtBALB cybrids through the up-regulation of CCL20 since neutralizing antibody significantly decreased in vivo tumor growth of these cells; and tumors from anti-CCL20 treated mice injected with mtBALB cybrids showed significantly decreased CCL20 levels. When rmCCL20 or mtBALB cybrids were used as chemotactic stimuli, mtB6 cybrids showed increased motility while anti-CCL20 antibody decreased the migration and in vivo tumor growth of mtBALB cybrids. Moreover, the inhibitors of MAPK signaling and NF

  10. Evolutionary Analysis Predicts Sensitive Positions of MMP20 and Validates Newly- and Previously-Identified MMP20 Mutations Causing Amelogenesis Imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Gasse

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI designates a group of genetic diseases characterized by a large range of enamel disorders causing important social and health problems. These defects can result from mutations in enamel matrix proteins or protease encoding genes. A range of mutations in the enamel cleavage enzyme matrix metalloproteinase-20 gene (MMP20 produce enamel defects of varying severity. To address how various alterations produce a range of AI phenotypes, we performed a targeted analysis to find MMP20 mutations in French patients diagnosed with non-syndromic AI. Genomic DNA was isolated from saliva and MMP20 exons and exon-intron boundaries sequenced. We identified several homozygous or heterozygous mutations, putatively involved in the AI phenotypes. To validate missense mutations and predict sensitive positions in the MMP20 sequence, we evolutionarily compared 75 sequences extracted from the public databases using the Datamonkey webserver. These sequences were representative of mammalian lineages, covering more than 150 million years of evolution. This analysis allowed us to find 324 sensitive positions (out of the 483 MMP20 residues, pinpoint functionally important domains, and build an evolutionary chart of important conserved MMP20 regions. This is an efficient tool to identify new- and previously-identified mutations. We thus identified six functional MMP20 mutations in unrelated families, finding two novel mutated sites. The genotypes and phenotypes of these six mutations are described and compared. To date, 13 MMP20 mutations causing AI have been reported, making these genotypes and associated hypomature enamel phenotypes the most frequent in AI.

  11. Development and inter-laboratory validation of unlabeled probe melting curve analysis for detection of JAK2 V617F mutation in polycythemia vera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiyuan; Yuan, Hong; Zhang, Xinju; Liu, Weiwei; Xu, Jinhua; Zhang, Wei; Guan, Ming

    2011-01-01

    JAK2 V617F, a somatic point mutation that leads to constitutive JAK2 phosphorylation and kinase activation, has been incorporated into the WHO classification and diagnostic criteria of myeloid neoplasms. Although various approaches such as restriction fragment length polymorphism, amplification refractory mutation system and real-time PCR have been developed for its detection, a generic rapid closed-tube method, which can be utilized on routine genetic testing instruments with stability and cost-efficiency, has not been described. Asymmetric PCR for detection of JAK2 V617F with a 3'-blocked unlabeled probe, saturate dye and subsequent melting curve analysis was performed on a Rotor-Gene® Q real-time cycler to establish the methodology. We compared this method to the existing amplification refractory mutation systems and direct sequencing. Hereafter, the broad applicability of this unlabeled probe melting method was also validated on three diverse real-time systems (Roche LightCycler® 480, Applied Biosystems ABI® 7500 and Eppendorf Mastercycler® ep realplex) in two different laboratories. The unlabeled probe melting analysis could genotype JAK2 V617F mutation explicitly with a 3% mutation load detecting sensitivity. At level of 5% mutation load, the intra- and inter-assay CVs of probe-DNA heteroduplex (mutation/wild type) covered 3.14%/3.55% and 1.72%/1.29% respectively. The method could equally discriminate mutant from wild type samples on the other three real-time instruments. With a high detecting sensitivity, unlabeled probe melting curve analysis is more applicable to disclose JAK2 V617F mutation than conventional methodologies. Verified with the favorable inter- and intra-assay reproducibility, unlabeled probe melting analysis provided a generic mutation detecting alternative for real-time instruments.

  12. Development and inter-laboratory validation of unlabeled probe melting curve analysis for detection of JAK2 V617F mutation in polycythemia vera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyuan Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: JAK2 V617F, a somatic point mutation that leads to constitutive JAK2 phosphorylation and kinase activation, has been incorporated into the WHO classification and diagnostic criteria of myeloid neoplasms. Although various approaches such as restriction fragment length polymorphism, amplification refractory mutation system and real-time PCR have been developed for its detection, a generic rapid closed-tube method, which can be utilized on routine genetic testing instruments with stability and cost-efficiency, has not been described. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Asymmetric PCR for detection of JAK2 V617F with a 3'-blocked unlabeled probe, saturate dye and subsequent melting curve analysis was performed on a Rotor-Gene® Q real-time cycler to establish the methodology. We compared this method to the existing amplification refractory mutation systems and direct sequencing. Hereafter, the broad applicability of this unlabeled probe melting method was also validated on three diverse real-time systems (Roche LightCycler® 480, Applied Biosystems ABI® 7500 and Eppendorf Mastercycler® ep realplex in two different laboratories. The unlabeled probe melting analysis could genotype JAK2 V617F mutation explicitly with a 3% mutation load detecting sensitivity. At level of 5% mutation load, the intra- and inter-assay CVs of probe-DNA heteroduplex (mutation/wild type covered 3.14%/3.55% and 1.72%/1.29% respectively. The method could equally discriminate mutant from wild type samples on the other three real-time instruments. CONCLUSIONS: With a high detecting sensitivity, unlabeled probe melting curve analysis is more applicable to disclose JAK2 V617F mutation than conventional methodologies. Verified with the favorable inter- and intra-assay reproducibility, unlabeled probe melting analysis provided a generic mutation detecting alternative for real-time instruments.

  13. Quantitative PCR high-resolution melting (qPCR-HRM) curve analysis, a new approach to simultaneously screen point mutations and large rearrangements: application to MLH1 germline mutations in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Etienne; Lefol, Cédrick; Bourdon, Violaine; Coulet, Florence; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Soubrier, Florent; Bièche, Ivan; Olschwang, Sylviane; Sobol, Hagay; Lidereau, Rosette

    2009-06-01

    Several techniques have been developed to screen mismatch repair (MMR) genes for deleterious mutations. Until now, two different techniques were required to screen for both point mutations and large rearrangements. For the first time, we propose a new approach, called "quantitative PCR (qPCR) high-resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis (qPCR-HRM)," which combines qPCR and HRM to obtain a rapid and cost-effective method suitable for testing a large series of samples. We designed PCR amplicons to scan the MLH1 gene using qPCR HRM. Seventy-six patients were fully scanned in replicate, including 14 wild-type patients and 62 patients with known mutations (57 point mutations and five rearrangements). To validate the detected mutations, we used sequencing and/or hybridization on a dedicated MLH1 array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). All point mutations and rearrangements detected by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC)+multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) were successfully detected by qPCR HRM. Three large rearrangements were characterized with the dedicated MLH1 array-CGH. One variant was detected with qPCR HRM in a wild-type patient and was located within the reverse primer. One variant was not detected with qPCR HRM or with dHPLC due to its proximity to a T-stretch. With qPCR HRM, prescreening for point mutations and large rearrangements are performed in one tube and in one step with a single machine, without the need for any automated sequencer in the prescreening process. In replicate, its reagent cost, sensitivity, and specificity are comparable to those of dHPLC+MLPA techniques. However, qPCR HRM outperformed the other techniques in terms of its rapidity and amount of data provided.

  14. Molecular analysis of HEXA gene in Argentinean patients affected with Tay-Sachs disease: possible common origin of the prevalent c.459+5A>G mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampieri, Stefania; Montalvo, Annalisa; Blanco, Mariana; Zanin, Irene; Amartino, Hernan; Vlahovicek, Kristian; Szlago, Marina; Schenone, Andrea; Pittis, Gabriela; Bembi, Bruno; Dardis, Andrea

    2012-05-15

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a recessively inherited disorder caused by the deficient activity of hexosaminidase A due to mutations in the HEXA gene. Up to date there is no information regarding the molecular genetics of TSD in Argentinean patients. In the present study we have studied 17 Argentinean families affected by TSD, including 20 patients with the acute infantile form and 3 with the sub-acute form. Overall, we identified 14 different mutations accounting for 100% of the studied alleles. Eight mutations were novel: 5 were single base changes leading to drastic residue changes or truncated proteins, 2 were small deletions and one was an intronic mutation that may cause a splicing defect. Although the spectrum of mutations was highly heterogeneous, a high frequency of the c.459+5G>A mutation, previously described in different populations was found among the studied cohort. Haplotype analysis suggested that in these families the c.459+5G>A mutation might have arisen by a single mutational event. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Structure-Function Correlation Analysis of Connexin50 Missense Mutations Causing Congenital Cataract: Electrostatic Potential Alteration Could Determine Intracellular Trafficking Fate of Mutants

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    Devroop Sarkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Connexin50 (Cx50 mutations are reported to cause congenital cataract probably through the disruption of intercellular transport in the lens. Cx50 mutants that undergo mistrafficking have generally been associated with failure to form functional gap junction channels; however, sometimes even properly trafficked mutants were found to undergo similar consequences. We hereby wanted to elucidate any structural bases of the varied functional consequences of Cx50 missense mutations through in silico approach. Computational studies have been done based on a Cx50 homology model to assess conservation, solvent accessibility, and 3-dimensional localization of mutated residues as well as mutation-induced changes in surface electrostatic potential, H-bonding, and steric clash. This was supplemented with meta-analysis of published literature on the functional properties of connexin missense mutations. Analyses revealed that the mutation-induced critical alterations of surface electrostatic potential in Cx50 mutants could determine their fate in intracellular trafficking. A similar pattern was observed in case of mutations involving corresponding conserved residues in other connexins also. Based on these results the trafficking fates of 10 uncharacterized Cx50 mutations have been predicted. Further experimental analyses are needed to validate the observed correlation.

  16. Statistical guidance for experimental design and data analysis of mutation detection in rare monogenic mendelian diseases by exome sequencing.

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    Degui Zhi

    Full Text Available Recently, whole-genome sequencing, especially exome sequencing, has successfully led to the identification of causal mutations for rare monogenic Mendelian diseases. However, it is unclear whether this approach can be generalized and effectively applied to other Mendelian diseases with high locus heterogeneity. Moreover, the current exome sequencing approach has limitations such as false positive and false negative rates of mutation detection due to sequencing errors and other artifacts, but the impact of these limitations on experimental design has not been systematically analyzed. To address these questions, we present a statistical modeling framework to calculate the power, the probability of identifying truly disease-causing genes, under various inheritance models and experimental conditions, providing guidance for both proper experimental design and data analysis. Based on our model, we found that the exome sequencing approach is well-powered for mutation detection in recessive, but not dominant, Mendelian diseases with high locus heterogeneity. A disease gene responsible for as low as 5% of the disease population can be readily identified by sequencing just 200 unrelated patients. Based on these results, for identifying rare Mendelian disease genes, we propose that a viable approach is to combine, sequence, and analyze patients with the same disease together, leveraging the statistical framework presented in this work.

  17. Sequence analysis of laci mutations obtained from lung cells of radon-exposed big blue trademark transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Layton, A.D.; Cross, F.T.; Steigler, G.L.; Stillwell, L.S.; Jostes, R.F.; Lutze, L.H.

    1994-01-01

    We have exposed Big Blue trademark transgenic mice by inhalation to 320, 640 and 960 Working Level Months (WLM) of radon progeny. Mice were sacrificed after 3, 6 and 9 days; the time periods required to obtain the exposures. Control mice were also sacrificed at each time interval. In each case all tissues were excised, flash frozen in liquid nitrogen, and stored at -80 degrees C for further analysis. Twelve lacI mutations have been isolated from the lung tissue of a mouse from the 960-WLM exposure group; the lacI genes from these mutants have been sequenced. Sequence data indicate that three of the mutants have a C;G deletion at BP 978 and are possibly clonal in origin. Two mutants have multiple events within the gene: one has a an A:T to C:G transversion and a C:G insertion separated by 291 BPs; the second has a G:C to A:T transition as well as an A:T deletion followed by 6 base pairs downstream by a T:A insertion. Other mutations include a single G:C to A:T transition, a two base pair deletion, and a C:G to T:A transition. Mutant plaques are being evaluated from individual mice at other dose levels. Time course experiments are also planned. These studies will help define the molecular fine structure of mutations induced by high-LET radiation exposure

  18. Mutational spectrum analysis of umuC-independent and umuC-dependent γ-radiation mutagenesis in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargentini, N.J.; Smith, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    γ-radiation mutagenesis Escherichia coli K-12. Mutagenesis (argE3(OC) A rg + ) was blocked in a δ(recA-srlR)306 strain at the same doses that induced mutations in umuC122::Tn5 and wild-type strains, indicating that both umuC-independent and umuC-dependent mechanisms function within recA-dependent misrepair. Analyses of various suppressor and back mutations that result in argE3 and hisG4 ochre reversion and an analysis of trpE9777 reversion were performed on umuC and wild-type cells irradiated in the presence and absence of oxygen. While the umuC strain showed the γ-radiation induction of base substitution and frameshifts when irradiated in the absence of oxygen, the umuC mutation blocked all oxygen-dependent base-substitution mutagenesis, but non all oxygen-dependent frameshift mutagenesis. For anoxically irradiated cells, the yields of GC T and AT GC transitions were essentially umuC independent, while the yields of (AT or GC) TA transversions were heavily umuC dependent. These data suggest new concepts about the nature of the DNA lesions and the mutagenic mechanisms that lead to γ-radiation mutagenesis. (author). 48 refs.; 1 tab.; 6 refs

  19. Identification and Genetic Analysis of a Factor IX Gene Intron 3 Mutation in a Hemophilia B Pedigree in China

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    Dong Hua Cao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Hemophilia B is caused by coagulation defects in the factor IX gene located in Xq27.1 on the X chromosome. A wide range of mutations, showing extensive molecular heterogeneity, have been described in hemophilia B patients. Our study was aimed at genetic analysis and prenatal diagnosis of hemophilia B in order to further elucidate the pathogenesis of the hemophilia B pedigree in China. METHODS: Polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing of all the coding regions was conducted in hemophilia B patients and carriers. Prenatal diagnosis of the proband was conducted at 20 weeks. RESULTS: We identified the novel point mutation 10.389 A>G, located upstream of the intron 3 acceptor site in hemophilia B patients. The fetus of the proband’s cousin was identified as a carrier. CONCLUSION: Our identification of a novel mutation in the F9 gene associated with hemophilia B provides novel insight into the pathogenesis of this genetically inherited disorder and also represents the basis of prenatal diagnosis.